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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (July-Dec. 1893)"

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EDO? 120171M D 

California Slate Library 



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Pri c« p«r Copy. 10 Cent*. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00. 






Vol. xivn 



SAN FRA 






Number 26. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fbideb] 
Mabriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran- 
cisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

THE office o( the News Letter in New York City has beeD 
removed to the Evening Post Building, 204-206 Broadway, 
Room 1, where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
cription and advertising rates. C. C. Marphy, manager. 



THE only appointment made since that Patronage Conference 
in Oakland would seem to indicate that the Democratic states- 
men of California made the mistake of not taking the Adminis- 
tration into their confidence. 



THE Texan car conductor who pursued May, the train-robber, 
and captured him single-handed, is deserving of praise. If a 
few men like that conductor had camped on the Sontag and 
Evans trail, these desperadoes would now be sleeping peacefully 
beneath the daisies. 

THE Spring Valley Company is said to be wasting water in 
Alameda county; but what of it? Nobody in Alameda county 
drinks water, and we have not much use for it over here, either. 
As a matter of fact, we are too close to Alameda county for our 
morals to be of the best. 



ON petition of a number of the residents of Santa Clara county, 
the Board of Supervisors have passed an ordinance making 
the time during which male deer may be killed in that county 
from August 15th to September 1st. Before the change was 
made, the time was from September 1st to October 15th. 

THERE is no money in the city treasury to pay salaries, and so 
grass will be short with the patriots for a little time. That is 
not half a bad thing, either, when yon come to think of it. Hav- 
ing short commons, the city's servants will learn a lesBon in 
economy — and no set of servants in the world ever needed it 
more. 



MI88 LAURA E. WILK8 was induced to appear against coun- 
terfeiter Howell upon the assurance that she would not be 
closely pressed, which only goes to show what peculiar creatures 
women are. The average one, now, would not consent to ap- 
pear unless she were closely pressed — at least that is the crude 
male opinion. 



AS the years progress, the college youth continues to be as big 
an asB as he ever was. Some playful Yale students blew up 
a letter box, destroying its contents, the other day. This is a fel- 
ony, punishable by a long term of imprisonment. It would do 
these overgrown boys much good if they were made to pass a 
short time in the cooler. 



JOHN JACK made an eloquent speech at the Democratic love 
feast last Saturday night. During his remarks, speaking of 
the future prosperity of this city and State, he said that the pro- 
posed midwinter fair would bring succor to our shores. His au- 
dience understood him to say "suckers," and there was in conse- 
quence a loud Democratic yell of approval. 

THE German Foreign Office, it is stated, expects that Russia 
will forthwith open a commercial war against Germany. One 
should imagine that if these expectations are well founded, the 
German Government would realize that a prosperous financial 
condition of Germany is better to avert any dangers that may 
arise from such a war, than an increased army budget obtained 
by over-taxing the people. 



THIRTY-FIVE HUNDRED citizens of the Grand Duchy of 
Mecklenburg, and five thousand inhabitants of the free city 
of Hamburg, went to Friedriscbruh recently to pay their 
respects to Prince Bismarck. That does not look as if Prince 
Bismarck, as the Socialist Liebknecht imagines, is "loathed," 
and as if "all the population of Germany is against him." Mr. 
Liebknecht would do better to study practical politics than to 
relinquish himself to theoretical fancies. The latter may secure 
him the applause of the ignorant masses, but will ridicule him in 
the eyes of all who count with figures and facts. 



EL TERRY says that somebody has been setting traps for 
him in the Heath case, though why anybody should want to 
catch him is a mystery unfathomable to any but the Terry intel- 
lect. To an ordinary man the game would seem to be scarcely 
worth the candle. 



THERE seems to be a detective for every criminal in Fresno, 
which, by the way, makes the population about half and 
half, and that is the reason, perhaps, that crime is so seldom 
punished in the raisin belt. You cannot punish a criminal until 
he has been found out, and no detective was ever known to find 
one out. It follows, naturally, that the more numerous the de- 
tective force, the greater the percentage of chance in favor of the 
criminal. 



NOW that George Sontag has been started on the road to join 
his brother John in the Bright Beyond, it being, in fact, 
something of a race between them as to which would get there 
first, it is to be hoped that California has heard the last of this 
delectable family of desperadoes. It is a page in the State's his- 
tory that should be sealed forever — and that will be sealed, too, 
so soon as Chris Evans has been jerked into eternity at the end 
of a good stout bit of hempen cord. 



DR. BRIGGS says he has a right to preach, and he has. It is a 
free country. Those who do not want to hear him are at 
liberty to remain away. It is safe to say, just the same, that 
the "heretic" will draw bigger crowds and a fatter collection than 
the men who condemned, and would have burned him at the 
stake, too, bad they dared. As it is, they have only made the 
Doctor valuable to himself. That is where he has an advantage 
in not having come into the world at the time of Latimer. 



TOWNSHEND S. BRANDEGEE, naturalist, has found the snow 
plant in Lower California. Townshend is entitled to great 
credit. Men have been searching for something, anything, they 
did not care what, in Lower California ever since the time of Ca- 
brillo, and so far it has always been without result. We are glad 
to know that the peninsula is good for something. Everybody, 
you know, needs a snow plant. You cannot keep house without 
it. 



WE have always had admiration for men of science, and have 
never believed that because of their ignorance of the ways 
of the mercenary world that they would not take advantage of 
an opportunity to make money. That we were not mistaken is 
shown in the claim presented by Professor Price for preserving 
the ship Elmbank from fire. He fought the sulphur fire in that 
vessel upon scientific principles, saved the vessel and $40,000 
worth of the cargo, and now, bis bill having been rejected by the 
vessel's captain, Price has recourse to his learned brothers of the 
law, and asks them for protection. These scientific men are dan- 
gerous fellows to get riled; they always know so much. 



THE idea is becoming prevalent among those who have fol- 
lowed the Heath case that Judge Holmes, of Fresno, before 
whom the case is being tried, is not a strong man. If he were be 
would insist upon proceedings being conducted before him in an 
orderly and dignified manner. One of the first things he would 
have to do to effect this end would be to suppress " Bully " 
Foote, who, unfortunately for his reputation, seems to have been 
at or near the center of every disgraceful row that has occurred 
during Ihe trial. The Ecene that occurred in the courtroom on 
Wednesday, when a dozen armed men aligned themselves 
against one another, waiting for a signal to open fire, could have 
transpired only at Fresno. The row was precipitated by Foote, 
who, brave man and upright lawyer, acknowledged that he car- 
ried a revolver; in fact, had one upon him at that moment. A 
man had threatened to slap his face, he said; therefore, he carried 
a revolver. Those who know Foote would be willing to give odds 
against his using a pistol even if, as may happen, his face were 
slapped and his coat-tails kicked. The state of affairs at Fresno 
is disgraceful. When officers of the court, who are presumably 
honest and law-abiding citizens go armed to a Court-room; when 
lawyers take every possible opportunity to insult witnesses; and 
When the temple of justice is made to resemble a bar-room, on ac- 
count of the brawls within it, we think it is about time for vigor- 
ous reformation. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 



GIVE US AN EXTRA SESSION. 

THE suspension of free coinage by India has entirely altered 
the financial oatlook. The unprecedented fall of silver has 
made it essential for us to revise our financial policy. The neces- 
sity of retaining silver as part of our monetary system remains 
unchanged; the inadequacy of gold alone as a basis for the trade 
of the world ia becoming more patent than ever, but the course 
that was safe for our Government a few weeks ago is not safe 
now. The Sherman Act is hopelessly futile as a lever for main- 
taining the price of silver against the world. As long as the mar- 
ket remains in the present state of uncertainty there will be less 
confidence in notes based on that metal than in paper issued with 
no specific backing at all, and resting merely on the general 
credit of the Government. 

When one wall of a house fails down, it is sometimes advisa- 
ble to rebuild it without disturbing the other walls; but when the 
whole house fails, except the chimney, the part of wisdom is to 
pull that down, too, and bnild a new house. The Sherman Act 
is now the chimney that is all that is left of the old fabric of sil- 
ver money. It is impossible to make any satisfactory use of It 
in constructing a new building, and it is threatening at every 
moment to topple over on ui and smash our skulls. It is best for 
us to know the worst at once. We have seen the silver dollar 
brought down to a bullion value of fifty cents. Let us clear 
away the last artificial prop and find out where the bed rock is, 
below which further reductions are impossible. Then we shall 
have a solid basis for a new policy. No country in the world ia 
adapted to draw gold from the common stock as is the United 
States. Europe has fairly forced us to join in the general scram- 
ble, and before she is much older she will be begging us to keep 
out. If we repeal the Sherman Act and allow silver to find its 
own level, the Monetary Conference will reconvene at the requeat 
of the powera that made its last session a failure, and the Ameri- 
can delegates will have nothing to do but to meet the advances 
that will be made to them from the other side. There is not gold 
enough to supply the needs of the world, but in a game of grab 
it will be the financially strong countries that will get what there 
is, and we are strong enough to pull in all we want if we are 
compelled to reach for it. 

The end of all this we think will be a restoration of the condi- 
tions that prevailed before 1873, with silver as a money metal rest- 
ing upon the combined and loyal support of the principal powers 
of the world, instead of upon the half-hearted patronage of one. 
It may be necessary to establish a new ratio, for although the 
greater part of the decline in the price of silver since 1873 is un- 
doubtedly due to its demonetization in America and Europe, part 
of the fall has probably been cauaed by increased production, and 
this part would have to be allowed for in the creation of a per- 
manent arrangement. 

It ia plain that while matters are in such confusion it is 
simple folly for us to go on buying 4,500,000 ounces a 
month of silver bullion which is worth half its nominal coinage 
value to-day, and may be worth only a quarter to-morrow. There 
can be only two objects in such a course. One is to increase the 
price of silver, and that has proved an ignominious failure. The 
other ia to expand the currency, and that ia proving a more dis- 
astrous failure than the other. At the present price of silver, 
the amount of money added to the currency of the country under 
the operations of the Sherman Act would be only about $36,000,- 
000 a year, and to get that we are probably sacrificing at least a 
thousand millions of our circulating medium through the export 
of gold, the hoarding of money and the contraction of bank cred- 
its. Expansion of the currency is impracticable without confi- 
dence, and just now that has been destroyed. At other times it 
would be the duty of Congress to provide more money, but the 
pressing duty of the present ia to give us the uae of what we 
have, by reatoring confidence to the buaineas community. Only 
one thing can do that, and that ia the immediate repeal of the 
8herman law. The American people are quick to adapt them- 
selves to changed conditions, and already the West and South are 
accepting the situation and joining in the demand for the suspen- 
sion of the process that is drying up the life-blood in the veins of 
trade. The moat radical free silver organ in the South is the At- 
lanta Constitution, but every member of the Atlanta Chamber of 
Commerce, without exception, baa joined in urging the imme- 
diate repeal of the Sherman law. The merchants of Memphis, 
Louisville, Savannah, New Orleans, St. Louia, Kansas City and 
every other commercial centre in the South and West, outaide 
of the mining Statea, have taken the same position. An extra 
session of Congress is the one cure for the present condition of 
financial chills and fever. Let President Cleveland take a day 
off from the office-aeekera and do something for the busineaa in- 
terests of the country. 



THE HAWAIIAN SITUATION. 



MR. ESTEE is getting a whole lot of " prominent mention" 
these days, but it will not probably go any further than that. 
It never does with Mr. Estee. He is the moat available man in 
the State— to mention for office. When it comes to getting the 
pie — well, the Napa man is not in it. Nobody disputes his mouth 
for pie, you understand, but the pie itself appears to be elusive. 



WHAT we predicted regarding the situation in Hawaii at the 
time of the receipt of the news of the overthrow of the 
Queen ia about to come to pass. The latest and most reliable 
advices from the islands indicate that the anti-annexation senti- 
ment is rapidly gaining strength. In fact, the Provisional Gov- 
ernment is afraid to take a vote of the people upon the question 
for fear of being defeated. The natives are anxiously awaiting 
conclusive action by the United States, and the Provisional Gov- 
ernment officials are looking for soft spots on which to drop when 
the bottom falls out of their great scheme. Minister Blount's re- 
port to President Cleveland will be forwarded to Washington by 
the steamer that leaves Honolulu two weeks hence. It seems 
now generally admitted that Blount is opposed to annexation, 
and while he may favor a protectorate the ultra- Hawaiians fondly 
hope that he will suggest a return of the government to the con- 
dition in which it was before the revolt. That is, the re-estab- 
lishment of the Constitutional Government and the restoration of 
the Queen to the throne. This result is not all improbable. It 
is the very action suggested by the News Letter some weeks 
since. If the arm of the United States Government laid low the 
Government of Hawaii (and that this is so those who know of 
the manipulations of the American naval forces at Honolulu by 
Minister Stevens are aware), then it is only proper, now that the 
time has come, that our Government should reinstate that at 
Hawaii in the same power that it formerly enjoyed. If Cleveland 
does not do this, then the Queen's party will take advantage of 
the weakness of the Provisional Government, and establish 
Liliuokalani's Government on the other islands of the group. 
The usurpers will have all they can do to keep Honolulu well in 
hand. Affairs at the islands will soon approach a chaotic condi- 
tion unless something definite be done soon. Many of the tax- 
payera are now refuaing to pay their ratea, for they fear that if 
they pay the demanda of the Government de facto that no sooner 
will the money have been collected than the tables will be turned, 
and along will come the Government de jure and again demand 
toll. The Annexation Club, which is the main support of the 
Provisional Government, is going to pieces, and the Government 
ia following it as rapidly aa consistent with the dignity of a body 
of men who succeeded in stealing a country. In the meantime, 
the anti-annexation party is growing stronger and bolder. Busi- 
ness at Honolulu is at a stand-still, as might well be expected 
under the circumstances. The business of the ialands has been 
greatly injured by the unsettled political condition, and shop- 
keepers, planters and politicians alike are yearning for a cessa- 
tion of the great strain to which existing uncertainty subjects 
them. 

MORE POLICE BLACKGUARDISM. 

THERE was a dress parade of police insolence in one of the 
Police Courts on Monday last, in the case of two gentlemen, 
named Martland and Troy, who were charged with disrespecting 
the person, august station and high importance of a policeman 
named King. The circumatancea of the case atand thus: The 
gentlemen in question were members of a large private party 
which held a picnic on the Mission road on Sunday last. On re- 
turning home in the evening they stopped in front of a grocery 
store, where they rearranged themselves in the vehicles employed 
in their transportation, ao as to facilitate their delivery at their 
various homes. This waa really the breaking up of the party, 
and there was, it seems, a good deal of jocular and merry leave- 
taking, in the course of which the defendant, Martland, actually 
kiased his wife on the atreet, without asking leave of Policeman 
—he would doubtless prefer to be atyled "Officer"— King. Such 
conduct shocked Policeman King, and he immediately addreaaed 
himaelf in boisterous, overbearing and insulting language to the 
party, and even, according to the published reports, assaulted one 
of them. Messrs. Martland and Troy had the audacity, there- 
upon, to take Policeman King's number, and were promptly ar- 
reBted for the peraonal diareapect implied by that act. Strange to 
aay, the caae was dismissed by the Police Judge. 

Now, there ia in the almoat ludicrous facta of this little matter 
food for serious reflection. Police outrages are not always com- 
mitted in the broad daylight and in the presence of a large party 
of witnesses, but they always show the same characteristics on 
the part of the patrolman— ill temper, an entire misconception of 
duty, and an insolent disposition to swagger. The fact of the 
matter ia, that the 8an Francisco policeman is a ridiculous and 
overgrown cross-roads constable. He has been dubbed an "offi- 
cer," and allowed to wear that title on his star; as a consequence 
he has really come to regard himself as an important official 
instead of a menial servant of municipal order and regulation. 
Add this to the fact that he is overpaid and aurrounded by cor- 
rupt superiors and Police Courts, and we have an adequate con- 
ception of the condition which leaves us all liable to be insulted, 
maltreated and arrested every time we go abroad on the streets 
of San Francisco, and even when we remain at our homes. 



JuW 1, 1893. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTER. 



THE OUTBREAK AT FOLSOM 



PASS THIS ORDINANCE. 



THE local sensation of the week has been the outbreak of con- 
victs of tbe penitentiary at FtiLom, and its suppression by 
the prison officer?, who killed three of the men, mortally wounded a 
fourth, and seriously wounded two other?. The daily press has 
teemed with adulation for Warden Aulland his men, and has praised 
them to the skies for the manner in which they slaughtered the con- 
victs. The papers have joined hands in praising the "discipline" 
and the "bravery" of the guards. We fail to see wherein is the foun- 
dation for all this undue praise. Let as review the facts. Lieutenant 
Brairre, of the guards, was seized by the leaders of the revolt, his 
seizure being the signal for the outbreak. He was on duty at the 
time, and says himself be was "seated in a chair." He saw George 
Sontag come into the quarry, Brairre's station, and asked him what 
he wanted. At that moment the officer was seized from behind by 
the other participants in the outbreak. Now here is an officer whose 
duty it is to guard the convicts at work in an open country, who, 
while upon duty, takes his ease in a chair, and allows himself to be 
surpnse*l. A prison guard is in a position somewhat similar to a 
sentinel in front of an encampment in time of war. If the sentinel 
should take his ease in a chair, in front of the enemy, and allow 
himself to be surprised, every court in the world would find him 
guilty of criminal negligence, and sentence him to death. Brairre 
was likewise guilty of criminal negligence in allowing himself to be 
surprised. In the best regulated penitentiaries, convicts are not al- 
lowed to approach an officer, surprise being thus guarded agaiust. 
At San Quentin and Folsom, it seems, the prisoners and the guards 
carry on interesting conversations, remarking the heat and chatting 
on other subjects. 

If the reported statement of Warden Aull, published in the Chron- 
icle, be correct, that gentleman is not fitted for his office, and the 
sooner the Prison Commissioners depose him, the less likely will it 
be that they will be considered aiders and abettors in the wanton 
slaughter of human beings, even though the dead men be convicts. 
Warden Aull announces with some bravado, that he knew an out- 
break was being planned. For this reason he imported from the 
mountains a number of sharpshooters upon whom he could rely, and 
posting them as guards, instructed them to kill any convicts who 
might try to escape. They followed instructions. Aull says also 
that he sent to Sontag, who is said to have been the ringleader in the 
revolt, a plan of the prison and grounds, with suggestions as to mode 
of attack. Sontag received the documents, which he supposed came 
from some friend. "Then," says this peculiar penologist, Warden 
Aull, "we were ready for them." That is to say that he knew the 
men were contemplating an outbreak; he assisted them in their de- 
signs, and then, with his sharpshooters posted on every hilltop, he 
lured them on to their bloody death. This may be Warden Aull's 
system of conducting a prison, but it will not commend itself to 
students of penology. In fact it too nearly approaches assassination 
to be worthy of calm consideration. When he knew that these men 
contemplated an outbreak, why did not Warden Aull take steps to 
prevent the possibility of a revolt? He knew the ringleaders. Why 
did he not separate them, and place them in solitary confinement? 
What possible excuse can he have for sending to Sontag a plan of 
the prison, with advice as to the manner in which the convict should 
make his attack upon the works? Is Warden Aull aware that a jury 
might construe such action into aiding and abetting a felon to break 
jail? Prom all the statements and actions of Aull, one is forced to 
conclude that he had upon him a thirst for blood, and that knowing 
these convicts had determined to try to escape, he quietly waited for 
them to do so, and then killed them. Such a man is not worthy of 
a public trust. We would suggest that the Prison Commissioners 
make an honest and searching investigation into the general man- 
agement of the Folsom prison, and into the details of this outrageous 
affair in particular, had we the slightest hope that that honorable 
body would do aught but praise Aull and his sharpshooters, and pass 
over with a whitewash brush all and several the delinquencies and 
offenses of himself and his officers. It may be that the convicts re- 
ceived their just deserts, but it is also as certain as the sun shines, 
that had a conscientious official been Warden of Folsom Prison, with 
the knowledge that Mr. Aull had of the intentions of the convicts, 
the world would not have been shocked last Wednesday morning by 
reading of " another bloody affair in California." 



IN making an appeal to the vicious element of Chicago by the 
pardon of the anarchists, Governor Altgeld has secured his own 
Immediate political future, perhaps, but he has alao demonstrated 
the fact that the World's Fair is being held in the most radically 
un-American city in America. There will be a new reign of ter- 
ror, of course, in a small way, and the red flag will make its ap- 
pearance once more. It has already been shown by John Most, 
though he is harmless. The demons turned loose by the Gov- 
ernor of Illinois are of another sort, altogether, and there is 
nothing in the lessons of history if they do not yet destroy him. 



THE Legislature of Pennsylvania has appropriated $25,000 for 
the purchase of the battle-field at Valley Forge. This is a 
commendable action, and we trust it will be followed by ap- 
propriations by other States for similar purposes. 



TH E proposed city ordinance restraining deputies and other em- 
ployes of the various departments of the municipal adminis- 
tration from taking part in primary politics and nominating con- 
ventions, is a measure which is in the nature of civil service re- 
form, and must, therefore, commend itself to the support of all 
thoughtful and patriotic citizens. We do not believe that under 
the present charter of municipal organization (otherwise known 
as the consolidation act) it is possible to frame any snch ordinance 
in such terms that it cannot be and will not be outrageously vio- 
lated, for, under the existing conditions of law the various de- 
partmental heads seem to be endowed with a degree of inde- 
pendence in the execution of their duties that renders them quite 
beyond the control of cily ordinances, or any other agency of the 
popular will, during the term to which they have been elected. 
In theory they are servants of the municipal administration, but 
in practice they are masters. If these men desire their subordi- 
nates to rustle, at the primaries or in the clubs, in their behalf, or 
in behalf of their friends, they will find a large variety of ways 
of evading any such ordinance as the one proposed; but it must 
not be inferred from this that the ordinance would be an infringe- 
ment of the constitutional rights of any one. The municipal gov- 
ernment of San Francisco is simply a public corporation — a com- 
bination of taxpayers— and, though we have eliminated from the 
municipal electoral franchise the requirement that the voter be a 
member of the corporation, or taxpayer, we still retain the 
majority of ordinary corporate rights, and are as much entitled 
as any private corporation to affix such conditions to the em- 
ployment we have to offer as may seem wise and prudent, even 
though those conditions amount to a limitation upon ordinary 
individual rights. For instance, the Board of Directors of the 
Bank of California would have a perfect right to adopt a resolu- 
tion declaring that their clerks and other employes should not 
speculate in stocks, bet on horse races, deal in wheat, or engage 
in any other class of transactions calculated to excite their 
cupidity or undermine their integrity. And, jnst in the same 
way, the Bonrd of Supervisors (who are the directors and mouth- 
piece of the members of the corporation of San Francisco) have 
the right to direct the city employes to abstain from participating 
in ward politics and manipulating nominating conventions. Be- 
ing a valid exercise of power, and in keeping with good morals, 
this ordinance should be passed. Its passage will not be a futile 
act. Insofar as it fails to effect its purpose, its failure will be a 
valuable guide post to the framers of our next charter of corpor- 
ate existence. It will show them the necessity of making the 
city employes subservient to thecitv. 



THE LOCAL BANKS. 



ANY excitement that may have been caused in this city within 
the past week by the suspension of the Pacific Bank and the 
People's Home Savings Bank, on Friday and Saturday last, has 
entirely abated. The people have the utmost confidence in the 
absolute stability of our banking institutions. The two suspen- 
sions referred to caused a run on other savings banks, but the 
nervousness of the depositors soon disappeared as they saw 
stacks and stacks of gold being paid out over the counters. In- 
vestigation has demonstrated beyond a peradventure that the 
suspension of the Pacific Bank was not brought about except in 
the remotest degree by the stringency in the money market. The 
difficulty was that the bank became involved in a great many 
schemes, most of which proved valueless, and as its resources 
were thus tied up to a considerable extent in losing investments, 
it was unable to raise needed money, and therefore closed its 
doors. The People's Home Savings Bank was the business asso- 
ciate of the Pacific Bank; in fact, they were practically one insti- 
tution, and when one fell the other followed. The other local 
banks, however, are in excellent condition, and there is no reason 
to believe that they will be otherwise. In anticipation of a run 
large sums of coin have been called in by the banks of this city 
from the East, and all the institutions are now prepared for the 
hardest siege that can possibly howl around their doors. The 
banks of San Francisco are among the firmest in the country. 
They enjoy the absolute confidence of financiers and merchants, 
and will continue to be so honored. It is alao worthy of notice 
that the banks have of late shown a disposition to afford better 
accommodation than usual to small real estate holders who de- 
sire to build homes. This fostering of homes will prove most 
highly beneficial to the banks themselves, for with the building 
up of the city it is apparent that their field will become largely 
increased, and their business correspondingly developed. 



SO the anarchists of Chicago have been permitted to raise a 
statue to the memory of the men hanged for the murders in 
the Haymarket. The speeches, we are told gravely, were all in 
foreign tongues. Of course they were. Americans and English- 
men have had practical liberty for too many centuries to inter- 
pret it as license at this late day. But, apropos of that statue, is 
not it about time to start a campaign of dynamite on behalf of 
law and order? That Haymarket statue would be a pretty good 
target to begin upon. 



SENATOR STANFORD'S FUNERAL. 

THE body of Leland Stanford was placed in its tomb at Palo 
Alto last Saturday afternoon. It was followed to its final 
resting place by thousands of people who admired the great man 
who was dead, for the many good deeds he had performed during 
life, and for the great works for the benefit of his fellow men 
which bis being had aided so greatly in consummation. The de- 
ceased had been a plain, simple roan; be had expressed a desire 
that his funeral services should be as bad been his life— unosten- 
tatious. This desire of the deceased was carried out to the letter. 
There was no great pomp and ceremony, such as are only too 
often the accompaniments to its grave of the body of a wealthy 
man; bnt instead, the simple ceremonies, such as would have 
been performed over the humblest of his fellows, were made to 
suffice. There was no need of display, for the multitude that as- 
sembled in the University quadrangle where the services were 
held; the sorrowful faces, and the weeping eyes of the strong 
men who had been the associates of the dead; the sobs of 
hundreds all attested that he who had been, was mourned deeply 
and sincerely in death, and that his memory would ever remain 
fresh in the hearts of those who had known him. 

The casket was carried from the house, down the stairs, be- 
tween two lines of pallbearers, and being placed in the hearse, 
was conveyed to the quadrangle. Thence it was followed by the 
carriages containing the mourners. Beneath the awning in the 
quadrangle, the casket was placed upon a bier, which was sur- 
rounded by magnificent floral emblems. These tokens, which 
came from all over the State, were very beautiful. The bearers 
were preceded into the quadrangle by Bishop Nichols, who re- 
cited the order for the burial of the dead. Following him were 
Rev. Dr. Foute, of Grace Episcopal Church, and Rev. Dr. 8teb- 
bins, of the Unitarian Church. As the cortege approached the 
catafalque, the choir intoned a chant. Following the clergymen 
and the pallbearers came the widow, supported by her brother, 
Mr. Charles G. Lathrop, and followed by other members and con- 
nections of the family. As the sorrowful procession moved 
along, all of the many thousands there arose, and every man un- 
covered. The clergy having taken their places on the platform, 
and the mourners and pallbearers being seated, the choir sang the 
burial chant: "Lord, Let Me Know Mine End." Rev. Dr. Foute 
then read the lesson, taken from the fifteenth chapter of the first 
epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians, beginning, ** Now is Christ 
risen from the dead and become the first fruits of them that 
slept. For Bince by man came death, by man came also the resur- 
rection of the dead." 

The choir sang the hymn, ii I Heard the Voice of Jesns Say," 
and after the prayers, which were said by Bishop Nichols, Mrs. 
Marriner-Campbell rendered the solo, "For Thee, Ob, Dear, Dear 
Country." 

Rev. Dr. Stebbins then stepped forward to the lectern, and said : 

• < Dear friends, kind neighbors, respected fellow-citizens, beloved 
all! This great concourse of people, of all conditions of human 
life, gathered here within these youthful walls of youthful learn- 
ing, at this unaccustomed hour and unaccustomed place, attests 
that a conspicuous figure has been withdrawn from earthly scenes. 
It is not the occasion for biography or for eulogy. The events of 
his life, from the farm on which he was born, along the struggles 
of youth, to the brilliant successes of manhood, and to the last 
final, simple, human scenes of the dying chamber are familiar to 
all. Even if eulogy could bring power and eloquence to its dup- 
port, it could give no new light, and paint no new colors, for the 
earthly scenes. Your presence attests the common, human feel- 
ings — the common, human estimation in which he was held by 
all. It is enough to speak a word intiutuility, in praise and thanks- 
giving. 

It was Mr. Stanford's lot to stand at the focus of many earthly 
contentions. Opinions of likes and dislikes were often expressed 
with the decision which belongs more to interest or to passion 
than to the calmness of reason and pure intelligence. With these 
contentions, with these short-sighted judgments, I have nothing 
to do. i leave them to be read finally in the truth of history, 
from the mixed records of good and evil. But high above all this 
and all these there is in every human life, bigb or low, rich or 
poor, a track of light that illumines its inner ideal, shows the mo- 
mentum of the man and the gravitation of his mind, even as the 
law which holds the celestial orbs keeps the stars from wrong. 

Mr. Stanford's powers of mind and character were constituted 
by that happy combination of the faculties of our common 
human nature; a combination, I say, which makes common- 
sense, and which we call '■ long-headedness," united with fine 
aud charming human sentiments and -sympathies. His reputa- 
tion and his name will rest, not upon any public office of State or 
nation that he has ever held, but his name and reputation will 
rest on bis being one, among others, of the founders of one of the 
greatest corporate properties of the country, and on how he used 
that portion of the property which came to himself. And here I 
touch the quick and pith of every man's character, as touching 
his possessions. The question is with every man of wealth : How 
did he behave in the region of his own? Does he fling about his 
power as if he were a chartered libertine or Belf-willed? Or, does 



he abdicate self-will in obedience to a higher law and confess the 
obligations which he is under to the world and to his fellow-men? 
No man can be rich by his own industry simply. When Mr. 
Stanford came upon the tableland of life, be came in the new era 
of the country; he came in the tempest and torrent of war, and 
in the morning light of a new age of liberty. The earth turned 
for him; suns rose and set ; rains fell; winds blew; the Nation's 
grief and weeping History stood and opened the gates of Oppor- 
tunity — Opportunity, the tide which taken at the flood carries on 
to fortune. The line that divides between human responsibility 
and Divine beneficence, the line that divides between man and 
his opportunity, will never be drawn by any hand bnt the 
Almighty hand in which we all live. The question with Mr. 
Stanford is, as it is with us all, what does this finally issue in, as 
the experience of life and of events? What does it come to? 
What does it ripen to in the last autumn days that flush the vint- 
age and by which the ripe fruit falls gently to the ground. 

Mr. Stanford had, in his latter days, a great conception, ideal 
and immortal, above all the tumult and noise of earth. I suppose 
there can be no question that the moral crisis of his life was at 
the death of his son — fair boy, whose counterfeit presentment in 
yonder hall will be looked on with wondrous love by the genera- 
tions of youth that shall follow him, but who never saw him, and 
shall learn that by his translation this immortal light is shed 
upon this domain. It obscured tbe heart of Mr. Stanford and 
drew tbe beams of the sun out of tap day ; but, strange anomaly 
and strange paradox of human life and experience — darkness re- 
veals light. Darkness creates the impression that there must be 
light somewheie to make so deep a shade. Tbe darkness was 
cleft to bis mind, and celestial beams illumined, by which he 
looked, as it were, in prophetic vision, down the future ages, and 
exclaimed as the inspired lyrist has written in song: 

Seel seel A long race to thy spacious temples throng; 
Sons and daughters yet unborn on every hand rising 
As they go, demanding life; impatient for the skies. 

This thought, tbis imagination fascinated him and bound his 
heart. It filled his being. It illumined his faith and made 
clear bis judgment and his will. 

In a recent conversation with him, be said that the purpose of 
bis life was fulfilled. I congratulated bim upon tbe prospects 
and felicity of this young institution, to which he replied: <« We 
have great hope." He always spoke in the plural. " We have 
great hope." My dear lady, he made that confession in acknowl- 
edgement to the heart that bad been his counsellor, and from 
whose fountains his own heart had been ever refreshed. His 
mind was on education — education as the keynote and theme of 
humanity; education, as he called it, "tbe business of God;" 
that grand perception of the senses by which God leads on tbe 
races of mankind, and is ever encbarging His spirit in tbe minds 
and heart of the race. It is for this that 1 praise him. It is for 
this that bis name will endure; written upon these walls, upon 
the sky, and upon the earth around. All earthly grandeur will 
fade; but that glory will never be dimmed. For this I praise him, 
and when I praise bim I praise God. 

The hour is advancing, dear lady. It would be unfitting in me 
to intrude upon tbe privacy of a woman's sorrow or a widow's 
grief; but this occasion, tbia large concourse, this flow of human 
hearts that would bear you on and those bands that would lift 
you uponjhigb, let them encourage you. Rise up in your grief, and 
let a song of joy rise from your heart to God. Take wise coun- 
sel, but keep your own discretion. Learn of God and his spirit, 
yet lake counsel of your own heart. 

And, fellow citizens, and especially those of yon who are 
charged with the carrying of this body to-day — men of iron 
hands, men of iron hearts, some of you — gentle down your 
strength a little as you bear his body out; gently carry it forth — 
it is a man ye bear — and place it in its last strong resting-place 
on earth. 

" Such honors Ilium to her hero paid ; 
Silent slept the mighty Hector's shade." 

Mrs. Marriner-Campbell then concluded tbe services by singing 
"Lead, Kindly Light." The employes of the Palo Alto grounds, 
tbe railroad employed, the personal friends of the deceased, the 
University students, and finally all of the five or six thousand 
people present then filed past the catafalque and looked the last 
time upon the face of the dead. After they had passed, Mrs. 
Stanford gave her last kiss to tbe departed, the casket was closed, 
and the cortege moved to tbe mausoleum. 

There Dr. Foute read the usual Episcopal prayer, after which 
the choir sang "Abide With Me." Then Bishop Nichols said the 
benediction, and the body bearers bore their burden into the 
vault. A.s the casket disappeared within the portals, thefce- 
reaved widow began silently sobbing. Seeing that her self-control 
was passing away, her brother and niece helped her without de- 
lay into a carriage, and she was driven home without staying to 
see tbe doors closed on the loved remains. 

Senator Stanford's body rests at the right side of the marble 
mausoleum, which he built to receive the remains of himself and 
family. During this week the remains of his son were removed 
from their temporary resting place, and placed in the receptacle 
at the left side of the mausoleum. Between them is a niche in 
which, upon her death, the body of Mrs. Stanford will rest. 



July 1, 1893. 



S.VN IKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE FLIRTATIOUS MARRIED WOMAN. 

[B T Di Virshs.1 

" I CAS hold my own with any young girl," said a flirtatious 

1 old married woman, with an air of conviction and satisfac- 
tion. It was perfectly true. No respectable young girl, though 
aided by all the charms of youtb and beauty, could hope to enter 
the lints with the veteran campaigner, and come out of the fray 
either with victory or a whole reputation. The flirtations mar- 
ried woman owes her success, if success it must be called, first to 
the very fact that she is married. Young men who enjoy ladies' 
society and yet are averse to matrimony, and fearful of being 
drawn into some compromising situation by their attentions to a 
single girl, do not hesitate to hover around the married woman. 
It seems so much safer: whether it is or not, is somewhat a 
matter of doubt. 

To the impecunious young man, to the young man 
whose slender salary will just permit him to live in ap- 
parent respectability, the married woman other things 
being equal, can offer so much more in a social way 
than any young girl. Dinners, theatre parties, summer excur- 
sions, and winter entertainments are at her command, and her 
satellites may hope to hold prominent places during the festivi- 
ties. 

The flirtatious married woman often enters upon her career 
very early in life. There have been brides in San Francisco 
whose easy affections were transferred from their husbands on 
their very wedding night to some one of the guests, and who 
were not happy until a divorce, and one case that I remember, 
two divorces had made it possible for a second marriage to take 
place. 

It is fortunate for society that all flirtatious married women 
do not start in with quite so rapid a pace. 

A pretty girl married to an elderly business man absorbed in 
his affairs; a woman whose husband is notoriously neglectful of 
her; whose gallantries have made him the talk of the town; a 
woman who enjoys the excitement of skirting along the edge of 
thin ice, or a woman whose butterfly nature craved admiration 
and constant change — these are the ones who may, who are very 
apt to develop into the flirtatious married woman. 

Often for this state of affairs, the husband is entirely to blame. 
He shifts the performance of his social duties upon some other 
man; some friend of the family. That he has anything to fear 
from the fact that the family friend may be younger, better look- 
ing, and always actuated by a desire to please, does not once 
strike the husband, who is planning a way out of social bore- 
dom. This oblivion to danger is due, not so much to his faith 
in his wife, as to his self-satisfied confidence in himself. He 
himself sets the time lock, and goes off leaving the key to the 
combination in other hands. 

The flirtatious married woman finds her field in summer at the 
fashionable resort, and in winter in the cily. Her tactics are 
much the same in both instances, varying only as occasion may 
require. It is anything to have and hold the attention of the 
men. When she is posing and scheming for the multitude, she 
is safer than when she narrows her attacks down to one man. 
When she confines herself conspicuously to the one she has be- 
come a fair subject for comment and severe criticism. She is 
perilously near the point where the flirtatious matron will be- 
come the shady woman, and then let her beware. Society, that 
was pleased to consider her so charming, so fascinating, will at 
last revenge itself upon her for carrying off its prizes, by calling 
her bold and shameless. 

No married woman can hope to make and to retain friends 
among her own sex, when she exults in her power to attract 
every man who comes within her presence. Many a young girl 
in whose heart love was awakening has had her dream of happi- 
ness rudely shattered by some flirtations married woman who 
delighted to win away her lover. 

At the summer resort the matron is daintily dressed, rests all 
day, and saves herself and her good looks for the dinner hour 
when all the men will be there to see. She can play, she can 
aing, she can dance, she can sit in a sheltered nook of the porch, 
she can receive confidences or give them, she can use her eyes. 
She can take moonlight walks, and she does. All the men are 
one after the other in her train, some because they are irresistibly 
attracted, others because their pride is challenged, and they are 
determined to succeed where others have. 

It seldom matters to the flirtatious married woman what her 
husband says or thinks. Sometimes he gets mad and makes a 
row, but soon wishes he hadn't. The institution of chaperone 
is a grand opportunity for the flirtatious married woman; it 
makes it easier for her to keep in the swim, and she does not let 
the chance slip by. Many a party of young people have learned 
to their cost that if they wish to maintain the peace, preserve a 
pleasant atmosphere, and keep the chaperone in good temper, 
they must let her monopolize the most eligible man of the 
occasion, and have first call on the attention of all. It gets tire- 
some after a while, and every one rejoices when a flirtatious 
married woman received some kind of a rebuff. 

In the city, she has a different set of chances. She can intrude 



upon a man in his place of business and she does. She can 
make him the butt of all the clerks who mercilessly launch their 
coarse witticisms at his expense, even while envying him his 
distinction of having been singled out for so much notice. She 
will not take no for an answer. 8he is a sort of expurgated 
edition of 1'otiphar's wife, and lays hold upon him that she may 
drag him to her teas, her receptions and her dinners. She does 
not hesitate to make him break other engagements. She even 
drags young girls into her schemes, and uses them to help her 
to secure her prize. She often finds herself engaged in a deep 
flirtation, one that has passed the bounds of a mere society in- 
terest. She does not dare to confide in any married woman, who 
might in a moment of confidence tell her husband, who theu 
might tell her own. No, the married woman knows that the 
young girl will be the safer reposilory of her secret. 8o she 
does not hesitate to use her, even though she jeopardizes the 
girl's good name by the complications likely to grow out of using 
her as a go-between. When the flirtatious married woman goes 
away for a week or two, it is to her friend in the city that she 
has her admirer address her letlers. Then under cover of her 
own, the foolish girl will forward them to the married flirt, who 
will congratulate herself upon the clever arrangement by which 
she deceives ber husband "for," as she told her friend, "Smith 
would kill me if be suspected anything." He had better, and do 
it at once. The girl who lends herself to an affair of this sort 
will have cause bitterly to regret it. The married woman will 
not hesitate to sacrifice her friend to save herself. When she so 
far forgets her vows as to make her husband's name less 
respected among men, even though her offense go no further, 
what honor, what fidelity can she show in friendship? Let all 
girls beware of the flirtatious married woman! 

When this creature reaches the point where she boasts of her 
conquests, then let her look to her laurels, her power is on the 
wane; men do not like to be told off like so many dozen buttons. 
When her power wanes, and she vows that she will have the 
man back again, that he shall be more prostrate than ever at her 
feet, her day, with that man at least, is over. By the force of 
former attractions she may win him back, but hold him she can- 
not. Is not this true, flirtatious married woman ? 




(Copyright.) 

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W^ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 



SOCIETY IN LONDON. 



London, June 10, 1893. 

THE State concert held last Monday night at Buckingham Pal- 
ace was made the occasion for the display of smart, though 
not necessarily, new gowns. Except for the absence of the Court 
trains, the dresses were much the same as those usually worn at 
the Drawing Rooms. Comparatively few ladies carried bouquets, 
fans being used instead. Many of these being jeweled and flash- 
ing with every movement^of their owners, added greatly to the bril- 
liancy of the effect of the dresses and the jewels worn with them. Sir 
Arthur Sullivan conducted and Madame Albani carried off the vocal 
honors of the evening. The quartet from Verdi's " Othello " and se" 
lections from " The Golden Legend " were the chief features of the 
programme. There were eighteen members of the Royal Family 
present, among them the Princess of Wales, who wore a dress of 
black satin, embroidered with jet, trimmed with Brussels lace. The 
headdress was a tiara of diamonds, the ornaments being pearls and 
diamonds. Without exception, however, the most magnificent dia- 
monds seen at Buckingham Palace were those of Lady Gar vagh , whose 
beautiful toilette of white satin trimmed with cascades of lace and 
clusters of roses and lilies was immensely admired. The young Coun- 
tess of Dudley was the beauty of the evening, though Lady Brooke 
made very close running. Lady Dudley's gown of white satin of su- 
perb texture was very decollete, though the decolletage was almost filled 
in with rows of magnificent pearls and diamonds, a snake composed 
of emeralds, rubies and diamonds twined round the neck, and a large 
snake of the same costly gems encircled the waist. 

Steady progress is being made with reference to the arrangements 
for the royal wedding. The arrangements correspond to those ob- 
served in January, 1858, on the occasion of the wedding of the Prin- 
cess Royal of England and the late Emperor Frederick, which also 
took place at the Chapel Royal, St. James's. That ceremony was in 
" full State," but full State as it was understood 35 years ago is a very 
different thing to what it is at the present time, and although the 
ceremony on the 6th July is officially described as "semi-State," it 
will be carried out with a magnificence and pomp at least equal to 
that of the predecessor in qnestion. Applications to be present at the 
ceremony have been far in excess of the somewhat limited accom moda- 
tion provided by the Chapel Royal. In order, however, that the com- 
fort and curiosity of all may be consulted as much as possible, there 
will be special provision afforded within St. James's Palace to witness 
the bridal procession and the Prince of Wales has ordered that on 
this occasion the whole of the State rooms shall be thrown open. 

Inside the Chapel Royal, the pulpit and the Communion Table have 
been removed, and in their place smaller rails and a loftier and yet 
smaller Communion Table have been erected. A haul pas seven inches 
high and one hundred feet broad covers the space hitherto allotted to 
the choir, and upon this seats will be placed for members of the Royal 
Family, the Queen taking a position on the left of the Communion 
Table. The dais will be covered with a rich purple carpet, and from 
it running along the center of the Chapel to the entrance will be a 
broad processional way covered with a specially manufactured carpet 
of gray with crimson bordering. Over the magnificent tapestry 
from Buckingham Palace, which will adorn the walls of the 
chapel, will be suspended festoons of roses and other flowers 
from the royal conservatories. The Archbishop of Canterbury will 
officiate at the service, which will commence about half-past twelve. 
There will be at least three processions, viz. : the bridegroom's, the 
bride's, and the royal guests. At the wedding of the Princess Royal 
the Premier, Lord Palmerston, bore the sword of State before the 
Queen, but on this occasion Mr. Gladstone will simply be present as 
a distinguished official guest. Nothing official has yet been issued 
relating to the dress to be worn, bu>t it is 

expected that only gentlemen will be asked 

to wear full Court dress. The Queen in- 
tends in driving to the wedding to avail 

herself of the celebrated cream-colored 

horses, and the Duke of York's carriage 

will be drawn by the equally celebrated 

black horses belonging to the Prince of 

Wales. On the return from the wedding 

the new Duchess of York will be seated in 

this carriage. A conspicuous feature of 

the wedding will be the representatives of 

the navy, and the Duke of York himself 

will wear his naval uniform. At two 

o'clock a royal dejeuner will be given at 

Buckingham Palace, over which the Queen 

will preside. 

A delightful little nest is the pretty lodge 

on the Sandringham estate, where the 

Duke and Duchess of York will begin their 

married life. The reception rooms, if such 

diminutive sitting-rooms may be dignified 

with such a title, are three in number, and 

include a small " den " for the royal master 

of the house, furnished in essentially mas- 
culine fashion. There are only two guest 

chambers, besides the other bed-rooms, so 



that the young couple will not have accommodation for an autumn 
house party, even if they wished to entertain one. The upholstery 
is light and pretty throughout, and the furniture of the sitting-rooms 
has more of comfort than stateliness. Thelittle drawing-room, which 
will serve as the boudoir of the royal bride, will be beautified by a 
host of the pretty trifles, photos, and china from the charming snug- 
gery at White Lodge that has been her own particular domain. There 
are lovely grounds, a lake, a rustic bridge and shady trees— in fact, it 
is an almost ideally romantic spot for a honeymoon. 

We have had two very smart weddings this week. The marriage 
of Miss Hilda Brassey, niece of Lord Brassey, and Lord Lettrington, 
the eldest son of the Earl of March, and the heir-presumptive to the 
dukedom of Richmond and Gordon was a great " Society " function. 
The bride was followed by four little train-bearers and six brides- 
maids. The Court train was of white and silver brocade. Both train- 
bearers and bridesmaids wore white satin. Their fancy Tuscan straw 
hats were trimmed with forget-me-not blue velvet and white plumes. 
The bridegroom's presents to the bridesmaids was a diamond pin 
brooch, with coronet in pearls and sprays of dark green enamel ivy 
leaves on either side, this being the Gordon badge. The newly married 
pair left for Molecomb House, where both Lord Settrington and his 
father, Lord March, first saw the light of day. The other swell wed- 
ding was that of Lady Frances Spencer Churchill and Sir Robert 
Gresley. The bride was given away by her brother, the Duke of Marl- 
borough, whose wedding presents to his sister consisted of a superb 
diamond star and comb, necklace and bracelets. The eight brides- 
maids were presented with pearl and enamel heart-shaped brooches. 
There is some talk just now about a mystery at Windsor Castle. 
This particular mystery, like most others, is of the feminine gender. 
The lady is young, beautiful and accomplished, and never ventures 
beyond the Castle domain. The world, it appears, is shut to the fetch- 
ing mystery because she has no name and no legal standing as a social 
ego. She, however, is addressed as " Your Highness," and is served 
by attendants of rank. The mystery cannot elucidate herself, and 
Our Gracious Queen is believed to be the only person holding the key. 
Presents are rolling in at the White Lodge in great numbers. 
Among them are no less than four grand pianos, also a neat little 
" buggy." The City Corporation silver dinner and dessert service to 
cost £1600, will be supplemented by a service of silver dinner plates 
to match this service, the gifts of the inhabitants of Windsor. This 
wedding present business is getting to be quite a nuisance, and it is 
extremely fortunate that the marriage will soon be over. It takes 
away from the pleasure of knowing that the young people are going 
to marry and be happy at last, when at every turn some one asks you 
to subscribe for some present or other— especially when both the 
Duke and Princess have more presents now than they can possibly 
know what to do with. 

Some of the present fashions in the shop windows for ladies' dresses 
and hats are appalling. I haven't seen any one yet wearing them, 
but 1 suppose it is only a question of time. One hat in particular was 
almost covered by drooping falls of lace, and looked more like a lamp 
shade than any headgear I am acquainted with. And the dresses 
are absolutely hideous with their deep flounces of lace and other ma- 
terial. 

There is a young man who, at the present moment, is the observed 
of all observers, the envy of the entire world of London both high and 
low. I refer to Mr. Hugh McCalmont. A gentleman who reaches 
the age of thirty-two, comes into a fortune of four millions and wins 
the Derby, all on the same day, is indeed the favorite of the fickle 
goddess. Helen Stuart. 

"What's a lapstone, papa?" "It's a stone the cobbler uses to beat 
his leather on." "Why doesn't he use a cobblestone, papa?"— Puck. 



CLEANLINESS, PURITY, RICHNESS 

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^iala5«ioKap ro tectoa%a» slv,np 




July 1. 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



GOTHAM GOSSIP. 



NBW York, June 17,1893. 

EVERYONE is in a state of such ment.il and physical wilt that 
nothing is being done that can possibly be of interest. We 
are in a negative existence: content to let thing." happen without dis- 
turbing ourselves as to when, how or why they happen. The country 
is only a little better than town, for in the mountains, the heat is as 
intense as on the lowlands, although happily it is a dry heat; while 
at the seashore, one is grilled. No one is truly happy save the yachts- 
man. It was necessary to invent a word for such heat, and sizzard 
is good enough, especially as it has the additional advantage of rhym- 
ing with blizzard. All thought of looks has gone to the wall; the 
perspiring individual in wilted collars, lank locks, and with water 
coursing in streams down his cheeks and neck, is not beautiful, and 
he is so hot he is indifferent. This is the weather for the girl without 
a fringe; her star is in the ascendant. Players play their plays in 
vain, and the lingerers in town hopelessly endeavor to beguile the 
time with dinners and breakfasts to their fellow loiterers. Nothing 
draws except the Roof Gardens, and they are in such demand that 
two more have been opened, the Manhattan and the American. The 
attractions are extraordinarily good, and he is hard to please who 
cannot pass an agreeable hour or two listening to good music, amus- 
ing songs, and sipping now and then from one of those insidious iced 
drinks whose refreshment is so exceedingly temporary. The Casino 
is almost the only theatre which entices a crowd, but the crowd goes 
only to remain during Sandow's wonderful exhibition. I do not 
know if he will go to you, but if he should appear before you, you 
will see the marvel of the century. His great charm is his quiet 
manner. There is absolutely no sign of effort in any of his marvel- 
ous performances, and, moreover, heis young and exceedingly hand- 
some. 

The races absorb public attention, and many a sportive dollar was 
dropped at yesterday's Suburban. The race season has been one of 
surprises. Morris Park races proved advantageous to Californians I 
the Keenes, father and son, heading the winning list with something 
near twenty-nine thousand to the good. O'Brien Macdonough came 
out with fifteen hundred on the right side, and Jack Follansbee with 
a third of the amount, which is surely better than nothing at all, 
Frederick Gebhard came out also a mild winner. I wonder if he will 
be as successful in his courtship. He is entirely devoted to Miss 
Lulu Morris, of Baltimore, who is said to be the most beautiful young 
woman in America, with a strong likeness to Mrs. Langtry, but in- 
finitely more lovely even than the famous Jersey Lily. 

There was a pretty wedding in All Saints' Church yesterday, in 
which Miss Edith Crowell, of San Francisco, figured, not as a princi- 
pal, but as one of the bridesmaids. The bride was the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Whitney, whom Miss Crowell has been visiting. 

Mrs. Mackay has been a recent entertainer, and gave a large and 
elaborate dinner the other night in the Astor Room of the Hotel 
Waldorf, Mr. and Mrs. La Montague, Mrs. Catherwood and Senator 
Jones were among the guests. "Romie" Hart, who has been for 
three weeks in New York at the New Amsterdam Hotel, is cruising 
on the Ramona, with Harry Oillig, and expects to be on the yacht for 
a fortnight. He will not return to California for two months. Hugo 
Toland is about leaving for Buzzards Bay, where he will be the guest 
of the Jeffersons. Miss Eugenie Ferrer is in New York for this week, 
but will return in a few days to Chicago, where she expects to play 
in public during the autumn. 

Colonel Savage and Mrs. Savage have just returned from a visit to 
West Point, Colonel Savage has just published his speech on Siberia 
which he delivered before the Yale Scientific School. A great success 
has been scored in Robin Hood by a Californian, Miss Finlayson. She 
has been siDging in a number two company on the road, and has just 
taken the place of Jessie Bartiett-Davis, in the New York company. 
She sings in a beautiful mellow contralto with so evident a delight 
in music that it is joy to listen to her. Vive la Californie ! 

Senator and Mrs. Stewart left Washington on Friday for a trip 
through Chicago and California. " Stewart Castle," where the Chi- 
nese Legation have dwelt so long, will be occupied by the owners 
next winter. 1 hear that the little artist, Marion Foster, who is at 
Chicago, working on pastel portraits, will go to California for the 
winter. She always holds California in tender recollection for the 
sake of the kindness she met th ere. Passe-Paetout. 

A Valuable Remedy. 
Hon. Edmund L. Pitts, the late president of the New York State 
Senate, writes : 

"State of New Yohk, Senate Chamber, 

Albany, March 11, 1886. 
I have used Allcock's Porous Plasters in my family for the past 
five years, and can truthfully say they are a valuable remedy and 
effect great cures. I would not be without them. I have in several 
instances given some to friends suffering with weak and lame backs, 
and they have invariably afforded certain and speedy relief. They 
cannot be too highly commended." 

Landladies and other heads of households who desire to have their 
curtains or carpets cleaned, should remember that the very best place 
in the city to have such work done is at the Pioneer Carpet Beating 
and Pacific Cleaning and Dyeing works of J. Spaulding & Co., at 353 
and 357 Tehama street. Spaulding's has for years been the favorite 
cleansing house in the city. 



§loa^ D<?partm<?nt 
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Bar^aitys : 

Jackets, Capes, Ulsters, Suits, Linen Duck, 
Storm Serge and Fancy Mixtures, 

Also a full line of LADY CRAVEN VESTS, the 
London and New York craze, 

WW E K u/eici. 8 <?0., 

|\f. U/. Qorqer post ai?d Kearny 5t. 



TO LET 
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A modern house of eight rooms; 
convenient to two cable lines; grand 
marine view; good neighborhood. 
Rent reasonable to desirable party. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND. 
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NERVE JOY'S PHARMACY, Agts, 

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SOLE AGENT FOR 
PAOIFIO OOA8T, 

123 Calif orniaSt.,S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOB SALE BY ALL FIBST-CLA86 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 31:83. 




"We Obev no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

" llffAINE AND GEORGIA" had a brilliant first production 
1V1 at Stockwell's on Monday night. The fact that it was a 
benefit night for the veteran actor and soldier of the civil war, 
John Jack, added to both the interest and the enthusiasm. The 
latter was more than ordinarily demonstrative, and showed itself 
tuniultuously whenever the favorite old actor appeared before Ihe 
scenes. 

The author, Howard P. Taylor, was vociferously called for 
after the second act, and at last gave che audience a snap-shot at 
him from the side door, appearing and disappearing with modest 
dispatch. Scenically the production is one of the most striking 
of the many scenic successes at Stockwell's. The battle scene, so 
much more difficult to produce effectively than the audience is 
apt to realize, was remarkably good and full of the movement 
which is the soul of stage realism and effectiveness. As vivid is 
the picture of the interior of AndersonvilleprisoD, in somber sug- 
gestiveness of one horror of the war which will never be forgot- 
ten while one of the sufferers within that terrible stockade sur- 
vives. 

There was a presentation of beautiful flowers to John Jack and 
of a watch to Ethel Brandon, which, with the accompanying 
speeches, aided in making an unusually lively and exciting even- 
ing of the opening night of the new play. The bouse was a 
splendid one, and the attendance has kept up encouragingly 
through the week. 

The Stockwell company is tor the most part exceedingly well 
cast in the varying characters of the play. L. R. Stockwell, as 
the Maine farmer who seeks the front, not to gratify his own 
patriotic yearnings bat those of the enthusiastic Yankee school 
ma'am he wants to marry, is the central figure and makes all the 
fun, his odd humor lighting up even the hopeless dreariness of 
Andersonville. George Osbourne, of course, plays the bad man in 
artistic fashion, singularly enough managing to make each sue 
cessive villain, of which he portrays so many, a distinctive type. 
John Jack makes an imposing and weighty Confederate General, 
and Hereward Hoyte does his duty by the author in portraying 
with conscientious unnaturalness the impossible young Irish 
journalist, which the stage has made familiar to us, and who is 
so filled with bottled enthusiasm that it is constantly effervescing 
and running over in such expressions as " A true Irishman will 
never go back on the stars and stripes while there's an office 
nnder them," or something of the kind, which used to bring down 
the gallery till the gallery became too knowing in the ways of 
claptrap. Francis Powers, as the hero, Carroll Snow, utterly 
fails to touch his audience or awaken one thrill of sympathetic 
interest in his fortunes, either in love or war. This failure seems 
not so much owing to a want of intelligent comprehension as to 
an apparently unmanageable voice, a personality singularly 
unmagnetic and an enunciation which gives to every speech, 
patriotic, manly, or tender, the effect of a snarl at his unhappy 
interlocutor. Ethel Brandon has, as usual, to support every 
sorrow known to the melodrama, and bears them like a heroine 
and a gentle womanly heroine, at that. Bertha Foltz, Mrs. F. 
M. Bates, and Minnie Ellsworth fill their parts acceptably. The 
expectations of Polly Stockwell's many friends were not disap- 
pointed. Sensibly choosing a comparatively subordinate part 
for her debut, she filled the not unexacting role admirably and 
with an intelligence which assures her an honorable place on the 
stage, where study, refinement, and intelligence are so greatly 
needed. 

Robert Gaylor, Sport McAllister, and his company, who are at 
the California for the present week, are fine examples of what 
Philosopher Square styles " the eternal fitness of things." They 
are all alike noisy, inconsequent, rough-and-tumble, unfunny, 
and— popular. Perhaps "unfunny" is too sweeping. Mr. Gaylor 
says and does some very laughable things, and puts similar 
things into the mouths and antics of his people; but there is so 
much noise and vociferation that the dazed and deafened auditor 
can hardly find time or inclination to be amused, even by the 
things which are funny. Less shouting and bellowing, less 
horseplay and forced excitement, might make Robert Gaylor 
acceptable on the stage. It would be too much to promise the 
same for Sport McAllister; but in the meantime both seem, with 
all their imperfections on their heads, to suit the taste of a suffi- 
ciently large number of theatre-goers to prevent the pious hope 
that they will be soon discouraged out of existence. 
* * * 

It is claimed by his friends that Robert Gaylor is a very funny 
man "off the stage." Should the claim suggest to the Irish comed- 
ian the proper field for the exercise of his gifts, the move, though 
perhaps not to his own financial advantage, would certainly not 
hurt the stage. 



The reopening of the renovated, refurnished, and beautified 
Baldwin will take place Monday evening, July 10th, the sale of 
seats beginning at 9 o'clock next Wednesday morning. During 
the vacation the Baldwin has, under the benign influences of 
paint, soap-and-water, and upholstery, renewed its youth and 
beauty. The new season will be opened by Daniel Frohman's 
Lyceum Company in its latest success, Americans Abroad. The 
company has not been here for two years, but it is well remem- 
bered and is certain of a welcome. Most of the old favorites re- 
main with the company, among them Georgia Cayvan, Kelcey, 
LeMoyne, Mrs. Whittin, the Walcots, Effie Shannon, and others. 

The admitted odium attaching to comparison is all that can 
place the Tivoli production of AH Baba at a disadvantage. If the 
visitor go there to see a repetition of the scenic splendors of Hen- 
derson's production at the Grand Opera House he will doubtless 
be disappointed; but if he judge the Tivoli production by itself 
he will find plenty to enjoy and no little to admire. The peculiar 
virtue attaching to every production at the Opera House is thor- 
oughness. Whatever is undertaken is well done. The work may 
stop short at a certain point, but up to that point it is complete 
to the smallest detail. There is no sign of "scamping," no loose 
ends left to be worked in later. The quality extends to the peo- 
ple. No one ever saw one of the Tivoli corps at sea in his part, 
either in lines or business, a fact more remarkable from the 
weekly change of play. The smoothness is what most impresses 
the constant visitor to the Tivoli, and is suggestive of a strict 
supervision in the management of house and stage, which might 
be advantageously copied in many more pretentious theatres. 

Ali Baba is a fair example. Without lavish display and glitter 
or any attempt at "gorgeousness," scenery, costumes, and all 
accessories are bright, new, and attractive, and the general effect 
is suggestive of " spectacle" if not entirely spectacular. The 
changes from the All Baba we have seen in music, etc., are many, 
almost enough to make it a new play. With these additions, and 
the absurdities and local interpolations of Ferris Hartman, there 
is no question of the extravaganza being fully "up to date." 

Gracie Plaisted is one of the most tricksy and charming Morgi- 
anas ever seen, and her song, "Bad lack to him who buys me 
now," is given with a dash and spirit which briugs down the 
house. Fanny Llddiard makes a gallant figure as Zizi, and TilHe 
Salinger sings as sweetly as usual, but the semi-masculine cos- 
tume of Ali Baba is something of a disadvantage to her stage ap- 
pearance. To say that Ferris Hartman plays Cassim with his 
characteristic overflow of animal spirits and originality is to say 
that the audience is kept laughing while he is on the stage. Geo. 
Olmi, Phil Branson, and all the Tivoli corps have good parts, and 
fill them well. 

Ali Baba will run for another week. 
* » * 

The great attraction of the week at Meyer's Wigwam Theatre 
has been the beautiful Turkish dancer, Omene, in her dance of 
the Harem and the famous danse du ventre. The Wigwam under 
Mr. Meyer's management is steadily advancing in favor as a 
family resort, since it is becoming more and more generally un- 
derstood that nothing is admitted upon its stage that is not of a 
clean, wholesome nature, as well as interesting and amusing. 
The programme is so varied and all are so g)od that it is difficult 
to particularize, but there is certain to be something to suit the 
taste of every patron. A Fourth of July Matinee will be given 
on Tuesday, at 2 p. m. 

Mark Mnrphy who comes to the California next week will be 
remembered as the Murphy of Murray and Murphy in Our Irish 
Visitors. O'Dowd's Neighbors, the piece in which he appears at the 
California next Monday, is a farce comedy with an unusual num- 
ber of songs and other musical attractions. It will run but one 
week, ending the present season at the California and it? fourth 
year under the Hayman management. The theatre will be closed 
for general renovation till July 31st, reopening on that date with 
Robert Mantell in a new play, The Face in the Moonlight. Mr. 
Hayman has secured a large number of the latest plays and best 
companies for this theatre, a detailed list of which will be given 
later. Among them is Mrs. John Drew starring with a special 
company. 

The annual meet of California Division, L. A. W., will take 
place at Central Park, July 1st, 3d and 4th, under the auspices of 
the Bay City Wheelmen. Work on the park and speed-track has 
long been going forward in preparation for this event, which ia 
expected to be an unusually interesting one to 'cyclists and sight- 
seers. 

Miss Edna Wallace, who was married this week in New York 
to De Wolf Hopper, is one of San Francisco's native daughters, 
well known and greatly admired among the handsome and 
charming young girls of which this city can boast so many. She 
is the only daughter of the late " Wally Wallace," as he was always 
called, for years a prominent figure among the attaches of the 
old California Theatre, and still kindly remembered by many 



July 1, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



here. Miss Wallace left this city for the East a few years ago, 
and ber many friends will extend congratulations and good 
wishes on the occasion of her marriage. 

Abbey, 8choeffeI, and Grau have secured Mme. Melba, the de 
Keszke brothers, and Lasalle for an American tour, beginning at 
Chicago October 2d, and taking in San Francisco and Mexico. 
Cassira, a singer well known at the Paris Grand Opera, will prob- 
ably be a member of the company, as will Emma Eames, Nordica, 
and Scaled i. A special feature will be made of the battet, and 
Maurice Grau is now raking Europe for good material for a sen- 
sation In this taking department. Beside this organization, the 
firm will run three important companies, all opening in Chicago 
on the same date, October 2d, namely, an opera company at the 
Auditorium, the Irving-Terry company at the Columbia, and the 
Coquelin-Hading company at Hooley's. All these companies will 
play a New York engagement in the winter, after which they 
come to San Francisco. 

The bicycle clubs of the city will come in a body to the Califor- 
nia on Monday night to see 0' Dowd's Neighbors. Mamie Taylor, 

formerly of the Tivoli in this city, is among the favorites in 

O'Dotvd's Neighbors. The California, Stockwell's, the Tivoli, and 

the Wigwam theatres will each give an extra matinee Tuesday, 

July 4tb. Manager J. J. Gottlob, of the California, will spend 

part of the coming vacation at Santa Cruz and Monterey, remain- 
ing in town most of the time, however, to supervise the improve- 
ments going on at his theatre. The performance at Stockwell's 

July 7th will be the 366th at that theatre, and in commemoration 
of its first anniversary a handsome and elaborate souvenir will 

be distributed to all patrons present on that evening. Several 

new members will be added to the Stockwell company after 
Maine and Georgia is off. Among them are Clarence Holt and F. 
D. Frawley, last seen here with Nat. C. Goodwin's company. 



WILLIE WILDE says that Frankie's letters to the press about 
him are incredible. That's what we always thought. Frankie 
surely must have exaggerated. She said Willie paid for those 
objectionable false teeth himself. 




Baggage Notice. 
Round-trip transfer tickets are now on sale at any of our offices at 
reduced rates, viz. : One trunk, round trip, 50 cts. ; single trip, 30 cts. 
Keep your baggage checks until you reach this city. Morton Spec- 
ial Delivery, 17 Geary street, 408 Taylor street, and Oakland Ferry 
Depot (waiting room). 

THREE AND ONE-HALF DAYS TO THE WORLD'S 

i FAIR. — We take pleasure in advising the readers of the 

News Letter that the UNION PACIFIC is the most 

k directand quickestline from San Francisco and all points 

lin California to the WORLD'S FAIR. 

It is the ONLY LINE running Pullman's latest im- 
proved vestibuled Drawing-Room Sleepers and Dining 
Cars from San Francisco to Chicago without change, and only one 
change of cars to New York or Boston. 

Select Tourist Excursions via the UNION PACIFIC leave San 
Francisco every Thursday for Chicago, New York and Boston in 
charge of experienced Managers, who give their personal attention 
to the comfort of ladies and children traveling alone. 
Steamship Tickets to and from all points in Europe. 
For tickets to the World's Fair and all points east, and for Sleep- 
ing Car accommodations, call on or address D. W. Hitchcock, Gen- 
eral Agent Union Pacific System, No. 1 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. 

MEYER'S WIGWAM THEATRE- 

Cor. Stockton and Geary Sts. 

CHARLES MEYER Proprietor and Manager. 

Week commencing July 3, 1893. 

OPERA AND SPECIALTY. New operatic Btars and new specialty ar- 
tists. A grand double entertainment. Nothing like it in the city. 
First time at this theatre, Offenbach's opera, 

MARRIAGE BY LANTERN LIGHT. 
A comic opera iu one act. 
The opera will be produced under the direction of Mr. Fred Urban, late 
stage manager of the Tivoli Opera House. Also the following specialties: 
First appearance of America's greatest male soprano and operatic vo- 
calist— ELLWOOD. Haley & Raymond; Camilla; Steve Carroll; Hunn & 
Bohee; Miss Ella Ralme; Al. Leech; 

GRAND HOLIDAY MATINEE TUESDAY, JULY 4th, AT 2 P. M. 

Every evening. Matinee Saturday and Sunday. 
Prices, 10c, 25c, 35c. 






SbO£S F^p/HI^ED U/^ICE YOU UJfUJ. 



GEO. 



Solelng 65c. Done in 20 minutes. Fine calf shoes to order, 
for $3.50 up. 
POLLOCK - - - - 202 Powell Street 



rHADC Bush & G-erts Pianos 
M1HDB Parlor Organs 

HAINES Inst allments Rentals 

A. I. Bancroft 4 Co. D I A |\| fj (2 

803 Sutter St., S.F. W W r\l M^^^J 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Al Hayman * Co Proprietors. 

PRELIMINARY.— Mr. Hayman takes pleasure in announcing that the 
11th regular season of tho Baldwin Theatre uuder its present management 
will commence 

MONDAY/ EVENING. JULY lOTu, with the reappearance here of 
DANIEL FROHMAN'S LYCEUM THEATRE COMPANY 
Presenting their latest success, 

^h M ^^, IC ? ANS ABROAD - Victor.^' Rardou. 

The cast will include: Herbert Kelcey, Georgia Cayvan, W. J. Lemoyne. 
Effle Sanuon, Charles Walcot. R. R. Ralcliffe, Mrs. Charles Walcot, Fritz 
Williams, Mrs. Thomas Wbiffen, Eugene Ormonde, Charles W. King, Chas. 
Robluson, Bessie Tyrel, Augustus Cook, Madge Carr, Annie Leland.Vaughu 
Glaser, Little Annette, etc. 

The theatre has been thoroughly renovated, and Increased efforts have 
been made to provide additional comforts for both audience and players. 

The sale of seats will commence WEDNESDAY, JULY 5th. 

Regular Baldwin Prices— Orchestra and Dress Ciicle, (I 50. Balcony, re- 
served, $1, 75c. and 60c. ; Gallery, front rows, reserved chairs, 35c. ; Gallery, 
other rows, 25c. Proscenium Box e s, »12 50 and »10. 

STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 

L. R. Stockwbll Lessee and Proprietor 

Alf Ellinghoosb Business Manager 

Second week. Monday. July 3d. Matinee Saturday. 

SPECIAL MATINEE (TUESDAY) JULY 4th. 

The spectacular military play, 

MAINE AND GEORGIA. 

See the great battle scene. 
See Andersonville Prison. 

Next 

ROGER LA HAUTE. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 



Al Hayman & Co Proprietors. | J. J. Gottlob Manager. 

For one week. Extra matinee Tuesday, 4th of July. 
" That Smart Bit of a Man" 

MR. MARK MURPHY', 

Assisted by Sam J. Ryan and Clara Thropp, and a company of 20 fun pro- 
vokers, in the operatic Irish comedy success, 

O'DOWD'S NEIGHBORS. 

NOTE— Commencing July 10th, the California will close for a period of 
three weeks, during which time the theatre will be thoroughly renovated. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Beos Proprietors and Managers 

Tonight! Production par excellence. A hurricane of mirth and melody. 

ALI BABA, 

(Up to Date). 
The Oriental Spectacular Extravaganza. 
Numerous novel specialties. 
Popular Pkices ... 25 and 50c. 

HAVE YOU HEARD ? 

GREAT 

BICYCLE TOURNAMENT, 

At CENTRAL PARK, S. F., Cal. 

JULY 1-3-4. 

Annual meet of California Division, L. A. W., under auspices of the 

BAY CITY WHEELMEN. 

Races called at 2 F. M. Admission 50 cents. Reserved seats 75 cents. On 
sale with Clabrough, Golcher & Co., 605 Market 8treet. Don't miss it! 



SAN LORENZO GROVE. 



On the Line of the Oakland, San Leandro and. Haywards 
Electric Railway. 

Beautiful natural forest, romantic walks, luncheon tables, inviting ar- 
bors; a large new pavilion, excellent floor for dancing. Swings and other 
attractions for children. Grand open air concert by First Regiment Band 
every Sunday. Cars connect with all broad-gauge local trains at Twenty- 
third avenue, Oakland; also with narrow-gauge at Thirteenth and Frank- 
l in streets. 

HAYWARDS PARK- 

At the terminus of the Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards Electric 
Railway. 
Romantic walks; mountain streams; dense woods; secluded lunching 

g laces; mineral springs; beautiful banks of ferns, maiden-hair and wild- 
owers. Cars connect with all broad-gauge local trains at Twenty-third 
avenue, Oakland; also with narrow-gauge at Thirteenth and Franklin Sts 



5IANO AND VOCAL LESSONS, ?3 TO ?6 PER MONTH. 

MRS. MCDONALD, 135 Larkin Street, S. F. 



OLOAKMAKING A SPECIALTY; ALSO DRESSMAKING. 

w MRS. A. C. ALLEN, 142 Seventh Street, S. F. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893 . 



J^ tooker-oi?. 

SAM DAVI8, the swarthy humorist of Carson, was id town 
this week, and confessed to a friend that he was engaged on 
a long poem of a pre-historic character, having for its foundation 
the big foot-prints in the Athens of Nevada. Sam began his liter- 
ary career on the Morning Ledger^ an off-snoot of the Post, started 
by Henry George. The city editor found it difficult to confine Mr. 
Davis to prose. At last he said to Sam, in jest: "Oh, if you must 
have rhyme, go around the dives, and write me a poem about 
them.'' A rew hours after and Sam appeared, and with a serious 
face, handed Lhe editor bis poem. There were some two hundred 
lines in all, and it opened with : 

** Down on Kearny street, underneath the ground, 
Various dens of infamy are found; 
And when the moralist wanders in there, 
If he is tender-hearted, his soul is filled with care." 
The editor read about twenty lines of this sort of stuff, put it 
deliberately into his desk, and said, "Sam, take in the Police 
Court to-morrow, and please let me have it in prose, nothing but 
prose." Davis was crushed, and retired, mutteriog, "That fellow 
would reject The Star Spangled Banner." 

* * » 

8unday last the handsome new Roman Catholic Church at Mill 
Valley was consecrated by Archbishop Riordan. Mr. James 
Thompson, the pillar of the faith in that part of the country, gave 
His Grace and the guests a breakfast at his villa. Among those 
who sat down to table was Mr. P. T. Sullivan, the agent of the 
Barron estate. The first course was bouillon en tasse. Now Mr. 
Sullivan has not been accustomed to have hi9 soup served in that 
manner, and therefore looked upon the steaming mixture as a 
perfect stranger. Presently a gleam of intelligence illumined his 
expressive countenance, and with an airy gesture he placed two 
lumps of sugar in the soup, following this with a liberal dose of 
cream. A wild guffaw from Mr. Louis Harrison called the atten- 
tion of Mr. Sullivan to the fact that he was laboring under a mis- 
conception of the nature of the mixture before him, and even the 
stern features of the Archbishop relaxed as the agent gasped out, 
"Be Jabers, I thought it was green tea." 

Mr. Richard Tobin has a luxurious house-boat moored in Belve- 
dere Bay. On Tuesday night Mr. Tobin and some guests sat upon 
deck, enjoying the glorious moonlight. They played, and sang, 
and praised the climate, and felt generally happy. A shriek from 
a lady who had been pensively gazing into the silvered water 
startled them. "Look, look 1" she cried, "See that drowned 
woman drifting by." Sure enough, there, under the rays of the 
pale moon, was the face of a girl, the hair disheveled, the eyes 
closed, and the figure clad in some light stuff, floating out with 
the ebb. To jump into the boat that lay moored astern was the 
work of a moment, and two athletic young men pulled swiftly 
toward the floating body. When they came alongside and 
reached for it, they fell back in amazement at the remonstrance: 
"Oh, what for you makee all this lobbery? I swim." Mr. Max- 
well's Chinese cook is partial to an evening bath, and is an ex- 
pert floater. His resentment at the sensation be created was in- 
tense and natural. 

* * # 

Mr. Frank Pixley's recovery from the miser mania has been pre- 
maturely announced in the dailies. Asa matter of fact, the veteran 
editor still labors under the hallucination that he is going to die in 
the Alms House. A small boy on Union street, whom Mr. Pix- 
ley had offended by ordering him off his premises, experimented 
with the old gentleman the other day by tying a string to a dime 
and trailing it along the sidewalk. Mr. Pixley was on bis regular 
walk down town when he espied the lure. He did not distinguish 
the black thread or the hole in the coin. He saw only a dime on 
the sidewalk, and a small boy a few yards ahead. When he 
stooped to pick it up. the dime moved a few inches, and Mr. 
Pixley missed his first swoop. Unlike the chicken-hawk, which 
will plunge but once, he tried again, and missed again. This fail- 
ure be attributed to his dimness of vision, and be made a third 
grab. The small demon gave a violent snap at the thread, which 
broke it, and Mr. Pixley secured his prize and examined it 
closely. He growled a bit at his luck on detecting the hole, but 
pouched it all the same, and felt much happier during the rest of 
the day. 

* * # 

Hamilton W. Gray, the well-known mining operator and 
speculator, has been pondering seriously over a novel phase of 
Chinese character which came under his observation recently. 
Hamilton, when he is not wrestling with the bulls and bears on 
Pine street, or with some irrigation project in Stanislaus or Kern 
Couoty, amuses himself with a little gravel claim near the head- 
waters of the Feather river. His neighbors are Chinese, who 
potter aronnd and make money where white men could not earn 



a living. Not long ago a freshet from the melting snows in the 
high Sierras set the rivers booming, and some new flumes which 
had just been put in by the miners were endangered. Gray began 
to take his down for safety, but the Chinese just stood calmly by, 
and saw their plant carried off piece by peace down the raging 
stream. When the last plank had disappeared , the patient heathen 
cooked a couple of pigs and a dozen or so of fowl, and dished 
them up in the best oriental style. These they packed about half 
a mile up the bank and threw them into the river. This naturally 
excited the curiosity of Gray, who had been watching the pro- 
ceeding. " What for, John, you throw him food in river? " he 
asked. » Debbie heap like em, catchee," was the reply. " Him 
then no hurt 'em tiuem, sabee ? " " What has the devil got to do 
with it; why don't you pray God to save the flume?" queried 
the miner. » What for play him God; he alle lite, no flaid him, 
flaid of debble ; he catch 'em food, alle same flend, leave Chinaman 
lone." The balance of the gang nodded approval of the leader's 
remarks, and after concluding the propitiatory service to his 
Satanic majesty they all went home to await the effect and a 
chance to resume work, leaving Gray in deep and silent medita- 
tion. 

* * * 

The reception given to Max Popper by the Democratic Asso- 
ciation of California, at the club house on Stockton street, last 
Saturday evening, was a deserved tribute to a gentleman who 
has of late years done more for the local advancement of the 
party than any other individual. There was a large attendance 
of members of the Association and their guests, and numerous 
felicitous speeches were delivered. President McCarthy pre- 
sided, but after brief opening remarks, resigned the chair to 
Rudolph Herrold. R. P. Hammond delivered the address of 
welcome, and speeches were made by Mr. Popper, T. J. Clunie 
and John Jack. References were made to the great success of 
Democracy during the recent campaign, and the probabilities of 
success in both State and nation, when next the people go to 
the polls, aroused great enthusiasm. A somewhat humorous in- 
cident of the gathering was the " recitation" delivered by John 
Jack. Mr. Herrold called upon Mr. Jack, who is an actor, to 
entertain the crowd with arecitation. Jack, instead, to the sur- 
prise of the audience, but not to their disappointment, for he spoke 
well, delivered a good old Democratic stump speech, which 
lasted about half an hour. The gathering did not disperse until 
midnight. Judging from the opinions expressed, the local Dem- 
ocracy feels itself to be in a safe position, so far as the city and 
State go. Popper is recognized as a man peculiarly well fitted, on 
account of his political knowledge and his ability as an organizer, 
to lead the forces to victory. His management of the State Com- 
mittee during the fight of last November is conceded to have been 
worthy of high praise. He will receive loyal support from the 
Association, which, composed as it is of men prominent in the 
business world, and not politicians, should have considerable 
weight among the people. 

* * » 

The sailing of the steamship Australia, advertised for July 5th, 
has been postponed until July 6th, on account of the two days' 
holiday. 

• * » 

So Jimmy Cogan has cropped up as the main factor in the 
Flood defalcation mystery. That such an insignificant mortal as 
little Jimmy was, should have figured in anything so important 
is a genuine surprise to those who knew the defunct broker. 
Cogan stood about five feet one in his stockings, and did not 
weigh an ounce over a hundred pounds. He was lean as a 
boarding-house rat, neat, even foppish in his dress, and extremely 
vain of his successes with the fair sex. Jimmy was the most im- 
pressionable diminutive that ever lived. If a lady smiled at him 
on the street, he would at once conclude that she was fatally 
smitten by his charms, and would trail her all over town. After 
his losses in Con. Virginia and California, he became morose and 
drank heavily. He was never worth any money. All his wealth 
was prospective. If he had bought this, and if he had sold that 
in time, he would have realized on this and have missed being 
caught short on that. This was the way that Cogan talked, and 
he was classed "on the street," accordingly. 

A man of his figure and disposition became naturally a target 
for practical jokers, and Jimmy was not spared. He boarded on 
Geary street, near Taylor, in a house filled with merry, mischief- 
making young clerks, leavened by a few families. Cogan had a 

seat at table opposite very pretty Miss 8 , and fell in love 

with her promptly. He would generally come to dinner so 
loaded, that instead of throwing compliments at her across the 
table in his squeaKy voice, strongly tinged with the Hibernian 
brogue, Jimmy would, speechless from drink, roll his eyes, and 

look unutterable things. The boys induced Miss 8 to help 

them in persecuting Cogan. The next time he spoke to her, she 
looked at him with disdain, and declared that any gentleman 
who could use such language as he had used to her in the corri- 
dor on the previous night, should address her at his peril. Jimmy 
was too full that evening to remember whether he had met her 
or not, so could not deny the charge. He felt still more embar- 



July 1, 1893. 



S.VN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



11 



nssed when every one along the table muttered audibly, "He 
ought to be ashamed of himself. He is no gentleman." Cogan 
fled, and did not make his appearance for a week at the boarding- 
house. He had dropped on the joke, and was thirsting for the 
blood of his persecutors. 

Jimmy visited one afternoon a friend's camp on the Sausalito 
shore. He got full, and consequently amorous, and so annoyed 
one of the lady guests with his attentions that it was resolved to 
punish him. He was plied with more liquor, which betook with- 
out persuasion, and when he became helpless he was lifted into an 
open boat, towed out into the bay, and moored about three hun- 
dred yards from the camp. The cold night air soon revived 
Jimmy. The tide was running furiously, and when he looked 
over the side he at once concluded that he was drifting out to sea. 
He shouted for help, but none came, although there was a boat 
not far off, manned by his tormentors iu case he should become 
panic-stricken. Then he appealed to heaven for ruercy, confessed 
his sins, and was kneeling in the boat, prepared to meet his fate, 
when his rescuers appeared. They made him believe that he was 
miles outside the Golden Gate — that he had, contrary to their ad- 
vice, gone out for a row, and lost his oars, etc., so that when they 
did put him ashore he wept over them, and promised to make 
their fortunes by carrying any mining stock on the list for them 
without a cent of margin. 

The assignment of the old and popular firm of 8. & G. Gump, 
the dealers in art goods on Geary street, has called forth many ex- 
pressions of sympathy from the merchants of the city. This as- 
signment is by no means a failure, as the firm is perfectly solvent, 
but to protect its creditors it made an unconditional bill of sale of 
all the property in the local store and the Portland branch to 
Daniel Meyer. The indebtedness amounts to about $135,000, of 
which some $10,000 is owed to European creditors. The assets 
are estimated at from $150,000 to $200,000, their value depending 
greatly upon the manner of their sale. The firm has many book 
accounts outstanding, amounting to at least $35,000, which are 
perfectly good, but at present money cannot be procured upon 
them. All the creditors are rich men and friends of the Gumps, 
of whose business integrity they speak in the highest terms. The 
business is now being conducted by Daniel Meyer. 

When Jack Stanton, the artist, returned recently from Paris, 
he was arrayed in all the magnificence of a boulevardier. A large, 
low-cut collar encircled his neck; he walked with a mincing gait 
in his peg-top boots, and his clothes and hat bore the stamp of 
the Parisian. Stanton appeared, in fact, to be a French exquisite. 
He called at the place of business of one of his brothers. They 
had not seen each other for two years. The brother took in the 
artist's foreign make-up, as Jack advanced toward him with out- 
stretched arms. Then the local Stanton raised his right arm, as 
a -look of pain crossed his face, and waving Jack from him, he 
simply said, "Go home 1" Jack went. He is now dressed like 
the rest of us. 

* * # 

Stanton says that Charley Peters has not made expected pro- 
gress with his picture of Napoleon, as the attractions of dinner 
parties and gay companions prove greater than his art. He in- 
tends to submit his Napoleon at the next Salon. Peters is now 
at London. 

* * * 

Miss Julia Heynemann has returned from Paris. Carlson is 
undergoing genteel starvation at New York. Mr. and Mrs. C. D. 
O'Sullivan (Bessie Curtis) are expected here soon. Peixotto is 
working at Monterey. He goes to Paris in October. Julian Rix 
will soon return to this city. 

Quite a lad. East is to chew for half an hour after dinner Adams' 
Tutti Prutti Pepsin Chewing Gum for indigestion. 

WILSHIRE SAFE AND SCALE COMPANY. 

AMONG recent notable changes on California street, necessi- 
tated by an increased business and the consequent demand 
for larger quarters, is the removal of the Wilshire Safe and Scale 
Company, to the handsome and commodious store at 6 Cali- 
fornia street. Mr. W. B. Wilshire, the head of the house, is well 
and favorably known as a most energetic business man, and his 
removal to a larger building is only the natural result of the man- 
ner in which he has developed his business. The Wilshire safes 
are used extensively throughout the country, and have passed 
satisfactorily through the most severe tests. The Buffalo scales 
are well known on this coast, and stand second to none. 



THE Bancroft Company has issued a very handsome publication 
by Hubert Howe Bancroft, " The Book of the Fair." It is a 
history and description of the World's Columbian Exposition at 
Chicago, and also includes graphic accounts of all the great fairs 
of modern times. The book is profusely illustrated with cuts of 
the Chicago buildings, and of those at other great fairs, and it 
makes an interesting and beautiful souvenir of the great exposi- 
tion. 



PIPER-HEIDSIECK 



"SEC 
CHAMPAGNE. 



INTENSELY DRY. 



THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO., 



SOLE AGENTS PACIFIC COAST. 



El ^f\f[\pO o, *. Bay. 

l/ia c!?e 5afe ai?d lar^e Steamer U^ial?. 
I^opeped a$ a Supday pa/T\ily Resort. 

Choice programme of popular music. Refreshments, 
fishing and boating, NO DANCING. Tables and seats 
for family lunches. Decorum will be preserved. Round 
trip and admission to the grounds, 50 cents. Children 
under 10 years free if accompanied by parents. Steamer 
Ukiah leaves Tiburon ferry, foot of Market street, every 
Sunday at 10:30 A. M. and 1:45 P. M. Leave El 
Campo 12:45 and 5 P. M. 



MOTHERS. 

SAMARITAN POWDERS are a speedy and harmless cure for 
morning sickness. One box will be sufficient to cure the most trouble- 
some case. PRICE, $2 per box. Address, 

SAMARITAN POWDER CO., 

P. O. Box 214. Oakland, Cal. 



rRANK KENNEDY, LAW-OFFICE, ROOM ( 
1286 MARKET STREET. 



MURPHY BUILDING, 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 




LITTLE Bt. Mary's the Virgin, out at the end of Union street, 
had a real sensation last Sunday. The "Juke" was there! 
and as His Grace of Newcastle is said never to stir anywhere without 
his camera it is fair to assume that snap shots were taken of sancti- 
monious brother Bolton while High Mass was going on. It is not 
reported that the Ducal person made the expected donation, but can 
it be true that the Pastor informed his congregation of the fact that 
it was owing to the illness of the "Juke's" valet detaining His Grace 
from Monterey, that they were honored by his visit? 

" What is Ed. Sheldon going to do about choir singing when the 
Rev. Davis and his British organist fold their tents like the Arabs 
and steal away?" is a question at present agitating those who sit in 
the front pews of little St. Luke's church. 

What fascinating pictures our girls make of a pleasant afternoon, 
clad in their summer suits and "dude" hats. If the tourist wants to 
see the California girl in all her beauty, let him take in San Jose on 
his wanderings. Nowhere in our Golden State are there more pretty 
girls to the square mile than in the Garden City. The 'Frisco girls 
are like their local climate— breezy, and the Oakland girl knows it 
all ; the Los Angeles maiden is generally transplanted from the East, 
bat at San .lose the girls are always charming. 

H # * 

The distressing news has reached here that Lieutenant Blake, 
whom society so surely credited with being engaged to Miss Myra 
Lord, is about to marry an Eastern girl. 

The lately announced engagement of Miss Millie Ashe has caused 
quite a flutter in the swim. The wooing took place at Stag's Leap, 
the country home of Miss Ashe's devoted friend, Mrs. Chase, nee 
Minnie Mizner, and if true, only serves as another illustration of the 
power of propinquity. It also assures the girls who are yet unap- 
propriated that "everything comes in time," etc. 
• • * 

The condition of our watering places, as regards beaux, is truly 
appalling. A recent visitor to Del Monte describes the ball room 
there as lined along the walls with rows of women, and with but one 
man in sight ! San Rafael is also suffering from a dearth of the male 
element. In fact, the different club houses seem to be the only 
places where the genus can be found in quantity as well as quality. 
* * » 

Reuben Lloyd has been known to blush. It Is a fact, and 
those who thought that nothing could ever disturb the placidity 
of his calm countenance may acknowledge themselves deceived. 
Mr. Lloyd and his niece recently visited the World's Fair. After 
leaving Chicago they went to Boston, and it was in the staid old 
town of the blue stockings, curious enough, that, for the first 
and only time in his history, Reuben Lloyd blushed. When he 
went to his room in the hotel in the evening to retire, he opened 
his valise before disrobing to draw therefrom his night-gown, or 
night-robe, or robe de nxtit, or whatever may be the proper term 
to apply to the cheese-cloth which covereth the limbs of the law. 
Plunging his hand into the valise in that careless way of his, 
Lloyd drew forth a magnificent garment; a dream of loveliness, a 
confection in night robes, a beautiful gown of delicate silk, orna- 
mented with laces and ribbons, and fit to enclose the form of a 
vestal virgin. Of course Lloyd at once comprehended that the 
porter had placed the wrong valise in his room. Then he thought 
of the young and beautiful owner of the gown he held {for only a 
young and beautiful woman would wear such a magnificent crea- 
tion) opening his valise in her room and drawing forth his night- 
robe. 

Then Reuben Lloyd blushed. 

History does not tell us whether Lloyd drew his borrowed 
drapery about him and thus laid down to pleasant dreams that 
night, or whether he preserved the gown unsullied by the farther 
touch of man, and shivered in the sheets. Bets are about even in 
the cl ubs upon either end of the question. 

Among the sojourners at Santa Cruz is Mr. W. H. Chamblisa, 

who has made himself very popular with the members of the 

fair sex who loiter upon the seashore. Rumors are current about 

his probable engagement to a well-known society girl. 

» * * 

The English papers have recently given publication to the 
statement that it is now a custom at English houses, instituted by 
the Prince of Wales, to weigh guests before and after dinner. The 
inauguration of this curious custom has given great pleasure to a 
certain lady who keeps a fashionable boarding-house not far up 
town. She has many anglo-maniacs among her guests, and when 
she stated that she intended to weigh them before and after din- 
ner, in the English manner, they did not object in the slightest 



degree. She is a wise woman, who knows her sex, and she has 
already saved much money on provisions by the institution of 
the dinner scales. There are certain young ladies with enormons 
appetites, but who wish to appear delicate and sylph like, who 
fear to lose a possible admirer if the record shows them to be six 
or seven pounds heavier after their meal than before. Conse- 
quently, they satisfy themselves with a plate of sonp and a cracker, 
and the landlady saves money accordingly. The scales are also 
in favor among those gilded youths who are proud of the fact that 
they can carry more intoxicants than some of their fellows, and 
bets are not infrequent as to the capacity of individual gnzzlers. 
The wager is settled by the youths stepping on tne scales, and 
weighing their loads. Some of the voracious feeders are to be 
charged by weight for their dinners hereafter, and hence there is 
complaint among those who delight to linger over the flesh-pots. 



Moit 6c Chandon Champagne, Brut Imperial, is the fashionable 
wine— dry and yet with tine grape flavor. 



Dr. Hammond recommends, as a certain cure for chronic indiges- 
tion and dyspepsia, chewing Adams' Pepsin Chewing Gum after each 
meal for half an hour. 



Ladies, call at the Wonder Hat, Flower and Feather Store, 1024- 
26-28 Market street, and see our new line of novelties in hats, flowers 
laces, ribbons, etc. Large stock. Low prices. 



AIDS DIGESTION. 



PROLONGS LIFE. 



A Long Drink. 

Benomm 
Benovem 

CLEANEST OF NATURAL SPARKLING TABLE WATERS 

Springs : Agents : 

Niedermendig O-R CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Germany. 314 Sacramento St., S. F. 

BYRON HOT SPRINGS, 

68 Hiles; 3 Hours; All Rail; 3 Trains Daily. 

THE ONLY 

HUD OR PEAT BATH ON THE COAST. 
Hot Salt Water and Sulphur Baths, 

Infallible cure for rheumatism, liver 
and kidney trouble and kindred complaints. 
JJW" Pamphlets mailed on application. 

C. R. HASON, Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. 0., Cal. 

Palo Alto Stables. 

R. E. MILES, Proprietor. 

S20 O'FARRELL ST San Francisco. 

Victorias, Rockaways, Landaus, Buggies of all kinds. Also Saddle 
Horses. Boarding a specialty. 

These large brick stables offer especial inducements to boarders, being 
new, with all modern improvements, well ventilated and healthy. All 
horses are kept above ground, with first-class attendants. 
Telephone No. 2615. 



July 1, 1393. 



san rmxcisco news letter. 



13 



LATEST TENNIS NEWS. 



THE straggle for the championship begins at Ban Rafael to-day, 
and at there are so many players, equally matched, who have 
entered, it la more than probable that much interest will be cen- 
tred on the games, as nobody can at present vouch for the out- 
come. There has not been much tennis practice at the clubs 
this week, but last week most of the contestants were visiting and 
playing at other clubs to get an insight into the mysteries of their 
opponents' games. Taylor and Tobin have been playing quite a 
good deal of late, and we understand that shortly after the Fourth 
they will go East, and will represent California at the double 
tournament at tbe World's Fair. The Whitney brothers have 
also expressed their intention of entering the same tournament. 
Mr. Taylor has been in receipt of quite a number of invitations 
asking him to play In tournaments in the East, and to one espe- 
cially, which is considered quite an honor — the invitation tour- 
nament of the Essex Club. There are only eight invitations 
issued in all, therefore it is quite pleasing to note that one should 
find its way to California. We hope Mr. Taylor will make a 
record for himself at the Eastern matches, and show them that 
we know a certain amount about tennis, even though we live 
In the secluded West. 

Frank Carter, brother of "Wind-mill" Carter, who played 
against Taylor three years ago, was again beaten in tbe Chis- 
wick Park Tournament. They had some pretty high scores 
this year. Among others, the Hon. E. Pomeroy was beaten byW. 
M. Cranston, 16-14, 12-14, 6-4, 6-4, which is quite a match to play 
on a hot afternoon. Ball-Greene Is becoming one of the cracks, 
and a likely winner of the championship. He won the all- 
comers at the Welsh championship, and defeated Barlow, the 
holder of the cup, 2-6, 6-1, 7-5, 4-6, 6-4. Ernest Renshaw and 
Goodbody won the North ot Ireland championship doubles, and 
Goodbody took the singles easily. 

it seems to us that the San Rafael games, being now best three 
out of five, will be far more interesting than the games held be- 
fore. It requires more skill and more endurance to win a five-set 
match. In some of the earlier tournaments superior players were 
defeated by inferiors, owing to the former "fooling" in the first 
set, and not being able to regain proper form in the second. 
There are many instances, both in singles and doubles, where the 
player on one side has two seta to love and five games to two, 
but fails to win the match, and as an instance of tbe same thing 
in doubles we can recall Bates and Haight having two sets to 
love, five games to two, and forty to thirty, against the Hardy 
brothers, and losing, whereas if tbe match had only been two out 
of three the other side would not have won. It will be an experi- 
ment this year, and we hope it will succeed. 

The championship at Wimbledon takes place this year on July 
10th, and will be followed by the doubles on the 13th. 

0. 8. Campbell, the champion of the United States, has written 
a book. It is entiled "The Game of Lawn Tennis, and How to 
Play It." Records, history, clothing, training, hygiene, hints on 
the game, and advice about courts, are comprised in its con- 
tents. 



The Original Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, is the favorite 
dining place among all people of the city who appreciate the com- 
forts of good service in connection with an excellent dinner. It is 
particularly popular for dinner parties. The Original Swain's has 
been established for years, and is patronized by the best people in 
town. 

If you really want good whisky, and know a good thing when you 
have it, you will try Argonaut Old Bourbon, and then never drink 
any other. Argonaut is sold at all leading bars, hotels and clubs, 
and cannot be excelled. Argonaut is the favorite among men who 
drink whisky. 

For a good dinner at reasonable rates, you cannot go to a more 
suitable place than the Maison Riche, at the corner of Geary street 
and Grant avenue. The Riche easily leads all the rest. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, Mills Build- 
ing, 218-220 Montgomery street. Special attention given to the col- 
lection of rents. Full charge taken of property for absent owners. 



OLD SCALE REMOVED, 

FORMATION OF NEW SCALE PREVENTED, 

Without the aid of chemicals, 
by the use of : 



STEAM 
BOILER 
INCRUSTATIONS. 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER 

Over 800 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

.Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent. In the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

8S0 Fine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

______ 

BOOK i UDEB, PAPER-RULER, PRINTER _B BUNK BOOK MMUFJCTUREB 
536 Clay Street, Near Montgomery, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO DEPOSITORS 



PACIFIC BANK. 

All Depositors in the Pacific Bank are hereby 
requested to immediately present their respec- 
tive Deposit Books to the Bank, so that the same 
may be balanced at once. 

R. H. McDONALD, Jr. , Vice-President. 

By order Board of Bank Commissioners. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, San Francisco. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors, Dividend No. 10 was declared pay- 
able out of the profits of the bank, for the six months ending June 80, 1893, 
at the rate of five per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and one 
sixth per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, and that the same be 
credited to the accounts and payable after July 1, 1893. 
J. E. FARNTJM, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

Dividends on Term Deposits at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum, 
and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of four and one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent 
per annum, for the six months ending June 30, 1898, free of taxes, will be 
payable on'and after July 1, 1893. S. L. ABBOT, Je., Secretary. 

Office— 222 Montgomery street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 
A dividend has been declared for the six mouths ending June 20, 1893, on 
the deposits in the Savings Department of this company, at the rate of five 
(5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and one-sixth (4 1-6) per 
cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and after July 1, 1893. 
J. DALZELL BROWN, Secretary and Treasurer. 
Office— 441 California street. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The California Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-6) p^r cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office— Corner of Powell and Eddy streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

For the six months ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and 

one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Saturday, July 1. 1893. 

CYRUS w. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending with June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and four and one 

sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 
Office— 33 Post Street, San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Baturday, July 1, 1893. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier, 
Office— 326 California street, corner Sansome. Branch— 1700 Market St., 
corner Polk. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits 
and four and one fourth (4^) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893, 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street. 

PROTECT YOUR ROOF FROM 

FIRE. 

ASBESTOS ROOF PAINT. 

Lasts twice as long as any other. 
Covers more square feet than any mixed paint. 
Furnished in three colors— Red, Drab, Brown. 
JAS. A. MAGUIRE. 

S3 First Street, S. F. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 




rpHE sudden break in the market for silver bullion 
Mljyuxtr. | nag bnocKe d tne bottom out of Comstock min- 
ing ahares. The decline haB, however, caused little damage to 
any one, as prices have ruled so low for months past that there 
was not much margin for heavy loss. The future cannot readily 
be foretold with any degree of certainty. There is one thing in 
favor of the Comstock mines that the ore carries a high percentage 
of gold. For those properties which carry silver alone there is 
little hope, unless something is done to restore the price of bull- 
ion to its old standard. Whether this will be done successfully 
is something on which the most experienced financiers hesitate 
to express an opinion. There are several remedies suggested, but 
with the repeal of the Sherman Act as one of the possibilities of 
the near future, the matter ends so far as any government legis- 
lation is concerned. An attempt may be made to carry a bill 
through for the free coinage of silver, which would prove a most 
salutary measure. The suggestion has also been made to accept 
the Bland compromise, providing for the coinage of $2,000,000 
monthly, raising the rates of silver from 1-16 to 1-20. The trouble, 
however, seems to lie more in the hoarding of silver coin, of 
which there is an immense amount locked up in the government 
vaults. If a large proportion of this money could be brought 
into general circulation, it would prove a more effectual remedy. 
It is satisfactory to know, however, that this State will not suffer 
from the depreciation of silver, all business here being transacted 
on a gold basis. But for the general prosperity of the country at 
large it is to be hoped that something will be done to settle the 
silver question as speedily as possible, and for all time. 

$$ $ 

A FEW years ago the News Letter had a single-handed battle 
for the rights of the hydraulic miner, the only assistance be- 
ing received from the press of Nevada, Placer and other northern 
counties of California. It was then considered a crime to even 
suggest that the miner had as much right to earn a livelihood at 
his business as the grain grower had at his. Times have changed. 
The seed planted then has borne good fruit, and it is a pleasure 
to note that one of the staunchest advocates of the hydraulic 
miner to-day is found in a paper which only a few months ago 
could only review the chances for the resumption of work in the 
mines through the sombre-hued glasses of an anti-debris enthusi- 
ast. The only trouble is that agitation now will amount to noth- 
ing in the way of expediting the early resumption of work at the 
mines. The struggle will be to evade the red-tape of Federal 
officialdom as much as possible, as everything now depends upon 
the Government Commission. It is impossible to realize that the 
merchants of this city have yet opened their eyes to the true 
situation of affairs, recognizing the fact that by their supine ac- 
tion during the past decade they have lost millions in gold which 
should now be in circulation. Had they taken the proper stand 
in the first place an extensive trade would now be carried on 
with twenty or thirty flourishing towns in the mountain region, 
the inhabitants of which have disappeared with the closing down 
of the mines. There are many valuable properties lying idle at 
the present moment which could have run steadily along with- 
out injury to any one were it not for the unwarranted interfer- 
ence of the Valley combination, which has been permitted to ruin 
the prosperity of the State to humor* an impudent prejudice. If 
there is a genuine desire to increase the gold production of 
California up to its old time standard, something more effective 
will have to be done than talking into empty air. The merchants 
of this city should get together and put sufficient money up to 
assist mine owners who have been impoverished in a battle for 
their rights, to open up their properties. Some good would then 
result from the movement which has hitherto been limited to a 
semi-political campaign. 



THERE are negotiations now pending for the purchase of the 
Sumner mines of Kern county. These are very valuable, 
and it is a wonder that they have not been taken in hand long ago 
by persons possessed of the necessary means to exploit them on 
a large scale and with a proper outfit. Many years ago Senator 
Jones had an interest in them, before he was so rich as he is to- 
day, but the property finally got into the possession of some 
storekeepers in the vicinity, who lacked either the brains or the 
ability to open up the mines to advantage. There is a mill on 
this ground now which should be replaced by a new one, with 
nine stamps. There is plenty of water convenient for all the 
power required, and this should take the place of steam. The ore 
is free milling, of a grade which will yield a handsome profit, and 
there is plenty of it, ready for extraction. There are several other 
deals in gold properties mentioned in different parts of the State, 
and from all appearances the quartz mines of California will soon 
again be in good demand. 



THETominil mines of Mexico, the promotion of which created 
a Bhortlived sensation in mining circles some years ago, owing 
to the manner in which the shares were taken up by speculators 
in London, are said to be mixed up in a hopeless tangle. The 
management of the property is blamed for the affair, and a total 
loss is predicted for the shareholders. An agent of the company 
named Gosset, who was the original promoter, is believed to be 
somewhere in Mexico, unwilling to face the trouble which awaits 
him in this city and in London. There is a great deal of talk 
in lccal mining circles over the affair, and the scandal connected 
with the management is such that it cannot be kept covered up 
much longer. Gosset is known herein connection with the sale 
of a valuable California mine, which was disrupted in some man- 
ner through his agency. The vendors also allege bad faith, and 
a quarrel over the division of the spoils among the English syndi- 
cate, so that there is little grief displayed over the news that the 
wily individual has run a-muck on his latest venture. 
$ $ $ 

MISCELLANEOUS. Q° f ME ?i en * fican * **?** f™ Sphered 
O from the fire statistics of the twenty 

largest European cities fncorporated in the Consular reports sent 

to the Department of State at Washington, D. C. According to 

these figures, the number of fires for 1000 population is as follows : 

London, 68 per cent; Paris, .43; Berlin, 2.55; St. Petersburg, .57; 
Constantinople, .65; Vienna, .71; Hamburg, 1.17; Glasgow, 88; 
Warsaw, 22; Rome, 76; Marseilles, 1.13; Milan, 1.15; Leeds, .75; 
Sheffield, .29; Turin. .88; Copenhagen, 80; Odessa, 2.31; Dresden, 
1.21; Edinburgh, 1.43; Belfast, .22. 

. $ ?S 

The same for the five largest cities of Asia, Africa and South 
America is as follows": 

Bombay, .14; Bankok, Siam, .008; Buenos Ayres, .13; Monte- 
video, Uruguay, .19; Cairo, Egypt, .30. 



For the twenty-five largest cities of the United States the com- 
mittee's statistics for 1892 show the following percentage of fires 
per 1000 population : 

New York, 2.24; Chicago, 2.46; Philadelphia, 1.34; Brooklyn, 1.68; 
St. Louis, 1.68; Boston, 1.69; Baltimore, 2.40; Buffalo, 1.61; Cincin- 
nati, 2.58; Detroit, 2.46; Cleveland. 3.64; San Francisco, 1.96; Wash- 
ington, 1.32; New Orleans, 2.72; Minneapolis, 2.88; Newark, 1.83; 
Louisville, 2.04; Jersey City, 2.66; St. Paul, 2.51; Omaha, 1.57; Kan- 
sas City, 4.39; Providence, 3.56; Rochester, 1.71; Indianapolis, 2.69; 
Columbus, 2.33. 

$ $ j 

The comparison of the American and European figures is sig- 
nificant. It is further emphasized by a comparison of the total 
losses for the year. Paris, Berlin and Constantinople, with popu- 
lations, respectively, of 1,424,705, 1,533,000, and 1,000,000, had 
losses, respectively, of $917,444, $348,834, and $591,000. 



THE Cogan story does not tend to improve the position which 
Flood, the convicted ex-bank cashier now holds before the 
community. The mistake was made in selecting a dead man to 
bear the burden of crime, and his advisers, whoever they may 
be, have selected poor material of which to weave a net of sym- 
pathy around their erring friend. In the absence of all proof , 
people will give little credence to this latter-day revelation, as 
there was just enough cunning displayed in the methods adopted 
to screen the theft from his trusting employers, to prepare for fur- 
ther trickery of any kind which might promise relief from San 
Quentin. Cogan may have executed orders for Flood, but if he 
did so there is every reason for the presumption that it was sim- 
ply as a go-between with the broker. An innocent man, and 
especially if holding the confidential position which Flood did, 
would have had no necessity to shoulder an ordinary business 
transaction until it placed him in the position of a thief. That 
the money went in the stock market is morally certain, and that 
Flood was personally responsible for the transactions which in- 
volved the loss of the stolen coin will be carried home to every 
one with a stronger conviction than ever, from the fact that the 
reputation of the dead has been attacked in such an unseemly 
manner. 

JOHN HAYS HAMMOND, the California mining engineer, and 
President of the Bunker Hill and Sullivan mines of Idaho, left 
for South Africa during the week. He has been retained by a 
wealthy London syndicate, which owns the majority of the rich 
gold mines at Johannesburg, to look after their interests there, 
and to re-model the numerous reduction plants which are scat- 
tered over the district. Mr. Hammond is one of the most popular 
young men in the State, throughout which he is widely known, 
and the success which he has achieved through a rare professional 
ability, is the subject for much congratulation among his friends. 
He will stay at Johannesburg for about six months, if the present 
arrangements remain unchanged. A millwright from this city 
accompanies him, to supervise the construction of new reduction 
works on the latest plans adopted in California. 



July 1, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTER. 



15 




"Hear the Crier:" " What the devil art thou?" 

" One that will pUTtho-levil. sir. with vou." 

THOSE old warhorses. the Pioneers, are about to hold another 
annual election, and, as usual, opposing forces are aligned in 
battle array. The memory of man runneth not to the time when 
the Pioneers held an election around which a big and bitter fight 
did not center. Their fights are somewhat like the Civil War. 
Daring the battle all the old gray-beards toil to the utmost to 
down the other fellows: but as soon as the result is announced, 
let it be what way it may, Israelite and Philistine join hands over 
the bodies of the fallen; and pledge renewed friendship at the 
banquet board. The older the pioneers get, and the more reduced 
in numbers, the more bitter it seems do their annual contests be- 
come. Why the old fellows should tight as they do over the 
empty honnr that attaches to office in their society, is something 
that the uninitiated cannot understand. Still we are glad to see 
them contesting. It shows to the world at large that the men 
who delved in the bosom of California over two score years ago, 
are yet vigorous. They are made of the right stuff, and it is to 
be hoped that their descendants will be as lively forty years from 
now as the Pioneers are to-day. 



B 



OY- 
Toy. 



Gun; 
Fun. 



Toy 
Boy 

Toy 
Boy 



Burst — 
Hearsed. 



Gone; 



Done. 



A PARK policeman made an exhibition of himself last Sunday 
afternoon while trying to lasso a tagless dog that was trotting 
down the road beside a buggy. The policeman attracted the at- 
tention of several hundred people, the dog escaped, as a matter of 
course, and several horses were frightened by the anticB of the 
policeman. I have had occasion, heretofore, to refer to the peelers 
of the park, and again call the attention of the Park Commis- 
sioners to the all too apparent fact that their uniformed represen- 
tatives should be taken down a peg or two, and made to appreci- 
ate the fact, of which they are now apparently oblivious, that 
they are the servants of the people. I am a law-abiding citizen, 
and have a great abhorrence of personal violence, but — I would 
feel constrained to say " ameu " if I read an account of an indig- 
nant taxpayer giving one of these insolent coppers a deserved 
thumping. 

ALL this correspondence about the Aggie and the Jessie is very 
funny to the reader who knows nothing about the merits of 
the case, and cares less. When two bodies of able-bodied, sensi- 
ble men get wranging over a certain newspaper statement, and 
write letters to the newspaper expressive of their views in the 
matter, of course there is only one result — that is to prove that 
the newspaper is correct. The only man worthy of congratula- 
tion connected with the Aggie-Jessie controversy seems to be the 
reporter who wrote up the account of the yacht cruise. He has 
managed to draw unusual attention to himself, create greater dis- 
affection between the two bodies of yachtsmen, thus opening the 
way to future stories, and to advertise his paper. That young 
man possesses the elements of genius; his salary shoald be raised 
at once. 

ANDREW BLOOM, the twelve-dollar-a-week bookkeeper and 
lady-killer of Oakland, must be a very credulous youth if he 
expects any one at all to believe a single word of his tale of woe, 
about being surprised by burglars, bound, gagged and robbed. It 
is too gauzy for even an Oakland man to put any stock in, and 
what an Oakland man will not believe must be preposterously 
false. Andrew and his twelve dollars a week have been engaged 
to be married seven times, says the former; the latter, however, 
jingle dolefully against one another in the young man's pockets, 
and long, and long for companions. Andrew should take a long, 
quiet vacation at some seaside resort. We suggest San Quentin, 
which is a very pretty place. 

A noticeable tact about the cowboy cross-country races is tha tthe 
man with the bad name was distanced, and the racer who 
was attired like an ordinary citizen and had a commonplace 
name was the winner. Rattlesnake Pete came in last, though 
from that name we might think Pete a terrible fellow. It is 
always the way, though, you may notice, the fellow who starts 
out with a great blare of trumpets usually gets left, while the 
quiet, determined man gains his end. 



COUNCILMAN BARNARD, of Oakland, announces In stento- 
rian tones that tbe tiger walketh abroad in Oakland of nights, 
and that he Intends to do what he can to stop tbe prowling of 
the voracious beast. The Chief of Police swears by the moon that 
there is no gambling game within his preserves, and be adds that 
he is insulted by the remarks of Mr. Barnard. A mean-spir- 
ited man says that the Chief is accustomed to being " insulted," 
and the fact that he says himself he is insulted, is conclusive 
proof that gambling prevails at Oakland. I fear that Mr. Bar- 
nard's constituents are doomed to be plucked. A man that gam- 
bles expects to be plucked, anyhow, and a man that gambles in 
Oakland deserves to be. 

JOSIE EVANS, a pretty vagrant, who wbb released upon her 
own recognizance by the Police Court, upon agreeing to go to 
the Beulah Home of the 8alvation Army, has been returned to 
prison. Josie says the Salvationists wanted her to march on 
their parade and hold herself up on street corners as a " horrible 
example." This she declined to do; hence her present immure- 
ment. We fear that Josie is luxurious, for she seems to prefer 
a comfortable cell with free board to lung-developing psalm-sing- 
i ng. That holy man, C. R. Bennett, Secretary of the Society for the 
Suppression of Vice, should wrestle with Josie, and show her the 
error of her ways. Bennett is a great success as an evangelist, 
and— Josie is a pretty girl. 

THERE is one thing about the Reporter's Derby, to be run 
presently at the Bay District track, and that is, no horse will 
be pulled in the race. They will go for all they are worth. Why? 
Well, it is not because reporters are any more honest than any- 
body else, only they don't give each other away. The horses 
will go for all that is in them, simply because their riders will be 
unable to control them. The life of a reporter requires wide and 
varied attainments, but he haB no call for the peculiar gifts of a 
horse jockey, and no reporter cultivates what he does not need 
in his avocation. It will be a runaway race, and the lightest man 
will most probably win. 

THAT a horse should drown itself rather than return to Oak- 
land, having escaped thence, is but one more exposition of the 
vaunted common sense of the noble brutes. As a matter of fact, 
the horse seems to have had more sense than its owner, who 
threatened to stop the ferry-boat unless he was paid for the ani- 
mal. Just how stopping the boat would have helped matters is 
not quite clear, though Mr. HobsoD may have preferred to re- 
main adrift on the bay forever than to take a ride on the Sev- 
enth-street local up to Broadway. Any man who has taken that 
ride on a Sunday afternoon will appreciate his feelings. 

WE are surprised at the Call, and we are more surprised at 
Reno. One Hines fired five shots at one Middleton in the 
Reno streets the other day, and hit his man only once, making a 
slight wound. "Wherefore the Call heads its item "Poor Marks- 
manship of a Nevadan," as if surprised that any self-respecting 
Renoite could possibly have fired all the charges of his revolver 
without killing some one. Reno must be getting proud, or 
cemetery lots have increased in price. Fresno continues to carry 
the palm as the champion "bad town" of the Coast. 

MISS BLANCHE CTJLBERTSON, of Louisville, disdained her 
share of $500,000 in her father's estate, gave up her hope of a 
fortune, and married her own true love. Blanche is a girl after 
our own heart. Such devotion — such superiority to the sordid- 
ness of which we all have too much, is touching in these days. 
By the way, I wonder whether Blanche has commenced suit to 
break the will yet. 

THE result of the trial at San Jose of the Salvationists who were 
arrested for violating a city ordinance by holding street meet- 
ings within certain proscribed boundaries, will be watched with 
great interest by the general public. There is no denying that 
the Salvationists do much good in their own peculiar way; nor, 
on the other hand, is there any question but they are frequently 
disturbers of peace, and should, therefore, be subdued or sup- 
pressed. 

WILLIAM SAVAGE, the bootmaker, who is arguing his 
claims to the Blythe estate before Judge Coffey, though not 
a lawyer, has acquired many of the tricks of the expounders. 
On Wednesday he introduced his own face in evidence to assist 
in his claim. This is a favorite trick of lawyers, not a few of 
whom travel on their faces alone, wherefore it is that their cheek. 
becomes bo very hard and pronounced. 

THE new offices of the City and County Treasurer are said to be 
the very handsomest in the City Hall. The desks are all of 
quarter sawed oak , and the grill-work in the railings and wickets 
is said to be the best ever seen on this Coast. Yet the city is not 
able to pay the salaries of its employes. 

IT is perfectly in preservation of the unities that Phil Crim- 
mins should come home from New York in a box coat. He 
has cut his coat according to his cloth. Phil has been in a box 
ever since last November, and a pretty bad one at that. 

SENOR McFadden of Texas married Florence Hopkins of Ala- 
meda, notwithstanding the objections of the girl's mother. The 
Seuor's mother-in-law will now follow him to Texas, where she 
will teach the McFadden to dance. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 



IT IS JULY. 



It is July 



It is July 



It is July 



It is July 



It is July 



It is July 



When the June days fly; 
When daisies fade out in the dells; 
When bluebells ring their own death-knells; 

When fairest spring blooms die. 

When south winds sigh; 
When dairy cows stand in the stream; 
When through the grain the sickles gleam ; 

When harvest wains go by. 

When young quails cry; 
When thirsty crows perch on the trees; 
When corn blades cut the summer breeze; 

When blows the wheat awry. 

When ponds go dry; 
When hills in sober robes are rolled ; 
When dells of emerald turn to gold; 

When dead leaves drop and lie. 

When things just fry; 
When night glows like a fiery noon; 
When sultry dogs bark at the moon; 

When courting cats climb high. 

When burns the sky; 
When hopper-grasses come again; 
When fevered bull-frogs howl for rain; 

When glowing suns draw nigh. 



THE 

sniTH 

riOQUETTE 
CARPETS. 

The most artistic low-priced pile fabric carpet- 
ing, of GUARANTEED DURABILITY, in the 
market. 

We are now offering a larger assortment of pat- 
terns than ever before, and AT THE PRICE of 
a Medium or Best Quality Brussels. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

Carpets, Furniture, and Upholstery, 
641=647 MARKET ST. 

JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 

CITY IRON WORKS. 



Tom Gbegoky. 



BASEBALL NOTES. 



AT this writing, the future of the California Baseball League 
does not look over-promising. The attendance at the game 
laat Sunday was the smallest Sunday attendance since the grounds 
were opened. The San Franciscos went to Los Angeles, and 
their trip was a financial failure, as the manager of the club did 
noi receive money enough as his share to pay the expenses of 
his visit. The Stockton team went to Los Angeles last Tuesday 
in a somewhat demoralized condition, and without their man- 
ager. Unless the Fourth of July game draws a large crowd, 
some of the players will have to borrow money to return home. 
At present, however, they have no home; they have suffered 
with Stockton, and have not yet obtained a settlement in Sacra- 
mento. Things from a baseball point of view are looking very 
gloomy in Los Angeles, and it is among the possibilities that that 
city will be dropped from the league. The present manager of 
the Stocktons cannot live at Stockton and manage the team in 
Sacramento, so he will have to retire from baseball. Oakland has 
not paid for years, and is used only to fill up between dates. Tip 
O'Neill has been signed by New Orleans. He was always faith- 
ful to his employer and his interests, and will be a good man for 
the owners of the New Orleans club to secure. The "Western 
League has disbanded. The fortunes of the Southern League are 
not improving, if the reports may be relied on. Irwin, of the 
Oaklands, is likely to wear a Boston uniform before the season 
closes. Oakland, at this writing, is in the lead for the pennant. 



MR. GOODENOUGH, of Oakland, has come out in defense of 
the Geary law. That is good enough, so far as it goes, for it 
gives us the rare spectacle in these days of a preacher who puts 
the pulpit en rapport with the populace; but Mr. Goodenough 
can hardly hope, for all that, to escape the censure of those 
bigots, his superiors. There is no room in the pulpit now for 
men who think abreast of the age, and such a man Mr. Good- 
enough appears to be. There were certain laws good in the time 
of Moses and of Pontius Pilate, and if these laws will not fit con- 
ditions now, then conditions must be bent. That is all there is 
in it. The progress of mankind has nothing to do with the case 
whatever, and it is precisely the logical falling out of this dogma 
that has lost the pulpit all the influence that it ever had. Mr. 
Goodenough is to be congratulated upon breaking away from the 
old traditions, but he is also to be commiserated. He is in the 
wrong pew. 

J. M. Litchfield, of 12 Post street, easily takes place as the best 
and most popular tailor in the city. He has been engaged in 
business here for years, and has always enjoyed the confidence of the 
community. Colonel Litchfield makes a specialty of uniforms, 
regalias and other appurtenances of military, naval and society 
outfits. 



Office 51 Fremont Street, 
S-A-nsr :^:R,.A_:isrcisco, - - c-a_iil. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Boilers, Engines, Pumps and achinery of Every Description. 

Patent Lead-Lined Coupled Tubing, for use as 

Water Pipe , for Sale Cheap 

LAVER, MULLANY &, LAVER, 

ARCHITECTS, 

Furnish plans, specifications, and Superintendence for the construction 

or renovation of dwelling houses, and every description of building. 
Office : 93 Flood Building. Cor. 4th and Market Sts., S. F. 



LOUIS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Steel Ceilings, Wall Paper, Lincrusta Walton, Papier Mache 

Parquet Flooring, Moorish Fret Work, 

Frescoing. Wall Mouldings. 

943 and 945 Market St., between 5th and 6!h, San Francisco. 



Are "Sou Going to the World's Fair?— Will you spend the sum- 
mer in the country? If you leave the city at all, deposit your val- 
uables — such as trunks, boxes, silverware, paintings, bric-a-brac, etc. 
— with the California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. , corner of Mont- 
gomery and California streets, and be relieved of all anxiety for their 
safety. Storage rates low. Boxes to rent at $5 a year and upwards. 




includes the great temperance drink 

Hires'^ 

t gives New Life to the Old Folks, 
Pleasure to the Parents, 
Health to the Children. 




Good for All— flood All the Time. 

25 cent package mak 
gallons. Be sure and g 
Hires.' 




July t. HM 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




THE prettiest lamp shade that we bare come across lor a long 
time was an exact replica of one in Marie Antoinette's salon 
at Trianon. Imagine a shade almost as wide above as below and 
covered with rose-colored silk, the inner side puckered, the outside 
stretched lightly and covered with a mass of gold spangles. In 
the center is a medallion thickly embroidered with gold beads, pearls 
and colored spangle?. At the summit and round the edge is a deli- 
cate, lace-like passementerie, which serves to soften the effect of the 
toot ensemble. An exquisite lamp shade for a boudoir is made of 
faint azure crepe, shirred finely and then drawn over a lining of pink 
silk. Two large windmill bows of pale silk and azure shot moire 
fasten a graceful garland of shaded cornflowers to the left side, and a 
deep fringe of cornflowers and pink heather droops all around the 
lower edge of this tasteful " abat-jour." 



Women will be interested in learning that in London the latest pet- 
ticoat is not a petticoat — it is a knickerbocker. Many fashionable 
women are wearing knickerbockers made of satin and brocade, very 
large and very full, and reaching to the knee. Those who wear the 
petticoat now have it made of brocade or watered silk ; very little lace 
is put on a skirt to be worn in walking, but quantities of lace are used 
on skirts for evening wear. A French gown of a demure and dove- 
like appearance is of mastic gray crepon, lined with white silk and 
trimmed with Valenciennes insertions on both skirt and corsage. A 
black and white foulard is trimmed with pleated ruffles in white crepe 
banded with black. A gown of mauve foulard has ruffles of delicate 
mauve silk muslin. The reign of everything airy and floating and 
graceful is to be chronicled. 

One of the latest fashionable fads is to have the bed as little 
like a bed as possible. Happy is the fashionable youth who 
can secure such a quaint old Dutch bedstead with the high, 
swanlike curve of tester and the frame of highly polished mahogany 
with inlaid sides, after the fashion of the best old Dutch pieces. This 
antique couch is placed in the corner, with a canopy of old brocade, 
which is lined with faded rose pink satin, and is held in place by a 
curiously wrought metal crown, from which falls a flounce of beauti- 
ful old lace, the crown being suspended by four chains from the ceil- 
ing, and the sides of the canopy looped back against the wall. 

Blotting-paper pink is tbe name of a new colored linen sold by the 
Royal School of Art Needlework in London. This linen, as well as 
pale green, blue and yellow, English women use for teacloths, chair 
and hassock covers, and bed spreads. The patterns wrought on the 
linens are done in white silk or crewels. 



The ribbon work of the last century is a fad of the present day. It is 
much used for the ornamentation of silk covered boxes, cushions and 
screens, and is done with Tom Thumb ribbons in those dull, faded 
tints that mimic the decoration of the revolutionary period as it has 
been handed down to us. 

A dab of powder is often much and suddenly needed. A little flat 
bag of chamois, punctured and filled with powder in a coarse cheese- 
cloth covering, may be carried in the pocket and very skillfully con- 
cealed in the handkerchief during application. 

A group-vase is to be seen in the form of three kneeling cherubst 
who support on their shoulders jugs tilted to a jaunty angle. The 
effect, when these last are filled with flowers, is charming. 

A rich and beautiful portiere is made of two shades of green plush. 
It is ornamented in a thistle pattern with gold thread, and has a heavy 
knotted fringe of silk across the top. 

Lillian Bbddaed coaches ladies and gentlemen for the dramatic pro- 
fession; appearances arranged, Shakespearean Academy, 509 Hyde street. 

Squint in children's eyes prevented without surgical operation, consult 
free of charge, C. Muller, Oculist Optician , 135 Mon tgomery street. 

Mothers be sure and use 
children while teething. 



'Mrs. Winslowa' Soothing Syrup" for your 



REMOVAL 

CITY OFFICE 

CYPRESS LAWN CEMETERY. 

TO 9 CITY HALL AVE. 



(T^idsummor Qearape<? Sal© 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 
Sremeodous Qut5 io prices. 



— ON— 

<5loal(5, Dress Qoods, Sillfs, Caqes, Ffibbops, 

parasols, (Jloues, 5rimmir;?s, 

JHaijdlKrer/itfs, /T\<?9'5 R^isl^gs, jHosi<?ry, 

Ur;deruj(?ar, Corsets, (^urtaiQS, 

Ipousefurr/istyii}^, Ete. 

Mail orders promptly executed. 

Goods delivered free in Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, San 
Rafael, Tibnron, Saasalito, San Qaentin, Mill Valley, Ross 
Station and Blitnedale. 




Murphy Building. 



MARKET. JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 

Beauty Lost Easily Regained. 

No more wrinkles; old age defied. Dimples made on cheeks or 
chin in twenty minutes. Noses straightened. Superfluous hair re- 
moved. Splotches removed. Mouths made small. Bust developed 
three times the size in three months. 

DR. CARPENTER, 

ROOMS 27 and 28 1346 MARKET ST. 

The Only Dermotolooist on the Pacific Coast. 

Jgg^, REMOVED 

TO 121 POST STREET, 



BET. KEARNY ST. AND GRANT AVE. 



Y^UdiaN 

Disfilledaml bodied by 

WALrin^iLLE, Canada. Y t 1 1 1 J^ 



Whisky 



1 he ac;e and iK'nuinenessof this whisky are guaranteed by Ihc Excise Deport MCI 
of Ihc Canadian Government tjy cettificale over the capsule of every b'ultlc.Frofi 
Hit moment of manufacture until this certificate is affixed the whisk) never 
leaves the 'custody ot'the Excise olfK-ers.No other Government in Ihc world provide 
for consumers this independent and absolute guarantee of purify and ripeness 
Canadian Club'VhisUy is particularly adapted for medicinal use. 

BELLING AGENTS 

WILLIAM WOLFF 8c CO.' 

5AN Ff?ANCI BCD, E A L. 




SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 



NO foreign news this week ia perhaps of greater importance than 
the announcement made in the British Parliament that the 
Indian Council has passed an act for the immediate closing of the 
Indian mints to the free coinage of silver. Those who have 
watched Great Britain's attitude at the late Monetary Conference 
might have anticipated such a move, but to most people the news 
came with the full force of an unexpected event. India has averted 
the further decrease of the rupee by a radical measure of self- 
protection, and there is little doubt that in our country the repeal 
of the Sherman Act will now become a matter of course. At least 
it is difficult to see what else can be done to restore confidence in 
monetary circles, since never before has the silver market been so 
depressed. The supporters of the Sherman Act hope that by per- 
mitting a further decline of silver Great Britain will be forced to 
enter into some international agreement; the present British gov- 
ernment, however, has so firmly resisted all offers of that kind 
heretofore that it is not likely to change its position now, which 
would be tantamount to a confession of a mistaken policy. 



The internecine war in the Irish camp is in fall blast, and the 
Parnellites, prompted by their hatred against the anti-Parnelliles, 
appear to be ready to wreck even the home-rule bill. But the 
most astonishing feature in the new turn of affairs is the appeal 
of Irish members of Parliament to American sympathizers for 
funds to fight against Mr. Gladstone's home-rule scheme, not- 
withstanding the fact that in past years they have clamored for 
American assistance in their etforts to enable the present Prime 
Minister to introduce his home-role bill. Of course the excuse 
given for the new appeal is that Mr. Gladstone's offers do not 
satisfy them, although in the eyes of all non-Irish they seem 
ruthlessly extravagant. But would anything short of absolute 
separation from Great Britain satisfy the Parnellites? Apparently 
not. 8ince even the present home-rule bill meets with the unani- 
mous opposition of all non-Irish members of Parliament, except 
the few Radicals, it is beyond doubt that a home-rule scheme on 
the Parnellite lines would have not the slightest show of success 
in the present House of Commons, since even the British Radicals 
would not support it. Under tbese circumstances one would 
wish to know what the American money is to be used for. 
For dynamite and assassinations? The suggestion seems cruel, 
but is justified by precedent, and the Americans appealed to will, 
no doubt, recognize that by contributing money for an agitation 
against Mr. Gladstone's bill they would annihilate the last 
chances of even a moderate measure of home-rule for Ireland, in 
which they still believe, although these chances seem very 
slight, indeed, to all but those who are blinded by their admira- 
tion for Mr. Gladstone and their hatred against the conservative 
element in English politics. 

There seems to be an epidemic of rowdyism in the European 
Parliaments of recent years. The scenes in the British House of 
Commons since the home-rule fight began have disgusted most 
of the respectable popular representatives in England. They 
were surpassed, however, by far in the French Chamber and 
almost equaled by the disturbances in the German Reichstag 
created by Rector Ahlwardt and the anti-semites, and now we 
hear from Rome that Premier Giolotti has been called a liar and 
a coward in the Italian ChambeV If this state of things con- 
tinues, the term "representatives of the people" will become an 
insult to the people who elected them. 

Riots have taken place at Rangoon, in Burmah, in consequence 
of the order issued by Mr. Fleming, the British magistrate, pro- 
hibiting the Moslems from sacrificing a cow near the Hindoo 
temple. Our daily contemporaries, as the headings with which 
they publish the cablegram containing this news indicate, seem 
to imagine that the action of the British authorities was an undue 
interference with native religious ceremonies, while, on the con- 
trary, it was the consequence of due regard for the religious preju- 
dices of the Hindoo population. The sacrifice intended by the 
Moslems was not objected to, but its performance near a temple 
of the Hindoos to whom the cow is sacred, would have been an 
insult to the Hindoo population. Had the sacrifice actually been 
performed, a more sanguine riot even than the one which occurred 
would probably have taken place, and the British authorities only 
did their duty in trying to prohibit an intentional and unne- 
cessary insult to the non-Mohammedan population. 

It is stated now that the frightful disaster of the battle-ship 
Victoria was due to an error committed by Rear Admiral Mark- 
ham. Even if this statement should turn out to be correct, it 
does not invalidate the argument of those who maintain that the 
construction of gigantic battle-ships is unwise, as even the best of 
them are at the mercy of a powerful ram and of torpedoes, and 



that it is therefore wiser to distribute the naval strength over a 
number of ships of less dimensions, so that one single accident in 
warfare should not suffice to annihilate so great a percentage of 
the tonnage power of the fleet. 

Emperor William's majority on the re-opening of the Reichstag 
will be a scanty one at best, and whether it will not be decreased 
still more, or entirely annihilated, may depend on the form in 
which the army bill will be reintroduced. 

Cornelius Herz, the notorious Panama Canal hoodler, ia re- 
ported to be dying. His death will, at all events, prevent the 
French authorities from enacting another farce by inaugurating a 
sham-trial. 



John W. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, has the best line of gen- 
tlemen's furnishing goods in the city. All the dressy men of town 
patronize his store. 

Lucile & Stone, formerly in the White House building, have re- 
moved temporarily to 128 Post street until their new rooms opposite 
are completed, and are selling millinery at greatly reduced prices. 

For Wedding Cakes, Charlotte Russe, Ice Cream, fine Cakes and 
Pastry, go to Page & Falch's Restaurant and Bakery, corner Mason and 
Turk streets, junction of Market. 

X-CTSTTIR AZEsTQIE - 

FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company, 
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL. $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000, 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'l Managers. 

AO to 44 PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 

Assets $2,607,675 76 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,139,766 99 

HAZARDS INSURED. 

EMPLOYEES AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILER EXPLOSION, 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOSSES. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, and 
FIDELITY. 
MAXWELL & BERRY, General Agents, 

421 California Street. 

SVEA FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF GOTHENBURG. 

Funds invested 14,661,924 

Shareholders' Obligations 2,133,333 

Total Assets 6,795,257 

We beg to notify the Agents and Policy-holders of the above company 
that we have been appointed its General Agents upon the Pacific Coast and 
are authorized to collect all of the unpaid premiums and accounts. We 
solicit on behalf of this deservedly popular and well known company the 
favor of the renewals of all expiring policies and an additional share of 
your good business.: 

BROWN, CRAIG & CO., General Agents, 

407-409 Montgomery Street. 

Represent also. PHENIX, of Brooklyn; THE A MERICAN FIRE; PENS 
8YLVANIA FIRE; THE GREENWICH INSURANCE CO. 
Total Assets over $30,000.000. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest r*.^s of !nt6?e8'=on Qralngtorsd In Warehouses! 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

_ ^1 [ESTABLISHED 1782. „ _ ■ . 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, \ 

E3 " ..: ", -*"~ r ~^C = = 1473 California Street, San Francisco. 
f- 



1, 1893. 



svx FRANCISCO NEWS I-l l n R. 




19 



A SONG OF THE FLAG.— HVittrr Benia rollock. 



w 



HO breaks shall pay— the saying's worn; 
But heed it ere the Hag be torn '. 
Who breaks shall pay— the time has come, 
With blare of bugle, beat of drum, 
To herald it, by sea and lane. 
That Saxon, Celt, and Norman stand 
Still foot to foot, still hand to hand. 
Still to the Uag their faith they hold— 
The flag that's new, the flag that's old. 

Wave high, wave high the Union's Flag, 

And God for merry England. 

And what should quench our Union lamp 
But treachery within the camp ? 
The traitors speed their eager race; 
For Patriotism ? No— for Place! 
Then be it ours their plans to meet, 
To prove that patriot hearts still beat. 
Recall the days of hard campaign, 
When in the bitterest storm of pain, 
When cannon roared to bullet's ping, 
The selfsame rage, the selfsame swing 
Bvsrnt Irish, English, hearts to one, 
Swelled to the highest organ tone, 
Wrote history as one, not two, 
In the great name of Waterloo. 

Wave high, wave high the Union's Flag, 

And God for merry England. 

Wave high again the Union flag, 

Drop low to lowest depths the rag 

That treacherous dismay would weave! 

Again, 'tis ours to retrieve 

The glories Empire has given, 

The glories earth has caught from Heaven. 

Who breaks shall pay— the tale is worn. 

Yet shall we see our splendor shorn, 

To give the weak a fretful joy, 

To make the Empire a toy, 

A byword that will curse the men, 

Who think of now and not of then 7 

Wave high, wave high the Union's Flag, 
And God for merry England. 



A LOVE SONG.— Frank L. Stanton in Atlanta Constitution. 

Sweetheart, there is no splendor 
In all God's splendid skies 

Bright as the love-light tender 
That dwells in thy dear eyes. 

Sweetheart, there are no blisses 
Like those thy lips distill; 

Of all the world's sweet kisses 
Thy kiss is sweetest still. 

Sweetheart, no white dove flying 

Had e'er as soft a breast 
As this sweet hand that's lying 

Clasped in my own — at rest. 

Sweetheart, there is no glory 

That clusters round my life 
Bright as this bright, sweet story, 
" My sweetheart and my wife." 



JUNE.— W. J. Lampton in Godey's. 



A dewy kiss of fragrant lips 
Upon the budding roses' tips; 
A shower of sunshine falling slow 
Upon the lily's breast of snow; 

A touch of languor on the air, 

A living poem everywhere; 

A song of birds in sweet attune 

With earth and sky— and this is June. 



ROSE LEAVES.— Flavel Scott Mines, in July Lippincott's. 

The perfume of these dead, brown leaves 
Is like the memories which cling 

About some men — whose goodly sheaves 
Are not of Death's keen harvesting. 



I ILT S XT U A. 3ST C IE . 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 
Herbert I.. Low, Manager for the Pacific 1'oaNl Branch, 

220 Nil lisnillc St., S. 1". 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S. 534.795.72 



GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 

232 California St., S. F.,< al. 



3PJLCIJTIC 3DEF^.iaTJVnE13SrT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - t 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, $23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded A. D. 1710. 

Cash Assets, $10,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - 12,510,368. 



Will. J. LANDERS, Uen'l Agent, 20* Sansome St., San Francisco, Gal. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets 119,724,638.46. 

President. KKHJAMIN F. STEVENS. 1 Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. 8EXTON, S. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Pacific Branch, 214 Sansome St., S. F. 

SWAIN & MURDOCH:, City Agents. 

THE 



FIRE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed 910,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 e, 124,067.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up ( 500,000 

Assets , 3,181,763 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,525,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 

€lty Office— 501 Montgomery St. General Office — 401 Mont'g, St. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office — Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomer 

CEO. F. GRANT, Manage 

BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL J6, 700,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street, San Francisco 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPiTAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
mav be sustained, 
may ue bub. HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

410 California St. , San Francisco, Ca 1 



20 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 1,1893. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour— Demand light; Extras J4@M.20. Superfine, *2.80®t3.25. 

Wheat— Light trade; Shipping, S1.22K; Milling, J1.2t@J1.30 per cental 

Barley is slack; Brewing, 90c. @*1.02V;; Feed, 80c.@S/".;c. per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, Jl.50@tl.00; Feed, Jl.15oJl.25 per ctl. 

Corn, White, J1.15; Yellow, J1.C0@$1.06 per ctl. 

Eye is quiet, fair demand, J1.10@J1.15. Cement, J2.00@J2.25. 

Hay is steady; Wheat, J12; Oats, J9@J10; Alfalfa, JS@J10. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, J10@J17.50 per ton. 

Beans, good request, $2.00@J2.60 per ctl. Potatoes, obc.@J75 per ctl. 

Butter is firmer; Choice, 2uc.@25c. ; Fair, 16c.@17c. 

Cheese, light stock, Sc.@12c. Eggs, free supply, 16c.@l9c. 

Honey, Comb, 12c. @13o.: Extracted, 0c.@7c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth 50c.@75c. Beeswax is steady, at 20c.@21c. 

Fruit — all kinds dried — active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Hides are steady ; Dry, 6c@9c. Wool is in light demand at llc.@16c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6c. 

Coffee sluggish at 16c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is plentiful ; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 14c.@17c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at $42.50 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. White. 6c ®6$£c. 

The banking scare of last week was of abort duration, and all 
excitement has died out, and business affairs have settled down 
to their normal condition. 

The Fruit market is now liberally supplied with Apricots, 
Peaches, Berries, etc., while the Vegetable supply of all seasona- 
ble varieties, including Green Corn, is copiously supplied at low 
prices. Peaches of good quality are hawked on the street at six- 
teen for a dime. 

The Pacific Mail steamer China, from the Orient via Honolulu, 
arrived on the 26th inst. with a large cargo, consisting in part of 
£00 bales Hemp, 297 bales Gunnies, 63 bales Silk Goods, 1500 bas- 
kets Sugar, 619 rolls Matting, 625 bags Coffee, 3115 pkgs. Tea, 
5036 mats Rice and 3000 pkgs. Mdse: also, in transit to go East, 
10,404 pkgs. Tea, 3000 pkgs. Raw Silk Goods, 1000 pkgs. Mdse. 
for Oregon, and Central and South America, 3250 pkgs Mdse. 

The St. Paul's cargo for tbe Isthmus and way ports on the 
24th inst., was of the valae of $80,136— say for New York, 20,000 
gals. Wine, 385 bbls. Asphaltum, 150,348 lbs. Borax, 22,970 lbs. 
Beans, 4761 lbs. Beeswax, 63 bales Rags, 55 pkg9. Leather, etc.: 
for Central America, 1100 bbls. Flour, 2268 lbs. Malt, 19,800 lbs. 
Rice, 250 bbls. Lime, 32,301 lbs. Tallow, 1355 cs. Coal Oil, 70 M 
8hingles, 1109 ctls. Corn, etc.; To Panama, 75 bbls. Flour, 15,000 
lbs. Rice, 40 cs. Wine; to Ecuador, 750 bbls Flour; to Hamburg, 
600 gals. Wine. 

The Pacific Mail steamship San Jose, hence for Panama and 
way ports, on the 23d inst., carried to Central America Mdse., 
value ?35,500— say 1638 bbls. Flour, 21,347 lbs. Tallow and Mdse. ; 
for Mexico, Mdse, value $1735; to Panama, 150 bbls. Flour and 
Mdse., value $1643; also, in transit, 170 pkgs. Mdse., value 
$1450. 

For the Orient— The P. M. S. S. City of Peking, hence on the 
24th inst. to Hongkong, had $30,912 in Treasure; also, to China, 
Mdse., value $72,680, consisting in part of 14,703 bbls. Flour, 634 
lbs. Ginseng, 3000 lbs. Butter and Cheese, 5000 lbs. Beans, 500 bxs. 
Pearl Barley, 7 csks. Beer and 17 cs. Wine; for Japan, Mdse., 
value $12,810— say 1260 bbls. Flour, 1124 lbs. Coffee, 72 rolls 
Leather, 600 gals. Wine, 500 sks. Salt, 3812 lbs. 8ugar, 98 sks. 
Hoofs, 2000 lbs. Butter and Cheese; to Vladivostock, 40 bxs. 
Axes; elsewhere, East indies, 328 cs. Canned Goods. 

The steamer Alameda, hence for Honolulu on the 23d inst., had 
for cargo 19,566 lbs. Caustic Soda apd other Mdse., value $39,000; 
also, in Treasure, $25,000 gold coin. For Sydney, per same 
steamer, 100 flsks. Quicksilver, 167 bdls. Door 8tock, 4183 lbs. 
Malt, etc., value $20,370; to Melbourne, 6723 lbs. Coffee and 
Mdse., value, $6500; to Auckland, 25 flsks. Quicksilver and Mdse., 
value $5027; to Apia, 17 M. feet Lumber and Mdse., value $1614; 
for Dunedin, Mdse., value $2148; to Wellington, 160 cs. Salmon 
and Mdse., value $3784; to other ports in the Colonies, Mdse. 
value $3000. 

Honolulu — The bark Albert, 20 days thence, bad for cargo 
19,736 bags of Sugar. 

Imports from Hawaii during the week under review have been 
of considerable importance, and embrace the following; From 
Kahului, per bark Forest Queen, 21} days thence, with 13,200 
bags Sugar; bark GainBborough, 24 days from Honolulu, with 
17,767 bags Sugar; scbr. John G. North, 19days from Kahukona, 
10,610 bags ditto; per 8. N. Castle, from Honolulu, 13,887 bags 
Sugar; 100 bbls. and 100 kegs Molasses; per C. D. Bryant, 25 days 
from Honolulu, had 50,200 bags Sugar; per Irmgard, from same, 
19,800 bags 8ugar. 

The Produce Exchange has adjourned from Friday, the 30th of 
June, to Wednesday, Joly 5th. 

Charters — Br. iron ship Dumfriesshire, 2512 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1; direct port, 18s. 
9d. Br. iron ship Barfiiian, 2108 tons, Wheat same voyage as 
above, £1 2s. 6d. Br. iron ship Cape York, 2030 tons, Wheat 
same voyage; September loading £1 5s., chartered in England. 
Br. iron ship Medita, 2640 tons, Wheat as above, terms private. 



eristics. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAP,TAL PAW Up 1 ™ 1 * '^.* 07 " ^™ 2 -.... $3 000 000 

RESERVEFUND 7,300,000 

Southeast corner Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE Bi, ' OMSARD 8TREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland. Oregon- 

Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES— Kamloops, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, British 

Columbia. 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
u 1?™ s , Head 0mce aQ d Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

T*EW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA-Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
r?££ ba , ad8outhWa ' e8:Bailk : SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SODTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America: CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
!„ Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (West Indiesl-Colonial Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Northeast Corner California and Sansome Streets, 

Formerly Occupied by Bank of Wells, Fargo & Co. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, Jane 30, 1893 $35,890,003 00 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 1^33,136 00 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin. W. C. B. DeFremery 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland ; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
pt the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. fumoj 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

N. W. Corner Sansome and Bush Streets. 

p?^?}^^ l ?™- D. 8. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) S7 500f>no 

SUJPLUS. ... $700,000 I UNDIVIDED PROFITS l'l8b'000 

S.G.MURPHY President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE ....... '.Ass t Cashier 

DIRECTORS: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, S. G. Murphy. 

N, Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffltt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J.D.Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 
S<VFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
„ , JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from »5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of thecareof wills. Offi ce hours, 8a. m. to 6 p. m. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

S3 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, $1,000,000. 

. OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR Presidont 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY '.V.'. Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker 
JameB Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecunties. JAMES A. THOMP80N, Cashier. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RE8ERVE FUND % 1,685,000 00. 

Deposits Jan. 1, 1893 .. 30.327,159 02 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT' 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOTJRNY; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. MULLER. Board of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse 
George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Beck- 
er, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart. Attorney. John R . Jareoe. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and. Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,090 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund 9760,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

A9BNTS— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.).No. 10 Wall St.,N. Y. PARIS— MeBBrs. Lasard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

8IG. GREENEBAUM, j „„„ 

C. ALTSCHTJL, { Managers. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited, 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 8 Angel t.ourt, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seli man £ Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking lusiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
worlu. 3ends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART («.„„„., 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.t Managers 
A. L. SELIGMAN. Cashier 



July 1, 1893. 



SAN FRANC ISCO NEWS LETTKK. 



21 




5UNBCAM5 




<<I SHALL never believe there has been mnch romance in your 
1 life, Mr. Bond." •Well, there ha9. I proposed to an heiress 
by mail. She accepted rce by telegram, which an error of trans- 
mission made a refusal. I went West. When I returned her 
father had tailed and she had married a poor man. I recovered 
the amount of her dowry, with interest, from the telegraph com- 
pany, but lost it all when she sued me for breach of promise." 

— Lift. 



She was a sweet Milwaukee bride, 

Blue eved, with golden hair; 
Her husband on her gazed with pride— 

They'd come to see the fair. 
She gazed across the lake and sighed. 

He said, "Why pensive, dear?" 
"Oh, Chawles," the velvet voice replied, 

"If it were only beer!" 



-Judge. 



Propbietok of Museum— I am glad to see that you are looking out 
for my interests so well. That last freak— the girl who hasn't slept 
for years— is a dandy. Manager— Sh— I Kot so loud. She has just 
gone into the next room, and she told me not to wake her until half 
an hour before show time. — Texas Siftings. 

* * 

•• Yonr daughter has a fine touch, Mrs. Moriarty." " Yis, so they 
do be tellin me, an sure 'tis no wonther, for she loves the pianny an 
niver tires of it. She has a great tashte for moosic, but thin that's 
ownly natural, for her gran'-father had his head brokin wid a cornet 
at a picnic ! " — Tit-Bits. 

* * 

City Guest— This road seems very narrow. How do two wagons 
pass? Farmer's Boy— Well, mum. w'en a man comes drivin' along 
I gives him half the road' and we pass on a trot, but w'en 1 see a 
woman comin' I gen'rally takes down the fence bars and dodges into 
a Held. —Goad News. 

* 

* * 

Tacklow— 1 see there is a man in Boston who claims to have in- 
vented a fleld-glass with which vou can see through fog. Backeow 
— If he could succeed in inventing an opera glass with which you 
could see through millinery he'd make his fortune. —Life. 

Young housekeeper— We cannot afford fish at your prices. They 
cost too much. Fishman— I have several dozen oysters, ma'am, left 
over from April, marked down fifty per cent. Young housekeeper 
—Oh, good. Send them up. John is so fond of oysters. 

* * 

Me. Nuwed (gloomily)— My salary has been cut down ten per cent. 
Mrs. Nuwed (cheerily)— Oh, don't worry about that, dear! Silk, 
Ribbons & Co. are advertising perfectly lovely things marked down 
twenty per cent. ruck. 

* * 

"The inventor of the alphabet must have been a modest man," 
said Hawkins. "Why so?" asked Mawson. "Because he began it 
with A," said Hawkins. "Most men would have begun it with I. 

—Harper's Bazar. 
«% 
Dr. Thirdly— You love to go to Sunday school, don't you, Dick? 
Dick Hicks— Yes, indeed. Dr. Thirdly— What do you expect to 
learn to-day? Dick Hicks— The date of the picnic. —Puck. 

**» 
"Beg pardon, sir; but who are you?" "I am the husband of Mrs. 
Lease, of Kansas. And you?" "I am the husband of the Infanta 
Eolalia, of Spain." "Shake!" f —Puck. 

* * 

Bell boy— Dere's a young couple on de piazzy as wants you to 
send 'em some chairs. Clerk— Is it bright moonlight? Bell boy— 
Nope; dark. Clerk— Take them this chair. —Puck. 

Edith (aged four, having trouble with her dolls)— Oh, s'oot it! 
Mama— Why, Edith ! you must not say "shoot it." That is naughty. 
Edith— Well, mama; what mas' I say? Mus' I say "wats?"— Puck. 
*** 

Unmarried one— Jack is not rich, but then one in moderate cir- 
cumstances can be happy. Don't you think so ? Married one— 
Yes, but not two, dear. —Life. 

**« 

Skinner— I am a trifle particular— 1 always pick my friends. 
Skunn (his creditor to the extent of a hundred or so)— Yes, as you 
would a chicken. —Life. 

* * 

Grace Ingle— You ask me to marry you. Can you not read your 
answer in my face? Ned Naver (cruelly)— Yes ; it is very plain. 

The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic feature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 



- 



A Cultivated Taste 
would naturally lead a person possessing it to prefer the best things 
obtainable andgunrd against imperfections. The <Jail Borden Eagle 
Brand Condensed Milk is unequalled in quality, as a trial will prove. 

(irocersand Druggists. 

Special attention glveu lo all caseB recommended by family physician, 
free of charge. C. Muller, refraction specialist, 185 Montgomery street, 
near Bush. 

PEOPLES HOME SAVINGS BANK. 

80S Market Street, Flood Building. San Francisco, t'al. 

ORGANIZED MAY, 1888. 

Guaranteed Capital (1, 000,000 00 I Reserve and Profits $49,000 00 

Capital Paid Up, in Gold 333,333 33 I Deposits, January 1, 1893. 2,065,000 00 
INTEREST PAID FROM DAY OF DEPOSIT. 
Mil: DEPOSIT BOXES 
For rent, monthly or yearly, from $4 to $20 per annum. Local and Foreign 
exchange Issued at current rates. Money to loan on real estate and ap- 
proved collaterals. Open Saturday aud Monday evenings. 

COLUMBUS WA1ERHOUSE, President. 
J. E. FARNUM, Secretary and Manager. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $8,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Jan. 1, 1893), 3,276,486 60 

r WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomap Bbown Cashier | I. F. Moulton, 2d Assistant Cashier. 

8. Prentiss Smith, Asst, Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of The Bank of California. BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank. LONDON— Metsrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. PARIS— 
Messrs. De Rothschild Freres. VIRGINIA CITY (Nev.)— Agency of The 
Bank of California. CHICAGO— Union National Bank. ST. LOUIS— Boat- 
men's Bank. AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND— Bank of New Zealand. 
CHINA, JAPAN andlNDIA— Chartered Bankoflndia, Australia and China. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Dratvs direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama, Gepoa, and all cities in Italy. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital paid up 2.450,000 

490,000 



Authorized Capital. 
Reserve 



.$3,500,000 | 



San Francisco Office, 4Z4 California St. 1 London Office 73 Lombard St., E.C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1166 Pacific Avenue. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM 3TEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank, 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank Is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital ■ -61,250.000, 

Successor to Sather <fe Co., Established 1851, San Erancisco. 

J AMES K. WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, P. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, ^m. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes A Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner sansome and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

John J. Valentine President. 

Homee S.King Manager. 

H. Wadsworth. Cashier. 

F L. Lipman Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS* 
John J. Valentine, Lloyd Tevis, Oliver Eldridge, Leland Stanford, James 
C. Fargo, Geo, E. Gray, W. F. Goad, Chas. F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Maricet, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL (1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS i 
CHAS. V. CROCKER, | B. H. MILLER, Jb. 

B. C. WOOLWORTH Pbbsideht. 

W. E. BROWN Vicb-Pbesidbnt. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cabhibb 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS: 
William Alvord Jerome Lincoln 

ffm, Babcock O. D. Baldwin 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones 



H. H.Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon, 
J . B. Randol. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

NO. 18 Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C WEBER President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 



The Czar, who saya the Vienna corres- 
pondent of the London Standard has hith- 
erto been regarded as of a serious disposi- 
tion, has recently given evidence of a deli- 
cate humor. He has sent to the Sultan 
as a present an album of paintings, by 
first-rate artists, of all the war-ships of the 
Russian Black Sea fleet. 



He. — I believe I won't go to-night. 

She. — Why, what changed your mind 
so suddenly? 

He. — I understand that Mr. Crane-Fal- 
lon, the pianist, is to be there, and I can't 
stand the expense. One hand last night 
cost me eighty-five dollars. 

— Tansill's Punch. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leave | From June 70, 1893. I aeeive 

7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogdea and East 7:45 p 
7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento 6:45 P 

7:30 a Haywards, Niles and San Jose .. *12:1op 

Niles and San Jose. . 16:15 p 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and Santa Rosa 6:15p 

8:00 a. Sacramento & Redding, via Davis 6:45 p. 
8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Oroville, 

and Red Bluff 4:15 p 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Los Angeles 
Deming, El Paso, New Orleans, 

and East.. 8:45 p 

*9:00 a Peters and Milton *8:45 P 

12:00 m Hay wards, Niles and Livermore . . 6:45 p 

*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00 p 

1:30 pVallejo and Port Costa 12:15 p 

3:00 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose ... 9:45 a 
4 :00 p. Martinez, Stockton, Ramond ( for 

Yosemite), and Fresno 12:15p 

4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 

Santa Rosa 9:45a. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Landing, 
Marysville, Oroville and Sacra- 
mento 10:15a. 

5:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 10:45a 

•5:00 p. Niles and Livermore *8:45a. 

5:30f. Lob Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfield, Santa Barbara and 

Lob Angeles 9:15a. 

5:30p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 9:15a. 

6:00 p. HaywardB, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

17 :00 p. Vallejo +8 :45 p. 

7:00 p. Oregon ExDress, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 8:15 a 

8:00 p. Castle Crag and Dunsmuir, via 

Woodland and Willows 7:15 a. 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

J7:46 A. Sunday Excursion for Newark, 
San Jose, Los Gatos, Felton and 

Santa Cruz J8:05p. 

8:15a. Newark. Oenterville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 
Cruz and way stations 6:20 p. 

*2:15 P Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations fl *10:50a 

. 4:45 p. Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos. 9:60a. 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets ). 
*7:00a. 8an Jose, Almaden and Way 

Stations ... .. *2:30p. 

17:30 a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 

Grove, Principal Way Stations 18:33 p. 
8:15 a. San Jose, TreBPinoB, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, Santa 
Margarita {San Luis Obispo) and 

principal Way Stations 6 :26 p. 

J9:30 a. Palo Alto and Way Stations . . . J2:27 p. 

10:40a. San Jose, and WayStations 5:06p. 

12:05 p. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 4:25 p. 
*2:00 p. Menlo Park, San Jose, Gilroy, Pa- 
jaro, Castroville, Del Monte, Mon- 
terey and Pacific Grove *11:23a. 

*2:S0p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove ... *10:40a. 

*3:30 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions *9:47a. 

*4:25p. Palo Altoand WayStations.. *8:06a. 

6u\0f. San Jose and Way Stations 8:48a. 

6:30p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6:35a. 

t11:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 

Stations +7:26 P. 

a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 
•Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 
tSundaysonly. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 



CONSUMPTION 

SURELY CURED 

To the Editob — Please inform your read- 
ers that I have a positive remedy for the 
above named disease. By its timely use 
thousands of hopeless cases have been per- 
manently cured. I 6hall be glad to send 
two bottles of my remedy free to any of youi 
readers who have consumption if they will 
send me their express and post office address. 
T.A. Slociim,M.C.,183PearlSt. l NewYork 

THE Salem Register, of Salem, Mass.. 
has suspended publication after an 
honorable career of ninety-three years. The 
senior editor, Charles W. Palfray, who is 
eighty years of age, has been in the active 
service of the paper for fifty-five years. His 
father entered the office in the first year of 
its establishment, and the connection of the 
two with the publication covered the whole 
period of its existence. The junior editor, 
Eden N. Walton, is sixty-eight years old, 
and has been connected with the Register 
since 1S55, first in the marine department 
and then as a local reporter. One of the 
earliest and most prolific of the contributors 
to the paper was Judge Story. 

Mrs. Wabash (of Chicago) — Do you con- 
sider it good taste, ^Mrs. Breezy, to serve 
pie for breakfast? 

Mrs. Breezy (reflectively) — Well, no, 
Mrs. Wabash, I tbink it looks a trifle too 
ostentatious. 




k 3)0 tO $10 home. selliS 

Ik. UGHTHING PLATER 

BnJplaiiuj^ji-welry.traictics 
tfiblewuru, &e. I'iatus the 
of JuwUrjr good »< 
v, on all kinUs r>r mclal 
ti gold, Bllver or nickel, 
experience, Jin capital. 
ltv house has cooda need- 
ing plating. Wholesale to 
acent= $5. Write forclrcu- 
lars. II. E. DEL3TO «fc 
Co., Columbus, O. 



ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THB 

MODEL AMERICAN CATERER; 
1206 Sutter Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Link to New Yobk, via Panama. 
Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 
SAILINGS— At noon. 
"S.S. " Acapulco," July 3. 1893. 
"S.S. "Colon," July 13, 1S93. 
S.S. "San Juan," July 24, 1893. 
S. S. "Colima," August 3, 1893. 
Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers wilt be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 
AND HONGKONG. 
Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 
Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 
India, etc.: 
SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 
S. S. "China," via Honolulu, Monday, July 3, 
1893, at 3 p. m. 
8. S. "Peru," Saturday, July 22, 1893, at 3 p. M. 
S. S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, Aug. 
10, 1893, at 8 P. m. 

S.S. "City of Peking," Thursday, Aug. 31, 1893, 
at 3 P. m. 
Round TriD Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office — 
202 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m., June 4, 14, 19, 29. July 
5, 14, 19, 29. Aug. 3, 13. 18, 28. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
June 4th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo and 
Newport, every fourth and fifth day, at 11 A. m. 

For ports in Mexico, 1st of each month. 

Ttckbt Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



SAM FRANCISCO AND NORTH PAC1FH, 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, April 16, 1893, and 

until furtner notice, Boats and Trains will 

leave from and arrive at the San Francisco Pas* 

senger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHASP, as 

follows: 

From San Francisco lor Point Tiburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40 A. M., 9:20 a. m., 11:20 a. m.; 

1:30 p. M., 3:30 P.M., 5:05 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 a.m., 9:30a.m., 11:00 a.m.; 1:30 

p. M. 3:30 p. m., 5:00 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 
From San Rafael tor San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25 a. m., 7:55 A. M., 9:30 A. M. 

11:30 A. M., 1:40 P.M., 3:40 P.M., 5:05 P.M. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An extra trip at 6:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 a.m., 9:40 a.m., 11:10 A. M.; 1:40 

p.m. 3:40 p. m., 5:00p m., 6:25 p.m. 
From Point Tiburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:50 A.M., 8:20 A. M., 9:55 A. M.; 

11:55 A. M. ; 2:05 p. M., 4:05 p. M., 5:35 p. M. 

Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:40 A. M., 10:05 A. M., 11:35 A.M.; 

2:05 p.m., 4:05p.m.. 5:80 P.M.. 6:56 P.M. 



Leave S.F. 


Debti'tion. 


AEBIVEINS.F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
5:05 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


Petaluma 

and 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 A, M 
6:05 P.M 
7:30 P.M 


8:50a. m 
10:30am 
6:10 p.M 






Fulton 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

Pieta, 

Hopland 

and Ukiah. 








8:00a.m. 




7:40a.M. 
3:30 p.m. 


7:30p.m. 


10:30 am 
6:10 pm 
















7:40a. m. 
3:30 p.m. 


8:00 a. m. 


Guerneville ^Op.m. 


10:30 am 
6:10 ph 



7:40 a. m.|8:O0a.m. I Sonoma andli0:40A.M. 8:50am. 
5:05 p.m. |5:00p.m] Glen Ellen. | 6:05p.m. |6:10pm. 
3:40a. m I 8:00a. M.j Sebastopol. 110:40a. m|10:30a.m 
7:30 P.M f 5:00 P.M.I 1 6:05p.m1 6:10p.m 

Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyservllle for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena: at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port and Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lake- 
port ; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sarato- 
ga Springs, Blue LakeB, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Cahto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Orr's Hot Springs, Westport, Usal, 
Hydesville and Eureka. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to 
Mondays— To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, 
$2 25; to Healdsburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, $4 50; 
to Hopland, $5 70; to Ukiah, $6 75; to Sebastopol, 
$2 70; to Guerneville, $3 75; to Sonoma, $150; 
to Glen Ellen, $1 80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for 8undays only 
—To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $150; to 
Healdsburg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, 
$4 50; to Hopland, $3 80; to Sebastopol, $1 80; to 
Guerneville, $2 50;to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, 
$120. 
H. C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN. 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
nd 2 New Montgomery Street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Belgic Thursday, July 13, 1893. 

Oceanic (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Aug. 1, 1S93 

Gaelic Tuesday, August 22, 1893. 

Belgic Thursday, Sept. 21, 1893 

ROUND TRIP TI0KET8 AT REDUCED RATE8 
Cabin Flans on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets, San Francisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, 
San Francisco. 

T. H.GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO.H.RICE. Traffic Manager. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000 

ton steamers of the 

Oceanic Steamship Co. 

sail for HONOLULU, 

O. AUCKLAND and SYD- 

° NEY as under: 

For HONOLULU, 
8. S. -AUSTRALIA," 

July 6, 1893 
For HONOLULU, 
APIA, AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY, S. S. 
"MARIPOSA," July 
20, 1893. 
Forpassageand freight 
apply to 
J. D. SPRECKELS A BROS. CO., 327 Market St 



«\>5£0. 




NEVE'S 



July 1, 1893. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 




THE Belt of the Sword of State of Scotland, which has been pre- 
sented to Scotland by the Rev. S. Ogilvy Baker, a clergyman 
in Essex, was on May 24th last restored to its place among the Re- 
galia of Scotland, in Edinburgh Castle, by the Marquis of Breadal- 
bane, the Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the 
Church of Scotland. Mr. Reginald Macleod, the Queen's Remem- 
brancer for Scotland, stated that after the battle of Dunbar it became 
necessary to place the Regalia of Scotland in a place of greater safety 
than Edinburgh Castle, and they were removed to the strong castle 
of Dunnottar, where Sir G. Ogilvy defended them. He had, how- 
ever, only forty men. and could not hold out; and he allowed his 
wife to remove the Regalia from the Castle. They were then 
buried underneath the stones in Kinneff Church, where they lay for 
several years. At the Restoration they were restored to the sover- 
eign, but for some cause not explained Sir G. Ogilvy retained the 
sword belt. It was discovered after the lapse of more than a hun- 
dred years in 1790, built into the garden wall of the House of Barras, 
near Stonehaven, and since then it had been handed down from 
father to son as a precious relic, until it came into the hands of 
Mr. Baker. Lord Breadalbane read a letter from Mr. Ogilvy Baker, 
and said the thanks of every Scotsman were due to Mr. Baker for 
his generous action in returning to its proper place the ancient belt 
of the Regalia of Scotland. 

It is well known that Mrs. Mackay, the wife of the Silver King, has 
a very fine collection of precious stones, which are kept in cases of re- 
markable beauty, says the Court Circular. One of these, two feet 
square, is of solid silver, and holds the ornaments she wears and 
keeps for ordinary use. The other is of gold, and three-quarters of 
a foot square. The top is entirely encrusted and thickly studded 
with precious stones, some of which are over a carat in weight. This 
gold box is tufted with Royal purple velvet. There are three trays, 
which are fastened in with a patent spring, of which Mrs. Mackay 
alone holds the secret. When the tiny gold key is turned to open 
the box, an alarm is started from a small alarm clock fitted into the 
inside, and thus is every precaution taken to guard the enormous 
value of the contents. Her silver jewel case is less intricate, as well 
as less beautiful and costly. The lid and sides are heavily chased, 
and it opens with a secret spring. The trays have spring fastenings. 
The lining is of dark blue satin, so dark as to be almost black. The 
gold case has an outside case of thick black ebony, heavily clamped, 
and a top handle of gold with which to carry it. The silver case has 
an ordinary Russia leather cover, with a silver top handle. When 
the Princess Colonna, Mrs. Mackay's daughter, was married, she re- 
ceived from her mother a jewel case exactly like the gold one de- 
scribed above. 



How "The Lost Chord," perhaps the most successful song of mod- 
ern times, came to be written, is related by Mr. Willeby in a touching 
little story. Only a few months after Sir Arthur Sullivan had ac- 
cepted the post of Principal of the National Training School for 
Music he received a severe blow in the death of his brother Frederick, 
whose talents as an actor are well remembered. For nearly three 
weeks he watched by the sick man's bedside night and day. One 
evening, when the end was rapidly approaching, the sufferer had for 
a time sunk into a peaceful sleep, and as his faithful attendant was 
sitting as usual by the bedside it chanced that he took up some verses 
of the late Miss Adelaide Proctor, with which he had some years 
previously been much impresse'd. Now in the stillness of the night 
he read them over again, and almost as he did so he conceived their 
" musical equivalent." A sheet of music paper was at hand, and he 
began to write. Slowly the music grew and took shape until, becom- 
ing absorbed in it, he determined to finish the song, thinking that 
even if in the cold light of day it should appear worthless it would at 
least have helped to pass the weary hours, and so he went on till the 
last bar was added. Thus was composed a song of which the sale up 
to now has exceeded a quarter of a million of copies. 

—In the bright little French play called Fin de Siecle, the lively 
Mme. d'Epiglotte does precisely what Mr. Gladstone's half did the 
other day. The Premier's wife gave a small dance, and the guests 
wondered as the evening wore on why there were no men. This was 
mentioned to the hostess by a member of the family. "Oh, dear I " 
she exclaimed, "I quite forgot to send out the men's invitations; 
they are all in that bag under the sofa." 



To the World's Fair ! 
Are you going ? If so, it will be to your interest to call on or write 
to the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The SANTA FE 
ROUTE is the only line under one management from California to 
Chicago. The only line running Pullman Palace and tourist sleep- 
ing cars through to Chicago on the same train every day without 
change. Personally conducted excursions through to Boston leave 
every Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, "Chronicle" 
Building, San Francisco. 




PRICE soc. pint. Let those who have 
pale faces try it. It is A GREAT RKS- 
torative TONIC that acts upon the 
blood immediately. 

Be Sure You Cet BURNHAM'3. 
Our formula is a secret. No other is 
"just as good." All grocers sell it. 

<*„~ ix •/I",' 1 * hottlos ex-pressed for S1.50. Send 
stampg for book—" Household Hints •' 
E. S. EURNHAM CO.. 130 G.insevoort St , N.Y. 




RUBBER 
HOSE. 

"GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST MADE. 
GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY, 

577-579 Market St., S. F. 
R. H. PEASE— managers— S. M. RUNYON. 

WHEW1 

IT IS HOT. 
WELL, YES, 

It is that 

ROCK SPRINGS COAL 

which heats quicker and bakes and roasts better than any coal on the coast. 

Egg Size ?9 00 Delivered. 

Lump Size ?10 00 Delivered. 



Telephone 989. 



HUSBAND & BROOKS, 



No. 4 California Street. 



(ESTABLISHED 1862.J 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE, 

J. Tomkinson, Proprietor. 

Nos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna Street, between First and Second. 

Through to Natoma street, Nos. 64, 66 and 68. One block from the Palace 

Hotel, also carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, corner Post and 

Stockton streets, San Francisco. Telephone No. 153. 

Fine turnouts kept especially for calling. Also rockaways, buggies and 
vehicles of every description at reduced rates. 

SYLVAIN SALOMON, 

IMPORTER OF 

EUROPEAN and ORIENTAL ART GOODS. 



BEST QUALITIES OF TEAS. 



218 Post St. 



J. R. SMITH, & CO., 

Merchant Tailors, 230 Bush Street, 91111m Building, formerly 
under Occidental Hotel. 

THE CORK-FACED HORSE COLLAR. 

M M M 

Prevents the horse from having a sore or galled neck; is cool and elastic 
and does away entirely with sweat collars. If your local saddlery shop 
does not have it, send your order to MAIN & WINCHESTER, 214, 216, 218 
and 220 Battery street, San Francisco, Cal. Send for descriptive circular 



24 



SAN PKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 




WITH the advent of warm weather the necessity for a supply 
of pare, well-filtered water becomes imperative, and a scien- 
tific journal has advisedly described two methods whereby an effect- 
ive filter can be easily and cheaply provided. Procure a wine barrel 
and a piece of fine brass wire cloth large enough to make a partition 
across the barrel. Support the wire cloth with a coarser wire cloth 
under it, and also a light frame of oak to keep the cloth from sagging. 
Fill in with about 3 inches in depth of clear, sharp sand, then 2 inches 
of charcoal, broken finely, but no dust. On top of this put 4 inches 
more of sand, fill up the barrel and draw from the bottom. In an- 
other method two barrels or two stone pots or jars may be used. The 
top jar must have a hole drilled or broken in the bottom, and a small 
flower-pot saucer inverted over the hole. Then fill in with a layer of 
sharp, clean sand, rather coarse, a layer of finer sand, a layer of pul- 
verized charcoal, with the dust blown out, then another layer of sand 
which will come up to about one-third of the jar. The jar which is 
to hold the supply of filtered water can have a side hole drilled for a 
faucet, so as to obviate the necessity of removing the top jar when 
water is wanted. The filtering jar is placed on the top and rilled with 
water, and thus a supply of the filtered liquid is always obtainable 
in the bottom receiver. 

The amount of power required to operate a street railway by 

electricity is much greater than generally comprehended. The City 
Railroad Company in Brooklyn, for example, is now building a plant 
which will comprise eight engines of 1000 horse-power each, and six 
of 2000 horse-power each, all of the cross-compounded condensing 
type. The smaller engines have cylinders 26 and 48 inches stroke, 
while the larger engines have 32 and 62-inch cylinders and 60-inch 
stroke. The main shaft of each of the latter is 23 inches in diameter 
and carries a fly-wheel 25 feet in diameter, weighing seventy-five tons. 
The armatures of the dynamos are built up directly on the main 
shafts, in the manner now becoming quite common. Although these 
engines, when taken collectively, represent an enormous amount of 
power, nevertheless they are only of about two-thirds the capacity of 
those on the Campania, which fact gives a good idea of the require- 
ments of modern marine engineering. 

■^— An English inventor is tempting the cyclist on summer excur- 
sion bent with a rose-colored scheme for increasing the luxury of his 
fascinating pastime. An umbrella can be fitted to the frame of the 
bicycle which is to keep the rider dry and cool in all weathers, and 
increase his speed of transit. It is light and strong, the stalk and 
socket being made of steel tube ; it can be put up or down instantly, 
and entirely removed from the machine in less than a minute. 
While rising and falling, in telescope fashion, to the required height, 
where it is kept in position by a pinching screw, it is furnished with 
a ball and socket joint, which permits it to be moved backwards or 
forwards or to either side, as desired. By this means it can be fixed 
in such a position as to catch the breeze, and thus act as a sail. It is 
claimed that with a favorable wind the cyclist's umbrella will add 
from two to five miles per hour to the speed of traveling. 

The problem of silent machinery running appears to have been 

brought a step nearer solution by the introduction in Austria of cog 
wheels made of pressed raw hide, which are to work in conjunction 
with wheels of cast iron, steel and other metals. The new wheels 
are said to possess great strength. They do not require lubricating, 
and therefore are clean in operation. It is claimed that they sub- 
stantially reduce the vibration of the machinery in which they are 
used. They can be had ready made or in the form of raw-hide disks 
for shaping by the purchaser. They are supported by a wooden 
frame-work, and after being cut the wheel is covered with a shellac 
solution. The greatest drawback to the new wheel is its compara- 
tive expensiveness. 

Dr. Charrin has brought forward a most uncomfortable theory, 

which opens up a wide field for speculation in the study of epideni- 
ology. He maintains that pathogenic microbes (or disease germs) 
which are injurious to animals, may also prove so to plants, being 
equally pathogenic for the vegetable and animal kingdoms. "While 
it is true that the envelopes of plant leaves offer greater resistance to 
the entrance of microbes into the circulatory system of cells than 
does the epidermis of animals, the poisoning micro-organisms may 
set up morbid physiological phenomena in both plants and animals, 
the physiological action being apparently similar in both kingdoms. 

A French physician has obtained good results in dressing burns 

with milk. Compresses are soaked with milk and laid on the burn, 
to be renewed night and morning. An extensive burn on the leg 
was healed in this manner. Two days reduced it in size'from 14 to 
7 centimeters ; at the end of three days it measured but 1\i centi- 
metres in diameter. Another burn which had been treated for eight 
days with olive oil and oxide of zinc, healed rapidly under a simple 
milk dressing. 

A. H. Ricketts, attorney-at-law, rooms 201, 202 and 203, Crocker 
Building, SanFrancisco. 



Unlike the Dutch Process 

i\o Alkalies 

— or — 

Other Chemicals 

are used in the 
preparation of 

W. BAKER & CO.'S 

reakfastCocoa 

which is absolutely 
pure and soluble. 

j It has more than three times 
the strength of Cocoa mixed 
J with Starch, Arrowroot or 
_ 'Sugar, and is far more eco- 
nomical, costing less than one cent a cup. 
It is delicious, nourishing, and easily 

DIGESTED. 

Sold by Grocers eyerywhera. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass, 




SLATE BURIAL VAULTS. 




Are recommended by every person who sees them. They are proof 
against dampness, rodents and reptiles; are portable to ship to any part 
of the country. Are cheaper than brick and can be put in place by ordinary 
workmen. Slate Is Im- 
perishable by nature, 
and has greater strength 
than any other stone. Ap- 
ply to R. F. ROBERT- 
SON, Pacific Coast Agent, 
Los Gatos, Cal. N. CLARK 
& SONS, 17 and 19 Spear 
St., San Francisco. 

Telephone 771. 

CANCER. 

THE KOEHLER CANCER CURE CO., 708 FULTON ST., S. F. 

Cancer, Tumors or malignant growths removed without knife or caus 
tic. A GUARANTEED CURE a specialty Call or send for circular. Over 
300 cancers preserved in alcohol in our office. Consultation free. 

PHILIP KOEHLER, Manager. 

DR. ZEILE'S, the 
largest, oldest, best fur- 
nished and most complete in the State. Sulphur, Russian, steam and any 
kind of medicated bath for ladies and gentlemen. The largest and health- 
iest in the city. 522 to 528 Pacific Street, between Kearny and 
Montgomery. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 



Dr. A. S. and Mrs. Dr. Cook, 

CANCER, TUMOR AND ECZEMA SPECIALISTS, 

OFFICE— 222 POST STREET, 

DR. THOMAS L. HILL, DENTIST, 

OFFICE— ODD FEIXOWS' BCHJMNtt, 8. W. Corner Seventh and 

- Market Streets. 
Office Houbs: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours: 4 to 5. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Phelau Building.) 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for pois- 
tively extracting teeth without pain. "Colton Gas" has an established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
in all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations in dentistry. 
DB. CHABLES W. DECKEB 

PACIFIC TCWEL COIMZIP.A.IISrS - 

9 LICK PLACE, 
Furnishes Clean Towels at the folio wins low rates: 

Clean Hand Towels each week, ! 1.00 per month ; 12 Clean Hand Towels 
each week, $1.50 per month; 4 Clean Boiler Towels each week, $1.00 
6 month; 6 Clean Boiler Towels each week, $1.25 per month. 



Louis Roederer Champagne- 

The Highest Grade 
Champagne in the World. 

WHITE LABEL, "Carte Blanche." 

A Magnificent Rich Wine- 

BROWN LABEL, "Grand Vin Sec." 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every bottle bearsthe private label of 

MACONORAY & GO. 

Sole Agents for the PAcific Coast 




Jnlv 1, 1803. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS T,ETTER. 



25 









THERE seems to be a contradiction to tbe statements regarding 
the scarcity of money in this city, in the record of loans made 
on real estate security. Within a week a local capitalist loaned 
$70,000 on first-class security at Gj per cent. This was by Charles 
Mayne, for one year, on tbe northwest corner of Hayes and 
Lagnna; the corner of Grove and Laguna; the southeast corner 
of Grove and Buchanan, and a lot on Powell street, north of 
Broadway. Tbe Hibernia Bank has also made a heavy loan — 
$40,000. for a year at 6J per cent to George W. McNear, on a lot, 
40x137:6, on tbe east side of Montgomery, between Pine and 
California, and 52:6 on tbe west side of Leidesdorff, between Pine 
and California. A large number of small loans have also been 
made, so that the financial scare throughout tbe country does not 
serm to have affected our bauds or capitalists to any very consid- 
able degree. 

New York capitalists are considering a proposition to erect a 
fine nine-story hotel on tbe lot on the corner of California and 
Jones streets. The building, as proj cted, will cost $300,000. 

H. 8. de Rochemont, of 415 Montgomery street, and H. E. 
Poehlman, who recently established an office at 11 Montgomery 
street, have entered into partnership, and will commence busi- 
ness in real estate under tbe new arrangement July 1st. The 
office of tbe firm will be at 415 Montgomery street, room 7. 

Tbe residents of South Park complain that they do not receive 
proper attention from tbe city, and they intend to endeavor to 
induce tbe Board of Supervisors to appropriate a sum of money 
out of the receipts from the next tax levy of the improvement of 
South Park. This one-time famous and aristocratic pleasure 
ground has for many years past been more and more neglected, 
and it is felt that something should be done to restore it. A stum- 
bling block in the way of the Supervisors taking action consists 
in tbe fact that the park has never been dedicated to public use, 
since it was in the beginning tbe private property of those whose 
houses fronted upon it. The claim of private ownership has been 
practically dropped in the course of years, but in law it is still in 
effect, for which reason tbe residents will have considerable diffi- 
culty in securing from the city tbe desired relief.. 

Building seems to be keeping up its record, for notwithstanding 
the comparative lightness of the summer's business, the number 
of contracts let does not materially diminish. Tbe average kept 
up is very goo.l. 

Old Trinity Church will soon be torn down to give room to 
modern improvements. 

The work recently undertaken by Senator Fair in the northern 
portion of tbe city is one of tbe greatest tbe city has known for 
some time. He has awarded a contract for tbe grading and fill- 
ing in of 2,500,000 cubic yards of sand in that section of North 
Beach between Webster and Baker streets. The contractors are 
to move 5000 cubic yards a day, and will employ in the work 
over 200 men. The cost of the enterprise will be $300,000, and it 
is calculated it will require nearly two years to complete the con- 
tract. Mr. Fair's plans contemplate an expenditure of over 
$3,000,000, and it will transform the northern beach of tbe city 
west of Fort Mason into a good water front for tbe accommoda- 
tion of warehouses, factories and shipping. 



EL CAMPO, that beautiful place upon the Marin County shore, 
will be re-opened as a family resort, to-morrow. Crowds will 
assemble there every Sunday. The round trip fare, including ad- 
mission to the grounds, will be fifty cents. A choice programme 
of music will be rendered every Sunday, and refreshments, fish- 
ing and boating may be enjoyed. No dancing will be allowed, 
and decorum will be preserved throughout the day, so that 
families may fear no unpleasantness. Tne bay trip is delightful, 
and tbe grounds are beautiful. Tbe steamer Ukiah leaves the 
foot of Market street every Sunday at 10:30 a. m. and 1:45 p. m. ; 
returning it leaves El Carapo at 12:45 and 5 p. m. 



P.&& 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS, 
BUILDING PAPERS, 
ROOFING AND PAINTS. 



PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 116 Battery St. 

George Goodman, 

—Patentee and Manufacturer of— 

ARTIFICIAL STONE in all its branches. 

Schillinger's Patent Side Walk and Garden Walk a specialty. 
Office, 307 Montgomery St., Nevada Block, S. F. 




Driving the Brain 

at the expense y^-. 
of the Body. ^~ 
While we drive 
the brain we 
must build up 
the body. Ex- 
ercise, pure air 
— foods that 

make healthy flesh — refreshing 
sleep — such are methods. When 
loss of flesh, strength and nerve 
become apparent your physicia \ 
will doubtless tell you that the 
quickest builder of all three is 

Scott's Emulsion 

of Cod Liver Oil, which not only 
creates flesh of and in itself, but 
stimulates the appetite for other 
foods. 

Prepared by Scott A Bowne. N Y. All drucpials. 



R. LIDDLE & Co., 

Formerly of No. 538 Washington street, San Francisco, have removed to 
No. 110 Montgomery street, under Occidental Hotel. Sole Agents for W. 
& C. Scott & Son, W. W. Greener, Lefever Arms Co., I. C. Smith, Parker 
Bros., Ithaca, Baker and Remington Shotguns. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

Send Three-cent Stamp for Catalogue. 



Our House Renting Department is one of 
the best equipped in the city. We guarantee 
prompt and efficient service in renting 
houses, collecting rents and placing insur- 
ance. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND, 

10 Montgomery St. 



RENTS! 



REALTY 



A HOME3EEKER3 AND INVESTORS' JOURNAL 
Reports of everything relating to land from fllty 
tiwns in Southern California. No boom articles, 
but a conservative, honest record of progress 

Los Angeles office, 136 S. Broadway. Send $2 for 
a year's subscription, and begin with volume— out 
in July. This is the only publication of its char- 
acter. Persons interested in land cannot afford to 
be without it* Address correspondence to Edgar F. Howe, Redlands, Cal. 



ANNUAL MEETING- 

Overman Silver Mininq Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Ovcman Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of tbe company, 414 California 
street, San Francisco, California, on 

Thursday, the 13th day of July, 1893, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M. 

for the purpose of electing a board of directors to serve for the enticing 

year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before t*\e 

meeting. 

Transfer books will close on TUESDAY, July 11.1893, at 1 o'clock p.m. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS. Secretary. 
Office— 414 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETIN6. 

Beet & Belcher Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the above named 
Company will be held at the office of the company, Room 33, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday. Ju y 1 0, 1 893, (second Monday in July) at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Friday. July 7, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 



THE summer hegeira ia upon us in its power and might; for the 
present everything resembling festivity in town is at a stand- 
still, and until after next week at least the streets will wear a 
very deserted appearance. All who can get away have either 
gone or are going to-day, to spend the glorious Fourth anywhere, 
so long as it is outside the city limits. Dinners and lunches, 
which are always being given even at the dullest period of our 
fashionable life have almost entirely ceased, and it is only in the 
country that teas are still to be heard of occasionally. The most 
recent of note were those given last week by Miss Ethel Cohen in 
Alameda, one having Miss Mollie Torbert — who is meditating a 
trip to the Orient to visit her sister, Mrs. Fearon — as the guest of 
honor; the other was for Miss Josephine Welsh, music forming a 
leading feature at both of them. 

Those of our society who still linger in the city had a treat last 
Wednesday in witnessing an extremely pretty midsummer wed- 
ding, wherein dashing uniforms, pretty girls and sweet flowers 
combined to make an effective ensemble. The bride was Miss 
Nellie Smedberg, daughter of Colonel and Mrs. W. R. Sraedberg, 
and the groom Lieutenant George Mclvor of the army, who came 
all the way from the East to claim his wife. The wedding was 
set for 1 o'c'ock, at the family residence, on Larkin street, where 
the bride was born, and long before that hour the guests began 
arriving, so that at the appointed time all were assembled, and 
the ceremony took place punctually. The house was tastefully 
decked with floral adornments; the bow window used for the 
bridal bower was literally transformed into one by large palm 
trees and ropes of ferns and feathery smilax, from the centre de- 
pending the traditional wedding bell, composed of red and white 
roses. Masses of roses and pinks were used to decorate the walls, 
mantels and window sills. Daylight was shut out, and gaslight 
used to add brilliancy to the scene. The bridal cortege consisted 
of two little cousins of Miss Nellie's, Miss Frankie Raymond, 
also her cousin, and her sister, Miss Cora Smedberg, 
who acted as maid-of-honor; the bride on her father's arm, and 
the groom and his best man, the recent West Point graduate, 
Lieut. Renwick Smedberg. They advanced slowly from the rear 
door of the end parlor up to the nuptial bower, where Dr. 
Howard, an uncle of Mrs. Sraedberg, stood waiting to tie the 
knot. Near by were Mrs. Smedberg, Mrs. Raymond, her mother, 
and her sister, Mrs. Ashton, and her husband. The ceremony 
was simple and soon over, and then hearty congratulations were 
in order, which were followed by the wedding breakfast, at which 
repast the guests were seated at little tables. Many toasts were 
drank, and the health of the happy pair pledged in bumpers of 
sparkling wiue. The bride's dress was of Eastern importation, a 
gift from a New York relative. It was of heavy cream-white poult 
de soie, made with a long train and classic in it Bevere simplicity; 
a bertbe of duchesse lace was the only trimming; a tulle veil fell 
from head to foot, and a bouquet of lilies of the valley completed 
a very beautiful costume. The bridesmaids' gowns were a com- 
bination of white crepe and satin, and each carried a bouquet of 
mignonette and ferns. Mrs. Sraedberg was dressed in a matronly 
robe of grey satin trimmed with black lace. Mrs. Raymond, the 
bride's grandmother, in black with widow's cap. The officers 
were in full uniform, and the guests were in light summer attire, 
which still further added to the bright effect. The wedding 
presents were numerous and in many instances costly. Among 
the donors were Mrs. Samuel Hort, who gave an elaborate game 
set, Mrs. Louis Haggin, Mrs. Geo. C. Boardman, Mrs. Lord, Mrs. 
Graham and many others. The guests were limited to the seat- 
ing capacity at the breakfast, and numbered all the military at 
the different posts near by, with a few intimate friends in civil 
life. The bride and groom left on the afternoon train for Del 
Monte, but will remain on a visit to theSmedbergs until the 
autumn before taking up their residence at Fort Logan, Colorado, 
Lieut. Mclvor's leave extending until September. 

The otbe> event of this week will be the tennis ball at San 
Rafael to-night, which wilt take place at the Hotel Rafael and 
which it is anticipated will be one of the best attended of those 
given for several seasons past. 



July weddings promise to be quite numerous both at home and 
abroad. The marriage of Miss Emma Boynton, of Berkeley, and 
A. B. Pierce, instructor of mathematics at the University, whose 
engagement has just been made public, will be one of the early 
events of the month; the nuptials of Miss Mae Taylor and Charles 
Lipman are set for the 18th. The week alter next is the time 
named for the wedding of our erstwhile pretty little belle, Mrs. 
Ruth Blacknell, nee Holladay, who will then in London become 
the wife of Lieut. Brooke, of Her Majesty's Life Guards. He is 
a widower with two daughters, who are, however, still in the 
very early bud period of existence, so their new mama will have 
a little time ere she be called upon to chaperone them in society. 
The news of Mies Millie Ashe's engagement to Harold M. Sewell 



has been heard by her friends with mingled feelings of pleasure 
and regret — pleasure at the prospect of her coming happiness, re- 
gret at the probability of losing her as a member of our swim, in 
which she has been such a favorite ever since her first entrance 
into society life. The recently announced engagement of Miss 
Georgiana Masten to W. F. Perkins following so closely after 
that of her sister Irene to Philip Gordon gives the assurance that 
Society will witness a brilliant double wedding when the pretty 
sisters appear in the role of brides during the coming autumn, 
October being the month named for their nuptials. 

Each season some one of our resorts appears to be more highly 
favored than its rivals in the way of crowds. Last year Castle 
Crag was the place most affected; the summer before San Rafael 
had it all its own way, and before that Del Monte distanced all 
competitors. This summer Santa Cruz has the lead, and the beach 
of an afternoon is a sight to behold. Tea under umbrellas is the 
latest fad, and at this pretty mode of entertainment Miss Laura 
McKinstry is said to shine pre-eminent as a tea-poorer. Hops 
have taken place at the Sea Beach and the Ocean House; there 
are riding parties on horseback and Launch parties on the bay. 
Next week Golden Gate Villa will be the scene of a brilliant house 
party, for wtose entertainment Major and Mrs. McLaughlin have 
ar.anged a succession of gaieties. There will be a procession, 
yacbt racing, oratory and fireworks on the 4th, and altogether 
the holiday week at Santa Cruz promises to be the gayest known 
there for years. Mr. and Mrs. J. Philip Smith returned from Japan 
by the steamer China last Monday, and visitors at Santa Cruz are 
considering themselves in great luck, for now Sunshine Villa will 
be opened, and, as last year, be again the center of festivity, some 
of last season's gayest doings taking place there. Nick Kittle and 
Peter Donahue Martin are among the latest acquisitions in the 
beaux on the beach. 

In the list of attractions offered at the different resorts for the 
. holiday festivities, the young lady visitors are among the most 
powerful. In this respect. San Rafael seems tu possess the lion's 
- share, containing as it does, among those already at the hotel 
' and in the village, the Misses Mae and Eleanor Dimond, Marie 
and Bessie Zane, Loughborough, Dore, Blanding, May Hoffman, 
Lucy and Maggie Brooks, Hush, Maud Morrow, Helen and Ethel 
Smith, McCutchen, Seligman, Welch, Helen Walker, Lawton, 
' etc., to which list may be added Miss Alice Ames, who will 
spend the Fourth in Ross Valley, and the young matrons, the 
Mesdames Magee, Basil Heathcote, Robert Oxnard, Will Dargie, 
i Charles Hanlon, and many other belles married and single, whom 
I the tennis match will draw thither to-day. And where the belles 
, are the beaux are sure to appear, and the congregation of male 
I beauty now there assembled is the largest Been at any of the 
I resorts this season. Dick Tobin, Lansing Kellogg, Charley Bald- 
win, Joe Grant, Harry Simpkins and Ward McAllister have been 
among the most constant visitors there so far. Mrs. Edith B. 
Coleman has joined the Tevis party at the Hotel Rafael. 

The latest additions to the circle at Del Monle are the James 
Robinsons, Mr. and Mrs. James Carolan, Miss Emily Carolan, Mr. 
and Mrs. George H. Lent, Miss Hooker, Mr. and Mrs. E. J. 
Bowen, Miss Bowen, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Redding, etc. A. H. Small 
is one of the beaux that can be counted upon at Del Monte, and 
Hubert Carolan is another. 

Among the city's visitors this week has been Gotham's noted 

; whip, Mr. T. Sufferin-Tailer, he and his bride, nee Maude Loril- 

1 lard, making the Pacific Coast the scene of their honeymoon trip. 

1 Mr. Tailer is a prominent member of the New York Coaching 

Club, holding the " blue ribbon" of that organization. 

More absentees have returned and others are coming. Mr. and 
and Mrs. C. A. Spreckels were among those whom we have re- 
cently welcomed, with them coming pretty Miss Nellie Jolliffe, 
whose long absence in the East has been bewailed by her friends 
! and admirers in San Francisco. Some compensation to them, 
however, lay in the news of the innumerable conquests she made 
; while away from her native heath. Other arrivals Include Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Bradford, nee Maud Badlam, from their honey- 
| moon trip East, and Lieut, and Mrs. Richardson Clover, who will 
| remain in California until nearly time for Lieut. Clover's next sea 
< cruise to commence, when they will return to Washington, D. C, 
; for a short time before he joins his ship. They will reside chiefly 
'. at the Miller ranch, in Napa Valley. Among the expected are 
Mrs. and Miss Blair, Mr. and Mrs. C. D. O'Sullivan, nee Curtis; 
i Mr. and Mrs. George Pope, nee Taylor; Mrs. Peter Donahue and 
1 Mrs. Eleanor Martin, all of whom have been abroad for some 
time; and Miss Carrie Taylor and Miss Edith McBean from the 
I East. Miss Ruger returned to town early in the week from a 
visit to San Rafael. . 

During the holidays consequent upon the Fourth, the pretty 

1 Hotel Mateo will be crowded with guests, who will assemble 

| there to pass the pleasant first days of July in the country air. 

The Mateo has become one of the most popular hotels patronized 

j by movers of the swim. • '- • 

Miss Daisy McKee will visit friends in Santa Cruz during the 
I next two weeks. 



July 1. 1893. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



The yonng ladies who composed Mre. Henry Scott's recent 
party to Japan did not waste much time in the city npon their 
return, but hied themselves away to Yoseniite to enjoy ita 
beauties ere all the wild flowers droop and fade. Mrs. W. H. L. 
Barnes and Mrs. Clara Oatherwnod will remain at Wawona yet 
awhile longer, and Major and Mrs. Wilson will travel in their 
direction next week. 

Dr. W. E. Taylor was one of the passengers by the City of 
Peking last Saturday, bis destination being Japan, where he will 
vieit his daughter, Mrs. Parmenter. whose bnsband. Lieutenant 
Parmenter, is now cruising in Asiatic waters in the flagship. 



News Is received of the safe arrival in Paris of Dr. and Mrs. 
Clinton Cusbing. Mrs. Austin Sperry, the Misses Sperry, Mrs. 
Hayes and the Misses Simpson are at present enjoying the season 
in London. 



Captain Dougherty, General and Mrs. Dickinson, Mrs. Henry 
Wetherbee, Miss Sbipman and Major Stanley, who left last week 
for Humboldt county, will spend the next few weeks up there in 
nsbing and hunting, and otherwise enjoy camping life. 



Dr. and Mrs. O. O. Burgess, who are at Santa Cruz, will return 
to town the end of next week, after an absence of several weeks 
in Southern California. Mr and Mrs. W. I. Kip, the Misses 
Clementina and Mary Kip, will leave Watson's, where they spent 
the month of June, on Friday next, and go to San Mateo for the 
rest of the summer months. Mrs. W. B. Wllshire and family are 
among the guests at the Pacific Congress Springs. Miss Nellie 
Hillyer has been visiting the Misses Upson at Sacramento. Mrs. 
John £. de Ruyter, who is at Santa Barbara, will remain there a 
couple of weeks longer ere returning to San Francisco. Mrs. 
Charles Hollbrook and her daughters have gone to Castle Crag, 
whence Mrs. Rutherford and her daughters have just returned. 

The Rev. Dr. McKenzie, accompanied by bis daughter, re- 
turned from his vacation trip to Europe last week. Henry P. 
Bowie and his stepson, Henry B. Howard, who have been spend- 
ing several weeks in Japan, will arrive by the China steamer due 
today. 

Mrs. Hedges has returned from a visit to her daughter, Mrs. 
Judge McKinBtry, at Santa Cruz. Mrs. McKinstry and family 
will remain at the seaside nntil the end of July. Mrs. Belle 
Donahue will spend the month of July at Del Monte. 



Mr. and Mrs. Jorge C. Monzoin.nee Smith, of Guatemala, C. A., 
will leave for the East Saturday next, accompanied by Miss Ta- 
ber of this city. They will spend about two months doing the 
Exposition at Chicago. 

Mrs. W. H. Keith and Miss Eliza D. Keith have been to Niagara 
New York, Philadelphia, and will return to Chicago about July 4th. 

Emile Bruguiere has come up from the Del Monte for a few 
days, and will soon return. He will then take a trip to Lake 
Tahoe, and thence to the World's Fair. 

Mr. Fred Hotaling has returned from San Rafael. 



Mr. and Mrs. Will E, Fisher, Ed. and James Jennings, Miss J. 
Jennings, Miss M. Forest, Mrs. and Miss Leila Ellis are passing 
the summer at Santa Cruz. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Liebes, nee Samson, have returned from 
their wedding trip to the Atlantic coast, and Mrs. Liebes will be 
at home to her friends, at 421 Lott street, every fourth Monday 
of the month. 

Mrs H. Hunt and her charming daughter, Miss Anna Hunt, 
leave this morning for Santa Cruz to Spend the Fourth. 



Among prospective losses to our young society will be those of 
Miss Alice 8impkins and Miss Mary Eyre, who, with Mrs. Simp- 
kins and her son Harry, are contemplating a tour of Europe, 
which will occupy the better part of a year. The date of their 
departure will probably be some time next month. 



One could not imagine a more delightful place to pass the 
Fourth than at the Hotel El Monte, at Sausalito. Delightfully 
situated upon the hillside, and commanding a superb view of the 
bay and San Francisco in the distance, the El Monte is pecu- 
liarly happy in its location. Guests may enjoy hunting, fishing, 
swimming, boating, and most pleasant walks and rides in Wood- 
land paths. The hotel has an excellent cuisine, and in all its ap- 
pointments it is first-class. A brilliant display of fireworks will 
be made at the hotel during the evening of July 4th. 

Dr. and Mrs. B. W. Haines are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Mackay at their magnificent residence on Michigan avenue, 
Chicago. They did the Fair thoroughly, and had many pleasant 
coaching trips. They remained at Chicago for the Derby. 

Eli S. Dennison and family, of Oakland, Mrs. and Mr. Carl Von 
der Mehden and the Misses Von der Mebden, Mrs. Jenkins and 
Miss Jenkins of San Francisco, Mr. and Mrs. Morse Barrett are 
at Jitna Springs. 



^PRICE'S 




Powder 



The only Piro Cream of tartar Powder. — No ammoDla; No Alum 
Used in Millions of Homes— 40 years the Standard 

A RESOLUTION OF SYMPATHY. 



THE faculty of the Leland Stanford Junior University have 
presented the following resolution of sympathy to Mrs. Stan- 
ford: 

To our dear and honored Mrs. Stanford: We, the faculty of this uni- 
versity, founded and sustained by "Mr. Stanford and yourself, come 
to you in this time of your grief to express to you our most profound 
sympathy and our own sense of personal loss in the death of your 
husband. 

We feel that in his death we have suffered an irreparable loss. His 
broad and original grasp of educational problems, his profoundly ac- 
curate judgment, on men and affairs, and his stimulating and ever 
present sympathy, made him a source of strength and helpfulness, 
which we shall sadly miss. 

But it is not alone as one of the founders and supporters of this 
university, with which our lives are so closely united, that we shall 
mourn him. To us who have known him has come a feeling of af- 
fection deep and strong, resulting from his simple straightforward na- 
ture and his interest in all our plans. Because of this we feel in his' 
death the loss of a personal friend. 

With renewed expression of our grief and sympathy, we remain, 
dear madam, most respectfully yours. 

The Faculty of the Leland Stanford Jr. University, 
Earl Barnes, John M. Stillman. Albert W. Smith, Charles D.Marx, 
William R. Dudley, Committee. 

NEWSPAPER methods in Paris at present seem to be on a par 
with legislative methods in the use of fraud and corruption. 
The Cocarde recently published documents alleged to have been 
taken from the British Embassy, and mentioning large sums of 
British money said to have been used to bribe French papers. 
These documents, however, were forged by a certain M. Norton, 
who claims that he committed the forgeries at the request of 
Ducret, the editor, who promised him 100,000 francs, bnt paid 
only 10,000 francs. Since there seems to be plenty of money in 
the case, the two scoundrels, although they are both under arrest 
this moment, will probably escape punishment just as the Panama 
Canal swindlers have escaped. Of course, the statute of limita- 
tion cannot be used in the present case, but there are still such 
subterfuges as " writ of error," insufficiency of testimony, etc., 
which are usually employed with good results in cases where the 
criminals are willing to surrender a part of the " boodle" to the 
lawyers. 

THE recent socialist and anarchist riots in Switzerland, in con- 
sequence of which the Swiss capital, Berne, has been tempor- 
arily placed in a state of siege, plainly demonstrate that the 
socialists, like their allies, the anarchists, are not satisfied with 
republican institutions, but are hostile to all forms of orderly gov- 
ernment. This should suffice to undeceive their sympathizers in 
non- monarchical countries, who imagine that the socialist move- 
ment in Europe merely makes war against tyranny. 



NO lady of course could think of going to the country unless 
she look with her a bountiful supply of fine writing paper, 
such as that to be had at Sanborn & Vaii's, on Market street, op- 
posite Grant avenue. This house has the largest and best stock 
of fine stationery in the city, which is for sale in neat packages, 
at reasonable rates. 

Another Tribute to Pommery Sec. 
At one of those petit soupers for which London society is so cele- 
brated, and which are attended by the English royalty ana the flower 
of London aristocracy, the following clever acrostic on Pommery was 
recently read: 

Pour out the Pommery, wine of Elysium, 

Only its sparkle care's sad pulses still ; 

Mark in its bright depths a host of sweet visions, 

Making each dull soul with ecstacy thrill. 

Ere the night waneth we'll drink to its glory, 

Roll out its pleasures in rhythmical story, 

Youth is renewed in each bumper we fill. 

— Court Journal. 



The doctors recommend, for indigestion, after dinner chewing for 
half an hour Adams' Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1, 1893. 



A POEM OF SCRAPS.— The Student. 

1. Why alt this toil for triumphs of an hoar? 

2. Life's a short summer, man a flower; 

3. By tarns we catch the vital breath and die — 

4. The cradle and the tomb, alas! so nigh. 

5. To be is better by far than not to be. 

6. Though all man's life may seem a tragedy; 

7. But light cares speak when mighty griefs are dumb. 

8. The bottom is but shallow whence they come. 

9. Your fate is but the common fate of all ; 

10. Unmingled joys here to man befall. 

11. Nature to each allots his proper sphere — 

12. Fortune makes folly her peculiar care. 

13. Custom does often reason overrule, 

14. And throw a cruel sunshine on a fool. 

' 15. Live well, how long or short, permit to heaven; 

16. Those who forgive most shall be most forgiven. 

17. Sin may be clasped so close we cannot see its face — 

18. Vile intercourse where virtue has not place. 
\&. Then keep your passions down, however dear, 

20. Thou pendulum betwixt a smile and tear. 

21. Her sensual snares let faithless Pleasure lay 

22. With craft and skill to ruin and betray. 

23. Soar not too high to fall, but stoop to rise, 

24. We masters grow of all that we despise. 

25. O, then, renounce that impious self-esteem; 

26. Riches have wings, and grandeur is a dream. 

27. Think not ambition wise because 'lis brave, 

28. The paths of glory Lead but to the grave. 

29. What is ambition? 'tis a glorious cheat, 

30. Only destructive to the brave and great. 

31. What's all the gaudy glitter of a crown? 

32. The way to bliss lies not on beds of down. 

33. How long we live, not years but actions tell; 

34. The man lives twice who lives the first life well. 

35. Make, then, while yet ye may, your God your friend; 

36. Whom Christians worship, yet not comprehend. 

37. The trust that's given guard, and to yourself be just; 

38. For, live how we can, yet die we must. 

(1, Young; 2, Dr. Johnson; 3, Pope; 4, Prior; 5, Sewell; 6, Spen- 
ser; 7, Daniel: 8, Sir Walter Raleigh; 9, Longfellow; 10, Southwell; 
ll.Congreve; 12, Churchill; 13, Rochester; 14, Armstrong; 15, Mil- 
ton; 16, Bailey; 17, Trench; 18. Somerville; 19, Thompson; 20, By- 
ron; 21, Smollet; 22, Crabbe; 23, Massmger; 24, Crowley; 25, Bea't- 
tie; 2H,Cowper; 27, Sir Walter Davenant; 28, Gray: 29, Willis; 30, 
Addison; 31, Dryden; 32, Francis yuarles; 33, Watkins; 34. Her- 
rick; 35, William Mason; 3G, Hill; 37, Dana; 38, Shakespeare.) 



With the refitting of yachts and the overhauling of their gear comes 
a reawakened interest in sea-going and shore-going gowns. The fav- 
orite fabric of the Summer will be sail cloth serge of either indigo 
blue or a bright brown, of just the tint used by Venetian fishermen 
for their sails. Very decorative, too, it looks against sunny skies, 
though somewhat dun against brown ones. There are not many with 
much color who can wear bright browns, while the color is particular- 
ly becoming to a great variety of pale skins. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Savage Mining Company. 

Location oi principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is" hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the Twentieth day of June 1893, an assessment (No. Si) of 25 
Cents per share was levied upon the* capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street 
3an Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-filth Day of Ju'y. 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction-, and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 14th day of August, 1898, to pay 
the delittquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office- Room 50, Nevada Blocn, 303 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place ot business -S&a Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the sixteenth day of June, 1893, an assessment, No. 18, of Ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able Immediately, In United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice of the company, room 5*, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
i Ighteen.h Day or July, 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction: and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on SATURDAY, the 5th day of August. 1893, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 58, Nevada block. No. 309 Montgomery street. San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Exchequer Mining Company. 
Location of Principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Twenty seventh day of J in e. 1893, an assessment (No. 36) of ten (10) 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 1st day ot August. 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the twenty-ninth day of August, 
, 1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal . 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best and Beleher Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Virginia City, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held on 
the aixth day of June, 1893, an assessment (No. 64) of Twenty-five Cents 

f»er share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmed lately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 33, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, 
California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpajd on 
Friday, the 14th Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and, uuless payment is made 
before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 4th day of August, 1893, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Hale & Norcross Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held on 
the Twenty-first day of June, 1893, an assessment (No. 104) of 50 cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
pany, at the office of the Company, room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 25th Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 18th day of August, 1893, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Silver Hill Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill Mining District, Storey Couuty, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 29th day of May, 1893, an assessment (No. 33) of Five (5c) 
Cents per Bhare was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery streets, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Wednesday, the Fifth (5th) Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the twenty eighth day of June, 1893, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

D. C. BATES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Twelfth day of June, 1893, an assessment (No 61) of 25 cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the Secretary.at the office of the 
company, room 85, third floor, of MillB Building, northeast corner of Bush 
and Mont;omery streets, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

The 18th Day of July, 1893. will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on Tt ESDAY, the 8th day of August. 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 35, third floor of Mills Building, northeast corner Bush and 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No 13 

Amount per Share 10 centB 

Levied .June 22, 1893 

Delinquent in Office July 26, 1898 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Aug. 17, 1893 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
C alifornia. 



Prl ce per Copy, 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00. 




NE \^^%||e TT BR 




pw. xiv 1 1 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY JULYS, 1S93. 



Number 1. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by ffce Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran. 
eisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

THE office of the News Letter in New York City has been 
removed to the Staring Post Building, 204-206 Broadway, 
Room 1, where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
cription and advertising rates. C. C. Murphy, manager. 



CLEVELAND is confined to his room at Buzzard's Bay with an 
attack of rheumatism. Uneasy lies the foot that carries the 
king. 

EMPEROR WILLIAM will leave to-day on a trip for Norway. 
He probably feels that it is wise for him to cool off a little be- 
fore facing again the political issue which his wayward policy 
has raised. 

" TT has taken Gladstone," says the Chronicle of the 30th ult., 
1 "a long time to find out that the only logical rule in a pop- 
ular government is the rule of the majority." Now, that reads 
like a very sound abstract principle. Suppose we apply it to 
Hawaii. 

THE physician who attended Samuel J. Tilden during the last 
eight years of his life, has just been paid $40, 000 by the estate. 
He sued for $150,000. The allowance made him seems very 
small when compared with those allowed physicians in this 
8tate, who smooth the way to the grave for wealthy men. 

WITH the lesson of Oakland before us, the Mayor and Super- 
visors should lose no time in establishing that garbage 
crematory for which $10,000 has already been appropriated. The 
only proper disposition of the city's garbage is by cremation, and 
the sooner we get to work at it, the better will it be for us. 

A DARING sinner went up in a balloon from St. Louis on 
Wednesday. He came down a converted man, and has de- 
termined to torn over a new leaf. The balloon might play an 
important part in the conversion to a better state of Chinese and 
other heathen. When it comes to a question of conversion or 
being dropped with a dull thud to earth, conversion has the call. 

THE doctors say they fear the bullet hidden in his worthless 
body may kill Chris Evans. That shows the difference be- 
tween them and us, for we fear it won't kill him. Chris should 
no longer linger in this unfeeling world. He should go at once 
to meet John upon the farther shore, and where, if the gods be 
just, George will soon join them. 

AGAIN has Fresno been left in the lurch. In anticipation of a 
very warm summer at the East, San Diego capitalists have 
bought up twenty tons of lemons in the South, with the idea of 
niakiug the sojourner at the White City pay dear for his lemon- 
ade in months to come. We suggest to the San Diego boomers to 
have this statement printed on their circulars : "We beat the world 
on lemonade." ^ 

DEATH, the Gripman, has started his annual tour by running 
away with a cable car at New York city. The runaway 
knocked down several street-car horses and dragged them fully 
two hundred yards at a high rate of speed, but they were not in- 
jured. Of course not. Nothing can injure a street-car horse, but 
let a human being get in front of the careening cable car, and 
the morgue business is increased at once. 

SINCE the success of the Midwinter Fair seems assured, the 
Executive Committee saw the necessity of having a Secretary 
of more than ordinary executive ability. At their meeting on 
Wednesday, Alexander Badlam was selected for the position, 
and a man better fitted for this responsible place could not have 
been found. His personal magnetism, his wonderful popularity 
with all who know him, and his thorough ability as a manager 
will add more to the success of the Fair than any one man in the 
community could do. 



THE students of Paris are having a row with those bngbears, 
the police, and all because of a difference of opinion regard- 
ing the apparel of some fair ladies who attended the students' 
masked ball. The maintainers of law and order say the ladies were 
immodestly dressed, while the students swear they were mod- 
estly attired, for "they wore strckings." What do these Parisian 
police want, we would like to know? Can they expect more than 
stockings? 

NEWSPAPER despatches from Montreal, where the Christian 
Endeavor Convention is being held, announce that San Fran- 
cisco has a good chance to secure the convention for 1895. The 
endeavoring Christians know not the extent of the field that here 
await their ministrations ; if they did, the unregenerate would need 
have no fear of a visit from them two years hence, for annual con- 
ventions, which custom has made opportunities for pleasure, look; 
with great fear and trembling upon a place where work awaits 
them. 



THE robber who deprived Mme. Demorest, of New York, of a 
portion of her large collection of diamonds, administered a de- 
served lesson to an all too proud woman. Mme. Demorest pub- 
lishes a magazine, an indictab'e offense in well regulated commu- 
nities; farther, she wore diamonds, though engaged in the news- 
paper business. This latter fact causes us to entertain suspicion 
of the lady. Then her husband, a newspaper man, bad $1500 in 
his pocketbook and slept with diamond studs in his night-shirt. 
They were legitimate prey, and were properly plucked. 



A CONTEMPORANEOUS writer recently spat defiance on that 
rule of English grammar which declares that the indefinite 
article takes the form of an before a vowel or a silent h, and wrote 
down the following caption: "An Historical Parallel." Then 
he proceeded to quote from one of Buchanan's proclamations con- 
vening Congress and from Cleveland's recent proclamation, and 
to comment sagely on the similarity of condition which drew 
them forlh. Upon this basis he threw out the inference that 
Democratic administrations and policies are always disastrous to 
business interests. But this gentleman's inference is as illogical 
as his grammar is unsound. If the similarity of condition which 
drew forth the respective proclamations of Cleveland and Bu- 
chanan carries any inference, it is that the four years of Har- 
rison's administration drove us back from prosperity and busi- 
ness activity to the commercial doldrums of Buchanan's time. 



OUR attention has been directed to the very reprehensible cus- 
tom practiced by wholesale butchers in this city of carting 
large quantities of uncovered meat through the streets, in great 
wagons drawn by four and six horses, which dash along through 
mud, dust and garbage, thereby covering the meat with masses 
of dirt. This meat is placed in butcher shops, and without any 
attempt being made to remove from it any of the filth it gathered 
in the streets, it is sold to consumers. Carrying dead carcasses of 
animals used for food, uncovered through the public streets, is a 
misdemeanor, and made punishable under section 58, order 1587, 
of the Board of Supervisors, by a fine of $1000, or six months im- 
prisonment, or by both fine and imprisonment. Yet this order Is 
openly violated in the middle of the day, under the very noses of 
the police, and right in the center of the most frequented parts of 
the city. We call the attention of the Board of Health to the 
matter. 



PRE8IDENT HYDE, of the Board of Education, and Director 
Ames will find but little sympathy in their endeavor to force 
the Chinese children of the city into the public schools. Ames 
says he sees no reason why the Chinese should not be admitted 
to the public schools, the same as children of any other race. We 
feel very sorry for Mr. Ames, for his mental vision must be 
peculiarly affected. Mr. Hyde also thought it the duty of the 
Classification Committee to provide accommodations for Chinese 
or any other children who might wish to enter the public schools. 
Ames' resolution to admit Chinese to the evening schools was 
lost, notwithstanding the able arguments of the champions of the 
heathen. These are rather radical views to be expressed by 
School Directors of this city. We are more surprised at Hyde 
than at Ames, for the former, we understood, had the Mayoralty 
bee in his bonnet, and his statements regarding Chinese school 
children will not be very apt to aid his ambitions. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893. 



A QUESTION OF PATRIOTISM. 



A LOSS of twenty thousand dollars by fires caused by bombs, 
sky-rockets and firecrackers; a waste of three thousand dol- 
lars in pyrotechnical displays, processions, carriages for "promi- 
nent citizens,*' and brass bands; innumerable personal injuries 
caused by explosives, and two children shot, one of whom will 
die; a fire department on constant duty for two days, at great 
additional expense to the city, and a day of noise and dirt, 
powder and blood — this Is a brief record of the recent celebration 
of the glorious anniversary of our independence. Now that 
it is all over, and we have recovered from our headaches result- 
ing from the incessant noise of the fireworks, and have been bold 
enough to remove the garden hose from the Dozzle of the bath- 
room faucet, let us ask ourselves what it all amounts to, anyhow? 
In what respect are we better to-day, or in what respect is our 
country stronger, because of the barbarous noises and idiotic pro- 
cession of Tuesday last? The oaly argument that can be advanced 
in behalf of the present manner of celebration of the Fourth is 
that it is said to engender a spirit of enthusiastic patriotism in the 
breasts of the rising generation. We do not believe it, for there 
were at least ninety youngsters who made both day and night 
hideous on Tuesday who never gave the Revolution a thought, 
or knew what the celebration meant, to five who did. This mis- 
taken idea that Independence Day can be properly celebrated 
only by the hideous noises of fire-crackers, we have indulged in 
long enough. The yearly enthusiastic pandemonium has cost us 
many a pretty penny, as the records of Fourth of July fires will 
show. This year we were very fortunate. Last year the loss 
caused by fireworks was much greater, and twoyea'S ago it was 
fully 1150,000. Insurance men and firemen have protested time 
and again against the promiscuous explosion of fireworks on the 
streets, but all protest has been unav tiling. It remains for sen- 
sible citizens, many of whom have become disgusted with the 
kind of celebration we have had for some years past, to combine 
in their protests, and by force of their example cause a change 
in the manner of our Fourth of July celebration. The change 
must be radical, and must extend from the appointment of the 
Committee of Two Hundred by the Mayor all through the ridicu- 
lous farce. 

The Mayor appoints two hundred citizens as an honorary 
Fourth of July Committee. About half of these meet, and select 
an Executive Committee, which manages the celebration. It is a 
peculiar fact, that every year almost every member of the Execu- 
tive Committee is a politician, or a man who wants to be a poli- 
tician. None are there for purely patriotic motives, but rather 
with an eye to that main chance which will bring them nearer to 
their political goal. Every now and then the wire-pullers in the 
committee discover some unknown man (who may have an open 
purse) who would like to be President of the Day, or Orator, or 
Grand Marshal, or what not. He is appointed for purely "patri- 
otic" motives; the people read his name in the paper, wonder 
who he is, and why they never beard of him before, and then he 
drops out of sight. The Fourth of July Committees have been 
productive of more scandals than any other official or semi-official 
bodies. Even this year, though this Committee has so far been 
ve p y quiet, it is said the collectors sent out to solicit subscriptions 
from the public have embezzled large sums. There are men 
in town who manage to get on the committee every year. They 
always manage, also, to have something to do with the awarding 
of contracts. The city usually gives $3000 to assist in the cele- 
bration, a portion of which always goes toward a public pyro- 
technical display in the evening. Yet does the man live who can 
honestly say be was ever satisfied with one of those displays? 

If we wish to make patriots of our children, why not go about 
it in a rational way? Spend that $3000 from the city and all con- 
tributions for a children's day at the Park, or some suitable 
place, where they could all be well entertained and instructed. 
Above all, prevent them setting the city on fire witb their fire- 
crackers. So great is this danger in this city that many of the 
insurance companies have clauses in their policies providing that 
no claim will be allowed for damages caused by a fire resulting 
from the infraction of fire or police regulations. The danger is 
great, and should be avoided. The present Fourth of July cele- 
bration is better befitting a village than a great city. We should 
improve on it, or drop it altogether. 



THE law authorizing the holding of a constitutional convention 
in New York passed by the Legislature of that State permits 
the participation of women as delegates in the work of the con- 
vention. In this fact the women suffragists will find much en- 
couragement. To have a voice in determining the fundamental 
laws under which they live is a greater privilege than the liberty 
of voting on the ordinary administration of laws. 



THE PRIVATE ENTRANCE. 



THE exceptionally brutal murder of Mrs. Griffes in the back 
room of a water-front saloon last week has served to project 
the *• Family Entrance," alias " Ladies' Entrance" of the omni- 
present gin trough of San Francisco into that notoriety and atten- 
tion which its demoralizing influence demands and deserves. 
There is reasonable ground, however, for a fear that, in the midst 
of this promiscuous chatter, fact and fiction will become mixed 
up, and in the confusion of truth and falsehood, the real basis of 
the evil be lost sight of. The private entrance to the private room 
of the public bar is more of an effect than a cause, though, in its 
turn, it has undoubtedly acted as a cause in the creation of many 
results that are destructive to good morals. The " Family En- 
trance" is not, as a morning paper recently asserted, an imported 
luxury. It is an indigenous development — a supply that came 
in response to a demand, and, if we want to understand the mat- 
ter thoroughly, we must delve down beneath the surface and seek 
for the cause of the demand. If we do that, we will be brought 
face to face with that distorted condition of public morals which 
countenances the promiscuous use of the same bathing place by 
both the sexes, which throws the mantle of respectability over 
the private dining-room of the swell restaurant, which builds 
hotels, boarding-houses, restaurants and lodging-houses in every 
block, to the destruction, in men and women alike, of that re- 
finement, respect and delicacy of intercourse which springs from 
the privacy of properly domesticated family life. The private 
entrance to the private room of the public bar is simply a result 
of those general conditions of life under which our women are 
gradually growing into sensuous, indolent tipplers, to whom the 
restraints, and burdens, and duties of motherhood and straight- 
laced family life are onerous— of, in short, a womanhood that men 
are beginning to look across at with a feeling of " bail fellow well 
met" familiarity that is akin to contempt, rather than up to, with 
a feeling of courteous respect that is akin to reverence. And, 
when we reach a place in the development of organized society 
where men are no longer compelled by nature to look up toward 
womanhood with respect, then we will have reached a place 
where one of the great forces in civilization has dropped out of 
life and left honorable individual exertion and ambition and re- 
straint without a goal for which to struggle. 

But no matter what be the cause or genesis of the " Family 
Entrance," alias the " Ladies' Entrance" to the back room of the 
saloon, it should be abolished, because, although it is in itself but 
the result of evil conditions, it is also the parent of demoralizing 
and destructive agencies and opportunities. Ten years ago there 
were but few private entrances to the saloons of San Francisco, 
and the women who used them were social outcasts. It is true 
that there were then in existence a certain class of drugstores 
where frisky females who still remained within the limits of rep- 
utable society obtained surreptitious tipple. But that was a sys- 
tem of limited demoralizing influences. With the advent of pri- 
vate entrances on every corner, the opportunities for female 
drunkenness were expanded, the liquor habit cultivated , and the 
line of demarkation between the bawd and the matron nearly ob- 
literated — and in that obliteration lies the great menace to social 
order and decency. 



THEY SING IN VARIOUS KEYS. 



COUNT DELESSEPSis reported to be dying. Death, no doubt, 
will come as a great relief to the disgraced builder of the Suez 
Canal, but it would have been a far greater blessing to him had 
it arrived a few years earlier. In that case his name would prob- 
ably have remained untarnished in the books of history. 



THE tune of that portion of the philosophers of the press who 
conceive that the one great end and object of all profitable 
discussion of public affairs should be to decry and ridicule the 
acts and opinions of the present President of the United States, is 
pitched in a variety of decidedly inharmonious keys. For instance 
it has been a cardinal doctrine with these remarkable gentlemen 
that the Cleveland policy in regard to all public affairs was dic- 
tated " by England." When, however, the Indian government 
stopped the free coinage of silver the other day, an incident was 
presented for which the idiocy of partisan malice demanded that 
our executive be held responsible, and so that act was promptly 
charged as a result of Cleveland's policy. But if that charge be 
true, it shows that instead of being influenced by foreign dicta- 
tion the President is actually a person of such importance that his 
jurisdiction exceeds the limits of his country, and that he dictates 
his policy to other governments. Then again the finger of scorn 
has for some months past been pointed at Cltveland because of 
the period of commercial depression and financial disturbance 
through which the country has been passing. To be sure* 
Cleveland had nothing to do with this condition of affairs, except 
to inherit it from the administration of his predecessor. But that 
did not count for anything with the philosophers. The condition 
came to a crisis during the first few weeks of his term, and under 
the logic of demagogy, that saddled the burden upon him and his 
policy. But now that the commercial and financial atmosphere 
shows signs of clearing, we hear nothing of the influence of the 
Cleveland policy and administration upon the result. Indeed we 
may expect to be soon confronted with the doctrine that the 
national administration has no influence whatever in such mat- 
ters. 



July 8, 1893. 



! FRANCISCO NKW'S LETTER. 



PRESS MANUFACTURED HEROES. 

THE refusal of Warden Anil, of the Folsom Penitentiary, to 
permit Sontae. the train-robber, to be further Interviewed by 
representatives of the press, is a step which should meet with the 
commendation of all thoughtful citizens. It is a lamentable fact, 
but nevertheless a fact, that from first to last the newspaper press 
has. all through this EvansSontag matter, endeavored to make 
heroes and persecuted rcen out of these murderous ruffians and 
robbers— to hold them up to the public gaze as persons who were 
worthy of great respect because of their personal courage, and en- 
titled to sympathy because the forces of law and order eventually 
got the better of them. It may be that the papers did not intend 
to do this, but that is comparatively immaterial. We are inter- 
ested in what they did do, not what they intended to do. By 
means of these sensational publications the mind of the com- 
munity has (so far as it is possible for the present newspaper press 
to affect the public mind) been trained into the belief that it is a 
heroic act to leave such a trail of blood and robbery across the 
State as the Evans-Sontag gang have within the past two years 
or so. Every incident in this career of plunder and murder has 
been written up and distorted and colored with a view to making 
it a notable achievement rather than a despicable crime, and in 
every encounter which occurred between the outlaws and the 
representatives of law and order the latter were held up to ridi- 
cule, while the former were posed as invulnerable warriors. Of 
the widows and orphans who were made by these murderous 
scoundrels not a word was beard. The curtain was never pulled 
aside to let us have a glimpse at the anguish of their bereavement 
and the desolation of their homes. But the moment the murder- 
ers were captured we were surfeited with a nauseating supply of 
Mrs. Evans and the Misses Evans, and the limited resources of 
the Evans pocket-book and larder. And then the mother of Son- 
tag was brought upon the scene, and never permitted to leave it 
until her worthless offspring was buried out of sight. And so it 
has been with the attempt to break jail, which was headed by 
the other Sontag. The press was not content to tell the story of 
this incident, but it continued piling up interview after interview 
with Sontag (as though he were a man of great ability and high 
station whose individual opinions were of interest) until the fel- 
low was almost transformed from a blood-stained thief into a fit 
subject for a pantheon. In well-regulated prisons the inmates 
are not allowed to pose before the public in interviews regarding 
their audacious attempts to break jail. Indeed, in any place 
where imprisonment is a reality rather than a name, prisoners 
are only allowed to communicate with their friends occasionally 
and under great restrictions. It was time, therefore, that the 
Bon tag levees to the representatives of the press were brought to 
a close. They should never have been allowed to open. 



THE GERMAN EMPEROR'S SPEECH. 



THE speech from the throne read by Emperor William oil Tues- 
day, at the formal opening of the new Reichstag, contained a 
few remarks which deserve attention. "You will receive," the 
German ruler said to the members, "a new bill regarding the 
peace footing of the army, in which there will be taken into 
account, as far as possible, certain desires expressed during the 
discussion of the late bill." This proves that Emperor William 
himself has come to understand that the old bill in an unmodified 
form would never have a chance to pass, even in a "packed " 
Reichstag, and the opponents of the bill in the defunct assembly, 
therefore, have to a great extent carried their point. It is, how- 
ever, not yet time for the German patriots to rejoice, since the 
"cloven foot" is apparent in the speech, for the Emperor declared 
that the Reichstag would be asked to pass the bill with the 
utmost speed, and that after the bill is passed, the government 
would introduce in the winter session (I) a bill providing for the 
expense that will be caused by the increase of the army. This 
looks ominous, since the question of expenditure is the vital 
point with regard to the bill, and to postpone its consideration 
until after the bill has become law ought certainly to be 
objected to by the representatives of the people. The device of 
hiding the financial proposals from the Reichstag, in order to get 
the army bill accepted meanwhile, is unworthy of the govern- 
ment of a great nation, and it will be interesting to know whether 
the members of the German Reichstag will actually permit them- 
selves to be led by the nose in such a manner. The scheme is so 
transparent that one would hardly believe that the bait will be 
taken. 

The Emperor, referring to the proposed taxation, added: "I and 
my high confederates remain convinced that the means for the 
new organization of the army can be procured without over- 
burdening the people." Well, nobody ever doubted this opinion 
of his Majesty, but it is usually the case that persons who want 
to appropriate other people's money, and their confederates hold 
a very different opinion from the people about to be robbed. 



IT IS IN THE WAY. EVIDENTLY. 

IT is evident that the law passed by the last Legislature, com- 
pelling Police Court Clerks to give a particular form of printed 
receipt to all persons from whom they receive money in con- 
nection wi'h their office, forms a useful and important regulation. 
The evidence of this is found In the fact that nearly everybody 
connected with these hotbeds of official iniquity is opposed to the 
law. that two of the clerks have absolutely set themselves above 
the will of the sovereign people as expressed through the Legis- 
lature, and refused to obey the law (a piece of official insolence, 
by the way, that has never yet been equalled) and that the Chief 
of Police has recommended tbe Board of Supervisors to proceed 
and amend this State law by a municipal ordinance, thereby 
making it workable. Parenthetically it may be remarked that 
the Chief of Police has a strange conception of the respective 
authorities, duties and powers of the Legislature and the Board 
of Supervisors; but, perhaps, that is not to be wondered at when 
it is borne in mind that our Police Department has existed out- 
side the pale of the law for the past twelve years or so, and is in 
itself a usurpation of authority and an invasion of Republican 
institutions of government. 

The News Letter begs to recommend the Supervisors to avoid 
attempting to usurp authority or amend State laws. We beg to 
suggest to them that, on the contrary, they remove from office 
those impudent officials who have set themselves above the law of 
the State, and appoint in their places reputable and competent gen- 
tlemen. Then the new law will be found simple and effective. 
The pretense that there is any difficulty in receipting for the bail 
which is deposited in the Police Stations is absurd. A collective 
receipt should be issued to the Property Clerk, with the individ- 
ual amounts and the names of the persons from whom it was re- 
ceived endorsed on the back. For any of this money that has to 
be returned to the depositors a return receipt could and shonld 
be exacted — thus keeping tbe books properly balanced. In the 
same way, where the deposit is used in partial payment of a sub- 
sequent fine, a receipt for its release in the one capacity should 
be taken, and a receipt for its application in the other capacity 
issued. There is no difficulty in the way of the full enforce- 
ment of the new law except a disinclination on the part of those 
connected with the Police Courts to recognize any measure which 
stops official peculation, and has a reformatory tendency. A few 
reniovalB by the Board of Supervisors, and a few indictments by 
the Grand Jury will make this condemned law work with the 
desired precision and regularity. 



THE MIDWINTER FAIR. 



THE prospects for the consummation of the Midwinter Fair 
scheme are most alluring. All the indications now point to 
the complete success of the proposition, and as a consequence 
the gentlemen who have the matter in charge are jubilantly en- 
thusiastic. At the outset it was stated that $500,000 would be 
needed for the Fair, and many men of faint hearts at once threw 
up their hands, and said the work was impossible of accomplish- 
ment, because the money could never be raised. The projectors 
are now able to announce with pardonable pride, that although 
no endeavor has yet been made to solicit subscriptions from the 
public, the voluntary contributions already amount to $300,000. 
This is a most commendable showing, and certainly one for which 
our citizens are deserving of the highest praise. The Midwinter 
Fair is slowly resolving itself into a most important fact. It has 
passed the visionary stage, and is now far on the road toward 
actual construction. That nearly half a million of dollars was 
raised by voluntary contributions in a few weeks for the estab- 
lishment in this city of a great exhibition for the benefit of the 
people, and this in a time of general financial depression, bespeaks 
volumes for the prosperous condition of this city. The spirit that 
animates tbe people who have given their aid to the Fair project 
is well shown in the contribution to the cause by the Judson 
Manufacturing Company and the Pacific Iron and Nail Com- 
pany. These companies have agreed to donate all of their kind 
of material that may be used in the Fair buildings. Such an offer 
means far more than one may suppose who reads the statement 
in a cursory manner. There will be four, and possibly more, 
large buildings, built of iron and steel in Golden Gate Park, where 
an excellent site has been selected within easy reach from the 
termini of all the Park cable lines. Tbe Coast States and Terri- 
tories have given evidences of a desire to participate in the Fair, 
and one or more of them will doubtless wish to put up its own 
lu'lding. Washington and Arizona, it is said, will each want a 
State building. The different counties of this State will also par- 
ticipate in a spirit of friendly rivalry. It should be remembered 
that the Fair will be for the benefit of the entire State at large. It 
is not in any sense a San Francisco scheme, more than in tbe 
minor fact that it will be located here. Any visitors that may be 
attracted here by the Fair will be certain to visit various parts of 
the State, all sections of which will be liberally advertised and 
aided. Here is now a chance for the people of California to all 
pull together, and give one of the best of the smaller international 
fairs known to history. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893. 



THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 



THE tournament this year will remain a long time in the mem- 
ory of those who witnessed it; it was so different from the 
former ones. The draw was very unsatisfactory, as many good 
players came together in the early rounds, and when the big day 
arrived and the final round was called, for the first time in the 
history of tennis the game was too tame to admit of any great ap- 
plause. The final round should really have been in the morning, 
when Sam Hardy played Driscoll, as the tennis was certainly 
much better than in the morning, when Allen met Driscoll. 

It would be needless to repeat all the different scores of the 
matches played, but I would like to say something as to the style 
adopted this year, compared with that of last. Driscoll, the win- 
ner, deserves all the credit be can get, for many reasons. He 
played hard matches from the beginning, and stuck bravely to 
all his opponents, even when handicapped with lameness, wbich, 
on the hot courts at San Rafael, is most trying. In the first round 
he encountered Bates, who was a favorite from the beginning, 
but Driscoll surprised all present by taking a love set, which is a 
pretty good piece of business for any one to do from such a player. 
Driscoll's style adopted this year was far better than when he 
played last, and it is entirely due to his being so expert on the 
volley and smash that he was able first to defeat Bates, then Stet- 
son and Sam Hardy, all first-class players. Moreover, his ser- 
vice is not to be overlooked, as it is very effective, and will easily 
bother many good players. One thing which gave the champion 
a certain advantage is, that he is left-handed. People are accus- 
tomed to play against right-handed players, and play at their back 
hand, while with Driscoll one plays at his right, and it is some 
time before his opponent can get used to playing to the other 
hand. 

Allen, the runner-up, certainly played a very brilliant game 
against Sumner Hardy, the day previous to the finals, but fell 
down so terribly that it was absolutely painful to watch the ten- 
nis during the final match, which was won in straight sets. No 
one has ever considered Allen a really first-class player, and it was 
therefore surprising that he should have found his way into the 
final. He really had no match, outside of the one with Hardy, to 
play, and when he played him, he was fresh, and the Oakland 
boy had already played a very hard match and was probably 
tired out. Had Allen but played as well against Driscoll as he 
did the day before, it would have relieved the monotony of the 
otherwise very stupid game. 

This tournament had. its many faults forgotten, one very pleas- 
ing feature, and that was the sunny smile and gentlemanly be- 
havior of young Sam Hardy. Without any doubt, he is the 
best loser on the court, and never by word or deed shows that he 
is in the least annoyed at any remarks passed by bis opponent, 
.nor because he is not winning. His game is a very pretty one, 
but at times lacks severity. His ground volleying always wins 
applause for him. His vollying at the net is also one of his strong- 
est points, and it seems a pity that he does not acquire a drive, as 
this would very materially improve his game, especially when he 
is driven back to the base line. I do not for a minute doubt that 
he will come against the present champion next year. 

His brother Sumner is also quite a favorite on the courts, and 
well deserves to be so, and has, I think, a little better style than 
8am, but does not volley as well. 

I was very much disappointed by De Long, who was really the 
favorite from the California Club, but who did not play as well as 
expected, but fell before Sam Hardy, though he fought very well 
in the second set, bringing the score from five to one to five all. 
His game in the match compares badly with what I have seen 
him do in practice, and his failure to do better shows conclusively 
that even the best players are subject to streaks of off play, and 
fail to do themselves justice when they most need all their facul- 
ties. 

Stetson played a very good game this year, and did better 
against the champion than I expected. He has a very good idea 
of the game, but I think he is afraid to put more " ginger " into 
his strokes, and often looses a stroke owing to lack of severity. 
Bates has been before the public so often that it is useless to dis- 
cuss his game, but in my opinion he is not up to the form he dis- 
played last year against Hubbard. Dr. Phillips also seemed 
weaker than last year, when his fight against Haight won for him 
quite a reputation. Dr. Seager and Mallory have never been with 
us before, and both gentlemen played very well, though Mallory 
was not in good trim. His first set with Sumner Hardy was 
quite interesting, but he showed that he was lacking in both 
practice and condition, and fell a very easy victim in the second 
set. 

Taking the tournament as a whole, I feel sure that many will 
agree with me in saying that it cannot compare with that of 1892. 
I hope more interest will be shown next year, and that the stand- 
ard of play will improve rather than depreciate. 

Alec. B. Wilberfoece. 



IN STANFORD'S MEMORY. 

THE Southern Pacific Company directors have adopted resolu- 
tions in memory of Senator Stanford, reciting that, "In conduct- 
ing the details of his vast undertaking his judgment was nevtr 
swayed by impulse, nor were his actions controlled by any thought 
of individual gain ; but the dominent idea that prevailed in his mind 
was how to bring about the greatest good to the greatest num- 
ber." 

The directors of the Central Pacific, of which Senator Stanford 
was President for thirty-two years — in fact he was the only Pres- 
ident the road ever had— adopted resolutions dwelling at length 
upon their estimate of Stanford's public and private character. 
The concluding language of the resolutions is as follows: 
«« Possessing a broad public spirit, he devoted the flower of his life 
to the development of the vast resources of his country, while the 
fortune his genius, enterprise, industry and energy accumulated 
he devoted to the cause of philanthropy. He has left to the State 
the prosperity which will follow from the work of his hands, and 
to the youth of this land an example of the success which waits 
upon high purpose. In his dealings with men he was mindful of 
justice; to the requirements of friendship he paid the tribute of 
sincerity; to the obligations of husband and father he yielded the 
devotion of love and truth; to the duties of citizenship he gave 
the service of patriotism, and in devoting the fortune he has accu- 
mulated to the foundation of a great university, he made the 
highest and noblest aims of humanity his sole heir. His death 
closed a strong, brave and useful life, and in recording this sin- 
cere tribute to his memory, we are conscious that he has left a 
name so illustrious that it cannot be dimmed by detraction or 
brightened by eulogy. 

WILLIAM F. HERRIN. 

IN the appointment of William F. Herrin, of Newlands, Allen & 
Herrin, to be General Solicitor, vice E. L. Craig, deceased, the 
Southern Pacific Company called one of the ablest lawyers on the 
coast to its council chamber. He was selected by a committee of 
the directors of the railroad, and their choice was endorsed by 
the Board. It is said that Mr. Herrin will continue his affiliation 
with the Spring Valley Water Works, for which company he has 
been counsel for some years. So reluctant was this corporation 
to losing its able adviser, that it is said he agreed to devote at least 
a portion of his time to their affairs. Mr. Herrin will occupy the 
place with the Southern Pacific Company formerly held by Creed 
Haymond. On Hayinond's death, Mr. Herrin was mentioned to 
succeed him, but the position was awarded to Mr. Craig, of Au- 
burn, instead, as Mr. Craig was intimately acquainted with the 
railroad's affairs. On Mr. Craig's death, Mr. Herrin was again 
mentioned for the office by several of the directors, and was se- 
lected. Mr. Herrin has had a remarkably brilliant legal career. 
He began practice in Nevada, where he became to some extent 
identified with the affairs of the late Senator Sharon. Subse- 
quently he was prominent among the Senator's counsel in the 
Sarah Althea Hill suit. He is eminently qualified to fill the im- 
portant post to which he has now been called, for he is a pro- 
found lawyer, a diligent student, a keen judge of men, and of a 
pleasing address. 



A LEGAL precedent of importance concerning the rights of 
alien heirs of foreign born American citizens has been estab- 
lished in Illinois under the new alien law of the State. An Irish- 
man at Bloomiogton, a naturalized citizen, died possessed of con- 
siderable wealth. He had a wife and two children, and also 
brothers and sisters in Ireland, some children of whom are living 
in Illinois. The old alien statutes would have given one-half of the 
decedent's estate to the wife and her children ; the other half to the 
alien brothers and sisters and their children. The Circuit Court, 
however, has decided that the new law will not permit of aliens 
buying and owning land in the State; nor can aliens, or their de- 
scendants born abroad, receive property through inheritance. In 
accordance with this decision, in the event of their being only 
alien heirs to property left by a foreign-born citizen, such prop- 
erty must escheat to the State. The rapid multiplication of re- 
strictions against alien ownership of property will soon furnish 
the text for criticisms on the contracting tendency of the liberality 
of the Uniled States Government. A few years ago the Iilintia 
statute and the ruling of the court would have been charged to 
knownothingism. Now it is held to be commendable conserva- 
tism. 



A. H. Ricketts, attorney-at-law, rooms 201, 202 and 203, Crocker 
Building, San Francisco. 



ADK. TONICK, now an inmate of a Montana penitentiary, 
asks the Prison Commissioners to allow him to grow his 
whiskers, so that when bis term has expired two months hence, 
he may reappear in his old haunts in all the glory of bis hirsute 
appendages. The Commissioners may grant the request, for the 
wind blows on both the just and the unjust, and the freed convict 
would naturally want protection from the elements. If Dr. 
Tonick advertises those whiskers, though, as the result of only 
two months' application of his tonic, he should be sent back to 
jail. 



July 8, 1893 . 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SHALL GIRLS UO TO GYMNASIUMS? 

[B T Di V i«so».| 

FiR centuries women were denied any dislinctive privileges of 
Iheir own. To-day, baring secured some, they are determined 
to secure more. Because women have succeeded in doing for 
themselves what men as a class would not do for women, or admit 
women's right to do for themselves, the sterner sex has at last 
thought it time to take the matter in baud. If men cannot success- 
fully oppose a movement, then they will try twice as hard to control 
it. There never were so many men interested in women's progress as 
at present, only the advance must be- along the lines marked out by 
bis superior knowledge. That often a woman is the best judge con- 
cerning what affects her own sex, is seldom recognized by those who 
seek to put her in training. This is especially true in whatever effects 
the physical well-being of woman. To-day gymnastics are in high 
favor for women. " Send your girls to a gymnasium or a good 
turning school," is the advice that we hear on every side. Is that 
good advice? Yes and no; most emphatically no. Why? Because— 
oh, ever so many reasons. No one should be permitted to speak upon 
this subject except from the knowledge gained by actual experience 
in the gymnasium. Even then the testimony must be weighed and 
examined by the standards used to determine expert testimony, and 
that may be summed up in a few words : " Do the people know what 
they are talking about?" 

Every one must admit that it is great fun to belong to a ladies' 
class in a gymnasium. First, there is the spirit of good comrade- 
ship, the social feeling that binds a certain set together. To many 
this feeling is intensified by the friendly emulation existing among 
the members of the class. Then there is that delightful sense of 
muscular freedom, of emancipation from the great bondage of clothes. 
The Turkish trowsers, the loose blouse waist, comfortable sleeves, 
and easy rubber-soled shoes, all these give a girl who has escaped 
from her corsets, a lightness of step and a buoyancy of body that she 
never can know in her other clothes. To be sure, she is apt to look 
like a terrible guy, and when she is facing in the opposite direction 
may be likened to the stern of a Dutch man-of-war, but her self-con- 
sciousness lies wrapped up with her street suit in the dressing-room 
locker, and she simply does not care. But stop, there is one time 
when she seems to feel the unconventionality of her attire ; and that 
is when the " turning teacher," or class leader, walks in upon his 
class without having donned his gymnasium attire. Well do I re- 
member how on one such occasion our class of girls suddenly flutter- 
ed together, and felt that they were a good deal undressed to be seen 
by a man. His presence in his Prince Albert coat, with his hat in 
his hand, seemed to emphasize the contrast all the more sharply. It 
was a ludicrous idea, but it only goes to prove what creatures we are 
of clothes. 

It is a great mistake for a woman to have but little clothing on under 
her gymnasium suit. This is true of any woman, but most decidedly 
so of one of rounded plumpness. It no longer occasions any surprise 
that women wear corsets while surf-bathing. It is just as necessary, 
in fact more necessary, for her well-being and comfort, that a wo- 
man engaged in any sort of active exercise should be protected about 
her bnst. It is absurd, it is a crime to let false modesty interfere 
with comfort and health. I do not intend that it shall weaken the 
force of this article, and I state at once that the girl who takes off her 
corsets, and without donning in their stead some stout cloth band or 
loose equipoise waist, and attempts to run around on the gymnas- 
ium floor for hours, to say nothing of other ground and lofty tum- 
blings, will be ready to cry quits long before the class is dismissed. 
She will have reason to do so, too, for Nature never intended a fat 
woman to carry her rotund figure all by herself. 

In brief, I very much wonder if Nature approves of all this gym- 
nastic exercise for girls. I rather think she does not. Calisthenics 
with dumb-bells and wands, yes, with light iron bars, with Indian 
clubs, or grace hoops and fancy marching, will do yery well for wo- 
men up to a certain age. They are excellent for children, for little 
girls whose frames have not yet lost the elasticity of developing 
youth, and whose bodies are not fully developed. I do not suppose 
that what is known as the " ground movements" can be injurious to 
any woman if carried on under the direction of a careful teacher, who 
will not allow his pupils to exceed their strength, especially at first. 
The great objection to these ground movements is that they seem so 
easy that those who essay them become over tired. But a pair of 
Indian clubs that do not weigh more than a pound and a half each 
soon seem like a pair of tons when swung too long. I very much 
question the virtue of stepping and twisting and springing and strid- 
ing and squatting this way and that with a force, with a jerky force 
which means so much that is harmful to a woman. 

When it comes to such exercies as the running jump, the excercises 
on the leather horse, and the struggling and straining to tie oneself 
up in a double bow-knot on the rings or the parallel bars, I know 
that such exertions are injurious to the majority of women, especially 
to fat women. To go home with pains that are inde- 
scribable, and yet excruciating, to develop a different set of muscles 
every day, and be able to locate them by the steadiness and persist- 
ence of the ache there is in them for days; to know, as only a woman 
can know, that she has overtaxed her strength— let this happen a few 



times, and then what wonder that the class loses many members be- 
fore the season is over. 

Of course, such opinions as these will call forth indignant protests 
from the more " advanced thinkers " in the cause of women'i rights- 
Thev will declare that I would seek to wrap women up again in the 
swaddling clothes of past customs and tie her to the bed post of old 
ideas. Not at all. I know there are those, and to their shame be it 
said they are women, who insist that a woman is physically able at all 
times, under ail circumstances, to do all that a man can do. She 
ought to be able, at least, so say these apostles of a new physical de- 
velopment, to run as fast, and as long, to bear as much, and as con- 
tinuously, to stand on her feet as uncomplainingly and as unprejudi- 
cially to her health as does a man. This is all nonsense. Women can 
be educated out of many of their tendencies to weakness and ill- 
health which are the results of ignorance of themselves and the laws 
of nature. But it will not be accomplished by the violent exercise 
of the gymnasium. The gentler methods of physical culture by which 
a woman is taught how to stand, how to carry herself, how to walk 
with the least possible exertion and greatest conservation of energy, 
will do more to make a healthy, graceful woman than all the banging 
of punch-bags, the leaping over barriers, and the hanging by the heels 
from the horizontal bar ever accomplished for any woman. For we 
do not seek to make professional acrobats and gymnasts of our girls. 
It would be impossible, anyway, for they are all too old when they 
enter the adult classes. 

Let a woman acquire ease and grace of motion. Let a woman 
learn how to preserve her health, and save her strength by a daily, 
hourly avoidance of that which exhausts without building up, and 
she has learned more than she ever will in turning school. 

Let her take her exercise in the open air, in comfortable clothes 
and in cheerful company. Let her learn that a woman does not need 
so many tons of horse power in her muscles, but rather the trained 
ability to perform her appointed tasks with grace, ease, and the least 
expenditure of power. 

Between the advocates of the gymnasium on one side, and the de- 
votees of Delsarte on the other there often wages a fierce and bitter 
war. My sympathies are with the Delsarteans. So when some long 
lank specimen of womanhood declares for the gymnasium, I say let 
her go, but as for the nice plump girls, I am loath to see them under- 
take the discipline. A man may say to a woman : " You ought not 
to do that, it will injure you." He may know what he is talking 
about. If he is a physician that's what he will say every time about 
the severe exercises in the gymnasium. But I don't care if he be the 
most learned doctor in the college — if he say to a woman, " That's all 
right, it won't injure you," and she knows how she feels after she has 
gone through certain exercises, let her take warning of her own feel- 
ings rather than be urged on by his words. That is the time when 
women know more than men. 



She is right. 

The thrifty housewife cleaves to all 
Good things that are allowed her, 

And in this 'land of lands' she cleaves 
To Cleveland's baking powder. 



LOUIS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



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SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 8, 1883. 



HIS LAST ROLE. 



By Paul Gerristy, in " Short Stories. ' 



KHE curtain had been already raised three times and still 
the applause was prolonged. They were compelled to raise 
it again. Darzincourt, bis left hand pressed against his 
_ __ heart, his right holding several gilt laurel crowns, bowed, 
while his eyes filled with tears. The bravos increased to a 
storm; be wanted to say something to express his thanks to the 
public, but the old comedian could only open his lips and utter a 
mumbling sound. He was overcome; his emotion was too deep to 
clothe in words. 

Ganes beat on the floor with a furious noise; the entire theatre 
shook with the sound. Again and again did the ushers pass up 
to the stage paper palm branches bearing ribbons, on which the 
principal roles of the actor were printed. Meanwhile, as Darzin- 
court stood in the midst of the company that had supported bim, 
the stage manager left the group and embraced him in 
the name of the crowd. At the same time he placed one of the 
crowns on his head. The crown, far too large, slipped down to 
his shoulders, but what of that, the scene was beautiful! 

It was on thlB tableau and amid fresh and furious applause that 
the curtain descended, leaving Darzincourt to take off his crown 
and receive the felicitations of his comrades. 

Never before in that provincial city bad a similar manifestation 
been made over a retiring actor; and, as he was to leave the stage 
permanently, there was no jealousy among his fellows. 80 tbey 
retired to the Cafe" de la ConiGdie, where a second ovation awaited 
him, and the fragrant smoke from the punch-bowls on the marble 
tables revived the enthusiasm of those who pressed forward to do 
him honor. And there were toasts without number, you may be 
surel 

The old habitue 1 a of the theatre reproached him for leaving them 
so soon — "Why, if one pleases the public one is always young." 

And he, rubbing his chin that bad been shaved for more than 
half a century, was obliged to defend his retirement. His hair 
was white, he was too rheumatic to kneel gracefully in the love 
scenes. Besides be had made bis mark, bis life had been passed 
on the boards. Well, he needed repose. He wanted to see the 
real country instead of faded canvas. He had dreamed of a little 
farm, a little garden where he could smoke bis pipe in peace to 
the end of his days. It was time to think of himself — he had 
given enough of his life to the public. And it was amusing to 
hear him speak of his farming projects, seated there in the cos- 
tume of Louis XV., with the «< make-up " still on his face, which 
in the heat of the caf€ glistened in oily lines. 

At last the manager, with his majestic gravity, and also moved 
by the libations he had taken during that affecting evening, de- 
clared that there was no telling what the future might bring 
forth. Who could say that Darzincourt would not come back 
some day? But the latter shook his head. No! his decision had 
been made, he wanted now to enjoy the luxury of doing nothing. 
Two days afterwards Darzincourt, installed in his little house, 
his bead covered with a large straw bat, wearing a linen suit and 
wooden shoes, began to water bis flowers in the midst of the 
broiling sun, while chatting with his little serving maid. 

"But you ought to wait until evening," she said. "They will 
perish." 

"Bah I" he smiled. "Flowers are like women, you can't show 
them too much attention." 

From that time a delicious life began for him in the peace of 
his rustic borne. He thought with horror of the rehearsals of 
other days, of the constant changing of costumes and parts to be 
learned, and shivered at the remembrance of those scenes wbicb 
called for nervous action. A year of blissful pleasure followed. 
He was very happy, and why not? he kept asking himself again 
and again — so often, in fact, that be began to doubt if be felt so 
sincerely. 

This happiness at the bottom was devilish monotonous. Yet he 
was not willing to acknowledge that ennui had crept into that 
pretty little bouse which he had longed for so much. Aud the 
more be assured himself that he needed nothing, the more he 
saw that the days that dragged by were abominably void and dull. 
To-day, seated in an arbor taking bis coffee, he allowed his pipe 
to go out as he read over some old plays; occasionally pausing to 
exclaim, as he came to some familiar role, "Ah, I was great at 
thatl" And the old memories of the past that he thought were 
buried came back to the present and sang a siren song in bis ears. 
Ah I the music of applause, the shouts and bravos that set the 
lights trembling, after an impassioned speech! And the little ser- 
vant, coming to remove the dishes, surprised him standing there 
flushed of face, his hair blowing in the breeze, apostrophizing an 
imaginary personage. 

"Ah, Monsieur le Gomte — at last we are face to facel" 

"A Count here. Where is this Count of yours?" 

And the girl laughed until the tears ran down her cheeks. 

Oh, these old habits that we can never lay aside! One fine day 
Darzincourt was forced to acknowledge that he regretted the 
theatre. Well, yes, why not? One cannot live on the boards 



with impunity, and not suffer from nostalgia. He subscribed to 
the town paper, and followed the theatrical notices written by a 
young lawyer's clerk who had literary aspirations. When be 
read the eulogies on bis old companions his bile rose, besides they 
were playing in roles that he had filled. He had hesitated before, 
he hesitated no more. 

One morning be abandoned bis linen suit, put on bis holiday 
clothes, and sought the director of the theatre. The latter ap- 
peared to be surprised at bis visit, and learning the motive raised 
his hands with a gesture of deprecation. 

"What, Darzincourt at bis age wished to reappear?" 

And he noticed that the comedian stooped feebly since be bad 
lived an idle exile, and bad accumnlated a fresh crop of whiskers; 
still the prospect of a fruitful evening, on the strength of the 
actor's reputation, tempted him, and be had already formed a 
plan announcing the " reappearance " of the celebrated Darzin- 
court. 

"Well, why shouldn't you return to the stage?" he said. 

Radiant with the idea of again filling this dingy hall with his 
sonorous speeches, the old actor began to discuss the piece. He 
didn't need any rehearsals of course, he had played the part so 
often! With the joy of a child he sought the costume room, tried 
on again the clothes that be had worn more than a hundred 
times, requested that a few changes be made, and passed the day 
in consultation with the hairdresser and costumer of the theatre. 

Not a wig pleased him; be ordered a new one. A nervous 
gaiety possessed bim, be could have turned somersaults. 

The advertisement produced Us effect. When the time came 
the ball was crowded to witness bis appearance, but the feverish 
enthusiasm that be bad counted on was lacking. He appeared — 
a little applause saluted him, but it was not continued. The 
audience became apathetic. What! was this the Darzincourt 
that had charmed them in other days? Why, the poor fellow 
was grotesque! He felt disconcerted but not alarmed. Since his 
departure they had missed the fire of the old school of acting; be 
would show them what it was! 

The old patrons of the theatre, whom he knew, uttered little 
exclamations of surprise. The new-comers began openly to ridi- 
cule. The rest of the company sulked and gave Darzincourt his 
cues reluctantly until he began to lose his assurance, little by 
little. He stumbled in a pathetic speech — turned a sentence into 
ridicule — the parterre howled. From that moment every word, 
every gesture provoked a tempest. 

Darzincourt felt a cold perspiration gather on bis forehead. 
Around him in the boxes people were going out, and he mur- 
mured, pale with anger, " Ingrates! Ingrates!" 

At that point in the play where he was to fall — in a faint after 
reading a letter — he could not get up, until a machinist was sent 
to help him. Then the hisses rose like a storm. Such an oppor- 
tunity to have fun was infrequent in this quiet town, and the 
crowd set up an awful racket. But Darzincourt persisted, though 
his eyes were filled with tears — at last crushed by his emotions, 
he forgot bis lines. He stood with mouth wide open, bearing no 
more the derisive shrieks of the orchestra or the catcalls from the 
galleries. The failure was decisive, the play could go no further. 
Entering his dressing-room the old comedian tore hia hair — reel- 
ing like a drunken man. 

" You've put us in a nice box," growled the director, who 
nevertheless had just pocketed the receipts. 

Darzincourt regained his home in a crushed condition. A whole 
life of glory to end in this fatal defeat! Still dressed, he lay down 
on the bed and reviewed the horrible evening. No! he would 
not allow himself to be beaten. He would fight again. Could he 
leave the theatre forever? Even with his chagrins and mortifica- 
tions be bad need of it. 

The handsome Darzincourt of the past now supplicated and 
implored the Director; he did not wish to be paid — he only asked 
to have a small role given him — a little, a very little role. 

From motives of economy they acceded to his request — he was 
given the part of a servant, and he set out to study it with all the 
ardor of a debutant. 

When he came in, letter in hand, the audience, without reason, 
except that of cruel joy, began to sing, »< Dar-zin-court — Dar-zin- 
court" to a popular air. From balcony to orchestra rang the 
derisive sound. 

" You see, my poor old man," said the manager, " you are no 
longer wanted." And he, haggard, sinking — having tasted again 
the intoxication of the theatre, asked himself what was to be- 
come of him away from the footlights. 

All his life was bound up in the theatre. He was a martyr off 
the stage! He passed his days in the corner of the wings, hav- 
ing no more right to show himself in the evening, however hum- 
bly. He wasted away, worn by sadness and longing; wander- 
ing about through the dressing-rooms of the artists, like an old 
dog whose bunting days are over, but whom no one will turn 
away. One night the manager approached him with a cruel 
smile. "Look here," he said, " we are going to put on anew 
piece. In the third act the barking of a dog is beard in the 
wings. You be the dog, will you?" 

Darzincourt took the extended band in his — trembling with 
joy — his face transfigured — as he stammered out his thanks. 

" A role !" he cried. ' • I shall have another role ! " 



JulyS, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKU. 



SOCIETY IN LONDON. 



Lohxm)K, Jane \~. 

EVKKY day brings with it exhibitions being opened or about 
to be opened. The picture season is dying hard — very hard — 
this year, in spite of all one hears of bad limes and defunct Aus- 
tralian banks. Messrs. Gouptl have on view a collection of pic- 
tures that everyone condemns, and yet that everyone goes to see. 
They are by M. Andre Sinet. The prude may be shocked, the soulful 
one may sigh over the lightness of M. Sinet's heart, but yet both the 
prude and the soulful go to see the studies of young women in every 
state of dsshnbtilt, before and after repose. With the thermometer re- 
gistering SO degrees in the shade I must candidly confess, afternoon 
operatic concerts, with which we are fairly deluged, are not what my 
soul yearns for. There is not sufficient in them of repose and tran- 
quility. If they could be given in some shady nook under the broad 
canopy of heaven, I might reconcile myself to the altitude of the art- 
ists, who all seem hampered by the restraint that the concert platform 
demands. 

The neighborhood of Ascot was in a very lively condition Monday 
last, for the house parties were in process of assembling, and the 
roads were crowded with vehicles. Sir Arthur and Lady Hayter at 
Sonthhill park, Lady Diana Huddlestone at the Grange, Mr. and Mrs. 
Grenfell at Taplow Court, Capt. and Mrs. Fitz George at the Towers, 
Lord and Lady Arthur Grosvenor at Kenilworth, and Prince Solty- 
koff at Fir Bank received large parties, which kept dropping in all 
day. Houses have not let well this year. The course itself was very 
considerably improved in many ways, and the accommodation for 
spectators has also benefitted by Lord Ribblesdale's reign. As a rule 
the recurrence of the Ascot meeting marks the climax of the London 
season. It may have a rival in Goodwood so far as the fashionable 
attendance is concerned, but the meeting in the Duke of Richmond's 
park will not compare with that on the Berkshire heath so far as 
sport is concerned. Indeed, there is not a race meeting in the United 
Kingdom that can compare with Ascot, and the man who can find 
room for complaint must indeed be hard to please. From a weather 
point of view everything was encouraging. One of the biggest crowds 
ever seen was present on the opening day, last Tuesday, and in the 
royal enclosure the gay toilettes of the ladies presented a charming 
picture. Thursday, Gold Gup day, was, however, the crowning suc- 
cess. From early morn the sun shone with great brilliancy; and 
without ever a threat of rain, there was just sufficient breeze to ren- 
der the atmosphere thoroughly enjoyable. The muster was the big- 
gest on record. All the enclosures were packed to overflowing. In 
the royal enclosure there was likewise a strong gathering, and the 
scene was a charming one when, just before the first race, the royal 
party arrived in semi-State. The procession headed by Lord Ribbles- 
dale, Master of the Buckhounds, consisted of six carriages, and in the 
first were the Prince and Princess of Wales and the Duke and Duch- 
ess of Edinburgh; in the second, Prince and Princess Christian and 
Princess Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein ; in the third, the Duke and 
Duchess of Teck, Princess May and the Duke of York ; in the fourth, 
the Princesses Victoria and Maud of Wales, Col. Clarke, and Miss 
Knollys ; whilst the two remaining carriages were occupied by attend- 
ants of the Royal household. 

The Royal Aquarium has added two attractions to its already 
crowded drawing card. One appeals to the lovers of sensation in the 
person of Prof. Ben Fuller, who has utterly eclipsed what has been 
done before in the way of a daring dive. He goes up fifteen feet above 
the roof and comes down into the tank just as a thunderbolt in a 
hurry might, only he comes down safely. The other addition is a 
Dress Show and a Royal Wedding Exhibition held in celebration of 
the much talked about nuptials. 

Speaking of Royal wedding gowns, Ireland certainly cannot com- 
plain of being slighted in the matter of the Royal trousseau, for Princess 
May has shown special preference for Irish goods and Irish houses in 
giving her orders. Poplin is the material chosen for the traveling gown 
and many others, and Irish lace is freely used for trimming. All the 
lovely Irish woven handkerchiefs have been marked with a wreath of 
shamrock surrounding the handsome coronet and elongated initials 
specially designed by an Irish artist. A tea-gown ot delicately toned 
poplin and an exceedingly smart yachting costume both came from 
Dublin. Boots and shoes have been ordered on a very liberal scale 
by the Princess. Dark tan has been selected for several smart pairs, 
some for evening wear are embroidered in pearls and fancy beads > 
brocade and satin being used for these chaussiires. Amongst the many 
hats is a very fine navy blue straw, boat shape, trimmed with silk, 
and suitable for traveling. More elaborate is one in ecru-colored 
armor chip adorned with creamy fawn silk and Yorkist roses, slightly 
tinted and mixed with dark foliage. The wedding-gown is nearly 
ready. It is a lovely white brocade from the Spitalfields looms, richly 
wrought with silver thread, and trimmed with historic old lace. The 
bridesmaids will be gowned in white satin. The Scotch tweeds and 
homespuns bought at the sale of Scottish industries have been stylish- 
ly made up, together with several tailor-made gowns. One in straw 
color is daintily embroidered in iridescent beads; another, just a 
shade of warm tan, has wide revers in a darker shade of velvet. A 
number of exceedingly pretty underskirts are made in black surah 
and glad silk trimmed with lace and ribbons. A dove gray and rose 
pink shot silk is furnished with pink ruching, and for other skirts 



cream brocht has been used with charm log effect, arranged with nar- 
row flounces of silk. A pretty morning gown is of white and pale 
hot silk trimmed with White lace and ribbons; another la ol 
rose crepon. artistically trimmed with lace and rose ribbons, and a 
dainty little malin/c of finely-tucked surah showing Valenciennes in- 
sertion matching the lace, which is used in profusion, with ribbons to 
complete the trimming. Among the trousseau is a magnificent large 
boa composed of white ostrich feathers. 

Among the wedding presents is one from the South Africans in 
London. It is a fan made entirely of the products of South Africa. 
Carefully selected ostrich feathers are mounted on an ivory and gold 
frame ; the principal stems are ornamented with very artistic diamond 
work. The stones are all from the celebrated .Tagersfontein Mine. 
Messrs. Brinsmead & Sons have presented the Princess with a grand 
pianoforte designed to imitate a highly-decorated harpsichord, the 
ordinary style of legs used in grands being superseded by a handsome 
framework in the early English style. This piano has been placed in the 
drawing-room of York House. Mrs. Beerbohm, Tree and Mrs. Ken- 
dal presented the Princess with a spray of rose leaves in diamonds 
from a few women of the stage. The present was accompanied by a 
scroll containing the autographs of the givers, which included the 
names of all the foremost ladies of the dramatic profession. Some 
beautiful hand-painted screens have also been received; one large 
three-panel screen shows large tea-roses and foliage (tumbling about, 
as it were) on a shaded brown background, and is mounted in a 
carved gold frame. 

Another has a graceful trailing design of white roses and pink and 
white May blossoms on a duck-egg green background. 

It has been decided that the last of the Royal processions will ar- 
rive at the Chapel Royal just before half past twelve, at which hour 
the wedding will take place. The ten bridesmaids will be Princesses 
of the Royal family, grandchildren of the Queen. The Duke of 
Hesse will act as best man at the wedding, and will be accompanied 
by the Czarevitch, cousin of the Duke. The Duke will be supported 
by the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Edinburgh, all three to be 
in naval uniform. As the Archbishop of Canterbury and officiating 
clergy enter the Chapel Royal, Handel's "Occasional" March will be 
played; as the Royal Family and the Royal visitors enter, the organ 
will roll forth the march from Handel's "Scipio." The procession 
of the Queen, Princess of Wales, and the Duchess of Teck will enter 
to the music of Sir Arthur Sullivan's "Imperial" march; and the 
bride, the Duke of Teck and Prince Adolphus of Teck, to that of the 
bridal chorus in "Lohengrin." The marriage choral, "Father of 
Life," the hymn, "Oh, perfect love," which formed part of the ser- 
vice of the Duke of Fife's wedding; and finally that beautiful old 
German chorale, "Nun Danket," to the English words, "Now thank 
we all our God," will be included in the musical service. At the 
close of the ceremony the choir will chant the psalm, "Blessed are 
they that fear the Lord," and Mendelssohn's wedding march will 
conclude the ceremony. The Lord Chamberlain's Department and 
the officers of the Board of Green Cloth are kept busy sending out 
hundreds of invitations to the dejeuner the Queen will give at Buck- 
ingham Palace which, it is expecte i, will last till after three o'clock. 
The procession through London will therefore not start till half-past 
four. The Lord Mayor and the entire City Corporation will head 
the procession to Liverpool-street station. Among the many public 
buildings which will be illuminated, the Bank of England will be the 
most elaborate, the Governor having given carte-hlanche to Messrs. 
Defires & Sons for that purpose. 

In these days of her royal betrothal I wonder does Princess May 
ever think of an admirer of hers in the past who was of a very 
different rank to her present fiance ? This was a tradesman's boy, 
who had often seen her in the town of Richmond, and who fell in 
love with her, just as Aladdin fell in love with the Princess of China. 
The Richmond Aladdin wrote declaring his love. The Princess was 
naturally much embarassed, and at once put the letter in the hands 
of her father. The Duke of Teck, who is a very sensible man, sent 
for the youth, and explained to him quietly that his conduct was in 
every way reprehensible, because it was underhanded; secondly, 
that it was not manly for a man to propose to marry a girl unless he 
was prepared to beep her in the position to which she was accus- 
tomed; and, thirdly, that it was an exceedingly dangerous thing for 
one of so humble an origin to attempt to force himself into the circle 
of the Royal family, which is guarded by so many statutes. This 
harangue frightened the youth, and he withdrew in a more sober 
frame of mind. Helen Stuart. 

Always Giving Satisfaction. 

Brandreth's Pills have always given satisfaction. In fifty years 
there has been no compla nt of them. That is about their life in the 
United States, and millions of persons have used them. There is 
no doubt that they have established themselves by merit alone. 
They cure rheumatism, dyspepsia, piles, liver complaint, biliousness, 
and any disease arising from an impure state ot the blood. One or 
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in good form and tone up the system. They are purely vegetable, 
absolutely harmless, and safe to take at any time. 

Sold in every drug or medicine store, either plain or sugar coated. 

Lucile & Stone, formerly in the White House building, have re- 
moved temporarily to 128 Post street until their new rooms opposite 
are completed, and are selling millinery at greatly reduced prices. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, ]K3. 




We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



THE early death of tbe gifted actress, Georgie Drew Barryniore, 
has aroused a sentiment of sorrow and regret even deeper, 
perhaps, from a personal than a dramatic standpoint, though the 
loss to the stage of an actress so talented, so strongly individual, 
and whose methods were never sunt to cater to a false taste, can 
hardly be exaggerated. 

Georgie Drew, of the family as famous in stage annals of to-day 
as the gifted Chapman family, now extinct or unknown to con- 
temporaneous fame, was the eldest daughter of that house, and 
a sister of John Drew, so long, with Ada Kenan, the light of the 
Daly company. Both by inheritance and training she should, 
therefore, have been a great comedienne; but, in addition to 
these, she was endowed with a singular independence and origin- 
ality, and her style, speech, stage methods, etc., were neither 
learned nor derived from any one. Even where they passed into 
mannerisms, not always pleasing to every taste, they were dis- 
tinctly and distinctively her own — a quality rarer, perhaps, than 
any other one on the modern stage. 

Though married in 1876, and at the time of her death the 
mother of three children ranging in age from twelve to sixteen 
years, Georgie Drew had greater vivacity and a more overflowing 
fund of life and gayety of spirit than many a young girl, being, 
in truth, as much the comedienne off as on the stage. It was, 
doubtless, this lightness of heart and buoyancy of soul which 
aided her remarkable vitality in prolonging her life for tbe past 
year, as well as in deceiving both her friends and herself into a 
hope of her recovery, and, though the pulmonary trouble which 
ended her life at Santa Barbara last Sunday was of several years' 
standing, made her death seem sudden at tbe last. 

The best epitaph for the dead comedienne is not, after all, in a 
recountal of her dramatic triumphs, brilliant and even excep- 
tional as they were, but in the fact that her goodness of heart 
phown to all alike, her unaffected friendliness of manner, and her 
kindly interest in others won the hearts of all who came inco con- 
tact with her professionally, and which gained for her, as a 
woman a love more warm and enduring than jeven the admira- 
tion she inspired as an artist. 

* W tr 

The sale of seats which began at the Baldwin last Wednesday 
morning indicates a reception for Frohman's Lyceum Company, 
on the reopening next Monday night, equal to the most brilliant 
of the Baldwin opening nights in the past. The return from the 
summer resorts has begun, and many will come in from their 
country seats for this special occasion. 

The company is so well known here as to need no introduction. 
Manager Daniel Frohman will personally supervise the present 
Pacific Coast tour, his second visit here during ten years. The 
season at the Baldwin will open with a new production here, 
Victorien Sardou's Americans Abroad. It presents the story of a 
rich American girl, born poor, but suddenly enriched by inherit- 
ance, and her suitors, and is on the lines of The Scrap of Paper 
and other of Sardou'a lighter works, yet the unrivaled dramatic 
skill of the author is said to pervade both plot and construction. 
The Grey Mare, The Wife, The Charity Ball, and Old Heads and 
Young Hearts will be given during the engagement. 

It is a great pity that whoever is responsible for the last book- 
ing at the California had not gone out on the road to meet 
O'Dowd's Neighbors, as the result, of having seen that play at a 
one-night Btand would have been to head off the show if he had 
to kill off the principals or empty the theatre's treasury-box to 
do it, and so save the California from closing its season with an 
anti-climax of a depth unknown to rhetoric. 

Bobby Gaylor was a big drop after Africa, but Mark Murphy 
and O'Dowd's Neighbors come down to the very bottom of the in- 
cline with a dull thud. Neither plot nor play have a spark of 
humor in them, and the only worse things in the production are 
the people. There is generally in the poorest play one redeeming 
feature or fairly good actor, but in O'Dowd's Neighbors there is 
not one player who in any way justifies his or her appearance on 
any stage. Mr. Murphy himself is about as full of humor as a 
clam. There is probably not a social coterie in San Francisco 
which does not boast at least two amateur Irish imitators who 
can beat Mr. Marphy on his own track. 

We have had many poor plays in San Francisco, but this for 
unqualified badness could easily take purse and gate-money over 
all competitors. The scattering attendance after the first holiday 
rush is a fair test of its caliber. A farce-comedy that San Fran- 
cisco can't stand must be bad indeed. It is unfortunate that the 
California did not close a week earlier, or secure for its closing 
attraction one that would have left a pleasanter memory during 
the vacation. 

# * # 

Maine and Georgia has had a second successful week at Stock- 
well's. The introduction of much new business by Mr. Stockwell 



in tbe last act adds to- the humor and consequent enjoyabiMSy of 
the play, and the players have improved by practice. Miss Bertha 
Foltz in particular seems to have caught the spirit of her part, 
and throws into it much more life than she did last week. The 
success of the play, as indicated by the steady patronage, fully 
justifies tbe conclusion of tbe management to keep it on for an- 
other week. 

* ■¥ * 

Alf Hayman's many friends here will be pleased to note his 
success in the important post to which he waB recently appointed, 
that of general manager of a-ti Mr. Cbas. Frohman's companies. 
Of these there will be seventeen on the road this season, embrac- 
ing many of the best players in America. 

The new Empire Theatre, New York, in whicb Mr. Alf Hayman 
and Mr. Frohman are associated, closed on the 24th ult., after a 
season of 204 nights, during which only one play, The Girl I Left 
Behind Me, was presented. This play is now being given by the 
same company at Schiller's Theatre, Chicago, where it will remain 
all summer, after which it will be Been at the Baldwin in this city. 

Another of Mr. Frohman's most popular productions id How- 
ard Bronson's Aristocracy, which will be produced at the Baldwin 
July 15th, Maurice Barrymore taking for the first time the role of 
Jefferson Stockton, Mr. Lackaye's original part. 

The re-opening of tbe California July 31st will begin the fifth 
regular season at that theatre. Following The Face in the Moon 
light, with which Robert Mantell will begin the season, will come 
a succession of attractions already booked for the California by 
Mr. Hayman. Among them are Elaw and Erlanger's production 
of TJie Soudan, Pete Daily in Mb new play, The Country Sport, Jane, 
Frank Daniels in his reconstructed Little Puck, Hoyt and Thomas' 
A Temperance Town, the Howard Specialty Company, John T. Kelly 
in McFee of Dublin, Roland Reed in Innocent as a Lamb, Primrose 
and West's Eight Bells, The Lost Paradise, Friends, Chas. Dickson 
with Incog, and other new plays, Hanlon's Saperba, and Mrs. 
John Drew, supported by a good company. The list certainly 
furnishes an inspiriting outlook for the new season. 

The Tivoli continues to be crowded with its spectacular Ali 
Baba, up to date, as an attraction. A weekly change of bill be- 
ing the rule of action with tbe Tivoli management, makes a three 
weeks' run for any one production, however elaborate, a certain 
indication of popular favor. New business is introduced weekly, 
so that the piece savors of novelty even on a second or third visit. 
Indiana will be the next opera produced. 

Mr. Alfred Wilkie participated in the musical portion of the pro- 
gramme at the recent anniversary exercises of the Knights of 
Honor. 

The Chicago Inter Ocean pays a high compliment to the musical 
productions of Leila France, the talented San Francisco lady com- 
poser. One of Miss France's most popular compositions, "The 
Year's Sweetheart," received the still higher tribute of being se- 
lected by the great Sousa and played by his famous band at the 
World's Fair. 

Signor Minelti, who is already recognized as one of San Fran- 
cisco's leading violinists, will, with Madame Ferrari, vocalist, 
give a series of chamber-music concerts, beginning in September. 
The first will be devoted exclusively to eminent Italian composers 
little known here, the aim being to present works not only of the 
highest class, but entirely new to San Francisco, thus combining 
the two objects of such entertainments, enjoyment and instruc- 
tion. These concerts will take place on Saturday afternoons, al- 
ternating with the Carr-Beel "Pops." 

Mr. Al. Marks has gone to New York, Chicago and Boston, 
where he will secure attractions for the fall season in this city. 

Americans Abroad ran for 150 nights at the Lyceum Theatre, 

New York, during the past season. John Drew, with Maude 

Adams as leading support, will resume his starring tour August 
15th with The Masked Ball, producing also a new play during the 
season. Minnie Renwood, the serpentine dancer, is now seek- 
ing a divorce from Frank Bemis, to whom she has been married 
a few years, during which time the trail of the serpent, if not tbe 
serpentine, has been over the household. Bemis is tbe son of the 
"millionaire" proprietor of the gem-like and exclusive Hotel 
Richelieu, Chicago, and "the Cardinal" papa sides with hia 

daughter-in-law. Bronson Howard's Aristocracy had a run of 

two seasons in New York. — Ovide Musin issues a circular letter 
announcing his farewell tour of America before leaving the coun- 
try for an extended European engagement. Beside his wife, 
Annie Louise Tanner Musin, and Edward Scharf, the brilliant 
pianist, Mr. Musin's company now includes a new tenor, F. W. 
Elliott, and Miss Bessie Bonsall, a young contralto, whose mag- 
nificent voice, Mr. Musin predicts, will place her among the Tre- 
bellis and Scalchis of the musical world. 



July 8, 1893. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 







THE CLUBMAN'S TOAST. 



LET as drink an adieu to sorrow. 
And a truce lo vain regret; 
Let us drown alt fears of the morrow 
In a toast to our Ray soubrette. 

Then we drink to her witching glances, 

And the subtle, seductive arts 
That hold us enthralled while she dances 

Her way straight into our hearts. 

Men rave over Langtry and Potter, 

And their gorgeous costumes, and yet, 

They've nothing so utterly utter 

As the gown of our gay soubrette. 

'Tis true, it is short, but what matter, 

Added beauty it thus reveals, 
Aa she drives me as "mad as shatter," 

With the flights of her twinkling heels. 

8he sings with the voice of the starling. 
Her laughter's a chime of sweet bells; 

Of box and parquette she's the darling — 
The hope and despair of the swells. 

She comes like a radiant vision, 

Oar senses all addled depart, 
And we sink In a dream elysian, 

'Neath the spell of her magical art. 

"When Cupid his quiver has emptied, 
Straightway to her presence he flies, 

And Gils it with love-darts he's tempted 
From the depths of her topaz eyes. 

Then we'll drink from Love's golden chalice, 

A health to the clubman's pet; 
A toast to the mischievous malice 

In the eyes of our gay soubrette. 

Harold Leach. 



BASEBALL NOTES. 



THE first half of the present championship closed last Tuesday. 
Los Angeles claims to have won it. This claim is denied by 
Oakland, the latter club asserting that it won the championship, 
because Los Angeles played Sunday, who is an ineligible player, 
in several games, which should for this reason cause the games he 
participated in to be ignored in figuring up the percentages. Sun- 
day was suspended several weeks ago by the Stockton manage- 
ment for Insubordination, and he has never been reinstated. 
Under the circumstances, Oakland's contention seems to be well 
founded. After their experience during their last trips to Los 
Angeles, it is doubtful if either Oakland or San Francisco will 
visit that place again, unless the manager of the Los Angeles Club 
will guarantee them at least $100 over and above expenses — in 
other words, insure them that they will each receive $425 as their 
share of the gate. 

«* Tip" O'Neil has gone to join the New Orleans club of the 
Southern League. It is understood that an effort is being made 
to force New Orleans out of that league. 

A week from now will prove whether Sacramento desires base- 
ball. Should that city not support the team, things will look 
very gloomy for the league. Up to this writing, there has been 
no league meeting to admit Sacramento as a member of the 
league. 

All the California players now at the East are doing well. 
Sweeny, as umpire, is not giving as much satisfaction as Dona- 
hue. Umpires McDonald and 8sveeny are brothers-in-law. The 
revolution inaugurated by the new managers a month ago has 
not produced the financial results anticipated, although the press 
gave the managers every encouragement in writing up the 
games. 

Baggage Notice. 
Round-trip transfer tickets are now on sale at any of our offices at 
reduced rates, viz. : One trunk, round trip, 50 cts. ; single trip, 30 cts. 
Keep your baggage checks until you reach this city. Morton Spec- 
ial Delivery, 17 Geary street, 408 Taylor street, and Oakland Ferry 
Depot (waiting room). 

Are "You Going to the World's Fair?— Will you spend the sum- 
mer in the country? If you leave the city at all, deposit your val- 
uables—such as trunks, boxes, silverware, paintings, bric-a-brac, etc. 
—with the California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., corner of Mont- 
gomery and California streets, and be relieved of all anxiety for their 
safety. Storage rates low. Boxes to rent at $5 a year and upwards. 



All householders know that in this season of housecleaning it is 
money in their pockets to do business with a responsible firm, that 
may be relied on to do first-class work. Such a firm is J. Spaulding 
& Co., whose Pioneer Carpet Beating and Pacific Cleaning and Dye- 
ing Works, at 353 and 357 Tehama street are known throughout the 
city. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

a i. Hatha* A Co. Proprietors. 

A i ran BouriEB Manager. 

IMPORTANT.— Mr. lUyinnu takes pleasure In announcing Hint the 
11th regular season of tho Baldwin Theatre uuiler Its present management 
will commence 

MONDAY EVENING, JULY IOtii, with the reappearance here ol 
DANIEL PEOHMAN'fl LYCEIM THEATRE COMPANY, 
Presenting their latest success, 

AMERICANS ABROAD, vle.or.e^Sardou. 

The theatre has been thoroughly renovated, aud increased efforts have 
been made to provide additional comforts for both audience and players. 

STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 

L. R. Stockwkll Lessee and Proprietor 

Alf Ellinohousk Business Manager 

Monday, July 10th. Matinee Saturday, 

Last week of the successful military drama, 

MAINE AND GEORGIA. 

NEXT— July 17th— The amusing comedy, carefully presented by the 
NEW STOCKWELL COMPANY OF PLAYERS, 

OUR BACHELORS. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Beob Proprietors and Managers. 

TO-NIGHT. Second week. A meritorious success! 

The Oriental Spectacular Extravaganza. 

ALI BABA, 

(Up to Date). 
A dream of the Arabian Nights realized. A royal treat for the little oues. 
The talk of the town. 
Next opera, 

INDIANA. 
Popular Peices 25and50c. 

SAN LORENZO GROVE. 

On the Line of the Oakland, San Leandro and Hay-wards 
Electric Railway. 

Beautiful natural forest, romantic walks, luncheon tables, inviting ar- 
bors; a large new pavilion, excellent floor for dancing. Swings and other 
attractions for children. Grand open air concert by First Kegiment Band 
every Sunday. Cars connect with all broad-gauge local trains at Twenty- 
third avenue, Oakland; also with narrow-gauge at Thirteenth and Frauk- 
l in streets. 

HAYWARDS PARK- 

At the terminus of the Oakland, San Leandro and Hay wards Electric 

Railway. 

Romantie walks; mountain streams; dense woods; secluded lunching 

g laces; mineral springs; beautiful banks of ferns, maiden-hair and wild- 
owers. Cars connect with all broad-gauge local trains at Twenty-third 
avenue, Oakland; also with narrow-gauge at Thirteenth and Franklin Sts 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. 

Parties with money for investment can find choice City and County Real 

Estate at market values, and Loans with approved Security at the office of 

LE ROY G. HARVEY & CO., 

No. 518 Montgomery St., S. F. 



SI?0r;S FAIRED lI/filCE YOU WfHJ. 

► Soleing 65c. Done in 20 minutes. Fine calf shoes to order, 
for $3.50 up. 
GEO. POLLOCK - - - - 202 Powell Street 



tt^ 



Q| M Hl^\0 Knabe, Haines, 

P* I HIV LJS Bush <fc Gerts, o* others. 
" " "" ™^^^ CashorinstalUnents. Rented 
and Repaired. Please call or send for circulars. 

g BANCROFT 

PIANO AND VOCAL LESSONS, JS TO $6 PER MONTH. 
MRS. MCDONALD, 135 Larkin Street, S. F. 

CLOAKMAKING A SPECIALTY; ALSO DRESSMAKING. 
MRS. A. C. ALLEN, 142 Seventh Street, S. F. 

Tine diamonds, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew-l| 
ellery of first quality only, at* 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St., 
Under Masonic Temple. 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893 . 



J^ Looker-oi?. 



COL. ADAMS, of Idaho, has left the city and the Pacific Union 
Club for his home in Idaho. The Colonel will be missed by his 
numerous friends. When he came to the clnb first he was at once 
initiated into the little poker game which is the pride and relaxa- 
tion of the organization. The Colonel was a cheerful loser. He 
appeared to be the simplest man that ever shuffled a deck. A few 
hundred a night was nothing to him. Then the regular evening 
question was, " Is Colonel Adams in the club?" or " Has that 
good fellow Adam- put in an appearance yet?" However, there 
came a change. Colonel Adams, of Idaho, began to play in a 
new streak of luck. Indeed, so remarkable became the chop 
that where before he lost hundreds he now won thousands. Then 
the answer to the question, "Has Colonel Adams come yet?" was, 
" Don't care a cent if I never see him again; he called me last 
night for $500, and got away with it, too." The Colonel had 
studied poker in Idaho, where the maxim is, " Give a man a 
long line and treat him tenderly in the game, and you will 
surely land him." He is now at home on his mine. 

* * » 

An incident occurred the other evening at the same club which 
shows how circumstances may alter cases. A man well known 
on the Produce Exchange was raking in everything before him 
at the poker table. As he took in each pot he'd remark, "Boys, 
the Pacific-Union Club should make up a purse for the families of 
those poor firemen." Again, when he scooped in the ducats, he'd 
observe, " I'll be among the first — I'll be the first to head the 
list." His luck turned, and he couldn't win a bet. Then one of 
the players remarked, " How about those families, Tom!" "Oh, 
rot I we can't afford chanty these times," was the unfeeling reply. 

* * * 

A good story is told by a member of the University Club regard- 
ing the excellent manner in which the affairs of that club are ad- 
ministered, with the view to giving all pleasure and comfort pos- 
sible to the members. The gentleman in question came down to 
breakfast a few days ago quite early. As he took his seat at the 
table, it occurred to him that a cocktail would make him some- 
what happier, and give him additional appetite for his meal. He 
therefore told John to get him a cocktail. The boy went to the 
wine-room, but found the door locked. He was then in a quan- 
dary. He did not want to disappoint the gentleman who had 
ordered the drink, but yet he did not know how to get the seduc- 
tive eye-opener. He consulted the steward and asked his ad- 
vice. 

"Wine-rooms locked, eh?" said that important functionary. 

" Yes, sir." 

"The gentleman said he wanted the cocktail before break- 
fast, eh?" 

" Yes, sir." 

" Well, then, I'll tell you what you have to do. You know the 
invariable rule in this club is to give the members what they ask 
for, no matter what it costs. Now, we must get that cocktail. 
You go and break in the door of the wine-room and produce the 
drink." 

The waiter did as ordered, and delivered a delicious drink to the 
waiting member. A few days later, the member was in the read- 
ing-room, when he was approached by a member of the house 
committee. 

" Say, Jones," said the committeeman, " you had a cocktail at 
breakfast a few days ago, didn't you?" 

" Yes — fine one, too." 

" Well, it should have been. Do you know what that cocktail 
cost the club?" 

" Cost the club? No; usual rates, I suppose." 

"No, sir; that cocktail cost us just twenty-three dollars. The 
steward had the wine-room door broken in just to get you your 
cocktail, and to repair the damages we had to pay just twenty- 
three dollars." 

" Is that so?" said the surprised drinker. I didn't know any- 
thing about that. Well, it was a good cocktail, though; let's 
have another." 

* • * 

The Union League has been the latest to give up its kitchen 
and dining-room, on which, like every other club in town, it lost 
considerable money. Most of the members who lunched or dined 
at the club now sit together at a private table in the Occidental 
Hotel dining-room, where they pass many pleasant hours to- 
gether. There are many bright men at that board, and they all 
have a very jolly time. Colonel Macdonald has made for himself 
a reputation as a wit, and his stories are related by his auditors 
to their business friends. Since the publication of the story on 
him regarding his adventures at the Scottish picnic, he has been 
hailed with "Hello, Mac!" scores of times, until now it Is said it 
is necessary to address him as "Colonel Macdonald," and in a 
dignified manner, to attract his attention. 



Rudolph Schmid, the sculptor, strangely enough numbers 
among his friends a gentleman who has the most pronounced 
ideas on the subject of tippling. Schmid is at work on a Bacchus, 
and persuaded, much against his wilt, his temperance friend to 
snbmit his muscular legs as a model. The day was warm , and the 
model, who was posed on a lounge in the sculptor's studio, fell 
asleep. When he awoke he was filled with wrath and indigna- 
tion. Under the skilled fingers of the sculptor, the plastic clay 
presented the features of the disciple of Gough upon the reeling 
Bacchus, distorted by a drunken leer. Schmid protests that he 
can see no likeness, while the other swears he will enjoin the 
Bacchus, or if it be sent abroad, obtain admission to the owner's 
house and make smithereens of it. 

# * * 

The deeds of daring performed by Carey Friedlander, Esq., at 
the disastrous fire at Sausalito will be remembered as long as a 
bowlder remains in Hurricane Gulch. When men usually brave 
and cool, lost their presence of mind, Mr. Friedlander, simply but 
elegantly attired in a white flannel tennis suit, picked out as it 
were with a crimson sash and necktie and Panama hat, bounded 
like a wild gazelle toward the flaming building. 8trong men held 
their breath (and some of the breaths required much muscle, for 
it was a Portuguese population,) and timid women sobbed as the 
undaunted Carey flung himself into the breech. The flames roared 
and crackled, but Mr. Friedlander wavered not, but directed the 
stream of a quarter-inch garden hose against the devouring ele- 
ment. Once, and only once, was his Herculean figure silhouetted 
against the luried sky, and then one mighty arm held aloft a bot- 
tle and a solemn hush fell upon the crowd, broken only by the 
liquid tones of Alex. Hamilton, « 'Tis only soda-water." All 
through the night did Carey labor, and it is hardly necessary to 
say that but for his efforts San Rafael, and possibly Berkeley, 
might have been destroyed. When the town is incorporated he will 
be presented with a silver bugle and other insignia of his industry 
and bravery. 

« » * 

William Kruse, Esq., familiarly known as "Billy" Kruse, per- 
formed a feat in Sausalito, on the 3d of July, which will be long 
remembered there. He had been making a visit to Captain Rollo, 
of the British four-masted ship Palgrave, and was returning in a 
steam launch when a most unforseen accident occurred. The 
painter of the boat had been left adrift and had fouled the screw 
and jammed it, and the launch was being swept seaward on the 
ebb tide. Mr. Kruse, whose legs are not only very long but 
double-jointed, with great presence of mind, attached a boat- 
hook to his right foot, thrust it over the stern, caught the rope, 
and, while himself half immersed in the water, cleared it, and 
actually saved a party from being swept out the Golden Gate. 
In the performance of this feat, however, Mr. Kruse injured the 
cap of his knee, which may cause him inconvenience for some 
time to come. It is only fair to say that Baron Von Gheteldi, 
who had seen the perdicament the party was in, was pulling to 
the rescue at the time Mr. Kruse's presence of mind averted what 
might have proved a very severe marine disaster. 

* # * 

Since the destruction of his residence at Redwood City, Mr. 
James Robinson has made the Del Monte Hotel his headquarters. 
On the Fourth of July he took his fishing rod and started for the 
Carmel river to do a little quiet angling. Although he does not 
run much to fat, Mr. Robinson is very partial to the good things 
of this world, and therefore his fishing lunch was not of a simple 
character. When he arrived at the Carmel he set his basket 
down behind a tree, and began to flog the stream. When he re- 
turned about noon, for his luncheon, he missed the following 
items from the basket; One can of pate" de foie gras; one can of 
potted game with truffles ; a pile of Rocquefort cheese sandwiches, 
three strawberry tarts and a pint of Pommery Sec. There was 
nothing left but a little cold beef and a bottle of beer. It may be 
added here that the cheese sandwiches were highly flavored with 
garlic. At the hop of the Del Monte that evening, three pretty 
girls sat on the piazza gazing disconsolately at the whirling 
throng, and when Mr. Robinson paused to converse with them, 
after sniffing the air for a moment, he remarked: » Fern gather- 
ing on the banks of the CaTmel river does not improve the 
breath. I hope you ladies admired the flavor of my sandwiches." 
And then he passed coldly on, for his revenge was complete. The 
fair brigands, led by Miss Nettie, had looted his lunch. 

Carlton Taylor, a young man connected with the National 
Theatre, went to the Crystal Baths in this city last Tuesday after- 
noon, and there was seriously injured while diving. He is now 
completely deaf, the attending physician stating that both his 
ear-drums are completely paralyzed, and the entire result of his 
injuries cannot yet be stated. Taylor is a good swimmer. The 
place from which he dived is only twelve feet above the surface 
of the water, a height that cannot by any means be considered a 
high dive. He had taken the plunge several times, and after the 
last dive was swimming around in the tank when he suddenly 
cried for help and sank beneath the surface. He was quickly re- 
moved from the water, and was taken to a dressing-room in a 
semi-conscious condition. He was then carried home, where he 
is now, partially deranged. The doctor who is attending him 
states that his condition is the result of the shock he received 



July 8, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



11 



upon entering the water. It is not known whether be struck the 
bottom of the tank in his dire, but the nature of his injuries seem 
to indicate such a disaster. I cannot refrain from here suggest- 
ing to all tank bathers that they cannot be too careful in diving 
into tank water, for in most case? the water is too shallow, and 
in many cases Its condition is such that a sensitive organization 
wonld be greatly shocked by the slightest contact with it. 
It fs said that all the public swimming tanks are cleaned daily. 
Whether emptied daily or not, the water during the daytime 
must be particularly filthy, as it is used by dozens of people. 
The water that remains in a tank for twenty-four hours, used 
by numerous bathers, many of whom go to the tank more for 
cleansing purposes than for pleasure, if swallowed while swim- 
ming, is enough in itself to cause typhoid fever. 

The State Sportsmen's Association is taking some action with re- 
gard to the game laws of the State and county, and has petitioned 
the local Board of Supervisors to pass the following amendment to 
the game ordinance: 

Bectaon 1. Every person who in the county of San Francisco, be- 
tween the 1st day of March and the 1st day of October in each year, 
sells or offers for sale, or has in his possession any quail, bob-white, 
partridge or grouse, or any kind of wild duck, snipe or rail, or who, 
between the 1st day of March and the 1st day of July in each year, 
sells or offers for sale, or has in his possession any doves, shall, with- 
out regard to where the same was taken or killed, be guilty of mis- 
demeanor. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect immediately. 

The amendment should not pass. If a man kills game in a 
county where and when the county law allows it, he should be 
permitted to bring the game home to San Francisco. If the pro- 
posed amendment passes, this could not be done in some cases. 
Local sportsmen all go out of town to hunt, as there is no game 
in this county, and the proposed amendment, if passed, will de- 
prive them of much sport unnecessarily. 
* * » 

From the statements of the shareholders, it is evident that the 
business of the Pacific Bank is about to be resumed. This an- 
nouncement will cause pleasure to the many people who have 
transacted business with the bank in the past, and who greatly 
regretted the necessity that precipitated its suspension. The 
Pacific Bank was known for years as one of the most solid and 
conservative financial institutions on the Pacific Coast, and it 
was not until it became entangled in a number of unfortunate 
speculations, in which it lost large sums of money, that a word 
was ever breathed against its good name. It is said by the man- 
ager of the bank that its assets are over and above all its liabili- 
ties, and he adds that all its depositors will be paid in full. The 
new corporation, which it is proposed to organize to carry on the 
affaire of the bank, will do a conservative business, and in a 
comparatively short time should be able to replace the bank in 
that honorable position which it so long enjoyed. 

California street is laughing anent a good joke played upon the 
confiding citizens of an up-country town a short time ago by a 
bright insurance man. It matters not who the underwriter was, 
for they are all bright men ; it might have been the clerical Fay- 
mon ville, the debonnair Herold , or the dashing Fogarty. He was 
traveling on business through the northern portion of the State, 
and arrived in the town referred to just a day before a dog show 
was announced there for exhibition. For some reason, probably 
on account of his general appearance, the townsmen thought the 
fire fighter was the advance agent of the dog show. He first learned 
of the mistake regarding his identity from the clerk of the hotel, 
who received him graciously, and with more than usual polite- 
ness. 

» Will you be in town long ? " said the clerk. 

" No, I leave early to-morrow morning," the visitor answered. 

" Ah, yes, of course, you travel right on. Well, say, if it 
wouldn't be too much to ask, could you— ah— let me have an 
order for a couple of tickets for your show?" 

"Show? What show ? " 

<« Oh, now, come off. Of course, I know you are in advance of 
the dog show that gets here to-morrow night, and if you can give 
me a couple of tickets, why, I can even it up for you." 

••Yes, yes, of course, of course. Fact is, I was trying to keep 
quiet, for you know how a fellow is bothered about these passes. 
But seeing it is you, why I don't mind. Will four do?" 

And the insurance man wrote an order on the dog show in 
favor of his friend, the clerk, for four tickets. Before night he 
had issued about two hundred passes, and every man who had 
received one had solemnly sworn to say nothing about it. The 
"advance agent" left town in the morning. He was accom- 
panied to the station by scores of his new friends, all of whom 
wished him a pleasant voyage. That night there was a riot at 
the dog show when the management refused to honor the passes. 
The insurance man has not passed through that town since. 

Sherwood's Monogram Whisky is recommended by physicians 
as pure and wholesom e, and will prevent the gri ppe. 

The doctors recommend, for indigestion, after dinner chewing for 
half an hour Adams' Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum. 



ANTEDILUVIAN 



WHISKEY. 
VERY OLD, 




AS 



CREAM 



AND 
SMOOTH 
AS 



SATIN. 



THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 

TO LET 
FURNISHED. 

A modern house of eight rooms; 

convenient to two cable lines; grand. 

marine view; good neighborhood. 

Rent reasonable to desirable party. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND. 

10 Montgomery Street. 

LAVER, MULLANY & LAVER, 

ARCHITECTS, 

Furnish planB, specifications, and Superintendence for the construction 

or renovation of dwelling houses, and every description of building. 
Office s 93 Flood BnUdlng, Cor. 4th and Market Sts., S. F. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W.B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PAOIFIO OOAST, 

123CaIiforniaSt..S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOB SALE BY ALL FIB8T-CLA88 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893. 




AND so they are swimming atSan Mateo. If the muddy waters 
of the south end of the bay have any temptation for such girls 
as Jennie Masten and Marie Durand, what are our maidens com- 
ing to? Mr. Ojeda, they say, looks particularly stunning in his 
bathing suit. 

There are big chances lying around for available men at Del 
Monte this year. At present writing, A. H. Small and Herbert 
Garolau have their bands full. 

Society at Santa Cruz is anxiously waiting to see Miss Nellie Mur- 
phy, authoress of the celebrated Murphy letters, go into the surf. 
All the inducements of those good swimmers, the Misses Delmas, 
whose guest Miss Murphy is, will not make this fair heroine brave 
the waves. She keeps very quiet, but invitations to the Delmas 
dinners to see her are eagerly, yes, very eagerly sought. 

From Monterey the gossip comes that in the same party with 
Miss Millie Ashe and her recent capture are Miss Jennie Hooker 
and Herbert Carolan. The latter, it is said, is " all devotion " to 
Miss Hooker. Can it be that we are to lose, and Chicago gain 
this charming young lady? 

# # » 

The glorious Fourth at Santa Cruz was a day of pleasure from 
dawn to midnight to all the people congregated in and about that 
seaside resort. Bach " set " had its own style of enjoyment. 
There was a picnic, a coaching party, a beach tea and reception, 
visits to the yachts, fire works and dancing, with feasting ad lib. 
at each. Men, too, were more plentiful than ever before. Truly 
the ways of fashion's votaries are what might be called » mighty 
onsartin." 

# » * 

Mrs. Delmas is assuredly a matron of much energy and hospi- 
tality. Her daughter and their attendant coterie of guests and 
friends are certain to have a good time if she can make it for 
them. Then she doesn't seem to care whether the elements are 
mixed, or discordant; she relies upon herself to bring harmony to 
the whole. She secured a trump card when she drew Ed Sheldon 
as a holiday guest, and 'tis said that those belles who were 
tempted away to Del Monte, did nothing buf; bewail their absence 
from Santa Cruz on the Fourth. 

* * * 

Miss Murphy's correspondence anent her sojourn with the 
"Delmas gang" will no doubt be highly interesting. We can only 
hope the fortunate recipients of her up-to-date letters may keep 
them in as good a state of preservation as those that have gone 
before. It would be startling, possibly, but no doubt instructive 
to know some years hence just how we impressed the Murphy 
mind on the beach at Santa Cruz in the summer of '93. 

# # # 

Thus far the season of summer outings does not seem to prom- 
ise a very satisfactory crop of matrimonial captures. Whose 
fault is it? The girls are as charming, nay more so, than usual; 
the engagement of one, and the absence of another veteran belle 
has left a clearer field for the rosebuds. Then, too, the married 
frisky is not so prominently en evidence; one leading type of that 
kind is in seclusion. These antagonistic elements are thus out of 
the running. The fact remains, Ubwever, that the male birds are 
scary of the net. Truth to tell, the majority of the society beaux 
have scarcely reached a marriageable state; unquestionably in 
years is this the case. 

# # T» 

The ducal camera of Newcastle secured several snap shots at 
Monterey, that, paradoxical as it may appear, were, it is said, of 
anything but a filmy nature. It would seem that his Grace's 
obsequious compagnon du voyage, Bolton by name, is to label the 
lot, and gossip says, "A young girl entering the bath," "A fin de 
siecle Juno," and "A prank of the naughty Cupid" are bound to 
create a sensation anywhere. 

An amusing episode comes from Monterey, to the effect that 
during the recent visit there of the Duke of Newcastle and Mr. 
Gambier Bolton, a young lady who had visions of joining the 
ranks of American Duchesses, determined to take vigorous 
measures to achieve that end. The story goes that she accosted 
Mr. Bolton as he was pacing the veranda on the evening of ar- 
rival, and asked at what hour his master arose in the morning, 
evidently taking the sleek-looking person for the Duke's valet. 
Mr. Bolton hemmed and hawed himself off, without giving the 
desired information. But on repeating the scene to his Grace, 
that gentleman considered the chance of a bit of a lark so good, 
that he induced his companion to intercept the young lady on 
her way into the ballroom with the purpose of naming 5 a. m. as 
the Duke's hour for breakfast. Next morning his Grace bestirred 



himself at that hour, and on his entrance to tbe dining-room 
found not one, but a bevy of girls, who looked sheepishly at him 
and at each other, as it dawned upon their minds simultaneously 
that each girl had tried to get ahead of the other in breakfasting 
with the Duke. The result was they all fled, and the wearer of 
strawberry leaves had to eat his early breakfast alone. 

It is whispered in society circles at San Rafael that an engage- 
ment is very probable between MrB. Everett Wise and Will Bab- 
cock. 



Add some of Sherwood's Monogram Whisky to your milk and 
avoid the tj'phus fever now prevalent. 

Quite a lad East is to chew for half an hour after dinner Adams' 
Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum for indigestion. 

Lillian Beddard coaches ladies and gentlemen for the dramatic pro- 
fession; appearances arranged. Bhakespearean Academy, 509 Hyde street. 



El <?/^p0 , ^ Bay . 

Via tl?e 5afe a7<d large 5team<?r U^ia!?. 
r^opei?ed a5 a Supday pa/T\ily Resort. 

Choice programme of popular music. Refreshments, 
fishing and boating. NO DANCING. Tables and seats 
for family lunches. Decorum will be preserved. Round 
trip and admission to the grounds, 50 cents. Children 
under 10 years free if accompanied by parents. Steamer 
Ukiah leaves Tiburon ferry, foot of Market street, every 
Sunday at 10:30 A. M. and 1:45 P. M. Leave El 
Campo 12:45 and 5 P. M. 

BYRON HOT SPRINGS, 

68 riiles; 3 Hours; All Rail; 3 Trains Daily. 

THE ONLY 

HUD OR PEAT BATH ON THE COAST. 
Hot Salt Water and Sulphur Baths, 

Infallible cure for rheumatism, liver 
and kidney trouble and kindred complaints. 
JW- Pamphlets mailed on application. 

C. R. riASON, Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. O., Cal. 

Morphine-Opium 

HABIT permanently cured in five days, without harm, trouble or 
inconvenience. New method. No cure, no pay. 

JOY'S BALDWIN PHARMACY, 

Powell and Market Sts., S. F. 



July 8, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



L8 



GOTHAM GOSSIP. 

Nkw York, June 28,1893. 

1 WONDER if you b»ve among you any such club as the new 
one just started in Lenox, which represents a capital of fifty 
million dollars. Lenox is of all resorts the one par txotUmoe for 
autumn, and has been established upon a firm social footing by the 
interests of the Sloanes. the Auchmutys and the Anson Phelps 
Stokes. No one ha? ever thoroughly understood how Lenox first be- 
came the ra^e, for it is a hot little village in the Berkshire hills, 
where for the first year or two the visitors were obliged to occupy 
quarters which would not be for one moment considered desirable in 
the smallest Californian village. But its frequenters had the conso- 
lation of knowing they were in the swim, and so were willing to put 
up with all sorts of tribulations. Lenox was the scene of Mrs. West- 
inghouse's first social appearance, and curious enough it was, too. 
The Westinghouses took a very fine house at Lenox for the season. 
She had only a very limited acquaintance, and expected little atten- 
tion from the Lenox set. But behold the power of money and influ- 
ence! Mr. We>tinghouse was an important man in business circles, 
and in response to his invitation several of the wives of his business 
associates called upon Mrs. Westing house. The phalanx was led by 
two of the most important women of Lenox summer society. The 
wife of the great inventor kept them waiting for half an hour, and 
then descending, entered her drawing-room with these words: "Ah, 
good morning, ladies. What — what can I do for you?" Then, look- 
ing at the cards, " I really do not know the names !" If any thoughts 
existed of snubbing Mrs. Westinghouse, they died at that instant. I 
must not forget, while speaking of Lenox, to tell you that George 
Crocker is a member of the Lenox Club. 

Newport is rapidly filling up. Colonel and Mrs. Best went down 
three weeks ago, and Lieutenant and Mrs. Best, nee Corbett, will 
visit them during the summer. Mr. and Mrs. Oelrichs are at their 
Newport home, and not the least feature of the Newport season will 
be the debut of Miss Virginia Fair, which will take the form either of 
a ball or of an afternoon tea. Mrs. E. M. Robinson will be a guest of 
the Oelrichs' during the summer. 

Californians seem to strew themselves all about the country. Even 
Buzzard's Bay, where the President has his cottage, is chosen by one 
Californian, Mr. Cross, of Colusa. The yachting people are in great 
form. The Ramona, as usual, is crowded with guests, among them 
being Jerome Hart, who will leave the yacht for a visit to New Lon- 
don and the excitement of the Yale and Harvard race, after which 
he will go to California. Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Farley and James 
Burling sailed on the Etruria a few days ago for a summer abroad. 
W. F. Lewis and W. Meertieff are in Paris for the summer. Percy 
Chubb, who is well known in San Francisco, where he married a 
daughter of Mr. C. Adolphe Low, has just had a serious shock in the 
accident to his yacht, the Queen Mab, which he was bringing over 
from England, and which was obliged to put into Bermuda in a 
thoroughly disabled condition. He means to race her in America. 

The Princess being gone, the liugering Duke de Veragua is still 
"on deck' for attention. One of the smartest functions Riven for his 
party lately was the dinner by Mrs. Kidd, of Albany, a sister of Mr. 
Harry Martindale, who has been wintering in Santa Barbara, where 
they are both well known. Mrs. Kidd is-, if I am not mistaken, a 
cousin of Mrs. Will Crocker. The dinner was elaborate, and the 
decorations superb. Covers were laid for eighty guests. 

The recent Harvard class day should possess an interest for Cali- 
fornians because of the great hit made by ' ' Jimmie" Wilder, of Hono- 
lulu, whose mother belongs to your State. He was class wit and 
poet, and during the recital of his verses kept his hearers in roars of 
laughter. 

The only native sons and daughters I have seen lately were John 
T. Cutting, who is at the Murray Hill, and Mrs. George Gibson, ne'e 
Belden, who was en route to her pretty cottage in the grounds of the 
Westchester Country Club, quite the smartest of all the country 
clubs about New York. Theatrically there is little that the telegraph 
does not give you. Heinrich's opera season has closed after a suc- 
cessful month, both artistically and financially. The Grismers are 
on their way back to the metropolis, where they will produce The 
New South at the Fourteenth-street Theatre. Clay Greene is at work 
on a new play. Guy Carleton is reveling in royalties. Tom Magnire 
is having a benefit which should reap shekels, and altogether the 
Californian dramatic goose is hanging especially high. 

Passe-Partodt. 

Colonel J. M. Litchfield, of 12 Post street, has obtained the proud 
position of being considered the leading tailor in town, on account of 
the style and quality of the suits made at his establishment. His 
suits 'always fit to perfection. Colonel Litchfield gives particular 
attention to all uniforms, regalias and military accoutrements. 

Drink the John F. Cutter whisky when you want a good drink. It 
is acknowledged by every one to be the very best in the market. It 
is sold at all first-class bars, hotels and restaurants, and is always 
called for by men who know good liquor and enjoy it. 

Of course you cannot think of going to a summer resort this sea- 
son unless you have a complete outfit of linen, silk shirts, belts, light 
costumes, and the other necessary comforts. The only place to get 
them is at John W. Carmany's, 25 Kearny street. 



NOTICE TO DEPOSITORS 

OF 

PACIFIC BANK. 

All Depositors in the Pacific Bank are hereby 
requested to immediately present their respec- 
tive Deposit Books to the Bank, so that the same 
may be balanced at once. 

R. H. McDONALD, Jr. , Vice-President. 

By order Board of Bank Commissioners. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, San Francisco. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors, Dividend No. 10 was declared pay- 
able out of the profits of the bank, for the six months ending June 80, 1893, 
at the rate of five per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and one 
sixth per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, and that the same be 
credited to the accounts and payable after July 1,1893. 
J. B. FAKNTJM, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 
A dividend has been declared for the six mouths ending June 20, 1893, on 
the deposits in the Savings Department of this company, at the rate of five 
(6) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and one-sixth (4 1-6) per 
cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, payable on and after July 1, 1893. 
J. DALZELL BROWN, Secretary and Treasurer. 
Office— 441 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-6) po.r cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office— Corner of Powell and Eddy streets. _^__^_^ 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

For the six months ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and 
one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending with June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and four and one 
sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 
Py JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— 33 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. ^^ ^^ ^^ 

Office— 326 California street, corner Sansome. Branch— 1700 Market St., 
corner Polk. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits 
and four and one fourth (4J4) per cent, per annum ou ordinary deposits, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. mnTTnXTXr _ 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
O ffic e— 526 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE- 

Pacific Coast Savings Society. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of 6 per cent per annum on term deposits, and 5 per cent per an- 
num on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable oi and Piter Saturday, 
July 1, 1893. G- B. BARNARD, Secretary. 

Offi ce— No. 30 Montgomery street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco, June 30, 3893. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter {4)4) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 1893, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1893. 

R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Street. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893 . 




MTNTNG T F a numDer of tne so-called financiers of this great 
X and free American Republic were to pack their 
traps and hie themselves off to the great desert of Africa it would 
be a relief for those long-suffering fellow countrymen who have 
been compelled to suffer through the mistakes resulting from ig- 
norant officiousness. The zealots whu are harping continually on 
the silver question can only be compared to a set of howling der- 
vishes. The energy of both is wasted in the wrong direction. The 
News Lettek has always been and is to-day in hearty sympathy 
with the silver miner, and any proposition which is likely to bene- 
fit the important industry which he represents will always be sup- 
ported to the fullest possible extent in these columns. It is im- 
possible, however, to agree with the plans of politicians who are 
again forcing themselves conspicuously to the front in a partisan 
movement which is highly objectionable, to say the least. The 
elaborate theories hitherto propounded in this quarter have 
proved worse than useless upon practical application, as a solu- 
tion for existing difficulties, and further suggestions from the same 
clique will naturally be received with poor grace. The Sherman 
Act has not done much to reflect credit upon its supporters, and 
yet they now demand additional legislative favors in case the bill 
is repealed. The sooner this law is blotted from the statute books 
the better. The probability that this will be done at the extra 
session of Congress, which will be convened early next month, 
has already had the effect of restoring confidence in commercial 
circles, showing very plainly the feeling of the mercantile classes 
in regard to the matter. If politics are discarded for the time be- 
ing, and cool good business judgment is substituted instead, with a 
determination to nip in the bud any obstructionist tactics, it will 
not be difficult to devise a plan for the settlement of the present 
difficulty. The gold will take care of itself. The freer circulation 
of silver is what is wanted. The dollars, amounting to millions, 
now locked up in the Treasury should be turned loose among the 
people to be used in the manner for which they were originally 
coined. There is no more sense in questioning the value of a 
silver dollar as a medium of exchange than there would be in dis- 
cussing the flimsy piece of paper which represents fifty dollars in 
gold. If it came down to an argument, the silver token has an 
intrinsic value, which the rag has not, while the government im- 
print should mean as much on one as on the other. There will 
be no hindrance to the free and unlimited coinage of silver if the 
home market is protected against the influx of silver bullion, and 
the small gold coin and greenback are withdrawn from circulation. 
It can only be hoped, in the interests of silver mining in this 
country, that Congress will see fit to declare that an American dol- 
lar is a dollar to all intents and purposes, irrespective of its me- 
tallic ratio to a gold standard, and whether or not it is seen fit to 
increase or diminish its intrinsic value in the silver used in its 
composition. The government imprint should be the sole gua r - 
antee of its value in exchange, bi-metallists and other carping 
financial critics to the contrary. 

$$ $ 

THE hydraulic mining men of this State should look to it that 
the over-zealous efforts of a few new converts do not jeo- 
pardize the position gained after a hard struggle for years past. 
It is rather late in the day to revive a controversy by any ill- 
advised or hasty actions. There is always a class of people ready 
to seize an opportunity to make capital out of a proposition with 
a popular side, and others can always be found among the hot- 
headed and inexperienced members of any organization to rush 
blindly into any scheme, even though it may end in ruin to the 
cause they wish to advocate. The straightest course is generally 
the best in all business matters, and the course of the hydraulic 
mining men is very plainly outlined at the present time. It is 
now beginning to be generally recognized that the great wealth 
of the State lies in vast tracts of auriferous gravels, as yet only 
partially developed. It has taken considerable pounding for the 
past six years to thump this into the thick craniums of the men 
in this city, who are more interested than others in the revival of 
gold mining. Now that the idea has been inculcated, the urgent 
necessity for the advancement of our commercial prosperity will 
stimulate the flagging energies of merchants, and awaken them 
to true sense of the duty they owe to themselves by increasing the 
annual output of the yellow metal, which is not so plentiful with 
the masses as it was some years ago. The resumption of work on 
the hydraulic mines of the State is an assured fact, but it is only 
right that the earlier basis of operations, looking to the protection 
of the rights of others should be closely adhered to in every partic- 
ular. The conservative mine-owners have always been ready to 
concede this point, and no interlopers coming in at the eleventh 
hour should be permitted to interfere in such a manner as to 
create antagonisms and thereby retard the natural progress of 
events toward the happy consummation so long desired. 



THE market has been dull during the week for Comstock 
shares, and prices have been rapidly declining to a lower 
basis than has been known lor many years past. The demand has 
been light, and the majority of the sales have been made on behalf 
of outside holders, who do not take a very sanguine view of the 
situation. No attempt is being made to stay the decline. The 
inside manipulators very evidently recognize the position of 
affairs, and regard cheap stocks as one of the chances of a season 
of financial depression. The news from the mines comes down 
in a more favorable shape than ever, the assays in the mines 
running ore, working higher, but still the effect on the market is 
nil. Lower prices are predicted by those who look forward to 
the disorganized condition of the silver market, and dealers are 
not as sanguine as they might be over the position of affairs. 
The fact that the Comstock ores carry a large percentage in gold 
is not recognized by the majority of investors, and in conse- 
quence the sales are unusually heavy on the decline. The time 
is coming, however, when those who have the nerve to go in and 
buy at the present price will reap a good return on their invest- 
ment. Money is plentiful in town and all over the State, not- 
withstanding the financial depression, and it is only a matter of 
time until the surplus funds seek investment In the mining 
market, which offers such unusual advances just now. Those 
who can pick stocks up at the lowest point within the next week 
or so, and hold them pending an assessment or so, will reap a 
bushel of money in profits. 

$ $ $ 

THE mines of Grass Valley are in a flourishing condition, judg- 
ing from the reports which are made from time to time. There 
is a good deal of San Francisco money being invested in this 
direction just now, and to very good advantage. The California 
mill is crushing ore from the Evening Star mines, and some good 
returns are expected before long in the way of coin. The Em- 
mett Company of New York have driven a tunnel 100 feet in the 
8unbeam ground in a very favorable formation. The mines in 
the neighborhood of Nevada City are doing well and attracting 
considerable attention here and elsewhere. 



THE California Mill, at Grass Valley, is running on ore from 
the Evening Star mine, with the prospect for a very steady 
continuance for months to come. There was some slight delay 
experienced during the week, owing to some trouble over the 
water supply. This was probably due to the malicious interfer- 
ence with the gate of the reservoir, which resulted in the tempor- 
ary suspension of work at the Idaho and several other Grass 
Valley mines. 

$ $$ 

nrTQrjPT t j KnrnrTQ T HE Sunset Telegraph and Telephone 
MlbLJLLLAJX&UUb. | Company are now offering for sale 
$100,000 of tneir first mortgage twenty-year gold bonds at par, 
with accrued interest after July 1, 1893. The mortgage covers 
the entire property of the company in the States of California 
and Washington. The bonds pay 6 per cent, semi-annually, pay- 
able in San Francisco or New York. These bonds are unquali- 
fiedly recommended by Wells, Fargo & Co., who have thoroughly 
investigated them. The total issue is $750,000. 

$ $ $ 

THE accusation of A. W. Fox by embezzler Flood is another 
proof that the convicted thief is losing whatever brains he 
had during his confinement. Any one who knows Fox, the ac- 
cused, is fully cognizant of the fact that for years past he has not 
been able to handle the quantity of stocks which the overdrafts 
alleged from the Donohoe-Kelly Bank would have permitted. 
The whole matter becomes more apparent as the old sinner wrig- 
gles under the thrall, that the money stolen went into the stock 
market, and stayed there, and Fox and Cogan were probably the 
tools, but Flood took the risk and stood the damage. He got 
left, and now he wants to shoulder the blame for his theft on a 
dead man, and involve another who was unfortunate enough to 
have been mixed up in the affair. There is nothing meaner in 
life than a squealing gambler. Flood ought to be promptly sent 
to San Quentin, where he belongs. 
$ $ $ 

THE semi-annual statements of the savings banks in this city 
which are now appearing, show heavy assets in the way of 
coin over and above the securities held against investments. The 
folly of making a run on these institutions becomes evident on a 
close investigation of their resources. The cash on hand in most, 
of the concerns is more than enough to stand depositors off for 
months, the cash assets ranging from $25,000,000 to $50,000,000. 
It is doubtful if anywhere else in this universe there are such solid, 
substantial banks as those, both commercial and for savings, as 
in San Francisco. 

$ $3 

THE semi-annual statement of the People's Home Savings Bank 
for June 30th, shows resources of $2,406,122. The semi- 
annual statement of the San Francisco Savings Union shows re- 
sources of $29,863,000. 



July 8, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




'Heir the Crier!" "Whil the derll »rlthouf " 
• One th»t will pl«T the rteTll.ilr. with yon." 



M 



ETHINKS the Day is out of date— 
The Day — so-called — we celebrate, 
And all its honored features cast 
Among the dead things of the past, 
Else whither has the spirit gone 
That marked oar Freedom's natal dawn? 
A world new from its chains released, 
First watched its coming in the East; 
And warriors fresh from deadly fights, 
Assisted at the welcome-rites. 



Metbinks it's out of style — the Day, 

Its origin's too far away; 

Where armies marched with swinging tread — 

A hero-troop by heroes led, 

With arms agleam and proud ensign, 

I see "a long, thin, slender line;" 

Where statesman's voice upheld the laws, 

And patriots vowed for country's cause, 

I hear the demagogue unknown 

Mouth out his little plaint alone. 

I AM glad to see that that highly moral journal, the Examiner, 
has joined in the hue and cry against the " ladies' entrance" 
to saloons. "Close the side doors," says the Examiner, and in 
ita editorial upon the subject, that journal then proceeds to point 
out that there are 1700 side entrances in this city. » Multiply 
the 1700 by 20 or 30, and we get some idea of the number of 
female visitors inveigled into these places in the course of a year." 
All this may be true, of course, and equally of course the Exam- 
iner means what it says. It means it the more, probably, be- 
cause its advertising columns have no department headed » La- 
dies' Entrances." It has a column beaded "Massage," however, 
beneath which the Examiner prints daily the advertisements of 
from forty to fifty public prostitutes. This great paper which, upon 
one page urges the Supervisors to pass an order closing the ladies' 
entrances to saloons, and uses many words to express its horror 
at the extent of immorality in this community, upon another 
page solicits prostitution for its patrons. Wherein lies the force 
of the Examiner's editorial in behalf of the elevation of the moral 
tone of the community? That paper alone, by the publication of 
objectionable advertisements, does as much direct harm as half 
the side entrance saloons in town. We have repeatedly directed 
public attention to the objectionable course of the Examiner in 
publishing the cards of prostitutes, and we now call attention to 
the hypocritical endeavor it is making to win good words for 
itself, while yet it is the favorite organ of the most depraved 
women of the town. 

NOW comes another brutal tale of the sea. The Tarn O'Shanter 
arrived Wednesday, 131 days from New York, and the sailors 
tell a tale of awful cruelty. They have had second mate Crocker 
arrested, as he seems to be the officer who took most delight in 
bullying, beating, and even biting them. It is about time that some 
of these brutes of officers of merchant ships should be severely 
punished by long imprisonment in jail for their inhuman treat- 
ment of sailors. The sailor at sea has no protection whatever 
from a brutal officer. If he attempts to defend himself he is liable 
to be shot as a mutineer. As a rule, the officers escape upon trial, 
for they, somehow, manage to intimidate witnesses sufficiently 
to leave the complaining sailors a losing case. The case of 
Crocker, of the Tarn O'Shanter is a particularly heinous one, and 
we would delight in seeing the fellow get his deserts. 

THERE is a Mayor at Argentine, Mo., who knows his business. 
His name is Williard, and he has a wooden leg, of which he 
is particularly proud, and with good cause. At a recent meeting 
of the Board of Aldermen, several unruly members would not 
come to order at the command of the Mayor, and that worthy 
thereupon unslung his wooden leg, and laid about him like an 
Irishman at a fair. After the injured Aldermen had been restored, 
and the dead taken to the Morgue, the Mayor strapped on his 
leg again and resumed business. There is a moral hidden In this 
story for Mayor Ellert. 

WILLIAM MEYER, with all that careless grace and freedom 
from conventionality which mark the Alamedan, took off 
his shoes and stockings and went to sleep in a field. A man un- 
acquainted with the formation of the Meyer pedal extremities, 
came along, and seeing the feet sticking up from the grass, 
thought he had a rabbit in view, and blazed away. William 
Meyer now swears he will forever deprive Alameda of his 
presence. But he should not be angry, for other men who have 
lived at Alameda have been taken for worse than jack-rabbits. 



THE case of Blanche Comarie, vagrant, has been dismissed from 
the calendar of the Police Court. Blanche was one of the fair 
and frail ones that testified against Police-Sergeant Wittman dur- 
ing the recent whitewashery by the Police Commissioners. Since 
then, Blanche has not been enabled to earn an honest living, in 
her own guileless, loving way, for the policemen persist in ar- 
resting her. Chief Crowley concluded that she was being perse- 
cuted, instead of prosecuted, and, therefore, requested Judge 
Campbell to dismiss the case, and this was done. I cannot help 
admiring the beauties of a system which allows the police to ar- 
rest a person because she is offensive to them personally, and not 
because she is a law-breaker, and then to have the Judge dismiss 
the case at a nod. The police are a power in the land, and Judge 
Campbell is their prophet— (or profit?) 

OF course the waiters of the University Club went on a strike, 
and quit the club. Had they not just cause? To be served 
cigar butts in their stewl Is that not more than sufficient cause 
to commit mnrder? Surely all men who have ever heard a Uni- 
versity Club cigar groan, as it sent its rank breath heavenward 
during its cremation, will acknowledge that the waiters were 
hardly treated. Then to get nothing but mutton — that was too 
much, even though above the door of the clab's dining-room 
hangs the legend, "Let us return to our muttons." Oh, but those 
clubmen will be sorry when they are banded their dishes fresh 
from the dirty thumbB of inexperienced waiters. But it serves 
the clubmen right. They went too far, and though waiters are 
long-suffering and patient animals, I do not blame them for 
drawing the line at stewed cigar butts. 

JAMES McDONALD is a pirate bold, and on his low, rakish 
craft he scours the bay from Port Costa to Alviso, and raids 
everything raidable within reach. The local Captain Kidd made 
a grand mistake when he attempted to rob Oakland. Any man 
who attempts to get anything of value from Oakland makes a 
grand mistake anyhow, but Jimmy, the pirate, made the error 
of his lawless life. All he could find worth taking was a coil of 
rope, and as he was captured in the act of stealing it, the Oak- 
land officers say they will now give him ample opportunity to 
regret his wild career. McDonald seems to have reached the end 
of his rope. 

THERE is at least one boy in town who will remember the re- 
cent glorious Fourth with great gasps of joy. He is the lad 
who covered the pan of red fire that was burning at the corner of 
McAllister and Buchanan streets, and was consequently the 
direct cause of the ensuing explosion that blew out all the 
windows in the adjoining houses, wrecked a drug store, injured 
three men, knocked two boys unconscious, and called out the fire 
department. That lad will make his mark in the world if he gets 
his rights. His fond papa will also leave marks on his trowsers 
"if he gets his rights." 

THE Examiner stated very solemnly in its description of the 
Fourth of July parade that the Second Brigade of the National 
Guard was under command of Captain Evans, upon whose staff 
was a large number of Lieutenant-Colonels, Majors and Captains. 
It was probably the first time in the history of the Guard that 
a Captain commanded the brigade upon parade. I wonder what 
Colonel Macdonaid, who happened to ride at the head of the col- 
umn, thinks about it? 

ROBERT ASHE, President of tne Fourth of July Committee, 
must be a very guileless gentleman. He actually became 
offended because the committee's collectors were holding out 
some of the money that found its way into their hands. What 
do you suppose those professional patriots, the collectors, are for, 
Mr. Ashe, if not to steal everything in sight? The Fourth of 
July professional patriot is a great and glorious institution. He 
should be caged. 

A SENIOR at Smith College, a young ladies' seminary, failed to 
secure her diploma this year because she had a large number 
of outstanding bills among tradesmen. One of these amounted 
to $200, and was for ice-cream sodas. Just imagine that, guileless 
youth! Two hundred dollars for ice-cream sodas, and all con- 
sumed by a lady of superior education. Oh, save us from the 
superior woman! 

HARRY E. WISE has made himself solid with the Duke of 
Newcastle. It is said he promised to use his influence with 
the government to have Newcastle's cameras and pictures ad- 
mitted here free of duty on the Duke's return from the Orient, 
and hence he is high in the ducal favor. Harry now carries his 
right hand in his breast coat pocket. The hand has touched a 
duke's. 

ON the first day of the Rosalie's business, one hundred people 
came to this city on the first trip, at five cents a head. On 
each succeeding trip the number of emigrants increased; all of 
which goes to show that there are some Oaklanders who will not 
miss a chance to get away from the "beautiful Athens." 

THE fellow who was arrested for throwing lighted bombs into 
crowded street cars, and exploding pistol fire-crackers beneath 
ladies' feet an the Fourth, should be placed on a can of gun- 
powder, and hoisted with his own petard, as it were. We can 
get along very well without him. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 3893. 



IN CAMP. 



JOY and sadness, sunlight and shade, 
And the brook goes brawling by; 
We live our life as our hearts are made, 
And we love before we die. 

The camp-fire gleams, and in hot desire 
The wild sparks seek the sky; 

And we in the glow of the forest fire 
For the dead past breathe a sigh. 

And the sparks fly high to the paling moon, 

And we feel the chill of the day; 
But the promise of love will fever us soon, 
And burn for ever and aye. 

We dream as the fleecy wreaths ascend 
To the sheltering boughs above, 

That the best of life is the love of friends, 
For creation's crown is love. 

And the wraith of a memory comes to me 

As I lie on my pallet of pine, 
And bids me sleep till my soul is free, 

When my love will forever be mine. 



THE NEW COLUMBIAN LIBERTY BELL. 

THE Columbian Liberty Bell was rung for the first time at the 
celebration of the Fourth of July in Chicago. This bell was 
manufactured solely from materials of national interest, typical 
of the "Union of to-day," contributions of historical mementoes 
of Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Hamilton and others, and 
filings from historical treasures, such as the key of the famous 
Bastile, presented by General Lafayette to George Washington. 
The Governors of every State in the Union contributed some 
metallic object of interest, and specimens from all mines produc- 
ing gold, silver, copper, or any suitable metal, throughout the 
States were fused into the bell metal. Each Daughter and Son of 
the American Revolution contributed one cent for the same pur- 
pose. The responsibility of the production of this bell was 
placed in the hands of a committee composed most particularly 
of a woman representative of each State and Territory in toe 
Union, one representative of every republic in the world, and 
representatives from the Daughters and Sons of the American 
Revolution, and other kindred organizations. It is Intended that 
the liberty bell shall be rung at 9 o'clock on the morning of anni- 
versaries such as July 4th, October 21st, September 3d, November 
4th, and other com memorable events in American history. 

On the anniversaries of the birthdays of " creators of liberty," 
such as Washington, Jefferson, Lafayette and Kossuth, peals will 
be rung from the liberty bell at noon, and on the anniversaries of 
their deaths, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, the bell will toll the 
number of strokes corresponding with the age of the deceased at 
the time of their death. At the closing of the World's Fair the 
liberty bell will journey from place to place — to Bunker Hill, 
New Orleans, San Francisco, or any place throughout the world 
where any great patriotic celebration is being held. In the year 
1900 it will be sent to the next World's Exposition at Paris, and 
remain there until that Exhibition closes. When not in use in 
other places, Washington will be the home of the liberty bell. It 
is always to be returned there, and safely deposited under the 
care of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. WinslowV Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 



REMOVAL 



CITY OFFICE 



CYPRESS LAWN CEMETERY. 



TO 9 CITY HALL AVE. 



Palo Alto Stables. 

R. E. MILES, Proprietor. 
320 O'FARRELL ST San Francisco. 

Victorias, Rockaways, Landaus, Buggies of all kinds. Also Saddle 
Horses. Boarding a specialty. 

These large brick stables offer especial inducements to boarders, being 
new, with all modern improvements, well ventilated and healthy. All 
horses are kept above ground, with first-class attendants. 
Telephone SIo. 2615. 



JjiE Mf\\\JE JK)US£. 



Bar^aips : 

Jackets, Capes, Ulsters, Suits, Linen Duck, 
Storm Serge and Fancy Mixtures. 

Also a full line of LADY CRAVEN VESTS, the 
London and New York craze. 

I^p^El^ U/EICI^ 9 <?0., 

\l. U/. <5on?er post ar/d Keanjy $t 

THE 
SfllTH 
riOQUETTE 
CARPETS. 

The most artistic low-priced pile fabric carpet- 
ing, of GUARANTEED DURABILITY, in the 
market. 

We are now offering a larger assortment of pat- 
terns than ever before, and AT THE PRICE of 
a Medium or Best Quality Brussels. 

W. & J. 5L0ANE & CO., 

Carpets, Furniture, and Upholstery, 
641=647 MARKET ST. 



OLD SCALE REMOVED. 

FORMATION OF NEW SCALE PREVENTED, 

Without the aid of chemicals, 
by the use of 



STEAM 
BOILER 
INCRUSTATIONS. 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND CONDENSER 

Over 800 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats 'he Water to 212°. Saves from 26 to 60 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Osed. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

LLEWELLYN STEAM CONDEN8ER MANUFACTURING CO., 

380 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

A. BUSWELL, 

BOOR > EIDER, PAPER-RULER, PRINTER MB KUSik ROOK IMUPACTUREB 
636 Clay Street, Near Montgomery, San Francisco. 



July B, lill 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS T.r.TTER. 




^O 



FISH net for draperies in seashore cottages is growing more 
and more in favor, and, artistically used, is very decorative 
and appropriate. A new departure is to either gild it or dye it to 
match the colorings of the room, and in this way an extremely 
pretty effect may be obtained. Thus a bine chamber may have 
silvered net caught back from the windows with blue ribbons, or 
a dining room dark red beld by gilt chains. Handy holdalls of 
fish net for traveling now take the place of the once popular can- 
vas shawl bag. 

One of the newest ideas for carrying flowers for bridesmaids are 
the green wickerwork watering pots, filled with lilies of the valley or 
any other bloom suitable to the dresses. They have this advantage, 
that they are so placed they appear as if they were growing, and the 
handles of the watering pots are tied with colored ribbons. This is 
even prettier than the high-heeled shoes, filled with flowers, which 
used to be slung from the arm. Other novelties are ribbon chate- 
laines, with small bouquets hanging from the ends of ribbon, and 
bracelets of flowers to correspond. 

Fashion never tires of red. It is the life of a dull complexion, and 
the salvation of a plain face. Gooseberry, cherry, radish, magenta, 
mahogany, cardinal, crimson and rosewood are some of the popular 
shades. Crimson leads. Tomato, strawberry, and old rose are still 
on the list, making frights of the ignorant women who try to become 
them. Such high and delicate tints as daisy, shell, pomegranate, 
peach and clover red are too perishable for service. They brighten 
under gas, but pale before the sunlight aud laundress. 

The sailor hat has a broad brim this summer or sometimes a 
straight one turned up all round. Black or tan or white are its colors 
trimmed with shaded ribbons. But the leghorns are prettier, crossed 
and re-crossed with narrow folds of black velvet, while in front rise 
convincing sprays of pink roses. Convincing of what? Why, to be 
sure, of their right to be in view. 

Everywhere is a tendency to flowers and flower forms. Two of the 
prettiest things seen in a week have been a flower with three tendrels 
wrapped in the centre as a standard. The centre of the flower held 
a taper. The other was an envelope cutter elongated; the handle 
was the flower, whose long lily-like leaf became the cutter. 



Brown shoes are not made of goat this season ; the leather par ex- 
cellence is Russia kid. It is light weight and very glossy, which 
lends the foot a slender appearance. Prices are not high. Hand- 
turned low shoes sell at $4 and $3.50, and the $2.50 goods are very 
desirable. 



Balloon sleeves have begun to collapse, voluminous skirts are sub- 
siding, flamboyant hat trimming has had several reefs taken in, 
equatorial ruffles have been ripped from the dresses of short girls 
and waddling women, and the summer fashions are beginning to be 
sightly. ^^ 

A rough chip hat, with a spray of wild crimson roses— stem, 
thorns, foliage, bud and blossom — and of nothing else but a lining 
and a bottle-green hat pin, is decidedly smart and inexpensive. 

Swords are enriched with flowers, and the last produced are the 
most magnificent. One has for the guard a flower design in gold set 
with rubies and emeralds. 

Charming necklaces of silver are worn with fine chains netted 
together. They cannot fail to be popular with young girls with their 
summer gowns. 

The new silver bracelets are charming in design and workmanship. 
One variety is made up of woven wire and ends in tassels. 

A serpent with a head curved for a handle had its tail smoothed out 
and polished to open envelopes. 

Candle shades of perforated gilt and enamel are beautiful and 
among the fascinating novelties. 

Salvers of polished wood set in silver are preferred for pitchers to 
salvers entirely of silver. 

A beetle three inches long has a diamond body, emerald eyes and 
gold claws. 

Ladies, call atthe Wonder Hat, Flower and Feather Store, 1024- 
26-28 Market street, and see our new line of novelties in hats, flowers 
laces, ribbons, etc. Large stock. Low prices. 

The Maison Riche. at the corner of Geary street and Grant ave- 
nue, is the most popular restaurant in the city among people who 
enjoy good dinners. It enjoys the patronage of the elite. 



fT\\dsun\n\^r ^learape^ Sal<? 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 
Sreme^dous Qjt$ ii? prices. 

— ON— 

<5loal(5, Dress (Joods, Sill^s, Caqes, Ribboijs, 

parasols, Oloues, Srimmir^s, 

JHaijdl^rel^fs, /TV?i/s Furrjislpirjgs, JHo$i(?ry, 

<Jr?deru/i?ar, Corsets, C,urtair;5, 

tyousefurr^styir/gj, Ete. 



Mail orders promptly executed. 

Goods delivered free in Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, San 
Rafael, TiburoD, Sansalito, San Quentin, Mill Valley, Eoas 
Station and Blithedale. 




Murphy Building. 

MARKET. JONES AND MoALLISTER STS. 

Beauty Lost Easily Regained. 

No more wrinkles; old age defied. Dimples made on cheeks or 
chin in twenty minutes. Noses straightened. Superfluous hair re- 
moved. Splotches removed. Mouths made small. Bust developed 
three times the size in three months. 

DR. CARPENTER, 

ROOMS 27 and 28 134,6 MARKET ST. 

The Only Dermotologist oh the Pacific Coast. 

Jyg^ REMOVED 

TO 121 POST STREET, 



BET. KEARNY ST. AND GRANT AVE. 



Y^adiaN f 

Distilledand boflled bv V I 3=4^ * kj U 
Wal^ille, Canada. T T mT lOIV I 

Thence and (>emiincness'of this whisky are guaranteed by lhef.x<ilsc DeparliiicT 
of the Canadian Government by certificate over Ihe capsule of every butlle.Fror 
llic moment of manufacture unlit this certificate is affixed the whisky n'evct 
leaves the custody 6'f'llie Excise officers. No olherGovcrnmcnt in the world provide 
for consumers this independent and absolute guarantee of purity and ripeness. 
"Canadian Club"whisky is particularly adapted for medicinal use. 



WILLIAM WOLFF 8c 
5an Franci sco, Ea l. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893. 




MR. GOSCHEN, the British ex-Chancellor of the Exchequer in 
an interview regarding the closing of the Indian mints to the 
free coinage of silver said that the measure is only temporary and 
a trial. He is reported to have added that the Indian natives re- 
garded the silver rupee as almost sacred, and that if they abso- 
lutely refused to accept the new measure the Government would 
be compelled to withdraw it. It is certain that the British in 
India cannot entirely ignore native prejudices, but it is not likely 
that the duration of so important a measure as the suspension of 
the free coinage of Bilver will be seriously influenced by Hindoo 
objections. The country which Great Britain is watching most 
eagerly at this moment is the United States, and what will happen 
in our Congress is of more importance to the Indian government 
than what occurs in native circles in India at present. 

Mr. Gladstone slipped last Sunday while descending a staircase 
in the residence of the Earl of Dysart, and fell. Fortunately for 
the old gentleman the fall was without any serious results, but 
when one considers what far-reaching consequence a dangerous 
accident to Mr. Gladstone might have upon the internal adminis- 
tration of affairs in the United Kingdom, one cannot help wonder- 
ing why a great nation ever makes her own fate dependant upon 
the precarious life of one single human being. It is laudable to 
entrust to great statesmen the leadership in government matters, 
but it is almost a crime to permit them to rise to such power, that 
their death would entirely change the course of affairs in a large 
country. 

Our new Minister to Chili has been received with unusual 
honors at Valparaiso, and the cablegrams point out that no foreign 
representative was ever received with like distinction. This news 
is very satisfactory, but after all it is quite natural that the United 
States minister to Chili should be treated with greater attention 
than his colleagues, since the countries of South America must re- 
cognize that among all countries of the world those that have a 
republican form of government deserve their first attention, and 
that amongst all republics none deserves greater recognition than 
our own, not to speak of the fact that the United States is the 
ruling power on the continent which Chili occupies. Diplomatic 
courtesies are rarely the result of sentimentalism; in most cases 
they are based upon good common sense. 

A cablegram announces the intention of the Belgian government 
to convene a special conference of the Latin Union for the pur- 
pose of considering what action the States belonging to it shall 
take in view of the recent fall of silver. If this conference meets 
at too early a date its members will probably agree to disagree. 
At present there is no chance for concerted international action 
on the silver question. 

The English Premier is pushing the committee vote on the 
Home Rule bill, and the third reading is to take place probably 
within a couple of months. The sooner the better. This is a case 
where discussion is a mere waste of time, and all proposals of the 
Unionists to amend the bill are insincere, since outside of the 
Irish members and the few Radicals, nobody wants such a bill 
amended or unamended. Even a certain group of the Irish do 
not want it. It is to be hoped, thefefore, that at the earliest pos- 
sible moment the Lords will get a chance to kill it, and to present 
to the people of Great Britain the corpse for further disposal. 

The French are making preparations to bombard the capital of 
Siam, but the Siamese, notwithstanding the threatening attitude 
of the invaders, are quietly preparing for stubborn resistance. 
Even if the French should succeed in demolishing Bangkok, that 
would by no means insure their ultimate success. Wooden capi- 
tals are quickly rebuilt, and the inhabitants of Siam will carry on 
war as long as a French soldier is left in the country. To subdue 
a kingdom like that of Siam, a permanent occupation of the ter- 
ritory would be necessary, and the example of the British in In- 
dia would have to be followed. The French have not the talent 
of British colonizers, nor the racial peculiarities adapted to the 
subduing of Oriental countries. The ultimate result of the pres- 
ent campaign will be the abandonment of Siam by the majority of 
the French troops, the installment of officials to carry on the in- 
ternal administration, and then the Siamese will have a chance to 
regain lost ground. They have plenty of time to wait for their 
chance, and seem quite ready to do so. 



Serious Railway Accident. 
Milk train in collision; no milkman turns up; disappointed house 
keepers; coffee without cream. A petty annoyance resulting from a 
neglect to keep the Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk in the 
house. Order now for future exigencies from Grocer or Druggist. 



The offices of the 



NOTICE. 

Mutual Life 



INSURANCE COMPANY of New York, have been removed to 

The Company's Building, 

Corner California and Sansome Sts., S. F. 

A. B. FORBES & SON. General Agents. 

FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company, 
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL. $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000. 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'l Managers. 

■40 to 44 PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 

Assets »2,607,676 76 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,139,766 99 

HAZARDS INSURED. 

EMPLOYERS AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILER EXPLOSION, 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOSSES. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, and 
FIDELITY. 
MAXWELL. & BERRY, General Agents, 
421 California Street. 

SVEA FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF GOTHENBURG. 

Funds invested $4,661,924 

Shareholders' Obligations 2,133,333 

TotalAssets 6,795,257 

We beg to notify the Agents and Policy-holders of the above company 
that we have been appointed its General Agents upon the Pacific Coast and 
are authorized to collect all of the unpaid premiums and accounts. We 
solicit on behalf of this deservedly popular aud well kuown company the 
favor of the renewals of all expiring policies and an additional share of 
your good business. 

, BROWN, CRAIG A CO., General Agents, 

407-409 Montgomery Street.* 

Represent also. PHENIX, of Brooklyn; THE AMERICAN FIRE; PENN 
SYLVANIA FIRE; THE GREENWICH INSURANCE CO. 
| Total Assets over $30.000.000. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Ions. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco .Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lOTrastrslee oHnter^slon G;sin storsd In Werehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in FirBt-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
If desired, at current rates. wwflft , 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-Calilornla Bank. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO-, of New York. 

RRjTTSH AMERICAN "ASSURANCE CU., of Toronto, r 1 

WESTERfTASSURANCE CO., of Toronto J 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, Asst. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE GO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



July 8, 1393. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



W- Ro5 




ELDER BLOSSOM&— Ind<)*i>denl. 



THE attar of rose is quaint and rare, 
It pleases all noses, or ruddy or fair; 
It is the most regal of scents. 
But talk as you will, I'll hold to it still. 

Though yon deem my perception is dense, 
There's nothing so sweet as 
The wild elder blossoms 
That bloom by the old rail fence. 

The odor of musk is a scent of old time, 
A whiff in the dusk is a theme for a rhyme; 

'Tis the perfume of all most intense. 
But a Hg for the smell that nothing can quell 
"Von'd wish it a mile or two hence 
If once you had scented 
The wild elder blossoms 
That bloom by the old rail fence. 

A violet scent is a scent that is neat, 

To use in one's twenties an odor most meet, 

A fragrance quite free from pretense. 
But leave it for maids to bind in their braids, 
And give me the rarest of scents. 
The breath of the blossoms 
The wild elder blossoms 
That bloom by the old rail fence. 

Their fragile white grace is like point de Venice; 
They drape the wood places with fragrance and peace; 

A virginal charm they dispense. 
Like a lass of sixteen that no lover has seen, 
They spell you with bright innocence. 
In childhood they won me, 
The wild elder blossoms 
That bloom by the old rail fence. 



NEARER TO GOD AND TO THEE.— Cy Wurman. 

Go make thee a mark far above me, 

Near the top of the temple of fame; 
Say that thou'lt endeavor to love me, 

When there I have written my name. 
Think not of the hearts that have fainted 

While striving for what I would be, 
For I shall be better for striving, 

And nearer to God and to thee. 

No burden could e'er be too heavy, 

No task ever seem too great, 
No journey too long or too lonely, 

No hour too early or late. 
For my matchless love would be thriving 

On the hope of the bliss to be, 
And 1 should be better for striving, 

And nearer to God and to thee. 

All the long way from noontime till midnight, 

And back from the midnight to noon; 
By the bright light of love I'd be toiling, 

And hoping the end would be soon. 
And when time of hope had bereft me, 

Tossed wildly on life's troubled sea, 
I should know the struggle had left me 

Still near to God and to thee. 






A DAY IN THE 'WOODS. 

A mockingbird, sweet-singing on a spray 
Of dewy blossoms, lightly shaken down; 
A river running by the brushes brown, 

Its green banks drifting dreamily away, 

And the sun centered in the splendid day ! 
Far off, faint echoes of a noisy town, 
And hills that wear a blue and golden crown, 

And fields of corn, and meadows sweet with May! 

And then-the bells of twilight-restful, sweet! 
A lulling murmur from the languid rills— 
A gray star glimmering in the blended blue; 

And my heart heaving with a happier beat, 

Answering the calling of the whip-poor-wills 
That time my footsteps home to love and you! 



i it s XT k, .a. :r>r c :b . 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 
Herbert I.. Low, Manager for the Pacific Coast Branch, 

2SO Miiiwiriif Sl„ S. t. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S. 534,795.72 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 

232 California St., S.F.,Cal. 

pacific iD^iF^-iarra^CEiirT 
6UARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a d. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - J 6,000,000. 
Cash Assets, J23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded a. d. 1710. 

Cash ABsets, »10,044,712. 

AsBets in America, - - - $2,510,368. 



W.ll. J. LANDERS, flen'l Agent, 20* Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets $19,724,538.45. 

President, RENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. QIBBENS 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



INSURE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Pacific Branch, 214 Sansome St., S. F. 

SWAIN & MURDOCK, City Agents. 

THE 



FIRE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8,124,057.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up { 600,000 

ABBets 3,181,753 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,526,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 

City Office— 501 Montgomery St. General Office— 401 Mont's, St. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

f Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgome i 

CEO. F. GRANT, Manage 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL .^^ $6,700,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Wo. 316 Calllornia Street. San Franclaco. 

ThFsWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. ° F 8T - OAI - L - OT ™ MCH - 

rnuainlFn CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

Thew : three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. HAREY w . STZ| Geneia i Agent , 

110 California St. , San Francisco, Ca 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8,1893. 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour— Demand light; Extras ?4®|4.20. Superfine. $2.80@$3.25. 

Wheat— Light trade; Shipping, *l.22V 2 ; Milling, *1.25@$1.30 per cental 

Barley is slack; Brewing, 90c. @U>02V->; Feed, 80c.@8^o. per ctl. 

Oats, Milling, fi.50@|1.60; Feed, $1.15(g>$i.25 per ctl. 

Corn, White, $115; Yellow, $l.00@$l.05 per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, fair demand, $1.10@$1. 15, Cement, $2.00@$2.25. 

Hay is steady; Wheat, $12; Oat6, $9@$10; Alfalfa, $8@$io. 

Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, $16@$17.50 per ton. 

Beans, good request, $2.00@$2.60 per ctl. Potatoes, 55c.@75c. per ctl. 

Butter IB firmer; Choice, 20c.@25c. : Fair, 16c.@17c. 

Cheese, light stock, 8c.@12c. Eggs, free supply, 16c.@l9c. 

Honey, Comb, 12c.@13c. ; Extracted, 6c.@7c. Poultry in good supply. 

Ouions are worth 50c.@75c. Beeswax is steady, at 20c.@21c. 

Fruit — all kinds dried — active. Fruit is very plentiful aud cheap. 

Hides are steady ; Dry, 6c@9c. Wool is in light demand at llc.@16c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6c. 

Coffee sluggish at 16c.@22c. for C. A. Cauned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal is plentiful; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 14c.@17c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at $42.50 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws aud Refined. White, 6c.(3K>9£c. 

Harvesting is now the order of the day. Vast quantities of 
hay have been gathered, and not a little of it found its way to 
market; in fact, the new hay has already crowded out the old 
stock. 

The harvesting of wheat and other cereals is now at its height, 
with a cheery outlook as to quantity and quality. 

Our fruit market for weeks past has been surfeited with 
Berries, Cherries, Apricots, etc. Fit's are now on sale of good 
quality, while Bananas, Limes, Lemons, etc., are in full supply. 
Oranges are in lessened stock and are more or less neglected. 
Watermellons are on the street stands and will soon be super- 
abundant, as well as other kinds of the mellon family. 

Our canners have had their fill of Tomatoes, and are now at 
work upon Apricots, contract sales of which have been made in 
quantities at one cent per pound. Cherries have for weeks past 
been superabundant, and the price very tempting to the canners. 
Peaches and Nectarines are now coming to the front, selling at 
comparatively low prices. 

Treasure. — The Pacific Mail steamship China, hence for the 
Orient on the 3rd inst., carried to Hongkong $160,650, chiefly 
silver; and to Hiogo, $30,100, same coin. The shipments of 
Treasure in June by sea aggregated $973,053, and for the past six 
months a grand total of $4,796,646. 

The steamship China, on the 3rd inst., carried to Hongkong 
3284 lbs. Ginseng, 170 cs. Canned Fruit, 8000 lbs. Provisions, etc., 
value $18,301, and for a wonder no Flour. To Japan, 1762 bbls. 
Flour, 1430 galls. Wine, 2433 lbs. Butter, 1650 lbs. Sugar, 50 bbls. 
Beef, etc., value $13,235. Elsewhere, Mdse. value $1375. 

The Pacific Mail steamship Acapulco, hence for the Isthmus 
and way ports on the 3rd inst., carried to Central America 2802 
bbls. Flour, 2296 ctls. Corn, 2734 lbs. Lard, 10,305 lbs. Malt, 11,635 
lbs. Rice, 9164 lbs. Beans, 315 cs. Beer, 2000 ealls. Wine, etc., 
value $3792; to Panama, 90 bbls. Flour, 2297 lbs. Rice, etc., 
value $418; to Ecuador, 1000 bbls. Flour, value $4100; to Mexico, 
60 fisks. Quicksilver, etc., value $4742. 

For Mexican ports — The steamer Newborn sailed hence with 
cargo valued at $35,746, consisting in part ot 150 bbls. Flour, 
3500 gals. Wine, 15,829 lbs. Coffee, 427 bales Hay, 50,000 lbs. 
Rice, 2170 lbs. Malt, 10,000 lbs. Beans, 50 csks. Beer, 28,412 lbs. 
Tallow, 12,764 lbs. Bread, etc. 

Hawaii — Bark Harvester, 23 days from Hilo, had for cargo 16,- 
326 bags Sugar; bk. S. C. Allen, 22^ days from Honolulu, had 
19,279 bags 8ugar; brig Lnrline, 20 ds. from Hilo, had 10,197 bags 
Sugar; bark Discovery, 10 ds. from Honolulu, had 10,470 bags 
Sugar; brig Consnelo, 16i ds. from Kahului, 6800 bags Sugar. 

Mexico — Schr. Ottillie Fjord. 73 ds. from Petalalco, had for 
cargo 950 Cedar and Mahogany Logs, 2300 Cocoanuts and 5 bales 
Deer Skins. 

The P. M.S. S. Acapulco, 21 ds. from Panama and way ports, 
had 400 sks. Cocoa, 2597 bags Coffee from South and Central 
America, and from Mexico 1521 cs. Limes and other Fruits, 1048 
bags Ore, etc., and 208 pkgs. Treasure, $101,724 63. 

Liverpool — The ship Susquehanna, hence on the 29th ult., had 
for cargo 2S.163 ctls. Barley and 55,457 ctls. Wheat, value $93,281, 
dispatched by Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 

The Commercial News and Shipping List, annual issue containing 
statistics for the past harvest year, is before us. It is an illus- 
trated paper, in book form, and is complete in all its varied de- 
partments, and is in every way creditable to its editors and pro- 
prietors. 

From this time forward we look for an active export trade in 
Cereals, by reason of low freights and exceedingly low prices for 
all Cereal Grains. 

Independence Day passed off without leaving a sad fire record, 
as customary. The city was in a measure depopulated, and busi- 
ness affairs suffered in consequence, but we now look for an 
active summer traffic. 



B-A-ITSriKIS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,300,000 

Southeast corner Bush aud Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE bo ' OMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia: Portland, Oregon; 

Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES— Kamloops, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, British 

Columbia. 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America: CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia: DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (West In dies)— Colonial Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVIN6S UNION. 

Northeast Corner California and Sansome Streets, 
Formerly Occupied by Bank of Wells, Fargo & Co. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1893 925,890,653 00 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 1,533,136 00 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland ; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for passbook or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. M.to3p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



N. W, Corner Sansome and Bush Streets. 

Established 1870. u. S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL [PAID UP) .21,500 000 

SURPLUS $700,000 , UNDIVIDED PROFITS 1185,000 

S. G. MURPHY. President J E, D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT.. .Vice-President | GEO. W.KLINE Ass t Cashier 

DXBECTORS: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins. 8. G. Murphy, 

N Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffltt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Bunk lug Business Transacted. 
S^FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p.m. 

MUTUAL SAVIN6S BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, (1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMBS PHELAN, 8. G. MDRPHY. : Vice-Presidents 

Directors — James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAMES A. THOMP8QN, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and. Sutter Sts. 

Sibscribed Capital $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $760,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street. London 

A6BNT8— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.).No. lOWaUSt.N. Y. PABI3— Messrs. Laiard Freres 4 Cie.l7Boule 
yard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

g^ggff*™- j Managers. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited, 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 700,000 

Hbad Office— 3 Angel i .ourt, London, E. C. 
AgentB at New York— J. A W. Seli man & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking tusiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
worlu. 3ends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART I Va „„ M „ 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.l Managers 
A. L. SELIGMAN. Caehiett. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street. San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND f 1,726,000 00. 

Deposits July 1, 1893 ... 3 1,428,984 37 

Ofticbbs— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President. EDW. KRUSE 
Second Vice-President. GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. MULLER. Board of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, 
George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Beck- 
er, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steiuhart. Attorney, John R. Jabboe. 



July 8, 1893. 



s\N i i:w> ism mays lettkh. 



21 



i5UNBEAMS?» 



rHE wiud just breathed it to the pine, 
Who shook her bead and sighed. 
And then she told it to the oak, 
Who said the wind bad lied. 
But, all the same, he told the ash, 
Who told the willow tree, 
And so it passed aloup the line, 
Until it came to me. 
I heard it from the speckled trout 
Who bad it from the pool, 
And this is how the story ran— 
Lati night the moon tra* full! 



Juipx. 



When Daniel Webster visited these parts for the purpose of de- 
livering his Bunker Hill oration, he was entertained at the house of 
a Charleston merchant. Tbis merchant was so embarrassed by the 
honor ot the great statesman's presence that be brought out not only 
one but several decanters of the best liquor he had in the bouse. Mr. 
Webster carefully searched out the vessel containing the brandy, 
and poured from'it a drink that to-day would be generally termed "a 
bath," and drank the liquor in -a few" complacent gulps. Tbe anx- 
iously obliging merchant inquired of Mr. Webster whetber he would 
not like a glass of water. The Senator looked up calmly, and in his 
most magnificent tones replied, urbanely: " I thank you, sir, but I 
am not thirsty." — Boston-Globe. 

Mrs. Innit (severely)— Clara, I heard Mr. Sampson kiss you last 
night as he left. You should not allow a man to kiss you until he 
is engaged to you. Grace Innit (in surprise) — Why, mother! What 
can you be thinking of? You don't suppose I would do anything so 
unladylike as to engage myself to Mr. Sampson when I am already 
engaged to Mr. Tompkins. —Puck. 

Will Getthere— Miss Howe, you know the language of flowers; 
do you find any bidden meaning in this simple little clover leaf? 
Annie Howe — A clover leaf? Let me see. One, he loves me; two, 
he loves me not; three, he loves me! Oh, Will, this is so sudden ! 

—Puck. 
*** 

Young Housewife— James, I want you to make a little garden for 
me out in the back yard. Young Husband— Going into amateur gar- 
dening? Young Housewife— Yes; I got some bird-seed this after- 



noon, and I'm going to try to raise some canaries. 



-Judge. 



Oldboy — When I play whist with a girl I can always tell when she 
holds the ace of trumps. Newman— How? Oldboy — I tell her that 
when she holds it her lover is thinking of her, and then I watch to 
see if she blushes as she picks up her cards. — Truth. 

* * 

Jobson — Why is young Vandyke Brown, the artist, seen in society 
so much of late? I thought people of his profession rather cut such 
things. Dobson — I fancy he is quietly making an economical study 
of the nude. — Town Topics. 

*"* 
Teacher— Willie, does your mother know that the buttons are off 
your coat. Willie— Yes'm, and she knows where they are, too. 
Teacher— Where are they? Willie— They are on father's trowsers. 

— Judge. 

* * 

She— For my part, I like to strive for a thing and win it, and not 
have it drop in my lap. Don't you agree with me, Mr. Dobson? 
He — Ye-es— unless it is the girl I am courting. — Judge. 

*** 

Tragedian (on the stage)— My soul longs for something higher and 
nobler than this base life can give. (Exit). Chase the duck again, 
Mike; I'm as dry as punk. — Truth. 

* * 

Jasper— I wonder why the dromedary has such a strange back I 
Jumpuppe— Probably because Noah made him hump himself when 
entering the ark. — Town Topics. 

*** 

Patient— You practice the faith-cure, eh? Physician— To some 
extent. Patient — Is it good for much? Physician — Oh, about two 
thousand a year. — Judge. 

Barker— Who, in your estimation, is the smartest man in public 
life? Billings (with dignity)— I do not aspire to public life. 

— Truth. 

Willie— Pa, did you ever see a white elephant? Bores (dejected- 
ly)— No, my son, but I own a steam yacht. —Town Topics. 

* * 

Mrs. Bridie— Did you taste any of that pudding I made for dinner? 
Mr. Bridie — Yes; I tasted it for six hours. — Puck. 

She — When my horse threw me this morning I saw stars. He — 
And I saw stripes, — Truth. 



The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artixtie feature of the NKWH LHTKB. are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pin« street. The Ann, which give par- 
Uiular attention to this line Of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in tbe West. They hnve far more than a local reputation, 
being widely know n as excellent artists and artis ans. 

Infi.amrd kybs and lids permaneutly cured If paused by defective &tgM. 
Consult, (free of charge) U. Muller, refractlou specialist. 135 Moutcomery 
street ^ 

BAISTKB. 



PEOPLES HOME SAVIN6S BANK. 

805 market Street, Flood Building, San Francisco, 4'al. 

ORGANIZED MAY, 1888. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 00 | Reserve and Profits . .. $49,000 00 

Capital Paid Up, in Gold 333,333 33 I Deposits, January 1, 1893. 2,066,000 00 
INTEREST PAID FROM DAY OF DEPOSIT. 
SAtE DEPOSIT BOXES 
For rent, monthly or yearly, from (4 to $20 per annum. Local and Foreign 
exchange issued at current rates. Money to loan on real estate and ap- 
proved collaterals. Open Saturday and Monday evenings. 

COLUMBU8 WATERHOU8E, President. 
J. E. FARNUM, Secretary and Manager. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3, 000, OOP 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Jan. 1, 1893) 3.276.486 60 

WM. ALVORD, President. ' ' ' '™ 

Thomas Brown Cashier | I. F. Moulton, 2d Assistant Cashier. 

S. Prentiss Smith, Asst. Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of The Bans: of California. BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank. LONDON— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. PARIS- 
MessrB. De Rothschild Freres. VIRGINIA CITY (Nev.)— Agencv of The 
Bank of California. CHICAGO— Union National Bank. ST. LOUIS— Boat- 
men's Bank. AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND— Bank of New Zealand 
CHINA, JAPAN andlNDIA-CharteredBankbflndia, Australia and China' 
Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world 
Draws direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankforton-Main, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai 
Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. ' 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 



Authorized Capital 
Reserve 



.$3,600,000 | Capital paid up 2,460,000 

490,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard St., E.C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1156 Pacific Avenue. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GU8TAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
ohange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

Capital ■ ■ ■ 81,850,000. 

Successor to Satheb & Co., Established 1861, San Francisco. 

J AMES K. WILSON President 

3. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Tin. P John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents : New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St.Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

John J. Valentine President. 

HOMERS. King Manager. 

H. Wadsworth Cashier. 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS:! 
John J. Valentine, Lloyd Tevis, Oliver Eldridge, Leland Stanford, James 
C. Fargo, Geo, E. Gray, W. F. Goad, Chas. F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner MarKet, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL (1,000,000. 

OIRECTOR8: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Jk. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH President. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

222 Montgomery St., MULs Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord Jerome Lincoln H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O.D.Baldwin A. K, P . Harmon, 



Adam Grant 



O. D. Baldwin 
W.S. Jones 



■J. B. Randol. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

NO. 18 Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



22 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

••THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, April 16, 189S, and 
until further notice. Boats and Trains will 
leave from and arrive at the San Francisco Pas- 
senger Depot, MABKET-8TBEET WHABP, as 
follows: 
From San Francisco for Point Tlburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40 A.M., 9:20 A. M., 11:20 A. M.; 

1:30 P. M., 3:80 p. M.,5:05 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 A.M., 9:80 A.M.. 11:00 a.m.; 1:30 

p. M. 3:30 p. Jt 5:00 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 
From San Rafael for San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:26 A. M., 7:55 A. M., 9:30 A. M. 

11:30 a. M., 1:40 p.m., 3:40 P.M., 5:05 P.M. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An extra trip at 6:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10a.m., 9:10 a.m., 11:10 a. h.; 1:40 

P.M. 3:40 P.M., 5:00 p M., 6:25 p. H. 
From Point Tlburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:50 A.M., 8:20 A. M., 9:55 A. M. ; 

11:55 A. M. ; 2:05 p. M., 4:05 P.M., 5:36 p. M. 

Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:40 A. M., 10:05 A. M., 11:35 a.m.; 

2:05 p. M., 1:05 p.m., 5:30 P.M., 6:55 P.M. 



LEAVBS.F. 


Dbbti'tion. 


ARRIVE IN B.F. 


Week 

DayB. 


Sundays 


SundayB 


Week 

Days. 


7:40a.m. 
8:30p.m. 
5:05 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
5:00p.m. 


Petaluma 

and 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a.m 
6:05 p.m 
7:30 p.m 


8:50a. M 
10:30 AM 
6:10p.M 






Fulton 

Windsor , 

HealdBburg, 

Cloverdale 

Pieta, 

Hopland 

and Ukiah. 








8:66a.m. 




7:40 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 


7:30p.m. 


10:30am 
6:10 pm 


















7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


Guerneville 


7:30p.m. 


10:30 am 
6:10 pm 


7:40 a. M.|8:00a.m. 
5:05 P.M. |5:00p.m. 


Sonoma andliO:40A.M.|8:50AM. 
Glen Ellen, 1 6:05p.m. |6:10pm. 


3:40 A.M | 8:00a.m. 
7:30 p.m | 5:00 p.m. 


Sebastopol. |10:40a.m|10;30a.m 
| 6:05p.m| 6:10p.m 



Stages connect at Hanta Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port and Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lake- 
port ; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sarato- 
Ea Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
ake, Lakeport, Willitts, Canto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Orr's Hot Springs, Westport, Usal, 
Hydesville and Eureka. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to 
Mondays— To Petaluma, ?1 50; to Santa Rosa, 
52 25; to Healdsburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, ¥4 50; 
to Hopland, $5 70; to Ukiah, $6 75; to Sebastopol, 
$2 70; to Guerneville, $3 75; to Sonoma, $150; 
to Glen Ellen, $1 80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only 
—To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $150; to 
Healdsburg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, 
$4 50; to Hopland, $3 80; to Sebastopol, $180; to 
Guerneville, $2 50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, 
$120. 
H. C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN. 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
nd 2 New Montgomery Street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S$, CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Belgic .Thursday, July 13, 1893. 

Oceanic (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Aug. 1, 1893 

Gaelic Tuesday, August 22, 1893. 

Belgic Thursday, Sept. 21, 1893 

ROUND TRIP TICKET8 AT REDUCED RATES 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at S. P. Company's General 
OfficeB, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets, San Francisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, 
San Francisco. 

T. H.GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO.H.RICE. Train cManager. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

,{ W . The splendid 3,000 

v^J^===s5j «S* ton stearQ ers of the 

<S*y^ fcT^fcv'.o Oceanic Steamship Co. 

£// «5t ^f' 6ail for HONOLULU, 

S>// ■tfSjifo \P AUCKLAND and SYD- 

\?NEYas under: 

For HONOLULU, 
S. S. -AUSTRALIA," 

July 6, 1893. 
For HONOLULU, 
APIA. AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY, S. 8. 
"MARIPOSA," July 
20, 1893. 
Forpaesageand freight 




S EVES 



apply to 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., 327 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Theough Line to New York, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 

America. 

SAILINGS— At noon. 

" S.S. "Colon," July 13, 1893. 

S. 8. "San Juan," July 24, 1893. 

S.S. "Colima," August 3, 1893. 

S. S. "San Jose," August 14, 1893. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 

AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc. : 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

S. 8. "Peru," Saturday, July 22. 1893, at 3 p. m. 

S, 8. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, Aug. 

10, 1893, at 3 p. m. 

8.8. "City of Peking," Thursday, Aug. 31, 1893 
at 3 p. m. 

8. S. "China," via Honolulu, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 
1893, at 3 p. m. 
Round TriD Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight "or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 
202 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COT 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m., June 4, 14, 19, 29. July 
5, 14, 19, 29. Aug. 3, 13, 18, 28. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
June 4th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo and 
Newport, every fourth and fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For ports in Mexico, 1st of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALX, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 




HOUSEHOLD 
REMEDY FOR PAIN. 

Mild, effective, contains no opium. 

Cures Neuralgia, Sciatica, La Grippe. 

Rheumatism, and all bodily pains. 
Warranted to Cure any Headache 
in 10 minutes. Sample and booksent 
FREE. Box containing 75 doses — 
Price 50 cts. — at druggists or by mail. 
PAINSFOE CHEMICAL CO., 87 College PI.,N.Y. 

BUTTERMILK 

TOILET SOAP 

Over 1,000,000 Ladies who 
have used it pronounce it 
the Best Soap in the World 

For the Complexion. 

Excels any 25c. Soap. Ask 
y> ur dealer for it. Full size 
sample, 12 cents. Beware 
of imitations. 

Cosmo Buttermilk Soap Go. 

84 Adams Stiibbt, CHICAGO. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL AMERICAN CATERER; 
1206 Slitter Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO 

IPILEPSY OR FITS 

Can this disease be cared? Most physicians say 
No— /say, Yes; all forms and the worst cases. Af- 
ter 30 years study and experiment I have found the 
remedy.— EpUepsy is cured by it; cured, not sub- 
dued by opiates— the old, treacherous, quack treat- 
ment. Do not despair. Forget past impositions on 
your pnrae, past outrages on your confidence, past 
failures. Look forward, not backward. My remedy 
is of to-day. Valuable work on the subject, and 
large bottle of the remedy— sent free for trial. 
Mention Post-Office and Express address. 
Prof. W. H. FEEKE, F. D., 4 Cedar St, New York. 




SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trams Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave I 



From June 10, 1893. I areive 



7 :00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 7:45p 
7:00 a Benlcia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento 6:45p 

7:30 A Haywards, Niles and San Jose *12:15 p 

— Niles and San Jose J6:i5p 

7 :30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and Santa Rosa 6 :15 p 

8 :00 a. Sacramento & Redding, via Davis 6 ;45 P. 
8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento. Marysville, Oroville, 

and Red Bluff . . 4:15 p 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Los Angeles 
Deming, El Paso, New Orleans, 

and East 8:45p 

*9:00 a Peters and Milton *8:45 p 

12:00 m Hay wards, Niles and Livermore.. 6:45 p 

*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00p 

1:30 p Vallejo and Port Costa 12:15 p 

3:00 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose . . . 9:45 a 
4:00p. Martinez, Stockton, Ramond(for 

Yosemite), and Fresno 12:15p 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 

Santa Rosa 9:45a. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Landing, 
Marysville, Oroville and Sacra- 
mento 10:15a. 

5:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 10:45a 

*5:00p. Niles and Livermore *8:45a. 

6:30p. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara and 

Los Angeles 9:15a. 

5 :30 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 9:15a. 

6:00p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

17:00 p. Vallejo f8:45 p. 

7:00 p. Oregon ExDress. Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 8:15a 

8:00 p. Castle Crag and Dunsmuir, via 

Woodland and Willows 7 :15 A. 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

17:45 a. Sunday Excursion for Newark, 
San Jose, Los Gatos, Felton and 

Santa Cruz 13:05 p. 

8:15a. Newark. Centervllle, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 p. 

*2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Almaden, Felion, Boulder Creek. 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *10:50a 

4:45 p. Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos. 9:50 a. 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets ). 
*7:00a. San Jose, Almaden and Way 

Stations *2:S0 p. 

J7:30 a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 

Grove, Principal Way Stations 18:33 p. 
8:15 a. San Jo8e,Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) and 

principal Way Stations 6 :26 p. 

19:30 a. Palo Alto and Way Stations- .. . J2:27p. 
10:40a. San Jose, and WayStations. .. . 6:06p. 
12:05 p. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 4:25 p. 
♦2:00 p. Menlo Park, San Jose, Gilroy, Pa- 
jaro, Castroville, Del Monte, Mon- 
terey and Pacific Grove .... *11:23a. 

*2:S0p. San Jose, Gilroy, TreB Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10:40a. 

*3:30 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions. *9:47a. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations *8:06a. 

5 J.0 p. San Jose and Way Stations 8:48 a. 

6:30p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6;35a. 

rll:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 

Stations f7:26 p. 

A. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. ^Saturdays only. 

tSundays only. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 



The family tutor was invited to a grand 
dinner party by his employers, and surveyed 
with intense satisfaction the half-dozen wine 
glasses arranged in front of his plate. The 
footman came round with the wine. The 
young man presented the smallest of the 
glasses. " It is vin ordinaire" observed the 
waiter. " Ah, precisely," replied our ascetic 
philosopher; "I am reserving the larger 
glasses for the finer sorts." 

— La Ghronique Bourgeoise. 

The Heiress — Yes, when I don't wish to 
accept certain men's attentions, and they ask 
where I live, I say in the suburbs. Mr. Self- 
sure— Hal Ha! Ha! Excellent! But where 
do you live, Miss Brown ? The Heiress — In 
the suburbs, Mr. Selfsure. — Life. 



July 8, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



23 



^5^^^^^^^®"^ 



ON K of the queerest cases that ever came before a court of law 
has just been heard by the Civil Tribunal of Compiegne, 
France. A young and pretty lady named 8imon put in a plea for 
divorce because of her husband's persistent neglect of his conjugal 
duties. She had. she said, been married to 11. Simon for more than 
two years, but he had been to her nothing more than a purely platonic 
husband. Maitre Marechaux, the counsel for M. Simon, protested 
strongly against the plaintiff's charges, and called the husband to 
prove that Mme. Simon had nothing to complain of, but had enjoyed 
all the rights of marriage. Madame Simon, however, insisted upon 
calling an expert in the person of Dr. Chevalier, who said that after 
fall examination he had come to the conclusion that the lady had 
real cause for complaint, and that she might still, if necessary, wear 
the orange blossom with pride and honor. So far there was nothing 
very extraordinary about the case; but the court was simply as- 
tounded when the lady added that she was a widow when she mar- 
ried M. Simon ; that she had been previously wedded to an old gentle- 
man named Durand, and that she had lived with him six months, but 
under exactly the same conditions. The court, in rendering judgment, 
said: " In such a delicate and truly mysterious case, they could not 
grant a divorce upon the unsupported testimony of Dr. Chevalier re- 
garding physiological facts." The plaintiff was therefore non-suited. 
Poor Madame Simon ! She is truly to be pitied— the victim of a suc- 
cession of misfortunes. 

Major Count von der Schulenburg, a very able cavalry officer, was 
recently appointed colonel and commander of the 10th Uhlans. It is 
the duty of an officer of superior rank to report himself in person to 
the Kaiser on promotion, and the new colonel appeared in the uni- 
form of the regiment in due course to announce to his Majesty in 
correct form the fact of his advancement. The Kaiser was attended 
by his aides-de-camp in waiting, and Colonel von der Schulenburg 
pronounced gravely, but with a certain amount of innate modesty, 
the set phrase, " Your Majesty, I announce myself," etc. When he 
had concluded the Kaiser, whose face was seen to be gradually be- 
coming more serious, responded almost sharply, " Your announce- 
ment is false." The gallant colonel was aghast, and looked as if he 
wished he were back with his old corps or anywhere except in the im- 
perial presence; while the aides-de-camp eyed one another, wonder- 
ing what was coming next. There was a dead silence, broke at last 
by his Majesty, who said, " Your announcement is false. I have ap- 
pointed you Colonel of the 1st of the Uhlan Regiments of the Guards 
at Potsdam," and then burst out laughing. The colonel was at once 
at his ease and happy at being given the command of this crack regi- 
ment. The fact was, this latter post had become vacant after the 
first appointment had been made, and the Sovereign had given it to 
the Count unknown to him, as a mark of special favor. 



The " Bear," at Hungerford. which stands on the great Western 
road between London and Bath, was sold on June 6. The "Bear" 
has of late years been chiefly known as the headquarters of the anglers 
who visit the town for its trout fishing, but it is chiefly notable as the 
house where on December 8, 1688, occurred the memorable interview 
between William, Prince of Orange, afterwards William III., and the 
Commissioners, Lord Halifax, Nottingham, and Godolphin, appointed 
by James II. to treat with the Prince, then on his march from Tor- 
bay to London. After the audience, which took place in an apart- 
ment still known as " the King's Room." the Prince retired to Little- 
cote. The State bedstead on which the Prince reposed, hung appro- 
priately with orange velvet, is preserved in the latter house— one of 
the most interesting specimens of an early Tudor mansion to be found 
in England. 

Seldom have so many historic properties come into the market in 
England as are now announced. Lord Revelstoke's mansion, Esher 
Place; Killeen Castle, in County Meath; and Hedingham Castle may 
be mentioned. Borde Hill, erected by Stephen Borde, Court physi- 
cian to Henry VIII. ; Potterspury Lodge Farm, including the old 
mansion house, once the hunting lodge of Charles II.; the Manor 
House, near Windsor, built in 1465, with memories of Queen Elizabeth 
and James I.; Coldham Hall, built by Ralf Rookwood, one of the 
Guy Pawkes conspirators; and Hengrave Hall, a fine Elizabethan 
mansion, dating from 1525, are offered for sale; while, coming to 
more recent times, Merton Abbey, Nelson's last residence, is to be 
let or sold for building purposes. 

To the World's Fair ! 
Are you going ? If so, it will be to your interest to call on or write 
to the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The SANTA FE 
ROUTE is the only line under one management from California to 
Chicago. The only line running Pullman Palace and tourist sleep- 
ing cars through to Chicago on the same train every day without 
change. Personally conducted excursions through to Boston leave 
every Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, "Chronicle" 
Building, San Francisco. 



Scott's Emulsion 

of cod-liver oil presents a 
perfect food — palatable, 
easy of assimilation, and 
an appetizer ; these are 
everything to those who 
are losing flesh and 
strength. The combina- 
tion of pure cod-liver oil, 
the greatest of all fat pro- 
ducing foods, with Hypo- 
phosphites, provides a re- 
markable agent for Quick 
Flesh Building in all ail- 
ments that are associated 
with loss of flesh. 



Prepared by Scott A Bowne, Chemists, 
New York, Sold by all druggiata. 




RUBBER 
HOSE. 

"GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST MADE. 
GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY, 

577-579 Market St., S. F. 
R. H. PEASE— managers— S. M. RUNYON. 

WHEW I 



IT IS HOT. 
WELL, YES, 

It Is that 

ROCK SPRINGS COAL 

which heats quicker and bakes and roasts better than any coal on the coast . 

Egg Size $9 00 Delivered. 

LumpSize $10 00 Delivered. 



HUSBAND & BROOKS, 



Telephone 989. 



No. 4 California Street. 



(ESTABLISHED 1862.J 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE, 

J. TOMKINSON, PROPRIETOR. 

Nos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna Street, between First acd Second. 

Through to Natoma Btreet, No8. 64, 66 and 68. One block from the Palace 
Hotel, also carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, corner Post and 
Stockton streets, San Francisco. Telephone No. 163. 

Fine turnouts kept especially for calling. Also rockaways, buggies and 
vehicles of every description at reduced rates. 

SYLVAIN SALOMON, 

IMPORTER OP 

EUROPEAN and ORIENTAL ART GOODS. 

BEST QUALITIES OF TEAS. 218 POST ST. 

J. R. SMITH, & CO., 

Merchant Tailors, 230 Bush Street, Mills Building, formerly 
under Occidental Hotel. 

THE CORK-FACED HORSE COLLAR. 

M M S 

Prevents the horse from having a sore or galled neck ; is cool and elastic 
and does away entirely with sweat collars. If your local saddlery shop 
does not have it, send your order to MAIN & WINCHESTER 214, 216, 218 
and 220 Battery street, San Francisco, Cal. Send for descriptive circular 




SAN FKANTISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8,1893. 



THE Latest systems of automatic time and date stamps, time de- 
tectors, time recorders and similar apparatus, have shown a 
niarfced increase of effectiveness. One of the best time stamps now- 
made is operated by a marine clock movement, and requires no at- 
tention beyond being wound once a week. It makes its impression 
clearly in plain type and straight lines, printing the exact date and 
time. It is absolutely automatic in setting dates for long and short 
mouths, even tor February in leap year. This instrnment is coming 

gen mal use in commercial houses which have large correspond- 

md every letter received is stamped with the date and mo. 
ment of receipt as it is opened. The stamp can also be used as a 
watchman detector. For this purpose it is made in two forms, one 
i the other for single stations. In the former the 
time stamp is placed wherever the employer finds it most conven- 
ient, and it can be electrically connected with as many stations as are 

* -<i. At a given station on his line the watchman inserts a key 

into a metal station box. This establishes an electrical connection, 

and a magnet operates the stamp and makes an impression, giving 

the number of the station, the date, and the exact time. As the key 

v 3 dials are advanced, one showing the number of the 

b and the other the number of the line, which serves as an ad- 
ditional check to the automatic record of the stamp. In connection 
with the numbering machine the time stamp is used in recording the 
movements of messengers, as, for example, in telegraph offices. 
When a messenger starts out, he slips his ticket into the gauge, and 
the number of the service, date, hour and minute are all registered. 

^is return he again stamps his ticket, and places it on record 
nz the time consumed can be ascertained at a glance. 

^—Americans are generally credited with having shown phenome- 
nal ingenuity in the invention of milking machines, but the latest 
candidate for honors in this branch of science is a Norwegian. In the 
machine which he has produced the mechanical milker has been de- 
:■:■ closely imitate the sucking functions of a calf's mouth, with- 
out cansing irritation to the cow. All four teats are milked simul- 
taneously by two pairs of elastic and feathering roller segments, 
which have n ----ng, approaching and receding movements. 

The teat3 ar-f . -;m the upper ends down to the bottom. 

The operator turns a handle, and the machine does the rest. The 
milk flows through a funnel into the milk can, and the operator can 
thna see when the cow is milked clean; that is to say, when no more 
milk flows. It is claimed that cows Like the process, and keep per- 
fectly - :he operation. It is also said that even in the case 
n with sore teats that the animals stand more quietly than 
when milked by hand, as the mechanical pressure is more even and 
•otter, and throws Less strain on the milking organs. It is obviously, 
too. an advantage, that the objectionable habit of dipping the hand 
into the milk, and the consequent liability to contaminate the milk, 
ia dispensed with entirely in the new milker. 

■^— mectric train-lighting apparatus is being introduced on the 
Northern Railway of France, six. eight or ten candle-power lamps 
being used according to the class of the compartments. Each car 
earriea its own independent battery of sixteen storage cells inclosed 
- :oden boxes, four of which are attached to 
the longitaidmai frames or the car in such a manner as to be readily 
accessible. Commutators and switches placed outside the car enable 
all the necessary connections to be made easily. The lamps are 
supplied with bright, white-enameled reflectors, fitting into the ordi- 
nary oil lamp globes, with covers so arranged that oil lamps may be 
miiilini i d for the electric lights 3 desired. A number of these 
tarn cfcca are now running on the express trains between Paris and 
ind it will be interesting to watch their history and compare 
•£ing with the system, outlined recently, now in 
i of oar American railway cars. The French road has 
? about two years with these lights already, and a 
t of storage batteries has been made on one of 
the Swiss roods for more than a year past. 




. . - -.-£- 

"■ ' - 
eni a i - 1 1 

I - . - on 



THE.EE AN-D ONE-HALF DATS TO THE WORLD'S 

—We take pleasure in advising the readers of the 

the C"3TXOS PACIFIC is the most 

i ~d quickest line from 3an Francisco and all points 

ia Calfnmia to the WORLD'S FAIR. 

LINE running Pullman 3 ia:est im- 
aa agwad v esabnled Drawing-Room, Sleepers and Dining 
■a Francisco to Chicago without change, and only one 
-' - ~ *£ or Boston. 

■"* 3 MMm P um ***■ *■* ~^ **** PACIFIC leave San 
rery Thnr sday for Chicagc New York and Boston in 
:~~r --. "e-l . . -.\ -..-- - _ »XTOtfaeB p , «*ffHwl Btteotiaa 
~ ---- --- - -""- " r=:„iz ilone. 

---> to and from ail p m Earope. 

'(■Hfe Fair and ail points east, and for Sleep- 
er address D. W. Hitchcock, Gen- 
■ I Montgomery street, San 



.::z _- \c:z : 




BEEF 



pi:i«l:H 



PRICE sec. pint Let those wta have 
pale faces trv it. It is A GREAT RES- 
TORATIVE TONIC that acts upon the 
blood immediately. 

Be Sure You Cet BURNHAM'S. 
Our formula is a secret. No other is 

'just as .pod." All grocers sell it. 

Slx K pine bottles expressed Ete SljO. Send 
stamps for book— ■• Hooseaold HI:: 
E. 3. BTTR5HA3C CO.. 120 Gansevoorc St.. S.T. 




SLATE BURIAL VAULTS. 

Are recommended by every person who sees them. They are proof 
against dampness, rodents and reptiles: are portable to ship to any part 
of the country. Are cheaper than brick and can be put la place by ordinary 
workmen. Slate Is im- 
perishable by nature, 
and has greater strength 
than any other stone . A p- 
ply to B.F ROBERT 
SOS, Pacific Coast Agent, 
Los Gratos, CaL N. CLAfiK 
A SONS, 17 and 19 3pear 
St., San Francisco. 

Telephone 771. 

CANCER. 

THE KOEHXEB CANCER CUBE CO., 7G8 FULTON St.. 3. F. 

C-lnchb, Tumors or malignant growths removed without knife or cans 
■Ac. a :-""aJ.a_7ZZ: : "RE a specialty Call or send for circular. Over 
M aakcess pasBBned hi ilanaal bi an : — se Bsasal bbbb Ibbb 

PHILIP K0EHLEB, Manager. 

PRIVATE HOS.PITA.i_, largest, oldest, best tox- 
nished and moat complete in the State. Snlphnr, B -idslan, steam and any 
kind of medicated bath for ladies and zentlemen. The largest and health- 
i sl& city. 525 to 5-28 Paeinc Street, between Kearny and 
Mo Di£omery. 

Dr. A. S. and Mrs. Dr. Cook, 

CANCER, TUMOR AND ECZEMA SPECIALISTS. 

OFFICE— 222 POST STREET. 

DR. THOMAS L. HILL, Dentist, 

OFFICE— ODD FBLtOWS" HCTXDEW, 3. W. Corner Seveath and 

Market Streets. 
Ofvtcb Houas: 9 a. a. w 3 ?. a. Consultation Hoars: 4 to 5. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

306 Barfcet Street Pnelan Bn tiding.) 

Gaa Specialists. Originated the oae of Pure Nitrons Oxide Gaa for pois- 
dvely extracting teeth without pain. "Colton Gas" has aa established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for ita parity, emcacy and perfect safety 
la all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1363. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and pirrsiciaas. Also performs 
all operations In dentistry. 

DE. CHA3XE8 W. DECKES 

MOTHERS. 

- <V(R T<\ POWPEBS «re a speedy and harmlem cure for 
morning sickness. One boi will be sufficient to cure the moat trouble- 
some case. PRICE. $2 per box. Address, 

SAMARITAN POWDER CO, 

P. O. Box 91 Oakland, CaL 

TTBXSS; KSStSEDT. LAW-OFFICE, ROOM 56. MTTRPEY BCTLMSS. 
r tag Mj_aSET 3TE2ET. 3A2? FRA^CI3CO. CAL. 



_l 



8, 1893. 



SAN FRAWISCO NKW8 T.KTTKR. 



<£& R^PCRtS 

A B stated in this column daring tbe put few weeks, tbe real 
estate market bolds firm with improving prospect?. Theont- 
look for autumn business is very good. Tbere continues to be a 
good demand for income property, and tbe past two weeks bas 
shown an increased desire on tbe part of investors for that class 
of property. Building improvements continue unabated, and tbe 
residence portion of tbe city seems particularly rich in owners 
who are improving tbeir lands by erecting good booses thereon. 
Small holders, and those thrifty people who seek tbe aid of the 
loan Associations increase, rather than diminish in numbers, and 
the agents therefor are confident that August and September will 
see a development in business. 

Although it is rather premature to refer to tbe probable effect 
upon real estate values of tbe proposed Midwinter Fair in this 
city, agents and owners fully appreciate the benefits to be de- 
rived by tbem from sach an exposition. All the leading real 
estate firms are enthusiastic in tbeir support of the Fair. 

Thomas Magee gives a very interesting review of tbe real estate 
business in tbe city for the first half of tbe year, wbicb is well 
worth reproducing: "The total number of city real estate sales 
made in the first half of this year was 2350, of the total value of 
$8,177,813, against 2180 sales in the last half of 1892, of the value 
of $11,160,692, and 2778 sales, of the value of $9,358,263, in the 
first half of 1892. In comparison with the last half of 1892, this 
shows an increase in the number and a decrease in the amount 
of sates made. This means that there were more small sales 
made in 1893 than in the last half of 1892, when rich men bought 
heavily in wholesale property, and there were more large sales 
made, thus swelling tbe amount of the half year's sales. This 
year the rich have stored their millions in the savings banks, and 
the middle classes have been buying. This is especially true of 
last month, when the poor have been withdrawing their savings 
and investing them in lots or in homes. Another reason for the 
large number of small sales is that many who bought in 1889-'90 
on the installment plan, are getting their deeds now. The sav- 
ings banks have been paying so high a rate of interest on de- 
posits that the moneyed class preferred to have the banks do 
their financiering rather than invest in any enterprise involving 
risk and worry. At the beginning of this year money was tend- 
ing downward. Country borrowers were numerous. In the 
month of January there were 329 mortgages taken, amounting to 
$1,210,093, and 269 releases, amounting to $1,377,040. During 
February money still accumulated in bank, but no general re- 
duction was made except on a few large and very choice loans, 
when money was loaned at 6J per cent. There were 322 mort- 
gages recorded, of the total value of $1,198,751, and 212 releases 
of mortgage, of the aggregate value of $794 430. There was good 
demand for money from the country during this month. In the 
month of March there was an increase in the number and amount 
of mortgages above the totals of both January and February. 
The number of mortgages made was 458, of the total value of 
$1,679,017, and 284 releases, of the value of $896,413. Although 
interest was tending downward during April, no reduction was 
made. Interior borrowers were clamoring for a reduction, and in 
many cases concessions were made to tbem. In April 414 mort- 
gages were recorded, of the value of $1,453,290, and 240 releases, 
amounting to $717,012. There were 400 mortgages, of the value 
of $1,729,985, recorded in May, and 177 releases, of the total value 
of $915,181. There was an abundance of money in the banks, 
but the demand for it was light. In the month just passed very 
little money was loaned. Large sums were loaned out at 6J per 
cent. During the latter part of the month hardly any money was 
loaned by the banks, and it is safe to say very little will be 
loaned for a while. Any loans that are made will be at 7 per 
cent as the minimum. The total number of mortgages recorded 
for the pasi six months was 2261, of the value of $8,868,000, and 
1372 releases of mortgage, of the total value of $5,643,861." 



Mr. S. H. Conklin writes from ML Carmel, Coun.: 
" Enclosed please find check for your bills of May 2d and 12ch. I 
repeat the gratification I expressed before as to the convenience, the 
economy, and the real artistic beauty the National Lead Company's 
Pure White Lead Tinting Colors have proved to me in using them. 
It would seem as if the old way of" trying to produce the de- 
sired shade of colors by mixing many colors together with much 
labor and guess-work must be abandoned in favor of your economi- 
cal, sure and easy method. My painters wish to introduce their use 
in an adjoining town, aud want a cou ple of your books as guides." 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, Mills Build- 
ing, 218-220 Montgomery street. Special attention giveu to the col- 
lection of rents. Full charge taken of property for absent owners. 

For Wedding Cakes, Charlotte Russe, Ice Cream, fine Cakes and 
Pastry, go to Page & Falch's Restaurant and Bakery, corner Mason and 
Turk streets, junction of Market. 

A fine assortment of large round English shell Pebbles, only at Muller's 
1S5 Montgomery street. 



Unlike the Dutch Process 

No Alkalies 

— OR — 

Other Chemicals 

are used In the 
preparation of 

W. BAKER & CO.'S 

reakfastCocoa 

which is absolutely 
pure and soluble. 

j It has morethan three times 
I the strength of Cocoa mixed 
■ with Starch, Arrowroot or 
_ r Sugar, and is far more eco- 
nomical, costing less than one cent a cup. 
It Is delicious, nourishing, and easily 

DIGESTED. 

Sold byGrorers everywhere. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mats. 




R. LIDDLE & CO., 



Formerly of No. 538 Washington street, San Francisco, have removed to 
No. 110 Montgomery street, under Occidental Hotel. Sole Agents for W. 
& C. Scott & Son, W. W. Greener, Lefever Arms Co., I. C Smith, Parker 
Bros., Ithaca, Baker and Remington Shotguns. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Send Three-cent Stamp for Catalogue. 



RENTS! 



Our House Renting Department is one of 
the best equipped in the city. We guarantee 
prompt and efficient service in renting 
nouses, collecting rents and placing insur- 
ance. 

BALDWIN k HAMMOND, 

10 Montgomery St. 



REALTY 



be without it. 



A HOME3EEKERS AND INVESTORS' JOURNAL- 
Reports of everything relating to laud from fiity 
towns in Southern California. No boom articles, 
but a conservative, honest record of progress 

Los Angeles office, 136 S. Broadway. Send $2 for 
a year's subscription, and begin with volume— out 
in July. This is the only publication of its char- 
acter. Persons interested in land cannot afford to 
Address correspondence to Edgar F. Howe, Redlands, Cal. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the above named 
Company will be held at the office of the company, Room 33, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday. Ju y 1 0, 1 893, (second Monday in July) at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. 

Transfer books will close on Friday, July 7, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



m 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS, 
BUILDING PAPERS, 
ROOFING AND PAINTS. 



PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 116 Battery St. 

George Goodman, 

—Patentee and Manufacturer of— 

ARTIFICIAL STONE in all its branches. 

Schillinger's Patent Side Walk and Garden Walk a specialty. 
Office, 307 Montgomery St., Nevada Block S- F. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893. 




FROM a society standpoint San Francisco has been little better 
tban a howling wilderness this week, and the different fash- 
ionable resorts the gainers by the cily'a loss. From far and near 
conies news of gay doings in celebration of the nation's birthday, 
the prolonged holiday making it to be more thoroughly enjoyed 
than for many years past. Society has not confined itself t ) any 
one or two localities this year, but has scattered itself, so to Bpeak, 
all over the State, each one choosing the place most pleasing to 
them without thinking— or caring, possibly — who else would do 
likewise. The tennis tournament drew an immense crowd to the 
courts at San Rafael, <tnd though possibly the enthusiasm mani- 
fested in former years was not so intense, the games were 
watched with keen interest, and the new champion, Dritcoll, 
greeted with cheers and applause at the finish. There were 
pretty maids and matrons in abundance, and beaux without stint 
at each day's games, and the dances that followed at the Hotel 
Rafael. One of the attractions of the Fourth was the presence of 
His Grace of Newcastle, who appeared upon the court long 
enough to allow the assembled throng to see what a real live 
British Duke looked like. One of the pleasant pastimes have 
been drives to the Country Club grounds; otheis include bowl- 
ing, billiards, sailing on the bay and exchanging ■visits with the 
numerous campers in the vicinity. Among the entertainments 
this week were the yachting party arranged by E W. Newhall, 
Judge Ward McAllister's dinner at the Hoiel Rafael, and dances, 
luoches and teas literally tco numerous for special mention. It 
will be pleasing news to hear that Saturday evening hops are 
hereafter to be the rule during the rest of the season. 

The yachts were the chief attraction of the Fourth at Santa 
Cruz. Receptions and dances were given the yachtsmen at the 
Sea Beach and Ocean House on Tuesday evening, and the presen- 
tation of the Loring Cup to Captain John Spreckels of the Lurtine, 
the winner of the yacht race, was one of the pleasant events of the 
week. There were dances, drives, fishing, open air concerts, teas 
on the beach, yachting, musicalea. a brilliant reception given by 
Mrs. McLaughlin at Golden Gate Villa, lunches and candy pulls. 
Moonlight beach parties were the fad last week, several of them 
ending with a dance in the bath-bouse to the music of mandolins 
and guitars. Mrs. Dtlujas had a large party down from the city 
for the Fourth, her guests including Miss Nellie Murphy, Ed. 
Sheldon and C. H. Mcintosh. The death of Mr. John R. Jarboe 
caused the doors of one hospitable cottage to remain closed, and 
the sad reason for the absence of the Jarboes from 8anta Cruz, 
where they have of late years been among its foremost entertain- 
ers, cast quite a damper upon the spirits of their friends, 



Castle Crag has had a long list of guests there during June, 
among them being the Irving Scotts, W. Greer Harrisons, Charles 
Holbrooks, Mrs. Hort and Mrs. Boardman, Mrs. Voorbies and 
her daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Horace L. Hill, Miss Mamie Burling, 
Mrs. H. M. A. Miller, Rev. J. K.. and Mrs. McLane, Mrs. Chris. 
Reis, Mrs. Mike Castle, Mrs. L. S. Adams, Miss Adams, Mrs. 
Knowles, Mrs. Daniel Hanlon and the Misses Han'on. 



The pleasures of Del Monte are well-known, and v ere the male 
sex there more numerous the dances would be more enjoyed. The 
Fourth drew quite a contingent from town and the vicinity to 
the holiday ball, which came off 6o Monday evening, and picnics 
have been tolerably numerous during the week. Grand displays 
of fireworks have been made a feature at nearly all our resorts 
this year, and the insignificant firecracker has made itself an ob- 
ject of terror at more than one of them. They caused the festivi- 
ties of the 4th at Sausalito to have a most disastrous termination, 
and the pity of it is that residents in wooden walls are compelled 
to take such fearful risks that others may evince their patriotic 
feelings on the birthday of our nation. Each recurring holiday 
only strengthens the knowledge of our madness, and the wish 
that some less dangerous way of working off our superfluous 
steam might be invented. 

But although it may be dull in every olher line of festivity, 
weddings continue to take place and are almost the only '-gay 
doings" indulged in just now. Cards have betn issued by Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward H. Coe for the marriage of their daughter Alice 
and John H. Fallon on the evening of Tuesday, the 18th. 

Certainly the most romantic wedding of the summer season 
was that of Miss Lettie Woods and Frank McNear, which took 
place last Monday, on board the old battle-ship Hartford, notable 
as having been tbe vessel in which Admiral Farragut made his 
attack on New Orleans. The young bride, an Oakland belle, in 
company with tbe friends she was visiting at Vallejo, and the 
prospective groom and party, were making a tour of the Navy 
Yard that day, when tbe thought struck one of the party that an 
original idea would be to have tbe wedding (arranged for the 



evening on shore) take place on the old ship. 8o Captain Howi- 
son's permission was obtained, Rev. W. L. Case, the Baptist 
minister from Vallejo secured, and the wedding party proceeded 
to the Hartford, where, in front of the mast to which the gallant 
Admiral was lashed, the nuptial knot was tied. The happy couple 
stood under the requisite bell, this time not of flowers, but be- 
longing to tbe ship, and which was so realistic in its effect, the 
fire tag responded to the ringing and tbe bridal party came near 
having a flood of water poured upon them, which might have 
been a damper on the general hilarity of the occasion. Tbe news 
of the novel affair getting round the Navy Yard, steam whistles 
and bells were set going lo render a greeting to the bride and her 
party as they came over the side of the old ship, and they left the 
Yard amid showers of rice and good wishes. Mr. and Mrs. 
McNear took the afternoon boat for San Francisco, and later 
started on a tour of the Southern counties and the East. Dpon 
their return from tbe honeymoon trip they will reside in this city. 

Two approaching weddings in London, Eng., are of interest in 
San Francisco, inasmuch as by them San Francisco society will 
be deprived of two of our former belles, of whom, though it haa 
not seen much during the past two years, society has regarded as 
belonging to it. Mrs. Ruth Holladay Blackwell will become 
Mrs. Brooke on the 17th, and on Thursday, the 20th, her sister, 
Miss Louise Holladay, will be married to Allen E. Mesmer, at 
St. Mary Abbott's Church, Kensington, London. It has of late 
years been the intense desire of Miss Louise to be mistaken for 
an Englishwoman, ao her happiness may be considered complete 
when she will, by marriage, be transformed into one. Though a 
residence in British Guinea may not be tbe most desirable in tbe 
world, it being her prospective husband's abiding place, she will 
no doubt "make herself at home" there speedily. 

Recent weddings include the nuptials of Miss Mary Martha 
Fisher and Dr. Hugh McClelland, which were celebrated at Grace 
Church last week, tbe Rev. Dr. Foute officiating. Miss Kiltie 
O'Connor was sole bridesmaid, and Frank H. Belcher beet man. 
The bride wore her traveling dress of pearl grey crepe de chine, 
with a coquettish bonnet to correspond, and directly after tbe 
wedding breakfast at the home of the bride's father, the happy 
pair left town for a honeymoon trip. In Oakland, Miss Hattie 
Cox and C. W. Cappleman were wedded last week, tbe ceremony 
taking place at the Chnrch of the Advent, where the Rev. Dr. 
Lathrop tied the nuptial knot. Tbe bride was attended by Miss 
Emma Crocker as maid-of-honor, wee Ethel Oaks playing the 
part of flower bearer and Gage Johnson that of best man to the 
groom. 

A very pretty wedding was the recent one at the Church of the 
Advent, when the rector, Rev. John Gray, married Miss Mabel 
C. Parker and R. Curtis Ross. The fair bride, accompanied by 
her mother, Mrs. Apestus Work, of Lowell, Mass., came all the 
way from the East to be married to the man of her choice, and 
the groom, being a foremost and energetic member of the Advent 
Church, the others all united in evidencing their appreciation by 
doing all in their power to make the affair a brilliant one. Tbe 
decorations of tbe church were elaborate and beautiful; masaes of 
white flowera and feathery ferns were uaed in trimming the altar, 
screen and altar rails, the many gas jets of the altar adding to the* 
effect. It was an afternoon wedding, and promptly on time the 
ceremony took place. The groom and his best man, Elmer Chal- 
oner, were in the chancel when tbe choristers of the church ap- 
peared, chanting tbe bridal hymn. Then came the ushers, Messrs. 
Charles Iredale and Theodore Erleu, followed by the maid of 
honor, Miss May Sproston, and then the charming young bride, 
leaning upon the arm of the Rev. H. B. Monges, assistant minis- 
ter of the Advent, who acted as parent iu giving the bride into 
the groom's keeping. Mrs. Work, the mother of the bride, waa 
escorted by Mr. John Allaire. Arrived at the altar, tbe ceremony 
waa impressively performed by Mr. Gray, amid a subdued peal of 
harmony from tbe organ, which at the conclusion of the service 
broke into the joyoas wedding march as the bridal cortege pro- 
ceeded down tbe aisle to their carriages. The breakfast was held 
at the new house of the bappy couple, wliere a few intimate 
friends joined them in the repast. Toasts were drank and good 
wishes offered. The bride's gown was of creamy silk, made en 
traine, trimmed with costly lace and white roses. She carried a 
white prayer-book, which was used in the service by tbe officia- 
ting clergyman. The bridesmaid's costume was of blue cr6pe, 
made in the Empire style, and her hand-bouquet bright pink 
roses. The wedding gifts were numerous, and very valuable. 



There was a number of relurns to town yesterday from Del 
Monte; Mr. and Mr. Alvord and tbe Lent-Hooker party were 
among them. Mrs. A. E. Head came up from Menlo Park; Mrs. 
Peter Donahue and Mrs. Martin arrived from the East last Tues- 
day. Dr. and Mrs. O. O. Burgess are looked for to day, and early 
next week will see the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. George Pope, nee 
Taylor, who have been abroad ever Bince their marriage, accom- 
panied by Miss Carrie Taylor, fresh from an EaBtern achool. 
Thoae legal lighta, Reub Lloyd and Judge W. T. Wallace, are 
among this week's arrivals from their vacation trips East and to 
the World's Fair. 



Julv B. 1803. 



BAN PRANCI8CO NEWS LKTTER. 



27 



The new quarters of the Merchants' Clob will be open for In- 
spection this afternoon. Tbey are on the seventh and eighth 
floors of I be new building of the Mutual Life Insurance Com pan y, 
at the sontheast corner of California and Sansome streets, and 
bare been handsomely fitted up, at a cost of several thousand 
dollars. Lancb will be served for the first lime on Monday. The 
clob bas been in existence since 1878, and now has 300 memher?. 
Its otHcers are as follow*: President, \V. B.Harrington; Vice- 
President. EL D. Laidlaw: Treasurer, Samuel Bussman: Secre- 
tary. W. K. Erzgraber; Directors, Grove P. Ayrea and 0. W. Co- 
burn. 



Among the announced engagements of the week are those 
of Ms* Sarah Merriman and Mr. Harry Thomas, of Oakland, 
and of Miss Pauline Aueroack and Nat Raphael. The latter will 
bold congratulatory receptions, to be held to-morrow and on 
Wednesday next, at the home of the bride, on Post street. 

Mrs. J. L. Poole expects to leave for Castle Crag about the 
middle of this month to join her sister, Mrs. Favre, who preceded 
her to the mountain? last week. 8ociety will lose this charming 
lady for the coming season, as it is Mrs. Poole's intention to 
spend the winter at New York city. Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Kip and 
their daughters go to San Mateo to-day for the rest of the season. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Spreckels were among the guests whom 
Mrs. C. O. Alexander has been enter;aining at ber cottage in San 
Mateo. Tbey have since gone to L>el Monte, where they will 
spend several weeks. Mrs. F. H. Tyler and her three pretty 
daughters have divided their time between the Napa Soda Springs 
and the White Sulphur Springs, at which latter place they spent 
the 4th of July. Mr. and Mrs. Nat Messer are among the guests 
at Ben Lomond. 

The Duke of Newcastle, accompanied by Mr. Gambier Bolton, 
sailed on the Australia last Thursday for Honolulu, whence he 
will continue his travels to Japan and India. 



Mr. W. B. Chapman will leave New York city for Europe on 
the 12th inst. 



Prof. Samuel Adelstein has returned from his vacation trip to 
Alaska. 

The San Mateoites are happy in having 
Judge and Mrs. Hayne domesticated with 
them again after quite a long absence, and 
the promise that tbey will remain there 
at leaBt until the return of Mrs. Parrott 
from Europe, which will be some time in 
August. 

The next few weeks will bring several 
acquisitions to our young society, notably, 
Miss McBean, Miss Julia Crocker, Miss 
Carrie Taylor and Miss Ella Morgan, and 
we shall also have some losses in the 
Misses Eyre, Alice Simpkins, Minnie 
Houghton and Bessie Shreve. The two 
latter young ladies purpose leaving us 
early next month, and will remain on the 
otber side of the continent until the win- 
ter, if not longer. Miss Alice Shawban is 
one of the recent additions to the number 
of maidens of whom San Francisco is so 
justly proud. Miss Shawhan has been an 
absentee for several years past, traveling 
and studying in Europe and the East, but 
will now remain here, and is with her 
brother, W. D. Shawhan, at the Berk- 
shire, 

Among the city's distinguished visitors 
this week are the Roman Catholic prelate, 
Mons. Satolli and party, who leave for the 
East next Tuesday. 

News from absentees tells us that Mrs. 
Monroe Salisbury has been enjoying her- 
self greatly in Washington City, where she 
accompanied her husband on his last visit 
to the Nation's Capital; that James 
Burling has reached England from New 
York; John Mackay, Jr., has arrived in 
London in time to take in the Royal nup- 
tials; Mr. and Mrs. W. Keith are at Paris; 
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Bancroft are at New 
York; Miss Jennie Catherwood, with ber 
sister, Mrs. La Montague, at Westchester; 
Mr. and Mrs. James Otis enjoying the de- 
lights of Gotham; Mrs. John Boggs and 
Miss Alice Boggs spending the summer at 
Bar Harbor, Me.; Mr. and Mrs. Tim Hop- 
kins and family, and Mr. and Mrs. 
McBean were at Chicago early in the 
week, bound West. 



John 0. Maynard died at his San Mateo residence last Friday 
afternoon, after a lingering Illness caused by dropsy. He was a 
native of Richmond, Va , and was about (13 years of age. He 
rame lo California early In the liftles, but In 1802 he returned t<< 
Virginia, where he became a quartermaster in the Confederate 
army. He returned to this State at the close of the war, and en- 
gaged in mining speculations. During Cleveland's lirst term he 
was appointed cashier of the sub-Treasury under General Brooks. 
His second wife, who survives him, was a Miss Hetb, sister of 
General Heth, of the Southern Confederacy. The Maynarde are 
very well and popularly known throughout the State. 

The San Mateo Country Club, now In process of formation, 
promises to be one of the best of the clubs in the State. It will 
lease the shooting and fishing privileges of the Spring Valley 
Company, and in order to ensure to its members that no outsiders 
will be allowed to hunt or fish on the reservation, three mounted 
patrolmen will constantly pass over the sacred territory. The 
Sharon lake and the bunting grounds adjacent to it will also come 
under the management of the club. The new club has rented 
two of the new cottages now being erected at Burlingame, 
where headquarters will be maintained. Special attention will be 
devoted to the supply of goods for the pleasure of the inner man. 
The committee in charge consists of J. L. Ratbbone, W. H. How- 
ard, W. H. Crocker, J. B. Casserly, Hall McAllister, John Parrott 
and Harold Wheeler. The first meeting of the new club was held 
at Burlingame last Saturday. 

Mr. George a. Low is paying 8an Francisco a vi c it, on bus-i 
ness only this time; Mr. and Miss Low remained at their country 
home on the Atlantic seaboard during his absence on the Pacific 
Coast. 

The Sausalito fire seems to have had no appreciable effect upon 
business at the Ei Monte ±iotel. It has its usual large number of 
visitors, all of whom are enjoying themselves immensely at this 
pleasure resort. The El Monte is the most beautifully situated 
and most popular place within easy reach of the city. It is only 
half an hour from this city, and can be visited half a dozen times 
a day, upon any of the steamer trips. It affords unexampled 
opportunities for fishing, boating, bunting, riding and other 
sports. 



Wemembet 

In all cooking receipts calling for Baking 
Powder, or Cream of Tartar and Soda, 

Dr. Price's 
Cream Baking: Powder 

Will give better results. Simply use one teaspoonful of Dr. 
Price's Cream Baking Powder to each pint of flour, or in 
the proportion of two teaspoonf uls to every pound of flour. 
How to avoid Alum and Ammonia Baking Powders: 
First, All powders offered at twenty-five cents or less a 
pound can safely be discarded as Alum, for a Pure Cream of 
Tartar Powder cannot be sold at such price. 

Second, Avoid all brands labeled "Absolutely Pure," 
Chemical analysis, as revealed by the Scientific American report, 
proved that brands so labeled contained, in every instance, 
either Ammonia or Alum. The first aim of a dishonest man- 
ufacturer is to deceive by his label. 

J)r* firm'* 
€team flaking ftotuWr 

not only does finer and better work, but its purity has never 
been questioned. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1893. 



The Hotel Mateo bad a very large contingent of guests during 
the holidays. Its popularity increases with its age, and it is now 
the popular place with a number of the Four Hundred. The 
Mateo is delightfully located, and a visit to it is productive of 
much pleasure. 

Morgan Hill left for N*w York last Wednesday, en route to 
Europe. Mr. and Mrs. John Kilgariff have gone on a trip to 
Yosemite. 

John R. Jarboe, senior member of the law firm of Jarboe & 
Jarboe, died at his residence, 917 Pine street, on the 4th inst. 
Mr. Jarboe had been a resident of this city for many years. He 
was a native of Maryland. His fam.ly is very well known in 
society circles. 

Mrs. W. H. Keith of this city, accompanied by her daughter, 
Miss Eliza D. Keith, the » Di Vernon" of the News Letter, have 
gone to Philadelphia and Washington. Before returning to Cali- 
fornia they will visit Boston, and remain for some time in Chi- 
cago while en route for San Fraucisco. 

Miss Eleanora Connell , who has been enjoying herself for some 
weeks past at the World's Fair, will return to San Francisco about 
the middle of July. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rod Church have returned from Haywards. 

Mrs. O. F. Willey and Mrs. Jennie Poultney have returned 
from a trip to Niles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Overacker, who have been the guests of 
Dr. Luella Cool, have returned to Niles. 

Mrs. Sarah Farr, of Minneapolis, has returned from Yosemite 
and started for the World's Fair. 

Miss Rachel Pope is the guest of Mrs. Haywards of Haywards. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Mrs. Carmichael-Carr has returned from an extended trip to 
British Columbia, during which she was the recipient of unusual 
social attentions, a recognition of her personal and artistic stand- 
ing equally gratifying to the gifted artiste herself and to the city 
whose musical reputation she bas done so much to enhance. 

Miss Carrie L. Gould has returned after a year's visit at the 
principal Eastern cities. 

Dr. Hammond recommends, as a certain cure for chronic indiges- 
tion and dyspepsia, chewing Adams' Pepsin Chewing Gum after each 
meal for half an hour. 



IF you are going to the country, do not fail to bring with you a 
supply of the handsome stationery that may be procured at 
Sanborn & Vail's, at 741-743 Market street. This house has the 
largest and most varied stock of the best stationery in the city. 
Get your note paper there. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the sixteenth day of June, 1893, an assessment. No. 18, of Ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice of the company, room 58, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Eighteenth Day of July, 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on SATURDAY, the 5th day of August, 1893, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of tbe Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 58, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETIN6. 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Cousoli 
dated Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 
room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, Cal., on 
Monday, the 17th day of July. 1893, at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M. 
for the purpose of electing a board of directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Friday, July 14, 1893, at 3 p. m. 

CHARLES C. HARVEY, Secretary. 
Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Overman Silver Mininq Company. 

San Francisco, June 27. 1893. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Overman Silver Mining 
Company for the election of directors for the ensuing year, and for the 
transaction of such other business as may properly come before it, will 
be held at the company's office, No. 414 California street, San Francisco, 
California, on 

Thursday, July 13th, 1893, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M. 
Transfer books will be closed on TUESDAY, July 11, 1893, at 1 o'clock p. m. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 
Office— 414 California Street, Sau Francisco, Cal. 



Exchequer Mining Company. 

Location of Principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Twenty seventh day of June. 1893, an assessment (No. 36) of ten (10) 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporatiou , payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 
Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 1 st day of t ugust. 1 893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction: and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the twenty-ninth day of August, 
1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expeuses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best and Beleher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Virginia City, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held on 
the Sixth day of June, 1893, an assessment (No. 54) of Twenty-five Cents 

fier share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 33, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, 
California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Friday, the t4th Day of July, 1893, wilt be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction: and, unlesB payment is made 
before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 4th day of August, 1893, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Hale & Norcross Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held on 
the Twenty-first day of June, 1893, an assessment (No. 104) of 50 cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
pany, at the office of the Company, room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 25th Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction: and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 18th day of August, 1893, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Bobrd of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill, Storey couaty, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Twelfth day of June, 1893, an assessment (No 61) of 25 cents per 
share was levied upontbecapltal stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the Secretary.at the office of the 
company, room 35, third floor, of Mills Building, northeast corner of Bush 
and Montgomery streets, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

The 18th Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 8th day of August, 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 
Office — Room 35, third floor of Mills Building, northeast corner Bush and 
Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia Miniug District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby giveu that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the Twentieth day of June 1893, an assessment (No. 81) of 25 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of tbe Company, Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street 
3au Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty- fifth Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 14th day of August, 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 13 

Amount per Share — 10 cents 

Levied ■• .June 22, 1893 

Delinquent in Office July 26, 1893 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock . Aug. 17, 1893 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



Pri e* p*r Copy, 10 Cent*. 







Annual Subscription, S4.00. 




Vol. XLVIl 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY JULY 15, 1 893. 



Number 2. 



Printed and Published ewry Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran. 
Cisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

THE office of the News Letter in New York City has been 
removed to the Evening Post Building, 204-206 Broadway, 
Kooni 1, where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
cription and advertising rates. C. C. Murphy, manager. 

CLEVELAND has recovered from his rheamatism, and has gone 
fishing. We may breathe easy. The country is saved. 

" r)ULLY" FOOTE has ca'.led Ambrose Bierce a professional 
JJ blackmailer. Ambrose Bierce has called Foote a bullying 
lawyer. Friends of both men say each will fight. We hope they 
do, and trust that when they meet their guns will be double- 
shotted and their aims be true. We need something for which to 
be thankful. 



MRS. EVASS is in town seeking legal defense for her villain of 
a hosband. While we may bave sympathy for the wife, we 
cannot forbear stating that it will astonish us if any reputable at- 
torney goes to the rescue of this double-dyed ruffian and red- 
handed murderer. A strong rope and a short shrift should be his 
portion. 

CHRI8 BUCKLEY has had a son born to him at London, Eng., 
and is anxious to find out whether this chip of the old block 
is an American citizen. He says he hopes the boy, if he lives, 
will be a much better man than his father. So say we all of us. 
Else it would be well for Jerry Lynch to enter into another con- 
tract with his literary secretary for the writing of a Becond Buck- 
ley brochure. 

THE Chinese sky-rocket shall go. Fire Marshal Towe has said 
it, and that should settle the question. For years he has 
made a study of Fourth of July fireworks, and he has found that 
fires were usually caused by particular kinds of bombs or rockets. 
The bombs were forbidden, and now the Chinese sky-rocket re- 
mains as the greatest offender. The Supervisors should lose no 
time in suppressing it. 

BURGLARS entered the house of State Senator George Williams, 
and stole a quantity of clothing. A few days later Williams 
received an anonymous letter, telling him in what pawn shops 
he could find an expensive suit of his clothing, and a fine dress 
of his wife. The burglars probably found out after the robbery 
that their victim was a State Senator, and had sat at Sacramento. 
Even burglars sometimes have respect for others. 

THE Examiner is now running a cartoon on its " small ad " 
page in which it represents itself as a blacksmith who has 
forged the link (a small ad) which brings capital and labor to- 
gether. Next to this picture it runs the addresses of some forty 
public prostitutes, otherwise known as " massage artistes," which 
seems a passing Btrange sort of " labor " for a reputable publica- 
tion to desire to bring " capital " into conjunction with. 

<' T DEMAND protection," howled " Bnlly " Foote. "The man 
1 who for thirty days badgered, abused, browbeat, insulted 
and bull-dozed witnesses now asks the Court to protect him. "The 
man who armed himself with a revolver because a woman had 
threatened to slap his face, cried for the court to throw its cloak 
over him and hide him from the view of the public prosecutor. 
" Bully " Foote, " Bully " Foote, you have received your just de- 
serts. 

WE heartily commend Judge Morrow for the admonition he 
administered to Attorney Campbell when he addressed a wit- 
ness in an insulting manner in court the other day. There are so 
few Judges who take the trouble to protect witnesses from the 
insults of attorneys, that one might as well be put in the stocks 
as to attempt to give testimony in the local courts. A witness is 
entitled to the greatest protection the court can give him, and a 
judge who does not compel attorneys practicing before him to con- 
duct themselves in a gentlemanly manner is not fitted for a judicial 
position. 



THE Frenchmen celebrated the Fall of the Bastile yesterday. 
July 14th is their great day, and, as usual, this year there was 
a row over it. Some anonymous blackmailer published a vile 
pamphlet about Charles Greffe, the President of the committee; 
the Lafayette Guard was not sure whether it would parade, and 
there were other dissensions. The Frenchmen are getting to be 
as bad as the Irishmen in regard to the celebration of their 
national anniversary. 



MON8IGNOR 8ATOLLI says that California in climate is a sec- 
ond Italy, and that he will endeavor to return here and pass 
more time with us than he can upon the present trip. Of course 
we knew all along that our climate is unsurpassed in the world, 
but at the same time we are pleased to have our State so highly 
praised by so eminent a gentleman. If we could only get sev- 
eral hundred thousand gentlemen to visit us, be favorably im- 
pressed and return for good, we would be all right. 



THE convention of Presbyterian preachers and laymen that met 
at Pittsburg on the 9th inst., and solemnly declared that the 
disastrous fire at Chicago was a direct visitation of Providence 
upon the city for keeping the World's Fair open on Sundays, 
should be forever known in history as the Conclave Asinoram. 
Rarely, of recent years, has there been such a public display of 
bigotry. The funny part of the whole thing is that the burned 
building was not on the Fair grounds, and had nothing to do 
with the Fair. 



EDWARD H. THOMPSON, a fool of a countryman in New 
York State, became dissatisfied with his wife, to whom he 
had been married six months, and be sold all his right, title and 
interest in her to Charles Lewis for fifty cents. The wife ac- 
cepted her new owner cheerfully, and has lived happily with 
him ever since the purchase, about a month since. Now Thomp- 
son wants her back, and has consulted a lawyer as to his rights 
in tbe premises. He should not be given a standing in court, for 
any man who will so cheaply give up a wife is unworthy of the 
society or comfort of any woman. 



SUPERVISOR DENMAN is correct when he says the Board 
should advertise for proposals for the purchase of ten chem- 
ical engines for the Fire Department. If it be true, as Supervisor 
Stanton says he has been informed, that the agent from whom it 
was proposed to purchase the ten engines is a relation of one of 
the Fire Commissioners, there is all the more reason why pro- 
posals should be advertised for. The matter has been referred to 
tbe Fire Department Committee, and it is safe to say that the 
gentlemen upon that committee well appreciate the wisdom of 
advertising when such a large purchase as that of ten chemical 
engines is to be effected. 



MRS. HANNAH McNALLY, a widow, walked all the way 
from San Benito to this city to appear at the United States 
Land Office in an endeavor to save from confiscation her home- 
stead upon recently opened Government land. Mrs. MeNally is 
an honest, industrious woman, who has asked odds of no one, 
but undertook her battle with the world alone. Now, it these 
ladies and gentlemen who have been so loud of late in their cries 
in behalf of the "poor, down-trodden dive girl," and womankind 
in general, want to do some real good to a really good woman, 
let them look into the case of the woman from San Benito, and 
lend her a helping hand. 



CW. 8TERRICK, a dealer in patent steam cookers, was arrested 
, at Santa Rosa by a man named Eves, upon a requisition 
from the Governor of Missouri. Eves was also the prosecuting 
witness, and charged that Sterrick had sold him land in Indiana 
and Illinois which had been sold previously. They went as far 
as Sacramento on the return East, when the prisoner proposed to 
his captor and prosecutor to submit their differences to an 
attorney, and if the latter said Eves had a good case, Sterrick 
would go East with him; if not, Eves should relinquish all 
claims, release Sterrick and go home alone. The case was sub- 
mitted to an attorney, who decided against Eves, who thereupon 
released his prisoner and went his way. This is the best way we 
know of to settle a dispute. It is always necessary, however, to 
have|the lawyer fixed beforehand. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 



CRIME AND ITS REMEDY. 



IN the current number of the Modern Review, Lady Cook, nee 
Tennessee C. Claflin, has a paper upon "Crime and Its Rem- 
edy," in which some strong and original views are expressed. 
Lady Cook's argument in brief is that the propagation of mentally 
or physically diseased children should be prevented by such su- 
pervision of the ceremony of marriage as would allow the mating 
only of people who are physically and mentally well. The mar- 
riage of the physically unfit form only a part of the wedded evil, 
says the writer. Loveless marriages are answerable for much. It 
is with us now as it was in France before the Revolution. We 
are cheated by words. For these unnatural unions are not mar- 
riages. True marriage is a spiritual and mental exosmose and 
end osmose; each gives of its own to each until both are alike. It is a 
natural and spontaneous union of ideas, aims and sympathies; 
and where these exist, rights and ceremonies are superfluous. 
They can neither give nor take away. For the marriage cere- 
mony is not marriage, but it is merely the public profession of an 
accomplished fact; otherwise it is morally fraudulent. If mar- 
riage do not precede the ceremony no real marriage exists. It is 
because we attach to the word what rightly belongs to the thing, 
that an act of nature is stigmatized as a crime. 

When women, prompted only by their own affectionate and 
generous Instincts and regardless of ceremonies, have become 
mothers, our social Juggernaut crashes them remorselessly. It 
brands them as outcasts, and thus they hang, drown or prosti- 
tute themselves. Holocausts of little ones, innocent as those of 
Bethlehem, are annually sacrificed to the fear of this wooden god. 
"What," say you, "would you permit 'natural' children among 
us?" Most certainly. All children are natural except the off- 
spring of enforced and unnatural marriages. 

It is evident to all observers that the prudent and wise are cau- 
tious in the exercise of their creative powers, whereas the least fit 
are the most reckless of consequences. Their criminal folly is 
thus perpetuated as well as its evils. Who, then, it may be asked, 
shall j'-.dge, as to fitness? We reply, a jury of matrons could, on 
examination, easily decide as to a man's general capacity for 
marriage. If it be said that the unrestricted association of the sexes 
would increase immorality, we deny it and affirm the contrary. 
Nature sterilizes women of immoral lives. Immoral men should be 
sterilized also, but this can only be done by artificial means. Jesus 
said: "Some are born eunuchs, some are made eunuchs, and 
others have become eunuchd for the kingdom of Heaven's sake." 
The saintly Origen emasculated himself. What has been done 
from religion, luxury or choice maybe done again from necessity. 
It might easily be made a physical impossibility for criminals, 
hereditary paupers, imbeciles, profligates, and others suffering 
from gross bodily or mental defects, to propagate their fallings 
and their yices. 

The scientific improvement of our race is one of the great meas- 
ures of the future, and will be taken in hand as soon as the na- 
tion is sufficiently enlightened as to its necessity. We cannot go 
on forever permitting swarma of weak and depraved creatures to 
flood society with lunatics, idiots, criminals, and other defective 
offspring. Their maintenance and control alone constitute a seri- 
ous menace to the welfare of the industrious and deserving poor. 
Their contagious and vicious example outweighs the efforts of 
missionaries and reformers, who are, as it were, forever rolling a 
Sisyphean stone. We banish or isolate physical leprosy; moral 
leprosy may have to be subjected to similar treatment. 

When Cato lent his wife to Hoitensius it was from no immoral 
motive, but from a high sense of public duty. Hortensius was a 
"goodly man;" his physical and mental excellencies were appre- 
ciated by his friend, and therefore he selected him as bis deputy 
to raise up children to the State. And Cato is esteemed a model 
citizen and patriot- One of the greatest punishments inflicted on 
the Romans was the withdrawal of the privilege of lending their 
wives. We should, however, pursue the mental and physical 
perfection of our race by means suitable to our time and place. 
Marriages should be resolutely discouraged where the parties 
are unfit through any disqualification. Where a community has 
taken upon Kself the burden of all, it should have the power of 
regulating the actions of individuals in so far as they create the 
difficulty. A man imbued with these ideas would no more think 
of marrying a woman of defective physique or one possessing 
hereditary taint than he would of purchasing a wind-broken 
racer and entering him for the Derby. And a woman would do 
the same. She would decline to become the mother of a line of 
puny and dyspeptic weaklings. Fathers would mate their daugh- 
ters at least as carefully as they mate their dogs and horses; and 
the 8tate would make it a serious crime for an unhealthy person 
to produce a child. A license to marry should be given by a 
medical board, and not by a priest. Marriage would then be a 
sacred privilege. It would be the reign of the fit, instead, as now. 
of the unfit. Modesty and manhood would stand out foremost. 
Wealth would give place to worth. The dream of the Psalmist 
would be realized. Our eons would grow up as the strong palm 
trees, and our daughters like the polished corners of the Temple. 



BRUTES OF THE OCEAN. 



THE American ship Tarn O'Shanter sailed into this harbor the 
other day with the usual story of brutality and abuse on the 
part of the officers toward the crew, and the incident has moved 
a contemporaneous writer to inquire why it is that this ocean 
blackguardism seems to be confined almost exclusively to ships 
of our own nationality. Answering his own query, the writer 
points out that this condition of affairs is probably the result of the 
fact that American ships' officers are possessed of more " snap 
and drive" than those of other nationalities. Rational men, how- 
ever, will be apt to think that this is one of those picturesque ex- 
planations which require explaining. Rational men. who have 
devoted intelligent consideration to the matter will, indeed, flatly 
refuse to accept this explanation, because they will find a much 
truer and more forcible one in the fact that the courts manage to 
evade punishing ill-treatment and brutality on the part of American 
ships' officers toward the men who sail under them; that agents 
and owners invariably side with the brutes who thus show their 
unfitness to command, and that the absence of a proper govern- 
mental supervision over the personnel of our merchant marine 
results in placing beetle-browed ruffians and shoulder-strikers, 
rather than gentlemanly and accomplished mariners on the quar- 
ter decks of vessels that carry and disgrace our flag. 

In the case of the Tarn O'Shanter one of the males, a fellow 
named Crocker (who, by the way, is a sort of fugitive from jus- 
tice, inasmuch as he escaped arrest for ill-using the crew of the 
last ship be came to this port with, by running away), has been 
indicted by the United States Grand Jury. This is a farce which 
is always enacted when the case against the brutal officer is too 
gross to be smothered by the Court Commissioner. But that is, 
probably, all that will come of the matter. The machinery of 
the Federal Courts seems to be especially adapted to the task of 
acquitting the ruffians of our merchant marine. In theinfamous 
case of the Sunrise one of the fellows was convicted, but the local 
authorities of San Francisco afterwards did penance for the wrong 
by making him a special policeman, with authority to club all 
citizens with whom he came in contact. One of the Gatherer 
fiends was also convicted and sentenced to a short term of im- 
prisonment; but we are not advised as to whether he was made 
a policeman when his martyrdom to the cause of appearance ex- 
pired, though it goes without saying that he would beat him? 
among the men whoconstitute the present force. In general, how- 
ever, cases against ships' officers in the Federal Courts take the 
course of that against the captain of the T. F. Oakes, who, though 
he proved his guild by his own witnesses, was acquitted by a 
jury which added a rider to its verdict congratulating the Prose- 
cuting Attorney on the masterly way in which he had presented 
his case. 

Brutality prevails upon American ships because the ruffians of 
the quarter-deck are excused by the press on the ground of su- 
perfluity of " snap and drive," protected by the courts and main- 
tained in their positions by conscienceless agents and owners. 



THE SCHOOL BOARD. 



THE Board of Education has undertaken several so-called re- 
forms in its administration of the School Department, that 
have not been received favorably by the school teachers, and the 
beneficial results of which are not very apparent to the ordinary 
citizen. The proposition that has simply convulsed the body of 
instructors, and done considerable toward a disruption of the 
organization of the schools, is the order requiring children to at- 
tend schools within the districts in which their residences are lo- 
cated. The object of this order, it is said, is to "consolidate out" 
of the list of instructors a number of teachers, thus decreasing 
the working force of the department. If this be done, it is ap- 
parent that the work of the remaining teachers will be made 
much harder, for besides their own classes, they will have to in- 
struct those of the consolidated teachers, although the pupils of 
the latter classes will be distributed. We have not seen it stated 
anywhere by any Director that the local school teachers bad not 
now all they could well attend to. A teacher's task is at best a 
thankless one. Our teachers are able, industrious and hard- 
worked; they compare well with any similar body of instructors 
in the United 8tates. We believe in treating them with the great- 
est consideration that the exigencies of the service will permit, 
and are opposed to allowing any ambitions Director or Directors 
to impose upon them, merely for the sake of making a record as 
an economist. 

We also take issue with Director Clinton and his proposition to 
restrict the Normal Class to High 8chool graduates under twenty- 
two years of age. We fail to appreciate this endeavor to fix an 
age limit as an educational qualification. There are many girls 
who graduate from the High School in their twenty-first year. 
Why should they be given tbe advantages of the instruction in 
the Normal Class, which under Director Clinton's resolution, 
would be refused to a classmate who might have happened to be 
born six, eight or twelve months earlier than they? It is an un- 
fair proposition upon its face, and should be defeated. 



July 16, 1893. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE STATE ROAD CONVENTION. 



WK trait thai the local Board of Supervisors will be properly 
represented at the State Koa>l Convention to be held at the 
Stale Capitol on September 7th next. It seems lo us that in the 
rash of minor local matters which mostly occupy its attention, 
that the local daily press has not given deserved notice to the 
endeavor to formulate a plan of action for the construction and 
maintenance of good roads throughout the State. The call was 
Issued by the Sacramento County Humane Society and was ap- 
proved by the Governor. It Is addressed to Supervisors, to all 
Chambers of Commerce and Boards of Trade, to municipal boards, 
granges and other agricultural associations, and to all societies 
immediately interested in and informed upon the subject of good 
roads and economic road construction and administration, to all 
County Surveyors and to all transportation companies. All the 
matters to be discussed at this proposed conference are of the 
greatest interest to the taxpayers of the Slate, who in some coun- 
ties expended in the last ten years from $268,000 to $400,000 in 
making and repairing roads, and in most cases not more than 
ten or fifteen per cent, of their worth remains. The main objects 
ot this convention will be: 

To disseminate information concerning the advances made in 
recent years in the matter of road building and economic methods 
therein. To this end it is intended to secure, if possible, the pres- 
ence at the convention of some of the most experienced and dis- 
tinguished men of the East who have made the question a study 
and have borne official and other relations to the agitation. 

To gather data for consideration relative to the cost of road con- 
struction and road maintenance in California, and to compare the 
same with the cost in other States and countries under systems 
that have proved more economical and beneficent. 

To ascertain and consider the relation of such costs to the econ- 
omy of production, and the relation they bear to profit and loss 
in production of articles the producer consumes or sells. 

To ascertain the influence of good and of bad roads upon the 
conditions and results of rural life; upon taxation; development 
of the resources of the State; the settling up of the State, and 
upon all trade and industry. 

To consider the influence and effects of good and poor roads 
upon animals used in the transportation of products and the 
people; the cost of feed for such animals; the cost of vehicles 
and their maintenance; time consumed in travel, in shipping, in ,' 
marketing; the bringing of farm and town nearer together or the 
putting of them further apart, and the effect of good road agita- 
tion in making rural postal delivery probable. 

To consider the differing conditions relating to road construc- 
tion and maintenance in the several counties of the State, the 
question of trunk line construction in the counties and its rela- ! 
tion to collateral road lines. 

To consider propositions and plans of road constiuction in the ] 
light of experience and scientific knowledge, and what systems, 
if adopted in this State, would most conserve economy and pub 
lie and private good by reducing the time of movement, lessening 
the cost of production and enlarging its gains, increasing hauling 
capacity, conserve humanity to draft animals, lessen wear and 
tear on vehicl* a, reiuce largely the cost of road maintenance, en- 
hance the value of property and render rural life and possessions 
more desirable. 

At the National Farmers' Convention at Lincoln, Neb., in No- ! 
vember last, it was estimated that proper roads throughout the 
country would save $250,000,000 annually to the people in the 
transportation of products alone, and allow 2,000,000 of the 20,- 
000,000 draft animals now in use to be dispensed with, thus mak- 
ing another saving in capital invested in animals of $170,000,000, 
and in feed of $1,000,000 annually. 

Good roads throughout the State will have a most beneficial 
result upon the development of us industries, and will tend to in- ! 
duce immigration. While most of the discussion at the meeting 
will probablv be upon country roads, some attention will also 
doubtless be given, as there should be, to street paving in cities. 
If our City Fathers can gain wisdom from others who have ex- 
perimented with all the various street pavements known to civ- 
ilized man, and can select one which will properly serve our pur- 
pose, the trip to Sacramento will not be without direct benefit 
to us. 



THE " Monarch of the Dailies" decidedly needs a telegraph 
editor, or, if it possesses one, that gentleman ought to brush 
up bis French and spend a few hours in studying the topography 
of the great cities of the world. In a recent telegram from Paris 
he permitted, among other mistakes, the following ridiculous and 
impossible words to appear in print: "The Cairassiero (Cuiras- 
siers) and Chassearo (Chasseurs) patrolled it and the Chassenlio 
(Chasseurs) occupied the palace of Luxembourg, etc. » » * 
The troops drove the people off the boulevard Stinechel (Saint Mi- 
chel) and 8t. Germaine (8aint Germain.) Several cavalry regi- 
ments at Versailles, Vincounes (Vincennes), etc." It will hardly 
do to make the ■• printer's devil" responsible for that kind of gib- 
berish. 



A RUMPUS IN THE POLICE CAMP. 

THE action of the Police Commissioners in dismissing three 
members of the force, on last Monday, Is liable to be misun- 
derstood because of the senseless newspaper gabble to which It 
has given rise. This action Is not|a symptom of a change of heart 
on the part of those who control the force. It is not an Indica- 
tion of the fact that the autocrats have awakened to the fact that 
many, if not most, of the men under tbeir charge are corrupt ras- 
cals. Indeed, it Is nothing new. There has not been one of the 
past ten years in which (at a rough estimate) less than thirty 
men have been "dropped" from the force under somewhat simi- 
lar circumstances. When an outsider alleges and proves indi- 
vidual corruption against some policeman or officer of police, and 
thus creates a scandal which calls attention to the rottenness of 
the whole department, he Is laughed out of court — that is, out of 
the Commissioners' meeting-room. But when the magnates of 
the department, or some one having a "pull" with tbem, wish to 
"drop" any one, there is a different system of proceeding alto- 
gether. In the one case no evidence that can be brought is 
worthy of credence; in the other case no evidence at all is neces- 
sary. Knudsen and 8mith were whitewashed and acquitted 
when they were charged with attempting to blackmail Lister; 
but when, under the inspiration of that acquittal, they grew bold 
and sought to put their finger into pie that belonged to their su- 
periors, they were "dropped" with a dull thud, and upon evi- 
dence which would not suffice to maintain a suspicion against a 
yellow dog. 8o It has been with the men who were dismissed on 
Monday evening last. One of these fellows has been a pet of the 
Chief of Police for a long time past, though every one who came 
in contact with him regarded him with suspicion and aversion. He 
and his two comrades were not "dropped" because they were 
corrupt and unreliable, nor was the same evidence demanded 
against them which was refused in Wittman's case. If the bot- 
tom of this matter could be reached it would be found that they 
were indiscreet in their predatory exploits, and that they poked 
their nose into territory that belonged to their superiors. That is 
an offense which is not tolerated in the department. Policemen 
may insult and maltreat reputable citizens, they may accept little 
tokens of esteem from those who are subject to their interference, 
they may commit perjury and suborn perjury, but they must not 
interfere with or talk about that which has been licensed by their 
superiors. And the penalty of any breach of this unwritten rule 
is silent, sudden, swift decapitation without benefit of clergy. 

TFE MIDWINTER FAIR. 

THE preparations for the Midwinter Exposition to be held in 
Golden Gate Park go on merrily, an i there is now not a man 
in town, who has given the matter any serious attention, who is 
not satisfied that the exposition will be established, and will be a 
grand success. The executive committee has selected an excel- 
lent site in Golden Gate Park, in what is known aE Concert Val- 
ley, and the preliminary surveys have already been made upon 
it. The site contains about sixty acres, and lies between Straw- 
berry Hill and the King monument. It is about 1700 feet long, 
and about 1400 feet wide. It is divided by three mounds, and is 
very well protected from the ocean winds. Before the founda- 
tions for the buildings can be laid, some of the mounds will have 
to be graded, and some of the hollows filled. It is confidently 
hoped by the gentlemen of the Executive Committee that active 
work will begin upon the site within a week at the farthest. The 
money already subscribed makes a goodly sum, and the Finan ial 
Committee has divided the city into districts, so that all quarters 
will be visited, to the end tbat no one will be able to say that he 
did not subscribe to the Fair because he was not asked. The 
sooner work is actually begun upon the foundations of the build- 
ings, the better it will be for the subscription list. There is a 
certain class of men that is reluctant to subscribe money for any- 
thing that is not in sight, no matter bow brilliant the prospects 
may be. These conservative gentlemen can be properly appealed 
to only when the dirt turned by the shovels can be shown them. 
There is every reason to feel satisfied with the progress of the 
Fair so far. The interior of the State will be properly educated 
up to the idea by the country editors, who have promised the 
proposition their hearty support, and the Exposition will prove, 
what was always intended, of the greatest benefit to the State at 
large. Advices received from a number of Eastern States, and 
from the Commissioners of foreign countries, show that our Cali- 
fornia Fair, to be held upon the shores of the Pacific Ocean in 
midwinter, has been very favorably received in all quarters. We 
are assured of as many exhibits as can be conveniently handled 
in the buildings that will be erected. It is the best opportunity 
California has had for years to show herself to the world, and in 
the names of progress and prosperity, every citizen of the State 
should do what he can to help the cause of the commonwealth. 



NOW that the Heath trial is about closed, Fresno takes occasion 
to keep up its repution. The latest news from that county 
is tbat a negro cut his wife's throat during a row. Fresno is a 
nice quiet place for a summer residence. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 




SINCE the tournament at San Rafael, every one has been giving 
reasons why the other men did not win, and very funny 
reasons they are, too. When a tournament is over, it is only 
natural that there are many who think they are entitled to the 
prize more than the winner, but we think that Mr. Driscoll de- 
serves the position that he 
got, and played very good 
tennis, too, considering 
how handicapped he was. 
The next event will be the 
seventh quarterly tourna- 
ment at the California 
Club, for the champion- 
ship of the club, and it is 
now a matter of conjecture 
who will be the winner 
this time. There has been 
a general clearance of ten- 
nis players from the club, 
including DeLong, Stet- 
son, the Whitney brothers, 
Tobin and the Taylors (all 
of whom have gone East) 
which leaves the field open 
to either Allison or Allen. 
Allen must play better 
than he did at the tourna- 
ment, or else he will not 
defeat Allison, who has 
been improving all the 
time. It will be quite a 
matter of interest to all 
lovers of tennis to watch 
what progress Mr. W. H. 
Taylor, Jr., makes at the 
East. He has been in re- 
ceipt of many invitations 
Champion Driscoll. to the best clubs, and also 

tD take part in some of the most prominent invitation matches, 
and, considering that Mr. Hubbard was ranked in the first ten 
players of the United 8tates, it is more than probable that Mr. 
Taylor will get a very good ranking, because his volleying game is 
more suitable to the grass courts than to asphalt. In the Essex 
invitation tournament, to which he has been invited, there are 
only eight players to compete, and they include, outside of the 
United States champion, all the best champions of the East, such 
as the Inter-Collegiate, etc. Mr. Taylor is as yet uncertain 
whether he will enter for the championship at Newport, but we 
hope that he will be able to do so, for it will be the first time that 
California will be represented in that match. Mr. Taylor is in 
first-class form, and will no doubt give a very good account of 
himself. He, partnered with Joe Tobin, will represent California 
at the World's Pair Tournament at Chicago. 

The ladies now think it is high time that they should do some- 
thing, and we understand that they are talking of getting up an 
invitation tournament at San Mateo. It is a long time to wait 
for the 9ih of September, and therefore they think it would be 
just as well to show the public at large that they have not forgot- 
ten the game. We shall look forward to the issuing of the circu- 
lar with pleasure. Miss Bates and Miss Gibbs have been playing 
a good deal of late at the California Club, and Miss Bates is getting 
into very good shape, so much so that Miss Morgan may have to 
look after her laurels on the 9th. 

Tennis in England is booming. Willie Renshaw ia again in the 
field, and was one of the contestants at the Beckenham tourna- 
ment. He won the All Comers' cup, but was beaten in the Cham- 
pionship round by Barlow, who was the holder by three sets to 
one, 2-6. 6-3. 6-1. 6-4. Willie, it is said, will play in the All Eng- 
land tournament, but Ernest says he will not take part this year, 
which leaves the championship between Baddeley and Pirn. The 
latter has jast won the Yorkshire championship for the second 
time. 

Chaotic If the California League has any expectation of con- 

Condition of eluding the season intact, it must adopt a different 
Baseball. method from that developed during the last month. 
Over five weeks ago the new regime went into possession of the 
League, and between that time and last Wednesday no League 
meeting has been held; in the interim there was more or less 
chaos. Neither players, officers or managers knew where they 
stood, and it was i sort of go-as-you-please league. Managers 
failed to accompany their clubs, and discipline was ignored. 
Umpires failed to receive their details, and knew not where to 
officiate. One club, the Stocktons, so-called, went to Los An- 
geles on a speculation, not knowing whether or how they would 
return to their starting-place. The first half of the season closed 
July 4th, with no provision made for a schedule or a circuit for 
the remaining half of the season, which was to commence on the 
next day. Although games were played in Sacramento by the 



Oaklands last week, yet until last Wednesday Sacramento had 
not been admitted into membership in the League. 

Last Saturday the league enjoyed the novelty of the Sheriff of 
this city taking possession of the box office at the Haight street 
grounds, and attaching the share of the gate coming to the Los 
Angeles Club to secure a debt of the manager of that clnb. As 
the party putting on the attachment came from Los Angeles and 
secured only $55, his visit was not a financial success. When the 
new management went into power they promised innovations; 
all will agree that a Sheriff in possession of a box office was an 
innovation in California League affairs. 

Lindley, the manager of the Los Angeles Club, who, six weeks 
ago, assumed the role of dictator and Napoleon in the California 
League, was unceremoniously thrust from his position as Mana- 
ger last Monday by the street railroad company of Los Angeles, 
which was his backer, and if reports are true, it was done for 
reasons which are not creditable to the manager. A representative 
of the road is in this city looking after the interests of the club and 
the road, the latter particularly. Los Angeles has been unfortun- 
ate in its managers. Last season the manager was too parsimoni- 
ous, and went after every dollar in sight. His successor, while 
not parsimonious, also looked after every dollar in view, and 
took care of it, much to the disgnst of those who were behind 
him. 

The managers, instead of discussing whether or not to put the 
pitcher's box in its former position, should think whether it is 
not desirable for them to procure better fielders. It is true, the 
scores were large and one-sided. At the same time, the earned 
runs are very few. Large scores and few earned rnns show poor 
fielding — something the pitcher is not responsible for. The base- 
ball cranks or fans, and there are several thousand in San Fran- 
cisco, ranging from General Green, Center and Joe Quae of the 
Pacific-Union Club to » Whitey," the milk boy, who appears to 
be the " filler- in" of the Olympic Red and Maroons when a 
player fails to appear in their scheduled games, and all want bat- 
ting and base-running and no pitcher and catcher contests. 

Some of the clubs of the Southern League are after certain 
players of the league here. As this league is not under the pro- 
tection of the national agreement, the Southern League is at lib- 
erty to raid California. President Bob Wieland has already com- 
menced to feel the caustic pencil of some of the local baseball 
writers. He cannot complain, as the criticisms were just; in 
fact, the press has been very indulgent toward him. He evi- 
dently does not pay much attention to the business — the adver- 
tising departments of the dailies. 

Fresno is anxious to have a baseball team in the leagae. If 
that city can support a club, she should take the place of Oak- 
land, which is of no financial assistance to the league, the other 
cities having to support its team. 



AT VICHY SPRINGS. 



NO more enjoyable or healthful trip can be taken by the Sum- 
merite than that to Vichy Springs to take the waters. The 
Springs are three miles from Ukiah, the terminus of the San 
Francisco and North Pacific Railway, and is the only place in the 
United States where Vichy water is abundant. There are two 
trains to the Springs daily. The baths are half an hour from the 
railway station, and are reached by a good stage road. A dip into 
these baths is alone worth the journey to the Springs, without 
taking into consideration the beauties of the trip or the de- 
lightful surrounding country. It is the only place in the world 
where the bathtubs are supplied by a continuous flow of this 
kind of water direct from the spring. The flow of water from the 
main spring, Vichy Spring, is truly wonderful. The quantity of 
gas in it, and the strong current of electricity that permeates it, 
have caused the baths from this spring to be called the only natural 
electric baths, and to be considered the best natural bath in the 
world. The waters of Ardecbe Spring contain many of the qual- 
ities of the Vichy water, and also hold a great quantity of borax, 
which gives the water a very great degree of softness. The ben- 
eficial effect of this water upon the skin and complexion has 
caused this bath to be called a beauty bath, fully equal, if not 
superior to the celebrated " Baths of Beauty" of Schlangenbad, 
Germany. There is also a small, constant stream of the purest, 
coldest and clearest Apollinaris water, which makes an excellent 
lemonade. The quantity of carbonic acid gas in the spring waters 
gives the bath the appearance of a tub full of champagne, and 
hence they are known as champagne baths, tn the beautiful 
grounds of the Springs are many neat cottages for guests. The 
charges are very reasonable, being $12 to $14 a week, there being 
no charge for baths to weekly boarders, except on Sundays. 



THE new law allowing enlisted men in the United States navy 
to purchase their discbarges seems a fair and equitable one. 
There are many men who enter the navy when out of work to 
procure means of livelihood, who are entitled to better opportuni- 
ties for improvement in their condition than are there afforded. 
Being allowed to purchase their discharges, they will be able to 
look forward to something better than a long service at very poor 
wages. 



July 15, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



SOCIETY IN LONDON. 



U»DOjr, June 21, 1893. 

OWING to the great disaster which befell the country in the 
loss of the lu-torin. the 2000 invitations to the State Ball, 
which was to have taken place at Buckingham Palace last night, 
were canceled, or rather deferred. In expectation of the ball be- 
ing one of unusual splendor the ball-room and the promenade 
gallery had both been re-decorated. A special train from Windsor 
Castle brought up the gold plate for the occasion, and the magnificent 
sheilds, embossed in very heavy relief, were in position when the tele- 
gram announcing the loss of the ship with her crew arrived. There 
is a rumor that the Queen intends mourning to be worn at the 
wedding as a consequence. Imagine the Royal wedding 
in black; it would be too awful for anything. Her Majesty is, how- 
ever, quite capable of giving such a command, though there is the 
consolation that black dresses cannot possibly be got ready in time 
for the wedding. 

St. James' Chapel Royal being in the hands of decorators, the som- 
bre German Chapel Royal was chosen on Thursday last for the 
christening of the baby daughter of the Duke and Duchess of File, 
born last Easter Monday at East Sheen Lodge. The chapel was gayly 
decorated with flowers for this occasion, the altar being one mass of 
blooms backed by flowing palms. The gold sacramental service be- 
longing to the Chapel Royal was also effectively displayed. The first 
personage of rank to arrive in the chapel was Princess Louise, Mar- 
chioness of Lome, who was gowned in light gray silk, and represented 
Empress Frederick as sponsor. Then followed the Archbishop of 
Canterbury and attendant clergy. The Princess of Wales arrived 
from Marlborough House by the private passage, leading by the hand 
her granddaughter, the Lady Alexandra Duff, now nearly three years 
of age, and they were accompanied by the Duchess of Fife. The Prin- 
cess of Wales, who is suffering from melancholia, looked very tired 
and worn. She was, as usual, beautifully dressed in a lilac-colored 
silk bodice with cream sleeves, and wearing a Princess bonnet, in 
which was a red rose. The infant Lady Duff, an extremely fine baby, 
who gave unmistakable evidence of the possession of a strong pair of 
lungs, was carried into the chapel by nurse Butcher. The baby was 
dressed in a cream robe trimmed with richest lace. Next came the 
Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Teck, the latter dressed in ma- 
roon velvet and silk. They were followed by the Duke of York and 
Princess May. The Princess wore cream cashmere trimmed with 
braids of lace, and a hat of the same material, for the trimming of 
which two dove's wings, with a solitary pink rose between, were em- 
ployed. The Princess and the Duke immediately took up their posi- 
tions on the left of the altar, both being sponsors. The Prince of 
Wales undertook to assign to each his or her proper place, the cere- 
mony being " strictly private." 
The service opened with the hymn : 

In token that thou shalt not fear 
Christ crucified to own, 

We print the cross upon thee here, 
And stamp thee His alone. 

This was exquisitely rendered by the choir without the aid of the 
organ. The Archbishop of Canterbury then proceeded to read the 
baptismal service. When the time came for handing the infant over 
to his Grace the little one was crying very loudly, but the Princess of 
Wales took it in her arms, and soothing it with whispered words and 
Msses, managed to keep it quiet. The Archbishop proved a far less 
successful nurse than the Princess, for while he had charge of the 
child the little one cried unceasingly. The water used on this occa- 
sion was some of that brought from the Jordon by the Duke of York 
and his late brother on the occasion of 
their voyage in the Bacchante, and the 
Archbishop was most sparing in its use. 
At the conclusion of this part of the cere- 
mony the infant was handed back to the 
Princess of Wales, amid many half- 
repressed smiles at his Grace's expense. 
The young lady cried most lustily again at 
this point, and was taken out of the chapel 
by the nurse. The entry in the register 
leads as follows: 

" Mand Alexandra Victoria Georgia 
Bertha, daughter of the Duke of Fife and 
Her Royal Highness, Princess Louise of 
Wales, Duchess of Fife, born on the 3rd 
day of April, Easter Monday, 1893; was 
baptized in the German Chapel Royal, St. 
James's Palace, on 22 June, 1893, by Me 
Ed. Centaur." 

The next entry in the book will proba- 
bly be that of the marriage of Princess 
May and the Duke of York, and appar- 
ently this fact was present in the minds 
of those present, for there were many 
smiles as the Duke took from the Princess 
the pen to sign the register. The organist, 
Dr. Cresor, played a march as the christ- 



ening party left the Chapel by the private way to Marlborough 
House, where luncheon was served. 

Fully BOO presents have been received by Trincess May and Prince 
George. The jewelry is a brilliant collection, and so costly that special 
detachments of police are on duty day and night at White Lodge, 
line of the loveliest fans it is possible to imagine was given to the 
Trincess by the Lord- Lieutenant of Ireland. The rich point lace is the 
work of the Irish Industries Association. It is stretched upon mounts of 
clear pale yellow amber. The sticks have been adorned with the bride's 
monogram in diamonds and emeralds, and the lovely gift is en- 
cased in a box of white Irish poplin, lined with white satin. Lady 
Elizabeth Biddulph, on behalf of the ladies of England, presented the 
Princess with a magnificent pearl and diamond ornament, so ar- 
ranged that it may be used either as a necklace, a tiara, ora baixdean, 
to trim the corsage of a gown. It can also be detached, so as to be 
converted into several smaller ornaments. The design is made up of 
scrolls wrought in diamonds over fleur de lys in larger stones. From 
each group hangs a splendid drop pearl, fully an inch in length. The 
Principality of Wales sends a set of centre ornaments for the table 
manufactured of gold and of special design, emblematical of Wales' 
and its ancient principalities. Nottingham's present was a valuable 
assortment of Nottingham lace, including some very handsome cur- 
tains. The Marquis and Marchioness of Salisbury sent a very costly 
turquoise and diamond bracelet, and Lord and Lady Rothschild one 
of pearls and diamonds. There are also some beautiful diamond and 
ruby sleeve links, a diamond and turquoise broach, an emerald watch , 
and a magnificent diamond comb. So far the Princess of Wales has 
not congratulated publicly the bride on her approaching marriage 
but to those who are behind the scenes it has been known for some 
time that Her Royal Highnesswould have preferred as " daughter-in- 
law-elect " one of her nieces of Russia. However the dislike often 
displayed towards the Duchess of Edinburgh has been too palpable 
for any such match to have proved acceptable to the English people. 
There was a time, when the late Duke of Clarence was alive, that 
hopes had been entertained of the Duke of York becoming an ac- 
cepted suitor for the hand of the little Queen of Holland. The Dutch 
favored the match, but fate has willed otherwise. The Princess of 
Wales' well-known partiality for her eldest son was always exerted 
on his behalf, and years ago, when Prince George wished to 
marry his present lady love, the Princess of Wales refused 
her consent because just at that time the Duke of Clarence had 
transferred his attentions from Princess Helene d'Orleans to his 
cousin of Teck. 

Princess May will leave the White Lodge for " good and all," as 
the story books say, on the Fourth of July. Up to now, her Serene 
Highness has been a very unimportant member of the Royal Family. 
Exceedingly sweet-tempered and good-natured, she and her little 
pony and carriage have been at every one's beck and call. Anything 
that the other members of the Family did not care to do or be both- 
ered with, Princess May never refused to attend to. But soon that will 
all be over. As Princess May of Teck, only a Serene Highness with 
forty lives between her and the succession, and as Duchess of York 
with only two lives between herself and the throne of the British Em- 
pire, there is a wide gulf bridged. Even should the Duke of York 
die before his father, as possible mother of the heir or heiress appar- 
ent, the Duchess of York would be the first lady in the land, second 
only to the sovereign. 

The stay of the bride and bridegroom at Sandringham Lodge will 
be only a short one, the second part of the honeymoon having been 
arranged to be spent on the royal yacht Osborne, in a trip to Norway, 

Helen Stdaet. 



YOUR MOTHER RAISED YOU 

And your grandmother raised your 
mother on the 

GAIL BORDEN 'EAGLE' BRAND 

Condensed Milk. It's the oldest 
brand, it's the richest brand, it's 
the most reliable brand of condensed 
milk ever offered to the public. 

Your Grocer and Druggist sell it. 

Use it for custards, puddings, ice cream, pies, cakes, and general cooking purposes. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 



THE EVOLUTION OF THE "NEW RICH." 
[By Di Vebnoh.1 

i 'THE Lord knows whom to cover Dp I" exclaimed an old lady as 
I a prominent parvenu rolled by in her carriage. *■ It's well 
that the "new rich" do not have to walk with the rest of us. 
The contrast would be too painful for them. Who are the "new 
rich," the American parvenu class, the social mushrooms, the 
codfish aristocracy ? 

They are the people who came from nobody else knows where. 
They are the ones who think that money is everything. They are 
the men and women who fancy that they can buy their way into 
society, as readily as they can buy a house in a fashionable locality. 
All over the world their endeavors and their antics have been the 
sport of the humorist and the butt of the satirist. In California we 
do not not lack for specimens! of the class that has done so much to 
cast discredit upon Americans at home and abroad, by their 
vulgar ostentation, their loud voices, their obstreperous 
manners, and their general lack of good breeding. What are the 
features of the "new rich" in California? Well, without desiring to 
be personal in my descriptions, let me quote Dickens as nearly as I 
can from memory. The great novelist was describing some of his 
characters. He said they had a spick and span new house, filled with 
spick and span new furniture, in fact, they were a spick and span 
new family. It's the extreme newness of the "new rich" that strikes 
even the most casual observer. In the first place, they seem to have 
sprouted into existence. Tbey have no ancestors, at least none to 
speak of, in the earliest stages of their careers. Later on, it is true 
they generally develope a relationship to some "old family" of New 
York, or Boston, the relationship growing closer, in a direct ratio as 
the distance between them and the "old family" increases. They 
have no old family portraits done in oil. The nearest they can come 
to it, are the pictures that have been "enlarged" in crayon or in 
water colors, of themselves, in the days before they had reached 
their present elevated position as leaders of the "new rich." It is 
true that some of our representative " new rich families had old pa- 
rents who came out to California on the steamer, or who crossed the 
Isthmus, or who crossed the plains ; but it is an astonishing fact that 
after a few years residence in California, the old folks utterly disap- 
peared, leaving no trace. Perhaps their elevated children felt like 
the New York parvenu when asked if his father and mother were at 
his grand reception and replied : "Oh, no; you see one must draw 
the line somewhere." 

Or, as a variation on this phase of the " new rich," the mother— I 
think it generally is the mother, is resurrected from her seclusion in 
"the country," and presented in grand style to her "new rich" 
daughter's fashionable acquaintances at a musicale or an afternoon 
tea. But this is only done when time has softened the lines, whitened 
the hair, and refined and quieted the style of the old person so to be 
honored. It is a wise child that knows how to make the most of its 
own father or mother to meet a social need. Often the spick and span 
new family has the good sense to remove some of the prevailing new- 
ness of their surroundings by visiting auctions and buying up mas- 
sive pieces of old-fashioned furniture, which look well in their par- 
lors. Or better yet, they buy some house already furnished, and 
try to fit into their new environment. It's hard, very, but they make 
the endeavor, like the woman whom Bret Harte has immortalized 
in " Her Letter" as " Ma," who sat up in her carriage " trying to 
look preternaturally grand." That's one of the distinguishing fea- 
tures of the "new rich;" they try to look not only grand, but at 
ease. Instead of repose they present vulgar assurance ; instead of 
being poised, they simply fidget. 

Early days in California were gsand times for the beginning of the 
" new rich." Often some elder member of a family came here. Her 
husband either made money rapidly, and so placed her above her 
former station, or she opened a boarding house, and so came into as- 
sociation with gentlemen. And there were many men in California 
in those days. So she would send home for her younger sisters or 
nieces, and they came to her. The old Californians, those who left 
good homes in the East, who brought money with them to this coun- 
try, who came with all their family, as these, the real aristocracy of 
California, say, these girls were "brought out on speculation." They 
married well, many of them; they began the evolution of a "new 
rich" family. Some have, from the humble beginnings of a sailor or 
a mechanic's boarding-house, reached the proud eminence of society 
leaders. 

It is not always easy for the " new rich " to get on well in their 
new environment. It must be very mortifying for the daughter who 
has been sent to a fine pay school, and who has made some nice ac- 
quaintances, to have a mother who will wear colors that fight, or a 
father that ignores the cuspidor. It must be quite a strain on her 
nerves when she meets old acquaintances who at any moment may 
make allusions to her former position under the brow of the hill, be- 
fore she had attained to her present elevation. 

For the " new rich" who are not content with dazzling their for- 
mer acquaintances, for those who wish to shine in " society," the 
quickest way to get recognition is to become identified with some 
prominent charity, if possible to become a lady manager of some so- 
ciety, well — like the Women's Exchange, for instance. I can imag- 
ine how such a position would materially help to establish a "new 



rich" woman in her own opinion. The Women's Exchange is or- 
ganized to assist needy gentlewomen to earn a livlihood. The "new 
rich" lady manager thus comes in contact with those who socially 
were born her superiors, but whom fortune has placed temporarily 
in her power to assist or to snub. She generally snubs them. It 
makes her feel better. She can go into the Exchange when her day 
for supervision comes round, and exercise her authority over the em- 
ployees, and that gives her a pleasurable sensation of importance. 
Such a " new rich" woman will be prominent in all social plans for 
raising money. She will lend her house for social functions, or she 
will give largely, and so purchase a controlling interest in affairs. 

Sometimes the " new rich" attempt to play the grand dame, and 
then it's very funny. " Pa was a merchant, you know, and never 
did any hard work," said one such in the hearing of an old Califor 
nian, who politely responded, "Ah, yes; I remember when he kept 
a little butcher shop not far from our house. We always dealt with 
him. He gave very good weight, too." Sometimes, when "pa" 
did not happen to be a merchant, he kept a grocery or corner store, 
and the girls who were afterwards to grace the "new rich" set, were 
running around the saloon barefooted. More than one such little 
scrap of humanity attracted the admiring attention of some habitue 
of the place. He took her away from her surroundings, placed her 
in a convent, paid for her education, and when she was sixteen mar- 
ried her. 

Sometimes a " new rich" lady puts on airs. I have one in mind 
now. Her husband was a Tombs lawyer, which in New York con- 
ferred as proud a distinction upon the limb of the law as it does in 
San Francisco to say that a man is a shyster lawyer of our Police 
Court. And yet, when his wife came to California, there was no one 
quite good enough for her to notice. She could not lower her high 
mightiness by associating with the common herd, so she and one 
other kindred spirit would go to the springs and shut themselves up 
in their rooms all day long, and never mingled with the rest of the 
guests. They were very exclusive. 

Another, and by far the most detestable class of the " new rich" 
is that composed of those snobs of snobs, women who have once 
earned their own living and are ashamed to admit it, who live in ter- 
ror lest it should be found out. It is tbey who, having been shop- 
girls themselves, are most unkind and rude to the "sales ladies" of 
to-day. It is they that, once nurse-girls themselves, are most cruelly 
exacting of those in their employ. It is they who organize them- 
selves into swell clubs and associations, and are as intellectual as their 
social standing will permit. It is they who grovel at the feet of a 
celebrity and implore bim to walk on their necks. 

It is the " new rich" woman who lives high and fast, whose face 
and figure bear the evidences of her newness to her position, and all 
its possibilities of eating and drinking. It is the "new rich" lady who 
metaphorically falls under the table, and becomes a fit subject for a 
snap shot of bichloride of gold. It is these "new rich" women whose 
place is in the kitchen instead of the drawing room. It is the "new 
rich" women who are the living danger signals for us to so slow in 
our American civilization. But who can stop the car of Juggernaut? 



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July 15, 1 <93. 



SAN FHANI 1st u NEWS 1.1 111 R. 



FASHIONS ON THE FERRIES. 

NEARLY one-third of San Francisco? population sleep ont of 
■own In summer. 01 those that live across tbe bay. Oakland, 
Alameda and Berkeley claim the steadiest sbare, winter and 
snmruer residents, while San Rafael. Sausalito, Mill Valley and 
Larkspur capture tbe summer butterflies. People who travel 
dally on ferryboats acquire certain set habits, that is, they bave 
a fancy for certain portions of tbe steamer, and while away the 
voyage in much the same manner every trip. 

Tin Oakland Fbrby Sow, on the Oakland boats, when 

Editor Bartlett of tbe Bulletin steps on board, his first quest is 
tbe solid men. If Mayor Pardee be on deck, Mr. Bartlett is by 
bis side in a moment, discussing the corrupt ways of tbe Super- 
visors, and denouncing Dr. Woolsey and all his schemes. This 
wilt occur every day when Mr. Bartlett can obtain an audience. 
Mr. E. L. G. Steele will look around for Major Wheaton, and dis- 
cuss railroads until Charley Yale and Captain Stafford come 
along, when tbe conversation takes at once a nautical turn. 
Should Frank Havens join the group, the "chin" chops at once 
to insurance and the cultivation of roses. Bank Commissioner 
Knight never joins those conversational parties. He is always 
absorbed in the financial article of the evening papers. He un- 
folds his journal, sbndderingly anticipating another bank failure, 
and tbe attendant strictures on the neglect of the Bank Commis- 
sioners. When Fred Campbell stalks aboard he scans the horizon 
for a group to gather around the festive mahogany, throw in a 
nip, and tell a few cheerful stories. Campbell is one of the un- 
daunted. For a man who has resided so long in Oakland, his 
sense of tbe ridiculous is intense and abundant. His features 
have never caught that sombre cast that marks the chronic Oak- 
lander. 

The Sausalito Ferry.— Of all who tempt the stormy waves in 
ferry steamers, and who have failen into set ways, tbe regular 
passengers by the Sausalito boats are the most pronounced. 
Should any rash person take Commodore Harrison's seat on tbe 
port side under the lee of the paddle-box, the scowl on the brow 
of that veteran mariner is dark enough to obscure the quiet flirta- 
tion that cnnning dude of the Rover is having in the corner with 
the dark-haired daughter of Sonoma. Mr. W. G. Harrison, the 
coal king, scorns a lee, and will expose his manly form to the 
westerly winds on the forward deck during the entire passage. 
Mr. Harrison's appearance in this quarter is the signal for tbe 
gathering of the incorporation crowd, Messrs. Shoobert, Sperry, 
etc., who will each in torn declaim upon the advantages that 
must accrue to 8auaalito the minute the town is incorporated. It 
is a foregone conclusion that as soon as this is accomplished Mr. 
Sperry will be Mayor. Tbe Board of Town Council has also been 
decided on. Prominent in these pleasing debates is Charles 
Foster, of the Hacienda, who has watched Sausalito grow up, 
and the wilds of Hurricane Gulch become transformed into a flour- 
ishing annex of the great metropolis. Tbe San Rafael contingent 
listen scornfully to the future of Sausalito as mapped out by the 
glowing Harrison. Mr. Butler, the member from Ross Valley, 
where, the slanderers say, the mosquitos could give the Mew 
Jersey fellows points, and beat them out, quits the group in dis- 
dain, and goes off to the snug whisi party in the private room by 
the paddle casing. Mr. J. B. Gill, the electrician, chips in, and 
attributes the depressed condition of Sausalito hotels and 
boarding-houses this season to the duty on tin, and 
Mr. Cleveland's delay in repealing the McKinley act. 
When Fred Hutchinson or School Director Magee, of Mill Valley, 
put in their oars, they are at once repulsed by the statement that 
they've got no water-front, no yachts, no sea-bathing and that 
the valley, once a picturesque spot, has degenerated into an open 
rural market for five-cent soda water and sawdust sandwiches. Mr. 
8teele, the Tamalpais railroad king (who must not be confounded 
with Mr. E. L. G. Steele of Oakland), frowns sternly when any 
strictures upon the valley reaches his august ear, for he is one of 
the barons of the land, and he and Mr. Joe Eastland have pro- 
jects in view which will make Mill Valley the wonder of Califor- 
nia. Mr. Frank Pixley, sad and afraid of the Almshouse, con- 
verses with none on his journey to Mill Valley. He sits by him- 
self and sneers at the editorials of the pigmy editors of tbe even- 
ing papers. 

The Tiburom Ferry The population of Belvedere is a haughty 

and exclusive set. They regard Sausalito as a plebeian town, a 
sort of a semi-Portuguese settlement, in fact, unworthy the re- 
gards of a true Belvederean. When Halleck Wright, Robert 
Breitzman and John Haven come together, they hold a congrat- 
ulatory meeting on tbe forward deck, look disdainfully at Sausa- 
lito, and thank Heaven that they are residents of a lonely island 
where there are " no winds, no fogs," etc., etc. Charley Holmes 
and George Bargate pace up and down and discuss the new drive 
when Belvedere shall be connected with San Rafael by that high- 
way so long projected and so slow in coming. The Belvedereans 
poke fun at their neighbors for being so somnolent. They claim 
that Sausalito is wrapped in slumber just about the time Belve- 
dere has begun to enjoy itself. Also, that they bave got more 
houseboats and steam and naptha launches than 1 the sister burg. 
They point with pride to that bouquet of bachelors, Hickman, 



Greenlee. Mulr, Tittell an, I Hawkins on board tbe Pollvrog, and 
draw odious comparisons between her and the Sphi/nx, where 
Commodore Frank CarUn lives in gloomy and solitary marine 
state. Again they assert that whereas Mrs. Bleihen Sherwood is 
the only lady In Sausalito who is remarkable for good rowing and 
swimming, they have dozens, among whom the Morses, Cooks, 
Mai wells and Stocks are prominent. Another favorite topic on 
tbe Tiburon Ferry is the future of the west sldeof Belvedere. Ed. 
Rix has begun its settling by building certainly the most pictur- 
esque cottage in Marin county If not in California, and more may 
follow. A feud, at present no larger than a gad-fly, but which 
may grow to the proportions of a Florida alligator, has grown up 
between the residents of Tiburon proper and the haughty natives 
of Belvedere. The Tiburonites declare that the others look down 
upon them in a double sense, not alone from their lofty villas, 
bnt because they consider themselves, forsooth, their social supe- 
riors. But those little things are inevitable in seaside places, 
where people are idle, and the hours are long between the rising 
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SAN EKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 




We Obev no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



"""THERE is quite a number of people in town already," waa 
1 the remark, with a decidedly qualifying accent, of a stylish 
young woman whose fashionably sun-browned face and rather 
neglige" attire denoted her one of the just-come-in. It was on the 
theatre car, and the car was filled with patrons of the Baldwin 
re-opening with Americans Abroad and Daniel Frohman's Lyceum 
Theatre Company. The smile, reaching the very outside limit of 
perceptibility allowed by decorum, which rippled along the rows 
of car occupants, was no doubt excited by a remembrance of the 
large and handsomely appareled audience which had filled the 
theatre to its utmost seating capacity and even to a small over- 
flow into aisles and lobbies, and which certainly gave tangible 
proof that a few people at least are in town, even at the seaBon 
which Fashion still relegates to seaside, summer-sauntering, and 

sunburn. 

* ■ * 

The re-opening, last Monday night, of the theatre called » lead- 
ing " by everybody who is, or would be thought, anybody in the 
social swim, was attended by many circumstances calculated to 
make it an event in its way. Among them were the popularity 
of the company and the reputation of the play, but no small 
factor was that, after its long closure, the re-opening of the 
theatre was in itself most welcome to amusement seekers. The 
gentlemen looked much as usual in full or semi-evening attire; 
but this manly unconsciousness of any special call to be un- 
natural did not extend to the feminine contingent which, always 
alive to conventional niceties, managed, while displaying much 
elegance and even costliness of toilet, in some indefinable way to 
suggest that it was only half in harness, so to speak, and with its 
degage air to remind itself of its recent run in pasture and of the 
temporary nature of its assumption of the burnished and gilaed 
trappings fitted to trotting in urban traces. 

The intangible differences, however, merged themselves in a 
general satisfaction on the rising of the curtain and the beginning 
of the play. To speak exactly, the play hardly begins till toward 
the end of the first act, when the people begin to act and stop 
talking. Hamlet himself could not have said, "Words, words, 
words," more disparagingly than the Baldwin audience did dur- 
ing the long- winded dialogue of the tedious opening scene, the 
only excuse for which may be in the necessity for introducing 
the people and the situation, both of which could have been 
safely left to develop themselves. The expectant audience had 
almost lapsed into acknowledged boredom, and was becoming 
decidedly restive when Le Moyne burst upon the scene, bringing 
with him the beginning of movement and life, which were kept 
up to the end of the pretty play. 

Americans Abroad, while it may not equal either in dramatic 
value or characterization, most of Sardou's work, has one crown- 
ing virtue in the eyes of Americans at home. It presents none of 
the absurd and ridiculous caricatures which foreign playwrights 
generally give us as " typical" Americans, or as they, with a fine 
disregard of nomenclature, "lump" as "Yankees." The Ameri- 
cans of Mr. 8ardou and the Lyceum Company are the kind we 
know and recognize as well-bred, well-read, well-mannered people, 
reasonably familiar with the rules of English grammar and good 
society, with no special loudness of dress, voice, or behavior to 
distinguish them from well-bred people elsewhere. The two 
young girls may, indeed, differ widely from the inevitable 
alternative of dull reserve or Slangy fastness of the average Eng- 
lish girl and the unnatural repression of the unmarried French 
girl; but the difference is as charming as it is depicted 
by Georgia Cayvan and Effie Shannon. The bright, ready 
wit and delightful audacity of speech at home and in society are 
American and ought to be universal. Effie Shannon is as differ- 
ent as possible, loo, from the ordinary stage ingenue, who seems 
to confound that term with a feminine idiot with underdone 
brain and an overdone English accent. Miss Shannon, as the 
three-million heiress, is unaffected, lively, audacious, and coax- 
ing, like a thousand young girls we all know and like and scold. 
With the rest, she is also refined and intelligent, characteristic 
equally conspicuous in Ethel Winthrop as depicted by Georgia 
Cayvan. This character gives good opportunity for displaying 
both the lighter and the deeper vein of Miss Cayvan's ability. 
As the light-hearted but loving girl, ready to sacrifice all men's 
adulation for one man's love, and as its happy winner and 
wearer, she is sweet and womanly. On the supposed discovery 
that her lover is, after all, a money-hunter, differing only in type 
from the rest, her "righteous wrath" and indignation are realisms 
in acting. And finally, when he indignantly repudiates a love 
which under any proof could believe him so base, her penitence 
and appeals evince as much passion as any delicate-minded 
woman would show under any provocation, and which is likely 
to be a thousand-fold deeper than the reckless abandonment of 
the "emotional" actress in ordinary. In whatever phase Ethel 
Winthrop is presented, it is Georgia Cayvan's charming person- 



ality which transfuses and harmonizes the whole, and secures 
the sympathetic interest of every auditor in the little comedy by 
which she wins a declaration of love from her somewhat Quixotic 
artist-lover. 

Herbert Kelcey seems to have been specially intended for an 
ideal lover of the romantic type, as John Drew is in the light- 
comedy line. At first sight the invariable dead blackness of his 
broadcloth and dazzling whiteness of- his linen aid his serious 
visage in giving the impression of a fashionable undertaker at a. 
ten-thousand dollar funeral. But this wears off and leaves an 
admiring sense of power in one who can under so much serenity 
of countenance contrive to show so unmistakably a depth of 
feeling which the average actor depends upon contortions of 
visage to convey. He never laughs and seldom smiles, and com- 
ports himself altogether so like the imaginative woman's ideal of 
a delightfully romantic and Byronic lover as to make the ordinary 
woman wonder if with such a husband one would not need a lees 
heroic companion to come down from the clouds and have a good 
time with, now and then. But Mr. Kelcey is always so person- 
able a figure on the stage, besides being an unobtrusive gentle- 
man and a sombre-eyed, absorbed lover, that there is great 
danger of some unfeeling advance agent offering him the insult of 
claiming him as a <<matin€e star." 

Mr. Le Moyne is beyond praise as the rich American who, with 
a strong infusion of the national humor, is at once a gentleman 
and a practical man of business, free alike from the purse-proud 
ignorance and the pompous self-assertion of the usual stage 
American millionaire. His interview with the broker Baroness 
is a rare bit of comedy, as well as of human nature. 

The foreign characters are distinct failures, only, however, 
because they are not foreign at all. The Baroness, for example, 
of Mrs. Walcott would be admirable for an American adventuress, 
but it smacks aa little of Madame la Baronne as it does of a 
Scandinavian peasant woman in bark shoes. The same fault 
may be found with Mr. Katcliffe's otherwise well-acted Landolphe. 
Augustus Cook makes a good deal of comedy as the butler to < 
Mr. Fairbanks, in the opening scene especially, but for bis 
whiskers and bis accent, one would take him for a family friend 
and adviser rather than a servant, however trusted and im- 
portant. The minor parts are entitled to be called good in the 
sense that they are not bad, and do not break the general har- 
mony of a good and enjoyable production. 

Next Monday will be the opening of the fall season at Stock- 
well's Theatre, and of the second year of its existence, the cele- 
bration of its first anniversary having been recently noted. In 
consideration of the inevitable difficulties of maintaining a new 
theatrical venture in San Francisco, and of the strong and in- 
creased competition, that the year has not been disastrous is in 
itself a success. 

The new season will open with a production of Our Bachelors, 
the amusing comedy in which Kobson and Crane starred to- 
gether. It will bring out the strength of the new Stockwell com- 
pany, in which the young Californian. Miss Katherine Grey 
(Katie Best), will be the leading lady. Mr. T. D. Frawley, lately 
seen here with Nat Goodwin, is another important addition to 
the company. There is every prospect of a brilliant opening of 
the new season next Monday night. Following is a list of the 
people in the cast of Our Bachelors: L. K. Stockwell, George Os- 
bourne, T. D. Frawley, Francis Powers, D. P. Talbot, George 
Bosworth, Ethel Brandon, Katherine Grey, Mrs. Bates, Bertha 
Foltz, and Minnie Ellsworth. 

• # * 

AH Baba, with an entirely new musical and humorous setting, 
has more than kept up its first popularity during this, its third 
week at the Tivoli. With its new songs, dances, humors, and 
specialties, it has been virtually a new production. Thos. C. 
Leary has filled well the role of Zizi, in place of Fannie Liddiard, 
who is taking a short rest prior to her appearance in Indiana. 
Mr. Leary has proved an acceptable addition to the company, 
his specialty in the last act has been greatly applauded. The new 
songs are all charming selections and well sung. Among them 
are "Dear Heart," sung with much expression and feeling by 
Tillie Salinger (a special request), " Tbe Modest Man," by Gracie 
Plaisted, "A Bandit's Life," by Geo. Olmi, and "Thine Always," 
by Phil Branson. Ferris Hartman's new topical song, "In 'Frisco," 
has made the usual hit. The Griffith sisters give some new and 
rather startling dances, and a musical finale to the second act is a 
grateful change from the "cobweb ballet." It will be seen that 
the extravaganza, which will have its last productions to-uight 
and to-morrow night, is, in effect, a new piece, even more pleas- 
ing than the old one. 

Tbe next Tivoli production will be Audran's musically brilliant 
opera, Indiana. Since The Mascot and Olivette, none of Audran's 
operas have met with the success of Indiana. In addition to its 
sparkling and catchy music, the book and plot are full of unusual 
romantic interest as well as fun. The picturesque scenery appro- 
priate to the opera, and tbe eighteenth century costumes will add 
to the general attractiveness. Fannie Liddiard will return for 
this production, and tbe cast will include the entire strength of 
the Tivoli Opera House Company. 



july 15, 1893. 



sax rnvNvisco m:\vs LETT] i; 



By special arrangement with Augustin Paly, the powerful 
drama, Royer Ln ltonlt, will be played at Stockwell'a Theatre by 
the new stock company (or the week beginning July 34th. 

The usually low, duloet tones of Manager Louis Morgenstern's 
voice, beard in unwonted sternness and inflexibility at the door 
of the Baldwin Theatre last Monday night, in the ukase, " Re- 
member, Mr. Kreuger, no stools or seats in the aisles, under any 
circumstances," was a satisfactory reminder that with some 
managers, at least, the lives and limbs of their patrons are of 
more consideration than the few dollars which might accrue from 
winking at an infraction of the law in this case made and pro- 
vided. 

• * • 

The seating capacity of the Baldwin has been diminished by 
some fifty seats by the late changes and reservations. The greater 
convenience of access to boxes is an undoubted improvement, 
but in case of any unusual atiraction, it will as certainly be 
found to have been paid for perhaps too dearly in the loss of 
seating places. The changes and renovations recently made at 
the Baldwin in the way of carpets, drapery, drop-curtains, etc., 
are all in excellent taste, and add to the aesthetic enjoyment of 
its patrons. 

* » * 

The second week ot the Lyceum Theatre Company, at the 
Baldwin, will open Monday night with The Orey Mare, a three-act 
comedy by Sims and Raleigh. It has never been seen here, 
though played two seasons ago by the same company, when it 
called out much favorable comment. 



Jefferson Thompson, as the farm hand in Maine and Georgia at 
Stockwell's, will long be remembered as one of the distinct hits 
of that production, especially by those familiar with actual spec- 
mens of the genus. From one of the » unconsidered trifles" of 
the first production, the quiet drollery and fidelity of this rural 
characterization has won on the public till it is C3rtain to stand 
out as a salient feature whenever the play is called to mind. 

The benefit to be given to Meyer Cohen, the young baritone, at 
Metropolitan Hall next Thursday evening promises to be a great 
success, as he is very popular and his friends want to give him a 
bumper before his departure East to join Archie Boyd's Country 
Squire company. Among the many names on the programme are 
found those of John Jack and Annie Firmin in the quarrel scene 
from the School for Scandal; Julius Kahn, Miss Dorothy Ross- 
more, Miss Alice Nielson, Mrs. Gussie Cohen-Levy, Miss Minnie 
Huff, Thomas C. Leary, Professors L. Tronchet and H. Ansot in 
an exhibition of fencing, J. W. McKenzie's 8inging Society of 
sixty members and others. Seats are on sale at Kohler and Chase's 

music house. 

# * * 

J. H. Rosewald and Madame Julie Rosewald will return from 
their summer outing early in August, and will resume their pro- 
fessional work August 7th. Mr. Rosewald is well known as one 
of the leading violinists of San Francisco, as well as an enthusi- 
astic teacher of the instrument. Madame Rosewald's many pu- 
pils who have achieved brilliant successes in the East and in 
Europe are the best advertisement of this able and indefatigable 
vocaljinstructor. 

Lucile & Stone, formerly in the White House building, have re- 
moved temporarily to 128 Post street until their new rooms opposite 
are completed, and are selling millinery at greatly reduced prices. 



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BALDWIN THEATRE. 

a!\^ V u"""'" Proprietor,. 

AttuoBormn Manager. 

To-night. Matinee To-day. 

DANIEL FROHMANS LYCKIM TItEATKE COMPANY 
Presenting their latest success, 

AMERICANS ABROAD, vlctorl r„ardou. 

^^t^^^^^i^T 1 second week of Ly " 

THE GREY MARE. 

Seats now ready. 



L. R. Stockwell 

Alf Ellinohousb 

Monday evening, July 1 
ing with 



STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 

Lessee and Proprietor 

Business Manager 

beginning of the second season, open 

THE NEW STOCKWELL COMPANY OF PLAYERS, 

in the amusing comedy, 

OUR BACHELORS. 

„,^- xt n^ onda ,Yv July24th ' by s P ecial arrangement with Mr. Au- 
gustin Daly, wdl be presented the powerful drama, 

ROGER LA HONTE. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

K **" N °=* 0B Proprietors and Managers. 

TO-NIGHT. Second week. A meritorious success I 

The Oriental Spectacular Extravaganza. 

ALI BABA, 

(Up to Date). 

Ttotalk of°the h town abian NiSh ' S realized ' A r °y al treat f ° r the little ones. 
Monday, July 17th," 

INDIANA. 
PopqlabPbiceb 25and50c . 

OX^IEi. X. H. EOSEWALD, 

VIOLIN, 

M^E. TTJIjIB EOSE'WALD, 

VOCAL, 

Will resume the duties ol their profession on 

MONDAY, AUGUST 7th. 

922 GEARY ST., 

on Thursday and Friday, August Sd and 4th, from 2 to 4 p. m. to arrange 
time for pupils and new applicants. unaugi. 



Will be at home, 



SAN L0RENZ0_ GROVE. 

On the Line of the Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards 
Electric Railway. 
Beautiful natural forest, romantic walks, luncheon tables invitintr ar- 
bors; a large new pavilion, excellent floor for dancing. Swings and other 
attractions for children. Grand open air concert by first Regiment Baud 
every Sunday. Cars connect with all broad-gauge local trains at TwenTy- 
third avenue, Oakland; also with narrow-gauge at Thirteenth and Frank- 
lie streets. 

HAYWARDS PARK- 

At the terminus of the Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards Electric 
Railway. 
Romantie walks; mountain streams; dense woods; secluded lunehlne- 
places; mineral Bprlngs; beautiful banks of ferns, maiden-hair and wild- 
flowers. Cars connect with all broad-gauge local trains at Twentv-third 
avenue, Oakland ; also with narrow-gauge at Thirteenth and Franklin Sts 



^ 



§l?0£S F^p^ED U/JUCE YOU UZ/IIJ. 



GEO. 



Soleing 65c. Done in 20 minutes. Fine calf shoes to order 
for $3.50 up. 
POLLOCK - - - - 202 Powell Street 



PIANO AND VOCAL LESSONS, ?S TO |6 PER MONTH. 
MRS. MCDONALD, 1SS Larkin Street, S. F. 

fLOAKMAKING A SPECIALTY; ALSO DRESSMAKING. 

*-> MRS. A. C. ALLEN, 142 Seventh Street, S . F. 

LAVER, MULLANY &. LAVER, 

ARCHITECTS, 

FurnlBh plans, specifications, and Superintendence for the construction 

^novation of dwelling houses, and e\ 
Office t 93 Flood Untitling, Cor. 



or renovation of dwelling houses, and every description of building. 
— T. «il and Market Sts., S. P. 



VMADe Bush * Oerts Pianos 
IMIMDC Parlor Organs 

HAINES Installments Rentals 



A. I. Bancroft & Co, 

SOS Sutter St.,S.F. 



PIANOS 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 



Jf^ looker-op. 



NONE of the daily papers have published the story of the latest 
courageous exploit of Ambrose Bierce, that brave and honor- 
able gentleman, who takes most pleasure in assaulting defence- 
less women and vilifying gentlemen. It may be that they fear 
the lash of this public scold, and therefore are not eager to ex- 
pose his cowardly conduct to the people's scorn. Because of 
this very fear of vilification from his pen, Bierce haB met with 
but little opposition in his recent career, and has therefore come 
to imagine himself as really of some importance in the commun- 
ity. Now that the real nature of the man is known, the place 
that was formerly filled by him as a little tin god on wheels will 
be represented by a very red pimple upon a very large pump. 
The facts in connection with his recent personal attack upon Dr. 
G. A. Danziger show the fellow to be not only a coward, but a 
gross ingrate. From a person intimately acquainted with both 
sides of the question, I have obtained the following statement, 
comment upon which is unnecessary: 

In his article in last Sunday's Examiner, Bierce referred to Dr. 
Danziger as "the dismal ass whose conceit incited him to send a 
book (of Bierce's) to Mr. Gladstone." In the article of two weeks 
ago, the Bierce quoted the letter sent to him by Gladstone, 
acknowledging receipt of the novel, and referred in "terms of 
mild contumely" to Danziger, whose name, however, was not 
mentioned at the time. Whether the resenting of the receipt of 
a courteous note from the Premier of England be evidence of 
sublime egotism, or not, the reader may decide for himself. How 
it was that Danziger came to send the book to Gladstone is an 
interesting story. 

When Bierce decided to have published "Black Beetles in Am- 
ber," which is a compilation of some of his most scurrilous news- 
paper verses, he had great difficulty in finding a publisher. The 
book was refused by more than one Eastern house, and was also 
declined by Mr. Hearst. Finally the author made an agreement 
with one Langton, a printer of this city, promising to pay him 
$500 for the publication of one thousand copies of the book, 
which in shape, style, stock and general appearance was to be 
similar to " Soldiers and Civilians." Subsequently Bierce insisted 
on the production of a better made book than his first, and Lang- 
ton, therefore, had to change his plans accordingly. About this 
time Dr. Danziger was very enthusiastic over a proposition to es- 
tablish a publishing association in this city, and he spoke to Bierce 
about it. At that time the two men were very friendly. Danzi- 
ger said he would like to bring out "Black Beetles in Amber," 
but Bierce preferred to have Langton produce the book. The lat- 
ter, however, was without sufficient money, although Bierce had 
paid a first installment of $250 which went for composition expen- 
ses, and Langton could not continue the work in accordance with 
the new and more expensive plans of the author. Danziger then 
advanced over $400 to the publisher in behalf of the book. The full 
edition was finally published, but the books fell flat on the mar- 
ket. Danziger took charge of the sale. He has charge of it yet, 
and, incidentally, has several hundred books also in charge that 
he does not know what to do with. As agreed, out of the first 
receipts of the sales, he repaid to Bierce what he could of the $500 
Bierce had advanced to the publisher. In this manner Bierce re- 
ceived $420 in cash and about $50 worth of books. Danziger, 
therefore, yet owes him $30. The confiding friend, however, never 
received even a copper upon his investment of over $400. In pay- 
ment of the $30 due Bierce, Danziger offered him about half the 
remaining books. Bierce, however, knew the public's opinion of 
his work, and refused the offer. He also refused to consent to 
the publication of a cheaper edition of the work, as suggested by 
Danziger, who wanted an opportunity to get some of his money 
back. It was a copy of this book that the doctor sent to Glad- 
stone. 



"Soldiers aDd Civilians" had been well received in England, 
where the papers published favorable opinions of it expressed 
by Gladstone. In the hope of getting another good notice from 
the Premier, but this time for "Black Beetles," Danziger '.'had 
the conceit" to send him a copy of the book. For this legitimate 
endeavor to create a demand for the work abroad, and thus get a 
return upon his investment, Bierce refers to Danziger in terms of 
"mild contumely." 

This was not the only bitter experience Danziger had with the 
ungrateful dictionary student. It will be remembered that about 
November last the Examiner began the publication in serial form 
of "The .Monk and the Hangman's Daughter," an adaptation 
from the German. The original story contained about 5000 words. 
Dr. Danziger's adaptation, in which he introduced several new 
characters, had 28,000 words. After he had completed the tale, 
Danziger showed it to Bierce, and asked the tatter's assistance in 



editing the work. Bierce agreed to rewrite the story according to 
the best of his ability, for which work Danziger agreed to pay him 
at the rate of $50 a week, but the total payment for this literary 
labor was not to be over $200. It was also agreed between them 
that the story should be published with their names as joint au- 
thors. Danziger was to receive two-thirds of the profits of the pub- 
lication of the story in book form, and Bierce was to receive two- 
thirds of the profits of its newspaper publication; and, further, 
from his share of the profits, Bierce was to repay to Dan- 
ziger the $200 advanced him for his work as editor. The Ex- 
aminer paid them $199 for the story, and from his share of this 
money Bierce paid Danziger $132.66. The book publication was 
undertaken by Schulte, of Chicago, who was to issue 6000 copies. 
Bchulte failed, and nothing came from the books. It would thus 
appear that Bierce is about $66 ahead in the transaction, while 
Danziger is a total loser. But the money received by him is not 
the only benefit the Prattler obtained from his association with 
the story-writer. When the novel was published in the Ex- 
aminer the names of the authors appeared as "G. A. Danziger and 
Ambrose Bierce." Before Schulte undertook the publication of 
the book Bierce wrote Danziger asking that the latter allow 
Bierce's name to appear first upon the title page. To this Dan- 
ziger consented, and consequently the novel has become known 
as Bierce's; it has been so catalogued in libraries, and referred to 
in public prints, although all that Bierce ever had to do with the 
work was to review it, as already stated. At one time while at 
this work he wrote to Danziger that he found the plot of the 
novel so nearly perfect as it came to him that all he could do was 
to improve to some extent its style and diction. After Schulte's 
failure Danziger wished to try again, and proposed to incorporate 
in one volume with the novel some other stories of his own or of 
Bierce. To this the latter objected, and it was not done. 

* * * 

A very peculiar fact in connection with this affair was Bierce's 
disposition of the manuscript Danziger had sent him to rewrite. 
After the Examiner began its serial, the author wrote Bierce ask- 
ing for the return of the copy that the latter had labored over at 
$50 a week. Bierce replied that he had destroyed it. Fortunately 
Danziger had retained the original manuscript himself, the one 
he sent to his associate being a copy. This Bierce did not know, 
but as Danziger now has the original manuscript, all of which 
is in bis own hand, there can be no question that he, and not 
Bierce, is tne author of the story. Danziger, by the way, organ- 
ized the Western Authors' Publishing Association of this city, with 
W. C. Morrow. The latter, owing it is said, to the influence of 
Bierce, has since withdrawn, and Danziger is now alone in the 
venture, which is proving quite successful. 

* * * 

Now comes the denouement. Danziger told another writer 
about Bierce's destroyal of the manuscript, and stated that he 
himself had the original copy. Bierce said Danziger was a liar, 
and that he would have his blood. He then went to the doctor's 
office in the Murphy Building and there assaulted him. He 
struck him with his fists and then with a cane, and drew a pis- 
tol on him, telling Danziger at the same time to arm himself, as 
he intended to kill him. The author, who was so unfortunate as 
to associate himself with a bully and coward, is a minister and a 
man of peace. He has not armed himself, nor does he intend to 
do so. It may be that somewhere he has read that the bark of a 
cur is more dangerous than its bite, and he believes it. 

The Bohemians are making active preparations for the Mid- 
summer High Jinks, which is to be held Saturday, August 5th. 
The club will leave by the 11:20 boat, Tiburon Ferry, and will 
meet the " Midsummer Jinks special," which will make the trip 
in three hours. A series of novelties, under the direction of Sire J. 
D. Redding, will be introduced. The Meeker Grove, where the com- 
ing Jinks takes place, is near Guerneville, and is an old camping- 
ground of the Bohemians. It is about the only fine big tree 
grove in that part of the country that the woodman's axe has 
spared. 

The Burlingame Club is just rushing things. The new club- 
house will be started shortly, and at present the two pretty cot- 
tages at the disposition of the members are highly appreciated. 
An English groom has been imported to look after the stables, 
and the new tally-ho coach will of course be thoroughly Eng- 
lish. A golf links will be laid out, and a Scotch professor of this 
favorite game will instruct the uninitiated how to knock the ball 
i from one end to the other. Tennis and cricket will be added to 
this Western Tuxedo. 



The absence of the liveliest members of the Pacific-Union Club 
in the country has made that venerable institution more than 
usually grave. However, a quiet little poker game every night 
keeps the veterans who have remained in town from ennui. The 
young fellows are completely engrossed with the Burlingame and 
the Country Club. 



July 16, 1893 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



11 



While the late Ned Marshall wis * genial, good-natured man, 
his temper was quick and fiery. He was seated one day on 
the piazza of a hotel in Los Angeles when a stranger near him 
began discussing the merits, or rather demerits, of one of Mar- 
shall's intimate friends. Ned sprang to his feet and quietly re- 
monstrated with the slanderer, who. deceived by his gentleness, 
got quite saucy. The immediate result of the altercation was, 
that the Kentuckian kicked the stranger off the piazza, and then 
prepared for more serious war. But the fellow took the insult 
quietly and walked off. The next day, as Marshall was taking a 
drink at the bar of the same hotel, be saw the man that be bad 
kicked administering similar punishment to another. 

" Why, yon scoundrel," said Marshall. ■■ are not you the fel- 
low I thrashed yesterday?" 

" Tes," was the quiet reply; "but I am just like you, Mr. 
Marshall. I know exactly who'll take a kicking and who 
won't." 

Like other Kentuckians, and indeed many gentlemen outside 
that State, Marshall was very fond of a mint julep. While on 
a political campaign in San Diego he discovered to his consterna- 
tion that there was not a sprig of mint to be had in the town. He 
took his straight whisky sulkily, and then accepted the invita- 
tion of a friend to take a drive in the suburbs. " I will show 
you," said his host, "the cabin of the most notorious thief, and I 
believe murderer, in this country," as he pulled up opposite a 
tumble-down adobe hut. Ned glanced carelessly over the wall, 
and suddenly a joyous expression lit up his features, for on one 
side of the cabin door was an odorous bed of wild mint. 

"I don't care," said Marshall, " if be was the biggest scoun- 
drel unhung, I'm going to have some mint julep right here." Of 
course be had his flask. The Indian supplied the mint and 
sugar, and half an hour afterward, some of the swell people driv- 
ing by were horrified to see the distinguished lawyer hobnobbing 
with the hardest case in San Diego county. 

When Ned Marshall was strong in his Know-Nothing doctrine, 
it naturally followed that he incurred the animosity of those 
American citizens not born on the soil. One evening, after deliv- 
ering a red-hot anti-foreigner speech in Red Bluff, Marshall, de- 
clining the hospitalities of the committee, took a horse and rode 
out of town to spend the night at the ranch of a friend. The 
pleasant November evening was succeeded by a drenching rain- 
storm, and as Marshall pushed on, he sincerely wished that 
he were snugly installed at the hotel, then miles behind. At last 
the weather grew so bad that he decided to solicit the hospital- 
ities of the first house he came to. A comfortable house a few 
yards from the road, from the windows of which a friendly light 
streamed, presented itself. Marshall dismounted, hitched his 
horse at the gate and knocked at the door. It was opened by a 
stalwart man, who said at once: " Come in out of the wet. Be 
Gob, yez must be hard up for riding, to travel on a night like 
this.'-' 

The anti-Celtic orator felt there was no help for it, and became 
the guest of his foe, who cared for his horse and invited him to 
partake of a bounteous supper. With natural politeness, the 
host did not ask his name, but when Marshall said that he had 
ridden from Red Bluff, inquired: 

» Did ye hear that vagabond Marshall orate agin the people?" 

11 1 did," said Marshall, » and I must say I never heard a finer 
speech in my life." 

" Fine or not," said the brawny Celt, » the first time I see him 
I'll take a fall out of him, just for !uck. What kind of a man is 
he off the stump?" 

" Nice as they make 'em," replied Ned, who was beginning to 
feel uncomfortable at the turn the conversation was taking. " I 
know him well." 

" That's nothing to your credit," said the host grnffly, who 
then, as if conscious of his discourtesy, pressed another hot 
whisky on Marshall. The next morning Ned mounted his horse 
at daybreak, after heartily thanking the generous Irishman. 

" Hould on," shouted the latter, as Ned was riding away, 
ii We've had a mighty pleasant night together, but you've never 
tould me your name." 

" Ned Marshall," yelled the Kentuckian, with a wave of his 
hand. The Irishman was staggered for a moment, and then bel- 
lowed back: 

" I don't care if you were ould Nick himself, you're good com- 
pany, and there's always a plate and a glass of whisky for you 
whin you come this way." 

* * * 

The University Club is all agog, and hints are abroad of mys- 
terious meetings held by the directors, which will shortly bring 
forth fruit, or else the proceedings will never see the light. It ia 
a tacit understanding among the members that the discussion of 
a certain disagreeable topic within the precincts of the club is 
tabooed. 



Quite a fad East is to chew for half an hour after dinner Adams' 
Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum for indigestion. 

Squint in children's eyes prevented without surgical operation, consult 
free of charge, C. Muller, Oculist Optician, 135 Montgomery street. 



PIPER-HEIDSIECK 



"SEC" 



CHAMPAGNE. 



INTENSELY DRY. 



THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO., 

SOLE AGENTS PACIFIC COAST. 

TO LET 
FURNISHED. 

A modern house of eight rooms; 
convenient to two cable lines; grand 
marine view; good neighborhood. 
Rent reasonable to desirable party. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND. 
10 Montgomery Street. 

Morphine-Opium 

HABIT permanently cured in five days, without harm, trouble or 
inconvenience. New method. No cure, no pay. 

JOY'S BALDWIN PHARMACY, 

Powell and Market 8ts., S. F. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W.B. CHAPMAN, 

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l23Califomi»St.,S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOB SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



12 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 




EVERYONE ia wondering why the four young ladies and their 
charming daddy, N. K. Masten, left their brown cottage in 
San Mateo so hurriedly last Sunday morning and came to San 
Francisco. Surely they must have intended to stay longer than 
they did, for they went to great expense to furnish their cottage, 
and gave out that they were going to remain for at least six 
moons. But Dame Rumor, who always settles such things, 
gives her version of the sudden departure like this; There are 
two fair ydting la^.ISs at the Hotel Mateo, the Misses Boone, 
the sisters of two more who are at present in Monterey. They 
have plenty of money, and so has their loving papa, who sent his 
daughters to the coast under the care of two very giddy chaper- 
ones, the Misses Fascault, of Boston. The one in charge of the two 
at San Mateo is a middle-aged blonde, with just enough of the 
old-girl about her to be interesting. The ravages of time have 
not dealt with her very seriously, and she Btill maintains some 
maidenly loveliness. So the gray-haired father of the maidens in 
the brown cottage saw her and fell madly in love with her. 
Nothing could undo hie passion, and he taught bis daughters to 
love her — as a sister. One night when she had returned with him 
from their customary drive, they found two easy chairs in the 
reading room of the hotel, and while the rest of the guests were 
wandering out among the shrubbery, she was showing him a lot 
of pictures of Baltimore young ladies who had married elderly — 
yes, quite elderly gentlemen. This was the incentive he was 
looking for; and afterward when he walked with her through 
gnarling oaks and pining pines, he popped the question. Her 
love for him, if she ever had any, turned to anger, as though she 
had been struck by a thunderbolt. In loud tones, which let the 
story out, she called him to account for his audacity, and walked 
away in the night the master of the situation. On the next 
morning he asked for his bill, and told his daughters to pack 
their grips. The affair has proved very serious for Miss Fascault, 
who was dismissed by the Misses Boone. She is now at the 
Catholic Orphan Asylum at San Rafael, recovering from nervous 
prostration. 

* » # 

By long odds the prettiest bathing suit at Del Monte is worn by 
Hilda Hecht. The best swimmer is her sister, Miss Zadie Hecht, 
and the most popular young lady at the hotel Miss Sarah Boone. 
The prettiest woman is Mrs. Bob Wieland, and the most fashion- 
able Mrs. Bruguiere. The men hold no claim to distinction. Joe 
Redding is about the best-looking man in the place. 

The check intended for the Church of St. Mary the Virgin did 
not materialize. Although the Duke of Newcastle was wooed, he 
was not won. 

It would be well for the Del Monte management to discharge 
the freckle-faced bell-boy. As a scandal-monger he has not an 
equal in the ranks. 

* » # 

The Duke of Newcastle gave a dinner to Beveral of his friends 
at the Palace before he left for Honolulu. It was a swell affair, 
and in front of the few covers sat Gambier and his prelate 
brother, the British Consul and his Vice and the " Dook" him- 
self. The manner in which he tipped the servants was so 
surprising to the lacqueys that they became intoxicated before the 
dinner was over. 

More than one fair damsel of the Four Hundred, it is said, 
were Been in conditions of intemperance at the tennis tourna- 
ment. Strolls with young men into coveted nooks during the 
dark hours were not infrequent. Everything gave evidence that 
the girls were having a «• speedy" time, and were making the 
most of it. On the afternoon of the Fourth there were at least 
six young ladies of excellent families who sat in front of the bar- 
room listening to the wild carousals of the boys and drinking 
champagne, which was readily supplied to them by their ad- 
mirers, as though they had been used to such a life for many 
years back. The talk that must have reached their ears from the 
barroom was rather strong, but they stood it bravely, and when 
they left to go to dinner it was impossible for them to reach the 
hotel without leaning very heavily on the arms of their escorts. 
Perhaps it is best not to mention any names. But we trust that 
our girls will conduct themselves " discreetly'' in the future. 

* # # 

How was it that the Rev. Bolton should have singled oat but 
one of bis wardens for the honor of a ducal dinner at the Palace 
Hotel ? Why could not brother Gambier have given his Grace the 
tip to do the thing handsomely, when at all, and take in the ves 
try and acolytes? Surely a spread at his Grace's expense would 
have been more enjoyable {though not so lasting) as the photo 
done by the Newcastle camera. 



The San Mateoites are brim full of jollity. The hotel is full of 
charming people who all pnll together admirably, tennis flourishes, 
the beautiful drives are largely patronized, and the charming 
climate is fully appreciated by those who have taken up their 
abode there for their summer outing at the pretty town. 



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Hot Salt Water and Sulphur Baths, 

Infallible cure for rheumatism, liver 
and kidney trouble and kindred complaints. 
Pamphlets mailed on application. 

C. R. r\ASON, Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. O., Cal. 



PURIFIES 

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BEAUTIFIES THE SKIN. 

No other cosmetic will do it. 




IHt. T. FELIX GOURACD'S 

Oriental (team, or Magical 

Bea miner. 

T> EMOVES Tan. Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
-" Patches, Rash and Skin diseases, and 
and every blemish on beauty, and defies 
detection. It has stood the test of 40 years, 
and Is bo harmless we taste it to be sure 
it is properly made. Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Br. L. A. Sayre said 
toaladyof the haut-ton ia patient): "As 
you ladies will use them I recommend 
'Gouraud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." 

For sale by all druggists and fancy goods 
dealers in the United States, Canadas and 
Europe. 

FEHD. T. HOPKINS, Proprietor, 

37 GREAT JONES STREET, 

New York, 



The Midwinter Fair will see a great many people familiar with 
Sherwood's Monogram Whisky. 

The doctors recommend, for indigestion, after dinner chewing for 
half an hour Adams' Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum. 



El */VT\P0 0, *. Bay. 

l/ia tlpe Safe ai?d large Steamer UKial?. 

reopened a5 a Sunday pa/r\ily Resort. 

Choice programme of popular music. Refreshments, 
fishing and boating. NO DANCING. Tables and seats 
for family lunches. Decorum will be preserved. Round 
trip and admission to the grounds, 50 cents. Children 
under 10 years free if accompanied by parents. Steamer 
Ukiah leaves Tiburon ferry, foot of Market street, every 
Sunday at 10:30 A. M. and 1:45 P. M. Leave El 
Campo 12:45 and 5 P. M. 



July 15, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTKR. 



13 



AS SEEN BY AN ENGLISHMAN. 



RKV. T. HEKBKKT STEAD. M. A.. In the Rerietr of Ii- 
gives the following interesting description of the World's 
Fair: 

*• To parody a much-tortured iistu-u. if thou woaldst view the 
World's Fair right, go visit it by tbe pale arc light. Illuminated, 
the grounds and buildings become an enchanted world. You 
stand in a region preturnatural. Tbe material seems wholly 
transfigured into tbe ideal. A Platonist might imagine that he 
■aw no longer tbe gross palpable structures, but beheld their 
archetypal ideas as they glowed in the mind of tbe Eternal. Tbe 
Administration Building was but a framework of beaded fire in- 
closing spaces of erubescent snow. Its dome Bhone out as a col- 
lossal diadem gemmed with jets of Same upon a ground of gold. 
Similar rosaries of incandescent wire ran round tbe colonade at 
tbe foot of Ihe great basin, and lit up the architraves of tbe inter- 
vening buildings. Search lights of various colors flashed about 
the grounds, flinging by turns every object of special prominence 
into bold relief. But, though the incandescent burners wreathed 
the palaces with rare splendor, it was tbe arc light which gave to 
the illumination its peculiar unearthly semblance. Everywhere 
within and without the building it shed its rays, soft, mysterious 
and benignant as of tbe harvest moon. It was as though the light 
which never was on sea or shore had at last been made visi- 
ble to other than poet eyes. It gave tbe grass an eerie tinge. It 
lent an in tenser whiteness to the masonry. It changed the 
waters into sheets of pallid flame. The greatest building in the 
world with the electric radiance streaming through its miles 
of glass seemed to be the very home of the starlight, and 
its shining sides called to mind Lucretius' lucida moenia 
mundi. But fairest of all the fair creations which night and light 
together formed within the grounds was the effect produced by 
the exterior of the Agricultural Building. Even in the daylight it 
is a fairy structure, but seen by the tamed lightning it is a vision 
of almost heavenly beauty. Viewed from the north side of the 
basin, with the foreground of gleaming water, its pure white col- 
umns standing out against tbe rich rose-coloring of the inner 
wall, glowing within and without with the clear, calm light that 
recalls the luminousness of perfect moral insight, it fills tbe mind 
with a positive fervor of spiritual joy. I have seen no picture of the 
abodes of tbe blest which comes near to it in its serenity, its sug- 
gestion of tbe invisible holiness, its atmosphere of bliss. "This 
would have given 'points' to the writer of Revelations had he 
seen it," was a remark which scarcely seemed profane in tbe 
presence of that mystic spectacle. Precious stones do not appeal 
to us Westerners as they do to Orientals, and for my part I pre- 
fer the white glory of the Hellenic architecture, transfigured by 
the electric light, to the blaze of all the jewels with which the 
gorgeous imagination of the East could deck the battlements or 
pave the streets of Paradise. "Until I see the walls of the New 
Jerusalem itself I never expect to see a dream of more exquisite 
loveliness than this." So I heard a man say to his friend; and 
tbe pure splendor of tbe scene before bim made the enthusiasm 
of his words seem at least pardonable. Those who are most 
ready to depreciate the Fair, and to cavil at the glowing language 
used over it, have to reckon with the fact that it has the power to 
turn the heads, as they would say, of an extraordinary large num- 
ber of speakers and writers usually sane. There must be some 
strange witchery about a spot which tempts so many differently 
constituted beholders to exhaust the resources of eulogy in the 
effort to transcribe the impressions it gives them. 

"Yet all this wonder-world is in Chicago; it is the historci 
achievement of the Lake City." 

LAST week, 2643 births and 1453 deaths were registered in Lon- 
don, the former being 72 above and the latter 85 below the 
average numbers in the corresponding weeks of the last ten years. 
The death-rate per thousand fell to 17.6, or lower than that re- 
corded in either of the preceding three weeks. There were de- 
creases in the fatalities attributed to smallpox, measles and scar- 
let fever; but deaths from diptheria rose from 41 to 51, and were 
28 in excess of the corrected average. Twenty-one deaths were 
primarily attributed to influenza. 

J. M. Litchfield, of 12 Post street, easily takes place as the best 
and most popular tailor in the city. He has been engaged in 
business here for years, and has always enjoyed the confidence of the 
community. Colonel Litchfield makes a specialty of uniforms, 
regalias and other appurtenances of military, naval and society 
outfits. 

Landladies and other heads of households who desire to have their 
curtains or carpets cleaned, should remember that the very best place 
in the city to have such work done is at the Pioneer Carpet Beating 
and Pacific Cleaning and Dyeing works of J. Spaulding & Co., at 353 
and 357 Tehama street. Spauldmg's has for years been the favorite 
cleansing house in the city. 

Ladies, oall at the Wonder Hat, Flower and Feather Store, 1024- 
26-28 Market street, and see our new line of novelties in hats, flowers 
laces, ribbons, etc. Large stock. Low prices. 

Lillian Beddabd coaches ladies and gentlemen for the dramatic pro- 
fession ; appearances arranged. Shakespearean Academy, 509 Hyde street. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Cnlif.'rnin Savinqn nnd Lonn Society. 
Kor the half your Boding -lime 30, !»«, a dividend hu bcon declared at 
the rate of (He 16) per cent per annum on Term Deposit*, aud four and one- 
flxth (I 1-r.) p.T rent per annum OD ordinary Deposit*, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Saturday. July l 

\ BRNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office — Corner of Powell and Eddy -dreets. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Lonn Society, 

For the six months eud.UR June. 10. isy;,, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of Ave (6) per ceut per annum ou Term Deposits, and four and 
one-sixth (4 1-6) per ceut per annum ou Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Saturday, July l. 1893. 

CYRUS \V. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending with June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five per cent, pe^ annum on Term Deposits and four and one 
sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

Office— 33 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIOEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-61 per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 
Office— 326 California street, corner Sansome. Branch— 1700 Market St., 
corner Polk. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half-year ending June 30. 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum on term deposits 
and four and one fourth (4'4) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE- 



Pacific Coast Savings Society. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of 6 per cent per annum on term deposits, and 5 per cent per an- 
num on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable ou and after Saturday, 
July 1, 1893. G. B. BARNARD, Secretary. 

Office— No. 30 Montgomery street. ^ 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

San Francisco, June 30, 1893. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held thiB 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter (4J^) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 1893, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1893. 

R. J. TOB1N, Secretary. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Street. 




! KEEP COOL 



inside, outside, and all the way through, 
by drinking --^ . 

HIRES' §°* 

This great Temperance drink; ■-^w^** 
is as healthful, as it is pleasant. Try it. 



Palo Alto Stables. 

R. E. MILES, Pbopbietoe. 

320 O'FARRELL ST San Francisco. 

Victorias, Rockaways, " Landaus, Buggies of all kinds. Also Saddle 
Horses. Boarding a specialty. . 

These large brick stables offer especial inducements to boarders, being 
new, with all modern improvements, well ventilated and healthy. All 
horses are kept above ground, with first class attendants. 
Telephone Mo. 8615. 



14 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 




A Mining Case That interesting young person who measures off 
Where the sufficient boiler plate matter to fill up the blanket 

Shoe Pinches, sheet which moulds public opinion in a portion of 
the State where an Evans or a Sontag is esteemed as a leading 
citizen, has been posing as a critic of an article published in this 
paper some time ago, and which was reproduced the week follow- 
ing in the "patent insider'' to which we refer. The " store- 
keepers" evidently did not relish the publication of their true 
mental calibre right in their own camp, and the young person, in 
self-defense had to make a prodigious howl; and by way of ex- 
planation gives a display of ignorance such as one might look 
for in that ill-favored locality. It is very evident that any 
one in search of information in the mining line need not apply 
in his quarter. A few reliable pointers might probably be ob- 
tained in train-wrecking, assassination or sinking wells where 
" tanglefoot" is not to be had for theft or murder, but not in re- 
gard to such an honorable industry as mining. Mines do not 
flourish in that land, famous alone for its sandy wastes and mala- 
rial swamps. The only apology for a property of the kind was 
one, the mention of which has stirred up the bile of the ••shop- 
keepers" whose ambition carried them beyond their depths and 
cost them money, the severest blow of all. Why the names 
of wealthy and estimable men should be dragged into 
the same category as these little " grub-stake" speculating 
knights of the yard-stick is not quite clear. As for the typo- 
graphical error which made " more " read » nine," the mistake is 
too apparent to need an explanation, except in a case like the 
one at point. The News Letter knows just enough about the 
mine referred to, and its ownership past and present, to rest sat- 
isfied that the » storekeepers' " friend is not quite so well posted 
as be thinks he is. In other words he has been stuffed to a 
nicety. "Without disputing the Vanderbilt fairy tale, we would 
remark that the rumor about the river flooding the lower levels 
killing the sale in London, is the veriest rot, showing very 
plainly that the writer does not know the first thing about the 
matter. We have the report now, which killed the sale, and 
there is not a word in it about the river. Furthermore, if the 
same number of the News Letter had been read with care by 
one well posted on the situation, the reason for the allusion to 
the mine, which was made with the friendliest intention, would 
have been apparent. As it is, the end desired was attained, re- 
gardless of the "storekeepers' " feeliDgs. The truth is rather un- 
palatable at times. Everybody knows that, and allowance can 
be made for a little temper in return. 
$ $ $ 

THE depreciation in the valuation of silver bullion is being felt 
more heavily among the working classes of the West than 
has yet been apparent to the wealthy capitalist, who can close 
down his mines and calmly review the situation without having 
to bother about where his next meal is coming from. More seri- 
ous results are to be dreaded than the mere disarrangement of the 
National finances. It would be wise rule to insist that the Presi- 
dent of this great country and his CabinetOfficers should in every 
case be compelled to make a visit to the different States of the 
Union so as to be familiar with their requirements before enter- 
ing his official duties. Mr. Cleveland before giving his "object 
lesson," which has cost the Nation millions, might have thought 
twice before committing his unpardonable blander, had he known 
enough about the Western State* which stood gallantly by him 
during his last victorious campaign. From one hundred and fifty 
to two hundred thousand men are now idle owing to the closing 
down of the mines, and it is only a question of a very short time 
until the majority will be on the verge of starvation. The 
worst of it is that these men have in many instances 
wives and children dependent upon them. The question now is, 
what is going to be done with this great army of unemployed? 
What will they do if driven to desperation by hunger? Thia is a 
subject which would strike one as worthy most serious consider- 
ation, when acquainted with the true situation in Montana, Col- 
orado, Idaho and the Dakotas. The collapse has been too sud- 
den to give anyone a chance to make new arrangements, and in a 
business community dependent entirely upon the mining popu- 
lation for support, a close-down at the mines means sudden and 
swift annihilation. Of all the camps in Nevada there are only three 
now working outside the Comstock, and hard times exist all over 
the State. The Comstock mining market in this city has dwindled 
down to almost nothing in the matter of trading and values, and 
there is only one course open unless some change takes place for 
the better within the next sixty days. Kentuck was assessed 10 
cents and Potosi 25 cents during the week. 

* $ $ 

THE prospectus of the Pacific Mining Agency and Trust Com- 
pany has been issued, and its intentions are now more clearly 
set forth than they were by the garbled statements which have 
hitherto appeared in public print. All that can be said is that if 



the purposes of the new company are carried out in accordance 
with the terms of this prospectus, it will prove an important 
factor in solving the hitherto vexatious question: What shall we 
do with our mines? The Board of Directors and general man- 
agement is made up of men, all of whom stand high in financial 
circles. Irwin C. 8tump, whose name is now suggested for the 
United States Senatorship, is President; W. C. Ralston, the Gov- 
ernment Appraiser at this port, is Secretary, and the Anglo-Cali- 
fornian Bank, Treasurer. The Directors are Irving M. Scott; 
Jacob H. Neff, W. F. Goad, R. C. Chambers, P. N. Lilienthal. 
and D. M. Burns. The names are all as familiar to Californians 
as household words. 8cott is the builder of the warships San 
Francisco, Monterey and Charleston. Goad is a millionaire lawyer, 
thoroughly versed in all those portions of the Code which refer to 
mining. Chambers is one of the most experienced mining super- 
intendents in America. Lilienthal is generally recognized one of 
the ablest financiers on the Pacific Coast. Neff is a pioneer 
miner of California and President of the State Miners' Associa- 
tion; while Burns owns a Mexican bonanza mine, the Cande- 
laria, of Durango. There is one certainty that if those gentle- 
men devote their personal attention to the new company's affairs, 
as it is to be presumed they will, there will be no more thieving 
raids made upon foreign investors, to the disgrace of the State. 
The London investors will now have a source upon which they 
can draw for reliable information about all schemes which may 
be presented for their acceptance, with the absolute certainty of 
escape from wholesale robbery. 

$ $ $ 

IN answer to a question put to Melville Attwood, the well- 
known geologist, respecting the occurrence of gold in the con- 
glomerate beds of the South African camp of Witwatersrand, and 
which has led to so much discussion among English mining 
engineers, he replied by first showing us his collection from all 
parts of the mining world a particularly valuable collection of 
specimens of alluvial gold from New Zealand, which had been 
classified and presented to him by James Hector, Esq., F.R.S., 
Director of the Geological Survey of New Zealand. He then 
showed us a specimen of crystallized iron pyrites from the Idaho 
mine, GraBS Valley, the faces of which were covered with beauti- 
ful crystals of gold. Then be handed us a specimen of water- 
worn placer gold, taken from one of the ancient river beds near 
the North Bloomfield mine, Nevada county. The water-worn 
scales of gold were imbedded in crystals of iron pyrites, showing 
the subsequent growth of the pyrites. Mr. Attwood is of the 
opinion that, as the gold in the African conglomerates is almost 
invariably in a crystalline form, and occurring with such a large 
proportion of auriferous pyrites, that it is reasonable to conclude 
that from the great age of the beds, that they formed fissures, 
and that the gold was introduced into them after the same man- 
ner as that of our quartz veins. One of the strongest evidences 
of the great age of these conglomerate beds of South Africa, is 
the fact that the coal measures lie above them. The coal bear- 
ing strata overlying the Witwatersrand series rest unconformably 
upon the eroded edges of all the beds below, and are the newest 
stratified rocks of the district. In one locality the coal seam 
measures twenty-one feet in thickness, and the product from 
that colliery alone exceeds 13,000 tons. There are no evidences of 
such ancient beds in California. Our mines of the same character are 
comparatively young in age. k 

Closed Banks The only sensation in banking circles during the 
which are week was the discovery of additional liabilities "of 
Solvent. the Pacific Bank. These will, however, prove a 
benefit to the People's Home Savings Bank, to whom the money 
is due. The amount involved will not cripple the Pacific in any 
way, and both banks are declared solvent by the Bank Commis- 
sioners. 

$ $ $ 

THE affairs of the San Francisco and San Mateo Railroad 
seem to be rapidly drifting into a condition of entanglement 
which it will be difficult to unravel. The road is on paying basis, 
and there should be no difficulty in clearing the indebtedness, 
which only amounts to $70 000. The trouble seems to be that 
the creditors have no confidence in the Board of Directors, and 
the latter have about the same opinion of the gentlemen who hold 
the tags. The Directors, at the meeting on Wednesday last, re- 
fused point blank to accept the mediation of the Creditors' Com- 
mittee, persisting in retaining the management of their own af- 
fairs. This has served to complicate matters. The monthly re- 
ceipts are about $5000, and the total for the six months ending 
June 30th being $30,000. All of this money uas been consumed 
in repairs and operating expenses. 

$ $ $ 

THE deposits of the San Francisco Savings Union on June 30th 
last were $28,058,691; on June 20, 1892, they were $25,890,- 
653. The guarantee capital and surplus on June 30, 1893, were 
$1,599,434; on June 30, 1892, they were $1,533,136. 



July 16, 1893. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




"Hear the Crier:" "Wh>t the devil nrtthou" 
•■ One th»t wlllplavthcrt evil. «lr. with tou." 



AN Almshouse horse bad fallen beneath his heavy load, 
And they saw the poor beast dying upon the dusty road, 
And they thronged about him swiftly, and one kind mortal said, 
"Since be lived at the Almshonse, 'twere better he were dead. 

" For sore must be his lot indeed to labor every day. 
Hauling sinkers for the paupers along the dusty way, 
Tottering under shinbones, so thin to pass belief, 
With specimens most marvellous of attenuated beef. 

" Sometimes to haul short weight of flour, then wearily to toil, 
Past Sutro's big plantation with prunes too old to spoil, 
To watch the country horses bring sweet-smelling hay to town, 
Then to long for fragrant meadows to feed in and lie down. 

» When wretched paupers wail about the scarcity of food, 
Alack-a-day the paupers' horse must lack both bone and blood, 
And feed perhaps on corn-husks, and never gaze within 
The stable's pleasant shelter, upon a well-filled bin." 

While thus the crowd did moralize, one on the dead horse laid 
A kindly hand, then started back, all trembling and afraid, 
" Oh, Job," be cried, and then he gave the horse another pat, 
" My friends, I swear, upon my soul, this Almshouse horse is 
fat .'" 

The watching crowd jeered loudly then, and one man did ex- 
claim, 
*' Let's sorely smite this lying wight who puts us all to shame. 
The fat upon this Almshouse horse! Oh, vile mendacious mind." 
Then some did beat him on the face, some smote him from behind, 

1 Till one Samaritan cried out, " Come, hold your hands, 'tis so; 

A miracle! The Almshouse horse was too obese to go." 

The wondering crowd then closely scanned the prostrate equine 

corse, 
Of fatted heart expired that day that lucky Almshouse horse. 

Keep the tidings from the Almshouse, or ere the set of sun, 
By the pauper mob infuriate some bad work will be done; 
They'll crucify Pop Weaver, or ride him on a rail, 
While the pauper dames with needles sharp, the matron will 
impale. 

That a horse should die of fatness and they so woful lean — 

A dinner on a beef shank, a supper on a bean. 

No boneyard should obtain that horse, did they believe this true, 

For they'd charge out in a body and the carcass barbecue. 

SCENE — A corridor in the El Monte Hotel, Sausalito. 
Time — Midnight. 

Man's Voice — ."Come, come, open the door, and let rue in." 

Woman's Voice — "Go away." 

Man's Voice — "I won't go away. That was a nice way to treat 
me, wasn't it — going off with that Sheeny. I won't be treated 
like that. Won't you open the door?" 

Low murmur takes the place of the woman's voice. 

Man's Voice — "And you said you loved me. I am going over to 
the city to-morrow. Yes, I will. I'll go over unless you open 
the door." 

Woman's Voice — Low murmur. 

Man's Voice — "Well, won't you open the door? I won't be 
treated like this ; won't stand it. 'Tain't right. I won't go away 
to-morrow, if you'll open the door." 

No answer. 

Man's Voice — "Well, just open it a little bit, anyway, and kiss 
me good-night. Won't you kiss me good-night? Yon won't? 
Well, I'll leave to-morrow." 

Footsteps echo down the hall as the man and the voice take 
themselves away on a cruise to the bar. A deep, deep sigh is 
heard from the inner side of the door, as the fair Dulcinea, as if 
freed as any one in tbe land from cares and responsibilities, re- 
signs herself to pillows and plattituaes. 

FLEET F. 8TROTHER has given that long-suffering tuft of 
hair upon his chin another dose of lamp-black. It is gener- 
ally known that Strother dies his whiskers, but that he uses 
lamp-black for that purpose is not a matter of public knowledge. 
It is a fact, though. It is a sign of mourning with him. When- 
ever stocks go his way, Strother allows his whiskers to assert 
themselves in their natural grayness. He is kind to them then, 
but when he is forced to the wall he appears on the street with 
a fierce black beard, looking like a bloody pirate. Strother is as 
vain a man as may be found in two States. When a man of his 
years wears high-heeled peg-top boots, strokes his painted beard, 
and does other things to make himself beautiful, people begin to 
look askance at him. 



TIIK newspaper publications about tbe recent departure of 
Frank I). Willey from (he city do that young man an injus- 
tice. He did not •■ disappear," but went away with the knowl- 
edge and consent of his father. He Is not a defaulter, and all 
his accounts are correct. The trouble with Willey is that he is a 
very susceptible youth. It was a dull year that did not Bee him 
in love half a dozen times. Recently he became very lunch in- 
fatuated with a Miss Barbier, and told his father he wished to 
marry her. To this the father objected, saying that Frank had 
no right to think of marriage before he could support himself. 
There was a row, which was ended by the young man announc- 
ing that he would show his father that he could support himself. 
He had been offered a position in Arizona at a fair salary, and 
this he said he would accept. Thereupon he packed his grip and 
departed for the cactus region on the next day's train. His step- 
mother went with him a short distance, and his father has re- 
ceived a letter and several telegrams from him since his depart- 
ure. Meanwhile, Miss Barbier is supposed to be patiently wait- 
ing for ber lover to make his fortune, when, like the heroes in the 
story-book he will return and marry her, and they will live hap- 
pily ever afterwards. She is a sister of Mrs. Emeric, of Oakland, 
and is a popular and beautiful society belle. 

THE "Willie boy" will be abroad to-day in all his glory, and he 
don't care who knows it. Young Jimmy Flood, the nephew 
of the late Honorable James W. Flood, of the Donohoe Bank, is 
tbe daring youth who will venture upon the promenade clad in 
the latest style swell coat. He is the Flood who was called a bar- 
keeper by the Examiner, an imputation which the young man in- 
dignantly refutes, though he confesses that during the week, 
while receiving the congratulations of his friends, he has learned 
more than he ever knew before about the mixing of drinks. To 
show the people of this city, however, that he does not look like 
a barkeeper, he has agreed to take to the boulevard this after- 
noon "dressed to kill." He will wear the Willie coat and a silk 
hat, and will have his trousers turned up at the bottom, and will 
carry his new gloves in his left band and his stick in his right. 
When I consulted with him last upon bis daring project I sug- 
gested to him that he be preceded by a brass band, and hire a 
Salvation Army lass to follow him with a tambourine. He prom- 
ised to take this proposition under consideration. About 4 
o'clock this afternoon, then, let all men and women who have 
never seen a Willie boy in all his glory take good positions upon 
the Rialto and behold one of the grandest works of the sartorial 
art. 

WILL BARNES is a very clever young man. He is happily 
married, and in many ways has been blessed by the Gods. 
But— and he says it with a big, big B — there are moments when 
he likes to be alone. He was recently at Santa Cruz, and as has 
been his custom for some seasons back, went in swimming. He 
is a good swimmer, one of the best at Santa Cruz, in fact, and a 
daring. There were, of course, a number of fair young ladies in 
the surf, and there is no denying that Will is a handsome man. 
That may or may not have something to do with the fact that 
whenever he would start for the raft a still small voice would call 
from the sands, " Now be careful, Willie, dear, and please do not 
venture to the raft." And Willie, dear, was of course, careful, 
but — there are moments when he likes to be alone. 

WINNIE STANTON, a fair and affectionate young woman of 
easy ways, entered into a contract with Charles Stenzel, a 
gay and bad youth, and performed her part thereof. The party 
of the second part, however, declined to fulfill his agreement, 
whereupon the Stanton lassie stencil-marked his countenance 
with many and various burns and scars, resulting from a viol of 
vitriol she had carelessly used as a marking brush. Stenzel's face 
iB now a work of art. The Examiner should urge the woman's 
relentless prosecution, for if stencil marking becomes popular 
among the young ladies of Winnie's class, the Monarch will be 
crippled by the loss of its massage ads. 

SOLLY WALTERS, the artist, has just returned from Fresno, 
where he was for some weeks in attendance at the Heath trial. 
He says he wouldn't stay a similar time again in that God-for- 
saken place for anything on earth. He swears he could not get 
a square meal in town, and as he has not much flesh to spare, he 
feared he would become a skeleton. Solly forgot that the regular 
Fresnoite lives on blood. They have a man for breakfast every 
morning. 

THOMAS R. DAVIDSON, of Fruitvale, who has lived in this 
vale of tears for full three-BCore years and ten, proposes to 
marry Miss Elizabeth E. Harding, a maid of forty autumns, who 
recently nursed him back to tottering life. They should call their 
happy home "The Last Chance." 

BLISS is ft good name for a football player. When the other 
fellows are thrown to grass, trampled upon, gouged, punched 
and kicked into sections, then we will hear the idiotic spectators 
yell, "Oh, Bliss! This is Bliss!" 

JUDGING from the newspaper cuts of it, that proposed tall 
tower for the New City Hall, if erected according to the pres- 
ent plans, will be a thing of ugliness and a joke forever. 



16 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 



STATEMENT 



THE 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



JULY I, 1893. 

Showing the actual condition and value of its Assets and Liabilities and 
where situated at the close of business June 30, 1893. 

ASSETS. 

Bank Premises $ 260,000 00 

Real Estate in Various Counties of California 20,052 14 

Miscellaneous Storks and Bonds — 1,131,063 78 

Loans on Real Estate in California, Nevada, Washington, Idaho 

and Illinois 442,161 21 

Loans on Stocks and Bonds 1,101,403 32 

Loans on Warehouse Receipts, Grain, Merchandise, etc 323,439 85 

Loans on Personal Security 6,739,399 30 

Due from Banks and Bankers 1,477,434 27 

MoneyonHand 1,407,726 42 

Other Assets 35,242 42 



LIABILITIES. 



$11,927,922 71 



Capital Paid in Coin $3,000,000 00 

Reserve Fund 1,000,000 00 

Profit and Loss 2.283,379"" 



Due Depositors 

Due Banks and Bankers 

Dividends Unpaid 

Other Liabilities 



4,708.039 15 

927,448 70 

6,555 00 

2,500 00 



$11,927,922 71 



State of California, City and County of San Francisco, ss. — William Al- 
vord, President, and Thomas Brown, Cashier, of the Bank of California, 
being each and severally duly sworn, each for himself deposes and says 
that the foregoing statement is true to the best of his knowledge and belief. 

WILLIAM ALVORD, President. 
THOMAS BROWN, Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 7th day of July, 1893. 
ISealJ. JAMES MASON, Notary Public. 



SEMIANNUAL STATEMENT 

OF 

Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 

BANK. 

JUNE 30 1893. 



ASSETS. 

Real Estate $ 760,370 56 

Miscellaneous Bonds 161,678 48 

Bills Receivable and Overdrafts 7,878,743 48 

Due from Banks and Bankers 401,169 26 

Miscellaneous Accounts 61,753 21 

Furniture, Safe, etc , 31,041 39 

Cash 1,366,915 34 

$10,661,666 72 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Paid in $ 500,000 00 

Surplus 5,750,000 00 

Undivided Profits 734,168 58 

Due Banks and Bankers 512,688 37 

Due Depositors 3,164,809 77 

$10,661,666 72 

JOHN J. VALENTINE, President. 
H. WADSWOBTH, Cashier. 

PACIFIC TOWEL COMP JOISTS' 

9 LICK PLACE, 
Furnishes Clean Towels at the following low rates i 

Clean Hand Towels each week, 51.00 per month; 12 Clean Hand Towels 
each week, $1.5.0 per month ; 4 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1.00 

6 month; 6 Clean RoUer Towels each week. $1.25 per month. 

A. BUSWELL, 

BOOKMNDEIt, PAPER-RULER, PRINTER MB B>,MK BOOK MANUFACTURER 
635 Clay Street, Near Montgomery, San Francisco. 



HIS SUMMER APPAREL. 



THE starched and polished bosom not alone 
Doth hide deception. On a summer day 
The San Franciscan, eager to exhibit 
His garments of the season, new straw hat — 
With rim so ample in circumference 
A race-course were not larger — yellow shoes, 
In cost and color eloquent of gold, 
Serenely moves, his bright habiliments 
The heraldry of fashion for the nonce. 
But, ah! beneath the light and sportive shirt, 
The broad surcingle and the negligee, 
Is panoply of wool, more thick than speech 
Inebriate, and warm as Love and wine. 

Thus did the gallant in the olden days 
Wear coat-of-mail beneath his gay attire — 
In ontward seeming being not the man 
He was within. To him of feudal fame 
Came invitation for festivity, 
And he, uncertain of his host's intent, 
Responded with a mien to fit the dance, 
But eke with trappings to avert a trap — 
Such armor as might fail unfriendly swords. 

By June invited (birds her messengers, 

Her bidding writ in alphabet of flowers), 

The modern knigbt to sunny revels goes, 

Yet fearful that the winds which serve the months 

May trech'rous come and pierce him to the marrow, 

He underneath his jocund vesture bears 

Perennial flannels and a chest protector. 

James Donahue. 



A RETURN just issued as a Parliamentary paper shows that dur- 
ing the years 1884-92, inclusive, 256 persons were sentenced to 
death for the crime of murder in England and Wales. Of these 
145 were executed in due course; one was pardoned; in 95 cases 
the sentence was commuted to one of penal servitude for life; 
eight were removed to Broadmoor, having been certified to be in- 
sane, and in seven cases the prisoners were let off with minor 
terms of penal servitude or hard labor or imprisonment. Thirty 
of the murderers were of or under the age of twenty-one years. 
In 49 cases the victims were under the age of twelve. There are 
22 cases in which young women murdered their illegitimate chil- 
dren. 



Are you going ? If so, it will be to your interest to call on or write 
to the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The SANTA FE 
ROUTE is the only line under one management from California to 
Chicago. The only line running Pullman Palace and tourist sleep- 
ing cars through to Chicago on the same train every day without 
change. Personally conducted excursions through to Boston leave 
everv Tuesday. W*. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, "Chronicle" 
Building, San Francisco. 



Are "You Going to the "World's Fair?— Will you spend the sum- 
mer in the country? If you leave the city at all, deposit your val- 
uables — such as trunks, boxes, silverware, paintings, bric-a-brac, etc. 
— with the California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., corner of Mont- 
gomery and California streets, and be relieved of all anxiety for their 
safety. Storage rates low. Boxes to rent at $5 a year and upwards. 



A. H. Ricketts,attorney-at-law, rooms 201, 202 and 203, Crocker 
Building, San Francisco. 

SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT OP 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

JULY I, 1893. 

ASSETS. 

Loans and Discounts $4,155,103 68 

Bonds 448.990 60 

Bulllon.etc 20,674 42 

Furniture and Fixtures 3,000 00 

Customers' Liability on Letters of Credits 743,998 84 

Due from Banks and Bankers - 1,295,340 21 

Money on Hand 1,296,678 57 

Total Assets $7,963,786 32 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital $3,000,000 00 

Reserve 400,000 00 

Undivided profits 188,789 77 

Due depositors 2,703,834 58 

Due banks and bankerB 1,030,235 69 

Sterling credits ... 628,650 53 

Other liabilities 6,855 75 

Dividends unpaid 420 00 



Total liabilities. 



$7,963,786 32 



State of California, City and County of San Francisco, ss . — Isaias W. 
Hellman, President, and D. B. Davidson, Cashier of the Nevada Bank of 
San Francisco, being each and severally duly sworn, each for himself, de- 
poses and says that the foregoing statement is true, to the best of his 
knowledge and belief. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 3d day of July, 1893. 

ISAIAS W. HELLMAN, President. 
D. B. DAVIDSON, Cashier. 



Julv 15, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEM'S LKTTER. 




RIBBON this season is used witb the utmost profusion. Many 
dancing toilets of diaphanous shot textile have the entire 
front and 9ides formed of lengthwise rows of ribbon, giving a 
striped effect to the fabric. The new opalesque ribbons are very 
suitable for the purpose. This sort of ribbon is used for making the 
pretty neck trimmings now used. The ribbon must be quite wide, 
and the neckband is doubled to within half an inch of the upper edge. 
Beneath the chin the ribbon in its full width is made into loops. 
There are three of these with ends falling right and left, they being 
nearly all of the same length. Very easily made are the ribbon braces 
combined with lace that may be worn over any simple bodice. The 
ribbon strand is formed into a very long V, which terminates in a 
series of loops and ends at the waist with Empire bows on the 
shoulders. Cream white lace is jaboted very gracefully down the 
outside of the strand, terminating at the belt under the ribbons. 



Eulalia's lounging robes are things of beauty and joys forever, for 
she loves a luxurious lounging time. White, violet and blue are the 
reigning colors of these comfortable items, and the designs follow the 
accepted styles. An empire robe has a poke of velvet and epaulettes 
of chiffon, with cascades of lace and ribbons. There is a long train 
and the entire draperies are looseIj T hung for supreme comfort. A 
gretchen frock has a mass of shirrings from the neck to the belt, and 
tremendous sleeves of circular shirrings entrapped in passementerie. 

Tennis and yachting gowns which may also be worn on the street 
are made with a serge skirt and a waist of different material, either 
of shot taffeta, ombre surah, or figured foulard. These are not the 
familiar shirt waists, unlined, with yoke and turned-over collar— a 
fashion relegated to cheviots and cottons — but are made over a thin- 
fitted lining in very fanciful fashion, with fluffy sleeves, high stock 
collar, and a girdle-like finish that must not be too wide to give a 
slender effect. 

Parasols and fans galore have a trunk all to themselves. The para- 
sols are nothing like ours, as they have short handles and springs to 
enable their owners to revert the shade at any focus. Bright red lined 
with yellow, black finished with buff, and blue tinted with pink are 
exquisite models. Eulalia's flag sun-umbrella is historical. It is 
made of a Spanish flag and has bundles of little flags at the handle 
and tip. She carries it upon all patriotic occasions. 



"While white ribbons are the most used on white gowns, especially 
muslin .ones, some recently imported mull frocks have Empire girdles 
of ombre satin ribbon, shaded through two or three colors. These are 
folded closely across the back, with wider spreading folds in front 
extending in a point up to the bust, and are shirred into two little 
frills that meet and conceal the hooks and eyes. 

A Scotchman who employs 4000 French women in Paris making 
lace has sent a pair of curtains to the World's Fair. In the six months 
required for the making of these curtains 2000 different women worked 
on them. The cost of the single pair of curtains three yards long 
was $6000. The Scotchman himself came to superintend the hanging 
of his $50,000 worth of lace exhibit. 

One chic pair of violet silk has a forget-me-not vine beginning at the 
toe and twining itself most sensuously around the ankle, calf and 
over the knee, where its pretty posies make a perfect E. A pink lisle 
thread pair blushes with tiny silver crescents inlaid with rosebuds 
and green leaves. 

Pearls and rubies strung on ribbons have a snake-like effect. A 
daisy chain of ribbons made to form the wild flowers perfectly are 
fastened with a big daisy of white ivory. Then the ribbon-braided 
garters are combinations of dark and light shades, which blend har- 
moniously. 

The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic feature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artis ans. 

If you really want good whisky, and know a good thing when you 
have it, you will try Argonaut Old Bourbon, and then never drink 
any other. Argonaut is sold at all leading bars, hotels and clubs, 
and cannot be excelled. Argonaut is the favorite among men who 
drink whisky. 

For "Wedding Cakes, Charlotte Russe, Ice Cream, fine Cakes and 
Pastry, go to Page & Falch's Restaurant and Bakery, corner Mason and 
Turk streets, junction of Market. 

Mothers be sure and use 
children while teething. 



■Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 



/T\id8umm<?r (?learai}e<? Sal<? 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 
Sremendous (^ut$ in prices. 

-ON— 

QloaHj, Dn?ss Goods, Sill^s, Caqes, Ffibbotys, 

parasols, (jloves, Srimmii^s, 

^aijdK<?ret?i<?fs, HWS Rrr/islpiws, Hosiery, 

tl7deru/<?ar, Corsets, (^irtaii^, 

tyousefunjistyii}^, Ete. 



Mailorders promptly executed. 

Goods delivered free in Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, Ban 
Rafael, Tibnron, Sansalito, San Qnentin, Mill Valley, Roes 
Station and Blithe dale. 




Murphy Building. 

MARKET. JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 

Beauty Lost Easily Regained. 

No more wrinkles; old age defied. Dimples made on cheeks or 
chin in twenty minutes. Noses straightened. Superfluous hair re- 
moved. Splotches removed. Mouths made small. Bust developed 
three times the size in three months. 

dr. carpenter, 

ROOMS 27 and 28 1346 MARKET ST. 

The Only Dermotologist on the Pacific Coast. 

Jggs REMOVED 

TO 121 POST STREET, 

BET. KEARNY ST. AND GRANT AVE. 



Y^jjJadiaN 

Dislilledand boHled by ', 



Wal^erVille, Canada. 



Whisky 



1 hi- iiQC and (jenuinencss'ol Ihis whisky are gunranieeil by the r.xelsc 1 
of the Canadian Government by certificate over the capsule of every I 
Ilic moment (if manufacture- until Ihis certificate is affixed Ihuwhi 
leaves the custody 3fllie Excise olficers.Nu other Government in the* 
for consumers Ihis independent and absolute guarantee of purity ai 
"Canadian Club" whhky is particularly adapted for medicinal use. 



WILLIAM WDLFF 8c CO. 
San Franci 5CD. Ea l. 



18 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 




THE Italian Chamber adjourned for the midsummer holidays 
last week, after passing the bank bill by a vote of 222 against 
135 votes, not, however, before another of those rows had taken 
place for which modern parliaments have become notorious. 
Signor Bovio provoked the disturbance by threatening to give 
the names of several deputies whom he accused of having been 
bribed, but after the example of Ahlwardt in the Reichstag, he 
ultimately refrained from substantiating his accusations. It is an 
amusing fact that since the Panama Canal scandals in France 
members of other European legislatures have tried their best to 
conjure up similar scandals in miniature for their own countries, 
and it appears that Paris, after having been the leader of 
the fashion in dress, is considered by these gentlemen as a worthy 
example to be imitated in politics. 

It has never been a great secret that the Duke of York some 
years ago followed the inclination of his heart as he followed 
the dictates of politics last week, but it is a sign of very question- 
able taste that several London papers are at this moment remind- 
ing the newly-wedded wife that he is the father already of two 
children. Before the marriage of His Royal Highness with 
Princess May of Teck, there might have been an excuse for such 
publicity as a prophylactic measure, and after the Duke's death, 
when his history comes to be written — provided that his life tu^ns 
out to be worthy of memory — the historian may have the duty 
for the sake of truth to mention also his youthful amours, but 
the occasion of his marriage should have silenced the scandal- 
mongers. No decent newspaper would take up the former life of 
a reputable private individual at the time of his wedding, know- 
ing that by so doing it would cast gloom Into the life of bride and 
bridegroom alike at a period when it is customary to wish them 
joy, but it seems that persons of rank or distinction are rarely 
treated by the press with the same fairness. 

Emperor William, who was to have started last week on his 
yacht for Norway, suddenly changed his mind on being in- 
formed, it appears, that the majority in favor of the Army bill 
was by no means an absolute certainty. Later, however, hiB 
fears must have been quieted to a certain extent, for it iB now 
announced that the voyage has been postponed only for a few 
days. Most likely Count Caprivi reported to his royal master a 
favorable result of the negotiations between the government 
and the leaders of the smaller parties, but such a result must 
have been largely based upon the Chancellor's hopes merely. 

As matters stand at this moment in the German Reichstag, the 
ultimate issue of the vote on the army bill is a matter of con- 
jecture only. The government is straining every nerve in order 
to secure a coalition of various smaller political groups in favor 
of the measure, but as none of these groups is likely to give its 
aid without equivalent concessions, Count Caprivi will have a 
hard task to perform if he wants the bill passed with a decent 
majority. The interests of the many political parties in the 
Reichstag vary so much that concessions to the one are likely to 
give offense to the other, and to satisfy all those who are needed 
for the passage of the array bill will require a great deal of 
diplomacy. Still the government is in the fortunate position of 
being able to grant favors which the leaders of the opposition 
have not in their power to confer, and if reportB are correct, 
many members of the new Reichstag are not above venality. 

Dr. Miqnel, the Prussian Minister of Finance, is at present be- 
ing loaded with favors by his sovereign, who well knows that 
the attitude of that popular and able minister will have the most 
decisive influence upon the issue of the army bill. Great, how- 
ever, as the temptation is, which has been pat into the way of 
Dr. Miqnel, it is not likely that he will surrender his opinion in 
return for royal favors. As a minister of the crown, he can, of 
course, not join the opposition, but it would disappoint many of 
his admirers if he were to identify himself with the Emperor's 
pet schemes. Dr. Miquei has always been a champion of moder- 
ate liberalism, and has a reputation to loose, which is more diffi- 
cult to acquire than court favors. 

Some people seem astonished that the well-deserved punish- 
ment of several art students in the Latin Quarter in Paris has led 
to a general riot of the Parisian mob; those, however, who know 
the character of the Parisians and have studied French history, 
ought to remember that revolutions in France are caused or pre- 
vented by the merest trifles, while serious events, such as, for in- 
stance, the Panama Canal revelations, often pass over without 
producing any lasting effect. Daring the riots of the Fronde, 
Cardinal Mazarin was informed one morning by his Chief of 
Police that earnest disturbances had been prepared for the day. 
He met the news with an inquiry about the weather, and when 
he was told that a slight rain had set in, he replied: << There will 



be no riot to-day; the Parisians do not like to fight in the open 
air when it is raining." The anecdote is characteristic, and there 
is nothing startling in the fact that a populace which is swayed 
in its intentions by such trifles should be ready to rise against the 
authorities on the most trivial provocation. The ultimate result 
of the riots also will depend upon mere accident rather than 
upon deeply laid plans. 

xjsr stt:r a. :cr o:e . 

FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

IN8URANOE COMPANY, 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000. 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'l Managers. 

40 to 44 PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 

Assets $2,607,675 76 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,139,756 99 

HAZARDS INSURED. 

EMPLOYERS AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILEK EXPLOSION, 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOSSES. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, AND 
FIDELITY. 
MAXWELL & BERRY, General Agents, 

421 California Street. 

SVEA FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF GOTHENBURG. 

Funds invested 14,661,924 

Shareholders' Obligations 2,133,383 

TotalAssets 6,795,257 

We beg to notify the Agents and Policy-holders of the above company 
that we have been appointed its General Agents upon the Pacific Coast and 
are authorized to collect all of the unpaid premiums and accounts. We 
solicit on behalf of this deservedly popular aud well known company the 
favor of the renewals of all expiring policies and an additional share of 
your good business. 

BROWN, CRAIG A CO., General Agents. 

407-409 Montgomery Street. 

Represent also. PHENIX, of Brooklyn: THE AMERICAN FIRE; PENN 
SYLVANIA FIRE; THE GREENWICH INSURANCE CO. 
Total Assets over $20.000,000. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the hest and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest ratM of IfiteHsioz Grain stored In Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Office ot the Company, 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO-, of New York. 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, As8T. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE GO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California street, San Francisco 

JS^^Oldest Stock Fire Insurance Company in the United States. 
Capital Fully Paid $3,000,000 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA 

OP PHILADELPHIA, Penn. 

Office Pacific Department— 

412 California Street, San Francisco. 

JAMES B. BAILEY, General Agent. 

f- 



July 15, 1393. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



TijE TtaSEMi 




GO LITTLE VIOLETS.-/;- ('. S..in The Chaperone. 

GO, little violets, crushed and faded- 
Violets bluer than sky or sea — 
Go to 1x17 loved one, and all unaided, 

Tell him— tell him that be is free. 
Say that I would not hold bun forever 

Bound by my arms against bis will, 
Say I forgive — but O! I can never — 

Never forget him. I love him still. 
Violets, had you but arms to enfold him — 

Had you but lips — what a joy — what bliss 
To lie in his arms — in your arms to hold him, 

And press on his lips an endless kiss! 
Poor little flowers — your life I am taking. 

Even as he has taken mine; 
ButO! if you knew how my heart is aching, 

With a painless sorrow I cannot define. 
Go, little violets, crushed and faded — 

Violets bluer than sky or sea- 
Tell him that love has my soul invaded, 

I am his captive, I cannot be free. 



AN EXHORTATION.— C. E. Barnes in Vogue. 



Awake! Sir Cupid, up, awake! 

Nor with the landsmen dally; 
The sails are set on sea and lake, 
The brave and fair once more forsake 
The shore, and where the wild waves break, 

Around their pennants rally! 

Lo! at the sea-sprayed helm she stands — 
The yacht-maid of our yearning; 

The winds seem awed at her commands, 

Old Ocean leaps to kiss her hands, 

8he is the child of many lands, 

For whom brave hearts are burning. 

80 gird your loins, Sir Cupid! Rise 

As they in old-time story; 
The sibylline wave and cloud-bound skies 
Beckon, and where the sea-bird flies, 
There, with a bridegroom's cup of prize 

We pledge you life-long glory 1 



FOR THE LONG VOYAGE.— Tom Hall in Vogue. 



"Were I a captain bold," I said, 
And gently clasped her hand, 

"Woulds't sail with me, by Fancy led, 
To every foreign strand ? 

"Woulds't help me furl my silver sail, 

And be my trusty crew ? 
Woulds't stand by in the midnight gale, 

My pilot, tried and true ?" 

"Well, no, "-she answered, blushing red; 

"Such heavy work I hate. 
But — " listen what the maiden said: 

"I would be your first mate." 



A BABY'S FEET AND HANDS.— Algernon Charles Swinburne. 



A baby's feet, like seashells pink, 

Might tempt, should Heaven see meet, 
An angel's lips to kiss, we think, 
A baby's feet. 

No rosebuds yet by dawn impearled 

Match, even in loveliest hands, 
The sweetest flowers in all the world — 
A baby's hands. 



TO MAMIE— MY LOVE.— Truth. 

When first we met I liked you, dear, 
Nor could your coldness stay me; 

A sudden friendship drew me near, 
And soon I called you "Mamie." 

Since love on friendship quick doth trench, 

And you my own will be, 
I speak your name in dulcet French, 

Yet write it still "Ma-mie." 



I3SrSTTE.^.lSrCEl. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 
Herbert I.. Low, Manager for the Pacific (oust Brand. 

880 Mi ii-i.mc St., 8. F. 

TUSSSLiiiirh t1 ,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S 534,795.72 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 

232 California St., S. F.,«al. 



PAGITIC IDIEIF'.A.K.T-kriEIN-T 

6UARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE. 



OF LONDON. 

Established A. d. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - $ 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, $23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded a. d. 1710. 

Cash AsBets, $10,044,712. 

Assets In America, - - - $2,610,368. 



Wl. J. LMDERS, tlen'l Agent, 20» Sansomc St., San Francisco, Cal. 
THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets 119,724,638.45. 

President. HKNJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBEN8 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



FIRE 



INSTJKE your property against FIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 
Pacific Branch, 214 SansomeSt, S. F. 
SWAIN & MURDOCH:, City Agents. 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed f 10,000, 000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserue (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6.124,067.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 
306 C alifornia Street. San Francisco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up f 600,000 

Assets 8,181,753 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,626,167 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F. 

City Office— SOI Montgomery St. General Office— 401 Hont'g, St. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and MontgomeJ 
GEO, g. GRANT. Manage 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $6,700,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
No. 316 Calllornla Street. San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZUBICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. 8YZ, General Agent, 

110 California St., San Francisco, Cal 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1893 . 




SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour— Demand light; Extras M@*4.20. Superfine, 12.80@*3.20. 

Wheat— Light trade; Shipping, J1.15; Milling. fl.20@fl.25 per cental 

Barley is firm; Brewing, 90c.@fl. Feed, 80c.@S2ljc. per otl. 

Oats, Milling, fl.40@fl.60; Feed, fl.l5@f 1.25 per ctl. 

Corn, White, fl.l2}£: Yellow, fl.00@fl.05 per ctl. 

Rye is quiet, fair demand, fl@fl.0o. Cement, f2.0O@f2.25. 

HayiB steady; Wheat, $11; Oats, f9@fl0; Alfalfa, f7@fl0. 

Milistuffs, good demand. Bran, fl6@fl7.50 per ton. 

Beans good request, f2.00@f2.60 per ctl. Potatoes, 7oc.@f I per ctl. 

Butter is firmer; Choice, 20c.@25c. ; Fair, 16c.@17c. 

Cheese, light stock. 8c.@10c. Eggs, free supply, 18c.@24c. 

Honey Comb, 12c.@13c. ; Extracted, 6c.@7c. Poultry in good supply. 

Onions are worth 75c.@f 1.15 Beeswax is steady, at 20c.@22c. 

Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 

Hides are steady ; Dry, 5c@6c. Wool is in light demand at llc.@16c. 

Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6c. 

Coffee sluggish at 16c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 

Coal Is plentiful; large Btock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 14c.@18c. 

Quicksilver is nominal at J42.60 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. White, 6c.@69ic. 

There is no life discernable in business circles. This is notice- 
ably so in all kinds of imported staples and of assorted mer- 
chandise. Not so in the domestic market of Fruits and Vegeta- 
bles. In this latter department the daily receipts are large and 
free, causing low prices to prevail. 

Our foundries and other local manufacturing companies, if not 
idle are running on short time, and are generally complaining of 
dull times. It is to be hoped that the proposed Midwinter Fair, 
now on the tapis, may be the means of throwing new life into 
all trade departments. 

Our commerce with the Orienl for the past six months — Ex- 
ports to China and Japan were as follows: Mdse. to China, 1893, 
$177,350, and in 1892, $186,511; ditto to Japan, 1893, $37,944, 
and in 1892, $55,418; Treasure and Mdse. to China six mos. 1893, 
$4,283,725, and ditto 1892, $3,964,829; Japan, 1893, $860,136, 
and 18J2, $1,612,890. 

Kahului— Bark Alden Besse, 24 days thence, is at hand with 
19,000 bags Sugar to J. D. Spreckels Bros. & Co. Scbr. Anna, 
from same, with 5300 bags ditto. 

The Pacific Mail steamship Colon arrived on the 11th inst from 
the Isthmus, with a light cargo. For cargo she has 3485 pkgs., 
including 2433 bags Central American Coffee, 980 bxs. Mexican 
Limes, etc. 

The Orient The Belgic, from Hongkong, had for cargo 2300 

mats Rice, 1577 pkgs. Tea, 964 cs. Oil, 6130 bags Sugar, 377 rolls 
Matting, 2339 bales Calcutta Gunnies and 3000 pkgs. Mdse; 
also, in transit, to go Overland, 11,309 pkgB. Tea, 129 pkgs. 
raw 8ilk, 160 packages and parcels Silks, 246 packages 
Curios, etc.; for Central and South America, 30 pkgs. Silk Goods, 
200 mats Eice and 130 pkgs. Mdse. 

Grain Charters Br. iron ship Eoby, 2239 tons, Wheat to Cork, 

,U. K.. Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1 2s. 6d., nothing less 
direct. Br. iron ship Yola, 1407 tons, Wheat same voyage, 
owners' account. Br. iron ship Cawdor, 2355 tons. Wheat same 
voyage, £1 2s. 6d., nothing less direct. Br. iron ship Ulrica, 1923 
tons, Wheat same voyage as above, £1 2s. 6d., August loading. 

Hawaii The bk. R. P. Rithet, hence for Honolulu on the 8th 

inst,, carried 625 bbls. Flour, 3688 ctls. Barley, 750 bales Hay, 
2500 sks. Bran, 1002 ctls. Oats, 393 ctls. Corn, 150 tons Fertilizers, 
etc., value $16,690. Schr. Transit, for same on the 7th inst., had 
87,029 lbs. rolled Barley, 200 bMs. Flour, 294 bales Hay, 200 M. 
Shingles, 6000 Posts, etc., value $10,266. 

Barley and Wheat for Great Britain.— The ship Beacon Rock 
sailed on the 8th inst. for West Hartelpool, Eng., with 48,841 ctls. 
Barley and 19,745 ctls. Wheat, value $75,600. Mexico— Schr. 
Amethyst hence had for Cargo 38 pkgs. Machinery, 40 cs. Dyna- 
mite, Lumber and Produce, value $9683. Tahiti— The City of Pa- 
peete, thence on the 7th inst., had for Cargo 68,000 Cocoanuts, 
296 sks. Copra, 159 bales Cotton, 275 sks. and pkgs. Shells, etc. 

New York.— Ship W. H. Smith, thence in 123 ds. to J. W. 
Grace and Co. had for Cargo a large and well-assorted list of gen- 
eral Mdse., besides Iron, 8teel, etc.; Ship Tarn O'Sbanter, from 
same, had a full cargo of well-assorted Mdse. 

•Liverpool The Ship California thence had for Cargo 25,000 

bags Salt, 1111 pkgs. Chemicals, Ale, Beer, 36,789 bxs. Tin Plate, 
etc. 

The stmr. Australia, hence for Honolulu on the 6th inst., had 
a large cargo of Mdse. valued at $57,000; also in transit Mdse. 
valued at $7290. This steamer also carried in Treasure $25,100 
Gold Coin. 

The stmr. Mariposa, from the Colonies via. Honolulu, had for 
cargo 1026 cs. Lemons and 27 cs. Oranges from Sydney, 106 bales 
Sheep Skins, etc.; from Auckland 56 bags Kari Gum, 111 cs. 
Grass Seed, etc.; and from Honolulu 4027 bags Sugar, 212 cs. 
Pine Apples, 1220 bchs. Bananas, etc. 

London, pr. ship Ellesmere, cargo 450 bags Sugar 18,590 cks. 
Cement, 494 pigs Lead, etc. 




THREE AND ONE-HALF DAYS TO THE WORLD'S 
FAIR. — We take pleasure in advising the readers of the 
News Letter that the UNION PACIFIC is the most 
, directand quickestline from San Francisco and all points 
|in California to the WORLD'S FAIR. 

It is the ONLY LINE running Pullman's latest im- 
proved vestibuled Drawing-Room Sleepers and Dining 
Cars from San Francisco to Chicago without change, and only one 
change of cars to New York or Boston. 

Select Tourist Excursions via the UNION PACIFIC leave San 
Francisco every Thursday for Chicago, New York and Boston in 
charge of experienced Managers, who give their personal attention 
to the comfort of ladies and children traveling alone. 
Steamship Tickets to and from all points in Europe. 
For tickets to the World's Fair and all points east, and for Sleep- 
ing Car accommodations, call on or address D. W. Hitchcock, Gen- 
eral Agent Union Pacific System, No. 1 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. 

For a good dinner at reasonable rates, you cannot go to a more 
suitable place than the Maison Riche, at the corner of Geary street 
and Grant avenue. The Riche easily leads all the rest. 

ZB-A-HSTHSIS. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $8,000,000 00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Jan. l, 1893) 3,276486 60 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Brown Cashier | I. F. Moulton, 2d Assistant Cashier. 

S. Prentiss Smith, Asst. Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

NEW YORK— Agency of The Bank of California. BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank. LONDON— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. PARIS— 
Messrs. De Rothschild Freres. VIRGINIA CITY' (Nev.)— Agency of The 
Bank of California. CHICAGO— Union National Bank. ST. LOUIS— Boat- 
men's Bank. AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND— Bank of New Zealand. 
C HINA, JAPAN and INDIA— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver. Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital paid up 2,450,000 

Reserve 490,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office 73 Lombard St., E.C 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1166 Pacific Avenue. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager. WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank, 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKIN6 COMPANY. 

Capital Sl.250.000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K.WILSON President 

J. L. N. 8HEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, Win. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan <& Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlas National Bank. 8t. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley A Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes A Co. 

WELLS. FARGO & CO.'S BANK. 

N. E. Comer Sansome and Sutler Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

John J. Valentine President. 

Homer S. King . . Manager. 

H. W adswobth Cashier. 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS:) 
John J. Valentine, Lloyd Tevis, Oliver Eldridge, Leland Stanford, James 
C. Fargo, Geo, E. Gray, W. F. Goad, Chas. F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

THE CROGKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner .Harliet, Montgomery and Post Streets. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL 11.000,000. 

UIRECTOHS : 
CHAS. F. CKOCKER, | E. E. MILLER, Jb. 

B. C. WOOLWOBTH Pbesident. 

W. E. BROWN Vicb-Pbesidbnt. 

WM. H. CBOCKEB Cashibb 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

333 Montgomery St., 91111s Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord Jerome Lincoln H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin A. K. P. Harmon, 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones J. B. Randol. 

HUMBOLDT SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

NO. IS Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBEB President 1 EBNST BRAND Secretary 



July 15. 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKK. 



21 




HE took a glass of beer, and one small pretzel from the free-lunch 
table. When he bad finished he laid a ten-dollar bill upon the 
bar, and started (or the door. " Here, sir," called the bar-tender, 
ii you've left your change! " The man flushed hotly as he came 
back and pocketed the bills and silver. •■ Excuse me," he said; 
"but I have been in Chicago for the last week, and I forgot." 
And the barkeeper nodded sympathetically. — IVwIn. 

" What became of that bright son of yours that you sent to college? 
Was be graduated ? " " Oh, yes. He is at present interested in dic- 
tionaries." "Ha! Become a lexicographer 1 " " Well, not exactly 
a lexicographer. He is soliciting subscriptions for a dictionary." 

— New York Press. 

Jcxia— How did the Meringue's dinner pass off? Hattie— Delight- 
fully ! and the male contingent was a decided success. It's such a 
pleasure to converse with experienced men of the world. Why, three 
were divorces, and the other two Keeley Cures. — Puck. 

" By the wav, Bishop, why is it that you always address your con- 
gregation as 'Brethren,' and never mention the women in your ser- 
mons?" " But, my dear Madam, the one embraces the other." "Oh, 
but, Bishop, not in church! " — Life. 

* * 

" Do I make myself plain ? " asked the angular lecturer on 
Woman's Rights, stopping in the middle of her discourse. " You 
don't have to, mum," replied a voice from the rear; " the Lord did 
it for you long ago." — Vogue. 

They were toiling up the stairs in the tower of the Madison Square 
Garden, when Gus De Smith remarked : " This is rather a spiral flight 
of stairs." " Yes, perspiral," replied Birdie McGinnis, wiping her 
brow. — Texas Siftinqs. 

.'. 
Lawyer- You think, then, that your assailant attacked you with 
malice prepense! Client— I dunno, sah— he might 'er had one o' dem 
kind o' mallets ; but de principal thing he used wor a razzer, sah ! 

— Puck. 
* 
% * 

Pebdita— Oh! mamma is looking at us through her opera-glasses. 
Jack Dashimg (groaning)— Great heavens! And I put a couple of 
cigarette pictures in the lenses. —Truth. 

*% 
Asken— What kind of a fellow is Dumleigh ? Tett— Well, Dum- 
leigh is a fellow who, if he were to think twice before he spoke would 
lose the use of his voice. — Puck. 

.** 

Eazzle— Jagway went to the Fourth of July fancy ball as a toy pis- 
tol. Dazzle— Was his impersonation a success ? Eazzle— Yes. So 
much so that he didn't know when he was loaded. — Truth. 

*** 
"What has become of Squibb, who used to be the leader in all your 
local enterprises ? " " Dead. He was cannonized during the Fourth 
of July celebration." — Truth. 

Madeline — Did he make amends for stealing that kiss ? Olga — 
Yes. He was very manly and would not stop until he had made com- 
plete restitution. —Town Topics. 

Tillie— Have you heard the news? Minnie is to be married. 
Millie— Are you quite sure ? Tillie— Well, she has stopped chew- 



B^ITICS. 



mg gum. 



-Truth. 



" Brown says you have been telling it around that you saw me com- 
ing out of a saloon." " Well, Brown is a liar. I said that I saw you 
go into one." 

**« 

First Bohemian — The treasurer of the club posted me last month. 
Second Bohemian— For what ? First Bohemian— Broke the rule — 
paid my dues. — Town Topics. 

*% 

Willie — Papa, give me some money to buy some punk with. Slim- 
son — Use those cigars your mother got for me the other day. 

—Truth. 
*** 
" I want to see the sexton," said Jones. " What for ? " asked the 
bishop in charge. " It's his duty to set up the bier, isn't it ? " 

" Those spinster girls remind me of eggs." ',' Eggs ? " " They never 
look their age." — Life. 

Baggage Notice. 
Round-trip transfer tickets are now on sale at any of our offices at 
reduced rates, viz. : One trunk, round trip, 50 cts. ; single trip, 30 cts. 
Keep your baggage checks until you reach this city. Morton Spec- 
ial Delivery, 17 Geary street, 408 Taylor street, and Oakland Ferry 
Depot (waiting room). 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAPITAL PAID ( / P ,nCOrPOr,tedby KOralChlrler : 1 . 862 - t3 000 000 

RESERVEFUHD l',300,000 

Southeast corner Bush and Sansome Streets 

HEAD OFFIOE Bo ' OMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vaucouver, Britlsi. Columbia; Portland On n 

Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. • ' 

SUB-BRANCHES— Kamloops, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster British 

Columbia. 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows- 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA-Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AU8TRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia- DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (WeBt Indies)— Colonial Bank 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

H. W. Corner Sansome and Bush streets. 

Established 1870. rj. B. Depositary. 

CAPITAL (PAID UP) ...... ft, 6O0J00O 

SURPLUS 1700,000 1 UNDIVIDED PROFITS... $185 000 

S.G. MURPHY President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFPITT.. .Vice-President I GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

directors: 
Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, S. G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J.D.Harvey. 

A General Banking; Business Transacted. 
S*.FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $6 to tlOO per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p.m. 

MUTUAL SAVIN6S BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranty Capital, 9l t OOO,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY vice-PreBidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker 
James Phelan, James Moffltt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecuritieB. JAMES A. THOMPSON. Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sta. 

Subscribed Capital $2,600,000 | Paid Up Capital 92,000,000 

Reserve Fund 9760,000 

HiAn Omci 68 Old Broad Street, London 

AaiNTS— NE W YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.).No. lOWall St.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Laiard Freres & Cie, 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, I „„„„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHPL, j Managers. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK. Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized . .?6,000.000 1 Paid up 91,600,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 8 Angel court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Sell man & Co., 21 Broad Btreet. 
The Bank transacts a general banking tusiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
wonu. dends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART > «__._„. 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.i Managers 
A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVIN6S UNION. 

Northeast Corner California and Sansome Streets, 

Formerly Occupied by Bank of Wells, Fargo & Co. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Btreet, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1893 938,058,691 OO 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,599,431 OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans onlyon real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 
GUARANTEE OAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND I 1,726.000 OO. 

Deposits July 1, 1893 81,428,884 37 

Omcaas— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRTJSE 
Second Vice-President. GEO. H. EGGER8 ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT ' 
Assistant Casliier, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. MULLER. Board of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Erase, 
George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Beck- 
er, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart. Attorney, W. 8. Goodpellow. 



22 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 15, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, April 16, 1893, and 
until further notice. Boats and Trains will 
leave from and arrive at the Ban Francisco Pas- 
senger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, as 
follov/B: 
From San Francisco for Point Tlburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40 a.m., 9:20 a. M., 11:20 a. m. ; 

1:30 p. M., 8:80 P. M.,5:05 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 A.M., 9:80A.M., 11:00 A.M.; 1:30 

P. M. 3:30 p. M., 6:00 p. M., 6:20 p. M. 
From San Rafael tor San Francisco. 
week days— 6:25 a. m., 7:55 a. m., 9:30 a. m. 

11:30 a. m., 1:40 p.m., 8:40 p.m., 5:05 p.m. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An extra trip at 6:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 a.m., 9:40 A.M., 11:10 A. M.; 1:40 

P.M. 3:40 p. M., 5:00 p M., 6:25 P.M. 
From Point Tlburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:50 A. M., 8:20 A. M., 9:55 A. M. ; 

11:65 a. m.; 2:05 p. m., 4:05 p. m., 5:85 p. M. 

Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:40 A. M., 10:05 A. M., 11:35 A.M.; 

2:05 p. M., l:05p.M., 5:30 P.M., 6:55 P.M. 



Leave 3. F. 




ARRIVE IN 8. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Dbbti'tion. 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40 a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
6:05 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
9:30a.M. 
5:00p.m. 


Petaluma 

and 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a.m 
6:05 p.m 
7:30 p.m 


8:50a. m 
10:30 am 
6:10p.m 






Fulton 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

Pieta, 

Hopland 

and Ukiah. 








8:66a.M. 




7:40A.M. 

3:30p.M. 


7 :80 p.m. 


10:30am 
6:10 pm 


















7:40 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 


8:00 a. m. 


Guerneville 


7:30p.m. 


10:30 am 
6 -.10 pm 


7:40 A.M. 
5:05p.M. 


8:00 a.m. 1 Sonoma andliO:40A.M. |8:50am. 
5:00p.m. | Glen Ellen. 1 6:05p.m. [6:10pm. 


3:40 a.M 

7:30 p.m 


8:00a, m.I Sebastopol. I10:40a.m|10:30a.m 
5:00 p.m.) | 6;05p.m| 6:10p.m 



Stages connect at Santa Kosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena: at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyvllle, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port and Bartlett Springs ; at Hopland for Lake- 
port ; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sarato- 
ga Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Cahto, Mendocino City, 
Fort Bragg, Orr's Hot Springs, Westport, Usal, 
Hydesville and Eureka. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to 
Mondays— To Petaluma, ?1 50; to Santa Rosa, 
$2 25; to Healdsburg, ?3 40; to Cloverdale, ?4 50; 
to Hopland, ?5 70; to Ukiah, $6 75; to Sebastopol, 
$2 70; to Guerneville, $3 75; to Sonoma, $150; 
to Glen Ellen, $1 80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only 
—To Petaluma, $1 ; to Santa Rosa, $1 50 ; to 
Healdsburg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, 
$4 50; to Hopland, $3 80; to Sebastopol, $180; to 
Guerneville, $2 50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, 
$120. 
H. C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN. 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
nd 2 New Montgomery Street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. C7. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and*BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 P. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with SteamerBfor SHANGHAI: 

Belgic . .Thursday, July 13, 1893. 

Oceanic (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Aug. 1, 1893 

Gaelic Tuesday, August 22, 1893. 

Belgic Thursday, Sept. 21, 1893 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
Btreets, San Francisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, 
San Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H.RICE. Traffic Manager. 

CONSUMPTION 

SURELY CURED. 

To the Editor — Please inform your read- 
ers that I have a positive remedy for the 
above uamed disease. By its timely use 
thousands of hopeless cases have been per- 
manently cured. I shall be glad to send 
two bottles of my remedy free to any of yom* 
readers who have consumption if they will 
send me their express and post office address. 
T. A. Slocum, M.C., 183 Pearl St. , New York 



ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL AMERICAN CATERER; 
1906 Sutter Street, 



Telephone 2388. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 
Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America, 
SAILINGS— At noon. 
"S.S. "Colon," July 13, 1893. 
S. S. "San Juan," July 24, 1893. 
8.8. "Colima," August 3, 1893. 
S. 8. " San Jose," August 14, 1893. 
Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 

AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc. : 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

S. S. "Peru," Saturday, July 22, 1893, at 3 p. m. 

S. S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, Aug. 

10, 1898, at 3 p. m. 

S.S. "City of Peking," Thursday, Aug. 31, 1893 
at 8 p. M. 

S. S. "China," via Honolulu, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 
1893, at 3 p. M. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight "or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 
202 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General A gent 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP~CoT 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m., June 4, 14, 19, 29. July 
5, 14, 19, 29. Aug. 3, 13. 18, 28. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
June 4th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo and 
Newport, every fourth and fifth day, at 11 A. M. 

For ports in Mexico, 1st of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

per week, 
to A cent*, 

I.mlU'- or 

Gontlenifii. u-lnu: or Bellini; 
"Old Reliable Plater." Only 
practical waj? to rep I ale mstj' anil 
\i mil knivt>», ftii-],'., ■.(iiniii-, de: 
quickly done by dipping in nieiu-d 
metal. No experience, polishing 
or machinery. Thick plate ui one 
operation: lists 5 to 10 years; line 
finish when taken from the plater. 
Every family has plating to do. 
Plater sells read i I v. Profits large. 
W. 1'. Harrison & Co.. Colnmbuh.0. 




$25 to $50| 



AN Italian Prince who had a Sicilian 
cook was once traveling to his provin- 
cial estates, taking witb him his cook, to- 
gether with his entire kitchen force, with- 
out which, so fond was he of the delica- 
cies they were won't to prepare, he rarely 
if ever traveled. At a point where the 
narrow path along the precipice turned 
the angle of a projecting rock the Prince, 
at the head of his long cavalcade, beard a 
shriek and the splash of a body falling into 
the torrent far below. With a face white 
with horror he pulled up and, looking 
back, exclaimed: "The cook! the cook I 
Oh, do not tell me it is the cookl " «« No, 
your excellency," cried a voice from the 
rear; " It is Don Prosdocemo.' 1 The Prince 
heaved a aigh of intense relief, then said: 
"Ah, only the chaplain I Thank goodness?" 

The lace Mr. Broadwater, of Montana, had 
the misfortune to be bow-legged, which sug- 
gests an anecdote told of Senator Sanders of 
that State. The Senator has always been op- 
posed to Major Maginnis, of Montana, and 
has been in the habit of criticising his course 
with considerable Western freedom. " The 
trouble with Maginnis," he said on one occa- 
sion, "is that he is all things to all men. 
With a Republican, he is a Republican; with 
a Democrat, he is a Democratic; with a 
Presbyterian, he is a Presbyterian; and, by 
Jove, with Broadwater he is bow-legged." 
— iVew York Tribune. 



If I could have my dearest wish fulfilled, 
And have my choice of all earth's bles- 
sings, too, 

And ask from Heaven whatsoe'er I willed, 
I'd ask for you. — Truth. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trams Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO; 

Leave I From June 10, 1893. I Arrive 

7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogdea and East 7:45 p 

7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento 6 :45 p 

7:30 a Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. . *T2:15p 

— Niles and San Jose J6:15f 

7:80 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and Santa Rosa 6 :15 p 

8 :00 a. Sacramento & Redding, via Davis 6 :45 P. 

8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Oroville, 
and Red Bluff 4:15 P 

9 :00 a New Orleans Express, Los Angeles 
Deming, El Paso, New Orleans, 

and East 8:45 p 

*9:00 A Peters and Milton *8:45p 

12:00 m Haywards, Niles and Livermore.. 6:45 p 
*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00 p 

1 :S0 p Vallejo and Port Costa 12 :15 p 

3:00 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose ... 9:45 a 

4:00 p. Martinez, StocktOD, Ramond (for 

Yosemite), and Fresno 12:15p 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 
Santa Rosa, 9:45a. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Landing, 
Marysville, Oroville and Sacra- 
mento ■. 10:15a. 

5:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 10:45a 
*5:00p. NileB and Livermore *8:46A. 

5:30p. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfield, Santa Barbara and 
Los Angeles 9:15 a. 

5 :30 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 9:15 a. 

6:00p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.- 7:45 a. 

J7 :00 p. Vallejo +8 ;45 p. 

7 :00 p. Oregon ExDress, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 
Puget Sound and East. .. ... 8:15 a 

8:00 p. Castle Crag and Dunsmuir, via 

Woodland and Willows 7:15 a. 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow'Gatige). 

J7:46 a. Sunday Excursion for Newark, 
San Jose, Los Gatos, Felton and 
Santa Cruz 18:05 p. 

8:15a. Newark. Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 p. 

*2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 
stations *10:50a 

4:45p. Newark, San Jose, Lob Gatos. 9:50a. 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets). ~~ 
*7:00a. San Jose, Almaden and Way 

Stations . *2:30p. 

17:30 a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 

Grove, Principal Way Stations 18:33 p. 
8:15 a. San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Roblee, Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) and 

principal Way Stations 6 :26 p. 

J9:30 A. Palo Alto and Way Stations }2:27P. 

10:40 a. San Jose, and Way Stations. ..... 5:06 p. 

12:05 p. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 4:25 p. 
*2:00 p. Menlo Park, San Jose, Gilroy, Pa- 
jaro, Castroville, Del Monte, Mon- ' 

terey and Pacific Grove *11:23a. 

*2:S0p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove ... *10:40a. 

*3:30 P. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions-. . . *9:47 a. 

•4:25 P. Palo Alto and Way Stations *8:06a. 

5:10 p. San Jose and Way Stations... ... 8:48a. 

6:S0p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6:35a. 

f-ll:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 

Stations f7:26p. 

a. for Morning . p. for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. ^Saturdays only. 

ISundays only. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 3,000 

ton steamers of the 

Oceanic Steamship Co. 

sail for HONOLULU, 

-_ AUCKLAND and SYD- 

\° NEYas under: 

For HONOLULU, 

APIA, AUCKLAND 

and SYDNEY, S. S. 

"MARIPOSA," July 

20, 1893. 
For HONOLULU, 
S. 8. "AUSTRALIA," 

Aug. 2, 1893 
Forpassageand freight 

SPRECKELS& BROS. CO., 327 Market St. 




SEVETi 



apply to 
J. D. E 



July 15, 1393. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



23 




JH. MITCHNIER, in Knowledge for June, gives an interesting 
. account of the oldest book in the world. Many will suppose 
that the Bible is meant, bat the most orthodox have never claimed 
that the earlier books of the Bible were written prior to the exodus 
from Egypt, while the " Papyrus Prisse" was written at least 1500 
years before Moses was born, and many years before the occurrence 
of the Noachian deluge. The book was discovered by a Frenchman 
named Prisse at Thebes, and presented to the Bibliotheque Nation- 
ale in Paris. It was taken from a tomb in which was found the 
mummy of one of the Entews of the eleventh, or first Theban, dy- 
nasty, which would prove that the manuscript was written at least 
prior to 2500 B. C; but the book itself furnishes internal evidence of 
the date of its composition, and contains extracts from a work that 
was much older. It was compiled by the Prefect Ptah-hotep during 
the reign of King Assa. This potentate was the last but one of the 
fifth dynasty, so that the book must have been written about 3350 
B. C, or considerably more than 5000 years ago. The precepts of 
Ptah-hotep, which give the title to the book, are preceded by passages 
from an earlier work written by Kakimna, Prefect to King Seneferu, 
of the third dynasty, which ruled before the Pyramids were built, 
about 37*K> B. C, which would make it, if in existence now, 5650 years 
old, antedating, according to the old chronologists, and as some 
still believe, the creation of Adam in the Garden of Eden, or at least 
his fall from grace. The book is written in Hieratic, and has been 
translated into French by M. Virey, and into English by Prof. Os- 
good. Its main value is not as a literary curiosity, but for the insight 
it gives into the education and culture which had been reached by 
man at that early period in the history of the human race. Its 
writer, Ptah-hotep, was a Prefect — a place of great dignity and re- 
sponsibility under the ancient Egyptian Kings. It was second only 
to that of the King — the same office which was held by Joseph, the 
son of Jacob, during the latter portion of his career, as told in the 
Bible. The Prefect was a sort of Pooh-Bah, or Treasurer, Secretary 
of State, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court rolled into one, so 
that what is said in the book must be accepted as authoritative, so 
far as it goes. 

A certain baker in business in a small town in Normandy obtained 
his supply of butter from a farmer in the neighborhood. One day he 
discovered that the pats, which were supposed to weigh three pounds 
each, were not up to the standard, and further examination revealed 
a steady diminution in the daily provision. At last the baker lodged 
a formal complaint against the farmer, and the affair was brought 
before the local court. " Have you scales? " inquired the magistrate. 
"Yes, Monsieur le Juge," was the reply. "And have you any 
weights? " continued the Judge. An answer this time in the nega- 
tive was as promptly given. " But how did you manage to weigh 
your butter?" asked the magistrate. Then the farmer related that 
ever since the baker had taken his butter, he had returned the com- 
pliment by buying his bread. The baker supplied him with three 
pound loaves, and he had used them as weights for his butter. " It 
is his fault, not mine, if the weight is not correct," added the farmer, 
who was speedily acquitted, and left the court in triumph with an 
escort of friends and admirers. Since this trial the farmer is said to 
have been supplied with more than his due provision of bread; but 
he has taken good care not to fall into the opposite error, and the 
baker has now his three-pound pats of butter, full weight, but not an 
ounce more. vwn/vx 

From the report on the administration of justice in France and Al- 
geria for 1891, which has but now appeared, we gather some signifi- 
cant facts about suicides. The total number in France for that year 
was 8120, while ten years before, in 1881, with nearly the same popu- 
lation, there were but 6751. This shows an increase of more than 
21 per cent., and seems to indicate that in France the conditions of 
life have become harder than they were ; perhaps as a result of an 
increased military burden, together with depression from the late bad 
financial state. Suicides were most frequent in the Department of 
the Seine, where 1465, or 50 in 100,000, occurred, while they were few- 
est in Corsica, where only 12, or 4 per 100,000, took place. In gen- 
eral the inclination to self-destruction was markedly stronger in the 
North than in the South. Thus, in the Northern eight departments 
there were 2882 suicides, or 36 in 100,000. while in the thirteen de- 
partments of the South only 795, or 19 per 100,000 occurred. 

Are You Married ? 
It is the small annoyances that worry— sour milk over night, no 
milkman in the morning; no cream for the coffee; no milk for the 
baby. The Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is always 
ready for use. Grocers and Druggists. 

Gentlemen who desire to appear well dressed, know how necessary 
it is to have a complete supply of the best linen in the latest styles. 
To be satisfied they should patronize John W. Carmany, the well- 
known dealer in gentlemen's furnishing goods, at 25 Kearny street. 




Sips of Health, 

You don't have to look 
twice to detect them — bright 
eyes, bright color, bright 
smiles, 
bright in 
every ac- 
tion. 
Disease is 
overcome 
only when 
weak tissue 
is replaced by the healthy 
kind._ Scott's Emulsion of 
cod liver oil effects cure by 
building up sound flesh. It 
is agreeable to taste and 
easy of assimilation. 

Prepared by Scott A Bowno, 3. Y. All druggists. 



Scott's * 
EMULSION.. 

If 



TT 




RUBBER 
HOSE. 

"GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST MADE. 
GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY, 

577-679 Market St., S. F. 
R. H. PEASE— managers— S. M. RUNYON. 

WHEW I 

IT IS HOT. 
WELL, YES, 

It is that 

ROCK SPRINGS COAL 

which heats quicker and bakes and roaBts better than any coal on the coast. 

Egg Size J9 00 Delivered. 

LumpSize $10 00 Delivered. 

HUSBAND & BROOKS, 

Telephone 989. No. 4 California Street. 

[ESTABLISHED 1862.J 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE, 

J. TOMKINSON, PEOPBIBTOR. 

Nos. 57, 69 and 61 Minna Street, between First aDd Second. 

Through to Natoma street, Nos. 64, 6G and 68. One block from the Palace 
Hotel, also carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, corner Post and 
Stockton streets, San Francisco. Telephone No. 153. 

Fine turnouts kept especially for calling. Also rockaways, buggies and 
vehicles of every description at reduced rateB. 

SYLVAIN SALOMON, 

IMPORTER OF 

EUROPEAN and ORIENTAL ART GOODS. 

BEST QUALITIES OF TEAS. 218 PQ8T St. 

J. R. SMITH, & OO, 

Merchant Tailors, 230 Basil Street, Mills Building, formerly 
under Occidental Hotel. 

THE CORK-FACED HORSE COLLAR. 

3a M & 

Prevents the horse from having a sore or galled neck; is cool and elastic 

and does away entirely with sweat collars. If your local saddlery shop 

does not have it, send your order to MAIN A WINCHESTER, 214, 216, 218 

and 220 Battery street, San Francisco, Cal. Send for descriptive circular 

To the World's Fair ! 



THE Educational Department of England requires each pupil 
in the public schools to have 130 cubic feet of space in the 
room where he sits. Hence this regulation requires that 130 cubic 
feet of air per pupil, assuming that the school room is crowded to its 
legal capacity, he furnished twenty-three times in the course of an 
hour, a rate of supply which requires careful planning to avoid 
draughts. Again, heated air is often over dry and unhealthy, and in 
large towns needs to be freed from floating particles before it is in a 
fit condition to breathe. In the Victoria Hospital in Glasgow there 
is a system of ventilation in which the air is forced through hanging 
screens kept saturated with running water. The sanitarian also has 
to deal with another branch of ventilation, that of sewers, and the 
work thus far accomplished in this line is less satisfactory than with 
buildings. We are all familiar with open man-hole covers, and the 
odors sometimes given off through them. These odors are, of course, 
due to a lack of ventilation. The underground sewers and drains 
have been compared to a great barometer, and during certain states 
of weather the air is retained until it is thoroughly impregnated with 
the filthy emanations from the sewage within. Then comes a change 
of wind, a surcharge of moisture and lightening of the atmosphere, 
when from every man-hole and grating the sewer air steams out. 
Various remedies have been tried, such as tall chimneys drawing 
the air from the sewers, smaller chimneys like a lamp-post, up which 
the air is sucked by a gas jet, and ventilating shafts up the fronts of 
buildings, but no entirely successful system has yet been devised 
which will cover all the cases that arise. 

— The number of locomotives built during the past year has fallen 
below the figures for the two preceding years. Thirteen companies 
last year constructed 1882 locomotives; fifteen companies in 1891 
constructed 2300, or 418 more. Taking twelve companies from which 
reports have been received for both 1891 and 1892, it is found that in 
the former year 1963 engines were built against 1703 in the latter. 
In 1890 thirteen companies built 2240 locomotives, that year being 
the best of the three. As regards freight cars, forty-eight companies 
turned out 93,293 cars in 1892, a figure that compares favorably with 
the 95,514 built by fifty companies during the previous twelve months. 
The forty-two companies reporting in both years, made 90,340 cars 
in 1892, and 77,020 in 1891; while their output of passenger cars was 
3795 and 1636, respectively, for 1892 and 1891. Judging from these 
returns, it appears that the car business has been better than the lo- 
comotive, although neither shows the expected increase on account 
of Columbian Exposition traffic. It must be remembered, however, 
that the railway companies themselves are large builders, and if their 
returns were made public, a different showing might result. 

The land of " Wang" has been invaded by an American com- 
pany, and an experiment is now being made to see how the electric 
railway will please the Siamese of Bangkok, the present indications 
being that the venture will prove anything but the elephant on the 
hands of the promoters that is celebrated in De Wolf Hopper's little 
hymn. The line is three miles long, and is operated by electric ma- 
chinery from Cleveland, O. The motive power is furnished by two 
eighty horse-power American engines, with 12% inch cylinders, and 
12 inch stroke. The pumps were made in Elizabethport, N. J., and 
practically the whole work was done in the manner considered stand- 
ard in the United States. The cars are built of teak and carry a 
twenty horse power motor. Their speed in long runs is about fifteen 
miles an hour, although the usual rate is, of course, much less. The 
road bed consists of iron rails laid on iron cross-ties, and overhead 
trolly wires are used. 

— A physician, writing on the subject of the benefits of cultivat- 
ing an erect carriage, urges its special importance as a matter of 
health. A body bent forward by the shoulders and mid-spine causes 
compression of the vital organs, the true place at which to bend the 
body being the hips. Many people are ignorant of this, and instead 
of keeping the head erect and the shoulders well back, and bending 
forward, when necessary, from the hips, round their shoulders, 
crook their spine, and crane their head and neck forward in a most 
ungainly manner, continuing this until, by force of habit, the posi- 
tion becomes natural. 

Self Praise. 

Self praise is no recommendation, but there are times when one 
must permit a person to tell the truth about himself. When what 
he says is supported by the testimony of others no reasonable man 
will doubt his word. TStow, to say that Alicock's Pobous Plasters 
are the only genuine and reliable porous plasters made is not self 
praise in the slightest degree. They have stood the test for over 
thirty years, and in proof of their merits it is only necessary to call 
attention to the cures they have effected and to the voluntary testi- 
monials of those who have used them. 

Beware of imitations, and do not be deceived by misrepresentation. 
Ask for Allcock's, and let no solicitation or explanation induce you 
to accept a substitute. 




BEEF 



WMM 



PRICE 50c. pint. Let those who have 
pale faces trv it. It is A GREAT RES- 
TORATIVE TONIC that acts upon the 
blood immediately. 

Be Suro Ycu Get BURNHAM'S. 
Our formula is a secret. No o+her is 

just as good." All grocers sell it. 

Six K pill tinttlcs expressed fnr S1.50. Send 
stamps for b.ioU~-IIou^hul 1 Sluts.*' 
E. S. BURNTIAM CO., iglOanseroort St , N Y 




SLATE BURIAL VAULTS. 

Are recommended by every person who sees them. They are proof 
against dampness, rodents and reptiles; are portable to ship to any part 
of the country. Are cheaper than brick and can be put in place by ordinary 
workmen. Slate Is Im- 
perishable by nature, 
and has greater strength 
than any other stone. Ap- 



)ly to K. F. KOIIEK t 

SON, Pacific Coast Agent, 
Los GatoB, Cal. N. CLARK 
& SONS, 17 and 19 Spear 
St., San Francisco. 

Telephone 771. 



CANCER. 

THE KOEHLER CANCER CURE CO., 708 FOLTON St., S. F. 

Cancer, Tumors or malignant growths removed without knife or caus 
tic. A GUARANTEED CURE a specialty. Call or send for circular. Over 
300 cancers preserved in alcohol in our office. Consultation free. 

PHILIP KOEHLER, Manager. 

PRIVATE raOSPITA.I_i, largest,' oldest, best fur^ 
nished and most complete in the State. Sulphur, Russian, steam and any 
kind of medicated bath for ladies and gentlemen. The largest and health- 
iest in the city. 522 to 528 Pacific Street, between Kearny and 
Montgomery. 

Dr. A. S. and Mrs. Dr. Cook, 

CANCER, TUMOR AND ECZEMA SPECIALISTS, 

OFFICE— 222 POST STREET, 

DR. THOMAS L. HILL, Dentist, 

OFFICE— ODD FELLOWS' BCIXDINU, S. W. Corner Seventh and 

Market Streets. 
Office Hodks : 9 a. m. to 5 f. m. Consultation Hours: 4 to 5. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Phelan Building.) 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for pois- 
tively extracting teeth without pain. "Colton Gas" has an established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for itB purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
in all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physiciaas. Also performs 
all operations in dentistry. 

DR. CHARLES W. DECKER 

MOTHERS. 

SAMAKITAN POWDERS are a speedy and harmless cure for 
morning sickness. One box will be sufficient to cure the most trouble- 
some case. PKIOE, $2 per box. Address, 

SAMARITAN POWDER CO., 

P. O. Box 214. Oakland, Cal. 

FRANK KENNEDY, LAW-OFFICE, BOOM 66, MURPHY BUILDING, 
1236 MABKET STREET, SAN FBANCI8CO, CAL. 



J. 



July 16, 1898 



BAN FTUNCTBCO NEWS T.KTTKR. 



<ff A J-_^°PCWMi 



THERE Is but little to record in the real estate market. The 
plain fact is that business continues dull, and there is no 
good in denying it. The prospects certainly are good, for the es- 
tablishment of the Midwinter Fair should have a decidedly good 
effect upon the city. The money market shows a few signs of 
loosening up. and if the indications are followed by the hoped for 
facts, the autumn will open well. The banks are beginning to 
feel easier, and show more disposition to extend loans than dur- 
ing the past two months. It is said that the aggregate amount 
of dividends payable by local banks this month is $5, 000, 000. 
Most of this money should go into active circulation at once. 
The beneficial result will be immediately felt. Dealers say that 
several large transactions have been banging fire for a number of 
weeks because of the disinclination of the local banks to go into 
any big schemes, or to open their vaults for the loaning of large 
sums of money, even upon the best of security. With the im- 
proved financial condition, these transactions should be consum- 
mated, with the result that the real estate market will be placed 
in a healthy condition once more. 

Applications on tile for loans will receive the usual attention 
from the banks to-day, and the custom of waiving notice on 
term deposits will be resumed this morning by all the banks. 

Rents hold well, because landlords usually take advantage of 
the midsummer exodus to improve their properties. Conse- 
quently they can consistently hold to a good rental. There is a 
fair demand for residence property for purchase and rental. 
There is said to be quite a cumber of visitors in the city, and to 
this fact is attributed the demand for small house? and flats. 

The congregation of the Temple Emann-El has purchased the 
full fifty vara on the northwest corner of California and Octavia 
streets, diagonally opposite St. John's Presbyterian Chnrch. On 
the site stands the old Rosenbaum house, and the transaction 
was a private one between the Rosenbaum heirs on the one side 
and the trustees of the Temple Emanu-El on the other. The price 
paid was $60,000. 

The temple property on the north line of Sutter street, west of 
Stockton, is worth about $1000 a front foot, unimproved. The 
building is of little value, as it would have to be torn down to 
make the lot available for business purposes. Although the con- 
gregation has secured a fine site, it will not build until the pres- 
ent site on Sutter street is sold. 

Umbsen's paper, the Record, says in reference to the Fair: "As 
the proposition is at present in its infancy.it is unnecessary to do 
more than point out that if it is brought to a successful issue it 
will be of incomparable benefit to the city and State. It will 
naturally strengthen the real estate market, not only for the time 
being, but for a long time after." That is the opinion of all the 
real estate men in town. 



THE city architects are after the scalp of Mr. Bonet. That gen- 
tleman having claimed the ciedit of inventing the " staff," the 
material with which the World's Pair buildings are covered, a 
dispatch was sent to Messrs. Van Brunt & Howe, the architects of 
the Electric Building, who returned the following: 

" Staff is French invention, origin unknown. Bonet was employed 
as an assistant only. Very little of his design used. 

Van Brunt & Howe. 

The statue of St. John of ' Nipamuck, made for the Bohemian 
Club's Midsummer Jinks in the Redwoods eight years ago, was 
covered with " staff," which was used before Mr. Bonnet or Ma- 
rion Wells were born. 



A MOST interesting musical programme of twelve numbers has 
been arranged for to-day at El Campo, under the leadership 
of Marcus M. Blum. It includes a number of operatic and pop- 
ular selections, and several novelties, among which will be a pot- 
pourri "Der Freischutz," by Von Weber, with solos for cornet and 
trombone, and a selection from " Un Ballo In Maschera," with 
claronets and euphonium. Thomas Lowans will sing the fine 
baritone solo, " In the Cellar Deep." El Campo has become very 
popular since its reopening as a Sunday family resort. 



The recent pleasant ■weather has attracted hundreds of people to 
Laundry Farm, and, the picnic trains of the California Railway, which 
run to this favorite resort, are nowadays crowded with happy child- 
ren and their parents and sisters and brothers, all eager for an outing 
at this beautiful spot. The trains connect at Fruitvale with the hourly 
boats from this city by the Oakland broad gauge. The round trip 
fare is only fifty cents. Laundry Farm is a most delightful place, 
and a visit to it will prove very enjoyable. 

Shainwald, Buckbee &Co., Real Estate Agents, Mills Build- 
ing, 218-220 Montgomery street. Special attention given to the col- 
lection of rents. Pull charge taken of property for absent owners. 

Special attention given to all cases recommended by family physician, 
free of charge. C. Muller, refraction specialist, 136 Montgomery street, 
near Bush. 



Unlike the Dutch Process 

No Alkalies 

— on — 

Other Chemicals 

are used In the 
preparation of 

W. BAKER & CO.'S 

reakfastGocoa 

fhirh v.* absolutely 
pure and soluble, 

I Ith&amorethanthreetiTtiea 
| the strength of Cocoa mixed 
■ with Starch, Arrowroot or 
* Sugar, and is far more eco- 
nomical, costing- less than one cent a cup. 
It is delicious, nourishing, and easily 

DIGESTED. 

Sold by Grocers ererywher*. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mais. 




R. LIDDLE & Co., 



Formerly of No. 5S8 Washington street, San Francisco, have removed to 
No. 110 Montgomery street, under Occidental Hotel. Sole Agents for W. 
AC. Scott & Son, W. W. Greener, Lefever Arms Co., I. C. Smith, Parker 
Bros., Ithaca, Baker and Remington Shotguns. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Send Three-cent Stamp for Catalogue. 



BENTS! 



Our House Renting Department is one of 
the best equipped in the city. We guarantee 
prompt and efficient service in renting 
bouses, collecting rents and placing insur- 
ance. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND, 

10 Montgomery St. 



REALTY 



A HOMESEEKER3 AND INVESTORS' JOURNAL. 
Reports of everything relating to land from filty 
towns in Southern California. No boom articles, 
but a conservative, honest record of progress- 

Los Angeles office, 136 S. Broadway. Send $2 for 
a year'B subscription, and begin with volume— out 
in July. This is the only publication of its char- 
acter. Persons interested in land cannot afford to 
be without it. Address correspondence to Edgar F. Howe, Redlands, Cal, 



P.&B 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS, 
BUILDING PAPERS, 
| ROOFING AND PAINTS. 



PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 116 Battery St. 



George Goodman, 

—Patentee and Manufacturer of— 

ARTIFICIAL STONE in all its branches. 

Schillinger's Patent Side Walk and Garden Walk a specialty. 
Office, 307 Montgomery St., Nevada Block S. F. 



LOUIS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Steel Ceilings, Walt Paper, Lincrusta Walton, Papier Mache 

Parquet Flooring, Moorish Fret Work, 

Frescoing, Wall Mouldings. 

943 and 945 Market St., between 5th and 6th, San Francisco. 




JCNE is always the dullest of the summer months in San Fran- 
cisco's society circles — so many of its members are ont of 
town, while those who remain within the city limits are content 
to drop the roles of hostess for a time. Bo: once the Fonrth of 
July has come and gone tbe reopening of the schools call scholars 
and parents back to the city again and hospitalities are indulged 
in once more in the shape of lonebes and dinners: visiting strin- 
gers are the motif for some, while the desire to see one's friends 
in a quiet way influence others to open their doors. However, 
there are plenty of our fashionables who will remain in the country 
till the end of August at least, and for the preset: ;£. let e; :a the 
city need not be looted for or expected. There have been numer- 
ous changes in the personnel of guests at the different resorts 
since tbe National holiday, and there appears to have been a 
regular change around, as, for instance, to San Hafael have gone 
Mr. and Mrs^V. S. Barnes and the Hecbt family from Santa Cruz, 
as well as the MeN ntts an d the Will Tevises from Baktrsfield : Mrs- 
Peter Donahue and Mrs. Martin are among other recent anil 
San Mateo has gained Mrs. W. I. Kip and her daughters from 
Watson's. Mr. and Mrs. a M. A. Miller ir::c Oasl e 3rag, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Webster Jones from Oakland. The Blakeman- 
Keeney party have cone :: Ssr:s Crux from Del Monte, while to 
Del Monte have come Mr. and Mrs Henry L. Dodge from Santa 
Ciu-. Mr. and Mrs. Kerry I. Scott and family and M- 
Mrs. Ira Pierce from Oasile Crag. M-s 0. W. thuds and her 
daughters, the Misses Emma and Eulb. from 1 • -.:-- 
A I Tope and Mr. and Mrs. Dan Murphy from Napa. Mrs- and 
Hiss Nellie Chabot from Oakland, and Mrs. f- Benkaai 

B the end of the month the st of guests w inner acg- 

mented by the arrival gi the H pet W. H. 

Taylors. P. G. McBeans. Miss Sperry. ;c i 

:t and iami =.yson. Me. 



Other changes include the loss to Santa Crax of Mrs. Delnts 
and her party, who have returned to the Dcslmas Viila at Moun- 
tain View, where s ay Mrs. Delmas will resume giving 

_ she inaugurated earlier is 

the season. In sp rpears 

to t>« bat little falling off in tie n Santa Crax- 

ate ViUa the McLaughlins are enierti ng ssoccession 

i Mrs. J. Pb are doing a great deal in 

that line at Sunsh - ekCam ; irea of getting 

..- a c -i- . : t - :s ice 
is pronounced unexcelled. Miss Lottie Clarke, who has been 
awl - res were a i lineal 

additions to the beach net ^ : pronounced snc- 

cesses were those of the - -• •-• 

By the way. i: is on the cards that Miss La or* McKinslry will 
Spend - with her relatives in t±: place 

where she ■ " she being one of those w heal foreign 

spoils for home life in California. 



The spring and early summer season was excepticna.y -- 
• year, hot » 
lier times. For one thing, the Hagers and the Deans are leaked 
for some time nex : . rgs are save 

train. The annua ruatry Cias 

I data set for the £5th of Aagast 
I c three foi.. • . J . a- . s . a i ; 

at the death " and the tmvx 
o,uer.i : all included. To the yoaager set of gaests those 

. are indented for soaae very soccessfal i nli.ii ■ 

. - 

ants .: strength, wrestling, boxing. 

arc r. *:. ;..'.; c s . . » ■ ; -..- .- : ■ : - ■.-. :a - !:•:•:;: r- 

tTaar .-.- and on the next a secies ef 

tableaux wen presented hy the yoaag peaeae. the Misses Lixaae 

•" 4 : ... -: ? . S ^ »-:-> .""-a -.> N -■- .-i 1. •--.-.-. S ;--;-■ i-j 

a p peari ng »a the King of Spain," -The tear Q;ei » ng ." the -- P i a »i»L 
had the Paaper," -- Nyrht and Homing. - Liberty." e-:r.. with 
great sawwess, and weretae i itaai aat T elnaaehpraraeand apa VlinM 



Mer.lo rart has had several pleasant 

M-s. Cia-.es Hoihreofce and her I 
• 
Mr. and Mrs. IV- back agaia , 

their crip to the World's Fair. Tbe new d 
new fairly laaa c k a d. as* 
the aaost p ap aatr in the State. They 
banc hut week, which indaded a 
»t rw ac adM a e. The teams toaraaaaeai is the 
aapi> at the H.-ce. Mateo, and tat h a dii aci ea ra 
one of the iaMl»"W. of the 



. -. : .: i 

. 7": T - 5 J-' t"; 
- 

.-- : - . . if: ". 

i. ~ - Ci.l r 

:. -i-: :.-::. 
;a aooachisg 
:.r; I -• r .y 

. = i :c .- ..- : 

: . .. .-.= 



Mrs. Charles T. W-'ison, who is such a pleasaDt hostess, gave 
another of her charming loach parties last Thursday at her bom'. 
on Sacramento street. Chief among the out-of-town lonebes of 
recent date was thai ziven by Mr. and Mrs. Jack Parrott. at San 
Mateo last Friday, when tbe guests of bonor were Monsignor 
Satolli, Archbishop Eierama and Archbisbop Grace of Minnesota; 
to meet whom were invited several of the Ban Franciseo Ueiey 
and one or two of tbe Parrotrs' neigbbors in tbe country, beeidea 
members of tbeir :«-r_ famOy. 



The 

:e 7r: 



On FridBy evening of next week tbe Camera 
another of then rable lectures at M ctiup ata 

subject is to be "Egypt, and Cp tie . ^r_rl it will 

fusely illustrated. 

Fruitvale was :ie scene of a pre:;- wedaingeai Weir-esiay 
eve-ir,g of last week, when Miss Florence Grey and Stephen H. 
Knapp. Jr.. were amited in marriage at the residence of tbe 
bride's :;:cer Thnim H. Grey. Tbe ceremony was performed 
by Rev. Cii;:;_ i ": - e in the prettily decorated parlors. Miss 
>"e ie Grey : Be .s -..:: i? maid of honor and Charles 8. fCmwrll as 
best man. A handsome sapper followed the ceremony and tbe 
-.'.-.'.--.:■_;:::: i-. i i -::-.--. i :: - --T-. ■-'■ "-'-■-■- 
rii:- 

San Rafael had a wed: be ;• week. Tbe contracting parties 
were Miss Adeiina Poerari sad Saraer Carlos P a ul a ri, sad th e c er - 
emony took place at a. in tbe presence of a large 
asBnaahhase of guests. This was followed hy an 

i i later the happy pair left f 
the honeymoon will be uptaa Their fntnre res . 
San Anselmo, Marin eoc : ~ 



Amccc the weci cr5 . : this week in the city was that of Miss 

card and Frank Anson, and the nwatial knot was 

tied a: r Jntbedral on Tuesday evening. The fare ■ a n is 

. - ._.- = - : - . ' - ■: • - - : c i. r_ : c f s : - e : : 

1: r_- t: ; 



: 

ci: :si;: ', - ■ ' --'- = ' - - '-'- '■ ■- ' " - -■ - -- 1 : r_i:.e !c:cr: :: 

Miss Mabel Bddy. who win have at 

M issee Mae Merry and Maad Magee. The 

groom. Edward Louis Jacobs, will he uappilua by Frank D. 
;ii:.-::i<:ri _:: lz : -.;= .i_-:i : c- Si" : r v :_ : ; -.- - 

residence of Mr. and Mrs. George F KB TaQey. On 

tr'-r :: -er 
:.:: .-;:•-:■ .: i :;e c:r_e : :i; : - ce : - L-ec .= r . z. :z 



la Jewish cxrcJes . one of 
of Miss Bella Xewbaosr and 

. cer residence, on Van > ess i 
Kahai Tina ni»,iii officauxas- The nridal mhe was ef whine i 

; i : ■ :-i:e - :- :_ r. e : — c 7: ~: .i.:e :;: 



— - * ' 7 : f : : -r" :cf c 
tbe Misses Castle for soed 









- 

- . - .- . - 

- : • .: . _-r "..-.; . - ".".- 

sesaite: ' 'T T ill I ~ 11 iniijl of Medical TS- 

reessr Saaath, tram a visit ts Portland. Osngaai: af Capsaai aaat 
Mrs. Parker, at the Prasad**, bean a Task ts the If sail TeaaWsne, 
tat ef Ijewt. and Mrs. Mclwar, ear Tail dk i.nfe,. tr— a their barney 
:-:-■: - ; : S. . : ■_ -s . - C£- : =- ::: .-= '-;;. 

are in Chicago doing the C 

r T.r-ir w!_ 

»:r: ■:: :;■ :■:: : : 
. r ; ; : -• m 

F - i 




Atrrr-: be B Wai :c »n 
Afice. Mr. and Mrs. Vaa 
- 
Meadeckaa 
VaJtey. where sibe was 




Mrs. 

V- *cm X-5. _r 

re . Si - : :- 



... , . - 

mala. K. A. IVxfy from 



.».-« .' Ih a apay r-.-uri* tr tbi ■rwaWfelhnt 
!-. » :• - - • -a »«ts . i ;J r 

■Edst ar eg) -. r^ekt k«aa the Bast Mr. 

:c : : •- .- ■ : : ^ . 

:: »rs: . .-: . .:; :i-!ii.:l .'.• ; . 




7 



July 16, 1893. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



^PRICE'S 




Baking 
Powder 



Tbe only Two Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia; No Alum 
Used in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard 



Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Page are among recent visitors at Lake 
Taboe; Miss Betty Ashe is at Santa Cruz. Tbe Misses Blanche 
and Octavia Hoge are at the White Sulphur Springs in Napa 
Valley. Capt. and Mrs. G. F. 8mith and Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Has- 
sett have been visiting Vichy Springs; Mr. George Sbreve, Miss 
Bessie Shreve, Miss Minnie Houghton, Mrs. Charles Decker and 
family were at Pescadero last week. Mrs. James de la Montanya 
is visiting ber parents, Judge and Mrs. Spencer, at San Jose. Dr. 
and Mrs. McLane left N v ew York last MoDday en route home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Peaee were the guests of Colonel Fred Crocker 
last week at Castle Crag. Recent arrivals at the tavern include 
Mrs. M, Cheeseman, Judge and Mrs. Hayon, Mr. and tbe Misses 
Goad, and the Misses Boone, of Baltimore. 



Recent arrivals at Del Monte are Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Bowen and 
Miss Mary Bowen. Mrs. Hager and her daughters returned from 
their trip to Alaska on Tuesday, and the same day brought us 
Frank Carolan, Mrs. A. N. Towne and Mrs. Eva Shaw from 
Chicago, Mrs. Latham and her neice, Miss McMullin, from Guer- 
neville, and Miss Joliffe from her visit to Mrs. Miller at San Mateo. 
Mr. and Mrs. George Pope and Miss Carrie Taylor are with us at 
last, arriving from the East last Thursday evening, and Mrs. Vol- 
ney Spaulding was one of the passengers on the Peru from Japan. 
Miss Claire Ralston is expected here next week upon her return 
from the East and Europe. 

One of the most attractive young ladles at the Hotel Mateo is 
Miss Clementina Kip. Her modest mien and ingenious grace 
bave made ber many friends. 

Menlo Park seems to be unusually dull and sleepy this season. 
None of the big houses have been hospitably inclined. But now 
that the Tim Hopkinses bave returned they may infuse new life 
into the district. It is whispered that the Floods intend to enter- 
tain a number of guests during tbe next three months. 

Tbe Burlingame Tuxedo of the Pacific has got a large sized 
black eye in tbe non arrival of the Fred Sbarons, and things at 
that close corporation resort are very quiet. The Haggin son-in- 
law, tbe Austrian Count, is contemplating a prolonged yachting 
tour. He does not seem to take much interest in land festivities. 

Widower Bowie and his step-son are meditating a trip East- 
ward. Mr. Bowie is enthusiastic over the land of the Orient, 
whence he has recently returned. 

The announced engagement of Mrs. Belle Donahue and young 
Sprague bangs tire. It is .said Miss Ashe is urging her friend, the 
gay widow, to be spliced at the same time with herself -in the 
autumn. 

Rumor is again busy giving 'Rome Watson a bride from Pacific 
avenue. 

The prettiest woman in Mill Valley beyond all dispute is 
claimed to be Mrs. Martin Schultz, the popular vocalist. 

One of the most universally popular ladies at Santa Cruz this 
summer was undoubtedly the charming wife of Dr. 0. 0. Burgess. 
Mrs. Burgess has always a bright smile and pleasant word, and 
the influence of her genial manners was like sunshine in a beach 
group. 

8t. Luke's congregation has been gradually getting to the watery 
stage, fcs the time draws near for tears to flow, and tbe little pastor 
to say adieu to his erstwhile flock. 

Mrs. Louis A. Phillips and her uncle, James Viosca, Esq., 
U. 8. Consul at La Paz, Mexico, have come borne from their visit 
to the Fair. They included in their trip a visit to Niagara, Thousand 
Islands, and New York. Mr. Viosca intends spending the sum- 
mer in this State, returning to his station some time in November 
next. Mrs. Phillips will spend the summer at "Casa Blanca," 
San Leandro. 



Dr. and Mrs. Byron Haines bave returned from their visit to 
the World's Fair, to their hom*» at Belvedere, having stopped to 
rest at Lake Tahoe en mute Dr. Haines was entertained exten- 
sively by tbe Chicago dentists. 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Coe make the announcement of the 
marriage of their daughter, Alice Fcye, to John Henry Fallon on 
Tuesday evening next, at 8:30 o'clock, at 1809 Union street. 



Mrs. B. Biber left for Paris la?) Saturday, whence she will re- 
turn in September, accompanied by her daughter. 

AT none of the hotels in tbe country, whether frequented by 
members of tbe social set or not, can you procure as fine 
stationery as you can at Sanborn, Vail and Co. 'a, at 741-743 Mar- 
ket street. If are going to the country, therefore, do not forget 
to get your stationery first at this popular bouse. It is in all styles 
and shades. 



THE Arizona Historical Wild West Show will open to-night at 
Central Park, giving two performances daily. Bands of cow- 
boys, scouts and Pima Indians will liven the show with their 
famous riding, lasso throwing, etc. Miss Lillian Smith, the 
famous rifle shot, is one of tbe attractions. 

Dr. Hammond recommends, as a certain cure for chronic indiges- 
tion and dyspepsia, chewing Adams' Pepsin Chewing Gum after each 
meal for half an hour. 

"central park. 

Corner of Eighth and Market Streets. 
Commencing SATURDAY NIGHT, JULY 15th. 
Two performances daily. 

ARIZONA HISTORICAL WILD WEST. 

Bands of Cowboys, Scouts and the famous Pima Indians. 

MISS LILLIAN SMITH, 

Champion Rifle and Revolver Shot in America. 

Broncho riding, flag racing, lasso throwing, steer tieing, Indian 

races, dances, etc. Acknowledged champions of the world in rough 

riding and lasso throwing. Grand street parade each day at 12:30. 

Admission, 50c. ; Children 10 years, 25c. Gates open at 2 and 7 p. m. 

Performances at 3 and 8 o'clock. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Savage Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of stockholders of the Savage Minlug Com- 
paay will be held on 

Thursday, the 20th Day of July, A. D. 1893, 
at the office of the company, room 60, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St.f 
San Francisco, Cal., at the hour of 1 o'clock p.m. Transfer books will 
close on Monday, the 17th of July, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 50. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. Ran Francisco. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Virginia and Gold Hill Water Company 
The annual meeting of t*\e stockholders of the Virginia and Gold Hill 
Water Company for the election of trustees to serve for the eosung year, 
and for the transaction of such other business as may be regularly brought 
bef< re the meeting, will be held at the office of the company, room 25, Ne- 
vada Block, 3.9 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Thursday, the 27th ( ay of July, 1893, at the hour of 1 O'clock P. V. 
S an Francisco, July 10, 1893. W. W. STETSON, Secretar y. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Consoli 
dated Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, 
roo:n 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 
Monday, the 17th day of July, 1893, at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M. 
for the purpose of electing a board of directors to serve for ihe ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Friday, July 14,1893, at 3 p.m. 

CHARLES O. HARVEY, Secretary. 
Office— Room 4, Nevad a Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Spring Valley Water Works. 

San Fbancisco, July 7, 1893. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valit-y Water 
Works for the election of trustees for the enduing year, ;aud for the 
transactiou of such other business as may properly come before it, will 
be held at the company's office, No. 516 California street, San Francisco, 
California, on 

Wednesday, July 19th. 1893, at the hour of 12 o'clock M. 

WM. NO RRIS, Secretary. 
Office— 516 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Yellow Jacket Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the above named 

Company will be held at 'the office of the company, at Gold Hill, Nev., 

Monday. Ju y 1 7, 1 893, at the hour of 3:30 O'clock P. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 

Transfer books will close on Monday. July 10, at 3 o'clock p. h. 

W H. BLAUVELT, Secretary. 
Offioe— Gold Hill, Nevada. 



D 



R. E. H. SCHULTZE, DENTIST, 1073J^ MARKET STREET; FJLI/INGS 
from 50c. up ; teeth extracted for 25c. ; good set of teeth cheap. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1893. 



J. C. WILSON & CO.'S NEW QUARTERS. 

THE growing business of J. C. Wilson & Co., the coal dealers, has 
necessitated the removal of their offices to 900 Battery 
street, corner Vallejo (Telephone 1864) where, being connected 
with their immense yards, they have now much greater facil- 
ities for the transaction of business than formerly. This 
well-known firm imports as much coal as any other 
house on the Pacific Coast, and always have on hand 
a large stock of the best qualities. Throughout their 
long business career they have enjoyed an unexcelled reputation 
for honest dealing, and to that fact and the fine quality of the 
coal they sell, owe their present large and increasing trade. Full 
weight is guaranteed, a very important fact, let it be remembered, 
in the purchase of coal. J. C. Wilson & Co., besides their large 
yards in this city, also have large yards on Broadway, in Oakland, 
with office at 908 Broadway, Tel. 54. They are therefore enabled 
to supply coal to San Francisco, Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, and 
Piedmont at the lowest market rates. 

OBITUARY. 

THE death of Edward C. Marshall, or, as he was better known, 
"Ned" Marshall, last Sunday night, removes from the bar of 
this 8tate one of its ablest practitioners. He was a native of Ken- 
tucky, and was seventy-two years old. He came from an able 
family. Chief Justice Marshall of the United States Supreme 
Court was his uncle, and Tom Marshall, United States Senator 
from Kentucky, was the brother of the deceased. Ned Marshall 
was a brilliant lawyer and an orator of marked ability. He was an 
omnivorous reader and bad a remarkable memory. He was one of 
the first Representatives in Congress from California, and in the 
early days was a political power in the State. He also served with 
distinction as Attorney-General of the State. The deceased had suf- 
fered from heart disease for several years, and that malady, com- 
bined with rheumatism, finally caused his death. His wife died 
four years ago. He leaves two sons and a daughter. 

IT is reported that the U uited States Legations in Europe have 
been instructed to study and report on the existing systems of 
taxation in European countries, in order that our Government 
may select the least oppressive to cover the deficit that will result 
from the contemplated tariff reform. If our Ministers wish to 
learn what not to do, rather than what to do in this matter, ibey 
will find abundant material in Europe. 

"JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 

CITY IRON WORKS. 

Office 51 Fremont Street, 

SA.1ST FBAliTCISCO, - - - CXA.I.. 
Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Boilers, Engines, Pumps and achinery of Every Description . 

Patent Lead-Lined Conpled Tubing, for use as 

Water Pipe, for Sale Cheap 

REMOVAL 

DR. ROBERT A. McLEAN 

Has removed his office from Merchant and Montgomery Streets to 

304 KEARNY ST., Cor. BUSH. 

gpr*Hou r a— 9 to 10, morning; 2 to 5, afternoon; 8 to 9 evening. 

FICTION MONTHLY. 

No. 9, August, NOW READY, contains, complete, a thrilling novel, new 
and original, entitled, " Her Second Marriage." Price, 10 cents. 
Of all newsdealers, and 

THE INTERNATIONAL NEWS COMPANY, New York. 

Subscriptions received for any periodical, foreign or Domestic. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



Lo- 



Potosi Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California, 
cation of works — Virginia, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 11th day of July, 1893, an assessment (No. 38) of Twenty-five 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
ofnceof the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery streets, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the Fifteenth (16th) Day of August, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; aud unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the fifth day of September, 1893, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOTT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Exchequer Mining Company. 

Location of Principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Twenty seventh day of June, 1893, an assessment (No. 36) of ten (10) 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporation , payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, room 79, Nev^a Block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 1 st day of f ugust, 1 893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the twenty-ninth dayof August, 
1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costB of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale &' Norcross Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held on 
the Twenty-first day of June, 1893, an assessment (No. 104} of 50 cents 
per Bhare waB levied upon the capital Btock of the corporation, payable 
Immediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
pany, at the office of the Company, room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 25th Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment 1b made 
before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 18th day of August, 1893, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costB of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Gold Hill, Storey couuty, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Twelfth day of June, 1893, an assessment (No 61) of 25 cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable Imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the Secretary.at the office of the 
company, room 35, third floor, of Mills Building, northeast corner of Bush 
and Montgomery streets, San FranciBco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

The 18th Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 8th day of August, 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 35, third floor of Mills Building, northeast cornerBush and 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the Twentieth day of June 1893, an assessment (No. 81) of 25 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street 
3an Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-fifth Day of July, 1 893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 14th day of August, 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place ot business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the sixteenth day of June, 1893, an assessment, No. 18, of Ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately, in United StateB gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice of the company, room 53, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Eighteenth Day of July, 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on SATURDAY, the 5th day of August, 1893, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 58, Nevada block. No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No 13 

Amount per Share . . 10 cents 

Levied June 22, 1893 

Delinquent in Office July 26, 1898 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Aug. 17,1893 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



Pri ce per Copy, 10 Cents. 




e* H 'J^P'^eo 



Annual Subscription, S4.00. 




i&ixlxf 0xniW%b btxtx sjer. 




Vol. xivn 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY JULY 22, 1893. 



Number 3. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran. 
Cisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

THE office of the News Letter in New York City has been 
removed to the Evening Post Building, 204-206 Broadway, 
Room 1, where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
cription and advertising rates. C. C. Murphy, manager. 



THE story of the smuggler Alexander's assaultupon the Mohican 
seems to be a canard. The Mare Island cotillion contingent 
need have no fear. 



IT is said that at a meeting of the Bar Association to be held 
soon, interesting papers will be read by several gentlemen of 
the profession on the topic: " How to be a gentleman, though a 
lawyer." The view9 of the foot, as well as the head of the bar, 
wilt be listened to with great interest. 



NOT to allow the courts to be out of a job in the criminal de- 
partment, just as the trial of Heath for the murder of Mc- 
Whirter was being brought to a close, a negro man at Fresno 
deliberately cut bis wife's throat, and is now in jail awaiting the 
action of the Grand Jury. 



A SAN JOAQUIN valley paper, in speaking of the tax law as 
amended by the last Legislature, calls it "a bungling piece of 
legal architecture." A law affecting the revenue should be care- 
fully drawn, and made as plain to the ordinary mind as words 
could make it, but tbat Legislature must be pardoned on the plea 
of irresponsibility. The law regulating the sale of grain bags 
manufactured by prison labor is another specimen of bungling, 
and stands as a magnificent specimen of legal ignorance and stu- 
pidity. It iB much better to class it as the work of ignorance than 
to charge that it was the result of deliberate demagogism. 



ANOTHER death at the Palace Baths is recorded. A bather 
jumped off the spring-board, and shortly afterwards called for 
help, and Bank. He was drowned. The doctors say his death 
was caused by apoplexy, but that does not remove the unpleas- 
antness connected with the now large list of deaths that have oc- 
curred in the tank baths of this city. As we have had occasion 
to remark before, there is something about bathing in a public 
tank that is cleansed only every twenty-four hours (if then) that 
is decidedly repugnant. When to that is added the probability of 
coming up against a corpse, when diving, the public tank swim 
becomes decidedly objectionable. 



DR. A. B. HAWKINS, of Florida, the gentleman who has been 
appointed on the jury on citrus fruits at the World's Fair, 
should be assisted back to his everlasting everglades just as soon 
as Providence will permit. Dr. A. B. Hawkins, of Florida, is 
too important a man to be outside his own miasma-breathing 
territory. When he spouted out his opposition to our fruits, and 
everything Californian, he called down himself stacks of wrath 
that will continue to unload upon him for some time to come. 
He is very evidently an improper man to act as a judge of 
awarda, for he is ignorant and prejudiced. Dr. A. B. Hawkins 
should be dropped with a dull thud. 



ATTORNEY JOHNSON has a beautiful flow of language, an 
admirable thing in a lawyer. He knows words that burn, 
and uses them well, a necessary qualification for one in his pro- 
fession. He keeps his BUbject well in hand, and applies the laBh 
in an artistic manner, for which he should be praised. When he 
finds another lawyer who has shown himself a bully, and one 
who seems to glory in ungentlemanly conduct, Johnson points 
out the error of the fellow's ways, for which we commend him. 
Though not a young man nor a strong, he has no fear of blus- 
terers with revolvers. These remarks are called forth by John- 
son's able address to the jury in tbe Heath case, during which be 
paid his compliments to the late Bully Foote. Those who heard 
it said the speech was a masterpiece. Foote does not care for 
maaterpieces; therefore he left FreBno before the day on which 
he knew Johnson wonld speak. 



A SUGGESTION to the Chief of Police— the Bidewaiks are for 
the use of pedestrians, and the police have no right to 
march upon them in column, jostling people out of their way, as 
if they owned tbe earth, and others lived merely by their suffer- 
ance. A column or" Chinese with swinging baskets have as much 
right upon the sidewalks as a column of policemen. If the cop- 
pers want to march, let them march in the streets. Other people 
have some rights. 

FOUR gold medals were recently presented to New York fire- 
men; two were in recognition of heroism, and two for good 
discipline. The medals are awarded yearly, but the presentation 
is made only every other year. It is made a gala event. The 
Mayor of the city presides, there is a fine procession, a fire 
machine drill, and a general holiday for the firemen. The Ben- 
nett medal, established in 1868 by tbe late James Gordon Bennett, 
8r. , is for heroic conduct. Mr. Bennett presented tbe city with 
$1500, the interest on which pays for the medal. The Stephenson 
medal, for good discipline and efficiency, is from a small fund 
founded by John Stephenson in 1883. It is recognized that compe- 
tition for these medals does much to improve the New York fire 
service, and keep it up to a good standard of excellence. Let us 
suggest that some local capitalist and house-owner, or some in- 
surance company donate a fund for the establishment of similar 
medals for the San Francisco department. 

THE reception to Vice-President Stevenson was all right in it- 
self. Mr. Stevenson is a prominent citizen, and has been 
highly honored by his fellow-countrymen. All the honors that 
were accorded him the other night were his due, and as to their 
bestowal no one will say nay. But as to the manner of it — ah, 
that is another matter. These honors to a Democratic official 
were by no means paid in a Democratic manner. In fact, it was 
something more akin to a monarch's reception than anything we 
have bad here for some time. A crowd gathered in front of the 
locked doors of the Pavilion about 8 o'clock. The members of 
Stevenson's party arrived in carnages at 8:30 o'clock, and were 
ushered into the vast and vacant barn, where in solemn grandeur 
they awaited tbe Vice-President. They militia arrived at 8:45 
o'clock, and by 9 had formed an alley-way down the Pavilion 
floor from the entrance past tbe stage to the side door on Grove 
street. Stevenson was saluted when he arrived. He took station 
on the stage, and tbe people, the profane mob, the bowling mul- 
titude, the jostling voters, were pushed by police from the street 
into the Pavilion, there the soldiers guided them down the rifle- 
lined alley-way, and, like cattle in a corral run, they were driven 
down the floor, past the stage, and out again. Meanwhile the 
visilors looked at the crowd as they would at so many strug- 
gling animals in an arena. It was not an inspiring sight. It re- 
flected no credit upon the Committee. 

THAT the struggle for tbe vacant Senatorship from this State is 
approaching a crisis, is evident from the events of the last 
few days. When Governor Markham returned from Chicago, it 
soon became known that he was more friendly disposed to M. 
H. de Young than he had been for a long time. He had bad a 
consultation with deYoung at Chicago, when they made mutual 
explanations, came to the conclusion that they had never under- 
stood each other, and parted very good friends. When de Young's 
friends pushed him for the late 8enator Stanford's vacant desk, 
it was admitted on all sides that he was very strong with Mark- 
ham. Upon the Governor's arrival in this city, the assaults upon 
the editor began, but they seemed to be of no avail. Finally, as 
a last resource, de YouDg's enemies managed to secure tbe publi- 
cation in two evening papers of a story to the effect that his 
friends had charged that Mrs. Stanford, at the instigation of 
8teve Gage, had used her money and influence with Governor 
Markham to defeat de Young. An endeavor was made to give 
the impression that de Young himself had started this story. The 
object of such a publication is obvious. If Markham could be 
made to believe that de ^oung had caused the circulation of the 
outrageous statement, that would turn him against the editor. It 
would also have the effect of arraying the Stanford interests 
against him. There is, of course, no truth whatever in the story. 
Politicians are rather hard pushed when they find it necessary to 
drag into tbeir battles for a dead Senator's seat, tbe name of his 
sorrowing widow, with the intimation tbat she had attempted 
the outrageous crime of bribing the Governor of a State. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893. 



GREAT OAKS FROM LITTLE ACORNS GROW. 



IT seems to be conceded on all sides that the recent murder trial 
in Fresno was marked by scenes and general characteristics 
which were a disgrace to the State. On a couple of occasions 
every vestige of dignity and decency was banished from the 
court-room, and the place assumed the appearance of a frontier 
gambling room on the eve of a battle between two gangs of semi- 
civilized ruffians. The normal condition of affairs at the bar was 
that of rampant blackguardism rather than of forensic contro- 
versy, and a proper and honorable professional activity on behalf 
of the clients who were represented, was replaced by personal 
truculency and presumption, which made a business of brow- 
beating and traducing witnesses, and insulting opposing counsel. 
The manners and courtesies of a learned profession were con- 
spicuous by their absence, and the habits and methods of angry 
fishmongers were conspicuous by their presence. 

In alt these respects the Heath trial was an exceptional one, 
but, nevertheless, it was an excellent illustration of the condition 
of affairs which the lax discipline and backwoods system of our 
courts may produce at any time. No such scenes would be pos- 
sible in a French court, or a German court, or an English court. 
They are almost impossible in our Federal courts and in the 
courts of some of the older States. A sure care, or, rather, pre- 
ventive, for them is to be found in the strict maintenance of that 
dignity and outward formality which constitutes a fitting sur- 
rounding for the administration of justice, and there is no gov- 
ernment under which so much deference should be paid to the 
law as under republican institutions which are founded on law. 
It would not, therefore, as narrow and shallow-minded people 
have asserted at times, be unrepublican to surround our courts 
and their Judges with all the pomp and ceremony and austerity 
of English and other foreign tribunals. The average man is to a 
very large extent influenced and even controlled by the character 
of his surroundings. The most philosophical agnostic will ex- 
perience more or less of that reverence, which, as an abstract 
proposition, he looks upon as being akin to superstition, when he 
stands in the Roman Catholic cathedral, the Jewish synagogue, 
or the Moslem mosque. So it would be with our courts if organ- 
ized society ordained that they should and must preserve a be- 
fitting and decorous ceremony throughout their proceedings. 
The Judge should wear the judicial robe of office and he should 
never be seen in his court-room except when on the bench and 
properly costumed. His entrance sbould be ceremonious; he 
should be announced by an usher and greeted with the obeisances 
of the members of the bar; the individual man should be lost in 
the Judge, in the representative of organized society and good 
order, in the judicial arm of the sovereign people. Under such 
surroundings even Bully Foote would feel the obligations of his 
profession, and would conduct himself toward the Court, toward 
the members of the bar, and toward the witnesses in a respectful 
and dignified manner. And, if he did not do so voluntarily, of 
course he wonld be compelled to do so, for the assumption of out- 
ward forms would imply an entire change of the present loose 
methods of judicial procedure, under which a Judge opens his 
court a good deal after the fashion in which an auctioneer opens 
a sale of old junk, and any attempt to enforce proper court dis- 
cipline almost takes the character of a personal quarrel between 
the Judge and the refractory counsel, in which the latter must 
either be allowed to escape punishment, or to pose as a victim of 
personal malice. 

This lack of dignity and proper ceremony in our State courts is 
indirectly the cause of a great many of the evils which we suffer 
from in connection with the administration of justice. In a gen- 
eral way it cheapens and degrades justice in the popular mind, 
and so the elevation of incompetent or corrupt men to the bench 
is looked upon with comparative indifference; trifling witb juries 
is tolerated as an established industry, while perjury and suborna- 
tion of perjury are every day occurrences. In snort, we have 
torn away the trappings and embellishments of the judicial func- 
tion, and thereby have assisted to remove from it that respect and 
reverence which served to protect and maintain it as a funda- 
mental institution in our scheme of government. The Judges' 
gows or robe of office and Bully Foote's truculency are both 
trivialities, if regarded superficially; but, if we look into them a 
little deeper, it will be found that they have a significance that 
reaches into regions that are untbought of in connection with 
them. But even when regarded in their superficial aspect, it may 
be said if Judge Holmes had worn a gown, or possessed a mind 
attuned to the dignity and stern decorum which go with that in- 
signia of office, the rowdyism which disgraced that Fresno court 
would not have occurred. 



SHAM REFORMERS. 



THE request of the Police Surgeon for an ambulance in con- 
nection with the City Receiving Hospital is reasonable and 
proper, and should be granted. At present we have only 
the police patrol wagons to act as ambulances, and though they 
are an improvement on the springless express wagons used only 
a couple of years ago, still they do not fully serve the purpose. 
The city hospital should have its own ambulance service, and the 
Board of Health should give it one as soon as possible. 



THE recent report of County Clerk Haley is a public document 
of considerable interest, inasmuch as it raises a little corner 
of the curtain which hides from general view the methods of the 
ward politician and party boss in their efforts in the direction of 
administrative reform and municipal economy. The County 
Clerk's office has for many years past been a department of the 
municipal government which ward statesmen, party bosses, Silu- 
rians, progressionists and party conventions of all breeds agreed 
to regard as indefensively extravagant. Having first thought- 
fully fixed salaries, by a State law, on a basis which rendered it 
almost impossible to employ the number of people the office re- 
quired at an expense of less than eight or nine thousand dollars a 
month. Buckley, Higgins, Crimmins and Kelly and Sullivan & 
Co., in convention assembled solemnly went through the farce, 
every two years, of pledging their nominees to conduct the office 
at an expense of no more than six thousand dollars a month. 
The result of this remarkable system of economy was always the 
same to the tax-payers. They got cinched. The County Clerk's 
office went on in the old way, and at pretty nearly the old ex- 
pense — but the pledged County Clerk always managed to place 
himself in a position where he could claim to be innocent of any 
invasion of his promise. In fact, this office became the strangest 
anomaly in municipal politics in the United States. The bosses, 
the ward rounders, the party conventions and the incumbents 
(indeed, all those influences that are practical and operative in 
city affairs,} were united in devising to secure reform and re- 
trenchment in this branch of the government, but it refused to 
be reformed or subjected to economy. It insisted npon being 
wicked and extravagant, and, strange to say, was assisted in its 
disobedience to political influence by tbe Supreme Conrt and 
other conservative and reliable friends of good government. 

And right here it occurs to us to suggest that though all this 
talent has been so anxious to reform and economize the County 
Clerk's office nobody has thought of the one simple and effective 
method ot accomplishing the purpose — tbe application of business 
principles and the securement of such alterations in tbe law as 
might be rendered necessary thereby. It is a notorious fact that 
any person conversant with the requirements of the County 
Clerk's office would undertake a contract for the performance of 
its duties in a thorough and satisfactory manner for a lump sum 
of five thousand dollars per month ; that in tbe execution of that 
contract he could employ first-class assistants, and pay them even 
better than they would be paid bv any private employer for simi- 
lar work ; and that such a contract, so carried out, would yield to 
the contractor a fortune in a few years. 



DAIRY INSPECTION. 



THE agitation begun some months ago in the Board of Health, 
and commended at the time by the News Letteh, for a more 
rigid inspection of the dairies that supply milk to the city, has borne 
good fruit. An inspection of the dairies by the Milk Inspector, Chief 
Market Inspector and Dr. Creeiy, was made last Wednesday, and it 
is reported by those officials that the result, on the whole, was very 
satisfactory. Since a previous inspection, many of the dairymen 
have whitewashed and otherwise cleaned their barns, improved the 
feed of their cattle, and disposed in various ways of cows unfitted for 
milch purposes. There are yet, however, more than a few dairymen 
who have refused or neglected to comply with the orders of the 
Board of Health. To these men the Inspectors will direct particular 
attention, and take all needfnl precautionary measures to prevent 
them selling milk from diseased cows. The immediate confiscation of 
a number of cows found to be suffering from consumption, tubercu- 
losis, lung diseases and other affections, has had a most beneficial 
effect upon the dairy system of the city. On Wednesday's tour, 
though all the principal dairies of the county were visited and hun- 
dreds of cows inspected, only three were found tainted with disease. 
On account of an improvement in the quality of the feed, consequent 
upon the direction of the Inspectors, the cows are fatter and healthier 
than ever. They present a fine appearance. To further insure good 
milk, it is proposed by the Board of Health to adopt a new plan of 
testing the milk of a suspected dairy. Hereafter two bottles of milk 
will be taken from the same can, and each will be sealed. The dairy- 
man will be given one bottle, the other being kept by the Inspector. 
When the dairyman presents a chemical analysis of the milk in his 
bottle, he will also have to present a statement signed by the chemist, 
to the < ffect that the latter received the bottle with the seal intact. 
This should effectually prevent the dairyman substituting good milk 
for that which is doubtless bad, unless he gets a duplicate of the 
Health Board's seal made, and rings the changes on the bottles. The 
dairymen take the Inspectors in the proper spirit, and in fact seem 
well pleased with them. There is every reason why they should be, 
for honest milkmen have nothing to fear, and should be quite confi- 
dent of confusion befalling their less scrupulous brethren, whose im- 
proper methods endanger not only the business, but the lives of the 
people of the city as well. 



Julv 23, 1803. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE GERMAN ARMY BILL. 

THE modified German army bill has passed by the scanty 
majority of sixteen votes, and the Emperor has temporarily 
dismissed his "packed" Reichstag, evidently fearing lhat while 
he is cruising in the northern seas votes might be taken without 
consulting bis wishes. Though the bill has been pushed through 
by the government in consequence of qnite a number of secret i 
bargains with such politicians as happened to be for sale, the 
country is stfll in ignorance with regard to the manner in which 
the expenditure is to he distributed, and it must not be imagined 
that the fight is actually over. All will depend on the bill pro- 
viding for the new taxes, and on the way in which the govern- 
ment will redeem its promises to the leaders of the doubtful groups. ( 

Several Germans in this country, no longer in contact with I 
affairs in their own fatherland, and, of course, not fearing any 
disagreeable consequences for themselves from Emperor Will- i 
iam's misrule, have expressed themselves as pleased with the 
passage of the army bill. Almost without exception the reason 
they give for their joy over that event is that Germany should 
always be well prepared to resist an attack of her neighbors, es- 
pecially at the present critical state of affairs. Of course such a 
reason, at the first glance, appears patriotic and plausible. Upon 
a careful scrutiny it will be seen, however, that it is no reason at 
all for the support of the measure in question. That the German 
army should be always maintained iu such a state as to be able 
to defend the country nobody will gainsay. The present bill, 
however, by introducing the two-years' service clause, as a gen- 
eral rule applying to all recruits, will eventually decrease the 
efficiency of the army. This at least is the opinion of some of 
the greatest military authorities in Germany, and of some of her 
most patriotic statesmen. The gain in numbers is only an ap- 
parent one, and a smaller number of thoroughly drilled and ex- 
perienced men is better in times of war than a larger number of 
superficially trained soldiers. Those who were able to show pro- 
ficiency after two years of service have been practically exempt 
from the third year even heretofore, and the others ought not to 
be dismissed before another year of training. 

As far as patriotism is concerned, no German has a greater 
claim to this virtue than the ex-Chancellor of the empire, but it 
was for this very reason that he, as well as his son, Count Her- 
bert, expressed themselves as not in favor of the new bill, al- 
though Count Herbert voted for it, and neither he nor his father 
were opposed to a necessary increase in the number of fighting 
men. Moreover, many of the defenders of the bill in this coun- 
try labor under the deception that the new army law is to pre- 
pare the German army for an emergency in the near future. This, 
however, is by no means the case. Many years have to pass ere 
its provisions can bring about the contemplated change, and this 
means fur years to come an additional burden of taxation, with- 
out any tangible results. 



WHY WE ARE NOT RESPECTED. 



THERE are times when the people of this city and State are dis- 
posed to wonder why it is that so little attention is paid to 
their wishes, expressions of judgment, and concernments of busi- 
ness interests by those who are charged with the administration 
of the affairs of the national government, as well as by those who 
compose great national gatherings such as Congress, political or 
business or sociological conventions, etc. This is the result of the 
loose and insincere way in which our representative citizens and 
organizations conduct themselves when giving expression to their 
views in regard to grave affairs. Let us take the action of the 
Chamber of Commerce on last Wednesday afternoon as a case in 
illustration. On that occasion it adopted resolutions endorsing 
the Nicaragua Canal, and designed to influence Congressional 
action in relation thereto; and yet it would be perfectly safe to 
bet dollars to doughnuts that there were not six members present 
who understood or could state the salient features of the Nicaragua 
Canal scheme which is to be submitted to Congress. They were, 
therefore, dealing with a grave affair recklessly and blindly, and 
men who do that cannot expect to carry influence or be listened 
to with respect. 

On this same occasion these remarkable gentlemen also endorsed 
Hawaiian annexation, and yet we would be willing to wager that 
there are not six of them who could make a plain and logical 
statement of the reasons which have been advanced on behalf of 
annexation, or make an intelligent answer to the case of the oppo- 
sition. And yet they not only dared to vote on the subject, but, 
through the aid of their mercantile title, endeavored to carry the 
inference to Congress and the administration that the business 
people of this city are in favor of completing the conquest of the 
islands under the name of annexation— an inference, by the way, 
which is absolutely false, for there is no such sentiment prevail 
ing in mercantile circles. Bye and bye, when we are crying out 
for the removal of some evil that has been established in our 
midst or are protesting against some threatened wrong and no at- 
tention is being paid to our outcries and protests, we should re- 
collect these little things, for they explain the indifference with 
which we are treated and the lack of influence which we possess. 
We are like the boy who cried wolf for amusement. 



THE TONGUE OF SCANDAL. 

THE lamented death of Miss Pascault, who was murdered by 
the venomous tongue of scandal, has aroused indignation 
throughout the State. On all sides are heard the severest con- 
demnation of the man and women who hounded this unfortun- 
ate woman to the grave. It is one of the most outrageous cases 
in the history of this State, known as California is for ingenious 
crimes, and polite language cannot be found sufficiently strong to 
express the horror it arouses. The deceased lady, from all ac- 
counts, was a most estimable woman; of prepossessing appear- 
ance, highly educated, cultured and refined, she was possessed of 
all those virtues which mark woman as the noblest work of the 
Creator. Miss Pascault was on a visit to California, and white a 
guest at a country hotel, misfortune overtook her. She met N. 
K. Masten, a millionaire, over seventy years of age; a man with 
married children. He paid her much attention, being evidently 
very favorably impressed with her, though it may be doubted if 
the icewaler that is mixed with what serves him for blood, would 
permit of a more ardent feeling. Whether he proposed marriage 
to the lady or not, is immaterial. His daughters thought he had, 
or contemplated doing so, and affrighted at the prospect of a step- 
mother depriving them of some of papa's dollars, they bore down 
on Miss Pascault like a pack of wolves upon a stray lamb, and 
assaulted her with all the venom that women's tongues can bear. 
The victim was pursued by the tongue of scandal; she was 
pointed at with the finger of scorn. Malicious minds concocted 
insulting anonymous letters which were sent to her; her place of 
residence was invaded, and in brief, she was abused like a pick- 
pocket. The result was the natural one. This delicate woman, 
of a refined and highly sensitive nature, was prostrated; she be- 
came delirious, soon gave symptoms of insanity, and witnin a 
week she was dead. Her body is now being conveyed across the 
continent to her home in Baltimore, in charge of a sister, who 
crossed the continent to receive it. Meanwhile, what of the 
" gentleman" who was chiefly responsible for the brutal attacks 
upon the lady whom he would not have hesitated to make his 
wife? Did his chivalrous nature rebel at the treatment accorded 
her by his gentle relatives? When he knew that she was ill in a 
public hospital, did he hasten to her side? When informed that 
as an insane patient she had been taken to that other institution, 
the Home for Inebriates, the very name of which is opprobrious, 
did he go to her relief? -Not hel He supinely awaited the end, 
which came all too soon, and when the coffin, with its lonely 
guardian, started for the sorrowing home in the Southland, it 
bore not even a sprig of green from the San Mateo trees to tell 
that the gray-headed lover remembered. There was a time in 
the good old days when a public scold was put in the stocks, or 
ducked in the horse-pond to remind her that silence is golden. 
If the women of society who daily blast reputations, wreck 
homes, and occasionally, as in this case, commit murder with 
their tongues, had some such punishment in store for them, 
the world would be the better for it. As for the man who would 
act as Masten did — but bah — he is beneath contempt. 



CALIFORNIA WINE IN NEW YORK. 



THE Executive Committee of the State Viticultural Commission 
has formulated a plan for putting California wines on sale in 
New York under their own labels. This is an undertaking that 
we trust will succeed. It should receive the hearty support of 
every one interested in the vinicultural and viticultural interests 
of the State. For years our wine has been sold in many of the 
leading hotels, clubs and restaurants of New York and other 
cities under French labels, and consumers have paid advanced 
rates for it under the supposition that it was imported wine. 
California wine has been also sent to France, and then reimported 
into this country, and sold as the product of French soil. That 
such wine is fully as good as foreign wine of the same class the 
practices resorted to, prove. Our wine will rank with any in the 
world, but though connoisseurs admit its good qualities, diffi- 
culty has been encountered in the endeavors made to introduce 
it at the East, on account of the prejudice there among wine 
drinkers against a domestic production. It is now proposed to 
establish headquarters in the metropolis, where dealers and pri- 
vate consumers will be furnished with real California wine under 
its own name. There is no need of our growers sailing under 
false colors, for their wine is as good as any, but there is need of 
them showing their own goods, for unscrupulous dealers have not 
hesitated to foist deleterious mixtures upon the market under 
California labels. Arrangements will be made with restaurateurs 
to handle our wines, so that consumers will have opportunity to 
ascertain for themselves the difference between the real and the 
false California grape juice. Cafes may also be started, if the pro- 
ject succeeds, similar in character to the Viticultural Cafe in this 
city, where only the wines of the Golden State will be offered for 
sale. The plans of the enterprise are not complete. The matter 
is now in charge of a sub-committee, which will do everything in 
its power to effect the desired result, ff the New York trial 
pioves satisfactory, headquarters will be established in other 
large Eastern cities, and a concerted effort will be made to push 
tie sale of California wines throughout the country. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893. 



DO WOMEN LIE ? 



IF not so pleasant, it is without doubt more valuable to know 
what people say about us than to' us. Regarding it thus, I 
have obtained and herewith append the unbiased opinions of a 
number of San Francisco's most prominent citizens respecting 
the veracity of women in general. I must insist that none of 
these gentlemen referred personally to any of their lady friends. 

M. M. Estee believes that it is the natural inclination of both 
men and women to tell the truth. That if you ask a question of 
any one their first impulse is to give you a truthful answer. He 
says veracity is not a question of sex, but in man or woman there 
must exist the necessity for falsehood before they will resort to 
its use. It is his opinion that in matters pertaining to the affec- 
tions, women might, if the necessity became apparent, be more 
untruthful than men, affairs of the heart being of paramount im- 
portance to the former. Veracity, says Mr. Estee, might not weigh 
in the balance with love. 

Frank M. Pixley says that, as a class, women are arrant liars 
from their birth, and also by education. That from the cradle 
they are taught to deceive, and that they have imbibed the idea 
that in order to cope with men they must not only be able to lie 
with becoming grace, but in so convincing a manner that men 
will swear away their honor and even their lives on a woman's 
word. In matters gr*eat and trivial women are never so unhappy 
as when telling the truth. 

Henry E. Highton expresses the belief that both men and 
women are prone to evil as the sparks fly upward, and it is only 
through moral and religious training and education that they are 
finally brought to a realization of their condition and a desire for 
reformation. Vice, however, he considers without sex. Truth- 
fulness, perhaps, predominates in women, he thinks, as their 
moral education has ever been subject to more rigorous training 
than their mental, and is usually infinitely greater than that of 
men. . 

Sam Shortridge says that truth and falsehood in either men or 
women is simply a matter of environment. That women, given 
the scope and opportunity enjoyed by men, will equal if not ex- 
cel them in all the vices religiously relegated to the sphere mascu- 
line for so many generations. That women held in high repute 
for honesty and honor might, probably, degenerate under the 
withering blight of daily communication with lawlessness and 
vice. That, anyhow, right and wrong are mainly questions of 
opinion, and that most people of intelligence now believe that in 
extreme cases falsehood is not only justifiable but highly honorable 

I am happy to record the opinion of Henry T. Scott, as it is 
manifestly liberal. He says that it is six on one side and half a 
dozen on the other, with the odds in favor of women. Both men 
and women lie, and they both tell the truth, but women, says 
Mr. Scott, speak with such grace and discretion that whatever 
they elect to say is apt to be received with belief. 

I quote the opinion of Rev. Jacob Voorsanger unhesitatingly, 
since he expressed himself in unmistakable language on a topic 
upon which, from his profession, he should be an authority. 
His word will no doubt carry comfort and conviction to many 
who have heretofore wavered in their belief in the upright hon- 
esty of women. He said women are by instinct and principle 
more honest than men. Men, he avers, have been taught to lie 
from their earliest infancy. Women are incorruptible where men 
will lie for a dollar. Ministers, he says, will stand in the pulpit 
and lie. Physicians do not dare to tell the truth to their patients, 
nor does any one suppose that a merchant will tell the truth 
about his wares. Dr. Vocsanger has found women universally 
more honest than men, with the exception of women book- 
agents. He declares that " the effrontery and mendacity of book- 
agents, male and female, have passed into a proverb;" that they 
are set apart by the Most High as an example of God's wrath to 
mankind. 

Mr. G. L. Spear says that a long and varied experience has 
taught bim that in small matters women are universally more 
untruthful than men. He does not refer in this connection to 
the little white lies so necessary in polite society, but in matters 
more nearly pertaining to the welfare and happiness of domestic 
life, as well as in business relations, he thinks women are apt to 
neglect the observance of strict veracity in small matters. It is 
the nature of women, says Mr. Spear, to grasp at trivial situa- 
tions in life, lacking an appreciation of momentous events. In 
affairs of importance, they will not take the chances of discovery 
and possible disgrace that men will, even for the aak of prooT 
ised reward. They reason too closely from cause to effect, and 
are too cowardly regarding consequences. 

Irwin C. Stump is a modest man, and his acquaintance with 
women has been limited, but, permitting himself an opinion on 
the subject, it must be expressed in favor of women. He has 
found them more honest and straightforward than men. When, 
however, they become depraved he thinks they will sink to 
greater depths than men. Men, from their association, naturally 
have greater temptation for dishonest conduct than women, and 
possibly from education and training do not place upon morals 
the same degree of importance that women do. While it may be 
a question of necessity rather than principle, he believes women 
to be more honest than men. 



Louis Sloss, Jr., in his happy manner, proclaims himself a 
crank, who believes that every lady is honest and means what 
she says. Of coarse, he says, people speak many times without 
sufficient reflection, and we are all liable to make mistakes. He 
does not think one sex more or less honest than the other. Since 
his marriage his acquaintance with women has been extremely 
limited, and his memory scarcely antedates that period. His in- 
competency to judge of the relative virtues of the sexes will 
therefore be readily comprehended. 

Faxon Atherton would trust a woman sooner than a man, ex- 
cepting in a love affair, for a woman in love is full of guile, he 
says. Men generally are filled with conceit and deceit, both of 
which lead directly or indirectly to dishonesty. Woman is more 
affectionate and confiding than man, hence more honest, unless 
her nature has been soured by contact with dishonesty in men. 
The higher moral atmosphere surrounding women in their home 
life, and the companionship of innocent children, would natur- 
ally predispose them to honest and upright deportment. Faxon 
Atherton believes in women. Janet Macdonald. 



DEER HUNTING IN MARIN COUNTY. 

BEFORE Judge Angelotti, » enthroned in awful state," thun- 
dered his injunction against the deer hunters, the ravines 
and spurs of Tamalpais were peopled with mighty deer slayers. 
In one camp rested under the peaceful light of the stars, 
Great German Traveler Berg, William Brown, Mayor Sperry, John 
Bergez and Mr. Carrigan. On the morning of Saturday they 
arose long before the traditional lark, and scattered among the 
peaks and crags, taking up the most available positions from 
which to shoot at the running deer. The hours passed on, and 
the great stillness of the mountain was broken only by the occa- 
sional baying of a hound, or the crack of a Winchester. In the 
evening Berg was the first to reach camp. Presently Brown rode 
wearily in. 

"What luck, Billy?" inquired the Traveler. 

"Not much," replied Mr. Brown. "Got one shot at a buck and 
broke his leg. But he got away in the brush." 

A few minutes afterwards John Bergez made his appearance. 

"Deer are pretty scarce," remarked Mr. Bergez; "fired at a 
buck twice, missed his heart, but broke his leg." 

Mr. Berg smiled, and began to whittle away at the side of an 
empty beer box with his hunting-knife. It was almost dark 
when Mayor Jim Sperry crashed through the brush on his white 
mustang. 

"Hello, you fellows," shouted the genial Mayor, "what's the 
matter with all of you? Where's the deer? You don't mean to 
say that you have not got one," and he proceeded to uncinch his 
steed. 

"What did you do yourself, Jim?" inquired Brown. 

"Got only one rap at a buck," said Mr/Sperry, "a big fellow, 
too, held on him just by the Bootjack yonder, but I did not 
shoot far enough ahead, and only broke his hind leg; too bad, 
wasn't it?" 

There was a pause at this, and the hunters looked queerly at 
one another. At last Mr. Berg spoke. "Gentlemen," he said, 
"you wonder, no doubt, what those sticks I have been whittling 
are. They are crutches tor all the bucks you have lamed to-day 
on the Tamalpais preserves." And then the Traveler disappeared 
into the brush before the angry and insulted hunters had time to 
draw a bead on him. 



TWO of the local jeunesse doree had an experience the other 
night from which they have barely recovered, and white hairs 
have begun to fleck the dark locks of the more impressionable of 
the two. On their way home from a down-town club, after mid- 
night had chimed, they drifted in through the side entrance of an 
Ellis street symposium for a quiet half hour at cinch. They had 
hardly been seated in a private card-room attached, when a 
gigantic negro entered the bar, and proceeded to stand the pro- 
prietor up with a "gun." The latter was quick on the trigger 
himself, and to the dismay of the horrified youths, bullets began 
to crash round the saloon, and in and through their cabinet par- 
ticular. Twenty minutes later, somebody thought about looking 
up the society men, and after considerable trouble, one of 
mamma's darlings was persuaded to release his hysterical pres- 
sure on a chair which was rammed tightly against the door. His 
companion was found lying full length on the floor, almost dead 
with fear. A coupe was sent for and the alarmed youngsters 
were started home, with the caution not to stay out so late 
another night. 

PAUL DEROULEDE, the French Chauvinist, announces that 
he will withdraw from political life for four years. That res- 
olution is praiseworthy, but he would receive greater gratitude 
from the friends of peace if he should withdraw from politics for- 
ever. Mr. Deroulede and his friends belong to a class of politi- 
ticians who are a great disturbing element in modern politics, 
their only aim being to provoke international quarrels on the 
slightest provocation, and there is not a single European country 
that would not benefit by leaving international politics alone for 
a few years and by turning its whole attention upon national 
affairs. 



Julv 22, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SOCIETY IN LONDON. 



London, July 1, 1893. 

FITFULLY gleamed the son through fleecy masses of cloud last 
Monday afternoon, as, arrayed in our best bibs and tuckers, 
we drove in dusty procession through the leafy glades of Richmond 
Park in response to an invitation from White Lodge to bid farewell 
to the Princess May at one of those charming festivities where the 
genial and popular Duchess of Teck and her amiable husband dis- 
pense smiles and hospitality under the greenwood tree. We enter 
beneath the Georgian portico, and passing to the left through the fa- 
mous " green corridor"— cosily furnished and fragrant with flowers 
— and the pretty little morning-room of the Duchess, descend a flight 
of green-balustered stone steps to the garden where the Princess 
Mary Adelaide, the Princess May, the Duke of Teck, Prince Adol- 
phus and Prince Francis, received their friends. We duly make 
obeisance, and after a warm clasp from royal hands and the pleas- 
antest of smiles from Princess May, we merged ourselves in the gaily 
dressed throng. Princess May was clad in ivory samite, wrought 
with lavish stitchery on corsage and skirt-hem, and void of current 
exaggeration in the matter of sleeve width. A coquettish little bon- 
net of gold fancy straw, wreathed with forget-me-nots, aigretted with 
polyanthus and lily-of-the-valley, and tied with blue ribbon velvet in 
the nattiest of bows, rested on her head. At her throat flashed the 
magnificent diamond and pearl brooch, presented earlier in the af- 
ternoon by the ladies of Richmond, and on her right wrist sparkled 
the emerald, sapphire and diamond bracelet from the Surrey Needle- 
work Guild, a gift which she gleefully displayed to many admiring 
friends during the afternoon. 

By five o'clock the majority of the guests had arrived; then the 
host, hostess and their family moved towards a marquee erected in 
the grounds. Here a circle was formed, and a certain air of expect- 
ancy was justified when the Earl of Lovelace, as Lord- Lieu tenant of 
Surrey, bearing a sapphire velvet casket, stepped forward, and with 
a few appropriate words, handed it to Princess May. "Open it, May 
dear," said her mother, and the case fell apart to disclose a magnifi- 
cent Empire diamond tiara, the gift of the Ipeople of Surrey. "It 
cost £1200," whispered my neighbor, as the Princess showed the gift 
to those about her ; and the Duke of Teck made a graceful little 
speech of thanks, to which the Duchess added a few pleasant words. 
Afterwards came a deputation from a working men's club with a 
handsome china vase, which Princess May received, and gave her 
hand in turn to each with smiling words of thanks. Then the Duke 
of Teck suggested an adjournment for tea, and the royal party, with 
a few intimate friends, retired into the prettily draped tent, and the 
rest of us dispersed to the great marquee, sacred to such creature 
comforts as strawberries and cream, champagne and truffled chicken. 
Bending admiringly over the sparkling array of jewelry set forth 
among the wedding presents, I noticed, among others, the Dowager 
Lady Napier of Magdala. That close friend of Princess May, Lady 
Eva.Greville, was not far off. Lady Eva has been chosen by the 
Princess as her lady-in-waiting; she has all the artistic tastes for 
which her mother, the Countess of Warwick, is distinguished. Both 
she and the Princess are crazy about fans, which I suppose accounts 
for the large number the latter has received as wedding presents. 
Among the presents I counted fully a dozen parasols. One lovely 
blue silk one, into the handle of which was worked a sprig of May 
in diamonds, came from Lord Wolverton, and the French Embas- 
sador and Mme. Waddington sent a white silk one with a diamond-set 
gold handle. Mr. White, of the American Legation, presented a 
magnificent thermometer in silver, and Mrs. Henry White a copper 
service in gold. 

The Cesarewitch arrived yesterday and went to Marlborough House 
to stay with his aunt, the Princess of Wales, till the wedding is over. 
He has very much improved in personal appearance and physique, 
so his travels have done him good, and there are hopes that he may 
conquer the anaemia, which is the curse of his race. He has an un- 
fortunately timid manner with strangers, and as he knows very few 
people here, this is quite noticeable. He has very little real ac- 
quaintance with any of the European Royal Families except those 
of Denmark and Greece. Yesterday was quite a busy day for roy- 
alties, for besides the Cesarewitch, the King and Queen of Denmark, 
and the King and the Queen of the Belgians arrived. The papers 
have been circulating rumors to the effect that the Duke of York is 
ill, but they had no more substantial basis than the fact that he has 
been suffering from distressing toothache. 

By invitation I was present at the Greek play performed by the 
students of Queen's College in the original tongue. It was the Andro- 
mache of Euripides, a very embarrassing play. However, it was in 
Greek, and the ladies threw themselves heartily into its embodiment 
and achieved an unquestionable success. Not knowing Greek my- 
self, 1 hardly knew just when to blush, so I watched when the fans 
fluttered violently, and concluded the correct moments were then. 
On a low dais in front of the proscenium was the altar of Dionyous 
piled high with fruits, and soon after eight o'clock the brief opening 
notes of Prof. Gadsby's music, specially written for the occasion, 
gave the signal for the curtain to rise. The scene, representing the 
Shrine of Thetis, was beautifully painted, and the costumes were all 
that could be desired. The first two acts— if that expression may 
be used for the matter between the choruses— were entirely confined 



to female characters, Andromache, Hennione and the chorus, and 
were therefore more satisfactory than the scenes where male char- 
acters were represented. The heroine was finely represented by 
Frances Whitlow, but when the inferior sex began to make its ap- 
pearance the make-up was that of Menelaus, but the voice was the 
voice of Eleanor Davies-Colley. 1 cannot honestly say that the kind 
of amusement which found favor with Athenian audiences over two 
thousand years ago would fill our modern theatres, but all the same 
1 am glad I have heard a real Greek play at last, even if I didn't un- 
derstand it. 

Baron Hirsch has paid three hundred guineas for a room in Picca- 
dilly, opposite St. James Street, for the use of his party on the day 
of the royal wedding. But, by being earlier in the field, Mr. Reuben 
Sassoon for two hundred guineas secured a similar room in the same 
situation. At St. James's Chapel Royal all the pews have been re- 
moved, and in their place are rows of seats covered with scarlet cloth. 
The altar is draped with crimson velvet, on which the magnificent 
gold communion plate will be placed. The pillars have been re- 
painted, and on the wedding day will be ornamented with gold shields. 
It is expected that the chapel will hold at a pinch about four hun- 
dred and fifty persons, including the representatives of the press. I 
saw four gowns of the trousseau which are unusually lovely. One is of 
turquoise blue satin, with a lovely moire design woven in gold. An- 
other, the palest tone of spring green, is dotted over with tiny daisies. 
A silk of myrtle green, intended for morning wear, is powdered with 
white violets ; and a handsome dinner gown of rich brocade in peach 
color, with alternate clusters of rosebuds, jasmine and maiden-hair, 
knotted with silver cord. 

M. Sarcey, the great French critic, declares Henry Irving's face to 
be the handsomest he has ever seen. I hope this remark will not 
produce in Irving the same result as the Queen's praising Terriss has 
produced. After the performance of Becket at Windsor Castle, the 
Queen, who had been greatly interested in the play, and was loud 
in her applause, sent for Irving, Terriss, Ellen Terry and Miss Ward. 
Her Majesty unluckily praised Terriss's kingly manner as Henry II., 
and Terriss, who was already several times too large for this world, 
now wants a new planet created for him. Another member of the 
Lyceum Company distinguished himself at the Castle in a way not 
down on the programme. Seeing several gentlemen -in- waiting, and 
mistaking their uniforms for liveries, said to one of them in his most 
lofty tragic style, and in a voice 200 fathoms deep : " Er— I say— just 
get me a cigar, will you— or show me where I can find one." 

Helen Stuabt, 

Of Interest to Athletes. 

James Robinson, the athletic trainer at Princeton College, Prince- 
ton, N. J., says: 

*'l have found it imperitive to have sure and simple remedies on 
hand in case of cuts, bruises, strains, sprains, colds, rheumatism, 
etc. Shortly after entering upon my profession, I discovered such a 
remedy in Allcock's Porous Plasters. I tried other plasters, but 
found them too harsh and iritating. Allcock's Porous Plasters 
give almost instantaneous relief, and their strengthening power is 
remarkable. In cases of weak back put two plasters on the small of 
the back and in a short time you will be capable of quite severe ex- 
ercise. In "sprint," and "distance" races and jumping, the muscles 
or tendons in the legs and feet sometimes weaken. This can invari- 
ably be relieved by cutting the plaster in narrow strips, so as to give 
free motion, and applying on muscles affected." 



Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, Mills Build- 
ing, 218-220 Montgomery street. Special attention given to the col- 
lection of rents. Full charge taken of property for absent owners. 



REMOVAL 



CITY OFFICE 



CYPRESS LAWN CEMETERY. 



TO 9 CITY HALL AVE. 



FINE DIAMONDS, 

Gold and Silver Watches. 

The newest designs in jew-- 
ellery of first quality only, at" 
very reasonable prices. 
A. W. STOTT, 

3 Montgomery St., 
Under Masonic Temple. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893. 



GOTHAM GOSSIP. 

New Yokk, Jaly 8, 1893. 

THERE is a dearth of news here. People are chiefly interested 
in the weather, which remains surprisingly cool, and in the 
water, which is poisoning people all over the place. The races, re- 
gattas and roof-gardens are the only diversions, and exist in pleasant 
alliteration to charm the soul of him to whom the fickle dollar has 
not yet proved its inconstancy. But even these joys pall now and 
then, and one yearns for the simple farm house delights of child- 
hood, when hunting eggs and tossing hay made up one's happiness. 

I know few stories more interesting in a way than the trial and 
sentence of ex-Governor Rodman M. Price, a memory in California 
of the very early days. He is now well over seventy, but as firm and 
determined as ever. He was sued a few months ago for a wine bill 
which he considered an unjust claim. The court disagreed with him, 
and he was sentenced to three months imprisonment. A few days 
ago, he was released on a bond for forty-eight hours, at the end of 
which time he quietly returned to prison, where his son is in con- 
stant and devoted attendance upon him. The old gentleman has re- 
fused all offers of assistance, so he will doubtless serve the full time. 

It is at last frankly admitted that the scheme promoted and aided 
by Mr. H. B. McDowell— "The Theatre of Arts and Letters"— has 
not been a success. Mr. McDowell was generosity itself in all his 
dealings with the enterprise, and sunk more than thirty thousand 
dollars in the work. As all the plays produced were beautifully 
staged and costumed, the sale of properties will interest the theatri- 
cal world. I believe they have, together with the tuanuscripts, been 
offered at private sale, but without result, so that the trustees have 
handed them over to be sold through the Theatrical Exchange. 

The funeral of the pretty and deeply lamented Georgie Drew Bar- 
rymore is being held to-day in St. Stephen's Protestant Episcopal 
Church in Philadelphia, and she will be buried in the family plot. 
This will surprise many of her friends, who know that five years ago 
she fervently embraced the Roman Catholic faith, but the explana- 
tion given by her husband and reiterated by Father O'Reilly is sim- 
ple enough. As she had died with the offices of the church, the 
church held no objection to her burial in a Protestant Cemetery, 
where she could lie beside the members of her family who had passed 
away. 

W. H. Crane came to town yesterday on his steam yacht, The Sen- 
ator, from his country place at Cohasset. He brought with him Jo 
Holland, Paul Arthur and Hugo Toland, all of whom were recently 
yachting with Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Gillig on the Ramona. Mrs. Ar- 
thur, you will remember, was Miss Kate Best, of San Francisco- 
known in her profession as Katharine Gray. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Sharon are at Lake Hopatcong for Mrs . 
Sharon's health, which has been far from robust lately. His Japanese 
valet is making a sensation, Eastern people being unused to our Ori- 
ental domestics. Mrs. Sharon is devoting herself to the piano, which 
she seems to prefer to vocal music, although every one who has 
heard her lovely voice will wonder how she can fail to appreciate its 
charms. She proposes giving a series of musicales during the winter, 
and her cousin, Mrs. Lounsberry, will follow her lead, being, like 
Mrs. Sharon, a music-lover, though not so gifted as the latter lady. 

Mrs. Carl Jungen, whose life on Randall's Island leaves many 
hours upon her hands, pursues her musical studies with the same 
avidity as of former years. Her magnificent voice has developed 
wonderfully, and she sings with great dramatic fervor and fire. Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Gillig were in town a few days ago looking for a 
house. Mrs. Gillig is anxious to find a New York house for the win- 
ter, prior to joining her husband in India next spring. Mr. Gillig 
will spend the winter tiger shooting in Burmah, on the Irrawaddy. 
Jerome Hart is still on the Ramona. Miss Ferrer is in New York, 
but is thinking of going to Chicago for concert playing, and to form a 
class for the piano. The Russian officers of the Dlmilri Donskoi, now 
in port, are being largely entertained. A garden party was given 
them a few days ago at Cold Spring by General and Mrs. Daniel But- 
terfield, who were assisted by the Consul-General and Madame Ola- 
rovsky and by Colonel and Mrs. Richard Savage. The officers were 
all in uniform. One of them, a Cossack Lieutenant, was very strik- 
ing in a long cloak of white and gold. 

From Newport comes news that Miss Jennie Blair has made some- 
thing of a sensation. It is not necessary to tell any of you San Fran- 
ciscans that Miss Blair's extreme refinement of appearance and 
conversation, together with that elegance of deportment which 
marks those " to the manor born," and which is so conspicuous in 
this young lady, must make her a striking person wherever she may 
appear. Captain and Mrs. Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Taylor, Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Rosenfeld, all of San Francisco, have been at New- 
port during the week, Mrs. Pratt, nee Matthews, is already installed 
there in the beautiful cottage her mother, the late Mrs. Mary Matthews, 
was just completing at the time of her death. The Bests, too, are there 
entertaining largely, and as usual chiefly in the way of morning mu- 
sicales and large dinners. Mrs. Ralston is visiting her friend Mrs. 
Field at Stockbridge, in the Berkshire Hills, and was the honored 
guest at a recent garden party given by that lady. 

For the first time since his residence at White Plains, young 
Fair has been before the public in a fighting mood. I give you the 
tale for what it is worth, regarding the fight between Howell Osborn 



and "Waddell, in Burns' restaurant, about which no doubt the tele- 
graph has kept you informed. Waddell has been arrested, but Os- 
born has apparently no idea of prosecuting him. Osborn looks well 
and hearty, but not so fat as of yore. By the way, what an oppor- 
tunity for an intending purchaser to buy is the Osborn country house. 
It is said to have cost half a million, and that it may be purchased 
for a fifth of that amount. The greenhouses and graperies alone 
cost over eighty thousand dollars. The erratic Howell has appar- 
ently no taste for a quiet country home, and seldom visits the place. 
From London I hear of the safe arrival of Mr. James Burling and 
Senator Farley, who sailed on the Etruria not long ago. 

Passe Partout. 

Baggage Notice. 
Ronnd-trip transfer tickets are now on sale at any of our offices at 
reduced rates, viz. : One trunk, round trip, 50 cts. ; single trip, 30 eta. 
Keep your baggage checks until you reach this city. Morton Spec- 
ial Delivery, 17 Geary street, 408 Taylor street, and" Oakland Ferry 
Depot (waiting rooin). 

A. H. Ricketts, attorney-at-law, rooms 201, 202 and 203, Crocker 

Building, San Francisco. 

TJ1E U/j-HJE JWUSF^. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED 

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July 22, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE INSINCERITIES OF SOCIETY. 

[B T Di V in s OR.l 

18 society insincere? "Hollow to the core," say those who are 
impatient under the restrictions, ceremonious etiquette and 
formalities which good society imposes upon its members. There 
are those who declare society to be insincere because it insists 
that its say at home shall be respected. "I don't want to be told 
when I may see my friend," says the one who charges insin- 
cerity against society. "When I want to see her, I'll go, aud not 
wait till some one day in the week, when everyone else is there, 
too." That is very fine, no doubt, but how will the busy society 
woman discharge one-tenth of the duties which her position lays 
upon her, if her time is to be at the mercy of every one who is, 
or who chooses to consider herself a friend? "Mrs. X — is so 
changed since she became so wealthy," exclaims some former 
acquaintance. " I remember the time when she would see any 
one, and was always ready to help a good cause. But now, you 
never can get near her. Everything goes through her secretary 
or her companion. It is only another evidence of how artificial, 
how insincere is society." Is it ? Why, without some such de- 
spised red tape, every prominent woman, every noted man 
would be sacrificed to the greed or the selfish interests of each 
new comer, of each man with a hobby, each woman with a fad. 
There be those who profess to despise the ceremonious observ- 
ances of society, and to find in them additional evidences to sup- 
port their theory that all good manners are proofs of insincerity. 
With such it is useless to argue that all things must be done 
decently and in order. Yet it is perfectly plain to the most 
casual and fair-minded observer that without set rules, and their 
compulsory observance, a great deal of friction, discomfort, and 
even ill feeling would inevitably result. The whole system of 
receiving, of entertaining, of calling, of interchanging cards, is 
but society's way of endeavoring to perform what Is expected 
of it, in the most concise and unmistakable manner. No one 
who hopes to be acceptable in society can hope to succeed by 
ignoring the prevailing customs. It is often too true that factions 
carry some observances to the verge of absurdity, but it is en- 
couraging to observe how quickly the social craft rights itself. 

There are always selfish people in the world ; but it is not fair, 
neither does it betray any knowledge of human nature, to say 
that society alone is insincere, hollow-hearted, and always alive 
to its own interests. There be those who love front seats in the 
synagogue, as well as those who love uppermost rooms at feasts. 
I have seen as much scheming, self-seeking and discourtesy in a 
church entertainment as I ever have seen at a dancing party. 
Good manners may be only the veneer upon punk, but I am in- 
clined to think that they are more likely to be the enduring 
polish upon solid material. The acquired manner, the false ease, 
the not-at-home air always betrays itself, and very quickly, too. 
When an act is the outward expression of the inward, the heart- 
felt desire to please, it is apt to be clad in graciousness. It may 
be uncouth, but it is more apt to be courteous. The old rhyme 
sings, " Politeness is to do and say the kindest things in the 
kindest way." Whoever tries to attain to this perfection of 
action cannot go so very far wrong, even though he may fold up 
his napkin after a banquet, or wear a turn down collar when he 
should wear a stand up one. 

Society should not be called insincere because it multiplies op- 
portunities for acts of courtesy. There is a so-called politeness 
which is an egotistical nuisance. It is that sort of obsequious- 
ness that is content with nothing less than being constantly in 
the eyes of all beholders. It is always saying "excuse me," and 
"I beg pardon." It thrusts itself and its politeness into places 
where it is not needed nor would otherwise be noticed. It 
always seems hypocritical to me, and I will have none of it. 

But when society strives to make a stranger feel at ease, when 
it endeavors to express appreciation for favors received, why 
call society insincere because it has expressed itself in a most 
gracious way? "It is impossible for a society woman to be glad 
to see everyone who comes to her reception," says another; "and 
it is hypocritical for her to meet each one with a smile." Is it ? 
May she not be grateful to each guest for doing his best to 
make her evening a success, or may she not be glad to see that 
many people are going to have a pleasant evening, and owe it to 
her? At any rate, the society woman who opens her hospitable 
doors to her friends, who entertains, and who stands with a 
smile of gracious recognition to welcome each guest, holds a 
higher place in the world than that sincere solemn old party who 
wisely shakes her head, says "Society is a fraud, it shall get 
nothing from me," and barricades her house, her home, and her 
heart. It may be that Frances Cleveland cared nothing about the 
people she met. It may be that her winsome smile, and pleasant 
hand clasp were merely assumed for the purpose. But many of 
us prefer to believe that her genial kindly nature went out in 
honest sincerity to the vast throngs who sought to do honor 
to her, or to her husband. Had she been insincere, her personal 
magnetism instead of attracting would have repelled. 

Society is accused of insincerity because it says pleasant words 
where often it would be easier to say blunt ones ; because it stands 
and smiles, when it would rather flee and retire. It is not every- 



one who could be or who would wish to be a Frincess Eulalia, 
and say as she said to her hostess, » I don't want to meet any 
more of these people; show me over your house." An American 
woman would have endured it to the end. No one knows what 
a society woman endures both physically and mentally. It may 
be that she wishes to become a leader— it may be that she is am- 
bitious for her husband, and seeks to further his political advance- 
ment. 

It is none the less true that society women are often moulded 
in heroic form. It requires ability of high order, as well as good 
temper and self-control, always to say the right thing, to create 
the right impression, and to preserve one's poise. A society 
woman is not always insincere even when she praises a mediocre 
performance. If she be wise she will render thanks for the attempt 
to please, praise the music itself, rather than dwell upon the talent 
of the performer. There are ever so many ways, after all, to be 
polite without telling a lie. 

But supposing that society is insincere, would it be any pleas- 
anter to be told bluntly that one was not welcome — that the song 
was poorly sung, that the picture was badly painted? 

There are more than a few people in the world who pride them- 
selves upon their sincerity. They make a hobby of it. Any one 
of them will say, " I'm not one of your society hypocrites. I'm 
a blunt sort of a person. I always say what I mean." Beware 
of such. They are very unpleasant company. They are first 
cousins to the class who like to make human pincushions of their 
friends, and stick into them the pins and needles of unpleasant 
suggestion. " I say this in perfect candor," or "I tell it in all 
kindness," is the way they preface a remark. Then they admin- 
ister a staggering slap in the face to their unfortunate friend. Or 
" I am your friend, and you had better hear this from me than 
from some one who would tell you just for the sake of hurting 
you " is another favorite form to introduce a topic to be made 
painful by these sincere, candid " friends." Such people are a 
nuisance. They should b§ suppressed. Instead of them, let us 
have the woman who knows how to look pleasant, even if she 
does not feel so; who will say nice things even if they are not 
her deepest conviction. Human nature craves what the world 
calls flattery, not that it wishes to sup upon lies, but that it may 
feed upon what it hopes is the truth. A compliment pleases, not 
because it is an extravagant statement, but because the gratified 
recipient wishes to believe its delightful phrase may fit the fact. 
Few of us wish to appear better than we are. We wish to feel 
that we are the best in every way. Therefore flattery, if we must 
use the word that now carries some odium with it, is to some ex- 
tent a tribute to our intrinsic worth, for the one who offers it 
wishes to stand well with us. He wishes to please, to leave a 
favorable impression, to become a pleasant memory. For my 
part, I am loathe to believe that all pleasant things, all compli- 
mentary phrases ring hollow. But even if they were they are less 
annoying to meet than the blunt, outspoken person whose words 
and whose views are " as vinegar to the teeth and as smoke to 
the eyes." 

The so-called insincerities of society are not so bad after all. 



Instead of bread 

'Twas lead, she said, 
Till the privilege was allowed her 

To make and bake 

And take the cake 
With Cleveland's Baking Powder. 



REMOVAL 

DR. ROBERT A. MeLEAN 

Has removed his office from Merchant and Montgomery Streets to 
304 KEARNY ST., Cor. BUSH. 
Hours— 9 to 10, morning; 2 to 5, afternoon; 8 to 9 evening. 



DR. E. H.SCHULTZE, DENTIST, 1073*4 MARKET STREET; FILLINGS 
from 50c. up ; teeth extracted for 25c. ; good set of teeth cheap . 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893. 




L^l^T^tfD 



'"We Otaev no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



OF the two plays so far presented by the Lyceum Company 
at the Baldwin, » The Grey Mare is the better horse"— the grey 
mare which Dr. Maxwell did not ride, but which Mr. Herbert 
Kelcey does, and straight to the goal. There is a brightness and 
liveliness, natural and unforced, in every line and situation of the 
German comedy adapted by Messrs. Sims and Raleigh, and the 
company enters into both with admirable ease and spirit. 

The unutterable seriousness which characterizes Herbert Kel- 
cey's face under all dramatic circumstances seems to have been 
previsionally catered to in writing up the part of John Maxwell, 
M. D., the good young man who, without a spark of humor or 
even understanding of humor, in himself, is yet the cause of infi- 
nite amusement to others, and who takes so tremendous a view 
of life's responsibilities that he cannot unbend even under the 
sweet influences of love and being engaged to Georgia Cayvan. 
When he arrives, in his mouldy-looking water-proof wrappings 
from a midnight traversing of the slimy moat in unavailing 
search of the botanical specimen, the alleged object of his ficti- 
tious ride on the grey mare, the deep melancholy with which he 
recounts his mishaps and their barrenness of result is funnier 
than the most extravagantly humorous description could be. 
Even in bis exultation at his success in inventing a " white lie" 
in order to give a lesson to his tricksy fiancSe, the transient lapse 
into the hilarity of the ordinary young man of everyday suggests 
a solemn and highly intellectual elephant executing the heifer 
dance. ThiB phase of the character of the moral and didactic 
young doctor is so thoroughly sustained by Mr. Kelcey to the 
end as to make the assumption something more of a study than 
is usual in a light comedy role, but none the less laughable. 

Georgia Cayvan, as the engaged young lady who does not un- 
derrate the efficiency of white lies in oiling the social and domes- 
tic machinery to the smooth-running point, is as usual, one of the 
most bewitching womeu on the stage to be made love to in any 
character; yet it is greatly to be feared that " Kate Stanhope" 
will be remembered as " the part in which she wore the spun- 
glass dress, don't you know." The sheen and shimmer of that 
wonderful garment, less like the glitter of glass than the 
white, glistening depths of a silver sea, so dazzled the eyes of the 
audience as almost to cast into temporary eclipse the brilliancy 
of the actress. However, the part makes no special demand on 
Miss Cayvan's abilities, except to present a very charming foil to 
the awful seriousness of her "John," and to wear the glass 
dress. 

Effie Shannon, as the wife of John's artistic brother — rather 
tamely and perfunctorily played by Mr. Ratcliffe — assumes the 
airs of young matronhood very prettily, and with no more need- 
less acerbity, perhaps, than stage tradition has decided to be the 
proper thing. Augustus Cook had a proof of the favor he won 
last week as the butler, in having quite a little reception on Mon- 
day night when he came on as Collins, the livery man, in which 
bit he repeated his » character" success. Charles Walcot made 
his first bow for this visit and was warmly welcomed. He, as 
well as Le Moyne, had a small part, but both were well done, 
a more important factor in an all-round good production than is 
always borne in mind. Fritz Williams is himself again this 
week. His " Lajolly" in the last play, was as tame, flavorless, and 
un-French as it could well be; but as the youth who runs away 
with and marries the Count's daughter, he is the same pleasant 
scapegrace in whose many phases we remember him. Eugene 
Ormonde as the Count de Chervelle, and Bessie Tyree, the French 
maid, are on the stage perhaps ten minotes, but in that time 
make a distinct and incisive impression which will last and which 
conclusively shows the good player. 

Our Bachelors is an amusing comedy with many possibilities of 
unusual good playing in the principal parts. That 8tockwell and 
Osbourne take the utmost advantage of these possibilities goes 
without saying. As the two sworn bachelors, sundered in friend- 
ship by the irrepressible matrimonial proclivities of one and the 
equally rampant misogyny of the other, the two keep the audience 
amused to the laughing point while they are on the stage. Ethel 
Brandon makes a very interesting young widow and T. D. Fraw- 
ley a personable and fiery lover. For the rest, none are so bad as 
to spoil the general good effect of the production, though none re- 
quire special mention, with the exception, perhaps, of Mrs. F. M. 
Bates, who plays the comparatively inconspicuous part of Mrs. 
Monser with accustomed ability. 

On MoDday night Stockwell's Theatre will present an unusually 
interesting programme in the first production here of Roger La 
Honte, a drama in four acts, adapted by Robert Buchanan from 
the French of Marie and Grisier. The play will introduce a new 
member of the Stockwell company in Clarence Holt, last seen 



here with Nat Goodwin in his recent engagement, and whose ex- 
cellent rendering of Bannister Strange in A Gilded Fool will be re- 
membered. T. D. Frawley, the Jack Duval of the same produc- 
tion, and now also a member of the Stockwell company, Kathe- 
rine Grey, L. R. Stockwell, and Geo. Osbourne will also be in the 
cast. Miss Loraine Hollis has been engaged for this production. 
New scenery throughout has been prepared, and every prepara- 
tion has been made for an adequate production of the drama. 

Indiana, the present production at the Tivoli, is a somewhat 
sketchy opera, musically speaking, giving almost the impression 
of a musical comedy rather than of a sustained opera. The de- 
tached metrical numbers are, however, full of the characteristic 
melody of the composer, and the acting plot is more than usually 
interesting for its class. Ferris Hartman, as the young miller, 
Matt; George Olmi, as Lord Dayrell; Thos. C. Leary, as Peter, the 
miller's servant; Fanny Liddiard, as Nan, Matt's lively and arbi- 
trary young wife, and Tillie Salinger, as Indiana, are the best in 
the principal parts, which are unusually numerous. 

The success of Indiana has led to its being kept on for another 
week. 

The movement in favor of doffing the hat at theatre and opera, 
happily begun of late among San Franciscan ladies, seems to have 
taken a back step. The last opening night at the Baldwin, when 
The Grey Mare was produced, was as fashionable an event as 
the first of the season; but uncovered tresses were hardly to be 
found. 

It can scarcely be expected that any feminine reform will be ac- 
complished all at once. Reason may be convinced (for the pur- 
pose of argument it may be assumed that women have reason), 
but the trammels of custom are strong, and it requires no in- 
considerable amount of resolution to leave off the hat when 
" 'they' are wearing them." However, there is hope that so sen- 
sible, courteous, and comfortable a fashion must win its way 
gradually, especially if the gentlemen of the press will join their 
voices, or their pens, in pushing the ladies on to the point where 
timid and wavering inclination shall "take the name of action." 

The young lady in the Evening Post who pronounced the anti- 
hat movement impracticable because " ladies do not always have 
a day's notice when going to the theatre," must be unfortunately 
fitted out as to "woman's chief adornment." Happily 
for the success of the reform, however, the majority of San Fran- 
cisco girls are endowed with tresses so abundant and of natural 
waviness and glossiness that a short half hour without any pro- 
fessional hair-dresser will render them equal to the " fullest dress" 
emergency. The lady who needs a day's notice to make her hair 
presentable with evening dress may well be excused for hiding it 
under the very biggest hat she can find. 

Mr. Henry Heyman has come back from his summer outing 
sooner than he intended, a very painful accident to his left leg 
having necessitated a return to this city for treatment. The pop- 
ular violinist's friends are glad that the accident did not happen 
to his bow arm or that he does not play the violin with his legs. 

Next week will be the last of the Lyceum Company's Baldwin 
engagement, and will be a repertory week, with The Idler on 
Monday evening; The Charity Ball Tuesday and Saturday nights; 
Wednesday night, Old Heads and Young Hearts ; Friday night and 
Saturday matinee, The Wife. On Thursday night Americans 
Abroad will be repeated. 

* # » 

The production at the Baldwin of Bronson Howard's latest 
play, Aristocracy, to follow the Lyceum company July 31st, will 
be under the personal supervision of Mr. Al. Hayman and Mr. 
Cbas. Frohman, who are ambitious to make this presentation, in 
point of scenic and other accessories, as well as cast, a notable 
event in San Francisco theatricals. 
» * # 

The reopening of the California will take place on Monday 
evening, July 31st, with the engagement of Robert Mantell and 
company in an interesting repertory of plays rarely produced 
here. The season will be opened with Monbars, to be followed by 
Othello, The Face in the Moonlight, and The Corsican Brothers. The 
second week a new tragedy, founded on the life of a famous 
Greek sculptor will be produced. The pathetic and exacting one- 
act sketch, A Lesson in Acting, will precede the play. 

* * * 

A liberal offer has been made to the Midwinter Fair Finance 
Committee by the Stockwell Theatre management, of an evening 
to be set aside and the entire proceeds of the performance de- 
voted to the subscription fund. All the attaches of the theatre 
have generously offered their services on the occasion, the cor- 
responding reduction in their weekly salaries to form a special 
contribution to the fund. 

* » # 

Sousa's Military Band, which has contributed so much to the 
musical department at the World's Fair, will perform during the 



July -22, 1893. 



RAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



remainder of tbe season alternately at Chicago, Manhattan Beacb, 
arid the 8t. l.onis Exposition. Trie last two engagements have 
been (or many years filled by the band led by the lamented P. 8. 
Gilmore. It will be remembered that John Philip Sousa resigned 
tbe leadership of the 0. S. Military Band abont a year ago to 
organize his present one, with the purpose of making it to Amer- 
ica what tbe Band of the Garde Rcpublicaine is to Europe, and to 
take a stand in military music with that of the Thomas, the Bos- 
ton Symphony, and the Damrosch orchestras in orchestral music. 

The engagements mentioned will close about the time expected 
to be the opening of California's Midwinter Fair, and tbe musical 
committee would do welt to open negotiations with Mr. D. 
Blakely, Sousa's manager, for its appearance here. 
# # » 

Tbe Wild West Show, which opened at Central Park last Sat- 
urday, is attracting crowds of people, and entertaining them, too. 
There is a wonderful fascination about cowboys and scouts, 
bronco-riding and lasso-throwing, Indians and their war-dances 
and fleet-footed runners, steer-tying and rifle practice, and all tbe 
sports and work of the rough life on the frontier and the alkaline 
deserts of the West, which appeals to human interest on the sav- 
age side, which is said to exist in every breast, cultured or un- 
tutored, and makes all classes and kinds meet for a time on a 
level. Ail these novel sights are seen in remarkable realism at 
Central Park, with the rifle shooting of Lillian Smith, the cham- 
pion rifle and pistol shot, as an added attraction. Two exhibitions 
are given daily, but the audiences are never lacking, either in 
numbers or interest. 

Ship Ahoy will be the next Tivoli production Miss Eleanor 

Barry has about concluded an engagement in New York City to 
take part in a great spectacular production of A Midsummer 

Night's Dream Nat C. Goodwin has telegraphed his wish to 

engage Miss Polly Stockwell as ingenue in the coming production 
of his new play.— Manager J. J. Gottlob, of the California 
Theatre, returned from Lake Tahoe on Wednesday last, to look 

after the finishing touches in the renovation of the theatre. 

With Indiana the Tivoli begins a revival of the best works of the 
modern French and German composers.^— The libretto of Indiana 
is by the famous French librettist, Iambro, and rendered into 

English by H. B. Farnie. Among the most attractive numbers 

in Indiana is "O, Sunny South," sung by Tillie Salinger to banjo 
accompaniment — the latter, however, being "out of time" in 

more senses than one. -Henry Irving and Ellen Terry are 

among the season's bookings at the Baldwin. Hayman and 

Frohman's Empire Theatre, New York City, will open its season 
August 21st, with R. C. Carton's comedy, Liberty Hall, to be fol- 
io wea by The Councillor's Wife Dunlop's Stage News pronounces 

the present season the dullest for years in summer theatricals in 
New York, the hopes of transient patronage from those going to 
and coming from the World's Fair having been disappointed.— 
Jennie Reiffarth, an old acquaintance in California theatricals, 
will join Lawrence Hanley's company this season. 

Unlike the Dutch Process 

So Alkalies 

— OB— 

Other Chemicals 

are used in the 
preparation of 

W. BAKER & CO.'S 

reakfastCocoa 

which is absolutely 
pure and soluble. 

|j It has moretkan three times 
{the strength of Cocoa mixed 
| with Starch, Arrowroot or 
v ' Sugar, and is far more eco- 
nomical, costing less than one cent a cup. 
It is delicious, nourishing, and easily 

DIGESTED. 

Sold by Grocers crer ywhen. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mai a. 

MADAM SYLVAIN SALOMON 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC, 




1842 Sutter St., 



Will resume her lessons on AUGUST 1st. 



PIANO AND VOCAL LKSSON8, (S TO ?6 PER MONTH. 
ulov a.nv vuuau xj ^^, McD0NALD| 188 Larkin street, S. F. 



/-■LOAKMAKING A SPECIALTY; ALSO DRESSMAKING. 
^MWlUttAllira » on^i^^ ^ c AIXEN| H2 g eTenth atreet| S . F . 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

A l Hayman & Co Proprietors. 

Alfred Bouvikr Manager. 

Last week but one of 

DANIEL FROHMAN'S LYCEUM THEATRE COMPANY, 

Everv evening this week and Saturday matinee. 

THE GREY MARE. 

Saturday matinee, WHITE ROSES and GREY MARE. 

Next week, Lyceum Company's Farewell. 

REPERTOIRE— Monday, " The Idler." Tuesday, " The Charity 
Ball." Wednesday. "Old Heads and Young Hearts." Thursday, 
"Americans Abroad." Friday night and Saturday matinee, "The 
Wife." Saturday night, " The Charity Ball," (And farewell night 
of the season). Seats for ev ery performance ready. 

STOCKWELL'S THEATRE. 

L. R. Stockwell Lessee and Proprietor 

AlfEllinohodse Business Manager 

Commencing Monday, July 24th, matinee Saturday. First time in 
this city, by kind permission of 

MR. AUGUST1N DALY, 

The powerful drama, 

ROGER LA HONTE. 

Presented by 

THE NEW STOCKWELL COMPANY OF PLAYERS. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bbob Proprietors and Managers. 

TO-NIGHT. An artistic rendition of Audran's melodious opera 
coniique, 

INDIANA. 

Rendered by the greatest comic opera company in America. 
Look out for 

"SHIP AHOY.*' 
Populab Prices 25 and 50c. 

CENTRAL PARK. 

Corner of Eighth and Market Streets. 
Commencing SATURDAY NIGHT, JULY 15th. 
Two performances daily. 

ARIZONA HISTORICAL WILD WEST. 

Bands of Cowboys, Scouts and the famous Pima Indians. 
MISS LILLIAN SMITH, 
Champion Rifie and Revolver Shot in America. 
Broncho riding, flag racing, lasso throwing, steer tieing, Indian 
races, dances, etc. Acknowledged champions of the world in rough 
riding and lasso throwing. Grand street parade each day at 12 :30. 
Admission, 50c. ; Children 10 years, 25c. Gates open at 2 and 7 p. m. 
Performances at 3 and 8 o'clock. 

IIvER. J. H. ISOSE-W-AuIjID, 

VIOLIN, 

3^E^v<E3E!. TTJXjIE EOSB'WJLLr), 

VOCAL, 

Will resume the duties of their profession on 

MONDAY, AUGUST 7TH. 

922 GEARY ST., 

on Thursday and Friday, August 3d and 4th, from 2 to 4 p. m. to arrange 
time for pupils and new applicants. 

SAN LORENZO GROVE. 

On the Line of the Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards 
Electric Railway. 

Beautiful natural forest, romantic walks, luncheon tables, inviting ar- 
bors; a large new pavilion, excellent floor for dancing. Swings and other 
attractions for children. Grand open air concert by First Kegiment Band 
every Sunday. Cars connect with all broad-gauge local trains at Twenty- 
third avenue, Oakland; also with narrow-gauge at Thirteenth and Frank- 
lin streets. 

HAYWARDS PARK- 

At the terminus of the Oakland, San Leandro and Haywards Electric 
Railway. 
Romantic walks; mountain streams; dense woods; secluded lunching 

§ laces; mineral springs; beautiful banks of ferns, maiden-hair and wild- 
owers. Cars connect with all broad-gauge local trains at Twenty-third 
avenue, Oakland; also with narrow-gauge at Thirteenth and Franklin Sts 



Will be at home, 



tt^ 



SbO£S l^p/MRED U/J-UCE YOU Wftf\. 



GEO. 



Soleing 65c Done In 20 minutes. Fine calf shoes to order, 
for $3.50 up. 
POLLOCK - - - - 202 Powell Street 



PIANOS 



303 Sutter St., S.F. 

Knabe, Haines, Bush & Ghrts, and others. 
Cash or installments- Please call or correspond. 

franco. BANCROFT 



10 



SAN EKANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 22, 1693 . 



J^ ^ooker-op. 



STRANGE thingB happen at seaside resorts these days. If a sen- 
sation doea not assert itself in the legitimate course of business, 
those who spend their money to "enjoy" life at the seaside, 
manufacture one for the occasion. Just such a thing happened 
the other day at the Sea Beach Hotel at Santa Cruz. Among the 
floaters in the swim who are there assembled, are Mrs. D. M. 
Delmas and Mrs. Dr. W. F. McNutt, who, it should be known* 
for the full appreciation of the fine point of this tale of woe, are 
of the ultra set, that never by the slightest chance has contact 
with the vulgar herd. Some of the ultras insist on having to 
wait upon them at table none but a temporarily stranded German 
baron, and they will visit no hotel which has not upon its roll of 
dining-room jugglers at least one poor but honorable gentleman, 
who, if he had his rights, would be a prince in his own country. 
The two highly-strung matrons referred to, in horror of having 
their skirts touched by the dress of a woman lower in the social 
scale than they place themselves, induced Manager Sullivan, of 
the hotel, to set apart for their exclusive use, the reading-room 
Upon the door thereof they placed the sign, " Private Parlor," 
and safely ensconced behind the portals, they breathed freely, 
and gave thanks to the God of Mammon that they were pre- 
served from the unpleasantness coincident with association with 
the common people. But there was a boy — one of the unregen- 
erate sons of the people — to whose uncultured mind there 
seemed something hugely humorous in the retreat of the ultra 
from the crowd. He passed their parlor door several times, and 
each time it occurred to him that an additional sign upon it 
would heighten its beauty and increase the exalted station of the 
blue-blooded inmates of the sanctum sanctorum. This bad, bad 
boy considered it his duty to insure protection to the patricians 
from the proletariats. So he went to work with his scheme of pro- 
tection. He secured a piece of pasteboard a foot long, printed an 
appropriate legend upon it, covered its back in an artistic manj 
ner with strong glue, and pasted it upon the door. Then those 
who passed that way read: 



SHODDYITES' RETREAT. 
No Admittance. 



fc The occupants of this private 

parlor cannot afford to jeopardize their 
social positions by recognizing any- 
body who is not a shoddylte. 



And those who read smiled, and pondered on the vanity of 
human nature. Such toying with their dignity was too much for 
the parlor occupants to tolerate, and they packed their trunks 
and hied them to pastures new. 

# * # 

Tom Burns, of the Sub-Treasury, is camping near Tamalpais 
station. Mr. Burns has fenced himself in from the profanum 
vulgus, and none but those specially invited may enter the lofty 
barrier which surrounds his tent. The most conservative bach- 
elor in the place, he prepares bis own meals, and sings for his 
own delectation, accompanying himself sweetly on the guitar. 
He refuses all invitations to come out and be sociable. He is in 
camp for rest, and rest he means to have. A few evenings ago, 
however, Mr. Burns was lured from his retirement, and enjoyed 
the hospitalities of a neighboring camp. When he returned, un- 
locked the gate of his fence, and peered into his tent, he was 
horrified to see, in the dim light, a female figure seated on bis 
bed. 

Mr. Burns coughed warningly as he thought to himself, "begad, 
she must have climbed the fence," bat the lady did not move. 
"I beg your pardon," he said, "but haven't you made some mis- 
take? You ruuet have taken this for some one else's camp. It 
is Mr. Burns' tent, and I am Mr. Burns." Still no reply, and 
then as Tom flashed his lantern upon her, a shriek of feminine 
laughter behind him revealed the fact that his fair girl neighbors 
had put up a job on the obdurate bachelor, and set a clever 
dummy on his couch, just to see what he would do. " 'Tis a 
good thing," says Mr. Burns, "that I was so awfully polite. Had 
I been otherwise, what a joke these girls would have had upon 
me." 

• • » 

The programme for the Bohemian Club midsummer jinks as 
now definitely arranged will consist of Druidical ceremonies in 
Meeker's groves. George Bromley will be the head Druid, and 
Howard MacSherry, Northrup Cowles, George Hall and others 
will assist. There is a demand for the very thinnest men in the 
club to do a skeleton dance with real skulls on their heads, which 
will lend a ghastly and impressive effect to the scene. 



The University Club is in a condition of discord. Scandals and 
troubles with its servants keep this once quiet club in a state of 
turmoil. The original members are now inclined to attribute all 
the trouble to the financial management, which was anxious to 
swell the roll for the entrance fees. Nobody talks shop there any 
more. " You remember what Horace says," or "Virgil's lines as 
follows," once familiar phrases, are heard no more. Some even 
go to the extent of loudly saying at dinner, "I don't want no 
soup," just to show their independence, as it were. The shade 
of Lindley Murray has fled shrieking from the premises, and one 
collegian of well-known daring has actually threatened to eat 
pease with his knife, and fling defiance in the teeth of the Direct- 
ory. 

The Burlingame Club is rejoiced over a large supply of golf 
sticks, which have been imported by a Market street firm. The 
first game will be played next Sunday over the new links, which 
is an easy one for beginners. Golf is not an easy game to play 
well. The drives are the least difficult part of it. but the putting 
requires lots of practice and skill. 

* # » 

The filing of the answer of the defendants to the fourth 
amended supplemental complaint of the plaintiffs in the case 
of Thomas Bell vs. George D. Graybill et al., has reawakened 
public interest in the matter of the Bell estate. The defendants 
principally interested in the Buit are Mrs. Dexter, the widow of 
George T. Coulter, and Henry D. Dexter, her husband; George 
T. Coulter, Jr., John and Gladys Coulter, children of the 
late George T. Coulter. The original suit was entitled Thomas 
Bell vs. George T. Coulter, and was to secure the payment of 
Coulter's note for $42,000. It was instituted in the spring of 1890, 
a short time before the defendant's death. Mr. Graybill, Coul- 
ter's administrator, was then made defendant, with the heirs, 
and since then the complaint has been amended four times. Bell 
is also dead now, having broken his neck by falling over the ban- 
isters in his residence last October. In answering the complaint, 
the Coulter heirs have set np a cross-complaint, in which they 
claim $132,126.75 as due from Bell's estate to Coulter's. The story 
of the connection of the two deceased capitalists is most inter- 
esting. 

For a quarter of a century they were friends and business 
associates. Bell was the stronger man of the two, as events 
proved, and though Coulter was a good business man and made 
fortunes, he allowed liquor to get the better of 
him. When in financial straits he borrowed heavily 
from Bell, giving as security valuable paper. Now Coul- 
ter's heirs assert that Bell, instead of proving a true friend, sold 
these securities at high figures, thereby becoming possessed of 
vast sums of money, and represented to Coulter that he had dis- 
posed of them at a sacrifice. Bell, it is charged, thereby robbed 
Coulter of a fortune, and it is in the hope of recovering these 
funds that the widow and children of Coulter now set np their 
claims. For instance, it is said that a note of $25,000 given to Bell 
by Coulter on November 19, 1881, was paid, and an acknowledge- 
ment to that effect was given Coulter by Bell. The latter, how- 
ever, retained the note, which was not cancelled, and it now ap- 
pears, like a ghost of the past, as an asset of the Bell estate. On 
December 28, 1887, Bell held $100,000 worth of securities belong- 
ing to Coulter, no account of which was ever rendered. It is de- 
nied that Bell loaned Coulter any money after the last mentioned 
date, and as no accounting was made of the securities, it is 
claimed that all the debts were paid out of them. Bell had been 
selling these securities for their market value, but it is alleged he 
informed Coulter that he had disposed of them for much less, and 
he credited Coulter only|with the amount of the loans, retaining the 
difference. It is also said that Bell held mining shares of the 
value of $50,000 belonging to Coulter on which there should have 
been a return of at least half a million. Another claim is that 
certain valuable Colorado coal lands now held by the Bell estate 
were conveyed by Coulter to Bell only as security for a loan of 
$3000, and not in fee simple. The Coulter heirs desire an exam- 
ination of Bell's books, so that they may ascertain the condition 
of the affairs of the two men. Not only do they deny owing any- 
thing to the Bell estate, but on the other hand, claim that it is in- 
debted to them to the amount of over $132,000. When Bell 
died he was reputed to be a millionaire. If the claims of the 
Coulter heirs are allowed, however, and they will be able to make 
a very good showing, the tables may be turned, so that the Coul- 
ters will prove to be the monied side of the partnership and the 
Bells the insolvents. 

* * * 

Vice President Stevenson is known by his friends as a man of 
the most retiring disposition, one who detests notoriety of all 
kinds, and avoids a fuss-and-feather demonstration whenever it 
is possible. He found his way to the Palmer House recently after a 
visit to the attractions of the Midway Plaisance, and taking a 
room, was soon engaged in conversation with a friend. When 
mine host Palmer heard of the arrival of his august guest, he lost 

Db. Hammond recommends, as a certain cure for chronic indigestion 
and dyspepsia, chewing Adams' Pepsin Chewing Gum after each meal for 
half an hour. 



Julv 22, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



no time in wailing upon bim. and upon entering the room, his 
effusive patriotism involved him in trouble with a vase of 
flowers, which vacated a center table for the floor, by way of 
accentuating a spread-eagle sweep of Palmer's arm, made in imi- 
tation of the latest Imported salaam. Confusion reigned, and one 
series of apologies followed another. Servants were called for 
with voice and annunciator to remove the debris, and the unfor- 
tunate Palmer looked as though he could not survive the shock 
to bis nerves. Mr. Stevenson, who was almost as badly put out 
by the occurrence, tried to smooth the ruffled feelings of his 
visitor, and after picking up some broken fragments of china, 
the Vice President started in with a towel to wipe up the water 
on the carpet. This was too much for Palmer, who took one 
look at the second highest official of the United States govern- 
ment at work upon bended knees, and fled, the most thoroughly 
demoralized man In Chicago for the time being. 
* • • 

A dispatch from Washington printed in last Sundays papers 
announced that the acting Secretary of the Interior had " consid- 
ered the motion of the Waterloo MiDing Company for a rehearing 
of its contest against John 8. Doe, which involves the title to the 
Oriental No. 2 lode claim in the Los Angeles, California, mining 
district. The Acting Secretary says there is sufficient reason for 
the exercise of supervisory authority by the Department. He 
therefore directs that the Departmental decision of November 16, 
1891, be revoked and that the record be certified to him for appro- 
priate action." This is only one of a series of suits involving 
mining claims in the Calico District that the Waterloo Mining 
Company and John S. Doe have been engaged in for some years 
past. The mining company is a Milwaukee corporation, repre- 
sented in this city by A. H. Ricketts, the well-known mining 
lawyer, whose offices are in the Crocker Building. Doe is the mil- 
lionaire lumber dealer of this city, whose interests were repre- 
sented by Judge Mesick, until the latter's death a short time ago. 
This series of suits, in the value of the property involved, the im- 
portance of the questions raised and determined, and the signal 
ability with which the cases have been contested, makes one of 
the most interesting collection of mining cases in the annals of 
California jurisprudence. The case of the Oriental No. 2, is well 
worth citing. 

This location, which is claimed by Doe, adjoins the Silver King 
claim of the Waterloo Mining Company. When Doe applied for 
a patent upon the Oriental No. 2, the owners of the Silver King 
appeared as protestants, alleging that the location for which a 
patent was sought contained no lode, and therefore could not, 
under the Federal laws, be located as a mining claim. The Com- 
missioner of the General Land Office denied the protest. Mr. 
Kicketts then invoked all the machinery of the law, and has now, 
as the Washington dispatch states, secured a rehearing by order 
of the Acting Secretary of the Interior. 

This claim was also involved in what is known as "The Zone 
Suit," which is now on appeal to the Circuit Court of Appeals. 
Doe sued the Waterloo Mining Company to prevent them work- 
ing a lode in the Oriental. The defense set up by Mr. Kicketts 
was that there was, in fact, no lode belonging to the Oriental, as 
that which ran into that claim was the hanging wall of the Silver 
King lode, the owners of which claimed that their zone lay 
between this hanging wall and the foot wall, and that they were 
entitled to everything between the two lines. Judge Ross de- 
cided this case in favor of the Oriental No. 2, but Mr. Kicketts 
appealed it as stated. 

Judge Koss decided the Ked Jacket Mammoth suit last April, 
between the same contestants, in favor of the mining company. 
In this case the court coincided with the views advanced by Mr. 
Kicketts as to the number and location of the monuments on 
mineral lands, in the absence of a State or local law as to the 
manner in which the monuments should be placed. In this case, 
Judge Ross reversed the decision of the Supreme Court of Cali- 
fornia rendered July 22, 1884. Judge Ross' decision lays Doe 
liable for the value of all the ore he took out of the claim in 
question, and also holds his title to be invalid. 

Mr. Kicketts also won the case of the Oregon No. 3 for his cli- 
ents. The Waterloo Mining Company had its works on a certain 
part of the claim, and instructed its agent to prove up on all the 
claim. Instead he proved up only on a portion of it, and filed for 
himself a claim to a triangular section, on which were the com- 
pany's works. This triangle the agent sold to Doe. The court 
held, however, that there was no lode in the triangle, and that, 
therefore, it was not a mining claim, so Doe got no patent. 

Mr. Kicketts has been engaged in the affairs of the Waterloo 
Mining Company for five years past. He has shown himself a 
lawyer of profound knowledge of the intricacies of mining law, 
and a man of great fertility of resource. 

THUS far in July the Treasury has purchased only 738,000 of 
the 4,600,000 ounces of silver called for under the Sherman 
law. The price paid for the June purchases was 82.20 cents per 
ounce. On July 7, 1,278,000 ounces were offered, and only 100,- 
000 ounces were taken at .7200. The next day 538,000 ounces 
offered by telegraph at .7230 were accepted. The 100,000 ounces 
purchased on Monday at .7150 complete the purchase so far this 
month. 




ANTEDILUVIAN 

WHISKEY. 

VERY OLD, 

RICH 

AS 
CREAM 

AND 
SMOOTH 
AS 



SATIN. 



THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 

TO LET 
FURNISHED. 

A modern house of eight rooms; 
convenient to two cable lines; grand 
marine view; good neighborhood. 
Rent reasonable to desirable party. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND. 
10 Montgomery Street. 

Morphine-Opium 

HABIT permanently cured in five days, without harm, trouble or 
inconvenience. New method. No cure, no pay. 

JOY'S BALDWIN PHARMACY, 

^ Powell and Market Sts., S. F. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W.B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PAOIFIO OOA8T, 

l23CaliforniaSt.,SX 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOB SALE BT ALL PIB8T-CLA88 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 22, 1893. 



A 8 stated last Saturday, considerable comment was caused by 
the unwarranted publication in a daily paper of an untrue story 
to the effect that Frank D. Willey was a defaulter. Investigation 
shows *hat the libelous tales emanated from a man who, more 
than any other, has enjoyed the hospitality of the Willey family. 
They have dined him, wined him, taken him on boating parties, 
invited him to house parties, and in other ways shown him the 
greatest friendship, and dispensed for him the most liberal hospi- 
tality. Why the fellow should have lied as he did about the son 
of his host is beyond comprehension. The scandalmonger has 
been often befriended by Frank himself, for whom the false tale- 
bearer bad expressed friendship and admiration. The fellow has 
proved himself an ingrate and a false friend. He has himself 
enjoyed so much newspaper notoriety, that he doubtless wishes 
to cause others to have the sensation incident thereto. Frank D. 
Willey went to Arizona, as we said last week, with the 
knowledge and consent of his parents, who have been and are 
now in communication with him. 

# # * 

They have a good laugh on Fred Webster at the Bel Monte. 
When it was announced that the long-tailed "Willie boy" was 
all the go, the men at the hotel, with one accord, donned them, 
and wore them morning, noon and night, so that the ladies would 
know that they were in the swim. Herb Carolan had one, so 
did Joe Redding, A. L. Tubbs, A. H. Small and the rest of the 
Del Monte dudes of the season of '93. But when Fred Webster 
looked in his trunk for bis, he discovered his valet had not 
sent it. Mr. Webster hastily telegraphed to his " man" at the 
Union Club: " Express my Willie boy immediately." 

" A ■ Willie boy,' a ■ Willie boy,' " said the man at the club, 

over and over aga:n, " What in is a * Willie boy?'" Then a 

sudden thought struck bim, and after rustling about the streets 
for some time, he found a newsboy bearing the name, whom the 
man knew Mr. Webster had made his protege to some extent. 

" Mr. Webster wants you at the Del Monte right away," said 
the man. The boy threw away bis papers, howled with delight 
at the prospect of going into the Country Club President's ser- 
vice, and hurried away with the valet. He was duly labeled and 
shipped to the Del Monte. When the flyer arrived there, Willie 
jumped from the smoking-car and rushed up to the hotel, where 
Mr. Webster stood viewing the cypress trees." 

He sidled up to Webster until he stood directly in front of him, 
and then, pulling the Websterian vest, the lad said in a piping 
voice: "Mr. Webster, your Willie boy has came." 

To say that Frederick was overcome would be putting it mildly. 
He was speechless. His friends shrieked with laughter. Web- 
ster gave the boy some money, Joe Redding promised him a 
Willie boy coat, and the little fellow went away rejoicing. Web- 
ster is now training for a meeting with his valei, which is soon 
to take place. 

* » # 

There has been recently as a guest at one of the popular coun- 
try resorts near town (and she may be yet) a "lady," whose chief 
occupation in life seems to be to slander honest women who do 
not meet her fancy. It iB a curious fact, often noted, that those 
women most addicted to the art of scandalmongery are those 
who are themselves most open to attack. So it is with the 
woman in question. There has been so much unpleasant talk 
regarding herself, as she well knows, that her mean spirit doubt- 
less finds its satisfaction in throwing mud at others. She has 
been in the swim, or rather, floating with the tide, for some 
time; as long ago, in fact, as when sttte was accustomed to leave 
her husband in this city or Oakland on Saturday morning, and go 
to Santa Cruz, where she found a comforter until Monday morn- 
ing in the then private secretary of a certain well-known United 
States Senator. The secretary, it seems, had secured the husband 
a position, and the husband, who must have something of the 
spirit of the noble Roman, surrendered his wife to his friend. 
Yet this woman has the effrontery to endeavor to besmirch the 
reputation of honest maids and matrons! 

Among the guests at Del Monte who have distinguished them- 
selves by their equestrianism this season, is W. H. Chambliss. 
He has his own horse with him, and takes the seventeen-mile 
ride every day, usually before breakfast. He has made many 
friends at the hotel, who admire the dignified manner in which 
he ignores certain envious people who have tried to injure him. 
Why false stories should be circulated about this gentleman is 
beyond comprehension. He has a good position in society, en- 
joys an ample income, which allows him to select his own 
pleasures, is quiet and unostentatious. It seems to please him to 
treat his enemies with the quiet scorn they certainly deserve. 

# * « 

Letters from New York say that every one there is predicting 
a very swell wedding there tbis winter between young John 
Mackay and Miss Virginia Fair. The young lady makes her 



formal debut into society this season at the Oelrichs' cottage at 
Newport, while the young gentleman is taking a plunge into the 
London whirl. Quid nuncs aver that the coming winter will wit- 
ness a bridal which will set Gotham talking of the power that 
wealth can bring to make a magnificent function. Should the re- 
port be true, it will certainly be an interesting occasion; for the 
union of old friendship, great wealth, and youth and beauty is 
something unusual these prosaic days of the fin de Steele. 

8udden and unexpected was the marriage of Louis Arguello 
and Arcadia Spence in Santa Clara last week. No one even knew 
they were engaged, and every one wondered why they were not 
married at San Jose. Arguello's father, Alfred Arguello, it is said, 
was not particularly in favor of his son's choice. He waB sick in 
bed when the wedding took place, and died on the following 
day. 

The Savoy, on the Thames Embankment, London, makes a 
specialty of Old Saratoga Rye. 

Quite a fad. East is to chew for half an hoar after dinner Adams' 
Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum for indigestion. 

Eyes tested according to physiological laws of light, and not by machin- 
ery. C. Muller, the progressive optician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush. 



EL WPO 



Oi? tl?e Bay. 



Uia tl?e Safe ai?d large Steamer Ul^iar;. 
I^opeped as a Sunday pa/ryiiy Resort. 

Choice programme of popular music. Refreshments, 
fishing and boating. NO DANCING. Tables and seats 
for family lunches. Decorum will be preserved. Round 
trip and admission to the grounds, 50 cents. Children 
under 10 years free if accompanied by parents.. Steamer 
Ukiah leaves Tiburon ferry, foot of Market street, every 
Sunday at 10:30 A. M. and 1:45 P. M. Leave El 
Campo 12:45 and 5 P. M. 

BYRON HOT SPRINGS, 

68 niles; 3 Hours; All Rail; 3 Trains Daily. 

THE ONLY 

HUD OR PEAT BATH ON THE COAST. 
Hot Salt Water and Sulphur Baths, " 

|Infallible cure for rheumatism, liver} 
and kidney trouble and kindred complaints. 
IW" Pamphlets mailed on application. 

C. R. riASON, Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. 0., Cal. 

A. BUSWELL, 

BOOK-MNDER, PAPERRUIER, PRINTER ANB BLANK BOOR MANUFACTURER 

535 Clay Street, Near Montgomery. San Francisco. 



July 22, 1893 . 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



TENNIS AND BASEBALL. 



Under Way. 
Club next 



13 

nWWWWJW 




Tennis The next tennis tourna- 

Toumaments nient will be tbe quarterly 
tournament at tbe California 
Saturday. Games will be 
called at 2:30 o'clock sharp; entries close 
on the 27tb. The entries so far are R. J. 
Davis, A. 8. Keeler, W. Morgan O'Connor, 
Robert Harrison, C. B. Fernald, Dell 
Linderman, F. S. Mitchell, J. G. Hooper, 
A. B. Wilberforce and J. H. Mee. 

It is nearly settled that the ladies will 
have a doable invitation tournament at 
the Hotel Mateo. Miss Martha P. Gibbs 
is getting it up, and any one who knows 
how enthusiastic she is over tennis, will 
readily understand that the match will 
soon take place. The tournament for gen- 
tlemen's doubles championship, and the 
ladies' single championship will be held at 
the Hotel Rafael on September 7th, 8th 
and 9th, under the direction of the Pacific 
States Lawn Tennis Association. The 7th 
will be entirely a ladies' day, and all 
matches will be played off if possible, 
giving the winner till Saturday morning, 
when she will have to meet Miss Morgan, 
the present champion. On the 8th the gentlemen's doubles will 
commence, and as the entry is never very large, it is expected 
the finals can be played in the afternoon, letting the winning 
team rest till Saturday afternoon, when they will meet the pres- 
ent champions, Messrs. Sam and Sumner Hardy. It seems to us 
that unless Taylor and Tobin play in the tournament the present 
champions will have but little difficulty in retaining their title, as 
probably the only team who will run them at all close will be 
Champion Driscoll and his partner, Charlie Bates. 

The tournament which will take place next month at Hay- 
wards, we understand, will not be managed by the Alameda 
County Tennis Club, which certainly seems strange, if the 
championship for Alameda county is to be played there. Hardy 
won the championship last year, and since the Fourth, has been 
improving his game, so there is but little doubt that he will retain 
his title. 

Dr. Phillips, of the Pastime Club, of Nevada, who is always such 
a good addition to the tournament at San Rafael, owing to his 
willingness to help everyone out, has hinted that the Pastime 
Club will hold an invitation tournament latter on in the season, 
and that they are very anxious to have a party from 8an Fran- 
cisco. This is an excellent idea. The club has been putting out 
a good deal of money on improvements, and is probably one of 
tbe best this side of the Rockies. Parker Whitney, who is also 
an enthusiast, is talking of holding a tournament in Placer 
county, and winding up with a few days of fishing, shooting, etc. 

The courts at the California Club look quite deserted, owing to 
the departure of so many of the players. W. H. Taylor, Jr., 
Augustus Taylor and Joe Tobin were East-bound travelers last 
Sunday, en route to Chicago, where they will play in the National 
tournament. R. N. and G. Whitney left also on Sunday, for the 
North, and take the Canadian route, winding up at Chicago. 
They hope to be able to be in time for the doubles, so California 
may have two teams in the field. Walter Hobart and D. E. Alli- 
son are at Lake Tahoe; Harry Stetson is at Chicago, and many of 
the other players are in the country. 

The News Lettek, through its London correspondent, received 
the following cablegram : 

Wimbledon, July 17, 1893. 

I. Pim won the all-comers' match in the all England champion- 
ship, and defeated W. Baddeley, the present champion, in the cham- 
pionship round. 

This news is very satisfactory, as we have all along chosen Mr. 
Pim as our favorite. There is no doubt that he deserves the 
championship, as he has given great attention to the game, and 
been constantly improving. He now holds the all England, the 
Northern and the Irish championships, all won this season, and 
may, if properly partnered, take the all England doubles, too. 
We believe it is the first time on record that an Irishman has won 
the all England championship, though the Englishmen nearly al- 
ways have won the Irish championship. 

Railroads Los Angeles Club is now located in last place, while 
Running the San Franciscos are in the lead. The Los Angeles 
Baseball, electric road is now running the club of that city. Rail- 
road companies are also running several baseball clubs in the 
Southern League. The Oakland Club does not receive any as- 
sistance or support from the cable road running to its grounds. 
There is great rivalry between Petaluma and Santa Rosa, of the 
Central League. This the railroad encourages, as when these 
clubs play in either city excursion trains are run. 

It is not generally understood that the reason McDonald is sent 
to the country to umpire and Sweeny is retained in this city is 
because the latter is a night watchman. McLaughlin, who is 



(BALD HEADS! 



What is the condition of yours? Is your hair dry, 
harsh, brittle? Does it split at the ends? Has it a 
lifeless appearance ? Does it fall out when combed or -. 
brushed ? Is it full of dandruff? Does your scalp itch ? J 
Is it dry or in a heated condition ? If these are some of V 
your symptoms be warned in time or you will become bald. £ 

SkookumRoot Hair Grower £ 

Is what you need. Ita production Is not an accident, but the result of scientific i 
research, knowledge of the diseases of the hair and scalp led to the discov- ? 
ery or how to treat them. "Skookum "contains neither minerals nor oils It ■ " 
is not a Dve, but a delightfully cooling and refreshing Tonic. By stimulating 
the follicles, rt stops falling hair, cures dandruff and grows hair on bald 

S&~Keep the scalp clean, healthy, and free from irritating eruptions, by ' 
trie use of Skooknm Skin Soap. It destroys parasitio insects, which, feed on r 
ana destroy the hair. i 

If your druggist cannot supply you send direct to na, and we will forward i 
prepaid, on receipt of price. Grower, $1.00 per bottle; 6 for £5.00. Soap, 50c. 
- >forS2.50. w ' ' 



a ' ouuiu rum jihihil-. ,'civ i urn. a . l , " B 



per jar ; 6 for $2.50. 

THE SKOOKUH ROOT HAIR GROWER CO., 

57 South Fifth Avenue* New York, N. Y. 



now umpiring in the National League, and who officiated here 
several years ago, is having a hard time of it. Sheridan and 
Sandy McDermotl, who both officiated in the California League, 
are now umpiring in the Southern League. As no complaints 
are made about their work, they must be giving satisfaction. 

Glenalvin has concluded not to go to the Chicago Club. In 
this he is probably both prudent and wise. He is now captain 
of the Los Angeles team, with a salary of $250 a month, and with 
every assurance of continuing in his place should the club live 
out the season. Should he goto Chicago, he would receive a lit- 
tle more salary, but at the same time he would take the chances 
of not giving satisfaction to that club, and his release would fol- 
low. This would throw him on the baseball market without 
employment. 

Stafford, who played with Los Angeles last year and this sea- 
son with Augusta, has been signed by New York, and is praised 
very highly. He is placed at the head of the batting order of the 
team. 



Go to the Pacific Cleaning and Dyeing Works of J. Spaulding <fc 
Co., at 353-357 Tehama street, if you want any clothing dyed, or cur- 
tains, carpets or smaller articles cleaned. This establishment leads 
the coast in this particular line. It is patronized by all the leading 
hotels and families in the city, and enjoys great popularity on ac- 
count of its excellent work. 

Nothing can exceed the delicious flavor of the John F. Cutter 
whisky. It is recognized by connoisseurs as the best in the market. 
It is used at all the leading clubs, bars, hotels and other places 
where men of tine tastes mostly congregate. No whisky can beat 
the J. F. Cutter. 

John W. Carmany, of 25 Kearny street, always has an excellant 
stock of gentlemen's furnishing goods on hand. His shirts neck- 
wear, gloves and handkerchiefs are the best. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1893, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-6) p«r cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 
Office— Corner of Powell and Eddy streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

For the six months ending June 30. 1893, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four and 

one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1893. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco, June 30, 1893. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter UJ4) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 1893, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1893. 

R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Street. 

ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1604-1606 VAN NESS AVENUE, San Francisco. 

French, German and English day and boarding school for young ladies 
and children. Next term begins August 3, 1893. For prospectus, address 

MME. B. ZISKA. A. M., Principal. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893 . 



A New Era of Gold mining in California ia once more begin- 
Qoid Mining ning to attract attention, and the prospects are 

in California, now good for the revival of an industry which 
has been too much neglected during the past twenty years. A 
correspondent very aptly and correctly says in the course of a 
sensibly written communication to a daily contemporary, that 
only one capitalist of note in this city has for years past shown 
any interest in keeping gold mining alive in the Slate. Of course 
a number of small monied people have been delving for the 
metal under great disadvantages, trying to keep body and soul 
together in the meantime, but outside of Mr. Alvinza Hayward, 
the gentleman referred to, there has not been another man of 
wealth to whom a prospector could go with the chance of even 
getting so much as a hearing. Until very recently, when it be- 
came patent that silver was no longer a profitable commodity, 
the fact that a man was a gold miner caused people to look 
askance at him, especially when he came as an applicant for 
financial assistance. Silver mines in Mexico were acceptable 
propositions, but a little gold prospect in Nevada, Placer or any 
of the other northern counties of the State, which might be de- 
veloped into a large and paying property was sniffed out of con- 
sideration with the remark that it was ,i too small," or something 
similar. Down-town merchants, also, who could always find a 
hundred or so for a flyer in some speculative mining stock, were 
systematically cornered for cash when asked to help and open up 
some promising vein of gold quartz. It has been the same thing 
over again with hydraulic mining. A few fanatics dragged the 
farming classes of the Sacramento valley into their meshes by a 
false proposition, and with the aid of these honest but misled men 
they have successfully managed to hoodwink intelligent business 
men of this State and citizens generally into supporting 
their infamous claims for recognition and support. It has 
just cost in the neighborhood of $100,000,000 in gold 
to run these wolves in sheep clothing to earth, and even now, 
when backed into the last ditch, they have the impudent effront- 
ery to snarl back their lying excuses for the right to even dis- 
grace by their presence the land which they have almost ruined. 
The merchants of this city recognize to their everlasting sorrow 
and regret to-day, as they note their diminished trade and recall 
the number of prosperous towns now lying in ruins among the 
Sierras, that this so-called anti-debris movement has been a delu- 
sion and a snare. The farmers themselveB, with their acres of 
grain now ready for the sickle, and without the gold neces- 
sary to protect it from destruction or themselves from the loss 
which must follow forced sales on the lowest market for grain 
ever known, that they have been victimized by a clique 
of unscrupulous tricksters, who have not even profited them- 
selves by the slimy operations of a decade. 
$ $ $ 

IT is high time that the people of this State were awakened to a 
true sense of the situation. The press, which has been 
hitherto silent out of a deference to subscribers among the tules 
and within the farming regions under the thrall of the anti-debris 
banditti, is now almost a unit in supporting the popular demand 
for the immediate resumption of work on our auriferous grnvel 
mines. An increased annual output of gold is of more import- 
ance to California just now than all the other live issues of the 
day, with the settlement of the silver question first and foremost. 
Charity begins at home, and with the gold mines in full blast 
again we can afford to send bread to Colorado or any other point 
if starvation must necessarily follow the suspension of silver min- 
ing. The local influences brought to bear with the Federal Gov- 
ernment ought not to be confined to the representatives of the 
raining classes or any individual set of men. If we are to have 
a mass meeting for the purpose of expressing our sympathy with 
those who are saffering from the silver depression, why not bring 
people together from one end of the State to the other to make 
known our own necessities and demand relief? From all ac- 
counts the Caminetti act is too slow in its operation to suit the 
exigencies of the case. There is too much red-tape about its re- 
quirements, and the duties of the engineers are too widely diver- 
sified to enable them to devote exclusive attention to any particu- 
lar branch of the work devolving upon them. A special State 
Commissioner would lighten the burden now reposed on the Fed- 
eral officials, and they on their part would doubtless be only too 
glad to share the responsibility with a capable man. The main 
thing, however, is to do something. It has been little more than 
talk for some months past, and the time has come for action 
which will lead to results. 

I $ $ 

THE Comstock management have inaugurated a new policy, 
which will be certain of popular approval. During the week 
the first step has been taken preparatory to a general reduction 
of expenses, and the cut in salaries already announced has been 
a heavy one in comparison with that which is asked from the 



miners. Something bad to be done if the mines are to be kept 
open. Of course they are, as a rule, large gold-producers, but 
even then the expense of operating at such a great depth offset 
any benefits derived from the fact that silver is the minimum. 
The action of the wood, water and transportation companies will 
now be anxiously awaited. There is little doubt about the 
mineis, as they will have the good sense to recognize that in the 
present condition of affairs, half a loaf is better than no bread. 
The situation in some of the Comstock mines is particolary prom- 
ising just now, and it would be a pity if work had to be stopped. 
Once a mine is shut down it is always an expensive job to reopen 
it, especially where water has to be contended with, the damage 
resulting sometimes being irreparable unless at a cost which is 
apt to make investors shirk the responsibility. The shares of 
these mines are pow very low, and the opportunities for specula- 
tion will undoubtedly attract much of the capital lying idle for 
lack of employment. If Con. Cal. -Virginia was a good buy at 
$3 a few weeks ago, and Potosi at the same figure or thereabout, 
they must be a pretty safe pick-up at the prices of to-day. The 
news of a settlement at Virginia City on as liberal a basis as that 
which has been suggested by the officials in this city, will have a 
good effect on the market, and help to keep the miners in Nevada 
fed throughout the winter, which does not promise to be a very 
warm one in the silver camps of adjoining States and territories. 

$ $ * 

The State fnuest- The struggle which is now going on over the 
ment Insurance receivership of the State Investment Insurance 
Company's Affairs, Company does not augur well for the stock- 
holders or creditors of the bankrupt concern. If a receiver had 
been appointed long ago, as suggested by many of the friends of 
the company, it would have been much better for all concerned. 
An insurance man could have disentangled many of the tangles 
which have now been woven in the intricate mass. There were 
premiums falling due and policies about to lapse which could 
have been secured by an arrangement such as was proposed at 
the time when Mr. Jacobs was supported by many of the outside 
companies as a receiver. Now the Sheriff has possession of the as- 
sets, and shows a disposition to hold on to them against ex-Judge 
Van Reynegom, who was selected for the position of receiver by the 
company. What the outcome of the fight now going on in the court 
may be no one can tell from the drift of the arguments on either 
side, but the result will be the same — unfavorable for the com- 
pany and those who are interested in thesettlement of its affairs. 
The insolvency proceedings were ill-advised and altogether un- 
warrantable. 

%% % 

THE week has been an uneventful one in local insurance circles. 
Business has been rather quiet, and few of the companies 
have done much in the way of increasing their risks. As usual 
there are any number of rumors afloat about changes in manage- 
ment, but with one exception there is nothing in them. That 
which refers to the Continental of New York seems to have an 
element of truth about it. It is certain that D. B. Wilson, the 
former manager, will retire on August 1st, but as to his successor 
there seems to be some doubt. Some say that Alfred Stillman 
will be appointed the manager, and others that Mr. Du Val will 
retire from the Pacific Insurance Union, to take the Continental, 
while Stillman will be elected in his place to the position which 
he filled for so many years. There has again been some talk 
about two new British companies entering the field, but this is 
not credited, as it is understood that all the more important 
underwriters from abroad are already engaged in business on this 
coast at the present time. 

$%% 

THE Sun Insurance Company has declared a quarterly dividend 
of $2.50 per share, payable immediately. 

%%% 

California Favors The silver men have rallied around the ban- 
Free Coinage ner of the party in this city, and declared thetn- 
of Silver. selves for free coinage of silver, and the repeal 
of that dangerous makeshift, the Sherman Act. At a meeting 
held on Tuesday evening last, Congressman F. G. Newlands, in a 
vigorous and able address, explained the true causes for the de- 
preciation in the value of the metal, and pointed out the disas- 
trous results which would attend the continuance of the present 
policy of the government. A mass meeting has been called for 
to-night, which will give the friends of silver an opportunity to 
express the sympathy of California for Nevada and other West- 
ern 8tates, and a determination to assist them in every way to 
obtain relief and protection from a malign foreign Interference. 

$ $ $ 

MONEY is easier all over town, and business will soon be run- 
ning along in its usual course. The Bank of California has 
been the first commercial bank to unlock its vaults for the bene- 
fit of the farmers throughout the State, but the others will fol- 
low. The Hibernia and German 8avings Banks began loaning 
money on the 15th inst., and within the past few days the Sav- 
ings Union has made some loans. 



July 22, 1893. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




■Hear the Crier:" "What the devil art thou?' 
• One that will plavt he d evil. sir. with vou." 



AFTER reading Professor Jordan's '"it rro/.<— 
Beyond the bay I know not where, 

There is a place called Oakland town; 
I know not if it's foul or fair, 
Whether on the earth or air, 
I know none who were ever there — 
(In fact no one was ever there!) 

I only kaow 'tis Oakland town. 

I cannot fancy Oakland town, 
I cannot even think the place, 
It occupies an unknown space — 
And e'en the space it occupies 
And all the space that round it lies 
Of a conception there's no trace 1 

Even the thought of such a spot, 

The bare idea in the mind 

Has since evanished — lost — forgot; 

But e'en the mind that thought is not r 

But gone forever like the wind. 
It cannot be, in Oakland town, 
There's not any thing in Oakland town. 

No thing on earth could be more free 
From anything than Oakland town; 

No anywhere could well less Be — 

Nor any place less entity 

Than we could And in Oakland town, 
Quite surely find in Oakland town. 

A GREAT question has thrown its shadow over Sausalito, and 
the sojourners at that gossiping retreat are divided into two 
factions in consequence. The problem is, " Did Varney Gas- 
kill pay $1.50 a dozen for those six dozen real chicken tamales 
consumed by the gourmets of the tamale party last week?" (Be- 
fore going too deeply into the question, let me say right here, 
that of courBe Varney did not buy the fruit with his own 
money. It was an assessment scheme. Hence this yearning for 
knowledge.) Let it not be understood that anyone would en- 
tertain the base supposition that the honorable Mr. Gaskill 
would cinch his friends on a wholesale deal in tamales. Not for 
all the seagnlls in the bay! But if the market rate for tamales 
is $1 a dozen, why, oh why, ask the assessed, did Gaskill re- 
verse the rules of trade and pay .f 150 a dozen when he bought 
six dozen? Of course, Mr. Gaskill may be extravagant, and one 
gentleman has stated that he could produce a man who would 
swear to having seen Varney, on a time, give more for something 
than was asked, or he could get it for. The witness is yet non 
est. Meanwhile, Sausalito wonders, and the assessed cover 
reams of paper with figures as they calculate the price they 
would have to pay for tamales by the dozen were they to pur- 
chase them by the gross or in carload lots, Mr. Gaskill being the 
purchasing agent. 

LB D WIG EUPHRAT, poor and dirty, went unto Leon Lemos, 
tailor, and sednced that trusting section of humanity into 
selling him half a dozen shirts "on tick." Now comes Lemos 
and prays the Justice's Court to put into motion the machinery 
of the law to the end that Ludwig be compelled to pay to him as 
mnch bullion as will properly represent the value of those cover- 
ings to his nakedness which Lemos sold to Euphrat. The shirts 
will have to be introduced in evidence, and herein lies Euphrat's 
great chance for overcoming his unyielding creditor. If those 
shirts are produced, frayed, rumpled and soiled, the tailor will 
lose the case, for nothing on earth Is more productive of sym- 
pathy than a frayed and dirty shirt. Then even Justices of the 
Peace are sometimes troubled by shirt bills themselves. 

CARLTON COLEMAN divided the honors with Mr. Stevenson 
at the pavilion on Wednesday night. Carleton, who ought to 
he a General, though he is only a General's staff officer, is, as one 
of the mob expressed it, the very anatomy of grace. To see him 
running down the pavilion floor in jack boots was alone worth 
traveling 3000 miles. The ladies of the party were so very well 
impressed with him that for fully two minutes they allowed their 
attention to wander from General Richard P. Hammond. 

WE suggest to the managers of the Midwinter Fair that they 
pat themselves immediately in communication with the re- 
cently organized International Cold Wave Company, of Aberdeen, 
S. D. This corporation is capitalized at $6,000,000, and its business 
is to raise the wind wherever necessary. If its services were re- 
tained in this city by the Fair projectors it might be possible to 
do something satisfactory with close-fisted capitalists. 



" A N " " le ( ' ev '' aros e and warned the wicked of their evil 
l\ ways." So said a gentleman who listened to Mr. Pillsbury 
refer in scathing terms to the press during his argument in the 
Howell case the other day. Pillsbury reproves the press! There 
is something funny about that. Pillsbury, the confidante of Kelly 
and Crimmins, the man who thought he carried all San Francisco 
in his little vest pocket, actually has the effrontery to admonish 
the press. Ob, well, Kelly and Crimmins are dead, and Pillsbury, 
poor old man, is merely a reminiscence. It is well for Pillsbury, 
though, that the daily papers of this city are too jealous of one 
another to defend themselves as a whole, and for that reason will 
not notice his unkind remarks. Else the press might say unkind 
things regarding the late king maker. 

HERE is a brilliant opening for those geniuses who are looking 
for legitimate speculations these hard times. Ban Bernardino 
people have asked their Supervisors to put a bounty of ten cents 
a head on rabbits, which have become a pest in that county. Now 
then let some bright young man see that the bounty is offered, 
and then offer five cents a head for all the cats he can get. Every 
boy in town would be his willing agent, and in a week he would 
have thousands of cats, the supply of which is never ending. The 
cats' scalps sold to San Bernardino as rabbits would bring the 
bounty, and besides, the speculator would have the pelts left, 
which could easily be transformed into fox skins and the bodies 
would make excellent rabbit pie or stewed hare. It's a great 
scheme for an enterprising man. 

POLICEMAN DONOVAN tried to serve a search warrant upon 
Mrs. Gregory, an athletic woman, of 905 Bush street, who 
has certain fixed ideas regarding the sanctity of her home, and 
her rights as an independent citizen that believes that woman's 
sphere is indoors. The lady took umbrage at the limb of the law, 
and smote him hard upon his rubicund smeller. Wherefore Mrs. 
Gregory will now be given opportunity to show that if she had 
not been at home, but had been engaged in that noble struggle 
for her own sustenance spoken of by Mrs. Foltz, she would 
not have committed a breach of the peace. She should quote in 
her defense all the letters on the woman question recently pub- 
lished in the daily press. 

HE belongs to an athletic club, is an aspirant for the honors of 
middle-weight champion, and occasionally likes to impress 
people with his manner. He was in a railroad car the other day, 
and when the conductor, a small man, came around for tickets, 
Mr. Middleweight saw a chance to make an impression. 

"Tickets f'said the conductor. 

" Aw, me face is me ticket, see?" said the coming prize-fighter, 
in his toughest manner. 

"Well, I punch all tickets twice," said that little conductor, 
and quick as a flash he did his duty. When the fighter awoke, 
he was lying in the dust by the side of the railroad track, miles 
from home and friends, and the train was out of sight. 

SO Chicago will have none of Jim Corbett. The negroes, the 
Arabs, the Egyptians, the barem dancers, and all the fakirs 
from the thimble-rigger to the three-card monte man, may pursue 
the even tenor of their ways, but Midway Plaisance is held to be 
too aristocratic for an exhibition of the noble art of self-defense. 
We always thought that Chicago was unable to appreciate cul- 
ture, and now we know it. 

BARON KAROLYI has sold his peanut roaster and returned to 
fortune and position in Hungary; Baron Von Wrede no longer 
receives the welcome guest at the Baldwin Hotel, for he has gone 
back to Berlin. Thus doth our glory fade. Oh, girls, girls, to 
think that you should have allowed two real titles to escape 
you. But we have one consolation. The Naval Reserve is yet 
left us. 

CE. MOSER has been released on young and unsuspecting 
. Oakland. Moser is the old fellow who persecuted a young 
lady across the bay by writing her infamous letters. He has 
managed to get two men to go his bail in J2000 1 , and now he is 
trying to square things. The Oaklanders should see that Mr. 
Moser is given a vacation at that popular and pretty resort — San 
Quentin- 

THE Chronicle recently published a life-size cut of a French 
woman's foot, said to be the smallest in the world. It is 
about seven inches long. Now, if it would enlarge its sheet for 
the purpose, and print a eut of Carey Friedlander's boot, we 
would,, by the comparison,, be better able to appreciate the 
beauties of that French woman's extremity. 

THURSDAY'S papers gave the information in the telegraph 
columns that an Eastern brewery had been attached and closed ; 
the next item stated that an Eastern newspaper had suspended. 
Now, let some philosopher explain the connection between these 
two interesting facts. 

THE club waiters are jubilant. The victory of the University 
Club waiters have set all down stairs a howling. Club mem- 
bers will hereafter be careful that none of their cigar-stumps get 
into the waiters' soup, or pay the consequences. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893. 



THE SILHOUETTES. 



By A. T. Qtjiller-Couch, in "The Speaker.' 



nHE sinall round gentleman who bad come all tbe way to 
Gantick village from the extreme south of France, and had 
blown his flageolet all day in Gantick street without excit- 
ing its population in the least, was disgusted. Toward dusk 
he crossed the stile which devides Sanctuary Lane from the 
churchyard and pausing, with a leg on each side of the bar, shook 
bis fist back at tbe village, which lay below, its gray roofs and 
red chimneys just distinguishable here and there, between a 
foamy sea of apple-blossom and a haze of bluish smoke. He could 
not very well shake Its dust off his feet, for this was hardly sepa- 
rable from tbe dust of many other places on his boots, and also it 
was mostly mud. But bis gesture betokened extreme malevolence. 

" These Cor-rnisbman," he said, " are pigs all. There is not a 
Cor-rnishman that is not a big pig." 

He lifted tbe second leg wearily over the bar. 

" As for Art — phitl Moreover, they shut up their churches." 

This was really a serious matter, for he had not a penny-piece 
in his pocket, the last had gone to buy a loaf — and there was no 
lodging to be had in the village. The month was April, a bad 
time to sleep in the open ; and though the night drew in tranquilly 
upon a day of broad sunshine, the earth had by no means sucked 
in the late heavy rains. The church-porch, however, had a broad 
bench on either side and faced the south, away from the prevail- 
ing wind. He had made a mental note of this early in the day, 
being schooled to anticipate such straits as the present. As he 
passed up the narrow path between tbe graves, with a gait like a 
limping hare's, he scanned his surroundings carefully. 

The churchyard was narrow and surrounded by a high gray 
wall, mostly hidden by an inner belt of well-grown 
cypresses. At one point the ranks of these trees were 
broken for some forty feet, and here the back of a small dwelling 
house abutted on tbe cemetery. There was one window only in 
tbe yellow-washed wall, and this window looked straight on the 
church porch. The flageolet player regarded it with suspicion; 
but the casement was shut and the blind drawn down. The 
aspect of the cottage, too, proclaimed that its inhabitants were 
very poor folk — not at all the sort to tell tales upon a casual 
tramp if they spied him bivouacking upon holy ground. 

He limped into the porch and cast off the blue bag that was 
strapped upon bis shoulders. Out of it he drew a sheep's-wool 
cape, worn very thin, and then turned the bag inside out, on the 
chance of discovering a forgotten crust. The search disappointed 
him, but he took it calmly — being on the whole a sweet-tempered 
man and not easily angered, except by an affront to his vanity. 
His violent indignation against the people of Gantick arose from 
their indifference to his playing. Had they even run out at their 
doors to listen and stare, he would not have minded their stingi- 
ness. 

He that cannot eat had best sleep. The little man passed the 
flat of his hand, in the dusky light, over the two benches, and 
having chosen the one with fewest asperities on its surface, 
tossed his bag and flageolet upon the other, pulled off his boots, 
folded his cape to make a pillow, and stretched himself at length. 
In less than ten minutes he was sleeping dreamlessly. 

Over his head there hung a board containing a list or two of 
the parish ratepayers, and the usual notice of tbe spring training 
of the Royal Cornwall Rangers' militia. This lasu placard had 
broken from two of its fastenings, and toward midnight was 
rustled by an eddy of the light wind so loudly as to wake the 
sleeper. 

He sat upright and lowered bis bare feet upon the pavement. 
Outside, the blue firmament was full of stars, sparkling unevenly, 
as though the wind was trying in sport to extinguish them. In 
the eaves of tbe porch he could hear the martins rustling in the 
crevices that they had come back, but a few days since, to warm 
again. But what drew the man to the entrance was the window 
in the cottage over the wall. 

The lattice was pushed back and the room inside was brightly 
But a white sheet had been stretched right across tbe win- 



lit. 



dow between him and tbe lamp. And on this sheet two quick 
hands were waving all kinds of shadows, shaping them, moving 
them and reshaping them with the speed of lightning. 

It was certainly a remarkable performance. The shadows 
took the form of rabbits, swans, foxes, elephants, fairies, sailors 
with wooden legs, old women who smoked pipes, ballet girls who 
pirouetted, twirling harlequins and the profiles of eminent states- 
men — and all made with two hands and, at the most, the help of 
a tiny stick or piece of string. They danced and capered, grew 
large and then small, with such odd turns and changes that the 
flageolet player could hardly hold his laughter. He remarked 
that the hands, whenever they were disentwined for a moment, 
appeared to be very small and plump. 

After about ten minutes the display ceased, and the shadow of 
a woman's head and neck crossed the sheet, which was presently 
drawn back at one corner. 



" Is that any better? " asked a woman's voice, low but dis- 
tinct. 

The flageolet player started, and bent his eyes lower across the 
graves and into the shadow beneath the window. For the first 
time he grew aware that a figure stood there, a little way out 
from the wall. As well as he could see, it was a young boy. 

"That was beautiful, mother. You can't think how you've 
improved at it this week." 

"Any mistakes?" 

"The harlequin and columbine seemed a little stiff; but that's 
the hardest of all, I know." 

"Never mind; they've got to be perfect. We'll try them 
again." 

She was about to drop the corner of the sheet when the listener 
sprang out toward the window, leaping with bare feet over the 
graves, and waving his flageolet madly. 

"Ah.no — no, madame!" he cried. "Wait one moment, the 
tiniest, and I shall inspire you!" 

"Whoever is that?" cried the voice at the window, rising 
almost to a scream. 

The youth beneath the wall faced round on the intruder. He 
bad turned white and wanted to run, but mastered his voioe to 
inquire gruffly: 

" Who the devil are you?" 

"I? I am an artist, and as such I salute madame and mon- 
sieur, her son. She is a greater artist than I, bat I shall help 
her. Her harlequin and columbine shall dance better this time. 
Why? Because they shall dance to my music, and music that I shall 
make, here, on this spot, under the stars. I shall play as if pos- 
sessed -I feel that. I bet you. It is because I have found an 
artist — an artist in Gantick. O — my — good — Lor I" 

He has pulled off his greasy hat and stood bowing and smiling, 
showing his white teeth and holding up his flageolet for the 
woman to see and convince herself. 

" That's all very well," said the boy ; " but my mother doesn't 
want it known yet that she practices at these shadows." 

" Ha! It is perhaps forbidden bylaw." 

" Since you have found us out, sir/' said the woman, " I will 
tell you why we are behaving like this, and trust you to tell no- 
body. I have been left a widow, in great poverty and with one 
son, who must be educated as well as his father was. Six months 
ago, when sadly perplexed, I found out by chance that'this small 
gift of mine might earn me a good income at a — a music hall. 
Richard, of course, doesn't like my performing at such places, but 
agrees with me that he must be educated. So we are hiding it 
from everybody in the village, because we have always been re- 
spected here; and, as soon as I have practiced enough, we mean 
to travel up to London. Of course I shall change my name, and 
nobody will — " 

But the flageolet-player sat suddenly down upon a grave and 
broke into hysterical laughter. 

"Oh — oh — ohl Quick, madame, dance your pretty figures 
while yet I laugh and before I curse. O, stars and planets, look 
down upon this mad world and help me play 1 And, O mon- 
sieur, pardon me if I laugh; for that either you or I are mad is a 
cock-sure. Dance, madame — " 

He put the flageolet to his lips and blew. In a moment or two 
harlequin and columbine appeared on the screen and began to 
caper nimbly, naturally, with the wildest grace. The tune was 
a merry reel, and soon began to inspire the performer above. Her 
small dancers in a twinkling turned into a gamboling elephant, 
then to a couple of tripping fairies. A moment after, they were 
flower and butterfly, then a jigging donkey; then harlequin and 
columbine again. With each fantastic change the tune quick- 
ened and the dance grew wilder, till, tired out, the woman spread 
her hands wide against the sheet, as if imploring mercy. 

The player tossed his flageolet over a headstone and rolled back 
on the grave in a paroxysm of laughter. Above him the rooks 
had poured out of their nests and were calling to each other. 

" Monsieur," he gasped at last, sitting up and wiping his eyes, 
" was it good this time?" 

«' It was quite different, I'll own." 

" Then could you spare from the house one little cruBt of bread? 
For I am famished." 

The youth returned in a couple of minutes with some bread 
and cold bacon. 

•• Of course," he said, " if you should meet either of us in the 
village to-morrow you will not recognize us." 

The little man bowed. "I agree," said he, " with your 
mother, monsieur, that you must be educated at all costs." 



Are "You Going to the World's Fair?— Will you spend the sum- 
mer in the country ? If you leave the city at all, deposit your val- 
uables— &uch as trunks, boxes, silverware, paintings, bric-a-brac, etc. 
—with the California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., corner of Mont- 
gomery and California streets, and be relieved of all anxiety for their 
safety. Storage rates low. Boxes to rent at $5 a year and upwards. 

The fire-proof and burglar-proof safes of the Wilshire Safe and 
Lock Co. are best and cheapest. They are also agents for tbe famous 
Buffalo U. S. Standard Scales, best in the world. Write for prices to 
their new store, No. 6 California street. 



July 22. 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 







SOME of the new hammocks are marvela of fine workmanship 
and material. The most dainty affairs are of sweet-smeliing 
Mexican grasses in different colors, fringed on the side and knotted 
and tasseled. Others are of plain or many-colored cotton cords. 
These swinging nests are cushioned and valanced and padded. Plain 
colors are less used for pillows this summer, and a last summer's silk 
gown may be effectively used in this way. Silkoline makes the most 
agreeable kind of pillow covering for summer. Japanese crepe cloth 
is another stuff from which pretty pillows can be made. It is strong 
and serviceable, ana the blue and white is restful to the eyes. The 
ordinary cotton crepe cloth, such as is used for summer gowns, rivals 
the more expensive Japanese crepe, and is nearly as pretty. 

The fiat has gone forth in England calling the white stocking back 
into vogue. England is always and forever making a mess, and 
when it comes to fashions in feminine apparel, England is particu- 
larly unfelicitous. Our pretty, tasteful fashions all come from Paris. 
White stockings have never gone out in Germany ; tabooed else- 
where, they have continued in favor with the average Teuton frau. 
And in England the older ladies have continued to wear white cot- 
ton hosiery. It is well known, we think, that Mrs. Gladstone has 
never incased her nether limbs in any but white cotton stockings. 

The majority of the most fashionable corsages are either seamless 
and drawn over glove-fitting linings, or merely fitted with side forms, 
with the immediate front and back portions slightly gathered. It is 
of less consequence, however, than formerly, how perfectly they are 
adjusted after the lining has been fitted, since the actual bodice is 
now merely a foundation for elaborate trimming under which it is 
nearly hidden from sight. 

Little capes barely reaching beyond the shoulders are made of 
coarse net and covered with frille bordered with narrow white lace. 
Full ruches of black silk muslin or net edged on both sides with the 
lace and tied with a ribbon in front are worn without a cape. 



Very long silk mittens, with or without decorated tops, will be worn 
this summer, and in the greatest length shown will run quite up to 
the top of the shortest sleeves, while in a diminished length they will 
reach the ruffle, coming below the elbow. 

A serviceable bathing suit can be made of white cashmere trimmed 
with rows of braid in any color desired, or bands of colored serge. 
The cashmere is of lighter weight than flannel, sheds the water read- 
ily, and will not shrink. 

Embroidered hosiery seems Eulalia's taste, and although she has 
striped, checked, criss-crossed, plaided and zig-zagged designed stock- 
ings, yet her fondness rests with the floral embossed hosiery. 

A Hebe robe is just two long sheet-like stripes of white nun's veil- 
ing which Eulalia's maid forms into a dress by catching up in folds 
at the waist and shoulders and confining with a girdle. 

Bodices of undulated gauze, closely gathered at the neck, and 
allowed to puff over the top of the wide draped belt, are a new Paris- 
ian fancy. The gauze is made for this purpose. 

The newest waistbands are composed of seven rows of beads 
joined together at intervals by bands of imitation gold finely chased 
and ruched. 

The rage for lace is greater than ever before, and from 30 to 40 
yards of Valenciennes lace is a moderate amount for a silk muslin 
dress. 

The new grenadines with silk figures and stripes are particularly 
suitable for afternoon dresses during the warm weather. 

A new grenadine for trimming purposes is checked and spotted 
with a color. It is used over silk of a third shade. 

A favorite dress material for seaside wear is light wool, goffered in 
the manufacture so that it is not affected by damp. 

The hair at present is completely waved all over the head. 

Black roses are novelties in millinery. 



The Maison Riche, at the corner of Geary street and Grant ave- 
nue, is the most popular restaurant in the city among people who 
enjoy good dinners. It enjoys the patronage of the elite. 



Mothers be sure and use 
children while teething. 



'Mrs. Winslows' Soothing 8yrup " for your 



(T\idsumm<?r <?IearaQe<? Sal<? 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 
Sre/nepdous Qjts ii> prices. 

-ON- 

<$loal<5, Dn?ss Qood$, Sill^s, Cac.es, I^ibboos, 

parasols, (Jloues, Srimmings, 

JHar>dl«rel?i(tfs, (T\?r/S Furnishings, Jto5i<?ry, 

Underwear, ^orsets C^urtaios, 

tyousefurnistyingj, Ete. 

Mail orders promptly executed. 

Goods delivered free in Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley, San 
Eafael, Tiburon, Sausalito, San Qnentin, Mill Valley, Ross 
Station and Blithedale. 




Murphy Building. 

MARKET. JONES AND MCALLISTER STS. 

Beauty Lost Easily Regained. 

No more wrinkles ; old age defied. Dimples made on cheeks or 
chin in twenty minutes. Noses straightened. Superfluous hair re- 
moved. Splotches removed. Mouths made small. Bust developed 
three times the size in three months. 

DR. CARPENTER, 

ROOMS 27 and 28 1346 MARKET ST. 

The Omly Dermotologist on the Pacific Coast. 



J&%^ REMOVED 

TO 121 POST STREET, 

BET. KEARNY ST. AND GRANT AVE. 



LOUIS COOKS. 



WILLIAM COOKS. 



MAX COOKS. 



COOKS BROS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Steel Ceilings. Wall Paper, Lincrusta Walton, Papier Mache 

Parquet Flooring, Moorish Fret Work, 

Frescoing, Wall Mouldings. 

943 and 945 Market St., between 5th and 6th, San Francisco. 
Louis Roederer Champagne- 

The Highest Grade 
Champagne in the World. 

WHITE LABEL, "Carte Blanche." 

A Magnificent Rich Wine- 

BROWN LABEL, "Grand Vin Sec." 

Perfection ot a Dry Wine. 

See that every bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & GO. 

Sole Agents for the PAcific Coast. 





SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 52, 1893. 



AT the first glance it appears difficult to reconcile the contents 
of the later telegrams on the Franco-Siamese imbroglio with 
the news which arrived in the beginning of this week. The later 
telegrams announce that France desires an apology on the part 
of Siam, while on Monday it was stated that the French Govern- 
ment had disavowed the action of the French naval commanders. 
Both statements, however, are probably correct, though it is not 
likely that the French officers acted without authority. The 
French gunboats, in advancing in their voyage up the Menam 
river past Palenam, without previous permission of the Siamese 
Government, violated the treaty of 1856, and when the French 
Government became aware that England would support 
Siam in protesting against such a treaty violation, France 
thought it wise to disavow the action. On the other hand, it 
appears that two French soldiers were killed while the boats 
passed the bar of the Menam, and for this the French demand an 
apology. 

The French press blusters and foams over the interference of 
Great Britain, and the authorities at Paris, in order to soothe the 
indignation of their countrymen have, it seems, permitted the 
publication of what looks like a semi-official denial of the state- 
ment that the government disapproved the action of the com- 
manders of the gunboats. It ought to be borne in mind, how- 
ever, that Sir Edward Grey, British Under Secretary of State for 
Foreign Affairs, distinctly declared in the House of Commons 
that France had sent " orders to Admiral Humann not to pass 
the bar of the Menam." This statement would never have been 
made except upon official information from the French Govern- 
ment, and the contradiction in the French press is of no value. 
There is no reason, therefore, to assume that the Franco-8iamese 
imbroglio will lead to serious complications. At all events, Siam 
is secure against French annexation, as Great Britain would 
never tolerate it, and the British Government is not likely to be 
intimidated by French bluster. 

The London Times publishes an editorial in which it explains 
England's temperate attitude towards France, notwithstanding 
the continual political intrigues against Great Britain on the part 
of the French Government, as similar to the patience which a 
strong man has, notwithstanding his indignation with " a fretful, 
unhappy woman of light character, who is dying of consumption." 
That is not a very flattering simile, but the French Republic can 
hardly complain of the allegory, since by recent events it has 
been shown that the country is being slowly but surely led to the 
verge of an abyss by a Government which the people tolerate 
without even making an effort to rid themselves of their danger- 
ous leaders. Internal corruption and external b'unders are the 
symptoms of disease plainly perceptible in modern French politics, 
and England has a right to speak of her forbearance, for the in- 
trigues in Egypt alone would have led to a sterner attitude on her 
part, had her government not recognized the fact that the French 
people are pushed against their will into conflicts, which they 
neither desire nor can bring to a successful issue, except by pro- 
voking a great war. 

A telegram announces that M. De Launay will shortly interpel- 
late the French government and insist upon depriving Mr. Oppert, 
better known after his birthplace as Oppert of Blowitz or M. de 
Blowitz, of his French citizenship, because he sent to his paper 
despatches commenting unfavorably on the recent actions of the 
French government. If the Times correspondent should really be 
excluded from his acquired rights of citizenship of France, it 
would simply be another proof that France is a Republic in name 
only. 

The French intrigues by which the young Khedive of Egypt 
was, not long ago, induced to break his faith with Great Britain 
ended in so ludicrous a fiasco that one should have imagined the 
French government would hesitate before trying again to inter- 
fere with England's interests by a kind of coup d'etat, but the events 
in Siam show that the lesson had not born fruits, and the same is 
evident from the French machinations at Constantinople at this 
moment, aiming to secure the 8ultan's support for the anti-British 
plots of young Abbas Pasha in Egypt. The Sultan, however, will 
hardly venture upon endangering his old shaky throne by pulling 
the chestnuts out of the fire for France, and Great Britain is so 
well aware of this that the British Ambassador to Turkey as well 
as the Ambassador to Egypt are absent from their posts at this 
moment. This ostentatious indifference to French intrigues on 
the part of England's government must be extremely galling to 
the vanity of French politicians. 

Mr. Gladstone, according to the court circular published in the 
English press, only after having received Queen Victoria's ap- 
proval, " was invited to dinner " by Her Majesty, " but was un- 



able to obey Her Majesty's commands." The phraseology of this 
announcement is remarkably pointed, and it takes no prophet to 
see that the Queen wishes to administer another little chastise- 
ment to the present Prime Minister. 

Qeandmas' made happy with perfect fitting glasses from C. Muller, op- 
tician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush. 

X-ETSTriRAIErOIE . 

FIRE, MAKINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company, 
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL. $1,000,000. | ASSETS, $3,000,000. 
AMERICAN CASUALTY INSURANCE AND SECURITY COMPANY 

BEECHER, SCHENCK & CO., 
Gen'l Managers. 

■iO to -44, PINE STREET, NEW YORK. 

Assets $2,607,675 76 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,139,756 99 

HAZARDS INSURED. 

EMPLOYERS AND PUBLIC LIABILITY, 
BOILER EXPLOSION, 
GENERAL CASUALTY, 
ELEVATOR ACCIDENT, 
SPRINKLER LOS8E8. 
GENERAL ACCIDENT, AND 
FIDELITY. 
MAXWELL <& BERRY, General Agents, 
421 California Street. 

SVEA FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF GOTHENBURG. 

Funds invested $4,661,924 

Shareholders' Obligations 2,133,333 

TotalAssets 6,795,267 

We beg to notify the Agents and Policy- holders of the above company 
that we have been appointed its General Agents upon the Pacific Coast and 
are authorized to collect all of the unpaid premiums and accounts. We 
solicit on behalf of this deservedly popular aud well known company the 
favor of the renewals of all expiring policies and an additional share of 
your good business. 

BROWN, CRAIG A CO., General Agents. 

407-409 Montgomery Street. 

Represent also. PHENIX, of Brooklyn; THE AMEBICAN FIRE; PENN 
SYLVANIAFIRE; THE GREENWICH INSURANCE CO. 
Total Assets oxer $20.000.000. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORTCOSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery forcleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest r&«68 oflnteTttSton Grain stored In Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Off ice of the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-Calllornla Bank. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO-, of New York. 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, Asst. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 

£l^-01dest Stock Fire Insurance Company in the United States. 
Capital Fully Paid $3,000,000 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA 

OF PHILADELPHIA, Penn. 
Office Pacific Department— 

412 California Street, San Francisco. 

JAMES B. BAILEY, General Agent. 



July 22, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



10 




TO DAISY.— Frank Banficld in Public Opinion. 



YOUR eyes, niy sweetest Daisy, own the hue 
A German singer erstwhile gave to slyness; 
They are not black, my dear, nor brown, nor blue, 
And never droop from shyness. 

The saucy piquancy of your pert chin 

Recalls the conch which, borne on Western waves, 
Comes from the gulf 'raid ocean's warring din 

To charm our Cornish caves. 

Your ears, my love, no pink and white of pearl 
Could carver set more deftly 'neath the hair; 

They woo to wonder with their curve and curl, 
In flowerlike beauty rare. 

Yonr nose in all its beauty fain I'd sing, 
Its dainty curves deserve a stately rhyme; 

But who in words could shape so fair a thing, 
And make those words keep time? 

No opening bud is so tempting as the lips 

Which, archly pursed, await your lover's kiss; 

And, ah! his joy when he that nectar sips! 
He thinks this queer life bliss. 

Yet ill It is, my Daisy, when the heart 
Yearns deathlessly for one so sweet of face; 

But doubts much if the soul hath any part 
In all the outward grace. 

HER PICTURE.— Ladies' Home Journal. 



8o long— a hundred years ago ! 

The orchid stood all white, 
Because her face has caught the glow 

Of Summer, just in sight, 
And she looked behind its boughs, I know, 

For her eyes hold Heaven's light. 
"My Cicely," the letters old 

Seen written through a tear; 
How tenderly the story's told 

Of him who put them there! 
The passing of her hair's young gold 

Took light from all the year. 

"My Cicely," — 'twere easily said 

To such a one as she; 
Methinks the leaves they whispered, 

The blossoms bent to see, 
When on God's world her smile it shed 

As she doth smile at me! 

"Jly Cicely," somewhere to-day 

The grass grows at your feet; 
Yet these old letters plainly say 

How one 8pring was complete, 
Because that time you passed this way 

Earth found a thing so sweet 1 

ASRA. — Coleridge. 

Are there two things, of all which men possess, 

That are so like each other and so near, 
As mutual Love seems like happiness ? 

Dear Asra, woman beyond utterance so dear! 
This love which ever welling at my heart, 

Now in its living fount doth heave and fall, 
Now overflowing pours tbro' every part 

Of all my frame, and fills and changes all, 
Like vernal waters springing np through snow, 

This Love that seeming great beyond the power 
Of growth, yet seemeth ever more to grow, 

Could I transmute the whole to one rich Dower 
Of Happy Life, and give it all to Thee, 
Thy lot methinks, were Heaven, thy age Eternity. 

TRAVELERS.— Percy Addlcshaw. 

We shall lodge at the Sign o' the Grave, you say I 
Yet the road is a long one we trudge, my friend, 

So why should we grieve at the break of the day ? 

Let us drink, let us love, let us sing, let us play, 
We can keep our sighs for the journey's end. 

We shall lodge at the 8ign 'o the Grave, you say I 
Well, since we are nearing the journey's end, 

Our hearts must be merry while yet they may; 

Let us drink, let us love, let us sing, let us play, 
For perchance it's a comfortless inn, my friend. 



IZL^STTIRA-IISrCE. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, GERMANY. 

Herbert L. Low, manager for the Pacific Coast Branch 

220 Sansome St., S. F. 

^reVM^'s;::::::::::::::::^::::::;::::::;:;;:;;:*^^" 
GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
232 California St., S. F., Cal. 



pacific zDEiFA-iiTrMiiEiDsj-T 
6UARDIAN ASSURANCE CO.. SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established a. d. 1821. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - I 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, {23,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded a. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, $10,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - $2,510,368. 



Wm. J. LANDERS, ften'l Agent, 208 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets 119,724,638.46. 

President, WKNJAMIN F. STEVENS. | Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENB 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francises. 



FIRE 



INSURE your property against EIRE in 

The Lion Fire Insurance Co. Limited, of London. 
The Imperial Insurance Co. Limited, of London 

WM. SEXTON, R. C. MEDCRAFT, 

Manager. Sub-Manager. 

Pacific Branch, 214 Sansome St., s. F. 

SWAIN & MTJRDOCK, City Agents. 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 



THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10 oooooo 

Capital PalU Up 1000000 

Cash Deserve (In addition to Capital) ' J 12B am 

Total Assets December 31. 7888 '.'.'.'.'.' '6,124,067.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 
306 California Street, San F rancisco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YOHK. 
Capital Paid Up ? 500,000 

Assets 3 181 7fiq 

Surplus to Policy Holders '.!'.'.'.'.'.'.! 1$»,1W 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, S. F.' 
City Office— 501 Montgomery St. genera l Office— 401 Hont'g, St. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1886.] 
Office— NorthweBt corner Sacramento and Montgomer 
GEO. F. GRANT, Manage 

BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL J6,700,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Wo. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OP BASLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

410 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893. 



ZB-A-HSTICS. 



SUMMARY OF THE MARKETS. 

Flour— Demand light; Extras ?4@S4.20. Superfine, $2.SO@S3.20. 
Wheats-Light trade; Shipping, $1-17: Milling. JL20@J1.25 per cental 
Barley is firm; Brewing, 90c.@tl. Feed. 77!. 2 o.@S' 1 i .c. per ctl. 
Oats, Milling, J1.40@J1.60; Feed, (1.15@(1.25 per ctl. 
Corn, White. J1.12VS; Yellow, tl.00@tl.00 per ctl. 
Rye is quiet, fair demand, tl@tl-05. Cement, J2.00@J2.25. 
Hay is steady; Wheat, til; Oats, J9@J10; Alfalfa, J7@J8. 
Millstuffs, good demand. Bran, J16@J17.50 per ton. 
Beans good request, J2.O0@J2.60 per ctl. Potatoes, 65c.@90c. per ctl. 
Butter Is easier; Choice, 20c.@22c; Fair, 16c.@17c. 
Cheese, light stock, 8c.@10c. Eggs, free supply, 18c.@24c. 
Honey Comb, 10c.@13c. ; Extracted, 6c.@7c. Poultry in good supply. 
Onions are worth 75c.@Jl.15 BeeBWax is steady, at 20c.@22c. 
Fruit— all kinds dried— active. Fruit is very plentiful and cheap. 
Hides are steady; Dry, 5c@6c. Wool is in light demand at llc.@16c. 
Provisions move off steadily. Bags favor the buyer at 6c. 
Coffee sluggish at 16c.@22c. for C. A. Canned Fruits of all kinds in favor. 
Coal Is plentiful; large stock. Nuts find ready sale. Hops, 15c.@18c. 
Quicksilver is nominal at t42.50 per flask. 

Sugar, good stock of both Raws and Refined. Wjite. 6c.@6%c. 
The Australian mail arriving by the Servia at New York, for 
dispatch by the Mariposa from this port, left New York at 9 a.m. 
last Monday morning, and will not reach this city before this 
morning. The sailing of the Mariposa, advertised for the 20th, 
has therefore been postponed to 2 p.m. to-day. 

Treasure for China, per steamship Belgic on the 13th inst., con- 
sisted of silver $250,000, and $1880 gold coin. She also carried to 
Japan $32,000 in silver. The total shipments, $285,400. 

The stringency in the money market has compelled the farmers 
to sell their Wheat and Barley more freely than of late, and this 
has been the indirect cause of an advance in grain freights to the 
United Kingdom, with increased exports as the result. 

Our fruit canners find some difficulty in procuring needed funds 
for the full prosecution of their business, notwithstanding the 
abundance and cheapness of fruit, the packing thereof promises 
to be less than last season. 

The Orient.— The P. M. S. 8. Peru, 27J days from Hongkong, 
via Japan 19 days, and Honolulu 7 days, arrived here on the 15th 
inst., having for cargo 290 pkgs. Calcutta Gunnies, 664 rolls China 
Matting, 67 pkgs. Silk Goods, 360 pkgs. Gambier, 509 bags. 
Beans, 4360 pkgs. 8ugar, 251 bags Coffee, 406 pkgs. Curios, 2152 
pkgs. Oil, 4732 pkgs. Tea, 2842 mats Rice, 3300 pkgs. Mdse. ; 
also, for Portland, 224 pkgs. Gunnies; for Central and 8outh 
America, 385 pkgs. Mdse.; for Overland, 441 pkgs. Matting, 1156 
pkgs. Curios, 130 pkgs. Silks, 9516 pkgs. Tea, 337 pkgs. Mdse. 

Exports to the Islands Schr. John G. North, for Mahnkona, 

had for cargo Mdse. value $4795. This included 200 bbls. Flour, 
1495 ctls. Barley, 200 cs. Coal Oil, Beans, etc. The Imgard, for 
Honolulu, carried 2137 lbs. Rolled Barley, 57,216 Bricks, etc., 
value $5228. S. N. Castle, for Honolulu on the 13th, had Mdse. 
value $23,147. The Annie Johnson, hence for Hilo, bad Mdse. 
value $28,019. 

Grain Charters Br. iron ship Palgrave, 3078 tons, Wheat to 

Cork, U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1 5s., if to a direct 
port, £1 3s. 9d. Br. iron ship Agnes Oswald, 1380 tons, Barley 
from 8an Diego to Cork, D. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, 
£1 7s. 6d. Br. iron ship City of Glasgow, 1168 tons, now due at 
San Diego, Barley thence to Cork,, U.K., Havre, Antwerp or 
Dunkirk, £1 7s. 6d. Ship General Knox, 2141 tons, to Liverpool 
direct, Wheat, £1. Snip J. B. Walker, 2106 tons, Wheat oame 
voyage as above, £1. Br. iron ship Carleton, 1299 tons, Wheat 
to Cork, U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dunkirk, £1 6s. 3d., nothing 
less direct. 

Barley shipments to Cork, U. K., are now in order. The ship 
Cedric the Saxon on the 13th carried 42,159 ctls. Two ships have 
been chartered to load some 3000 tons same at San Diego. 

Calcutta— The Castle Rock, thence 142 days to Meyer, Wilson 
&Co., had 2145 bales Gunny Bags, 3925 bales Jute, 1600 bales 
Gunnies, 810 bales Gunny Cloth, 250 bales h. b. w. bags and 14 
pkgs. H H Goods. 

Tonnage and freights. — We note an advance in grain freights to 
Europe. The British Br. iron ships Bardowie, 2630 tons, and Elm- 
bank. 2188 tons, load Wheat to U. K., Havre, Antwerp or Dun- 
kirk at 25s. and 26s. 3d. respectively. 

The stmr. Satnrn of the North American Transportation Com- 
pany carried to New York, via Isthmus, a large cargo of Wine 
and other Mdse., say: 8000 gals. Wine, 300,592 lbs. Borax, 200 
pkgs. Canned Goods, 14,965 lbs. Mustard Seed, elc, value $60,000; 
for BaBle, Switzerland, 1502 gals. Brandy, value $1433; to Boston 
80 rolls Leather, value $2286, etc. ; also for Central America 1369 
bbls. Flour and other Mdse., value $10,630; to Panama 100 bbls. 
Flour, 10,806 lbs. Sugar, Beans, Potatoes, Onions, etc., value $3,- 
300. 

New York John Rosenfelds Sons dispatched hence on the 17th 

inst the ship Bonanza with Mdse. to the extent of 5000 tons, in- 
cluding 246,924 gals. Wine, 8397 gals. Brandy, 200,721 lbs. Borax, 
750 fisks. Quicksilver, 350 cs. Honey, 940 Primera Logs and 32,- 
888 ctls. Barley, etc. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE FUND 1,300,000 

Southeast corner Bush and Sansome Streets. 

HEAD OFFICE Bu ' OMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; 

Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. 
SUB-BRANCHES— Kamloops, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, BritiBh 

Columbia. 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEM- 
ERARA and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

N\ W. Corner Sansome and Bush Streets. 

Established 1870. U. S. Depositary. 

CAPITAL {PAID UP) $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $700,000 I UNDIVIDED PROFITS SI 85,000 

S. G. MURPHY President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFPITT.. .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE AsstCashier 

DIRECTORS; 

George C. Perkins, 8. G. Murphy, 

James D. Phelan, James Moffitt. 

John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A Oeneral Banking Business Transacted. 
S*.FE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 
JAME8 K. LYNCH, Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m . to 6 p . m . 



Geo. A. Low, 
N. Van Bergen, 
Thomas JenningB, 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

Snarant) Capital, $1,000,000. 
OFFICERS. 

JAMBS G. PAIR President 

JAMES PHELAN, S. G. MURPHY Vice-PreBtdents 

DiEBCTOBs—James G. Fair, Edward Barron, J. A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James Phelan, James Moffitt, S. G. Murphy, Chas. Cadwalader and James 
D. Phelan. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved 
ecurities. JAMES A. THOMPSON, Cashier. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and. Sutter Sta. 

Sjbscribed Capital .$2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund $750,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

A&bnts— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.).No. 10Wall8t.,N. Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lasard Freres A Cle. 17Boule 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, | Manfleprs 
C. ALTSCHUL, ( Mana gers. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N.E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel ».ourt, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seli man A Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking tusiness, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 
worlu.. .Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART t ManflD . ftrfl 

P.N.LILIENTHAL.t *«»»*«« 
A. L. SELIGMAN, Cashier. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVIN6S UNION. 

Northeast Corner California and Sansome Streets, 

Formerly Occupied by Bank of Wells, Fargo & Co. 

Branch Office 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

Deposits, June 30, 1803 928,068,601 00 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus i ,599,4 3 4 OO 

DIRECTORS. 

Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-President; Thomas 
Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. DeFremery, 
George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and LoanB onlyon real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, hut the responsibility of this 8avings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge Is made 
for pass book or entrance fee. Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 P. m. Saturday 
evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND | 1,726,000 00. 

Deposits July 1, 1893 3 1,428, 984 37 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRTJ8E 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. MULLER. Board of Directors— L. Gottig, Edw. Kruse, 
George H. Eggers, O. Schoemann, F. Tillmann. H. Horstmann, B. A. Beck- 
er, H. L. Simon, Ign. Steinhart. Attorney, W. S. Goodfbllow. 



July 22, 1393. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 




5UNBCAM5 




IT seems that one of oar Generals, with a numerous company of 
ambassadors and consuls, had been to a grand dinner at Naples. 
The flow of wine had been quite as noticeable as that of the soul, 
bat the General aDd his friend were moderate in their libations, 
and left early, intending to take a slight walk before going to 
bed Arm in arm thev wandered tranquilly along until they came 
to the principal square of the citv. Now in this square was an 
obelisk, planted, as the General knew, very firmly upon its 
base. But, mirabile dictul As he entered the square he distinctly 
saw the obelisk wavering from side to side. " Did you see that? |J 
asked the General, grasping his companion convulsively. " \es, 
answered the latter. " Well, what do you think about it ? said the 
General " Well, I think the sooner we get home and to bed the bet- 
ter. Consider the disgrace to our respective foreign offices if we were 
found in the streets of Naples in this condition." So, with due regard 
to their supposed condition, the General and his friend carefully felt 
their way along, holding on to the railings. They arrived safely at 
their hotel, tumbled into bed, and, as in duty bound, slept late the 
next morning. When they came sheepishly down to breakfast, the 
bustling waiter's greeting carried with it both pain and pleasure: 
" Did the noble gentlemen feel the earthquake last night ! " 

—Boston Budget. 

* * 

The orator whose voice can sway the purposes of man, 

The statesman who in thought evolves some brilliant public plan, 

Each plays a part in government that really isn't small, 

But the hand that spanks the children is the hand that's boss of all. 

For men are only children of a somewhat larger growth, 
Each living out the lessons he acquired in his youth; 
He's governed solely by decrees observed while he was small, 
So the hand that spanks the children is the hand that's boss of all. 

—Peck's Sun. 

Me. Brokerly— I don't see how you can be so happy, when you 
know I've iust failed for half a million. Mrs. Brokerly— Yes, dearie ; 
but iust think— a half million I Why, that Mrs. Cleverton's husband 
failed for only ahundred thousand. This will take her down.— Truth. 

*** 
Black— I wish you would join our lodge, Browu, for the sociability 
of the thing, if for nothing more. Brown— Carter, one of your 
brothers took my name in last week. Hasn't he said anything to 
you about it ? Black— No, we don't speak to each other. — Puck. 

* 

* * 

" You have no ancestry," said Mr. Blueblud to Charlie Noo, who 
wished to marrv Miss Blueblud. " You are a man of no family.' 
"That's why I wish to marry," said Chollie. "I wish to start a 
family." -Puck. 

* * 

Husband— Our office boy died to-day, and I think you ought to go 
to the funeral. Wife— I'd like to know why ? Husband— For the 
past month he has been eating the lunches you have put up for me. 

—Life. 

Wool— I have been living for a month at a cost of eight cents a 
day. Van Pelt— That all it cost you ? Wool— Oh no ; I paid twenty 
dollars a week; eight cents a day was what it cost my landlady. 

— Truth. 

* 

Maiden— When Frank first met me and I lived in a brownstone 
house he was very devoted. But now, how different! Friend— It 
seems to have been a case of love at first site. —Truth. 

*** 
I'm in an awful fix. I proposed to that girl last night." "Did 
" There's the trouble. 'Twas after dinner, and i 



shejiltyou? ■ ucjca wc mu«w^. 
can't remember whether she said yes or no, 



— Life. 



" They say," said Spriggins, " that it takes three generations to 
make a gentleman." '■ That," replied Wiggins, " opens up a pleasant 
prospect for your grandson." Life. 

* * 

Briggs— The thermometer in my room is ninety degrees. Griggs— 
Don't you want to borrow the one in my room ? It's only eighty-six 
degrees. Truth. 



He— She smiled when I told her that joke, 
must think she has pretty teeth. 

"Speech is silver; silence is golden." 
every day, then." 



SHE-Didshe? She 
— Life. 

' Talk is getting cheaper 
— Detroit Tribune. 



Colonel J. M. Litchfield, of 12 Post street, has for years enjoyed 
the patronage of all well dressed men in the city who insist on hav- 
ing their clothes well made. Colonel Litchfield also makes a specialty 
of all military goods and regalias, and all the army, navy and 
National Guard officers stationed here get their suits made by him. 

Lillian Bkddard coaches ladies and gentlemen for the dramatic pro- 
fession ; appearances arranged. Shakespearean Academy, 609 Hyde street. 




Lucile & Stone, formerly in the White House building, have re- 
moved temporarily to 12S Post street until their new rooms opposite 
are completed, and are selling millinery at greatly reduced prices. 

THREE AND ONE-HALF DAYS TO THE WORLD'S 
FAIR. — We take pleasure in advising the readers of the 
News Letter that the UNION PACIFIC is the most 
direct and quickest line from San Francisco and all points 
!in California to the WORLD'S FAIR. 

It is the ONLY LINE running Pullman's latest im- 
proved vestibuled Drawing-Room Sleepers and Dining 
Cars from San Francisco to Chicago without change, and only one 
change of cars to New York or Boston. 

Select Tourist Excursions via the UNION PACIFIC leave San 
Francisco every Thursday for Chicago, New York and Boston in 
charge of experienced Managers, who give their personal attention 
to the comfort of ladies and children traveling alone. 
Steamship Tickets to and from all points in Europe. 
For tickets to the World's Fair and all points east, and for Sleep- 
ing Car accommodations, call on or address D. W. Hitchcock, Gen- 
eral Agent Union Pacific System, No. 1 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. 

ZB-A-ZETIECS. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital *8,000,00(i 00 

Surplus * ni Undivided ProfltB (Jan. 1, 1893) 3,276,486 60 

WM. ALVORD, President. 

Thomas Bbown. Cashier | I. F. Moulton, 2d Assistant Cashier, 

8. Prentiss Smith, Asst. Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS * 

NEW YORE— Agency of The Bank of California. BOSTON— Treinoht 
National Bank. LONDON— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild 4 Sons. PARIS— 
Messrs. De Rothschild Freres. VIRGINIA CITY (Nev.)— Agency of The 
Bank of California. CHICAGO— Union National Bank. ST. LOOTS— Boat- 
men's Bank. AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND— Bank of New Zealand. 
C HINA, JAPAN and INDIA— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Maln, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiania, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 



Authorized Capital 
Reserve 



.{3,600,000 



Capital paid up 2,450,000 

490,000 

San Francisco Office. 424 California St. | London Office 73 Lombard St.. E. c 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. Tacoma Branch, 1166 Pacific Avenue. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank, 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San FranciBCo, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE SATHER BANKIN6 COMPANY. 

Capital 81,250.000 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1861, San Francisco. 

JAMES K.WILSON President 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, Vice-President. J. S. HUTCHINSON, Manager 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W. Sumner, Albert Miller, ^m. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, J. L. N. Shepard, James K. Wilson. 

Agents : New York — Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston — Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Atlaa National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co. Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

WELLS, FAR60 & CO.'S BANK. 

IV. E. Corner sansome and Sutter Streets. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CASH CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $6,250,000.00 

John J. Valentine President. 

HomebS. King Manager. 

H. Wads worth Cashier. 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS:} 
John J. Valentine, Lloyd Tevis, Oliver Eldridge, Leland Stanford, James 
C. Fargo, Qeo, E. Gray, W. F. Goad, Chas. F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

322 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS: 
William Alvord Jerome Lincoln 

Wm. Babcock O. D. Baldwin 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones 



H.H.Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon, 
J . B. Randol. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

SO. IS Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER.. President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Marfcet, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL SI.O00.000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. B. POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER . ...FMBIDMrr 

W. E. BROWN VlC*-PM8ID«BI. 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashiib 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893 . 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave | From June 10, 1893. I abbivk 

7-00 a Atlantic Express. Ogdea and East 7:45p 
700 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento 6:45p 

7-30 a Haywards, Niles and San Jose . . 12:15 p 

... Niles and San Jose J6:15p 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and Santa Rosa 6 :15 p 

BOO a. Sacramento & Redding, via Davis 6:45 P. 
8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Oroville, 

andRedBluff .. 4:15p 

9 00 a New Orleans Express, Los Angeles 
Deming, El Paso, New Orleans, 

and East 8:45 p 

*9:00 A Peters and Milton *8:45 p 

12:00 m Hay wards, Niles and Livermore.. 6:45 p 

*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00 p 

1:30 p Vallejo and Port Costa 12:15p 

300 pHaywards, Niles and San Jose ... 9:45 a 
4:00 p. Martinez, Stockton, Ramond (for 

Yosemite), and Fresno ... 12:15p 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 

Santa Rosa 9:45a. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Landing, 
Marysville, Oroville and Sacra- 
mento 10:15a. 

5:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 10:45a 

*5:00p. Niles and Livermore *8;46 A. 

5:30p. Lob Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfield, Santa Barbara and 

Los AngeleB 9:15a. 

5:30 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic ExpreBS, 

for Mojave and East 9 :15 a. 

6:00p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

17 :00 p. Vallejo +8 :46 p. 

7:00 p. Oregon ExDreBB. Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sound and East 8:15a 

8:00 p. Castle Crag and Dunsmuir, via 

Woodland and Willows 7:15 a. 

Santa Cruz Division (NarrowGauge). 

J7:45 a. Sunday Excursion for Newark, 
San Jose, Los Gatos, Felton and 

Santa Cruz 18:05 p. 

8:15a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 p. 

*2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *10:50a 

4:45 p. Newark, San Jose, Lob Gatos. 9:50a. 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend Streets). 
*7:00a. San Jose, Almaden and Way 

Stations *2:S0 p. 

J7-.30 a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 

Grove, Principal Way Stations 18:33 p. 
8:15 a. San Jose, TresPinoB, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) and 

principal Way Stations 6 :26 P. 

19:30 a. Palo Alto and Way Stations . . . 12:27 p. 

10:40 a. 8an Jose, and Way Stations 5:06 p. 

12:05 p. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 4:25 p. 
*2:00 p. Menlo Park, San Jose, Gilroy, Pa- 
jaro, Castroville, Del Monte, Mon- 
terey and Pacific Grove *11 -23a. 

*2:80p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove ... *10:40A. 

*3:30 p. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions *9:47A. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations *8:06a. 

5:10 p. San Jose and Way Stations.... ... 8:48a, 

6:S0p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6:35a. 

t11:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 

Stations +7:26p. 

a . for Morning . p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. fSaturdayB only. 

ISundaysonly. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m., July 5, 14, 19, 29. Aug. 
3, 13, 18, 28. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
July 5th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Santa Monica, 
Redondo, Los Angeles, and Newport, every 
fourth and fifth day, at 11 a. m. 

For ports in Mexico, July 28, August 25. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO, 

Through Link to New York, via Panama. 
Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 
SAILINGS— At NOON. 
S.S. "City of Sydney," July 24, 1893. 
S.8. "San Juan," August 3, 1893. 
S.S. "Colima," August 14, 1893. 
S. S. " San Jose," August 23, 1893. 
Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 

AND HONGKONG. 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc.: 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

S. S. "Peru," Saturday, July 22. 1893, at 3 p. M. 

S. S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, Aug. 

10, 1893, at 3 p. m. 

S. S. "City of New York," via Honolulu, Thurs- 
day, Aug. 17, 1893, at 3 P. m. 

S.S. "City of Peking," Thursday, Aug. 31, 1893 
at 3 p. m. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office — 
202 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

The splendid 8,000 
ton steamers of the 

- Oceanic Steamship Co. 

- sail for HONOLULU, 
<5, AUCKLAND and SYD- 

? NEYas under: 

For HONOLULU, 
APIA, AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY, S. S. 
"MARIPOSA," July 
22, 1893, at 2 p. M. 
For HONOLULU, 
S. 8. -AUSTRALIA," 

Aug. 2, 1898 
For passage and freight 



SVj^O.,. 




seve* 



apply to 

J. 6. SPRBCKELS & BROS. 



CO., 827 Market St. 




THE 
HOUSEHOLD 
REMEDY FOR PAIN. 

Mild, effective, contains no opium. 

Cures Neuralgia, Sciatica, La Grippe. 

Rheumatism, and all bodily pains. 
Warranted to Cure any Headache 
in io minutes. Sample and book sent 
FREE. Box containing 75 doses — 
Price 50 cts. — at druggists or by mail. 
PAINSFOE CHEMICAL CO., 87 CoU*go P1..N. Y. 

BUTTERMILK 

TOILET SOAP 

Over 1,000,000 Ladies who 
have used it pronounce it 
the Best Soap in the World 

For the Complexion. 

Excels any 25c. Soap. Ask 
your dealer for it. Full size 
sample, 12 cents. Beware 
of imitations. 

Cosmo Buttermilk Soap Co. 

64 Adams Stbsst, CHICAGO. 

ERNST H. LUDWIG, 

THE 

MODEL AMERICAN CATERER; 
1206 Sutter Street, 

Telephone 2388. SAN FRANCISCO 

Claha — Why are you so bitter against him , 

i'ast because he proposed and you refused 
dm? Maud— The wretch! He said he 
would never ask me again. — Vogue. 

" There always seem to be plenty of men 
in Briefer's office. Has he a very large prac- 
tice?" " No; a very pretty typewriter girl." 
—Truth. 

Editor— Always write your jokes on the 
thinnest paper you can get. Young Humor- 
ist— Why ? "Sol can see through them." 
— Truth. 




SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE/' 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, April 16, 1893, and 
until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave from and arrive at the San Francisco Pas- 
senger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, as 
follows: 
From San Francisco for Point Tlburon, Belvedere and 

San Rafael. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40 A.M., 9:20 A. M., 11:20 A. M.; 

1:30 p. M., 3:30 p. M.,5:05 P. M., 6:20 P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 a.m., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.; 1:30 

P. M. 3:30 P.M., 5:00 P. M., 6:20 P. M. 
From San Rafael for San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25 A. M., 7:55 A. M., 9:30 A. M. 

11:30 A. M., 1:40 P.M., 3:40 P.M., 5:05 P.M. 
SATURDAYS ONLY— An extra trip at 6:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10 a.m., 9:40 A.M., 11:10 A. M.; 1:40 

P.M. 8:40 p. m., 5:00 P M.,6:25 P. M. 
rrom Point Tiburon to San Francisco. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:50 A.M., 8:20 A. M., 9:55 A. M. ; 

11:55 a. m.; 2:05 p. m., 4:05 p. m., 5:86 p. M. 

Saturdays only, an extra trip at 6:55 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:40 A. M., 10:05 a. M., 11:35 A.M.; 

2:05 P.M., 4:05p.m., 5:30 P.M., 6:55 P.M. 



Leave S.F. 


Dbbti'tion. 


ABBIVEIH8.F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40A.M. 
3:80 P.M. 

5:05 P.M. 


8:00 a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 
5:00p.m. 


Petaluma 

and 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40a.m 
6:05 p.M 
7:30 p.M 


8:50a. m 
10:30am 
6:10p.m 






Fulton 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

Pieta, 

Hopland 

and Ukiah. 








8:66a.m. 




7:40a.m. 
3:30p.m. 


7:30p.M. 


10:30am 
6:10 pm 


















7:40a.m. 

3 :30 p.m. 


8:00a. M.| 9uerneTllle 


7:30p.m. 


10:80 am 
6:10 pm 


7:40a.m. 
5:05 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 1 Sonoma andll0:10A.M.|8:50AM. 
5:00P.M. 1 Olen Bllen.l 6:05p.m. |6:10pm. 


3:40 a.m 
7:30 p.M 


8:00a.m.I Sebaatopol. 110:40a. m|10:30a.m 
5:00 p.m.I 1 6:05p.m| 6:10p.m 



StageB connect at uanta Rosa for Mark West 
Springs; at Geyserville for SkaggB Springs, 
Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point Arena; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers, at Pieta for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyvllle, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port and Bartlett Springs; at Hopland for Lake- 
port; at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Sarato- 
ga Springs, Blue Lakes, Witter Springs, Upper 
Lake, Lakeport, Willitts, Cahto, Mendocino City, 
Port Bragg, Orr's Hot Springs, Westport, Usal, 
Hydesville and Eureka. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to 
Mondays— To Petaluma, $150; to Santa Rosa, 
$2 25; to Healdsburg, $3 40; to Cloverdale, $4 50; 
to Hopland, $5 70; to Ukiah, $6 75; to Sevastopol, 
$2 70; to Guerneville, $3 75; to Sonoma, $150; 
to Glen Ellen, $1 80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only 
—To Petaluma, si; to Santa Rosa, $1 60; to 
Healdsburg, $2 25; to Cloverdale, $3; to Ukiah, 
$4 50; to Hopland, $3 80; to Sebastopol, $180; to 
Guerneville, $2 50 ; to Sonoma, $1 ; to Glen Ellen, 
$120. 
H.C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN. 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

TICKET OFFICES at Ferry, 36 Montgomery street, 
nd 2 New Montgomery Street. ^_^_____ 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p.m. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with SteamerBfor SHANGHAI: 
Oceanic (via Honolulu), Tuesday, Aug. 1, 1893 

Gaelic Thursday, August 24, 1893. 

Belgic Thursday, Sept. 21, 1893 

Oceanic (via Honolulu)... Tuesday, Oct. 10,1893 
ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES 
Cabin Plane on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at 8. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets, San Prancisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, 
San Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO.H.RTCE. Traffic Manager. 

EPILEPSY OR FITS 

Can this disease be cured? MoBt physicians say 
No — I" say, Yes ; all forms and the worst cases. Af- 
ter 30 years study and experiment I have found the 
remedy. — Epilepsy is cured by it; cured^ not sub- 
dued by opiates— the old, treacherous, quack treats 
ment. Do not deBpair. Forget past impositions on 
your purse, past outrages on your confidence, past 
failures. Look forward, not backward. My remedy 
is of to-day. Valuable work on the subject, and 
large bottle of the remedy — sent free for trial. 
Mention Post-Offlce and Express address. 
Prof. W. H. PEEKE, F. D., 4 Cedar St., New York. 



July 22, 1393. 



SAX FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



^^^Tjdjb^^^^t^^ 



EIGHTY million dollars in bills were received at Atlanta a day 
or two ago, the mammoth packages filling five large dry-goods 
boxes and making in all more than a dray-load. None of the bills 
were current, however, as they represent " nothing in God's earth 
now and nanght in the waters below it." They were Confederate 
bills of the rarest type. The huge pile of genuine Confederate money 
was shipped from Richmond, Virginia, the former capital of the Con- 
federacy, and is now the property of Charles D. Barker, No. 90 South 
Forsyth street, Atlanta. The money is of every denomination is- 
sued by the departed nation, and in the big collection are bills of the 
rarest type. There are bills issued during every year of the war. 
Thousands of them are very valuable as relics, but the great number 
of them Mr. Barker has on hand will make them so common as to 
bring but little on the market. This $80,000,000 of Confederate money 
has been all along supposed to have been destroyed. This is undoubt- 
edly the largest lot of Confederate money in the world. 

It is related that Sir Hussey Vivian wrote to the Member for the 
Gower Division, and signed himself Hussey Vivian, having quite for- 
gotten that he was no longer a Commoner. He had clearly not prac- 
tised his hand in signing his future name like ladies are wont to do 
who are about to have the marital ring placed on their finger. Mr. 
Kandell, having heard that the Datent of nobility had been made 
out, wrote to Sir Hussey Vivian to inform him that he had no right 
to sign himself Vivian, as Swansea was his correct name. His lord- 
ship was astounded at the novelty of the situation, and wrote to 
apologize, asking to have the letter back, on which he duly erased 
himself, and for the first time in his life called himself Swansea. 

An amusing story is told of M. Charles Gervais, a great French 
cheese merchant, who recently died in Paris, full of years, honors and 
wealth. M. Gervais was a self-made man and no scholar. Last year 
he stood for some municipal post in the department of Seine- Inferi- 
eure, and, in the course of his campaign, read a speech composed for 
him by a journalist of Rouen, beginning as follows : " As a candidate 
for this important office— comma— fully understanding your wants — 
comma — I come to solicit your votes— full stop." The scribe had 
written down the stops as a guide to elocution, but poor M. Gervais 
conscientiously delivered it as a part of his speech. 

Three years ago a priest named Laporte arrived in Fau, where he 
lived in the greatest retirement. Shortly before his death, which oc- 
cured last month, he asked that a small box which he had under his 
bed should be buried with him. His request was, however, not com- 
plied with, and the box on being opened was found to be richly lined, 
and to contain the head of a woman about thirty-five years of age 
with beautiful hair. The housekeeper stated that he had been in the 
habit of locking himself in his room and contemplating for hours 
some object which is now supposed was the woman's head. 



A famous chef, M. Joseph Dugnol, formerly of the Maison Paillard, 
Chaussee d'Antin, was interviewed when in New York by an enter- 
prising press man. With all the deliberation imaginable, he wrote 
out a menu on a piece of paper, which he folded, endorsed with the 
words "The Best Bill of Fare in the World," and handed to his per- 
secutor, who hastened away to anxiously scrutinize the prize that he 
imagined he had secured. Here it is : Breakfast — Anything you like, 
and not too much of it ; change every day. Dinner— ditto. Supper- 
ditto. ^^ 

There is to be a show of centenarians in Paris. Each of the ex- 
hibits will be warranted up to the age, as there will be great care 
taken to have local authority, and also, which is much more to the 
point, to examine registration ary and documentary evidence. 
Doubtless the fatigue of the journey and the excitement will kill off 
some of them. A ;prize of 20,000 francs is to be given to the one 
who, being really 100 years old, can give the best narrative of the 
events of a century, speaking from personal knowledge and impres- 



A story is told about Ondrieck, the famous violinist. He was re- 
cently at Parma as the guest of Baron Achille Paganini, son of the 
famous violinist. The Baron was determined that M. Ondrieck 
should have an opportunity of seeing the face of Paganini, and he 
obtained from the Municipality of Parma permission to exhume the 
body. This, according to the Paris Figaro, was done on April 28th, 
and the countenance of the great violinist, preserved by embalming, 
is said to have been in a perfect state. 

Careful Preparation 
is essential to purity of foods. It is wisdom and economy to select those 
that are pure. The Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is pre- 
pared with the greatest care, and infants are assured the best. Gro- 
cers and Druggists. 




A Ruddy Glow 

on cheek 
and brow 

is evidence ~ 

that the 

body is 

getting proper nourishment. 

When this glow of health is 

absent assimilation is wrong, 

and health is letting down. 

Scott's Emulsion 

taken immediately arrests 
waste, regardless of the 
cause. Consumption must 
yield to treatment that stops 
waste and builds flesh anew. 
Almost as palatable as milk. 

Prepared by Scott & Bowne, N, T. All druggists. 




RUBBER 

HOSE. 

"GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST MADE. 
GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY, 

577-579 Market St., S. F. 
R. H. PEASE— managers— S. M. RUNYON. 



QUALITY BEST. 

PRICES LOWEST. 
NOW IS THE TIME 



CAST 
IRON 
WATER 
AND GAS 

PIPE. TO BUY. 

HUSBAND & BROOKS, 

Telephone 989. No. 4 California Street. 

[ESTABLISHED 1862.J 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE, 

J. TOMKJ.NSON, PROPBIETOB. 

Nos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna Street, between First aDd Second. 

Through to Natoma street, Nos. 64, 66 and 68. One block from the Palace 
Hotel, also carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, corner Post and 
Stockton streets, San Francisco. Telephone No. 158. 

Fine turnouts kept especially for calling. Also rockaways, buggies and 
vehicles of every description at reduced rates. 

SYLVAIN SALOMON, 

IMPORTER OF 

EUROPEAN and ORIENTAL ART GOODS. 

BEST QUALITIES OF TEAS. 218 POST ST. 

J. R. SMITH, & CO., 

Merchant Tailors, 830 Bush Street, Mills Building, formerly 
under Occidental Hotel. 

THE CORK-FACED HORSE COLLAR. 



M M 



Prevents the horse from having a sore or galled neck; is cool and elastic 
and does away entirely with sweat collars. If your local saddlery Bhop 
does not have it, send your order to MAIN «Sc WINCHESTER, 214,216, 21 
and 220 Battery street, San Francisco, Cal. Send for descriptive circular 



is tic 

?£? 

ular 

I 



24 



SA^ FBANCISCO NEWS LBTTEE. 



July 22, 1893. 



THERE has been a vigorous contest in the legislature of Con- 
necticut over the provisions of the proposed general statute 
for the regulation of electric-railway enterprises. As finally passed, 
the bill permits the paralleling of existing steam railroads, provided 
the courts can be convinced that the public interests require it in any- 
particular case, which is perhaps the wisest disposition of the matter 
that could have been made. Freight may be transported under sim- 
ilar conditions. Our own view of the matter is that the steam rail- 
road companies will ultimately find it for their interest to control all 
the profitable and well located electric lines, and will operate them 
on a coupon ticket system as feeders and distributors of their local 
passenger traffic. That this might be done in many cases, with the 
greatest possible advantage to all concerned, is obvious upon the 
most casual consideration of the matter. — Engineering Magazine. 

A way to dispose of odds and ends of silk, and one which has 
to a large extent superceded the once ubiquitous crazy-quilt, is to 
cut the silk in long strips about half an inch wide and piece them to- 
gether, "hit or miss," winding the silk in balls like worsted as it 
grows too long to be easily managed. Four pounds of these strips 
when closely woven with a heavy linen thread warp make an effect- 
ive oriental or Roman looking portiere. If there is a preponderance 
of silk of some one color, as an old silk gown, a broad plain stripe 
may be placed near the top or the bottom of the portiere with good 
effect. The weaving of these portieres is usually accomplished on 
the private loom of some old-fashioned countrj r dame, who still 
weaves her own rugs and carpets in these days when such single- 
handeJ manufacture is rare. 

Inventors arc apt to become discouraged when they are told 

that their discoveries, scientific and otherwise, have been anticipated 
some 6000 or 7000 years ago. The announcement in this connec- 
tion is that the ancient Egyptians were on nodding acquaintanceship, 
if not perfect familiarity, with the camera and its attendant sprite, 
the lens. It is stated, in all seriousness, that as the results of certain 
digging operations among the ruined temples of Upper Egypt, an 
iron box, to which was attached a suspicious looking glass object, 
was recently brought to light. Upon a closer inspection these were 
pronounced to be neither more nor less than the now familiar camera 
and lens. 

Articles made of silk should not be kept folded in white paper, 
as the chloride of lime which is f req uently nsed in bleaching the paper 
will sometimes destroy the color of the silk. Blue, brown or a glossy 
kind of a yellowish paper is the best to select for this purpose. A 
white satin dress or cloak should always be wrapped up in blue pa- 
per, with an outer covering of brown paper sewn together at the 
edges. It is never advisable to keep lengths of silk long before hav- 
ing them made into dresses, etc., as the silk is apt to cut and split 
at the folds, especially if it is thickened and stiffened by artificial 
means, as is sometimes the case with the inexpensive kinds. 

—Crushed coke is now being introduced into the eastern part 
of the United States in competition with anthracite coal for domes- 
tic use. There is much less gas and bad odors from it than from the 
hard coal. It is also being used in locomotives on the fast passenger 
trains of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad between New York and 
Washington. It will probably be used very largely in the future in 
Pittsburg, now that natural gas is becoming scarce, as its freedom 
from dirt and small amount of ash, as compared with the bitumin- 
ous coal formerly used before the days of natural gas, make it pre- 
ferable. — The Engineering Magazine. 

— A housewife whose table linen always does her good service, 
mends it with embroidery cotton of a number to correspond with the 
quality of the cloth. Under the ragged edges of the tear she bastes 
a piece of stiff paper, and makes a network of fine stitches back and 
forth over its edges, carrying the stitches about ten inches beyond 
the edges. Then places and breaks in linen may run with the flax 
or embroidery floss, and towels should be mended in the same way. 

To the World's Fair ! 

Are you going ? If so, it will be to your interest to call on or write 
to the undersigned before arranging for your trip. The SANTA FE 
ROUTE is the only line under one management from California to 
Chicago. The only line running Pullman Palace and tourist sleep- 
ing cars through to Chicago on the same train every day without 
change. Personallv conducted excursions through to Boston leave 
everv Tuesday. W. A. BISSELL, 650 Market street, "Chronicle*' 
Building, San Francisco. 

The half tone engravings, which for a long time have been a 
popular and artistic feature of the News Letter, are from the studio 
of Bolton & Strong, of 430 Pine street. The firm, which give par- 
ticular attention to this line of work, are at the head of their pro- 
fession upon the Pacific Coast. Their half-tone engravings are un- 
excelled in the West. They have far more than a local reputation, 
being widely known as excellent artists and artisans. 




TT 



BEEF 



jimii 



PRICE 50c. pint. Let those who have 
pale faces try it. It is A GREAT RES- 
TORATIVE TONIC that acts upon the 
blood immediately. 

Be Sure You Get BURNHAM'S. 
Our formula is a secret. No other is 
" just as good." All grocers sell it. 

Si* K pint bottleB expressed for S1.50. Send 
stampa for bonk—- Household Hints.*' 
E. S. BUKNHASI C0..12nGansevoortSt , N.Y. 



SLATE BURIAL VAULTS-2 



||Are recommended by every person who sees them. They are proof 
against dampness, rodents and reptiles; are portable to ship to any part 
of the country. Are cheaper than brick and can be put in place by ordinary 
workmen. Slate Is Im- 
perishable by nature, 
and has greater strength 
than any other stone. Ap- 
ply to B. F. ROBERT- 
SON, Pacific Coast Agent, 
Los Gatos, Cal. N. CLARK 
& SONS, 17 and L9 Spear 
St., San Francisco. 

Telephone 771. 




OANOER. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 



THE KOEHLER CANCER CURE CO., 708 FULTON St., S. F. 

Cancer, Tumors or malignant growths removed withouti knife or caus 

tic. A GUARANTEED CURE a specialty. Call or send for circular. Over 

300 cancers preserved in alcohol in our office. Consultation free. 

PHILIP KOEHLER, Manager. 

DR. ZEILE'S, the 
largest, oldest, best fur- 
nished and most complete in the State. Sulphur, Russian, steam and any 
kind of medicated bath for ladies and gentlemen. The largest and health- 
iest in the city. 533 to 538 Pacific Street, between Kearny and 
Montgomery. 

Dr. A. S. and Mrs. Dr. Cook, 

CANCER, TUMOR AND ECZEMA SPECIALISTS, 

OFFICE— 222 POST STREET, 

DR. THOMAS L. HILL, DENTIST, 

OFFICE— ODD FELLOWS' BUILDING), S. W. Corner Seventh and 

Market Streets. 
Officb Houes: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Consultation Hours: 4 to 5. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (Pnelan Building.) 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for pols- 
tively extracting teeth without pain. "Colton Gas" has an established: and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for Its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
In all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations In dentistry. 

DR. CHARLES W. DECKER 



MOTHERS. 



SAMARITAN POWDERS are a speedy and harmless care for 
morning sickness. One box will be sufficient to cure the most trouble- 
some case. PRICE, $2 per box. Address, 

SAMARITAN POWDER CO., 

P. O. Box 214. Oakland, Cal. 

FRANK KENNEDY, LAW-OFFICE, BOOM 66, MURPHY BUILDING 
12S6 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



July •■>->, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



<B*!r -R£PCW& 



AS intimated by us last week, the condition of tbe real estate 
market has improved with the betterment of the financial 
gi'uation in the city. The banks have not yet got back to their 
usual run of business, for in some quarters money continues to 
be as light as at'any time this year, and therefore tbe local banks 
are far more conservative than usual. It may be safely said, 
however, that within a month, at least, tbe banks should feel at 
liberty to transact business on their old Hues. There will then be 
an immediate booming tn real estate. The great majority of real 
estate sales made in this city are subject to mortgages, and it is, 
therefore, very apparent that without the aid of the banks the 
business in realty is necessarily at a stand-still. Bankers express 
opinions coinciding with tbe view of the situation set forth in 
these columns. There need be no fear whatever regarding the 
ultimate success of any real estate projects that may have been 
undertaken in this city. San Francisco realty is a safe invest- 
ment. The city is in a good condition, and while we confess that 
business is not now as br.sk as is desired, it must be remembered 
that we are only fellow-sufferers with the people of all the large 
cities of the world. Throughout the globe since last Christmas, 
and in some places from before that time, trade has not been sat- 
isfactory. We suffer far less than other places; in fact, not at 
all, in comparison with many. We are undergoing a state of 
things that is expected by all philosophers, and there is no cause 
for dismay. When the banks resume loaning, business will 
make a spurt in pace with the embettered financial condition. 

Notwithstanding the dullness in the realty market, the build- 
ing trades are kept busy. One would certainly think so who may 
pass the Exchange on Post street about the noon hour, and there 
see the crowd of artisans and contractors. A large number of 
buildings will be erected this year. Numerous contracts are now 
ready to be let, and the architects report good prospects for the 
fall. 

The corner-stone of the San Francisco Savings Union's new 
buildings on California and Webb place was Laid last Saturday 
afternoon, in a hollow in the stone the regulation copper box 
with the newspapers of the day, photographs ot the original in- 
corporators and present directors, minor coins, and blanks in use 
by tbe banks, were placed inside tbe box. There were no cere- 
monies. The handsome marble columns which will form part of 
the magnificent vestibule are now being erected. 

Among the choice bargains which are offered to the public at 
the present moment is the beautiful Pacific Heights residence of 
Mr. Alfred Bouvier, which is offered for sale on account of the 
approaching departure of Mr. and Mrs. Bouvier for Europe, 
where Mrs. Bouvier expects to remain for a lung period. The 
house is pronounced by all who have been inside of it one of the 
most thoroughly artistic and comfortable houses in the city. It 
possesses a beautiful marine view and the unique advantage of 
being surrounded with lawns on all four sides. The particulars 
are advertised in another column. 

Thomas Magee offers this week a number of choice residences 
and building lots in the Western Addition, Hayes Valley and the 
Mission, All the offerings are good property, and the prices fixed 
on them are very reasonable. 



OBITUARY. 

THE remains of M. J. Flavin were laid at rest in Holy Cross 
Cemetery on Monday last. The body was followed to the 
grave by a large number of friends, who had admired the many 
excellent qualities possessed by the deceased. The funeral pro- 
cession left the residence, 810 Lombard street, for St. Francis 
Church at nine o'clock. The pall-bearers were George Hudson, 
C. R. Loomis, Charles Eickel, George Wolf, Jeremiah Coffey, 
William Magner, J. M. Kerby and J. S. Drysdale. At the church, 
Rev. Father Conlan, assisted by Rev. Father Connolly, cele- 
brated a requiem high mass, after which the funeral procession 
wended its way to the grave. Among those who attended were 
many of the city's prominent merchants, who had been asso- 
ciated in business with Mr. Flavin during his long mercantile 
career in this city. There were many handsome floral tributes, 
and numerous other evidences of the esteem in which the 
lamented dead was held by those who had known him. 



p,i& 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS, 
BUILDING PAPERS, 
ROOFING AND PAINTS. 



PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 116 Battery St. 



F^ ESTATE 

por Sale by 

Jtyomas /T\a<5ee, 

RE/1C EST/1R POENT. 

publisher "I^eal Estate <^ir<;ular," 

flo. 20 /T\ont<2o/T\ery 5^-, °pp- Ci( * H°««<- 



Pine and Hyde, South East corner, 62 1-2x87 1-2, lot 
only; building now being removed: houses built here will rent 
well. Cable cars pass. One-half cash . 

Mission street, between Seventeenth and Eighteenth, 
23x122 1-2, and two story house of 6 rooms, bath and cel- 
lar. §6500. 

Hayes street, between Scott and Devisadero, 25x137 1-2, 
and extra lot, 25x37 1-2, suitable for stable. Hayes street 
cable cars pass. §3250. 

Cheap lots, §1300 each, 25x100; one-third cash, balance 
in one and two years: Greenwich street, between Octavia and 
Laguna. 

§1400 each: lots 25x137 1-2; Greenwich between Octa- 
via end Laguna; one-third cash, balance in cne and two years. 

Filbert St., near Fillmore, 25x137 1-2, each §1325; one- 
fourth cash. 

Fillmore St. lots near Filbert, 24x100, $2100 each; stone 
blocks down and street accepted by city. 

Shotwell St. house and lot, 23x96 1-2; six rooms; $2500. 

Mission St., near junction Valencia, 26x132; one story 
store and rear house: 



R. LIDDLE & CO., 



Formerly of No. 538 Washington Btreet, San Francisco, have removed to 
No. 110 Montgomery street, under Occidental Hotel. Sole Agents for W. 
& 0. Scott & Son, W. W. Greener, Lefever Arms Co., I. C. Smith, Parker 
Bros., Ithaca, Baker and Remington Shotguns. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



Send Three-cent Stamp for Catalogue. 



RENTS! 



Our House Renting Department is one of 
the best equipped in the city. We guarantee 
prompt and efficient service in renting 
nouses, collecting rents and placing insur- 
ance. 

BALDWIN & HAMMOND, 

10 Montgomery St. 



REALTY 



be without it. 



A HOME3EEKER3 AND INVESTORS' JOURNAL. 
Reports of everything relating to land from filty 
tjwns in Southern California. No boom articles, 
but a conservative, honest record of progress. 

Los Angeles office, 136 S. Broadway. Send $2 for 
a year's subscription, and begin with volume— out 
in July. This is the only publication of its char- 
acter. Persons interested in land caunot afford to 
Address correspondence to Edgar F. Howe, Redlands, Cal. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893. 



THE number of theatre parties observable at the Baldwin and 
at Stock well's this week show that Society is beginning to 



find its way back to town again, though for the present they are 
content to take it quietly as they rest from their labors; Tor who 
can deny that a visit to a fashionable resort during tbe height of 
the season is a matter of labor rather than the reverse However, 
July is always a trying month in the social life of San Francisco, 
and wh< n little is expected there can not be much cause for disap- 
pointment. 

It has often been a matter of openly expressed surprise among 
visiting strangers that with weather that can be depended upon 
in tbe way of no rain to spoil the affair, out-of-door parties are 
not more numerous during the summer in tbe suburbs around 
San Francisco. Wind and fug are the excuses brought forward 
against the attempt being made in the city proper, and yet in 
former years General and Mrs. McDowell were very successful in 
giving parties frequently, while they lived at Black Point. Mrs. 
Henry Wetherbee has had one or two pretty garden parties at 
her Fruitvale home. Berkeley and Sausalito have been the first 
heard from this season in that way. A very pleasant party was 
given at Sausalito last week at Mira Villa, the Misses Le Count 
and Aggie Flood doing the honors charmingly. The week before 
the grounds of the Bondrow Villa at Berkeley were the scene of a 
most successful affair. In both instances music formed a leading 
( eature of the entertainment. 

One of the most elaborate dinners of the month was given by 
Mr. Henry Crocker at his residence oa Washington street, in 
compliment to Mr. Laurie Bliss, who has come all the way from 
the East to coach the Olympic Club of the Pacific metropolis in 
the game of football. A very toothsome menu was served the 
party of a dozen stags. 

Another notable dinner was the one given in celebration of Mr. 
Louis 81098* seventieth birthday, which took place at San Rafael, 
where he and his family are spending the summer. 



The next dance at tbe Pacific Yacht Club-house at Sausalito is 
definitely named for the evening of Saturday, the 29th. Moon- 
light will add its attractions to the others promised, and a large 
attendance of guests is already a certainty. 

Miss Holbrooke has, since her return from Castle Crag, inaugu- 
rated what is to be a series of house parties at the Holbrooke 
villa at Menlo Park. Among the first to partake of her hospital- 
ity were Miss Minnie Houghton and Miss Bessie Shreve, who 
came from Pescadero to stay with her over Sunday. E. N. Bee 
was one of the beaux of the party. 



Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard Chase's wooden wedding anniversary 
was celebrated last Tuesday. 



Tuesday was the day selected for two of the weddings of the 
week — those of Miss Mae Taylor and Chas. Lipman; and of Miss 
Alice Coe and John Fallon, who were united in marriage at the 
Coe residence, on Union street, on Tuesday evening. The parlors 
were beautifully decorated for the auspicious event, the bow 
window in which the ceremony took place looking a veritable 
bower with its delicate tracery of smilax and clusters of white 
pinks, the background being filled in with ferns, palms and 
potted plants. Dr. McKenzie performed the marriage service 
which made the twain one flesh, in tbe presence of a large assem- 
blage of friends, the beautiful blonde bride being attended by 
Miss May Hoesch as maid of-honor, Frank Ames supporting the 
groom as best man. The bridal robe was of rich white corded 
silk made with a court train, and handsomely trimmed with 
point lace and orange blossoms. Later, an elaborate supper was 
served, and on Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Fallon left for Los 
Angeles, where tbe groom's fatber, Major Fallon, resides, and 
where a wedding reception will be held to-day. Their future 
home will be in San Francisco. 



The most notable out of town wedding this month was that of 
Miss Arcadia Spence, who is well known in San Francisco so- 
ciety, and Louis Arquello, which took place at Sr. Clare's Church, 
in Santa Clara, the bride's uncle, Fatber Kenna, tying the nnptial 
knot. One of San Francisco's pretty belles, Miss Ada Sullivan, 
officiated as maid of honor, Charles Fay was the groom's best 
man, an uncle of the bride gave bis fair niece into the keeping 
of the husband. A wedding breakfast followed the ceremony and 
nuptial mass, and Del Monte has been tbe scene of the happy 
pair's honeymoon. 

Jewish circles have some brilliant festivities in prospect. The 
marriage of Miss Hilda Hecht and Marcus L. Gerstle is arranged 
to take place in September, and will be on a scale of much mag- 
nificence. The ceremony, which will be performed in church, 
will be followed by a banquet and ball, according to the usual 
Jewish custom. The recently announced engagement of Miss 
Minnie Weil to Louis Hirsch gives promise of another grand 
function, when the marriage takes place in the near future. The 
marriage of Miss Agnes Curtis, daughter of ex-Supervisor Curtis, 
and Fred L. Wight will take place about the end of next month. 



It is said that there are Beveral things in the gay line under 
discussion to take place ere long. Among others, it is whis- 
pered that tbe married officers at the Presidio and their wives are 
meditating an afternoon reception, to take the form of a garden 
party, in the near future. 



The Saturday night dances at the Hotel Mateo are increasing in 
favor with the improved attendance of the men, and the first 
season of the new resort has been a most successful one. 



The mid-summer guests are commencing to arrive in large num- 
bers at Del Monte, and number among them i he Deans, Alvords, 
Murphys, Popes and Taylors, Mrs. de Santa Marina. Mrs. R. E. 
and Miss WilsoD, Mrs. and the Misses Childs; while the Parrotts, 
Paysons, Faxon Athertons, Tubbs family, including the Oysters; 
Wilcox and Longstreets; Towne's, Shaws, etc., are aunounced as 
•'coming." Mrs. and Miss Hager were very busy after their re- 
turn from AlasKa, preparing swell toilettes for the Del Monte 
campaign and in beating up recruits to join them at that delight- 
ful resort the ensuing months of late summer. The pretty young 
matron, Mrs. George Pope, has been warmly welcomed by her 
numerous friends upon her return from the prolonged bridal tour 
in Europe. 

Among the chauges at the resorts this week are those of Mr. 
and Mrs. Morgan and Miss Theresa Morgan from Santa Cruz 
to Del Monte; Miss Mae Dimond from San Rafael to Santa Cruz; 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles L Leonard from San Rafael to Castle Crag; 
Mr. and Mrs. Scbwerin from Sau Mateo to Del Monte; Mr. and 
Mrs. M. H Hecht from Del Monte to Santa Cruz. 



Mrs. George Hyde and her daughter, Miss Mamie, and Mrs. 
Bayard Smith have been visiting the Hotel Vendorae at San Jose. 
Miss Roger, who has been visiting Miss Maude Morrow at San 
Rafael, returned home yesterday. Miss Nellie Hillyer is back 
again in the city after a long visit to the Misses Upson of Sacra- 
mento. Miss Jessie Newlands has also arrived at home from a 
lengthy stay with her uncle, Frank, in Washington city. The 
Mioses Hobart will not return to the coast until September, but 
Mrs. A. J. Ralston and her daughter, Miss Claire, are looked for 
next week. 

Frank Carolan, en route North, Miss Howard, Harry Howard, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ignatz Steinhart.are among recent arrivals at Castle 
Crag. 

Mr. Colin Boyd left for a three months' absence in the East and 
Europe, last Saturday. 

Rev. W. W. and Mrs. Davis were among the East-bound passen- 
gers last Tuesday. Mr. George Brewer, late organist and choir 
master at St. Luke's Church, was also of the party who have all 
said a final adieu to California. Mrs. Frances Edgerton, who has 
been spending the summer at the parental homestead in Napa 
Valley, will spend the rest of the month of July at Corouado. 
Mr. and Mrs. Homer 3. King have been doing tbe World's Fair at 
Chicago. 

Among prospective departures are Mr. and Mrs. J. Philip Smith , 
who are to leave for the East on Monday next. The closing of 
Sunshine Villa will be a decided loss to society at Santa Cruz. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Kip and their daughters will return from 
San Mateo on the 1st of August, from their visit to the Hotel 
Mateo, and will reside during the autumn and winter at the Hotel 
Richelieu. Mrs. C. C. Catherwood, it is expected, will return to 
town next week, from her visit to Wawona. Bishop and Mrs. 
Nichols and their young family, who are enjoying camp life in 
Santa Cruz county, will also return to town in a few days. 



Jim Phelan and George Duval arrived from the East on Sunday 
last. Dr. and Mrs. McLean have returned from their trip across 
the continent. Miss Goewy is back home from her visit to Chi- 
cago, as well as Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Hallidie, who have also been 
doing the Columbian Exhibition. Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Spreckels 
have returned from Coronado. Mrs. Fred Castle and her daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Lyman and Miss Lottie Clarke have arrived from Santa 
Craz. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Belden, who have just returned 
from tht ir trip to Japan, will spend August at the Del Monte, and 
among others who will be there for the » shoot" of the Country 
Club are the Misses Upson, of Sacramento, and Mr. and Mrs. 
H M. A. Miller. 



Harry SUtson is enjoying himself very thoroughly the other 
side of the Rocky Mountains, bis trip East being one for pleasure 
merely. So also is Joe Grant, who is making a tour of the prin 
cipal Eastern watering places. Among those who were in New 
York early in the week were Tom Dargie and the Misses Alice 
and Ella Hobart. Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Hecht and family are at 
Long Branch. 



July 22, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



-Although not a society event, strictly speaking, the reception 
to Vice President Stevenson and party will have to be classed as 
among the leading social affairs of the week. The committee in 
charge did their work con amort, and well sustained our reputa- 
tion for generous hospitality. As he drank to tbe greater pros- 
perity of this city and this State, in flowing bumpers of Louis 
Roederer, the Vice President said he bad never before been so 
graciously entertained. So say all distinguished guests who visit 
us, for they are always given tbe best of everything that is apt to 
please, not tbe least among which is sparkling Roederer. 



It is said marriage is imminent between George Crocker and 
the beautiful widow, Mrs. Aleck Rutherford. 



Mr. Fred Hotaling has just returned from a pleasant sojourn 
at Santa Crnz. He will leave in a few days for Butte City, en 
route to the World's Fair. 



Mr. and Mrs. Geo. A. Crnx will pass the summer months be- 
tween their 8an Francisco home and their house-boat at Belve- 
dere. Mrs. Crux will receive her friends on Saturdays on board 
The Chimzic, until the end of October. 



David Gray, of Buffalo, N. Y., the author of the libretto of the 
opera, The Sphinx, is the guest of Dr. G. J. Bucknall. He will 
leave for home next Wednesday. 



The two daughters of Mrs. John Vance Cheney, out of forty-six 
clubs competing at Chicago, took the prize for piano-forte playing. 



Mr. and Mrs. Emil Kehrlein are guests of the latter's uncle, Sir 
Toussaint Da Fresne, in Canada. 



Mrs. W. H. Keith and Miss Eliza D. Keith, of this city, are 
now in Cleveland, Ohio, having spent a month in New York, Bos- 
ton, Philadelphia and Washington. They will spend some time 
in Chicago, at the World's Fair, on their way home. 



The El Monte Hotel, at Sausalito, continues to be the favorite 
summer resort. It has its usual large number of visitors, all of 
whom are enjoying themselves immensely. The El Monte is the 
most beautifully situated and most popular place within easy 
reach of the city. It is only half an hour from this city, and can 
be visited half a dozen times a day, upon any of the steamer 
trips. It affords unexampled opportunities for fishing, boating, 
hunting, riding and other sports. 



The doctors recommend, for indigestion, after dinner chewing for 
half an hour Adams' Tutti Frutti Pepsin Chewing Gum. 

WHEN about to depart for the country, be sure to secure for 
yourselt a full supply of the latest fashionable stationery 
from Sanborn, Vail & Co., of 741-743 Market street. This house 
makes a specialty t.f fine stationery, and the paper, envelopes and 
writing materials it offers cannot be excelled anywhere in the 
city. 

WHY all this debate about the silver question ? Has not the 
Chamber of Commerce adopted resolutions stating its opinion 
on the silver question ? Let there then be peace. The country 
is saved. 



ETCHING: IMAGE^-L. Cleveland in Slwrt Stories. 



Ruffles and puffs and frills, 

Flounces and furbelows; 
Frocks in a flurry of lace, 

That's where the money goes! 
Berthas and gigot sleeves 

Hoops and the Empire waist — 
These are the things they wear, 

This is their simple taste. 

Blue eyes and brown and black 

Curls and a dimpled cbin, 
Blushes to shame the rose, 

That's where the rouge comes inl 
Glances and smiles and sighs, 

Hints of a breaking heart! 
These are the tricks they try, 

This is their naughty art. 

Summer and bloom and song, 

Mischief is everywhere. 
Go, little rhyme, abroad, 

Bid the poor lads beware. 
Curls and a dimpled chin, 

Ruffles and puffs and frills, 
Only to catch a man, 

Someone to pay the bills I 



Foa Wkddino Cakes, Charlotte russe, Ice Cream, flue Cakes and 
Pastry, go to Page & Palch's Restaurant and Bakery, corner Mason and 
Turk streets, junotion of Market. 



D*PRICE'S 




Baking 
Powder 



The only Pare Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia; No Alum 
Used in Millions of Homes — 4.0 years the Standard 

ETCHING: THE IMAGE.— By L. Cleveland. 

AN image haa been sent to \he convent. The Superior haa given 
orders that Sister Felice shall unwrap it and place it in the 
chapel. The Count Br6da di Tagliono has graciously bestowed it 
upon the Order, with a good roll of louts d'ors and a smile at the 
wicket-gate. The image is large, and must be unwrapped in the 
convent garden. Sister Felice is on her knees before the huge 
box, which the old porter haa rolled down the garden path with 
a kick and a grumble, and a "K viene un po di bene!" glancing at 
the dark figure among the golden bloom of the orange trees. The 
fruit hangs in rich clusters, like huge globed giant wedding rings. 
The little banksia roses blush deep, and the nigbtingalea sing. 

Now the wrappers are unbound. Siater FSIice will carry the 
image into the chapel, take off the last covering at the altar rail, 
lest any speck of dust or a mote in the sunbeam should cloud the 
figure. 

The cbapel is in a golden radiance from the high emblazoned 
windows of yellow glass. The light is deep and burning, like 
the bloom of the wedding-circlets on the orange treea. There is 
a breath of incense lingering, for mass was to-day. The night- 
ingales are shaking the pulses of the sunbeams with their full 
love-heart of song. 

Sister Felice kneels before the altar rail. Slowly and with 
much devotion she has drawn off the last wrapper around the 
tall image. It la a knight in complete panoply of mail. 

But why does the Sister F6!ice shiver so suddenly and bow 
down, like the reeds in the garden stream under a tempest of 
tears, until the iron heart rests upon her own? 

The sharp voice of the Superior is at her elbow : <• Sister Felice, 
what makes you so long putting the image of St. George in its 
proper place!" 

THERE bas been a kind of •* merry war" in progress during the 
last few daya between France and Siam, and as so frequently in 
modern times, French politics have furnished again material 
splendidly adapted for » opera bouffe." Firat, the world heard 
of martial preparations on the part of France to annex Siam, 
then came a showy demonstration before Bangkok, then a bom- 
bardment of Siamese forts in which, as a recent cablegram states, 
" not even the sun-roofs" of the fort guns of the enemy were 
damaged, and finally a kind of apology on the part of the French 
Government advising the King of Siam tbat the French com- 
manders did not know what they were doing, and that, so to say, 
no barm was meant. In other words, the whole affair resembled 
a French duel on a large scale. The mountains were in labor 
and a petty little mouse was born! 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Virginia and Gold Hill Water Company, 
The annual meeting of fie stockholders of the Virginia and Gold Hill 
Water Company for the election of trustees Lo 6erve for the ensung year, 
and for the transaction of such other business as may be regularly brought 
bef( re the meeting, will be held at the office of the company, room 25, Ne- 
vada Block, 3.9 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Ihursday, the 27th ( av ot July, 1893, at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M. 
San Francisco, July 10, 1893. W. W. STETSON, Secretary. 



FOR SALE. 



A RARE BARGAIN 

ArtC Ofin T ^ e beautiful Pacific Heights residence of Mr. Alfred 
<X> jl.Q,\J\J\J Bouvi^r, 2524 Broadway, near Scott, is offered for sale in 
consequence of the owner's approaching departure for Europe, House of 
13 rooms, of which six are bed rooms and two servants' roims, and in addi- 
tion there are bath room, laundry, store rooms, studio, etc Thoroughly 
and completely finished, and in absolutely perfect repair. Lot 50x100. 
House surrounded by lawns on all sides. Marine view that never can be 
imperiled A rare opportunity to secure a comfortable and artistic home. 
House will be shown by appointment only . Will be sold on very easy terms. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., 

AGENTS. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1893. 



THE NECESSITY OF IRRIGATION. 



A CIRCULAR from the publication Committee of the Interna- 
tional Irrigation Congress calls attention to the extraordi- 
nary value of Irrigation to all lands which are now tilled under a 
deficient rainfall. The recent, drought reports from Western Kan- 
sas bring into strong contrast the uniform Buccess of farming, 
both in grains and fruits, which id met with in California, Utah, 
Colorado and other States. 

The Irrigation Congress which meets in Los Angeles October 
10th to 15th will be a notable gathering of prominent irrigators, 
engineers and bond investors, and very much valuable informa- 
tion to owners of arid lands will result from this Congress. The 
programme is now in the hands of the Executive Committee, of 
which ex-Governor Thomas of Utab is chairman, and it will em- 
brace such leading topics as irrigation, engineering, State laws 
affecting irrigation, national legislation on irrigation, effects of 
irrigation on horticulture and agriculture, irrigation bdnds as an in- 
vestment, irrigation machinery and appliances, and other topics. 

A handsome book on irrigation is also being prepared to be 
issued about August 10th, which will be sent to all interested 
parties who will send four cents in postage stamps for it. Par- 
ticulars about the Congress can be obtained from C. D. Willard, 
Secretary, 137 South Main street, Los Angeles. The interest 
which the Department of State at Washington is taking in the 
forthcoming Congress is well shown by a circular letter which 
Secretary Gresham has addressed to all the diplomatic officers of 
the United States Government, calling attention to the impor- 
tance of the Convention, and instructing them to notify the gov- 
ernments to which they are accredited of the Congress, and re- 
quest their cooperation through delegates. The Department of 
the Interior will be represented at the proposed meeting by an 
officer detailed by the Secretary of that department, for the pur- 
pose of giving such information as may be desired concerning the 
results obtained by the surveys which have been carried on for 
several years under the auspices of the General Government. The 
Congress will probably be attended by a thousand delegates, com- 
ing from all the States of this Union where irrigation is prac- 
ticed, and from foreign countries more or less directly interested 
in the subject. It promises, moreover, to be an important con- 
vention of persons actively interested in the development of the 
western half of the United States by means of irrigation. The 
matters to be discussed are of immediate practical interest to the 
nation and to the officers of the government having to do with 
the public lands and with scientific researches pertaining to the 
soils and waters of arid regions. Hence the exchange of ideas 
of writers on irrigation and others having practical experience 
with reference to irrigation problems cannot but prove highly 
beneficial to this most important interest, not only to our own 
country, but to all others where irrigation is practiced even to a 
limited extent. 

CONFESSED.— Vogue. 

My love is on the sunny seas 

With scarlet pennant waving; 
Like foam she flies before the breeze, 

Yon wave-battalions braving. 
Oh,. she has Deither face nor feet, 

And yet is fair and nimble; 
No heart-throbs in her bosom beat, 

And yet of joy the symbol. 

My love is on the starlit seas, 

And in her arms I'm rocking; 
She loves me not, yet, if you please, 

My passion is quite shocking. 
But all goes well — I'll tell you why: 

(I might have told you sooner) — 
A yacht club bachelor am I, 

My love's a sloop-rigged schooner! 

The picnic trains of the California Railway, which run to Laundry 
Farm are crowded every pleasant day with happy children and their 
parents, friends and acquaintances, all eager for an outing at this 
beautiful spot. The trains connect at Fruitvale with the hourly 
boats from this city by the Oakland broad gauge. The round trip 
fare is only fifty cents. Laundry Farm is a most delightful place, 
and a visit to it will prove very enjoyable. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

New Basil Consolidated Gravel Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Placer county, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Thirteenth day of July, 1893, an assessment (No 23) of & cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately In United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
The 21st Day of August, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 11th day of September, 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F.X.SIMON, Secretary. 

Office— 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Exchequer Mining Company. 

Location of Principal place of business — San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Twenty seventh day of June, 1893, an assessment (No. 36) of ten (10) 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporatiou, payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this asses&meut shall remain unpaid on 
The 1st day of / ugust. 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction: and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the twenty-ninth day of August, 
1893, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Hale & Noreross Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held on 
the Twenty-first day of June, 1893, an assessment (No. 1041 of 50 cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
pany, at the office of the Company, room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 25th Day of July, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 18th day of August, 1893, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Bo&rd of Trustees. 

A. B. THOMPSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the Twentieth day of June 1893, an assessment (No. 81) of 25 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-fifth Day of July. 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 14th day of August, 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the llth day of July, 1893, an assessment (No. 38) of Twenty-five 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery streets, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the Fifteenth (15th) Day of f ugust, 1893, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the fifth day of September, 1893, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E ELLIOTT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francis- 
co, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place ot business -San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the heventeenth day of Julv, 1893, an assessment, No. 48, of Twenty-five 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the of- 
fice of the company, room 79, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Twenty-second Day of August, 1893. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 12lh day of September, 1893, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada block. No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No 18 

Amount per Share .... 10 cents 

Levied June22,1893 

Delinquent in Office July26, 1893 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock Aug. 17, 1893 

A. K. DUKBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



Pri ee p*r Copy, lO Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4,00. 








jTflU 




Vol. xlvh 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY JULY 29, 1893. 



Number 4. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fbedeeick 
Marriott, Flood Building, Fourth and Market Streets, San Fran. 
Cisco. Entered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



ON AUGUST 1st., 

The office of the S. F. NEWS 
LETTER will be moved to 006 Merchant 
Street, above Montgomery. 



THE office of the News Lettee in New York City has been 
removed to the Evening Post Building, 204-206 Broadway, 
Room 1, where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
cription and advertising rates. C. C. Murphy, manager. 



THE great mass meeting of Wednesday night, in aid of the Mid- 
winter Fair, is already bearing good fruit. Subscriptions are 
coming in rapidly, and many more are needed. Send in your 
money at once. 

FOR the information of sportsmen and the general public, the 
Fish and Game Commissioners, as soon as possible, should 
have published a complete list of the State and County game 
laws. The laws are now so many and so various that the best- 
intentioned sportsman is apt to find himself in jail at any remote 
Country for infringing its dignity by breaking its law. 



THE officers and crew of the British ship Cedarbank, which ar- 
rived in this citv on Thursday, deserve the greatest praise for 
the manner in which they unflinchingly performed their duty, 
stuck to their ship, and brought her into port, after fighting the 
fire raging In her four thousand tons of coal since June 20th. It 
was a frightful tale of the sea they told. Their work amounted 
to heroism. 



JUDGE HORNBLOWER says it is customary for notaries pub- 
lic to acknowledge signatures of people who never appear be- 
fore them. If they know the signature, or think they do, it is 
all right, and they affix their seal, and statement that the person 
mentioned ••personally appeared" before them. If this be the 
custom of notaries, it is about time Governor Markham knew of 
it. A few vacancies in the ranks of these officials might have a 
good effect. 

THE scene in the House of Commons on Thursday was the most 
disgraceful the chamber has witnessed for many a long day. 
The clashing of the contending factions mast have roused the 
echoes around Parnell's tomb. It was a good indication of what 
may be expected when Ireland gets that much-demanded Parlia- 
ment of her own. Donnybrook Fair will then become a byword 
in comparison. Dr. Tanner, who was so cruelly prevented from 
engaging In the row Thursday, will then have ample opportunity 
to make the hair fly. 



THE condition of the Modesto irrigation d strict, as depicted by 
the land-owners, ought to be sufficient evidence that the Fed- 
eral Government is the proper party to handle such important in- 
terests. What is known as the Wright irrigation law was passed 
by the Legislature of 1887. Since that time it has been changed 
by judicial construction and legislative enactment to meet every 
technical requirement of the capitalists and the people, and dur- 
ing the five years of its existence there has not been one drop of 
water turned upon the soil through its operations, except in two 
small districts in the southern part of the State. What it controls 
otherwise has been acquired by purchase. The land-owners in 
the Modesto district, which was organized under this law in 1888, 
aside from a bonded indebtedness of $600,000, have been paying 
taxes annually for four years, and they see no immediate bene- 
fit. The $600,000 has been practically expended, and the bonds 
are a lien upon the real estate of the district. In summing up the 
expense up to the present time, they find that the land is taxed 
to the full amount of its value; tbey also find that the dam 
and ditches remain in a half completed state. They estimate that 
it will require fully $500,000 to finish the construction of the dam 
and main canal, and tbey say that the whole scheme will have to 
be abandoned, in which case the bondholder's will either be com- 
pelled to finish the work or close in on the farmers. 



THE San Francisco Bold Gazelle has appeared in new form, 
with a handsome cover, and presents a very neat appearance. 

THE Examining Beard appointed under the provisions of the 
bill passed at the last session of the Legislature regarding di- 
plomas of veterinary surgeons, have effected good work so far. 
They granted certificates to practice to a number of gentlemen 
who appeared before them, and now they are pushing the non- 
graduates of reputable colleges to the wall. After December 26th 
next no person will be allowed to practice veterinary surgery or 
medicine in this State without a certificate from the State Board. 
That gives everybody plenty of time to prepare himself for an ex- 
amination. Then let the quacks be named and driven out of 
town to practice their jobs on old country nags. 

WHAT is "news?" There seems to be a great diversity of 
opinion among " newspaper men" upon this point. One 
"newspaper," for instance, published a twelveline account of 
the funeral of Watts (the Gatherer brute), in which it was said 
that not one of the dead man's fellow workmen was present, and 
not a single flower was sent. Another "newspaper" published a 
picture of the dead man's coffin literally covered with flowers, 
and described one of his fellow workmen as being hysterical with 
grief. According to present "newspaper" practices, we feel in- 
clined to define "news" as being a full account of that which 
never happened, and a solemn silence in regard to that which did 
happen. 

THE temperance lecturers should secure copies of the recent 
report to the Supervisors, of Chief of Police Crowley, and dis- 
tribute them as tracts. The Chief says his men made 26,982 ar- 
rests during the fiscal year euded June 30th last. Of these arrests, 
14,000 were for drunkenness. This does not mean that that 
number of individuals was arrested for inebriety, for there are 
many hopeless cases who are taken in repeatedly by the police 
in the course of a year. The statement, however, proves beyond 
the question of a doubt the direct connection of drunkenness 
with crime. It is a stronger argument in favor of temperance 
than would be any of the eloquent speeches of the many ex- 
horters. 



SO at last a man has been found in Congress, it seems, who 
thinks an investigation into the Post-office site job would be 
productive of great results. That has been the opinion of the 
people of this city ever since they heard of the nasty affair. The 
Nemesis of Messrs. Irish, Masten and Bryan says that if the 
manner of the purchase of the Eighth street bog is ever thor- 
oughly exposed, one of the biggest scandals of the century in 
connection with a public building will be developed. We believe 
him, and we trust he will go to the bottom of the bog and expose 
all its rottenness. One Commissioner, Masten, will not be much 
chagrined by a sensation, for he is just now on the very thick of 
one, which, in its way, is just as scandalous as the other could 
ever be. 

THE pension question has been agitated of late through the 
operations of the new administration in striking from the roll 
a number who have been enjoying the luxury of a few dollars 
monthly from the government. It is a dangerous piece of busi- 
ness to commence pruning that branch of the service. A man 
who has been placed upon the pension roll through fraud and de- 
ception will kick harder than one who has a deserving and honest 
hold upon the Federal treasury. There are, no doubt, thousands 
who are now d:awing pensions who have no right to, under the 
law, but to reach them without doing an injustice to those who 
deserve the distinction, is not an easy job. It does seem very 
strange that up to the first day of the current year additions have 
been made to the pension roll monthly, and that, after thirty 
years, there seems to be a larger number of maimed and depend- 
ents than after twenty years. It suggests that service in the army 
Is a great promoter of longevity, and that the Grand Army of the 
Republic need have no fears of being disseminated in its ranks to 
any large extent during the present century. It is true that every 
soldier who suffered physically or mentally in the service of the 
Union is entitled to its aid and support, but there are those who 
gained new life through physical endurance, and came from the 
conflict better men who are on the pension rolls to-day, and 
shame, if nothing else, should have deterred them from employ- 
ing the means tbey did to get there. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29. 1893. 



A SWELLED-HEADED EX-PRESIDENT. 

THAT ex-President Harrison is a thort-range, small-caliber man 
— a politician rather tban a statesman — is a generally recog- 
nized fact; but aDy compelent observer who doubts the truth of 
that estin ate of his intellectual standard can readily be convinced 
by a reference to the statement in regard to the present business 
crisis which was put forth in his name in last Sunday's New York 
World. The ex-President sees in all this financial, industrial and 
commercial disturbance nothing but the logical result of hia own 
defeat. He says that by this political result "The enormous 
manufacturing interests were, of course, duly impressed, and 
business has been compelled to suit itself to the condition to 
which the Chicago platform would logically lead * " * fact- 
tories stop, workshops close, and prices shrink." The ex-Presi- 
dent does not seem to have kept himself in touch with the pro- 
gress of events. He does not seem to be informed of the fact that 
prices generally have been steadily shrinking since the passage 
of the McKinley bill in 1890; that workshops have been closing, 
factories stopping, and wages going down since that time. He 
does not seem to be aware of the fact that we are suffering in 
part from a wave of business depression which is sweeping over 
the world, or to know that these waves of depression are peri- 
odical phenomena, of which no man knows the origin, and which 
do not seem to be amenable to the ordinary laws of commerce. 
He does not seem to have grasped the fact that not a single fac- 
tory has stopped or a workshop been closed because of the anti- 
cipated effect of any contemplated tariff legislation. He does not 
seem to have learned that there is not a single hitherto prosper- 
ous protected industry, within the length and breadth of the 
land, to which he or any other person can point, which has, so 
far, curtailed its product or gone out of business because of any 
expected reduction in the tariff schedules by which it is affected. 
He does not seem to know, judging by the utterance which is 
here under consideration, anything explicit or clear, except that 
he was defeated last November, and that now we have a financial 
crisis and a commercial depression; and, in the narrowness of his 
egotism, he ascribes this business condition to bis defeat. 

But in reaching this opinion the ex-President has followed a 
hop, skip and jump mental process rather than the dictates of a 
logical habit of mind. It would be far more rational and logical 
(though not absolutely true) to say that the present disturbed 
condition of business and finance is the result ot the policy which 
was pursued during the four years in which he exercised the 
Presidential powers rather than of the policy which may be fol- 
lowed during the three years and seven months that are to come. 
It is certain that when be took office he found the treasury burst- 
ing with a surplus of revenue, the financial condition of the 
country healthy, and business interests of all kinds prosperous; 
but, on the other hand, when he surrendered his official station, 
the treasury bad been for months in the gravest difficulties, 
financial distrast existed on all sides, and business interests were 
languishing. As a matter of fact, however, it would not be in 
keeping with a truthful and intelligent comprehension of the 
situation to charge the present condition as a result solely of the 
policy followed during ex- President Harrison's administration of 
the public affairs. It is the result of an unaccountable wave of 
business depression acting upon an artificially based industrial 
organization (which aims to make every man pay more for that 
which he uses than the laws of trade demand) and a false system 
of finance. 

As Colonel Ingersol, who is a close observer and in touch with 
commercial and industrial life in the great Eastern centres of 
population, says: 

"This is a banker's panic. The bankers have been predicting a 
panic for years, and have done all they could to fulfill their predic- 
tion." 

Of the means employed to foster and promote it, a sample may 
be found in this incident, which is taken from the Philadelphia 
Times : 

"It is stated, on apparently reliable authority, that a number of 
banks in New York made large loans on Thursday last to specula- 
tors, on condition that the money should not be drawn out. What 
the speculators wanted was to tie up money and make it impossible 
to get it on the best security. The banks were safe in lending down 
to the full extent of their means when the money was not to be 
drawn ; but it was an exhibition of greed at the cost of a plain duty 
to the business public. Money commanded as high as seventy per 
cent in New "iork at one time on Thursday, simply because no 
money could be had even with Government bonds as collateral." 

This seems to indicate that "the conservative portion of the 
country," which, ex- President Harrison says, "stands aghast at 
the possibilities of legislation," is taking curiouB methods of 
"trimming sails to suit the weather." We fear that the ex- 
President is inebriated with self-sufficiency. 



FOR Patrick Leonard, the brute who assaulted and nearly mur- 
dered his old father, and then gloated over the latter's misery, 
the statute books contain no fitting punishment. Imprisonment 
would be luxury for him; a flogging would hardly crease his 
tough hide. It would be a good idea to roll him down Telegraph 
Hill in a barrel filled with sharp, projecting nails. 



ENGLAND AND THE FRANCO-SIAMESE CONFLICT. 



THOSE of our contemporaries which cater for the Irish applause 
rarely miss an opportunity of attacking England and of mis- 
representing her people whenever they hear of any real or possi- 
ble conflict between that country aDd any other nation. It is not 
astonishing, therefore, to people conversant with journalism in our 
country, to find Great Britain once more the aim of vituperation 
proceeding from a certain class of American journals, but it must 
be puzzling to foreigners to read in papers printed in the English 
language such aspersions as have been recently directed against 
Great Britain, simply because her people claim the right of pro- 
tecting British interests in Asia. England is called " dog in the 
manger," or "greedy Albion," simply because the English pro- 
test against the aggressive and overbearing attitude of France 
toward Siam, but the American papers that attack England either 
forget the fact, or are ignorant of it, that all that exists in Asia of 
modern civilization is due to British enterprise; that India has 
not suffered but prospered by British rule, while the other Asiatic 
countries in the hands of Europeans are in a worse condition 
than they were under native rule. As far as Siam is concerned, 
the diplomat to whom the honor is due of having opened up the 
country to Europeans was an Englishman, Sir J. Bowring, 
who secured the treaty with Siam granting great privileges to Eu- 
ropeans, permitting them to boy or rent bouses and to lease land, 
fixing the import and exportation duties, and introducing many 
other improvements of modern civilization. The first Europeans 
establishing connections with Siam were the Portuguese, in 1511, 
but their influence left few traces. They were supplanted in 
the seventeenth century by the Dutch; but their accomplish- 
ments were still more evanescent, and it was not until Crawford, 
Burney, Sir J. Brooke, and above all, the gentleman above men- 
tioned. Sir J. Bowring, had been sent to the country, that Eu- 
ropeans obtained a firm hold in Siam and established valuable 
commercial relations on an amicable basis. England's trade with 
Siam at this moment annually amounts to $13,000,000, as com- 
pared with $40,000 engaged in the trade with France, and it is 
stated that 13,500 Englishmen are employed in the commerce 
with Siam, as compared with 250 Frenchmen. Why, therefore, 
should Great Britain remain unconcerned when the annexation 
of the country by France is threatened? Moreover, the northern 
portion of exactly that part of Siam which France tries to capture 
is situated between Tonquin and the British province of Bur- 
man. It therefore prevents the direct contact of the colonies of 
two great powers whose commercial interests are often antago- 
nistic. Would it not be better for the peace of the world if such 
direct contact could be prevented? It is to be sincerely hoped 
that a war between England and France can be avoided over the 
threatened annexation of Siam, but if it should break out, it is 
not likely that the greatest naval power on earth, and a country 
which has no equal as far as colonial enterprise is concerned, 
would be defeated. One cf our contemporaries last Tuesday, in 
an editorial, made the remarkable statement that in case of war 
between France and England, " within a month of the declara- 
tion of war the bulk of the British mercantile marine would be 
destroyed," and that " even if the British navy defeated the 
French warships in every battle, there would be cruisers enough 
to turn the scale of advantage against British manufacturers in 
every market." Why should this be the case, and why should 
not France be the country to suffer, which cannot compare with 
Great Britain as a naval power? With the writer of the above 
prophecies the wish seems to be the father of the thought, bat why 
such a wish should animate persons of British descent, and 
united by the bond of language with the Anglo-Saxon mother 
country, is equally difficult to comprehend, unless the expres- 
sions emanate from a pen guided by Hibernian subscribers. It 
is sincerely to be hoped that a conflict between France and Eng- 
land may be avoided, but if such a conflict should arise, England 
in the present question has the sympathies of nearly the whole 
civilized world. 



A WASHINGTON dispatch states that the authorities have 
received from Captain Ludlow, of the Mohican, the report of 
his transactions in northern waters while on sealing duty. We 
are curious to know whether Ludlow incorporated in his report 
any statement of his cruel and inhuman treatment of Captain 
Foley and the crew of the wrecked Sea Ranger. The Sea Ranger 
was wrecked at Kyak Island, and at Sitka Ludlow refused to 
supply Captain Foley and his men with any of the necessaries of 
life unless they first paid for them. As all their possessions had 
gone to the bottom of the sea with their vessel, the stranded sail* 
ors were of course unable to comply with this demand, and this 
American officer therefore turned them adrift. Ludlow refused 
to give them even a biscuit without a quid pro quo. Foley said 
he would throw a biscuit to a starving dog, but Ludlow was differ- 
ent; be wouldn't. Such inhuman treatment of shipwrecked 
mariners deserves the severest condemnation, and we trust that 
Captain Foley's complaint will receive at Washington the atten- 
tion that is warranted by the heinonsness of the offense charged 
against Ludlow. 



July 29, 1893. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THEY ARE FALLING INTO LINE. 



WHEN a fngitive steamer from the Hawaiian Islands brought 
to this city, in January last, notice of the fact that a cabal 
of foreign residents of Honolulu (mostly American citizens or the 
descendants of American missionaries) had arisen in revolt against 
the established government of the country, and, with the ap- 
proval of the United States Minister and the armed support of 
the United States warship Boston, had deposed the reigning sov- 
ereign and established an oligarchy which was solicitous of an- 
nexation to this country, honest men who had an intelligent com- 
prehension of the great principles which underly our government 
were almost stricken dumb with amazement. The scheme was 
such a flagrant invasion of the liberties and natural political 
rights of the Hawaiian people, and the participation of the United 
States Government, through its agents and representatives, in the 
crime against the political privileges of the Kanakas was so ap- 
parent, that it seemed as though we were about to stultify our 
traditions by denying to others those rights of governmental 
selection and freedom which we have always claimed were an in- 
herent human inheritance, and to engage in an underhand pro- 
ject of territorial aggrandisement in which the national existence 
of a weaker race was to be trampled under foot. Strange to say, 
too, the newspaper press of the country, with a few honorable 
exceptions, enthusiastically and ignorantly endorsed this annex- 
ation conspiracy. In San Francisco, the News Lettek was the 
only paper which immediately recognized and antagonized the 
shameful character of the political pillage of the Kanakas which 
was involved in the proposed annexation (conquest would be the 
more literal term) as a result of a " revolution" in which our 
sailors formed the principal part of the " revolutionists." As 
time passes over, however, we are g adually being joined in our 
demand for the maintenance of a decent respect for American 
traditions by our contemporaries. There is the Examiner, for in- 
stance, which, for a couple of months after the arrival of the 
Claudine in the harbor, kept up a continuous howl for annexa- 
tion. Of late it has changed its tune, and on Sunday last pub- 
lished these remarks: 

We do a good many queer things in this country, but not things of 
that kind. When we want more territory we buy it, or take it by 
the vote of the people who inhabit it. We do not first covet our 
neighbor's land and then steal it. 

The fact that these observations are of a long range character, 
and refer to the Franco-British position toward Siam, does not 
impair their value as an abstract statement of the truth, and as 
an argument against the proposed annexation (through the in- 
vasion of the Boston's sailors) of Hawaii. 

The Chronicle, too, has been a champion of annexation, yet on 
Sunday last it published this pointed criticism on the position of 
some of the great powers toward the Siamese imbroglio: 

In this controversy and all these combinations, nobody seems to 
pay any attention to the wishes of the Siamese any more than to 
their rights. Siam is only the bone over which the fierce and hungry 
dogs are snapping and snarling. It is strange that in this advanced 
age of the world, and in view of all the sermons preached and books 
written on national rights, three civilized nations should go to work 
deliberately to denationalize a country like Siam, but such is the 
scheme, no doubt, which actuates France, England and Russia. 

This, also, is a clear and logical statement of abstract truth 
which may be paraphrased and applied to the Hawaiian situation 
thus: " It is strange that in this advanced age of the world, and 
in views of all the sermons preached and books written on na- 
tional rights, one civilized nation should go to work deliberately 
to denationalize a country like Hawaii." 

The recantation of the Bulletin and Call may be looked for 
daily. Just at present they are so busily engaged in thanking 
the Lord that they are not as other papers are (publicans and sin- 
ners), that they have not been able to realize that, in the face of 
Franco-British schemes of territorial aggrandizement in Siam, they 
have lost their desire for an American conquest of the peaceful, 
kindly, and weak Kanakas. In due time, however, they will 
turn from this engrossing contemplation of their own excellencies, 
and then they will fall into line in the procession which the News 
Letter has led toward the preservation of American traditions 
and American honor. 

BY the appointment of George C. Perkins to the vacancy in the 
United 8tates Senate created by the recent death of Senator 
Stanford, Governor Markham has chosen a good and strong man 
to represent California in the upper house of Congress. Senator 
Perkins has had a public career in this State that is well known 
to the people. He made a good Governor, and will make a good 
Senator. He is a conservative man, who, by the nature of his 
shipping business, has become intimately acquainted with all 
sections of the State, and he knows our needs and what measures 
are necessary to relieve them. Above all, he is a man of high 
character, who fully appreciates the great responsibility of bis 
office. We look for good reports of the work of Senator Perkins. 

A "POET" has broken loose in San Jose, and is running riot in 
the editorial columns of the Mercury of that place. He should 
be Instantly snppressed, if San Jose would retain its reputation 
as a peaceable community. 



THE MIDWINTER FAIR. 



THE great mass meeting in aid of tbe Midwinter Fair, held in 
Metropolitan Hall last Wednesday evening, gave the stamp 
of public approval to the grand project. No longer should any 
doubt exist regarding the certainty of the success of the under- 
taking. The people are unanimously in favor of the project; 
they are for the fair in a body, and judging from the great en- 
thusiasm at Wednesday's meeting, they are determined to see it 
carried out to a successful consummation. This fair will prove 
one of the very best enterprises that has ever benefited San Fran- 
cisco. Projected and organized as it has been, at a time of great 
depression throughout not only this, but all countries, its estab- 
lishment will prove to the nations of the earth that hereupon 
the farthest confines of the continent, there is a city facing the 
western sea that is bound to be heard in the world. Tbe best 
men in the city are at the head of the enterprise. To it they have 
given their names, their money and their brains, and it will be 
indeed an untoward circumstance that can now prevent the car- 
rying out of their designs. Upon this issue they are all in accord. 
Men who, as General Barnes said the other night, have been an- 
tagonistic politically for years, or are opposed to each other in 
religious and social views, join hands on this measure, and like a 
band of brothers work in the common cause. It is all for one, 
and one for all ; for let it be remembered that not only the men 
whoBe names may be mentioned in the newspapers will reap the 
benefit from the fair. The beneficial results will be felt through- 
out the entire coast; landlord and tenant, merchant and clerk, 
manufacturer and workman will all be the better for it. It will 
bring hundreds of thousands of people here, who cannot fail to 
be impressed with the present prosperous condition, and the 
magnificent future that awaits this city and State. The fair will 
cause an awakening. Energies that for some time have been 
latent will spring to life under its inspiring influence, full confi- 
dence will be restored, and San Francisco will again resume that 
bustling air that so well becomes her. But it must be remembered 
that all this cannot be done without money. The Director-Gen- 
eral says a million dollars will be needed. About one-third of 
that sum has been subscribed. The remainder must be had, and 
the sooner it is procured the better for the fair. Those intending 
to subscribe should do so without further delay. Any sum is 
acceptable. Wealthy men, heavy land owners, merchants and 
manufacturers should give most liberally, for they, of all the 
people, will be the most direct beneficiaries of the great exposi- 
tion. 

THE BANKS AND THE FARMERS. 



THE apparent endeavor of political agitators to send abroad the 
impression that this city is suffering from a financial panic 
fails to bear trait. Our financial position is a strong one, and we 
need have no cause to fear. It is true, and no attempt is made to 
deny the fact, that because of the uusettled financial condition in 
those cities in which their correspondents are located, our banks 
are to-day more conservative than is their wont. Still they are 
affording as much relief as possible to the farmers and fruit- 
growers. The situation was well expressed the other day by the 
manager of one of our leading commercial banks. "The fact is 
simply this," said he; "we are willing to afford farmers and 
fruit-growers all the assistance we can to move their crops, and 
thus carry on their business. We are not trying, nor have we 
ever endeavored to block the wheels of commerce. But, while 
willing to afford aid for the transaction of legitimate business, we 
cannot lend money on wheat in warehouses for speculative pur- 
poses. Why? Simply because we haven't got it to lend for that 
purpose. We are compelled, owing to the condition of affairs 
throughout the country to keep ready for an emergency an 
amount of funds sufficient for any unexpected demands that 
may be made upon us. The farmer and the fruitgrower, however, 
can get all they want to bring their crops to market." The 
clearing-house banks are all united on this basis. During the 
week many loans have been made by them to growers. The 
fruit canneries have also been greatly aided by the bankers, and 
now most of them are running in full blast. The fruit crop, be- 
ing perishable, greatly needed assistance. Two weeks ago, and 
in fact up to ten days ago, the outlook for the fruitmen was not a 
roseate one, for at that time the banks had not yet seen their 
way clear. Now, however, the vaults have been opened, and the 
canners are jubilant. Loans have also been made on other in- 
dustries. The banks now show a disposition to do what they 
can to help along legitimate enterprises, though, as stated by the 
manager quoted, they are yet a bit shy of advancing coin on a 
speculation. It is hardly a time for speculation just now, for the 
times are out of joint. Until the financial world assumes a firmer 
tone, the banks will continue their conservative course, but they 
wish it to be understood that they are strong, and are willing to 
aid the State's producers. 



WE trust the lovers of the Chinese across the Rockies read tbe 
description of the recent massacre of two missionaries in 
the Celestial Kingdom' It will give tbem an insight into the 
beauties of the Chinese character as we know it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1893. 



THE SANTA CRUZ SALMON CRAZE. 



THE night before. The very latest stragglers have left the din- 
ner table. And now the evening possip on the piazza of the 
Sea Beach Hotel is not about the tennis conrt, or who shall lead 
the german, or who swam to the raft that afternoon. Fish and 
fishing, salmon, boats and bait are the topics of the hour. 

J. J. O'Brien, bronzed and exhibiting that tired feeling that 
comes after landing a hundred pounds of salmon or thereabouts, 
confesses to fifty-six fish since he has taken the rod in hand. 
The ladies are as enthusiastic as the men. They throng to the 
clerk's desk. They make personal demands upon Mr. Sullivan to 
see that they shall be called in time. They abandon the constitu- 
tional ramble upon the broad verandas. The tennis court is de- 
serted. Salty boat rowers are grouped about waiting the orders 
of their patrons. 8almon is the topic of the hour. All less im- 
portant themes are thrust aside. 

The Morning.— Four o'clock, just as the gray light of dawn is 
showing in the East and the bed-room window panes of the Sea 
Beach Hotel are aflame. Twenty minutes afterwards and the 
breakfast room is thronged with men in the most various and 
fantastic of fishing costumes, and with women in the most an- 
tique and dowdiest of old clothing. They look wonderfully bright 
and fresh, these nymphs of the seaside, as they chat animatedly of 
the prospects of the day, and put away private packages of fruit 
and things to add to the lunch of the noontide hour. And now 
the procession moves to the wharf, and one is puzzled at the at- 
traction which can bring people, who come to Santa Cruz for per- 
fect indolence and uninterrupted ease, out of their beds this chi'Iy 
morning, to row for miles and miles upon the oily surface of the 
waveless sea. 

'•Here, that is my boat." 'Say, I want two seats for these la- 
dies." "Give us a little fresh bait, will you? — do as much for yon 
to-morrow." "Come, now, I'm not going to be left; I hired that 
boat last night." "Ob, George, you don't mean to say that after 
all our preparations we are going to stay ashore?" — these and 
many in the same strain make the wharf a lively scene for half 
an hour before starting. Then order is restored, the boats shove 
off, the rods are put together, the hooks baited, and the lines 
reeled off, and the serious work of the morning begins. 

Phineas Fogg. — A grave and dignified-looking gentleman, in 
the most correct angling uniform, a perfect prototype of Phineas 
Fogg, is pulled up and down the bay by a swarthy retainer, who 
is really a striking suggestion of Passe-Partout, Mr. Fogg's faith- 
ful attendant. When Phineas strikes a fish not an expression of 
gratification or excitement illuminates his impassive features. It 
is a case of pull salmon, pull Phineas, and, to the credit of the 
latter be it said, the salmon almost invariably gets the worst of it t 

The Australians. — Two Australian colonists, fresh from the 
bush, enjoy a sport denied to tbem in the Antipodes. One is de- 
licate and interesting, the other is robust, wears Knickerbockers, 
and is more English than Australian. They fish every day, and 
give the man who rows them their catch. They utterly ignore 
the ladies, being altogether occupied with the work in hand. 

J. J. O'Brien. — One of the most sociable anglers in the army of 
devotees is Mr. J. J. O'Brien. With his wife and nieces he works 
faithfully from early morning till noon. Luck attends him. The 
ladies are equally fortunate. Miss Dillon, on Monday morning, 
hooked and landed three nice fi&h, averaging eight pounds apiece, 
before another fin had been lifted from the bay. She played them 
without the least trace of nervousness, and with a skill that would 
have done credit to a veteran angler. Then Uncle John began to 
get in his work, and ran his score up W> eleven fine fish before the 
sun had reached the zenith. 

The Dark Man. — A prominent club man, a State official, dark 
and determined, has been here looking into the affairs of the local 
banks. When weary of computing assets, and bills receivable, 
be, like the hero of a dime novel, flings himself into a skiff, and 
trolls for salmon. To see him wrestling with a twenty-pound 
fish is a spectacle of joy and admiration. He baffles his captive 
at every turn. His intelligent face is lit up with joy when the 
big fellow shows signs of exhaustion, and the darkest despair 
neatles among his coal black whiskers when the fish gets his sec- 
ond wind, and makes a wild break for liberty. And when the 
salmon is finally gaffed, and safe in the boat, he vows a pound of 
perfumed candles to the shrine of Cloasina. 

The Chicagoese. — Tall, lean and pallid, the Chicago contingent 
clamber on board their boat, and proceed to business. They 
always carry with them a sunny haired girl for a mascot. She 
sits in the bow, and gazes with wistful eyes over the calm water. 
I think she is mourning in this tranquil place for the Windy 
City, and longing for the noise and bustle of the World's Fair. 
What Chicago in Santa Cruz does with its fish, nobody knows. 
There is a rumor among the guests at the Sea Beach that they are 
corned down and shipped overland. 

The Oldest Inhabitant. -No matter how early the fishers 
start, the oldest inhabitant is on the wharf to see them off. His 
beard is white and long, but no man liveth in Santa Cruz who 
may say how many summers have passed over that falcon-like 



head. He is pregnant with gloomy prophecies. "Wal, now you 
folks is right foolish to go out this morning. I know the run is 
over, and you won't catch a blamed thing. There ain't no more 
sardines in the bay," and so on. But every day the boats come 
in with their cargoes of glistening, beautiful fish, and the lugubri- 
ous predictions of the venerable croaker are whistled down the 
wind. 

Major McLaughlin. — To behold the handsome and portly 
Major stepping into his fishing boat, his features beaming with 
expectancy, his hand clinging fondly to his trusty and well-tried 
split bamboo, and bis well-conceived lunch snugly stowed away 
in the stern-sheets, is a vision of delight. The Major is a salmon 
killer of the premier class. When a thirty-pound fish tackles 
him, he strikes him with an amiable carelessness, and brings him 
to the gaff as indifferently as if he were landing a smelt. His 
score is so large that it would hardly be safe to publish it lest 
the Philistines should, in the words of honest Jack, declare, 
" Lord, how the world is given to lying." d.