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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (Jan.-June 1893)"

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California State Library 



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Price par Copy, 10 Cents. 



.inscription, $4.00 









Vol. XIV I. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 18i)3.\)\^ - Q3 Number 1. 



Primed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, flood Building. Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran. 
Cisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

THE office of the Neks Letter in New York City has been es- 
tablished at 196 Broadway, room 14, where information may 
be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

THE Legislature is dipping into the public treasury with liberal 
hands. "Following a precedent" is but a poor excuse for 
pillaging the funds. 

ONE of the 6nest exhibits in the Mechanics' Fair will be the 
oranges from Thermalito. The Thertnalito product is famous 
throughout tbe country, and many people will flock to see the 
bearing trees. 



AND now gamblers Williams and Schwartz having determined 
to each hold a racing meeting, the gullible public needs to 
look to its pocketbook, and keep a tight clasp on it. Verily, it 
seemeth that we are in the hands of the Philistines. 



EMPEROR William's New Year's speech seems to have been of 
an unusually commonplace kind, at least the press treats it in 
rather scanty comments. Perhaps the German monarch has run 
short of sensational materia], or at least that which he possesses 
might work the wrong way if employed in speech-making. 

IT is proposed to ask the Legislature to appropriate a small sum 
for tbe erection of a monument on the shores of Donner Lake, 
for the commemoration of the ill-fated party so many of whose 
members perished there forty-seven years ago this winter. This 
is an eminently fitting thing to do, and there ought not to be a 
single dissenting voice when the measure comes before the Legis- 
lature. 

THE natives of British India are irritated because trial by jury 
has been abolished in some districts of the country. Their 
irritation is easily understood when the fact is considered that 
the national characteristics of the race to which the judges be- 
long and of that which furnishes the defendants are so great that 
real justice will be rarely obtained if a jury trial is not permitted 
where men of the same race are able to judge their compatriots 
upon a less prejudiced basis. 

AS foreshadowed by the News Letter, McGlashan, of the 
Truckee Republican, has come into his own again, and his 
name still heads tbe editorial columns of that pungent journal. 
The cards must have come his way in great shape to have en- 
abled him to recover his partially sold property again so soon. 
Mac naively explains that the to-be purchaser <• failed to obtain 
certain moneys that he expected." Just so. Many a man with 
two pair, or even three of a kind, has had the same sort of a 
failure. 

TIMES must be getting pretty hard down in San Bernardino. 
The insurance companies appear to have awakened to tbe 
fact that there were altogether too many fires " with loss fully 
covered by insurance." Nothing daunted, the thrifty " San Ber- 
nardinoites," as they call themselves, have, with their wives, 
taken to the road. A highwayman, accompanied by his wife, 
held up a stranger on the principal street of the town the other 
evening, and now this bids fair to become the favorite winter oc- 
cupation of the people of tbe Mormon outpost. 



AMID all the discussion over the State text-book matter, it is 
refreshing to find a little common sense injected into what is 
rapidly becoming a most malodorous mess. The teacbers of 
Butte county, instead of siding with the old book ringsters, have 
adopted resolutions calling for a revision of the books, instead of 
their wholesale rejection. Professor Moses, of the State Univer- 
sity, at the same time has expressed what is manifestly an 
unbiased opinion — that the books are as good as could be ex- 
pected, considering the short time the State has been in tbe busi- 
ness. Now, if the preparation and handling of the text-books be 
intrusted to the friends instead of tbe enemies of the system, all 
the objections to them can be removed, and tbe book-ring will 
have received its death blow. 



WHITE received the unanimous vote of the Democratic Legis- 
lative caucus for United 8tates Senator. He needs two 
votes to be elected, and his Democratic friends tbronghout tbe 
Slate feel that he will secure them. He would, at Washington, 
prove to be one of the best Senators California has had in years. 



IN London New Year's Day was utilized by the so-called " un- 
1 employed " for another public demonstration. That in all great 
centers of population there is an enormous number of people who 
cannot find any employment, however hard they may try, is a 
sad fact which needs not to be demonstrated, but is too apparent 
to escape general attention. It is no doubt a serious duty of every 
civilized government to remove the causes for this state of things 
as muctf as is in its power, and in justice to the British govern- 
ments of recent times, whatever political party they may have 
represented, as well as in recognition of the London Local Govern- 
ment Board, it must be said that they have endeavored to fulfill 
this duty, though much still remains to be done. Public demon- 
strations, however, like that which took place at St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral on the first of tbis month, are of little value, and apt to com- 
promise the cause of the really unemployed more than to assist it, 
because, of those who take part in such a demonstration, a great 
number, if not the majority, consists of loafers and idlers whose 
very appearance in public kills sympathy. 

THE Pope has addressed an encyclical to the Italian people for 
the first time in their own language, instead of using the 
Sanskrit of tbe Middle Ages— the Latin. This is a wise step, and 
demonstrates anew the worldly wisdom of the present head of 
the Catholic Church. Not the clergy, but the great masses at 
present decide the fate of religious as well as great social institu- 
tions, and to reach the people one must speak in the language 
they speak. Our scientists have recognized this fact long ago, 
and not only in America, but also in England and Germany the 
old abstruse terminology and style which was comprehensible 
only to the initiated, has of late years given way to a popular 
mode of expression which is understood by all people who have 
an ordinary education. The result has been that scientific books 
have been spreading enormously, and that thousands have been 
reached and influenced by scientific doctrines and teachings 
which would have played no part in modern progress had they 
been published in the mystical jargon which formerly was held 
to endow with special dignity scientific and philosophical pub- 
lications. 

TELEGRAMS from Calcutta announce that the Indian National 
Council has passed several important resolutions which ought 
to be acted upon by the British Government. One of them con- 
tained a strong condemnation of the withdrawal of the grant for 
higher education. In order to understand the withdrawal of this 
grant, it should be remembered that the British Government is 
anxious that most of the Indian civil officials should receive their 
education in the mother country, for it is feared that if they were 
educated in India their connection with the old country would 
be weakened, since a man's character is greatly influenced by the 
associations of his school and university days. Furthermore it 
is believed that the education to be obtained in England for many 
years to come would be a superior one than that which might be 
procured in India, even if large grants were allowed for educa- 
tional purposes there. This may be quite true, but the reason 
why not only the natives, but also so many anglo-Indian civil 
servants justly demand that the opportunities for higher educa- 
tion should be increased in India is the fact that many of them 
cannot afford to have their children educated in the mother coun- 
try, since the monetary condition of India offers a serious draw- 
back. The British officials receive their salaries in rupees the 
actual value of which has been steadily decreasing, so that when 
that currency has to be used in England, it has only about half 
the nominal value. In other words, that part of the income of 
the British civil officials which has to be employed for the edu- 
cation of their children abroad is decreased to one-half of the 
amount which it represents if employed in India itself. The 
desire to have high-class educational institutions in the country 
where they and their children live is therefore very natural on 
tbe part of the Anglo-Indian officials, and equally natural in the • 
native population. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893 



THE GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 

THE message to the Legislature of Governor Markharn is a 
voluminous and sensible document, containing many sugges- 
tions which would be advisable to adopt in the management of 
State institutions and the transaction of State business. He in- 
forms the people that the State is in a most prosperous condition, 
and then devotes his attention to different branches of the Gov- 
ernment. One of the first recommendations is a good one, and 
should be acted on. Attention is called to the fact that the stat- 
ute providing that County Assessors shall report annually to the 
Surveyor-General the condition of the agricultural pursuits and 
products of the county is a dead letter, and it is recommended 
that the State Agricultural Society be required to establish a Sta- 
tistical Bureau, wherein the people may always obtain such in- 
formation as would be interesting and valuable to intending set- 
tlers and purchayers. Another very timely suggestion is that 
calling attention to the somewhat ludicrous fact that publicinsti- 
tutions, instead of interchanging their products, have been sell- 
ing them in the open market, and then buying in the market the 
products sold by other State institutions. For instance, the Home 
for the Adult Blind, at Oakland, makes more brooms than are 
used in all the institutions in the State; yet all these brooms are 
sold in the market, where the other institutions are required to 
buy them at the seller's price. One institution sells dried fruit .n 
the market at the buyer's price, and the market sells the same 
fruit to another institutionjat the seller's price. By interchanging 
their products these inst tutions would effect a great saving to 
the State. The Governor's suggestion i3 very practical, and the 
wonder is that it was not thought of and acted on long ago. A 
recommendation that should be carefully considered by the Legis- 
lature is that calling attention to the increase in the number of 
indigents who are supported in State institutions. At the present 
rate of increase, says the message, it will be only a few years un- 
til our State tax will far exceed that of any other State in the 
Union in proportion to population. If the counties were com- 
pelled to take care of the poor who are now provided for by the 
State, the Governor thinks there would be a decrease in the num- 
ber of indigents, while at the same time as many worthy cases 
would be received as at present, and with much less expense to 
the taxpayers. In this remark there is much truth, for the gen- 
erous accommodation now afforded in Stite institutions is a con- 
stant temptation to hundreds who are too lazy to work, and who 
consider that the world owes them a living. This matter re- 
quires thorough investigation as recommended, and reformatory 
legislation. Another matter which needs careful investigation is 
that in relation to the charges of fraud preferred in connection 
with the construction of some of the new buildings at the Home 
for Feeble Minded Children, at Glen Ellen. The truth should be as- 
certained about these charges before the claims of tne accused are 
allowed by the State Board of Examiners in whose hands they 
now are. The recommendation of the abolition of the State 
Board of Forestry is one that will meet the approval of taxpayers 
who, ever since the establishment of tbat ornamental commission, 
have wondered what the officials did for the money they used, 
besides enjoying the street scenes from their commodious offices 
on Market street. The inefficiency of the fire agents employed 
by this Board is referred to in the message, which also calls at- 
tention to the recommendation of the commission that fire 
wardens shall be appointed in each county by the Supervisors 
thereof, who shall have power to call upon citizens for assistance 
in fighting fire. The attention of the Legislature is called to the 
recommendation of the State Treasurer on irrigation bonds, and 
it is suggested that if the district irrigation bonds. are found to be 
a safe and judicious investment of the State funds, it would en- 
able the State Board of Examiners to invest the public money at 
a very advantageous rate of interest, and w^uld also afford a 
much-needed market for those bonds. It is recommended that 
needed changes be made in the system of assessing property now 
in vogue, which the Governor says in the most cumbersome, in- 
convenient and expensive system of assessment and tax collect- 
ing in the United States. Personal property, he tbinks, should 
be assessed annually, and real estate every two or more years. 
In discussing criminals and pardons, the Governor says that in 
this State, in proportion to population, tbere are confined in the 
State Prisons more than two or three times as many prisoners as 
in any other State in the Union. This fact, he thinks, is due to 
the exceedingly large number of State Prison offenses created by 
our statutes, and also that our Judges impose excessive sentences 
as compared with those imposed in the East. He recommends 
that some attention be given to the parole system, and also that 
a thorough discussion be held upon the question of capital pun- 
ishment, as he thinks that the people of the State are no longer in 
favor of it. The Nicaragua Canal project is warmly com- 
mended, as are the efforts on behalf of the resumption of 
hydraulic mining. The Governor thinks it is the duty of the 
Federal Government to provide means whereby the important 
industry of mining can be revived without inflicting substantial 
injury toother interests. He thinks this can and will be ac- 
complished. The message is one which thoroughly reviews the 
condition of affairs in the State. It is an able and creditable 
document. 



THE SUPERVISORS. 



THE Board of Supervisors whose. black fl.ag was struck from 
the City Hall this week, will long live in the memory of San 
Francisco's citizens as one of the most malodorous that this much 
suffering city has ever known. Time was when a Supervisor 
whose palm itched for the touch of boodle would go about his 
thieving schemes in a somewhat circumspect manner, for the 
fear of the people was in his heart, and he wished to retain the 
good reputation with which he might have entered office. Those 
days were not of this period, however, for recent events have 
demonstrated that the latter-day Supervisor has no more hesita- 
tion in publicly recording himself as a purchased commodity than 
has the footpad in slugging a wayfarer. From the beginning 
most of the members of the recent Board of Supervisors were 
11 on the make." They hesitated at nothing and did their work 
well for their masters. How well they did it also for them- 
selves may be conjectured when ft is stated that it is said upon 
reliable authority that at least two of them, after two years ser- 
vice at $100 a month leave the City Hall each $40,000 richer 
than when he entered it. But then these two men were the ring- 
leaders of the merry gang. Whether they were untrue to their 
fellows, and retained more of the spoils than they should have 
done, is a question. Of course it is thought that there is honor 
among thieves, but we doubt it. The endeavors of the Board in 
the last few days, of its life to pass over the vetos of the Mayor 
the city railway ordinances which have caused so much discus- 
sion, was one of the boldest attempts at an outrageous act that 
the city has ever known. So hard were the schemers pushed 
that they were forced to bring Supervisor Artigues into the com- 
bination. He had until that time resisted the temptings of the 
seven, but at the last moment be succumbed, only, however, to 
make a fool of himself, and to blot his otherwise fair fame with 
a stain that no amount of explanation can ever wipe out. The 
city is well rid of these men, who, judging from their actions, 
are entirely lost to all sense of decency and honor. Their out- 
rageous street extension schemes aronsed the indignation of 
the residents of the city. It is hoped that tbe new Board will be 
wise in its generation, and heeding what has gone before, shall 
shut their eyes to the sight of gold, and labor only in the inter- 
ests of the entire community. If any of them be found tripping, 
it is not a threat to say that the feeling of the people is now at 
such a pitch that the dishonest Supervisor might meet with sum- 
mary treatment. 



MAYOR ELLERT. 



AS might be expected, judging from his extensive experience in 
the Board of Supervisors, the inaugural address of Mayor 
Ellert thoroughly reviews the condition of municipal affairs, and 
makes a number of recommendations regarding needed changes and 
improvements. Considerable attention is given to needed changes 
in the laws regulating streets and sewers, and many of the opinions 
expressed by the Mayor will meet the warm approval of property 
owners. He recommends a change in existing street laws, and par- 
ticularly in that regarding the improvement of streets. "Pernicious" 
is the word applied to the provision enacted by the last Legislature, 
that an assessment district may be laid out whenever, in the opinion 
of the City Council, the proposed improvement was of more than 
local or ordinary benefit. The act of the Legislature of 1889, em- 
powering City Councils to open and close streets, is a statute, says 
this address, " that displays the vicious tendency inaugurated by 
this species of legislation to destroy property and property rights 
under the specious plea of the public interest or convenience. A 
close analysis of its provisions discloses the fact that its entire 
object under this plea is to give patronage to the City Council to em- 
ploy Commissioners and a host o£ experts, clerks, appraisers, etc., 
whose service in appraising the land to be taken, even when confirmed, 
as to valuation by the City Council, is nugatory. ''As long as thie 
statute exists, no owner of property is safe. Such legislation dis- 
courages the owning of homes by our citizens of limited resources, 
and is foreign and inimical to the fostering care and protection that 
should be afforded those who most need aid and encouragement to 
acquire and retain homes. Whatever the public interest and welfare 
require should be provided for at the public expense." Attention is 
again called to the immediate need of a practical plan of sewerage 
for the city, and the legislation necessary to insure proper perform- 
ance of street work is also referred to by Mayor Ellert. He also 
suggests a plan for the rapid canvass of election returns by the count- 
ing of the ballots during the day of election by a Board of Election 
Commissioners appointed from the citizens by the Superior Judges. 
It is suggested that committees on assessment and legislation be 
added to the present committees of the Supervisors. It is recom- 
mended that-the House of Correction be done away with, as it is not 
fulfilling the ideas for which it was established. Increased efficiency 
of the po'iee force and the suppression of the dives are declared to 
be needed regulations for the improvement of the city. Considerable 
attention is also given to existing Chinatown nuisances that the 
Mayor thinks, and rightly, should be speedily suppressed. One of 
the most important paragraphs in the address is that near the end, 
calling attention to the need of the city owning its own water supply. 
The address is replete with good ideas, and it will be well for the 
new Supervisors to carefully consider them. 



Jnn. 7 



BAH FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



TV BAR OUT QUACKS. 



(( A S act for tbeTeguIation of the practice of medicine and 
A surgery in the State of California and for the appointment 
of a Board nf Medical Examiners in the matter of said regula- 
tion. ' will be presented to the Legislature. As it is in behalf 
of the regular and legal practitioners of medicine, and has for it? 
main object the suppression of the "quacks" who of late have 
been filling the city, it is to be hoped that the measure will 
meet with the approval of the Legislators, and will be made a 
law. Observant people need not be told that within the la*t two 
years the number of disreputable practitioners of medicine and 
surgery, the latter particularly, has greatly increased in this city. 
The stringent laws made in other Stales regulating the practice of 
medicine within their borders, has perforce, driven these fellows 
to this State, where the laws are so loosely drawn and such 
apathy has been displayed upon the subject of quackery, that 
they have indulged in their objectionable and immoral practices 
without fear of criminal prosecution. 

The first section of the new bill provides for the appointment 
of a board of medical examiners on or before July 1, 1893, such 
board to consist of seven members, who are to be selected by the 
Governor. It is provided that the Governor shall select as mem- 
bers of the Board citizens of the United States, graduates from 
some legally chartered medical school, and who shall be repre- 
sentative men in their profession as well as legally qualified prac- 
titioners of medicine in this State. The terra of office shall be for 
four years, but the first appointees shall so arrange it that one 
shall go out of office at the end of one year, two at the end of two 
years, two more in three years and the remaining two at the end 
of the four years' term. As the vacancies occur they shall be 
filled by the Governor by further appointments made for four 
years each. The officers of the Board shall consist of a president, 
vice-president, secretary and treasurer. The secretary shall be 
paid a salary not exceeding $2,400 a year, and the other members 
of the board a "per diem" while actually mating examinations, of 
$10 a day. Every member shall have the power to administer 
oaths in the course of taking testimony. The regular meetings 
of the Board are to be held quarterly. The most important pro- 
visions of the proposed law are to be found in section 5, which 
sets forth that » every person before practicing medicine or sur- 
gery or any of the departments thereof in the State must have 
the certificate herein provided for." 

«* In order to procure such certificates he must produce satis- 
factory testimony of good moral character and a diploma issued 
by some legally chartered medical school, or satisfactory evi- 
dence of having possessed such diploma or a license from some 
legally constituted institution which grants medical and surgical 
licenses only upon actual examination or of satisfactory evidence 
of having possessed such a license, and he must accompany said 
diploma or license by an affidavit stating that he is the lawful 
possessor of the same, that he is the person therein named, and 
that the diploma or license was procured in the regular course 
either of instruction or examination, without fraud or misrepre- 
sentation of any kind. In addition to such affidavit said board 
may hear such further evidence as in its discretion it may deem 
proper as to any of the matters embraced in said affidavit. If 
it should appear from such evidence that said affidavit is untrue 
in any particular, or -if it should appear that the applicant is not 
of good moral character, the application must be rejected. In 
addition to the requirements above set forth, each appli- 
cant for a certificate must be personally examined 
by said board as to his qualifications to practice medi- 
cine and surgery. The examination shall be conducted in 
whole or in part in writing, and shall be on the following sub- 
jects : Anatomy, physiology, pathology, chemistry and toxicology, 
surgery, obstetrics, materia medica and therapeutics, and the 
theory and practice of medicine. 

Certificates may be refused or revoked after issuance upon satis- 
factory proof being made to the board of examiners that the person 
in question has been guilty of unprofessional conduct. Under this 
head are to be included anything connected with the procuring of abor- 
tions, the obtaining of fees by propositions to cure manifestly incur- 
able diseases, the willful betrayal of professional secrets, habitual in- 
temperance and the fact that the person in question has been" con- 
victed of a crime involving moral turpitude. 

The present proposed act also provides that any person prac- 
ticing in the State without a proper certificate shall be guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and shall be punished by a fine of from $100 to 
$1,000, imprisonment for from 30 to 365 days, or by both fine and 
imprisonment. For presenting and filing false certificates, or 
certificates issued in the name of some one else than the person 
so presenting them for record, the guilty individual shall be held 
to be guilty of a felony, and punished accordingly. The pro- 
visions of the bill are not retroactive and do not affect physicians 
now legally practicing. In this we think a mistake has been 
made. Although it might be impracticable to examine all phy- 
sicians now practicing, something should be done to weed out 
from the reputable doctors the numerous charlatans who are rob- 
bing the public and daily endangering human lives. 



M. RIBOT'S GOOD SENSE. 



MR1BOT, the present Prime Minister of France, has shown 
. good sense and courage— for it takes a great deal of cour- 
age in France to act in opposition to popular prejudices — in refusing 
to accept the challenge of M. Andrieux to fight a duel. His ex- 
ample ought to be followed by all sensible Frenchmen. There 
was a lime when a contest of arms decided in the eyes of the 
people which was the better man. In such times duelling had 
an apparent justification, but only because physical strength and 
skill were overrated; because, furthermore, the duels of that time 
really necessitated physical strength and skill, and because tbey 
also gave a test of personal courage. All these conditions are no 
longer extant. At a later period the meaning of the duel changed, 
in so far as the acceptance of a challenge demonstrated that the 
person who offered an insult was so fully persuaded of its justice 
as to risK his life rather than to withhold punishment from his 
antagonist whom be thought worthy of contempt, while the in- 
sulted person, by equally being ready to risk his life, indicated 
that he felt himself unjustly insulted and wished to prove his in- 
nocence. Under such circumstances there remained at least a 
show of reasonableness, especially when an open insult, which 
remained unresented, was apt to ruin a man's position in the so- 
ciety in which he moved, and whose condemnation was a greater 
punishment to him than death. Nothing but a duel could re- 
habilitate him in public opinion, and a refusal to fight would 
have required more courage than the average man possesses. In 
many civilized countries such a state of society fortunately no 
longer exists, and no enlightened person, in England or the 
United States, for instance, would nowadays condemn any per- 
son for refusing to accept a challenge. Still in France, Germany, 
Austria and other countries of the European continent, there yet 
exists classes of society pervaded by the old prejudices, and 
whose members in ordinary cases would not be excused by their 
equals, were they to receive an insult without challenging the 
offender to a contest with swords or pistols. When we consider 
that social ostracism in such countries is the punishment, our 
condemnation of duelling will be rendered less severe. It be- 
comes the height of absurdity, however, when a man occupying 
the highest and most important official position, and whose life 
and services belong, above all, to his country, which may be en- 
dangered by his death, is asked to risk his life to meet the first- 
comer who feels himself insulted by him. And the acceptance of 
M. Andrieux' challenge by M. Ribot would have been especially 
absurd, since the alleged insult consisted in a perfectly 
justifiable public condemnation of the political activity 
of M. Andrieux, which M. Ribot had good cause to 
believe to be directed against the welfare of the Repub- 
lic. 



KELLY AND CRIMMINS. 



AT the beginning of the year, San Francisco should have given 
thanks for escaping from the clutches of as bold a brace of 
bandits as have ever robbed the treasury of any city in the Union. 
With the downfall of Buckley, it was fondly hoped that we had 
escaped from evil influences, but with the Republican restoration 
to municipal power came the Third-street bosses, Kelly and Crim- 
mins, who possessed all the vices of the Bush-street boss, with- 
out any of his virtues. We never had a kind word to say for 
Buckley, for we believed him as great a rogue as ever kept out 
of jail ; but bis successors, as political dictators of San Francisco, 
were worse than he was. Kelly and Crimmins had nothing to 
recommend them. Ignorant and vulgar, boodlers in the smallest 
sense, they were repulsive in every feature ; without political abil- 
ity or competent knowledge of the art of political warfare, they 
kept their place by force and aims whenever other plans failed, al- 
ways employing bulldozing tactics to carry their points. Their bad 
management in the recent municipal campaign angered the Re- 
publican forces, and fully realizing the odium that attached to 
any man or organization which was in any way connected with 
the Third-street saloon, the new Republican County Committee 
quietly undertook measures which compelled the retirement from 
it of Kelly and his henchmen. On the day that Kelly left the 
Committee, Crimmins returned from Sacramento, where he had 
met with no recognition from the legislators. These 
two men are public enemies, inasmuch as their energies 
are devoted to injuring the public interests by the 
bribery and corruption of the officers of the municipality. 
During their two years of power the Board of Supervisors 
passed many measures which bad their sole reason for exist- 
ence in the fact that there was money in them for the Supervisors 
and their bosses. Of all the tough old boards that have robbed 
the people of this city, none were ever tougher than that whose 
members have just been thrown out of the City Hall. Everyone 
of the boodling combination ought to be in jail, for there is no 
sensible man but is convinced that tbey accepted pecuniary re- 
ward for their peculiar actions. Kelly and Crimmins pulled the 
strings, and the puppets responded. If these contemptible bosses 
ever regain power it will be the direct fault of the people. Now 
that they are down, they should be kept as completely buried as 
is Buckley. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893 



A FIGHT FOR MILLIONS. 




SAN FRANCISCO is fast bringing forth some brilliant young 
attorneys, and among the moat prominent of these ia Herbert 
8. Herrick, of the Nevada Block. Mr. Herrick, though quite a 
young man, has brought himself forward so rapidly that he soon 
bids fair to rank among the leaders of the young law generation. 

His efforts while a law stu- 
dent brought him out at the 
head of his class, and the 
same year saw him admitted 
to the bar without examina- 
tion. He was also admitted 
to practice in the Federal 
courts on motion of Mr. 
Lloyd, of Lloyd & Wood, with 
which firm he waa associated 
for several years. At present 
Mr. Herrick is engaged in 
what promises to be one of 
the most sensational land 
suits ever brought in the 
State. This is the attempt to 
restore to the Cata heirs their 
great rancho in Ventura 
county, comprising 3,000 
acres, which was wrested from 
them by grant many years 
ago. The case probably never 
would have come to light had 
it not been for the efforts of 
Mr. Herrick, who, by perse- 
Herbert S^Herrick. verence and hard work, dis- 

covered the old records in the Surveyor-General's office in this 
city, which will give the heirs their rights. The case is a most 
peculiar one, as the battle will be fought for a posthumous heir 
discovered by Mr. Herrick, which enabled him to reopen a case 
thought to be settled many years ago. Over a million dollars is 
involved, and over one hundred and fifty defendants will fight 
the suit. Mr. Herrick, however, feels fully able to cope with 
them, and is confident that he will win. 

Herbert S. Herrick, besides being a candidate for high legal 
honors, is a prominent member of the Native Sons, California 
Schuetzen Club, Order of Red Men and many other social organ- 
izations. 

ON SUBTERRANEAN RIVERS. 

JOHN HAYS HAMMOND, the well-known California mining 
engineer, and President of the celebrated Bunker Hill and Sul- 
livan mines, had a novel experience during a recent trip to Nev- 
ada on professional business. The story he tells reminds one of 
the castawaya on the Mysterious Island, as detailed by Jules 
Verne. One can hardly realize the possibility of navigating great 
subterranean rivers in the bowels of the earth outside of the 
realms of fiction, but strange things occur now-a-days, and facts 
are difficult to combat. Mr. Hammond has had the honor of 
rivaling the celebrated Captain Nemo, although his bark was 
anything but a Nautilus. He had been retained to examine and 
report on the old Raymond and Ely mines, near Piocbe, in Lynn 
county, Nevada, a celebrated mine, which bad the distinction of 
being the first to attract the attention of the world to mining possi- 
bilitiea in the Silver State, owing to its heavy output of bullion from 
1869 down to 1875. During this period over thirteen milliona in 
money were taken out, and the excitement which this created was 
intense. However, when Mr. Hammond arrived at the mine all the 
preparations which had been made for his descent of 1,200 feet from 
the surface were an old bucket dropped from an ancient windlass 
and a canvas boat. The boat was sent down the shaft, and four 
stalwart miners followed it. Mr. Hammond then descended and landed 
in the boat, which settled in the subterranean stream almost to the 
gunwale, so heavy was its cargo. The voyage of discovery was then 
begun through the dark and yawning caverns, which under ordinary 
conditions woald be termed drifts. After traveling for a mile or two 
in all directions, the examination was effected with the aid 
of a flare-light manipulated by a tall Missourian at the 
bow of the strange craft. Before regaining daylight and a 
normal frame of mind, Hammond passed through all the 
horrors of a shipwrecked mariner in mid-ocean on a raft, and 
even a catch of strange fish, devoid of eyes and scales, could not 
reconcile him to his uncanny poaition. Before he completes his 
explorations the mine will be pumped out, if such a feat can be 
accomplished, the extent and depth of the water indicating a 
more important and interesting discovery in the form of a sub- 
terranean sea. 

Latest discovery and craze in Paris.— Gray hair restored to all 
shades; perfectly harmless. Faoe cream, powder and lotion in- 
dorsed by Dr. Dennis of this city; also the emporium for Parisian 
novelties" and manufacture of natural curly front pieces, from $1 up. 
Great reduction in prices and prompt attention, at Strozynski's, cor- 
ner of Ellis and Leavenworth streets. 



THE BALDWIN'S NEW CAFE. 



UNDER ita new management, the Baldwin Hotel is offering 
numerous additional attractions to the comfort loving public. 
The hotel baa long been known as one of the most commodious 
in the city, and its handsome furnishings and unrivaled cuisine 
make it without a superior, and with few eqnals upon the 
Coast. The latest addition to its many conveniences is the hand- 
some Cafe" upon the Powell street side, just north of the main en- 
trance, which will be opened to the public to-night. The open- 
ing of this Cafe will be hailed with delight by thousands of theatre- 
goers, who have long telt the need of a first-class establishment 
in that neighborhood, to afford them refreshments amid beautiful 
surroundings, after their enjoyment of the play. As the Cafe is 
opposite Stock well's Theatre, and under the same roof as the Bald- 
win, it exactly fills the "long-felt want" of the patrons of the 
dramatic art. As is customary with all improvements at the 
Baldwin Hotel, the Cafe" is luxurious in its artistic perfection, 
nothing having been spared to make it as attractive and satisfy- 
ing to the eye, as its service and menus will be to the palates of 
its patrons. In all respects it will be first-class. Lunches and 
suppers will be served a la carte, and one may if he wishes enjoy 
in the Cafe* the same dinner that he might have selected in the 
hotel dining-room. A new feature in this city is furnished in the 
Parisian iridescent glass globes which shade the incandescent 
lights, adding to their lustre and beauty. The Cafe promises to 
be the most popular in the city. 



FROM H. Raschen, the well-known artist who has just returned 
from a residence of several years in Europe, much interesting 
information is obtained about A. Wiernsz-Kowalski, the famous 
artist, a half-tone reproduction of one of whose masterpieces, 
" Homeward Bound," was published in the Christmas News Let- 
teb. Mr. Raschen visited the International Exhibition in the 
Glass Palace at Munich, and there saw several of Kowalski's 
works. The latter was awarded the only first class medal, and 
such of his pictures as were sold brought first-class prices. Lovers 
of art should not fail to see one of this famous painter's works. 
His canvas << Homeward Bound," to which reference has been 
made, is now on exhibition at the art gallery of S. & G. Gump, 
on Geary street. In view of the great interest displayed in Eu- 
rope in everything Kowalski does, local connoisseurs should not 
miss the treat now offered them at the Gump Gallery. 

"Apoundis a pound the world around." Curtice's " Pound for 
Pound" Preserves and rich Jellies are standards of excellence every- 
where. Live grocers keep them. 




INSTANT RELIEF 
FOR COLD IN THE HEAD. 

CORYZON 

CATARRH AND HAY FEVER. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 

IT NEVER FAILS. 



Food for the hungry, 

And sleep 

For the weary, 

Are riot more 

Refreshing than 

CORYZON 

Is to sufferers from 

Catarrh, 

Influenza, or 

Cold in the Head. 

It relieves at onee; 

The cost is trifling, 

And 

It can be carried 

In the vest pocket. 

Samples free. 

At all Druggists. 

Try it. 



INSTANT RELIEF 
FOR COLD IN THE HEAD. 

CORYZON 

CATARRH AND HAY FEVER. 
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 
IT NEVER FAILS. 






Jan. 7. L*98 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 1. 1. 1 WAX. 



LOVES TRIALS. 

*( y 'TIS roy wedding morning*" he says, as he awakes. »' To- 
1 day of all days shall be to me the happiest," and he rings 
for his morning chocolate, ami his papers and letters are brought 
to him. Bat even he to-day la nervous, and wishes the time 
would move more quickly, that they may be away alone to- 
gether. 

■ To-day I am to be married to him," she thinks, as she opens 
her grave blue eyes: ■■ how sweet to be just his — be and I together 
to roam the wide world through ," and she sips her tea and waits 
till It is time for her women to dress her. 

Carriages block the street. Her set have turned out to do her 
honor, the fairest prize of this vast city. The belle of the season 
she had been, dividing her honors with no one. It was a cold 
crisp morning, one week from Christmas. It had been her wish, 
and ber merest whim was law ttiat they should be married on 
that day. 

Inside the church people pnsb and crush to even catch a glimpse 
of the decorations, which are really beautiful. At last there is a 
bush, then a murmur through the dense throng of " she comes." 

How solemn is this short service, how few think anything 
about it. "Till death us do part." «• Till death do us part." 
They meant it, those two, and as they turned and faced tbe sea 
of faces every one remarked the calm joy of his face, the loving 
trust in her eyes. 

Three hours later they were speeding towards the southern 
home he had prepared for her with that lavish hand of his. No 
two ever started out together under happier auspices; the one 
proud and glad in his new charge, tbe other loving and trusting 
implicitly in his strength. Alas, how many start out like this, 
rich in the knowledge of each other's love, only to stumble — re- 
cover, perhaps— then fall. 'Tis hard to think it, harder yet to 
say it, but is nevertheless the truth. 

#»•#•■# 

There was a hush in the great house on the hill; the servants 
went about on tip-toe, fearing to make the least noise. Two car- 
riages stood at the door. Two great men were upstairs in deep 
consultation. Madame was about to become a mother. 

In his library sat the husband, with pale face, waiting for the 
first news. At last it comes, brought by her mother. " A little 
girl," she whispers; " Constance stood it beautifully." "Thank 
God," he murmurs, as he kisses the bearer of the glad tidings. " I 
can see her soon," he asks. " Yes, now, at once, she wants you, 
come.*' 

Quickly they enter the darkened room. As he kneels beside 
her there is still that great love that was there two years ago, 
greater, perhaps, at this moment with both of them than they 
have ever known. And she smiles at him and whispers : " Look, 
sweetheart, is she not lovely; it is my Christmas present to you, 
darling." He murmurs words of love in her ear, rejoicing in her 
great joy. What a load off his mind now she has passed through 
this terrible ordeal in safety. 

This man whose nature is ice feels his being melt in the great 
love he has for her, his sweet wife, the mother of their child. And 
the doctors go away after drinking long life to the young daughter, 
rubbing their bands, knowing that their fee will be the largest 
they have received in the year, and thankful that everything has 
turned out well. Two Christmas days have come and gone, and 
their love remains greater than ever, with that lovely bond be- 
tween them— their first born. 

Six years had passed away; it was summer time, and their 
southern home was full of friends, there to stay as long as they 
cared to. Six years had been enough for evil to creep in. She, 
proud and imperious, now refused to do aught but her pleasure; 
he, courteous as of old, bore with her, taking the great love he 
had borne her and bestowing it on their child, beautiful as spring, 
beloved by all, and loving her father with an idolatrous love, and 
giving him what the mother bad ceased to give. 

At last the end came. One evening, most of his guests having 
retired to their rooms, he left the smoking room and strolled over 
the bluff, and gazed out on those southern waters made glorious 
by the moon, and slowly he traced his way by a winding path 
down towards the beach. Presently he heard voices — the one in 
entreaty, the other wavering between " yes " and " no." "He 
no longer loves you," the one said, "be is a brute who thinks 
only of himself, whilst I," (and the voice dropped to exquisite 
softness and sweetness) " I love you with my whole soul. Como, 
sweetheart, come with me where we can live alone and happy, 
far away from here; what say you, beloved, will you come ? " 
<« Oh, no, I cannot; hush, you know not what you ask," came 
back the answer. 

The listener, in spite of himself, trembled in every joint. He 
turned to go, hesitated and stayed. 

14 I know not what I ask? Ah, yes, dear one, I do, but think of a 
life far from here of everlasting happiness. To-morrow night at this 
hour I will be ready, my yacht shall be close to the heads, a boat 
shall be ready to take you on board. Come, darling, one little word. 
No I then the pressure of your hand. Ah I sweet, I knew you would 
be true. Till to-morrow, aurevoir, till to-morrow." She mounted 



theclitr— he who had won her walked along the sands. She nut do 
one. and reached the DOOM ol the men were coming out 1<>r 

I last cigar on the veranda. " Hon beautiful the night la," she said 
to them. " You should go over and look at the ocean; it is magnifi- 
cent and has quite cured my headache." 

And be. the husband, with hatred in his heart and a cur.se on his 
tips, he had returned W the house before she hud got there, and was 
busy playing pool with some of t he men. 

This man. who would .seduce his wife, had been his guest in the 
early part of the summer, and bud been called north very suddenly 
a week before. The thief, the trickster, the snake in the grass, hud 

now returned to steal his wife from him— Oh, the coward, the 

But no. this thing should not be; his honor and her's demanded 
that such a thing should never come to pass. His mind once made 
up, he no longer hesitated. That night they met, the husband and 
the would-be lover. There were few words spoken— few were neces- 
sary. The two walked side by side to the heads where the boat lay, 
but the husband returned alone, with a grim smile on his white face 
and the remnants of a thick ash stick held firmly in his hand, and as 
he mounted the cliff to await tbe coming of the woman who had so 
nearly played him false, he murmured: " Better lick the life out of 
the young whelp than shoot him. And he smiled, thanking heaven 
that his honor and her's were safe. 

* * * * * 
Christmas was near at hand. After that night by mutual consent 

they had separated, she by his wish taking the child, though it was 
like giving his life to part with her. He had gone to Europe where 
he had roamed for over a year. Each Christmas his little girl had stayed 
with him for a week, and he had but lately arrived from the East to 
be with her. This very afternoon she was to come, he had had the 
hotel rooms brightened up by flowers and evergreens, and under the 
chandeliers had hung a bunch of mistletoe; he remembered it had 
pleased her. 

* * * -X- * 

Alone he sat, the rain pouring in torrents outside. 

" What a lottery this life is," he thought. "These two years of 
misery have effaced the happiness that went before. If she would 
only come back tome how different it might all still be. I see every- 
thing so clearly now. Too much occupied with state affairs I let my 
love grow cold. Poor little wife, perhaps it was natural for her to 
seek tenderness elsewhere. If I could only see her again, if ." 

Suddenly there is a knock at the door, it is thrown ODen and in 
rushes his little treasure. "Oh, daddy, daddy, how glad I am you're 
back; how I have missed you, daddy! " Before her his face loses 
its coldness, and th^re are tears in his eyes, but joy in his heart as he 
helps her off with her little jacket, plying her with questions, whilst 
the nurse stands off in the corner waiting orders. He gives the little 
one's things to the woman and bids her take them to the rooms pre- 
pared for her. Then he turns and gathers her once more to him, 
kissing her tenderly. And she laughs gaily, this little princess, and 
prattles away to him, till suddenly, as if remembering something, she 
grows very grave. " Daddy, I want you to sit down in this big arm- 
chair. Yes, like that. I've brought my Christmas present, and I 
can't keep it. I want to give it to you now; be a good daddy and 
cover your face with my handkerchief. Now, don't move, daddy, 
till I tell you, will you? Promise, now." And he promises. 

The little one steps quietly to the door, opens it ever so gently, 
then closes it again, and now there are three in the room, and one 
we have not seen for a long, long time. Gently she draws this grave 
beautiful being towards the arm-chair. Then when they both can 
touch it she says: " Now you may look, daddy. Happy Christmas! 
Happy Christmas! " and runs for her life. 

* * * * * 

Away, far away by the side of a blue lake, nestles a small house. 
It is Christmas morning. Inside everything goes to prove it. Ever- 
greens and flowers and holly brighten the large hall, where burns 
merrily the yule log. To the right is the dining room , What a harpy 
sight is there. There these three, father, mother and daughter, 
stand, and surely they must see, right under a big bough of mistletoe. 
At last, vou slow coaches, you have seen it, but how long it has taken 
you. Laughing joyously, lovingly they kiss one another, and wish 
each other A Merry Christmas. w. J. 




To the readers of the News Letter who are contem- 
plating a trip to the East, see the advantages of taking 
the Union Pacific. It is the only line running Pull- 
man Drawing-room Palace Sleeping Oars and Dining Cars 
1 from San Francisco to Chicago without change. You are 
'only three and one-half days from San Francisco to Chi- 
cago, and only four and one-half days to New York or 
Boston. 

Every Thursday a Tourist Excursion leaves San Francisco via (his 
line for Chicago, New York and Boston, making 25% hours quicker 
time to Chicago and two days quicker time to Boston than other 
excursion lines. 

For sleeping-car reservations, tickets and full information, apply 
at the General Office, No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 
D. W. Hitchcock, General Agent. 



A. H. Ricketts, attorney-at-law, rooms 201, 202 and 203, Crocker 
Building, San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893. 




WHO says that San Francisco is not progressive! The Woman's 
Club project effectually answers that question. Can any- 
thing be more in keeping with the times than the prospective 
bliss of the dear ladies who will be members of the same? If 
husbands stop down town, so can wives. Should a man put on 
his hat after dinner and " stroll down to the club/' the wife can 
don her hat and wrap and go to her club, it is not stated as yet 
whether a woman can bring in a friend — a male one — to lunch 
at her clnb. Ye gods! What a lively time might be anticipated 
should tbe event be signalized by two women bringing different 
husbands in for a snack. 

• • * 

The old-time Pacific-Union has long had the reputation for 
brewing more dishes of scandal than any other spot in the city, 
but we venture the prediction that in that respect the " Woman's 
Club " will double discount the old institution, and go several 
better. A glance over the list of ladies who propose joining re- 
veals the names of one or two noted bavards whose ability to 
furnish &chronique scandaleuse there can be no manner of doubt. 

* * * 

Charming little Miss Mary Templeton Crocker (Col. Fred's fair 
young daughter) made her first appearance in the r61e of hostess 
on Christmas Eve. It was a lovely sight to see such a bevy of 
pretty, well-behaved children as assembled at the residence at 
Pine and Leavenworth streets, in obedience to the young girl's 
invitation, and what a glorious time they did have I The cotil- 
lion, which was danced as the wind up of the festivities, proved 
that an embryo " leader " is already among us, who will un- 
doubtedly be the Ward McAllister of our future Four Hundred. 

* # * 

Again gossip is busy with the rumor of a possible match be- 
tween the gallant Colonel and the handsome Miss Hager, and if 
the talk means anything it promises a bridal that will vie in 
magnificence with any that our society has ever witnessed. 

* i * 

The chosen colors for last evening's cotillion were aptly illus- 
trated by the pretty debutantes themselves, in rose-colored illu- 
sions, verdant freshness and snowy innocence. 
» * » 

Two on dits of society which prevail in the opening of the New 
Year are calculated to give that select body feelings of mixed pain 
and pleasure; the one being that popular Major Eatbbone is not 
likely to remain with us very long after the Cleveland inaugura- 
tion, his resuming of the duties of Consul-General to Paris being 
quite on the cards soon after that event. The other is to the ef- 
fect thai, owing to the persuasive eloquence of her friend, Mrs. 
Rath bone. Miss Flood has decided to emerge from seclusion, and 
the mansion tin Nob Hill will open its hall door to a limited circle 
during the winter season. At Eastertide society may be treated 
to a large entertainment, whether in the form of a reception in 
town or a fete champetn in the country has not yet been finally 
determined. 

* * • 

A set of society people are meditating a trip to Southern Cali- 
fornia during Lent. The idea suggested itself upon the anticipated 
visit of the Montaigue-Catherwood party, which will go south- 
ward from here. 

A question asked on New Year's day by a leading belle was; 
*' Is it the correct thing for a person supposed to be in too great 
mourning for city gaieties, to go in for rural festivities con amoref " 



FAMINE again threatens to invade the Russian Empire. The crops 
are an absolute failure, as acknowledged by the official reports, and 
the condition of the farmers is said to be worse than in 1891. Under 
these circumstances the necessity of administrating interior affairs 
may put a stop for some time yet to the aggressive schemes abroad. 
In fact, the muddle existing in all the European countries at this 
moment should suffice to prevent war and the rumors ot war for 
some time to come, though, as the French saying has it, "It is 
always the unexpected that happens," especially in politics. 



BY the deaMa of Dr. Kerner Siemens, Germany loses one of her 
most esteemed men, and of our age one of its greatest practi- 
cal scientists. Dr. Kerner Siemens, of Berlin, as his late brother, 
Sir William of London, had enormously benefitted the world by 
his great discoveries and practical applications of electricity. 
Social 



C. MAREY & LIGER-BELAIR 

Nuits. 

BURGUNDIES. 



Beaune (Red 

Pommard " 

Clos de Vougeot " 

CHAMBERTIN. 

Chablis (White 

(Black Label.) 

•' Gold Label" 

" 1878 




Good Cooking 
Is one of the chief blessings of every home. To always insure good 
custards, puddings, sauce, etc., u>e*Gail Borden "Eagle" Brand Con- 
densed Mxlk. Directions on label. Sold by your grocer and druggist. 



CHAS. MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents, 314 Sacramento St. 

CHAMPAGNE 

KRU6 & GO. " PRIVATE CUVEE," 

QUARTS AND PINTS 

FROM 

Krug & Co., Reims. 

BY 111 DE1LEE8, JOBBERS 1KB GROtEBS. 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast, 
525 Front Street, SAN FRANC/SCO. Telephone m. nt . 

JJ1E QJY f/Wr; 

IMPORTERS. 

WHOLESALERS, 

ahd RETAILERS 

OF OSLY FIRST-CLASS 
Wines, Cordials, 

Champagnes and 
Table Delioacies. 

Etc., Etc. 

Genuine Goods. Low Prices. 

EM. MEYER & CO., 

1047-1049 Market St., S. F. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. 
THE SAN FRANCISCO FENCING ACADEMY. 

501 Post Street, Corner Mason. 
Professors Louis Troncnet and Alfred De Smet 

Special classes twice per week for young ladies between the ages of 
10 and 1.0 years. Reasonable terms. 

CYPRESS LAWN CEMETERY. 

Situated in San Mateo County, between tbe Holy Cross and |Home of 
Peace Cemeteries, now ready for interment. 

if-a-zmhiiTcT plots 

For sale in any size required. 

Tbe cemetery is non-ectarian and is laid out on the lawn plan, thereby 
saving the lot owners the great and useless expense of coping, at the same 
time making it a beautiful burial place. 

For further information apply at the office, 325 Montgomery street, or at 
the cemetery, of W. J. BLaIN, Superintendent. 

The Strath more Apartment House 

N. W. Cor. Larkin and Fulton Streets. 

Exclusively for families. First-class in every respect. Ele- 
vator day and night. First-class restaurant in the building. 

Apply to Janitor in the building, or to A. Hayward, No. 224 
California Street. 




Jan. 7, 1893 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKK. 



FOR WELL-DRESSED MEN. 

A 8 to the styles, there is little change in fabrics— the conserva- 
tive ideas in pattern and color continuing to prevail. The 
materials most used in suitings la «>f ohSTOtt in black and blue. The 
sack suitings are both single and double-breasted, and they are fin- 
ished with greater care in accord with the feeling for betterment. 
The spring top-coats will be in rough-faced cheviots, the costliest 
, light in weight, of medium length, and faced to the edge of 
the lapel with the silk lining. The little short light top-coals of the 
covert species have not been included in the spring offerings. There 
are black worsted cutaway coats and waistcoats which are for the 
tine trade. These are made longer and more in keeping with the 
mandates of the fashionable vogue. 

Speaking of neckwear— it is marvelous to what lengths the makers 
have gone toward the costliest and most artistic scarrings. The 
custom-made element has gained new converts in the purchasing of 
squares of silk that are made into the latest shapes of made-up and 
partly-made examples. Not alone has the quality of neckwear ma- 
terial been far in advance of previous seasons, but there has been a 
betterment in workmanship that has adduced shapes in partly-made 
and excellent imitations of these when folded, in the regulation 
made-up specimens. 

The premiership of self-tied effects, and the dissemination of how 
to wear the scarf-pin, has helped the jewelry-makers— for every well- 
to-do-man, out of the greater regard which the quietude of the 
clothing has engendered for the zest which the bit of neck,wear color- 
ing imparts — has been led to an ownership of more of these baubles 
in decoration which have a just right in their proper time and 
place, and are become the most important piece of masculine 
jewelry in every-day garb. 

The innovations in form of Flowing-Ascot, Windsor-Four-in- 
hand, Graduated-Ascot, and the more general wearing of the De 
Joinvilles were bought and then transformed by the retailer into ac- 
ceptable and readily adjusted replicas for those that have not ac- 
quired the knack of scarf-tying. 

There was a time when all linen shirts were generally worn by the 
rich men of the town, and there are a number of the old guard, and 
many of the younger men of the town, that pay so much as twelve 
dollars each, or ?144 per dozen, for their all tine white linen shirts. 
These are with and without collars and cuffs. The laundry men do 
not get a chance at them. Some old-fashioned retainer handles 
them tenderly, and gets the homelike dull-finish on the starched 
shirt front. 



The long-tailed cutaway frocks have been made with 
trousers and waistcoat to match, out of fine striped trousering 
cloth, which realizes the ideal mixed suitings now to be had from all 
high grade clothiers. This latter phase in suitings, moreover, is a 
positive boon to the men of dressy inclinations, for the solid clothes 
are sombre and the plaids that are to be had are in trite designs. 



The demand for soft tourists shows no sign of abatement, all of 
the factories that produce such goods being run to their utmost 
capacity, and are still unable to satisfy the urgent demands of cus- 
tomers. There is evary probability that the tourist will be a popular 
style for some time to come. 

One good feature about the great sale on soft hats is that it does 
not supplant, in any great measure, the demand for stiff hats, but 
creates its own place. That it is in the wardrobe of the ordinarily- 
dressed man; the soft hat is an addition merely, the stiff hat being 
also in use. 

There is also being shown a stiff Homberg, a shape that has had a 
great run at different times. This may sell in a stiff brim with soft 
crown, but such stock is always dangerous to handle, and is rarely 
profitable to the retailer. 

In the matter of hat blocks there is the usual variety, the newest, 
in combination with the wide brims, being a bullet shape and a cross 
between a bullet and an acorn. The latter makes a very extreme 
looking hat. 

In colors, browns are still the favorites, with a prospect that nutria 
shades, both dark and light, will be popular. Pearls, with the ex- 
ception of soft hats, are not in it as yet. 

So this makes it a good thing for the hat business, and should re- 
sult in a larger total sale. — Clothier and Furnisher. 

The Maison Riche, at the corner of Geary street and Grant 
avenue, is the most popular restaurant in the city among people who 
enjoy good dinners. It enjoys the patronage of the elite. 



John W. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, always has an excellent 
stock of gentlemen's famishing goods on hand. His shirts, neck- 
wear, gloves and handkerchiefs are the best. 



MoTiiRR.sbe».tiro and use "Mrs. Wluslotrs' Soothing Syrup " for your 
nlldreu while U-othlug. 

wS?, ACK .", fta<1 Patont Optometers, a fruitful sourco of Misfits. Consult 
Mnl, it. the optlcihii. 



$6 
Blasts. 

$6 buys a pair of our celebrated White Cali- 
fornia Family Blankets. Superfine quality and 
full size. Worth $9 a pair. 







111 to 121 Post Street 




COATS 

FOE 

MEN AND WOMEN. 

Are worn in place of an over- 
coat or outside wrap . 

Perfectly Waterproof. 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO, 

R. n. Pease — Agents— S. B. Bonyon. 
677-579 Market St.. S. P. 




TO 

O-. -W. OLABK Sg CO.. 
653 Market Street, 

POB 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

MR. H. J. STEWART, 

PROFESSOR OF SINGING, PIANO FORTE, ORGAN AND HARMONY, 

AND 

MRS. H J. STEWART, 

PROFESSOR OF THE PIANO-FORTE, 

Will resume teaching TUESDAY, JAM. 3d. 

2417 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893. 




<We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



THE closing of the Ali Bnba spectacle and the betaking itself 
"thither and away" by Mr. Henderson's merry company has 
left something of dullness and flatness spread over matters 
dramatic in San Francisco. The only new thing for the week 
was the reopening of the Baldwin by Frohraan's company of 
comedians, which took place Saturday night, the play, Settled 
Out of Court, continuing through the present week. Mr. Gillette's 
adaptation cannot be mentioned in the same breath with The 
Private Secretary, nor compared favorably with Wilkinson's Widows. 
It is not without a vein of humor in construction and situations, 
its weakest point being in the dialogue, which is absolutely nil, 
except where bright acting gives it point. 

Joseph Holland improves with every visit, where improvement 
could scarcely be demanded. The slight stiffness perceptible in 
the dignity of his acting in his old days at the California has 
quite disappeared, leaving behind only the manly dignity and 
earnestness which form so marked a characteristic in this actor's 
performance of even the lightest comedy role. 

M. A. Kennedy is an unchanging favorite here, and the uni- 
versal approval which follows everything he does must have a 
foundation in something. Just what the something is, is hard to 
say; but in a certain line he has a humor of his own which no 
one else approaches. The character of Mr. Plunkett suits this pe- 
culiar vein in spots, and the "spots" are delightful. 

Mrs. Georgie Drew Barrymore would, no doubt, be more highly 
appreciated with less heralding. Somehow this pleasant lady 
never seems quite to come np to her reputation, her pretensions, 
or her name. As Mrs. Plunkett, on the opening night, this de- 
fection was strikingly apparent; but as Mrs. Barrymore has been 
ill before and since her arrival, it may not be fair to comment on 
any shortcomings. 

Mrs. Barrymore's frequent indisposition during the tour and in 
San Francisco has thrown to the front a charming and talented 
actress, the young San Franciscan, Miss Margaret Craven. On 
several nights this week Miss Craven, whose ambition led her to 
understudy the part at the beginning of the tour, has taken the 
leading role with an intelligence and ability which, considering 
her short apprenticeship to the stage, have be"en a pleasant sur- 
prise to her friends and all San Franciscans. Minnie Tittel, another 
home-production, makes a good bit of the pert and lawless ser- 
vant maid. 

Next week, beginning Monday night, Mr. Frohman's company 
will have, according to report, a better opportunity, all around, 
in Lestocq's comedy, The Sportsman. 
» * * 

A Jolly Surprise, whatever personal opinion may be held of its 
merits, may certainly claim the verdict of the popular vote, as 
Stockwell's pretty and pleasant little theatre has seen no falling 
off in the large audiences which greeted the opening of Fanny 
Rice's engagement. Fanny Rice's cabinet act is a charming and 
clever novelty, and some of the singing is pleasant enough, 
which, with the laisser-aller of the season, may account for the 
agreeable result. 

# # * 

Strangely enough, the California has reversed the usual order 
of things in the Dickson Incog, engagement. The opening at the 
Christmas matinee was rather disappointing if not discouraging; 
but the houses have gone on steadily increasing in numbers and 
in demonstrativeness. The reason may be found in the fact that 
Incog, is a bright and amusing comedy, with far more than the 
average infusion of genuine wit in the dialogue, and Mr. Dickson 
as a refined and comprehending cojuedian merits the high favor 
in which he is evidently held here. 

# # # 

The Man About Town which has been played this week as a 
curtain raiser is a mere chapter out of a tender and pathetic 
story, perhaps all the more fascinating that the conclusion is left 
to each auditor's individual fancy. Mr. Dickson plays the lead- 
ing part with a sympathetic understanding that reveals an ability 
in the line of sentiment should he turn his attention in that 
direction. 

■* # * 

U and I has not been doing so well at the Bush as its opening 
promised. That it is the trashiest of an objectionable class of 
plays, is no good reason for or aeainst such a falling off, as San Fran- 
cisco is joined to farce-comedy as Epbraim to his idols, and the 
week's rather poor patronage may, therefore be set down to 
sheer luck. An impossible Dutchman, an incredible Irishman, 
and a policeman "that never was on sea or land," outside of 
farce-comedy, with a lot of strident, noisy hoydens kicking and 
capering without grace, and talking slang without humor, do not 
form an intellectual or even an amusing entertainment, and in 
ceasing to be a novelty long ago last what dubious attraction 
may ever have belonged to them. U and I should be sent on 



the Samoan or Zulu circuit, and the Murphy-Lederer company, 
which has a good deal of talent in its composition, might easily 
find a play better adapted to an at least supposed civilized com- 
munity. 

* # # 

The Trip to ths Moon has continued to the end its unexampled 
success at the Tivoli. Even yet there seems to be no lessening of 
the desire to see and to hear tbeTivoli's holiday production, with 
its musical numbers and its spectacular splendors. Next Mon- 
day, Jan. 9, the holiday piece will give place to Faust, of which 
the present augmented Tivoli company should give a more than 
average rendering. 

* * # 

The Sportsjnan, Lestocq's comedy which will be brought out by 
Mr. Frohman's company Monday night at the Baldwin, had its 
first production last October m Boston. It was written for the 
Frohman company from the French of Georges Faydean. The 
story is that of an Englishman, Harry Briscoe, with an uncon- 
querable passion for gambling. He spends his summer leisure in 
a Chelsea club playing cards, but making his wife believe he is 
hunting in Sussex with his friend, Perkins. After he has started 
on one of these "hunts" Perkins arrives and reveals the fact that 
no hunt is on foot and that he has not seen Briscoe for a year. 
The remaining complications are of a similar kind, and the scenes 
include a raid of the police on the Bachelor's Club. The usually 
happy ending is accompanied by the "Sportsman's" complete 
reformation. 

* * * 

Schilling's Minstrels will make their first appearance here next 
Monday night at the Bush-street Theatre. During its coast tour 
the newspaper comment has been favorable, and as no minstrel 
company has visited San Francisco since last July, the one week 
at the Bush should be a successful one. The organization is said 
to be particularly strong in its vocalism and instrumental play- 
ing. 

« # » 

M. B. Leavitt's Spider and Fly will soon be seen at the Bush. 
The best English specialty people and American pantomimists 
and burlesquers are in the company, and the paraphernalia is 
complete and costly, the production being pronounced superior 
in all respects to the last given here of Mr. Leavitt's famous bur- 
lesque extravaganza. 

w * # 

At Stockwell's the next production will be The Magistrate, Mon- 
day night, January 9th, when L. R. Stockwell will make his re- 
appearance. Mr. Stockwell is always welcome in any character, 
but doubly so in The Magistrate, his great hit in this play being 
well remembered. 

* # • 

Denman Thompson's play, The Old Homestead, needs no more 
than a mere announcement to insure for it a success as complete 
as it won two years ago. The play, which will follow Incog, at 
the California, is one of the clean, wholesome, yet not unexciting 
plays of which we have too few, and can never have too many. 
It will open Monday evening, January 9th. 
« » # 

The first lecture of Mrs. Annie Besant, at Metropolitan Hall 
last Tuesday evening, was attended by a large and intensely in- 
terested audience. Mrs. Besant has, to start on, the grand de- 
sideratum, a thorough and exhaustive knowledge of her subjects, 
from her peculiar standpoint. She brings to bear upon them a 
masculine strength of treatment as well as of voice, and helps out 
the impressiveness of her words and gestures by a remarkable 
personal magnetism. Her theme on Tuesday evening was " The 
Evolution of Man," upon which she presented succinctly and 
logically the theory of Theosophy. She has given two subse- 
quent lectures — on " After Death — What?" and " Mesmerism and 
Hypnotism," but too late for review in this Issue. 

* # * . 

The last of the present series of Palace Ballad Concerts will 
take place January 13th, in the Maple Hall of the Palace. The 
remarkable popularity of these charming musicales has led to a 
general request that Mr. Wilkie arrange another series. This 
has been done, and the new concerts will take place half in the 
evening and half as now, at 3 p. m., so that business men can 
have an opportunity of attending. 
» » # 

This afternoon, at Irving Hall, will be the first of the new sea- 
son of the Carr-Beel Pops. The new people engaged will add 
materially to the range of music, and the aim of the organizers 
will be to present new and unfamiliar compositions of a high 
order. Every indication points to the probability that the ear- 
nest and intelligent effort of Mrs. Carmichael-Carr and Mr. Sig- 
mund Beel has reached the reward of popular appreciation, and 
that the season's Pops will be a financial as well as an artistic 
success. By general request the bright Frenchy trio of Godard's 
will be repeated, and Mr. Beel will play alone Bach's great master- 
piece, the Chaconne in D minor, for violin. The newly estab- 
lished string quartette will play Beethoven's C minor quartette. 

m * • 

In according just praise to the Baldwin staff for its efficient aid 
in the splendid success of Ali Bdba at the Grand, an evening 



Jan. 7, 1893. 



SAN FRANCIS* <> NEWS LETTER 



B 



pftper omits one name which should Ma ml high on the list. 
" Mannte" r.reenberg, Mana^t-r Bouvler's private secretary al 
the Baldwin, is not only a polite and modeM young gentleman, 
bat a thorough bnMne?* man and a •• mailer " Daring Mr. llen- 
demon*i Bncoasafal Ati liobn pea* on at the Grand, Mr. Greenberg 
has had sole charge of the nrn-[iaper work, which he ha? nmn- 
aged like a veteran and to the admiration o( the whole press fra- 
ternity. \V. nilly find, in a business sense, " old beads 
on young shoulders," but not often joined with the rarer quality 
— a complete freedom from the usually accompanying » fresh- 
ness,'' to borrow a term — which is not the least of Alannie's 
good qualities in the eyes of bis older friends. 

• • ♦ 

Signora Virginia Ferrari, a prima donna soprano of the Italian 
opera, will give a concert Thursday evening, January 26tb, at 
Irving Hall. She will be assisted by Mrs. Oarmicbael-Oarr, Signor 
Minetti, Lawrence Peterson, and Signor Martinez. 

• • * 

No light opera has ever achieved the success which has 
attended De Koven & Smith's Robin Hood in the hands of the 
Bostonians. Though produced for five months this year in New 
York, people were turned away duringits last nights. It is now 
en (our. 

• • * 

Fifty young ladies, former school-mates of Miss Margaret Craven, 
now playing with the Frohman Company at the Baldwin, will at- 
tend the matinee to-day in a body, in compliment to their former 
companion. 

» » » 

The mandolin musicale to be given by Mr. Samuel Adelstein in 
Metropolitan Hall next Friday evening will be a very enjoyable 
affair. Among the notable numbers to be rendered will be an instru- 
mental quartette, "Meditazione" (Bach-Gounod), in which the par- 
ticipants will be: Mr. Samuel Adelstein, mandolin; M. Solano, 
harp; H. Clay Wysham, boehm flute; Martin Schultz, organ. 
Messrs. Adelstein, Arthur Regensberger and Solano will also give a 
trio on the lute, cello and harp— Schubert's "Serenade" and Jung- 
man's "Harp Sounds." "Fantasie Caprice," Opera 17, Sylveatri, will 
be rendered by Messrs. Adelstein (mandolin) and Solano (harp), and 
in conclusion there will be an instrumental sextette, "Musica Proi- 
bita" (Gastaldon),by mandolins, flute, violin, harp, and cello. 

• # * 

The first reappearance of L. R. Stockwell will bring forth a 
great many of his admirers on Monday evening, when will be 
presented the neat comedy, The Magistrate, in which Mr. Stock- 
well made such a strong impression when last played by him in 
this city some two years ago. The favorite comedian will receive 
a warm reception on Monday evening, and let us hope for his 
best wishes. The Magistrate will be on for one week. 

• # # 

Mr. Wm. Lestocq, author of The Sportsman, also wrote Jane. 

Sydney Grundy's Arabian Nights will be given at the Baldwin for 
the third week of Frohman's Comedians — its first production in 

America. Peck's Bad Boy will follow Schilling s Minstrels at the 

Bush.— —Mr. J. H. Love is arranging the dates for the Paderew- 
ski recitals here in March. — The successful young actor, Hugo 
Toland, is here from the East visiting his mother, Mrs. M. B. M. 

Toland. His Majesty, the new comic opera composed by H. J. 

Stewart, Peter Robertson, librettist, will be brought out in Feb- 
ruary, in aid of the Polyclinic Society.— .The New York Evening 
Telegram says : " The enthusiasm which greeted Dr. Carver's 
show has not been equalled in the theatrical business for 

years." Mrs. Batchelder will be the vocalist at the Carr-Beel 

concert to-day.^— The symphony concert under Mr. Bauer's 
direction was given at the Tivoli yesterday afternoon, too late for 

critical mention here. Sousa's new marine band of Chicago 

will soon visit this city. — — A part-song written specially for Mr. 
Wilkie by the popular composer, H. J. Stewart, will be given at 
the next Palace Ballad concert by a fine vocal quartette, including 
Mr. Wilkie.— -Miss Gruenhagen, who made such a pronounced 
success at the iast Wilkie concert, has been engaged, by request, 
for that of January 13th. The popular Mrs. Brechemin will also 
sing- 

WITH the opening of the new year it is noticeable that many people 
are improving the appearance of their homes by adding to their 
furnishings handsomely framed pictures, engravings and etchings. 
A house without pictures can never be considered a home, for the 
latter word implies an abode where due attention is given to the art 
beautiful. Pictures are now so cheap that no home should be with- 
out them. For instance, at Sanborn & Vail's, on Market street, one 
can procure the handsomest of steel engravings and etchings, in 
artistic cream and gold and white and gold frames of Florentine de- 
sign for $25. These are large pictures, and will adorn any parlor. 
Then there are three sizes of etchings, ranging in price from $5 to 
$10. Besides these, the art gallery shows a line of beautiful artotypes 
fn fine frames, at prices ranging from $5 to $6.50. The picture easels 
are also very handsome and at reasonable rates. 

Merit will tell; misfit spectacles will ruin your eyesight; judge by com- 
parisons. Muller's Optical Depot. 



, „ BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Ai Human ft Co. ... Prop] 

Engagement of 

CHARLES FROHMAN'S COMEDIANS, 

Last night. Lasl malinae Saturday. Oilli 
Aa&ptal 

SETTLED OUT OF COURT. 

EXTRA.— Next Week ek of the comedians), Brat pro 

auction here of the brilliant comedy, 

THE SPORTSMAN, 

By Lestocq. author of "Jane." Recently produced with immense 
ucceis ni the Columbia Theatre, Boston. 
Seats for next week now ready. 



STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 



t. K. Stockweii Lessee and Proprietor. 

Alp Ellinqhouse Business Manager. 

Commencing Monday, January 9th, Matinee Saturday, reappear- 
ance of L. E. STOCKWELL, the Public Favorite, for one week only, 
in Augnstin Daly's successful comedy, 



THE MAGISTRATE. 



Seats now ready. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

AlHayman & Co.. Proprietors. | J. J. Gottxob Manager. 

Monday, January 9th. Every evening, including Sundav. Matinee 
Saturday, DENMAN THOMPSON'S celebrated play, 

THE OLD HOMESTEAD, 

Presented with the same minuteness of detail that characterized its 
fo rmer successful engagement at this theatre. 
Seats now on sale. 



THE BUSH STREET THEATRE. 

Ma. M. B. Levitt Proprietor and Manager. 

Georoe H. Bboadhorst Resident Manager- 
One week only, CHARLES E. SCHILLING'S 

MINSTRELS. 
Next attraction, 

PECK'S BAD BOY. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kbeung Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night. THIRD WEEK. A Grand Success. Houses crowded 
Every Evening. Offenbach's Operatic Spectacle, 

TRIP TO THE MOON. 

Monday, January 9th, FAUST. 

Popular Prices 25 and 50c. 

METROPOLITAN HALL 

(Fifth street, between Market and Mission streets.) 
Mandolin Musicale, given by 

MR. SAMUEL ADELSTEIN, 
Solo Mandolinist and Lutest, FRIDAY EVENING, JAN. 13 1893. 
Assisted by: Mrs. Martin Schultz, Soprano; Mrs. Lillie Bir- 
mingham, Contralto; Mr. J. F. Fleming, Basso; Mr. M.Solano 
Harp; Mr. Martin Schultz, Organ; Mr. H. Clay Wysham, Boehm 
Flute; Mr. Arthur Regensberger, 'Cello. Admission, 50 cents. 

Seats may be reserved at an extra charge of twenty-five cents, at the 
music store of Sherman, Clay & Co., on January 11th, l'ith, and 13th. 



Perrier-Jouet & Oo. 




W.B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AQENT FOR 
PAOIFIO OOA8T. 

l23CaliforniaSt..S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOR BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



KMltte Bush & Gei-ts PInnos 
IV M D C Parlor Organs 

HAINES Installments Kentala 



A.L. Bancroft 4 Co. 
303 Sutter St., S.F. 



PIANOS 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893. 



THE SCAVENGER HABIT. 



[By Di Vernon.] 

IN some natures the quality of accumulativeness or acquisitive- 
ness is so peculiarly developed that properly it may be described 
as an excess of the scavenger habit. 

Never do I see a bit of the yellow, loose-twisted government 
twine lying on the sidewalk where it has been dropped by the 
postman on his rounds, but I recall one of the most pathetic of all 
the short stories by Guy de Maupassant. The name has slipped 
my memory, but in brief the story is this. An old man, a highly 
respected citizen in a provincial town of France, chanced to see a 
bit of stout twine lying in his path one bright morning. Moved 
by the spirit of economy he bent over and secured the string. As 
he straightened up he saw that he was observed by a sarcastic 
neighbor over the way. Being ashamed of his act, he pretended 
to search diligently in the earth as if he had dropped something 
and sought to find it. Certain that he now had his neighbor on 
another string, so to speak, he departed with the twine in his 
pocket and satisfaction in his mind. Alas, a pocket-book had 
been lost that very day, and he, the innocent gatherer of stray bits 
of twine, was accused of having found the pocket book and of 
keeping the money. His very pretense of searching in the earth 
was adduced as proof that he had been been seen picking up the 
scattered coins after he had found the pocket book itself. In due 
time the missing article was found where its careless owner had 
misplaced it; but the gossips said: "It was easy enough to find 
things when the thier had taken alarm and returned his stolen 
property." The poor old man was ridiculed for his excuse of bis 
bit of twine, and he died a heart-broken man, robbed of the good 
reputation of a life time. Poor little old Frenchman, was he not 
the victim of the scavenger habit? 

It's strange how many people are held in the grasp of the same 
perversity. Any economy practiced to the extreme must result in 
parsimony of soul and spirit. The inner life responds to the outer 
line of action. Some natures must economize, and to economize 
thoroughly and consistently one must practice the scavenger 
habit. " A saving housewife skimps at the table," said a wise 
man — and what else are the indigestible stews of tough meat, 
and hashes of gristly pieces of beef, and mince pies made of 
soup meat, but an evidence of the scavenger habit — the same 
thought that finds expression in the gathering up of the scraps of 
butter from each individual butter plate? What else Is the sav- 
ing and storing away in the garret or in the cellar of three-legged 
chairs and broken bits of furniture, of old shoes to invite mould, 
and old clothes to breed moths? There are some people so mean 
that they will not give away even a pair of old socks, but cut 
them open and sew them together and use them to polish the 
stove with. I have known housewives who carefully treasured 
up all tbeir old newspapers — never had any to spare, never used 
a whole one with which to light a fire, or to polish a pane of 
glass, who tiled them away one by one, day by day, until fearful 
of fire or of rats' nests, tbey were compelled to pay an ashman to 
cart off the collection. I have seen good housewives sorting over 
their piece bags as they attempted to tidy up their sewing closets 
— and what a collection of odd bits of rag. tag and bob-tail of by- 
gone styles and fashions and fabrics it wasl 

Yet they could not throw away a single scrap of it all. Or if a 
good housewife, in whom economy running riot has developed 
the scavenger habit, feels compelled by lack of space to cast 
aside some of her cherished collections — does she dispose of it 
utterly? No. In one family I know when anything has out- 
lived its usefulness the members all chorus "Ob, give it to Kate," 
because Kate is the collector of the family and will not suffer 
anything to be "wasted" — that is, thrown away. 

It is very funny to watch the scavenger habit in little children. 
I can remember one playmate of my childhood — the daughter of 
wealthy parents — who could not resist the temptation to pick up 
cigar ends in the street, she though! "they might do for some one 
to smoke in a pipe." One day I met her, her rosy cheeks aglow 
with excitement. She was running as fast as she could toward 
her home, holding a dead mouse by the tail between her thumb 
and finger. By the way, she was addicted to sucking that self- 
same thumb a great deal of the time, and I shuddered as I 
thought of the possibilities. "What in the world are you doing 
with that dead mouse?" I asked. "I thought I'd take it home to 
the cat," she replied without slacking her pace. Is it necessary 
to recount the contents of a boy's pockets to see how he will 
illustrate the workings of the scavenger habit? Hardly; for his 
tops, marbles, knives, bullets, bits of glass, odds and ends of 
pencils, rubbers, strings, cigarette pictures and advertising cards 
are familiar to all. 

Of all the expressions of the scavenger habit that have ever 
come under my notice, the craze for the collection of cancelled 
United States postal stamps was about the most senseless. I 
have assisted in that imbecile attempt to get a million can- 
celled stamps, and have sent from my door several potato sacks 
full of cancelled stamps, and all for a fake idea. No one ever 
wanted a million stamps, but some one said so, and we all, stimu- 
lated by the charity fad, worked on a false idea. But, speaking 
of the craze for cancelled stamps, I know the young people of St. 



Stephen's Parish, of which Rev. E. J. Lion is the rector, have 
sent over ten thousand cancelled American stamps to England, 
where they are sold to collectors by a society for the spread of 
church work, and the money thus gained is devoted to the good 
cause. The collectors of postage stamps, bric-a-brac, autographs 
and buttons doubtless would resent having their pet fad called a 
manifestation of the scavenger habit, and perhaps I should 
modify the word sufficiently to say that to be a scavenger in this 
sense is not necessarily to deal in what is offensive or useless. 
But this sweeping up, this gathering and hoarding up of what is 
useful in itself in Its own place — for even dirt is only matter out 
of place — but which is of no practical utility In a collection 
as such, is certainly a manifestation of the miserly rag-picker's 
instinct. For to how many of these collections has any one 
access other than the owner, or perhaps a few of his most inti- 
mate friends? What good does such a collection do, even as an 
educational agent, when its beauties, such as they are, are hidden 
from those they could help, or interest, or elevate? Do not our 
millionaires owe it to society that their priceless collections should 
not remain always under lock and key and behind closed doors? 
The most objectionable feature of the scavinger habit is mani- 
fested by the toady who will accept benefits and snubs at the 
same time from the same hand; who will take old clothes or 
eleventh hour invitations, who buy into every raffle or lottery, 
who gather up salacious tidbits of scandal, who have a keen 
scent for impurities of life, whose minds are dump-carts for 
immoral ideas — scandalous stories and all sorts of envy, malice 
and all uncharitablecess. 



PRE8IDENT CARNOT has been blamed for hesitating to en- 
dorse radical measures in the Panama Canal affair, though he 
is supposed to have been acquainted with the full scope of the 
corruption. No doubt it was this very knowledge which made 
him pause, and it would have been a blessing to France if less 
sensational means could have been found to rid the Chamber and 
the Cabinet of the offenders, than the present public revelations. 
It is not unlikely that if the guilty persons had been confronted 
with evidence of their frauds privately, they would have taken 
the hint to retire, and reforms might have been inaugurated with- 
out scandalizing the whole world. This at least seems to be the 
feeling which is now prevailing, and if it were not too late, it 
would, no doubt, still be acted upon. 



Marion Harland, 

Author of "Common Sense 
in the Household," writes, 
February 5, 1892: "After 
long and careful trial 
of others, I prefer 

(TeYQiands 

BakingPowder. Cleveland's 
is a pure cream of tartar and 
soda mixture, not containing 
alum or ammonia or any 
other substance deleterious 
to the human stomach." 



Louis Roederer Champagne. 

The Highest Grade 
Champagne in the World. 

WHITE LABEL, "Carte Blanche." 

A Magnificent Rich Wine- 

BROWN LABEL, "Grand Vin Sec." 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every bottle bears the private label of 

MAGONDRAY & CO. 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




Jan. 



189.' 



SAN IK W [SCO NEWS LETT] i; 



11 



&ewm 




THERE seems to be no doubt that an attempt was to be made 
to overthrow the republican form of government in France 
during the excitement prevailing in the country in consequence 
of the Panama Canal revelations. It may be, and it is most 
likely that the prime movers in the investigation into the bribery 
and fraud of some persons connected with tbe Panama Canal 
Company bad no intention of fomenting a revolution, but it is 
almost certain that tbe stale of affairs created by the startling ex- 
posures of corruption offered too favorable an opportunity not 
to be utilized, if possible, by one or the other of the pretenders 
and supporters of a monarchial, or at least dictatorial form of 
government. Notably, the Boulangists imagined that their time 
for revenge and a possible success had come, and they did all in 
their power to promote revelations which were sure to compro- 
mise many members of the present and recent governments of 
the republic, it was unlucky for the plotters that in their ex- 
citement, created by their anticipation of triumph, they acted too 
openly, and permitted their intentions to become apparent too 
soon. M. Ribot, tbe present Prime Minister, one of the most 
able members of the Parisian bar, is too well versed in the 
methods which may favorably influence a jury, and with excel- 
lent tact be utilized the dramatic value of the discovery that tbe 
republic was in danger, to obtain a vote of confidence for his 
government. Whatever the opinion of the members of the Cham- 
ber may have been, it was certain that there would be many of 
them who would disregard all minor considerations when so im- 
portant an issue was presented to them, and even those who 
perhaps cared little for the preservation of the republic would not 
dare in open assembly to side with persons who bad been stig- 
matized as conspirators against the country, and whose actions 
had been such as to render it almost impossible to refute the 
accusation. 

By Mr. Ribot's clever move at an opportune moment, his gov- 
ernment was not only saved, but obtained a chance of stability 
which it did not possess when its members took office. The Re- 
public, also, escaped perhaps a serious danger. What really 
averted that danger, however, was not so much Mr. Ribot's 
speech, but, on one hand, the fact that those who desire a return 
to monarchy in France have been steadily diminishing in num- 
ber, and, on the other hand, that none of the parties hostile to 
the republican form of government possess a real leader. One 
single man with a prominent personality, firm will and conspicu- 
ous ability, might have succeeded perhaps in inducing a sanguine 
population, incensed against the authorities in office, to gather 
around him and to assist him in obtaining dictatorial power. 
Such a man, however, seems to we wanting at presentin France, 
and the antagonistic monarchical groups, even if their very an- 
tagonism bad not prevented them from united action, were pow- 
erless without a leader to guide their attacks. Tbe Republic, 
therefore, is saved from monarchy; it is, however, not yet saved 
from anarchy, and there lurks the greatest danger. 

Nothing has given a stronger impulse to the anarchist and 
SDcialist movement in France than recent events in that country. 
The revelations have plainly uncovered the true character of a 
group of men, nearly all of whom belong to the wealthy or to the 
governing class, and therefore to that part of society against 
which anarchists and socialists have always directed their at- 
tacks. While formerly such attacks appeared unjust to the 
greater number of peaceable citizens, who, though living in mod- 
erate and even straightened circumstances, were unwilling to 
join a war against capital and government in order to better their 
condition, the aims of the socialist and anarchist agitators at 
thia moment appears to have received a certain sanction by what 
has happened, since events seem to prove that the so-called upper 
classes of society deserve to be overthrown. It must further be 
remembered that the vast majority of the many millions which 
were squandered by the Panama Canal Company, and of which 
so great a part was given to real scoundrels, came out of the 
pockets of the poorer people, and represented the savings of the 
thrifty peasants, the mechanics, the clerks who have been 
cheated and swindled out of their small fortunes which they had 
accumulated for a rainy day, or as a resource in old age when 
they no longer would be able to earn a living by hard toil. Under 
these circumstances it could not surprise any one if the adher- 
ents of socialistic and anarchistic doctrines in the French Repub- 
lic were to increase in number conspicuously within the next few 
years, and in this fact lies tbe germ of a danger which threatens 
not only France, but also other European countries, and which 
to avert will be a difficult task for even tbe wisest and moat 
patriotic statesmen. 

Go to Moraghan's, in the California Market, for your oysters. 
They are the very best in the city, for which reason all epicures de- 
mand them and none other. 



yHilkman's 
Uate — ^gain? 

That don't matter so much, now-a- 
days. Dilute one part of Highland 
Evaporated Cream with two vol- 
umes of water — for delicious cream; 
with three volumes of water for rich 
milk — You've solved the milk ques- 
tion for all time. We use only milk 
obtained from farms under our own 
supervision. Prepared in hermeti- 
cally 1 sealed cans. Ask for the 
Highland brand — take no other. 

HELVETIA MILK CONDENSING CO. 
Highland, III. 



In addition to their large and care- 
fully selected stock of 

LADIES', MISSES AND CHILDREN'S 
Jae^ets, 

$ui(5, 

Ulsters, 

FRATINGER & CO., 

also carry the finest assortment of 
LADIES' FUR CAPES, in the lat- 
est and most fashionable shapes, and 
at prices the lowest in the city. 

FRATINGER & CO,, 

108 Kearny Street. 

IDEAL COFFEE. 

This famous brand of fresh ground blended coffee is unexcelled for quality 
and delicacy of flavor. 



No. 1 


No. 2 


No.S 


No. 4 


25 cents 


SO cents 


35 cents 


40 centsTper lb 



For sale only by 

RATHJEN BROS., Grocers. 

21 STOCKTON STREET. 
Sole Agents for the Celebrated IDEAL coffee POT. 

THE 

BANJO 

ASHTON P. STEVENS. 

STUDIO : 26 MONTGOMERY STREET. 
The Fashionable Accomplishment. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893. 




A-T-Ml -,fa ,>R r-i a r.fflQ i1Aj2ai 



fBE-LOPKER-oN® 



rrff^^^ET^^cnr 



IF the correspondents at the State Capital perform their duties 
faithfully, the public will learn, much to their amazement and 
amusement, that among the lawmakers sent to Sacramento this 
session, is a number of orators who needed only the inspiration 
gained by looking at the crowded lobby of a Legislative chamber, 
to develop into grandiloquent utterance the burning thoughts 
that have long smouldered in their breasts. The indications are 
that the floor of the lower house will become a field for rhetorical 
display, such as has not startled the spiders in the rafters for 
years. With the day of its organization, the Assembly echoed 
with the roar of words. Every county seems to have a favored 
son, to whose eloquence is entrusted the proper exposition of the 
merits and demerits of men and measures. Among all the 
talkers, however, there are few who have the divine gift of talk- 
ing naturally and well. Upon Tuesday, when several speeches 
were made in behalf of members nominated for Speaker, it was 
painfully noticeable that the speech makers had carefully studied 
their words for days beforehand, but with bad results, for they 
forgot their lines, and more than one was compelled to have re- 
course to the typewritten copy of his "extemporaneous" effort, 
which was upon the desk before him. Most of the new mem- 
bers have the heavy style of declamation usually identified with 
the Bowery tragedian. Each mounts his Pegasus most carefully, 
takes tight hold of the reins, and trembles and stutters whenever 
the winged steed gives indications of a flight into the realms of 
oratory. But it is only fair to consider that the riders are new In 
the saddle, and that as they become more accustomed to their 
seats, fear will fly before them, and with distended nostrils and 
flaming eyes, will their steeds make the Capitol to resound with 
tramping of their hoofs and their snorting. I hold Julius Kahn 
responsible for causing additional distress to an already long suf- 
fering public. He it was, that during his remarks, in seconding 
the nomination of Bledsoe, sprung upon his unsuspecting hearers 
the time-worn phrase "Well done, good and faithful servant." 
At first his colleagues were astonished at the temerity of the 
speaker in using such terms in speaking of any gentleman so unfor- 
tunate as to have been identified with the twenty-ninth session. 
The astonishment soon wore off, however, and every speaker 
who followed Kahn, used the "Well done, etc.," in his remarks. 
First there came a gentleman from the interior, who shook the 
hayseed from his hair, as he proudly proclaimed with calm 
egotism that was worthy of admiration, that "in the name of the 
people," he nominated the gentleman who he knew would de- 
serve the "Well done," tribute. Speaker Gould also worked in 
the faithful servant in his address. Gould's address was disap- 
pointing. It was heavy, labored and evidently delivered while 
he was suffering from a severe attack of stage fright. There was 
no doubt that he considered his position one of great responsi- 
bility, for he introduced the word "responsibility," into every 
phrase in his address, and there were many phrases. The mem- 
bers have not yet had time to display their various character- 
istics, but there are several gentlemen with heavy lower jaws, 
who have not yet spoken, that will doubtless be heard from be- 
fore the session is over. The San Francisco delegation is not 
occupying a very enviable position. The gentlemen from the 
interior have treated our representatives very cavalierly; hence 
there is much gnashing of teeth among the men from "the bay." 
As a body they are not distinguished looking. The monotony of 
mediocrity is relieved in one or two instances, however, by 
broa.l heads and high foreheads. 

* * * 
Julius Kahn has made his mark. On Tuesday morning he 
looked very solemn when he first swung in his revolving chair. 
The sombreness disappeared from his broad face, however, when 
a page placed a beautiful bouquet upon his desk. Partially hid- 
den among its blossoms was a card, which Kahn read, smiled a 
wide, generous smile, and then carefully placed the card in his 
inside breast pocket. Throughout the day thereafter everything 
seemed to tickle Kahn. He even saw something humorous in 
the presence af Jerry Lynch, and the reference to the "Well." 
He has been dubbed Julius the Jolly — and is therefore a man of 
note. A fact that is peculiarly noticeable, is that many of the 
new men seem to think that a certain air of dignity or an appear- 
ance of determination is given them by the wearing of black 
slouch hats. Never were there such slouch hats! A first term 
Senator wore one on Monday, with a brim only an inch and a 



half wide, but when he saw a similar covering upon the head of 
an Assemblyman the member of the Upper House immediately 
ordered built a hat that is a thing of wonder. Its brim is fully 
five inches wide, and its crown as high as that of a silker. One 
ceases to wonder why slouch hats are associated with California 
in the minds of Eastern people when he sees the hat shown at 
Sacramento. TheSergeants-at-Arms of both Houses are capable 
men, judging from the manner in which they have supplied each 
member with all the tools of their law-making trade. With an 
utter disregard, also, for ironical smiles or sarcastic remarks, a 
waste-paper basket has been placed at each desk in the two 
chambers. How many men will fall into them before the session 
is over? In the Assembly the only breeze so far is the draught 
that comes up from the "well," the saloon in the basement of the 
Capitol, every time that the gentleman from Humboldt arises to 
protest against the selling of bad liquor to the Legislators beneath 
the dome of the State House. Ostrom, in the Senate, made a fu- 
tile attempt to institute a reign of economy. Although he was 
patiently listened to, the Senate went on in the even tenor of its 
way, and appointed dozens of useless officials. The henchmen 
of the party must be satisfied, and places, therefore, must be 
made f r them. There are not nearly enough places to accom- 
modate the army of applicants, and the lives of the members are 
made miserable in consequence. Four Senators have secured 
positions as clerks in State offices for their sons, and several As- 
semblymen have their wive3 and daughters with them ready to 
install them in sinecures. Hence curses, both loud and deep, are 
hurled upon the heads of these nepotists. 

* * # 

Phil Crimmins had an opportunity during the week to fully 
comprehend the greatness of his fall. Two years ago when he 
was at Sacramento men greeted him effusively, hung upon his 
words, touched their hats when he passed, and sought the honor 
of an interview with the Third street boss. I stood near him out- 
side the Assembly chamber on Tuesday, just as the Assembly ad- 
journed, and watched as the members went out. Of all the crowd 
not one shook hands with him, only a few spoke to him, and 
most of those who in 1891 would have done anything to gain his 
favor passed him with a slight nod. Crimmins returned to town 
Tuesday afternoon, his occupation gone. Upon arriving here he 
ascertained the fate that had overcome his partner, Kelly. They 
are now known in political circles as Tom Thumb and Commo- 
dore Warren, the two smallest men on earth. 
- * • 

The withdrawal of Foote from the Senatorial conttst was not 
so much of a surprise to those " on the inside" as the correspond- 
ents would make out. Foote had no chance whatever to win, as 
at no time did he have more than six votes, while White had by 
far the majority of the caucus. By remaining in the fight, there- 
fore, Foote would only have prolonged the agony without gain- 
ing his ambition. With the withdrawal of the Alameda states- 
man, the dropping out of sight of Lynch was a foregone conclu- 
sion. The Egyptian traveler's strength consisted of one vote, 
and upon this single voice he hoped to overcome the strength of 
the Southern champion. Lynch was never considered seriously 
in the matter by people with political acumen, but the legisla- 
tors with a liking for duck, wines and cigars, preferred to keep 
him on a string, for he is a generous entertainer, and had no hes- 
itation in filling the bellies of the men who had votes. One 
result of bis single vote campaign may be, he hopes, his appoint- 
ment to represent this great and glorious country at some place 
in the Orient where he may smoke his hookah, sip bis sherbet 
and enjoy that luxurious ease for which he gained a taste by his 
famous travels in the land of the Pharaohs. As the contest for 
the Senatorship stands at this writing, White needs two votes to 
win, and these he must obtain outside*the Democratic ranks. He 
relies upon winning over Burke, the Non-Partisan of this city, 
and Carlson, the San Diego Independent. His friends also claim 
that they can draw down one or more of the Populists. As the 
latter have all signed an agreement to stand by Cator to the end, 
and upon being interviewed each has firmly announced his 
intention to hold to the compact, the probabilities of getting any 
of them for White is very problematical. White's friends seem 
confident, however. It was said early in the week that the Re- 
publicans would make certain overtures to Burke and Carlson, 
and also to the Populists, with a view of preventing them going 
to White. If this could be effected there would be no election, 
and the Governor would have the appointment. The Republi- 
cans, however, seem to have no plan of action, and it is not 
apparent that they have approached any of the men in whom 
rests the balance of power. Although it is said that the men 
who are standing out have been tempced by promises of political 
office under the new Federal Administration, it is conceded on all 
sides that money is not being used. In fact, the use of money 
for the aiding of any measure before the Legislature will be a 
particularly dangerous expedient, for it is said that the Citizens' 
Defense Association of this city have hired detectives, who are 
now at Sacramento closely watching the proceedings. 

* » # 

There is a nice little story connected with the rupture between 
the bookmakers Schwartz and Kingsley. A difference had 



Jan. 7, 1893. 



SAN I'KW I-m NEWS II I I II!. 



13 



sprung up between the two men at the tint Sen wart r. a 
Kinsley of jobbing htm in a race, anil the trouble soon broad- 
ened into an open clash. As last week closed in, they met in the 
Palace Hotel, among a group of horsemen, and the question of 
the race the next day, in which Iris and Misty Morn were 
entered, came up. Kinesley mad* the remark, " I'll bet 
to 1350 that Iris beats Misty," and Schwartz, seeing an oppor- 
tunity for revenge, promptly took bitu up. Klngsley thought, 
however, that he could fix matters by going round to Misty 
Morn's owner and giving him $100 to Bcratch ber, but when he 
made the trip be discovered that be bad been out-generaled. The 
wily Schwartz bad rushed around first and had spent $750, or 
rather promised that amount to the owner and jockey if the 
horse won, so of course they were determined to ran her. Kings- 
ley had no alternative, therefore, but to trust to luck, and Dame 
Fortune played him a sorry trick, for Misty Morn not only won, 
but Schwartz backed her heavily on Kingsley's book, thus mak- 
ing quite a haul from his quondam ally. The ill-feeling between 
the two men is broader than ever now, and Kingsley is watching 
for a chance to get even. 

* • • 

Shafter Howard, of Oakland, belongs to that class of the aris- 
tocracy that prides itself on blood and gentle breeding. He does 
not believe in the social recognition of any one who does not 
possess a family tree, and he smiles sweetly as he thinks of his 
noble lineage and of the blue blood that is flowing through his 
veins. He made a call the other night in the ultra-fashionable 
district of San Francisco, and as the elders of the family were out, 
he entertained the youngest daughter with a full account of how 
the Howards came over as deckhands with Columbus. Then, 
inch by inch, he traced his genealogy up to the grand effort by 
which nature had produced him, and he advised his wondering 
auditor to have nothing to do with people who did not know 
even their grandmother's maiden name. And then he talked of 
the hatchments, crests, mottoes, coats-of-arms, and the heraldic 
devices connected with his own family, a discourse which was 
strangely and painfully interrupted by his listener's saying, "Oh, 
yes, I have seen them on our tubs of butter in the kitchen. We 
always use yours, you know." Poor Shafter was crushed, for 
the artless remark had conveyed all the elements of truth — the 
business trade-mark of the Howards' famous butter ranch being 
a crest. 

* * * 

Bob Slavin, the famous minstrel, died recently at the Merchants' 
Hotel, Toledo, Ohio, being found dead in the morning. This sudden 
death of Bob Slavin is somewhat remarkably coincident with the 
similar fate of poor Charlie Reed, the two having been as nearly 
counterparts, both in the vein and the method of their humor, as two 
so orginal could be. The resemblance was so marked that each has 
been charged with being the "imitation" of the other. The truth 
probably is that their humor was so nearly on the same plane that 
each naturally and unconsciously appropriated something of the 
other's style and method until the resemblance became almost iden- 
tification. There is no superior to either in originality and a genuine 
and peculiar humor left to the minstrel stage or its modern comedy 

substitute. 

* # * 

The advent of Mra. Annie Besant in San Francisco, and her 
close connection with Colonel Olcott, the High Priest of the 
Theosophical 8ociety, brings to mind some interesting gossip of 
the latter's family, a member of which made this city his home 
for a number of years, and was quite a beau in our best society 
circles. Although it is over ten years ago since handsome Dick 
Olcott lived here, he is still remembered by the old crowd that 
used to flock to balls and parties in those days, and many were 
the shattered hearts he left among the gentler sex when he be- 
took himself to other fields and pastures new. When Dick first 
came to California his father had just made his first advance into 
theosophical circles, and was not as well known as he now is, 
with the exception that there was a terrible scandal at the time 
of his going away with Mme. Blavatsky. When she arrived the 
first time in America with her, at that time, new faith, Colonel 
Olcott was a brilliant member of the New York Bar, and one of 
the handsomest men in the metropolis. In a fatal moment he 
went to hear Mme. Blavatsky preach her doctrines, and from 
that moment he was lost to his old life. Wife, children and 
home were forgotten, and without warning to any, he went 
away to the jungles of India in the train of the Prophetess, to at 



laal bftcome the H I the order. After his father de- 

parted, Dick left bis motbtr to the wreol a y on agar brother, and 
ckme West t<> mak« bla fortune. Baocraa did not shine upon bin 
to any great extent, but he made bin way rapidly in the good 
graces of people here, and for a long time was one of society's 
shining lights, lie used to go with the Whitney boys, Horace 
Honey and thai crowd, and was one of the best liked men-about- 
town. When he left, it was first to go to Portland, and from 
there back to New York, where he has wince made an immense 
fortune through .South American investments. He married and 
la now traveling in Europe with his wife and the Princess 
Egalitife. 

The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
poimlar and artistic feature of the News LETTER, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Const. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 

ANTEDILUVIAN 

WHISKEY. 

VERY OLD, 
RICH 

AS 
CREAM 

AND 
' ' SMOOTH 
AS 
SATIN. 

THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 



FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
ellery of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St., 
Under Masonic Temple. 







S, 



27 to 37 Kearny St. 



Fall Overcoats Inverness House Coats 
Styles Ulsters Full Dress Neckwear 

1892 Officer Capes Suits Underwear 

THE YBBY LATEST. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893. 




THS Exploration Company of London is offering for sale on 
that market 40,000 shares of the old Alaska-Mexican Gold 
Mining Company, at £1 2s per share. This is one-half of the 
stock available for raising working capital, the remaining 120,000 
shares oat of the 200,000 shares of capital stock being held by the 
owners. This company is fortunate in having a California man- 
agement, the President being William Alvord, of the Bank of 
California. The other directors are Colonel J. D. Fry, and Messrs. 
E. W. Hopkins and Edgar Mills of this city. The mine is an ex- 
tension of the Alaska-Treadwell property which has paid divi- 
dends for some time past. It is developed by an adit tunnel and 
drifts, for about 3,000 feet at a depth of 150 feet. The ore is not 
high grade, running from a trace to a little over $5 per ton, but 
the ledge is said to be a larger one, averaging about thirty-five 
feet. As this is vouched for by Tom Mein, a miner whose word 
goes for something in this State and Nevada, where he has beeu 
tried and found worthy and reliable in every respect, it is reasona- 
ble to expect that there will be little difficulty experienced in rais- 
ing the necessary funds to erect the large milling plant which is 
necessary. This is more than could be said of the enterprise if it 
depended upon the opinion of Hamilton Smith who was ac- 
credited with being back of the company the last time it made its 
appearance in London. Mr. Smith may be a very competent au- 
thority in regard to hydraulic mines, for all we know to the con- 
trary, but after the Josephine affair his reputation as an expert 
on a quartz proposition can be questioned. 
$$$ 

THE ladies (God bless them) are again in full control of the des- 
tinies of the far-famed Callustro Ranch, of Sonoma county, 
and the seven Micawbers who are accredited with spending the 
past twelve months in patient expectation, have been sniffed out 
of office with the haughty disdain befitting their useless, if orna- 
mental, existence. No ornaments are evidently desired at the 
head of this gigantic enterprise, but still it was hardly gallant of 
a morning contemporary to allude to the new board as "grim 
middle-aged matrons, with strong executive faces." It is more 
than probable that a number of right arms wielding shelter-sticks 
or sunshades would have been the strong executive portions of 
the lady managers if the writer of such an uncomplimentary de- 
scription of their personal charms could be hauled into their 
presence for vengeance sake, which would undoubtedly happen 
had the sex the rights which they hope eventually to gain in the 
community. The ladies had, however, enough of men mixed up 
in their business affairs sometime ago, when the gay deceivers 
from Chicago stole into their little Eden, and blasted temporarily 
their hopes of fortune. In the future theCallustro signs will hang 
as high as ever, judging from the promises made in the flush of 
victory; soap and polish galore will flood the laud, and the 
busy housewife, when gazing on the shining pots and pans, will 
bless the reappearance of the petticoated apostles of the doctrine 
that cleanliness is next to godliness. 'Rah ! for Callustro and el- 
bow greasel May the shadows of its promoters never grow lessl 

8 $ $ 

THE prospect that gold mines will soon again be in demand has 
created a new interest in California properties. From all over 
the State news is beginning to come in of developments which 
are taking place in old and new districts, which have been more 
dead than alive for years past. The only one of our many local 
mining millionaires who has kept up his interest in California 
mines during the dull period, when everybody else hunted their 
holes out of sheer cowardice at the black aspect of affairs, is 
Alvinza Hayward, and it is safe to say that he has lost nothing 
by the operation. With him can be mentioned the names of 
Martin, Ballard, Nevills and the owners of the Kennedy mine of 
Amador, who have kept at work on a minor scale; but still they 
are entitled to credit for their grit. All the heavier producing 
mines of the State have, however, been run by Hayward, and 
when one is put on a paying basis another is taken up. His 
operations in Butte during the past two years have been ex- 
tensive, and the condition of the Shakespeare mine to-day 
speaks for itself. On top of a rich strike in the Utica mine, of 
Calaveras, owned by him, comes the news that he has taken up 
the old Hardenburgh claim, which has a record, although none 
of its former owners ever had the money to develop it. The day, 
however, ia apparently near at hand when a California mine 
will be worth picking up, and when the owners, poor in pocket, 
but rich in patience and endurance, will be amply rewarded for 
the trouble they have had in merely holding on to their claims. 
$$S 

THE Comstock market has been fairly active during the week 
and the see-saw in prices has enabled dealers with their wits 
about them to make many a happy turn. The middle stocks and 



the Northends bave been the moat active. Potosi ranging between 
$1.80 and $2 40 and Con.-Cal.-Virginia, between $1.62 and $2. The 
trouble is all over in the latter mine. It never amounted to 
much in the first place and a mole-bill was magnified into a 
mountain by the touts on the street who cater to outside specu- 
lators in the bear interest. Tbe fire is out now and the president 
and superintendent have during the past day or so been wander- 
ing unscathed through leads that some of the deep level miners 
on Pine street would make out were a fiery furnace. The fact 
that Messrs. Lyman and Fish bave been down on a tour of in- 
vestigation and returned unscathed must of itself contradict the 
fire theory, unless the gentlemen are salamanders of a type simi- 
lar to the three Hebrews, whom tbe Chaldeans tried in vain to 
roast. With the suppression of fire the resumption of ore extrac- 
tion is only a matter of time, and the mills have already started. 
The Potosi mine is in a healthy condition on and about tne 1100 
lead and the prospect for some lively work is anticipated by 
shareholders who have been lately backing up their belief in tbe 
future of tbe property, with solid gold coin. In the Belcher 
mine ore production has been going on for some time past, and 
the bullion output is a great relief to stockholders. A very 
promising property at the South end is the New York Con. and 
it can be truthfully said, that if some of the better known prop- 
erties on the lode could make the same showing of ore, thsy 
would be selling at pretty high figures. 

$ $? 

WHEN Judge Hebbard took upon himself to decide a number 
of technical points on mining and milling operations, of 
which he evidently knows nothing, tbe News Letter took excep- 
tion to his faulty judgment on the subject as an outrageous mis- 
statement of figures and facts, which was calculated to prejudice 
tbe position and standing of the defendants in the case, who un- 
fortunately for themselves happened to be rich men. At that 
time the honorable jurist was sheltered under the guns of a pow- 
erful daily contemporary, who believing in the conglomeration of 
figures, which stupidly enough are never supposed to lie, accepted 
the verdict as unassailable from any point of view. Judge Heb- 
bard was then held up as the greatest wonder of the period — an 
honest judge who had the temerity to beard the lions of capital 
in their very den. Alasl for the idols of the worldly wise, and of 
a newspaper in particular. The modern Samson pulls 
the temple self-created over his massive ears, and the worshipers 
before his shrine perish in the wreck. 

$ ? $ 

ON Tuesday last the ex-champion of the faithful dailies finds it 
expedient to clear itself of the flying mud which accompanies 
the crash of the deified Hebbard as he topples from his saintly 
pedestal. In a pungent editorial tirade against the municipal 
boodlers who have held the public by the throat during tbe past 
two years, the hands are thrown up in holy horror when the 
name of Hebbard is mixed up with the gang. His past credit- 
able position in the community is referred to, which has procured 
him such '* favorable notices from the press." In view of this, 
his erstwhile champions feel constrained to ask, how it is that 
such a good and pure being can be found acting with the solid 
eight conspirators, and backing them up to the best of his ability 
in their " jobs," by reversing the decision of another Judge, and 
holding court late at night " at unprecedented hours." This, it 
is pleaded in self-defense, requires an explanation, which will 
not likely be forthcoming, something like that asked for in the 
matter of the Hale & Norcross judgment. The public, however, 
will not likely ask for any explanation in regard to matters 
which, so far as they are concerned, are self-explanatory on their 
face. Every one understands very fully what the solid eigbt 
were trying to do, and when Judges hold court long after the sun 
is set, and respectable people are enjoying their beauty sleep, it 
does not require three moons in the sky for even such a dotard 
community as this to see a nigger on the fence. But, then, in an 
age of wonders, such as this is, an explanation of course is the 
proper caper, a matter of courtesy expected in all cases of the 
kind, even when a gentlemanly foot-pad is detected with hia 
hand in your pocket. By all means let us have an explanation. 
There will be none inquired for in the future, however, about the 
Hale & Norcross. It will probably come along in due time. 

SI* 

IT is to be hoped that the reported resignation of Colonel D. B. 
Jackson from the superintendency of the Holmes mine at Can- 
deleria is not founded on fact. His retirement would be a loss to 
the company which they will undoubtedly regret, owing to the 
high esteem in which he is held by every one connected with it. 
While it is possible that Colonel Jackson has business interests of 
his own which require attention, still there should be no reason 
for his retirement from a position which he has so ably filled for 
years past. The Holmes, although inactive at present, may start 
up any day on orders from London, and from his acquaintance 
with the mine and its management, there is no one better fitted 
to make it a paying concern than Jackson. If bis resignation as 
Superintendent has gone on to London, it will be a subject of 
congratulation if he can be prevailed upon to withdraw it. 



Jan. 7, 1893 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




'<£r^ 



"Hear the Crier!" " Wh»l the devil arttnouT' 
•• One tbat will pin t be lerll.slr. with von." 



w 



E sft before (be blazing grate, 

My friend and I together; 
Oo many things we speculate, 

But never on the weather. 

For we are old philosophers, 

Who aye detest repining, 
We're happy when the rain pours down, 

As when the sun is shining. 

The northern wind is keen outside, 
The coals are brighter glowing, 
My friend says, with a sensuous shrug, 
11 Methinks 'twill soon be snowing." 

And then we light another pipe, 

And gently fall to drinking, 
Not much, but just sufficiency 

To stimulate our thinking. 

The pause is broken by my friend, 
Who says, "This curious chalice 

You brought last year from Nuremburg, 
Recalls the face of Alice." 

The sweet belle of the boarding-house, 

The coquette's airs assuming, 
Her morning soul was bent on dress, 

Her evening soul on spooning. 

Fair Alice made a solemn vow 

The pretty, giddy sinner, 
No poor man e'er should have her hand, 

And naught but wealth should win her. 

I saw her lately in the Park, 

She feigned complete obliquity; 

She reminds me of that chalice now, 
Because of her antiquity. 

She would not have the honest clerk, ■ 
Her blue blood could not mingle 

With salesmen or with bookkeeper, 
So Alice still is single. 

Ere Aleck Badlam's hair was gray, 
And Henry Chauncey flourished, 

When South Park's pleasing, shady place 
The 8outh's best people nourished, 

Then marriages were more in vogue, 

And Cupid's self invested 
In male as well as female stock, 

And was disinterested. 

The marriage bells were oftener heard, 

But now, alas! the fashion, 
To wed alone for bank accounts, 
Has smolhercdbonest passion. 

OPIUM smuggling is beginning to be recognized in circles out- 
side of Uncle Sam's revenue service as one of the legitimate 
industries of the coast. There is nothing so appeals to the sym- 
pathies of humanity (except beating the doorkeeper of a circus) 
as smuggling. It is practiced by the high as well as the lowly, 
ar_d is not alone a source of personal profit, but also of mental 
gratifications. Ladies of the highest rank, the very cream of 
society, gird their delicate loins with immense rolls of French 
silk, and conceal diamonds in their armpits and other places 
where they are not likely to be detested. Out here opium is our 
Indian, and it is far more profitable than diamonds or silk. The 
enthusiastic contrabandist will make any sacrifice to successfully 
accomplish his project. In evidence of this an American gentle- 
man residing in Honolulu lost his twin brother recently. He was 
inconsolable. He was an opium smuggler and his brother was 
his partner, and a fellow with a long head, which teemed with 
ingenious devices. The body was shipped to this city for burial. 
The grief-stricken survivor accompanied the coffin, and had it at 
once removed upon the steamer's arrival here to the home of his 
uncle. The funeral took place some days afterwards, but the 
Honolulu mourner remained a couple of weeks in town, doing a 
large business in opium with the Chinese. He had had his brother's 
body embalmed in Hawaii, and then had cleverly stuffed the 
body with opium cans and sewed it up again. And furthermore, 
to show how strong the spirit of opium smuggling is, even in 
death he declared that the gruesome plan was his brother's inven- 
tion and his dying request. 



CHICAGO, notorious for outrages of every description, swindles 
the most Ingenious, and robberies the most barelaccd, has In 
some of ils publishers worthy types of the general characteristics 
of that town. They sell books by the cover. On the latter ap- 
pears an alluring picture, a lady reclining In a gentleman's arms, 
or two loving lips being embraced by two other loving lips, or a 
boudoir wherein an elegant girl in dishabille is receiving a youth 
with abundant locks and arrayed in the very highest style of 
Parisian fashion. Everything about the book suggests that its 
contents come under th.- head of that peculiar literature which is 
known to the fast world as " spicy." The person who was to be 
spiced eagerly buys the book and hastens home to devour it. 
But it does not take him many minutes to discover that be is 
awfully and consumedly sold. The reading matter Is flat and 
uninteresting; there is nothing whatever to carry out the prom- 
ise of spice insinuated by the pictures; the men and women in 
the book talk rot, but do nothing naughty, or if they do, no 
mention of it is made between those covers. Books baited with 
those alluring covers sell rapidly on trains, and the dupe comes 
and comes again, hoping tbat in some of the fakes his appetite 
for spice will be gratified. 

THE season is close at band, nay, almost arrived, when the 
San Francisco women may wear a sealskin with some appear- 
ance of an understanding of the fitness of things. Not that those 
fastidious creatures have shed them during the warm weather. 
By no means. It is not an uncommon thing for the stranger on 
the street (the native is too hardened to notice any eccentricity of 
the California female) to Bee a lady clad in furs gazing in the mil- 
liner's shop touching elbows with a lady arrayed in the lightest 
muslin. He naturally concludes that one has been born in Tim- 
buctoo and one in Alaska. Not at all, my New Zelander. The 
lady In muslin and the sealskin lady are both natives of the fash 
ionable quarters of this city of hills; and the solution of the 
climatic problem is, the lady in muslin has no sealskin, or is else 
a miracle, while the furred lady is a martyr, and is perspiring like 
a quarter-horse after an hour's exercise. There is nothing like 
this to be seen in any other city under the sun. And Ibe num- 
ber of ladies who will mortgage their claim to a place in Paradise 
for one of these expensive and by no means comfortable gar- 
ments is positively alarming. 

DOES it ever occur to the ordinary citizen what a fine lot of 
city property the thrifty constructor of big bouses gets for 
nothing? He burrows under the sidewalk far into the street. His 
own lines are merely trifles compared with the area of his excava- 
tions. And furthermore, he positively thinks he owns those cellars. 
He does not. Every inch beyond the actual lines, belongs to the 
city. In other towns the corporation charges rent for such occu- 
pancy, but here we are too liberal and rich to care about such a pal- 
try matter. To make a test case of this let some tax-payer wander 
into any one of those great cellars where lager flows at a nickel a 
flow. When he is so filled up that his presence becomes obnoxious 
to the less intoxicated guests, and the question of his speedy ejection 
passes the house by a unanimous vote, let him contend that he is on 
public property, and has just as good a right to abide beneath the 
sidewalk as upon it. Of course the consequence will be a knock 
down and drag out, but then he will have the proud consciousness 
of knowing that he is a martyr to the vindication of his civil rights , 
an that our benign laws will certainly not protect him. 

MR8. ANNIE BESANT and Mr. Russell should certainly make 
a combination. Mrs. Besant is as mysteriously incongruous 
and incomprehensible in her line as Mr. Russell in his. But who 
shall growl? The world owes both of them a living, and they 
have a perfect right to make it as long as they do not transgress 
the laws of the State of California. Blessed, aye, thrice blessed is 
the man or woman who gets in early as the apostle of a fad. For 
the world must have fads. It must be amused, and it must also 
be mystified. A smell of the supernatural always brings coin. 
The suspicion of a ghost is always worth money. Aye, and the 
individual who could produce a genuine ghost of any age, sex or 
previous condition of servitude, would never live long enough to 
count the millions that would accrue. Russell has found an easy 
and luxurious way to solve the bread and butter problem. Mrs. 
Besant has also brought the beefsteak business down to a fine 
point. They should combine, and take turn about at the public 
purse. 

THERE was quite a lively time in the Union Club recently in 
connection with the return of Fred Webster. The boys had de- 
termined to give him a rousing reception, and a swell programme 
was got up, including music by Brandt's orchestra. The selec- 
tions to be played were picked out by Bob Grayson, and when 
the members assembled on the evening of the festivities, they 
were surprised to find on the programme Chopin's march, "Fune- 
bre." " Say, Bob, a dead march is not appropriate to an affair of 
this kind," said one of the members to Grayson. Another echoed 
the idea, and finally the matter was taken up generally, a row 
almost ensuing over the settlement of the question. Bob won 
the day, however, and the solemn notes of the dirge resounded 
as the guest of the evening took his seat and the corks began to 
fly. Grayson's explanation of selecting the piece is that he did 
so because, in his opinion, the mnsic is as grand as anything ever 
written. 



16 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893. 






^SSj^^^S 



FOR a time at any rate there will be peace in the matter of street 
extension steals. The malodorous board has departed with- 
out regret, and though it fought valiantly to make a thorough 
clean-up did not succeed in putting through the whole programme 
of its outrageous jobs. Charles Taberand his colleagues have passed 
forever out of power, and there is consolation in the fact that no 
worse gang can ever preside over the city's affairs. The prompt 
action of the Mayor at the eleventh hour saved the city from the in- 
flictionof two jobs, and had he been more emphatic before perhaps 
some of the shameless steals would not have gone through as easily 
as they did. The property owner is intensely interested in almost 
every movement of the Board of Supervisors, whether it be in con- 
nection with street work, lighting, police, or fire protection, and to 
hi m the need of that almost unknown quantity "honesty" is proba- 
bly most apparent. There is a new board in power, however, and 
with the change there is hope for a more honest management of the 
city's affairs. 

In real estate the outlook is quite encouraging. Truth to tell, there 
is no very great activity yet, but many good sales have already been 
ro ade and more are on the verge of being closed up within the next 
f ew days. A purchase of some interest was made last week by the 
L uning estate in the northwest corner of Turk and Larkin streets, a 
full fifty-vara lot. The price paid was $75,000 and was low, in fact, 
considerably below the original asking price. Another sale of per- 
haps greater interest was that of a large lot to be used for the pur- 
p oses of a steel plant, to be moved from Folsom and Main streets to 
a site 183.4x137.6 on the southwest corner of Montgomery and Chest- 
nut streets. The property sold for $35,000 and will be improved dur- 
ing the spring. Among other sales recently made is that of the 
southwest corner of Octavia street and Ivy avenue for $12,000, 
measuring 35x80. 

The Legislature is in session, and among those who will be in the 
lobbies are the secretaries of both "national" and "local" building 
associations. At the last legislative session the latter, backed by the 
State League, succeeded in having strongly restrictive measures 
passed, so far as the business of the former is concerned, and it looks 
now as though the locals proposed to try and wipe the nationals out 
altogether. As a simple business proposition there can be no ques- 
tion as to which class of associations is the safest and the most 
profitable to the investor. The "national" is a money-making asso- 
ciation for its officers and the subscribers to the shares support the 
officers. The "local," on the other hand, is in every sense of the 
word a mutual and cooperative institution, in which every member 
is working for himself and. every other member. The expense funds 
in these "local" organizations are less than half of 1 per cent, of the 
money paid in. With the nationals the expenses are as high as 20 
per cent, of the receipts, and it is a libel on the name to call them 
"mutual" building and loan associations. The proposed amend- 
ments to the existing laws, whatever other motives, if any, may be 
behind them, are certainly in the interests of the public at large, who 
are so readily induced by plausible argument to invest in associations 
which hold out promises of large returns. 

In the auction field three firms are preparing catalogues. Easton, 
Eldridge & Co. will hold one this month and another firm will also 
be ready before the 1st proximo, while Baldwin & Hammond e xpec t 
to have a splendid subdivision sale early in February. - i 

Building is very quiet at present in the city , though there is promise 
of an active spring season. (ftSjpSSPSS! 

A large four-story and basement boarding-house is now build- 
ing on Bush, near Powell, for Mrs. Eyer, from the plans of 
W. H. Lillie. The first story ^s to be of pressed Roman brick 
and the rest in wood. The design will be old Colonial. 

One of the charms of life in California is that we can here enjoy 
the perfume of beautiful flowers in the deepest winter. Nature has 
been so kind to California that we have blossoms the year round. 
For that reason, a particularly charming gift to a fair friend in the 
winter months is a bouquet of roses or some other flowers. That 
San Francisco ladies love flowers is shown by the large business en- 
joyed by Leopold, the Post-street dealer, who is the favorite among 
the members of society. 



Colonel Litchfield, of 12 Post street, has the reputation of being 
one of the best tailors in San Francisco, and his establishment is a 
favorite among men who dress well. He makes a specialty of uni- 
forms and regalias, and is patronized by all the State's and nation's 
defenders stationed in this vicinity. 

REMOVAL NOTICE. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
KENTUCK CONSOLIDATED MINING COM- 
PANY, held this day, the office of the Company 
-was ordered removed to Room 23, Nevada 
Block, No. S09 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, December 21, 1892. 



Steele's Grindelia Lotion is the best remedy known for the allevia- 
tion of the distress caused bv asthma and for the cure of poison oak. 
It may be purchased at the Palace Pharmacy, 635 Market street. Its 
curative powers are exactly as they are represented, for which rea- 
son it is generally used. j 

~ ANNUAL MEETING- 

Brunswick Consolidated Gold Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Brunswick Con. 
Gold Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 
Room 56, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Thursday, the Twelfth Day ot January. 1 893, at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors, to serve for the ensuing 
year and for the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Trausfer books will close on Tuesday, January 10, 1893, at 3 o'clock 
p. m. J. STADTFE1D, Jr., Secretary. 

Office— Room 56, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Bullion Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Bullion Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the company, room 20, 331 Pine 
street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Thursday, the 12th Day of January. 1893, at the hour of 2 o'clock P. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before, the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on SATURDAY, January 7, 1893, 
at 12 o'clock m. , „ 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 20, 331 Fine street. San Francisco, Cal. _ 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Pajaro Valley Railroad Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Pajaro Valley Rail 
road Company will be held at the office of the Company, 327 Market St., 
San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 16th Day of January, 1893, at the hour of 11 o'clock A. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Wednesday, January 4, 1893, at — 
o'clock f. M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

Office— No. 327 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada Sil- 
ver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 15 Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Wednesday, the 18th day of January, 1893, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuingyear- 
and the transaction of such other business as may come before the meet 
ing. Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 14, 1893, at the hour 
of 12 o'clock m. E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 

Office— 15 Nevada Block, 309 Mon tgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Utah Consoli- 
dated Mining Company will be held of the office of the company, room 58, 
Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal.,ou 

Wednesday, the 25th clay of January. 1893, at the hour of 1:30 P. M. 
for the purpose of electing aboard of directors to serve for ihe ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 21, at 12 o'clock 
M. A. H. FISH, Secretary. 

Office— Room 58, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending December 31. 1892, a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits 

and four and one-fourth (4%) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free 

of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday, January 3, 1893. 

J. A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 
Office— No. 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and L.o n Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of Four and one-quarter (4%) 
percent, per annum on all deposits for the six months euding December 
31, 1892, free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 3, 1893. 

San Francisco, Jan. 3, 1893. R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



wmm> 



Corner Clay and Sansome. 



Our House Renting Department ia one of 
the best equipped in the city. We guarantee 

Erornpt and efficient service in renting 
ouses, collecting rents and placing insur- 
ance. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND, 

10 MOHTGOMEBY St. 



RENTS! 



Jan. 7. 1898. 



BAN FB \\i Is M W 3 LETT] R 



17 




(M p^p fffj 



Til B various amendment? to tlie laws of the P. 1. U., which were 
originally to have become effective on December 1st and were 
held over until New Year's day, tire now in effect. It is too soon to 
say how honorably the members <>f the compact will adhere to the 
rules laid down, bat it can be safely asserted that while some of the 
amendments do cive general satisfaction, others are not so cheerfully 
accepted. Many of the local tympanies were prepared to make the 
change among their agents from salary to commission, and the 
chances are that while it may make the agents in some localities 
work a little harder, the result, so far as their pockets are concerned, 
will be as broad as it is long. 

Those who are not over-pleased, but nevertheless propose to 
give the amendments a fair trial, are the city agents. By the 
new law 22J per cent, commission is allowed, whereas heretofore 
25 per cent, to 35 per cent, has been paid, with often a contingent 
of 10 per cent, added. These rates enabled the city agents to pay 
liberal salaries and have a fair amount left for business and profit. 
Now the city agents have been obliged to notify all their agents 
that the old arrangement is off, and 15 per cent, will be possible, 
though the P. I. O. allows 20 per cent, to be paid. The idea of 
all this is, of coarse, to reach the rebate evil, and the act is made 
in the belief that if the city agent has less to pay the broker, the 
latter .will have less to make a rebate on to the assured. The city 
agents, however, all say they will stick to the law to the very 
letter and give it a fair trial; then, if it won't work, one of two 
things mast happen — the law must be revised, or the city agents 
must go oat of business. 

The Western Assurance has bought a majority of the stock of 
the British America, and the general agency of the two Toronto 
companies has been placed with Alfred Jones, Maxwell and 
Berry retaining the city agency. 

Jack Hoffman, a well-known Stocktonian insurance man and 
member of the firm of Hoffman & Sperry, spent the holidays in 
this city and returned home a day or two ago. 

J. 0. Cadman, formerly secretary of the Home Benefit Life, 
has gone into general insurance with Maxwell & Berry, and 
ought to make a hit in the casualty line. 

George W. Turner left on Thursday for Los Angeles to revise 
the agency in that city so as to accord with the new P. I. TJ. rnles. 

Harry Boyd, Rudolph Harold's superintendent of agencies, is 
making a tour of the northwest. 

Smedberg & Mitchell have resigned the city agency of the 
Orient, of Hartford, and the Providence, Washington, Providence 
of Rhode Island. Alfred Stillman is the general agent of both 
companies, 

While it is still a little early to present accurate figures, it is 
pretty safe to say that the loss ratio of 1892 in marine business 
will be a trifle in excess of the average. All the local companies 
are busy making up their annual statements. Thus far there 
have been no losses during the year except on the Tiburon. 

The Dunbarton Ruck, bound from Calcutta to this city, with a 
cargo of bags, has had to put back owing to a serious fire, and 
the voyage will probably be abandoned altogether. 

The adjusters are now at work on the ferry steamer Tiburon, 
which was burned at the dock on Sunday last. The loss will be 
less than was at first supposed, as the fire was confined to the light 
upper wood-work, and though the blaze looked very serious it 
probably caused not more than $20,000 damages. 



ANOTHER attempt was made last week to overthrow a French 
Government, but the hidden motive was too apparent, and 
the scheme failed. The real object seems to be to give a death 
blow to the Republic, but though the later is shaking in its foun- 
dations, it may weather the storm, as is to be hoped, in the in- 
terest of free government in general. It cannot be denied that 
French politicians have sadly misused the privileges which they 
enjoy under a democratic form of rule, but it would be sad, in- 
deed, if this form itself should be defeated in consequence of their 
actions. The corruption under the Empire was as great, or even 
greater, than that of recent administrations in France, only Na- 
poleon III., as long as he was in power, knew bow to prevent 
unpleasant revelations. One thing is certain, the French Consti- 
tution needs amendments in many important details, especially 
as regards the power of the Ministry to influence elections with 
the famous "secret service fund," but if the French people were 
to listen to the blandishments of the Royalists during the present 
crisis they would make a serious mistake. A return to monarchy 
now, that the French have been partly educated in the lessons of 
self-government, would be a serious offense against the spirit of 
progress. What the French need, above all, is the development 
of the faculty of self-restraint. Most of their recent as well as 
their previous political blunders are due to their sanguine tem- 
perament, which prevents them from, calm actions in critical 
momenta. 



FrarjK J. Symmes, 

President. 



l/ar?derlyr;r; Stovu, 

Treasurer. 



j^os.D^ro^o. 



Cja5 ar?d 

Eleetrie 

fixtures 

/T\etal U/orK- 

(jas Stouts and 

^ndirons. 

ta/T\ps and 

pin? Sets. 
Supplies for 
(Jas and 
^leetrie 
lj$btin$. 

Oppi^E and 

5/HE5noo/i\, 

222 SUJJr^ 5TRE E T- 



/Iboue ^arijy. 
5ffl FW?I5<?° 



<?/H!FOFW 



18 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



Jan. 7, 1893 . 




«-.© 

j #0 



THE Queen Regent of Spain does not take delight in the national 
bull-light, but recently she broke her long fast of this sanguin- 
ary amusement by being present at a bull-fight; this was out of 
courtesy to the King and Queen of Portugal, her guests. Both 
ladies were in the national costume of mantilla, high combs, etc., 
and the King of Portugal was in evening dress, wearing a splendid 
diamond pin of great value. This he took out of hia shirt aDd 
flung to Mazzantini, the celebrated torero, who dispatched a bull 
with a dashing coup oV epee. The dramatic episode on the part of 
the King and the torero was vociferously applaused. 

Jeweled pins and brooches of all sorts in rayed work are not, 
as heretofore, exclusively of diamonds. There is a large increase 
in the use of colored stones. These are combined in the moat 
interesting manner. In one such brooch the center was an opal. 
Diamonds composed the second row of stones, and sapphires the 
third. These were all separated slightly by the gold mounting, 
says Elsie Bee, in the Jewelers' Circular. 

Vogue is the name of a bright weekly that has just made its ap- 
pearance in New York city. As its name implies, it will be devoted 
to the fashions and to society gossip. Mrs. Josephine Redding 
is the editor, Harry McVicker, art director, and Artbur B. Tar- 
nure, publisher. The first number ia well-printed, has many 
handaome illustrations, and is filled with bright and interesting 
matter. 



Modern Delft is one of the moat attractive warea now shown, 
since it is used in such a variety of interesting articles. An ink 
set simulates a steamabip with amall boats hanging from the 
davits. Articles of furniture, animals, hunting horns and musical 
instruments are among its caprices. 



The newest bases of lamps are of pale-hued greens, red amber 
and yellow glasa with floral incruatations of enamel. The brass 
bodies for oil are fitted at the top. The lamp shade carries out 
the color. There ia nothing more gorgeous than these superb 
things, says the Jewelers' Circular. 



Bonbon dishes and spoons are now regarded as a necessity. 
The custom of eating confectionery after dinner has assisted the 
demand for these dishes, which are in every conceivable style, 
the newest being of pierced work and silver gilt. 

A good deal more ingenuity might be expended now on clasps 
and buckles, large and small. These ornaments are used on 
everything. The more artistic they are, the more they will be 
valued and the greater will be the demand. 

New candle shades are in the form of yachts made of crepe 
paper. Sometimes they are all of one color, yellow or heliotrope, 
and again the hulls are pale gieen, with sails of pink. Lighted, 
the effect is extremely good. 

There is no telling of the numerous and fanciful fruit knives, 
forks and spoons in silver gilt with Dresden china handles. 
Almost all have a curious bend in the handle, which aeems to be 
the last struggle for novelty. 



In corkscrews, a pair of miniature riding boots reversed is 
quite unique, and manicure knives and files are shown in a dozen 
designs, with sterling silver handles and equipments of the finest 
steel. 

The latest fashions in pocket-books are black seal; cigar cases 
of lizard skin; card cases of salmon-colored seal; memorandum 
books of lizard or alligator skin. All are tipped with silver. 



One of the finest pieces of bric-a-brac is a caraval of silver cov- 
ered with pictures in enamel. These are from antique subjects, 
and each sail is a different picture. 

There ia bewilderment of choice in the vaaea and their pedestals 
intended for the spreading palm, and the lofty India-rubber 
plant. 

The latest fashion in hair-dressing allows for an ornament 
being placed vertically, cutting it directly in two. 

Bohemian glass is now made like an Alexandrite, which is 
green by day and red by night. 

Nothing can exceed the delicious flavor of the John F. Cuttaor 
whisky. It ia recognized by connoisseurs as the best in the market. 
It is used at all the leading clubs, bars, hotels and other placet, 
where men of fine tastes mostly congregate. No whisky can bea.4 
the John F. Cutter. 



GRAND 

MIDWINTER CLEARANCE SALE. 
In 

EVERY DEPARTMENT. 

Silks, Fancy Dress Goods, 
Jackets, Cloaks, Gloves, Laces, Fans, 
Parasols, Neckwear, Hosiery, Initial Handker- 
chiefs, Purses, Boston Bags, 
Children's Coats, etc. 

Hosiery, Underwear, House Furnishing 
Goods, Etc,, 



TREMENDOUS CUTS IN PRICES, 

Mail orders promptly executed. 

Goods delivered free in Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, San 
Rafael, Tiburon, Sausalito, San Quentin, Mill Valley, Ross 
Station and Blithedale. 




Murphy Building. 



MARKET, JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 




Thousands of delighted ladies 
have vibited my parlors. Can I 



LOLA 



not see you this week? You can MONTEZ 



learn many of the secrets of pre- 
serving and beautifying the 
complexion. 

MRS. NETTIE HARRISON, 

26 GEARY STREET, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CREME 
The Skin Food 

AND 

Tissue Builder 
75 CENTS. 



THE SCIENCE 

OF 

THE SKIN. 



324 SUTTER ST., 

The Most Skilled Dermatologist in 
San Francisco. 

The skin rendered soft, velvety and 
elastic with the aid of Dermoline. 
The form developed by a New Method. 

Freckles and facial blemishes re- 
moved and superfluous haireradicated 
by a new process. 

Hull- Iiivigorator, guaranteed to 
cure BALDNESS. 



CALIFORNIA WIRE WORKS, 

9 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

E of all Kinds, WIRE NAILS, Best Steel, 

BARBED WIRE, Regularly Licensed. 
WIRE ROPES AND CABLES. 
WIRE CLOTH AND NETTING. 

HALLADIE'S ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY for transporting 
ore and other material over mountains and difficult roads. 

Send for limit rated Catalogue. 

BRANCHES.— 22 Front street, Portland, Or.; 201 N. Los Angeles street, 
Los Angeles, California. 



Jin. 7, 1393. 



SAX l'i;\M isco NEWS LETT] R. 



19 



V- RoSgjjA 




THE NEW YEAR MINUET— Flatel Scott Mines in (he January 
Ladies' Home Journal. 



IT was danced in the hall by the fire's red glow, 
For the palm bid the lan.ps at the side, 
And each form was outlined in the floor below, 

While the shadows were spread far and wide. 
Bat the shadows were misty — a softened gray — 

In accord with the slow melody. 
The light of the fire drove the dark lines away, 
While it lent all a sweet mystery. 

Both dancers were courtly and figures of grace, 

Yet the maid held my fancy alone; 
The glow gave a blush to her beautiful face; 

In ber dark eyes a fairer light shone. 
And then as she curtsied, so stately, so slow, 

With the grace of an age that is passed, 
It seemed like a dream of the long, long ago — 

Like a dream that I knew could not last. 

So stately, so slow, was each step that she made, 

And so graceful the head that she bent; 
The old-fashioned fan, that at times cast a shade 

Such an air of true elegance lent. 
The place of the dance gave a place to my thought, 

And I dreamed of the days that are dead; 
The spell of the dance was by sorcery wrought 

And the hurrying modern days fled. 

It was peace — the sweet rest of the olden day, 

When all idols were not overthrown; 
When romance still lived, and as king, Love held sway, 

Before Mammon to ruler bad grown. 
And all those who watched were bewitched by the dance. 

And they dreamed till the measure was o'er, 
To-day was forgot in the short backward glance 

And the charms of the day gone before. 



THE STREAM OF LIFE.— From The Academy. 



Like a small streamlet on a mountain side, 

A white thread glancing in the summer sun, 

Lightly down leaping with a joyous spring, 

So passes happy childhood's playful hour, 

Next, through green dells and 'neath o'ershadowing crags, 

Tbe growing stream with heedless flow winds on, 

Now gladly lingering round some glowing isle 

That smiles with heavenly beauty, and allures 

With promise of perpetual delights; 

Now fiercely dashing down some rough cascade 

Where rushing waters split on hostile rocks, 

Spouting aloft the iridescent spray 

Drifted in sunless clefts by swaying winds; 

So pass the years of youth. Our riper age 

Is like the broadened river's stately march, 

Whose current slackens, yet admits no pause, 

But passes field and coppice, tower and town, 

Not wholly 'scaping from defiling stains, 

Yet toiling onward restlessly. Adown 

Its smooth yet ever-sliding stream we haste, 

Nor mark the progress of its quiet speed, 

Till, faster, rushing as it nears the end, 

It sweeps us onward in resistless course 

Through the torn rapids of disease and pain, 

Till, plunging down the cataract of death, 

We glide into a vast and unknown space, 

The boundless ocean of eternity. 

"LA MORT-UNE RESTITUTION. "-(F. Hugo), 



"THE WHITE HOUSE." 

In keeping with our 
Usual custom at this season 
Of the year, 
We will for the month of 

JANUARY 

Have our annual 

ft 

CLEARANCE SALE. 

Great bargains and sweeping 
Reductions in all Departments. 

RAPHAEL WEILL & CO., 

N. W. Cop. Post and Kearny Sts. 



Now you are dead, the little rift that lay 
Between your life and mine grows dim and gray 
In the soft distance, as I look across 
The past to one foil hour of love and loss, 
The hash of happiness and dear delay. 

The tide that flowed beneath ns till that day 
Granted one perfect pause before the sway 
Of the sad ebb on which alone I toss, 
Now you are dead. 

They for whose sake you, thirsting, put away 
The cup our lipa had touched, lose you to-day j 
Their part in you now lies beneath the moss. 
But mine the golden soul they held as dross I 
Mine I by a right that Life shall not gainsay 
Now you are dead 1 



/ETNA 



Situated in Napa County, Cal. 

Eeached by a delightful stage ride over the moun 
tains. Sixteen Miles from St. Helena. Good Ac 
commodations. Ample Bathing Facilities. 

A FEATtJBE OF THE PLACE, 

A Large Swimming Tank of Hot Mineral Water 

The waters of the iEtna Mineral Springs have 
long been celebrated for their wonderful cures in 
cases of Acute and Chronic Dyspepsia, Rheuma- 
tism, Inflammation of the Bladder, and Liver and 
Kidney Complaints. 

The temperature of the water is 98 degrees, and 
is highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas, making 
it pleasant to the taste, and giving to the bath a 
most delightful sensation. 

High Altitude ! No Fogs 1 No Mosquitoes 

Water from the Springs bottled by the 

AETNA MINERAL WATER CO., 

Telephone 536. office, 108 Drain Street, 8. 

THE COLEMAN. 

STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS HOTEL, European Plan.) 



L 



H. H. PEARSON, Proprietor. 



BROADWAYL'and 27th St., NEW YORK 



Horse cars of Broadway, University Place, West Shore R. R., Grand and 
Houston Bt Ferries pass the door. Sixth Avenue Elevated Railroad 
tation and horse cars : also, Fifth avenue stageB within one block. 



B. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIRVIM. 



J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, 

Hose, Packing, etc., 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc, 

Pacific Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather & Ladew, 
ormerly J. B. Hoy 1 4 eo. 6 California St., 8. V„ Cal. 



20 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Jan. 7, 1893. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Consolidated. California and Virginia 
Mining Co. 

Location of principal place of business — San 
Francisco, California. Location of works— Vir- 
ginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 13th day of Dec* 

1892, an assessment (No. 3) of Fifty (10) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company. No. 58 Nevada block, No. 30i fllont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 21st Day of January. 1893, will be delin- 
quent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
FRIDAY, the Tenth day of February 

1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with the costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. H WENS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 58, Nevada block, No. 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Con. Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San 
Francisco, California. Location of works — 
Story County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 13th day of Dec. 
1892. an assessment, (No. 16), of Ten Cents 
(10c. ) per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, No. 58 Nevada block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The Nineteenth Day of January, 1893, will be de- 
linquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made oefore, will be sold on 
THURSDAY, the 9th day of February, 1893. to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
costB of advertising and expenses of sale. By or- 
der of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. FISH, Secretary, 

Office— Room 58, Nevada block, 309 Montgom- 
ery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining 
Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San 
Francisco, California. Location of works — Gold 
Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held or* the 20th day of Decem- 
ber, 1892, an assessment (No. 59), of twenty-five (25) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable immediately in United 
States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, Room 35, third floor, Mills Build- 
ing, corner Bush and Montgomery streets, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upou which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 24th Day of January, 1893, will be delinquent 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and un- 
le*B pavment is made before, will be sold on 
TUESDAY, the 14th day of February, a. d. 1893, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
the costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLAND3, Secretary. 

Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills Building, 
corner Bush and Montgomery streets, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Alpha Consolidated Mill and Mining 
Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San 
Francisco, Cal. Location of works— Gold Hill, 
Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors of this company, held on the 
20th day of December, 1892, an assessment (No. 
10) of Ten Cents per share waslevied upon the 
capital stock of the corporation payable immedi- 
ately in United States Gold coin, to the Secretary, 
at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada 
block, 309 Montgomery street. Sau Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 24th day of January, 1893, will be delinquent 

and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction; aud unless payment is made before, 
will be sold on TUESDAY, the 14th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 



THE CUIRASS. 

IT is evident that the days of thecuirass 
are numbered, for, though it at one 
time afforded considerable protection to 
its wearer, since the introduction of 
rifles of greater penetration than those 
formerly in use it has become a useless, 
not to say dangerous article to wear. 
Italy has now no cuirassier regiments at 
all, Russia has only four, and Austria has 
bad none since 1860; but on the other 
hand France, though she did away with 
six of her twelve regiments of cuirassiers 
in 1881, has lately revived its use. In 
spite, however, of this revival on the part 
of France, the general use of the cuirass 
is rapidlv declining. Some years ago, in 
May, 1888, the German Emperor pro- 
nounced the cuirass as fit for parade 
only; and since then there has been a 
growing objection to it among military 
men ot experience, though some writers 
of note have recently expressed them- 
selves in favor of retaining it in the 
army. With the object of demonstrating 
how little protection it would afford in 
these days of improved rifles, a number 
of experiments were recently made at the 
non-commissioned officers' school at Bi- 
bericb, in Germany. Four kinds of rifles 
were experimented with, namely, the 
needle gun, the Mauser of 1871, the new 
model Mauser rifle of 1871 to 1884, and 
the existing rifle— the model of 1888. The 
cuirass, when tired at by the needle gun, 
resisted perfectly, the ball making a 
scarcely visible mark. With the Mauser 
rifle of 1871 and that of 1871-84, the results 
were very much the same, with the ex- 
ception that trie impression of the mark 
where the shot struck the cuirass was 
slightly deeper. But when the rifle in 
use at the present time was fired, the 
projectile of hardened lead covered with 
steel not only went right through the 
cuirass but carried away a portion of its 
substance about the size of a shilling, 
thus proving the contention of those 
who are against its use, that it would be 
most dangerous to its wearer, for the ill 
effects to be apprehended from a wound 
caused by a rifle bullet would be consid- 
erably augmented were a roagh and 
jagged piece of metal from the cuirass to 
penetrate the flesh at all. 



WIRE glass is made in Tacony, near 
Philadelphia, in the following man- 
ner; the melted glass is run out on a 
rolling-table provided with little ledges to 
regulate the thickness and width of the 
sheet. A carriage with three rollers 
moves over this taole, the first roller 
smoothing out the hot glass. The second 
roller presses a strip of red-hot wire 
gauze into the mass below and leaves it 
imbedded in the form of little corruga- 
gations, which are pressed out by the 
third roller. The system of corrugating 
the wire-mesh is found to answer far bet- 
ter than if laid flat, for it insures the 
gauze being thoroughly protected from 
the air. The wire glass is then annealed 
for forty hours like an ordinary sheet, 
when it is ready for use. The advan- 
tage of having a transparent plate which 
will not fly to pieces when hit sharply 
has already led to the adoption of this 
material for some of the Government 
naval vessels now building, and in a 
number of large manufacturing establish- 
ments which have been troubled with 
windows broken by stones thrown from 
the street. 




A FEW men have been seen at the 
theatres this season in New York 
wearing small opera glasses attached to a 
cord, which encircled their necks like an 
eyeglass cord. 



LONG DISTANCE 

TELEPHONE. 

LATEST DB2CTSIsrSI035r. 
Salinas, Chualar, Gonzales, 
Soledad, Marysville, Chico, Oro- 
ville, Viua, Coluas, giving un- 
broken commumeation be- 
tween these towns aud San 
Francisco. The Hues are con- 
structed of specially prepared 
extra heavy copper wires, are 
equiped with tue latest appli- 
ances kuowu to the scieuee of 
and are " Loug Distance" Lines 

in every sense of the word. The Mail is quick, 

the Telegraph i> quicker, but the 

J.WSG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 

Is instantaneous, aud you don't have to wait for 
an auswer. 

OCCIDENTAL. HOTEL 

San Francisco. 

A Quiet Home, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED. 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND 

ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL AMERICAN CATERER; 
1206 Sutter Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Cunningham, Curtiss I Welch, 
WHOLESALE 

STATIONERS 

AND BOOKSELLERS. 

327.329. 331 SANSOME STREET. 

J, 0. SPRECKLES & BROS, COMPANY, 



SHIPPING and Commission Merchants; gen- 
eral agents "Oceanic Steamship Company, 
Gilliugham Cement. 

327 Market street, cor. Fremont. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment ..No. 70 

Amouut per Share 25 cents 

Levied.. . Nov. 22, 1892 

Delinquent in Office Dec. 28 1892 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Jan. 20, 1893 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— No. 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery- 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1892, a 
dividend has been declared at therate of five and 
one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent per annum on Term 
Deposits, aud four aud one quarter (4!4) pe r cent 
per annum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and 
after Tuesday, January 3, 1892. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1892, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of five 
and oue-teuth (5 1-10) per cent per annum on 
Term Deposits and four au^ one-fourth (4%) per 
cent per auuum ou Ordinary Deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on aud after Tuesday, Januarys, 
1893. LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Office— No. 532 California street, corner Webb; 
Branch— 1700 Market street, corner Polk. 



J in. 



i i 13 



BAN kkwvim NEWS U in R. 



Mr* FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

■THE DON*HUE BRO»D-G»UGE ROUTE/' 
COMMKN' 'i.v. SUNDAY, -M, and 

QDtll funncr notice. Boat.- *n 1 Trains will 
leare from and arrive at the >a:i Kraurlsco Pas- 
•cu*cr Depot, SJAKKETM KKK1 WUABF, at 
follow*: 
From S«n Francisco for Polnf Tlburon, Belvedere end 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DATB— 7.-*) a.m., 9:20 a. v.. 1140 A. *.; 

8:S0r. B.,506 P. i.,t^0r. «. 
BATCRDAY.S ONLY— Ad eitra trip at 1:50 p. M. 
Sl'.SI>AY;<-v00 A.M.,9:SU A.*.. 11 :tO A.M. ; 1:30 P.M. 
S:30 p. »., 5.0Dt>. M„ 6:20 p. X. 

From San Rafael lor San Francisco. 
WEEK PAYS— 6:25 a. m.. 7:55 A. *., 9:30 A. X. 

12:45 P.M., 3:40p.M., 5:05 P.M. 
8ATIKKAYS ONLY - — An extra trip at 6:30 P.M. 
SI'S HAYS— 6:10 a.m., 9:40 a.m., 11:10 A.M.: 1:40 P.M. 
3:40 p. M., 5:00 r M., 6:25 P. M. 

r-rom Polnf Tlburon fo San Francisco. 
WEEK I)AYS-6:50 A. M., 8:20 A. M., 9:55 A. M.; 
1:10 p. M-, 4:05 p. M., 5:35 P. M. 
Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 P.M. 
SI' Nl> AYS— 8:40 A. M., 10:06 A.M., 11:35a.M.: 
2:05 p. M., 4:05 P.M., 5:30 P.M., 6:55 P.M. 



Leave S. F. 



ArbiveinS.F. 



Week 
Days. 



JDestination. . 

Sundays' Sundays 



7:40a.m. S.-OOa.m. Petaluma 
3:30P.M. 9:30a.m.; and 

5:05 p.m. 5:00p.m.; Santa Rosa. 



7:40a.m. 

3:30p.m. 8:00a.m. 



7:40a. m. 8:00 a. m 



7:40a.m. 8:00a. m 
3:30 p.m. 



7:40a.m. 8:00a.m. 
5:05 P.M. 5:00p. M 



7:40 A. M I 8:00a.m 
3:30 p.m 15:00 p.m 



Fulton, 
Windsor, 
Healdsburg 
Litton Kprines. 
Cloverdale & 
Way Stations. 



Week 
Days. 



10:40a. m;8:50a.m. 
6:05 p.m 10:30 A.M 
7:30p.m|6:10p.m. 



Hopland 
and Ukiah. 



Guernevllle. 



Sonoma and 10:40a.m. 
Glen Ellen. 6:05p.m. 



8ebastopol, | 10:40a.m 
! 6:05 p.m 



10 :80a. M 
6-.10P.M 



10:30A. M 
6:10 P.M 



8:50a.m. 
6:10p.m. 



10:30am 
6:10 P.M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs: at Geyserville for SkaggB Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena: at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyvllle, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port and Bartlett 8prings: at Hopland for Lake- 
port; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sarato- 
ga Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Cahto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Westport, TJsal, Hydesville and Eu- 
reka. 

EXCTJRBION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days— To Petaluma, Jl 50; to Santa Rosa, S2 25; to 
Healdsburg, 83 40; to Cloverdale, 84 50; to Hop- 
land, 85 70; to Ukiah, 86 75: to Sebastopol, 82 70; 
to Guernevllle, S3 75; to Sonoma, 81 60; to Glen 
Ellen, 8180. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, 81; to Santa Rosa, 81 60; to Healds- 
burg, 82 26; to Cloverdale, S3; to Ukiah, S4 50; to 
Hopland, {3 80; to Sebastopol, $180; to Guerne- 
vllle, 82 50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1 20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

25th of each month, 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 

Through Line Sailings. — "City of New York," Jan- 
uary 5, 1893. "City of Sydney," January 26, 1893. 

S. S. " City of Panama" will sail for Panama at 
noon, Saturday, December 17th, calling at Mazat- 
lan, Acapulco, Port Aug^l, Salina Cruz, Tonala, 
San Benito, Ocos, Champerico, San Jose de Guate- 
mala, Aeajutla, La Union, Amapala, Corinto, San 
Juan del Sur and Punta Arenas. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 

HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for East 

Indies, Straits, etc. : 

8. 8. "Peru," Saturday, March 4th. 1893, at 3 P. M. 

"City of Rio de Janeiio," Saturday, Jauuary 

14th, 1893, at 8 P. M. 

8. 8. "City of Peking." Saturday, February 
4th, at 3 p. m. 

S. S. " China," (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Feb. 14, 
1893, at 3 p. M. 

Round Trio Tickets to Yokohama at reduced 
rates. 

For frefght or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 202 
Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent 



NOON AND MAY. I 

'Tin noon and May. About the happy 

lawna 
Bweel airs are breathing. 8miny showers 

have \vash\i 
The morning white, and deck'd the 

gleaming buds 
With drops and sparks. There's gladness 

in the grass, 
And a light Buttering music thro' the 

leaves, 
Where amorous birds their busy loves 

begin. 



IT was a member of the Senate from 
Sacramento county named Thomas 
Jefferson Green who earned for the first 
California Legislature its title of the 
" Legislature of a Thousand Drinks." 
Green was accustomed to keep a demi- 
john of cognac (all brandy was "cognac" 
in those days) under the stairs of the 
State House, and whenever he was 
thirsty, which was frequently, would 
move the Senate to adjourn and invite 
its sixteen members out to take a drink 
from his demijohn. It is hardly neces- 
sary to say that Green's motions to ad- 
journ the Senate always carried unani- 
mously. After the session of the Legisla- 
ture closed, Thomas Jefferson Green's 
empty demijohn was found beneath the 
State House stairs, and some nameless 
scapegrace took it and hoisted it to the 
top of the Liberty pole, where for six 
long weeks it bung and swung as a hol- 
low and sounding memorial of the " Leg- 
islature of a thousand drinks." 



"So friend Bushier was on top of Mt. 

Blanc?" "Notatall." "But he said so." 
"True. Two months ago when he returned 
from Switzerland he said he had been at 
the foot of Mount Blanc. Since then 
he has gradually lied himself to the top." 
— Fliegende Blaelter. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Mining Company, 

Assessment No. 103 

Amount per share 25 cents 

Levied Nov. 9, 18y2 

Delinquent in office Dec. 14, 1892 

Day of sale of delinquent stock. .Jan. 3, 1893 
E L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada block, 309 Mont- 
gomer street, San Francisco, Cal. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
witb Steamers for SHANGHAI: 
Oceanic (via Honolulu), Wed'sday, Jan 4, 1**93 

Gaelic Tuesday, Jan. 24, 1893 

Belgic Thursday, February 23, 1893. 

Oceanic Tuesday, March 14, 1893 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets, San Francisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, 
San Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen.PasB, Agt. 
GEO. H.RICE. Traffic Manager. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 



.v^byp. 



The splendid 3,000 
•S 1 . ton steamers of the 

•tP Oceanic Steamship 
& Company sail for 
O Honolulu, Auckland 
and Sydney as under: 
For Honolulu, Auck- 
land and Sydney, 
8S. Alameda, Mon- 
day, January 9, 1S93 
at 2 P. m. 
For Honolulu " only, 
S3. Australia, Wed- 
nesday, January 18, 
at 2 o'clock p. m. 
For passage or freight apply to J. D. SPRECK- 
ELS & BROS. CO., 3*7 Market Street 




StfVEtf 



21 

LOUISK mm nix nnnonnoee Ihlhl she 
will come to Chicago daring the 

World's Fair. Tin' talegram ..... 
mention whether she has been engaged 
by one of our enterprising dime mnaeama 
ns an exhii.it of mental aberration, <>r 
whether she Intends to leotare on an- 
archism. In both casessheis superfluous. 
The sp< cles is unfortunately too well 
represented already in our collection of 
European cranks. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 
Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive 
SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leave' From December 3, 1892. | Arrive 

7:00 a. Benicia, Rumsey, Sacramento. 7:15 P 

7:30a. Haywards, Niles and dan Jose.. *12:15 p 

. . . Niles and San Jose 16 :15 p 

7:30a. Martinez, San Ramon, Calistoga 6:15p. 

8:00a. 3acram*to& Reddiug, viaDavis. 7:15p. 
8:00 a. Atlantic Express for Ogden and 

East, 9:46p. 

8:30a. Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Oro- 

ville and Red Bluft" 4:45p. 

0;0.0a. New Orleans Express, Lob An- 
geles, Deming, El Paso, New 

Orleans and East 8:45 p. 

*9 :00 a. Stockton and Milton *8 :45 p. 

1200m. Haywards, Niles and Livermore 7:15 p. 

*1 :00 p. Sacramento River Steamers *9 :00 p. 

1:30 p. Vallejoand Martinez 12:45 p. 

3 :00 P. Haywards. Niles and San Jose . . 9 :45 A. 
4:00 p. Martinez, Stockton Merced and 

Fresno 12:15p 

4;00p Martinez, San Ramon, Val'ejo, 
Calistoga, El Verano, aud Santa 

Rosa 9 :45 A. 

4 :30 p. Benicia, and Sacramento 10 :45a. 

4:00p. Woodland and Oroville 10:15a 

4:00p Vacaville 10:16a 

*4:30p. Niles and Livermore *8:46a. 

5:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East.. 10;45a 
6:30p. Lob Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara & 

Los Angeles 9:45a. 

5 :30 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 9:15a. 

6:00 p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

{7:00 p. Vallejo +8:45 P. 

7:00 p. Oregon Express. Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East. . . 8:15 a 

Santa Cruz Division. 

+11 :45a. Hunters and Theater Train for 
Newark, San Jose, and Los 
Gatos 18:05 p. 

8:16a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6:20 p. 

*2:15p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 
SantaCruz. *10:50a. 

4:15p. Centerville, San Jose, Los Gatos. 9:60a. 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets). 

*7:0Oa. San Jose, Almaden and Way Sta- 
tions *2:S8 p. 

8:15 a. San Jose, Gilroy, TresPlnos.Pa- 
jaro, SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Kobles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations 6:10 p. 

10 :37 a . San Jose, and Way Stations 5 :08 p. 

12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 8 :30 p. 

*2:80p. San Jose, Gilroy, TreB Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove and principal 

Wav Stations *10:37 A. 

*S:80p. San Jose, Gilroy, and Principal 

Way Stations., . *9:47a. 

*4:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . *8;06 a. 

5:15 p. San Jose and Way Stations. 8:48a. 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations... 6:35 a. 
fll:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations +7:30p. 

a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. +Saturdays only. 

tSundays only. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for ports 
in Alaska, 9 a. m., Dec. 16, Dec. 30 and Jan. 13. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 
9 a. m'. every Friday. 

For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Santa Ana, Los Augeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Los Angeles, . 
Santa Barbara and San Louis Obispo, every fourth 
and fifth, day, at 11 a. m. 

For ports in Mexico, 1st of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 



22 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893 . 




BY way apparently of illustrating the manners and customs of 
the old nobility in France, Mr. Walter Hemes Pollock sends 
to the National Review a passage in French from some unpublished 

memoirs of the ''Marquis of , 1780." The marquis, says this 

imaginary diarist, lingered at the table enjoying, in a leisurely way, 
with a keen smile about the lips, the last glass of the last bottle of 
his old Burgundy, which had descended to him from his ancestors. 
M. de Sarazere, his unexpected but pampered guest, was sleeping in 
his bed-chamber. The marquis had said to him, grasping his hand, 
"Sleep well, dear sir, Pierre will show you to your room." Presently 
the marquis rang the bell. Francois answered the summons. "What 
does Monsieur the Marquis desire?" "A trifle. It appears that 
Monsieur does not like my old Burgundy. Cut the gentleman's 
throat." The command, it is added, was promptly obeyed. ' ' This," 
continues the narrative, " is the crime which has so dazzled Ver- 
sailles." The marquis only referred to the subject once. " That 
man," he said, "annoyed me. He did not like my wine. It became 
my business to kill him; I had him killed. What is the use of a 
duel de convenance ?" 

An old resident of Indianapolis, who was well acquainted with 
the elder Booth, says that when that great actor lived near Balti- 
more, the little farm in the suburbs on which he raised garden- 
truck was a source of much greater interest to him than the 
theatre in the city. The products of his farm he would himself 
take to town to sell, and "many is the time," says the aged In- 
diana man, "I have seen Mr. Booth standing in the market place 
In Baltimore aa eager to sell a quart of berries as any of his neigh- 
bors, though perhaps that night he would make thousands of 
dollars at the theatre where he was billed to appear. He would 
hang around the market until it was time to go to dress for his 
part, and then he would leave his wagon 'in somebody's charge, 
returning when the performance was over, perhaps to find it, per- 
haps not." 



There is a romance about the clock of the Church of St. Magnus in 
London. It is to the effect that Sir Thomas Duncombe, Lord Mayor 
of London, in the early part of the last century, when he was a poor 
boy, had to wait for his master on the bridge, and was puzzled to 
know how the time went. He determined then and there that if 
ever he became well-to-do he would present a clock to the church, so 
that other persons might not be inconvenienced as he had been. He 
was able to keep his promise, and he did so; he became an opulent 
goldsmith, and the clock, after 180 years, is to-day a memorial of his 
generosity. The organ was also presented by him, but the instru- 
ment has undergone a great deal of alteration. The church is in the 
ward of Bridge Within, which the present Lord Mayor represents. 



Leo XIII. is extremely severe about the things which have belonged 
to him because he knows the abuses which took place during the last 
years of the pontificate of his predecessor. Apropos of which, a story 
is told about a French grande dame, who one day threw herself at 
the feet of Pius IX. to thank him for giving her the return of her 
former good health. " How? " asked the Holy Father. "Because 
I succeeded in obtaining a stocking belonging to your Holiness." 
"One of my stockings? " " Yes, I wore this talisman on my left leg 
and it became completely cured! " " Well, Madame," said Pius IX. 
maliciously, " you had rare luck. It was enough for you to wear one 
of my stockings; whereas I, who put on two every morning, can 
scarcely walk at all." 



Julia Ward Howe began the study of ancient Greek in her old 
age, but probably with no greater-lnterest than that with which 
Queen Victoria took up Hindustani at seventy. That was three 
years ago, and Her Majesty is still bending her energies to acquire 
a perfect command of the language of her Oriental subjects. She 
has added a staff of Hindoo servants to her household, to whom 
she gives orders in Hindustani, and whenever a Rajah from her 
far Eastern dominions visits her palace, as in the case of the 
Gaikwar of Baroda, she converses with him in his native tongue. 

(jro to the Pacific Cleaning and Dyeing Works of J. Spaulding & 
Co., at 353-357 Tehama street, if you want any clothing dyed, or cur- 
tains, carpets or smaller articles cleaned. This establishment leads 
the coast in this particular line. It is patronized by all the leading 
hotels and families iu the city, and enjoys great popularity on ac- 
count of its excellent work. 



Shahrwald. Buokbee & Co., Ileal Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses 
rented, rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. 
office, 407-409 Montgomery street. 

" Kritiko" reads character from handwriting. Write in ink, in an 
unfeigned hand, on unruled paper. State sex. Send 50 cents 
stamps or postal note. Address " Kritiko, "609 Merchant street, S. F. 



IZCr STTIE&J^lsrOIE . 




Insurance Company, 
capital $1 .000,000, | assets 13,000,000 

STRONG, PROSPEROUS, PROGRESSIVE. 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United StateB . 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up *400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SANSOME STRtET, 

San Francisco, California. 



GEORGE L. BRANDER, 

President. 



OHAS. M. BLAIR, 

Secretary. 



QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up I 500,000 

Assets 3.181,753 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,526,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
city Office— 501 Montgomery st. General Office— 401 Mont'g, St. 

AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

OF BALTIMORE CITY. 

Cash Capital 11,000,000.00 

Cash Assets, over...., 2,200,000.00 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., Gen'l Managers. 

NEW YORK OFFICES 40 to 44 Pine Street 

MAXWELL* BERRY, Oeneral Agents. 

421 California Street. 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Pacific Branch, 214 Sansome St., S. F. 

SWAIN & MURDOCK. City Agents. 

STEAM 
BOILER 
INCRUSTATIONS. 



FIRE 



OLD SCALE REMOVED. 

FORMATION OF NEW SCALE PREVENTED, :: 

Without the aid of chemicals, : 
by the use of : 



LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER 

Over SOO In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufaoturinq Co., 

330 Fine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

tX ELECTRIC IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. 

Systems : 

induction- General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Ari- 
"Wood" '; zona and Washington of the 

Factorie^ 1 - ' • Fort Wa * ne Electric Light Company, Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Fort Wayne. Estimates furnished for electric railways, electric 

Indiana;: light and steam plants, house wiring, etc. Marine wor 

|I jj 35 New Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS 

PROPRIETORS OP THE 

CITY IRON WORKS. 

Office 51 Fremont Street, 

S^.33" FBAlsTCISCO, - - C_A.Ii. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Boilers, Engines, Pumps and Machinery of Every Descript ion. 

Patent Lead-Lined Coupled Tubing, for use as 

Water Pipe, for Sale Cheap 



Jan . 



IW8. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I.I III B 



23 



GA8-FITTING8 are not supposed to be particularly difficult ob- 
jects to keep in proper condition, yet one of tbe leading sani- 
tary engineers in the country. \V. P. Gerhard, has been so frequently 
consulted on gas questions that he has drawn up a few rules on tbe 
subject. If gas kevs turn too hard he advises having them greased 
from time to lime with a mixture of one part of beeswax and two or 
three parts of tallow melted together and welt strained. When a gas 
flame that has previously been well-shaped becomes ragged and un- 
even the burner needs cleaning. If it is a slit burner a thin strip of 
brass can be used to remove tbe deposit, while jet burners can be 
cleansed by a small awl made for the purpose. A pin or needle may 
be used in place of anything better, but care should be taken not to 
injure the burner. No burner will last for years, but it is well to re- 
place those used daily in a dwelling house about once a year. In all 
unoccupied buildings, and in all buildings closed from Saturday un- 
til Monday, the same engineer states thegas should always be turned 
off at tbe main, after first shutting off all the burners. Moreover, 
a gas meter should never be examined by candlelight, owing to the 
danger of an explosion, unless the meter is positively known to be 
tight, and the piping and connections in perfect condition. For the 
same reason, it is well to avoid the use near a gas meter of tools 
causing Hying sparks. To thaw out a frozen wet meter do not use 
a flame, the thawing may progress too rapidly for comfort, but use 
warm bags of sand or clotbs dipped in hot water. Tbe water can 
be partly drawn off and some alcohol or glycerine substituted when 
the cold is very severe. A very practical suggestion when using 
portable or desk gas-lights connected with a fixed outlet by rubber 
tubing is to close the fixture key before the key at the portable light, 
for otherwise the rubber tubing remains full of gas, and after some 
use becomes so saturated as to give off disagreeable odors. In case a 
leak is discovered in a room, tbe windows and doors should be 
opened at once, in order to let the gas out. As coal gas is lighter 
than air, it accumulates near the ceiling, hence the upper sash 
should be let down. Under no circumstances should a light or 
matches be used in searching for a leak, since the mixture of atmo- 
spheric air and gas, under certain conditions, is highly explosive. 

——An interesting gun is now being constructed in Pennsylvania 
for the Government. It is 19 feet long, has a calibre of 5 inches, and 
will require a charge of 35 pounds of powder to propel the 60 pound 
projectile which it is designed to use. It will be formed of a set of 
twelve crucible chrome steel segments, around which layers of 
square steel wire are wound under a constant tension of 130.000 
pounds per square inch, binding the parts tightly together. The wire 
is wound to a depth of 2.31 inches at the breech, diminishing to 0.71 
inch at the muzzle. Altogether, 3,256 pounds of wire were used, 
equivalent to a single strand thirty-seven miles long. The difficulty 
of constructing a wire-wound gun is to give it sufficient strength 
longitudinally, it being very easy to prevent a tube made in this way 
from bursting. In order to prevent sagging Mr. Brown conceived 
the idea of constructing a core of longitudinal segments, put together 
somewhat like barrel staves ; in other words, he sub-divides the body 
or core of his gun into such small pieces that he is able to obtain by 
tempering a degree of elastic strength that cannot be obtained in 
large masses of metal, it being a well-known fact that in pieces of 
steel which are small enough to insure tempering all the way through 
it is possible to obtain very much higher physical conditions than 
can be obtained in large masses. 

— A great dam is now building across the Periyar River, in India, 
which is designed to store up 13,300,000.000 cubic feet of water, of 
which 6,815.000,000 cubic feet will be available for irrigation. The 
dam will be 173 feet above the lowest point in the river bed, with a 
5-foot parapet rising above this. The thickness at the lowest foun- 
dation level is 138% feet and 12 feet at the top. The material is con- 
crete, composed of 25 parts by measure of hydraulic limeground, but 
not slaked, 30 parts of sand, and 100 parts of broken stone. The 
front and rear faces are of uncoursed rubble masonry, pointed with 
Portland cement. The limestone is obtained from quarries sixteen 
miles distant, and is transported partly in boats and partly by an 
overhead rope conveyor. This stone yields a lime differing but 
slightly from that used in many large French dams. The stone for 
the masonry is a hard syenite, of which the neighboring hills are 
composed, and much of it will be obtained in excavating the waste 
weir through which the surplus water from the reservoir will escape. 
The sand used is sharp and clean, and is obtained from the river- 
bed at tbe site of the work. 



i isr sxttm^jxt c:e. 



Do Not Be Deceived. 
Persons with weak lungs — those who are constantly catching 
cold — should wear an Allcock's Porous Plastee over tbe chest 
and another between the shoulder blades during cold weather. Re- 
member they alwavs strengthen and never weaken the part to which 
they are applied. "Do not be deceived by imagining any other plaster 
like them— tbey are not— may look it, but looks deceive. Insist 
always on having Allcock's, the only reliable plaster ever produced. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG. OKKMANY. 

Herbert L. I ...» Manager for the P.rlHo i ami Branch, 

Zlo Mnnome St., s. I . 

Capital .. $1,600,000.00 

Invested in U. S. S34.T95.T2 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
23« 4 ii I Horn In St., S. P.. Cal. 



THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OP U.VM.K. OF 8T. GALL. OP ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000.000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HAKRY W. 8YZ, General Agent, 
4 10 Californ i a St., Ban Francisco. Cal. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed 110,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve lln addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8,124,067.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, [Established 1 782-] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Established 1 857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

fEstablished by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office — Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 

OEO. F. GRANT. Manager. 



PACIFIC 3DE3E 3 A.E.TD^CE3SrT 

6UARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established A. D. 1821. 
Paid-up capital, - - - t 5,000,000. 
CashAsBets, {23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Pounded A. D. 1710. 

Cash Assets, 110,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - {2,222,724. 



WM. J. LMItERS, flen'l Agent, 20» Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL *5,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
No. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,638.45. 

President. imjjAMIN P. STEVENS. | Vice-President, JOS. M. G1BBEN8. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mil ls Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORTCOSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain ttored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in FirBt-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if doBired, at current rates. 

Offlca o' the Company. 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-Calltornla Bank. 



INSURANCE COMPANY- LTD. 

Capital paid oj guaranteed $8,000,000,00. 

CHf\s,ALATON,Manar)er. 
433 Calif oral? Ft g^ F,-r ---n. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour— Demand light; Extras $3.75(S)K Superfine. $2 60@$3.00. 

Wheat— Light trade; Shipping. C1.2 >S4 • Milling, ll.30®$1.32j^ per cental 

Barley is dull; Brewing, S5^90c. Feeu. 77^e @80c. per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, $1.35@$1.87M 1 Keed, $i.25®$L.3o per ctl. 

Corn, White, $1.10; Yellow, $1.05@$1.2} per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, good demand, $1.10tt§$1.15V2- Cement, $2.00@$2.25. 

Hayisluwer; Wheat, $10.50: Oats, $7@$lu; Alfalfa, $8@$9.50. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, $14.o0(g)$15 per ton. 

Beans, good request, $2.00('g)$A40 per ctl. Potatoes, 60o.@$l per ctl. 

Butter is lower; Choice, S0c.@32 l .^c. ; Fair, 16c.@17c: Eastern, 16c@20c. 

Cheese, light stock, 8c.@10c. Eggs, free supply, 35c.@40c. 

Honey, Comb, 10c. (§>12c. : Extracted, 7c.@8c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth "Iqc.'qOjc. Beeswax is steady, at 23c.@25c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 7c@7>^e. Wool is in good demand at llc.@16c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6|^c. 

Coffee sluggish at 15e.(<§2lc. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is plentiful; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 16c.@20c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at $4 1.50 per flask. 

Sugar, good stocK of both Raws and Refined. White, 4K®a?ic. 

We enter upon the new year with cheering prospects, having 
had as a sure foundation more than ten inches of rainfall thus 
early in the season, giving sufficient moisture for the successful 
tilling of the soil, and enabling the farmer to plow and sow his 
seed and do other needy seasonable work, such as planting and 
pruning trees, etc. The mountains round about us are covered 
with snow and the rivers full to overflowing, so that the outlook 
is exceedingly propitious for the husbandman as well as for the 
miner. 

In passing let me remark that during the past year we had no 
serious failures among our merchants and traders; and although 
the business of 1892 was equal, in the average of the past, in 
volume, the profits were materially lessened by reason of high 
railroad freights and sharp competition. 

The Paci6c Mail Steamship, Coliraa, 28 days from Panama and 
way ports, arrived on the 1st inst., having for Cargo 1.781 bags 
Central America Cotfee. etc.; from Mexican ports, 2,296 sks. Silver 
Ore, 417 Bks. Coffee, 690 pkgs. Limes, etc., 116 pkgs. Treasure, 
valued at $68,322, etc., but no New York Cargo; the ship St. 
Nicholas, however, arrived the same day from New York with a 
large cargo of Mdse. 

The holiday season has been a joyous one, fine weather giving 
pleasure of a high order to ail classes of the community. Shopping 
has been very general and purchases liberal, our streets thronged 
night and day with pedestrians. The poor were cared for in a 
very generous manner by charitable, well-to-do citizens, thus 
showing a good degree of prosperity among all classes. 

Coal receipts from all quarters during 1892 aggregated about 
1,600,000 tons, widely distributed between this port, San Pedro 
and 8a n Diego, low prices ruling the year through. Closing prices 
for 1892—$6.25 per ton for Australian. 

The Wool product of the State during 1892 was 35,802.930 lbs., and 
that from Oregon and foreign ports approximated 10.000,000 lbs. Of 
this we exported by sea and rail about 33,'O00,O00 lbs., leaving stock 
on hand 1,500,000 lbs. Value of exports, $fi,000 000. The balance has 
gone into the woolen mills for local consumption. George Abbott, 
in his annual circular, states that California Wool product for the 
past 39 years aggregates 956 342,765 lbs. 

Liverpool. — The Br. ship Langdale, hence, having been cleared by 
Balfour, Guthrie & Co., had for cargc, 6,924 bbls. Flour, 6.852 lbs. 
Honey, 56,525 cases Salmon, 1,525 sks. Bran, 7,693 lbs. Cascara Bark, 
2,374 cases Canned Fruit, 9,733 ctls. Wheat, 501 gallons Brandy, etc., 
value, $315,705. 

Honolulu. — The schr. Aloha, 27 days thence, had for cargo 25,314 
bags Sugar to Williams, Diruond & Co. The W. G, Irwin, hence, had 
a cargo of produce, etc. , value, $21,000. 

The Br. ship Gosford, hence for Liverpool on the 27th ulto., 
cleared by Geo. W. McNear, had for cargo 12.473 cases Salmon, 1,819 
cases canned Fruit, 135,866 lbs. Tallow, 484 sks. Tanbark, 82 M. feet 
White Pine Lumber, 30.586 feet White Cedar, 61,440 ctls. Wheat 
and 1,093 ctls. Barley value, $175,000. 

Wheat, Flour, Barley, etc., all rule low in price, and this has been 
the case for the past few months, and this, too, in the face of low sea 
going freights to Europe, New York, etc. 



Are You Going East ? 
Take the Santa Fe Route. You will find it to your interest to call 
on or address the undersigned before purchasing tickets. No other 
line crossing the continent can offer you a trip combining equal com- 
fort and pleasure. The only line running Pullman palace and tour- 
ist sleeping-cars through to" Chicago on the same train every day 
without change. Personally conducted excursions through to Bos- 
on leave every Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 050 Market street, 
Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 



Use Brown's Bronchial Troches for coughs, colds and all other 
Throat Troubles.— "Pre-eminently the best."— Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. 



B-A.05rs:s_ 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,250,000 

Southeast corner Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; 

Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES— Kamloops, Nauaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, British 
Columbia. 
This Bauk transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted aud ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rateB 
upon its Head Office and Branches, aud upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North aud South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British LiueuCompauy; IRE- 
LAND— Bauk of Ireland; MEXICO aud SOUTH AMERICA— Loudou Bauk 
of Mexico aud South America. CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia aud China; AUSTRALIA aud NEW ZEALAND— Bauk of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
aud Australian Chartered B.ink and Watioual Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (We^t Indies)— Colonial Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

632 Caliiornia Street. Corner Webb street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1893 $35,890,653 OO 

Uuaraitteetl Capital aud Surplus l,o33,13t» OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Millsr, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardmau, J. «. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, aud Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in Sau Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the mouey. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge Is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— y a. m. to 3 P. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



N. w. Corner Sansome and Bush Streets. 

Established 1870. U. S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL [PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $600,000 | UNDIVIDED PROFITS $160,000 

S. G. MURPHY President IE. D.MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT. . . -Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE .Ass t Cashier 

DIBECTOES: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, S.'G. Murphy, 

N Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A Oeneral Banking Business Transacted. 

P\FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT. 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 

tho renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

storage. A spe inlty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8a.m. to 6 p.m. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RE8ERVE FUND S 1,645,000 00. 

Deposits Ju y 1, 1892 28,776,697 91 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRU8E 
8econd Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon. Attorney, 
John R. Jarbos. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY . . Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Mofhtt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term aud Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and. Sutter Sts. 

ubscried Capital $2,500,000 \ PaH Up Caaltal 92,000,000 

Reserue Fund $650,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
yard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits isBued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 

LC. Altschul, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000! Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel ourt, Loudon, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Sell ran & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking I usiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
work.. .Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART | «„..-„. 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.I «» n aKers. 
A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier. 






Jan. 7, 1893 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 




SUNBEAMS 



(i A I. AS, how light a cause may move 
Pi Distention between hearts that love I" 
It may be nothing more nor less 
Than price of bonnet or of dress. 

—Detroit Tribtttie. 

^— The long-haired caller in the editorial room was indignant. 
' Poetfl are born, sir." he said to the eminently practical editor. 
" Of course they are." re<p"iidr1 the editor, suavely, "you didn't 
imagine I thought they were hatched, did you?" "I mean, sir, 
they are born ; born, sir. do you understand?" " I think I do," and 
the editor rubbed bis chin reflectively, " but why are they?" That 
was the straw that fractured the spinal column of the camel, and 
the poet stalked out of the den. Detroit Free Press. 

^— " Well, what is your grievance?" said the Warden of the peni- 
tentiary to the mutinous convict who had been brought before him. 
" I have been unjustly humiliated, sir," replied No. fi21, his cheek 
flushing hotly at the recollection. " I'm doing time for imbezzling a 
million dollars and you've put me in a cell with a cheap, low-down 
scrub that's here for counterfeiting nickels I" 

" These folks think they're purty smart," said the burglar to 

himself, Ashing from its concealment under the edge of (he parlor 
carpet, back of the piano, a well-stuffed pocket-book and slipping it 
into an opening in his coat. " And they are!" he ejaculated in deep 
disgust, as he opened it a few hours later and found it to be stuffed 
with tracts on the sin of stealing. 

^—Miss Gigglegirl— So you teach at Harvard? That must be nice? 
And you teach the students all sorts of languages. I suppose they 
never speak English at all? Professor —Very seldom speak it. Miss 
G.— There. I was sure of it! What language do they speak most, 
Greek, or Latin or— Professor— Slang. —Boston Transcript. 

Mrs. Grumpy— Our minister would like very much to have you 

come to church occasionally." Mr. Grumpy— So as to get me to sub- 
scribe to the fund for missions to the heathen, I suppose? Mrs. 
Grumpy— No, indeed, but to have you receive benefit from that mis- 
sion. — New York Herald. 

— — Lady (in bvtcher shop) — You can put aside half a dozen of your 
plumpest partridges. Butcher— Yes, ma'am. Shall 1 send them right 
away? Lady— No, mv husband is out, shooting partridges to-day, 
and he will call for them this evening. — Texas S if tings. 

— — " How is the Colonel ? " asked one Kentuckian of another, who 
had just returned from Colonel Frankfort's sick room. " The Colonel 
is a very sick man, sah. I saw him swallow a glass of water given 
him by the nurse without even a protest, sah." 

— Pittsburg Chronicle. 

— Some one has recalled Sheridan's rhyme of the months. It ie 
as follows: "January, snowy; February, flowy; March, blowy; 
April, showery ; May, flowery ; June, bowery ; July, moppy; August, 
croppy; September, poppy; Octoher, breezy; November, wheezy; 
December, freezy." 

^—Rivers (at the theatre)— That fellow who is acting the part of the 
murderous villian disgusts me. Banks— Why, what's the matter with 
him ? Seems to me he's the best of the lot. Rivers— That's it ! Why 
doesn't he kill all of 'em, blame him ! —Chicago Tribune. 

—Proprietor oj a Palatial Confectionery Store (whose holiday stock 
is all in) — Want to see me personally, do you? Youthful Applicant — 
Don't you want to hire a nice little girl to sit in your front window 
and eat candy? 

— — Tommy — Paw, the teacher says that if a man gets dyspepsia it 
may make him baldheaded. Is thatso? 

Mi: Figg — I guess so. 

Tommy — Then if a man eat too much pie would he be pie-bald?" 

— Indianapolis Journal. 

Professor Charles Geoffrie, the most experienced and best violin 
teacher in California, as proved by his numerous distinguished pu- 
pils—Misses Blair, Joran, Wright, Woolfe, Hill, Mr. Henry Larsen, 
and many others — continues to give violin instruction. A long list 
of pupils for reference at his residence, 1430 Webster street, near 



The Original Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, grows more 
popular daily. Its menus are always so very good, and its service so 
superior to that of other restaurants, that it is the favorite dining 
place of epicures. If you wish bo be certain of a good dinner, do not 
fail to visit it. 

* * 

: SHIPPING and COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

* » AND 

* • 

I GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS. I 

* • 

Nos 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco. 
National Assurance Company ----- of Ireland 

Atlas Assurance Company ------ of London 

Boylston Insurance Company ------ of Boston 

Ocean Marine Insurance ------ of London 



Mr. and Mrs. Pan Murphy look a party of friends to ipend 
the New Year holiday with them at the Pope villa, in Napa Val- 
ley, In preference to joining the crowd at Dei Monte this season, 
and it is safe to say the house party enjoyed themselves very 
thoroughly. Mrs. Louis Haggin did not go East last week, as 
has been erroneously slated, but enjoyed New Year's with her 
friends in San Francisco. 

J. H. Bates, of New York, has announced that after the 1st inst. 
Mr. I.ymin I). Morse will become a partner with him in the business 
of his newspaper advertising agency, and the style of the house will 
be Bates & Morse, Advertising Agency. Mr. Morse has been asso- 
ciated with Mr. Bates for many years, and for the last three years 
practically managed the business, " with an intelligence, zeal and 
fidelity," says Mr. Bates in his announcement, " that will now have 
even fuller scope, and acting along the settled conservative lines 
already established, will not fail to benefit both publishers and 
advertisers in the future." Mr. Bates' agency is the largest in the 
United States, Mr. Bates being very popular with newspaper pub- 
lishers. 



Chalmers' Gelatine is the most thoroughly refined, most reliable, 
and the cheapest that is offered. 

Durkee's Spices are absolutely pure, are the strongest, most econ- 
o rnical and finest flavored offered. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $8, 000, prr 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (April 1, 1892) 3,278,653 23 

#M. ALVORD, President. ' ' 

Thomas Brown Casbier | Ibvins F. Moulton, Assistant Cashier. 

Edward S. Hast, Secretary. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of t\ie Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London — Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati. Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 



Authorized Capital {3,500,000 I 

Reserve 



Capital paid up 2,450,000 

460.000 



San Francisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office 73 Lombard St., E.C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1006 A Street. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 
Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital $1,250,000. 

Successor to Satheb & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

J AMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, IV m. P. John- 
sou, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, JameB K. Wilson. 

Agents i New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shi pley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & CO.'S DANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CASH CAWTAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

John J. Valentine President. 

HomerS.King Manager. 

H. Wadswokth Cashier. 

J. L. Browne Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS;' 
John J. Valentine, Lloyd Tevis, Oliver Eldridge, Lelaud Stanford, James 
C. Fargo, Ge o. E. Gray, W. F. Goad, Chas. F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THECR0;KER-W00LW0RTH NATIONAL DANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | B. H. MILLER, Je. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH -Peesidknt. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-Pbesident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashieb 



Guarantee Capital. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 



$800,000 



OFFICERS: 



President JEROME LINCOLN Secretary . 13. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. 8. JONES | Attorney 8IDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

Office— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Franclsoc. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893 . 




ALTHOUGH some complaint has been made that the holidays 
have not been so gay and festive as they ought to have been, 
they were by no means so dull as the same season has been for sev- 
eral years past, but were, on the whole, quite well filled with events. 
Commencing with the Festetics' dance, the whole week which fol- 
lowed had every evening engaged, the New Year's Eve dance at Mrs. 
Catherwood's closing it most charmingly, to say nothing of the large 
receptions at both the Concordia and the San Francisco Verein Clubs, 
which were thoroughly enjoyed by crowds of guests. 



The dance given on New Year's Eve by Miss Jennie Catherwood, 
though limited in the number of guests, was a very pleasant gather- 
ing. The cotillion was the feature of the evening's festivities, and 
the favors were particularly pretty. They were highly appreciated 
by the young ladies who received them , as it is a long time since they 
have received any so much to be admired. 



New Year Eve parties were very plentiful last week, and among the 
prettiest of small gatherings was the one given by Miss Emma Eaton 
at her home on Steiner street. Music filled the earlier hours very 
pleasantly, then came dancing and refreshments, and then the birth 
of the New Year was welcomed in appropriate style, causing much 
amusement. Not the least pleasant in its way was the children's 
party at Colonel Fred Crockers, at which his young daughter, Miss 
Mary Crocker, was the hostess, and exceedingly well did she acquit 
herself; and it is safe to say the afternoon and evening hours were 
among the most delightful her guests spent during the entire year. 

The close of the year was also appropriately celebrated at the Navy 
Yard, Mare Island, where a dance was given in the Sailmaker's Loft 
by the officers of the steamers Hassler and Albatross, which was largely 
attended and greatly enjoyed, several of our San Francisco belles 
being among the guest's. A few evening's previously Lieutenant 
Stoney personated Santa Claus at a Christmas tree distribution, 
greatly to the delight and admiration of the children at the yard, and 
acquitted himself capitally. The new head of the Pacific squadron, 
Admiral Skerntt, is looked for on Tuesday next, and directly after 
his arrival Admiral Brown and Flag Lieutenant Dwyer leave for 
their Eastern homes. 



This week opened with a hop at the Pleasanton on Monday even- 
ing, which like all parties given by Mrs. Pendleton was most enjoy- 
able. The dance at the Presidio on Tuesday evening was as delightful 
as its predecessor, and the force of language can no further go. It is 
just possible an added zest was given to the enjoyment of those pres- 
ent by the knowledge that the series was to be brought to an abrupt 
conclusion, and possibly that hop would be the last of this season. 
Wednesday was chosen by Mrs. E. E. Eyre and her daughter. Miss 
Mary Eyre, for receiving their friends, and a large number of invita- 
tions were sent out. But on Tuesday Mrs. Eyre was obliged to recall 
them, owing to the serious illness of Colonel Eyre, and postponing 
her tea indefinitely. 



Last evening at Odd Fellows' Hal! the last of the Friday Even- 
ing Cotillion Club dances before Lent took place under the leader- 
ship of George Newhall, and of which more extended mention 
will be made next week. 



Mrs. John R. Jarboe's recent violet lunch was one of the pret- 
tiest given this season. Pale mauve was the hue chosen for the 
table and its decorations, and the sweet scented violet was laid in 
dainty bunches at each lady's plate, herguests numbering sixteen 
of her intimate friends. Mrs. R. Woolworth chose yellow as the 
tint for the pretty lunch at wrfich she presided as hostess, and 
golden-skinned oranges, chrysanthemums and satin ribbons were 
artistically used in decorating the table and its surroundings. 
Fourteen ladies were invited to meet Mrs. C. J. Hillyer and Mrs. 
Geo. B. Williams, the guests of honor, and a most enjoyable 
afternoon was the result. Another of last week's lunches was 
the charming one given by Mrs. George H. Powers at her pretty 
cottage in San Rafael, in honor of Miss Nellie McDowell, and to 
which the majority of the guests went over from the city. 



At the urgent request of many members of the Calvary church 
the Chrietmas service was repeated last Sunday evening. The 
excellent choir assisted by a full chorus from the Sabbath school 
rendered the difficult musical programme in a most proficient 
manner. The alto solo from the Messiah "0 Thou That Tellest 
Good Tidings," was admirably sung by Miss Ella McCloskey, 
whose careful phrasing and smooth execution made a most pleas- 
ing impressson on her bearers. In the hymn "Adown the 
Ages," the fine baritone of Mr. F. G. B. Mills was heard to ad- 
vantage. Mrae. de Seminario and Mr J. R. Ogllvie comprised 
the other members of the choir. The violin solo for the Offertory 
played by Prof. Carl Vandal was a special feature of the service. 
The entire programme was under the direction of the very effi- 
cient organist, Professor G. A. Scott. 



CInb receptions were in order last Monday. The Press Club 
hung out its latch-string during the afternoon and evening, and 
members made all visiting friends feel very much at home in 
their quarters on Pine street. The crush at the opening of the 
new Olympic Club in the afternoon was something terrific. It 
really seemed as if all San Francisco was at the door intent upon 
gaining entrance to the building, and the gymnasium and it° sur- 
rounding galleries was literally packed during the time the con- 
cert was in progress. Those who were present at the evening 
exercises fared better than the visitors in the afternoon, inasmuch 
as seats were provided for them, and therefore the music sounded 
sweeter, and the witticisms of President Harrison more pointed to 
the ears of the comfortable throng. The oration of W- H. L. 
Barnes was an effort worthy of the occasion, and naught but 
words of praise of the beautiful building and its hospitable mem- 
bers were heard on all sides. The Bohemian Club also kept open 
house, and the members were untiring in doing the honors to the 
many ladies and their escorts who favored them with a call. 



One of the pleasant affairs of last week was the gathering of 
the Entre Nous Cotillion Club held in the banquet hall of the 
California Hotel on Friday evening. The members were first 
entertained at dinner which lasted a couple of hours, the menu 
and wines being everything to be desired. Then followed music, 
both vocal and instrumental, and recitations; and finally the 
cotillion which was led by S. J. Lewald and Miss Julia Emanuel 
and four figures were danced, after which there was general 
dancing till a late hour. Truly a case of "linked sweetness long 
drawn out." 



There are, no doubt, many among our old society people who 
will recall the name of Miss Rosa Gore as that of one of San Fran- 
cisco's early day belles, and who afterwards became the wife of 
Charles Bonner, the well-known mining man. To those it may 
be of interest to bear it was her daughter, Miss Edith Bonner, 
who was married to Ed. N. Lindsey at the residence of her step- 
father, Frank Locan, on Post street last week, Mrs. Bonner upon 
the death of her husband marrying Mr. Locan. The bride being 
ill and unwilling to postpone her marriage, which was set for the 
26th of December, the ceremony was performed at her bedside, 
the Rev. C. L. Miel officiating. 



Another pretty wedding of last week was the one at which 
Miss Rose Heister and Gerard Hotf Oulton appeared as bride and 
groom. The ceremony was performed at the Heister residence 
on Howard street, in the presence of a number of relatives and 
intimate friends, by the Rev. E. B. Spaulding of St. John's Epis- 
copal church, the bridal party standing in an arbor of vines and 
wild roses, which had been erected in the front room, ferns, chry- 
santhemums, voileta, roses and foliage being largely used in fur- 
ther adorning the rooms. The bride, who was given away by 
her father, wore a wedding robe of white brocaded silk, and was 
attended by the Misses Lydia Heister and Rebecca Rowen, who 
were attired in pale pink and Nile green silk gowns respectively. 
James Newlands, Jr., was the groom's best man. A handsome 
supper was partaken of later in the evening, and upon the return 
from their honeymoon trip Mr. and Mrs. Oulton will reside at the 
Hotel Richelieu, where Mrs. Oulton will receive on Mondays. 

The parlors of the First Presbyterian Church, on Van Ness 
avenue, never looked to more advantage than they did last Mon- 
day evening, the occasion being the marriage of Miss Emma L. 
Cooper and William L. Maule, which took place amid beautiful 
surroundings. Clusters of green leaves, festoons of evergreens, 
palms, red berries and flowers were the decorations used in bring- 
ing about this result, and here in the presence of a large number 
of their friends the Rev. Dr. McKenzie tied the nuptial knot. The 
bride was attended by Miss Ella Dallam as maid of honor and 
the Misses Helen Ames and Lillie McMurry as bridesmaids, and 
was given into the keeping of the groom by her father. Andrew 
Johnston supported the grom as best man, and Fred Alam and 
Walker Ames were also in attendance on him. 



The marriage of Miss Aileene Iversand Mr. Edward Moore Rob- 
inson will be solemnized at the Church of the Heavenly Rest, on 
Fifth avenue and Forty-seventh St., New York, on Tuesday next, 
and will be one of the society events of Gotham's winter season. 



The Japanese training ship Kong Go, which has at last departed 
on its home"'ard cruise, will long be remembered in port for the 
pleasant entertainments the officers gave while here, but especi- 
ally the reception held on board last Wednesday night, when 
the decorations were the wonder and admiration of all beholders. 
Particularly novel and enjoyable were the series of Japanese 
plays which were produced by the sailors and very well done, 
the dancing and singing eliciting much praise. Finally a hand- 
some supper was served, and the pleasant affair was at an end. 



Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Van Ness and family are domiciled at the 
Palace Hotel for the next three months. Mr. and Mrs. H. P. 
Sonntag are at the Pleasanton for the rest of the season. Mrs. 
Samuel Strauss, who is occupying the residence 1444 Leavenworth 
street, will receive on the first and third Saturdays of each month. 



Jan. 7, 1393. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



One of the notable events of next week will be the cotillion of 
the Monday Night Club at the Palace Hotel, for which every 
prepralion ha* been made to render it a success. The dancing - 
will take place in the maple room, and the adjoining recep- 
tion room will be utilised for supper. Another is the open- 
ing of the sbow on Tuesday of ihe Columbia Fair exhibits at the 
Pavilion, which is looked forwftrd to with an immense amount 
of interest, especially by those of our residents who have no hope 
of seeing the bigger one in Chicago; and the new departure of 
the Mechanics' Insti ute of holding a fair in the winter will no 
donbt result in a big success. On Wednesday evening the Fort- 
nightly Club will hold ibe third of tbeir meetings, and on the 
evening of the Tib there will be a reception at ibe Cosmos Club, 
under the name of a "Saturday Night," for stags only. They 
will no doubt make a nigbt of it and have a jolly good time. 



The long expected marriage of William 8. Barnes, son of Gen- 
eral W. H. L. Barnes, and Miss Delpbine Delnias, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Delmas, took place at the residence of the 
bride's parents, at Washington and Taylor streets, last Thursday. 
The ceremony was performed at 1:30 o'clock, the officiating 
clergyman being Rev. \V. S. Davis, of St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church. The bride was attended by her sister, Miss Josephine 
Delmas, who was maid-of-bonor, and by Miss Antoinette Delmas 
and Miss Harrington, bridesmaids. She entered the room upon 
her father's arm. There was a large attendance of the fashion- 
ables of the city. After the wedding Mr. and Mrs. Barnes left 
for Coronado. Upon their return they will live at the Richelieu. 



The veteran General Rosecrans accomplished the journey 
across the continent in safety, and with his daughter, Miss Rose- 
crans, who came with him, is at Redondo Beach, where they 
will remain during the rest of the winter season. Mr. George 
Cbeeseman, who has been spending the holidays in San Francisco 
with bis mother and sister, expects to return to his Mexican 
ranch ere long. Frank S. Johnson is among recent departures 
fur the East. 



Miss Hudah Richards, daughter of Mrs. W. H. Richards, will 
be married to Mr. C. T. Wendell, next Wednesday, at the resi- 
dence of the bride's mother, 2143 Post street. Only relatives will 
be present. 

Mrs. A. L. Bancroft, who has only recently arrived at her city 
residence on Franklin street, from her country home, will be " at 
home" to her friends on Thursdays in January and February. 



w 



ITH White in the Senate and Koote in the Cabinet, Cali- 
fornia should become of importance at the National Capital. 






75,827 CASES OF MUMM'S EXTRA DRY. 



THE following telegram from the United States agents for G. 
H. Mumm & Co.'s Extra Dry Champagne to Jones, Mundy & 
Co., of this city, their Pacific Coast agents, shows the most won- 
derful increase and sale of any brand of champagne in the 
United States during 1892. Superior quality is bound to tell: 

New York, January 3d, 1893. 
Jones, Munhy & Co., 

16 Front street, San Francisco: 
Our total importations and sales of the G. H. Mumm & Co.'s 
extra dry champagne for 1892 amount to seventy-five thousand 
eight hundred and twenty-seven cases (75,827), being nine 
thousand one hundred and twenty-seven cases (9,127) more than 
of any other brand. Fbed'k de Baby & Co. 

Prof. Crepaux. of the Paris Grand Opera, has the honor to inform 
the public that he is now forming singing classes. Two lessons a 
week— per month— $10. Vocal and scenic lessons in classes or pri- 
vate. Applications will be received at 1119 Sutter street, between 
Larkin and Polk streets, at the Larcher School of Languages. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH 
INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 

OF THE 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE 

AND PRELIMINARY 

WORLD'S FAIR EXHIBIT of CALIFORNIA. Opens 
January 10, Closes February 11, 1893. 
New Features. Special Attractions. 
Among which will be the annual exhibition of the Northern California 
Citrus Pair Association, a grand display of natural products of the various 
counties of the State, the largest collection ever seen in this city of valua- 
ble statuary and paintings, an orchestra of fifty musicians, including noted 
soloists and Miss May Cook, the young California come 1st; six large 
aquariums, machinery in motion, objects of art, industry and manufacture 
ADMISSION— Adult's slugle admission in day time 25c; evening 50c. 
Child's single admission in daytime 15c; evening 25c. Season tickets is- 
sued only to members of the Mechanic's Institute. Double season tickets 
$2.50, siugle season $1.50. Season tickets may be obtained by non-members 
at the following rate: Double season $5, sln?le season $4. which includes 
membership in the institute, subject to confirmation by the management. 
nd dues for the present quarter. IKWIN C. STOMP, President. 



^PRICE'S 

aAPssas 

The only Pure Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia; No Alum 
Used in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard 

The wedding of Miss Emma Davis and ex-Senator John J. Har 
rigan took place in Oakland last Tuesday. The ceremony was 
performed by Rev. J. H. McLane in the First Congregational 
Church, in which were assembled relatives and intimate friends 
only, it being their desire to have it a very quiet affair. Wash- 
ington City will be the locale where Mr. and Mrs. Harrigan will 
spend their honeymoon. 



Senator Stanford, who has been detained here by illness, is 
now convalescing very rapidly. 

LATEST TENNIS NEWS. 



THE fifth quarterly tournament at the California Lawn Tennis 
Club was not so successful as expected, for being postponed 
from Christmas to New Year's there were many who were un- 
able to be present. Out of thirty entries there were nine in the 
first round who defaulted, being out of town. The Tournament 
Committee consisted of Stetson, Field and Davis, and the referee 
was C. P. Hubbard. The play was not equal to that of the 
former tournament, but the audience was -much larger. A light 
lunch was served on Monday, and every one seemed to enjoy 
the hospitality that the club always furnishes on such occasions. 
The final round between H. N. Stetson and G. B. De Long was 
not played, owing to the lateness of the hour, and a large audi- 
ence was disappointed. The best matches were those between 
Field and Whitney, and Hobart and George DeLong. Whitney, 
in the first set had 7—6 and 40 love, but Field stuck bravely to 
him, and won the set 12 — 10, and took the second at 6 — 2. George 
DeLong beat Hobart 6 — 2, 6 — 2, which would look as if it were a 
bad beating; but, on the contrary, DeLong had to play his level 
best to win, and in nearly every game i< deuce " was called sev- 
eral times. Hobart smashed exceedingly well, and showed bet- 
ter form than usual. DeLong also beat Field 6—0, 6—2, which 
was a surprise to many, as of late Field has been doing some very 
good work. Stetson played a very fair game throughout. The 
final between him and DeLong will take place at the club on the 
14th inst. at 1 :30 o'clock. 

To-day there will be a football match between the California Lawn 
Tennis Club and the Oakland Tennis Club at Central Park. Joe 
Tobin will act as captain of the California and his assistants will be: 
L. Adams, Dr. Wood, U. S. A., Schmieden, Coleman, A. Taylor, 
W. H. Taylor, Jr., Page, G. Whitney, F. Whitney and Gunn. The 
Oakland Club have also arranged to play the Sacramento Club at an 
early date. 

On Wednesday the ladies gave a fashionable audience quite a treat. 
Count Festetics was highly enthusiastic over the play. The Misses 
Bee and Ethel Hooper played against Miss Morgan and Miss Lord. 
Miss Bee Hooper's underhand drives were excellent. After some 
very good play, the Misses Hooper won by two sets to one — 4-6, 6-1, 
6-3. 

It would be quite interesting to have a match arranged- between 
Miss Morgan and Miss Bee Hooper. They played once and Miss 
Hooper was victorious by two sets to one — 6-1, 4-6, 6-4. 

The club is seriously thinking of going into mourning. Chappie 
Gardner has shaved off his moustache and is going to Hongkong. 



SANFORD S. PRObSER. 

PHARMACY FRANCAIS. 
Ill Grant Ave. Telephone 1SSO 

Parfumkrie Victoria, Rigaud'e & Cie's Lucreeia Graciosa, Louis XV 
and Exorad'Afrique are the latest odors and so different from perfumes 
familiar to everyone. Piveot' Legrand's violet and Roger & Gallet's Lubtn 
and Piuaud's perfumes, Soap. SachanFace Powders, Cosmetics, etc. 

Pinaud's 8 ounce bottles, $3,50 ; regular size reduced from $1.25 to 85 
cents per botile, including Peau d'Phpagne in bulk at 50 cents per ounce. 

Every lady knows that exclusiveness in perfumes is as desirable as 
in dress. __. . 

DODGE BROS., en«ravers.' 

We use Ames' unrivaled Wedding Paper and 
Cards only. They are the medium of all the 
great society events. 

COPPER PLATES. OOR Pfi^T *sT 
WEBBIKfl CABBS. ^J r VO I O I . 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1893 . 



A FAMOUS DUEL. 

TO GIVE an idea of what a brave man can do if he knows 
fencing thoroughly and but keeps cool and collected in dan- 
ger, we will relate an historical duel. So extraordinary is this com- 
bat that it would be held a romance, had it not been witnessed by a 
whole army. The hero is Jean Louis, of whom we have already 
spoken as one of the great masters of the beginning of this century 
and the duel happened in Madrid in 1813. He was the master-at- 
arms of the Thirty-second Regiment of French Infantry; the First 
Regiment, composed entirely o£ Italians, formed part of the same 
brigade. 

Regimental esprit de corps and rival-ies of nationality caused con- 
stant quarrels, when swords were often whipped out or bullets ex- 
changed. After a small battle had occurred in the streets of Madrid, 
in which over two hundred French and Italian soldiers had taken 
part, the officers of the two regiments, in a council of war assembled, 
decided to give such breaches of order a great blow, and to re- 
establish discipline: they decreed that the master-at-arms of the 
two regiments should take up the quarrel and tight it out. 

Imagine a whole army in battle-array on one of the large plains 
that surround Madrid. In the centre a large ring is left open for the 
contestants. This spot is raised above the plain, so that one of the 
spectators of this tragic scene— gayly-dressed officers, soldiers in line, 
Spaniards, excited them — will miss one phase of the contest. It is 
before ten thousand men that the honor of an army is about to be 
avenged in the blood of thirty brave men. 

The drum is heard. Two men, naked to the waist, step in the 
ring. The first is tall and strong; his black eyes roll disdainfully 
upon the gaping crowd; he is Giacomo Ferrari, the celebrated 
Italian. The second, tall, also handsome, and with muscles like 
steel, stands modestly awaiting the word of command: his name is 
Jean Louis. The seconds take their places on either side of their 
principals. A death-like silence ensues. 

"On guard!" 

The two masters cross swords. Giacomo Ferrari lunges repeatedly 
at Jean Louis, but in vain : his every thrust is met by a parry. He 
makes up his mind to bide his chance, and caresses and teases his 
opponent's blade. Jean Louis, calm and watchful, lends himself to 
the play, when, quicker than lightning, the Italian jumps aside with 
a loud yell and makes a terrible lunge at Jean Louis,— a Florentine 
trick, often successful. But, with extraordinary rapidity, Jean 
Louis has parried, and rispots quickly in the shoulder. 

"It is nothing," cries Giacomo, "a mere scratch," and they again 
fall on guard. Almost directly he is hit in the breast. This time 
the sword of Jean Louis, who is now attacking, penetrates deeply. 
Giacomo's face becomes livid, his sword drops from his hand and 
he falls heavily on the turf. He is dead. 

Jean Louis is already in position. He wipes his reeking blade, 
then, with the point of his sword in the ground, he calmly awaits 
the next man. 

The best fencer of the First Regiment has just been carried away 
a corpse; but the day is not yet over. Fourteen adversaries are 
there, impatient to measure swords with the conquerer, burning to 
avenge the master they had deemed invincible. 

Jean Louis has hardly had two niinutesVrest. He is readv. A 
new adversary stands before him. A sinister click of swords is 
heard, a lunge, a parry, a rispot, and then a cry, a sigh, and all Is 
over. A second body is before Jean Louis. 

A third adversary advances. They want Jean Louis to rest. "I 
am not tired," he answers, with a smile. 

The signal is given. The Italian is as tall as the one who lies there 
a corpse covered by a military cloak. He has closely watched Jean 
Louis's play, and thinks he has guessed the secret of his victories. 
He multiplies his feints and tricks, then, all at once, bounding like a 
tiger on his prey, he gives his opponent a terrible thrust in the lower 
line. But Jean Louis's sword has parried, and is now deep within 
his opponent's breast. 

What need to relate any more? Ten new adversaries followed 
him, and the ten fell before Jean Louis amid the excited yells and 
roars of an army. 

At the request of the Thirty-second Regiment's colonel, who 
thought the lesson sufficient, Jean Louis, after much pressing, con- 
sented to stop the combat; and he shook hands with the two' sur- 
vivors, applauded by ten thousand men. 

From that day fights ceased between French and Italian soldiers 

This wonderful and gigantic combat might be held a fable were 
not all the facts above stated still found in the archives of the Min- 
istry of War.— Eugene Van Schaick, in January LippincotVs. 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

|OF LIVERPOOL. 



Capital .. .. 

Net surplus over amiabilities. 



THE SHADOW OF THE CRINOLINE. 

A thing of monstrous size, 
Of bands and hooks and eyes; 

Of steels and springs, of tapes and strings, 
Small wonder groans arise. 
And this horror, like the sword of Damocles, is suspended over 
the feminine bead, to descend in the summer. Dame Fashion, 
who is more antocratic than the Czar of all the Russias, has 
issued her imperial mandate, ''Hoops;" and where is the woman 
bold enough to fling defiance in her face, and go without the 
monstrosity? Women will endure hardships, face danger, suffir 
pain with more fortitude than men, but when it comes to a ques- 
tion of dress, there is not one woman, unless she be a "reformer," 
advocating a costume of her own, who has sufficient bravery to 
stand the verdict of being "out of fashion." For the sake of 
that fashion she will smilingly receive abuse, contumely, vitup- 
eration, pleadings, commands, and continue placidly on her way. 
The reign of the high bat, is an instance of her submission. In 
the past few years the feminine garb has been growing more and 
more consistent with the laws or health, common-sense and good 
taste; and now when women are dressing more sensibly than ever 
before, carrying less weight in their clothes, and conforming 
more to artistic ideas, comes this threatened revolution and return 
to the styles of the Victorian Era, thedressof 1830-1860. A glance 
at the fashion plates of those days and the caricatures in Punch 
shows the female form divine in tremulously extended skirts, 
under which the crinoline tilted, displaying white-clad ankles 
above low Prunella gaiters. The bonnet was a huge structure of 
feathers, flowers and streamers, while on either temple of the 
wearer dangled a bunch of curls. Accept the crinoline, and the 
rest will follow. Not a woman but groans and protests when 
that ' horrible hoop ' is mentioned, and yet the brightest and 
cleverest will submit to the edict of Messrs. Worth and Redfern, 
and meekly accept what they choose to pronounce the thing. The 
majority of women have no stamina or backbone where dress is 
concernrd. No wonder the charge of lack of gray matter is laid 
upon them when they show so little sense over a matter which 
concerns them so materially. The advent of the crinoline, with 
its accompaniment of voluminous skirts, means bodily fatigue 
and subsequent ill-health to the wearer. It is a destroyer of all 
artistic lines and grace of carriage. It will change the woman of 
to-day, with her symmetrical lines and sofily falling draperies, 
intoa guy with distended skirt-* and outlines suggestive of a Dutch 
churn. Yet, knowing all this, and protesting vehemently against 
the change, ii will require a mightier power than has yet appeared 
to keep her from becoming a victim of ber own free will, lest the 
dreadful judgment be passed upon her, " old style." Verily the 
mothers and daughters of the nation are exceeding bard to under- 
stand, and wise is he who gives up the solution, and lets them 
" gang their ain gait; " they will go it anyway. 

OBITUARY. 



William Macdonald, Manager. 
D. E. A/Ties, Assistant Manager. 

315 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCI8CO. 



$10,637,5no 
...3,116,3Qo 



ALBERT TOUCHARD, the oldest son of the late Mr. Gnstave 
Touchard died of pleural pneumonia at his residence in Oak- 
land on Tuesday, December 27th. His death was sudden and 
unexpected. On Friday he was slightly indisposed, Sunday and 
Monday seriously sick, and on Tuesday the hand of death touched 
him, and beckoned him away from his bed of suffering. He 
was a student, not only of books butof human nature, evidenced 
by productions from his pen, by his sage observations and 
sparkling repartee. Kindness, courteousness and generosity 
were prominent traits in his character and no one knew better 
than he that the essence of true happiness here consisted in the 
rigid observance of the scriptural saying "It is more blessed to 
give than to receive." From the natural promptings of a pure 
heart he was an exemplary young man, and all his pleasures 
were found at h^me or among a select few. Being of a retiring 
disposition his qualities showed to far better advantage midst 
the quiet, select circle of his acquaintances than in large gather- 
ings. He was esteemed and loved by all who knew him as a 
devout, humble Christian and one whose character was pure and 
unblemished. He leaves a mother, two sisters and a brother to 
mourn bis loss. 

Dr. John F. Foulkes, formerly police surgeon of this city, who 
died recently in Arizona, was buried from St. John's Episcopal 
ch u r ch, Oakland, on Wednesday last. _^^^^___^^^^^^_ 

"loflCEinSSESSMENT. 

Seg. Belcher and Mides Consolidated Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— dan Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the5tndayof January, 1893, an assessment (No. 11) of Twenty-five (26) Cents 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
Immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 4, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the 7th Day of February. 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction: and, unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 27th day of February, 1893, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising ana 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of D*™*™^^ Secretary 

Office-Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Prte* per Copy, 10 Cent*. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




<&n\ifoxnmj£bbtxtx sex. 




Vol. XLVI. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1893. 



Number 2. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran. 
Cisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



THE office of the News Letter in New York City has been es- 
tablished at 196 Broadway, room 14, where information may 
be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 



K 



EEP your hand on your purse when there is a man about 
who prates of the dishonesty of others. 



[R dealing with Women, a man is in danger only when he has 
reached the point at which he considers himself safe. 



[T is just as well to speaK no evil of the dead. You know per- 
fectly well what it is in the power of the living to say of you. 



THE California Turf Club opened its race meeting at the Bay 
District Track last Tuesday. Keep your hand on your watch I 



PALERMO shows a very handsome arcade and market palace 
at the Pavilion. Butte county's display includes the best 
variety of all the citrus fruits displayed. 



IT is not remarkable that Ben Butler should have died. All men 
die. But that he should have died without taking the world 
into his confidence! That is the extraordinary thing. 

REGISTRAR BROWiv says that he has been removed from office 
because of his honesty. Registrar Brown should have found 
out long ago that men are not in politics for their honesty. 



THE first thing some irreverent San Francisco scribe knows 
Annie Besant will reach out her astral hand and take him by 
the nape of the neck — and what will he do then, poor thing? 



ASSEMBLYMAN ALFORD, who has been appointed Chairman 
of the Committee on Corporations, is one of the young mem- 
bers ef the Legislature who will doubtless make his mark. 



LEGISLATURES, after all, do not come i.ito being without 
some good purpose. The rest of us need the moral tonic 
afforded by the contemplation of our own superior honesty — 
when we have not been tempted. 



BARRING the fact that Jefferis did not kill Miss Ayers, a 
pretty plain case of murder seems to have been made out 
against the engineer. He should have killed her, you know, if 
only to have made the facts of the case fit the theory of the 
detectives. 

IN their report the Yoseraite Valley Commissioners give the in- 
teresting information that the Yosemite Valley was formerly 
a forest park, dotted with open meadows. We are glad to know 
it. Now it is a private park, dotted with barbed wire fences and 
oyster cans. 

JOHN F. BURRIS has filed a document in the Superior Court, 
which is signed "John F. Burris, Pro-per Person." It is not 
long ago that there was a widespread belief in this community, 
baaed upon certain Court proceedings, that John F. Burris was 
by no means a "proper person." 



THE Chronicle, the Examiner and the Oakland Tribune each is- 
sued an excellent New Year's edition. The Chronicle, as 
usual, was filled with interesting statistics regarding the growth 
of the State; the Examiner had several good literary features, and 
the Tribune was in all respects a most praiseworthy paper. 



EMERIC, of Alameda, has introduced a bill in the Assembly to 
have every Sheriff in the State appointed a Game and Fish 
Warden, and to empower tbem to make arrests for violations of 
the game laws. For their services, the bill provides that they 
shall be paid $10 for every arrest and $20 for every conviction. 
At this rate the State would go broke iu short order. Hundreds 
of tramps would make a fine living in allowing themselves to be 
arrested, and dividing the $10 with the Sheriff. This is worse 
than the coyote scalp bill. 



IT appears now that Billy Carlson, the Independent Assembly- 
man from San Iliego, was elected "just as a joke," the bulk of 
the votes cast for him being deposited by those who simply "did 
it for fun." As Mr. Carlson has it within bis power to cast the 
deciding vote for United States Senator, the dangers of that kind 
of idiocy by which be was given such power become fully ap- 
parent. 

A CLAIM that should receive the favorable consideration of the 
Legislature is (hat of Dennis Jordan for $79,000 for work done 
on the Folsom Prison. It was passed at the Twenty-seventh, 
Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth sessions of the Legislature, but 
on account of some technicalities was not signed by the Gov- 
ernors. It is a just claim, being a demand only for the return by 
the State of money actually expended upon a building now and 
for years past used by the State. 

THE Ladies' Auxiliary to the World's Fair Association, which 
modestly asked $50,000 from the county to aid in its work, 
does not make much of a showing at the Mechanics' Pavilion. 
The principal exhibits in its booth are a model of the Chronicle 
building and lot of old City Directories on a bay-rope. The pre- 
sumption is that the Chronicle model is to give the East an idea 
about the architectural beauty (?) of our buildings, and the Direc- 
tories are probably a literary exhibit. 

THE good citizens of this city will hail with delight the enact- 
ment of the proposed law prohibiting prize-fights. We have 
had enough of prize-fights and prize-fighters. Of late the contests 
have become only so many schemes for the robbery of the pub- 
lic. They should be prohibited, and prize-fighters and those who 
live off them should be made to work or go to jail. The latest 
fight was between a worthless negro and a sneak-thief. Both 
men would look well in stripes. 



ELI W. PLAYTER was worried to death by the politicians of 
Oakland. The reflection that bis death has not been altogether 
in vain will probably afford him small consolation now, if the 
names of the dead ever reflect at all; but, after all, it is some- 
thing to have shown the world that there was one man who 
could not go on breathing in the political atmosphere of Oakland. 
It is also something to contemplate in advance, the fate stored 
up for the politicians of Oakland. 



STATE Senator Elliott McAllister, representing Contra Costa and 
Marin counlies, has for the past few days been the object of 
an unwarranted newspaper attack regarding the position he as- 
sumed during the Senatorial contest between Foote and White. 
Senator McAllister emphatically states that his position on this 
matter was always clear and honorable, and that he has in no 
way violated any of his pledges to his party nor to any one else. 
His friends cheerfully substantiate these statements. 



GOVERNOR MARKHAM'S intention of appointing F. S. Chad- 
bourne Harbor Commissioner, to succeed C. O. Alexander, is 
very satisfactory to the people of San Francisco, and especially 
to the merchants duing business on the water front. Mr. Chad- 
bourne has been a merchant for several years in this city, and 
always public spirited. He served three terms as foreman of the 
Grand Jury to the entire satisfaction of the people, and has been 
instrumental in bringing about many needed reforms. Through 
his support, the Supervisors were induced to [appropriate money 
for the present police patrol system. It was always a mystery 
to us why Mr. Chadbourne did not enter public life before this. 

ONE of the Directors of the Turlock Irrigation District is re- 
ported to bave purchased five more $500 bonds of that Dis- 
trict to furnish the means for the payment of the running ex- 
penses of that organization The Tulare Register remarks in this 
connection that the bond-purchaser referred to is regarded just 
now as a public benefactor, and asks: " Will he be denounced 
as a plunderer and an oppressor of tbe poor about the time those 
bonds become due?" Since the sale of bonds for the purpose 
mentioned is entirely illegal and without authority of law, it is 
altogether probable that there may be more or less trouble in col- 
lecting the same. Irrigation District Directors ought to study the 
law a little more closely before performing such illegal acts as 
this. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Jan. 14, 1893. 



WHAT WILL CLEVELAND DO? 



THE recent utterances of the President-elect are marked very 
distinctly with an almost oppressive aenge of the gravity of 
the situation ahead, as well as with an ill-disguised fear that his 
party associates may not prove equal to the just expectations of 
the country. There has to be a very discernable change in the 
incidence of taxation, and a decidedly appreciable reduction in its 
amount. If this be not done the agitation of the past four years 
will have been as sounding brass and tinkling cymbal. There 
will have been much cry, but little wool, and, when four years 
have rolled around a disappointed people will not forget that 
they were duped by aery that proved, in the mouths of half-hearted 
Congressmen, to be a sham, a delusion and a snare. It may be 
doubted whether any other member of his party realizes all this 
with the force that Mr. Cleveland himself does. It may be said, 
in this connection, that something akin to the cares of paternity 
are upon him. The issue which the country, upon reflection, re- 
sponded to with such force of numbers was of his creation. What 
the country really did in November last was, after a sober second 
thought, to give a mandate to Congress to clothe with the force of 
law the principles of Mr. Cleveland's tariff message of five years 
ago. That is the business ahead that must be undertaken with 
courage and pushed through to completion without halt or hesita- 
tion. Any discussion of the wisdom of such a policy would now 
be out of place, an insult to the people who, in the exercise of 
their plenary power, have duly considered and determined it, and 
a menace to our form of government, which would be a delusion 
if the constitutionally rendered verdict of the sovereign people 
did not prevail. There can now be no crying back, and there 
onght to be no disposition to do so. Mr. Cleveland's policy is 
now the people's policy, and that renders it disloyal to hesitate, 
and traitorous to seek to pare down and whittle away the scope 
and purpose of the popular verdict. But it is one thing to say 
that a particular policy has to be carried out, and quite another 
to do it. What Mr. Cleveland originally proposed was easily done 
at that time; it is a much more difficult task now. The Repub- 
licans, under the lead of McKinley and Reed, have spent four 
years since then in placing obstuction^ in the way. In the first 
place they have changed the figures of the public ledger. The 
enormous surplus piled up during Cleveland's administration, 
and which called forth and justified his message, has wholly dis- 
appeared, and the probabilities are that a considerable deficiency 
will have to be encountered. Once again it is » a condition, and 
not a theory" which confronts Cougress. But it is a changed 
condition— a vastly changed one— in point of fact. There is a 
wide gulf of difference between a full treasury and one tbat is 
empty and in debt. Moreover, appropriations more or less per- 
manent, of which the enlarged pension list is a sample, have been 
greatly increased since 1888, as witness the acta of the billion dol- 
lar Congress. Again, important sources of revenue have been 
either neglected or abandoned. The revenue from opium, through 
neglect, is not half what it ought to be. Sugar, instead of produc- 
iug a very large income, now causes a considerable outgo in the 
shape of bounties to people who consent to engage in a not other- 
wise profitable enterprise. These facts render it painfully appar- 
ent that the difficulties in the way of reducing the burdens of the 
people have, within the last four years, been swollen to a maxi- 
mum. Yet, as we have aeen, those burdens must be reduced. The 
incoming party has so promised, and the people have so willed. 
But how is it to be done? The building of the new navy up to 
the capacity of protecting our commerce must go on. Log-roll- 
ing Congressmen can be depended on to keep up the River and 
Harbor appropriations. The pension roll, under existing statutes 
which nobody would venture to repeal, will grow longer rather 
than shorter. The reimposition of the sugar duties would not be 
tolerated and would not be reduction of taxation if it would. 
The permanent appropriations for running the government and 
paying the interest on the national debt cannot be touched. 
Palpably in order to reduce income there must be a reduction of 
outgoings. What cheese can be pared, what salary shaved, what 
leak stopped or, in short, what substantial saving made that 
will permit of the promises made to the people being kepi? It is 
in very truth a difficult problem to solve, and President-elect 
Cleveland may well be excused if, like our Judge Coffey, he lies 
awake of nights worrying over things. Yet the changed con- 
dition with which he is confronted must be met and dialt witb 
upon the lines he himself has laid down. We do not think the 
problem insoluble to strong men who will handle it heroicly, but 
therein is likely to consist Mr. Cleveland's real difficulty. Con- 
gress is not made up of men of that class. There are too many 
men of the calibre of "Murphy the Brewer" in it, and their num- 
ber is not likely to lessen. Pray the strong man who will be in 
the White House never soearuestly, and remonstrate he never so 
loudly, he will be hardly likely to arouse the horde of mediocri- 
ties who have ridden into Congress on his popularity, to a due 
sense of the imperative necessity of realizing popular expecta- 
tions. 



THE FEDERAL OFFICES. 

THE "workers" are greatly disturbed over the question as to 
who shall fill the Federal offices on this Coast under the in- 
coming Administration. They may as well preserve their souls 
in peace. Hardly one of the fraternity we allude to will get "a 
smell." They are not of the class who seek office as "a public 
trust," and therefore they are not "in it" with the strong man 
who will go to the White House on the 4th of next March. 
Moreover, it ia idle to say tbat they were in any exclusive sense 
"the workers." Not one of them would have had Orover Cleve- 
land nominated if it had been possible to prevent it, and all that 
any of them did to secure his election was nothing to nobody. 
That California was carried was not because of but in spite of 
their efforts. Never was there a campaign in this State in which 
thfre was so little and such half-hearted work done. It took care 
of if self, and the result would hive teen pretty much the same 
had there been no Campaign Committee and no so-called workers. 
The fact is that the Democratic politicians of the bread and but- 
ter kind had not the remotest idea that the State would go the 
way it did. It was an election of ideas and principles — a kind of 
stock in trade with which [they are not in touch. Grover Cleve- 
land's inherent strength with the people, who believed in his 
principles, his capacity, his sincerity, and his sturdy manhood, 
carried California, and the professional politicians had as little to 
do with producing the result as the fly on the wheel has with 
causing its revolutions. The election of '92 was not won during 
the three or four months preceding the polling day, The educa- 
tional efforts of the independent press, beginning from the start- 
ing point of Cleveland's celebrated message and continuing 
through good and ill report for four years, bad rendered the 
splendid achievement of November tat-t a foregone conclusion. 
On the Pacific Coast, at least, the incoming President owes no 
political debts, unless, indeed, it be to the thoughtful writers who 
were the John the Baptists to his success. That class, as a class, 
will not seek office, and it will be well that office abould not be 
thrust upon them. They are better employed serving ihe public 
in their present capacity. President Harrison spoiled several 
good editors by creating as many indifferent public servants, and 
in the end took nothing by his bid for slavish press support. The 
better "recognition" that can be given earnest writers is to pay 
heed to their timely warnings against possible mistakes, and 
these we have reason for saying, the President-elect will invite 
and respect. That being so, the hungr y crowd of political loafers 
who are now hawking around petitions for office had better cease 
from troubling, and go to work. 



IN FAVOR OF ANARCHISTS. 

ASSEMBLYMAN THOMAS, of Santa Clara, has introduced a 
bill into the Assembly, which is more plainly an endeavor to 
give legislative support to anarchistic assaults upon life and 
property than any other measure that has ever been presented, 
even at Sacramento. His bill provides that the National Guard, 
or any division, brigade, battalion, regiment or company thereof, 
shall not be called into active service, or if so called, no officer or 
private need respond thereto in a case for the purpose of quelling 
any disturbance caused by any strike or lockout, nor for the pur- 
pose of dispelling any gathering of persons engaged in any such 
strike or lockout; nor for the purpose of protecting any property 
belonging to any person or corporation against whom a strike or 
lockout is pending, when such property shall be threatened with 
destruction at the hands of any person or persona engaged in such 
strike or lockout, unless the person or corporation asking such 
protection shall first have made an offer of submission to arbitra- 
tion of all alleged differences which caused such strike or lockout 
or caused the same to be maintained. Nor shall the aid or as- 
sistance of the National Guard be given or rendered to any per- 
son or corporation in the protection of bis or its property during 
the progress of a strike or lockout of his or its employes, unless 
such person or corporation shall have paid all the taxes then due 
that may have been levied against it under any law of the State 
of California. If such a bill aa this should become law, employera 
would be placed immediately at the mercy of those demagogues 
who rule the labor unions, and whose means of subsistence de- 
pend upon frequent difficulties between master and man. We do 
not object to labor matters being submitted to arbitration, but 
unless an employer received protection from mobs of strikers, be 
would be forced into any compromise that the workmen may 
dictate. The workmen are very powerful. They have no need 
of greater power, for if they conduct iheir affairs in an honest 
and conservative manner, they will receive all just demands. It 
is only wneu they become unreasonable, and demand that to 
which they have no right in law or in equity, that trouble en- 
sues Then an employer has a right to call for protection upon 
the State forces, which are sworn to uphold the peace and dignity 
of the commonwealth, and he should receive such protection. 
We cannot entertain for a moment the idea that any body of 
legislators would pass such a law as that proposed by the gentle- 
man from Santa Clara. 



Jan. 14, 



SVN FRAN< [SCO NEWS LETTER 



AUSTRALIA AT THE WORLDS FAIR. 



ALTHOUGH New Sooih Wale? will be the only Australian Col- 
ony officially represent ed at tbe Chicago Exhibition, her 

exhibit will be ft very Urge one. ami fully representative of the 
resources of the preat island continent. New South Wftlefl will 
occupy 10,000 superficial feet in the mining section. Complete 
collections of gold, silver, coal, shale, tin, copper, antimony, bis- 
muth, cobalt, tungsten, mercury, iron, magnesia and other ores, 
non-metallic minerals and gem stones have been prepared by the 
Department of Mines, in addition to a very large and valuable 
collection sent by the Sydney University and other extensive 
private ones. 

A large and complete collection of fossils from the principal sedi- 
mentary formations will illustrate the geology of the colony. 
The northern and southern coal fields will be represented by a 
number of •• full sections*' of the seams worked in some of the 
principal mines. Seams of petroleum oil and kerosene shale will 
be exhibited in bulk, while a large number of enormous blocks 
of coal is being sent for the erection of a large coal trophy. Bulk 
exhibits of the various silver and silver-lead ores from all parts of 
the colony have been prepared, as well as ingots of silver and sil- 
ver lead, and the great Broken Hill Proprietary Company's 
exhibit will include a very handsome and imposing column, rep- 
resenting the bulk of the silver (30.500,000 ounces) won since they 
commenced smeltiqg. up to May, 1892. Quartz and other speci- 
mens of gold-bearing rocks are being sent from the principal gold 
fields, and the exhibit of tin will embrace a large trophy of ingots. 
Copper, iron and other ores are also being sent from all districts 
producing those minerals. 

The exhibit of wool is looked upon by our Australian cousins 
as a very important one, as they hope to obtain differential duties 
In favor of Australian wool as one of the results of the Chicago 
exhibition. With this view, a special committee was formed, 
consisting of wool-growers and brokers, who have prepared a 
very carefully selected exhibit, comprising every description of 
colonial wool in fleece and bale. This wool will be especially 
classed to suit the American market. 

The fine art contributions will include pictures from the com- 
petitive section of the Art Society and paintings sent on loan 
from the National Art Gallery of New South Wales, while about 
800 photographic views of the colony, enlargements by the brom- 
ide process, will illustrate the principal public buildings, churches, 
university, railway bridges, etc. Among these views is a pano- 
rama of the city of Sydney, 21 feet 6 inches long by 30 inches in 
width, and another 17 feet by 30 inches. No less than 16,000 
superficial feet of wall space will be required for these pictures. 

The section of forestry will be represented by full and com- 
plete collections of all the different woods and timbers found in 
the colony. Some months ago nearly 100 tons of orchids and 
ferns were sent to Chicago for the purpose of acclimatizing them 
preparatory to their being used for the decoration of the courts. 

Complete sections of wooden block street paving will be shown. 
Some of the Australian gums, by reason of their durability, are 
peculiarly adapted for street paving and railway sleepers and 
building purposes. In the department of viticulture a large 
exhibit of all the various wines manufactured in the colony will 
be on view for sampling, as well as large photographs illustrating 
the work on the vineyards, making the wine, wine cellars, etc. 
Very complete and valuable collections have been prepared, illus- 
trative of the natural history of Australia and the South Seas, 
and the exhibit of the numerous birds of brilliant plumage, and 
the different species of marsupials will be very interesting. The 
Commission have taken great pains to secure representative eth- 
nological collections of the Australian aboriginees — their weapons, 
stone and flint, knives and tomahawks, fishing and hunting im- 
plements, carvings, etc., as well as photographs of the vaiious 
types. An exact representative settlers' hut will be erected in 
the Exhibition grounds as illustrative of the life of the Australian 
pioneers. 

Marble slabs and a large and complete exhibit of building stones 
will also be sent to Chicago. 

A number of books and pamphlets have been prepared at the 
Government printing office for free distribution at Chicago, illus- 
trative of the colony generally, its geology, pastoral and mineral 
resources, ethnology statistics, wealth and progress, among which 
is a very complete geographical encyclopaedia, handsomely bound, 
containing 462 pages of instructive matter, illustrated with maps 
and diagrams, and containing full information about every town 
and village, river and mountain in the colony, postal and tele- 
graphic information and full details of harbors, rivers, docks and 
wharfage, the different tonnage duties, harbor and pilot rates, 
depth of water. These books are to be distributed at the World's 
Fair, with the object of affording information to visitors and pro- 
moting commercial relations with Australia. After the closing ot 
the World's Columbian Exposition, the greater por ion of the 
Australian exhibits will be forwarded to London and presented 
to the New South Wales Court in the Imperial Institute. From 
first to last New South Wales will spend $200,000 to secure proper 
representation at Chicago. 



BOSS SULLIVAN. 

EX-JUDGE SULLIVAN Is the undoubted Bom of this great 
city's local politics. Me, perhaps wisely, kept his hands oft* 
St it. and national affairs, except as is charged, to the extent of 
making » dickers " to benefit bis local ticket. He lessened the 
area of antagonisms by this process and thereby promoted the 
prospects of the straight Democratic ticket, which, with few ex- 
ceptions, won. In him, so far as power goes, a new Buckley has 
arisen. The question is troubling many minds as to the use be 
will make of his power. Happily, no one suspects that he will 
apply it to the dishonest gathering in of pelf and plunder, as 
Buckley did. As limes go, that is saying a great deal. It is 
much, very much, to have achieved, no matter through whom 
or by what process, a city government that can be trusted with 
the handling of money. We do Judge Sullivan and his nominees 
the justice to say that we confidently believe that they can be so 
trusted. If we should prove to be right in that belief, so phe- 
nomenal a gain will have been made for this city that we may 
for the present be content to bear a few ills that are said to be in 
process of development. The monster evil was the turning of 
everything in sight into plunder. The struggle against that evil 
has been long and arduous, and if we have at last escaped from 
it, only to Hy to others that we wot not of, we are disposed to be 
thankful and to hope for the best. It is urged against Sullivan 
that he has, in an inordinate degree, the lust of power. Well, it 
is difficult to see how a man could aspire and labor to be a polit- 
ical Boss without a lust of some kind. Sullivan's is not an ignoble 
.passion ; Buckley's was. It is very much a question of the ends 
intended to be subserved. If the purpose be, as we believe it is, 
to import common honesty into what has hitherto proven to be a 
den of thieves, the city can tolerate the exercise of not a little of 
that kind of power with advantage. If the new Boss can keep 
his men straight in this respect, we are inclined to bespeak more, 
rather than less, power to his elbow. As might have been ex- 
pected, he is already encountering difficulties in this direction. 
For once our sympathies are not with " the kickers." The sus- 
picion is that they are kicking over the traces because they do 
not want to go straight. We care not how hard the driver lays 
on the lash and whips such recreants into line again. It is true 
that the new Boss owes his rise to power to the Iambs he drew 
from an institution of a religious character. Well, Buckley and 
Kelly and Crimmins drew theirs from a very different kind of 
fold. Sullivan will not need to run the criminal courts in order 
to protect his followers. Besides, if we must have a Boss, it is 
well that he should not be strong enough to become our master, 
and no man can ever become that in this cosmopolitan com- 
munity, whose strength is comprised within the segment of a 
circle. In the nature of things Sullivan's reign cannot be for 
long, and, when the time comes, a cry will suffice to "knock 
him out." 



TOO MANY COURTS. 



SAN FRANCISCO is blessed, or cursed, as the case may be, 
with as many Judges as suffice to do the whole legal business 
of England, civil and cr.cuinal, and yet, astounding to say, the 
cry is that our city is in need of nothing so much as more Judges! 
We have seven Supreme Judges, twelve Superior Courts are pre- 
sided over by as many Superior (?) Judges. The poor man's litiga- 
tion requires five Justices of the Peace Courts, and our criminals are 
attended to by three Police Courts, which is at least one too many. 
Yet the Legislature is being importuned to give us three more 
Superior Courta and one more Police Court. It is an impudent 
request, that ought to meet with no favor. It is not approved by 
the best men on the bench, and is not sanctioned by thoughtful 
public opinion. If a firm man had the assigning of the cases in 
the Superior Courts and the power to keep the Judges at their 
work, the business of those Courts could easily be disposed of in 
much shorter time than it now is. When two or more cases are 
ready for trial in one Court and none in another, why should not a 
reassignment be there and then made and acted upon on the spot? 
Then litigation would be much shortened in its duration and 
reduced in its volume, if the Supreme Court were required to set- 
tle instead of unsettle cases. When it has the facts and the law 
before it, it ought to declare what the verdict in civil cases ought 
to be, and not put litigants to the trouble and expense of a new 
trial. That is the practice elsewhere. Ours is more of an appel- 
late court in name than in fact. It ought to apply the law as 
well as construe it. 



IN the sun-kissed lexicon of the Southern Citrus Belt, "political 
organization" means the possession ot the secret of making 
the other fellows stand out of your way without a contest, and 
Stephen M. White is the great prophet of the new dispensation. 
Mr. White is going to have harmony if nobody besides himself 
ever gets to the Senate. What sweet content, by the way, would 
be brought into the affairs of San Francisco if only this semi- 
tropic secret were whispered to Mr. Dwyer, or Mr. Sullivan, or 
Mr. Kelly, or Mr. Crimmins, or Mr. Dan Burns, or Mr. M. H. de 
Young. 



SAN FBAKCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jiin. 14, 18P3 



DISGRACEFUL STREET WORK. 

THE street contractors of this city have been having thiDgs 
their own way for years past, and it is high time thai some 
action was taken to protect property-owners from outrage and 
robbery under the guise of improvements. Immunity from richly 
deserved punishment has made these cormorants so bold and 
daring that they have in many instances had the temerity to 
threaten small property-owners, too weak or too timid to pro- 
tect themselves, and not infrequently have been, assisted by 
corrupt confederates in the Street Department and the Board of 
Supervisors in carrying out their iniquitous schemes. The city 
has been districted among certain cliques, and so closely has the 
business been concentrated, that no independent man in the busi- 
ness with honest intentions could bid for work with any 
chance of getting it in opposition to the rings. Complaint to the 
Street Department afforded no relief, and the Street Committee 
was if anything worse, some " friend" always managing matters 
so that the contractor was insured his bill. And then the work! 
Take the streets to-day for a sample of it, especially where the 
rubbish termed bitumen has been plastered over mud and peb- 
bles. As a case in point now under consideration, there is the 
block between Valencia and Mission, where an investigation 
shows that the " bitumen" is laid less than two inches thick on 
concrete which consists of mud and stones, according to the 
official report. As for the sewers, the less said the better. One 
contractor, named Dowling, has just finished one on Chestnut 
street, between Jones and Leavenworth, which is worth the in- 
spection of those who are interested in exterminating diphthe- 
ria and typhoid fever. Built in a half circle, regardless of specif!-" 
cations, it is a fair specimen of a street contractor's handiwork. 
And yet the last Street Committee of the Supervisors said it was 
all right, and that contractor Dowling was justly entitled to col- 
lect his bills against the property owners. Things must have come 
to a pretty pass here, when such conduct on the part of officials 
is permitted to escape notice in the courts. 

"THE FIRE ALARMS." 



THE fire alarms that have of late been so numerous should be a 
warning to our mercantile community that, any hour of the 
night, their property may be endangered by fire. 

The past week has been a very disastrous one; in all, the fire 
bells and whistles sounded the alarm twenty-one times, and seven- 
teen out of the number were after business hours. 

To hear the clang of the bell, and the whistle blowing, is enough 
to make any man who has large or small interest in the business 
portion be a little anxious. 

Fire Dispatch is becoming so popular that older and larger cities 
in the East are adopting San Francisco ideas. 

The Commercial Fire Dispatch Company, of this city, guaran- 
tees to each subscriber instant transmission to the place of busi- 
ness in the event of any danger from fire, either in his business 
premises or endangering proximity. 

One of oar reporters called on Mr. John H. Wise, President of 
the Commercial Fire Dispatch Company to ascertain the ad- 
vantages to be obtained by becoming a subscriber to the com- 
pany, was referred to the Vice President, Mr. Samuel H. Brown, 
the Fire Commissioner, who was not backward in showing the 
books of the company, with subscribers numbering one thousand 
eight hundred. 

Not only did the company have the leading wholesale mer- 
chants, but the retailers as well. 

At every fire since its organization five years ago, this com- 
pany has rendered valuable service in notifying and conveying 
to the spot, owners or employed of the endangered property, and 
it is not surprising that it has come to be generally recognized 
among business men as one of the most important auxilliaries of 
the salvage service of the Fire Department. 

OBITLPARY. 



HENRY M. HALE, a pioneer merchant, and of the late firm of 
Hussey, Bond & Hale, died in the Alms House on the 6th 
inst., in his 72nd year. He was for eight years Auditor of the 
City and County, and later acted as book-keeper for Meyer, Wil- 
son & Co., of this city. He was a native of Boston, and came 
here in 1850. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church 
in the days of Rev. Albert Williams. For a season Mr. Hale was 
an inmate of the Crocker Old Peoples Home, but a few months 
ago was removed by friends to the Alms House, under the special 
care of Mr. and Mrs. Weaver, Superintendent and Matron. Mr. 
Hale was buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery in a private lot of Mr. 
Tallant's. 

The funeral was attended by Messrs. Tallant, Meyer and Wilson, 
and the matron of the Hospital. Rev. Dr. Willie officiated at the 
funeral. 



IT was to have been expected, perhaps, that the French, being 
more intense, should go to greater lengths in corruption than 
men of colder race, but who would have believed that an Ameri- 
can statesman had so much to learn in the way of expediting leg- 
islation! 



GUESTS who have enjoyed the many comforts coinci- 
dent with residence at the Palace Hotel, no matter for how 
brief a period, will hail with great delight the reopening of the 
American dining room at that popular house. During the summer 
months, as many of the regular guests of the hotel went out of the 
city, the management closed the dining room. Now, however, it 
has acceded to the requests of its patrons and has reopened the din- 
ing room, where all guests mav now enjoy meals that are unsur- 
passed in excellence in the city with all that comfort that is abso- 
lutelv necessary to a full appreciation of the good things of the table. 
The Palace has* a famous chef, who takes professsonal pride in put- 
ting before those who are made happy by his efforts, the most entic- 
ing menus that ever made life glorious to a hon vivant, or sorely 
tempted a sybarite. 



THE President of the Blood Horse Association, in his annual 
report, refers with praise to everything done by the Associa- 
tion during the past year. Now the numerous people who were 
robbed at the meeting of the Association should be heard. If 
they should talk, we would receive the benefit of an animated 
dissertation on the evils of horse-racing, uttered in beautiful lan- 
guage, soft and sweet." 

Couslis ami Cold*. Tho^e who are suffering from Coughs, Colds. 
Sore Throat, etc., should try Brown's Bronchial Troches. Sold only in 
boxes. 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup' 
children while teething. 



for your 



&C0. * 



REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND GENERAL AUCTIONEERS, 

14 MONTGOMERY ST., S. F. 

AT AUCTION 

WEDNESDAY, February I, 1893. 

AT 1 2 O'CLOCK M. 

AT THE 

REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE BUILDING, 

16 POST ST., S F. 

THE ESTATE 

op 

CHARLES E. S. MACDONALD 

WILL BE SOLD 

BY ORDER OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. 



First— Improvements and lot, 25x75, at Nos 427 and 427% Clementina St., 
S E line, distant 300 feet S \V of Fifth. 

Second— 928 Folsom st., N\V Hue, 300 feet SW of Fifhh; improvements and 
lot, 2-5x85 feet. 

Third — N W corner Drumni and Commercial streets: improvements and 
lot. 50x59%: 50 feet front ou Commercial st., fine business property. 

Fourth— Nos. 113-115 Leidsdorff street, W. line, 117^ feet N of California 
street, theuce N of 35x55 feet, aud improvements consisting of brick build- 
lae. 

Fifth— N E oruer Folsom and Beale streets, thence N E on Folsom St., 
91-3 feet by a uniform depth of 137}^ feet, with improvements; excellent 
manufacturing district. 

Sixth— Lot 55, Grift Map I, being 25x70 feet in size; situated on the S E 
line of Case st , distant 450 feet S W of Weldon 

Seventh— Lots 4 aud - r >, block 34, Paul tract, being 100x120 feet, tituated 
on the W Hue of Girard street, 150 feet N of the N W corner of Girard and 
Wilde. 

Eighth— 5 lots each 25x100, on the SW line of Teneriffe street (Fifteenth 
ave.), 300 feet N W of Potomac street (R street); also 3 lots, each 25x100, N 
E line of Falkland street (Sixteenth ave), dis ant 325 feet N W of Potomac 
street tR street); part of block 303, O'Neil and Haley Tract. 

Ninth— Lot 150x100 feet in size, S W. line of Sumatra street (Seventeenth 
avenue\ 50 feet N W of Sau Joft«juin street (S street) ; part of block 342 of the 
O'Neil aud Haley Tract. 

Tenth— 50x109, NE line of Dominica street (Twelfth avenue), 150 S E of 
Santee street (G. street), thence SE 50 by 100, South San Francisco Home- 
stead and Railroad Association . 

E eveuth— Roadside resort on San Bruno road and bay shore, house and 
lot, 13 acres of tide land, known asEight-mile House aud also "MaeDonald's 
Ranch." San Mateo county. 

Twelfth— About 225 acres tide lands near the town of Sau Mateo; deep 
water for wharf; belDg the SW quarter of section 8, township 4 south, range 
4 west and lots land 2, seetiou 17, township 4 south, range 4 west, Mount 
Diablo meridian. 

TERMS OF SALE: 

Ten per cent cash at time of sale, balance cash when sale is confirmed by 
court; abstract of title furnished free to date; 20 days allowed to examine 
title. , , „ . 

For further particulars applv to either the undersigned referees: 

G. H. UMB3EN, 14 Montgomery Street. 
THOS. ARCHER, 320 Sausome Street. 
GEO. E. KING, 533 Kearny Street. 
Or G. H UMBSEN A CO., Auctioneers, 14 Montgomery St. 



Jan. 14, 1893. 



3AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETT] R 



SNAP SHOTS. 
[Hi Di Vebxoh.] 

THERE is no folly Rreater than continued explanation. The 
man who is constantly apologizing is a bore, and the woman 
who is so self-conscious that she la Always begging to be excused 
for what no one noticed her enough to see that she did, is one to 
be avoided. It is not well always to look back. A disaster over- 
took Lot's wife for not looking in the directioi. in which she was 
going, and those people who are always casting timorous or self- 
deprecatory glances over their shoulder, are quite apt to run into 
something that lies directly before them. 

It is the little graces of manner that make up a charming per- 
sonality. So few people know how to receive a favor graciously. 
Ask them to render you a service, and they could not be more 
ready than they are. But try to offer them a courtesy, and see 
how quickly you will retire from their presence with a feeling of 
wounded pride and annoyance. Some will refuse outright, and 
others will accept as if they were bestowing a royal condescen- 
sion. To accept something that we do not want, for which we 
have no use, to accept it in such a manner that the one who 
offers it will feel that be has rendered a desired service is the 
height of consideration and good breeding. I know that the 
strong, capable and able-bodied do not like to be served. It is so 
much easier to serve one's self than to lie back and be wailed 
upon. They truly feel that it is more blessed to give than to re- 
ceive; blessed, perhaps, because they do not want to receive. 
But such people would deny to others what they claim most 
strenuously for themselves, the right to confer a favor or to dis- 
charge an obligation, the sense of which sets heavily upon them. 
That large and kindly sisterhood, known as the "Kiig's 
Daughters," hold as a cardinal principle that it is a privilege as 
well as a duty to offer little acts of courtesy to those who may 
need them, albeit that the proposed recipients of such delicate 
attentions are perfect strangers to a King's Daughter. I saw an 
instance of such service which will illustrate what. I have said in 
regard to the ungraciousness with which some people receive 
favors. Two elderly ladies entered a crowded street-car. Im- 
mediately two young girls, each wearing the silver cross, the 
badge of the King's Daughters, arose and offered their seats to 
the new-comers. One of them accepted and politely thanked the 
yoang girls. But the other old lady, drawing herself up aggres- 
sively, demanded, » Why do you offer me your seat? I am as 
able to stand as you are." " Oh, ain't you ashamed! " exclaimed 
the old lady who had already seated herself. *• If you're not, you 
ought to be," and the whole car laughed. Now, why was that 
second old lady so disagreeable? The same trait of character 
manifests itself at table when, instead of appearing to want what 
is offered, one who has been invited to partake of a certain dish, 
will say, in a condescending tone, " Well, yes, you may give me 
a piece." Such people are exasperating. 

This is what one teacher said to another: " My dear, you must 
learn to avoid embarrassing situations. First of all, never 
answer any questions, but when you are on a subject outside of 
the regular lesson, just say ' Hands down.' When you come 
upon a puzzling example, don't allow it to phase you in the 
least; just say, • To-night you may find out for yourselves how 
to do that example, and tell me to-morrow.' " " I never read the 
newspapers," said the second teacher. » Indeed, you are wise," 
returned the other, " for it is a great waste of time." " Well, I 
know that if anything important is going on I shall hear it dis- 
cussed, and that will save me all the bother." Now, how is that 
for average intelligence? Such teachers ought to have their sal- 
aries raised, or if not, why not? 

Ouida has been inveighing against what she is pleased to call 
the sins of society, and she finds that the vulgarity of the age is 
highest in high places. She claims that royal personages are 
always the first offenders and the worst examples. She insists 
that they keep up many usages and obligations in society which 
are absolutely unpleasant and barbarous. Among these barbar- 
ous customs Ouida counts the habit of shaking hands. While it 
cannot be denied that the habit of shaking hands often assumes 
proportions of frightful magnitude at public receptions, yet I am 
willing to believe that the memory of the firm, magnetic hand- 
clasp of President Cleveland's wife won him more votes than a 
barrel of campaign literature or a forest full of stump speakers. 
For my part, I should be sorry to see the habit of hand-shaking 
fall into " innocuous desuetude," for of all the ways to sum up a 
person's temperament and disposition, I know of none so quick 
and so thoroughly satisfactory as the shake of the hand. Never 
put any faith in the loyalty or steadfastness of the man who 
bands you his hand and waits for you to hand it back to him 
again. 

Ouida also gives utterance to this characteristic sentence: " Our 
society is full of snobbishness, greed, haste and slavish adora- 
tion of wealth, in which it basks as pigs in mud." No one can 
gainsay that we as a people do fall down and worship the golden 
calf, and burn our heart's best hopes and our soul's highest aspira- 
tions to the god of Mammon. Do we all not know families 
where there is no peace by day nor rest by night because of this 
ceaseless struggle to appear richer than they really are? Have 



we not seen managing mamuiis take their marriageable daughters 
here and there to summer resorts, to winter ronnds of gaiety, all 
in the hope of finding a rich husband? Are not the young men 
all looking for a girl with money? Do they not wear a pathway 
to the Assessor's olHce as they go to examine the tax-roll of our 
wealthy citizens to see at how much the fathers of the fair 
maidens are rated? And yet there are a few of us who did not 
need to wait for Annie Besant to tell us that wealth is not every- 
thing; that as a man thinks, so be is. Truly there are some who 
will say. " Better a dinner of herbs with contentment than a 
stalled ox where strife is." 



One 

rounded teaspoonfu 1 
f of Cleveland's^ 
Baking Powder^ 
I does more and better work\ 
i than a heaping 
teaspoonful 
of any other. 
A large saving on a 
year's bakings. 



The best 

known writers 

''on domestic science, as^ 

Marion Harland, Mrs. McBride, 
Mrs. Parker and Emily Hayes, 

| and teachers of cookery, | 

as Mrs. Rorer, Mrs. Lincoln 
and Mis. Dearborn, 

use and recommend 

Cleveland's Baking 

Powder, 




INSTANT RELIEF 
FOR COLD IN THE HEAD. 

CORYZON «^ 

CATARRH AND HAY FEVER. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 

IT NEVER FAILS. 



Food for the hungry, 

And sleep 

For the weary, 

Are not more 

Refreshing than 

CORYZON 

Is to sufferers from 

Catarrh, 

Influenza, or 

Cold in the Head. 

It relieves at once; 

The cost is trifling, 

And 

It can be carried 

In the vest pocket. 

Samples free. 

At all Druggists. 

Try it. 




INSTANT RELIEF 
FOR COLD IN THE HEAD. 

CORYZON 

CATARRH AND HAY FEVER. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 

IT NEVER FAILS. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan . 14, 1893. 




Wb 



"We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 



"""THE SPORTSMAN," which began Monday night the second 
1 week of the Frohman people at the Baldwin, is an alto- 
gether laughable and delightful play, and as delightfully per- 
formed. The large and fashionable audience was eminently good 
humored, and responded with laughter, more effective than ap- 
plause to the continuous fun and absurdity. 

It would be hard work to overpraise Mr. Holland as the hus- 
band who pretends to go shooting, but in fact seeks only "big 
game," commonly known as " the tiger." The highest triumph 
of his performance is not in what he does, good as that is, but in 
what he doesn't do, viz., taking the audience into confidence 
with the side glances and winks which so many comedians 
would think essential when telling such « awful fibs" to his con- 
fiding little wife. Mr. Holland never seems to see anything but 
the people on the stage, and needs no side-play to the house to 
accentuate the humorous quality of the comedy. His network 
of impossible inventions are so woven as to give somehow the 
conviction that Briscoe isn't a bit of a bad fellow, and lies chiefly 
because he loves his wife, and hasn't the heart to hurt hers by 
telling her that he has broken his pledge against gambling; and 
to enlist the sympathy of the audience, which is almost as much 
worried as he is at each contretemps which threatens disclosure. 
The thoroughly gentlemanly and charming light in which be 
presents the naughty, but evidently devoted husband, whose 
fondness for gambling and the usual desire to " even up " makes 
all the trouble, affords the best kind of an excuse to his wife for 
believing him. In spite of his transparent surprise and " doubling 
on himself," every woman in the house knows that she would 
have believed him, too. 

Miss Evelyn Campbell makes, of Mrs. Briscoe, an excellent foil 
to her mercurial husband, being as credulous as he is inventive, 
and looking the charming and handsome lady she should be. 
Minnie Tittel has made of Mrs. Fritchley, the landlady, a real 
character study which would not discredit the most experienced 
hands in that line. 

M. A. Kennedy is just what he always is in characters like 
that of Dr. Holroyd — full of a quiet humor which is as impossible 
to describe as to resist. The part would seem to have been writ- 
ten for him, if one did not remember that every part in which he 
appears gives that same impression. If anyone has been defer- 
ring an evening at the Baldwin during this engagement he will 
do well not to lose this, the last evening's production of The 
Sportsman. 

Next week Bisson's clever comedy, Wilkinson's Widows, will be 
brought out, beginning Monday night. 
* * * 

8tockwell'e Theatre was crowded with a friendly and expectant 
audience on Monday night, the occasion being L. R. StockwelPs 
reappearance as Mr. Posket in The Magistrate, a part which is as- 
sociated with his name in the minds of San Francisco theatre- 
goers. Not only on the opening night, but on each succeeding 
one, Mr. Stockwell's appearance on the stage has been the signal 
for a hearty greeting, which must be very gratifying to the 
manager-actor. Mr. Stocfcwell's performance shows the same 
smooth completeness as of old, and is as full of characteristic 
quaint drollery. Ethel Brandon looks strikingly handsome and 
well dressed as the magistrate's wife, and acts the part without 
exaggeration and with an agreeable freedom from the manner- 
ism that sometimes mars her intelligent conception of her roles. 
Bebe Vining plays "Sister Charlotte" in a singularly meaningless 
and perfunctory manner, and Mr. Jewett goes to the opposite ex- 
treme and fatally overdoes Colonel Lukins. The boy, Cis Far- 
ringdon, is very well done by -Arthur Livingston. Mr. Hugo 
Toland made his first appearance at Stockwell's on Monday 
night, and made himself welcome in the role of Captain Vale. 

Next Monday evening the production of Mr. Barnes of Neiv 
York will be marked as the first appearance at this theatre of 
George Osbourne. 

» » * 

The long continued and unusually pronounced success of Den- 
man Thompson's play, The Old Homestead, does not seem extra- 
ordinary to one who is looking at its presentation. It is so full 
of genuine humor, genuine human nature of the right kind, of 
homely pathos and homely enjoyment, so clean and wholesome 
both in its lighter and sadder aspects, that while humanity loves 
and hopes and toils, laughs and weeps, The Old Homestead will 
possess a perennial human interest. 

The company now presenting the play at the California is an 
excellent one in the main, and its members are so thoroughly 
fitted into their various parts and those of all the rest that the 
performance moves with the ease and certainty of a well-oiled 
piece of machinery. The salient part of the tramp, always such 
a favorite with the audience, is less satisfactory than it would be 
if Mr. Sandford made less effort to do something out of the com- 
mon way, managing only to be affected and melodramatic. The 
double quartette is a pleasing and very popular feature. 



The Carr-Beel "Pop" on the 7th inst. was hardly as largely at- 
tended as the previous concerts, the cause doubtless being that 
the Bauer symphony concert of the day before had exhausted 
the local musical devotion, San Francisco being as yet hardly 
equal to the strain of two consecutive days of high-class music. 
The programme was an interesting one, in some points remark- 
ably so. The new quartette rendered Beethoven's Op. 18, No. 4, 
with wonderful precision and exquisite shading considering the 
short time it has been organized. The Godard Trio, Op. 42, re- 
peated by dtsire, was played with the same dash and spirit as 
before. The highest compliment which could be paid to any 
violinist is due to Mr. Beel's rendering of Bach's extremely diffi- 
cult and intricate Chaconne, — that he made a Bach composition 
interesting to an average musical audience. Mrs. Batchelder, 
who was to sing, was taken ill at the last moment, and her place 
on the programme was supplied by Mr. Osgood Putnam, the 
effect of whose rather pleasant voice was marred by a constant 

gasping far breath. 

* * # 

Mrs. Carr and Mr. Beel have wisely determine \ to avoid the 
conjunction of concerts above referred to by having the next 
Pop Jan. 28th instead of the 2Lst, the next Symphony concert 
being set for the 20th, the remaining concerts to follow at inter- 
vals of two weeks. 

# # * 

The concert announced by Signora Virginia Ferrari for January 
26th will be a notable one, as introducing to a San Francisco 
audience two new musicians, who, while coming before us with- 
out flourish of trumpets, will be found equal 10 any here, if ex- 
pert testimony counts. Signora Ferrari, soprano, was a pupil of 
Pedrotti and of Fasso, the great teacher and composer at the 
Conservatory at Turin, Italy. Signor Giulio Minetti, violinist, 
stadied at the same conservatory, with Cavaliere Ferni. This 
gentleman, though known for some time to a few as first violin 
in the Baldwin orchestra, and now in that of the Tivoli, and who 
delighted his hearers by a number played at a Carr-Beel concert 
some time ago, virtually makes his bow here on the 26th at 
Irving Hall. The programme is a fine one, and the occasion will 
be of rare interest to the connoisseur and to the general music- 
lover. 

• * * 

Schilling's Minstrels have had a week at the Bush, which will 
end to-morrow night. The programme is made up of the usual 
minstrel features, with the addition of a first part, The Pirates of 
Penzance, which could be advantageously omitted. There is a 
notable lack of humor, with some fair dancing and neat costum- 
ing, while the singing is perhaps no more (certainly no less) atro- 
cious than the average minstrel vocalism. The best features of 
the rather long programme are the juggling and finger-shadow 
pictures of Dandy Olivette, and the statue posing and acrobatic 
performance of the unusually clever athletes, the "Leondor 
Brothers." Monday night the Bush begins another one week's 
engagement, with Peck's Bad Boy. 

• # # 

The crowd at the Tivoli repeated itself on Monday night and 
was rewarded by an extremely creditable production of Faust. 
Tillie Salinger deserves great credit both for her singing and act- 
ing of the difficult role of Marguerite. Mr. Schuetz's Faust was 
less successful, being uneven. Miss Annandale gave a finished 
rendition of Siebel; Olmi sang well as Valentine, and did some 
fine acting in the death scene. Mephisto received only a medi- 
ocre interpretation from E. N. Knight. The celebrated march 
was delightfully rendered by the orchestra and vigorously en- 
cored. Faust has been less thoroughly interpreted in this city 
by traveling opera companies, at three times the price, and it 
promises to repeat at the Tivoli the immense patronage of the 
holiday piece. 

* * * 

M. B. Leavitt's Spider and Fly, which will begin its season at 
the Bush January 23d, is even better appointed and equipped 
than when last seen here. Mr. Leavitt sends with his spectacle a 
special manager and car loads of gorgeous and costly scenery 
and accessories. The Bush will take on a new lease of popu- 
larity with the Spider and Fly. 

* * * 

A Trip to Chinatown appears to be one of Hoyt's greatest as well 
as latest successes, having been kept on for fifteen consecutive 
months at the Madison Square Theatre, New York. It will soon 
be seen at the California. 

• * • 

Miss Susie Bowers, a fair Philadelphian only seventeen years 
old, has made a sensation at the Hamburg Conservatory of 
Music, where she is studying. In one evening she played three 
extremely difficult compositions and created a furore, being 
called down to the footlights twelve times during the evening. 
Miss Bowers will come to America in July next. 
» » * 

Last Saturday's " Symphony " filled the Tivoli to overflowing 
with the largest audience that has as yet attended the concerts. 
The programme was exceptionally good, and the orchestra ren- 
dered the floe music in a manner which merited the enthusiastic 
applause it received. It really seemed a pity that local talent 



Jan. 14. 1893. 



s\\ n;\\< im \rws nn t i; 



•hoald be introduced on such an occasion, especially when the 
Interpolated moslfl lost by comparison with that going before and 
after. The " Tell " overture and the suite (Pew Qyot) from 
lirieg. received the most delightful and expressive Interpretation, 
and Itrahiu's splendid "Symphnny In E Minor" was well played. 
These concerts are a treat to the musical people of San Francisco, 
and clearly show that the public appreciate good music when 
they can hear it. 

• • • 

George K. Sims, the famous dramatist, has this to say in his 
column. " Mustard and Cress," in the London Referee, of Miss 
Maggie Garratt, who appeared ai the California two years ago, 
with James T. Powers' A Straight Tip. company : " The English 
dancing girl seems to have become quite the rage on the conti- 
nent. 5ot only is there an English or American young lady 
superintending in all the capitals of Europe, but at the Nouveau 
Cirque. Paris. Miss Maggie Garrett has scored quite a great suc- 
cess in the quaint Japanese pantomime, Papa Chrywnthcmc. Her 
dance across a lake of real water, tripping lightly over the leaves 
of floating water lillies, is one of the daintiest things I have seen 
for a long time, and brings down the house.'' 
• • * 

Manager Broadburst has introduced several changes in seat 
reserving and other matters at tbe Bush, which will prove an 

advantage to patrons The next attraction at the Baldwin will 

be the Liliputians, in their great success, Candy. The opening 

attraction of AI. Hayman's New York theatre, the Empire, now 
building, will be The Girl I Left Behind Jfc — John Drew has 
made a tremendous success in The Masked Ball, in which he made 

his debut as a star Aristocracy, Bronson Howard'9 latest play, 

is crowding Palmer's Theatre, New York. Tbe Bostonians are 

capturing the Eastern cities as they did San Francisco Mrs. 

Carmichael Carr and Mr. Martinez will be the pianists at Sig- 
nora Ferrari's concert February 26th Mr. Hinrichs, the Bald- 
win orchestra leader, gives this week a set of waltzes from "The 
Year's 8weetheart" aDd other songs, by Leila France, arranged by 

tbe composer. The Mechanics' Pavilion will be a favorite 

promenade resort of evenings for the next few weeks. A pas- 
tel picture of Maud Morgan, the famous harpist, by J. Ludovici, 
in the Mechanics' Fair exhibition, may be called, in regard to 
pose, exquisite detail, and artistic handling, high art in portrait 

painting. The young cornetist, Miss Mabel Cook, is a musical 

attraction of the Fair. — Paderewski will play in Boston Jan- 
uary 12th and 21st and February 11th John B. Schceffel, of 

the Tremont Theatre, Boston, is making a vigorous onslaught on 
tbe big theatre hat, and he will not give up till the high hat 

comes down. Frank Daniels has scored a hit with Br. Cupid, 

which he will bring to the California next month. The last of the 

present series of Wilkie's Palace Ballad concerts took place yes- 
terday, too late for review in this issue. The rehearsals of His 

Majesty, Stewart and Robertson's new opera to be given in Feb- 
ruary in aid of the Polyclinic, are going on satisfactorily. Ber- 
nard Mollenhauer, the violinist, will give a concert at Irving 

Hall, January 20tb. Schalchi will be a member of the Nordica 

company, which begins its concert tour in Boston, January 16th. 

Jeffreys-Lewis is playing at Fort Worth, Tex. Sydney 

Grundy's Arabian Nights will have its first production in America, 
at the Baldwin, Monday evening, Jan. 23d, for the last week of 
Frohman's Comedians. 



YOU cannot expect to be considered » in the swim " unless you 
consistently obey all the dictates of fashion. One of these 
which no one in society can afford to overlook, is that referring to 
stationery and visiting cards. The proper thing in stationery is 
the fine paper and envelopes that come out with the Hurd stamp 
upon them. They are in all delicate and popular tints, and are 
really very artistic creations. Sanborn, Vail & Co., of 741-743 
Market street, has a large stock of this fashionable stationery in 
neat boxes, which may be had for fifty cents each. This house 
also makes a specialty of printing handsomely engraved visiting 
cards, and all those who are within the charmed circle make it a 
point to get their cards there. Tbe mere fact that anything comes 
from Sanborn, Vail & Co. is a guarantee that it is first-class, and 
of the latest design. The house enjoys the patronage of all the 
leaders of society. 



THE California Gas Engineering and Machine Company, 519 
Market street, of which Badlam Brothers are the managers, 
has issued a beautifully illustrated catalogue descriptive of the 
many virtues of its Peerless Gas Machine. The front cover 
shows a moonlight scene. In the foreground is a commodious 
country house, through the windows of which stream a warm 
and welcome light, which, in its effulgence seems to rival the 
moon itself, that partly hidden by a cloud, hovers in the heavens. 
Throughout the catalogue are numerous photogravures of country 
residences of prominent people, and of public institutions in 
which tbe light-giving gas is generated by a Peerless Gas 
Machine. 



Grandmas' made happy with perfect fitting glasses from C. Muller, op- 
tician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush. 



Now that leap year ha* gone, and tfa« young ladln no longer 
hare opportunity t.> show their gentlemen mends tin- high regard In 
which Hi- fah ont hold them, the beaux are heaping favors on the 
belles in return f«.r th« klndtu tyear, No more suitable 

nor popular token <<f esteem can be given ■ young lad; than a bou- 
quel of any of tin beautiful blossoms to be seen at the establishment 
oi Charles Mi osl itreet, 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

A i HAYMAK&Co. Proprietors. 

Engagement of 

I'll U!l.l> I'KOHMAN'S COMEDIANS. 
Lastnight. Laal matinee Saturduy. Tbe brilliant comedy, 

THE SPORTSMAN. 
Written for this company by Wm. Lestocq, autbor of "Jane." 
EXTRA— Monday. January Uith— Third and last week but one of 
the Comedians. Revival of the wonderfully successful comedy, 

MR. WILKINSON'S WIDOWS. 
8eats now on sale. 

STOCKWELL'S THEATRL 

L. R. Stockwkll Lessee and Proprietor. 

Alf Ellinghousb Business Manager. 

Commencing Monday, January 16th, one week, matinee Saturday 
GEORGE OSBOURNE, his first appearance at this theater, in A. C. 
Gunter's romantic drama, 

MR. BARNES OF NEW YORK. 

Seats now ready. 

Next^Joint appearance of GEORGE OSBOURNE and L. R. 
STOCKWELL in 

OUR BACHELORS. 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Al Hayman & Co.. Proprietors. I J. J. Gottlob Manager. 

Second and last week, but one, DENMAN THOMPSON'S famous 

play. 

THE OLD HOMESTEAD, 

Which has been aptly styled "A Play, a Song, a Sermon, and a 
Benediction." 
Matinees Saturday only. 

THE BUSH STREET THEATRE. 

Me. M. B. Levitt Proprietor and Manager. 

Geokge H. Beoadhuest Resident Manager' 

One week only, CHARLES B. SCHILLING'S 

MINSTRELS. 

Next attraction, 

PECK'S BAD BOY. 

~ TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night. Grand production of GOUNOD'S masterpiece, 

FAUST. 

Next opera, 

LA BELLE HELENE. 
Popular Prices 26 and 6Qc. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH 

INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 

OF THE 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE 

AND PRELIMINARY 

WORLD'S FAIR EXHIBIT of CALIFORNIA. Opens 
January 10, Closes February 11, 1893. 
New Features. Special Attractions. 

Among which will be the annual exhibition of the Northern California 
Citrus Fair Association, a grand display of natural products of the various 
counties of the State, the largest collection ever seen in this city of valua- 
ble statuary and paiutings, au orchestra of fifty musicians, including noted 
soloists aud Miss May Cook, the young California cornetist; six large 
aquariums, machinery in motion, objects of art, industry and manufacture. 

ADMISSION— Adult's single admission in daytime 25c; evening 50c. 
Child's siugle admission in daytime 15c. : evening 25c. Season tickets is- 
sued only to members of the Mechanic's Institute. Double season tickets 
$2 50, single seasou $1.50. Season tickets maybe obtained by non-members 
at the following rate: Double season $5, sinele season $4, which includes 
mpmbershiD in the institute, subject to confirmation by the management, 
nd dues for the present quarter. IRWIN C. STOMP, President. 

Q| ARIAC Knabe, Haines, 
Y* I /4ll| WO Bush <fcGerts, Mothers. 

^^ ^ Cashorinstallments. Rented 
and Repaired. Please call or seed for circulars. 

Sr BANCROFT 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893. 







AS the end of the century approaches, we are returning to the 
fashions of its opening years. Nowhere is this more apparent 
than in hair ornaments, which are as fanciful, splendid and 
dainty as in the days of Josephine. Gold acorns with diamond 
sprays, lilies of pearls with diamond tipped stamens, birds' 
heads glistening with precious stones, jeweled coronets, and 
many other equally costly pieces are worn at dinners, balls and 
other evening entertainments. An exquisite ornament, which is 
quite new, represents two gracefully carved gold antennce, each 
about three inches long. Upon the ends are pear-shaped dia- 
monds. Two gold prongs, from which the antennce spring serve 
to fasten the ornament in the hair. A beautiful hair-pin shows a 
peacock's head and throat set against the fan-like tail. The head 
is encrusted with diamonds and the tail outlined with rows of 
small rubies, each row terminating in a large diamond. Oth' r 
hair-pins are ornamented with enameled gold and precious stones. 
A bulfinch's head, set in diamonds, with ruby eyes and wiugs of 
colored enamel interspersed with small emeralds, is a very at- 
tractive hair-pin. — Vogue. 

Gold and silver pierced work in the shape of shields, crescents 
and ribbon bows all appear mounted upon one pin or two 
prongs, to be used for hair ornamentation. An exquisite tor- 
toise-shell comb is cut in the shape of a small palm leaf, sur- 
rounded by a border of filigree gold, following the same curves 
and edged with a narrow bordering of tiny diamonds. Some odd 
fancies in hairpins appear in the shape of spiders and beetles, 
with garnet or diamond eyes and enameled wings. Small gold or 
silver balls, set with tiny rubies, diamonds or emeralds, are favor- 
ite hairpins, although not very new. 

An extravagant fancy of the day is the use of "unborn" astrachan 
lamb skins. They are softer than velvet and are much prettier 
than other varieties of astrachan as they present a curious wavy 
appearance. These are the very last mode for linings, collars and 
cuffs to wraps, cloaks and jackets. They are very expensive, and 
the idea seems cruel; two reasons de plus why the ladies of the 
great world have adopted them with eagerness. I must say the 
effect is very novel and charming. 

Some pretty shield-shaped combs, each with two tortoise-shell 
prongs, are of gold trellis-work, and with an outer edge of twisted 
gold cord. At each point where the trellis-work intersects, a 
tiny diamond is set. This form is quite new and very attractive; 
sometimes the comb is of silver and the trellis points set in gar- 
nets and the shape varied to other heraldic forms. 

A dainty hairpin represents an English double violet in silver. 
Each petal is closely set with small diamonds, the ensemble be- 
ing graceful and delicate. A unique ornament with two prongs 
simulates a fleur-de-lis in purple enamel, held together by three 
small pearls. The flower is placed in the centre of a gold circle, 
in which is set fifteen amethysts. 

Large coronets or crowns of diamonds, pearls or opals, or of 
many-pointed stars within circles of pearls are shown. These are 
worn frequently, but of course only by the very rich. A pretty 
shape is a crown with points of pearls and rubies. 



The jeweled daggers now worn for hair ornamentation are very 
beautiful. One example shows hilt and guard olosely set with 
small diamonds, a green stone of good size finishes the hilt, and 
there is one upon each end of the guard. 

New designs of fern fronds in diamonds, or entirely of emer- 
alds, are superb and of immense value. 

A new smoking set has the three pieces attached to an over- 
hanging support above the tray. 

Up to date the only thing that is not manufactured silver for 
women's use is corset steels. 

A charming headband is of gold with a waving rayed dia- 
mond pin. 

Coooa for Summer.— As a partial substitute for solid foods that 
shall contain proper nourishment in small volume, there is probably 
nothing combining so many merits and so few defects as a fine, pure 
cocoa. For hot weather it is almost a boon. It is stimulating, not 
difficult of digestion, not long in preparation, and it is nourishing, 
sustaining and satisfying. This at least applies to the world-famous 
article manufactured by the firm of Walter Baker & Co., Dorchester, 
Mass. The delicious products, in cocoas and chocolates, that come 
now from this firm are possibly not better than when they were first 
put forth, 1705, but they are prepared with greater skill, and pro- 
duced at a nominal cost to the consumer. 

— The (N. T.) Heme Journal. 



GRAND 

MID-WINTER 

CLEARANCE 



SALE. 



Cloaks, Silks, Velvets, 
Laces, Ribbons, Gloves, Plain and 
Fancy Dress Goods, Silk Umbrellas, Under- 
wear, Hosiery, Corsets, House 
Furnishings, etc. 
AT — 

EXTREME REDUCTIONS. 

CtfSte Daily Papers for Special Bargain offerings. 

Mail orders promptly executed. 

Goods delivered free in Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, 8an 
Rafael, Tiburon, Sausalito, San Qaentin, Mill Valley, Ross 
Station and Blith^dale. 




Murphy Building, 

MARKET. JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 




Thousands of delighted ladies 
have vibited my parlors. Cau I 
not see you this week? You can 
learn many of the ser rets of pre- 
serving and beautifying the 
complexion. 

MRS. NETTIE HARRISON, 

26 GEARY STREET, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



LOLA 
MONTEZ 

CREME 
The Skin Food 

AND 

Tissue Builder 
75 CENTS. 



THE SCIENCE 

OF 

THE SKIN. 



im^ fioticijiE, 

324 SUTTER ST., 

The Most Skilled Dermatiloiist in 
San Francisco. 

The skin rendered soft, velvety and 
elastic with the aid of Dermoline 
The form developed by a New Method. 

Freckles and facial blemishes re- 
moved and superfluous hair eradicated 
by a new process. 

Hair Invtgorator, guaranteed to 
cure BALDNESS. 



IDEAL COFFEE. 



This famous brand of fresh ground blended coffee is unexcelled for quality 
and delicacy of flavor. 



No. 1 


No. 2 


No. 3 


No. 4 


25 cents 


30 cents 


35 cents 


40 cents T per lb 


sale only by 









RATH J EN BROS., Grocers. 

21 STOCKTON STREET. 
Sole Agents for the Celebrated IDEAL COFFEE POT. 

THE 

BANJO 

ASHTON P. STEVENS. 

STUDIO : 26 MONTGOMERY STREET. 
The Fashionable Accomplishment. 



Jan. 14, 1863. 



s\\ ! i:\\< [S< NEWS i.i: I hi; 



fnz 



na 






ws© 



Till: 1 N HARRIED WOMEN.' by Klu-a Chester, seems to be 
an argument in favor of single blessedness, though the author 
is ready lo admit, with St. Paul, "that those whn marry do well, 
while those who don't, do better.*' 'Few sensible women of thiriy- 
ihfl says, "feel in any way bound to admire and love a man, 
simply because they did so at eighteen. ' "<'nc grc.it blessing of a 
single life is that one may cherish any genuine love without finding 
it fade into the light of common day." The author is entirety 
against women choosintr a business as a nieaus of making money. 
"If a business should ever become a passion with women as with 
many men, it would degrade them even more than it does men, be- 
cause they have not the excuses of centuries of training n. the doc- 
trine that it is always a merit to make a good bargain for ourselves." 
In another place, she asks, "Is there any intrinsic reason why it is 
belter to marry than to live alone? Must we not admit that there 
never was such a school for self forgetfulness as marriage? A de- 
pendent unmarried woman learns the hardest lesson of self sup- 
pression, an independent unmarried woman, on the contrary, has 
such a training in self-assertion that the sweetest natures can hardly 
keep their balance. Self assertion is not beautiful, nor self suppres- 
sion either; but self forgetfulness is the very blossom of character. 
The book, though much above the common run, has not the vertue 
of terseness. Published by Dodd, Mead & Co., of New York; for 
sale by Payot, Uphani & Co., of San Francisco. Price, $1.50. 



Beauty ok Foem and Gbace of Vesture, (by Frances Mary Steele 
and Elizabeth L. Steele Adams — The "Contents Bill" gives perhaps 
as good an idea of the "true-inwardness," of this well-printed and 
abundantly-illustrated book, as anything, a reviewer can tell. The 
book seems to be an extended and elaborate advertisement of the 
first society formed by the ''Chicago Woman's Club" for the pro- 
motion of physical culture and correct dress. The tone of the book 
is pnre if even the authoresses do not write with the pen of a Ruskin 
or an Erasmus Wilson. The full page pictures are nearly all bad 
copies and reproductions of photographs of such well-known sub- 
jects that they have become hackneyed; and though of course there 
is but one "Venus of Milo," it might be illustrated, say, by a gravure 
of a good photograph, instead of a copy of a copy. The "get up" of 
the book itself is excellent. Published by Dodd, Mead ife Co., of 
New York; for sale by Payot, Uphani & Co., San Francisco. Price, 

$1.25. ^^N*N*N 

The Death of CEnone, Akbar's Dream, Etc. — These are the last 
words of that great, good man, Lord Tennyson. Besides the poems 
of the title, there are a score of others, several of which are imbued 
with deep religious fervor. "CEnone " was the first wife of Paris, who 
deserted her for the beautiful Helen, who caused the Trojan war. 
Paris has been struck by a poisoned arrow in the fight, and appeals 
to CEnone to save him from death. She refuses, and consequently 
he soon falls headlong dead. Then his body was reverently pre- 
pared for cremation. Meanwhile, CEnone dreamed, and heard a 
moving cry, and on awakening — 

" She rose and slowly down 
By the long torrent's ever-deepen'd roar, 
Paced, following, as in a trance, the silent cry — 
which leads her to the funeral pyre, where she saw 
" The flames 
Enfolding that dark body which had lain 
Of old in her embrace, paused — and then ask'd 
Falteringly, ' Who lies on yonder pyre?' 
Whereon their oldest and their boldest said: 

' He whom thou would'st not heal! ' and all at once 
The morning light of happy marriage broke 
Thro' all the clouded years of widowhood, 
And muffling up her comely head, and crying 

' Husband ! ' she leapt upon the funeral pile. 
And mixed herself with him and past in fire." 

The poem of St. Telemachus has for its motif the efforts in behalf 
of Christianity of Telemachus, an ascetic, who in the days of the 
Emperor Honorious, went to Borne, and throwing himself into the 
arena, there, in the name of the Savior, endeavored to stop the 
gladiatorial combats then taking place. He was stoned to death by 
the people. The result, however, was that Honorious interdicted the 
bloody sport, which "made the festal hour dark with the blood of 
man who murdered man." 

The great Mogul Akbar was born in 1542 and died in 1G05, and at 
18 he had sole charge of government. He subdued and ruled over 
fifteen large provinces, and his Empire included all India north of 
the Vindhya Mountains. He invented a new electic religion by 
which he hoped to unite all creeds, castes and peoples. Akbar's 
toleration permitted " Heresy to the heretic and religion to the or- 
thodox, but" (in the flowery language of the Hindoos) " the dust of 
the rose-petal belongs to the heart of the perfume seller." "Akbar's 
Dream " is the piece de resistance of she present work, though the 



tin* dream itself occupies only a page and a hnlf mil <.f 
the 16 pages <>f this poem in blank reree. 

" The Bandit'- Death" is a very dramatic poem, and "The Church- 
warden and the Curate " wQJ alao attract much attention. " Kap- 
iolani " is a poem in Whitman's style, descriptive ol a great 
Hawaiian Chieftalness, who at the beginning of the present century 
did much for the cause ol Christianity among her people by openly 
defying the terrible Goddess '• Peele." in the poem "Dawn," the 
poet inveighs against that press which " Easily violates virgin truth 
foracoinorachecqtie." Published by MacmlllanA Co., London. 
For sale by Wm. Doxey, UStt Market street, S. F. Trice $1 25. 



The general reader who is pressed for time will find in the January 
Current Literature a comprehensive, accurate and entertaining record 
of the month. The Death of Jay Gould, The French Political Disturb- 
ance. Dr. Brigg's Trial, The Silver Conference, National Quarantine 
and Hawaiian Annexation are among the current subjects discussed. 

Next to the article on Mexico, the feature of the January Review of 
Reviews that will deserve to attract the most attention affords an- 
other instance of the enterprise of the Review. It is an article by a 
bright young American lady, who was married to a Frenchman and 
lives in Paris. She offered herself to Drs. Pasteur and Haffkine as 
the first woman who dared to submit to the experiment of being in- 
oculated by the new method at the Pasteur Institute for Asiatic 
cholera. She has written of her experience and of the wonderful new 
cholera preventive; and her article is so recent that it was not re- 
ceived in New York until late in December. It is one which will be 
read and talked of eve ry where. 

This is the weather that makes good old whisky appreciated. 
Order only Argonaut Old Bourbon when you call for your tipple. It 
is the favorite drink among those who know good liquor for it has no 
superior. Argonaut may be had at all first-elass bars, hotels, restau- 
rants and clubs. 

Such Lovely 
Rich Cream 

is every housewife's verdict upon trying her 
first can of 



"HIGHLAND 




UNSWEETENED 



An ideal form of rich milk for table, nursery, 
and cooking use. 

Write for our Cook Book and Infants' Food Circular 
Mailed free. 

HELVETIA MILK CONDENSING CO., Highland, III. 



/ETNA 



L 



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Beached by a delightful stage ride over the moun 
tains. Sixteen Miles from St. Helena. Good Ac 
commodations. Ample Bathing Facilities. 

A FEATURE OF THE PLACE, 

A Large Swimming Tank of Hot Mineral Water 

The waters of the .SDtna Mineral Springs have 
long been celebrated for their wonderful cures in 
cases of Acute and Chronic Dyspepsia, Bheuma- 
tism, Inflammation of the Bladder, and Liver and 
Kidney Complaints. 

The temperature of the water is 98 degrees, and 
is highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas, making 
it pleasant to the taste, and giving to the bath a 
most delightful sensation. 

High Altitude ! No Fogs ! No Mosquitoes 

Water from the Springs bottled by the 

AETNA MINERAL WATER CO., 

Telephone 536. Office, 108 Drumm Street, S. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893. 



ON DIT that one of our pretty belles, who is credited with be- 
ing of a very decided character, took the idea of the Leap 
Year cotillion au serieux, not limiting her «« asking " of the young 
man who was her partner in the cotillion for the dance, but 
actually as a partner for life. Gossip does not say with what re- 
sult, but the story of the gentleman's attentions to the young 
lady has been an old one for some time back, and possibly she 
thought leap year too good an opportunity to lose to fix mat- 
ters one way or the other conclusively. 

# # » 

One of the most becoming toilettes worn at the last Friday 
Night Cotillion was that of charming Miss Kuger, daughter of 
the Commanding General of this army department. The young 
lady is a sylph-like blonde, and her sunny golden hair contrasted 
delightfully with the fresh green tint of her gown. 

Little dark-eyed Miss Bee Hooper, who is such an agile tennis 
player, was one of the cheeriest looking girls in the hall. Her 
friends are very sanguine of her coming off victor in the antici- 
pated games of tennis between Miss Morgan and herself, for the 

championship. 

• • • 

Rumor says that Mrs. Fred Sharon is devoting many hours a 
day to her piano practice in New York. The cause of so much 
energy is the coming visit of the celebrated but somewhat eccen- 
tric Paderewski. 

it * # 

" Uncle Billy Foote " has recently attained the dignity of 
great-uncle, through the arrival in Washington the day after 
New Year's of an infant son to his niece, Mrs. Wildman, the erst- 
while talented actress, Miss Letitia Aldrich. 

Every one is asking, is there no chance of the popular Col. 
Stuart Taylor coming back across the sea to serve his country 
in some official capacity after the inauguration of the Democratic 
regime? 

The tea craze, which swept through our social system in such 
a vigorous manner in the season before the holi- 
days, seems to have given way to dances and balls, to 
the no small delight of the younger portion of society. Mrs. 
Will Crocker has earned the devotion of all the girls for choosing 
a ball instead of a tea, wherewith to entertain them; and it is 
whispered that the date of Mrs. A. M. Parrott's big annual ball 
will soon be announced. 

# * * 

Already cnteries and clubs are being formed for social diver- 
sion during Lent. As dancing is forbidden, card parties will be 
the chief attraction with some, while with others (principally 
those of an anglomanian turn) tableaux vivants, like those recently 
done at Osborne before Queen Victoria by the royal family, will 
be taken up with vigor. 

• « * 

Apropos of "living pictures," what a magnificent <• Semira- 
midis" Mrs. Will Crocker would make, and handsome Miss Beth 
Sperry's flashing olack eyes would admirably portray » Judith." 
Who can fancy a better examplar of the gentle, persuasive 
«* Marguerite" than Sweet Eva Carolan? and as to " Zenobia," 
Miss Gertrude Wilson would be a perfect picture. These are only 
a few; but take it altogether, the field for successful tableaux 
vivants is a large and prolific one in San Francisco. 

* * * 

Gossip says Jack Houseman has captured a rich widow who 
attends St. Luke's Church. Jack's 'many friends hope it is true, 
and wish him luck in his new venture. 

* * • 

Miss Emily Hager's friends and admirers are getting somewhat 
impatient for the swell wedding so eagerly prophesied at the 
opening of the season. Eastertide, however, may be the time 
chosen for further developments, as the phrase goes, as wedding 
bells never chime more merrily than in the joyous Easter season. 
* » 

Why were the two old stand-by's absent from the Delmas wed- 
ding — Mrs. Holt and Mrs. Chauncey? 

* # * 

One of the prettiest sights at the recent Catherwood cotillion 
was the distribution of the favors by the attractive widow, 
Mrs. Favre. 

# * # 

How funny it is to hear of the faux pas frequently made by 
people in their efforts to be ultra fashionable and quite in "good 
form" without exactly knowing how. A case in point occurred 
not long ago, which illustrates this to a degree. Two young 
ladies, rather new to the ways of the swim, meeting a third, 
spoke of having seen a mutual friend at an afternoon concert a 
few days before, accompanied by « such a nice young lady, and 



she never introduced us." "Naturally," responded No. Three. "The 

young lady ! was the maid who always goes with Miss when 

her mother is unable to be her companion." Not long after- 
wards Number Three saw the two young ladies at a theatre 
matinee, and with them was a female of decidedly Milesian 
appearance. Upon being questioned as to her identity, the 
spokesman of the previous occasion proudly remarked, » Oh, we 
took our cook along to-day as our chaperon." 

The increase of imports of Moet & Chandon Champagne in 1892, 
over 1891, as seen in statistics of the Custom's House, was most remark- 
able when one notes the falling off of some other popular brands ; and is 
accounted for, doubtless, by the high quality of the champagne 
shipped by Moet & Chandon. 

Nothing is so delicious on one of these January evenings than a 
dozen or two of those famous oysters of Moraghan, that may be had 
in the Calitornia'Market. 



Without exception thefinest Gin 
imported, and especially adapted 
for Family Use and Medicinal pur- 
poses. 

In large, square, white bottles, 
without printed labels, excepting 
the label of Origin "IAIN" Schie- 
dam, Holland. 

Annexed Trade-Mark appears on 
cap and is blown in on shoulder 
of the bottle. 




SOLD BY GROCERS AND DEALERS, 

BEWARE OF FILLED-UP BOTTLES. 



Charles Meinecke & Co., 



Sole Agent*. 



314 Sacramento St., S. F. 




CHAMPAGNE 

KRUG & CO. " PRIVATE CUVEE." 

QUARTS AND PINTS 

FROM 

Krug & Co., Reims. 

BY 111 DEJLEBS, JOBBERS SID GBOCEBS. 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO, 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
525 Front Street, SAN FRANC/SCO, niephon^o.m . 

W QTY m 

IMPORTERS. 

WHOLESALERS. 

and RETAILERS 

OF OSLT FIRST-CLASS 
Wines, Cordials, 

Champagnes and 
Table Delicacies. 

Etc., Etc. 

Genuine Goods. Low Prices. 

EM. MEYER k CO., 

1047-1049 Market 8t„ 3. E. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. 
THE SAN FRANCISCO FENCING ACADEMY. 

501 Post Street, Corner Mason. 
Professors Louis Troncbet and Alfred D* Smet. 

Special classes twice per week for young ladies between the ages of 
10 and 15 years. Reasonable terms. 




Jan. 1-i, 1893. 



SAN FRANCIS! NEWS I. II 1 I R 



11 




T 



CRYPT AND CATHEDRAL. 

UK pile of great cathedral stood, 

In the ages long ago, 
On ihe marge where the ^reat Rhine River Mowed 

To the breadth of the sea below; 
And under the deep, dim arch and nave, 

Where the river washed the walls. 
Was the gloomy crypt, a waiting grave, 

With its silent, shadowy halls. 

When the morning struggled through windows 

When the sunset fell aslant, 
A hooded friar, with utterance slow, 

Rehearsed the Litany Chant 
With a choir of boys from streets and lanes, 

Who stood where the death damp dripped, 
And sang together the friar's strains, 

In the great cathedral's crypt. 
And the friar said: "As each one learns 

The chant in this prison gloom, 
He shall pass, by a stair that winds and turns 

To the great cathedral room; 
He shall stand in a surplice white as snow, 

Where the lights of the altar fall, 
And the voice of his song shall rise and flow 

Like a glory along the wall." 

0! world-wide prison, girt with graves, 

The song you echo now, 
When che singers learn, shall lift their waves 

Where the veiled angels bow. 
The sound of the harp reverberates, 

The altar lights are aglow, 
But the full cathedral service waits 

For the singers from below. 



low, 



TO BERNARDINE.— J. C. B. in the Londo?i Academy. 

I love thee, Bernardine, nor more nor less 

Could I in amplitude of words express, 

If with poetic art and fancy's play, 

I troped and figured for a summer's day. 

What is't to quiver when thy name is heard 

Like aspen leaves by breath of evening stirred ? 

What is't to hope for thee like heaven above? 

Tell me, my Bernardine, is this not love? 

The chemist's skill can never analyze, 

What makes the lovelight flash from beauty's eyes. 

Nor can philosophers in words impart 

The intuitions of man's love-moved heart. 

I do not love thy head, divinely placed, 

Thy taper fingers or thy dainty waist, 

Or eyes or lips, but thy sweet soul serene, 

That blends all these and makes them Bernardine. 

If in a vale of poppies I should sleep, 

While centuries o'er land and ocean sweep, 

Waking at firstling of my lips I'd yean 

That heart inwoven, love-word Bernardine. 



Get your suit* made at the establishment of Colonel J. M. Litch- 
Meld.at IS Post Btreet, and you will have no cause to inveigh against 
tailor?. Colonel Litchflield has the reputation of making the hen 
raiU In the city , and he is patronised by all the well dressed men in 

town. Hera t) illy of army and all kinds of uniforms and 

regahay. He lends in his profession. 



51ft fl^u/^st 5NK5 



5/1 RW PC/IIDS 



ROfryiN sjRipts. 



A FULL ASSORTMENT 
NOW ON EXHIBITION. 







Ill to 121 Post Street 



RENOUNCEMENT.- Jlfra. Revnell. 



I must not think of thee; and, tired, yet strong, 

I shun the love that lurks in all delight 

The love of thee — and in the blue heaven's light, 
And in the dearest passage of a song, 
Oh, just beyond the sweetest thoughts that throng 

This breast, the thought of thee waits hidden, yet bright; 
But it must never, never come in sight 1 
I must stop short of thee the whole day long. 
But when sleep comes to close each difficult day, 
When night gives pause to the long watch I keep, 
And all my bonds I needs must loose apart, 
Must doff my will, as raiment laid away — 

With the first dream that comes with the first sleep 
I run, I run, I am gathered to thy heart. 



The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic feature of the News Letteb, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being; widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 



Squiht in children's eyes prevented without surgical operation, consult 
free of charge, C. Muller, Oculist Optician, 135 Montgomery street. 




COATS 



-FOR- 



MEN AND WOMEN. 

Are worn in place of an over- 
coat or outside wrap. 

Perfectly Waterproof. 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO, 



R. U. Pease — Agents— S. M. RouyoQ. 
577-579 Market St., S. P. 




TO 

Gk W. OLABK Sc CO.. 
653 Market Street, 

FOB 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 
And CORNICE POLES. 

MR. H. J. STEWART, 

PROCESSOR OF SINGING, PIANO FORTE, ORGAN AND HARMONY, 

AND 

MRS. H J. STEWART, 

PROFESSOR OF THE PIANO-FORTE, 

Will resume teaching TUESDAY, JAN. 3d. 

2417 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893. 




THE gallant manner in which Colonel Perrie Kewen, late As- 
sistant Adjutant-General of the National Guard of California 
recently defended his honor from the assaults made upon it by 
Major Peter Cotter, is certainly worthy of the greatest commenda- 
tion. Although the code duello is not followed to a great extent 
in this State and duelling is a penal offense, the fact that so high- 
minded and honorable a gentleman as Colonel Kewen risked im- 
murement in a dungeon deep, and also the penetration of his sub- 
cutaneous areola tissue by a pistol bullet, rather than allow the 
imputation of cowardice to attach to bis honorable name, is cer- 
tainly evidence sufficient to satisfy any fair-minded man that the 
Colonel is a warrior in fact as well as in name. Well was it for 
Major Cotter that, by the intercession of his weak-kneed friends, 
the affair came to a conclusion so happily as it did, for had Col- 
onel Kewen had his way, he would have wiped out the word 
"coward," which the Major had put upon his escutcheon, with 
the warm, red blood from the palpitating body of the foolhardy 
Cotter. Though a man of quiet demeanor, and one who never 
seeks a quarrel, Colonel Kewen has a record that might well cause 
to pause any who might, even for a moment, think of calling him 
to the field of honor. In his apparently frail frame are muscles 
of steel, and his good right arm has downed many dangerous ene- 
mies, before which other men have fallen vanxuished. During 
his well-remembered career as Assistant Adjutant-General he had 
the reputation of being the best fencer in the State forces. It 
was, therefore, natural that he should have chosen broadswords 
for his encounter with Major Cotter. If his rust — trusty blade had 
ever descended on the Cotter caput there would have been a va- 
cancy declared in the Cotter family at that moment, I under- 
stand that the National Guard Officers' Association, of which Col- 
onel Kewen is an honored member, will, at a special meeting to 
be called for that purpose, adopt resolutions testifying their ap- 
preciation of the brave and gallant manner in which he sustained 
his honor and theirs by rushing to the field. 
# # # 
Colonel Kewen comes from a family of brave soldiers. It was 
in 1858 that bis uncle fought his famous duel with the Missis- 
sippi Colonel. A dispute over politics — Kewen was a Whig, the 
other was a Democrat — arose at the Blue Wing saloon on Mont- 
gomery street, near Clay, and the fight resulted. The duel was 
fought on ground comprised within the present town of Alameda. 
Kewen killed bis man, and afterwards joined Walker's filibus- 
ters in Nicaragua, where he was himself killed. Perrie's father, 
being a newspaper man in the early days, received and gave 
many challenges to duels, but they never came to anything more 
serious. The real martial member of the family was Kewen. Sr., 
the grandfather of the present hero of the N. G. C. He was a 
" foine old Oirish gentleman," the kind celebrated in Lever's 
novels, and described in a song Walter Campbell nsed to sing with 
effect. Though he was a principal in numerous street difficul- 
ties, duels never fell to his share in this country. Rumor, how- 
ever, states that in Ireland he had a big reputation upon that 

score. 

* *** 

Apropos of dueling, one that I have never seen recounted in 
the papers was that of Chris. Dowdigan, Deputy Sheriff and a 
great friend of Chief Scannell, with Jim Hawkins, Sergeant-at- 
Arms during two or three terms of the California State Senate, 
The latter is now, or was recently, an employee of the Board of 
Harbor Commissioners. The quarrel arose over political diffi- 
culties, in Benicia, which was then the capital, and resulted in a 
duel. Rifles were the weapons, and Dowdigan received a shot 
in the leg. 

" Governor" Lionel H. Sheldon, of Los Angeles, is a gentleman 
who has gained Borne fame in recent years in both the political 
and literary fields, for he has appeared at the State Conventions 
and has been bold enough to publish magazine articles. There is 
no doubt of tbe Governor's political ability, for he was once the 
Chief Executive of a Territory, ttian which there can be no office 
more laborious, or in which statesmanship of the highest order is 
more necessary. Up to the time of one of the State Conventions 
of last fall, Governor Sheldon considered himself a political Napo- 
leon, as it were — at any rate, a strategist of the highest order. 
He had then a very important fight on hand, the object of which 



was to secure the nomination of a Los Angeles friend of his as a 
Presidential Elector. At the time of the State Convention, every- 
thing looked promising to him for the success of his friend. So 
confident did the Governor feel, that one evening, while telling a 
reporter of the manner in which he had made certain of the nomi- 
nation of his man, he said that after the election he would write a 
magazine article on " Political Strategems," in which he would 
give the novices in the great game of politics, who had been try- 
ing to defeat his man, some points as to how the thing was done. 
Unfortunately, however, Sheldon's man was not nominated. 
After the defeat, the reporter who had been the Governor's con- 
fidant, again met him, and said, » Ah, by the way, Governor, 
about that magazine article — I suppose you have changed the 
title of that article now, haven't you?" But Sheldon said not a 
word, but silently went his way. The magazine article has not 
appeared, nor has Sheldon noticed that reporter since. Of course 
it is hard on the reporter, but then reporters get inured to such 
things and don't mind them as much as ordinary mortals. 

* w # 

There is a member of the Assembly from San Francisco named 
Conway, who will surely make his mark in time, if he gets his 
rights. As the members of the San Francisco delegation will get 
everything they are entitled to, Conway has a fair chance to be- 
come famous. The other day, when voting on a bill, he answered 
<< yes," when his name was called. As he did bo, his colleagues 
turned and looked at him in surprise. The suspicious law-maker 
at once thought that something was wrong, and as he heard men 
he knew were in favor of the bill respond wilh " ayes " aa the 
clerk called the roll, he became quite certain he had made a mis- 
take. He got red and fidgety, and the perspiration could be seen 
trickling down the half-inch of space between his eyebrows and 
his hair. Finally the roll call was finished, and the clerk pro- 
ceeded to cast up tbe vote. Then came Conway's opportunity. 
He sprang up excitedly, waved his large right hand at the 
speaker, and yelled, " Mr. Chairman! Mr. Chairman 1 I've made 
a mistake in roy vote. I want to change it at once, before it is 
too late. I voted yes, and I want to vote aye, like the other 
fellows, Mr. Chairman." And even the clock held its hands be- 
fore its face and smiled. 

» » # 

The exhibition at the Mechanics' Pavilion which opened last 
Tuesday, is one of the most attractive for many years. The 
feature that will receive the most attention from tourists and 
from those residents of the city who know little of the wondrous 
beauties of the orange growing counties, is the display of citrus 
fruits. The interior counties made a happy choice when they de- 
cide dto make their citrus display in this city this winter, for 
here many more people will visit the show, and comment on 
the novelty of a display of thousands of oranges in mid-winter 
than at any of the interior cities. Most of the orange exhibits 
are of novel and handsome designs. The most notable is that of 
Placer, the Gateway County. Placer has a great triple arched 
gateway of oranges, that stretches across the main floor from gal- 
lery to gallery, just within the doors. Its top is on a level with 
the gallery floors. The gateway is covered with thousands of 
oranges, and makes a very handsome exhibit. It would be a 
good idea for the managers to place at one of the pillars of this 
golden gaieway a sign, telling what county's exhibit it is. 
Though tbe name of Placer county stretches across the front of 
the gateway, the structure is so high, and the name is so nearly 
hidden by the overhanging branches of potted plants that sur- 
mount the gateway, that one cannot see the name at all until he 
gets well into the middle of tbe hall, and looks backward. Other 
counties also have good exhibits in oranges and other fruits. The 
aquarium and the art gallery are two departments that will cer- 
tainly prove very popular. Both are very attractive. In the 
aquarium, swimming in large tanks, are numerous specimens of 
the fishes of the State. The art exhibit is the best the Pavilion 
has known for years. Most of the leading local artists are well 
exhibited, though some, like Matthews and Robinson, have not 
represented at all. Tom Hill has three large canvases, " The 
Last Spike," " Yosemite Valley from Inspiration Point," and 
«' Wawona." Keith, Kunath, Yelland, Joullin, Chittenden, 
Bush and others are also represented. There is also upon the 
walls a number of pictures from the recent exhibit of the pupils 
of the School of Design. From all these pictures will be selected 
those that are to be sent to the World's Fair. Many of them are 
intended for the National Gallery; others will be placed in the 
gallery in the California Building. The fair withal promises to 
be very successful. 

« * * 

Mrs. Ballou's two nndes, " Night" and " Morning," that were 
sent to the Mechanics' Fair for exhibition, were refused by the 
art censors there and returned to the artist. Mr. Bush, who 
superintended the collection of the art exhibit, has not much 
acquaintance with the nude, most of his time being devoted to 
paintings of tropical scenes. He was not certain, therefore, 
what one of Mrs. Ballou's pictures represented. Finally he 
decided it was " Evening," and in a note to her, referred to it by 
that name. Back came the answer, in which Mr. Bush was in- 



Jan. 14, 1893 



s.V\ FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



formed that be bad made a mistake in the picture. It was not 
>• Evening." but •• Night." Mrs. Rallon baa no balf-tone effects; 
no evening in her's ; night or nothing. Some of the connoisseurs 
who saw her canvases do not speak of them in the highest terms. 
Tbey are thought to be just a little too bare to be appreciated, 
even by a prurient public. No doubt seems to exist, however. 
in the mind of the artist as to their acceptance at Chicago. If 
any of the Sunday closing cranks get sight of them there, tbey 
will soon go the way of all flesh. 

Yelland has a canvas at the fair, the scene being a stormy 
day off the Monterey coast. In cataloguing the picture, an 
error was made and its title was made to read ••Steamer Day/' 
That picture is now most appreciated by those city merchants 
whose lives are made miserable by the survival of the Silurian 
"Steaoler day" custom in this city. The raging sea and the low- 
ering sky properly picture their -state of mind" on steamer day. 
* • » 

Some time since it was announced, and almost immediately 
thereafter denied, that Mr. 8earles had presented the Hopkins 
mansion to the Art Association for use as a public and permanent 
art gallery. I am now enabled to state that the Art Association, 
will soon get into the magnificent house upon the hill. Arrange- 
ments are now about completing, by which the Hopkins House 
will be transferred to the University Regents for the use of the 
Art Association. An endowment will accompany this magnifi- 
cent gift. With the impetus, that may be assumed, will be given 
to art matters in this city by the establishment of the Hopkins 
Gallery, the artists may look for better times. 

Incidental to the Senatorial fight in Sacramento last week 
the following interesting telegram was received by a promi- 
nent Democratic politician of this city. "White carries Caucus; 
Lynch the Banner." 

• • • 

The exclusive social circles of San Rafael have been all torn up 
of late over a somewhat sensational divorce case, which has so 
far been kept out of the columns of the daily press. It appears 
that some time since a dashing ex-preacher and pseudo-journalist 
with oily tongue and winn-ing manner took up his residence in 
the metropolis of Marin county. He had been married for sev- 
eral years to a daughter of one of San Francisco's prominent pion- 
eers, but unfortunately no offspring had blessed the union. Both 
husband and wife were of an affectionate nature, however, and 
as the years rolled around the childless couple often had occasion 
to envy the happiness of their more fortunate friends. Finally 
the wife, despairing of being blessed with offspring of her own, 
expressed a desire to adopt a child, and the husband, falling in 
with her humor, agreed to find a suitable infant for the purpose. 
After considerable search, lasting indeed for a period of several 
months, a bright little youngster was found whose putative par- 
ents were willing to part with it, and after due consultation it 
was taken into the household of the preacher-journalist. But 
alas for the peace of that household. The husband developed a 
moat inordinate fondness for the infant, remarkable indeed, 
where there were apparently no real ties of blood, while the wife 
was observed more than once to make suspicious comparisons of 
the color of the eyes, shape of the features, etc., of the infant 
with those of her husband, a singular similarity between which 
was gradually developed. Finally, in some manner, she learned 
the trnth — which was the child that she had taken to her bosom 
was none other than the actual offspring of her husband and a 
pretty Spanish girl quite well known in the town. Then there 
was a row, of large sized proportions, which ended with a divorce 
suit, won by the wife, and to which no defense was made. 

Latest discovery and craze in Paris. — Gray hair restored to all 
shades; perfectly harmless. Face cream, powder and lotion in- 
dorsed by Dr. Dennis of this city; also the emporium for Parisian 
novelties and manufacture of natural curly front pieces, from $1 up. 
Great reduction in prices and prompt attention, at Strozynski's, cor- 
ner of Ellis and Leavenworth st reets. 

" Kritiko" reads character from handwriting. Write in ink, in an 
unfeigned hand, on unruled paper. State sex. Send 50 cents 
stamps orpostal note. Address " Kritiko, "609 Merchant street, S. F. 



Shainwald, Buckbee & (Jo., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses 
rented, rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. 
office, 407-409 Montgomery street. 



ANTEDILUVIAN 




WHISKEY. 

VERY OLD, 
RICH 
AS 
CREAM 

AND 
SMOOTH 
AS 



SATIN. 



THE\JOHN T. CUTTING CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 



FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
ellery of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St., 
Under Masonic Temple. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 





W.B. CHAPMAN, 

80LE AQENT FOR 
PAOIFIO 00A8T, 

123CaliforniaSt..S.F 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOB BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 




s 




27 to 37 Kearny St. 



Fall Overcoats Inverness House Coats 
Styles Ulsters Full Dress Neckwear 

1892 Officer Capes Suits Underwear 

THE "VIEIR/Z" LATEST. 



. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan . 14, 1893. 




NOW that the Legislature has settled down to its labors, the 
friends of gold mining in California will naturally look for 
some relief by the passage of a measure which will strengthen 
the claims which aie now being urged on the national govern- 
ment. It is to be hoped that the busy-bodies who are contin- 
ually interfering with matters which they do not understand, 
and which do not concern them one way or the other, will be 
debarred in this instance from an opportunity to thwart or delay 
any action which may be proposed. The mere endorsement of 
hydraulic mining as a necessary adjunct to the wealth and pros- 
perity of the State, by the Legislature now in session, would do 
more to assist a speedy and satisfactory solution of the question 
than by wasting time in useless argument. The subject has been 
talked threadbare for years past, and beyond that little has been 
done. The people all over the State are in favor of the mines be- 
ing reopened, outside of a few malevolent individuals, who are 
constantly airing their prejudices for personal reasons more than 
anything else. Their vaporing has coat the State in the neighbor- 
hood of $80,000,000, and it is high time that a stop was put to 
such nonsense. The miners might as consistently insist on levees 
to restrain the water from inundating the swamp lands around 
Marysville and Sacramento, just for a change. The rivers retir- 
ing within their banks after a winter freshet, carry down more 
filth and debris to shoal this harbor than the mining operations 
would in three years. Mining debris is simply a bugbear, useful 
to schemers and political tricksters. It will be a fortunate day 
for California when the subject is buried out of sight and mind 
with those who advocate it in the falsity and perverseness of 
their hearts. 

$ $ $ 

THE Comstock market is holding its own pretty well under the 
adverse conditions of an unusually dull business. There is 
talk at present of a possibility that deep mining in the Southend 
mines will have to be suspended owing to the expense of pump- 
ing, which has fallen so heavily on the companies engaged in de- 
veloping the ground at that end of the lode. The responsibility 
for the stoppage of pumping is laid on the companies which sup- 
ply the wood for fuel, which is said to be the chief cost in keep- 
ing the pumps running. Of course there are arguments on both 
sides for and against a reduction in the price of this very neces- 
sary commodity, but it is to be hoped that in view of any dis- 
pute which may now exist over the matter, that the difficulty 
will be bridged over in a manner satisfactory to all parties con- 
cerned. It should be remembered by the managers of the mining 
interests on the lode, and the companies in control of the wood, 
that besides themselves, the public as shareholders in the different 
mining corporations, have rights which should be considered in 
the matter. If it is deemed expedient on their behalf, by those 
who represent them, that the properties be explored at great 
depth, there should be no hesitation in undertaking the work, 
and again for their own pecuniary welfare all outside concerns 
connected directly with the preliminary arrangements to carry on 
this work should recognize it as their duty to facilitate the execu- 
tion of the proposed plans, even at a temporary reduction in their 
profits. If the lower levels are closed down, a certain amount of 
business will be lost in any event, and even with wealthy cor- 
porations, half a loaf is better than no bread, with business in its 
present conditions. 

%t% 

THE mining companies in turn will make any reasonable con- 
cessions in the way of retrenchment of expenses, and this 
will permit a united effort along* the entire lode to drain the 
mines at depth. As it has been, the expense has been too heavy 
for the two or three companies which undertook the herculean 
task. They have found it out at last, and in closing down no 
blame can be attached to those in charge for the failure. They 
have done the best they could under the circumstances, and that 
is all that is to be said. Should those at the bead and front of 
the business fail to come to an agreement, as at present under 
discussion, it will be another hard knock for the Comstock, but 
it has stood up under a good many worse blows in the past. 
Another proposition is now under consideration, which will help 
to revive matters if it is carried through, and that is to thoroughly 
prospect the American Flat section of the Comstock lode. This 
includes all the promising mineral belt below Belcher down to the 
Alta, Justice and New York. The promising outlook for ore re- 
vealed in these mines by the limited amount of work done, is the 
basis upon which mining men are working to enlist the interests 
of shareholders, on whom the assessments will fall light, the bulk 
of the expense being paid from the ore extracted. As an instance 
of what can be done in this way, the record of the Con. New 
York mine for the month of December last, speaks for itself. The 
expense of mining and milling during that month was a little 
over $6,000, while the bullion return from a two-week's run of 
the mill was over $20,000, leaving a handsome surplus on hand 



for the month of $14,000. With good and economical manage- 
ment an enterprise of this kind would offer the most profitable 
kind of investment. The gas is now all out of Con. Cat.- Virginia, 
and ore extraction will be resumed next week. In Potosi an im- 
provement was reported, and the strength of the stock for days 
past may be accepted as the best kind of corroborative evidence. 
An assessment of 25 cents was levied on Overman during the 
week, and those on Con. Cal. -Virginia and Utah are delinquent. 
*$ * 

EDWARD CAHILL, one of the oldest members of the San Fran- 
cisco Stock Exchange, died during the week at the ripe old 
age of 71 years. Cahill was one of the few who remain of the old 
type of brokers — whole souled, broad minded and liberal to a 
fault. None knew "Ned " Cabill but admired and respected him 
as a man among men, and the confidence reposed in him by stock 
dealers, rich and poor, showed the high estimation which was 
placed upon his integrity. His word was his bond with all who 
were connected with him in business, and no one, during his long 
career on the Board, ever had cause to feel that the confidence re- 
posed in him was misplaced. Devoid of the selfishness necessary 
for the accumulation of wealth, Cahill died a comparatively poor 
man, when the immense amount of money which he had made 
from time to time is considered. Although retired from business 
at the time of his death, the members of the Stock Exchange ad- 
journed on theday of the funeral, which they attended in a body. 
His Nephew, Edward Cahill, Jr., succeeds to the seat in the 
Board, so that the old firm will continue unchanged, a fact which 
will be the subject of congratulation among the many friends of the 
worthy broker, who has just passed to his reward. 
$ $ $ 

IF all accounts are true about the cost of the production of silver 
at Creede, Montana, it is about time that the miners of Nevada 
and other portions of the Pacific, were beginning to cast around 
for new and cheaper methods of reduction, if they propose to 
keep their end up in the bullion market. The astonishing state- 
ment is made that the average cost of production of the three 
most prominent mines of Colorado, is on 25 cents per ounce. 
Two of them can produce 8 000,000 ounces per annum, and the 
profit from one of them last year was $1,000,000 on an investment 
of only $200,000, while according to the latest accounts the same 
mine is paying dividends at the rate of $150,000 per month. The 
question which immediately propounds itself to the uneducated 
mind in this benighted portion of the Western Slope, is how the 
dickens they manage to do it. 

* S$ 

THE affairs of the old Palmarejo Company, of Mexico, are not 
in a very flourishing condition, judging from the drop in the 
shares in London, which are now offered at four shillings. In 
alluding to the decline, Money says: " We very much fear it is 
true that as a contemporary has pointed out, that the directors 
of this company are contending with difficulties which are 
1 beyond the management of man' to overcome. Next year, 
which will try many things, will also prove whether their prog- 
nostications at the recent meeting were justified or not." The 
directors of a concern like the property referred to should not 
undertake matters they are unable to carry out. This is wherein 
the trouble lies more than anywhere else. 
$ $ $ 

ACCORDING to the annual report of the President of Wells, 
Fargo & Co., the production of precious metals for the year 
shows a comparative decrease of $6,705,711 with the yield for 
1891. The gross yield for the year amounted to $111,531,700, 
against $118,237,411 for the year 1891. Of this, the total product 
of California was $11,598,196, as compared with $12,215,233 in 
1891. Segregated, the gross yield for 1892 is approximately as 
follows: Gold, $30,119,936; silver, $50,607,301; copper, $19,370,. 
516, and lead, $11,433,947. In 1891 the product was given as fol- 
lows: Gold, $31,975,994; silver, $60,614,004; copper, $13,261,- 
663; lead, $12,385,780. 

s $ $ 

THERE is no abatement in the mining excitement near Urea, 
Sonora, over the rich gold finds made a few weeks ago. It is 
estimated that the new camp has now a population of 15,000 per- 
sons, mostly Mexicans, with a few American prospectors from 
the southern part of Arizona. Traces of old workings have been 
recently discovered. This fact gives color to the belief that the 
long lost mines of fabulous riches of the Aztecs are about to be 
rediscovered. There has been no trouble so far between the 
prospectors and the Yaqui Indians, although the latter view with 
sullen silence the encroachment upon their domain. 

ts ; 

THE management of the Reed mines, of Shasta county, has 
been so very successful in the development of the property, 
that they propose to branch out more extensively than ever this 
year. In order to do this they have very wisely decided to divert 
the coin on hand received from bullion sales to the uses of the 
mine, instead of distributing it, as at first intended, in dividends. 
$$$ 
APTAIN ASHBY will probably succeed D. H. Jackson as 
Superintendent of the Holmes mine at Candelaria. 



c 



Jan 



1803. 




FRANCISCO NEWS I ETTER. 



15 



'Hear the rrlcr' " What the devil art thou" 
* One that will DlarthcloTll. sir. with too." 



A MUM; many fads we are absorbing from the tight little island 
across the pond, is the highly reprehensible one of docking 
horses' tails. It is not a pretty, and it is undoubtedly a cruel 
custom. A "bleed" who rides every morning in the Park, and 
who is particularly conspicuous on Sunday, is at work on a song 
(he is a lightning striker at ladies' albums) and I humbly otTer 
him the following suggestions: 

I say "fawncy" for "guess" and I "rawtber" think 

I've modeled myself on the English plan, 
A river I designate as "the drink," 

Like every well bred English man. 
I ride "to hounds" and I follow the hare 

With a leash of greyhounds, I call it "a course," 
But of all my possessions, my choicest care. 

Is centred, I swear, on my dock-tailed horse. 

For others may course the hare with hounds, 

And any intelligent parrot gang, 
May be "anglo-maniac" without bounds, 

And revel in genuine, Cockney slang; 
But I depend on an English fad, 

And I prate of "heather," and "burn" and "gorse," 
And I mark my fellow dudes grow mad 

When I boastfully talk of my "dock-tailed horse." 

Though I make the poor beast stand in the sun, 

Pestered with flies, I do not pause 
To reflect that I have bereft him of one 

Great source of defense made by nature's laws. 
My pride is flattered, I feel my purse 

Which has bought me the right to this suffering beast, 
And for vanity's sake I offer him up 

Helpless and dumb to the insects' feast. 

MR. CHARLE8 HANLON has been retired from the Donohoe 
estate, and Mr. George R. B. Hayes has taken his place. 
Since Mr. Hanlon and his whiskers ran up against Judge Evans' 
brawny fist, the world has been souring on that versatile at- 
torney. Few men on the face of this broad earth have more 
aplomb than Mr. Hanlon, but that quality is not always a win- 
ning card. Some people carry a white alley in their pockets for 
luck, some a medal, some a fragment of rock, others an amulet 
plucked from an Egyptian tomb. Mr. Hanlon's amulet and 
guardian is his whiskers. There are other whiskers in town, to 
be sure; some brown, some blonde, and some foxy, but they are 
as the feeble glow-worm to the planet Mars by comparison with 
Mr. Hanlon's whiskers. He is utterly and completely dominated 
by them. They possess some wierd and inexplicable power over 
him. Now, as the story goes, Mr. Hanlon's whiskers have an in- 
satiable appetite for a certain brand of pomade. When that is 
not forthcoming, and when it is applied in meagre quantities, the 
whiskers wax furious, and destroy all Mr. Hanlon's sense of 
comfort. The morning Judge Evans smote him the whiskers 
had not been fed. Mr. Hanlon was in a hurry to get into court, 
and therefore made a hasty toilet, thinking, rash man, that a 
few hours fasting would not disagree with his whiskers. It did. 
It made them raging, tearing mad, and they, in turn, riled Mr. 
Hanlon so much that he gave Judge Evans the lie, with the 
awful consequences noted above. To be revenged on the malig- 
nant whiskers, Mr. Hanlon gave them nothing but a mild colla- 
tion of vaseline. The result was he quarreled the next day with 
P. J. McGlynn, was retired from a lucrative job, and the whiskers 
were again on top. Now the whiskers are bursting with pomade, 
but, alas, it is too late. All the damage has been done. 

NEVER, since the Morgue became a civic institution, did 
Coroner cross its gruesome threshold with a keener apprecia- 
tion of its doleful delights than Dr. Jerome A. Hughes. The 
rumble of the dead wagon has more music for the Doctor's ears 
than the tinkling of silver sleigh-bells, and its gloomy panels 
more delight than the gay colors of a circus chariot. 
Dr. Hughes is at the Morgue in the early morning ere 
the night dews have disappeared from the cobblestones, flitting 
hither and thither among the slabs, and seeing that no one has 
walked off with his silent and impassive proteges during the still 
watches of the night. When a new one arrives the Doctor re- 
ceives it with affectionate solemnity, sees that it is properly in- 
stalled, and has all the comforts of home— that is, as much com- 
fort as a person in its condition can expect. When the relatives 
and friends remove the Doctor's guest, he bids it an affectionate 
farewell, and turns with an easy conscience to see how the other 
tenants of the house are getting along. Seriously, Dr. Hughes 
is making many needed improvements in the Morgue, and with 
a little assistance will soon bring that institution to the proper 
standard. 



SOMETHING of * sensation WU created during the week by 
the statement made by Ptpptn, the negro prize-fighter, that 
; a spirting man had given him |750 worth of pool tickets to 
• throw" the fight with Zrllner at the California Club. Peppers 
refused to stair, at tin ■■ investigation" held by the club, who 
the sport was. hut he nan since told a number of people that 
Harry Corbett, brother of the redoubtable James, was the guilty 
person. After th* agreement, Corbett placed $3,6T»0 in the differ- 
ent poolrooms on Zellner. While he was doing this, young 
Mitchell had a talk with Peppers, and learned of the deal. Tbey 
put their heads together and resolved to give Corbett " the double 
cross." Mitchell gave Peppers $700 worth of tickets on himself, 
and also an agreement that he was to have a share in other win- 
nings. To protect himself, and prevent Peppers from deceiving 
him, he took the Zellner tickets and placed them in his safe. He 
then covered all the Zellner money he could find. Peppers won 
the fight easily, and he has since been going around town show- 
fng the Zellner tickets, and boasting how he gave Corbett the 
" double cross." All honorable sporting men are much elated 
over the result of the job, and although none of them have any 
use for Peppers, they think Corbett got what he deserved, and 
that it will tend to put a stop to fixing future fights. 

SUPERINTENDENT of Streets Ackerson is out with anew 
broom, and disguised in a brand new duster, keeps on the 
track of the street sweepers. He has followed the machines 
around for three nights, and is worn to a shadow from taking so much 
exercise on an empty stomach. Mr. Ackerson says that the machines 
fake their work, and that unless there is a marked improvement in 
their methods, their money will not be forthcoming at the end of the 
month. Those streets, those streets, they have ever been the cause 
of much sorrow and tribulation! Old Montgomery, after years of 
chronic rupture, has been at last permitted to temporarily repose 
with a new sewer planted in its chaste bosom. Kearny, the bitum- 
inous, is suffering from a deep rut caused by the broad wheel of the 
dray of commerce. Market smilingly watches the discarded " dod- 
ger," the " snipe." and the outcast straw whirl in the country dance 
on its surface. The others submit to the cobblestone and the basalt 
block with a groan. Mr. Ackerson has a pleasing task before him. 
The street sweepers will bate him well, and the public will begin, as is 
their wont, to renew their irritating comparison between the streets 
of San Francisco and the Augean stables. 

THE leg show men of this city, or I may say the impressarios 
who look up leg shows, but not among the male sex, should 
import some dancers from the Paris Casino. Why, bless me, 
our people here who blush at an abbreviated skirt would bleed 
at the nose at one of these performances, which have literally 
taken New York by storm. Imagine a damsel standing on one 
leg, holding the other in the hollow of her arm, with her toes far 
above her head, and strumming on it with her right hand as if 
she were playing on the guitar; or a somersault, where all the 
dancers roll over and stand on their heads for a brief moment, to 
give the audience a good view of their draperies. Yet this is 
done every night in two of the respectable theatres of New York, 
and the maids and matrons of the Gotham Four Hundred look on 
calmly without embarrassment or even amazement. 

A BAVARIAN Prince recently married a ballet girl forty years 
older than himself. This is a fearful waste of aristocracy, 
even admitting that the lady is yet sufficiently limber to kick off 
the bridegroom's hat. Bavarian Princes, though not as good as 
Bavarian beer, are Princes, nevertheless, and are always market- 
able in this country. The stage seems to gather in the choicest 
flowers of the European nobility. The young British Earl who 
has not an affair with an actress these days is not in the swim, 
and is an object of contempt and disgust to the rest of his 
brethren — the hereditary legislators of England. But a ballet 
girl of sixty! Great Scott 1 Why even the Rev. Junius Hatch 
would turn his apostolic back upon such an antique fairy. 

ASSEMBLYMAN O'NEILL, of Haywards, will introduce a bill 
for the extermination of squirrels in Alameda county. If 
passed, this important measure will allow opportunity of em- 
ployment to a few of the lambs who were left. We suppose a 
Bureau of Squirrels and a Commission to Locate Squirrel Holes 
will be established, with an appropriation of about $30,000. The 
measure will receive support from the numerous "squirrel hunt- 
ers" throughout the State. 

OF course mail carriers, when in the discharge of their duties, 
should be allowed to ride free upon street cars. Every man 
who has ever waited an hour to receive an answer from his best 
girl, letting him know whether she would rather go to a dinner 
or a theatre, will favor the bill to give the letter-carriers free 
transportation. It is a great measure for the relief of a long- 
suffering public. 

A YOUNG Englishman went out of a Chicago hotel with $300, 
and never returned, at which the Chicago newspapers seem 
much surprised. The wonder is, how the deuce, being a guest at 
a Chicago hotel, he ever managed to keep such a sum intact from 
the rapacity of those sharks. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893. 



<B^J%°Fcw*i 



IT Is part of a plumber's stock in trade to discover that the man 
who last worked on the job he is engaged to repair, knew 
nothing about the business, or if he did, he didn't show it in his 
work. The new Supervisors and the Superintendent of Streets 
are the new plumbers in this case, and are making plenty of 
discoveries. The people are looking to them for repairs, how- 
ever, and not discoveries. If Mr. Ackerson will carry out his 
good intentions and his good commencements he will give great 
satisfaction. A new broom always sweeps clean; — the question 
is will these new brooms wear well. The discovery of choked 
sewers in Ashbury Heights is an outrage on the inhabitants of 
that pretty residence section, and if the Supervisors can fix the 
blame on the electric road builders they should demand speedy 
repairs and a restoration of the streets to their original good con- 
dition. Many other street contractors need looking up, especial- 
ly near the park panhandle. 

The matter of street sweeping and the fact that it has been for 
a long time most unsatisfactorily done is well known, but the 
patient tax-payer who has often sought relief at the polls has 
almost despaired of getting it, so often has he been deceived. 

Another street extension report has been filed and like its many 
predecessors its estimates are very extravagant. The report re- 
fers to the extension of Twenty-fifth avenue, Twenty-seventh 
avenue and New street. The land required for the streets is val- 
ued at $14,503, and the assessment for benefits is nearly two 
and a half times that sum or $34,000. The salaries of the com- 
mission amount to $7200 and the expenses to more than the 
value of the land by $1100. 

Although the assessments for the extension of the streets from 
Nineteenth to Twenty-third inclusive will become delinquent on 
the 27th inst, not much attention is being paid to that fact by 
the property-owners. Their chief concern seems to be to have 
the Legislature amend or repeal the laws which have made it 
possible to impose such outrageous jobs upon the people. A new 
bill has been drawn by a special committee of the Mission Real 
Estate Owners' Union which will practically amend the law of 
1889 out of existence. It will abolish the commissions, rescind 
all their powers, and yet provide for the payment of the expenses 
of these commissions which have labored, or have professed to 
do so, in the interests of street extensions. A bill introduced by 
Pindall, last week, in the Legislature, will not fit the exigencies 
of the case at all, for the reason that it places altogether too much 
power in the hands of the Supervisors. It would be well to re- 
member, however, in all this proposed legislation for street work, 
the one-twelfth and consolidation act which is apt to interfere 
when least desired. 

Jacob Heyman can unfold a tale of the devious ways of exten- 
sion commissioners. He owns all that portion of Twenty-second 
and Twenty-third streets from Douglass through to Corbett road, 
which the Nineteenth and Twenty-third streets' commission has 
at its tender mercy. He opened Elizabeth and Alvarado streets 
at his own expense, and offered to deed to the city all that was 
required of the other two streets for extension purposes. This 
did not suit the commission, however, and his offer was refused. 
A value was set upon the land which he offered to give, and he 
has been assessed for benefits and all the district for damages to 
pay for land which the city could have had as a gift. 

The news of the week in real estate circles is the announce- 
ment of auction Bales in the near future. Easton, Eldridge & 
Co. will hold one on January 24th in this city, and in the first 
week in February will run an excursion to McMullin, there offer- 
ing 4,000 acres of fruit land and town lots for sale. The particu- 
lar town is twenty miles from Fresno, and is in a district of much 
promise, so far as fruit-raising is concerned. Baldwin & Ham- 
mond have closed arrangements for an auction sale of $150,000 
worth of Western Addition property on February 16th. The 
property consists of thirty-eight lots, fronting the block bounded 
by 8teiner, Fillmore. Fell and Hayes, and a fifty-vara on Fulton, 
between Steiner and Fillmore. The terms are 40 per cent. cash. 
The property belongs to 8. H. Brodie, and was bought by him 
thirty years ago for $2,500. It is all well graded, and is ready to 
build on, while in the matter of location it leaves nothing to be 
desired, being at the very highest point of Hayes street. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co have made several very good sales 
within the past few days. Among them were the house and lot, 
25.6x137.6, at 514 Sutter street, near Powell, for $25,000; a fifty- 
vara, southeast corner Bay and Van Ness avenue, for $15,000; 
a small lot on Market street, near Eighth, with frame improve- 
ments, for $26 000, and a house and lot, north line of Eddy, 
west of Leavenworth, for $20,000. 

The Original Swain's Bakery at 213 Sutter street stands easily 
among the first in the city as a family restaurant of high-class and 
unexcelled service. The fact that erery night, dinner parties of the 
best people are held there, give indication of its popularity. Go 
there for your dinner. 



Are You Going East ? 
Take the Santa Fe Route. You wilffind it to your interest to call 
on or address the undersigned before purchasing tickets. No other 
line crossing the continent can offer you a trip combining equal com- 
fort and pleasure. The only line running Pullman palace and tour- 
ist sleeping-cars through to" Chicago on the same train every day 
without change. Personally conducted excursions through to Bos- 
on leave every Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, 
Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

A. H. Ricketts, attorney-at-law, rooms 201, 202 and 203, Crocker 
Building, San F rancisco. 

iisrsTjie._A_isrcJE . 




Insurance Company, 
capital $1,000,000, | assets $3,000,000 

STRONG, PROSPEROUS, PROGRESSIVE. 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United States . 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 278 AND 220 SANSOME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 

CHAS. M. BLAIR, 

Secretary. 



QEORGE L. BRANDER, 

President. 



QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Dp 5 500,000 

Assets 3.181,753 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,525,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Office— 501 tioutgomery St. General Office— 401 Mont's, St. 

AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

OF BALTIMORE CITY. 

Cash Capital *1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets, over 2,200,000.00 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., Gen'l Managers. 

NEW YORK OFFICES 40 to 44 Pine Street 

MAXWELL & BERRY, General Agents. 

421 California Street. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE C3MPANY. 

|OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $10,637,500 

Net surplus over all liabilities 3,116,305 

William Macdonald, Manager. 

D. E M'les, Assistant Manager. 

315 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



FIRE 



RENTS! 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Pacific Branch, 314 Sansome St., 8. F. 

SWAIN & MURDOCK, City Agents. 



Our House Renting Department is one of 
the best equipped in the city. We guarantee 
prompt ana efficient service in renting 
houses, collecting rents and placing insur- 
ance. 



BALDWIN & HAMMOND, 

10 MONTGOMEEY Si. 



wmwm 



Corner Clay and Sansome. 



Jan. 14, 1393. 



SAN FB W< tS< NEWS LEI 11 I; 



17 




THE P. I. U. did not meet on Wednesday. One of the dailies 
said it was because certain reports were not ready, and to 
tbe statement in its vagueness there is a certain amount of truth. 
Behind tbe statement lies tbe fact t'mt certain of the members 
are not altogether satisfied. One of tbe requirements of the 
I'nion as now constituted is a cash guarantee of $250 that the 
member will abide by its laws implicitly. Some of tbe members 
have paid up. others have not. Now the former ask that either 
Ibe others be made to pay up at once, or tbat the deposits which 
have been paid be returned to tbe depositing companies. The 
next meeting will probably be held on January 24th or 25th, by 
which time it is expected that some sort of an understanding will 
have been reached. In the meantime, there is no tack of restless 
spirits in the P. I. TJ. Some seem bent on dissolution, others 
argue that to dissolve would be suicidal in view of the existing 
condition of business. 

The Continental is neither in nor out of the Onion. It has not 
withdrawn its notice of withdrawal, nor yet has it signified its 
intention of remaining in the Union. It is complying, however, 
with the new amendments to the law, but bas not put up the 
$250 deposit already referred to. A rumor bas gone abroad that 
there is dissension in tbe compact camp, and dispatches from 
Chicago have been received asking for details of the condition of 
affairs. 

The Fireman's Fund indulged in its annual handshaking on 
Tuesday last. The Directors held their annual meeting, congra- 
tulated themselves on the very good showing the company has 
made, in spite of dull business and a plentitude of foes, and then 
re-elected their officers. A neat statement of the condition of the 
company's affairs has been issued, and it shows that the com- 
pany paid during 1892 the substantial sum of $1,004,780 in losses, 
of which sum $159,851 represents the marine and $844,928 the 
fire losses. The net surplus for the year was $680,974, and as- 
sets, reinsurance reserve and net surplus have all three been 
handsomely increased. For a company born and bred in San 
Francisco, assets of $3,037,706 is a handsome showing, and even 
if the city's companies have been greatly reduced in number, this 
H one which consoles for the absence of many less prosperous. 

Another jollification in insurance circles was that of the Pacific 
Mutual Life, which celebrated its entry into the building it has 
built and owns, on the northeast corner of Montgomery and 
Sacramento streets. This company is to the life insurance busi- 
ness what the Fireman's Fund is to the fire and marine. It has 
a splendid record, and one of the best evidences of its careful 
management and its prosperity is the fine building mentioned — 
a valuable and substantial asset for any company. 

It will be three years ago next month since the commission- 
paying business occupied the attention of the P. I. TJ. To-day it 
is certainly a move in the right direction to have the expenses of 
insurance cut down and make pay dependent upon business suc- 
cess. The bugbear of insurance is heavy expense, and it is never 
felt so keenly as when losses are as heavy as they have been this 
year and last. The loss ratio for 1892 is 46 per cent., and the pre- 
mium income for the coast about $12,000,000, so tbat while losses 
have increased, income has not. 

George H. Tyson is back from his trip north, and has made up his 
totals for the past year, receiving a congratulatory dispatch from the 
home office on the fine showing he has made. He claims, and doubt- 
less knows what he is talking about, that the German-American has 
the largest increase in business of any company for the past year. 

J. E. Meyers has succeeded John E. Stevens as general agent of the 
.<Etna Life. The company has moved into new offices at 212 Sansome 
street. 

W. H. C. Fowler is in England, where he will remain for about six 
month. 

Letter from Cyrus W. Field, Jr. 

8 East 56th Stbeet, J 
New Yobk, May 8, 1883. f 
Several times this winter I have suffered from severe colds on my 
lungs. Each time I have applied Allcock's Porous Plasters, and 
in every instance I have been quickly relieved by applying one across 
my chest and one on my bacTc. My friends, through my advice, 
have tried the experiment and also found it most successful. I feel 
that I can recommend them most highly to any one who may see tit 
to try them. Cyrus W. Field, Jr. 

REMOVAL NOTICE. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
KENTUCK CONSOLIDATED MINING COM- 
PANY, held this day, the office of the Company 
was ordered removed to Room 23, Nevada 
Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 

San Francisco, December 21, 1892. 



XHSra-O-RA-INCIE). 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBl'RO, GERMANY. 
iirriM-ri I.. Low, Manager for the Pacific i mm Branch, 

■; , .'n Mmomr »!., S. K. 

iHPlllL «••» - $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S. 534,795.7! 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
, 238 California St.. S. F., Cal. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OP ST. GALL. OP ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. 8YZ, General Agent, 
410 California St., Ban Francisco, Cal. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed SI 0,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6,124,067.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street, San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, [Established 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Established 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. - 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 
CEO. F. BBAST, Manager. 

PACIFIC IDZErF-ARTDyCZEIISn? 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO.. SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 

OF LONDON. 

Established A. D. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - J 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, $23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded a. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, $10,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - $2,222,724. 



WM. J. LMDERS, flen'l Agent, 204 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL 16,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street. San FrancUco. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, (19,724,638.46. 

President wwNJAMIN P. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Buil ding Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 

°Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in Pirst-ClaBS Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-Callfornla Bank. 




INSURANCE COMPANr-LTD. 

h foF^lvl AMCMES-TEF^ , ENS l-ANoT^ J 

Capital paid 6j guaranteed 38,000,000,00. 

Chas, A Latoii, Manager. 
439 California St". San franmsza- 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893 . 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour— Demand light; Extras $3.75@$4. Superfine, J2.60@J3.00. 

Waeat— Light trade; Shipping, $1.27!^: Milling, 51.32^^1.35 per cental 

Barley is dull; Brewing, 85@90c. Feed, 77J^c.@80c. per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, $1.35@$1.37U; Feed, $1.25@$1.35 per ctl. 

Corn, White, $1.10; Yellow, *l.05@$l.07}£ per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, good demand, $1.10tg»$1.15^. Cement, $2.00@$2.25. 

Hay is lower; Wheat, $10.50; Oats, $7@$10; Alfalfa, $8@?9.50. 

Millstuffs.good demand. Bran, ?15@?15.50 per ton. 

Beans, good request, J2.00@J2.40 per ctl. Potatoes, 60c. @Jl per ctl. 

Butter is lower; Choice, 30c.@32 1 ^c; Fair, 16c.@17c; Eastern, 16c@20c. 

Cheese, light stock, 8c.@10c. Eggs, free supply, 35c.@40e. 

Honey, Comb, 10c.@12e. : Extracted, 7c.@Sc. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth 75c.@95c. Beeswax is steady, at 23c.@25c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 7c@7J.2C Wool is in good demand at llc.@l6c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6J^c. 

Coffee sluggish at I5c.@21e. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is plentiful; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 16c.@20c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at J4 1.50 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. White, 4J^(3r5%c. 

The daily receipts of Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, Limes, Banan- 
naa, etc., are large, the market really overstocked, this coot 
weather limiting the consumption. Apples are also abundant 
and cheaper. Potatoes and other vegetables are in liberal 
supply and low in price. 

The new crop of Hawaiian Sugar is now arriving, and is sell- 
ing to the refiners at a low price. 

Imports of leading staples are free and liberal, and outside of 
the jobbers, trade is exceedingly quiet. 

Tonnage is superabundant, and low freights prevail for all 
business, be it Coal, Wheat, Barley, etc. The ships arriving 
and departing from New York, Philadelphia, etc., are having 
quick dispatch, and find good encouragement from our mer- 
chants for a long continuance of the service. At the same time, 
the railroads are getting a good share of the business. 

The Pacific Mail S. S. City of Rio de Janeiro arrived in port on 
the 8th inst., 29 days from Hongkong, via Yokohama and Hono- 
lulu in 7 days. Her cargo consisted of 22,572 mats China Rice, 
1,210 pkgs. Tea, 2,120 bags Sugar, 656 rolls Matting, 70 bags 
Spice, 500 bales Hemp and 500 pkgs. Mdse. ; also, in transit to go 
overland, 1,109 pkgs. raw Silk, 70 pkgs. Silk Goods, 261 pkgs. 
Tea and 357 pkgs. Mdse.; also, for Central and South America, 
271 pkgs. Mdse. 

The steamer City of New York, hence for the Isthmus on the 
5th inst., carried en route to New York, 66,000 galls. Wine, 1,380 
galls. Brandy, 913,811 lbs. Beans, 304,335 lbs. Borax, 4,269 ctls. 
Barley, 216,520 lbs. Canned Fruit, 130 bales Rags and other Mdse., 
value $105 000; to Panama, 180 bbls. Flour and other Mdse., 
value $5,500; to Mexico, Mdse., value $1,454; to South America, 
750 bbls. Flour, value $3,050; to Central America, 200 bbls. Flour 
and other Mdse , value $2,475. 

The Orient The steamer Oceanic, hence, carried to China, 

Treasure, $249,747; also, Mdse., value $58,264, including 2,566 
bbls. Flour, 13,000 lbs. Ginseng, etc.; to Japan, Mdse. value 
$10,884; to East Indies, 85 cs. Canned Fruit, etc , value $260. 

Salmon Combine. — All of the Alaskan canners have formed a 
combination, with one exception. The capital stock is $5,000,000. 

Mexico. — The steamer Colima, hence, carried Mdse. value 
$7,200. To Central America, 1,125 bbls. Flour and Mdse., value 
$20,242. Steamer Newbern, for same, carried 175 flsks. Quick- 
silver and Mdse., value $56,000. 

Flour and Barley for Chili, — The Br. bark Gwalla has sailed for 
Iquique with 5,600 bbls. Flour, »4,900 ctls. Barley, value $54,000. 

Honolulu. — The Dan. Bk. Jordon J. Lotz, hence on the 7th 
inst., carried Mdse. valued at $15,262, say: 300 bbls. Flour, 2,500 
lbs. Oleo Butter, 350 bbls. Lime, 1,057 gals. Wine, etc. The stmr. 
Alameda, hence on the 9th inst., carried $50,000 in Gold Coin ; also 
75 cks. and 75 cs. Beer, 25 bbls. Salmon, 5,000 lbs. Provisions, 67,- 
000 Cigars, 100,000 Cigarettes, etc., value $24,865; also to the Sa- 
moan Islands 123 bbls. Flour, 25 cs. Salmon, 6,300 lbs. Bread, etc., 
value $2,410. The 8. G. Wilder, 20 days from Honolulu, brings 
17,496 bags Sugar. 

Salmon pack on the Pacific Coast in 1892, as pr. M. S. Lowen- 
thal's report: Columbia River, 513,800 cases; Oregon, 118,000 cs. ; 
Alaska, including shipments to Oregon, 480,000 cs. ; British Col- 
umbia, 221,797 cs. ; Frazer River (outside) 15,200- cs., making a 
grand total of 1,348,297 cased. 

The Colonies. — The stmr. Alameda, hence on the 9th inst., car- 
ried to Australia Mdse. valued $69,731, say 3,772 cs. and 1,200 
half bbls. Salmon, 785 cs. Canned Fruit, 12 flsks. Quicksilver, etc. ; 
to New Zealand Mdse. valued at $12,134— say 950 cs. Salmon, 249 
cs. Canned Goods, 3,653 lbs. Hops, etc. 

Central America. — The Br. s mr. Crandholm carried a large 
Cargo of General Mdse., valued at $60,350. 

Tahiti— The Tropic Bird hence carried 1,178 bbls. Flour and 
Mdse., value $18,500. 



"THE WHITE HOUSE." 



ENLARGEMENT OF PREMISES. 



DURING ALTERATIONS 

AND 

BEFORE STOCKTAKING 

JANUARY 3IST\, 

GREAT REDUCTION 

IN 

EACH DEPARTMENT. 



RAPHAEL WEILL & CO., 

N. W. Cor. Post and Kearny Sts. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Navajo Mining Company. 

Location of principal phve of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
company, held on the ninth day of January, 1893, an assessment (No. 24) 
of Ten 10) Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, 310 Pine Street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Thirteenth Day of February, 1893. will be delinquent. 
and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the Seventh (7th) day of March. 1893, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F J. W. PEW. Secretary. 

O ( Bee— No. 310 Pine Street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco. Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Hale & Norcros^ Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Seventh day of January, 1892, an assessment (No. 103) of Filty 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Tenth Day of February, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 3d day of March, 1893, to pay the 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 
K A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery ssreet, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

North Commonwealth Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the North Common- 
wealth Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 
310 Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal., on 
Tuesday, the Twenty-fourth Day of January. 1 893, at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M„ 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and for the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will closeon Saturday, January 21, 1893, at 12 o'clock 
M J W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— 310 Pine Street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California. _ 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 

The regular aunual meeting of the stockholders of the Oceanic Steam- 
ship Company will be helj at the office of the company, 327 Market 

street, Sau Francisco. Cal., on 

Saturday, the 21 st Day of January. 1893, at the hour of 11 o'clock A. M., 
For the purpjse of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may cou.e before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on TUESDAY, January 10, 1898, 
at 3 o'clock p. m. E H 3HELD0N| Secretary . 

Office— 327 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Jan. 14, 1393. 



>\\ l R wcisro NEWS 1 I 



19 



THREADS OF THOUGHT. 
[J'U'K must be Ihe inseparable companion of the happy. 

Al The getu Is no less a gem. though trodden under foot in the 
dust. 

A pretty ancient custom was to place upon the graves of loved 
ones the flowers they cared most for. 

The cheerful heart seeks the sunshine, while the gloomy soul 
stirs not from its sombre shadows. 

Do we not really hope our illusions may be true, sometimes, 
while tlattering ourselves that we do not. 

The door of the lips seems to have binges swinging each way, 
it is so bard to keep closed. 

If we had to have all sunshine, would we not be wishing and 
searching for a shadow ? 

The crooks in life will not straighten themselves to suit our 
convenience; we must do the adjusting. 

There are chords of the heart that respond to written thoughts 
as do the strings of the harp to the touch of the musician. 

8ouls are not unlike the clouds — some dark and mottled; 
while others are white, that become, at close of day, gloritied. 

Louise Snow. 

PRINCE PONIATOWSKI. 

THE reported engagement, subsequently denied, of Miss Birdie 
Fair, of this city, to Prince Poniatowski, now in New York 
city, has drawn attention to that reputed princeling, and many in- 
quiries have been made regarding his identity. The last direct de- 
scendant of the Poniatowski family, which furnished several kings 
to Poland, was Prince Stanislaus, who died somewhere about 1833, 
leaving two sons. They were not, however, of legitimate birth, being 
the children of the wife of his valet. It is true that Prince Stanis- 
laus went through the form of officially recognizing them as his off- 
springs, but inasmuch as their mother's legal husband, the valet, was 
living at the time, this recognition ot the paternity of the children 
by the Prince had no value in the eyes ofthelaw.It was only later on 
that the two young men in question were able to obtain recognition 
by acquiring, through purchase, the Florentine title of Princes of 
Monte Rotundo. The title was subsequently confirmed by the Aus- 
trian Archduke, who at the time reigned over Tuscany, and through 
his influence the young men also secured a recognition thereof at the 
Court of Vienna. Each of them married an Italian Countess. Charles, 
the elder of the two, left no children, but Joseph, his younger brother, 
has a son now living named Stanislaus, who occupied an important 
position at the Tuilleries under the reign of Napoleon III. His mar- 
riage in 18G8 caused a tremendous sensation, for his bride was no 
other than the famous — or, rather, infamous — Madame LeHon, who 
lived so many years openly and publicly in Paris with the Duke de 
Moruy. 

Of Jewish birth, Madame LeHon was the wife, in name, of a Bel- 
gian diplomat, and occupied a superb mansion on the Champs 
Elysees, near the Eond Point, while the Duke de Morny's quarters 
were established in a small pavilion adjoining thereto and which 
used to be known as the "kennel of Madame LeHon's pet dog.'' 
So public were their relations that the Official Gazette of Milan an- 
nounced the marriage of Mile. LeHon to the now living Prince Stan- 
islaus in the following terms: "Yesterday was celebrated the wed- 
ding of Mile. LeHon, daughter of the Countess LeHon and of the 
Duke de Morny, to Stanislaus, son of Prince Joseph Poniatowski." 
Prince Poniatowski, who is now in New York, is the son of this 
Princess Louise Poniatowski, nee LeHon, and of Prince Stanislaus. 
His real and only authentic title is that of Prince of Monte Rotundo, 
and when he styles himself as Prince Poniatowski, he is just as wrong 
as is the present young chief of the Russian House of Deniidoff, who, 
instead of calling himself Prince of San Donato, which is his only 
legal title, persists in styling himself Prince Deniidoff, although there 
are no Princes of Demidoff in the Russian Peerage. The relations 
between the late Duke de Morny and the Countess LeHon continued 
until the date of his marriage, in 1857, to Princess Sophie Troubets- 
koi. The separation which then took place between Madame LeHon 
and de Morny was attended by very disagreeable financial questions. 
Madame LeHon had entrusted her entire fortune, to the amount of 
several millions of francs, to the care of the Duke, who absolutely 
refused to make any restitution thereof until forced to do so by Em- 
peror Napoleon III., who was desirous at all cost to avert the legal 
proceedings which she threatened. Save for the empty honor of 
bearing the title of Princess, it will be seen, therefore, that the Pon- 
iatowski alliance would not be a very brilliant one for any young 
lady. 

Steele's Grindelia Lotion is the best remedy known for the allevia- 
tion of the distress caused bv asthma and for the cure of poison oak. 
It may be purchased at the Palace Pharmacy, 635 Market street. Its 
curative powers are exactly as they are represented, for which rea- 
son it is generally used. 

The Maison Riche, at the corner of Grant avenue and Geary 
street, enjoys the patronage of all the good livers in the city. With 
out exception it easily leads in a city where good restaurants abound. 



K. iwc. osrE^xr:Ei^i_,i-, <sc co- 



shipping and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS. 

Nos 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco. 

National Assurance Company or Ireland 

Atlas Assurance Compasy of London 

Boylston Insurance Company of Boston 

Ocean Marine Insurance - of London 

STEAM 
BOILER 
INCRUSTATIONS. 



OLD SCALE REMOVED, 

FORMATION OF NEW SCALE PREVENTED, 

Without the aid of chemicals, 
by the use of 



LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER 

Over 800 In Daily Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212®. Saves from 26 to 60 per cent, in the Amount ol 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Fine street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Systems : 
"Slattery" 

Induction; 
"Wood" 

Arc. 
Factories : 
Fort Wayne, 

Indiana; 
Brooklyn. 

New York. 



ELECTRIC IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. 



General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Ari- 
\ zona and Washington of the 

Fort Wayne Electric Light Company, Fort Wayne, Ind. 
: Estimates furnished for electric railways, electric 
: light and steam plants, house wiring, etc. Marine wor 
: a specialty, 
jj 36 New Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



R. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIBVIN. 



J. W. GIRVIN &. CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, 

Hose, Packing, etc.. 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc, 

Pacific Coast Agents Jor Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather & Ladew, 
ormerly J. B. Hovt & Co. 6 « allforiila St.. S. >'.. Dal. 

CALIFORNIA WIRE WORKS, 

9 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WIRE of all Kinds, WIRE NAILS, Best Steel, 

BARBED WIRE, Regularly Licensed. 
WIRE ROPES AND CABLES. 
WIRE CLOTH AND NETTING. 

HALLADIB'S ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY for transporting 
ore and other material over mountains and difficult roads. 
Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

BRANCHES.— 22 Front street, Portland, Or.; 201 N. Los Angeles street, 
Loa Angeles, California. 

CYPRESS LAWN CEMETERY. 

Situated in San Mateo County, between the Holy Cross and Home of 
Peace Cemeteries, now ready for interment. 

Fj^3VniXi"Z" PLOTS 
For sale in any size required. 

The cemetery is non-sectarian and is laid out on ihe lawn plan, thereby 
saving the lot owners the great and useless expense of coping, at the same 
time making it a beautiful burial place. 

For further information apply at the office, 325 Montgomery street, or at 
the cemetery, of W. J. BLA.IN, Superintendent. 

Louis Roederer Champagne. 

The Highest Grade 
Champagne in the World. 

WHITE LABEL, "Carte Blanche." 

A Magnificent Rich Wine- 

BROWN LABEL, "Grand Vin Sec." 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every bottle beart the private label of 

MAGONDRAY & CO. 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893 . 



NOT many months ago on account was received from Russia of 
the bringing to life by means of application of electricity, of a 
patient who had apparently died from the effects of a lightning 
stroke. A resuscitation of a different character, although by the 
same agency, has just been effected in Scotland. A man who 
was bathing was seized with cramps and sank, being two minutes 
below water. For some time after he was rescued life was thought 
to be extinct. An electrical apparatus was procured, and the 
current was passed between the nape of the neck and the heart. 
Within a very short time animation was restored, and the man 
soon recovered. 

— A peculiar kind of call has been devised for special military 
purposes by a French army officer. This call, which is called 
"the dog," is produced by means of an instrument in which a 
wheel carrying a series of strips of steel upon its circumference 
and passing between the poles of a magnet develops currents of 
variable frequency. The circulation in the line of these currents 
produces in the receivers a characteristic signal, perceptible at a 
distance, and exactly resembling the bark of a dog. It would ap- 
pear that the most enlightened nations of the day are not above 
following the methods adopted by the untutored savage, whose 
favorite mode of transmitting signals, both in war and the chase, 
is imitating the cries of animals or the note of wild birds. 

—— A most wonderful mechanical toy has been on private exhibi- 
tion in Paris lately, and it is understood efforts are to be made to se- 
cure the curiosity or curiosities for the Chicago Exposition. This 
remarkable piece of mechanism consists of seven life-sized kittens, 
covered with real skin, but with eyes of emeralds set in white enam- 
el. Each kitten is provided with some instrument, such as a flute, 
a zither, a violin, a drum, a harp, a cornet, an accordeon. all per- 
fectly harmonized. With these the kittens play the most difficult 
pieces of music, operas and such. The mechanism is similar to that 
of a common music box, and the whole apparatus, kittens, etc., is 
valued at about 20,000 francs. The curiosity is even reported to be 
insured for 12,000 francs. 

Professor Huxley declares that the proper weight of man is 154 

pounds, made up as follows: Muscles and their appurtenances, 68 
pounds; skeleton, 24 pounds; skin, 1034 pounds; fat, 28 pounds; 
brain, 3 pounds; abdominal viscera, 11 pounds; blood (that which 
would drain from the body) 7 pounds. The heart of such a man should 
beat 75 times in a minute, and he should breathe 15 times during 
each minute. At that rate, in 24 hours he would vitiate 1,750 cubic 
feet of pure air to the extent of 1 per cent. In the same length of 
time he should throw off through the skin 18 ounces of water, 300 
grains of solid matter, and 400 grains of carbonic acid. 

The United States consul in Liverpool recently received 

government orders to inquire into the manufacture of oil of sweet 
almonds in England. He reports that two London firms, whom he 
names, seem to be the principal, if not the only, firms in England 
engaged in this business. The kernels are crushed by hydraulic 
pressure, and from the cake thus formed the oil is distilled. The 
same process is carried on in Havre, but it is said that there the ker- 
nel of the peach is used instead of the almond, and that, conse- 
quently, the oil is cheaper in price and not so good. 

Herr Weissmann, a distinguished German biologist, has 

pointed out that the average duration of the life of birds is by no 
means well-known. Small singing birds live from eight to eigb teen 
years. Ravens have lived for 100 years and parrots still longer in 
captivity. Fowls live from ten to twenty years. The wild goose 
lives over 100 years, and swans are said to have attained the age 
of 300. The long life of birds has been regarded as compensation 
for their lack of fertility and the ^reat mortality of their young. 

Reports still come in of the electrical imposter who ap- 
pears in various localities with inventions greater than the Bell 
telephone or the Edison light, sells a little stock and then disap- 
pears. England is now infected with him, together with other 
and older electric frauds heretofore well-known in this country. 

—^ The use of rubber tires on private carriages has become quite 
common in New York. For invalids and nervous persons physicians 
recommend their use. But the rubber tire is not only expensive, but 
lasts only a little while, owing to rough pavements and street rail- 
way tracks. 

——In view of the fact that electric omnibuses operated by stor- 
age batteries have been introduced in London, the Electrical Review 
advocates a similar motive power being employed on the Fifth 
avenue Btage line in this city. 

It is estimated that about 150,000 incandescent lamps are 

burned in New York every night. 

John "W. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, easily leads in the hand- 
ling of all gentlemen's furnishing goods. He is therefore patron- 
ized by the city's well-dressed men. 



:B_A_:r>r:K:s_ 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by .Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 7,250,000 

Southeast corner Bush and 9ansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; 

Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES— Kamloops, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, British 
Columbia. 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW TORE, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

532 California Street. Corner Webb Street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1892 925,890,653 OO 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 1,533,136 OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland ; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



S. W. Corner Sansome and Bush Streets. 
Established 1870. U. S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL (PAID UP) 91,600,000 

SURPLUS $600,0001 UNDIVIDED PROFITS $160,000 

8. G. MURPHY President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT. . .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass t Cashier 

DIEBCTOES: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, 8. G. Murphy, 

N Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 

S^FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT. 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 

the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to6 p. m. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisco. 

QUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RE8ERVE FUND I 1,685,000 OO. 

Deposits Jan. 1, 1893 30,327,159 02 

Officees— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-PreBtdent, EDW. KRDSE 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGEE8 ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Krnse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon. Attorney, 
John R. Jabbob. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, 91,000,000. 

OFFICEEB. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAME3 A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W". Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

ubscried Capital 92,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000, 000 

Reserve Fund $650,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 

LC. Altschtjl, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited, 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 j Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 700,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel oourt, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seli man & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking lusiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
worlu. 3ends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART | «-„-_._. 

P. N. LILIENTHAL. i Managers. 
A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier. 



Jan. 14, 1893. 



SAX FRAN< [SCO NEWS l.i I in; 



21 



5UNBEA<HS 



^ 



baostics. 



AN editor once began a leading article thus: "To-morrow is the 
anniversary of the death of Louis Phillippe." The editor's 
writing was not the clearest, so when he received the proof it ran: 
" To-morrow is the anniversary of the death "f Bam Phillips." Justly 
indignant, he wrote on the margin : " Who the dickens is Bam Phil- 
lip- " At breakfast on the following morning, when he turned with 
pride to the article, which he considered better than usual, he tore 
his hair, for it began thus: "To-morrow i> the anniversary of the 
death of Sam Phillips. Who the dickens is Sam Phillips? " * 

— Whole Family. 
—'• Who is that little man talking to alt those people crowding 
about him. He's been attracting no end of attention to-night?" 
•■ Why , haven't you heard of Jin kins, the great explorer, just re- 
turned from his expedition into the very heart of Bungaboo, where 
he had the most thrilling experiences? " "Certainly ; and you don't 
tell me that's Jinkins!" ''Oh, no. Jinkins isn't here. That's Fil- 
kins, who claims he used to go to the same school with Jinkins." 

— Puck. 

^— Mr. and Mrs. Foxxy have been calling on the Swizzles. "What 
a delightful married life "they have, don't they dear?" said Mr. 
Foxxy. " They're so affectionate." " That's just like a stupid man," 
said Mrs. Foxxy. " Why, didn't you bear mm say that he'd lived 
happily with his wife for thirty years? That makes her fifty, at 
least. * I tell you he's simply brutal." — Chicago News-Record. 

— -c' Invisible checks are very stylish now," said young Mr. Dolley, 
as he turned over his tailor's samples, preparatory to ordering a 
suit. " Many of my customers have been paying me in that mater- 
ial for years," replied the tailor, with a sigh at the recollection. 

— Vogue. 

First Passenger (irritably) — Where are your eyes, anyhow ? 

Celtic Passenger (pleasantly) — In me head. First Passenger (warming 
up) — Well, can't you see my feet? Celtic Passenger (more pleasantly) — 
Jto; yez have shoes on. — Puck. 

—Harkins— Who is that fellow with those terribby crooked fin- 
gers? Is he one of those professional base-ball players? Parkins— 
Why.no; that's Mr. Digits, the deaf and dumb wit who cracks his 
jokes on his fingers. —Puck. 

Proprietor— Didn't that man order tenderloin steak? Waiter- 
Yes, sir. Proprietor — Then you've got the wrong knife. Always 
take a razor-edged knife with tenderloin steak. Don't forget to re- 
member this hereafter. — Puck. 

—Old Brute— There is but one way to get the best of a woman in 
an argument. Young Brute— What is that? Old Brute— State your 
side, and then laugh so loud that she can't make herself heard. 

—Pack. 

—Clara— "Why, what a large pillow ! New, isn't it? Maud— Yes. 
You know Charlie Gouger, Harvard's half-back? Well, he had his 
hair cut off, stuffed that pillow with it, and gave it to me. — Puck. 

—Cultured Foreigner — I do not see how that vulgar woman came 
to be a leader of Society. Mr. Sillery— Ah ! but you have never tasted 
her wines. After a few glasses you would think her an angel. 

— — '' John," said Mrs. Norton, as she seated herself at the hotel 
table, "did you call a waiter?" "Yes," said Norton, looking up 
from his paper, " I called him and he had a tray full." —Life. 

" I'd like to be rich," said Tommy. "How rich?" asked his 

sister. "Oh," replied the young man, after some thought, " rich 
enough to wear my Sunday clothes every day." — Life. 

Clytie— Roses love me. I've wore these all the evening. See how 

they keep? ChoUy (whom Clytie has frozen) — Yaas. The flowers keep, 
but no wondah— they are on ice. —Club. 

— — " If I were you, Jones, I wouldn't be a fool," said Robinson, 
during an argument. "You are right: if you were me you wouldn't 
be a fool," replied the latter. — Life. 

—Husband (to wife from Boston)— You never find any blue stock- 
ings in the Prince of Wales's set. " Wije (strong-minded)— No ; blue 
is not a fast color. 

Taulby — I'm too long. I ought to have about six inches taken 

off, now, from my feet up. Cynicus — You could spare it better from 
the other end, Taulby. — Club. 

—She— Did your grandfather live to a green old age? He— Well, 
I should say so. He was buncoed three times after he was seventy. 

— Life. 

— Fosdick— Well, the new year arrived on time. Ricketts — Yes ; 
right on the second. Fosdick— You are wrong. It came on the first. 

— Judge. 

—Cholly—I should like to have lived in the olden days and been 
your page." She— Thank you— but a blank page is so dull. — Vogue. 

——" Yes " said the duck, waddling away with an air of import- 
ance, " I'm one of the swagger set, you know." — Club. 

Sickness Among Children, 
Especially infants, is prevalent more or less at all times, butis largely 
avoided by giving proper nourishment and wholesome food. The 
most successful and reliable of all is the Gail Borden " Eagle" Brand 
Condensed Milk, Your grocer and druggist keep it. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital *s,oon.nrr oo 

Surplui ind Ondividod Profit! I April I, 1892), 3,278.653 23 

WM. ALVORD, President. ' ' 

Thoma« Bbowm Cashier | Ibvino F. Mom.ToN, Assl«taut Cashier. 

Edward 3. Hast, Secretary. 

KIKHKSI'IIMIRNTS i 

NSW YORK— Agency ot f.e Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bant; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild 4 8ona. Correspondents In India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has AeencleB at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining District* and Interior Towns ot the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. LouIb, New Orleans, Denver. Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati. Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremerj, 
Hamburg, Fraukfort-ou-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Paid-up Capital, $100,000,000. 

Corr.er Montgomery end Ca'ifo^nia Streets, San Francisco, Cat. 

J. D. FRY, President. HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Secretary and Treasurer. 



This Company is authorized bylaw to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depository for Court ana 
Trust Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, col- 
lecting the income aud profits, and attending to all such details as an indi- 
vidual in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar aud Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposit 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rates of interest thereon. 

lite rate of Interest on Term Deposits for six months ending 
December 3J, 1892, was at 5 1-10 per cent, per annum, and on 
Ordinary Deposits, 4 1-4 percent, per annum. 

Rents safes inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from 55 per annum 
upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored at low 
rates. 

Wills drawn and taken care of without charge. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Authorized Capital ?S,600,000 | Capital paid up 2.450,000 

Reserve 460,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard St., E. c 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1005 A Street. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER: Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GOSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan A Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank iB prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital 81,250.000. 

Successor to Satheh & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

J AMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Tm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel <Ss Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. PariB— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & GO.'S DANK. 

N. £. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

John J. Valentine! President. 

Homers. Kino Manager. 

H. Wadsworth ....... Cashier. 

j, L, Browne -. Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS:' 
John J. Valentine, Lloyd Tevis, Oliver Eldridge, Leland Stanford, James 
C. Fargo, Geo, E. Gray, W. F. Goad, Chas. F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE CR0uKER-Y/00LW0RTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL *I,000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, JB. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH ...PRESIDENT. 

W. E. BROWN VICE-PRESIDENT. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier 



SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 



SSOO.OCO 



Guarantee Capital 

OFFICERS: 

President ...JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary . 8. L. ABBOT Jr. 

Vlce-Preride'nt. W. S. JONES I Attorney^ SIDNEY V. SMITH 

LoanB made on Real Estate and o ther a pproved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Streel, San Franclsoc. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893. 



JOHN J Valentine, President, San Francisco. 
\V. F. GOAD. First Vice-President, San Francisco. 
DUDLEY EVANS, Second Vice-President. New York. 
IAMBS HkkoN, Secretary, San Francisco. 
II. U. Parsons, Assistant Secretary, New York. 
H. WADSWORTH, Treasurer, San Francisco. 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT. 



fe% J arp & | mnpanj, 

Sa-n eFtawcioco, 'Deccin&c-t 31, 1892. 



Dear Sir : The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River (including British Columbia) during 1892, which shows in the aggregate: Gold, $30,119,636; Silver, $50,607, 601; 
Copper, $19,370,516; Lead, $11,433,947. Total gross result, $111,531,700. The "commercial" value at which the several metals 
named herein have been estimated, is : Silver, 87 cts. per oz. ; Copper, 12 cts. per lb.; and Lead, $4.10 per cwt. 

As in former reports, allowance must be made for probable variations from exact figures, by reason of constantly 
increasing facilities for transporting bullion, ores and base metals from the mines outside of the Express and the difficulty of 
getting entirely reliable data from private sources. Estimates obtained in this way are liable to be exaggerated and are, to a 
degree, guess work; but with some modifications on this account, made herein, the general results reached, while only approx- 
imately correct, may be accepted as the closest approximation possible under the circumstances. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by Express, 



California 

Nevada 

Oregon 

Washington 

Alaska 

Idaho 

Montana 

Utah 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Dakota 

Texas 

British Columbia . 



Total . 



$ 8,961,486 

i,378,38i 

945,886 

237,208 

1,790,100 

2,875,000 
23,791 

4,743,503 
357,820 
787,505 

2,955,578 

272,192 



$25,328,450 



Gold Dust and 

Bullion by other 

Conveyances. 



$1,400,000 

75,OO0 

25,000 

785,000 



125,000 
215,000 



$2,625,000 



Silver Bullion 
by Express. 



Ores and Base 
Bullion by Freight. 



* 351,139 

2,632,431 

H5,4IO 

150,000 

2,434,260 

13,650,000 

I,3S3,657 

I9,984,S59 

114,718 

287,426 

230,000 

268,740 



$41,602,640 



S85.57I 
1.403,350 



2,536,875 
14,386,673 
11,139,888 
4,472,627 
1,639,950 
5,492,676 



$41,975,610 



$ 11,598,196 

5,414,162 

1,136,296 

4I2,2oS 

785.000 

6,761,235 

30,9",673 

12,547,336 

29,200,989 

2,237,488 

6,782,607 

3,203,578 

268,740 

272,192 



$111,531,700 



The gross yield for 1892, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

Gold 27-ftV $30,119,636 

Silver 45^ 50,607,601 

Copper 17,% 19,370,516 

Lead lo^fo 11,433,947 



Total $111,531,700 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 1870-1893. 



YEAR. 


Production as 
per W. F. & Co's State- 
ments, including 
amounts from British 
Columbia and West 
Coast of Mexico. 


Product after 
deducting Amounts 

from British 

Columbia and West 

Coast of Mexico. 


The Net Products of the States and Territories West of the Missouri River, exclusive 
of British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, are as follows. 


LEAD. 


Copper. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


I87O 

1S7I 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1S76 

IS77 

IS79 

I8SO 

I8SI 

JSS2 

18S3 

18S4 

ISS5 

1836 

1SS7 

18SS 

1889 

1S90 

1S91 

[S92 


$ 54,000,000 
58,284,000 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 
80,889,057 

90,875,173 
98,421,754 
81,154,622 
75,349,501 
80,167,936 

84,504,417 
92,411,835 
90,313,612 

84,975.954 
90,181,260 
103,011,761 
104,645,959 
114,341,592 
i2f,677,S36 
127,166,410 
118,237,441 
111,531,700 


$ 52,150,000 
55,784,000 
60,351,824 
70,139,860 
71,965,610 

76,703,433 
87,219,859 
95,811,582 
78,276,167 
72,688,88S 
77,232,512 
81,198,474 
89,207,549 
84,639,212 

81,633,835 
87,311,382 
100,160,222 
103,327,770 
112,665,569 
126,723,384 
126,804,855 
"7,9+6,565 
111,259,508 


$ 1,080,000 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,800,000 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452,000 
4,185,769 
5,742,390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
8,163,550 
6,834,091 
8,562,991 

g.'Ss,^ 2 
9,631.073 
11,263,630 

14,593,323 
11,509.571 

12,385,780 

11.433,947 




$17,320,000 
19,286,000 

19,924.429 
27.483.302 

29,699,122 

31,635.239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 
37,248,137 
37,032,857 
38,033,055 
42,987,613 

48,133,039 
42,975,101 

43,529,925 
44,516,599 
52,136,851 

5 o,833,8S4 
53. r 52,747 
64,808,637 
62,930,831 
60,614,004 
50,607.601 


$33,750,000 
34,398,000 

38,177,395 
39,206,558 
38,466,488 
39,96s, 194 
42,SS6,935 
44,SSo,223 


















37,576,030 




$ 898,000 
1,195,000 
4,055.037 
5.6S3.92I 
6,086,252 
7,838,036 
9,276,755 
10,362,746 
18,261,490 

14,793.763 
20,569,092 
13,261,663 
19.370,516 


32,559,067 

30,653,959 
29,011,318 
27,816,640 
25. 183,567 
26,393.756 
29,561,424 
32,503,067 
29,987,702 
32,527,661 
3t,795,36i 
31,685,118 
29,847,444 



The exports of Silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc., have been as follows: From London, 
$54,226,465 ; from San Francisco, $13,116,059. Total, $67,342,524, as against $41,379,445 l ast year. Pounds Sterling estimated 
at $4.S4- 



Jan. 14 1898 



SAN FRJlNi I-m NEWS LETTER. 



23 



WvMtob State* of 9R c a- i co. 

STATKMKN I OK THE PRODUCT OP COLD AND SILVER IN THE REPUBLIC OP MEXICO, REVISED AND CORRECTED FROM l8?7 TO l8oJ 

VALUES ITON MINTAGE BASIS. 



YEARS. 


Gold. 


SILVER. 


Total. 


1S77-1S7S 


$ 747.O0O 

SSl.ooo 

942,000 

1,013,000 

937,000 

956,000 

1,055,000 

914,000 

1,026,000 

1,047,000 

1,031,000 

1,040,000 

1,100,000 

1,150,000 

1,275,000 


$24,837,000 
25,125,000 
26,800,000 
29,234,000 
29,329,000 
29,569,000 
31,695,000 
33,226,000 
34,112,000 
34,60O,O00 
34,912,000 
40,706,O00 
41,500,000 
43,000,000 
45,750,000 


$25,584,000 
26,006,000 


I87S-I879 


IS79-IS80 


l88o-l88l 




ISSI-ISS2 


30,266,000 


18S2-1SS3 


1SS3-1884 


32,750,000 
34,140,000 
35,138,000 
35,647,000 
35,943,000 
41,746,0=0 
42,600,000 
44,150,000 
47,025,000 


18S4-ISS5 


ISS5-I8S6 

ISS6-1S87 


ISS7-1S88 


ISSS-1S89 










Total 


$15,114,000 


$504,395,000 


$5I9,509,ooo 





EXHIBIT OK COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FROM THE 1st OF JULY, 1S73, 

TO THE 3OTH OF JUNE, " 



YEARS. 


Gold Dollars. 


Silver Dollars. 


Copper Dollars. 




$866,743 
862,619 
809,401 
695,750 


$18,846,067 
19,386,958 
19,454,054 
21,415,128 


$15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9.035 
41,364 
16,300 
14.035 
42,258 
11,972 


1S74-1875 


1875-1876 


1S76-1877 


1877-1S7S 


1S78-1879 


658,206 22,162,987 


1879-1880 


1880-1881 


492,068 
452,590 
407,600 
328,698 
423.250 
425,000 
410,000 
340,320 
305,100 
243,298 
308,000 
291,940 


24,6i7,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25,377,379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 
24,328,326 
24,238,000 
25,527,000 


1882-1883 


1883-1S84 




1884-1885 




1SS5-1886 




18S6-1887 




1887-1888 




1888-1889 




















Total 


$9,534,407 


$449,962,434 


$203,296 





Summary. — Totals: Gold, $9,534,407 ; Silver, $449,962,434 ; Copper, $203,296 ; Grand Total, $459,700,137. 

EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN I537 TO THE END OF THE 

FISCAL YEAR OF l802. 



Colonial Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


TOTAL. 




$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 
342,893 


$760,765,406 
461,518,225 
929,298,329 


Independence. 


$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,960 


Iturbide's Imperial Bust, from 1822 to 1823 .... 


$ 557,392 
45,040,628 


$ 18,575,569 
740,246,485 




$ I9. 1 32,96i 
790,522,290 


$5,235,177 


Republic. 


$45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1873, to 30th of 


$ 9.534,407 


$449,962,434 


$203,296 


$459,700,137 



SUMMARY. 

Colonial Epoch— from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960; Independence— from 1822 to 1873, $809,655,251 ; Republic— from 
1873 to 1892, $459,700,137. Total, $3,420,937,348. 

The returns from Mexico continue to show a steady forward movement, in full accord with the healthy progress of 
mineral developments and mining interests in the United States. This result is owing, in great measure, to the liberal and 
friendly policy of the Federal Government of Mexico, which has afforded enterprises of the kind every reasonable encour- 
agement. The prospects for the future are also very bright. 




^^^t^CC^L^) 



President. 



24 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893 . 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT 

Consolidated California and Virginia 
Mining Co. 

Location of principal place of business— San 
Francisco, California. Location of works— Vir- 
ginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 13th day of Dec, 

1892, an assessment (No. 3) of Fifty (10) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company. No. 58 Nevada block, No. 30.) Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 21st Day of January. 1893. will be delin- 
quent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
FRIDAY, the Tenth day of February 

1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with the costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS. Secretary. 
Office— Room 58, Nevada block. No. 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Con. Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San 
Francisco, California. Location of works- 
Story County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 13th day of Dec. 
1892. an assessment, (No. 16), of Ten Cents 
(10c. ) per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of the corporation, payable immediately in 
United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, No. 58 Nevada block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The Nineteenth Day of January, 1893, will be de- 
linquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
THURSDAY, the 9th day of February, 1893. to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By or- 
der of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. FISH, Secretary, 

Office— Room 58, Nevada block, 309 Montgom- 
ery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining 
Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San 
Francisco, California Location of works— Gold 
Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held op the 20th day of Decem- 
ber, 1892, an assessment (No. 59), of twenty-five (25) 
ceuts per share was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable immediately in United 
States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, Room 35, third floor, Mills Build- 
ing, corner Bush and Montgomery streets, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 24th Day of January. 1893, will be delinquent 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and un- 
less payment is made before, will be sold on 
TUESDAY, the 14th day of February, a. d. 1893, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
the costs of advertising and expenses of sale 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary 

Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills Building, 
corner Bush and Montgomery streets, 8au Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Alpha Consolidated Mill and Mining 
Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San 
Francisco, Cal. Location of works— Gold Hill 
Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors of this company, held on the 
20th day of December, 1892, an assessment (No 
10) of Ten Cents per share waslevied upou the 
capital stock of the corporation payable immedi- 
ately in Uuited States Gold coin to the Secretary, 
at the otficd of the company, room 79, Nevada 
blocn, 309 Montgomery street. San Fra MCisco Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 24th day of January, 1893, will be delinquent 

and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction; and uuless payment is made before 
will be sold on TUESDAY, the 14:h day of Feb- 
ruary, 1893, to pay the delinquent assessment 
together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, California 



TO EYES OF BROWN.— James G. But- 
nett in the Club. 

In all the lovely songs, everywhere, 
'Tie strange, and yet 'tis true, 

That every girl has golden hair, 
And all their eyes are bine. 

But though the tender eyes of blue 

Inspire so many rhymes, 
The brown-eyed girls have lovers, too. 

And claim a song sometimes; 

For in my heart the soft brown hair 

And eyes of deeper shade 
Have left more tender memories there 

Than blue eyes ever made. 

And while the blue-eyed maidens live 

In all my fellows' lays, 
A modest verse I'll sometimes give 

To brown-eyed maidens' praise. 

And may the songs we each shall write 

The pleasure to us bring, 
Of finding favor in the sigbt 

Of her whose charms they sing. 

So, brothers of the pen, to you 

I toss this goblet down — 
Long may you write to eyes of blue, 

And I, to eyes of brown. 



MULDOON'S CHICKENS. 

GENERAL HORACE PORTER tells 
this story: << The client of a friend of 
mine who came from the land of St. Pat- 
rick erected in the Twenty-fourth Ward 
of New York City a structure with pilas- 
ters of lath on the facade and with rusty 
tin for the roof, with a cellar below for 
fowl, chickens in this case. Mr. Muldoon 
went to the Commissioner of Public 
Works with this statement: < Me name is 
Muldoon, of the Twenty-fourtb Ward. I 
control forty votes. I keep chickens in 
me cellar and there is water in it. I want 
It cleared out or I shall throw me forty 
votes against your par-r-ty.' Muldoon 
was advised to go to the Fire Depart- 
ment. He went there and he said : i Me 
name is Muldoon. I control forty votes. 
I want the water pumped out or I'll cast 
them forty votes for a nay-gur.' The Fire 
Commissioners said they would be glad to 
pump out the water, but Muldoon had 
better see the Mayor. The Mayor, who 
was Mr. Grace, received bim with that 
bland air which he always wore when he 
did not intend to give any attention to a 
complainant. Muldoon repeated his story, 
saying: 'If you don't get the water out 
I'll give my forty votes to a haythen 
Chinee.' The Mayor sent Muldoon to the 
Board ol Aldermen, where Muldoon's 
friend, McGuffin, a countryman of his 
and a member of tbe board, engraved on 
the tablet of Muldoon's memory the in- 
tellectual remark: 'I was jist thinkin' 
tbe party would stand it much longer if 
you could be induced to keep ducks.' " 

QUEEN MARGHEKITA of Italy's 
wonderful collection of laces, dating 
back 1,000 years before Christ, and gath- 
ered from Egyptian and Etruscan tombs, 
wiU be sent to the Chicago Exhibition — 
tbe first time that they have ever left 
Italy. Accompanying this exhib t of 
laces there will be a collection of the work 
of Italian women up to date. This ex- 
hibit will be one of the most prominent 
features of the display in the Women's 
Building. 

THE POET'S REVENGE. 

" Is the editor in ? " asked the poet, with 

A smile that was far from bright. 
<« He is," said the drowsy printer; " they 

Run him in last night." 
Then the poet laughed — for revenge is 

Sweet— and gratefully went his ways, 
And softly hummed as he trod the street: 

" Ten dollars, or thirty days! " 




LONG DISTANCE 

TELEPHONE. 

ZEiXTSiisrsioiria - . 

Salinas, Chualar, Gonzales, 
Soledad, Marysville.Chico, Oro- 
ville, Vina, Coluas, giving un- 
broken communication be- 
tween these towns and San 
Francisco. The lines are con- 
structed of specially prepared 
extra heavy copper wires, are 
equiped with the latest appli- 
ances known to the science of 
, and are "Long Distance" Lines 

in every sense of the word. The Mail is quick, 

the Telegraph i- quicker, but the 

M»« DISTANCE TELEPHONE 

Is instantaneous, and you don't have to wait for 
an answer. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

San Francisco. 

A Quiet Home, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED. 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND 

ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL AMERICAN CATERER; 
1206 Sutter Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch, 
WHOLESALE 

STATIONERS 

AND BOOKSELLERS. 

327. 329. 331 SANSOME STREET. 

J, D, SPRECKLES k BROS, COMPANY, 



SHIPPING and Commission Merchants; gen- 
eral agents "Oceanic Steamship Company, 
Gillie -ham Cement. 

327 Market streBt, cor. Fremont. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Gould & Curry SilverMining Company, 

Assessment No. 70 

Amount per Share 25 cents 

Levied ... Nov. 22, 1892 

Delinquent in Office ■ Dec. 28 1892 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Jan. 20, 1893 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— No 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 

~ DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1892, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of five and 
one tenth (5 1-10) per cent per annum on Term 
Deposits, and four aod one-quarter (4J4) per cent, 
per annum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and 
after Tuesday, January 3, 1892. 

(iEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1892, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of five 
aud one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent per annum on 
Term Deposits and four an-i one-fourth (4 l /j) per 
ceut per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Tuesdav, January 3, 
1893. LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Office— No 532 California street, corner Webb; 
Branch— 1700 Market street, corner Polk. 



Jan. 14. 1398. 



s\N n; \\< [SCO NEWS I E 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 



PACIFir 8Y8TBM. 
Trains L«*ve and *r« DuetoArnvt 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Lkatb From Decemb r 3. 1892. Amuvi 

7.00 a. Beuicia. Kum-cy. Sacnunentn 
7:30 a. Harvard*. 2fUo« and dan 

Nile* ao-l Sun ' 
7 30a Martinet, San Ramon, ■ i 
S-OOa. iacram'toA Bedding, TUDftvli 
3:00 a. Atlantic Kxpren for Ogden and 

East. 9:46 P. 

8:30a. Nlles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento. MarvsviUe. Oro- 
villeand Red BIniT 4:46 P. 

4^*. Sew Orleans Express, Los An- 

Seles, Deming, El Pa^o, New 
rleanF and East BHfi V. 

"9.00 a. Stockton and Milton 
12 00m. Haywards, Niles and Livennore 7:16 p. 
•1:00 p. Sacramento River Steamers "9:00p. 

1:80 p. Vallejoaud Martinez 12:45p. 

3-00 P. Haywards. Niles and Sau Jose 9:46 a. 
4:00 p. Martinez, Stockton Merced and 

Fresno 12:16? 

4 OOp Martinez, San Ramon, Val'ejo, 
Calistoga, £1 Verauo. and Santa 

Ro^a 9:45a. 

4:30 p. Benicla, and Sacramento. 1045a, 

4O0p. Woodland and Oroville ... 10:15 a 

4:00p Vacaville 10:15a 

"4:30p. Nlles and Livermore *8:46a. 

5:00 p European Mail, Ogdeu and East . 10;45A 
5:30 p. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfield, Santa Barbara & 

Los Angeles 9 45a. 

5:30 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 9:15 a. 

6:00 p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose 7:45a. 

I7:00P. Vallejo +8:45 P. 

7:00 p. Oregon Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound an d East . . 8:15 a 

Santa Cruz Division. 
■{■11:45a. Hunters and Theater Train for 
Newark, San Jose, and Los 

Gatos 18:05 p. 

8:15a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6 :20 P. 

•2:16 p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

SantaCruz- *10:50a. 

4:15 P. Centerville, San Jose, Los Gatos. 9:60 a. 



6:10 p. 



no 37 a. 

*9:47a. 

*8:06a. 
8:48 a, 
6:35 a. 



Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Streets). 

*7 :00 a. San Jose, Almaden and Way Sta- 
tions *2:3i 

8:15 a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, Pa- 
jaro, SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Kobles and Santa 
Margarita (San LuiB Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations . 

10:37a. San Jose, and Way Stations 5:) 

12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 

'2:S0p, San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey. 
Pacific Grove and principal 

Way Stations 

*3:30 p. San Jose, Gilroy, and Principal 

Way Stations . ". . . 

♦4-.30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . 

5:15 p. San Jose and Way Stations 

6 :30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations . . . 
rll:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations • +7:30 P. 

a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. +Saturdays only. 

tSundays only. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

26th of each month, 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 
Through Line Sailings.— "City of Sydney," Janu- 
ary 25, 1893. S- S. "San Jose," February 6,1893. 
Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers wilt be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

WAY LINE SAILING. 
8. S. "Acapulco," February 30th. 
JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 
HONGKONG, 
Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongkong for East 
Indies, Straits, etc.: 
S. 8. "Peru," Saturday, March 4th. 1893, at 3 p. m. 
"City of Rio de Jaueiio," Saturday, January 
14th, 1893, at 3 p. m. ' 

S. 8. "City of Peking." Saturday, February 
4th, at 8 p. m. 

S. S. "China," (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Feb. 14, 
1893, at 3 p. m. 

Round Trin Tickets to Yokohama at reduced 
rates. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Brannau streets. Branch office— 202 
Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent 



TO A HAND 

Give me your hand — I lonp to feel it* 

touch; 
Give me your hand -it is not asking 

much. 
Ymi give it to a stranger, or a friend — 
A gallant who will take, and o'er it hend, 
Press it with lips too careless e'en to rest 
A moment) or to know how more than 

blest 
Is he to whom you grant so great a boon — 
Or, if he know, who will forget too soon, 

Give me thy hand, to soothe my aching 

brow. 
As humbly kneeling at thy feet I bow, 
Give me thy band, to still my beating 

heart — 
Place it in mine, and feel my passion 

dart 
Through every trembling pulse and throb- 
bing vein. 
Through every nerve that quivers now 

with pain ! 
Oh ! touch me, soothe me, calm my fevered 

brain — 
Give me tby hand, and give me peace 

again ! 



AT the last half-yearly meeting of the 
gambling company of Monte Carlo it 
was reported that the total revenue from 
the tables for the past year had been about 
$4,600,000, or $200,000 more than the re- 
ceipts of the previous year. The capital 
of the society is about $6,000,000, in 60,- 
000 shares of 500 francs, or $100. A total 
revenue of 190 francs per share was paid 
during the year, or 38 per cent upon the 
original value, and 9i per cent upon the 
existing value. The total returns in 1891 
was 180 francs a share, and in 1890, 160 
francs. The contract of the company ex- 
pires in 1913, when it is expected to reim- 
burse the shareholders in full, $200,000 
having been laid aside each year for the 
past six years for the purpose. 

Get Macbeth's "pearl top" 
and "pearl glass" lamp- 
chimneys ; they are made of 
tough glass, tough against 
heat ; they do not break in 
use ; they do from accident. 

They are clear, transparent, 
not misty. Look at your 
chimney. How much of the 
light is lost in the fog ? 

Be willing to pay a little more. 

Pittsburgh. Geo. A. Macbeth Co. 

I AQT H£ ARING RESTORED 

Im I^AI S byonewhowssdeaf for30vears. 
7™ . ... Call, or send stamp for particu- 
(nf«™«-2 T> tf r?^ m0 W al3 - JOHN «ABB1UBG, 
ttammonfl Building, Fourth and Vine, CINOIHNATI.o' 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour oJ sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BR AN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic Tuesday, Jan. 24, 1893 

Belgic Thursday, February 23, 1893. 

Oceanic Tuesday, March 14, 1893 

Gaelic {via Honolulu), Tuesday, April 4, 1 93 
KOUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATE8 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets. San Francisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at 
the Pacific Mail steamship Company's Wharf, 
San Francisco. 

T. H.GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H.RICE, Traffic Manager. 



SAN FRANC/SCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

■ THE 00NAMUE BR0A00MIGE ROUTE.' 
COMMENCING SUNDAY, NOV. 20, 1892 and 
until further notice, Bnn! k nti.l rrsln» will 
leave from au.l arrive al the Han Krauclsco Pas- 
senicer Depot, MARKET STKKKT WHARF, as 
follows: 
From San Francisco lor Polnl Tlburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS-7:40 A.M., 9:20 a.m., 11:10 A. M. ' 

3 TO r. m.,S:05 r. M., 6:20 p. M. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An exlra trip at 1:50 p. m. 
8CNDAYS-8:00 a.m., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.; 1:30 P.M. 
3:30 P. M., 5:00 p. m., 6:20 p. m. 

From San Ralacl lor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAY8-6:26 a. m., 7:66 A. m., 9:30 a m. 

12:45p.m., 3:40 p.m., 6:05 p.m. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An exlra trip at 6:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 a.m., 9:40 a.m., 11:10 a. m.; 1:40 p.m. 
3:40 p. M., 5:00 p m., 6:25 p. M. 

rrom Point Tiburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS-6:50 A. M., 8:20 a. m., 9-55 A. M.; 
1:10 p. m., 4:05 p. M., 5:35 p. M. 
Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:40 A.M., 10:05 A.M., 11:35 a.m.; 
2:05 p. M., 1:05 P.M., 5:80 p.m., 6:65 P.M. 



Leaves. F. 


Destination. 


AheiveinS.F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
5:05 P.M. 


8:00 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
6:00p.m. 


Petaluma 

and 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a.M'8:50a. m 
6:05 p.m 10:80 a.m 
7:30p.m| 6:10p.m. 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


Fulton, 
Windsor, 
Healdsburg, 
Litton Springs, 
Cloverdale & 
Way Stations. 


7:30 p.m. 


10:30a. M 
6:10p.m 








7:40a.m. 


8:00 a. m. 


Hopland 
and Ukiah. 


7:30 p. M. 


6:10p.m. 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


S:0Oi.M. 


Guerneville. 


7:30p.m. 


10:30a.m 
6:10 p.m 


7:40 a.m. 
5:05 p.m. 


8:00 A.m. 
5:00p. m 


Sonoma and 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. 
6:05p.m. 


8:50a.m. 
6:10p.m. 


7:40 a. m 
3:30 p.M 


8:00 a.m 
5:00 p.m 


Sebastopol. | 10:40a.m 
! 6:05p.m 


10:30 am 
6:10 p.m 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Qeyserville for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port and Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lake- 
port; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sarato- 
ga Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Cahto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Westport, Usal, Hydesville and Eu- 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, $2 25; to 
HealdsbUTg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, $4 50; to Hop- 
land, $5 70; to Ukiah, $6 75; to Sebastopol, $2 70; 
to Guerneville, $3 75; to Sonoma, $150; to Glen 
Ellen, $180. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, $1 ; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Heaids- 
burg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, $4 50; to 
Hopland, $3 80: to Sebastopol, $180; to Guerne- 
ville, $2 50: to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1 20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLTNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for ports 
in Alaska, 9 a. m., Dec. 16, Dec. 30 and Jan. 13. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 
9 a. M. every Friday. 

For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 A. m. 

For Santa Ana, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifih day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only_ at Los Angeles, 
Santa Barbara and San Louis Obispo, every fourth 
and fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For portB in Mexico, 1st of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 



The splendid 3,000 
ton steamers of the 
^tf 1 Oceanic Steamship 
,"fj Company sail for 
\o Honolulu, Auckland 
and Sydney as under • 
For Honolulu, Apia, 
Auckland and Syd- 
ney, SS. Mariposa, 
Friday, February 3, 
at 2 p. M. 
For Honolulu only, 
SS. Australia, Wed- 
nesday, January 18, 
at 2 o'clock p. m. 
For passage or freight apply to J- D. SPRECK- 
ELS & BROS. CO., 3*7 Market Street 




StfVEt* 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893 




THE wedding of Miss Aileen Ivers, oE which the telegraph has 
informed ua as having taken place on Tuesday morning last 
Id New York, was of immense interest, not alone to the Califor- 
nia colony in that city, but to the many friends of the Ivers fam- 
ily in San Francisco, the bride's birthplace. The fortunate groom 
who won the beautiful blonde is Mr. Edward Robinson, a promi- 
nent business man of Gotham, being attached to the banking 
house of Drexel, Morgan & Co. Mr. Robinson's mother married 
Mr. J. Lloyd Wright, and is a wealthy fashionable member of 
New York society. The ceremony took place at noon, in the 
Church of the Heavenly Rest, on Fifth avenue, and was per- 
formed by the Rev. Parker Morgan, and the service was choral. 
The church was elaborately decorated with garlands of green; 
the altar and chancel trimmed with lilies and myriads of candles, 
and when the guests in gay attire had rilled the church to reple- 
tion, and the notes of the organ pealed forth the bridal chorus 
from Lohengren, the choristers advancing up the aisle chanting 
the strain, the scene must have been a brilliant one. The eight 
ushers, after filing up the centre, opened ranks, and standing 
guard, as it were, on each side, allowed the bridal party to pass 
through. First came the groom's sister, Miss Bertha Robinson, 
in a stylish costume of pink satin embroidered in silver, and 'hen, 
the cynosure of all eyes, came the handsome bride, leaning on the 
arm of her brother in-law, William G. Irwin of Honolulu, who 
gave her away. The young lady bore the gaze of a thousand 
people remarkably well. Her queenly figure was in a long tulle 
veil, caught at one side by the feather of diamonds which was 
the groom's special gift. The bridal robe was one of Worth's 
masterpieces, being of white satin profusely draped with point 
lace, the present of her aunt, Mrs. Byrne. A pretty conceit was 
the loop of ribbon at the side, to serve as the repository for the 
bridal bouquet, which style was also a feature of the wedding 
robe of the Princess Marie of Edinburgh. As the bride reached 
the chancel, the groom, who had been awaiting h r coming with 
his best man, Wm. Byrne of this city, stepped forward, radiant 
with happiness, and taking her hand, led her to the officiating 
clergyman, and the ceremony began. At the conclusion of the 
service, the newly-wedded pair, with their relatives and most 
intimate friends, drove to the Victoria Hotel, where the wedding 
breakfast was served, and later in the day Mr. and Mrs. Robinson 
left for a honeymoon trip through Canada. Upon their return 
they will reside on East Fifty-seventh street, and add another to 
the many homes in New York where California friends are always 
sure of a hospitable reception. The wedding presents were 
numerous, many of them magnificent, including gifts from the 
Adam Grants, Callingham Byrne and Joe Grant. Mrs. Irwin, 
formerly Mrs. Ben Holladay, Jr., a sister of the bride, who came 
on to New York from Honolulu to attend the wedding, gave a 
diamond necklace, and Mrs. Herman Oelrichs, nee Tessie Fair, a 
set of Bohemian glass finger-bowlf. Henry Pierce, of California, 
sent a thousand-dollar cheque, and the groom's mother, in addi- 
tion to a superb silver dinner service, gave a cheque for five 
thousand dollars, so, take it altogether, our California belle will 
begin married life with a fair supply of this world's goods, as 
well as a handsome young husband. 



Although teas are not so numerous as earlier in the season, 
they promise to be the favorite function with our society host- 
esses until the advent of Lent, now only a few weeks distant. 
Miss Gertrude Jack, of San Luis Obispo, was the guest of honor 
at a young people's tea given by Miss Edna Robinson last week, 
at which the young hostess had the assistance of the Misses 
Delmas, Mercado Breeze and Scott in doing the honors. The tea 
given by Mrs. E. J. Bowen and tfer daughter, Miss Mary Bowen, 
at their Franklin street home on Saturday last, was prolonged 
until quite a late hour iu the evening— the elders presenting 
themselves in the afternoon, enjoying tea and the music of Noah 
Brandt's orchestra, while the younger guests put in tbeir appear- 
ance early in the evening, when dancing was in order and con- 
tinued until eleven, at which hour supper was served. 



Mrs. George H. Lent's first reception since her marriage was 
one of the pleasant events of last week, taking place at her pretty 
home on Washington street on Wednesday evening. The party 
given by Misa Charlotte Moulder, on Thursday evening of last 
week, was a very pleasant little affair of the small and early 
type, dancing, which was the chief feature, ending at midnight, 
when supper was announced. The ruoms were tastefully orna- 
mented, foliage and red berries predominating, and the Hungar- 
ian band furnished the music. 



A social event was the marriage, on Tuesday evening, of Frank 
P. Thwaites to Miss Moore. The nuptials were celebrated at 
the residence of the bride's parents, at Vernon Heights, Oakland, 
and a large throng of invited guests was present. 



The third dance of the Friday Night Cotillion at Odd Fellows' Hall 
last week was scarcely a whit less pleasant than its predecessors, 
though perhaps not quite so largely attended, and the weather was, 
by way of contrast, almost perfect. The colors chosen for the deco- 
rations were pink, white and green, and the ladies were requested, so 
far as possible, to wear gowns of like tints; and, though many re- 
sponded, the rule was not universally observed, as, for instance 
pretty Mrs. Endicott, who was partner of the leader in the first cotil- 
lion of the season, wore lilac. Mr. George Newhall led alone with 
the assistance of nine couples in the first set, and chose Figure five, 
the Amazon March, the Circus, and Wheel of Fortune, through the 
intricacies of which he ablv led them, and, thanks to the rehearsals, 
they were gone through in excellent style by the first set. Supper 
was served at midnight, and from the table the guests took their de- 
parture, as there was no dancing afterwards. The next Cotillion will 
be danced on Friday evening, the 20th inst. 

The '' stags " of the Cosmos Club had the anticipated good time at 
their comfortable club house last Saturday night, and between 
speech-making, songs, the flow of anecdote and reminiscence, to say 
nothing of that which came from the punch bowl, a right jovial time 
was passed. Club houses are in request at present, not only here in 
town, but over in Sausalito. where the Pacific Yacht Club house has 
been the scene recently of two delightful parties. The first one was 
the dinner given by General and Mrs. John H. Dickinson to a 
party of friends, after which there was music, dancing and supper at 
Craig Hazel, the Dickinson residence, which is inclose vicinity to the 
club bouse, many of the guests remaining over until Sunday after- 
noon. The second occasion was the duck dinner which took place 
last Saturday evening, and to which ladies were for the first time in- 
vited, the party from town going over by tug, departing at 6 p. m. 
The repast was a plentiful one, and was followed by speeches, music 
and recitations, Mr. Alfred Wilkie contributing two vocal selections 
in his best style. A jolly good time was spent, and it was at a very 
late hour the return trip was undertaken. 

"The Mikado" which was sung at Saratoga Hall last Friday 
night in aid of the treasury of St. Paul's Episcopal Church netted 
a nice little sum. The cast embraced a number connected with 
that church who acquitted themselves to the entire satisfaction 
of a goodly sized audience that warmly applauded their efforts. 
The Ladies' Aid Society of St. John's Church announce that the 
San Francisco Operatic Society will give an entertainment for 
their benefit on the evening of the 26th, when an adaption of 
"A Trip to Africa" which is now being vigorously rehearsed will 
he the attraction. 



Several pleasant gatherings took place in Oakland last week. 
One of them was the tea given by Mrs. Oretha Pierce at her 
charming home on Vernon Heights, which was attended by a 
large number of guests. On Thursday evening Mrs. Goodall gave 
a Kalamazoo whist party in which about fifty of their friends 
took part ; and on Thursday evening also another card party was 
given by Mrs. Houghton to a smaller number of guests. 

A step in the right direction is the effort being made to have 
dances commence at a sensible hour of the evening so as to allow 
of their being brought to an early conclusion and thus enable our 
society beaux to enjoy them without a consequent loss of much 
needed rest. The Friday Night Cotillion Club was the first to 
inaugurate this idea, (though this season their dances have been 
prolongued till a much later hour than has. heretofore been the 
rule) and the Monday evening club has followed their lead. The 
first dance of this new club was given in the maple room of the 
Palace Hotel on Monday evening last was a decided success. 
The room itself presented a very pretty appearance when all the 
guests were assembled ; the costumes of the ladies were handsome 
and sufficiently varied in color to make a most pleasing ensemble. 
Dancing commenced promptly on time at half past eight, and 
ended at midnight, refreshments being served during the evening, 
and the second of the series, which will be given after Lent, will 
no doubt be eagerly anticipated by all the guests of this occasion. 
The same evening, Monday, a reception was given by Major and 
Mrs. Cluff at their home on Vallejo street in celebration of their 
wedding anniversary, and proved a very pleasant affair. On 
Tuesuay evening George Crocker gave a large dinner at the 
Crocker mansion on California street at which his cousin Mrs. 
Steadman, and Mrs. Edgar Carroll of Sacramento were the guests 
of honor. The McGavin residence on California street was the 
scene of the Fortnightly Club reunion on Wednesday evening. 



Miss Bessie Shreve accompanies Mrs. John F. and Miss Minnie 
Houghton on their trip to Southern California. The ladies antic- 
ipate an absence that will extend well on into February, if not 
longer, and during the time Mrs. Houghton is away from 
home, Mrs. Charles S. Houghton will make her headquarters at 
the family residence, on Jackson street in Oakland, and look 
after the comfort of those left behind. 



The wedding of William K Sanborn and Lida Bruce took place 
at the residence of the bride's parents in Oakland, on Thursday 
evening. 



Jan. 14, 18'3 



S\N FRANCISCO NEWS III I I i; 



27 



There are times when to have a large family connection may 
be looked upon in the light of an actual calamity, ami it is just 
possible that Mr*. Will Crocker may so regard it. For no sooner 
is another Crocker Festivity announced than the sudden demise 
of Mr. Edgar Mills occurred to cast a shadow over what promised 
to be the most brilliant function of tbe season. Mr. Mills being a 
c >nneclion by marriage >f Colonel Kred Crocker. Last evening 
was a favorite one, apparently, for entertaining, and among other 
affairs were the party given by the Club of 'i»3. At Union Square 
Hall, and tbe monthly meeting of the Pacific Coast Association of 
the Native Sons of Vermont. At the latter a musical programme 
was first listened to, Miss Mabel Pelton contributing a recitation, 
after which a farce in one ac», entitled Cabman Xo. 93, was capi- 
tally done by several talented amateurs. 



Yesterday afternoon Mrs. Kideout gave a tea, at her residence, 
on Wellington street, between the hours of 4 and 7 o'clock. 

The Aldine Club will give their next party at Union Square 
Hall, on Tuesday evening, the 24th, and among other good 
things in prospect is a young people's dance, which will be given 
at one of our small halls in the very near future. In this case it 
will be the young ladies who will have charge of the affair, while 
tbe young gentlemen will appear as guests only — what might be 
termed a leap year party if tbe date was only suitable. Another 
anticipated pleasure is the ladies* night at tbe Olympic Club, set 
for tbe 3lst of January, when a benefit has been arranged to aid 
in procuring bedding for the California Woman's Building at Chi- 
cago. The programme will consist of athletic displays, and a 
musical olio under the direction of Henry Heyman. On Monday 
next Mrs. W. W. Morrow will give a lunch at her San Rafael 
villa in honor of Mrs. Howison, of the Navy Yard. 



It is not often that the unlucky day of the week is chosen for 
one's wedding day, but it would seem as though the pretty, dark- 
eyed bride of last week, Miss Anita Davis, defied all augury un- 
propitious to her happiness when she named Friday of last week 
for her marriage with Ed. H. Clough, the ceremony being very 
quietly performed in Sacramento. Tbe bride, who is a resident 
of Oakland, belongs to the Estudillo family, who are among the 
oldest land-owners in California. 



Two marriages were celebrated on Wednesday afternoon this 
week. The bride and groom in one case were Miss Blanche 
Lalande and M. A. Taix, of San .Tuan, the ceremony taking place 
at tbe residence of Dr. Dewey, brother-in-law of the bride, on 
Sutter street. The other was also a home wedding, at the resi- 
dence of the bride's mother, on Post street, and relatives only as- 
sembled to see Miss Ada Richards converted into Mrs. Clarence 
T. Wendell. 



Mr. and Mrs. Drexler, nee Elsie Kelley, whose marriage was 
celebrated in Mendocino City last week, have arrived in San 
Francisco, and are occupying the Drexler residence on Van Ness 
avenue. Tbe date for Miss Alice Cooper's and Thos. I. Dillon's 
wedding is set for the first of February; while St. Valentine's 
Day has been selected by Miss Tillie Hageman and Dr. West- 
phall as an appropriate one for their nuptials. 



It is seldom that a fashionable wedding takes place in San 
Francisco, according to the rites of the Russian Greek Church, so 
that whenever one does, it is safe to say curiosity attracts many 
to the scene. This was the case last Sunday, when the Russian 
Chapel on Powell street was crowded with people to see the cere- 
mony performed between Miss Helen Athanasiadore and Nicholas 
Daminakis by Father Greekevitch. The bridal party arrived 
about half-past two, the bride attended by her mother and sister, 
and the groom supported by a couple of his friends; and while 
the choir chanted an anthem, they took their positions in front 
of the altar, and the long ceremony began. Lighted tapers were 
first placed in the hands of both bride and groom and their at- 
tendants, after which tbe happy pair had golden crowns placed 
upon their heads, rings were exchanged, the cup of misery 
sipped, etc., and a triple march around the Chapel closed it, when 
the Greek Consul, D. G. Camarinos, saluted the bride. The bride, 
an exceedingly pretty brunette, was attired in a handsome robe 
of white satin en traine, trimmed with orange bl>ssoms, and wore 
a wreath of the same flowers in her hair, fastening the long tulle 
veil. The wedding feast was held at the home in Berkeley of the 
newly-wedded couple, who have been passing their honeymoon 
this week at Del Monte. Another pretty Russian service was 
held in the Chapel in the evening, when Bishop Nicholas held a 
Vesper service in commemoration of Christmas, after which a 
Christmas-tree was lighted, from which gifts were distributed to 
tbe children of the Sunday-school, followed by refreshments for 
tbe little ones and their parents. 

Mrs. Coombes, wife of our Minister to Japan, accompanied by 
her daughter, arrived from the Mikado's ream by the steamer 
Rio de Janeiro last Saturday. She is at present at her home at 
Napa, and no time has yet been named for her return. Mrs. J. 
P. Parker and her daughter were also passengers by the same 
steamer from Yokohama. 



The members of the Paolflc 7*0 D I Club introduced their lady 
frit-mis to roast duck, at the clubhouse, last Saturday night; not 
plain, ordinary dock, but duck roasted on spits, a la BaumlUo, 

The crit-H from the fair ones for participation in the feasts became 
so importunate that the yacbUOQeo had to yield, and set aside a 
duck night at which the la lies might be present. A band, a hun- 
dred members and guests went over on the tug Relief, leaving 
this city at 6 o'clock. The clubhouse and its approaches were 
made brilliant with lights, and the band played merry airs as the 
feasters watched the preparations for the spread. General Dick- 
inson, President of the club, presided. He made an address in 
his usual happy vein, and the Mow of soul was added to by Dan 
O'Connell, who spoke in gentle tones of "The Ladies," by the 
singing of Alfred Wilkie and Clarence Howland, and the banjo 
playing of the well-known Polk Brothers whose preeence had 
been secured at great expense. Dancing was enjoyed after the 
feast. 

It is actually appalling to read the very long list of our old and 
well-known residents who have joined the silent majority within 
the past few weeks, while every day seemingly adds one or more 
to tbe roll. There were few men better known in the community 
than NedCahill; none more respected than Edgar Mills, two of 
those whom the reaper Death has gathered in this week, two 
whose familiar presence will be missed in the daily walks of life. 



Mrs. William B. Bourne will be " at home " on the second and 
third Wednesdays ic January at her residence on the corner of 
Broadway and Gough streets. Mrs. Oscar F, Giffin, Jr., has se- 
lected the second and fourth Fridays of the month as her recep- 
tion days at 2633 Sacramento street, and Mrs. W. S. Hinkle, 
Mondays, at 1628 Sutter street. Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Oulton have 
returned from their honeymoon, and are at 1418 Webster street, 
where Mrs. Oulton will receive on the second and third Wednes- 
days of the month. 

Mrs. Hallidie wilt be " at home " on the second, third and fourth 
Fridavs of January and February at 1515 Washington street, which 
Mr. Hallidie has taken for the winter months. General and Mrs. 
Dickinson are at the Palace Hotel, where they will remain several 
weeks. Mrs. Phcebe Hearst is occunying pleasant apartments at the 
California Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Horace Hill are residing at 1812 Van 
Ness avenue. 



Amongprospective arrivals in the near future are Mrs. Peter Decker 
and her daughter, Miss Alice, who are expected to reach here from 
the East to-morrow. Mrs. George Loomis is anticipating the early 
arrival of her niece's sister-in-law, Miss Elkins, of Philadelphia, who 
will spend some weeks in California as her guest. Mrs. Moses Hop- 
kins is back from her trip to Southern California. Miss Maud Mor- 
row and Miss Grace Taylor, who have been visiting at Mare Island 
navy yard, are again at their homes in this city. Mrs. A. M. Parrott 
and family have returned to town from San Mateo, where they spent 
the Christmas holidays together. Miss Clara Taylor of Sacramento 
has been visiting her aunt, Mrs. W. H. Tajdor, on California street. 
The Messrs. Thomas and William Magee and their brides were among 
recent arrivals in New York from Europe, and may, therefore, be 
looked for at an early day in San Francisco. Mrs. Belle Donahue 
and her sister, Miss Marguerite Wallace, are enjoying their visit to 
the Old World so greatly they have still further deferred the time for 
turning their footsteps homeward. 



Quite a party of society folk left for a trip to the Hawaiian 
Islands by the steamer Alameda on Monday last, and anticipate 
a very pleasant visit in Honolulu. Among them were Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Philip Smith, who did so much to render life at Santa 
Cruz delightful last summer; Mr. and Mrs. Alexander McBean, 
Mrs. Percy Williams and Miss Traherne. Added to these were a 
number of Eastern tourists and English scientists en route for 
Australia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McDonough, Mrs. C. A. Spreckels and 
Miss Ailene Spreckels are spending some time at Del Monte. 



PRICE'S 




Baking 
Powder: 



The only Pure Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia ; No Alum 
TJsed in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard 



28 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1893. 



A most interesting foot ball match will be played at Central Park 
Saturday the 28th inst. at 2:45 p. m. It will be a contest between a 
team representing the Army, and an eleven known as the University 
Veterans, which is made up of the best players of the Universities 
of Berkeley, Palo Alto, and the Olympic Club. The proceeds of 
this game will be given to the Arruitage Orphanage of San Mateo, 
and the San Francisco Nursery for Homeless Children, two of the 
most worthy charities in the State. The Presidents of these two 
institutions are ladies well known in connection with these charities 
— Mrs. Brewerof San Mateo, and Mrs. James Dunn of San Francisco. 
The sides will most likely be represented by the following gentlemen : 
Army— Lieutenants Wilcox, Flaglor, Drs. Wood and Wilcox, Rick- 
etts, Code, Taylor, Sherrard, Nolan. Potter and Wilson. University 
Veterans— Messrs. Benson, Tobin, Clemans, Pierce, Porter, Brewer, 
D. McLain, W. L. McLain. Graham and Harrison. These gentle- 
men have very kindly given their services for this good cause. As 
both the teams are made up of such splendid players a very close 
and exciting game will result. The event should attract a large 
crowd from all parts of the State. 



Mr. John P. O'Brien the rising young lawyer" of this city, and 
junior partner in the firm of Campbell & O'Brien, returned during 
the week, from a honeymoon trip through the southern portion of 
the State. His bride, who is as clever as she is charming, was Miss 
Teresa C. Anson, the daughter of Colonel Anson, one of the earliest 
pioneers of Sutter County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Basil Heathcote and Mr. and Mrs. George Boyd 
have been spending the holidays in town with their mother, 
Mrs. Nick Kittle. 

A brilliant affair in Oakland this week was the marriage, on 
Thursday, of W. H. Waterbouse and Eva May Pearl. The event 
took place at the Second Presbyterian Church, and afterwards a 
reception was held at the residence of J. E. Y. Terrell. 

Mrs. J. B. Schroeder wili be at home to-day, from 2 to 5 p. m., 
at 1104 Eddy street. 

SOME time since mention was made in the News Letter of a 
suit brought by a wealthy mercantile firm in Sacramento to 
restrain a modest rival from constructing a building on an adja- 
cent lot with a front that was an exact imitation of that occupied 
by the complainants. It was claimed that the peculiar style of 
construction was a sort of trade-mark, and the defendants had 
no right to imitate it. The Court, however, has recently decided 
that tbis claim is untenable, and the case was therefore dis- 
missed. 



Professor Charles Geoffrie. the most experienced and best violin 
teacher in California, as proved by his numerous distinguished pu- 
pils—Misses Blair, Joran, Wright! Woolfe, Hill, Mr. Henry Larsen, 
and many others — continues to give violin instruction. A long list 
of pupils for reference at his residence, 1430 Webster street, near 



Prof Crepaux, of the Paris Grand Opera, has the honor to inform 
the public that he is now forming singing classes. Two lessons a 
week— per month— $10. Vocal and scenic lessons in classes or pri- 
vate. Applications will be received at 1119 Sutter street, between 
Larkiu and Polk streets, at the Larcher School of Languages. 

SANFORD S. PROSSER. 



PHARMACY 



FRANCAIS. 

Telephone 



111 Grant Ave. 

Parfumerie Victoria, Rigaud's & Cie's Lucrecia Graciosa, Louis XV 
and Exora d'Afrique are the latest odors and so different from perfumes 
familiar to everyone- Piveot" Legrand's violet and Roger & Gallet's Lubiu 
and Piuaud's perfumes, Soap, SachauFace Powders, Cosmetics, etc 

Pinaud's 8 ounce bottles. $3,50; regular size reduced from $1.25 to *5 
cents per bottle, including Peau d'Fspagne in bulk at 50 cents per ounce. 

Every lady knows that exclusivefiess in perfumes is as desirable as 
in dress. 

DODGE BROS., HE 

Crane's Distaff, Crane's kid finish, and Hurd's 
Royal Purple, are groups of perfection in note 
papers that greet you in all your correspondence. 
They are art in stationery. 

COPPER plates. OOf; PflQT QT 
WEDDING CARDS. ^3 lUO I O I . 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Del Monte Mining Company, 
The regular annual meeting of the- stockholders of the Del Monte 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 310 Pine St., 
rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 25th day of January. 1893, at the hour of t o'clock P. M. 

For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer books will close on SATURDAY, January 21, 1893, at 12 o'clock m. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 
Office— 310 Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 



STATEMENT 

OF THE 

Actual Condition and Value cf 'he Afs^ts and Liabilities of 

PACIFIC BANK, 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

At the Close o Business Hou's on the 31st Day of Decem- 
ber, 1892. 

The assets all being f-ituate in the city and crmnty of San Francisco, the 
counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, los Angeles, Marin, Sauta Clara, San 
Diego aud Tulare, iu the Slate of California, and in the county of Genesee 
in the State of Michigan. 

Assets. 

Solvent bills receivable $3,107,738 67 

Banking house and other real estate 321,219 86 

Sundry stocks au I bonds 573^74132 

Due from solvent banks aud bankers 3141yl 30 

Moueyonhaud 806,475 30 



Total 



*6,123,366 45 



Capital stock 

Surplus fund.. 

Undivided profits 

Due depositors 

Due bauks aud bankers 
Due dividends 



Liabili ies. 



?l, 000,000 00 
WOO 00 
*,S54 07 
l,li03 04 
i,273 34 
1,136 00 



7S,S 
2.071,t 
1,132,2 

40,1: 



Total 



If % 123, 366 45 



State of California ) 

City and County of San Francisco. ( as - 
R. H. McDonald, Jr., Vice-President, and Frank V, McDonald, Cashier 
of Pacific Bank, do make oath and say that the foregoing statement is true 
to the best of their kujwledge and belief. 

K. H. MCDONALD, Jb„ Vice-President. 
FRANK V. MCDONALD, Cashier. 

Snbsc.-ibed aud sworn to before me this 9th day of Jauuiry A D 1893 
[SEAL J E. H. THARP, 
Notary Public iu aud for said city and county of San Francisco. 



STATEMENT 

OF THE 

Amou t of Capital of 

PACIFIC BANK, 

OF SAN FRANCISC \ CAL., 
At the Close of Business Hours, on the 3l«t Day of Decem- 
ber, 1892 
Amount actually paid In IT. S. tiold Cola - - - . $1,000, coo 

State of California, ) 

city and county of san francisco-, 8sl 
R. H. McDonald Jr.. Vice President, and Frank V. McDonald, Cashier, 
of Pacific Bank, do make oath and say that the foregoing statement is true 
to the best of their knowledge and belief. 

R. H. McDONALD. Jr., Vice-Pressdent. 
FRANK V. MCDONALD, Cashier. 
Subscrided and sworn to before me this 9th day of January, A. D,, 1S93. 
[seal.] E. H. THARP, Notary Public. 
Iu and for said city and county of San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada, 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the 10th day of January, 1893, an assessment (No. 6H) of 25 cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
pany, at the office of the Company, No. 4L4 California street, San Fran- 
cisco. Califoruia.|| 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 14th Day of February, 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; aud unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on the seventh day of March, 1893, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order 01 the Board of Directors. 

GEO D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office — 414 Californ ia street, San Fraocisco, C4. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Justice Mining Company. 

Location of priuctpal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill Mining District, Storey county, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Gth day of January, 1893, an Assessment (No 63) of ten cei ts per 
share waslevied upon the capital *tock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company. No. 419 California street, room 3, Sau Francisco, California. 

Auy stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
The 9th Day of February 1893. will be de'inque t, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 2d day of March. 1893, to pay 
thedelinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. E. KFLLY. Secretary. 

Office— Room 3, Haywards building, 419 California Street, S F., Cal. 



Priee per Copy, 10 Cent*. 



Aiuiunl Subscription, S4.00 





gir 




Vol. XL VI. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 



Number 3. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marbiott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran. 
cwo. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



THE office of the News Letteu in New York City has been es- 
tablished at 19G Broadway, room 14, where information may 
be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 



DI8H0NEST man is the ablest work of the devil. 



FRIENDSHIP does not aim at tbe pocket, bnt it is the genuine 
article if it gets there. 



fOU will find that it is a pretty slow world if it does not bap- 
. pen to progress your way. 



PUBLIC servant is a man who permits the public to pay him 
a salary for the privilege of serving him. 



M 



ANY a nian cannot stand prosperity, but there are few who 
would not like an opportunity to try. 



[F the devil senda cooks he also takes them, and so, on the 
1 whole, it may be considered a pretty even thing. 

rjO f-f as has yet been made apparent, the Populist tail of the 
^ Legislature seems to have mistaken itself for the dog. 



w 



OMEN do not love men so much for the dangers they have 
passed a3 for the dangers that have overtaken them. 



[N starting out to reform the world it is just as well, perhaps, to 
begin at home. Then you are not apt to get much further. 



YOU cannot judge a man's character from his tombstone, though 
you may sometimes be able to tell how he left his property. 



THERE is something lacking in the virility of California journa'- 
ism. Nobody has called John P. Irish a thief for as much as 
a week. 



HONESTY is the best policy, to be sure, though it has gone 
oat of fashion of late years; and if you cannot be honest and 
live, why, you must still live. 



OP course, if the new navy is to be used in deporting the Chi- 
nese, there is the Monterey. They can be washed that way at 
the same time they are being deported. 



WHAT Porfirio Diaz wants to know is, did the example set by 
the United States in November awaken in the breasts of the 
Mexicans a wild desire to Mexicanize Mexico? 



IT is just as well to strike a man when he is down. The op- 
portunity, you know, may not occur again, and whether it is 
as well or whether it is not, it is the way the world does. 



" A JjL things come to him who waits," perhaps, but if he sits 
J\ around waiting in this day and age he will find things get- 
ting to him several years after he has been put out of the way of 
caring for them. 

MR. ESTEE is not being mentioned for things now so mnch as 
be was. There is still the same amount of Mr. Estee, but 
there are not so many things floating toward gentlemen of his 
manner of thinking. 

A MAN is a fool if he falls in love, and he is something more 
than a fool if he doesn't. All men are therefore fools — or 
something worse. It follows, of course, that the wise man is the 
one who has not been found out. 



THE Petalnma Peewee gravely announces that " later dispatches 
from Paris fully sustain the position taken by it in regard to 
the charges and insinuations against President Carnot." Shades 
of the Eatonsvitle Gazette! There is not the least doubt but the 
filminations of the Peewee have exercised a powerful influence 
upon the course of recent events in France. 



U7H0E\ER comes out ahead in tbe struggle for supremacy 
YT now going forward between the rival jockey clubs at San 
1 ranciseo and at Oakland, the betting public can be reasonably 
certain of getting the •• double cross." 



A HER all, with tne present shortage in the United States 
lreasury, there would seem to be no immediate danger of the 
ban l<rancisco Postofflce going out on Mission street. When it 
does go, possibly the town will have gone out there too. 

HAVING succeeded in not getting elected to the Senate, and in 
getting Congressman Cannon never to speak to him again 
Mr. Cator had as well pack up his doll-rags and come home for a 
season. There is still tbe Presidency to be tried for. 

THERE is just the faintest taint of ingratitude in the fact of 
midnight thugs making a vicious assault upon a great lawyer 
—which is possibly why the police believe the thugs to have 
been but novices in the trade. Footpads of larger growth womld 
have been possessed of a stricter sense of the proprieties. 

WHILE the tunnel at Wright's station is being repaired, it 
would be a great accommodation to people living at that 
point if the trains that now run to Los Gatos would run down 
to Wright's. At present the people at Wright's have to walk the 
distance between the two stations to secure necessary transport- 
ation. 



AFTER all, perhaps, if it were not for Dr. O'Donnell's little 
biennial spree with tbe ballots, perhaps we never should know 
just how an election in San Francisco had gone. Perhaps that ac- 
counts for the doctor's strength, in fact. There are some tire- 
some people, you know, who will insist upon having their figures 
strictly accurate. 

WHEN a pilot takes a China steamer onto the Oakland mud 
flats, thinking he has found the Mail Dock, we could not 
possibly have a clearer demonstration of the fact that San Fran- 
cisco was built on the wrong side of the bay. We have known 
it all along, of course. Every tourist that ever came out here 
to discover us has advistd us of the fact. But we have not been 
discovered for some years, now, and we had hoped fate had 
concluded at last to pardon that little original error of the first 
discoverers, who built the city. 



THE Supervisors of Sonoma county have cut down the per 
diem of ihe Horticultural Commissioners of that county from 
$2.50 to $1 a day, and Ihere is a loud howl from the gentlemen who 
have been making a good thing out of the bug business at the 
large figure, "with expenses." There is a well-founded belief 
that many of the horticultural commissions have been enjoying a 
very " soft snap," and that their emoluments are far in excess of 
the real value of their services. There is certainly a large loop- 
hole for rascality in the administration of the law which provides 
for their appointnent. 



THE news reported last week about the revolutionary move 
ment in Mexico, as usual, appears to have been exaggerated. 
Nevertheless, it would be rash to take the official denials as giv- 
ing the real state of affairs. Both versions, evidently, contain 
only a part of the truth, though probably the chances of President 
Diaz are by far superior to those of his antagonists. Our south- 
ern neighbors are forced by the very spirits of the Romance lan- 
guages to use the superlative where we would use simply the 
positive, and if due attention is paid to this peculiarity, one may 
even arrive at the correct meaning of their political messages. 

ALTHOUGH this aoes not promise to be a very good year for 
the useless State com missions, which expend tens of thousands 
of dollars of the people's money without any adequate return, 
the people who are anxious to get their noses into the public 
trough do not appear at all discouraged. Bills have been intro- 
duced into the Legislature for the organization of at least three 
more affairs of the kind — all with liberal appropriations, of 
course. The dairymen, the irrigators and the ramie cultnrists all 
want to spend a lot of the public funds, and the members of the 
Legislature are being worried to death by the friends of the 
various measures, none of which, however, are likely to pass. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1893. 



WHAT CLEVELAND MAY DO. 



IT must continue for some time to come to be a matter of deep 
interest as to what the incoming administration may do. The 
President-elect made his own issue; went down with it for a time, 
but that courage which is taking with the people and is too rare 
a quality in the public men of tbe period, brought him through 
triumphantly in the end. His action of 1888 in raising a great, 
but not too well understood issue, and staking all upon it, was a 
brave thing and a good thing to do. It was brave because it en- 
dangered, and, as the event proved, lost an otherwise pretty sure 
election. It was a wise and good thing, because it at once lifted 
tbe politics of the nation up to a higher plane than had been 
known by the generation that has succeeded the war epoch. 
Statesmanship had seemed to die with the old party leaders, and 
of issues that had any real concernment for the people, or that 
were calculated to excite in the minds of disinterested but 
thoughtful men and intellectual interest, there was an almost total 
absence. One of the many bad consequences was the waving 
aloft of the bloody shirt long after it was meet and right and to the 
advantage of the whole country that it should be buried out of 
sight. With tbe issuance of the celebrated tariff message of 1887, 
a new era in political discussion began , and disintegration in party 
ranks set in. The solid North, as tbe late election proved, was 
broken, and if tbe solid South did not f Ulow suit it was because 
of a dread of the renewal of the Force Bill. At last the country 
has cut loose from the corpse of dead issues born of war memories. 
To-day we are Tariff Reformers or anti-Tariff Reformers, just as 
our interest or our judgment inclines, but nowhere are we 8ec- 
tionalists, or Secesh, or Wavers of the Ensanguined Garment. 
Economic considerations as to what is best for the material inter- 
ests of the whole country has made us one in purpose, if not one 
in methods. The great work of determining the policy best 
suited to the industrial, commercial and material development of 
our united and happy land is that which now engages the atten- 
tion of its people. Suggestively and appropriately it happens 
that the opening of the World's Great Industrial Fair at Chicago, 
at which all nations, kindreds and tongues will be represented, 
inaugurated wjat we believe to be a new trend and tendency in 
our national life and development. We have invited a great 
display of the work of men's hands from everywhere. It is cer- 
tain that there are many branches of industry in which we shall 
not suffer by comparison. What the McKinley tariff failed to do, 
the superior skill of our workmen will accomplish — it will open 
new markets to the rapidly enlarging over-production of our 
country. The representatives of the nations, let us hope, will 
take back with them better ideas of what we can do, and of our 
willingness and even anxiety to do it. The best exhibit at the 
Worll's Fair will not b9 ready for its opening. A copy of 
our new commercial policy — a sort of reciprocity treaty with all 
nations, as it were — is the natural corollary to the Chicago invi- 
tations and display, without which they will in some sense be 
an insult to our guests, but with which, the Fair would close in 
a blaze of glory, and the United States receive "a send off" before 
the world that would bring trade to our ports and prosperity to 
every industrious man's door. 

But what a disappointment and humiliation it will be if we 
should have no new commercial policy, no relaxation of the bur- 
dens of taxation, and no tariff reform? A promise that was not 
intended to be carried to fulfillment, an issue that, having won 
the elections, had no further use, and a verdict by the sovereign 
people that had no potency, would be poor exhibits of contem- 
porary American history to make to our guests from abroad. 
Yet there is grave danger that those very exhibits will be made. 
There is likely to be failure arising from two causes. First, the 
difficulty of tbe task, and secondly, the half-heartedness of those 
engaged in it. The News Letter pointed out last week the great, 
though not insuperable obstacles in the way of lessening taxa- 
tion with a depleted treasury, and therefore we need not go over 
that ground again now. Well nigh all situations are conquerable 
by determined men. But there is the rub. It may well be 
doubted whether there is in the Democratic ranks a single 
capable man intent upon grappling with this great subject, save 
and except Cleveland himself, who, after all, is only the execu- 
tive and not the legislative power. The signs are not cheering 
that Congreis will prove equal to the condition that confronts it. 
Murphy is not the kini of Senator the great State of New York 
ought to have sent to help frame a new commercial policy. 
Crisp is to be Speaker again, and be is hall-hearted, if not traitor- 
ous. No leader is forcing himself to the front in Congress who is 
at once capable and in down-right earnest upon this, one of the 
largest and most difficult subjects that can engage the mind of a 
statesman. Economic reform is not yet as paramount in tbe 
minds of Congressmen as it is with the President-elect, or with 
the mass of the people who know where the shoe pinches. But 
it has got to come, and it will come, although it is at present 
difficult to see how. Tbe instruments may not yet be fashioned 
fit for the work to be done, but the people will supply them 
sooner or later; for the great issue raised by Grover Cleveland — 
and it is not one of Free Trade or Protection, in the sense of the 
schoolmen — will not down until it is settled. 



SENATOR S. M. WHITE. 



NOW that Senator White has wrapped the toga about him, 
the people inquire what effect upon the material progress 
and prosperity of the State will bis election have. We believe 
that his choice for the Senate will have such a good result upon 
California, that during the six years of his terra the State will 
enjoy the bemfits of a directing and aiding power at tbe national 
capital that will result to our great good. He is an able man, 
and more than that, is one who is thoroughly imbued with 
knowledge of the State. He knows what California needs, and 
to secure her wants be will give his greatest energies. In his ad- 
dress before the joint session of both Houses of the Legislature 
after his election, he outlined to some extent the ideas that will 
guide him during his term of office. He favors honest currency, 
having often expressed himself in favor of gold and silver. He 
announces himself in accord with the Democratic principle of 
tariff for revenue only, for it is a matter of polittcal faith with 
him that the taking of money from the pockets of the public 
should be only for the purpose of government, and that a 
plethoric treasury, containing millions boarded and unused, can 
not but be productive of business stringency and wide-spread in- 
jury. He declares in favor of tbe election of United States Sen- 
ators by direct vote of the people, the proposition which was 
submitted to the people of this State at the last election, and in 
favor of which they so decisively decided. Senator White will 
also pay needed attention to tbe condition of the great water 
ways of the State, so that, as far a° practicable, they may be 
placed in a navigable condition. For this purpose more 
Federal aid than we have yet received is necessary. 
Upon the mining question Senator White expressed himself in 
favor of such legislation that will enable the mining industry of 
the State to be prosecuted under such circumstances as to avoid 
interference with agricultural pursuits, and so as not to obstruct 
the free navigation and use of our streams. If mining can under 
this limitation be carried on (and it appears possible that it can), 
it is unnecessary to point out the benefits that will accrue to all 
from this renewed activity and vitaliaation of an almost aban- 
doned industry. Our resources cannot be too varied, and we 
should be loath to abandon any legitimate means afforded by a 
generous providence for our advancement. The new Senator is 
a thoroughly able man. Although his opponents brought the 
" sectional " question into his campaign, it can be said confident- 
ly that he will represent the whole State. With him in the Senate 
California will hope for added strength and importance in the 
union of States. 



RAILROAD TAXES. 



THE question as to the amount of taxes due by the railroad 
has twice been made to enter into State campaigns and is 
likely to enter into one or mora before it is sett'ed; and, for 
the reason that politicians of the John P. Dunn stamp, appear to 
think that there is much political thunder in it. As long as that 
is the case, a settlement is neither needed or desired by those who 
think there is profitable occupation and possible power in what 
seems to them a very seductive issue. They say 'the railroad 
ought to pay its taxes like other people," and of course it ought. 
That is exactly what the railroad folks say, but claim that an 
attempt was made to tax them differently from other people. 
Therein consists the whole germ and essence of the controversy, 
which has lasted several years, dragged its slow length along in 
the courts and been decided every time adversely to the schem- 
ing politicians, who were acting in the name of the people. And 
now the indications are that three or four years more are to be 
wasted over the supposed "burning question" before we get 
down to solid and honest business in regard to it. The Shana- 
han bill has passed the Assembly without opposition, and doubt- 
less will go through 8enate in like manner. It is a fool-bill that 
will tie up the whole subject matter for an indefinite period. It 
cannot stand in the courts, as every third-rate lawyer knows. 
Nobody can Jose by its passage, save the taxpayers of the 8tate 
whom it hypocritically pretends to favor. Those who want to 
see the State Treasury replenished and tbe whole subject matter 
taken out of the domain of unscrupulous politics, would do well 
to read the very full report of Attorney-General Hart just pub- 
lished. From it, we learn that the State can at once collect over 
one million and a quarter dollars of back railroad taxes, and that 
it is entitled to no more upon the basis upon which "other people" 
are taxed. If the popularly elected Aitorney-General, whose in- 
tegrity has never been questioned, arbitrating between the people 
on one side, and the railroad on the other, finds that the State is off- 
ered, and can at once collect, all that it is justly entitled to, is it 
not arrant nonsense and humbug to keep the controversy longer 
open? It is to the interest of the railroad to be at peace with the 
people in regard to all such issues, but it cannot on its own mo- 
tion atone settle things that the politicians are determined to 
keep open. 

IN the Saar district of Germany, serious strikes have broken out 
among coal miners, and similar strikes are being prepared in 
the Rube district. 



Jan. 21, 18*3 



SAN FRAN< [» <> NEWS 1. 1 IT) l: 



STANFORD'S BILJ. BEFORE THE LEGISLATURE. 

T\\ V. legislature of California now in MftJlon could not do 
many belter things than put Itself on record in regard to the 
present peculiar financial status of the country, which has so agi- 
tated the Mreat West that a third party has been Imported into 
politics, carried several 8tates. given Weaver a by no means 
Insignificant vote, elected Senators enough to control the highest 
law-making power in the country, and even in our own fair 
State of California holds in its band* the balances that can elevate 
one party and weigh the other down. It is idle to longer attempt 
lo poob-pooh a movement that has in such a short time given us 
these substantial results. It is the part of wisdom to inquire 
into the cause of dissatisfaction with old methods and old 
parties, and find out just what the new movement among the 
people means. The platform of the People's party deals largely 
with financial questions. An improvement of the pecuniary 
condition of the people is its main object. Its cardinal doctrine 
plainly is that greater material prosperity means greater happi- 
ness all round and a more united and happy people. It seeks to 
promote that prosperity by increasing the wealth-producing 
power — not of millionaires or of corporations — but of the com- 
mon people. It proposes that the son of toil who puts an honest 
dollar's worth of value upon the soil shall, if he wants, have it 
appraised and stamped as the representative of the very best 
currency a country can have. When the people's dollar is 
backed, not by the money-bags of Lombard or Wall 
streets, but by the productive enterprises of the indus- 
trious, there will then be, it is argued by the Populists, as 
safe, sound, conservative and as elastic a financial system as it is 
within the power of man to devise. Gold in a vault does not 
toil, nor does it spin, but, on the contrary, it corrodes, and, when 
passed around, it wears and wastes and becomes less. A dollar's 
worth of labor used in putting a fruit tree into the ground does 
not deteriorate or attenuate. Not muchl With each recurring 
year the tree enlarges and produces more and more fruit. Unlike 
gold, the soil and tree remain, and cannot be embezzled or profit- 
ably made away with. No smashers can wreck a farm or an or- 
chard l... meydo the vaults of a bank. It is therefore argued that 
there can be no better basis or security for the finances of a na- 
tion than the reproductive fruits of the people's labor. That, at 
any rate, is the idea which has seized hold of great masses of men 
throughout our Western States, and that has given us the Peo- 
ple's Party. Senator Stanford's Land Loan Bill is the expression 
and embodiment of that idea. What has our Legislature, in 
which the Populists hold the balance of power, to say to that 
widely discussed and deeply interesting measure? Have the 
Democrats the political prescience to adopt a joint re- 
solution asking Congress to pass our Senior Sena- 
tor's bill? If the Republicans should have the fool- 
hardiness to reject such a resolution, so much the worse for 
them. Action in this direction necessarily appeals to and " catches " 
the Populist eight who are in tbe Legislature, and the increasing 
thousands of voters throughout the State who think as they do. It is 
certainly good politics, and there are many able thinkers who believe 
it would be sound economic science to indorse and approve of the 
Great Land Loan Bill. We do not know what our new Senator's 
views may be upon the subject, but we do know that if Assemblyman 
Kerns, as is reported, first obtained Mr. White's promise to favor 
that Bill before voting for him , the gentleman from Los Angeles made 
a bigger point than any of his associates in the Populist cause have 
yet done, or are li kelj r to dp during the entire session. It is idle to 
attempt to blink the fact (and the politician is not wise who thinks it 
is) that the issue raised by the Stanford Bill has come to stay. The 
idea it involves has sunk deep into the popular mind, as it is suf- 
ficiently evidenced by the impression it has made upon national poli- 
tics within the short space of two years. The pebble has been thrown 
into the political pond that has already greatly agitated the waters 
and that bids fair to stir them, within the next four years, to their ex- 
tremest circumference. Astute politicians are indicating their belief in 
the inevitable drift of things by stepping aboard the recently launched 
craft that is evidently on its way, by the aid of a rising tide, to a 
safe harbor. The cry is "AH aboard, gentlemen I" and he who 
permits himself to get left shivering on the bank is not wise. 
Many safe, conservative men are to-day afraid of the new pro- 
posal. Why should they be? They themselves loan money on 
real estate as the very best security. A backing of improved 
and productive land is good enough for their mortgages; why 
should it not also be good enough as a basis of value for the peo- 
ple's currency? A mortgage on profitable real estate is coddled 
and nursed, and put away safely by its holder, who rightly 
esteems it a reliable hold-fast should storms of adversity arise. 
He knows no surer or better way of making himself safe and 
snug against a rainy day. If that is true in regard to the safety 
of the individual, why is it not equally true in regard to the 
security of the many? If a mortgage to a bank is the best se- 
curity it knows for tbe loaning of its coin, why is it not also the 
best security a government can have for the loaning of its credit? 
Until somebody can tell why, the argument in favor of the Stan- 
ford Bill is unassailable. 



COURT HOUSE RINGS. 



THE tendency of tin- limes is to consolidate city and connty 
governments, and nol divide tlu-in. Hut a movement seema 
to be 00 font all over ibis SUtfl to *pltt up its local Kovernmenia 
into infinitesimal fragment*. Hardly a county appenrs satisfied 
with Its present status. Hut it would be a mistake to sappose 
that tbe dissatisfaction exists among the people generally of the 
counties supposed to be agitating for division. The truth is the 
little Court House rinn«< are at the bottom of much (hat is taking 
place. There are nol at present enough offices to go around. 
Every Utile village In almost every county has its busy-bodies, lo 
whom the neighboring farmers, orchardings and toilers almost in- 
variably leave the running of things. When a certain number of 
these busy-boiies manage to capture tbe County government 
they straightway form * a ring M and often manage to hold on to 
power for many years. Naturally there are other busy-bodies who 
are l*ft out in the cold. These are not infrequently joined by 
tax-paying citizens disgusted with the petty, corrupt ways of the 
ruling Court House ring, and a cry for a division of the country 
is the result. Tbe belief is often expressed in San Francisco that 
the local governments of the counties are invariably honest, 
whilst those of the city are generally corrupt. The latter part of 
that belief is only too true, but unfortunately that which applies 
to the counties has not an equally good basis. It is only a ques- 
tion of degree and opportunity. In the country they have not so 
many big things worth selling, but they are very industrious in 
selling things for all that. Their industry leads them to take coin 
for trifles that in tbe city would be unconsidered. If in the city 
the paths to tbe Temple of Justice are sometimes bestrewn with 
dangers, it is unhappily true that in the country they are some- 
times absolutely blocked. The Court House ring stands in the 
way. The local Dogberry usually knows little about law, and 
cares less, but is mindful of the ring that sometimes divides, and 
upon which he is dependent for a re-nomination. It results 
that matters in the cow counties become excessively exasperating 
to honest dwellers therein, but an increase of the opportunities 
to form other rings is hardly likely to prove the true cure for 
these evils. Dividing the counties only promises to make mattera 
worse. The truer remedy for the rings is that which the people 
up in Solano County applied to the District Attorney the other 
day, and are waiting to apply to their Superior Judge — give them 
an unmerciful whipping at tbe polls. 

STREET PAVEMENT SWINDLES. 

THE owners of property along the line of streets which have 
passed through the hands of one or other of the so-called 
paving companies in control of the rubbish often sold under the 
name of bitumen, are very much in the position of the man who fell 
asleep on his donkey after loading it with a sack of wheat at the 
miller's, and awoke in bis barn-yard to find a hole in the sack, and 
no grain. They have made a bad investment of their money. The 
entire block on Pine street, between Montgomery and Sansome, is 
not the only sample of contractor's bad work in town. Take the 
corresponding block on California street, fronting the Merchants' 
Exchange and Chamber of Commerce, and in fact any street where 
this poultice has been applied by any company which possessed a 
friendly ear in a tough Board of Supervisors. From the result of re- 
cent investigations, it seems it will behcove property-owners assessed 
for pavements of this material, under contracts let by the previous 
Board of Supervisors, to see to it that the specifications have been 
fully complied with before paying out a dollar for the work. The 
job on Twenty-fourth street, between Mission and Valencia, was just 
detected in time, and fortunately after the power was broken which 
made it safe for contractors to try such a game. There are probably 
hundreds of other cases of the kind in town where criminal proceed- 
ings against the contractors would appear only just and proper. 
People always had an impression that robbery was rife among street 
contractors, aided by collusion with city officials in combination 
against property owners, but within the past few weeks enough has 
been discovered* and published to remove any uncertainty which 
ever prevailed on the subject. A few determined citizens, backed by 
an honest Grand Jury, would do much to assist in clearing the 
moral atmosphere around the New City Hall. New York, under the 
Tweed administration, was never so thoroughly debased by official 
rascality as this city has been for some years past, and in no branch 
of the municipal government more notoriously than in that which 
has had to do with contractors for street work. 



THE cotton spinners' strike continues in England, since the 
spinners refuse to submit to the reduction of five per cent, in 
their wages, which the condition of trade has rendered necessary. 
It is said that in Oldham many millions invested in cotton mills 
are paying one per cent. only. That is, of course, a poor profit, 
but if inquiry shouid be made regarding the losses sustained by 
the laborers since the strike began, it would be found that they 
amount to many limes more than five per cent.Jof the wages for 
many years to come. Strikes hurt employers as well as em- 
ployes, but experience has shown that the latter sustain by far 
the greater losses, not actually, perhaps, but comparatively. 



SA^" FRANCISCO .NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21 1893 . 



THE NEW SENATOR AND HI3 LIEUTENANTS. 



THE election to the Coked States Senate of Stephen M. White 
has given to California one of the ablest men that have repre- 
sented this State in the upper house of Congre -aide- 
cades. Born in this State, educated in its schools, a life-long 
resident upon its soil, and ina ; ienably identified with its varied 
:*.s. he is in all respects a true Californian— a Native Son of 
whom the Golden West is justly proud. An orator without a 
peer in the West, a lawyer eminent in bis profession, a §4 
man whose broad mind has comprehensive grasp of the great 
questions that will come before him for adjudication, Senator 
White will take rank with the ablest of those men of might who 
from their Beats in the upper house determine the course of this 
great government. His election give; great satisfaction to the ' 
people throughout the State, irrespective of political creed, for be 
is known as one of them. By the force of his own unaided 
energies has he raised himself, and to-day he is a representative 
of our institutions who will reflect glory upon California. 

Senator^White was born in this city on January 19th, 1853 
His whole'life, except short periods devoted to travel, has been 
spent within the borders of his native State. Since 1874, be has 
made his home in Los Angeles, and has at various times served 
that county as District Attorney, State Senator, and in other im- 
portant positions. As a public man Mr. Waite seems to be ever 
inspired by two cardinal principles, unwavering faith in the righteous- 
ness of democracy, and unalterable confidence in the magnificent 
destiny of California. During the recent national canvass, when the 
over-confident Republicans threw down the gauge of the battle, and 
called upon the Democrats to send forth their most valiant knight 
to meet the champion of McKinleyism, the eyes of every Californian 
Democrat turned instinctively to Stephen M. White as the advocate 
par excellence of Democratic principles, and he did not fail them. He 
entered the arena folly panoplied with the armor of truth and 
knowledge, and none who heard him in that memorable contest will 
ever forget it. His powerful logic was like the blows of a steam 
hammer, and bis fervid oratory like the leaping lightning, and back 
of it all was the splendid personality of his unsullied manhood. He 
believed in his cause and he has always had the courage of his con- 
victions. Mr. White's charming personality has drawn around him 
a large circle of devoted triends, and it is no exaggeration to say 
that no man in California has so strong a following among the young 
men of the State. He has officiated as chairman of two State Con- 
ventions of his party, and in the Senatorial struggle of 1890 he re- 
ceived the complimentary vote of the Democratic party for United 
States Senator, to which high office he has just been elected. 

Naturally, after such a hot campaign as that in which Senator 
White has just proved victorious, those who take interest in political 
affairs would like to know something of the men who aided him to 
gain his high ambition, and directed his forces to ultimate success. 
In the supplement accompanying this issue of the News Letter are 
printed artotypes of the nine lieutenants who were active in his be- 
half. 

Prominent among these is John T. Qaffey, of Los Angeles. Mr. 
Gaffey is well known throughout the'State, having served a term 
upon the State Board of Equalization, a position requiring a high 
order of ability and intimate knowledge of the States. For a long 
time he has been a friend of Senator White, and upon his judgment 
and experience the latter placed the greatest confidence. Mr. Gaffey 
was, in fact, his chief lieutenant in the contest. He is particularly 
well fitted for political management, for he is an excellent judge of 
men, and has the happy faculty of rapidly appreciating a situation. 
He has made a study of statecraft, in fact, and may well feel proud 
of the great victory of Mr. White, gained throughout by only the 
most honorable methods, and so much of which is due to Mr. Gaf- 
fey's personal exertions. 

John T. Murphy, of San Jose, was^also a prominent worker in the 
cause of Senator White. He is a younger brother of Hon. B. D. 
Murphy, who presided over the Fresno Convention. Mr. John T. 
Murphy was, with Evan J. Coleman and Kubert Watt, a member of 
the first Bank Commission, which had the dubious pleasure of put- 
ting into liquidation more banks than all the succeeding Commis- 
sions. Mr. Murphy was a State Elector upon the Democratic ticket 
in 1884, and has since taken an active interest in politics. 

Senator John R. Mathews, of Los Angeles, has been one of the 
staunchest supporters of Senator White since the beginning of the 
campaign. He formerly served in the Assembly. He placed Senator 
White in nomination in the Democratic caucus, and seconded his 
nomination in the Senate. The election of White has been one of 
the most satisfactory results in Senator Mathews' political expe- 
rience. 

Senator Goucher, of Fresno, placed White in nomination in the 
joint convention of both Houses two years ago, when the latter re- 
ceived the complimentary vote of the Democracy, then in the minor- 
ity, for United States Senator. Senator Goucher, who is one of the 
ablest men in the Legislature, is an old friend and supporter of the 
new Senator. He would have nominated White at the joint session 
last Wednesday, had not illness prevented. 

Senator Langford, of San Joaquin, the Nestor of the Legislature, is 
now serving his fifth term. He was one of the first among the prom- 
inent men of the State who announced themselves for White at the 



opening of the campaign. His arm in the battle was of great assist- 
ance, for he is a man of wide influence, and one who makes himself 

Senator Sewell is another staunch White man. This is his second 
- iator and his third :-_ :':.-- Legislaiiire. for in 1S89 be was 
an Assemblyman. Senator Sewell is a Missourian, though his fam- 
ily are from Virginia. Nurth Carolina and Tennessee. He came to 
California in 1833. He graduated from the Pacific Methodist Col- 
lege in liTl, 3nd immediately thereafter went to Mendocino, where 
_-i2ed in school-teaching. He was Principal of the Ukiah Pub- 
lic School four yea-- 3 a perin tend en t of Schools of Mendo- 
cino for two years, and declined re-election, and Under Sheriff for 
eight years. He was then admitted to the bar, and is now engaged 
in practice. He is now a Director of the State Asylum for the In- 
sane at Mendocino. Senator Sewell was with White from start to 
finish. 

v Mr. White's champion in 

the Assembly, where he placed the Senator-elect in nomination. 

. iuahan is well known all over the State as an able man. 

When he goes into a fight he does it with all his strength, and as a 

rule victory perches on his banners. 

Charles I*raeger t of Los Angeles, has been a friend of the Senator- 
elect ever since he went to Los Angeles. Mr. Praeger, although re- 
lieved of active business some seven years ago. has always taken 
keen interest in the success of his party, and particularly the success 
of his friend Stephen M. Waite. Mr. Praeger went to Los Angeles 
in ls57,and has been a resident of that place ever since. His great 
business experience and ability was greatly appreciated by the Sen- 
ator-elect and his supporters. 

H. W. Patton, of Banning, went to Los Angeles about ten years 
ago. He was connected with the Los Angeles Herald for several 
years, and was subsequently Registrar of Land Office under Grover 
Cleveland. After serving his term of office, he became the owner of 
the Banning Herald. He was a delegate to the last Democratic 
National Convention. Mr. Patton is a rising man and is destined to 
make his mark. His energy and ability did much to bring about the 
victory of Senator White. 



THE San Francisco Gas Company held its annual meeting on 
Wednesday last, the full particulars of which have, however, 
not been made public yet. It is known, however, that in face 
of the progress made by the Electric Light Companies, the com- 
pany has been very successful last year, the consumers showing 
an increase of 960, and the product of gas, an increase of forty- 
five million cubic feet. The company has just completed an im- 
mense new holder at the North Beach works, said to be one of 
the largest in America. A twenty-four inch main has been run 
from it to the corner of Van Ness and Washington, which, in 
case of emergency, is capable of supplying illumiaating power 
for the entire city. 



COUNT CAPRIVI will not let the opportunity pass of utilizing 
the present condition of France for an argnment in favor of 
the necessity of passing the German Army bill. He has hinted al- 
ready in the Reichstag that Germany may need her army sooner 
than expected, but if that shonid be the case it is difficult to see 
how the proposed changes could be carried ont in time to become 
effective. The danger signal has been used too often in the Ger- 
man Reichstag to make any great impression. It may be, as in 
the old fable, the child cried ** wolf," " wolf " so often without 
cause, that when the wolf really came nobody paid attention to 
it. Sti 1, there is no reason yet for the Germans to imagine that 
the moment of Hannibal ante portas has really arrived, and their 
reluctance to pass the army bill remains unchanged. 

THE German government sternly refuses to support tbe striking 
coal miners in the Saar District, and tbe strikes are abating. It 
is not likely that the statement of the Ministry that the strike is 
merely due to agitators is absolutely true, for the condition of 
the working classes in many parts of Germany, as all over the 
world, is unsatisfactory. Still the course of the government in 
enforcing obedience to the existing laws is by far preferable to 
the vacillating policy of the French government in the Carmaux 
strikes. If tbe condition of the working classes is to be bettered, 
it must be done by changing the laws, not by breaking them. 

MR. GLADSTONE'S scanty majority is decreasing rapidly by all 
kinds of unforeseen accidents, and though of course in Michael 
Davitt'S place a home-ruler will be elected, it is by no means so cer- 
tain that a Liberal candidate will conquer the seat rendered 
vacant by the bankruptcy of J. 8. Balfour, who last week left 
England to escape his creditors. It does not matter much, how- 
ever, as the moment when the whole Gladstonian surplus will 
have to surrender is approaching fast. The spring will bring new 
hopes to England. 

PRINCE FERDINAND, Crown Prince of Roumania, is now the 
legitimate husband of Princess Marie of Edinburgh. For the 
sake of the newly-married couple it is to be hoped that their union 
will be a happy one, but the auspices are doubtful, as tbe wed- 
ding must be called a marriagede convenance in the fullest sense of 
the term. 



Jan. 21, 1893 



SAN FRAX< [S( O NEWS I . | J ] i R 



5 



THE PANAMA CANAL SCANDAL. 

WHOEVER lUrtod lb«SObem»o( making it appear that the rev- 
elation* of the Panama ''anal scandal are the work of foreign- 
ers, must certainly be credited with cleverness and an intimate 
knowledge of (he character of his countrymen; but to an out- 
sider the poor logic of the argument that the disgrace of France 
is the result of foreign Intrigues, is too apparent to produce any 
effect. The disgrace of France lies not in the revelations, but in 
the real facts revealed, and for these Frenchmen alone bear the 
responsibility. What these facts really are is now fairly evident. 
The Panama Canal Company undertook the execution of a 
work for a certain amount of money obtained by subscriptions 
from the public in general, on the strength of representations 
that the work was feasible, and would be profitable to the in- 
vestors. These representations were believed by the people, 
coming, as they did. from a company whose bead was Count 
Ferdinand de Lesseps, the builder of the Suez Canal, whose 
ability had been magnificently demonstrated and whose integrity 
nobody doubted. Even at this moment it is not yet proved that 
Ferdinand de Lesseps was not perfectly sincere in the beginning, 
but de Lesseps is an old man, and in order to carry out the work 
he bad to rely npon the assistance of thousands of other people 
entrusted with the execution of the details. As the work pro- 
gressed unexpected difficulties were encountered and large sums 
expended, first injudiciously, perhaps, afterwards criminally. 
How far de Lesseps was directly acquainted with these facts, 
and how far, in his position, he should have been acquainted 
with them, is a question which remains open as yet. One thing, 
however, is certain, the directors of the company, and among 
them his sons, notably his son Charles, who is at present a de- 
fendant in the criminal court in Paris, must have known all the 
important details of the state of affairs. 

When it became known that unexpected difficulties, and the 
misuse or injudicious use of large sums of money necessitated the 
obtaining of further funds for the company, the directors had to 
give motives for their demand, by either revealing the true state 
of things or by hiding it and making false representations. In 
the first case, which would have been the honest way of pro- 
cedure, they would probably^bave failed to obtain what they 
wanted, and rather than give up the enterprise, they chose decep- 
tion, hoping, perhaps, that ultimately the success of the work 
would be such as to enable them to secure the investors against 
loss. 

To raise money for carrying on the work, somebody suggested 
a lottery scheme. The person who suggested it was a banker 
named Oberndorffer. This scheme, though under the circum- 
stances not only a doubtful measure from a moral point of view, 
appealing to the gambling spirit of the public, but a direct fraud, 
because it was based on false representations, was approved of 
and adopted by the directors as the saving straw. But it could 
only be carried out by paying hush-money to those who might 
defeat its aims by revealing what they knew about the true state 
of affairs; and further, the scheme had to be legalized by the 
government and a vote of the Chamber ere it could be inaugu- 
rated. For the latter purpose bribes had to be paid to Deputies 
and to Ministers. It is now certain that tens of millions were 
paid for hush-money to the press, still larger sums to bankers, 
and other large sums to Deputies and Ministers. Finally, these 
sums aggregated to such an amount that even the money 
obtained by the lottery loan no longer sufficed to cover the 
expenditure of the actual work on the Canal, and the collapse 
came when millions after millions bad to be given to men who 
demanded the contract for carrying out the work, and though 
partly incompetent, partly claiming a payment absolutely exorbi- 
tant, had to be chosen for fear of making enemies of them, and 
in order to secure their silence. 

Among those arrested so far is ex-Minister Baihut, who has 
confessed to receiving a large bribe for suppressing an official re- 
port drawn up by a government engineer, and demonstrating 
that even by a lottery scheme no sums large enough could be 
raised to complete the Canal. It is surmised that his colleagues 
connived at this suppression of the report, and he is said to have 
distinctly charged M. Carnot, the present President of the Repub- 
lic and his former colleague, of having not only consented to, but 
advised the suppression of the report. So far the charge has not 
yet been proved. M. Carnot's friends declare that Baihut ought 
not to be credited, as he is a self-confessed criminal, and that his 
charge against Carnot ib an act of vengeance prompted by Carnot's 
permission to have the law take its course. The enemies of Car- 
not say that at the time when he held the Ministry of Finance he 
must have known what was going on, and if the report was sup- 
pressed he must also have received a bribe. Against this assump- 
tion speaks the fact that Carnot voted against the lottery bill. To 
an impartial observer, however, this alone does not suffice to 
clear the President from suspicion. It is quite possible that his 
conscience prevented him from directly voting for a fraud, and 
that still he maintained a guilty silence when he should have 
spoken. At all events the suspicion against the President should 
be removed, and since matters have gone so far it is doubtful 
whether the country is better served by having the chief magis- 
trate hurled from his high position if he is really guilty, or by 



maintaining as the head of a great country a man who fa sus- 
pected. The situation will increase in gravity either way, and 
though no decided change baa taken place recently, the crisis is 
by no means averted, and matters must reach a climax sooner or 
later. Toe attempt to lead the scandals into outside channels is 
not likely to be BUC< essful, though of course more than once gov- 
ernments of European countries, and especially of France, have 
seized as a last means of maintaining themselves in power, a 
foreign complication. 

ME. GLADSTONE has again taken an opportunity to show his 
appreciation of foreign merits at the expense of his country, 
by writing a complimentary letter to an American author, who, 
it is said, had treated England rather cavalierly in one of his 
works. Though, of course, it will please many Americans to 
have the G. 0. M. take an interest in our writers, one cannot 
blame the English people for being irritated with a Prime Min- 
ister, who continually goes out of his way to show his sympa- 
thies towards other countries. Professor Goldwin Smith hardly 
exaggerates the truth when he says that Mr. Gladstone has 
shown himself the friend of every country but his 
own, and Mr. Gladstone has during recent years Mat- 
tered Italians, Turks, Africans and in fact almost every 
nation of the globe to such an extent that his flat- 
tery has become rather cheap and can hardly be considered a 
compliment at all. Whether bis sympathies are really so cosmo- 
politan or not, does not matter. In his position, his eulogies of 
foriegn achievements ought, at all events, to remain within reas- 
onable limits. 



THE Pope, it is said, is preparing an encyclical in anticipation 
of a general crisis in Europe. The signs of the times are such 
that this work may not be premature, and all European coun- 
tries are so closely connected that serious disturbances in one 
must entail the most far-reaching effects in its neighbors. The 
events in France alone, therefore, are more than sufficient to jus- 
tify the anticipation that the present year may bring matters to 
a climax. 




The (Jhicago and Northwestern Railway, with 
its connections, is the fastest line across the Con- 
tinent, landing passengers at Chicago, New York 
and Boston ahead of all competitors. It is also 
the only line running Palace Drawing-room 
sleepers, Dining Cars and Pullman Tourist 
sleepers to Chicago daily without change. It 
also runs select Overland Excursions, with expe- 
rienced manager in charge through to Chicago, New York and Bos- 
ton, leaving San Francisco every Thursday. No other line offers 
facilities even approaching these. For full information, berths in 
through sleepers and tickets at low rates, apply to E. A. Holbrook, 
General Traffic Agent, 2 New Montgomery street, under Palace 
Hotel, San Francisco. 

"THE WHITE HOUSE." 



ENLARGEMENT QF PREMISES. 



DURING ALTERATIONS 

AND 

BEFORE STOCKTAKING 

JANUARY 3lsr., 

GREAT REDUCTION 

IN 

EACH DEPARTMENT. 



RAPHAEL WEILL & CO., 

N. W. Cor. Post and Kearny Sts. 



SAN EBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1893. 




IthSdi&sWflriD 



' We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



MR. WILKINSON'S WIDOWS at its last visit to the Baldwin 
hardly called out the enthusiastic appreciation bespoken for 
it by its admirers and its author's reputation. Mr. Holland was, 
as in its present production, the nervous, fidgetty. and almost 
uxorious husband, Mr. Percival Perrin. But M. A. Kennedy 
was not the Major Mallory. And therein lies a difference which 
stretches all the way from the mildly amusing to the inexpressi- 
bly and irresistibly funny. The play is too well known to need 
mention but that it is to a certain extent worthy of the author 
(adapter) of The Private Secretary is admissible or even Kennedy 
and Holland could not create so much laughter in it. Any audi-" 
ence but the severely conservative one which fills the Baldwin 
of a first night, would have made the roof ring on Monday night ; 
but even that august assemblage unbent to smiles which could 
occasionally be heard. 

Mr. Holland, though he is essentially fitted forthe more quietly 
humorous lines of light comedy, like all genuine humorists can 
enjoy and interpret the purely farcical, and as Percival Perrin 
much of his "underplay," in the way of gesture and inflection is 
broadly comic. 

Miss Evelyn Campbell makes an excellent Mrs. Perrin. The 

anger and excitement are up to concert pitch but not overstrained 

or betraying a false note. While Miss Campbell has such roles 

as she haa played here, Mr. Frohman need fear no loss to his 

company's reputation in the sudden illness, or something, which 

"carried off" Mrs. Barrymore. Charles Abbe as the husband of 

Mr. Wilkinson's other widow and Margaret Craven as the once 

flighty and flirting "Little Birdie" of Major Mallory's ecstatic 

remembrance, are a piquant companion picture to the principal 

pair; and Minnie Tittel is a thorough character in the "coo-k," 

and her make-up shows her a comedy artist. Wilkinson's Widows 

at the Baldwin this week has certainly not shared the usual luck 

of "repetitions" for it it is undeniably brighter and funnier than 

when last seen here. 

« » * 

The main interest in an anticipatory way at Stockwell's Thea- 
tre this week was in the first appearance on that stage of George 
Osbourne as Tomasa Monaldi. Mr. Osborne received a kindly 
demonstrative reception, given with evident genuineness of good 
feeling. The part seems a small one as measured by time and 
number of lines. But what there is of it is powerful and in- 
tense, and Mr. Osborne's interpretation develops to the utmost 
both its power and intensity. One of the salient characters of 
the production is Marina Paoli, as portrayed by Ethel Brandon. 
It is entirely free from any familiar mannerism, and the transi- 
tion from a simple, confiding, and happy girl to a woman torn by 
the diverse passions of love and a morbid devotion to what she 
believes sacred vengeance, is most artistically managed. In the 
last act Miss Brandon's acting is deeply tragic, yet in no way ex- 
aggerated. This, and perhaps one other personation, leads to the 
conclusion that long as this actress has been known on the local 
stage, her work has not yet done full justice to her abilities. 
■* * » 
In regard to J. N. Long, one may safely risk the Hibernicism 
that he is most at home in foreign parts. But the foreigner must 
be Gallic, rather than of the fiery Southern type. The flippant 
cynicism, the mercurial vivacity, and heroic but showy bravery, 
the veneer and polish, of the Frenchman Mr. Long can put on as one 
to the manner born; but the somber depths of the Italian's love and 
vengeance is not his to portray. As Mosso Danella, while satis- 
factory enough, neither his love nor his hate give an impression 
of anything more tragic or baleful than the superficial or frothy 
sentiment of the boulevardeur. 

# # * 
Mr. Jewett's remarkable success in eliminating his marked 
English accent in deference to the strong Americanism of his role, 
deserves all credit; but it could not make him an acceptable 
Barnes of New York. Perhaps no man could be, for it is doubt- 
ful if Mr. Barnes of New York is himself acceptable to the Amer- 
ican mind. But there is a mistiness and uncertainty about Mr. 
Jewett's personation, which leaves the auditor who has not read 
the book in doubt as to what the burly Burton is really crying to 
do, and why he doesn't do it. The numerous characters in the 
cast preclude further specification, but the production as a whole 
is even and satisfactory. 

K # * 

The California is enjoying another run of luck in Dentnan 
Thompson's perennially popular play. The Old Homestead seems 
to suic the popular taste better the longer it is known, and the 
popular taste never did itself greater credit than in liking any- 
thing so homely and wholesome in tone and sentiment. The sec- 
ond week has seen the California crowded to the doors every 
night, and the interest shows no sign of slackening. The Old 
Homestead will remain for one week more. 



Peck's Bad Boy, at the Bush, is the same old rough-and-tumble 
farce-comedy, and, as a play, is not so well done as at its last 
visit. Its specialty business and people are, however, rather 
better. Some of the dancing would be really good, if it did not 
just miss being pleasant to look at. The telephone duet of 
Misses Schuman and Randall is a taking song, and the baton 
juggling of Master Evans is very clever. There are two char- 
acters on the farce-comedy stage, and prominent in Peck's Bad 
Boy, which have had more than their day, and should be dis- 
pensed with at once and forevermore, viz., the Irish policeman 
and the comic song-and-dance man, whose humor consists in an 
immense pair of trowsers lumpily and bumpily stuffed out — the 
former because he is insufferably stale, and the latter because he 
is ineffably disgusting. 

* # * 

Faust will be kept on another week at the Tivoli, and for 
cause. Notwithstanding the immense crowds of the week past 
there are still so many people who wish to hear grand opera well 
sung, and at moderate comic opera prices, that it would be folly 
to make a change for the present. 

# * * 

The "Mandolin Musicale" given by Mr. Samuel Adelstein, 
January 13th, at Metropolitan Hall, was largely attended, and 
all who were present were repaid by a most delightful musical 
evening. Mr. Adelstein has caught the true spirit of the Spanish 
instrument, and his mandolin solo, "Souvenir de Firenzi," was 
exquisitely played. He was'well assisted by the following 
favorite artists: Mr. J. F. Fleming, the well-known bass solo- 
ist; Mr. Martin Schultz, organ soloist; Mrs. Martin Schultz, the 
favorite soprano; Mrs. Birmingham, contralto; Mr. Arthur 
Regensberger, cellist; H. Clay Wysham, flutist, and many 
others. An instrumental sextette for two mandolins, flute, 
violin, cello, and harp, was given for the first time here, and was 
greatly enjoyed. 

* * * 

The last week of the Frohman company at the Baldwin wil 
be devoted to Sydney Grundy's Arabian Nights, its first presenta- 
tion in America. Following this engagement, the famous Lili- 
putians will appear at the Baldwin in their new piece, Candy, 
which has made a great success ftfr the smart little people wher- 
ever played. Adolph Zink, the clever little comedy mite, well 
remembered here, will give a burlesque of Lottie Collins' "boom- 
de-ay," which is said to be "killing," and an electric ballet and 
other new specialties are promised. 
» » # 

A Night Off, Daly's very laughable comedy, will be brought out 
Monday night at Stockwell's, and will bring Stockwell and Os- 
bourne together on the stage once more for the first time in some 
years. Preparations for an elaborate production of Siberia have 
been going forward at Stockwell's, the play to succeed A Night Off, 
January 30th. 

» * * 

A greatly changed and improved version of Leavitt's burlesque 
pantomime, Spider and Fly, will no doubt make things lively 
enough at the Bush next week to wipe out the remembrance of 
many poor engagements. Costumes, scenery, mechanical effects, 
and all the accessories have been placed in the most competent 
hands and are said to be as gorgeous and handsome as money 
and skill could make them. Among special attractions are Ja- 
guarine, the beautiful swordswoman admired of Californians not 
many years ago; the gorgeously-costumed " Columbia ballets ; " a 
comic novelty, " On the Roofs," and a wonderful juggler who 
juggles it with the best while standing on his head, poised on the 
neck of a small bottle. 

* * * 

Hoyt's A Trip to Chinatown will be the next attraction at the 
California, following The Old Homestead on Monday week. It has 
been one of the season's Eastern successes. 

* # » 

The Friday Evening Orchestra, an organization which has been 
for months practicing under the direction of J. H. Rosewald, will 
give its first public concert at Kohler & Chase's Hall, Friday 
evening, January 27th. As Mr. Rosewald never permits the peo- 
ple under his direction to appear in public till be is sure they will 
do themselves and him credit, the public may feel certain that the 
music on this occasion will be worth hearing. The vocalists will 
be Miss Jennie Eastman and Miss Maude Priest. 
« • » 

Miss Selma Goerner, the clever though tiny soubrette of the 
Liliputians, is one of the best interpreters of comic opera on the 

stage. The Knickerbockers, De Koven and Smith's new opera 

lately produced by the Bostonians at the Tremont Theatre, Bos- 
ton, achieved a success equal to that of Robin Hood both in popu- 
larity and real merit.— There are sixty people in Spider and Fly, 
several of them European celebrities. The next Carr-Beel con- 
cert will take place at Irving Hall, on the 28th instead of the 21st 

as originally intended. The BandurriaClub will give a concert 

Feb. 7tb, at Metropolitan Hall. Los Bandurristas always call out 

a large audience. "An Overworked Trumpeter" is Mr. Cowles' 

best song in The Knickerbockers. Count and Countess Magri 



Jan. 21, 1893. 



BAN FR \\» IS< NEWS l.l 1 ill; 



(the latter oner Mm Tom Thumb and the Utile Baron are at the 

ntal in lhi» city. Hermann Hllcilts, a well-know n 

York theatrical manager, is at the Baldwin HoUl.— Jeaale Bart- 
lett-Pavi* \* Prtodll*, a Puritan maiden, In The dioJbfrftodbtrt, 

Coquelin's leading lady at the Thtatrt Francaiic is Kleanor Cal- 
houn, a native California girl well known in San Francisco. Bhfl 

speaks French like a native. Edwin Booth is said to have 

$750,000 to rest on. and will play no more. W. H. Etnuell, 

who wrote »<A Life on the Ocean Wave," 'Cheer Boy?, cheer." 

and other stirring songs, is eighty and still bale and strong 

Franz Ebert of the Liliputian? i^ a clever little actor and a great 

favorite- Cttiuty had a six months successful run in New York 

— — Hi* MajtUjf, the new opera composed by H. J. .Stewart to 
Peter Robertson's libretto, will be produced early in February in 

aid of the Polyclinic. J. H. Love will manage the business. 

Joseph (irismer's The .Yew South has been produced in New York, 

and was "harpooned" by the pre?*'. Sherry, the well known 

caterer for New York's Four Hundred, served bons bona frappfa to 
every lady who attended the New Year matinee of A Trip to 
Chinntoun at the Madison Square Theatre. N. Y.' ■'■-Young Sal- 
vini has finished an arrangement of Ruy Bias and will add it to 

his repertoire. H. Clay Miner is on bis way to California for 

a three months' rest Chas. H. Hoyt's new play will deal with 

the volunteer soldiery. In the first ballet in Candy the Lilipu- 

tlons will be costumed to represent everything known in the 
confectionery line.- The midgets in Candy will appear in a 
dance as hens, chickens and roosters. 



LATEST TENNIS NEWS. 



TH E finals of the fifth quarterly championship were played last 
Saturday at the California Club. There was a very large at- 
tendance, the ladies having a decided majority. C. P. Hubbard 
has won the cup twice, and then G. B. DeLong and H. N. Stetson 
were the next two winners, and as these two gentlemen were to 
play off in the finals for the cup, interest was stirred up to see the 
struggle. At 1:45 o'clock the players entered the court, and the 
first set was the best, both players making very fair strokes. 
The set fell to Stetson, with the score of 7-5, 39 strokes to 32; 
time, 35 minutes. DeLong, however, got in with some very 
pretty play, and took the next set at 6-0, including three love 
games, 27 strokes to 9; time, 17 minutes. The third set, which 
lasted 20 minutes, fell again to DeLong at 6-3, 30 strokes to 21, 
and each player secured a love game. The fourth set, which 
concluded the match, was very interesting, and remarkable for 
the way that DeLong took many of Stetson's very brilliant 
smashes and scored off them. The games stood 6-2 in favor of 
DeLong, Stetson making a double fault on the last point. DeLong 
scored 34 points to his opponent's 22; time, 20 minutes. The 
total score was in DeLong's favor by 23 games to 12, and 123 
points to 91. Total time, 1 hour and 32 minutes. 

DeLong is certainly to be congratulated on his play, which was 
very good throughout the match. He made only one double 
fault against three by his opponent, and some hard strokes he 
scored off brought him a good deal of applause. Considering the 
fact that he is a young player, the hopes of the club are centered 
in him to do something in the coming championship in July , as W. 
H. Taylor, Jr., and C. P. Hubbard will not, we understand, play 
this year. 

Harry Stetson was evidently not in his usual form, as lack of 
practice will tell on any one, yet he played well and stuck 
bravely to the game till the last moment. One noticeable fact 
was that DeLong has now adopted the stroke that C. R. Yates 
was famous for, that is running up and volleying a low ball. It 
ia a very hard stroke, and one which bothers an opponent a good 
deal. DeLong scored a good many points on this shot, and 
missed only one. 

To-day there will be a " mixed doubles "' tournament for the 
championship of the club, and this new feature is sure to be a 
success. The managers of the tournament are G. P. Hubbard 
and Southard Hoffman, and the entries so far are: Hubbard and 
Mrs. A. E. Wood; DeLong and Miss Myra Lord; R. N. Whitney 
and Miss Morgan, and 8. Hoffman and Miss A. Hoffman. 

It is probable that Harry Stetson will play with Miss Bee 
Hooper, and also that W. Mayo Newhall will partner Mrs. Basil 
Heathcote, who is playing a very strong game. 

There is but little going on in tennis circles in Oakland, as the 
members are practicing for their game of football with the Sacra- 
mento Lawn Tennis Club, which takes place shortly in Sacra- 
mento. 



Prof. Crepaux, of the Paris Grand Opera, has the honor to inform 
the public that he is now forming singing classes. Two lessons a 
week— per month — $10. "Vocal and scenic lessons in classes or pri- 
vate. Applications will be received at 1119 Sutter street, between 
Larkin and Polk streets, at the Larcher School of Languages. 



The Original Swain's Bakery at 213 Sutter street stands easily 
among the first in the city as a family restaurant of high-class and 
unexcelled service. The fact that every night, dinner parties of the 
best people are held there, give indication of its popularity. Go 
there for your dinner. 



Proprietors. 



. „ BALOWIN THEATRE. 

A l. HATl 
Third nml |ul week bill 

''" A i IUH MAN'S COMEDIANE 

Every evening ihis work UalinM Saturday, in 

MR. WILKINSON'S WIDOWS. 
Monday. Janoarj 2Sd Nut w«k of toe comedian* and first pre- 
sentation in Anion, i ol Sydney Orondy'a Big London Hit, 

ARABIAN NIGHTS. 



L. R. Stock we li, 
Ai,f Eli.int.iioi'se 



STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 



Lessee and Proprietor. 

Business Manager. 

One week, conunenrini: M.imlnv, Ian. 23d. Matinee Saturdav. 
Joint Appearance of 

GEORGE 0SB0URNE and L. R. STOCKWKLL, 
In Augnstin Daly's Favorite Comedy, 

A NIGHT OFF. 
Next.— Monday, Jan. 30, Bartley Campbell's Thrilling Melodrama, 

THE (NEW) 
SIBERIA. 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Al Hayman & Co Proprietors. ] J. J. Gottlob Manager. 

Monday, Jan. 23d. Last week of Denman Thompson's 
OLD HOMESTEAD, 

Farewell performance Sunday night. 

Monday, Jan. 30th, Hoyt's "A TRIP TO CHINATOWN." 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kbelinq Bros Proprietors and Managers. 

Last nights of our latest great success, of Gounod's masterpiece, 

FAUST. 
Monday, Jan. 23d, 

LA BELLE HELENS. 

And Benefit of French Library. 
Popular Prices 25 and 50c 

THE BUSH STREET THEATRE. 

Mr. M. B. Levitt Proprietor and Manager. 

George H. Broadhubst Resident Manager- 
To-night. Atkinson's Comedy Company, producing the comedy 
PECK'S BAD BOY. 

Monday, January 23rd., continuing all week, M. B. Leavitt's 
spectacular extravaganza, 

SPIDER AND FLY. 

CHARITY FOOTBALL GAME. 

HAIGHT ST. GROUNDS, Jan. 28, at 2. SO P. M. 

THE ARMY vs. THE UNIVERSITY VETERANS. 

For the benefit of the Armitage Orphanage and the San Francisco 
Nursery for Homeless Children. 

Tickets now on sale at Clabrough & Golcher's. Also at Sherman 
& Clay's, on and after January 25th. 

Admission 50 Cents. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH 

INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 

OF THE 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE 

AND PRELIMINARY 

WORLD'S FAIR EXHIBIT of CALIFORNIA. Opens 
January 10, Closes February 11, 1893. 
New Features. Special Attractions. 

Among which will be the annual exhibition of the Northern California 
Citrus Fair Association, a grand display of natural products of the various 
counties of the State, the largest collection ever seen in this city of valua- 
ble statuary and paintings, an orchestra of fifty musicians, including noted 
soloists and Miss May Cook, the young California corne'ist; six large 
aquariums, machinery in motion, objects of art, industry and manufacture. 

ADMISSION— Adult's single admission in daytime 25e.; evening 60c. 
Child's single admission in daytime 15c; evening25c. Season tickets is- 
sued only to members of the Mechanic's Institute. Double season tickets 
$2.50, single season $1.50. Season tickets maybe obtained by non-members 
at the following rate: Double season $5, sinele season $4. which includes 
membership in the institute, subject to confirmation by the management. 
nd du for the present quarter. IRWIN C. STtTMP, President. 

KM ARC Bush & Gerts Pianos 
WADC Parlor Organs 

HAINES Inst allments Rentals 

A. L. Bancroft A Co. D| A IV] ||6 

303 Sutter St., S.F. M | g^\ I ^ ^^^^ 



SAN EBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. SI, 1813 



HARRY AND MAUD AND I-ALSO JAMES. 

By John Kendrick Bangs, in Harper's Weekly. 

WE both loved Maude deeply, and Maude loved ua. We know- 
that, because Maude told na so. 8he told Harry ao one 
Sunday evening on the way home from church, and she told me ao 
the following Saturday afternoon on the way to the matinee. 

This was the cause of the dispute Harry and I had in the club cor- 
ner that Saturday night. Harry and I are confidants, and neither 
of us has secrets that the other does not share, and so, of course, 
Maude's feelings toward each of us was fully revealed. 

We did not quarrel over it, for Harry and I never quarrel. I 
wanted to quarrel, but it is a peculiar thing about me that I always 
want toquarrel with men named Harry, but never can quite do it. 
Harry is a name which, parse, arouses my ire, but which carries 
with it also the soothing qualities which dispel irritation. 

This is a point for the philosopher, I think. Why is it that we 
cannot quarrel with some men bearing certain names, while with 
far better men bearing other names we are always at swords' points? 
Who ever quarreled with a man who had so endeared himself to the 
world, for instance, that the world spoke of him as Jack, or Bob. or 
Willie? And who has not quarreled with Georges and Ebenezers 
and Horaces ad lib., and been glad to have had the chance. 

But this is a thing apart. This time we have set out to tell that 
other story which is always mentioned, but never told. 

Maude loved us. That was the point upon which Harry and I 
agreed. We had her authority for it; but where we differed was, 
which of the two does she love the better? 

Harry, of course, took his own side in the matter. He is a man of 
prejudice, and argues from sentiment rather than from conviction. 

He said that when on her way home from church, a girl's thoughts 
are of necessity solemn, and her utterances are therefore the solemn 
truth. He added that, in a matter of such importance as love, the 
conclusion reached after an hour or two of spiritual reflection and 
instruction, such aa church in the evening inspirea, is the true con- 
clusion. 

On the other hand, I maintained that human nature has some- 
thing to do with women. Very little, of course, but still enough to 
make my point a good one. It is human nature for a girl to prefer 
matinees to Sunday evening services. This is sad, no doubt, but so 
are some other great truths. Maude, as a true type of girlhood, 
would naturally think more of the man who was taking her to a 
matinee than of the fellow who was escorting her home from church, 
therefore she loved me better than she did Harry, and he ought to 
have had the sense to see it and withdraw. 

Unfortunately, Harry is near-sighted in respect to arguments 
evolved by the mind of another, though in the perception of refine- 
ments in his own reasoning he has the eye of an eagle. "Love 
on the way to a matinee," he said, " is one part affection and nine 
parts enthusiasm." 

"And love on the return from church is in all ten parts temporary 
aberration," I returned. " It is what you might call Seventh Day 
affection. Quiet, and no doubt sincere, but it is dissipated by the 
rising of the Monday aun. It is like our good resolutions on New 
Year's day, which barely last over a fortnight. Some little word 
spoken by the rector may have aroused in her breast a spark of love 
for you, but one spark does not make a conflagration. Properly 
fanned it may develop into one, but in itself it is nothing more than 
a apark. Who can say that it was not pity that led Maude to speak 
so to you? Your necktie may have been disarranged without your 
knowing it, and at a time when she could not tell you of it. That 
sort of thing inspires pity, and you know as well as I do that pity 
and love are cousins, but cousins who never marry. You are favored, 
but not to the extent that I am." 

" You argue well," returned Harry, "but you ignore the moon. 
In the solemn presence of the great orb of night no woman would 
swear falsely." 

" You prick your argument with'your point," I answered. " There 
were no extraneous arguments brought to bear on Maude when she 
confessed to me that she loved me. It was done in the cold light of 
day. There was no moon to egg her on when she confessed her af- 
fection for me. I know the moon pretty well myself, and I know 
just what effect it haa on truth. I have told falsehoods in the moon- 
light that I knew were falsehoods, and yet while Luna was looking 
on, no creature in the universe could have convinced me of their un- 
truthfulness. The moon's rays have kissed the Blarney-stone, 
Harry. A moonlight truth is a noonday lie." 

" Does not the genial warmth of the sun ever lead one from the path 
of truth?" queried Harry, satirical of manner. 

" Yes," I answered. " But not in a horse-car with people tread- 
ing on your feet." 

" What has that to do with it?" Harry asked. 

" It was on a Broadway car that Maude confeaaed," I anawered. 

Harry looked blue. His eyes said: "Gad! How she must love 
you!" But his lips said: "Ho! Nonsense!" 

" It is the truth! " said I, seeing that Harry waa weakening. "As 
we were waiting for the car to come along I said to her: ' Maude, I 
am not the man I ought to be, but I have one redeeming quality. 
I love you to distraction.' ' ' 



" She waa about to reply when the car came. We were requeated 
to step lively. We did so and the car started." 

"Absurd! " ejaculated Harry. 

" It was a little absurd," said I, referring to thestarting of the car, 
for the horses did not look as if they had strength enough to pull the 
wool over the eyes of a sheep, much leas drag a car along. " Then 
as we stood in the crowded aisle of the car we spoke in enigmas. 

" ' Did you hear what I said, Maude? ' I asked. 

"'Yea,' aaid she, gazing softly out of the window, and a slight 
touch of red coming into her cheeks. ' Yes, I heard.' 

" 'And what is your reply? ' I whispered. 

" ' So do I,' she answered, with a sigh." 

Harry laughed, and so irritatingly that had his name been Thomas 
I should have struck him. 

" What is the joke?" I asked. 

'" You won't think its funny," Harry answered. 

" It must be a poor joke," 1 retorted, a little nettled. 

" Well, it's on you," he said. " You have simply shown me that 
Maude never told you she loved you. That's the joke.' 

I was speechless with wrath, but my eyes spoke. " How have I 
shown that? " they asked in my behalf. 

" You say that you told Maude that you loved her to distraction. 
To which declaration she replied, ' So do I.' Where there ia in that 
any avowal that she loves you I fail to see. She simply stated that 
she too loved herself to distraction, and I breathe again." 

" Hair-splitting!" said I, wrathfully. 

" No— side-splitting! " returned Harry, with a roar of laughter. 
" Now my declaration was very different from yours. It was made 
when Maude and I were walking home from church. It was about 
nine o'clock, and the streeta were bathed in mellow moonlight. I 
declared myself because I could not help myself. I had no intention 
of doing so when I started out earlier in the evening, but the up- 
lifting effect of the service of song at church, combined with the 
most romantic kind of a moon, forced me into it. I told her that I 
was a struggler; that I was not yet able to support a wife; and that 
while I did not wish to ask any pledge from her, I could not resist 
telling her that I loved her with all my heart and soul." 

/ began to feel blue. " And what did she say?" I asked, a little 
hoarsely. 

" She aaid she returned iny affection." 

I braced up. " Ha, ha, ha ! " I laughed. " This time the joke is 
on you." 

" I fail to see it," he said. 

"Of course," I retorted. " It is not one of your jokes. But say, 
Harry, when you send a poem to a magazine and the editor doesn't 
want it, what does he do with it? " 

" Returns it. Ah! " 

The "ah" waa a gasp. 

'• You are the hair-splitter this time," said he, ruefully. 

" I am," said I. " 1 could effectually destroy a whole wig of hairs 
like that. If you are right in your reasoning as to Maude's love for 
me, I am right as regards her love for you. We are both splitting 
hairs in a most unprofitable fashion." 

"We are," said Harry with a sigh. "There is only one way to 
settle the matter." 

"And that?" 

" Let's call around there now and ask her." 

" I am agreeable," said I. 

In a few moments we were ready to depart, and as we stepped out 
into the night, who should we run up against but that detestable 
Jimmie Brown! 

" Whither away, boys? " he asked, in his usual bubblesome man- 
ner. 

" We are going to make a call." 

"Ah! Well, wait'a minute, won't you! I have seme news. I'm 
in great luck, and 1 want you fellows to join me in a health to the 
future Mra. B." 

" Engaged at laat, eh, Brown? " aaid Harry. 

I did not speak, for I felt a audden and moat depressing sinking 
of the heart. 

" Yea," aaid Brown, and then he told us to whom. 

It is not necessary to mention the lady's name. Suffice it to say 
that Harry and I both returned to our corner in the club, discarded 
our overcoats, and talked about two subjects. 

The first was the weather. 

The second, the fickleness of women. 

Incidentally we agreed that there was something irritating about 
certain name , and on this occasion James excited our ire somewhat 
more than was normal. 

But we did not lick James. We had too much lingering regard 
for some one else to split a hair of his head. 



Are You Going East ? 
Take, the Santa Fe Route. You will find it to your interest to call 
on or address the undersigned before purchasing tickets. No other 
line crossing the continent can offer you a trip combining equal com- 
fort and pleasure. The only line running Pullman palace and tour- 
ist sleeping-cars through to* Chicago on the same train every day 
without change. Personally conducted excursions through to Bos- 
on leave every Tuesday. * W. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, 
Chronicle Buifding, San Francisco. 



Jan. 21, 189.1 



BAN IK W' 1m M'\\ s i, ii | i i; 



A SEALSKIN SACKED. 



- r I. 

The i.rtakftut mom of the Brmm SUmm. Mr. om* Mrs. Brotm-Stont 
lib. 

Mr. Brawn-Shnu — No, Kale, I can't pot you a sealskin. It's all I 
can do to feed and rluthc the Family respectably without indulging 
in luv 

Mrs. Brown-Stone— Bat, John, 1 really need it. i haven't a 
decent cloak i>f any kind to wear, and if you'll get me that I won't 
ask (or any other Christmas present. 

Mr. Brown-Stone — Yon women always say you haven't anything 
lit to wear. I can't afford it. and thai settles it. I'll get you a val- 
uable umbrella instead. 

Mrs. Brown-Stone — You know I have no use for an umbrella. My 
health won't permit of my going out in rainy weather. 

Mr. Brown-Stone — Well, that'll be something useful for me when 
you don't happen to be using it. I'm on the verge of bankruptcy 
now, and I'll have to go slow. 

Ughta a twenty-live cent cigar and starts for his office. Mrs. 
Brown-Stone sprinkles the rolls with tears. 

Si km: II. 

Mr. Srown-Aone's office. Mr. Bromi-Stone seated at his desk writing. 
Enter messenger boy. 

Messenger— Mr. Brown-Stone? 

Mr. Brown-Stone — Yes. what is it? 

Messenger— Letter for you, sir. Strictly private. 

Mr. Brown-Stone— Ah! Hello, what's "this? (reads.) 

DiakMr. Browx-Stose— A little brunette, who sees you go to 
your office every morning, has become enamored of your charms. 
If you would like to meet one who would appreciate nice presents 
and would try to repay them, meet me in front of Harry Skinner's, 
the furrier, at 3 p. m. 

As discretion is necessary, I will be veiled, but will wear a large 
white chrvsanthemum. Your Own. 

P. 8. — 1, also, am married, so you need fear nothing. 

By Jove, this is great! I'll look into this. Twenty minutes to 
three! I must hurry right down to Skinner's. Ah, the ladies can't 
resist me. 

Scene III. 

In front of Skinner's window, Fifth avenue. Heavily veiled lady gaz- 
ing abstractedly in window. Mr. Brown-Stone approaches. 

Mr. Brown-Stone (delighted, but embarrassed) — Er — beg pardon, but 
m— er 

Veiled Lady (starling)— Oh, Mr. Brown-Stone! How you startled 
me! 

Mr. Brown-Stone— I beg ten thousand pardons, I'm sure! 

Veiled Lady — I suppose you think it very bold of me, Mr. Brown- 
Stone to send you that note, but— er— I wanted to see you 

Mr. Brown-Stone (recovering his composure) — Don't say a word, my 
madam. I was Derfectly charmed. I assure you; and now, although 
you have not granted me a sight of your face, am both charmed and 
delighted. 

Veiled Lady— You shall see my face later. As I was saying, my 
reason for making bold to write to you was that I wanted to see 
you 

Mr. Brown-Stone — Now, I beg of you, no apologies. It was quite 
right and proper. 

Veiled Lady— Let me finish, please. I say, I wanted to see you, 
John, (throwing bach her veil and disclosing the face of Mrs. Brown- 
Stone) to ask you if you hadn't repented your decision of this morn- 
ing about the sack. 

Mr. Brown-Stone— Great Gawd ! You, Kate? 

Mrs. Brown-Stone— Yes, "your own" Kate. Now tootsie, I know 
you will go right in here with me and get the sealskin, wont you? 

Mr. Brown-Stone heaves a groan that jars his check book out of his 
pocket, and follows sadly after. —Town Topics. 



IT seems as if a single well-known French name is not to remain 
unsullied by the Panama Canal revelations. The flood of mire 
is rising from day to day, and it has reached the head of the 
French republic who is accused of having been aware that bribes 
were paid to M. de Freycinet's cabinet, of which he himself was 
one of the ministers. Whether this accusation will be verified, 
and whether the Chief Magistrate of the French republic will 
have to become defendant in a criminal court, it suffices that 
words were given to such a suspicion, to show the seriousness of 
the situation. The President of a great republic, like Crasar's wife, 
must be above suspicion, if public order is to be maintained. 
Now that one of M. Carnot's former colleagues has plainly 
charged the President with having connived at the offense with 
which he has been charged, it is difficult to see how M. Carnot 
can maintain his position unless he can hand over his accuser to 
the full punishment of the law as a traitor and calumniator. 



Tliroat Diseases commence with a Cough, Cold, or Sore Throat. 
Brown's Bronchial Troches" give immediate relief. Sold only in boxes. 
Price 25 cents. 



Inflamed eyes and lids permanently cured if caused by defective sight, 
consult, (free of charge) C. Muller, refraction specialist, 135 Montgomery 
street. 



MR rumors. President Carnnt could very well afford to deny, 
but the statement of ex Minister Bailiul. together with the 
ooniMiion ol II. Blondln, of Hie Credit l.ynnnals. if correctly re- 
I in the cablegrams, must lead to an indictment of the 
President, or, »i least, to his resignation, still, it is not unlikely 
that the facts mentioned in the telegrams are exaggerated, f..r. as 
if toe soandal were noi great enough, soma ol the foreign corre- 
spondents atam to take eapasUI delight In magnifying it. But 
should the no. si reoenl news prove true, even as regards the 
greater part, Hun the danger of a victory of anarchy is still 
nearer than could have been anticipated a week ago. 



POST mortem vanity has founded more seats of learning than 
oil the scholars who have burned out their eyes from the time 
the Phonician first indited a letter. 



Don't Blame 
The Baby 

who will not know enough to ask for 

^HIGHLAND 




unsWEE TENE0 

Meanwhile its lungs and stomach are protest- 
ing 'gainst the"inf ant-food" that don 1 1 feed — 
nourish. Highland Evaporated Cream 
is the completest, safest and most readily 
assimilated food. Send your name and ad- 
dress for our Infant Food Circular— it's free. 
HELVETIA MILK CONDENSING CO., Highland, III. 

IMPORTANT AUCTION SALE 



STANDARD AND HIGH-BRED 

TOTTING BROOD MARES 

In Foal to Choice Young Trotting Stallions. 

Sons of Electioneer, 125, and Gen. Benton. Also by Piedmont, Nephew, 
etc., being a consignment from the famous 

PALO ALTO STOCK FARM, 

TO TAKE PLACE AT II A. M., AT 

SALESYARD, Cor. Van Ness Ave. and Market St, S. F. 

FRIDAY, JAN. 27, 1893. 

Horses will be on exhibition from Tuesday, Jan. 24th, up to sale. 
Catalogues giving description, pedigrees, stallion bred to and date of 
service, now ready, and will be mailed upon application. 

KILIJl' «fc CO., rive Stock Auctioneers. 

22 Montgomery Street. 

IDEAL COFFEE. 

This famous brand of fresh ground blended coffee is unexcelled for quality 
and delicacy of flavor. 

No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 No. 4 

25 cents 30 cents 85 cents 40 cents per lb, 

For sale only by 

RATHJEN BROS., Grocers. 

21 STOCKTON STREET. 
Sole Agents for the Celebrated IDEAL COFFEE POT. 



10 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 18S3. 




V-rBII -,ra ,*>. r; e. ^gfij il *3u. 



HE.LQPKER-9N* 



YT^g^=*V23&a?n 



ALL of the many merchants, insurance men, bankers, capital- 
ists and commercial travelers who for years have waxed fat 
upon the luxurious fare afforded them by Mine Host Claffey, of 
the Mercantile Lunch, on Pine street, expressed great surprise 
the other day when the proprietor of the popular restaurant an- 
nounced that on account of losses which he was unable to over- 
come, that he was no longer able to conduct the establishment. 
The doors were closed, and those who went there for their break- 
fasts or lunches on the day the attachment was levied, found the 
Sheriff's lock upon the door. The Lunch for years bad done a 
great business. So numerous were his patrons that once or twice 
Mr. Claffey raised his rates. It made no difference, for his place 
continued crowded at every meal. hour. His patronage was the 
best in town, for one needed to be possessed of considerable 
pocket money to be enabled to enjoy the fine menus the chef pre- 
sented. How he ever came to fail is more than Mr. Claffey can 
figure out, for unless there was a leak somewhere he should have 
made money. True, bis expenses were heavy, for at his tables 
only the best in the market was ever served; but then his rates 
were high enough to offset the outlay, and leave considerable 
profit. For his information, though it seems hardly possible that 
a good manager should not know of it, I will tell Mr. Claffey of 
one immense hole through which dropped many hundreds which 
should have gone into his till. Those who have dined at the 
Mercantile Lunch for any lei, gib of time need not be told that 
"some men they knew" would frequently eat a five dollar dinner, 
for which they would pay only one or two dollars. How did 
they do it? They paid simply what their checks called for. The 
modus operandi was simple. A regular customer would become 
known to all the waiters. They, always in search of tips, evolved 
a scheme by which ihey enriched themselves, but robbed their 
employer. For instance, a heavy diner would give the waiter 
fifty cents or a dollar, and the latter, in return, instead of pre- 
senting the patron with a check for the proper amount of the 
cost of his dinner, would give him one for half the amount, and 
frequently for much less. One capitalist I know of became so 
conscience-stricken that he declined to dine at the Lunch any 
more, and withdrew his patronage (?) This was just after he 
had paid for a seven-dollar dinner with a two-dollar check. It 
seems that the manager, or whoever it was that conducted the 
place, kept a check only on the bottles of wine sent to the tables. 
What came from the kitchen was unknown. There probably 
were some honest waiters at the Mercantile Lunch, but there 
were enough dishonest ones to put the Sheriff's lock on the door. 
» » * 
A very funny mistake appeared in the society department of 
the Chronicle one morning last week. In a description of some 
private theatricals those who took part therein were referred to 
as "amateur mummers." Bat the intelligent compositor and the 
equally intelligent proof-reader allowed the ladies referred to to 
bespoken of as "amateur mammas." At last accounts Society 
Editor Mackay was still in hiding. 
# * # 

The Butte County people at the Mechanics' Fair are very indignant, 
and not without cause, at the action, or rather inaction, of the art 
award committee, which declined to even recognize Butte's Rock of 
Ages as a thing of beauty in their report on the exhibits at the Fair. 
It is said that the committee objected to the exhibit on the ground 
that it was offensive to the religious sensibilities of many people, if 
not absolutely sacriligious. The Butteites, however, seem to think 
they are just as well able to determine the proprieties as are the mem- 
bers of the committee, and they hold that in taking the religious 
stand the committee has given evidence of a narrow-minded, bigoted 
spirit which should have no place in the breasts of artists. Certain it 
is that to the layman, Butte's "RockofAggs" makes a very pretty 
show, for every night a great crowd has gathered and admired it. 
Two of the county's fairest daughters posed at the cross every night, 
and they, too, are, of course, included in the sweeping denunciation 
of -'inartistic" from the committee. And they always looked their 
very prettiest, too ! It does seem that the exhibitors had the better of 
the argument so far. The Committee was appointed to judge the ex- 
hibits from an artistic, and not a religious standpoint. Whether in 
their opinion the " Rock of Ages " (in oranges) be irreligious or not 
is immaterial. If it be artistic it should receive mention. The 
Butte people will not be easily put off, for they intend io have 



a vote of the visitors to the fair upon the question of the eligibility of 
their display to be mentioned in the art committee's report. 

* * • 

I would suggest to the Butte county people that they hold 
another guessing contest, for that recently decided was hardly a 
fair test of the capabilities of the people to determine bow many 
oranges are in that old wind-mill. The exact number of oranges 
was known to the exhibitors, and they offered to give a box of 
the luscious fruit to the person who guessed nearest to the num- 
ber. An envelope containing a slip of paper upon which was the 
number was handed for safe-keeping to an enterprising news- 
paperman. To avoid all error or possibility of additions to the 
pile of oranges after the contest began, be informed himself of 
the number. To further insure its safe-keeping, he then told it 
to a friend. Then to test the matter, and for once in his life to 
win something in a lottery, the friend "guessed" just two less 
than the exact number of oranges in the display. Of course he got 
the prize. All I have to say about the matter is, that no men on 
earth can get as much satisfaction out of a luscious orange as 
newspapermen. The prospects are now bright for every reporter 
in town to revel in Butte fruit as long as that box exists. 
» » » 

One of the interesting exhibits at the fair is the piece of antique 
German tapestry shown by Mme. Alvina Mangenberg, whose 
handiwork it is. She is an old Californian, and only recently 
completed this work, so that she might be represented in 
the display of women's work from this State at Chicago. This 
piece of tapestry is well worthy of attention. The scene repre- 
sented is after a historical painting, *« The Taking of Calais," 
and King Edward III. is shown pardoning the magistrate of the 
city at the intercession of his Queen and the Black Prince. Eu- 
ropean ladies are now giving great attention to tapestry-making, 
and the designing of ancient and modern scenes is a popular fad 
in continental society circles. The ancient tapestries, preserved 
as heirlooms in many old families, are held as priceless. The 
resumption of the almost lost art of tapestry-making will be 
hailed with delight by the admirers of the beautiful. 
*. • « 

John Luning, the son and heir of Nicholas is not as insane 
as the newspapers would make him out to be. The telegraphic 
dispatches on Thursday morning announced that Luning had gone 
mad at Nice, and had been taken by two keepers to Paris. A dis- 
patch received by George Whittell from Luning dated at London on 
the same day, indignantly denies the assertion. The fact is, that 
Luning and his •' friends" on his yacht Alert were on a frightful 
debauch, and to escape his too eager companions, Luning left the 
yacht and went to London. He has been very, very drunk, but 
truly may he say, in the words of the parlor orator, " I am not 
mad," Luning's life story reads like a romance. The son oi a 
multi-millionaire, he was cast off by his father, and eked out a 
hard existence in New York and other Eastern cities. There his 
condition may be best portrayed by the expressive phrase, that 
he was " on his uppers." He worked at all sorts of odd jobs for 
be bad no credit, his notes being refused by the brokers. Aa 
long as he had any credit at all, he paid enormous rates of discount 
for accommodation, frequently accepting for bis paper one-quar- 
ter the amount of its face. When his fortune came to him he 
was in poverty. Walking home one night;, with a few nickels in 
his pocket, he was importuned by a newsboy to buy a paper. 
Although Luning needed his nickels far more than the paper, the 
newsboy pleaded so hard with him that he gave him the price of 
the paper, shoved the latter in his pocket, and continued on his 
way. That night, as he lay in bed reading the paper, he saw, 
in Btartling headlines, the account of his father's death. He 
then, as a prospective heir, was enabled to raise enough money 
to come to this city, where millions awaited him. Here he 
became very popular at several clubs. He was extravagant to a 
fault, and a number of well-known club men, who made life 
agreeable to him, were presented by him with rich gifts. After a 
while, he tired of San Francisco and went East. Then be started 
on bis yacht Ale*t to tour the world. With him went a party of 
friends. That they had a wildly hilarious time is shown by the 
results. Luning has evidently tired of paying the expenses of 
the blood-suckers who have been living off his generosity, and 
has determined to cut loose from them. 
* • * 

The Mr. Olcutt mentioned as being with Luning at the time ofi his 
" meutal derangement " is the youngest brother oi Richard Olcutt,. 
formerly well-known here. Both ihe boys are the sons of Colonel 
Olcutt, the High Priest of Theosophy, but neither of them have ever 
cared to follow in the footsteps of their ethereal father, believing that 
a close attention to commercial pursuits would improve theirworldly 
welfare much better than following the mystic ways of Theosophy. 
Will Olcutt's acquaintance with John Luning dates back about ten 
years, when Luning was poor in New York, and in direful need of a 
friend or two. He had met Will through his brother Dick, whom he 
knew in San Francisco. Dick being a bosom friend of Charles Rollo 
Peters, and also of Luning. Will always aided John when he was 
able, and on coming into his fortune the latter, no doubt, on reaching 
New York looked up his former friend and took him on the trip 



Jan. 21, 1393. 



sv\ nav im NEW8 I BTTER 



around the world. Will Olcolt, in Jippcarancc. is a handsome fellow. 
entertaining in his conversation and most lavish with money, making 
a good companion for Lulling. He has been a stock-broker in New 
York, and is fairly well-otrin the world's goods. 

One who goes to Sacramento io listen to pare oratory flow 
from the lips of the statesmen who assemble daily in the State 
Capitol, will begrievou^ly dieappi inled. Wotds. wordy, words— 
these will be hear until be hangs bis head in deep dejection, and 
envies the man who was born deaf and dumb; but as to oratory, 
be might as well look for a member without a bill or a scheme, 
as to expect that eloquence which we are taught to associate wit b 
statesmen. The difficulty with the Legislature, and particularly 
with the larger house, the Assembly, is that most of the mem- 
bers are new, painfully new; so very young in affairs of 
State, in fact, that they bow every lime the Speaker raises his 
gavel, look with awe upon the Latin inscription in letters of 
gold above bis head, and tremble and turn pale when they hear 
their own voices. Some members ihere are who have wrestled 
with problems of Stale before, and now fear not the echoes that 
rumble back from the ceiling when Ihey raise their voices in ap- 
proval or denunciation of some other gentleman" who now is true 
(or nntrue) to his constituency in introducing such a measure 
upon the floor of this House." The speaker who talks to the 
gallery and throws bouquets at himself, always sweeps the cir- 
cumambient atmosphere with his good right hand, grows red in 
the face, husky in voice, apoplectic in appearance, and swears 
by all the Gods that he will raite his voice upon the issue in 
question as long, sirs, as long — as he gets his eight dollars a day. 
I listened to the nominating speeches in the Assembly Chamber 
on Tuesday last, and was disappointed. Sbanahan, the "Tall 
Sycamore from Shasta," had the honor of nominating Stephen M. 
White for United Slates Senator. Sbanahan has gained a reputa- 
tion as an orator, but bis reputation depends, I think, more upon 
the kindness of the correspondents than upon his own ability. 
He may be an orator, but no one would ever even guess it to hear 
and see him speak. He makes up in virile force what he lacks 
in the perfection of the art. He is a big, strong man, and as he 
yells at the top < i his strong voice, and waves bis arms wildly in 
the air, one is impressed with his physical strength. He seems 
to mean what he says, and to mean it with all his might, and 
that is a great point for success in a public speaker; but orator 
he is not, and never has been. Bledsoe, who runs a race with 
8hanahan as to which shall be mure frequently mentioned in the 
press, does not pretend to "orate." No one would ever pick 
Bledsoe out of a crowd as a statesman, as personally he is neither 
impressive nor prepossessing; to be can '.id, I most say be seems 
rather insignificant. Yet he makes himself heard and felt. 
Finlayson, who seconded White's nomination, would have 
made a good speech if be had been more natural, and 
had not strained so for effect. He made a mistake 
at the outside by rolling out in Bowery tragedian's tones — " that 
favored son of the State, Stephen Mai lory White." A politician 
with three names can never be as successful as a man with one. 
"Stephen Mallory White" would have failed utterly long ago 
in crises which "Steve White" passed triumphantly. Finlayson 
had his speech memorized, but he lacked confidence, and there- 
fore failed in his address. A legislator must have as many inches 
of nerve as he has of cuticle if he would succeed. O'Keefe, who 
nominated Felton, acted the old style, deeply mysterious. "The 
man I am about to name," he said, five or six times, until at last 
a nervous gentleman beside me said, "Well, name him, name him, 
for heaven's sake." Why do sensible men indulge in such balder- 
dash, anyhow? The old-style stump-speaker or convention nom- 
inator always held back the name of " the man I am about to 
name" until the last minute, and then with a yell, threw the 
name at the audience as if expecting them to fall paralyzed at 
bearing the magic syllables. That's all right in a nominating 
convention, where claptrap methods often make votes, but when 
we, the people and taxpayers, send men to to the Legislature and 
pay them eight dollars a day to transact our business, 
we don't want to see them waste very valuable 
hours and much good coin by " the man I am about to 
name " rot. What good are long drawn-out speeches, such as those 
of Tuesday and Wednesday last at Sacramento? Every man there 
knew whom he would vote for, and not a vote was changed by the 
hurricane of words. Still, nearly a whole day was wasted in hauling 
the man and the ghosts across the boards for the glorification of a 
few politicians and the edification of a crowd of loiterers. In the years 
to come we hope the public business will be transacted according to 
private business rules, and then any gentleman who occupies several 
hours by displaying his extensive vocabulary will be "docked" for 
just that part of the Legislative day that he wasted with his words. 
We must save our eight dollars, or get those fellows at Sacramento 
to earn their salaries. 



ii 




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W.B, CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
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Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



12 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1893. 




THE Ladies' Club is indignant at the editorial in a Sunday's news- 
paper which portrayed a possible appearance on the steps of 
the club of two of its fair members singing " Razzle-Dazzle " in a 
somewhat muddled condition. 

* * * 

» Don't the horrid editors know," asks one dame, "that the 
women will not meet to drink, as men do, but for chat and re- 
pose; and then such a lovely place for making appointments, and 
having one's parcels and notes sent." Yes, this is all bo, but how 
if appointments should be made that will not do to make for 
home, and letters are addressed to a woman's club that she could 
not give her own address for ? What then ! " 

* • • 

The spirit of fun is not so rampant in the city as in the rural 
districts, to judge from what a member of the Fortnightly said 
the other day. This was her plaint. •■ In San Rafael, for instance, 
any amount of jollity is got up and gone through with by the 
Nonsense Club; but let the least little bit of anything risque crop 
into the programme here and it is at once rubbed out, every one 
is so afraid of the horrid newspapers, don't you know." 
» * * 

Why does not Wilkie secure Mrs. Everett Wise's brilliant voice 
as an attraction for his Palace Hotel concerts ? Her many friends 
would crowd the Maple room and prove that his selection was a 
wise one in fact. Another good pointer for Wilkie would be keep- 
ing the best seats reserved till the last moment, when late comers 
would willingly pay the •« 25 cts. extra " for a desirable seat, and 
thereby swell the exchequer considerably. 
* * * 

Ever since the Ivers-Robinson nuptials in New York, our 
belles are looking with a yearning eye towards Eastern cities, 
and even the tourist from beyond the Rockies gets a warmer 
welcome from the dear girls than do our local beaux. Why? 
Some say our men {not the youths who pose as partner for the 
dance but the men of society — may their size increase) are not 
given to matrimonial joys, but aw contraire seek the seclusion of 
club life in preference to the glitter of a ballroom, allurements of 
dinner or frivolity of a tea. We are inclined to think the true 
reason lies in the fact that marriage has become a fine art, where 
prizes have to be worked for with as much skill as any other 
effort in life. The rich man takes as his motto " much would 
have more;" the poor man sees a vista of delight opened before 
his eyes by a plethoric bag of gold held in tiny fingers, while the 
girls — bless them — all want rich husbands, who will bestow soli- 
taires, sealskins, trips to Europe and Worth toilettes ad lib. 
% » * 

The recent murderous attack upon General Barnes has resulted 
in men getting home from the club while the cars are run- 
ning. The gallant General's many friends — and they are legion — 
rejoice over his escape from the midnight assassins, and his lady 
friends are unanimous in their delight that his good looks are 
un marred. 

* * # 

The whisper goes that the choice made of Mr. McLaren to im- 
personate the biblical character who saved nis family from the 
flood was owing to his peculiarly British method of saying 
H No — ah." His assumption of the Frenchman in the farce was 
not so happy. A Scotchman can never sufficiently overcome his 
native accent to appear to advantage (even in a broken effort) in 
the French tongue. 

Apropos of the Flood, an English tourist, who has been going 
round a good deal in our swim, made a lot of girls laugh the 
other day. It was at an " afternoon," and a knot of people were 
discussing the probabilities of the California street heiress taking 
active part in the post-Easter gaieties. The local beau who has 
had such desperate aspirations to become a wealthy woman's 
husband for some seasons back, was appealed to for certainty, 
and when he said the lady might appear in a very interesting 
r61e (whether as hostess or bride his significant shrug would seem 
to imply either) the Britisher spoke up: » By Jove, what a stroke 
of luck for some fellow to get a pot of money like that. I say, 
though, why would the lady married be like a phase of * Ocean, 
thou mighty monster?' " and he looked at Miss Emily for a re- 
sponse. " Because there would be a lot of wrecked hopes and all 
that sort of thing among the men," she said. << Oh dear, no, be- 
cause she would be a Flood-tied," and he giggled in concert with 
the girls. 

* * * 

Parties to the World's Fair are already agitating the question 
of time and place. But it is a trifle too soon to begin making 
definite plans for that trip. Better wait and see if a clear bill of 
health prevails in New York harbor before serious talks of trips 
to Chicago next summer. 



It is amusing to witness the efforts of some of the mushroomers 
who try to obtain recognition in society. A flagrant case is on 
Madison street, Oakland, where a certain family recently es- 
consed themselves and commenced desperate efforts to worm 
their way into the inner circle. The lady of the house was 
naturally the most anxious to secure the entree, and she tried 
every conceivable plan for obtaining recognition, even through 
the medium of the society columns of the newspapers. At last 
she hit upon an idea. She gave a swell party in honor of her 
daughter, who is but sixteen, and invited a number of young 
ladies belonging to the haut ton. Most of them had never met 
the hostess, but were bidden at the invitation of friends. This 
was done in order that their mammas would come when after- 
wards the party calls were made. Every arrangement was made 
by the hostess to make the affair a memorable one, and so it 
proved to be, for the young ladies all came, but accompanied by 
maids. This was a crusher, and to add to the joke, it has leaked 
out that the gentleman of the house, who had been studying his 
part for a week, so as not to appear gauche, got scared at the last 
minute, and went off to his ranch. 



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Jan. 21, 1893 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS Ml II R. 



13 



PASSE PARTOUTS GOTHAM GOSSIP. 

Nru York, Jan 10 

Twelfth oigfatl and the holidays winding up with n line and 
fioariahlofl hlixzanl— a present from Hriti«h Columbia— more im- 
petuous than welcoming, but we cannot resent the gift, as (here i? 
no animous about it. otherwise our neighbors across "the ghost 
line" in Canada would not be shivering. Hard lines that a blizzard 
and the Christmas bills should make their cold and depressing ap- 
pearance together. Why does the wassail bowl become in memory 
a thing of £ s. d.., and why do sordid thoughts cling about that 
baron of beef— that plump Christmas goose, and that blazing, holly 
decked pudding? Away with such thoughts! Have the good 
cheer, the joy, the mutual kindly acts. Three new COUntryhoase 
parties galore for the holidays. Of Californiatis uot many are living 
in the country about here, but down at Fort Hamilton, Lieutenant 
and Mrs. J. C. Bailey had a charming family party. I hear that 
the Clermont Bests were with Lieutenant Best's father and mother 
in their beautiful Sixty-liifth street house, so they cut the country. 
Major Darling was with General Howard's family on Governors' 
Island, where they are all stationed. The Lounberrys had a lot of 
guests, and in Westchester, Mr. and Mrs. "Johnnie" Lake had a 
large house party. At their house Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Teall were 
host and hostess to a number who on the night after Christmas 
danced the Cotillion at the Country Club. 

1 saw Mrs. William Wayne Belvin as she went through New York 
the other day. She looked beautiful I must say, with that mass of 
golden hair twisted in a loose knot low on her head. The only other 
woman I have seen daring that knot is Mrs. Cora Urguhart Potter. 
She has dropped the "Mrs. James Brown." Her coppery locks are 
always done in like fashion. Ou the same day Mrs. Belvin floated 
across my vision I saw Mrs. Gashwiler and her daughters and I do 
not mean anything unkind to the daughters when I say that the 
mother is far and away ahead of them in looks. She is wonderfully 
well preserved, and as the Yale men say when they wish to pay their 
highest compliment, "easily Queen of the May." Mrs. Gashwiler 
has taken a house with her sister, Mrs. Verdenal, for the winter. The 
Dykemans (Bessie Grattan) have come back from Plainfield and are 
installed in an apartment in Sixtieth street for the winter. They 
were at the Charity Ball the other night, and so were Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Savage— Madame de Carriere — Mr. and Mrs. Whitelaw 
Reid, Mr. and Mrs. Olarovsky and Mr. and Mrs. Lane Booker. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ogden Mills at No. 2 East Sixty-ninth street, gave a 
delightful dinner dance a few nights ago. Flowers and favors with- 
out number. 

Irving Scott appeared here the other day and set himself down 
like so many Californians recently at the Holland House. I met 
him near the door, and behind him grown and staid and portly 
"little" George Upshm, who used to be such a pretty boy in the 
early days of the Nevada Bank, when, if I remember rightly, James 
Coffin, Ned Greenway (both also grown portly), Louis McLane, 
J. George, Noodie Fox and Winfield Jones were the flowers of 
society. Alas for "the flowers that bloomed in the spring." Full 
blown or without all of them and some have fallen from their stalks 
dead and perhaps forgotten. Melancholy stalks in close fellowship 
with conviviality, especially after the gloomy resolutions of the New 
Year, so until they are broken or breaking look for silence from 

Passe Partout. 

THOUGH all prophecies, in politics are hazardous, especially 
when elements of so unstable a character have to be taken in- 
to consideration as that of the Gallic population, whose mania for 
innovations was recognized by Ctesar, and has remained unal- 
tered even in our day, one still may foretell with certainty that, 
whatever may befall the French Republic, the Royalist pretenders 
will have no chance of success. Their cause, as one of the shrewd- 
est, if not the shrewdest, of modern politicians, Pope Leo XIII., 
has correctly recognized, is a lost one; and the chief of the Catho- 
lic Church acted not hastily, but very deliberately when he with- 
drew further support from it. If the present French Republic is 
to fall it will he overthrown by a man who ascends to power by 
the assistance of the most radical elements of the country, and 
when, like the Napoleons, first poses as the friend of the people, or 
rather, perhaps, of the mob. At present, as pointed out hereto- 
fore, no leader has yet appeared upon the horizon who would be 
willing or able to undertake the task, but if opportunities make 
men, a man should soon be found in case events continue in the 
direction they have taken. Though unknown at this moment, 
the future Csesar of France may be walking the streets of Paris 
even now. It would be a sign of the greatest blindness if the 
French people were to give up their liberty once more to an am- 
bitious dictator, and it is to be hoped that the Republic may even 
yet be saved, but it cannot be denied that blindness is prevailing 
at this moment in France, otherwise a remedy would not have 
been chosen to cure an evil more destructive than the evil itself. 

The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic feature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 



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PROFESSOR OF THE PIANO-FORTE, 
Will resume teaching TUESDAY, JAN. 3d. 

2417 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan, 21, 1893. 




THE Comstock market dropped during the week, 
MtNINU. J[ from lack of business. The only activity was 
in Potosi, which, however, made a better record from a bear than 
a bull standpoint. The movement was altogether due to manip- 
ulation, and a lot of margin stock, which came to make matters 
worse. It is not very likely that prices will decline much fur- 
ther, especially, in view of reports from the mines, which are 
favorable enough to justify a much higher range of values. The 
resumption of ore extraction from the Con. -Cal. -Virginia haB 
been announced, but the fact has not done much to benefit the 
stock, which, strange to say, has been rather weak, under the 
news that the mine is now free from gas, and that the company 
is in better condition financially than it has been for months 
past, when the shares were marked up to $5. It has always 
been one of the peculiarities of Comstock manipulation, that the 
better the mine looks, the worse the condition of the stock. Mex- 
ican has been a firm stock lately, and the weakest on the list has 
been Belcher, which has been knocked about from bonanza 
prices down to the short-bit rate open to operators, known and dis- 
respected as nickel-plated. A few more whacks like it has 
received lately, and an exchange at par can be made with Loco- 
motive. Bullion valued at $6,283 55 came along from New York 
for the week , a mine which is doing better than some of the big 
'una. A shipment of $14,048 70 was also reported from Belcher, 
which may have caused the decline In the stock. At the annual 
meeting of the Sierra Nevada. Charles Fish was re-elected Presi- 
dent; Charles Hirschfeld, Vice-President; E. L. Parker, Secre- 
tary, and Herman Zadig, George Cope and A. K. P. Harmon, 
Directors. 

$ $ $ 

THE reform movement in the Comstock seems to have com- 
menced in good earnest, and probably before another issue of 
the News Letter all arrangements now contemplated will have 
been completed. The official salary list is to be scaled, and a re- 
duction made on the prices of timber and water required in the 
mines. There is some talk of lowering the miners' wages, but it 
is to be hoped that no material change will be made in the rate 
now paid to the men who work under the ground. For the sur- 
face hands a good all round cut will do no harm for a time at 
least, but in regard to the men on shift, in any of the deep work- 
ings along the lode, they earn every dollar they get. It is non- 
sense to compare the Comstock with other mioing camps and 
districts, for it is entirely different from ail others in many ways. 
The miners in other places have a picnic in comparison with 
their brethren at Virginia City. Of course if they are willing to 
come in and help matters out, so much the better, and if it is 
necessary, there is no doubt that they will stand in without very 
much solicitation. 

$ $ $ 



THE calm which precedes the tempest has 
: 



1 prevailed in local insurance circles during 
the week, and while no open demonstration has been made on 
either side pending another meeting of the P. I. U., the feeling 
has been at a white heat. The position of the Union has been 
freely discussed, however, among the different cliques, and 
when the meeting arranged for next Tuesday is called to order, 
the orators of the fraternity will be fully prepared to speak their 
little piece. The general opinion among the more conservative 
brokers is, that unless some concessions are made on both sides, 
at this meeting, so as to settle the point in dispute, that the days 
of the Union are doomed, and from that on it will be go-as-you- 
please among the members in the general scramble for business. 
When it is considered that in an organization incorporated on the 
same principle and for the same purposes as a bank, the directors 
have little or nothing to say on any question of vital importance, 
the only wonder is that it has lasted so long as it has. 
How long would a bank last if every petty shareholder in the 
concern had the right to come in and raise an issue with the 
Board of Directors on matters pertaining to the management? 
This has been the great trouble with the P. I. U. The directors 
have always been treated as a fifth wheel to the coach, and any 
action on their part has had a similar effect on the members as a 
red flag has on a bull. If the Board is only elected for orna- 
mental purposes alone, it will be just as well to dispense with it 
entirely. If not, its condmct should be left untramelled by the 
antagonistic views of a membership which, for display of obstruc 
tionLst tactics, would make a very creditable comparison with 
some of the old-time legislative assemblies at College Green. 

i $ $ 

THE annual meeting of the California Insurance Company took 
place on Monday last, and 4,920 shares were represented out 
of a total of 6,000. The folio w ing Board of Directors were elected 
to serve for the ensuing year: John Bermingham, 8. C. Bigelow; 
W. J. Bryan, S. K. Ballard, L. L. Bromwell, Daniel Meyer, M. A. 
Newell, John R. Spring and A. W, Scholle. A dividend (in 



liquidation) of $25 per share was declared payable February 2d. 
This company reinsured all its risks in April last, and since 
then bas ceased writing new business. Two dividends have been 
declared, aggregating $50 per share, and it is estimated that 
further dividends will be disbursed out of the assets, making $125 
returned on each share of the capital stock. 

in 

THE retirement is announced of Mr. E. L. Bosqui from the 
firm of Maxwell & Berry, the well-known fire and Marine 
underwriters. Bosqui will now work on his own account, and 
the copartnership of Maxwell & Berry will carry on business 
under the old firm name. 

$ $ * 

CHARLES OKELL, the active and enterprising agent of a 
number of Eastern companies of high standing, is visiting 
Portland, Or., on business. His return is looked for within the 
coming week. 

RANKINP HPHE commercial banks of this city are one and 
1 all in a (flourishing condition each controll- 
ing enough business in certain lines, to make their stocks a very 
profitable investment. Money continues to pile up in the sav- 
ings banks, and the deposits are still a long way in excess of the 
loans. The increased activity reported during the week in real 
estate circles will have a beneficial effect in putting more money 
in circulation by stimulating work in the way of improvements. 
Exchange on New York has neen firmer lately. Silver has also 
crept up a poiut or two in both New York and London. 

THE annual statement of the Pacific Coast Savings Society now 
on file, shows a total of assets in cash and loans of $514,611.41. 
A large business was transacted during the year, and the earn- 
ings were $38,048 97. Two dividends were paid, aggregating 
$16,972.87. The deposits ran up to $1,206,174 07. 

s $ 5 

THE Columbus Savings and Loan Society has been incorpor- 
ated with a subscription of $162,000 toward a capital stock of 
$300,000. The following have been elected Directors: Isaias W. 
Hellman, J. F. Arata, E. C. Palmieri, C. J. Caglieri and J. F. 
Fugazi. 

$ $ $ 

THE First Natioual Bank has just increased its annual divi- 
dends from eight to ten per cent, paying $5 on the 10th inst. 
instead of $4 as previously. The stock is quoted ex-dividend at 
$185 per share, equivalent to $190. 
$ $ $ 

THE Bank of California has paid its regular quarterly dividend 
of $3.75 on the 30,000 shares of capital stock, which is quoted 
at $263 per share. 

.. ICPCI , AMpniic TTHE principal feature of interest on 

MliJLtLLMPItUUi), | tfae lQcal gtock and Bond ExCQange 

during the week has been a heavy drop in Omnibus Cable Stock. 
At a meeting held on the 16th, the Directors decided to increase 
the capital stock from 20,000 to 25,000 shares. By doing so they 
will be enabled to issue 500,000 additional bonds in lieu of the 
stock, which will be sold to pay for the new acquisition, the line 
and right of way belonging to the old North Beach and Mission 
Company. The control of this road was obtained some time ago, 
and the Omnibus Directors are identical with both Boards of 
management. This new issue of stock will, of course, add to the 
monthly operating expenses, involving an additional outlay in 
the way of interest, amounting to $2,500 per month. The share- 
holders have settled it pretty well in their own minds that the 
next move on the part of the Directors will be a cut in the divi- 
dends, perhaps to 25 cents per share, may be to 30 cents, to cover 
tbe new interest account. This scared people, and timid hold- 
ers began to tumble in their stock on the market, and tbe price 
gradually settled from $56 to $45. The bond issue of this com- 
pany will be pretty heavy with the new allotment, amounting 
to 2,500,000, quoted in the market to-day at from $115$ to $116. 

I $ 5 

THE combination of the local electric companies, has been made 
air-tight during the week, the transfer papers having been 
received from New York, signed, sealed and now delivered. The 
subject has been done up so brown during the past six months, 
tbat little remains to be said. If the terms of the contract are 
not known to every one in the community able to wade through 
a first piimer, it is their own fault. They were published often 
enough. 

$$$ 

A BREAK has taken place in water stock, under the impression 
that the Supervisors will lower rates when the subject comes 
up for settlement. A decline in the stock is not unusual bow- 
ever about such periods. 

$ $ $ 

THE Geary Street Cable will pay a dividend of fifty cents on 
the 23d inst. 



Wltfl S. F. Niwi; Letter, January Si, 1UW3 









^HITE AND HIS LIEUTENANTS. 



oueher. 

T. W. H.Shanahan. 



7. Hon. Johi T. Murphy. 
O. Hon, Charles Praeger* 



9. Hon. G. W. Patton. 

10. Senator B. F. Langford. 



Jan- 21, I 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




'HeartbeCrlerl" 'What the devil art thou? 
'One that will pUt the ilerll.ilr. with you." 



THE prize-fighter had fought bis fight, 
His frame was wounded sore, 
From up to toe the gallant man 

Was stained with ruddy gore. 
They bore bira from the bloody ring, 

They crowded round his couch, 
They loved him for the battle put 

Much money in his pouch. 
And yet the surgeon shook his head, 

When he his ear applied, 
To that broad chest, to lung and heart, 

And mournfully he sighed. 
'• What says he?" moaned the prize-fighter 

To those who circled round, 
'* Am I gone in for aye or still 

Is th.s stout body sound?" 
" Your heart's affected," then spoke one, 

" Your lungs are just the same, 
Your legs are injured, and he fears 

You'll be forever lame." 
The hardy gladiator smiled, 

As their sad eyes he saw, 
" Weep not for me," he stoutly said, 

** I still have left my jaw." 
" I fought more battles with that jaw 

Than ever with my fist; 
As long as that is unimpaired 

My muscle won't be missed." 
And when again he walked abroad, 

And blustered as of old, 
Though babies might have bested him, 

His jaw-bone won him gold. 

A MORNING paper, taking John Luning for its theme, gave, on 
Monday morning a wild, Arabian Night sort of tale about 
that young millionaire and his friends. Among other startling 
pictures was one that when an artist painted a picture for Mr. 
Luning, he took him to the Palace, exposed a chest of twenty- 
dollar pieces, and begged the lucky painter to help himself with 
both bands. Another tale was that he distributed diamond 
lockets and gold watches to all his friends. AU of which is bosh. 
Mr. Joallin, a friend of Mr. Luning, denies that he was ever 
invited to plunge his bands into a mass of twenties, or that he 

ever saw even the outside of the trunk. Monsieur J also 

declares that he would have no conscientious scruples, if such 
were the case, in pulling out all he could hold in both hands for 
one of his Chinese pictures. Mr. Strauss was deeply offended 
when he heard this most unfounded rumor about the chest of 
gold that he had not been invited to take a whack at it, but was 
reassured when he learned that the story was one of the vaga- 
ries of Bigelow's brain. Solly Wolter protested that if such a 
trunk bad been, and only a few select artists were asked to the 
game of grab, he never would speak to John Luning again. The 
days of romance are over. Young millionaires with trunks filled 
with gold are found only in the story books and among those 
reporters who must kill space, and who have about as much 
respect for the Goddess Truth as a society belle for a wet dog, 
and shun her accordingly. 

A FRESNO monkey has got its owner, a lady, into a peck of 
trouble. She has threatened to horsewhip the editor of a 
Fiesno paper for the humane suggestion that the monkey should 
be killed before be chewed up the population of that prosperous 
town. The libeller of the monk remarked that he was "an ugly 
brute, without one redeeming trait." Ladies who go on the war- 
path to horsewhip editors for no more grievous offense than de- 
nouncing a vicious pet should be subjected to a peculiar treat- 
ment. They should not be clumsily handled, or compelled to 
suffer any punishment too severe. But they should be as mildly 
and mercifully spanked as the operation of spanking will permit. 

TO your knees, oh Californian, and thank heaven that you are 
not spending this merry month of January in the East or in 
Europe. You will denounce the climate, ingrate, because, forsooth, 
we have a little tiny bit of a cold snap, a few bushels of fog, a north 
wind or some other trifling and temporary inconvenience. If you 
were in New York your ears would be frozen, and if you were in 
Prussia you would be eaten by the wolves. Here you have no neces- 
sity for fires in your bed room, you can keep your toes on your legs 
without swathing them in blankets, and your nose owes its ruddy 
hue to hot toddies, and not to J ack Frost. Go to ! and sing hymns of 
gratitude that you have been mercifully let off with mud and sewer 
gas. 



FBOet time Immemorial we have been celebrated for the great 
act of closing tin door of the stable promptly after the meed 
has escaped. Poor David Porter's death bes suddenly Impressed 
the people of this beautiful seaside village that in loms pi 
our large building' the bau olsten ere dangerously low. Now ws 
will at once proceed to have tbls remedied is speedily as possible 
before the marble tin. .rings are bapIUe.i in the blood of another 
prominent citizen. The day after n window washer on the Mills 
Building lost hU life through the breaking of a rotten rope at- 
tached to the platform on which he stood, wo made the discovery 
that contractors were to be reprimanded for not paying proper 
attention to (hose matters. After serious deliberation we 
thought it advisable that street cars should be provided with 
safety attachments so the death rate of mangled citizens might 
be reduced. This occupied us" for some time, and some feeble 
efforts were made to secure a serviceable invention. But we got 
tired of that and permitted the matter to drop. We are quite a 
progressive people— on the spur of the moment, but the trouble 
is the spur soon loses its edge. 

THE Oakland parsons, backed by those good people who pack 
microscopic lunch baskets with diminutive sandwiches to 
this city to stay the cravings ot their dyspeptic stomachs at 
noon, insist that Manager Mothersole of the Macdonough Theatre 
shall not run his show on Sundays. Mr. Mothersole says he'll 
see them (missing word) and then he'll keep open; anyhow, that 
he does not care for the church peop.e, who make bis life 
wretched, sparring him for free passes to the show. He says 
that Oakland is not much of a theatre town, and that whenever 
there is anything in the line of a leg show in San Francisco, all 
the deacons and sub-deacons, with their following, rush over to 
secure the seats nearest the stage, and come back singing "Under 
your laces, my darling." If Mothersole takes my advice, he'll 
keep his show open all the week round, though every mother's 
son of them should fall to snarling and kicking. 

AT some of the city clubs, noticeably the University, where 
dinner is served a la carte, the bad custom prevails of placing 
thepriceof each dish opposite the same. The embarrassment which 
this occasions can be easily understood. A man asks a friend to 
dine, and passes him the carte. Now, the guest may like an ex- 
pensive dish, but feeling for the pocket of his host reduces him 
to asking for something marked at less price whose only recom- 
mendation to him is its cheapness. On the other hand if the host 
reads from the carte a cheap dish which he knows to be good, fearing 
that his guest may imagine he is endeavoring to be economical with 
him he passes it over. The better way would be to have the dishes 
named without the amount of dollars and cents. This would be 
more satisfactory to both parties, and would banish from the board 
the most objectionable part of a club dinner, its commercial side. 

THE swagger girl has discarded the night gown for slumber 
garments, and has gone in with all the energy of her character 
for pyjamas. A young lady, good as she is beautiful, but as inde- 
pendent as they make them, had her photograph taken in pyjamas 
one day this week for the delectation of a few of her friends. One of 
the latter borrowed it, and I saw it. Now, on men the pyjama is 
not an interesting costume. Upon this young lady it was simply 
adorable. The cunning damsel had the neck cut low, and the jacket 
made tight-fitting about the chest and shoulders, so not a single line 
of her graceful figure is lost. The trowsers are just too sweet for any- 
thing. The ensemble is perfect. It is an awful pity that such a cos- 
tume should be worn only at night, and that those who have a nice 
appreciation of art should be deprived of its contemplation. 

MAYOR CHAPMAN has disappointed the politicians of Oak- 
land in the appointment of a member of the Board of Public 
Works to succeed the late Mr. Playter, dead because of inability 
to live for more than seventy years in the political atmosphere 
that hangs, miasma-like, above the town across the bay. The 
politicians of Oakland have been disappointed a great many 
times recently, though it has been the people and not the Mayor 
who have disappointed theru. This time the feeling of the poli- 
ticians appears to be of much the same sort as that experienced 
by the man who comes home to find that the wife of his bosom 
has mixed strychnine with his gruel. 

THE Khedive in his great trouble applied to the Sultan for ad- 
vice, and the Sultan wrote to his Consul, Mr. George Hall to 
ask him what the deuce he was to tell the Khedive. Whereupon 
Mr . Hall cabled the Sultan to tell the Khedive not to do a blamed 
thing until he heard from him. Meanwhile the Sultan is on pins 
and needles to know what Mr. Hall will tell him to tell the Khedive 
to do, and Consul Hall himself is anxious to make everything as 
pleasant as possible for all parties. But what Mr. Hall is to tell the 
Sultan to tell the Khedive has not yet leaked out in diplomatic 
circles. 

MR. CLEVELAND is a large man in more ways than one, but 
you will not. know in three months from now whether it is 
the President who occupies the White House or whether it is 
Baby Ruth. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1893. 



ii>rs"crs.-A_^"GDE _ 




EUROPEAN history and law appear to offer sad stumbling 
blocks to the native students in the Indian colleges and schools. 
A writer in the Deccan Budget gives some examples. In one paper 
the question was to explain the sentence: " 8he (Queen Mary) 
was not only his wife, but his friend." The translator made the 
passage to run : " She was not only his wife, but the wife of all 
his friends!" An jther student defined Salic law as «« a law in 
France by which no man descended from the female sex was to 
get the French crown." The Habeas Corpus Act was described 
as a very important Act passed in 1628. It declared, said one 
student, « that the bread and wine taken at the Lord's Supper is 
the real blood and body of Christ." Another imagined the Act of 
Uniformity to be a law " that all soldiers should dress alike." 
Asked to explain the expression, » a Sponging House," another 
ventured upon the following wild guess: " In England there are 
many people who live by sponging on others, so there are bouses 
in which some who are too lazy to work depend on others." The 
last example is that of an embryo political economist who, on be- 
ing asked to write a note on the Poor Law, said : " The poor laws in 
1601 were passed in Elizabeth's reign; they were that all fires in 
England were to be put out at eight o'clock." 

In the month of May, 1889, there was an evening party in 
Berkeley Square, and in the early part of the day Lord Rosebery 
had met in Piccadilly a Scotch farmer with whom he had some 
acquaintance, and he asked bis friend to " look in " in the course 
of the night. Tue farmer duly presented himself in something 
that resembled his idea of an evening dress. All went well until 
the Scotchman got into the supper-room, and after eating of a va- 
riety of delicacies, he lighted on an ice-cream — a form of nourish- 
ment that was new to him. Having taken a large spoonful, he 
managed to conceal his discomfort. But seeing his host he thought 
it his duty to inform him of what had taken place. " I don't 
suppose yoa know, my lord," he loudly whispered, " but I think 
I ought to tell you— there has been a mistake somewhere and this 
pudding's froze." Lord Rosebery grasped the situation in a 
moment. With perfect courtesy, and with a pretty appearance 
of critical inquiry, he tasted the ice-cream. " So it is," he said; 
•« that's very strange; " and then, after speaking to one of the 
servants, he returned and said to the Scotch farmer: " It's all 
right; I am told that this is a new kind of pudding they freeze 
on purpose," and taking bis friend's arm led him out of the room. 



A Greek died in the small town of Caracal, having always lived 
on the alms of his compatriots. Before dying he made his wife 
swear that she would bury him in the dirty old overcoat he wore 
every day. The poor woman had to ask the Greeks of Caracal to 
help her to provide the costs of the funeral. A good hearted 
Greek went to see her in her affliction, and, pointing to the body, 
Baid he would give her a better coat to bury the man 
in. Then she told him of the dead man's last wish. The Greek, 
whose suspicions were awakened, told her that she should cer- 
tainly not part with the body before she had well-examined the 
coat, for there must be some particular reason for the request. 
The widow unpicked the lining of the overcoat and found 35,000 
franc bank-notes which the miser wished to take into the grave 
with him. 

Renan left so small a private fortune that his widow is forced 
to sell his library, and disposed of it at the beginning of this 
year, while waiting for Parliament to provide her with a pension. 
Renan's life-long friend, M. Berthelot, says that the philosopher 
left the world almost as poor as on toe day he quitted St. Sulpice 
to begin the struggle of life. In our land of well-paid college pro- 
fessors it will be of interest to learn that Renan's salary as a pro- 
fessor in the College de France was only $2,000 a year, five per 
cent, of which was deducted for a pension. Yet there was no 
other theological lecturer in the French republic who attracted so 
many listeners to his class-room, or gave his college so wide a re- 
putation abroad. 



The pathway to literary success is not always smooth. The 
greater part of the first edition of Ibsen's maideD effort in litera- 
ture, Cati'ine, was sold for a trifle to a grocer to use for wrapping 
paper; and even when the dramati°t was well started on his ca- 
reer his chief source of support was the stipend of $226 a year he 
received as "theatrical poet" at Bergen. Ibsen showed great 
talent as a school-boy — so much, in fact, that his master, suppos- 
ing him guilty of plagiarism because of the maturity of thought 
exhibited in bis school-room compositions, attempted to chastise 
him. 

False Economy 
Is practiced by people who buy inferior articles of food because 
cheaper than standard goods. Infants are entitled to the best food 
obtainable. It is a fact that the Gail Borden " Eagle" Brand Con- 
densed Milk is the best food. Your grocer and druggist keep it. 



Insurance Company. 

CAP1TAL $1.000,0 00, | A SSETS $3,000,000 

STRONG, PROSPEROUS, PROGRESSIVE. 

AgentB in all prominentlocalities throughout the United States. 

THE STATElNVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AUD 220 SANSO/HF STRUT, 

San Francisco, California. 

GEORGE L. BRANDER, ent ~~ CHAB. M. BUIK,^ 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,526,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Offlce— 501 Montgomery St. General OiBce— 401 Mont'g, St. 

AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

OF BALTIMORE CITY. 

CashCapital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets, over 2,200,000.00 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., Gen'l Managers. 

NEW YORK OFFICES 40 to 44 Pine Street 

MAXWELL & BERRY, General Agents. 

421 California Street. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

|OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital .. ?10,637,5no 

Net surplus over all liabilities 3,116,305 

William Macdonald, Manager. 
D. E Mies, Assistant Manager. 

315 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



FIRE 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Paclnc Branch, 214 Sansome St., S. F. 

SWAIN & MURDOCK. City Agents. 

CALIFORNIA WIRE WORKST" 

9 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WIRE of all Kinds, WIRE NAILS, Best Steel, 

BARBED WIRE, Regularly Licensed. 
"WIRE ROPES AND CABLES. 
WIRE CLOTH AND NETTING. 

HALLADIE'S ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY for transporting 
ore and other material over mountains and difficult roads. 
Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

BRANCHES.— 22 Front street, Portland, Or.; 201 N. Los Angeles street, 
Los Angeles, California. 

CYPRESS LAWN CEMETERY. 

Situated in San Mateo County, between the Holy Cross and JHome ol 
Peace Cemeteries, now ready for interment. 

IrT^ILVIIIXj-Sr PLOTS 
For sale in any size required. 

The cemetery is non-sectarian aud is laid out on ' he lawn plan, thereby 
saving the lot owners the sreat aud useless expense of coping, at the same 
time making it a beautiful burial place. 

For further information apply at the office, 3'25 Montgomery street, or at 
the cemetery, of W. J. BLA.IN, Superintendent. 



Jan. 21. 1893. 



SAN TKWi l^i NEWS l.l I II R 




THE SILENT PIPES —Longman's Magazine. 



rHKY 1,1, raise the reel and rant no more, 
Nor play the springs they played of yore, 
When lad* and lassies tripped the tloor 

From gloamm* until early; 
No more a bridal lilt tln-y'U blow, 
Or wailing coronach, although 
Heath's hand should lay a kinsman low, 
The pipes that played for Charlie. 

t'lenhnnan heard their joyful note, 
And distant straths and hills remote. 
When in the Northern air afloat 

The Koyal flag waved fairly; 
They blew a welcome to Lochiel, 
And many a chieftain's heart of steel 
Beat high to hear the warlike peal 

Of pipes that played for Charlie. 

Oh! lightly marched the Highland host, 
And o'er the Fords o' Frew they crost, 
And lightly faced the sleet and frost, 

Though tartans clad them barely. 
Before them Cope was fain to flee, 
They took St. Johnstone and Dundee, 
The bailies heard with little glee 

The pipes that played for Charlie. 

They sang fu' low at Holyrood 
To suit the gentle ladies' mood, 
The ladies fair, of gentle blood, 

Whose smiles the prince lo'ed rarely; 
But when at Prestonpans they played, 
The lowland lads were sore dismayed. 
Their horsemen ran, and ne'er drew blade, 

From the pipes that played for Charlie. 

They blew a last, a mournful strain, 
When on Drummossie's weary plain 
The day was lost and hope was gane, 

And hearts were sinkin' sairly. 
No more they'll swell the pibroch shrill, 
Or in the glen, or on the hill; 
Forever now the voice is still 

Of pipes that played for Charlie. 



THE REWARD OF THE WORLD.— Ftavel Scott Mines. 

He lingered behind, while his comrades marched on, 

A captive to cowardly fears. 
He knew not the heights which were steadily won, 

He quailed at the deafening cheers. 

Who lingers behind thinks the battle is lost— 

At victory turned he to fly. 
But saw the blue standard which fluttered and tossed 

From the enemy's ramparts on high. 

Then sought he the city and stood in the mart, 
And cried that the day had been gained. 

Forgetting the fear that had lived in his heart, 
Forgetting his manhood enchained. 

The people poured out the rich gold at his feet, 
And wove for his brow a fair wreath; 

They knew not the sword of this messenger fleet 
Had rusted within the bright sheath. 



THE THREE WORDS.— Silas Urban. 

When from the boundless stores of E.iglish speech 

Imperial passion made his careful choice, 
Trying the tuneful words, each after each, 

To cull the vocables of sweetest voice, 
With glowing scorn he ever flung aside 

All glib aspirants for the honor high, 
All terms of ponderous syllabic pride, 

And e'en of richly cadenced harmony. 
Impatient thus he closed his tedious quest: 

"Of all this glut of words I need but three; 
Let Thought and Strife and Fancy take the rest; 

Not language, but caresses are for me! 
' I ' for the man I need, for the woman 'You,' 

And only 'Love' between to link the two." 



xisrsTjR^isrcE. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, l.KHMANY. 

Herbert I,. Low, Miiiinjter for Hie Purine i obn! Brnurh 

■4iU MlUNOIlie St., S. »'. 

iSSLltL .„ n c $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S 534.795.72 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
_______ 232 * ji 1 1 loin In St., S. F.,Cal. 



THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OP BT. GALL. OP ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

lliese three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 
410 Califor nia St., San Fran cisco, Cal. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve On addition to Capital) 2,125 000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8,124,057.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, [Established 1 782.] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Established 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
473 California Stree t, San Francisco. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

fEstablished by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 
GEO. F. GBAMT. Manager. 

PACIPICI ZDIEF.A-K,' - IMIIEIISrT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - S 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, $23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Pounded A. D. 1710. 

Cash Assets, $10,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - $2,222,724. 



WM. J. LAIUDERS, (ien'l Agent, 20> Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $6,000,000 

AGKNTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
Wo. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets $19,724,638.46. 

President. hknjamIN V. STEVENS. | Vice-President, JOS. M. QIBBEN8. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORTCOSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Office ol the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-Callfornfa Bank. 



INSURANCE COMPANY- LTD. 



Capital paid 6j guaranteed $3,000,000,00. 

Chas, A Latom, Mana&er. 
433 California St. San Przasssza- 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Jan. 21, 1893. 






E ASTON, ELDRIDGE & CO. are at work, upon a big irrigation 
scheme, in which about two millions of English capital will 
be invested. It involves the building of irrigation canals in the 
San Joaquin Valley by which vast tracts of land will be made 
fruitful. They are now in communication with English pro- 
moters in London, and are in receipt of advices that indicate the 
favorable manner in which the proposition is considered by the 
English capitalists. Four Hundred thousand dollars are already 
subscribed toward the scheme, and the local firm hopes to have 
the whole thing in working order before long. If the proposition 
is worked out upon the scale spoken of by Easton, Eldridge & 
Co., the scheme will prove to be one of the biggest irrigation pro- 
positions in the country. This firm reports a good business in 
country lands, to which of late it has been giving considerable 
attention. It is now, among other lands, offering the El Capitan 
colony, near Merced, at private sale, the Gonzales properly, at 
Monterey, considerable of which has been sold, and will sell 400 
acres of Fresno lands, and 500 town lots at McMullin, Fresno 
county, on February 4ih. 

One of the largest local sales of the week was that of Easton, 
Kldridge & Co., of the NW corner of Eddy and Jones, 87:6x137:6, 
with residence, for $85,000. Mrs. Conley was the seller. This 
firm also sold a Pine street lot, near Octavia, 27x120, with im- 
provements, for $6,500. 

The Tabernacle, on Golden Gate avenue and Polk, went for 
$33,000 to the United Presbyterian Church. 

The reported project for the erection of a fine building on the 
Parrott lot on Market street, opposite the Baldwin Hotel, is re- 
ceived with pleasure by all property owners and business men in 
that vicinity, and also by all others who are interested in the 
progress of the city. It is said that a company is being formed 
with the object of leasing the Parrott lot for twenty years. The 
Idea is to erect upon it a large building, in which would be lo- 
cated a great bazaar, that would be more advanced tban anything 
else in the city. Such a scheme should be a good business propo- 
sition. It will certainly receive from that large and growing class 
of citizens who favor improvements. 

Will E. Fisher, of Tevis & Fisher, reports business as good as may 
be reasonably expected at this time of the year, and just succeeding 
an exciting political campaign and election. The market is in 
a healthy condition, offers continuing in goodly number and at fair 
rates. 

The property owners are watching with great interest the new ad- 
ministration of the office of Superintendent of Streets. Mr. Acker- 
son seems determined to do his duty well, and he should receive the 
approval and support of all taxpayers. He has already done much 
good in a general way by exposing the street-sweeping frauds, and 
compelling certain contractors to do better work upon streets. One 
of the most recent discussions that has arisen in his office is, that 
over the curbing of cross streets, and the compelling of objecting 
property owners to pave the streets in front of their property, when 
a majority of the owners have signed an agreement to do the paving. 
Heretofore the objecting property owners have been overruled, and 
have been compelled to do the work whether they liked it or not. 
While we are always in favor of public improvements, it must be 
admitted that the objecting owner has some rights. Street Superin- 
tendent Ackerson says he does not intend to assist contractors by 
compelling objectors to do street work, whenever their neighbors 
wish it done. 

AN unusually fine list of animals is shown in the catalogue of stan- 
dard and high-bred brood mares, property of the Palo Alto stock 
farm, to be sold by direction of Senator Stanford, at 11a.m. on 
Friday, January 27th, at the saleayard at Van Ness avenue and 
Market street, by Killip & Co., auctioneers. In this second annual 
draft from the broodmares of the famous stock farm at Palo Alto, the 
quality of the animals, from a breeder's standpoint, is exceptionally 
nigh. Not only in the mares, but also in the stallions used for service, 
the blood of the great Electioneer, 12,j, predominates to a very large 
degree. Among the other famous sires whose blood is in the get that 
will be presented at this sale, are General Benton, sire of 18 in two 
thirty or better, and the dams of 26, two thirty performers, one of the 
greatest brood mares sires of America. Four of his daughters from 
different sires, produced in 1892 an average of 2:23. Piedmont, 2:17}^ 
is sire of 14 two-thirty performers. Piedmont is a son of Altmont, 
also a great brood-mare, producing sire Mohawk. Chief is also re- 
presented. Through mares sired by this well-known stallion, many 
good performers have been given to the turf. Among other stallions 
whose strains are in the mares to be sold are Follies, sire of Monique, 
dam of D.onchka (2) 2:24; Messenger Duroc, sire of 21 two-thirty per- 
formers, and of the dams of 24 two-thirty performers; Kentucky 
Prince, sire of Dexter Prince, one of California's great sires; Nor- 
way, Alfred, 2:25, Will Crocker, Del Sur. Whipple's Hambletonian, 
Carr's Manibrino, Yorktown, Champion (Gooding's) and Don Victor. 



Nothing is so delicious on one of these January evenings than a 
dozen or two of those famous oysters of Moraghan, that may be had 
in the Calitornia Market. 



This is the weather that makes good old whisky appreciated. 
Order only John F. Cutter Whisky when you call for your tipple. It 
is the favorite drink among those who know good liquor for it has no 
superior. John F. Cutter 'Whisky may be had at ail first-class bars, 
hotels, restaurants and clubs. 

ZEi. 3^. ITE-^THALL <Ss CO-, 

* * 

'SHIPPING and COMMISSION MERCHANTS: 



* AND 



GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS. 



Nos- 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco. 

National Assurance Company of Ireland 

Atlas Assurance Company ------ of London 

Boylston Insurance Company ------ of Boston 

Ocean Marine Insurance ------ of London 





INSTANT RELIEF 
FOR COLD IN THE HEAD. 

CORYZON 

CATARRH AND HAY FEVER, 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 

IT NEVER FAILS. 



Food for the hungry, 

And sleep 

For the "weary, 

Are not more 

Refreshing than 

CORYZON 

Is to sufferers from 

Catarrh, 

Influenza, or 

Cold in the Head. 

It relieves at onee; 

The cost is trifling, 

And 

It can be carried 

In the vest pocket. 

Samples free. 

At all Druggists. 

Try it. 




INSTANT RELIEF 
FOR COLD IN THE HEAD. 

CORYZON 

CATARRH AND HAY FEVER. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 

IT NEVER FAILS. 





Our House Renting Department is one of 
the best equipped in the city. We guarantee 
prompt and efficient service in renting 
houses, collecting rents and placing insur- 
ance. 

BALDWIN &, HAMMOND, 

10 Montgomery St. 



^P^OIILTaC TOWEL 001^ETPA.3Sr-Z" 

9 LICK PLACE, 

Furnisher t'lean Towels at tlie following low rates: 

Cleau Haud Towels each week, $1.00 per mouth; 12 Cleau Haud Towels 
each week, $1.50 per month: 4 Clean Roller Towels each week. $1.00 
6 month; 6 Clean Rol.er Towels each week. $1.25 per mouth. 



rftGOMEfflfi 

iJ** PRINTERS. 44i W 



Corner Clay and Sansome. 



Jan. 31, 1803. 



s v\ FB \\< IS< <> \r\\ S LETTER 



19 



EDWARD SEARLES AND HIS GIFT. 
[By Pi Virkok.] 

TBB munificent pift of K.Jw arc! SeariM hns attracted general 
attention, not only to the bouse which he desires to devote to 
the c«u-e of art. hut to art itself, and to a consideration of how 
art is to be served and advance. 1 by the acceptance of his gift. 
Hy many it was deemed a misfortune that the Art Association 
should have been forced to decline the gift because of its inability 
to pay the taxes on so valuable a piece of property. Others, on 
the .-ontrary. see in the fact that Mr. Searles pift, if accepted at 
all, must be accepted by the Btate, an added dignity and im- 
portance to the proposed art gallery. Instead of being merely a 
local atTair, it will then be a Stale institution, with greater possi- 
bilities and wider interests, especially if attached to the 8tate 
D Diversity. That there should have been any hesitation in the 
acceptance of the gift, especially since Mr. 8earles has added to 
his original princely offer the promise of an annual sum for its 
maintainance, does seem ungracious, though perhaps the public 
are not able to judge the reasons that are weighing with those 
who can act with authority on this matter. It would indeed be 
a pity if this opportunity to have an art palace in San Francisco 
should be allowed to slip out of our grasp. 

To estimate the educational effect that such a place would 
have upon the public is comparatively easy. It is claimed that 
the artistic nations of Europe are artistic partly through inherit- 
ance, and a great deal through the cumulative influence of asso- 
ciation. The Frenchman of Paris has every opportunity of hear- 
ing good music, of seeing fine paintings; so has the Italian. The 
churches of the old world, with their grand and imposing archi- 
tecture, their beautiful windows, their magnificent music, their 
master-pieces of frescoes and altar paintings, their stone statues 
of 8aints — all these factors must exert an elevating, improving 
and refining effect npon the artistic sense of the humblest wor- 
shipper wno passes beyond the portals of church or cathedral. 

It has been said that we Oalifornians are too quick to call at- 
tention to what is grand, and imposing, and large in our State; 
that we are governed more by size than by quality. That may 
be partly true. Certain it is that nature has lavished her benefits 
upon us with a prodigal hand, and that we are but following a 
natural law when we are impressed by what we see on every 
side. It has been said that we lack finer perceptions, that our 
tastes are crude, that we are semi-barbaric in our love for rich- 
ness of color and our fondness for display. How irue this may 
or may not be, I am not prepared to say. But this certainly is 
true, that we are not slow to embrace opportunities for self-im- 
improvement. Californians, like their native woods, are capable 
of taking a very high polish, for they are sound clear through, 
and of a very fine fibre withal. 

Let the Hopkins mansion be accepted from the generous hand 
of Edward 8earles; let it become an art museum or art gallery, 
and its educational influence will be felt in no uncertain way 
upon all generations to come. A city set on a hill cannot be hid, 
neither can a palace on the summit of a hill be placed under a 
bushel. The very location of the Hopkins mansion would in- 
spire a visitor to our city with a feeling akin to awe, and the citi- 
zen of San Francisco would feel uplifted with a sense of pride as 
from many a point on this peninsula he could see the turrets and 
towers of "our art gallery" pointing skyward. 

Some one has suggested that the mansion be used at stated 
times for loan art exhibitions. On several occasions, notably the 
loan art exhibition held for the benefit of the Maria Kip Orphan- 
age, it has been demonstrated that in the private art galleries of 
San Francisco there are works of great artists. Of these pictures 
the general public had no idea. A few of them had been written 
about, represented by a wood-cut or two, in a Sunday paper, but 
as for knowing {of them by the sense of sight, by comparison 
and contrast, that was impossible for all but a very few. Of 
course no one questions the right of a man to do as he choses 
with his own, but it does seem to be generally considered that 
those whom fortune has favored owe a debt to those less for- 
tunate than themselves. A debt that they can discharge by al- 
lowing others to enjoy their art treasures with them, at least to 
the extent of placing their paintings on exhibition once in a 
while, and allowing the public to pass in admiring procession 
before the works of the masters of both worlds. 

No better place for such exhibitions could be devised than the 
Hopkins mansion. It is to be hoped that the management will 
be both liberal and progressive in their policy, so as to place the 
benefits of such a gallery within the reach of the greatest number. 
As to the question of charging admission, some there are who 
would like all such exhibitions to be free. Others maintain that 
a low price for an admission fee would not be a burden on those 
who would really care to visit the gallery, and that people really 
care most for what they have to pay. Mr. Searles in one of the 
conditions accompanying the gift states that he wishes to reserve 
the right to have the galleries and reading rooms opened to the 
public free on stated occasions. It can not be that the generous 
donor would ever abuse this right. He has already shown him- 
self a patron of the arts, a lover of music and a man of refined 
tastes and public spirit. That he should want to throw open the 



mansion with its art treasures lo the public, (.peak* volumes for 
his interest in San Francisco and of his desire to make this a city 
among cities. Doubtleas he would wish to mark such ovr, 

and Army reunions, Knights Templar Conclaves, and ■■■iu- 
cational conventions, by throwing open the door of the Hopkins 
Gallery to the visiting strangan ami their friends. 

[fl it to be doubted thai Edward Bearlea wonld want the chil- 
dren of San Francisco t<» he educated to a love and an apprecia- 
tion of blgfa art? This could be attained by inviting the schools 
of the city, indeed the schools of nil the vicinity, to visit the 6rt 
gallery, class by class, on specified days. By the way, there Is 
not enough of this teaching through the eye in our city schools. 
Certainly oar boys and girls should be taken through the Mint, 
and through the museum of the Academy of Sciences. There 
was a movement in this direction once upon a time, but it has 
fallen into the rear. Perhaps it is because some of our public 
school teachers do not like to be seen walking on the street with 
their classes. But if the Board of Education would give the 
classes permission to go on such tours of inspection and object 
lessons during schools hours, it could be done with pleasure and 
profit. It would be rather hard to ask teachers to assume respon- 
sibilities out of school hours. To the Hopkins gallery would not 
every child turn with longing, and remember such a visit with 
delight? Of course. By all means, let Mr. Searles reserve the 
right to throw open the art gallery whenever the spirit moves bim. 

Perhaps it might be a good plan to devote the receipts of cer- 
tain days to local charities, according to the designation af Mr. 
Searles. To return to the subject of the loan art exhibition, pro- 
bably some picture owners might object on the score of fear of 
fire. But would such a fear be well grounded? I think not. At 
least it certainly seems that it could be robbed of its reality by an 
efficient corps of watchmen. At all events, let us accept the 
Hopkins mansion, with a proper appreciation of the generous 
spirit which directed its presentation. 



/ One ^ 

/ rounded teaspoonful 

of Cleveland's 5 ^ 
Baking Powder 



does more and better work ! 
than a heaping ;; 
teaspoonful 
of any other. 
A large saving on a 
year's bakings. 



A pare cream of tartar powder. 

Used in the U. S. Army and by 
teachers of Cookery. 

Cleveland's is the standard, it never 
varies, it does the most work, the best 
work and is perfectly wholesome. 



OlD SCALE REMOVED, 

FORMATION OF NEW SCALE PREVENTED, 

Without the aid of chemicals, 
by the use of 



STEAM 
BOILER 
INCRUSTATIONS. 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER 

Over 300 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212 c . Saves from 26 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

830 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 



R. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIBVIN. 



J. W. GIRVIN &. CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, 

Hose, Packing, etc., 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc, 

Pacific Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather & Ladew, 
ormerly J. B. Hoyt & Co. 6 California St.. S. F., Cal. 



20 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



Jan. 21, 1893. 




5UNBCAM5 




ALL hail to thee, great Jgnace Paderewski! 
Thy shock of hair, through which the breezes blewski, 
Is not so lengthy as of yore it grewski, 
For which atl hail and many thanks to youski! 

— Town Topics. 

Uncle Henry — Willie, I hear you were suspended from Sunday- 
school right after the Columbus tableaux ? Willie — Yes, sir. I was 
Columbus in th' tableaux, an' I had ter show tb' Spanish Court how 
to make a egg stand on its end. Uncle Henry — But why were you 
suspended? Willie — Fer nothin'. How could I have known the egg 
was bad? — Judge. 

-^" I hear you took the West by storm." " Well I should say 
so. Why, the first time I got on a cable car half the men offered 
thei~ seats, the other half tried to pay my fare, the conductor gave 
me a pass, and the motor-man came in and proposed to me." 

— Life. 

— White — Brown caught his wife in the dark hall last night, mis- 
took her for their new girl, and kissed her. Black — You don't say so! 
Great Scott, what a break ! What did she say ? White— She mistook 
him for their new lodger, and told him to do it again. — Truth. 

Fashionable Mother {languidly) — Well, Sarah, bow is baby to- 
day? Maid — He cut two teeth this morning, ma'am. Fashionable 
Mother (still more languidly) — That was very negligent of you, Sarah. 
You ought not to let a young baby play with a knife. —Truth. 

— Some love the stately, proud brunette, 
And some the blonde alone; 
But I adore a girl who is 
Without a chaperon. 

" No, I'll not marry. I think I'll become a Sister of Cbaritv." 

" You don't know what that means." " Don't I? Haven't I sat "up 
with you every night from eight to one for three months? " — Life. 

She — A man cannot leave his wife to go and get a drink at 

church as he does at the theatre. He— Oh, I don't know. He might 
go out between the Acts of the Apostles. —Truth. 

" Whose poetry does yo' laik de bes', Mistah Ealy, Longfel- 

lows?" Mistah Ealy— "So, indeed, I doan' loik dem longfellahs. I 
laiks Plymouth-rocks, leghorns an' brahmas. -^Judge. 

Mr. Bleecker (indicating n picture)— This is the " Landing of the 

Pilgrims." Mr. Livewayte (of Chicago)— Then I suppose that man 
standing up in the bow of the boat is Columbus. —Puck. 

— Mrs. Fitzgerald— How is Mr. Mooney this foine avenin', Doctor 
Dumond? Doctor Dummond— He's doing prettv well, but if he dies 
before morning I have no hope for him. —Judge. 

Mr. Dacosta— Howley jabers, Ellen, phat's dis shtove put an 

me fur? Mrs. Dacosta— Whisht, darlint! De docter tole me ef Oi 
didn't kape yez quiet, you'd die of relaps. —Truth. 

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, 

Though gorgeous their plumage and regal; 
But instead of an oriole, robin, or thrush, 

Let that bird be a bright, golden eagle. — Truth. 

— " After all," remarked a disciple of the great thinker, " what 
is Life?" " That, sir," replied Diofrrates, " is a riddle which, in the 
end, is given up by everybody." —Life. 

— She— Oh, yes, mamma and I have much the same tastes. Do 
you think I am like my mother? He (an old widower)— 1 hope not. 
Your mother rejected me twenty-four years ago. — Life. 

Mr. H. — I am sorry not to have seen more of you this evening, 

Mrs. Shapely. Mrs. S.—l wish my husband was of' the same mind ; 
he does not approve of decolletes. — Truth. 

Miss Maud— You remind me of a Thanksgiving turkey, Mr. 

Smartly. Mr. Smartly— Indeed? How? Miss Maud— You appear to 
be stuffed with chestnuts. — Town Topics. 

"Mama," said Willyboy, " I want to ask one more question." 

" Very well, Willyboy." " Are sweetbreads made of loaf sugar ? " 

—Puck. 

— " Drink robs you of vour senses! " roared the orator. " But it 
enables us to get a head," retorted the unconverted sinner in the 
front row. 

He— I am sure that Ferguson is in love. She— Why ? flu— Be- 
cause I frequently see him go into a bar and buy a solitary drink. 
—Truth. 

They Never Fail. 

J. N. Harris, 3 Pulton Market, New York City says: 
" I have been using Beasdbbeth's Pills for the last fifteen years. 
There is nothing equal to them as Blood Purifiers and Liver Regu- 
lators. But I wish to state how remarkably they cure rheumatism, 
and how easily. I was affected by rheumatism in the legs. My busi- 
ness (wholesale fish dealer) naturally leads me to damp places. I 
could not walk, and at night I suffered fearfully; I tried Balsams, 
Sarsaparillas and all sorts of tinctures, but they did me no good, and 
I was afraid of being a cripple. I finally commenced using Brand- 
beth's Pills. I took two every night for ten nights, then I began 
to improve. I continued taking them for forty days, and I got en- 
tirely well. Now, whenever sick, I take Beaxdbetu's Pills. They 
never fail." 



B-A.3STEIS- 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital J8,000,00ro0 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (April 1, 1892), 3,278,653 23 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Bbown Cashier | Irving F. Modi/ton, Assistant Cashier. 

Edward 8. Hast, Secretary. 

I'ORRESPONDENTS * 

NEW YORK— Agency of t\ie Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild A Sons. Correspondents in India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver. Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland.O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, BremeD, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland- 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST COMPANY. 

Paid-up Capital, $100,000,000. 

Corner Montgomery and California Streets, San Frandsco, Co/. 

J. D. FRY, President. HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Secretary and Treasurer. 



This Company is authorized bylaw to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depository for Court and 
Tru*t Funds. Will take entire charge of Real aud Personal Estates, col- 
lecting the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an indi- 
vidual in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent, per anaum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposit 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rates of interest thereon. 

The rate of Interest on Term Deposits for six months ending; 
December 3 1, 1892, was at 5 1-10 percent, per annum, and on 
Ordinary Deposits, 4 1-4 percent, per annum. 

Rents safes inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from 15 per annum 
upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored at low 
rates. 

Wills drawn and taken care of without charge. 

AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS OF THE 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED, 

73 LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES: 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 425 California Street 

PORTLAND, OREGON 48 First Street 

TACOMA, WASHINGTON 1156 Pacific Avenue 

SCOTLAND. UNION BANK OF SCOTLAND, (Limited.) 
MALTA, TURNBULL JR. & SO MERVILLE. 

„ . , THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital.. $1,250,000. 

T . .™„ Successor t0 8athee 4 Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 
J A P„SK WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. 3. 8. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Blrectors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Im, P. Join- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Sbepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer 4 Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel 4 Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley <fc Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes <4 Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & CO.'S BANK. 

H. E. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

John J. Valentine President. 

HomerS. King ' Manager' 

H. Wadsworth .' ,.. Cashier 

J. L. Browne '.... '."Assistant Cashier'. 

DIRECTORS* 
John J. Valentine, Lloyd Tevis, Oliver Eldridge, Leland Stanford, James 
C. Fargo, Geo, E. Gray, W. F. Goad, Chas. F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE CROSKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL (1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS ; 

CHAS. F. CBOCKEB, I E. H. MILLER. JE. 

£■• I W 2SL W , 0BTH ..PEEBIDENT. 

S^-^^S^. Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKEK Cashiee 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

223 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 



William Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS: 

Jerome Lincoln 
O. D. Baldwin 
W.S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon, 
J. B. Randol. 



Jan. 21, 



s\\ ri;\\( [SCO M'.w 3 I '[ I EB 



21 



./-» -> 



$0&£/mr/&?/s£FM 



AQREA.T number of people have bat a very obscure idea of the 
principle of the arc nnd incandescent lamp respectively. It maybe 
-tatt-l that in the arc lamp electric discharge takes place between 
two pieces of hard conducting carbon, separated from each other by 
an interval whiHi i^ kepi :is nearly as possible constant by automatic 
devices. An arc of light of intense brilliance called the voltaic arc, 
is thus obtained.' The carbons, being raised to an exceedingly high 
temperature and exposed to the air, suffers waste by combustion, 
and hence require renewal. There is also a transference of particles 
in the direction of the current, the negative carbon increasing at the 
expense of the positive one. With the view of obviating inconven- 
iences arising from this cause, arrangements are often made for al- 
ternating the direction of the current. It is desirable both for the 
diffusion of light, and for the lessening of its otherwise painful and 
injurious intensity, that a globe of ground glass should be used. In 
the glow or incandescent lamp, a filament of carbon inclosed in a 
globe exhausted of air by a mercury pump serves as a path along 
which the current passes. The resistance the electricity meets with 
in passing through this filiament is sufficient to raise the latter to 
incandescence, and alight is thus obtained more suitable for domes- 
tic purposes and the illumination of interiors generally than that 
afforded by the arc lamp. 

~— An interesting experiment in aerial navigation will shortly be 
made by Commandant Renard, director of the central establishment 
of military balloons of the French army at Chalais-Meudon. His ex- 
periments with the dirigible balloon, La France, were a distinct ad- 
vance in aeronautics, and it is expected that valuable results will be 
obtained from the Gen. Meusnier, its successor. This measures 300 
feet from tip to tip, and has a diameter of 43 feet, its shape being 
that of a cigar. The car is built of bamboo and steel, and contains a 
cabin for the machinery and men. The motor employed is worked 
by means of gasoline, and develops 45-horse power during eight or 
ten hours. It is designed to drive the balloon at a speed of nearly 
twenty-five miles an hour when the air is still. The total weight of 
the machinery with the carburator and other accessories will prob- 
ably not surpass 2,fi00 to 3,100 pounds, or 66 pounds per horsepower. 
The screw propeller is placed in front of the car and the rudder be- 
hind. The balloon has been constructed entirely at the Chalais 
works by engineering soldiers, who are studying the art of balloon- 
ing, and it is expected that the first trial will take place early next 
spring. 

The deflections of eight iron bridges 13 to 204 feet long 

under both fixed and moving loads were recently carefully meas- 
ured by M. Rabut, a member of the Paris Academy of Sciences, 
and the results are of much interest. Under a moving load it 
was found that the time it took the bridge to make a single vi- 
bration was entirely independent of the speed, and peculiar to the 
structure. The velocity of the passing train scarcely affected the 
mean deflection, and the vibrations due to this train were but a 
small fraction of the deflection produced by a fixed load of an 
equal amount. It is easy to show that a suddenly applied load 
gives theoretically twice the deflection of the same load applied 
slowly, but as regards the main girders of bridges the load is not 
applied in practice with sufficient rapidity to be materially in- 
creased, as is proved by M. Rabut's experiments. With the floor 
beams and stringers the case is different, as they are supported at 
points not far apart and receive the direct shock of the locomo- 
tive. Nevertheless, the measurements show that the deflection 
under the moving load does not equal twice that under the same 
load when fixed. 

Wool fat contains wax-like substances, which are produced by 
the splitting up of the cholesterin, isocholesterin, and higher alco- 
hols. This wax detracts from the medicinal fitness of wool fat, 
and Dr. Benno Jaffe and Dr. Ludwig Darmstadter have devised a 
process for effecting an improvement. This process consists in 
dissolving the wool fat in benzol, toluol, ether, chloroform, or 
other suitable solvent, several of which are named, and adding 
to the solution ethyl or methyl alcohol, which has the effect of 
throwing out the wool wax proportionately to the amount added. 
An alternative method is to dissolve the crude fat at its melting 
point in fusel oil, and it is found, on cooling, that the wool wax 
crystallizes out. The result in either case is that the purified fat 
is much improved, especially in consistency, and it makes ,( an 
excellent lanoline" on further treatment by the applicants' well- 
known process. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses 
rented, rents collected, real estate* bought and sold on commission, 
office, 407-409 Montgomery street. 

A. H. Ricketts, attorney-at-Iaw, rooms 201, 202 and 203, Crocker 
Building, San Francisco. 



B-A_3STICS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Incorporated by Royal Charier. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND J, 250, 000 

Southeast corner Bi.?.li nm! s.msomo Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD 8TREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; 

Seattle and Taeomn, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES- Kamloopa, Nanaimo, Nelson. New Westminster, British 

Columbia. 
ThiB Bank transacts a Goneral Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Otlice and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
— North au.J South Wales Hank; SCOTLAND— British Li neu Company ; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland ; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon Bank 
of Mexico aud South America; CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia aud China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English. Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD ( West Indies)— Colonial Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

632 California Street, Corner Webb Street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1802 925,890,653 00 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 1,633,136 OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardmau, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo &■ Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the mouey. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for passbook or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. M.to3p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8, 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



S. W. Corner Sansome and Uusli Streets. 

Established 1870. U. S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $600,000 UNDIVIDED PROFITS $160,000 

S. G. MURPHY President IE. D.MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. -Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Astvt Cashier 

dibectors: 
Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins. S. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, JameB Moffitt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 
S^FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT. 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control ol 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND $ 1,686,000 OO. 

Deposits Jan. 1, 1893 80,327,159 02 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGER8 ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon. Attorney, 
John R. Jarhoe. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000, 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. PAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Pair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecuritieB. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and. Sutter Sts. 

ubsciied Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $660,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Aqents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall 8t.,N. Y. PARIS— MeBBrs. Lazard Freres & Gie, 17Bonle 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
LC. Al tschtjl, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel (;ourt, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Self Iran & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking l usiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
worlu. 3ends billB for collection, loanB money, buys and sells exchanga 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART } Mallfteera 

P. N. LILIENTHAL. 1 Man agers. 
A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier 



22 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1893. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour— Demaud light; Extras $3.75@?4 Superfine, $2.i30@$3.00. 

Wheat^Good trade; Shipping jl.30; Milliner. $l.S2l4f$$l.'Sb per cental 

Barley is firm; Brewing, S5@90c. Feed, 7Jc.@Sle. per ctl. 

Oats. Milling, fl.33@fl.37 1 ; i ; Feed, fl.l5@$1.25per ctl. 

Corn, White, fl.Hi; Vellww, fl.05@$1.07K per cfi. 

Rye is quiet, good demand, fl.O*gtfl.iu l «. Cement, $2.00@$2.25. 

Hay is lower; Wheat, $10.50: Oats, *7fg>*iu; Alfalfa, $8@$9.50. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Brau, fl3@flS.50 per ton. 

BeaDs, good request, $2.O0@$2.4O per ctl. Potatoes, 75*?.@$1 per ctl. 

Butter is lower; Choice, 30c.@32"^c. ; Fair, 16c.@17c; Eastern, 16c@20c. 

Cheese, light stock, 8c.@10c. Eggs, free supply, 30c.@37^c. 

Honey, Comb, l0c.(g)12c.: Extracted, 7c.@3c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth 75c.@?l. Beeswax is steady, at 25c.@27c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 7c§»7}.£c. Wool is in good demand at Ue.@lGe. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6J^c. 

Coffee sluggish at 15c.@2le. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is plentiful; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 17c.@20c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at f 4 1.50 per flask. 

Sugar, good stocit of both Raws and Refined. White, 5c.®o%c. 

Imports of Coffee, Sugar and Tea are liberal and the markets 
devoid of animation. The receipts include new crop Central 
American Coffee, Hawaiian Sngar of the new crop, and moderate 
supplies of new crop Teas from China and Japan. 

The Br. steamer Gaelic, from the Orient, arrived on the 12th 
inst,, having cargoes as follows: From Japan, 933 bxs. Mikado 
Oranges, 750 bales Manila Hemp and Jute, 394 pkgs. Calcutta 
Gunnies; from China, 48 pkgs. Silk Goods, 2,383 bags Sugar, 869 
bags Coffee. 2,574 rolls Matting, 294 pkgs. Curios, 1,699 pkgs. 
Tea, 31,529 mats Rice, 152 pkgs. Gambia, and 10,000 pkgs. Mdse. ; 
also, in transit to go overland, 147 pkgs. Straw Braid, 133 pkgs. 
Silk Goods, 395 rolls Matting, 1,526 pkgs. Raw Silk, 1,430 pkgs. 
Tea, 318 pkgs. Mdse., etc.; for Central and South America, 30 
pkgs. Silks, 170 pkgs. Tea and Rice, 41 pkgs. Mdse., etc. 

The ship James Drummond, 140 days from Philadelphia, had a 
large cargo of Iron, Steel, Chemicals, etc. 

Honolulu. — The S. S. Australia, from the Islands, had for 
cargo, 10,295 bags Sugar, 1,570 mats Rice, 8,600 bchs. and crts. 
Bananas, 524 Hides, etc. The bark Albert, from same, had 17,824 
bags Sugar, 157 bbls. Molasses, etc. The J. C. Glade, thence, had 
30,000 bags Sugar. 

Central America, etc. — The stmr. Starbuck, to the Pacific M. 8. 
8. Co.. had for cargo only 51 bags Coffee and 15 bales Hides; 
from Mexico, 40 pkgs. Ore and Mdse., and $3,460 in Treasure. 

The Pacific Mail S. S. City of Sydney, from the Isthmus, brought 
a cargo of heavy goods from New York and from Europe, 586 
pkgs. Hardware, 28 pkgs. Dry Goods, 160 cs. Wine and 150 
pkgs. Mdse. ; and from Central America, 1,419 sks. Coffee, 787 cs. 
Fruit, etc. 

The Pacific Mail steamer San Bias sailed for the Isthmus on 
the 16th inst., carrying en route for New York, etc., 200,000 gals. 
Wine, 723 gals. Brandy, 50,000 lbs. Beans, 102,205 lbs. Rags, 
328,632 lbs. Borax, 39,780 lbs. Dried Fruit, 3,656 ctls. Barley, 107 
cs. Canned Fruit, 21,422 lbs. Antimony, 900 gals. Vinegar, 1,000 
cs. Salmon, etc., value $95,211. To Central America — 1,493 bbls. 
Flour, 13,822 lbs. Tallow, 105 pkgs. Beer, 14,325 lbs. Rice, 3,000 
lbs. Provisions, 3,828 lbs. Sugar, 110 bdls. Shooks, etc., value $23,- 
449; also, $10,000 in Gold Coin. To Ecuador— 204 bbls. Flour, 
value $825. To Panama— 82,507 lbs. Rice, 5,104 lbs. Beans, etc. 

Pitcairn — The missionary brig sailed for the Pitcairn Islands on 
the 16th inst. Her cargo, valued at $10,453, consisted of 125 
cs. Religious Books and Stationery, 4 Organs, 1 Buggy, 2,000 feet 
Lumber and 1 Sugar Crusher. 

The Br. ship Lord Templemore, 202 days from Liverpool, ar- 
rived here on the 12th inst. Fears had been entertained of disas- 
ter, and for cargo 40 per cent, had been paid for re-insurance. 
This ship had a very large and valuable cargo, consisting in part 
of 16,932 sks. Salt, Iron, Steel, Chemicals, etc. 

The ship Charles Moody, hence for New York on the 13th inst., 
carried 143,871 gals. Wine, 24,760 gals. Brandy, 200,945 lbs. Borax, 
9,993 ctls. Barley, 9,614 cs. Canned Goods, 1,091,011 lbs. Beans, 
65,000 feet Lumber, 223,540 lbs. Ore, 5,197 gals. Whale Oil, 600 
flsks. Quicksilver, 100 bales Rags, 3,816 cs. Salmon, etc.; also for 
Chicago 5,061 gals. Brandy and 5,100 gals. Wine; to Connecticut 
21 cs. Old Iron. 

Hawaii.— Exports to Honolulu, per Bk. Ceylon, embraced 400 
bbls. Flour, 1,200 gals. Gasoline, 18,320 lbs. Rolled Barley and a 
large quantity of Mill Feed, value $14,605; per Brig Lurline, to 
same, 266 bbls. Flour, 41,344 lbs. Rolled Barley, etc., value $5,568. 

Get your suits made at the establishment of Colonel J. M. Litch- 
field, at 12 Post street, and you will have no cause to inveigh against 
tailors. Colonel Litchfiield has the reputation of making the best 
suits in the city, and he is patronized by all the well dressed men in 
town. He makes a specialty of army and all kinds of uniforms and 
regalias. He leads in his profession. 

A finr assortment of large rouud English shell Pebbles, only at Muller's 
135 Montgomery street. 



John W. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, easily leads in the hand- 
ling of all gentlemen's furnishing "goods. He is therefore patron- 
ized by the city's well-dressed men. 

REMOVAL NOTICE. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
KENTUCK CONSOLIDATED MINING COM- 
PANY, held this day, the offiee of the Company 
was ordered removed to Room 23, Nevada 
Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
San Francisco, De cember 21, 1892. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia City, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on Monday, the Sixteenth (16th) day of January, 1893, an assessment (No. 
53) of Twenty-five (25) cents per share was levied upon the capital stnck 
of the corporation, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the 
Secretary, at the office of the company, room 33, Nevada Block, No. 309 
Montgomery street, San Franciaco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the 21st Day of February 1893, will be definquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on TUESDAY, the 14th day of Mar.'h, 1893, to pay the de- 
linquent assessmeut, together with costs of advertit-iug and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. L. OSBORN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada block. 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Navajo Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
company, held on the ninth day of January, 1893, an assessment (No. 24) 
of Ten U0) Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, 310 Pine Street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Thirteenth Day of February, 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold ou TUESDAY, the Seventh (7th) day of March. 1893, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW. Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine Street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 



Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the 10th day of January, 1893, an assessment (No. 6f>) of 25 cents 
per share was levied upou the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
pany, at the office of the Company, No. 414 Califoruia street, San Fran- 
cisco. California.] 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 14th Day of February. 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on the seventh day of March, 1S93, to pay the 
delinquent, assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— 414 California street, San Francisco, C-il. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Justice Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works — Gold Hill Mining District, Storey county, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 6th day of January, 1893, an assessment (No 53) of ten cei ts per 
share waslevied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, No. 419 Califoruia street, room 3, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
The 9th Day of February 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pavment is made 
before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the '2d day of March, 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessmeut, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. E. KELLY, Secretary. 

Office— Room 3, Haywards building, 419 California Street. S. F., Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Del Monte Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Del Monte 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 310 Pine St., 
ooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 25th day of January. 1893. at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M. 

For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

meeting. 

Transfer hooks will close ou SATURDAY, January 21, 1893, at 12 o'clock m. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 
Office— 310 Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The State Investment and Insurance Company. 
At a regular meetiug of the directors of this company, held January 10, 
1893, a dividend of fifty cents per share ou its capital stock, was declared, 
payable at its office in Sau Fraucisco on and after January 16, 1893. 

CHAS. M. BLAIR, Secretary. 
San Francisco, Jan. 14, 1893. 



Jan. 21. 1893 



BAH l'KWt is ( o NEWS I. II li R, 



23 




IN alt colors ami materials are dainty slippers made, to match 
or to contrast with tbe gown, and always to be worn with 
stockings to correspond, invariably with pointed toe— and whis- 
per it not to tbe family physician— with the Louis Quinze heel. 
The fashionable girl is willing to wear heavy boots with low 
broad heels when in tbe street, bnt once in the house she lets her 
American taste gain the ascendency, and revels in her high heels 
and pointed toes, and the higher the heel and the narrower the 
point, the better is she pleased. Some slippers are cut quite high 
and worn with bow and buckle fashioned of jet, silver or Rhine 
pebbles. Others have straps across the instep. With full ball 
costume tbey are finished only with the tiniest of buckles. Suede 
Is a great deal used, but it stretches too much to be becoming. 
When black slippers are worn the material mast be of patent 
leather and the stockings must also be black. However, fancy 
can add any additional touches, such as clocks of brilliant color, 
with a piece of finest lace insertion let in over the instep, or with 
dainty jieur-de lis embroidery or with stripes of lace. Bright red 
slippers trimmed with silver buckles are worn with silk stockings 
of precisely the same shade and are very effective. — Vogue. 



For a nook suggestive of cozy comfort, the netted silk ham- 
mock, suspended across a corner atid piled high with cushions, is 
preferred by many to the regulation couch, writes Angela C. 
Boyce in the Christmas number of The Ladies 1 Home Journal. Less 
expensive hammocks, covered with a striped Indian curtain, with 
fringe knotted in to match the stripes, also serve to brighten a 
dark corner. With a soft rug thrown beneath, nothing is want- 
ing to complete tbe charm. So many lovely rugs are shown in 
all the harmonious blending of colors (of which art the Orientals 
are masters) that one is bewildered. The Kirman, Cashmere and 
Teheran rugs are all choice. The Sumach, which is less expensive, 
combining artistic beauty with durability, is the best for ordinary 
use. When hygienic considerations are of account to the occupant 
of the room, rugs are preferred to any other floor covering. 

A toilet which is a very good compromise for wearing at a smart 
afternoon reception on a cold winter's day is of mirroir plush 
made with a perfectly plain, short-trained skirt and an Empire 
bodice with high puffed sleeves. All around the bottom of the 
skirt is a deep border of chincilla fur, matching exactly the color 
of the plush in somewhat darker tone. With this gown is worn 
a cape of chincilla fur, composed of three little collars, and a most 
becoming dark gray felt hat, the gracefully undulating brim of 
which is lined with old-rose velvet. Around the crown are three 
rouleaux of chinchilla, and in front a few curled fronds of gray 
and pink feathers. A cluster of natural " La France " roses, 
fastened to the little chinchilla muff by a diamond arrow, com- 
plete this fetching get up. 

The favorite piece of fur for the throat is the little " cravate " 
or neck-band, formed of the entire animal, with its head, tail and 
claws. In the finest quality of black sable this will cost $175, 
though an inferior one, still of sable, may be purchased as low as 
$20. Mink cravates are also very fashionable. There are rumors 
from Paris of the revival of the stole in fur, but this is one of the 
anticipations for another season, as it has not appeared in tbe 
shops of the New York furriers. There is more demand for muffs 
this season than for some time past, and muffs are all larger, tak- 
ing on somewhat of the huge dimensions of the muff of 1830. A 
large muff of sable will cost from $40 to $300, according to the 
quality of the skin. 

Parisian "elegantes" are now adopting a style of coiffure in- 
finitely superior to that which has recently been in vogue, and 
which was so injurious to the hair by reason of the amount of 
crimping which it required — a process which is apt to prove fatal 
even to the most luxuriant of tresses. According to the new fash- 
ion the hair is brushed up toward the top of the head and is coiled 
smoothly over the brow. The forehead is vailed by a light fringe 
of soft fluffy little curls artistically tangled, and for evening wear 
diamond stars, crescents, or other jeweled ornaments are fashioned 
" en diademe " in the coil. 

Russian fashions are popular for school-girls. A charming Rus- 
sian dress for a girl of fourteen is made of dark mixed cheviot, 
striped with zig-zag stripes of long black hair. A close-fitting lit- 
tle jacket is made of this cheviot and fitted over a close bodice of 
red cloth, braided in horizontal lines of black braid. The plain 
bell skirt of the cheviot is finished with a four inch hem of black 
cloth, braided in the same manner with black braid. 

Some of the new gowns of serge, trimmed with plaid, are fin- 
ished with long, narrow scarfs, hanging on either side, like the 
familiar stole of priestly garb. 



GRAND 

MID-WINTER 

CLEARANCE 



SALE. 



Cloaks, Silks, Velvets, 
Laees, Ribbons. Gloves, Plain and 
Fancy Dress Goods, Silk Umbrellas, Under- 
wear, Hosiery, Corsets, House 
Furnishings, etc. 
AT 

EXTREME REDUCTIONS. 

£W*See Daily Papers for Special Bargain Offerings. 

Mail orders promptly executed. 

Goods delivered free in Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, San 
Rafael, Tiboron, Sansalito, San Quentin, Mill Valley, Ross 
Station and Blithedale. 




Murphy Building. 

MARKET, JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 




Thousands of delighted ladies 
have visited my parlors. Can I LOLA 

not see you this week? You can MONTEZ 
learn many of the secrets of pre- 
serving and beautifying the 
complexion. 



MRS. NETTIE HARRISON, 

26 GEARY STREET, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CREME 
The Skin Food 

AND 

Tissue Builder 
76 CENTS. 



THE SCIENCE 

OF 

THE SKIN. 



324 SUTTEE ST., 

The Most Skilled Dermatolotist in 
San Francisco. 

The skin rendered soft, velvety and 
elastic with the aid of Dermoline. 
The form developed by a New Method. 

Freckles and facial blemishes re- 
moved and superfluous hair eradicated 
by a new process. 

Hair Invig-orator, guaranteed to 
cure BALDNESS. 



THE 

BANJO 

ASHTON P. 



STEVENS. 



STUDIO: 26 MONTGOMERY STREET. 
The Fashionable Accomplishment. 



Louis Roederer Champagne. 

The Highest Grade 
Champagne in the World, 

WHITE LABEL. "Carte Blanche." 

A Magnificent Rich Wine- 

BROWN LABEL, "Grand Vin Sec." 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & GO. 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 18S3 



Macbeth's "pearl top" and 
"pearl glass" lamp-chimneys 
are carefully made of clear 
tough glass ; they fit, and get 
the utmost light from the 
lamp, and they last until 
some accident breaks them. 

"Pearl top" and "pearl 
glass" are trade-marks. Look 
out for them [and you needn't 
be an expert. 



Pittsburgh. 



Geo. A. Macbeth Co. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT 

Consolidated California and Virginia 
Mining Co. 

Location of principal place of business— San 
Francisco, California. Location of works — Vir- 
ginia Mining District, Storey Couuty, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 18th day of Dec, 

1892, an assessment (No. 3) of Fifty (10) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, No. 58 Nevada block, No. 30J Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 21st Day of January. 1893. will be delin- 
quent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
FRIDAY, the Tenth day of February 

1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with the costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 58. Nevada block, No. 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Grown Point Gold and Silver Mining 
Company, 

Location of principal place of business— Sao 
Francisco, California Location of works — Gold 
Hill, Storey Couuty, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held op the '20th day of Decem- 
ber, 1892, an assessment (No. 59), of twenty-five (25) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of 
the corporation, payable immediately in United 
States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, Room 35, third floor, Mills Build- 
ing, corner Bush and Montgomery streets, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 24th Day of January, 1893, will be delinquent 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and un- 
less payment is made before, will be sold on 
TUESDAY, the 14th day of February, a. d. 1893, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
the costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 35, third floor. Mills Building, 
corner Bush and Montgomery streets, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT," 

Alpha Consolidated Mill and Mining 
Com pany. 

Location of principal place of business— ^an 
Francisco, Cal. Location of works— Gold Hill, 
Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors of this company, held on the 
20th day of December, 1892, an assessment (No. 
10) of Ten Cents per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of the corporation payable immedi- 
ately in United States Gold coin to the Secretary, 
at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada 
block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 24th day of January, 1 893, will be delinquent 

and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction; and unless payment is made before, 
will be sold on TUESDAY, the 14th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

CHAS. E. ELLTOT. Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 



WESTWARD.— Chambers 1 Journal. 

WESTWARD the sunset is dying, 
For twilight bas gathered and grown; 
Westward the swallow is flying, 

The way that the Su miner has flown, 
Flying, flame-crowned and crested 

With light from the day that is spent, 
After the Summer that rested 

Awhile in our meadows — and went. 

Westward the breezes are blowing 

And breathing of nothing but rest; 
Westward the river is Mowing — 

Thy home is there in the west. 
And Summer around thee is springing, 

And Autumn is lingering with me, 
And westward my fancies are winging 

Their flight unto thee — unto thee! 

Ah, dreary and darkly and slow drifta 
The time to the end of the year I 

Blow, winds of the Winter, with snow- 
drifts, 
And frost upon moorland and mere, 

With the day when at last X shall follow 
The flight of my thoughts and have 
rest, 

Shall follow and find, like the swallow, 
My queen of the year in the west. 



APITTSBURGER who spent a part o f 
last Summer in England tells an inci" 
dent which sadly disturbed the religious 
peace of a parish in Penzance. 

A maiden lady of that town owned a 
parrot, which somehow acquired the disa- 
greeable habit of observing at regular in- 
tervals : 

" I wish the old lady would die." 

This annoyed the bird's owner, who 
spoke to her curate about it. 

" I think we can rectify the matter," re- 
plied the good man. " I, also, have a 
parrot, and he is a righteous bird, having 
been brought up in the way he should 
go. I will lend you my parrot, and I 
trust his influence will reform that de- 
praved bird of yours." 

The curate's parrot was placed in the 
same room with the wicked one, and as 
soon as the two had become accustomed 
to each other the bad bird remarked: 

•' I wish the old lady would die." 

Whereupon the clergyman's bird rolled 
up his eyes and in solemn accents added: 

11 We beseech thee to hear us, good 
Lord! " 

The story got out in the parish, and for 
several Sundays it was necessary to omit 
the litany at the church services. 

— Pittsburg Chronicle. 



The British Medical Journal gives some 
interesting personal reminiscences of Sir 
Richard Owen. Mr. Ernest Hart tells a 
pretty story of him: "I well remember 
one of his pleasant and characteristic say- 
ings on the day when I first had the 
pleasure of introducing to him my wife. 
Walking round the garden on a pleasant 
summer's day, and showing her his favor- 
ite flowers and fruits, we came to cherry 
trees, of which some were netted and 
others left over, from which all the cher- 
ries had disappeared. My wife remarked 
on this, and be answered with that beam- 
ing smile and sympathetic twinkle with 
which his face often lighted up: 'Ah, 
those — those I leave for the birds- I call 
them the salary of the orchestra.' This 
was characteristic of his whole cast of 
thought and of the sweetness and consid- 
erateness of his character." 



il T AM speaking," said a long-winded 
1 orator, " for the benefit of posterity." 

" Yes," said one of his hearers, " and if 
you keep on much longer, your audience 
will be here." 

The remark concluded the lecture. 




A COUNTRYMAN was sowing his 
ground when two smart fellows riding 
by, one of them called out, with an inso- 
lent air, " Well, my good man; 'tis your 
business to sow, but we reap the fruits of 
your labor." 

The rustic replied : » Tis very like you 
may, for just now I am sowing hemp." 

LONG DISTANCE 

TELEPHONE. 

XjA-T'eist lEixiTjEirsrsioiN". 

Salinas, Chualar, Gonzales, 
Soledad, Mary&ville.Chico, Oro- 
ville, Viua, Coluas, giving un- 
broken communication be- 
, tween these towns aud San 
| Francisco. The lines are con- 
structed of specially prepared 
extra heavy copper wires, are 
equiped with tne latest appli- 
ances known to the tcieuce of 
"Telephony," and are " Long Distance " Lines 
in every seuse of the word. The Mail is quick, 
the Telegraph i - quicker, but the 

LHKU DISTANCE TELEPHONE 

Is instantaneous, aud you don't have to wait for 
an auswer. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

San Francisco. 

A Quiet Home, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED. 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND 
ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL AMERICAN CATERER; 
1206 Sutler Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch, 
WHOLESALE 

STATIONERS 

AND BOOKSELLERS. 
327.329. 331 SANS0ME STREET. 



J, D, SPRECKLES i BROS, 



SHIPPING aud Commission Merchants; gen- 
eral agents "Oceanic Steamship Company, 
Gillingham Cement. 

327 Market street, cor. Fremont. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1892, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of five and 
one tenth (5 1-10) per cent per annum on Term 
Deposits, and four and one-quarter (4V£) per cent, 
per annum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and 
after Tuesday, January 3, 1892. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California street. 

Vapor and Water— 
h, uit. Mineral > 




*• >> Centennial Award, J 

•£§ Medal and Dlplomn 

"»3 arninsl the world. ,» ..., 

E= Whottialc A Retail. Old Batb* Renewed. 

Send for circular*. E. J. KN0WLT0N, Ann Arbor. Mich- 



Jan. 21. 130*? 



S\N FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



25 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 
Trains L«av« and are Due to Arnv§ 
SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leavk From Decembr 3. 1892. 1 Arrive 

7 -fJQ a. Kernels, Kurasoy, Sacramento 7:16 r 
7:30 a. Hay wards, Niles aud Sau Jose *U:lfiF 
HUM and Baa Jom 

7:30a. Martinet. Sau Ramon, Calistocti 6:15 P. 
'7:90a. El Verauoaud >> auta Rosa *o;15p 

8:00 a. 3acram'toA Redding, via Davis 7:L6p. 
S.-OOa. Atlantic Express for Ogden and 

East, 9:46 P. 

S-.SOa. Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Oro- 

ville and Red Bluff 4:45r. 

4:ftnt. New Orleans Express, Los Au- 

Seles, Demlng, El Paso, New 
rleau*. aud East 8:45p. 

•9:00 a. Stockton and Milton *8:45 P. 

12 00m. Haywards, Niles and Livermore 7:15 P. 

•1:00 P. Sacramento River Steamers *9:00p. 

1:30 p. Vallejo and Martinez. 12:15 P. 

3 -00 p. Hay wards, Niles and San Jose 9 :45 a. 
4:00 p. Martinez, Stockton Merced aud 

Fresno 12:15P 

4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Val ejo, 
Calistoga, El Verano. and Santa 

Rosa 9:45a. 

4:30 p. Benicia, aud Sacramento 10:15a. 

4:00 P. Woodland and Oroville 10:15 A 

4:00r Vacaville 10:15a 

'4:30 p. Niles and Livermore *8:45 a. 

5:00 p European Mail, Ogden aud East . 10;45a 
6:30p. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara «i 

Los Angeles 9.15a. 

5:30 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 9:15 a. 

6:00p. Haywards, Niles and Sau Jose.. 7:45a. 

17:00 p. Vallejo f8:45 p. 

7:00 p. Oregon Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 

land, Pnget Sound and East. . - 8;16 a 

Santa Cruz Division. 
+11:45 p. Hunters and Theater Train for 
Newark, San Jose, aud Los 

Gatos - t8:05p. 

8:16a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6:20 p. 

•2:15 p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

- SantaCruz *10:50a. 

4:15 p. Centerville. San Jose. Los Gatos. 9:oUa. 
Coast Division (third a id Townsend Streets). 

7 :00 a. San Jose, Almaden and Way Sta- 
tions 2:38 p. 

8:15 a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tree Pinos, Pa- 
jaro, SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Robles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations 6:10 p. 

10:37 A. San Jose, and Way Stations 5:03 P. 

12:15 p. Cemetery, Meulo Park and Way 

Stations 3:30 p. 

*2:30p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove aud principal 

Way Stations *10:37a. 

*3:80 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions. . *9:47a. 

*4:30p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . *8:06a. 

5-.15 p. San Jose and Way Stations 8:48 a. 

6:30p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. .. 6;35a, 
rll:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations +7:30 p. 

a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 
•Sundays excepted. +Saturdays only. 
ISundaysonly. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 
Steamers will sail at NOON ou the 5th, 15th aud 

25th of each mouth, 
Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 
Through Line Sailings.— "City of Sydney," Janu- 
ary 25, 1893. S. S. "Acapulco," February 6,1898. 
8.S. "Sau Juan," February 15, 1893. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls ou 9uuday, 
steamers wiP be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

WAY LINE SAILING. 
S S. '-San Jose." February 3, 1893. 
8. 8. "City of Panama," February 18, 1893. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 
HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for Bast 

Indies, Straits, etc.: 

S. 8. "City of Peking." Saturday, February 

4th, at 3 p. m, 

S. 8. "China," (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Feb. 14, 
1893 at 3 p m 
S. S. "Peru,'" Saturday, March 4th, 1893, at 3 p. m. 
"City of Bio de Jaueiio " Thursday, March 
23d, 189S, at 3 P. M. 

Round Trio Tickets to Yokohama at reduced 
ratei. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 302 
Front street ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent 



THE Inquiring Parisian mind has been 
on the search for the discovery of the 
origin of the custom of the Christinas 
tree; that mind has been duly rewarded. 
It was Colomban, the Kishop of the Cha- 
teau de Anegray, situated on the confines 
of Loraine and Alsace, who bad the first 
Christmas tree presented to him; It was 
displayed on his altar, surrounded by 
lighted candles. This act was done on 
one 26th day of December in the fourth 
century. It was placed there in grateful 
memory of the miraculous saving of the 
bishop's life, who, being in a forest, saw 
a band of brigands advancing towards 
bim; upon this he ran to an oak, which 
immediately thereupon bent all its boughs 
towards the earth and completely envel- 
oped the bishop. The robbers passed by, 
and his life was saved. Colomban was 
an Irishman by birth, but had to fly from 
bis native country in consequence of his 
exceptional beauty, which caused him to 
be much pestered by the females. 



AM-iRRY yjung Irish man is employed 
by a Birmingham family as coachman. 
Recently, while suffering from a very se- 
vere cold, he made his appearance one 
morning with his hair cut close to his 
head. 

" Why, Dennis," said his mistress in 
shocked accents, *< whatever possessed 
you to have your hair cut while you had 
such a bad cold ? " 

11 Well, mum," replied the unabashed 
Dennis, " I do be takin' notice this long 
while that whinever I have me hair cut, 
I take a bad cowld, so I thought to me- 
self that, now, while I had the cowld onto 
m--, it would be the time of all others to 
go and get me hair cuttin' done, for by 
that course I would save meself just one 
cowld." 



EVEN against a good man fate is con 
stantly raising up enemies. There 
have been 296 babies named for Dr. De- 
pew — witn the West to hear from. 




CAVEATS, 
TRADE MARKS, 
DESIGN PATENTS, 
COPYRIGHTS, etc 

For information and free Handbook write to 

MUNN & CO.. 361 Broadway, new York. 
Oldest bureau for securing patents in America. 
Every Datent taken out by us is brought before 
the public by a notice given free of charge in the 

gamtxfk Jlwewati 

Largest circulation of any scientific paper in the 
world. SDlendidly illustrated. No intelligent 
man should be without it. Weekly, S3. 00 a 
vear; $1,50 six months. Address MUNN & CO* 
Publishers, 361 Broadway, New York City. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic Tuesday, Jan. 24, 1893 

Beloic Thursday, February 23, 1893. 

Oceasic . . Tuesday, March 14, 1893 

Gaelic (via Honolulul, Tuesday, April 4, 1593 
ROUND TRIP TIOKET8 AT REDUCED RATE8 

Cabin PlanB on exhibition and Passage 
TicketB for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
Btreets, SaD Francisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, 
San Francisco. „ . . 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H.RICE, Traffic Manager. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUOE ROUTE." 
rOMMKNCINU SUNDAY. NOV. 20 1S'« and 
until further notice, Boats and Trains' will 
leave from and arrive at the Sau Francisco Pas- 
senger Depot, MARKET STREET WHARF, as 
follows: 
From San Francisco lor Point Tlburon, Belvedere and 

San Raiael. 
WEEK DAYS-7:40 a.m., 9:20a.m., 11:40 a. m.- 

3:80 P. M.,6:06 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 
SATURDAYS ONLV-Au extra trip at 1:50 p. m. 
8UNDAYS-8:00 A.M., 9:80 A.M., 11:00 a.m. ; 1-30 p m. 
3:30 P.M., 6:00 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 

From San Raiael lor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS-6:25 A. M., 7:86 A. M., 9:30 A M 

12:46 p.m., 8:40 p.m., 6:06 p.m. 
8ATURDAYS ONLY-An extra trip at 6:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 a.m., 9:40 a.m., 11:10 a. m. ; 1-40 p M 
3:40 p. m.,6:O0p m.,6:26 p. m. 

rrom Point Tlburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS-6:50 A. m., 8:20 A. M., 9-56 A. M i 
1:10 p. M., 4:06 p. M., 5:35 P. M. 
Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:40 A.M., 10:05 A.M., 11:35 a.m.; 
2:05 P. m., 1:05 p.m., 6:30p.m., 6:65 P.M. 



LEAVB 8. F. 


Destination. 


Arrive in S. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
6:05 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


Petaluma 

and 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40a.m 8:60a. h 
6:05 p.m 10:30 a.m 
7:30p.M 6:10p.M. 






Fulton, 
Windsor, 
Healdsburg, 
Litton Springs, 
Cloverdale & 
Way Stations. 






8:66a.m. 






7:40a.m. 
3:30p.m. 


7:30 p.m. 


10:30a. m 
6:10p.m 








7:40a. m. 


8:00 a. m. 


Hopland 
and Ukiah. 


7:30 p.m. 


6:10p.m. 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Guerneville. 


7:80p.m. 


10 :30a. m 
6:10 p.m 


7:40 a.m. 

5:05 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
5:00p. m 


Sonoma aud 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. 
6:05p.m. 


8:50a.m. 
6:10p.m. 


7:40a.m 
3:30 p.M 


8:00 a. m 
5:00 p.m 


sebastopol. | 10:40a. m 1 10:30am 
! 6:05p.m 1 6:10 p.M 



StageB connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena- at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port and Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lake- 
port: at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sarato- 
ga SpringB, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Cahto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Weatport, Usal, Hydesville and Eu- 

EXCDRSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 60; to Santa Rosa, J2 26; to 
Healdsburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, $4 60; to Hop- 
land, $5 70; to Ukiah, $6 75; to Sebastopol, $2 70; 
to Guerneville, $3 75; to Sonoma, $150; to Glen 
Ellen, $1 80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma. $1; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, $4 50; to 
Hopland, $3 80; to Sebastopol, $1 80; to Guerne- 
ville, $2 50; to Sonoma, $1; to Gien Ellen, $1 20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from Sau Francisco for ports 
in Alaska, 9i.it., Dec. 16, Dec. 30 and Jan. 13. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 
9 a. m. every Friday. 

For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 A. m. 

For Santa Ana, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth aud fifth day, 8 A. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Los Angeles, 
Santa Barbara and San Louis Obispo, every fourth 
aod fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For ports in Mexico, 1st of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANr? 



^^X3- 



The splendid 3,000 
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26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



Jan. 21,1893. 




IT goes without saying that when great wealth, beauty and 
social tact combine, the hostess may rest assured of making a 
great success. The dance given by Mrs. Will Crocker last week, 
which was decidedly the private function of this winter's season 
so far, was composed entirely of young people, including the 
young matrons, so that the chief point of the affair was dancing. 
The rooms of the beautiful home on California street were rich 
with floral adornments, as well as palms, ferns and smilax, 
although therein the artistic coloring, rich paintings and elaborate 
furnishing required little aid in decoration. The Hungarian 
Band, which appears to have quite pushed Noah Brandt's 
orchestra into the background this season, discoursed the music 
for the dancers, stationed in the large entrance hall, while the 
entire suite of rooms were thrown open for their pleasure. The 
prettiest women in society were present; the handsome hostess 
and her equally fine-looking sister being companion features of 
the same, bud wig served the supper at the usual tUe-h-tHe 
tables, and the whole affair was redolent of thorough enjoyment 
from start to finish— to use a racing term— and when good-nigbts 
were said, it was with the earnest hope on the part of the guests 
that they might have just such another charming evening before 
the season closes. 

Lunches and teas continue to be the rule, almost to the ex- 
clusion of any other kind of festivity. The most prominent of 
the recent teas was the one given by Mrs. Breeze last Thursday, 
for the purpose of introducing her daughter into society, in 
which pleasing duty she had the assistance of Mesdames McOop- 
pin and Adam Grant; the Misses Breeze, Jarboe, Otis, Bowen, 
Robinson, Martin and Connor. The large house on Sutter street 
was redolent with the perfume of flowers used in decoration, in 
conjunction with the season's foliage, and filled with guests, the 
entire lower portion of the house being thrown open. During 
the afternoon hours, from 4 till 7, music, tea and chit-chat was 
the programme; but from 8 till 11 the muaic changed to a livlier 
measure, and dancing was in order until supper was served, and 
was very thoroughly enjoyed by the young people. The cos- 
tumes worn by the ladies were remarkable for their elegance, and 
taken altogether, the tea was one of the most successful of the 
season. 

Another charming tea of last week was the one given by Mrs. 
N. D. Rideout at her home on Washington street last Friday, 
which was profusely adorned with La France roses, ferns and 
foliage, and there also dancing was the order of the evening 
hours. The other teas included those given by Mrs. Charles 
Nauman of Sbotwell street; and by Mrs. Voorhies of Clay street 
last Saturday when music was the chief feature of the afternoon. 
Miss Alice Ames performed several choice morceaux on the vio- 
lin, and Mrs. Berry, Mrs. Chase and Mrs. Voorhies herself also 
contributed to the programme. 

Prominent among recent lunches was the one given by Mrs. 
Lloyd Tevis, a form of entertainment which has always been a 
favorite one with her. Mrs. Tevis has appeared so seldom in 
the role of hostess of late, that the ladies who were her guests on 
this occasion felt themselves particularly honored, and greatly 
enjoyed the choice dainties set before them, as Mrs. Tevis has 
long been celebrated for the excellence of her menus. Scarcely 
less elaborate were the violet lunches given by .Mrs. John O'Neil 
Reis at her rooms in the Palace Hotel the same day ; and by Mrs. 
Edward Barron who also selected Wednesday for her young 
ladies' lunch at which Miss Fanny Loughborough was the guest 
of honor; by Miss Alice McCutchen at the Hotel Richelieu to a 
dozen or more of her young lady frfi-nds at a very prettily ap- 
pointed table on Friday last; and Friday was also seleoted by 
Mrs. William Romaine at her residence on Devisadero street for 
a lunch to some friends from Sacramento, and by Mrs. Trilley 
whose lunch at the Bella Vista was in honor of Mrs. Middleton 
from the Presidio. Dinners have not been quite so plentiful, 
but two worthy of more than passing mention were the recent 
one given by Mrs. J. R. K. Nuttall, and the Stag Banquet at 
which Mr. John R. Jarboe presided as host at his residence on 
Pine street, President Jordan of the Stanford University being 
chief guest. 



Mrs. Morrow's tea at San Rafael, in honor of Mrs. Howison, 
was one of the pleasant out-of-town events of this week, taking 
place on Monday last. Other functions of this week include the 
reception of the "Reading Club," which was called a basket party, 
last Monday night; the hop at the Colonial Hotel on Tuesday 
evening; Mrs. Isaac Walter's reception on Thursday evening; 
the fourth dance of the Friday Night Cotillion Club, at Odd Fel- 
lows' Hall, and the fourth gathering of the Entre Nous Cotillion 
Club, in the Maple Room of the Palace Hotel, last night, and the 
charity ball of the German Benevolent Society, at Odd Fellow's 
Hall, to-night. 



It is somewhat amusing, the air of deep mystery with which 
the "Forthnigbtly Club" seek to enshroud their doings, and to 
say they are successful in their endeavors is equally absurd; for 
where so many talkative people congregate and chat both before 
and after, it is a foregone conclusion the mystery ceases. All so- 
ciety knows that the last meeting of the club was not so jolly as 
on previous occasions, and that owing to the uncertainty of the 
locale (Mr. Eyre's illness preventing any of hiB family doing the 
receiving act) there were not as many people in attendance as 
had been expected. On the programme was a good deal of Mr. 
McLarnn, but then he is so good at theatricals that was accepted 
ai satisfactory, and as a Frenchman he showed bis versatility. 
To witness Miss Ashe's performance one would never imagine 
her to be the chief mover in getting up the more ambitious 
" Woman's Club," which is creating so much comment pro and con 
in the swim. The young animals who came out of the Ark had 
apparently the be9t fun of all, and the supper was enjoyed thor- 
oughly by old and young alike. 

The hop at the Colonial was a very pleasant affair. Danc- 
ing was indulged in till a late hour, in the spacious hallway 
near the dining-room, and at midnight supper was served. There 
was a large number of guests present, and the ladies all looked 
charmingly. 

Clubs are still keeping open house. The lunch at the Cosmos Club 
last week was a pronounced success; there were pretty floral decora- 
tions, a well-arranged musical programme, delicious refreshments 
and some charming ladies to do the honors for the members, who 
were untiring in their efforts to entertain their lady guests. On Thurs- 
day evening of this week the Century Club gave a reception in honor 
of Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, who was their first President, and who is now 
spending a few weeks in San Francisco. 



This has been decidedly an off week in weddings, nor is next week 
much more promising in that line. The most prominent one will be 
the we Uling of Miss Nannie Clark, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Goddard Clark to J ames R.uggles, Jr., which will take place at 
St. Luke's Church on Van Ness aveuue on Wednesday next, the 25th, 
at five o'clock in the afternoon.. 



The last addition to church entertainments appears to be the 
conundrum supper, one of which was given with great success in 
the parlors of the First English Lutheran Church, on Geary 
street, last week. The rooms were charmingly decorated with 
flowers, evergreens and smilax, and a string orchestra gave a 
choice selection of music between the hours of 6 and 11 P. M. 
The tables were prettily draped in pale green and lighted with 
Japanese lanterns, the menu placed upon them being most ap- 
petizing under the strange names which the dishes bore, and 
hence the appelation of 'conundrum supper." The result was 
very satisfactory, and there are hopes that another one will be 
among the events of the near future. The chief feature of the 
musical part of the entertainment was a charmingly executed 
duo between the Misses Noble upon the trombone and the cor- 
net, it being their first appearance together in San Francisco. 



Inspired by the success of the young ladies of the Saturday 
Morning Orchestra, a new musical club has come into existence, 
and will be heard for the first time on the evening of the 28th, 
under the nomenclature of the Friday Night Orchestra, Kohler 
and Chase's Hall, on O'Farrell street, being the locale chosen by 
them for their initial efforts in public. It is understood that in 
February they will give a musicale in one of the large halls in aid 
of one of our fashionable charities. 

The Howard Choral Union will give a concert, at the Howard 
Presbyterian Church, on Mission street, next Thursday evening. 

A very stylish elaborate wedding was that of Miss Bertha Franklin 
and Sam Salomon on Wednesday evening last. It was quite an 
event in our Jewish society and was largely attended. The marriage 
took place at the handsome home of the bride's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. L. Franklin, on Califurnia street, where the large parlors 
were profusely decked with flowers aud wreaths of smilax and de- 
pending from the centre of the bay window was the wedding bell of 
pink and white rose buds. The orchestra was stationed in the spac- 
ious hall, and when the notes of the Bridal Chorus struck up the 
wedding procession appeared. The pretty brunette bride was 
attended by the Misses Salomon and Boas, and looked lovely in a 
gown of white satin en traine heavily trimmed with Duchesse lace; 
her tulle veil was caught on one side with a spray of orange blossoms 
and the latest fad , the satin ribbon round the waist, was also one of 
the features of the toilette. The groom had as his two attendants 
his brother Maurice and Max Salomon. The happy pair having 
taken up their place underneath the bridal bell the nuptial knot 
was tied by the Rev. M. S. Levy, and Rev. L. M. Franklin of Omaha, 
cousin to the bride. Congratulations then followed after which a 
delicious >upper was served by Ludwig. at the conclusion of which 
dancir.g was in order and kept up until a late hour. The guests 
were numerous and many beautiful costumes were worn, notably 
that of the bride's mother Mrs. Franklin, who appeared in a robe 
composed of black velvet and pink brocade artistically combined. 
The mother of the groom, Mrs. M. Salomon, wore brown brocaded 



Jan. 21, 1893. 



9AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



velvet. Both ladies wore dopant diamond ornaments. The gown a 
oftheprt'ity maids wen fashioned in the ampin style, Mies Bolo- 
moo raring fallow, and Miw Boas pink. The gifts were handsome 
and cosily and evinced the high esteem in which bolh families are 
held by their friends. Among the guests were the ancle of the groom 
Bd. !-nU mon and wife. Mr. and Mr*. Morris Cerf, and charm- 
ing Mi-- Louie, the beautiful Mr-, Sig. Stern, bo recently n bride her- 
self, and her husband, Judge and Mrs. Toohey and many others. 

Teas will he on the cards again for next week. Among others, the 
ladies of the Hotel Beresford will give one on Friday afternoon be- 
tween the hours of four and seven, and in the evening there will be 
dancing from eight until midnight. On Saturday afternoon Mine. 
Ziska will give a tea at her residence on Van Ness avenue, when her 
young lady pupils will contribute niusioaj selections aud recitations 
for the enjoyment of her guests. 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Barnes, who have been spending their 
honeymoon in the Southern counties, were made guests of honor 
at several points during the progress to Coronado. At Santa 
Barbara the Arlington Jockey Club gave them a reception at 
their handsome club rooms, Mr. Barnes being one of the earliest 
members of that association of blue-blooded Golhamites. Mr. 
and Mrs. Barnes have returned again to the city, and were wel- 
comed home by a dinner given by Mrs. Del mas in their honor on 
Wednesday evening, at which the guests were all young people. 
The bride and groom are at the Palace Hotel, where they will for the 
present reside, and Mrs. Barnes will be " at home" on Mondays. 



Dates for February are filling up quite rapidly, and as Lent 
appears upon the scene on the 15th, it behooves all those who 
are anxious to be hosts or hostesses ere the dawn of the peniten- 
tial period to bestir themselves lest they fail to find one vacant. 
Among the events of note already named to take place are A 
Trip to Africa, to be given by the San Francisco Operatic Society 
at the Grand Opera House, on the 2d; the Club of '93 will give a 
dance at Union Square Hall, and the Army and Navy German 
will take place at Odd Fellows' Hall on the evening of the 3d 
The second of the Monday Night Club dances will be given at 
the Palace Hotel on the 6tb, and on the 8th Stewart's new opera 
of His Majesty will be produced at the Grand Opera House, in aid 
of the San Francisco Polyclinic. The annual masquerade ball of 
the San Francisco Verein Club is named to come off at the club- 
rooms on the 25th of February. Miss Elsie Hecht will be the 
head and front of the next assembling of the " Informals," which 
will be held at the California Hotel some evening before the end 
of this month. 

Colonel Fred Crocker left in 'his special car for a trip East, last 
Wednesday, via the Southern route, to remain several weeks. 

Mr. C. W. Bonynge is making one of his periodical visits to the 
Pacific Coast, and has been a guest at the Palace Hotel during 
the present week. Mr. D. 0. Mills is coming to pay his usual 
spring visit to California a little earlier than usual this year. He 
will be accompanied by his son-in-law, Mr. Whitelaw Keid, who 
finds the weather in the East too severe for his health, by Mrs. 
Reid and family. The party are expected to arrive here early in 
February, and will probably remain in this vicinity for some 
time; Mr. and Mrs. Clarence T. Wendell, nee Richards, who have 
been spending their honeymoon at Coronado, will receive on Fri- 
days, in February, at 2147 Post street. 



The interest is steadily increasing in the coming foot-ball game 
between the army officers stationed at the Presidio and the Uni- 
versity Veterans, on Saturday afternoon, January 28th, at the 
Haight-street grounds. This is the only Gontest of great interest 
that will be played this season, as the rumor that the two Uni- 
versity teams were going to play in February for the benefit of 
different charities, and also to settle the championship, is a mis- 
take, as only one game a year is allowed by the Rugby rules. 
The colors to be worn by the players are the National colors — 
red, white and blue for the army, and blue and white for the 
University Veterans. The institutions are having a large number 
of flags made that will be disposed of by some of the orphans 
during the game. The benefit that these two charities, the Ar- 
milage Orphanage, of San Mateo, and the San Francisco Nursery 
for Homeless Children, will receive from this match, will be of 
great assistance to them in helping to carry on their good work. 
The gentlemen who are going to play are: The Army— Wood, 
Kennedy, Crofton, Downing, Ricketts, Harrelson, Wilcox, Code, 
Flaglor, Frankenheimer, Walton. Wilson, Taylor and Wilcox. 
University Veterans — Clemans, Benson, Briggs, Pierce, Tobin, 
Purter, Brewer, Morse, Downing, D. McLain, W. L. McLain, 
Graham, Whitehouse and McKay. The referee for the game 
will be a gentleman thoroughly conversant with the rules. Tick- 
ets for the match will be found the latter part of next week. 



Among the pictures in the art gallery at the Mechanics' Fair 
those of Julius Ludovici have attracted general attention since 
the opening of the exhibition. This artist has had great success 
with his pastel portraits. 



Announcements have been made of the first Ladies' Night, 
raasdny, January 31st, at the Olympic Club, on post street, for 

the benefit of the •'California Room" In the Woman's Building at 
the World's Columbian Exposition. Chicago. Tickets, one dol- 
lar, are on sale at Sherman, Clay A Co.'s, and Olympic Club 
Bouse. The following are among those whose gratuitous ser- 
vices make the programme of exceptional interest and value: 
Mr. Henry Heytnan, musical director, assisted by Mrs. L. Brecbe- 
min, Donald de V. Graham, Mrs. Charles Dickman, Mr. J. C. 
Hughes, Mrs. J. M. Pierce, Miss Anna Miller-Wood, Miss Lillie 
Birmingham. Madame t'rsumando, Master Henry Samuels, Pro- 
fessor G. Sauvlet, Henry Heyman String Quartette. The athletic 
entertainment will be by the full strength of the Olympic Club, 
under the leadership of Mr. E. A. Kolb. Stage decorations by 
Miss A. E. Dugan. The beautiful club-house will doubtless be 
crowded with those who desire to aid in the worthy motive of 
the entertainment. Society's ladies will grace the benefit with 
their presence, and to show their appreciation of the Olympic 
Club's generosity they will wear their pretty gowns, and 
make the new club-house really a temple of beauty on this, its 
first "ladies' night." 

The Roman combats announced by the Olympic Club ought to 
prove very successful. The idea is excellent, and if properly 
presented the gladiatorial combats will draw great crowds. 



The California Camera Club showed a set of slides received 
from the Plainfield Camera Club, of Plainfield, N. J. , last Wednes- 
day evening. The club's thirty-second illustrated lecture will be 
given in Metropolitan Hall, on Friday evening, January 27th, 
when Captain Henry Clay Cochrane, U. 8. M. 0., will tell about 
"The Kremlin, and the Coronation of a Czar." 



At the election of the Geographical Society of the Pacific, on 
January 17th, the following officers were chosen for the ensuing 
year: Directors — Prof. George Davidson, Thomas E. Slevin, John 
Partridge, Harry Durbrow, L. L. Nelson, Charles L. Taylor, E. J. 
Bowen. Councillors — Hon. Jeremiah Lynch, John Dolbeer, 
Irving M. Scott, Gen. James F. Houghton, Captain W. L. Merry, 
Hon. Charles Goodall, Captain Charles L. Taylor, F. Steven Cook, 
M. D.; Mark Sheldon, Wm. Hood, R. W. Poulson, M. D.; Jus- 
tice Ralph C. Harrison. Honorary Member, Sir Edwin Arnold, 
K. C. I. E., C. S. I., London. 

A very enjoyable concert was given on Wednesday evening, at 
Irving Hall, by Signora Cosati (contralto of Italian opera), which 
we should like to have seen better attended. There were some gems 
in the programme, generally well rendered. The Signora showed her 
vocal capabilities to advantage in Rossini's cavatina, "Arsace," 
Semiramide, and again in the quartette JRigoletto of Vedi. All 
the artists did well. A special feature of the concert was the 
coming to the front once more of Ugo Talbo. In Tosti"s "Non e 
ver" he, although just recovering from the effects of a severe 
cold, showed that Talbo was himself again. Why an artist of 
such remarkable musical ability should have so long hidden his 
light under a bushel has often puzzled us; however, we hope 
Talbo has taken a new departure, and that for the future we 
shall often hear his splendid voice. 



The news of the sad death of David Porter, on Monday last, 
carried sorrow to the hearts of thousands of Californians, who 
had known and admired the deceased during his long residence 
in this city. Mr. Porter had for years been a prominent mer- 
chant here, and had hosts of friends, who were greatly shocked 
at hearing of his tragic and untimely taking off. His funeral took 
place in this city on Wednesday last, and was largely attended. 
Mr. Porter was a native of Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland, and was 
sixty-four years old. His widow and three daughters survive 
him. His eldest daughter is now Mrs. Campobello. 

Mrs. George D. Boyd, who is spending the winter with her 
mother, Mrs. Nick Kittle, is " receiving" on Fridays in January- 

The ball of the German Benevolent Society will be given to- 
night, in Odd Fellows' Hall. As usual, it will be a very interest- 
ing and swell affair. 





Baking 
Powder: 



The only Pure Cream of tartar Powder .-No ammonia; No Alnm 
Used in Millions of Homes— 40 years the Standard 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1893 



As spring draws near, we may expect to hear of numerous 
departures from the towns in divers directions, and among the 
earliest of those who have announced their intentions is Mrs. W. 
Greer Harrison, who expects to sail for the Antipodes by the 
next Australian steamer, where she will visit her relatives in New 
Zealand for a couple of months. Dr. and Mrs. Perrin will be 
early birds of passage to the East, with a trip across the Atlanlic ere 
they return. Mr. and Mrs. James Baird have already gone East, 
where, «« weather permitting," they will make an extended tour 
of the Atlantic Coast. Mr. and Mrs. John Kittle and Miss Lucie 
are in New York this winter, where are also Captain and Mrs. 
Millen Griffith. Miss Jennie McLane, who spent last summer 
with theGritfiths in Ross Valley, has recently been playing the 
hostess in turn to Miss Griffiths in Baltimore, who has been 
the recipient of many hospitalities in that lovely Maryland city, 
including teas, dances, dinners and cotillions, several of which 
were given especially to do her honor. Just at present it seems 
to be the correct thing to do the Southern counties. Among 
those of our residents who are there already are Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Holbrooke and family, Mrs. and Miss Houghton, Miss 
Bessie Shreve, ex-Mayor and Mrs. Sanderson, Mrs. H. M. A. 
Miller and Miss Mamie Burling, all at Coronado, where Mr. 
and Mrs. Hemy Bothin and Mrs. Casius Morgan will soon joio 
them. Mrs. B. F. Norris and her niece, Mrs. Frank Thompson, 
will leave for there on Monday next. Mrs. Charles Simpkins 
will matronlze a party of young people for a visit to Santa Bar- 
bara, and Miss Gertrude Jack left for her home in San Luis 
Obispo on Thursday, after a delightful visit to San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Schwerin have been doing Lus Angeles, and 
Miss Jennie McMillan is visiting friends in San Jose. 

" THE PATRIARCHS " OF NEW YORK. 



Delmonico's Rooms the Scene of Another of the Very Swell Balls. 



DELMONICO'S ball-room was in trim again last Night, for the 
second subscription ball of the Patriarchs. As at the first ball 
of the season, the cotillion was danced before supper, Mr. Elisha 
Dyer, Jr., leading. For the consolation of latecomers, who found 
all the cotillion chairs taken, there was the Hungarian Band in 
the red room for informal dancing. Among the dancers and in 
the throng were: Mr. and Mrs. Van Rensselaer Cruger, Mr. and 
Mrs. Anson Phelps Stokes, Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alexander, 
Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey Depew, Mr. and Mrs. "Whitelaw Reid, 
D. O. Mills, W. G. Rockefeller, Mrs. Pierpont Morgan, Pierre 
Lorillard, and many others of New York's Four Hundred. A 
most delicious supper was served at 1 o'clock, the only wines be- 
ing Moet Blanc and Moet Imperial Brut. 

— New York Herald, Jan. 10, 1893. 



LADIES desirous of increasing the beauty of their households 
by the addition of handsome and useful furniture should visit 
the art rooms of Sanborn, Vail & Co., of 741-743 Market street. Among 
the latest novelties there displayed are the brass and onyx top tables 
which make such a pretty feature in a drawing-room. They are of 
numerous sizes and designs, and range in price from $8.50 up. The 
firm is also showing a line of beautiful plate glass swinging mirrors, 
which are just the thing for a lady's boudoir, as they show the full 
length of the figure. Those who desire pictures can not do better 
than to procure some of the fine etchings in the art gallery. They 
range in price from $3.50, $5.00, $7.50 and $10. With them should be 
procured one or two of the handsome easels in silver, cream and gold 
or white and gold. 

THERE is a funny journal down in San Bernardino known as 
the Courier, which is evidently edited by some more or less 
recent arrival from the baokwoods of Dtah or Arizona. Here ia 
a sample of its editorial utterances aneni the proposition to es- 
tablish the county of Riverside: "The haughty, ignorant angle- 
worms of county division will never succeed. No Bruners are to 
be found in the ranks, therefore county division must languish, 
gnaw its own vitals, and die." ffust fancy a haughty angle- 
worm gnawing its own vitals and then dyingl 

Latest discovery and craze in Paris.— Gray hair restored to all 
shades; perfectly harmless. Face cream, powder and lotion in- 
dorsed by Dr. Dennis of this city; also the emporium for Parisian 
novelties and manufacture of natural curly front pieces, from $1 up. 
Great reduction in prices and prompt attention, at Strozynski's, cor- 
ner of Ellis and Leavenworth streets. 

A lady who has crossed the ocean twenty -oue times, who con- 
verses in the various languages necessary for a European trip, 

offers her services as a chaperone. Address Mme. S , care this 

office. 

The Maison Riche, at the corner of Grant avenue and Geary 
street, enjoys the patronage of all the good livers in the city. With 
out exception it easily leads in a ci ty where good restaurants abound. 

DR. F. PAGUeT" 

Dentist, 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 
810 Markcc Street. 



A SIGNIFICANT statement was last week made by Count Ca- 
privi in the Reichstag as to the future of the Triple Alliance. 
He declared that its renewal after the present term of the con- 
tract had expired is not absolutely certain. Either this is merely 
a statement to scare the members of the Reichstag into submis- 
sion, or it is a statement of the highest importance. It is by no 
means unlikely that there may be a real apprehension on the 
part of the government with regard to the duration of the alli- 
ance, not because Austria or Italy are not satisfied, but because it 
is evident that at this moment Germany has to bear far more of 
the burden than her share. But in that case it would be tne duly 
of the country to look for stronger and more powerful allies, for 
no reasonable German statesman can imagine that, even if taxa- 
tion is increased beyond the limits of endurance, Germany can 
keep a standing army suffcient to resist all Europe united. Aa 
an argument in favor of new taxation and an increase of the 
army, the hint that the Triple Alliance may be dissolved is a 
weak one. 

DODGE BROS., engravers.' 

Fashion's finger beckens your steps here, where 
the rich and rare in Writing Papers, Invitations, 
Calling Cards, etc., hold sway. 



(UPPER PL.VTKS. 
HEIIDIK CARDS. 



225 POST ST. 



SANFORD S. PROSSER. 

PHARMACY FRANCAIS. 

Ill Grant Ave. Telephone 1330 

Parfumeeie Victoria, Rigaud's & Cle's Lucrecia Graciosa, Louts XV 
and Exora d'Afrique are the latest odors and so different from perfumes 
familiar toeveryore. Piveot' Legrand's violet and Roger & Galtet'sLubin 
and Piuaud's perfumes, Soap. SachanFace Powders, Cosmetics, etc. 

Pioaud's 8 ounce bottles, $3,50; regular size reduced from $1.25 to 85 
cents per botile, including Peau d'Fspague in bulk at 50 cents per ounce. 

Every lady knows that exclusiveness in perfumes is as desirable as 
in dress. 



Situated in Napa County, Cal. 

Reached by a delightful stage ride over the moun 
tains. Sixteen Miles from St. Helena. Good Ac 
coiumodations. Ample Bathing Facilities. 

A FEATURE OF THE PLACE, 

A Large Swimming Tank of Hot Mineral Water 

The waters of the Mtna Mineral Springs have 
long been celebrated for their wonderful cures in 
cases of Acute and Chronic Dyspepsia, Rheuma- 
tism, Inflammation of the Bladder, and Liverand 
Kidney Complaints. 

The temperature of the water is 98 degrees, and 
is highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas, making 
it pleasant to the taste, and giving to the bath a 
most delightful sensation. 

Higo Altitude ! No Fogs ! No Mosquitoes 

Water from the Springs bottled by the 

AETNA MINERAL WATER CO., 

Telephone 536. Office, 108 Drnmm Street, S 



HOT 



L 



JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 

CITY IRON WORKS. 

Office 51 Fremont Street, 

SJ^IST IF'B.A.IISJ-CISOO, - - - CAL. 
Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Boilers, Engines, Pumps and Machinery of Every Description. 

Patent Lead-Lined Coupled Tubing, for use as 

Water Pipe, for Sale Cheap 

ELECTRIC IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. 

General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Ari- 
zona aud Washington of the 
Fort Wayne Electric Light Company, Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Estimates furnished for electric railways, electric 
light and steam plants, house wiring, etc. Marine wor 
a specialty. 

35 New Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



I! 



Systems : 
"Slattery" 

Induction; 
"Wood" 

Arc; 

Factories : 

Fort Wayne. : 

Indiana; ' 

Brooklyn, 

New York. 



U 



trlo'.yp* Ser;»». Plat* 180. 



VViit. 3. F. New ► L«Uar, January 28, 18&8. 




Chico. 
Oroville. 



THE LEADING EXHIBITS FROM BUTTE COUNTY, 
At Mechanic's Fair, 1893. 



Palermo. 
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sSto-HETTER 



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Fo/. JIK/. 



i\4tf FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 28, 1893. 



Number 4. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran. 
eisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



THE office of the Nsws Letter in New York City has been es- 
tablished at 196 Broadway, room 14, where information may 
be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 



N 



O man can be a hypocrite to bis own children. 



T?ORTUNE favors the brave because the brave compel her favors. 

IT is time to repent when you have tried the patience of a just 
God to the extremist limit. 

A LITTLE learning is never so dangerous as when it becomes 
the property of a little man. 

AN wants but little here below, and be can count himself un- 
commonly lucky if he gets it. 

ID you ever notice how quickly the world gets out of joint 
when it ceases to rnn your way ? 

COURTESY is that sort of silence that leads us to believe that 
our friends have not fathomed our little private meannesses. 



M 
D 



THIS thing of mistaking a torpid liver for genius is what is 
leading the fool of every family into the newspaper business. 

VIRTUE may be its own reward all right enough, but it is such 
poor pay that few men care to waste their lives working for 



AFTER all, the woman's pocket is bat an index of the mind 
feminine. No mere man can ever hope to fathom its mys- 
teries. 

IT is not that Alameda county, or San Francisco, either, for (he 
matter of that, needs more Superior Judges. It is more justice 
that is wanted. 

THE San Franciscan of the future who dies will do well to 
count up his children before he shuffles off — and to see that 
all the precincts have been heard from, too. 

WHEN Peter Jackson, as " Uncle Tom," falls down at Stock- 
well's Theatre, where he is to appear in that historic play, 
some wag in the gallery will be sure to count him out. 



THE California and Nevada railway is moving on all right 
enough. In fact, a contract has just been let for building 
another five miles of it. The only trouble seems to be that no 
matter how much the California and Nevada moves on, it never 
gets anywhere. 

IF the late Justice Lamar was not the ablest of American jurists, 
be was at least an honest man upon a bench that has not been 
always free of the attaint c t corruption, and no man ever said that 
in the highest or lowest place to which he was called he did not do 
his full duty as a gentleman of spotless integrity. 



THE Legislature has wisely given over the task of providing 
jobs for all the ward strikers of the State. It was such a per- 
fectly hopeless task, you know. And then if they had all been 
taken care of, those yawning voids at the several State penal 
institutions might never have been filled. 

IF nothing will turn Manager Stockwell from the pecunious 
iniquity of starring Peter Jackson, and he is probably joined 
to his dusky, if profitable, idol, it is respectfully suggested that 
Peter be cast for Othello instead of Uncle Tom. There is a preity 
bit of fighting in Othello, and, though it be not exactly of Peter's 
sort, he would probably be vastly more at home even in strang- 
ling a woman than in going out alone for a catch-as-catch-can 
bout at prayer. And then there is the chance to ring in some 
vicious little pug as Iago. A little pug would double the attrac- 
tion, and it is easy enough to get a vicious one. They are all 
that way. 



ONCJB more has the abhorred vacuum been filled. The branch 
county jail needs a lady, if ever an institution did, and 
no sooner is the need beginning to be felt than along comes Mrs. 
Mills-Evans and gets popped in. Oh, yes, Mrs. Mills-Evans is a 
real lady. If you do not believe that she will tell you the same 
thing herself. 

LONG distance telephone lines are now in course of construction 
connecting Fresno with San Francisco, via Hollister. This 
new line will traverse a part of the country that will avoid the 
heavy induction the telephone would be subjected to if used on 
wires following the Southern Pacific Railroad, and will be one of 
the greatest acquisitions to the telephone company's extensive 
system. 

THE complaint made by many of the inmates and some of the 
Directors of the Home for the Adult Blind that the Superin- 
tendent should be displaced on account of his physical infirmi- 
ties, seems well founded on common sense. A blind man should 
not be intrusted with the important duties of Superintendent of 
a public institution. That a blind man should also be watchman 
of the grounds is ridiculous. 

EDWARD F. SEARLES is truly a public benefactor, for he ia 
making a disposition of the fortune that he inherited that will 
be beneficial to thousands of bis countrymen. His latest gift in 
the cause of education is a building for the study of sciences at 
Bowdoin College. It will eclipse any like building in the coun- 
try, as money will not be considered in its equipment. Work 
upon the building will be commenced next spring. 

POSSIBLY the Republican party in Kansas would not die so 
hard had it not been so strong there — and that is true of the 
Republican party everywhere. History repeats itself, in this 
country as elsewhere, and there may be truth in the notion that 
the campaign of General Weaver in 1892 was the campaign of 
General Fremont in 1856 over again. You had as well keep your 
eye on the Populist party another time, gentlemen politicians. 

WHAT Mr. Dan Burns will do when political bosses are done 
away with is one of those things which no fellow has yet 
attempted to find out. We all know, of course, what Mr. Phil. 
Crimmins and Mr. Martin Kelly will do. We did not have to 
wait, bless you, until political bosses, as a rule, were done away 
with to find that out. Phil and Martin were just found to be 
trotting in the wrong class, and the ballot-box handicap let them 
out. 

THE French have been greatly disappointed because of the atti- 
tude of Mr. Gladstone upon the English occupation of Egypt; 
but that proves nothing, except, perhaps, the foolishness of the 
French in ever supposing that Mr. Gladstone would be a 
Liberal before he was an Englishman. Mr. Gladstone, like all 
statesmen, has a theory of politics, at which it pleases him to 
play in time of peace. At other times, it is his country first and 
bis theory afterwards, and in that, too, he is like all other states- 
men. 

OVER in Oakland, when a policeman is seen talking to a re- 
porter on the street, that means that the policeman loses his 
job. If you live in Oakland, therefore, you don't get the news, but 
if you are a just man, you can sleep in the sweet consciousness 
that the moral tone of the press is being upheld and that the re- 
porters are being preserved from eternal damnation. If you are 
an un]ust man, you can sleep in sweet consciousness, also, know- 
ing perfectly well that the police will not find out anything. As 
they do not talk td reporters, of course they cannot. 

THE adoption by the Assembly of the concurrent resolution oust- 
ing the Railroad Commissioners from office was one of the 
most outrageous, unfair and unmanly actions that has ever dis- 
graced a legealative body. All fair-minded people throughout 
the State, even those who were most utterly opposed to the 
Commission, will resent this high-handed procedure. The Com- 
mission was entitled to a fair and open trial upon charges pre- 
ferred against it. The manner in which it was deposed was 
un-American and contrary to the spirit of justice that pervades 
our institutions. Dr. Matthews, who voted in favor of the reso- 
lution, because he said he was indignant at Mr. Rea's letter, and 
for that reason alone, proved himself a political demagogue, with 
no appreciation of justice. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893 . 



CAN UNCLE SAM SAFELY LOAN MONEY? 

ONE of tbe least understood functions of government is the 
business of making and issuing tbe people's money. If every 
man paid bis neighbor in kind for what be bought, we should 
have a return to the old system of barter, and gold and silver, 
except for use in the arts, would lose their value. But it is sim- 
ply not convenient to pay directly in kind. Indirectly, however, 
we still all pay in that way. In other words, men still labor to 
live. We give out of the fruits of our labor in return for the fruits 
of other men's labor; only that we, meanwhile, for the sake of 
convenience, go to the banker, broker or middleman and get from 
him the gold and silver, which in themselves have little or no 
intrinsic value, but which serve our purpose in that they facili- 
tate our operation in parting with our labor or its fruits in return 
for something we want. The so-called precious metals are easier 
to receive and deliver and handle generally than the ordinary 
products of toil, and accordingly, for that reason, and that only, 
the world has become accustomed to the use of what is pleased 
to call » money"— a thing of little value in itself, but which may 
arbitrarily be made to have any current value that a solvent gov- 
ernment may choose to stamp upon its face. We see how this is 
in the present use by our government of silver. The amount of 
the white metal we put in a dollar is received in other countries 
as only of the value of 75 cents, but because it bears the stamp 
of our own perfectly safe and honest government, we readily 
accept it in payment of 100 cents. Indeed, we do the same thing 
with its pieces of paper on which its promises are printed instead 
of stamped. Moreover, we think those paper promises the very 
best of money. They are convenient to carry around, or to stow 
away, or to pass from hand to hand; in short, they serve the 
purposes of money, as a medium of exchange, better than any 
other form of currency yet devised. In fact, the convenience of 
paper currency is so great in many ways that its use has become 
one of the established practices of even the most conservative 
governments. Uncle Sam has resort to its use for his own and 
bis people's benefit, and mighty advantageous both he and they 
on occasion have found it to be. It carried them through the war 
and saved tbe government and country. Since then we have 
gone further, and so far have not fared worse. We now permit 
our national banks to issue paper notes, the redemption of which 
we guarantee. It is an arrangement that has proved a conveni- 
ence to the people and very profitable to the institutions which 
have enjoyed the privilege; so profitable, indeed, that it is diffi- 
cult to tell why Uncle Sam should delegate a power which he can 
better exercise for himself. England, in like manner, delegates 
to a siogle bank the authority to issue paper money that 
passes current everywhere throughout the Empire, and, as a 
matter of fact, is sometimes at a premium at places at which bills 
of exchange happen to be selling high. The security at the back 
of our National bank notes, which is acceptable to our Govern- 
ment and gives us all the confidence in them we show when we 
so readily accept them, is the deposit with the United States 
Treasurer of a certain amount of the nation's bonds. At the 
back of the Bank of England's notes, which serve as almost a 
wide-world currency, the security is a section in the bank's char- 
ter (which may be and several times has been suspended) requir- 
ing that it shall at all times keep in its vaults an amount of gold 
equal, if we remember rightly, to one-third of its note issue. 
That is to say, it may, and it almost invariably does, issue to the 
people a volume of paper money which could not be immediately 
redeemed upon demand, and for a considerable portion of which 
it holds no readily available security. Yet, as we have seen, thit 
paper currency serves the world's purposes of money so well that 
it is readily accepted everywhere at par, and at certain times and 
places commands more than its face value in gold. "As safe as 
the Bank of England" is accepted as a proverbial truth wherever 
the language is spoken. The banfe having established confidence 
in its ability to pay, its notes, or paper promises to pay, are 
deemed good by everybody, when, as a matter of fact, two out of 
three would be bad if tbe whole were presented for collection. 
But experience demonstrates that nothing of the kind will ever 
happen. In the course of business money comes in as well as 
goes out. Tbe coin paid out to one man is by him handed over 
to another, who straightaway takes it back to the bank again. 
Bills of exchange, clearing houses, and other mercantile and 
financial devices, adjust accounts so easily all round that the ac- 
tual handling of coin amounts to a mere bagatelle compared with 
the volume of trade done. Yet the necessity of the individual to 
have money or credit with the bank is as great as it ever was. 
The Bank of England could not get along with customers who 
should deal with it as it does with the general public. It is plain 
that the "making of money" for issuance among the people is a 
governmental function often delegated to private corporations, 
without profit to the Government or advantage to the people. 
We think, further, that in addition to making money, Uncle Sam 
can loan it as safely as the Bank of England, and that upon se- 
curity that private money-lenders always prefer as tbe safest 
and best the world knows, namely, upon improved and produc- 
tive real estate, in the way proposed by Senator Stanford. 



WILL CLEVELAND STOP PAYING THE DEBT. 



IP there is to be tariff reform, reduction of taxation, and other 
good things promised by and expected of the incoming ad- 
ministration, a way must be found to lessen the public expendi- 
tures. The News Letter has heretofore shown how difficult it is 
to change appropriations which the party soon to leave power, 
has labored assiduously during the past four years to render per- 
manent. It almost seems as if the billion dollar minimum has 
come to stay. If it ha?, there can be no reduction of taxes and 
no tariff reform worthy of the name. It is hard t) retrench when 
the money-voting-power is not that way minded. Yet some- 
thing has got to be done to justify the advocacy of economics that 
has taken place during the past four or five years. How can 
that something be better accomplished than by stopping, either 
in whole or in part, further payments into the sinking fund that 
pays off the national debt? We believe the time has fully come 
when that step ought to be taken. There is no necessity for, 
and no wisdom in further payments into that fund. The present 
generation has done nobly in that regard, and may well be al- 
lowed a breathing spell. It has often been said that "a public 
debt is a public blessing" and that, in a certain sense, is more 
nearly true than unthinking people are likely to suspect. We 
need government-guaranteed securities for many purposes. They 
form the sound basis for the safest banking system this country 
has ever enjoyed. They are particularly useful for the invest- 
ment of trust funds and for other purposes too numerous to men- 
tion. The country has not at present any too many bonds to 
serve the many good and useful ends to which they are applicable, 
The debt is now below the billion dollar mark, and is a mere 
bagatelle to be owed by this rich nation of sixty-five millions of 
people. All tbe good there was to accomplish in rapidly reduc- 
ing the debt has been accomplished. Our credit abroad is now 
second to that of no other nation, and had we a war on our 
hands, we could raise the sinews necessary for its prosecution 
without trouble and at low interest. The money we continue to 
pay out at such a rapid rate is worth more in the pockets of the 
people than the two and a half per cent, we are now paying for 
it. There are few or no industries in tbe country that do not 
yield a better return than that upon the capital invested. Pay- 
ing off a low-interest-bearing debt is not good financial policy so 
long as we can use the money to better advantage, and of our 
capacity to so use it at present there cannot be the shadow of a 
doubt. The President-elect would find in this direction a way to 
render his economic reforms easy. We do not believe he will 
find such a way in any other direction, and we further believe 
that tbe true policy of all tariff-reformers is to advocate the tak- 
ing of the one step that will render it possible for them to make 
their reform radical, effective, and acceptable to thinking people. 
It would be a bold move, worthy of Mr. Cleveland's reputation 
for courage, and we think it would promptly prove a popular 
move; at auy rate, we are satisfied it would prove a wise move 
for the countiy, ard therefore we make no apology for inviting 
party leaders to give it early and serious consideration. It can- 
not be said that the public mind is unprepared for such a step. 
It is one that has been advocated by tbe independent press for 
years past. We are now simply paying off the very attenuated 
balance of a debt, because we have become accistomed to do so, 
and not because there is any longer sound sense or discretion in 
such a financial operation. Better leave our money where it ia 
doing more good. 



AS TO STEPHEN M. WHITE'S ELECTION. 



THE News Letter has had its say in regard to California's 
junior Senator, and has nothing to take back, or vary in that 
connection. We have nothing but commendation for tbe meth- 
ods of bis election, which were honorable alike to the candidate 
and to the party that has raised him to an exalted position, 
which he has the capacity to fill with distinguished usefulness to 
the public, credit to his State, and honor to himself. Mr. White 
had made himself, by his courageous and manly course in openly 
making his fight before the people of the whole State, the in- 
evitable and logical candidate of his party, and as the Democracy 
carried the State with him as its candidate, his election followed 
almost as a matter of course. It was a fight of brains, and not 
of money, as everybody knows. The scandals which two or 
three politicians, maddened by disappointment, uttered at Sacra- 
mento, had not even tbe appearance of truth in them, and should 
be treated as the acts of falsifiers and cowards. We are very 
sure, from indications not to be mistaken, that Mr. White did not 
spend a single dollar corruptly, and we believe that he made no 
promise of patronage, or of anything else, to secure any man's 
support, or the withdrawal of opposition to his candidature. We 
know that stories to tbe contrary are rife, but we decline to re- 
peat them because they have been denied by Mr. White himself, 
and that is enough for us. We believe them made out of whole 
cloth by interested parties, and until the contrary appears, sht.ll 
give Mr. White credit accordingly. 



[N this day of record breaking, first thing you know we may 
have an honest Legislature. 



Jan. 28, 1893 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVEY OF THE STATE. 

A JOINT COMMITTEE, composed of various committees rep- 
resenting the University of California, the Leland Sianford, 
Jr.. I'niversity, the Technical Socio 13 the Academy »f Sciences, and 
the Science Association o( the University ol California, has held a 
number of meetings, at which has Bed a plan whereby 

may be secured a detailed general map of permanent value for the 
more valuable portions of California, through the agency of the 
topographical section of the United States Geological Survey, and at 
a cost that would be equally divided between the State and the Fed- 
eral Government. The desirability of such a general atlas-sheet 
map for California is, in a general way. indicated by the committee 
by an enumeration of these advantag* > : It would afford a uniform 
base for the record and comparison of statistical facts, and for the il- 
lustration of the State's products ; it would serve for the preliminary 
planning of public works, such as the selection of routes for roads, 
railways or canals, by exhibiting all the possibilities and the impos- 
sibilities for the special undertaking in hand, in a general way, thus 
obviating the necessity for many trial surveys, and suggesting possi- 
bilities that the trial survey might not discover; it would aid in the 
proper understanding and just solution of many perplexing contro- 
versies, such as that between the hydraulic miners and the agricul- 
turists; it would prevent the development of radical mistakes in 
complex systems of irrigation, which might eventually necessitate 
expensive remodeling; it would serve as a base for the rapid, easy 
and accurate production of agricultural product and soil-maps, 
and for the study of the bearing of altitude (irrespective of soil qual- 
ity) upon horticultural products; it would simplify the preparation 
of real-estate maps; it would facilitate the solution of our forestry 
problems that are rapidly growing in intricacy and importance; it 
would aid in the planning of better highways for the readier trans- 
portation of farm products; it would greatly stimulate scientific re- 
search; it would facilitate travel for business, and would encourage 
travel for pleasure; as our last war abundantly demonstrated.it 
would vastly simplify military operations; and, finally, it would 
have a high educational value, important, though as difficult to de- 
fine as the value of culture in general. 

The map would be published in small sheets, each having about 
the proportions of a newspaper page, and all of which, when joined 
together, would make a continuous map. Each sheet, which would 
cover above six and a half townships, would thus be a complete map 
in itself. It is believed that the best interests of the work would not 
demand a larger expenditure than $50,000 annually. By the terms 
of the proposed arrangement with the United States Geological Sur- 
vey, one-half of this annual expense would be borne by that bureau. 
The cost of surveying the atlas sheets would average about $3,000 
each, and it is thought that the annual product of the survey would 
be from fifteen to twenty of these sheets. The cost of engraving 
would not have to be shared by the State. The cost of electrotyping 
and printing, from time to time, could be more than covered to the 
State Treasury by selling the sheets at a uniform price of ten cents 
each. It is thought that to survey in this manner the whole of the 
valley and foot-hill areas of the State, together with a small percent- 
age of the more important mountain areas, would take ten 3 r ears of 
time, and call for a total expenditure by the State of $250,000. The 
committee has now submitted its plan to the people for their en- 
dorsement. Such maps as that proposed have been made in nearly 
all European countries and in several Eastern States of the Union- 
Buch a map would be of great benefit to Ihe State, as pointed out by 
the committee. 

TO PROTECT PATRONS. 

THE bill introduced in the Legislature to compel racing and 
other associations that give public exhibitions to admit to 
their grounds people who pay or tender the usual fees and con- 
duct themselves in an orderly manner, is one that will probably 
meet with the warmest disapproval of the gentlemen of the Blood 
Horse Association. They have conducted their meetings in such 
a manner that is is only with fear and trembling that one who 
has had the temerity to censure them for their unfair practices ap- 
proaches their gateway. They caused one scandal at their track 
by ejecting from the grounds a visitor who had paid her fees, and 
was conducting herself in a proper manner. Then it declined to 
again admit this << offender," although the entrance fee was ten- 
dered. It should be compelled to admit all who wish to enter, 
provided they comply with the ordinary rules, pay the admission 
fees, and are quiet and orderly. Tom Williams, however, seems 
to think that other men have no rights on earth, or that they 
have to surrender all they have at his wish. Another bill that 
might cause some change in the management of the Blood Horse 
meetings would be one making it a felony to connive at, or know- 
ingly allow, any fraud to be perpetrated at the race track. If this 
were a law several prominent gamesters might soon assume 
stripes. 

MR. BRETZ might go into the Third House of the Legislature 
after the Assembly shall have finished with him. Nobody 
can expel him, then, and the worse he gets the more highly will 
he be honored. That is a whole lot better than a refuge in a luna- 
tic asylum. 



THE MEN WITH INFLUENCE. 

THE men who gain influence around Congresses, Legislatures, 
Boards of Supervisors and other public offices are certainly a 
curious nondescript class. The same old crowd are at work 
around the capitol at Sacramento thai were such faithful hench- 
men of Buckley four years ago, and thatdid Crimmins and Kelly 
such yeoman's service two years ago. No matter which party is 
in the majority, the same class of shady politicians manage to 
gain influence. Their kind has just been described in Washing- 
ton by a high authority, in terms that ought to come home to 
the consciences of public men, if they have any. Dr. Ainsworth, 
who, by a special Act of Congres-s, has been placed in charge of 
the record and pension division of the War Department, with 
rank of Colonel, and who has been intrusted with the entire 
administration of pension matters, so far as they relate to army 
records, was examined the other day before a sub-committee of 
the House of Representatives, and what he said was worth lis- 
tening to. In fact, his testimony was decidedly racy. In speak- 
ing of the proposed transfer of the whole pension business to the 
War Department, he said: " No commissioner, whether the pres- 
ent one or the new appointee of Pre.-ident Cleveland, can bring 
order out of the chaos in the Pension Office, because he has no 
authority to keep order and discipline, or discharge refractory or 
worthless employees. You can set this down as a general rule, 
with but few exceptions, that the more worthless a public employee 
is, the greater the amount of influence he possesses. The good 
man is usually a man without influence, but the drunkard, the 
loafer or the insubordinate trifler is a man of so much influence 
that the Chief of the Bureau cannot get him out." Appalling as 
that statement ia in regard to the condition of things around a 
great bureau that is handling untold sums of the public money, 
there can be no doubt that it is true, not only of that department, 
but of many others. In fact, it is too true in regard to State and 
county, as well as Federal offices. No matter what the name of 
the board or commission, or which party is in power, the men 
around with influence in this State are, as a general rule, worth- 
less fellows, unfit for aDy job that may happen to turn up. This 
would not be the case as frequently as it is, if elected officials and 
representatives of the people kept as good company as they 
ought to do. But they are given to consorting with their own 
kind, and therein consists the real difficulty. It is a sorry condi- 
tion of things. 

AS TO NATIONAL ROADS. 

WE are in receipt of another long communication from that in- 
defatigable gentleman, Albert A. Pope, who seems de- 
termined to establish good roads throughout the country, if his in- 
dividual efforts can effect the purpose. Mr. Pope calls particular at- 
tention to the fact that the petition for the proposed National Road 
Department at Washington does not ask for anything more than 
that there be founded in the City of Washington, in the District of 
Columbia, a Road Department, similar to the Agricultural Depart- 
ment, for the purpose of promoting knowledge in the art of con- 
structing and maintaining roads; and ask that in such department 
provision be made for teaching students so that they may become 
skilled road engineers. In connection with this road department, it 
is requested that there be established a permanent exhibit, in which 
shall be shown sections of roads, illustrating the various methods of 
construction, and also the best road materials and machinery. It is 
also asked that Congress appropriate funds sufficient to erect a build- 
ing at the World's Columbian Exposition for the purpose of a com- 
prehensive road exhibit. The object of the Agricultural Department 
is to promote knowledge in relation to agriculture, and the object of 
the Road Department would be simply to promote knowledge in re- 
lation to roads. 

While Mr. Pope's idea is certainly a good one, the benefits to be 
derived from it will depend altogether upon the efforts of State and 
county governments to improve the condition of their roadways, for 
it is not proposed that the Federal Government shall do more than 
afford facilities for local governments to acquire knowledge on the 
subiect. That the roads throughout the country are, as a rule, in a 
bad condition as compared with European highways, there can be no 
doubt; nor can there be any reasonable objection made to any ef- 
forts made with a view to their improvement. Whether the proposed 
National Road Department, if organized, would effect the desired re- 
sult, is, however, questionable. It would be merely a bureau for the 
dissemination of knowledge that any enterprising State or county 
can now get if it wants it. The agitation on the subject will draw 
attention to the condition of our roadways, and therefore should at 
least effect some good. 



AUDITOR BRODERICK proposes to employ no female book- 
keepers who come to him seeking places with diamonds in 
their ears, and it is just possible that Auditor Broderick, though 
he has gone about it, perhaps, in a somewhat crude and brutal 
way, has stumbled upon a great truth. The young woman who 
wears diamonds has no need of public employment. She has no 
need of employment of any kind, except possibly as an alterna- 
tive against a charge of vagrancy. 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893, 



EDWIN DEAKIN'S PAINTINGS. 

EDWIN DEAKIN, the artist, issued cards last Saturday for a 
private view of his paintinps, in room 231 of the Crocker 
Building. There, upon the top floor of the great building, in a 
well-lighted apartment, has been seen by many visitors during 
the week one of the very best displays of fine canvases that has 
aroused the admiration of art-lovers of this city for some time. 
Mr. Deakin's work is well-known here and in the East, and he 
has a high reputation as a man of genius. The principal canvas 
shown in this collection of his works is the first mentioned in the 
catalogue: " East View of Notre Dame, Paris." In making this 
study, Mr. Deakin left the beaten track and presented an entirely 
new view of the great cathedral. Most pictures of Notre Dame 
show the front view, but this painting of the scene from the 
river baa a charm of its own that the others do not possess. In 
the foreground, massed against the heavy walls that surround 
the cathedral grounds, are several old-style scows and arks of the 
river, with their high and ancient rudders, that seem to require 
a Titan's hand to move them. The smoke that rises lazily from 
the decks of these craft serve to break the severe lines of the 
stone embankment, and also makes a good effect, combined with 
the color of the trees that bend their green branches above the 
wall. Back of the trees rise the impressive sides of the magnifi- 
cent cathedral, surmounted by the lofty spire that lifts its head 
high into the sky of blue and gray that bends its arch above it. 
In the foreground, also, but on the rigbt hand side, is given an 
idea of one of the many bridges that span the river. A thread 
of smoke that hangs upon its side gives suggestion of the passen- 
ger boat that has just passed beneath it, borne by the rapid cur- 
rent. The picture is in Mr. Deakin's best style. He is himself 
well satisfied with it, and considers it one of his most successful 
works. It is certainly an excellent canvas, and well deserving 
of all the praise l .hat has been conferred upon it by the art con- 
noisseurs who have seen it. 

"Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey," is a picture that at once 
aronses in one all the veneration that is due that ancient and 
historic pile and the famous men that rest beDeath the shadows 
of its walls. The "Poet's Corner" of the Abbey is its most inter- 
esting portion, for it is there that one feels identified with the 
mortal remains of the masters of English poetry. Through a 
large rose window the sunbeams cast their bright shafts to mingle 
on the columns with others that enter through an illuminated 
window. There is much feeling in the picture, which is painted 
in a somber tone that adds to the impressiveness of the subject. 

Another fine canvas is "Christmas Morning," the motif for 
which Mr. Deakin took from a corner of the old Hotel de Cluny, 
in Paris. The scene is the outside of a church, the space in front 
of the heavy door being covered with snow, in which dances the 
sunlight, reflected from an illuminated window in the walls of 
the holy edifice. The architecture of the building is massive, and 
in that style so much favored by the old builders of the Conti- 
nent. The canvas will be sure to attract very favorable attention. 

Among the smaller paintings that will be greatly appreciated, 
are an outdoor "Study on Strawberry Creek, Berkeley;" and "An 
Old Moss Back," another study on the creek. Mr. Deakin also 
shows a number of fruit pieces, all of which have been rendered 
with very happy effect. His pictures will be on view until 
Tuesday, February 14th. 



OBITUARY. 

FREDERICK L. CASTLE, the well-known merchant, died at 
his residence, on the northeast corner of Sutter street and 
Van Ness avenue, Thursday afternoon. Mr. Castle was born in 
London, England, on February 7, 1829, and was 63 years and 11 
months old when he died. He emigrated to this country when 19 
years old, and had been here only a few years when the gold discov- 
ery in California attracted him to this State. In 1850 he started in 
business on a modest scale as a grocer. By strict attention to his 
affairs, he four years later found himself sufficiently well off to re- 
turn to England and wed the lady of his choice. Returning to San 
Francisco, Mr. Castle again took up the management of his business, 
and so much ability did he devote to it, that at present the firm of 
Castle Brothers is one of the principal tea, coffee, spice and com- 
mission houses of America. 

Aa his sons attained their majority, Mr. Castle made them 
partners in the firm, which is now under the management of his 
three sons. He devoted his personal attention to his affairs 
until June last, when he was compelled by sickness to retire 
from active work at the store and confine himself to his resi- 
. dence. Mr. Castle was President of the Union Club before it was 
consolidated with the Pacific Club, and was also an old member 
of the Bohemian Club. He was a Past Vice-President of the 
Chamber of Commerce, and was succeeded by Barry Baldwin as 
President of the Traffic Association. 



"HIS MAJESTY" AT DRESS REHEARSAL. 

THE rehearsals for the new opera, His Majesty, by H. J. Stew- 
art, composer, and Peter Robertson, librettist, are now as- 
suming a shape that enable one to judge pretty fairly of the merits 
both of the opera and the performers. The music is extremely me- 
lodious, and its appropriateness to the words of the libretto is re- 
markable and striking. While smooth and sonorous to theear.it 
lends itself easily to the sentiment of humor of the lines. Some of 
the soloists' songs and the concerted pieces are worthy of any singer 
and any composer of comic opera. 

The libretto is so full of good points that it justifies the suggestion 
that much of it will be lost unless the players enunciate the words 
more clearly than during rehearsals so far. The ladies and gentle- 
men do as well, perhaps better in this respect, than many profes- 
sionals, but it is a pity that one line of the bright and witty libretto 
be lost, and extra care should be taken to insure its being heard and 
understood by the audience. 

The plot is amusing and full of capabilities. The people of Patata 
want a king, and finding one out of a job, so to speak, engage him 
at a salary. Patata being in a state of bankruptcy, the King's salary 
is irregularly paid, and His Majesty is reduced to letting apartments 
in the palace, while the Queen does the work of the royal household 
with her own royal hands. This idea is very laughably carried 
through the opera. 

The first scene is at the celebration of the King's birthday by his 
loyal employer-subjects. The opening chorus is by the Patatan 
peasantry, in deprecation of what they declare one 
" Of those absurd old fallacies. 

That there's no happiness or fun 
In castles or in palaces." 
The peasants then salute His Majesty in the same spirit, the mu- 
sical and absurd lines ending with : 

" For though in face and figure he 
Is just like all the rest of us, 
We've made him King, and that, you see, 
Gives him somewhat the best of us." 
A rollicking and rhythmical chorus is that sung by King and sub- 
jects, which begins 

" When I consented to be born, 
It was for me the saddest thing. 
The saddest possible kind of a thing, 
That I elected, fate forlorn. 

To be the son of a regular King, 
The poorest possible kind of a King." 
The quotations given are scant, but will serve to indicate the spirit 
and the odd and droll conceits of the amusing libretto. 

Mr. Stewart's music is in many respects an improvement on that 
of Bluff King Hal. The choruses, orchestration and ensemble work 
are equally good, while the solos are much more melodious and tak- 
ing. 

The rehearsal of Thursday night shows that the cast is, for the 
most part, about the best that could have been made in the city. 
Charles Dickman makes a noble-looking King Cadenza, and has 
some good solos and taking duets with the Queen, Mrs. Dickman. 
Donald deV. Graham appears to the manor-born as Prince Feodor, 
and sang on Thursday night his solo, " The haughty courtier passed 
me by," in a voice and style that roused the invited spectators to an 
outburst of applause. T. J. Walsh, as the mock Prince, and Elmer 
de Pue, as Don Impressario, sang and acted well. Mrs. Mary 
Wyman- Williams is the Princess Enid. 

The star of the evening was, and will be, unquestionably, Mrs. 
Brechemn, the sweet singer of the Presidio, whose rich voice and 
fine method were no surprise of course. 

The public production will be at the Grand Opera House, Febru- 
ary 8th. for the benefit of the San Francisco Polyclinic. The auction 
sale of premium seats will begin at the California Theatre at noon on 
Wednesday next, February 1st. 



Camelline is the best known emollient for the complexion. It is 
used by all ladies who desire to retain the beauty of their complex- 
ions, for its virtues are many and wonderful. No lady's boudoir is 
complete unless she has Camelline upon her dressing stand. 



Thousands of people who have visited the citrus fair at the Me- 
chanics' Pavilion have expressed desires to procure photographs of 
the leading exhibits. Such may be had from George Knight, the 
photogiapher, either at his stand in the gallery at the Fair, or at 31 
Third street. 

An Extended Popularity. Brown's Bronchial Troches have for 
many years been the most popular article iu use for relieving Coughs and 
Throat troubles. 



Eyes tested accordiner to physiological laws of light, and not by machin- 
ery. C. Muller, the progressive optician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush 

MR. H. J. STEWART, 

PROFESSOR OF SINGIM, PIMO FORTE, OROAil ADD HAR.U0SV. 

AND 

MRS. H J. STEWART, 

PROFESSOR OF THE PIA1J0-F0RTE, 

Will resume teaching TUESDAY, JAN. 3d. 

2417 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS l.l I n i: 



WHAT SHALL SHE SAY TO HIM? 
fBr Pi Viiioh.] 

'* 1"\0 women not owe il to themselves to make society more 
L/ brilliant intellectually? Bbonld they not revive the lost art 
ol conversation?" "Should a sot lety gfarl, well educated, wealthy, 
cultured and polished, be satisfied with an average man?" " Are 
men slow to return to a clever woman?" •• If so, is it because of 
their inability to appreciate her?" ■« Do men prefer forbearance 
in women?" These are a few of the questions that were pro- 
pounded to me during a discussion upon the intellectual tendency 
of the times. "Is conversation a lost art?" I ask in return. In 
all things we feel the spirit of the age. We are all In a hurry. It 
may be that as we near the close of the century we are anxious 
to have it over, and to start afresh with a 1900 at the head of 
our calendars. We have so much to bear, to see^to learn, that 
we hasten through everything. We have so much to read that 
we strive to get the news in the most condensed form, and often 
content ourselves with reading the headlines or with looking at 
the pictures. Conversation has been curtailed in the general rush 
for brevity. The insidious yet almost irresistible creeping in of 
the curl " Thanks," in place of the more courteous " Thank 
you," is an instance familiar and to the point. The too general 
use of slang is another evidence that, for the sake of conciseness, 
of saying much in as few words as possible, the men and women 
of to-day welcome any device for saving time and speech. Not 
that they may lazily say less, but that they may have time to 
say more. 

" In our intercourse with each other we have fallen into the 
habit of rapid, disjointed utterances. We do not finish our own 
sentences, nor do we allow others to reach a period. " Hurry up; 
get through; next;" is the unspoken slogan in conversation. We 
are like the Athenians of old who sought to know and to hear — and, 
I might add, to say some new thing. This is true of our general 
social intercourse. Who believes that two intelligent persons, 
nowadays, are any more at a loss to express themselves or to 
converse with each other than were two other such people in 
days that are now historic ? At all times and in all classes of so- 
ciety have there not been people who loved the sound of their 
own voices, who harangued the company to the verge of dis- 
traction ? Surely there is such a man in every prayer meeting, 
there is such a woman in every sewing society, there are such 
persons in all clubs and associations. Carlyle was one; he bore 
down his opponent by sheer physical force of noise, roaring with 
all his might so as to drown out his weaker-lunged opponent. 
Macaulay was another. His dinner " conversation " was some- 
thing to be dreaded by gods and men. His thunders of speech 
were occasionally lightened by brilliant flashes of silence. George 
Eliot waa another type of the haranguing speaker. Kate Field 
told me that George Eliot's evenings at home were characterized 
by her monologues, delivered in a clear, melodious, impressive 
voice, and that if any one ventured to utter a word even in an 
undertone during her flow of words, her ever-watchful husband 
would say: " Hush, Mrs. Lewes is speaking." 

But all that is not conversation, though in the minds of some it 
may pass as such. To converse is to meet, thrust, parry, lunge, 
to pink an opponent; o to compare, contrast and agree with a 
companion. It is to, take a text and stick to it with a certain re- 
sponsive exercise as a feature of the discussion, so that each 
speaker shall have a chance to bear and to be heard. Some one 
has well said that conversaiion is possible but between two. Is 
there anything more exasperating than to have the subject sud- 
denly changed by a third parly, whose ignorance or want of in- 
terest has caused him to wish for a different topic ? General con- 
versation is only a series of interruptions, often as brilliant' as a 
pyrotechnic display, it is true, but each one who participates sim- 
ply sets off bis own little bundle of sky-rockets or whizzes a pin- 
wheel or two, while in the true conversation — in the talk, between 
two people — each feeds the flame and piles the bonfire higher and 
higher until the entire field bounded by their subject is well- 
itluminaled. 

Is it possible to converse at social functions? Certainly not at 
afternoon teas where people are coming and going, and unable to 
remain more than a second or two in one place or with the same 
person. Certainly not at dancing parties, for the square dances 
are full of interruptions, and the round dances too laborious, and 
too great a struggle for the survival of the fittest to permit of 
more than a gasp or two of sweet nothings. Would it not be 
quite safe to say that only at the theatre and the opera does so- 
ciety do itself the pleasure of conversing, and that a theatre party 
i3 always more enjoyed by its members than it is by the rest of 
the house? If the society girl would talk less there, and con- 
verse more in the drawing-room.it might " elevate " society. 
But as to her being content with an average man, she generally 
takes what she can get. It is said that men talk business, poli- 
tics, or tell questionable stories when among themselves; that 
women talk dress, servants and gossip to one another. Un- 
doubtedly this is true to a great extent, but that it is a general 
fact, I am loath to believe. This, however, is true, that if women 



read nothing but novels and the society column of the paper; if 
men never get beyond the trade reports or a play bill, they must 
be at a loss when any intellectual, moral, political or religious 
question of the time is introduced. Il is impossible to eradicate 
frivolity from a nature in which it is ingrained, but many girls 
appear frivolous because their minds have not been trained. 
They have not heard current topics discussed from their youth 
up, they have not read the news of the world day by day, they 
have not been taught to observe, to think, to reason, to express 
themselves in language devoid of exaggeration. They do not 
know how to talk. This brings me to what is after all the lead- 
ing questions of tbem alt: Is it worth while for a girl to be able 
to converse brilliantly and well? Do men like clever women? 
No woman can answer these questions save from observation. 
I asked a man to tell me his honest, candid opinion, and this is 
what he said: " Well, don't you know, really, a man is afraid of 
a clever woman generally. She carries more guns than he can 
muster, and he's afraid she'll make him appear ridiculous, and no 
man likes to appear foolish, don't you know, especially in the 
presence of a woman. Then, again, it hurts a man's self-respect 
to discover that a woman knows more than be does on a subject. 
Besides, your smart woman, don't you know, has such an irri- 
tating way of showing off." That seemed to be the head and 
front of her offending; the clever woman has the average mau at 
a disadvantage. He knows it. and he does not like it. The sen- 
sation is not pleasant. He takes care not to repeat it. He keeps 
away from her. He goes away and seeks out the sweet, the 
solacing, the flattering companionship of some ox eyed daisy of a 
girl whose round-orbed wonder at his wit will " mark him one" 
every time he opens his mouth. He has the field all to himself. 
He marries the sweet, appreciative little thing; then he discovers 
that the inability to count her change, which before marriage, 
along with the rest of her appealing helplessness, filled him with 
a sense of strength, is, after marriage, very apt to land her in 
financial difficulty with her cook. He thinks that all women are 
incapable. When she ceases to be impressed by his empty re- 
marks; when, because she has no mental resources of her own, 
she grows fretful and peevish, so that he dreads to go home, then 
he thinks that marriage is a failure. Poor fellow, so it is for him. 
He made it so. 

But that there are men who respect intellect in a woman; who 
will return, and return yet again to talk with a bright woman, 
needs no demonstration at my hand. For the cleverest woman 
of all is she who will be deferential instead of authoritative; who 
will forbear to express all her convictions at once; who will con- 
vey her knowledge in the form of a graciously worded question, 
and who, now and then, will ask for information, although she 
might be capable uf writing an article on that self-same subject 
for the Encyclopaedia Brittanica. 



IT is proposed by a bill now before the Legislature to accelerate 
the making of election returns by a machine-worked ballot- 
box. We had a faint idea that the ballot boxes were now worked 
by a machine. How will the new machine improve affairs? 



Light Muffins. 

By Eliza R. Parker, Bedford, Ky. 

Sift one quart of flour, and two 
teaspoons of Cleveland's Baking 
Powder. Add two tablespoons of 
melted butter, a tea cup of sweet 
milk, a teaspoon of salt, and the 
beaten whites of six eggs. Bake in 
well greased muffin moulds. 

Use only Cleveland's baking powder, 
ike proportions are made for that. 50S 

Cam A pure cream of tartar powder. 
gYoiantfs 



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"Absolutely the Best.' 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 




i^^t^w^D 



We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



K ""THE first shall be last, and the last first," may be quoted of 
1 theFrohiuan Comedians' engagement at the Baldwin, if 
similarity of inanity is implied. Either might have taken the 
place of the other on this ground. Settled Out of Court was an in- 
glorious beginning, and Sydney Grundy's Arabian Nights an "im- 
potent conclusion.'' The two intervening plays, The Sportsman 
and Wilkinson's Widows, were bright and amusing, and the col- 
lapse in the last week's production is the more notable. These 
strictures relate wholly to the play. Mr. Holland and M. A. 
Kennedy would make an audience laugh if they should come out 
on the stage and play "puss in the corner," and the major part 
of Mr. Frobman's company could materially aid in making the 
evening go merrily. Bat we could not accept the play as " new," 
even if so announced in the bills that never tell a He. Neither 
can we so accept Mr. Grundy's play. The only material point of 
difference between this and The Sportsman is that a dreadful 
young person from the "Theatre Francaise " takes the place of 
the deck of cards (and she has so many prototypes that no one 
not a '* freak " could count them on his fingers} and the verbal 
figure-head, Haroun-al-Raschid, whom we never see. Mr. 
Grundy's putting bis name to The Arabian Nights is about as im- 
pudent as if be had given Romeo and Juliet another name to 
smell as sweet by, and a new locale, and then announced it as " a 
new play by Sydney Grundy, for the first time in America." 

* # » 

Having thus disposed of the piece, it remains to say in justice 
that it has been so charmingly played that the audiences have 
undoubtedly almost lost sight of the undeniable facts above set 
down. Mr. Holland slips so easily and delightfully into the role 
of a young husband with an irresistible talent for fibbing to his 
confiding young wife, that one wonders that his actual wife — in 
esse or in posse — should ever, after seeing him act, believe a word 
he says to her. He is as delightfully naive in his duplicity as 
Hummingtop as in all similar characters and setting aside the 
improbability and intrinsic unloveliness of the lying, the per- 
sonation is thoroughly enjoyable. Miss Evelyn Campbell is 
easy, natural, and essentially ladylike in the part of the young 
wife and the other characters are well taken, especially that ot 
the fop by Chas. 8. Abbe. 

j* * # 

When one reads the announcement of A Night Off it naturally 
suggests a certain amount of temerity in a company presenting a 
piece so identified with the Daly company, unless to a Grove- 
street or South-side audience, which never expects to see a Daly 
play unless as a very free translation. But the audience at Stock- 
well's Monday night was certainly impressed with no such idea. 
No Daly company, or any other, ever held a better Professor 
Babbitt than L. R. Stockwell. The seeming serious unconscious- 
ness that he is doing anything funny is a gift which Mr. Stock- 
well shows in a degree equaled by no other actor ever seen here, 
and this gift betrays itself irresistibly as he potters about the 
stage in the quaint garb of the learned, but not dry-as-dust, pro- 
fessor. His occasional lapse into a smile is so drolly and comically 
suggestive that any auditor who does not smile responsively has 
has no humor in his soul. 

w « * 

Mr. Osbourne is equally beyond the ordinary shady stage traged- 
ian as Marcus Brutus Snap. Two such actors in this amusing come- 
dy would carry it triumphantly even with worse support, and that 
at Stockwell's is by no means bad, though it certainly might be 
much better. Nick Long, as Harry Damask, helps out the two 
more prominent sinners amusingly and with his usual verve. 

* * # 

The curtain-raiser which was chosen to precede Mr. Grundy's 
play at the Baldwin, was probably selected by that shrewd actor 
himself with the idea that any piece after that must seem cheery 
and blithesome. The Burglar and the Judge has but one recom- 
mendation; it has given us one more glimpse nightly of the in- 
imitable Kennedy before his leaving us. He had a chance to do 
some remarkably clever acting, too, particularly when the burglar 
nas extracted his false teeth, but nothing could light up the 
dreary waste of plot and dialogue. The appalling heaviness 
weighted down Mr. Holland and transformed that born speeder 
of time into a priggish and burglarious bore. Even the dance at 
the rope's end, which might have been funny, was given without 
life or spirit. The piece is a dead weight which will drop easily, 
and Mr. Frohman should let go of it at once. 

* * * 

La Belle Selene has been another drawing card at the Tivoli. 
Mr. Schuetz and Tillie Salinger have done the best of the singing, 
and Ferris Hartman has carried off the honors in acting. The 
orchestra, as usual, has made itself a salient factor, and the entire 
production has done credit to actors and management. 



The third week of The Old Homestead still sees the California 
crowded, and the crowd apparently as pleased as ever with the 
old play that will not wear out. To-night and to-morrow night 
will be the last of a three-weeks' engagement, which would have 
been eminently satisfactory for a new play, and is remarkable 
for one so long familiar. 

« * • 

Mr. Leavitt's spectacle, Spider and Fly, can hardly be called an 
improvement on its last production here, though changed con- 
siderably, and novelty being always acceptable. The strength of 
the piece is, if anywhere, in its specialty rather than in its spec- 
tacular element. The costuming of the ballet is neat and pretty, 
though entirely conventional. Miss Royce, " queen of the mer- 
maids," is tall and handsome, and as she has no voice it is of less 
conseqnence that she doesn't know how to sing. The only thing 
to be regretted is that she tries it. The three Putnam sisters, 
Zarmo, the juggler, Jaguarine, the swords-woman, and an eccen- 
tric couple who develop considerable humor in a comic duet, are 
the best of the specially performers. The opening house was 
a good one, and it has kept up fairly through the week. 
* * * 

Candy is the Dew play which will re-introduce the wee players 
known as the Lilliputians, to a 8an Francisco audience at the 
Baldwin next Monday night. Franz Ebert, Minnie Becker, Her- 
mann Ring, and the funny little comedian, Adolf Zink, are still 
remembered by all theatre-goers, and the rest of the company, as 
well as the play, are well spoken of. 

• * » 

Beginning next Monday, Siberia will be put on for a two weeks' 
ran at 8tockwell's. All old theatre-goers will remember the sen- 
sation caused by Bartley Campbell's powerful melodrama on its 
first production here at the old California, and its revival will be 
an interesting event. That the production will be made with 
every attention to detail in staging, costumes, and scenery, the 
already won reputation of this theatre is sufficient assurance. 
Several new specialties will be introduced in the palace scene. 
■* » • 

Since the first production here of A Trip to Chinatown, about 
two years ago, Mr. Hoyt has entirely re-written and revised it, 
and it comes to the California next Monday night virtually a new 
play, as well as with the strong indorsement of a 500-night's run 
in New York. Scenery, furniture, draperies, etc., will be, it is 
promised, exact reproductions of those used at its Madison 
Square Theatre presentation. The sale of seats began Thursday 
and is already very large. 

• • * 

Carmen will be put on Monday night at the Tivoli, with Lizzie 
Annandale as Carmen, Tillie Salinger as Michaela. Ferdinand 
Schuetz as Don Jose, George Olmi as the Toreador, and Gracie 
Plaisted, Irene Mulle, Ed. Torpi, and E. N. Knight in the cast. 
Bizet's musical opera is always a favoiite, and the Tivoli com- 
pany, with Miss Annandale as Carmen, is well able to give it a 
satisfsctory production. 

• • * 

The programme for the Carr-Beel concert this afternoon will be: 
String quartette, Mendelssohn; cbaconne for two pianos, Raff, 
played by Mrs. Carmicbael-Carr and MIsb Weigel; terzetto for 
two violins and viola, Dvorak, with Miss Gill as vocalist, in sev- 
eral German songs. Miss Gill has just returned from Germany, 
where she has been studying with 8tockhausen. The Dvorak 
terzetto is entirely new here, and will be an interesting number. 
» • • 

Mr. Albert Marks, manager of Irving Hall, announces the 
appearance there in March of the eminent pianist, Adele Aus der 
Ohe. This lady's previous performances have made so profound 
an artistic impression that her greeting will be one seldom 
accorded to any musician. To a masculine strength and force, 
Miss Aus der Ohe adds a smoothness and delicacy of touch rarely 
equaled. Her coming promises a genuine treat to all lovers of 
high-class music. 

• * * 

The attention of several charitable ladies having been called to 
the sad case of Mrs. Davis, an aged and infirm woman in dire 
want, a concert for her benefit has been arranged to take place at 
Irving Hall, next Wednesday afternoon, under the direction of 
Mrs. Fleissner-Lewis. The date first set, January 25th, has been 
changed to the one named. The best musical talent in the city 
will assist, and all who attend can enjoy at once a rare musical 
treat and the consciousness of helping the unfortunate. 

• * * 

The San Francisco Operatic Society will produce A Trip to Africa 
at the Grand Opera House, Feb. 2nd, in aid of the furnishing 
fund of St. John's Church. As this is the tenth public perform- 
ance of the society, its long practice may reasonably insure 
an excellent rendition of Von Suppe's Opera. The prima 
donna, MisB Alvina Heuer, a general favorite musically and so- 
cially, has in Titania Tanfarri a part entirely suited to her, and 
the rehearsals show that Mr. A. M. Thornton's rendition of the 
difficult role of Miradillo will equal in fire and life that of most 
professionals who have essayed it here. Mrs. Madden, contralto, 
and Mr, F. Coffin, tenor, will have important parts. Seats can 



Jan. 2S. 18SC,. 



SAN JKW Is, NEWS LETTER. 



be reserved at Sherman and Clav's. Jan. Slat and Feb. 1st and 

• • * 

It is a question if the "Symphony" of last Friday was not the best 
of the season in point of general excellence. The vocalist had & very 
pleasing voice, somewhat light, but sweet and expressive; and 
Mr. Zech's overture, "St Agues Eve.* 1 was a masterly composi- 
tion, sustaining well the picturesque and artistic effect of the 
poem. Mr. Bauer's orchestra never played better, and Beetho- 
ven's melodious and well-known overture, » Fidelio," was a 
good introduction to the deJghtful music of the Tschaikowsky 
suite. " Casse Novisette," which followed, and was the gem of the 
programme. The distinctive music of the different dances was 
finely given, and the delicious "Valse des Fieurs," which closes 
the suite, brought enthusiastic applause. Hermann Goetz's 
" symphony" (in F) closed the programme, which was a trifle 
long, so that the final number did not receive the attention it 
should. A word to the leader: it adds vastly to the enjoyment 
of a listener if be knows a little something of tbe nature of the 
material offered for his hearing. The unfortnnates who sat under 
the gallery last Friday were unable to read their programmes, 
owing to the obscurity surrounding them, and more than one was 
seen grbping for his seat. The full attendance at the concerts 
imply a supply of funds, so it certainly cannot be economy which 
prevents the lighting of a single gas jet in that part of the house. 
• » * 

The first concert of the second series of Alfred Wilkes' ballad 
concerts will take place on Wednesday evening next, at 8:15 
o'clock, at Maple Hall, Palace Hotel. The fashionable and po- 
pular success of the first series will doabtless be emphasized on 
this occasion. The surroundings of the Palace have given a pe- 
culiar charm to these very interesting concerts. Tbe acoustics 
are perfect, and the brightness of the hall and the comfortable 
and commodious accommodations make enjoyment assured 
The artists are all well and favorably known, and the programme 
very well chosen and attractive, so that a crowded house may 
reasonably be anticipated on Wednesday evening. 

# * » 

Sunday evening, January 29th, Papageno will be played by tbe 
German Theatre company at tbe Baldwin, for the benefit of Mr. 
Selig.— — The first of the second series of Mr. Alfred Wilkie's 
Palace Ballad Concerts will be given February 1st, at 8 p. m., in 

the Maple Room of the Palace. The concert announced to be 

given by Signora Virginia Ferrari, in which tbe gifted violinist, 
Signor Giullio Minetti was to make his bow as a soloist, is post- 
poned, on account of tbe lady's serious illness. The Saturday 

Morning Orchestra, composed of young society ladies, under tbe 
direction of J. H. Rosewald, has received the honor of an invita- 
tion to assist at the opening exercises of the World's Fair at Chi- 
cago. The King's Daughters' Home for Incurables will have 

a benefit concert, at Metropolitan Hall, February 14tb, under tbe 
direction of Mr. Louis C. Knell, who has arranged an attractive 
programme, and is already drilling his orchestra of sixty ama- 
teur musicians for the occasion. Tom Keene, in a recent ar- 
ticle in Kate Field's Washington, strongly recommends collaboia- 
tion in playwriting — one for dialogue, and one for plot, situa- 
tions, and" "business." Hermann Sticlitz, a well-known theat- 
rical manager of New York, is visiting this city Sir Arthur 

8ullivan is in London, busy with his alterations of his opera, 

Ivanhoe, preparatory to its coming production in Berlin 

Widow Tom Thumb, Baron Magri, and the Little Count returned 
to Ban Francisco last week. Miss Eleanor Calhoun, a Califor- 
nia girl, born in Visalia, is the leading lady of Coquelin's comedy 
company at the Theatre Francaise. She speaks French like a 
a native. Lotta is coming to California for her health. Re- 
port says Marie Osborne is to marry Harry Davenport. The 

Bostonians will bring out here next spring a new opera by T. 

Pearsall Thorne. The Bandurria Club will give a concert, at 

Metropolitan Hall, February 7th. According to the press ac- 
counts of Paderewski's first appearance, the main interest of cul- 
tured Boston seems to have centered in the fact that he had not 

cut his hair. Los Angeles, San Diego and other large southern 

towns are threatened with a theatrical boycott. James T. 

Waldron and Frank Connolly will manage B. J. Henley 

John L. 8ullivan has secured Dr. Bird's tragedy, The Gladiator, 
Forrest's and McCullough's old play, and will appear in it soon. 
——The Commissioners of the District of Columbia have ordered 
all Washington Theatres to use only electric lights. The auc- 
tion sale for Stewart and Robertson's new opera, His Majesty, 
will be held February 1st, at the California Theater. 

Prof. Crepaux, of the Paris Grand Opera, has the honor to inform 
the public that he is now forming singing classes. Two lessons a 
week— per month— $10. Vocal and scenic lessons in classes or pri- 
vate. Applications will be received at 1119 Sutter street, between 
Larkin and Polk streets, at the Larcher School of Languages. 



Ol ARIAC Knabe, Haines, 
"I Mill U9 Biisb A €fertS,V others. 

Cash or installments. Eented 
and Repaired. Pleaso call or fiend for circulars. 

ST BANCROFT 



BALOWIN THEATRE. 

4t HAYiu»a Co. Proprietors. 

Last night. Ust niniiii.-p Sntiirdav. 

CHARLES I liulIMANS COMEDIANS 
In Sydney Grundy's Big Suooa 

ARABIAN NIGHTS. 
EXTRA.— The Even! of theseason. Monday, January 30th. 
ivery evening, including Sunday. Matinees'..,, Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. Reappearance of the celebrated and wonderful 

LILIPUTIANS 

In their latest phenomenal success, 

CANDY. 
As produced for 150 nights in New York. 
Seats now on sale. Regular Prices. 
Remember the matinee— Wednesday and Saturday. 



STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 



^'eSoSr ■ ■ Lessee and Proprietor. 
alf kllinohousk Business Manager. 

Commencing Monday. January 30th, Matinee Saturday. 
BARTLEY CAMPBELL'S THRILLING MELODRAMA 
SIBERIA. 
Introducing a world of novelties. 
Seats now ready. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

AlHayman&Co Proprietors. |J. J. Gottlob Manager. 

Beginning Monday, January 30th. Every evening, including Sun- 
day. Matinee Saturday. HOYT'S most successful comedy, 

A TRIP TO CHINATOWN. 

Seats now on sale. 



„ M „ T THE BUSH STREET THEATRE. 

M J.-„^' ¥i L „ EVITT Proprietor and Manager. 

George h. Beoadhoest Resident Manager- 
To-night ! In all its splendor, M. B. Leavitt's Magnificent Spec- 
tacular Production, 

SPIDER AND FLY. 

60 People. 30 European Celebrities. Georgeous Scenery and Cos- 
tumes. Grand Ballet. Large Chorus. Form, Melody 'and Color 
in Exquisite Harmony. 

Matinee Saturday at 2 p. m. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Krelins Beos Proprietors and Managers. 

LAST NIGHTS. Grand production of Offenbach's Sparkling Opera, 

LA BELLE HELENE. 
Monday, January 30th, "CARMEN." 
Popular Prices 2 5 and 50c 

MAPLE HALL, PALACE HOTEL ~ 

WILKIE'S " BALLAD CONCERTS." 
WEDNESDAY, February 1st. at 8:1 a I». M. 

FIRST CONCERT— SECOND SERIES. 

ARTISTS— Mrs. Mollie Melvin Dewing, Miss Jennie Eastman. Miss Anna 
Miller Wood, Wm. J. Ktadtfeld, J. C. Hughes and Alfred WilKie 

VOCALIST— Miss Florence Fletcher. SOLO VIOLINIST— R. Fletcher 
ACCOMPANIST — Tilton. 

Season Tickets, Reserved, J4. Single Tickets, Reserved, 51 25. Admis- 
sion, (1. Season tickets may now be had at News Stand, Palace Hotel, and 
Single Seats on Tuesday, January 31st , and Wednesday, February 1st. 

£m~SKF, PROGRAMMES, 

TWENTY-SEVENTH 

INDUSTRIAL EXPOSITION 

OF THE 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE 

AND PRELIMINARY 

WORLD'S FAIR EXHIBIT of CALIFORNIA. Opens 
January 10, Closes February 11, 1893. 
New Features. Special Attractions. 

Among which will be the annual exhibition of the Northern California 
Citrus Pair Association, a grand display of natural products of the various 
counties of the State, the largest collection ever seen in this city of valua- 
ble statuary and paintings, an orchestra of fifty musicians, including noted 
soloists and Miss May Cook, the young California corne'ist; six large 
aquariums, machinery in motion, objects of art, industry and manufacture. 

ADMISSION— Adult's single admission in daytime 25c; evening 50c. 
Child's single admission in daytime 15c; evening25c. Season tickets is- 
sued only to members of the Mechanic's Institute. Double season tickets 
$2.50, single season $1.50. Season tickets may be obtained by non-members 
at the following rate; Double season $5, sinele season $4, which includes 
membership in the institute, subject to confirmation by the management. 
n IRWIN C. STOMP, President. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 



PROMINENT ASSEMBLYMEN. 



SPEAKER GOULD. 



GH. GOULD, the Speaker of the Assembly, was boril in Iowa 
, in 1856, and came to California in 1862, going to Santa Clara 
county. He attended the Gates Institute and State Normal 




School. He was a teacher from 1875 to 1884, and meantime was 
a law student in San Jose and elsewhere. Owing to bad health, 
he was forced to give up teaching, and accepted appointment as 
County Surveyor of Mariposa county. He opened a law office in 
Merced in 1887, since being a practitioner at the bar. He has 
been connected with several prominent law cases, among which 
was the Olsen murder case. He was elected in 1890 to the Assem- 
bly from the Sixty-seventh District, consisting of Mariposa and 
Merced, and in 1891 represented the Fifty-seventh District, con- 
sisting of Merced and Stanislaus, and at the last election he was 
returned to the Assembly by a majority of 626 votes. He is an 
able presiding officer, and gives great satisfaction. 

HON. JULIUS KAHN. 



THE acknowledged leader of the Republicans in the Assembly 
i8 Julius Kahn, the able representative from the Thirty-ninth 
District. He was one of the two Republicans elected to the As- 
sembly from this city last November. Though he bad opposed 
to him a Non-Partisan Republican who polled 793 votes, besides 

the Democratic nominee, 
Mr. Kahn carried the dis- 
trict by a majority of 174 
votes, twice the majority 
received by Harrison in 
the same district. Since 
entering the Assembly 
Mr. Kahn has given evi 
dences of unusual ability. 
He came to California in 
his fifth year, and after 
living in Calaveras and 
San Joaquin counties, 
came to this city, where 
he attended the public 
schools. In his eighteenth 
year he adopted the stage 
as his profession, and 
made a successful debut 
at the Baldwin Theatre as 
Shylock, in The Merchant 
of Venice. Subsequently 
he went East, where he 
traveled with Booth, the elder Sal vini, Mr. and Mrs. W.J.Florence, 
Joe Jefferson, Clara Morris, and most of the principal stars of the 
country. About two and a half years ago he settled in this city, 
where he is now engaged with his brothers ;n a mercantile busi- 




ness. While on the stage he started the actors' movement against 
contract labor, and also that by which doty is now required to be 
paid on imported scenery. For three years he was vice-President 
of the Actors' Order of Friendship. He is President of the Apropos 
Outing Club, Vice-President of the Harmonie Club, and a member 
of the Players' Club of New York, the Press Club of this city and 
numerous fraternal organizations. He is in his thirty-first year, 
and has a bright future. 



HON. HENRY F. EMERIC. 

HENRY F. EMERIC, who represenTs the Twenty-Fourth Dis- 
trict (Contra Costa county), in the State Assembly, has been 
well placed as the Chairman of the Committee on Fish and 
Game. A wealthy man, and possessed of a principality in the 
8an Pablo Rancho, in Contra Costa, he has expenaed large sums 
of money in the importation of game birds and fish into this 
State, and now wishes to protect them from pot-hunters, so that 
they may have an opportunity to propagate. He is a native of 
New York, where he was born in 1849. and has bad a very 
varied career, throughout which he has shown himself a man of 
Independence and ability. His father was the late Joseph Emeric, 
a pioneer, whose name is known from one end of the State to 
the other. On account of differences with his father, who was a 
somewhat erratic man. Henry left his h msehold at an early age, 
and secured employment as a letter exchange clerk in Donahue, 
Kelly & Co's bank. Shortly afterwards he removed to France, 
and there resided with his uncle while studying medicine. In 
1875 he returned and took charge of his father's ranch. He 




again left, however, and settled in this city, where he married a 
daughter of J. W. Tucker, the well-known jeweler. Soon after 
that, his estrangement with his father became complete, and 
lasted until the elder Emeric was on his deathbed. Henry carved 
out his own fortune, and notwithstanding his father's great 
wealth, never received assistance from the latter. Upon his 
father's death, he inherited the domain in Contra Costa county, 
with which the name of Emeric has been identified for years. 
The people of that county, knowing the history of Mr. Emeric, 
senc him to the Legislature to there represent them. He is a 
Democrat, whose presence adds strength to the power of the 
party in the House. 



ISIDOR ALEXANDER, of 8acramento, who was appointed 
Minute Clerk of the Assembly, is performing his duties to the 
great satisfaction of that body and the general public. His ex- 
perience as a newspaper man fits him peculiarly for this im- 
portant place. 

IN all this talk about opposition steamship lines, it is just as 
well, perhaps, not to forbid the ocean to take the Pacific Mail 
boats. There is such a thing as so much opposition that the 
other fellow is driven from the field entirely, and then there 
ceases to be opposition. 



THE gentlemen in charge of the weather can turn on the hot 
air now as soon as they have a mind to. We have been sat- 
isfied all along that they were on terms of intimacy with the 
Polar currents, and would have taken their word for it any day. 



Jan. 38, 181 8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETT] R 







HON. BERT i> ;HLESINGER. 

BERT BOHLfiUNGKR, chairman of the Assembly Committee 
on Constitutional Amendment?, is one of the able men of the 
lower boose who has taken prominent place among the law- 
makers. He was born in England, and with his parents came to 




this country when he was only two years old. He graduated 
from Hastings College of the Law in 1885, and subsequently read 
law with Scrivener & Boone, of this city. He is now the partner 
of Mr. Boone. He went to Sierra County in 1885, and there 
practiced law. In 1888 he was the Democratic nominee to repre- 
sent Sierra and Plamas counties in the Assembly, and, though he 
ran 450 votes ahead of his ticket, be was defeated by 35 votes 
He returned to this city the same year. At the last election be 
was the Democratic nominee for the Assembly from- the Thirty- 
eighth. District in this city, and was elected with a plurality of 
520 votes. Mr. Schlesinger is married and has one child. 

HON. W. ^HENDRICKSON. 
ON. W. HENDRlCKSONTAssemblyman from the Forty-Sec- 
ond District of San Francisco was born in this city, and was 



H 




educated in ita public schools. He graduated in Dickinson Col- 
lege, Carlisle, Penn., and from the Hastings College of the Law 



in 1888, and has aim f h<-rn engaged in the practice of the law. Mr. 
Hendrickson has always taken an active interest In the Demo- 
cratic party, on which ticket he was elected in November last 
from a very strong Kcpiiblican district, his plurality being over 
300. The principal bills Introduced by Mr. Hendrickson. Is one 
ti regulate the practice of medicine, and establish a State Board of 
Medical Examiners. He has introduced some bills to amend 
several sections of the Political Code. He was the first Assem- 
blyman to declare his preference for the Hon. Stephen M. White 
for United States Senator. Mr. Hendrickson is Chairman of the 
Committee on Public Printing. He is a young and able man 
who will reflect credit upon bis constituents. 



w 



TO MARIQUITA. 

HEN Spring comes laughing o'er the hills 

With fragrant flowers and sudden rain, 
When through the wood the robin trills 

And violets blossom in the lane, 
My heart forgets its grief and pain 

As thy dear eyes look up to me; 
And as the hours pass amain, 

My heart is filled with love for thee. 

When Summer's splendid bounty fills 

With flower and fruit the fertile plain, 
When Nature's breast responsive thrills 

With boundless wealth and golden grain ; 

The world may turn in cold disdain, 
And all her choicest blessings flee 

From my poor lot; but, dear, again 
My heart is filled with love for thee. 

When Winter like a conqueror wills 

The generous northland's rich domain — 
When on a thousand lofty hills 

The soft moon's jeweled hand is lain, 

And fountains held in icy chain 
Hush all their Summer songs of glee, 

Though other joys I may not name — 
My heart is filled with love for thee. 

l'envoy. 
Sweet! be the glad year old or young, 

It matters not a whit to me; 
Though all its beauties die unsung, 

My heart is filled with love for thee. 

Robert Gray Mackay. 



Good Cooking 
Is one of the chief blessings of every home. To always insure good 
custards, puddings, sauce, etc., use Gail Borden "Eagle" Brand Con- 
densed Milk. Directions on label. Sold by your grocer and druggist. 

If you can't eat take Prentiss Rectifying Pill. It will make you. 
They don't Gripe and make you as sick as a dog. All Druggists; 
25c. a box. 

The Maison Riche, at the corner of Grant avenue and Geary 
street, enjoys the patronage of all the good livers in the city. With 
out exception it easily leads in a city where good restaurants abound. 



" Happy Rhymes" from Ali Baba has been published by The John 
Church Co., Cincinnati. For sale by Zeno Mauvais Music Co. 

Tts so Gooclf" 




is the universal tribute of the children Who use 

Highland 
Evaporated Cream 

unsweetened. 

Don't take other, cheap brands — insist on 

having Highland. 

HELVETIA MILK CONDENSING CO., Highland, Hi. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 




Be-LQPKER-on® 



^jsmns^^^^^^ 



NOW that it is decided that the Hopkins mansion on California 
street is to be devoted to the cultivation of art, is it not 
about time that the artists of the city and State organized that 
society for mutual bene6t and improvement, of which they have 
been talking for some years past? Art matters in tbis city have 
been at a very low ebb for a long time, and now here comes 
an opportunity to improve the condition of affairs, and for all 
time. The artists have long complained that they do not get a 
fair show; that they are too much at the mercy of the dealers; 
that they as a body are not recognized in the community, with 
the result that their profession is not here upon that dignified 
plane where it belongs. The Art Association does not effect the 
desired result. The artists should get together and have an in- 
terchange of views upon the probabilities of improving their 
condition by the organization of a Society of California Artists. 
They might doubtless get quarters in the Hopkins house for ex- 
hibition purposes, and with that center to work from, ought to 
get along better than they have for some time past. 

I am sorry to see that that versatile and popular young actor, 
Joe Holland, is getting very bald; but I think I know the cause 
thereof. Holland has several mannerisms that mark him just as 
plainly as if he were labeled. When he was at the old California, 
where he appeared on numerous occasions as a lover, he had a 
way in moments of embarrassment of looking at the finger nails 
of his half-closed left hand, as if the sight of them would give 
him inspiration. He got over that mannerism, but now he has 
another, and a worse, for it has made him bald. Any one who 
has seen Holland of late may have noticed that in Arabian Nights 
and other plays in which he has added to his reputation as a 
good actor, he has a way of rubbing the back of his head with 
his left hand. The motion is natural and hardly noticeable. I 
don't think, in fact, I would have noticed it at all were it not for 
the results I have mentioned. The other night, for instance, 
when I saw Holland as the much-be--mother-in-lawed young 
husband, he rubbed his head several times with that hair de- 
stroying left hand. The consequence is that he is daily getting 
balder, and unless he loads down that awful hand with chains, 
or ties it to his side, he soon will be as bald as the inside of a 
wig, and that is the most unhandsome and desolate sight on 
earth. 

* * » 

Now that various Legislative committees of investigation are 
about to start upon their several junketing tours to different 
portions of the State, a story about the commission appointed by 
a former Legislature to locate the site for the Home for Feeble 
Minded Children is timely. Among the different sites mentioned 
was that at Glen Ellen, which was formally selected, and where 
the Home is now located. One of the many inducements offered 
by the Glen Ellen people in behalf of their locality was the ex- 
cellent quality of the water to be had there. Good water was of 
course an absolute necessity at a place where children were to be 
cared for, and the statesmen were duly impressed with that fact. 
When the committee, of which a statesman was secretary, ar- 
rived at Glen Ellen, they were very well treated by the people 
there. There was the usual course ot drives and walks, admira- 
tion of the beautiful scenery, and sufficient good fare to tempt 
those even less apt to worship the good things of life than Sacra- 
mento legislators. The statesmen were very favorably impressed, 
withal, and left Glen Ellen with the opinion that it was the very 
place for the Home. They had ridden some miles upon their re- 
turn, when it occurred to the secretary to speak of the water, 
which had been such an important factor in the attractions of 
the place. "I suppose that some of you gentlemen tried the 
water, and found it as represented," he said. 

"Water ! Water I" gasped the committee's members; "No, we 
didn't drink it at all. We thought you bad done that." 

"I! I drink water!" said the secretary "No, sir; I did not. 
I presumed the committee would do that." 

In fact not a man in the party had ever thought of allowing 
water to pass his lips throughout the trip. Bnt it was necessary 
that they should know by personal experience something about 
the water. At the next station, therefore, they left the train, and 
then returned to Glen Ellen. There each member of the com- 
mittee solemnly swallowed a mouthful of water, whereupon they 
held an executive session, and pronounced the water as good as 
any they had ever drank in their legislative experience. 



The Democratic statesmen had a merry time at the bar of the 
Golden Eagle on the 16th inst., for then they had assurance 
that Burke, the Non-Partisan, would vote with them, and they 
were sure enough of Kerns, the Populist, to bet on him. So the 
bells of the cash register kept up a merry chime as success to the 
new Senator was pledged in flowing bowls. Jerry Lynch had a 
humorous experience. He was chatting at one end of the bar 
with two friends, and had just ordered a round when Bill Eng- 
lish approached. "Hello, William," said Lynch, " come and 
join us." " Ah, thank you, Jerry," said "Smooth Bill," " but I 
have a friend with me." 

" Bring him along," said Lynch. 

" Certainly," English replied, and he thereupon brought up 
Judge Campbell, and introduced him to Lynch. The latter put 
another fifty-cent piece on the counter. 

" Oh, excuse me a minute, Jerry, I see another friend," said 
English. Then he brought up 3tate Senator Lynch, a namesake 
of the Egyptologist. While the Lynches were talking, English 
came up again, this time with Foote, John T. Gaffey, James 
Murphy and a couple of stray newspapermen. Lynch continued 
to put half-dollars on the bar. Then English rushed out into the 
hotel lobby and dragged up two more statesmen. Presently the 
crowd on the sidewalk got an idea that some one was setting up 
free wine, and in a moment Lynch was the center of an admiring 
but very thirsty throng. He stood his ground bravely, however, 
and tipped his glass with Foote, as they drank " To those who 
withdrew." When the barkeeper raked down the stack of silver 
he had to use both hands. 

Tom Hill's pictures at the fair have attracted general admira- 
tion. He has several of his large canvases in the art gallery, 
among which is his famous "Yosemite," declared by connoiseurs 
to be the most magnificent representation of the valley ever made 
by an artist. Hill is peculiarly happy in the portrayal of the 
grand works of nature. No artist can put more feeling into a 
landscape than he; none has a better command of the difficult 
effects of atmospheric perspective. One who looks at his "Yo- 
semite" can feel the inspiratian drawn from the very air that 
circles round the lofty heights of the massive cliffs that tower 
above the beautiful valley. Hill is at home in Yosemite scenes; 
he paints them con amore. No artist approaches him in this work 
with which he has identified himself. Another canvas upon 
which his brush has lingered lovingly is that entitled "Wawona," 
which hangs upon the north side of the gallery. It gives a view 
of Yosemite from the entrance, and is equal to anything he has 
done. It is a new work and has been greatly appreciated by 
those visitors to the fair who have an understanding of the 
b^autifulin art and nature. "Wawona" includes three scenes, 
the main one in the center of the canvas, and two panels, separ- 
ated from the main effect by redwood framing. On the walls 
also is his famous large historical painting of "The Last Spike," 
representing the scene at the driving of the golden spike that 
marked the completion of the Central Pacific Railroad. All the 
faces in the large group around Governor Stanford, the central 
figure, are portraits. Hill's pictures easily take rank with those 
in the famed galleries of Europe. He has a world-wide reputa- 
tion. 

» » • 

As a New Year's gift to its numerous employes, Wells, Fargo & 
Co. has arrauged to present each employe" a specimen of the souve- 
nir coin, of which the government at Washington has coined five 
millions to promote the success of the celebration. The coins are de- 
signed simply as souvenirs or keepsakes, and as such will, it is 
thought, enhance in value from year to year. It is in this spirit their 
presentation is made, with the hope that as a token of their regard 
they will be prized and preserved. The distribution of these coins, 
which are now ready, will be made through Superintendents and 

Route Agents of the company. M 

# « * 

Santa Rosa has rapid transportation, the means whereof rest 
in a street-car line on which run three cars and as many sad eyed 
nags. A gentleman from this city visited the town recently, and 
when leaving a friend's house, he said he would take a car to his 
hotel. 

" You'll get no car to-day, sor," said the servant. 

" Why, aren't the cars running?" 

" Faith, they are, but they're all at the funeral." 

And such the visitor found to be the fact. Whenever Santa 
Rosa has a funeral, the mourners charter the three street cars to 
take them to the cemetery, and until their return, the rest of the 
town are without public means of transportation. On another 
occasion, the same metropolitan was walking down Santa Rosa's 
main street with a little nephew, who seeing a street-car approach, 
ran toward it, saying he would take a ride. He ran around the 
car and returned to his uncle. 

" I thought you were going to take a ride," said the latter. 

" 80 I was, answered the boy; I thought Alec Smith was driv- 
ing, but I guess it is his day off. The president of the road is 
taking his place." 

And there is no competing road in Santa Rosa, either. 



Jan. 23, 18»3 



SAN rn VNVtsi NEWS LETT] R 



U 



The recent retirement of the Kev. Dr. Hill from the Bishopric 
of British Columbia and his return to England, recalls an amus- 
ing incident of bis first appearance Id San Francisco. It was in 
the early part of 1869, at which time the Church of the Advent 
under the rectorship of Rev. K. Marion McAllister was making 
such valient efforts to take front rank among the Episcopal 
churches of the city, its rector being ably backed by his mother, 
the wife of Judge M. H. II cA II later. In fact, so energetic was 
the lady, she was looked upon as the mainspring of what was 
then called 'the Church of the Holy McAllister." It appears 
that when Dr. Hill was appointed to the British Columbia See, 
knowing he would have to pass through San Francisco on his 
way to his diocese coming via Panama, Bishop Kip. naturally 
expected to have him as his guest and had a room in bis house 
in readiness for him for several weeks awaiting his arrival. But 
Mrs. McAllister, determined to have that honor herself, per- 
suaded her husband, Judge McAllister, to meet the English 
Bishop at the steamer and carry him off as their guest. This 
programme was accordingly carried out, and the first intimation 
of bis arrival that Bishop Kip bad was the announcement in the 
morning paper (Saturday) that the Bishop of British Columbia 
had reached the city the night before, and would preach the next 
day at the Church of the Advent, and a polite invitation by post 
to Bishop Kip to meet him that day at dinner at Judge McAllis- 
ter's. Bishop Kip was very much provoked at being thus de- 
prived of bis expected visitor, but was determined to still win 
the day. So he at once proceeded to the McAllister residence, 
where he found the family at breakfast, claimed the Bishop as 
his guest, and bore him off in triumph. 

BUTTE COUNTY'S EXHIBIT. 

AMONG the county exhibits at the Mechanics' Fair deserving 
of special mention, that of Butte county easily takes first 
place, on account of both the exhibits and the beauty of its dis- 
play. The county has reserved all the western quarter of the 
main floor of the Pavilion, and it is noticeable that to that section it 
is that the thousands of people find their way every afternoon 
and evening. Individual exhibits have been made by Oroville, 
Cbico, Palermo and Thermalito in the Butte county section, and 
each of these In its turn tends to increase the fame that will add 
to Butte county as a producer of citrus fruits, as a result of the 
very successful exhibition. The exhibit in which the different 
portions of the county combined is that known as the Rock of 
Ages, an artistic display, that is more greatly appreciated by the 
people than any other in the Fair. Rising from a point of rock 
that thrusts its shaggy spurs from out the foam-encrested waves 
that encircle it, a mighty cross rears its head against the extreme 
western side of the Pavilion. The cross is made entirely of 
Butte county oranges, and when lighted by incandescent lamps 
that cast their glow upon it every evening, it is certainly an 
object of great beauty, that is at once creditable from an artistic 
standpoint and also as illustrative of the luscious fruit that Butte 
county soil gives to the world. In letters of gold, made of 
oranges, above the cross, in the form of an arched scroll, is the 
name of the exhibit: " Rock of Ages." This is in turn encircled 
by an arch of palm leaves, surmounting which is a star of electric 
lights. This exhibit is one of the most popular in the Fair. 
Every evening, two of Butte county's fairest daughters, in robes 
of pure white, arise from beneath the rocks and peacefully em- 
brace the cross. The orange-covered, pyramidal slopes that 
descend from the foot of the cross, form the exhibit of Oroville, 
that is again true to its name in showing to the world the golden 
product of its fruitful groves. It is not to be understood that 
the oranges in these large exhibits are displayed for their qualita- 
tive virtues; it was rather sought by the aggregation of tens of 
thousands of oranges to give the people some slight idea of *he 
wonderful progress and present prosperous condition of the 
orange growing industry in a cotmty that nntil very recently 
was thought to be unsuitable for the cultivation of citrus fruits. 
Palermo has a most imposing exhibit of 39,000 oranges. It is 
in the form of a Spanish market, and its graceful arcades and 
mighty square tower, from the top of which bang the national 
colors, raise their orange-covered sides from the south side of the 
county's section. Chico's exhibit, in the shape of a Turkish 
temple, is opposite Palermo's. Prominent in its display are 
numerous large jars of fine fruit preserved in spirits. By a cun- 
ning arrangement of mirrors, it seems that the entire superstruc- 
ture rests upon columns of these fruit jars. The exhibit is very 
attractive. Thermalito sends some excellent specimens of fine 
oranges, than which no better can be produced anywhere. Its 
exhibits are between those of Oroville on one side and Chico and 
Palermo on the other. Butte county, it mast be remembered, is 
very young yet in the orange business, but for the time its trees 
have been in bearing, wonderful and most satisfactory results 
have been achieved. Those who have never enjoyed the sight of 
an orange grove in bearing should not fail to see the exhibit of 
this county, for it alone contains over 100,000 oranges. But this 
rich county has not its wealth in citrus fruits alone, as one may 
judge who examines the exhibit of cereals, dried fruits and 
nuts in the handsome glass cases on the north side of the 
seotion. The cereal exhibit will go to the Chicago World's Fair. 




ANTEDILUVIAN 

WHISKEY. 

VERY OLD, 
RICH 

AS 
XREAM' 1 

AND 
SMOOTH 
AS 
SATIN. 

THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO. 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 



After months of preparation and rehearsals, the LADY PATRON- 
ESSES of the 

SAN FRANCISCO POLYCLINIC 

Tate pleasure in announcing that the first production of one of the 
cleverest and brightest written operas by the well-known 
Librettist, PETER ROBERTSON, and 

Successful Composer, Peof. H. J. STEWART, 
Written and composed especially for the benefit of this charity, 
which freely extends its aid to all, knowing no racej religion, sex or 
color in the extent of its good work. The 7 , s, ,,»j 

GRAND PRODUCTION 

— op — 

"HIS MAJESTY" 

Will take place at the 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE, WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8. 

The following well-known gentlemen and ladies have in the kindest 
manner volunteered their valuable assistance and will assume the leading 

r °MKS. MARY WYMAN WILLIAMS MRS C. H. DICKMAN 

MRS. DR. BRECHBMIN MR. ELMER DEPOE 

MR DONALD db V. GRAHAM MR. P. G. B. MILLS 

MR. C. H. DICKMAN MR. T. J. WALSH. 

The ladies and gentlemen composing the chorus have kindly volunteered 
their services. There will be 100 CHORISTERS. There will be 50 MUSI- 
CIANS in the orchestra. 200 people will take part in the great production 
which will excel anything of the kind ever seen in this city. It will cost 
over FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS, for the costumes, scenery and 
properties. Costumes designed by MISS FLORENCE GRAHAM, of Lon- 
don Scenery entirely new, designed and painted by PROP. SEABURY 
and assistant. Properties by MR. MORRISHEY. Stage Settings by MR. 
LANG . Costumes and wigs by GOLDSTEIN 4 COHN. Stage Manager, 

'''''' l ' J>,> " 1 ' THE BE1IAN1) FOR TICKETS 

Has been so great the Lady Patronesses have decided to sell the choice of 
seats and boxes at auctio n. Due notice will be given of the date. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR LADIES £ND GENTLEMEN- 
THE SAN FRANCISCO FENCING ACADEMY. 

501 Post Street, Corner Mason. 

Processors Louis Troncliet and Alfred De Smet. 

Special classes twice per week for young ladies between the agea of 
10 and 15 years. .Reasonable terms . 



12 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893 . 




THERE are circumstances surrounding the divorce just granted 
to Colonel Meyers, Chairman of the Republican State Central 
Committee, that have so far not been brought to light. A cloud 
of mystery has been thrown over the affair in the Alameda 
County Courts where the divorce was granted, for the complaint 
mysteriously disappeared the moment the decree was made. As 
regards the co-respondent, he figured in the document as that 
versatile character John Doe. From all accounts it appears that 
Mrs. Meyers has been a very flighty woman for many years past. 
The Colonel had some trouble with her before, and he left her to 
her own devices while he went out into the world alone. He 
was caught in a snow blockade near Denver some months after- 
wards. She was in the town at the time, and she sought him, 
pleaded for forgiveness, and was taken back to his heart. Mey- 
ers then came to the coast and established his home here. Peace 
did not reign very long, though, for he got a clue that his wife 
was deceiving him and he therefore set about investigating. The 
suspicions had some foundation; hence the divorce. 

* « • 

Can a more forcible illustration of the laxity of parental su- 
pervision of young daughters be offered than the sentence anent 
the two young girls who made a silly endeavor to furnish a 
sensation for the dailies by disappearing from their homes for a 
couple of days. The excuse given is, "their minds were filled 
with novels and play." If mothers saw to it personally that no 
trashy novel found its way into the hands of their young daugh- 
ters, and put a veto upon the Saturday matinee, there would be no 
danger of the high-flown runaways at which these silly girls tried 
their hands. 

» * «f 

A place, of all others, to see the pernicious effect of matinees 
and novels is the Mechanics' Fair. It is "positively shocking" — 
to use Lord Alcash's phrase — to see misses, of ages ranging from 
ten to sixteen, ogling and flirting like experienced old stagers — 
and the boys! II 

* • • 

Society is sadly in need of a fresb supply of beaux. Every 
pretty debutante, with her leaves unfolded from bud to blossom, 
who has entered tbe social arena this season, has brought a fresh 
pang to the full-blown rose, who sees one more claimant for the 
attentions of the few men, who are not enouga to go around as 
it is. One can fancy how hard it is on the girls who have been 
dancing the cotillions, and industriously going through the grand 
right and left for years, to be obliged to receive — and welcome — 
the attentions as beaux of chaps they knew in knickerbockers, 
or do the wall-flower act. 

The last cotillion was a trifle "off." The spirit of the former 
affairs seemed lacking ; but the girls are all looking with the most 
pleasurable anticipations towards the next, which will be the 
army and navy function, and the hall will be ablaze with gold 
lace and bright buttons. One of the belles of the season was 
wondering the other night if the ladies would be requested to 
•wear tbe national colors, and appear like animated sticks of pep- 
permint candy. 

* * * 

Very few girls have ever come to town that have attracted as 
much attention as Miss Furth, of Seattle. She is a rare 
beauty, with a lovely complexion, beautiful black eyes and 
tresses to match, and a figure that is all her own. The men 
scramble for ber at the Friday Night Club's cotillion. 

Society is not itself this season. There is a something lacking 
that is indescribable, and no one seems able to solve the riddle. 
It cannot be tbe lack of dinners, teas and balls, for there seem to 
be plenty of them going on. It may be the lack of a good society 
scandal, for the life of society is indeed tame without even a 
tinge of scandal, or it may be the lack of a leader among the 
women. The chances are in favor of the latter. 

Society Assumes the Lead. 

The continued efforts to establish a name for certain brands of 
champagne winch have outlived original merit, and obtain for them 
a foothold similar to that which Fommery Sec eniovs among all 
lovers of a good and incomparable wine, reminds one'vividly of the 
antique coquettish damsel who cannot grow old gracefully These 
spasmodic attempts are like puny shadows passing before the sun, 
through which the reputation of Pommery Sec shines all the brighter 
and Us hold upon the esteem of the aristocratic and refined grows 
stronger and more enduring than ever. As an example of this, in 
1891 over sixty thousand cases of Pommery Sec were imported to the 
United States Pommery Sec is the wine of princes and the prince 
of wines, and the high place it has steadily won among the refined 
and epicurean of this country is a good sign of the progress made in 
the discrimination of the best things in life. The verdict of the 
Prince of Wales and the wine-drinkers of Europe has received the 
amplest comnrmation from the aristocracy of this country 



The "Commendador" and 
"Palmeiro" Port Wines 

rt,Ub.nrlL.L.nlJ rUK I Oporto, are invaluable as 

a restorative for the inva 
lid. 

The most celebrated and 
best known brand in the 
world. 

Distilled by J. J. Meder 
d? Zoon, Schiedam, Hoi/., 
since 1819, and imported 
Into the U. S. since 1824. 

For sale by the leading Wine 
Merchants and Grocers. 

Chas. Meinecke &Co., 

Sole Agents, 311 Sacramento St.. S.I'- 



DUFF GORDON 

SHERRY. 

Swan Gin. 




CHAMPAGNE 

KRUG & CO. " PRIVATE CUVEE." 

QUARTS AND PINTS 

FROM 

Krug & Co., Reims. 

BY ILL DEALERS, JOBBERS AID 6R0CERS. 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
525 Front Street, SAN FRANC /SCO. Telephone no. m. 

w w ?m 

IMPORTERS. 

WHOLESALERS, 

AND RETAILERS 

OF ONLY FIRST-CLASS 

Wines, Cordials, 

Champagnes and 
Table Delicacies. 

Etc., Etc. 

Heimine floods, low Prices. 

EM. MEYER & CO., 

1047-1019 Market St., S. F. 

324 SUTTER ST., 

The Most Skilled Dermatjloijst in 
San Francisco. 

The skin rendered soft, velvety and 
elastic with the aid of Dermoline. 
The form developed by a New Method. 

Freckles and facial blemishes re- 
moved and superfluous hair eradicated 
by a new process. 

Hair Invlgorator, guaranteed to 
cure BALDNESS. 




THE SCIENCE 

OF 

THE SKIN. 



E. J. WHEELER. 



J. W. GIBVIN. 



J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

Rubber and Leather Belting, 

Hose, Packing, etc., 

Rubber Clothing, Boots, Shoes, etc, 

Pacific Coast Agents for Boston Belting Co. and Fayerweather & Ladew. 
ormerly J. B. Hoyt A Co . 6 California St.. S. F.. Cal. 

DR. F. PAGUE, 

Dentist, 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 
81 9 Market Street. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB 



18 



A CONVENTS JUBILEE. 



FOR month? paM the Indies ol the .Milium*' Association of the Con- 
Tent of the Holy Name? ol Jesus and Mary, in Oakland, have been 
looking forward to the approaching twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
foundation of their Alma Mater. Tbla anniversary, or silver jubilee 
of the opening of the DOOM, will occur on May 9th of the present 
year, the convent having been dedicated on that date in 1SI18. The 
Mother-General of the Order. Mother ttaptist. who has been visiting 
all the houses of the Order in the North, will arrive here sometime 
in March, and stay for the jubilee. The Order is essentially a teach- 
ing Order of the highest class. This is its characteristic feature. In 
Oakland the Convent opened with a class of three pupils, and 
it has since reached a total of one hundred and twenty boarders, 
which, anyone must confess, is considerable of a family to maintain 
in order, harmony and happiness. Rev. Mother Baptist may be 
fairly considered the foundress of the Oakland Convent, although 
she did not arrive until some eighteen months after the opening in 
1868. When called to the office of Mother-General, nearly five years 
ago, she was succeeded by Mother Elizabeth, the present Superior. 
The first actual Superior of the house was Sister Mary Michael, of 
All Saints. But her tenure of office, as stated, lasted only a year and 
a half. Without being able to ascertain positively the exact number 
of young ladies who have passed through the educational course of 
the Sisters of the Holy Names, iu Oakland, the total maybe safely 
set down at 1,200 and over. Among those who have been educated 
here, may be counted the daughters of J. K. Kelly, Miss Martha 
Kelly being the second graduate on the roll, the first graduate being 
the daughter of the celebrated General Keyes. Then follow such 
names as Mrs. Lyle(nee Sarah Kelly); Mrs. W. H. White, first and 
only President of the Alumna:-, nee Flora McGary ; Mrs. Uhler Hast- 
ings, nee Alice McGary; Dr. Nicholson's daughter, Miss Laura 
Nicholson; the Princess Colonna, nee MissMackay; Miss Emelita 
Ralston, Laura McKinstry, Mrs. Dr. Garceau and Mrs. Smith, the 
last two daughters of Judge Hyde. Many former pupils will remem- 
ber also such names as Mercedita Ringgold, granddaughter of Presi- 
dent Monroe, who died in the community, and was known as Sister 
Antoinette of Mary. Her uncle, Colonel Ringgold, was the hero of 
Palo Alto in 1851. Florence, another daughter of Judge Hyde, the 
first Alcalde, was also known in religion as Sister Gertrude of the 
Sacred Heart, who died two years ago. Then come such names 
as Edith, daughter of Hon. de Barth Shorb; Elena and Minnie 
O'Farrell, intimately connected with the early history of the State; 
Flora, Ella and Lillie Hastings, Mrs. Dr. TJrquhart {nee Lizzie Lan- 
der), Daisy McDermott, the two daughters of Judge Tagliaferro, 
Flora Sharon, Lizzie Baroillhet and Antonia Coats, the first parlor 
boarder, and now the wife of Dr. Scott's son; Isidora, Elena Coats, 
Lillie Delger, the daughters of J. P. Hale, Governor Downey's niece, 
Miss Leonora Caldwell, Miss Mamie Schofield, Misses Emily and 
Adele Marriott, daughters of the late Frederick Marriott; Mary and 
Maggie Montgomery, daughters of Hon. Zach Montgomery; Mrs. 
Jasper O'Farrell {nee Mamie Loughran), Laura Bosqui, Belle "Wal- 
lace, now Mrs. Mervyn Donahue; Annie Healey. niece of the late D. 
J. Oliver; Miss Mollie King, niece of Rev. F. King; the daughter 
and nieces of J. F. Gashwiler, Eugenia de Santa Marina, Lettie and 
Edith Clarke, Acacia and Anita Orena, the four daughters of Gen- 
eral McFarlane, Miss Echeguerin, who married a Spanish Duke; 
Miss Sisson, the O'Briens of Smartsville, Mamie Yore, now Mrs. 
Michael Davitt, of Irish fame; Laura Glenn, Captain Reed's -two 
daughters, Mabel and Julia; the three daughters of Thomas Bell, 
lately deceased ; the Misses Lohse, Sabichi "Workman , Villagran, and 
various members of the old Spanish families of Peralta, Alvarado, 
Bernal and Nugent. Prominently among these is Mrs. W. E. Dargie, 
nee Miss Peralta. Here also Gustave Touchard's daughters were 
educated, the three Misses Delmas, the three Misses Redmond, Miss 
Carrie Childs, Miss Cecilia O'Connor. Senator Stephen M.White's 
sisters, Fannie and Geraldine; Miss Edith Auld, of the Royal Ha- 
waiian family; Miss Mamie Myers, Misses Nellie and Mamie Cough- 
lin, Blanche Belden, and hundreds of other ladies well known to so- 
ciety. What the Alurnnce Association intends doing is not yet posi- 
tively known, but it is understood that it will not let the silver jubi- 
lee of the Oakland Convent pass without testifying the gratitude of 
its members to the Sisters in some permanent, lasting and 
substantial way. In connection with the jubilee will be is- 
sued a beautiful volume containing extracts from the prose and 
poetical writings of members of the Alumnfe. An introduction will 
be written by Rev. Father Kenna, S. J., and Miss Harriet Skidmore, 
Sister Anna Raphael, Eliza Allen Starr and other members, will be 
represented between its covers. 

Latest discovery and craze in Paris.— Gray hair restored to all 
shades; perfectly harmless. Face cream, powder and lotion in- 
dorsed by Dr. Dennis of this city; also the emporium for Parisian 
novelties and manufacture of natural curly front pieces, from $1 up. 
Great reduction in prices and prompt attention, at Strozynski's, cor- 
ner of Ellis and Leavenworth streets. 



Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses 
rented, rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission, 
office, 407-409 Montgomery street. 



Printed 
5 at W5 



of ^oecblip preres. 

|fou/ or; Exryibitioij, tl?i? 
first arrival of r;<?u; 
Design ai)d Qolors 
For tl?<? 5^509 of 



1893. 







111 to 121 Post Street 



"THE WHITE HOUSE." 



ENLARGEMENT OF PREMISES. 



DURING ALTERATIONS 

AND 

BEFORE STOCKTAKING 

JANUARY 3IST., 

GREAT REDUCTION 

IN 

EACH DEPARTMENT. 



RAPHAEL WEILL & CO., 

N. W. Cor. Post and Kearny Sts. 



14 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893 . 




iT<HE Comstock Market has been inactive during 
MINING- j^ t jj e wee i t w ith a downward tendency. The 
public are not in the market at present is a fact which becomes 
every day more apparent, from the light offering of stock which 
come in from the commisaion brokers even in the breaks which 
under ordinary conditions would soon obliterate margins. The 
news from the lode is not on the whole unsatisfactory , but there 
is evidently no disposition on the part of the mining manage- 
ment of the different sections, to precipitate matters in the way 
of an ore development. Just how long this peculiar condition of 
affairs is going to continue is difficult to predict, but in the mean- 
time arrangements are progressing to pump out the lower levels 
of the principal mines. All of the companies are acting in accord 
in the proposition, bear rumors to the contrary, and it is only a 
matter of time until some scheme is devised to overcome the 
emergency. Ore extraction has been resumed at the Con.-Cal.- 
Virginia Mine, and it is understood that the mill will start up on 
February 1st. The break in Potosi can be safely attributed to 
manipulation, the condition of the mine not having changed to 
such an extent as to warrant a depreciation of fully 75 per cent, 
within a few days. The mine would be a profitable investment, 
like many another along the lode at three times the 
price the stock is quoted at to-day. The South end stocks have 
been the weakest of any during the week. Belcher broke in 
half on the rumor getting about that an assessment would be 
levied when the annual meeting takes place shortly. Business 
has been dull and the commission bouses have not made their 
expenses for some time past. 

$ $ $ 

IN referring to the Good Hope Mine, in the Southern portion of 
the State, a few weeks ago, the News Letter, in view of the 
many failures which have taken place in floating California pro- 
perties abroad, advised investers to be cautious before putting 
their money into the enterprise. Exception having been taken 
to the remarks in their particular reference to the Good Hope, it 
may as well be understood by mining promoters that what is con- 
sidered a just and fair criticism of a mining venture will always 
be made in these columns, unbiased by any personal feelings, 
which are suggested in this case. If the mine can stand the in- 
spection of Colonel J. B. Low, and the other parties whose names 
are mentioned in this connection, that settles the matter of value, 
so far as we are concerned, and the property is good for any- 
body's money, provided no attempt be made to overload the sale 
with a heavy expense account. In dealing with this property 
before, the fact was not known that further developments had 
been carried on with such satisfactory results, but when particu- 
lars are obtainable from any of the sources alluded to they will 
be given all the prominence necessary to set matters right with 
everybody concerned. The experience of the past ten years 
teaches one that they cannot be too careful in passing a favorable 
opinion on mines, especially when the money of people is at 
stake, who, as a rule, know little or nothing about such matters. 

J ? 5 

A GOOD demand is beginning to be noted for the gold mines of 
this State, and especially in the southern portion of it. There 
are rumors of some very important developments there in new 
districts which have not yet been made public, the prospectors 
keeping their operations pretty secret, for very good reasons 
which are obvious to the initiated. Ii is to be hoped that some 
measures helping hydraulic mining will be adopted in good time, 
to enable the valuable properties of this description throughout 
the State to benefit from the coming boom. When it is remem- 
bered that they are the source of the greatest mineral wealth in 
California, it is only reasonable to Relieve that enough interest 
will be taken in their resuscitation to expedite favorable legisla- 
tion. The addition of something like len millions annually to the 
revenue of the State would naturally enhance the general pros- 
perity of other business interests. 

$$ I 

THE information was received here on Thursday last that the 
Senator and President mines at Kingman, Arizona, bad been 
sold to Denver people for the sum of $150,000. The properties 
were owned by some Los Angeles mining men, and the sale was 
effected by a Denver promoter. It is a mistake however, to al- 
lude to this sale as the largest which has ever taken place in the 
Territory. There have been several others involving much more 
money, than the figures now quoted. 

S $ * 

WA. NEV1LL8, the managing owner of the Rawhide, one of 
. the most promising gold mines of Tuolumne County, was 
in town during the week. His partners in the property are 
Messrs. Martin and Ballard, the wealthy capitalists of this city. 



THE P. I. TJ. met during the week, but took 
INSURANCE. | no steps to carry matters to an issue one 
way or the other. The reason assigned by some for this masterly 
policy of inactivity, is that four or five of the members are 
still delinquent in dues, while others assert that the differences 
with Craig, of the New Zealand, are not a desirable subject for 
discussion more than once in a month of Sundays. At any rate 
the doughty warrior from Maori-land still holds the fort, and 
there are some arrayed against him who admit that there is rea- 
son in his arguments against dispensing with the services of paid 
solicitors. The P. I. D., as it stands to-day, is, however, only al- 
lowing the recalcitrant underwriter, an opportunity to corral a 
lot of free advertising at the expense of its membership. An- 
other meeting of the organization will be held next week. 
$ $ $ 

THE Sun Insurance Company has re-elected the old board of 
directors to serve for the ensuing year: R. D. Chandler, W. G. 
Hall, J. D. Phelan, E. B. Pond, 8. Wangenheim, J. N. Knowles, 
A. Barstow, I. Steinhart, C. L. Taylor, J. S. McKinnon, J. R. 
Kelly. The officers of the company for the ensuing year are: C. 
L.Taylor, President; J. N. Knowles, Vice President; William 
H. Friend, Secretary, and H. Stephenson Smith, Marine Secre- 
tary. 

?$$ 

HARRY BOYD, the assistant agent of the Niagara, of New 
York, and other companies, is now viating the different 
agencies under his supervision throughout the southern portion 
of the State. 

$ $ $ 

HENRY HYDE, President of the Equitable Life Insurance 
Company, of New York, is expected in the city within a few 
days, on his way to Mexico. 



,,,„„,-, . AKir -«,, TT was expected that the combination 
MISCELLANEOUS. [ effected P by the Electric Light com- 

panies, and the virtual absorption of the California Electric Light 
Company, as well as the Electric Improvement Company by the 
Edison Electric Light and Heat Company of New York, would 
have a depressing influence upon gas values. The stock of the local 
gas companies continues, however, In good demand, San Francisco 
Gas Light Company's stock being quoted at $72 and Pacific Gas 
Improvement at $79 at latest dates. Experience shows that in 
Europe and throughout the Eastern States, gas has not suffered 
from the introduction of electricity, but just the contrary, the latter 
companies selling more gas than ever. The question naturally 
arises, how is this possible? The explanation is that competition 
has brought the cost of gas manufacturing down to a minimum, 
and its cleanliness as a fuel has largely increased its consumption. 
Another item which works against the electric light in houses, 
besides the danger to life and property, which always accompanies 
its introduction, is the nearly total absence of heat. Hotels, 
clubs and large establishments where it has been introduced, find 
that their coal bills have increased at an abnormal rate, which 
added to the very high cost of the electric light, nearly debars its 
use, excepting as a luxury in any event. The Pacific-Union Club, 
in this city, recently introduced the incandescent light in the 
first floor of their building, but found the increased expenses so 
great that they have ceased to use it excepting during the dinner 
hour in the dining-room. 

$ $$ 

NOTWITHSTANDING this, the Directors of the Electric Light 
Companies have seen fit to increase their prices about fifty 
per cent. The opposition this imposition has created will un- 
doubtedly revert on the profits of the concern, and that this is be- 
ginning to dawn upon the ouside shareholder is apparent from 
the fact that the stock, which was stlling at from $22 to $22.50 
per share, was recently offered freely at $21.25, seller thirty days. 
In regard to the Gas Company, as show a in this column of the 
News Letter last week, the annual report now on file for the 
past year, shows a marked increase, not only in the number of 
consumers, but also in the production of gas. Besides this, the 
very fact of an attempt by an outside concern to force upon 
the residents of this city, a trust scheme for the purpose of ex- 
tortion, is peculiarly obnoxious in itself. 
SS i 

BUSINESS has been very quiet during the week in local stocks. 
Money is plentiful with the banks, but investors are back- 
ward in entering the market. The surplus of the banks and 
insurance companies are not yet on file, but it is expected that 
they will be made public early next week. From the manner in 
which a number of attempts have been made to borrow Hawaiian 
stock during the week, in order to make up small allotments, it 
is believed that a number of the more conservative holders of 
limited means are contemplating paying up. It is not generally 
known that already over 2,500 shares of stock have been paid on, 
but the prevailing impression is, that the delinquent sale will be 
enjoined. So far as the position of Spreckels is concerned, he is 
evidently unly acting in self-protection, and the option is open 
to the shareholders to relieve him of the bond issue and assume 
the full proprietorship of the property. There seems nothing 
unfair about this. 



Jan . 23, 1393. 



s\\ m\i im ,. NEWS LEI 1 1 B 



L6 




■ • Bear the Orterl" "Whit thedcTii art thou T' 
"ODethtt will pUt the •terll.itr. with tou." 



YOU may ar^ue all you please, 
You may go upon your knees, 
Pray, revile, condemn, beseech, in essay 

Or in sonnet.; 
But take my word for this, 
Frown, or growl, or kiss,; 
The woman at the play will wear 
An all-obscuring bonnet. 

One cannot comprehend 
Why women thus will tend 
To make a man's enjoyment 

Of the drama rather bard. 
And when the show is done, 
And they've spoiled just half the fun, 
One takes them to the restaurant 

And gives them their reward. 

Luscious oysters on the shell, 
Some terrapin as well, 
And Pommery delicious 

That has rested on the ice. 
Then you may remove their hats, 
Give them cupidinian pats, 
Which they don't resent, but 

Gushing say, "Oh, ain't this supper nice?" 

You see the deuce is in it, 
We can't hold out a minute, 
Or be really wrathy with them, 

Though their fashions we despise, 
For we like their lips to taste, 
And hold them round the waist, 
We cannot live without them, 

And 'tis there the trouble lies. 

MISS SADIE SAULTEK, of Oakland, shot away one side of 
Brake man Vinnell's moustache one cold afternoon this 
week. Brakemen are notoriously amorous, more so, indeed, 
than the conductors of street cars, and Miss Saulter, who might 
be called Assaulter if the fitness of things were considered, has 
been purged of all crime by the Oakland authorities. Sadie was 
unquestionably right. Hardly a day goes by wherein we do not 
read of some love-sick fellow killing his sweetheart and then 
taking his own worthless life. This is not a square deal, and I 
contend that if a girl is pestered by a crack-brained swain, es- 
pecially a brakeman, she has the right to shoot off one or both 
sides of his whiskers, and if this does not teach him a lesson, to 
plant the next bullet where it will do the most good. Courting 
is such delicious sport, when both parties are agreeable, that it 
must not be spoiled by the attempts of any obnoxious suitor to 
wear out tidies and burn gas. Let the unwelcome swains be 
thrown out when they come hovering around the cot or palace 
where beauty is enshrined. Let them be filled full of lead, or 
clubbed, or booted, or bull-dogged, so the acceptable suitor may 
go on sueing and cooing undisturbed and undismayed by the 
lurking shadows of these skulkers. 

A WEEKLY journal has made gentle reference to the ways of 
the young aristocracy in what the writer modestly alludes to 
as the cocktail route. Now we must really get out of the idea of 
thinking we have any such thing as an aristocracy in this coun- 
try. Americans are above all such nonsense as hunting for their 
hard-worked, pioneer ancestors to prove ancient gentility ; the 
Irish have also a respectable lot of honest peasantry to look back 
upon, and those of pedigree who are working out their destinies 
in this country are much too sensible to refer to any of their peo- 
ple who may have enjoyed both rank and position. Therefore, 
aristocracy is a bad word. We haven't it here, and we don't 
want it. We judge a man by what he is, and not by what his 
ancestors were, and in that respect we are infinitely wiser than 
those who would attempt to introduce an unfamiliar thing Into a 
community that has positively no use for it. 

THE times are now quite ripe for a Legislative scandal. We 
know, all too well, that the banditti are laying their wires for 
the great cinch bills. But so far, nothing startlingly scandalous 
has appeared. Come together, ye clans of the outside politicians, 
lay your beads together and build up something that will yield 
ye coin. What! is the Third House, that aggravation of graceless 
vagabonds, to have its occupation taken from it, and not a dime 
to be distributed among its most honorable members ? It is the 
old, old story. With the early ministrations of the Legislature 
first comes piety; then, when they have been calloused to the at- 
tacks of the correspondents, a cold indifference to everything but 
•• the Btnff." 



I SAW number ol member! of the Paolflo-Unlon club filled 
with eDger and disgust, in front of Trinity Gburoh, about «i 
one evening thll week. They were waiting for a Powell 
street car, and tboogta several passed while they stood there the 
clubmen only stared at them and swore. The trouble wan that 
every oar was crowded, packed, jammed with dirty, greasy, 
loud-smelling coolies, who were returning to Chinatown from 
their places of employment in the wool warehouses and can- 
neries at the foot of Fifth street. Every night about the hour 
mentioned the same thing occurs. About two hundred dirty 
coolies take three or four cars by storm, and compel people who 
like to pick their company to wait until they have all been trans- 
ported to their destinations. The Powell street line should put 
on enough extra cars to accommodate their regular passengers 
and their coolie patrons at the same time. 

YOUNG men who live in flats should be very careful about the 
female acquaintances they make and their deportment. A 
few days ago a gentlemen who came hither to introduce an East- 
ern cheese, was conducted by a bachelor friend to his apartments, 
and told the plain facts of the case. " If," said the sage, " you 
want to make a hit with your cheese, you must first take me 
into your business confidence as a club man." " Alas! " rejoined 
the drummer, "has it come to pass that a really good thing 
cannot work in on its own merits, but must have the boost of 
some gourmet fakir?" Now this is where the young lady in tbe 
flat came in. She ate the cheese, she praised the cheese, she de- 
clared that tbe cheese was the only thing worth eating in the en- 
tire menage. The result is that every drummer who wants to 
win a wife must estimate the sex at their own level, a percentage 
on the goods sold. 

MR. JOE REDDING, now absent from this city, has incurred 
the wrath of the sportsmen of this State. Our Joe is respon- 
sible for the introduction of the German carp, and the carp is a 
glutton on wild celery. Behold the natural result. Hither comes 
the canvasback, seeking his favorite food. But the carp has been 
ahead of him. The celery bulbs are gone, and the natural result is 
that the "cans" are lean. Therefore is Redding largely re- 
sponsible for the shrinkage in the canvasback. And Palmer, Ned, 
he the expert of the markets, wanders from people to people, like 
a mortal driven by the destinies, and jointly execrates carp and 
Redding. 

IT is seldom a Los Angeles man can walk abroad without being 
assaulted by a former wife. This former wife incumbrance is 
about as common in the City of the Angels as in Oakland or 
Chicago. 

FOUR hale and hearty fellows 
Sat down before the feast, 
Some drank the girl and some the dish, 
They loved of all the best. 

Quoth one, » I toast the terrapin. 

Naught can with him compare, 
I pick him clean, I wash him down 

In good wine, old and rare." 

Another spake, " The canvasback 

Beyond all things I class, 
The canvasback, the blazing fire, 

The Pomarde in the glass." 

» Oh," cried a gourmet boldly, 

Those things my palate clog, 
Who dare deny the excellence 

Of the imperial frog?" 

'< Out on ye," yelled a stranger, 

By custom you'r oppressed, 
I hold a devilled lobster 

Is of all things the best." 

Then came the landlord's daughter, 

And by their chairs she stood, 
•< Ye name," she said, " ye name my friends, 

The chiefs of all good food." 

<< Blest is the man who cherishes 

Each reptile, bird and fish, 
And finds in every season 

*A palatable dish." 

Then the good men subsided, 

And for a time were still, 
But shivered when the maiden 

Presented each his bill. 

NOW when the weather's dark and dreary, and all the world's 
a'cold, 
Within an arbor quite mossgrown, I dream the dreams of old. 
I dream of her whose lips I kissed within that arbor gray, 
I wonder if this year again she'll come to Monterey; 
Ah! if, indeed, this mossy seat, all ruined by the rain, 
'Neath Cupid's smile, so help my love, shall bloom and bud 
again. 



16 



SAN FBANCISCO MEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 




MK. RICHARD M AN8FIELD has ordered bis manager to discon- 
tinue the use of posters and window cards, and to confine ali 
the advertisements of his company to newspapers. He says: "A 
man who does riot read the newspapers does not attend the 
theatres," and goes on to observe that if the hundreds of thous- 
ands of pounds which are spent on making cities hideous were 
spent on people who could read, and who patronize the drama, 
it would be much better for theatres. Mr. Mansfield is not alone 
in his views. Mr. John Hollingsbead has said he never willingly 
stuck on a wall as much paper as would make a halfpenny 
staujp, and Sir Augustus Harris tells the following good story 
about himself: After some years of covering London with « Mr. 
Augustus Harris's Drama," and " Another Drury Lane Success," 
he went to Edinburgh and was introduced to a gentleman who 
evidently did not catch bis name. To put him at his ease the 
Drury Lane manager said, " I am Mr. Harris." He still looked 
embarrassed, and so Mr. Harris explained he was " Mr. Augustus 
Harris." The only answer he got was the query, *< In trade, 
Muster Harris?" The reply was, •■ No, I am Augustus Harris of 
Drury Lane Theatre." " Do they pay you well?" was the next 
remark. " I am the manager!" " Then you don't act?" "Yes, 
I do — have you never been to Drury Lane?" " I can't remember 
that I have!" " But you have often driven about London?" 
"Frequently." "Well, have you not noticed the 36-sheet 
posters with ' Augustus Harris's Latest Success?' " "No, I cannot 
say I have." Mr. Harris sighed and said, " And it is to attain 
this I spend £100,000 a year!" It was after this he diminished 
his posters, and he has certainly not suffered thereby. 



A certain Chinese official underling one day drew upon himself the 
wrath of his wife, wbo scratched his face so severely that when he 
presented himself before his chief the next morning, that officer 
asked him the cause of his wounds. With ready wit the underling 
replied, " While taking my ease in my garden last evening a portion 
of the vine-trellis fell on me and scratched my face." The officer, 
who knew something of his domestic relations, at once divined the 
true cause. " Don't talk nonsense," he replied; "it was your wife 
who scratched you. Send a policeman to bring her before me." As 
it happened, his own wife had been listening to this interview behind 
the door, and in defense of her sex burst in upon the scene. The of- 
ficer, terrified by this invasion, said hurriedly to the underling: "Go 
away, never mind your wife; my vine-trellis is about to fall on me." 

An Arctic explorer, it is said, once planted a sunflower in the Arc- 
tic region. The poor sunflower followed its natural instinct and 
turned its head always towards the sun; but as the latter never set 
the head went round and round until it twisted off the sunflower's 
neck. The story reminds one of a certain traveler, of Munchausen- 
like propensities, who was describing the wonders of the South 
American continent, and among them the prairie owl. " The bird 
never loses sight of you," he said; " you may ride round and round 
it, and it sits still and turns its head slowly as it follows your move- 
ment." " But if it did that it would twist its head off," objected a 
skeptic. " So it does," he answered calmly. " I have often killed 
them that way, but they are not good eating." 



I2SrSTJttJ±.2ir CE . 



A Chinese Rothschild is on his way to Paris to seek medical ad- 
vice. He rejoices in the name of Han-Qua, and is a martyr to neu- 
ralgia. He is said to vent his pain by kicking his attendants, his sec- 
retary bearing the brunt of these attentions, which, if unpleasant and 
unsought, are paid for handsomely. Even rich are not above sus- 
picion, and the fact that Han-Qua will be attended whenever he ap- 
pears in public by two or three Chi»ese nobles, who will form his 
suite, gives some little color to the story now going the round of the 
Parisian papers of the kicking powers of the Canton Crcesus, who 
pays the Chinese Government some £40.000 a year to be allowed to 
enjoy his wealth. 

A Russian lady has invented something new which has at least 
much originality. The Russian coachman wears the caftan, and, 
above this, a belt of a bright color. This grande dame, who at least 
must be very coquettish, has had attached to this belt a good-sized 
looking glass, in which the fair dame can admire herself; and it also 
serves a second use, for as these small Russian carriages are all open 
ones, she can see perfectly well the gentlemen who are following her. 

Are You Going East ? 
Take the Santa Fe Route. You wiirfind it to your interest to call 
on or address the undersigned before purchasing tickets. No other 
line crossing the continent can offer you a trip combining equal com- 
fort and pleasure. The only line running Pullman palace and tour- 
ist sleeping-cars through to Chicago on the same train every day 
without change. Personally conducted excursions through to" Bos- 
on leave every Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 6S0 Market street, 
Chronicle Buildmg, San Francisco. 




IN8URANOE COMPANY. 
CAPITAL 11.000,000,1 ASSETS 13,000.000 

STRONG, PROSPEROUS, PROGRESSIVE. 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United 9tatea - 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SAN80ME STRtCT, 

San Francisco, California. 



GEORGE L. BRANDER, 

President. 



CHAS. 



BLAIR, 

Secretary. 



QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up * 500,000 

Assets 3,181,763 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,525,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 
City Office— 501 Montgomery St. General Office — 401 Mont's, St. 

AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

OF BALTIMORE CITY. 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets, over 2,200,000.00 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., Gen'l Managers. 

NEW YORK OFFICES 40 to 44 Pine Street 

MAXWELL. & BERRY, General Agents. 

421 California Street. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT. 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

|OP LIVERPOOL. 

Capital ?10,637,500 

Net surplus over all liabilities 3,116,305 

William Macdonald, Manager. 
D. E. Miles, Assistant Manager. 

315 MONTGOMERY 8TREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

INSURE your property against FIRE in 

r I fl T The Lion Fire lnsurance Co - Limited, of London. 
r I n r Tl,e lmperia ' lnsuranoe C0, Limite(l ' of LoiHl011 

I L WM - SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Paclflc Branch, 214 Sansonie St., S. F. 
SWAIN & MURDOCK, City Agents. 

CALIFORNIA WIRE WORKS, 

9 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WIRE of all Kinds, WIRE NAILS, 

BARBED WIRE, Regularly Licensed. 
WIRE ROPES AND CABLES.] 
WIRE CLOTH AND NETTING. 

HALLADIE'S ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY for transporting 
ore and other material over mountains and difficult roads. 
Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

BRANCHES— 22 Front street, Portland, Or.; 201 N. Los Angeles street, 
Los Angeles, California. 

CYPRESS LAWN CEMETERY. 

Situated in San Mateo County, between the Holy CrosB and |Home of 
Peace Cemeteries, now ready for interment. 

IF-A-IMIII/S" PLOTS 
For sale ia any size required. 

The cemetery is non-sectarian and is laid out ou ihe lawn plan, thereby 
saving the lot owners the great and useless expense of coping, at the same 
time making it a beautiful burial place. 

For further information apply at the office, 325 Montgomery street, or at 
the cemetery, of w. J. BLAIN, Superintendent. 



Jan. LM 1W. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




THE CHRYSANTHEMUM BOUTONNIERE.- William II. 

II i -,\f in .lu'lge. 



MAN from the road of the a la mode, 
L Though financially half ran down, 
With brains as nil as a dried-up rill, 

And debts that alarm the town. 
To keep "in the swim," on the billowy brim 

Of fashion's sea to float. 
Must jauntily wear as a boutonniere 

A chrysanthemum in the coat. 

The violets blue have vanished from view; 

Roses and pansies have lost their grace. 
The chrysanthemum stout has jostled them out 

Usurping their fragrant place. 
So every man of the social clan 

For the burly bloom must vote; 
Obese and bright, 'tis the style called "quite," 

A chrysanthemum in the coat. 

The tiny bouquet has had its day, 

And for it we may shed a tear; 
Yet we bid it "begone" as a thing forlorn, 

Like the ghost of Hamlet pere, 
And we hasten to glide on the booming tide 

In fashion's foremost boat, 
"With trousers pressed and a bulging breast, 

A chrysanthemum in the coat. 

THE WORLD'S A WARDROBE. 



All the world's a wardrobe, 
And all the girls and women merely wearers. 
They have their fashions and their fantasies, 
And one she in her time wears many garments 
Throughout her seven stages. First, the baby, 
Befrilled and broidered, in her nurse's arms. 
And then the trim-hosed schoolgirl, with her flounces 
And small-boy-scorning face, tripping, skirt-waggling, 
Coquettishly to school. And then the flirt, 
Ogling like Circe, with a blushing ceillade 
Kept on her low-cut corsage. Then a bride, 
Full of strange finery, vestured like an angel, 
Veiled vaporously, yet vigilant of glance, 
Seeking the women's heaven — admiration, 
Even at the altar's steps. And then the matron, 
In fair, rich velvet, with suave satin lined, 
With eyes severe, and skirts of youthful cut, 
Full of dress saws and modish instances, 
To teach her girls their parts. The sixth age shifts 
Into the grey, yet gorgeous, grandmamma, 
With gold pince-nez on nose and fan at side, 
Her youthful tastes still strong, and worldly wise 
In sumptuary law, her quavering voice 
Prosing of fashion and Le Follet, pipes 
Of robes and bargains rare. Last scene of ail, 
That ends the sex's mode-swaying history, 
Is second childishness and sheer oblivion 
Of youth, taste, passion — all, save love of dress. 

LA BELLE DANSEUSE.— Life. 



In Betty's boudoir of delight 
Like Betty's self, all pink and white, 
She lingers pensively to choose 
Among the saucy little shoes 
That stand in a coquettish row, 
Heel set to heel, and toe to toe. 

The slippers with the big rosette ? 
The scarlet or the tricked with jet? 
As if she did not know, the witch, 
That let her wear no matter which, 
No matter where, no matter when, 
She trips into the hearts of men ! 

THE SNOW.— Emerson. 



Announced by all the trumpets of the sky, 
Arrives the snow; and, driving o'er the fields, 
Seems nowhere to alight; the whited air 
Hides hills and woods, the river and the heaven, 
And veils the farm-bouse at the garden's end. 
The sled and traveler stopped, the courier's feet 
Delayed, all friends shut out, the housemates 
Around the radiant fireplace, inclosed 
In a tumultuous privacy of storm. 



X3STSTJR-A.2SI OI&J. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Herbert I.. Low, Manajrcr for the Pacific loaal Branch, 

' ■ " Miuomt St., 9. F. 

Capital $1,600,000.00 

Invested in U. S 534,795.72 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
232 California St., 8. F., Cal. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSUi, INGE COMPANIES 

COMBINE-) 

BALOISE HELVEHA SWITZERLAND 

_ OF BASLE. OF ST. Q-L1-* OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable joi_.- j and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. 8YZ, General Agent, 

410 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 7,000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 188B 8,124,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, [Established 1 782] 
American Fire Insurance Company of New York [Established 1 857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
473 California Street, San Francisco- 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Streets. 
GEO. F. BRANT , Manager. 

pacific iD-EFJtLttTi&ttisri? 
GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established A. D. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - S 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, $23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded a. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, $10,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - 12,510,368. 



WM. J. UNDERS, (ien'I Agent, 20& Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL *5,000,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets $19,724,638.46. 

President. BENJAMIN P. STEVENS. | Vice-President, JOS. M. QIBBENB. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS POUT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of intereston Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sola, 
if desired, at current rates. 

Offlc* ot the Company. 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-CaMornIa BaaK. 




INSURANCE COMPANY- LTD. 

fJ gr MANCHESTER , EtNl E L->\NJD. ^ 3 

Capital paid 6j guaranteed $3,000,000,00. 

ChasALatoh, Manager, 
439 California St. San Francisco. 



18 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 



^J^lM&*1M 



JUDGING from the statements made by the agents, it is safe to 
predict that witbin a few weeks the real estate market will 
be much brisker than it is to-day. Since the election and the 
holidays, business has not been as good as coald be desired, but 
the present indications are that in a short time the market will 
again resume strength, as far as local realty is concerned. Busi- 
ness in interior lands is reported to be as good as dealers can 
properly expect at this season of the year. Several firms are giv- 
ing particular attention just now to country property, and with 
very satisfactory results. Acreage property and town lots in the 
interior both sell at good rates, and as far as they are concerned 
there is no cause for complaint. The evident desire of a number 
of large holders to cut their great tracts into small pieces has had 
a good effect upon the market. Such division of the immense 
tracts which cover the State should result very beneficially, for 
the opportunity to obtain small pieces at reasonable rates should 
induce the immigration that we so greatly need to build up the 
State. The excursion season will soon open, and then additional 
tracts will be placed upon the market. Business prospects now 
seem brighter than they have for several months. Building 
is also on the increase, a very good sign for the real estate deal- 
ers. During the past week a larger number of building contracts 
was let than during aDy other week of the year. 

The auction of G. H. Umbsen & Co., of the Macdonald estate, 
will be held in the Real Estate Exchange next Wednesday. The 
offering includes twelve pieces that will be sold for cash, of which 
ten per cent, is payable at the sale, and the balance upon the con- 
firmation of the sale by the Probate Court. The list includes valu- 
able property, among which is the hotel at the northwest corner 
of Drumm and Commercial, lot 50x59:9; the building and lot, 
35x55, at 113 Leidesdorff; a tenement house on Folsom near 
Fifth; three building at the corner of Folsom and Beale; a cot- 
tage on Clementina near Fifth; some of the outside homestead 
lots and tide lands near San Mateo. 

Baldwin & Hammond will sell at auction the southwest cor- 
ner of Hayes and Fillmore on February 16th. The terms are 
cash. 

The Murphy ranch, in Santa Clara, is to be cut up into parcels 
and put upon the market. Mr. Phillips, of San Jose, has the 
matter in hand. 

Among the new buildings to be erected is the hall for the Order 
of B'nai B'rith, which is to be built at the corner of Van Ness and 
Fell, at a cost of about $200,000. The members of the order had 
a meeting this week about the matter, and it was decided to push 
the building project. The new hall will be a large and handsome 
structure. 

Tevis & Fisher report the sale of the 50-vara at the corner of 
Octavia and Filbert for $12,000. 

The owner of Trinity Church, who has for a long time been 
wondering what she would do with that ancient and insecure 
structure, has almost decided to tear it down, but when it will 
be razed is not yet fixed. Its demolition may begin about 
Easter. 

H. Liebes, of Irving Hall, will remodel that building for busi- 
ness purposes at the completion of the present lease. 



WHOEVER heard it stated that the looking-glass was first in- 
vented to spite a pretty woman? And how would it be 
possible to spite a woman by showing her a perfect reflection of 
her own dainty self ? Well, according to Japanese mythology, 
the deity presiding over the sun, and furnishing light to the 
world, became infuriated at some trifle and hid herself away in a 
cave, tbus depriving humanity of a very necessary element. In 
order to induce her to come out, the mirror was invented and 
placed in the cave. The beautiful goddess, seeing another 
beautiful goddess within those narrow confines, immediately de- 
parted, and the people took care that never again should she en- 
ter the precincts of a cave. And so that most valued of woman's 
treasures was invented for spite, but for what a different purpose 
has it served I 



The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic feature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent arti sts and artisans. 

This is the weather that makes good old whisky appreciated. 
Order only Argonaut Old Bourbon when you call for your tipple. It 
is the favorite drink among those who know good liquor for it has no 
superior. Argonaut Old Bourbon may be had at all first-class bars, 
hotels, restaurants and clubs. 

" Kritiko'' reads character from handwriting. Write m ink, in an 
unfeigned hand, on unruled paper. State sex. Send 50 cents 
stamps or postal note. Address " Kritiko," 609 Merchant street, S. F. 



&co. 



REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND GENERAL AUCTIONEERS, 

14 MONTGOMERY ST., S. F. 

AT AUCTION 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY I, 1893. 

AT 12 O'CLOCK M. 

AT THE 

REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE BUILDING, 

76 POST ST.. S. F. 

THE ESTATE 

OF 

CHARLES E. S. MacDONALD 

WILL BE SOLD 

BY ORDER OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. 



First— Improvements and lot, 25x75, at Nos 427 and 427!-£ Clementina St., 
S E line, distant 300 feet S W of Fifth. 

Second— 928 Folsom st., NW line, 300 feet SW of Fifhh; improvements and 
lot, 25x85 feet. 

Third— N W corner Drumm and Commercial streets; improvements and 
lot, 50x5S5i; 50 feet front on Commercial st., fine business property. 

Fourth— Nos. 113-115 Leidsdorff street, W. line, \Yi\i feet N of California 
street, thence N of 35x55 feet, and improvements consisting of brick build- 
ins. 

Fifth— N E corner Folsom and Beale streets, thence N Eon Folsom st., 
91% feet by a uniform depth of 137J^ feet, with improvements; excellent 
manufacturing district. 

Sixth— Lot 55, Gift Map 4, being 25x70 feet in size; situated on the S E 
line of Case st, distant 450 feet 8 W of Weldon. 

Seventh— Lots 4 and 5, block 34, Paul tract, being 100x120 feet, situated 
on the W line of Girard street, 150 feet N of the N W corner of Girard and 
Wilde. 

Eighth— 5 lots, each 25x100, on the SW line of Teneriffe street (Fifteenth 
ave.), 300 feet NWof Potomac street (R street): also 3 lots, each 25x100. N 
E line of Falkland street (Sixteenth ave), disiant 325 feet N W of Potomac 
street <R street); part of block 303, O'Neil and Haley Tract. 

Ninth— Lot 150x100 feet in size. SW. line of Sumatra street (Seventeenth 
avenue), 50 feet N W of San Joaquin street (S street) ; part of block 342 of the 
O'Neil and Haley Tract. 

Tenth— 50x100, NE line of Dominica street (Twelfth avenue), 150 SE of 
Santee street (G. street), thence SE 50 by 100, South San Francisco Home- 
stead and Railroad Association. 

Eleventh— Roadside resort on San Bruno road and bayshore, house and 
lot, 13 acres of tide land, known as Eight-mile House and also "MacDonald's 
Ranch," San Mateo county. 

Twelfth— About 225 acres tide lands near the town of San Mateo; deep 
water for wharf; beiugthe 9 W quarter of section 8, township 4south, range 
4 west, and lots land 2, section 17, township 4 south, range 4 west, Mount 
Diablo meridian, 

TERMS OF SALE: 

Ten per cent cash at time of sale, balance cash when sale is confirmed by 
court; abstract of title furnished free to date; 20 days allowed to examine 
title. 
For further particulars apply to either the undersigned referees: 

G. H. UMBSEN, 14 Montgomery Street. 
TH09. ARCHER. 320 Sausome Street. 
GEO. E. KING, 533 Kearny Street. 
Or G. M. UMBSEN A CO., Auctioneers. 14 Montgomery St. 



n 



xx 



Systems : 
: "Slattery" 
: Induction;: 
;"Wood" 

Arc.: 
; Factories : ; 
:Fort Wayne, 
: Indiana;: 

: Br0 N k e'rYork.^^eci a lty. 



ELECTRIC IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. 

General Agents for California, Nevada, Oregon, Ari- 
zona and Washington of the 

Fort Wayne Electric Light Company. Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Estimates furnished for electric railways, electric 
light and steam plants, house wiring, etc. Marine wor 



35 New Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



RENTS! 



Our House Renting Department is one of 
the best equipped in the city. We guarantee 
proru pt ana efficient service in renting 
houses, collecting rents and placing insur- 
ance. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND, 

10 MONTGOMEEY Si. 



HUMBOLDT MINERAL WATER, 

Humboldt Artesian Mineral Spring In Eureka, Cal. 

" The speciBc gravity is scarcely above that of distilled water." 

Henry G. Hanks, Assayer. 
We claim for this water to be the purest in Cslifornia. 
J. P. MONROE, Manager. 

Crocker Building, 8an Francisco 



Jan . 2*. I 393. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS l.l.l I I I: 



1!> 




mm^ 



THE intrigue against British influence in Egypt, which cut 
mtnated in the young Khedive's attempt to violate the agree- 
ment existing between him and the British government with re- 
ference to appointments in bis cabinet, has resulted for tbe time 
being in dismal failure, in consequence of tbe firm attitude of 
Lord Rosebery and bis colleagues. Tbe Prime Minister of Egypt, 
who bad been appointed by Abbas Pasha without tbe consent of 
the British representative in Egypt, and whose dismissal was at 
first stubbornly refused by tbe young Khedive, was immediately 
forced to resign when England sent tbe ultimatum that such a re- 
signation would have to lake place within twenty-four hours, and 
Mr. Gladstone demonstrated to the world by his speedy interfer- 
ence that he will not permit Egypt to violate any agreements con- 
cluded by his predecessors, as long as tbey have not been repealed 
by mutual consent. 

It might have been foretold that Great Britain would maintain 
her authority abroad at all hazards in the case of so open an af- 
front as that attempted by the young Khedive, for Mr. Gladstone, 
even if he wished to relax British influence in Egypt at this mo- 
ment — and there is no proof that this is tbe case — could not pos- 
sibly afford to meet Parliament under tbe suspicion of having 
shown new signs of weakening in bis foreign policy, at a time 
when his position is already rendered sufficiently precarious in 
consequence of his attitude in the Irish question. Nevertheless, 
the firmness of the present British Cabinet witb regard to occur- 
rences at Cairo last week, tbough it has had tbe effect of forcing 
Abbas Pasha to surrender for the moment, will not suffice to re- 
move tbe impression produced by the events upon the Egyptian 
people, and it would not be astonishing if tbe resentment of an 
insult and of a breacb of treaty rights were to be interpreted by 
tbe dissatisfied elements of the population as a tyrannical attitude 
on tbe part of England. At all events it will be easy for French 
and Russian intriguers to produce such an impression amongst 
the population, and though Mr. Gladstone's Cabinet has merely 
insisted that England's rights in Egypt should be respected, the 
events which forced biui to make this public demonstration will 
most likely result in embarrassing consequences for him, which 
most add to the difficulties with which he will soon have to cope 
at home- 
Count Caprivi's speeches seem to have given some umbrage to 
Russia, as was to be forseen. The Chancellor attempts to throw 
the responsibility upon the reporters who distorted his utter- 
ances in the telegrams to their papers. This excuse, however, 
will hardly be accepted by Russia, since the Russian government 
has better sources of information than European newspaper dis- 
patches, which, it is true, are often pitiful caricatures of the 
actual speeches. The fact is that Count Caprivi's utterances of 
late have been more indiscreet than formerly. This can astonish 
nobody who appreciates the truth of tbe saying that evil com- 
munications corrupt good manners, and William II. of Hohen- 
zollern is bad company for a man to keep, who wishes to main- 
tain the art of discretion in speech-making. 

The Sultan is reported to have instructed his censor to cut 
out from the Bible all passages which contain references that 
might lead his subjects to doubt his power, and also that passage 
in Jeremiah xsx, 7-16, which hints at an eventual return of the 
Jews to Jerusalem. The anti-Semites in Paris and Berlin, if tbey 
were permitted to exercise censorships over the Bible, would 
probably have the latter passage printed witb leaded type instead 
of having it cancelled, but in Christian countries, fortunately, 
the censor has to leave some books untouched. Nobody ought 
to be dissatisfied with this, were it not that among us, other books 
are not treated with equal fairness. 



Special attention Riven to all cases recommended by family physician , 
free of charge. C. Mailer, refraction specialist, 1S5 Montgomery street 
near Bush. 



Mothers be sure and use 
children while teething. 



'Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 




FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew- 
ellery of first quality only, at 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St., 
Under Masonic Temple. 



Nothing ia 9o delicious on on* "I thara January evenings than a 
ir two of those (anions oyatan ol MoniiMiiin, tliut may be had 
mi tin' California Uarket 

GRAND CLEARANCE SALE 

BY AUCTION 

ORIENTAL ART GOODS. 

AT l(t POST STREET. 

COMEICIM THURSDAY, FKB. 2nd TILL 8th, AT It 1. ID. EACH DAT. 

A big collection, including 
all late arrivals, directly im- 
ported by 

M. B. MIHRAN, 

Turkish and Persian Ru£s, 
Palace Embroideries of all 
sorts, Curtains, Mosque Par- 
tierres. Lanterns, Curios, etc. 
which are now on free exhi- 
bition at 

16 POST STREET, 

and will be cleared out by 
auction on 

February 7th to 8th 

All are invited to this grand 
Bargain Sale. 

Wm. butterfield, 

Auctioneer. 

IDEAL COFFEE. 

This famous brand of fresh ground blended coffee is unexcelled for quality 
and delicacy of flavor. 




No. 2 
30 cents 



No. 3 
35 cents 



No. 4 

40 cents per lb, 



No. 1 
25 cents 
For sale only by 

RATHJEN BROS., Grocers. 

21 STOCKTON STREET. 
Sole Agents for the Celebrated IDEAL COFFEE POT. 

REMOVAL NOTICE. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
KENTUCK CONSOLIDATED MINING COM- 
PANY, held this day, the office of the Company 
was ordered removed to Room 23, Nevada 
Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 

San Franciseo, December 21, 1892. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Franeiseo. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits 

and four and oue fourth (.4.%) per cent, per anuum ou ordinary deposits, free 

of taxes, payable ou and after Tuesday, January 3, 1893. 

J. A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 
Office— No. 33 Post street, San Franciseo, Oal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Lo n Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of Four and one-quarter (4^) 
per cent, per annum on all deposits for the hix months ending December 
31 1892 free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 3, 1893. 

San Francisco, Jan. 3, 1893. K. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

O mce _Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

dTvideniT notice. - 

Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 81, 1892, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five and one-tenth (6 1-10) per cent, per annum on Term De- 

gosits and four and one-quarter (1%) per cent, per annum on Ordinary 
eposits, payable on and after Tuesday, Januarys, 1893. 
* ' v CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
OfBce— 101 Montgomery street, corner 8utter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1892, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and four-tenths (5 4-10) per cent, per annum on term de- 
posits, and four and one-half (4%) per cent, per annum on ordinary de- 
Dosits free of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday, January 3, 1893. 
y ' VERNON CAMPBEXL, Secretary. 

Office— Cor. Powell and Eddv streets. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan . 28, 1893. 




J~\^' 



'$£nrm£4/sg£ifjL 



B^_nsTK:s. 



TWO interesting announcements are made in the French papers, 
one of these being the discovery of a process for metallizing 
textile fabrics, by which, it is claimed, the latter are rendered proof 
against the attacks of insects. The materials, such as wool, flannel, 
calico, etc., are for this purpose immersed about an hour in a boiling 
bath composed of two and one-half pounds of sulphate of copper, one 
pound of sulphuric acid, and sixty-two gallons of water, the fabric be- 
ing calendered and dried after its removal from the fluid. The finish 
obtained by this process will, it is said, bear two or three washings 
before it is again necessary to subject the cloth to a repetition of the 
operation. Another process deserving of mention, as of similar m- 
geniousness and utilitv, is a practical application of the well-known 
fact that a thin laver of magnetic oxide of iron will protect articles 
made of wrought or cast iron, the method, as now proposed, being to 
coat the surface of the iron or steel by electro-deposition with some 
metal or alloy which is capable of being volatized at about 2,000 de- 
grees ; the article is then placed in thefurnace heated to this tempera- 
ture, the iron becomes oxidized— but only to the magnetic oxide 
stage— the metallic coating in the meantime volatilizing, and the 
whole operation requiring but a few minutes. 

The completion of the first elevated railroad in Liverpool, and 

ir. fact in England, is now announced, the line traversing the whole 
length of the docks of that citv, some six miles, with important ex- 
tensions contemplated. According to the account given of this 
structure, it consists generally of wrought iron plate girders of fifty 
feet span, supported on channel iron columns. Some of the spans 
are 100 feet long, and others are so arranged that they can be lifted 
to afford a passage for specially bulky goods. The columns are bedded 
in cast iron sockets, with thin cement, or " grout," which are in turn 
firmly fastened to large masses of concrete. The structure is floored 
with arched plates, two and one-half feet wide and fifteen inches deep, 
covered with asphalt. The electricity by which the railway is worked 
is distributed along the line by a steel conductor placed between the 
rails on porcelain insulators; hinged collectors sliding along this con- 
ductor take off the current to the motors, which are attached to each 
car. 

A new method of obtaining fibres from ramie is described in a 

London paper as one of merit. The material, ied into the machine 
through a tube, is crushed by india-rubber rollers, split longitudinally 
by a cutter, and each half of the divided stem is stripped of its bark 
by other cutters, which are strengthed by curved metal bars. The 
bark passes out of the machine in one direction and the wood in an- 
other. In order that material of varying thickness may be properly 
presented to the cutters, the bearings of the rollers are connected by 
links with blocks which can slide horizontally in the framing, so that 
when the rollers approach or are separated from one another they 
move oppositely and symmetrically with regard to the cutters; there 
is also a modification in which the rollers are arranged vertically. To 
separate the cuticle from the fibrous portion of the bark it is drawn in 
between a roller which is pressed by a spring into a dish-shaped chair 
or block, 

Prominent men in the shipbuilding and shipping interests of 

the United States have completed the preliminary organization of a 
professional society to be called the Society of Naval Architects and 
Marine Engineers, whose object will be to promote the art of ship- 
building in all its branches, both commercial and naval. The com- 
mittee of organization, consisting of William H. Webb, of New York ; 
Lewis Nixon, general manager of Cramp's Shipbuilding Company, of 
Philadelphia; Col. E. A. Stevens, of Hoboken; Francis T.Bowles, 
Naval Constructor, United States navy; and (ex-officio) Clement A. 
Griscom, President of the International Navigation Company, expect 
to incorporate the society in New ifork, and are now sending out in- 
vitations to membership. 

The process of engraving on glass by electricity is exhibited 

at the American Institute Fair. 

The famous Cathedral of Vienna is now lighted with elec- 
tric arc-lights. 

The Original Swain's Bakery at 213 Sutter street stands easily 
among the first in the city as a family restaurant of high-class and 
unexcelled service. The fact that every night, dinner parties of the 
best people are held there, give indication of its popularity. Go 
there for your dinner. 

John W. Cannany, of 25 Kearny street, easily leads in the hand- 
ling of all gentlemen's furnishing goods. He is therefore patron- 
ized by the city's well-dressed men. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Ho. 18 Weary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24, 18C9. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President 1 ERNST BRAND Secretary. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 



$3,000,onr oo 
3,278,653 23 



Capital 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (April 1, 1392), .... 
WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Brown Cashier | Ibving F. Moulton, Assistant Cashier. 

Edward 8. Hast, Secretary. 

CORRES PONDEXTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of tie Bank of California: BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Onion National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, China, 
Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Lob Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, BremeD, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland- 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST COMPANY. 

raid-Dp t'apital, $lOO,ooo,ooO. 

CoT.er Mon'gomery and California Streets, San Franc'sco, Cat- 

3. D. FRY, Presideut. HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Secretary and Treasurer. 



This Company is authorized bylaw to act a.s Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depository for Court and 
Trust Funds. Will take eutire charge of Real aud Personal Estates, col- 
lecting the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an indi- 
vidual in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 

Eer cent, per auuum ou daily balances. Issues certificates of deposit 
earing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from$l upwards, and allows 
the usual rates of interest thereon. 

The rate of Interest on Term Deposit's for six months ending 
December 3i, 1892. wasat 5 1-10 percent, per annum, and on 
Ordinary Deposits, 4 1-4 percent, per annum. 

Rents safes inside its burglar proof vaults at prices from 55 per annum 
upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored at low 
rates. 

Wills drawn and taken care of without charge. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 I Capital paid up 2,450,000 

Reserve 450,000 

San Francisco Office. 424 California SI. I London Office 73 Lombard SI..E. C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch. 1166 Pacific Avenue. 

SCOTLAND. UNION BANK OP SCOTLAND, (Limited.) 

MALTA, TURNBULL JR. & SOMERVILLB. 

Manager, ARTHUR, SCRIVENER: Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan A Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ez- 
ohange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital £1,250.000. 

Successor to Satheb & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

J AMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. 8. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere. F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Sm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents t New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia — Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis — The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

John J. Valentine President. 

HomerS.King Manager. 

H. Wadsworth Cashier. 

J. L. Browne Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS;] 
John J. Valentine, Lloyd Tevis, Oliver Eldridge, Lelaud Stanford, James 
C. Fargo. Geo, E. Gray, W. F. Goad, Chas. F. Crocker, Dudley Evaus. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11,000.000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, I E. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH PBE8IDEHT. 

W.E.BROWN Vice-Pbebident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashieb 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 



William Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS: 

Jerome Lincoln 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K, P. Harmon, 
J. B. Randol. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 



-W FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



21 



SUNBEAMS! 



H 



l/RRAH. hurrah, (or Women's Rights 

That, from a race of stocking menders, 

A sex has risen which now delights 

In coats, boiled shirts and men's suspenders. 



BA.3STICS. 



'That's a lie!" shouted a Chicago man, entering a railroad 

station as an employe was putting up a placard, ' Chicago Limited." 
'■ Let me tell you, sir. Chicago nin'i limited. She's got more stretch 
to her than a wad of warm taffy, and it wouldn't surprise me none to 
see tbe earth bulge out to make room for her." — Judge. 

T}<t Dimity <» Game— When folly eloped with Lord Forgivuz 

she sent a note to' her father that the " Lord gave and the Lord had 
taken away." The Divinity in 7"i.;/i(.-— What did be say to that ? The 

Dirinitu in Gauze He wired back. "Blessed he the name of the 

Lord." —Truth. 

He started from his slumbers in the middle of the night, 

For a specter stood beside him in a rustling robe of white ;^ 
And the specter said, advancing, with its presence magnified; 
" I'm the Xew Year resolution! " And the man fell back and died! 

— Atlanta Constitution. 

" You must dun Jones again to-day for that bill," said tbe mer- 
chant to his clerk. " Yes, sir; and by the way. Smith, who lives next, 
door to Jones, owes us an account also." " 0, Smith is a man of 
means; we can let his account stand until he gets ready to pay." 

— New York Press. 

Mr. N. E. Verylale— Have you ceased to care for me. Adele? I 

came earlier this afternoon, and you do not even look glad to see me. 
Hiss Adele Sartean— Indeed. 1 am glad to see you! But this is my 
hour for resting my features from all expression. —Vogue. 

" Is your father a church member. Miss Jorkins? " was asked 

of the editor's daughter. " No." she replied. " Pa thought of becom- 
ing an Episcopalian . but his principles forbid his acceptance of thirty- 
nine articles all in a bunch." — Vogue. 

— Editor — I'm sorry we can't print these articles of yours on " The 
Tariff Question " and '• The Labor Problem;" but if you can get us up 
a new idea for a guessing contest we'll buy it at your own figure." 

— Puck. 

" Your friend Mr. Barlow isn't a very civil man. Hewas posi- 
tively rude to me last night," said Maude. "That's Henry's great 
fault," said Ethel. " He has very little respect for age." —Vogue. 

" Tbe fashionable Mrs. Tyler is ill." "With what?" "The 

Doctor won't say. He wants to find out what the prevailing malady 
in society is to be this winter before he commits himself. — Vogue. 

— I didn't see anything funny in the story that fellow just told. 
What made you laugh so over it?" "Do you know who he is?" 
" No. Who is he?" " He's the head of our firm." —Life. 

" I'm in a deuce of a hole," said Biggs; " I heard Miss Ander- 
son had gone to Lakewood and 1 sent my valet with my card to call 
upon her last night, and by Jove she had left town ! " — Vogue. 

— Oladys— How do you like a man to propose? Mertie— By mail. 
Gladys— But that is so prosaic. Mertie— Prose goes further than 
poetry in a breach of promise suit. —Vogue. 

— — " The poor man was dying. His breath was becoming weaker 
and weaker every minute when I saw him." "And what did you 
do?" " I gave him an onion." — Judge. 

Be (.just engaged)— I don't think vou kiss with the same earnest- 
ness and abandon that other girls do. She— Don't you think so? 
Why, other men say I do. — Truth. 

o What makes you so thirety to-day, old fellow 1 " "I had to 

stick one of those deucedly large Columbian stamps on the letter my 
wife gave me to mail." — Puck. 

Professor (examining class in physics)— The pressure of bodies at rest is 
called force. Give an example, Jones. Jones (an observant scholar)— 
The Police Force. —Puck. 

She— Don't you think I am an angel to brush your silk hat so 

nicely for you ? Be— But think how much I must love you to let you 
doit. —Puck. 

— Teacher— Tommy, what constitutes the difference between a 
village and a city ? Tommy— One's in the East and the other's out 
W es t # — Indianapolis Journal. 

Maud— Whv don't Milly light the gas when she knows that Mr. 

Oldswain is coming ? Gertrude— Oh, he's an old flame ! 

— Inter Ocean. 

Delia— Oh, he's too voung. Dolly— Howyoung? Delia— When 

he kisses he smacks. Doily— Oh, so young as that! — Truth. 

" Harold, papa calls vou a fortune hunter. I'm sorry I'm rich." 

" So am I. Everybody will say that you bought me." — Life. 

A Household Remedy. 



Allcock's Porous Plasters are the only reliable plasters ever 
produced. Fragrant, clean, inexpensive, and never failing; they 
fully meet all the requirements of a household remedy, and should 
always be kept on hand. For the relief and cure of weak back, weak 
muscles, lameness, stiff or enlarged joints, pains in the chest, small 
of the back and around the hips, strains, stitches, and all local pains, 
Allcock's Porous Plasters are unequalled. 

Beware of imitation, and do not be deceived by misrepresentation. 
Ask for Allcock's, and let no solicitation or explanation induce you 
to accept a substitute. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND J ,250, OOO 

Southeast corner Bush and Sansome Street*. 

HEAD OFFIOE 80 LOMBARD STREET. LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon ; 

Seattle aud Tacoma, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES-Kamloops, Nauaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, British 

Columbia. 
This Back trausacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office aud Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO aud CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
— North and South Wales Bauk; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA-Loudon Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA aud NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Baukiug Company of Sydney, English. Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

532 California Street, Corner Webb Street. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1893 925,890,653 00 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus t, 333, 136 00 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for passbook or entrance fee. Omce Hours— 9 a. M.toSp. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



W. W. Corner Sansome and Bush Streets. 

Established 1870. U. S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL (PAID UP) $ 1,600,000 

SURPLUS $600,000 | UNDIVIDED PROFITS $150,000 

8. G. MURPHY President IE. D.MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. . .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE As&tCashier 

DIRECTORS: 

Geo. A, Low, George C. Perkins, 8. G. Murphy, 

N Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking: Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAME8 K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from {5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 

the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. h. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND $ 1 ,686,000 OO. 

Deposits Jan. 1, 1893 80,327,169 02 

Officers— President, L. GOT TIG; Vice-President. EDW. KRUSE 
8econd Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGEES ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, 0. Schoemann, E. 
Meyer, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon. Attorney, 
John R. Jabbqb. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

OFFICEBS. 

JAMES G. FAIR ' President 

JAMES PHELAN, 8. G. MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 

interest' paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. VV. Cop. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

ubscrled Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Re8erue Fuf]d 96B0000 

HkadOffich 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd ) No. 10 Wall St., N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
merclal and Travelers' Credits issued. EUGENE MEYER, Manager. 
LC . Altbc hpl, Cashier. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

(lanital Authorized ?6,000,000 I Paid up »l,600,0O0 

SiXt-ribed 8,000,000 Reserve Fund 700,000 

budsc ' " ' head Office-3 Angel (Jourt, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sell man & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a goneral banking 1 usiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
eranbio transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
work, jends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
Tud bullion IGN. 8TEINHART j M „ naMr . 

ana DUllion. p ^ LILIENTHAL. i Mana B e ™' 

A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier 



22 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour— Demand good ; Extras $3.85@?4. Superfne. S2.G0@»3.10. 

Wheat— Good trade; Shipping, $1.30; Milliue, gl.SZft@tt.33 per cental 

Barley is firm; Brewing, 90®H 00 Feed, 77%c.@80c. per ctl. 

Oats. Milling, *1.35@n- 40; Feed, $1.15®H.25 per ctl. 

Corn, White, S1.05; Yellow, $L0o@S1.10per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, good demand, $1.05i8M.lu'/4- Cement, *2.00@»2.25. 

Hay is lower; Wheat, $10: Oats, »7®?9; Alfalfa, J8@J9.50. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, $15@$15.50 per ton. 

Beans good request, $-2.00@$'2.40 per ctl. Potatoes, 55c. @$1 per ctl. 

Butter is lower; Choice, 30c.@32'4c; Fair, 16c.@17c: Eastern, 16c@20c. 

Cheese, light stock, 8c.@10c Eggs, free supply, 30c.@3"isC. 

Honey, Comb, 12c.@13e. : Extracted, 8c.@9c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth 75c.@?L Beeswax is steady, at 25c.@27c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Raisins and Dried Grapes in high favor. 

Hides are steady; Dry, 7e@7J*2C. Wool is in good demand at llc.@16c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6^c. 

Coffee sluggish at 15c.@21c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds iu favor. 

Coal is plentiful; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 17c. @20c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at $41.50 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. White, 5c.@5%c. 

Grain freights to Europe having dropped down squarely to 
20s., quite a number of ships are loading Wheat, etc., for Europe, 
upon owners' account, while others are going elsewhere in bal- 
last to load Sugar, etc., for New York. Competition in freight 
rates, both by sea and rail, is now in order, and tbe cut is some- 
what formidable, be it via Panama, Cape Horn or by that of the 
Southern Pacific route. The Pacific Mail Steamship is likely to 
have a lively competitor in the North American Navigation Com- 
pany via the Isthmus route. 

Grain charters include those of the Br. iron ship Millon Stuart, 
3,140 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, 
£1. Br. iron ship Lord Roseberry, 2,678 tons, Wheat same voy- 
age, £1. Br. iron ship Clarenden, 2,452 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
TT. K., owners' account. 

There are now sixty sailiug ships in port flying the British flag, 
and among them are several of the largest afloat, tbe Pelgrave 
and others over 3,000 tons register. The American ships are now 
given employment loading general cargo for New York and other 
Eastern ports. 

The steamship Mariposa, from Sydney, etc., had for cargo 225 
bales Wool, 2,093 ingots Tin, 1,226 cs. Canned Fruit and 2,364 
pkgs. Exhibits, 8,000 Wood Blocks and 3 cks. Casings for the 
World's Exhibit at Chicago; from Auckland, 366 bales Flax, 307 
Hides and 4 cks. Casings; from Honolulu, 2,582 bcbs. Bananas, 
17 crates Pineapples, 18 cs. Betel Leaves, etc. 

Mexico The P. M. 8. S. Co. 'a Starbuck, hence, carried 341 

hbls. Flour and Mdse., value $29,246; also, to Central America, 

285 bbls. Flour and Mdse., value $56,000. 
^■The steamer Australia, for Honolulu, carried in Treasure 
*75, 000, and for cargo 747 bbls. Flour and Mdse., value $70,000. 
The schr. B. W. Bartlett, hence for Hilo on the 23d inst., carried 
Mdse. value $6,964. The S . G. Wilder, for Honolulu same day, 
carried Mdse. value $18,150. 

New York. — Tbe ship Parthia, hence on the 24th inst., carried 
1,000 flsks. Quicksilver, 7,564 cs. Salmon, 6,351 sks. Beans, 9,142 
cs. Canned Fruit, 150 bbls. Vinegar, 255 sks. Bark and 18 bdls. 
Herbs, etc. 

Hoi for the Orient — The steamer Gaelic sailed hence on the 
24th inst., carrying $404,336 in treasure; of this $254,336 went to 
Hongkong and $150,000 to Singapore. Her cargo was valued at 
$117,322, and consisted in part of 13.025 bbls. Flour, 13,391 lb- 
Ginseng, 200 bxs. Pearl Barley, Provisions, etc. For Japan ^o0 
bbls. Flour, 11,780 lbs. Sugar, 2,500 lbs. Oleomargarine, etc. 

Exclusive of precious metals, California is credited with having 
produced, in 1892, other materials as follows: Aspbaltum, 3,500 
tons; Bitumen, 50.000 tons; Copper, 900 tons; Coal, 50,000 tons; 
Chromic Ore. 3,000 tons; Lead, 1,300 tons; Salt, 35,000 tons; 
Cement, 6,000 bbls; Gypsum, 1,800 tons; Petroleum, 500,000 
bbls. 

The exports and imports of Mdse and Treasure to and from 
San Francisco to foreign ports only in 1892 are as follows: 

Exports. Imports. 

Merchandise $31,697,903 $45,607,950 

Treasure 14 596,578 8,990,386 

Totals $54,994,481 $54,598,336 

Showing an excess of imports for the past year of $8,323,775 
The Wheat and Flour exports for 1892 were valued at $18,. 
935,630. 

One of the mostextraordinary business phenomena is to beseen 
in the management of the various powder companies on this 
coast. Some years ago by a mutual understanding, prices of 
powder were maintained, and all of the companies were making 
money. Owing to some cause the combination came to an end, 
and for years the companies have been trying to out each other's 
throats, benefitting no one but the consumer, while the poor 



stockholder whistles for his dividends. The Giant Powder Com- 
pany recently absorbed the Safety Nitro, and we would suggest 
that the California and the Giant should now join forces. The 
Judson and Vigorit would then gladly agree to some arrangement 
whereby prices could be maintained. Daring all these years 
the manufacture of powder on this coast has been so unsatisfac- 
tory, the Atlantic Dynamite Company has been paying 40 cents 
per month on stock quoted at $46, and has also paid extra divi- 
dends during the past two years amounting to $1.40 per share, 
and still has a surplus of about $90,000 on hand. With such 
financial showing in comparison with that of the local compan- 
ies, it stands to reason that action of some sort tending towards 
consolidation on the part of the latter, is not only advisable bat 
a vital necessity. 

Professor Charles Geoffrie, the most experienced and best violin 
teacher in California.as proved by his numerous distinguished pu- 
pils— Misses Blair, Joran, Wright, Woolfe, Hill, Mr. Henry Larsen, 
and many others— continues to give violin instruction. A long list 
of pupils for reference at his residence, 1430 Webster street, near 



n. i^c. :tcr:E:-wx3:^.iiii_, <& co. 



SHIPPING and COMMISSION MERCHANTS: 



» AND 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS. 



Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco. 
National Assurance Company f Ireland 

Atlas Assurance Company ------ of London 

Boylston Insurance Company ------ of Boston 

cean Marine Insurance ------ of London 



/ETNA 

HOT 



L 



Situated in Napa County, Gal. 

Reached by a delightful stage ride over the moun 
tains. Sixteen Miles from St. Helena. Good Ac 
commodations. Ample Bathing Facilities. 

A FEATURE OF THE PLACE, 

A Large Smmhz Tank of Hat Mineral Water 

The waters of the J5tna Mineral Springs have 
long been celebrated for their wonderful cures in 
cases of Acute and Chronic Dyspepsia, Rheuma- 
tism, Inflammation of the Blad'der, and Liver and 
Kidney Complaints. 

_ The temperature of the water is 98 degrees, and 
is highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas, making 
it pleasant to the taste, and giving to the bath a 
most delightful sensation. 

High Altitude ! No Fogs ! No Mosquitoes 

Water from the Springs bottled by the 

AETNA MINERAL WATER CO., 

Telephone 56. Office, 108 Oruiitm street, SJ 



OLD SCALE REMOVED. 

FORMATION OF NEW SCALE PREVENTED, 

Without the aid of chemicals, 
by the use of 



STEAM 
BOILER 
INCRUSTATIONS. 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER 

Over 800 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Bemoves all Impurities from the Water before .Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Louis Roederer Champagne. 

The Highest Grade 
Champagne in the World. 

WHITE LABEL, "Carte Blanche." 

A Magnificent Rich Wine- 

BROWN LABEL, "Grand Vin Sec." 

Perfection ot a Dry Wine. 

See that every bottip hears the private label of 

MAGONDRAY & GO. 

ce Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




s\\ n;\\. [» i) NEWS l ETTER. 




23 



THK struggle for supremacy between ibe styles of 1830 and 
tbose of ibe Empress Josephine period is still continuing, and 
it is possible that both sets of fashion may niii in parallel lines, each 
having its disciples. The Umpire dresses are considerably modified 
to suit English tastes, the waist? being almost invariably made long 
at the back. In some lea gowns they are short, but these are quite 
the exceptions to the general rule. In many evening dresses there 
is a close-fitting bodice made to accurately define the figure, and over 
this is draped from the bust a veil of thinnest lace, silk muslin, or 
gauze, through which the colored bodice may be seen. This is by 
no means ungraceful, the tendency of the lace being to fall into the 
figure with the slightest pressure from the hand. On a fine figure, 
as may be imagined, the effect is very good. Some of the afternoon 
Empire dresses are made with full folds of woolen material from the 
bust, falling sheer to the feet. This is rather trying to all but the 
very tall and well-formed, especially when the dress is short in the 
skirt, as Empire dresses should be. In this particular, however, 
dressmakers do not appear to be very severely rigid as to holding the 
rule. Some of them are quite trained, while others rest an inch or 
two on the ground. These are solely for house wear, all walking 
dresses being quite short in the skirt. There is no exception what- 
ever to this excellent rule. A skirt that touches the ground any- 
where is hopelessly old-fashioned, short as is the time they were held 
to be correct and orthodox. 

One very marked feature of the season's fashions is the fancy for 
wearing dark gowns, with coats or capes of velvet in rich, bright 
shades and very ornate and brilliant in decoration. Particularly ef- 
fective, because as yet uncommon, are the coats of black or dark 
green velvet worn by the tall, slight women, for which fashion ever 
reserves her choicest productions. These coats are cut much on the 
old basque order, with a very flaring skirt fulling out from the waist, 
and deep shoulder ruffles, or several frilled capes with a high flaring 
collar. Very dressy are those worn of dark green velvet, with 
trimmings of rich and handsome jet and fur borders. One of these 
coats has a solid yoke of jet, a full ruff of velvet covered with jet and 
wired into the shape desired, and a soft, deep flounce below that, 
which is of velvet in this case, but may be of rich lace for dressy 
wear. Parisian ladies are wearing these coats in Velasquez red, with 
yokes of gold and jet embroidery and borders of Persian lamb. The 
gown must be simply made, always of black, and of rich material. 

The waistcoat is a matter of particular importance and of much 
diversity in material, color and cut, and very horsey in all. Lady 
Brooke, the perfection of whose equestrian attire is a proverb with 
the Essex Hunt, wears sometimes a long-skirted coat of rough-sur- 
faced Oxford gray cloth over a double-breasted vest of white plush 
leather, fastened with gold buttons bearing the hunt cipher. On 
other occasions a red-brown tweed riding coat opens over a single- 
breasted vest of buff velvet cord dotted with pale blue silk dots. 
Dark shades of blue, green and brown, once favorite color for eques- 
trian attire, are not considered at all smart now, except in the hunt- 
ing field, and then only when these tints belong to the club colors. 
A pretty woman member of another well-known Hunt, who is gen- 
erally " there or thereabouts," to use sporting parlance, when the 
pack checks or kills, has a uniform of gray, a single-breasted coat 
with a scarlet collar, and a double-breasted crimson cloth waistcoat, 
with gold buttons engraved with an Earl's coronet. 

A. H. Ricketts, attorney-at-law, rooms 201, 202 and 203, Crocker 
Building, San Francisco. 



GRAND 

MID-WINTER 

CLEARANCE 



SALE. 



Cloaks, Silks, Velvets, 
Laces, Ribbons, Gloves, Plain and 
Fancy Dress Goods, Silk Umbrellas, Under- 
wear, Hosiery, Corsets, House 
Furnishings, etc. 



EXTREME REDUCTIONS. 

C^-See Dally Papers for Special Bargain offerings. 

Mail orders promptly executed. 

Goods delivered free in Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, San 
Rafael, Tiburon, Saasalito, San Qaentin, Mill Valley, Robs 
Station and Blithedale. 




Murphy Building. 

MARKET, JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 



Thousands of delighted ladies 

have visited my parlors. Can I LOLA 

not see you this week? You can MONTEZ 

learn many of the secrets of pre- fRFMF 

serving and beautifying the *-»ncmt 

complexion. The Skin F(Jod 

AND 

Tissue Builder 
75 CENTS. 




MRS. NETTIE HARRISON, 

126 GEARY STREET, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE 

BANJO 

ASHTON P. STEVENS. 

STUDIO : 26 MONTGOMERY STREET. 
The Fashionable Accomplishment. 




mm* 



t we [orpplepior} 




'G 



' ~The mw$t u.nitfeKs®tifo used P&ce <® 
fgrwpi oration, indorsed by society, the st&.&e\ " 
<amd! 'jV[edica7 profession <ss efficient ' nmd\ 

COft.JBUSt/ acJYro/s/TGOMfZQV 8rJ3PfMVct/,SL/TTlZR3cPoLKSrS. I 



C \OLQGNES. QJ-^ 
Pcnri/ME 

essences, 
Toilet Waters. 
RICH CUT GLASS 

0DOn23OTTL.E.S, \ 

FANCY CASE 

EXTRACTS, 
j3aj5ket czologjves 

Foreign — _ 

■■■-• -JDOMESTIO 



24 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. £8, 1893. 




"Telepuuuy, 1 



THE COUNTRY FAITH. 

Here in the country's heart, 
Where the grass is green, 
Life is ihe sarae sweet life 
As it e'er hath been. 

Trust in God still lives, 
And the bell at morn 
Floats with a thought of God 
O'er the rising corn. 

God comes down in the rain, 

And the crop grows tall. 

This is the country faith. 

And the bes t of all. 

LONG DISTANCE 

TELEPHONE. 

LATEST IETXITJEICjTSIOILST". 
Salinas, Chualar, Gouzales, 
Soledad, Marysville, Chico, Oro- 
ville. Viua.Coluas, giving un- 
broken commiiQ i cation be- 
\ tweeu these towns aud San 
I Francisco. The lines are con- 
' atructed of specially prepared 
extra heavy copper wires, are 
equiped withtue latest appli- 
ances known to the tcieuce of 
, and are "Long Distance " Lines 

in every sense of the word. The Mail is quick, 
the Telegraph I - quicker, but the 

LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 

Is instantaneous, and you don't have to wait for 
an auswer- 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

San Francisco. 

A Quiet Home, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED. 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND 
ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL AMERICAN CATERER; 
1206 Sutter Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch, 
WHOLESALE 

STATIONERS 

AND BOOKSELLERS. 

327. 329. 331 SANSOHE STREET. 

J, D, SPRECKLES & BROS. COMPANY, 



kHIPPING and Commission Merchants: ffen- 
) eral agents "Oceanic Steamship Company, 
Gillin^ham Cement. 



327 Market street, cor. Fremont. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

DIVIDEND N3TIGE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 
For the half year ending Dee mber 31. 1*92, a 
dividend has be^u declart-d at the rate of five and 
one tenth (5 1-XO) per cent per annum oti Term 
Deposits, aud four and one quarter (4%) per cent, 
per aunum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and 
after Tuesday, January 3, 1892. 

GKO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office -526 California street. 

HEARING RESTORED 

byonewhowasdeat forsm-ears. 

Call, or send stamp for particu- 
lars and testimonials. JOHN UARMORE, 
Hammond Building, Fourth and Vine, CINCINNATI,^ 



LOST 



MY LADY.— J". G. Burnett in Truth. 

My Lady has no ancestral hall, 
With its oaken floor and its gilded wall; 
No pages start at the beck and call 
Of my capricious Lady. 

No maids of honor around her stand, 
No knights and vassals wait her command 
No signet graces the slender band 
Of her I call My Lady. 

She owns no acres or jewels rare, 
For her own wealth is her golden hair; 
And who wins her hand holds her fortune 
there — 
Would it were I, My Lady 1 

No title descends in her family line, 

But peace and truth in her clear eyes 

sbine, 
And she lives a queen by a right divine, 
And reigns by love, My Ladyl 



A GHOST STORY. 

THE late Sir Richard Owen had a re- 
markable gbost story. In his early 
days, when he held the post of surgeon to 
the prison at Lancaster, a negro died in 
tbe jail, and a post-mortem as well as an 
inquest were necessary. After the in- 
quest, the young surgeon saw the body 
put in tbe coffin and the lid screwed down, 
to be ready for the funeral nest day. 
Owen had at the time been already at- 
tracted to the study of comparative ana- 
tomy, and negroes' heads were not plenti- 
ful; so he made pp his mind tbat this one 
should not be lost to the cause of science. 
In tbe evening he returned to tbe prison 
with a black bag containing a brick — from 
his official position he had no difficulty in 
getting admittance 10 the mortuary, wbere 
the coffin lid was unscrewed, and screwed 
down again. During this process the 
brick and tbe negro's bead changed places. 
The ground outside the principal entrance 
to tbe jail has a considerable descent; and 
tbe time being winter, with snow and 
frost, Owen had scarcely passed out when 
be slipped and fell all bis length — tbe bag 
went irom bis band, and the head tumbled 
out, and rolled down tbe paved way. He 
jumped up, caught the bag, and following 
the bead clutched it just as it finished its 
career in a small shop where tobacco was 
sold. Pushing it into tbe bag again, he 
vanished, out of tbe shop with all tbe 
speed he was capable of. Next morning, 
when Owen was going to his usual duties 
at the prison, he was called in by the 
woman at the shop where the accident 
had occurred on tbe previous evening, 
fcjhe wished him to see her husband, who 
was very ill. He had had, she said, a 
fright the night befurethat caused him to 
look wild and dazed-like. Tbe man, it 
turned out, was aretired sea captain, who 
had been in many adventures among the 
West India Islands, wben many deeds 
were done that did not at tbat time re- 
quire to be accounted for. Among these 
had been the killing of a negro in which 
he had a band, and the transaction had 
left a touch of trouble on his conscience. 
After giving these details the old captain 
told of the horrible event that took place 
the night before. He was sitting in bis 
shop, all was quiet, and it so chanced 
that he bad been thinking of tbe negro, 
wben suddenly be saw the very head roll 
into tbe shop in front of tbe counter, and 
it was followed by tbe Devil, all in black, 
with a black bag in his band. Tbe Devil 
snatched up the head, and both disap- 
peared through tbe earth lik-: a flash of 
lightning. The description was perhaps 
not quite complimentary to the young 
anatomist, but it was satisfactory so far 
tbat it showed his identity had not been 
recognized. 



If you look at a dozen com- 
mon lamp-chimneys, and then 
at Macbeth's "pearl top" or 
"pearl glass," you will see 
the differences — all but one — 
they break from heat ; these 
don't ; you can't see that. 

Common glass is misty, milky, dusty; you 
can't see through it; Macbeth's is clear. 

Tough, clear glass is worth fine work; and a 
perfect chimney of fine tough glass is worth a 
hundred such as you bear, pop, clash on the least 
provocatiou. 

Pittsburgh. Geo. A. Macbeth Co. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Nevada Queen Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San 
Fraucitco, Cal ; location of works — Tuscarora, 
Elk'i County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby t>iven that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the '23d day of Janu- 
ary, 18J3, an assessment. No. 8, of 10 ceuts per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payabl * immediately iu United States 
gold coin to ihe secretary, at the office of the cnm- 
pauy, room 20, 321 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 
Ihe Twenty-seven'h Day of Februa-y, 1833, will be 

del nquent, 
aud advertised for sale at public auction, and un- 
less payment is made btfure will be sold on MON- 
DAY, the 20th day of March, 1893, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment together with the cost of adver- 
tising aud expenses of sale. By order of the 
board of D rectors. R. R GRAYSON, Secretary. 

office— Room 20, 321 Pine street, Sau Fraucisco, 
California 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Andes Silver Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San 
Franc sco, Cal. Locationof works— Storey county, 
Nevada, 

Notice is hereby given that at a meetiua of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 21st day of Janu- 
ary, 1S93, an a-sessmeut. No. 39, of 2.i cents per 
share, was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable Immediately iu United 
States gold coiu. to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, room 2, Nevada block. No. 309 
Montgoon ry street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on 

The 24th Day of February, ' 893. will be delinquent, 
aud advertised for sale at public auction; and 
uuiess payment is made before, will be sold on 
THURSDAY, the sixteenth day of March, 1^93, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
costs oi advertising and expenses of ssl«\ By 
order of the Board of Directors. 

JOHN W. TWIGGS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 2. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery 
St., San Fraucisco, Cal. 




CAVEATS, 
TRADE MARKS, 
DESICN PATENTS, 
COPYRIGHTS, etc. 

For information and free Handbook write to 

MUNN" & CO.. Sin. BliOADWAT, NEW YORK. 
Ol'dest bureau for securing patents in America. 
Ever* patent taken out by us is brought before 
the public by a notice given free of charge in the 

Largest circulation of any scientific paoer in the 
world Snlendidlv illustrated. No intelligent 
man should be without it. Weekly, S3. OO a 
vear- 51 50 six months Address MUNN & CO., 
Publishers, 3*il Broadway, New York City. 

"fiction monthly. 

A New Magazine containing an original 
novel of absorbing interest, entitled "True 
L»ve Wins." complete in No. 3, now ready. 
Price 10 «'enlit. All newsdealers aud Tbe 
International News Company. New York ; 

Subscription received for aLy Periodical, 
Foreign or Domestic. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



26 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 
Train* Leave end are Due to Arrive 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Leave From December 3. 1892. I Auiri 

7:00 a. Beuicia, Kuraser. Saerameuto 7:16 r 
7*40a. Haywards, Nile* and dan Jose "13:15* 

Nile? and San Jo.- e I6:IS p 

7:90 a. Martinet. Sao Ramon, Calistoga S:\Sr. 
"7:S0a. El Veranoaod ranta Ko>a "o:15p 

8:00 a. Sacram'loA Redding, via Davis : ..-« r. 
5:00 a. Atlantic Express for Ogden and 

East, 9:45 p. 

8:30a. Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysvllle. Oro- 

rf lie and Red Bluff 4 :45 r. 

0;0ru. Sew Orleans Express, Los An- 

8eles, Demlng, El Paso, New 
rlean^and East. 8:4.*) P. 

•9:00 a. Stockton and Milton "8:45 P. 

12-00*. Haywards, Ntles and Livermore 7:15 p. 

*1:00p. Sacramento River Steamers *9:0Q p. 

1:30 p. Vallejo and Martinez 12:15 p. 

3 00 p. Hay wards, Niles and San Jose 9:45 a. 
4:00 p. Martinez, Stockton Merced and 

Fresno 12:15P 

4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Val ejo, 
Calistoga, El Verano. and Sauta 

Rosa 9:45 a. 

4:30 p. Benicia, and Sacramento. 10:15a. 

4:00 p. Woodland and Oroville 10:15 a 

4:O0p Vacaville 10 :15a 

■4:30 p. Niles and Livermore *8:45 a. 

5:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East . 10;45a 
6:30p. Lob Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfield, Santa Barbara &. 

Los Angeles. . «. 9 15 a. 

5:30p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 9 :15 a. 

6:00 p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

J7:00f. Vallejo +8:45 p. 

7:00 p. Oregon Express. Sacramen- 
to, Marysvflle, Redding, Port- 

land, Puget Sound and East. - . 8:15 a 

Santa Cruz Division. 
+11^45 pTHunters and Theater Train for 
Newark, San Jose, and Los 

Gatos J8 :05 p. 

8:15 a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6 :20 p. 

*2:15p. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

SantaCruz *10:50a. 

4:15p. Centerville, San Jose, Los Gatos. y:50A. 
Coast Division (Third a id Townsend Streets). 

7:00 a. San Jose, Almaden and Way Sta- 
tions 2:38 P. 

8:15 a. San Joae, Gilroy, TresPinos.Pa- 
jaro, SantaCruz, Monterey, Pa- 
cific Grove, Salinas, San Mi- 
guel, Paso Kobles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations 6:10 p. 

10 :37 a . San Jose, and Way Stations 6 :0S p. 

12:15 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 3:30p. 

*2:80p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove and principal 

Way Stations *10:37 a. 

*8:80 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions.. *9:47 a. 

*4:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . *8:06 a. 

5J.5P. San Jose and Way Stations 8:48a. 

6:30p. MenloParkand Way Stations. .. 6:35a. 
f-ll:46p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations f7:30p. 

A. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 
"Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 
tSundays only. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Thbough Line to New York, via Panama. 
Steamers will sail at NOON on the 5th, 15th and 

25th of each month, 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

Through Line Sailings.— "City of New York," 

January 25, 1893. S. S. "Acapulco," February 6, 

1893. S. S. "Sau Juan," February 15, 1893. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

WAY LINE SAILING. 
Steamers leave San Francisco at noon on the 
3d and 18th of each month. 
S S. '■ San Jose," February 3, 1893. 
S. 3. "City of Panama," February 18 1893. 
JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA AND 
HONGKONG, 
Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongkong for East 
Indies, Straits, etc. : 
S. S. "City of Peking." Saturday, February 
4th, at 3 p. m. 

S. S. " China," (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Feb. 14, 
1893, at 3 P. m. 
S. S. "Peru," Saturday, March 4th, 1893, at 3 p. m. 
"City of Rio de Janelio," Thursday, March 
23d, 1898, at 3 p. M. 

Round Trin Tickets to Yokohama at reduced 
rates. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner 
First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 202 
Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 

General Agent 



LOVE PLATONIC. 

Once we met. and then there came. 
Like a Pentecostal Maine. 

A \v«-rd: 
All I said not, 
Only thought. 

She heard! 
All I never say but sing, 
Worshipping; 

Wrapt in the bidden tongue 
Of an aiubigious song. 

How we met what need to say ? 

When or where, 
Years ago or yesterday, 

Here or there. 

AH the song is — once we met, 

She and 1 ; 
Once, but never to forget, 

Till we die. 

All the song is that we meet 

Never now — 
* Hast thou yet forgotten, sweet?" 
"Love, hast thou?" 



NOW is the winter of our discontent 
made glorious summer by the fellow 
who brings in the coal bill on the first 
of the month, and 90 saves our executors 
a whole Jo:, of trouble they mi.^ht have 
had if anything had been left of the estate. 

DURING the last Russian war in which 
the Kekholmly Regiment was engaged 
the soldiers found a woman dead in the 
snow on a battle-field with an infant girl 
in her arms. By common con°ent the re- 
giment adopted the child, who was 
christened Maria Mekholmskaya, and 
sent to school at their expense. As she 
grew older she followed the regiment, and 
last week the St. Petersburg correspond- 
ent of the Standard says, Lieutenant 
Shlemmer, of the Tzumsky Dragoons, de- 
manded her hand in marriage. A meeting 
of the regiment was held under Colonel 
Reichenbacb, who laid the proposal before 
«• the fathers " of the girl. He gave the 
whole story of her life and her acquaint- 
ance with her lover, and added the high- 
est testimony from General Panintin and 
all the officers of Lieutenant Shlemmer's 
regiment as to that young officer's char- 
acter. This extraordinary meeting unani- 
mously consented to give away their 
" daughter, " the marriage taking 
place immediately. The incident shows 
a curious side of Russian army life, en- 
tirely to the credit of all concerned. 

CTJRRAN was once addressing an Irish 
jury in an important case. 

During hia speech he observed that the 
judge shook his head. 

Fearing lest the gesture should have an 
adverse influence on the jury, Curran 
warmed up for the moment, and said: 

" I see, gentlemen, the motion of his 
lordship's head; but, believe me, if you 
remain here many days, you will perceive 
that when hia lordship shakes his head 
there's nothing in it!" 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3:00 P. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic Tuesday, Jan. 24, 1893 

Belgic Thursday, February 23, 1893. 

Oceanic Tuesday, March 14, 1893 

Gaelic (via Honolulu), Tuesday, April 4, 1-93 
ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES 

Cabin PlanB on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth- and Townsend 
streets, San Francisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, 
San Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H.RICE, Traffic Manager. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

•THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 
COMMENCING SUNDAY, NOV. 20, 1892, and 
until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave from and arrive ni the San FrmiriKco pan- 
senior Depot, MARKET STREET WHARF, as 
followB: 
From San Francisco for Point Tlburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40 A. M., 9:20 a. m., 11:40 A. u. ; 

3:30 P. M.,6:05 P. M., 6:20 P. M. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An extra trip at 1:50 P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11:00 A.M. ; 1 30 P.M. 
3:30 P. M., 5:00 p. m., 6:20 p. m. 

From San Rafael lor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAY8-«:26 A. M., 7:55 A. M. ( 9:30 A. M. 

12:45 p.m., 3:40 P.M., 5:05 p.m. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An extra trip at 6:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 A.M., 9:40 A.M., 11:10 A. M. ; 1:40 P.M. 
3:40 P. M., 5:00 p M.,6:26 P. M. 

rrom Point Tlburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAY'S— 6:50 A. m., 8:20 A. M., 9:55 A. M. ; 
1:10 P. M., 4:05 P. M., 5:35 P. M. 
Saturdays ouly, an extra trip at 0:55 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:40 A.M., 10:05 A.M., 11:35 a.m.; 
2:05 p, M., 4:05 P.M., 5:30p.m., 6:55 P.M. 



LkaveS.F. 




Abrivkin 8. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Destination. 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40a. K. 
3:30 p.m. 
5:05 P.M. 


8:00 A.M. 
9:30 A.M. 
5:00p. m. 


Petaluma 

and 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40 A. M 8:50a. M 
6:05 p.M 10:30 a.m 
7:30p.m 6:10p.m. 






Fulton, 
Windsor, 
Heald sburg, 
Litton Springs, 
Cloveraale & 
WayStationB. 






S:00a.m. 






7:40A.M. 
3:30 p.m. 


7:S0p. M. 


10:30a^m 
6:10p.m 








7:40a.m. 


8:00 a. m. 


Hopland 
and Ukiah. 


7:30 p.m. 


6:10p.m. 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Guerneville. 


7:30p.m. 


10 :30a. m 
6 :10 p.M 


7:40a.m. 
5:05 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 
5:00p. m 


Sonoma and 
Olen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. 
6:05p.m. 


8:50a.m. 
6:10p.m. 


7:40a.m 
3:30 p.M 


8 :00a. m 
5:00 P.M 


Sebastopol. 1 10:40a.m> 
I 6:05p.m 


10:30 am 
6:10 p.M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs SpringB, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena: at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port and Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lake- 
port; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sarato- 
ga Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Wlllitts, Cahto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Westport, Usal, Hydesville and Eu- 

EXCUR8ION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, ¥1 50; to Santa Rosa, $2 25; to 
Healdsburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, 54 50; to Hop- 
land, $5 70; to Ukiah, $6 75; to Sebastopol, $2 70; 
to Guerneville. $3 75; to Sonoma, $150; to Glen 
Ellen, $180. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
hurg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, $4 50; to 
Hopland, $3 80; to Sebastopol, $180; to Guerne- 
ville, $2 50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1 20. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
and 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for ports 
in Alaska, 9 A. m., Jan. 27, Feb. 10-24, Mar. iu-24, 
April 15-30. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
9 a. M. every Friday. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m.'. 

For Santa Ana, Los Augeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Los Angeles, 
Santa Barbara and San Louis Obispti, every fourth 
aud fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For ports in Mexico, 1st of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 



The splendid 3,000 
ton steamers of the 
^ Oceanic Steamship 
^ Company sail for 
\ © Honolulu, Auckland 
and Sydney as under ■ 
For Honolulu, Apia, 
Auckland and Syd- 
ney, S3. Mariposa, 
Friday, February 3, 
at 2 P. M. 
For Honolulu only, 
SS. Australia, Wed- 
nesday, Feb. 15th, 
at 2 o'clock P- m- 
For passage or freight apply to J. D. SPRECK- 
ELS & BROS. CO., 3^7 Market Street 




S £VET* 



26 



SAX FEAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan . 28, 1893. 




THE fourth of the Friday Night cotillions, which was danced 
last week at Odd Fellows' Hall, while thought by some to be 
leas brilliant than its predecessors this season, was by others 
deemed far the pleasantest of the series so far, as there were 
more figures danced than usual, as well as several " extras " in- 
dulged in after supper. White, pink and yellow were the dom- 
inating hues of the decorations, aside from the red, white and 
blue streamers which always adorn the ceiling and upper part of 
the hall. Mr. Vernon Grey, to whom had been entrusted the 
leadership of the cotillion, failing to come to time, that arduous 
duty was performed by Mr. Ed Greenway, who had Miss Alice 
8impkins as bis partner, aod the figures danced were the grand 
right and left (of course), Greek cross, concentric circle, the 
march, grey figure, and figure right. The ladies were very pret- 
tily costumed, though in that respect no doubt the most fetching 
gowns seen this winter will be worn at the Army and Navy Co- 
tillion on the 3d of February, which will be the last one of the 
season. 



The dance given by the Entre Noas Club on Friday evening, in 
the Maple Room of the Palace Hotel, proved a very pleasant af- 
fair. The cotillion was led by Mr. Joseph Emanuel, who bad 
Miss Maud Rotherwel as bis assistant, and whose choice of fig- 
ures — military, star and circle, ribbon and arbor, and the sleigh- 
tells — met with much approval, and were well executed. The 
decorations were pretty, the ladies handsomely dressed, and the 
music and refreshments were both good, and the hours not too 
late. 



There was a perfect epidemic of tea at the Beresford last Thurs- 
day, the hostesses being Mr?. William Chamberlain, Mrs. George 
Boole and Mrs. Robert Forsythe, the hours ranging from 4 till 11, 
with dancing after S o'clock. The same evening the informals 
held their second meeting at the California Hotel, when Miss 
E sie Hto it was the hostess of what proved a delightful evening, 
the entertainment taking the form of a balpoudre. Among the 
most enjoyable of last week's gatherings were the small parties 
given by Miss Jennie Catherwood and by Mrs. Monroe Salisbery, 
and the tea given by Mrs. James Carolan and her daughters last 
Saturday, which was an unusually pleasant affair. On Saturday 
evening the Harvard Club of San Francisco gave their quarterly 
dinner, at the University Club, on Sutter street, and the attend- 
ance was very large. The recently elected Superior Judge James 
M. Seawell was chosen President, and Hall McAllister, Secre- 
tary. 



Odd Fellows' Hall was never more elaborately adorned than 
for the occasion of the grand ball in aid of the German Benevo- 
lent Society on Saturday evening last. From the center of the 
ceiling were red, yellow and white ribbons, which were festooned 
to the galleries, making a parti-colored doraeas it were; the walls 
were adorned with evergreens and red berries, and the galleries 
were draped with yellow and white, and flags and bunting. 
Myriads of electric lights flashed here, there and everywhere. 
Upon the stage, hidden by masses of foliage and flags were sta- 
tioned the musicians, who had no light task, as the dancing was 
begun at balf-past nine and kept up until far into the *• wee sma' 
hours." The galleries were packed at an early hour by elegantly 
dressed ladies and their escorts, also in ball attire, while the floor 
itself held a glittering throng. Supper was served for nearly five ' 
hundred people by Ludwig, and was pronounced a feature of the ' 
affair. Among the many beautiful toilettes worn, those of the | 
Miases Ada Schilling and Elsie Hecht were specially noticeable. 
Mrs. Koester, the efficient and er er^etic President of the German 
Ladies' Benevolent Society, to whon^raach of the success of the 
ball was due, was attired in a combination costume of black and 
eau dtNile, with ornaments of pearls and diamonds. The ladies 
may be congratulated upon their annual ball of 1893 being a pro- 
nounced success. 



On Tuesday last, in response to an invitation from the Captain 
and officers of the U. 8. 8. Mohican, about three score guests, who 
would no doubt have been more numerous had the weather been 
warmer, went up to Mare Inland to enjoy a dance given by them 
In the sail loft at the Navy Yard. The company were conveyed 
to their destination by the army steamer McDowell, leaving town 
at 6 p. m., and upon reaching there, the warmth of their reception 
compensated for the coldness of the trip. Dancing was the order 
of the evening, followed by a delicious supper, and then more 
dancing, and morning was near at band ere the return trip was 
made. 

The marriage ceremony of Miss Annie Scblaegeterand Mr. Charles 
Latterof was performed by the Rev. Father Sassia at the home of 
the bride on Tenth street on Thursday of last week. Miss Min- 
nie Plageman was bridesmaid and H. A. Cunningham best man. 
Coronado was the scene of their honeymoon. 



Last evening there was a pleasant little party at Mrs. Henry 
Hunt's, on Geary street, in honor of her daughter's birthday, and 
entertained a large number of gnests, chiefly young people. Two 
other enjoyable entertainments of last evening were the concert 
given by the Friday Evening Orchestra at Kohler & Chase's Hall, 
on O'Farrell street, at which Miss Jennie Eastman, Miss Maud 
Priest and Julian Goldman were the soloists; and the illustrated 
lecture of the Camera Club at Metropolitan Hall. It was the 
thirty-second of the series, and Captain Henry C. Cochrane, of 
the U. 8. Marine Corps, appeared in the role of lectnrer, choosing 
for bis subject " The Kremlin and tbe Coronation of the Czar." 
The first Ladies' Night at the Olympic Club's new building, on 
Tuesday evening, is an engrossing theme, and if the talked of 
programme is carried out, it will leave nothing to be desired by 
tbe audience, which promises to be a very large one. 

To-3ay Madame Ziska gives a matinee tea at her Van Ness Avenue 
residence; and in Oakland Mrs. John Coleman and her daughter. 
Miss Jessie Coleman, will receive the Four Hundred of that locality 
as well as many of their friends from this side of the bay, between 
the hours of four and seven o'clock. And to-day if the weather 
proves propitious the Central Park will be the scene of a fashionable 
gathering to witness the long talked of football match between the 
University Veterans and the Army Officers who deem themselves 
proficient at the game. It has already attracted much attention, and 
the probabilities are it will be one of the most fashionably attended 
events of the season. 

St Luke's Church on Van Ness Avenue has seldom, if ever, held 
a larger number of people than were assembled there last Wednes- 
day to witness the marriage of Miss Nannie Clark and James Rug- 
gles, Jr. When five o'clock, which was the hour named for the 
ceremony, arrived, there was not a seat unoccupied, and even standing 
room was hard to be obtained. The little church was bright with 
the light of innumerable gas jets, and comfortably warm, in decided 
contrast to the bitter air outside; and the opening of the doors was 
no doubt a welcome sound to the throng of half frozen guests who 
were patiently awaiting the arrival of the ushers ere they were 
allowed to enter. . The edifice was still trimmed with its pretty 
Christmas garb of evergreens in wreaths and garlands, and to this 
was added the beautiful adornment of the chancel in pure white 
blossoms and choice foliage, the labor of love of the young ladies of 
the Church of which body the fair young bride has been a valued 
member since childhood. The ushers had a difficult task to find 
places for all who wished to see her enter upon her new sphere of 
life, and wore a decidedly pleased expression when that duty ended. 
They led the bridal cortege as it entered by tbe center aisle. After 
them came the four bridesmaids, the Misses Bessie Ver Mehr, 
Mattie Brown, Violet Ransom, and Jennie Thompson, and Miss Van 
Wyck, the maid of honor. All robed alike in gowns of white nun's 
veiling with corsage bouquets of purple violets from which depended 
a pretty garniture of the same flower. The lovely bride who came 
last with her father, who gave her away, looked charming in a bridal 
robe of heavy white corded silk made with a Watteau train, and 
fleecy tnlle veil, her floral trimming and boquet being of white hya- 
cinths. The groom and his best man, Will Clark, met the party at 
the chancel where the nuptial knot was tied by the Rev. W. W. 
Davis, rector of St. Luke's. The groom and his attendants all wore 
morning dress, grey trousers and cutaway coats. After the cere- 
mony a bridal dinner was served at the residence of the bride's par- 
ents and Mrs. J. Goddard Clark on Leavenworth and Green streets, 
where the bride was born, and later a smalt reception of intimate 
friends was held from 7 to ( J o'clock. The bride was the recipient of 
many presents which were both handsome and valuable. Among 
them were a silver service from her mother, and another from the 
attaches of the Bank of California in which institution both her 
father and her husband are employed. 

Among the recently announced engagements are those of Miss 
Christine Lubrs to Congressman John T. Cutting, and Miss 
Annie Bernard, of Kansas, to Dan Polk, who is so well known 
in society circles as the most accomplished banj? player outside 
of the profession. Their wedding will take place in San Fran- 
cisco, at Grace Church, and will be one of the events of the early 
Easter season. 



A novel and unique entertainment was that provided for their 
friends by Mr. and Mrs. Walters, last week, at their Van Ness 
avenue residence. The guests comprised the cream of our Jewish 
social element, and the evening wa9 a delightful one, being 
a succession of surprises from "start to finish." Possibly tbe 
most amusing feature was the circus, which was held in the back 
parlor, where a ring was erected and presided over by no lesB 
than three clowns, in the persons of Messrs. Louis Greenebaum, 
Alfred Seligman and Ullfelder. The ladies who took part in the 
equestrian parade were Misses Alice Gerstle, F. Lilienthal, M. 
Greenebaum and Mrs. Feuchtranger. Joseph Sloss, as a bearded 
woman, caused a good deal of fun. Henry Heyman's portrayal 
of a Circasian beauty was immensely fnnny. In fact, the whole 
thing was provocative of roars of laughter, and the guests 
declared that their aides acbed when supper was announced. 
Dancing finished the evening, and the festivities were kept up 
until a late hour. 



Jan. 2<. ISO?. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETT] B. 



27 



One o( tbe pleasantest events ol next week will be the tea 
which Mrs. \V. I. Kip. Jr.. ami Mi.s Kip will Rive, at their resi- 
dence on Harrison street, on Thursday, the M of February, 
between the boars of 4 and 7 p. m. Another is the 10th, when the 
Entre Nous Club will give their ami Lenten dance in the maple 
room of the Palace Hoel 

The Night in Venice, which was at one time contemplated to 
be given at the Concordia Club, has been finally abandoned, and 
some other form of entertainment will be substituted in its stead. 
In the meantime, the members are amusing themselves with 
bowling, several evenings in tbe week being specially devoted to 
the fascinating game. Monday belongs to the young married 
people; Tuesday the young men have it all their own way; 
Thursday both married and single compete, and Friday there is 
a grand tournament to show off the prowess of the best players. 



Mr. and Mr9. Will Outhcut, who came up from their ranch to 
be present at tbe recent dance given by Mrs. Will Crocker, spent 
last Saturday and Sunday with the Crockers at Del Monte, quite 
a number of San Francisco people going down there also for a 
few days at the same time. Among other hospitalities extended 
to the Outbouts during their stay in town, was a dinner at Mrs. 
J. R. K. Nuttall's, on Thursday, the other guests being Mr. and 
Mrs. Will Crocker, Miss8perry and George Newhall. 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward Moldonado, nee Acosta, are domiciled at 
the Hotel Colonial, where Mrs. Moldonado will be at home on the 
first Monday of each month. Mr. and Mrs. McLaughlin and Miss 
Agnes have returned from their Eastern trip. 



The Southern hegira still continues. Mrs. John F. Merrill left 
for Pasadena last Friday; Mrs. Pbo3be Hearst departe.1 for Santa 
Barbara on Monday, and the Misses Ada Doherty and Mae 
Robinson for Los Angeles, where Mrs. James F. Sullivan and Miss 
Angela Sullivan are at present, visiting Mrs. Cbilds; and Mr. and 
Mrs. H. 8. Crocker are at the Westminster Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. 
George Mead, who intend to rebuild their beautiful house recently 
destroyed by fire, were among tbe South-bound passengers on 
Wednesday; Mrs. Webster Jone^ is going to Coronado for a 
month, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bothin's departure is named for 
the 1st of February. 

Mrs. F. L. Stedman has returned to her Eastern home, after a de- 
lightful visit to her cousin , George Crocker, during which she was the 
recipient of many hospitalities from her friends in San Francisco. 
Mrs. George B. Williams is also among recent visitors who have gone 
home, expecting to sail for England early next month. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dick Pease's absence on the other side of the continent will cover a 
period of several months. They were among the New York bound 
passengers last Monday. 

The Junior Olympic Club is attaining full growth. The pres- 
ent membership is 100, and at a meeting this week it was an- 
nounced that when the roll bore 175 names the members would 
be allowed to use the gymnasium of the club four times a week, 
two afternoons and two evenings. The gymnasiuru of the jun- 
iors is being rapidly put in working order, and by Monday next, 
the boys will have use of it. They will also be allowed use of 
the bathing tank on one afternoon and evening of each week, 
but the rest of the club is barred against them. 

Miss Morrison, of San t Jose, entertained a large house party 
Saturday and Sunday at her elegant home, corner Fifth and Julian 
streets, San Jose, in honor of Senator-elect Stephen M. White and 
bis charming wife. The other guests were Judge and Mrs. W. B. 
Gilbert, Mr. and Mrs. L. S. B. Sawyer, Judge Thomas P. Haw- 
ley, Mr. Q. O. Houghton, Mr. William Matthews, Hon. B. D. 
Murphy, L. G. Nesmith and others. A handsome dining party 
was given in their honor Saturday evening at which there was a 
number of additional guests. Sunday a drive was taken to "The 
Cabin," the country home of Mr. William Matthews, the well 
known lawyer. A splendid collation was served there with typi- 
cal Southern hospitality. The party returned to this city Sun'' ay 
afternoon by the late train. 

The ladies of the California State Floral Association made a 
very interesting exhibit of flowers in the Mechanics' Fair last 
Wednesday, and will have another exhibit next week. 



Following is the programme for the entertainment to be given 
January 31, 1893, at the Olympic Club, for the benefit of the Cali- 
fornia Room in the Woman's Building, at the World's Fair: 
Parallel bars, A. Hoffman, C. J. Schuster, J. M. Brewer, Geo. C. 
Rouse and L. Hinz; double horizontal bars, Professor H. Belau, 
Robert Leando, Ben Bogner (clown); acrobatics, Lansberg Bros.; 
wrestling, W. T. Haberly and H. B. Graham; wrestling, C. 
Kreling and Harry Baker; fencing, Professor L. Tronchet and F. 
A. Chapuis; boxing, F. L. Cooley and R. MacArthur; boxing, W. 
P. Henry and Phil. Boule; single trapeze, Master Walter Hogg; 
Indian club swinging, J. 8. J. Otto, P. P. Bernhard and H. Mc- 
Gill. E. A. Kolb will be leader. 

Miss Tubbs gave a card party to a select throng at the hand- 
some residence of her parents in East Oakland, on Wednesday 
evening. 



^PRICE'S 




Baking 
Powder 



The only Puro Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia; No Alum 
Used in Millions of Homes — iO jea.TB the Standard 

The sixth concert of Los Bandurristaa (the Bandurria Club) 
under tbe leadership of Professors Sancho and Lotubardero, will 
take place at Metropolitan Hall, Tuesday evening, February 7th 
next, at 8 o'clock. The club on this occasion will be assisted by 
Mrs. Maud Berry Fisher, soprano, who made such a brilliant 
success in the title-role of the opera Baioness Meta, recently given 
at the Grand Opera House; also, Mr. H. A. Melvin, baritone, 
and Miss Ada E. Weigel, accompanist. The Bandurria Club has 
increased its membership, and the coming concert will be a mu- 
sical treat. The members of Los Bandurristaa are Messrs. Hal- 
lock Wright, George J. Wellington, Irving Lundborg, Charles H. 
Gardiner, George A. James, R. Cabrera, A. H. Willcox, W. J. 
McLean, Fred H. Parks, Harry F. Betbers, Charles A. Davis, 
Elmer E. Simmons, M. M. Dinkelspiel, Pazton Wright James 
Goewey, and Professors Sancho and Lombardero, leaders. 



The many people throughout the city who take delight in deco- 
rating their homes with their own works of art will find much to 
interest them in the novelties to paint on, now displayed in the 
artists' materials department of Sanborn, Vail & Co., at 741-743 
Market Street. These novelties include photograph frames of num- 
erous designs, and other dainty ornaments. The line of mathemati- 
cal instruments shown by this house is also well worth examination. 
They are of the best makes and include everything that a designer, 
an architect, or an artist may desire. This department has probably 
a more assorted stock of brushes, colors and other materials needed 
in the studio, than any other house in town can show. The leading 
artists of the city get their materials at Sanborn & Vail's because 
they are always certain of procuring the best there, the reputation 
of the firm is the highest and all goods that come from its counteia 
are known to be first-class. 

SANFORD S. PROSSER. 

PHARMACY FRANCAIS. 
Ill Grant Ave. Telephone 1330 

Parfumerie Victoria, Rigaud's & Cie's Lucrecia Graciosa, Louis XV 
and Exora d'Afrique are the latest odors and so different from perfumes 
familiar to everyone. Piveot' Legrand's violet and Roger & Gallet's Lubia 
and Pinaud's perfumes, Soap, SacbanFace Powders, Cosmetics, etc. 

Pinaud's 8 ounce bottles, $3,50; regular size reduced from $1.26 to 85 
cents per bottle, including Peau d'F&pagne in bulk at 50 cents per ounce. 

Every lady knows that exclusiveness in perfumes is as desirable as 
in dress. 

DODGE BROS., engravers.' 

The Hurd-Crane note papers are in perfect 
chime with everything high-toned, and are of the 
Four Hundred by right of merit, and stand for 
the superlatively good things in correspondence 
papers. 

COPPER PLATES. OOK DfiQT <sT 
WEDDING CARDS. ^J TUO I Ol. 



Perrier-Jquet & Co. 




W.B. CHAPMAN, EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 



SOLE AGENT FOR 
PAOIFIO OOAST, 

123CaliforniaSt..S.F l 



FOB BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1893. 



PASSE PARTOUT'S GOTHAM GOSSIP. 

New York, Jan 15, 1893. 

PADEREWSKI gave his second concert this season to-day, and 
Music Hall was crowded to the doors. Now, when one 
knows that Music Hall holds three thousand people, it means some- 
thing to say that one man can command such a house, and its double, 
were there room, every time he appears. Though women have not 
gone so mad here as in London, where he was pelted with flowers, 
and where one woman prostrated herself before him in St. James 
Hall, Piccadilly, to his intense and obvious embarrassment, never- 
theless, the women made up the majority of his audience. But— to 
their credit be it said, lhat they were there in force, for certainly the 
pianist merits appreciation if delicacy, power, cleanness, precision, 
grace, an indefinable charm, and a colossal intellectuality of inter- 
pretation deserve praise. Among Californians there I saw Miss 
Bonynge, Mr. and Mrs. Henry McDowell, Mrs. Jimmie Lake, Mrs. 
Savage, Mr. and Mrs. Newton, and was somewhat surprised to see 
the bride. Mrs. H. Mone Robinson, with Mr. and Mrs. Billy Irwin, of 
Honolulu. The bride was very fair in a beautiful gray velvet gown, 
trimmed with chinchilla. Mrs. Irwin was as handsome as ever in a 
most trying violet velvet, with a violet toque and vail, which nobody 
but a daringly beautiful woman could risk. In every part she is the 
handsomer of the two sisters. The younger Harry McDowell's ap- 
pearance reminded me of the very amusing contrast between him 
and "Ollie" Teall, formerly of California, in their new ventures. 
The former has handed out as a garanlie thirty thousand good silver 
dollars in backing the Theatre of Arts and Letters, where only the 
most classic drama is to be upheld. 'Ollie," on the other hand, has 
started amongst the Four Hundred, where his marriage introduced 
him several years ago in New York, although, as a matter of fact, 
his Rochester associations might easily have launched him, a sort of 
midnight variety show called the "Vaudeville Club," where the 
lights of the variety stage from the Imperial, Tony Pastor's and Ros- 
ter & Bial's disport themselves between 11 p. m. and 2 a. m., for the 
exclusive set who can enjoy vulgarity, but not vulgar surroundings. 
I use the word in its strictest Latin sense. An amusing episode took 
place the other night when Kelly, one of Tony Pastor's stars, find- 
ing his monologue fulling flat, addressed his audience as follows : 
" Ladies and Gentlemen— This is the first time I have had the honor 
of appearing before the Four Hundred. I see that we do not under- 
stand each other, so I propose an arrangement. When I make a 
joke, I will lift my right hand; the higher I lift it the funnier the 
joke." After this he was appreciated. 

Henry McDowell has been honored this month by a poitrait, and a 
very good one, too, in the Review of Reviews. I remember hearing 
souie Californians laugh at his efforts in a literary line several years 
ago, when he started a weekly paper in San Francisco. They are 
quite out of it now. A very pretty wedding of a once Califomian 
and the most popular young officer of his time at the Presidio, will 
take place at Scranton, Penn., on February 14th— St. Valentine's 
Day— a happy day for lovers. Lieut. Tate is the happy man, and 
Miss Lida Scranton the bride. She is a beautiful brunette, tall and 
graceful, and most lovable as well as talented and accomplished. It 
will be an army wedding, with six officers as ushers. Lieut. Pound- 
stone, of the navy, has been figuring at a wedding in Erie, although 
not as the responsible person, but only as best man. 

The rumor is newly rife that Mr. J. V. Coleman is about to marrv 
Mrs. Sanford, the daughter of the late Dr. Marion Sims, and sister 
of Dr. Harry Sims. She has lived abroad for several years, but spent 
last winter in Washington. Mr. Coleman's attentions were very 
marked in Paris, and have recently been renewed. Mrs. Sanford is 
a handsome woman, and was looked upon as one of the brightest 
women in the American colony in Paris. Miss Ivers' marriage was, 
of course, the event of the week as far as California people are con- 
cerned, and as she has married into au excellent New York family 
many old New York people were pres»nt. It is a matter of surprise 
to all the acquaintances of the beautiful bride that she has not mar- 
ried a diplomat, a statesman, a man of parts, rather than a charm- 
ing -boy of twenty-three, certainly her junior, and who is, I am told, 
only a clerk with Drexel & Morgan. She cannot be marrying for 
position, for although, as 1 have said, her husband's people are of 
excellent birth and blood, they have never been quite in the ex- 
tremest swim. I hear that an old friend of Miss Ivers expressed her 
surprise of the marriage, saying: "I thought, Ailene, you would 
marry, at least, a man of distinction or of wealth," and that the 

bride-elect responded: "Ah, but, Mrs. , I love him. I have never 

loved before, but I adore my future husband." Therefore say I 
your humble correspondent, all honor and all felicitation to the new- 
y married pair. They are keeping house in the Palermo, a very 
beautiful apartment house on East 57th street, near Lexington ave. 

Little Miss Eugenie Ferrer, the Examiner correspondent, left sud- 
denly for San Francisco last Tuesday in response to a wire from 
home announcing her sister's violent illness. She was distracted wilh 
grief when she left. I do not know who will take her place on the 
paper. 

Caspar Whitney, formerly of San Francisco, he was a San Mateo 
(St. Matthew's Hall) boy, has just recovered from a serious and in- 
deed dangerous surgical operation. He has given up Mr. James 



Waterbury's paper, The Week's Sport, and is a regular writer on Har- 
per's Weekly. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Savage gave a dinner in honor of Madame 
de Carriere a few nights ago. The Steinways, Tretbars, Gunters, 
Miss Bean and the Lockes were present. Colonel Savage is about 
producing a new -book, which is to come out in February. I ran 
across, the other day, a clever and charming brochure, sure to be in- 
teresting in the days of the Columb-an Exposition. It is called "The 
Birthplace of the Colombos." and traces the course of the Columbian 
family from Ireland to Italy. It seems to me that this appeals 
strongly to Irish Americans. The sketch is of absorbing interest. It 
is. moreover, clever, correct and dependable. It is published by the 
United States Publishing Company. Father Hugh Flattery, the au- 
thor, is considered the most brilliant priest in New York, and is a 
man of wonderful research and perspicacity. Passe Partout. 

LATEST TENNIS NEWS. 



THE games last Saturday proved to be a great success, and at- 
tracted the most fashionable crowd that have visited the 
courts for some time. It was a novel idea on the part of the Di- 
rectors to have a " mixed " tournament, and the fair sex gave 
some very good exhibitions of tennis, especially the playing of 
Miss Bee Hooper. Her driving was exceedingly good, and her 
passes on the side lines were very neat. Her style of play re- 
minds one of that adopted by Miss Lottie Dod, who so far has 
held the unbeaten record of lady champion of England. Mrs. 
Barry also played a fine game, but somewhat on a different style, 
her strong point being her volleying, which surprised the on- 
lookers. The game between Mrs. Barry and Whitney, and Miss 
Bee Hooper and Stetson, was without doubt the best of the after- 
noon, though the finals were quite exciting. Each side won a 
set, and Mrs. Barry and Whitney were 5-3 and 40-15, but with 
some careful play on the part of Miss Hooper and her partner 
the games were brought to " games all," and the latter won a 
very brilliant match by two sets to one. There were quite a 
number of disappointments: Miss Morgan sprained her ankle 
and did not play. She and Joe Tobin, her partner, were looked 
upon as winners. C. P. Hubbard, partner with Mrs. Woods, did 
not do himself juslice, being out of practice. 

The final round started at 3:50 o'clock jsst after George DeLong 
and Miss Mira Lord had defeated W. S. Hobart and Miss Hooper. 
Miss Lord appeared tired out and did not play with the same ac- 
curacy and decision that has so often won her applause. DeLong, 
however, played well at the net, but was continually passed 
down the side line by Miss Bee Hooper who played remarkable 
tennis and kept cool and collected throughout. The first set fell 
to Miss Bee Hooper and Stetson at the score of 6-1, twenty-seven 
strokes to fourteen. The second which was well contested went 
to Miss Lord and DeLong at G games to 5, and strange to Bay the 
strokes won were even at thirty-four each. The third and final 
set fell very easily to Miss Hooper and Stetson at 6 games to 1, 
twenty-eight strokes to fifteen. The total score was 2 sets to 1, 
seventeen games to eight, and eighty-nine strokes to sixty-three. 
Both Stetson and DeLong made a double fault, but there was 
on'y one love game which was won on Stetson's service. After the 
match was won and congratulations given, President Linderraan 
presented the winners with their racquets, made a few appro- 
priate remarks and closed a very successful meeting. The pairs 
defeated by the winners will play off for second prize next Sat- 
urday at 2:30 o'clock, as to-day the football game will be held be- 
tween the University and the Army teams. 

On Washington's birthday, February 22nd, the California Club 
will give its second double tournament for the club's trophies. 
Allen and Field were the first winners, and a very good entry is 
expected. We understand that the Oakland and Alameda 
Clubs will give some kind of a tournament, but it has not yet 
been decided. People are already beginning to make inquiries 
as to where the 4th of July tournament will be held. We under- 
stand that the hotel at San Rafael will be open this year under 
new management, and it is to be hoped that it will offer a trophy 
as the one won last year by W.H.Taylor, Jr., has become 
that gentleman's sole property, he having won it three times in 
succession. 

Get your suits made at the establishment of Colonel J. M. Litch- 
field, at 12 Post street, and you will have no cause to inveigh against 
tailors. Colonel Litchfileld has the reputation of making the be-t 
suits in the city, and he is patronized by all the well dressed men in 
town. He makes a specialty of army and all kinds of uniforms and 
regalias. He leads in his profession. 



THE WIRE ARTIST, 
A, LAITY, 

Manufacturer of Chinese Cats-eye Pearl Goods, Bracelets, Breast- 
Pins and Necklaces. Choice and selected "Eves" only used in 
my Goods. For sale at 11 POLK St., SAN FRANCISCO. Cal. 

J R7 SMITH, & CO., 

Merchant Tailors, 230 ECush Street, Mills Building formerly 
under Occidental Hotel. 



New Artotype Series. Plate 137. 



WitliS. F. News Letter, February 4, 189S. 




MEN WE KNOW. 
Attorney General Wm. H. H. Hart. 



Price per Copy, 10 Cent*. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 








Vol. XL VI. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1S93. 



Number 5. 



' and Published awtry *liinlo;/ by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and ifnrket Streets, San Fran. 
citeo. Entered at San Francisco Pott-office as Second Class Matter. 



THE office of the News Letter in New York City has been es- 
tablished at 196 Broadway, room 14, where information may 
be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

YOU will find the greater evil in the man who scorns all the 
petty vii 



petty vices. 

iY married i 

not tie in her anger. 



AN Y married man will tell yuu that danger from a woman does 
nc 



CONSISTENCY is the virtue you always look for in the posses- 
sion of the otber fellow. 



B 
I 



Y the way, is it not about time for Judge Wallace to have 
another spasm of honesty? 



T is the man who is (oiled of his annual pass that speaks most 
feelingly of the soulless corporation. 

MAN loves but once, as a woman does, the difference being 



AMAr* loves but once, as a woman d 
that a woman loves somebody else. 



THE rain falls alike upon the just and upon the unjust, but it 
is usually the just who are caught out without umbrellas. 



IF Jim Rea were to discharge his Secretary and get one who does 
not know how to write he might save himself a whole lot of 
trouble. 



AND so they are to use home made iron-work in the new post- 
office. That is all right, so far as it goes, but when are we to 
use the new postottice? 



BEN BUTLER had the largest brain of modern times, which 
explains perhaps how he could carry so many bricks in his 
hat to throw at his enemies. 



JT may be a wise child that knows its own father, but Solomon 
was not a circumstance to the man who has succeeded in get- 
ting acquainted with his own son. 



VIRTUE left the world so long ago that no man knows the real 
article now when he sees it — if it be ever seen. Hypocrisy 
is the thing that passes current. 



WHAT does it profit a man to sell the nation a postoffice site 
if he also takes so much money from the national treasury 
that enough does not remain to build a postoffice? 



THE Legislature will get no truth from the well at the Capitol, 
because there is no well; but is the waste-basket still in the 
library? The waste-basket's the thing, you know. 



IT seems to be a case of honest men falling out in the matter of 
the Oakland city election and, if the rogues do not get their 
dues, they will at least continue getting everything in sight. 



IT iB said by men on the ground that some members of the pres- 
ent Legislature are perfectly willing to be insulted. The 
thing lacking is some adroit worker, such as Dibble, for instance, 
to do the insulting. 



ASSEMBLYMAN BRETZ, of Alameda, has held out his hand 
and taken his whipping like a good little boy, and has gone 
to stand in the corner for a whole week. That completes the 
picture, for we can imagine the white paper cap on his head with 
almost no effort at all. 



THE annual report of the Spring Valley Water Company shows 
that it has 55,000 patrons. The total receipts of the year were 
$1,674,828.96, of which $1,571,612.33 were from private consumers 
and $85,988.13 from the City and County. The operating ex- 
penses were $395,387.78, and the dividends $660,000. 



THE British ship Nereus has just cleared for Sligo, Ireland, 
with an entire cargo of 86,000 quarter sacks Starr Flour. Since 
20th July last, when new Wheat came in, between 200,000 and 
250,000 barrels of '-Starr Flour" have been shipped to Enrope, 
and nearly all sold prior to the ships leaving San Francisco bay- 



THE book-makers at Oakland do not seem to have the terror of 
Tooter Williams very strongly before their eyes — but what 
would you? Here are people coming every day to be robbed. 
Even honor among tbieves does not go to the extent of one rob- 
ber keeping his hands off because another robber has forbidden 
him to cut purses, excepting according to tne method approved 
in bandit circles. 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEY REED says he wants to purify 
the Police Courts, and Police Judge Campbell replies that any 
plan proposed for the purification of " the dens of iniquity and 
sinks of corruption," as the Prosecuting Attorney called these 
courts, is impracticable. Police Judge Campbell ought to know 
about it, as be has had vast experience in dens and sinks similar 
to those referred to. 



THE young Liberals of Servia have recognized the real meaning 
of the reconciliation between ex-King Milan and his consort, 
and are prepared to resist its consequences. They will have the 
sympathy of the civilized world, for it would be a pity if the des- 
tiny of Servia should ever be connected again with that of Milan 
Obrenovitch, who not only has disgraced the very name of mon- 
archy, but even that of humanity itself by his life. 



NO punishment can be too severe for the man who had a 
chance to kick C. M. Bennett off the Oakland boat, and did 
nut. There is no field so good for the suppression of vice as the 
bottom of the bay, and it is a field that the community at large 
would cheerfully abandon to the sole efforts of this sanctimonious 
leper who invades homes to ruin them, and who only lives be- 
cause an Oakland father was stricken with blindness before Ben- 
nett had laid contaminating hands upon his daughter. 



JOHN D. SPRECKLES and Frank Moffittdid not steal the For- 
esting Commission's appropriation, but that was not because 
there was no appropriation to steal. Mr. Spreckles was not here, 
and he dues not steal, anyway, and Moffitt even if he does live In 
Oakland, would have to arise much earlier than he does, and 
stay up a good deal later nights, to be able to steal anything so 
long as Walter Moore was going about in the neighborhood. After 
all, Allen Kelly appears to have been the chief sufferer. 



HAVING been nominated for re-election on two municipal 
tickets, Auditor Snow, of Oakland, now rinds himself con- 
fronted with the difficulty of how to vote both those tickets and 
so preserve his solidity with the boys, and, at the same time, keep 
out of jail. It is not, you understand, a moral difficulty, although 
Auditor Snow is as truly a moral man as ever wore a halo. In fact 
it is a matter of common repute among the worldly that Auditor 
Snow wears out two balos a week, and finds the second one decidedly 
off color by church time on Sunday. But there is the infernal Aus- 
tralian ballot law taking a man's description so accurately that even 
the most stupid of Oakland election officials could not be fooled 
though they wanted.to be never so badly. 

WITH the death of James G. Blaine passes into the void the 
most remarkable American of his time. With lesser oppor- 
tunities, he was to America what Gladstone is to Great Britain, 
and what Bismarck has been to Germany — and he had all of the 
unscrupleness of Gladstone and all the disregard for means, so 
long as his end was obtained, shown by Bismarck. His great 
talent no man can question, and he was loved as no American 
public man has been loved since Henry Clay. Even Lincoln did 
not inspire the affection felt by his followers for James G. Blaine. 
He was the most conspicuous illustration in modern times of the 
fact, not hitherto generally accepted, that love can exist without 
trust, for the inherent integrity of the American masses led 
them to distrust Blaine even while they loved him. It was pre- 
cisely because of this distrust that he failed to reach the highest 
honors, and so failed, after all, of his dream of seeing but one 
America in the western hemisphere. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Feb. 4, 1893 . 



GOVERNMENT CREDIT, THE PEOPLE'S PROPERTY. 

CREDIT is money, or, at any rate, money'a worth, and capable 
of being disposed of. The man without credit who wants to 
discount his note finds that out quickly. Try he never so hard, 
nobody will accommodate him. His honesty may not be doubted, 
but his ability to pay is, and that settles the question. Let him, 
however, get *he self-same note endorsed by somebody in good 
credit, and although the piece of paper has not intrinsically en- 
hanced in value, it has all at once taken on the characteristics of 
money and become "as good as gold." The change Is solely and 
wholly due to the fact that there is now credit to the back: of it. 
Just that credit, and nothing else, suffices to do nine-tenths of all 
the world's commerce. All the gold and silver in existence 
would be a mere drop in the bucket of commerce's needs if 
it were not for promissory notes, mortgages, bills of exchange, 
bills of lading, and other paper evidences of credit. Plainly then, 
credit if not money, serves the place of money, and serves it 
most usefully, faithfully and well. Of that kind of credit which 
is capable of being turned readily into money, the United States 
Government has an abundant stock, of which it makes little or 
no use, but which it might; were the Standford Land Loan Bill 
a law, sell to its people on perfectly safe security, to their and 
its own great gain and to the consummation of the most success- 
ful financial operation of this or any otner age. There can be no 
better basis of credit in this world than, the fruits of the people's 
industry. As a matter of ract, there is no other. Even gold is 
the result of the miner's toil, and, as a rule, uses up as much labor 
in the procuring of it as it is worth. Gold, therefore, 
is but the fruit of labor, just as corn and potatoes are, with this differ- 
ence, that whilst gold never increases in bulk or weight, no matter 
what labor is applied to it, corn and potatoes go on increasing inde- 
finitely. If planted in the ground they multiply a hundred fold 
yearly. If given to animals they yield us beef, mutton and pork, or 
if fed to human beings they increase the members of the race, who, 
in their turn, produce more potatoes and corn. Articles of food neces- 
sary to sustain human life and supply the boiler power, as it were, to 
human industry, are intrinsically an infinitely better basis for credit 
than gold. They are easily saleable, may be exchanged without much 
difficulty, and are of iruperativeand wide-world necessity, whilst gold 
has little or no value, except the fictitious one given to it by a sort of 
common consent, just as the natives of certain of the South Sea Is- 
lands agree among themselves to accept Kowrie shells as money. Is 
it not due to the needs of mankind, as well as to the genius of the 
orumercial age in which we live, ihit there should be a re-arrange- 
ment of the common understanding by which gold alone is accepted 
as money or as a basis of credit? Of course, it is true that corn and 
potatoes cannot be handled and exchanged with the same convenience 
that gold can, but right there conies in the true function of the govern- 
ment as the maker and distributor of the people's money. If corn 
and potatoes cannot be readily handled the government's notes can, 
and so long as they represent good and valid security what more is 
left to be desired ? It may be said that corn and potatoes are perisha- 
ble, and therefore not lasting security. No doubt. But the land on 
which the potatoes and corn are produced, together with the perma- 
nent improvemeuts thereon, are not perishable, and it is as against 
these, the safest securities a country knows, that the government 
may loan its credit. The presence and necessities of sixty-five mil 
lions of people is the all-sufficient guarantee that the land must con- 
tinue to have the necessary industry applied to it to cause it to yield 
up the people's food. It is population that gives value to land,' and 
why should not that value, like any other, be the subject of mortgage 
and loan? It is made so subject by banks and corporations as 
"gilt-edged" security to be preferred to all others, and why should 
it not be equally desirable as the backing for a Government 
loan? It is urged that the loauing of its credit by the Govern- 
ment is competition with private corporations and individuals, 
and therefore not properly a Governmental function. But the 
Government already does loan its credit, and to those very cor- 
porations and individuals, and why it may not enlarge its sphere 
of usefulness to all its people who have security to give, it is not 
easy to reasonably answer. The whole matter of money-making 
and issuing is, for the common good, taken out of the region of 
private enterprise, and therefore the usual stock arguments that 
are well enough when applied to Governmental interference with 
personal industry, have no applicability whatever in this con- 
nection. We notice that wben these self-same people who are so 
opposed to Government interference find themselves in a tight place 
byreason of somebody else having "interfered" with theirbusiness 
by getting up a "Black Friday" or a corner in gold, or by unduly 
exporting it, they rush to the Secretary of the Treasury to do the 
very thing for them which they say he must not do for the peo- 
ple—namely, loan out the people's money or credit on good col- 
laterals. If that is so good a thing to do to save Wall street from 
the effects of financial pressure, it is assuredly no less desirable a 
thing to do when another class, who, as producers, are the back- 
bone of the count:y, are subjected to a like pressure. It is this 
very class that has mainly contributed to the establishment of 
the Government's credit, and if anybody is to be favored in shar- 
ing the benefits of that valuable thing, it is surely they who 
created it. 



SPECIAL COMMISSIONS AND BOARDS. 



IT is to be hoped that the present Legislature will frown down 
all attempts to create more special commissions, boards or 
bureaus, and legislate several already created out of existence. 
These exceptional bodies are responsible to nobody, invariably 
waste a lot of money for which there is little to show, too fre- 
quently cover up a job, and, upon general principles, ought to 
have no place under our Constitution. That instrument creates 
an executive, legislative and judicial department, to which are 
allotted the whole round of duties that properly come within gov- 
ernmental funclions. Those duties may be added to from time to 
time as the Legislature sees fit, and heads of departments may be 
given authority to employ an expert or experts in the execution 
of any particular work, or in pursuing any special inquiry, and 
that is all that is necessary, as well as all that is within the spirit 
and scope of the fundamental law. It was never intended that 
the work of the Government should be put out upon commission. 
Indeed, in regard to municipal governments, that sort of thing is 
specially interdicted. "No special board or commission shall per- 
form any municipal functions whatever," are the plain and man- 
datory words of the Constitution under which we exist, but up 
to which we do not live. In San Francisco we still have all sorts 
of boards and commissions, despite the fundamental law. The 
Supreme Court, in its peculiar wisdom, says that the Constitu- 
tion, self-acting though it is in this respect, is not operative until 
we get a new charter, and that is how it comes that all these 
special bodies, with their attaches, manage to keep the city from 
bringing itself under the operations of a Constitution adopted 
nearly fourteen years ago. For the creation of commissions to do 
State work there is no excuse whatever, and almost ail of them 
could be wiped out to-morrow with gain to the State. Their 
principal work consists in getting up long tabulated reports that 
are printed at public expense, but are read by nobody and serve 
no useful purpose. They encumber several rooms in the Capitol 
whilst the Legislature is in session, and after ihat become the 
perquisites of somebody who sells them to the paper manufac- 
turer. It is a poor outcome to so much expenditure. We have 
witnessed the worKings of a great many of these commissions in 
our time, but never knew more than two or three that were not 
appointed to work out some job, or to find places for somebody, 
or to carry out some ulterior and evil design. The present Legis- 
lature can very easily and wisely effect a saving in this direc- 
tion. 



AN UNJUST CHARGE. 



SOME excitement was created in legal circles last week by the 
report of a committee of the Bar Association, wherein they 
condemn as unprofessional the conduct of Colonel Kowalsky, for 
receiving a payment of $2,000, on account of $15,000 due him for win- 
ning what was considered an impossible case. A careful reading o: 
the charges against this attorney and a review of the facts upon 
which the charges were based fail to show to a layman why any set of 
fair-minded men should arrive at such a conclusion against a brother 
lawyer, it appears that P. J. Corbett, who was the guardian, and 
who was the person to be deceived, if any one, says fairly and frankly 
that Kowalsky, in the first place, was not his attorney in this matter; 
that Kowalsky in no sense and in no wise deceived him, but, on the 
contrary, informed him before Mr. Sullivan (who was his attorney) 
that there was no order of Court for the payment of the money in 
question, and that Corbett acted solely on the advice of Sullivan, and 
never without consulting him. This Corbett told to Judge Coffey and 
to the Bar Association. 

Kowalsky owes it to himself to insist upon a full bearing before 
the Supreme Court of this State, to force his accusors to show 
their hand and be made to prove what they assert. What has 
Kowalsky done to have caused these attorneys to attack him 
and report that his conduct has been unprofessional? The receipt 
of $2000 on account of a very large fee, amounting to $15,000 
that he had earned, is about the size ot it. It seems like an or- 
dinary, fair, business transaction. A lawyer is employed to try 
a case, and such a case that every second lawyer said could not 
be won. The case is finally won, and the result to the contest- 
ant was like the result produced by AUadio's Lamp — it was a 
"find." It was one of those contingent cases that ninety-nine 
lawyers out of every hundred would not have undertaken, on 
account of their belief in the impossibility of its being won, even 
if the whole winning had been offered them. About the only 
thing we feel sorry for Kowalsky, is, the company he is placed 
in, but like the 8avior, he can console himself on the fact that he 
has been crucified between two rascals, and has thus been made 
more prominent. 

THE prospects seem very good for the passage of the Riverside 
bill, as it has been reported favorably upon by the Senate 
Committee. The people most affected by the proposed creation 
of the new county are favorable to the project, which in all re- 
spects seems a wise measure. The territory within the new 
boundaries is very productive, and will make Riverside one of 
the most prominent counties in California. We await its estab- 
lishment. 



Feb. 4, 1893 



BAE FRANi E3C0 NEWS LETT] R. 



THE TRUTH ABDUT THE HAWAIIAN REVOLUTION 

THK remarkably peaceful revolution In Hawaii is not alto- 
gether what it seems. It is, however, very easy to account 
for the milk in the cocoanut. Since the abrogation of the sugar 
duties by the Tinted States, the reciprocity treaty has lost its 
virtue for the Hawaiian planters, who saw no necessity for a 
change of rulers as long as it lasted, but are now for annexation 
in order to recover their lost bounties. Of course, if the Islands 
become part of our national domain, they will be entitled to 
share in the sugar bounties which the last Congress voted, and 
endeavored to pledge the country to for a period of fifteen years to 
come. Annexation would entail a direct money payment by the 
people of this country of several millions a year to the bandfull 
of planters in the Islands, who, for that reason, and that alone, 
are very ardent annexationists, as we should all probably be 
under like circumstances. To procure those millions is the 
motive for the "revolution" that has just been accomplished, and 
is the real business of the commissioners now in Washington. 
Annexation may be a good thing for both countries, but it will 
not make it any the less a good thing to understand just why it 
is being asked for. It is a sufficiently important transaction to 
entitle the people of this country to understand it before commit- 
ting themselves to it. It is moreover due to the truth of history 
that it should be understood that the very substantial material 
interest we have alluded to, and not anything done or left un- 
done by Queen Liliuokalani, is the real propelling motive for 
what is now taking place. The Queen's act that is made the 
excuse for the revolution was the signing of two bills that were 
passed by Parliament, which she bad a right to sign, and which 
it was even her duty to sign, as a constitutional monarch. 
The merits or demerits of those bills cut no figure in the 
controversy. They were the acts of a majority of the people's 
representatives, elected, by the way, under a constitution formu- 
lated against the wishes of the Crown by the very men who have 
now upset it. The abnormal prosperity of the Islands caused by 
the sugar duties, the gift of the people of this country, under- 
went a material change upon the virtual repeal of the Reciprocity 
treaty. The question arose as to how to bring about another 
boom. There was money in licensing the sale of opium to the Chi- 
nese, and a company incorporated in this country, offered a large 
sum for the privilege of legal protection in running an American 
lottery on Hawaiian soil. Bills were passed favorable to those 
projects by the representatives of the people, signed by the 
Queen, and became laws. They are doubtless very wicked 
measures, that we may all unite in condemning; yet we meekly 
venture to suggest, not by way of palliation or excuse, but as 
precedents of a civilized order, that the native Hawaiians had 
high examples for what they proposed to do. Moral EDgland 
still draws revenue from the opium monopoly in India, and even 
a Sovereign State in this Christian Union of ours still replenishes 
its treasury by the aid of a lottery patronized by citizens in all 
our States. The truth, without much doubt, is that the worthy 
planters would have shut their eyes, as the good people of 
Louisiana long did, to the iniquities of the lottery, had not a 
larger and better thing been believed to have been within grasp. 
It is not so sure, however, that that belief is well founded. It is 
by no means certain that annexation will secure sugar bounties 
for Hawaiian planters. We believe the incoming party will re- 
peal the bounties and not re-impose the sugar duties, and, in 
that case, it is pretty safe to say that all Hawaiians, native as 
well as foreign born, would rather bear the ills of Queen Liiiuo- 
kalani's mild regime, than those of the class of carpet-bag poli- 
ticians we should almost inevitably send to rule over them. It 
is, therefore, decidedly premature yet to have the question that 
has just been taken to Washington passed upon by an expiring 
Congress and a dying administration, not at all in touch or 
sympathy with what is to follow on the fourth of next month. 
Meanwhile, the wisest and best policy in regard to these inter- 
esting Islands is to continue to treat them with benevolent con- 
sideration, keep a keen eye upon them, see that they fall into 
the hands of no other power, and, for the rest, leave them alone 
for the present to settle their little lottery bills and other do- 
mestic concerns to'suit themselves. Some day, perhaps not far 
distant, the trend of events may render annexation inevitable, 
but that is not yet. When it comes there will not be a legitimate 
sovereign to overthrow, nor an unwilling majority of the people 
to first coerce and then hold in subjection, and above all, there 
will be no sugar bounties to continue paying as the price of any- 
body's loyalty. In the fullness of time the Islands will be ours, 
if we want them. For the present we should be content with a 
well defined policy. A note to other powers to keep their hands 
off, an intimation to the native government that the lives and 
property of resident Americans will be protected at all hazards, 
an ocean cable and a fitting expenditure upon Pearl Harbor as a 
rendezvous for our ships of war, constitute a safe and sufficient 
policy for the present. Time will develop the rest. 



WE do not hear so much talk now as we did four years ago of 
California in the Cabinet. In all this broad land of the 
West, you see, there has never been a Democratic Estee. 



THE MASSAGE OPERATORS. 

AT last a Police Judge has taken official cognizance of the dis- 
reputable practices of the notoriously immoral women who, 
under the cloak of " massage operator." OOOdaot houses of prostitu- 
tion throughout the city. Police Jtldge Conlao has announced his 
intention of endeavoring to suppress this evil, which has assumed 
alarming extents in this city. He has asked the assistance of the 
Chief of Police, and that official will instruct his officers to treat 
these offenders with due seventy, so that they may be made to feel 
that the heavy hand of the law is upon them. These women will be 
arrested on charges of vagrancy, and will either be sent to prison or 
ordered out of town. Probably the latter sentence would be the bet- 
ter one. We do not want them in the city, and there is no good 
reason why they should be fed in the jails, for imprisonment would 
have no good effect upon them. For several years the News Letter 
has roundly condemned the courts, the police and the duily press for 
extending their aid to these moral lepers, and thereby allowing 
them to spread vice broadcast throughout the community. What- 
ever may be said of a Judge who will not give these painted harlots 
their just deserts, or of a police officer who will not arrest them 
wherever found, only one conclusion can be reached regarding a 
daily newspaper that will publish their shameless advertisement. 
Such a paper has not the best interests of the community at heart, 
and it should not receive support from residents who wish to sustain 
and improve the purity of the people. The greatest offender for a 
long time past in the publication of the advertisements of " massage 
operators " has been the Examiner. Why such a wealthy, enter- 
prising and prominent paper as this should surrender its columns for 
such immoral purposes is a conundrum that no one can satisfactorily 
explain. It cannot be for the money there is in it, for Mr. Hearst 
and the Examiner are both too wealthy to feel in the slightest degree 
the insignificant amount that the advertisements bring in. It must 
be that the Examiner is blind to the evil it is doing. That cannot be 
for want of knowledge, however, for we have called attention to this 
disgraceful business time and again. We heartily endorse every- 
thing said from the bench by Judge Conlan in commenting upon the 
deplorable fact that newspapers of the city are aiding the cause of 
immorality by publishing the advertisements of these vile women. 
A newspaper should be above such low truckling. We trust that 
Judge Conlan will be well aided in his meritorious work by the 
police, and that the city will soon be rid of the massage operators. 

IN RESPECT TO HIS MEMORY. 



THE recent deaths of a number of prominent men, and the con- 
sequent action taken thereupon by legislative bodies, causes 
us to remark that much valuable time, belonging properly to the 
people, is lost by the following by Legislatures of an old custom that 
has no good reason for further enforcement. A death of a prom- 
inent man is reported to a public legislative body, which thereupon 
listens to many addresses eulogizing the deceased, adopts resolu- 
tions, and then " adjourns in respect to his memory." It is against 
this last action that we note objection. For instance, the Legisla- 
ture of California, only, a few days ago, adjourned for a day because 
an Assemblyman had died. This senseless action entailed an ex- 
pense of over a thousand dollars to the State in the salaries of the 
legislators alone, and about as much more in the salaries of the em- 
ploye's. All this money will be paid out for this day upon which no 
work was done. Nor was this by any means the greatest offense. A 
far graver one was the delay to legislation caused by the adjourn- 
ment. A whole day was lost in the middle of the session, with the 
riles crowded with bills, and far more work before the members than 
they can hope to accomplish in their given time. And what good 
did it do Mr. Price that the Legislature adjourned in respect to his 
memory? Far be it from us to withhold in any manner any of the 
honors due to an honest public man, who has fallen while engaged 
on behalf of the people, but at the same time we cannot refrain from 
expressing the opinion that a great deal of valuable time and money 
is wasted uselessly in following an ancient custom. The'best inter- 
ests of the people demand that their business shall be transacted in 
the most expeditious and economical manner. It would have the 
same effect, for instance, in cases similar to that referred to, if a 
committee were appointed to prepare proper resolutions in honor of 
the deceased, which might then be adopted, spread on the minutes, 
and copies sent to the family. Nobody can do more than this, nor 
should any more be done. Legislators should pay proper respect to 
their fellows who may die during the session, but their first duty is 
to transact the business of the people, and to their first duty they 
should be true. 

MR. HEAP should not be discouraged because the use of cay- 
enne pepper as a corrective of juvenile vices went out of 
favor at the JBoys and Girls Aid Society with his loss of the 8u> 
perintendency of the institution. There are plenty of associated 
charities remaining, and there will always be a demand for men 
of his stamp so long as charities are associated. The same spirit 
that leads people to advertise their charity leads them also to 
employ men whose atrocities in petty tyranny over the weak 
and the infirm, form the most effectual sort of advertisement. 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



Feb. 4, 1893 . 



WELL KNOWN MEMBERS OF THE SENATE. 

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR REDDICK. 

JOHN BURK REDDICK, Lieut.-Governor of California, was 
born in Ohio in 1845. Both his parents emigated to that 
State, from Virginia, about the year 1840. In 1854 Mr. Reddickcame 
to this State with his parents, who located in Calaveras County 
where, in his teens, he engaged in raining enterprise, and subse- 
quently managed his father's ranch, which consisted of agricultural 
land, and a large orchard of deciduous fruits. In 1862 he entered the 
old Brayton School at Oakland, which was then the preparatory 
department of the College of California. After a due course 
there, and after remaining at home on account of sickness for 
a year, he returned to Oakland, and was admitted to the College of 
California which is now the College of Letters in the State Uni- 
versity from which he graduated in 18G9, with the honors 
of salutatorian of the class. After graduation he taught 
school for a short time, engaged in the management of a farm, 
and in 1875 was elected to the Legislature by a large majority in 
a then Democratic county. After the expiration of the session 
of 1875-76, he commenced the study of the law, following the 
advice of Henry Edgerton and Colonel E. J. Lewis. In 1878 he 
commenced the practice of the law, and has since been actively 
engaged in his profession. Mr. Reddick is a man of pronounced 
legal temperament, a natural lawyer, and he developed naturally 
so decidedly in that direction that he was called into the councils 
of the State before the period of his preliminary legal study baa 
been 'completed. He acted as District Attcroey of Calaveras 
county, in the absence of his law partner, F. J. Solinsky. In 1881 
he was again elected to the Legislature over a very popular Demo- 
cratic candidate, and was a member of the Judiciary Committee 
of the Assembly during this term. 

In 1880 Mr. Reddick was married, and now he has a family 
consisting of a wife and two children. In the Blaine campaign 
he was selected as an elector on the Republican ticket, canvassed 
the central portion of the State, and received the highest number 
of votes cast for any of the electors. He is known in his section 
of the country as an enthusiast in horticulture, and in that way 
contributes much to the beauty of the city of San Andreas, and 
to his own happiness. The Lieutenant-Governor is now engaged 
in developing a quartz mine in Calaveras county, and is also part 
owner of two other mines, both of which are idle. He is a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trade of Calaveras county, and in all respects 
is a representative Oalifornian. A man of tine presence and 
genial manners, he readily makes friends. His manner of address 
is strong and attractive, and ay the presiding officer of the State 
Senate, he has administered his high office in a most dignified 
and satisfactory manner. 

SENATOR BAILEY. 



SENATOR W. C. BAILEY, of the Thirteenth District, is one of 
the leading attorneys of San Jose. He is a native of Wiscon- 
sin, where he spent his early years upon a farm. He went to the 
front with a Wisconsin regiment during the war, and for six 
years was Judge Advocate-General of Wisconsin upon the staff of 
Governor Rusk, now the Secretary of Agriculture. He received a 
classical education at one of the Eastern colleges, and subse- 
quently began the practice of the law, in which he has since been 
actively and successfully engaged. In politics Senator Bailey is 
a Republican, but is opposed to all boss rule. By President 
Arthur he was appointed Postmaster of Green Bay, Wis., and 
held that office for three years under President Cleveland. In 
1887 he left the Badger State for San Jose, and three years later 
was Bent from that city to the State Senate, taking his seat at the 
opening of the last session. There he at once took a prominent 
place by reason of his force and ability. He nominated Senator 
Stanford for the United States Senate, and also led the forlorn 
hope in which Mr. Estee placed his trust for the Senate. Senator 
Bailey is an able lawyer and a distinguished legislator. He is a 
fluent speaker, and has made great success upon the stump and 
before juries. The Senator has a charming wife and three sons, 
and, being of a domestic nature, spends most of his leisure 
moments at home among his family and books. 

SENATOR G. S. BERRY. 

SENATOR BERRY, of Tulare and Inyo counties, was born in 
1847 in the State of Missouri, and came to California in 1857. 
He settled in San Joaquin county and engaged in farming, and 
has followed that pursuit ever since. Politically he is a Demo- 
crat. He was elected from Tulare county four years ago, and 
two years ago was sent to the Senate. He introduced the Re- 
assessment bill last session, and again this session. He has also 
submitted an amendment to the Constitution, requiring a de- 
scription of persons registering. This created a great comment 
on all sides. In Senator Berry we find a man strong in his beliefs, 
true to his friends and an honest man in every particular. His 
record while a member of the Legislature is beyond reproach, 
and full of honor to himself and his constituency. 



ELLIOTT McALLISTER. 

ELLIOTT McALLISTER, State Senator from the Eleventh Dis- 
trict (comprising the counties of Marin and Contra Costa) 
comes of a family which has been long and honorably identified 
with the history of this State. His grandfather, Matthew Hall 
McAllister, was the first United States Circuit Judge of Califor- 
nia; his father, the late Cutler McAllister, was one of the 
foremost members of the San Francisco bar, and a partner of the 
well-known lawyer, Hall McAllister, who was Senator McAllis- 
ter's uncle. Another uncle, the late Colonel Julian McAllister, 
will be remembered by residents of Benicta as the commandant 
of the United States Arsenal at that city for many years. It is to 
that city, we may add, that Senator McAllister owes his early 
education. At the Saint Augustine School there he was prepared 
for the University of California, from which institution he was 
graduated with high honors in 1885. After his graduation he 
passed a year in travel and study abroad, taking a particular 
interest in social, political and economic questions. Upon bis 
return to this country he studied law in the Columbia Law School 
in New York, and was admitted to the bar of that State. Thence 
he returned to California, and is at present engaged in the active 
practice of the law in San Francisco. Senator McAllister is a 
man of high principle, well balanced judgment and great strength 
and honesty of purpose. His active interest in the welfare of the 
State, his liberal views, his wide knowledge of men and affairs, 
and his determined opposition to all forms of corruption and 
oppression, make him eminently fitted for his high duties. He 
took an active part in the Imitation Butter bill and the Collateral 
Inheritance Tax bill. He is the author of the bill for reform in 
land transfer in accordance with the Torrens Act of Australia. 



SENATOR WM. SIMPSON. 



SENATOR SIMPSON, of Alameda, was born in New York city 
in 1823. He came to California in 1849, and engaged in min- 
ing for a short time. He subsequently went to Stockton, where 
he practiced medicine and engaged in the drug business. He 
was one of the pioneers of the Slough City. He came to San 
Francisco in 1863 and continued the drug business here. Sena- 
tor Simpson, although taking a great interest in politics from a 
Republican standpoint, has nevertheless a great preferment for 
literary work, and was associated with that well-known pioneer 
paper, the Golden Era, at the time it had on its staff such brilliant 
men as Mark Twain, Bret Harte and Colonel Evans. Senator 
Simpson's most recent literary effort is in a book called " A Man 
From Mars." It discusses the labor question in an interesting 
manner, and has a high rank among the literary works of the 
day. The Senator has very pronounced labor views, and believes 
legislation in behalf of the toilers should have an equal chance 
with the enactments for the benefit of capital. 



SENATOR E. C. SEYMOUR. 

SENATOR SEYMOUR, of San Bernardino County, is one of 
the well known and able men of the Senate. He was born in 
New York in 1845, and came to California in 1882, settling in 
Riverside. He engaged largely in the contracting business. He 
was Sheriff of the county two terms, and was elected Senator on 
the Republican ticket at the last election. He served gallantly in 
the war of the Rebellion, and is prominent in Grand Army circles. 
He is now Senior Vice Department Commander of this State, and 
will no boubt be chosen Commander at Los Angeles in March. 
Senator 8eymour possesses a kind, courteous disposition, and 
makes friends of all that meet him. He is energetic and skillful 
in debate, and makes a strong fight for any measure he supports 
by reason of the forcible way he represents his cause. As a po- 
litical campaigner from his section of the country, he has no 
superior. 

SENATOR J. B. HOYT. 

SENATOR HOYT is a native of Franklin county, Vermont, 
where he was born in 1827. He came to California in 1852, 
in the ship Panama. He went to El Dorado and Placer counties, 
where he worked in the mines eight months. Early in October, 
1852, he located in Suisun, Solano county, and engaged in farm- 
ing. In the winter of 1855 he became interested in the sheep 
business, and has been ever since. He gives particular attention 
to the breeding of merino sheep. Senator Hnyt was married in 
Vermont in 1856. He has been a Republican since 1864. He 
was the first partisan elected to the Board of Supervisors in his 
district. Senator Hoyt is one cf the men who believes in honest 
methods in politics, and lives up to his beliefs. He is respected 
and honored by his colleagues in the Senate. 



WHAT the Alameda regency wants to know is, whether Irish 
home-rule is to be extended to Oakland? If it is, and if 
President Cleveland is to intrust its administration over there to 
John P., the English will gird up their loins and go out and get 
somebody to kick them. 



rte» PI..: 



' M«w« :.-iit. F«bruar% | 






WELL KNOWN MEMBERS OF THE SENATE. 



1. Lieut. Governor J. B. Redriick. 
S. Senator Wm. Simpsorf. 
3. Senator J. B. frjeyt. 



4. "Senator E. C. Seymour. 
3.- Senator W. C. "Bailey. 

6. Senator G. S. Berry. 

7. Senator Ellio»t McAllister. 



Feb. 4, 18S3 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I.l.l 11 I; 



WILL THE HOOP-SKIRT OOME TO STAY? 
[By Pi Ykrkoh.] 

THOSE Infallible recorders of public events, the newspapers, 
tell as that tbe hoop-skirt has begun its triumphal entry, that 
crinoline will soon be all the rage. Alas, and has that old skeleton 
escaped from the closet? The public press is enchanted with the 
thought, tbe cartoonists have found a new subject for the point 
of both wit and pencil, and even tbe small boy at school relieves 
the monotony of a writing-exercise by drawing huge hooped fig- 
ures upon bis ^late! Is there no way of escape from this incur- 
sion of steel rims and belts and buckles? Alas, I fear not, for if 
fashion has decreed that boops must be worn, what elegant, re- 
fined or lovely lady could consent to eppear on the street with- 
out following the mode? Who, indeed I Of course we know that 
the manufacturers of fabrics and the dressmakers, and those who 
make those marvelous creations of fact and fancy, known as 
fashion plates, are all in league to promote the sale of so many 
extra yards of material to a dress-pattern. Of course we know 
this will be an added expense to every lady; of course we know 
that every woman thinks with dread of resuming crinoline; but 
all the same, we will fall into line — no, into circles, and wear 
• hoops. Why? Because a host of silly women who always fol- 
low the latest fashion, be it the Grecian bend or the kangaroo 
walk, will wear hoops. Then a host of others who dread being 
thought odd or singnlar, will follow the majority, so as to escape 
notice. Last of all, there will be many sensible women who 
would prefer to continue to wear sensible, tasteful costumes, but 
who dread being called strong-minded and bold, and even vulgar, 
because they dare to be different from the rest of their sex as re- 
gards dress. Some of these will endure to the end; but oh, how 
they will be ridiculed! They will be the sport of the artist and 
the scribbler. They will be guyed on the street. Their motives 
will be impugned, and before they get through, they will wish 
themselves dead or — in hoops! 

Think of the children. Think how nice all the little girls will 
look with their dainty gowns all puffed out over a framework of 
crinoline! It will be so convenient when they wish to skate, or 
to ride down hill in a brake-wagon, or to climb trees, or to walk 
fences. True, in the former days, when children used to wear 
hoops, little girls sometimes came to grief by being hung by a 
hoop to a picket, or by catching a foot in a steel ring and falling 
headlong as they rushed around playing tag. True, many a 
small child has felt her belt-buckle break, and like a little hero- 
ine, stood still while the dreadful skeleton made its way to the 
ground, and then, stepping out of the nest of concentric circles, 
ring after ring, as it were, of steel hoops, has gathered up the wire 
" bird cage," rolled it u'p quite compactly, and tucking it under 
her cloak or her apron, made her way back to the paternal roof- 
tree. There she hung the skeleton up in the closet and went out 
to play for the rest of the day, to be untrammeled by the thought 
of keeping her heels out of her hoops. 

Oh, if hoops come in again, it will be loads of fun to watch the 
deft and dapper yoang clerks roll up a pair of hoops into a parcel. 
It will be joy in the household, and all the children will stand 
round to enjoy it when the mother cuts the string and lets this 
feminine jack-in-the-box fly out of its confines! The closet 
wherein hung Bluebeard's wives won't be a circumstance to the 
wardrobe of the fashionable belle when her hoop skirts droop 
like bells in the belfry from the hooks on which they hang! 
When hoops come in they will bring with them all those dainty 
little suggestions for economical fancy work. I knew a man 
once who made a rose trellis out of two laths and an old hoop- 
skirt. But that was merely a utilitarian project. By hoop-skirt 
fancy work I mean those useful (dare I say ornamental?) wall- 
pockets, that were designed by one of those odd coincidences to 
be a receptacle for old newspapers. Think of it — an old hoop- 
skirt to hold the newspapers that soon were to supplant the 
hoop-skirt, and appears in the shape of a bustle! But let me not 
anticipate. Those wall-pockets were made of the old hoops, 
either stripped of their cotton covering, or painted over it, and in 
either case bent into all sorts of shapes, and tied with bits of 
worsted. Oh, shades of Kensington and art needle-work I Are 
we to return to the hoop-akirt wall-pocket? 

Another questionable advantage of the hoop-skirt is that it is a 
chapter of surprises in itself. It is so apt to break loose and fall 
to tbe ground at the wrong time, or one of tbe rings will slip its 
fastenings and sharply shoot out at a tangent that makes the 
dress hang askew. I have no doubt that blubbering children, 
seeking to take refuge behind their mother's skirts, may have 
had an eye put out by some steel point that had made its way 
through her dress. 

Alas, if hoops do come in, what a weary way we must take to 
get back to our " umbrella sheath," as the dress of to-day has 
been not inaptly called ! We shall have to go through the bustle 
period, we shall be at the mercy of reeds and wires and hair-cloth 
and wire spiral springs; we shall always wonder if our bustles 
are on crooked. We shall ran such risks of taking cold if our 
bustles are taken off or are not all of equal weight. Why, X have 
no doubt in the world that some women injured their spines by 



wearing bustles In the afternoon, and none when they were work- 
ing round the bouse in the morning. We shall have to go through 
ell that trouble of steel •■ skirl extenders " and skirt straps. We 
shall be more at tbe mercy of a gale of wind than we are now. Oh, 
if hoops come in, the seating capacity of our cars and churches and 
theatres will be greatly reduced. We shall be thoroughly uncom- 
fortable. We have tried our hand, I was going to say, but I 
really mean our dresses as street sweepers; we have com- 
mitted all sorts of folly in the name of fashion, but are we to be 
led into this latest and most ridiculous of all ? Has the boop skirt 
come to stay ? 



Marion Harland, 

Author of "Common Sense 
in the Household," writes, 
February 5, 1S92 : "After 
long and careful trial 
of others, I prefer 

dvelantfs 

BakingPowder. Cleveland's 
is a pure cream of tartar and 
soda mixture, not containing 
alum or ammonia or any- 
other substance deleterious 
to the human stomach." 




INSTANT RELIEF 
FOR COLD IN THE HEAD. 

CORYZON 

CATARRH AND HAY FEVER, 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 

IT NEVER FAILS. 




Food for the hungry, 

And sleep 

For the weary, 

Are not more 

Refreshing than 

CORYZON 

Is to sufferers from 

Catarrh, 

Influenza, or 

Cold in the Head. 

It relieves at once; 

The cost is trifling, 

And 

It can be carried 

In the vest pocket. 

Samples free. 

At all Druggists. 

Try it. 




INSTANT RELIEF 
FOR COLD IN THE HEAD. 

CORYZON 

CATARRH AND HAY FEVER. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 

IT NEVER FAILS. 




J R. SMITH, & CO., 

Merchant Tailors, 230 Bush Street, Mills Building, formerly 
under Occidental Hotel. 



SAN EKANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



Feb. 4, 1893 . 




[^JfeSfKfrrtD 



'We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



THE Baldwin's back: rows of benches must have been aston- 
ished Monday night at the unwonted pressure. Not one of 
them was empty. More than that, there was a double row around 
the walls of the auditorium of the victims of the "standing-room 
only " placard. The handsome theatre has had many attractions 
lately which were worthy of a crowded house, but it took the mites to 
draw the crowd, after all, and a well-dressed and brilliant crowd it 
was. 

That the Lilliputians were the drawing force and not the new play, 
Candy, was made evident by the fact that while the dialogue is entirely 
in German, those who do not understand a word of that language 
(doubtless the majority) laughed and applauded and enjoyed as if 
every joke had been translated for them. Genius is of no language, 
or rather speaks a Volapuk comprehended of all, and tiny Franz 
Ebert and Adolf Zink are geniuses of comedy. There is nothing of 
the parrot-like drill of the child-players which they look like. They 
are full of the most exuberant drollery and humor of an original vein 
and method, and one needs not know what they say to enjoy the 
drollery and humor, for it speaks in every expression and every ges- 
ture. The two little comedians make a perfect foil each for the other, 
being alike in nothing but in being irresistibly funny. The rest of 
the players, little and big, have the even excellence of the German 
dramatic school, which tolerates no slipshod work and is certain to 
produce good actors if not great ones. 

The stage settings are bright and pretty; the ballets exquisitely 
costumed, and, more wonderful, made up altogether of young 
faces and slender, youthful forms, prettily appropriate to the 
comfits and flowers they represent. 

The quaint little people, the beautiful electrical effects, and 
the charming ballet have captured the town, and the Baldwin 
will have no seats to spare during their stay. 

• # # 

The opponents of farce-comedy have received a knock-down 
blow at the California this week, and one from which it will be 
hard to recover, unless some special pleader shall arise to prove 
that A Trip to Chinatown is not farce-comedy. Hoyt's revised play, 
which comes to us with a record of something over five hundred 
nights in New York., is not without merit in itself. The dialogue, 
with one notable exception, is not much above average farce- 
comedy level, but the plot and its working out have a spice of 
originality, and far more than a spice of fun and brightness. 

It is difficult, however, to pronounce judgment on the piece, 
for the people in it would have redeemed some utterly condemned 
and condemnable farce comedies which have visited us. There 
are none of the "fillers" usually dragged about by this class of 
productions, apparently because they can be had for traveling 
expenses, or because they are somebody's wife or grandmother 
or something, who has to go along and might as well be utilized. 
In Mr. Hoyt's company all the people seem to have been chosen 
for the parts they assume. 

« # * 

J. Aldrich Libby (Rashleigh Gay) and Miss Trixie Friganza 
(fsabel Dame) are exceptionally good singers with exceptionally 
good voices, and the two who pair off with them act up to their 
parts well. Harry Gilfoil comes out as a barkeeper at the Maison 
Riche, and while manipulating his glasses and spoons does some 
extremely clever whistling and imitations, working them in 
neatly with the "mixing" process. Laura Biggar is a fascinating 
Widow Geyer, with a great deal of magnetism and an easy car- 
riage, which in itself is a fascination. Geo. A. Beane as Ben Gay 
does some excellent comedy work in a quietly effective way 
while waiting all night at the restaurant for the widow that never 
came; and the widow's maid, Flirt, is played with spirit and a 
great deal of good dancing of the high-kicking variety by a young 
lady who appears on the bills merely as "Patrice." 

* * * 

But the undeniable character of the piece is Welland Strong by 
Burt Haverly. It is indescribable, perhaps not worth describing, 
but as a genuine farcical-comedy performance imbued with the 
spirit of genuine humor which is neither to be taught nor acquired, 
it will outlive the impression of a thousand more ambitious and 
pretentious efforts. The part itself is an exceptionally original 
and humorous one, and the lines, whether Haverly or Hoyt is 
responsible for them, are bright, witty, and incisive. The audi- 
ence feels when Strong leaves the stage that there is nothing to 
do but wait for him to come back, which is all the higher com- 
pliment as the other people are amusing enough. The two little 
sisters McCoy do a pretty skirt dance, and the "Reuben and 
Rachel" song of Miss Biggar and Burt Haverly has to be repeated 
over and over before the audience is satisfied. 



As a deftly woven arabesque of tragedy and tenderness, with 
a glistening thread of humor running through the entire fabric, 
lighting up its sombre coloring with gleams of gold, Siberia is no 
doubt destined to a performance of interest greater than that 
which attaches to any other of Bartley Campbell's plays. Most of 
us remember the sensation it caused on its long run at the old 
California something like a decade ago, when new and sensa- 
tional plays were not so common, and those who so remember it 
are the most surprised to find in the present production at Stock- 
well's how real and deep, and how little evanescent was the in- 
terest. The story is an absorbing one. and its dramatic working 
out is effective and powerful. 

# » * 

The leading characters are well taken by the Stockwell com- 
pany, though in so long a cast there must be some unevenness 
with the force at command in any San Francisco theatre. Some 
of the personations deserve particularization. Mr. Jewett plays 
the part of Nicolai intelligently, as usual, and, not at all as usual, 
magnetically. His strong tendency to recitative and declamation 
betrays itself occasionally, but not aggressively. Mr. Stockwell, 
as the awkward but shrewd lover of Vera, followed out the de- 
lightful method of his humor, never omitting a suggestion of 
drollery, yet without exaggeration or any effort to be fun ay. 
George Osbourne made a strong part of a small one as Sparta, 
Nick Long an equally salient one as the French waiter, and John 
Jack made a noble appearance as the Governor-General, and 
played two small parts with his accustomed ability. The fem- 
inine part of the cast is an unusually long one, and is fairly good 
all through, Ethel Brandon as Marie, Bebe Vining as Vera, and 
Lillian Beddard as Sara, notably so. The last-named lady made 
her first appearance in America on Monday night. 8he seems to 
have been trained in a good school, and to possess more than the 
average dramatic intelligence; but no school could obviate some 
of her natural defects of voice and enunciation, which jar so un- 
pleasantly on the ear as to detract from her best work. How- 
ever, Miss Beddard will no doubt prove a reliable acquisition to 
Stockwell's company. 

Mr. Leavitt's spectacle, Spider and Fly, has had a good second 
and last week at the Bush. As a spectacle it does not deserve 
the recognition received, and as anything else, it has no right to 
be at all. However, theatrical spectacles, like those of another 
kind mentioned in story, are "made to sell," and if the publi