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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (July-Dec. 1894)"

D 2007 lE'iSbll D 

California State Library 

State Library. 



No, 1 A rtiw ?§.... Received 

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fne» p«r Copy, 10 C*nu>. 



Annual Subasrlptlon, ** OO 




Ke ws^|tt eh 



I >278 




Vol. XI.IX 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1894. 



Number 1 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred 
Marriott, 606-609-613 Merchant Street, San Francisco. En- 
tered at San Francifco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



The office of the News Letter in Hew Tork City is at the " Evening 
Post " Building, 204-206 Broadway, Room 1, where information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

IV there is an idler thing than a painted ship on a painted ocean, 
it is a Republican platform. From the one adopted at Sacra- 
— mo it seems that they are hard to write this year, and are use- 
less and meaningless when written. 



THE California Midwinter International Exposition " offi- 
cially" closed on the 4th inst. Bot that means nothing. 
It will unofficially remain open indefinitely, although an official 
entrance fee of twenty-five cents will be charged. 



1 ' pSTEE and Women's Rights," is to be the slogan of the Ke- 
Hf publican party in this campaign. We do not know whom 
tbe Democrats will nominate, but we are positive that the last 
part of their motto will read, "the rights of men." 



IT is reported that the United States are rather unpopu- 
lar in Salvador at this time. We are proud of it. If our 
refusal to surrender political refugees to be butchered in cold 
blood renders us unpopular, then we glory in our unpopularity. 



FRE8NO has suffered more grievously from the railroad strike 
than any other community in California. A dispatch comes 
thence announcing that there is a local beer famine, and that the 
price of the beverage has been advanced to ten cents a glass. The 
horrors of the strike are beginning to be really felt. 



THE Rev. Dr. Parkburst, of New York, has been severely criti- 
cised for his activity in the work of exposing the corruption 
of the police system of the metropolis, but the facts brought out 
by the investigating committee fully vindicate him, and prove 
that the situation is even worse than he has represented it to be. 



RICHARD CROKER has baffled tbe Lexow Committee by re- 
turning to New York city. His fearless action will, no doubt, 
have a tendency to make the Committee cease its investigations 
and leave him to rule the field again. Committees of the Lexow 
order have never been known to do any good in New York city 
while a Tammany tiger stayed at home. 



THE leading business organizations of San Francisco have by 
resolutions condemned tbe action of the strikers, thus ex- 
pressing the calm, law-loving, and business sense of the community. 
The larger fruit-growers have announced that they are willing to 
suffer the heavy loss which the inability of the Railroad Company to 
forward their fruit entails, so that the issue raised by the strikers 
may be fought to the end and the question of the stability of com- 
merce and the authority of the Government may be settled. 



THE Examiner, the Bulletin, &nd the Call, in singling out the 
Southern Pacific Company as the one whose arrogance has 
forced the strikers to resort to violence in obstructing the for- 
warding of trains, tbe transportation of the mails, and the defy- 
ing of the laws, tbe peace-officers, and the courts, energetically 
keep out of sight the fact that the Southern Pacific is acting in 
no respect differently from all tbe other great railroad compa- 
nies in tbe United States. In order, however, to make a pretense 
of fairness, these papers blame tbe strikers a little for resorting to 
violence, but do not counsel tbem to respect the officers of the 
law or the processes of the courts 1 These papers obscure every 
principle involved in the struggle, and by assailing the Southern 
Pacific for calling upon the authorities for protection, tbey 
covertly attack the Government for the protection which it ex- 
tends. To the full length that they dare go th«y^ r 'array~ 
themselves on the side of lawlessness and against the con- 
stituted authorities, and are doing all they can to increase the 
reign of terror. They are the organs of anarchy. 



D1VVER says that the chargeH against him are merely trumped 
up. But charges are trumps in New York nowadays, since 
clubs have been turned down. 



NOT taking the question of anarchy into consideration, the pet 
aversion of France just now is England, and the latest Eng- 
lish move in Africa has intensified the feeling. France has in the 
Mediterranian 8ea, at this time, nineteen great armored ships and 
two hundred torpedo boats, and a very formidable fleet also in 
the neighborhood of the channel. 8he is trying to keep pace with 
England, too, in adding to her navy. A future war between 
France and England would not be a credit to civilization, but it 
is not an improbability. 



ACCORDING to the latest cable advices, the Roman Catholics 
of Hungary are working with an earnestness approaching des- 
peration for the defeat of the civil marriage bill. Both sides are 
said to be in readiness for a division in the upper bouse, which is 
quite probable. The Government claims a majority of six for the 
bill, but the estimate may be doubtful. It lies in the power of 
Dr. Werkele, of the Hungarian cabinet, to break the Opposition 
by the creation of as many new life peers as may be necessary, 
in order to secure a majority for the bill. 



NO wonder that Judge O'Brien, of New York, saw no reason 
why a receiver should be hindered from disposing, for the 
benefit of creditors, of a lot of copies of the celebrated old English 
novel, "Tom Jones." What the professional suppressors of vice 
have to do with that out-of-date, although brilliant, book, when 
there are so many up-to-date and vulgar novels issuing from the 
press, it is difficult to understand. But it is much easier to tread 
on the interests of a dead author than on those of a live one. If 
the self-appointed censors must condemn something, let tbem at- 
tack the modern erotic novels which feminine pens prepare for 
the market. 

THERE appears to be a fair prospect of an order for the build- 
ing of a revenue cutter to patrol the bay of San Francisco. 
Why so expensive a vessel as a cutter for patrolling a land- 
locked harbor, in which even frail and top-heavy ferry boats are 
perfectly safe? It is true that this port needs far better protec- 
tion against smugglers than it enjoys, and a seventeen-knot ves- 
sel would be none too fast; but a tug would be equally as effective 
as a cutter. The coast of California has very few landing places, 
the harbors of San Francisco and San Diego being tbe best, and a 
better cutter protection is needed than is furnisher but the 
places where smuggling can be carried on with greatest ease are 
the sparsely populated open harbors, like those of Monterey, 
Port Harford, and Santa Barbara, where there are many miles 
of uninhabited beach country where landings can be made. It is 
noticeable that at most of these places there are thriving Chinese 
fishing villages, the one at Monterey especially, having a large 
direct traffic with China by means of Chinese junks. The oppor- 
tunities for smuggling opium into such places are really superior 
to those which exist at San Francisco. 




THURSDAY'S great yacht race on the River Clyde resulted in 
the defeat by thirty-five seconds of the American yacht Via- 
ilant by the Prince of Wales's yacht Brittannia and in tbe sink- 
ing of the British yacht Valkyrie in collision with the Satanita. 
This was a strange conjuncture of events. First, the Valkyrie 
had been beaten in American waters by the Vigilant in a close 
race, and in consequence, American yacht-builders had arrived at 
the firm conclusion that tbe centre-board type was superior to 
the cutter type, which idea, in spite of frequent victories of 
the American centre-boards, the Englishmen stubbornly re- 
fused to accept; second, the Brittannia is a cutter, and tbe Eng- 
lishman has shown that the cutter can out-race tbe centre- 
board, and America's pet idea is badly shaken; third, tbe 
B> ittannia had already defeated the Valkyrie, cutter against cut- 
ter; fourth, the Satanita, a fine and beautiful cutter, anxious to 
try issues with the Yankee centre-board Vigilant, was so badly 
damaged by the collision that she cannot be put in repair for sev- 
al weeks. It is clear that in the science of yacht-bnilding the 
shape of the bottom is not the controlling factor. The learning 
tA uut one lesson will have Berved a useful purpose if it broad- 
ens the views of American builders. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1890 



A DEPLORABLE SITUATION. 

THE position assumed by the railroads in the boycott agains* 
Pullman cars has had the effect virtually of arraying the Gov" 
eminent against the strikers, the railroads and the general busi- 
ness of the country standing helpless between the contending 
forces, and suffering immeasurable damage. Had the railroads 
consented to the demand of the strikers to run trains without 
Pullman cars, and had not Attorney-General OIney ruled that the 
mails must be forwarded in the "usual way" (which means that 
they must be sent on trains made up in the ordinary way, 
with Pullman cars), the terrible conflict would have been averted — 
the fight would have been between the railroads and the strikers, 
and the Government would not have intervened. But the very life 
of the railroads depended upon refusing to comply with the de- 
mand of the strikers. It would have been easy and inexpensive to 
comply, and it was not love for Pullman that urged the railroads to 
meet the issue at whatever cost. That the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany, which has never had any trouble worthy of the name with 
its men, and which has a better record for generous treatment 
of employees than any other great transportation company in the 
country, should so promptly and stubbornly have resisted the 
demand of its strikers, shows that it realizes the gravity of the 
principle involved, and that it must win or go under forever. H. 
E. Huntington, in a published letter, has stated the character of 
this principle in a very able manner. 

In substance it is this: First, the men engaged in building 
Pullman cars are not railroad men in any sense, and an attack on 
the railroad companies to force their demands is unreasonable and 
futile, and the issue does not involve any of the rights of 
railroad employees; second, that the railroads have no interest 
whatever in the fight between Pullman and his employees ; third, 
that surrender to the strikers' demand would be an acceptance 
of the principle that disagreements between any manufacturer 
and his employees would place the railroads at the mercy of his 
employees, for if those employed in the manufacture of Pullman 
cars can demand that the product of their labor be not trans- 
ported, those employed in the manufacture of any other product 
for railroad transportation can make a similar demand. The 
effect would be, as Mr. Huntington points out, to change the 
whole character of transportation and make the operation of 
railroads uncertain if not impossible. In short, the railroads 
take the ground that the American Railway Union, which is 
championing the cause of strikers at the Pullman car works, and 
which is tying up and destroying the property of railroads in 
that pursuit, has established an anarchistic policy in violation 
of law, of right in property, and of the conduct of business. 

It was probably an understanding of the menace to everything 
which concerns the material welfare of the country that induced 
the United States Government to intervene. Hence the issue now 
is, not between capital and labor, but between the Government 
and a powerful organization of men. The hatred which dis- 
affected labor cherishes for capital has now been transferred to 
the Government, which is regarded by the desperate men as the 
creature of capital and an abettor in its oppressions. Therefore 
the (rovernment now has to deal with a rebellion against its 
authority and power — the interests of the railroads and of gen- 
eral commerce and the public convenience are merely incidents, 
and may be dropped out of sight. It is now a question both of 
patriotism and strength. # Those who lend their support to the 
strikers are aiming a blow at the integrity of the Government; 
this is true, whether it be passion or ignorance that moves them. 
Such persons, lacking either the understanding or the patriotism 
which makes good citizens, are a menace to the public peace and 
safety, and if the power of the Government or the patriotism of 
private citizens is sufficient, they should be arrested and held in 
restraint. Among these are Mr. Adolph Sutro and the publishers 
of nearly all the daily papers of San Francisco. 

More than that, and worse: Those whose sworn duty it is to 
enforce the decrees of the Government and maintain peace and 
order, who refuse to perform that duty when commanded so to 
do, are guilty of a specific serious infraction of the law, for which 
heavy penalties are provided, The spectacle furnished by a sec- 
tion of the National Guard of California at Sacramento this week 
would have been ludicrous bad it not been so degrading a con- 
fession of the inferior intelligence, courage, physical stamina, and 
patriotism of its members. When broagbt face to face with the 
strikers it was discovered that it would be useless to order them 
to clear the depot in order that the mail trains might be for- 
warded, for that would have meant the use of bayonets and ball 
cartridges and the killing of men who seemed determined to die 
rather than retreat. Nearly a thousand men, armed and drilled, 
were pitted against a mob of two or three thousand unorganized 
rioters, and none dared to order a charge! Hence they were used 
merely for a » demonstration," and were jeered at. Then they fra- 
ternized with the rioters, gave them their rifles to carry, made the 
rounds of the drinking saloons with them, and distributed their 
cartridges among the women who invaded their rankB to flirt 
with them. They whined because they had not had aufficient 



sleep and food, and because the rioters would not let them come 
into the depot out of the hot sunshine! If it is true that United 
States Marshal Baldwin refused to give the order to fire, he de- 
serves his share of this criticism; but there is no excuse what- 
ever for the men's deserting their post and fraternizing with the 
strikers. 

The material of which the National Guard is composed and the 
purposes of its organization are therefore discovered. That the 
men in its ranks have any conception of the nature of the oath 
which they took; that they have any comprehension of the 
duties of a citizen or a soldier; that their understanding of their 
function rises any higher than a desire to impress foolish women 
and small boys with the magnificence of their clothes and to 
drink and flirt in annual "encampment" at the seaside; that the 
slightest dependence whatever may be placed in them to perform 
their sworn duty in defending the law and upholding the Govern- 
ment — it would take a very hardy man to declare. These pretty 
fellows cost the taxpayers of the State more than $150,000 per 
annum. That money is paid to them in good faith for a specific 
service. Something like eight hundred of the five thousand men 
enlisted in this State have shown themselves incompetent and 
untrustworthy. The remaining four thousand and over may not 
be so bad, and they should lose no time in showing that they can 
be men. If they fail (though it seems unlikely that the Govern- 
ment will again make the experiment of calling on them), then 
the approaching Democratic State Convention should have a 
plank in its platform demanding the withdrawal of the appro- 
priation. For if the spirit displayed at Sacramento animates ihe 
whole body, the organization is worse than useless — it is sr - . 
and dangerous threat to the public peace and se"" 1- ' 

It seems inevitable that martial law must be declared and 
habeas corpus suspended. This would make the issue clearer and 
would remove the prevailing excuse that the Government \* 
merely taking sides in a conflict of private interests; for bo long 
as the Government limits the exercise of its power to the lending 
of assistance to the railroad companies in the moving of trains, 
there will be confusion in the minds of those who lack the pene- 
tration to grasp the whole subject in its present form. In this 
confusion lies the danger of an anarchistic revolution. That the 
masses of the people sympathize with the strikers and are blind 
to the fact that in aiding them they are aiming a blow at the 
Government, there can he no doubt. The total exclusion of the 
railroad companies from the management of their own affairs, 
and the manning of trains with officers of the Government, 
would rid the issue of the obstacles which affect the general un- 
derstanding. The injunctions which have been issued by the 
United States Courts against the leaders of the strike seem utterly 
useless, because so easily evaded. If the Government should 
take sole charge of the situation and hold it with regular troops 
(who may be depended upon to fight), it could do as it pleased in 
the matter of running Pullman cars. A judicious handling of 
that problem under such circumstances would in nowise affect or 
bind the railroad companies, and temporary expedients might be 
thereby employed to quell the present storm and permit it to pass 
over without harm. 



WANTS REVENGE. 



EX-BOSS BUCKLEY claims to be out of politics, yet he is as 
palpably in it as he ever was. The distinction he draws is, 
not in the business this time for profit, but for revenge. He is 
taking a hand in what is going on with a view to be revenged on 
what he calls » the City Hall crowd" — that is, upon the "ins" of 
his own party, who took up the reins when he fled to Canada, 
and who managed, despite his absence, to drive the somewhat de - 
moralized team first past the winning post. But therein 
consists their unpardonable sin, against which the ex-boss 
is so terribly in earnest to be revenged. The local Democrats 
actually succeeded in his absence, and now he wants to teach 
them a lesson for their temerity. If he had really been in and 
of the Democratic party, he would have rejoiced that it was not 
weakened, but rather strengthened, by what he doubtless deemed 
adverse circumstances. But the truth is, that Buckley was never 
of any party, except to debauch it and make money out of it. If 
he wants to punish it now, it will be to seem to mase hims- If a 
necessity to it hereafter. If he can have it appear that he has 
been the direct means of relegating it to a back seat, the natural 
inference will be that the sooner be is called upon to resume the 
handling of the ribbons to the end that he may lead the party 
back to victory again the better. But we are persuaded that is a 
mistaken calculation on the part of Buckley. The Democratic 
ship has been greatly lightened by his being cast overboard, and 
any other party that picks him up will find him a too heavy 
burden. The most curious part of the man's career cornea in 
right here and now. It is not curious that a thief will steal, but 
it is singular, indeed, that men of pretended honesty should so 
loudly proclaim their great gain in having enrolled such a fellow in 
their ranks. Buckley's only possible use is found in bis wide 
knowledge of the men who are usable and purchasable. 



Julv 7, 1894. 



. FR \\< l-( <> \i:w - 111 IKK 



THE TRADE CONFERENCE AT OTTAWA 



THE PROGRESS OF THE TARIFF 



CKRTAIB of oar daily contemporaries are making light of the 
Trade Conference held at Ottawa the other oay; they are pre- 
dicting thai tt will come to naught ; that it will not bal Id the 
great Pacific cable from Vancouver through the coral islands to 
Australia. These selfsame journals declared that the Canadian 
Pacific would never prove practicable, and would have to be cov- 
ered tty a snow-shed nearly its entire length. As a matter of fact, 
it la tunning as smoothly to-day as any road on the comment. 
Ud« luorning daily declares that an ocean cable will not be of 
much value unless accompanied by steam lines, and that these 
can n« ver be supported on the routes alluded to. Pshaw 1 Where 
on the lop of this earth has ibis editor been living? How comes 
it that be does not know that the necessary steam lines have been 
firmly established already? Tbe line, embracing the Empresses of 
India. China, and Japan, are giving the best service known on 
this ocean, and are compelling tbe Pacific Mail and 0. and O. 
Company to secure new ships in order to maintain anything like 
a creditable opposition. Then the recently established line from 
Vancouver by way of Honolulu to Australia is doing good work, 
and will do better next year, when the New Zealand subsidy is 
withdrawn from the line to this port. We could wish that all 
these things were otherwise. We would have San Francisco the 
great central entrepot of the North Pacific, as it might bave been 
i( its destinies had been properly |shapen in the seventies. Un- 
equahd as the groat central port of the Pacific, with a fine back 
country, and tha populous countries lying invitingly open before 
us ur«'und the entire ocean, our position as the Queen City of the 
Pacific ought rever to hi've been in any sort of danger. But we 
failed in a large measure tc take advantage of our position. We 
needed push and organization. We talked with an air of con- 
tempt at what our neighbors were threatening to do. Whilst we 
have been vaunting ourselves overmuch, they have been working 
with a long pull, a strong pull, and a pull altogether, with what 
result we now begin to Bee. 

The serioua question of the day is as to what we propose to do 
about it? What do we think of the conference of English 
and colonial statesmen at Ottawa? It is now beyond a 
doui.t that the Britishers will lay a te:egraph cable across 
tbe Pacific, and that they are bent upon making the 
Western terminus of the Central Pacific a menace to the 
future of San Francisco. To do them justice, the colonists 
were a long time in lending aid and comfort to such a policy. By 
almost every means known to them, they endeavored to attach 
themjelves to California. For twenty-two years past the Aus- 
tralians and New Zealanders have paid the entire subsidy neces- 
sary to maintain an American steam line between that country 
and this. It has been a performance not often paralleled in his- 
tory. Commercial countries are not given to subsidizing the flag 
of their rivals. It was a friendly and generous policy on tbe part 
of Australia and New Zealand. If it had been as heartily met 
and reciprocated as it ought to have been, that conference would 
not have been witnessed at Ottawa. Long ere this a splendid 
trade would have been built up, and nothing so cements friend- 
ship as a reciprocal exchange of mutual benefits. All these years 
we bave had an overland railroad, which gave us a long start in 
advance in the race for the Pacific trade. Even Victoria and 
British Columbia generally almost exclusively traded with us 
and long showed every desire to maintain the connection. How 
we are being outpaced in winning the commerce of the Pacific we 
do not care to fully pronounce, but we think part of the reason 
Is to be found in that many of our merchants are not prepared to 
do foreign business on the old established basis. You cannot 
trade with distant markets on the principle of cash down at the 
port of shipment. Bank references with orders, and drafts at 60 
and 90 days do not go in California, and thence we are not able 
and willing to trade as pretty nearly all the rest of the world 
dues. There is not money enough in circulation to swing com- 
merce on our lines. An Australian merchant can get bis orders 
filled from Vancouver on drafts at 60 days sight, whereas he 
would have to pay cash on collection day if he expects his order 
to be filled in California. That is a method of such violent an- 
tagonism to the commercial ways of the world that it has got to 
be abandoned ere 8an Francisco can be deemed to be a commerce 
winner at all. We can be what we are, viz. : jobbers, but not in 
the high and proud sense of the terra — merchants. In internal 
improvement and development we have accomplished wonders, 
but in regard to conquering commerce we are not, as the slang of 
the period goes, « in it." But there has got to come a change in 
these matters. The era of over-production is upon us, and out- 
lets must be found for our wares. We must go around the world 
in quest of customers, and be quick to discern their wants and 
to supply them according to the rules of commerce. 



ANARCHISM is synonymous with assassination, and therefore 
it is not to be tolerated even in the mildest form by any civi- 
lized country. The proper way to deal with it is to crush it 
while it is still in an incipient condition, and not wait for it to 
develop into murder. 



Tn 1 tariff Is at last through the Senate, but In so altered a con- 
diiion that its father*- Id the House must fall to recognize their 
child. With Senator Hill so voting as to cause his party the 
largest possible amount of embarrassment it went through with 
a majority of five, and that was fully all that was expected. Hill 
once made some capital out of Ibe expression, " I am a Demo- 
crat." It would be amusing lo hear bim repeat it now. A bolter 
of nearly the entire programme of the party, which he was pre- 
pared to go to the country upon as a candidate for the Presidency, 
he is a faithless politician who cannot be tuosoon retired to private 
life. A great orator at a National Convention once said : "We 
love Cleveland for the enemies he has made." David B. Hill was 
one of tbe enemies referred to, and his course of action since 
shows tbat with such a marplot across his path the President still 
merits sympathy. The interesting question now is as lo what the 
House will do with the mutilated bill. Will it make a struggle to 
restore the bill to its original form, try to re-amend it, or accept it 
as it is ? We fear that the country is in for another parliamentary 
struggle. The House will hardly be likely to accept the bill with- 
out striking out some of tbe objectionable features tbat have been 
added to it, and a course of that kind once entered upon, it will 
be difficult to tell when the end will come. It is a notable fact 
that great changes of tariffs are seldom accomplished fully at the 
first attempt. Sir Robert Peel is historically credited with being 
the great English Repealer of the corn laws and champion of 
Free Trade, yet as a matter of fact he was for many years forced 
to accept what was known as the » sliding scale " duty on corn, 
and for nearly fifty years past England has been striving to reach 
tbe goal of perfect Free Trade. Whenever any system of protec- 
tion becomes strongly engrafted upon the commercial affairs of a 
nation, it is almost impossible wholly to eradicate it. There is 
always some industry tottering, and pretty snre to fall, unless 
braced up by protection for a time longer. Not in this century 
will any tariff worthy of the name of Free Trade be adopted in 
the United States. The '■ new and struggling " industries will 
continue to be new and struggling for many a long year yet, and 
all that can be fairly expected for the present is the scaling down 
of the monstrously high duties extended to certain trusts that are 
not new, and certainly not struggling, except, perhaps, in the 
matter of attempting to corrupt Congress. 



AN INEVIATBLE STRUGGLE. 



THE sweeping extent of the railroad strike and the sympathy 
and aid of other labor organizations are the culmination of 
the spirit of bitter unrest which was born within the last year 
from the stagnation of business and the consequent enforced 
idleness of hundreds of thousands of laborers. Nothing could 
have averted the present outburst, and anything might have pre- 
cipitated it. Pullman and the railroad companies cut no figure 
in the tragedy, except as accidental agencies and from the fact 
that the great extent of railroad operations made possible the 
existence of a large labor organization extending over the whole 
country. It is not a railroad Btrike that we are facing now — it 
is a rebellion. It may become a revolution. All the labor dis- 
turbances of recent times have been merely an expression, locally 
and on a limited scale, of the dissatisfaction of the laboring 
classes. Much of this feeling is purely anarchistic, having no 
grounding in real wrongs, and has been^the work of law-hating 
foreigners, who have found in this free country a wide scope for 
the exercise of their genius. It is well enough that tbe issue has 
come at last, and in so formidable a shape. For now comes the 
test of patriotism and courage, and the man who loves law and 
his couniry will know where to stand in the struggle. 



THE Occident, official organ of the Presbyterian Church of this 
State, after hailing with delight the appearance of a paper 
started in the interest of the American Protective Association, 
makes the following astounding assertions : "The Roman Church, 
with less numbers than the Methodiet Church alone, and, out- 
side the pulpit, with much less intelligence and education, have 
so united with the saloon element and the criminal classes, that 
that church actually controls all the positions of profit and trust 
in all the large cities of the United States. It is well known that 
the Roman Church has received a large amount of its support 
from the blackmail extracted by its leading members from the 
saloons and disreputable houses of New York City." The bitter- 
ness with which these mendacious statements are made indicates 
either that the American Protective Association is conducted as a 
Protestant engine for the destruction of a powerful rival Christian 
organization, or that the Presbyterian Church, at least, desires 
that the public should have that impression — either of which 
aspects is most damaging to the anti-Catholic cruBade. Under 
these circumstances patriotism, so far as tbe Presbyterian Church, 
at least, is concerned, is wholly out of consideration, and refer- 
ence to it defiles and degrades it. If the Presbyterian Church de- 
sires that religion and politics should be kept separate, and can 
understand that truthfulness is becoming in gentlemen and 
Christians, let it set the example. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1894. 



THE SILVER QUESTION. 



EDITOR News Letter: At the International Bi-metallic Con- 
ference held in London May 2nd and 3rd, which was little 
more than an oratorical tournament, Mr. A. J. Balfour is reported 
Lo have expressed himself as follows: 

" The general consensus of scientific economic opinion has now for 
many years been thrown with an overwhelming balance of opinion 
into the scale of the double standard. I am not offering now an 
opinion as to whether the double-standard is just or is expedient. I 
am only discussing whether it is possible; and I say that on that 
question there is practically now a consensus of the whole economic 
scientific opinion which has devoted itself to the elucidation of this 
problem, and any man who in the face of that opinion now quotes 
any of the old tags about demand and supply making it impossible 
to fix a ratio between the two metals, or such doctrines as that the 
interference of the state to fix prices must necessarily fail— any man 
who now relies on arguments of that kind to show that the double- 
standard is an impossible expedient does nothing else than write him- 
self down an individual ignorant of the latest scientific developments 
of political economy." 

Mr. Balfour's remarks are very similar— almost identical in sub- 
stance—with some made by Prof. Andrews, of Brown University, at 
the Congress of Economics and Politics held in this city March 29th 
and 30th of the present year. And they may justly be termed merely 
the obiter dicta of two theorists. To them, at this phase of the sub- 
ject, I will oppose the opinion of Hans Forssell, the eminent and very 
able delegate from Sweden to the Monetary Congresses at Paris, 1881, 
and Brussels, 1892. Said Mr. Forssell: 

" The problem of a bi-metallic union sufficient to guarantee us 
against a premium upon gold and against the drain of gold resembles 
strikingly the investigation of another very delicate and very difficult 
question, which might be formulated thus: What length, what 
breadth, and what capacity should be given in order best to contain 
a certain quantity of liquid in a hogshead of which there is no possi- 
bility of stopping the bunghole ? " 

Mr. Balfour went on to say that •• of course the percolation of scien- 
tific opinion through the general body of the community is slow," 
etc. Now, the practical consideration of this subject internationally 
has not been by the general body of the community, as one might in- 
fer from Mr. Balfour's remarks, but by the " judicious few " who 
have given the subject profound study on account of its practica 
bearings on the general welfare — trained experts, as it were. 

At the first session of the Paris International Monetary Congress 
of 1881, M. Magnin referred to the two great preceding Congresses 
held in Paris, the first in 18G7 and the second in 1878, at the first of 
which, in a representation of twenty states (only two of them then 
maintaining the gold standard) the conclusion was reached that the 
surest basis for the monetary unity of the future should be sought in 
the gold standard, " with silver, if need be, as a temporary compan 
ion," in which the delegates concurred by a seven-eighths majority. 
In 1876 a commission was appointed in this country to consider the 
subject, from which the Paris Congress of 1878 resulted. Practically 
the action of the Paris Congress of 1867 was confirmed by that of 
1878, and also those of 1881 and 1889, and also that of Brussels of 1S92 
and Berlin 1894, and gold remains to-day the standard of all the great 
commercial nations. 

In view of the deliberate conclusions thrice affirmed by the best 
equipped men available as judges, men who brought to the considera- 
tion of the subject substantially all that is comprised in the term 
scientific attainment — knowledge and wisdom derived from study, 
observation, and practical experience — Mr. Balfour's assertion that 
any man who now " quotes any of the old tags," etc., " writes him- 
self down as ignorant of the latest scientific developments of political 
economy," is certainly not entitled to serious consideration. 

It may have been imagined by advocates of the unlimited free coin- 
age of silver that the panics and depression of the '80's, and in 1892, 
1893, and 1894 would more favorably dispose Germany and Great 
Britain, but what are the facts ? After all the sentimental speeches 
and the grandiloquent expressions of scientific economic opinions, so 
called, at the Bi-metalhc Conference in London, May 2nd and 3rd 
the subject was tabled in the House of Commons without a word of 
discussion, or even a division. The close of the Berlin Congress, a 
month later, was just as hopelessly uncompromising so far as " help- 
ing silver" was concerned. As Forssell, the representative of 
Sweden, said in the Paris Congress of 1881, so the facts show in 1894: 

" As to the free coinage of silver, as for the coined silver being an 
unlimited legal tender, no confession, not even one ray of hope, on 
the British or German horizons." France and Holland are scarcely 
less inimical. 

The most ardent of the European bi-metalists admit that for any 
one state or government to try the experiment of unlimited free coin- 
age of silver would inevitably prove disastrous, and yet the Kepubli- 
can Party of California is demanding that very thing to be done by 
the United States Government at a ratio of 16 to 1. What egregious 
folly ! A Layman. 

San Francisco, Col., July 3, 1894. 

For Bronchial. Asthmatic and Pulmonary Complaints, 

" Brown's Bronchial Troches" have remarkable curative properties. Sold 
only in boxes. 

Begin to use Ayer's Hair Vigor now, and by the next Fourth of July your 
hair will be " a thing of beauty." 



INTERESTING TO LADIES. 

IT has been generally remarked that no class of articles at the 
Midwinter Exposition received more attention than the vari- 
ous indispensible, and, to the masculine mind, mysterious ad- 
juncts to the toilettes of our fair ladies. Manufacturers from 
every part of the globe were represented, and the products of 
America, France, England, and Germany competed for the honor 
of the first award at the great Exposition. The points of com- 
petition were: freedom from all injurious or deleterious sub- 
stances, efficiency in producing the desired results expected in 
a preservative of the complexion, chemical skill in preparing and 
compounding, and finally, elegance of appearance and general 
style. Upon all these points, our own California " Camelline" 
was awarded highest position, and received the unusual distinc- 
tion of a special honorary diploma of merit, a result not only em- 
inently gratifying to the manufacturers, Messrs. Wakelee & Co., 
of this city, but an endorsement of the good judgment of the 
ladies of the Pacific Coast, who, long ago, pronounced in favor 
of the superior excellence of ''Camelline." 

J/UIOI^ (T\f\DE SillJS. 



latest 
5tyles. 
p<^rfe<;t 
pitti^. 

pipisb. 

£Ie<£apt 

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Complete 

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prices. 



prattler <$o., 105 t^earpy St. 



T 

A Modern House of Eight rooms; 

Convenient to two cable lines; grand 
marine view ; good neighborhood. 
Rent reasonable to desirable party. 

BALDWIN & HAMIIOND, 

10 nontgomery Street. 




K) LET==Furnished. 



REMOVAL. 

DELMAS & SHORTRIDGE 

Hare removed their law offices to the 

CROCKER BUILDING (Third Floor.) 

SH. REGENSBURGER, attorney-at-law. 
■ Rooms 1 and 2, 319 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



@ 









H 




DBOBHBKB 18— The Paris winter fog bad given me a bad at- 
tack of the bines. So when Unbert asked me this morning: 
•• Berthe. what present would you like to find in your Christmas 
stocking? " I put my arms around his neck and unhesitatingly 
answered : 

••Take me where there is sunlight — wherever you like, pro- 
vided I can see the sky and the blue sea from my windows." 

December 19 — Hubert leaves to-night. He is the dearest hus- 
band in tbe world, courteous to all women, even his wife. He 
is thirty-six years old, and I shall be thirty-two next month; but 
how much younger he is than 1 ! He knows it, too, dear fellow. 
for be keeps calling me " little one" and » dear child," the most 
delicate flattery to a woman over thirty. 

My love for him has in it much of maternal indulgence. I am 
almost vexed when women resist his flirtations, so sure am I of 
his heart. 

December 20.— Hubert went alone so as to spare me the fatigue 
of looking for rooms, climbing stairs, meeting cross landladies, 
and of asking questions about water and drainage. To-day at 
breakfast 1 received this little note from him: 

" My Dear — Arrived here rather late. All the dainty little nests 
are occupied, and to make a choice I want your advice. Join me at 
San-Retuo at the Royal Hotel. We will spend the Christmas holi- 
davs among a lot of Anglo-Americans, who will amuse you." 

December 24. — Hubert met me at tbe frontier to help me 
through tbe customs-house. How glad I was to see him I I still 
was wrapped in furs; he, without an overcoat, wore his light 
suit and a little Tyrolean cap, jauntily poised on one side. I 
conld hardly realize that he had left me only a few days ago. A 
whole season seemed to lie between our parting and meeting. My 
heart was bappy with the spring, and I felt young and buoyant. 
I conld not help saying to Hubert — begging his pardon with my 
eyes for such a ridiculous thought: 

" Doesn't this recall our wedding trip? " 

He smilingly placed a finger on his lips, and mysteriously said: 

" Hush ! 8ome one might hearyoul At the Royal Hotel they 
think I am unmarried, and an American lady there wants me for 
her son-in-law." 

» What!" 

"Oh, yes! Everybody is talking about my engagement. They 
are waiting for the Christmas dance to have us pass under the 
mistletoe." 

He seemed to enjoy the fun of the thing so hngely that 1 had 
not tbe heart to scold him. I only said: 

"Oh, Hubert! " 

But he gallantly raised my hand to his lips without fearing to 
scandalize a clergyman who, severe and silent, sat in tbe other 
corner of the compartment. 

•* I assure you, Berthe, dear, that 1 am not to blame in the 
least. This provident mother beard the hotel-keeper call me « Ex- 
cellency.' I had a particle before my name and a crown on my 
traps; so she at once put her daughter in my way, and has man- 
aged several tete-a-tetes for ua. My mother-in-law watches me 
closely. She was very much alarmed at my trip to Vintimille, 
and asked the porter whether I took my luggage. I almost be- 
lieve that for a moment she thought of letting her daughter come, 
too. I am sure that both will be at tbe station." 

Sure enough, as tbe train entered the little depot of San-Remo 
I noticed two ladies in a pony-chaise. They did not see me, but 
sent Hubert a coquettish salute, tbe mother with the end of her 
whip, the daughter with her parasol. There was barely twenty 
years difference between the ages of the two, and they looked 
just as I had pictured them. Their wavy hair had the same red- 
dish golden tint, natural, perhaps, with the daughter. You might 
have taken them for sisters. Hubert beamed. I asked him: 

<< Is there a father? " 

" He must have remained in Chicago salting pork. They never 
speak of him." 

As we went down to dinner a maid handed me some flowers, 
and announced that there would be a dance after pudding. 

I found a large room all festooned with Italian, American, and 
English flags. Garlands of green reached from the chandelier to 
the four corners of the gallery, and a wreath of mistletoe hung 
very low over the entrance. Hubert had our dinner served at a 
separate table. Pointing to the wreath, I said: 

"That is what you are to pass under with Miss What is 

your fiancee's name? " 

"Ethel. Here she comes 1 What a stunning gown she wears 
for the dance I " 



Yes, thr 1 All girl looked very pretty in hemnow white, (pathetic 
[OWD, poffod on the shoulders, and leaving the white arms bare. 
When she entered her eye sought Hubert. She saw him, and at 
tbe same time perceived me. Not a feature moved. She passed 
very graciously, her head so naturally turned away from us that 
I judged her to be an excellent actress notwithstanding her an- 
gelic dress. 

Her mother was less discreet. Hubert's seat next to her at the 
tnlilc d*KBU was vacant. She leaned toward her daughter, prob- 
ably asking news of tbe Absentee, then eyed me calmly and de- 
liberately through her lorgnette. Hubert, bending across tbe 
table, said : 

" Well, my dear, I am going to tax your indulgence still far- 
ther. You must permit me to open the cotillion with Ethel. 
Yes, 1 know, it is not very gallant to leave you alone, but in tbe 
first place you will have the company of my mother-in-law, 
whose conversation, I know, will not bore you. And then, 
frankly, I can't get out of this gracefully just yet. If I retreated, 
now that you have arrived, I should be laughed at as a married 
man who wanted to play bachelor during his wife's absence. 
Y T ou know I am not the man to do such a thing." And as I 
could not help smiling, he said with comical gravity: " Why do 
you laugh ?" 

" I am thinking of the discomfiture of the poor girl. You must 
give her time to grow used to her misfortune. Do me a favor. 
Don't only open tbe cotillion with her, but devote yourself to her 
for the whole evening." 

As Hubert had predicted, I bad barely seated myself in the 
ball-room when Ethel's mother installed herself beside me. She 
graciously spread out her laces, opened her fan, smiled at me, and 
without the least embarrassment addressed me: 

" Dear Madame, I see we have a mutual friend in Count de 
Valville — perhaps you know him longer than we do. We met 
him five days ago, and tbink him a charming man." 

<< Indeed he is, Madame." 

" Of good family ? " 

" Excellent." 

"And so handsome! My daughter is charming, also. Don't 
you think so, Madame ? " 

" I admired her a little while ago." 

» And rich, you know, very rich ! And so well informed I She 
was educated in Boston. She speaks Latin! See how well she 
dances! " 

Hubert and Ethel had just waltzed past us. Many admiring 
eyes watched them. They were certainly the most elegant couple 
in tbe room. My neighbor continued: 

« Don't you think, dear Madame, that Count de Valville would 
be a suitable husband for my daughter ? See how well they look 
together, height and all! " 

She was so delighted with her combination that it seemed cruel 
to disillusion her. It took all my courage to say: 

"Certainly, madame, but there is a slight obstacle " She 

did not let me finish. 

" Which? M. de Valville is not rich ? We do not care for 
money " 

»»It is not that; M. de Valville is not free !' 

" You are sure ? " 

" He is married! " 

"To whom ?" 

"To me." 

My neighbor looked at me with open-monthed astonishment 

an astonishment not flattering to me. I concluded that this was 
not her first mistake of the kind. Finally the lady's mouth 
closed, and she obligingly said to me: 

" I thought on seeing you, Madame, that you were his sister 

yes, his sister — you might so well be bis sister 1 It would have 
been so nice! What a pity, Madame, that you are not his sister I 
They are such a handsome couple I Look at them ! What a pity ! 
[Translated from the French of Hugues Le Roux, by Alice Ziska ] 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

123 California Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1894. 




1 We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's 



IN the wide, wide world there is not a better picture of grief and 
poverty than Edward Harrigan's Old Lavender. There are 
places in it, however, where one stops to suppress a yawn, and 
there are places in it where one tries to suppress a tear. But the 
best of plays have their dull moments, and he is a great author 
who can build a play without monotony. There are very few 
dramatic writers of the hour who regard the stage play as a seri- 
ous thing, and in the whole list of dramatists none has striven 
to give as true and serious a picture of any phase of contempora- 
neous existence in America to such an extent as Mr. Harrigan. 
He has reproduced with wonderful realism the life of the East 
Side. Old Lavender is just a bit unreasonable, and its main plot 
is slightly exaggerated in order that the main scenes may be held 
tightly together; bat the denouement is not disappointing, and 
then, it is the characters, and not the plot, that interest one in 
Old Lavender. Edward Harrigan's character of Cieorge Coggswell 
is the central attraction of the piece; everything is built around 
it. It is a wonderful piece of work, and true to nature, from the 
lame walk, nervous fingers, and swollen face, to the tattered gar- 
ments. It fits Mr. Harrigan like a perfect glove. It is his artistic 
triumph. It is good enough to make him rank as one of the 
leading character actors of the age. The absence of effort, the 
absolutely perfect comprehension, the naturalness of personifica- 
tion lead us to believe that Mr. Harrigan is one of two things — a 
genins, or merely himself. His mummers give him excellent sup- 
port in Old Lavender, but there are a few among them who might 
thrive if they had a few good lessons from Mr. Harrigan himself. 
Harry Wright, for instance, the comely young man with the 
chrysanthemum locks, is altogether too stagey. We also take 
pleasure in informing bim that when a man makes love to a 
woman, even though she be a married woman, he does not do it 
in the same way that a schoolboy recites *< Kienzi's Address to 
the Romans." It was the roughest love-making that was ever 
seen on the stage; there was not even a tinge of gentility in it. 
Another mummer who needs the watchfulness of Mr. Harrigan's 
eagle eye is George Merritt. In the three plays which have been 
produced since Mr. Harrigan came among us, that mummer has 
appeared with the same ungainly, unnatural walk. No man, 
no matter how low bis calling or bow disjointed his brain, 
walks like a sick owl in a basin of hot water, as does Mr. Mer- 
ritt through Mr. Harrigan's plays. Joseph Sparks is always 
good, and so is Dan Burke. As the negro and the Italian their 
work is imbued with a spirit of sincere humor. Miss Lee and 
Miss Moore played their roles very acceptably, and little Miss 
Pollock made a decided success of Dick, the Rat. There is one 
adjunct of Harrigan's plays that is always a success, and that is 
the songs. They are sung in a soul-stirring manner by good 
voices, and they are songs that will always be worth the hearing. 



One of the handsomest young ladies that the stage has ever 
seen is Miss Inez Dean, the young contralto who made her debut 
a fortnight ago at the Orpheum. Sbe has a beautiful face, full of 
expression and sentiment, and a voice that matches it perfectly. 
Her tall, dignified figure will be a valuable addition to any stage. 
With the exception of two numbers, the Orpheum programme 
this week is interesting. Those two are O'Brien and Redding 
and the Pack Quartette. It is hard to tell which is O'Brien and 
which is Redding, but whichever is the man, there is no excuse 
for his being on the stage, except it be that he wants to show the 
public that the range of aBses is still a wide one. He is not funny ; 
he is painfully Idiotic. The woman, also, might find some other 
calling that would suit her better. Th'e Pack Quartette was cut 
off from its queer antics, on the second night of its appearance, 
by the stage manager, who lowered a drop scene while the singers 
were being unmercifully guyed by the gods. The programme 
will be strengthened by the addition of the Braatz Brothers, Con- 
nors and Staley, O'Brien and Carroll, and Charles H. Duncan, who 
will appear after the strike is over. 
* * * 

On Monday evening Dick Turpin will be seen at the Tivoli Opera 
House. If all that has been heard about it is true, it will be one 
of the Tivoli's greatest successes. To-nigbt and to-morrow night 
will be the last performance of Tar and Tartar. 

• * * * 

The Baldwin Theatre will reopen for its twelfth regular season on 
Monday. The attraction will be Mrs. James Brown Potter and 
Kyrle Bellow, who will play a week's engagement. They will pre- 
sent, during the week, three plays, Therese, In Society, and Charlotte 
Corday, all of which are new here. The last-named will receive its 
first American production at the Baldwin. Therese has been 
played in the Eastern cities with considerable success. In Society 
is a drama of the highest order, and Mrs. Potter will wear some 



gorgeous costumes in it. The repertoire for the week has been 
arranged as follows: Monday and Tuesday, Therese; Wednesday 
and Thursday, and Saturday matin6e, In Society; Friday and Sat- 
urday, Charlotte Corday. 

* * * 

On Monday, the 16th inst., John Drew will appear at the Bald- 
win, for the first time in this city, as a star. He will present, 
during his engagement, all the plays that he has appeared in dur- 
ing the past season. The opening piece will be Henry Guy Carle- 
ton's The Butterflies, which is one of the latest Eastern successes. 
It will be followed by The Masked Ball. 

* # * 

The Midwinter Fair Quintette will give a concert at Metropol- 
itan Hall on Thursday evening next. F. K. Tobin, the trombon- 
ist; Genaro Saldierna, the violinist; Will E. Bates, the tenor; 
George McNiece, the clarionetist, and Charles H. Prince, the 
pianist, will assist in performing the numbers of an excellent pro- 
gramme. Miss Neva M. Krehmeke will make her d6but as a 
vocalist on that evening. 

* * * 

The Leather Patch, which Mr. Harrigan will present at the Cali- 
fornia next week, is another of his merry plays of New York 
lower life. It was originally produced in that city in 1886, and 
made an instantaneous hit. In this play Mr. Harrigan appears 
as an undertaker whose father leaves a will which for safe keep- 
ing is placed beneath a leather patch, which is sewed to a pair of 
trousers. The trousers are stolen and pawned. The search for 
them forms the ground work of the play. 

Business men making a specialty of one article of commerce are 
becoming more numerous every day. Edmund Taylor, of 218 Post 
street, is making a specialty of imported Irish Linens. Ladies and 
gentlemen should bear in mind that he sells the finest handkerchiefs, 
shirting, linens, table linens, huck damask, bath towels, crashes, can- 
vases, and stamped linens for embroidery in the city. He carries no 
other goods except those. 

BALDWIN THEATRE.-EXTRA. 

Al Haymen Lessee and Manager. 

Reopening Monday, July 9th. One week only. Only matinee Saturday. 

MRS. POTTER 



MR. BEULEW, 



And an excellent metropolitan company. 

Monday and Tuesday evenings— THERESE, by Emile Zola. 

Wednesday, Thursday evenings and Saturday matinee— IN SOCIETY, 
by Alexander Dumas. 

Friday and Saturday evenings— CHARLOTTE COBDATf, first time in 
America. 

Meats now ready Next Attraction— JOHN DREW, in "The Butterflies." 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 



. Lessees. 



Matiuee Satur- 



AlHa,YMAN«£CO.. 

S.N. Fribdlandek, Manager. 
Week of July 9th— Every evening, including Sunday, 
day. The most absolute and emphatic success, MR. 

EDWARD HARRIGAN'S 

famous creation of THE I I till I It PATCH. 

All the original music by Dave Braham. 

Reserved Seats, night— 25c., 50c , 75c., jl. Reserved seats, matinee— 25c. 
50c, 7JC. Next— CORDELIA'S ASPI RATIONS . 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

KkklinqBroh ..Proprietors and Managers. 

Fifth and last week. Last nights. Eclipsing all other successes. 
The great comic opera success, 

TAR AND TARTAR. 

By Harry B. Smith and Adam Itzell, Jr. 
Monday, July 9th— DICK TURPIN. 
PopdlaePeicbs 25 and 50c 

ORPHEUM- 

O'Farrell St., between Stockton and Powell Sts. 
San Francisco's Great Music Hall. 
Week of Monday, July 9th — A superb programme of 
MEW ATTRACTIONS. 

The vaudeville world strongly represented by our splendid aggregation 
of picked artists. 

A B1IX OF BARE MERIT, 

Introducing refined novelties, strong specialties, and along list of enter- 
taining acts. By long odds the greatest specialty show offered in the city. 

Reserved Seats, 25e. ; Balcony 10c. ; Opera Chairs and Box SeatB, 50c. 

Saturday and Sunday matinees. 

i I IAN RFRHARn The En g lisn actress, coaches ladies and 
L_ I L_ L I M 11 ULL/L/MnU, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 

O I A IVI f*% C A - L - BANCROFT & CO. 
rlMllWO 303 Sutter St., S.F. 

Knabe, Haines, Bush & Gerts, and others- 
Cash or installments. Please call or correspond. 

FRANCISCO. BANCROFT 



Julv 7, 1894 . 



SAN FUAXCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



THE EYES OF PUBLIC SCHOOL CHILDREN. 

(Bl Dl VlBKOK.1 

' * TV' oor P ubIic schools develop short-sightedness among chlld- 
Ly ren* " is a question that bas been considered by special- 
ists, with a decision in tbe affirmative. One of tbese learned men, 
after a scientific examination of a number of school children and 
a close study of tables of statistics, goes so far as to say that 
children are taktn from school at ten years of age simply be- 
cause they are too near-sigbted tn see anything, and so learn 
nothing, become discouraged, and are finally pnt to work because 
their parents feel that they are wasting their time at school. 

This seems to me to contain some exaggeration. Tbe teachers 
in tbe San Francisco public schools are awake to the dilficulties 
of near-sighted pupils, and do everything that can well be done 
by favoring them as to seats or lights to remove their disability, 
and help them overcome their natural handicap in tbe race for 
knowledge. 

But It cannot be denied that the conditions in all the schools 
are favorable to the development of diseases of the eye. Cross 
lights are ruinous to the organs of vision, and yet they exist in 
nearly every school room in San Francisco. How cross lights can 
always be avoided it is impossible to see, when we consider the 
problem of ventilation and the need of fresh air in every school 
room. The more windows we can have the better. The problem 
of bow to regulate the light might be solved if we had inside 
blinds or roller shades to every window. But such luxuries do 
not exist in every schoolbonse in San Francisco. Some of our 
school windows have been painted a dull white, which, wnile it 
tempera the glare of the sun. does not entirely do away with 
cross lights. 

ii Do you see these glasses? " asked a lady, taking a pair from 
her nose and looking up from the article of the scientist on school 
children's eyes, published in a San Francisco daily paper; 
H I have worn these glasses for the last ten years, and I am 
not the only one of my graduating class who bad to consult 
an oculist after I left school. My last year in the high school 
was made miserable by a patch of sunlight that would fall near 
the teacher's desk and not far from my seat. There was no way 
to avoid seeing it, for our inside blinds had been carted away to 
the cellar on tbe ground that we were too fond of sitting in the 
darkl The windows had shades, but these did not cover the 
upper sash, which was rounding at the top, and the shade was 
stretched across the window beginning at the lower ends of the 
arc. 

" What I suffered from pains in my head and flashes before my 
eyes in tbe dark, I do not like to remember. It resulted in a visit 
to a specialist, who thoroughly examined my eyes, and who de- 
clared that my case was only one of many such which had been 
brought to him for treatment. I was not short-sighted; on the 
contrary, I was very far-sighted, a fact upon which I bad prided 
myBelf in the school-room, often ostentatiously taking a seat fur- 
thest from the blackboard, so as to give up my good position to 
some less fortunate companion. The trouble, said the oculist, 
was excessive strain of tbe muscles of accommodation of the eye. 
He insisted that the practice of patting work to be copied on 
state or in a book upon a blackboard, and expecting children to 
glance up and away to the blackboard, and then down and near 
to their paper on their desk, called for a constant shifting of the 
focus of the eye, first, to discern the distant object, and then to 
follow the motion of tbe pen in his own hand under his nose." 

For years the children in our public schools look from the desk 
to the blackboard, from the blackboard to tbe desk. Cross lights 
make writing upon the blackboards quite indistinguishable at 
times, especially when the teacher, with a mistaken craze for fine 
writing, makes almost illegible marks upon the surface, or the 
blackboard itself, either because of poor material or old age, bas 
become shiny and too slippery to write upon. Cracks or nicks 
in the old blackboards of course show white plaster, and add con- 
fusion to the white writing of the chalk. The chalk itself is often' 
too hard in quality to write smoothly or legibly. Then the con- 
stant erasing of the writing from the blackboard fills the air with 
chalk dust, which is bad for the eyes and for the lungs as well. 
It does not seem possible that it is still necessary to insist upon 
pure air for the preservation of the sight, and yet many people 
ignore this fact. 

Much stress has been laid upon the books read by children in 
school. Some authorities on tbe eye go so far as to recommend 
that all books, and slates, and pencils, and paper should be ban- 
ished from the school-room until the child is out of the primary 
grades. This advice could not be followed without depriving a 
vast army of young children of their only means of gaining a 
working knowledge of reading and writing. Nor is it founded 
upon necessity. From my observation in the school-room I should 
sa"y it was as bad to compel children to learn everything from a 
blackboard as to make them do all desk work. "Change about" 
is best. The harm to tbe child's eye is done when he is compelled 
to copy work, word for word or letter by letter, from the black- 
board, looking up and down, up and down, many times in a 
minute. The white paper on which our school books are printed, 
the small size of much of the type, and the glaze on the paper in 
the books and on the foolscap, strain the eye. Much injury is 



worked by the use of the fine ruled paper for writing. The child 
is compelled to study lines and spaces, and instead of studying a 
letter in all its parts and the relation of tbe curve to the straight 
line, and the height and the slant, he Is put to the torture, and 
compelled by the »one system" to make a thing of angles, just 
so long, just bo wide, slanlinn here, stopping there, and a line and 
a space the unit of measure for every letter. This method tarns 
out fairly good mechanical writers or penmen, who as long as 
they have their fine lined paper can do laborious work of a cer- 
tain kind of excellence. Hut there is no freedom of motion, no 
independence, no character in the writing, and when deprived of 
their guide lines such little scribes are completely at sea. Tbe 
strain on the eyes is very great. The use of a greasy slate and a 
poor quality of slate pencil on lines that have been scratched on 
the slate with (he sharp end of a file or the point of a knife cause 
a failure of sight. I have seen little children bending their heads 
over their desks at the most uncomfortable of angles so as to be 
able to see wbat they write on their slates. 

We need a soft green color for slates, if that were possible. No 
more white glazed paper should be in a school-room. The cross 
lights should be >emoved, ventilation improved, and less strain 
imposed upon tbe eyes of the young. 



SPECIAL RUG SALE 

Until July 15th. 



We have placed on sale 2500 Rugs — ORIENTAL 
and DOMESTIC— and INGRAIN ART SQUARES, 
at prices never before approached in this city. 

SriYRNA RUGS. 

Best quality, ROYAL AND IMPERIAL. These 
are not the cheap and flimsy ones commonly used, 
but the BEST QUALITY. 

, ^ „ , , Sale Price . Regular Price. 

lit. 9 in. by 8 it. 9 in $150 $2 26 

2 it. 2 in. by 4 it. 6 in 2 00 3 00 

2 ft. 6 in. by 5 it. in 2 75 4 00 

3 it. in. by 6 it. in 4 00 5 75 

4 ft. in. by 7 it. in. 6 75 9 50 

ART SQUARES 

All Wool Ingrain, (Not part cotton. ) 

„,,,.. , Sale Price. Regular Price. 

7>4it.by9it $6 65 J 7 60 

9it. by9ft 6 75 900 

9ft.byl0«ft 790 10 50 

9 it. by 12 fi 900 12 00 

9 it. byl3^it 10 15 13 50 

12 it. by 15 It 15 00 20 10 

ORIENTAL RUQS. 

A great variety at correspondingly low prices. 
The kinds and sizes are too numerous to quote, 
but for example we mention 

DAQHESTANS FROM $6 UP. 

W. & J. Sloane & Co., 

Carpets, Furniture, Upholstery, 

641-647 MARKET ST. 

Joshua Hendy 
Machine Works, 

Proprietors of the CITY IRON WORKS, 
Manufacturers of and Dealers in Boilers, 
Engines, Pumps and Machinery of every 
description. Patent lead-lined Coupled 
Tubing, for use as Water Pipe, for sale 
cheap. 
Office: 51 FREMONT ST. San Francisco, Cat . 

Will Remove to 824 Market St., Phelan Building, July 1st. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1894. 




the: 

OOKCR-ON. 




WE have just learned that the "Western Addition has a social 
club composed of married ladies whose b usbands are noted for 
staying down town rather late at night. The ladies meet fre- 
quently and gosBip freely about the many little things that are so 
dear to the feminine heart, but they seldom speak about the 
short-comings of the heads of the household. Sometimes a lady 
will speak in a guarded way of dear George, or Frank, or 
"William, who has to work so hard during the economic crisis 
that often he has to stay out until long hours doing the work 
that he used, when things were different, to hire others toper 
form. That is real nice and sweet, and there is a delicacy about 
the way in which it is put, and none other than a woman would 
know how to handle such a dangerous subject as a refractory 
husband. Some of the dear ladies of the Western Addition Club 
may make it lively for their liege lords in the privacy of their 
own homes, but at a meeting of the club they are referred to only 
in the most tender terms. Every week a dinner is given by one of 
the ladies, and all the others are expected lo be present with their 
husbands; but sad to relate, after an existence of three months, 
the average attendance of husbands has not been encouragingly 
large, two being the most that could be mustered at any of the 
various dinners given by the ladies. The husband of the lady 
who gives the dinner is expected to be present at all hazards, and 
help to assist his wife in entertaining the club members, and 
thus far but one failure in that respect has been scored. It occurred 
last week, when the husband forgot all about it until midnight. 
He had been talking to an undertaker on the science of embalm- 
ing, and when he reached home, wearied with mental strain and 
the waters of Bacchus, the company waB just leaving. He must 
have needed some embalming fluid himself, for as he remarked 
to a friend on the following day, "I fell dead." 

* * * 

There was a jolly little scene in a Bohemian restanrant a few 
nights ago, which brought to light one of the unaccountable 
luxuries which men of the world will call for, probably more for 
the sake of variety than anything else. We have often heard of 
champagne baths, but this one was sparkling enough to put the 
breath of life and the spirit of passion into an Egyptian mummy. 
1 hs citizen was not accustomed to such tbingB, but he went up there 
and ordered at champagne bath, to cost $500. The tub was pre- 
pared, a number of cases of different brands were brought in, and 
soon the corks were popping and the tub was filled. He got into 
the bath, and soon began to revel in one of those delights which 
made him believe that he must be living in another day of 
Arabian nights. Presently a thought strnck him. He sat upright, 
rang the bell, and waited with an eager countenance until the 
waiter came in. 

"How many bottles of champagne did you put in the bath?" 

"Well, you ordered $500 worth, and I pot in one hundred 
bottles," answered the garcon. 

"The devil you did I I want you to get twenty bottlea more." 

"But, sir, the price is $5 a bottle." 

"Well, that don't go with me, young fellow. I will pay $5 a 
bottle to drink champagne, but I'm hanged if I'm going to allow 
any McKinley tariff to be placed on my bath." 

And the waiter hurried away for another twenty bottles. 

* * * 

Robert Grayson is a popular member of the Pacific Union Club, 
and is fond of field sports. Mr. Grayson was fishing in 8an An- 
dreas Lake recently, where he encountered a singular adventure. 
He had just landed a black bass, and had cast his shrimp-baited 
hook behind him, when a friend of his in a boat close off shore 
shouted to him. Grayson, permitting his bait to lie on the 
ground, replied. In the middle of the conversation he felt a 
wrench on the rod on his shoulder which almost dragged him to 
the ground, and the line went hissing from the reel. He turned 
sharply and beheld a plump young hog, which, nosing around, had 
gobbled shrimp and hook, running up the hillside. Now, Mr. 
Grayson's split bamboo is a handsome one, and to save it he ran 
like a streak after the hog, reeling in line as he went. Down the 
slope on the other side went piggy, Mr. Grayson badly in the 
rear. At last a big boulder tripped him mercifully up, and in his 
fall the line broke, the hog went off with the slack, and the rod 
was saved. When that pig comes to his natural and inevitable 
end, the gourmet who discovers a number eight Limerick hook 
in its jowls will have something to speculate on. 

* * » 

The toilets that one sees at the seaside are always jaunty and 
natty, but there is an unusual amount of chic about them this sea- 
sun. It is difficult to define jnst what this chic is; whether it is 
in the cut of the gown, or the material composing it, or the trim- 
ming ornamenting it, but it stamps the summer gill's seaside 
clothes — her bathing suit as well as the fluffy tulle frock which 



she wears in the ballroom. All of these have a certain crisp charm 
about them, quite a salty flavor, if such a term can be feasibly 
used in describing personal adornment. Take the yachting suit 
that one sees at Santa Cruz, for instance. It is of dark blue 
serge, like any other girl's mountain dress, but it differs from that 
in having a dainty vest of scarlet cloth, striped with gold braid. 
a large collar, in which the same color scheme is carried out, and 
energetic-looking roll cuffs, on which "dear little anchors," as the 
girls call them, are worked in gold. Her sailor hat differs from 
the land girl's sailor. It is a white suede affair, with wide band, 
on which nautical emblems are embroidered. The seaside girl of 
this season leaves white duck shoes to the mountain maid. She 
knows the havoc that wet sands work with them, and conse- 
quently wears dark ties that fit daintily, or tan-colored tieB and 
stockings to match. The white parasol is in evidence this sea- 
son. But that does not find favor in her eyes. A cool, blue shade 
is more to her liking when she is gazing on the deep blue sea. 
The mountain costumes are very pretty, and the white duck suits 
with colored vests are distinctly the thing. That is about the 
exact resume of the costumes that one will see at any resort, 
from Castle Crag to Coronado, this year. 
» * » 

Mrs. Pbelan, mother of the orator and widow of the famous 
connoiseur in plaster statues, was looking over an art catalogue 
with a view to adding to the already famous Phelan collection. 
She noted thai the catalogue very highly extolled the beauty of a 
"Winged Victory" that was dug up near Athens not lone before, 
and which had excited the admiration of artists and critics of the 
entire world. So Mrs. Phelan promptly ordered a replica of the 
ancient statue. 

Now this particular Winged Victory had the misfortune to lose 
her head some time back in the ages, and when she was dug out 
from a pile of ruins she was minus that part of her marble anat- 
omy. But Mrs. Phelan didn't know anything of that; so when 
the replica arrived she was very angry. 

•< Those .careless railroad people!" she exclaimed. "They've just 
knocked the head off that woman. I'll send after them for dam- 
ages." And so she did. Her claim was regularly presented to 
the railroad officials. An agent was sent to inspect the statue, 
and he returned with the report that it certainly was headless, 
and that in all likelihood the company was to blame. 

The gentlemen who attend to the claim business of the S. P. 
Company are not all highly educated in art, and they recom- 
mended that Mrs. Phelan's demand be allowed. And that is 
how Mrs. Phelan was paid for a Winged Victory's head that is 
lying over in Greece somewhere. 

# k * 

Secretary Holbrook, of the S. P. C. A., has a mortal aversion to 
bulls. When at the Fair he sallied forth to forbid the bull-fight- 
ing feature of the fiesta, he could not be induced to examine the 
steers. In the country, when Mr. Holbrook sees a steer coming 
along the road, he will climb a fence and turn his back until the 
animal has passed. The reason of this dread and abhorrence of 
bovines dates from the period when Mr. Holbrook was a school- 
boy, attending the old City College in Oakland. Creeping unwil- 
lingly to school one fine spring morning, Urchin Holbrook felt 
himself suddenly lifted into the air, a rampagious cow having in- 
serted her born under the band of his trouserlets. Then the beast 
tried to shake Holbrook off, but the stitches were honest ones, 
and so she carried him in her mad career to Twelfth street, and 
finally pitched him into the muddy waters of Lake Peralta. Since 
that eventful day, Mr. Holbrook cannot abide a cow. 

The Rev. Horatio 8tebbins and General W. H. L. Barnes were 
riding on a Geary street car the other day, deeply interested in 
heavy religious subjects, which were occasionally brightened by 
the General's flashes of wit. They were talking about Bob Inger- 
soll and his doctrines and the General surprised the reverend gen- 
tleman by saying, <• There is one thing that I admire in men who 
believe in nothing." 

" Why, General Barnes, how is that ? " 

" Because, Stebbins, tbey believe bo much in themselves." 

* w w 

The Fourth, at Burlingame, was spent in a very happy man- 
ner. The few trains from Third and Townsend streets brought 
down a number from this city who were to be the guests of the 
club members on the natal day. Miss Tobin gave a luncheon, so 
did Miss Dimond, and Mrs. Spreckeis and Mrs. Page Brown had a 
number of merry people in their cottages during the noon hours. 
There were races in the afternoon, and a few sets of tennis were 
played. Mr. Clifton distinguished himself in the saddle. 



The economic crisis is a dangerous thing, and it is a source of 
trouble to all men. Nothing will allay that trouble so easily as a 
drink of Argonaut whisky, which would make a man forget all the 
troubles of his existence. It is a wonderful stimulant, and by long 
odds the best whisky in the market to-day. All admirers of good 
liquor drmk Argonaut whisky in preference to any other. E. Mar- 
tin & Co., agents, 408 Front street. 

Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 



Julv 7. 1894. 



SAN m YNCISCO NEWS LKTTI K. 



CRICKET. 



Til K season keeps up iu early reputation and is full of sur- 
prises. On Sunday last, the proud colors of the Bohemians 
who were well in the lead, were trampled in tbe dust and dragged 
all over tbe field by the •• lail-endrrv" Mr. Anson, tbe Captain 
of tbe California*, played one of bis old-time innings, remaining 
unbeaten at tbe close for a fine 87. It is a very rare occurrence 
for one of the best players to go in first and carry his bat at tbe 
close of the innings, and it is a feat for the genial Captain to be 
highly proud of. particularly against tbe Bohemia bowling. 

it ta hoped that this is but the forerunner of a series of victor- 
lea for the " tail-enders," as tbe other clubs are running so uneven 
that any spurt from that direction makes the fun fast and furious. 

When tbe Bohemians first took Alameda into camp at the be- 
ginning of the season, dismissing them for a meagre thirty runs, 
it was a championship feat, and nnequaled in tbe history of tbe 
Alameda Cricket Club, but, alas, bow tbe mighty fall! Their 
total effort last Sunday against the Pacific CricKet Club, with a 
magnificent batting team, resulted in one run less — viz: 29. 
Think of it, ye admirers of tbe grand old game! Uood, Hogue, 
Richardson, Moriarity, and Sloman, all out for a total of thirteen 
rnns! It seems absolutely impossible, and yet it happened, and 
only proves that a » glorious uncertainty " is one of the greatest 
charms of the game. •• To the victors belong the spoils," and 
it is a performance that the scarlet and black may well be proud 
of. Much could be said for the unfortunates, but, undoubtedly, 
tbe best team won. They fielded excellently. Three good catches 
were made by the veteran Wiseman, and a grand stand catch 
from Richardson's bat by another old reliable, George Theobald. 
That playing had a material influence on the result. Griffiths and 
Cassidy bowled excellently, tbe latter especially keeping a good 
length with mathematical accuracy. 

Ward, Jr., and Hoinan bowled very well, but were supported 
only indifferently, so that the deadly sting was lacking, but it 
was their inability to bat that distinctly lost the game for the 
Alamedas. 

8o much for an off day. If good batters never bad them, poor 
players would soon get tired of trying to get in a game, and a 
match would be like deciding an opinion with the " toss up " of a 
double headed coin. 

To-morrow will be sure to produce a strong struggle at the Ala- 
meda grounds between the Alamedas and the Bohemians. Each 
team having lost a game to the other, will put forth every effort 
to turn the scale. Should the champions lose, it will put them 
back four points, and should Bohemia lose it will even its score 
with that of the Alameda and Pacific teams. 

The Pacific Club, on present form, should win from the Cali- 
fornias at Golden Gate, but just now I am free to admit that it is 
hard guessing. 

The present standing of the club's playing cup matches is as 
follows: Bohemia — games played, 7; won, 5; percentage, .714; 
Alameda — games played, 7; won, 4; percentage .571; Pacific — 
games played, 7; won, 4; percentage, .571; California — games 
played, 7; won, 1; percentage, .143. p. h. w. 



See that Ste«dman is spelt with two ees when you buy Steedman's 
Soothing Powders. Beware of spurious imitations. 



Fubnished double upper flat to rent in Western Addition. Seven rooms, 
b ath, and attic. Rent, $75 a month. Apply, 3116 Washington street. 



AYER'S 



Prevents 

BALDNESS 
REMOVES 




DANDRUFF 



AND 



Restores Color 

TO 

Faded and Gray 

HAIR 

THE 

Best Dressing 




^sK Your 
Doetor 



Then go to the 



Whether a 
Hot Salt 
Water Tub 
Wouldn't be 
Good for you, 



Curiae 
Batfys. 



A Plunge 150x70 feet. 



ZISKA INSTITUTE, 



1606 VAN NESS AVENUE. 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. French. GermaD, and English Day and Boarding 
School. Elegant home. Best educational advantages. 
Next term commences August 1, 1894. 

miHE. ll ZISKA, A.m., Principal. 



HOTEL 
VENDOME, 



SAN JOSE, GAL 



TO say that the Hotel Vendome is 
the best Is enough in its favor. It 
is one of the largest and most ele- 
gantly appointed hotels in the State. 
It is situated in the center of a finely 
cultivated park twelve acres in ex- 
tent, and is surrounded by trees of 
many years' growth. 

The location is in the most fashion- 
able part of the city of San Jose, and 
is only two blocks from the Southern 
Pacific Railroad depot. Electric cars 
pass the door at short intervals . 

The appointments of the hotel are 
first-class in every particular, being 
furnished throughout in the most 
elegant and attractive manner. 

(JeO. p. 59 6 "> MANAGER. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1894. 




THOSE on the inside among Mrs. Catherwood's acquaintances 
claim that the recently announced engagement of that lady 
to Mr. Zimmerman, of Cincinnati, has been an expected thing 
for some time past, as the widow's matronly affections were 
touched by the persistent wooing of the gentleman, whom she 
met in Louisville. It is commented upon as a coincidence by 
Mrs. Catherwood's friends that both mother and daughter should 
have found their mates in the Southern city; and it is comforting 
to know that the many millions attributed to Mr. Zimmerman 
will furnish additional sinews of war, in case of further will con- 
tests and the like. 

* * * 

That there should be more or less gossip floating about our fash- 
ionable "outing" resorts is to be expected, of course, for where) 
people congregate the unruly member is pretty certain to wag, 
and San Rafael rejoices in the presence of so many dowagers of 
well known chatty propensities it is small wonder that Dame 
Rumor finds pleasant gronnd there. One of the latest on dits from 
this delightful spot is the devotion of a talented young architect 
to one of the Delmas girls; and another goes that the blonde- 
haired sister-in-law of a lawyer's wife is again in the race for 
favor with the young man from Gotham. Somewhat mysterious 
this to the uninitiated, bat doubtless intelligible enough to " the 
swim." 

The English element at Barlingame is more apparent than ever, 
and Talbot Clifton is to the fore both as rider and beau. The 
" breakfasts " at this charming locale are among the delights of 
8an Mateo county, and no householders are more eagerly culti- 
vated by the girls and men alike than the Page Browns and the 
Dimonds. 

Mrs. Lou Parrott is gaining ground as the leader of festive do- 
ings at Monterey. Whether in walking, riding, swimming, or 
dancing she is sure to be in the lead and enthusiastic on the sub- 
ject. 

* * * 

" It's all very well," said a young lady on the veranda at Del 
Monte the other day, » for Ren 8medburg to say there's no truth 
in the report of his admiration for Miss Hobart, but I'd like to 
know what he is so dead set after her for. And Wilcox, too. 
"Why, he's simply wild about Julia Crocker. But I guess the girls 
are not so certain to bet on; that's where it is." 

It is a common complaint this season that the scarcity of men 
at the different resorts is appalling. Beaux are almost an un- 
known quantity, and the mothers of marriageable daughters are 
puzzling over the problem, *< Why is this thus? " Many reasons 
may be assigned by the observant or thinking mind. First of all, 
money is scarce; next, men's resorts are so delightfully free from 
conventionality— Sausalito's yacht club, the club house at Bur- 
lingame, and the arks at Belvedere all have superior attractions 
to offer the men, apparently; over-playing the devoted to pretty 
women either at San Rafael. Del Monte, or Castle Crag. At the 
first named the beaax vary from the veterans, Carey Friedlander, 
and Henry Reddington, to the juvenile Milty Latham, Addison 
Mizner, and Ed Schmieden. As a girl pathetically remarked 
Fourth of July night on the club house balcony, "Awfully nice 
boys in their way, but not profitable to tie to. Hugo Toland 
doesn't count, and Dr. Tevis is so carefully guarded that no one 
outside the family set can get a show at him." 

* * « 

Davy Crockett's advice, "Be sure you are right, then go ahead," 
would be a good thing for a certain society youth to study. The 
deplorable way in which the young man flounders Into nice little 
quiet confabs, secret strolls, and after-dinner flirtations is a trial 
to those whom he thus disturbs. 

When people go into public places they should, in the words of 
the old distich, " Three things observe with care: Of whom they 
speak, to whom they speak, and how, and when, and where." 
A couple at the Midwinter Fair recently had evidently never 
beard this, or if so, had paid no heed to its moral teaching. The 
man was a well-known married" man, a clubman, and a gay one; 
his wife is at a rural resort; the lady, a society light. He was 
urging her to go to a caf£ near by and have refreshments, when, 
quite oblivious to the fact that on all sides around her were atten- 
tive ears and eyes, she replied that there was no fun in a cafe" — 
to go and see if some of the officials would not let them go into 
one of their rooms and have a little time there! And people won- 
der how th»y get " talked about," and how on earth things get 
oat. 

At Santa Cruz there is a diversity of girls in all styles and all 



ages, from the opening bud to the very full-blown flower. Pos- 
sibly the merriest of the youthful set is the trio composed of the 
cousins Ethel Keeney and Leontine Blankman, and Helen Thorn- 
ton, Crit Thornton's daughter. These girls are inseparable com- 
panions, and have a gay tent on the beach, wherein they gather 
a following of boy beaux as well as oldsters (on occasions), and 
the laughter which rings out from its sides is a sound delightful 
to hear. 

* * * 

Again rumor declares it to be the intention of handsome wid- 
ower Babcock to enter the matrimonial state for the second time. 
The lady, It is said, is to be found in Marin county. 
* * * 
Every one at San Rafael's hostelrie is commenting upon the re- 
semblance between Dentist Yonnger's second daughter and Mrs. 
Louis Haggin. 

» * * 

So far the guests at Castle Crag seem to be having a thoroughly 
"country" time — less fashion and dress, and more lazy enjoy- 
ment of fresh air and pine woods. The stylish widow, Mrs. Kate 
Favre, is as popular op there as she was last season, while Mrs. 
Easton at the Crocker cottage has afternoon teas for a coterie of 
intimate friends. 

Husbands, brothers and bachelors wishing to obtain the best 
gentlemen's furnishing goods and latest tailoring should go to John 
"W. Carmany, 25 Kearny street. 



After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. You 
will find it admirable. 




Contains Valuable Medicinal Properties 
in all cases of Affection of the Digestive 
Organs, prevent Cholera, and have in- 
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Dyspepsia, Malarial Fevers, Summer 



These bitters have been Complaints, etc. 
renowned since 1828, ana ^ 

no family should be 
without them. 



A fine Cordial if taken pure, unequal- 
ed for mixing with other Cordials, etc- 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

AGENTS, 314 Sacramento St. 



Eureka 
Fire Hose Co. 




Goodyear Rubber Co., 

R. H. Pease, Vice-President and rianager. 
577-579 Market St., S. F. 73-75 First st., Portland, Or. 



Julv T. 1 



S\N IKW'i I Si I) NT.WK 1. 1. III. R. 



11 



LAWN TENNIS. 



!r\ 




THE seventh annott tournament for the championship of the 
Pacific ODMl commenced at the Hotel Rafael un July Id, and 
continued until the 4tb. when the championship round between 
Sam Hardy and Thomas Driscoll was played. There were thir- 
teen entries, which was rather slim for a championship meeting. 

bat ft was a matter of 
_ — _. _ — -- - — oommeiil a r <> □ d <I the 

courts that this was the 
first meeting for some 
lime in which every 
match was played aDd 
in which winning by de- 
fault was unknown this 
year. Every match was 
stubbornly contested un- 
til ibe last stroke was 
won, and considering 
tbat the matches were all 
best three out of rive in- 
stead of two out of three, 
as in former years, the 
runner up deserves the 
highest credit for bis 
fine exhibition of tennis 
all the way through. 
The strain upon the 
player who has to save 
himself as much as pos- 
sible for the other 
matches in view is 
Sam Hardy, Champion of the always a great one, and it 
Pacific Coast. was simply due to the fact 

that there was a small entry that the association decided to make 
all the matches three out of five, thinking also that tennis should 
prove not only skill but power of endurance, and it was probably 
this that kept some players from reaching the semi-finals, being 
worn out with the play of the morning, and not being in fit con- 
dition to cope with both the heat and the exercise. 

There were many surprises for the public, who rather specu- 
lated upon seeing Sanborn and Sam Hardy play off for tbe right 
of competing against Driscoll, as the former was putting up a 
great game, but somehow or other R. J. Holmes, of Alameda, 
who was his first opponent, showed superior style of play, and 
much to everyone's surprise defeated the left-handed champion 
in straight sets. 

Taking the tournament all through, the play showed an im- 
provement on last year's style, and Hardy, the runner up, vol- 
leyed with better discretion than he did last year. It is strange 
to notice how many of the players adopted the back court game, 
and seldom, or never, came to the net, which rather would have 
improved them against their opponenta who used the same tac- 
tics. Personally we think the volleying game as played by ex- 
champion Taylor is the prettier game, but to combine a good 
strong drive with a first-class volley would give any man a great 
start over most of the local players, who aeem unable to develop 
both strokes to perfection. 

It was a pleasing feature to notice the entry of some of the 
yonnger players, who knew full well that they stood no show of 
winning, yet entered with the determination of learning tourna- 
ment form. We certainly encourage such entries, and only wish 
they were more numerous. 

The best exhibitions of tennis were the matches between the 
Hardy brothers and Magee and Brown, and the spectators were 
treated to some of tbe finest shots made during the runner-ap 
matches. Without doubt Sam Hardy put up the best game all 
through, though in the other match some of Magee's shots were 
worthy of tbe highest praise, but be was not sufficiently steady, 
and lost through wildness. The other matches were, most of 
them, pretty to watch, but hardly of a championship nature, but 
we do not doubt that many of tbe vanquished will be favorably 
heard from during the coming season. 

The Fourth of July presented a bright and pleasing spectacle to 
the players when they arrived, finding every available seat filled 
with the fashionable set of both San Francisco and Oakland. 
There were some fifteen hundred people present, who applauded 
every good shot, no matter who made it. 

At a quarter to three Hardy started the ball rolling, and com- 
menced by making a love game. Driscoll appeared nervous, and 
made double faults at critical times, losing the first set six games 
to love. Hardy again started the second set, taking the first 
game, and after a better exhibition of tennis, placed the second 
set to his credit, with six games to three. He also took the third 
set, with six games to one, winning the championship without 
losing a set. 

Hardy is to be congratulated upon his victory, as he played all 
through a strong game, making but few mistakes and keeping as 
cool as a cucumber through all the excitement, reversing the 
match of last year, which was fresh in the memory of all who 
witnessed it. Driscoll, on the other hand, did not do himself 
justice and seemed at times to be completely winded. His strokes 



were not as clean as usual and he lacked good judgment and se- 
verity. for which he has been Union*, and we are afraid he made 
a big mistake Id OODflnln* his practice to one person instead of 
playing more generally with the other players who were to enter. 
Still, we repeal that he was not up to his usual form, and it may 
be some time before we see him again on tbe courts, as he antici- 
pates eoing East and will remain probably for tbe next two years. 
The Eastern practice should give him an excellent opportunity to 
regain his lost laurels on his return. 

Taking everything into consideration tbe tournament was a 
brilliant success, and people are already anxious to have the 
much-talked-about invitation matches at Del Monte on July 23rd 
and 24th. 

The Association will hold a meeting next Wednesday in the 
Directors' room at the Olympic Club to elect a member of the 
Executive Committee, a vacancy having been caused by the re- 
signation of W. H. Taylor, Jr., and to talk over tournament 
matters for the coming doubles and Ladies' singles, which will be 
held in September next. 



CHANGE OF LABEL 



AND NAME OF BRANDS OF 



SCHLITZ BEER. 

"The enviable world wide reputation 
of Sehlitz Beer necessitated the adoption 
and registration of distinctively character- 
istic labels and packages to fluard our 
friends and ourselves against further un- 
scrupulous infringements and fraudulent 
misrepresentations. We propose to sell 
the products of our brewery as 

SCHLITZ BEER, 

and have decided to discard the use of all 
foreign beer names, such as Pilsener, Bo- 
hemian, Budweiser, Wiener, etc., which 
are being used by scores of brewers in the 
land." 

Our Pilsener will hereafter be sold as 
"SCHLITZ EXPORT " 

Our Extra Pale -will hereafter be sold as 
"SCHLITZ PALE." 

The " LIGHT SPARKLING SCHLITZ" 
will be continued. 

Our Extra Stout will hereafter be sold as 
"SCHLITZ DARK." 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS: 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

212-214 MARKET ST. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



BYRON HOT SPRINGS 

Resort is reached by a pleasant three- 
hour ride by rail from San Francisco. 
The hot mud, hot salt water, and 
hot sulphur baths are infallible cures for 
rheumatism, sciatica, neuralgia, liver 
and kidney troubles, blood and skin dis- 
orders. 
L. R. HEAD, C. R. MASON, 

Proprietor. Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. O., Cal. 




l/icby 5pni?$s, 



MENDOCINO COUNTY, 

Three miles from Jkiah, tbe terminus of the S. F. & N. P. Railway . 
Only known natural electric water. Warm "champagne" baths. Situa- 
tion, location, and scenery not surpassed. Terms, $12 to ?14 per week. 
Posloffice and telephone at springs. 

WM. DOOLAN, Proprietor. 



Q/JC/H/EtyiS 
BIQ TREES- 



THE HOTEL standing among the sequoias is 
now open. Best of accommodations and finest 
of Trout Fishing. J. t. SPEKRY, Prop. 



For information and tickets to Big Trees and 
Yosemite, apply to J. M. HTJTCHINGS, No. 19 
Montgomery street, 9an Francisco. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1894 




Honorary Now lhat the honors due to the several counties 
Mining and districts have been distributed, in regard to the 

tfujards, excellence of their ruining exhibits, the next thing 
to be considered is what is best to be done with the medals, etc., 
looking toward their future preservation and publicity. We 
would suggest that in view of the fact that these trophies, what- 
ever they may be, are taken away to their respective counties, 
they will be to a great extent lost to the greater masses of the 
public, the proper custodian of them is the State Mineral- 
ogist. By placing them with Mr. Crawford, that very efficient 
official could have a special case set aside for them in the Mining 
Bureau, where, deposited in order of merit, they would be seen 
by all visitors. Over two hundred people a day visit this very 
valuable adjunct to the Bureau, and by giving the depository due 
prominence, and marking everything distinctly, the laurels 
gathered by the successful counties and districts would be always 
fresh. If not, they may be placed with some county official, and 
by him be locked up for safety, where their memory will soon be- 
come of the past. We suggest this idea to the mining representa- 
tives in charge of the different exhibits in the hope that they may 
see fit in their good judgment to act upon it. It would make an at- 
tractive addition to the State exhibit, which ought to be encour- 
aged as one of the best of educational factors for the young and 
rising generation. 

$$$ 

A Scherqe There is a report here that a company has been 
Wortq formed in London to float certain properties said to 
Watchiqg, lie in Mariposa county, under the names of the 
Omaha, Lone Jack, W. Y. O. D., and North Star. These are the 
Dames of several of the best paying mines in California, and it is 
to be presumed that the new properties are christened after them 
to help the sale along on the strength of their reputation. It is 
very suspicious, at least, when a scheme presents itself in snch a 
form. It looks too much like masquerading in borrowed plumes. 
The case of the Anglo-Montana Company, which appeared in the 
English market shortly after the "Montana" mine became justly 
celebrated. People should be cautious in regard to this new ven- 
ture, and not be misled by any telegraphic communication which 
does not designate the property specified. For instance, a wire 
from London, " Do you know the North Star mine? Is it O, K.?" 
would certainly bring a favorable reply from any of the more 
prominent mining men here. But he would refer to the prop- 
erty at Grass Valley, and not to some namesake in Mariposa or 
elsewhere, of which he has probably never heard of before. These 
new properties may be all right for aught we know, without hav- 
ing them located more definitely, but their names do not fit them 
right, somehow or another. The other mines referred to are not 
for sale or likely to be. 

% % % 
News The Investor's Gxiardian, of London, says: "At an 

Frorn extraordinary meetiDg of this company, held on 
Abroad. Tuesday last, a resolution was passed approving of 
the amalgamation of the property with that of the Waterloo Min- 
ing Company. The great benefits arising to both parties from 
this arrangement were clearly explained by Sir Samuel Canning, 
who occupied the chair. The combined properties will form one 
of the largest mining undertakings in the world, and the man- 
ager estimates that the monthly production will be about 75,000 
ounces, yielding a profit of £20,000 per annum, as the proportion 
payable to the Silver King shareholders. A most important 
aspect of the Bcheme is its bearing on the economical working of 
the two properties. Under separate management they have been 
for some time at war with each other, and mines affected by the dis- 
pute, which are known to be rich, and have produced good ore, 
could not be touched owing to an order of the California law 
courts. All this doubly expensive litigation will cease, and the 
energies of both parties will now be harmoniously applied to the 
furtherance of the common advantage." 

Complimentary It is always pleasant to note a compliment 
to paid to California mining men, whether it be 

California, from people at home or abroad. The recipient 
in the latest instance is Mr. W. W. Belvin, whose name is familiar 
to this mining community. His indorsement has just been ac- 
cepted by the capitalists in New York who are about to float the 
Victor mine of Cripple Creek, in Colorado, on the New York 
market, of such men as D. H. Moffat, W. A. Farish, and H. R. 
Reid, all of whom are prominent in their own circles. The Victor 
mine is one of the new gold producers of this district, which is so 
rapidly becoming famous, and it is said that it is also one of the 
most promising. Belvin has heretofore been very successful in 
his operations, and he will not likely make a failure in his latest 
venture. 



Corqstoch There is little to report about the Pine street 
Mining market this week. The Board has ODly been in ses- 

Shares. sion for a couple of days, and even then ihe outside 
financial situation does not warrant very much activity in this or 
any other market. Prices opened fairly steady, but the transac- 
tions have been on a moderate scale. Cod. Cal. -Virginia has made 
a shipment of $24,000 to the Carson mint, the product of ore 
from the new development on the 1650-level. The latest letter 
from the superintendent is favorable, but it tends to corroborate 
the belief that in order to tap the main portion of the ore body on 
the 1700-Ievel, cross-cutting will have to be carried on from a 
more southern point than that where the work commenced. The 
future of the other stocks depends largely upon the welfare and 
activity of Con. Virginia. When matters quiet down in com- 
mercial circles and financial affairs get easier, the mining market 
can be expected to do better. 

%%% 

Methods Hon. J. J. Crawford, State Mineralogist, has just 

of issued Bulletin No. 2 on " Methods of Mine Tim- 

Timberiqg, bering," by W. H. Storms, an assistant in the field. 
This is a most comprehensive description of one of the most im- 
portant branches of the mining industry, and it will well repay a 
close and careful study even by men who are well up in the busi- 
ness. There is always something new to be learned by every 
one, unless he belongs to that dogmatic class which cannot be 
taught, self-satisfied that, as individuals, they were gifted from 
birth with omniscience. The compilation of this essay must have 
involved considerable labor, from the amount of work it covers 
in various sections of the State. The illustrations in themselves 
are very creditable, and they will go a longer way in giving people 
abroad a more lucid idea of the system of timbering in use on 
this Coast thao chapters of descriptive writing. 

$ $ $ 

/} tyiniqg Money, of London, says; " A revival of the good 
Boon}. old speculative times of 1889 is being boldly at- 
tempted in many quarters, and if only a concerted plan can be 
arranged, there is no knowing how the public may catch on. Con- 
currently with the revival of the nitrate boom will come a 
marked recovery in gold miDes. They will all be receiving cable- 
grams announcing finds of gold within a few weeks of each 
other. Properties situate in China and Peru will apparently 
strike the lode at the same time. This will stimulate others in 
Colorado and Charters Towers, who will discover the long-lost 
reef within a couple of hours of each other." What is the mat- 
ter with California being heard from, too, at the same time? 

? $ % 
ft New A company has just been formed here to raise cap- 
Miniqg ital to exploit the Lincoln gold mine, of Placer county. 
Scheme, The property is said to possess considerable merit as 
an investment, and it can be safely recommended as worthy of in- 
vestigation. The average assay of the ore runs from $15 to $20, 
mill runs giving an average return of $10 in free gold. The cost 
of mining, milling, and supplies is comparatively moderate. 

% % % 

THE Mining Journal, of London, is runniDg an article on the 
geology and mineralogy of Shasta county, by H. W. Fair- 
banks, F. G. S. A. 

■p ¥ ¥ 

A RECENT working of ore from the Osborne Hill Mine, of Ne- 
vada county, averaged $70 per ton in gold. 

$ $ $ 

Local The operations at the San Francisco Clearing 

Bank House for the first six months of the year aggregate : 

Clearings, Clearings, $324,627,578; balances, $45,669,752, 
against $381,997,678 in clearings and $50,478,846 balances for the 
same period in 1893. For the last week in June there was a 
small increase over the corresponding week last year. That was 
the first week in twenty-six of which this could be said. The 
total for June, 1893, was $57,429,074, or about $6,200,000 in excess 
of last month. For the last half of the year it is believed the com- 
parison will be more favorable than it has been during the first 
half. 

$ $ $ 

Outside The following savings institutions of San JoBe 

Bankiqg are paying semi-annual dividends: Commercial and 
Diuidends, Savings Bank, Bank of San Jose, and Security 
Bank, all at the rate of 5 per cent, per annum on term, and 4 per 
cent, on ordinary deposits, and San Jose Deposit Bank of Sav- 
ings, 4.80 per cent, per annum on term and 4 per cent, on ordi- 
nary deposits. 

$ $ $ 

SOME surprise has been exhibited in London at the announce- 
ment, by Renter's telegram, of a half yearly dividend at the 
rate of 5 per cent, per annum, declared at the regular meeting of 
the directors of the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company in Mon- 
treal. 



July 



1894. 



i-T. wnsco fJBWS LETTER 



13 




H 



"Hw the Orler! ' "What the devil art thou?" 
"Ono that will pliy the devil, sir, with you. 

0\V wondrous strange is .Nature in her ways I 
There's nothing that Is absolute 
(E'en preacher* might * -"ic drabs pollute). 
What endless compensations crowd the days! 

The stars are bright till Luna doth arise; 

But she in turn must fadeaway 

When blazes forth the God of Day, 
And his rays pale beside One woman's eyes. 

When ordinary crimes harass the right, 

We grieve o'er human weaknesses 

And say that Christian meekness is 
The guide that's slowly leading to the light. 

And then, no warning beard, the earth is riven ; 

A savage burst of death and blood 

Pours forth, a mad, resistless Mood, 
O'erwbelming manhood, inking e'en fair Heaven! 

All smaller ills, quite dimmed by its fierce glow, 

Work now in safe obscurity. 

Ruin what is left of purity — 
The minor sparks which swirling winds will sow. 

Thus falls the wisdom of all ages down. 
That which is found so soon is lostl 
Late fruits are often nipped by frost. 

Right; law, and order — they are but a sound ! 

AT this writing Mr. de Young's solemn announcement that "for 
obvious reasons" the report of the committee of awards for 
the art display at tbe Midwinter Fair would have to be amended, 
bas not been explained, but it is assumed that tbe ignominious 
treatment of Miss Harriet Hosmer's statue, Isabella, at tbe hands 
of tbe committee is the "obvious reasons." Any additional ob- 
jections which might serve to give a plural form to "reason" are 
hardly worthy of attention — unless it be, indeed, that the other 
marble mistresspiece, the Butter Sculptress's wonderful represen- 
tation of the Vanderbilt family, is sufficient for Mr. de Young's 
syntactical purposes. Tbe sweet and guileless gullibility of the 
multiple she-person (who invariably takes every Thing at its own 
estimate of itself) received Miss Hosmer in San Francisco with 
reverberating huzzas; dined her, made over her, listened gleefully 
to her audible shoulder-shrugs and the thundering silence of her 
tongue when she damned all local stone-cutting except her own, 
and organized a society to raise $10,000 for the purpose of buying 
Isabella from her and setting her up in Golden Gate Park. And 
now comes a miserable gang of iconoclasts who ignore Isabella 
and gold-medal a nasty naked bronze man straining his unthink- 
able bronze in'ards in an altogether unnecessary and wholly im- 
moral attempt to squeeze bronze juice out of bronze grapes in a 
bronze wine press I Why, Isabella wears clothes — is nothing but 
clothes! Naked? 'Deed not I Miss Hosmer could never have thought 
of such a thing. O, San Francisco! It was bad enough that 
the larded aristocracy of Chicago should have turned up its pig- 
gish nose at Miss Hosmer's inexpressibly virtuous Isabella; the 
golden aristocracy of San Francisco, founded on countless gener- 
ations of the indigoest of all possible blood, would show that it 
knew its own ear from a palmetto fan, that it could recognize the 
genius of Rome's greatest chiseless — but here language fails and 
tears usurp its function. And where is poor Hattie's ten thou- 
sand dollars? 

GOOD old Mr' Sutro, maddened by a realization of tbe fact that 
the railroad strike has completely obscured him along with 
the freaks of the Midwinter Fair, has offered the splendid gift of 
$1000 to aid the strikers in their fight and to keep himself from 
being forgotten. That anything could over-shadow his own 
awful fight with the Southern Pacific has placed upon him a 
humiliation almost too great to bear. But really the strike offers 
him the great opportunity of his life. Why does he not throw 
himself into the leadership of the strikers, lead them on to victory 
and a revolution, overthrow the Government, establish himself 
as Dictator of the United States, and then quietly take Mr. Hunt- 
ington across his knee and give him a good old grand-motherly 
spanking? Surely Mr. Sutro does not lack the courage or ability I 

WE noticed a sad look about the Third street car horses' faces 
on Thursday, which we were at a lbss to account for. We 
have since learned that the active part which they took in the 
Fourth of July parade has raised them above work. What a 
wretched thing pride is, to be sure! 

NOW that Colonel Daniel M. Burns has converted Chris. Buck- 
ley to Republicanism, be will confer a great favor on the pub- 
lic at large by keeping his convert from meddling in Democratic 
politics. 



TO what may we ascribe the failure And withdrawal, after a 
brave attempt, ol the disgusting •• fiesta" as an attrac- 
tion of the Midwinter Fair! To a sense of re fine mem ud de- 
oenCJ In (he oommontly ' Then why was the fiesta at Shu Jomc, 
orael, bloody, and revolting to the laat degree, so great a •• sue- 
aod why did li Bead the people into spasms of delight? For. 
-f. beil understood, is the center of refinement in California. 
It is the home of the big State school which instructs teachers in the 
art of no old I Dg the minds, morals, and manners of the young; of the 
( Ollege of Notre Dame, where hundreds of girls are taught sweet- 
ness, grace, and light; of Santa Clara College, the ablest Catholic 
school in the West; of the University of tbe Pacific, the leading 
Methodist school In California; of numerous other public and 
private schools. It is under tbe shadow of the greatest astron- 
omical observatory in the world, and the Stanford University is a 
neichbor. It prohibits the selling of liquor on Sundays, and im- 
poses heavy restrictions on week-day traffic in the poison. It is 
orderly, decent, clean, and beautiful. And yet all San Jose 
flocked to see horses and cattle tortured with unspeakable cru- 
elty, and its dainfy women screamed huzzas when the maimed 
and bleeding brutes bellowed with pain. In view of these facts, 
why was the Midwinter Fair fiesta a failure through lack of spec- 
tators? There are men, honestly deeming themselves gentle- 
men, whose hearts nearly burst with happiness at seeing two un- 
speakable human brutes beat each other into bloody insensibility 
in a prize-fight, and there are sweet, soft-voiced, and gracious 
women to whom God, in his inscrutable wisdom, has denied the 
ability to find anything but delight in tbe spectacle of seeing men, 
presumably of some refinement and education, liberate tame pig- 
eons from a coop and shoot them for sport. But men Know them- 
selves to be savages ; women have not been given the understanding 
to recognize savagery when they see it. It is admitted that if the 
original programme of the Fair managers had been adhered to, in- 
cluding bull-fights, all fashionable, rich, refined, and Christian 
San Francisco would have scrambled like maggots in a carcass 
for seats in the grand stand. What conclusion, then, is it possi- 
ble to draw than that the suppression of the more revolting fea- 
tures of the fiesta by the firm intervention of tbe Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals kept the crowd away and pre- 
vented a nasty stain upon the fair name of California? 

THE last bomb has exploded, the last fire-cracker blown itself 
into chaos, the limp five-cent flags no longer brave the battle 
and the breeze in all their shoddy starchery, the orator has 
orated, the poet warbled forth his little song, and the 118th 
"glorious Fourth" bas vanished into the limbo of tbe past. No 
serious accidents fortunately marked our country's celebration of 
its anniversary, although luck had more to do with it than any- 
thing else, for patriotism which can find vent only iD bombs and 
fire-crackers, though, of course, noble in its way, is often danger- 
ous and always disagreeable. It is, however, encouraging to 
fathers of families and others engaged in tbe useful occupation of 
increasing the census, to notice how the glorious example that 
has been set by our Mongolian brother, John, is followed by our 
rising, nay, even our setting generation. What would a New 
Year's day be to John without his fire-crackers? What would 
a Fourth of July be to a San Francisco youth without his mu- 
sical bomb? Some women are so wretchedly weak-minded that 
the explosion of a bomb, containing a pound or so of gunpowder, 
in their immediate vicinity startles them. This amuses our pat- 
riotic youths, who never feel so much like an eagle, or so Fourth- 
of-Julyish, and so altogether glorious as when frightening some 
timid female into hysterics with their innocent little jokes. Next 
to our admiration for M. M. Estee, Adolpb Sutro, Sandow, the 
Sketch Club, and Russian tea, comes our warm appreciation of 
the disinterested patriotism which tempted the law makers to 
allow the discharge of fire-crackers within the limits of a large 
city. Bombs and crackers add a dignity to the occasion never 
otherwise acquired. They seem to patriotic ears to be the echoes 
of the cannon which over a century ago belched forth their 
deadly salute at Bunker Hill. Long may the noble youths con- 
tinue to blow off their dear little fingers on the Fourth of July, 
but commend us to the patriotic few who preferred suicide to 
fireworks. 

AS we have a Young Ladies' Institute, it is difficult to under- 
stand why its masculine counterpart should not call itself the 
" Young Gentlemen's Institute." It is presumable that as the 
young ladies have an organization of their own, thB young women 
aspiring to feminine fellowship will have to enroll themselves 
with the Gaytive Naughties of the Wolden Dust. 

IF you want to see fortitude, just ride on a California street car 
and watch a girl try to look pleasant while a flea is lunching off 
her leg, and she dare not scratch. Job was a pretty patient old 
boy, but he never had a hungry California flea bite him and not 
be able to spoil the little devil's appetite by a good scratch. 

IT does not seem to have occurred to the authorities that a 
stream of water from a fire engine is generally more effective 
in dispersing a mob or quelling a riot than a galling gun could 
be. It might be advisable, however, to have one or two gatling 
guns to protect the fire engine. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 7, 1894. 




A THIRD direct heir to the British Crown was born the other day. 
The first of these is the Prince of Wales, who is the heir ap- 
parent; the second is the Duke of York, who is heir presump- 
tive; and the third is thfi infant son of the Duke of Y.ork, who 
has just made his appearance, and who is also an heir presump- 
tive in the direct line of succession. There are enough collateral 
heirs to fill a large barn, so that the reign of the Guelph dynasty 
may be regarded as a certain and fixed fact for the first half of 
the next century, unless the British people should arise in revolt 
against monarchical institutions. That such a revolution is un- 
likely is amply demonstrated by the spirit in which the arrival of 
the new heir was received. Among the very advanced radicals, 
only one voice was raised in opposition to the traditional address 
of congratulation, and that was the voice of boorisbness rather 
than of political sentiment. As a matter of fact, the radicals 
have no objection to the throne, though they do object to much 
of the fuss and feathers by which it is surrounded, and to the 
gradually disappearing class privileges which had their origin in 
the earlier development of the royal office. The British people of 
to-day recognize the throne as a very useful axis around which 
the political machinery of their republican empire revolves, but 
which, of itself, performs, as Lord Roseberry put it the other day, 
social rather than political functions. The government of the 
British Isles is in name and outward form a monarchy; but if we 
accept Abraham Lincoln's definition of a republic as correct, and 
describe it as "a government of the people, by the people, and for 
the people," then we must realize and admit that the government 
of the British Isles is far more republican than are those of Mex- 
ico or France. Indeed , many close observers are inclined to think 
that the popular voice of the British people exercises more influ- 
ence over the administration of their public affairs than the voice 
of the American people does in their affairs, and that the 
British Government is therefore a more democratic institution 
than ours is. In this thought there is more truth than poetry. 

The assassination of the late President Carnot has already 
passed into history. His body has been deposited in the tomb, 
his successor has been elected, the administration of public affairs 
goes on as before, and nothing is left of the ghastly tragedy save 
the stricken woman who was but a short time ago a happy wife, 
the truculent murderer who stands defiantly in the shadow of 
an ignominious death, and — the conditions out of which the sul- 
leD, brutal and illogical warfare on the instrumentalities of social 
and political organization, of which this murder was an incident, 
comes. And in this connection it may be remarked that those who 
gard the anarchist as a fiend who does murder for the sheer lust 
of shedding blood are deceiving themselves. He is illogical, and 
stupid, and brutal, but he is not without a cause. The social and 
political system wbich turns free four out of every five Panama 
Canal swindlers, while it sends to jail five out of every five hun- 
gry men who steal a loaf of bread, is responsible for him. He 
can conceive of no improvement in this system, and so he makes 
a senseless war upon it, even at the sacrifice of his own life. But 
he is not animated by an empty desire to take human life. 

The major-generals and admirals of the daily press can find in 
the circumstances surrounding the assassination of the late Pres- 
ident Carnot another evidence of the fact that when they told us, 
as they have been continually telling us for years past, that Eu- 
rope was an armed camp, and that its various governments were 
only waiting for a pretext to spring at each other's throats; they 
(the major-generals and admirals) were mistaken, and did not un- 
derstand either the military or diplomatic situation at all. The 
fact of the matter is, that notwithstanding their vast armaments, 
no European power desires to go to war. Had it been otherwise, 
the French and Italian armies would have been confronting each 
other now. Both governments seem to have exercised great for- 
bearance, but the people of Lyons behaved very badly in this 
matter. Indeed, if it were not for the fact that both governments 
are anxious to keep the peace, the conduct of the French people 
toward the Italians would surely provoke a conflict. In this 
matter of the assassination of the late President Carnot, they 
have allowed the nationality of the assassin to lead them into an 
exhibition of racial prejudice that was altogether uncalled for. 
Premier Crispi's assailant was a Frenchman, but the Italians did 
not make that fact the cause of any exhibition of hostility toward 
France or Frenchmen. 

The disorderly character of the meeting of the French Cham- 
ber of Deputies which took place on last Tuesday was a rather sig- 
nificant omen for the opening of the administration of the new 
President. The fact that the members would not listen to either 
the explanation of the Premier or to the President's inaugural 
message, shows that there is a startling lack of sympathy and 



unity of purpose between the executive and legislative branches 
of the government. This is a strange way of beginning a new 
regime, and one which the Chamber was a large factor in creating 
but a few days ago. 

The telegraphic rumors which have been coming to hand lately 
in regard to Corea are difficult to understand, and obviously col- 
ored with sensationalism. There is an old and standing dispute 
between China and Japan as to which country is entitled to a 
protectorate over Corea, and this dispute was brought to some- 
thing like a head by the recent murder of Kim, but it would prob- 
ably bave fallen back into the lethargic condition of innocuous 
desuetude in which it has rested for so many years if it were not 
for a latent spirit of aggressive nationalism which seems to be 
sweeping through Japan. Under the influence of this spirit, the 
Japanese Government has felt compelled to meet an exhibition of 
pro-Chinese sympathy on the part of the dominant party in Corea 
with an occupation of Corean territory by an armed force. At 
this juncture, Russia is now reported to have interfered and de- 
manded the withdrawal of the Japanese soldiers, so we have a 
three-cornered international complication which nobody can find 
the bottom or basis of, and nobody can predict the outcome of. 
The diplomatic relations between Japan, Russia, and China have 
been more or less Btrained at times for years past, but they are 
still likely to do more talking than fighting. 

The last news from Bluefields is, like the peace of God, beyond 
human understanding. One statement it contains, however, 
should serve to temporarily pacify the angry philosopher of San 
Francisco's tall tower. It is that the British and American Min- 
isters have reached an agreement as to what they will jointly do 
in regard to compelling the Nicaraguan Government to carry out 
the treaty of Mangua in respect to the autonomy of the Mosquito 
Territory. The fact that Americans have been reaping the prin- 
cipal advantages under it, should reconcile the philosopher's hy- 
percritical patriotism to the fact that it is a British convention, 
and under the circumstances, it is hoped that the Chronicle will 
refrain, for the present, from demanding a declaration of war 
against both the British and Nicaraguan Governments. 





THE 

Gentleman's Smoke 

J Adelitjhrful Bland of 5tjame5 
Pflrish,Uuisidnfl.Peri£Kie .Genuine lm> 
Jporfed Turkish, Zt\ra Drighr Plvq Cuf.^ 
* Erfra 8ri$M Lon$CuT,cirid Marburg 
. Bros Celebrated Brand "Picking* 
MAR8URG BROS.. 
BALTIMORE MO. 




ANNUAL MEETING- 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Con- 
solidated Silver Mining Company will be hela at the office of the com- 
pany, room 4, Nevada block, o09 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 16th Day of July, 1894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year audthe transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on FRIDAY, July 13th, 1894. at 3 
o'clock p. m. CHAS. C. HARVEY, Secretary 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING. 

Notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a resolution of the Board of 
Directors of the Paraffine Paint Company (a corporation), duly adopted at 
a regular meeting of said Board, held at the office of ?-aid Company on 
Wednesday, the 13th. day of Juue, 1894, a meeting of the stockholders of the 
Paraffine Paint Company will be held on 

Wednesday, the 22d day of August, 1894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M. 
of that day, at No. 116 Battery street, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, the same being the principal place of business 
and office of srid corporation, and the same being the building where the 
Board of Directors of said corporation meet 

The object of said meeting is to consider, act upon, aud decide a proposi- 
tion to diminish the Capital Stock of said corporation, the Paraffine Paint 
Company, from One Million Dollars to One Hundred Thousand Dollars- 

Dated San Francisco, June 13th, 1834. 

PARAFFINE PAINT COMPANY. By 
R. S. SHAINWALD, Secretary. R. S. MOORE, President. 



MRS. POTTER IN THE ORIENT. 

MR8. Cora DrqObUl .'otter, be*ide» being an actress, is « charm- 
log corjTersftltoniH't and a clever writer. In a letter to the 
editor of the NbwI I.kttbr. she gives (he following information 
about some of our neighbors in the land of the setting sun. which 
she gathered daring ber Oriental pilgrimage: 

•• Daring my stay abroad 1 have visited many strange lands. 
and have played in almost every city in the Eastern 
Hemisphere. My reception in all of those places, both 
artistically and socially, has been all that the heart conld 
wish for, and I hare made hundreds of friends and well- 
wishers. Particularly was this the case in Calcutta, where 
I played for five months. This is all the more remarkable 
as there are but thirty thousand European residents m 
that city. The natives of India are a most peculiar race of peo- 
ple, and are filled with ridiculous superstitians, which may be 
termed the corse of the nation. Many of their animals are held 
sacred, and it is considered an unpardonable crime to kill or mal- 
treat the domestic cat. In Benares, the sacred city of the Hindoos, 
a cow may walk the streets at will, and brush pedestrians away 
as tnough they were flies, and no one is bold enongh to offer a 
protest. I had the opportunity while there of seeing one of the 
most sacred as well as the rarest of all animals, the famous white 
cow. This rare creature can scarcely be termed white, as her 
hide is of a dark cream color. She is held in the utmost rever- 
ence by the superstitious Hindoo, and is approached with as 
much deference and formality as were the mighty monarchs of 
ancient days. 

" The Japanese and Chinese, like all other inhabitants of Asia, 
although they fear the Europeans and the Americans, at heart 
they hate and despise them. They will resort to any means, no 
matter how low and despicable, to make their lives a burden. 
The old story of the servant who spat in his master's food to pay 
off an old grndge frequently receives practical illustration in 
that country, and they have even been known to fill the food 
with chopped bamboo, which will choke a person to death before 
relief can be afforded. When I first took up my residence in 
Chlmchu, one of the first persons to visit me was a man who 
called himself ' King of the Robbers.' For a consideration he 
agreed to protect my property for one year, so that, instead of 
paying the insurance company a bonus, I paid the robbers not to 
rob me. I afterward found out that this was customary, and 
during my stay in that country, although I possessed many valua- 
ble things, I never lost as much as a hair-pin. This merely il- 
lustrates one of hundreds of customs equally strange and ludi- 
crous. There is also a « King of the Beggars ' who must be paid, 
in order that you may not be pestered to death by these creat- 
ures. 

" My voyage from India to this country was anything but a 
pleasant one, as it was filled with disagreeable incidents. The first 
misadventure was a quarantine of nine days, during which time 
we were put through a most undignified and disagreeable form of 
treatment. Scarcely had we got through with this and started 
on our way again, when the ship's cook, a Chinese, made mat- 
ters lively by carving one of his assistants into a dying condi- 
tion and then cutting his own throat. This is what is commonly 
termed In China "running amuck," and for the balance of the 
voyage I did not dare to close my eyes for fear that some of his 
companions might take it into their crazy heads to do likewise 
and murder the entire ship's company. 
"Yes; America is good enough for me." 

Coka Ubquhart Potter. 



The art of making a shoe that, from the very first, feels as 
comfortable as an old shoe, while looking a great deal better, has 
been so thoroughly mastered by P. P. McNulty, 220 Post street, that 
the reason of his popularity among fastidious people is fully under 
stood. Besides comfort and fit, he keeps wide awake to the best and 
most fashionable styles, and is prepared at all times to suit every 
taste. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

Dividends on Term Deposits at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum, 
and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of four and one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent 
per annum, for the half year ending June 30, 1894, free of taxes, will be 
payable on and after July 2, 1894. 8. L. ABBOT, Jb., Secretary. 

Office— 222 Montgomery street. Mills Building. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. - 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending with June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four and four-fifths (4 4-5) per cent per annum on Term Depos- 
its and four per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, July 2, 1894. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 
Office— 33 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Savings and. Loan Society. 

For the six months ending June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four and eight tenths (4 8-10) per cent per annum on Term 

Deposits, and four (4) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 2, 1894. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

New Banil Con.ol irlnted Grovel Mitnnq Company. 

Location of principal nlai f bniUMn— Ban Francisco. Cal. Location 

of works— Placer conntv, i allfornla. 

Notice l« berab, riven that at a meeting of the Boanlof Directors, held 
on tie 1Mb .lav of June, ISM, an assessment (No. 2f>) of Klvc cents per 
share n-aalvvlc.I npoiithccapltal stock of the corporation, payable Imme- 
diately In 1 Kited States fold coin to the Secretary, at the ofTlco of the 
company, BBS. Commercial street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid ou the 
The 28th Oar ol Jul,. 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold ou MONDAY, the 18th day of August, 1894, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costa of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. X. SIMON, Secretary. 

Office— 52» Commercial street. Salt Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Seg, Belcher <Sr Mides Consolidated Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
: cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

I Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Twelfth day of Jum> 189-1, an assessment (No. 14) of Ten cents 
| per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
| immediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
I pany, at the office of the Company, room 50, Nevada block, 309 Mont- 
| gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 16th Day of July, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment la made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 6th day of August, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 50, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of .Principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Twelfth day of June, 1894, an assessment (No. 50) of Twenty-five 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in TjDited States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the 1 7th day of July, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the Seventh (7th) day of August, 
1894, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fr ancisco . 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 20th day of June, 1894, an assessment (No. 49) of Fifteen cents 
per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any Btock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Wednesday, the 25th Day of July, 1 894. wlh be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 15th day of August, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. C. HARVEY, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

__________ 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 16 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied May 31, 1894 

Delinquent in Office July b, 1894 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock July 31, 1894 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Best & Belcher Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Best & Belcher 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 9th Day of July, 1894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on FRIDAY, July 6, 1894, at 1 p. m. 

M. JAFFE, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-61 per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, payable on and 
after Monday, July 2, 1894. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Hi hernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Fkancisco, June 29, 1894. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter (4J4) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 1894, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 2, 1894. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and JoneB Streets. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1894. 







Hft 



zb^hstiecs. 



THE latest work from the peD of " The Duchess " is a story of 
a very sensational character, that borders on the improbable. 
It relates the experiences of a medical man whose love for a 
young girl makes him hate his wife, whom he had married for 
her money, and their only child, a boy who was born an uncanny 
idiot, without the sense of hearing or speech, bat, unfortunately 
for his father, with the sense of sight. The medical man murders 
his wife, and his idiot son sees him. He then tries to win the 
young girl, but her love is for another doctor, and, in his mad 
passion, the first doctor find3 that he must murder the second one 
in order to gain his end. But " unnatural deeds lead to unnat- 
ural troubles." The spirit of the dead mother's revenge is infused 
into the idiot, and one night, as his father seeks the baled rival to 
stab him to the heart, the idiot follows him, and, just as he has 
climbed the ladder which reaches to the window of the room, the 
idiot pulls it from under and he falls to the ground. Then the 
idiot yells " Sho, Sho, Shol " and his father is a corpse. It is a 
plot that would do very well as a subject for a short story of about 
2000 or 3000 words, but when spun over an area of two hundred 
odd pages it is quite too long. We do not find much to commend 
in any of the characters except Agatha, the girl with whom the 
murderous medical man is in love, and even she is unnatural at 
times. Although the book has an unwholesome, uncanny flavor, 
it will be a rich morsel for those who like sensational dishes. 
[Rand, McNally & (Jo., Publishers. For sale at Cooper's.] 

Under the very startling title of " Roses and Thistles," Rufus 
C. Hopkins has caused to be published a volume of verse contain- 
ing many samples of poetry, from an Aztec romance to an ordinary 
epitaph. There are just about one hundred poems in the book 
written, in various moods, since 1848. Of course, the author is 
an elderly gentleman, and he is only one of that large army of 
poets who believe that they were asked by God to write. Pass- 
ing through the long list of verses we come to a little poem of un- 
certain metre, entitled " Woman." That was written by Mr. 
Hopkins in this city in 1869. We refer to it because it is the only 
verse in the book that directly touches the sacred subject. Poor 
Mr. Hopkins, what an amount of remorse must be nestling in his 
breast! He says of woman: 

Search North, or South, or East, or West. 
You'll find no living thing 

That such a deadly venom bears 
Or sports so sharp a sting. 
Can it be possible that Mr. Hopkins has never basked in the 
sunshine on a July day, under a big umbrella, or a weeping wil- 
low, with a California girl, wishing, at the same time, that he 
could stay there forever and a day. If he had been, he would 
have left those verses out. » I'll Strike the Epic Lyre no more," 
*• Prayer of the Rev. Ezekiel Mucklewrath," "Some Philosophic 
Advice About Hornets," and "An Apology for the Devil " are 
four of the most formidable and ambitious verses in the book, 
which is very neatly printed and handsomely bound. [William 
Doxey, publisher. For sale by all booksellers.] 

The July number of Current Literature contains its usual mel- 
ange of current fiction and verse. Two particularly interest- 
ing selections are, "The Elephant Dance," by Rudyard Kipling, 
and "Mark Antony's Return," by George Ebers. The follow- 
ing story of Mr. Benson and Miss Margot Tennant {now Mrs. 
Asquitb) whom he is said to have portrayed as Dodo, is put into 
circulation by a Canadian paper, the Province. It appears that 
Mr. Benson wrote to her and said, "»Dear Miss Tennant : All the 
world is talking of you and my novel; when may I come to see 
you?" She replied : " Dear Mr. Benson: Did you really write a 
novel? How clever of you! Come and see me at any time." 

When he came Miss Tennant was out. The British Weekly has 

the courage of its convictions. In a recent issue it says: " There 
is not the faintest ray of genius in Mrs. Ward's " Marcella." 
There is not a sentence in the two volumes of her story that be- 
longs to literature." >• The Swinburne of the canteen" is what 

Conan Doyle calls Rudyard Kipling. It would be interesting to 
know what Swinburne thinks of the profane association of his 

name Since her marriage, Miss Olive Shreiner that was, calls 

nerself Mrs. Olive Shreiner. Her husband, however, changed his 
"maiden name" by making his wife's family name his surname, 
so that his visiting cards now read, "Mr. Cronwright Shreiner." 
— The ex-Empress of France, Eugenie, has been engaged on her 
memoirs for many years. As soon as a page is written it is 
placed under lock and key, and not even her most intimate 
friends ever see it. The work is not to be published until twenty- 
five years after her death. The ex-Empress uses in writing a 
penholder which is ornamented with diamonds. It was used by 
the fourteen representatives in signing the Treaty of Peace of 
Paris in 1856, and was given to the ex-Empress as a memento. 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TROST CO. 

Paid-up Capital, «l,0OO,00O. 

Corner Montgomery and California Streets, San Francisoo. 

J. D. FRY, President HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown. Secretary and Treasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depositary for Court and TruBt 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an individual 
in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent per aunum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rate^ of interest thereon. 

RENTS SAFES inside its 'burglar-proof vaults at prices from $5 per 
annum upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 

WILLS DRAWN AND TAKEN CAKE OF WITHOUT CHARGE. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



V 



Established 1870. 



Corner Sansome and Busli Streets. 

U. S. Depositary. 
Capital (Paid Up) $1,500,000. 

SURPLUS $800,000 | UNDIVIDED PROFITS $76,196 

S. G MURPHY President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT . .Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

directors: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, S G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelau, James Moflfitt, 

'Ihomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 

the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Oftiee hours, 3 a., m. to 6 p.m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited- 

Authorized Capital . $3,500,000 | Capital Paid Up. $2,450,000 

Reserve $500,000. 

San Francisco Office— 424 CaliforniaSt. London Office— 73 Lombard St., E.C. 

Portland Branch— 18 First St. Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER. Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 

NEW YORK— Diexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between saidcities and 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, Limited. 

N. W. Corner SANSOME and SUTTER. 

subscribed Capital . $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $800,000. 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 
17 Boulevard P oi ssoniere . Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issue. 

rAL G T R S E C^U B L AUM 1 wagers. 

THE SATHER BANKIN6 COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $1,260,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

C. F. A. TALBOT, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, C. S. Benedict, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis- 
Toe Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co, Paris— Drexel, Harjes A Co. 

THE CROCKER- W00LVV0 RTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, I E. B, POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice president 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK- 

222 MONTGOMERY ST., MILLS BUILDING. 
INTEREST PAII> ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 



Wm. Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS: 
Jerome Lincoln 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon 
J. B. Raudol. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. IS Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



All the new Books at COOPER'S. 



July 7, 18!M . 



- \\ Ki; \\. [SCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



GBOBOI WH1TTKU.. the manager o( ibe Liming estate, has 
filed with the Board of Supervisors an application for an elec- 
tric railroad franchise. The right of way taked f«>r is* as follow « : 
Commencing at the Intersection of Eleventh, Bryant ami inannt-i 
streets: thence northwesterly along Klerenih strett tu Market; 
thence across Market to Van Ness avenue; thence northerly 
along Van Ness avenue to its intersection with Lewis street. 
Ever since Van Ness avenue was accepted as the fashionable 
thoroughfare of Ban Francisco, an effort has been made by the 
property holders and the public at large to keep it free from rail- 
ways of any kind, and Mr. Whittell is not the first man who has 
tried to push a road through the street. It was always deemed 
advisable to let Van Ness avenue remain free from cable and 
electric cars, the people believing that such "conveniences" 
would not enhance the value of its real estate and would only 
obstruct a handsome driveway. But to-day there are only a few 
blocks that are deemed fashionably sacred, and those are the 
blocks between Pine street and Pacific avenue. The rest of the 
thoroughfare is unimproved so far as street work is concerned, 
and is one of the dustiest sections of the city. Time has moved 
the stylish part of the city toward the west, and to-day Presidio 
and Pacific Heights are regarded as the stamping grounds for 
nobby houses. Then, the city has loag looked for — in fact it has 
been suffering for — a cross-town road. Such a line is inevitable, 
and unless Fillmore street is used for the purpose, Van Ness 
avenue in time will likely be. 

.Assessor John D. Siebe filed his annual report with the 
Supervisors on Monday. He also turned over to the Board the 
real estate assessment roll, containing fifty-four volumes, amount- 
ing to $261,895,196, of which $177,901,440 Is the assessment 
on land, and $88,994,755 is the assessment on improvements. 
The real estate assessment roll shows a decrease from last 
year of $16,377,675 on land, and an increase of $1,291,645 on im- 
provements. This resolves itself into a net decrease of $17,017,- 
323 on real estate and personal property from last year. The re- 
port is a long one, and shows careful preparation. It is a valua- 
ble document, and is eminently to the credit of Mr. Siebe. The ex- 
act condition of really in San Francisco is accurately given. Mr. 
Siebe's report shows that there has been a falling-otf in prices 
and rentals, and he gives some good reasons for it. He says that 
it has been a year of financiel disaster, and that real estate has 
had to face it. Assessment values had to be reapportioned 
on an entirely new basis, and great difficulties had to be met and 
solved. Values were constantly shifting. Serious depreciations 
were followed by depreciations still more serious. The year 
ends with a stagnant market that is supported by low values in 
all real estate holdings. Want of confidence in financial affairs 
and general uncertainty and distrust in labor had a great deal to 
do in depressing the market. 



The Grand Canon Line !— To the East ! 



Commencing May 1st the "Santa Fe Route" Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Tuesday. 
Manager in Charge. Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are 
run through to Chicago every day without change. This is the only 
Line by which the Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. 
Send for illustrated book giving full particulars. W. A. Bissell, 
G. P. A., 650 Market street, Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Carson City, the most beautiful town in Nevada, only 14 miles 
from Lake Tahoe, is the place to take thn Keeley cure. No graduate 
from this institute has relapsed. 



Bacon Printing Company, 

508 Clay Street. 



BETHESDA. 



AMERICA'S FAVORITE WATER. 
"I regard Eethesda as a delightful water, refreshing and invigorating, 
with medicinal properties of much value." 

—Hon. Charles Foster, ex-Secretary of Treasury. 
" I have used Bethesda for many years, and deem it the best in the coun- 
try." —Hon. Joseph W. Fifer, ex-Governor of Illinois. 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, 

418 aacrameuto street, S. F. 

DR. H. G. YOUNG, Dentist, 
1841 JPolk St., near Jackson, S. F. [Telephone 2605 

Painless extraction. Teeth without plates a specialty. 
HOURS— 9 A. M. to 5 P.M., 8 to 9 P. M. Sundays, 9 a. m. to 2 p. m. 



IB A. 1ST IKIS. 



BANK UP BKIlfSH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Ron] Cfamrtor, isivj. 

CAPIT'L P«ld Up J3.000.000 

RE.-ERVE FuSD 1,404.000 

can corucr Buab and Sansome all 
HEAD OFFICE no i ..!,, I.., ..i mi-.ti, i oikIoii 

lir.AS.il>:-. -Victoria, Vane i.iviT, New « estmlnster, Kamloops, Nanalmo, 

"," ' «•' llrili.li Columbia: 1'orlland, Oregon; Seattle mid Tacoma, 

\\ n>Ml)Rton. 

i hi* batik trausacta a Genera] Hanking lluslness. Accounts opened sub- 
let in Cheek, and ~i,cpIbI Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available iu all parts of the World. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
trances made oo rood cnllatoral security. Draws -lirect at current rates 
tipnu its Hcail Office ami Br -nehes, and upon Its Ageuts, as follows: 

NEW YORK— Merohauts Bank of Canada-. Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and south Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen Com- 
pany; Ireland— Bank of Ireland: Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bauk of Mexico and South America; China and 
-Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company 
of Sydney. Ld. ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. San Francisco. 

CAPITAL $3,000,000 00 

SURPLUS and Undivided Profits (January 1, 1894) ... ,. 3,247,684 02 

WILLIAM ALVORD, President. THOMAS BROWN, Cashier. 

S. Prentiss Smith, Ass't Cashier, I. P. Moulton, 2d Ass't Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co; The Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremont National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. De Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev)— Agency 
of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of New Zealand; China, Japan and India— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. St. Louis — Boatmens Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Syndey, Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Branch office 1700 Market Street, corner Polk. 

DEPOSITS. June 30, 1893 $28,058,691 00 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL and Surplus 1,599,434 00 

DIRECTORS— Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Thomas Magee, B. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. 
De Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signa- 
ture of the depositor should aocompany the first deposit. No charge is 
made for pass book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9 a. m. to S p. M. Satur- 
day evenings, 6 :30 to 8. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

GUARANTEED CAPITAL, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES D. PHELAN, S G MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, L P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James D. Phelan, James Moffitt, S G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, and 
Robert McElroy. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening ac counts send signature. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 CALIFORNIA ST., S. F. 

Guaranteed Capital and Reserve Fund $1 770,000 OO 

Deposits January 3, 1894 30,018,739 94 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B A. Becker; 
Second Vice-Pres dent, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— Edwarl Kruse, George H. EggerB, O. Schoe- 
mann, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign, Stein- 
hart, Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. 8. Goodfellow. 

THE ANGLO-CAUFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. £. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,600,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) „ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL, i Managers 

WELLS, FARGO & CO-'S BANK. 

N . E. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Cash Capital and Surplus $6,350,000 OO 

John J. Valentine President I Homer 8. King. . Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. PARSONS, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E . DOOLY, Cashier 

DIRECTORS . 
John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry E. Hunting- 
ton, Homer S. King, Geo. E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



july 7,1894. 




WRITE ME A LETTER.— Emma P. Seabury, in N. Y. Clipper. 



w 



KITE me a letter, my dear old friend, 

Bay that you love me yet; 
I kDOW you are true, but I wish that you 

Would say that you never forget 
The springs, all bubbling, and scent and song, 

The summer's blossoming rhyme, 
The orchard talks, and the woodland walks, 

In the golden autumn time. 
Write me a letter, my dear old friend, 

Write of a sunny June; 
Meet me again in a ferny glen, 

In the glow of an afternoon. 
Read me the " Idylls " over anew, 

Your voice has a charm that rings 
Its rhythm, cheers through the vibrant years 

Above all other things. 

Write me a letter, my dear old friend, 

Leave out the years between: 
The ways have been rough and thorny enough, 

Which 'twixt us intervene. 
Sing me a song of the long ago, 

Ere I knew the world could cheat. 
Of moonlight gleams and fond day dreams, 

That were so divinely sweet. 
Write me a letter, my dear old friend, 

I love you more and more 
As farther apart we drift, dear heart, 

And nearer the other shore. 
The dear old loves and the dear old days 

Are a balm to life's regret; 
It is easy to bear the worry and care 

If the old friends love us yet. 



WHY SHOULD I LIVE.— P. V. Mighels. 

' Why live to have my blossoms fall on stones ? " 
The city sapling sighed; "and what atones 
For blasting heat, for brown, unlovely walls; 
For lack of lovely meadows green, for birds' sweet calls? 
Ah me, ah me ! it is no joy to live. 
Thus all my leaves, my loveliness, to give 
For naught. Oh, let me die or let me look 
Once more into the ripples of a brook." 
An older elm, whose twigs had oft shed tears 
Of snow through the winters of the years ; 
Whose re-incarnate wail thus at its feet 
Was echoed o'er, breathed back in cadence sweet; 

1 Let not thy young unburdened limbs complain. 
Thou has but tasted of the worldly pain, 
Which fleeting time doth bring with sad'ning truth, 
But which, thank Heaven, is spared to dreaming youth. 

' Live for the joys, the comfort you may be 
To tired souls ; for those who love to see 
Thy cheerful green. Let not thy efforts fade. 
While weary hearts are thankful for thy shade. 
Live for the good you may to others do ; 
To your own self and to your God be true." 
The springtime came. Lo ! in the morning sun, 
Loveliest of the trees, that litfle one. 



FATE.— Susan M. Spalding, in Detroit Free Press. 



Two shall be born the whole wide world apart, 

And speak in different tongues, and have no thought 

Each for the other's being, and no heed. 

And these o'er unknown seas to unknown lands 

Shall cross, escaping wreck, defying death ; 

And, all unconsciously, shape every act 

And bend each wandering step to this one end — 

That, one day, out of darkness they shall meet 

And read life's meanipg in each other's eyes. 

And two shall walk some narrow way of life, 

So nearly side by side that should one turn 

Even so little space to left or right, 

They needs must stand acknowledged face to face, 

And yet, with wistful eyes that never meet, 

With groping hands that, never clasp, and lips 

Calling in vain to ears that never hear, 

They seek each other all their weary days, 

And die unsatisfied, and this is fate* 



City Index and Purchasers Guide. 



ATT YS. -AT- LAW. 
BERGEN A w IMSl'R, (B. F. Bergen; C. M. Wilbur), 215 Sansome 8t. 
FRANK K ENNEDY, law office, 66 Murp h y Bldg., 1236 Market 8t. 

CANDIES. 
C'ANPIES put up for shipment at ROBERTS', Folk and Bush streets. 

DENTISTS 
R. COTLAB, 416 Geary street. 
F. BE. HACKETT, 413 Leavenworth street. 

DOOR CHECKS. 
THE NORTON Door < heck and Spring- F. D. Morrell, 593Mission St. 

DRUUGISTS. 
KELLY'S CORN CUBE, 85c. Drugs at wholesale, 102 Eddy street. 
EVANS" POISON OAK SPECIFIC Positive cure. 8old by all drug- 
gists. 

MARBLE AND GRANITE. 
W. H. BIcCORBIICK, 1422 Market st., bet. City Hall Ave. and Larkiii St. 

MILLINERY. 

THE WONDER Hat. Flower and Feather atore, 1024-1028 Market street. 

RESTATJ RANTS. 

FRANCO-AMERICAN Restaurant 521 Montgomery 8t. F. Hirte. 

SHOEMAKERS. 

REPAIRING PONE while yon wait at POLLOCK'S, 202 Powell street. 



SURVEYORS. 
JOHN A. BENSON, Engineer. Dealer in Land Scrip. 



) Kearny St. 



HYGIENIC AIR COMPRESSORS 
For automlzallon purposes. 

THE CLEVELAND FAUCET CO., 208 Ellis street 



x-t>tstt:r,_a_:n"o:e _ 



INSURANCE ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The undersigned hereby announces his appointment as MANAGER of 
the PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT for 

The Imperial Insurance Company, Ld„ of London, 

AND 

The Lion Fire Insurance Company of London. 

Both well known to the Insuring public. The general offices of these 
companies, in conjunction with the 

Sun Insurance Office of London, 

Will hereafter be at 
205 SANSOME ST., 

(This City.) 
San Francisco, June 27, 1894. 



WM. J. LANDERS, 

MANAGER. 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BABLj. OF ST. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINEDCXPiTAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may he sustained. 

HARRY W. 8YZ, General Agent, 
410 California St., Ban F rancisco, Cal 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

(Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Establishad 18S6.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 
BEO. F. CHANT, Manager 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 
PROVTl>EME- WASHINGTON INSURANCE COMPANY, 

(Incorporated A. D.,1799.) 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



Julv 7, 1894. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 




a SUNBEAMS 



D[BBS (Who has been wailing in bis friend's studio) — Ah, here 
yon are at Itst. Your dog has been paying a good compli- 
ment to that bit of scenic painting. I Imd to drive the little beggar 
off Datum agreeably surprise*! — What was he doing. DlBBs— 
< l . h>- mistook that river for real water, and he starlet! lapping it. 
r.v-the-bye. what river does it represent.' Dai BKB (savagely— River 
be hanged! That isn't a river; it's a prairie fire! Where's that dog? 

—lid-Bito. 

On, yon sweet daisies, fresh and fair, 

I wish that you would tell me where 

My lover is." He should be here 

To whisper that he loves me dear ; 

But I'll not yield to blank despair— 

I will not shed a single tear; 

And unto all 1 will appear 

As careless, bright, and debonair 

As yon, sweet daisies. 

And yet, and yet, if he were there, 

And offered me a solitaire 

On bended knees, I greatly fear 

I'd answer yes within his ear; 

For single life I do not care: 

Do you, sweet daisies? — Truth. 

" Do \<>v know that editors are the most unselfish set of men in 
the world?" remarked a young author to his friend. " Why, no. I 
never heard of that before." ■' It's a fact. They will cheerfully send 
back your best manuscript, regardless of the fact that they know you 
will immediately post it on to a rival publication." — Answers. 

Said an exasperated father at the dinner table: "You children 
turn up yoar noses at everything on the table. When I was a boy I 
was glad to get enough dry bread to eat." " I say, papa, you are 
having a much better time of it now that you are living with us, ain't 
you? " remarked little Tommy. — Tid-Bits. 

Dear Friend— Try to console yourself, my dear. Remember that 
your late husband was verv, very old, and he left you a fortune, you 
know. Young Widow — Yes; but it was on— on condition that I 
should nev — never marry again. Boo, boo, hoo! 

Mr. Bilkins— "We've got to get divorced. Mrs. Bilkins— Great 
goodness, my dear! Why? Mr. Bilkins— Why, twenty-two of the 
people who gave us presents when we married are to be married this 
month. It's divorce or ruin. — Pearson's. 

Witherry— My wife keeps a scrap book now of all the bright 
things our baby says. Plakkington — Why, is the little fellow old 
enough for that? Withekby— Oh, yes; it's quite wonderful. He re- 
peats everything I say. — Answers. 

" Alas," cried the tramp, "I am hungry and sore; 

Is there none who will pity my plight?" 
" Oh, yes," said the dog, as be sharpened his teeth, 

Come in and I'll give you a bite." — Ex. 

" Are you master of this house?" asked a stranger, addressing a 
young married man. "No," said the young married man, with a 
deep sigh; "my wife has just taken the master upstairs to nurse 
him." — Ex. 

First Damsel — But I thought he said he would never speak to you 
again. Second Damsel— Oh, yes; but he saw I had a cold, and he 
couldn't resist the temptation to tell me of a sure cure. 

—N. Y. News. 

For railway fare and a summer place, 

The pater spends his shekels, 
And finds returns in his daughter's face — 

A crop of tan and freckles. —Washington Star. 

A grateful Baboo in India wrote the following touching letter not 
long ago to a gentleman : " You have been very kind to me, sir, and 
may God Almighty give you tit for tat." 

Mr. Wick wire— Now, my dear, you must admit that Mrs. Watts 
looked exceedingly well in her new gown. Mrs. Wickwire— Y-e-s, 
the gown did look very well on her. — Exchange. 

Miss Bellefield (relating an incident)— Then I dropped my voice, 

and Mr. Harket (interrupting)— That wouldn't nurt it. Yours 

is such a soft voice, you know. —Pittsburg Chronicle-Telegraph. 

" Now, little one, what would you say if I were to give you these? 
Would you say these is good oranges or these are good oranges?" 
" How kin I tell till I suck 'em?" — Life. 

She— There is a new ice box advertised in which a person can keep 
anything. He — I'll get one, and see if it will help you to keep your 
temper, dear. — Tonkers Statesman. 

Ethel— Oh. auntie, we've been having such fun ! George has been 
showing me Venus through his telescope. Auntie — I'm surprised at 
George. — Buffalo Express. 

She — I beg your pardon, monsieur, for treading upon your toe. 
He— Madam, I apologize for having a foot. — Ex. 



Impaired Digestion. 
The patient is required to diet. In building up and maintaining 
good health, milk is recognized as a valuable factor, but it is import- 
ant that it be absolutely pure and sterilized. Borden's Peerless Brand 
Evaporated Cream meets all requirements. Entirely wholesome. 

It pays to have the best. Remember, Ayer's Sarsaparllla is the standard 
blood-purifier. 



i^srsTJR^isrcE. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG. GERMANY. 
V. t'arns i.riill. 1,1 Mtniger for (he Pacific i i Branch. 

-■ 30 Siiiismiic 81., 8. F. 

Capital .... $1,500,000.00 

Invested in U. S. 654,433.31 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 

S38 California St., n.K.,(h1. 



NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California, 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for Nau 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are iurUshed 
with the latest Improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery foroleanlng 
foul and smutty Wheat. " 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
If desired, at current rates. 
Office ol the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-Callfornla Bank. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto- 

A. R. GURREY, MANAGER. | C. A. STUART, AS8T. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL »6,700,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE or. CO., 

No. 318 California Streof. Sin Francisco 



SIEBE, RASCHEN k CO., 

GENERAL INSURANCE, 

Telephone 272. 210 Sansome St. 

Agents foe San Francisco.— Germania Fire Insurance Co , of New 
York; Hanover Fire Insurance Co., of New York; United Firemen's Insur- 
ance Co., of Philadelphia; Sun Insurance Office, of London. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets 519,724,538.46. 

President. BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vloe-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTEB 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. 
Established 1825. 
Capital, $2,250,000- Total Assets, $6,854,653 66 
United States Department: 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FEANCISCO. 
VOSS, CONRAD A CO., General Managers. 

PACIFIC IDIEiF.A.I&TMIElDSrT 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., SUN INSURANCE OFFICE, 



OF LONDON. 

Established A. d. 1321. 
Paid-up Capital, - - - J 5,000,000. 
Cash Assets, 123,194,249. 



OF LONDON. 

Founded A. d. 1710. 

Cash Assets, ?10,044,712. 

Assets in America, - - - $2,510,368. 



WM. J. LAMBERS, fon'l Agent, 20» Sansome St., San Francisco. Cal. 
THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Llmltld) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $ 10,000, 000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

TotalAseets December SI, 7888 6.124,067.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Franclico. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up t 500,000 

Assets 3,181,753 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,525,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

401 Montgomery Street. 
BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 

50 1 Montgomery Street 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1894. 




FROM London: " Pique, of wbich we are {following in the 
footsteps of our Parisian sisters) beginning to appreciate the 
summer charm, is of much more service than ordinary cotton or 
cambric. To begin with, it washes better and never offers that limp 
appearance which is often the means of a girl gaining the reputation 
of being slovenly, no matter how crisply she may dress at other 
times. The advantage of pique cannot be too fully appreciated for 
tennis wear. This fabric in white, patterned with the new black 
' pen-scratch ' lines, composes the blouse of my costume. The cor- 
sage is blouse only by name, for it fits like a jersey, fastening, of 
course, at the back. There is a V of black satin ribbon at the neck, 
while a broad sash ntban starts from the side seams of the Zouave 
jacket and is tied into a large artistic bow. Thanks to this pretty 
contrivance, the little coat is kept in its right place. The skirt, like 
the Zouave, is in black serge, both being treated with some narrow 
white braid. This galon edges the flap of the pocket, which is in 
front, thus doing away with a back one. At tennis a girl must look 
her neatest, especially as regards her plaquet-hole and pocket. 

" One arrangement shows a jupe, which fastens at the side of the 
poche, the opening being hidden by the broad flap. Among dress- 
makers there are divided opinions on the question of the bodice made 
to tuck under the skirt, and the one made to wear over the jupe. In 
general more favor is shown the latter, as it makes the waist look 
longer, and can, moreover, always be safely secured to the skirt by 
means of a couple of patent hooks and eyes. Here is an example. 
If one looks at illustrations of the sleeves worn this time last year 
one is struck by the smallness of them, as compared with our up-to- 
date balloons and gigots. Indeed, an energetic society hostess tells 
us that this season her table will only hold twelve, whereas a year ago 
eighteen was generally the chosen number. At the Derby tailor- 
made costumes seemed the order of the day; but at the Baroness de 
Worms' 'Derby' tea in Grosvenor Place there was more sartorial- 
daintiness than on the Epsom Downs. A young thing, in the full 
flush of her beaute du diable, was much admired in a simple frock of 
mauve nun's veiling, in which the real chic consisted in the addition 
of broad velvet ribbon braces, developing on the shoulders into full- 
blown rosettes, and at the back into a bow and long ends. There 
were also a few mohair gowns, this fabric being one of the derniers 
cris of the gay capital." 

A pretty dress is of black grenadine over shot silk, the skirt being 
made quite plain. The fully-gathered bodice had a deep collar of 
guipure lace, with puffs of black chiffon passed through the lace. A 
velvet collar and the twist round the basque are made of the same 
color as the underskirt of silk. The sleeves have an accordion-plaited 
cape falling over the close-fitting sleeve. Another gray grenadine ia 
made up over pink, the skirt slightly draped on one side, showing 
ecru lace above the pink underskirt. The bodice has a yoke back and 
front of pink silk, covered with mother of pearl galon, and is trimmed 
with rosettes of pink chiffon and lace. 



The bolero affords a pretty way for making over a last summer's 
dress, as it can be accomplished out of the old waist. A gray nun'j- 
veiling, for instance, is freshened by a shirt waist of pink China silk 
and bolera of the gray veiling. A last season's figured silk is im- 
proved by removing all the ruffles or bands from the skirt and by 
trimming the waist with a double collarette, one of plain black silk 
above one of lace. Black organdies are preferred this summer made 
over black rather than any color. If the thin material is still good it 
will pay to drape it over either black lawn or black taffeta, made 
with a simple fitted waist, large sleeves, and a straight full skirt over 
a gored one of the lining. 

Blouses of washing silk are most appropriate for morning wear. 
Some are made with plaits from neck to waist and simply buttoned 
with gold studs. In cambric porcelain blue, phlox pink, and pale 
lavender are the favorite colors. Sheer striped ginghams made sur- 
plice, with scalloped edge wrought in black silk, are among the pret 
tiest of the ready-made designs. 

Petticoats are made in crepon, in spotted muslins, with three or 
four full-gathered flounces edged with lace, and in batiste with Valen- 
ciennes, showing the new lace, which forms a sort of garland that is 
applique on to the edge of the flounce. Most of the white petticoats 
are trimmed with this sort of lace, and cluny is coming in for petti- 
coats. 

For boating purposes nothing looks nicer than a good cream wash- 
ing serge dress, especially if designed in accordance with my third 
model, in which the short coat is turned back in a most original style 
over a white shirt and Petersham belt buckled with a steel buckle. 
The cuffs carry out the same "angle" idea. A cream tie spotted 
with either blue or scarlet affords a discreet suggestion of color. 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup' 
children while teething. 



for your 



Fruit Trees. 



Fruit Trees. 



Vegetable, Flower, Tree and Farm. 

SEEDS. SEEDS. 

Blackberries, 

Strawberries, 

Raspberries, 

Gooseberries, 

Currants, 

ROSES, 

PALMS, 

Etc. 

Trumbull & Beebe, 

419-421 SANSOME ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION. 

THE MATRIMONIAL POST 

AND FASHIONABLE MARRIAGE ADVERTISER. 



The leading agency of the world. Old estab- 
lished. The largest, most reliable agency 
extant. Secrecy observed. Confidence re- 
spected. Price, 3d; in private envelope, 6d. 
Address EDITOR, 9 Nicholas Street, Bristol, 
England. 




MATRIMONY. 



Lady, daughter of landed proprietor, good 
horsewoman, tall, fine figure, very stylish, 
brilliant pianist, with £1400 per annum and 
£4000 at bankers, would correspond with gen- 
tleman with a view to marriage. The strict- 
est privacy and confidence will be observed. 
Photo will oblige. AddresB Miss Annesley, 
box 3682 Advertiser Office, Bristol, England. 



MATRIMONY. 



Member of the aristocracy of the highest 
rank, aged 43, with £15,000 yearly and four 
large estates, tall, handsome, wishes to meet 
with a lady heiress, English or American. 
Lady must be fully able to take her place at 
court and in society of the highest grade. A 
large income a very necessary qualification. 
Send photos and full particulars (to be re- 
turned) in strict confidence. Address Hunts- 
man, box 7004 Correspondence Office, Bristol, 
England. 



THE ALEXANDER MATERNITY COTTAGE 

CONNECTED WITH THE 

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, 

IS NOW OPEN. 
THE ACCOMMODATIONS OFFERED are unexcelled by any similar 
institution in the country, and patients are afforded the beet medical skill 
and the most careful nursing. Terms and further particulars furnished 
upon application to the Resident Physiciau, Children's Hospital, 

3 7UO California Street. 



p. a 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS. 

BUILDING PAPERS. 

ROOFING AND PAINTS. 

PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 

116 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



HEALDS BUSINESS COLLEGE 

C'ld jalts for Year Ending lunt 30. 1894. 

irO Ions ]l.l of »raduat<-» from 
. 
lartr DnraWr W7i«, from various ca>].- 
u.-t t«i had th* flual examination 

What Is more Important la the fact 
thai, notwithstanding the Unto nmiihor i>[ por- 
it of employment hy rea>ou of the pre- 
vailing hard times, a lane proportion ol iho 
Sradoalej fr-,in HeahlS Immedlatelj 
situation*. Thoae who did are marked with a 
.he following list 
mi msiss department 

•May l.utlerield City. 

Clark Am Hewlett. ...Oakland. Cal. 
Agnes Whooten .. Redwood City; Cal. 

•\S . H. Uoldin .^nn Bernardino, Cal. 

o T. Harding City. 

"Shirley Johnson City. 

K.lw. 0. Gait El Dorado. Cal. 

\. Smith Vallejo, Cal. 

J. I'. Sullivan City. 

•Henry 1". De Corse Yuma, Ariz. 

lohn'J. Demnsy Santa Rosa, Cai. 

Km m a H. Hilrner Fresno, Cal. 

Frank J. Dempsy... Santa Rosa, Cal, 

Albert A. Wilson Pescadero, Cal. 

Eugene Montevaldo . Pescadero, Cal. 
Herman M. Levy. . . . .City. 

a masa S. Bryant Bridgeport, Cal. 

F. A. Esqnivel Vacaville, Cal. 

J. M. Freeman Oakland, Cal. 

•C I. McCarthy Ireland. 

•Juliet Boido Guaymas, ilex. 

K D. Bean Citv. 

John L. Stubbs Lower Lake, Cal. 

Robert E. McDonald French Gulch, Cal. 

Mary L. Davison Medford, Or. 

Alvin Judd City. 

•Geo. H. Garrison Forest Hill, Cal. 

Ed. B. Starr Oro Fino. Cal. 

Miles S. Ferrara Decoto, Cal. 

Willie Banmgarten. . .Tehama, Cal. 

'Joseph Lopez San Luis Obispo, Cal. 

•Frank D. McGinn City. 

♦Josephine Dufficy San Rafael, Cal. 

•Mary H. Mondon. .. .San Rafael, Cal. 

Ella Henley Petaluma, Cal. 

Realto Burton Fort Jones. 

•August H. Denke Alameda, Cal. 

'Rutherford Beaton. . .City. 

•Jeanetta Ott Santa Barbara, Cal. 

A. F. Guinasso City. 

•Geo. W. Boido Guaymas, Mex. 

Banyer Davis City. 

W r . H. Kirsten City. 

Mas. Wm. McClellan. .Martinez, Cal. 

•S. D. Sutton City. 

Claude H. Nichols . . . .Hollister, Cal. 

Daniel Donovan Drytown, Cal. 

Silvia Codoni Tocaloma, Cal. 

James E. Warrington .Salinas, Cal. 

Acton Haven Novato, Cal. 

•Wm. H. Pyburn, Jr.. .Salinas, Cal. 
Geo. W. Rosekrans . . .City. 

R. L. Wagner City. 

J.J. Codoni Tocaloma, Cal. 

J. R. Williams City. 

Delos R.Noble Petaluma, Cal. 

Isador Reinheimer . . . City. 

•Sylvia Moore City. 

Wm. R. Twamley City. 

Ida Munro City. 

Ellen A. Stone City. 

•Sam Jacoby City. 

Thos. McCudden Vallejo, Cal. 

Gus Schoenfeld City. 

Rodney P. Snider Vallejo, Cal. 

•♦Isabel A. Little City. 

Carlos A. Mina Santa Ana, Salvador. 

Wm. C. Crook, Jr.... Makawao. H. I. 

R.J. Dennemark City. 

Mary C. Dorris Alturas, Cal. 

* Jas. R. Quick Patterson , Cal. 

Arthur Goslinger City. 

•Jas. W. Mulcahy City. 

•Minnie Brown City. 

Harry Chadbourne . . .Pleasanton, Cal. 

J. Hammerschlag City. 

•Anna Zerdng San Luis Obispo, Cal. 

Ed. M.Morton City. 

*Chas. H. Eilse Yuma, Ariz. 

Ella C. Hussey You Bet, Cal. 

Chas. H. Lauer Omaha, Neb. 

•Anna T. Deeney City. 

Thos. J. Powers City. 

John O. McCallum... Willows, Cal. 
Michael W. Smith. . . .Empire City. 

Louise A. Bricca City. 

Timothy V. Corcoran . Benicia, Cal. 

Wm. F. Stelling City. 

Alex R. Larson Berkeley, Cal. 

J H. Dooling Holhste'r, Cal. 

Marion J. Limbaugh. .Woodbridge, Cal. 
James M. Eva.. City. 

•Alfred E. Sbarboro . . .City. 



Walter Oe a ler r mt ohar. Alameda. Cal. 

■ n\ . 
Clara Kellner Berkeley 

■Henry atseroth . . City. 
Ramon Aviia .PrasnOiOal. 

l.v.relt Harry Redwood City, Oal. 

Walter Lane i>m Mno 

Barney City. 

Mands M. Qeb City. 

1 Rdna Gibson . ' Ity. 

Lizzie A. Lanm Omaha, Neb. 

•( has. H. Dobel .City. 

Joseph Lewis Saasalito. Cal. 

Flora Nicholson Vallejo, Cal. 

Joseph J. Qeary Citv. 

Jules B. Didier ... Alameda, Cal. 
•Maud M.Elliott . . Winneiniicca, Nev. 

Wm. llogers Bristol, Tom. 

I.P.Moore Pleasanton, Cal. 

•Jos. D. Regan City. 

•Edw. M. Kelly . . Salinas, Cal. 

Geo. E. Allen Sutter Creek, Cal. 

Harry T. Bailey Pleasanton, Cal. 

•George Maggio City. 

Lily T. Swales ]. .City. 

•Paul Lehndorff ...City. 

Jos. B. Wootten Linden, Cal. 

•F. E. Wheeler Riverside, Cal. 

•Henry von Tagen Martinez, Cal. 

Robt. L. Cooper Winters, Cal. 

John F. Davies Carbonodo, Cal. 

Jessie J. Gross City. 

Sadie May Brooks Berkeley, Cal. 

J. F. Agee Dixon, Cal. 

L. P. Hourihan San Luis Obispo, Cal. 

•Hattie Samuels Lincoln, Cal. 

•Henry Windt City. 

H. C. Fuller Kremlin, Cal. 

J. B. Brown City. 

James E. Jaeger Oahu, H. I. 

*J. M. Pike City. 

Ella Eastman Walnut Grove, Cal. 

Louise Hippen San Mateo, Cal. 

Arthur Nelson City . 

Maggie E. Sheean — City . 
Herbert Davidson .... City . 

•Roger J . Scanlan Oakland, Cal. 

John C.Barnard Ventura, Cal. 

C. Huntington Wight. Cornwall, Cal. 

*Alf. G. Harms Pleasanton, Cal. 

•Wm, H. Abramsky . . . City 

•Loretti M. Sandi Hollister, Cal. 

•Lily W. Goodman City 

Ernest Scossa Woodfords, Cal. 

Eliza Holmes City 

Belle Crichton City 

Lillie Berg Eureka, Nev. 

Mary G. Smith City 

Nora Cleary ... City 

•Annie A. Power City 

Ebba L. Anderson City 

•Louis J. Henrioulle. .San Mateo, Cal. 

Fritz Geo. Crist Oakland, Cal. 

*Alb. S. Goldsmith City 

Thos. B. Adam Santa Maria, Cal. 

* Chris. J. Bauer City 

Wilbur C. Beard Estrella, Cal. 

Alf. L. Burgan Napa, Cal. 

Henry Mallory S. Luis Obispo, Cal. 

Chas. N. Taylor City. 

Guy L. Reed Middleton , Cal. 

Anna B. Moser City. 

Paul Cavala Los Banos, Cal. 

Jas. Cunningham City. 

Horace Merrill Prescott, Ariz. 

Albert Sullenger Brentwood. Cal. 

•John H. Robinson . . .Prescott, Ariz. 

Chas. A. Peters Dixon, Cal . 

John M. Pfister Pinole, Cal. 

Frank J. Zimmer Reno, Nev. 

•Samuel M. Rothchild.City. 

Mary E. Whelan Virginia City, Nev. 

Henry M. Corthay St. Helena, Cal. 

Cecil Fugler Santa Maria, Cal 

Chas. Gumpel City. 

•Annie M. Hinck City. 

"Frank J. McHenry S. Luis Obispo, Cal. 

Wm. W. Irmie Napa, Cal. 

Ernest F. Mast Pope Valley , Cal. 

Otto E. Soheerer City. 

Juliet F. Wohrield.... City. 

Herbert Gilbert Modesto, Cal. 

Clara Dieterich Empire City. Nev. 

Joseph Gately San Pablo, Cal. 

Wallace Rutherford. .Calistoga, Cil. 

Albert Ellis City. 

Bert Winchell Vallejo. 

Laura M. Barnes Arroyo Grande. 

Wm. TuckS Sheridan. Nev. 

Elmer N. Clark Salinas, Cal. 

SHORTHAND DEPARTMENT. 

•Annie McDonough. . .Vallejo, Cal. 

•Frank Nantz City. 

•Jeanetta Ott Santa Barbara, Cal- 

Frank B. O'Reilly. . . .City. 
•Mamie Piver Sea View, Cal. 



•Ernest W. Porter Ban Mateo, CeL 

'Margie A. Befrtn citv. 

~initli Vallejo, Cal. 

•Flora If. Traoy San l.ui Obi pn. i al. 

•Matilda Vermeil .....( 

"Kmii i Wlaland. . .City. 

•Fred Westphal.., Oakland, Oal. 

•Anna Zernng Ban Luis Obispo, Cal, 

•Minnie Barke Virginia City, Nev, 

• l.ctnia Banotti City. 

•Tessie Qransy City. 

"ICIla LagOnl Illy. 

•Sylvia 10. .Moore City. 

1 on. II. McCarthy. ...Ireland. 

•Ella Solomon City. 

Daisy Smith City. 

•May Skofield City. 

Jennie Ryan City. 

Alonzo Winans Vallejo, Cal. 

Sadie Brooks . . Berkeley, Cal. 

•Emma A. Browne ...Bolinas^ Cal. 

•Minnie Brown ..City. 

•EllaCallinan City. 

Susie Stewart Placerville , Cal. 

Belle Crichton City. 

•Mollie Collin City. 

Jno. C. Duchow, ,lr Sonora, Cal. 

•Anna Deeney City. 

Ella Forsyth City. 

•Jessie L. Gordon City. 

*Lily W. Goodman City. 

•Mrs. Anna Gutheil City. 

Albert Goldsmith City. 

•Edna Gibson City. 

•Georgie Hurney City. 

•Fred C. Hart City. 

•Ada Halket Salt Lake City. 

Eliza Holmes City. 

*Ed. M. Jones Ross Valley, Cal. 

•Jennie Kivell... City. 

Anna Moser . . City. 

B. F. Miller Valley Ford, Cal. 

•Jas. Mulcahy City. 

Nellie Mahoney City. 

•Annie Power City. 

•Jas. R. Quick Patterson, Cal. 

•Jno. C. Reimers City. 

Minnie Smith City. 

•Roger Scanlan. .' Oakland. 

•Frank I. Woodbury . . Weaverville, Cal. 

Nora Cleary City. 

EmilH. Granz Fresno, Cal. 

Jacob M. Pike City. 

Joseph G. Geary City. 

Clara Kellner Berkeley, Cal. 

Mary Kevlin City. 

•May Littlefleld City. 

Belle McMaster Antioch, Cal. 

Mary McEntree Berkeley, Cal. 

Eleanor F. Martin City. 

Thomas Powers City. 

Wm . R. Rogers Monterey, Va. 

Rodney P. Snider Vallejo. 

Kate Sullivan City. 

Charles N. Taylor City. 

Henry L. Thompson. .Sonoma, Cal. 

Mabel E. Vance Yreka, Oal. 

Laura E. Woodin Benicia, Cal. 

Julia Wohlfleld City. 

•Emily Wood Albany, Oregon. 

•Annie Hinck City. 

•Charles E. Bigelow City. 

Gilbert D.Bell City. 

•Annie Carpenter San Louis Obispo, Cal. 

•Wm. J. Curtin City. 

May K. Cook City. 

•Edith C. Cox City. 

•James H. Day Bridgeport, Cal. 

•Emma Dieekhoff City. 

*F. W. Dobbel... Stockton, Cal. 

•Josephine L. Dufficy. . . San Rafael, Cal. 

•Alice M. Farmer Red Bluff, Cal. 

•Abe Friedman City. 

•Curtis L, Gomez Ensenada, Lower Cal. 

•Florence Gray City. 

•Ben H. Graves.... City. 

Emma Hilmer Fresno, Cal. 

•Andrew Jacobson City. 

•John A. Johnson Fisherman's Bay, Cal. 

Mrs. Rebecca Jackson. .Fresno, Cal. 

•Shirley W. Johnson City. 

•Elizabeth Jenks Edna, Cal. 

•William Kuhne City. 

Charles Lindsay Ball's Ferry, Cal. 

•hernird Lepachet City. 

•Mwrguerite MeNamara..Healdsburg, Cal. 
•H'rauk D. McGinn. City. 

*J. 3. Mee San Bernardino. 

TEIEUKAPHIC DEPAPTMENT. 

•Minnie Burke Virginia Citv, Nev. 

Elizabeth Weferling. .Lockwood, Cal. 

*M. Burnett City. 

•C. H. Adams Menlo Park, Cal. 

Lillian Wright Carson, Nev. 

Lilly A . Fogarty Alturas , Cal . 

Arthur Chenoweth...Mt. Olivet, Cal. 

Debbie Lyle Honolulu, H. I. 

Kitty Tyrrell Oakland, Cal. 

Gus C. Lindow Oakland, Cal. 

Wm. Abbott City. 

•Students marked with a star are in positions 




SAN EKANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1894 . 



T-'OURTH of July week is always ao off one in SaD Francisco's 
r social world, society being supposed to be away from tow n 
and tnjoying the festivities uf soine one or the other of Califor- 
nia's numerous summer resorts. Many and various have been the 
diversions planned for a jolly holiday this year, and up to a week 
ago, with every prospect of there being lively times everywhere. But 
the railroad tie-up proved a sad drawback in several instances. Some 
who intended joining parties out of town hesitated to start , not know- 
ing when or how they were to get back , and timid ones , especially , pre- 
ferred the certainty of home comforts rather than the uncertainty of 
railroad travel and possible short rations. Probably San Rafael has 
been the most fortunate of them all in gathering the expected guests, 
and the crowd there this week has been quite a large one. The hop 
last Saturdav evening, which was the opening event of the holiday 
season, was a success, and the tennis courts during the week weie 
filled with friends and admirers of the contestants. There have been 
bowling matches, teas, luncheons, and driving parties without num- 
ber and the ball on Wednesday night was among the best that have 
been given at the Hotel Rafael. Walter Hobart was the guest of Dr. 
Harry Tevis during the week, and among other young beaux who 
made San Rafael their headquarters were Will Heath, Milly La- 
tham, Paul Delmas, Sam Buckbee, Laurie Adams, Will Page, Harry 
1'ringle, etc. Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Barnes were among the holiday 
visitors at San Rafael, as were also the Webster Joneses, Mrs. E. B. 
Coleman, Donald de V. Graham, etc. 

There are always some gay doings at Del Monte, though, as one 
enthusiast recently declared, "It is quite sufficient pleasure simply 
to be here." Music is one of the delights of the season, and of late 
the hops have attained sufficient size to lay claim to that title. Pic- 
nics are another of the pleasures of Del Monte, and during the season 
they are frequent, and popular with old and young alike. One of 
the best that has taken place this season was given last week by Mrs. 
Louis Parrott, in celebration of her daughter Daisy's birthday. The 
Misses Goad were warmly welcomed upon their arrival, and will re- 
main during the rest of the season. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Van Ness, 
Miss Jeuny Dunphy, and Mr. and Mrs. Tim Hopkins were among the 
guests there from San Francisco this week. 

Strikes and tie-ups have not seemingly interfered to any great ex- 
tent with the pleasures of Santa Cruz. There was another hop at the 
Sea Beach, as well as at the bathhouse, on Saturday evening, and 
several took place on Tuesday and on Wednesday evenings at the 
hotels and cottages. The visits of the yachts have been a great fea- 
ture of the week's pleasure, and the entertainments both afloat and 
ashore quite frequent. Among the recent arrivals there are Mr. and 
Mrs. Gaston Ashe, Mr. and Mrs. John Landers, Mrs. N. J. Brittan 
and family, Mrs. and the Misses Forbes, and Mrs. Mclvor. Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Sullivan are at Phelan Park for the season. 

The wedding season does not seem to have come to an end with the 
advent of July, two of much interest being named to take place 
within the next fortnight. One, on Wednesday next, will be at the 
Simpson Memorial Church and the bride and groom Miss Florence 
Stapleton and Chalmers A. Graham. The following Wednesday, 
July 18th, is the day named for the marriage of Miss Agnes Drew 
and J. H. Skinner, of the First National Bank. 

There was a pretty wedding at Plymouth Church, on Post street, 
last week, when Miss Francis Whitney and Edward G. Smith were 
united in marriage by the pastor, the Rev. W. D. Williams. White 
and green were the prevailing colors of the decorations of the sacred 
edifice, white sweet peas, smilax, and palms being used for that pur- 
) ose. Miss Emily Yates officiated as maid-of-honor, Charles W. 
Crane supported the groom as best man, and Charles M. Whitney 
gave his sister away. 

New engagements are of almost daily announcement, the most 
prominent of those recently made known here being between Miss 
Ethel Martel and Charles J. Stovel; while from the East we hear that 
Mrs. 0. C. Catherwood will again become a bride, taking for her sec- 
ond choice Mr. Zimmerman, of Cincinnati. From the East also 
come the particulars of a wedding in Wilmington, Delaware, which 
is of interest to us, owing to the groom's family being so well known 
in San Francisco's circles. The happy man was William B. Peyton, 
of Santa Cruz, the bride Miss Anna Dupont, and the Bishop of Dela- 
ware tied the nuptial knot on Tuesday of last week. Mr. and Mrs. 
Peyton will soon be among us, and as their future home is to be at 
the paper mills, near Santa Cruz, it is highly probable that they will 
frequently be seen in our social world's gayeties during the season. 
The groom's cousin, Mrs. Marian Wise, was again a bride this week, 
her marriage to Dr. Henry Wagener taking place at San Rafael on 
Thursday, the Rev. Charles Miel officiating. After the ceremony a 
few relatives and friends were entertained at Miramonte, the home 
of the bride's mother, Mrs. Hall McAllister, in Ross Valley. 



Our San Francisco belles have been visiting among their friends in 
different directions this week. At San Rafael Miss Ethel Murphy 
has been the guest of Mrs. A. B. Moulder at the Hotel Rafael, Miss 
Alice Hobart has been staying with Mrs. George Boyd, and Miss 
McBean with Miss Alice McCutcheon in Ross Valley. Miss Jennie 
Blair is one of Mrs. Clark Crocker's party at the Hotel Rafael, and 
Miss Zane is with the Loughboroughs at the same hostelrie. Miss 
Emily Carolan is spending the holiday week with Miss Mary Eyre at 
Fair Oaks. Miss Lillie Lauler is making her holiday visit to Miss 
Sadie Collier up in Lake County. Miss Bettie Ashe and Miss Sallie 
Maynard have been the guests of the Misses Bourne at St. Helena, 
Napa County. Miss Augusta Cole is visiting Mrs. Searle at Santa 
Cruz. Miss Ramona Shorb, of San Gabriel, is the guest of some 
friends at the Palace Hotel. Miss Kinzie, of the Presidio, has been 
entertaining the Misses Casey from Benicia. Lieutenants Benson, 
Wilcox, and Smedburg have been taking in the pleasures and 
delights of Del Monte and Santa Cruz alternately, very much 
to the gratification of the belles in those watering places. Ed. 
Sheldon and Allan St. John Bowie have been paying a visit to 
the Colliers at Villa Ka Bel in Lake County. The Isaac Hechts have 
gone to Lake Tahoe for the months of July and August. The Siebes 
have returned from their camp in the Yosemite Valley. Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred Ford are at Castle Crag. Miss Ethel Murphy will be 
one of a party to the Yosemite Valley as soon as travel is free in that 
direction. Judge and Mrs. McKenna and Miss McKenna have de 
cided upon San Mateo as their abiding place for the ensuing month 
or six weeks. Miss Alice Boggs is one of the belles at the Hotel 
Rafael this week. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Center have returned 
from a visit to Healdsburg. Mrs. James Irvine is one of this week's 
guests at Del Monte. Mrs. Joseph G. Eastland has returned from 
the Paso Robles Springs, where her sojourn has been very beneficial 
to her health. Misses Mae and Claire Tucker, of Oakland, will go to 
Del Monte after their visit to San Rafael is concluded. 

The ante-holiday season in town ended very pleasantly. There 
were several theatre parties during last week, as well as a number of 
lunch parties. Misses McNutt and McBean each gave a good-bye 
one, while that of Mrs. Breeze was quite a large affair. 

Charity entertainments are becoming qu ! te the thing at our rural 
resorts across the bay. In San Rafael a very successful one was 
given last week in aid of the Free Library, when Widows Bewitched 
was prettily produced by a company of amateurs, who did excellent 
work. Last evening Sausalito followed, when Everybody's Friend, 
under the title of A Widow Hunt, was acted for the benefit of the 
Sausalito Charity Fund by some of the well-known society folk of 
that little place, Mrs. Mason, Mrs. Miel, and Miss Le Count taking 
the leading female roles. 

Fred Sharon, having started the ball in motion at Burlingame, 
greatly to the regret of those he left behind him departed for New 
York, and accompanied by his wife has sailed for Europe, where they 
will make a stay of some duration. Its length will greatly depend 
upon Mrs. Sharon's health, for whose benefit the trip abroad has 
been made. 

The London Figaro speaks handsomely of the receptions given on 
board the American man-of-war. the Chicago, off Gravesend, last 
month. In one party of distinguished English people is mentioned 
a young lady well known in San Francisco— Miss Kathrine Clem- 
mons, the actress. After paying her some exceedingly fine compli- 
ment, the London paper announces that she is there looking for a 
play, which she wishes to produce either in London or New York. 

The informal hops given at the Vendome, San Jose, every Wednes- 
day and Saturday evening promise to become the most enjoyable 
social features at this popular caravansary during the summer. 
Manager Snell is making the hotel and the beautiful grounds sur- 
rounding it the favorite rendezvous for San Franciscans who intend 
to pass the summer mouths in the country. Among the late arrivals 
are J. D. Phelan, Mr. and Mrs. V?. H. Dumphy, Mrs. J. M. Neville, 
Mr. and Mrs. Marion Leventritt, Dr. J. A. Kenny, D. M. Delmas, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Levy, Miss Ethel Levy, Mrs. G. D. Bliss, Mrs. J. 
B. White. W. H. Moore, Miss Moore, and Miss Alice Atherton. 

Awarded Highest Honors World's Fair. 

^PRICE'S 




Baking 
Powder 



The only Pure Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia; No Alum 
C;«4 in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard 



July " 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



L Stan* of Portland. Or., Ii tht goataf Kn.B. Hoiiubof 

718 ■ Mitral «Tfmif, 

I**M T. (ilennon i* fWttng hrr brother. I. ienK'tiftnl James 
H.tilennon. instructor at the Dnitod state? Naval Academy, at 
AjumdoU*! lid. 

Prof. Samuel Adttetali. la spending the sunimer montha at Mono- 
lulu. and is visiting the different point* of interest In the Hawaiian 
Island*. 

Mr*. W. C. Ralston and her daughter. Miss Bertha Ralston, arrived 
from the Kast last week, and they are the guests of her eldest daugh- 
ter. Mrs. Arthur Page, at Belvedere. 

George Magiiire is at the Hotel Mate) for the summer. He is the 
life of every party and the joy «>f the evening. 

THE CABMEN OF PARIS.. 



Paris, June 10, 1894. 

ONE morning recently I got up at four o'clock and took a stroll 
down to the river to make some sketches. These mornings 
are fine, and it is then that one sees Paris altogether different 
from that which many are familiar with. The streets are quiet and 
deserted, and gangs of men wash the roads as clean as a waxed Moor. 
All the hydrants are turned full on and the streets are flooded with 
water. By eight o'clock the main thoroughfares are all cleaned and 
dry. ready for the traffic of the thousands of omnibuses, cabs, and all 
other kinds of vehicles. 

Paris is a city of cabs. I believe there are more here than in any 
other city in the world, unless London be excepted. And then, the 
cab rates are reasonable. They charge you only a franc and a half 
for a trip, no matter how far it is. Of course you are expected to 
give the cocker a ponr boire of five sous. The cab horse is 
a type all by himself, and they are all alike — little fellows with their 
ribs and hip bones quite prominent. They all keep up the same 
pace as they jog along, never going any slower or faster, and seem 
contented with their lot. It is amusing to see a whole row of ihem 
at a cab stand— nearly all in the same posture, their heads hanging 
low down and their weight resting on three legs, while the other 
hangs limp in repose. 

The cockers^ too, are a type, dressed in their thick, well-worn coats, 
with blazing red waistcoats and a hard leather "plug" hat with large 
quantities of shine on it. Their faces are just as red as their waist- 
coats, probably from too many petits boires or from exposure to the 
Paris weather. In any event, they are mostly a jolly set, and are at 
their best when standing in groups around the cab stands in their 
wooden sabots, and telling yarns. 

Most of their work- is done after dark, when Paris assumes its 
natural air, and the gaiety commences. Then they go rattling away 
to the theatres, balls, cafe concerts, or wherever the public fancy 
calls them. It is after midnight that they make their money, for 
then they charge double rates, and it is then that the night owls want 
to go home. And so the cabmen go all night, and daylight finds 
them straggling up to the stands again, one after another. If the 
weather is cool they wrap themselves in their big coats and soon fall 
asleep on the box. The tired horses hang their heads and dream of 
hay and oats. 

The experiences of any of the cockers would fill many a book, I 
should think. The sights which they see and the escapades in which 
they participate during the small hours, must be interesting indeed. 
How they can know all the streets, big and little, is a mystery to me. 
You get into a cab at night and tell the cocker to drive you to some 
small street at the other end of Paris, and he will not ask you to re- 
peat it, but in due time will have you there. Edouard Cucuel. 

Railroad Tie-Up. 
The railroad tie-up seems to effect everybody except Groom & 
Nash, hatters, under Baldwin Hotel. This enterprising firm did not 
fall to sleep, like many of their competitors, and get caught without 
stock. They displayed the dash and good judgment for which their 
house has become famous, and secured a choice stock of fashionable 
hats before the tie-up. Now they will reap a harvest, as their com- 

fietitors cannot secure any stock during the tie-up, which may last 
or some time. This popular hat store of Groom & Nash, 942 Market 
street, under Baldwin Hotel, made a big hit last Saturday by selling 
Midwinter Fair tickets at the reduced rate of twenty -five cents. 

Ladies Calling 
At the exhibit of Wakelee & Co., in the Manufactures Building at 
the Midwinter Fair, will receive a free sample of Camelline, the Cali- 
fornia preservative for the complexion. It received the highest 
award at the Exposition over all foreign and American competitors. 
As a remedy and preventive for the distressing effects of sunburn 
and poison oak, it will appeal to alt ladies who are visiting the moun- 
tains and seaside. 

That charming resort. Larkspur, lies only twelve miles from San 
Francisco, in one of the prettiest spots in California. It can be 
reached by easy access from the city ; it contains all the attractions 
of the country— fine climate.no fogs, no winds, an excellent table, 
shade trees in abundance, and many attractive surroundings. Busi- 
ness men who want a resting place from Saturday to Monday, or a 
summer home which is close to the city and is not affected by any 
railroad tie-up, will find that Larkspur is an ideal resort in every 
respect. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

3O0 ami 311 Mutm SI Nail Franrlxco, « nl 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM A BRODIK 48 and 46 Thrcadnecdlo St., London 

SIMPSON, M ACKIRDV A CO 39 South Castle St., Liverpool 

MACY A DUNHAM 66'^ Pino St., New York 

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the finest wine or champagne, is at 
the same time unlike them, being free 
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A temperance drink for temperance 
people, delicious and wholesome as well. 
Purifies the blood, tickles the palate. 

Package makes five gallons. 

Ask your storekeeper for it. 

Take no substitutes. 

Send 2 -cent stamp to Chas. E. Hires 
Co., Philadelphia, tor beautiful pic- 
ture cards. 



Brool^Iyr; 
Jtotel. 



Conducted ou both the 

EUROPEAN AND 

AMERICAN PLAN. 

BUSH STREET, bet. Sansome A Montgomery, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



This favorite hotel is under the management of CHAS. 
MONTGOMERY, and is as good, if not the best, Family and 
Business Men's Hotel in San Francisco. 

Home comforts, cuisiue unexcelled, first-class service and 
the highest standard of respectability guaranteed. 

Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

BOAED AND ROOM, per day, 51 25, $1 50, {1 75 and ?2 00. 
" " " per week, ?7 00 to $12 00. 

" " " per month, J27 50 to M0 00. 

SINGLE ROOMS, 50 cents to tl. 



pree <?oac;r? to ar>d F rom . t*? 1 ? Hotel. 



INGLENOOK TABLE WINES AND OLD BRANDIES. 

(PORTB AND SHERRIES.) 

The Standard of Excellence and Purity. 
Grown and bottled at the Celebrated Inglenook Vineyards, Rutherford, 
Napa County, California. 
CLAREiTS ^^_ BURGER 



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PRIVATE STOCK BRANDY. 
CALIFORNIA'S CHOICEST PRODUCTION. 
DISTRIBUTING AGENTS— John H. Magruder, Washington, D. C 
H. B. Kirk A Co., New York and Brooklyn; Geo. B. Woodman A Co , Phil 
adelpbia; Hopper, McGaw & Co, Baltimore; .T. B. Fuller A Co., Boston 
Wm. Donoghue, Rochester, N. Y ; James McPhillips, Mobile, Ala.; Haley 
Grocery Company, Seattle, Wash. ; Macfarlane& Co., Ld., Honolulu, H I 
Shawhan A Co., Chicago, 111.; O. B. Cook A Co., Detroit, Mich ; A. K 
Clarke Mercantile Co., Denver, Colo. ; Klauber A Levi, San Diego, Cal. 
Dingens Bros., Buffalo, N. Y.; C. Grosjean A Co., San Rafael, Cal. 

For prices, address 
Inglenook Vineyard Agenoy, IOI Front St., S. F. Cal 



D* 



FRANKLIN PANCOAST, DENTIST, 

703 Market Street, Rooms 18, 19 and 20. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 7, 18£4. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 
Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANC/ SCO: 

Lbave i From June 26, 7894. I abbivb 

7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogdeu and East 6:45 a 
7:00 a Benlcia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Redding, Castle Crag 

and Dunsmuir, via Davis 7:15p 

7 :S0 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calls- 

toga and *Santa Rosa ... 6 :15 P 

8:30 A Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone. 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red Bluff 

andOroville 4;15p 

9 :00 a New Orleans Express, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles, Doming, El 
Paso. New Orleans andEaBt. , .. 5:46 p 

9:00 a Martinez and 8tockton 10:45a 

*9:C0a Peters and Milton .. ... *7:15p 

12:30 p Niles, San JoBe and Livermore . 8:45 a 
♦1:00 p Sacramento River steamers. . *9:00 p 
4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 

SantaRosa ... 9:15a, 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Landing, 
Marysville, Orovllle and Sacra- 
mento - 10:45a 

4:30 p. Niles. San Jose, Livermore, 
Stockton, Modesto, Merced and 

Fresno 7:15 p 

4:30 p. Raymond (for Yosemite) 10:45 a. 

5:00p. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara and 

Los Angeles 10:45a. 

5 :00 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic ExpresB, 

forMojave and East 10:45a. 

6:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East.. 9:45a 
6:00p. Haywards, Niles and SanJose.. 7:45a. 

17:00 P. Vallejo +7 :45 P. 

7:00 p. Oregon Exnress, Sacramento, 

Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

PngetSound and Ea st. .. . 10:45A 

Santa Cruz Olvislon [Narrow Gauge). 

17:45 a Sunday excursion for Newark, 

San Jose, Los Gatos, Felton and 

SautaCruz .... 18:05 p 

8:15a. Newark. Uenterville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 
Cruz and way stations fi :20 p. 

•2:45 p Newark, Ceuterville, San Jose, New 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *11:50a 

4 :4 5 P. Newark. SanJose, Los GatoB. 9:50a. 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets). 
*6:45 a. San Jose, New Almaden and Way 

Stations *1 :45 p. 

]7:30a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 
Grove and Principal Way Sta- 
tions J8:33p. 

8:15 a. San Jose, TresPinoB, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, San 
San Luis Obispo and principal 

Wav Stations 6:26 p. 

19:47a. PaloAltoaiid Way Stations . . .. Jl:45p. 
10:40a. San Jose, and Way StationB... 5:06 p. 

:i:4S a. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 3:30 p. 
*2:20p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tree Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove ... ..*10:40a. 

*3:30 P. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions.. 9:47 a. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way StationB *8:06a. 

5:10 p. San Jose and Way Stations *8:48a. 

6:S0p. Palo Alto and Way StationB 6:35a. 

rll:46p. Palo Alto and principal Way 
StationB +7:26p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From SUB FRAHCISC0— Foot of Market St. (Slip 8)— 
*7 00 *8 00 9 00 *10 00 and 11 00 A. M., *12 30 
11 00 *2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *6 00 P. M. 
From OUttAM— Foot of Broadway. 

*6 00 *7 00 8 00 *9 00 10 00 and *11 00 a. m. 
112 00 *12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 and *5 00 P. M. 
a. for Morning. p.forAftern^ou. 

•Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

_ jSundayponly. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 

NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 

and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 

with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, May 29, 1894 

Belqic (via Honolulu), Thursday, June2«, 1894 

Oceanic Tuesday, July 17, 1894 

Gaelic Tuesday, August 7. 1894 

ROUND TRIP TICKET8 AT REDUCED RATE8 

OabiD PlanB on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at 8. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Towunend 
streets. San Francisco. 

For freight apply at offices of Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, at wharf, or at No. 202 
Front street, San Francisco. 

T. H.GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 



ROUGHLY speaking, the British Em- 
pire extends over one continent, 100 
peninsulas, 500 promontories, 1000 lakes, 
2000 rivers, and 10,500 islands. The Assy- 
rian Empire was not so wealthy as this is. 
The Roman Empire was not so populous. 
The Persian Empire was not so extensive. 
The Spanish Empire was not so powerful. 



THE mourners at Persian funeraU are 
supplied with little wads of cotton, 
which are used to wipe away their tears. 
The cotton is afterward squee/.ed and the 
tears are bottled and preserved. They are 
supposed to possess restorative qualities 
in case of fainting. 



CREMATION is gaining favor in France 
and Japan. Last year, in the crema- 
tory of the Pere Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, 
there were 3741 cremations. In Tokio, 
the chief city of Japan, the average num- 
ber of cremations is thirty a day. 



STREET bands are not permitted in 
Germany unless they accompany pro- 
cessions. In Vienna the organ grinders 
are allowed to play only between mid-day 
and sunset. 



A MERCHANT in Germany has been 
fined heavily for using a quotation 
from the Bible to head an advertisement. 

PACIFIC HAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New Yobk, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 

8AILING8— At NOON. 

8. S. "Acapulco," July 9, 1894. 

S. S. "San Bias," July 18, 19y4. 

8. 8. "San Juan," July 28, 1894. 

S. 8. "Colon," Augu&tO, 1894. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 
AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc.: 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

S. S. "Peru," Saturday, July 7, 1894, at 3 p. m. 

8.8. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, July 

26, 1894, at 3 p. m. 

8. 8. "City of Peking," Thursday, August 
16, 1894, at 3 P. M 
8. 8. "China," via Honolulu, Aug. 28, 1894, at 

3 P. M. 

Round Trir> Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight "or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 
2 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a, m., May 25, June 4, 9, 19, 
24; July 5, 9, 19, 24; August 3, 8, 18, 23. 

For BritiBh Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
May 25th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Lob Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles), and Newport, every fourth and fifth 
day, at 11 a. u. 

For Ensenada, Mszatlan, La Paz and Guaymas 
(Mexico), 25th of each month. 

Ticket office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS A CO., Gen'lAgentB, 
Nn. 1 Marketstraet. flan Francisco 

STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

World tours, steamer 

o and rail. First class, 

$610. Second class, 

$350. 

^q O. S. S. Company's 

- steamers sail : 

For HONOLULU, 

8. 8. -AUSTRALIA," 

July 7. 1894. 
For HONOLULU 
APIA, AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY, S. S. 

"MONOWAI," 
July 26, 2 p. M. 
For passage apply to 188 Montgomery Street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market S' 
J. D. SPRECKELo & BROS. CO, 



OCEANIC 




S £VE« 



y to 327 Market Street. 

General Agts 



THE chpque cannot be proved to have 
existed in the commercial transactions 
of Europe, outside of Italy, until late in 
the seventeenth or early in the eighteenth 
century; in England not till about 1760. 




THE names of delinquent taxpayers in 
Saxony are conspicuously displayed in 
restaurants and saloons, and any persons 
who serve them with food and drink are 
liable to have their licenses revoked- 

A Little "Beauty" Book 

150 pages on skin and scalp, care of the hair, 
preservation of the complexion. removal of 
moles, wrinkles, pimples, superfluous 
hair, eczema and all skin blemlBhea, 
in short the result of 20 yearB' prac- 
tical experience treating the skin. 
Price 10c. mailed. 



IS IT? 



John H. Woodbury 

Dermatological Institute, 

Established 1870. 125 W. 42dSt., N. Y. 

SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

TIBUR0N FERRY-Footol Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20, 11:00 A. M.; 12:35,3:30, 

6:10, 6:30 p. M. Thursdays— Extra trip at 

11 :30 p. M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 50 and 

11:30 p. M. 
8UNDAYS-8:00, 9:30,11:00 a.m.; 1:30, 3:30,5:00 

6:20 p. M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 A. M.; 12:45, 

3:40, 5:10p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:55 

and 6:30 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 A. H.; 1:40. 3:40, 5:00, 

6:25 p. M. 
Between San Francisco and Scbuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 

Special Saturday to Monday Train Service. 

SATURDAYS— Leave San Francisco at 5:10 P.M.; 
arrive at Cloverdale at 8:45 P.M. 

SUNDAY'S— Leave San Francisco at 5:00 p. m. ; 
arrive at Cloverdale at 8:38 p m. 

SUNDAVTS-Leave Cloverdale at 6:45 a. m.; ar- 
rive at San Francisco at 10:40 A. M. 

MONDAY'S-Leave Cloverdale at 6:00 A. m ; ar- 
rive at San Francisco at 8:50 a. m. 



Leave S.F. 


In Effect 
Ap'l 15,1894. 

Desti'tion 


Abbivein S. F. 


Week 

Daya 


Sundays 


SundayB 


Week 
Days. 


7:40a.m. 

3:30p.m. 
5:10 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 
9:30 a.m. 
5:00p.M. 


Novato, 
Petalums, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a. M 
6:05 p.M 
7:30p.m 


8:50a. m 
10:30am 
6:15p.m 






Fulton 
Windsor , 
Healdsburg, 
Geyserville, 
Cloverdale 
Pieta, Hop- 
land, Ukiah. 




10:30am 




7:30p.m. 




8:66a.m. 




3:30 p.m. 




6:15 pm 


7:40 a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


8:00a. m. 


Guerneville 


7:30p.m. 


10:30a m 
6:15 PM 


7:40a. M.|8:O0A.M. 
5:10 P.M. |5:00p. M 


Sonoma 

Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m.|8:50am. 
6:05p.m.|6:15pm. 


7:40 A. M I 8:00a.M. 
3:30 p.M [5:00 P.M. 


Sebastopol. 


10:40a. m|10:30a.m 
6 05 p.M | 6:15p.m 



Stages connect at Hanta Rosa for Mark West 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs 
Springs, Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point 
Arena. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lake- 
port, Booneville, Greenwood, Orr's Hot Springs, 
Mendocino City, Port Bragg, Usal, Westport, 
Cahto, Willitts, Capella, Porno, Potter Valley, 
Johu Day's, Lively's, liravelly Valley, Harris, 
Blocksburg, Bridgeviile, Hydesvilleand Eureka. 

Saturday to-Monday Rouud Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— Corner New Monteomerv 
and Market streets, under Palace Hotel 
H. 0. WHITING, R. X. RYAN. 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent 



r*nc^ P«r Copy. 10 - 



Annual SiinarTiptfon. $4 OO. 




News vIetter 




Vol XL IX 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 1 4, 1894, 



Number 2. 



Prihted and Published every Saturday by the Proprietory Fred 
Marriott, 606-609-613 Merchant Street, San Francisco. En- 
tered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



The office of the News Letter hi New York City is at the " Evening 
Post " Building, 204-206 Broadway, Room 1, where information 
nay be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

WHEN (be Brittannia defeated the Vigilant the first time, 
American yachtsmen explained it on the score of the wind; 
bnt the fourth defeat seems to settle the question definitely that 
the cutter type is as good as the centre-board, and that American 
builders have learned an important lesson none too soon. 



CONTRARY to expectations. Casimir-Perrier has reduced the 
military staff kept by Carnot and increased his civil staff. It 
is said that he intends to use bis additional secretaries to repre- 
sent him in the lobbies of the Senate and the Chamber of Depu- 
ties. That kind of political manipulating may go in France, but 
it would not be tolerated in America. 



THE Washington Post has announced a number of men as being 
capable candidates for the Republican Presidential nomina- 
tion in 1896, and the latest is Henry M. Teller. One can hardly 
believe that this is anything but a joke on the part of the Post, 
but it is no more ridiculous than the attempts of some Eastern 
politicians to concilliate the Populists, who are really not worth 
conciiliatiDg. 



THE men who invested their money in the Panama Canal 
scheme do not seem to care to abandon the enterprise so long 
as there is any hope of putting the affair on its legs again. A 
large amount of money has been lost on the project, and it will 
take a lot more to put even a small section of the canal in order. 
The truth is, it would take more coin to build the entire canal 
than de Lesseps originally figured on, although enough has been 
spent to have completed the .Nicaragua waterway. 



JUDGE MURPHY based his refusal to grant R. H. McDonald, 
Jr., a change of venue on the ground that although there is 
undoubtedly a strong sentiment against him in this community, 
still, out of 40,000 or 60,000 men in San Francisco competent to 
serve on a jury, there must be twelve who could give him a fair 
trial. This argument is fully as peculiar as the transference of 
the case from Judge Hebbard's court to Judge Murphy's, and it 
only adds to the list of suspicious circumstances attending the 
conduct of the case. 



ONE of the controlling factors in the rejection of the woman 
suffrage provision by the Constitutional Convention of New 
York was embodied in the fact that it would place the bailotin the 
bands of the degraded women of the metropolis, and there would 
be no ballot reform in that. It is a phase of the woman suffrage 
question that has not been considered before, and it is one that 
may kill the movement. If there is one thing that a good woman 
despises, no matter how pure and charitable that good woman 
may be, it is a fallen one, and when both go to the polls they are 
placed on the same tooting. 



ASSISTANT United States Treasurer Hamlin has discovered 
identically the same condition of affairs with regard to the 
protection of this coast against smuggling as has been pointed out 
by the News Letter — namely, that the coast south of Sau Fran- 
cisco is insufficiently guarded and that the Chinese at Santa Bar- 
bara, Monterey, and other open harbors are not properly watched. 
It is difficult to understand, however, why Mr. Hamlin should 
propose to recommend an expenditure of $175,000 for a cutter for 
San Francisco harbor and only $10,000 for the protection of the 
extensive lower coast. It seems equally strange that he should 
be so deeply interested in the prevention of smuggling dutiable 
ores over the northern boundary of the Western States, when it 
has long been a notorious fact that the Eraser River country is 
the locality most generally employed for smuggling Chinese and 
opium into the United States. Mr. Hamlin undoubtedly is a 
very intelligent and conscientious officer, but his ideas of propor- 
tion seem somewhat foggy. 



THE scoundrelly and cowardly wrecking of the train from 
Sacramento, and the death thereby of a number of persons, 
was the logical consequence of the conduct of the American Rail- 
way Union, if not tbe direct act of the strikers; and the American 
Railway Union, the daily press, the Populists, and all who aid and 
sympathize with the strikers, are morally responsible for the 
tragedy. Tbe wreck was exactly wbat the strikers openly an- 
nounced would occur, and as train wrecking is a capital crime, 
the three or four strikers who may have actually done the deed 
are not tbe only ones who could be put on trial for their lives. 



IF ever the necessity for a severe restriction upon foreign im- 
migration was apparent, It is now, when the Huns and Poles 
of Chicago have applied the torch to more than a million dollars' 
worth of property. It might not be unprofitable at this time to 
fish out the old Confederate Constitution and study it carefully. 
Constructed with an intelligent understanding of the shortcom- 
ings of the Federal Constitution, it contained many valuable im- 
provements on that venerable document, one of them being a re- 
quirement of birth or its equivalent — a residence of twenty-one 
years in the country — before the privileges of the franchise might 
be enjoyed. 

MR. DEBS says that he is of the belief that the main cause of 
the present trouble is the depreciation of values caused by 
the demonetization of silver. Then, why did he not use all of his 
efforts to have tbe laws changed, instead of trying to ameliorate 
the effects of the depression by calling for a strike ? He seems to 
think that he is capable of arriving at a logical conclusion, but if 
he is of the opinion that wages can be kept up in the face of tbe 
depression which he is trying to quell he is a mistaken man. If 
the cause of the depression was removed strikes would be unne- 
cessary, but the richest and the poorest of us must face the 
economic crisis until it is over. 



ON Thursday it was announced that the men of the Pullman 
car works, in whose behalf the great railroad strike was made, 
had decided to petition President Debs, of the American Railway 
Union, to suspend the strike, because of the vast injury done 
thereby to the business of the country. This report, if true, dis- 
closes a magnanimity and a breath of understanding that are emi- 
nently creditable to the Pullman operatives and that put the 
striking Railway Union and Grand President Sovereign, of the 
Knights of Labor, at a pitiable disadvantage. This, together with 
the brutal assassination of soldiers brought about by the wreck- 
ing of a train near Sacramento, has bad the effect of turning a 
foolish and always unstable popular sympathy against tbe strikers. 



APPARENTLY with the sole intention of convincing every in- 
telligent and patriotic citizen that it is wholly unfit to have 
any control in governmental affairs, the Populist party has de- 
clared its sympathy for the railroad strike. All its professions of 
love for the people fall to the ground in the presence of an atti- 
tude which is purely anarchistic. An expression of sympathy 
for the strike means an indorsement of the methods and pur- 
poses of the strikers — a defiance of the Government, the assassin- 
ation of its defenders, the destruction of commerce, and the 
precipitation of riot and pillage. The strikers at Oakland have 
announced that they will never go hungry so long as there are 
groceries in the stores. "What has that wealthy banker, J. V. 
Webster, Populist candidate for Governor of California, to say on 
the subject? 

THE philosopher in the tall tower is surrounded by fresh 
troubles. The Mosquito Indians are reported to have rebelled 
formally against Nicaraguan control. When the trouble first 
arose at Bluefields the philosopher in the tall tower denounced 
the Mosquitoes and the British (who had landed some marines to 
protect life and property). Subsequently it transpired that the 
life and property which the British marines defended against the 
Nicaraguan officials was principally American, whereupon the 
philosopher in the tall tower denounced the Nicaraguan and Brit- 
ish Governments for having eaten Corn Island and being about to 
build a canal to the moon (or something of that kind). The dis- 
closure of his attitude on this new complication is awaited with 
that same feverish interest which men usually take in the utter- 
ances of the philosopher of the circus ring. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14 1894 



OBSERVATIONS ON THE RAILROAD STRIKE. 

THERE are few who realize the extent of the power which the 
President of the United States can exert on extraordinary 
occasions. While his domestic authority in times of peace is not 
great, bis power in the suppression of rebellions and insurrections 
is formidable, enabling him to become a military despot not 
weaker in authority than the German Emperor or the Russian 
Czar. He is Commander-in-Chief not only of the regular army 
and the navy, but of the National Guard and the militia as well. 
(There is a confusion in the public mind regarding the National 
Guard and the militia. The first is composed of enlisted citizens, 
organized on a military basis, armed, uniformed, and drilled, and 
consisting, in California, of 450 officers and 4,700 enlisted men; 
the militia are the citizens at large enrolled by the county Tax 
Collectors as fit, under the law, for military duty, numbering 
154,589 in California, and though not organized, armed, or drilled, 
yet subject to call for military service). This makes the President 
the military head of all the men in the United States able to bear 
arms, and if any of them should refuse to serve in obedience to 
any order which he may give, they are rebels and are liable to 
the severest penalties. The conspicuous instances in which ibis 
enormous power has been exercised were the following: The 
suppression of the Rhode Island rebellion in 1840-2 with State 
troops; the emancipation proclamations and the suspension of 
habsas corpus by Lincoln; and the arbitrary choice, in 1873, by 
the President between two contending forces in Louisiana, each 
claiming the right to the control of the State government, and the 
enforcing of that choice with troops. As John Bryce, in his 
American Commonwealth, states the matter: "Abraham Lincoln 
wielded more power than any single Englishman has done since 
Oliver Cromwell. * » * The President enjoys more authority, 
if less dignity, than a European king." That President Cleve- 
land has abundant courage and patriotism none will attempt to 
deny; and while, in view of the prevalence of sympathizers for 
the railroad strikers, he would not do so foolhardy a thing as call 
out the militia (which would be the calling out of the strikers to 
take up arms against themselves), he has sufficient resources in 
the armed and drilled bodies of men in the country, and he may 
be depended on to use them wisely and firmly in the protection 
of the country against insurrection. 

The daily press is wofully at sea with regard to the meaning of 
tne President's course in the matter of the handling of troops to 
suppress the insurrection which has broken out in this country. 
The papers luridly announce that in ordering the troops to dis- 
perse mobs, suppress riots, and protect the property of the Gov- 
ernment, the President has declared "martial law." Nothing 
could be more absurd than such a claim. In the original and 
proper sense "martial law" meant an agreement between bellig- 
erent countries that their wars should be conducted on certain 
lines recognized as proper in civilized warfare — that, for instance, 
the water supply should not be poisoned, that prisoners should 
not be tortured or butchered, and the like. In more recent times 
the term has come to mean the same as "military law," which is 
the sweeping aside of civil courts, officers, and processes, and the 
substitution of military procedure in dealing with infractions of the 
law. Hence, a proclamation of "martial law," as we now under- 
stand it, means a recognition of the inability of the civil arm of the 
Government to cope with a great and overpowering disturbance, 
and the necessity for the substitution of military force. Hence, 
further, a proclamation of raaitial law means a suspension of the 
authority of the civil courts. Nothing of that kind has been even 
hinted at in the President's recent proclamations. Having at one 
time lived under martial law in this country, the writer of this 
paragraph is familiar with its terrors and rigors — with the inflex- 
ible command that no lights should burn in private houses at 
night; that window blinds should be kept closed, and that the 
presence of a face at the window meant a minie-ball in the brain ; 
that appearance on the street after sundown meant arrest and 
imprisonment, without the power to inform friends or family — 
and things like that, and worse. All that President Cleveland 
has ordered his soldiers to do is to perform police duty in the pro- 
tection of Federal rights and property. When he is fully con- 
vinced that the local authorities are incapable, or through dis- 
loyalty unwilling, to enforce local laws, protect private property, 
guard the public peace, and shield the Federal interests, be can, if 
requested, send soldiers to assist them; and if he sees that local 
authority has been swept aside, that the troops detailed for 
police duty in the protection of Federal property are defied and 
attacked, and if, further, it is evident that an insurrection is afoot, 
he may declare siege, proclaim martial law, and suspend habeas 
corpus. Nothing at all resembling that has appeared in his pro- 
clamations. 

A good many people who ordinarily respect the laws permit 
their sympathies to override their judgment, and in aiding law- 
lessness which threatens the Government they become insurrec- 
tionists. There are many who openly declare that the " right of 
insurrection " is inherent and sacred, and that if insurrection 
could curb the insolence of the rich and make lighter the burdens 
of the poor, then insurrection becomes more than a right — it is a 



duty. They do not reflect that history shows precious few suc- 
cessful insurrections, and fewer still that, even though successful, 
secured the end desired. For insurrections are generally the ex- 
pression of a disrespect for all laws. They are a mistaking of license 
for freedom— in short, they are nearly always anarchistic. The de- 
struction of the wealth of the rich means the extinction largely of 
the means by which the poor may earn a livelihood. A rebellion, 
a revolt, and a secession are entirely different matters, and are on 
a much higher plane than an insurrection. The question of the 
" right of insurrection" was settled once in France in a very 
startling manner. Robespierre was dead, the Reign of Terror had 
passed, and France was slowly ridding its blood of murderous 
sansculottic madness. The National Convention, controlling- the 
government, was still in session, but it dared not put in force the 
terrible constitution of '93. The Jacobins, maddened to see the 
wavering of their old instrament, the National Convention, and 
seeing the hated remnant of the wealthy classes daring to crawl 
out of their hiding places, raised in Saint-Antoine, the fiery revo- 
lutionary center of Paris, the cry of the " right of insurrection." 
Saint-Antoine instantly responded with 40,000 armed men to 
crush the National Convention and institute the constitution of 
'93. The government had only 5000 men to defend it. A small, 
cadaverous, saturnine major of artillery, hardly more than a boy, 
was idle in Paris, and the Convention asked bim to defend the 
government against the insurrectionists. He considered, then 
accepted. Taking only the artillery at his command, be planted 
his cannon in the streets of Paris and calmly awaited the terrible 
onslaught of Saint-Antoine's 40,000 men. He stood so calm and 
rigid in the face of the oncoming multitude that the government 
wondered and feared. When the insurgents had come quite near 
he opened his month to utter a Bingle word. But at that word 
his cannon responded, and in a moment the streets were paved 
with corpses, and nearly 40,000 living men had fled. It was sup- 
posed that he had fired blank charges at first. " No," explained 
the saturnine man — known as Napoleon Bonaparte — "no; that 
would have been a useless waste of life ! " Thus ended in a whiff 
of grapeshot the " right of insurrection" in France. The incident 
is familiar to alt, but some may have forgotten it; and it is well 
to reflect that the President of the United States has incompar- 
ably greater power than Napoleon then possessed, that grapeshot 
is as deadly now as then, and that a legally constituted govern- 
ment will oppose with the lives of its loyal defenders the anarch- 
istic demand for the " right of insurrection." 

So far as California is concerned, the daily newspapers are the 
most efficient, and therefore the most dangerous, of all the ele- 
ments which are conspiring to precipitate an insurrection, over- 
throw the Government, and institute a reign of anarchy, riot, in- 
cendiarism, and assassination. In San Francisco the Examiner, 
the Call, the Bulletin, and the Report are resorting to every possi- 
ble trick of the pen to magnify the wrongs of the strikers and the 
oppressions of tfee Southern Pacific Company. They do this solely 
because a large majority of the " people " are in sympathy with 
the strikers, thus showing themselves to be cowardly time- 
servers. By every conceivable means they seek to concentrate 
local attention upon the Southern Pacific Company and to obscure 
the great principles of property rights and governmental authority 
involved. Not one of them has had the manhood to declare that 
the strikers had no conceivable right to involve the railroad com- 
panies, the transportations of the mails, the forwarding of passen- 
gers and freight, and the lawful, business, and domestic security 
of the country in a private quarrel between Pullman and his em- 
ployees. All are united in a mendacious effort to show that the 
Southern Pacific Company solely is to blame for the stoppage of 
traffic by reason of its refusal to run any trains without Pullman 
cars, when they know well enough that the local trains in Oak- 
land never carried Pallman cars and yet were stopped by the 
" killing " of locomotives and the forcible dragging of firemen 
from the cabs. Not one of tbem has had the decency and honesty 
to hold up the Sheriffs of Alameda and Santa Clara counties to 
scorn, or to show that those official worthies, while protesting 
that they would not permit any violent interference with the 
running of trains, have stood idle and seen strikers throw them- 
selves on the rails in front of locomotives, and trains stopped by 
the dragging of firemen from the cabs by hand or " persuasion " — 
the surest of all kinds of violence. Only in San Francisco has 
there been the smallest effort at police protection against violence. 
That part of the daily press which has arrayed itself on the side 
of anarchy calculates shrewdly that business men must adver- 
tise, that capital is cowardly and temporizing, and that when the 
storm has passed they can slip back into their old Pharisaic 
groove and wheedle themselves back into the favor of law-loving 
men. But if the railroads, having sown the wind, are now reap- 
ing the whirlwind — if they have committed even more than the 
crimes with which their enemies have charged tbem — no imagi- 
nable acts of theirs conld be so serious a threat to the rights of 
men and the authority of the law as the insurrectionary attitude 
of the daily press. 

THE efforts to depose Mr. Bland and make Mr. Reed the parti- 
cular champion of the silver dollar is an interesting perform- 
ance that is going on in politics just now. 



— -- : — — 



July U. 1894. 



SAN FR.\\<ls<o NEWS LETTER 



:! 



THE FUTILITY OF FOREIGN M1S8IONS. 



THK two Scotch women who are traveling around the world 
Doling and comparing the condition of the women of different 
countries, declare themselves on the subject of missionary work 
with a straight-forwardness and amount of common sense abso- 
lutely refreshing after all the twaddle expended in that direction 
by advocates of foreign missions. They declare from personal 
obse'vation that the lives of the women of the Orient are not the 
utterly degraded arid entirely wretched affairs that mission pro- 
moters would have ns believe tbem to be. They are happy in 
their religion and its teachings and are content to remain in it; 
and, in truth, a religion that is older than the hills and fostered 
by superstition and ignorance is not to be supplanted by another 
in one year nor in one hundred years. Time and again it has 
been proved that the wily heatben assumes the adoption of the 
faith taught by the zealous converters, only as a means of gaining 
some worldly end. After years of patient teaching and striving, 
when the self-elected missionary is rejoicing over the result of his 
labors, the opportune moment arrives, his pupil casts aside all 
semblance of Christianity and is quite ready to kill or otherwise 
ill-treat his deluded teacher. One hears constantly of deplorable 
tales of missionaries fleeing for their lives from among the very 
people whom they fondly imagined were young lambs in the new 
fold. Is the heatben with his idols of wood and stone so much 
the inferior, in his religion, to his Christianized white brother, 
who breaks all the commandments six days in the week, and on 
the seventh appears in bis glass beads and feathers to worship his 
i.od and give a large dollar towards the enlightenment of his un- 
civilized brother in the same lines ? The large sums that are an- 
nually devoted to the cause of foreign missions would go far to- 
ward ameliorating the condition of the poor and suffering in the 
cities where the money is obtained. The Scriptural injunction, 
•* <io, teach the heathen," did not specify where the work of con- 
version was to be carried on. There is a large lump of solid 
heathenism right here on which those ardent, glowing souls, 
eager to ■• do the Master's work," might expend their efforts with 
boundless good. With the field of their labors within reach of 
civilization, there would not be the danger of hasty and secret 
flight in the night in order to reach a safe shelter, which was the 
plight of a young female missionary a short time since. It is a 
seif-evideDt fact that the heathen neither desires nor is grateful 
for conversion; he is wedded to his idols. Let him alone. Here 
in the crowded city are fathers and mothers who need to be 
tanght the Ten Commandments; yonng people to whom a pure 
heart is an untranslatable phrase, and little children who know 
the name of ' -od only in an oath. Establish the missions where 
so urgent and crying need for them is apparent to every passer-by, 
and the heatben in a far-off land will not suffer. There is a 
Methodist mission school in distant Sitka where the children of 
Alaskan Indians are taught the difference between right and 
wrong, and to sing hymns of praise. But with all this teaching, 
an unrelaxing watch is kept over them, and the girls are never 
permitted to go to the village alone. The Superintendent will 
tell you they have absolutely no moral sense. Then why expend 
time, energy, and money in erecting a system which, when the 
support is removed, falls to the ground ? Let the saver of souls 
center his energy and work where the result will be deep-seated 
and abiding, and he will go hence with a blissful sense of having 
accomplished a good work which will be lasting for all time. 



THESE ARE PINCHING TIMES. 



TEN days ago a wholesale merchant of this city, who owns a 
large vineyard in Fresno Connty, advertised for a man to do 
bookkeeping and drive an express wagon at his vineyard. The wages 
offered were $25 a month and found. In less than one week from the 
time the notice appeared in the morning papers he had received over 
one hundred and fifty applications for this position by letter. Among 
the applicants, and a greater part of them, were men who had served 
as bookkeepers for years at salaries ranging from $75 to $125 a month, 
and who were well educated and expert accountants. These were 
able to furnish acceptable references as to efficiency, sobriety, and 
honesty. The gentleman expressed himself as astounded at the evi- 
dences of actual distress that exists, and surprised at the willingness 
of these men to leave the city, where they had formed associations 
during years of greater prosperity, and go to the country. It touched 
him keenly, and he was free to confess that there were many young 
men who refrained from gambling and entering into other question- 
able avocations rather than seek for honest employment in the coun- 
try. He was now in a quandary as to which one of the excellent men 
he should employ, and has taken the matter under advisement for 
one week. He is only sorry that he cannot give employment to each 
one of them, as he is satisfied that they are all well qualified to per- 
form the required service , The conduct of these accountants is in 
strong contrast to that of laborers, who preferred to starve or beg in 
San Francisco, or work for a dollar a day in the Park, to going into 
the country and supplying an urgent demand for labor in the 
orchards. It is of these litter that " industrial armies " and strik- 
ing and rioting bodies are composed. 



THE REDEMPTION OF THE NATIONAL GUARD. 

THAT fraction of the National Onard which, for Its first bearing 
at Sacramento, has been receiving the ridicule of ihe wlu.lv 
Slate, deserves all credit for its later conduct. The simple fn.is 
of the first occurrence were these: United Stales Marshal Bald- 
win assumed command and issued Instructions to the officers to 
order a volley. Before Ihe officers bad time to deliver the com- 
mand Mr. Baldwin couulermanded it, and accordingly left the 
already exhausted men standing for hours in the broiling sun. 
Two companies then, without orders, left the ranks, and for this 
disgraceful conduct they have been court-martialed, disgraced, 
Bnd expelled from the service. The remaining six hundred men, 
mostly from San Francisco, stood their ground for hours longer, 
patiently awaiting an order to charge or fire. Through the ex- 
traordinary weakness and vacillation of Marshal Baldwin that 
order never came, and the men were finally withdrawn. It is 
useless and unwise for Mr. Baldwin's friends to explain his con- 
duct by saying that he did not give the order to fire for the reason 
that he believed the men would not obey it. That was no con- 
cern of his, for his duty clearly was to order a volley or a bayonet 
charge. The San Francisco men feel bitterly the disgrace which 
Mr. Baldwin has put upou them, for there is no clear reason to 
doubt their subsequent assertion that they would have obeyed 
the order had it been given. The unfortunate result has been, 
however, that the conductor thedeserting Sacramento and Stock- 
ton companies has brought the whole Cuard under unjust con- 
tempt, and in doing really courageous and intelligent service now 
they are likely to receive less credit than they deserve. Their 
bearing on Wednesday at Sacramento, when they searched the 
homes and headquarters of the strikers for arms, and captured an 
armament sufficient, if used, to do enormous damage, was emi- 
nently praiseworthy, and the promptness and firmness of the 
contingent at San Jose in clearing the depot and permitting the 
rehabilitation of the train service on the Coast Division, after the 
Sheriff had made so disgraceful a failure, was the work of intelli- 
gent and courageous men. In short, the National Guard, except- 
ing two companies composed largely of strikers, has not yet 
failed to obey an order and is evidently anxious to overcome the 
disgrace which Mr. Baldwin has brought upon it. Its conduct 
henceforward will be watched with a very sharp interest, and 
the least mistake on its part will likely cause the disbanding 
of the organization. 



WHAT MARTYRDOM ACCOMPLISHES. 

SALVADOR FRANCH, the anarchist who threw the bombs in 
the Liceo Theatre, Barcelona, has confessed that he threw the 
bombs with the object of destroying the people present. " He 
declared that he was glad," says the dispatch, " that he had killed 
so many people, but regretted that the second bomb had not 
exploded. He appeared to take delight in giving the details of 
his villainous crime. The audience were horrified by the sang 
froid displayed by Franch as he calmly proclaimed his guilt." 
It seems not to have occurred to the horrified audience that the 
most terrible thing before them was neither the crime itself nor 
the coolness of its telling, but the fact that a man who has com- 
mitted such an act is joyfully willing to suffer its consequences. 
Tnat is a species of martyrdom which, when directed in the chan- 
nels of anarchy, becomes a most terrible thing. This spirit is 
more extensive in the world to-day than most people think. The 
man who will deliberately sacrifice his life for a cause which he 
holds dear is one for whom the law has no terrors. The three 
causes in which this dangerous species of fanaticism expends its 
force are religion, politics, and hatred of the rich by the poor. 
Human nature is so constructed as to applaud the martyr, for 
there is a heroic tinge in his conduct; and it is this sentiment 
that renders martyrdom so powerful a factor in the extension of 
the cause for which it suffers. Just as much of the vitality of 
early Christianity was due to the martyrdom of its founder, so 
does every martyr to the cause of anarchy add immeasurably to 
the force of the movement. 



THE Sheriff of Santa Clara County, while repeatedly assuring 
Mr. Towne that he was ready to suppress any violent inter- 
ference with the running of trains, stood idly by with his worth- 
less and idle deputies and saw firemen " persuaded " to leave the 
engines by a dangerous mob of strikers; and so, through his in- 
activity, the trains of the Coast Division were stopped, and the 
fruit growers of his county suffered more loss than a thousand of 
his ilk could earn in a century. When at last, however, the sen- 
sible men of San Jose, moved thereto by a conspicuously sensible 
and courageous Mayor, offered themselves as Deputy Sheriffs and 
demanded to be sworn in, so that tbey might protect the trains, 
the Sheriff yielded; the citizens were appointed; they established 
a cordon, kept the strikers back, and made it possible for willing 
men to man the trains. In an instant the blockade was broken, 
traffic was resumed, the county was saved an enormous sum, and 
men whom the violence of "persuasion" had prevented from 
earning a livelihood were permitted to act in accordance with 
their sense of right, self-duty, and good citizenship. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1894. 



AT TWENTY- THREE. 

By Robert G. Mackay. 

THERE'S something noble in a shattered life, 
That bends its remnant still against the blast; 
There's pathos in the blindness that doth grope 

Where light lay last 
In level lines across Life's western slope. 

And be who battled nobly in the strife 

Is loved, and he who bravely fell is mourned; 

Bat one, O Godl I know whose empty life 
Is justly scorned. 

E'en by himself, with myriad sad reflections rife. 

0, score of barren years, forever fled! 

0, horror of inverted life, when age 
Is felt in youth, and youth's desires are dead, 

When the sweet mage 
Of music vainly seeks to thrill this heart of lead! 
Sail Francisco, July, 1894. 

THE SILVER QUESTION. 



EDITOR News Letter— Dear Sir: A correspondent in New York 
writes me that "There is a growing tendency amongst Repub- 
licans to do something for silver." I opine that if that sentiment 
be generally entertained by Republicans, as it appears to be, the 
"growing tendency to do something for silver" will very 
seriously add to the already heavy burdens and perplexities of 
the country. The Indiana Republican State platform this year 
declares as follows: 

" We believe in a currency composed of gold, silver, and paper, 
readily convertible at a fixed standard of value, and entirely under 
National control, and we favor the imposition of increased tariff duties 
upon the imports from all countries which oppose the coinage of silver upon 
a basis to be determined by an international congress for such purpose. 

Even Mr. Balfour, one of the neo-bimetatlists, in his speech at 
London, May 2d, admitted " That the solution of the problem of 
international bi-metallism was incomparably easier ten years ago 
than it was rive years ago, and five years ago than it is now, and 
now than it will be five years hence." 

When and by what International Congress is it to be deter- 
mined ? There have been six in twenty-seven years, and no ap- 
proach has yet been made to an agreement for a basis. The Cali- 
fornia convention of the Republican party adopted a platform de- 
claring for the free and unlimited coinage of silver at a ratio of 
16 to 1, which, under present conditions, would be as fatuous a 
thing for the welfare of the country as can well be imagined. If 
the attitude of all Europe — that is to say, that portion of the 
world which, with its dependencies, is doing very considerably 
more than one-half the entire business of the world, and with 
which our most extensive and important commercial and finan- 
cial transactions are chietiy maintained and inextricably con- 
nected, remains steadfastly set against anything of the kind, as 
by six monetary congiesses in twenty-seven years they have 
affirmed and re-affirmed, it is simply financial folly for a political 
party of the United States, whether Republican or Democratic, to 
come forward at this time with a declaration for the unlimited 
free coinage of silver. It is incredible that men of intelligence 
should thus play with fire. 

The governments of Great Britain, France, and Germany have 
indicated conclusively for twenty-seven years that they are 
averse to bi-metailism in so far as the free coinage of silver is con- 
cerned, and all the reasons for being averse to it during that 
period — the increased annual product of both metals with ever- 
increasing excess of silver — exist to-day in an enlarged degree. 
Director Preston, of the United States Mint, reports the world's 
product of precious metals for 1893, at present mintage ratios, as : 
gold, $155,000,000; silver, $207,000,060— each, I think, exagger- 
ated, but evidently large enough in fact to emphasize the reasons 
why all Europe has turned to the gold standard within twenty- 
five years, and uses silver only as a subsidiary or auxiliary 
money metal — " a temporary companion to gold." 

In this connection it seems pertinent to ask: Can any man 
whomsoever show how he would become possessed of more 
money if we had unlimited free coinage of silver, which would 
undoubtedly put gold at a high premium and exclude it from cur- 
rent circulation ? Whatever theorists and politicians may say, it 
is not conceivable that any device is possible by which the United 
States could create an independent money standard which would 
effect special benefits to the people of this country in their trade 
with the rest of the world. Our standard money must be as good 
in London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, or any other foreign trade 
center, as it is in New York, Chicago, or San B'rancisco; otherwise 
the disadvantages will be suffered by our people. Can any man 
who participated in framing the recent Republican platform of 
this 8tate show wherein California would be benefited by a de- 
preciated currency on the basis of the unlimited coinage of silver 
at a ratio of 16 to 1, which is what thai platform declares for ? If 
the industrial, commercial, or financial ills of this country could 
be cured by the issue of fiat money, metal or paper, it certainly is 
a pity the remedy was not sooner discovered and applied. 

San Francisco, July 10, 1894. A Layman. 



T^'IPR A^ DE suijs. 




latest 
5tyles. 
perfect 
pittii}<£. 

pinisb. 

£le$ant 

/Material. 

Complete 

flssortm^t, 

lowest 

priees. 



pratir/^er 9 <$o., 105 j^earpy St. 



*0 LET==Furnished. 



T 

A Modern House of Eight rooms; 
Convenient to two cable lines; grand 
marine view ; good neighborhood. 
Rent reasonable to desirable party. 

BALDWIN & HAMHOND, 

10 ilontgomer y Street. 

REMOVAL. 

DELMAB & SHORTRIDGE 

Have removed their law offices to the 

CROCKER BUILDING (Third Floor.) 

pacific tcwei coi±/L^>A.isr-z: 

9 LICK PLACE, 
Furnishes Clean Towels at the following low rates: 

Clean Hand Towels each week, ?l.oo per month; 12 Clean Hand Towels 
each week, J1.50 per month; 4 Clean Roller Towels each week. J1.00 
^ 6 month : 6 Clean Roller Towels each week, $1.25 per month, 

A. BUSWELL, 

BOOH i DIDER, PAPER-RULER, PRMTER AS» BI.AKK BOOK lAJIl/FACTURER 

535 Clay Street. Near Montgomery, San Francisco. 

Q H. REGENSBURGER, attorney-at-law. 

**' Rooms 1 and 2, 319 Pine Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



DR. FRANKLIN PANCOAST, Dentist, 
703 Market Street, Eooms 18, 19 and 20. 



[I #£-£- /^EiL-E\7 _ _. 
Will Remove to 824 Market St., Phe/an Bui/ding, July 1st. 



July 14. 1804. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS I BTTSR. 



SNAP SHUTS. 

|Bt Di Viuof.) 

TH K Cinttrbury TnltJ must stand ft* tbe but description of a 
body ol fellow-travelers ever written. For a keen analysis of 
each character, nothing coold be more Dearly perfect tban 
Chaucer's method and lis results. Had the father of English lit- 
erature lived in onr day and traveled behind tbe locomotive, orin 
the »ix-horse stage, his observations would have been equally 
worthy of attention. 

This is an age of hurry, and just as some travelers forget their 
hand satchels at tbe last moment, so do many of them start off 
In such haste that they leave their manners at home. Only, to 
be perfectly accurate, there is likely to be this difference: the for- 
getful traveler may really own a gripsack, while the others 
never have any manners to speak of, at home or abroad. 

Often tbe exigencies of the case require hast?, and baste in 
itself is never dignified, although tbe thoroughbred who is run- 
ning tbe race will avoid jostling tbe others on the track, while 
tbe clodhoppers will not only trample all over people, but will 
seem to take pleasure in the successful attempt. A person who 
is without natural refinement, or who lacks consideration for tbe 
feelings or rights of others, can become a veritable tborn in tbe 
flesh to alt ailticted with his or her company. A pantomime con- 
test over a car window as to whether it may remain open or not, 
a wordy war over a choice of routes, or tbe seating of a party for 
a pleasure trip, greediness or impatience at the table — these are 
familiar scenes witnessed by travelers. 

We have just passed through the period when friendships are 
suddenly made and more suddenly broken. The summer vaca- 
tion is ended, and many of those who left the city for a brief out- 
ing have returned to their usual routine of city life. School- 
teachers who went away together, society girls who were mem- 
bers of the same party, many of them returned not in each other's 
company, and they do not speak as they pass by. Why? Be- 
cause it is a rare friendship that can stand the test of its mem- 
bers being together morning, noon, and night. Tbe best of friends 
may develop an aversion for each other through sharing the same 
apartment. The fact that one lady was the personification of 
order and neatness, while her companion had a habit of leaving 
her belongings all over the room, has shattered more than one 
friendship. 

But tbe green-eyed monster is also apt to play an important 
part in separating very close frieods. Women love to be admired, 
and are happy in receiving attention from the lords of creation. 
Some girls do not hesitate to adopt contemptible tactics to win 
away the object of so much interest from the one who has ap- 
parently captivated his fancy. "I had him first, but she took 
him away," is a plaint that may be heard more than once toward 
the end of the season. For men are all too scarce at the summer 
resorts, and much strategy must be used to attach a cavalier to 
one's train. More than one young girl has had cause to regret 
her intimacy with an older woman, after she has had the bitter 
experience that her friend has played her false and simply used 
her as a foil to herself. 

Among school-teachers and those accustomed to tbe use of 
authority, there is a tendency to show a disposition to take the 
upper hand in all projects for pleasure. This is quite likely to 
happen when the one in whom authority is vested is some old 
maid who tries to be young, and who, while wishing to pose as 
one of the young girls, asserts herself with all her schoolroom 
manner. There are some women who ought, for the good of the 
community, to be kept in a subordinate position, for when clothed 
with the power to command they become despots of the meanest 
type. 

A woman who is growing old, whose personal charms have 
faded, and who has no graces of intellect, cannot afford to as- 
sume a show of authority while away from her schoolroom, or to 
lend herself the airs of an imperious beauty. She will meet with 
defeat and humiliation on every side, and every one will rejoice 
at her unhappy condition. 

Among some of the types of to-day that would receive 
Chaucer's attention were he among ns taking notes, would be 
the summer girl and her flirtations, her affair first with this one 
and then with that, the rapidity with which her admirers suc- 
ceed each other, or rather, to be more exact, the brevity of each 
one's stay, and the defiant attitude of the girl herself towards all 
those whose sense of propriety she has shocked. The aimless 
society youth with his affectations of attire, his hair parted in the 
middle, his creased trowsers, and his inevitable cigarette, would 
not escape Chaucer's pen. Neither would the American child 
whose defiance of authority and disregard of parental control have 
rendered it a creature to be dreaded, and which has made a wel- 
come and familiar sight the prohibition, "Children will not be 
allowed to make a playground of the parlors or the halls." 

The parvenu and his wife, who are trying to live up to their in- 



come, are a familiar spectable at summer resort*. B« may take 
on varied appearances. He may be tbe commonplace but honest 
old man who ha* nia.ir money rather unexpectedly to himself, 
who Is da cl by his good fortune, and somewhat embarrassed by 
the attempts of bis wife and daughters to sblne In society. Or 
he may be a sporty individual with a porcine throat and vulgar 
air. who has made his money in stocks or mines, or at the horse 
races, and whose idea of being "swell," as he would call it, con- 
sists in standing with his hands in his pockets and keeping bis 
bat on in the presence of ladles, stuffing himself at meal times, 
and chewing a toothpick the rest of tbe time. His wife Is apt to 
be a dowdy, giving herself absurd airs, and talking about money 
and the cost of everything, wearing her diamonds to breakfast 
and her dresses too tight across the back. 

The snob, the toady, the sponge are other types never to be 
looked for in vain at the summer resort. Similarly present are 
the people whose devotion to a toothpick would be more accept- 
able to everybody were it practiced in the privacy of their own 
rooms rather tban in the parlor or on tbe porch. 

To a sojourner at a popular summer or winter resort, the 
meteoric appearance and disappearance of bridal couples is a 
never-ending source of interest. Even an inexperienced eye can 
detect them as they enter the dining-room. There is a newness 
of attire noticeable in both, sometimes a slight, often a visible, 
hesitancy as to which shall take the lead in following the steward 
to a table. The man always seems to be tbe more conscious and 
uncomfortable of the two. The bride generally sits up, and re- 
inforced by the knowledge that she has on a complete new suit, 
tries to look self-possessed. But the bridegroom has more 
nervousness in his demeanor, and seems unable to cope with the 
newness of the situation. They gravely study tbe bill of fare, 
and their ignorance of each other's tastes is another proof of the 
surmise that they are on their wedding journey. They converse 
in monosyllables, and then, as if frightened by the sound of their 
own voices, succumb to the situation, finish tbeirmeal in silence, 
and vanish. Another evidence of newly-married relationship is 
to be seen in tbe distance between their chairs on the porch and 
the vacuous expression of their countenances as they sit staring 
before them. Animation shows itself only when they are about 
to depart. Perhaps they are glad to escape from observation. 

Human nature loves to study human nature. Sometimes it is 
vivisection of its subjects. Often the feelings of others are dis- 
regarded through thoughtlessness. To remind such, would it not 
be a good plan to add a line to tbe notices in public conveyances 
which forbid smoking, a line that will read, "All whistling 
strictly prohibited?" Human calliopes should be suppressed. 



Mothers and nurses all the world over have given their teething 
babies and feverish children Steedma n's Soothing Powders. Try them. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

123 California street. 

THE ALEXANDER MATERNITY COTTAGE 

CONNECTED WITH THE 

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, 

IS NOW OPEN. 
THE ACCOMMODATIONS OFFERED are unexcelled by any similar 
institution in the country, and patients are afforded the best medical skill 
and the most careful nursing. Terms and further particulars furnished 
upon application to the Resident Physician, Children's Hospital, 

3 300 California Street. 

FRUIT DRYING PAPERS. 

BUILDING PAPERS. 

ROOFING AND PAINTS. 

PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 

116 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



P.M 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 14,1894. 




[e^Si/jighfrrfD 



We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's.' 



THERE are thousands upon thousands of playgoers and there 
are many critics, too — excellent and useful members of the 
community — who are too liberal and well-balanced to fear con- 
tamination from seeing a drama acted that is purely realistic, yet 
would shrink with horror when told that their life is exactly like 
the life behind the scenes. They are the people who are pleased with 
a play or a work of fiction so long as it presents a certain artifi- 
cial resemblance to life, bat begin to clamor against it if they find 
it is too nearly true to actual humau existence, too plainly out- 
spoken, especially when it deals with vicious and immoral 
actions, and yet they know that such actions constantly occur in 
the world. They want to have the play seem very near like life, 
yet, to please them, it must ignore a good deal. They do not like 
to have trath brought out plainly on the stage. They want the 
illusion, for the time being, that human life makes rather a fine 
show, that it is amusing or pathetic, as the case may be, but 
never really bad or hideous to excess; and yet, in their own 
careers, their own histories, their personal gossip about public 
men, acquaintances, friends, and even respectable women is far 
from being anything but pure. If there was anyone in the Bald- 
win Theatre on Monday night who had any fear that Mrs. Cora 
Urquhart Potter and Mr. Kyrle Bellew were taking a step too far 
beyond the illusory drama, and were dealing too closely with 
nature, let him dispel the thoagbt. A sermon from the pul- 
pit treating of the same subject as Zola's play, Therese, would 
have been vague, pallid, and remote, for all practical purposes; 
but the play teaches and clearly defines a great startling picture 
in human life, and one goes home and lingers over its simplicity 
and its pathos, and then perceives how perfectly true it all is. 
Therese Raguin is a great play. It is the acme of realism. In 
London and Europe its success has been marvelous, and it has 
been watched, studied, and discussed by millions. But Europe 
is more given to realism ; it has had realism from its cradle. It 
was weaned on Tolstoi, reared on Ibsen, and now it thrives on 
Zola, and looks toward him as the greatest realist in the world. 
Of course it is too bad that we could not have enjoyed the same 
benefits, In the same degrees, instead of having the work of the 
great master burled at us so suddenly; but it was so well defined 
and so admirably rendered that it opened the eyes of many to the 
fact that a new style of drama had been born, and that an ambi- 
tious actor and actress had made a success of it. Therese is not 
like Zola's novel "Therese Raquin." The motive is the same, 
but a number of scenes have been changed and omitted to make 
the drama run more smoothly. It is strong, natural, and intense, 
and it shows the powerful work of a master and the subtle 
touches of a practiced hand. We have seen dramas in royal halls 
with gilded settings, where lordly people slew each other, and 
where the loves of dukes and princesses were portrayed in all 
truthfulness. Therese is just as wonderful as any drama of that 
description, only it is played within the walls of a humble home 
instead of the glittering halls of a castle, and the players are 
common folk in everyday clothes instead of lords and ladies in 
the finest that money can buy. But it is just as strong in action, 
in scene, and in motive, and it is not an illusion — it is a chapter, a 
living chapter, from life, a work of art with an improving aim. 
The love sceue between Therese and Laurent, the grief of the 
mother for the loss of her son Camille, the horror when she finds 
that Therese and Laurent had killed him in order that they could 
marry, the budding hatred that showed itself on their wedding 
night, the way that it overpowered them, the madness that made 
them rush to the gallows, the awful silence when vhe paralized 
mother regained her speech and proclaimed them murderers, the 
last scene of the hating couple in each other's arms drinking 
poison from the same vial, were the main scenes of one of the 
strongest plays that was ever seen in this city. 



To say that Mrs. Potter has improved since she was here in 
1888 would be only a mild compliment. To-day she is one of the 
greatest actresses on the stage. Her diction is wonderful, finer, 
even, than that of any other woman on the English-speaking 
stage to-day. Every syllable is pronounced correctly, the modu- 
lations and accents are perfect, and in all, her voice is like a sil- 
very brook flowing over spheric stones too swiftly to break. 
There is a naturalness about her work that is charming. When 
she is gentle she is like a bird that has flown from its cage; when 
she is angry, she has all the fury of "a woman scorned ;" when 
she tortures, she does it with the artlessness of a siren. No one 
who watched her girlish beauty fade in Therese, and her life 
change from love to hatred, could deny that she was portraying 
her art as cleverly and as gracefully as any actress could have 
done. She plays to the characters on the stage, speaks to the peo- 
ple there, and does not care to woo the approbation of the gal- 
lery by addressing herself in that direction. 



Mr. Bellew needs no praise for his acting. He won his laurels 
long ago and be still wears them. His pnre speech and fine pres- 
ence still have their charm, and while Laurent is a character 
which is new to him, his work in it is artistic. He is a powerful 
actor. He plays with ease and a naturalneas which are pleasant 
to see. If the eyes could overpower every other sense, Mr. Bel- 
lew would always be enjoyable. His tragic scenes were given 
with admirable effect and without the slightest overwork on his 
part. Mason Mitchell, John Ward, Verner Clarges, Miss Monk, 
and Miss Hudspeth supported Mrs. Potter and Mr. Bellew very 
successfully. 

* * * 

Alexander Dumas fits wrote Francine years ago, and it was pro- 
duced at the Comfidie Francais, where its success has never 
faded, even unto this day. The translation that is being pre- 
sented by Mrs. Potter and Mr. Bellew is called In Society, and the 
work of the translator is very good. The play is dainty, bright, 
and interesting, it is placed in a far different sphere from Therese, 
it is a society drama in every sense. The witty lines, mingled 
with the author's charming philosophy, the magnificent cos- 
tumes that were worn by Mrs. Potter, and the rich settings of a 
drawing-room in high life; the lesson that teaches that an "eye 
for an eye and a tooth for a tooth" should be the motto of every 
wife whose wayward husband seeks pleasure outside his home, 
made up a play that was worth every other English translation 
of French comedies, as an evening's entertainment. Mrs. Potter 
looked beautiful in her rich gowns. There was an effectiveness 
in her playing of Francine due to both her personality and her 
ability. She played it so well that she produced on the audience 
the same impression that she supposedly produced on the players, 
that she could not be guilty of an intrigue of the character which 
Lucien de Kiverolles indulged in. Mr. Bellew, as the last named 
character, gave a representation that was artistic and polished. 

* # ■» 

The triumphant event of the week's performances was the pro- 
duction of Charlotte Corday, We write this after having witnessed 
a dress rehearsal preparatory to the regular performance. It 
was the first production of the tragedy in America. We bad 
been favored with realism in its true condition followed by a dainty 
bit of French social life, and then the grand character of Charlotte 
Corday d'Armour was given with all of its wonderful power. 
Charlotte Corday, in the bands of Mrs. Potter, is as great a stage 
character as Joan of Arc, Cleopatra, Camille, Becket or Marie 
Antoinette. Charlotte Corday lived in a period when France was 
looking for a leader, at a time when the waters of the Seine were 
red with the blood of the murdered victims of Marat. Every 
one who has read the life of the wonderful woman who killed 
that dictator know how intensely interesting the story is, how 
closely it appeals to humanity, and how valuable it is as dramatic 
timber. One may wonder why the story has not been drama- 
tized before. It may be because of the fact that no one could be 
found with sufficient courage to prodnce it. Corday was nnlike 
other heroines, inasmuch as her life was free from many dramatic 
acts. She lived for the teachings of the church, and her 
love for her country, and her whole heart's blood was stirred to 
rise and be another martyr for the sake of the lives of her fellow- 
beings. The character 1b a charming study in the hands of Mrs. 
Potter. She plays it with such an intensity of purpose and with 
so much dramatic power, that she holds the audience in a tremor 
of excitement and interest. There is one thing that must be said 
in favor of ber, and that is the way in which she closely follows 
nature. She seems to be the woman herself, and not an actress 
portraying the character, and the manner in which she infuses 
that sentiment into the audience is of the finest intellectual qual- 
ity. All of the Hues that Mrs. Potter speaks as Charlotte Corday 
are those that are recorded in history. Not one word has been 
changed for better or for worse, as it was her desire to play the 
part just as Charlotte Corday lived it. Even the scene where 
she murders Marat, when he is in his bath tub, was brought out 
with a wonderful amount of realism. And in that respect it may 
be an interesting fact to know that the dress worn by Mrs. Pot- 
ter when Charlotte Corday is guillotined was made for her by 
a female warden in the Prison de la Roche, and it is of the exact 
color and material as those of all the guillotine costumes. 
* » * 
Mr. Bellew had a powerful scene in conjunction with Mrs. 
Potter in the third act, which was excellently presented. Mr. 
Bellew was a strong Marat, and gave the character great force, 
but we would rather have seen him as Adam Lux, the romancer 
of the play, and the backbone as well. Mr.|Bellew could have 
made a wonderful character out of the part; as it was, in the 
hands of Mr. Rolleston, it lost its flavor. But Mr. Bellew has 
played every lover that is known to the mummer, and to see 
him in a tragical part that called for all of his dramatic ability 
was a new and a very palatable theatrical dish. 

It remains to be seen how the rest of the United States will 
take to Charlotte Corday. With the genius of Mrs. Potter and Mr. 
Bellew and a good dramatic company it ought to succeed, for in 
these days, when art is lost in the whirl of the serpentine dance 
and nature goes winging away in the path of the clown, it is a 



July 14, 1894. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ple*»ur« to f«* butory rvTirtd. llor* peopltbare br«n imlrncled 
by \h* ttajce ibtn by books, and if Mr*. PolUr and Mr. Bellew 
kwp on Id the way that they bare began. Id fire years from now 
tbtlr dramatic worth will be known to every theatregoer Id the 
land. 

• • • 

Mr. Harrigan » play. TV Ltathrr Patch, which it the bill at 
the California Theatre this week, is an odd conceit, and its grue- 
some humor attests Mr. Harrigan's ability as a dramatic author. 
It is bnttt on the same lines a? a great number of his plays, and It 
deals with the Kast-side folk exclusively. The pawnbroker, 
the negro, the tongb saloon-keeper, the tougb girl, and the under- 
taker revel in unmitigated bliss through three acts of highly 
boisterous fan. There is a big vein of naturalness in all of it, 
however, from the rival Irish undertakers who were battling 
with each other for the burial of an Italian, to the negro who re- 
quested that the body should not be placed too deep in the 
ground, as be wanted to dig it up and sell it to a "yarb doctor." 
The negro congregation sitting up at the wake of Levy Hyer, 
singing their quaint songs and clamoring for the bottle of gin, 
was one of the great bits of the piece. Mr. Harrigan's corps of 
mummers were quite at home in all of the scenes. Mr. Harrigan 
himself played with bis usual versatility, and Mr. Sparks, Mr. 
Doane, Mr. West, and Mr. Harrigan, Jr., made a quartette of 
negroes that would be hard to beat. Harry Wright lost his in- 
cipient staginess in several character sketches which he played 
successfully, and Dan Burke, as the tougb, was just about as 
tough as any one could wish to see. Miss Pollock was a dainty 
flower girl, Miss Amy Lee was a robust Miss Dooley, and Miss 
Moore and Miss Flynn were "Connaught ladies" of great ability 
in the matrimonial line. 

» » * 

After a long series of clatter-trap operas it is a pleasure to see 
the Tivoli present one that has a backbone. Dick Turpin is not a 
great opera, but it is solid. After it has been put into running 
shape it ought to be as great a success as Robin Hood. H. Grattan 
Donnelly has written a clever book for the purposes of comic 
opera, and the music by Bowness Briggs is in a light vein and 
full of catchy melodies. Some of tbem are very charming and all 
of them are melodious. The serious part of the story is well 
worked out, the lines are bright and original. Throughout the 
opera the acting and singing were excellent. Ferris Hartman and 
T. C. Leary made a great deal of fun out of their r6Ies. Mr. 
Dunbar, Mr. de la Motta, and Miss 8alinger were acceptable. The 
staging and costumes were new and pretty and were an addition 
to the work. Dick Turpin should have a long run. 

* # * 

The programme at the Orpheum still continues to draw crowds. 
Gilbert and Goldie, the Wilmots and their daring bicycle feats, 
and Miss Inez Dean are the principal drawing cards, and they are 
clever enough to carry any variety performance. Yesterday after- 
noon a matinee concert was given at the Orpheum by the Mexican 
band, which has been engaged by Manager Walter for two mati- 
nees. The last one will be given to-day at 2 o'clock. It was the 
intention to have the band give four matinee concerts, adding 
Monday and Tuesday of next week, but the Mexican Govern- 
ment ordered the band home, and the members must leave Mon- 
day morning. After two weeks delay in Ogden, the new vaude- 
ville company for the Orpheum will arrive in time to open on 
Monday evening. The new people include the Braatz Brothers, 
acrobats; Connors & Staley, musical comedians; O'Brien & Car- 
roll, parodists; Charles H. Duncan, singing comedian, and Miss 
Lydia Yeamans Titus, the versatile comedienne. 

A PHILADELPHIA journal estimates the loss to the miners 
by the great coal strike, which began on April 21st, at $12,- 
600.000. The loss to mine owners, consumers, transportation 
companies, and for property destroyed will not fall short of $7,- 
500,000. The loss in expenses inflicted on local and State Gov- 
ernments has been very large, and the loss of life and the injury 
inflicted in weakening respect for self-government have also been 
very severe. But the greatest injury of all should be taken to 
heart by every striker in the land to-day. It bears no reasonable 
proportion to the riBk incurred or the frightful injuries done. The 
savings of years have beeD swept away and there is nothing to 
show for them. 



Ladies Calling 
At the exhibit of Wakelee & Co., in the Manufactures Building at 
the Midwinter Fair, will receive a free sample of Camelline, the Cali- 
fornia preservative for the complexion. It received the highest 
award at the Exposition over all foreign and American competitors. 
As a remedy and preventive for the distressing effects of sunburn 
and poison oak. it will appeal to all ladies who are visiting the moun- 
tains and seaside. 

IfNADC Bush & Gerts Pianos 

M'^Dt Parlor Organs 

U aim ES installments Rentala 



A.t. Bancroft & Co. 

803 Sutter St. ,S.F. 



PIANOS 



I II I 1AM RrnnARH Tne English actress, coaches ladieB and 
LI L LI Mil DLUUMnU, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 



SPECIAL RUG SALE 

Until July 15th. 



We have placed on sale 2500 Rugs— OR IE NT Al- 
and DOMESTIC— and INGRAIN ART SQUARES, 
at prices never before approached in this city. 

SflYRNA RUGS. 

Best quality, ROYAL AND IMPERIAL. These 
are not the cheap and flimsy ones commonly used, 
but the BEST QUALITY. 

, , , SalePri-e Regular Price. 

lit. 9 Id by ad 9 In fi no »2 26 

2 ft. 2 in by 4 ft. ti In 2 00 3 00 

2 ft *i m bv 5 ft 111 . . - 2 7i 4 00 

3 ft iu bv H ft Uiu ... 4 00 5 75 

4 ft. In by 7 ft Oiu .. . . 75 9 50 

ART SQUARES 

All-Wool Ingrain, (Not part cotton.) 

„, ,. Sale Price Regular Price. 

7'/ift by 9 ft I h 65 J 7 50 

9 It. by 9 ft 6 75 9 00 

9ft. by 10H ft 7 90 10 50 

9 ft. by 12 ft 9 00 12 00 

9 ft. by 13(4 ft 10 15 13 50 

12 ft. by 15 ft 15 00 20 M) 

ORIENTAL RUGS. 

A great variety at correspondingly low prices. 
The kinds and sizes are too numerous to quote, 
but for example we mention 

DAGHESTANS FROM $6 UP. 

W. & J. Sloane & Co., 

Carpets, Furniture, Upholstery, 

641-647 MARKET ST. 

BALDWIN THEATRE -EXTRA. 

Al Hayman ... .Lessee and Manager. 

Beginning Monday, July 16th— First stellar advent, 

MR. JOHN DREW, 

and his Americau company, under tbe direction of CHA8. FROHMAN. 
Monday, July 16th-FIRdT WEEK. 

THE BUTTERFLIES, 

Henry Guy Carleton's comedy, presented for over 150 nights at Palmer's 
Theatre, New York. 
Monday, July 23d— Second week— THE MASKED BALL. 
Monday, July 30th— CgRHTOPHER JR. 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

A.L Hayman <5t Co Lessees. 

S.N. Friedlander, Manager. 
Week of July 9th— Every evening, including Sunday. Matiuee Satur- 
day. Beats them all. MR. 

EDWARD HARRIGAN 

la his great original character, " Dan Mulligan," in one of his most suc- 
cessful plays in three acts, entitled 

<OKIu:i,l.VS ASPIRATIONS. 

Unique stage effects and novelties. Entirely new scenery for this pro- 
duction. All ihe original music by Dave Braham: "Just /croeB from Jer- 
sey," "Dad's Dinner Pail," ''Samuel Johnson's Cake Walk," "Wear the 
Trowsers, Oh." 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

KaELiNG Bbos Proprietors and Manager*. 

To-night. Production of the season. The ideal romantic opera. Com- 
panion piece to " Robin Hood. " 

DICK TURPIN. 

Book by H. GraUan Donnelly. Music by Bowness Briags. 

Next Opera— RIP VAN WINKLE. 

PopuxarPrices 25and50e 



ORPHEUM. 



O'Farrell St., between Stockton and Powell Sts. 

San Francisco's Great Music Hall. 

Week of Monday, July 16th. ARRIVAL FROM THE EAST of our tal- 
ented new company of specialty Btars : 

LYDIA YEAJIAS'S TITUS. 
CONNORS A STALEY. 
C'AAS. II. DUNCAN. 



THE BRAATZ BROS. 
O'BRIEN A CARROLL. 

Elc, Etc. 



^^-They have finally arrived after long delay by the railroad blockade 
Reserved Seats, 25c. ; Balcony 10c. ; Opera Chairs and Box Seats, 50c. 
Saturday and Sunday matinees. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1894. 




TriC 

OOKCR-ON. 




MR. de Yonng was walking along Kearny street on Wednes- 
day, when he met an old man whose step told that he was near 
the brink of eternity, and whose dusty beard gave evidence of 
having held many a peck of hayseed. He saw Mr. de Yoang 
approaching him and stopped in the middle of the sidewalk until 
the promulgator of the late Midwinter Fair was almost abreast 
of bim. 

" Be you de Young ? " 

The words were spoken so loudly that the Director-General 
was startled, and dozens of people who knew him by reputation 
only turned to look at him. 

«• I am Mr. de Young, and what can I do for you? " 

" "Well, my gal Mary had one of them paintin's in the Fair, an' 
I'll be gol darned if the danged thine didn't get a prize. Now, 
Mr. de Young, I've been a-lookin' for you for a week to thank 
you for givin' her that there prize. I was told that you was the 
prize committee, and by gosh, you're a corking one at that." 

« I am very glad that your daughter got a prize, said Mr. de 
Young, " but I am sure I had nothing to do with it." 

"Oh, now, you're too danged modest! I know you did it," 
answered the granger. "Come with me; I want to show you 
that I appreciate your knowledge of art and them things by 
giving yer Mary's picture. Talk about Joolan, an' Keith, an' 
Feck, an' them fellers — why, they ain't in it with my Mary! 
Why, them cows in the backgroun' of her paintin' could eat 
hay!" 

" Where is the painting? " 

» Down to the Chronicle buildin'. I jest left it outside the door 
on Market street, as the place was so blamed high that I didn't 
know how to get up to your office." 

So Mr. de Young and his strange friend walked down Kearny 
street to the tall edifice, and, sure enough, on the Market street 
side a large landscape was resting against the building. But sad 
to relate, the crowd that was watching the bulletins of the strike 
had crushed into it, and some fellows had put their feet through 
it in several places. The poor man looked at it for a moment, 
gathered the remnants of the canvas in bis arms, and the tears 
came to his eyes. 

■■ That is too bad," said de Young. 

"Too bad! " returned the hayseed; " but I'll tell you what I'll 
do. You keep the frame, an' I'll have Mary paint another, an' 
you can put it in." 

A new fad has been introduced into New York society, and 
hereafter married men may act as best men and ushers at fash- 
ionable wedding ceremonies. Oakley Rhinelander, who was mar- 
ried in that city recently, surprised his friends by choosing bis 
younger, but married, brother, Philip Rhinelander, as his best 
man. For many years there has been an unwritten law exclud- 
ing Benedicts from officiating in any capacity at weddings, except 
as spectators, and, in consequence, a great amount of fun has 
been poked at them by bachelors and unmarried maidens of 
society. Many pleasing and jocose titles have been awarded 
them, such as " Death's head's at the feast," but Mr. Rhinelander 
has changed all that, and every married man shonld rise and call 
him blessed. Many a man about to be married, especially if he 
has reached that age when all of his intimate male friends are 
married, has puzzled his brain and groped wearily through the 
liBt of friends to find one unmarried man on whom he might con- 
fer the honor of best man, and has mentally cursed the custom 
which has prevented bim from choosing a married man for that 
office. Now the problem has been solved, and married brothers, 
uncles, cousins, and even sons, may act as best men with im- 
punity, as far as Mrs. Grundy is concerned. 

The date of this year's midsummer high jinks of the Bohemian 
Club is set officially for the 18th of August. For quite a long time 
the members went about with long faces because of dismal 
rumors that there would be no jinks this year, the club's treasury 
having, it was thought, suffered too greatly from the heavy in- 
roads made upon it to meet expenses connected with the new 
building. But it is all right now; the jinks will come off. The 
scene of operations will be Meeker's Grove, Sonoma County, the 
same as last year. Peter Robertson will sire the high jinks, and 
it is said that Amad€e Joullin bas almost been persuaded to come 
back into the fold and double up with John A. Stanton as asso- 
ciate sire of the low jinks. All the members agree that if such a 
state of affairs could be brought about, their end of the festivities 
would be what is technically known as a " lulu," whatever that 
may be. But there will be a jinks; everybody is enthusiastic, the 
owl flaps his dexter wing with a cheerful flap as in days of yore, 
and all is well. 

» • # 

Fresno is capable of producing anything and anybody. Its 



raisins are the most magnificent on earth, and the raisins are 
quite proud of their raising. Some of the raisings have not been 
so good as they should be. The human raising is meant. Among 
the great raisin raisers is a gentleman long known to fame 
through the medium of bis dried fruit, his constant attendance on 
the Transcontinental Association, and his skill as a pugilist of a 
long departed era. This gentleman's raising has not been good, 
and he is so modest a chap that he is quite ashamed of his father. 
This particularly unhappy father dwelt a peaceful life among the 
mountains; no butler attenuated his cellar, no chef prepared his 
meals — indeed, he was his own butler, chef, groom, and house- 
maid. He cast longing eyes on the fertile plains of Fresno, where 
the vines were bending earthward laden with their yellow fruit. 
He finally summoned up courage and sought his son's vineyard 
and begged from him employment. 

" You can work here," said the magnanimous son. » You can 
do the odd chores and such like, but on no account are you to 
tell anybody that you are my father." 

The father dutifully promised, and so faithfully kept his prom- 
ise that even his daughter-in-law never knew that the old chore 
man was her dear husband's papa. 

But one day there came a crash. The old man asked leave to 
walk to Fresno and the son graciously complied. As he was 
trudging back, hot, sore, and dusty, he was overtaken by a 
kindly doctor in a buggy and asked if he would not take a lift. 

" Certainly," said the old man. 

» What is your name?" inquired his host. 

The old man was silent. The question was repeated. Finally 
he faltered out his name. 

" Are you any relation to ?" 

" I am his father." 

The son met the father as he was descending from the buggy, 
and when the doctor was out of sight, asked: 

" Did you tell Dr. S. your name?" 

" I did." 

" Did you tell him your relationship? 1 ' 

» I told him you were my son." 

" You get out of here as fast as your old legs will carry 

you, and never set foot on these premises again!" 

The father left, and is now working with the kindly doctor 
who gave bim the lift. 

* * * 

When Henry Irving and Ellen Terry visited us some months 
ago, Irving, on account of his almost unapproachable eminence 
in the theatrical firmament, was naturally sought a great deal 
and made the guest of honor at many a stag dinner, notably that 
given him by the Bohemian Club, of which, after the event, he 
was made an honorary member. Among the local celebrities 
present at this last mentioned affair was Mr. Richard M. Hotal- 
ing, who himself has done Hamlet and Iago many a time, with- 
out, however, having done time for it, although — but thereby 
hangs this tale. 

Of course Richard met Henry, and after the introduction the 
introductor added that Hotaling had "figured somewhat in our 
own little theatricals, you know," and forthwith departed. 

"Ah," said Irving, » you appear, then, at times, do you?" 

Nettled somewhat, possibly, at the "little theatricals," and too 
quick, perhaps, to detect a note of patronage, entirely absent 
from Irving's inquiry, Richard assumed his most "Never, caitiff," 
"Around her form I draw the awful circle," manner as he replied : 

"Yes, I do consent to appear now and again at the request of 
my friends only, in some worthy cause, but never under any cir- 
cumstances for money — only for charity, simply for charity." 

"Ah," drawled IrviDg, in his clammiest tones, "charity — um 
— yes — charity covers a multitude of sins." 

• » * 

Fred Hallen, of the Hallen & Hart troupe of players, has been 
forced to remain in San Francisco longer than be cared to, owing 
to the tie-up. Some of the members of his company, including 
his partner, Joseph Hart, were lucky enough to start East just 
before the strike, and are now in Denver, where the company 
was booked to appear a week ago. Mr. Hallen was greatly dis- 
appointed because he could not appear in that city, but he was 
more disappointed when he discovered that Mr. Hart would have 
a hard time to find a man in Denver who looked enough like him 
to fill the bill. Mr. Hallen is a good looking young man, with a 
smooth face, and is known to all theatre goers. He knew that 
his partner would find it difficult to secure a substitute who 
resembled him, and on the first night of the performance he re- 
mained in his room trembling with expectancy as he awaited the 
telegram that would announce the success or failure of the pro- 
duction. Finally it came, and Mr. Hallen read as follows: 

" The show was a big hit. House crowded. The man who took 
your part was a good actor, but " Joe Haet. 

The abrupt ending terrified Mr. Hallen. He rushed to a tele- 
graph office and wired to Hart: 

"But what? " 

And the answer came, " But he would not shave his beard." 



After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. You 
will find it admirable. 



Julv 14, 1894. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



LAWN TENNIS. 



TBI officers of tbe Pacific States I, two. Tennis Association 
held a meeting last Wednesday at the Olympic Club to elm 
a member of the Kxecutive OommlttM, vice \V. H. Taylor. Jr.. 
and to transact any otber business of importance. After some 
di«<u)«»ion Sam Hardy, the present champion, was appointed, 
and the officers for the ensuing year are as follows: A. B. Wilber- 
force. President : A. A. Hewing. Vice President: <*. E. Stoker, 
Secretary and Treasurer; A. J. Treat. I>r. J. Spencer, and Sam 
Hardy. Executive Committee. 

Tbe first business on the tapis was to appoint an official organ 
for the Association, and it was decided to make tbe San Fran- 
Rswfl Lettei: the representative of the association, in recog- 
nition of the valuable services rendered during the past in the in- 
terest of lawn tennis, and henceforth all official notices connected 
with tbe Association will be found in its columns. 

The tournament for invitation singles, doubles, and mixed 
doubles, which will be held at tbe Hotel del Monte on July 21st 
and 22nd, was taken under advisement, but it was found impos- 
sible for tbe Association to take any active part in the matter; 
still, the officers all agreed to do personally all they could to 
make tbe tournament a success. A committee of five will be 
formed by tbe promoters of the tournament to arrange all matters 
and issue invitations to the players. At present quite a number 
of the prominent players have signified their willingness to enter, 
and a good tournament is now looked for. The interest taken in 
this affair is on the boom, and whatever one of the weeklies may 
have to say concerning tennis being dead, shows their utter lack 
of knowledge on the subject. 

The double championship for the Pacific 8tates and the Ladies' 
Single Championship was also taken under advisement by the 
Association, and the date of the meeting, tbe value of the prizes, 
etc., were discussed, but no final arrangement was made. The 
meeting was adjourned until Monday, and it is probable that be- 
fore long the circulars announcing full particulars will be sent out 
to the public. 

There is no doubt that interest is picking up again and that be- 
fore long we shall have several more tournaments. The Cali- 
fornia Club will, in all probability, hold a meeting shortly; the 
Oakland and Alameda Clubs intend having something, and there 
is some talk of repeating the pleasant little tournaments held last 
year at the court of the Hotel Mateo. Moreover, some of the 
members of the different clubs are in favor of starting another 
" League " tournament similar to that started by C. R. Yates a 
few seasons ago, and we earnestly hope that, if commenced, it 
will end as favorably as the one which caused so much pleasure 
and did so iuuch for tbe tennis players of this Coast. 



As invigorating as a breath from old ocean, as pure as the milk of 
human kindness! That is our idea of the John T. Cutter Old Bour- 
bon Whiskey, and that is the idea of every man in the country who 
has tried that delightful beverage. Your life is a desert waste with- 
out your daily tipple. It drives all woes and cares into the limbos of 
the past, and makes you love your worst enemy's pup. E. Martin 
& Co., 408 Front street, are the agents. 



Carson City, the most beautiful town in Nevada, only 14 miles 
from Lake Tahoe, is the place to taketho Keeley cure. No graduate 
from this institute has relapsed. 

Furnished double upper flat to rent in Western Addition. Seven rooms, 
bath, and attic. Rent, $75 a month. Apply, 3116 Washington street. 




Cures 

OTHERS, 



WILL 



Cure You. 
AYER'S 

Sarsaparilla 

MAKES 

THE 

WEAK 

STRONG. 




Jtealtt/. 

Qo/T)fort 

Exereis<?. 

ALL COMB/NED 
AT THE 

Curiae 
Batl?s. 

An all-wool bathing suit furnished free. 

r\R- D. E. DUNNE, 

Chiropodist. 

Now at I.UKI.INi: BATHS, 3d floor, 

Next to Ladies' Parlor. 
Late of DR. LORYE4S HAMMAM BATHS. 



HOTEL 
VENDOME, 



SAN JOSE, CAL. 



TO say that the Hotel Vendome is 
the best is enough in its favor. It 
is one of the largest and most ele- 
gantly appointed hotels in the State. 
It is situated in the center of a finely 
cultivated park twelve acres in ex- 
tent, and is surrounded by trees of 
many years' growth. 

The location is in the most fashion- 
able part of the city of San Jose, and 
is only two blocks from the Southern 
Pacific Railroad depot. Electric cars 
pass the door at short intervals. 

The appointments of the hotel are 
first-class in every particular, being 
furnished throughout in the most 
elegant and attractive manner. 

(JeO. p. 59 e "> MANAGER. 





SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1894. 



IT was decidedly amasii g to hear the different opinions expressed 
by the bystanders on toe veranda of the Hotel Rafael when 
Walter Hobart's spanking foor-in-hand team, with his Btylish 
drag, came up to the door for the first time. The point of won- 
der and admiration eliciting the remarks was not the young man 
who possesses all this splendor, but the unusual sight in this part 
of the world of the postillions. Those of the onlookers who had 
not been to Earope and knew nothing of the trappings of Roy- 
alty, were at a loss to account for them, while those who were 
lucky enough to have made the grand tour smiled knowingly. 
It is another illustration of the frequent sight of a millionaire's 
whims gratified, no matter in what direction, and it now remains 
for some rich man to "see" Hobart and "go one better" by 
having outriders to his turnout. This would be fetching in the 

extreme. 

* * * 

A Ross Valley belle, at the Fourth of July hop at the Hotel 
Rafael, was pacing up and down the corridor with her escort. 
He had been reproaching her for her evident absentmindednesa, 
her attention being directed to another couple who were whirling 
by in the giddy maze of a waltz in the ballroom. Suddenly the 
girl remarked: » How that woman carries her three P's around 
with her!" Naturally her companion was somewhat mystified 
by her speech, until she elucidated it by saying: " Why, can't 
you see? Provincial Pnllman Pride! " The escon was enlight- 
ened at once as to the canse of his fair charge's distrait manner. 
" He" was dancing with the Chicago matron. 

* * # 

There is no use disguising the fact that a spirit of apathy per- 
vades the society life at the different resorts, and things do not 
move with the "go" of former days. At Del Monte the non- 
arrival of its tourist contingent through the tie-up of travel is a 
great loss, and on the ample shoulders of Mesdames Louis Parrott 
and B. B. Gutter have fallen the task of finding amusement for 
their friends. It must be admitted that these jovial ladies hav» 
performed their part nobly, but the young element is discouraged 
by the absence of beaux. Santa Cruz misses the impetus given 
by the military. 8an Jose has a local gathering at the Vendoms, 
which keeps things lively at that charming abode. 

* # * 

San Rafael has the dowager element in large numbers, with the 
inevitable result of chatty groups and conclaves of congenial 
spirits. Thus, the Fred Low and Lawton set, the Tevis, Bland- 
ing, McCoppin, Toland coterie, the Schmieden, Lilienthal corner, 
etc. Mrs. Ruger and her stylish daughter belong to all and none, 
keeping to themselves a good deal and visiting friends who reside 
in the village. The residents make the hotel the objective point 
for their afternoon and evening drives, while the tennis court 
always has its devotees, and also the bowling alley. But, as Miss 
Laura McKinstry is said to have wittily observed at Santa Cruz, 
" it is the non-arrival of t be males that makes us all so dull." 
Little Sausalito has had its chance in the fact of easy access to 
and fro and no " tie-up." The Delmas outfit have been disport- 
ing themselves in the briny waves, dipping and rowing, and mak- 
ing merry generally, as wherever they are fun is sure to follow. 
80 many of the bank and grain clerk contingent pass the summer 
In this little marine settlement that men are more abundant there 
than in other places this year. 

» » w 

Castle Crag has the advantage of beine thoroughly "country," 
and people need not be tied to fashionable attire three times a day 
if they do not wish to. Several married men, who are fond of a 
good time, have been making things lively up there, but "there's 
no profit in this," said an anxious mamma of the swim on the 
national holiday. It is the quiet, unobtrusive spots that are 
" panning out" with better results for the matrimonial market. 
Mill Valley will surely furnish one or two "announcements" ere 
the season wanes, and Larkspur is, it is said, the locale for a real 
sensational episode. 

* * * 

Cazadero gossip affirms that one of the catches of the season 
has been made by an impecunious but worthy young man, who 
has landed a big fish in the form of a rich widow who is visiting 
there. Albeit a disparity of years exists in the favor of the lady, 
yet such matches are often happy ones: witness the Hopkins- 
Searles union. 

Already Ross Valley society people are saying that Mrs. Wise- 
Wagner will have one of the most attractive homes in the city's 
winter gaieties. Music will be the central feature, while dinner 
partus will take a prominent place in the hospitality of the 
newly wedded couple. 

Rumor credits the ambitious young thespian, Hugo Toland, 



with a desire to win the favor of a well-known financier's grand- 
daughter. The attentions bestowed in that quarter by tbe young 
gentleman are conceded by the elderly matrons to be quite pro- 
nounced, and the mamma and grandmamma are evidently 

willing. 

• » # 

The raid on the dens of vice in the Midway Plaisance was a 
great surprise to many, but probably more so to the men who 
were watching tbe vulgar exhibitions when tbe officers of the 
Society for the Suppression of Vice swooped down on them and 
dragged them to the station house. Among the number who 
were trying to evade the law and bush up their escapade was 
Jack Chretien, tbe lawyer, whose expulsion from the Bohemian 
Club for irregular playing at poker, some years ago, is yet fresh 
in the memory of his friends. He was as good a patron of mus- 
cle dancers as of poker, but he was just about as successful with 
one as the other. 

* * » 

Society is wondering when the Englishman who was so fortu- 
nate as to capture Miss Anna Head will make his appearance on 

the coast. 

* * » 

On dit t a recently ruptured matrimonial engagement bids fair to 
be "on" again, to judge from appearances. 

* * # 

The ladies (dear creatures 1) are coming to it fast. Preparing 
for tbe suffrage privilege, they are on the eve of a movement 
which will, if adopted, practically illustrate what many of them 
have done in their own homes; i. e. , worn the breeches 1 



Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 



C. MAREY & 
LIGER-BELAIR, 

NU1T8 (Cote d'Or), 



Clos de Vougeot, 

Chambertin, 

Beaune, 

POMMARD, 

Chablis (White), and 
Chablis (White) 1878, 

In Cases, Quarts and Pints. 



Sold by the Leading Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



CHARLES MEINECKE &. CO., 

Sole Agents. 3'* Sacramento St , S. F. 



Eureka 
Fire Hose Co. 




Goodyear Rubber Co., 

R. H. Pease, Vice-President and ilanager. 
577-579 Market st., S. F. 73-75 First st., Portland, Or. 



July 14, 1*94. 



SAN FKANVlSl'O NEWS LETTER. 



11 



TOWN AND COUNTRY CLUB. 



TH K Town ami Country Cloft glided into the world like a charm- 
ing, well-bred, cultured debutante. There was nothing of the 
advertised or hackneyed belle about her. She was new, un- 
known, yet charmingly conservative (rom the start — came into 
the world a success and meant to remain one. Such was the be- 
ginning of the Town and Country Club. Its members did not 
come from the rank and file of the common herd! Oh, no! they 
were all swells; many with long purses, some with big names, 
and otners sweet and lovely in tbenueive?, with an ancestry which 
traced away back to the time of the tlood. The only ihing not 
•well about them is the entrance to their exclusive quarters. Up a 
broad but darkened stairway, throogh a steep and narrow ball- 
way, trip the charming maids and matrons. Upon the landing 
are five delightful rooms, each perfect in itself — perfect in every 
detail of color and comfort. In the first room sits the librarian, a 
young woman of good pedigree and good manners, who takes 
charge of all the books, arranges the flowers, ferns, and palms 
around the different rooms each morning, and serves tea in the 
afternoon. In the next apartment, furnished in richly shaded 
Oriental colors, is the reading room. It is an ideal room, with 
its cosey fireplace, deep leathern chairs, and old, quaintly carved 
table, on the top of which are strewn the latest magazines and 
illustrated papers, while against the wall are rather low book- 
cases, ornamented above by pictures in water colors and well- 
framed engravings and etchings. Each one is excellent of its 
kind: there is nothing to distress the artistic eye of the lonnger. 
There the book-cases contain all the latest books; none of the 
older works — obsolete, if one may use the term — are given accom- 
modation. The French novels bave a cozy corner all to themselves, 
while the writing desk, a lovely old-fashioned brassed affair, stands 
between two windows. This is one of the greatest comforts of 
the club. The stationery is perfect, all headed "Town and Coun- 
try Club," and there are dainty pen-holderB, sealing-wax — in 
short, all those little accessories which make a lady's desk com- 
plete. Adjoining this is a small room, racked op to the ceiling, 
with the year's magazines nicely piled on the lower shelves, leav- 
ing the others for packages and grips belonging to the members. 
The telephone and umbrellas occupy the remaining space. Surely 
can another club boast of providing umbrellas for its members 
when caught in a shower? 

The dressing-room is simplicity and perfection, where one can 
find anything needed, from a well-filled work-basket to curling 
irons — not forgetting hat pins, boot polish, and manicure neces- 
sities. This room is a luxury in every sense of the word. 

The tea room is the most inviting room of the suit. It is dainty 
in the extreme, with its flowers and palms, delightfully cushioned 
sofas, pretty chairs, pictures, and tea tables. Many an aching 
head has been comforted by a cup of fragrant tea, and many the 
epicy tales told over the pretty blue teacups. It is in here 
that those charming girls rest a moment after adjusting a hat 
pin or giving an extra polish to those pretty pink nails before 
lunching at the Exchange or the University Club, for at these 
places are to be found the members of the T. and C. Sometimes 
they meet in this favorite room for a chat before a concert, and 
always between the hours of three and five are to be seen visitors 
from San Rafael, Ross Valley, and the chosen few of Sausalito 
and Oakland. Now a whisper, then a sigh ; someone goes off 
into fits of laughter. » What is that you said?" » How funnyl" 
are heard; but the faintly tinted walls tell no tales, even refusing 
to change color after its repeated blushes. 

In comes stately May Hoffman, smiling as only a girl of many 
conquests can smile. What a fine woman she has become, to be 
sure! Miss McAllister rings the telephone and wonders why 
Central cannot make the connection. Dainty Miss Spragne joins 
the group, with a roll of music under her arm, while Mrs. Parrott 
changes her books and regrets that someone has taken out "The 
Rubicon." Miss Goad is scratching off a note at the desk as Miss 
Ashe is cataloguing the new books. Miss Kittle sends over 
flowers from her lovely home in the Valley, and drops in for a 
chat and a sip before journeying on to the boat. And so they 
come and go. 

This charming club has a membership of two hundred, and 
many months mast a proposed member wait before enjoying the 
privilege of membership, for so eager are the girls to remain 
members that not even for a winter East or a trip abroad do they 
resign, leaving little chance for someone else to step in and enjoy 
this exclusive club. 

An Ounce of Prevention 
is cheaper than any quantity of cure. Don't give children narcotics 
or sedatives. They are unnecessary when the infant is properly 
nourished, as it will be if brought up on the Gail Borden Eagle Brand 
Condensed Milk. 

A man who can serve a luncheon or supper at a house party suc- 
cessfully has reached the acme of art. The most artistic catering ii 
done by the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street. The table 
■ervice is perfect, and the ices, bon-bons, Roman punch, sandwiches, 
cakes, salads, and other delicacies are served with neatness and dis- 
patch. If you are going on a picnic have your luncheon put up at 
Swain's. 




WE COULD NOT IMPROVE THE QUALITY 

if paid double the price ft is 
the choicest Smokin^Tobacco 
thai experience can [jrocluce 
or that money can buy 



BYRON HOT SPRINGS 

Resort is reached by a pleasant three- 
hour ride by rail from San Francisco. 
The hot mud, hot salt water, and 
hot sulphur baths are infallible cures for 
rheumatism, sciatica, neuralgia, liver 
and kidney troubles, blood and skin dis- 
orders. 
L. R. riEAD, C. R. MASON, 

Proprietor. Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. 0-, Cal. 

l/ieby $prin$s, 

' MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

Three miles from Ukiah, tbe terminus of the 8. F. <&N. P. Bailway. 
Only known natural electric water. Warm "champagne" baths. Situa- 
tion, location, and scenery not surpassed. Terms, $12 to 514 per week. 
Postomce and telephone at springs. 

WM. DOOLAN, Proprietor. 






THE HOTEL standing among the sequoias is 
now open. Best of accommodations and finest 
of Trout Fishing. J. J,. SPEKRY, Prop. 



For information and tickets to Big Trees and 
Yosemite, apply to J. M. HTITCHINGS, No. 19 
Montgomery street, Pan Francisco. 



COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 
806 Market Street (Pnelan Building-) 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for jpois- 
tively extracting teeth without pain. "Colton Gas" has an establishecf and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for ItB purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
in all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1863. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations in dentistry. 

DR. CHARLES W. DECKER 



D 



R. LUDLUM HILL, 

1443 MARKET ST , Near Eleventh. 



No charge for extracting when plates are made. Old plates made over 
like new. Teeth from $8 per set. Extracting, 50c. Gas given. 



RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the 
Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vital- 
ity, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medi- 
cine, PariB, and the Medical celebrities. Agents for California and the 
Pacific States, J G STEELE A CO., 635 MARKET STREET (Palace 
Hotel), San Francisco. Sent by mail or express anywhere, 

PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, $1.25; of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills, 
tit 60: of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for Circular. 

R. R. F. VERRINDER, ORAL SURGEON, 

Successor to Drs. Winter & Winter, Dentists. Specialties: Surgical 
treatment of ulceration, abscesses and other diseases of the Mouth. 
Jaws, Gums and Teeth. Implantation of Natural Teeth, Continuous 
Gum Plates and Crown and Bridge Work. 
Office: 306 Kearny Street, CorneT Sutter. 



DR. RICORD'S 



D 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1894 




Comstock Business has been as dull on Pine street during the 
M"V n 9 P ast wee ^ as might be naturally expected. While 
Shares, trade and commerce are obstructed by the spirit of 
anarchy which is stalking abroad through the land, it cannot be 
expected that capital will venture boldly into speculation. In 
the meantime, from the scanty information received from the lode, 
it is gratifying to know that the miners are working quietly 
along, improving the conditions of the several leading properties 
along the lode until the time when the market will be free to de- 
rive a benefit. Virginia City to-day is the most peaceful in the 
United States. The law-respecting and order-loving citizens of 
this hard-working little community have no time to devote to 
business which does not concern them, and labor strikes have so 
far been a comparatively unknown quantity among them. So 
long as the mines are running to give the men a chance to labor, 
it is all that is asked. Differences, of course, have arisen at times 
with their employees, but a peaceful settlement has always been 
effected without recourse to arms or the outrages which have 
worked so much injury to the cause of labor elsewhere. Private 
reports have been received recently from Con. Virginia of the 
most satisfactory description, and if there was any business at all 
here, there is little doubt but that the stock would be selling at a 
much higher figure. As it is, prices rule remarkably steady, and 
any stock offering is quickly absorbed by buyers who recognize 
that the outside troubles in business matters will disappear as 
suddenly as they appeared. The great mass of the people have 
not quite lost their senses during the turmoil, and reason will 
prevail eventually. The majority of the companies with assess- 
ments delinquent have postponed their sale day, out of consider- 
ation for the financial stringency, caused to a great extent by a 
delay of mails. No new assessments have been announced. 

$ $ $ 
/? Neuj A proposition is now on foot to utilize a portion of 

Mining the Fine Arts building which will be left standing on 
Museum], the grounds when the other structures have been de- 
molished, for a mineral exhibit, and perhaps eventually the 
whole of the specimens in the Mining Bureau will be removed 
there. The idea is not a bad one so long as the control is main- 
tained in the Bureau, in a manner which will not impair its use- 
fulness. Mining men speak very favorably of the scheme, and 
some of them promise to help the exhibit out by additions to the 
collection. Mr. James M. Yerrington, the Nevada Commissioner, 
also says that if his State is allowed the space required for a per- 
manent display, he will see that all new strikes reported will be 
represented. It is argued that the thousands who visit the Park 
daily will do more to advertise the resources of the State in the 
way of its mineral deposits than the few hundreds who find their 
way on fete days up to the Mining Bureau. It cannot be denied 
that there is something in this. 

SSI 

ijydraulic A great deal of money is being taken out in a 
Mir)ing quiet way just now by hydraulic and drift miners. 
rfctiue. The capital required for this work is not heavy to 
start with, and unlike quartz mining the ground in the majority 
of instances pays from the start. One well-known mining man 
of this city, who had about $50,000 to commence on, is employ- 
ing about thirty men at an expense of $25,000 per annum. The 
property is paying at the rate of $10,000 per annum, so that this 
capital of $50,000, of which perhaps less than $10,000 was 
actually employed at any time, is the means of putting an addi- 
tional $65,000 in gold in circulation in* a year. And with thous- 
ands of acres of just such gravel lying all over the State, millions 
of money are now lying idle in our bank vaults. 

$ $ $ 
Diuideqds The following local companies have declared div- 
Nolu idends, payable on Monday next: Atlantic Dyna- 
Payable, mite, 40 cents; California Electric Light Company, 
15 cents ; Edison Light and Power Company, 66$ cents ; Metropol- 
itan Railway Company, 10 cents; Bank of California, $3; Oak- 
land and San Francisco Gas Companies, 20 and 35 cents, respect- 
ively; Pacific and Sunset Telephone and Telegraph Companies, 
40 and 25 cents, respectively. The Alaska Packing Association 
paid a dividend of 75 cents per share on the 12th inst. 
$ $ $ 

THE Merchants' National Bank of San Diego has secured the 
handling of the $250,000 received for the sale of the bonds 
of the Escondido Iirigation District. 
$ $ $ 

THE banks of Santa Cruz are now paying dividends as follows: 
Bank of Santa Cruz, $2 50 per share; City Bank, $1 50 per 
share, and City Savings Bank, $1 per share. 



iqsurance Insurance Commissioner Higgins has just 

Gorqmissioqer's issued his annual report of the business 
Report. transacted in this State by all the companies 

under the jurisdiction of the department during the past year. 
In that period fifteen new companies were admitted to do busi- 
ness here, and eleven companies retired from the field. The 
average percentage of losses to premiums on fire risks for the 
year was 39.4. The average percentage of losses to premiums on 
marine risks was 59.7. The amount of fire insurance was $388,- 
522,503, and the premiums paid on same were $6,780,453. The 
losses paid were $2,667,160. The amount of marine insurance 
written was $128,610,786. The premiums paid on same was 
$1,354,439, and the losses to $287,276.58. The State companies 
wrote $42,062,967 of fire and $22,250,522 of marine risks. In 
closing Mr. Higgins refers briefly to the affairs of the Oakland 
Home Insurance Company, and the action which he was forced 
to take to protect the people and policy holders. The receipts 
during the year were $34,316, and disbursements $6,861, leaving a 
balance of $27,455. 

$$$ 

PROMINENT Insurance men of this city nod at one another 
significantly when the Colorado mosquito is mentioned in 
their presence. Although a little larger than the New Jersey 
brand of the pest, it takes less to satisfy him, although as an 
all-round nuisance the one is fully as bad as the other. Some people 
are mean enough to say they refer to the deputy commissioners 
from that State who recently fussed matters up considerably for 
some of the heavy weights in the business. It is pleasant to 
know, however, that the trouble on both sides resulted in noth- 
ing more than a little loud talk, and that before leaving, the guile- 
less straggler from Colorado had his ruffled feathers all straight- 
ened out for him. He leaves a few regrets behind him among 
those to whom he paid the most particular attention in a business 
way, tempered with a thankfulness, however, that their expense 
accounts have not been swelled to a greater extent than they 
have been. Still, at the same time, the reception of such distin- 
guished guests is rather too much of a luxury for these dull times. 
$ $ $ 
A County The Central California FiremeD's Association is 

Fire about to be formed. The organization will em- 

Association, brace the fire companies in Fresno, Madera, 
Kings, Tulare, and Kern counties. F. H. Banta, of Fresno; G. 
H. Vandever, of Tulare, and T. S. Rickey, of Porterville, have 
been chosen a committee of organization. 
$ $ $ 

HORATIO HASKELL has been removed from the management 
of the Southern California department of the Mutual Life In- 
surance Company of New York. Mr. W. O. N. Morrison will 
take his place. 

ON the 1st, Mr. Sexton, who for so long has had control of the 
Lyon and Imperial Insurance Companies in this city, 
assumed charge of the loss department of the Fireman's Fund. 
% % % 

ANEW insurance company of Chicago proposes to insure 
house-holders against losses by burglars. 

$ $ $ 
Local The semi-annual reports of the San Francisco Sav- 

Sauings iegs Banks, filed with the Bank Commissioners, show 
Bands, that there are now eleven banks in operation, ex- 
clusive of the savings department of the Trust and Safe Deposit 
Companies. The assets of the active banks amount to $110,564,- 
399. The deposits amount to $100,833,075. The total resources 
show a decrease of $7,530,035, in comparison with the amounts 
reported on June 30, 1893. The increase of property held under 
foreclosure sales shows an increase for the year of $595,231. The 
amount invested in bonds also shows a decrease during the same 
time of $2,221,165. The loans on real estate have decreased in the 
aggregate $2,690,088, and the loans on stocks and bonds, $4,967,- 
515. The cash on hand with the banks shows an increase of $1 ,- 
263,526 over last year, a gain of over fifty per cent. The amount 
of reserves shows an increase of $242,276 during the year. There 
has been a decrease in aggregate deposits, the first in many years. 

$ $ $ 
Tqe New The newly-appointed Bank Commissioners are 

Bankiqg now in office, H. W. Magee, of Los Angeles, 
Gomrqissioq, takes the place of C. H. Dunsmuir, of that 
city, whose term expired during the week. The other Com- 
missioners are Paris Kilburn, of Salinas, and Colonel Fuller, of 
Marysville. C. H. Dunsmuir, the retiring Commissioner, will 
succeed to the Secretaryship of the Board on the first of next 
month. 

$ $ $ 

THE First National Bank of Pasadena has declared a dividend 
of 5 per cent for the half year, and the Pasadena National one 
of 3i per cent. 

$ $ $ 

PASADENA City School District in Los Angeles County is now 
offering $20,000 6 per cent, school bonds for sale. 



July 14, 1894. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 




■' Hear the Crier' ' " What the derll art thou* ' 
"One that will play the devil, sir. with you." 



WE'RE a mighty, awful terror when it conies to a parade, 
For we are Nashnal Guardsmen (though we Moorish by 
State kid 
The women, oh, they dirt and flatter, gasp, and call us sweet 
When we buckle on our uniforms and swagger down the street! 

The spirit of a warrior barns fierce within our breast 
White we measure tape and calico— such things we do detest 
In oar citizen employment, for the pulsing of great heroes 
Strains oar arteries with a passion to become a lot of Neros. 

In our dreams we kill whole legions who would subrogate the 

laws; 
We drink hot blood by bucketsful and sink our reeking jaws 
In the carcases of traitors to the peace of this fair land, 
So repletely and completely are our gizzards filled with sand! 

What's that? the drum-beat? So, there's riot in the air? 
Oh, isn't that delicious! It's like going to a fair! 
Now the soldier wrath within us rises up in angry surge, 
And the field is strewn with corpses when a soldier cuts a 
splurge. 

What I Ball cartridges and bayonets? Blank volleys are ruled 

out? 
Those quiet men confronting U3 — must we put them all to rout ? 
We must fire? Gad, man, don't say that horrid word — 
It's an awfal thing to shoot a man — our bowels, sir, are stirred! 

They are menacing the country? They are tying up the mails? 
Their conduct every vital thing in government assails? 
Oh, yes! but see their women strewing flowers 'neath our feet, 
While the rioters are flattering us and still do not retreat! 

And oh ! while they stand firmly there and look at us real mad, 
Do you think that we'd do otherwise than look at them real sad? 
Oh, we're our sweethearts' darlings! Our mammas are crying, 

tool 
Excuse our blubbering, mister, but send us home, oh, dol 

THE audacity with which the nickel-in-the-slot swindling 
machines are operating under the noses of the police is aston- 
ishing to all who are not familiar with police methods in this 
city. Even in the case of a machine which is honest — that is, one 
which does not absorb more than half the money put into it — 
the owner supplies the machine's lack of total dishonesty by 
robbing it when there is a chance to win something from it. 
Thus, in those machines which have trays to catch nickels (and 
they are the most alluring and dangerous of all) the owner, when 
he sees that one or more of the trays is pretty well filled and that 
the next idiot who blunders along may secure them, deliberately 
opens the machine and robs the trays. Even leaving out of 
account the swindling character of the machines, the fact that 
they are open violations of the lottery laws brings them under 
the ban. The police display remarkable zeal in suppressing faro, 
which comparatively is an honest game and which gives the 
player a nearly even chance. Moreover, faro games are con- 
ducted in out-of-the-way places, and are visited only by men who 
are fully aware of what they are about. The slot machines are 
not only unconscionable swindles, but they are conducted 
openly and are a special invitation to women and children and 
all others whose guilelessness makes them easy victims of swind- 
ling schemes. The absurd inconsistency of the police in prohib- 
iting faro and permitting the slot machines calls for an indignant 
protest from all good citizens and special action on the part of the 
courts and the Police Commissioners. 

IT is a great pity that there are people in this enlightened city 
of culture, refinement, Russian tea, and country clubs, who 
would be so impolite as to go to a theatre and jabber and titter 
without any respect for the actors, or the spectators sitting around 
them. This was plainly visible at the Baldwin on Monday night, 
when Mrs. Potter and Mr. Bellew made their opening. There 
were four or five parties in the house who knew as much about 
the play as they did about the dark side of the stars. They were 
composed of pretty girls in pretty dresses, and brainless fops, and 
while the wonderful work of the Thespians floated over their 
empty craniums they kept up an incessant clatter, until several 
people had to cry " hush " in order to make them drown their 
voices. The guilty ones blushed with shame, but they had gained 
their point— they wanted others to look at them. San FranciBCO, 
which has the name for being a critical city, cannot blame mum- 
mers for calling it a " jay town," when such people get into the 
audiences. ■» 



QKKKV la the safest and sorest of all means for obtaining 
moony dtihooaiUy, and while there are laws which aim to 
protect ignorant sufferer* from those quacks who profess to be 
pbyala1tOI ( there is none which csn reach that far more dangerous 
class of rogues who pretend to heal by a hurrah and '-personal 
magnetism." This most gullible of all cities is now suffering 
from the presence of a peripatetic "healer" of that class. The 
financial success of snob "healers" comes from the fact, well 
understood by physicians and other intelligent persons, that peo- 
ple who are suffering from disease are not generally in a full 
healthy condition of mind, and are led to hope for and expect re- 
I lief from any one who loudly and persistently declares that be 
can core. This hope and expectation, added to excitement which 
the hurrah heale r s create, sometimes produce a mental stimulus 
which has the temporary effect of obscuring the disease and sus- 
pending the pain or disability which it causes. It is exactly 
analogous to drunkenness. Liquor may make a coward tempor- 
arily brave, but when he has sobered up he is more abject than 
ever. So, whatever temporary relief a sufferer may receive under 
the manipulations of these traveling mountebanks, the nervous 
exaltation which has produced the relief makes a damaging drain 
on the nervous forces and in the end leaves the sufferer in a 
worse condition than before. It is generally the poorer people 
who are thus imposed upon, and the laws at present give them 
no protection. One can only grieve that ignorance makes this 
common form of rascality possible. 

JUST as the Midwinter Fair came to a close {for all the shows 
on the Plaisance moved out this week), and when it was no 
longer possible for the indecent » muscle dancers " to pursue 
their disgusting vocation, the Society for the Suppression of Vice 
swooped down on the obsence exhibitions and closed them. 
This served only to call attention to one or two very 
interesting facts. One was that the shows were indecent and per- 
nicious, and yet have been running since the opening of the Fair 
with the full consent and approval of the Society for the Suppres- 
sion of Vice. Hence the Society, by its recent action, has merely 
called attention to its own incompetency. A more interesting 
fact, however, is the one that these exhibitions all these months 
have been generously attended by respectable women and girls, 
having been quite a fad especially with society people. To all 
jocose criticism of their attendance the dear dainty creatures re- 
plied with a pretty shrug and a sweetly lisped <» honi soil " — that 
old-time shield for a guilty conscience, that threadbare masque- 
rade of meretricious curiosity in the form of innocence, that most 
convenient of all rebukes to the understanding of the wise. " Honi 
soit " has more sins to answer for than all the legions of Beelze- 
bub. Its logic is this : If I do not see harm in a thing, there is no 
harm in itl 

il THE guests of the hotel, who cannot return home, owing to 
1 the strike, find pleasure by going into the fields and pluck- 
ing margueriies." — Society correspondence to a daily paper. 

He plucked a marguerite within a field; 

Its dainty petals to his touch did yield. 

He pulled them out, like Faust's fair Marguerite, 

Beneath the summer sun's seductive beat. 

Only in handling them I think he said 
Something that never entered Gretchen's head. 

Instead of saying: "Ah, she loves me well, 
She loves me not at all," oh, fate most fell! 

He, like a Mephistopheles of Sin, 

Simply when plucking muttered: "Beer, Wine, Gin." 

Yes, " Beer, Wine, Gin," in accents firm and clear, 
And the last petal proved it to be beer. 

So to the bar he went, and in a trice, 
Had half a dozen bottles put on ice. 

THE Trustees of the State Normal School at San Jose have been 
shaking up the dessicated faculty in rather a hearty fashion. 
They discovered that certain of the » professors " were privately 
teaching some of the pupils for a private honorarium, and that 
the pupils not thus taught were likely to be "conditioned," or 
kept from advancing. Trris served as a menace which terrorized 
the pupils financially unable to buy their advancement. The 
Trustees have put a stop to that. There remains, however, an- 
other mean swindle which the Trustees thus far have ignored. 
Several of the teachers have published text-books which they re- 
quire the pupils to buy. Ignoring the possibility that these books 
may have some merit, the fact remains that the teachers use 
their authority to extort money from the pupils. This is shame- 
less and reprehensible. 
IN speaking of the terrible railroad wreck near Sacramento on 
Monday, 11th inst., the Post, in its issue of that day, immedi- 
ately underneath the statement that several privates of the Fifth 
Artillery were killed, printB the following: "A soldier named 
Wilson had his arm cut off and two others are missing. It is 
supposed that they are under the wrecked train." We of course 
have a natural antipathy toward a jest upon so sad an occur- 
rence as the maiming of Private Wilson, but still we should like 
to know how many arms Private Wilson had when he started. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1894. 








f ( T" MIGHT just as well be in Hades, only I don't suppose I'd 
i get two thousand a year to stay there," and Harry 
J Laurence threw away his cigar, leaning languidly against 
X the door to survey the landscape stretched before him. He 
was heartily tired of it all, but it was a good chance — the 
management for a Los Angeles firm of the only drug store in Yuma. 
At first he had enjoyed the strangeness of the place, but everything 
eventually had become commonplace— the sandy wastes, the cloud- 
less skies, the low houses, and the town lively with crime. Even the 
brilliant August moon and gleaming stars could not beautify it to 
him. In his estimation he " might just as well be in Hades," for 
summer nights in Arizona somewhat resemble the lower world so far 
as temperature is concerned. 

He could hear very plainly the music and shouts of applause 
which came from the theatre down the narrow street on the opposite 
Bide, and the sound of angry voices in the " Hell Gate Saloon." He 
wondered half impatiently who would be the next victim with a knife 
wound or a pistol ball in his body that would need his aid ; for th« 
civilization of Yuma regarded the druggist in the same light as the 
doctor, much to Harry's disgust. 

Suddenly the music in the theatre stopped with a discordant crash. 
With hurrying feet and eager voices the audience came out and 
gathered in a crowd around the entrance. As Harry watched them 
idly a man came running down the board sidewalk to where the 
colored lights of the drug store shone gayly. 

" Hallo, young feller ! " he panted, as he caught sight of Harry; 
" yer wanted — Favorita's hurt." 

" Who the devil is Favorita ! " asked Harry, regarding him with 
decided ill-favor. 

" Well, come alongan' you'll findout," retorted theother. "Hurry 
up, I tell yer! Do you want her ter die?" 

So it was a girl this time. Harry's face grew grave at once. " I'll 
come," he answered, and giving a few directions to his clerk, he fol- 
lowed his conductor down the street, through the crowd of excited 
men, and into the theatre, whose flaring lights and stifling atmos- 
phere almost suffocated him. The gaudy curtain was down and some 
of the wooden chairs were upset. As he threaded his way to the 
back of the stage, Harry suddenly remembered that be had seen 
posters in front of the theatre that afternoon announcing that Favor- 
ita would appear for "one night only;" therefore he concluded that 
she must be the dancer he had beard the men talking of. 

The girl was lying on a rude couch hastily extemporized in the 
middle of the stage. A stout man with a very red face was swearing 
and gesticulating violently, and a young woman in an abbreviated 
costume bent over the sufferer. 

" Scenery fell," explained Harry's conductor; "knocked her flat, 
by gosh! " 

Harry put the stout man gently aside and bent over the dancer, 
who lay motionless, her short spangled dress in dreary contrast to 
the white face and closed eyes. "Go for the doctor, Pete," he said, 
shortly, to the man who had summoned him; " and hurry, for it's 
serious." 

Kneeling beside her, he raised the girl to a more comfortable posi- 
ion, noting with surprise the beauty of her uncovered neck and 
arms, for the theatrical talent which honored Yuma was not as a 
rule the best. 

Dr. Farquhar was not long in making his appearance, and immedi- 
ately the stout man, who had regarded Harry with disfavor, came 
forward bristling with importance. * What's the matter with her, 
anyway?" he asked. 

The doctor looked up. " She's badly hurt," he answered, gravely; 
" spine affected slightly. She'll get well, but she'll never dance again 
if she knows what's good for her. Who's running this? " 

" I am," returned the man. " Damn the luck! This is the third 
time she's failed me. Fainted twice on the road. Can she travel ? " 
" Certainly not," replied the doctor, " unless you want a funeral on 
your hands." 

" Well then, Rosalie," said the manager, turning to a girl who stood 
by, pale even through the paint laid thick on her face, " you may as 
well pack up. You'll have to play off as 'Favorita,' and the train 
leaves at one. Look sharp! " 

" Do yon mean," inquired the doctor, " that you are going to leave 
the girl here alone ? " 

"That's what," answered the other. "We're dated all along 
through California, and money is money. If she can't dance she's no 
use to me, and I can't afford to run a hospital. I guess some one'll 
take care of her; she's good-looking enough, although she's down on 
that sort of thing. Too darn particular for the business." 

Dr. Farquhar gazed at him in angry disgust. "You brute!" he 
exclaimed at last. " Did you hear that, Harry ? " 
But Harry did not answer. He was looking at the girl, who lay 



almost within his arms. She was beautiful— there was no denying it. 
Her soft auburn hair was the work of nature, not of dyes. The lashes 
which shaded her cheek were long and dark, her mouth seemed made 
for kisses, and her skin was like a child's. Suddenly she opened her 
eyes. They were soft and dark, and filled with suffering. At the 
manager's brutal words the blood rushed in a torrent to her face ; she 
tried to rise, but fell back with a moan, looking up pleadingly at the 
young man who supported her. 

Harry hesitated no longer. Arizona was monotonous at best; the 
girl was in trouble. Why not ? He whispered a few words in her 
ear, bending low to catch her answer; then, taking his friend aside, 
he held a low consultation with him. 

" All right," replied the doctor. " You can afford it, Hal." Turn- 
ing to the scrowling manager, he added savagely: " Take your Rosa- 
lie and get out, you sneaking cur! We will look out for the girl." 

Soon afterward it was talked of considerably over the bar of the 
"Hell Gate," Ralph Smith, the Wells-Fargo agent, deciding that 
Harry had a " snap." No one dared speak of it to him, however, 
since the day when Pete, emboldened by many " whisky straights," 
sauntered into the store and inquired when ' ' he was going to give the 
fellers a sight of his girl." Harry's revolver lay uncomfortably close 
at hand, and so all questions were silenced. No one but the doctor 
ever saw the inside of Harry's small adobe house, where he had lived 
alone with his Chinese cook and big mastiff before Favorita came, or 
knew that it was fitted up with the best that Los Angeles could afford. 
Dr. Farquhar told him that he was too extravagant. Whereupon 
Harry laughingly replied that he was trying an experiment, and he 
thought that his money we s not wasted if it made the girl happy. 

Weeks passed, and Favorita grew better and was able to walk about 
and lie in the hammock, dressed iu the soft clinging gowns that Harry 
sent as far as San Francisco to secure. She told the doctor and 
Harry the story of her life. Her mother had been a French ballet 
girl, and, while traveling through Kentucky, had died at a convent 
in giving birth to her child. Her father she never saw. The sisters 
had taken her and educated her for a nun, but the life was hateful to 
her. One night she had stolen away and gone to a theatre in Louis- 
ville. Dazzled by the glamor of the footlights, she had eone to the 
manager, who, struck with her beauty, engaged her. It was not 
hard to learn the dances, and she had traveled with him two years 
when they came to Arizona. 

The doctor shook his head over Harry's experiment. He had 
grown fond of the girl. Even the Chinese cook smiled on her. 
"Courage," Harry's big mastiff, adored her, and Harry, well, Harry 
decided that Arizona was not quite Hades, after all. He refused to 
think of the future and how it would end, until at last he was forced to. 
He came home from the store one day earlier than usual. " Little 
girl," he said to Favorita, " you and I have had a nice time together, 
but I don't know what will become of us. I'm ruined, sweetheart," 
and he laughed recklessly as he threw himself into a chair before her. 
" Ruined ?" she repeated slowly ; "what do you mean, Harry ? " 
" Only this," and he laughed again bitterly: " I've been playing 
too high, and last night, in a game with Tracy, I overdrew two hun- 
dred dollars. Mr. Holmes is coming down the day after to-morrow 
to look into things, and unless I can pay it before then I am ruined. 
Here's every cent I have," and he tossed two shining twenties on the 
table. " I'll see that you don't suffer, honey," he went on in a softer 
voice as he saw her distress; " but I've got to cut, that's all. I can't 
face Mr. Holmes— he trusted me so." 

She knelt beside him frightened. " You will leave me ? " she asked, 
throwing her arms around him. " Oh, Harry, don't say thatl" 
" I've got to," he replied. " My God! don't look at me like that,'' 
and he buried his face in his hands. 
" Where is Mr. Tracy ? " she asked quietly. 
" Ten miles on his way to Phoenix," answered Harry. 
Favorita clung to him a moment; then, pressing her soft lips on his 
hair, she left the room. Once in the hall, she leaned heavily against 
the wall for support. " I will, I will ! " she muttered fiercely. " Oh 
Jesu, help me ! " 

Hastening to the stable, she fastened the saddle on Harry's pony 
and mounting, rode out of the yard. The sun had set, and the dark- 
ness, corning swiftly, hid her from notice as she rode down the nar- 
row street and out into the desolate country. Ten miles on his way 
to Phcenix ! She urged her horse forward ; it was life or death. 

It was dreary, riding alone at night. Now and then she would pass 
a drunken cowboy riding from the town. Her heart beat fast as she 
passed the long lines of embankment thrown up beside the irrigating 
ditches. Once she met a tramp, who called out to her, frightening 
her so that she almost fell from her horse. She was weak from her 
recent illness, and her back ached with the motion of the saddle. 

" Ten miles on his way to Phoenix." The words fitted themselves 
(o the ringing of the horse's hoofs. She knew Mr. Tracy ; she had 
seen him in Virginia City. He was a noted gambler, very gentlemanly 
in appearance. 

The sun was rising as she approached the " Golden Eagle Half-way 
House." She thought she would stop there and inquire if he had 
gone by. Dismounting from her foaming horse, she timidly entered. 
" Is Mr. Tracy here ? " she inquired of the bartender. 

The man eyed her curiously. She was covered with dust and her 
face was pale and haggard. 

"Jack Tracy?" he said civilly enough. " Why, yes; he's playing 



Julv 14. IbW. 



SAN KKAM'ISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 



with some (tenia in the other room. Want to *e* trim 1 I gueu tbry're 
about tbroQitb." 

. pleaw." *he answered, 
was trembling in every limb. N«>w that *hehni1 found him she 
did not know what to >ay . but when he came to her in tin- mu-ty 
parlor she told him how she hud ridden all night to find him and how 
ber lover was ruined. 

" Ob, Mr. Tracy,*' she concluded, " give me ihe money ! He has 
been so good to me and I love biiu ! It i« all for me that he has spent 
bis money, and now I am powerless to help him I " 

Jack Tracy looked down into her pleading eyes. " Little one,'' he 
said gravely. " If I give you the money will you kiss me 7" 

" Y. N . "h . y* - ' " -he answered. 

He smiled at her eagerness. " It is all for his sake,*' be said half 
sadly. " But never miud." He held her in his arms a moment, then 
pressed the gold into her hand. " Two hundred dollars for a kiss," 
he said lightly. " You had better ride my horseback, sweetheart." 

He made her drink a glass of wine, helped ber to mount bis horse, 
then went inside, saying to himself. " .lack Tracy, you're a fool." As 
for Favorita, she turned her horse's head toward Yuma with a light 
heart, the gold hidden safely in ber bosom. 

Harry Laurence stood in the store talking idly with Ralph Smith 
and a few of the men who had lounged in. He looked haggard and 
reckless. To-morrow Mr. Holmes would be there and be dishonored. 
Favorita 's loss, too, affected him more than he cared to own. He 
bad thought that she loved him, and, though the possibility of his 
leaving her had sometimes presented itself, he had never looked at 
it the other way. Well, it was only an experiment, after all, and he 
laughed as he talked, although a close observer would easily have de- 
tected the bitterness lying underneath. 

It was late in the afternoon, and the day bad been unusually hot. 
The men lounged about lazily, seemingly too enervated to move. 
Suddenly there came the sound of a horse galloping swiftly. It 
stopped in front of the door, and, before they could see who it was, 
Favorita staggered in. She took a few steps forward, then fell heavily 
to the floor. 

" Harry," she gasped, '* I've got the money," but sbe could say no 
more. 

Unmindful of observers, he knelt beside her. " Favorita," hecried, 
" what have you done? Oh, speak to me, sweetheart! " 

8he opened her eyes, and feeling feebly for the gold, handed it to 
him. " I— I followed Mr. Tracy," she said faintly, " and he gave me 
the money. So you will not leave me, Harry," and her eyes closed. 

Harry looked up at the men who were watching him. " Boys," he 
said brokenly, " I wronged the girl, God knows! " 

" I'll be hanged if I don't think so, Hal," replied Ralph Smith. 

" But she'll never regret it if she'll marry me," Harry went on. 
" I'm not worth much, I know, but I may be if she'll be my wife." 

Jerry Brown, the owner of the " Hell Gate," held out his big hand. 
"Harry," he said, "shake. We'll all stand by you, boy." 

When Mr. Holmes came the next day he was introduced to Mrs. 
Laurence. After he went back to Los Angeles he would say to his 
friends: " Harry's a lucky dog. Down there in Arizona, the most 
god-forsaken country on the globe, he's found a jewel of a horse, the 
noblest dog I ever saw, and a wife that not a woman in Los Angeles 
can hold a candle to." 



To Let— Furnished . A Modern House of Eight rooms; convenient to 
two cable lines; grand marine view; good neighborhood. Rent reasonable 
to desirable party. BALDWIN & HAMMOND, 10 Montgomery Street. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



New Basil Consolidated. Gravel Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Placer county, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 18th day of June, 1894, an assessment (No. 26) of Five cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable Imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment Bhall remain unpaid on the 
The 28th Day of July, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment Is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 18th day of August, 1894, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. X. SIMON, Secretary. 

Office— 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 16 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied . ; .... May 31, 1894 

Delinquent in Office... July 5, 1894 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock... July 31, 1894 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-61 per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, payable on and 
after Monday, July 2, 1894. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street. 



A SAMPLE CAKE 

Of Woodbury** Kurlal Snnp *0<J 1» PM« book 

on IV»utv *n.l T>f>rm«tt>l'<itr. K»ri*l L>rT«Iop. 

merit, ttupn-nuoim Tfln'r. wrinkle*. Plm- 

■ona Mid Ml Skin and Scalp 

trnprrffi-Mtinn wnt oralrd to 

nny n-VIrcM for 10 cent*. 



**«»* 



for P*tI **"* 

SKIM. 



, (- V.w; 



•. ®f"1l 



John H. Woodbury 
Dermatological Institute, 

Eotebllsbed 1870. 125 \V. 42d St., N.T. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Osborn Hill Gold Mining and Milling Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Grass Valley, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Seventh day of July, 1894, an assessment, No 3, of Fifteen (16) 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the cor- 
poration, payable immediately, in United States Gold coin, to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the company, Room 20, 331 Pine 8t., San Francisco. 
Cal. 
Any stock upon which thiB assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the 7th Day of August, 1894, will be delinquent. 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 28th day of August, 1894, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 20, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Oal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Seg. Belcher <& Mides Consolidated Mining Company, 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Twelfth day of June 1894, an assessment (No. 14) of Ten cents 

J»er Bhare was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary of the said com- 
pany, at the office of the Company, room 50, Nevada block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which thiB assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 16th Day of July, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment Is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 6th day of August, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 50, Nevada block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of Principal place of business— San Francisco, Calif ornia. Lo- 
cation of works— "Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Twelfth day of June, 1894, an assessment (No. 50) of Twenty-five 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the 17th day of July, 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the Seventh (7th) day of August, 
1894, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Btreet, San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— Ban Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 20th day of June, 1894, an assessment (No. 49) of Fifteen cents 
per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately In United States gold coin, to the Secretary? at the office of 
the company, room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any Btock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Wednesday, the 25th Day of July, 1 894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 15th day of August, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors 

CHAS. C. HARVEY, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran Cisco, Cal. 



D.VIDEND NOTICE. 



Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco, June 29, 1894. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter (4J4) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the 6ix months ending June 30, 1894, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 2, 1894 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office — Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

For the six months ending June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four and eight tenths (4 8-10) per cent per annum on Term 

Deposits, and four (4) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 2, 1894. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1894. 




P. F. McNulty, of 220 Post street, makes the most comfortable and 
best wearing shoe in 8an Francisco. His experience and ability are 
so well known that he has the best and most fashionable people for 
his customers. Of course these people demand style, and they get it, 
but it is very hard to get comfort with style. The shoes made by Mr. 
McNulty supply both, and perfect satisfaction as well. 



&M&i 



MR. LEIGH H. IRVINE, the author of "The Struggle for 
Bread," has written another book which is entitled "Told 
in Whispers." It is a story that is intended to lead oue to believe 
that the working classes in America are greatly abuaed men, 
and that they need the sympathy of the rich. Coming at this 
particular season, when the strike is on, it is of more than pass- 
ing Interest, but it is not a book that one should take to heart. 
The laboring element of this country is well-paid, fortunate, in- 
dependent, and educated. Nobody can deny that. Mr. Irvine's 
book contains an anarchist vein— indeed, its hero is an anarchist. 
A spirit of discontent is in it, and the idea that it evidently in- 
tends to convey is that the working masses should overthrow 
their employers. If Mr. Irvine were a great writer, that is, if he 
were a Tolstoi or a Stead, and had written such a book as "Told 
in Whispers," we would say that it would be wrong for bis work 
to be circulated among the laboring classes, as U would influence 
ttiem to step out of the paths of lawful conduct and contentment 
into the highroad of ruin and revolt. But as it is, it is harmless. 
It is the work of a bright young man who is making a study of 
the labor question, but who is still unable to solve it. [The Crown 
Publishing Co., Publishers. For sale by all booksellers.] 

Edgar Fawcett's latest novel, "Outrageous Fortune," iB claimed 
by some critics to be his best. It contains some good descriptive 
work, and he has struck the popular vein of using queer and un- 
usual adjectives — words to learn the meaning of which the reader 
would have to consult his dictionary. The scene is laid in the 
aristocratic suburbs of New York, on the Hudson. The import- 
ant characters area spoiled heiress, and a young physician who 
is in moderate circumstances. The heiress has a doting father, 
who uses bad grammar and spends his money lavishly. The 
girl falls in love with the young doctor, and he, notwithstanding 
he has a written proposal in bis pocket to another girl, accepts 
the heiress when she proposes to him. There is a sub-head to the 
book, "A Martyr to Destiny," but the hero seems rather a weak, 
vasodilating creature, who whines at the destiny that he alone 
made possible for himself. The story possesses interest for the 
average reader. [For sale at Cooper's.] 

Some weeks ago, the interesting announcement was made that 
a work by Charles Lamb, hitherto unpublished, was to be brought 
out by a fortunate English publishing house. The work was en- 
titled "Cupid's Revenge." Now it appears that a tale, bearing 
that title, founded on the plot of Beaumont and Fletcher's play 
bearing the same name, is to be found in Bell and Daly's edition 
of Lamb's Essays, 1867. "Verily," says an English journal, 
"these reported discoveries must not be taken on trust." 



The Geographical Society of California has issued its May bul- 
letin, which contains some very interesting articles and notes 
written by prominent men. The report of Dr. Fred W. d'Evelyn, 
President of the Society, shows that the Society is in a flourishing 
condition. 



Our Society Blue Book. 
The Blue Book of San Francisco and suburban towns for 1894-95 
will be the finest work of the kind ever produced in Europe or Am- 
erica. It will be divided into departments — seventeen in number — 
each preceded by an elaborate title page of unique and elegant design. 
These title pages will be embellished in gold with superb etchings, re- 
presenting typical scenes of localities and figures illustrative of each 
subject. Among the departments will be found sections devoted to 
the " Army and Navy," " Picturesque and Artistic Homes of Califor- 
nia," "Leading Private Institutions of Learning," "Calling and 
Street List." "Classified Business Houses of San Francisco." The 
leading hotels, alphabetical list, personnel of the press, theatre dia- 
grams, clubs and societies, private memorandum, street and avenue 
guide, etc. The residence streets of the cities of San Francisco and 
Oakland will be numerically arranged so that any desired private ad- 
dress can be readily found. The book will be elegantly bound in the 
familiar blue and white covers. The Blue Book is sold by subscrip- 
tion. Advance orders only will be recognized, as the edition is limited 
to the class of people for whom the work is especially intended. Now 
in compilation. Address all changes to Charles C.'Hoag, publisher. 
Office, 179 Crocker Building. San Francisco. 

A ■well-dressed man is proud of his furnishing goods, and every 
well-dressed man knows that John W. Carmany, 25 Kearny street, 
keeps the finest and latest line in the city. 



Mothers be sure and use "Mrs. WinsloWB' Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 



AH the new Books at COOPER'S. 



eristics. 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

Paid-up Capital, 91.000,000. 

Corner Montgomery and California Streets, San Francisco. 

J. D. FRY, President HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown. Secretary and Treasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depositary for Court and Trust 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an individual 
in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rate- of interest thereon. 

RENTS SAFES inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from ?5 per 
annum upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 

WILLS DRAWN AND TAKEN CARE OF WITHOUT CHARGE. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



N. W, Corner Sansome and Bush Streets- 
Established 1870. U. S. Depositary. 

Capital (Paid Up) $1,500,000. 

SURPLUS $800,000 | UNDIVIDED PROFITS $76,196 

S. Q MtJRPHY President! E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT .. .Vice-President | GEO. W.KLINE Ass'tCashier 

directors: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins. S G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moflitt, 

'I nomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 

the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hourB, 6 a., m. to 6 p. m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited- 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 I Capital Paid Up. $3,450,000 

Reserve $500,000. 

San Francisco Office— 424 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St., E.C . 

Portland Branch— 48 First St. Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER. Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. 

Cashier, GDSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 

NEW YORK— l)i exel. Morgan &. Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, Limited. 

N, W. Corner SANSOME and SUTTER. 

subscribed Capital $2.500,OOU | Paid Vp Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $800,000. 

Head Office ... 58 Old Broad Street, London. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
Limited. No- 10 Wall street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 
17 Boulevard Poissouiere . Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issue. 

g IG AL G T R S E C E H^L AUM 1 onager. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather &, Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON .... , President 

C. F. A. TALBOT, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, C. S. Benedict, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan A Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics' Bank, Kansas City— First National Bank, London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co, Paris— Drexel, HarjeB & Co. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 51,000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, I E. B, POND. 

VVM. H. CROCKER PRESIDENT 

W. E. BROWN Vice president 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

SECORITY SAVINGS BANK- 

222 MONTGOMERY ST., MILLS BUILDING. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOAN'S MADE. 



Wm. Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS: 
Jerome Lincoln 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon 
J. B. Randol. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November24.1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



July H, 189-4. 



BAN IK 1NCI8I NEWS LETTER 







SAYS ft New York fashion writer: Indift silk dresses are very 
comfortable to play tennis In. The pretlleM 1 ever saw wu 
worn by a Miss Nichol at NuragailMM Her. The gown WU made 

of two ptftTfl. skirt ami w.ii?t. of very tofl India *ilk. or perhaps Wasb 
silk, of white, with a hair line of red. The skirt was shirred over the 
hips with eisht rows of shirring. Over each row of shirring was 
sewed while beading, through which was run a narrow red ribbon, 
which was fastened at the ^ide with a porky little bow. The waist 
bad a shirred yoke with the beading and ribbons to match the skirt, 
while the sleeve was finished at the wiisl in the same way. The dress 
was deliriously cool and washed like a piece of white cotton. The 
Misses Roosevelt, who are acknowledged to be almost, if not the best, 
players in the country, wear invariably blue serge-skirts and white 
muslin or silk .shirt waists. The sleeves, finished with a cuH", are 
wide enough to admit of their being pushed up above the elbow, so 
that the muscles of the arm can get full play. A cap such as the boys 
call "polo cap" is the favorite wear by champion players. The 
sailor hat is a capital thing if a woman does not play except for fun. 
Tight fitting waists are an impossibility with good tennis playing. 
The shirt waists are the best, because they can be worn with any kina 
of skirt, but I should advise any woman who wanted to be comfort- 
able — and such a thing is possible, strange as it seems, in this pas- 
time — to try the India silk skirts and waists, or the silk skirts and 
linen shirt waists. 

There is a great latitude between the yachting gowns to be worn on 
sea and those for wear on land. For sea wear there is nothing like 
serge. It is not so warm as flannel, but is lighter and does not fade 
so quickly, and best of all, repels water and dust alike. The smartest 
gowns are made with one skirt and blouse waist — as nearly as possible 
to the regular man-o'-war suit worn by the "blue-jackets," as the 
men before the mast are called. The skirts should be quite wide, so 
that in case of high winds they will not show too distinctly the con- 
tour of the figure, and will have none of the disagreeable wrapping 
about the legs, which is so uncomfortable with a badly hung skirt- 
It need have no trimming at all, but two rows of braid around the 
bottom of the skirt seems to make it hang rather better. The blouse 
waist should be made with a very deep sailor collar. With this is 
worn a piece of blue serge, like a vest, and under the collar must be 
knotted a black half handkerchief, and a pocket at the side of the 
blouse, just like those on the men's blouses, is an absolute necessity. 
The skirt and waist are buttoned together, and are covered with a 
simple black belt, or belt of the serge. 

A pretty creature is the summer girl of 1894. In the first place 
she is distinctly feminine, even her "tailor-mades" being delightfully 
eccentric, with picturesquely draped sleeves and artistically arranged 
revers. A recently imported English tailor gown is in a new shade 
of covert cloth, a light grayish blue, which is extremely becoming to 
blondes. The skirt is plain, without trimming, but is curiously cut, 
so that from the side seam on the right there is a continuation, as it 
were, of the skirt, showing the moire as it turns over, and ending 
with a fold of blue. The cloth is cut away from the blue lining under- 
neath to prevent a double thickness. The perfectly cut Eton jacket 
has tremendously large revers of white moire, with ends turning over 
showing the blue cloth. A new French idea is a basque waist of 
light figured silk, worn with a black skirt over a petticoat to match 
the waist. In the example quoted the skirt of black satin-striped 
faille was slightly raised in scallops at the bottom, the point of each 
scallop being finished with a satin bow and showing a ruffle of the 
chene brocaded patterned silk petticoat underneath. 

A great many of the new dresses would be regular harlequinades 
were it not for the French taste that puts such seemingly incongru- 
ous materials and colors together. Imagine, for instance, a dark blue 
accordion-pleated chiffon body, short, full accordion-pleated sleeves 
and literally half of a flounced skirt, the other half being of draped 
pale mauve crepon, caught up on the side of the chiffon flounces 
with a velvet bow of salmon pink, the drapery of the crepon being 
continued over the body, where it is crossed, surplice fashion, and is 
gathered in folds on the shoulders, together with the under part of 
the sleeves which meet at the elbow, leaving the accordion-pleated 
flounces of the dark blue chiffon standing well-out and then continu- 
ing in a perfectly straight tight sleeve to the wrist. The "stock," 
which, by the way, is the latest word for the high folded collar, is of 
salmon pink velvet, with a bow at the back and another bow of the 
same on the left side of the dressed bodice. 



Business men making a specialty of one article of commerce are 
becoming more numerous every day. Edmund Taylor, of 218 Post 
street, is making a specialty of imported Irish Linens. Ladies and 
gentlemen should bear in mind that he sells the finest handkerchiefs, 
shirting, linens, table linens, huck damask, bath towels, crashes, can- 
vases, and stamped linens for embroidery in the city. He carries no 
other goods except those. 



U InTICR. 



BANK IF BKIIISH COLUMBIA. 



irporated bj Unyal charter, 
CAPIT'L Paid Up S3 000 000 

RE ERVE FUhO t.404,000 

Southeast corner Bu*h and Sanaome ita 
HI AH oil hi 64» loin bar (I Street, London 

in-, am Baa— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Naoatmo, 
snd Kelson British Columbia; Portland, urn^n. .Seattle, and Tacoroa, 
Washington 

Thii Hunk transacti ■ General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
l hiM-k. ami s (.«■(• i ni Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all part* ol the world Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vance* mad rood collateral security. Draws direct at currant rates 

Head Office and Br nchea, and upon Its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Nerobauta Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
I.ivKi'.rooi.— North and doutfa Wales Hank: SCOTLAND— British Ltuen Com- 
pany; ittELAMt— Bank of Irelnml Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
Booth America— London Baits ol Mexico and Booth America; China and 
Japak— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company 
of Sydney, Ld. ; Drmeraka and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. San Francisco. 

CAPITAL ... ..... $3,000,000 00 

SURPLUS and Undivided Profits (January 1, 1894) . 3.247,684 02 

WILLIAM ALVORD, President. THOMAS BROWN, Cashier. 

8. Prentiss Smith, Ass't Cashier, I. F. Moulton, 2d Ass't Cashier. 

(OKHIMMIMIIMS: 

New Yore— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co; The Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Trcmout National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. De Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev)— Agency 
of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of New Zealand; China, Japan aod India— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. St. Louis— Boat mens Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
Loudon, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Fraukfort-ou-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Syndey, Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Branch office 1700 Market Street, corner Polk. 

DEPOSITS, June 30, 1893 $28,058,691 00 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL and Surplus 1,699,434 00 

DIRECTORS— Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Thomas Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B, 
De Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, hut the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signa- 
ture of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is 
made for pass book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Satur- 
day evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Median les' Institute Building 

GUARANTEED CAPITAL, $1,000,000. 

OFFICEES. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES D. PHELAN, S G MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, L P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James D. Phelan, James Muffin, S G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, and 
Robert McElroy. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

No. 526 CALIFORNIA ST., S. F. 

Guaranteed Capital and Reserve Fund $1,610,000 OO 

Deposits January 3, 1894 39,429,21 7 OIB 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B A. Becker; 
Second Vice-Pres dent, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A, H. K. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoe- 
mann, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Stein- 
hart, Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Good fellow. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general hanking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ( „ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL, J Managers 

WELLS, FARGO & GO'S BANK. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 OO 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S. King. .. . . Manager 

H. Wads worth. Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. PARSONS, Cashier. 1 Salt Lake City, J. E. DOOLY, Cashier 

DIRECTORS . 
John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge. Henry E. Hunting- 
ton, Homer S. King, Geo. E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



july 14,1894. 




THE KING IS DYING.— James B. Keynon, in Seattle Post-Intel- 
ligencer. 



J^OOL, stand back, the King is dying, 
Give him what little air remains; 
See'at thou not how hia pulse is hying ? 

Hear'st thou not how he gasps and strains 
To catch the one other stertorous breath ? 
God! how he labors! yes, this is death! 

Blow up the fire — his feet are cold; 

Ay, though a King, he cannot buy 
One briefest moment with all his gold; 

His hour has come, and he must die; 
Withered and wrinkled and old and gray. 
The King fares out on the common way. 

Light the taper; he's almost gone; 

Stir, thou fool, 'tis past the hour 
To cower and cringe, and flatter and fawn— 

The thing lying there is shorn of power; 
Henceforth the lips of the King are dumb; 
Bring up thy ghostly viaticum. 

Absolve his soul; need enough, God wot! 

Mumble and sprinkle and do thy shriving; 
Yet, methinks, here and there shall be left a blot, 

Hideously foul, despite thy striving; 
Nor purified quilts, nor pillows of lace, 
Can relieve the guilt iu the grim old face. 

Soft! stand back— it is his last; 

Get hence, thy priestly craft is o'er; 
For him the pomp of the world is past— 

The King that was, is King no more; 
Let the bells be rung, let the mass be said, 
And the King's heir know that the King is dead. 



INTO THE FOREVER.— E. R. Sill. 



What may we take unto the vast Forever ? 

That marble door 
Admits no fruit of all our long endeavor, 

No fawn-wreathed crown we wore, 

No garnered lore. 

What can we bear beyond the unknown portal ? 

No gold, no gains 
Of all our toiling; in the life immortal 

No hoarded wealth remains, 

No guilt, nor stains. 

Naked from out the far abyss behind us 

We entered here; 
No word came with our coming, to remind us 

AVhat wondrous world was near, 

No hope, no fear. 

Into the silent starless night before us, 

Naked we glide. 
No hand has mapped the constellations o'er us, 

No comrade at our side, 

No chart, no guide. 

Yet fearless toward that midnight black and hollow, 

Our footsteps fare; 
The beckoning of a father's hand we follow— 

His love alone is there; 

No curse, no care. 



SONNET.— George Santayana. 



O world, thou choosest not the better part! 
It is not wisdom to be only wise. 
And on the inward vision close the eyes, 
But it is wisdom to believe the heart. 
Columbus found a world, and had no chart, 
Save one that faith deciphered in the skies ; 
To trust the soul's invincible surmise 
Was all his science and his only art. 
Our knowledge is a torch of smoky pine 
That lights the pathway but one step ahead, 
Across a void of mystery and dread. 
Bid, then, the tender light of faith to shine 
By which alone the mortal heart is led 
Into the thinking of the thought divine. 




A few Pennies 

on the one hand — ruined garments 

on the other. That will be the 

result of your trying to save 

money by using poor, cheap 

washing-powders, instead of 

Peariine. Just consider. 

How much could you 
save in a year if you 
bought the cheapest and 
most worthless ? And how far 
would it go toward paying for the things ruined 
in a single month? You can't save anything 
by buying cheap washing-powders. The way 
to save money in washing is to use what has 
been proved to be absolutely safe. That is 
Peariine. Millions use it. 417 james pyle. n. y. 

City Index and Purchaser's Guide. 



ATT YS. -AT- LAW. 
BERGEN A WILBUR, (B. F. Bergen; C. M. Wilbur), 215 Sanmme St. 
FRANK KENNEDY, law office, 66 Murphy Bldg., 1236 Market St. 

CANDIES. 
CANDIES put up for shipment at ROBERTS', Polk and Bush streets 

DENTISTS. 
R. « UTI.AK, 416 Geary street. 
F. M. HAtKEIf, 413 Leavenworth street. 

DOOR CHECKS. 
THE NORTON Door check and Spring. F. D. Morrell, 593Mission St. 

DRUOGISTS, 
KELLY'S CORN CURE, 25c. Drugs at wholesale, 102 Eddy street. 
EVANS' POISON OAK SPECIFIC. Positive cure. Sold by all drug- 
gist!^ 

MARBLE AND GRANITE. 
W. H. MoCORIIICK, 1422 Market st., bet. City Hall Ave. and Larkin St. 

MILLINERY. 
THE WONDER Hat, Flower and Feather Store, 1024-1028 Market street. 
RESTAURANTS. 
FRANCO-AMERICAN Restanrant-521 Montgomery St. F. Hitte. 
SHOEMAKERS. 
REPAIRING DONE while yon wait at POLLOCK'S, 202 Powell street. 

SURVEYORS. 

JOHN A. BENSON, Engineer. Dealer in Land Scrip. 430 Kearny St. 

HYGIENIC AIR COMPRESSORS 
For automfzalion purposes 

THE CLEVELAND FAUCET CO., 208 Ellis street 



x jsrsTTia^irsj-ciE . 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 139 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720.) 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

; Established 1886.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 
CEO. F. GRANT, Manager 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE COMPANY, 

(Incorporated A. D.,1799.) 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



July 14, U9<. 



SAN 1 i; AN' ISt (. M.US 1,1.1 Hi; 



19 




pt 



)R want of space, for want of space. 
We caoDOt ase your contribution. 
From manr an editorial place 
These words at sncta a fearful pace 
Came tripping, that with tearful face, 

The rbymist made a resolution. 
He sptlt bis ink. be smashed his quill. 

And i with a madness not quite groundless) 
He wanders now o'er vale and hill, 
Revolver-amied, and swears he'll kill 
The scoundrel— be he who he will— 

Who dares assert that space is boundless. 

— Canton (N. J.) Bohemian. 
The spirit of the Bard of Avon held converse with the wraith of 

the philosopher of St. Albans. '■ Marry " Shakespeare naturally 

fell into the vernacular of h»s own day. " the world seemeth not 

to be much interested in the dispute* over the authorship of those 
plays and poems." " Too much baseball," mattered Bacon. " Ay." 
They sat for a time in bitter silence. " William." " Francis." "Do 
vou happen to have the percentage of the national league with you ? 
1 heard some one saying that Chicago is crawling up." 

— Detroit Tribune. 
W« have lived a great many years, and have experienced the usual 
joys that befall a man in that length of time : Holidays, picnics, well- 
cooked steaks, good pie crust, etc., but have never k'nown the joy of 
receiving a letter from a woman who was coming to visit us in which 
she stated explicitly what train we were to meet at the depot. We 
Bay, and can prove it, that such a considerate, thoughtful woman 
does not live. — Atchison Globe. 

" Papa," said the young woman, " surely you ought to know bet- 
ter than to use the small ' i ' in your letters when speaking in the 
first person singular. You should use the capital." " Not much 1 
won't," said the plutocratic parent. " The small letter uses up less 
ink." — Indiana-polls Journal. 

The maiden sits so prim and shy, 

The butt of jests and quips, 
And there is kissing on the sly 
And also — on the lips. 

— Canton (N. Y.) Bohemian. 
Binkebs— This life insurance idea is good enough if a man dies 
young, but suppose I should live thirty or forty years longer— I'd be 
terribly out of pocket. Agent— No danger of that, sir. You'll soon 
kill yourself working to pay the premiums. — New York Weekly. 

Sometimes there are instances in life like those in story books. An 
Atchison girl engaged herself to a carpenter, thinking he was poor, 
and discovered on the eve of her wedding day that he had $50 in the 
bank. He had not told her, wishing to be loved for himself alone. 

— Atchison Globe. 
She— I have just been reading about theseven ages of man. I won- 
der how Shakespeare would have described the ages of woman ? He — 
There would be but two ages of woman. She — How's that ? He— 
Sweet sixteen and not yet thirty. —Detroit Tribune. 

She sat on the steps at evening tide 

Enjoying the balmy air. 
He came and asked, " May I sit at your side ? " 
And she gave him a vacant stair. 

— Canton (N. J.) Bohemian. 
Louise— What do you think is the ideal marriage ? Laura — Why, 
to marry a lord and live in England. What do you ? Louise— To 
marry an English lord and live in America. — Vogue. 

Mb. Softleigh (waking in middle of the night)— My dear, I am 
sure there is a man in the house. Mrs. Softleigh— Go to sleep again, 
Algy, you are nattering yourself. — Town Topics. 

" I understand you've bought a dog to keep burglars away?" 
"Yes." " You are not troubled any more at nights, then, T sup- 
pose ? " " Only by the dog." — Tit-Bits. 

" This amateur performance you speak of — was it a charitable 
affair? " " O, yes; the people knew the young folks were doing as 
well as they could. " — Answers. 

Said an Irishman the other day to a friend: " Arrah, where will 
you find a modern building that has last as long as the ould wans ? " 

— Tit- Bits. 
" Could I see the head of the house ?" Servant— I don't see how 
you could miss it. There was a champagne supper here last night. 

— Ex. 
Jack— I notice that you keep on the right side of your chaperone. 
Jess— Ye-es ; she is deaf in that ear. —Harlem Life. 

A man never has real trouble until he has a son big enough to wear 
his clothes. — Atchiton Globe. 



The Grand Canon Line !— To the East ! 



Commencing May 1st the "Santa Fe Route" Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Tuesday. 
Manager in Charge. Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are 
run through to Chicago every day without change.. This is the only 
Line by which the Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. 
Send for illustrated book giving full particulars. W. A. Bissell, 
G. P. A., 650 Market street, Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

For jaundice and liver complaint. Ayer's Pills are better than any other. 
They do not contain a particle of calomel. 



I3SrSTJR-A.UTCE3. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMRCKO, GERMANY. 

V. « «rn. DrlBBelil, Manag-tr for the Pacific Coaat Branch. 

--:" MaiuomeSt., s. r. 

7 af ""}'^ ,, o tl.SOO.OOO 00 

Inretted in U. S 664.433 i 1 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agents City Department, 
»88 California St., S.F..UI. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA. California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Ton... Begnlar warehouse for Sau 
Francisco Produce Exchange mil Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest Improvements tor the rapid handling and storing ol Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery forcleanlne 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of Interest on grain stored fn Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates In First-Class Companies, or Grain sold, 
If desired, at current rates. 
Office ol the Company, 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-Callfornla Bask. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO. of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO.. of Toronto- 

A. R. GURREY, MANAGER. | C. A. STUART, A88T. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL .^^ 16,700,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
No. 318 California Street San Franc ltco 

SIEBE, RASGHEN & CO., 

GENERAL INSURANCE, 

Telephone 272. 210 Sansome St. 

Asents foe Ban Fbancisco— Germania Fire Insurance Co , of New 
York; Hanover Fire Insurance Co., of New York; United Firemen's Insur- 
ance Co., of Philadelphia; Sun Insurance Office, of London. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets $19,724,638.«. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vlce-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTER 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Buildinq Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. 
Established 1825. 
Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, $6,854,663 66 
United States Department: 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
VOSS, COMBAD & CO., General Managers. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZUBICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

110 California St. , San Francisco, Ca l 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Gash Reserve (In addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1S88 8.124,057.00 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 
BOB California Street. San Francisco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up 5 500,000 

Assets 3,181,758 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,525,157 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

401 Montgomery Street. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 

SOI nontgomery Street 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1894. 




THE latest news from Corea is to the effect that the Japanese 
Government is continuing to occupy Corean territory with 
troops, notwithstanding the protests of the Chinese Government. 
The statement that Russia also has protested against Japanese 
occupation of Corean territory is not confirmed and will probably 
turn out to be false. Russia does not seem lo have any interest, 
except that which she may assume on the basis that somebody 
is making a grab, and that she has a right to be heard on the 
subject. The rumor that Cbina has lauded troops in Corea is 
likely to prove incorrect. The present Corean Government is 
pro-Cbinese, and its forces represent China in the struggle; there- 
fore, until they come into conflict with the Japanese, and prove 
inadequate, there is no need for the Chinese to do anything. The 
existing government of Corea is practically a Chinese govern- 
ment, in that it recognizes itself as subservient to the Chinese 
authority, and it is that very fact which has caused the Japanese 
occupation. As for the Japanese side of the controversy, the 
government of that country may be said to be between the devil 
and the deep sea. For the last two years or so the Parliament of 
that country has been assailing the Ministry of Count lto upon 
the ground of its effeminacy. Repeated votes of want of confi- 
dence in it have been passed by the House of Representatives. 
One of the principal causes of this parliamentary lack of confi- 
dence has been the desire for a revision of existing treaties in the 
direction of a greater ass.-rtion of national dignity by making all 
foreigners subject to the ordinary laws and tribunals of the coun- 
try instead of being endowed with special privileges and entitled 
to special tribunals. So late as the latter end of last May a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives expressed himself thus : 

The task of Treaty Revision required the utmost strength of will, 
and to expect such a determination in the present Government was 
to tell a cripple to run. The country was in- - 
suited by even Corea and China, and how 
could a man rationally hope to stand with 
stronger powers on equal footing? Again 
the question of Chinese was too weighty to 
be disregarded, and to be entrusted to the 
Cabinet. 

That extract serves to illustrate the 
spirit which stands behind the present 
aggressive movement in Corea. The pres- 
ent Japanese Government cannot recede 
without encountering the risk i»f provok- 
ing such a commotion at home as will 
reach within measurable distance of revo- 
lution. 



Belgian capitalists have burned their fingers a little in Africa. 
In the scramble for territory in the Dark Continent, Belgium may 
be said to have led the way. Perhaps it would be more correct 
to say that the King of the Belgians led the way, because it is 
understood that the Congo Free State, which was organized under 
Belgian influences and auspices, is to a large extent Leopold's 
personal property. But however that may be, the Congo Free 
State, when organized, found that it needed a railroad for its de- 
velopment — railroads, it may be remarked, seem to be neces- 
sary to modern colonization, though they were luxuries to the old- 
time colonists. A company therefore was formed to construct a 
road and the work was inaugurated; but so far, only twenty- 
eight and a half miles, out of a survey of one hundred and thirty- 
four miles, have been built, and that part has not been attended 
with any "serious results" in the way of profit. Great difficulty 
has been experienced in recruiting a black staff and in maintain- 
ing it in a healthy state when recruited. There has also been an 
almost endless series of delays and vexations, and increases in 
the estimated expenses. The engineers believe that when the 
road is completed and opened to Stanley Pool it will pay a fair 
return on the capital employed in its construction. Meanwhile 
the concessionaires have gone too far to go back, and feel that 
they have a very unpleasant sort of a white elephant on their 
hands. 



oxjo jtoip/w, 



Established 187). 



411 Bush Street. Opposite 
the New California Hotel. 
Best Equipped 

Large diuing-room for ladies. Sole depot for JOS. FCHUTZ MILWAU- 
KEE BEKK. Imported European Beer from Buergerlicfies Brauhaus, 
filsen, Bohemia; Ac iea Beer fr.>m R-zzL Culmbach, Bavaria 



Small things sometimes serve as the 
fulcrum upon which the lever that moves 
the world rests, and a story which is now 
going the rounds of the European clubs 
seems to illustrate this. According to this 
tale, the condition of a diplomat's finger 
nails has recently imperilled the dynasty 
of Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria. The 
trouble arose thus : A certain diplomat 
was introduced to Prince Ferdinand's wife. 
His person was ungroomed and the lady 
said to her husband: "Please send that 
man away ; he has such dirty finger nails 1" 
The diplomat heard of this somewhat per- 
sonal remark, and was highly incensed. 
He bided his time for revenge, and when 
the commotion arose over the recent dis- 
missal of the premier, he assumed an atti- 
tude of antagonism that almost shook the 
throne and its occupant apart. 

It ia a fact worthy of note that Queen 
Victoria, who completed the seventy-fifth 
year of ber age on the 24th of last May, 
and the fifty-seventh year of her reign on 
the 20th of last June, has reigned longer 
than any other British sovereign except 
George III., who nominally occupied the 
throne for nearly sixty years, and has 
reached a greater age than was attained 
by any other British sovereign except 
George II. and George III. George II. 
lived seventy-seven years and George III. 
nearly eighty-two years. And yet there are 
not wanting those who entertain the be- 
lief that the infant who was born the 
other day is likely to be his great-grand- 
mother's direct successor. 




SURBRUG'S GOLDEN SCEPTRE. 



cos coo cos coo coo coo coo coo coo cos cose. 



» coo coo co; to; <ua coo coo cos coo cos coo co: cos coo coo 



If Ynn arp a Pinp Smnkpr we want Y0U t0 tr y golden sceptre- 

II IUU die d ripe OlIIUISCI, a nthe talk in the world will not convince as 
quickly as a trial that it is almost perfection. We will send on receipt of 10 cents, a 
sample to any address. Prices GOLDEN SCEPTRE, 1 lb., $1.30; Jilb.,40c. Postage 
paid. Send for pamphlet. 

M. BLASKOWER & CO., 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 



22S Montgomery Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO, Cal. 



ftlGHEST^ 

DV 




G)UKhSKUb.l5g FULTON si.nV "■■■^■MMHHBMH^B^^"" , ~^ 

TUC I CAniUC UIUIHI SMP1D of the United States. Stands without a rival. Equal to any 
B tit l_tAUINU HAVANA l_»luAK Imported eic.tr. VTe prefer you should buy of your dealer. It 
he does not keen them, send S1.00 for sample box of ten. Send mnn'T by recistered mall. 

JACOB STAHL, Jr., & CO., Makers, 1 68th St. and 3d Ave., New York Citv- 

ROOi & SANDERSON. San Francisco, and KLAUBER & LEVI. San Diego, Cal , Distributing Agents. 



Jwlv M. 1804. 



SAM IK IX< tS( SEM S LETTER 



21 



^jv^r.. ft&xm 



kit/ 



THK local savings banks began paying their semi-annual divi- 
dends lo stockholders and depositors on Monday last. The 
banks were never in a stronger or easier condition to meet every 
dividend In money. The dull demand for gold has enabled them 
to collect a large sum. which they would gladly use to pay to de- 
positors for the interest due on deposit?. The aggregate amount 
that was on band in the books ou Monday morning Tor the use of 
paying depositors was estimated at $2. 500,000. There are always 
some depositors who do not care to draw their dividends, prefer- 
ring to have tbem added 10 their bank accounts. The payment 
nf dividends, however, cannot fail to make circulation a little 
more active. 

Six City Hall lots, more or less improved, were sold to a New 
York capitalist last week for $200,000. The property fronts 
seventy-five feet on the northerly line of Market street, and runs 
back 200 feet to City Hall avenue, on which there is a like front- 
age of seventy-five feet. It is encouraging to learn that outside 
capital is being pot into San Francisco at a season when business 
depression is prevailing on all sides. Local capitalists are always 
ready to pick op opportunities in dull times, but it is gratifying 
to know that money is coming in from a foreign source. 

Presidio Heights is budding with new houses, which are going 
up in all directions. Property in that section of the city is bring- 
ing fancy prices, in fact, the only fancy prices that are quoted in 
the market. 

The fourth annual report of the Capital Building and Loan 
Association shows that the concern has outstanding loans to the 
value of $77,850. During the year ten loans were made of $1000 
each. 8tocks on which the full four years' installments have 
been paid, amounting to $48, have a book value of $61.44 and a 
surrender value of $53.88. Mayor Ellert is President of the As- 
sociation, W. H. Davis, Secretary, and Herman Shainwald, 
Treasurer. 

Alterations and additions are to be made to the Art Association 
building on Nob Hill. The contract for the work has been let. 
The work will cost $7000, and it will be finished in two months. 

The number of city real estate sales for the six months just 
ended were 1710, of the value of $7,887,382, againHt 1767 in the 
last six months of 1893, of the value of $5,443,679. The sales 
made during the last six months do not show any increase in 
number, but a slight reduction. The increase was a large one, 
and a decided surprise to many realty dealers. The increase 
amounted to $2,443,703. The amount of money loaned out on 
mortgage since January 1st was $9,168,113. 

A country real estate exchange is being organized with head- 
quarters in this city. 

THE SUPPRESSION OF ANARCHY. 




THE refusal of the German Government to enter into any sort 
of international combination for the suppression of anarchy 
seems to be founded on good grounds. There is no need for any 
such combination. All governments will in the nature of things 
suppress disorder within their own territorial limits and punish 
any outward conspiracy against the peace of their neighbors; 
and beyond that it would not be possible to get any combination 
of European governments to go. The British Government, for 
instance, would not join in a general hunt of persons who are 
merely suspected of being anarchists. It is by following this sys- 
tem for years past that British territory has been kept so free of 
anarchy and British subjects of even the most radical type so 
antagonistic to anarchical theories that the red flag provokes 
them to personal violence. In the British Isles government and 
governmental methods have for centuries been open to the fullest 
and freest discussion. As a result, dissatisfaction has never been 
bottled op and driven into criminal waste pipes. Intemperate- 
minded people have been allowed to talk so freely that they 
could and can get but few auditors. On the continent, on the 
other hand, everything has been bottled up, and thus the founda- 
tion for anarchy — which is but the dissatisfaction of the ignorant 
and illogical with existing institutions of government — has been 
laid. Men who have desired to criticise organized society have 
been driven into the cellar and sewer, and out of the darkness of 
their surroundings have come the blind theories and brutal instru- 
mentalities of anarchy. 

THE British Columbians intend to put steam into the trade be- 
tween that country and the South Pacific Islands, where 
fruit, copra, shells, and pearls are the chief commodities. For 
years California merchants have been content with sail power, 
but if our northern neighbors are enterprising enough to make 
steam pay, California will lose the products of a valuable coun- 
try. For years the South Sea Islanders have been looking for the 
advent of steamers in order to increase their commercial relations 
with foreign countries. 

A bright, blooming complexion comes of the good blood made by using 
Ayer's Sarsaparilla. 



Copyrighted. 



knitJ-ingco. 

120 8UTTBB 8T , Kooms 21-24, 8. P. 
Ill Y VOIR 

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SUIT 

Direct from the manufacturer at head- 
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Latest and prettiest styles. Season 1894. 
Perfect fit Beft goods Lowest Prices. 
Ladies' aud gents' 
swi;,\TKHN, BICYCLE, ATHLETIC 
SUITS, Etc. 
f SILK AND WOOLEN 

UNDERWEAR 

KNIT TO ORDER. 
J3^*9end for illustrated catalogue, free. 



NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING, 

Notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a resolution of the Board of 
Directors of the Paraffine Paint Company (a corporation), duly adopted at 
a regular meeting of said Board, held at the office of r-aid Company on 
Wednesday, the 13th day of June, 1894, a meeting of the stockholders of the 
Paraffine Paint Company will be held on 

Wednesday, the 22d day of August, 1 894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M, 
of that day, at No. 11G Battery street, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, the same being the principal place of business 
aud office of said corporation, aud the same being the building where the 
Board of Directors of said corporation meet. 

The object of said meeting is to consider, act upon, and decide a proposi- 
tion to diminish the Capital Stock of said corporation, the Paraffine Paint 
Company, from One Million Dollars to Oue Hundred Thousand Dollars. 

Dated San Francisco, Juue 13th, 1894. 

PARAFFINE PAINT COMPANY. By 

R. S. SHAINWALD, Secretary. R. S. MOORE, President. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Union Con- 
solidated Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the com- 
pany, room 4, Nevada block, b09 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 1 6th Day of July, 1 894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M .. 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on FRIDAY, July ISth, 1894, at 8 
o'clock p. m. CHA8. C. HARVEY, Secretary 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 30B Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Savage Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders in the Savage Mining 
Company, will be held on 

Thursday, the nineteenth (19th) Day of July, 1894. 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., at the office of the company, room 50, Ne- 
vada block, 309 Mootgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. Transfer books 
will close on Monday, the sixteenth day of July next, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
San Francisco, July 2, 1S94. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Virginia and Gold Hill Water Company. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Virginia and Gold 
Hill Water Company, for the election of trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, and for the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting, will be held at the office of the company, room 25, Nevada 
block, 809 Moutgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Thursday, the 26th L ay ot July, 1894, at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M. 

W. W. STETSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 25 Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, S. F., Cal. 
San Francisco. July 9, 1894. _____ 

AKNUAL MEETING. 

Spring Valley Water Company. 

The annual meeting of the Stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works Company will be held at the office of the company, 516 California 
street, San Francisco, cal., ou 

Wednesday, the Eighteenth Day of July, 1894, at 12 o'clock M„ 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. WM. NORRIS, Secretary. 

Office— 516 California street. San Francisco, Cal. 

San Francisco, July 6, 1894. 



Bacon Printing Company, 

508 Clay Street. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14. 1894. 



WE have been hearing news all the week of how the holiday 
season was passed at the principal places of resort, and from 
all accounts, the efforts to make the time pass pleasantly were in 
the main rewarded with success. The picnic on the raft at Del Monte 
was strongly reminiscent of other days, but few, however, of the 
original crowd taking part in it. Mrs. Chreitain gave a delightful 
picnic to Cypress Point, three four-in-hands carrying the party, and 
the fireworks and ball could only have been better had there been 
more there to enjoy both. Now everyone is talking of the coming 
tennis tournament, which will not, however, take place until the 
trains are running regularly again. 

Mrs. N. J. Brittan's picnic to Brighton was one of the events at 
Santa Cruz; there were dinners at Golden Gate Villa, and danciner 
everywhere. At Burlingame there were a picnic, two luncheons, 
and several dinners, four-in-hand drives, pigeon-shooting, and pulo, 
and though there were not many visitors, those who put in an ap- 
pearance had a "rattling good time of it." At Castle Crag a cotillion 
was the piece de resistance of the Fourth, and under the leadership of 
Miss Alice Scott it proved a very pretty affair. Many of the guests 
there are far from willing captives, and like the starling, the cry of 
" I can'tgetout!" has reached even to San Francisco. Thejolliest 
crowd seems to have been at San Rafael, where picnics were almost 
as much the order of the day as tennis was during the tournament. 
Walter Hobart made himself the Hon of the hour from a coaching 
pjintof view. The gathering at the McCutcheons was one of the 
most enjoyed affairs of the holiday week; and what with luncheons, 
dinners, cards, and dancing, all declared that they could not possi- 
bly have had "'a nicer Lime. " 

The next out-of-town frolic to look forward to is the Country Club 
shoot at Del Monte, for which event great preparations will be made 
to atone partly for the recent partial failure. Everyone is going to 
be there, and aside from the shoot there are to be polo, golf, tennis, 
and baseball for out-of-doors, music and dancing indoors, and feast- 
ing everywhere. 

The first of the July weddings took place on Wednesday evening, 
when the Simpson Memorial Church was the scene of a very pretty 
bridal, the contracting parties being Miss Florence Stapleton and 
Chalmers A. Graham. The decorations of the church were beauti- 
ful, and consisted of ropes of sniilax caught by bows and streamers 
of white satin ribbon and hanging in festoons over banks of sweet pea 
blossoms which adorned the front of the organ loft, while upon the 
platform were graceful fern leaves and stately palms interspersed 
with groups of la France roses, sweet peas and hydrangeas artistic- 
ally arranged, green, white, and pink being the prevailing tints. The 
church was crowded. During the assembling of the guests they were 
treated to a charming selection of airs upon the organ. Finally, at 
nine o'clock, the strains changed to the Lohengren chorus as by the 
west doors of the church the bridal party entered. First appeared 
the four ushers, who had been so hard at work for an hour ^or more 
making room for the company bidden. And following them came 
two dainty little maidens clad in pink India silk robes made in the 
empire style, and carrying baskets filled with pink sweet pea blos- 
soms. After them appeared the pretty maid of honor, wearing a be- 
coming gown of white, and finally the lovely brunette bride and her 
father. The wedding robe was of white corded silk made en traine, 
with high corsage and puffed sleeves; a long fleecy veil quite envelop- 
ing the bride's slight figure was held in place by a coronet of while 
Mowers. The groom and his oest man awaited them at the plat- 
form, where the pastor, the Rev Dr. Hirst, tied the nuptial knot, 
using the service of the Episcopal Church. At the conclusion of the 
service the wedding party left the churcjh by the eastern aisle and 
doors, and were driven direct to the home of the bride's parents, 
where a bridal supper was served and a reception held. 

The long-looked-for cards for the wedding of Miss Ella LeCount 
and Eugene Slocum, 0. S. N., are out, and the ceremony, which 
promises to be a very pretty one, will be performed at Christ Church, 
Sausalito, on the afternoon of Saturday, the 21st, and afterwards a 
reception will be held at the home of the LeCounts, Cliff Haven, 
from three till five o'clock. 



The engagement of Miss Alice Kinne, daughter of Col. and Mrs. C. 
Mason Kinne, is one of the latest announced in the social world. Her 
wedding with Dr. Clark Burnham is named to take place during 
August, and the ceremony will probably be a church one. 

Gossip avers that Ed. Schmieden has at last become a captive to 
Cupid's charms, and that it will not be very long before an "announce- 
ment" is made from Ross Valley, in which locality the fair enslaver 
resides. 

Dr. and Mrs. Wagner, who came over to the California Hotel di- 
rectly after their marriage in Ross Valley, have been busily engaged 
in looking for a bouse sufficiently large to enable them to entertain 



on an extensive scale the coming winter. Pacific Heights is the place 
most in demand, and the news will no doubt be pleasing to society at 
large, who are always charmed to hear of one more being added to 

the list of party givers. 

There has been a feeling of disquiet gaining ground at the different 
resorts, some being anxious to return home, deeming it the safest 
place under the circumstances ; others, influenced by a spirit of con- 
trariness, wishing to leave simply because it was impossible to get 
away. Those who were desirous of coming to town early in the week 
waited not for trains, and took the old-time but still very delightful 
mode of travel, and drove, Judge McKinstry's family, among others, 
leaving Santa Cruz in that way on Monday last. There has been a 
grand scattering of guests from the Hotel Rafael this week, and 
among those who returned to San Francisco are Mrs. Clark Crocker 
and her two daughters, the Misses Hobart, Mr. and Mrs. Webster 
Jones, Miss Edith McBean, etc. Mrs. Tucker and Misses Mae and 
Clair Tucker, of Oakland, stopped en route homewards at Sausalito 
to visit Commodore and Mrs. Harrison. One of the losses from Del 
Monte is pretty Miss Babette Howard, who was there with Mrs. 
Dick. Miss Howard returned to San Mateo with that party, as she 
has been the guest of Mrs. Parrott during the absence of her step- 
father, Mr. Bowie, in Japan. 

The Colliers, who entertained a very large house party at Villa 
Kabel during the holidays, lost a number of their guests, who re- 
turned to town on Monday. Several of them, among whom were 
Miss Cohen, of Fruitvale, and Miss Lawlor, remained a little longer 
to enjoy still further the delights of that beautiful region. Walter 
Hobart started on his drive to Del Monte early in the week, and took 
quite a party with him on his coach. 

Governor and Mrs. Low and Miss Flora are occupying their resi- 
dence on Gough street after a visit of several weeks to San Rafael. 
Miss Cora Smedberg has returned to town from her visit to San Ra- 
fael, where she was the guest of Mrs. Sydney V. Smith. Miss Emily 
Carolan has been spending a few days with Mrs. George Pope at St. 
Helena. The Misses Siebe were among the guests at the Geysers 
last week. 

Mrs. James Freeborn's friends are highly delighted at the pros- 
pect of seeing her again before long in San Francisco. The Free- 
bornes have been residents of Paris for a number of years, but since 
Mr. Freeborn's death there his widow has taken a dislike to that 
gay capital, and announces that her return to her old home, Califor- 
nia, will probably be about the beginning of September. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Alexander, nee Crocker, are off for Europe- 
having sailed last Wednesday with the intention of remaining abroad 
until the late autumn. 

Although army circles in San Francisco will soon lose one of its 
bright particular stars in the departure of Miss Florence Hartsuff 
for Chicago, it has lately been the gainer of another charming young 
lady in the person of Miss Edilh Greenleaf, daughter of the Medical 
Director of this department, who has recently arrived here to join 
her parents, and will be one of the army belles the coming winter. 
There are no doubt many of our elder society folk who will pleas- 
antly remember a popular army officer of early days and his 
beautiful wife, Colonel and Mrs. R. N. Scott, and who will be pleased 
to meet their daughter. Miss Bessie Scott, who is now visiting San 
Francisco as the guest of her aunts, Mrs. Foster and Mrs. Nick 
Kittle, and may possibly make a prolonged stay with her friends 
here. 

The strike has been causing trouble in many directions, but it is 
quite likely that one of its most annoying effects has been the inter- 
ruption of travel, compelling many to remain who wish to leave us; 
but still more are wishing to come, and are obliged to remain in statu 
quo. Mrs. Colton and Mrs. McLane Martin are among those who 
are detained in New York, having arrived from a prolonged visit to 
Europe last week, and hoped before this to be at their villa in Santa 
Cruz. Among those who are kept here by the same trouble are 
Lieutenant and Mrs. Hayden, nee Lord, who have been visiting 
Major and Mrs. Lord since their return from their honeymoon trip, 
and who spent the recent holidays at the Hotel Rafael. 

Awarded Highest Honors World's Fair. 

D*PRICE'S 




Baking 
Powder 



The only Pure Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia ; No Alum 
U;«>d in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard 



Julv 14. ! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



The American colony in Paris has, of late years, been ron«i<irr 
■bly on the decrease. an»l society nm.WWH.MlUj misses their lavish 
hospitality. A <listinguished American lady. Mme. Aver, however 
one of the richest of that colony, b still an entertainer on a liberal 
scale, her receptions bein*; remarkable for their refinement. IN- 
cently she pare a gTand dinner party to one hundred and 
guesLi. who were invited to meet Prinoa Francis Joseph of Batten* 
berg; the brilliant dinner was followed by a cotillion. 

Mr. and Mrs. I. 1*. Crane. D. B. Crane. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Todd, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Marshall, and Mr. and Mrs. H. 0. Donnela are at 

larkspur for the summer. 

The Hotel Vendome, San Jose, is now in the zenith of its summer 
clones. The late arrivals are: Mrs. C. A. Spreckels. Mrs. Thomas 
Y. Welh. Miss Crowell. J. C. Damphy. Miss Dumphy, It. K. Cray- 
son. Miss Grayson, Mr. and Mrs. I*. A. Kinnagan, Joseph C. Hoffman, 
Mr. and Mrs. I>. B. Francis. Mr. and Mrs i 'lark Wise, Dr. and Mrs. 
M. A. r-outh worth. Mrs. J. C. Flood, Miss Jennie Flood, Henry Miller. 
Mrs. J. E. Nolan, and Miss Eva R. Shatter. 



London Vanity Fair, in its account of the Queen's last Drawing 
Room, mentions the fact that Lady Deerhurst (ne'e Bonynge) was 
presented by Lady Coventry. " Lady Deerhurst," adds that paper, 
•' bore oft the palm for beauty and was immensely admired. Lord 
Deerhurst was in close attendance on his lovely bride." 



LONDON NOTES. 



THERE now seems to be some degree of certainty felt that the 
Khedive of Egypt will, after all, pay a visit to the Queen dur- 
ing the season. Although the visit will be to Her Majesty, the 
Khedive will reside at Buckingham Palace. 

Lord Roseberry had no sooner won the Derby than the oppor- 
tunity came to him of creating a bishop. The circumstance that 
enables the "Fairy Prime Minister" to present a plum out of the 
ecclesiastical pie is, however, one much regretted, for the vacancy 
is caused by the death of the much-respected and clever divine, 
the Bishop of Bath and Wells. Lord Arthur Hervey was a rep- 
resentative man, but not of the present race of clergy, who are 
displaying so much energy in trying to prove that their cloth has 
always been as active as themselves, and for that reason the 
Church should not be disestablished. The deceased Bishop was a 
schoolfellow of Mr. Gladstone, and though he never wavered in 
his admiration of the ex-premier as a student, he did not like the 
tendency of his politics. 

Mr. Gladstone is going on well, but more slowly than he an- 
ticipated. He is housed comfortably at Dollis Hill, thanks to the 
Earl of Aberdeen, and lives in close conjunction to rurality, 
while, at the same time, at the south of his house, at no very 
great distance, there is an extensive panorama of London, where 
life's-doings are going on with the usual gush, and the usual 
energetic haste. 

THE awards were made in all of the departments at the Mid- 
winter Fair during the week. In the art department there 
were two pictures that received first medals. One was entitled 
" Churching," by J. Rongier, and the other was entitled << Des- 
sert," by Dominique Rozier. They were French pictures by 
French artists, and were two of the finest canvasses in the Fair. 
Unfortunately, however, they were classed with the Italian in- 
stead of the French exhibit. Mr. 8. Gump bought the pictures in 
the Paris salon and placed them on exhibition at the Fair. They 
can be seen now at Gump's, 113 Geary street. 



MM. ESTEE had no views to express regarding the great 
. railway strike. He told a reporter that he had opinions of 
his own, but that he did not feel at liberty to give them for the 
public benefit. The reporter should have called on Colonel Dan- 
iel M. Burns for the interview, as he would have been able to tell 
just what Mr. Estee thought. 



THE " Lucille Waltz," by Emile A. Bruguiere, Jr., has just been 
published. It is in a dainty, flowing movement, and exceed- 
ingly brilliant in several parts. The composition is dedicated to 
Fritz Scheel. 



That charming resort. Larkspur, lies only twelve miles from San 
Francisco, in one of the prettiest spots in California. It can be 
reached by easy access from the city ; it contains all the attractions 
of the country — fine climate.no fogs, no winds, an excellent table, 
shade trees in abundance, and many attractive surroundings. Busi- 
ness men who want a resting place from Saturday to Monday, or a 
summer home which is close to the city and is not affected by any 
railroad tie-up, will find that Larkspur is an ideal resort in every 
respect. 

The business men who have made a specialty of one article of com- 
merce are the most successful business men in the country. Edmund 
Taylor, of 218 Post street, is making a specialty of Irish linens. He 
sells the finest handkerchiefs, shirtings, table linens, huck damask, 
bath towels, crashes, canvasses, and stamped linens for embroidery, 
in San Francisco. He carries nothing but linens. 



THE Snpreme Conrt has engaged In the Uik or finding out who 
•Colonel Mazuma" li. and hit exact position in legislation 
and litigation. If the bossen get control of the Supremo Court, 
then that august body will be thoroughly acquainted with all the 
schemes of the Colonel. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 



SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

3O0 and 311 Saiiaomp St. San Franclnco. <al 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM A BRODIE .43 aud 46 Threaducedle St., London 

SIMPSON. MACKIRDY A CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

MACY A DUNHAM 66'^ Pine St., New York 




HIRES' 




I makes the home circle complete. This I 
) great Temperance Drink gives pleas- 1 
f ure and health to every member of tne J 
1 family. A 25c package makes 5 gal- 
f ions. Be sure and get the genuine- 
Sold everywhere Made only by 

I The Chas. E. Hires Co., Philada. 

1 Send 2o. stamp for beautiful Picture Canli nnrl Rook. I 



Broo^Iyr? 
Jtotel. 



Conducted on both the 

EUROPEAN AND 

AMERICAN PLAN. 

BUSH STREET, bet. Sansomb A Montgomery, 
. San Francisco, Cal. 



This favorite hotel is under the management of CHAS. 
MONTGOMEKY, and is as good, if not the best, Family and 
Business Men's Hotel in San Francisco. 

Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, first-class service and 
the highest standard of respectability guaranteed. 

Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness aud comfort. 

BOARD AND ROOM, per day, ?1 25, $1 60, HI 76 and $2 00. 

per week, t7 00 to $12 00. 

" " per month, J27 50 to W0 00. 

SINGLE ROOMS, 50 cents to *1. 



pree <?oa<;i? to arjd frop\ tifn flotel. 



BETHESDA. 



AMERICA'S FAVORITE WATER. 

" I don't think Bethesda has any equal as a pure, agreeable, aud whole- 
some table water.—/. B. Foraker, ex-Govemor of Ohio. 

" I think the Bethesda as good a mineral water as I have ever tasted." 
T, jy. Palmer, President World's Columbian Commission. 

L. CAHEN &. SON, Agents, 

418 Sacrameuto street, S. "F. 



ZISKA INSTITUTE, 



1606 VAN NESS AVIiMi;. 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. French, German, and English Day and Boarding 
School. F.legant home. Best educational advantages. 
Next term commences August 1, 1894. 

RIME. B. ZISKA, A.M., Principal. 

DR. H. G. YOUNG, DENTIST, 
1841 Polk St., near Jackson, S. F. 

Painless extraction. Teeth without plates a specialty. 
HOURS— 9 a. k. to 5 p.m., 8 to 9 p. m. Sundays, 9 a. m. to 2 p. m 



[Telephone 2606 



1 ■ .■.,!■• !L"!JiS!!!E*!!-l! 



24 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



3\.)y 14 31 H. 



VI60R of MEN 

Easily, Quickly, Permanently Restored. 

Weakness, Nervousness, 
Debility, and all the train 
" i of evils from early errors or 
1 later excesses, the results of 
overwork, sickness, worry, 
etc. Full strength, devel- 
opment and tone given to 
a every organ and portion 
.of the body. Simple, nat- 
1 ural methods. Immedi- 
] ate improvement seen. 
Failure impossible. 2,000 references. Book, 
explanation and proofs mailed (sealed) free. 

ERIE MEDICAL CO., Buffalo, N.Y. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 
Trains Leave and are Due 1o Arrive at 
SAN FRANCISCO: 




Leave | 



From June 26, 1894. 



I Abbive 



7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 6:45 a 

7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Redding, Castle Crag 
and Dunsmuir, via Davis 7:15 p 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and *Santa Rosa 6 :15 p 

8:30 A NUes, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red Bluff 
andOroville 4:15p 

9:00 a New Orleans ExpresB, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles, Deming, El 
Paso, New Orleans and East 5:45 f 

9:00 a Martinez and Stockton 10:45a 

*9:00a Peters and Milton ... ... *7:15p 

12:30 p Nlles, San Jose and Livermore .. 8:45 a 
*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers. . .. *9:00 p 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 
Santa Rosa. 9:15 A. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Landin m, 
Marysville, Oroville and Sacra- 
mento .... 10 :45 a 

4:30 P. Niles, San Jose, Livermore, 
Stockton, Modesto, Merced and 
Fresno 7:15 P 

4:30 p. Raymond (for Yosemite) 10:45 a. 

5:00p. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara and 
Los Angeles 10:45a. 

5:00 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

forMojave and East 10:45 a. 

6:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45a 

6:00f. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

J7 :00 p. Vallejo +7 :45 p. 

7:00 p. Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Pu g et Bound and East 10:45 a 

Santa Cruz Division (N arrow Gauge). 

J7:45 a Sunday excursion for Newark, 
San Jose, Los Gatos, Felton and 
Santa Cruz 18:05 p 

8:15a. Newark. Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 
Cruz and way stations 6:20f. 

*2:45 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 
stations *11:50a 

4:45 p. Newark. SanJose.Los Gatos. 9:50a . 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend Streets ). 

*6:45 a. San JoBe, New Almaden and Way 

Stations *1:45p. 

17:30 a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 
Grove and Principal Way Sta- 
tions J8:33p- 

8:15 a. San Jose, TresPmos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove. PaBO Robles, San 
San Luis Obispo and principal 

Wav Stations 6:26 p. 

19:47 a- PaloAltoaud Way Stations 11:46 p 

10:40 a. San Jose, and Way Stations. .. . 5:06 p- 
11:45 A. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 3:30 p. 
*2:20p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, SalinaB, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove *10:40 a. 

*3:80 P. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions 9:47 a. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations *8:06a. 

5:10 p. San Jose and Way Stations *8:48a, 

6:30f. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6:35a. 

t11:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 
Stations +7:26 p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERHY. 

From SAN FftAlflSOO— Foot of Market St. (Slip 8)— 
*7 00 *8 00 9 on *10 00 and 11 00 ^. m.. *12 30 
11 00 *2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *6 00 p. m. 
From 01KMVP— Foot of Broadway. 

*6 00 *7 00 8 00 *9 00 10 00 and *11 00 a. m. 
t!2 00 »12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 a nd *5 p. M. 
A. for Morning . p. for Afternoon . 
•SundayB excepted. -{-Saturdays only. 
tSunday p only. 

The FACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 



THE amelioration of the condition of 
mankind and the increase of human 
happiness ought to be the leading objects 
of every political institution and the aim 
of every individual, according to the 
measure of his power in the position he 
occupies. — A. Hamilton. 



AN awkward man never does justice to 
himself, to his intelligence, to his in- 
tentions, or to his actual merit. A fine 
person, or a beauteous face, are in vain 
without the grace of deportment. 

— Churchill. 



IF you treat wth courtesy your equal, 
who is privileged to resent an imperti- 
nence, how much more cautious should 
you be to your dependents, from whom 
you demand a respectful demeanor? 

— Chambers. 

WHO taught the natives of the field and 
wood to shun their poison and to 
choose their food — prescient, the tides and 
tempests to withstand; build on the wave 
or arch beneath the sand? — Pope. 

IT has been well said that no man ever 
sank under the burden of the day. It 
is when to-morrow's burden is added to 
the burden of to-day that the weight is 
more than a man can bear. 

— G. Macdonald. 

AS objects close to the eye shut out larger 
objects on the horizon, so man some- 
times covers up the entire disk of eternity 
with a dollar and quenches transcendent 
glories with a little dust. — E H. Chapin. 

THE French army is three times as large 
as it was in 1870. 

JAPANESE children are taught to write 
with both bands. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 

NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 

and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 

with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Oceanic Tuesday, July 17, 1894 

Gaelic Tuesday, August 7, 1894 

Belgic Thursday, Sept. 6, 1894 

Oceanic (via Honolulu)... Tuesday, Sept. 25, 1894 
ROUND TR«P TICKETS AT REDUCED RATE8 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage 
Tickets for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and TownBend 
streets. San Francisco. 

For freight apply at offices of Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, at wharf, or at No. 202 
Front street, San Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, flen.Pasn. kv* 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a, m,, May 25, June 4, 9, 19, 
24; July 5, 9, 19, 24; August 3, 8, 18, 23. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
May 25th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles), and Newport, every fourth and fifth 
day, at 11 a. m. 

For Ensenada, Mazatlan, La Paz and Guaymas 
(Mexico), 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'lAgents, 
No. 10 Market street. San Francisco 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

< fl bv « World tours, steamer 

i5V^_! £0. r. aDd rail. First class. 

OV^ rr^WC" r. W10. Second class, 

^// ]y/^V' to \^ °- 9 - s - Company's 

steamers sail: 
For HONOLULU 
APIA, AUCKLAND 
and SYDNEY. S. S. 
"MONOWAI," 

^V^SSSE^fPi'* For HONOLULU, 
<.p*Si=i^<^ s. s. ■AUSTRALIA," 

S.EVE'S v AugUBt 4, 1894. 

For passage apply to 138 Montgomery Street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market Street. 
J. D. SPRECKELo & BROS. CO., General Agts 




SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

TIBURON FERRY— Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20, 11:00 A. M.: 12:36,3:30, 

5:10, 6 30 p. M. Thursdays— Extra trip at 

11 :30 p. m . Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 n od 

11:30 p. M. 
SUNDAY8-8:00, 9:30,11:00 A.M.; 1:30, 3:30,5:00, 

6:20 p. M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAY8-«:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 A. M.; 12:45, 
8:40, 5:10 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at la 
and 6:30 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40,11:10 A. M.;l:40, 8:40,6:00, 
6:25 p. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 
same schedule as aboye. 

Special Saturday to Monday Train Service. 

SATURDAYS-Leave San Francisco at 5:10 P.M. : 
arrive at Cloverdaleat 8:45 P.M. 

SUNDAYS— Leave San Francisco at 5:00 p. m ; 
arrive at Cloverdale at 8:38 p m. 

SUNDA1J8-Leave Cloverdale at 6:46 a. m.; ar- 
rive at San Francisco at 10:40 A. M. 

MONDAYS— Leave Cloverdale at 6:00 a. m. ; ar- 
rive at San Francisco at 8:50 a. m. 



Leave 8. F. 


In Effect 
Ap'l 15, 1894. 


AebiveinS. F. 


W b 




Days 


Sundays 


Desti'tion 


Sundays 


Dayb. 


7:40a.m. 
3:S0p.m. 
5:10 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
9:80 a.m. 
5:00p. m. 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa- 


10:40a.m 
6:05 p.m 
7:30 p.M 


8:60a. m 

10:30 a* 
6:15p m 














Windsor, 
Healdsburg, 
Geyserville, 
Cloverdale 
Pieta, Hop- 
land, Ukiah. 












3:80 p.m. 


8:66a.m. 


7:30p.m. 


6:15 pm 


7:40a.m. 
3:80 p.m. 


8:00 A. M. 


Guemeville 


7:80p.m. 


10:30a m 
6:15 l « 


7:40A.M. 
5:10 p.m. 


8:00A.M. 
5:00p.M 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. |8:60a«. 
6:05p.m. |6:15pm. 


7:40 a. M 
3:30 p. M 


8:00 A.M. 
5:00 p.M 


Sebastopol. 


10:40a.m|10:30a.m 
6 05p.m| 6:15p m 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs 
Springs, Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point 
Arena. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lake- 

Sort, Boonevllle, Greenwood, Orr's Hot Springs, 
[endocino City, Fort Bragg, Usal, Westport, 
Cahto, Willitts, Capella, Porno, Potter Valley, 
John Dav's, Lively's, Gravelly Valley, Harris, 
Blocksburg, Bridgeviile, Hydesvllleand Eureka. 
Saturday to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

Ou Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— Corner New Montgomery 
and Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 



H. O. WHITING, 
Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN. 
Gen. Passenger Agent 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Thbotjgh Link to New Yobk, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. 

SAILINGS— At NOON. 

8. S. "San Bias," July 18, 1994. 

8. S. "San Juan," July 28, 1894. 

S. 8. "Colon," August «, 1894. 

S. S. "Colima," August 18, 1894. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 
AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamers for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc.: 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

8.8. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, July 

26, 1894, at 3 p. M. 

8. S. "City of Peking," Thursday, August 
16, 1894, at 3 p. M 

8. 8. "China," via Honolulu, Aug. 28, 1894, at 
3 p. M, 
S. S. "Peru," Saturday, Sept. 15, 1894, at S P. m. 
Round Trn> Tickets at reduced rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office— 
2F M ont street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 



Prio« P«r Copy. XO Cent*. 



Annual S»l^«ripUon, $4 OO 




«»H r "*^ e '*e tt 



Ne w s-J|e tier 




Vol. XL1X 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 2l, 1894. 



Number 3. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fried 
Marriott. 606-609-613 Merchant Street, San Francisco. En- 
tered at San Frai\cisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 

The office of the Niwb Letter in Sew York City is at the " Evening 
Post " Building, 204-206 Broadway, Boom 1, where information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

THERE is some talk of Robert T. Lincoln as a Republican can- 
didate for President. In fact, one of the purposes for which 
Mr. Lincoln seems to exist is that of being thus talked about with- 
out any probability of being nominated. 



THE Boston Herald criticises the sentiment in favor of admitting 
the territories of New Mexico, Arizona, and Oklahoma to the 
Union. The people of New England are about as familiar with 
the rights and status of the territories as they are with the Indian 
or the Chinese question. It is fortunate that the West is getting 
in a position to assert itself regardless of the jealousy, selfishness, 
and ignorance of the East. 



ITALY seems to be continually looking for affronts. It fancies 
that it has a grievance against Brazil on account of the arrest 
of some Italians in the latter country, and it has given notice 
that two warships will be sent to Brazil with orders to remain 
until satisfaction is granted. If the Brazilians should take a 
notion to blow the Italian ships out of the water the Italian Gov- 
ernment might not be so eager hereafter to find indignities. 



BEFORE the late President Carnot was assassinated, a paper 
published by Herr Most, the anarchist, had been giving its 
readers some advice on the choice of weapons for murderers. 
"Attempts by means of a revolver are utterly played out," said 
Herr Most, " because out of twenty-five attempts only one is 
successful." The article concludes with, "Long live the torch and 
bomb!" Society is singularly lax in defending itself when a 
wretch can write and publish such matter as that without incur- 
ring at least a long term of imprisonment. 



THE great railroad strike has ended, though the strikers have 
been carrying on a desultory skirmish for the purpose of an- 
noying the railway companies and creating an impression that ii 
is dangerous to travel. In this some of the daily papers of San 
Francisco have given them efficient assistance. These papers 
have ignored the fact that the Southern Pacific Company would 
not invite damage suits amounting to millions of dollars by run- 
ning trains manned by incompetent men, and that as the com- 
pany invites travel it is ready to handle it with the old-time 
safety. 

A DARING but none the less attractive proposition has been 
made by a Roman newspaper on the subject of a proposed 
arbiter of international differences. "There is," it says, "a way 
out of the difficulty. Instead of nominating a tribunal on every 
occasion, a permanent court should be appointed in some neutral 
land. But who enjoys such universal confidence as to be choseD 
arbitrator? Is there any one who possesses the qualities neces- 
sary to inspire such confidence? Yes. That person is the Pope, 
whose position lifts him above all suspicion of partiality." We 
submit this alluring offer to the wisdom and forbearance of the 
American Protective Association. 



THE Moulvie Rafiuddim Ahmad, an enlightened Moslem, con- 
tributes to The British Medical Journal an article on the Mecca 
pilgrims and the cholera, in which he points out that the pilgrim- 
age as at present conducted is an international disaster. The 
remedy, he thinks, lies in the power of the Sultan, who should at 
once appoint a commission to investigate the matter. If the 
present state of affairs continues, the recurrence of the plague at 
Mecca will diminish the number of pilgrims, destroy the trade 
dependent upon them, and cause a loss of much of the Sultan's 
moral influence over the Mohammedan world. This view of the 
subject from the standpoint of the pilgrims themselves is encour- 
aging, and indicates that the Mohammedans are not so bigoted 
in the matter as has been believed. 



DEAR old Mr. Sutro has relaxed in his zeal to build a street 
railroad to the Cliff House, and has been begging tbe Super- 
visors to return the $6010 which be paid for the franchise. Mean- 
while, his patriotic blood surges furiously in the interest of the 
railroad strikers, for he is melting the wires with instructions to 
President Cleveland as to how the Southern Pacific Company 
might be destroyed. 

AMONG the places which are hotter than Hades in these days 
is the Prussian court. A wretched Paul Pry has been writing 
all sorts of wickedness about the Court goings-on, and as the 
scandalmongering society paper is unknown in Berlin, the aristo- 
cratic tattler has Dot only had to write his stories but to circulate 
them himself. There is some question as to his identity, although 
one official is in jail for the offense. We can give no opinion on 
the truth of the allegation as to various marital sins alleged 
against the high-born dames and reaching up even unto the Em- 
peror himself; but we think it is a sign that German imperial in- 
stitutions are not as sound as they appear to be, when such 
stories get abroad. Emperors may be a law unto themselves, but 
in the nineteenth century they must at least seem to respect the 
best part ot the Ten Commandments. 



THE autocratic bearing of American millionaires toward their 
.employees, as illustrated particularly by George M. Pullman, 
angers men in a country where they are taught that all men are 
free and equal. This overbearing hauteur, combiDed with a vul- 
gar aDd showy use of money, is an important element of the bit- 
ter restiveness of American workingmen. The American million- 
aire might make a profitable note of the kindly, sympathetic 
bearing of wealthy English aristocrats toward their employees. 
We have not forgotten how Lord Roseberry, some fifteen years 
ago, put an end to tbe great coal strike in England by inviting 
the leaders to supper with him, at which his geniality and per- 
fect bonhomie so won them that they came to terms with bim at 
once and ended the strike. Imagine an American aristocrat of 
tbe Pullman type condescending to break with his employees ! 
And yet human fellowship is the greatest force in the world. 



AFTER being bounded and beset by an enterprising matrimon- 
ial agent who persisted in finding husbands for his already 
married daughters, H. O. Armour, of New York, went to the 
police to ask advice on the best means of keeping.his family from 
being too much married. He awoke on tbe following morning 
to find himself the recipient of sympathy from all over the coun- 
try. It is evident that the judgment of New York matrimonial 
agents has been spoiled by Lillian Russell and other versatile 
creatures who save time by looking for their next husband before 
they have disposed of the present one. It does not seem possi- 
ble to the materialistic matrimonial agents of New York that a 
woman with one husband on hand shrinks from entering into 
negotiations for another. No penalties suggested by the police 
seemed to Mr. Armour to be severe enough for so crude a mar- 
riage broker, but we trust that he will yet find something to fit 
the crime. 



ANEW definition of Senatorial dignity has been authorized by 
Senator Call. It consists of a Senator removing his shoes and 
planting his Senatorial feet, proudly encased in bis Senatorial 
stockings, in a prominent position on the Senatorial desk, where 
all may observe and admire. Plain citizens who have not been 
brought up on dignity in early life, but want to acquire it, and 
have had a special veneration for the Senatorial brand, will be 
glad to know that it can be embraced in so comfortable a fashion. 
it is time that there was some disagreement between Senator 
Call and the newspaper correspondents whose version is given 
above. The Senator claims that he took off only one shoe, cov- 
ering the foot that is crowned with the pet Senatorial corn, and 
that be kept that foot modestly concealed under his desk instead 
of flourishing it aloft. But it certainly appears that tbe habit of 
using the truth only in moderation, acquired in testifying before 
investigating committees, may have tinged Senator Call's recollec- 
tions of the incident. If his shoeless foot had been concealed un- 
der the desk the correspondents would not have seen it. There- 
fore, it was on the desk. Whether one stocking or two were dis- 
played is a mere matter of detail, and the other Senators evident- 
ly owe a vote of thanks to their Florida colleague for keeping his 
stockings on. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21 1894 



THE WRECKERS OF A BANK. 



THE postponement till September of the trial of R. H. McDon- 
ald, Jr., on a charge of embezzlement, coupled with the fact 
that McDonald's health is rapidly breaking down in jail, creates 
the possibility that the whole scandalous story of the wrecking of 
two banks may never be told in court. The local papers have 
never published it or anything approaching it, and no intelligent 
citizen is ignorant of the motives which have inspired them. But 
it is one of those extraordinary transactions which cannot be hid- 
den, and when the whole truth is published the conduct of Su- 
perior Judge Hebbard will be better understood. Being a Judge, 
he ia necessarily the central figure in this remarkable drama. He 
doubtlees knows why he failed to be nominated for Supreme 
Judge by the Republican Convention, but more than likely that 
will prove the smallest of his difficulties which will grow out of 
his handling of the bank cases. It may be explained in time why 
he imposed a bond of $100,000 on R. H. McDonald, Jr., for an al- 
leged embezzlement of $14,000, when upon an ex parte application of 
a shareholder, with a bond of only $5,000, he appointed a receiver 
and closed a bank in the business of which over a million dollars 
was involved. There are many more things in his conduct that will 
likely be ventilated, but only a few of them can be touched upon 
here, for the ramifications of the case are many and extraordinary, 
and the conduct of other men besides Judge Hebbard would be 
involved in a full inquiry. As is well remembered, Judge Heb- 
bard crushed the Peoples' Bank by declaring it insolvent and ap- 
pointing a receiver on an ex-parte showing. Delmas & Shortridge 
were then retained by a majority of the parties in interest to try 
to undo this mischief and wind up the affairs of the bank. At 
once they appealed to the Supreme Court from Judge Hebbard's 
ruling, and just as the Supreme Court rendered a decision over- 
ruling Judge Hebbard, he received another application similar to 
the first and acted upon it in a similar manner! Of course he 
will be overruled again, but meanwhile he is " running the bank," 
for a receiver is the representative of the Court. The principle 
which he violated is so old and well-established, so vital to the 
safe conduct of banks, and so thoroughly understood by bankers, 
lawyers, and courts, that his audacity in overriding it ia amazing, 
even in San Francisco. 

Not satisfied with that, he next took the first step in a course 
which finally resulted in the removal of Delmas & Shortridge 
from the case. It was the majority of the parties in interest who 
had retained Delmas & Shortridge, and when the storm broke these 
attorneys advised that the then Board of Directors resign. They 
consented and a new Board was agreed on, which Judge Heb- 
bard approved. When, however, it was discovered that the new 
Board would be unfavorable to Judge Hebbard's receiver, ibe 
Judge refused to permit the election. He had already assumed 
full power over such elections by issuing an injunction restrain- 
ing the old Board from resigning and a new one from being 
elected — an unheard-of and high-handed proceeding. He refused 
to modify that order so as to permit of resignation and a new 
election, evidently for the reason that it would weaken his con- 
trol. The matter was then appealed by Delmas & Shortridge, 
and it was then that the crowning act of the scandal was done. 
The attorney who had represented the receiver and who had 
always had his own way in Judge Hebbard's court, was substi- 
tuted by an order of court for Delmas & Shortridge. This attor- 
ney had opposed Delmas & Shortridge in all the steps which they 
had taken in the interest of the bank, and hence his apparent 
position before the Supreme Court will be directly antagonistic to 
that which he occupied before Judge Hebbard! It means, of 
course, that if the Supreme Court, in the absence of any attorney 
to oppose the plans of Judge Hebbard and the interests which he 
has championed, will permit so scandalous a proceeding, this at- 
torney will undo all that Delmas & Shortridge have done to pro- 
tect the interests of the depositors and to bring about an intelli- 
gent and honest settlement of the bank'« affairs. It happens that 
he Is the presiding Judge. In the exercise of that power he has 
been careful to assign to himself all the cases growing out of the 
litigation of both the banks, and besides has transferred to Judee 
Murphy's court the embezzlement case against R. H. McDonald, 
Jr. That last in itself was a peculiar proceeding, and Judge Mur- 
phy's refusal to grant a change of venue, in the face of the over- 
whelming evidence produced that a change would have been 
right, are all of a kind. What hand certain others, who have 
profited enormously out of the ruin of these banks, and all of 
whose plans are in harmony with the conduct of Judge Hebbard, 
have had in all this miserable business, is not under discussion at 
present. Having now removed from the case Delmas & Short- 
ridge, whose ability and honesty might have been depended on to 
save to the depositors what is left of the bank, and possibly to 
pay them in full, the real wreckers (who are not yet behind the 
bars), are resting in unstable security. With the assistance of 
the Presiding Judge of the Superior Court they feel safe, no doubt. 
They have the power to convict R. H. McDonald, Jr., and they 
may be depended upon to exercise it. He knows the whole story, 
but by arresting him and keeping him under heavy bonds they 
discredit him, and when they convict him they will be in a posi- 
tion to dictate terms by which his silence may be secured in con- 
sideration of a light sentence. 



NEW BILLS IN CONGRESS. 



SEVERAL bills have been introduced in Congress as the result 
of the present strike, and a number will follow. The politi- 
cians are always ready to take advantage of such conditions by 
proposing new schemes of labor legislation, the main object of 
which seems to be to Matter the vanity and reach for the votes of 
members of labor organizations. In a period of ten years there 
have been more laws made at Washington to please the laboring 
classes, and more time spent in endeavoring to pass bills to benefit 
their condition, than for all other purposes combined. The differ- 
ent aspects of the question of employment have crowded the 
Federal and State statute books, all with the effort of conciliating 
the wage-earners on account of their political power. A number 
of those laws have served a good end; but a greater number of 
them have Bimply tended to magnify the importance of organ- 
ized labor and to increase the demand for special concessions and 
advantages. The average statesman has not dared to oppose such 
legislation, even when he knew it to be foolish or pernicious, but 
has given his consent to it under intimidation, and mainly to se- 
cure his election. It cannot be said that the experience through 
which we are now passing will make friends for the theo-y of 
further legislation of this kind. It places the interests of all other 
classes and matters iu subordination to organized labor. There is 
something due to unorganized labor, to the different kinds of busi- 
ness in which many people are engaged, and to the advancement 
of State rights. It is easy to see that an abundant legislation for 
the benefit of a particular part of the workingmen of the country 
has not lessened the danger of public disturbance on the part of 
those who have been favored in that manner, but has had the 
effect, rather, of encouraging strikes and increasing the difficulties 
of a situation which crippled every business industry in the land 
and made the poor suffer tenfold. Organized labor has been 
shown so much distinction that it is in danger of losing sight of 
the wise and beneficent uses of organization and of giving undue 
regard to its own desires. And so the time has come to call a 
halt on labor legislation for the few, and give preference to the 
good of the many in the framing of laws in that respect. 

THE MARTIN WILL CASE. 



THE testimony which has been brought out in regard to the 
genuineness of the second will of Henry Martin which his 
sister-in-law, Mrs. John Martin, has offered for probate, has 
created an impression on the public mind which only the very 
strongest evidence could remove. There are not many who would 
like to stand in Mrs. John Martin's shoes. At the time of this 
writing the expert testimony has gone to the effect that 
the second will was a forgery, but this doubtless will be 
met by counter expert testimony, and for that matter " scientific " 
expert testimony on handwriting commands little respect. There 
are many circumstances, however, that make it difficult to enter- 
tain the belief that the will is genuine. It has been shown that 
Henry Martin feared Mrs. John Martin and declared her capable 
of imitating any handwriting. He would not even write with 
his own hand to her, fearing that she would become too familiar 
with his penmanship. Soon after the filing of the first will, 
which ignored Mrs. John Martin's child, she made frequent 
visits to the County Clerk's office, and suddenly the will dis- 
appeared and was not found till four months afterward, when it 
was discovered lying on a chair in the Clerk's office. Soon after- 
ward Mrs. Martin offered the second will for probate. 

Ex-Mayor Pond stated very clearly his belief that the second 
will was a forgery. " I came to my conclusion," he said, " from 
the general surroundings of the case. The will was not with his 
other papers. Four months elapsed before it was filed. Then 
Henry Martin had frequently spoken to me about Mrs. John 
Martin. He disliked and was afraid of her. He told me that she 
was a bad woman — one who could imitate anybody's handwrit- 
ing. When he was obliged to correspond with her he had 
others write the letters. Under these circumstances it seemed 
to me impossible that he should have made such a will." 
William Martin, a brother, who was made a beneficiary under 
the second will and who was omitted from the first, has testified 
that he does not believe the second will to be genuine. It is 
singular, too, that the second will, if genuine, should be dated at 
a time when Martin so hated Mrs. Martin. When that phase of 
the case involving Mrs. Martin's history and the paternity of her 
supposed child is reached, there will likely be some sensational 
developments. 

PRESIDENT CLEVELAND'S facility for clearness of expres- 
sion is exemplified in his brief statement concerning the 
National finances. Republican newspapers and other political 
birds of evil omen will derive no comfort from the facts that he 
has presented. It is shown that the financial standing of the 
Government, has vastly improved within the last year. The com- 
mercial balance indicates that the United States are $127,512,608 
better off, on foreign account, than they were a year ago. And for 
cash in hand, aside from gold, the Government now has $53,000,- 
000, as against |19,000,000 last year. The present outlook 
for an early resumption of good times is most hopeful. It is dis- 
couraging only to Republican ammunition makers. 



July 21, 1894. 



BAN KRAM'Isoi \ i:\vs LETTER. 



A REMARKABLE SUIT. 

TH K most rxiri<uillniry outcome of the railroad strike has been 
tbe suit brought by Gajorgt J. Penis, I'nlled States Attorney 
for (be Southern District o( California. In the I'nlted States Circuit 
Court at Lop Anueles. toconipel the Southern Pacific Company to 
surrender control of the various transportation companies which it 
operates, and to force each of these companies to operate its own 
lines independently. The excuse given for the action is that by 
controlling these companies Ibe Southern Pacific Company is a 
trust, and comes under the operations of the Anti-Trust Act of 
Congress, and tbat it is a monopoly and is conducted in restraint 
of trade. Mr. Denis claimed that be had authority from 
I'nitcd Suites Attorney-'. eneral Olney for bringing the suit, but 
Mr. Olney has promptly denied it. All the principles involved in 
the suit are so simple that a mere statement of them is sufficient 
for an understanding of their merits. Up to the time of the char- 
tering of the Southern Pacific Company by the Legislature of 
Kentucky the numerous lines owned by the interests of which 
Messrs. Huntington, Hopkins, Stanford, and Crocker were tbe 
main factors were operated separately, with numerous distinct 
sets of general officers, at an enormous and unnecessary expense 
(which bad to be charged to the traffic), and with imperfect facili- 
ties for the transaction of business. Furthermore, it was desira- 
ble to open a southern overland route to the Gulf of Mexico, so 
tbat a line of steamers might be put on to bring freight from New 
York to New Orleans and then load it upon cars for California, 
and in this way establish a through freight tine between the At- 
lantic and Pacific. Tbe formation of the 8outhern Pacific Com- 
pany enabled all this to be done, and thus tbe expense of operating 
tbe various separate lines was reduced and the facilities for band- 
ling freight between California and the Atlantic 8tates enormously 
increased. Tbe leasing of the various lines by the Southern Pa- 
cific Company and this company's acquisition by direct purchase 
of other lines to complete the New Orleans route in uo way altered 
tbe fact that all tbe lines were owned by the same persons, tbe 
leasing being merely a business formality. It did not strengthen 
the hold of the railroad owners on the transportation lines which 
they already owned. The bringing of tbe different properties 
under one management was a step which any one of sense could 
see was proper and wise, and that act in nowise created a trust 
or made the monopoly of transportation lines any stronger than 
before. But all the pretense that the Southern Pacific Company 
has a monopoly of the transportation of the State is absurd. The 
Canadian Pacific, tbe Northern Pacific, and the Union Pacific tap 
the northern coast and have regular lines of steamers connecting 
their western termini with 8an Francisco. On the south the 
Santa Ft is a powerful rival, and besides handling nearly all tbe 
business of Southern California, it was able to compel the South- 
ern Pacific to run Santa F6 freight and passenger trains over the 
Southern Pacific tracks from Mojave to San Francisco, and to 
charge only a fair pro rata for the track service. BesideB these 
lines we have the Pacific Ocean, which carries an enormous 
traffic, and which is free to the world. Hence it is seen that the 
two principles on which the suit is founded — that the Southern 
Pacific Company is a trust and monopoly, and tbat as such it is 
operated in restraint of trade — do not exist in fact, and therefore 
Mr. Olney's surprise upon hearing of the action at Los Angeles is 
not strange. 



CONCERNING ATTORNEYS FEES. 



■WHAT THE STRIKERS HAVE LEARNED. 



THE new and vital iesson which organized labor has learned 
from the railroad strike is that, to whatever extent it may be 
successful fn directing its power against private interests, the mo- 
ment that it attacks the interest of the United States Government 
it has dashed its bead against a wall. For there it encounters not 
only authority and power, but patriotism as well. On the other 
hand, if workingmen become unreasonably aggressive against pri- 
vate interests, they will invite the making of laws which will 
place all strikes and boycotts under Federal ban. Laboring men 
are at last beginning to learn that the savage and destructive 
methods which they have pursued heretofore are out of place in 
these times, and will prove more harmful to themselves than to 
the better educated men whom they antagonize. Education, 
therefore, is the solution of the problem. It will give tbem a 
broader understanding of the ethical relations existing between 
employers and employees, will increase their patriotism and re- 
spect for law, will reduce an inclination to violence and passion- 
ate resistance, will enable them to understand, agree upon, pass, 
and enforce legislation which will protect their interests, and will 
reduce the present corrupting power of money, and induce thrift, 
sobriety, and industry. Besides the best school education that 
can be had, the unions should employ lecturers on industries, 
ethics, and political economy. 



TH K f.'j.imiurr has Indulged its propensity for persiflage and a 
distortion of facta in attempting U) Invest with lujplelot] the 

awarding of $80, by Judge Levy out of the Ulythe estate to 

Naphtbaly. Kreldenrich ,V Ackerman as a fee for services rendered 
by them as attorneys for the late Judge Pennle, Public Adminis- 
trator. It attempts to show that Judge Coffey, from whom the 
case was transferred to Judge Levy, would never have permitted 
such an outrage, and that tbe transfer was made in order to ren- 
der this "legal brigandage" possible. Tbe case was transferred 
from Judge Coffey's court for the simple reason that bis is a Pro- 
bate Court, with limited jurisdiction, and tbat his function as a 
Probate Judge in this case having terminated, tbe case bad to go 
to another Judge. It was accordingly assigned to Judge Levy. 
There was nothiug peculiar about tbat. As to tbe testimony 
given by D. M. Delmas, E. J. McCutcheon, Arthur Rodgers, T. C. 
Van Ness, and other eminent attorneys, to tbe effect that in their 
opinion the services of Naphthaly, Freidenricb tfc Ackerman were 
worth considerably more than tbe amount which Judge Levy 
awarded, tbat must stand on its own merits; but the Examiner's 
insinuation tbat when there is a rich estate to be robbed all 
lawyers "stand in" with one another, is a pretty serious 
charge against responsible men who are entrusted with the man- 
agement of vast interests. Tbe Examiner declares that tbe 
$80,000 was in addition to payments, amounting to $15,000, 
already made tbe attorneys, whereas sucb is not the fact at all, 
as the $80,000 includes all that. As Mr. Wright, attorney for 
Public Administrator Roach, was familiar with the affairs of the 
estate, he was engaged by Naphtbaly, Freidenrich & Ackerman, 
and had to be paid out of tbe award. W. H. H. Hart, attorney 
for Florence Blythe, examined tbe bill of services and expendi- 
tures rendered by Naphihaly, Freidenrich & Ackerman, and 
agreed to tbe paymeit of $80,000. Mr. Wright had been awarded 
$125,000 for his services as attorney in the case for Pub- 
lic Administrator Roach. The award was contested by 
the estate and an appeal was taken to the Supreme 
Court. That Court sustained the award, and yet the award 
of $80,000 to Naphthaly, Freidenrich & Ackerman, one-third 
less than tbe award which the Supreme Court sustained, and for 
services covering an equal length of time, has alarmed the Exam- 
iner and led it to hint tbat a conspiracy exists between the Su- 
perior Court and the bar of San Francisco to loot tbe Blythe es- 
tate. Responsibility, as well as legal service, is an important 
factor in tbe handling of large estates, and it has to be paid for. 
If the lawyers had been thieves it would have been cheaper and 
easier to steal the $80,000 from the $1 000,000 in cash tbat passed 
throngh their hands than have the Superior Court assist tbem in 
their " brigandage." 



THE conservative newspapers of France express regret that 
President Casimir-Perrier did not make a forcible anti-An- 
archist proclamation. Why should he do it? The people whom 
he represents have issued their own anti-Anarchist proclamations 
all over France. 



WE ARE GROWING BETTER. 

THERE is a fatal defect in the philosophy of the reformers of 
the present time, and that is that they ignore the most sig- 
nificant historical facts. Their philosophy assumes tbat civiliza- 
tion is a failure, and that all things are constantly going from bad 
to worse. Tbe marvelous record of the progress of our race is 
not taken into consideration in their doctrines and conclusions. 
They ask us to believe tbat all tbe wisdom of the past has been 
profitless, that heroes and martyrs have lived and died in vain, 
that the advantages secured from time to time are to be rated 
only as snares and shams. This complete and persistent pessim- 
ism is a contradiction of truths that are familiar to all intelligent 
people, and that count for more as a basis of logical analysis and 
reflection than all the theories by which they are discredited. The 
process of improvement can be traced from the earliest periods 
down to the present day. Each age bas shown an advance over 
the preceding one, not merely in special relations, but in a gen- 
eral sense and according to a systematic plan of development. 
The people of to-day are brighter, better, richer, and more civi- 
lized than ever before. We need not go back to the primal groves 
of Eden for tbe materials for definite and satisfactory comparison 
in this respect. Tbe story of what has taken place in the pres- 
ent century furnishes ample proof tbat the world is growing bet- 
ter as it is growing older. In the course of a hundred years 
more beneficial acquisitions were made to the world than in the 
course of 1794 years; beneficial acquisitions that were miracles of 
progress, unmatched in all previous history. It is impossible to 
contemplate the list of achievements in all branches of profitable 
service without a feeling of profound wonder, as well as a con- 
viction of tbe potency of sound and wholesome influences in the 
affairs of mankind. Not simply in material gains have former 
centuries been surpassed, but also in scientific, political, social, 
and moral triumphs. Tbe drama, sad to relate, is not on tbe high 
plane on wbich it rested years ago, but it may be — some day, let 
ns hope. But the spread of knowledge has corresponded to tbe 
increase of physical comforts. Life was never worth the living 
so much as at present. That is due to the reformatory spirit 
which bas been a part of human nature from the beginning of 
the world, and wbich has gradually wrought changes of perma- 
nent value. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21,1894. 




aw A KNirD 

[BY GERALDINL" MCYR1CK] 



THE little town of Rocky Canon was filled with idle men, for 
the lumber mills which surrounded it had all closed down on 
account of the heavy rains. The idle men were not entirely idle. 
They were continually passing in and out of the half dozen saloons 
which formed (he business part of the town; they were drinking, 
gambling, and telling all the yarns they could possibly remember or 
invent. 

For three days the rain had been falling steadily, its monotony un- 
broken except by an occasional gust of wind. The men began to 
grow restless— to long for some new diversion. Two days ago the 
stage had gone out on its regular daily trip to Black Bay, but it had 
not returned; so there was no news from the outer world to be dis- 
cussed. The chief subject of interest was the creek, which had now 
risen to the highest point it had ever touched, according to the ac-- 
counts of all the oldest inhabitants. Occasionally some one would 
venture down to the bridge, always returning with the same report — 
that the creek was "awful wet," a joke which never failed to call 
forth the answering witticism : " Well, Vm kinder dry. Let's have a 
drink, boys." 

Suddenly came excitement enough. Big Jim had been shot dead. 
The -Mews spread rapidly, Crowds of men gathered round the store 
where the shooting had taken place, and round Big Jim's shanty, 
where his Mexican wife was howling over the huge, lifeless body. 
Those who had seen the killing were kept busy telling how it hap- 
pened. It was a simple matter, soon told. Al. Haydon, the store- 
keeper, had been standing at his door, when Big Jim, half drunk, 
came up and pushed past him into the store. Haydon said nothing, 
but turned his back toward the street and watchedJJim, who strolled 
to the end of the store and began talking to Haydon's wife. Tillie 
Haydon was a lively young woman, who never missed a chance for a 
flirtation ; and Big Jim , a Spaniard, was a fine-looking man. Woman- 
like, she enjoyed showing her power over the strong, rough man. 
But she must have gone a little too far with her aggravating mockery, 
for suddenly Big Jim uttered an oath, picked her right up in his 
strong arms, held her a moment in air, enjoying her evident fright, 
then placed her gently on her feet again ! She made a quick spring 
away from him; there was the report of a pistol, and Big Jim fell to 
the floor, shot through the heart. The three men in the store had all 
been watching Jim; now they turned to look at Haydon. He was not 
there; only his revolver lay on the floor, with one chamber empty. 

Haydon had fled, without waiting to see the result of his shot. He 
had fired under a sudden jealous impulse, but no sooner had he 
pulled the trigger than all other thoughts were lost in a terrible fear. 
He slipped round to the back of the store, expecting every moment 
to feel Jim's powerful grasp on his shoulder and a cold knife-blade 
entering his body. He rushed wildly along, not caring whither he 
went, till he found himself on the bridge. No one had seen him ; for 
though the shot had drawn all the men up to the store, they were not 
in time. to see him slip away. 

The cool air and the rain dashing in his face partly restored his 
senses, and he paused behind a beam to consider means of escape. 
Some one had been harpooning logs from the bridge, and a rope was 
tied to the rail in front of him, the other end being fastened to a big 
log. In an instant he had climbed over the railing and slid down the 
rope to the log. He crouched down, for it was impossible to stand 
upright on the slippery wood, rolling from side to side in the strong 
current. He began to draw his breath n5ore freely ; he felt compara- 
tively safe. It was hardly likely that any one would come down to 
the bridge before night; then he would climb back and make his es- 
cape from the town in the darkness. He began to realize now that 
his shot might have proved fatal. But in any case he had better eet 
down to Black Bay and place himself under the care of the Sheriff. 
Big Jim had many friends, who might take swift vengeance if they 
caught his murderer. 

He planned it all out, calmly enough, and then there was nothing 
to do but wait for the darkness— wait and think of his wife. His 
grasp on the log tightened as he thought of her, and, in spite of the 
cold rain beating through his shirt, hot blood ran through his veins. 
The coarse, ignorant man loved passionately. During the two years 
of their married life his wife had kept him in constant misery by her 
flirtations— not that he ever doubted her fidelity , but he could not bear 
to see her giving so freely to others the smiles and glances for which 
she made him beg, petty tyrant that she was. He wondered what 
she was doing. Did she hate him for what he had done, or did she 
admire his daring ? He could not guess. 

It seemed ages to him before it began to grow dark. Once a party 
of men passed over the bridge. He could hear them discussing the 
different routes that might have been taken by the fugitive; they 



never thought of looking down at the water below them. They passed 
back again very shortly, and he heard one say: 

" Shouldn't wonder if Jim's wife would find him. She's out look- 
ing for him and she's as 'cute as a cat." 

" And fierce as atiger," added another. " She keeps on saying, 'He 
kill Jim. All right. I kill him pretty soon.' " 

His strength was beginning to give way. He lay at full length on 
the log, and, resting his head on his hands, closed his eyes wearily. 
A short cry caused him to lift his head. On the bridge, looking down 
at him with glittering black eyes, was Big Jim's wife. She showered 
on him the bitterest curses that her tongue could find. She was 
frantic because he was beyond her reach. If she had a pistol she 
would soon treat him as he had treated her Jim. But she had only 
a knife, and she would not risk leaving him to summon help. Then 
an idea struck her. She would throw the knife at him ; its keen edge 
would surely find a way into his heart. She took careful aim, while 
he cowered down, afraid to move lest he slip from the log. He 
waited, with his head buried beneath his arms, but the knife did not 
come. He looked up. Another idea had come to her. With a shriek 
of triumph she brought the knife down on the strained rope which 
held the log to the bridge. The next instant the log was swept into 
the middle of the river, the terror-stricken man still clinging to it, and 
Big Jim's wife was flinging her curses at a white beseeching face rush- 
ing out into the mist. 

That evening many men were on guard on the bridge at Black 
Bay, keeping it clear of the brushwood and logs which threatened to 
bear it down to the sea with them. Armed with long poles they 
steered the dcbria into mid-channel, where it was rapidly carried 
away. Half a dozen lanterns cast a weird light on the muddy 
waters and on the glistening logs, whicn seemed to be hurled out of 
the darkness by an unseen hand. Suddenly the watchers were 
startled by a wild cry. Then a huge log dashed into the light. As it 
tossed and tumbled about, they saw a white hand waved, and caught 
a glimpse of a white scared face. But the log was in the swiftest cur- 
rent, and in a second it was under the bridge and out into the dark- 
ness on the other side. Again they heard the cry, then only the 
rush of the river; and as they strained their ears to listen there 
came only the steady thunder of the surf half a mile away. The sea 
was calling for its victim. 

Santa Vruz, Cat., July, 1894. 

12=ft. Wide LINOLEUM. 

We are offering a large line of patterns of EX- 
CELLENT QUALITY LINOLEUM, at 

65c. per Square Yard, 

LAID ON THE FLOOR. The regular price of 
these goods is 85c. per Square Yard. 

Special Rug Sale. 

To accommodate our out-of-town buyers, who 
have been prevented from making purchases 
through stoppage of mails, we have decided to 
continue our RUG SALE one week longer. 

SriYRNA RUGS. 

Best quality, ROYAL AND IMPERIAL. These 
are not the cheap and flimsy ones commonly used, 
but the BEST QUALITY. 

Sale Price . Regular Price, 

lft. 9 In. by 8 ft. 9 in $150 $2 25 

2 ft. 2 in. by 4 ft. Gin 2 00 3 00 

2ft. 6 in. by 5ft. in 2 75 4 00 

3 ft. in by 6 ft. in 4 00 5 75 

4 ft. in. by 7 ft. in • 6 75 9 50 

GENUINE ORIENTAL RUGS. 

An immense variety at correspondingly low 
prices. 
REAL DAGHESTANS FROM $6 EACH. 

1W-8EE DISPLAY IN OUR SHOW WINDOWS." 

W. & J. Sloane & Co., 

Carpets, Furniture, Upholstery, 

641-647 MARKET ST. 



Has Removed to 824 Market St., Phelan Building, July 1st. 



July 21, 1894. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS J JITTER. 



SNAP SHOTS. 

[Bt Di Vi^o*.| 

Soil K one bu said that it is no worse for ft girl to " touch " her 
hftir with chemicals tbftn it is for • young niftn to shave on* 
his beard, since in etch case the interested person is trying to 
circumvent nature. While this may be true in the Abstract, it is 
not true In practical application, since beauty is Its own excuse 
for being, and Nature guided, not opposed, by intelligence, may 
present a more pleasing result than when left to her own de- 
vices. But the improvement must be along nature's own lines, 
and not of the kind that is best described by the words, "gored, 
and cut bias." 

Many a man gains in good looks and general attractiveness by 
shaving off his beard. There is no reason that the fair sex should 
monopolize all the credit for clear skins and beautiful complex- 
ions. A healthy color, a dark olive tint, a hardy bronze on the 
cheek of a man are always a delight to see. Then many a man 
possesses that mark — in feminine eyes of rare distinction— a blue- 
black beard, which shows like the pile of dark velvet under his 
skin, no matter bow closely shaven its possessor may be. Nature 
has been kind to man. She gives him a mustache that he may 
cover up a tell-tale mouth, and often by some strange law of com- 
pensation purely her own gives the handsomest mustache to the 
ugliest mouth. Many a man would do well, too, were he to hide 
the weakness of bis chin with a beard that would lengthen and 
broaden bis face, and lend him an appearance for strength and 
sagacity. When that cowardly vagabond, Johann Most, was 
given a State's prison cut and a criminal's close shave, he stood 
revealed by the configuration of his face for the miserable, illogical, 
and unbalanced wretch that he is. His face was unBymmetrical: 
the two sides did not match, one side being distorted to the ex- 
tent of being a deformity. What else but mental eccentricity and 
moral obliquity could have been expected? The physical twist 
but indicates the mental, moral, spiritual slant or "crookedness." 

Bat to return to the dyed hair. No blonde of the bottle can 
hope to improve upon nature. She may wear straw colored hair 
as much as she likes — it never looks natural; it perhaps will 
make her look more " dashing," and loud, and fast, but it cannot 
make her look pretty or handsome. It deceives no one as to its 
cause; it is out of harmony with nature's intentions. It dulls 
the eyes, blurs the complexion tints, and is like a gaudy frame 
upon a picture — out of keeping in every respect. 80 while the 
young man may shave his beard because he looks better without 
it, and wear a beard only when for professional or business 
reasons it is imperative for him to look as if be had attained 
years, experience, and discretion, yet the girl should not seek to 
find justification in his example for her discourtesy to nature. In 
my heart I believe that the old Bible text about Jezebel should 
read, not that she tired aer bead, but that she bleached her hair 
and looked out at the window; for chemical blondes have to sit 
in the sun for several hours to have the dye take effect." 

Two ladies were engaged in a warm discussion. One insisted 
that it was an outrage upon a child's intelligence to talk " baby 
talk " to it, and the other one maintained with equal warmth 
that there was something so sweet and innocent in the child's at- 
tempts to articulate that she liked to say the words over again, 
just as her baby had said them; that it seemed to be a special 
bond between herself and the child. To me it has always seemed 
a pity to fill a child's mind, at its most receptive period, with a lot 
of stuff which it must throw out later, and yet which will always 
leave a trace in the brain. Why should a child be told to " wash 
bis hannies," when bands are meant ? I have known people of 
more tban ordinary intelligence to be mortified while in 
conversation by unconsciously using some word in its cor- 
rupted form, in the way it first had been given to them in 
" baby talk." A well-chosen vocabulary is not to be despised, 
and that a child should not be helped to attain one while in a re- 
ceptive state is a hardship which none of ns have a right to im- 
pose upon a child. Teachers will testify that the child who is 
the most promising pupil from the first is the one who has heard 
intelligent conversation, played with picture blocks and books 
before he was sent to school. 

It is not necessary that the child should understand every word 
uttered in his hearing. Let him become accustomed to the sound 
of words uttered in a conversational tone, and gradually he will 
acquire the meaning. His vocabulary will grow without con- 
scious effort on his part. This is now the acknowledged method 
for the acquisition of a foreign language — the ear must help the 
eye, and in some cases precede it. 

Let us protest against the use of " baby talk " and of all writing 
or talking down for the comprehension of children. To an intel- 
ligent child, one of the chief charms of Jean lngelow and our own 
Louisa M. Alcott is the fluent English which never seems to im- 
ply that the stories are being told to children who are not ex- 
pected to know or to understand very much. A wise teacher 
can get more and better work out of even a dull pupil by judi- 
cious praise, and an evidence of being surprised and pleased that 
the child can do as well as he has done, than by fault-finding. 

In these days we must do more than take people as we find 



them upon a superficial acquaintance. It is a wise roan who 
will learn 10 study his acquaintances, by the Iftws of scientific 
observation. The signs arc plain enough. He who runs ntay 
read. If he will. A school teacher In San Francisco has been 
examining school children's heads with calipers, and drawing his 
own deductions. My method Is simpler and quite as satisfactory. 
The boys of the present day have their hair cut close to their 
heads. This gives the coveted opportunity to observe how the 
hair grows, starting from a central point on the back of the head, 
toward the crown. At a glance I can tell whether to expect faith- 
ful, exact work, or loose and disjointed and indeterminate effort. 
If the hair starts from a well-defined point and grows in widening 
circles, the child's intelligence will be clear, and capable of steady 
development. When the point of starting Is not In the center of 
the head, and well up toward the crown, a lack of perfect balance 
may be suspected. Once I bad a shock-beaded boy in my class. 
He never had anything right. He could not spell, never knew 
his multiplication table, and fell over himself when be tried to 
read. He was untruthful as well, and walked in an aimless fash- 
ion. He could not keep in step white marching in line. It was 
for weeks uiy one desire to get a glimpse at that boy's cranium, 
shaven. Imagine my delight as an amateur scientist when that 
wobbly-legged boy straggled into school with his hair cut shortl 
Rushing behind him, I stood spellbound with delight. My theory 
was confirmed — his head carried out his character. Instead of 
one good start, the hair had made three poorly defined and eccen- 
tric attempts to start In the spiral to encircle his head, and finally 
gave it up as a bad job, ending with a cowlick Into the bargain. 

A man's head, palm, walk, and handwriting proclaim to the 
world what manner of man is be. 



T/*HP^ /TtylDE SUIJS. 




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pratio^er §0., 105 ^earny St. 



OJTO Jl0tyn/W> 



Established 1879. 



411 Bush Street Opposite 
the New California Hotel. 
Best Equipped 

Large dining-room for ladies. Sole depot for JOS. SCHLITZ MILWAU- 
KEE BEER. Imported European Beer from Buergerliches Brauhaus, 
Pilsen, Bohemia; Actien Beer from Rizzi Culmbach, Bavaria. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1894. 




THE 

OOKlD-ON. 




THE story of how "King" McManus (whose brother has been 
killed in a brawl) came to graduate from Los Gatos has not 
been in print yet. There are few men as nervy as the "King." For 
three long years there were only occasional spells when he did 
not see reptiles and such things before he could sleep at night. 
But they never troubled him much. With drunken curses he 

UBed to pull the covers over his head and mutter: "Well, d 

you, I'm as big a snake as any of you!" 

But one night after he had bought Kelly & Crimmina's place on 
Third street, a big crab followed him upstairs to bed. This was 
a new kind of horror for the "King," and the cold sweat broke 
out on him when the crustacean monster crawled up on the bed, 
pulled the covers from his face, and pinched his nose. McManus 
got np and consulted his bartender. "Better take a Hammam 
bath," suggested that knowing one. 

McManus went to the bath and got safely seated in the hot 
room without seeing anything more of his jim-jam crab. Then 
a big Englishman came in and stood talking in the doorway, 
holding the door open a few inches — just wide enough to permit 
that crab to get through. It crawled straight toward McManus, 
climbed into the pan of hot water, and bit bis toes. The "King" 

got up and moved to the other side of the room. "If that d 

Englishman would only shut the door!" was bis unanswered 
prayer. Against his better judgment he looked again to the 
door. There was a long procession of crabs marching in. The 
Englishman seemed to take a fiendish delight in admitting 
them. They crawled slowly but surely to McManus. When the 
first one reached him he lost his nerve entirely. He snatched the 
towel from his loins and made a wild dash at the crabs with it; 
then with a cry of terror he sprang pait the Englishman in the 
doorway and was out on the street, stark naked, before anyone 
conld stop him. The first policeman he ran against covered him 
with his coat and took him to the central station. And the next 
day the King of the Potrero went to Los Gatos. 



She tripped up to the box office of the Baldwin Theatre on 
Baturday morning the perfect picture of a summer girl, and look- 
ing as modest as a saint on a stained-glass window. Louis Mor- 
genstern, the treasurer of the theatre, was standing by the main 
entrance, and as the girl was questioning his assistant about the 
tickets, be was eyeing her from head to feet, wrapt in admira- 
tion. When his eyes had reached her feet Mr. Morgenstem was 
almost dazed. Lying on the marble floor was a dainty black 
garter with a diamond buckle, which was adorned by a little gold 
snake with glittering ruby eyes. The girl moved away, and with 
a hurried step Mr. Morgenstern reached the box-office rail and 
picked up the garter. He followed the young lady to the side- 
walk, and tapping her on the arm, said with great hesitancy: 

it Er — ah — excuse me, but may I ask you a delicate question?" 

"Sir!" answered the young lady, with great vehemence, "I 
do not know yon." 

<• I know that, but I am afraid that I will be forced to do so." 

" Take care, sir! " 

" Well," said Mr. Morgenstern, as the blush of modesty filled 
his ample face, "I think that this is your garter. I picked it up." 

She blushed, too, and clasped her left knee to find out if it was 
really true. Then she recognized the jeweled band, and held out 
her hand to Mr. Morgenstern, saying: 

" I thank you, sir. I see that you are a gentleman. But tell 
me : How long have you been following me ? " 
# * * 

The summer young man is the one who, if he finds time to 
leave the city and pass a few weeks at one of the resorts, makes 
himself useful by devoted attention to the summer girl. He glides 
in her wake from early morning until late at night. He drives 
for the summer girl, he rides beside her, he rows a boat for her, 
carries picnic baskets, climbs slippery banks in quest of alluring 
plants or vines, shoos off cows, gallantly spreads his coat for 
beauty to stand upon on the damp sands of the seaside, teaches 
her to ride the bicycle, and, in short, performs a thousand and 
one duties. The summer young man is at present making the 
most of his short season, for he knows that when he returns to 
the city he will be utterly eclipsed again by the temporarily dis- 
carded real young man. 

* * 4 

While some of the incidents of the present strike have been of 
a sad nature, it has also been attended by some of a very amus- 
ing character. One of the humorous sort occurred a few days 
ago at Golden Gate, near Berkeley. Since the strike the residents 
of that place have been obliged to use the electric cars for trans- 
portation to their places of business. For many days they left 



their homes in the morning and gazed wistfully up and down the 
track for the train that never came. At last, however, fortune 
smiled on them. Some one at the station saw the train about a 
mile away. With one bound he started through the suburb cry- 
ing, "Train coming! Train coming!" One man heard the yell 
and hastened to hoist his flag, not forgetting to notify his neigh- 
bors, the druggist, and the baker of the happy event. The baker 
rushed out, followed by the druggist and the druggist's clerk. 
The train was coming into the station and the crowd was large. 
AH points of vantage had been taken except one, the coal dealer's 
wagon, into which jumped the drug clerk. He was not to be de- 
prived of the welcome sight, and as the train came to a stop be 
stood there in a sort of ecstacy, unconsciously scratching his left 
hand with his right. Militiamen were scattered all over the en- 
gine and tender, and the drug clerk looked on admiringly. His 
was but a short stare, however, for down from the cab jumped 
a burly fireman, casting ugly looks at the occupant of the coal 
wagon. 

"See here, young man, "shouted the fireman, "what are you 
scratching your hand for? Do you mean that we are scabs?" 

The frightened compounder of pills climbed down hastily from 
his point of view, muttering to the coal dealer that he meant no 
offense by his action. He realized, however, that any trifling 
action in these days means fully as much as it does for a cus- 
tomer to wink at him when he is drawing soda water. 

* * * 

That great bugbear, the new building, has resulted in the 
Bohemian Clnb's reducing its initiation fee to $50 from $100, and 
this, too, in the face of the fact that prior to the discovery that 
the new building bad brought the club to the verge of bank- 
ruptcy, the propriety of increasing the initiation fee to $300 had 
been very seriously considered. Of course the $50 initiation is 
only a temporary arrangement, with the idea of inducing an in- 
flux of desirable new members who at the proper time, should an 
assessment become necessary, would be ready and willing to bear 
their quota of the burden; but the new administration is coming 
in for quite an extensive and healthy roast from most of the 
members, who stand aghast at the prospect of a horde of snob- 
bish and impecunious young men monopolizing their favorite 
corners and favorite papers, which state of affairs they grumble is 
now made fairly possible by the $50 fee. If the directors respon- 
sible conld only know how many of the class mentioned, armed 
with borrowed money, are already formulating schemes for get- 
ting their names inscribed among the elect, they would make it 
three times as high as before. The next meeting of the club 
comes off next Thursday, and there is every indication of a lively 
time. 

It remains now to be seen what the jinks will do toward get- 
ting the malcontents in good humor. Everybody knows that 
Peter Robertson is a near relative of the missionary who "knew 
his business." And will not John Stanton, and Jack Lathrop, 
and Bob Fletcher add lustre in carload lots to the programme 
now in process of construction, and in regard to which it is 
prophesied that the members will spring the same old gag : "This 
is the best we ever had"? 

* » * 

Ex-Attorney-General Hart's row with Chairman Knight in the 
Republican Convention at Sacramento, and bis placing himself 
on record later on as an advocate of the strikers there, recalls a 
story in which the General's reputation for egotism in the first 
degree appears to be pretty well sustained. It appears that years 
ago, just before his departure for Washington to argue the rail- 
road tax cases before the United States Supreme Court — cases in- 
volving millions of dollars — his brother, the Hon. Thos. J. Hart, 
of Colusa, now deceased, who had a very keen sense of the ridicu- 
lous, and was considerable of a wit withal, dropped into his 
office, and the following conversation ensued: 

"Gus, who is going to assist you in those railroad cases?" 

"Nobody." 

"Who's on the other side?" 

"Oh, Edmunds, Judge Sanderson, Roscoe Conkling, and some 
of those fellows." 

"Well, do they know you are coming?" 

"No." 

"Now, Gus, don't you think you ought to telegraph them and 
let them know that you are coming, so as to prepare them a little? 
Do you think it right to take them by surprise in this way?" 

"No," said the Attorney- General, "they will have to take care 
of themselves the best way they can." 

* # * 

Colonel Chamberlain, whom all men know from his connection 
with banks as Bank Examiner, is located in Los Angeles. The 
Colonel has started a clnb, called the Jonathan Club, which is a 
sort of semi-political club with a terrific war-cry. It is located on 
Spring street in rather modest rooms, but has a good bar. The 
Colonel is the President and it is proposed to make the Jonathan 
Club the Union League Club of the South. It has a fair member- 
ship and is said to be doing well. 



Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 






Julv 21, 1894. 



SAN FRANCISCO NBW8 JXTTKR. 



LAWN TENNIS 



TH K adjourned meeting of tbr KxrcnlWe Committee of the 
Piclflc 8tttx Lawn Ttnnto Awoctttloa look place la?i Mon- 
day, and the Double and Ladies' Singlet championships were 
taken under advisement. It was finally settled to bold the cham- 
pionship meeting at tbe courts of the Hotel Rafael on September 
";h -th. and 10th. The tournament committee is composed of 
A. H. Wilberforce. '•. E. Stoker, and A. Kaeser for the gentle- 
men's event, and Miss <<ibbs. Miss Hates, and A. 1>. Wilberforce, 
Jr., tbe ladies'. The referee is to be 0. I*. Hubbard. Tbe entries 
are to close on September 5th at noon, ami all entries must be 
accompanied by the entrance fee of three dollars, a new and a 
very good rale. All sets for tbe gentlemen's doubles are to be 
three out of five, but tbe ladies will play only two out of three, 
except in tbe finals and championship rounds, when three out of 
five will be played. We have been promised a new entry this 
season in the shape of another » Hardy team," composed of two 
more brothers of the present champions, and it might be interest- 
ing to see all four brothers come together in tbe finals. 

Tennis players are returning to their old haunts, and the cry 
now is for new tournaments. Tbe California Club will doubtless 
soon respond and give an open double tournament in the first 
week in August. The Oakland, as well as tbe Alameda clubs, are 
also in tbe field for some kind of a tournament, shortly to be 
heid, and the officers of the Olympic Annex intend to hold a prize 
meeting as soon as convenient. We also hear that the Hotel 
Mateo people are awaiting with interest the outcome of the Hotel 
del Monte Invitation matches, and if these prove a success it is 
most probable that there will soon be another series of matches 
at the Mateo courts. The courts at the various clubs are once 
again becoming well patronized, and it seems like old times to see 
players waiting their turns to obtain a court to play on. 

The Hotel del Monte has issued the following invitation: "The 
Hotel del Monte invites you to participate in an Invitation 
Doubles and Mixed Doubles Tennis Tournament, to be held at its 
courts July 20th and 21st, 1894." Invitations have been issued 
to Messrs. W. H. Taylor, Jr., H. N. Stetson, G. B. de Long, C. P. 
Hubbard, A. J. Treat, A. B. Wilberforce, T. J. Driscoll, C. D. 
Bates, Jr., 8. 8. Sanborn, W. McGavin, D. E. Allison, Jr., G. E. 
Stoker, W. C. Hoban, A. J. Allen, W. O'Connor, E. N. Bee, R. J. 
Harrison, T. Magee, Will Magee, Walter Magee, and Misses Bee 
Hooper, Hush, Crouch, Gibbs, and several others. The tourna- 
ment committee consists of Messrs. A. J. Treat, G. E. Stoker, and 
H. X. Stetson, and the affair under such efficient management 
ought to prove an unbounded success. Tom Magee will also cap- 
tain a baseball team and a match will be played this morning, 
and Walter Aimer Newhall will, in his usual good style, lead a 
german in the evening. Mr. Shouewald will cap the climax with 
a supper, and then the entertainment will close. 

The All-England championships were decided on the 7th inst., 
and herald a new lady champion in the shape of Mrs. Hillyard, 
better known as Blanche Bingley, who defeated Miss Austin in 
the finals and took the championship, as Miss Lottie Dod did not 
defend this year. Wilfred Baddeley won the all-comers, but was 
defeated by I. Pirn (the champion) by three sets to love; score, 
10-8,6-2,8-6. 

Mothers and nurses all the world over have given their teething 
babies and feverish children Steedman's Soothing Powders. Try them. 

Furnished double upper flat to rent in Western Addition. Seven rooms, 
bath, and attic. Rent, $75 a month. Apply, 3116 Washington street. 




Ayer's 

PILLS 

Received 

Highest Awards 

AT THE 

World's Fair 



THE BEST 
Family 

PHYSIC 




LURLINE 



BATHS. 



Half a million gallons 
of pure warm salt 
water pumped into the 
tank every day. 



r\R- D. E. DUNNE, 

Chiropodist. 

Now at LCKLINE BATHS, 3d floor, 

Next to Ladies' Parlor. 
Late of DR. LORYEAS HAMMAM BATHS. 

r»R. H. G. YOUNG, DENTIST, 

*» 1841 I'olk St., near Jackson, S. F. [Telephone 2605 

Painless extraction. Teeth without plates a specialty. 

HOURS— 9 A. M. to 5 p.m. , 8 to 9 p. M. Sundays, 9 A. m. to 2 p. M. 



D 



R. FRANKLIN PANCOAST, Dentist, 

703 Market Street, Booms 18, 19 and 20. 



A. BUSWELL, 

BOO* ■ INDER, PAPER-RULER, PRINTER AND [SUNK BOOK MANUFACTURER 
535 Clav Street. Near Montgomery. San Francisco. 



HOTEL 
VENDOME, 



SAN JOSE, CAL. 



TO say that the Hotel Vendome is 
the best is enough in its favor. It 
is one of the largest and most ele- 
gantly appointed hotels in the State. 
It is situated in the center of a finely 
cultivated park twelve acres in ex- 
tent, and is surrounded by trees of 
many years' growth. 

The location is in the most fashion- 
able part of the city of San Jose, and 
is only two blocks from the Southern 
Pacific Railroad depot. Electric cars 
pass the door at short intervals. 

The appointments of the hotel are 
first-class in every particular, being 
furnished throughout in the most 
elegant and attractive manner. 

QeO. P. 57®. i » MANAGER. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1894. 




1 We Obev no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



MR. HENRY GUY CARLETON has performed the wonderful 
feat of writing a play in which the leading man and the 
leading lady do not speak to each other until the middle of the 
third act. Whatever Mr. Carleton may argue, it is one of the 
greatest faults of The Butterflies. The principal scenes of the play 
should have been between John Drew and Miss Maud Adams, 
but it was not until the last act that they met, and then it was 
in such an otd-time melodramatic manner that the audience lost 
interest in the scene altogether. The Butterflies is, without doubt, 
the weakest play that ever came from the pen of Mr. Carleton. 
No one recognizes in it any traces of the clever, careful work that 
he put into The Lion's Mouth and The Qilded Fool. The Butterflies 
is made up of scenes from comedies that have wandered 
down the grooves of time, but which are still fresh in 
the minds of theatre-goers. Before the first half of the 
opening act is over every one knows who is going to marry 
every one else, every one knows that Fred Ossian will pay Mrs. 
Stuart-Dodge's dressmaking bill, and every one knows that 
Miriam Stuart-Dodge would break off her match with Barrington 
Green. There is such a thing in dramatic composition as a play- 
wright holding some surprise in reserve for the interest of bis 
audience and for the intensity of his play, but Mr. Carleton has 
failed to do this in every respect. There is not one scene or one 
line in the first act that does not foretell what is to follow in the 
next two. The funniest scene is that in which Fred Ossian takes 
his lady love's shawl by mistake, thinking that it is her handker- 
chief, and is caught by the young lady's mother. The play is 
altogether too illusory and artificial. It is without depth or feel- 
ing, and what there is of it exists only on the surface. It is a 
poor vehicle indeed for a man of John Drew's capabilities — a man 
who has played all of Shakespeare's romantic heroes. He has 
been called the leading actor of the society comedy of to-day, 
and his charming personality and artistic ability clearly give him 
that position. All of his methods are facile, he knows all of the 
little tricks of the high comedian, but his histrionic ability goes 
to waste, and the fine shadings of his acting are useless in such a 
schoolgirl play as The Butterflies. Miss Adams and Miss Anna 
Belmont giggled through the play with all the artfulness of two 
girls who had never had the attentions of a man before. Mr. 
Carleton might have given them something more to do. Both 
young ladies are light and dainty, and Miss Adams has a sympa- 
thetic quality which tells all through her work — which tells, in 
fact, that she is capable of playing stronger and deeper parts. 
Harry Harwood's Hiram Green is a character that is not new to 
the stage, but he played it in a masterly way. Mrs. Annie Adams, 
as Mrs. Ossian, was quiet and natural. The players do well one 
and all, but it is not much to their credit, for the play is so airy, 
so indiscriminately false and unnatural, that it is hard to see how 
it can appeal to high-class players. 
* * * 
On Monday evening John Drew will enter upon the second 
week of his present engagement in this city, when he will pre- 
sent, for the first time here, Bisson and Carre's farce, A Masked 
Ball, which ran for an entire seasoD in New York. It will be 
given with the original cast. This is the comedy in which Miss 
Maud Adams, John Drew's clever leading lady, made such a dis- 
tinct hit. 

* # T» 

On behalf of a long-suffering public, we would respectfully ask 
the legislative highwaymen who will meet at Sacramento 
next January, to pass a law making it a misdemeanor for any 
person with a cold to appear in the orchestra circle of a theatre, 
and a felony for a man with a hacking cough to show himself 
inside the foyer; the misdemeanor to be punishable by death, the 
felony by incarceration with a person affected by a hacking 
cough of more diabolical character. A number of respectable 
human beings at the California Theatre, the other night, suffered 
at the lungs of people addicted to the hacking-cough vice, and 
they would have lost much of the boisterous delights of Cordelia's 
Aspirations had they not been blessed with eyes. Cordelia's As- 
pirations is fully as absurd and ridiculous as any of its predeces- 
sors. It will make one laugh just as many times and just as 
heartily. Harrigan as Dan Mulligan is capital. Miss Hattie 
Moore was good, and especially so when she swallowed the 
brandy instead of the poison. Mr. FiBher infused too much 
Dutch dialect into Planxty McFudd to make one believe that he 
was an Irishman. The Uncle Tom combination was original and 
amusing, and the dances, which are the creations of Dan Burke, 
were very clever. All through the play the singing is excellent. 
On Monday evening Mr. Harrigan will produce McSorleifs Infla- 
tion. In that play he interprets the character of a rollicking, 
typical New York politician. It is a character well known to 
the American people. In the great Fulton street market scene, 
his song, "1 Never Drink Behind the Bar," was one of the sen- 



sations of the season. Among the other songs introduced are: 
"The Market on Saturday Night," "McNally's Row of Flats," 
"The Salvation Army," and "Mrs. McKeon's Boarding House." 
A feature of this production is the original scenery and new 
types of characters that are seldom seen in any plays except 
those of Mr. Harrigan. 

» * * 

The Tivoli has arranged a grand production of Rip Van Winkle. 
The opening night will be Monday next. Dick Turpin did not 
make a success. It was too serious a work for the Tivoli people, 
and the fact that it was written in dialect made it bard to under- 
stand and hard to play. 

The new specialty stars at the Orpheum have been well received, 
and have succeeded in packing the house to the doors every 
night. Lydia Yeamans-Titus made an immense hit, and ber act 
went better at the Orpheum than it did at the California, when 
she appeared at that theatre with Hallen and Hart. The Braatz 
Brothers and George H, Duncan were good in their lines, and 
Gilbert and Goldie repeated their former successes. 

The following, taken from To-day, gives some of George Gros- 
Bmith's ideas of the A merican drama : " The American play of the 
period is a queer mixture of melodrama, farce, tragedy, comedy, 
music-hall, and a lot of other things. It has a profound pathos 
in it, and is plentifully supplied with what are called ' special- 
ties. 1 These are dragged in with a sublime indifference to every- 
thing but the very peculiar taste of the public that likes that sort 
of thing. There is just one theme for the drama in question. I 
will briefly outline the story. There is a homestead which is about 
to be sold to a railway company, as the projected line is to run 
through the farm; but the railway is given up, so the homestead 
is not sold. That's all." 

• # » 

Oscar Wilde's new comedy is to be produced at the Haymarket 
theatre in August, and Henry Arthur Jones's play will be done 
shortly at the Criterion. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 



Lessee and Manager. 



Al Hayman 
Monday. July 23d-SECOND WEEK 

MR. JOHN DREW, 

and first presentation of Bisson & Carre's comedy, 
THE MASKEIT BALL 

As performed for over 300 nights in New York. 

Monday, July 30th— Third and last week of MR. JOHN DREW. 

First three nights— CHRISTOPHER JR. 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

AlHayman&Co Lessees. 

S.N. Friedlander, Manager. 
Week of July 23d— Every evening, including Sunday. Matinee Satur- 
day. MR. 

EDWARD HARRIGAN 

and his New York company, presenting for the first time here Mr. Harri- 
gan's funniest of all comedies, 

-[.SOKLIVS INFLATION. 

His Greatest New York Success. Braham's delightful melodies. 
Reserved Seats, night— 25c , 50c , 75c . $1. Reserved seats, matinee— 25c. 
50c , 75c Next Play-SQUATTEK SOVEREIGNTY. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kbeling Bbos Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night. Production of the season. The ideal romantic opera. Com- 
panion piece to "Robin Hood." 

DICK TURPIN. 

Book by H. Grattan Donnelly. Music by Bowness Briggs. 

Monday, July 23d— RIP VAN WINKLE. 

Popolar Prices 25 and 50c 

ORPHEUM- 

O'Farrell St., between Stockton and Powell Sts. 
San Francisco's Great Music Hall. 
Week of Monday, July 23d. A Magnificent New Bill by our 
GRAND EASTERN SPECIALTY COMPANY. 
LYDIV YEABfAN'S TITUS. THE BRAATZ BROS. 

CONNORS A STALEY. O'BRIEN »i CARROLL. 

4 II VS. II. DUNCAN. Etc., Etc. 

Last week of the incomparable bicyclists— THE WILMOTS. 
Saturday and Sunday matinees. 

Matinee prices— Parquet, any seat, 25c, ; balcony, any seat, 10c ; child- 
ren, 10c., any part. 

Evening Prices— Reserved Seats, 25c; Balcony 10c; Opera Chairs and 
Box Seats, 50c. _ 

I II I IAN RFnnARH Tne English actress, coaches ladles and 
LI LLIHll uLUUftiiU, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 

Searances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
treet, opposite tne Flood Mansion. 

pianos %x=z &co - 

be, Haines, Bush & Gert : 



S.F. 



>„ash or installments. Please call or correspond. 

SAN 
FRANCISCO. 



BANCROFT 



July 21. 1394. 



sw i k\\. is< o m;\\s letter. 



g 



GOTHAM OUS8IP. 

Hn Youk. July 8, I S 

THY Mtfa of JaiM «aw * very pretty wedding at Wilmington. 
Pelaware. when KlM Anna Pupont became Mrs. William C. 
Peyton. Mlaa Julia Pay Ion came on with her brother from Cali- 
fornia to the wedding, and was. as she usually is wherever she 
appears, conspicuous for her beauty and dignity. The Right 
Reverend I.eighton Coleman. Bishop of Delaware, performed the 
ceremony. Mi«s Dnponl. who is young and attractive, wore a 
white satiu gown adorned with old rose point lace. Among her 
jewels was a pearl brooch (the gift of her grandmother), which 
for generations has been regarded in the Pupont family as a talis- 
man ensuring a happy marriage. The wedding gifts were numer- 
ous and very valuable. The diamond corsage ornament worn by 
the bride was a present from Mr. Peyton. The Peytons, both in 
England and America, are a remarkably handsome and charming 
family: many friends here and abroad wi&h joy to the newly 
wed scion of the family. 

Mr. John Mackay, who was recently elected an honorary mem- 
ber of the Commercial club, gave a dinner to the members in the 
Postal Telegraph Building recently completed in lower Broadway. 
George D. Roberts, one of San Francisco's old mining men, is 
preparing for a trip westward, as he does not find New York a 
congenial sammer clime. Mrs. William Wayne Belvin is still 
visiting the Calhouns in West End avenue, but expects to go for 
a part of July to Mrs. Preston Hix's lovely country place, Rye- 
holme, in Westchester County. Mr. and Mrs. Clans Spreckels 
and Mips Spreckels are in Paris. Mrs. Gertrude Atherton is still 
living in Warburton avenue, Yonkers. Her daughter is at a 
neighboring convent. 

William Walter Phelps's will has just been filed for probate. 
Among his legatees is the special correspondent, Charles Nordboff, 
who is now at Coronado, and who for years has been identified 
with Californian interests. 

C. P. Huntington has been making himself solid with the great 
American workman. The laborers employed on Mr. Elbridge 
Gerry's new house in upper Fifth avenue struck because Mr. 
fierry, in spite of the fact that hundreds of skilled marble work- 
ers are idle in this country, had imported all the mantels to be 
used in his new house. " He shows," they said, " how great 
his love is for children by helping to starve their parents." This 
scathing remark, together with the union men's enthusiastic ap- 
proval of Mr. Huntington, who has had no foreign work put into 
his new house, so overcame Mr. Oerry that he promised " never 
to do so no more," and consequently his house begins to show 
signs of completion. The Huntington house, unfinished as it is, 
is on the market. Yerkes, the Chicago millionaire, is, 1 am told, 
negotiating for the property as a New York pied a terre for him- 
self and wife, who have also, it is said, yearnings McAUisterward. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Dexter have gone to their country house 
at Oyster Bay, Long Island, and were at the reception given by 
the Seawanbaka Yacht Club. Harry Gillig, whose yacht Gloriana 
lay in the harbor, was also present. He has entered the Gloriana 
for the New London cruise, and Percy Chubb, who married Miss 
"Adolphe " Low several years ago, has entered his Queen Mab for 
the same event. 

From Milan I hear that Miss Ethel Corlette, whose mother, 
Mrs. Theresa Corlette, was long amongst the writers for the News 
Letter and other San Francisco periodicals, is about to make her 
debut at La 8cala in Somna?nbula, which she has already sung 
with great effect and success at Bassam. Her voice, it is said, 
has developed wonderful sweetness, power, and accuracy. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Ruiledge Gibson, who spent last winter in 
Cairo, have returned, and will go to Bar Harbor for the 
season. Sir William and Lady Booker sail on Thursday on the 
Campannia for a long absence abroad. Mrs. Sara Chase and Mr. 
and Mrs. D. L. Taft are at Long Branch for the season. George 
Roberts leaves for the Catskills to-morrow for a month. Mr. W. 
W. Belvin has returned from his Western trip, and he and Mrs. 
Belvin are at the Hotel Marlborough. The New London regatta 
ended on Saturday ended in a wild excitement with the race be- 
tween the Ariel, Gloriana {H. M. Gillig), and the Wasp. It was 
splendidly sailed, and the J WW. won by only five seconds, the 
Wasp following, and the Gloriana another five seconds behind. It 
was a blow to Gillig, as the Wasp and the Gloriana are so closely 
matched that there is more than the usual emulation between 
them. 

Something of a sensation has been created here by the career of 
Baron von Martsclis Hartswick, a yonng nobleman from Ant- 
werp, who is a philanthropist at twenty-four. Baron von Harts- 
wick has been and is very rich. He came to America a few years 
ago in order to arrange a colony in the South for impoverished 
Dutchmen. In connection with this enterprise he returned to 
Antwerp, where shortly afterward his father died, leaving him a 
large fortune. But a few months had elapsed before he made a 
singular determination. He placed his fortune in the hands of a 
trustee, making him swear to honor no draft before the expira- 
tion of two years, and set himself to find out by personal experi- 
ence what the life of a poor man might be. Finding that Ant- 
werp did not offer sufficient scope, he borrowed two thousand 
guilders and came to America. He was prepared for extreme ex- 



periences, and bud not been mirprined when Antwerp friends, 
hearing that he vm mined, on I him. Therefore, when an Ant- 
werp man declared him to the c erk of the Hotel Imperial a* a fraud, 
he wa« culm, and thank* to a friend who was pre**hi, wan noon 
able to prove bin probity. He bad brought over fr m Holland a 
quaint and very emart chaise, which made, with the handsome 
00b drawing it, a sensation In the Mall. As his money ran low, 
however, he was obliged to Abandon this agreeable diversion, and 
in fact to sell the chariot. From hotel to hoarding house, thence 
to lodgings, he Ml until he finally found himself living on fifteen 
to twenty-five ceni* a day for his two meals. In i rder to dothis 
he was forced to pawn his watch and a valuable peal ring. But 
be is plucky and determined to Ptick to hla two years of hard- 
ship. He has vainly sought employment in any capacity in New 
"\ ork, and now has only to struggle on through the summer be- 
fore going out to China, when he wilt take a clerkship at twelve 
hundred dollars a year. He persistently refuses to break his con- 
tract with the Antwerp guardian, insisting that he wishes to 
know from experience the life of the poor. This interesting 
young gentleman, when he appears in Broadway, is dressed in 
the most utter Piccadilly fashion. When, however, he is seek- 
ing employment his garb is of the simplest. I suppose you will 
see htm in San Francisco on bis way to the Flowery Kingdom, 
and I suppose also that he will be the interviewer's joy and the 
labor union's delight. Parse Partout. 



^iXTUot 



A GENTLEMAN'S SMOKE. 

TO THE MANUFACTURE OF THIS 
tobacco wc have diven the most 
careful attention and the benefit 
of many years experience. _/ 

If is |he choicest Smokino, 
Tobacco. 

MARBURG BROS., Baltimore. Md. 



BYRON HOT SPRINGS 

Resort is reached by a pleasant three- 
hour ride by rail from San Francisco. 
The h t mud, hot salt water, and 
hot sulphur baths are infallible cures for 
rheumatism, sciatica, neuralgia, liver 
and kidney troubles, blood and skin dis- 
orders. 
L. R. HEAD, C. R. MASON, 

Proprietor. Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. O., Cal. 



l/ieby 5pi"ip<$s, 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

Three miles from Ukiah, the terminus of the 3. F. &N. P. Railway. 
Only known natural electric water. Warm "champagne" baths. Situa- 
tion, location, and scenery not surpassed. Terms, $12 to ?14 per week. 
Postoffice and telephone at springs. 

WM. DOOLAN, Proprietor. 

FRUIT DRYING PAPERS. 

BUILDING PAPERS. 

ROOFING AND PAINTS. 

PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 

116 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



m 



*£*- 



10 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1M-4 




GorrjStock Business has been very dull on Pine street during 
Mining the week. Prices, however, hold tirm with a de- 
Sfyares. cided scarcity of stock in all the leading mines 
among the commission brokers. An order for a few thousand 
shares would make a material difference in tbe complexion of the 
market, and there is no telling when a change of the kind may 
come. The condition of affairs on the lode favors both more 
activity in business and higher prices- The disturbances in out- 
side affairs have undoubtedly had much to do with dulling the 
tendency to speculate, which is, ordinarily, rife in this commun- 
ity. Now that things are settling down, an improvement may 
be confidently expected in the stock market. Con. Cal- Virginia 
produced in all last mootb $108,078 81 in bullion. Of this 
amount, $37,047.22 was in gold and $71,031.52 in silver. The aver- 
age yield in bullion per ton of 1 ,916 tons of ore worked was $56. 39, 
and the average assay of the battery samples of the ore was $62 17 
per ton. The ore was worked up to 72.13 per cent, of car sample 
assay value. This is a good showing for a mine selling for 
a little over $3 per share, and which is .more likely to increase 
than to decrease its output in the future. The Crown Point Mine 
is also looking well, although the stock is depressed. Working 
tests of the ore have proved satisfactorily that it can be milled at 
alight expense in comparison with the old system. To such an 
extent has the reduction in expenses been made, that it is now 
said that a small profit can be made upon rock running as higb 
as $7 per ton in gold. The ore now being worked is of a free 
milling character, running high in gold, rather different from that 
formerly extracted from the mine. The Ophir mine is also show- 
ing signs of improvement. Assessments of 10 and 25 cents were 
levied during the week on Overman and Sierra Nevada respect- 
ively. 

$ $$ 

ft Boor] W. C. Ralston, secretary of the Miners' Asso- 

To elation of California, has just issued a bulletin 

Mine-Owners, confirming the statement made in the News 
Letter two weeks ago, that the mining law requiring the per- 
formance of one hundred dollars annual work on mining locations 
had been suspended for the year 1894, as it was for 1893. It will 
be necessary, however, to file a notice with the County Recorder, 
stating that the claim-owner intends to take advantage of the 
Act, and that he holds the claim for the purpose of working ir« 
This must be filed before the end of the year in order to be valid. 
Mr. Ralston also notes the fact that a bill will soon be brought up 
in the House providing that in cases of a contest on a mining 
entry the Land Office must presume that the lands situated in a 
mineral belt are mineral lands until the contrary is proved. This 
is expected to pass, and is designed to remove considerable diffi- 
culty and expense in contesting such suits. Copies of the dis- 
patch has been sent around by the Association to all County Re- 
corders and parties in mining districts, who are likely to spread 
the useful information. 

S $ $ 

ijydraulic A good demand is now reported for gravel depos- 
Gold its in Northern California, where water is available 
d/fines. in sufficient quantity for economical operation of 
tbe ground. A number of small private companies have been 
formed to take up claims for working purposes, and so far many 
of them have proved quite a success. It does not take a large 
capital for enterprises of the kind. The main thing is to get in 
right, and if the gravel has gold in paying quantities, everything 
is plain sailing in the hereafter. It ia,from this source that the 
bulk of the annual gold supply from this State must be derived in 
tbe future, and there are thousands of acres scattered about in the 
different counties available for location. 

Cyanide An attempt to create a monopoly in the importa- 

Process tion of cyanide of potassium by the Transvaal Gov- 
Monopoly. eminent of South Africa in the interests of theown- 
ers of the so-called process is now the subject of investigation by 
the Home authorities. The representatives of the mining inter- 
est of that State are up in arms against such a patent injustice, 
and it is not unlikely that the manipulators of the deal will carry 
their point in the face of the opposition. 



Savage At the annual meeting of the Savage Mining Com- 
rfqnual pany, which was held on Thursday, 83,973 out of the 
Election. 112,000 shares of capital stock were represented. The 
following officers and directors were elected to serve for the en- 
suing year: George R. Wells, President; Charles H. Fish, Vice- 
President; Herman Zadig, W. 8. Wood, and Thomas Anderson, 
Trustees. R. P. Keating was re-elected Superintendent, and 
E. B. Holmes, Secretary. 



4 Good The Sun Life office effected new assurances last year 
Financial to the amount of £1,012,634, yielding £37,870 in new 
SfjOiviqg, premium income. The average of each policy is over 
£500. The amount of claims for the year decreased from $212,750 
to $172,600, and tbe bonus additions from £28,500 to £25,100. The 
net result of the year's work is the increase of the total funds 
from £2,934,424 to £3,084,159, out of which total the assurance 
fund itself accounts for £2,681,471. The premium income of the 
year was £345.895, and the receipts from interest dividends and 
rents, £107,638, the average rate of interest earned being £4 4s. 5d. 
This financial showing is deemed remarkably good, considering 
the dull times which prevailed in all lines of business. 
$ $ $ 
To Take Mr. E. T. Campbell, of New York, has been solic- 
the Field, ited by Western Manager Littlejobn, of the North 
British and Mercantile, to take an important field position cover- 
ing several States. Mr. Campbell has been hitherto General Agent 
of the British from the United States headquarters in New York, 
having practically been agency superintendent. He was previ- 
ously resident secretary of the company at Kansas City. 

$ $ % 

MOST of the Guardian risks have been re-assured by the New 
York Underwriters' Agency, bnt for Cork County, Illinois, 
including Chicago, the Union of London will take its place. Pend- 
ing a decision in some territory where no decision has yet been 
arrived at, the agents will continue as before. When all the 
business interests have been assured, the company will still re- 
tain an office in this country to handle " detailed matters." 

SUPERINTENDENT Pierce, of the New York Insurance De- 
partment, has declared, after investigation, that marine com- 
panies are not authorized to write tourist floaters. Tbe Sea In- 
surance Company, which has been doing considerable of this 
business, was notified to discontinue, and has ceased insuring 
under this form. 

in 

THE Erie Insurance Company of Sandusky has, according to 
the assignee, cash on hand amounting to $1980, with possibly 
$500 more to be collected. This will allow a dividend of about 
nine cents, for the creditors in amounts aggregating $21,000. 

$ $ $ 

THE Royal Insurance company of England has just declared a 
dividend of 23s. per share, making, with the interim distribu- 
tion, 35s. per share for 1893. 

Natioqal Tbe San Gabriel Valley Bank paid a dividend of 

Baqk three and one-half per cent, on the 2nd inst. for the 

Diuidends, half year. The Los Angeles Savings Bank paid 
dividends at the same time at the rate of four and .one-half per 
cent, per annum on term and three percent, on ordinary deposits. 
The Main Street Savings Bank and Trust Company, of Los An- 
geles, paid a semi-annual dividend of five per cent, on the 10th 
inst. The First National and tbe Orange G rowers' Bank, of River- 
side, paid dividends on the 2nd inst. at the rate of six and four 
per cent. 

$ $ $ 

Wells The semi-annual statement of WellB, Fargo & Co.'s 

Fargo's Bank shows resources of $11,419,410. The paid-up 
Bank. capital is only $500,000, but the surplus and undivided 
profits are $6,465,320, and tbe amount due depositors $3,493,469. 
The amount of cash on hand is $1,814,129, or more than 50 per 
cent, of the amount due depositors. This bank, through its num- 
erous agencies all over the coast and the country, has unusually 
large facilities for collections and payments. The bank has just 
paid a semi-annual dividend of three per cent, on its capital stock. 
$$S 
Losses It is said that the railroad losses in tbe East during 
by the recent labor riots, when scaled down, will not ex- 
tfloters. ceed $200,000 and of this amount probably not more 
than $50,000 is covered by insurance. The Panhandle and Illinois 
Central, which suffered most heavily, carried no insurance, and 
the Chicago, Northwestern and Rock Island is also uninsured. 
The losses of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy and the Chicago 
and Alton have been ligot. For any obligations the underwriting 
companies will undoubtedly deny liability under the riot and 
civil commotion clause. The railroad companies will also carry 
the matter into court and make the several counties pay, and the 
decisions in these cases will settle the question whether or not 
tbe losses were due to rioters. 

$ $ $ 
Spring The annual meeting of the Spring Valley Water 

Valley Works was held on Wednesday last. There was a 
Directors. large representation of stockholders present, but 
no changes were made in the Board of the officers of the com- 
pany. The following gentlemen were elected directors to serve 
for the ensuing year: Charles Webb Howard, Charles Mayne, 8. 
C. Bigelow, G. W. Beaver, A. Borel, A. H. Payson, and Homer 8. 
King. 



July 21, 1894. 



8AN Kl: VNCI8C0 NEWS LETTER. 



11 




j> 



"Hear the Crier" "What the devil art thou'" 
"Oiif lh»l will clijr the de Til. ilr. with jrou." 

'HE dally newspapers ol San Francisco which, through the 
1 operation of a sordid motive, have been so industriously 
striving to encourage the strikers, to prevent travel by magnify- 
ing its dangers, and to throw d I sored 1 1 upon the agencies which 
have bad the courage to array themselves against a dangerous 
• ■popular" sentiment which imperil* the public safety, well 
might keep in mind the maxim of Ph.. lrua: ■Saepe intceunt aliis 
m'ditantet neeem;" which, being translated, means something like 
this: The fool who would punish a dog by twisting its tail is in 
danger of being bitten. 

And to think that it should come to this — 
That the Examiner, the Bulletin, the Call, ob, my! 
Should snout their three long noses in a very small sty, 

Just because they can't enjoy Mike's bliss! 

For he's made them chew a bitter cud: 
His Fair they had to boost, and thus so set him up on high 
For every one to see that he was soaring toward the sky, 

Where tbey could not reach him with their mad. 

And then revolt against the law came on, 
And Michael stood for Government, for order, peace. Behold, 
What could they do but egg on crime and say that he had sold 

His manhood to Huntington? 

Said that Mike'd been bought outright 
With a promise of some office which all railroads sell 
To a citizen for doing what good citizens know well 

Tbey should do with all their might. 

And still tbey do not stop at that. 
They stoop to personalities and show a rabid hate, 
Caring naught for public scorn so that their anger they may sate, 

And now wonder where they are at! 

For in yielding to an envious whim — 
In fighting those who prosper through a higher grade of sense — 
They now suffer from the evils that ensue from ways so dense, 

And are seeing their lights grow dim. 

Baecfabula docet, that any oaf 
Who strikes to gain advantage by the sacrifice of right 
Will surely leave the daylight for the wilderness of night: 

He'd better eat his half a loaf. 

ALAMEDA was the only city in the State whose citizens took 
prompt action to suppress disorder and prohibit to the full 
extent of their power interference with the running of trains dur- 
ing the strike. Its Committee of Public Safety was on guard day 
and night, and its members did their full duty as good men and 
citizens. San Jose remained indifferent and its officers stupidly 
inactive while its fruits were rotting, but finally it roused itself, 
forced its officers to do their duty, and broke the blockade 
in an hour. The people of Sacramento have covered them- 
selves with every possible kind of disgrace. Drawing a 
large part of their business from the Southern Pacific, 
they nevertheless not only remained absolutely idle, but permitted 
their women to fraternize with and assist the strikers and 
attempt to cajole from their duty the soldiers who had arrived to 
perform the service which the local constabulary had ignored. 
The conduct of Sacramento has alienated it from the respect of 
good citizens elsewhere and has made it a pariah among the cities 
of California. It may console itself, however, with the reflection 
that Los Angeles behaved not much better, and that Oakland's 
reputation is badly stained. But nothing coDld possibly equal 
the shameful conduct of Sacramento. As for San Francisco, 
whatever other shortcomings its Police Department has, it was 
the one city in the State whose police acted promptly, intelli- 
gently, and efficiently. 

NO wonder Britons are talking of a new creation so energetically. 
They are not scientists who are agitating the question, as one 
might suppose, but the great mass who are excited over the prospect 
of an additional volume of the Peerage, to be entitled " the American 
Lords." For what more natural to suppose than that such a thing 
will be required, as, if Mr. W. W. Astor is made a Baron, the great 
ambition of our moneyed power will be to emulate his example and 
seek the honor of wearing an English title even at the cost of relin- 
guishing their nationality. Things look wonderfully like it. 

THE woman who danced in a nude state, under the auspices of 
certain persons connected with the Midwinter Fair, was con- 
victed the other day, but great pains were taken not to involve 
the respectable men who had left their wives and families, and 
who aided and abetted the performance. Justice, as usual, was 
a failure in that case, as it has been in numerous others. 



TM B «lrikr has given ibr prearhers of kbit town a rare oppor- 
tunity to a.lverti-e themselves, ami they did not let II p., ape. 
Their walls and callous doottlDM made Sunday hideous, and they 
wore out lta« r»p . r i.-r« in their rltorts to get a notice In the morn- 
ing papers. In Die wihl wasle of three columns in Monday's 
Chronicle we gazed upon as lurid a mass of Incoherent sermons as 
ever we bad ihe pleasure ol sleeping through. They contained 
not a spark of common shrewdness, and presented assertions as 
new as Ihe fact that one and one are two. If the preachers bad 
had any practical suggestions to oiler or any remedy to advise 
for the warfare that is raging between the railroads and the em- 
ploy.'., Ihe public would have gladly turned a kindly ear in their 
direction, and would have felt that the church had not fallen be- 
hind the times. But each preacher was striving for notoriety and 
each fell flat. It would be tiresome to relate the inane verbosity 
of each preacher, but Dra. Hille, Henry, Hirst, and Brown carried 
off the palm for noise and nlllciousness In striving to decide the 
great question. The Rev. Johnnie Hemphill went deeper into the 
matter, and began his marvelous discourse by saying, "Christ is a 
pessimist and so am I." How highly complimented the Savior must 
have fell when these words found their way through the fog to the 
gates of Heaven! How proud the congregation in Calvary must 
have felt in noticing that strong resemblance between its pastor 
and Christ! How sad Brer Hemphill must have been when be 
uttered those words, and reflected for a moment to consider how 
many things he is which Christ is not! 

FOR these many years the Salvation Army has been the one 
Christian organization which has done the Master's work 
without hope of financial reward, without levying tribute on its 
followers, without seeking to attract by glitter, hired mummery, 
and costly parade, without setting baits for the rich, without de- 
pending more on money for the salvation of souls and bodies 
than upon human sympathy and that simplest of all simple 
things, the gospel of Jesus. But the grand old spirit of John Wes- 
ley has now stepped forth from the mists of forgotten years and 
stalks abroad in San Francisco — timidly, tentatively, it is true, as 
might be expected of a ghost that has not exercised its legs for a 
hundred years, yet with a clear eye and a face turned to the light. 
Know all men by these presents that the Christian Endeavor So- 
ciety of the Grace M. E. Church has planted its knees in the gutj 
ter and its heart in Christ, and goes about singing, praying, help- 
ing the lowly, just like those common Salvation Army people! 
Let fashionable Christianity, jejune, idle, and spectacular, look to 
its props, lest the Master's rate gnaw them asnnderl 

A8URPRI8INGLY intelligent member of the Oakland Board 
of Education has protested against the enforced use in the 
schools of text books written by certain professors of the Univer- 
sity of California. It is strange that the University Regents 
should permit the professors to practice this sort of meanness; it 
is not strange that the professors practice it so long as they are 
permitted. A similar condition of affairs exists at the State Nor- 
mal School at San Jose. Professors, like preachers, sign-posts, 
and other educating agencies which lack the salient knowledge 
that contact with the world imparts, are not expected themselves 
to go the way which they point out, and hence they need what- 
ever discipline inertia requires. A sign-post, for instance, is con- 
venient for pigs to scratch themselves with, but frequent scraping 
finally loosens it and turns it around, making it point the wrong 
way. And the sign-post is not the only educator of its kind that 
suffers a parallel affliction from a similar cause. 

THE immemorial right of lovers to sit upon the stoop and there 
to hold each other by the hand and to sigh, and sigh again, 
has just been consecrated by a new decision in Brooklyn. — a sub- 
urb of Oakland, we believe. The brutal minion of the law who 
interfered with it, and who even locked up a young lady's sweet- 
heart for presuming to say that his sonl was his own, received 
such a wigging from the Judge that he will not forget it during 
his tenure of office. Alas! Shall Cupid lower his bow and poise 
ne'er an arrow, because be fears a policeman's club? Perish the 
base thought I Let lovers spoon on the front stoop of the house 
as much as they please, subject only to the correcting influence 
of the "old man" and the bull dog. 

SOME gentleman bugs having acquired a reprehensible appetite 
for California fruit trees, Mr. Alexander Craw, quarantine 
officer of the State Board of Horticulture, has been cultivating a 
large quantity of lady bugs to exterminate their male congeners. 
And the woman suffragists see the hand of Providence in it. 

A WELL-KNOWN society matron, whose son is a member of the 
National Guard, hung upon his neck, kissed him, and wept as he 
was leaving for the scene of the strikers' war, and fired his patriotism 
with this injunction: " Oh, Charlie! if one of those nasty men points 
a gun at you, you just run / " 

THE police are displaying extraordinary zeal in arresting those 
agreeable gentlemen politely called bunko steerers. Suppose 
that the police, in their honest pursuit of this noble duty, should 
take to arresting one another! 

A CHINESE woman was discovered the other day conducting 
a tan game. As Woman refines all that she touches, why 
not turn over gambling to her and make it lawful ? 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1894. 




IT is amusing to note the avidity with which our fair ladies rush 
to the Midwinter Fair, since its official closing, in search of 
" bargains," that occupation so dear to the feminine heart. Any- 
day a visitor to the Liberal Arts Building will meet many of our well- 
known people intent on a "good thing." While no doubt many real 
bargains are to be had, there is also, no doubt, much humbug. One 
case has been heard of where the vendor has made it a practice to 
mark the goods exactly double what is asked, and pointing to the 
mark he will say, " You see what this was," etc. But the women do 
not stop to think how easily this can be done, and rush headlong into 
the trap. One elderly dame takes a servant along to carry her pur- 
chases, which one day consisted of a dressing comb and a souvenir 
spoon ! One of our prettiest belles had an Eastern admirer in attend- 
ance, and a wealthy young couple from Oakland laid in a stock of 
Carlsbad ware sufficient to keep them going for years. 

w # # 

Every cloud has a silver lining, we are told, and so even the sad 

side of the strike has its reverse in the comical views presented by 

some of the " situations " it has caused. For example, a gentleman 

who had been playing fast and loose with one of our charming girls 

prior to his departure Eastward telegraphed her, '* What answer to 

my letter? Be definite." The letter being in the tied-up mail along 

the overland road, of course its contents can only be guessed at, and 

the lady's mamma had to telegraph in reply " no letter received." 

And now the family feel the golden opportunity may have slipped 

forever from their grasp. 

• # * 

The people who have been really seriously annoyed by the stoppage 
of the railroad trains have been the people of moderate means who 
counted upon spending a certain sum for the " outing " and not a dol- 
lar more — they didn't have it to spend. These people have got shut 
in at hotels where the bill keeps increasing and the purse emptying, 
with no end to one in sight, while the other is plainly visible. 

" Just think," said an avenue belle the other day, as a group com- 
posed of a theatre supper party were discussing the fearful derailing 
of the engine by the strikers at Sacramento, "just think, it might 
have been Ren. Smedburg! " and then a titter on her left suffused 
her fair cheek with blushes. 

Rumor has it that August will be unusually gay at Del Monte, and 
on the tapis for the early part of September is a very elaborate rural 
fete, a very swell garden party to be given by one of the dames who 
live on the line of the San Jose railroad. The swim is busy deciding 
whether Menlo Park or San Mateo is the locality where the enter- 
tainment is to be given, for as yet absolute secrecy as to the donor 
and place has been maintained. 

" The best-laid plans of mice and men gang aft aglee," might Miss 
Laura McKinstry with justice exclaim, those horrid strikers having 
upset her second European trip, which she was on the eve of taking. 
However, all's well that ends well, and no doubt the tour will be ar- 
ranged in time as charmingly as at first anticipated. 

Now if ever is the chance for our brave soldier beaux to win their 
fair lady's favor, and gossip declares the parting words of a certain 
young Lieutenant and a sweet bud of the swim were of a nature to 
give the gallant son of Mars the right to claim her upon his return. 

Lansing Kellogg has been having a genuine "walkover" at the 
Hotel Rafael, and if he has not been spoiled by attention it has not 
been the fault of the feminines. Th£ gay widow seemed to have a 
goodly share of his favor. 

What a contrast the three Wallace sisters present— Mrs. Belle 
Donahue, animated and frolicsome. Miss Marguerite Wallace, spiritu- 
elle and refined, and Miss Romie, digni6ed and stolid. 

The dapper little Benedict whose frosted hair harmonizes with his 
favorite gray clothes seemingly enjoys San Rafael life these days of 
the strike. Truth to tell, this agreeable gentleman with the common- 
place cognomen is a trifle blast, and his frequent trips abroad return 
him to us still more inclined that way; so that to find him taking an 
interest in anything or any one is a novel sight worth making a note 
of. 

An amusing incident is reported as having taken place at a fashiona- 
ble picnic recently, at one of the swagger out-of-town resorts. The 
hostess was a society light, and, although " getting on," reluctant to 
admit the fact. As all pretty women do, she likes admiration, and 
on this day of the picnic had evidently determined to' gratify this 
liking, as her immediate attendant and* cavalier was unmistakably 
devoted. All went merrily until the time for the drive back to the 
hotel arrived. Then Madarne's husband, who had been having a 



good time of his own with a pretty sixteen-year-old girl, announced 

his intention of driving Miss in a buggy, so as to show her the 

place where wild blackberries were abundant. But his wife was not 
going to have that sort of thing by a good deal, and so she loudly in- 
formed him, and the result of it all was that husband and wife occu- 
pied the buggy, while Sweet Sixteen had the disconsolate admirer to 
console for madarne's defection. Moral. — When husbands see their 
wives flirting a Voutrance it sometimes has a good effect to try the 
same game. 

" When the cat's away the mice will play," says the adage, and 
from what people say this has been illustrated at Castle Crag, where 
several young people have had full sway for their frolics while the 
maternal was " tied up " in San Francisco. 

* * # 

If what gossip says is true charming Miss Ella was the lode star 
that drew the handsome blonde-raoustached beau from the ancient 
flame in the family circle. 

The rumor is again revived of the projected union of the well- 
known capitalist and a lady who runs a fashionable private hotel. 



After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. You 
will find it admirable. 



BOORD & SON, 



LONDON, ENG. 



OLD 
TOM 
GIN, 

The Finest Goods 
of their kind Im- 
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" The Cat and Barrel " Brand 
has been in use by Board A: 
Son since ISol . 



And 

ORANGE 

BITTERS. 

In Gases 
of twelve 
Bottles. 



CHARLES ME1NECKE & CO., 



Sole Agents. 



314 Sacramento St., San Francisco 



ZISKA INSTITUTE, 



1606 VAN NESS AVENUE. 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. French, Germao, and English Day and Boarding 
School. TClegant home. Best educational advantages. 
Next term commences August 1, 1894. 

DIME. It ZISKA, A.M., Principal. 



Eureka 
Fire Hose Co. 




Goodyear Rubber Co., 

R. H. Pease, Vice-President and Hanager. 
577-579 Market St., S. F. 73-75 First st., Portland, Or. 



July 21, 1894. 



s\\ i -i:\\. [Si n news utter. 



u 



THE EVOLUTION OF THE BANJO 



Bi A- P - its**, 

AKK of vrara ago, for one to play tbe banjo In an amateur 
way waa to have been (he cynosure of all eye?— and eara, too. 
whose close propinquity must bare made tbe auditory nerve 
squirm with wonder. In those days banjos were made without 
tbe raised metal frets that in tbe modern banjo correctly measure 
off the tones and semitones. Tbe dilettante who explored the long 
cumbersome neck of the instrument was only occasionally suc- 
cessful in discovering the notes he reached for. The first finger of 
bis right band was capped with a huge tbimble; the striking of 
this, alternating with the plunking of a stalwart thumb, gave an 
empbaticalness to the sound that did little to distinguish it from 
a busy day in a boiler factory. Chords beyond the fifth frel were 
mercifully untbongbt of. 

It was not long before banjos were made with raised frets. Who 
the first maker was I do not know, but Heaven bless him any- 
way! He was derided and hooted by all the crack " plunkers " 
of the day, and, if he had to live on his sales, must have had a 
starving time of it. Now and then a venturesome guitar player 
would purchase a fretted banjo, » picking " it as he did the guitar, 
with thumb, and first, second, and third fingers. To this day 
some of the old-time players cling to the three fingers and thumb. 
By all modern schools the third finger is inactive except in chord 
work. 

As the banjo's popularity grew and expanded far beyond its 
Southern environments, and from Maine to California could be 
beard the merry tinkle, its adherents multiplied by hundreds. 
Better instruments were turned out; strings of the proper thick- 
ness were manufactured in Germany, expressly for tbe banjo 
trade; musicians investigated and many adopted the banjo; a 
literature of the instrument — may be crude and unmusical, never- 
theless a literature — was beginning. Tbe evolution of the banjo 
was rapid, as is that of all things in the United States, and as tbe 
instrument, a few years before uncouth and blatant in tbe hands 
of the darkey, neared its present perfection, the American people 
realized that, though we may not have established a national 
music nor a national art, we possessed a national instrument. 

As the banjo surpassed its former self in musical mechanism, 
so its melody reached to more refined and artistic heights. Com- 
positions were written and arrangements transcribed that bad 
heretofore been deemed impossible. The tremolo movement, 
which allows such continued sustainment of tbe treble on one 
string and a perfect accompaniment on tbe ones remaining, was 
gladly welcomed by those who desired that " singing " quality of 
tone obtained on tbe violin and 'cello. 

The sharp staccato of the old banjo contrasted strangely with 
the resonance and timbre of the new. The perfect fretting gave 
tbe instrument a compass of three octaves, and the intervals be- 
tween the strings, eo adapted to harmonizing, permitted a rendi- 
tion of the most ambitious compositions. ' And, best of all, the 
banjo could be played alone — the solo strong enough with har- 
mony to be independent of any accompaniment. With the ex- 
ception of the guitar and zither the banjo is tbe only one of the 
smaller instruments having this advantage. 

From the old tunes of the plantation and levee, ,l Zip Coon " 
and " Dan Tucker," we have merged, how far! The mysterious 
grandeur of Gounod is possible; the thrill of Verdi's never-to-be- 
forgotten melodies — I mean those of his earlier works that the 
critics damn and the people love him for; the spell of Mendel- 
ssohn's wordless songs; the happy jingle of De Koven, and those 
brave marches of Sonsa's that make soldiers of us all — this is only 
a fragment of what, in the hands of an artist, the banjo's repeitoire 
may be. 

Twenty years are not many in the history of nations, but in 
that time tbe banjo has attained a position and dignity in the 
musical world that neither fad, fashion, nor time will change. 

San Francisco, July, 1894. 



"THE men who never go home except when they have to, and 
1 who neglect wife and children," writes a woman in a mas- 
culine hand to this office, "have a great deal to aay about the 
sacredness of the fireside and the danger that threatens the home 
when a woman talks of voting. Should she vote at every elec- 
tion, it would not take more than half an hour in a year." 



AN EXPECTED VINDICATION. 



The suit against Dr. George W. Leek, the dentist, for tampering with the 
mail of his employee, was dismissed without malice. The evidence in his 
favor was so strong that the court declared there was nothing in tbe charge, 
and dismissed all proceedings. Dr. Leek is now located in the large new 
building, 20 O'Farrell street, known aB the Curtaz Building. He occupies 
six elegant rooms, handsomely furnished and supplied with all modern 
conveniences for carrying on his business. Dr. Leek will attend to all 
patients personally, which is a guarantee that the work will be the best in 
San Francisco. His business is very large and increasing. He numbers 
among his patrons the best people in the city. Dr. Leek states that his 
secret method of filling and extracting teeth, which has made him famous 
as a dentist the world over, will never be divulged to the dental profession 
until his sons shall have developed into dentists. 



HER CARRIAGE FOR THE NURSES. 



A Woman who DM Rone abroad for the summer has left her 
carriage and pair at the service of some hospital nurses In an 
institution with which she Is connected, aays the New York 
At the hours when they are off duty In mm the carriage 
takes them by twos for a lonjr drive, and how much this will 
mean for theee workers shut away for most of tbe time from any 
change of air and scene can hardly be estimated. If there were 
more snch breaks in the lives of these women pnrsnlng a hard 
calling, the startling average of life which, according to Professor 
Tyndall, is theirs, might he raised. He stated that hospital 
nurses only attain, on an average, the age of 25 years, while non- 
nursing women reach tbe comparatively mature point of 58 
years. 

NO FEAR OF PIMPLES 

OR BLACKHEADS 

If you use Woodbury's Facial 
Soap. It is a pure antiseptic, 
medicinal toiiet soap for daiiy use, 
prepared by a specialist who has 

^ 2 ° yearS 'f^«^ 



20 

experience 
treati ng the 
skin. Drug- 
gists sell it. 



-^ SCALP 



">.: 



SK1H. ^~ (gg/** 

4 Beware of lmltn- ~~ 

tions. A book on Dermatology with every cake 



ACTORS, 
ACTRESSES, 



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troubles I shall be pleased to give a FREE TEST of my new scientific 
methods to all who call at my office. 

R. WESLEY ROGERS, M. D , 629 Kearny St., S. F. 
-Ear, Nose, Throat and Lungs a Specialty. 



TO LET==Furnished. 
A Modern House of Eight rooms; 
Convenient to two cable lines; grand 
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Rent reasonable to desirable party. 

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10 flontgomery Street. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 
806 Market Street ( Phelan Building.) 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for pols- 
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DR. CHAKLE8 W. DECKER 



D 



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Office: 306 Kearny Street, Corner Sutter. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1894. 



UP to the time of writing no hostile collision has taken 
place between the Japanese aDd tbe government forces 
in Corea, cor has there been any declaration of hos- 
tility between China and Japan in regard to the matter. 
The situation up to date seems to be this: There is a re- 
volt in Corea against the government. The rebels are of the Kim 
party, and are pro-Japanese in their sympathies; tbe government 
is in the hands of the pro-Chinese party. Japan, in view of this 
rebellion and the unfriendly attitude of the Corean government, 
has landed a considerable body of troops in Corea in order to 
assert and protect what she deems to be her legitimate interests, 
and this, of course, has produced a diplomatic tension between 
Japan and China. How far that will go remains as yet a matter 
of doubt. Other governments are said to be interesting them- 
selves, in a diplomatic way, in the situation. It was reported a 
couple of weeks ago that Kussia had protested against the course 
of Japan: but that rumor was vague and has never been con- 
firmed. Even if it was true, it would not necessarily mean that 
Russia proposed to take any very active interest in tbe matter. 
Such protests are frequently made as a formality and with a 
view to saving rights of subsequent national self-assertion in con- 
tingencies which may never arise. Our own Government is said 
to have sent some kind of a protest to Japan on this subject, but 
the rumors which have come from Washington in regard to the 
matter have been uncertain, palpably incorrect in their terms, and 
manifestly inspired by that prolific parent of mendacity, partisan 
malice. American interests in Corea are purely commercial, and, 
to a very large extent, visionary. It is hardly conceivable that 
our Government would feel called upon to take more than the 
most formal international interest in the Corean imbroglio, unless 
Secretary Gresham has become infected with the jingo mania for 
><a vigorous foreign policy" to an extent which has imperiled his 
sanity. The latest news seems fully to justify Mr. Gresbam's 
course. 

The Marquis of Salisbury has introduced into the British House 
of Lords a bill which, in the somewhat generic terms of the At- 
lantic cable vernacular, is designated "an alien law." The meagre 
synopsis of the debate that took place over the measure which 
has reached this occidental neck of the land indicates that the 
title does not express tbe purport of the bill. It is evidently a 
measure which is aimed at anarchy and anarchists, and which 
contemplates a closer governmental supervision over foreign resi- 
dents in the British Isles. Lord Roseberry, and the members of 
the Ministry of which he is the head, are opposed to the measure, 
which has the support of the Tories, and will, therefore, probably 
pass the Lords and be rejected by the Commons. Lord Roseberry 
and his confreres are right in their opposition. The bill is un- 
necessary and absolutely unwise. As was pointed out in last 
week's News Letter, the failure of anarchy and similar systems 
of political crime to find a lodgment among the people of the 
British Isles is largely the result of the fact that long-haired 
fanatics have in that country been allowed to live in the open 
daylight where the sun destroyed the germs of the political 
diseases with which they are infected. On the other hand, in 
continental Europe they have been driven, like rats, into the 
sewera and cellars, where their false philosophies have generated 
into crime and their theories have enjoyed the propogating ad- 
vantages of martyrdom. Lord Salisbury's idea seems to be that 
it is the duty of the British Government to engage in a crusade 
of repression against anarchists with a view to prevent crimes 
against other governments from being hatched on British soil. 
But that is going afield to look for trouble. None of the recent 
anarchist plots were, the police say, formed in England. 

The Brazilian Congress having duly celebrated the Fourth of 
July — whether the celebration included a procession of "horribles" 
does not appear in the record — has now advanced bo far in its at- 
tention to the maintenance of republican institutions of govern- 
ment in its own country as to canvass the returns of a Presiden- 
tial election which was held among Peixoto's followers some six 
months or so ago, and which, not unnaturally, resulted in the 
election of one of his adherents. It would seem, therefore, as 
though Peixoto has abandoned the idea of declaring himself 
dictator "in honor of the Monroe doctrine" — a step which he was 
said to be contemplating some little time ago. 

It is announced that the Czar is about to accredit a Russian 
legation to the Vatican. Its chief is to be a M. Isvolski, who is 
a Russian diplomat of considerable standing. The purpose which 
is behind the Czar's efforts to draw closer to the Pope is not alto- 
gether clear, but it evidently has some connection with the pos- 
sible complications which may arise out of Italy's connection 
with the triple-alliance. Tbe Muscovite is a very smooth diplomat 
and seldom fails to turn other nations' family difficulties to his 
own profit. 



The philosopher in the tall tower has again been heard from. 
He has discovered tbe key which unlocks the mystery of tbe sit- 
uation at Corn Island aDd makes everything as clear as mud. A 
Jamaica negro rebelled against tbe Nicaraguan government in 
order to furnish the British government with a pretex' for "inter- 
fering," fo that British capital, which has been awaiting an op- 
portunity for a long time, may have a chance to build the Nicar- 
agua canal. It may be said, in this connection, that the philoso- 
pher, though a trifle incoherent, is obviously correct in one par- 
ticular. British capital is awaiting for a chance to build the 
Nicaragua canal — under certain conditions. The British capitalist 
is waiting patiently for the United 8tates government to endorse 
the Maritime Company's bonds. Then he will build the Nicar- 
agua canal under conditions which may be epitomised thus — 
"heads I win, tails you lose." Indeed, it may be said that the 
British capitalist is a very long-beaded fellow ; be is, in fact, almost 
as long-beaded as the philosopher in tbe tall tower and infinitely 
more mercenary. That, perhaps, results from the circumstance 
that he does not do his thinking in a place which is so close to 
the heavens. 



RICHARD H. SINTON died on Wednesday at his home in this 
city, 932 Bush street. He was born in Richmond, Va., in 
1824, and after his graduation from the Virginia Military Insti- 
tute he came to California on the battleship Ohio in 1848, re- 
signed, aDd settled in San Francisco. He was City Treasurer id 
1851, School Director in 1869-70, and License Collector from 1876 
till 1881. After that he engaged in tbe real estate business. He 
leaves a widow, son, aDd daughter. He was a member of the 
California Society of Pioneers and the Associated Veterans of the 
Mexican War. Although not a wealthy man, Mr. Sinton has 
always been one of the most useful and influential citizens, aDd 
his kindly, genial nature brought around him a large number of 
devoted friends. 

ANNUAL MEETIN6. 

Virginia and. Gold Hill Water Company. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Virginia and Gold 
Hill Water Company, for the election of trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, and for the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting, will be held at the office of the company, room 25, Nevada 
block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal.,on 

Thursday, the 26th Day of July, 1894, at the hour of 1 O'clock P. M. 

W. W. STETSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 25. Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, 8- F., Cal. 
Saa Francisco, July 9, 1894. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco, June 29, 1894. 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter (4^) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June SO, 1894, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 2, 1894 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office — Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Streets. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Savings and Loan Society, 

For the six months ending June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four and eight tenths {4 8-10) per cent per annum on Term 

Deposits, and four (4) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 2, 1894. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office — 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, payable on and 
after Monday, Julv 2, 1894. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

123 California street. 



July 21, 1804 



- w 11: vncisco m:\vs letteb 



15 



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: <*\^ 



;^iiii€ 



a*»rj 



A COLLECTION of short esutyi on American life and literature 
has Deen written by Hjalmar Hjortb Boyesen, entitled 'Lit- 
erary and Social Silhouettes." As usual with foreigners, he en- 
tirely misunderstands the character and ideas of the American 
girl; in (act, if ail American girls were like those that are modeled 
in Mr. Boyeseo's book, we prefer to look to China for our wives. 
His comparisons are instituted in a faulty manner. He compares 
tbe American damsel with her German sister and gives the latter 
preference for stolidity of mind, heart, and virtue. It would uot 
be worth the time to enter into an analysis of his opinion of 
American realistic fiction, for it does not rise above the level of 
tbe commonest daily newspaper criticism. [For sale by all book- 
sellers.] 

The July issue of forum contains two papers on tbe violence of 
religious intolerance in tbe United Slates. Tbe first is by F. R. 
Coudert, in which be speaks plainly on tbe A. P. A. He says 
that it will be unwise to foster tbe organization and to draw 
dividing lines between two great bodies of Christian people. He 
asserts that the Roman Catholic Cburch has a place in America 
and that it has upheld it nobly. Tbe second paper is by J. B. 
McMaster. It is entitled 'Tbe Riotous Career of tbe Know- 
not biogs," and is a caieful review of the growth of "Americanism" 
in this country since its birth. Both papers are especially inter- 
esting in these days. Frederic Harrison has begun a series of 
studies of Victorian writers. His first essay is on Carlyle's place 
in literature. "The Manly Virtues and Practical Politics," by 
Theodore Roosevelt, "The Money That Would Rule the World," 
by M. D. Harter, and "The Stage as a Career," by Re de Cordova, 
will attract the attention of all readers. [The Arena Publishing 
Co. For sale by all booksellers.] 

On page 10 of "Every Inch a Soldier," by John Strange Winter, 
we read that tbe hero's chief accomplishment lies In tbe fact that 
he can play a tune on his cbin with his knuckles. With the ex- 
ception of that ludicrous mode of amusing his friends he is a gal- 
lant young man, and he falls in love with a cirl who, without 
notifying him, enters his apartments, professedly for a " lark," 
and in the end marries her. The story contains the same military 
flavor that is infused into the many preceding works by the 
author. Her style contaioa a literary touch of the old school, 
which adds a charm to her work. [J. B. Lippincott Co., pub- 
lishers. For sale at Cooper's.} 

Among the many interesting papers in the current Arena is one 
by Heinrich Hensoldt, entitled "Occnlt 8cience in Thibet." It is 
the first of a series in which the author will present some details 
in reference to Thibetan gnosticism, and the relations of the 
Thibetans to Theosophy and Buddhism. This issue also contains 
a number of social, economic, political, and ethical essays by men 
of prominence. [The Arena Publishing Co. For sale by all book- 
sellers.] 



The summer intellect of this country will gladly hail the 
advent of a book by Flora Anne Steel, "The Potter's Thumb," 
which deals with Anglo-Eastern and closely contrasts American 
and English types of womanhood. There is no lack of local 
color in the chapters, the tale drags, there is not sufficient inci- 
dent in it to hold the interest of tbe reader, and it is an excellent 
antidote for sleeplessness. [For sale by all booksellers.] 

Some one says of Paul Bourget, tbe new Academician: "No 
one ever unraveled the mysterious complexity of the female heart 
better than he. No one ever showed sncb acumen in searching 
the unconsciousness, the intuitiveness of fair humanity. No one 
ever showed so much delicate refinement in picturing the little 
things that make the life of tbe heroine." 



J. M. Hatchings, an old Californian, has compiled and published 
a little volume on the Yosemite Valley and the big trees of Cali- 
fornia. It contains a number of good photo-engravingB of differ- 
ent scenes in the valley and throughout California, and the read- 
ing matter is of an interesting and instructive character. 



The Food Exposition 
is an educator for housekeepers. You are not obliged to attend it to 
appreciate the value of Borden's Peerless Evaporated Cream. Your 
Grocer can supply you; always ready; uniform results assured. 
Insist upon having Borden's. 



All the new Books at COOPER'S. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

born Hill Oold Mining and Milling Company 
Location of principal p)ar« ol bosloMi Ban rruoUoo. Cal. Location of 
wnrfca—Oren vallrf, California 

NotiM ll hereby L.-1V.H thai h( n meeting of the Board of Directors, held 

on the terentb <)n\ -i, an ■■nnimnnt. No 3, of Flft. 

per ihare wti levied upon the capital ntock of the cor- 
poration, payable Immediately, in fulled State* Hold coin, to the 
r-iary. at the office of the company, Room 20. :i3i Pine St., San FrauclM-o. 
Cal 

Auyfltock upon whfeH thU Assessment nhall remain unpaid ou 
Tuesiar. th« 7th Dav ol August. 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for >ale at nubile auction; and miles* payment 1b made be- 
fore, will be «old on Tt'ESDAY, the 28th day of August, 1894, to 
pay the delinquent a->">Mn»nt. together with oosU of advertising aud ex- 
panses of sue. Bv order *>t the Board of Direction 

^ K.H GKAYSON, Secretary. 

Orrtci— Room 20, 381 Pine street, 3an Francisco, pal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Union Coneol idat-d Silver Mining Company. 

Location nf principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby giveu that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
ou the '20th day of June, 1«94, an assessment (No. 49) of Fifteen cents 
per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Wednesday, the 25th Day of July, 1 894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 16th day of August, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costB of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. C. HARVEY. Secretary. 

Office— Room 1, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



New Basil Consolidated Gravel Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works— Placer county, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 18th day of June, 1894, an assessment (No. 26) of Five cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid ou the 
The 28th Day ol July, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 18th day of August, 1894, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. X. SIMON, Secretary. 

Office— 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of Principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Seventeenth (17th) day of July, 1894, an assessment (No. 71) of Ten 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, 414 California street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which thiB assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Monday, the 21 st day of August, 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for Kale at public auction; and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the Eleventh day of September, 
1894, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 16 

Amount per Share 10 cents 

Levied May 31, 1894 

Delinquent in Office July 6, 1894 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock. July 31, 1894 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 107. 

Amou nt per Share 25 cents 

Levied July 18 1894 

Delinquent in Office August 22, 1894 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 11, 1894 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Francis- 
co, California 

NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING, 

Notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a resolution of the Board of 
Directors of the Paraffine Paint Company (a corporation), duly adopted at 
a regular meeting of said Board, held at the office of said Company on 
Wednesday, the 13th day of Juue, 1894, a meeting of the stockholders of the 
Paraffine Paint Company will be held on 

Wednesday, the 22d day of August, 1894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. W. 
of that day, at No. 116 Battery street, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, the same being the principal place of business 
and office of said corporation, and the same being the building where the 
Board of Directors of said corporation meet. 

The object of said meeting is to consider, act upon, and decide a proposi- 
tion to diminish the Capital Stock of said corporation, the Paraffine Paint 
Company, from One Million Dollars to One Hundred Thousand Dollars. 

Dated San Francisco, June 18th, 1894. 

PARAFFINE PAINT COMPANY. By 

R. S. SHAINWALD, Secretary. R. S. MOORE, President. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21,1894. 



THE SILVER QUESTION. 

EDITOR News Letter— Dear Sir: Wolowake, the Polish econo- 
mist, was the chief theoretical developer of the double stand- 
ard theory that free coinage of the cheaper metal would restore 
the equilibrium, but in France, although nominally bi-metallic, one 
or the other metal, silver or gold, has always preponderated and 
dominated at the fixed ratio of I5y, to 1. For thirty years it has been 
gold, and no equilibrium has actually been maintained in France, as 
silver has been used as an auxiliary money metal, or temporary com- 
panion to gold. 

At the Brussels Monetary Congress of 1892 Professor Andrews, 
President of Brown University, Rhode Island, himself a neo-bimetal- 
list and one of the United States delegates to the Brussels Congress, 
speaking for the advocates of bi-metallism and in behalf of silver, 
expressed himself as follows: 

" They wish to stay that baneful, blighting, deadly fall of prices 
which for nearly thirty years has infected with miasma the economic 
life-blood of the whole world." 

Mr. "Weber, delegate of Belgium, spoke as follows on the opposite 
side of the question : 

"According to these modern Jeremiahs the fall in the price of 
cereals, of sugar, of cotton, of wool, and of many other products re- 
sults from a scarcity of silver in the monetary circulation of the 
world. The enormous areas which have been put under cultivation 
or used for pasture in the New World and the Antipodes are ignored. 
They are not taken into account at all. For instance, three or four 
years ago America produced 6,000.000 bales of cotton, whereas the 
harvest of 1891 amounted to 9,000,000 bales. The London Economist, 
in one of its last numbers, reports that a census of the sheep in Aus- 
tralia gave 02,000,000 head in 1878. while for 1891 the figure is given as 
124,000,000 head; that is to say, exactly double. If these 62,000,000 
sheep which have been added to the figures of 1878, instead of con- 
tributing wool had contributed silver in the shape of fleeces, and if in 
consequence prices instead of falling considerably had been main- 
tained at a high level, I ask what profit humanity would have derived 
from this phenomenon? Does it not seem to you gentlemen that we are to 
a certain extent criticising Providence if we complain of the cheapness of 
products, when that cheapness is the consequence of their abundance t 

It is estimated that the amount of wealth that could be handed 
down to posterity produced during the first eighteen hundred years 
of the Christian era was equaled by the production of the first fifty 
years of this century ; and that an amount equal to both has been 
produced in the forty-four years from 1851 to 1894 inclusive. This 
will not seem incredible if we consider the further estimate that 
thirty years ago the manufacturing power of the machinery in the 
mills of Great Britain was computed to be equal to 600,000,000 men, 
or more than all the adults, male and female, of mankind. The 
manufacturing power of Great Britain to-day is greater than that of 
the whole world at the beginning of the century. Is it any wonder 
that the price of things has been downward? What would be the 
blessings of inventions and of mechanical progress if they did not 
cheapen the comforts of life ? Professor Andrews need not confine 
his lamentations over the "baneful, blighting, deadly fall of prices" 
to thirty years; it has been going on throughout the century— except 
■ in human wages, which have appreciated. Therefore, if humankind can 
now earn more than then, and buy more for a given sum with what 
they earn, humanity has been or will be in the main benefited by the 
fall in prices. Call it what you will, the fall in prices is due mainly 
to increased production ; and innumerable examples can be cited from 
every department of human industry whatsoever to show the univer- 
sality of this unerring law of supply and demand in commodities. 

The increase of each labor unit's power to produce commodities 
has been enormous. Is it a " baneful, blighting, deadly" thing to the 
human race that such production should cheapen articles of common 
use? The production of wheat in the United States alone has practi- 
cally doubled per capita within fifty years. In the item of sugar, an 
article entirely unknown to the ancients, Mulhall shows that fifty- 
five years ago the world's product was 1,150,000 tons; at present it is 
5,500,000 tons, or an increase of nearly 500 per cent., and sells for 
practically half what it did twenty years ago. Wheat sells to-day in 
San Francisco for 96 cents per hundred pounds instead of $1 60 
twenty years ago, a reduction of 40 per cent. The average reduction 
on cotton and woolen goods of all kinds, blankets included, in the 
United States has been over 40 per cent. ; in the price of copper over 
65 per cent. ; in the price of steel quite as much. The cost of tonnage 
on wheat by sail vessels from the Pacific Coast to Liverpool has been 
reduced 65 per cent. ; transportation rates generally have been re- 
duced throughout the United States, including the Pacific Coast, over 
40 per cent. Interest on money in San Francisco has been reduced 
over 40 per cent., and the general rate of interest is to-day 6 per cent. , 
instead of 10 and 12 per cent, twenty-one years ago. Insurance, fire 
and marine, has been similarly reduced. Is it a " baneful, blighting, 
deadly thing " to struggling humanity that these things should be 
cheaper? The progress of civilization has been an increase of wages 
and a fall in the prices of commodities. In this country to-day, in 
fact in all Christendom, the average workingman is better fed, better 
clothed, more comfortably housed, enjoys more real luxury than the 
average knight or baron of the middle ages, and this improvement in 
physical comforts is due to the abundance of things to be had at low 
prices. It is not meant by this to intimate that the condition of the 
masses is yet ideal. 
Our financial crises have been owing to extravagances, wasteful- 



ness — governmental, corporative and personal— undue expansion of 
credits, wildcat schemes of speculation, to extreme protection, so- 
called, ana to the reckless introduction of "assisted" immigrants, 
whose functions have largely been to supplant American labor; and 
to corporate schemes capitalized into stock shares beyond all reason 
— beyond all fair proportion to the money actually invested and 
beyond the power of the people comfortably to bear. For an ex- 
ample of this, consider the Sugar Trust. The reformation of all these 
evils requires more virtue than ever was or ever can be in money, 
fiat or otherwise. If the scholar in politics or in political economy 
would consider the milking process that the American public have 
been subjected to for thirty years under the guise of protection, so- 
called, of trusts, and stock shares in endless schemes of inflation, it 
seems to me he would doubtthe power of Government to obviate the 
evil consequences of such enormous extortions by the issue of fiat 
money, whether metal or paper. There is no real capital except 
from previous labor, and a government is as powerless to bring 
wealth into existence out of nothing by fiat as an individual. How- 
ever, if such a device be practical it is in truth the discovery of the 
philosopher's stone, and more's the pity that it did not happen to be 
discovered sooner. Yet in the presence of all the pernicious results 
consequent upon holding slack rein, the Republican party of Cali- 
fornia comes forward and declares for the unlimited free coinage of 
silver at the ratio of 16 to 1. What for? A Layman. 

San Francisco, July 17, 1894. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sausome St San Francisco, Cal 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAT, DURHAM 4 BRODIE 43 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

MACY & DUNHAM m\i Pine St., New York 

GARDEN HOSE. 

Black Line Spiral 
Cotton Robber-Lined Hose 

Will stand 300 lbs. pressure to the square inch and will outlast 
the best rubber hose manufactured. Try a length. 

BOSTON WOVEN HOSE AND RUBBER CO., 

14-16 Fremont St., 8. F-, Cal. 

REMOVAL. 

DELMAS & SHORTRIDGE 

Have removed their law offices to the 

CROCKER BUILDING (Third Floor.) 



SH. REGENSBURGER, attorney-at-law. 
• Booms 1 and 2, 319 Pine Street, San ] 



Francisco, Cal. 



x -rsrs-cr:Es,_A-:r>rc::E . 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 
OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 



CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 



439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 



LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1886.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 



GEO. F. GRANT, 31a naffer 



PHOENIX ASSURANCE GO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INS CHANCE COMPANY, 

(Incorporated A. D., 1799.) 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



July 21. 1894. 



BAN FBAN&SCO NEWS LETTEB 



17 



<^ au ngptm 



IMPROVEMENTS are be.Dg made in water-front property which 
will bare a significant effect on real estate In different parts of 
the city. Tne roadway on Washington street, east of Front, is 
being raised to conform with the official grade on Kast street, In 
front of the ferry landings. Jackson street, within the same 
boundary, will soon receive the same treatment. It is rumored 
that electricity is at the bottom of the new movement. To day 
horse-cars traverse these thoroughfares. Branches of the I'entral 
Railway Company and the Presidio and Ferries Company run 
down Washington street and up Jackson. For the past two years 
it has been expected that the cars of the Central Railway Com- 
pany would be propelled by electricity, and the directors of the 
Coion-street line recently obtained permission to use electricity, 
that particular motive power having been left out of the franchise. 
Double electric tracks are being laid at the ferry, with the rails 
curving into Jackson street, and that is an indication that the 
first steps toward electric lines are being taken. An agreeable 
feature of the laying of the rails is the absence of poles. The be- 
lief is therefore encouraged that the propelling power will be by 
motor or conduit, and not by tbe trolly system. 

Mission property is also likely to be materially stimulated be- 
fore tbe end of the year. It is understood that electric cars will 
be run on that thoroughfare, from tbe ferry to Silver street, not 
later than September 1st. The event will be of much importance 
to those who own land south of Twenty-ninth street. There are 
many homesteads in that vicinity, and owners will be able to 
reach their possessions easily and cheaply, and uncovered lots 
will be built upon during the next two years. Many of those 
homestead lots have not changed hands for over twenty years, 
and the new road should make sales active. 

So many misstatements have appeared in print in regard to the 
two new engine houses, on which bids were received last Mon- 
day at an open meeting of the Board of Supervisors, that we will 
state the facts in regard to the matter. On the 9th inst., the 
Supervisors passed to print an order calling for the erection of 
two fire engine houses for the city department, the bids to be 
handed to the Board one week later. That was allowing five 
legal days in which to obtain bids, and by working on Monday 
and Tuesday nights, three full sets of plans and specifications 
were arranged for the bidders. Tbe original remained in the 
office for the benefit of thoBe who could not get a date. To expe- 
dite matters, further, the architects segregated all tbe minor parts 
of the work, such as plumbing, painting, etc., so that men in 
those lines of business would not stand in the way of the prin- 
cipal contractor. There was no segregation of work called for in 
the advertisement, and in order to give room to all who wanted 
to figure, the architects prepared separate specifications. There 
were 127 contractors who tried to get a chance to figure. Of that 
army but eighteen were selected to figure. The Builders' Asso- 
ciation, through their president, sent in a protest to the Super- 
visors, because not a member of that organization was allowed to 
figure, and asking that new bids be called for. It seems that sev- 
eral members of the Association refused to consider the plans on 
the ground that there were "too many already figuring." There 
promised to be a merry war, but when it was discovered that of 
the eighteen accepted bidders fifteen belonged to the Builders' 
Association, the protest was quickly pigeon-holed. 



ALTHOUGH Queen Victoria rules over an empire that embraces 
possessions in every part of the world, she has never traveled 
outside of Europe, and even there her trips have been short ones 
to France, Holland, Germany, and Italy only. 

WE are in favor of a men's wading party. No women will be 
allowed along, and special guards will be employed to scour 
the brush along the edge of the creek to keep women from fol- 
lowing and watching. — Atchison Globe. 



Our Fair Maidens 



who go to the mountains and the seaside for the summer should be 
very careful when they expose their complexions. The effects of sun- 
burn and poison-oak are very distressing, and they will ruin the 
prettiest skin. Camelline is an infallible remedy and prevention for 
both sunburn and poison oak, and it is the only remedy that has 
proved successful. Its wonderful sales have forced all other face 
powders out of the market. Ladies should not be without it 



Bacon Printing Company, 

508 Clay Street. 



IN-8TTBAN-CB. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

Of HAMIUKO. c.KKMANY. 
V. 1 nru. llrlrrlrUI n initfrr for llie 1'artftr loan llr>i m li 

trio mi > at., n. r. 

Capital .. si.soo.eoo.oo 

Inrtsted in U. S. 654.433.31 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agent* City Department, 
»»» California St.. «. F-.twl. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS P0RTCOSTA. California. 

Storage Capacity, 100.000 Torn*. Regular Warehouse lor aau 
rranclaco Produce Exchange rail Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furiiiBhcd 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of drain . 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of Interest on grain Btored In Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in Pirst-ClasB Companies, or Grain sold, 
If desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-Callfornla Bank. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- Of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO.. of Toronto. 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, A88T. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL »6,700,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Ho. 318 California Street. San Francisco. 

SIEBE, RASGHEN & CO., 

GENERAL INSURANCE, 

Telephone 272. 210 Sanisome St. 

Agents foe San Francisco.— Germania Fire Insurance Co, of New 
York; Hanover Fire Insurance Co., of New York; United Firemen's Insur- 
ance Co., of Philadelphia; Sun Insurance Office, of London. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets 119,724,638.45. 

President. BENJAMIN F. STBVENS. | Viee-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTER 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 

Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. 
Established 1835. 
Capital, $2,250,000- Total Assets, $6,854,663 66 

United States Department: 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
TOSS, COMBAB A CO., General Managers. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BABLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPiTAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

TheBe three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

410 California St., San Francisco, Cal 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE liOMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed f 7 0,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reserve fin addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 7888 9. 124, 057. 60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street, San Francisco 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YORK. 

Capital Paid Up I 600,000 

Assets 8,181,763 

SurplUB to Policy Holders 1,526,167 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

401 Montgomery Street. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 

COl Montgomery Street 



18 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1894. 




5UNBEAMSB§ 



THE constant drop of water 
Wears away the hardest stone; 
The constant gnaw of Towser 

Masticates the toughest bone. 
The constant cooing lover 

Carries off the blushing maid; 
And the constant advertiser 

Is the one who gets the trade. — Wahoo Wasp. 
"Wife (in tears)— I'm sure— (sob)— there is no longer any chivalry 
in you men. Sir Walter Raleigh laid his cloak on the ground for 
Queen Bess to walk over, and you get mad just because poor, dear 
mother sat down on your hat for a minute! —Ally Sloper, London. 

Mr. Henpeck— I am very happy. I can't miss going to Heaven. 
Mr. Singlebliss— How can you prove that? Mr. Henpeck— If I die 
before my wife, then I'll be in Heaven. If she dies first, Heaven 
will be on earth for me. —Der Floh, Vienna. 

Prisoner (who has just been sentenced to two years)— Can't I be 
sent to prison to-day? Jtjdge — Why do you wish it? Pris- 
oner— They have my favorite dish there to-morrow, pork and beans. 
Lodger (to landlady)— Would you mind telling your daughters 
that it disturbs me wheu they play four-handed on the piano? 
Landlady— Why don't vou marry one of them? That will stop it. 

— Ulk, Berlin. 
Priscilla leaned back in her|well cushioned pew, 

With a smile on her winsome young face. 
As she beard the old story of Rachel anew, 
She yawned, mid her ruffles of lace. 
" One man for seven years !" thought this gay coquette, 
" How awfully stupid and queer! 
Now I should prefer, without one reerret, 

Seven men for a single year! " — Cincinnati Tribune. 
Gentleman (to laborer at the scene of a railroad accident)— Good 
gracious! What are you waiting for? Why don't you assist the 
sufferers? Laborer— We're waiting for the photographer, sir. 

— Humor istische Blatter, Vienna. 
" We don't want bear stories." said the editor. "Our readers de- 
mand something spicy." " Well," said the man with the manu- 
script, " this story is about a cinnamon bear." — Pearson's. 

Emily — I am so unhappy. I begin to see that Arthur married me 
for my money. Emily's Dearest Friend— Well, you have the com- 
fort of knowing he is not as simple as he looks. 

— Carricaturen, Vienna. 
Bacon— What's that thread tied about your little finger for? 
Egbert— Oh, that's just to remind my wife to ask me if I forgot 
something she told me to remember. — Tonkers Statesman. 

Crimsonbeak— Roof gardens have a decided advantage over the 
other kind. Yeast — How is that? Crimsonbeak — Your neighbor's 
hens can't get into them. — Tonkers Statesman. 

Little Dot— Oh, I'd give anything if I was old enough to have a 
husband! Mamma— Mercy, child! Why? Little Dot— I'm so 
tired of being petted. — Good News. 

Muller— You always said you would not marry except for beauty, 
yet your fiancee is not even good-looking. Schulze— The beauty is in 
her bank account. — Kladderadatsche, Berlin. 

Judge — What excuse had you to break the complainant's head? 
Prisoner— Force of circumstances, sir. He wouldn't hand over his 
watch without it. — H Folshetto, Rome. 

Teacher— Who was the first man? Fritz— Charles the Great, sir. 
Teacher— No! Adam. Fritz— Ach! I didn't know you meant a 
foreigner. — Wespen t Berlin. 

" That was an awful accident that happened to Smith when he 
was out fishing." " What was it? " " Hecaught half a dozen fish." 

— Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

Judge— Prisoner, the clerk will now read the list of your prior con- 
victions. Prisoner— Can't I sit while he does it, your honor? 

— Carricaturen, Vienna. 

w 

The Grand Canon Line !— To the East ! 



" Would n't be without it for worlds!" was the emphatic declaration of 
a lady in reference to Ayer's Hair Vigor. 



Commencing May 1st the <l Santa Fe Route" Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Tuesday. 
Manager in Charge. Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are 
run through to Chicago every day without change. This is the only 
Line by which the Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. 
Send for illustrated book giving full particulars. W. A. Bissell, 
G. P. A., 650 Market street, Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

There are plenty of stylish men in San Francisco, but they are 
the men who buy their furnishing goods at John W. Carmany's, 25 
Kearny street, where only the latest styles are sold. 



Carson City, the most beautiful town in Nevada, only 14 miles 
from Lake Tahoe, is the place to take thr Keeley cure. No graduate 
from this institute has relapsed. 

To Let— Furnished . A Modern House of Eight rooms; convenient to 
two cable lines; grand marine view; good neighborhood Keut reasonable 
to desirable party. BALDWIN A HAMMOND. 10 Montgomery Street. 

Dyspeptics, take comfortl Ayer's Sarsaparilla has cured worse caBes 
than yours. 



Mothers be sure and ubo "Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 

BAFKS. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST GO. 

Paid- u p Capital, SI, OOO.OOO. 

Corner Montgomery and California Streets, San Francisco. 

J. D. FRY, President HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown. Secretary and Treasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depositary for Court and Trust 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an individual 
in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rate* of interest thereon. 

RENTS SAFES inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from $6 per 
annum upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 

WILLS DRAWN AND TAKEN CARE OF WITHOUT CHARGE. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

-V W. Corner Sansome and Busli Streets. 

Established 1870. TJ. S. Depositary. 

Capital (Paid Up) $1,500,000. 

SURPLUS $800,000 | UNDIVIDED PRr FITS $76,196 

S. G MURPHY PretideutlE. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT .. .Vice-President | GEO. W.KLINE Ass'tCashier 

DIRECTORS: 

Geo A. Low, George C. Perkins, S G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, JameB Moffitt, 

'1 nomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking: Business Transacted. 

SAFE DFPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K LYNCH, Manaeer, 

Safes to rent from So to ?lO0 per annum (under the exclusive control of 

the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

storage A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. H. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited- 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid Up . $2,450,000 

Reserve $500,000. 

San Francisco Office— 124 CaliforniaSt. London Office— 73 Lombard St., E.C . 

Portland Branch— 48 First St. Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER. Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. 
Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDER1CH. 
LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Uiexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, Limited. 

N. W. Corner SANSOME and SUTTER. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 I Paid Up Capital. $3,000,000 

Reserve Fond, $800,000. 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London. 

AGENTS— New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 
17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issue. 

BIG. GREENBAUM, j „„„„„„„ 
C. ALTSCHUL j Managers. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sathee &. Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON President 

C. F. A. TALBOT, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, C. S. Benedict, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co Chicago — Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley A Co, Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHA8. F. CROCKER, | E. B, POND. 
WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN VICE . RESIDENT 

GEO, w. KLINE . . Cashier 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK- 

222 MONTGOMERY ST., MILLS BUILDING. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS HADE 



Wm. Alvord 
Wm Babcock 
Adam <->rant 



DIRECTORS: 
Jerome Lincoln 
Q. D Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon 
J. B. Randol. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. IS Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24. 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Secretary 



July 21, 1*94. 



> \n I l:\Ni 1-m O NEWS i.M I I I. 



19 



W- ItaSEjfliyjj;' 



WHAT DOES IT MATTER ?-. 1.7. Wattrhoutt in Stnrkti-n Mail. 



-BA.X 



w 



HAT need 1 care when the ■lorm-eloudi tly. 
Crossing the face of the sullen 
Whut doe? il matter though great drops beat. 
Surge of the tempest, or drift of the 
Why should I head the dash of the wave. 
Wind 1 ' that unceasingly mutter and rave. 
- of darkness that wail as they die, 
that crouch In the mista of the sky? 

After the tempest the sun will shine; 
Breath of the morning will cheer like wine , 
Blessing and happiness wholly divine 

Out of the darkuess creeping. 
And I shall partake of the daylight's cheer, 
Lire and be glad of it, holding lite dear : 
My soul will rejoice in a new atmosphere, 

I tat of its chaos leaping. 

Then need we care when the storm of pain 
Beats on our lives with its sullen rain ? 
Then shall we heed when the sun of hope 
Hides where the clouds no longer ope ? 
What will it matter when all is done, 
Wail of the tempest or shine of the suu? 
Voices of gladness or patter of tears, 
What will they count at the end of the years? 

Never the tempest that has no end ; 
Never the lonely who finds no friend: 
Never a way but will upward tend 

After the valley's ended. 
After the beat of the rain, the sun ; 
Eest for the toiler when all is done, 
And the lonely heart when the race is run 

By an infinite love's befriended. 



ROMANCE.— Andrew Lang. 

My love dwelt in a Northern land, 
A dim tower in the forest green 

Was his, and far away the sand 

And gray wash of the waves was seen 
The woven forest boughs between ; 

And through the Northern summer night 
The sunset slowly died away, 

And herds of strange deer, silver white. 
Came gleaming through the forest gray 
And fled like ghosts before the day. 

And oft that month we watched the moon 
Wax great and white o'er wood and lawn, 

And wane, with waning of the .Tune, 
Till, like a brand for battle-drawn, 
She fell, and flamed in a wild dawn. 

I know not if the forest green 

Still girdles round that castle gray, 

I know not if the boughs between 
The white deer vanish ere the day; 

The grass above my love is green; 
His heart is colder than the clay. 



OF MARGUERITES.— Ernest Dowson. 



" A little— passionately— not at all? " 

She cast the snowy petals on the air ; 
And what care we how many petals fall? 
Nay, wherefore seek the seasons to forestall? 

It is but playing, and she will not care: 
A little — passionately — not at all ! 
She would not answer us, if we should call 

Across the years ; her visions are too fair. 
And what care we how many petals fall? 
She knows us not, nor recks if she enthrall 

With voice, and eyes, and fashion of her hair, 
A little— passionately— not atali ! 

Knee-deep she goes in meadow grasses tall. 

Kissed by the daisies that her fingers tear; 
And what care we how many petals fall? 

We pass and go, but she shall not recall 

What men we were, nor all she made us bear. 

"A little— passionately— not at all! " 

And what care we how many petals fall ? 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

R tra] Chattel 
CAPITAL paid Up $3 000 000 

RESERVE FUND 1.404.000 

Southeut oornar Btutfa and 
HKAn ni'iii k At» Lombard street, London 

JtHAM hes— Victoria. vaiii'itnviT, n«*w WMimliuter, K»mloop», N&uafnm, 
I nix) NelMD: British Columbia: l'<>rti«ii.|. tn. ■. , sua I acorn ft, 

wubuaton. 

Bank transact* r Qeaeral HntikiuR Business, aeoouuti opened mi I* 
i heck, aud spool*] Deposit* received. Commercial Credit* granted 
AvaUahif in nil part* •>( the world approved hills dl&couuled and ad- 
vances made on e 1 collateral security. Draws direct »t current raiea 

Head Office and Br uches, am) upon Its Agents, ae Follows: 
New York— Merchants Bank <>r i anada; Cmi too— Ftrsl National hunk 
Liverpool— North ami tJouth Wales Bank; Scotland— Brltlt-h Llueo Com- 
pany; Icici.ANh— Bank 0l IrelAii<l ■ URXICO— London Hunk of Ml 
etor/ni Ajirrk a— London Bank <>f Mcxlmnud Booth America; china aud 
J aPAH— Chartered Hank ol India. Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Unnkhn: Company 
of Sydney. Ld.; Dembrara and Trinidad (West Ind ies)— Colonial Hank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. San Francisco. 

CAPITAL .. $3,000,000 00 

SURPLUS and Undivided Profits (January 1, W94) . 3,247,584 02 

WILLIAM ALVOKH, President. THOMAS BROWN, ('ashler. 

8. Prentiss asiiTH, Ass't Cashier, I. P. Moolton, -id Ass't Cashier. 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

New York— Messrs Laidlaw *fc Co; The Bank of New York, N. B. A 
Boston— Tremout National Bauk; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sous: Paris— Messrs. He Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev)— Agency 
of The Bank of California; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; Australia 
aud New Zealand— Bauk of New Zealaud; China, Japan aud India— 
Chartered Bauk of India, Australia aud Chiua st. LoU's— Boatmens Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, or., Los Angeles, aud on 
Loudon, Paris, Berliu, Bremeu, Hamburg, Fraukfort-ou-Maiu, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiauia, Melbourne, Syudey, Aucklaud, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, GeuoH, aud all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California ami Webb Streets. 

Branch office 1700 Market Street, corner Polk. 

DEPOSITS, lune 30. 1893 $28,058,691 01 

GUARANTEE CAPhAL and Surplus 1.699.434 00 

DIRECTORS— Albert Miller, President; George W Beaver, Vice-Presi- 
deut; Thomas Magee, E. B. Houd, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martiu, \V. C. B. 
Ue Fremery, George C. Boardmau.J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, aud Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in Sau Fraucisco, but the responsibility of this saviugs 
Bauk commences ouly with the acual receipt of t e money. The sigua- 
ture of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge Is 
made for pass book or eutrauce fee. Office hours — 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Satur- 
da y evenings, 6 ;30 to 8. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' institute Building 

GUARANIEED CAPITAL, SI, 004,000. 

OFFICE KB. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES D. PHLLAN, S G MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G Fair, L P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James D. Phelan, Jame> Moffitt, S G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, and 
Robert McElroy. 

Interest pa. d ou Term aud Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be seut by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Eschauge 
on City Banks. When opening accounts seud signature. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY- 

No. 526 CALIFORNIA ST., S. F. 

tfua-antecd Capital and Reserve Fund $1,610,000 OO 

Deposits January 2, 189* Z'.K I ait,:! I 7 O'i 

OFFICERS— President. Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B A. Becker; 
Second Vice-Pres deut, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Touruey; Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Mull r. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— Edward KruEe, George H. Eggers, O. Schoe- 
maun, F. lillmanu, H. H<>rstm<inn, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Stein- 
hart, Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfeliow. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,0u0 ] Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 | Reserve Fond 700,000 

Head Office— IS Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general baukiug business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, aud issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loaus money, buys aud sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) „„„„„„,, 

P. N. LILLfcNTHAL, ( Managers 



WELLS, FARGO & CO 'S BANK. 



N . E. Corner Sansome aud Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
(ash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 OO 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S. King. . .. Manager 

H. Wadsworth . . . . .Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. , 

N. Y. City, H. B PARSONS, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. DOOLY, Cashier 

DIRECTORS. 
John J. Valentine, Benj P.Cheney, Oliver Eldridge. Henry E. Hunting- 
ton, Homer S. King, Geo. E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS .LETTER. 



July 21 l&U. 




FROM a BostoD fashion writer's accouDt of the dresses seen one 
Saturday at the horse races of the Country Club the following 
selections are made: 

•■ Many of the girls affected the navy blue twill uniform, with its 
familiar accessories of sailor hat and blouse or vest. But there were 
scores of others who wore dainty feminine fripperies of lace and rib- 
bon and flowery hats. Two strikingly handsome toilets were a good 
deal stared at by the throng of visitors. They were worn by two very 
charming girls in an elegant carriage, with a smart coachman and 
tiger in fine livery perched correct and stiff on the box. One was an 
accordion plaited silk, such as are being worn with such exceeding 
favor in Paris at present, and was in a rich navy blue, trimmed taste- 
fully with black moire ribbon. The skirt, body, and sleeves were all 
accordion plaited, and otherwise quite plain. The ribbon was put on 
in a unique way, being used as bretelles over the shoulders and end- 
ing in a belt of the same, which fastened at one side with a bow and 
long ends; the bretelles were tied into crisp bows on the shoulders, 
and the choker, also of moire, was finished by a similar bow at the 
back. The hat was merely a French turban in soft black straw, fancy 
trimmed with folded gimp and a jetted aigrette at one side. 

" The other toilet was enhanced by a very elegant cape. The gown 
was of spotted wool, in an odd French crepe, and was a dull old rose 
spotted in black; it was quite transparent, like wool canvas, and was 
made up over black silk, I fancy, as I could not see distinctly from 
where I sat. It also was trimmed with moire ribbon. The cape was 
of black corded silk trimmed with black lace insertion. It must have 
been very stiffly interlined with canvas or crinoline, tor ii set out very 
crisply over the shoulders. Most capes are decidedly dowdy, but this 
one was very chic and elegant, and was finished at the throat by a 
thickly plaited ruche of black tulle, which was very becoming to the 
girl. The hat was a fine straw in rose and black interwoven and 
rolled gracefully at one side. It was tr'iumed with a wreath of duil 
pink roses under the brim, resting on the hair, and on the crown with 
bows and bows of black moire, two of which served as an aigrette 01 
cockade at one side. 

" An entire toilette of black moire, with grayish cream lace sleeves 
and Spanish lacket was worn by a very beautiful woman of about 
thirty-five, and was one of the most stylish costumes at the races, its 
extreme simplicity and richness giving it an ' air ' that a more fanci- 
ful gown could not possibly possess. The skirt was gored and very 
full at the back, and flared stifliy about the bottom, as if whalebone 
were inserted in the hem. It was entirely free from trimming, bin 
ritttd like a glove over the woman's perfect hips. The bodice was 
also finely fitted to the figure, and the lace was laid on smoothly. The 
sleeves were very large and set off well, giving great breadth to the 
shoulders. The perfecting touch to the costume was the small, toque- 
like bonnet, with a crown of violets and a cockade of green ivy 
leaves at one side. The brim was of coarse black straw, and it was 
tied under the chin at one side with soft crushed stiinga of black 
tulle. Dainty pearl white gloves and slender patent leather shoe.- 
were worn with this elegant costume, which was perfect in every 
detail. 

" Checked taffetas gowns were very numerous, and were made up in 
all sorts of styles, and with a great variety of trimmings. 1 cannot 
wonder at their popularity, for anything daintier, crisper, or cleaner- 
xooking cannot be manufactured, and, moreover, they are becoming 
to everybody, young and old, plain or pretty, and they may be made 
very dressy with trimmings of lace and ribbon, or severely plain fur 
street wear, with simple folds of the same laid on as a garniture. The 
favorite checks seem to be navy blue and white and lavender and 
white, although to my mind those of brown and white are very hand- 
some. ««— — * 

" Pique and drill tailor costumes were thickly scattered among the 
crowd, and were mostly dark in color. One fetching one was worn 
by a stylish-looking girl with reddish-brown hair and large gray eyes 
It was of gray drill, with a waistcoat of dull blue and white spotted 
pique, and was made up in the conventional manner with a full 
basqued coat and plain habit skirt. It had very deep revers and 
French sleeves, a departure from the gigot style which usually is seen 
on tailor gowns. A snowy shirt and collar were worn, and a prince 
scarf of black silk. The jaunty sailor hat was of navy blue straw, 
with a black moire band. 

" Several drill gowns were set off by crimson or scarlet waistcoats, 
but I cannot say that I think them pretty or becoming, for they seem 
so ' sporty ' to me, and not at all suited to a woman of refinement." 

The economic crisis is a dangerous thing, and it is a source of 
trouble to all men. Nothing will allay that trouble so easily as a 
drink of Argonaut whisky, which would make a man forget all the 
troubles of his existence. It is a wonderful stimulant, and by long 
odds the best whisky in the market to-day. All admirers of cnod 
liquor drink Argonaut whisky in preference'to any other. E. Mar- 
tin & Co., agents, 408 Front street. 



City Index and Purchasers Guide. 



ATTYS-AT-LAW. 
BERGEN A ffllBlH, (B. F. Bergen; C. M. Wilbur), 215 Santome St. 
FR ANK K E NNEDY, law offic e, 66 M urphy Bldg., 123 6 Market St. 

CANDIES. 
1'ANPIES put up for shipment at ROBERTS', Polk and Bush streets 



DENTISTS 
R UTIAK, 416 Geary street. 
V. M. H ACKETT, 413 Leavenworth street. 



DOOR CHECKS. 
THE NORTON Door Clieck and Spring. F.D. Morrell, 593 Mission St. 

DRUGGISTS. 

KELLY'S CORN (IRE, 85c. Drugs at wholesale, 102 Eddy street. 

EVANS' POISON OAK SPECIFIC'. Positive cure. Sold hy all drug- 
gists. 

MARBLE AND GRANITE. 

W. H. MCCO RMIC K, 1422 Market st., bet. City Hall Ave. and Larkln St. 

MILLINERY. 

THE WONDER Hat, Flower and Feather Store. 1024-1028 Market street. 

RESTAURANTS. 

FRANCO- AMERICAN RestaHrant-521 Montgomery St. F. Hitte. 

SHOEMAKERS. 

REPAIRING! DONE while you wait at POLLOCK'S, 202 Powell street. 

SURVEYORS. 
JOHN A BENSON, Engineer. Dealer in Land Scrip, 430Kearuy 3t. 

HYGIENIC AIR COMPRESSORS 
For antomlzaiion purposes. 

THE CLEVELAND FAUCET CO., 208 Ellis street 



HlNK 
THINKS 

IN CHOOSING DRINK5 AND 

MIRES' 

Root beer- 

WILL LINK YOUR THINKS. 

Deliciously Exhilarating, Spark- 
ling, Effervescent. Wholesome 
as well. Purifies the blood, tick- 
les the palate. Ask your store- 
keeper for it. Get the Genuine. 



THE CHAS. E. HIRES CO., 

Philadelphia. 



Broo^Iyi) 
Jtotel 



Conducted on both the 

EUROPEAN AND 

AMERICAN PLAN. 



BUSH STREET, bet. Sansome & Montgomery, 
Sau Francisco, Cal. 

This favorite hotel is under the management of CHAS. 
MONTGOMERY, and is as good, if not the best, Family and 
Business Men's Hotel in San Francisco. 

Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, first-class service and 
the highest standard of respectability guaranteed. 

Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

BOARD AND ROOM, per day, »1 25, *1 F-0, $1 76 and $2 00. 

per week, J7 00 to 112 00. 

per month, $27 50 to M0 00. 

SINGLE ROOMS, 51 cents to $1. 



pree <?oac,l? to and pro/r\ tl?(? f-Iotel. 



BETHESDA. 

AMERICA'S FAVORITE WATER. 
" Bethesda certainly possesses medicinal properties of rare value." 
—Hon. A. E. Stevenson, Vice-President of the United States. 

" I regard Bethesda Water the best in the market."— Hon. George 
R. Davis, Director-General World's Fair. 

L. CAHEN & SON, AGENTS, 

418 Sacramento street, S. F. 



July 21, 1894. 



>\\ I RAM I- NEWS III I I i: 



21 




.CxJr, 



meon-m^: 




IV laM week tt itemed lo b<» tbe most earnest wish and aim of 
everyone to get lo tbe city as soon as possible, the desire tbfs 
week has been equally as great, at least among our society folk, 
to get out of town in the direction -»f Monterey, ami u a oonseqaence 
social life in Bu Pnndsco has been far from lively. However, then* 
are few more active memlH*r< of the charmed circle than the Misses 
Hobart. and wherever they are there i* always something being done 
for the entertainment of their Friends, ami SO daring their recent Stay 
in town they made life pleasant for themselves and others through 
the medium of theatre partie-, supper>, a dinner, and a luncheon, as 
well as a farewell visit to the Fair. 



rhotfl hveh young bit I.alhnm. I.anrie Adams, and 

Southard HidTman. ha\- trip to Lake rahoe, going 

d their own team and taking II leisurely. Their friends an ex 
pectins; to hear, on their return, of some wonderful catches of hsh, 
that sport being in a verv satisfactory condition thereabouts at 
present. 

The Kay .tow. I assembled toi the merriment of the national holi- 
day at the Collier place! In Lake County, had the jolliest kind of a 
time, according to one ol Even -tuiriy Al. Howie relaxed 

from his aristocrat!) calm, tils '•pel weakness," as tin* girl* dubbed 
her, was then-, of course, but Ed, BheldOD was noticeably absent. 
Miss LtUte Lawlor's line voice woke echoes in vocal strains, and Miss 
Ethel Cohen's bright sallies evoked constanl laughter. 

Mi-- Mabel Yost has been spending two weeks with Mrs. John H. 
Dickinson, at .Siuisalito, keeping her from feeling lonely during the 
absence of the General in Sacramento. 



Del Monte i- having its turn now and gala times are expected there 
to-day. the tennis tournament which commenced yesterday and the 
baseball to be played to-day drawing a large crowd of our fashiona- 
bles to witness the games, and many of then) will remain there until 
after the Country Club shoot next month. The cotillion to-night 
will, it is thought, be one of the best danced there of late years; Mr. 
Greenway will, of course, be the leader, and a number of belles and 
beaux who will take part in it have been upon the ground for several 
day- past. These include Mrs. I'etle l>onahue and ber sisters, the 
Misses Wallace, the Misses Goad. Mesdames Will and Tom Magee, 
and the Misses Hush, of Oakland, Mrs. George Pope, Miss Carrie 
Taylor, Mrs. Dan Murphy. Miss Carolan, Miss Bee Hooper, the 
Misses Hobart, the Misses Crocker. Miss McBean, Misses Mae and 
Claire Tucker, Walter Hobart, Harry Tevis, Harry Simpkins, Bob 
Grayson, George Pope, Dan Murphy, Harry Stetson, etc. 

it has been rather quiet this week at the Hotel Rafael after the 
noise and bustle attendant upon the recent holiday season and its 
gayeties, but while there have been many departures there have also 
been a goodly number of new arrivals to fill up the gaps thus made, 
among whom Dr. and Mrs. 0. 0. Burgess were very welcome guests. 
Several pretty dinner and supper parties have been given in the 
private rooms of the hotel, and music, dancing, bowling, and tennis 
help to pass away the time most pleasantly. 

Recent additions to army circles in San Francisco are Major Bell 
and Captain and Mrs. Barrett. The latter are domiciled at the Occi- 
dental Hotel, where Mrs. Barrett will receive on Mondays. 

The marriage mart has been tolerably active of late. There were 
two weddings on Wednesday of this week, those of Miss Agnes Drew 
and J. H. Skinner, whicb was a quiet home bridal, and of Miss Millie 
Frank and Charles A. Gibson, which was solemnized at the Central 
Methodist Episcopal Church, on Mission street, and was followed by 
a large reception at the home of tbe bride's mother, on Haightstreet. 
The wedding in which out of town society is taking the most inter- 
est will take place to-day at Sausalito, where, in Christ Church, the 
Reverend Charles Miel will unite Miss Ella Le Count and George 
Slocum, TJ. S. N., in marriage, and the after reception at Cliff 
Haven promises to be a pleasant affair, largely attended. 

Among the weddings in prospect is that of Miss Millie du Frane 
and Alfred W. Wehie, which is named for Wednesday, the 8th of 
August, and which will be a home celebration, the ceremony to be 
performed in the afternoon at 2707 Bush street, in the presence only 
of relatives of the contracting parties. 

New York city will be the place next month of the nuptials of Miss 
Verdenal and A. Lee Gray, of Fresno, at which event the prospective 
bride's cousins, Misses Laura and Lottie Gashwiler, will officiate as 
bridesmaids, going East in time for that purpose. 

Last evening the Camera Club gave another— the fiftieth— of its en- 
joyable lectures. The theme, "Hawaii, the Paradise of the Pacific," 
was ably handled by the lecturess, Mrs. M. L. Gaus, and the views 
with which it was illustrated were very beautiful. As usual, Metro- 
polian Hall was tilled to its utmost capacity. 

Mr. W. B. Peyton and his bride were among the arrivals of the 
week from the East en route to Santa Cruz, where they will reside. 
Russ Wilson put in his appearance by the delayed train on Monday 
last, only twenty days from New York overland, and expressed him- 
self as being delighted to find himself here at last. Mrs. William 
Ellicott, who has been spending the past four months with relatives 
in Baltimore, also was a passenger by the same train ; she has gone 
to San Mateo, where she will remain during July, and upon her re- 
turn to town will occupy her old rooms at the Hotel Richelieu. Joe 
Grant is among the latest arrivals from Europe. Mrs. Torbert and 
Miss Molliehave left Mrs. Earle's, where they have been visiting for 
several weeks, and are residing at the Colonial. 

Mrs. Herman Oelrichs and her sister, Miss Birdie Fair, are again 
upon their native soil, having returned during the week from their 
trip to Europe. 

Mrs. Sam Wilson was among the arrivals of belated passengers by 
the first overland through train the early part of the week. 



Colonel and Mrs. Spaulding have returned to their home in the 
Sandwich Islands, after a visit of several weeks in California, during 
which time they were the guests of Dr. and Mrs. O. O. Burgess. The 
Reverend W. I. Kip has gone on a vacation trip to Alaska, sailing on 
the steamer Walla Walla on Thursday last. His youngest sister, 
Miss Mary Kip, accompanied him. 

Mrs. Lloyd Tevis's numerous friends at San Rafael were kept busy 
on Saturday evening last congratulating her upon a very lucky es- 
cape from what might have been a terrible accident. Mrs. Tevis, ac- 
companied by her friend, Mrs. Salisbury, and the Blanding children, 
was taking an afternoon drive when the pole of the carriage snapped 
and the horses bolted. Fortunately they were stopped before dam- 
age was done further than a severe fright. 

Joseph A. Donahoe, Jr. and family are spending the summer at 
Menlo Park. It is the intention of this young couple to build a tine 
residence on the corner of Fillmore and Broadway for their winter 
home. The elegant house now being erected in that vicinity by Mr. 
George W. Gibbs will prove a valuable addition to the beautiful resi- 
dences of the Western Addition. 



Society will be pleased to learn that Mrs. Thos. H. Selby is rapidly 
recovering from her recent severe illness, and, as soon as practicable, 
she will be moved to the city from Fair Oaks, where she is at present. 

Mrs. Cosmo Morgan returned from the Santa Cruz mountains this 
week, and will leave to-morrow for a two months' visit in Southern 
California. 

Mrs. Edward Morton and daughter leave to-day for San Jose, to be 
gone a month. 

H. S. Field, of Hammersmith & Field, is dangerously ill. 

THE power of the police of a city is so great and the temptations 
to err so numerous and pressing, that discoveries of crime 
flourishing under police protection are never surprising. The re- 
volting revelations of the corruption in the Police Department of 
New York have led tbe people of other large cities to watch their 
own guardians of the peace more closely. The Philadelphia Times 
has printed articles exposing the crookedness of the police of 
that city, and an investigation has been ordered. In Pittsburg 
and Boston there are loud demands made for investigation. In 
Chicago the Grand Jury, after a thorough investigation, has 
found a "highly discreditable and corrupt condition of affairs 
throughout the city." It recommends that a special Grand Jury 
be summoned for the purpose of investigating and exposing the 
evil of gambling "and the connection of police and other officials 
therewith." If this wave of indignation should happen to reach 
San Francisco there would likely be many amazing discoveries. 



EARRINGS are again fashionable, and jewelers are showing 
hoops, pendants, screw-solitaires and every form known. 
The conservative woman is waiting to see whether the fashion 
will be generally adopted before she spoils her pretty ears with 
this relic of savagery. 

Awarded Highest Honors World's Fair. 



DSPRIC 





Baking 
Powder: 



The only Pure Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia; No Alma 
Used in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1894. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trams Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leave 1 From June 26, 1894. I Abbive 

7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 6:45 a 
7-00 a Beniela, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Redding, Castle Crag 

and Dunsmuir, via Davis 7:15 p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and *Santa Rosa — 6:15 P 

8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone. 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red Bluff 

andOroville 4:15 p 

900 a New Orleans ExpresB, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles, Deming, El 

Paso. New Orleans and East 5:45 p 

9:00 A Martinez and Stockton 10:45a 

*9:00a Peters and Milton — ... *7:15p 

12:30 f Niles, San Jose and Livermore . . 8:45 a 

•1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00 p 

4-00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 

SantaRosa 9:15a. 

4:00 p. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Lauding, 
Marysville, Oroville and Sacra- 
mento 10:45a 

4:30 P. Niles, San Jose, Livermore, 
Stockton, Modesto, Merced and 

Fresno 7:15 p 

4:30p. Raymond (for Yosemite) 10:45a. 

5:00 p. Lob Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara and 

Lob Angeles. 10:45a. 

5 :00 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic ExpresB, 

forMojaveand East 10:45 a. 

6:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45a 
6*00p. Haywards, Niles and San Jose.. 7:45 a. 

J7:00 P. Vallejo +7:45 P. 

7:00p. Oregon ExnreBB. Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Pnget Sound and Ea st. 10:45 a 

Santa Crui Division (Na rrow Gauge). 

17:45 a Sunday excursion for Newark, 
San Jose, Los Gatos, Feltou and 

Santa Cruz (8:05 p 

8:15a. Newark. Uenterville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 p. 

*2:45 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek. 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *11:50a 

4:45 p. Newark, SanJose, Los GatOB. 9:50a. 

Coast Division (Third aid Town send Streets ). 

*6:45 a. San Jose, New Almaden and Way 

Stations *1:45 p. 

J7:30 a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 
Grove and Principal Way Sta- 
tions I8:33p. 

8:15 a. Ban Jose, TresPinoB, Santa Crut, 
Pacific Grove, Paso Roblea, San 
Ban Luis Obispo and principal 

Way Stations 6:26 p. 

J;9:47a. Palo Alto and Way Statious 11:45 p. 

10:40 a. SanJose, and Way Stations. .. 5:06 p. 

11:45 a. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 3:30 p. 
*2:20f. Ban Jobo, Gilroy, Tree Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

PaciflcGrove . ..*10:40a. 

*3:S0 p. Ban JOBe and Principal Way Sta- 
tions 9:47 a. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations *S:06a. 

5-J.O p. San Jose and Way Stations.... ... "8:48 a. 

6 :S0 p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6:35 a. 

tll:45P. Palo Alto and principal Way 

Stations... t7:26p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

FromSAI FRANCISCO— Foot of Market St. (Slip S)— 
*7 00 *8 00 9 00 *10 00 and 11 00 A. M., *12 30 
11 00 *2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *6 00 P. M. 
From OIKiaSD— Foot of Broadway. 

•« 00 *7 00 800*9 00 10 00 and *11.00 A. M. 

t!2 00 *12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 and «5 00 P. M. 

A. lor Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

•BundayB excepted. +8aturdays only, 

t Bund ay s only. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other infor m ation. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour oj sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Oceanic Tuesday, July 17, 1894 

Gaelic Tuesday, August 7, 1894 

Belgic Thursday, Sept- ti, 1894 

Oceanic (via Honolulu) . . .Tuesday, Sept. 25, 1894 
ROUND TRIP TICKET8AT REDUCED RATES 
Cabirj Plans on exhibition and Passage 
TIcketa lor Bale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
streets, San Francisco. 

For freight apply at offices of Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, at wharf, or at No. 202 
Front street, San Francisco. 

T. H.GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 



COLOR EFFECTS. 

GREEN placed in juxtaposition with red 
produces a very rich effect — the green 
becoming greener and the red more intense. 

Blue and orange harmonize; also yellow 
and purple. 

Blue, red, and yellow, if separated by 
linee of white, may all be used together 
and not produce a dazzling effect in a room. 

Blue and gray are cold colors, while red 
is warm and exciting, and these can be 
used to effect the mind to any extent de- 
sired. 

Blue used in a ceiliDg gives the effect of 
height ; in a recess it gives the effect of dis- 
tance. This is desirable for the owner of 
small rooms to remember. 

Yellow, on the contrary, lowers the 
height and brings out the recess, while red 
is the only color that appears to remain 
stationary. 

COUNTING the bearing and non-bearing 
orange trees in Florida, there are esti- 
mated to be 10 000,000 trees. California is 
credited with having 6,000,000 and Arizona 
about 1,000,000. 

If a boy is not trained to endure and to 
bear trouble he will grow up a girl; and a 
boy that is a girl has all a girl's weakness 
without any of her regal qualities. — H. W. 
Beecher. 

TitEEE is a law of forces which hinders 
bodies from sinking beyond a certain depth 
in the sea; but in the ocean of baseness 
the deeper we get the easier the sinking. — 
Lowell. 

Prescribe no positive laws to thy will, 
for thou ruayest be forced to-morrow to 
drink the same water thou despisest to- 
day. — Fuller. 

To judge human character rightly, a man 
may sometimes have very small experi- 
ence, provided he has a very large heart. — 
Buhner. 

A brave man knows no malice, but for- 
gets, in peace, the injuries of war, and 
gives his direst foe a friend's embrace. — 
Cowper. 

Let not the emphasis of hospitality lie 
in bed and board, but let truth, love, honor, 
and courtesy flow in all thy deeds. — Emer- 
son. 

Clear summer has forth walk'd unto 
the clover sward, and she has talk'd full 
soothingly to every nested finch. — Keats. 

The Turkish Government has forbidden 
tbe importation of all patent medicines 
into that country. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

DiBpatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a, m., May 25, June 4, 9, 19, 
24; July 5, 9, 19, 24; August 8, 8, 18, 23. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
May 25th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles), and Newport, every fourth and fifth 
day, at 11 a. m. 

For Eusenada, Mazatlan, La Paz and Guaymas 
(Mexico), 25th of each month. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOOr-ALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'lAgentB, 
No. 10 Market street. San Francisco. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

\S bv « World tours, steamer 

, ^>\zZ ''. r, and rail. First class. 

$610. Second class, 

$350. 

*£ O. S. S. Company's 

i steamers sail: 

For HONOLULU 

APIA. AUCKLAND 

and SYDNEY, S. S. 

"MONOWAI," 
J lily 26, 2 p. H. 
For HONOLULU. 
8. 8. - AUSTRALIA," 
August 4, 1894. 
For passage apply to 138 Montgomery Street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market Street. 
J. D. SPRECKELo <k BROS. CO., General Agts 




S£VE1» 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

TIBURON FERRY— Foot of Market Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9:20, 11:00 A. M.; 12:35,3:30, 

5:10, 6:30 p. m. Thursdays— Extra trip at 

11:30 p. M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 

11:30 p. M. 
8UNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30,11:00 a.m.; 1:80,3:30,5:00. 

6:20 p. M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 A. M.; 12:45, 
8:40, 5:10 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:55 
and 6:30 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40,11:10 A. M.;l:40, 3:40,5:00. 
6:25 p. M. 
Between San Francisco and Scnuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 

Special Saturday to Monday Train Service. 

SATURDAYS-Leave San Francisco at 5:10 P.M.; 
arrive at Cloverdale at 8:45 p.m. 

SUNDAYS— Leave San Francisco at 5:00 P.M.; 
arrive at Cloverdale at 8:38 p . m 

SUNDAYS-Leave Cloverdale at 6:45 a. m.; ar- 
rive at San Franci6co at 10:40 A. m. 

MONDAYS— Leave Cloverdale at 5:00 A. M. ; ar- 
rive at San Francisco at 8:50 a. m. 



Leave 8. F. 


In Effect 
Ap'l 15,1834. 


ARRIVE IN S. F. 


WprIt 


TO 1, 


Days 


Sundays 


DESTI TION 


Sundays 


Days. 


7:40a.M. 

3:30 p.m. 
5:10 P.M. 


8:00a.m.j Novato, 
9:30a.m. Petalums, 
5:00p.m. i SantaRosa. 


10:40 a. M 
6:05 P.M 
7:30 p.m 


8:50a. M 
10:30 am 
6:15p.m 


7:40a.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Fultou 
Windsor , 
Healdsburg, 
Geyserville, 
Cloverdale 
Pieta, Hop- 
land, Ukiah. 














7:30p.m. 




3:30 p.m. 


6:15 pm 


7:40a.m:. 

3:30p.M. 


8:00a. m. 


Guerneville 


7:30p.m. 


10:30 am 
6:15 fh 


7:40a. m.]8:00a.m.| Sonoma |10:40a.m. 
5:10 p.m. [5:00p. mi Glen Ellen. \ 6:05p.M. 


8:50am. 
6:15 pm. 



7:40a. m | 8:00a.m.| Sebastopol. 110:40a. m|10:30a.m 
3:30 p.m | 5:00 p.m.I | 6 05p.m| 6:15p.m 

Stages connect at aanta Rosa for Mark West 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs 
Springs, Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point 
Arena. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lake- 

Sort, Booneville. Greenwood, Orr's Hot Springs, 
[endocino City, Port Bragg, Usal, Westport, 
Cahto, Willitts, Capella, Porno, Potter Valley, 
Johu Dav's, Lively s. Gravelly Valley, Harris, 
Bloeksburg, Bridgeviile, Hydesville and Eureka. 
Saturday to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rates. 

On Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beyoud San Rafael at half rates. 



TICKET OFFICE— Corner New Montgomery 
and Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 



H. C. WHITING, 
Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN. 
Gen. Passenger Agent 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Thbouge Line to New York, via Panama. 

Calling at various ports of Mexico and Central 
America. * 

SAILINGS— At noon. 

S. S. "Sau Bias," July 18, 1994. 

S. S. "Sau Juan," July 2S, 1894. 

S. S. "Colou," Augusts, 1894. 

S. S. "Colima," August 18, 1894. 

Note.— When the sailing day falls on Sunday, 
steamers will be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 
AND HONGKONG, 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamerB for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc.: 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

8.S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, July 

26, 1894, at 3 p. m. 

a. 8. "City of Peking." Thursday, August 
16, 1894, at 3 P. m 
S. 3. "China," via Honolulu, Aug. 28, 1894, at 

S. s! "Peru," Saturday, Sept. 15, 1894, at 3 p. m. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduced rateB. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. Branch office — 
2 T ont street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 




■n »\ 



Pric« P«r Copy. IO C<-ni« 



Annual S" I f-4 oo 




News 




(^alif jcrrm¥X6irxrti sjcr. 




r /. xlix 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1894. 



Number 4. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred 
Marriott, 606-609-613 Merchant Street, San Francisco. En- 
tered at San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



The office of the News Letter in Nexc York City is at the " Evening 
Post " Building. 20-4-206 Broadway, Room 1, where information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

OUR latest warship can make a ran of 636 miles in twenty-four 
bonrs. No fleet could catcb ber, and no enemy could get 
away from her. Yet there are critics who think that it would 
hare been better to build a slow tab and save the $400,000 prem- 
ium. 



PENNOYER is celebrating the last days of his term of office by 
the wholesale pardon of criminals. But like Governor Alt- 
geld, in spite of himself, he is making harder the selection of the 
totally unfit for Governor. 



THE stringent bill against anarchists in Italy went through the 
Chamber of Deputies by a vote of 231 to 26. When it comes 
to a show of bands, the beetle-browed advocates of reconstruct- 
ing society by the dagger and dynamite are not found to be 
numerous. 



THE fact is worth considering that the number of people in this 
country who have money invested in railroad stocks and 
bonds, and depend on such investments more or less for a living, 
is considerably larger tban the number of people employed in the 
railroad service. 



A REPUBLICAN exchange says that if anybody wants to keep 
out of politics this year the surest way to do it ia to join tbe 
Democratic party. According to that proposition about one-third 
the Republicans of tbe State have concluded to "keep out," if we 
judge by the manner in which tbey have glorified and discussed 
the Burns ticket. 



THE railroads are generally taking back strikers who have not 
broken the laws, as fast as places can be made for them with- 
out discnarging tbe men employed during the strike. Bat it will 
necessarily be several months before they can all obtain work, as 
is always the case when well enough is not let alone in the matter 
of the interests of labor. 



THE people are rapidly learning that certain suggestions will 
not be accepted by the New York Constitutional Convention. 
Woman's suffrage is dead for tbe present. Its fate was settled 
by the Committee on Suffrage by a vote of 13 to 4. The 
manner in which the committee divided indicates that the 
woman suffragists will be defeated in the convention on every 
point except, possibly, on the suggestion that women be per- 
mitted to vote for School Directors. 



THE Sultan of Turkey evidently believes in the doctrine of the 
homeopathists that like is cured by like, for he is sending 
Mohammedan missionaries to traverse the track of the Christian 
workers in Africa. But then it must be remembered that the 
Sultan, not so very long ago, was under the spell of a witching 
young prima donna from classic Boston, and it is in the last of 
the century now, and surprising demonstrations even from so 
torpid a person as the Sultan are not to be wondered at. 



THE evidence produced against the train-wreckers at Sacra- 
mento leaves no doubt in the mind of any one that, if the 
courts do their duty, the men who committed the terrible crime 
will be punished. It is one of the grolesqueries of the law that 
tbe lawyers in the case could freely discuss in open court the pro- 
posed State's evidence confession of the men and the reasons for 
its not having been accepted, and yet the magistrate could not 
take into account the fact that the murderers wanted to save 
their own necks by implicating the true murderers wbo inspired 
them. But Justice is well enough blind, even though she may 
not find it proper to indict the Examiner, the Call, the Bulletin, 
and the Report as accessories; it will be sufficient for the present 
if she hang the men caught red-handed, leaving the instigators 
and their cause to the punishment which the contumely of good 
citizens brings. 



THE generous spirit of the wealthy men of San Francisco never 
fails in expression wben wise appeals are made to it. In ad- 
dition to the liberal contributions which Captain J. M. McDonald 
and Clans 8preckels have made to the Lane Hospital (an adjunct 
to the Cooper Medical College) Andrew B. McCreery has made a 
present of $6000 for the maintenance of a free bed. Tbe example 
set by these philanthropic gentlemen is worthy of emulation by 
other citi/.ens with whom the possession both of wealth and the 
milk of human kindness is possible. 



THE twentieth annual report of the Boys and GH] 
Society of San Francisco discloses a prominent ; 



rirls' Aid 
prominent advance 
of the beneficent achievements of this institution. Since 
the abolition of the Industrial School and the overcrowding 
of the Whittier Reform School, the wild boys of San Fran- 
cisco had no refuge except the County Jail until the Aid So- 
ciety began to co-operate with the authorities and take the 
boys in band. A large corps of special teachers of various indus- 
tries is maintained, and tbe boys are thoroughly taught. The 
institution deserves the encouragement of all good citizens able 
to contribute to its support. 



HAYTI seems to be in an alarming condition just now. There 
could not be better evidence of danger than that which Pres- 
ident Hyppolite himself is giving. He has cut off communication 
with Jamaica, nobody is allowed to depart without close exam- 
ination, and the mails are carefully scrutinized. General Manigat's 
supposed intent to make a descent on President Hyppolite is the 
explanation of the last-named gentleman's proceedings. A ruler 
who is confident of himself, of his strength, and of his followers, 
does not do such things. And when the situation is so bad that 
such things are supposed to be necessary, the doing of such 
things seldom amounts to anything. 



CAN it possibly be true that John J. Ingalls bas been offered 
the 'position of editor of a Republican newspaper in New 
York city at a salary of $25,000 a year? Mr. Ingalls bas always 
been receiving such munificent offers — in the newspapers. If 
the charges made by his political opponents be true, that he was 
in the habit of cribbing funeral orations and the like, wben he 
wanted to make a great effort in the Senate, then he would make 
a good exchange editor. If it is possible for a man of Mr. In- 
galls' extremely moderate talents to get $25,000 a year as an 
editor, Sam Jones ought to get $50,000 and T. DeWitt Talmage 
$75,000. Both are as good blackguards as Mr. Ingalls and infi- 
nitely more original. 



ALBERT and Sarah F. Hiller (formerly Mrs. J. W. Ladd) have 
brought a startling suit against the executors of the estate of 
W. S. Ladd, charging fraud in the management of her interests 
by W. 8. Ladd, injustice on the part of the executors of his will, 
and demanding $1,200,000 in settlement. It is charged that when 
her first husband, John W. Ladd, died, W. S. Ladd so juggled the 
affairs of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company, especially with 
regard to 7600 shares held by Alvinza Hayward in trust for J. W. 
Ladd, and not reported in the schedule of J. W. Ladd's assets 
after his death, as to prejudice the rights of the widow (now Mrs. 
Hiller) to the amount of over a million dollars. The peculiar 
character of the charges made and the prominence of the parties 
at issue invest the action with uncommon interest. 



THE recent victory of Oxford in the international athletic com- 
petition was well earned. However, it is surprising that the 
Englishmen excelled more in tests of agility than of strength, as 
public expectation was entirely the other way. It is to be said, 
too, that while the Yale team was undoubtedly the best that any 
single American university could produce, it was by no means so 
stroDg a team as could have been got together to represent the 
collegiate athletics of this country. By drawing on other home 
institutions for representations in some of the recent events, a 
better showing could have been made, but in that event, of 
course, the competition would not have been that of one uni- 
versity against another. We Americans are always so sure of 
victory that defeat sometimes means discouragement. In the 
years to come there will be plenty of chances for the home 
athletes to vanquish their British brethren. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1894 



THE " EXAMINER'S" ABSURDITIES. 

WITHOUT any reference to tbe doubtful question as to 
whether the Southern Pacific Company, which is virtual 
owner of the Central Pacific, would or would not be willing wr 
the (iovernmeot to assume ownership of the Central Pacific, the 
sole questions, as it concerns tbe Government and therefore the 
public, is as to whether it would be wise and profitable for tne 
Government to take such a step. The San Francisco Examiner is 
urging that this be done, and is endeavoring to secure an expres- 
sion of local sentiment (let the italics be noted) by printing a blank 
coupon for signature as a memorial to Congress. So far as the Ex- 
aminer is concerned, it has placed itself beyond tbe esteem of 
law-loving citizens, and even outside the pale of the law — has 
indeed, made itself a party to tbe riot, pillage, and murder of the 
recent railroad strikers by urging them on and by castiDg all 
manner of approbrium upon the peace and military authorities 
called upon to uphold the laws. Therefore no policy which it 
may urge, however vehemently and hysterically, is worthy of 
any following. But as tbere are many heedless persons in every 
community, aod as the strikers and their sympathizers of the 
Examiner ilk are signing tbe petition for Government control 
over the Union-Central Pacific road3, it is well to show even tbe 
foolish what folly it is. The original amount of bonds issued by 
the Government in aid of the Union-Central roads was about 
$60,000,000, and the accrued interest paid by the Government 
and due from the roads brings the total debt up to about $125,- 
000,000. That alone is probably more than the roads are worth. 
In other words, if the debt against them were no greater than 
that, they would have to be operated with great skill in order to 
make them pay expenses. But there is something else, and this 
something else the Examiner mendaciously ignores. Tbe Gov- 
ernment holds only a second mortgage, having by Act of Con- 
gress permitted tbe companies to create a bonded indebtedness to 
an amouut equal to the bonds which the Government issued, 
this super-indebtedness to be secured by a first mortgage, the debt 
to the Government to be secured by a second mortgage. The 
companies availed themselves of this opportunity and issued 
bonds, secured by first mortgage, to the amount of about $60,- 
000,000. 

The Examiner carefully obscures that fact, and keeps out of 
view the fact that in order for the Government to assume owner- 
ship of the Union-Central roads it must first assume the obliga- 
tion of the first mortgage — in short, the Government must first 
pay out $60,000,000 in cash to the first-mortgage bondholders 
before it could assume control. This, added to the original debt 
of $125,000,000, would mean the assumption of an indebtedness 
of $185 000,000, $60 000,000 of which would be in cash and $125,- 
000,000 running at interest on a losing investment. So far as the 
first-mortgage debt is concerned, the railway companies at the 
beginning instituted a sinking fund for the extinguishment of 
the debt, but it will not be available till the debt falls due. Sup- 
pose that the Government should assume control: Almost neces- 
sarily the roads would be operated at a loss, as is the case with 
tbe postal service. This deficit would be chargeable to the whole 
country: and what would such unbenefited sections as Florida 
and Maine have to say? Suppose that the seven competing over- 
land lines should combine to force down rates so as to compel the 
Government to operate the road at a heavy loss. Tbe absurdity 
of Government ownership is at once apparent. But the Examiner 
proposes that the road shall be maintained by the Government as 
a toll road, any company being permitted to send trains over it 
on payment of a toll of so much an engine and car. This is an 
old idea, which Mr. Sutro has recently revived. It is advanced 
in ignorance of the fact that tbe paralleling of roads does not 
make competition — it is at the meeting points of connecting lines 
that competition is encountered. This is a proposition which 
there is not space here to make clear, and still it is one on which 
tbe public is entirely at sea. That point may be passed for the 
present. Meanwhile, if the Examiner is anything besides an 
abettor of anarchy, riot, pillage, and murder, it will announce 
clearly to its readers that if Congress adopts the Reilly Funding 
Bill the Government will be assured of the payment of the entire 
railroad debt, and that if it assumes control it must pay out 
$60,000,000 in cash, lose the opportunity of recovering $125,000,- 
000 from tbe Uuion-Central roads alone, and run a public trans- 
portation line in opposition to seven private competing lines. 
Let the Examiner, if it can for a moment stop its flippancy, meet 
these issues honestly and tell tbe truth for once. 



AS a result of the untiring efforts of Senator White and Con- 
gressman English, $150,000 is to be spent at Mare Island in 
repairing the Hartford, For many years Farragut's old flagship 
has lain rotting at the naval station, and nothing has been done 
to preserve her. During the first two years of Harrison's Admin- 
istration there was a Republican House and Senate, and a Re- 
publican Congressman from this district, and yet the Hartford re- 
mained a dismantled hulk. Now the situation is reversed, and 
the famous flagship of America's greatest admiral will be rescued 
from decay. Once again she will sail forth on tbe breast of old 
ocean with the stars and stripes aloft, a floating monument to 
the gallant old sea dog whose deeds are known to all. 



THE SENATORIAL FIASCO. 

ALBEIT Senator Gorman has announced that the Senate of the 
United States is composed of the concentrated intelligence of 
the country, and upon that theory has bitterly assailed the Presi- 
dent and incidentally all else that represents the proletarian senti- 
ment of the country, there still remains an idea that if the views 
of the President on the tariff had been adopted long ago a very 
great deal of distress and uncertainty would have been aveit j d. 
It is most unfortunate at this time especially, when assumptions 
of aristocratic superiority cannot be beneficial, for the Senate, 
through its leader, to defy the Administration and the idea which 
it represents. It is ludicrously incongru ius, at tbe same time, 
for Mr. Gorman to assure us that the Senate Tariff Bill had not 
been formulated until after the concurrence of the Administration 
bad been secured. In short, first tbe Senate (according to Mr. 
Gorman) went upon its belly to the Administration to secure its 
approval of the Senate bill, and second the Senate, finding that its 
bill did not please the Administration, denounces the Administra- 
tion and proclaims itself superior in intelligence. An amusing 
side-show has been Senator Hill of New York. It is not con- 
veivable that a statesman has been evolved from a small poli- 
tician of the HiJl type. Not a single effort of bis in recent years 
has been incompatible with the idea that he deserves to impress 
himself on the public solely by means of spectacular effects. The 
shrewdness of it all is that tbere is a certain consistency in bis 
conduct. While bitterly attacking the President on all issues, in- 
cluding his leadership of the Democratic tariff measures, he now 
suddenly defends the policy of the President in the matter of tbe 
Wilson bill. He does this with the full knowledge that the Dem- 
ocratic party at large is deeply disgusted with the conduct of tbe 
Democratic Congress, and that his only opportunity to make 
himself popular is to attempt to share the conspicuously lone- 
some popularity which the President enjoys. Hill has all the 
shrewdness of a politician with nothing of the understanding of a 
statesman. Mr. Gorman, meanwhile, by his assumption of an 
extraordinary intellectual superiority for tbe Senate, and by his 
ludicrous opera-bouffe attack on tbe President, has placed tbe 
Senate, which is really an intelligent and dignified body of gentle- 
men (to say nothing of its sympathy for trusts, corporations, and 
millionaires), in rather an unfortunate light. And tbe deepest 
part of its humiliation is that it should have been called to ac- 
count by Dave Hill! Thus Mr. Hill has humiliated not only the 
Senate, but the President as well. 



AN EXCELLENT RECORD. 



IT is very amusing to observe the expressions of some of the in- 
terior papers and of the anarchistic daily press of San Fran- 
cisco on the subject of the "military despotism" of the President, 
and the "abuse of power" by the military authorities. It merely 
shows that our contemporaries, to say oothiDg of the more 
openly lawless element of the community, needed the instruction 
which they have received. It has not happened to the younger 
generation in California before to have seen the failure of tbe 
civil authorities to maintain order and to witness the necessity 
for and the presence of the armed branch of tbe National Govern- 
ment to maintain the public peace. Even the National Guard, 
part of the armed defense of the nation though it is, had hardly 
an adequate idea of the rigorous obligations resting upon it until 
it was ordered to the front with ball cartridges and fixed bayonets. 
At first one or two companies, misled by the silly notion that the 
railroad strike was "popular," and that they had a right to take 
popular sentiment into account, wavered from tbe line of a 
soldier's daty; but all that was soon done away with, and in the 
end the conduct of the lads shone forth luminous. At Sacra- 
mento the initial mistake of two companies — somewhat excusable 
on the score of the United States Marshal's inactivity — placed ihe 
National Guard under a cloud, so that the regular troops were 
called upon to do tbe heavier and more dangerous work. These 
regulars (excepting tbe officers) are trained to know nothing but 
obey orders, fight, kill, and die for thirteen dollars a month. The 
National Guardsman, in the absense of sucn a test as he has had 
lately, is too apt to think himself only a citizen, with a citizen's 
privileges and liberty. The Guardsmen of California know better 
now; they know now that they must obey orders, fight, kill, 
and die; and in the light of that knowledge they have behaved 
most handsomely. When, for instance, they were ordered at 
West Oakland to charge a mob which had arrested a train, tbere 
was no nervous fingering of triggers, no hanging back, no yield- 
ing to any sort of unsoldierly sentiment; but they went forth 
sturdily and courageously, fired not a single shot, prodded with 
the bayonet only when pushing with the butt had proved useless, 
and dispersed the mob as effectively as and perhaps more wisely 
than regular soldiers could have done. All this has been of vast 
value as an education, not only to the National Guard itself, but 
to the many citizens who have not recently had an opportunity 
to learn what a terrible force tbe armed supporters of the Govern- 
ment can become in an emergency; and from this strike the 
National Guard of California has learned more than a century of 
annual encampments at Santa Cruz could have imparted. 



Julv 28. 1804. 



IN n: W"< is< n MBWS LETTER 



THE TROUBLES OF THE WIELANDS. 

THK legal affalrt of the Wltlaod estate have produced an irk- 
some imonnt of mailer for the daily press, which, apparently 
influenced to an undue extent by the attorneys opposed to the 
executors, bas exhausted every means to cast odium on tbos* 
having in charge the settlement of the estate. Charles Wieland 
bas been the particular target for these malicious attacks, and 
thai be bas borne tbem so patiently is evidence of a certain tul 
mirable repose of character. Ii setrn* time, however, that Oil- 
persecution should cease. Tbo»e well acquainted with him 
know that while be bas suffered misfortune he is incapable 
of any sort of meanness. His greatest fault in these graspi:m 
limes is bis generosity, which his two brothers, mo~e than om- 
siders, seem to misunderstand a id resent. It is good to know, bow 
ever, thai ibis trait has never interfered with bis proper hai ri- 
ling of the trust reposed in bis care. His second annual account, 
including transactions from September. 1892, to September, 189.1. 
bas been objected to for the reason that it did not include cer- 
tain items. The simple explanation is tbat these matteis had not 
been completed, and were necessarily carried over. Every item 
bas been shown correct to a cent. An interesting side-light can 
be thrown on the whole situation. Mr. Loughborough, who is 
making these cbarges and complaints, was also the opposing 
counsel to Delrnas A Shortridge in the Calherwood-Hastings 
case, and wanted to gratify a petty pique against them as Mr. 
Wietand's attorneys. It will be remembered that in that case 
Mr. Shortridge demanded an accounting from bim which had 
been due four years. When il was filed in response to this de- 
mand General Keyes, father of the child contesting Mrs. Cather- 
wood's claim, showed that he had received $51,980.99. This in- 
cluded support of his own child, an expense which bewas bound 
to bear, and still be claimed that he had spent $16,891.89 on bis 
child in four years, aDd be asked the Court to allow that amount 
out of the estate. Mr. Shortridge objected on the very reasona- 
ble ground that the father, when able, must support his own 
child. General Keyes admitted in court that his property was 
worth $200,000. and that he had an income of $500 a month. The 
reasons for the attack upon Mr. Wieland's annual account are 
therefore not difficult to understand — he is made to suffer for the 
zeal of his attorneys in another case in which he had no concern. 
Mr. Wieland displays a commendable magnanimity for his sif- 
ters, who apparently, and most unfortunately, have been misled. 

THE CHINA- JAPAN IMBROGLIO. 

UP to the time of writing there has been no formal declaration of 
war between China and Japan, but there is what seems to be a 
well-authenticated report of a small conflict between Corean and 
Japanese soldiers. This does not necessarily amount to much of 
itself, but it may turn out to be the opening encounter of an 
Oriental war of greater magnitude than has been seen for several 
centuries. Such a war will clarify the atmosphere of the East 
considerably, as the relations between China and Japan have 
been intermittantly strained for some years past. But if the 
Japanese should win, the result will be that the victory will pro- 
dace a fresh, cause of disturbance. The Japanese are naturally a 
very consequential people, and since they have begun to adopt 
Western ideas, they seem to be animated by a desire to be recog- 
nized as one of the leading powers of modern civilization. It is 
this thirst for recognition as a nationality of great importance 
and high dignity which has forced the present situation in Corea, 
and behind it stands also a Japanese demand for treaty revision. 
In other words, the Japanese wish their treaties with other 
powers to be changed so as to make foreigners who are residing 
in Japan, or traveling through it, to be made amenable to Japan- 
ese laws and governmental institutions just as Japanese residenis 
or visitors in the United States are held amenable to our ordinary 
laws and governing devices. Victorious Japan is very likely to 
insist upon these changes, and the result will be the production 
of considerable commotion among Western powers whose people 
now enjoy especial and somewhat necessary privileges and im- 
munities in Japan. 

It is to be borne in mind, however, that it is quite possible that 
this war will not come out of the present tension, and that even 
if it does it will never be fought out. The dispute over Corea is 
not, as some writers have suggested, likely to set the Western 
powers fighting, but it interests them sufficiently to render it 
probable that it will be protected by the same influences which 
maintain the autonomy of Turkey and Morrocco. 

WHENEVER a woman says in company that she bas nothir g 
to wear, another woman will cry out. "What bas become 
of that gray wool you had last summer?" Another will ask the 
fate of a black silk that she bad two years ago, and another 
wants to know about a brown dress the woman had four years 
ago. You bet the women always remember just what another 
woman has had for the past five years. 

SENATOR PEPPER has advanced the idea that the House • f 
Representatives should be abolished and tbat the country 
should be governed by one man from each State. It is believed 
that with a reasonable amount of persuasion Senator Peffer would 
consent to act as the man from Kansas. 



THE RESPONSIBILITY OF LABOR. 

IN a very remarkable private letter from W. H . Mills, which 
has been published in the Loa Angeles Herald by the recipient. 
the Injustice ol tin- American Railway Tnion in ordering a strike 
against the Southern Pacific Company is shown with singular 
clearness. Hut of greater interest to the public is Mr. tfllls'fl 
plan for the regulation of the relations between capita! and labor. 
He shows that labor is but a form of capital, and that 
the two forms of capital— money and labor— ought, to have 
a mutual relation which the courts might regulate. To 
accomplish this end all organizations of labor should be 
required to incorporate, to have a common treasury and a board 
of directors, and every member of the organization to he regarded 
as a shareholder. It could then be made responsible for unlaw- 
ful and violent acts, and this responsibility would create con- 
servatism. Its officers should have sole control, and have power 
to bring actions in the courts to compel the payment of fair 
wages. It was in this way that Lord Roseberry, as arbitrator, 
settled the great coal strike in England, by deciding that the 
mine-owners were paying insufficient wages. In Germany, 
when laborers began to organize, Bismarck took the movement 
in band and made the empire a party to the organization. By 
this means the employer, the employees and the government 
contributed to a fund out of which disabled and superannuated 
laborers were supported. Mr. Mills suggests a combination of 
the English and German systems, with the addition of the right 
of action on the part of labor corporations to compel the payment 
of fair wages by appeal to the courts. At present no legal rem- 
edy exists for the disagreements which constantly arise between 
labor and capital, and methods for adjusting differences outside the 
law lead to lawlessness. " The great essential of the Government 
is its power to afford peaceful and judicial solution of disagree- 
ments among men relating to the rights of property and 
the protection of persons. A man's wages are his property; a 
man's capital is equally his property. Thus labor and capital 
can have no dispute which may not be settled by the cool deter- 
mination of judicial proceeding and the award of justice by final 
judgment." These measures, Mr. Mills points out, should be 
popular with the laboring classes. Conscience is the court of 
last resort, and the consciences of men crystalize into government 
and law. Mr. Mills adds: "Every uprising has its lesson, and 
the obvious lesson of the existing arrest of growth in the United 
States is that our civilization can be brought to a state of arrest 
through the blind efforts of uninstructed men to maintain their 
natural rights on the one hand, and the greed and rapacity of 
capital, which grow instead cf being satiated by the acquisition of 
wealth, upon the other." 



NO PLOTTING RELIGIONISTS. 

THE President of the American Protective Association has 
written an article in defense of his order, in the North Ameri- 
can Review, in which he repeats all those familiar quotations from . 
Catholic authorities which show the supremacy of the Pope over J 
his church. He could jave multiplied all those quotations by 
twenty, and even theD he would have fallen far short of the actual 
truth. It is true that the Pope is the supreme judge of what is 
right and wrong in doctrinal matters affecting the Church, and 
that the Church which he rules claims theoretically that if it can 
fix the limits of its own jurisdiction it can fix the limits of all 
other jurisdictions. But such claims are absolutely essential to 
its existence as an institution, and may be taken in the same 
light as the ruling of Victoria and the claims of her dominions— 
in fact, they are inherent in the claims of every institution. If a 
Protestant believes that the Bible is a guide in all human affairs, he 
ought in logic to maintain that its utterances limit the jurisdic- 
tion of every human government. That was the Puritan idea, 
and logically carried out, it made the Puritan as intolerant as any 
Papist. In its essence, there is no difference between the claim 
of the Catholic and of,any Protestant orthodox church. The Cath- 
olic Church has formulated certain ethical and religious claims 
which constructively oppose some social and political privileges 
which an American citizen believes to be inalienable and inhe- 
rent. Certain Popes and councils have denied the right of 
free speech, free press, and a free religion. The syllabus 
of Pius IX. was a perfect gattling gun aimed against such rights. 
But we have had the experience of eighteen centuries to tell us 
that men and churches are a great deal better than their creeds. 
The same claims of to-day were put forward by the Catholic 
Church in the last century, and yet England was broad enough, 
wise enough, and just enough, to judge Catholic men and women 
rather than Catholic creeds, and knowing that such men and 
women were honest, sincere, and devoted to English interests, 
she gave them the right to English citizenship. And she has 
never had reason to regret her action. Catholics have fought in 
her armies, legislated in her Parliament, and adorned and honored 
the various walks of English life, but they have never allowed 
the Catholic creeds to prompt their motives. 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1894.. 



PROGRESS OF THE MARTIN WILL CONTEST. 

THE Martin will contest is assuming a definite shape. There 
has been no mincing of word or thought since the case 
opened, and the fight will be stern, regular, and bitter before tbe 
million dollars left by Henry Martin, of the Brown Bear mine, 
have found their way to those who are legally entitled to possess 
them. Every day the testimony reveals strong evidences of the 
fact that there must have been a forgery in the case, and a forgery 
of a wholesale description. For, in addition to the second or 
alleged forged will that tbe deceased is charged with having 
made, other letters have been discovered of a more or less curious 
character which experts in handwriting refuse to acknowledge ay 
having been written by the hand of Henry Martin. Indeed, it now 
seems that more than one hand was instrumental in writing the 
several documents which Mrs. John Martin declares were written 



bravely In the field to answer any questions. Everything goes 
to show that Henry Martin was afraid of Mrs. John Martin in 
his lifetime. That woman evidently expected that he would pro- 
vide handsomely for her. Whatever Jobn Martin may have 
stated in his will is no evidence that Henry Martin would have 
done likewise. D. M. Delmas spoke a pretty plain truth when, 
in addressing Judge Coffey, he said: "Men do not in their wills 
call children their brother's children when they have all their lives 
said they were not their brother's children." Mrs. Henry Mar- 
tin's attorneys have covered every point which they deem vital 
in their case. An expert on handwriting has sworn that the evi- 
dences of forgery in several documents, including the second 
will, were plain to the most casual observer. He declared that all 
were in the same handwriting and that the very ink showed that 
the deceased had not written the second will. It has been shown 
that Henry Martin considered his brother's wife to be an im- 




THE PRINCIPALS IN THE GREAT MARTIN WILL CASE. 



by the dead man, in order to throw a third of his estate in tbe 
hands of her supposed child. During the week Mrs. John Martin's 
character has been assailed in a very bitter manner. Ex-Benator 
McMurry, of Weaverville, spoke his mind very clearly against 
her, and other men of equally high repute have not hesitated to 
come forward and defend the interests of Mrs. Henry Martin. 
The ears of the spectators were filled with somelively revelations, 
and the three-year-old proponent of the second will was spoken 
of as being a very incorrect likeness of his mother and the dead 
capitalist. The proceedings of the past week have made it a 
triumphant one for Mrs. Henry Martin and her attorneys. They 
have produced some very stroDg testimony to show that Henry 
Martin did not think that the little child of Mrs. John Martin 
was his brother's child at all, and that consequently he vvould not 
have thought of leaving that child one third of the estate. They 
have won the first legal skirmish of the fight and are standing 



poster, a blackmailer, a forger, and a woman dangerous to society. 
But so delicately has tbe case been nandled that at no time has she 
been directly charged with the forgery of the disputed document 
It has been simply insinuated. Witnesses have testified that 
Henry Martin had no desire to make a second will, and that his 
serious illness during the last days of his life made it impossible 
for him to have written tbe will without tbe knowledge of those 
around him. These are the essential points which will be pre- 
sented to the jury. They have been built on strong evidence, as 
the reports in the daily papers will show, and it clearly looks as 
though it was a very strong case. Now Mrs. Jobn Martin is 
having her swing, and as the central figure in tbe great case she 
will have a fair and square opportunity to prove what she can 
prove. Her honor and her reputation have been pretty badly 
shattered during the past week, and a decision to the effect that 
the second will is a forgery means to her the loss of both. 



Julv -.'8, 1894. 



SAN PRANCISCO NBW8 l BITER. 



THE SILVEK QUESTION 



EniT'ill Sk«. Lirrtii r?l» I hsre discussed in the rnlnmni 
04 your paper during the ps.t tew wrrk< variou. phases of 
the propaganda for the free coinaee of •liver, or for interna- 
tional bloieiallaiu. ami will in this psper cnn>e to Mmc Important 
facta bearing on tba relation of the orient to Ibis subject, to show 
tbat the relatively lessening use of silver in India as compared 
with its commerce is due to increased facilities of communication. 
But Brat, another word anent the neoblmelallsts. 

I find myself at variance wiih the views of the new school of 
binietali't; of this country, one of whom, for example, in the 
Congress of Economics and Politics held here March 2'.Hh, 30tb, 
and previously elsewbrre. indulged In extravagant assertions, as 
shown in my paper of the 17th. regarding wbat he deemed the 
world-wide calamitous results of excluding silver from unlimited 
free coinage. In short. I do not believe that discontinuing the 
free and unli wi'ed coinage of silver had or is having a dominating 
effect either in reducing the prices of commodities ihrougbout tbe 
world, nor that it was tbe primary cause of tbe crisis of last year, 
and of continuing tbe stagnation of the preseDt. Moreover, within 
fifty yenrr naaes in the United State* hare doubled on a gold basis. The 
coinage of silver and tbe use of silver coins within the period 
treated of, 1867 to 1893, has been far greater than for a like num- 
ber of years previous to 1867. And if tbe crises of 1891 and 1892 
in Argentina and Australia, and tbe resultant consequences in 
Great Britain, and the crisis of 1893 in the United States, were 
due to alack of currency circulation, why does not the reduudency 
of money to-day, which is an admitted condition in all the great 
financial centers of the world, relieve the stagnation ? 

As pertinent to this I submit tbe following table, from compila- 
tions on the subject by Mr. Charles P. Jackson, of Boston: In the 
government bants of England, France, and Germany were: 



Total. 



Gold, Silver, Hold »v. Silver, 

held distinct, held distinct, held together. 

Jan. 1832 $101.000 000 $ 93,000.000 $ 15 000.000 $209,000,000. 

Jan. 1862 122.000.000 18,000.000 63 ,000 000 203 000.000. 

Jan. 1872 228,000.000 16 000.000 137,000.000 381,000,000. 

Jan. 1830 277,000,000 236.000.000 128,000,000 641 000 000, 

Jan. 1887 333,000,000 223,000 000 165,000,000 721,000.000. 

Jan. 1891 452,000,000 245.000 000 191,000,000 891000,000. 

The per capita of circulation in the United States of America 
has risen from $13.85 in 1860 to $24.85 in 1894, tbe highest ever 
attained. In fact, the per capita of money the word over is 
greater to-day than it ever has been, but the money standard is 
not the primary cause either of tbe crises or of the subsequent 
stagnation, except in so far as security holders sold or may sell, 
or investors may hesitate for fear of possible ultimate payment in 
silver. The causes have been extravagance, wastefulness, arti- 
ficial stimulation of business, reckless speculation, and tbe inex- 
cusable expansion of credits in all sorts of unjustifiable schemes 
of inflation or ill-judged business ventures, conceived in the hope 
of making something out of nothing, or very near nothing. 
These are, in general, tbe primary reasons of the panics and sub- 
sequent stagnations, and not necessarily the kind of money nor 
the amount in circulation; and the public ought to reckon with 
its own folly and cupidity, and tbe hidden and abhorrent forces 
in protective politics, in considering the subject. In the long run 
the decline of prices of commodities has been aDd will be essen- 
tially beneficial to the welfare of the people at large, because, as 
already stated, wanes have in the aggregate largely increased — doubled 
since 1840. 

Now as to the relation of the Orient to Bilver: There is a very 
general misapprehension as to the former exceptional demands 
for silver; tbat is to say, the phenomenal demand for it by India 
during tbe sixties. 

The particular reason which rendered the amount of India's de- 
mand extraordinary — to wit, a total, between 1853 and 1866 in- 
clusive, of about $1,000,000,000 — is not, I assume, generally under- 
stood in the United States. There were four great causes for ex- 
ceptional requirements at that time— the previous building of 
canals and railways, the Sepoy rebellion, about 1857, and subse- 
quent famines. The maturity of obligations for tbe building of 
canals, railways, and other Internal improvements required about 
$850,000,000 of silver; famines and rebellions, $150,000,000. The 
exact amount required because of the Sepoy mutiny I do not 
remember, but it was also large. Now to the satisfaction of these 
extraordinary demands were added other causes, more recent, for 
the decline of demands, viz: In 1866 the cables were successfully 
laid across tbe Atlantic Ocean; in 1869 the Suez Canal was com- 
pleted, and subsequently cables laid along the Mediterranean, Red 
Sea, and the Indian Ocean; in 1869 the first transcontinental rail- 
way across America was completed, and regular steamship ser- 
vice established between San Francisco, Japan, China, and India; 
since then various transcontinental lines and the Canadian Paci- 
fic steamship line from British Columbia to Japan and China. 

Ocean navigation has been almost revolutionized in this period 
by the use of iron, the propeller, triple-expansion engines, etc. 
The result, commercially, of all these great changes has been, of 
course, simply marvelous. For example, the commerce of iDdia 
with the chief commercial nations of the world, which had pre- 
viously been hampered with a delay of months required for sail- 



ing vessel, to round the Cap* ol Good Hope, with advices by 
and drain, which had often to be accompanied by ship- 
ment, ol .liver. »ii from this time on susceptible of instant ad- 
visement by cable or by steamship mall, which latter oven re- 
I the time of transit more than four fifth. , and in consequence 
a system of cross exchanges grew up and promptly adjusted itself 
in tbe commerce of the world. As Illustrative of this fact, I will 
mention that in a given period. I860 to 1864 inclusive, the com- 
mercial business of India. Great Britain, France, and the United 
Males ol America amounted to $18,000,000,000, and it required the 
> movement of a certain volume of specie, say $3,100,000,000, or 
seventeen per cent, of the merchandise moved , to adjust the same. 
, In a like period of years, say from 1886 to 1890 inclusive, the 
I commerce of the same countries was $36,000,000,000, or more than 
double that of the preceding period; yet the amount of specie 
actually required to adjust balances was less than $2,600,000,000, 
or seven per cent, of the merchandise moved, being ten per cent, 
less specie required than during the previous given period on a 
total of business but one half the latter amount. Mulhall shows 
tbat in 1890 only five per cent, of specie or bullion was required 
in handling all ocean commerce as compared with niDe per cent. 
! used in the decade ending 1870. The money used in the entire 
financial transactions of Great Britain is only three per cent, of 
] the volume of business transacted. In the midst of these two 
periods of business mentioned in connection with Indian com- 
J merce including the intervening years, comprising a total of 
; twenty-seven years, the actual annual product of silver of the 
world almost quadrupled — it increased from about $55,000,000 In 
1867 to $207,000,000 in 1893. 

And here I will mention what appears to have been the great 
battering ram that natural causes propelled against silver. From 
1856 to 1865 (ten years) the world's product of silver was, say, 
$420,000,000. Tbe Orient took $640,000,000, thus drawing $220,- 
000,000 from the world's old stock. From 1866 to 1875 the world's 
product was, say, $688,000,000, of which the Orient took only 
$233,000,000, leaving $455,000,000 of the new stock to be absorbed 
by Western nations. From 1876 to 1885 the world's product of 
silver was $1,063,000,000; the Orient took $433,000,000, leaving a 
fresh surplus of $630,000,000 to be absorbed by Western nations. 
(During tbe same period Germany also sold $150,000,000 of old 
stock.) From 1886 to 1893, eight years, the world's product was 
$1,310,000,000. The Orient took approximately $340,000,000, 
leaving $970,000,000 more to be absorbed by Western nations, or 
a total aggregate of $1,985,000,000 of new silver to be utilized by 
the Western nations. Such an influx of the metal inevitably im- 
paired its utility, aud therefore its exchangeable value. 

The average of the world's product of silver for 1892 and 1893 
was more than six times as great as the yearly average from 1831 
to 1850. While India's commerce has doubled since 1870, the 
average yearly demand for silver in the Orient for tbe past twenty 
years has been less than $50,000,000 per year, while the world's 
product of silver has risen from $50,000,000 thirty years ago to 
$207,000,000 in 1893. Tbe result of this enormous increase is, as 
already stated, that in thirty years there has been added to the 
silver stock of Western nations approximately $2,000,000,000. 
And it is this tremendous fact and further probabilities in the 
same direction tbat cloud with doubt the ability even of an Inter- 
national Agreement as to unity of ratio to rehabilitate silver under 
unrestricted free coinage at the present ratio. The jitter and inex- 
cusable folly of any one Government with a gold standard currency at- 
tempting it is too palpable to require further argument. 

Now, in view of the fact that during this same period there 
have been six international monetary congresses — Paris, 1867, 
1878, 1881, and 1889; Brussels, 1892, and Berlin, 1894— and that 
all these congresses decided against international bimetalism, or 
failed to assent to it, and the large majority of the States compris- 
ing them had also decided against State or national bi-metalism 
(wisely so, as statistics fully show), we naturally infer that the 
general exclusion of silver from unlimited free coinage had some ef- 
fect on its value as compared with gold , to say nothing of increased 
production; but with this exclusion, the relative decline in the 
demands of India, and the enormously increased product, the de- 
cline in value of silver was so inevitable that nothing whatever 
that the United States Government could possibly do would have 
prevented or appreciably lessened that decline, and the foreign 
governments acted prudently, in their own interests, in restricting 
or discontinuing coinage, as the United Slates Government has 
recently done. Yet the California Republicans, in convention 
assembled, declare for tbe unlimited free coinage ol silver at a 
ratio of 16 to 1. Again I ask : What for ? I await with curious 
interest to see if California Democrats will imitate the egregious 
folly of the Republicans. A Laymah. 

San Francisco, Jul y 24, 1894. 

Carson City, the most beautiful town in Nevada, only 14 miles 
from Lake Tahoe, is the place to take tho Keeley cure. No gradnate 
from this institute has relapsed. 



All the new Books at COOPER'S. 



SAST FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28,1894. 




WD 



1 We Obev no Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore, 



WILL the playwright never learn that it is totally immaterial 
whether, or not, the man-servant and the maid-aervant in 
the drama marry? But it is with play-wrights as it is with 
preachers. They think that every one must marry, even to the 
most plebeian folk in the household, although it does not make a 
play compatible with the dignity of its original motif. A good 
example of lhatglaring fault shines in TJie Masked Ball, and when- 
ever Miss Bucklin harshly demands Mr. Lamb to name their 
wedding day the audience wonders why Messrs. Bisson and 
Carre should have caused their play to be so grossly interrupted. 
The Masked Ball is one of those rollicking, spirited, absurdly 
ludicrous farces which are called comedies in the theatrical world 
of to-day. If it was written to make people laugh it has filled its 
purpose very well, but if it was written to show the lights and 
shades of a great actor's ability, to show the dainty, polished 
work of a Drew, then it has fallen pretty wide of the mark. Like 
The Butterflies, it is far beneath John Drew's ability. Those who 
saw him in the Taming of tht Shrew, when his fine, musical 
voice lent such a charm to the piece, and his soulful love-making 
set every heart in the audience afire, and his polished acting 
stamped him a great mummer, and see him now in a farce in 
which he must purl out his cheeks and shake his hair and his 
long fingers to denote anger, may pause and wonder why he has 
not followed art more closely. It is certainly just as difficult to 
perform The Masked Ball as it is to perform a legitimate comedy. 
The last-named will carry itself; the first must be carried. In 
The Masked Ball the action is so quick that the players must rash 
throagh it like a train tearing over its course. One entrance 
made a moment too soon or too late, or one line spoken out of 
place, would throw the play out of its groove. It mu«t be care- 
fully acted, by alert and clever people, or it would go for naught. 
And so it will be seen that Mr. Drew is not saving himself any 
trouble or work by producing plays like The Masked Ball. He 
has to labor just as hard and rehearse just as often. He draws 
just as many dollars into the box office. He pleases his large 
audience just as well. But he made his name by his artistic, 
finished work in highly legitimate roles and he is disappointing 
his admirers, at least, by not continuing in that line. 
# * * 
The performance of The Masked Ball, &s given by Mr. Drew and 
his company at the Baldwin, is a good one. Every mummer has 
been thoroughly drilled in his or her work, and all keep up the 
boisterous spirit of the three acts most admirably. They act for 
all they are worth from the rising of the curtain till the going 
down thereof, and there is not one in the cast who overdoes his 
part. Little Miss Adams, with her dainty "raaw-maw" and 
««paw-paw," had ODe scene which she did charmingly. It was 
her "tipsy" scene in the second act. She did it so well that she 
held the audience in breathless suspense for fear that she would 
overstep the limits of genteel inebriety. She went just far 
enough; her acting at that point was delightfully clever, and it 
deserved the applause that it received. Bat it was the only thing 
that Miss Adams had to do in the entire three acts — the only 
thing whatsoever — and that is the part which the "Eastern 
press" said made her famous! It only shows the incongruity of 
the "Eastern press" and the manner in which it misleads. After 
having played sympathetic dramatic roles for years, in which 
she won praise and a name, Miss Maude Adams is made famous 
in one night by the » Eastern press " for playing a role in which 
she has not the smallest possibility, outside of her "tipsy scene," 
to show that she is a clever girl. Mr. Baker had a rough-and- 
tumble role which he played excellently. Harry Harwood was 
capital as the erring Poulard. Miss* Bucklin deserved a better 
r61e after her clever work in The Girl I Left Behind Me, in which 
she played Wilbur's Ann, and Kate Meek and Annie Adama were 
very effective. But Mr. Drew ought to be something more than 
a "dreas-auit" actor. He ia a brilliant mummer, a student in his 
art, a fine reader, and a handsome man. He has all the advant- 
ages that go to make an artistic actor, and he ought to be making 
better use of them. There are only a few actors on the American 
stage to-day who know how to make love. They are Salvini, 
Bellew, Coghlan, and Drew. Each of those gentlemen is a star. 
* * * 
Mr. Harrigan continues to please the patrons of the California 
Theatre. McSorley's Inflation is as absurdly amusing as any of 
its brethren. Mr. Harrigan ia the same familiar Irishman as 
Peter Mc8orley. He is delightfully natural; his songs were cap- 
itally given — he was, in brief, brimful of humor, abaolutely un- 
affected, and continuously mirth-provoking. Joseph 8parks was 
not far behind in sharing the honors with the star. The market 
women and the fighting negroes, the ward politicians and irre- 
pressible youngsters added plenty of amusement to the farce. 
Next week Squatter Sovereignty will be presented, and during Mr. 
Harrigan's last week, which opens August 6th, he will revive 
Old Lavender and Reilly and the Four Hundred. 



When Harrigan closes his engagement at the California, Charles 
Frohman's company will open there in Oscar Wilde'a clever play, 
Lady Windermere's Fan. The cast will include: Frank Gilmore, 
Edward Emery, Robert Jenkins, John Archer, Clifford Leigh, 
WalterS. Dolman, Olive L. Oliver, Laura Gilvray, Nita Sykes, 
Leona Clarke, Minna Nixon, Margaret Yates, Mrs. Fairmont, and 
Louise Douglass. 

The Tivoli has revived the popular Planquette opera. Rip Van 
Winkle. The feature of the performance is Ferris Hartman's por- 
trayal of Rip, which is acted in a serious manner very well for a 
light comedian. All through the opera is well played and well 
sung. It will give way, on Monday night, to The Gypsy Baron. 

Large audiences have greeted the new bill at the Orpheum this 
week and Harry de Gray and M'lle Josephine in their extraordinary 
" turn," entitled the " Roman Sibyl's Dream." It ia a aketch made 
up of clever illusions and new feats in necromancy, and it made 
a hit. Lydia Yeamans-Titas is, indeed, one of the best soubrettes 
on the stage, and when she sings » Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me a 
Bow-wow " it is one of the liveliest things on the bill. Connor 
and Staley, F. J. Titus, the Wilmota, the Braatz brothers, and 
Charles H. Duncan, add materially to the programme. The bill 
will be changed on Monday night, whea the management will 
present one of the wonders of the century, little Gertie Cochran, 
who is only three years and ten months old. Her marvelous 
memory is the cause of her fame. This infant, who has not yet 
learned all her A. B. C.'s, can answer a series of over 2000 ques- 
tions with ease and apparently without mental effort. 
* * # 

Central Park will be the scene of a great tug-of-war beginning 
August 3d, and continuing for two weeks. The contestants, who 
will be the representatives of the principal nations, have been 
training for some time. Cash prizes amounting to $20,000 will be 
offered, and with such an amount staring them in the face the 
men ought to pull for tbeir lives. The affair promises to be aa 
great a success aa the one which recently took place at the Pavil- 
ion. 



.Lessee and Manager. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 

AL HaYMAN 

Monday. July 30th— Third aud last week of 

MR. JOHN DREW. 

Monday, Tuesday, aud Wednesday evenings. Mr. Drew's latest success, 
< HKJVI lU'lll K JK. 

A Comedy by Madeline Lucette. 
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings, and Saturday matinee — 

THE IU ITER1 Ills 
Monday, August 6th— CHARTED FROHMAN'S STOCK COMPANY. 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Ai, Hayman & Co.. Lessees. 

8. N. Friedlandbr, Manager. 
Week of July 30th— Every evening, including Sunday. Matinee Satur- 
day. MR. 

EDWARD HARRIGAN 

and his New York company, presenting the most amusing of all comedies, 
ttOJ A I teh sovereignty, 

A cyclone of fun. A whirlwind of merriment. New scenery. Newstage 
effects. Biaham's delightful melodies Mr. Harrigan in his great char- 
acter impersonation of " Felix Mclntyre " 

Week Aug. 6— By request, OLD LAVENDER and REILLY AND THE 400. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOOSE. 

Keeling Bros — Proprietors and Managers. 

To-night and to-morrow night, RIP VAN WINKLE. 

Monday, July 30th — Johann .Strauss' masterpiece, 

THE GYPSY BARON, 

A romantic opera in three acts. New scenery by Oscar L. Fest. 
PopularPrices . ... ... 25and50c 

ORPHEUM. 

O'Farrell St., between Stockton and Powell Sts. 
San Francisco's Great Music Hall. 
Week of Monday, July 30th— An exceptional programme! Brimful of 
entertainment! New and sensational features! 

GERTIE COCHRAN, the marvelous child Prodigy, aged three years 
and ten months. 
THE BRAATZ BROS, and last week of the sparkling comedienne, 
1VIHA TEAMAN'S TITUS. 
And a magnificent company. 
Saturday and Sunday matinees. 

Matinee prices— Parquet, any seat, 25c. ; balcony, any seat, 10c : child- 
ren, 10c-, any part. 

Evening Prices— Reserved Seats, 25c; Balcony 10c.; Opera ChairB and 
Bos Seats, 50c. 

IIMIANRFnnARn The English actress, coaches ladies and 
1_ 1 LL I n II ULUUn I IL/, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 

K N A Ft F Bush & Gerts Pianos 

■*■ UM ** D ™ Parlor Organs 

HAINES Jnistallmeilts _ Rentals 



A . L. Ban croft & Co. 
303 Sutter BL.S.F. 



PIANOS 



July 23, 1894, 



BAN FRANCISCO Ni:\VS LKTTKK. 



LAWN TENNI8. 



CALIFORNIA cm now. n hm, b« proud of having reared two 
tennis players who apbeld her honor in such pood shape at 
Chicago, and who will be privileged lo combat for the double 
championship or the United State* later In (be season. Tbe Neet 
brothers played a very fair game when tbey were among us, and 
il only shows what practice and patience will accomplish. It was 
always oar opinion that i'arr Neel played (he better game, as bis 
brother Bam was given too much (o fancy shots, such as would 
attract the notice of tbe gallery at large, and would jump the net 
too often (o permit of championship eood form; but be was very 
young at tbe time, and doubdessbas learnt that such tricks are un- 
necessary to a good all-round player. It was much to be regretted 
that Carr Neel did not defeat Chase, considering bow near he cime 
to victory, but ibis year's match will probably dampen bis ardor 
and stimulate birn to greater energy for next season. It would be 
most interesting to have tbe Neel brothers in our championship 
double meeting in September, and a match between them and tbe 
Messrs. Hardy would give us a fair idea of bow our ideals rank 
with the Chicago players. An exhibition between Carr Neel and 
Sam Hardy would doubtless be a big arawiog card for San Rafael, 
and we hope that the Neels will be able to get here. 

The California Lawn Tenuis Club intends to throw off the dull- 
ness at the courts, and it is officially stated that a double tourna- 
ment, open to all members of recognized clubs, will take place at 
its courts on August IStb ami 19th ; entrance fee $2 a team. It 
has also been stated that at these open tournaments, to give a 
more equal chance to all, tbe present champion or champions of 
the coast should be handicapped to tbe extent of fifteen — a very 
good idea, for often, when players hear that the champions will 
play, they, realizing that they would have no chance of winning, 
do not enter, and, in consequence, the entry list is small. This 
handicap will, if always imposed, give a better chance to some of 
the stronger teams and will probably be the means of a better ex- 
hibition of tennis. 

The Invitation tournament given by tbe Hotel del Monte last 
week proved to be a grand success, and Messrs. Treat, Stoke , 
and Stetson are to be congratulated upon making a very efficient 
tournament committee and running things exactly to suit every- 
body, audience included. There was a great deal of interest taken 
in the events, especially as the hotel bad provided for a mixed 
doubles event, and the young ladies, one and all, played nobly, 
and really iu better form than most people believed tbey could. 
There were six entries, and Miss Bee Hooper and H. N. Stetson 
managed after considerable bard work to overcome all their oppo- 
nents, and won tbe first prize. Tbe finals betwen them and Miss 
Florence Hush and Tom Magee, Jr., was intensely exciting, and 
frequent applause greeted tbe players after a severe or long rally 
bad been ended. Among other teams worthy of mention were 
Miss Ella Hobart and C. P. Hubbard, and Miss Rogers and W. S. 
Hobart. It would be a great pleasure to see more interest taken 
in mixed double events, and it might be well for the Association 
to take under consideration whether or not it would be advisable 
to have a championship for mixed doubles at one of the meetings. 

The gentlemen's doubles, comprising nine entries, were inter- 
esting, and it was pleasing to see our old tennis runner-up, C. P. 
Hubbard, partnered with 8tetBon, win the first prize. Hubbard 
has always been a favorite on the tennis courts, and his gentle- 
manly conduct, coupled with his brilliant play, made him ex- 
tremely popular. It was therefore a feature of the meeting to see 
him before the net again, and both he and his partner thoroughly 
deserved the trophies. The Whitney brothers were their oppo- 
nents in the finals, and played better tennis than they ever put 
up before. Of late they have not played much together, as they 
did not seem thoroughly to understand each other's game, but 
their exhibition this year ought to teach them a lesson, and urge 
them on to practice for tbe championship meeting. They played 
a very good game, and their strokes and smashes were quite a 
feature; moreover, tbey did not seem to lose heart, and in the 
second Bet, with the score five to one against them, pulled 
together and took the next six games. The match all through 
was hotly contested, and Hubbard and Stetson won only by three 
sets to two, with score of 4-6, 5-7, 6-1, 7-5, 6-2. 

There were other interesting matches with Driscoll and Tom 
Magee, Jr., C. D. Bates, Jr., and Walter Magee, and W. H. Tay- 
lor, Jr., and W. 8. Hobart, all of whom put up strong tennis and 
gave, taking all in all, a very fair exhibition of tennis, Hobart 
especially being strong with bis smashes. 

The success of the younger contingent will do tennis a good 
turn, and we shall not wonder at seeing a fairly large entry for 
the double championship, made up of the younger members. 

Invitation tournaments are quite the thing in the East, but 
there, instead of drawing and playing as in a championship, they 
pit the players all against all, and the ones who win the largest 
percentage of matches are entitled to the prizes. This gives a 
fairer chance to all, and, moreover, a player beaten in the first 
match would not be immediately put out, but would have a 
chance to retrieve himself. We think this the best method, and 
hope that it will be in vogue for the next exhibition matches. 
One set alone could be played if the entry was too large to permit 
the usual two out of three. 



30 



DAY 
Reduction Sale. 

Furniture Department. 

To quickly reduce our large line of Fur- 
niture we offer for 30 days only our entire 
stock at prices CUT DOWN without regard 
to cost. 

Designs all late, exclusit/e, and not to 
he duplicated. 

Come at once. Every day will lessen 
your choice. 

A FEW INSTANCES: 



Handsomely 
Finished 
Quarter Sawed 
Oak. 

Birdseye 
Maple. 



r 



RECl'J.Alt Pkuk 



Sideboard* 
Dining lables. 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1894. 




the: 

OOKCR-ON. 




A MOST unique and picturesque building ia the new home of 
the Sainte Claire Club, of San Jose, designed by Page Brown 
and erected for them by James D. Phelan on a lot facing St. 
James Park. The architecture is Spanish in character, with 
square towers on each corner of the structure, deep windows, 
and a spacious iron balcony. The interior is in character with 
the idea. The walls are finished in deep golden brown, and the 
two large open fire places in the social room are most imposing 
and artistic. Old brass chandeliers and fixtures, and all elBe that 
corresponds with this style of furnishing, make certainly one of 
the handsomest club rooms in the State. Opposite the social 
room is the large dining hall, which was inaugurated Wednesday 
night by a banquet, at whicb nearly all the club members and a 
number of invited guests were present. Upstairs are a library, 
card rooms, and billiard room, and still higher sleeping rooms for 
the members. The latter are heated by steam, and indeed every- 
thing in the way of modern improvement has been applied to 
this building. The Sainte Claire Club has been from its very be- 
ginning a prosperous organization. A majority of the leading 
business men of San Jose and gentlemen living in the vicinity of 
that town compose the membership. It is noticeable for its 
geniality and hospitality to the stranger that comes within its 
gates. Once a year the club gives a bull's-head breakfast at the 
old Guadalupe mine, and its other entertainments are numerous 
and always eagerly looked forward to by those who have the 
entree to the club. Their present home is undoubtedly an orna- 
ment to their beautiful and progressive city. Its situation is 
conspicuously well chosen. From the quaint iron balcony which 
fronts the club house the Sainte Clairean enjoying his after-dinner 
cigar can look out upon St. James Park, with its green lawns, 
handsome trees, and winding walks, and imagine himself far 
away in the country among the sighing woods and rushing 
streams. And then, though convenient to the business part of 
the town, it is on one of the quieteBt streets of that busy metrop- 
olis of the Santa Clara valley. 

» * # 
There was not a summer resort in the State of California as 
merry as Castle Crag during the strike. A large number of the 
Pour Hundred were there, and the fun that they had will go 
down in history. After dancing, fishing, driving, and tennis had 
become tiresome, everyone set about to discover a new scheme 
for amusement. Several of the young ladies got together and 
thought that it would be quite original and entertaining to get up 
a real court and try Irving M. Scott for bridge-burning and train- 
wrecking. Fisher Ames was selected to act as prosecuting at- 
torney, Frank Sullivan as attorney for the defense, and Dr. Par- 
dee, of Oakland, for the judge. The trial was very amusing 
while it lasted, and the prosecuting attorney did everything in 
his power to convict the prisoner, even unto introducing K. Por- 
ter Garnett, who, as a Chinese convict from San Quentin, gave 
some very damaging evidence. Mr. Sullivan made an admirable 
defense, and it was his stirring address which saved the 
prisoner and which made the judge decide that both lawyers 
should buy champagne for the jury. 
* * # 

A pleasant affair was the play entitled Bang, or the Strikers 
Struck, which was written by K. Porter Garnett and produced on 
an elevated stage erected in the main office. Nearly every one 
at Castle Crag was present, and a dance and supper followed the 
performance. The characters were represented by Miss Alice Ha- 
ger, MisB Alice Scott, Andrew Martin, Frank King, Fisher Ames, 
and Mr. Garnett. 

» * * 

Donald de V. Graham has opened a studio on Sacramento 
street, and is pursuing his art work in the most enthusiastic man- 
ner. Mr. Graham's sketches are by no means amateur in char- 
acter. There is a dash in them, a verve, a chiaro-oscuro, a Je nesais 
quoi which excites the admiration of even the old artists. Mr. 
Joallln and Mr. Graham met with a slight misadventure Monday 
while transferring their impressionB of nature to canvas in a field 
at Ross Valley. They were pursued by a ferocious cow, and had 
a close run for it to the fence. Mr. Joullin's trowsers were sorely 
damaged by the barbed wire, but Mr. Graham cleared the obstruc- 
tion with great agility, and called the cow bad names from the 
other side of the fence. 

* » * 

The following from the New York Mail and Express of July 14th 
may prove interesting to California horBe-breeders: Turfmen 
hereabouts do not consider that young Mr. Macdonough, the Cali- 
fornia millionaire, who broke all known records by paying a 
South American breeder £30,000 for the English race horse Or- 
monde, got a bargain when he secured that famous animal, nor 



is it probable be thinks so himself. The horse has proved almost 
a failure at the stud, and but one foal has, thus far, come to re- 
present him, a little bay colt out of a fashionably bred English 
mare named Kissing Crust, that Mr. Macdonough imported in com- 
pany with a number of others. An Englishman who was informed 
of this disappointing state of affairs said, a day or so ago, that when 
Ormonde was at the stud in England his failure to produce foals 
attributed to illness, but that the Duke of Westminster did not 
believe in that excuse, and it was for that reason that he accepted 
the South American's offer of £16,000. "I came very near being 
one of a syndicate that was going to offer the Duke £20,000 for 
Ormonde," said the Englishman, "and most of that sum had been 
subscribed when the announcement that he was sold put an end 
to our scheme for keeping him in England as the bead of a stud. 
Onr money would have been thrown away, and I'm afraid Mr. 
Macdonough will find his has been to all intents and purposes." 
Mr. Charles Reed, who went all the way to Buenos Ayres and 
vainly offered about £28,000 for the horse, has good reason to con- 
gratulate himself that his mission was a failure. 

w # * 

Among the guests at the Sea Beach Hotel this summer was a 
tall young society man, who, when he left the place, left Mana- 
ger Sullivan in a puzzled condition. The tall young man 
had been a deft swimmer, an expert tennis player, and a gallant 
with the ladies during the four weeks of his stay. Manager Sulli- 
van grew to be very fond of him, and when he appeared at the 
counter one morning to pay his bill Mr. Sullivan took a long time 
to say good-bye. 

*« I hate to go; this is such a lovely place," said the young man. 

" Yes, I hate to have you go; this is a lovely place," answered 
Mr. Sullivan. 

<* There is only one fault that I can find with it — but — er — it is 
only a small one." 

» What is that?" queried Mr. Sullivan. 

" Well, there are too many rats here." 

« Yes, I have been told that before. I wish that I could get 
rid of them. Couldn't you tell me how to drive them away ? " 

" Yes," said the young man, with great vigor. » Just catch two 
or three nice fat ones and put them in a cage. Feed them as 
much as you fed me for two or three weeks and then charge them 
four dollars a day and let them go. They'll tell the other rats and 
then all will flee for their lives." 

William Berg, of the Produce Exchange, the «■ great German 
traveler," is making a record as a deer-slayer which will astoniah 
bis friends of the Black Forest. He has killed several bucks this 
season, and last Saturday brought down a three-pronged fellow. 
Berg hung his game up and went after more deer. In the mean- 
time Gaston Domergue and Billy Brown came along, speedily re- 
moved Berg's deer, and hid it in the brush. Half a mile away 
they met Berg. 

" Waat luck, Billy ? " asked Brown. 

» Got a fine one," aaid Berg, triumphantly; " come and look at 
him." 

They rode to the cache, but no buck was there. 

<• You ought to be ashamed of yourself," said Brown, indig- 
nantly, " telling us Buch a yarn as this. You've killed no deer." 

Mr. Berg swore by the leaves, and the trees, and high Heaven 
itself that be bad, but the others refused to believe him, and then 
the German Traveler sat down and invoked the vengeance of 
Heaven on the man who bad stolen his buck. He was too dis- 
gusted to eat luncheon, and at last Brown led him to the hiding 
place, and Berg was so delighted to regain bis prize that the din- 
ner that night at Gaston's was hia. 
» » * 

The Press Club iB alive with interest just now over the ap- 
proaching election. The nominations were made at the meeting 
which was held on Wednesday evening, and resulted aa followa: 
For President, W. W. Naughton, Wells Drury, F. C. Roberts; 
First Vice-President, C. M. Coe, L. H. Irvine; Second Vice- 
President, D. M. FraBer; Third Vice-President, John Finlay; Re- 
cording Secretary, Robert H. Davis; Financial Secretary, J. C. 
Donald; Librarian, John Dunnigan, George Fraser; Directora, 
M. C. Allen, George D. Squires, T. F. Bonnet, L. G. Carpenter, 
James 8. Tyler, Fremont Older, L. E. Fitch, A. L. Benson, C. A. 
Lee, J. Ross Jackson, J. P. Booth, E. F. Moran, W. 8. Drey- 
polcher, J. H. Griffes, N. A. Judd. 
* * # 

Lord Mt. Clifton, now temporarily living at the Palace, is an 
Englishman of the exploring type. His lordship has come 
hither with the determination to explore, and has been consult- 
ing such learned club men as George Nagle, Downey Harvey, and 
Northrop Cowles in regard to the beBt way to begin. Mr. Cowles 
suggested an investigation of the fauna and flora of Bernal 
Heights, while Mr. Nagle thought that an expedition into the 
jungles of the Western Addition would give his lordship some 
fine material for a letter to the Times. 



Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 



Julv 28. 1894. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A SUGGESTION TO THE PARK COMMISSIONERS 



THE Kine ArU building ■( the Midwinter F»ir hes been pre- 
sented to <. olden ''kit l'»rk . ha? been accepted by the Oom* 
mUsioners. and Is to be ■ permanent feature of the Park as an 
Art 'allery worthy of Sin Francisco and California. It would not 
be difficult for the Commissioners to fill It with poor work, but in 
view of the intelligent etTorts wblcb tbey hare put forth in the 
put to make the Park an attractive resort, the selections of paint- 
ings for the Fine Arts building; becomes a matter of some import- 
ance. It Is learned that Messrs. 8. it <i. Hump have olTered to 
sell any of their fine oil paintings at a reasonable price, without 
any idea of profit. These paintings have been selected from art- 
ists' easels and art exhibitions iD Europe and purchased with the 
greatest care, and constitute the best collection in 8an Francisco. 
Several of them have been reproduced in the News Lf.tter. The 
opportunity of the Commissioners and public-spirited citizens to 
take advantage of this rare opportunity is rare and inviting, es- 
pecially in view of the fact that the (lump collection was better, 
as a whole, than the exhibited pictures in the Midwinter Fair. 



f C 



COMPETITION in schools for tbe education of young ladies is 
\^t so great that those which have proved successful may be de- 
pended upon as efficient. Such is Miss Manson's School, 1625 San 
Jose avenoe, Alameda. The key to its popularity is found in the 
following paragraph of its prospectus: " It is the purpose of the 
Principal to offer to patrons the advantages of a thorough and 
refined school, to make her school the home of earnest effort, not 
to veneer, bat to educate young women for life's duties and posi- 
tions, and to give every advantage of study, culture, and health." 
With an efficient corps of teachers in all branches of culture, the 
school will re-open August Oth with prospects of continued use- 
fulness. 




World's Fair 

MEDAL 

And Diploma 

Awarded 

AVER'S 

CHERRY PECTORAL 

FOR 

THROAT 

and 

LUNG 

COMPLAINTS 




D 



R. H. G. YOUNG. DENTIST, 

1841 I'olk St., near Jackson, s. F. 



[Telephone 2605 



Painless extraction . Teeth without plates a specialty. 

HOURS— 9 A. M. to 5 p. M. , 8 to 9 P. M. Sundays, 9 a. m. to 2 p. m. 



D 



R. FRANKLIN PANCOAST, Dentist, 

703 Market Street, Rooms 18, 19 and 20. 



HOTEL 
VENDOME, 



SAN JOSE, CAL 



TO say that the Hotel Vendome is 
the best is enough in its favor. It 
is one of the largest and most ele- 
gantly appointed hotels in the State. 
It is situated in the center of a finely 
cultivated park twelve acres in ex- 
tent, and is surrounded by trees of 
many years' growth. 

The location is in the most fashion- 
able part of the city of San Jose, and 
is only two blocks from the Southern 
Pacific Railroad depot. Electric cars 
pass the door at short intervals. 

The appointments of the hotel are 
first-class in every particular, being 
furnished throughout in the most 
elegant and attractive manner. 

QeO. P. 59 e "» MANAGER. 





THE 
MARKET. 

749 MARKET ST., 

(Opposite Phelau Building). 

FINEST MARKET 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES. 

Giving Special Sales Every Day. 

Telephone B4GG. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1894. 




IF any proof were Deeded to convince skeptical people of the 
ease with which the young women of the period transfer their 
affections (?) from one lover to another, the recent annonncement 
of Miss Maud Burke's newly formed engagement would furnish it. 
Truly the funeral meats of the dead engagement with Poniatow- 
ski did furnish forth the supper for this marriage feast. The 
young lady is to be congratulated upon the wisdom of her latest 
choice. Some people in the grande monde may deem it a "come 
down " to step from a Prince to a business man, but there is no 
question as to the solid good sense displayed in preferring to have 
a husband able to earn his own and his wife's living than to de- 
pend for maintenance upon the charity of a rich guardian and a 
future possible will contest. 

It has been for years a favorite sneer of Eastern visitors that 
our society was like unto a flock of sheep — following the lead of 
the bell wether. Now, although we always indignantly deny 
such an assertion, there would seem to be a certain amount of 
fact to base it upon. Look, for instance, at Burlingame. Fred 
Sharon, the leading spirit of the place, is departed, and now the 
fun languishes and dies out 1 Mrs. Hager, the untiring society 
light, retires for a period of reBt, and where are the dinners, the 
tug parties, and "sich?" The truth is, the swim needs some one 
with plenty of "go" and plenty of cash to set the ball rolling, 
and presto! the crowd will follow in pursuit of the pleasure 
which at the present time is so fitful and transient a visitor of its 
rai ks. 

The gossip of the swagger set at Del Monte goes that the young 
doctor's devotion is now given to the younger sister in the capi- 
talist's family, and that the blonde sister-in-law is not "in it." 
Another on dit is that Jinimie is evidently stirred up by the atten- 
tions which his sharptongued lady friend is receiving, and things 
may yet reach a favorable stage in that direction, which goes to 
prove that there is no weapon more effective than rivalry. It 
outdoes even raillery. 

* * * 

The difficulties encountered by the ambitious Belvedereans in 
producing a brilliant Night in "Venice seems to have exhausted 
the energies of the island inhabitants, as that chaiiuing spot has 
not been in evidence since that date. 

Santa Cruz does not sparkle with its pristine vigor this season. 
Were it not for the Crit. Thornton-Keeney set the old-time faces 
would be sadly missed on tne beach. 

* * « 

It is nice to be rich, but still nicer when wealth and generosity 
are combined. Witness the two sisters, Mesdames Peter Dona- 
hue and Ed. Martin. Not only do they enjoy their wealth, but 
they share it with others. Some of the prettiest and most attract- 
ive girls present at the Del Monte festivities were guests of these 
ladies, and also of the Hobarts. In the latter party Miss May 
Hoffman was the bright particular star; her distingue appearance 
at the cotillion was universally commented upon. 

* * * 

One cannot help wondering if Mrs. Frank Carolan enjoys read- 
ing the published opinions of the entire country of her father, 
George M. Pullman, as culled recently from the several journals 
of the different States. But stop! She "never reads newspapers 
by any chance," and so of course is oblivious of the high esteem 
in which her paternal is held by his fellow citizens throughout 
the length and breadth of the land. 

* * * 

A pretty good story is told of a lady dwelling at one of our big 
hotels who seeks social recognition, having sunk a somewhat 
shady past by a second marriage into a higher social sphere. It 
is is said that she appealed to a friend for advice as to how her 
object could be attained, and the advice the friend gave her was 
to subscribe largely to charitable institutions, become a worker 
in a fashionable church, and cultivate stupidly good old men. 
Many will, no doubt, see the wisdom of the advice given. 

Miss Genevieve Goad and Miss Laura McKinstry were said to 
be " the prettiest buds " of the Del Monte gathering. 

The last diversion of the swagger set— which stands for the 
very top of the crhne de la crhne— is what is called guessing parties. 
A circle of the company forms and is privileged to " guess " until 
a correct answer is obtained, when the one who has to reply 
takes the question; the one gaining the most answers gets a 
prize. Anything for novelty, say the girls; but the reflective 
mind will see that the pastime opens the door to any amount of 
ill-nature and impertinent curiosity, two very pronounced con- 
comitants of " best society." 



After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. You 
will find it admirable. 



• 



K 



& 



"SPARKLING" 



NATURAL 
MINERAL 

WATER 

Of Niedermendig, on the 
Rhine, Germany 

The richest in Carbonic Gas 
of all Natural Mineral Waters, 
and the most effective in 
cases of Dyspep ia, Catabeh 
of the Stomach. Indigestion, 
Biliousness, etc. 

AS A TABLE WATER 
IT HAS NO EQUAL. 

Ask your Wine Merchant, 
Druggist or Grocer for it. 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 

Sole agents. 314 Sacramento 
Street, S. F. 



/T\r. and /T\/r\e.J. J4- 1^05^1/ald, 

922 GEARY ST., 

Will resume giving instructions on 

U/?di??sday, f\u<^u^t ist. 
/T)i55 /Sanson's 5ebool, 

1625 San Jose Avenue, between Grand 

and Paru Streets, 
/llameda, <?al. 

Boarding and Day School for Young Ladies and 
Children. Next term opens August 6th. 

ZISKA INSTITUTE, 

1606 VAN NESS AVENUE. 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. French. German, and English Day and Boarding 
School. Elegant home. Best educational advantages. 
Next term commences August 1, 1894. 

MME. B. ZISKA, A.M., Principal. 



Eureka 
Fire Hose Co. 




^REDCFOSCFIPEHl'" 5? 

' UBP ^UACKETFIREH05£|jM<;;yTf ■_" 



Exclusive 

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for 

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Goodyear Rubber Co., 

R. H. Pease, Vice-President and flanager. 
577-579 Market St., S. F. 73-75 First st., Portland, Or. 



Julv 2$, 1S94. 



S\\ ] i;\\( I SCO NEWS LKTTER. 



11 



THE FOURTH OF JULY AT PARIS. 



Paris, July 6, 1804. 

ALTHOUGH Id ft foreign country, and denied the fire-cracker 
and other noise-making things, the American art students 
bad a glorious Fourth, especially the San Francisco contingent. 
It happened that Sir Henry Heyman. the well-known San Fran- 
ciscan, member of the Bohemian Club and director of the Art As- 
sociation, bad just arrived, and after getting settled at the Belle- 
voe had come over to the Quartier Latin to see San Francisco's 
future artists; and a Fourth of July party was made up. 

At ten in the morning of the Fonrth. which was a beautiful 
day. a boat was taken at the I.ouvre for Suresnes. The run 
down the river was charming, particularly around Sevres and St. 
Cloud. The boat was well loaded, and it was pleasing to observe 
that most of the passengers were Americans bound on picnics 
and other pleasure parties: and it was more than pleasing to 
bear good old English spoken on all sides. But the pretty girls — 
oh, they were the prettiest lot I ever saw, and a!I Americans, 
too! All this made the trip very deligbtfui. 

Suresnes was reached about noon. There were five of us in 
the party, and we took a stroll back of the town among the 
beautiful villas and country homes, and soon were at the sum- 
mit of the hill on which the Fortress du Mont Valerian stands. 
Here a lovely view of Paris was seen like a panorama before us, 
with the beautiful Bois de Boulogne and the river in the fore- 



Thomas Na*t. the caricaturist, was there, as also was Mr. Yerkes, 
both being close friends of Mr. Kohlsaat. The boys did justice to 
the dinner and the wine. It was a jolly crowd, too. Nast amused 
us with the clever, quick caricatures which he made at the table. 
Champagne was plentiful, and the hoys were becoming merrier 
all the time. Over the cigars and coffee speeches and toasts were 
made. In response to a unanimous call Nast got up and made a 
speech in pantomime, which was clearly and cleverly done, and 
he was applauded heartily. Then Mr. Kohlsaat gave a short 
address, followed by Mr. Yerkes and Mr. Heyman. The boys 
cheered the giver of the banquet, and then all retired to the taste- 
fully decoiated drawing-room. Here singing and instrumental 
music, with sketches and stories, took up the rest of the evening. 
Mr. Heyman played a beautiful violin eolo, which captured the 
club and made an encore necessary. Then Nast made some more 
big caricatures, and thus the most delightful American cele- 
bration ever had in Pnris came to a close. Edouard Cucuel. 



FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF BOYS. 



IT is of particular interest to the parents ot California boys to 
know that they have an opportunity to avail themselves of 
the services of one of the most successful and distinguished edu- 
cators in the country, Prof. Ira G. Hoitt, Hoitt's Oak Grove 
School for Boys, at Burlingame, San Mateo County, is situated in 
one of the most delightful spots in California, and under the able 




HOITT'S OAK GROVE SCHOOL (FOR BOYS), SAN MATEO COUNTY, CAL. 



ground. Near the fortress a little fellow not more than fourteen 
years old was asleep on the fjrass, an accordion slung around his 
neck. We woke him up and bade him follow us, which he did 
quite willingly, playing all the while. Thus we marched along 
the road down by the river, the natives staring and laughing at 
the curious procession. 

Sir Henry took us up to one of the maisons, where they gave 
us one of the sweltest little dinners I had ever tasted. The place 
was enchanting, the tables being in a pleasant little arbor, shady 
and cool, while directly in front were the placid Seine and the 
beautiful Bois de Boulonge. We opened some good old Burgundy 
that had cobwebs on it, and drank to those thousands of miles 
away in San Francisco, and to the American flag, which floated 
abDve oor table, the little vagabond all the while working his 
accordion with all his might. 

Paris was reached at six o'clock, and we arrived at the club 
just in time for the banquet which Mr. Kohlsaat, a Chicago 
millionaire, formerly owner of the Inter Ocean, gave to all the 
American students. The big garden was all laid out and ar- 
ranged tastefully with long rows of tables; on all sides American 
flags were hung and the trees were filled with lanterns, making a 
charming effect. Every American in the Quartier was present, 
as a good dinner and good wine were not an every-day luxury. 



leadership of its principal, assisted by a corps of the best teachers, 
it has perfectly fulfilled its original promise of preparing boys for 
admission to any university or technical school, or for active 
business life. As such people as George C. Perkins, William 
Adams, the Blacks of San Mateo, the McChesneys of Oakland, 
the Miners of San Francisco, the Rylands of San Jose, and others 
of equally high standing send their sons 10 Prof. Hoitt, it may be 
taken for granted that bis institution is one of the most thorough 
in the country. A pleasant feature of the school is expressed in 
a letter to P^of. Hoitt from D. J. Staples, President of the Fire- 
man's Fund Insurance Company, in referring gratefully to the 
progress made by his grandson there. "The freedom which the 
boys feel in calling upon Mrs. Hoitt for her care and attention," 
he writes, " is the best evidence of the home-like character of 
your institution." All the leading educators of the State give 
Prof. Hoitt's school thair warmest endorsement. The school will 
re-open August 8th. 



J. R. SMITH & CO., 



MERCHANT TAILORS, 2SO Bush 
Street, Mills Building, formerly under 
Occidental Hotel. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1894 



mkY^f 




tfnotqer An attempt has been made recently to create a 
tyiqing newspaper sensation out of the allegations in the 

Scandal, complaint filed in the United States Circuit Court by 
one Keoabaw, a resident of London, against several prominent 
raining men of this city. They are mixed up in an alleged fraud 
perpetrated, it is claimed, upon the plaintiff in the matter of the 
sale, some years ago, of the Bears' Nest mine in Alaska The nar- 
rative is full of glaring absurdities, and especially in regard to 
the method employed to salt the Diamond Drill Cave. It is not 
likely that the grave charges made will be proven or sustainsd 
upon the trial of the case, and that the causes of the failure 
will be found in another direction. Persons familiar with the 
ground believe to-day tbat it is an open question whether the 
Bears' Nest group of mines is not as valuable as any in Alaska. 
Neither the original owners nor the English company that pur- 
chased the ground did sufficient work on it to determine its 
value. It will be remembered tbat the opinions of the experts 
who visited the Treadwell mine were diverse on several occa- 
sions, and that it took the San Francisco company which owned 
it three years of constant work before it was considered tbat the 
erection of mills and reduction works were warranted. Had the 
Bears' Nest promoters pursued a similar policy, it would have 
been wiser in tbe long run. It is possible that these three Eng- 
lish experts took too much for granted, assuming that the Bears' 
Nest, being the Northern extension of the now famous Treadwell 
mine, was equally as good. Tbe workings of the latter com- 
pany were entirely toward the Bears' Nest, and were close to the 
dividing line between the two locations, and it might have been 
inferred tbat the large body of quartz in the one opened up into 
the other. 

ns 

THE miserable fiasco which followed tbe promotion of this 
company in London has never yet been explained, but con- 
siderable light will be thrown on several rather mysterious hap- 
penings when tbe case comes up in court for trial. The length 
of time which has been permitted to elapse before riling the suit, 
coupled with the elaborate newspaper trial of the case, looks 
more like an exhibition of personal animus rather than a belief 
in the real merits of the suit. The News Letter urged upon in- 
vestors the necessity for the exercise of considerable caution at 
the time the mine was brought out, criticising at the same time 
the action of the Directors in letting contracts for a mill and 
machinery, aggregating the sum of $300,000, before developing 
ore sufficient to justify such expenditures. It seems tbat Mr. 
Renshaw is barking up the wrong tree. If be began by probing 
in other quarters to find how this money was disbursed, there is 
a possibility the forclosing down of tbe miDe in such a summary 
manner could be explained. Not long ago Mr. Bernhard, of Lon- 
don, visited this city and discovered a discrepancy in the accounts 
of the company, a difference between $220,000 and $265,000 in 
vouchers claimed by the original contractor, and it is known that 
he recovered some moDey. It is also known that Hammond, 
who was the leading contractor and had levied an attachment 
upon the property and mill, has just recently disposed of certain 
machinery to an adjoining company for $10,000. Mr. Renshaw 
might find it profitable to do a little delving nearer home, instead 
of engaging in his present wild goose chase. 
$ $ $ 
Gomstock The dull condition of business on Pine street is la- 
Miqing mentable, and more especially when the promising 
Shares. situation on the lode is taken into consideration. It 
is many years since some of the leading mines looked so well as 
they do just now, when the times are not propitious for an era of 
speculation. Many of the stocks should be selling for much more 
money, and, owing to the manner injwbich they are closely con- 
centrated, a little capital backed by judicious manipulation would 
speedily bring about a revival in the business. There are not 
many large outside holders of shares in mines like Con. Cal. -Vir- 
ginia on the street. One by one they have been dropping out on 
each successive decline, and the commission bookers, as a rule, 
bear witness to the fact that their wallets are well cleaned out. 
The shorts do not figure to any extent in tbe market, as the range 
of prices is too low to warrant the risk incurred by extending 
their lines. This is unfortunate in some respects, aa a heavy 
bear interest is always a prominent factor on an advancing mar- 
ket. The news from the recent important development in Con. 
Virginia continues very favorable. A large amount of high grade 
ore is being accumulated, and another run will shortly be made 
at the mill which will help to build up the coin reserves in the 
treasury. Tbe companies, as a rule, are in a strong financial posi- 
tion, and the assessments have been unusually light of late, ow- 
ing to the manner in which the resources are being husbanded. 
Business of all kinds is beginning to pick up considerably all over 
the country, and this will have a good effect upon the stock mar- 
ket eventually. There were no assessments levied during the 
past week. Standard Consolidated paid a dividend of ten cents 
per share. 



# Poor The English shareholders of the Anglo-American 
Fiqaqcia! firm of Fraser & Chalmers, mining machine inanu- 
Sqoiviqg. facturers, must regret that they ever had anything 
to do with this hybrid concern. After paying something like 
$800,000 for the good will of the Trans-Atlantic Company, tbey 
now find it advisable at their first annual meeting to wipe out 
$1,000,000 from the sum representing tbe Chicago plant, and to 
change the face value of their shares from $25 to $15. The stock- 
holders also voted to create 21,000 $15 shares of 7iper cent. 
I stock, and to pay $5 a share in cash in order to pay "a floating 
: debt of the company. The change of control does not appear to 
have been very beneficial, and like the big brewery companies 
which the hungry Britishers have gobbled up, the earnings, after 
coin passes and possession is obtained, always dwindle in a 
manner which is surprising. Working tests seldom or never fail 
to verify the figures representing profits in the past which make 
such an attractive showing in the company's prospectus. In the 
case of Fraser & Chalmers the net profits for the year now ended 
were only $94000, against $177,292 in the last year, and of this, 
some $56,000 had to be cancelled for bad debts and depreciation 
of investments. Besides, out of the balance, interest on deben- 
ture bonds, amounting to $21,000, had to be paid, which did not 
leave much to carry over. People, too, in this country are more 
inclined to patronize home makers, as a matter of self preserva- 
tion, so that these foreign corporations stand little show to make 
money. 

$ $ $ 

Successful News was received during the week that another 
tfiqt'ng Grass Valley mine had struck it rich. The gentle- 

Eqterprise. men in this city who own the Evening Star mine, 
decided a few months ago that it would be a wise move to sink a 
new shaft on tbe property, having been working to poor advantage 
through the old one. The superintendent was accordingly given 
instructions to do so, and assessments were levied to push the 
work, as rapidly as possible, with a view to economy. This week 
the shaft cut the main ledge, and tbe shareholders were gratified 
that the ore taken out was even richer than that from which 
such good milling returns were received at the other end of the 
mine. A great deal of money has been taken out of this property 
in the past, and appearances at present indicate that it will soon 
again rank as one of the leading gold producers in this district, 
which is famous for its rich mines. 

% % % 

Cheaply How the venerable Sage of Sutro Heights must 
Earqed snigger in bis sleeve every time an allusion is made to 
Farqe. the magnitude of the enterprise with which he is 
credited by sycophantic scribblers in tunneling the Comatock 
lode! No one Knows better than he that the great success of tbe 
scheme lay in the way the wool was pulled over tbe eyes of the 
individuals who voted away the public money which finally 
found its way into tbe 8utro coffers. The Sutro Tunnel is and 
always has been more or leas of a humbug. A much more re- 
markable piece of work has been done by a few miners of Sierra 
County, and at their own expense, in tunneling the old Bald 
Mountain Extension ground, and yet no one ever hears any talk 
about it. A profitable contract could be let to-day to ran the 
same kind of a drain tunnel for $20 per linear foot. It ia note- 
worthy alao that with the exception of the loan of bis name, Mr. 
Sutro has bad little use for tbe Tunnel. There was more money 
for him in selling tbe stock than in holding it as an investment. 
The people who were dazzled by the brilliant future outlined for 
the scheme in operation, like those who subscribed to construct 
it on the strength of promises, will probably wish by this time 
they had put their money in the sand dunea where Sutro has it 
now, and had let the wily old speculator keep his certificates of 
ownership in the mythical bonanza. When the history of the 
Tunnel is taken into account from the beginning down to date, 
there will be some hesitation in placing it among the wonders of 
the world. A great many people have never even heard of its 
existence, and as many more will wish they were in the same 
boat. Its only conceivable utility is to keep the world informed 
that a great philanthropist of tbe same name resides on the shores 
of the Pacific. 

$ $ $ 

Insuraqce The charter of the Carolina Mutual Insurance 
Charter Company, with headquarters at Charlotte, ST. C, 
ffeuoked. has been revoked by tbe Secretary of State of North 
Carolina. The company was operating as a mutual, but could 
not present a satisfactory statement. It claimed, however, to be 
doing business legally. Able attorneys represented both the 
company and the State, and the lower court decided the position 
taken by the Secretary of State correct. The case has been ap- 
pealed to the Supreme Court. 

$ $ $ 

IT is reported that many of the English companies with bead- 
quarters in Chicago are continuing the reduction. of lines be- 
gun early last fall. It is said that the decrease in the writings of 
the companies in that city alone is fully 50 per cent below what 
it was at this time last year. 



Julv 2<. 1894. 



BAN PR iNCISCO NEWS LETTER 



in 




mm 




" He»r the Crter' ' " W'hii the derll art thou* " 
"One thai will plij- the devil. »ir. with you." 

COLONKL Bl'KNS says that be Is bothered with hungry men 
every day who want to support him providing they are fed. 
He thinks (bat they are hungry ravage*, who loot do further 
than their next meal, and do not mean what they say. — /.»../ 
Chord from a Republican Organ. 
Lo. the holy politician who's so wildly patriotic 
That his advertised devotion strikes electors as Quixotic. 
Takes pleasure in administering a snub — 
Like an eleeant oration, 
To those men of lowly station, 
Who subordinate reformers' aims to glorify the nation 
To tbeir own prosaic hungerings for grub. 

We observe his righteous anger is most easily excited 
When he's gorging at a banquet to which cronies are invited 
To reciprocate the sentiment he feels — 
When be finds there's black sedition 
In the mental disposition 
Of those people who disturb the comfort-loving politician 
With complaints about the scarcity of meals. 

His contempt for all the fellows wbo're not open to bis reason, 

And whose politics is centered in tbeir stomachs for a season, 

Is described in words not altogether neat. 

Hence we koow how be despises 

That base wretch who never rises 

To the heights of those great principles and precepts he devises, 

Vulgarized by wolfish thoughts of bread and meat. 

Let the doughty Colonel Daniel seize the chance this weakness 

offers 
If he'd siience bis opponents and demolish all the scoffers, 
And sate the fierce ambition that he feels: 
Every ill-clad worthless faster 
Will accept him as the master, 
If he'll solve the great conundrum which is daily growing 
vaster — 
How's a man to rise superior to his meals? 

IT is amusing to read the long moral lectures which the Examiner 
and the Bulletin have been reading the community on young 
Melville's defalcation. Tbey blame him most unmercifully for 
having no " excuse " for his thefts — for having suffered under no 
"necessity" to commit tbem. It is not wonderful that news- 
papers which array themselves against law and order and which 
do all in their small power toparalyze business and bankrupt the 
fruit-growers of the State by encouraging disastrous strikes, should 
rend Olympus with their bellowings over a poor collection clerk's 
thefts. " No excuse," forsooth — as if any << excuse " for the com- 
mission of crime should be sought! To say that a crime has been 
committed without excuse is to plead justification for the com- 
mission of crime with an excuse. It was the Examiner, more 
than any other agency, that encouraged the ravages of Evans and 
Sontag; but then Evans and Sontag, like the American Railway 
Union, had an excuse — they were fighting property, peace, and 
law, and people who make that fight have to kill. Evans, Sontag, 
and the strikers had an excuse; the poor devil Melville had none. 
Wonderful is the difference between the men who rob a bank and 
those who rob and kill the people 1 

SUPERVISOR STANTON and Superintendent Titus, of the City 
and County Hospital, are battling for a bit of municipal su- 
premacy, and the first-named gentleman stands a good show of 
coming out a victor. Titus has assumed the role of a " political 
bluffer," and in making the wholesale discharge of the patientB 
(which ought to call for bis immediate discharge from the insti- 
tution) he has maliciously tried to create the impression that the 
Board of Supervisors and Mayor Ellert are responsible for his 
outrageous conduct by reason of the appropriation which they 
made for the hospital purposes being too small. The truth is 
that if it had not been for the waste, wanton extravagance, and 
mismanagement on the part of Titus the hospital would be able 
now to care for all its patients as it has in years gone by. 

SHALL we at no very distant day see the local dude, implicitly 
following the current of evolution in masculine costume 
abroad, appear in gorgeously embroidered coat of gay materials, 
a billycock bat resplendent with bullion, silk half-hose, and a 
waistcoat gemmed with pearls? The change in costume is much 
nearer than is generally supposed. Little things indicate it. The 
gaudy eccentricities of Parisian fops, and the daring innovation 
of certain men of fashion, which are being fostered by local dude- 
dom, herald the change. Long before the closing year of this 
century tbe hideous cylindrical hat and the tight-fitting clothes 
of sombre hue will have to join other sartorial horrors in merited 
oblivion. But what local dude or dudelet will first affront popu- 
lar satire by making the change? 



THE PopulUli of Sun rVaDOlSOO Imvp held their municipal con- 
rtnllOD tod have adopted ■ platform which is the natural 
product of the recent railroad strike and of the course of 
moat of lh« dally papers of the city. That Is to say. having 
put into its platform the principles for which tbe Cbtf, the 
BWIetin, the Report, and the Bramiturara contending, along with 
certain gentlemen who go on strike, destroy property, and com- 
mit murder, not to take into account a generous •• popular senti- 
ment " which Indulges In pastimes of that order, the Populists 
apparently have a clear held before them. The Democrats have 
no daily pnper at all, and the Republicans have only two. And 
the power of the daily press of San Francisco is so great (al- 
though it fails occasionally iu promoting Insurrections, incen- 
diarism, and murder), ihat tbe modified form of lawlessness which 
the Populist platform presents might be expected to prevail, pro- 
video: good citizens have not suffered any disseverance of their 
beads. To what extent Mr. Christopher Buckley, who appears 
to have taken in charge tbe welfare of the local Republican in- 
terests, may be pleased with the elimination of all conspicuous 
factors opposed to Republican success (the daily press and its 
agent, the Populist party, excepted), may be a matter which just 
at present is causing Colonel Daniel M. Burns and the Honorable 
Money Musk Estee considerable elation. 

IT is reported that the devotees of Woman's Suffrage in this city 
will endeavor to place a board of female school directors in 
the field for election. It will be interesting to the students of 
equal suffrage and emancipation of women to watch how tbe 
candidacy of the proposed board is received down in Egypt and 
in the Wabash bottoms. So far as announced to the world by 
recent explorers, the theory that it is properfor woman to voteor 
be voted for will be a new one to the aborigines of those localities, 
and they may be inclined to shy and kick over the traces on 
election day. There may be men in San Francisco so dense to 
tbe new light that they will prefer, if Democrats, rather to vote 
for a male Republican with whose peculiarities they are familiar, 
than for a woman, even though her name appear on tbe Demo- 
cratic ticket, and vice versa. The only way in which the women 
can score a clean sweep on tbe despised male sect is to see that 
the names of their candidates are on both tickets and to implore 
their friends on the registry lists to vote twice. 

WE would give an old mouse-trap to know where the patrons of 
the Oakland Ferry get their cigars. Man's inhumanity to man 
and to woman, in the matter of cigars, makes countless thousands 
mourn. But the world is full of villainous cigars, and a man 
takes his life in his mouth when he tries to smoke one. We can 
abide burning bay-rope and sole-leather, and rags dipped in tur- 
pentine, and fried fish soaked in garlic, and the exhaust pipe of 
a sewer; but when all these get together and mingle with tbe 
blessed odors that nestle in the dumps and fringe fragrant Blux- 
ome street and are rolled into one cigar, then we feel that we 
ought to ask the inventor of that cigar to step three paces to the 
front and be shot. Compared with one of the malodorous mon- 
sters that fumigate the Ferry the innumerable stenches of Lake 
Merritt at low tide are as sweet as a spray of mignonette. Mr. 
Huntington would be ashamed to give one of those cigars to Mr. 
Debs. 

CIVILIZATION is cursed with the benefits that follow in its 
train. When San Francisco's hundred hills, crowned now 
with stately mansions and airy palaces, were itinerant mounds of 
gray sand, and when the water laved tbe eastern line of Mont- 
gomery &treet in the days that are almost legendary, the hurrying 
citizen put his trust in his own legs as the superior and only 
means of locomotion. Montgomery street is cursed with its horse- 
car system. The single line of track that bears the slow-moving 
yellow vehicles is a serious hindrance to traffic. At every block, 
Clay, Sacramento, California, Pine, and the rest of them, loops 
are formed in the middle of the street, and there, to the complete 
stoppage of traffic, one car must stand still until another creeps 
slowly around it. Montgomery street is of too much consequence; 
it holds its place as too prominent an artery of the city's life to 
be barred and bolted by ineffable silurianism. 

IT has pained a great many people, a great many indeed, to 
learn that the resolution indorsing their philanthropic towns- 
man, Mr. Adolph Sutro, for Mayor on the People's Party ticket, 
was laid on the table in the Thirty-first District on Wednesday 
evening, with a dull, sickening thud — duller and far more sick- 
ening then was ever imagined by the ambitious reporters who 
write up the infrequent hangings. 

THE Populists of Massachusetts, at their recent State Conven- 
tion, congratulated themselves by saying, "Everything is go- 
ing our way." The platform which they adopted favors free 
silver, an income tax, a high tariff, and woman's suffrage. The 
Populists are up to their old game of throwing out hooks to catch 
all kinds of fish. 



CONSUL George Hall, Knight of the Medijjijji, since the close of 
the Midwinter Fair, has been infested by Turks. Mr. Hall has 
been negotiating with Adolph Sutro for the site for a small Cairo 
near tbe baths of that capitalist, with a view to induce tbe Turks 
to wash at indefinite periods. 



14 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 28, 1894. 



SNAP SHOTS. 

[By Di Vebnoh.1 

IT ia always imagined that a love fur the beautiful invests with 
gentleness and compassion the soul of the one who entertains 
it. This does not always follow. For instance, there is an old 
man in my neighborhood who devotes himself to the cultivation 
of a few choice flowers in boxes. He wages war upon all the 
cats in his little world. He is not more malignant against the 
common, vulgar, fence-walking feline than he is against the 
harmless, necessary cat of his neighbors' cellars and back, yards. 
His brutality is something dreadful. Nearly every family round 
about mourns the loss of a gentle tabby or a sleek grimalkin, 
which is no more because it fell under his ban and axe. One cat 
be beheaded, calmly and deliberately, though knowing that sne 
was nursing a litter of kittens, and only last week he stole upon 
a cat sleeping in the sun and battered its brains out in the sight 
of his horrified neighbors and a number of small children. I am 
now indulging in the luxury of a cat myself. When it begins to 
be old enough to wander in the starlight I will buy my pussy a 
tag, and then, having paid a license for it, my cat will have be- 
come personal property. Then let my neighbor beware. He can- 
not batter tbe brains of a two dollar piece of taxable property 
with impunity. In all things, at all times, let us have recourse 
to tbe law. 

Every once in a while some Easterner, overburdened with 
knowledge and a conviction that Californians know nothing at 
all, and but little of that, wanders out here with the benevolent 
intention of leading us out of tbe wilderness of our ignorance, and 
incidentally to earn a good fat commission from some publishing 
house for introducing his books, or models, or pencils to the 
school teachers of this city. Such a one is with us now. She is 
giving our teachers lessons in drawing. Some of them, still feel- 
ing rather sore over the cut in their salaries, and not overpleased 
with the fact that the special teacher draws a fine salary and en- 
larges it by commissions from her Eastern employers, are mur- 
muring among themselves. But that need not be noticed. They 
act thus only because they do not know what is good for them. 
The cut in their salaries will teach them self denial and economy, 
San Francisco teachers being so notoriously extravagant. I hope 
they, like myself, will be able to detect the fine wire edge of sar- 
casm in this little remark. It will also be of vast educative effect 
in teaching them to wish to vote, upon school questions at least. 
Still, I am afraid that since the reports of the elections in New 
Zealand have reached us women will be further away than ever 
from gaining their " equal rights." Do you know what dreadful 
results there followed their invasions of tbe polls ? Not that tbe 
elections passed off quietly. That might have been expected, 
perhaps. But no candidates against whose moral character any 
charge had been sustained was elected. Of course that settles it. 
No man wishes bis private character mixed up with his public 
career, and women are such impracticable creatures! Not that 
they wish every man to be a St. Anthony or a Joseph, because 
in one way that would be a reflection upon tbe power of their 
sex, but one must draw the line somewhere, and well, it is safer 
for men not to let women have tbe ballot — not 6ven on school 
questions. 

But to return to the teacher of drawing. She is fair to look 
upon and is an advocate of some advanced style of dress that 
makes her shirts haDg from her breastbone and from between 
her shoulder blades, so that the feminine eye, if allowed to wan- 
der, may take in the details of her costume, and the mind lose 
itself in admiration and despair. She is a fluent speaker, an in- 
teresting talker, and a very clear teacher, provided she is not in- 
terrupted by a question from one in search of information. At 
such a time she has a light and airy way of eluding the idea, and 
with a bright smile seeks to turn to* laugh upon the questioner 
instead of giving the desired information, which possibly is not 
within her power to give. Still, her work is just what we need. 
It is an excellent opportunity for the schools. An amusing little 
incident occurred at a recent lecture. She had been discoursing 
eloquently and in her peculiar vein upon how easy it was for 
teachers to interest children in the new style of model drawing, 
and how it would not be necessary for teachers to lose more than 
two or three minutes at the most in the distribution of materials 
and the getting to work. The teachers, who know the activity 
of the average San Francisco child, smiled at each other. At that 
moment two men at the furthermost corner of the room could be 
heard talking in the most subdued tones. Apparently they were 
there on school business. The drawing teacher stopped and quite 
impatiently demanded that '<they be put out of the room, because 
their talking disturbed her." A band was raised among the 
teachers, and then came the question : " If you, who are teaching 
grown people, are disturbed by so little a noise as that, what can 
we teachers do with fifty noisy, restless children? " " You must 
not have any noise," was the answer; "put them out." "But 
that cannot be done," was the reply; "we teachers need practi- 
cal answers to practical questions." The rest applauded, and the 
lady, having had the talking men put out, went on with her 



work. She is the lecturer who discovered that tbe colors of our 
street car transfers were of such hideous colors that they gave 
her a pain in her sensorium, aDd she felt as if she must throw it 
away as soon as she received one of the heart-breaking pinks or 
greens. The dear thing! We San Franciscans seem to spend our 
time in holding on to our transfers till the very last minute 
punched in the margin. 1 have known some clever manipulators 
to put back the little clip when it has not been detached, and 
pass the transfer later on. This moral obliquity must certainly be 
tbe result of not having a refined sense of color. It is wonderful 
what ideas one may pick up nowadays. 




YALE 



GENTLEMANS .SMOKED 




YALE MIXTURE SMOKING TOBACCO 
is manufactured of the be>T leaf 
§rown; selected especially for This 
l brand, regardless of cost- 

\MARBuRQ BROS., 8ALTIMORE.MD./- 



BYRON HOT SPRINGS 

Resort is reached by a pleasant three- 
hour ride by rail from San Francisco. 
The ^ot mud, hot salt water, and 
hot sulphur baths are infallible cures for 
rheumatism, sciatica, neuralgia, liver 
and kidney troubles, blood and skin dis- 
orders, 
L. R. HEAD, C. R. MASON, 

Proprietor. Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. O., Cal. 



l/ieby 5prip^s, 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

Three miles from Dkiah, the terminus of the S. F. AN. P. Railway. 
Only known natural electric water. Warm "champagne" baths- Situa- 
tion, location, and scenery not surpassed. Terms, $12 to $14 per week. 
Postoflieeand telephone at springs. 

WM. DOOLAN, Proprietor. 



LURLINE 



BATHS. 



Half a million gallons 
of pure warm salt 
water pumped into the 
tank every day. 



r\R. D. E. DUNNE, 

Chiropodist. 

Now at i.i'ki.im: baths, 3d floor 

Late of DR. LORYEAS HAMMAM BATHS. 



Next to Ladies' Parlor. 



July 28, 1894. 



SAN H:\\< \<i <■ \E\Vrt I.I.TTF.n. 



15 



GOTHAM GOSSIP. 



Nn Toax, July 17, 

WE have bwn mourning (be overwhelming drfrai of our great 
yacht. I do not know that occasional defpat Is unwhole- 
some for oar spread-eagle American <>pirlt. but such * serlp* ol 
defeats as we bare had in tbe last ten days Is certainly humiliat- 
ing to a degree. I cannot bring myself to believe that the races 
have been given away by Mr. Gootd, because I cannot conceive 
a nature so unsportsmanlike; but tbe opinion seems to be spread- 
ing that "to Murray Hill by way of Mayfair" is an explanation 
of those lamentable failures to uphold tbe Vigilant' $ last year's 
glory. Harry Gillig is giving his time completely to racing tbe 
Glortana. and the Ramona has not been put In commission nt all 
this year. He has made some gallant fights against tbe Waip, 
bnt has not had tbe success that be hoped for. 

Mrs. Crocker is at La Hacienda entertaining quietly. Mrs. 
Fassett. her daughter, has. with her children, been a recent guest. 
Julian Rix. as distinguished looking as of old, was also in Larch- 
mont for a few days, but has betaken himself to the Oriental 
Hotel at Manhattan Beach. Manhattan Beach is, as you know, 
the aristocratic end of Coney Island, but it is a distinction with- 
out very much difference excepting the absence of side shows, 
tintype tents, and itinerent venders of unwholesome-looking 
drinks. But nevertheless tbe tables on tbe Manhattan piazza are 
always crowded with "trippers, " and the roan who is good to 
his family and lakes wife and children along when he goes for an 
outing, is a conspicuous person, usually very much given to 
straw hat and flannels, the wife inevitably sbirt-waisted, with a 
serge skirt and tan shoes — this, no matter what her size, weight, 
and age — while the children, dear things ! usually appear in frocks 
once snowy, but bearing the signs of hard usaee in the journey. 
These family groups are somewhat trying to tbe unsympathetic 
neighbor who does not care for smeary juvenility. But the Ori- 
ental is much more exclusive and holds itself aloof distinctly from 
tbe "sands of Margate" crowd. 

To transport you at once to a more exclusive region let me an- 
nounce the return to Newport of Mrs. Hermann Oelrichs and 

Miss Fair, who arrived yesterday. Among , 

to-day's departures for the other side are 
Mrs. Frank Mayo and Miss Eleanore 
Mayo, who go to Paris for a few months. 
I am told on good authority that Miss 
Mayo will marry in September Mr. James 
Elverson, of Philadelphia, whose sister a 
few months ago married the French Min- 
ister. Mr. Elverson is a son of the editor 
of the Philadelphia Enquirer, and is said 
to be very rich in the world's goods as 
well as exceedingly charming in manner 
and character. Miss Mayo will sing again 
in October, having made a success during 
the last season. Mias Mayo's mother was 
Miss Bryan, of Vallejo, California, and a 
niece of Lady Franklin. 

Shafter Howard was a prominent feature 
of the avenue in the early summer after- 
noons, but his butterfly flight is hard to 
flollow, and perhaps he is once more with 
you. "Billy" Littauer. as his intimates 
call bim, who left a lasting impression in 
San Francisco as one of the most popular 
men whom the East ever lent to San 
Francisco, has betaken himself to Bar 
Harbor for the rest of tbe summer. Arthur 
Fawcett, who spent last summer in 8an 
Francisco, has just arrived with his sister 
from Chicago. They will go to Lozern 
and the Italian lakes for the autumn and 
winter, and to London for the season next 
year. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Alexander intended 
sailing this month for tbe other side, bat 
owing to their long delay in tbe West, 
they have abandoned the plan and will re- 
main at Seabright for the summer, going 
in the autumn to their magnificent new 
house at Tuxedo. Mrs. Bella Thomas 
Nichols is also at Seabright, where she is 
the guest of Mrs. Hazleton, of New York. 
Lieutenant Mott is enjoying the salt 
breezes at Arverne-by-the-Sea; Mrs. Hel- 
derman and Miss Cook are at the West 
End Hotel, Long Branch. Mrs. Gertrude 
Atherton, having finished her new book, 
has left Yonkers and come into New York 
for a visit. She. has been working on her 
new novel for several months. Consul- 
General of Russia Olarovsky and Madame 
Olarovsky, with Miss Olarovsky and the 
governess, are at Long Branch, accom- 
panied by Prince Gatlitzin. Edna Wal- 



* - M r*. dp Wolf Hopper) is dppmed one of tbe finest swimmers 
at Dip Branch. Mr. ami Mm. J. Hood Wright and Ml»* Bertha 
Koblnson are cruising on the /.nmpn for tbe summer. Miss Rob- 
inson's engagement has juni been announced. 8he I* to marry a 
Mr. Allen I'unnlngham, of Pittsburg, the scion of a very wealthy 
bouse. 

A chance encounter supplied me with certain information 
direct from Pullman, tbe centre of the labor dilllcultles. I met a 
surgeon who had just arrived from Pullman, his home. He is 
surgeon to several of the railway companies, and be assured me 
that better housed, better fed, better clothed working people 
than those at Pullman could not be found in tbe world. He said 
that but one grievance existed — tbe extortionate bouse rents; 
that he had a simple cottage which cost not more than twenty- 
five hundred or three thousand dollars, and in nine or ten years' 
residence he bad paid for it twice over in rent. He assured roe 
that when Debs arrived there a few months ago, he found a 
peaceful set of men. whose imagination be inflamed by bis 
speeches and from whose pockets he took, at a dollar ahead, 
four thousand dollars "for the cause." He also said that it was 
Debs' boast while he wa« in the Keeley Institute at Dwight, that 
before many months he would be the most talked-of man in 
America. Passe Partout. 



ojto rtoip/W, 



Established 1873 



411 Bush Street. Opposite 
the New California Hotel. 
Best Equipped 

OYSTER ai?d CUIYCJ? p^CO^S. 

Large diuing-room for ladies. Sole depot for .103 SCHLITZ MILWAU- 
KEE BEER. Imported European Beer from BuerEerliches Brauhaus, 
Pilsen, Bohemia; Actien Beer from Rim Culrabach, Bavaria. 




SURBRUG'S GOLDEN SCEPTRE. 



n«wc/»«»o 



If V«,, om r> P\na Qmnl/or we want Y0U to tr y GOLDEN SCEPTRE- 
IT TOU Eire a ripe OlIIOKtJI, allthe talk in the world will not convince as 
auicklv as a trial that it is almost perfection. We will send on receipt of 10 cents, a 
sample to any address. Prices GOLDEN SCEPTRE, 1 lb., !fl.30; M lb., 40 c. Postage 
paid. Send for pamphlet. 

M. BLASKOWER & CO., 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 



225 Montgomery Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO, Cal. 



Worlds e&i&Jt 



Exact Size. 





JOWNTOWNDEPnf^iiBaa 

5URBRUG,i S9 75o : or7lT^ lirais "SHBWHHHB"B^^ '•'-"•;'"■ 
THE LEABiMS HAUM CIGAR g^TSKMRfe. ^iWfWSS.ftllSWSSSrdSaS 

Khedoes not keep them, send S1.H0 for simple box of ten. Send money by registered mall. 

JACOB STAHL. Jr., & CO., Makers, 168th St. and 3d Ave., New York City. 



BOOT & SANDEBSON, SAN FBANCISCO, 
KLAUBEB & LEVI, SAN DIEGO, CAL , 
DISTEIBUTING AGENTS. 



and 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 28, 1894. 




THE government and press of France seems to be passing 
through a fever of anti-anarchist sentiment. This is, in itself, 
natural euough. The head of the French Government has just 
been assassinated by a member of the anarchist fraternity, and 
that grave, cruel, and illogical act was but one of a series of vio- 
lent incidents of recent occurrence which disclose the presence of 
a considerable body of people throughout Europe who are banded 
together for the purpose of destroying public order and assailing 
the lives of those who represent the forms and institutions of or- 
ganized society. The situation thus presented fs a very serious 
one, but it should be recollected that it is possible, by the adop- 
tion of remedies which are as illogical and futile as anarchy itself, 
so to confuse and confound that situation as to make its last con- 
dition worse than its first. Anarchy is simply the doctrine of no 
government or social chaos. Any attempt to apply it to the 
affairs of life is now and always has been a crime in France and in 
all other civilized countries. The difficulty wnich organized gov- 
ernment has found it impossible to get over in dealing with 
anarchy has been to discover the anarchist after he has applied 
or attempted to apply his theories to the practical affairs of life. 
That is a difficulty which cannot be obviated by legislation. On 
the other hand, laws established under the influence of the pres- 
ent hysterical condition of the public mind in France are likely 
to be dominated by the influences of the bafrted police and 
executive authority, and to be little more or less than a series of 
invasions upon the individual rights and liberties of the unofficial 
citizen. In the end laws of that nature will help to propagate 
rather than to destroy the cause of anarchy. 

It may be said in this connection that those who desire to un- 
derstand with reasonable clearness the methods which should be 
employed in dealing with anarchy should endeavor to compre- 
hend what anarchy means. Most people confuse anarchy with 
the outrages it perpetrates. These people mistake the remedy 
for the doctrine which suggests the necessity for the remedy; 
they mislead themselves into the belief that the anarchist kills 
and destroys through sheer wanton Inst for blood and destruc- 
tion. The anarchist is not a blind brute without an object. 
Practically speaking, he is an advanced socialist. The socialist 
wishes to reform the institutions under which men are organized 
into communities, so that there will be a more equal division of 
the good things of life between the masses and the classes. The 
anarchist has the same objection to the existing institutions of 
organized society that the socialist has, but he is a pessimist in 
regard to the possibility of their reformation. He is in touch with 
want and misery; they surround him and fill hie mind and color his 
life. He looks upon want and misery as the natural products of 
all government; he sees in government only a gross machine 
which enables the successful few to oppress the unsuccessful 
many. There is a substratum of truth underneath this idea, but 
the deduction which the anarchist draws from it, and which 
forms his remedy, is so grotesquely irrational that organized gov- 
ernment has nothing to fear from it, so long as it is kept in the 
open. Anarchy cannot survive free discussion. It has never 
been able to take root in the United States or in the British Isles, 
and in continental Europe it flourishes best where it is given the 
character of a remedy which the rich and influential fear and are 
seeking to crush. 

The victory which the Italian native troops won over the 
Mahdlsts in Africa last week will go a long way toward estab- 
lishing Italian influence on a permanent basis in the territory 
which they occupied a few years ago. It will also have a ten- 
dency to take the conceit out of "the Arabs who dominate the 
country adjacent to Egypt. If the British representatives sug- 
gested this occupation to the Italian Government — as is probable 
— they played a pretty shrewd trick, for Italy has acquired a 
commercial position of limited value while the British interests in 
Egypt have acquired a desirable neighbor. 

The philosopher of the tall tower has received a fresh inspira- 
tion from on high, and as a result he announces that Speaker 
Crisp and the present Democratic Congress are responsible for the 
disturbances at Bluefields. But the British Government is impli- 
cated as an accessory both before and after the acts. It never 
seems to occur to the philosopher that he does not understand 
some of the things he writes of. 



P.IB, 



FRUIT DRYING PAPERS. 

BUILDING PAPERS. 

ROOFING AND PAINTS. 

PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 

116 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Mothers and nurses all the world over have given their teething 
babies and feverish children Steedman's Soothing Powders. Try them. 

Furnished double upper flat to rent in Western Addition. Seven rooms, 
bath, and attic. Rent, $75 a month. Apply, 3116 Washington street. 

B-AJSTIE CS. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST GO. 

Paid-up Capital, *1, OOO.OOO. 

Corner Montgomery and California Streets, San Francisco. 

J. B. FRY, President HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown Secretary and Treasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee. It is a legal depositary for Court and Trust 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an individual 
in like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives deposits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 
per cent per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
bearing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rate-- of interest thereon. 

RENTS SAFES inside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from $5 per 
annum upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 
at low rates. 
WILLS DRAWN AND TAKEN CARE OF WITHOUT CHARGE. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

V W. Vomer Sanson. e and Bush streets, 

Established 1870. u. S. Depositary. 

Capital (Paid Up) $1,500,000. 

SURPLUS $800,000 I UNDIVIDED PRCFITS $75,196 

S. G MURPHY President | 

JAMES MOFFITT . .Vice-President | JAMES K. LYNCH Cashier 

directors: 

Geo. A. Low, George C. Perkins, S G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt, 

Thomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking: Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH, Manager, 

Safes to rent from So to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of 

the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 

storage. A specialty made of the care of wills. Office hours, 8 a. m. to 6 p. M. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO RANK, Limited- 

Authorized Capital $3,500,000 | Capital Paid Up . $2,-150,000 

Reserve $500,000. 

San Francisco Office— 424 California St. London Office— 73 Lombard St., E.C . 

Portland Branch— 48 First St. Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER. Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. 

Cashier, GUSTAV FRIEDERICH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 

NEW YORK— Diexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, Limited. 

N. W. Corner SANSOME and SUTTER. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 I Paid Up Capital. $2,000,000 

Beserve Fund, $800,000. 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London. 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 
17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 



Commercial and Travelers' Credits issue. 



SIG. GREENBAUM,, 
C. ALTSCHUL 



Managers. 



THE SATHER BANKIN6 COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $1,250,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. W r ILSON President 

C. F. A. TALBOT, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier 

Directors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, C. S. Benedict, James K- Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley A Co, Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. _______^_ 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market. Montgomery and l'ost Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHA8. F. CROCKER, I E. B, POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER PBE8IDENT 

W. E. BROWN Vice -'resident 

GEO. W. KLINE Cashier 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK- 

222 MONTGOMERY ST., MILLS BUILDING. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 



Wm. Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS: 
Jerome Lincoln 
O D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon 
J. B. Randol. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street, S. F, 

Incorporated November24.1869. 

ADOLPH C.WEBER President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



July 28, 1804. 



- \\ FRAN) [S( NEWS II II EH 



17 



OBITUARY. 

THK le*ih of Bx-GoTVrnof Frederick K. Low at bis mMtuMtn 
this city late BaturdiT brought to a oloM o >*•- f ti e lbo>l UM-ful 
of tbe live* wblcb have been devoted to ibe omldinR of ■ altfornla. 
He came of a poor and sturdy yeoman family oi M t>nr, * ■■ 
born in IS-?*, and bad only a common school education : i til m la 
commonly men of sacb origin and attainments tbat the inal* and 
demands of a pioneer existence develop Into ibe HAD nob Ml m>n 
and most useful citizens. Like moil of the other young men 
who came to California in Ibe early days, be went into the mine?, 
bat soon left them and established the mercantile h<m»e <<f Lam- 
bert A Low in 8an Francisco. In I860 be encased with bfa 
brothers in business at Marysville, there succeeded to tbe bank- 
log and express business of Adams & Co., sold out afterward to 
N. P. Hideout, and returned to San Krancisco. He served eight 
years In Congress, and in l--"3 was appointed Collector of tbe 
Port of San Francisco by President Lincoln, and in the same year 
was elected Governor of the State. He gave so good satisfaction 
that tbe office was again offered him. but he declined it, and in 
1869 be was appointed Minister to Cbira. After that service he 
returned to San Francisco and became associate manager of the 
Anglo-Californian Bank, which position he held till his death. 
For many years be was also President of the Sutter-street Kail- 
road, and was interested in many other important enterprises. 
A widow (formerly Miss Mollie Creed, of Marysville) and an un- 
married daughter survive him. While his usefulness and enter- 
prise as a capitalist were conspicuous elements of his force and 
popularity, it was as an officer tbat he showed his zeal for the 
public interests most effectively. He saved Golden Gate Park to 
tbe city by pocketing an Act of the Legislature tiansferring it to 
private ownership. He defeated an issue of $2,000,000 in bonds 
to aid the Pacific Railroad proposition, and in Congress did effi- 
cient work in bringing California closer to tbe Union. His pri- 
vate life was clean and admirable, and nis benevolence broad and 
generous. 

E. L. G. Steele died last Sunday of apoplexy, and thus passed 
away a leading merchant and man of affairs, a gentleman of cul- 
ture, and a club man of wide popularity. He was only fifty-two 
years old, and bad seemed so virile and hearty that bis death 
came as a heavy blow to tbe community. He was a native of 
Boston, with a long line of strong ancestors traceable to tbe May- 
flower, Edward Everett Hale being a cousin. Stopping here 
while making a tour of the world with bis father thirty-two 
yeara ago, he was offered a position in tbe commission bouse of 
C. A. Lowe & Co. Afterward be acquired an interest in the 
house, and besides was engaged in other and larger interests, be- 
ing President of tbe Northern Champerico Transfer Company of 
Guatemala, for a number of years President of the American 
Sugar Refinery, President of the Oceanic Steamship Company 
and originator and successful promoter of the idea of running a 
line of steamers to the Hawaiian Islands, and having other large 
commercial interests. He was genial, scholarly, and finished, a 
writer of ability, and a most charming companion and raconteur. 

The list of deathB of notable persona for tbe week includes that 
of good 8ister Aloyse of the Cross, at the Convent of Notre Dame, 
on Dolores street (of which she had been Superioress for thirty 
years past), last Saturday, at tbe age of sixty-two years. She was 
born in England, came to California forty years ago, and went to 
the College of Notre Dame at San Jose. When the Dolores Con- 
vent was built thirty years ago she was given charge of it, and 
under her wise administration it grew steadily and became one of 
the best and most flourishing Catholic institutions in the State. 
There is many a heart that grieves for the death of this fine, strong, 
and gentle woman. 

Ex-Mayor E. W- Burr's death added another to the week's list. 
He was eighty-five yearB of age, and one of the best known of 
the strong men in the ranks of the pioneers. After establishing 
tbe mercantile house of Burr, Mattoon & Co., and conducting it 
successfully for a number of years, he sold his interest and went 
into politics. The People's Party made bim Mayor in 1856, 1857, 
and 1858, and be served the city faithfully and intelligently. In 
1857 he founded the Savings and Loan Society and was its Presi- 
dent for twenty-one years. He leaves two sons and two daughters, 
all grown. 

L. L. Dennery died at his residence, 2621 Clay street, Thurs- 
day morning, after a long illness. As secretary for a number of 
building and loan associations he had a wide acquaintance, and 
was an instrument of great good. He was a kindly man, and the 
thousands who sought his wise counsels have lost a valued friend. 

The Grand Canon Line !— To the East ! 



Commencing May 1st the "Santa Fe Route" Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Tuesday. 
Manager in Charge. Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are 
run through to Chicago every day without change. This is the only- 
Line by which the Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. 
Send for illustrated book giving full particulars. W. A. Bissell, 
G. P. A., 650 Market street, Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



BANK OF BRI1ISH COLUMBIA. 

cap.mlp.uiup '" ^-"^->->^— — $3000000 

re erve fimd 1.404.000 

Southeast corner Bush and Bumohm itrtela. 

in in «hhu: no i I.....I si,,. r , i ,,,,.!,.,, 

URaxi m> -\ Ictorla, Vancouver, Now W Nanalmo, 

aim NeUrou: imtMi Columbia; lN>nian<l. Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 
w a&hlngtou 
i tilt Bank transact* n Qeaeral Bauklug Basinets. accounts: opened sub- 
1 beck, «"'! special i" . eeefved. Commercial Credits granted 

available lu all parts of the world Approved mil- discounted and «<i- 
vauceti made na mod c>ltHUTni security. Draw* direct m current rates 
up mi it« Hva-i Office ami Rr-uchcs, and upon Its agents* as follows: 

new York— Merchant* Us ok of Canada; Chicago— 'First National Bank; 
mvbrpooi.— North and eJouth Wales Hank; Scotland— British Linen Com- 
pany; Ireland— Bank of Ireland Mix ICO— Loudon Bank of Mexico; 
BOOTH America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bauk of AiihirnlasiR and Commercial Banking Company 
of Sydney Ld. ; Dkmehaka and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. San Francisco. 

CAPITAL ... $3/00,000 00 

SURPLUS and Undivided Profits (January 1, 1894) 3.247 584 02 

\N ILUAM ALVORP, President. THOMAS BROWN, Cashier. 

S. Prentiss smith, Ass't Cashier, I. F. Moulton, '2d Ass'l Cashier. 

CO R K ES I 'O M » I ; VI N : 

New York— Messrs Laidlaw & Co; The Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tre mo ut National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
8ous; Paris— Messrs. Pe Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev)— Agency 
of The Bank of California; Chicago— Union National Bank; Australia 
aud New Zealand— Bank of New Zealand; China, Japan and India— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. bT. Louis— Boatmens Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Denver, Kansas City, New Orleans, Portland, or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin. Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-ou-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christians, Melbourne, Syndey, Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRAKCISCO SAVINGS UNION. 

Corner California anil Webb Streets. 

Branch office 1700 Market Street, corner Polk. 

DEPOSITS. June 30, 1893 528,068,691 00 

GUARANTEE CAP11AL and Surplus I,B99!434 00 

DIRECTORS— Albert Miller, President; George W. Beaver, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Thomas Magee, E. B. Pond, Charles Pace, Daniel E. Martin, W. C. B. 
De Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland ; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the aciual receipt of the money. The signa- 
ture of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge ie 
made for pass book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. M. Satur- 
day evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

GUARANTEED CAPITAL, $1,000,000. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES D. PHELAN, S G MURPHY Vice-Presidents 

Directors— James G. Fair, L P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James D. Phelan, James Muffitt, S G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, and 
Robert McElroy, 

Interebt paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on Approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

No. 526 CALIFORNIA ST., S. F. 

Guaranteed Capital and Reserve Fund $1,610,000 00 

Deposits January 2, 1894 29,429,21 7 OIB 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-President, B A. Becker; 
Second Vice-Pres dent, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Mull^r. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoe- 
mann, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Stein- 
hart, Daniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. JE. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W, Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. STEINHART ) „ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL, | Managers 

WELLS, FARGO & CO-'S BANK. 

N . E. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 OO 

John J. Valentine President I Homer S. King. .. Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman.. Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B, PARSONS, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. DOOLY, Cashier 

DIRECTORS. 
John J . Valentine, Benj P . Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry E. Hunting- 
ton, Homer 8. King, Geo. E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



july 28,3894. 




THE SONG OF SHIPS. - 



-Frank L. Stanton in Atlanta Constitu- 
tion. 



THE sky made a whip of the wind and lashed the sea into 
foam, 
And the keen-blowing gales tore the flags and the sails of the 

ships that were plunging home; 
Of the ships that were tossing home on the black and billowy deep; 
But who shall reach to the wrecks, the wrecks where the ships and 
their captains sleep ? 

Oh, wrecks, hy the black seas tossed, 

In the desolate ocean nights! 
Lost, lost in the darkness, lost 

In sight o' the harbor lights! 

The sky made a veil o' the clouds, and a scourge o' the lightning 

red, 
And the blasts bowed the masts of the ships that fared where love 

and the seagulls led; 
Of the ships that were faring home with love for the waiting breast; 
But where is the love that can reach to the wrecks where the ships 

and their captains rest ? 

Oh, ships of our love, wave-tossed 

In the fathomless ocean nights! 
Lost, lost in the blackness, lost 

In sight o' the harbor lights? 

There was once a ship of my soul that tossed o'er a stormy sea, 
And this was my prayer, when the nights gloomed drear: "Send 

my soul's ship safe to rael 
Send my soul's ship safely home, from billows and blackened skies!" 
But where is the soul that can reach to the depth, the depths where 

niy soul's ship lies? 

Oh, ship of my soul, storm-tossed 

In the far and fearful nights, 
Lost, lost in the blackness, lost 

In sight o' the harbor lights! 



AT YOUR GATE.— Burton Grey. 



My darling! My darling! My darling! 

Do you know how 1 want you to-night ? 
The wind passes, moaning and snarling, 

Like some evil ghost on its flight; 
On the wet street your lamp's gleam shines redly, 

You are sitting alone — did you start 
As 1 spoke ? Did you guess at this deadly 
Chill pain in my heart? 

Out here where the dull rain is falling, 
Just once— just a moment — I wait; 

Did you hear the sad voice that was calling 
Your name as I paused by the gate ? 

It was just a mere breath — ah! I know, dear, 
Not even Love's ears could have heard; 

But oh ! I was hungering so, dear. 
For one little word. 

Do you think I am ever without you? 

Ever lose for an instant your face, 
Or the spell that breathes#always about you. 

Of your subtle, ineffable grace ? 
Why, even to-night, put away, dear, 

From the light of your eyes though I stand, 
I feel as I linger and pray, dear, 

The touch of your hand. 

Once again with its wonted caressing 

It sooths my deep wound like a balm; 

Once again with an exquisite blessing 
It hushes my grief into calm; 

And all the dear charm of your presence, 
My darling, is with me again, 

And takes, like some mystical essence, 
The sting from my pain. 

Ah, me! for a word that could move you 

Like a whisper of magical art ! 
I love you ! I love you! I love you! 

There is no other word in a heart. 
Will your eyes that were loving still love me ? 

Will your heart, once so tender, torgive ? 
Ah, darling! stoop down from above me 
And tell me to live. 




by not rubbim 



Does economy 

bore you? 

It ought not to, always. Take the 
matter of washing with Pearl- 
ine, for instance. That is a 
pleasant economy. There's 
your work made light and short 
tor you ; and while you're 
doing it, in this easy, pleasant 
way, you can be thinking of the 
actual money that you're saving 
g things to ruin, as in the old 
way. That ought to be pleasant to think of, 
whether you're doing the work yourself, or 
having it done. Millions use Pearline. 

Beware of imitations. 431 JAMES PYLE, New York. 

ACTORS, 
ACTRESSES, 

8ociety Ladies, Singers, Public Speakers, Business Men, 
ARE FBKIH IEN'1 I. V (JKEATLV ANNOYED BY 

HOARSENESS, 
SORE THROAT, 
IRRITABLE COUGH, 
ASTHMA, 
CATARRH, 
DEAFNESS. 
Knowing that I can effect a THOROUGH CURE of the above named 
troubles I shall be pleased to give a FREE TEST of my new scientific 
methods to all who call at my office. 

R. WESLEY ROGER!!, M. D , 629 Kearny St., S. F. 
"Ear, Nose, Throat and Lungs a Specialty. 



GARDEN HOSE. 



Black Line Spiral 

Cotton Robber- .Lined Hose 

Will stand 300 lbs. pressure to the square inch and will outlast 
the best rubber hose manufactured. Try a length. 

BOSTON WOVEN HOSE AND RUBBER CO., 

14-16 Fremont St., 8. P., Cal. 



REMOVAL. 



DELMAS & SHORTRIDGE 

Have removed their law offices to the 

CROCKER BUILDING (Third Floor.) 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Established 1836.] 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 
GEO. F. GRANT, manager 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE COMPANY, 

(Incorporated A. D.,1799.) 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 

413 California Street, San Francisco 



Julv 2\ 1894. 



8AN FltANVISCO M'.WS I. II n i; 



IS 




:;; 5UNBCAA\5 



SUE — It nnnol be— I am not worthy of yon. Hi;- Nonsense. 
• It is troe, too true." •• (mpottlbl*. You are an angel." 
■* No. no; yoa are wrong. I am an idle, silly girl, utterly unfit to 
become your companion through life." Thif i- madness, What sort 
of a wife do yon think I ought to have i re alooiating, 

practical woman who can live on yoar »mall salary." —Atuwen. 
. and your orchestra to plav at mv 
next Thursday night TuBOaraawru Leader — Certainly. 
Mm».. Pabvexc— Well, von may consider yourself engaged, Bat J 
want to make arrangement- 1 * to hire yon by the piece, do you under- 
stand ' The la*t time I engaged yoooy the hour, and your men tOOH 
advantage of it and played slow, soft thing-* most of the time. 

—Chicago R 
Lin is an overcrowded car 
Where fate can either make or mar, 
Three who get seals usurp the snaps 
While luckless souls must cling to straps. 

— Arkanwta Traveler. 

1*k n< v. Pomalohski I the guest of hon<»r at Mrs. Newlyri ten's after- 
no >n reception)— Zank you, Madame. I shall accept a cup of coffee 
wir mooch plaizhaire. Mmk. Nbwi yritvh (concerning whose early 
history society is in the dark, addressing the caterer's attendant)— 
Draw one. —Philadelphia Record. 

" Don't you like Prof. Knowall ? " asked one girl. "0, dear, no! " 
replied the other girl. " he's so fatiguing." " He has the reputation 
of being very clever." " That's why I don't like him. Wben he talks 
you have to listen to what he is saying, or you can't reply to his re- 
marks." — Answers. 

Yirzt Dlde — Going to see the animals, dear boy ? Second Dude- 
No, deah boy; can't stand the effect on me nerves. Just imagine 
what the king of beasts must suffer, poor brute, when the trainer puts 
his head in his mouth, if he doesn't happen to like hair oil ! 

— Judge. 

Hcbby (during the tiff) — I suppose now that you will be going 
home to your mother in the morning ? Wifie— I "just won't. I have 
tried that, and it doesn't seem to do any good. I am going to bring 
mother here this time. — Pearson's. 

Minnie— Here is a story about a girl who refused to marry a man 
because his complexion didn't match her hair. Mamie— Goodness. 
The silly thing must have thought that married people had to be to- 
gether most of the time. — Indianapolis Journal. 

Father (a few years hence) — Why do you take your bicycle when 
you are going such a short distance ? Why don't you walk ? 
Daughter ("modestly)— Walk? Mercy.no! I don't want to be so 
conspicuous. — Good News. 

Muller— All the fishes in the city-pond are suffering from alcohol- 
ism. Schttlze— How is that possible? Muller— Old Boozely fell 
into it the other night, and it took nearly a quarter of an hour to res- 
cue him. — Bombe, Vienna. 

Dun (to Smith, who has just paid an old debt)— There are still ten 
marks wanting, sir. Smith — Oh, I retain them as your share of my 
house-rent. During the last month you have occupied the ball every 
day. — Figaro, Vienna. 

" What's old Swizzles, the millionaire, looking so pleased about? 
He just lost $10,000 in stocks." " Yes, but afterward he managed to 
get a free ticket to a seventy-five cent show." — Chicago Record. 

Minnie — Mr. Dodgson actually proposed to me last night. 1 was 
never so surprised in all my life. Mamie — You needn't have been. 
His sole ambition is to be thought eccentric. — Forget-Me-Not. 

Something is the matter with the onward path of civilization. It 
says people mu^t eat pie with a fork, and then makes the crust so 
tough nothing but teeth will cut it. — Atchison Globe. 

*' Did you ever stop to listen," he asked, " to the booming of the 
ocean ? " " No." answered the Chicago maid, " there ain't nobody 
can give the We3t pointers on booming." — Town Topics. 

Elderly Spinster— This picture is a portrait of myself at the age 
of seventeen. Her Dearest Friend— Ah, indeed ? Painted by one 
of the Old Masters, I presume. — Journal Amusante, Paris. 

Aunty (finishing story)— And so Prince Goodygood married her 
and they lived happily ever afterward. Helen (thoughtfully)— Now 
tell us a true story, aunty. — Judge. 

" Why weren't you asked to the Van Noodle reception ?" " Mrs. 
Van Noodle said my complexion would clash with the new wall paper. 

— Answers. 

Husband (very late from the club)— Hum 1 I told yon not to sit up 
for me. Wife (sweetly)— I didn't. I got up to see the sun rise. 

— New York Weekly. 

Ladies Visiting 
The seaside or mountains should remember that Camelline is an 
infallible prevention and remedy for the distressing effects of sun- 
burn and poison oak. Those who have any regard for the complex- 
ions which they value so highly should not risk them in the country. 
Camelline is the only preparation of its kind which has proved suc- 
cessful. All other face powders have been forced out of the market 
by its wonderful sales . 

Mothers besure and use "Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 



xisrsiTR^isrcEj. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 



OF HAMRI'KU, (iKKMANY. 
V. UVOI Drirtl. lil Maimer for ihf Pai Hie ) oaal lira m li 

880 Saniomr St., N. F. 

t i.soo.poo. on 

654,433 31 



Capital 
Invested in U. S. 



GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

AflonU City Department. 
138 C-ailfornla St., N.F..«a|. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage < u|m<M>. 100,000 ions. Regular Warehouse for mii 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furbished 
with the latest Improvements for the rapid handling and storing of uratn. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery forcleaulne 
foul and smutty Wheat. * 

Money advanced at lowest ratesof Interest on grain stored In Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or Qrain sold, 
if desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 202 Sansome SI., over the Anglo-California Bank. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto- 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, Asst. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 



BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld, OF LIVERPOOL. 

capital $6,700,000 

AOBNTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
No. 318 California Street. San Francisco 

8IEBE, RASGHEN & CO., 

GENERAL INSURANCE, 



Telephone 272. 



210 Sansome St. 



A safe, simple, and effective remedy for indigestion is a dose of Ayer's 
Pill's. Try the Pills and make your meals enjoyable. 



Aoekts fob San Francisco.— Germania Fire Insurance Co of New 
York; Hanover Fire Insurance Co., of New York; United Firemen's Insur- 
ance Co., of Philadelphia; Bun Insurance Office, of London. 

THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets 519.724,638.46. 

President. BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. | Vice-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTEK 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. 

Established 182S. 
Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, $6,864,653 66 

United States Department; 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

VOSS, COMKAP «t CO., General Managers. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BABLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZURICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4.000,000 DOLLARS. 

These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

410 California St. , San Francisco, Cal 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE UOMPANY ( Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000, 000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Cash Reseroe (In addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

total Assets December SI, 7888 8,124,067.50 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YOHK. 

Capital Paid Up * 600,000 

Assets 8.181,768 

S urplus to Policy Holders 1,628,167 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

401 Montgomery Street. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 

501 Montgomery Street 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1894. 








THE aaucy little empire knot is deemed by the American woman 
the most fashionable style of coiffure. It is worn quite low 
or in the middle of the head during the day, and high on the head 
during the evening. Where the hair is unnaturally wav}', this is not 
extremely becoming. However, curling-irons are here to perform 
their important mission, and the maiden with obstinately straight 
strands of hair can manipulate the irons until her locks are as curly 
and wavy as those bestowed by nature on her more fortunate sister. 
The hair should be waved and parted before making the knot. Only 
the sides are waved, the rest being drawn up closely to the center of 
the head. There it is hrmly grasped by the right hand, while the 
left winds it into a coil straight out from the head. This rope, when 
tight, is brought forward aud twisted into an upstanding loop. At 
this point the first hairpin is put in, to secure the loop at the top. 
While the left hand still holds the strand in place, two pins are put 
in to secure the bottom of the loop. Then the rope of hair is wound 
its entire length about the loop. If there be short hair at the side 
and back, it is waved and brought up loosely into the knot, its ends 
being pinned away out of sight. All this accomplished, a long comb, 
pin, or dagger is then lightly run through. There are many novel- 
ties in combs and pins suitable for the empire knot. 

A Frenchwoman nowadays grows her own hair, making no pre- 
tense of great quantity. It is wonderful how small the fashionable 
knot is — merely large enough to center the lines from the nape and 
forehead, rather below the crown, into a knot bound round with a 
golden circlet. This circlet is formed of two or three gold-bound 
combs, permitting the waved spaces to be loosened about the ears or 
neck, or wherever there may be a defective form to be hidden. It 
rolls loosely off the forehead and temples, and drops half over the 
ear. Sometimes it is parted and combed down over the ears each 
way, because great width is the fashion, but not every face can stand 
the " part." This width accentuates the oval of the face, and hints 
at intellect, and is a long way better than the high, narrow style, 
with its brazen display of the ear and its suggestion of " rooms to 
let, unfurnished." 

Here is a description of an exceedingly neat costume worn at an 
Atlantic summer resort: It was of navy blue linen, and was made 
up very plainly with a gored skirt and box plaited bodice with a but- 
toned corslet. The skirt had a deep hem, and flared well about the 
bottom. The plaited waist had very large sleeves, in the French 
fashion, and the collar was straight and high. The corslet fitted 
smoothly, and was fastened with two rows of small navy blue but- 
tons. The hat was a jaunty sailor of navy blue and white, in alter- 
nate straws, trimmed with a band of white moire. It was worn by 
a handsome girl, who had that exceedingly well-groomed appearance 
that is so admirably suited to plain, severe garb. 

At Newport Mrs. William Travers has set the fashion for bicycle 
riding, and may be seen every fair day speeding along Berkeley 
avenue. She does not wear bloomers, but has adopted a very neat 
and comfortable suit, with short skirt and gaiters. This, coupled 
with the fact that Mrs. Robert Grant is a wheel enthusiast, ought to 
settle the question as to whether wheeling for women is good form 
in society. 

Laughing Babies 

are loved by everybody. Good nature in children is rare unless ihey 
are healthy. Those raised on the Gail Borden Eagle Brand Con- 
densed Milk are comparatively free from sickness. This milk is so 
easily prepared that improper feeding is inexcusable. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco, June 29, 1894 
At a regular meeting of the board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of four and one-quarter (.4%) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 18i>4, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 2, 1894 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office — Corner Market, McAllister and Jones S treets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

For the six months ending June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four and eight tenths (4 8-10) per cent per annum on Term 

Deposits, and four (4) per cent per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 2, 1894.' 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1894, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of five per cent, per annum on term deposits, and four and one- 
sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, payable on and 
after Monday, July 2, 1894. 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office— 526 California street. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 



.San Francisco, < al 



309 and 311 Sausome St 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAT, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MAOKIRDY 4 CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

MACY & DUNHAM 66^ Pine St., New York 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

New Basil Consolidated Gravel Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works — Placer county, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 18th day of June, 1894, an assessment (No. 26) of Five cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable Imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
The 28th Day of July, 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 18th day of August, 1894, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. X. SIMON, Secretary. 

Office— 525 Commercial street, San Francisco. Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Osborn Hill Gold Mining and Milling Company, 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Grass Valley, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Seventh day of July, 1894, an assessment, No 3, of Fifteen (15) 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the cor- 
poration, payable immediately, in United States Gold coin, to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the company, Room 20, 331 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the 7th Day of August, 1894, will be delinquent. 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 28th day of August. 1894, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R.R GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 20, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of Principal place of business — Sun Francisco, Calif ornia. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Seventeenth (17th) day of July, 1894, an assessment (No. 71) of Ten 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, 414 California street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Monday, the 21st day of August, 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction: and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the Eleventh day of September, 
1894, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 16 

Amount per Share .10 cents 

Levied May 31, 1894 

Delinquent in Office July 5, 1894 

DayofSaleof Delinquent Stock .. July31,1894 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 107. 

Amount per Share 25 cents 

Levied July 18 1894 

Delinquent in Office - August 22, 1894 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 11, 1894 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Francis- 
co, California. 

NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING, 

Notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a resolution of the Board of 
Directors of the Paraffine Paint Company (a corporation), duly adopted at 
a regular meeting of said Board, held at the office of haid Company on 
Wednesday, the 13th day of Juue, 18y4, a meeting of the stockholders of the 
Paraffine Paint Company will be held on 

Wednesday, the 22d day of August, 1894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M. 
of that day, at No. 116 Battery street, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, the same being the principal place of business 
and office of paid corporation, and the same being the building where the 
Board of Directors of said corporation meet. 

The object of said meeting is to consider, act upon, aud decide a proposi- 
tion to diminish the Capital Stock of said corporation, the Paraffine Paint 
Company, from One Million Dollars to One Hundred Thousand Dollars. 

Dated San Francisco, June 13th, 1894. 

PARAFFINE PAINT COMPANY. By 

R. S. SHAINWALD, Secretary. R. S. MOORE, President. 



July 28, 1894 . 



SAN 1 l: \\< t» " NEWS 111 I I I, 



21 



STRIKES AND BOYCOTTS 



EMTOK News Lrrrtu— Sir Juit one month ago the boycott of 
the American Kailwaj Ini.'n «r«i tUclared on. It fa now 
over, everywhere. A word ahout ttnke* in general may not be 
amiss. They have in some (orm oooorrtd throughout the pro- 
gress of cirllizauon. and have been especially frequent during 
the past iixiy years— iha six'v year* o! its greatest progress. 
There were over l 300 strikes in the world from 18SS to 1882, In* 
elusive, a perioO ..f only five years. 

Id 1S53 occurr-,1 the great cotton strike at I'reston, England. 
From 1868 to 1870 colliery strikes at ThomclifTe and Sheffield, of 
over 40,000 men, w«*re attended by great violence and devasia- 
lion. Id 187.1 over 60,000 c llier struck in Wales; again, in 
SO 000. In 1878 a sinke occurred at Lancashire 
of 120,000 cotton-workers; in I860 one at Durham of 70,- 
000 coal miners; in I88fl and 1889 a strike of London dock 
laborers with 80,000 men out; lu 1803 and 1894 the gnat 
coal miners' strike of Great Britain, when nearly 400.000 men 
went out, first and last. 

The strikes and rioting in Pittsburgh in 1877, and about the 
same time at Chicago; also the Homestead strikes aud rioting a 
few years ago, were much more disastrous in loss of life and 
actual destruction of properly thau the recent strike of the 
American Railway Union. 

The order to boycott roads which refused to cut off Pullman 
cars went into effect at Chicago Tburaday, June 26th. The Illi- 
nois Central was the first road to be attacked. The next day tbe 
Panhandle and Michigan Central, etc., fell into the hands of tbe 
strikers. Thursday the engineers and firemen quit work, alleg- 
ing that that their lives were in danger. Friday tower-men were 
driven from their posts, trains stooed. and switches spiked. Sat- 
urday tbe Rock Inland and Illinois Central trains were wrecked. 
Sunday and Monday the strike developed into a riot, and Tues- 
day tbe stock-yards were in possession of a mob, which necessi- 
tated the call for (overnmeni troops. 

A tabulated statement issued by (teneral Miles, at Chicago, tells 
tbe story of the loss of life and damage to property from the day 
after the military took control. It shows that between July 7th 
and 12th thirty-three persons were killed or fatally injured; at 
the same time 784 cars and locomotives were burned or wrecked 
and 122 cars were pushed over or partially destroyed. July 7th 
waa the worst day. Of tbe thirty-three men in the list of casual- 
ties, twenty-six met death or injuries on that day. The rioters 
burned, destroyed, or rendered useless 694 cars and locomotives, 
and overturned or destroyed ninety-six cars of merchandise. 
Sixteen railroad systems were molested, and only nine roads ran 
mail and passenger trains out of Chicago, and eighteen trains 
were stopped or fired upon that exciting day. The rioters also 
burned twenty-one buildings, nine of them July 7th. During tbe 
week above mentioned trains were stoned or fired upon to tbe 
number of forty-one; employees of the railroad companies killed 
or injured, ten. 

As to the loss of life and property actually destroyed in Califor- 
nia, they bear no appreciable proportion to many disturbances 
elsewhere in the Doited States; and we believe it to be quite 
within the bound* of truth to say that four highwaymen, Evans. 
theSontags, and Datton, were the cause of more loss of life and 
greater outright destruction of property than that effected in tbe 
recent strike. 

Despite the exaggerations of the daily press, I doubt if there 
were altogether 100,000 actual strikers out recently in the whole 
United States; that is, there were not one percent, of tbe adult 
males of tbe United States actually engaged in it. This fact is 
respectfully commended to the careful consideration of tbe indi- 
vidual alarmist and the sensational press, at home and abroad. 
who deemed social order and the Government of the United 
States of America on tbe verge of dissolution. 

That the boycott of the American Railway Union is over thus 
early is due to the effect of President Cleveland's wise, temperate, 
and firm attitude. The moral of the strike ia set forth in Harper's 
Weekly as follows: 

But the work which the occasion shows to be necessary is not done 
when the power of the conspiracy is broken. It remains to bring 
into harmony with the order of society, and with all the conditions 
of our industrial progress, the minds and hearts of the citizens who 
have been misled into this wild movement, and those of their many 
sympathizers throughout the land. Such rebellions again.st social 
order and the principles of civilization will grow more dangerous. 
unless the intelligence of the country shall come to understand their causes 
and find a way to remove them. A Layman. 

San Francisco, July 26, 1894. 



Bacon Printing Company, 

508 Clay Street. 



City Index and Purchaser's Guide. 



ATTYS -AT-LAW 
BMU4 "limn, B.ff HorRcii: ('. M. Wilbur), 215 Sauiom.- st. 
MUM* KBMIEDY, Uwoffloe, 88 Murphy BUI*., V2H6 Market HU 

CANDIES 

« AMlira put up for fchlpmool At ROBHKTS 1 , Polk mid Bu ti street* 

DENTISTS. 

K < i n.AK. 418 Geary street 

K n. IIA4'K>rrr. 418 Leavenworth strict. 

DOOR CHECKS 

THJB MOBTOM hoori heck «n J Spring. F. D. Morrell,,vj3MisBiou 9t. 

DRUGGISTS 
KH.IVS tOKN (IRE, *5c. Drues at wholesale, 102 Eddy street, 
EVANS' I»OIS«l>' OAK SPECIFIC. Positive cure Sold by all drug- 
g ie 

MARBLE AND GRANITE. 
W. H. MKORMUK, M2-2 Market st., bet. City Hall Ave. and Larkiu 3t. 

MILLINERY. 
THE WOM>FK Hat, Flower and Feather Store, 1024-1028 Market street. 



RESTAURANTS, 
lit V N« «>- \ Milt i< \ \ Restaurant 521 Montgomery st. 



F. Hltte. 



SHOEMAKERS. 
REPAIRING DONE while you wait at POLLOCK'S, 202 Powell street, 

SURVEYORS 
JOHN A BENSON, Engineer. Dealer In Land Scrip. 430 Kearny at, 

HYGIENIC AIR COMPRESSORS 
For antonilzatlon purposes. 

THE CLEVELAND FAUCET CO., 208 Ellis street 



COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 
806 Market Street (Phelan Building.) 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for poit>- 
Uvely extracting teeth without pain. "Colton Gas" has an established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
fn all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 186S. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentiBtB and physicians. Alsoperformt 
all operations in dentistry. 

DR. CHARLES W. DECKER 



D 



R. LUDLUM HILL, 

1443 MARKET ST., Near Eleventh. 



No charge for extracting when plates are made. Old plates made over 
like new. Teeth from $8 per Bet. Extracting, 50c. Gas given. 

r-\D DIOnPn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the 
Uri. T\\\SKJr\l-J O Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vital 
ity, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medi- 
cine, Paris, and the Medical celebrities. Agents for California and the 
Pacific States, J. G. STEELE A CO., 635 MARKET STREET (Palace 
Hotel), San Francisco. Sent by mail or express anywhere, 

PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, $1.25; of 100 pills, J2; of 200 plllc, 
Sit 50; of 400 pills. 36; Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for Circular. 



D 



R. R. F. VERRINDER, ORAL SURGEON, 



Successor to Drs. Winter & Winter, DeDtlsts. Specialties: Surgical 
treatment of ulceration, abscesses and other diseases of the Mouth. 
Jaws, Gums and Teeth. Implantation of Natural Teeth, Continuous 
Gum Plates and Crown and Bridge Work. 
Office: 806 Kearny street. Corner Sutter. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 

The Risdon Iron and. Locomotive Works 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Ki>don Imu 
and Locomotive Works will be held at the office of the company, south- 
east corner Beale and Howard streets, San Francisco, Cal., ou 

Monday, the 6th Day of August, 1 894, at the hour of 1 1 o'clock A. ML. 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for Die ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. L. R. MEAU, Sec etar y. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

"Yellow Jacket Silver Mining Company. 
The regular auuiial meeting of ihe stockholders of the Yellow Jaekel 
Sliver Mining Company, for the election of a Board of Trustees for the en- 
suing year an'l for the traui-action of such other business as mav b j prop- 
erly introduced, will be held at the office of the company at Gold Hill, 
Nevada, on 

Thursday, the Second Day of August, 1 894. at 3:30 o'clock p. M. 
Transfer buoks will close ou Thursday, July 26, 1894, at 3 o'clock *■ , m. 

W.H.BLAUVELT, S cretary 
Office— Gold Hill. Ne™*a. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Hakalau Plantation Company. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Hakalau Plantation 
Company, for the election of a Board of Directors to serve for the eusu up 
year and for the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting, will be held at the office of the company, 327 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. , on 

Wednesday, the 1st tavof August, 1894, at the hour of 11 O'clock A. V. 

Transfer books will close ou Saturday, July 28th, at 12 o'clock at. 

E. H, SHELDON, Secretary. 

O ffice— 327 Market Street, S. F., Cal- 

SH. regensburger, attorney-at-law. 
• Rooms 1 and 2, 319 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



-W FRAS ISC : NEWS LETTEK. 



Jul- 28 




Ti , | -i ; i . ■ »:.v: n ; j rise Churc^ 
- 

- 

._ . ..,,..- s ■- ■ ~ 

_■_:.•:--■ ..-.'. eii-UJ ' n -O: *>. Aii v ;i" tg like Cm S ■ - ttes 

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'""-■ -:.::.-: ; - ■ ^ v : j rj-vr ^ a'ti 4 number 01 prett; 

. 

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ran two pr-L 
:■. wore 'la; 

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nni and 

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lanes- I . .. . 

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. _ __ . _ ! 

.._----...'; there. 
*-^ 

_ i iriooa show 

■ . . ._:.-.— - : - _ - _ _ _ . :t- -."_ - ._-"..:.:..- 

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.. , . ~u tats summer, bui. 

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..... - - - ..__' x SBJOEesBE 

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-■■..•.. . - . 



.he Baiu w. . 
one co h were =eeneaeh ev^r .- .- 

and in nearly every instance they were followed by ehannm^ 
:e on Tuesday evening, for ■ 
:'-oot the coancry. was precede-.: 
i ■■ • •■:>: z'i ■ -m .'_'--■■ c - i:iiering 

-i i ".:z : -cached hen 

matrimonial tncen:: from England, o£ which 

ej the prosr- *eim im«h 

is his home is in London she probabilities are . 
this re IB ieen the ias 

i ■ 

The Reaper has :^ . . 

■■Bkc scbhtLm «fciVfchfti tea 

■ :.-ed 3BMB9K regai 
r probable khfl 

: irriedLy called h>: :.:. 
..■-.-■ 

Mrs. McClnng ace .It: - -• 

. icime u m iiom< 

: .- ■ . - ■ 

iuXQtnpanieti ciy Mrs. £« . 

een spemiinir _i - . . : . - 

home : 

■fafthme been the . 

- 

•:■■:_■ 

. - : i . fcC 5 ■!.> t. 

idenreni. who ha~ • 

: ■ . ■ . 

■ I 

- tfaer : 
... . . . " . : 



. ■ - 
^.e Tosemite 



Mr. and itrs. W. E. wisher and Miss Jemunas have reenrrced firom 

■ Z - 

- 



iiites damicxled •£ the i 
■ aaa Che charminie w.l a 

:: :: _ - • - .. - 

every ;i verandov 



The -. . .ire iceastanred <~q she aoand af •• yaa 

■ : | BMHIS& - -. 7 retry man : . 
obeye- Torconafie softer for one mare wai: i 

: 1. r - : ■ . . ■ 

he . - : ^7; -- ■■■ : :re atfereii - ~ 

-:_:- : i .as; ^ - - ~ . - v : lis.— 

; - . ::;-:- ii i 2 rza : ■ 

".■".■-: M . . _ i : uppers, yoc 



■ . - ■ - i : - ; _- aaea i family < 

as lar.- i;-«nd-ao applies with e : 

vanor.- is gonef 

European tu or Xz i:ia 

::¥: . v; 7.-..:: ; .. -: 

irise . l :s wo.;ca 



- ■ _ . - 

_ - - __ 

. r - • - ■■ [ i . -e 

■ _ . . md itesBBBH 

. ■ . - 

D^PRICE'S 

: ■ ' ■ - ■- - - ' 



July 28,1*94. 



^\.n I i: W 1SCO NEWS LETTEH 



28 



A VALUABLE ATTRACTION FOR THE PARK 



Ool the rery few exhibit) la the Lit! Midwinter Kair that 
i» worth prr«rrr)nr i» the Jap«n<«* '*r,trn It I* « thin* of 
b*«uiy. and wftt one of ihe □ Rtoal ftltraotflnnl in 

the KipoMtlon. Anions the militant of visitors who entered the 
Kiir iitea. thfrp wis not otif who .1i<1 not praise that exhibit. It 
would be « great snwnie to demoltefa it. There Is nothing like it. 
either in workmanship or artistic finish, in America to-day. If 
Kacailva Committee of the Fair wish to do something that 
will keep the Reposition alive in the memory of the people, and 
wt*h t«i put the Kair -nrplns to intellisenl use. let them buy that 
charming exhibit outright and present it to the Commissioners 
<>f I'.ilden «<ate Park. It will then be an ornament to one of the 
finest parks in the world. an<* an everlasiing monument to the 
Midwinter Kair. If the gates and the buildings are purchased 
just as they are. then the plant? could remain untouched. There 
is sotflcieot money in tbe Fair fnnd to buy the Japanese harden, 
and it would be well for tbe Commissioners to takn the hint and 
not let the matter go to waste. 

THE death of Miss Marguerite Wallace, on Thursday night, 
cast a eloom over the fa»hionable world in which she was a 
bright particular (lower. Miss Wallace was one of those rare 
girls whose faces light the dark ways of life and whose kindly 
hearts give happiness and chanty to all. Everyone who knew 
her was her friend and admirer, as tbe flowers and tears wbicfa 
have been laid by her coffin will attest. She was tbe third daughu r 
of Superior Judge William T. Wallace, and a sister of Mrs. Belle 
Donahue. She was only twenty-four years of age. 



As invigorating as a breath from old ocean, as pure as the milk of 
human kindness! That is our idea of the John T. Cutter Old Bour- 
bon Whiskey, and that is the idea of even- man in the country who 
has tried that delightful beverage. Your'life is a desert waste with- 
out your daily tipple. It drives all woes and cares into the limbos of 
tbe past, and makes you love your worst enemy's pup. K. Martin 
,v I i.,, 108 Front street, are the agents. 



It is delightful for ladies who are shopping, or who want a delicious 
and wholesome change from home cooking, to have such an estab- 
lishment as the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, to drop 
into for a luncheon prepared by the most expert cooks. The service 
at tbe famous family restaurant is perfect — no waiters could be more 
attentive, no restaurant cleaner. 



However elegant and carefully made his outer garments, good, 
well-fitting underclothing, such as that sold by John W. Carmany, 
25 Kearny street, is essential to comfort. 

Scrofula— a more common evil than people are aware— is cured by 
Ayer'a Sarsaparilla. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 8ole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

133 4'allfon.la street. 



K) LET==Furnished. 



T 

■ A Modern House of Eight rooms; 

Convenient to two cable lines; grand 
marine view ; good neighborhood. 
Rent reasonable to desirable party. 

BALDWIN & HAMHOND, 

10 nontgomery street. 




Has Removed to 824 Market St., Phelan Building 



"OR SALE. 



BANK VAULTS AND 

BANK FURNITURE 



and FIXTURES. 



Rldi for the nnrchuc ol the vault*, rata depoill boxoa 
lore and fixtures In i on pled by the 



nn.l offlOQ fnrni 



PEOPLE'S HOME SAVINGS BANK, 

Fimxl Building, are mllolled 

The nulla were conatrueted lot the bank !>y the Hail Sale and Look 

Company, ami are considered tbe lineal rtool, burglar proof, time lock 

raultt On (lie eoa-l Thin- are three vaults, (he Biifedi'posll vaiil- .Miilalli 

Ins mil t>oxes. 

l his is an excellent opportunity for a hank or safe depo8.il OOmpany 
Separate bide may be made for the otnre furniture and fixtures Bid. Bub- 
loot to approval of the Court or Board of Directors and Bank Commission- 
ers 

FOR RENT. 

The present bank premises, iuclndiue basement, the hank reserviuc that 
portion in the rear occupied by the vaults uiili) such time as the latter 
can be disposed of to ad\antage Address or inquire of 

JOHN F. SHEEHAN, 
Receiver People's Home Savings Bank, Flood Building, San Francisco 

IT pops! 

Effervescent, too. 

Exhilarating, appetizing. 
Just the thing to build up the 
constitution. 



Hires' 



Rootbeer 



Wholesome and strengthening, 
pure blood, free from boils or 
carbuncles. General good health 
— results from drinking HIRES' 
Rootbeer the year round. 

Tackage makes five gallons, 25c. 
Ask your druggist or grocer for it. 
Take no other. 

Send 2=cent stamp to the Charles E. Hires 
Co., 117 Arch St., Philadelphia, for beauii 
ful picture cards. 



BrooI^IyQ 
JHotel. 



Conducted on both the 

EUROPEAN AND 

AMERICAN PLAN. 

BUSH STREET, bet. Sansome & Montgomery, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



This favorite hotel is under the management of CHAS. 
MONTGOMERY, and is as good, if not the best, Family and 
Business Men's Hotel in Sau Francisco 

Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, first-class service and 
the highest standard of respectability guaranteed, 

Our rooms cannot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

BOARD AND ROOM, per day, $1 25, $1 hO, ?1 75 and $2 00. 
per week, $7 00 to $12 00. 
" " " per month, $27 50 to $40 00. 

SINGLE ROOMS, 50 cents to $1. 



pree <?oac,r? to ar?d pro/rt tl?^ J-lotel. 



BETHESDA. 

AMERICA'S FAVORITE WATER. 
"I regard Bethesda as a delightful water, refreshing aud iuvigorating, 
with medicinal properties of much value." 

—Hun. Charles Foster, eX'Secvetary of Treasury, 
" I have used Bethesda for many years, and deem it the best lu the coun- 
try." — Hon. Joseph IF. Fifer, ex-Governor of Illinois. 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents. 
418 Sacameuto street, S. F. 

A. BUSWELL, 

B0«» INDKK, PAPER-KILER, NUNTEK AND BMMt BOOK HIAKURACTIREB 

535 Clav Street. Near Montgomery. San Francisco 

WEAK MEN AND WOMEN %2 al ££'2£i£i£8? B l i 



gives Health and Strength to the Sexual Organs. 
Street, San Francisco. 



Depot at 328 Market 




VIGOR of MEN 

Easily, Quickly, Permanently Restored. 

Weakness, Nervousness, 
Debility, and all the tram 
" i of evils from early errors or 
later excesses, the results of 
overwork, sickness, worry, 
etc. Full strength, devel- 
opment and tone given to 
-every organ and portion 
of the body. Simple, nat- 
^VIIMfti ura * methods. Immedi- 
■, .. ,m |i'll)J ate improvement seen. 
Failure impossible. 2,000 references. Book, 
explanation and proofs mailed (sealed) free. 

ERIE M EDICA L CO., B uffalo, H. Y. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trams Leave and are Due io Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

Leave i From June 26, 7894. I Abbive 

7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ugdeu and East 6:45 a 
700 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Redding, Castle Crag 
and Dunsmuir, via Davis. . . . 7:15 P 

7:30 a Martinez. San Ramon, Napa, Calls- 

toga and *Santa Rosa . . 6:15 P 

8:30 A Niles, Sau Jose, Stocktou, lone. 
Sacramento, Marysville, Ked Bluff 

andOroville ... 4:15p 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles. Demiug, El 
Paso. New Orleans and East. . .. 5:45 f 

9:00 a Martiuez and Stockton 10:45 a 

•9;C0a Peters and Milton *7:15p 

12:30 p Niles, San Jose and Livermore 8:»5 a 
*1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00 p 

4 -.OOP Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verauo, and 

SantaRosa 9.15a 

4:00 P. Benicia, Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Landin M , 
Marysville, Oroville and tiacrn- 

mento . 10:45a 

4:30 P. Niles, San Jo«e, Livermore, 
Stockton, Modesto, Merced and 
Fresno . 715 r 

4:30p Raymond (for Yosemite) 10:45a 

5:0Op. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara and 

Los Angeles 10:15 a 

5;00p.Saut« Fp Rontp. Atlantic Express, 

forMojaveand East 10:45 a. 

6:00 P European Mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45a 
6:0Op. Haywards, Niles and San Jose 7;45a 

17 :00 P. Vallejo +7 :45 P. 

7;00 p. Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 
PugetSqund and East^_. . 10-4 =» a 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

17:45 a Sunday excursion for Newark, 
San Jose, Los Gatos, Felton and 

Santa Cruz .... 18:05 p 

8:15a. Newark. Centerville, San JoBe, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 
Cruz and way stations ... . 6:20 p. 
*2:45 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 

stations *11 :50a 

4:45 p. Newark, 8anJoBe,Los GatoB. 9:50a. 

Coast Division (Third aid fown&enri Streets). 
*6:45 a. San Jose, New Almaden and Way 

Stations *1 :45 p. 

I7:30a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 
Grove and Principal Way Sta- 
tions J8:33p. 

8:15 a. San Jose, TresPinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove, Paso RobleB, San 
San Luis ObiBpo and principal 

Wav Stations 6:26 P. 

19:47 a. Palo Alto and Way Stations 11:45 p. 

10:40a. San Jose, and WayStations. .. .. 5:06p. 
;i-45 a. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 3:30 p. 
*2:20p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

PacificGrove .. ..*10:40a. 

•3:80 P. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions 9:47 a. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and WayStations *8;06a. 

5:10 p. San Jose and Way Stations ... .. *8:48a, 
6:30 p. Palo Alto and Way Stations..... 6:35 a. 
t11:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 

Stations. .. .. .. +7:26 p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From SIN FRAMSCO— Foot of Market St. (Slip 8)— 
*7 00 "8 00 9 00 *10 00 aad 11 00 a. m., *12 30 
11 CO *2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *6 00 P. M. 
From 01KMSR— Foot of Broadway. 

♦6 00 *7 00 S 00 *9 00 10 00 and *U 00 a. M. 

t!2 00 *12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 and *5 00 P. M. 

a. for Morning . p. for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. f Saturdays only. 

t8undaysonly. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information. 



bAN FRANCISCO JNJuWo LET'HEh.. 



July 28, 1*94. 




A SOOTY chimney can be cleaned by 
firing a pistol or gun up the flue. The 
concussion dislodges the soot, and it tum- 
bles down. 

Doubt is almost a natural phase of life; 
but aa certainly as it is natural, it is also 
temporary, unless it is unwisely wrought 
into conduct. — T. T. Munger. 

Man is greater than a world — than pys- 
tems of worlds; there is more mystery in 
the union of soul with body than in the 
creation of a universe. — Henry Giles. 

A great idea is usually original to more 
than one discoverer. Great ideas come 
when the world needs them. They sur- 
round the world's ignorance and press fur 
admission. — A Phclpa 

The first virtue is to restrain the tongue. 
He approaches nearer to the gods who 
knows how to be silent, even though he is 
in the right. — Catn. 

The way of a superior man is threefold ; 
virtuous, he is free from anxieties; wise, 
be is free from perplexities; bold.be is 
free from fear. — Confucius. 



Worn Out Faces consultation 
Rejuvenated "."•ft" 

Letter. 

£0 years' practical experience 
removing wrlrkles, utllng out 
hollow theeks.re-formiiig noses, 
ears and mouths. Allskiublem- 
ishesa id deformities and their 
trealim nt described and illas- 
tra'i'd 1 1 a i5U-page book sent 
scaled to any address for 10 ctB. 

John H. Woodbury 

Dermatological Institute, 

Established 1870. 125W. 42d St., N.Y. 

Woodbury's Facial Soap for the Skin, 
Scalp and Complexion. 3 cakes, $1.00, at 

OrngTri ctc : r ...-. r -^,*, ?F ^. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Dispatch steamers from San Francisco for 
ports in Alaska, 9 a. m., August 3, 8, 18, 23. 
Sept 7, 22. October 7. 22 Nov. 6, 21. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports 
July 24th, and every 5th day thereafter. 
For Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, 
every fourth and fifth day, alternately at 8 a. m. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, 
Santa Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los 
Angeles), and Newport, every fourth and fifth 
dav, aHeruatelv at 11 a. m. 

For Ensenada, Magdalena Bay San Jose del 
Cabo, Mazatlau, La Paz and Guaymas (Mexico), 
1.5th of each month. 

Picket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New 
Montgomery street. 

GOOrALL, PERKINS A CO., Gen'lAgents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco, 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL SS. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Note change in hour of sailing. 

Steamers leave wharf at FIRST and BRAN 
NAN STREETS, at 3: 00 p. M. for YOKOHAMA 
and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Oceanic Tuesday, July 17, 1894 

Gaelic Tuesday, August 7. 1894 

Beloic Thursday, Sept. i>, 1894 

Oceanic (via Honolulu). ..Tuesday. Sept. 25, 1894 
ROUND TR»P TICKST8 AT REDUCED RATES 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage 
T:ckats for sale at S. P. Company's General 
Offices, Room 74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend 
atrpeta. San Francisco. 

For freight apply at offices of Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, at wharf, or at No. 202 
Fmut street, San Francisco. 

T q f.-.itMJtv fl«n.»-«. »— , 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

\\ bv r\ World tours, steamer 

\jV^_! JO. „ and rail. First class, 

OV^*^ -T^J/ r. * m0 - Second class, 

11 $350. 

^> O. S. 8. Company's 

- steamers sail: 

For HONOLULU, 

3. 8. ■•AUSTRALIA," 

Augll-t 4. 1894 
Fo- HONOLULU 
APIA. AUCKLAND 
aDd SYDNEY 8. 8. 

"ALAMEDA," 
August 23, 2 p. M. 
For passage apply to 138 Montgomery street. 
For freight apply to 327 Market Street. 
J. D. SPKECKELo & KROS. CO., General Agts 




SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY CO. 

TIBUR0N FERRY-Foot of Market Slreet. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:40, 9-20, 11:00 a. i».; 12:35,3:80, 

5:10, 6 30 p. m. Thursdays— Extra trip at 

11:30 p. M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 50 and 

11 :30 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30,11:00 A.M.; 1:30, 3:30,5:00, 

6:20 p. M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAY8-6:25, 7:55, 9:30, 11:10 a M. ; 12:45. 

3:40.5:10 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:55 

and 6:30 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40,11:10 A. M.;l:40, 3:40,5:00, 

6:26 p. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, 
same schedule as above. 

Special Saturday to Monday Train Service. 

SATCRDAYS-Leave San Francisco at 5:10 P.M. ; 
anive at Cloverdale at 8:45 p.m. 

SUNDAYS— Leave San Francisco at 5:00 p. M.; 
arrive at Cloverdale at 8:38 p m 

SUNDAVS-Leave Cloverdale at 6:45 a. m.; ar- 
rive at San Francisco at 10:40 a. m. 

MONDAYS-Leave Cloverdale at 5:00 a. m. ; ar- 
rive at Sau Francisco at 8:50 a. m. 



Leave 8. F. 


In Effect 
Ap'l 15, 1894. 

DESTI TION 


AEHIVEIN S. F. 


Week 
DayB 


Sundays 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40A.u. 
3:80p.m. 
5:10 p.m. 


8:00a.M. 
9:30 a.m. 
5:00p.m. 


Novato, 
Petalume, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a.Mi8:50a.m 
6:05p.m 10:31; am 
7:30p.m16:15p.m 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


S:00a.m. 


Fulton 
Windsor, 
Healdshurg, 
Geyserville, 
Cloverdale 
Pieta, Hop- 
land, Ukiah. 


7:30p.m. 


10:30 am 
6:15 pm 


7:40a.m. 
3:30 p.m, 


8:00a. m. 


Guerneville 


7:30p.M. 


10:30am 
6:15 PM 


7:40a.M. 
5:13 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 
5:00 p.m 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. 

6:05 p.m 


8:50am. 
6:15 pm. 






7:40a. M I 8:00a.m. I Sehastopol. |10:40a.mI10;30a.m 
3:30 p.m | 5:00 P.M.I | 6 05p.mI 6:15p.m 

Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West 
Springs. 

Stages connect at Geyserville for Skaggs 
Springs, Stewart's Point, Gualala and Point 
Arena. 

Stages connect at Cloverdale for the Geysers. 

Stages connect at Pieta for Highland SpringB, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs. 

S.ages connect at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, 
Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Lake- 
port, Boonevllle, Greenwood, Orr's Hot Springs, 
Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Usal. Westport, 
Cahto, Willitts, Capella, Pomo, Potter Valley, 
Jnhu Pav's. Lively's, Gravelly Valley, Harris, 
Blocksburg, Bridgeviile, HynVsvllleand Eureka. 

Saturday to-Muuday Kouud Trip Tickets at re- 
duced rales. 

Ou Sundays, Round Trip Tickets to all points 
beynud Sau Rafael at half rates. 

TirKET OFFICE— Corner New Moutgomery 
aud Market streets, uuder Palace Hotel. 
H.C. WHITING, R. X. RYAN. 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Passenger Agent 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Through Line to New York, via Panama. 

'ailing at various ports of Mexico aud Central 
America. 

SAILINGS— At noon. 

"Pan Juan," July 28, 1894. 

8.8. "Colon," Augur-tft, 1894. 

8. S. 'Oolima," August 18. 1894. 

8. 8. "Sau Jo-e." Aug. 28, 1994. 

Note.— when tne sailing day falls ou Sunday, 
steamers wil 1 be despatched the following Mon- 
day. 

JAPAN AND CHINA LINE FOR YOKOHAMA 
AND HONGKONG. 

Connecting at Yokohama with steamer*, for 

Shanghai, and at Hongkong for 

India, etc.: 

SAILINGS AT 3 P. M. 

3.S. "City of Rio de Janeiro," Thursday, July 

26, lfti-4, at 3 P. M. 

S. 8. "City of Peking," Thursday, August 
16, 1894, at 3 P M 

S S. "China," via Honolulu, Aug. 28, 1894, at 
3 P. M. 
S. 3. "Peru," Saturday, !-'ept. 15, 1894, at 3 p. M. 
Round Trip Tickets at reduceo rates. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor- 
ner First and Brannnn street* Branr- h office— 
'20 Front street. ALEXANDER CENTER, 
General Agent 



Pnc« P«r Copy, to 



Annnnl SnNcnpf 




c*n r "*"?»»e* 




N E Vt 'S ■::_. If E XT E R 




Vol. XLIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1894. 



Number 5. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frkd 
Marriott. 606-609-613 Merchant Street, San Francisco. En- 
tered a( San Francisco Post-office as Second Class Matter. 



The office of the News Letter in New York City is at the " Evening 
Post " Building, 204-206 Broadway, Room 1, where information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

THE Washington Post says that there were Waites and Altgelds 
in the days of Washington. Such iconoclastic tendencies on 
the part of the Post deserve a stern rebuke. There has never been 
bnt one Waite and one Altgeld, and they are on earth now. They 
are unique, original, inimitable, and unapproachable. The coun- 
try has never seen their like before. May it never again. 



CR. BENNETT, like virtue, is his own reward. The friends 
. who he thought would rush to his rescue and go on his bail 
bond have not turned up, and he is still the occupant of an iron 
tank in the Oakland City Prison, which place has been con- 
demned by the Grand Jury as unfit for human habitation and one 
hundred years behind the times. Mr. Bennett, it is said, fills his 
spare hours by swinging Indian clubs, and has already lost a 
quarter of a pound. What a fortunate quarter of a pound that 
111 It will miss the odium of going to San Quentln with Mr. 
Bennett. 



CANDIDATE Estee took in all the issues of the day in his 
speech on Wednesday night. Like the Populists, he has cast 
his lines in all directions by declaring for gold and silver money, 
against free trade, for Americanism, and against Europeanism, 
that labor should organize, that women should vote — in short, 
he made a bold dash for popularity. His ideas were mostly con- 
servative, but at times he seemed to be speaking at random, and 
made some pretty bold statements about the relations of corpora- 
tions to the protective tariff, for which he may be called to ac- 
count some day. 

WE are glad to learn from our Washington dispatches that 
Secretary Gresham has assured the Japanese Minister that 
he was animated by only the most exalted intentions in his re- 
monstrance of last week with Japan for her attitude toward 
Corea, and that his remark in regard to levying an unjust war 
upon a weak and defenseless nation had an exclusively Pick- 
wickian meaning. Mr. Tateno, the Japanese Minister, in reply 
had the honor to assure the Secretary of his most distinguished 
consideration. Thus the amende honorable has been made and the 
entende cordiale has been restored. 



UPON the release of Eugene Debs on bail the American Railway 
Union proposed to make a demonstration by turning out in 
procession to meet him on his arrival at Chicago, but Mayor Hop- 
kins refused to grant ihem permission. In view of the fact that 
Mayor Hopkins was the man who was so panic-stricken by the 
strike as to constitute himself Debs's messenger boy to bear pro- 
posals of settlement from that imposing personage to the railway 
managers, his present return to a sense of duty and of the dignity 
of his office is commendable. He was the man of whom W. T. 
Stead predicted that he would purge Chicago of her unlawful 
iniquities, bnt his pusillanimity has been discovered. 

THE sndden death of Nathaniel Holland occurred in this city 
last Tuesday, removing a man prominent in the work of 
making a civilization oat of the rugged conditions of this far- 
away country. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1812. In Phil- 
adelphia he was associated with Robert L. Tyler, son of President 
Tyler, in the practice of the law, and came to California in 1849. 
Here he formed a partnership with D, 0. Mills in the running of a 
trading schooner on the Sacramento river, but soon abandoned that 
enterprise and opened a law office In this city. As a member 
of the Board of Aldermen he assisted in organizing the first 
schools in San Francisco, and subsequently, as a member of the 
Legislature, helped in the promulgation of the Consolidation Act. 
He returned to Philadelphia in 1856 and married Mrs. Martha H. 
Smith, and returned to California in 1861 as Chief Supervisor of 
elections nnder Federal appointment, became United Slates Court 
Commissioner and then 8chool Director, and was a leading pro- 
moter of the construction of Pioneer Hall, on Fourth street. He 
leaves a widow and one daughter. 



A CONSTITUTION has been adopted and a Republic declared in 
Honolulu, but, as the reports naively put it, the change was so 
smoothly accomplished that only a very keen observer would 
have known that any change had taken place. We might go a 
step further and say, without any breach of confidence, that no 
change has taken place and that republican institutions of govern- 
ment do not exist in Hawaii. The band of usurpers who have 
seized the government of that country have tried to legislate them- 
selves into office without any reference to the will of the people. 
A republic is, according to Abraham Lincoln's definition, » a gov- 
ernment of the people, by the people, and for the people," but 
this unique Hawaiian Republic is built on Vanderbilt's famous 
maxim, " the public be d d." 



G ROVER CLEVELAND and David B. Hill have been strangely 
coopled in politics, though in general they are antagonistic. 
When Cleveland was Mayor of Buffalo, Hill was Mayor of 
Elmira. Without previous acquaintance they were nominated 
for Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, respectively, of New 
York, and elected by a plurality of over 200,000. Cleveland's 
first election as President made Hill Governor, and his defeat in 
1888 was the cause of Hill's re-election. They were rivals for the 
Presidency in 1892, and Hill organized New York's delegation in 
such a way that Cleveland was not represented by a single vote 
from that State. Yet Cleveland carried the State and swept the 
country. Now Hill, the only Democratic Senator who voted 
against the tariff bill, is Cleveland's defender on the Senate floor! 



SO many investors and inventors are interested in "flying 
machines" nowadays — so many acute minds are working for 
the solution of the great problem of navigating the air, that a 
universal thrill of sympathy will be felt for poor Herr Lillienthal, 
who fell nearly two hundred feet at Brussels the other day, while 
practicing with wings. But Icarus had the same fate, and Herr 
Lillienthal, if he survives, need not feel abashed; and the other 
inventors will continue their efforts for trampling the slant winds 
on high, whether or not they drop to failure and death. Man is 
bound to fly. It is only a matter of time. And how joyful sum- 
mer travel will be then I No tunnels.no boycotts of Pullman 
cars, no smash-ups can cast shadows over the weary man's vaca- 
tion! His only risk will be a tumble of a few thousand feet, and 
he will take that willingly for the fun of the flying. 



1 ' /*> ENERAL " Coxey's dupes are finding out that begging, as 
Vj a business, is not profitable. The leader of the common- 
weal has advised them to beg in order that they may be put in 
jail and be supported. But the men prefer open quarters during 
the summer months. They are finding that there is a limit to the 
charity of the National Capital and they will soon spread over the 
country as tramps, avoiding the harvest fields where work will 
be given them. Most of them will swell the ranks of the idle in 
the cities. It is a pity that no means can be found to reach Carl 
Browne, Coxey, and the other so-called leaders who have deserted 
their armies. The privates might get hold of them and give the 
officers a ducking in the Potomac, but that would hardly satisfy 
the country. It is difficult to realize now that a cheap humbug 
like Coxey ever filled so large a space in the public mind. 



THE usual deaths from genuine Asiatic cholera are taking 
place — in the newspapers. There is little excuse for these 
efforts of the imagination this season. There has been no dearth 
of legitimate sensational news so far, and it should not be neces- 
sary to conjure up cholera. This country has rarely been blessed 
with so healthy a summer season as the present one. Except in 
New York and one or two other unfortunate localities, where sick- 
ness and the death rate have been swelled by the great heat, there 
is a remarkable paucity of the usual seasonal diseases, and there 
is nothing threatening in the health conditions abroad. There is 
hardly cholera enough to « go round " in Europe, and the plague 
is subsiding in Canton and Hongkong. There is apparently not 
a trace of it in this country. In the philosophy of the Good Book, 
the Lord tempers the wind to the shorn lamb, and a common- 
wealth that has been afflicted with two years of financial dis- 
turbances and cursed with Debses and Sovereigns, may well be 
spared the further infliction of plague and pestilence. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1894 



A CASE OF CHRONIC MANIA. 



A NEWSPAPER whose policy is to be popular rather than 
right, can never wield the power to institute wholesome re- 
forms. The San Francisco Examiner has abandoned conservatism 
and has become so rabidly radical as to inspire disgust among all 
except the heedless and ignorant. During the great striKe the 
daily papers of San Francisco, excepting the Chronicle and the 
Post, were the only newspapers of any consequence in California 
that urged on the strikers and heaped contumely upon the law- 
ful organized forces of the Government opposing insurrection and 
murder. The Examiner has constituted itself the leader of the law- 
less element. Every day it is torturing all its resources to prevent 
harm to the murderers who wrecked the train near Sacramento. 
Although it has received several thousands of signatures to its 
memorial to Congress praying that the Government assume con- 
trol of the Union-Central Pacific roads, it ruefully acknowledges 
that, the leading business organizations of San Francisco, includ- 
ing the Merchants' Exchange, the Produce Exchange, the 
Chamber of Commerce, and the Traffic Association refuse to sign 
the petition. The Examiner is cheered to observe, however, that 
gentlemen who make cigar stands their headquarters are eager to 
sign! In that the Examiner has constituted itself the organ of 
strikers and the defender of murderers, it can hardly be expected 
that the cool, sensible, law-loving men of the community will 
follow its leadership. The Examiner's violent animosity against 
the Southern Pacific clearly takes the form of a desire to injure 
that corporation without reference to the public benefit, for it de- 
liberately conceals some vital facts and grossly distorts others. 

Here are some salient facts which it dares not touch upon : 
First, by assuming control of the Union-Central roads the < iovern- 
ment will have to take $60,000,000 bodily and immediately from 
the Treasury for the extinction of the first-mortgage debt on those 
roads; second, it will be assuming ownership of a property for 
which it must pay $185,000,000 (being the $60,000,000 first-mort- 
gage added to the $125,000,000 which the roads owe to the Gov- 
ernment); third, in the absence of any hope that the roads could 
be operated by the extravagant methods of the Government in 
competition with seven competing lines so as to produce a fair 
interest on that enormous investment, the plan as a financial 
proposition is wildly absurd; fourth, the Rellly Funding bill pro- 
vides for the payment tu tbe Government, by gradual extinction, 
of the whole debt of $125,000,000, with a graduated interest which 
will average two per cent per annum for fifty years on the debt, 
and will relieve the Government of the necessity of taking $60,- 
000,000 at once from the Treasury to pay off the first-mortgage 
debt; fifth, assumption of control by the Government would with- 
draw $25,000,000 from the taxable property of California, com- 
pelling a corresponding increase of taxes to supply the deficiency; 
sixth, Government control of one overland line to the exclusion 
of seven competing lines held in private ownership will make the 
Government a competitor for transcontinental traffic with those 
lines, with the result either that the competing lines may force 
the Government to operate its line at a heavy loss or that the 
Government may force them into loss and bankruptcy — in either 
event entailing a heavy loss on the country at large, and intro- 
ducing a factor in business which is repugnant to the spirit of 
American institutions and to the common sense of enlightened 
citizens; seventh, it being inconceivable that the line could be 
operated by the Government without heavy loss, this deficit must 
be made up by the country at large, without reference to the fact 
that California would be practically the only State receiving 
financial benefit from the arrangement, and would be in the po- 
sition of asking the other States to open their treasuries for its 
benefit; eighth, assuming, for the sake of argument, that Govern- 
ment ownership would be profitable to the Government, tbe 
profit would have to come largely from the industries of Cali- 
fornia, and hence California would be paying an unjust propor- 
tion of the return on the Government's investment; ninth, expe- 
rience having demonstrated the impossibility of railroads operat- 
ing without a traffic agreement between common points, and it 
being assumed by reasoners of the Examiner type that such ar- 
rangements are in restraint of trade and hence unlawful, the 
Government would have to enter into traffic arrangements with 
its competing lines and hence would be indulging in unlawful 
practices and restraining trade; tenth, any petition from Cali- 
fornia, Oregon, Nevada, and Arizona, from which the Examiner 
is drawing signatures, would amount to nothing in Congress in 
view of the fact they represent merely a sectional feeling and 
raise a sectional issue in a matter which financially concerns the 
whole country — even though tbe Examiner may secure the 100,000 
signatures in that section to affect a constituency representing 
11,000,000 voters. These ten propositions, none of which has 
received the slightest attention from the Examiner, reduce the 
whole matter to a reductio ad absurdum, and ought to make the 
gentlemen who have signed the petition feel foolish. In the 
meantime, in view of tbe fact that thoughtful men and men of 
affairs and business organizations — especially the Traffic Associa- 
tion, which was organized to combat the Southern Pacific— are 
ignoring the "movement," it deserves little attention. 

THERE are three P'a in the pod of Populism. They represent 
Platitudes, Poverty, and PaDic. 



A PROMISE OF CLEANLINESS. 

MUCH of the reputation which San Francisco has for maintain- 
ing dirty streets is due to the winds which, constantly 
sweeping the city, take up all accessible trash and send it flying. 
In the streets paved with cobbles and basalt the evil is almost 
unbearable, even tbe street-sweeping machines being inferior tu 
the wind in emptying the interstices of their trash. As a conse- 
quence the merchants suffer a good deal of annoyance and dam- 
age, and the eyes of pedestrians are made to sting. There is 
greater need in San Francisco for keeping tbe streets clean than 
in any other city in the Union, Chicago excepted. The merchants 
at last have roused themselves to the necessities of the case. A 
little while ago Mr. Dohrmann, the Butter-street merchant, in- 
duced the other merchants in the block between Montgomery and 
Kearny streets to combine with him in employing a man to keep 
that block clean. This man has been constantly en duty, re- 
moving every particle of dirt as it appeared, and the result has 
been so gratifying both to the public and the merchants them- 
selves that the Merchants' Association, of which Mr. Dohrmann 
is President, has taken steps to extend the system. Mr. Dohr- 
mann reports that his clerks are able to keep the store clean with 
one-third leBS work than they formerly had to do. Ab the 
contract for machine sweeping has about expired, the merchants 
have secured from the Supervisors a postponement of sixty days 
of a new contract, in order that a modified plan may be decided 
on meanwhile. In the interim the merchants in the district 
bounded by Market street, Grant avenue, California street, and 
Montgomery are urged by the Association to pay into its treasury 
ten cents a week for each twenty-five feet of store frontage, this 
amount to be paid by the Association to hand-sweepers. This 
will not only give employment to a number of idle persons, but 
will furnish information of the desired amendments to tbe street- 
sweeping contract by the city. In view of the fact that hand- 
sweeping is far superior to machine sweeping, the city 
could well afford to assist the merchants in bearing the 
expense, as the benefit is as great to the city as to the mer- 
chants. The plan of hand-sweeping has never been superseded 
in the clean cities of Europe by machinery, the hand-sweepers of 
Paris particularly (who are mostly women) being a feature of that 
city. But the Europeans learned long ago that the surface of the 
street is as important a matter as pains in maintaining cleanli- 
ness. Thus, in the retail districts they use asphaltum, which is 
very easily cleaned. At night it is washed with hose and brooms 
and in the day-time hand-sweepers are constantly in attendance. 
California is so bountifully supplied with bituminous rock (which 
is as good as and much cheaper than asphaltum) that there is no 
good reason for not employing it extensively in residence and 
retail districts, and keeping off heavy trucks. This material is 
coming into extensive use here, and chat is something to be grate- 
ful for. 



MR. SUTRO'S LATEST MOVE. 

THE Supervisors at last appear to realize that in dealing with 
Mr. Adolph Sutro they have an uncommon wily customer, 
and that his remarkable shrewdness compels them to be con- 
stantly on their guard. Having failed in his effort to secure the 
return of the $6010 wnich he paid for a street railway franchise 
from Central avenue to the ocean beach, he has now evolved a 
complicated plan which looks much as though it was intended to 
accomplish the same result. Judge Hebbard has rendered a de- 
cision dissolving an injunction to restrain the Supervisors from 
giving Mr. Sutro a franchise from Central avenue to the bay, but 
in it he declares that he does so for tbe reason that the matter 
was improperly advertised, and hence that a franchise conld not be 
legally granted under tbe advertisement. While this dissolved the 
injunction it at the same time decided against the validity of the 
advertisement, and therefore the Supervisors will not dare grant 
the franchise in the face of tbe decision. Upon the rendering of 
this decision Mr. Sutro tried to get the Board to pass a resolution 
including tbe route east of Central avenue in the original fran- 
chise for which be had paid $6010, but the Board unanimously 
refused to do so. Then he presented another resolution to the 
same effect, accompanied with $500, and this was defeated. It 
all looks strongly like a scheme to get some ground on which to 
make a stronger demand for the return of the $6010, and if this 
surmise is true it carries with it the other, that Mr. Sutro never 
had any intention to build a five-cent line from the bay to the 
beach, and that all his scheming has been for the purpose of 
frightening the established lines into making the trip for five 
cents. As this reduction would put perhaps more than a million 
dollars into Mr. Sutro's pocket, by making his baths and unim- 
proved lots more accessible, the people and the Supervisors at 
last are beginning to think that he is not so public-spirited, 
after all, and that in his joining issues with the strikers, the Pop- 
ulists, the daily newspapers of San Francisco, and the other law- 
less elements of the State in a crusade against the Southern Pacific 
Company, he is employing all available gudgeons to tear others 
down that he might be built up. 

DEBS has given American labor a boom by the report that he 
will never engage in a strike again. 



August 4, 1894. 



BAN FF tNCISOO LVBW9 LETTER 



IN A DIFFERENT LIOHT. 

THK . »«p of Alice LMttfa Blythe. ad presented In the point* tad 
•oiborUlea cited to her behalf by Henry K. HlgbfcOO and I' 
P. Wheeler, her attorney*, in Ihetr appeal to the Suprnne I'ouri. 
has been tor the first lima appealed and set fortb compactly and 
intelligently . and it forcibly presents one of the most remarkable 
dramas of modern time?. Not the Irn-t interesting of its disclos- 
ures is the one that her interests were persistently dlsorimlDfttrd 
against in the lower court in favor of Florence Itlythe. In Ibfl 
introduction the interesting legal point Is made that the petition 
for the Supreme Court to heir the appeal in bank cannot be 
granted, as the alleged disqualification of the thief Justice makes 
that impossible under Article VII. Section 2 of the Constitution. 
However, that point is one of more interest to lawyers than the 
public. It is shown that Florence and the persons associated 
with her, although Mrs. Blythe had not questioned their assump- 
tion that Thomas H. Blytbe was Florence's father, and although 
Hn. Blythe had treated them with the greatest kindness bail 
sent them money i which she had borrowed) to come to Califor- 
nia, and had never opposed Florence's claim to half the estate as 
Blytbe's illegitimate child, — never repaid ber. treated her with ihe 
basest ingratitude, and sought to secure the entire estate by show- 
ing that Florence was the daughter and Alice Edith the mistress. 
This is the blackest disclosure that is made, and is commended lo 
the study of those newspapers which have so industriously aided 
Florence in ber course. Instead of throwing a stone in Flor- 
ence's way or attempting to combat her claim as a daughter, Mrs. 
Blytbe confined herself to endeavors to establish the fact 
that she was a wife, not a mistress. Xow, however, Mrs, 
Blytbe has entered into tne whole case, and will attempt to 
meet ingratitude with justice; for her attorneys' document is di- 
vided into two parts, one assailing the paternity of Blythe and 
the other going to show that Mrs. Blytbe was a wife. It shows 
that altbongh Blythe may have believed Florence to be bis 
daughter, there is not the slightest evidence, apart from 
the testimony of Julia Ashcroft, her mother, that she 
was. The story of Julia's alleged seduction, as taken 
from the transcript, is told in a clear and forcible manner — 
bow a chaste girl submitted to the embraces of an elderly stranger 
without loving him; how evident it was that the child was 
Joseph James Ashcroft's, legitimatized by marriage; how dis- 
reputable were the relatives backing the claims of Florence; how 
bungling was the conspiracy formed to convince Blytbe that the 
child was bis; how Julia had acknowledged in EDgland that Ash- 
croft was the father; how foolish it was to claim that Blythe 
woold promise marriage to a woman whom he had picked up on 
the street; bow absurd it was for her to claim that Blythe per- 
mitted her to work for a living after promising to marry her — and 
soon. This division of the argument goes to paternity, promise 
of marriage, and institution. 

The second division goes to the question as to whether Alice 
Edith was Blythe's wife or his mistress. The facts on that one 
branch of the case are more familiar to the public, and are simple. 
A few of them are that all the legal conditions of a marriage were 
complied with; that a borne was maintained; that the agree- 
ment was kept secret through Blythe's fear of another woman 
who had threatened to kill bim if he should marry; that to his inti- 
mate friends he spoke of her as Mrs. Blythe. The high standing 
of the witnesses testifying to this branch of the case is placed in 
painful contrast to that of those testifying for Florence. It may 
be expected that this appeal will open the eyes of the public as 
to the real status of the case. In spite of the fact that Florence's 
newspaper advocates have tried to create the impression that the 
case has been decided in her favor finally by the decision on the 
appeal of the Williams claimants, the fact remains that the one 
important appeal has only now been made, and that the case is to 
be heard all over in the Supreme Court on graver issues. 



A DESPICABLE POSITION. 



ANEW party striving for supremacy has only its virtue in the 
absence of a record to commend it to public favor. As it 
grows in numbers and influence, disgruntled men from other par- 
ties fly to it, and being crafty and ambitious, seek to control It. 
During the late " unpleasantness" between capital and labor, the 
fact was developed that some of these unprincipled demagogues 
are at the helm of the People's Party. They were active in ex- 
tending sympathy and moral support, giving aid and comfort to 
the deluded strikers in their unlawful proceedings in preventing 
the transportation of the United States mails. At every oppor- 
tunity these leaders sent messages of comfort, expressing feelings 
of the highest respect and consideration. By so doing their un- 
lawful acts were endorsed. This was demagogic. It was more. 
Although perhaps not treasonable.it was at least unpatriotic. It 
was a bid for their support at the ballot-box, which was unlaw- 
ful. These laboring men, who were carried away for the time 
through sympathy with their fellows, who were also victims ot 
an nnwise demonstration, will live to learn, if they have not al- 
ready learned, that their best friends were those who intervened 
before the temper of the strikers was beyond the law's control. 



3 
INTERESTING POINTS IN THE MARTIN CASE. 

TBXHI i» a point in the Martin will content which appears to 
have escaped the lawyers who are ao busily engaged in nr^ii 
Ing the matter baton Judge IVtTey. It is that Mrs. John Martin 
is a Bldwall, an. I Is related to the two notorious forgers whose 
escapades with the Hank of England, In whirh they swindled 

that institution out of i. 1 forged notes, will go down on 

the pages of Time as the most daring in the history of the world. 
Whether Mrs. John Martin is possessed of the marvelous power 
of imitating other people's handwriting In the same degree as her 
relatives is a question which we will not discuss here, but 
it is a singular fact, and a circumstance that may throw 
great light on the case, that the Bldwells were in this State 
on a lecturing tour just about the time that the forged will 
was supposed to have neon written. Henry Martin died in 
February, 1893. In March of the same year the Bidwells 
were in California, and it was during that month that they 
visited Mrs. John Martin at her Weaverville home. The trial, 
this week, has been full of sensations. The chief one occurred on 
Monday, when the attorneys wbo are defending the genuineness 
of the second will threw aside their policy of suggestion and in- 
sinuation and introduced a letter which placed the stamp of dis- 
honor on Mrs. John Martin and the stigma of illegitimacy on her 
child. It was one of the "Dear Belle" letters, which are sup- 

[ posed to have been forged with the will. It is a unique epistle 
in every respect, and, if it be genuine, then the little curly. haired, 
blue-eyed boy is entitled to bis share of the estate of Henry 
Martin, his alleged father. But there are serious doubts sur- 

j rounding it. Mrs. John Martin is willine, in the eyes of the 
world and in the presence of her Maker, to declare herself un- 
faithful to her husband and to fasten the stigma of Illegitimacy on 
her child. It is clear that this incredible sacrifice was made 
solely for a chance — and apparently a slim one at that — to get 
money; and it is difficult to imagine that a women capable of 
that would scruple at forgery to gain the same end. 

ANTI-ANARCHIST LEGISLATION. 

THE French and Italian legislatures have recently enacted laws 
which are grouped under the somewhat general name of anti- 
anarchist legislation. Much of this legislation, however, is di- 
rected at the faults and defaults of institutions of organized 
society that have nothing to do with anarchy. For instance, one 
of the most important sections of the French bill is aimed at that 
sensational species of journalism which presents the discovered 
murderer, whose professed purpose is a furtherance of the cause 
of anarchy in unwholesome detail and in the self-made guise of 
a heroic patriot and self-sacrificing philosopher. The theory of 
the French authorities is tbat men are willing to sacrifice their 
own lives and destroy other lives for the petty gratification of 
thus posing for a few neeting moments before a world which they 
ha\e insured their departure from. The theory is a strange and 
incomprehensible one. Indeed, the theories of nearly all of those 
who profess to deal with or define anarchy are strange, and have 
that incomprehensibility which is a natural outgrowth of a lack 
of understanding. For instance, a recent writer ascribes anarchy 
to illiteracy and materialistic irreligion. And yet, as a matter of 
fact, the anarchist is, as a rule, a little better educated than his 
class, and Tolstoi's peasant, Borndarelf, whose theories were the 
very basis of the faults which both the socialist and the anarchist 
rind with organized society, was a pious man, whose mental 
habit was shaped in the superstitions (or faith) of revealed reli- 
gion, and whose form of thought took its expression and color 
from scriptural texts. 

IT seems likely that we shall be drawn into the Mosquito coast 
imbroglio more deeply than we are now, before it is settled. 
Americans resident on the reservation appear to have been the 
principal allies of Chief Clarence in the recent revolution, and it 
is said tbat Americans led the Indians in the attack on the 
Nicaraguan forces which preceded the return of Chief Clarence to 
power. It is further charged that Charence could not maintain 
himself or the Mosquito Indians maintain their independence of 
Nicaragua were it not for the moral support given them by the 
foreigners. The situation is therefore one which cannot last, and 
which involves some sort of an arrangement with Nicaragua 
which shall permanently determine the status of this strip of 
coast line. In some way our Government must help to bring 
this final settlement about, but in what manner does not yet ap- 
pear. Autonomy is guaranteed by treaty to the reservation, and 
we are to some extent bound to see that such autonomy is 
secured, as we are by the Clayton-Bulwer treaty, jointly with 
Great Britain, to keep our own hands off. If the administration 
has any policy, it has not declared it, and now that the Columbia 
has arrived at Blnefields we have force enough there to give the 
policy a substantial backing. 



THE Secretary of War has done well to issue an order inform- 
ing commanding officers that they may use troops for the en- 
forcement of the Interstate Commerce Act and other Federal laws 
pertaining to railroads. This will prevent delay and save trouble 
in the event of another strike like the one that recently occurred. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE 



August 4, 1894. 



THE SILVER QUESTIJN. 



EDITOR News Letter— Sir: One contention of the advocates of 
unlimited free coinage of silver is that the value of gold is de- 
rived fiom, or maintained by, government fiats. The first men 
tion of money is in the Bible— Abraham's purchase of the burial 
plot of Machpelah; silver shekels (a term limited to weights at 
the time) being there referred to as current money. The art of 
coinage was brought into use 1000 years later; that is, about 850 
years B. C. In Solomon's time, as in all times that history, sacred 
or profane, tells of, gold was par excellence the precious metal. In 
First Kings, 10th chapter, 21st verse, we are told. "And all King 
Solomon's drinking vessels were of gold, and all the vessels of 
the bouse of the forest of Lebanon were of pure gold. None were 
of silver — it was nothing accounted of in the days of Solomon." 
No such things as coins are spoken of at that period, but money 
metals were weighed in payment of debts, a practice which, iu 
large transactions, China still adheres to; the tael, 579.84 grains 
of silver at Hongkong, and 568 at Shanghai, being a Hypothetical 
weight, as the English pound sterling is also; there really being 
no such coin as a "pound" sterling — the sovereign and tbe 
guinea being the actual coins nearest to it. Aristotle never alludes 
to gold coins, but to silver only, and it is probable from all his- 
torical writings that gold was plentiful, relatively, in his day as 
in Solomon's time, and the most valued of all tbe metals, though 
not coined, and having no fiat quality whatever. If gold were 
demonetized to-morrow it would probably retain undiminished 
its commodity value as the best medium of exchange for settling 
balances in the world's commerce. Our gold coins contain just 
the amount of pure gold that their faces indicate, and are good 
for that whether in Shanghai, Calcutta, Constantinople, Vienna, 
Berlin, Paris, London, New York, or anywhere else, if melted up 
as so mnch bullion. For example, an ounce of pure gold is worth 
$20 67. A twenty dollar piece contains 464 04 grains of fine gold, 
which gives it a bullion value of $20 in any market. 

To recur to the lamentations of the neo-bimetallists, I repeat 
the following by Professor Andrews at Brussels, 1892: 

"They wish to stay that baneful, blighting, deadly fall of prices 
which for nearly thirty years has infected with miasma the economic 
life-blood of the whole world," 

and have to say that some of the utterances of General Francis 
A. Walker are in a somewhat similar strain. Upon these lines 
the National Silver Convention at Des Moines, Iowa, in March 
last, framed its platform. Now, it is no part of my purpose to 
attempt to deny the existence of extreme poverty — of untold suf- 
fering, of appalling misery in the world; but ibe issue of fiat 
money will not core it. Only in particular the return of commer- 
cial confidence, and in general the modification of man's ignor- 
ance, weakness, folly, greed, and avarice will cure those ills. 

In so far as California, for example, is concerned, tbe evidence 
of the accumulation of wealth by the masses in the period since 
the so-called demonetization of silver, that is, 1873, is overwhelm- 
ing. On a gold standard this State shows the accumulation in 
thirty years of one hundred and forty millions of dollars in sav- 
ings institutions, more than three-fourths of which has been accu- 
mulated since 1873; and the increase iu the past six yeara has 
been at an average of over twelve million dollars a year. 

Now, if we turn to the country at large we find that during the 
same period in which these gentlemen claim that the economic 
atmosphere of the world has been poisoned by miasma because 
of the exclusion of silver from unlimited free coinage, we find, 1 
say, that the savings banks' deposits of the United Siates in- 
creased within this period more than $1,100,000,000— one thou- 
sand one hundred millions. In other words, since silver was de- 
monetized, as the action taken in 1873 is called, the amount of 
money acquired by the masses, as indicated by their deposits in 
savings banks, has been greater than the entire accumulations in 
such institutions in the previous history of the country, and evi- 
dences abound of the maiked increase during the same time of 
all other forms of wealth in the hands of tbe peoples in every gold 
standard country. Now, in view of these facts, which are be- 
yond question, how is it possible to believe that the exclusion 
of silver from unlimited free coinage could have had a " baneful, 
blighting, deadly " effect upon the industrial activity, progress, 
and prosperity of this country. 

Such opinions as the one I have quoted from — Professor An- 
drews' — are calculated, from such a source, to do untold injury, 
for really no such conditions as his words indicate have existed 
generally in the thirty years mentioned. Take the ten great raw 
products of the United States — corn, cotton, copper, lead, lumber, 
meat, pig iron, tobacco, wheat, wool — combined, and the aggre- 
gate fall in prices since 1850, say forty-four years, bas been 12 
percent; and it is certain that lower rates of interest, reduced 
cost of transportation, and improved machinery far more than 
compensate for this. To demonstrate this, compare the per 
capita of wealth of the United States year after year, as per cen- 
sus reports- 1850, $308; 1860, $514; 1870, $780; 1880, $870; 1890. 
$1039. Observe that the increase of 25 per cent between 1870 and 
1890 is during just that period of time when the alleged "baneful, 
blighting, deadly miasma" prevailed. To this it may be said, 
"Ah, yes ; wealth has increased, but the rich have been growing 
richer, and the poor poorer." True, tbe rich have been growing 



richer; but the poor are not growing poorer, however unfairly 
the results of their toil may be divided, or however inequitably 
taxation is applied. In that same period tbe rate of wages in 
the United States increased over 14 per cent, and the savings of 
tbe masses, as shown by savings bank statistics, more than 
doubled; that is, increased from less than $700,000,000 in 1873 to 
over $1,800,000,000, at the present time. Europe increased from 
$1,200,000,000 in 1870 to $3,200 000,000 in 1890. And if the hard 
times of the past two years should have reduced wages so as to 
absorb the 14 per cent previous increase, they would still be 
nearly double what wages were fifty years ago, and the prices 
of all things essential to comfortable existence less, especially 
breadatuffs and manufactured commodities. The sympathetic 
sentiments of the neo-bimetallists are creditable to their hearts, 
but in attributing prevailing and temporary conditions of depres- 
sion to wrong causes they are likely to do far more harm than 
good, and the remedy they propose — more silver — by interna- 
tional agreement is impracticable, if not fallacious in principle. 

Any money is fiat in its nature that is not redeemable in in- 
trinsic equivalency, and all money not so redeemable is in truth 
false money. All ibe talk of tbe advocates of unlimited free coin- 
age of silver by the United States Government at a ratio of 16 to 
1, and of silver being a money of ultimate redemption in this 
country on that basis, is the veriest moonshine. 

According to the press extracts from an interview with ex- 
Speaker Reed, and published opinions of Henry Cabot Lodge, 
supplemented by concurring opinions from Senators Cameron 
aud Quay, of Pennsylvania, and others, these gentlemen consider 
silver and the tariff as but one issue — Protection — to be promoted 
by imposing coercive duties on Great Britain's products. Reed's 
expressions of opinion palpably defer to Populistic views regard- 
ing the sort of money panacea adapted to cure tbe ills of society. 
What he expects to do for our farmers by his suggested alliance 
with silver-standard cjuntries — that is to say, South American 
republics — is more than I can conceive. Those republics are 
agricultural and raw material producing countries. Tbe nations 
that chiefly use our farm products— Great Britain, France and 
Germany— are the ones with whom we carry on the most exten- 
sive trade and to whom we must sell, if we would find an ade- 
quate market for our farm products; because, generally tbe 
South American countries not only can supply their own wants 
in that line, but have a surplus left for export. The American 
wheat farmer, "protected" under the McKinley law by a tax on 
everything he uses, and paying the highest rate of wages known 
in the world, must compete with tbe cheap labor of the Russian 
peasant, tbe ludian ryot, or the Argentine peon, because bis sales 
to the "home market" are on tbe basis of the price at Liverpool 
for exported surplus. The American farmer's only real protec- 
tion is tbe superiority and advantage of his labor-saving machin- 
ery. Yet the Republican party of California declares for the un- 
limited free coinage of silver, at a ratio of 16 to 1. What for? To 
have the farmer take pay for his products iu silver intrinsically 
worth less than fifty cents on tbe dollar, and with which Europe 
could flood us if given an opportunity. 

Tbe folly of the California farmer clamoring for free silver and 
hurrahing for what politicians call tbe 'protection of American 
industry," is a spectacle for gods and men. For the farmers free 
to vote as they like, yet to vote for taxing themselves to the 
point of destitution — frying the last ounce of fat, not only out of 
themselves, but out of their wives and children — while they sell 
every pound of their grosser products on the basis of the price in 
Liverpool in competition with the world — for such excess as they 
may have left after borne needs have been satisfied, is fatuous to 
the last degree. 

Tbe scheme of coercive duties proposed to be levied on Great 
Britain's products is utterly unworthy men of the intelligence of 
Reed and Lodge. Great Britain and her colonies and dependencies 
are taking sixty per cent of everything the United States sends 
abroad. Suppose she persistently tries her hand at retaliation, 
where will there be a market for our farm products? In other 
words, where will our farmers come in? — the market for whose 
surplus nas been there, and it is universally recognized that the 
price of tbe surplus abroad largely fixes tbe value of tbe com- 
modity at home. 

As to compelling foreign nations to co-operate in our monetary 
experiments, let me quote M. Tirard, delegate of France to the 
Brussels Monetary Congress of 1892: 

"That is, in truth, a difficult undertaking. Peoples already far ad- 
vanced in civilization have habits, customs and laws which are adapted 
to their traditions. They are not applied in an arbitrary fashion, 
they are bound up with the very conditions of the existence of these 
peoples. Despite all the demonstrations and the speeches, all the 
publications and all tbe newspaper articles, do we see the powers 
change their opinion? Not the least in the world." 

Yet amidst all the grave difficulties that disturb the industrial, 
commercial, and financial situation of the country, the California 
Republican Convention of 1894 determined to go Reed and Lodge 
one better, and, in its platform, demand the unlimited free coinage 
of silver at a ratio of 16 to 1. I again ask, what for? Are the in- 
dustrial conditions of humanity better in silver-standard coun- 
tries than in gold-standard countries? Let the ardent silverites pon- 
der that question! A Layman. 

San Francisco. July 31, 1894. 



Aupu.«t -I. 1894. 



FRANCISCO NEWS I ITIKK. 



THE BORUMOAJU BRJOADE. 



" U El.li>.'' went throuch the trirphone lb* other day— not 
[I thai thai l« a remarkable thin*, by any means, but In this 
MM it wai calling up the Extern tourist who took * trip to San 
Kafirl in order i-> cain a slight Inalghl .»( the magic circle known ns 
'■ lb* -wiiii." as ihcy were about to take the boat lor their dally jour- 
ney, tin that occasion the San Francisco chap who had undertaken 
the job ol pointing out " who 1 , who " to the K«-«lerner promlasd Dim 
of what he called the " Burlingame brigade." and it was for 
the purpose of suggesting to him ■ In thai direclion that 

*' bello " resounded oeer the wires. Bit Iriend jumped at the idea 
and the two men were speedily ensconsed in the train, and. as they 
walched Ihe passengers arriving, the following might have been over- 
beard, the San Francisco man loquitor 

iv. you must be a regular mine of good luck, for we struck it 
rich ihe day I took you on the San Rafael boat. and. by Jove! here 
to-day is another instance of ii. Look at the fellows coming this way. 
See that little chap ahead .' That'- Fred Sharon. He*s a dapper 
looking fellow, as neat as wax and always dressed tip-top; if any- 
thing. ' to utterly too. 1 But then that's better than being slouchy. 
and our men, in eeneral, are proverbial for that fault. You thought 
he lived in New York ? Well, so he does, off and on. but he spends 
most of his time out here, having really made Burlingame (you know 
he owns the place; it's part of the Ralston assetsi, and it was his idea 
entirely to build the Club house and cottages on the tract. Fred is a 
good fellow, though a trifle • dudish," and very English, yon know. 
Guess he gets that from having an English ■ Sir ' tor a brotber-in- 
law. That long, lank-looking fellow is Jack Casserly. Rather loose- 
jointed, you think ? Ah ! my dear hoy. he is all right when he plays 
polo, barring a tendency to go over his pony's head. 

" Ah, there is Charley Baldwin ! Now, isn't he a nice-looking chap? 
Rich, too, as well. He is the brother of the Mrs. Deacon, whose hus- 
band shot her French lover; you are right. You see he has shared 
his sister's good looks and his eyes do no end of damage to the women. 
Why doesn't he marry 7 1 vow that 1 don't know. Guess he's afraid 
of too much mother-in-law; that's what society gossips say anyhow 
in reference to a girl be has been very devoted to for years. He is 
great at polo, and rides a hurdle race in A No. 1 style. Do you see 
that couple just approaching our car? The man is a fine, hearty- 
looking fellow and was chosen to do Ctesar at the Circus Maximus 
that they had in San Francisco last year. He drew a prize in the ma- 
trimonial lottery, for the lady walking beside him is his wife. Yes, 
she was the widow of young Hawes, of Redwood, and had piles of coin. 
They have gone through a good deal of it, according to rumor, but I 
guess Jack Schroeder still has enough to keep the wolf from the door. 
They are a handsome pair, though they say that the madame is the 
senior by several years. You don't like her taste for bright colors in 
dress ? Well, that's a matter of taste, my boy. Ah ! here's a pretty 
woman, now own up, and well-dressed, too. That's Mrs. Page-Brown. 
The Page-Browns have a cottage at Burlingame, which is always full 
of jolly guests. They are very hospitable and all that sort of thing. 

That couple just getting aboard are a nice looking pair, 
aren't they? The eldest is Charley Felton, the ex-Senator and all- 
round good fellow; the young chap is his only son. Can't say 
much for him, as he doesn't go about much. They live down near 
Menlo very quietly; both catches, but kind of shaky about matri- 
mony. Hello! here comes Dick Tobin. He is a star in the polo set. 
One of three brothers. Irish? Well, yes, of Irish stock, any way ; 
old folks from Ireland, I guess. Rich? Well, I should say so! Cords 
of money. Joe, one of the brothers, is going to be married soon to 
Miss Mae Dimond, who is very popular at Burlingame. The little 
pale looking fellow with him is the son of Loughborough, the lawyer. 

" You'd like to see some women ? Just wait awhile. Here come 
two worth waiting for now. They are the pretty, stylish daughters 
of Borel, the Swiss banker, who lives at San Mateo. You should see 
them on horseback. Ah! there goes the richest woman in California, 
because she has it in her own hand. Mighty good woman that; no 
one like her in charitable works ; awfully strict churchwornan as 
well. Yes. she's a widow. Old John Parrott, the pioneer banker, 
was her lord and master, and left her all bis fortune. She has a fine 
old place at San Mateo with cottages for her daughters built around 
about. You don't like that idea? I can't see the objection. It makes 
a family party. That's one of her daughters with her now, and the 
small fellow— foreign looking, you say— is de Guigne, her husband. 
He is a French banker. Here comes Bowie, the lawyer; the thick- 
set man with the brown beard. He married Mrs. George Howard, 
who was a wife for the second time when he was in knickerbockers. 
Extraordinary, you say ? By Jove! you'd say he was in big luck if 
ever you had seen her. He is going to the Howard place now at San 
Mateo. Lives by himself there with the youngest Howard boy. Isn't 
that a lovely face ? I believe you. She is the wife of the handsome 
chap with her, Faxon Atherton, and, as Miss Jennie Selby, was one 
of the prettiest girls of her day. They live at Menlo. The pale, blonde 
girl with them is Miss Eyre, Ned Eyre's daughter. Her sisters a£ 
married. The Eyres live at Menlo, too. Aha! look at that taU, thin 
man with spectacles. He is a lawyer named John Doyle, uncle to 
Jack Casserley , and always up for fight, like a true Celt, whenever op- 
portunity otters for tongue or pen. His pretty niece, Daisy Casserly, 



lit . Ins .laughter Fanny is on the loll I ; 
Ibe Dtmood girls, rhey lira at Menlo, and the on i this 

"Hen ray Frtsdlander. awful big cbap, yon say? Rlgbl 

Beta bound for Barllogama, and is another who 
[righteni the polo ponies. I'ra board tliBt Iht Society for Ihe Preren 
Hon ol Cruelty t" Aulmala Inland! to investigate Carey's pony, but 
of ooorae one can't depend on all the rnbbtab one hears. See thnt 
man with dark mustache and so neatly dressed, right over thereto 
the left? That Is Tim Hopkins, who gol three milium, or so from his 
adopted mother's estate, Had to fight for It. Nice fellow, Tim, and 

greatly liked around Menlo. where he lives and raises Mowers lor the 
city market. (Jileer. you think, for n rich man ; that's how you take 
it. Ah! here is Ned Eyre Ihe elder. Here come Hammond and 
Page-Brown, both bound for the happy polo ground, and that gawky- 
looking Britisher is under Fred Sharon's care. Sent out by Sir 
Thomas, I guess. 

" But if you want to see style just wait till we reach the station at 
Burlingame and see the turn-onus that will meet these fellows. To 
my mind Sharon has the best taste of all of them, but then of course 
he has lots of money lo back his taste. Lansing Kellogg is another 
of the same sort— money and taste as well. That's he over there 
with Edgar Mizner. Mizner is a capital hand with horses and can 
ride a ' hurdle' with most chaps, 1 tell you. Here's Harry Holbrook 
and his pretty sister. They go to Menlo. You say you like the looks 
of the San Rafael set best ? My dear boy, these are supposed to be 
the cream. They call themselves the ' exclusives,' don't you know. 
Here is another polo chap, Osgood Hooker. The girls are quite sav- 
age over the way he goes in for it, as they say he doesn't care for society 
any more, and what the Southern foiks call ' courtin beaux ' are 
somewhat scarce at present; why, the girls feel aggrieved— that's 
where it is. I wonder where this couple are going. They live over 
at San Rafael. Don't you remember, I showed you the madam on 
the boat the other day? I guess Burlingame is where they're bound 
for, and it must have been they whom Fred Sharon was searching the 
cars for just now. Are they relations of the rich widow Parrott, you 
ask ? Well, in a degree ; Louis Parrott is a nephew of the old man. 
1 say, what do you say to tbis set of noisy girls? They can talk six- 
teen to the dozen, any time. They live near Mountain View and are 
the daughters of a lawyer named Delmas I Ah I there is the married 
daughter coming along just now, with her husband. Isn't he a fine 
specimen of a native son? A right nice fellow is Will Barnes. What's 
that you say ? Our people don't have the same stylish appearance 
that New Yorkers and Philadelphians have! I think myself that our 
women dress too showily for outside affairs, and especially on rail- 
ways and ferry boats, and there is no question that the Eastern men 
can brag over us in general appearance. But don't you think hon- 
estly that our people have a more genial air about them than the 
folks on the other side of the Rockies? There, now, is a man just 
coming up who has more real good friends than any one I know. He 
is Reub Lloyd, the lawyer, a very clever fellow in every sense of the 
word, and yet you see he has not changed the style of his dress for 
years. He must be going to Pescadero to fish. There is one of the 
Presidio chaps going to have a try at polo, no doubt, as he is a capital 
fellow at riding. A chap came out from New York the other day and 
was taken down to the club bouse, and they say that he made a regu- 
lar guy of himself, which proves that even New Yorkers can do ridi- 
culous things. Eh? But there goes the bell. We're off !"' 

Merit is Essential. 
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Will stand every test. 

A well-dressed man is proud of bis furnishing goods, and every 
well-dressed man knows that John W. Carmany, 25 Kearny street, 
keeps the finest and latest line in the city. 



Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE, 

For sale by all first-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, Sole Agent for Pacific Coast, 

123 California Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4,1894. 




wt> 



" We Obev no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

SELDOM or never has a new play been produced in San Fran- 
cisco under such glittering circumstances as attended the pro- 
duction of Christopher, Jr., at the Baldwin Theatre on Monday 
night. Although it was "tried on the dog" once, in Podunk or 
some other diminutive place, the performance on Monday can 
practically be called the first that was given on any stage, for the 
revised manuscript arrived from London only a week before, and 
was far removed from the original. Madeline Lucette Kyley is 
the author, and she has written a clever play. Her experience 
as an actress has helped her greatly. The freshness and origin- 
ality of the piece are its greatest charms, it is full of bright lines 
and capital business, and above all it gives John Drew three or 
four chances in which be can act as he did before he eschewed 
plays equal to his abilities, for farces of the dress-suit, school-girl 
class. There are, however, some faults in the dramatic construction 
that should be attended to immediately. Christopher, Jr., will 
stand another revision, especially in the fourth act, whicb is too 
full of complications to run smoothly. Mrs. Ryley made a serious 
error, when she wrote the play, by not keeping within the bounds 
of one style of play-writing. Bhe has mingled farce, burlesque, and 
legitimate comedy with so much abandon that one can hardly be- 
lieve that she clung to the original motives of her work. She is 
altogether too fulsome in delineating character, and instead of 
leaving the audience to realize a few things, has spoilt several 
effects by over-drawing her personages. This is altogether too 
plain in the instances of 



best lines, and when, in the second act, he quarrelled with his 
father and left his home and his love, it was as dainty a piece of 
work as has been seen here in many months. Drew and Miss 
Anna Belmont, who played Nellie Colt, had a tender little scene 
in the same act, when they parted. Miss Belmont exhibited a 
dainty, sympathetic vein in that scene that was not far from 
nature. Miss Adams, like Mr. Drew, was supplied with a part 
that fitted her much better than either of her first ones. As the 
unknown wife of Christopher, Jr., she gave a strong yet sympa- 
thetic performance of good quality. But for her affectation and 
her awful accent she could be rated as a good actress. Lewis 
Baker, as Bert Bellaby, was excellent. Belle Bucklin, as Sally 
Spriggs, was dainty and clever. Arthur Byron played the villain 
very well, and Harry Harwood, Frank Lamb, Leslie Allen, Kate 
Meek, and Mrs. Adams sustained their respective roles effectively. 

Edward Uarrigan ended his variety of characters with Squatter 
Sovereignty. His peculiar faculty for portraying the scenes and 
incidents of the lower strata of life and his ability to write and 
speak the dialogue, are nowhere more clearly evinced than in 
that play. The difficulties of the Mclntyres and the Maguires, 
and the troubles of the "royal astronomer" and the widow Nolan 
bring about a series of laughable situations. Almost every char- 
acter in the piece is Hibernian, and speaks the broadest Milesian 
brogue. Harrigan had a good part as Felix Mclntyre, in which 
he was very funny. On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 
evenings of next week Old Lavender will be revived, and during 
the remainder of the week Reilly and the Four Hundred. It will 
be Mr. Harrigan's farewell week, and he will present his most 
popular plays. 



Mr. and Mrs. Christopher 

Colt, 8r., who convey their 

speeches to each other 

through the medium of a 

servant who is constantly 

with them. It is a good 

piece of broad burlesque, but 

it is altogether too prom- 
inent to be funny. The man 

who does not speak a word 

until the end of the last act 

is an original character, but 

it was badly played by 

Frank B. Hatch, who ap- 
peared to be suffering from 

the effects of too much 

liquor rather than a hen- 
pecking wife. The remainder 

of the characters are good. 

There are very few dramatic 

writers who have been able 

to write a last act. That 

part of the play is the bane 

of the dramatist's life. It is ; 

generally inane, vapid, and " z ^^ t 

hollow, and tiresome to the 

audience. Mrs. Ryley was Ti ' ir - Thompson, W 

wise in leaving some material for her last act — indeed, she was so 

eager to build it up that she saved too much material, and, as 

stated above, the complications in it are very confusing and spoil 
what might be a charming and interesting climax. For example, 
the act belongs to Mr. Drew and Miss Adams, who have been 
married all during the play unknown to each other. Instead of 
being made to realize the fact at the beginning of the act, so that 
they could have worted up to the climax through a love scene or 
two, and made a series of charming and clever scenes, Drew is 
told that his wife Is dead, that he has married another man's 
wife, and Miss Adams is equally confused, and just one minute 
before the curtain falls their real condition is made known to 
them, ending the play altogether too abruptly and unsatisfactorily. 
Mrs. Ryley wrote the fourth act, so that it is in no small measure 
apart from the preceding three. The scenes in that act do 
not dove-tail with those in the others, but it could be easily re- 
vised. The second act is the best; the climax of the first act is 
good, but we would beg to inform Mrs. Ryley that it was a white 
dove which Noah sent out o'er the waters of the flood and not a 
gray one. But the range of the playwrights is growing broader 
as the world grows older, and like the humble poets who peddle 
their wares to the kind-hearted editor, they want license for 
everything. 



Charles Frohman's stock company begins an engagement 

at the Baldwin Theatre on 
Monday evening. The com- 
pany conies direct from the 
Empire Theatre, New York, 
which is its home, and in 
which it made four great 
successes during the past 
season. The play which it 
will present during the first 
week of its season will be 
Sydney Cirundy's Sowing the 
Wind. This is the play 
which raised such a discus- 
sion in New York. Strong 
opposing views were held by 
the patrons of the Empire 
concerning the "sex against 
sex" question, upon which 
the play was built. It deals 
with different phases of high 
life and their consequences. 
It is said to be an artistic, 
high-strung play, and the 
work of a master hand. The 
mummers in the Empire 
Company are: Henry Miller, 
William Faversham, Robert 
II. Crompton, 1 iola Allen, and W. Faversham in " Sowing the Wind." Edeson W. H. Thompson 

Frank Mills, W. H. Crompton, E. Y. Backus, John Sorentz, W. 
J. Whitman, Arthur Boylan, Viola Allen, Isabel Irving, Mary 
Hampton, May Robsou, Agnes Miller, and Genevieve Reynolds. 

* » » 
Oscar Wilde's comedy, Lady Windermere's Fan, which will be 

seen at the California Theatre shortly, was declined by six London 
managers before it finally found acceptance. The last time it 
came back to Mr. Wilde with a note of refusal he put it away in 
his desk, as he thought, forever, writing across the top of the 
package: "Nothing fails like failure." Two days afterward Mr. 
Alexander, of the St. James' Theatre, sent for it. It was pro- 
duced, and for nearly a year it was the rage of the British 
metropolis. 

* # * 

A very acceptable presentation of The Gypsy Baron was given at 
the Tivoli Opera this week. The Tivoli company did some good 
work, the honors being about equally divided among the princi- 
pals. Tillie Salinger sang the music of Saffi with fine phrasing. 
Robert Dunbar never did better than as Sandor; in fact, it can 
safely be said that he made a hit. Ferris Hartman as Kalman 
was very funny, and his topical songs contain many allusions 
which were well received. The chorus was excellent, but the 
orchestra lacked fire and inspiration in several places. 




The play could not have been put into the hands of more com- 
petent people than those in the Drew company, and it could not 
have been staged with more effectiveness or with rarer taste or 
judgment. In it Mr. Drew, as Christopher, Jr., did the best work 
that he has done since he appeared here. Neither in The Butter- 
flies nor The Masked Ball did he have a single chance for real act- 
ing, but throughout Christopher, Jr., he has serious phases which 
are excellent. Every climax is his, the author has given him the 



Gertie Cochran, who has been the chief attraction at the Or- 
pheum this week, is probably the most wonderful child that the 
stage or the public has seen. How a child of three years could 
have learned to answer the questions that she does is as puzzling 
as it is mysterious. It is a wonderful case of remarkable mem- 
ory, and if there is a man in the United States to-day who could 
rattle off the answers to the questions that were asked Gertie 



Aupadt A, 1894 



S\\ FRANCISCO NT.WS I. II in; 



■n he would tM rated »i • wtlklrjf •ncjclopwll*. It la not 
»o much lb* Information that ib* iruparu to the tudienre that 
• larilei it. The audience rill and wonder> how .he OOOld 
have got the hell loto her little head, and how she remetubert 
them. Ljrdla Yeaman«-Titu» repeated her former incenses ihis 
week, and the remainder of the bill wu rjonsniMy good. An 
enure change will be made on Monday night. The new perform- 
ers will be Sadi Alfarahi. the Ratslan equilibrist; the I>eltorelli 
Brothers, musical arlisli: Levanion. Selson. and Bush, acro- 
bats . the V/Ing Blcketls. aeriallsts. and (.eorge H. Fielding, the 
joggl". 

• • • 

Beginning with Monday evening, the 13th inst.. Dr. J. Frankiin 
Brown, the well-known hypnotist, will appear at the Orphenui 
in a series of humorous hypnotic features. Dr. Brown's enter- 
tainments are of a most pleasing character. For years he has ap- 
peared in the most fashionable homes of this city, where his work 
has been looked upon as being interesting and instructive. 

* • • 

The gTeat international tug-of-war opened last night at Central 
Park, and an immense crowd attested the interest that the public 
has taken in the alfair. The work done by the teams was unusu- 
ally good and the men showed that they had been carefully 
trained. The matches are of the most exciting nature. They 
will be continued every evening, excepting Sundays, until the 18th 
inst. 



THE CAFE MORGUE OF PARIS. 



Paris, July 15, 1894. 

RIGHT down near the Bool' Michel, on a little side street oppo- 
site the Sorbonne, is a caf€. You would never know that it 
is a cafe* unless some one told you, for it is all closed up with black 
shatters, save the entrance. 

As you go in, a man dressed in the regulation coffin-bearer's 
costume pushes aside the heavy black drapery, like that used 
when there is a death in the house, and you are ushered into the 
» cafeV' If you do not drop dead with fright you will see com- 
mon black wooden coffins placed about the room, with chairs 
aloogside; these are the tables. The walls are all concealed be- 
hind black, silver-trimmed drapings, some of which are orna- 
mented with skulls and cross-bones and other uncanny suggestions 
of death. No matter which way you look, a skull will stare you 
in the face, grinning at your nervousness. 

The moment you are seated at one of the coffins a coffin-bearer 
comes and takes your order. If it be a " bock," he moans in a 
dreadful way, " Une microbe de cholera! " But you must not be 
afraid or faint, as he only brings you a very small glass of beer, 
and again informs you that it is a cholera microbe. As soon as 
you have finished your •< bock " and paid your fifty centimes, he 
hands you a ticket and you are led to a steep, dimly-lighted stone 
stairway, that smells like a vault, and, after stumbling down 
about thirty feet underground, you come into a gruesome cham- 
ber more horrid than the one above. 

Two forms, all in black, with black hoods over their heads and 
two holes for their eyes, greet you with loud wails and tell you 
that you are about to die. They lead you across the damp, dark 
hole to some coffins and seat you upon one of them, so that you 
are directly in front of a black bole in the stone wall. As you sit 
there wondering what's going to happen next, and feel shivers 
run up your back, you hear the moaning of a wheezy organ issu- 
ing from somewhere in the mysterious room, and this, with the 
wailing of the black forms and the sight of skulls, bones, coffins, 
and funeral trappings, is sure to make your hair stand on end and 
implant a desire to rush from the hole. But suddenly a soft light 
appears in the black hole, revealing a corpse of a woman in a cof- 
fin with a winding sheet around it, and you are horrified to see it 
decompose before your very eyes, the hair disappearing and the 
flesh growing whiter, the eyes sinking in. The flesh grows more 
putrid and horrid and the bones begin to protrude. And lol the 
shroud gradually disappears and a skeleton lies in the box where 
the corpse had been. Then a wait from somewhere announces 
that the skeleton will come to life. Gradually it disappears under 
the putrid flesh, which keeps getting more life-like — the eyes tak- 
ing the place of the black holes, a mouth covering the grinning 
teeth, and long hair growing on the head; the shroud appears 
again, and if you are not dead with a stroke of apoplexy, you see 
before you a beautiful woman, and alive too, for shesmiles at you 
and shows her white teeth, and finally steps out of the horrid 
box. Then the wailers wail some more and tell you that you are 
free to go, and they each hold out a brown skull, into which you 
drop a few sous through the hole whence issues the spinal cord. 
They bless you and hope that you will die soon, and you climb 
the steep stairs while the mournful organ wails a funeral march. 

How delicious the fresh air seems when you reach the street 
again and make haste to leave the place as far behind as possible! 
It all seems like a horrid nightmare, and you almost doubt what 
you have seen. And this is quite near one of the biggest boule- 
vards of Paris! Edouaed Cucuel. 

Mothbes be sure and use "Mrs. Winslows' Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething. 




— - Si 

A GENTLEMAN'S SMOKE. 

WE COULD NOT IMPROVE THE QUALITY 
if haid double the price. It is the 
choicest 5 mol<in£ Tobacco that ex- 
perience can produce or that 
can buy. 

... 



money// 



■Md{ 



~— J '- ■_;' '" 



Lessee and Mauager. 



. „ BALDWIN THEATRE 

AL Hayman 
Beginning Monday. August tith— 

< IIIKI 1 s i KiiilM ivn STUCK COMPANY, 

From the EMPIRE THEATRE, New York. First week only, 

SOWING THE WIND. 

As presented for 250 nierhts in New York. 
Week August 13th— UB EHTY HALL. 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE- 

Al Haynian A Co Lessees | 8. H. Friedlander Manager. 

Week oommencing August 6th Farewell performances of MR. 

EDWARD HARRIGAN 

And his New York company. By special request: 

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, Mr. Harrigan's beautiful 
comed;, OLD LAVB.VDEK. B 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday evenings and Saturday matiuee. Mr. 
Harrigan's greatest success, KE1LLY ami thk 40». 

New scenery and stage effects. Braham's delightful melodies. 

Secure your Feals at ouce to avoid the rush. POPULAR PRICES— Re- 
served Seats— Matinee, 25c, 50c , 76c Night, 25c . 50c, 75c, $1. 

Week of August 13th— LADY «I\I>l;KltIEIlK's FAN, Oscar Wilde's 
great comedy 

TIVOLI OPERA HOOSE. 

Kbeltng Beos Proprietor and Managers. 

To-night. A great production. Strauss' lovely waltz opera, 

THE GYPSY BARON, 

In Preparation— DON JUAN (ad lib). 

Popular Prices 25and50c 



ORPHEUM. 

O'Farrell St., between Stockton and Powell 8ts. 
San Francisco's Great Music Hall. 
Week of Monday, August 6th.— Big importation of new artists! Noted 
celebrities from all lands! 
SAME JMAKtlll, Oriental Russ Equilibrist, 
in l.TOltl! c I BROS , International Musical Artists. 
THE KICKETTS, Flving Acrobatic Meteors. 
LEVANION, NELSON * HI'sil, Ovmnastic Comedians. 
OE1ITIE ril('HII«s, Remarkable Infantile Memory Wonder. 
THE BRAATZ BKOS , Athletic Prodigies 
CHAS. H. DUNCAN, Popular Comic Singer, and positively last week of 

LYDIA YEAMANs -TITUS. 
Saturday and Sunday matinees. 

CENTRAL PARK — Market and Eighth Sts. 
INTERNATIONAL TUG-OF-WAR TOURNAMENT. 

.VI Wl ST 3d to I Kill Inclusive 

(Sundays Excepted). 

$20,000 PRIZE MONEY. 17 TEAMS W1JLL COMPETE. 

United States. Switzerland. Portugal. Slavonia. 

England. France. Austria. Canada. 

Ireland Denmark , Spain . Russia . 

Scotland. Italy. Norway. Sweden. 

Germany. 

1>. R. NcMJLL, Proprietor and Manager. 

I II I I AM RPHHAPn The En Elifih actress, coaches ladies and 
LI LL I nil ULUUn l\U, gentlemen for the dramatic profession; ap- 
pearances arranged. SHAKESPEAREAN ACADEMY, 1007 California 
Street, opposite the Flood Mansion. 

O i A IU f\ C A * L BANCHOr I «* UU. 
flnBnlwW^P 3C3 Sutter St , S. F. 

Knabe, Hainks, Bush & Gerts, and others, 
cash or installments. Please call or correspond. 

franco. BANCROFT 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1894. 




THE 



[OOKCR-ON 




A FASHIONABLE summer resort is a fine place at which to 
observe the habits and manners of le haut monde. Society's 
ways and doings are strange and impressive, for courtesy and 
good manners are out of date, and the refined gentlewoman and 
gentleman are "back numbers." They are undoubtedly still in 
existence, but unfortunately for society, they are not to the fore 
in its "functions." The broad verandas, the wide corridors, the 
airy lobbies of the "swell" watering place are a fine field of observ- 
ation, and he who reads as he runs will encounter much that is 
startling and peculiar. The country surrounding Castle Crag is 
full of charm and beauty to the lover of nature, but there are un- 
civilized beings who say that the innovation of the railroad has 
broken the spell. The "Tavern," a misnomer if ever there were 
one, has made it possible for luxury-loving society to breathe 
the health-giving mountain air without damage to be-ruflied 
skirts or flannels and white shoes. Those same frilled petticoats 
have much to answer for. They and the accompanying silken 
hose and dainty shoes are responsible for the extreme ( 1) altitudes 
taken by their wearers. "What's the use of having frills if you 
don't show 'em?" she asked; and forthwith reversed her crossed 
feet with such a flutter and kick that the quick eye caught the 
gleam of a pretty buckle just below the knee. They all did it, 
varying the extent of ankles to be seen only when the crossed 
foot was well poised in the air. A certain lady who wears the 
narrowest shoe to be found in San Francisco, combined a degree 
of elevation with an air of sublime unconsciousness which called 
for admiration. She also had a way of calling to her engaging 
husband when he was smiling on some other woman that brought 
him to "attention" instanter. It also brought out some pointed 
remarks about "Caudle lectures" on the night of the "High 
Jinks," so called on account of the altitude. 

* * * 

What interest surrounded one rich matron! One never knew 
whether she was to be right or left-handed until she appeared in 
the morning with one or the other blazing with gems. As her 
rings, so were her gestures, one hand or the other — never both; 
perhaps it was consideration for the eyesight of her audience; 
looking in two directions at the satue time is conducive to strabis- 
mus. Then there was the doctor who would go to bed early and 
insisted on his wife doing the same, though she did not want to. 
The giddy widow, who claims Knickerbocker descent, and who 
looks forty, but acts twenty, was one of the personages. The 
girls had a good time, especially those whose mothers came 
down to the city just in time to be strike-bound. The quartette 
improved the opportunity to the utmost. Some of the lookers-on 
declared that the sofaB in the public parlor were not the places 
for the young women to spread themselves at full length and thus 
disposed entertain their admirers, but then some people are so par- 
ticular ! Again the spirits of the quartette were so high that blind- 
man's buff was played on the top of the circular divan as well as on 
the floor. Comments were sharp, but the San Francisco girl has a 
reputation for being "lively," and she must live up to it. 

* * * 

Table manners were at a premium. Be it known to the un- 
initiated that the proper attitude, vide "Society," for eating corn 
is to take hold of either end of the cob, rest the elbows on the 
table, and proceed to munch. Inelegant? That does not matter, 
We do it, so it "goes." The elbow plays a prominent part in the 
dining-room; it is rested on the table most of the time, and the 
hand, thus supported, holds bread, fruit, or bone, as the case may 
be. To reach the point where one> may be a law unto oneself is 
a great thing. Having gained it, decorum may be thrown to the 
winds, good-breeding retired to the background, and courtesy a 
thing of nought. Those at the top notch can do no wrong; for 
the rest of us, some grovel to get there, and some — don't. 
» * * 

The affection between Lord Talbot Clifton and Dan McCarthy, 
he of the white hat and the keen horse-sense, is remarkable. 
Wherever Dan goes, there goes Talbot too. They drink the same 
sort of cocktail, frequent the same theatres, and suck their julips 
out of the same quill. By the way, Talbot has given the Burlin- 
game Club a genuine Tally-ho coach, horn, basket pouch, and all, 
which he ordered out from England. There is no doubt but he will 
drive it himself on the initial trip. Talbot is a good whip, and 
about as fond of a horse as his crony, Dan McCarthy. 

Dr. Aby, erstwhile manager of the Langtry ranch, in Lake 
County, will shortly leave for Africa for the gold Melds. He 
is a genial Kentuckian, who has had adventnres in many lands. 
He is a superb whip, and can hold the reins over a four-horse 
team with any man on the coast. Fond of field sports and 
natural history generally, he can relate the most interesting and 



at the same time the most astonishing experiences. A few men 
were talking of rattlesnakes over the walnuts and the wine a few 
evenings ago. When Aby's turn came, he sipped a glass of Pom- 
mery and turned himself loose. 

"The largest rattler I ever killed," said he, "was in Georgia. 
It was eleven feet six inches long and had forty-five rattles." 

"How many?" inquired one of his audience, aghast. 

"Forty-six," replied Aby, coldly. "I forgot one." 

There was an embarrassing pause, and then one man arose 
solemnly from the table and shook the raconteur warmly by the 
hand. His example was followed by the others, and the conver- 
sation changed to deer scooting. 

"The best record I ever made," said Doctor Aby, "was one day 
on the ranch in Lake County. I was riding up the mountain on 
a mule, which, by the way, could point a deer. Suddenly out 
came her ears, and she raised her right foot. I saw a big buck 
just ahead of me. I fired and down he tumbled. In another 
minute a second deer came tumbling down also, and I'm blest 
but a third — a doe, I'm sorry to say — rolled down the mountain 
close by my feet. That siDgle bullet, gentlemen, from my 40-65 
rifle had pierced and killed three deer. A buck, four prongs, 
dashed out immediately afterward, and I plugged him. Four deer 
to a couple of bullets are not bad, eh?" 

This time the hand-shaking was renewed more fervidly, and 
when the hero declared that in one night, with a dark lantern 
and a stick, he had knocked three hundred reed birds off a cedar 
hedge in Mississippi, a tall, slim gentleman softly placed a wreath 
of laurel on his forehead, and then burst into tears. 

• * # 

For many years General Heuston and Colonel Andrews never 
spoke as they passed by. The Colonel considered the General a 
gentleman unworthy of recognition, and the General would as 
soon bow to Lucifer as lift his hat to the Colonel. 

When the musician ran on to the point of General Heuston's 
umbrella, in London, a person who knew of the feud existing be- 
tween him and Andrews called upon the latter and congratulated 
him on the fact that his old enemy had got into a tight place. 

"That's so," said the Colonel sententiously. 

" You might write to some of your friends in England and sort 
of give him a black eye," pursued this amiable party. 

" That's so; I will write," said Colonel Andrews. 

And he did write to an influential friend of his in London, but 
it was to the effect that he should do everything in his power to 
help General Heuston out of his scrape, referring to that gentle- 
man in the kindest manner. 

When the London gentleman called on Heuston and showed 
him how his ancient foe had come to his assistance, the stout old 
warrior was deeply affected. And when General Heuston returned 
to this city almost his first visit was to Colonel Andrews, with 
outstretched hand to cement a feud nearly a quarter of a century 
old. 

# # * 

The worthy magistrate at Woodland, who is conducting the 
preliminary examination of the railroad strikers on the charge of 
having ditched a train and killed a number of persons, appears to 
be a little shaky with his Latin. Carroll Cook, who is defending 
the strikers, and A. L. Hart, special counsel for the prosecu- 
tion, have pretty hot wrangles now and then, and one of them 
the other day involved the magistrate in a tangle. Mr. Hart bad 
made himself particularly disagreeable to Mr. Cook, who finally, 
in his most offensive manner, demanded: 

"If the Court please, I object to the course pursued by counsel 
on the other side. I should like to know who employs him, 
anyway, and whom or what he represents." 

The magistrate politely transferred the demand to Mr. Hart 
with a glance, and that gentleman promptly replied: 

"I represent casus belli." 

"Objection sustained," sternly ruled the Court; " I don't know 
any such party." 

* * # 

During the service of the gallant Third in Sacramento, when 
the strikers fraternized with the soldiers and poured ice-water on 
many an aching head, Colonel Barry, of that regiment, exhausted 
from his labors in the field, reclined under the shade of a friendly 
tree. All day long, under the broiling sun, the Colonel had 
marched and countermarched, and when at last he sank to rest 
his slumbers were profound. 

The weary officer was awakened by the visitation of two of 
tbe strikers, who, supposing that he had an attack of snnstroke, 
grasped him, head and foot, and were bearing him off, when the 
Colonel awoke. 

"Poor fellow, poor fellow 1" said the sympathetic Btrikers, 
" we'll take care of yon." 

" May the devil fly away with you!" shrieked the indignant 
officer; " don't you see I'm Colonel of the Third Regiment?" 
* * * 

Henry Hey man, who is making a six months' tour of Europe, 
was, at last accounts, in Venice enjoying himself among tbe gon- 
dolas, moonlight serenades, and other Venetian luxuries, includ- 
ing perhaps a " pretty Jessica," though rumor makes no special 
mention of this item. The genial musician has not been hobnob- 



AuguM A % 1894. 



SAN rn v\< E300 NEWS LETTER. 



bing with (he •- crowned bead* " to any itrett extent . but he hat 
done belter Id being fraternally welcomed and royally entertained 
by those crowned with the Ianrrl» and wearing the purple of 
musical genius. The genial musician Is enjoying every moment 
of bis vacation and at the same time picking up much valuable 
information for future use In his profession. 
• • • 
The Bohemian Club expressed lis appreciation of the return of 
General Heuston to the borne of the owl by a dinner (o the vet- 
eran Thursday night, at which nearly all the prominent Bohe- 
mians were present. Ad incident of the London matter not men- 
tioned was that when the wounded musician was brought to the 
hospital be begged that be might Dot be searched. But after bis 
death several gold watches and some rings and pins were found 
in bis clothing, and a small bag of sovereigns. Tbe purpose of 
tbe gang in stopping General Heuston was to rob him. This was 
not brought onl in the trial at Bow street. 

It is well known to everyone that Johnson's restaurant. 28 Mont- 
gomery street, is the most popular dining room in San Francisco, 
and that it gained its reputation by the excellence of its viands and 
the elegance of its service. Its popularity will be increased by the 
liberal redaction in rates which has just been inaugurated. The new 
rates will not impair the qualitv of the service in tne least. The re- 
duction is warranted by the fall in the rates of high-grade provisions. 
This news will please the ladies, as they regard Johnson's as bein^ the 
best place for luncheon in the city. 

Carson City, the most beautiful town in Nevada, only H miles 
from Lake Tahoe. is the place to take thr Keeley care. No graduate 
from this institute has relapsed. 

Don't fail to chew Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Fratti Chewing Gum after 
meals. Indigestion fades before it. 

Never was the demaud for Ayer's Sarsaparilla so great as during this 
season. 



AYER'S 



Prevents 

BALDNESS 
REMOVES 




DANDRUFF 



AND 



Restores Color 

TO 

Faded and Gray 

HAIR 
THE 

Best Dressing 




ZISKA INSTITUTE, 



1600 VAJJ NESS AVENUE. 

SCHOOL FOB GIRLS. French, German, and English Day and Boarding 
School. Elegant home. Best educational advantages. 
Next term commences August 1, 1894. 

HUE. B. ZISKA, A.M., Principal. 



HOTEL 
VENDOME 



SAN JOSE, CAL, 



TO say that the Hotel Vendome is 
the best is enough in itB favor. It 
is one of the largest and moBt ele- 
gantly appointed hotels in the State. 
It is situated in the center of a finely 
cultivated park twelve acres In ex- 
tent, and is surrounded by trees of 
many years' growth. 

The location is in the most fashion- 
able part of the city of San Jose, and 
iB only two blocks from the Southern 
Pacific Railroad depot. Electric cars 
pass the door at short intervals. 

The appointments of the hotel are 
first-class in every particular, being 
furnished throughout in the most 
elegant and attractive manner. 

(JeO. P. $I)ell, MANAGER. 




THE 
MARKET. 

749 MARKET ST., 

(Opposite Phelan Building). 

FINEST MARKET 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES. 

Giving Special Sales Every Day. 

Telephone 5466. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1894. 




IF, as is often charged, the daily press is responsible for a crav- 
ing for sensational reading in our domestic circles, surely it 
may with equal truth be charged that the novel of tbe day is in- 
fluential in transferring so many of our erstwhile guileless maids 
and young wives into " Dodos" and " Evas" of the Rubicon, Tbe 
heartless, flippant pertness of speech and action which is so 
severely commented upon by strangers visiting our coast as a 
marked feature of our women, ia largely borrowed from those 
heroines of Benson, more's the pity! 

The girls at Del Monte were rather disgusted because, after fill- 
ing his fine drag to completion with a jolly crowd, young Walter 
Hobart would say >< ta-ta," and betake himself to the pleasures 
of the bowling alley. For although a drive in such a swell turn- 
out was a delightful thing, it was like the play of Hamlet with 
the Piince left out not to have the owner in the box seat. 

It was comical to see the well known men of position and 
years who attended the " Living Picture" show, at Metropolitan 
Hall, come creeping slyly in, hurry up to the front seats, and 
never turn to the right nor left afterwards. How absurd the 
ostrich act is! 

* * * 

The sad death of Miss Marguerite Wallace will rob society this 
winter of one of its fairest ornaments, and not alone will the 
charming girl herself be missed, but her sisters, Mrs. Belle Dona- 
hue and Miss Romie Wallace, will of course be withdrawn from 
the gay world in mourning. It will also probably have the effect 
of postponing indefinitely the ball which those hospitable ladies, 
Mesdames Annie Donahue and Eleanor Martin, are credited 
with having had the intention of enlivening the early autumn 
with, as not only a connection, but a strong friendship, exists 
between the families. 

* » * 

On dit, the widowed sisters, Freeborn and Santa Marina, will 
join purses this winter and keep house together in the Western 
Addition. 

* * * 

There is a rumor in the air of the beau monde that a reception 
will be given the recently wedded Mrs. Wise-Wagner by one of 
the McAllister clique. 

The beaux and belles will flit back from the Country Club shoot 
at Del Monte for the tennis at San Rafael, and then go somewhere 
else ere the season closes. •* By Jove," said one of the young 
men the other day, '< it is sometning of a pull on one's resources, 
such constant change of base, railway fares, hotel bills, etc." 
« * * 

What a pity some of the wealthy house holders in the rural 
districts cannot be induced to gratify the girls by a swagger fete, 
where fetching costumes would be in order, and all tbe delights 
of a garden party be enjoyed! 

" What next? " said a smart girl at Burlingarae as she looked 
at the illustrations of her friends in their bathing suits, as fur- 
nished the public by a sensational Sunday paper, and the remark 
has found echo in the minds of many. What the young girls, 
whose limbs were thus exposed for the public gaze, felt, is better 
imagined than described. 

. * B 

It is said that tbe dowagers held an indignation meeting on the 
veranda at having been overlooked by the "enterprising" camera. 
Several of the married ladies felt that they were equally entitled 
to "travel on their shape." 

» * » 

We may expect to hear of the " living picture " idea taking 
form in our swim, as anything for novelty is the cry; and the 
more daring in originality of conception and execution a thing is, 
the greater the chance of success. We do venture to hope, how- 
ever, that should our gilded youth and pretty belles pose for the 
cause of sweet charity before a promiscuous assemblage of eyes, 
they will not adopt the Cupid and Psyche style. In fact, let 
statuary go, and try the Huguenots or something that has drapery 
on other than wings or a circus rider's swathe. 

Cynics tell us that this is an age of sham, and possibly there is 
more or less truth in the assertion. In society life we find vari- 
ous forms of it, but certainly the last evidence of sham heard of 
takes the lead. Every one who has visited the Midwinter Fair 
must have noticed the display of old silverware made in the Eng- 
lish exhibit; but every one does not know that, during the period 
of bargains at the close of the Fair, among the throng who went 
out to the Liberal Arts building in search of such was a young 
couple from the most fashionable part of the Western Addition, 



who invested in a large piece of the ancient silver. And now 
they are said to be telling their friends that they have lately re- 
ceived some of the family plate from the ould country! 

The dread of earthquakes is again creeping into the minds of 
our people. Possibly the most nervous are to be found among the 
house-boat inhabiters of Belvedere, as a moderate-sized tidal wave 
would sweep them into — what? 

Eastern news contain two items of interest anent two of our 
rich California widows in the matrimonial line, Mrs. Bob Hastings 
being reputed as about to form new ties, and Mrs. Clara Cather- 
wood as having broken off her recently announced engagement. 

There is what seems to be a well authenticated rumor current 
in our best social circles that a young lady who has always had 
the reputation of a keen intelligence aud sharp tongue is about to 
favor tbe public with .her impressions and experiences of human 
nature as found in European and Eastern travel, and our own 
swim in town and country. The fair author, it is said, will not 
give names, but so portray the different characters she has come 
in contact with that they will surely be recognized. On dit, the 
book will be classified into three divisions — nature aw natural, na- 
ture cultivated, and nature perverted. All the Benedicts of her 
acquaintance are on tbe tenter hooks, as it is believed that she 
has given them the leading rSle in the last » division." 

The recent strike caused many inconveniences. A dire result 
would have been a shortage of Keystone Monogram Whiskey, which 
physicians recommend for the sick and well; but a carload arrived 
just before the strike and another just in will prevent any distress 
on that score. 

You 



After dinner try Adams' Pepsin Tutti-Frutti Chewing Gum. 
will find it admirable. 



4&2££o^ 




The Medical Department 

OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY 

Awarded their last contract for sherry to 
Agents of MESSRS. 

DUFF.GORDON&Co. 



IN PREFERENCE TO ALL OTHER 
COMPETITORS. 

■^i&S W& S ' SOLD BY THE LEADING WINE 

Awarded Medal and Diploma 
Columbian, Exposition, Cliicaao, li:i.:. MERCHANTS AND GROCERS. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

314 Sacramento St., S. F. 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 



Eureka 
Fire Hose Co. 




p 'WaC6n FIRE. HOSE [_ r _ 
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for 

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Aupr. 



s\\ it; \n. im .1 SEWS i.i i ill: 



11 



&mu mm 



THY. war between China and .lupin, orer Core*. seems lo b»ve 
broken out In reality, though « -ithoul any (ornjal declaration 
or preliminary cessation of diplomatic inlercou'se. The continu- 
ous forwarding of men and munitions by t'huia to L'orean terri- 
tory bas been challenged by Japan as an overt act of beligerency, 



7>\.<a 



xao 




J\pKri 



THE MIKADO OF JAPAN, sketched from, life at the autumn meeting of the 
Nippon Race Club, 1S93, at Yokohama, by F. A. Nankivell. (The value of 
this portrait may be appreciated when it is explained that sketches and 
photographs of the Mikado are strictly prohibited, being regarded as a great 
indignity to the ruler of Japan.) 
and two naval encounters have taken place in which the Japan- 
ese forces have been victorious. As a demonstration of relative 
military prowess this result is in accord with the concensus of 
the best opinion in regard to the physical strength of the two 
countries in war. China is the more powerful nation, but her 
power is undeveloped as a military factor and will take years to 
develop. Much more than modern arms is needed to perfect this 
development. The bulk of tbe army at the call of the Chinese 
Government to-day ia little more than a rabble, unused to dis- 
cipline and devoid of the implements and methods of modern 
warfare. That part of the Chinese army which is equipped witb 
the armB of this era and trained in the methods of Western 
conflict is small and lacking in a hundred and one of the elements 
which go to make up a first-class soldiery. Then there is an 
entire absence of reliable leadership in that military organization 
which is required in order effectively to handle and provide for 
armies when the armies are in existence. Tne War Department 
of the Chinese Government is as defective as its soldiery. There 



ft no general staff, and it If doubtful whether there Is to-day a 
native general officer who understands modern military ta.ii* > 
sufficiently to form a large army Into an affective and safely oon< 
strnned line of battle. In preliminary man-' uvrc.i, marchings, 
and skirni<«hings for advantage of position, under tin* modern 
system, til* Chinese would be lotl anion assisted by foreign offi- 
cers. (Mi tbe DtbOl hand, the Japanese for years past have been 
Industriously Adapting themselves to the Western military and 
naval system, and to-day their standing army and navy, as well 
as their reserves* are armed, equipped, and trained in modern 
style, and though they still have some foreign (Ulcers in their 
employment, their own leaders are fairly trained; they have an 
efficient general staff and a properly organised governmental de- 
partment of military management as well as one for naval affairs. 
These are things that are bound to tell. There are those who 
think that the Chinese will he able to bear the Japanese down by 
sheer weight of numbers if the conflict is prolonged, but it is diffi- 
cult to understand upon what basis this theory rests. The small 
forces which Knglacd and France sent against China were not 
beaten down by numbers, and they operated under more disad- 
vantageous conditions than those which confront the Japanese 
in the present conflict. The better opinion, therefore, seems to 
be that the two authentic naval encounters which have taken place 
are suggestive uf the ultimate result, and that from out of this 
difficulty tbe new force, which has been Blowly developing in tbe 
East for many years past, will emerge emboldened and solidified 
and demanding from Western powers a consideration not hitherto 
conceded to it. 

Some time ago there came from Honolulu a decidedly fantastic 
story to the effect that the British warship Champion had gone off 
to seize a sea gull perch known as Neckar Island, which, though 
an appenage to the Hawaiian group, had never, so to Bpeak, been 
legally naturalized. Tbe vigilant provisional government, how- 
ever, chartered a fast steamer (tbe Champion could run away from 
any vessel at the Islands), which outsailed the British warship, 
so the story ran, and triumphantly planted the Hawaiian flag on 
the barren and uninhabited roc*. Tnis grotesque romance was 
so ridiculous that no one took the trouble to deny it, and it died 
of its own vacuity. This week, however, it comes to us again in a 
somewhat changed form. The new form contradicts the old 
story in all essential particulars, and goes to show that somebody 
bas been " making game" of the provisional government and our 
own daily papers, and has not tired of the amusement yet. In 
its new form the story asserts that the Minister of Military Affairs 
of tbe colony of Victoria, Australia, sent a representative to Hon- 
olulu to charter a steamer to go to Neckar Island and take pos- 
session of it, in the expectation that the British Government 
would ratify the act and assume the responsibility for it; also 
that the scheme miscarried by reason of the leakage in the tongue 
of the representative. The pretense behind all this romancing is 
that Neckar Island is wanted as " a station" for a cable line 
across the Pacific Ocean which is now projected. In its new 
form the romance is even more ridiculous than in its old shape. 
Neckar Island would be perfectly useless for the purpose 
mentioned or any other conceivable employment. It is bar- 
ren, uninhabited, uninhabitable, and difficult to land on even 
in fine weather. Besides that, the colony of Victoria is in 
no way interested in the proposed cable which will run either to 
New Zealand or New South Wales. 

Some of the partisan daily papers are circulating a story to the 
effect that the present administration really disapproved of Ad- 
miral Benham's gallery play at Rio and was only restrained from 
censuring him by the fact that his act seemed to be very popular. 
If this is true, it goes to show that the original purpose of the ad- 
ministration was more in touch with the true requirements of the 
situation than its subsequent action was. Benham's course at 
that time practically turned the tide of war against the revolution- 
ists and in favor of Piexoto. As a result we seem to have fastened 
a governmental regime upon the unfortunate Brazilians which 
bears more resemblance to the institutions of Russia than to a 
genuine republic, which rests upon and has its strength in popu- 
lar approval. 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



August 4, 1894. 




THE trouble over the Harney Peak Mining Company's affairs 
appears to have resulted from the misconduct or ignorance of 
officials, who seemed at their wits' end to absorb every dollar 
subscribed by the shareholders, by a system of contracts for sur- 
face improvements. It is the same old game which has been 
played lirue and again in California, to the ultimate loss of the 
unfortunates who supplied the capital. In nine cases cut of ten 
the mine was simply used as a bait to enable tbe conspirators to 
live like nabobs and fatten upon the exorbitant commissions 
paid upon the bills for machinery which was never intended to 
be used alter its erection, and for elegant establishments fur- 
nished regardless of expense. If mining investors will go back 
into the history of the past ten or fifteen years tbey will find in- 
numerable instances of this reckless system of mismanagement. 
Take the old Ilex, Union Gold, Quartz Mountain, Esmeralda, and 
the Josephine: Who profited by these swindles but the con- 
tractors and tbe promoters? At tbe Ilex, Josephine, and Union 
Gold tbe machinery was of the most expensive description, and 
what became of it? The mill of the Ilex was distributed piece- 
meal all over the country at a small fraction of a cent for every 
dollar invested, and the Josephine plant, brand new, was finally 
bought in by the builder for something like $5000, while the 
stamp mill alone cost $60,000. The Union Gold mill and ma- 
chinery was not even erected upon the company's land, and it 
was gobbled up by the original owner of the mine as an addi- 
tional profit on a transaction which made him rich enough to 
retire a wealthy man after making a grand tour of the world. 
What has become of the thousands which have been squandered 
upon the Valley Gold, alias Holcomb Valley or whatever soubri- 
quet it is now traveling under? Where are the innumerable div- 
idends held out as an allurement by Alexander Del Mar when he 
brought the property out in London? When the Bears' Nest 
affairs are sifted out in court it will likely be found that again 
the contract system afforded more lucrative opportunities for 
those in charge than the exploitation of the property. There 
would have been a large balance on hand in the treasury out of 
the $265,000 subscribed for equipment purposes had it been de- 
termined first of all whether or not the prospects for a supply of 
ore warranted the erection of a milling or reduction plant. How 
it is that investors are so short-sighted as to permit such conduct 
upon the part of their representatives is their own business, but 
when they suffer by their folly it would be more graceful to do 
so in silence than to parade their ridiculous position before the 
world. 

$ $ $ 

Gorqstock The local mining market developed a healthier 
Miqiqg tone during the week, and prices fluctuated suffi- 
Sfyares, ciently to enable dealers to realize a profit, which is 
more than they have done for some time past. There is a great 
deal of money now concentrated in private hands, for which no 
use can be found in regular business channels, and the first signs 
of activity in stocks will draw a large proportion of these idle 
funds toward Pine street. The mines are in a remarkably good 
condition just now, and the future of several is more promising 
than at any other time for many years. Had it not been for the 
general commercial depression, much higher prices might have 
been expected just now, and, with the revival of confidence in 
outside business circles, a sharp reaction may be looked for in 
the mining market. As it is, values have been maintained won- 
derfully in all leading mines during tbe dull spell, and this would 
not have been so, had it not been for the merit which the proper- 
ties possess. A large amount of ore has been accumulated by the 
Con. Cal- Virginia Company, and the Morgan mill has just been 
started up again, with a possibility that it will run for some time — 
long enough to replenish the treasury materially. The prospects 
for discovering the downward continuation of the new ore body 
on the 1700 level are brighter than ever, and this in itself ought 
to act as a bracer on the stock. At the South End work has com- 
menced again on Belcher and Jacket, while the news from Crown 
Point continues to be of the most encouraging character. If not 
made entirely self-sustaining, this mine should soon be in a position 
where the burden on the shareholders will be lightened considera- 
bly by an output of bullion. The Justice mill is also ready to 
start up on a high grade of ore. Savage was assessed twenty 
cents, Silver King twenty cents, and Gould & Curry fifteen cents 
during the week. 

$ $ $ 

THE Toledo Board of Underwriters, at a meeting which has 
just been held, voted to prohibit the use of trolley currents 
for electric lightning or for power, and all users were given thirty 
days in which to discontinue the practice. Not long ago the 
Board issued a circular to their companies announcing that a 
method had been discovered which insured safety from fire. 
Evidently the companies were not inclined to this belief. 



ftfiqiqg A large amount of money is still seeking invest- 

in ment in California mines, particularly in those lo- 

Ca/iforqia. cated in the favorably known districts of Grass 
Valley and NevadaCity. Scarcely a week passes without some new 
bond or purchase being announced, and a good prospect is taken 
at all times in preference to an Englishman's hobby, "a going 
concern." The majority of the properties now being opened up 
in the vicinity of Grass Valley are turning out well, and at times 
some very rich strikes are reported. In Sierra County the Empire 
mine, near Downieville, has just been sold for $50,000 to a home 
company, and the intention is to open it up and erect a fioe re- 
duction plant. In the northern districts considerable attention is 
being paid to the vast gravel deposits which have been neglected 
for years, and as the terms offered for capital are generally very 
liberal, investors are taking hold freely. The future prosperity 
of California will depend largely upon the development of ihe 
vast mineral resources by our own people. 
* * $ 

Local Despite the prevailing dull times complained of 

Stock in business circles, the local investment companies 

Divideqds, have done remarkably well in the way of earnings, 
and the dividends paid for the month just ended are considerably 
in excess of the amount paid for the same month last year. The 
total of tbe recent disbursements is $875,520, against $847,400 for 
July, 1893. The payments are summarized as follows for the 
month in 1894: Banks, $495,304; mining companies, $107,350: 
water companies, $78,000; gas companies, $74,166; insur- 
ance companies, $32,000; powder companies, $19,500; street 
railroad companies, $11,000, and miscellaneous, $58,200. In ad- 
dition, the local savings banks have paid out in tbe neighborhood 
of $2,000,000 for semi-annual interest on deposits. 
$ $ $ 

4 Nan]e The Imperial Fire Lloyds opened for business on 
as the 1st inst., the date announced some time ago, when 

Capita/, the company was incorporated. It is believed that 
there is a scheme back of this new concern to play upon the name 
of the English Imperial Company. It is also said that the latter 
company will take immediate steps to protect itself against the 
infringement on a name which has become a household word 
all over the world. None of the men interested in the Imperial 
Fire Lloyds are considered heavy weights among the insurance 
fraternity, and some of them are but little known on the street 
either in New York or Chicago. If they intend to profit by using 
the name they have adopted, it will likely be after a long and 
expensive litigation with their powerful rival. 
$ $ $ 
Local Last month was the dullest with the business men 

Baqk of this city which they have probably ever experi- 

Cleariqgs- enced. The tie-up in transportation is of coarse re- 
sponsible for this stagnation in trade. The bank clearings for 
July were only $45,570,126, against $49,895,464 for the same 
month in 1893, a decrease for the past month of over $4,000,000. 
There has also been a decrease for every month this year, as com- 
pared with last year. The clearings for the first seven months of 
1894 were only $370,197,700, as against $431,893,000 during the 
first seven months of 1893, and the total for this year is the 
smallest in many years. It is hoped, now that the lowest point 
in the business depression has been reached, that times will now 
begin to improve. 

AGENTS of the Niagara Fire Insurance Company of New York 
have received an official circular announcing tbe intention of 
the management to re-establish the Western Department head- 
quarters at Chicago, and the appointment of Mr. 1. 8. Black- 
welder as Western Manager. The transfer will take place about 
September 1st, 1894, bnt until notice has been given that the new 
order has gone into effect, agents will continue sending reports 
and correspondence to the New York office. 
$ $ $ 

A BILL has just been passed by the Maryland Legislature 
which provides that insurance companies shall send a full 
and detailed statement of their business to policy holders, and 
also publish an abstract of the same for three consecutive weeks 
in April of each year in at least one newspaper published in each 
county. 

$ $ $ 

THE Farmers & Merchants Insurance Company of Nebraska 
have issued a circular denying in toto the reports that they 
were about to withdraw from the field in favor of the German 
American. A former Secretary is accredited with starting the 
rumor. 

I % % 

THE Vice-Presidency of the Western Department of the Han- 
over of New York , which has been vacant for some time past, 
has been filled by the election of Mr. Howard P. Gray, of New 
York. 

$ $ $ 

NO more days of grace will be allowed, or notes or any other 
evidences of indebtedness, in New York after January 1, 1895. 



18IM. 



KRANCI8C0 SKWB I BTTBR 



18 




"Bear (he Crier!' "Whit the d»Tll art thou' 
"On* that will play tbt devil, air. witb you." 



GOVB&KOR Markham* What did you say? 
Did I hear aright* Am I born again? 
This i« the man who. one bright day. 

Was, elected lo rule o'er this domain. 
Ye?. 1 remember, the applause and all. 

When he came from Pasadena's shore- 
Like the streak of a match on a white-washed wall 
He tlickered and then was seen no more. 

• •overnor Markbam! Broad and grand! 

He has found himself ! Remarkable tact! 
And by his own hypnotic band 

Has written a letter to reveal the fact. 
0. bones of » Old 1'ani," 'neatb the sod and dew, 

By the weeds that cluster around your pail — 
Will Governor Markbam deny this, too, 

And offer gold for the original? 

While war was on, and wheels of trade 

Were silent, and strikers took their stand, 
As the bead of the National wuard brigade 

He sat on his great, hypnotic hand 
While bridges were burned and people killed, 

And the poor were calling unto the Lord! 
By the brooks that run where blood ne'er spilled, 

He kept his ribald watch and ward. 

But that is all past. The snn shines bright. 

The angel of peace has spread her winga. 
The hypnotic hand now comes to light 

And long and loud discordant sings. 
It sings for a Markham brave and bold. 

Who hid when duty called him forth ; 
It sings that his heart is growing cold, 

That e'en to himself he's of little worth. 

Markbam! bow down to the will of Fate, 

Pennoyer's an ass, and Altgeld, too, 
And yon are as big as both, and Waite 

Is just as big an ass as you. 
With insane asylums all over the land, 

And horn^s for the feeble here and there, 
Why can't we keep the hypnotic hand 

And Markham ont of the (Governor's chair ? 

THOSE interesting gentlemen who kill wild animals for fun are 
carrying a long whip over those other interesting gentlemen 
who kill wild animals for money. It might do California good to 
receive at the hands of an enlightened outside world the deserved 
chastisement of contempt and derision which must follow from 
this publication of the fact that the last Legislature of California 
passed a law classing as a misdemeanor the selling of game out of 
cold storage during the season when the killing of such game is 
prohibited by law, no matter though the game was killed in sea- 
son. This law was inspired by the gentlemen who kill for fun 
and was aimed at the gentlemen who kill for money, for the first- 
named gentlemen scorn to put the product of their butchery 
in cold storage — they prefer to gorge it hot, bloody, and 
rank; it is a wonder they do not eat it raw, though, 
come to think of it, most savages do cook their meat. 
Of coarse this ridiculous law has been upheld in a test 
case, because it is " constitutional." It is somewhat interesting 
to reflect that the gentlemen who kill for fun are merely obeying 
that savage instinct to kill which makes wars necessary and una- 
voidable. Next to kicking a dog, beating a woman, or murdering 
a man, the keenest delight in human nature is to hunt down, tor- 
ture, and kill defenseless animals— even sweet-voiced California 
women, " cow-eyed and beautiful," dainty, gracious, and lovable, 
revel in the sight of gentlemen shooting pigeons as they fly from 
a trap, and civilized women the world over scorn a civilian if a 
soldier be near, for does not the soldier stand for blood and death ? 

THE usual farcical investigation of the County Hospital has 
been made, the usual exchanges of pleasant courtesies be- 
tween Superintendent Titus and a majority of the Supervisors' 
Committee have been indulged in, and in a few days the usual 
disgraceful report sustaining the management will likely be filed 
—unless it should happen that Supervisor Stanton wishes his 
pains taken in the investigation {Supervisors James and Kennedy 
did nothing) to be productive of results. The method of taking 
the statements of the inmates as to the conduct of the institution 
is so absurd that sensible people cannot be brought to believe that 
the committee has any desire to ascertain the evils believed to 
exist. 



Til I mo«t remarkabl. retult of the calling out ol the National 
\*A in IQpprUi the rtOtDl riots hat been the discharge of 
several of the men hy their employers. It Is believed, and DOl 
denied, that the men were discharged for the reason that their em- 
ployer* "Sympathised* 1 with the strikers and were Opposed to any 
measures for suppressing their lawlessness. The good Lord, evi- 
dently for the purpose of making wisdom and goodness conspicu- 
ous in those that way endowed, has created some men to whom he 
has denied those graces of mind and character. To hold the National 
•■uard responsible (or doing its duly — which, without reference to 
the merits of the strike, was simply and solely to obey orders — 
is meanness of a lamentable order. It is equally deplorable that 
any one should cherish a "sympathy" for one side or the other in 
the strnggle; and yet nine persons In ten, in discussing the strike, 
have expressed sympathy. Wheu men have so far removed 
themselves from the primitive methods of the savage as to think 
with their beads instead of their hearts, the first beneficent work 
of civilization will have been accomplished. To what extent 
theoretical Christianity, which, as preached, sets Mercy at the 
throat of Justice, makes this danger operative, it is difficult to 
determine. See what a wretched thing mercy is in the practices 
of inferior men! Sympathy suggests mercy; these men could 
sympathize with the strikers, who are poor and earn their bread 
by hard labor, and yet have none for their own employees, who, 
besides similarly earning their own bread, had the advantage 
over the strikers by acting with manly unselfishness and at the 
peril of theirlives supporting that authority which makes govern- 
ment and order possible. Captain Barry is making a list of the 
employers who have discharged their men for serving as National 
Guardsmen. That list would make as instructive reading as the 
one of signatures to the Examiner's petition to Congress. 

ATTORNEY Loughborough, in the action that he is taking 
against Charles and Robert Wieland, is exhibiting some 
phases of mental obliquity that are rare even in a lawyer. He 
claims that they did not present to the court an itemized account 
of the expenditures of the estate up to date. Up to date, indeed, 
Mr. Loughborough! You might as well ask that the Angel 
Cabriel be allowed to come to Earth to show yon the way to 
Heaven. The second annual account of the executors was filed 
on September 1st, 1893, and the third annual account is not due 
until September 1st of this year. So the objections made to the 
account that it did not cover all that had been received to date 
were vapid and unbecoming a man of integrity. But Mr. Lough- 
borough, aided and abetted by the Examiner, has attempted to 
bring shame and dishonor on two young men who never did a 
wrong act, and who have lived the lives of honest, peaceful citi- 
zens. From the amount of abuse that had been heaped on their 
beads, one would think that they were public officials who had 
gone wrong instead of private individuals who have done noth- 
ing. The whole matter looks very much like persecution, and as 
though Mr. Loughborough and the Examiner had some common 
purpose in pushing their work. 

THE war between China and Japan is raging in San Francisco, 
where the Japanese are now denied admittance to the Chinese 
theatres. It is a pretty sight to note the different external effects 
which the Oriental war is having on the local belligerants. The 
funny little Japanese teels his oats amazingly, und. is strutting 
with all the pomposity which his funny little legs can command, 
looking fierce and breathing hot war from distended nostrils. The 
Chinese, on the other band, are even more inscrutable and silent 
tban ever. This wonderful race has a depth, a patience, an im- 
movable and impervious spirit of fatalism, a slyness, a tiger-like 
cowardice and ferocity, that would make it infinitely superior 
to the Japanese in guerilla warfare, for a Chinese is more readily 
an assassin tban a soldier. But if the swaggering little Japs of 
San Francisco carry their noses too high in the vicinity of China- 
town they will likely have their weazands slit by invisible hands. 

THE Examiner took a step beyond its ordinary impudence on 
Sunday and printed a number of cuts supposedly representing 
society girls in the baths at Del Monte, and an accompanying 
article which dwelt at length on their ability as swimmers. It is 
a fact that none of the young ladies posed for the paper, as it 
stated, and it is also a fact that some of them cannot swim at all. 
The article was grossly insulting and a terrible reflection on the 
conduct of the misrepresented maidens. But the editors of the 
Examiner are so bitterly opposed to decency, morality, or any- 
thing whatsoever that would make better the condition of the 
public, that one may expect almost anything from them. 

WHERE do the ladies of the variety stage get their voices? 
They must be wonderful voices at the start and must have 
received some wonderful and startling training. Some of 
them sound like a sawmill, some the croaks and squawks of a par- 
rot store, and some the scraping of the nails of a hundred-fingered 
man on a window pane. We suppose that a variety singer who 
had a good voice and used it skillfully or agreeably would not 
get an engagement. It is a tradition of the variety stage that the 
voice shall gurgle and splutter and break and scratch and tear. 
Sometimes it seems as if a cat came oat of the fair singer's throat 
while a frog stayed in. 



14 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



August 4, 1894. 





in the: 

Stars 



By Robert- ($>. Mb-ck^y. 



iffl' 



^& 



f HERE was no apparent need for jeal- 
ousy on the part of Dick Palgrave 
simply because the girl whom he 
loved wore a red rose on her breast 
which had been given to her by an- 
other man. And Lisette seemed to be too sensible a girl to 
put any feeling into the matter, or to think that she ninst love 
a man simply because he gave her a red rose to wear. But 
Palgrave sat through the dinner and watched her, across the 
table, talking to the dark Mr. Marshall. A big diamond star glittered 
in her hair. A string of topazes encircled her neck and tried to 
diminish the lustre of her eyes. A laurel wreath of diamonds 
adorned her breast, and nestling among its glittering leaves was the 
red rose. Palgrave could see nothing but the rose, The diamonds, 
the topazes, and her eyes counted for naught, and to him the rose 
looked as though it was her heart. 

When the dinner was over and the guests wandered through the 
long halls of Mrs. Winston's rich home, and assembled in the draw- 
ing room to dance the hours away, there was one who lingered be- 
hind, and whose wrinkled face and downcast eyes told that he was 
not in a merry mood. It was Dick Palgrave. Jealousy had seized 
him for her own. The pangs of the green monster had grappled him 
around the loins, and he was ready to cleave the first man to the 
heart who would dare to cross him. And the especial object of his 
desire was the dark Mr. Marshall. That gentleman was a new one 
in their set. He was one of those fellows who had sprung from 
realms where only the eye of God can penetrate, and who had come 
into the midst of that little band of papillons who made Mrs. Win- 
ston's their headquarters. They had money, one and all. They 
danced, sang, and played the hours away from summer to summer, 
and they knew only this about life, that it was a bed of fairy blos- 
soms, lit by an August moon, and warmed and fed by an everlasting 
sun. 

The dark Mr. Marshall was a social mystery, whose appearance 
was all in his favor. Thackeray says that every man has a letter of 
credit written on his face. The dark Mr. Marshall seemed to have 
an ever-running bank account inscribed on his. It was "Isn't he 
handsome? " " Isn't he nice? " and " Hasn't he got lovely eyes? '• 
and at one time when the girls, who were rilling each other's ears 
with those ribald sentiments, had left the men and gathered together 
in Lisette's bedroom, they came to the unanimous verdict that the 
dark Mr. Marshall could have the hearts, hands, and fortunes of 
any of them for the asking. 

The night wore on and the dancers were growing gayer and gayer. 
Lisette was the star of the evening, and the dark Mr. Marshall was 
her guide. They danced together often, and Dick stood in an alcove 
and watched them. Other girls came to him and asked him to dance, 
but he refused, and finally, when Mrs. Winston came to him in person 
and called him a fool, he turned on his heel and walked out on the 
veranda. 

Myriad reflections ran through his brain; he vowed eternal 
vengeance by everything good and great. He would kill Lisette, he 
would kill that damned dark man, and he would kill himself. He 
would give society something to read about. He would let the world 
see that no woman could trifle with his love. He would go now. He 
would get a re ! 

A step on the veranda broke his soliloquy. He looked, He had 
just time to get behind a large passipn vine in order to be unseen. 
And there she came, leaning on the arm of the dark man. The 
diamond star— his diamond star— was gleaming in her hair, and the 
topazes, the laurel wreath, and the eyes sparkled as brightly in the 
night air as they had in the glimmer of the parlor lights. But the 
rose was gone. Dick looked at her breast again and again ; yes, it 
was gone, gone! His heart rose high when he saw that she was 
wearing it no longer, that it must have dropped from its place and 
been trampled to pieces on the ball-room floor. 

But as they came closer he saw that she held it in her hand, and 
that she was pressing it to her lips and was kissing it. 

" You men are all alike," she said, as she looked into the black 
eyes of his rival; " you tell a girl that you love her, and you know 
that you never mean it." 

" You think that a man cannot be sincere," said the dark Mr. Mar- 
shall, " but I swear that it is true. Man is sincere. When he loves 
a woman he loves her for herself alone. Women regard love as they 
do a book on political economy; men regard it as Heaven." 

" Pretty, very pretty sentiments, Mr. Marshall. But do you want 
me to believe you when you say that you love me? " 

There was a rustling noise behind the passion vine that made them 
pause for a moment. 

" I do. I love you. You must come with me this night, this 
hour. My yacht is down there. AVe will go and never return. 



Come. Say 'yes!' Say 'yes!' What is life without love? Come 
with me and all will be one eternal ocean of pleasure. We will die, 
love, we will die in that ocean." And he clasped her in his arms and 
kissed her upturned face. 

With a bound the blood rose in Dick Palgrave. But he resolved to 
keep quiet; he would see the game played out. They talked togetber 
for a few moments; they seemed arguing a point. Now they were 
gay— now they were serious. He smiled. Then she smiled. She 
placed her hand in his. He grasped her's warmly. She looked up 
and into his eyes. Her head swayed from side to side, and then she 
threw her arms around his neck. 

For a moment they rested in each other's arm s, and then the dark 
Mr. Marshall left her and hurried into the house. 

Lisette stood still for a moment as if discussing a deep problem. 
Then she began fanning herself, and Dick saw that she was leaning 
against the house and that she had placed her handkerchief to her 
eyes. 

She did not see him come from behind the passion vine, nor did 
she hear him walk stealthily toward her, but her body shuddered 
when he placed both arms around her and threw her head back on 
his breast. 

" ! Mr. Marshall, you have come back. Did you get my things?" 
she said. 

" No," said Dick, in a whisper, " I was afraid to go into the house. 
Go down to the end of the garden. Ask for my carriage and tell the 
man to drive you to the wharf, where you will meet me. I will go 
into the house now, so as not to excite suspicion, dance a few dances, 
and I will join you in half an hour." 

He whispered so low that she could not detect his voice. Tears 
filled her eyes and the topazes grew dim. Dick could see that she 
was about to hesitate, but he had made up his mind that he would 
be avenged. He drew her toward him, and could hear her say: 
" Will you always love me as you do now? I am giving up home, 
friends, and a dear, good sweetheart for you. But I can't help it. 
I can't help it?" 

"My word has never been disbelieved. When we reach another 
port, and when you are Mrs. Marshall, we will see how happy you 
will be then. But come " 

She ran to the carriage and was driven to the wharf. Fear and ex- 
citement had overcome her while she stood in the dim light of a 
street lamp, waiting for the man with whom she had consented to 
elope. She took a thick black veil from her pocket and wound it 
around her face. She had found a long coat in the carriage which 
she had modestly confiscated to keep her warm. Once or twice she 
made up her mind to go back to her home and her Dick. But now 
it was too late, and then she was to see all of the world, and to live a 
life that would make her an object of envy. How long would he be 
true, and did he really love her now ? The rumbling of a car- 
riage dispelled her thoughts, as it was driven close to the lamp-post. 
Lisette thought that the man who alighted was strangely familiar. 
In fact, she seemed to think that the dark Mr. Marshall was very 
much like Dick. But his hat was drawn over his eyes, and his high 
coat collar hid half of his face. He approached her and led her to 
the end of the wharf, and a little white boat was soon carrying them 
to the long, two-masted craft of the same color, which lay in the 
stream, swaying gently with the ebbing tide. 

The crew of the ship, without waiting for orders, set sail and soon 
she was plunging through the billows of the ocean, as free as a bird 
that cleaves the heavens. It was nearly two hours before sunrise, 
and together they sat on the white deck, listening to the low, languid 
lisp of the dark blue waves as they beat against the vessel's prow. 
Together they sat locked in each others arms ; and kisses had taken 
the place of words, and sighs the place of vows, and even Dick Pal- 
grave, whose heart was filled with revenge, felt that God had been 
good to him and that he had entered upon a life of everlasting 
happiness. 

" Are you afraid?" she whispered. 

'* Afraid of what?" he answered. 

" Afraid of Heaven, of what we have done, of the ocean. We may 
bedrowned. 0, I cannot be left alone! I am afraid. Tell me, dear, 
when will we be married?" 

Dick hesitated a moment, and then answered harshly, "To-night!" 

" My God," said Lisette, " is it for this that you have loved me? 
Do you think that I am a " 

" Hush ! hush ! my love, we will be married in England, in Spain , 
wherever the boat stops. I did not mean that. But, you are afraid. 
That's why I said it." 

" I am afraid. I am tired." 

He folded his arms around her still more tightly and led her to 
the cabin. A servant lit itup and threw open all of the apartments. 
The place was beautifully hung in the richest of Oriental tapestries. 
The furniture, carpets, ornaments, intaglios, all told that the owner 
had made a pilgrimage in every part of the world. It was the cremc 
of all life, love, and luxury. 

"0,1 am afraid, afraid!" she moaned. " Why did I do this; why 
did I leave Dick for you?— Dick, whom I loved so dearly, and who 
loved me so much ! But you must be good to me, I will love you. 
But hear, hear! The water! The ship is lurching! It is so dark 
outside ! 0, my God, my mother ! Mr. Marshall, how long will this 
last? I cannot stay alone. O, why did I come, why did I come? 






s\\ i i:\\. L» o NEWS 1.1 in k 



LC 



am I? Where arc- wf now " I *i lue go hoiue. Mr Marshall 
I want- I want Dtekl tfickl 0,1 am tainting! H«lp me I Hotp 

mr' I'm fainting; and then yon will, you will With on* 

niijebty effort she clutched hi* rout, and as be caught the laM glini)>*e 
of her - they were lull of plradinc. Then her hand* re- 

laxed and she fell on the floor. 

The opalescent hues that wen- tinting the eastern ?ky gradually 
outstripped the white yacht as it flew over its OOQI n burst 

into a new day. Pick was on deck telling the iklpper that it was all 
npht, and that M r. Marshall had given him his yacht for a onus* to 

" ^hall we put into the Bermudas?" said the skipper. 

'Anywhere you like. " said Dick, "only the farther away the 
better.'* 

He went below and cautiously opened the heavy door that gave 
entrance to a lartre >tate-rooni. Like the rest of the boat, it was 
adorned with all the fullness of taste and luxury. Lisette was resting 
just where he had placed her, and her eyes were still closed to all the 
world. Dick stood bv the couch and watched her for several 
moments, and as gently as a mother wakes her babe he knelt beside 
her and kissed her. He kissed her again and apiin, and then her 
eyelids slowly opened and she looked straight into his smiling face. 

" Pick ! " she said, raising herself on <>ne elbow. " (ireat Heaven ! 
How did you come here ? " 

" I came with you." 

" Yon did 7 And that dark Mr. Marshall— where is he ? " 

" I do not know. I do not care, my love. It was I who eloped 
with yon, and I stole his yacht, and we are going .somewhere, any- 
where. I was bound that no man could steal you from me, and no 
man will." 

" Forgive me, Dick, forgive me! I must have been insane. I love 
you, and " 

" Never mind, dear. That is past and gone. Let us live now for 
ourselves alone; the world is before us. Come. I have ordered 
breakfast. Shall we get ready ? " 

" Yes, Dick. But which is to be our room 7 " 

Like the peace of God, there are things in this life which pass all 
understanding. 

The Grand Canon Line !— To the East ! 



Commencing May 1st the " Santa Fe Route " Popular Overland 
Excursions to Chicago and Eastern Cities will leave every Tuesday. 
Manager in Charge. Palace and Upholstered Tourist Sleepers are 
run through to Chicago every day without change. This is the only 
Line by which the Grand Canon of the Colorado River can be reached. 
Send for illustrated book giving full particulars. W. A. Bissell, 
G. P. A., 650 Market street. Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works — Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 2d day of August, 1894, an assessment (No. 42) of Twenty-five cents 
per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Thursday, the 6th Day of September, 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on THURSDAY, the 27th day of September, 1894, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



ANNUAL MEETING- 



The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron 
and Locomotive Works will be held at the office of the company, south- 
east corner Beale and Howard streets, San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 6th Day of August, 1 894, at the hour of 1 1 o'clock A.M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
m eeting. L. R. MEAD, Secietary. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 74. 

Amount per Share 15 cents. 

Levied July 27, 1894. 

Delinquent in Office August 30, 1894. 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 21, 1894. 

A. K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California, 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 107. 

Amount per Share 25 cents 

Levied July 18 1894 

Delinquent in Office August 22, 1894 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September II, 1894 

E.L.PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery Street, San Francis- 
co, California. 



30 



KIMi KI.'TO 


M6 00 


22 50 


6 00 


75 00 


6 00 


4 50 


22 50 


12 00 


60 00 


3 00 


6 00 


45 00 


30 00 



DAY 
Reduction Sale. 

Furniture Department. 

To quickly reduce our large line of Fur- 
niture ive ofTer for 30 days only our entire 
stock at prices CUT DOWN without regard 
to cost. 

Designs all late, exclusive, and not to 
be duplicated. 

Come at once, Every day will lessen 
your choice, 

A FEW INSTANCES: 



Rki-.uj.ak Price 

Handsomely f Sideboards % 46 00 

Diulng Tables .. ... 80 00 

Finished Dink c Chairs 8 fO 

J Bedroom anils . .. 100 00 

Quarter Sawed 1 Bedroom chairs ... 9 00 

Tables (1 00 

Oak. Hall Stands .30 00 
^ Chiffoniers 16 00 

Birdseye i Bedroom Suits 80 00 

' Bedroom Chairs.... 5 00 
Maple. I Bedroom Tables 8 00 

Rich Mahogany Hall Stands , . , .'. 70 00 
Rich Mahogany Parlor Tables 50 00 

COMMENCES TO=DAY. 

W. & J. Sloane & Co., 

Carpets, Furniture, Upholstery, 

641-647 MARKET ST. 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Oaborn Hill Gold Mining and Milling Company. 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Grass Valley, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Seventh day of July, 1894, an assessment, No. 3, of Fifteen (15) 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the cor- 
poration, payable immediately, in United StateB Gold coin, to the Sec- 
retary, at the office of the company, Room 20, 331 Pine St., San Francisco, 
Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Tuesday, the 7th Day of August* 1894, wilt be delinquent. 
and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 28th day of August, 1894, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R.R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Offic e— Ro^m 20, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Overman Silver Mining Company, 

Location of Principal place of business— San Francisco, Calif ornia. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Seventeenth (17th) day of July, 1894, an assessment (No. 71) of Ten 
Cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the corporation, payable immediately in United States Gold Coin, 
to the secretary, at the office of the company, 414 California street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
Monday, the 21st day of August, 1894. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the Eleventh day of September, 
1894, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca 
tion of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the Twenty seventh day of July, 1894, an assessment (No. 84) of 20 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street, 
San Francisco, Cal., 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Thursday, the Thirtieth Day of August, 1894, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 19th day of, September, 1894, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees 

E. B. SQLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California, 



- L*4 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1894. 



SNAP SHOTS. 

[By Di Vbenon.1 

IT seems to be conceded that our American boys cannot hold their 
own in athletic contests with their English cousins. Nor is the 
reason far to seek. Our boys do not have the same steady train- 
ing in out-of-door sport as the English Jads undergo from the 
time that they are seven or eight years old. With our men two 
or three years in college athletics are the beginning and the end 
of their training. What folly to expect the American to contest 
with the Briton for supremacy! We may console ourselves over 
our defeat by claiming that we seek intellectaal, not physical, 
superiority, bat the fact remains tbat to-day we are bringing up 
a set of physical weaklings. The Germans understand the needs 
of the case far better than we, and their turn vereins are patron- 
ized by all classes of Germans, who do not grudge the small fee 
which they pay for their children's physical development. 

This is the age of educational experiment. A man or a woman 
with a fad can obtain a hearing from those engaged in educational 
projects where a sensible idea is excluded from discussion. Of 
course parents are advised to keep their children off the streets 
as much as possible. That is right. But where shall tbe child- 
ren play? Tbe "backyards" of city houses do not offer any 
promising field for playgrounds, and the park and our public 
squares are not accessible to every child in San Francisco. Per- 
haps some one will say, " Let the children play at recess time in 
their school yards." Oh, yes, let them do so by all means'. But 
you forget that many of our school yards are so small and so 
crowded that any freedom of action on the part of the occupants 
would mean danger to life and limb to tbe children. As it is, 
even now, with the strictest discipline, accidents will happen. 
Not long ago a boy was run into and thrown down, and his leg 
broken. 

In some of our schools — in too few, alas I — there are some at- 
tempts to provide means for the entertainment of the boys at 
recess times. A few upright poles, worn glassy smooth from 
much use, and a horizontal bar form what ought to be the nucleus 
of a school yard gymnasium. The "acting bar," as tbe boys 
call tbe horizontal bar, is a source of never-failing delight, and 
those boys who cannot get a chance to »» turn " on the acting bar 
content themselves by jumping from the benches to the frame 
work of the sheds, and swinging as long as they can hang there. 
It is a species of cruelty to expect a boy to keep still all the 
time. Those teachers who wish to preserve order in the school 
room will succeed best if they encourage the boys to work off 
their restlessness and their noise in the playground. If our School 
Department could fit up even a primitive sort of gymnasium in 
each school yard — poles, bars, rings, and leather horses — and let 
the boys take turns at enjoying the exercise of muscle, much of 
the problem of discipline would be solved, to say nothing of train- 
ing our boys to hold their own in contests for physical supremacy 
against all comers. 

In schools where men or large-minded women are principals, 
there is some attempt to let boys be boys under sympathetic 
guidance. But where the principal is some hateful, disappointed 
old maid, what do we see? In the first place, if tbe one in 
authority be old and her assistants young, the elder is spurred 
on by tbe inevitable jealousy of sex to make tbe lot of her hap- 
less assistants as hard as possible. Upon them she throws all the 
burden of discipline. She does not allow the children to raise 
their voices in the school yards. Shouts are punished by the 
whole school being " rung up " and made to stand out their 
recess. The boys are not allowed to play. They must sit down, 
each class in its own bench along the wall, and quietly talk with 
each other. That is not "recreation"; that is torture to an active 
child. What wonder that children so restrained in the school- 
yard should be restless and talkative in the class room? But that 
does not concern the principal. She would be disturbed by the 
noise in the yard. But the confusion in the class room doeB not 
disturb her. Let the teacher get along as best she may. 

Are these things right? Should our growing children always 
be repressed? We need public gymnasiums as an adjunct to our 
public schools. Where the school yards are large enough, let the 
appliances be supplied by our Board of Education to such schools. 
Where the yards are too small, let there be a room rented in the 
neighborhood and a gymnasium established for the boys of that 
district. Why does not some public-spirited man found gymna- 
siums in different parts of the city for the free use of our boys ? 
Few of tbe public-school boys can ever hope to belong to the 
Olympic Club. What is needed is a free gymnasium with an in- 
structor who can follow the German method of a cut with a strap 
to break up any tendency to monkey-shines. Our boys need 
both the gymnasium — and the strap I 

Now that the strike is over different papers are calling upon 
the educators of the youth of our land to bend more energies to 
tbe training of patriotic citizens, as they teach our boys and girls. 
They are asked to impress upon the youthful minds the high duty 
of submission to authority and the law of perfect obedience. Of 
course; but under our present system of instruction and school- 
room discipline that is almost impossible. To-day tbe teacher has 



no means of compelling obedience, save moral suasion, and we 
have seen in the late strike tbat " suasion " may sway one way 
as well as another. To-day the child has to be placated; he must 
be won into giving obedience. He is good— if good at all — in the 
majority of cases, because he wishes to be. Of course that is the 
highest reason for being good. But what shall be done with the 
child who does not wish to be good, whose every attitude and 
speech is a defiance of authority? It would not be strange if, 
reasoning from tbe conditions which prevailed during the late 
strike, some clear minds should see a necessity for returning to 
corporal punishment in tbe class room by the class teacher in the 
primary grades. Little children, when they begin to go to school, 
have not yet developed reasoning faculties. It is not Nature's 
way to reason and argue with her children. They commit the 
offense and she punishes them, generally on the spot. " The 
burnt child dreads the fire." In primary classes a few well be- 
stowed and humane slaps with a flat strap would do more to pre- 
serve discipline and to teach an unruly child that he must obey 
the powers that be than any amount of persuasion. When a 
child yields from being persuaded he feels that be has been tbe 
final factor in the appeal. He does not respect the " authority " 
that could not compel him to yield obedience. 

When a little child says "I will," or « I won't," or " You can't 
make me "to his teacher, and she is powerless to compel his 
obedience, what respect has tbat child, or the class which witnesses 
the defiance, for authority ? It seems to me that the moral suasion 
advocates have assumed a tremendous responsibility when they 
banished corporal punishment from the school room. The little 
child who is naughty should be corrected at the time; and persist- 
ence in any form of wrong doing needs swift correction. A few 
more whippings in the lower grades, and our boys, when they be- 
come members of the National Guard, will not attempt to parley 
with authority or to become a law unto themselves. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sausome St San Francisco, tal 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM &. BKODIE 43 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

MACY & DUNHAM W*A Pine St., New York 

Established 1879. 

ojto |ttww, 

411 Bush Street, Opposite 
the New California Hotel. 
Best Equipped 
OYSTER aijd CUtfg? p/^COF}S. 

Large dining-room for ladies. Sole depot for JOS. SCHLITZ MILWAU- 
KEE BEER. Imported European Beer from Buergerliehes Brauhaus, 
Pilsen, Bohemia; Actien Beer from Ri zzi Culmbach, Bavaria. 



THE 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 
CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California Street, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. FIRE RE-INSURANCE. 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE GO. OF LONDON, 

ESTABLISHED 1782. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON INSURANCE COMPANY, 

(Incorporated A. D., 1799.) 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents, 
473 California Street, San Francisco 

Oldest Stock Fire Insurance Company in the U. S. 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA, 

OF PHILADELPHIA., PA. 

CAPITAL FULLY PAID $3,000,000.00 

Office Pacific Department: 413 California St., S. F. 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Afjetit. 



August 4. 



BAN PRAN< [SCO NKM - LETTER 



J7 



GOTHAM GOSSIP. 

Vn York. July 24. 

SIKCBBfta Praoeteoo wltoMMd m many of in* aurccMm and 
defeats in tbe early ctrerr of I Miver 8uniner T» all. ber cillxens 
may be Interested In tbe most recent of tbe many original tcbemes 
by wbicb tbis public pursuing young gentleman seeks fortune 
and tbe fame of the morning daily. I dare say you remember 
that during a tour of the OraDges. of New Jersey, several years 
ago. the beguiling Oliver met and woo the lady whose wetlih and 
position have so materially aided him to become one of tbe most- 
talked of men In New York. Her wealth, however, vii appar- 
ently not sufficient to enable him to retire permanently from the 
commercial arena. It is particularly with reference to booming 
land, an art which be probably learned west of the Mississippi. 
that he is now occupying public attention. Having undertaken 
{for a consideration) to sell in villa lots a large tract of forest land 
near Yonkers. be betook himself, bis social position, and bis 
family to Park Hill. Since the world did Dot rally so rapidly or 
so thickly as be anticipated about tbe standard which be set up 
upon his front lawn, Ollie bunted about in bis fertile brain for 
some method of calling together tbe clans most uselul to bis ends. 

After days and nights of weary travail he brought forth the 
"Camp6re Tea." Tbis might suggest to your mind tbe Pension 
Bill and tbe Grand Army of tbe Republic, bat it had no such pur- 
pose. Pelf, not politics, inspired bis efforts — Murray Hill, and 
not the Hill of Albany, bis pains. The parchment adorned with 
the arms of the bouse of Teall, and engrossed with the family 
visiting list, was brought forth from its sacred receptacle. The 
result was a gathering of the expectant and curious Four Hun- 
dred at Park Hill, at dusk on a day at tbe end of tbe following 
week. Unctuous Oliver had indeed prepared a surprise for his 
guests, and, by tbe way, intended clients, and flitted among them, 
reveling in their astonishment. 

The entertainment was certainly unique. Hnge camp-fires 
lighted up a varied scene. On one side a veritable Aunt Dinah, 
in kerchief and turban, was tossing flapjacks and brewing coffee. 
A group of real, live tamale men, in the snowy uniform of the 
New York Tamale Company, stood behind a battery of shining 
copper kettles. Peanut men, with patent roasters, served indi- 
gestible " goobers " to dissipating aristocrats; while not far away 
the staple dish of New England, pork and beans, enjoyed a table 
to itself. It was not only the gustatory joys of life that he had 
provided; there was also food for the soul in the form of a negro 
minstrel and vaudeville entertainment. These original diversions 
took place weekly for a month, but alas! they were only partly 
crowned with the anticipated success. However, if the angels of 
the Four Hundred feared to tread upon the villa lots of Park Hill, 
those who crowd on the social boundaries rushed in pell mell. 
But perhaps it is trivial nowadays to draw distinctions between 
sheckels and society. 

An avalanche of Californians fell upon Long Branch last week. 
It is a mystery why Californians should still seek this resort, as 
it has long since passed out of the Eastern vogue. Among those 
registered at the Hotel Avenel are your distinguished young law- 
yers, Sam Shortridge and Willoughby Cole, and with them went 
Dan Murphy, of San Jose, Joe Harvey and Major Bonebrake, of 
Los Angeles. 

Charles Baldwin, the Oriental-eyed, arrived last night at the 
Ocean House at Newport. 

Sir William and Lady Booker were among the departures on 
the Teutonic to-day. Tbis will be 8ir William's first visit to his 
native land in thirty years. 

Tbe announcement of Mrs. Bob Hastings' engagement fell like 
a thunderbolt upon the Californian colony. The happy gentle- 
man is Mr. Danielson — vaguely of England, who has been in 
New York but a short time. He is said to be both good-looking 
and rich — two essentials to matrimonial success. 

You will be grieved to hear that the Rev. S. Gregory Lines has 
finally retired from tbe ministry. When, owing to ill health, he 
resigned last May, it was hoped that after a year of absolute rest 
he might be able to resume bis work. Although vastly Improved, 
his nervous system is not yet up to its wonted tone. He had an- 
ticipated a trip abroad, but as his mother is too feeble to accom- 
pany him, and as he is unwilling to leave her, they will spend 
the coming mouths quietly together in the country. 

Passe Paetout. 



Our Fair Maidens 



who go to the mountains and the seaside for the summer should be 
very careful when they expose their complexions. The effects of sun- 
burn and poison-oak are very distressing, and they will ruin the 
prettiest skin. Camelline is an infallible remedy and prevention for 
both sunburn and poison oak, and it is the only remedy that has 
proved successful. Its wonderful sales have forced all other face 
powders out of the market. Ladies should not be without it. 



Millie Christine, the famous living two-headed woman, better 
known as "The Carolina Twin," is now giving receptions daily (Sun- 
days excepted), at 917 Market street. Admission 15 cents, children 
10 cents. This is Millie Christine's farewell tour. See them while 
you have a chance. 



TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBURG, (iKKMANY. 

» . < urn. Ilrlntrlil 'I , ,•„_, r for i hi I'.. Ml. > ,,,.-i Branch. 

- mo < -i s y. 

'infl.lLi .. ,, c - tJ.500,000.00 

'"rested in (AS. 654.433. SI 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

Agent* City Department, 
. aaa « aiirornlR si., s. r < al . 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE ANO DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular «..r< lions, tor Nan 
Francisco Produce Exchange Call Hoard. 

These Warehouses arc the largest ou the Pacific Coast, and are f urnlBhed 
witn the latest Improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery lorcleanlug 
foul and Bmutty Wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of Interest on grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in First-Class Companies, or (iraln sold. 
If desired, at current rates. 
Office ol the Company, 202 Sansomc St., over the Anglo-Calllornla Bank. 

AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE CO- of New York., 
BRITISH AMERICAN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto. 
WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., of Toronto- 

A. R. GURREY, Manager. | C. A. STUART, Asst. Man. 

Pacific Department, 423 California St., S. F. 
BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. Ld. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL _ t6,700,000 

AGENTS: 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street. San F rancisco 

SIEBE, RASGHEN k CO., 

GENERAL INSURANCE, 

Telephone 272. 210 Sansome St. 

Agents foe San Feancibco.— Germania Fire Insurance Co . of New 
York; Hanover Fire Insurance Co., of New York; United Firemen's Insur- 
ance Co., of Philadelphia; Sun Insurance Office, of London. 

THE NEW EN6LAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets «1 9,724,538.46. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vlce-Pres., ALFRED D. FOSTER 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
Mills Building Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

~ AACHEN AND MUNICH FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF AIX LA CHAPELLE, GERMANY. 

Established 1825. 
Capital, $2,250,000. Total Assets, $6,854,663 66 

United States Department: 204 SANSOME ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

VOSS, IOSKAB «t CO.. General Manag era. 

THE SWISS MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

COMBINED 

BALOISE HELVETIA SWITZERLAND 

OF BASLE. OF ST. GALL. OF ZTJEICH. 

COMBINED CAPITAL 4,000,000 DOLLARS 

These three CompanleB are liable jointly and severally for all Losses that 
may be sustained. 

HARRY W. SYZ, General Agent, 

410 California St., Sa n Francisco, Cal 

LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON. 

[Established by Royal Charter, 1720. | 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON. 

[Establishod 1836. | 
Office— Northwest corner Sacramento and Montgomery Street. 

GEO. F. GRANT, manager 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA, 

NEW YOKK. 

Capital Paid Up ? 600,000 

AsBets 8,181,768 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,626,167 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

401 Montgomery Street. 
BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 

501 Montgomery Street 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETT 



ER. 



August 4, J»94 




Mothers and nurses all the world over have given their teething 
babies and feverish children Steedman's Soothing Powders. Try them. 

Furnished double upper flat to rent iu Western Addition. Seven rooms, 
bath, and attic. Kent, $75 a month. Apply, 3116 Washington street. 



AN OLD SWEETHEART OF MINE.— Janus WHtcomb Riley. 

AS one who cons at evening o'er an album all alone, 
And muses on the faces of the friends that he has known; 
So I turn the leaves of fancy till in shadowy design, 
I find the smiling features of an old sweetheart of mine. 

The lamplight seems to glimmer with a flicker of surprise 
As I turn it low to rest me of the dazzle in my eyes. 
And I light my pipe in silence, save a sigh that seems to yoke 
Its fate with my tobacco and to vanish in the smoke. 

'Tis a fragrant retrospection, for the loving thoughts that start 
Into being are like perfume from the blossoms of the heart; 
And to dream the old dreams over is a luxury divine, 
When my truant fancy wanders with that old sweetheart of mine. 

Then I hear, beneath my study, like a fluttering of wings, 
The voices of my children and the mother as she sings ; 
I feel no twinge of conscience to deny me any theme 
When Care has cast her anchor in the harbor of a dream. 

In fact, to speak in earnest, I believe it adds a charm 

To spice the good a trifle with a little dust of harm ; 

For I find an extra flavor in memory's mellow vine 

That makes me drink the deeper to that old sweetheart of mine. 

A face of lily beauty and a form of airy grace 
Floats out of my tobacco as the genius from the vase; 
And I thrill beneath the glances of a pair of azure eyes 
As glowing as the summer and as tender as the skies. 

I can see the pink sun bonnet and the little checkered dress 

She wore when first I kissed her. and she answered the caress 

With the written declaration that, " as surely as the vine 

Grew 'round the stump, she loved me," that old sweetheart of mine. 

And again I feel the pressure of her slender little hand 
As we used to talk together of the future we had planned, 
When I should be a poet, and with nothing else to do 
But to write the tender verses that she set the music to. 

When we should live together in a cozy little cot 
Hid in a nest of roses, with a tiny garden spot, 
Where the vines were ever fruitful and the weather ever fine, 
And the birds were ever singing for that old sweetheart of mine- 
When I should be her lover forever and a day, 
And she my faithful sweetheart till the golden hair was gray: 
And we should be so happy that when either's lips were numb 
They should not smile in heaven till the other's kiss had come. 

But, ah, my dream is broken by a step upon the stair, 
And the door is softly opened, and my wife is standing there ; 
Yet with eagerness and rapture all my visions I resign 
To meet the living presence of that old sweetheart of mine. 



IRISH SONG.— London Spectator. 



When Carroll asked Kate for her heart and a hand 
That crotrowled just a hundred good acres of land, 

Her lovely brown eyes 

Went wild with surprise, 
And her lips they shot scorn at his saucy demand : 

" Young Carroll Magfhn, 

Put the beard to your chin 
And the change in your purse, if a wife you would win.' 

Then Carroll made Kate his most illigant bow, 
And off to the Diggins lampooned from the plough; 

Till the beard finely grown, 

And the pockets full-blown, 
Says he : " Maybe Kate might be kind to me now ! " 

So home my lad came, 

Colonel Carty by name, 
To try a fresh fling at his cruel ould flame. 

But when Colonel Carty in splendor steps in, 
For all his grand airs and great beard to his chin, 

"Och! lave me alone! " 

Cried Kate, with a groan. 
" For my hearts in the grave wid poor Carroll Maeinn." 

" Hush sobbin' this minute, 

'Tis Carroll that's in it ! 
I've caged you at last, thin, my wild little linnet." 



ZB-A-HSTICS. 



CALIrORSIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST CO. 

Paid-up Capital, #1 , 000. 000. 

Corner Montgomery and California Streets, San Francisco. 

J. D. FRY, President HENRY WILLIAMS, Vice-President 

J. Dalzell Brown. Secretary and Treasurer. 

This company is authorized by law to act as Executor, Administrator, 
Assignee, Receiver or Trustee . It iu a legal depositary for Court and TruBt 
Funds. Will take entire charge of Real and Personal Estates, collecting 
the income and profits, and attending to all such details as an individual 
iu like capacity could do. 

Acts as Registrar and Transfer Agent of all Stocks and Bonds. 

Receives depoaits subject to check and allows interest at the rate of two 

Eer cent per annum on daily balances. Issues certificates of deposits 
earing fixed rates of interest. 

Receives deposits in its savings department from $1 upwards, and allows 
the usual rate- of interest thereon. 

RUMS SAFES iuside its burglar-proof vaults at prices from $5 per 
annum upwards, according to size. Valuables of all kinds may be stored 

WILLS DRAWN AND TAKEN CARE OF WITHOUT CHARGE. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



V H Corner Sansome and Busli Streets. 

Established 1870. U. 8. Depositary. 

Capital (Paid Up) $1,600,000. 

SURPLUS $800,000 | UNDIVIDED PROFITS 575,196 

S.G.MURPHY President! 

JAMES MOFFITT .. Vice-President | JAMES K. LYNCH Cashier 

directors: 

Geo A. Low, George C. Perkins, S G. Murphy, 

N. Van Bergen, James D. Phelan, James Moffitt, 

'I nomas Jennings, John A. Hooper, J. D. Harvey. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT, 

JAMES K. LYNCH. Manager, 
Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per aunum (under the exclusive control of 
the renter), for the care of all valuables. Trunks and Packages taken on 
storage A specialty made of the care of wills. Oftiee hours, 8 a. m. to 6 v. m. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited- 

Authorized Capital . $3,500,000 | Capital Paid ITp $3,450,000 

Reserve $500,000. 

San Francisco Office— 124 CaliforniaSt. London Office— 73 Lombard St., E.C . 

Portland Branch— 48 First St. Tacoma Branch— 1156 Pacific Ave. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER. Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. 

Cashier. GU3TAV FRIEDER1CH. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 

NEW YORK— u ■ exel, Morgan &. Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between saidcities and 
all parts of the world. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK, Limited. 

N. W. Corner SANSOME and SUTTER. 

subscribed Capital $2,500,000 1 Paid Up Capital. $2,000,000 

Beserve Fund, $800,0i>0. 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London. 

AGENTS— New York— Ageuey of the London, Paris and American Bank 
Limited. No- 10 Wall street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cle, 
17 Boulevard Poissouiere . Draw direct on the principal cities of the world, 
Commercial aud Travelers' Credits issue. 

g IG AL G T R S E C E HTL AUM 1 Managers. 

THE SATHER BANKING COMPANY. 

CAPITAL .. $1,260,000. 

Successor to Sather & Co., Established 1851, San Francisco. 

JAMES K. WILSON .... . . President 

C. F. A. TALBOT, Vice-President. L. I. COWGILL, Cashier 

Ulrectors: E. A. Bruguiere, F. W Sumner, Albert Miller, Wm. P. John- 
son, C. F. A. Talbot, C. S. Benedict, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— Drexel, Morgan A Co. Boston— Downer & Co. 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co Chicago— Atlas National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— FirstNational Bank. London— Brown, 
Shipley & Co, Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Streets. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS: 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. B, POND. 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

\V. E. BROWN Vice .resident 

GEO, w, KLINE Cashier 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK- 

222 MONTGOMERY ST., MILLS BUILDING. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS HADE. 



Wm. Alvord 
Wm. Babcock 
Adam Grant 



DIRECTORS: 
Jerome Lincoln 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. 8. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
A. K. P. Harmon 
J. B. Randol. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 18 Geary Street, S. F. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President | ERNST BRAND Secretary 



Augn - 



S.VN FBAN< [SCO NEWS LETT! R 



[9 



^5UNBCAA\S: 



I /VIST ECS. 



THE Mimmer youth for luontbs muat toil 
A m ui the mart's rnad whirl 
To pass a brief vacation near 
The dainty rammer frirl. 
And ^he, enshrined on wooded hill. 

Or by the imtrnumnp ikcbii, 
Reviews with gracious dignity 

A pageant of dev« — Washington Star. 

— No thank you, dear. I don't believe I care for any mince 

pie. Mk>. Bin But, Henry, I have put in a lot of that "brandy 

you brought home the other night. BtKQO , aghast)— What ! Not 
that brandy I paid $^ a quart for.' Mrs. B IK GO— Yes, dear. BlKOO— 
i.reat guns, give me the whole pie ! —Truth. 

Bbettv Giki.— All the girls in our set are going to be vaccinated 
to-iuorrow night. Do you know where? Bashkii. Youth (blushing 

deeply —Really— I— I couldn't— er—um Pretty Girl — Oh, you'd 

never" guess in the world. We are all going to meet at Cousin Clara's 
house, and be vaccinated there. — New York Weekly, 

Cai.i.er — I would like to see the religious editor. Office Boy — 
Yes, sir; vou'll find him in de next room an' you'll know him by 
his pink shirt, wit' a big diamond in de chest of it, an' by bis blue 
necktie, and by bid check suit, an' his patent ledder, pointed-toed 
shoes. — Brooklyn Eagle. 

Miss Hi. h-.iki (of Chicago)— And so you kissed the Blarney Stone 
at the Columbian Exposition? Ha, ha ' It was nothing but a Chicago 
paving stone. Mr. Smartch.ute— So I heard at the time, but I 
thought perhaps you might have walked on it. (Then she married 
him.) — New York Weekly. 

" Where are you going, my pretty maid? " 
" I'm going to church, kind sir," she said. 
" Why do you go so often, my pretty maid? " 
" The minister's young and unmarried," she said. 

— Detroit Free Press. 
*' Dolly Kinkles is not going to the seashore this summer," said 
one girl. "Why not?" asked another. "On account of her com- 
plexion " "Does it tan?" "No. It couldn't possibly. That's 
what she was afraid people would notice." — Washington Star. 

" This is tyranny." exclaimed the baseball player to the umpire. 
" Watstermatter wid ye?" inquired the mighty man. " Yer worse'n 
Debs, you are. AVhenye oncet get yer mind set on hollerin' 'strike!' 
dere's not'in' fur me ter do but go out." — Washington Star. 

Little Dick— Miss Antique is most forty years old. Mother— I 
told you to stop asking ladies their ages. " I didn't." 4 ' Then how 
do you know she is nearly forty? " " I asked her how many times 
she had seen the seventeen-year locusts." — Good News. 

Visitor— How do you like your new neighbors? Little Boy — I 
don't like them at all. They're too quiet. Visitor— Too quiet? 
Little Boy — Yes'm. Mamma makes me keep still all the time, so 
she can hear what they're doing. — Good News. 

Mrs. Bagsby — You're tipsy again, John. Oh, how I wish all the 
rumshops were at the bottom of the sea! Mr. Bagsby— Maria, I 
honestly believe you don't love ine. I chertainly think you would 
like to shee me drowned. — The King's Jester. 

" Behoij\ he knocketh at the door! " 

So sang the deacon gay- 
Then hustled out, as oft before, 
And drove the tramp away. 

— Cleveland Plaindealer. 
An, well, let the summer girl laugh and giggle, and have a good 
time. In a few years from now she will be married, and will wear 
her winter dress in summer, putting on a white starched tie to make 
it look cooler. — Atchison Globe. 

Mr«. Wanterneau— Do you think that men are born deceitful? 
Mrs. Weeds— I don't know. But I know they die deceitful. When 
my husband died 1 thought he was worth five times as much as he 
was. — New York Herald. 

The Postman— This book is prepaid at letter rates; what's the 
reason? The Postmaster— The author is so stuck on his own work 
that he would not allow it to be sent out as second class matter. 

—Brooklyn Eagle. 
Hicks — What queer terms are employed in our every-day language. 
Dryleigh speaks of the book he has written as a " work." Wicks — 
It is obvious that you have never tried to read that book. 

— Answers. 
He— Funny, isn't it, how we men get baldheaded and you women 
don't ? She— I don't think it strange. You know we women never 
get to be old enough for that. —South Boston News. 

She— Does it make anything cheaper to put it on the free list? 
He— Certainly, my dear. She— Then why don't they put house rent 
on? — Washington Star. 

Husband— My dear, don't you think that dress a— er — trifle im- 
modest? Wife— Immodest! Goodness me 1 Just look at the sleeves. 

—New York Weekly. 

Fond Mamma (to clerk in china store)— I see you have mugs marked 
Tom and Jerry. Have you any with Willie and Charlie on them? 

— Life. 

Miss Jayloss— She seems to be very popular with the men. Miss 
Bathbeach— Yes ; she has declared that she hates ice cream. 

— Judge. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated bj Ron] < "hartrr, IM'2, 
CAPITAL Paid Up 13.000.000 

RESERVE FUND 1.404,000 

Boutiiaaal oornec Bn»h tad Banaonit ■ 

III \l> OIH<l li«» I .wulMir.t s (r .< I, I nntl.Mi 

Hkani ni>- Victoria, Vancouver, Nan Weatmloiter, Kamloops, Ntwmimo, 
Mii>l Nelson Brttt-h Colombia; Portland. Oregon; Seattle una Tacoma, 
Washington 

This n«nk transacts a General Hanking Basinet Accounts npi'iu'd sub- 
ject to Check, sud Bpeclal Di red. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts ol the world, approved Bills discounted and ad- 
1'ia-li' mi good collateral fcccurltjT. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Its Head oihce au.i Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants Hunk ol Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Livkki'ohl— North ami South Wales Hank; Scotland— British LIucu Com- 
pany: Ireland — Bank of Irelaml . Mkxh <>— London Bank of Mexico; 
BOOTH Amkkua- London Bank of Mexim and South America; China and 
Japak— Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China; Australia and 

New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company 
of Sydney. Ld. : Dkmkrara ami Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA. San Francisco. 

CAPITAL $3,000,000 00 

SURPLUS and Undivided Profits (.January 1, 1894) 3,247.684 02 

WILLIAM ALVORP, President. THOMAS BROWN, Cashier. 

S. Prentiss smith, Ass't Cashier, I. F. Moulton, 2d Ass't Cashier. 

< ■« ► 1 1 It 1 M'O \ I » I VI N : 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co; The Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Boston— Tremout National Bank; London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons; Paris— Messrs. De Rothschild Freres; Virginia City (Nev)— Agency 
of The Bank of California; Chicago— Uulou National Bank; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of New Zealand; China, Japan and India— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. bT. Louis — Boat me us Bank. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

Draws Direct on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, Salt Lake, 
Penver, Kaosas City, New Orleans. Portland, Or., Los Angeles, and on 
London, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Fraukfort-on-Main, Copenhagen, 
Stockholm, Christiania, Melbourne, Syndey, Auckland, Hongkong, Shang- 
hai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

DEPOSITS. June 30, 1894 $24,061,791 27 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL and Surplus 1,627,062 43 

DIRECTORS — Albert Miller, President; E. B. Pond, Vice-President; 
Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Charles Pace, Paniel E. Martin, W. C. B. 
Pe Fremery, George C. Boardman, J. G. Eastland; Lovell White, Cashier. 

Receives Peposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country re- 
mittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signa- 
ture of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is 
made for pass book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Satur- 
day evenings, 6 :3Q to 8. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny Mechanics' Institute Building 

GUARANTEED CAPITAL, $1,000,000. 

OFFICE BS, 

JAMES G. FAIR President 

JAMES P. PHELAN, S G MURPHY Vice-PresidentB 

Pirectors— James G. Fair, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. Hooker, 
James P. Phelan, JameB Moffitt, S G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, and 
Robert McElroy. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Peposits. Loans on Approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Peposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signature. • 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 CALIFORNIA ST., S. P. 

Guaranteed Capital and Reserve Fund $1,610,000 00 

Deposits January 2, 1S94 29,429,217 09 

OFFICERS— President, Edward Kruse; Vice-Presideut, B A. Becker; 
Second Vice-Presdent, George H. Eggers; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; As- 
sistant Cashier, Wm. Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourney; Assistant 
Secretary, A. H. Muller. 

BOARP OF PIRECTORS— Edward Kruse, George H. Eggers, O. Schoe- 
mann, F. Tillmann, H. Horstmann, B. A. Becker, H. L. Simon, Ign. Stein- 
hart, Paniel Meyer. Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

THE ANGLO-CAUFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

iv. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up $1,600,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 | Reserve Fund 700,000 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. <fe W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. IGN. 8TEINHART i MaT1MO „ 

P. N. LILIENTHAL, j Managers 



WELLS, FARGO & CO-'S BANK. 



N. £. Corner Sansome and Sutter Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Casli Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 OO 

John J. Valentine.. President 1 Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier | F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City, H. B. PARSONS, CaBhier. |,8alt Lake City, J. E. POOLY, Cashier 

DIRECTORS . 
John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry E. Hunting- 
ton, Homer S. King, Geo. E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles F. Crocker, 
Dudley Evans. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1894. 




Q}f 



IN Paris this summer there are several different styles of Eton 
jackets, all pretty, comfortable, and becoming, but one does 
get a little tired of them, even though the shirt waists are » dreams 
of beauty." The white pique Eton suits are taking the lead for coun- 
try and seashore. Some are elaborately embroidered in colors and 
worn with silk shirt waists and blouses to match the embroidery, 
much beruifled with lace. A pretty white one seen the other day was 
embroidered in a large block pattern around the bottom in pale blue 
and worn with a plaited crepon blouse of the same color, much 
trimmed with white lace. The hat of the giri in this ravishing cos- 
tume was one of the broad-brimmed, flat-crowned affairs, made with 
an actual flower garden of daisies and corn flowers, with large white 
tulle puffs. *^wn^ 

Another pretty dress is in a dark buff-colored crepon, the skirt 
formed by two accordion-plaited ruffles, embroidered in blue; large 
accordion-plaited sleeves reaching to the elbow, and the corsage a 
plaited blouse held in to the figure by a little blue silk Spanish jacket 
that laced tightly across the bust. A large hat of buff-colored rough 
straw, trimmed with corn flower blue and with a heavy fall of lace 
over the brim, completed a very dainty costume for a garden party. 
Piques in all the fashionable colors are made up in Eton suits and 
worn with white or black shirt waists. If one has some old dark silk 
skirts to wear out the pretty light-colored crepon and silk blouses are 
cool and comfortable and give quite a summerish effect to an other- 
wise dark costume. They are much used in Paris for carriage wear. 

Marie Juneau says that lace is worn on everything in the after- 
noon, and is seen in great variety from the heavy Venetian points to 
the dainty Valenciennes like cobwebs. It is filled into rosettes for 
hats, and made into elaborate neck ruches, and whole bodices of it 
are very much the caper to be worn with plain, rich satin skirts for 
dressy afternoon or evening wear. Berthas, and revers, and epau- 
lettes of it appear on nearly every gown, and it may in every way be 
termed a lace season. A dainty frock has a revers collar of coarse 
gray lace, The gown itself is of heliotrope and rose taffeta, and black 
moire ribbon is used for the belt and bows. The hat is of black straw 
trimmed with bunches of heliotrope and rose chiffon, with stiffened 
ends of black moire springing out of the midst of them. 

A smart-looking costume by Doucet is a combination of dark green 
crepe and cafe-au-lait corded silk, the latter forming a pointed yoke 
with short shoulder capes (or ''jockeys," as they are frequently 
called), a pointed belt to match the yoke and the petticoat, which 
shows two or three inches below the crepe skirt. Below the yoke the 
crepe bodice is made very full in front, with less fullness in the back, 
and is gathered into the belt, which is cut V-shaped at the top and 
pointed at the bottom. The full folds of the crepe stand out in a sort 
of fan on the hips before falling in straight folds down to within a 
few inches of the ground, and showing the tan-colored petticoat. The 
puff sleeves are of a favorite Doucet model, very full and short, and 
finished with a tight-fitting elbow cuff' of the tan-colored silk. 



T/HCT ^ DE SiJI T s - 



One of the prettiest and coolest accessories of summer dresses is a 
blouse-front made of India mull, batiste, or net. banded with lace in- 
sertion, in perpendicular stripes of the thin fabric, and the insertion, 
if the wearer is inclined to stoutness, and in Breton style if slender. 
This is worn inside the open Eton jacket or blazer, and the full, broad 
front is fastened by shoulder and under-arm seams to a fitted back of 
lawn or batiste, which is buttoned down the back. Similar fronts are 
made of white nainsook, chambray, wash silk, or accordion-pleated 
chiffon. 



Sporting jewelry bids fair to become fashionable, and includes many 
designs based on the new game, golf. There will be golf rings and 
pins and sleeve links, and some costly designs for the fox-hunting 
and cross-country set, which will be made after the most recent Eng- 
lish models. Game cocks, woodcocks, quail, and other game birds 
made of tiny diamonds will also be a leading feature. In the " yacht 
signal " pins the latest is a three-pennant design. 

Toques are destined to hold their own in popular favor. Some are 
trimmed with gold, silver, or other rich metallic guipures or passe- 
menteries over a fountain of white or black net. Mercury wings or 
flowers in black velvet, roses, cowslips, or poppies, with perhaps a 
little light lace, or lisse studded with gold spangles, add individuality. 
Pure white widely plaited chip is very much used for stylish toques. 

The newest and handsomest parasols are heavily embroidered and 
have very plain handles. Those covered with lace either laid on 
plainly or ruffled are still carried, but the embroidery is more strictly 
" la mode." 




Ayeb's Cherry Pectoral gives prompt relief, 
other preparations for colds and coughs. 



That 's why it excels all 



latest 
5tyles. 

pittii^. 
5up<^rb 
pirjisb. 

(Material. 

Complete 

^ssortm^nt. 

Ipu/est 

prices. 



pratir^er 9 <So., 105 r^earny St. 
GARDEN HOSE. 

Black Liue Spiral 

< otton Rubber- Lined Hose 

Will stand 300 lbs. pressure to the square inch and will outlast 
the best rubber hose manufactured Try a length. 

BOSTON WOVE!! HOSE OB RUBBER CO., 

14-16 Fremont St-, 8. F-, Cal. 

REMOVAL. 

DELMAR & SHORTRIDGE 

Have removed tbeir law offices to the 

CROCKER BUILDING (Third Floor.) 

/TV55 /T)apsor/5 50(7001, 

1625 San Jose Avenue, between Grand 

and Paru Streets, 
/Mameda, <?al. 

Boarding and Day School for Young Ladies and 
Children. Next term opens August 6th. 



J. R. SMITH & CO., 



MERCHANT TAILORS, 2SO Bush 
Street, Mills Building, formerly under 
Occidental Hotel. 

r\R. H. G. YOUNG, Dentist, 

*■' 1841 Polk St., near Jackson, S. F. [Telephone 2605 

Painless extraction. Teeth without plates a specialty. 

HOURS— 9 a. m. to 5 p.m., 8 to 9 p. M. Sundays, 9 a. M. to 2 p. M. 



D 



R. FRANKLIN PANCOAST, Dentist, 

703 Market Street, Rooms 18, 19 and 20. 



h. regensburger, attorney-at-law. 

Rooms 1 and 2, 319 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



August I. 1894 . 



SAN FR/LNCTSOO NEWS LETTER. 



21 




NONK but * KfK genius to thr fullness uf his powers ami sup- 
ported by pure and lofty mollvw should have attempted to 
write such a book a? •■ A Modern Magdalen," by Virna 
Woods. We do U"t mean to say ihii the sabJMl is one that baa been 
tabooed, but a weak and trivial irrtter cannol help making it offen- 
sive. But. like the old proverb, it fa always another class of people 
who rush in where an^el? fear t«> tread, ami it is Virna Woods's own 
fault if she has caused herself to be » :Iasaed with these. The faculty 
for reproducing details of American life might, if otherwise employed, 
have made harmless summer reading, the story is devoted to the 
disagreeable expansion of one of the stories with whieh our news- 
papers unfortunately teem; the result is depressing, and no one is 
likely to read it through except from the motives of morbid curiosity. 
Neither on literary nor on ethical grounds has it any justification. 
I.e.- .v Shepard, publishers. For side by all booksellers.] 

Mr. \V. YV. Astor himself has a paper iu the summer number of the 
Pall Mall Magazine of more than passing interest. It is entitled "The 
< onfesaion of Kui, the Priest." It takes one back to the days of 
Pharoab, and it shows Mr. Astor to be a student and a scholar as 
well as a writer and millionaire. His style, in this article, is very 
much like that of Rider Haggard. He is rich in picturing and aspire 
to lofty phraseology. There are several good stories in this number. 
Among them are the " Revelations of a Shirt Cuff," by Percy Reeve; 
"The Little Pink House," by Beatrice Kipling, and " The Golden 
Scytheman," by Henry Herman. Rudyard ivipling has an excellent 
poem, *' Back to the Army Again," and one of the features is a dainty 
thing by Thomas Bailey Aldrich, entitled " Andromeda," charmingly 
illustrated by Abbey Alston. 

In ' The Queen of Ecuador," R. M. Hanley has written a book that 
is somewhat interesting. The scene is laid in South America and the 
United States, and, undoubtedly, the best part of the work is the de- 
scription of the two travelers' ride to the Valley of Ecuador in quest 
of lost treasure. Mr. Hanley has taken hypnotism for his central 
motive — a theme which has not met with success in the hands of 
many writers. There are too many disbelievers in hypnotism. Peo- 
ple are inclined to look upon it as a sham, and when it is made the 
motive of a novel, it generally lightens the interest that the reader 
may take in the book. The story is well written, and the characters 
are gool. (The H. W. Hagemann Publishing Co. For sale by ail 
booksellers.] 

A charming little story is " Dr. Janet of Harley Street," by Arabella 
Kenealy. It is a book that is well worth the attention which it de- 
mands, and if the conviction slowly dawns on the reader that it con- 
tains a purpose, he will see that that purpose was produced by a touch 
of nature. Miss Kenealy has a pleasant style, her climaxes are well 
worked out, and the story is one of intense interest. [D. Appleton 
& Co., Publishers. For sale at Cooper's.] 



The insidious gentleness of San Francisco's winds often brings dis- 
comfort, in the way of colds, to those who fail to take proper precau- 
tions. Preliminary to a drive or a cable ride in the daytime or a 
stroll in the evening, a drink of Argonaut whiskey (which is the pur- 
est and most wholesome of products) is a sensible precaution. As 
everybody calls for this whisky, the knowledge that E. Martin & Co., 
408 Front street street, are the agents, is acceptable. 

P. F. McNulty, of 220 Post street, makes the most comfortable and 
best wearing shoe in tan Francisco. His experience and ability are 
so well known that he has the best and most fashionable people for 
his customers. Of course these people demand style, and they get it, 
but it is very hard to get comfort with style. The shoes made by Mr. 
McNulty supply both, and perfect satisfaction as well. 



All the new Books at COOPER'S. 



NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING, 

Notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a resolution of the Board of 
Directors of the Paraffiiie Paint Company (a corporation), duly adopted at 
a regular meeting of said Board, held at the office of i-aid Company on 
Wednesday, the 13th day of June, 18y4, a meeting of the stockholders of the 
Paraffine Paint Company will be held on 

Wednesday, the 22d day of August, 1 894, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M. 
of that day, at No. lib - Battery street, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, state of California, the same being the principal place of business 
and office of said corporation, and the same being the building where the 
Board of directors of said corporation meet 

The object of said meeting is to consider, act upon, and decide a proposi- 
tion to diminish the Capital Sock of said corporation, the Paraffine Paint 
Company, from One Million Dollars to One Hundred Thousand Dollars- 

Dated San Francisco, June 13th, 1894. 

PAHAFFINE 1»AINT COMPANY. By 

R. S. SHAINWALD, Secretary. R. S. MOORE, President. 



Broo^lyr? 
Jtotel. 



Condw t.-.i on ihiiii iht 

EUROPEAN AND 

AMERICAN PLAN 

HI -M 9THBBT, BR Burerasdl MontiSomkky, 
Ban KrnneiM'o, Cftl. 



rblj favorite hotol Ifl under the management of ("HAS 
MONTGOMERY, mid ll n- good. If not the but, Family and 
Business Men's Hotel In San Frani 

Home comforts, onlslna. UDOXOBUed first rlass service and 
the highest standard of respeot&blHty guaranteed. 

Our rooms caunot be surpassed for neatness and comfort. 

BOARD AND KOOM, per day. »1 2li, (1 .'•0, $1 76 and VI 00. 

per week-. *7 00 to *I2 00. 

per month, |27 50 to MO 00. 

SINGLE ROOMS, SO cents to II. 

pree <?oa<;i? to and prom tt?<; J-iotel. 



ACTORS, 
ACTRESSES, 



Society Ladies, Singers, Public Speakers, Business Men, 
ARE FREQUENTLY GREATLY ANNOYED BY 

HOARSENESS, 
SORE THROAT, 
IRRITABLE COUGH, 
ASTHMA, 
CATARRH, 
DEAFNESS. 
Knowing that I can effect a THOROUGH CUKE of the above named 
troubles I shall be pleased to give a FREE TEST of my new scientific 
methods to all who call at my office. 

R. WESLEY ROGERS, M. O , 629 Kearny St., S. F. 
-Ear, Nuse, Throat and Lungs a Specialty. 



LURLINE 



BATHS. 



Half a million gallons 
of pure warm salt 
water pumped into the 
tank every day. 



D 



R. D. E. DUNNE, 

Chiropodist. 



Now at LURLINE BATHS, 3d floor, 

Nest to Ladies' Parlor. 
Late of DH. LORYEAS HAMMAM BATHS. 

Inghown Nails a Specialty. 



BETHESDA. 



AMERICA'S FAVORITE WATER. 

" I don't think Bethesda has any equal as a pure, agreeable, and whole- 
some table water.— J. B. Foraker, ex-Qovernor of Ohio. 

"I think the Bethesda as good a mineral water as I have ever tasted ' 
— T. N. Palmer, President World's Columbian Commission. 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents. 

__^ ^ 418 Sacameato street, S. F. 

FRUIT DRYING PAPERS. 

BUILDING PAPERS. 

ROOFING AND PAINTS. 

PARAFFINE PAINT CO., 

116 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

A. BUSWELL, 

BOOK I IHDEB, PAPER-RULER, PRIMER JJIB B),A.YK BOOK fflAMIFACTlREL 
535 Clay Street. Near Montgomery, San Francisco. 

WEAKMENANDWOMEN ?L %%ir£^i™l?*l 

gives Health and Strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
Street, San Francisco. 



P.U 



Has Removed to 824 Market St., Phelan Building. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1894 . 



THEATRE parties continue to be the chief form of dissipation 
indulged in by society in town, for while a good many of oar 
fashionable folk have returned home from their summer outings 
sufficient of them still remain out of town to render any attempt at 
gay doings in the city quite useless. An occasional luncheon or din- 
ner is given, mostly in entertainment of visiting strangers, but they 
are the exception, and not the rule, at present. Mr. Adolph Sutro 
was the host of an elaborate dinner given last week in honor of some 
friends visiting here from the East, the evening hours being devoted 
to a musicale, at which Mrs. "W. C. Little, whose exquisite voice has 
been heard so rarely in San Francisco of recent years, gave some 
charming selections. Among recent pretty entertainments was the 
luncheon given by Miss Young, at the Presidio, to a dozen or more 
of her young lady friends. Lavender was the color chosen, and 
heliotrope the flower used in decoration of the table; and the name 
and menu cards, the lamp and candle shades, ices, etc., were alt of a 
lovely lilac tint. Miss Young proved to be a most charming hostess- 
Wednesday evening was ladies' night at the Olympic Club, and for 
the amusement of their fair friends the members provided a special 
programme, which included a swimming tournament, and fancy 
divmg by Professor Clark, races, wrestling contest, and acrobatic 
feats. The rooms were crowded and the evening was greatly enjoyed 
by the guests of the club. 

Although there have been a number of departures from Del Munte 
ol those who went there especially for the tennis match, sufficient 
have remained to make life there very pleasant. Picnics have been 
in great favor; shooting and fishing have been the motifs for getting 
up a number of small parties; boat-racing is the fad with some; 
others prefer the more exciting swimming races to the raft, while yet 
others shine in the bowling alley, where some wonderful scores have 
been made. Mrs. Thomas Breeze and her daughters are among the 
most recent additions to the guests for the month of August. At Del 
Monte the 23d of August is awaited with the most pleasant anticipa- 
tions, and the gathering for the annual shoot of the Country Club 
will be, this vear. it is thought, quite equal to the one which assem- 
bled there last season. The pleasures of the three days of festivity 
will be of a very varied character, including races, steeplechases, 
concerts by Cassasa'sband, illuminations, fireworks, dancing, feast- 
ing, and "the shoot, " for which no less than eleven prizes are 
offerd— five silver cups, five gold medals and the " Shreve" cup of 
gold and silver, which will be for the best score of the day. Added 
to these what may be called public amusements, there is little doubt 
there will also be much done in the way of picnics and private parties 
of one kind or another, and as most of our swagger set have an- 
nounced their intention of being present, the summer season at 
Del Monte promises to end brilliantly. 

The season at Santa Cruz appears to have taken a fresh lease of 
life, the festivity consequent upon the fiesta being still continued, and 
it is thought that the month of August will prove the gayest one of 
the season. Boating parties on the river are very popular, dividing 
the honors at night with those of the picnics by day. Salmon fishing 
has its devotees, and the beach is gay with bathers and spectators, 
each tent and canopy being crowded during the hours devoted to that 
pastime. Mr. and Mrs. John Boggs, Miss Alice Boggs, and Mr. and 
Mrs. George Howard, of San Mateo, were among those noticed on 
the beach this week. 

Life at San Rafael has settled into the quiet routine which dwellers 
in that lovely vale claim is most congenial to them, nor will their 
repose be disturbed until the September tennis tournament, which is 
generally looked upon as marking the close of the out-of-town sea- 
son. Meanwhile the dissipations at the hotel are confined to card 
parties, tennis, bowling, and driving, witfi. an occasional dinner or 
luncheon exchanged between some of the guests at the hotel and 
residents of the town or Ross Valley. 

It has been quite lively of late at Burlingame. The coming races 
at Monterey hold first place in the thoughts of all, and then comes 
polo, which has a firm hold on the affections of the Burlingamites, 
and to witness the games come the folk from the adjacent country 
homes, with their parties of city friends, who applaud the sport and 
seemingly enjoy it. Besides polo there are numerous luncheon par- 
ties given at the club house, picnics to different pretty points in tbe 
country round about, and dinners among the cottagers are not infre- 
quent. Mr. John Drew was the guest of honor at the Page Browns 
last Sunday, and was made quite a lion of, as he will no doubt be 
again to-morrow if he re turns, as he promise d to do. 

The marriage of Miss Raraona Shorbe and Dr. White, of tbe Navy, 
is one of the events which the society people of Los Angeles have in 
prospect, and which will take place very soon. The Shorbes are, how- 
ever, being commiserated with for losing their charming daughter, 
as directly after the wedding the young couple will leave for the 
East, where Dr. White will be on duty at Annapolis for several years. 



San Jose had a wedding last Wednesday of interest to San Fran- 
cisco people, as the bride was Miss Bertha Foltz, daughter of the first 
"lady lawyer" of this city, Mrs. Clara Foltz, and she was married 
at the residence of her uncle, Samuel Foltz, of San Jose, to Fayette 
Smalley, the Reverend Dr. Jewell performing the ceremony at noon 
in the presence of relatives and intimate friends, after which a recep- 
tion was held. 

Among the most recently announced engagements is that of Miss 
Rose Splivalo, the pretty daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Splivalo, 
of Washington street, to Dan Polk, the popular young architect and 
banjo player extraordinary. The engagement of Miss Nettie Reiss 
and E. R. Golland will be signalized by two receptions, the first of 
which will be held at 1500 Post street to-morrow afternoon. Their 
betrothal dinner was given by Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Reiss last week, 
at their residence on Franklin street, at which they entertained thirty 
guests, and the evening hours were devoted to music and dancing. 

Mrs. Louis Parrott has been extending her travels, and after leav- 
ing Catalina she and the Tom Van Ness party went to Santa Monica 
to try the sea bathing in that locality. 

Mrs. Lucy Otis, Mrs. Will Tevis and the Misses Crocker have been 
among the latest additions to the visitors at San Rafael. Mrs. De 
Young is keeping open house at her pretty Meadowlands, and it is 
generally full of friends, whom she entertains right royally. Mrs. 
George C. Boardman is spending a few weeks at San Rafael as the 
guest of her sister, Mrs. M. M. Tompkins. 

Mr. Trax Beale and his wife, net Hattie Blaine, have been among 
the guests at the California Hotel this week. Mrs, Beale has been 
heartily congratulated by her friends on her escape from what came 
near proving a fatal accident while bathing at Santa Monica last 
week. Lieutenant R. H. Noble will be one of the beaux of the com- 
ing winter in San Francisco, and will receive a warm welcome after 
an absence of two years at Annapolis and in Europe, where he is at 
present. 

Mrs. Horace Davis has been the guest of P. B. Cornwell at Glen 
wood. Peter J. Donahue is one of those who have enjoyed the 
salmon fishing at Santa Cruz this week. Mrs. Leland Stanford will 
spend the month of August at her villa near Palo Alto. Mrs. J. C- 
Tucker and her daughters, Misses Mae and Claire Tucker, are domi- 
ciled at the Bella Vista, where they will remain some time. Mr. and 
Mrs. E. J. McCutcheon have gone East for a short visit. Dr. and 
Mrs. Middleton, who have been at the Presidio for the past two years 
will spend the coming wi nter at the Hotel Ri chelieu. 

There have been many returns to town this week. From Santa 
Cruz have come Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cole, Miss Augusta Cole, and 
the Misses Oliver. Del Monte has been the loser of Mrs. Clark 
Crocker, Mrs. Moses Hopkins, Mrs. Peter Donahue, Mrs. Martin, 
and Misses Laura McKinstry, Fanny and Julia Crocker, Mamie Hol- 
brooke, Nellie Hillyer, Belle McKenna, Fanny Loughborough, and 
Marie Zane. Mr. and Mrs. J. R. K. Nuttall have returned from San 
Rafael, as have also Mrs. Monroe Salisbury and her daughter, who 
anticipate a visit East, intending to leave here about the middle of 
the month. 

Among recent arrivals from afar are Mrs. John Hays Hammond, 
who has returned to California to recuperate from the effects of a 
year's residence in South Africa; Joe Grant from his trip to Europe; 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Redding from their visit to New York, and Capt. 
William R. Bridgeman, who arrived last Monday by tbe steamer 
Gaelic from China, where he has been in command of the Baltimore. 
Mrs. John F. Swift has been entertaining this week Mrs. Hugh 
Frazer, widow of the late British Minister to Japan ; she also was a 
passenger by the steamer Gaelic. Mrs. Fred L. Castle and her 
daughters have reached New York from Europe, where they have 
been for the past year or more. The Reverend W. I. Kip and party, 
consisting of his sister, Miss Mary Kip, and the Misses Stubbs, are 
looked for on their return from Alaska next week. 

Mrs. J. L. Poole has gone to Castle Crags to join her sister, Mrs. 
Favre, and where she will make a stay of some duration. 

Mr. Leo Cooper has returned to tbe city from Honolulu, where he 
spent his vacation. 

Awarded Highest Honors World's Fair. 





Baking 
Powdeit 



The only Pur" Cream of tartar Powder.— No ammonia; No Alma 
Used in Millions of Homes — 40 years the Standard. 



August 4, 1894. 



SAN n;\v [SCO NEWS I . I I I I H 



23 



LAWN TENNIS. 



IT mast be especially prttityinK to the If nnis player? of this 
Slate to DotMl the continued success of Carr Nee I. who now 
holds the championship of the Northwest for singles, and part- 
nered with his brother, he will contest against Hobart and Hovey 
f->r the championship of the Doited States. Mr. Neel will also 
contest for the single championship, which will be played at 
Newport. The success of these young gentlemen ought to be a 
lesson to the younger contlugent here, who say that it is not pos- 
sible for them to compete against the more experienced players, 
for they would not have any chance; but if they only look at the 
success of the Neels. and remember that they also were players 
here, and would then try and imitate them, tennis would soon 
again be on the same basis that it was three years ago. The sud- 
den calm which attacked tennis was due simply to the lack of 
interest displayed by some of the officials, who preferred to go 
their own way and let tennis go to the bow-wows. The players 
have all been ready to have some tournament or other, and have 
bitterly complained of this uncalled-for quietness, anil it seems to 
us that the present Secretary of the Association is doing good 
work in bis efforts to start new matches everywhere. 

The Hotel Mateo has been asked to give an invitation tourna- 
ment, and the aoswer has not yet reached us, but the California 
Club have a "doubles" on the tapis for the 18th and 19th of this 
month, and the Olympic Annex have issued the following cir- 
cular: "The Executive Committee of the Tennis Annex announce 
that there will be a handicap doubles class tournament, open to 
members of the Annex, Sunday, August 26th. Entries will be 
received up to and including Thursday, August 23rd. In every in- 
stance entry must be accompanied with entry fee, which is one dol- 
lar per team. The Committee urge that every member of the 
Annex turn out and make the tournament a success. No one 
should refuse to enter because he has had little opportunity of 
practicing team play. The Committee hope, by proper handi- 
capping, to give every team a fair and equal show. All members 
not having partners kindly send their names to the Secretary, and 
teams will be made up from this list so far as is satisfactory to 
each player. All entries must be sent to G. E. Stoker, Olympic 
Club." 

The ninth of September falling on a Sunday, the championship 
meeting will be held at San Rafael on the 7th, 8tb and 10th, when 
the double championship and the ladies' single championship 
will take place. The Association expects to have the circulars, 
announcing this meeting, oui at short notice now, and it is to be 
hoped that the double tournaments at the California and the 
Olympic, to say nothing of the Oakland and Alameda clubs, will 
bring out some new teams this year, and that the meeting will be 
a successful one. 

There will be a tournament at Santa Monica for tae champion- 
ships of Southern California in the near future, and several play- 
ers here have signified their intention of going down to compete. 



AVERY conspicuous example of generosity has been exhibited 
by J. J. O'Brien & Co., prominent dry goods merchants of 
8an Francisco. A number of their salesmen were National 
Guardsmen, and as such had been absent twenty-two days in 
July. The firm, realizing that the men had not been absent of 
their own volition, exhibited its usual generosity with its em- 
ployees by paying them a full month's wages. This was wholly 
unexpected by the men and touched them deeply. The example 
thus set is eminently worthy of emulation. 



"PULLER Claphin's comedy, Love at Randon, was produced at 
JT Linderman's Opera House, Alameda, last Saturday evening. 
The house was crowded and the production was a creditable one. 
John L. Stevens played the leading role, Benjamin Carleton, with 
considerable dramatic ability. He spoke bis lines clearly, and 
acted with the sang froid of a professional player. Miss Frances 
Mervy, as Gladys Paine, was charming and graceful. 



THE great need of the Republican party in California is a leader 
with sufficient wisdom 10 restrain it in the matter of steadily 
increasing the number of voters who will never again support its 
ticket. 



Bacon Printing Company, 



508 Clay Street. 



, The GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES at 

JOE POHEIM'S, The Tailor, 

for the last 30 days, is continuing. We have sold over 500 pairs of Paats for 
$4, worth from $5 to $7. Fine suits for $15. Don't miss your chance for the 
next 30 days, as some of our Goods are sold regardless of cost. 203 Mont- 
gomery street, 724 Market street, 1110 and 1112 Market street, Sau Francisco, 
and 485 Fourteenth street, Oakland. 



City Index and Purchaser's Guide. 



ATTYS -AT-L.AW 
HEMm .* H II 111 R, (B. F. Bngan; 0. M. WllbOT), 2lft8antome8l. 
I'K.WK BBWmt , Uw office, (S6 Murphy Bldg , 1236 Market St. 

CANDIES 
CAN DIES p ut up lor shipment at ROBERTS', Folk aud Bush streets 



DENTISTS. 
R. 1'ITTLAK. 416 Geary street. 
F. M. HACKETT, lis Leavenworth street. 



DOOR CHECKS. 
THE MORTON Door (heck and Spring:. F.D. Morrell,593Mi8sion St. 

DRUGGISTS 

KELLY'S CORN < IRE, )!5c. Drugs at wholesale, 102 Eddy street. 

itviM'OIMlMiik sr u Positive cure. Sold by all drug- 
g ists 

MARBLE AND GRANITE 
W. H. JlflOKJIKIi, 1422 Market St., bet. City Hall Ave. and Larkin St. 



MILLINERY. 

THE WONDER Hat. Flower and Feather Store. 1024-1028 Market street. 

RESTAURANTS. 

FRANCO-AMERICAN Restaurant -521 Montgomery St. F. Hitte. 

SHOEMAKERS. 

REPAIR1NU DONE while von wait at POLLOCK'S, 202 Powell street. 

SURVEYORS 
JOHN A. BENSON, Engineer. Dealer in Land Scrip. 43 Kearny St. 

HYGIENIC AIR COMPRESSORS 
For automfzalion purposes. 

THE CLEVELAND FAUCET CO., 208 Ellis street 



BYRON HOT SPRINGS 

Resort is reached by a pleasant three- 
hour ride by rail from San Francisco, 
The br,f m ud, hot salt water, and 
hot sulphur baths are infallible cures for 
rheumatism, sciatica, neuralgia, liver 
and kidney troubles, blood and skin dis- 
orders. 
L. R. HEAD, C. R. MASON, 

Proprietor. Manager. 

Byron Hot Springs P. 0-, Cal. 



l/iei?y 5prii?$s, 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

Three miles from Ukiah, the terminus of the 8. F. AN. P. Railway. 
Only known natural electric water. Warm "champagne" baths. Situa- 
tion, location, and scenery not surpassed. Terms, $12 to $14 per week. 
Postoffice and telephone at springs. 

WM. IHIOLAN, Proprietor. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 
806 Market Street (Plielan Building.) 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for poia- 
lively extracting teeth without pain. "Colton Gas" has an established and 
unrivaled world-wide reputation for Its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
In all eases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established 1868. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also perform b 
•ill operations in dentistry. __ 

DR. CHARLES W. DECKER 



D 



R. LUDLUM HILL, 

1443 MARKET ST , TVear Eleventh. 



No charge for extracting when plates are made. Old plates made over 
like new. Teeth from $8 per set. Extracting, 5Uc. Gas given. 

HD DIOnDn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the 
Uri. rtll/VJnL/ O Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vital- 
ity, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medi- 
cine Paris, and the Medical celebrities. Agents for California and the 
Pacific States, J «. STEELE A CO., 635 MARKET STREET (Palace 
Hotel), San Francisco. Sent by mail or express anywhere, 

PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, $1.25; of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills, 
ft) 50: of 400 pills. $fi: Preparatory Pills, $2. Send for Circular. 

DR, R. F. VERRINDER, ORAL SURGEON, 
Successor to Drs. Winter & Winter, Dentists. Specialties: Surgical 
treatment of ulceration, abscesses and other diseases of the Mouth, 
Jaws, Gums and Teeth. Implantation of Natural Teeth, Continuous 
Gum PlateB and Crown and bridge Work. 
Office: 306 Kearny Street, Corner Sutter. 



. ; i. '- ™ - L ' .- 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1?94. 




AN ARTIFICIAL MAIOFN. 

It Is Easy Enough to be Beautilul If 
You Only Know How. 

Moles and Blemishes on the Face, Moustaches 
on Women, Pug or Crooked Noses, Large 
Mouths, Outstanding Ears — there is no reason 
for putting up with such disfigurements now-a- 
days. They, andlotsmore.areall easily removed 
by well-known Surgical and Elec- 
trical processes. For years the 
treatment of such things has been 
asp i-ialty at the John H Wood- 
bury Deimatological Institute, 125 
West42dbt., New York. Regular 
Physicians there doing nothing! 
else all the time. Their 150 Page 
Book, telling all about it, will be mailed, sealed, 
to your address for 10c, in stamps or silver. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trams Leave and are Due to Arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO : 

Leave | From June 26, 1894. I Arrive 

7:00 a Atlantic Express. Ogden and East 6:45 a 

7:00 a Benicia, Vacaville, Rumsey, Sac- 
ramento, Redding, Castle Crag 
and Dunsmuir, via Davie 7:15 p 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Napa, Calis- 

toga and *Santa Rosa 6:15 P 

8:30 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marysville, Red Bluff 
andOroville 4:15p 

9:00 a New Orleans Express, Santa Bar- 
bara, Los Angeles, Deming, El 
Paso, New Orleans and East 5:45 p 

9-00 a Martinez and Stockton 10:45 a 

*9:C0a Peters and Milton ... "7:1op 

12:30 p Niles, San Jose and Livermore . . 8:45 a 
*1 :00 p Sacramento River steamers . . *9 :00 P 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 
Napa, Calistoga, El Verano, and 
Santa Rosa 9:15a. 

4.00 p. Benicia. Vacaville, Esparto, 
Woodland, Knight's Landin to, 
Marysville, Oroville and Sacra- 
mento . 10:45a 

4:30 p. Niles, 8an Jo«e, Livermore, 
Stockton, Modesto, Merced and 
Fresno - ... 7:15 p 

4:30p. Raymond (for Yosemite) 10:45 a. 

5:O0p. Los Angeles Express, Fresno, 
Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara and 
Los Angeles. 10:45a, 

5 :00 p. Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, 

for Mojave and East 10:45a. 

6:00 p European Mail, Ogden and East. . 9:45a 

6:00p. Haywards, Niles and SanJose.. 7-45a. 

(7 :00 p. Vallejo -(7 :45 P. 

7:00 P. Oregon Express, Sacramento, 
Marysville, Redding, Portland, 

Puget Sou nd and East. - . 10 :45 a 

Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). 

17:45 a Sunday excursion for Newark, 
San Jose, Los Gatos, Felton and 
Santa Cruz 18:05 p 

8:15a. Newark. Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 
Cruz and way stations ... 6:20 p. 

*2:45 f Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New 
Almaden, Felton, Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, and principal way 
stations *11:50a 

4:45 p. Newark. SanJose, Los Gatos. 9:50a. 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets ). 

*6:45 a. SanJose, New Almaden and Way 

Stations *1:45P. 

17:30 a. San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific 
Grove and Principal Way Sta- 
tions J8:33p. 

8:16 a. San Jose, TresPinos, Santa Cruz, 
Pacific Grove. Paso Robles, San 
San Luis Obispo and principal 1 

Way Stations 6:26 p. 

19:47a. PaloAltoand Way Stations U:45p. 

10:40a. San Jose, and Way Stations 5:06p. 

11-45 a. Palo Alto and Way Stations.. 3:30 p. 
*2:20p. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, 
Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, 

PaclflcGrove . .*T0:40a. 

*3:80 P. San Jose and Principal Way Sta- 
tions.. ... 9:47 a. 

*4:25p. Palo Alto and Way Stations *8:06a. 

5-10p. San Jose and Way Stations... .. *8:48a. 

6:80p. Palo Alto and Way Stations 6;35a. 

H1:45p. Palo Alto and principal Way 
Stations .. .. +7 :26 p. 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From SIN FRANCISCO— Foot of Market St. (Slip 8)— 
*7 00 *8 00 9 00 *10 00 and 11 00 A. M., *\2 30 
11 00 *2 00 3 00 *4 00 5 00 and *6 00 p. m. 
From OIKIASH— Foot of Broadway. 

•6 00 *7 00 8 00 *9 00 10 00 and *11 00 a. m. 
112 00 »12 30 2 00 *3 00 4 00 and *5 00 p. M . 
a . lor Morning . p. for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. f Saturdays only. 

tSundaysonly. 

The PACIFIC TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time 
Cards and other information 



CORRECT STARS AND STRIPES. 



THE law provides do specific dimensions 
for the flag of the United States. Sec- 
tions 1791 and 1792 of the revised statutes 
prescribe simply that there shall be thir- 
teen horizontal stripes, alternate red and 
white, and that the union of the flag shall 
be white stars in a blue field, the number 
of stars corresponding with the number of 
the States, and a new one being added on 
the Fourth of July next succeeding the ad- 
mission of a new State. At present there 
are forty-four States, and the arrangement 
of the stars which has obtained official 
sanction is in six horizontal rows, the top 
aDd bottom rows containing eight stars 
each and the intervening rows seven. 

— New York Press. 



THE men I am afraid of are those who 
believe everything, subscribe to every- 
thing, and vote for everything. — Shipley. 

Humor requires the direction of the 
nicest judgment, by so much the more as 
it indulges itself in the most boundless 
freedoms. — Addison. 

Neak the foul nettle, rough and coarse, 
groweth the rose, sweet, smooth, and soft; 
close to the valley rise the hills aloft. — 
Chaucer. 

If honor be your clothing the suit will 
last