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Full text of "S.F. Newsletter (July-Dec. 1903)"

200? 1210551 

OLAmy 



126209 



Price per copy. 10 cent*. 




ESTABLISHED JULY ao. 1856. 
SAM FPAMO|fc 0o 



Annual Subscription. $4.00. 




(&alit xrrttiolCpirjcrti stx* 




Vol. LXVII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 4. 1903. 



Number 1. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER la printed and pub- 
lished every Saturday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott, 
llalleck building. 320 Sansome street. San Francisco. Cal 

Entered at San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 

New York Office— (where Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— aw Broadway. C. C. Murphy, 
RepresentaUve. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England, George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication in the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 6 p. m. 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 



Dunsmuir could not have been so crazy as some of 
the excuses being used to plunder his estate. 

A Sierra County Indian killed his mother-in-law 
la>t week. ( Hir aborigines are fast becoming civil- 
ized. 



King Edward has celebrated his birthday by creat- 
ine a batch of new noblemen. American heiresses 
will please take notice. 

Andrew Carnegie has found a defender in Sidney 
Lee, the well-known author. Millions are never in 
want of a protector, and the literary snob is not yet 
extinct. 



The prison authorities say that a thief recently 

arrested is named Penny for two reasons, one be- 
cause he is a bad Penny, and the other because he 
always returns. 



Emperor William now likes our navy. A few 
months ago! — but his praise and blame are equally 
unimportant. 

"Happy Hogan," the baseball player, has mar- 
ried. It is to be hoped that he will be able to keep 
tip his name. 

There seems to be no talk of burning the white 
man wjio attacked a 14-year-old negro girl near San 
Jose this week. 

There is a Christian Science convention in Boston, 
and nobody is suffering much pain so long as the 
Eddyites pay their bills. 

There is now a flurry in cotton on Wall street, but 
the chances are that when it comes down, somebody 
will be snowed under. 



The native legislators want to keep the Americans 
out of Hawaii, but it is easy to see that their wish 
will be as futile as their opposition to the annexa- 
tion of the islands. 



The cladorena radiata and the turritopsis have 
been found in California waters, but there need be 
no immediate alarm as they are not nearly so danger- 
ous as they sound. 

The negroes of Wilmington, Del., are threatening 
war because one of their number was burned at the 
stake by whites. The colored population of that 
section is hyper-sensitive. 

Our Russian anti-Semitic circular reads : "Brother 
workers, orthodox and Catholic: Christ has arisen. 
Let us embrace, kiss and go and kill the Jews." There 
are practical jokers even in Russia. 

A Bakersfield groom has asked for a divorce on the 
grounds that his bride is only thirteen. The peti- 
tioner should be kept waiting, for time will remedy 
the failing complained of. 

Alden Sampson, the game expert, says that our 
shooting seasons are too long. Evidences of this 
are shown, not only in the deer and quail districts, 
but in the criminal courts. 

One Yale student spent $100 for expenses last year, 
another $11,000 for like purposes. It is not hard to 
tell who got the most education — it is equally simple 
to tell who had the most fun. 

The yellow papers are now trying to involve the jf sir Thomas Lipton can get enough wind to fill 

Marlborough family in a scandal. There always has j^g sa ;is, it will be something like the tempest in the 

been a close relation between dirt and the dema- tea-pot they tell about, but Sir Thomas won't care, 

gogue. so long as the brand is his own. 



Hernandez, the former rebel leader, will be sent 
by President Castro to Washington, where his bel- 
ligerence will not be noticed. 

Morgan and Rockefeller's duel with sections of the 
Steel Trust may be regarded as the greatest fencing 
match the world has ever seen. 



A new union has been formed at Vallejo. The 
members cannot want a reduction in hours. It is 
impossible to work less than they do at Mare Island. 



If our postage stamps were as sticky as the fingers 
of some of the authorities who issue them, the aver- 
age citizen would certainly have no complaint to 
offer. 



A Virginia Dale miner held up a town, hoping to 
get possession of a bar of bullion. He thought this 
was an easy method of striking metal. He jyas right. 
The metal he struck was a piece of lead whilsh -tgdged 
in his skull. 



President Droppers of the University of South Da- 
kota, who has been charged with drinking and smok- 
ing, is probably a much more agreeable man than 
many college presidents who are total abstaners. 

Emperor William has called on Admiral Cotton. 
Sir Thomas Lipton has called on President Roose- 
velt. It'rjow only remains for Mayor Schmitz to call 
on Father Yorke before diplomatic relations are 
again firmly established. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 



IS IT AN HONEST EFFORT? 

The word comes from Washington that the ad- 
ministration proposes to use all its power if need 
be to get at the bottom of the postal frauds. But 
that sort of word has been coming for some time, 
and no very "big guns" are disturbed, nor are thev 
likely to be if certain political and social influences 
are as potent in official life at the capital of the 
nation as is claimed they are. Now, it is an attempt 
to play upon the supposed credulity of the people 
to even intimate that such gigantic frauds could be 
committed year in and year out without the respon- 
sible head of the department being either grn>-lv 
incompetent or a willing tool. There is no middle 
ground, for it is the duty of the head of every de- 
partment of the Government to know for sure how 
business is being conducted under him. 

But what is retarding, and is likely to defeat a 
thorough overhauling of the postal scandal, is the 
danger of creating factions in the responsible partv 
and thus materially weakening its chances before the 
people at the next election. The powers that be 
should remember, however, that the crv "Turn the 
rascals out" nearly always wins at the polls in this 
country, and it will, be sure to win next year if all 
the rascals, high and low, are nut only turned out 
very speedily, but are sent before the criminal courts. 
The political salvation of the President and his 
party lies in a vigorous and honest prosecution of 
the postal rascals. Possibly, though, the rascally 
crew has a following strong enough to scare "Strenu- 
ous Life" into agreeing to make scape-goats of a lot 
of little fellows, and keep hands off the real benefi- 
ciaries of the frauds, and at this distance it looks 
as if the big ones will have nothing to fear in the 
way of either exposure or prosecution. Turn all the 
rascals out, great and small. That's what the pub- 
lic demands. 



THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 

Medical societies are clamoring for a reduction in 
the annual output of doctors. They say the profes- 
sion is overcrowded all over the country and that 
the colleges are grinding out new medical talent 
greatly in excess of the demand. The only wonder 
is that this complaint has been so long in coming; 
but, on the other hand, are there too many doctors 
of medicine? Undoubtedly there are too many al- 
leged doctors — too many who have gotten it into 
their obtuse minds that a diploma confers all there 
is to know of the healing art, but there are not too 
many doctors who are worthy and well qualified, 
and somehow the laws of the land fail utterly to 
make the right discrimination between profession 
and qualification. 

One of the reasons why doctors' signs may be 
seen everywhere is that medical colleges are for the 
most part private business enterprises. It is tin- 
students' dollars rather than his capacity, that counts. 
It is as easy these days to get a medical diploma as 
it is to get a business college diploma, and, for that 
matter, the holder of either is no evidence of com- 
mon sense or fitness. To be a doctor of medicine in 
the true sense, a man must have the heart attributes 
of a humanitarian, must have sympathy with suf- 
ferers, and must be a faithful student of bis art all 
the time. But these qualifications are not at all essen- 
tial with most medical colleges, and hence anything 
in the shape of a man that can pay the price can 
have himself launched into the channels of the pro- 
fession with a diploma all written in Latin pinned 



to his back. 

Now, what is wanted is fewer medicine men who 
are unworthy of the confidence of the community 
because of dull and deficient intellectuality, ignor- 
ance of the science and art of healing diseases, and 
inclination to experimentation on the happy-go- 
lucky plan. It is conceded that the medical is the 
most honorable, the most distinguished, and the most 
responsible of the professions, but is it really so? 
If it is not, the responsibility lies at the doors of 
"shops" that issue diplomas because the student has 
paid his money and answers a given list of questions, 
parrot-like. Still, it is not wholly the fault of these 
"shops," but of the law permitting their existence. 
Germany has discovered more than 100,000 such 
"doctors" in active practice in the Empire, and the 
State is taking active measures to drive them out of 
the business. San Francisco has very many doctors 
ot medicine who are in every respect an honor to 
the profession, and they should use their influence 
to suppress the army of incompetents, fakers and 
frauds. When a man is ill he wants a real doctor, 
and not a sham. Drive the humbugs out of town. 

THE SLOT-MACHINE SWINDLE. 

There is a difference of opinion as to whether the 
slot-machine is an instrument of immorality, the use 
of which ought to be entirely prohibited, but there 
can be no doubt that the player is entitled to a fair 
chance even with the odds all against him. This he 
does not get. for the machines are in very many cases 
so constructed that it is impossible for him to win. 
A common way of "doing" the player is to cut the 
edge of some of the largest cards, so that when they 
revolve they will not stop at the proper place, and 
thus never appear in the combination which wins 
a large prize. It is obvious that any one who plays 
on a machine so doctored is attempting the impossi- 
ble, is not getting a fair chance for his money, and 
is, in plain English, being robbed just as effectively 
as if he were actually held up. Another scheme of 
theft consists in so arranging the cards on their re- 
spective cylinders that by no possibility can such a 
combination be made as to entitle the plaver to 
receive t'he large rewards which are advertised 
on the face of the machine, and for which he plays. 
The large prizes are the enticement which causes 
the player to plunge his nickels, and even under the 
very best circumstances, the game is dead against 
him. But when the machine is deliberately treated 
so as to make winning an impossibility, at least win- 
ning of the great stakes, it should be obvious that 
the keeper of the machine is a knave and the player 
a fool. 



RETURNING THE COMPLIMENT. 

Ever since the first Christian organization was 
founded in America the work of sending missionaries 
to Asia to enlighten the people over there in all the 
ways of Christian civilization has been pushed with 
vigor, which was and is still commendable, of course. 
But the amusing, if not startling outcome, of these 
efforts to open the spiritual eyes of ( >riental heathen 
is that nearly all the Asiatic systems of religion are 
establishing missions in America to civilize Ameri- 
cans by converting them to the faith of the Far 
East. These "Pagan' missionaries are all "Imperial 
University men" in their own country, hence they 
cannot be said to be savages coming here to over- 
throw intellectual or industrial advancement. Nor 
do they come with guns or opium, nor yet for the 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



>f land. They arc anxious about Atneri- 
and would save them. 

Right here in San Francisco there arc highly edu- 
cated, cultured, polished and zealous preachers of 
the gospel of the leading religious systems of China, 
.!. Japan and India to lead us oul of the dark- 
of religious ignorance and superstition into the 
bright light of their own "right hand path." And 
what is more, those heathen preachers are invited 
bj our universities to lecture before the Students 
and "chum" with the presidents and faculty. Nor are 
they making no headway in winning sou]-. In the 
last halt dozen years Buddhism alone ha- perfected 
several legal organizations and founded some seven 
or eight "temples erected to Lord Buddha" on the 
Pacific Coast, to say nothing of entering wedges in 
several of the Eastern cities. 

All this means something to the religious world 
of this country, and it would seem to mean a good 
deal with the progress that these heathen ministers 
are making in their missionary work. After about 
500 years of bard, earnest and faithful work in 
China, the Catholic church has gained a following 
of not over 1,000,000, but at the present rate of 
Americans "running after strange gods," in too years 
a pagan temple will be seen in every community 
in the land. Well, let them come. Good and not 
barm will be the harvest ; besides, it helps com- 
merce, and commerce is the world*s greatest civilizer. 



VAIN EXPECTATIONS. 

Patriots who are counting on a war with Russia 
over the recent massacre of Hebrews, so as to afford 
the opportunity to secure army contracts or win 
epaulettes on the battle-field, may as well put their 
patriotism on ice to keep for a better chance. There 
will be no war. A diplomatic war of diplomatic 
insincerity may be waged, but only for show and 
effect. It is not likely that the Czar will go so far 
as to even intimate that it is none of our business 
what is done in Russia. He will simply assure our 
President that he continues to receive the Emperor's 
"most distinguished consideration," and that will 
close the incident. The brutality of the Russians 
towards Hebrews is condemned by all the civilized 
world, but verbal or written words of condemnation 
do not entail the cost in human lives and gold that 
war does ; besides, commerce and not sentiment is 
the dominating factor in international concerns these 
days, and commerce is always the sworn foe to war. 

It would not take much urging to get commerce 
in fighting humor over the closing of the Manchur- 
ian ports against it, for that is a really audacious 
act. And in this connection it may be observed 
that the closing of any Asiatic port, especially of 
China, is a hard blow to San Francisco. This city 
is the natural point of accumulation and distribu- 
tion of the traffic between the United States and 
the Orient, and the Manchurian ports are the gate- 
ways to what promises to be the richest field in 
all Asia for American goods and wares. This city 
has, therefore, plenty of reason to want Russia 
brought up with a round turn, but not on the ground 
of sentiment, patriotism, itching palms for army con- 
tracts or desire for military glory, but because Rus- 
sia is robbing commerce of opportunity to turn an 
honest penny. If President Roosevelt will set his 
diplomatic machinery to work to force open all trade 
doors to American commerce he will find the kind 
of patriotic Americanism at his back that counts for 
something. 



ENTER THE JAPANESE. 

The fishermen of British Columbia have end< 
ored to close down the work now that the fishing 
season has just commenced by putting in demands 

for largely increased wages. Twelve hundred of 
them have refused to go to work at the old schedule, 

and as the run of fish is JUSI beginning, every day's 
abstention from work means loss to the industry 
anil a possible ressati.ui of the operations for this 
year. If the men had it all their own way there 
would be no alternative between a yielding to their 

demands, which would, probably, be redoubled next 

year, even if a further advance was not demanded 
this season, and suspending the work, which would 
mean the loss of much invested capital and the de- 
privation of large masses of the population of a 
popular and nutritious food. Hut there are three 
thousand Japanese along the river, and these men are 
willing to pick up the tools where the wdiite fisher- 
men have laid them down, and to proceed with the 
catch upon terms much more acceptable to the em- 
ployers. When the Japanese go to work there will 
be a great outcry with regard to the preference 
shown the Asiatics, but the fishermen have brought 
it all upon themselves. An industry as short-lived 
as salmon-fishing cannot be placed at the mercy of 
a set of men whose demands are elastic and with 
whom no permanent agreement can be made. Here 
we see to wdiat the present continued labor agitation 
necessarily leads. Some reasonable basis must be 
found, and that very soon, upon which the two great 
factors in production can mutually stand, or the 
employers will seek outside the labor which they 
cannot find in the country, and all the disorder con- 
sequent upon the competition of rival races for 
the means of livelihood will be let loose on the land. 



THE WAY IT IS. 



Not guns, but "scandals to the right of us, scandals 
to the left of us, and scandals in front of us," is the 
way it is. High up, or rather what is called "high 
up social life," seems to have reached the point in the 
realm of morals where it is restless and discontented 
if it has no scandals to feed upon, and its hunger and 
thirst grow keener and more gluttonous as idleness 
increases by wealth accumulations. And when is the 
end of it all to come? Scarcely a day 'passes leaving 
the social atmosphere clear and bright and whole- 
some, and yet "exposures" are what that brand of 
society is ever looking and waiting. They are angel 
cake and champagne, and it is getting so that a 
"function" is incomplete without a dish or two of 
such food. 

Of course society — the "high ups" — is responsible 
for it all. Its code of ethics is fashioned out of cash 
on hand, and the cash on hand deems it vulgar and 
indicating "low born" to be "in trade." That is to 
say, these "high ups" regard identification with 
business pursuits or mechanical art a stigma on a 
man. He should be above work or employment of 
any kind, save that which is required of persons 
by the law of physical hygiene. But fortunately for 
those most concerned, scandals in that realm of 
social life are short lived, for they are quickly 
crowded into forgetfulness by a fresh invoice, and so 
the wheel of idleness keeps on whirling in the rut 
of moral degradation, with its tire of gold and its 
spokes of wine bottles centering in a hub of com- 
mon expectancy that revolves upon a spindle of 
pinchbeck Christian graces. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 



A CALL FOR PUBLIC ACTION. - 

An incident has occurred in labor union circles in 
this city which shoud arouse public indignation 
to such a pitch of resentment that no labor organi- 
zation or individual members of it, would ever again 
adopt such brutal and fiendish measures to deprive 
a citizen of his right to honestly engage in legitimate 
employment. 

The incident referred to was the waylaying and 
attacking with murderous intent two workers in the 
wire industry by three strikers for no reason under 
the sun other than that the workers, themselves mem- 
bers of the union, dared to criticise the way the 
strike was being conducted, and to suggest that 
the)' return to work on the same basis that obtained 
before the strike was ordered. To show by argument- 
and logical reasoning that a given demand for new 
or modified conditions for labor are not justified at 
that particular time is high treason against union- 
ism, and that to assassinate such traitors is union- 
ism's privilege, the law of the land to the contrary 
notwithstanding. 

If the time is not already here, it certainly is not 
in the very distant future when public sentiment, 
representing social order and the constitutional rights 
of the citizen, will be obliged to exterminate these 
brutal and fiendish conspirators against the public 
peace, and of the personal safety of individuals who 
have the audacity to declare that evil is not good. 
If public sentiment does not express its condemna- 
tion of the lawlessness of labor unionism, and take 
heroic measures, if need be, to suppress it, then let 
the public confess that it is as a whole no higher 
in the scale of moral unfoldment than that for which 
the brutal slugger's fist or the cowardly assassin's 
pistol stands for. 

Certainly not all members of labor organizations 
are innately law-breakers, but the dominating influ- 
ence in them seems to be an element that glories 
in disturbing whatever harmony there may be be- 
tween employers and employees. This element seems 
happy and content only when the channels of indus- 
try are clogged by hatred, confusion, idleness, hunger 
of labor to madness, and lack of opportunities to 
earn an honest living. 

And it behooves unionism to speedily abandon its 
high-handed aggressions upon individual rights if 
it would escape the fury of the wrath of an already 
too long suffering public. Almost from every trade 
and industrial center of the country the word comes 
daily that human lives, property and business inter- 
ests are being sacrificed upon the rule or ruin altar 
of labor unionism to the God of injustice, lawless- 
ness and social and industrial chaos. Surely the pub- 
lic has had enough of this sort of thing. 

.CHINESE AND AMERICAN GAMBLING. . 

A great commotion is made about the gambling 
houses in the Chinese quarter. The Chinese games 
are as fair as the American games, and much fairer 
than a great many of them. Fan-tan is merely a game 
of odd-and-even, and there is no chance for the dealer 
to swindle — not near as much as in the one-sided slot- 
machine. In fan-tan the dealer takes at random a 
handful of brass coins, or other "markers," and 
places a bowl over them. The player bets on an odd 
or an even number remaining. The bowl is lifted, 
and the dealer, with a stick about a foot in length, 
draws from the pile four coins at a time, until all 
have been drawn down excepting the last four, or 
under. If two or four markers remain, the even side 



wins. If one or three remain the odd side wins. A 
person can bet on a certain number of coins remain- 
ing, and is paid three or four fold, according to the 
hazard. As the dealer does not touch the markers 
with his hands, there is no chance to swindle, by 
adding or taking away a coin to make the result 
favorable to the bank. He is also required to roll 
back his flowing sleeve as a guarantee of good faith. 
There can be no stealing in fan-tan, as there is in 
"brace-faro/' where the cards are marked and the 
box so arranged that the dealer can pull two cards 
instead of one, and thus prevent the bettor from win- 
ni "g- This bunko game is played in the "tenderloin" 
district, and the public hears only an occasional 
squeal from a countryman who has been "touched" 
for more than he can stand. 

In Chinese lottery there are eighty characters on 
a ticket. Duplicate characters are placed in a bowl 
by the three commissioners, who conduct the draw- 
ing, which is simply faking at random twenty char- 
acters from the eighty. These are the winning num- 
bers. It will thus be seen that three-fourths of the 
number on the printed ticket have been taken out, 
and the player has that many chances against him. 
With a brush he marks out the number of characters 
he wishes to play. For example : He marks out the 
ten characters, paying ten cents for the ticket. If 
he has guessed five of the twenty winning numbers, 
he wins twenty cents, and more in proportion to the 
number guessed. Less than five is a blank. Agents 
must return their sales half an hour before the draw- 
ing, so that it would be a very difficult matter to take 
several thousand tickets, compare their numbers, and 
so arrange the drawing that the numbers upon which 
the heaviest sums are laid shall not appear as win- 
ners. 



WHICH IS THE CORRECT DATE? 

Very few of the San Franciscans who will parade 
on the Fourth of July know the history of the day, 
nor do many of the "spread eagle" spellbinders. In 
the early history of this Republic there were many 
who believed that the second day of July was the 
proper one to celebrate. Among these was Mr. John 
Adams, one of the strongest supporters of the several 
Acts of Independence. The resolution severing our 
political relations with Great Britian was passed on 
the second day of July, and was as complete and as 
effective as legislation could make it. It was the Act 
of Rebellion, while the Declaration, adopted two 
days later, is a Bill of Rights, and a Declaration of 
Principals. The Resolution of the Second was, in 
effect, a Declaration of Secession, and of war, if 
necessary. The Rebellion would have taken place 
and war followed even if the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence had not been made. Furthermore, it is 
argued that the 4th of July is not the proper dav 
anyway. While the Declaration of Independence 
was passed on the Fourth, and signed by the State 
Delegations, it was not signed by all the members, 
individually, until the 15th of August. Consequentlv. 
if these signatures were necessary to give it force 
and effect, then, the 15th of August is the da)' to cel- 
ebrate. In either event, it is held that the" Fourth 
is not the correct day! But, it so happened that the 
Fourth was adopted, and custom does not look ai 
technicalities. 



Zinkand's has made its own place. All that is good 

to eat or drink can be obtained there. The best viands and 
good music ought to be enough for any one, and the crowds 
of patrons show this to be the case. 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



SHORTEST RAILROAD IN UNITED STATES. 

California had tl • railroad in th 

iiul three feet widi 

• m any kind of schedule time. This 

tlier crawls, from the junc- 
tion to the pretty and prosperous little city •■ 

off the main line, this tap 
mail was built as a feeder to the town anil it > local 

holders, for the mail i> a paying investment, it 

id. It certainly ought to lie. as passenger 
charged eighty cents for a ten miles ride, which is 

-eil without a blush. Trains leave when they 

get ready, and arrive when they can. Usually the) 

usa with a margin of about two hours, so 

■ reach the Junction in time to connect with the 
north or smith hound trains, and they most al\\a\s 
arrive on time, or within that time. The track is 
over a level plain, lint there seems to he something 
in the laying of the rails or the road-lied that gives 
the cars a rollicking, unsteady motion, something like 
that of a drunken man who is trying to walk straight. 
<)ne unaccustomed to this giddy train soon becomes 
seasick, hut the citizens of Colusa seem to like it, 
and mi entering the coach square themselves for a 
nap, and are soon rocked to sleep. Some of them 
who are a little nervous set their worldly affairs in 
order before embarking on the journey, and still 
there are others who, when in a hurry, drive to the 
Junction in their teams. While the train is slow, i 
controverts the axiom that to he slow is always t (l 
he sure. The conductor is a narrow-guage young 
man. still in his teens, and not having arrived at the 
mustache period. He acts as ticket agent, checks 
haggage, and helps ladies on and off the train, with 
a special eye to the younger ones, and, in addition, 
has ample time to talk with the young ladies hefore 
the train reaches its destination. He is sometimes 
interrupted by his social chats by having to get out 
and drive cattle off the track. Whether the train 
or- the infuriated bovines would maintain the right 
of way in a collision is a matter of doubt, and the 
road takes the benefit of the doubt. The stranger 
has ample time to get a good view of the country, 
but the young conductor firmly refuses to stop the 
train to permit tourists to take a stroll and shoot 
jack-rabbits. When the train starts and lumbers 
along, puffing and snorting, it sometimes stops with- 
out any apparent cause, and gives the sleeping pas- 
sengers a jar that brings visions of a head-on col- 
lision. And it starts with an equal suddenness that 
tries one's nerves. For some time local stockhold- 
ers have been talking about changing it to a broad- 
guage, and others propose changing it to an electric 
line and adopting a real running schedule time. But 
so far the talk has ended in smoke. A story is told 
of a man who was trudging along to the Junction 
and overtook the train, which was having some 
trouble with cattle on the track. One of the passen- 
gers asked the pedestrians to get aboard and ride. 
"No, thanks! I am in a hurry," replied the pedes- 
trian. It is believed, however, that this is a yarn 
spun by one of the local wits of the town, who failed 
in his appeal for an annual pass over the road. 



The domestic method of carpet-cleaning is very unsat- 
isfactory. The expert is always ahead. If you are incredu- 
lous give Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Company, 353 Tehama 
street a trial, and you will see the difference between the 
real thing and the imitation. All the best machinery used 
in the work by Spaulding's. 







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Glen Gentry 

Old Highland Scotch 



FOR. BON VIVANTS 



TILLMANN <SL BCNDEL 

Purveyors to the PACIFIC SLOPE TR.ADE 



C. H. *Rehnftrom. 

FORMERLY SANDERS & JOHNSON 

Tailor. 

PHELAN BUILDING ROOMS I, 2. 3. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6387, SAN FKANCIBCO 

STUTTERING CURED 

Australian System, Melbourne 
School for Stammering. Hours 
1 to 5 p. m. Phone Folsom 239. 

P Cl NORCROSS Market Street and Van Ness Avenue 

WIN. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABJBBDKBN. 



Elegant designs in Hardwood Parquetry at Bush & 

Mallett Co., 328-330 Post St 



Scotch^Whisky 

importer* • MACONDRAY 4. CO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 




— 



■.;.:.w-;>;<! v. 



LiOokorWk 




The Reverend Dr. Guthrie, the new incumbent 
of the Episcopal parish in Alameda, had an experi- 
ence during his early clerical career in the East 
which has placed him in a position wherein he can 
discuss strikes and their causes from personal ex- 
perience. He was attached to a church in a large 
manufacturing town in Massachusetts, where ignor- 
ance was rife among the large population, consisting 
largely of employees in the mills. Among these peo- 
ple Dr. Guthrie worked as a missionary, with a vim 
and spirit which made him appear another John 
Storm to his friends. Among other ideas which he 
evolved for the benefit of his charges, who were to 
him in the light of children, was a system of bath- 
houses on the old-time principle that cleanliness is 
the nearest approach to the godliness wdiich in this 
case was sadly lacking. He raised the money by dint 
of hard work, and for a while the baths were crowded 
all the time by the working men and their families. 
But a cloud arose, and the attendance fell off sud- 
denly and sharply. The parson received nothing but 
hard looks instead of the cheery word which formerly 
greeted him. Finally, the truth came out — the baths 
and their builder were boycotted. The towels had 
been washed, it appears, by' an old Irish woman 
w.ho did not belong to a union. Her removal was de- 
manded and refused, and things went on from bad 
to worse; the trouble spread to the manufactories, 
and until within a week a strike was on which tied 
up the whole town for a period of months. 
* • * 

Apropos of strikes, few people may possibly know 
the cause of the great building strike now on in New 
York, which has kept from one to two hundred thou- 
sand men idle for some weeks past, owing to the 
determined stand taken by the employers who have 
combined in turn to oppose the tyranny of labor. It 
began on the new Stoke's building, which will take 
months yet to complete, owing to the number of 
strikes wdiich have taken place since work began on 
it. Some of the first floor offices had been let, and 
one of the tenants moved a safe in. A few days 
later Mr. Stokes was visited by a committee, who 
told him flat-footed that the safe had to come out 
of the office for the reason that it had been put there 
by non-union men. Out it must come, and out it must 
stay until union men put it back in its place. Mr. 
Stokes reasoned and argued in an attempt to assure 
them that he was not to blame in the matter, and 
that he could not control his tenants in a matter of 
the kind. But all of no avail, and the strike was de- 
clared on, spreading in time all over New York, cost- 
ing the strikers a loss which is not altogether repre- 
sented in money. Mr. Stokes, it is said, is out of 
pocket over $700,000 since he undertook to put this 
building up just through delays caused by trouble 
with the laboring element. A parallel case in a 
minor degree with the Stokes' tie-up, is that of a 
cheap theatre proprietor across the bay. He put 
on a "fire piece," and had a department machine 
driven across the stage every evening to give life 
to the performance. It went all right for a couple 
of nights, when a committee of labor turned up who 
told him if that engine was not relegated to the 



background, his house would be boycotted there and 
then, as the horses were boarded out by the munici- 
pality, and the man who stabled them was non-union. 
Sure enough the house was depopulated every night 
thereafter until the unfortunate proprietor bent his 
knee to the modern Moloch, and purchased immunity 
by the sacrifice of his independence and personal 
liberty, at one time the pride and boast of American 

citizenship. 

• • • 

The list of arrivals at a certain well-known resort 
in Lake County reminds me of something. I hap- 
pened to be at the hotel before the season opened up. 

"And what do people really enjoy most?" I asked 
a man who had seen years of service on the place. 
"Is it the boating or the baths or your ideal trails 
through the hills?" 

The man shook his head. "It's the potatoes," he 
answered. "We cater to the younger generation 
whose dads have 'made it' in a pile. What they like 
most is to build a bon-fire on the shore, and get me 
to bring down a sack of potatoes to roast. Eat them ? 
Why, of course not ! They dump them all in the 
ashes at once. When they cook and break open, the 
Willies' aim them at the 'Johnnies,' and the 'Geral- 
dines' and 'Paulines' clap their hands and scream 
with joy. Oh, here's the place to spend the good 
old summer time !" 

The same man told me a secret. He says there's 
a "whiskey spring" in Lake County, whose waters, 
though a natural mineral, are as cheap a way of 
"seeing things at night" as he knows. A certain 
city physician came up and tried it. Now the doc- 
tor's talking of erecting a quiet little sanitarium. He 
thinks he knows enough people in San Francisco to 

make it a surer thing than the new Alaska diggings. 

• • • 

Did vou'ever make a tour of the watering places 
before the season is on ? It's a great means of edu- 
cation. At Anderson Springs, almost the only 
prominent resort that does not keep a bar, I found 
that a number of San Francisco brewers and wine 
merchants had engaged rooms for their families 

months ago. 

• • • 

I see by the papers, that some of our leading buds 
and blossoms, have gone for a month to the "Fount- 
ain of Youth." Not that it was called that in print. 
It merely mentioned Springs, Lake County, 

Established in California 
...for thirty-five years... 

Repository in San 
Francisco at Mar- 
ket and Tenth Sts., 
has been rebuilt 
>. and enlarged, mak- 
ing it the finest car- 
riage salesroom in 
the United States. 
Five hundred styles 
of vehicles shown, 
probably more than all other stores in town com- 
bined. New things in robes and whips. 

SXUPBBAKFJR BROS. CQ 

Market and Tentn Sts. 

Telephone Priv.te 8S< 



r. 



IM 



July 4. 1903. 



oAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



but tl cently been there, know 

he comiiiL. 

The fountain rauled "ii tli»- h>t of attrac- 

;it the Springs — neither .Iocs the flag float 

ad. There's only a well-worn path through the 

r pines, and a small white board labeled "Ar 

"Anil do they really come for this?" I asked the 
attendant. 

"Do they?" he repeated. "Well, you'd thin'-. 
There's folks in San Francisco who come here every 
year: they're due in June. They come up looking 
yellow and leathery around the eyes. They drop 
down from the stage without energy enough to shake 
the dust off. At first, their appetite's all gone, hut 
you'll see them early in the day and late at nigl 
trailing through them pines. They're sampling that 
water just for tun — that's what they tell each ether. 
but we know what they're at. 

"We patch' up here. It's sort of like varnishing 
<dd chairs. The chair's no stronger when it's 'lone. 
but it looks a heap sight different, anyhow !" 
• * • 

Doctor stay! His spirit lingers. 

Catch it, hold it ere it goes — 
Pick up Johnnie's little fingers. 

Pick up Johnnie's little toes. 

Glory's fiery maw is sated. 

And the Fourth has had its fling; 
Johnnie Jones has celebrated, 

And he hasn't done a thing. 



Buy a wooden leg for Johnnie. . 

That his loss be not detected ; 
Dynamite has done for Johnnie 

Just what all of us expected. 



There wasn't as much hair on the top of his head, 
or on the sides, for that matter, as there is on a bil- 
liard ball. He was as bald as Bob Ingersoll. He set- 
tled down peaceably in the barber shop of the Cali- 
fornia Hotel, said "shave," and went sound asleep. 
When he awoke the barber was rubbing his face 
and gazing absent-mindedly out of the window. 

"Where do you want your hair parted, sir?" asked 
the barber, still in his trance. 

"Oh," grunted the bald man, "anywhere between 

the ears." 

• • * 

The town of San Francisco is getting so good or 
so prosperous or so something that the newspapers 
will have to go out of business if it keeps up. "Sin 
is news and news is sin," says Mr. Dooley. And it 
must be that San Franciscans sin no more, for the 
papers have never, in the memory of this present 
generation, been so hard put for local news. It is 
reported that when information of the Point Reyes 
train wreck came in, one city editor ejaculated 
piously : "Thank heaven !" 
Then, .realizing how it sounded, he added: 
"Well, if there had to be a wreck, I am at least 
thankful that it came just now." 



Fine stationery, steel anal copperplate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Pears' 

Whoever wants soft 
hands, smooth hands, white 
hands, or a clear complex- 
ion, he and she can have 
both : that is, if the skin is 
naturally transparent; un- 
less occupation prevents. 

The color you want to 
avoid comes probably nei- 
ther of nature or work, but 
of habit. 

Use Pears' Soap, no 
matter how much; but a 
little is enough if you use 
it often. 

Established over 100 years. 



Compiled from Custom House Reports 
Bu, S. T. ALLAIRE £• SON 

IMPORTS OF CHAMPAGNE 

INTO THE UNITED STATES 

From January isl to June 1st 

I 1902 I 1903 



Moet & Chandon 

("White Seal" and "Brut Imperial") 

G. H. Mumm & Co 

Rulnart, Pere & Fils 

Pommery & Greno 

Vive Cliquot 

Louis Roederer 

Piper Heidsieck 

Pol Roger 

Dry Monopole 

Due de Montebello 

P. Ruinart 

Perrier Jouet 

Bouche 

Jules Mumm & Co 

Royal 

Ayala 

Reinghold 

Bollinger 

Various other imports 

Grand Total 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents for 

Moet & Chandon Champagne 

2 1 6-2 1 8 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



| Cases 
43.I7I 

49,249 
6,051 

11,301 
4,445 
4,637 
5,276 
1,863 
2,500 
1.611 

635 
714 
394 

389 
7,375 


| Cases 
60,978 

54,900 


8,626 


6,310 


6,060 


4,116 


3,209 


3,057 


2,648 
2,407 
1,697 
1,000 


672 
669 
284 
200 
125 
100 
8.730 


139,621 


165.688 



Phoni Main 1231 



Bbbakfabt From 5:30. 



Lomch Fbom 11 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

Cures Poison-Oak and all Skin Diseases. Sold by all druggists 



Hannagan's Cafe and Grill 

FINEST BRANDS OF WINES 
AND LIQUORS 

W. N HANNIGAN, PROP. • 120126 CALIFORNIA ST., S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 




|ffi!1tSJf|gF| 



LibraryGable 



.y.v:"-''-'- 



■ingjpsaa.a 



_;:_ 




By Roland Whittle. 

The fourth volume of the 

Jewish Encyclopedia. Jewish Encyclopedia, pub- 
lished by Funk & Wag- 
nails, New York, keeps up the reputation of its pre- 
decessors. A glance through its seven hundred pages 
is sufficient to convince the least educated of the 
tremendous debt which civilization and the arts owe 
to the Jews. Besides the biographical, geographi- 
cal, and historical facts which are essential, and 
form a necessary part of any such compilation as 
this, one conies across peculiar and interesting little 
bits of information and generalization respecting the 
Jewish race. Thus, under the head of "Climation or 
Acclimatization," we read: "The Jews furnish per- 
haps the best statistics for solving the problem of 
climation. They live, thrive, perpetuate their kind, 
and preserve their identity in almost every climate. 
Andree aptly says that 'the Jew is able to acclima- 
tize himself with equal facility in hot and cold lati- 
tudes, and to exist without the assistance of native 
races. He lasts from generation to generation in 
Surinam (Dutch Giana) or in Malabar (India), 
tropical climates where Europeans in the course of 
time die out. On the other hand 'their increase in 
Sweden is said to be greater than that of the Chris- 
tian population, and it is apparent on comparison 
of statistics that even a little Semitic blood is a 
great help in acclimatization.' " Facts of this sort, 
which would be very difficult to obtain elsewhere, 
abound in this work. There is a peculiar interest 
attaching to the particular volume under discussion, 
and the discussion of the Dreyfus case. The famous 
"affaire" is handled with consummate tact and self- 
restraint. The story is made to tell itself; the facts 
are there with the logical results of the mass of mis- 
erable fabrication. There is a photograph of the 
famous "bordereau," the denouement is closely de- 
scribed, and the effects of the investigation into its 
authenticity set out with faithful diligence. The 
secret "dossier" also comes in for examination, and 
a mass of information is given which renders this 
volume invaluable to any one who in future may 
wish to study the Dreyfus matter. 

In the same volume we find lives of the two Dis- 
raelis, father and son, of whom the former was a 
distinguished writer, author of the curiosities of lit- 
erature, and the latter, afterwards Earl of Beacons- 
field, Premier of England, and the favorite states- 
man of the late Queen Victoria. Too much praise 
cannot be bestowed either upon this work or the 
mode of its publication. 

"The Sins of a Saint," by 

The Sins of a Saint. J. R. Aitken, published by 
D. Appleton & Co., New 
York, calls itself "an historical romance." As a 
matter of fact it is neither romance nor history. The 
story is a tangled mass of impossibilities and im- 
probabilities. It does not even possess the merit 
of being interesting. It is trite in method, artificial 
in construction, and unredeemed by even fair Eng- 
lish. As for the historical part, it is supposed to 
deal with the times of Dunstan and the schemes of 
the Saint that pulled the Devil's nose. It is swayed 
bv the greatest possible prejudice against Dunstan's 



work, and is nothing but a hideous caricature of per- 
sons and events. It is inconceivable that any one 
could have had the impudence to sit down and so 
mutilate facts, and at the same time proclaim that 
he was writing a romance founded upon historical 
fact. The book is worse than bad — it is dangerous. 
It instils false ideas of men and things into the 
minds of the young, for such "historical romances" 
are read chiefly by the young. It keeps alive the 
fires of sectarian hate, and really accomplishes a tre- 
mendous amount of harm. It is merely banal imita- 
tion of some of the worst work of the most uncon- 
scionable perverters of historical fact. 

"The Siege of Youth," by 
The Siege of Youth. Frances Clarke, is a silly, 
long drawn out novel 
without any reason for its existence. The style of 
the novel may be judged from the titles of the chap- 
ters, which comprise such original and startling 
phrases as "Reaping the Whirlwind," "A Young 
Man's Fancies," and others equally striking. As a 
sample of the English, the following extract may be 
taken : 

' 'You were wondering, I suppose, which of my an- 
cestors was an organ-grinder,' she said to him. 'The 
Bow of sound is analagous to a barrel-organ — clearly 
so." 

The (low of sound is "analagous" to the babble of 
an ill-educated, half-trained person whose time might 
lie better employed in the laundry than in inflicting 
her mutilated English upon an already book-stuffed 
public. There is no redeeming point in the book. It 
goes on for interminable pages of the same wretched 
twaddle. 

"The Captain's Toll-Gate" is 

The Captain's Frank R. Stockton's last book, 

Toll-Gate. published by D. Appleton & Co. 

The book is largely taken up 
with a biographical notice by his wife, which gives 
some interesting facts of Stockton's life. She ac- 
counts for the uniform optimism of his work upon 
temperamental grounds. The story is simple enough, 
in fact too simple, to be a story, but it affords good 
play to the characteristic Stockton humor. There 
is one character which contained possibilities of 
which Stockton's own peculiar temperament did not 
allow him to take full advantage. That is Claude 
Locker, an ass of a poet, who in the hands of a more 
robust writer might have become immortal. The 
book is good Stocktonese, quiet, a trifle tame, but 
with more real humor about it than the vast major- 
ity of his contemporaries can lay claim to. 

In "Truth and a Woman" we get the agnostic 
question, veteran old jade, trotted out again for the 
delectation of the novel reader, and relieved by the 
introduction of a fatuous and unsatisfactory love 
story. Sancta simplicitas! And goodness knows, 
the thing is simple enough. A powerful, free-think- 
ing professor, rather soft in his off moments and 
affectionate to a "most inordinate degree, a parson 
who is defeated early in the game by the contro- 
versial professor, and being worsted in love, takes 
vows of celibacy and hies him off to join the Cowley 
Fathers, and a silly, empty-headed theatrical young 
woman, not worth the attention of a nineteen-year- 
old boy, let alone a couple of men who are fighting 
their way in the world. There is the material, and, 
frankly speaking, it is too thin. All the technique, 
and there is more than the usual amount, will not 
save the book from being other than it is— an at- 
tempt to do too much with insufficient material. 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



A View of the Fourth 



From Another World 



li of July night, an.l the Visitor from 
scraper overlo 
clcbration. The black air 'was filled with a 

,n B ' lire that streaked through the night 

and vanished into the sideria! spaces; Of I. right hail- 
that sln.t up from earth and burst on high with a 
rt, tilling the heavens with brilliant, evanescent 
5« u st( rs in the hues of purple, red and burn- 

ing copper. 

"What are these things called?" asked the Visitor, 
whose iiKiuisitivencss was becoming almost a bore. 

"Those," said the man who was showing him 
around, "are called tire-works. They are being sent 
up at great expense by the Celebration Committee." 

"I have been on earth long enough to know that 
they are not sent into the sky every night," said the 
Visitor, "and from this I should naturally imply that 
there was something doing." 

"Well, rather," exclaimed the Worldling. "This, 
I should like to inform you, is the Fourth of July.' 1 

"I have observed the calendar," said the Martian, 
"but I don't see anything about that date that makes 
it necessary for you to paint imitation constellations 
all over the sky." 

"That," replied the American, "is because you are 
not so fortunate as to have been born south of 
Canada and north of Mexico. These skyrockets and 
Roman candles are being shot off to celebrate the 
fact that some 127 years ago the American people 
chased the British off their map and established a 
free and independent republic." 

"Did the American people chase the British off 
with sky-rockets and Roman candles?" asked the 
naive traveler. 

"Scarcely," said the American, who was becom- 
ing impatient. "Our patriots met 'em at Lexington 
and shot 'em full of lead pills, and when the enemy 
had vamoosed they set up, as I said, the greatest 
republic in the world " 

"So I understand," said the logical alien, "but did 
you found the greatest republic in the world through 
the help of these sky-rockets and things?" 

"Not as I know ©f," said the citizen in disgust. 

"Then pardon my foreign way of looking at 
things," said the Martian, "but what, would you 
please explain, have these great sparks up in the 
air to do with the Fourth of July?" 

"I'll hit you in a minute!" said the American. 
"Can't you see that they're used to celebrate with ?" 

"Just be patient a minute," said the bore from an- 
other star, but at that moment a diversion occurred. 
Something big and red had exploded with a bang, 
and the figure of a man was seen lying prone on the 
sidewalk far below. There was an excited rush of 
people, and an ambulance came clanging around the 
corner. 

"Ah," said the Martian at last, "I see, I see. The 
fiery demonstration is in the nature of a ceremony 
to your god of war, and the victim below is merely a 
human sacrifice. A very clever idea." 

So saying, the Visitor from Mars pulled on his tin 
helmet, took a chew from a plug of radium, and 
mounted his flying machine. 

"Oh, must you go?" asked the Worldling, trying 
politely to conceal a sigh of relief. 

"Oh, yes," said the Martian, "I think I'll take a 
run over to Chicago and study the trust question." 



Grand Opera on Talking Machines 

In your Otvn Home 

The Columbia Phonograph Company Announces a 

Most Extraordinary Achievement 




The Dtso Orapbophone 

Marking an Epoch in the Art of Recording and Repro- 
ducing Sound 

For the first time In the history of Talking Machine Art 

SUCCESSFUL RECORDS 

have been made of the yoloes of the 

VC/orld-'Renokvned Singers 
MARCELLA SEMBRICH T XVlT l 

SCHUMANN-HE1NK Th c e °£S£" 

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SCOTTIand CAMPANARI T ^ r ? r „ e " Mt 

and mnoy other members of toe 

Metropolitan Opera Company 

ThlB reBUlt has been Becured through the earnest Co-operation of these 
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Each record bearB the personal signature of the singer. They are In the 
form of 10 Inob discs (Flat. Indestructible Records), adapted to all dlBO 
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ORAND OPERA RECORDS, PRICE $2.00 EACH 

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Write for Catalogue de Luxe 

Columbia Diso Rbookds can be used on all disc talking machines. 
Columbia Moulded Records can be used on all talking 'maohlnes 
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San Francisco : 12> Geary St. Los A-nqblbs : 323 So. Mai n 8 . . 



Excursion East 

I am organizing an excursion to points East, to 
leave San Francisco June 24 to 30. 

Rates for round-trip tickets will be exceptional- 
ly low. Stop-overs granted also. 

Write me where you intend going and I will 
quote rates, with folders and map of route. 

F. W. PRINCE, 

641 Market Street. San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 



i* 





own \~rier 



"Hear the Crier?',hbat the devil art /,W,__^ 
"One that will play the devil ', j/r, miithyou 



Is there something in the air of Southern California 
that makes the inhabitants dippy, hoppy-eyed, prone 
to strange beliefs? Now, mark you, I am not refer- 
ring to Point Loma or to Katherine Tingley, since 
she has sued the Los Angeles Times and proved her 
faith, legally at least, far superior to the Christian, 
Mohammedan, Jewish, Mormon or Confucian. What 
I am referring to is that cobwebby band of spirit- 
ualists who have allowed themselves to be lured by 
a spook faker into seeking gold in a forest of Guate- 
mala. At the latest accounts they are camped in the 
middle of a South American swamp, where their 
most industrious trance-medium can call up nothing 
but mosquitoes and miasma. What they want is the 
money to get home, but I am beginning to think that 
it is almost better to play the races than to subsidize 
fools who have been caught in the mesh of their 
folly. Let Los Angeles help its idiots. We have 
enough of our own. Perhaps Cowboy Lummis, 
whose specialty is admiring Indians and other queer 
people, will start a standing fund for 

"Big Jim," the gambler, 's hurried back to China 
With a million Yankee dollars in his wad, 

He will teach them how to gamble back in China 
And start a shell-game on the good old sod. 

He'll teach the skillful poker back in China, 
And steal the coolie's yens by methods slick, 

He will bunco yellow rustics from the province 
And sell the bogus stocks and gilded brick. 

He will run a gambling palace a la 'Frisco, 

Where the Canton boy may drop his little horde, 
He will keep a handsome fund to bribe officials 

And spread his Yankee vices like a lord. 
"Big Jim," the gambler, 's hurried back to China 

With a cool, ill-gotten million in his vest, 
Just to show the poor benighted folk of China 

How they do it in the great, enlightened West. 

Is the eminent W. R. Price, L. L. S., Ph. D., Ps. M. 
and several more sections of the alphabet a psycho- 
hypnotic kissing bug? This sounds like the opening 
query in a Sunday supplement article, but I ask it 
in all seriousness. Dr. Price wears whiskers and 
practices hypnotism for that aggregation of dotty 
Dons, the Psychic Research Society. The trancey 
old gentleman has an interesting lady subject once in 
a while, it seems, and hysteria is more or less preva- 
lent among the fairest of these. Hysteria, above all, is 
trivial and annoying to a man of research, so the 
doctor has cast about, and has hit upon a beautifully 
simple remedy. When a young lady under his 
charge comes out of a trance and shows symptoms of 
intermittant weeps and giggles, the doctor adminis- 
ters a nerve tonic in the shape of a purely scientific 
kiss. There can be nothing imagined more unworldly 
or unfleshly than a Psychical Research kiss — but if 
the Doctor were in a less spooky business I would 
make so bold as to accuse him of being a giddy old 
thing. 



Now what is the matter with the mysterious flat 
at 845 Devisadero street? The unfurnished flat, the 
hag-ridden flat, the noise-producing fiat which was 
rented by a stranger and used for what outlandish 
purposes nobody knows? The papers have been 
trying vainly to make a mystery out of the place, 
but unfortunately no mystery will show up. Nobody 
has been drugged and killed, no children are missing, 
no counterfeit coins have flooded the market. Then 
what is the matter with 845 Devisadero street that 
a man goes there at night, but does not need any 
furniture? What is the cause of the strange noises 
that issue therefrom? Perhaps the man is training 
down flesh and uses the place as a gymnasium. Per- 
haps he is an elocutionist and goes there to practice 
Delsarte. If the latter is the case he ought to be 
arrested before he gets at the public — otherwise the 
house at 845 Devisadero street is nobody's business, 
so long as the occupant pays his rent and breaks 
none of the city's statutes. 

So a magazine poem has brought Clarence Urmy, 
poet, a prospective bride, and made him a co-respond- 
ent in a divorce case. Mr. Urmy lives in San Jose, 
where you would not imagine a poet would flourish. 
You usually regard San Jose as a prune metropolis 
profusely decorated by monuments from the fecund 
chisel of Rupert Schmid. But Clarence Urmy has 
flourished there and written good poetry all the time. 
Formerly he loved the wife of a commercial traveler, 
and when she went away he wrote a poem about 
her, and sold it to Munsey's, and the rhyme was duly 
published. Now, when Mrs. Russell (for that was 
the lady's name), saw the Verse, she regarded it as 
a message, so she told all to her husband, packed 
up her grip and came to California and Clarence. 
I have heard of love notes being left in books and 
periodicals, but actually printing them in a magazine 
is a stunt that in up-to-dateness outranks the news- 
paper "personals." Editors had better take care how 
they publish passionate poetry in the future, or they 
may find themselves charged with aiding and abet- 
ting a divorce. 

If my memory is not failing me, I took a crack at 
somebody a while back for not arresting and hang- 
ing a few of the Chinamen who are doing the murder- 
ing in Chinatown. You may talk as you will of the 
undesirability of the Chinese as citizens, but I tell 
you, good neighbor, that if Chinatown was as well 
regulated by the authorities as the rest of the city 
there would be no kick coming about the yellow fel- 
lows. I don't believe in lynching or abusing or ex- 
cluding Chinese, but I do emphatically believe in 
punishing them when they are guilty. How many 
murders have there been in Chinatown during the 
last year? How many Chinamen have been duly 
executed at San Quentin and Folsom? The percent- 
age of punishment to the percentage of crime you will 
find is appallingly, gruesomely small. A Chinese doc- 
tor was deliberately butchered last Thursday. Will 
anybody suffer for it? I Venture to opine that no- 
body will. It is not the Chinaman's fault. Execu- 
tive carelessness in San Francisco has made murder 
a mere misdemeanor or less to the grinning coolie. 
Personally, it is to his credit that he don't take ad- 
vantage of the conditions and do more of it. 

A new swindle by which a pair of rascals rented 
army captains' uniforms, and imposed upon the in- 
nocent as army officers, has been discovered by the 
failure of the crooks to return the uniforms. Look 
for the woman. Her fondness for bright buttons is 
at the bottom of the trouble. 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE FIRST REGIMENT IN CAMP. 

The First Reg. Inf., N. G. C, held its annual en- 
campment in Santa Rosa fr.»m June aoth to 
It was the m jsful encampment in the his- 

ition. Tlie camp was pitched in 

rlc Park, kindly placed at the di t the 

icnt by Mr. Mark McDonald, a wealthy resident 

The tents were pitched among the 

which made the camp comfortable and shady. 

"Hie sanitary conditions and the plumbing were 

perfect, even shower-baths being supplied. 

Battalion and regimental drills were practiced, 
and the sham battle on Saturday last was a beautiful 
and stirring spectacle. Company B of this regiment 
constructed a bridge over an imaginary' creek, and 



their work may he judged from the fact that the 
entire w..rk • within seven mil 

from the tune the fir-t plank was laid. Thl 
cal opera) of high order. 

oncl Thomas F. 1 (Neil d< - redil 

for hi t'ul management of the camp and Ins 

handling of the ir. ...)>-. Major McCreagh and M 
Kilmer, commanding the attacking and 
force respectively, received high commendation from 
the inspecting officers and spectators. 






— "The place to buy Hardwood Floors." Bush & Mallptt 
328-330 Post SL 



The Smith Premier Is the standard typewriter, and 

embodies the good points o* all typewriting machines. 



Tonopah==Tonopah 

INVEST NOW IN TONOPAH CENTRAL MINING STOCK 

Advanced in Price Jan. 15 from 25c. to 50c. a Share. Sure to go to Par. — $1 per share — soon. 




*%. 



THE TONOPAH C^Oggf 



5,*- "ft, 







JJCrteL., 







No risk whatever in investing in stock in the Tonopah Central Mining Company. It's bound to double 
and quadruple in value very soon. 100,000 shares of Treasury stock are being sold WHOLLY FOR THE 
PURPOSE OF DEVELOPING THE PROPERTY. 

The Company owns Eight of the best located claims. The ore is rich in gold and silver. Work Is 
now going rapidly forward. A double compartment shaft is now down 90 feet, fully timbered through- 
out. The following extract is from the Mining and Engineering Review, and bears out the claims of 
eminent experts that the Tonopah Central Mining Company's property is more favorably located than 
any of the other properties in the Tonopah District: "Another rich strike has been maae in Tono- 
pah. This time it is in the main shaft of the California Tonopah, which adjoins the Tonopah Central 
(formerly known as the St. Patrick Group.) A ledge of ore has been opened up which goes over $500 
per ton, and is in direct line with the Tonopah Central Ledge." 

The stock of this company is non-assessable, with a par value of $1.00 per share. The location of 
the company's mine on the slope of Butler Mountain, between the famous Mipah ledge and the rich 
strikes of Gold Mountain indicates that its stock will be a dividend paying investment, and that it will 
have an early increase in value. 

A hoist capable of sinking to a depth of 350 feet has been installed, and it is only a matter of a 
short time when the ledge will be encountered. The California lonopah struck their ledge at a depth 
of 127 feet, and it is 40 feet wide, and is continued through the properties of the Tonopah Central Min- 
ing Company. 

All stockholders participate equally in the profits of the company. 

Investors in shares of this company have no taxes, no assessments, fines, interests or liabilities of 
any kind to pay. 

The shareholders' interests are mutual and collective. There is no preferred stock, inasmuch aa the 
original stockholders have placed all their stock in escrow there to remain until the mine is on an 
absolutely dividend paying basis. 

No safer or more profitable investment can be made than is offered you in the shape of stock in the 
TONOPAH CENTRAL MINING CO. Address all communications and make remittances to 



OFFICES 401-2.3 CALL BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



J. H. N. CLAUSEN, Assistant Secretary 



J 



13 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 




Wand 

foCdeoin no wand but ^feature's 




By Barton Pittman 
The Amelia Bingham season at the Columbia 
Theatre was inaugurated last Monday night with 
great success, and the production of Clyde Fitch's 
play, "The Climbers," has been voted an unprece- 
dented triumph. The actress-manager has fulfilled 
all advance promises, and has brought here the most 
complete company of players seen on a local stage 
in some time past. So fine a dramatic organization 
one rarely meets nowadays, when all interest is usu- 
ally centered around the work of a star. Miss Bing- 
ham has done otherwise, and brings her production 
to a point of perfection by casting the piece with as 
strong an array of talent as is obtainable. "The 
Climbers" is most aggressively a Clyde Fitch play, 
and while many of Fitch's detractors resent the shal- 
low and cynical side of social life which it portrays, 
it is artistic and real, and even more intense and 
convincing than "Beau Brummel," Fitch's first bid 
for fame. It depicts New York life to-day, the exclu- 
sive circles of the very rich, all of whom are "climb- 
ers"— climbers after happiness, more wealth, noto- 
riety and the many human goals which attract us 
all. Miss Bingham, as one of the climbers, is Blanche 
Sterling, a young woman married to a dishonest man 
and moral coward. Wilton Lackaye is the husband, 
and even in this despicable role his art dominates 
every situation, even Miss Bingham's scenes. There 
are several genuine moments in the play when we 
almost forgive the horrible realism of the first act, 
which shows a wealthy widow and her daughter sell- 
ing their Paris gowns to friends on the day of their 
bereavement. The cast is excellent, almost as good 
as the one originally used in New York, and so great 
is the success of the piece that it will be continued 
next week. Bijou Fernandez, as the slangy girl, is 
inimitable ; W. L. Abingdon is good enough, but little 
. Minnie Dupree is sadly missed with all due respect 
to her successor. After two weeks of "The Climbers" 
we are to have a "Modern Magdalene," another of 
Miss Bingham's New York successes. 
• • • 

"In Central Park," which has succeeded "In Wash- 
ington" at the Grand, is perhaps on for a long run. 
judging from its enthusiastic reception this week. 
It is not undue praise to say that Raymond & Cav- 
erly are just as clever comedians as the original 
Rogers Brothers who popularized this set of pieces 
in New York. Audiences seem never to tire of their 
exaggerated German jokes and their unsophisticated 
actions, and truly as laugh-provokers these cannot 
be surpassed. "In Central Park" is more elaborate 
from scenic and sartorial standpoints than its pre- 
decessor, and while the general character of the two 
entertainments is the same, there is no repetition 
in music, dialogue or situations. While Ravmond 
& Caverly are the bright particular stars of all these 
Rogers Brothers pieces, others among the principals 
acquitted themselves with great credit, notablv 
Cheridah Simpson, Budd Ross and Anna Wilks. 
Louise Moore divided the honors with some of the 
other principals in solo work, and Camille Walling, 
new to the stage, made her first appearance in this 
production. An enumeration of the clever musical 
and comedy bits done by the various artists does 



not explain the witchery of such a merry melange of 
nonsense as "In Central Park," yet the witchery is 
there, and irresistible, too. In order to understand, 
one must sit through the performance and revel in 
the harmonious color scheme of the marching ballet, 
the obvious and sometimes dear and familiar jokes 
of the comedians, and feast his eyes upon the pretty 
ones in the chorus who are now designated as "show 
girls." 

• • • 

James Corrigan is always artistic, and throughout 
the wide range of his work I recall no character in 
which he seems more at home than in "Joshua Whit- 
comb," which has been the Central's success all 
this week. It is a quiet, rural play of the "Way 
Down East" type, and those opposed to innovation 
in things theatrical are sure to like it. There are no 
surprises and little unexpected in the plot or dia- 
logue. The inevitable quartette chimes in always 
at just the right moment, and popular songs are 
scattered through the piece. Still, Mr. Corrigan 
makes the character of Joshua Whitcomb loveable 
and real. Eugenia Lawton, Nellie Primrose, Car! 
Beach, Myrtle Vane and the others in the support 

were happily cast. 

• * • 

The Tivoli's latest offering is "Madeleine, or The 
Magic Kiss," a comic opera in which the libretto 
shows some ambition to possess a little more sense 
and continuity of story than is usually considered 
necessary. The music, by Julian Edwards, is as 
clever as anything else done by this prolific com- 
poser. Edwin Stevens in the leading part was quite 
successful. The role suits him as well as anything 
in which he has appeared here. Ferris Hartman and 
Edward Webb both had congenial parts. 

The Tivoli puts on "Wang" again next week, with 
the same fine cast that figured in the former pre- 
sentation. Edwin Stevens scored a distinct triumph 
in the role of the Regent of Siam, and many are 
anxious to see him again in the part. The popularity 
of the opera never wanes here, and good business will 
no doubt be the rule. 

V • • 

White Whittlesey in "Monbars," at the Alcazar, 
almost justified the things which the press agent 
said in advance about the performance, and this 
is the highest praise that can be bestowed upon an 
actor or a play. Robert Mantell's earlier success 
is closely identified with this thrilling drama of the 
mercurial French, and Whittlesey does it so well 
that he makes us forget Mantell. The play is a har- 
rowing story of adventure, in which love plays but 
a secondary part, and can boast one thoroughlv origi- 
nal scene, worthy in its lack of precedent of Clyde 
Fitch. This is where Robert Monbars (Whittleseyl 
cauterizes his arm with a red-hot iron after having 
been bitten by a mad dog. AH through, the play of- 
fers him the best opportunity to exercise his art, 
which he does most successfully. "Monbars" is de- 
cidedly a one-man show, and while the supporting 
company is good, the individual members have little 
chance. Bertha Creighton has an uncongenial and 
trying role, the daughter of a Marquis who weds 
Monbars through necessity, and she makes the best 
of it. The others in the company are uniformly good. 
"Monbars" is well liked, and would doubtless draw 
good houses for some time, but next week "Brother 
Officers" will succeed it. This is a military play, 
in which Mr. Whittlesey will have the leading part. 
Its success in the East was great, but it is a new- 
comer here. 






July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'3 



Thcatrc-gocrs of tins city take il delight 

. there are cruditii 
,er art which are rapidl 

ifornia 1 heatre all tins 
- 
lits her far hotter than 
require Icittenishncss, ami she is the tragedy 
111 the stronger scenes. Where >lu discovers the in 
nee of Loris, and to save him implores him to 
remain with her, she rises alrriOS J. E. 

J. Ratcliffe gives a remarkable impersonation "i 
Loris. Nance O'Neil plays "Fedora" for the last 
time to-morrow evening. 

Next week will he entirely devoted to a repretoire 
of Miss U Neil's greatest successes, commencing on 

ndav night with "Magda." 

• • • 

The Orpheum management takes a commendable 
pride in announcing that Miss Mabel McKinley, 
the beautiful soprano and favorite niece of the late 
President McKinley, will begin a limited engage- 
ment here this coming week. Miss McKinley studied 
under the famous La Couree of Paris, who takes no 
one unless possessed of extraordinary talent. Charles 
Dickson appears in a sketch. "A Pressing Matter." 
Mr. Dickson has always ranked high among come- 
dians, having achieved many notable successes at 
the old Baldwin Theatre. William and Kitty Har- 
beck ; Mosher, Houghton and Mosher,. Young and 
De Voie, Barney Fagan and Henrietta Byron, Julian 
Rose, "Our Hebrew Friend," and the Wang Doodle 
Comedy Four, are the others in the excellent enter- 
tainment offered. 

• * • 

Next Monday evening James Corrigaji will be seen 
at the Central in a grand revival of the powerful 
melodrama, "Kidnapped." It is a strong play, with 
plot and counter-plot, and complications which keep 
the interest at high tension. The play abounds in 
striking scenic effects, and among these is the start- 
ling leap for life and love from Brooklyn Bridge, "a 

hundred and fifty feet to the bottom." 

• * * 

The Lutz Brothers, known as the "twentieth cen- 
tury marvels," who created such a sensation in this 
city a short time ago, will make their first appearance 
at the Chutes this coming week. Evans and St. 
John, Fred Wadell, the Waldron Brothers, Kartelli, 
Robinson and Grant complete the programme. The 

amateurs will appear on Thursday evening as usual. 

• * • 

Few as satisfactory performances are given as the 
Weber & Field's burlesques at Fischer's Theatre. 
Aside from the fact that the productions are put on 
superbly, everything about the plays is unique and 
incomparable. "Twirly Whirly" is something fine 
and worthy as a show. It is always delightful. The 
costumes are fresh and beautiful, and so are the 
girls. Extensive preparations are already going on 
for the next double bill at this house. It will con- 
sist of two travesties, "Under the Red Globe" and 
"The Three Musketeers." 



The Hardwood Floors are better than carpets. See them at 

Bush & Mallett Co., 328-330 Post street. 



(3fter the Theater 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band »nd anjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering p'^ct after 
the theatre la over. 



No Dust 
While Dancing 



Flr-or W»i »!nk* Intr. ih#> W..-J fend 
p*M .f ibf> bra vlf ful 17 r/"I'»h#*d dfet rln« *irt*f* 11 ««*- ■ Bi <\v\ 
d «-* n->i rat> int.i lanftor site* to lb* •*..<•• JaM •print)** a% tad the 
dan*-*™ win do tbe i-wet. DocaootaoM draeM* or •l«tbes "f th* Inanl 
fabrlo 

for aa>by Maok * Co, Langley A Mlcba*U and KM.ngton * Co, 
San Franrlaoo; Kirk, (leery A Co., acra medio, an d F. W. nraun A - 
Los Angrlea, 

Bowdlear's Floor Wax 



Columbia Theatre. 



O0TT1.0B, Marx A Co, 

Lessees and Manager*. 
Keginolng next Monday, July Gib. 3d week 

AMELIA BINGHAM 

and tier company Id Clyde Fltoh'sgrcatest play 

THE CLIMBERS 

A production of rare worth. 

Next play— "A Modern Magdalen." 



Alcazar Theatre 



BeLaioo A Matxr, Proprietor! 
E. D. Prick, Oen Manager. Pbone Alcaxa' 
Regular matinee Thursday and Saturday. Week commencing Monday 
evening next July 6, tbo eminent actor 

WHITE WHITTLESEY 

Wltb tbe Alcazar Company In tbe English Military Drama 

BROTHER OFFICERS 

First time at popular prices. Evening— 25c to 75c. Mattneci Tbnraday 
and Saturday 19c to 50c, July 18— Tbe Prisoner of Zenda. 

C*r>r\\- vn 1 Than + ra B elssco A MByer, Props. Market Street, 
V^kSljLlUI 1 llCUllC. opp. City Hall. Phone South 533. 

Week starting Monday. July eth, 1903 Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Special engagement of the favorite actor 

cJAMES CORRIGAN 

In a magnificent production of tbe famous melodrama 

".KIDNAPPED" 

Prices: Evenings 10c to 50c. Matinees, 10c. 15c, 35c. 
Next— James Corrigan In "Muldoon's Picnic" 



Fischer's Theatre 

"Twirly WbtrlyV'a go, It's an up-to-date show. 

It's Ju»t the best thing ever written we know. 

Come to Fisher's tonight, where all round you la bright, 

And enjoy to the fait the most beautiful sight 

POTENT MIGHTY MASTERFUL OF FUN 



Reserved Seats Night prices 25-30-750. 
3ft-50c. Children at Matinee* 10 35c. 
Watch for the great double bill. 



Ban. Matinees 



Grarjd Opera House 



''The Show Is tbe largest and best of Its kind that has ever been brought 
oat from New York"— Examiner. Tonight and every night, 

RAYMOND AND GAUERLY 

And oar superb New York company In tbe faBclnatlDg muelcl eoce&trl- 
olty 

IN CENTRAL PARK 

Prices: 250, 60o, 75 eta. 



California Theatre. 



Tonight and tomorrow night. Last of Fedora. Commencing Monday 
evening. 

MISS NANCE O'NEIL 

In repertoire. Monday evening and Satnrday matinee— "Magda" To.es* 
day — "Queen Elizabeth." Wednesday — "Hedda Gabter." Thursday — 
"Fedora" Frldav and Saturday evenings — "The Jewess" Sunday — 
"Oliver TwlBt." Last week of the Nance O'Neil Beason, commencing Mon 
day July 13— "Romeo and Juliet." 



Tivoli Opera House. 



MliS. ERNESTINE KRKLINO, 

Proprietor and Manager 
Tonight and Sunday night last of Madeline 
Next week revival of the famous comlo opera 

WANG 

With Stevens In his great role of Wang. Next— Tbe Highwayman. 
Popular prices 29. 50 and 75a. Telephone Bush 9. 



Orpheun> 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

O'Farrcll St., between s'tockton and Powell streets. 



Week commencing Sunday Matinee, July 5. 

A PRODIGIOUS SHOW 

Mabel McKinley, the favorfte niece of the late President McKinley: 
Charles Dickson and cornnaov: the Great Harbecks: MoBber, Houghton 
and Mosher; Toungand De Vols: Julian Rose: the Blograpb: the Wang 
Doodle Comedy Fou rand last week of Barney Fagan and Henrietta Byron 
Usual matinee and > prices. 



14 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 4, 1903. 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide. New Tricks in Society 



BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladies and families 
Private entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street 
below Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT, N. E. corner Eddy and Ma- 
son Sts. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, 
Main 429. A. B. Blanco & D. Brun. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY, 838 Guerrero street. Selections on appro- 
val; any place in the world. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public and TJ. S. Pension At 
torney. Office at Lincoln Investment Co., 620 Market St, 
opp. Palace Hotel. Tel. Bush 618. Residence 415 Van Ness. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, 318 
Main St. Iron work of every description designed and 
constructed. 



RESTAURANTS. 



BAY 

STATE 

RESTAURANT 

N. n. ADLER, Prop. 



Ladies' Grill. 

Private Rooms. 

Eleeant Apartments. 

Open AllNlehl. 
Private entrance. O'Farretl, near Stockton 
Main entrance 

29-35-37 Stockton Street 
Tel. Main 5057 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Every deltcatessan. 

Domestic and imported Beers. 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



BOB KERN PHONE MAIN 1316 J. H. PEIN 

'Bob Kjern SSL Co. 



THE BOUQUET 
SALOON 



634 Market Street 



San Francisco 



Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

FINE MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Served every day from 11 to 2 o'clock. Finest 
Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

SEEBA « DOLAN. Proprietors 

312 Sansome St., cor. Halleck, San Francl»co. 
Telephone Black 602. 
Red Top Whiskey now on sale. 



Have You Noticed 

That the Sunday Call is publishing in two, or at 
most three issues, a complete novel? 

"To Have and to Hold." 

"When Knighthood Was in Flower" 

"Lazarre" 

"The Octopus" 
and a half-dozen others of the leading popular novels 
have already appeared. 

In addition, short stories by the best writers ap- 
pear every Sunday. 

Subscribers thereby secure one or more $1.50 
novels without charge, besides having at hand the 
best newspaper published in San Francisco. Then, 
too, every six-months' subscriber can secure a copy 
r-' the CRAM ATLAS of the world (regular price 
SS 00) for $1.50, or a $2.00 Cook Book for 50 cents. 



1 heard a story the other day. It seems that some 
of the young wives of Sacramento grew tired of 
being left alone in the evening. There were girls 
in the city who had sweethearts ; there were girls 
who only had "brothers," but they had all learned 
that unendurable loneliness that comes stealing into 
the heart with the twilight — that desolation born of 
the sound of grinding wheels on the asphalt, and 
of the footsteps that hurry to the gate, and — pass. 

Then one of the girls issued cards for an after- 
noon. The meeting had a long session and closed 
doors. When it was over the germ of another fra- 
ternity had been planted. 

The new club met as often as its members were 
lonely. Well-known society girls arrayed in fluffy 
fabrics, fluttered early to the rendezvous with a suit 
case in their hand. Young matrons were escorted 
by their maids, some came in their carriages, but 
they all carried the inevitable "case." 

When the club was brought to order a room full 
of smooth-faced young men (?) responded to the 
roll call. Most of their trousers bore evidences of 
having been tucked — n:ost of their coats were pad- 
ded, but the effect was good — the enjoyment was 
better. 

The club rooms always held cigarettes and easv 
chairs. There were little drinks, not over strong, 
and little games, not over long, for a girl's allowance 
has its limits. Anyway, there was plenty of gossip 
and a general good time. 

The fraternity accomplished its purpose. It 
stretched its warm clasp through the gray heart- 
gloom of the twilight. Its members came home early. 
The husbands and brothers wondered occasionally 
at the horizontal creases in the trowsers of their 
dress-suits. They discovered that nearly every man's 
had the same, so what did it matter? 

• * * 

Speaking of clubs and of coming home early, a 
few Oaklanders had a unique little experience that 
way some time ago. A handful of girls of a progres- 
sive turn of mind organized an Old Maid's Club. 
The meetings were bi-monthly; their purpose was 
to discuss local politics, new books, and to broaden 
one's mind in general. Promptly at ten, a supper 
was served, and at eleven the club house was to be 
deserted. If an old maid was afraid to go home un- 
escorted at that hour she was not an available mem- 
ber. 

The first two meetings were a success. The third 
was adjourned somewhat later. At the fourth, some- 
thing happened. 

The supper was not served quite at len. There 
were many good things on the table — together with 
bottles of cider — sweet cider, of course. There were 
some rather bright toasts, and then a discussion 
came up. 

At length one of the girls sprang to her feet. She 
was sure that it must be eleven. Some one looked 
at their watch. It was a quarter to three a. m. 

One member lived in Piedmont ; one lived on the 
Heights, and the cars had long been asleep. A cer- 
tain Old Maid was blessed with a telephone and four 
brothers. 

The following week the club was disbanded by 

letter. 

* # * 

Some enterprising young men in Oakland have 
created a new vocation. Tt is easy and lucrative. 
The requirements for success, consist in a versatile 
tongue, and a stalwart arm, a good dress-suit and a 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN KKANC1SCO NEWS LETTER. 



«S 



telephone. 1 >n the business card i> engraved, "l'r.>- 

rt." 
"Whir-r '- The young man Mart;- from Ins ■ 
chair. Office hours already"- His patrons are 
prompt. He saunters to the phone, and takes down 
the receiver. 

"Hel-lo — Yes— .\li.-s— '-. — Um— Hold the line a mo- 
ment.'" He turns to his date-book. "No. This even- 
ing is free — Thee MacdonOUgh? What row; — Oh, 
.1 box — Yes. I'll bring the carriage at eight." 

Again the young man rests in his easy chair, lie 
- out the list of his clientele and turns over its 
pages. Ah, here she is: 
"Miss — 

"Topics: Golf, travel." 

He begins to polish his brain tor the evening. 
The professional man charges according to dress 
and to time. Theater engagements come high. Ik- 
meets a train after dark from the city, for the sum 
of fifty cents. 

iety's escort is as silent on secrets of trade, as 
ietv's beauty doctor. At "Athens", available 
young men are scarce. The road to wealth is easy. 
• • • 

Money buys something besides escorts. An ec- 
centric heiress, not a hundred miles above San Fran- 
cisco, wished to go abroad, unescorted. She applied 
to a city physician. He picked her out a man from 
one of the hospitals. He had a good name, and no 
drawbacks in the way of relations. Besides he was 
>cheduled to die in six weeks. 

The "Mrs." cost her three thousand dollars. It 
is apt to cost more, for the man has forgotten his 
role, and recovered. 



LUCCHESI AT BOLOGNA. 

The papers of Bologna (Italy) are full of praises 
of Riccardo Lucchesi, of San Francisco, who on the 
10th of June gave a concert of his own compositions, 
interpreted by himself and a score of renowned ar- 
tists in the Teatro Comunale of that city. Lucchesi 
is recognized by the very best critics of that hyper- 
critical town as a musician of rare touch and a com- 
poser of great spontaneity, delicacy and elegance. 
The concert was given under the auspices of men like 
Carducci, Moncivelli and Sgamboli, for the benefit 
of the Institute of the Blind. The flower of Bologna 
aristocracy and art overflowed the hall. As Luc- 
chesi has been absent from Bologna thirty odd years, 
we can claim that his Italian talent has had its de- 
velopment here in our midst, a fact which ought to 
open the eyes of many blind people who walk our 
streets skeptically, without noticing those who work 
and follow their art sincerely. 



"Queer, isn't it," said the idiot, that beer should 
be cold just when the weather is hot. 

Frame Facts. 

We show you the greatest variety of ovals, circles and 
squares and odd shaped frames in Gilt Bronze Dark Oak. 
modern finishes to fit every size photograph and picture. 
ready made to take home with you in the Picture Frame 
Department, Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



Dr. Decker, 
Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless 
teeth extracting. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. WJnslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



To get a clear head try the Post-St. Turkish Baths. 



Murphy, Grant 6c Co.. 

Importers of Maple and fancy dry roods. Manufacturer* of fur 
nlshlng food*. Patentee* and aol* manufacturers of "The 
N£V£K-Hlt" OVKUAI.L The beet In (be world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress foods, vel- 
vets, silks, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens, etc. 
Blankets, calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawls, no- 
tions, smokers' articles, stationery, underwear, 
hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Santome and Bush Sts., 8an Francisco, Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Best and Belcher Mining Company. 

Location ol principal place of bu«lneas, "an Fianolsco, California. Loca- 
tion of works - Virginia District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given thut at a meeting of the Board of Director* 
held on the l:ih day of June. I9U3, an aMe^mrnt (No. M> ot flftten 
1 16) cmla per share was levied upou the capttwl Ntotk ol the corporation 
payable lmni» dUteiy, In United slates gold coin, to the Secretary. at the 
office of the Company Room 33. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery ktreet. 
San Francisco, t_ai. 
Any tttooic upou which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

THE 17th DAY OF JULY, 1903, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for ante at publio auction; and unless 
payment U made before, will be sold on Fri day. the 7th d *y of August 
1903. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors, 

M. JAFFE., Secretary. 

Office — Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, Man Francisco 
California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal plaee of business, San Kranolsco, California, Lo* 
cation of wo ks, Virginia Mining Di-tlnct, Storey County , Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting ot the Board of Direotors, held 
on the 12th day of June 1903, an asr-esr-ment (No 43) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the co>poration, pay 
able immediately In Ui.iied S.aies gold coin, to tee Secretary, at the ofHoe 
of the company, room 29. Nevada Blocs, No. 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California, 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
17lh DaY OF JULY, 1903 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at publio auction; and 
unless payment Is made before, will be sold on Prlday, the 7th 
day of August. 1903. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors, 

A. W. HAVENS. Secretary 

Offiae— Room 2), Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco 
California 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate ol JOHN R. DEN*N1S Deoeased. Notice Is hereby given by the 
undersigned, JOHN FaKN II *M, Administrator of the Estate o> JOHN R. 
DKNMS, Decea-ed, to Ihe creditors of. and all pejsons having claims 
against the Baid deceased, to exhibit them with the neceBf-ary vouchers, 
witbiu four months after the first publication of this notice, to the Bald 
Ad mi i latrntor, at Room ?'.• ( hronfcle Building, junction Kearny, Geary and 
Market Mi reets, Man Francisco, the haute being his placo for the trans- 
action of the business «f the said estate in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of Califoruia. 

JOHN FARNHAM. 
Administrator of the Estate of JOHN K. DENNIS, Deoeased. 
Dated at San Francisco, July 4. 19u3. 

CAKLTON W. GKEENE. 
Attorney f <r Administrator, 
Rooms 73 76-79. Chronicle Building. 



Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of WILLIAM JAOOBY, Deceased. No) ice la hereby given 
by the undersigned, JOHN FAttNHA.tf, Administrator of the Estate of 
WILLIAM JACoBY. Deceased, to the creditors of and all persons 
having claims again- 1 the sa d D c a-ed, to exhibit them with the neces* 
■ary vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this notice, 
to the said Administrator, at Room 7t»» Chronicle Building, junction 
ofKe-trny Geary and Market Streets the same being his place for the 
trauwa- tion of the business of the said estate in the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California. 

JOHN FARNHAM, 
Administrator of the Estate of WILLIAM JAOOJBY, Deoeased. 
Dated at San Francisco. Ju y 4. 1903. 

CARLTON W. GREENE 
Attorney for Administrator 
Rooms 73, 76 and 79 Chronicle Building 

Etjcamt nation*? Free . 

DR. F. A. OLISE & SONS 
Eye-sight specialists. 1021 Market Street, S, F. 
"I wish it were possible to make all the people 
who have imperfect vision, u' derstand what perfect work you are doing 
In fitting glasses. The lelasseH you prei-cribed for my wife and two 
daughters are entire'y aatUf actory. Being master of your profession you 
ought to do a fine business here in San Frauoiaco. Yours truly, 

JAS. W. HARRIS, Supt. Cal, St., R. R. Co. 




i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903- 



OBITUARY. 

Thomas J. Clunie died of Bright's disease on Tues- 
day. He had been a sufferer from this disease for 
some years, and a few weeks ago the complaint 
proved itself invincible. He was a well-known law- 
yer and an energetic Congrestsman, his political 
efforts being largely directed to the Chinese exclu- 
sion question. In 1888 he was Member of Congress 
for the Fifth District, being the last Democrat elected 
from that district. He married Miss Florence Tur- 
ton, daughter of E. William Turton, a prominent con- 
tractor of Sacramento. 

He was born at St. Johns, Newfoundland, in 1852. 
He was allowed to practice law at the age of eigh- 
teen by special act of the Legislature. He was 
elected to the Legislature in 1875, appointed Briga- 
dier-General of the Fourth Brigade of the National 
Guard of California in 1876, and was made delegate 
at large to the National Democratic Convention in 
1884. 

General Clunie left a large estate, including the 
Clunie Opera House, Sacramento, the Clunie Build- 
ing, San Francisco, and other valuable property. 

4TH OF JULY EXCURSIONS. 

On Friday, the North Shore R. R. offers reduced 
rates to Russian River and Giant Redwoods, good 
until Monday. On Saturday or Sunday round-trip 
to Camp Taylor, Tocaloma or Point Reyes, $1.00; 
Camp Pistolesi, $1.50; Camp Meeker, Monte Rio, 
Mesa Grande, $2.00; Duncan's, Watson's, Cazadero, 
$2.50. Good hotels, grand scenic trip, hunting and 
fishing. Trains at 7:45 a. m. and 5:15 p. m. Friday, 
or 8:00 a. m. Saturday and Sunday; also 10:00 a. m. 
Saturday and Sunday as far as Point Reyes. Infor- 
mation Bureau, 626 Market street, San Francisco. 
'Phone, Private Exchange 166. 

We note that P. P. Hood has bought out the 
Hannigan Cafe and Grill, and will run it as a first- 
class grill and restaurant. The standing of this well- 
known grill will be maintained. .Mr. Hood is an ex- 
perienced caterer, and knows better than most how 
to make his patrons satisfied. He will conduct the 
place in the most approved and recherche style, and 
we look forward to the period of great popularity 
for this place which will certainly follow its new 
and efficient management. 



If you have not lunched at Moraghan's you have not 

tasted the delights of the best oyster house on the Pacific 
Coast. Everything is of the very best. One need never 
be afraid of what they get to eat at Moraghan's. It is above 
suspicion. The best motto as regards food is the best, and 
you get it at Moraghan's. 



A Sovereign Remedy. 
Dr. Parker's Sure Cough Cure; one dose will stop a cough. 
It never fails. Try it Price, 25 cents. For sale by all 
druggists. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you will save at least one-third on your fuel 
bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



Are you tired? Go to the Post-St. Turkish Baths. 

UNITED UNDERTAKERS' ASSOCIATION 

FUNER.AL DIR.ECTOR-S 
AND EMBALMER.S 

866 MISSION STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, near 5th. S. F. 
Formerly under Metropolitan Temple Telephaa* South 167. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



GRAY BROS. 



Haywards Eldg.. California and 
Montgomery Sts.. San Francisco. 
205 New High Street, Los Angeles. 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1S79. Incorporated 1899 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 3S9 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

^^VAVVR — ^ 

TEL. MAIN 198 - 55-57-MMil FIKhT MV S W FRANCISCO 

Blake, Mofflt A Towne. Loi Angela. Cat. 
Bialte McFiili & Co.. Portland, Oregon. 



for barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houBes, 
D U/\ billiard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 

Kf||\IlR^ makers, canners, dyers, flour mills, foundries, 
u laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 

shoe factories, enable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush flfts., 609 Sacramento St t S. F., Tel. /lain 561 1 




Phone Main 153. Established 1862 

RUBBER TIRES 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-59-61 Minna St., 
between 1st and 2nd. One bloek from Palace 
Hotel 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union 
Olubcor. Post and Stockton. Tel Main 153. 
Every vehicle quisite for business or p.eas- 
ure. special orders tor Four-in-Handa. J. 
TOMKINSON. Proprietor. 



Mantle <<§L Son, Inc. 

Haberdashers 

And Dealers In Men's Hign Class Furnishing Goods 

10 Stockton St.. San Francisco. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gilllngham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens 

THE AWARD AT CHICAGO. 1893. 
"GRAND PRIX" PARIS, 1900. THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 
AWARD. These pens are "the best In the world." 
Sold by nil stationers. Sole agents for the United States. 
MK. HENK* HOE. 91 Joiin Street, New York. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. No. 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



W 






^Society 



Dear Bessie: Though not exactly what one would 
call a howling wilderness, .San Francisco has had a 
mtv deserted appearance this week. The summer 
in at the different resorts lias been later than 
usual this year, as well as much quieter, but now 
there seems to be more life — at least so one hears 
and the Fourth will ilraw crowds to them all, and al 
each and every one of them dances are to be g 
to celchrate the national holiday. Then such lot> 
and lots of house parties as have heen arranged 
this year for that same purpose; they extend all 
over the State, from Clear Lake to San Diego. I 
have been torn by conflicting desires, having been 
offered by choice of several — three in particular 
were most tempting, but alas! I can only be in one 
place at a time, and I will tell you next week which 
one I finally selected. 

The occupation of the new barracks at Monterey 
has been the occasion of numerous little fiestas 
thereabouts; Fred Greenwood has had parties of 
friends to sample his hospitality in the Peters cot- 
tage which he is occupying this summer ; Ethel 
Hager always has one or more of her pet girls 
staying with her ; the Parker Whitneys are among 
those at the hotel ; also the Edson Adams, and Jen- 
nie Flood, Sally Maynard and Miss Twiggs have also 
been at Del Monte of late, and Therese Morgan was 
down for a while. Mollie has just got back from a 
short 'visit to Del Monte, but goes back again in 
August, when apparently from all I can hear there 
will be a grand gathering. She says : "You ought to 
see Ethel in her new bathing suit; it just takes the 
cake," and that the military camp is a great at- 
traction, only that it is spread over such a vast space 
and the dust is simply awful. I believe the Eddies 
are not coming yet a bit, but will be here sometime 
during the month of July. 

Burlingame has been awakening into something 
like life of late ; for one thing, there was a polo match, 
and the Frank Carolans gave a picnic as a sort of 
welcome to Mary Burton Harrison, who is with her 
grandmother, Mrs. Easton, at Monte Robles, the 
Crocker place at San Mateo. Up at San Rafael, Mrs. 
Pinckard is to give several parties for her son Eyre, 
who has just returned with her from the East, where 
he recently graduated. At Meadowlands there is to 
be a succession of gay doings of every kind appro- 
priate to the country. 

Eleanor Morrow Roosevelt has been a good deal 
feted since her return; she is just as lovely and 
charming as when she was the most popular girl 
of the day, before the charms of army life and 
Lieutenant Roosevelt lured her away from us. I 
was at a delightful luncheon the other day given her 
by Mrs. Poole; there were about a dozen of us, all 
told, and we did so enjoy re-living old days over 
again. Mrs. Poole is going to Lake Tahoe, where 
she has a cottage, and will stay there several weeks. 
The card party given by Chrissie Taft in Oaklanu 
last week was one of the pleasantest I have been at 
in ages. We played five-handed euchre, and there 
were seven tables. The next day I went over to 
a luncheon given as a welcome home to Mrs. Pease 
— Mabel Gage "as was" — and they are talking of 
what a singular thing it was that all three of the 
Episcopal Churches in Oakland should be without 



take charge of Trinity until Septerab arson 

his hand! i the marr\ ing 

that takes place thi - mSITiagi 

usually a perquisite "i the parson's wife, Mrs. Shaw 
must he rather pleased at the Situation, don't you 
think? But talk about crowds I I got caught in the 
throng coming home from the Oakland street fair 
the other night, and I had enough of it to last me 
awhile. The fair has been a huge success, and it 
seemed to me as if all San Francisco was on the boat 
that night. 

But I must tell you about the wedding last Satur- 
day. Like all the country weddings this year there 
was a profusion of beautiful flowers decking the 
rooms of the Bclden villa in Ross Valley, where Ade- 
laide (JpSOn and William Orrnsby were married that 
afternoon, and especially beautiful was the room 
in which the ceremony took place, with its garniture 
of smilax and white lilies. Here the Reverend 
Dr. Eldridge of St. John's Presbyterian Church pro- 
nounced them man and wife, and although the gath- 
ering was in a measure a small one, owing to the 
bride's mourning, the rooms were filled with friends 
who nearly all came from San Francisco for the 
ceremony, which took place at four o'clock. .Ade- 
laide made a very pretty bride- — as all brides should, 
but sometimes fail — and her sister Marion, as maid 
of honor, was quite lovely. Mrs. Lou Hanchett's 
little daughter — she was one of the LTpson girls, you 

VOJV'T 
B*ftEA THE 
Dl/ST 




Let us clean hoa-fo lor you, without removing: # 

carpets from the floor : : : : A 

CO/fVE/flE/fT 

SAfilTA-Ry 

IJVEJTPEJVSI\/E 
$ QX/ICK 

£ Estimates given without oharee. 

s S.F. Compressed Air Cleaning Co. 

* Claus SprecMs Building. Phone Main 5237. Q 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 



know — Alice and Lucy, made a dainty little pair of 
Hower maidens, and seemed imbued with the import- 
ance of their office, to judge from their gravity; the 
groom had his friend, Douglas, of Sacramento, as his 
best man. The wedding breakfast which followed 
was a most delightful one, everybody seemed so 
happy and cheerful, and when the young couple 
left for their honeymoon trip they were pelted 
most unmercifully by those who remained behind. 

I do not know what we should do without the 
buttons to help out a dull time of the year like this, 
as well as at other times too. Look at the delightful 
hops at the Presidio which still continue to be given ; 
I almost danced myself lame last Monday evening — 
it was such a charming affair. And then there have 
been so many pleasant parties on board the New 
York and the other men of war ever since the Presi- 
dent's visit. We shall miss them sadly, but no more 
fun on them for awhile, as Admiral Glass has- taken 
the New York, the Concord, Bennington and Marble- 
head up north for a cruise, and may not be back 
again all summer. 

The Buckleys have bought the Thomas house on 
Pacific avenue, and while it is being remodeled to 
suit them they will spend the time at Santa Cruz, 
where Mrs. McLane Martin, who is out here now, 
will also soon be found. We shall soon bid adieu 
to Eleanor Davenport, as she and her mother are 
bound for Japan. Mrs. Center and Bessie don't go 
for several weeks yet. The Willard Drowns are at 
the Preston country home near Redwoods for the 
summer months; Delia and Bessie Mills are home 
again, after a brief visit at San Rafael, only to be 
off again in a few days elsewhere; Knox Maddox 
will, of course, spend most of the vacation time at 
Lake Tahoe, and Ed. McAfee will also be on hand 
there ; Mrs. jack Ruyter is to spend July at the Van 
.Vess hacienda in Napa, where the Follises are to 
pay a visit ere long. Leontine Blakeman has decided 
in favor of Lake Tahoe for July, and she and her 
mother are already gone ; Joe Loughborough is pass- 
ing the holiday with the George LaTours in Napa ; 
Mr. and Mrs. Gus Costigan are back again from 
their visit south, and have been at the St. Dunstan 
since their return ; the Jack Reises are back from 
their trip to Japan, and the Charley Mclntoshes 
from their trip East, and at San Mateo for the rest 
of the summer. The Clovers have arrived with their 
children from their long absence abroad, and Mrs. 
Clover says she is so glad to find herself in dear old 
California once more ; she will stay with us all sum- 
mer, chiefly at her home in Napa Valley. Mrs. Char- 
ley Keeney and Innes started East last Sunday, and 
will spend the entire summer with Ethel Tomlinson 
in New York. The Jack Casserleys are very proud 
of their young son who made his appearance upon 
the scene last week. 

ELSIE. 



A recent notable society event is the marriage of 
Colonel Francis E. Beck, the well-known assistant 
cashier of the Anglo-Californian Bank, and an officer 
in the National Guard, to Miss Alice M. Ogg. The 
wedding took place at the house of the bride's mother, 
Mrs. Martha A. Newton. The newly married cou- 
ple will reside in this city. 

The following guests have registered at the Hotel 
Rafael : James P. Sweeney, E. H. Kinney, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Lippman, Marion Lippman, P. George Gow, 
F A. Hyde, I. Hoyt Toler, C. Howe, W. Pillar, R. 
D. Purdy, Melvin G. Jeffres. 

Mrs. W. J. Somers and Mrs. M. P. Jones gave a 



tea and card party at Hotel Rafael on Tuesday, June 
30th, at which they entertained Mrs. W. E. Dean, 
Mrs. W. L. Dean, Mrs. George D. Toy, Mrs. H. P. 
Sonntag, Mrs. L. L. Baker, Mrs. McBean, Mrs. S. 
Hoffman, Mrs. F. H. Green, Mrs. Dr. Selfridge, Mrs. 
F. B. Anderson, Mrs. William Gwin, Miss Gwin, Mrs. 
A. Grant, Mrs. M. Casey and Mrs. A. Stevens. 
SOCIETY 

The highest score at the clock golf tournament at 
Del Monte was made by Miss Dolbeer. Mr. and 
.Mis. Parker Whitney gave the tournament. Herman 
Oelrichs finds the golf and salmon fishing at Del 
Monte very attractive. Among those who will spend 
the Fourth of July at Del Monte are Mr. and Mrs. 
Homer S. King, Mr. Frank King, W. D. Bourn and 
family, Mr. Horace L. Hill and family, and Mrs. A. 
L. Tubbs. 

Among the new arrivals at the Occidental we note : 
.Mrs. Arthur Rogers and daughter; Misses Mont- 
gomery returned from the East; S. M. Damon, 
banker, of Honolulu ; Prof. Thatcher and mother, 
New Haven, Conn. ; Mrs. J. P. Sargent, Stockton ; 
Colonel and Mrs. Van Oisdale, Mrs. Farrenholt, 
wife of Admiral Farrenholt. 

There never was a year when the Hotel Belvedere 
was as popular as it is at the present time. The 
guests form an important contingent of San Fran- 
cisco society, and there is such a diversity of amuse- 
ment, bathing, fishing, riding and other out-door 
pastimes. 

The Fourth of July is always a memorable event 
at the Hotel Rafael, and this year there will be no 
exception to the rule. The Hotel is crowded with 
guests ; merrymaking is in full swing, and between 
golf, tennis and paper chasing the amusement never 
flags. 



A Sterling Staple 



Things of sterling quality, standard 

value, the first sought and bought 

are staples. 




*gw& 



■Baltimore Rye 

U, BOTTLED Br * 

"M1ANAHAN6S0K. 
' BALTIMORE. 



Hunter 

Baltimore 

Rye 



par - excellence, in the staple 
whiskey of America. With uni- 
versal popularity at all the moat 
popular places there is one re- 
mark only. 



"Hnuter 
of Course" 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO.. 
213-215 Market St., San Francisco, 
Telephone Exchange 313. 






I California Safe 



: 



Deposit and 
Trust Co. 



Corner 
7 California & Montgomery 
^ Streets 

t San Francisco, Cal. 



July 4. 1903. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

THE EARTH CHY. 

Br Thaodoal* Oarr 

A Spirit and an Angel. 
Th t Spirit: 

How bluo the sky Is and how swo.-t the air' 
Slater. Is this n meadow whore we stray J 

the blossoms break, mil over then 
8urely a bird Is singing. Yesterday 
I had not thought that Heaven was like this. 
The Angel: 

Now. was it yesterday? 
The Spirit: I only know 

I have gone gently on from bliss to bliss; 
1 am too glad for laughter, nny, 1 crow 
Silent from very peace of comforting. 

Yet. sometimes, like a memory of pain. 
A shadow of a grief there seems to sting — 

A vague. Insistent sorrow, like a strain 
Of some lost melody that haunts and stays. 
The Angel: 

Men call It "Fear o' Death." 

The Spirit: A thing less rife 

With fear, it Is yet keener. 

The Angel: In the ways 

Of little earth men call it "Love o' Life." 
The Spirit: 

"Men call It 'Love o' Life.' " Perchance so, I 

May not remember. Now the bird has ceased. 
How still It Is! How bluer than the sky 
These blossoms are! 

The Angel: Our feet bend not the least 

Light petal of them. Nay, why stay you, sweet? 
The Spirit: 

Once I knew eyes as blue — I wonder where! 

Why, as I bent just now they seemed to meet 

My own again, and suddenly strangely bare 

And empty seemed my arms! What means this thing? 
The Angel: I may not say. 

The Spirit: I am so happy — yet 

Something within me seems to turn and cling 
To some past joy I may not quite forget. 

Hark! Heard you nothing then? 

I heard not, I. 
bird sang. 

The Spirit: Ah, It was not gay. 

So sad it was — a little, wistful cry, 

A little cry from very far away. 
So weak, so pitiful. Oh, I would go 

Where the voice calls me! 

The Angel: Sweet, It may not be! 

The 8pirit: 

Hark! where it comes again. Ah, heard you? 

The Angel: No- 

Turn and forget. Are you not happy? See 
Where the path leads to new, exquisite things 
That you have yet to find. Nay, touch my hand. 

The Spirit: 

Oh, must I follow? 

The Angel: As a bird that wings 

Its way from height to height, from touch of land 
To the blue distances of joy we go. 

The Spirit: 

How beautiful it is! How bright the way! 
I know: not what it was that hurt me so 
A moment since. 

The Angel: 



'9 



lipllli 4 Saralal tl.IJl.721.7t 



Total «i«tll 



5.914.414 It 



: 



Intrrr*, p*M on .lrt>n«1t*, nuhJc-M 

'■• ■ liN-k. al the ml* of two ♦ 
PH cent, pm ftinium. • 

IhttrcM paid on ft* vine* ijepoafu ^ 
at lite rate of ilirre and Mi- j 

Iriitli* p«r cent, p*r annum. ^ 

Trunt* executed. We are author- 
Iced to act a* the guardian of 
cut at en and the oxcculor of 
will*. 

Suit -■[<•iiot.it boxen rented at In 
per annum and upward*. 



I J. Dalzell Brown. 

Me.ne.tfer 
• ♦•♦•*•♦•••♦•♦•♦< • • • • 



i 



at 



S. SCHLAMM.. 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

First-class Workmanship and Fitting 

Reasonable Prices. 
Military, Naval and Society Uniform Equipments a Specialty 

140 Phelan Building, San Francisco. 

Cor. Market and O'Farrell Sts. Tel. Red 6921. 



The Angel: 

Perchance 



And are you happy? 

The Spirit: Yea, 

With a new peace, a comfort that was not 

All mine before. Sister, what means it, say? 

The Angel: 

That God is good and you have quite forgot! 



Hitchcock Hilitary Academy 

SflN RAFAEL, CAL. 

SEPARATE BUILDING FOR LITTLE 

. . . BOYS . . . 

Xmas tern) will begin Aug. 17th. 

EIGHTH YEAR. 

'"Beatilieti" 

Boarding and Day School for Girls 
2601 COLLEGE AVE. BERKELEY CAL. 
A L MoCVLLOVGH, Prlnclpe.1 

Catalogue furnished oo application. Telekom- Blazon llibf. 

BEST'S ART 83M00L 

LoBioni in Painting, Drawing, Sketching, ane* Illustrating 
Lilt clanet. 13.00 par month. 

937 nARKET STREET, 

WRINKLES 

JLIvfnir proof of our marvellouB skill In removing- wrinkles on exhibition 
from 1 to b daily* Slijlju reward lor a case we cannot cure. 
Importer*, of "Everything for Ihe Face." 
Torrwnce's Boudoir Wrinkle Plasters 8. a box. 
Torranoe's Boudoir Tai> Plasters 61 c a box. 
Samples 10c* blamps booklet. Established 1£67. Phone Black 1586. 

S V R.NE Y.TO R.R.AN CE, Skin Specialists- 

408 post sreter, san francisco, cal. 



The Star Hair Remedy — best of all ionics and re- 
storatives. Slops falling, cures daudruff, restores color. 
Not a dye. At druggists and hairdressers. Accept no 
substitute. Star Remedy Co., 385 Geary street. 



"Have your Hardwood Floors reflnished,' 

lett Co., 328-330 Post St, 



Bush & Mai 



Facial Blemishes Removed 

Wrinkles, yellow and flabby akin, birth marks, smallpox nit liners and 
scars scientifically rt- movod without cutting, massage, electricity or medi- 
cine : speotal demonstration this week. 
WHAT ladles say about DR. WILLIAMS' treatment: 
My wrinkles, yellow and flabby skin have disappeared, my health Is 
better and my eyesight Is greatly Improved. 

(MRS) L. BOWMAN. 
My skin Ifl getting better every day, and it la a real pleasure to look In 
the glass and see it free from every bieuiish. 

(MRS.) M. B. TJHLITZ. 
I more than appreciate what you have done for my fice. 

(MKS.1 3. a ACHUPF. 
Call or write DR. L. WILLIAMS. 371 Geary St. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 



BANKING. 



Thje San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast Corner of Sansome and Pine Sis., San Francisco. 

JAS. K. WILSON, President; WM. FIERCE JOHNSON, Vice- 
President; LEWIS I. COWG1LL, Cashier; F. W. WOLFE, As- 
sistant Cashier. 

Capital, $500,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits, $180,000. 

DIRECTORS— William J. Dutton, C. S. Benedict, William 
Pierce Johnson, H. E. Huntington, George A. Newhall, Orestis 
Pierce, George A. Pope, James K. Wilson, L. L Cowglll. 

AGENTS: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National 
Bank, Chemical National Bank. Boston— National Shawmut 
Bank. Philadelphia— JUrexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City- 
First National Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris — 
Morgan, Harjes &. Co. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. 
Johannesburg— Robinson South African Banking Co., Limited. 

Thje Canadian Bank, of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— Toronto. 
Paid-up Capital, ts,700.i,oo Reserve Fund, S3.O00.OO0 

Aggregate Resources, over J7o.ooo.000. 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. Walker, General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON oFFlCii; — 6U Lombard Street, E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlln, Cranbrook, 
Fernle, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmlth, Nanalmo, Nelson, 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 
Also 80 other branches covering the principal points In 
Manitoba, N. W. Territories and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank ot England, The Bank ot 
Scotland, Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union or London and Smiths 
Bank, Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The Northern Trust Co. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE- 

326 California Street. 

A. KAINS, Manager. 



London, Paris and American Bank Ltoiw 

N. W. Cor. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, J2.6O0.000. Pald-Up Capital, 12,000,000 

Reserve Fund, Jl,loo,ooo. 
HEAD OFFICE— to Tnreadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can BanK, Limited, No. 10 vail street, N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Fr res & Cle. 17 Boulevard Polssontere. Draw direct on 
the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits Issued. 

S1G. GREE..EBAUM. Manager; H. T. 8 1REEN. Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 



Central Trust Co., of CaliforQia 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital J3.O0O.0OO 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,726,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 

Trustee. 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Pro- 
bate Court proceedings. Interest paid on trust deposits and 
savings. Investments carefully selected. 

OFFICERS: 
Frank J. Symmes, President; A. Ponlatowskl, First Vice-Presi- 
dent; Horace L. Hill, Second Vice-President; H. Brunner, Cashier 



Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California St.. Sun Francisco. Dal. 

Subsorlbed capital $15 00ft.0"0.00 

Paid in capital ... ... 3,000,000.00 

Profit and reserve fund 460,0(0.00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of per cent per annum on term, 
and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

D*. Washington Dodge, President- William Corbln, Secy and Gen- 
eral Manager. 



The ^nglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin briars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized J6.0O0.0O0 Paid-up 1,600,00* 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund 700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
r ney, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

1GN. STEINHART, P. N. LIHENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord, William Babcock, Adam Grant, 
S. L. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Baldwin, F. Monteagle, Warren D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutchen, R. H. Pease. 




The recent decision of Superior Judges Seawell 
and Sloss in the case of Whitney vs. the City and 
County, must cause San Francisco to present a queer 
aspect to the stranger within our gates, as well as 
to the impartial outsider who can view our munici- 
pal mix-up from a distance. Undoubtedly the de- 
cision was legally and technically correct, but that 
it is directly in opposition to the wishes of the peo- 
ple is generally believed. When the Board of Super- 
visors, with the assistance of the City Attorney, con- 
cluded to levy this special tax of se^'en and one-half 
cents, no one questioned their right to 'do so, and 
very few persons protested against this alleged 
"emergency fund" to construct the needed improve- 
ments. The court decision makes the return of the 
tax-money of all of those who paid under protest 
obligatory, but doubtless the entire tax must be re- 
turned, and now because the need of this expenditure 
was not contemplated in the original city budget, we 
are to have neither hospital nor schools. Truly it is 
an absurd state of affairs and until San Francisco 
learns to use at least a reasonable proportion of 
taxes collected for the good of all, rather than for 
the benefit of a few office-holders, the great metropo- 
lis of the West is indeed in the kindergarten class 

of municipal Government. 

. * . 

The following communication is thought by some 
to indicate that it is the purpose of the city Govern- 
ment to put an effectual stop to the lotteries and all 
of the other forms of gambling which flourish in 
Chinatown. We have heard things like this before. 
"San Francisco, Cal., June 27, 1903. 

"Corporal D. A. Sylvester — Sir: You are hereby 
assigned to special duty in the Chinese quarter in 
charge of the special squad for the suppression of 
all gambling of all kinds in that quarter, relieving 
Sergeant Blank and squad. 

"The officers assigned to duty with you are J. T. 
Lankman, N. Z. La Grange, H. C. Schmitt, T. F. 
Conlon, A. L. Martien and W. W. Lambert. 

"They have been ordered to report to you at 10 
a. m., July 1, 1903, at police headquarters. 

"It will be your duty, and you are hereby ordered 
to use all lawful means to suppress gambling in the 
Chinese quarter, and to pay particular and unceas- 
ing attention to such places as may be frequented 
by whites for the purpose, to the end that gambling 
by whites with Chinese may be broken up. 

"Instruct the officers assigned to duty under your 
command that whenever they find or suspect that the 
law is being violated they must act at once, and not 
wait for orders, but arrest any and all persons vio- 
lating the laws, especially those pertaining to gam- 
bling and lotteries. 

"You will keep an accurate record of all arrests 
made by you or your squad, and the disposition of 
all cases in court, and make reports in detail at the 
end of each month showing all police work done by 
the squad. 

"This order to take effect July 1, 1003. 

"GEORGE W. WITTMAN, 

"Chief of Police." 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ti 



1 lie local realty market for the past several 
ccn characterized by about the average acti 
ral important transfers arc to ne noted. The 
southeast corner of Kearny and Bush street, upon 
which an eight-story tire-proof office buildil 
now in c • ruction, was sold by J 1 

Adams to Senator I Perkins. The proper!) 

sold for $175,000, and the cost to Mr. Adams, 
including the new building now partly completed, 
has been about $145,000. The building has already 
been partly leased by the new owner. The property 
on the west side of Third street. 85 feet north of Mis- 
sion, has been sold for $165,000 by A. A. Moore, Jr.. 
to a client of Shainwald, Buckbce & Co. The north 
east corner of Sansome and Green streets, 97:6x120 
feet to Gaines street, has been sold by the Perrezz. 1 
estate, and the Cuneo Company to Covington John- 
son for $19,000. It is probable that the lot will be 
improved eventually by the erection of a warehouse 
or a factory. Lyon & Hoag negotiated the transfer. 
The northeast corner of Third and Sherwood 
streets has been sold by J. M. Masten to the United 
Realty Company for $50,000. The purchaser has had 
plans drawn, and next month will commence the 
construction of a seven-story modern hotel building. 
This is the property which was recently bought by 
Douglas S. .Watson from the Pearson estate and sold 
by him to J. M. Masten. 



BANKING. 



Want a Pointer? 
A dainty box of stationery never comes amiss, be she 
maid or matron. The latest papers are French Fabrics, 
Raglan, L'Aiglon, two-tone linens; or a Pearl-Handled Gold 
Pen for her writing desk. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Continental Building and Loan Association. 

For the year ending June 30, 1903 has declared a dividend of 5 per cent on 
all ordinary deposits, 6 per cent on term denopils and 8 per cei t on in- 
stallment-took. WM. CORBIN. See. andGen'l. Mgr. 

Office- 3'Jl California Street. San Francisoo, 1 al. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending wllh June 30, 1S03. a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three (3) per eent per annum on all deposits f rt e of taxes, 
payable on and after Wednesday, July 1, l«li3. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Office— 710 Market St., opp. Third. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery street, Mills Building. For the half year ending 
June 3 1 , 1908, dividends upon all Deposits at the rate of three and one 
flf.h (3 I -5 J per ceut per annum, free of taxes will he payable on and after 
Julyl, 1903. FKED W. *tAY, Secretar y. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Spciety. 

The Board of Directors deel -red a dividend for the term ending June 30. 
1903 at the rate of three an<i one-quarter (3}£) per ceiit per annum on all 
deposits, free of tuxes, and payable on and after July 1, 190J. Dividends 
not called for are added to and be r the same rate of d.vtdend as the 
principal from and after July 1, 1903. 

CYRUS W. OABMANY, Cai-hier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, Mc- 
Allister and Jones streets, Sui Francisco, June 16 191)3. 

At a regular meeting of the Board • f Directors of this Society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-eight ('3 1-8) 
per cent per annum, on all' deposits tor Ihe six months ending June 
30, 1903, free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 1. 1903. 

Robert J. Tobin Secretary- 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending June 30, 1903, dividends have been 
declared on deposits In the savings department of this com- 
pany, as follows: On Term Deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent 
per annum, and on ordinary deposits . at the rate of 3 per cent 
per annum, free of taxes, and payable on and after Wednesday, 
July 1, 1903. Dividends uncalled for are added to the principal 
after July 1, 1903. J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 

Office— Corner California and Montgomery Sts. 



Wells, Fargo 6c Co. Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capital. 8urplus, and Undivided i cptMlM 
Profits. ( #■£.•»*,••» 

Homer 8 King, preslden.; H. Wadaworth, Cashier; F. L. Up- 
roan. Assistant Cashier; Frank B. King. Assistant Caahler. 
BRANCHES.-New Tori ; Salt Lake. Utah: Portland. Or. 
CorrupnnHent. throughout lha world. Oeneral banking buel- 
i>»»* transacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Deposits $32,139 939 

Paid-up Capital 1,000.000 

Reserve Fund 241,132 

Contingent Fund 665,769 

E. P. POND. President; W. C. B. DeFREMERT, VI e-President; 
ROBERT WATT. Vice-President; LUVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. 
M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— Henry F. Allen, William A. Magee, W. C. B. Do 
Fremery. C. O. G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, 
Fred H. Beaver, Jacob Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms 
and farming lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks 
payable In San Francisco postoflice, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express, but the responsibility of this 
bank commences only with the receipt of tho money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to S p. m. and Saturday evenings, for re- 
ceipt of deposits only 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

FOUNDED 1864. 

Capital $2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, April 1, 1903, $4,292,163.68. 

William Alvord, President; Charles R. Bishop, Vice-President; 
Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; Irving F. Moulton, Cashier, 
Sam H. Daniels, Assistant Cashier; Allen M. Clay, Secretary. 
DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord, President; James M. Allen, Attorney-at-Law; 
Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; William Babcock, President 
Parrott & Co.; Charles R. Bishop, Capitalist; Antolne Borel, 
Ant. Borel & Co., Bankers; Warren D. Clark, Williams, Dlmond 
& Co.; George E. Goodman, Banker; Adam Grant, Murphy, Grant 
& Co.; Edward W. Hopkins, Capitalist; John F. Merrill, Hol- 
brook, Merrill & Stetson; Jacob Stern, Levi Strauss & Co. 

Foreign and domestic exchange bought and sold. Commercial 
and travelers' letters of credit Issued, available In all parts of 
the world. 

Correspondence solicited. Accounts invited. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 626 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus S2.897.758. 10 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1913 31,819.8 3.1 2 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann, 
Ign. Steinhart, Emll Rohte, H. B, Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Vv al- 
ter, and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; A stant Cashier, William Herr 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muiier; General -attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank; of s* n Francisco 

710 MARKET ST., OPP. THIRD. 

Guaranteed $1,000,000 

Paid-up capital and surplus 440,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President; 
GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vlc«-Pre»'t 
C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. ±-helan, S. G. Murphy, Jo(in A. Hooper, 
James Moffltt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Charles B. 
Neat, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook, 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo de vo., or 
Exchange on city banks. 

International Banking Corporation 

Capital and Surplus Pald-tn 6,783,000 

Capital and surplus Authorized 10,000,000 

NEW YORK Oi * ICE— NO. 1 Wall Street. 
William L. Moyer, President; James H. Rodgers, Secretary pro 
tern; John Hubbard, Treasurer; John B. Lee, General Manager; 
William Maclntyre, Assistant General Manager. 

BRANCHES— London, City of Mexico, Singapore, Hongkong, 
Manila, Shanghai, Yokohama, Bombay, Calcutta. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— Nos. 32-34 Sansome St. F. B. 
BECK, manager; P. G. EASXW1CK, JR., Cashier. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of Corpora- 
tions, Firms,' and Individuals solicited. Commercial and trav- 
elers' Letters of Credit Issued, available in any part of the world. 
Cable Transfers, Foreign and Domestic Exchange and Bullion 
Dought and sold at current rates. Collections effected. Interest 
•earing certificates of deposit Issued for fixed period*. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 




Financial 




A Valuable La Zacualpa Rubber Planta- 

Rubber Plantation, tion Company of Mexico, 
with offices in the Spreckels 
Annex, 713 Market street, this city, ought to have 
no difficulty in the future in raising all the money 
necessary to carry out the extensive programme 
involved in the development of the large acreage 
owned by the corporation, which, by the way, is a 
California one. Some time ago the Hon. James Wil- 
son, Secretary of Agriculture, sent Mr. O. F. Wilson, 
Botanist in charge of the department, and his chief 
assistant, Mr. G. N. Collins, to study rubber culti- 
vation in La Zacualpa. Having spent some time on 
the plantation, these gentlemen are now compiling 
one of those instructive bulletins, for which this 
department is noted, dealing with the subject. In 
the meantime, the following letters from Mr. Wilson, 
the chief of this Federal department, and his first 
assistant, Mr. Cook, who has personally investigated 
the plantation, ought certainly to satisfy the most 
carping critic as to the value and great future in 
store 1 for La Zacualpa. These communications to 
Mr. J. W. Butler, president of the Corporation, are- 
as follows : 

Washington, D. C, June 22, 1903. 
Mr. John W. Butler, care La Zacualpa Rubber 
Plantation Company, San Francisco, Cal. — Dear Sir: 
In reply to your favor of June 31st, I beg leave to 
state that Mr. Cook's report on rubber culture is in 
course of publication and may be expected to ap- 
pear within the next two months, and that a set 
of the photographs taken on your plantation will 
then be furnished with pleasure, as a slight return 
for the excellent opportunities afforded us for study- 
ing rubber culture. 

Very respectfully, 
(Signed) JAMES WILSON, Secretary. 

Washington, D. C, June 24, 1903. 

Mr. John W. Butler, care La Zacualpa Rubber 
Plantation Company, San Francisco, Cal. — Dear Sir: 
I find your favor of March 25th awaiting my return 
from Costa Rica, where we have been pursuing the 
rubber question a stage further, though without find- 
ing anything better than La Zacualpa. 

Your very fine sample of rubber is also at hand. It 
is difficult to imagine how anything finer could be 
made. I will insert a reference to it in the proof 
sheets of my long-delayed report. This was finished 
before I left the country in March. I expected to 
find it printed when I came back, but it may be two 
months yet before it is issued. To avoid any further 
delay the results of the Costa Rican trip will be made 
into a supplementary paper. 

Very respectfully, 

(Signed) O. F. COOK. 

This official report will, in turn, prove a valuable 
document for La Zacualpa- Company, as it will sub- 
stantiate all that has even been claimed for its plan- 
tation by the management. 



of a warmer place has never had the terror for an 
Apache which the good folk back East thought could 
be utilized to better advantage than bullets from the 
blue-coats deterring these savages from their evil 
ways. Consequently the company will not press 
work at the mines until the heat moderates in Sep- 
tember. In the meantime, eight men are working 
on the ground, with good results, according to latest 
reports from Superintedent Woods. 



The weather at the camp of the Mavis Company 
on the banks of the Colorado is hot in an Arizona 
sense of the term, so hot, in fact, that the assertion 



This has been a short and con- 
Pine-St. Market, sequently a dull week on Pine 

street, as might have been ex- 
pected on the eve of a general holiday. The market, 
however, held firm until the close, with indications 
of strength, which augurs well for the near future. 
On Monday next Con.-Cal.- Virginia will be running 
in good shape, as if nothing had happened, which 
will naturally tone up the stocks in this vicinity. 
At the south-end things look very promising for 
higher prices. Every- day brings the long-sought 
ledge on the 600-level of Utah nearer, and it is 
momentarily expected, when drifting will begin 
north and south, and the present drift will be ex- 
tended after a west ledge which showed good form 
and values in the upper workings of the mine. The 
holiday season has enabled quite a number of opera- 
tors to take a run up to the lode and personally in- 
spect the various properties in which they are in- 
terested. They wili return well fortified for the work 
immediately ahead in the market, which will surely 
receive attention now that affairs at the mines are 
pretty well straightened out. 

A despatch from New 
Justice in Store York says that the 

for Thieving Promoters. New York stock ex- 
changes are about to 
inaugurate a vigorous campaign against "get-rich- 
quick" concerns pretending to center about Wall 
street. The programme will include legislation look- 
ing toward the incorporation of companies ; the 
prosecution of the swindlers when the evidence 
against them is sufficient to warrant arrest; ferreting 
out and exposure of the bogus mercantile agencies 
which supply references for these companies; the 
exposure and prosecution of Wall street newspapers 
which for a financial consideration supply these con- 
cerns with favorable reports and accept their adver- 
tisements. This is a move in the right direction, 
and supplemented by vigorous action in Boston and 
St. Louis, where the swindlers are, if anything, more 
numerous and dajing than they are in New York, a 
clean sweep will be made of the most dangerous set 
of rascals extant outside the walls of the peniten- 
tiaries, whose gates gape for them. Floating com- 
panies with millions of shares to float mines of no 
value outside of the imaginative mind of the pro- 
moter, or washing off stock in companies to float 
mythical mines, has been a lucrative venture for some 
years past, but it looks as though retributive Justice 
is yet in store for the thieves. 

It is generally understood that 
The Mine that operations will shortly begin 
Daly Wrecked. again at the Copper King 

mine, and that all attachments 
have been released with the exception of two, which 
it appears were taken out prior to the bankruptcy 
proceedings, and under some provision of law are 
not affected by the proceedings in the local Federal 
courts. Upon an order of court all other suits against 
the Copper King have been stayed for a period of 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



c months, after an adjudication. This is 
the foreign owners of the mine who 
rigled in all their difficulties by the action 
manager, a person named Daly, who "ii^ht to 
il inquiry and be dealt with 
iuct merits. A few ..i'his -tripe empli 

represent tlu-ir interests in 
ounlry would soon dull the edge ••! home inclus- 
ion direction. It will lie hoped that the Copper 
people will hnd time to make an example of 
this treacherous individual for the benefit of any more 
of his class. 



The Debenture Surety Company of San Francisco, 
on July 10th will pay the June dividend of ; 
cents per share on its- issue. i capital stock. This com- 
pany was incorporate. 1 last ( ictober and its stock 

first sold at twenty cents a share. It has alrea.K 
paid thirty cents a share in dividends. This company 
incorporates, finances an operates legitimate propo- 
sitions, also acts as trustee and fiscal agent for first 
companies. It is now handling the affairs of 
the Omah Gold Mining Company, which pays its 
first dividend in ( )ctoher. 



Charles Hirschfeld, the well-known operator on 
Pine street, has just returned with his family from 
a prolonged visit to the leading capitals and points 
of interest in Europe. He received a hearty welcome 
from his old associates in this city, who hail his 
return to active life among them with genuine pleas- 
ure. 



The local Stock and Bond Exchange has heen 
closed during the week, and will not open until Mon- 
day next. Some attempt at trading has been made 
by the clique on the street, which would work Sun- 
days as well as holidays if they had any one to trade 
with, but the quotations in a case of the kind are not 
a very reliable guide and command little attention. 



The San Francisco National Bank has just de- 
clared the usual semi-annual dividend of three per 
cent on July 2d. 

A promoter of a certain railway company declares 
that eleven councilmen of Scranton stood out for 
money for their votes. We should like to see a really 
careful computation made in this city. 



If Your Physician 

prescribes a milk diet, for its easy digestibility, it will be 
well to use Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream to 
get a rich, deliciously flavored milk food, perfectly steril- 
ized, according to latest sanitary methods. For general 
household uses. Prepared by Borden's Condensed M'ilk Co. 



Nelson's Amycose 
Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the Skin. 



33 
• ••••• ••••••• 

Mavis Consolidated Gold 

1 and Copper Mining Co. 



Capital Stock $1.00(1,000. Shares I.COO.OOO. 



a 



Inr.irporated under tlje laws of the State of Cali- 
fornia. 

atlon of works. BM W Mlnlnc District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will be levied. 

50.000 shares of stock for sale :it 3~< <pnts a share 
— for development purposes. The ore In sight Is prac i 
illy unlimited, when iho present issue of stocl 
enhausted, the price will be raised to BO cents ■ 9 
share. 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205. 718 a> 
Market street, for prospectus which gives full Infor 
' mation. . 

VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. J 



DANGER (ARIZONA 

TRANSCONTINENTAL TRUST CO. ' 

of Phoenix, Arizona. 



Has a fully equipped department for the registration end 
trans-fer of stocks and bonds. Files the charter does every- 
thing necessary to incorporate the company. Holds first 
meetings, organizes and elects director?, acts as agent for 
corporations, domestic and foreign, upon whom process 
may be served. Maintains an Arizona office, exposes a sign 
thereon, and acts as agent in charge thereof, as required by 
tbelaw. 



Q TRANS-CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY 

W Pacifio Coaat Branch 

Rooms 25-26-27, 4th Floor Mills Bldg,, S. F. 

Arizona danger; 

Pacific States Mining & Investment Co. 



Post St., 



Established 3892. 
San Francisco. European office, 64 Kaiser Wllhelm 
Street, Hamburg. 



This company has agents or brokers and own offices In the 
principal cities of America and Europe. Stock issues taken 
over for sale. Stocks underwritten and guaranteed by gold 
bonds. Choice stocks for sale. Legitimate mining, oil and agri- 
cultural and industrial enterprises financed and promoted. 
Publishers of the "Pacific States Investor," the leading financial 
paper of the West. Strictest confidence observed in all com- 
munications or inquiries. Bank references. 



1 70,000 



persons in Alameda 
County rely upon the 



TRUST FUND Oakland Herald 



We sell atook to develop oil and mining: companies, also dividend paying: 
stock. We bold as Trustee for oil and minine corporations almost 2.000.' 00 
shares of their capital stock In a TRUST FUND. If any company fails, we 
as Trustee, take up its stock and issue to its stockholders stock of the suc- 
cessful companies from the Trust Fund. Thus a buyer of stock of any 
company has an interest In a number of developing oil and mining pro- 
perties. Stockholders have a pro-rata interest In the enormous T ru«t Fund 
created for their protection. As Trustee and Fiscal Agent we control the 
TrmtFund bsolutely that guarantees protection to ctocb holders in each 
individual oompany, Maps, charts, printed matter sent on request Cor- 
respondence solicited. 



DEBENTURE SURETY 

INCORPORATED 



COHPANY 



RIALTO BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



FOR ALL THE NEWS 

THE HERALD is absolutely the Home Paper of 
Greater Oakland and of Alameda County. 

THE HERALD publishes each day complete for- 
eign, cable and domestic telegraphic news. 

THE HERALD records fully each day, and par- 
ticularly on Saturday, the doings of Greater Oakland 
Society. 

THE HERALD is without question the best ad- 
vertising medium in the County of Alameda. 



2 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 




twenty-two 



The Insurance Press compiles a most interesting 
and instructive little table, showing the records of 
the different States and territories as "areas of com- 
bustion" in 1902 and for a period of 
years prior thereto : 

Loss per $100 of Risk. 
22. Years 

States and Territories 1902. 

Nevada $1.49 

North Dakota 1.20 

Indian Territory 1.19 

Alabama 1.16 

Arizona 1 .08 

Mississippi 1.02 

New Jersey r.n? 



Idaho r.oo 



99 



Utah 

Arkansas .97 

Texas o 2 

Montana 88 

Florida 87 

Tennessee 85 

Virginia 84 

Maine 82 

Washington 79 

New Hampshire 78 

South Carolina 77 

Oregon 76 

Colorado 74 



Connecticut 



.72 



Kentucky 71 

Iowa 7 

Wyoming 70 

Louisiana 69 

Georgia .67 

Kansas 65 

Michigan 65 

Missouri 6c 

Indiana 64 

Minnesota £>■, 

New Mexico 63 

Illinois 62 

Oklahoma 61 

West Virginia 6r 

North Carolina 'en 

Ohio .;; ;g 

Pennsylvania cy 



South Dakota 
Wisconsin . . . 
California 



56 

55 

Maryland .... \ '. '. ' .' . .'. 47 

Nebraska 



■47 
■38 
•36 
•35 



Vermont 
Massachusetts 
New York . . 
Rhode Island ... 

Delaware ' 2C . 

Alaska ...... '24 

District of Columbia . . . . ' ' .'09 
19 years ; b, 20 years ; c, 12 years ; d, 



(i88o-'oi.) 

•94 
ci.58 
61.76 

.78 
2.09 

•99 

■4i 
i-47 

•72 
1. 21 
1.02 

•83 
1.86 
1. 00 

.81 

•83 
1.40 
.64 
•7i 
•87 
.72 

•44 
.82 
.68 
.68 
•58 
■74 
.68 

■77 
•78 
.69 

•83 
1. 10 

•57 

rf.50 

.69 

.84 

.66 

.62 

c.92 

.81 

.69 

■42 

.67 

•93 

•57 

■37 

•49 

•49 

0.31 

.24 

11 years. 



• ™ e - fire ""surance companies paid losses amount- 
ing to $94,176,595 last year, or something more than 
44 cents per $100 at risk. If the burning rate in the 
State wh,ch is at the top of the list had prevailed 



throughout the country, insurance companies would 
have had to pay in losses no less than $340,000,000, 
or nearly twice their total premium receipts. If the 
burning rate in New Jersey had been general, the 
companies would have had to pay in losses $245,000,- 
000, or $70,000,000 more than their total premiums. 
On the other hand, if the ratio of loss had been as 
low everywhere as in New York, the insurance com- 
panies would have paid only about $84,000,000. Why 
insurance premiums are relatively high in some 
States and lower in others calls for little explanation 
beyond an examination of the column above, show- 
ing the average losses per $100 of risk, State by State, 

for more than a score of years. 

• • • 

The St Louis boodle investigations have at last 
reached insurance circles, and on Friday last James 
A. Wentworth, the St. Louis rater, told the grand 
jury that the refusal of the fire insurance companies 
to put up money for the boodlers in the legislature of 
1894 was responsible for the passage of the bills 
forbidding local boards and co-insurance. The com- 
bine demanded $40,000 to prevent the passage of the 
bills. When repeal bills were introduced two years 
ago the same amount was demanded to secure their 
passage, but this was afterward reduced to $35,000. 
The companies refused to put up, and the bills were 



CALIFORNIA LIHITED 



TO CHICAGO BY WAY 
OF THE GRAND CANYON 
OF flRlZONIA : 



Santa Fe 



Mavis Consolidated Gold 

and Copper Mining Co. j 

Capital Slock $1,000,000. Shares 1,(100,000. ? 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of Cali- • 
1 fornia. ft 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share 
for development purposes. The ore in sight is prac I- 
cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock is 
enhausted, the price will be raised to 50 cents a 
share. 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 
Market street, for prospectus which gives full Infor- 
mation. 

VINCENT NEALE. Secretary. 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



as 



When the business men of the State attei 

the anti-insurance measures tin- 
the combine demanded $.25,000, which w . 
sequence only one act \va 
led. 

the legislation with which the Missouri 

underwriter must contend, but in the California 

.iture, to our credit, all legislation hostile and 

unfair to insurance interests has been defeated by 

legitimate means ami without the use of money. 

■ ■ • 

The Kansas City Life Insurance Company, re- 
organized as a stock company, has been licensed by 
the Missouri Insurance Department ami has begun 
business. It intends to enter Kansas, 1 Oklahoma and 
the Indian Territory in a short time. It is not yet 
stated by the management how soon the new com- 
pany will arrange to enter the Pacific Coast field. 



No man who values his personal appearance can afford 

to be Ignorant of the fact that his clothes may be perfectly 
cleaned and his appearance materially Improved by people 
who have made that kind of work a specialty. Such people 
are Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 Stockton. 
who also clean gloves, cravats, curtains and such articles. 
They call for and deliver goods. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco, Cal. 

PROFESSIONAL. 



SAMUEL M. 



SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney-at-Law 
Crocker building, San Francisco 



BUSWELL COMPANY: 



Bookbinder, paper-ruler, printer and Blank- 
Book Manufacturer. 



Clay street. 



INSURANCE. 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St, 8. F. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Go. 

(limited) of llverpool. 

Capital .' $87,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 816 California St, S. F. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mntnal Building 
San Francisco 

G .B. BURLING 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

221 Sansome Street, 

Tel Main 1193. San Francisco, Cal. 



NSURANCE. 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets. $4,000,000 

PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) of LONDON, ENQ. 

C. F. MULLINS. Manager, 416-41* California St. B. F. 
-IRE INSURANCE. 



Founded A. D. 17W. 



nsurance 



Uor 



>f /North Ar 



mpanyot j iortn / lmenca 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Pald-Up Capital »,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022,018 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 412 California St, S. F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D., 1720. 

Capital Pald-Up, J3.446.100. Assets. J24.662.043.JS 

Surplus to Policyholders, J8.930.431.41. Losses Paid, over J134.000.000 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager. 601 Montgomery Street 

HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF NEW ZEALAND. 
Capital, IB.000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDER!; 

Ofllce in company's building, 812 California street 

CLINTON FOLGEB, Aotlne Mnnaeer. 
The Lambla Realty Co., City Agents, 605 California Street 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go 

OF HAH.. JED. ' Established 1850 
Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Paclflo Dep't 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St 

Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York 

Capital, J3,000,000. Gross Assets, $15,256,869.73 

Surplus to Policy Holders, J8.906.342.8S. 
H. L. ROFF, General Agent; GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metro- 
politan Manager. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The HOME has a well-organized, competent and experienced 
force of GENERAL and SPECIAL AGENTS resident In the 
Pacific Coast States, ensuring prompt response to the needs and 
requirements of Its agents and the Insuring public, and IMME- 
DIATE ATTENTION TO THE ADJUSTMENT AND PAYMENT 
OF LOSSES. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT, GERMANY. 

Capital $2,260,000 Assets JIO.984,24. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manager. 
Pacific Coast Department: 201-208 Sansome St, San Francisco. 

North German Fire Insurance Gompany 

of Hamburg, Germany, 

N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St. S. F. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 4, 1903. 

HOTELS. QviacKs and THeir Tricks. 



New Hotel. 




Don Porter. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opposite U. S. Treasury, one block from the 
White House, Washington, D. C. The Hotel 
"Par Excellence" of the National Capital. 

First class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, Prop. 
American Plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



McCoy's New 
European Hotel 

250 East, South and 
West front rooms. Hy- 
draulic Passenger eleva- 
tor. Rates, $1 per day 
and upwards. Fire-proof 
building. Fire alarm call 
in each room. First- 
class restaurant con- 
nected. 

WM. McCOY, 
Owner and Proprietor. * 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Cor. Clark & Van Buren 

Streets. 




Hotel Richelieu 



Hotel Granada 




1012 Van Ness Ave IOOO Sutter St. 

The management of tbe Hotel Richelieu wishes to an- 
nounce to Its friends and patrons that It has purchased the 
property of the Hotel Granada, and will run the latter on the 
same plan that has made the Richelieu the finest family ho- 
tel in San Francisco. HOTEL RICHELIEU CO. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 



A Bleb Class Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on tbe European 
plan at moderate rates. 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 



W. Johnbon Quikn, Proprietor. 



HOTEL MATEO CLUB HOISE 

Oscar Courlln. Manager. SAN MATEO. CAL. 

BOWLING ALLEYS, BILLIARDS, RECEP- 
TION ROOMS. FIRST-CLASS WINES 
LIQUORS AND CIGARS 

The electric oin from San Franclwo etop at the gronndt 

New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont. BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOOD8, Proprietor*. 



By Jean Phillips. 

The fattest, richest and most impudent of our great 
army of fakers are our quack doctors. Indeed, it would 
take a very keen detective to discover one who does 
not sport large diamonds and a well-developed appe- 
tite for champagne, a gold-headed cain, highly-pol- 
ished silk hat, Prince Albert coat, and a female fash- 
ion plate in loud colors, with the manner of the slums. 
The "doctors' " paths to success are many, and all of 
them vile. But I will tell you just a few of them, and 
they are these: 

First, last, and all the time, he keeps the picture of 
a good-looking man in the daily papers. When you see 
the original you'll realize that your Sunday-school 
teacher made a mistake when she told you God made 
all men. You can see for yourself that the photogra- 
pher is responsible for this specimen. He may have 
whiskers like Lord Dundreary, or mustaches like the 
Kaiser, or a Van Dyke like the Czar of Russia, but 
tbe picture is made to catch your eye, and "My Mar- 
velous Secret About How to Live Forever," "My One 
and Only Remedy for You," "My Fountain of 
Youth," or "My Divine Touch," that the advertise- 
ment tells you of, holds you, if you're good at believ- 
ing things. And there right before your eyes are all 
your symptoms neatly catalogued. 

The next best scheme to assist the picturesque 
whiskers which float gracefully in the daily papers, 
is the friendly, familiar lounger who never works, and 
who hangs around the hotels frequented by country- 
men, with whom he strikes up a friendly acquaintance 
and to whom he shows the town. The part of the 
town that is shown to the farmer, or miner, or stran- 
ger would make a Telegraph Hill goat sick, much less 
a man. Then the familiar lounger, who is really a 
"capper" for some quack doctor, rushes the poor fel- 
low off to "the only man on earth who can save him," 
and the work really begins. The patient is usually 
thirsty, and he swallows anything and everything 
given him, and the "doctor" looks grave. "Of course 
T can cure you, can cure anything:: but it will be a 

hard pull. You are afflicted with " Here he 

launches into a description of diseases ; the very 
names of them are sufficient to terrify the wretched 
man. By this time he has swallowed the kind of 
drugs that will produce the desired symptoms. He 
can read them for himself in big; type in the "special- 
ist's" circulars. Then he is placed in the hands of 
the percentage druggist (another "capper") and ac- 
cording to his story they took him in hand, just in 
time to save him from the grave. By this time the 
"doctor" and his pals have every cent he has in bank 
and notes for more, and very often a mortgage on his 
farm or mine. By the time that the patient realizes 
that he has been robbed — if he ever does — he is so 
completelv in the power of these scoundrels that 
rather than stand a law-suit and have his family and' 
friends know what a fool he has been, he pays their 
demands in full. 

There is one case, at least, on record out at the New 
City Hall where the gentleman with the floating 
"Dundrearies" failed in his attempt to get all that the 
ranchman owned. Fortunately for this man. he ac- 
cidentally met a lawyer friend and confided his trou- 
bles to him. He had been entrapped into the "doc- 
tor's" hands by a scheme very like the one T described 
and when he got out of them the "doctor." the confi- 
dence man and the druggist had the seven hundred 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



and fifty dollar-, he earned to the city with him; an.i 
the "doctor" had li is notes for $1,000 more. The law- 
yer advised the ranchman to go to any reputable phy- 
sician in the city and to take the medicine al 
three bottles in all, that had cost him seventy-five dol- 
lars—and find out just what was the matter with him. 
He took the lawyer's advice, and much to his amaze- 
ment discovered that all his diseases came out of one 
of the bottles. There was about ten cents worth of 
drugs in this bottle, which caused a rash to break 
out all over his body. In the second bottle there was 
about five cents worth of the same stuff; and in the 
third bottle there was a quart of Spring Valley, with 
the usual number of microbes and about two spoon- 
fulls of common salt. Still the unfortunate man had 
been driven nearly insane by these vampires, who 
made him believe that he had more diseases than the 
bubonic plague doctors ever found in Chinatown, and 
that he would be guilty of all kinds of crime if he 
returned to his family until he was cured. 

Then the lawyer took the "doctor" in hand, and the 
scoundrel with the English whiskers put in the worst 
half hour of his life. The lawyer promptly brought 
suit. The "doctor" as promptly fled the State, but in 
the course of a few months discovered that his "able 
assistant," whom he had left in charge, had grown a 
beard identical with his own, had opened another 
place a few doors away, to which the "cappers" were 
transferring their victims, and that the "able assist- 
ant' was actually coining money out of his whiskers. 
Of course this meant ruin to the boss quack, and he 
quietly stole back, went up to the farmer's ranch, and 
induced him to accept his money back, picturing to 
him the scandal a suit would bring, and how his wife 
and daughters would suffer from the notoriety, as 
he and all his "able assistants" would swear to the 
diseases, and it would be one kind of expert testimony 
against another. The farmer, not knowing that he 
was transgressing any law, in order to save his family 
from humiliation, settled the case, and the "specialist" 
escaped the penitentiary. But the old quack and the 
young quack were fighting it out the last I heard of 
them. 

Another of these "eminent specialists," who mus- 
taches himself like "Unser Fritz," and keeps jostling 
around among diseases that were they as prevalent 
as he claims, would sweep the earth clean of its 
population, even if all men were to take Teddie's 
advice, used to resort to rather an old but newly re- 
vived method of gathering in strangers. He used the 
help of a street faker who sells medicines on the cor- 
ner, between acts, as it were — for he is something of 
a comedian and lightning-change artist — and a tre- 
mendous steam piano playing ragtime in a cellar near 
by. When the antics of this faker had drawn a large 
enough crowd he would invite them into the cellar, 
just to show them how it was done. Then he would 
excuse himself for a moment to make another change 
and introduce his friend, "Doctor" Gougem, who 
would entertain them for a while. Then the "doc- 
tor" would proceed to lecture, and before five minutes 
every man in that cellar felt every disease from the 
plague of ancient. Egypt to a touch of poison-oak 
breaking out all over him. Then the "doctor" passed 
his cards around, and as the audience left the cellar 
by one door, Johnny the faker, who had forgotten to 
come back, would be ushering in a new crowd 
through the other door. These are only a few of the 
tricks of these "eminent specialists," who treat "men 
only." ■ 

"Why," said a man I know, "when I first came to 



San Francisco from the mines, I heard that fellov 
turc, and having had a little too much bad whi 
inside. I called on him : and I swear h< :iakc 

me believe that I had so mam diseases that I 
ashamed to look in the £lav> when 1 pot to my room. 
But he had thl 1 sobering me up goo. I and 

quick. Then I returned to have a little talk with the 
'doctor.' I didn't get my $250 back, hut I took that 
much satisfaction out of his hide.'' 

If every man did the same there would not be so 
many "eminent specialists" in San Francisco. 

Irresistible Prices 
Offered In the Leather Goods Department. Wrist bags 
in Seal. Calf and Shaded Leathers. Pocket books In the 
fashionable shapes. Chatelaines and Card Cases; and for 
presents to the gentlemen. Cigar Cases, Wallets and Letter 
Books. Sanborn & Vail's, 741 Market street. 



When looking over the menus of the biggest banquet* 

and dinners, you will notice that G. H. Mumm's Is always 
the champagne used. In fact, epicures never think of drink- 
ing any other. 



At the first banquet given by tbe 
dtltens of the City of Cbtcago to 



President Roosevelt 

on bis Western trip, at tbe Andttorlam Hotel, April 
2nd, tbe only wine used was 

Ruinart Brut '93 



The President's Wine 



V RNEY W. G SKILL, Special Agent 

Wltb Hixbebt Mercantile Co., Importers. 
Telepbone Ezobange 818. San Francisco. Cat. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN should use damiana 

VVCHI\ IVICIM HIMU VVUIVICIV BIl'TERB, the great Mexican 
remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. Depot a 
323 Market St., San Fraucisco. Send for olrcular. 



Hon Marc he Clothing Puerto*) at or y 

40 Ellis Street, Booms 14-15-16. 

SUITS CLEANED AND PRESSED $1.00. 

Suits Called for and Delivered Free. 8TJIT3 PEES9ED WHILE YOU 
SLEEP. Repairing and Alterations. OPEN ALL NIGHT. We run 
four wagons. Telephone Drumm 44. 



SINQ FAT & COMPANY 

' Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. . We have but one 
price. All goods marked in plain English figures. 

614 DUPONT STREET, S. F. Next to St. Mary's Churoh. 



La Grande Laundry 



Tel. Bush 12. 

Principal Office— 23 Powell St. Branch Office— 11 Taylor St 
Laundry— 12th St., between Folsom and Howard Streets. 

GOLDEN WEST CLOTHING RENOVATORY 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Phone Main 1167. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed J1.00 

Monthly Contracts '. 1.60 



PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY 



No. » Lick Place. 



Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, Jl per month; 
12 hand or roller towels fl.60 per month. Tel. 
Main 1780. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 



The Trail of tKe Sea-Serpent. 



Breakerbeach, June 12th. 

Dear Jimmie: Do you remember what you said 
when we left you with our camp outfits and para- 
phernalia last week? Didn't you kind of sneer and 
tell us not to get bit by any sea-serpents? Well, we 
have been here only three days, and we have seen 
one! Yes, a full-developed, screw-propeller, Maltese 
sea-serpent like those you read about. It happened 
this way. We got into camp about sundown, and as 
we passed through a strenuous day, we had a little 
re-union after supper. We opened a few flagons dur- 
ing the ceremony and retired at about twelve feeling 
calm but buzzy. This morning early I awoke, and 
after having taken a wee dram of consolation medi- 
cine I ran down to the beach for a dip before the 
rest came to. I was bobbing about in the water when 
the first I knew something rose up in the water right 
in front of me, and began to wag a mile of tail. I 
didn't wait to call it "good doggie," but cut a bee-line 
for the camp, where I woke up the gang and took 
another jolt to steady my nerves. I am going out 
to-morrow to take another look, for I am getting in- 
terested in the monster — from a scientific standpoint, 
of course. 

Yours serpent-charmingly, 

BILLY. 

P. S. — Will you send out five more quarts of the 
same to-morrow? Old Juggins, the boatman will 
take it over to us. 

BILL. 

Breakerbeach, June 13th. 

Dear Jim : I think that I am on the eve of a great 
scientific discovery. The sea-serpent in all his wrig- 
gling, crawling, grinning reality is an assured fact. 
Last night we decided to form an expedition and 
hunt down the fabled monster. We were afraid that 
the alarm clock wouldn't wake us up, so we sat up 
all night waiting for the right time. Denis was ap- 
pointed toast-master during the vigil, and there was 
considerable doing in the way of bumpers. It's won- 
derful how much medicine is necessary during a va- 
cation in camp. By sunrise the glow of health was 
restored to each cheek, and we all sallied boldly 
forth to strangle and slay the elongated saurian. We 
started to run along the beach, when suddenly I grew 
absent-minded, and when I looked up I found to my 
surprise that my companions had all vanished, and 
the sea-serpent was rising out of the surf in iront 
of me. His face was loathesome and terrible, and 
with one of his hand-like claws he was eating a piece 
of cracked crab. Imagine my horror. Suddenly he 
looked up from his repast, and he seemed for the first 
time to take interest in me as an edible article. He 
reached out a long, scaly claw to seize me, and I made 
no resistance. Fear had bereft me of motion. I 
closed my eyes and swooned with horror. 

I came to with a sensation of water in my face. 
I found, when I recovered my senses, that my friends 
had found me apparently asleep on the sand, and 
had dragged me through the surf by the heels. When 
I related my trying experience, they told me that 
all I needed was another drink, and I reflected that 
there might be some wisdom in their remarks. 

Scientifically, 

WILLIAM. 

p. S. — Can't you send those five quarts? There is 
a drought here and much suffering. 

5 BTLL. 



Breakerbeach, June 15th. 
Dear James : Has 'Frisco gone temperance, or what 
is the matter that we can't get those five quarts? 
There is much sickness in camp, and we need the 
medicine. We have seen nothing of the sea-serpent 
to-day. I think it likely that he has gone up to the 
next camp for a drink. Think I will follow suit. 

BILLY. 

Breakerbeach, June 17th. 
Dear Jim: I feel that I have suffered one of the 
most terrible experiences of modern times. The hor- 
rible monster of the deep has left the sea and come 
into camp. Last night your long-delayed five quarts 
arrived, and the gang celebrated the wet season by 
pulling a few corks. I guess we must have sat up 
rather late, for I didn't much care to get up this 
morning when the others went down to the shore for 
a bath. I needed rest and lay quiet for a time, when 
suddenly the curtains of my tent were parted and 
a familiar head was thrust in. I recognized my 
friend the sea-serpent. He looked about the tent, 
and picked his teeth with a fish bone. Evidently he 
had been eating some more cracked crab. He would 
undoubtedly have seized me this time, but some noise 
outside disturbed him, and he glided away. Excuse 
my shaky handwriting, as my nerves are in a ter- 
rible state. 

Affectionately, 

BILL. 

Breakerbeach, June 19th. 
Dear Jim : Am coming home to-day. This coast 
is dangerous, and I believe that the Fish Commis- 
sioners ought to do something about it. A doctor 
and a professor came into camp to-day, and I told 
them of my adventures. The professor said that it 
was undoubtedly the Prolongusaurus, but the doc- 
tor counted the bottles and said that it was a wonder 
I hadn't seen more of 'em. I think I'll try Christian 
Science. 

Yours for home, 

WILLIE. 




Open evenings June 29th to July 4th inclusive. 
SEE ELECTRIC SIGN FROM MARKET ST. 



July 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»9 




BT AKTlira 11 

At the time of writing 1 Juno 30th; it really 
.1- though the journey overland from San Francisco 

rw Y..rk will be accomplished 1>\ the Pa 
car which left this city on Saturday, June 20th. The 
party, as already stated in the News Letter, coi 
of three: M. C. Krarup of The Automobile (New 
York), manager, historian ami photographer; E. T. 
Fetch, operator, and J. Allyn, mechanician. For the 
sake of lightness the tonneau was taken off the car. 
so that there are seats for only two persons. Allyn, 
the mechanician, will travel considerably by the rail- 
road, keeping about fifty miles ahead of the motor 
car. When the going is good enough to permit it, 
he will ride on the machine. 

< Mi Saturday. June 20th, the Packard car was 
driven out to the Cliff House, so as to start from the 
Pacific Ocean, but the time of arrival at the beach 
and the time of leaving it were kept so dark that 
scarcely anyone knew of the event. Though M. C. 
Krarup was directed by telegram from New York 
to keep me informed of his movements, and I re- 
ceived a telegram notifying me of his arrival in San 
Francisco, he still managed to elude me at the last 
and to start without my knowing it. Having re- 
turned from the Cliff House the Packard car went to 
the garage of the Pacific .Motor Car Company at 1814 
.Market street, where the last preparations' for the 
arduous trip were made. They started thence at 
5 p. m. on Saturday, June 20th, reaching Port Costa 
about 8 o'clock. 

The route across the continent was originally 
planned by C. D. Roberts, who was to have accom- 
panied the expedition as guide. Roberts had laid out 
a roundabout route for the purpose of avoiding the 
deep sand of the Nevada desert, which brought Al- 
exander Winton's attempt to cross the continent in 
a Winton car to an inglorious end. The route now 
to be followed, or at least the Pacific part of it, was 
laid out by Harold B. Larzelere, who determined 
that Winton's course should be pursued. It being 
feared that attempts would be made to damage the 
motor-car, a detective followed it as far as Placer- 
ville, and arrangements were made that some one 
should sleep each night with the machine. That 
the suspicion of a desire to damage the car was 
not altogether groundless is shown by the fact that 
just before reaching Benicia it was found that two 
oil pipes had been cut. 

The car reached Reno without hitch or mishap, 
having covered 220 miles on ten gallons of gasoline, 
over rough roads. A telegram, dated June 24th, an- 
nounced the arrival of the automobilists at Carson 
City, Nevada, via the Placerville grade. It was ar- 
ranged that if any mishap befel the party the office 
in San Francisco should be notified ; and as no mes- 
sage had been received up to Monday, June 29th, 
it is believed that all has gone well with the expedi- 
tion. If this is true, the worst part of the journey has 
been covered, and there is good reason to believe that 
the long and difficult transcontinental trip will be 
accomplished in a period of about 60 days, making 
an average distance of 64 miles per day. About 
twenty miles of the Nevada desert were to be tra- 



long, 
rnt thr wheels of the auton 
rnish enough 
able th. n 

\\ In 11 the Super , ntly 

I an ordinance im| ictiona on 

tin- iino of the unhorsed carriage, it «;^ intimated 

that the Automobile Club of California would 

the legality of the ordinance. ' In |une 24th the 

President of the Club sent P. F. Rockett, the well- 
known expert operator, over to San Rafael with in- 
structions to run along prohibited roads and also 
after sundown. At night Rockett was arrested on 
the charge of violating that clause of county ordi- 
nance No. 1-7 which forbids automobilists to oper- 
ate their motor-cars on any road in Marin County 
between the hours of d a. m. and 5 p. m. It appears 
from this that even the time of sunrise and sunset 
is regulated by supervisorial ordinance in Marin 
1 ounty. Rockett, on being taken before a Justice 
of the Peace, admitted that he had been instructed 

to violate the ordinance passed by the Supervisors 
On June 4th. 

Rockett was bailed out on the evening of his ar- 



"The 



Jtocomobile 



Is The Best Automobile" 




500 
"Loco's" 

in 

use. 
Fine bill 
climbers 



A customer writes: "1 am the owner of one of your 
earliest steam machines, No. 7; built in 1899, which 
still gives good satisfaction." 

MANY STYLES. CALL AND TRY THEM. 

The eCocomobilc Company of the Pacific 

1632 MARKET ST., B. F. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 

Successors to Locomobile Co., of the Pacific. 

1622-1628 Market St., S. F. 

Jobbers and Dealers— Automobiles and Accessories 

SELLING AGENTS 

Winton Motor Carriage Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Locombile Co., of America, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Olds Motor Works, Detroit, Mich. 

Vehicle Equipment Company, New York. 
Electric Trucks, Etc. 

Demmerle & Co., Leather Clothing- 

Kem TE Tr 'P ,e "P" Compound 

FOR 

PUNCTURES 

Geo. T. Moore Co. 1622 Market St. S. F. 



A perfect puncture healer and rubber pereerva* 

tlvefor : : : : { 

SINGLE TUBE TIRES 

Write for circular 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 



rest, but next morning the bail-bond was withdrawn 
and the chauffeur remanded to the custody of a con- 
stable. Joseph K. Hawkins, attorney, then petitioned 
for a writ of habeas corpus, on the grounds that the 
ordinance under which Rockett was arrested is op- 
pressive, discriminatory, unreasonable and unconsti- 
tutional. The writ was made returnable on Satur- 
day, June 27th. Last Monday, June 29th, the District 
Attorney demanded that the petitioner be dis- 
charged, but Rockett's counsel asked that his client 
be tried for the infraction of the ordinance. The Dis- 
trict Attorney, evidently wishing to evade the issue, 
had drawn up an obviously defective answer to the 
writ, and Judge Lennan had no alternative but to 
discharge the prisoner on the ground that he was 
being held by the constable without authority. When 
the court had adjourned, it was announced in the 
hearing of the under-Sheriff and two constables that 
Rockett would run his whiz-cart on the same evenfng 
along the Petaluma road. It was generally under- 
stood that no arrest would follow his violation of 
the ordinance, the amateur legislators, ignorant alike 
of the mysteries of law and the niceties of the Eng- 
lish tongue (or of any other, for that matter), hav- 
ing expressed themselves in the following manner: 
"No person shall run an automobile in any of said 
prohibited highways between the hours of suns-i or 
sunrise." Now, no human being, lawyer or other, 
can tell what the "hours of sunset" are, or in what 
manner an automobile can be run between them. 
It is equally impossible to determine the meaning of 
"hours of sunrise." My supervisorial friends have 
only demonstrated for the Nth time the utter felly 
of letting men who could not draw up a notice that 
they had a cat and kittens for sale without falling 
into some palpable absurdity, undertake the difficult 
and delicate task of legislation. The English lan- 
guage, almost wholly lacking in inflections, is a two- 
edged weapon which requires expert handling. Set- 
ting a blacksmith to repair a ship's chronometer is a 
sensible thing compared with letting the Man in the 
Street expend his unintelligence in the work of law- 
making. 

The Marin County ordinance reminds me of the 
State legislators (who are nearly as rank as the 
Supervisors) who drew up a prohibition to this ef- 
fect: "No person shall discharge a gun, pistol or 
other firearm within the limits of any city or town 
in this State, unless for the purpose of killing a wild 
or dangerous animal, or a policeman in the discharge 



NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 




Phone. Sou Hi I 142 134 to 148 Golden Gate Ave. 

The largest and 
finest "Garage" in 
j the West. 

Our line the highest 
" types produced. 

RAMBLER; KNOX, Waterless; HAY1NES-APPERS0N 

AbTOCAR... .Touring Cars 
TOLEDO. ...Touring Cars 
PEERLESS.. ..Touring Cars 

Give us a call and we will show you a full line of 
record-breakers. 



of his duty." Perhaps an ordinance substituting for 
the words "a policeman in the discharge of his duty," 
the words "a chauffeur operating an automobile" 
might suit the ideas of the Supervisors of Marin 
County pretty well. 

Frank E. Hartigan, manager of the Pacific Coast 
branch of the Mobile Company of America, has been 
in Los Angeles during the week on business. 

A shipment of seven new Packard motor-cars 
reached San Francisco last week. Two have been 
delivered to Dr. J. L. Benepe and A. H. Marten 



} 



MARSH MOTOR CYCLE $125 




The Marsh 3 H P. motor cycle is the most 
practical motor cycle in the world. It is guar- 
anteed for one year, also has a guaranteed speed 
of forty miles an hour. Write for full information, 
catalogue, etc. 

MOTOR CTCLC MFO. CO. Brockton, Mass. 



UNIVERSAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 

137 to 151 FIRST STREET 



The only thoroughly equipped 
factory on the Coast. Every 
facility for quick repairs, paint- 
ing, etc ... . 



LARGE STORAGE ROOM. 



THE CADILLAC 

Handsome 

Reliable 

Swift 

A HILL CLIMBER 

Price. $850.00. With tennuu, $950.00. 

AGENTS 

WESTETUV A\7TOMOTLILE CO, 

JOl-203 LAKK1N 6TREET. 8. F. 




July 



4. 1903- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



.ml iwo 10 11. M. Holbi 
I Menlo Part 
lining cl- 
ear lias ' •,. Mr. HarT) I .,n,| 
. A. Greenwood. The demani 
ird ears at that five \\<r<- brought 
coming through !r.>in the factor 
San Francisco in five days, 
lomohiling is a favorite diversion at I >el Monte, 
thel Mager. Mis- Dolhecr, S. (i. I'.uck- 
iil F. A. Greenwood are staying. Mi— Dolbeer 
new Packard oar. and has become a quite ex 
>perator. She is one of the most skillful of our 
chauffeurs." as Madame La Havarde might 
»y. though the phrase is just as impossible as "lady 
•undryman" or •"male actress." 

iking of the recent Paris to Bordeaux race> 
Charles Jarrott. the well-known English automo- 
rflist, makes some interesting remarks about the 
nsane behavior of the spectators. In an interview, 
niblished in The Auto-Car. he says: "For miles 
pom the start I drove into a solid wall of people 
landing wedge-shaped across the road, ami they 
inly just cleared and gave way before me. very much 
n the way the London crowd gives way before the 
>olice heading a Lord Mayor's show. Even then 
hey only separated sufficiently to clear my axle- 
-. and then only at the last moment. I should 
lave slackened speed frequently if I had not realized 
hat I should do as much damage at forty miles per 
lour as at sixty, and so I let the car go. Indeed, the 
:rowd was so bewildering that I nearly missed the 
oad just after the start." 

Apparently the French do not expect to win the 
ontest for the Gordon Bennett cup, and would be 
dad to have the race prohibited. They think that 
he results of the Paris to Bordeaux race show that 
hey are likely to be beaten. Of the three champions, 
r ournier, De Knyff and H. Fannan.. not one reached 
Jordeaux. 



We take pleasure in notifying our readers who are 
;oing to the country for the summer months that the 
SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER can be sent 
o them at ANY POINT by mail. 

Send address to office, 320 Sansome street, and 
>rompt service will be made. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleann- 
ess and heat producing qualities Briquettes are superior 
coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th and 
Jhannel. 'Phone South 95. 



"After the theatre, then to the Techau." That's what 

'epys would have said in his diary, if he had lived in San 
'rancisco. He knew the best in his day, and Techau's the 
■est of your day. Best quality at reasonable prices. 



.STHMA and stomach troubles successfully treated 614 Pine. St. 



ELECTR.IC &nd GASOLINE 
CARS 

WELCH GASOLINE TOURING 
CAR. 

CONRAD LIGHT GASOLINE 
RUNABOUT 



A. E. BROOKE RIDLEY, ' 8 F ( ^ L Ma ? t T , REET 




fllophone Sooth 894 



San FraDCiBco, Cal. 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile Co.— 288 S, Market St., Phone John 1661 
automobiles stored and repaired. Expert workmanship. Gaao- 
Ine and oil at all hours. Santa Clara agents for the Western 
automobile Company and National Automobile Company. 



PACIFIC HOTOR CAR CO. 

Agents. 

fc ^ Packard 

I Omr. 

St. Louis 

Motor QUi 

American 

\ Motor ( «r. 

* JONES CORBIN 

Itotm Out. 

The above cars exhibited at our repository, 1814 
Market Street. 




HAVB YOPR AUTOMOBILE EQUIPPED WITH 

Diamond Tires 



HIGHEST GRADE-LONGEST 
LIFE-MOST MILEAGE-CAUSE 
LEfqST TROUBLE **. <A *A 

Catalog* and literature from 

8 Beale Street, Sao Francisco, Cal. 



"Nothing so rare &s resting on Air" 



Pneumatic 
Cushions 



For Yacht, or Launch 

For Automobile or Carriage 

For Office Camp or Home 



FOE SALS IK 'TBI800 BY ; 

SKINNEK ft CO., 801 Market St. 8. F. WEEKS ft CO., 81 Market St- 




UCK, CRflSH 
d KHAKI SUITS 



BICYCLE SUITS 
JWMpfflW to order. 

ALL KINDS Of BAND SLITS 

FINE TAILORING A SPECIALTY 
79 Flood Building. Pbone Brown 196. S. F. 



VELVET 

LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 
and Women 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make then) in 
any style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

H. E. SKINNER CO. 

801 MARKET ST. 



THE CALIFORNIA DOOR CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

DOORS, WINDOWS 
and BLINDS 

20 and 22 DRUMM ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

TELEPHONE DRUMM 178. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



SOUTHERN 

Trains leave and are due to arrive at 



PACI FIC 



— Fbom Jumi 81, 1908. 



SAN FRANCISCO, Main Line, foot of Mark e 8 

COA? T L'NE (Narrow Gauge) 
bbto Foot of Market Street) 



7.00a Benk:la, SulBun, Elmlra and Sacra- 
mento 7-25p 



(Toot of Market Street.) 



7.00; 
7-30i 



VacaTllIe, Winters. Ramsey. 7.26f 

Martinez, Sad Ramon, Vallejo, 



8.00a 
1.00a 



•.30a 



Napa. CaI|fltogn, Santa Rosa 625p 

730a Niles, Lxthron, Stockton ., 7.26r 

|.00a PavlB.WoutllHinl. Knlchts Landing, 
Mary by! lie, Orovllle, (connects 
at Marysvllle for Grldley, Biggs 

and Cblro) 7.65p 

Atlantic ExpresB— Ogden and EaBt. 10-26* 
Port CoBta, Martinez. Antlocb. By- 
ron, Tracy, Stockton,Sacramento. 
Lob Bancs. Mendota, Hanford. 

Vlsalla. Portervllle ">4.26r 

Port CoBta, Marllnez, Laibrop, Mo- 
deeto, Merced. Fresno, Goshen 
Junction, Han ford, VtBalla, 

Bakerefleld 6.2Bp 

SbaBtn ExpreBB — Davis, Williams 
(for Harnett Springs). Willows, 

tFruto, Red Bluff. Portland 7-65p 

8.30a Kites, San Jose, Llvermore. Stock- 
ton, lone. SncriimeDto.Placerv Hie, 

Marysville. Cblco. Red Bluff 4.26p 

8.30a Oakdale. Chinese, Jamestown. So- 

nora. Tuolumne and Angels 4 25p 

8-00a Martinez and Way Stations 6 55 p 

10.00a Vallejo 12.26p 

rtl 0.00a Crescent City Express, Eastbound. 
—Port CciBta, Byron, Tracy, La- 
tbrop, Stockton, Merced. Ray- 
mond, Fresno, Hanford, Vlsalla, 
Bakerefleld, Lob Angeles and 
New Orleans. (Westbound ar- 
rives as Pacific Coaat Express, 

via Coast Line) «V30p 

10 00a Tbe Overland Limited — Ogden. 

Denver. Omnba. Clilcago 62Bp 

1200m Hayward, Nlles and Way Stations. 3.25p 

tLOOr 6acramento River Steamers tII.OOp 

3.30p Benlcla, Winters, Sacramento, 
Woodland, Williams. Coluea.WH- 
Iowb. Knights Landing. Marys- 
ville. Orovllle and way Ptattons., 
3.30p Hayward. NlleB and Way Stations. 
4C0f Martinez, Sun Rnmon.VnlleJo.Napa, 

CalUtoga. Santn Rosa 

400p Martinez, Tracy. Lntbrop.St'ckton. 1025a 
4 OOr NlleB. Llvermore. Stockton. Lodl.. 4.25p 
4.30r Hayward. Nllrs. Irvlngton. Sen t '855* 

Jose. Llvermore f 111. 55a 

Tbe Owl Limited— Frefino. Tulare, 
BnketsOcld, Los Angeles; con- 
nects at Saugus for Santa Bar- 
bara. 8.66a 

Port Costa. Tracy, Stockton, Los 

Banos 12-25p 

t6.30p Nlles. San Jose Local 7.25a 

6.00i- Hnyward.N11e6 and San Jose 1025a 

6.00p Oriental Mall — Ogden. Denver. 
Omaba. St. Louis. Chicago and 
EaeU (CsrrleB Pullman Car pas- 
sengers only out of San Fran- 
cisco. TourlBt car and coach 
passengers lake 7.00 p. x. train 
to Reno, continuing tbeDce Id 
tbelr carBfip.M. train eastward.. 
Weetbouod, Sunset Limited.— 
From New York, Chicago, New 
Orleans. El Paso. Lob Angeles. 
Fre»Dc. Rereads, Raymond (from 
TosemUe). Martinez. Arrives. . 
7-OOp Ban Pablo. Port Costa, Murtlnez 

and Way Stations 1125a 

17-OOp Vallejo 7 66p 

7-00p Port uosta. Brnlf-irt. Sulsuo, Davis, 
Bstrnmeiito, Truckee. Reno. 
Stops at all stations eaBt of 

Sacramento 7.6Ba 

80Bf' Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
ramento, Miiryevllle, Redding. 
Portland. Puget Soand and Ernst. 8-66a 
I910i- Hayward, Nlles and San Jobc fsun 

day only) 111.65a 

11.2Bp Port Costa, Trncy, Lathnir. Mo- 
desto, Merced. Raymond do v<> 

semite). Fresoo 12 26p 

Hanford. Vlsnllii. BakcrBfleld 6.25* 



10.65a 
765p 



3.25a 



6 00> 



6.00- 



4.25. 



8.25a 



I7-46a Santa Cruz Excursion (Sunday 

on 1 >• ) 1 8 . 1 f 

8-16a Newark. Ceniervllle. Snn Jose. 
Fcltou. Boulaer Creek, Santa 

Cruz and Way Stations 6 26"' 

12.16P Newark. Centi-rvllle, San Jobc 
New Almaden.Los Gatos.Felton, 
Bouidir Creek, Santa Cruz and 
PrliK-1] al Way Stations 10 56* 

4 16i- Newaik. San Jose, Los GatOB and 
way Murines (in, Saturday and 
Sunday runs througb to Santa 
Cruz, connects at Felton for 
Boulder Creek, Monday only 
fr-ni Santa Cruz)., <8-56 a 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

From SAN FRANCISCO, Fool ol Market St. <Sllp*i 

— 1-7:15 8:00 11:00 a.m. 100 3 00 616 p.m 

from OAKLAND. Foot of Broadway — t«:0O t8:(>J 

t8:0:. 10:00a.m. 12 00 2 00 4.00 p.m. 

COAST LINE (Hroad OmiKe). 

(Thlnl und Tmvnseud Streets.) 

61 0a San Jose and Way Stations 7.30p 

<7 00a San Jose and Way Stations . 6-30p 

'700a New Alaiaden M.I Op 

17.16a Monterey and Santa Cruz Excur 

sfori (Sunday only) i830p 

o8.00a Const Line Limited— Stops only San 
JoBe.Gllroy.Holllster.PaJaro.Cas- 
troTllle. Salinas. San Ardo, Pbbo 
Robles. Santa Margarita. San Luis 
Oblppo.(prlncipBlstatlODStbence) 
Santa Barbara, sod Los A n- 
geles. Connection at CaBtrovllle 
to and from Monterey nnd Pacific 
Grove and at I'ajaro north bound 
from Capltola and SantaCruz... 10.46p 
84")0a San Jose. TreB Pinos, Capltola, 
6auiaCruz.Paclfl<Grove.SallnBB, 
San Luis Ol.lspo and Principal 

Intermediate Stationp 4.1 Op 

Westbound only. Pacific Coast Ex- 
DreFH.— From New York, Chicago, 
New Orleans. El Paso. Lob An- 
geles, Santa Kaibara. Arrives.. 1.30p 

1030a San Jose and Way Stations 1.20p 

11-30a San Jose, Los Gsiob and Way Sta- 

tlons 6.36p 

o1.30p San JoBe and Way Stations x7 00p 

2. 0Op 6an Jose and Way StatlonB 59 40a 

\3C0p Del Monte ExprcBs— Santa Clara, 
c Ban Ji se. Del Monte. Monterey, 
Pacific Grove (connects at Santa 
Clara for Santa Cruz, Boulder 
Crt ' ck UDd Narrow Gauge points) 112.16P 
oiZOr Bnrllngame. San Mateo. Redwood, 
MenloPark. Palo Alto Mayfield, 
Mountain View. Lawrence, Santa 
Clara. San Jose, Gilroy (connec- 
tion for Holllster, Tres Pinos), 
Pajaro (connection for Watson- 
rllle, Capltola and Santa Cruz), 
Pacific Grove and way stations. 
Connect* at Castrovllle for Sa- 
linas 10.46a 

o4-30r San Jose and Way Stations 8. 36a 

ot6Jj0i- San J.-se. (via Santa Clara) Loa 
(j a (.is, Wright and Principal Way 

Stations 19 00a 

o16.30' Sun jnt-c and Principal Way Stations t8 00 a 
o16.16) San Mateo.BereBford. Belmont. San 
Carlos. Redwood, Fair Oaks. 

MenloPark. Palo Alto *fi 4R A 

6.30i San Jose and Way Stations.. . 6 36a 

o7-00p Sunset Limited, Eattbound.— San 

Luis Obispo, 6anta Barbara, Lob 

Angeles. Deming. El Paso, New 

Orleans. New York. (Westbound 

. anives vleSamKaquhiVallej) .. irS.25* 

8. OOP Palo Alto andWay Stallons 10 16a 

nil 30j Wlllbrae. Palo Alto and Way Sta- 
tions +9 45p 

C11-30J Mlllbrae, San Jose and Way Sta- 

tlons tfl-46r 



The UNI N TRANSFER COMPANY 
will call for and check bagcatre from hotelB and 
residence". Telephone. Kxelmnce > 3. Inquire 
of Ticaet Aeents for Time Cards and other 
information. 
*No day coaches run between San PranclBco and Reno. 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon, x Saturday and Sunday only, g Slops at all Stations on 
Sunday. T Sunday excepted. J Sunday only. a Saturday only, d Connects at Goshen Jc 
with trains for Hanford, Viealia. At Fresno, for VI- alia via Sanger 6 Via Coast Line. 

^luesday and Friday. m Arrive via Niles. n Daily except Saturday. "Via San Joaquin 
valley, 1 Stops Santa Clara south bound only. Connects, except Sunday, for all points Nar- 
row Gauge. 



Hero in Historical Novel — Look 
here, if you are going to write a 
sequel to this story, cut out a few 
"gadzookses!" and "oddsboddi- 
kinses!" and just substitute a few 
plain damns. 

"These labor unions are doing 
some good work, after all." "What 
do you refer to?"' "A walking dele- 
gate stopped our minister's sermon 
to-day and told him that he was 
working overtime." 



O. R. & N. CO. 

THE ONLY STEAMSHIP LINE TO 

PORTLAND, ORE 

And 8hort Rail Line Prom Portland to all Points 
East. Throueh Tickets to all Points, all Rail 
or Steamship and Rail, at LOWEST RATES. 
Steamer Tickets Include Berth and Meals. 
88. COLUMBIA Sails Peb 212,22. Mar. 4, II. 

24. 
S3. GEO. W. ELDER Sails Peb 7. 17. 27. Mar 

9, 19, 29. 
Steamer sails from foot of Spear St.. 11 a. ro 

Time is called the Despoiler, but 
he often robs us more by what he 
gives than by what he takes away. 



July 4, 1903. 

CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTEhN 
RAILWAY CO. 
lessees 
SAN FRANCISCO & NORTH PACIFIC 

RAILWAY COMPANY 
Tlburon Ferry, Foot of Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 
WEEK DATS— 7:30, 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 a. m.; 
12:35, 2:30, 3:40, 5:10, 5:50, 6:30 and 11:30 
p. m. Saturdays— Extra trip at 1:30 p. m. 
SUNDAYS— 7:30, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a. m.; 
1:30. 2:30, 3:40, 5:10, 6:30. 11:30 p. m. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
11:15 a. m.; 12:60, ^OO, 3:40, 6:00, 6:20, 
WEEK DAYS— 6:05, 6:50, 7:35, 7:50. 9:20, 
6:25 p. m. Saturdays— Extra trip at 

SUNDAYS-6:60, 7:35, 9:20, 11:15 a. m.; 1:46, 
3:40, 4:50, 5:00, 6:20, 6:10, 6:26 p. m. 
•Except Saturdays. 



Leave 
San Fr'cisco 



In Effect I 
May 3, 1903 I 



Arrive 
San Fr'cisco 



Week J 
Jays I 



Sun- 
days 



yes' nation 



Sun- 
uays 



Week 
Day 8 





7:30a 




7:46a 


7:45a 


7:30a 


8:00a 




8:40a 


8:40a 


8:00a 


9:30a 


ignacio 


10:20a 


10:2ua 


2:30p 


2:30p 




6:00p 


6:20p 


6:10p 


5:10p 




6:20p 
7:25p 


7:25p 


7:30a 


7:30a 




7:45a 


7:45a 


8:00a 


8:00a 


Novato 


10:20a 


10:20a 


2:30p 


9:30a 


Petaluma 


6:20p 


6:20p 


6:10p 


2:30p 
5:10p 


and 
Santa Rosa 


7:26p 


7:25p 


7:30a 


7:30a 




10:20a 


10:20a 


8:00a 


8:00a 


Fulton 


7:25p 


6:20p 


2:30p 


2:30p 






7:25p 






Windsor 






7:30a | 


7:S0a | 


H'aldsburg 
Lytton 


10:20a 


10:20a 


2:30p 


2:30p 


Geyservllle 
Cloverdale 


7:25a 


7:25p 



7:30a 
2:30p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


1 Hopland 
1 and Uklah 


10:20a 
7:25p 


1 10:20a 
1 7:25p 


7:30a 


7:30a 


| Wllllts 


7:26a 


| 7:25p 


8:00a 
2:30p 


S:00a 
2:30p 


Guernevllle 


10:20a 
7:25p 


1 10: Ma 
I 6:20p 


S:00a 
5:10p 


8:00a 
6:10p 


l Sonoma 
1 Qlen Ellen 


8:40a 
6:O0p 


1 8:40a 
| 6:20p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


[ Sebastopol 


10:20a 
7:26p 


1 10:20a 
| 6:20p 




Steamers leave San Franrlaco 
at follows: 

For Ketchikan. Juneau. 
Sbagway. etc, Alaska. 11 a. m. 
May 81. June 5. 10 IS, 20, 25, 80. 
July S. Change to company's 
steamer* at Seattle. 

For Victoria, Vancouver. 
PortTownseod. Seattle, Taco 
ma, Everett Whatcom— 11 a. m. 
MnySl. JuneB, 10, 15. 20. 25. 80. July 5. Change at 
Seattle to this company's steamers for Alaska and 
G. N, Ry.; at Seattle for Tacoma to K. P. Ry.: at 
to Vancouver C. P. Ry. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay> 
Pomona, 1-30 p.m. June S, 9, 15,21, 28. July 8 
Corona, 1:30 p. m. May 81. June 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 
July 6- 

For Los Angeles (via Port Los Angeles and Re 
dondo), Sau Diego and Santa Barbara- 
Santa Rosa Sundays, 9 a. m. 
State of California, Thursdays 9 a. m. 
For Los Ange'en. via San Pedro and Bast San 
Pedro, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Monterey. San 
S'.meoo. Cayucos, Port Harfold (San Luis Ublnpo) 
Ventura and Hueueioe. 

Coos Bay, 9 a. h. June 0, 14, 22, 30. July 8. 
For Ensenada, Magdalena Bay, San Jose del Cabo 
Mazattan, Altata. Topolobampo, La Pat, Santa 
Rosaila, Qoaymas (Mex.)— 10 a. m.. 7th eaob month. 
For further Information obtain folder. 
Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing 
dates. 

TICKET OFFICE— A New Montgomery street 
(Palace Hotel) 

Freight Office— 10 Market Street. 

C. D. DUN ANN. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

10 Market St.. San Francisco. 

The Professor — "A collector yoa 
say? Did you tell him I was out?' 
The Factotum — "Yes sir. l>ut lu 



wouldn't believe me." 
U-ssor — "Humph ! Then 
I'll have to l;<» and tell 

self." 



The Pro 

1 SUppi »-( 

him mv 



|uiy 4. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



33 



HIS FIRST FRIEND. 

Michael sal despondently on the 
,>. wishing himself an »r- 
»han The hand of his mother 
.ivy, and neither justice nor 
tempered it-- dealings. 
Vithm the fr- >nt ilo.ir it was now 
dust out of the parlor sofa 
nth the same vigor it hail ex- 
tended on him ten minutes car- 
ter — for the small matter of a 
buddy boot-heel on a clean 
11 floor. 
i learn him. she ••aid. She 
lad been learning him all his 
veary seven years, and still he 
new surprisingly little; not much 
leyond the tact that a boy was 
:e of endless trouble about a 
and that motherhood as an 
nstitution was vastly over-rated. 

Into his dark hour came a timid 
tatter of paws, then a cold, wet 
ouch on his hand. He lifted his 
leavv eyes to see a thin, brown 
nippy in a wriggling semicircle of 
ngratiation. bis long tail lowered 
leprecatingly. yet switching with 
lemulous hope, bis eager eyes 
finning over with love of man, 
;ven his bowed legs betokened his 
•everent fear. Michael, strangely 
stirred, patted the head thrust 
;oward him and felt the soft ears 
ivith kind fingers. Puppy, in a 
subdued agony of joy, wriggled 
up into his chest and offered a 
long wipe of a pink tongue. Ca- 
resses had not often come Mi- 
chael's way. He gathered the 
stranger into his arms and the two 
lonely faces rubbed gratefully to- 
gether. 

Then his fondling hands discov- 
ered the pathetic prominence of 
his new friend's ribs. He offered 
a corner of a cracker from his 
pocket, and it was swallowed with 
an eagerness that almost included 
his fingers. The ears cocked anx- 
iously, furrowing the soft forehead 
with frowns, as he searched his 
pockets in vain for a further offer- 
ing ; yet the new love was not 
mercenary. When no food was 
forthcoming, the puppy returned 
to affection, and gave a tender 
"M-ni ! M-m !" in return for rub- 
bings and cheerful whispers. The 
sudden opening of the door behind 
them gave the two a momentary 
resemblance — an air- of guilty 
shrinking. 

"Well, where in the name of 
kingdom come did you get that?" 
demanded Michael's mother. "My 
land, don't you know better than 
to pick up stray dogs? We'll have 

a time getting rid of him. You 
needn't think T'm going to have a 
pup around, digging up the yard 



and spoiling everything in the 
house. Send him off now. quick 
1 can. SI "lit !" 

\ v. the broom em- 

phasized her meaning. The puppy- 
shrank back and tumbled down the 
-tip-, where In- stood, crouching, 
hurt, yet faintly hopeful, a- the 
dixir slammed. Sudden tear- n ise 
in Michael's eye- He held "in 
entreating arms, and the puppy 
crept eagerly back into them. Mi- 
chael bid his burden under his 
.jacket, and slipped by devious 
ways to a pile of boards in a vacant 
lot next door. Here in an angle 
was a tiny shelter big enough f'>r 
a boy and a dog. Soft straw, a 
sack and a can of water turned it 
into a home, and a large half of 
Michael's supper went stealthily 
into a newspaper when his mother 
was not looking. 

The clandestine affair went on 
unmarred for two perfect weeks. 
Michael grew a trifle thinner, but 



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LANMANS 

FLORIDA WATER 



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— _ 



Timmy began to fill up bis sagging 
skin with gratifying speed. He 
learned to submit to a bale rope, 
too, when they came home from 
their happy excursions together, 
Michael put it on with tear- ■ >!' 
apology : but the fear of his mother 
haunted his days. 

Then one morning, coming down 



®$h? 




HOLDS THE HIGHEST 
AWARD 

EVER MADE TO AN AMERICAN PIANO! 

It is the a-ward of approval 
by the greatest artists and the 
musical public. 

■Within the short space of 
four years the E.VERETT ranhs 
foremost of America's great 
pianos, tailing the position 
from those maKes -which 
had consumed forty years 
in reaching similar distinc- 
tion. 

The story is told in two 
-words — 

Greater Jnerit 

-THE- 

Wiley B. Allen Co. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

991-933 Market Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 



The New 
DENSMORE 

Adopted a-s Official Typewriter by the 

WORLD'S FAIR. 
St. Louis 




Our free Booklet illustrates the Ball Bear- 
ings, Back Spacer, Justifier, Paper Reg- 
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to breakfast. Michael felt his heart 
sink in sick terror : for in the back 
yard, eagerly watching the kitchen 
doer, sat Timmy. a trail of bale 
rope behind him. his air cheerful 
and self-gratulatorv. .Michael 
would have enticed him softly 
away, but at that moment his 
mother glanced out. 

"If there ain't that wretched pup 
again !" 

She seized a dipper of water, and 
opening the door, flung it full into 
Timmy's trusting face. His dis- 
mayed retreat was followed up by 
a lump of coal and some emphatic 
orders : then she turned back in 
triumph, to be met by a scarlet 
face and clenched lists. For once 
Michael was lifted above his fear. 

"You are a mean, cruel old 
woman !*' he sobbed, fiercely. 

His mother's mouth tightened. 

"Oh, I am. am I !" she said, with 
a grasp on his arm that cooled him 
like ice-water. "I'll learn you to 
call me names!" And so she did. 
But he had Timmy to go to for 
comfort now. 

That was on Su nday. Mondav 

HAND 
SAPOLIO 

It ensures an enjoyable, invigor- 
ating bath ; makes every per? 
respond, removes dead skin, 

ENERGIZES THE WHOLE BODY 

starts the circnlatioo, and leaves a 
glow equal to a Turkish bath. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS 



morning after breakfast Michael 
was sent out to do various errands. 
It was two long hours before he 
came scurrying back. As he ran 
in with his bundles, a large hole in 
the center of his mother's parsley 
bed sent his heart into his mouth. 
It was fresh and deep and the 
earth had been scattered gailv in 
every direction. About it were tell- 
tale marks of paws, but Timmy 
himself was nowhere in sight. Mi- 
chael crept guiltily into the house, 
his knees shaking under him. The 
door of the parlor was open, and 
- ind drew him in. There was 
Timmy. bright-eyed and ropeless. 
tugging briskly at the red chenille 
fringe of the sofa. Long trails of 
it already strewed the floor, and the 
puppy was worrying and growling 
at the last breadth with whole- 
hearted abandon. At that moment 
the step of Michael's mother 
sounded in the hall without. 
* * • * * 

The police sergeant looked down " 
over his desk in wonder. 

"Well, what is it. sonny ?" he 
asked. The boy stood silent, tears 
dripping slowly down his cheeks. 
"What's up?" repeated the ser- 
geant. 

The boy unfastened the top but- 
ton of his jacket. A brown head 
wriggled out, and a long puppy 
tongue made eager passes at his 
chin. 

"Mother says— you're to — shoot 
1 immy," he stammered between 
choking breaths. Closing his eves 
he held up the little dog to the 
desk. The officer looked puzzled 
and a waiting policeman sauntered 
over to see what was happening. 

"\\ by. what's wrong with the 
pup?" they asked, with friendly 
pulls at '1 immv's ears. The little 
dog beamed at them, then climbed 
nil into Michael's neck. 

"He — tears things. She don't — 
want — him — around." sobbed Mi- 
chael. Then putting the dog from 
him he turned and ran blindly out 
of the room. 

"Not a bad looking pup." said 
tlu- policeman. "I'll take him home 
si you like." 

"All right." said the sergeant. 

And so the hoy. crouching 
against the wall outside, heard no 
shot, though be waited hour after 
hour, with his hands clenched 
against his ears. When he came 
home, long past the dinner hour, 
his mother was waiting for him in 
simmering wrath, -she'd learn him 
to he gone all day! Then her eyes 
happened to fall on his face: and 
tor once she said nothing. — Juliet 
\\ ilbor Tompkins in Everybody's. 



Have you 
a friend 

in Chicago or Boston 
or Kansas City or any- 
where else, for whom 
you want to buy a ticket 
to this city? 

If you have, call at 
this office and let us 
arrange matters for you. 

You deposit with us 
enough monev to cover 
transportation, as also in- 
cidental expenses of the 
journey, we do the rest. 



F. V. Thompson, 
Gen'l Western Agt., 
623 Market Street, 
San Francisco. 




"Rivers," said Brooks. "I'll bet 
you a new hat you can't say any- 
thing to old Hunks without get 
ting a crusty answer." 

"I'll just take that." replied Riv 
ers. 

"Mr. Hunks," remarked River 
meeting him on the sidewalk th 
next day. "I want to tell you tha 
the way you sawed off that cha 
who was trying to work you lor 
subscription in aid of the flood suf 
ferers the other day was about tin 
neatest thing you ever did." 

"How do you know it was' 
snapped old Hunks. 

"By the way. Brooks.'' said Ri' 
ers a dav or two later, "what soi 
of hat do von want — plug or pan 
ama?" 



|®ri>Stylish5li:-5o| 







Suits 



15 



F» Samples Sent 
> Free.... 



ft 
ft 
ft 

Dressy Suits $20 § 
Pants $4.50 j 

My $25.00 Suits are theS 
best in America. jsl 

1 C Per Cent Saved by get-SI 
Z ting your suit made byM 

JOE POHEIM 1 

TIE HUM 

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11101112 Market SL 



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ttAKKjej&AXJLXJiK************. 



OPIUM 



Morphine and Liquor 



Habits Cured Smatorlua 
Established 1875 Thou- j 
sands having* failed el«a- 
ther* h»Te been cured by ui. Trealmet can bs I 
tken at boms Writs Ths Or. J Slsphsns. Co. 
Ocpt. 78 Lebanon, Oh Is. 



July 4. 1903. 




The CLUB 

are the original bottled Cocktails. 
Years of experience have made 
them THE PERFECT COCKTAILS 
that they are. Do not be lured 
into buying some Imitation. The 
ORIGINAL of anything is good 
enough. When others are offered 
it is for the purpose of larger prof- 
its. Insist upon having the CLUB 
COCKTAILS, and take no other. 

G. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO., Sou Pretrials 

29 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Hartford, Conn. London 



PACIFIC COAST AGXXTS 

THE SPOHN-PATR1CK CO. 

*XMM Battery St San Fr»nc/«co, Cal 



New 
Overland Service 

From San Francisco to Chicago. 
Three fast trains every day. Time 
— less than three days. Route — 
Southern Pacific, Union Pacific 
and the 

Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railways. 

Leave San Francisco 8 a.m., 10a.m. 
and 6 p. m. Through trains to 
Union Passenger Station, Chicago. 
Tickets, berths or information at 

635 Market Street, C. L. CANFIELD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. General Agent. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

At a dinner given to ;i crowd 
of railroad hum Senator Chauncej 
M. Depew was the star spi 
In the course of his remarks. says 
the \'cu York Times, lie told a 
stury wherein a certain manufac- 
turer, left practically alone in his 

factory through a lOck-Otlt, was 

represented :i^ pointing to the of- 
fice clock mcr his desk ami saving 
to his friend : 

"There are only two hands in 
my office that never strike." 

"Whereupon." said the Senator, 
"the clock struck two." 

After the dinner, one of Senator 
I epew's friends came up and con- 
gratulated him: 

"Your speech was great," lie 
said. "That story about the clock- 
's a daisy." 

The Senator beamed. "I think 
it is pretty good." he said 
modestly. 

About five minutes later another 
friend came up who was not so 
eulogistic. 

"Chauncey," he said. "I think- 
that story about the clock better 
every time I hear it. I think to- 
night was the fiftieth time." 

"Why, President Newhall says 
that story is a daisy," expostulated 
Mr. Depew. 

The other laughed. "You ought 
to study botany, Chauncey, and 
you would learn that a daisy is 
a hardy annual." 

And thereupon the Senator sub- 
sided. 



35 



Much interest is evinced in the 
innouncement that Mr. Conreid, 
:he successor of Maurice Grau, in- 
:ends to produce Wagner's "Par- 
sifal" at the Metropolitan Opera 
House next winter. In his will 
Wagner stipulated that "Parsifal" 
should be produced in Baireuth 
anly, and since his death his 
widow has enjoyed what amounts 
:o a monopoly in this famous musi- 
:al work. It is said that Mr. Con- 
ried has offered Mme. Wagner 
£25,000 for the privilege of pro- 
ducing the opera, but that he will 
give it with or without her consent. 



.Padishah 





Non-Magnetic 

nickel Silnr Cue 

Fully Guaranteed 

For sale by 

ALL JEWELERS 

Illustrated Booklet 
on tequeat. showing 

COLORED 
FANCY 
DIALS 

The New England 
Watch Co. 

Factories— 

Water-bury, Conn. 

Olllcci— 
New York, Chicago, 
Sao Francisco. 



Gushing Young Lady (to Mr. 
Dunk, who has just returned from 
Rome) — They say, Mr. Dunk, that 
when one sets foot in Rome for 
the first time one experiences a 
profound feeling of awe. The 
cflaos of ruined grandeur, the mag- 
nificent associations, seem too 
much for one to grasp. Tell me, 
oh tell me, Mr. Dunk, what did you 
think of it all? Mr. Dunk (delib- 
erately, after considering awhile) 
— Very nice. 



It is a great sin to dc grasping, 
especially in the eyes of the man 
who has lost his grip or never had 
any. 



The Querist — What do you 
think of the doctrine of the sur- 
vival of the fittest? The Egotist 
— It is all right, so far. I am still 
alive. 



Burlington 



3 times 
every week 

PersoQally Conducted Excur- 
sions leave Los Angeles Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Thurs- 
days, and from San Francisco 
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fri- 
days. 

Tourist Sleeping car service 
to Chicago, St. Louis and 
Boston. 

Daily Pullrnan cars San 
Francisco to Chicago. 

631 Market St. 

Under Palace Hotel 

San Francisco 



W. D. SANBORN. 



Genere*l Agenr 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 4, 1903. 




COME TO ME, LITTLE ONE. 
Elsa Barker in Woman's Home l ompauion. 
Come to me, little one, drowsy and dear; 

Mother will spare me her darling awhile. 
I am so lonely when twilight is here! 

Lie in my arms, love, and nestle and smile. 

I have no little one, dearie, like you, 

No little hand to hold close in the night. 

No one to dream of the lonely hours through, • 
No one to wake tor when God sends the light. 

You are so sorry? Oh, bless you, my sweet! 

Dear little fingers that wipe off the tears! 
Little soft body and little white feet. 

How will they treat you — the terrible years? 

Life is so fair to a baby like you! 

All things are wonderful under the sun, 
Rainbows are real and all stories are true. 

Would they be so when childhood is done. 

Wide their eyes that are questioning so, 
Life is no stranger to you than to me. 

The secret worth knowing I never shall know; 
The end of the rainbow I never shall see. 

So. little drowsy one, nestle and sleep — 
Lullaby, baby, oh lullaby-low. 

There always is peace in the dreams that are deep- 
Lullaby, little one, lullaby-low. 



LIFE THE LOVER. 

E H. Sothern in Scribner's. 

Could we know — ah. could we know 
Whether what we might have done 

Ever will have chance to grow 
In the realms beyond the sun, 
Then the race were lost and won — 

Lost as winter yields to spring — 
Learned from limping how to run, 
Learned from lisping how to sing. 

Life the light and Flesh the lamp. 

Flame, or lantern, which is "I" — 
Earth which doth the spirit cramp, 

Spirit which the Earth doth fly? 

Word of hate and lover's sigh 
Pass they when their sound is spent? 

Shall we be mere memory. 
Or for sorrow or content? 

This may be the journey's end — 

Life and Death and passing man, 
Life the lover, Death the friend, 

Call for pipes and foaming can. 

List awhile the song of Pan — 
Life, my sweet, I love thee well! 

Laugh we while I live my span. 
Listen! 'tis our marriage bell! 



OWN A HOME 



IN 
BEAUTIFUL 



CAMP MEEKER 



free of fog and wind. 700 lots sold, 250 cottages built. Lots 
$10 up, cottages built by proprietor, $50 up. Boating, bath- 
ing, tenting, free. Sawmill, depot, stores, post office, ex- 
press, telephone and hotel on ground. Via Sausalito Ferry. 
Address M. O. MEEKER, Camp Meeker. 



BLITHEDALE 

Marin County, California. Opened April 15th. 

Hotel bus meets train at Mill Valley Station. 



Sisson 



Near Mt. Shasta 

3,555 feet above the 
level of the sea, on the 
western side of Mt. 
Shasta lies Sisson's Tav- 
ern nestled among the 
pines of the Sierras. Tel- 
ephone, telegraph and 
daily mail; a half mile 
from the railroad station 
with free bns meeting all 
trains. Magnificent 
scenery, mild, refreshing, 
healthful climate, pure 
air and lots of comfort. 
Sisson's Tavern is not a 
place for dress or society 
bnt rather a resort (there 
quiet and comfort and 
peace have precedent. 
The Tavern is large and 
comfortable and hard fin- 
ished throughout with 
polished floors. The table 






board is delicious, the 
dishes are dainty and 
served in a most, inviting 
manner. Fare $12.00 for 
round trip and $1.50 ad- 
ditional for sleeping car 
accommodations. Rates 
$2.50 per day or $14.00 
per week and upward. 
For information call at 
Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Information Bur- 
eau, 613 Market Street, 
San Francisco. Peck's 
Tourist Information Bur- 
eau, 31 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, 
or Traveler's Informa- 
tion Bureau, 630 Market 
Street, San Francisco, or 
at 410 Sonth Broadway, 
Los Angeles, Cal. For 
accommodations address 
Mrs. L. M. Sisson, Sis- 
son, Cal. 



MUS. L. M. SISSOSf. VROT 

SISSON, CAL. 



Hotel Rowardennan 

BEN I OHOND, Santa Cruz Co. 

Open June 1st, under entirely new 
and progressive management. 

The starting point for the Big Ba- 
sin. Cuisine and service equal to 
the best in San Francisco. 

Special attention given to private 
dinner and supper parties. 

Orchestra during entire season. 

The prettiest club house in the 
state. 



A. C. ROSCOE, 



H. F. ANDERSON, proctor. 



Vichy Springs 



Smiles from Ukiah, Mendoolno Co. Natural 
eleotrio waters, champagne baths. Only plaoe 
in the world of this oUss. Fishing, hunting, 
Crystal Springs. Aooommodatlons; table first 

class. 

J. A. Redemejer & Co., Props. 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY jo, 1856. Annual Subscription. $4.00. 



NET^^gJpFER 




Vol. LXVII. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 11, 1903. 



Number a. 



The 8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and pub- 
lished every Saturday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott. 
Halleck building. 330 Sansome street, San Francisco. Cal 

Entered at San r ranclsco Postofflce as second-class matter. 

New York Office— (where Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and adverUsIng)— 306 Broadway, C. C. Murphy. 
Representative. 

I>ondon Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m. 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 

The Alameda Encinal defends Father Caraher. 
None of Father Caraher's victims will he likely t" 
go to Alameda. 



Father Caraher is much more successful as an ex- 
ponent of religious truth than as leader of an unwise 
"goo-goo" crusade. 

A lull in news has come, hence the threat of the 
eternal Balkan trouble is revived. Very soon it will 
he the big melon season. 

Whitaker Wright, the famous millionaire swindler, 
is 'lying of vertigo in prison. He was a cool hand, 
but even his head is turned. 



Our lawyers cannot settle the little Donahue mat- 
ter without a mix-up. The more the soup is stirred, 
the better chance of a sop or two. 



W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., was injured by his automo- 
bile exploding. It is said that the makers are to be 
proceeded against for lese majeste. 



San Diego planted a thousand trees in the public 
park in honor of the Fourth of July. This was more 
sensible than the usual pyrotechnics. 

Washington is to have a Servian legation. It is 
reported that the Servian minister will apply for ad- 
mission to the Journeymen Butchers' Union. • 

In the matter of the glove scandal, nobody ap- 
pears to be either taking their gloves off or throwing 
down the gauntlet on the side of honesty. 

The Examiner is as ignorant of geography as of 
political economy. In Sunday's issue it described 
Valparaiso and Talchauana as in South Africa. 

The American society people are all coming back 
from London for the yacht races. The loss of Good- 
wood and Cowes will be the gain of New York. 

They talk about the wind in San Francisco ; why, 
only the other day they had a gale at Emeryville 
which blew all the paper off a barber's shop wall. 

The morbidness to which artists are prone appears 
in the case of John Donoghue, who committed sui- 
cide because his design for a memorial statue to 
President McKinley at Philadelphia was rejected. 
Abler men than Donoghue have been satisfied with 
getting drunk under similar circumstances. 



The Board of Works gives unsatisfactory answer-. 
to business men who desire to see the streets im- 
proved. Tins Board is more interested in working 
the public. 



A special item to the effect that no Spanish tlag* 
were seen at the Fourth of July celebration in Porto 
Rico naturally makes one wonder if any were ex- 
peeled. 



It is commonly reported that President Wheeler 
of the State University is to have a diplomatic ap- 
pointment. In this case the wish is father to the 
thought. 

The official who was dismissed for the Kichineff 
massacres has been received everywhere with cheers. 
Protests to the Czar appear very sensible under these 
circumstances. Eh? 



Towne has been holding forth again in his usual 
stream of high-faluting morality. The fact that he 
chose Tammany Hall for his oratory shows his de- 
fective sense of humor. 



The fight between blacks and whites at Evansville, 
Indiana, would have been called a revolution in South 
America. We are cooler about such things, but 
they are none the less a danger. 



Frank Collins, an expert English miner, saved 
eleven lives at Hanna before he himself was choked 
with after damp. Such men are a credit to humanity 
and the nation that bears them. 



W. B. Harrie, prisoner of a bandit in Morocco, has 
been exchanged for a number of native prisoners. 
This suggests the query : How many cannibals would 
be equivalent to one Hall Caine? 



We note that Root has been beaten by Gardner in 
the fight for the light heavy-weight championship of 
the world. The result would have been more inter- 
esting if Gardner's name had been Miles. 



An Italian fisherman took three shots at a disdain- 
ful woman on the Fourth of July, hoping that the re- 
volver shots would escape notice in the rattle of the 
fireworks. These foreign immigrants have no re- 
spect for our national institutions. 



The strikers against the Pacific States Telephone 
and Telegraph Company are busy suspending and ex- 
pelling one another. There is some proverb some- 
where or other about thieves falling out, and giving 
the corporation a chance. 

The Paris municipality has refused to grant Ameri- 
can capitalists a concession to supply gas to their 
municipality. Its attention being called to the mat- 
ter, the city decided to supply its own. It is hard to 
say which of two evils has been chosen. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 



THE FOXES MUST BREAK COVER. 

Judging from the action of many of the principal 
creditors of Eppinger & Co., there must be a strong 
impression prevalent that all the money raked in by 
the firm prior to its infamous close-down has not 
been thrown to the wind, and that a settlement might 
be expected. On the other hand the members of tins 
firm must believe in their ability to square matters 
with their creditors in the long run, when their at- 
torneys have exhausted all the means usually re- 
sorted to in cases of the kind to block the wheels of 
justice for a sum which will leave appropriate profits 
upon a transaction which it must be admitted in- 
volved more or less risk even in a place like this, 
where there is one law for the rich and another for 
the poor. 

Of course, if the blame could have been fixed upon 
the supernumeraries, which would seem to haye 
been the original intention of this precious trio, judg- 
ing from the trend of their evidence, all would- have 
been clear sailing for them, and the creditors could 
whistle for their money, while the chances are that 
the accused employee would have gone to jail. Fail- 
ing in this, they rest content to brazen the matter 
out in their contempt for a law of which they have 
no fear, while in a position to employ the services 
of men whose practice of the legal profession is 
mainly devoted to saving criminals of all classes 
from receiving their just deserts. The evidence al- 
ready before the Grand Jury of the light weights used 
in handling grain in the Eppinger warehouse, to- 
gether with other peculiar methods of business, 
shows how a firm of dishonest men can hoodwink 
people, even those most intimately connected with 
them until something occurs to show "the high, repu- 
table and representative firm" up in its true light, a 
grade far beneath the burglar or highwayman who 
takes his life in his hand when he steals. The only 
wonder is, that after such an exposure, men can be 
found in this city belonging to the mercantile com- 
munity who would lend their aid to shield the authors 
of such knavish work for the chances of having a few 
cents returned to them of the dollars filched by 
stealth. It is a still greater wonder, however, that 
men of this type are allowed to remain at liberty upon 
such a showing, free to get beyond the reach of law 
at any unfavorable turn of circumstances which would 
force the legal authorities to act, even though against 
their inclinations. Public attention is rivetted on this 
case, and the results of the present investigation will 
be far reaching in confirming or dispelling the grad- 
ually growing belief that justice no longer dwells in 
our midst if the accused be in a position to purchase 
immunity. 



REIGNING AS A BUSINESS. 

The change in the methods of producing and dis- 
tributing economic goods finds its counterpart in the 
changed attitude of the powers of the earth to one 
another. The feudal traditions of the superiority 
and aloofness of sovereigns and nobles are de- 
stroyed, and we find that these classes and powers are 
now obliged to justify their existence by work of 
some sort for the community. This is shown by the 
eagerness with which the aristocracy of England and 
Germany plunge into the feverish game of politics. 
The drawing-room and the shooting-box are aban- 
doned for the platform and the give and take of hard 
political contest ; the soft speech of the salon is ex- 
changed for the tumultuous applause or the vindic- 
tive execrations of roaring mobs; ease, refinement 



and luxury are put aside for strenuous and exhaust- 
ing battle in Parliament or the Reichstag. 

Even monarchs are not exempt from the new 
scheme of things. The President of the French Re- 
public is now engaged in returning a visit paid to 
him by King Edward, and the two men act as the 
attorneys for their respective nations. Here is an 
altogether new feature added to the onerous duties 
of monarchs, the ambassador is already relegated 
to an inferior position, the head of the nation must 
be equal to the occasion in his own person. 

Great Britain, with her usual good luck, finds her- 
self possessed of a sovereign who is entirely fitted 
by nature and training for the new role. The at- 
tractive personality of the King is known to all the 
world; his tact has become almost proverbial; his 
winning manner has made him hosts of friends ever 
since he was a mere boy, and the passage of time 
has but added to his capacity to win personal devo- 
tion. When it is remembered that he is an excellent 
linguist ; that he has known most of the sovereigns 
of Europe since they were infants ; that he has seen 
each statesman of importance rise in power, and that 
through long years of subordination he has learned 
the invaluable lesson of restraint in speech, and 
knows every intricacy of an involved, cumbersome 
etiquette, his value to his country will be at once 
seen. 

The Government was not slow to perceive the force 
of his influence, and this year even his bitterest 
enemy will be bound to admit that King Edward has 
earned his salary. It is owing to his social gifts and 
commonsense that France and England are to-day 
cheering each other, and that the war cloud which 
loomed so ominously but a short time ago is for the 
present lifted. 



OUR GREAT CABLE. 

The completion of the American Pacific Cable 
gives commerce another powerful and useful aid in 
work of distributing the commodities of international 
trade, and no business center will receive greater 
benefit from the enterprise than San Francisco. Now 
the pulse of the markets of commercial points stretch- 
ing over a distance of 8,000 miles, may be felt and 
known almost every hour of the day, thus enabling 
our exporter and importer to be quickly advised of 
sudden value fluctuations, which alone is of vast 
importance. But being in close touch with customers 
doing business thousands of miles away is of still 
greater importance, for to be advised immediately of 
actual or prospective disaster oftentimes gives oppor- 
tunity to prevent complications and great loss; be- 
sides, the rapidity now of the transmission of orders 
and demands, against the old way of waiting weeks 
for mail communication, means more to commerce 
than many people suppose. 

In a commercial sense, from Hawaii all the way to 
Manila, is in closer touch and of easier access to San 
Francisco to-day than a great deal of California was 
a third of a century ago. But there are other ad- 
vantages that will accrue to San Francisco from the 
American Pacific cable. It will greatly stimulate 
and increase trade and traffic with the Orient, and 
that in turn will increase ocean transportation facili- 
ties. So, altogether the new cable is a great thing 
for San Francisco, and there is much reason to re- 
joice that the enterprise has culminated and is a most 
pleasing and pronounced success. "To the far East 
and the Island of the Pacific by way of San Fran- 
cisco" is pretty sure to be the fingerboard at all the 
crossings of the commercial highways of America. 



July 



»9°3- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



OUR EXPORT TRADE. 

In face of a markcil increase in the national foreign 
t'.>r the year 1903, the total running 
1 15 millions in 1 xo ss if tl 
ord I -• point up to thai 

ii| in the commercial annals of the country, 
trade on the Pacific Coast is quiet, with a marked dc- 

c in the total figures representing the trad 
this city. The total valuation of exports from this 
■r the fiscal year just ended, exclusive of those 
[awaii which amounted to $9,543,000, was 
703,000, as compared with S: .>3'V 

173,000 in 1901, ami $35,232,0080 in 1900. 

Several reasons can be assigned for this de- 
clining trade. First of all, there has been a marked 
falling off in the movement of material for the army 
in the Orient, and on top of this a marked decrease 
took place in our trade with Mexico and Central 
America, due in a measure to quarantine in leading 
ports on the plague scare. Then, again, the practical 
tie-up in wheat shipments, which followed the drop 
in ocean freights, while the flour trade to China suf- 
fered materially from the extreme prices which pre- 
vailed, checking the export trade. But this little set- 
back, is not unnatural in its way, after the sharp ad- 
vances during the past three years, and a reaction 
may set in at any moment. The prospects for the 
ensuing year are brighter than ever before for the 
export trade of this city. Business with Australasia 
and Polynesia is growing all the time, and South 
Africa must be reckoned with as a prime factor in 
the future. All that is needed is a little more enter- 
prise upon the part of our merchants to make San 
Francisco a commercial emporium second to none in 
America. 

A REBUKE FOR THE CUSTOMS HOUSE. 

Out of regard for the fair name of San Francisco 
abroad and among the better class of the traveling 
public landing at this port, it is pleasant to note that 
at last the Government is taking cognizance of the 
high-handed and insolent methods pursued here by 
the Customs House officials. For some time past 
their zeal has induced them to make a mark of the 
wealthier class of our citizens arriving home from the 
Orient. People who have earned the respect of all 
who know them in their native land have been treated 
in the most scandalous manner. They have been 
paraded before the public as dishonest, as smugglers 
and thieves and the scurrilous abuse of the sensa- 
tional press has not been spared them, owing to the 
way these officials cater to the gossip-mongers for 
the sake of some cheap advertising they receive in 
return. The only wonder is that any one who can 
afford to travel comes this way at all. They certainly 
will not when the treatment people are now receiving 
from Customs officials gets noised abroad. Wh-n the 
Secretary of the Treasury instructs the officer now 
in charge here that information as to the discovery 
of unclaimed curios among a passenger's effects 
should not be given to the public press by Customs 
officials unless or until it is clearly apparent that 
there was a wilful intent to violate the revenue laws, 
it voices the opinion of every decent-minded citizen 
in the country. Such conduct as that of which com- 
plaint is now made would never be met with in older 
and more civilized communities, for the simple reason 
that no Government in Christendom would stand 
for it, outside of this politician-ridden republic. 



THE MAN FOR MAYOR. 

The Mayoralty contest already looms in view, and 
ked over and 

and tome very had. The 
iina in the game, and hereby nomii 

er the best candidate from 

W, J. Dutton, President of the Fireman's Fund 

Insurance I Ompan) . 

Mr. DuttOU is a man of unquestioned integrity. 

whose nai larantee in insurance and banking 

circles He i~ a Staunch American, the descendant 
whose ancestors fought in the Revolutionary War. 
He has always represented the best element in politi- 
cal life, and is an honored member of the Republican 
State Central Committee. 

A man of such personal probity, with such ante- 
its and connections could be well trusted to ad 
minister the city in the best possible way. As he 
would be free from indebtedness to the bosses for 
his election, so he would be independent of them in 
the matter of appointments, and we should have 
the new and delightful experience of the various 
Commissions filled with representative and reliable 
citizens. The News Letter is sure that the very men- 
tion of his name is sufficient to cause its endorse- 
ment. 



A UNION EMBEZZLER. 

H. M. Saunders, business agent of the Building 
Trades Council, was found guilty on Tuesday of 
misdemeanor embezzlement. 

This is another instance of the type of man who is 
too frequently appointed to influential positions in 
the trades unions. It is commonly recognized that 
the unions are political instruments, for the most 
part in the hands of unscrupulous leaders who deal 
with their power over their fellow-craftsmen for 
their own advancement and aggrandisement. It is 
not so generally known that the unions are honey- 
combed with personal dishonesty and petty thievery. 
Time and time again these exposures occur which 
show beyond doubt that there is much small fraud 
and crooked dealing among the officials who are 
selected to places of influence. The revelations of 
wholesale corruption among the trades-union officials 
in New York is shameful enough, but not surprising 
to those who have followed the course of modern 
labor organizations and become familiar with their 
working and with the type of men who are elected 
to power. In San Francisco, the New York record, 
there is little doubt, could be duplicated, and although 
the sums which have been taken by the union officers 
are not as large as in the Eastern metropolis, they 
would form a surprising total. 

This utilization of the union membership and the 
influence derived therefrom is responsible for much 
of the foolish and wicked actions which have lately 
marked the course of unionism. Under present con- 
ditions, trades unionism is but a form of graft for the 
unscrupulous. 

For a moment we pause our knocking to blow. 
Luck to the California Universities in the establish- 
ment of rowing as an intercollegiate sport. The 
stronger our young men come out of the universi- 
ties, the better for the State and the country. The 
trouble with football and a few other merry little 
undergraduate sports is that their value is modified 
by torn sinews and broken bones and other little 
minor blemishes. Rowing is a clean, plucky, man- 
making sport, without the broken bone feature. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July II, 1903. 



A SERIOUS MATTER. 

The arrival of 100,000 from beyond the seas the 
past year, and a large majority of them decidedly un- 
desirable material for citizenship, should call for some 
radical changes in our system of practically wide- 
open doors to Europe. It is an open secret that in 
Italy, Austria and Hungary, more especially, funds 
are raised in a semi-official but confidential way to 
aid undesirable human belongings of those countries 
to get out. Naturally the eyes of such people turn 
in the direction of the United States, and one reason 
for their coming in droves is that the steamship com- 
panies not only subscribe to the fund, but use some- 
thing more than their influence to secure the passage 
money, which they would not get if this immigra- 
tion were directed to other countries. 

Nearly all the lawlessness in the coal regions of 
Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and Illinois is 
inaugurated and committed by Huns, Slavs, Aus- 
trians and Italians. They have no sense of right, jus- 
tice or fairness. For the most part they live like 
hogs, and their code of domestic or any other kind 
of morals is not much better. But in whatever line 
of labor they engage they are restless and discon- 
tented. They seem to be entirely happy only when 
they are in turmoil and at war with the peace and 
dignity of the community in which they happen to 
be. Always they are first in strikes and last to com- 
promise. They want no school houses, for they pre- 
fer that their children shall grow up and be as tliev 
are. Altogether, they are a positive injury to the 
whole country, and the last year has added fully three 
quarters of a million of just such people to the 
nation's population. 

Certainly frugal, sober and industrious immigrants 
are cordially invited to come and identify themselves 
with the nation, and there is plenty of room and un- 
limited opportunity for all such to better their condi- 
tion, and at the same time all good material 
to the numerical strength and general wealth of the 
country. But the powers at Washington, for some 
reason, fail to see the need of sharp and telling dis- 
crimination in openine our gates to the world. And 
it is strange that they do not see, when it so very 
often becomes necessary to call out troops to pro- 
tect persons and property from the lawlessness of 
this very element. Perhaps the administration is 
waiting for public sentiment to force it to see this 
great danger to property and individual security. 
Public indignation is a dangerous thing to play with. 

THE "400" DELIGHTED. 

"American nobility," that is to say, the several 
flocks of "400," are on tip-toe of gleeful expectancy. 
Gabrielle Bompard, the notorious Parisian bawd, 
murderess and beauty, has been taken up by the "400" 
of Paris and inducted into the holy of holies of that 
"smart set." That gives her assured welcome in our 
several sets of "400," and she is coming to enjoy their 
favor and hospitality hence the tip-toe of gleeful ex- 
pectancy on this side of the water. Anything of the 
Bompard stamp is a legal tender in our smart sets if 
it first passes current in Paris or London's smart sets, 
and so, in the near future, the fair and vile Gabrielle 
will personally receive the homage of America's con- 
tingent in the world of gilded respectability. 

But aside from Bompard's fitting accomplishments 
for a high pedestal in the halls of our several job lots 
of "400" she comes with the pleasing though shadowv 
record of having been a hypnotic subject of Evraud, 
the gentleman who was party of the first part in the 
Eyraud and Bompard firm of murderers, thieves and 
criminals generally. She has great pleasure in re- 



counting the many horrible deeds she committed 
while in a hypnotic state. However, she says she 
committed the crimes without realizing what she 
was doing, which might reduce the load of iniquity 
she is carrying but for the fact that she remembers 
the killings and other crimes she participated in with 
rather too much vividness and recites them rather 
too graphically to make the hypnotic story fit in. 

But all that cuts no figure now. Bompard is on the 
top wave of favoritism and distinguished honors of 
the smart set in Paris, and at the request of some of 
our "nobility" — the nobility of gold and idleness — 
the same wave that is now bearing the fair Gabrielle 
to such lofty heights of social preferment in the capi- 
tal of the French republic will soon land her in the 
bare arms and upon the undressed bosoms of 
America's several smart sets — a social conglomera- 
tion of pure gold dollars and pinchbeck morals. Be 
it remembered that for the most part these smart sets 
are composed of men and women who hold them- 
selves far above people engaged in business pursuits. 
To be so engaged is to be "in trade," which is offen- 
sive to the eyes and nose of that brand of aristoc- 
racy. 

THE DECEPTIVE "DEWEY." 
Last week we called attention to the frauds prac- 
ticed upon those who gamble mildly on the slot- 
machines. Our remarks with reference to the card 
machines are equally applicable to those in which 
money is frankly played for. The disk which re- 
volves upon the pressure of a lever shows spaces of 
different colors, each of which represents a certain 
money-value, and the highest of which shows a pic- 
ture of the famous Admiral. Then there are inferior 
values for different colors, the smaller sums being 
more frequent. When the disk is revolved by the 
pressure of the lever as the force of the impetus dies 
away, the teeth at the back of the disk catch a cer- 
tain clasp which acts in front as an indicator, and 
when it stops the indicator points to the color the 
tooth of which has arrested the progress of the disk. 
This is losing gambling, for there are five or six 
colors, but still under fair treatment there is a gam- 
bler's chance, which is all that the player asks. In- 
stead, however, of giving him an opportunity to win 
the tooth is removed from some of the colors which 
carry the highest denominations. Thus, if the tooth 
is removed from the "Dewey," that will slip past the 
clasp wdiich should hold it, and the indicator will 
point to the next color, which is near enough to make 
the gambler wish for another try. Try as he will, 
however, it is obvious that he can never get the high 
stake, for the machine is so "doctored" that it cannot 
turn up. There is really satanic ingenuity shown in 
thus stimulating the gambling instinct, and hundreds 
of young men spend their week's wages or salary on 
Saturday night at one of these crooked machines. 
Words can hardly be found strong enough to de- 
scribe the knavery of these swindlers and the fatu- 
ous folly of their dupes, who will hardly be warned 
even by the exposure of the fraud. 



There is a postal deficit of over four millions. The 
deficiency, it is said, arose in the free delivery rural 
service. We had an idea from recent reports that 
it might have risen somewhere else. 



If you have not lunched at Moraghan's you have not 

tasted the delights of the best oyster house on the Pacific 
Coast. Everything is of the very best One need never 
be afraid of what they get to eat at Moraghan's. It is above 
suspicion. The best motto as regards food is the best, and 
you get it at Moraghan's. 



July ii. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



DOCTORING THE SOUP. 

A waiters' strike will be nothing t<. what is t.. lup- 
in Francis cl week — 
:irk yc, I will be avenged. 1 have learned - 
thniK — learned it from a waiter. I am "i a humble 
walk in liic, and do not deign to converse even with 
a waiter from a thrce-for-a-quarter restaurant. He 
• an habitual associate of mine, for 1 draw the 
line despite my democracy. We sometime.- talk to- 
gether, though, in a basement beer hall we both fre- 
quent. This waiter has told startling things 
me. It was with shuddering ears that I listened while 
he related that in some of the foundries they put 
left-over soup and vegetables hack into the kettles. 
He even told me that they employed at $3 per week 
whose duty it was to taste all the dishes men- 
tioned when they were brought hack to the kitchen, 
and if they were not unduly salted and peppered or 
bad not been dosed with sauces, back they went to 
their boiling places. He admitted, under pressure, 
that he was lying about the boys — but he assured 
me most solemnly that the first part of his storv is 
true. 

For years I have been eating in cheap restaurants, 
and I have a grudge against them, one and all. Meal 
time brings the "restaurant face" to me — that sour, 
bilious, cynical look that all restaurant feeders have 
who sit down to ten. twenty or thirty cent meals. 
Most of my sinister expression conies from a long- 
nourished suspicion that others had been before me 
— and having seen some of the others, I have sworn 
revenge. 

I have a friend who is a druggist. To him I will hie, 
and he will give me of the bitterest stuff he has in 
his mysterious bottles. Then to a restaurant I will 
hie, and the waiter will give me soup. As soon as his 
back is turned I will drop all that bitter dose into 
it. Such a huge plateful as I leave cannot escape the 
kettle — then the next guest will swear at the soup, 
and so will the next and the next. And I will go to 
this restaurant every day until I reform it — then on 
to another and another. They will have to give up 
their evil practice or hire boys — and God pity the 
boys ; for to-morrow I start my campaign against 
doctored soup. 



Oakland celebrated the Fourth of July by a big 
parade and a cock fight. It is seldom that such a 
choice of amusements is offered. We notice that 
Governor Pardee chose the parade. 



We take pleasure in notifying our readers who are 
going to the country for the summer months that the 
SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER can be sent 
to them at ANY POINT by mail. 

Send address to office, 320 Sansome street, and 
prompt service will be made. 



No man who values his personal appearance can afford 

to be ignorant of the fact that his clothes may he perfectly 
cleaned and his appearance materially Improved by people 
who have made that kind of work a specialty. Such people 
are Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 Stockton, 
who also clean gloves, cravats, curtains and such articles. 
They call for and deliver goods. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you will save at least one-third on your fuel 
bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 




Glen Ga^rry 

Old Highland Scotch 



FOR. BON VIVANTS 



TILLMANN ®. BENDEL 

Purveyors to tho PACIFIC SLOPE TR.ADE 



C. H. Hehnftrom 

FORMERLY 8ANDBB6 ft JOHNSON 

Tailor. 

PHELAN BUILDING ROOMS 1, 2, 3. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 5887, SAN FRANCISCO 



STUTTERING CURED 

Australian System, Melbourne 
School for Stammering. Hours 
1 to 5 p. m. Phone Folsom 239. 

Ffi NORCROSS Mark «t Street and Van Ness Avenue 
. \_l. 1TUIVWIVVJJ, San Franoisoo, Cal. 

WML WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABIBDim. 



-A rub at the Post-St. Hammam will do you good. 



Scotch_Whisky 

importers - MACONDRAY 4, CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 



Moves and Covirvtermoves. 



The Governor has at last been moved to announce 
a number of his appointments. The names are not 
bad, and all things considered, he may be congratu- 
lated on the selections he has made. Of course some 
of them, such as Guy Barham for Bank Commis- 
sioner, are funny, but then, having given his word to 
appoint Guy, he could not have done otherwise, and 
the inappropriateness of the appointment is rather 
due to Gage than Pardee. But his policy of delay- 
ing appointments months after they should have been 
made is not doing the Governor any good politically. 
When the appointment made is satisfactory finally, 
the delay has done much harm that cannot be re- 
paired. The recent appointment of Judge Bennett 
to the new Judgeship at Bakersfield is a case in 
point. As soon as the Legislature created the place 
a number of rival candidates arose for the place., and 
for five months they have been bitterly fighting each 
other, with the result that the breach in the party 
is so wide that it is going to be difficult to heal. It 
is true that the Governor appointed ex-Senator 
Smith, who was anti-Bennett, to the position of trus- 
tee of the Polytechnic school at San Luis Obispo, 
but while that may keep Smith quiet it will not keep 
the rest of the antis from saying a number of things 
that will have to be explained the next election, 
when the party should be united, especially in Kern 
County, which is nominally Democratic. 

In Santa Clara County the dissatisfaction that 
has arisen as a result of the delay in naming the Bank 
Commissioners has been very great, because there 
it touched that most sensitive of all nerves, the 
"pocket nerve." It will be recalled that the Union 
Savings Bank in that town failed a year or two ago, 
and that proceedings against the stockholders and 
debtors of the bank were brought by the old Bank- 
Commission. When it was abolished the work had 
to be done all over again ; and until the new Com- 
missioners get to work, nothing can be or has been 
done to collect the money that is needed to adjust 
the affairs of the bank. I am told that the Gov- 
ernor's attention has been repeatedly called to the 
condition, but that he continued to delay. I fear it 
will take time to adjust the ill feeling the delay has 
caused. 

This Bank Commissionership business has been 
a prolific source of political trouble in this and the 
two previous administrations. Under Budd, the 
Commissionership in the South was promised to 
Harry Patton, at that time owner of a weekly paper 
called the Capital in Los Angeles, and supposed to be 
very near the Governor. There was so much oppo- 
sition to Patton's appointment, however, that Budd 
gave the place to Barrett, his adjutant-general, and 
when Patton went North and started a paper in 
Washington, though I believe that now he has one 
of the Eureka papers. Under Gage the Southern 
Commissionership was promised to Joseph Aguirre, 
Warden's brother, and at present Deputy Warden 
at San Quentin. Jose was so certain of the place that 
he hired a house in Berkeley, and had a lot of fur- 
niture manufactured for it, as readers of the Call will 
recollect. The Aguirres were supposed to be as near 
Gage as Patton was supposed to be near Budd. Jose's 
object in moving to Berkeley was to establish a resi- 
dence there, as the law provided that two Commis- 
sioners could not be appointed from the same local- 
ity, and Dan Kevane had been slated for one of the 
places from the beginning of the Gage administration. 
But Barham got hold of the Evening Post, and came 



out in the strongest possible style for Gage, who as 
a reward for his work in that direction promised to 
Barham the Commissionership that was to go to 
Jose Aguirre. That resulted in a coolness between 
the Aguirres and the Gages. Mrs. Gage was no 
longer the guest of Mrs. Aguirre, and the Warden, 
while still for Gage on the surface, shed no tears 
when his nomination could not be secured, and 
hastened to make peace with the new kink. Whether 
he succeeded well enough to hold on to his job is 
doubtful, hardly likely in fact, but that he hoped to 
do so no one who knows the facts doubts. 

Now that the new Commissioners are appointed, 
however, they will have plain sailing, as ex-Commis- 
sioner Kevane, so his friends say, is waiting until 
they do something to appeal to the courts to have 
the law under which they are appointed declared il- 
legal for several reasons, and among others that the 
title of the bill repealing the old commission de- 
scribed the old law as having been approved "on 
March 25th," when it should have been March 26th 
or 27th. or some other date, and also on a number of 
other technical grounds, 

Another aftermath of the Gage regime is making 
its appearance in the rows in progress at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, of which Winslow An- 
derson is the President, factotum and general It. Dr. 
Anderson, it will be recalled, was a member of the 
late Governor's staff, and belonged to the Gage fac- 
tion. It is alleged by those who are not the distin- 
guished physician's friends, that to oblige his politi- 
cal friends he graduated a number of students who 
should not have been granted their diplomas, and in 
support of that statement they point, among other 
things, to the appointment of an ex-Assemblyman, 
who was one of the "push" and the "boys," who 
studied at the college, and immediately on his "gradu- 
ation" was given a position as a doctor in connection 
with one of the State Insane Asylums, without any 
examination by the Lunacy Commission as the law 
provides. A number of his fellow-students declare 
that if he was not a better politician than he is a 
doctor, he would still be student, and several of his 
former professors say "Amen." Anderson is said 
to have graduated the ex-Assemblyman to oblige 
Gage, who wanted to reward him with the place for 
political reasons. 

It is very much easier to say who will not get the 
nomination for Mayor than who will. The Republi- 
can nomination depends upon whom the Democrats 



CALIFORNIA LlfllTED 



TO CHICAGO BY WAY 
OF THE GRAND CANYON 
OF flRIZONIA : : : 



Santa Fe 



July n. 1903. 



&AN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



select as their banner bearer, and the Democrats do 
not know whom they will select untj \tion 

Counsel Lane decides whether they can use his name 
or not, and Lane cannot decide that question until 
he knows whether the labor clement ; run 

an independent ticket or will indorse him. The labor 
leaders are divided. The wisest and shrewdest favor 
endorsing Lane, but McCarthy prefers himself, and 
has the promise of the support of the Examiner. 1 >n 
the other hand, the Examiner, with it-- owner as a 
candidate for President, cannot afford to oppose the 
regular Democratic nominee even if he should be 
named Lane, as it would hurt William Randolph t.i 
have the fact that he opposed the party ticket spread 
before the National Convention if by chance his 
name should come up before that body, which many 
people doubt. Besides, the Lanites are strong enough 
to defeat the Hearstites if they attempt to have the 
California delegation to the National Democratic 
Convention instructed for him. Under those circum- 
stances, the Examiner is trying- to arrange with 
Lane to support him for Mayor, if he will support its 
proprietor for President, and if the treaty between 
the two factions is concluded, as now seems probable. 
McCarthy will find himself without an organ. If 
McCarthy and his wings of the labor element do not 
prevail, and no labor ticket is nominated, and Lane 
is named, with the practical if not formal indorse- 
ment of the labor vote, and the Examiner helping 
him, the Republicans will find it hard to get a can- 
didate for Mayor. 

Several of those who have been mentioned for the 
p': ce on the Republicin ticktt do not care to run 
against Lane with a united Democracy and the labor 
vote behind him. Speaker Fisk is one of those who 
does not care to commit political hari-kari for the 
sake of the party, and though he "has been men- 
tioned" and is likely to be mentioned much more in 
the future, he does not want the place, preferring to 
be a candidate in the Fifth District for Congress. 
With the normal Republican majority in that District 
and the change that is sure to occur in public senti- 
ment in the district, especially in a Presidential year, 
Fiske feels confident he can win, and he prefers liv- 
ing in Washington to appointing Fire and Street 
Commissioners in San Francisco, to say nothing of 
the chance that he may not be in a position to make 
the appointments anyway. 

Mayor Schmitz thinks he wants to succeed himself. 
But there are three difficulties in the way. First, the 
labor party will not give him its united support, es- 
pecially against Lane ; secondly, the Republicans will 
not nominate him because he went East booming 
Hearst for the Presidency on the Democratic ticket; 
and thirdly, the Democrats will not nominate him be- 
cause he says he is a Republican. There is there- 
fore not much use wasting time discussing his candi- 
dacy. 

With Fiske and Schmitz out of the field, no one 
can be said to be in it, and all the others mentioned 
by the daily papers are simply efforts on the part of 
the leaders to ascertain who would be the strongest 
candidate. The Republicans are having as much 
trouble to find a candidate for Mayor of San Fran- 
cisco as the Democrats to find a candidate for the 
Presidency. JUNIUS. 




"it WortM 

\»hl|»tori>k 
ruin «o your 
clothes for 
the e&vlng 
ol a. few 
ccnt»7 Sav- 
ing so very 
little— 

chance of loss so very gree^l. 
What you could save In e. year 
by using poor washing-powders 
would not pa.y for one ruined 
garment. PEARLINE costs a. 
trifle more— but It's absolutely 
safe. «71 

L Proved by Mi liorvs^, 



I prefer PEAR- 
LINE to any 

"thcr soap p 
tier- N'nt until 
ill sent re- 
cipe for making 
>ap from 
PE A R 1. 1 \ E 
did I know how 
to make it. I 
shall now make 
it. 
Mr^ Rev. I. S. H. 



Notice to Creditors. 

Estate ol JOI1N R. DENNIS Deceased. Notice In hereby elver, by the 
undersigned. JOHN FARNHAM. Administrator of the Estate of JOHN R 
DPNNI8. Decea-ed. to the creditors of. and nil persons having claims 
aeatnst the said deceased, to exhibit them with Die necessary Touchers, 
within four months after the Mist publication of this notice to the said 
Admit l.trator, nt Room 79 v hrnnlcle Bulldine;, junction Kearny Geary and 
Market Mireets, Ban Francisco, the same being; his place for 'the trans- 
action of the business of the said estate In the City and County of San 
Francisco. State of California. 

JOHN FARNHAM. 
Administrator of the Estate of JOHN R. DENNIS Dece.sArl 
Dated at San Francisco, July 4. 1903. ' 

CARLTON W. GREENE. 
Attorney for Administrator, 
Rooms 73-76-79. Chronicle Building. 



Makers of artificial gems are increasing and pros- 
pering throughout the country. This is not because 
the wives of the millionaires are shutting down on 
expenses, but because they are wearing more jewels 
than Kimberly can produce. 



Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of WILLIAM JACORY, Deceased. Notice Is hereby glv.n 
by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM. Administrator of the Estate of 
WILLIAM JACOBY. Deceased, to the creditors of and all persons 
having claims against the said D oa'ed. to exhibit them with the neces- 
•(try vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this notice 
to the said Administrator, at Room 79. Chronicle Building, Junction 
of Kearny. Geary and Market Streets the same being his place for the 
trausartion of the business of the said estate In the City and County of 
Sao Francisce, State of California. 

.... „ JOHN FARNHAM, 

Administrator of the Estate of WILLIAM JACOBY. Deoeased. 
Dated at San Francisco. Ju'y 4. 1903. 

CARLTON W. GREENE 
Attorney for Administrator 
Rooms 73, 76 and 79 Chronicle Building 



Have You Noticed 

That the Sunday Call is publishing in two, or at 
most three issues, a complete novel? 

"To Have and to Hold." 

"When Knighthood Was in Flower" 

"Lazarre" 

"The Octopus" 
and a half-dozen others of the leading popular novels 
have already appeared. 

In addition, short stories by the best writers ap- 
pear every Sunday. 

Subscribers thereby secure one or more $1.50 
novels without charge, besides having at hand the 
best newspaper published in San Francisco. Then, 
too, every six-months' subscriber can secure a copy 
of the CRAM ATLAS of the world (regular price 
$800) for $1.50, or a $2.00 Cook Book for 50 cents. 

Murphy, Grant & Co.. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of fur- 
nishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of "The 
NEVER-RIP" OVERALL. The best In the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, vel- 
vets, silks, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens, etc. 
Blankets, calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawls, no- 
tions, smokers' articles, stationery, underwear, 
hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii. 1903. 




ber two 



- rahoblf ; 

.1 ;- -:- "- . 
:r: 7 - - 



- ■ 



■ _ - :■-- 



aer is zt-w ref illing to the late Dr. 

- . .- - : -. : : Lt t -- " v It :? ■: . - 
-1: ----- - :-. ' '-■- - '■- - : t? - - - - - 

\r- ":•:■:'-■-. : i :i:r: '- - tit- 
he "-: :"-=.": c = • Ear a root which 

_. . - . . L . _ . _ ,_.--_.-- ^ - -^ r 

r. tr-.il — =-."->:■ t :■:' : a;. — ; 1 ■ : - - 
s this is aB very i 'i m> to those who 

character, bis tb- 
r tbe law. tbat a maa bas beea atn- 

l_- . - ~ -: —;■.;.•-—: :"-t--rs l~. 
nthing wiB be dose to bis nmr 
rz-r; -— t- ".t v- Hfi--' - r - 



-t ::•■•: :~ - r — - 

-■..".- " " ; " -. -" i" -" 
- 

. a- : ---■ :-- 
■----'-. .- ----..- t • ■ 

" "- 



■ 
* 



t " "" -ttL::VL L t ." t ~ ' : t- - 

-.'-=. t— — l-: r.Tirr - 7; ■■---.-. -: 

the wiTimg to f oB :nr bin to tbe ends of 

tbe eartb. DoB look Roehl borne with him. and 
Roehl. baring beard of 6:Cs booses, snspected 00 
gaBe. To DoB k was almost a siaac to take tbe 
acofv. He served bis visiror with irrnis ir more 
than doS-Bae qaasriries, aad before be knew it RoeU 
tefling bra aB abort bis &»»r-c z^r what be 
: l: -------- 7:r --it: thtr.£ 7- .-- -— - - -t 

rrring money away, and pretty sooa be woke ap 
l- --:■-:-----"- l- : 7 -" ■ -. - - > ' ■■-'-' 

a luugb boase oat of tbe DoITs bouse, aad 

l o oking * or aa easv meaas to kaock some of tbe saw- 

tet oat of tbe DoB. 



So the Judges actually found some crooked work 
in tbe races at Tanioran last Saturday. Tbe indica- 
tions of thievery must have been obvious indeed to 
demanded tbe calling off of a race or two and 
—position of a couple of nominal fines on the 
rs who were is league with tbe bookies and tbe 
bunco steerers. It seems that tips were freely banded 
1— .-; : « . r :'-- - - z --i :: ■. t::7 ■■■■-'- -.-z 
the winr- - to come in. aad the green-goods 

work was so crude aad amateurish tbat tbe judges, 
in the interest of ""dean - sport were obliged tc 
the herring. I. for my part, do not see any reason 
'.hey should have done so. The dupes who lost 
their money would, of coarse, have raised a bowl, 
= - much bowling about tbe local tracks 
nowadays that nobody would have paid any atten- 
tion to them. Tbe track, as we conduct k on this 

r": - _- . - - : - - 

gambling, and if tbe authorities were indhae 

-. - '- -; : . _-. _ -: : - '.-r.zy ::"--:.?--; 1 ;■ '. 

judges to interfere in a little extra swindling. 

I'd hate to be ehber. Dr. Strong's wife or Mrs. 
Strong's husband. In short. I've no use whatever 
for the Strongs, who are belied by their name. 
Strong was visiting at Fresno, aad was s ur pri sed aad 
flabbergasted to read tbat her husband, here m - 
Francisco, had soed her for a divorce. She r eg ar ded 
• . - - - 

aa explanation, and tbe doctor explained that a 
a m utual friend, bad beea telling him tales 
her. Tbev weat together to see this scandal- 
-d she" acknowledged thai she had He 
'.- z '. ■:' ' ''--." -- '-'.'.'- zir. - " ' ~~ - ": t 
His wife forgave bha. Td have takea ban to the bay 
aad stood baa in tbe mad ap to bis ankles — bead 
downward. Were be hah" a maa be would jrrumi 
- osroon vobaatarily. Dr. Strong's cheapness is 
- forbearaace. 
So Dr. Hodgefaead finds tbat tbe State Board of 
Medical Examiners is illegally elected. -Soes be : ' 
weB! That's probably what has beea the matter with 
tbem all this time. r beea a theory of anae 

the State Board aeeded fixing, bat just bow to go 
I never knew. At aay rate, tbe old doctor is aa 
i ngeni o u s gazaba. aad be bas bk opon a plan tbat 

is not botched, give as a dtxeat set f 
aminers. aad fiaafly decrease oar death rate. Dissolve 
the Board cm one pre t ext or another — die excuse isn't 
tbe important thing — aad tbe first we -know we wiB 
be able to make ap a aew board with tbe iaco n ro e- 
- oat aad tbe oonmeteats in. Whh a Board of 

"" ■ L- ------- ■- - -- - ■ '-- 5 " ' . -" " -Z- ----- -■' 

------- 

ished. aad tbe quacking m the lane wifl grow pro- 
portjoaately less. 

Tbe Great aad Good aad Only Wane is posing 

again as the friend of the "common people.* this 

rime in tbe shape of the baady-maa. IJveraash. who 

is acting as advoca te gen eral for the Carmen's Uaioa. 

: maa. what's the matter wkb the W- 

- " 

have bad tbe writers* cramp m thee- stomachs. Did 

- - - them right: tbev wont wear fiv- 

b, I doat know— election da 




There is aa obi p mwe ib about bfBIng the 
what wbea the cat be This haprwnfd in 

----- ' : ~ Z ----- '-?--- -■ -' 1 .- 

clock, which weat off m as pocket aad caased his 
"ere was a maa who advertised 

-.---■----.' ;- t- : -z " ■?-; t 



Statement of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of THE 
HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, [a Corporation] and where said as- 
sets are Situated. Dated June 30, 1903. 



ASSETS. 
1 — Promissory note* and the debts than 

il value of whi.h is M3 JO 

nf 8*ld promissory notes and 
debts Is as follows: They are all existing con- 
tracts, owned by said corporation, and are p 
able to It at Its office, which is situated at the 

r of Market. McAllister and .loins sip 
In the city and county of San Francisco, State 
of California, and the payment thereof is se- 
I by first mortgages on real estate within 
this Stiit.- (ttt.196.233 30» and the States of 
anil Washington ($275,- 
01. Said promissory notes are kept and 
held by sal! Corporation at its said office 
which Is Its principal place of business, and 
said notes and debts are there situated. 

2 — Promissory notes and the debts thereby 
secured, the actual value of which is 916,400 00 

Th" condition of said promissory notes and 
debts Is as follows: They are all existing con- 
tracts, owned by said corporation, and are pay 
able to It at its office, which is situated as 
aforesaid, and the payment thereof is secured 
by Market-St. Railway Company first consoli- 
dated mortgage 5 per cent gold bonds." "Nor- 
thern Railway Co. of Calitornia first mort- 
gage 5 per cent bonds," "Northern California 
Railway Company first mortgage 5 per cent 
bonds." "Spring Valley Water Works first 
mortgage 6 per cent bonds," "Spring Valley 
Water Works second mortgage 4 per cent 
bonds," "Spring Valley Water Works third 
mortgage 4 per cent bonds," "Southern Pacific 
Railroad Company of California Series 'A' 6 
per cent bonds." "Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company of California Series 'F and G' 6 per 
cent bonds." "Pacific Gas Improvement Com- 
pany first mortgage 4 per cent bonds," "Park 
and Cliff House Railway Company 6 per cent 
bonds." "San Francisco and San Joaquin Val- 
ley Railway Company 5 per cent Donds," 
"United States 3 per cent bonds," "Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company of California first 
consolidated mortgage Series 'A and B' 5 per 
cent bonds," "Southern Pacific Company 4% 
per cent gold bonds," "Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Co. of Arizona first mortgage 6 per cent 
bonds." "Oakland Water Company 5 per cent 
gold bonds," "Contra Costa Water Company 
5 per cent gold bonds," "Hawaiian Commercial 
and Sugar Company 5 per cent gold bonds," 
"United Railroads of San Francisco 4 per cent 
bonds," "Los Angeles Railway Company of 
California 5 per cent bonds," "Los Angeles 
Pacific Railroad Company 5 per cent bonds," 
"Pacific Light and Power Company of Los 
Angeles, California, 5 per cent bonds," "Pacific 
Electric Railway Company of California 5 per 
cent bonds," "The Park and Ocean Railroad 
Company first mortgage 6 per cent bonds," 
"Powell Street Railway Company 6 per cent 
bonds," "San Francisco and North Pacific 
Railway Company first mortgage 5 per cent 
bonds," "The Omnibus Cable Company of 
California 6 per cent bonds," "California St. 
Cable Railroad Company 5 per cent bonds," 
and "Southern Pacific Branch Railway Com- 
pany of California 6 per cent bonds," the mar- 
ket value of all said bonds being $1,099,007 00. 
Said notes are kept and held by said corpora- 
tion at its said office, and said notes and 
bonds are there situated. 

3— bonds of the United States, the actual 
value of which is 22,000,578 38 

The condition of said bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said corporation, and are kept 
and held by it in its own vaults anu are there 
situated. They are "Registered 4 per cent of 
1907 ($18,500,000 00) and 4 per cent of 1925 
($2,000,000) United States Bonds," and are 
payable only to the order of said corporation. 

4 — Miscellaneous bonds, the actual value of 
which is 7,879,264 09 

The condition of said bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said corporation, and are kept 
and held by it in its own vaults and are there 
situated. They are: 

"Market-St. Cable Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent bonds" $1,121,000 00 



Company 
Company 



Market 81. Railway Company 

lldated mortKn, 

Suit.r SI Railway 
■ ■ 

Railway 

h per lent bi.ii .1- 

Tin Omnibus ("abi.- Company 
6 per i anl bonds 

-bl In and Ferries Railroad 
Company 6 per i cut bond! 

Ferries and Cliff House Hal! 

way Company 6 per cent bunds" 

hern Railway Company 

llfOrnla 8 per rent liiuiilH" 684.000 00 

"San Francisco and North 
Pacific Railway Company f per 

i nil bonds" . 

Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company of California 6 per cent 
oon.ls 1,257.000 000 

"San FranclBco and San Joa- 
quin Valley Railway Company 

5 per cent bonds" 

West Shore Railroad Com- 
pany of New York 4 per cent 
bonds 

"Spring Valley Water Works 
first mortgage fi per cent bonds" 

"Spring Valley Water Works 
second mortgage 4 per cent 
bonds" 

"Spring Valley Waller Works 
third mortgage 4 per cent bonds" 

"City of San Luis Obispo 5 per 
cent bonds 

"The Sharon Estate Company 
5 per cent bonds" 1,000,000 00 

And "The Merchants' Ex- 
change 7 per cent bonds" 100,000 00 



.l"V Ill 

160.000 00 

168.000 00 

NO 00 

29,000 00 

1, Q 






56.000 00 



500.000 00 



111,000 00 



462.000 00 
1,020,000 00 
18.000 24 



5 — Interest on miscellaneous bonds accrued 
to July 1, 1903 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the city and 
County of San Francisco ($380,233 44), and 
in the counties of Santa Clara ($239,496 39) 
Alameda ($172,848 62) and San Mateo ($24,- 
345 43), in this State, the actual value of 
which is i 

(b) The land and building in which said 
corporation keeps its said office, the actual 
value of which is 

The condition of said real estate is that it 
belongs to said corporation, and part of it is 
productive. 

7 — Cash in Unitedl States gold and silver 
coin belonging to said corporation and in its 
possession, and situated at its said office, ac- 
tual value 1,305,925 95 



317.177 60 



816.923 88 



576,720 44 



Total assets $59,541,723 70 



LIABILITIES. 

1 — Said corporation owes deposits amount- 
ing to and the actual value of which is $56,231,918 17 

The condition of said deposits is that they 
are payable only out of said assets and are 
fully secured thereby. 

2 — Reserve fund, actual value 3,309,806 63 



Total liabilities $59,541,723 70 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

By ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

State of California, city and county of San Francisco, ss: 

JAMES R. KELLY and ROBERT J. TOBIN, being each 

separately duly sworn, each for himself, says: That said 

JAMBS R. KELLY is President and that said ROBERT J. 

TOBIN is Secretary of the HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND 

LOAN SOCIETY, the corporation above mentioned, and that 

the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 
1903. GEORGE T. KNOX, Notary Public. 

In and for the city and county of San Francisco, State 
of California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 




Library&abk 



^^™ 




By Roland Whittle 

Messrs. D. Appleton & Co. 
The Love Letters have published "The Love 
of Margaret Fuller. Letters of Margaret Fuller, 
1845-1846," with reminis- 
cences of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Horace Greeley and 
Charles T. Congdon. Truly a trio of grave and rev- 
erend seigniors to gather about the honeyed foolish- 
ness of a maid's love-dreams. Let the heart of maid 
beat high as it will, when once the magic draught is 
drunk, she becomes as other maids, and Margaret 
Fuller is no exception to the rule. She maunders on 
for page after page in excellent English, albeit with 
little sense. These rhapsodies are tiresome, and one 
feels a certain humiliation in listening to the passion 
throbs of a being of as high a purpose and as noble 
a heart as Margaret Fuller possessed. There is a vul- 
garity about the publication of love letters which is 
almost unpardonable. To go down into the market 
with the little missives which were at one time 
blushed over, laughed over, and wept over, appears 
a brutal proceeding, the act of a common person. 
When one thinks that the same words which are now 
flaunted in all the garishness of a double border and 
an elaborate binding were surreptitiously scrawled 
in the quiet of a woman's own room, slipped under 
the cloak, and mailed with a sort of innocent fur- 
tiveness, the crudity of the transaction of their sale 
is rendered manifest. Banal in sentiment, poor in 
English, they are lacking in wit and devoid of grace. 
If it had been a Frenchwoman, perhaps ! 

"The Mystery of Murray 
The Mystery of Davenport," by Robert Neil- 
Murray Davenport, son Stephens, published by 
L. C. Page & Co., is one of 
those stories whose title tells the tale. You know 
from the title that there is a mystery and you know 
when you have read the tale that there has been one 
query: Is it worth while? It would seem better this 
hot weather to let the brook babble rather than the 
author, for babblement is the essence of this kind of 
story. It does not matter whether one reads it or not. 
To some that will be an advantage and a recom- 
mendation, for they much prefer to read what does 
not matter, and concerning such it does not matter 
what they read. There is nothing particularly the 
matter with the tale. It is told well enough ; the Eng- 
lish is good as English goes nowadays. But it is 
not worth while. It leads nowhere. It is one of that 
mass of books which is flung incontinently upon the 
market, neither good nor bad, but damned by ir- 
remediable mediocrity. 

"A Prince of Sinner?," by 
A Prince of Sinners. E. Phillips Oppenheim, is 
a four-hundred page novel 
dealing for the most part with English political life, 
and is published by Little, Brown & Co., Boston. The 
most remarkable characteristic of the book is its 
entire absence of originality. The situations have 
been familiar from the time when we crept into the 
hay loft to read our stolen romances. For example, 
among the characters occur a prosperous North 
Country manufacturer with a bluff, noisy, ignorant 
style, a vulgar wife, and some provincial and silly 



daughters. But the niece ! Ah, it is always the niece 
who occupies the subordinate position, who dresses 
modestly in gray, who has the tact of a Tallyrand, 
the modest beauty of a Madonna, and attracts the 
manly hero who, although but a simple country law- 
yer, has the entree to all the great houses in the 
neighborhood. The "Prince of Sinners is Lord Ar- 
ranmore, a name delightfully reminiscent of Ouida. 
There is, indeed, just a touch of that lady, at her 
worst, in the ingredients of the story; so that, if it 
has any flavor at all, which is, to say the least, doubt- 
ful, it should be traceable to that source. You need 
not read the book; you can sit still and imagine the 
characters — a tall, thin aristocrat who smokes cigar- 
ettes and has a cynical air ; fat, prosperous manufac- 
turer; sylph-like aristocratic young lady who would 
like to marry the hero, etc., etc. But why go on? It 
is all so very obvious, so very, very flat. 

There is such a thing as real- 
A Daughter of ism and there is the other 
Thespis. thing, whatever you like to call 

it, but what "A Daughter of 
Thespis," by John I. Barrey, published by L. C. Page 
& Co., stands for it is impossible to say. The author 
shows a certain amount of knowledge of the life of 
the stage people in their off hours, and has evidently 
made this the basis of the novel. Now, however in- 
teresting such knowledge may be, it cannot be put 
either artistically or effectively in the form of a novel, 
particularly when that novel is deficient in plot, dia- 
logue, good English, and all the other components 
which go to make a piece of literary work, or which, 
perhaps, more accurately are supposed to do so. There 
are four titles and two etc.'s given as the list of this 
writer's literary achievements, and one can only mar- 
vel how, after such august preparation, a result like 
the present is placed before us. It has no hold upon 
the attention ; at least it would have to be a pretty 
tame sort of attention that was held by it. The char- 
acters are not characters at all, poor little dolls with 
the wires so dreadfully obvious and their little gog- 
gle eyes pulled in and out with a piece of string. The 
pity of it is that there is so much material even in a 
book like this which a good writer could have made 
something of. Take and compare a piece of work 
such as this with George Moore's "Mummer's Wife" 
and it will be seen at once how incomparably superior 
the man who has something to say is to the man 
who has not, however coarsely the former may ex- 
press himself. 

Charles G. D. Roberts has pub- 
Earth's Enigmas, lished fourteen books, accord- 
ing to the list published by 
L. C. Page & Company at the first part of his latest 
book entitled "Earth's Enigmas." The author claims 
that herein is an attempt to present one or other of 
those problems of life or nature to which as it ap- 
pears to many of us that there is no adequate solu- 
tion within right." The enigmas are, generally 
speaking, very commonplace, and the mode of stating 
them is not far different. Now and again it must be 
frankly admitted quite a high level is struck, but it 
is not maintained. The stories will not bear any com- 
parison with the work of Ambrose Bierce in the 
same field. The disease of modern optimism, which 
will wrencli all possibilities in order to have a sense 
of false comfort at the last, pursues the writer, and 
while he suffers from this complaint he will never 
accomplish much. 

The Hardwood Floors are better than carpets. See them at 

Bush & Mallett Co., 328-330 Post street. 



July ii. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



Tonopah— Tonopah 

INVEST NOW IN TONOPAH CENTRAL MINING STOCK 

Advanced in Price Jan. 15 from 25c. to 50c. a Share. Sure to go to Par. — $1 per share — soon. 




5 f#>^1 

£ ■$ <S ,£> ~ - 



No risk whatever In investing in stock In the Tonopah Central Mining Company. It's bound to double 
and quadruple in value very soon. 100,000 shares of Treasury stock are being sold WHOLLY FOR THE 
PURPOSE OF DEVELOPING THE PROPERTY. 

The Company owns Eight of the best located claims. The ore is rich in gold and silver. Work Is 
now going rapidly forward. A double compartment shaft is now down 90 feet, fully timbered through- 
out. The following extract is from the Mining and Engineering Review, and bears out the claims of 
eminent experts that the Tonopah Central Mining Company's property is more favorably located than 
any of the other properties in the Tonopah District: "Another rich strike has been mane In Tono- 
pah. This time it is in the main shaft of the California Tonopah, which adjoins the Tonopah Central 
(formerly known as the St. Patrick Group.) A ledge of ore has been opened up which goes over $500 
per ton, and Is in direct line with the Tonopah Central Ledge." 

The stock of this company is non-assessable, with a par value of $1.00 per share. The location of 
the company's mine on the slope of Butler Mountain, between the famous Mlpah ledge and the rich 
strikes of Gold Mountain Indicates that its stock will be a dividend paying investment, and that it will 
have an early increase in value. 

A hoist capable of sinking to a depth of 350 feet has been installed, and it is only a matter of a 
short time when the leclge will be encountered. The California Tonopah struck their ledge at a depth 
of 127 feet, and it is 40 feet wide, and is continued through the properties of the Tonopah Central Min- 
ing Company. 

All stockholders participate equally in the profits of the company. 

Investors in shares of this company have no taxes, no assessments, fines, Interests or liabilities of 
any kind to pay. 

The shareholders' interestsi are mutual and collective. There is no preferred stock, inasmuch as the 
original stockholders have placed all their stock in escrow there to remain until the mine is on an 
absolutely dividend paying basis. 

No safer or more profitable investment can be made than is offered you In the shape of stock in the 
TONOPAH CENTRAL MINING CO. Address all communications and make remittances to 



OFFICES 401-2-3 CALL BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



J. H. N. CLAUSEN, Assistant Secretary. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location ol prinoipal place of business, San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works, Vireinia Mining: District, Storey County. Nevada. 

Notloe Is hereby siren that at a meeting- of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 12th day of June 1908, an assessment (No. 43) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the eapltal stock of the corporation, pay- 
able Immediately In United States gold coin, to tbe Secretary . at the office 
of the company, room 29, Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California, 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
17th DAY OF JULY. 1903 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on Friday, the 7th 
day of August, 1908, to pay tbe delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of advertising: and expenses of sale. 

fi7 order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS, Seoretary 

Office— Room 29, Nevada Blook, 309 Montgomery street, San Franolsco 
California 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of prinoipal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
Works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that, at a meeting- of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 7th day of July. 19r3. an assessment (No. 59) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, 
payable Immediately, In United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, rooms 21 and 22,Nevada Block ,309 Montgomery street, 
San Franolsco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE lllh DAY OF AUGUST. 1903, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at publio auction, and until 
payment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 31th day of 
August, 1903, to pay the delinquent assessment together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale- By order of the Board of 
Directors. 

JOHN W. TWIGGS, Seoretary. 

Office— Booms 21 and 22 Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery Street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 



.. 



LiOokormk 



^^pp 




People may say what they please of Joaquin Mil- 
ler, but when the berserk fit is on him he can strike 
harder than most living writers. He is above all 
things a natural man, and the vices of our modern 
life, with its sham and shirk he will not tolerate. He 
has thus come out as an earnest champion of the 
President's "Race Suicide" propaganda in a recent 
poem, which he dedicates to "The Mothers of Men." 
Two of the most striking verses are as follows: 

"And oh, for prophet's tongue or pen 
To scourge, not only, and accuse 
The childless mother, but such men 
As know their wives but to abuse ! 
Give me the brave, child-loving Jew, 
The full-sexed Jew of either sex, 
Who loves, brings forth and nothing recks 
Of care or cost, as Christians do — 
Dulled souls who will not hear or see 
How Christ once raised His lowly head 
And, as rebuking, gently said, 
The while he took them tenderly, 
"Let little children come to me." 

Hear me this prophecy and heed ; 
Except we cleanse us kirk or creed, 
Except we wash us word and deed 
The Jew shall rule us, reign the Jew. 
And just because the Jew is true, 
Is true to nature, true to truth ; 
Is clean, is chaste, as truthful Ruth 
Who bore us David, Solomon — 

The Babe, that far, first Christmas dawn." 

• • • 

Whether the paternalism of the Government in 
attempting to protect its citizens against the circu- 
lars of get-rich-quick concerns by denying the latter 
the use of the mails is wisdom or foolishness, may be 
open to argument. But that the law should act im- 
partially is not open to debate; and if a law cannot 
reach the class of swindlers it is aimed at, it would be 
better expunged from the statute-books. Among 
other fraud orders issued about the same time, the 
records show that the use of the mails was forbidden 
to the Empire State Diamond Company, September 
5, 1902, and to the Preferred Tontine Mercantile Com- 
pany June 10, 1902. These orders are still in force. 
But if any one will take the trouble to go to room 
427 and to room 450 of the Parrott building he will 
discover that these companies are still doing busi- 
ness. In the same building is the office of the Ton- 
tine Savings Association, with which the notorious 
H. C. O'Neil, king of the tontine swindle game, was 
at one time connected. Room 425 is the headquar- 
ters of the Tontine Loan and Security Company ; 
room 428 is devoted to the interests of the Empire 
Diamond Company. In fact, there are several of 
our large office buildings in which, go where he will, 
the unwary investor cannot escape the toils of these 
fraudulent concerns. They all work upon precisely 
the same basis, and their essential features are the 
same. All promise returns of about 100 per cent, 
and if one deserves to be suppressed, all do. Yet in 
some instances, the Post-office Department has done 
nothing at all. In others, it has issued fraud orders, 



but allowed the same concerns to receive mail after 
making insignificant changes in their names. In yet 
other instances the name has been radically changed 
and a different board of clirectors printed on the cir- 
culars. But where does the protection to the public 
come in, and where in the name of common sense 
is the rationality of such an administration of the 
law? Would it not be better for Uncle Sam to leave 
it to experience to supply the fool with money a 
modicum of prudence? If by a merely technical 
change of name which does not destroy its identity, 
a firm may evade the law, something must be rotten 

in the State of Denmark. 

• * • 

Probably the best-groomed men in the New York 
literary set are Richard Harding Davis and Peter 
Finlay Dunne, the latter especially since his entree 
into the matrimonial ranks. The above is, perhaps, 
the only point of resemblance between the two stars 
who have never traveled in the same orbit with any 
degree of enthusiasm. There is a tacit feud between 
the author of Gallagher and the author of Dooley 
and it dates back to an argument about clothes which 
occurred directly after the Cuban war. Shortly after 
the battle of Santiago, the fight which made Dooley 
as well as Schley famous, Dunne was working as an 
editorial writer for the Chicago paper to which, for 
several years past, he had contributed the Dooley 
philosophy at an advanced pay of $10 per week. 
Davis had gone to war as a correspondent' for 
Dunne's paper, and it happened that the Philosopher 
of Archey Road was the man who read his copy be- 
fore it went to press. This Davis correspondence was 
written in the New Yorker's most irritatingly ego- 
tistical style. It exuded the pronoun I from start to 
finish, and was replete with valuable suggestions 
to the American Government, telling how the cam- 
paign would be brought to a speedy close were 
Richard Harding Davis at the head of the Yankee 
forces. In fact, the bulk of the copy was more in 
the nature of a pro-Davisite editorial than of a newsy 
write-up of war conditions, and the more of this stuff 
Dunne read the more prejudiced he became against 
the Davis personality. Davis, in fact, became one 
of his pet bugbears, and it became a common proverb 
in Chicago newspaper circles that if Davis ever ap- 
peared in Dunne's sanctum there would be hair flying 
all over Chicago. 

As fate decreed it, Dunne was one of the first men 




rv 



Established in California 
...for thirty-five years... 

Repository in San 
Francisco at Mar- 
ket and Tenth Sts., 
has been rebuilt 
and enlarged, mak- 
ing it the finest car- 
riage salesroom in 
the United States. 
Five hundred styles 
of vehicles shown, 
probably more than all other stores in town com- 
bined. New things in robes and whips. 

ftTIIDEBAKER BROS. CQ 

Market and TentK Sts. 

Telephone Private 634 



July II, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER- 



'S 



- night upon his return from Cuba. The 
editorial writer had been a Stranger ti n t • » fame a 
few months before, but during Davis' absence the 
ley utterances bad become a great voice in the 
land. So when Davis came I o he went lion- 

hunting, and sought the trail of the Irishman. There 

aible catching of breath in the Journal 
when the war correspondent called and asked to be 
introduced to the man who wrote .dr. Dooley. He 
was, however, led into Dunne's sanctum, ami when 
he entered he found Dunne in bis sleeves bard at 
work over a pile of copy. "How do you do, Mr. 
Dunne," said Davis: "I'm Davis." "Very well. Mr. 
Davis," replied the humorist, scarcely glancing up 
from his writing, "I'll be through with this in a min- 
ute." "Take a chair." "But I'm Richard Harding 
Davis," said the other. "Certainly," replied Dunne, 
still writing. "Won't you have a seat?" After Dunne 
had scribbled for some minutes he gave his copy to 
a bnv and turned on his visitor. "What can I do for 
you?" he asked. "I'm Richard Harding Davis," re- 
peated Davis, as one who gives a pass-word. "Yes.'' 
said Dunne, "and why am I honored by this visit?" 
"Well," said Davis, "I had the pleasure of reading 
your brilliant stuff while in Cuba, and do you know, 
from your writing I received an entirely erroneous 
opinion of your personality?" "Yes?" urged Dooley. 
"Yes," said Davis ; "I imagined that you were a raw- 
boned Irishman with a red fringe under your chin, 
hands like hams, a blue flannel accent and a red 
flannel shirt." "Well, Mr. Davis," said Dunne, 
quietly, "since you have gone out of your way to be 
so candid, I might as well be candid, too, and tell 
you that, from reading your writings, I also have 
received a false impression of your general appear- 
ance. By the general sound of the stuff wRich you 
sent from Cuba here I concluded that you must be 
a young person in a pink shirt waist." 
• * * 

A friend just back from the Yosemite had a little 
talk with Mr. Luck, photographer for Leslie's with 
President Roosevelt's party. Mr. Luck said that he 
had made six trips with the President, and that he 
saw him angry but once. That was on the historic 
occasion when the entertainment committee made 
arrangements for entertaining him. Roosevelt had 
other plans, though, known only to himself and to 
John Muir, with whom he was to take a two-days' 
trip through the valley. When the party arrived at 
the Big Trees, the President inquired for his valise, 
which had preceded him. He was told that it had 
gone ahead to Wawona, where he was to be ban- 
queted that night. The members of the party all 
thought the banquet was an assured thing, but with- 
in about ten seconds after Roosevelt discovered what 
had become of his valise they changed their minds. 

"His jaws snapped together like a coyote's," said 

Mr. Luck, "and the flow of language made even the 

drivers listen with admiring attention. It put an 

end to all monkeying with the President's baggage. 

» * * 

The struggle for the sensational often brings news- 
paper men into unenviable positions and predica- 
ments. At present the Baroness von Rekzenstern 
is on this Coast on her way home from a trip around 
the world. The Baroness is the wife of the Chancel- 
lor of Wurtenberg, and the story has permeated to 
the various sanctums that there is a bit of good sen- 
sation connected with her. Consequently, when the 
reporters have been scouring about for the facts, one 
of them tried the other day to bribe the Baroness' 
maid. When he reached the hall of the lady's apart- 



nictr a woman emerge from th<- 

'nistaking her for the maid, addressed h 

-h, and explained bis purpose, l'hc 

lady uietly until he had finished, and then 

■ eetly in 1 ,uc: 

ally, I should like to oblige you. but I can't do 

without incriminating myself; for it 

so happens that I am the Baroness. But" — and she 

hesitated a moment — "the maid is right inside, and 

I am told that she is a terrible babbler. Suppose you 

go iii and try her." 

The reporter has requested his editor to put him 
on duty at the morgue. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
Cures Poison-Oak and all Skin Diseases. Sold by all drug-gists. 



Fine stationery, steei and! copperplate engraving. 

Cooper & Co.. 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



ASTHMA and stomach troubles successfully treated 61« Pine St. 

\ Mavis Consolidated Gold 
I and Copper Mining Co. 

\ Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000. 

') Incorporated under the laws of the State of Call- 

• fornia. 
() Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 

• County, Arizona. 
A No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share 

A for development purposes. The' ore in sight is practi- 

}/ cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock is 

/. enhausted, the price will be raised to 50 cents a 

V share. 
? Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 

V Market street, for prospectus which gives full infor- A 
? mation. g> 
Q VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. J 

r* y 

1*J{\ C\C\C\ persons m Alameda 
J\j)\j\J\J County rely upon the 

Oakland Herald 

FOR ALL THE NEWS 

THE HERALD is absolutely the Home Paper of 
Greater Oakland and of Alameda County. 

THE HERALD publishes each day complete for- 
eign, cable and domestic telegraphic news. 

THE HERALD records fully each day, and par- 
ticularly on Saturday, the doings of Greater Oakland 
Society. 

THE HERALD is without question the best ad- 
vertising medium in the County of Alameda. 



phonk Main 1331 



Breakfast From 5:81 



Lonoh FBOM II 



liannigan's Cafe and Grill 

FINEST BRANDS OF WINES 
AND LIQUORS 

W. N. HANNIGAN, PROP. • 130-136 CALIFORNIA ST., 8. F. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 




usurelr 



Wand 



GJeohty nowand but Pleasure's 




By Barton Pittman 

Nance O'Neil's week at the California has proved 
a brilliant success. The repertoire included "Magda," 
"Elizabeth," "Hedda Gabler," and the "Jewess." 
"Magda" is the best of the Suderman problem plays, 
a restless and energetic woman who wearies of the 
conventional restraints of her narrow home life in a 
provincial European town, and as a consequence 
goes out into the world, where she attains fame as 
an actress. This is Nance O'Neil's part, the title 
role. After years she returns on a visit to her aged 
father (McKee Rankin) and all is forgiven until he 
discovers that his daughter has a living child. The 
great scene of the play is where she refuses the prof- 
fered marriage with her child's father. At this, her 
own father is unrelenting, and dies of an apoplectic 
stroke while disowning her. The play is up to 
the usual Sudermann standard, and the acting is uni- 
formly good, the work of E. J. Ratcliffe as the minis- 
ter whose suppressed love for Magda is apparent in 
every speech being the highest and finest art. "Eliza- 
beth" does not show Nance O'Neil to as great advan- 
tage as some of her other plays, although it was well 
attended and liked. 

"Romeo and Juliet" is Miss O'Neil's final offering, 
and the Shakespeare love tragedy is so different from 
anything else in which we have seen her that great 
interest attaches to the coming performance. E. J. 
Ratcliffe will play Romeo. The new piece opens 
.Monday and continues all week, concluding Miss 
O'Neil's engagement at the California. 

* * * 

One of the chief features of this week's bill at the 
Orpheum is Mabel McKinley, the singer, advertised 
as the favorite niece of the late President, and the re- 
cipient of a weekly stipend of $1,250. Passing over 
her family connections and alleged salary, neither 
of which seem relevant, her voice is excellent. It is 
a rich soprano, which shows both cultivation and 
natural strength. Of her three snugs, the one most 
applauded was "The Rosary." An exceedingly clever 
sketch, "A Pressing. Matter," is given by Charles 
Dickson and Nell McEwen. It is a little comedietta 
of a man who sends his only suit of clothes out to 
be pressed and receives back the coat and vest with 
a note from the tailor saying that the trousers will 
be ready next day. Miss McEwen is especially clever 
in this, as good, in fact, as she was in "The Salt 
Cellar," in which she made her initial hit at Keith's 
in New York. Another novel feature on the hill is 
the spinning of hoops of fire by William and Kitty 
Harbeck. 

* » » 

"Brother Officers," this week's bill at the Alcazar, 
seems to be a great success, very much more of one. 
perhaps, than it ever proved in the East. As the para- 
doxical Lieutenant John Hinds, White Whittlesej 
won warm sympathy and applause. He is the brave, 
yet weak young officer — brave enough to win the 
Victoria Cross on the field and weak enough to con- 
tract gambling debts which he cannot settle. The 
play is intensely English, and one of the most real- 
istic things in it is Fred J. Butler's portrayal of the 
despicable Robert Hutton, the parvenu Australian, 
to whom Hinds owes the gambling debt. Neither 



Bertha Creighton nor Oza Waldrop have much to 

do, but they make the most of their parts. 

* * * 

"The Climbers" has held its own during the second 
week at the Columbia, and so successfulhas it been 
that it would perhaps serve for the entire four weeks 
of Miss Bingham's engagement. The management, 
however, has concluded to present next week "A 
Modern Magdalen," and for the fourth and last week 
"The Frisky Mrs. Johnson." The last named is an- 
other Clyde Fitch play, typical, it is said. "A Mod- 
ern Magdalen" is by Haddon Chambers, and is a 
problem play. This should not frighten the public 
away, for there is nothing abstruse about it. It is 
merely the story of a young girl who sells herself 
completely in order to provide for an invalid sister. 
The piece was very much liked in New York, where 
it ran for a long time, and as Wilton Lackaye and 
the other chief members of the supporting cast appear 
with Miss Bingham, its favorable reception here 
seems assured. 

* » * 

James Corrigan is a perennial favorite with his 
friends at the Central, whether he plays the kindly 
farmer or the Hibernian policeman, which chances 
to be his role in "Kidnapped." The play is a melo- 
drama, of course, of the most pronounced type. It 
has all of the usual characters of hero, villain, heiress, 
erring father, comedy-love couple and kindly police- 
man. For the still further edification of its patrons 
a murder or two, a kidnapping and an explosion are 
provided. The players all do their best, and while 
James Corrigan has the leading role, he by no means 
bears off all the honors. Miss Myrtle Vane is a capi- 
tal soubrette (the policeman's daughter), and Eu- 
genie Lawton as the suffering heroine is most pleas- 
ing. Edwin Emery is good as her artist lover, and 
( reorgie Woodthorpe and the rest of the cast are ac- 
ceptable. 

* * • 

The Tivoli has tried during the present week an- 
other revival of "Wang," and fairly successful it has 
proven, too. The scenery and costumes are all that 
could be asked by the most exacting, and the opera 
itself is thoroughly enjoyable to those in whose minds 
visions of De Wolf Hopper and Delia Fox do not 
arise too persistently. The roles originally created 
by these two great stars, in the Tivoli production are 
invested respectively by Edwin Stevens and Annie 
Myers. Ferris Ilartman proved most refreshing as 
I'epat, the keeper of the royal elephant. The topical 
songs in the piece were received with great enthu- 
siasm. 

* * * 

Although "Twirly Whirly" continues a pronounced 
success at Fischer's, this is the last week. The new 
bill Monday night will be a combination of two great 
burlesques, "Under the Red Globe" and "The Three 
Musketeers." Nothing has been left undone to con- 
tinue to give the same excellent productions at this 
house as has been the rule since the first of the 
Weber & Field's plays were offered to the public. 
Among the features of the new burlesque are the 
latest songs. "The Leader of Vanitv Fair." "The Per- 
oxide Sisters," "For Love is King," and "Soldiers." 
In addition to these numbers there are as usual a big 
lot of surprises that always come with the shows at 

Fischer's. 

* * * 

The Alcazar's next play is Anthony Hope's "The 
Prisoner of Zenda." This offering seems especially 
apropos, as those who originally criticised Hope on 
the grounds that Kings were not murdered in this 



July ii. 1903. 



hi that, in view >>i tin- recei 

Rcdy. thai Amhonj Hope's romai 

Irawn. "The Prisoner of Zenda if the 

me delights of the modern stage, a deft blending 

.ili-.ni and romance, thorough!) up-to date and 

rtting a theme user which we are accustomed 

irnour of the past White Whittli 

personality should suit tin- leading r.ik- a> well as 

did those of his predecessors, James K. Hackett and 

I-'.. II. Sothern. 1 (thers of the Alcazar family arc to 

be happily cast in the piece, and an addition to the 

rie is expected in the person of Harry S. Milliard, 

the new juvenile man from the i 

* • • 

The Grand • >pera House continues well patronized 
with the musical eccentricity "In Central Park." 
Those inimitable droles, Raymond and Caverly, have 
made a tremendous hit. Cheridah Simpson is also 

a genuine delight. She acts gracefully and with 
magnetism, and her glorious soprano voice is one of 
the chief attractions of the performance. Harold 
Crane, Budd Ross. Anna Wilks, Louise Moore and 
Herbert Sears contribute to the general success. 
Charles H. Jones' beautiful march of^girls always ex- 
cites enthusiasm. "In Central Park" will begin its 
third week to-morrow night. It will be succeeded 
by "In Wall Street." 

* * ♦ 

James Corrigan's third and last week at the Cen- 
tral will be in "Muldoon's Picnic." It depicts the 
rise of the Muldoon family from humble beginnings 
on the Bowery to the splendor and affluence of Fifth 
avenue, and their debut into the smart set, with all 
the ludicrous incidents that accompany the meta- 
morphosis. Following the Corrigan season, July 
20th, will come the grand opening of the new Central 
Theatre Stock Company, with the brilliant actor, Mr. 
Herschel Mayall, as leading man, in a magnificent 
spectacular production of the immortal "" drama, 
"Faust." 

* * * 

Among the hold-overs at the Orpheum next week 
are Mabel McKinley, whose debut has proven so pro- 
pitious, and Julian Rose, "Our Hebrew Friend." On 
the new bill are De Kolta, the renowned juggler; Bai- 
ley and Madison, the grotesque eccentriques ; Hod- 
ges and Launchmere, the singers and dancers; Chas. 
Dickson, the legitimate comedian ; Young and De 
Voie, and Mosher, Houghton and Mosher, expert 

and comedy bicyclists. 

* * * 

The Chutes continues the great outing and all- 
round amusement resort. Next week's programme 
includes George Hanlon & Sons, late of the famous 
"Superba," Van Fassen and McCaulay, Marion 
George, the violinist, the Lutz Bros., and the ever 
pleasing animatoscope. The Cabaret de la Mort, the 
incubators, and the ride down the flume continue 
popular. 

* * * 

Dr. Adrian Hbfmeyr, of South Africa, will deliver 
his farewell lecture at Native Sons' Hall on Thursday 
evening, July 16th. This is a testimonial given under 
distinguished patronage to the well-known lecturer 
who has done much for our local charities and has 
delivered 126 lectures in this State. The title is 
"An Explorer's Adventures in the Dark Continent." 
introducing interesting descriptions describing his 
meeting with the great savage chief Segkome, also 
the mystery of the wonder gat, and story of Wilson's 
last stand. This is the first occasion in which this 
lecture has been given, and Dr. Hofmeyr's last ap- 
pearance before he goes to South Africa. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Alcazar Theatre 



«s 



flBL»*ro a Kit,,, rroprtoff* 
I n run. an liunn. I'lm Amu' 

RliUiBllliiMTbiMir •ithnrli; I«t »>»iilii M.r,«ij 
• tr.l.f nf II Jul; ; i, lot rallies! im, 

WHITE WHITTLESEY 

With It* A Ictur Compear la tbe romaaitr drama 

THE PRI8OMER OF ZEND8 

Flrittlmeet popular price* iTtBlof-Ko to 7S*. Mallim ThirM.t 
and Saturday lie to Vk Jaly A — Tht ManiBan. 



CeQtral Theatre. 



I'rlipco 



Mayer. Prop*. 
opp. City Hall. ~ 



Marktt BUHl, 
Ph'oae Booth US. 
ffatj aurttni Monday. July lih, 1903 af at!o*e* Batnrday and Bandar 
> p— c I at l engagement of the farorlte actor 

cJAMES GORRIGAN 

Id ihr funniest of all farcecomedlep. 

MULDOON'S PIGNIG 

Brfmfol of amuitng specialties 

Monday July J^tb. Mr. Herscbetl Mayall and the augmented fentral 

Theater Co. In a grand apeotAODlar production of "KAUBT" 

Prices: Erenlngs 10c toWc. Matinee*. lOo, 15c, 2Sc. 



Fischer's Theatre 



Sun. Matinees 



"Twlrly Whlrly lest night, come and bid It "Good Bye" 
For Its Joke* are 10 good that they never get dry. 
Bat we beg to remind that we ha vo It designed. 
Tomorrow to offer, quite the beat of It* kind. 

UNDER THE RED GLOBE 

As ever, everthlng new and magnificent, scenery costumes, paraphernalia. 

A hundred sarprleea and novelties 

Reserved Seats Night prlcea 23-30-?5c. Sat. 

25-50C. Children at Matinee* 10 250. 

Graod Opera House 

Only Matinee Saturday. Every night 
Tbe dellghtf ul rauBlcal eccentricity 

IN CENTRAL PARK 

Tblrd week begins tomorrow night. In preparation 

IN WALL STREET 

Prlcei: 25c. 50c. 75 eta. 



California Theatre. 



Tonlebl— TIIE JEWESS. Tomorrow night OLIVER TWIST. 
Commencing Monday evening last week of 

MISS NANGE O'NEIL 

Appearing for the first time In America In Shakespeare's Immortal drama 

ROMEO AND cJULIET 

A role In which Miss O'Neil scored great successln Australia. 

Next — TheNelll Moroaco Company for a season of seven weeks, opening In 

In tbe Palace of tbe King. 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mrs. Ernkbtinb K ruling. 

Proprietor and Manager 
Tonight and Sunday night and all next week revival of tbe famous comic 
opera 

WANG 

With Stevens in his great role of Wang. Next— Tbe Highwayman with 

Camllle B'Arrllle In tbe oast. 

Popnlar prices 25. SO and 7So. Telephone Bnib 9. 



Orpheuri). 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 



Weak commencing Snnday Matinee, July 12. 

UAUDEV/ILLE DE 



LUXE 



De Kolta; Bailey andMadlson; HodgeBand Launchmere; Charles DlckBon 
and Company In '-Heart to Heart Talks"; Mosher, Houghton and Mosher; 
Young and DeVole; Julian Hose; The Blograpb and last week of 

MABEL 

Usual matinee and prices. 



McKINLEY 



Columbia Tbeatre. G °™° E ' ^^Managere. 
1 week beginning next Monday. Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. 

AMELIA BINGHAM 

and her company in Haddon Chamber's play 

A MODERN MAGDALEN 

after 3(10 nlghtl In New York. July 30— The Frisky Mre. Johnson. 



(3fter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 



Listen to the matchless string band 
finest wines, beers and supper. 
The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering pi 
the theatre Is over. 



enjoy the 
after 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July II, 1903. 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE ELECTION. 

The Merchants' Exchange of San Francisco will 
hold its annual election for President and Directors 
on July 21st. The present Board consists of George 
W. McNear, President; William Babcock, vice-Presi- 
dent; Leon Sloss, Treasurer; T. C. Friedlander, Sec- 
retary. Directors — William Babcock, W. H. Crocker, 
William J. Dutton, E. W. Hopkins, George W. Mc- 
Near, Juda Newman, R. P. Schwerin, H. Sherwood, 
Leon Sloss, F. W. Van Sicklen, E. K. Wood. It is 
not known whether there will be a new ticket, for 
the old board has with comparatively little change 
successfully administered the affairs of the Exchange 
for the past two years. 



A SUMMER WIDOWER'S PROVERBS. 

Don't wash dishes to-day — your wife may be home 
to-morrow. 

A pint for a pint and a quart for a quart — yet" the 
confounded thing won't come out rjght. 

"Poets are born, not made" — would that pies were. 

A loaf from the bakery is worth a page of biscuit 
recipes. 

A cook in time saves indigestion. 



It is interesting and useful for summer visitors to 
San Mateo to know that the best livery stable in the 
county is kept by J. T. Jennings at San Mateo, and 
is called the San Mateo Livery Stable. The turn- 
outs are first-class, of the latest make and style, and 
are furnished at all hours of the day or night. Tran- 
sient trade is closely attended to, and the buildings 
are thoroughly fireproof. These stables are on B 
street, San Mateo. 

We notice that W. N. Hannigan has become the 
proprietor of the cafe and grill at 120-126 California 
street in succession to P. P. Flood. This restaurant 
will be run in the finest style. Breakfast can be had 
from 5:30 and lunch from 11. All the supplies are 
of the best quality, and the well-known reputation of 
the grill will be not only maintained but enhanced 
under its new management. 

The French industrial authorities are hesitating 
about sending exhibits to the St. Louis Fair because, 
they say, the Americans steal their ideas. The 
French are too particular. If they get through the 
fair without the Americans stealing their exhibits 
they may consider themselves in luck. 

Strikes have been so general all over the South 
recently that the sovereign people have not had time 
to think of the race problem. A general nigger bar- 
becue, however, may be expected as soon as the 
laborers get through shooting at each other and peace 
is restored. 



The domestic method of carpet-cleaning is very unsat- 
isfactory. The expert is always ahead. If you are incredu- 
lous give Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Company. 353 Tehama 
street a trial, and you will see the difference between the 
real thing and the imitation. All the best machinery used 
in the work by Spaulding's. 



Zinkand's has made its own place. All that is good 

to eat or drink can be obtained there. The best viands and 
good music ought to be enough for any one, and the crowds 
of patrons show this to be the case. 



Dentist, 806 Market, 
teeth extracting. 



Dr. Decker, 
Specialty "Colton Gas" 



for painless 



-Rheumatics relieved at the Post-St. Hammam. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



GRAY BROS. 



Haywards Bide., California and 
Montgomery Stfl., San Francisco. 
306 New High 8treet, Los Angeles. 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers In Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1899 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 389 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

TEL. MAIN 198 - 55-57-50-61 FIRST ST.. 'SAN FRANCISCO 

BUke, Mofflt ft Towne. Lob AnBeleB. Cal. 
Blake, McFaU ft Co.. Portland, Oregon. 



n t for barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

KriKhPS billiard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 
ill Udlivj ma kers, canners, dyers, flour mills, foundries, 
laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush flfts., 609 Sacramento St, S. F., Tel. flaln 561 1 




Phone Main 153. Established 1862 

■ RUBBER TIRES 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-59-61 Minna St., 

between 1st and 2nd. One block from Palace 
Hotel 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union 
Clubcor. Post and Stockton, Tel. Main 153. 
Every vehicle quisite for business or pleas- 
ure. Special orders tor Four-in-Hands. J. 
TOMKINSON. Proprietor. 



Mantle <<& Son, Inc. 

Haberdashers 

And Dealers In Men's High Class Furnishing Goods 

10 Stockton St.. San Francisco. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS- CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gllllngham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



Joseph Qillott's Steel Pens 

THE AWARD AT CHICAGO. 1893. 
"GRAND PRIX" PARIS, 1900. THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 
AWARD. These pens are "the best In the world." 
Sold by all stationers. Sole agents for the United States. 
MR. HENRY HOE. 91 Joun Street, New York. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. No. 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




July ii, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«7 




Dear Bessie: Luncheons arc becoming quite 1 
with out-of-town ho isant way 

of giving their city friends a mouthful ol fresh coun- 
try air. 1 have had several invitations of late, .me 
iroin Mrs. Mendall to San Rafael, where she has a 
pretty cottage; one iroin .Mrs. Allen lo Ross Valley; 
one irom Mrs. Easton lo San Mateo "to meet .Mrs. 
Francis Burton Harrison,' and 1 must nut forget 
the tea and card party given by Mrs. M. P. Jones at 
the Hotel Rafael. Apropos of card parties, those 
two indefatigable entertainers, Mrs. Lansing and 
Ethel Bent, gave the jolliest kind of one last 1 hurs- 
day at Fernside — a sort of welcome to their sister 
Edith Daggett and their cousin, .Morton Gibbon s 
little bride. It was delightful from the word go. 

1 lost my Fourth of July spree out of town, for 1 
had decided to go over to Airs. Huntingtons at 1'ied- 
mont ; she is such a charming hostess, and one always 
does have a good time with her. But the somewhat 
hurried departure of Mrs. Perkins for home caused 
a postponement till later on, which is something to 
look forward to, anyhow ; so 1 stayed in town, and 
I did not have such a bad time, either. Jennie got 
up a little dinner, and we all went in a party to see 
the fireworks in the evening, which was no end of 
fun. I have been hearing all sorts of stories about 
the doings at some of the holiday gatherings, but I 
shall only tell you the bare facts about some of them. 
Harry Tevis and Claude Terry joined forces on the 
Fourth — the Doctor took over a launch load of peo- 
ple to Sausalito, where Hamilton gave them dinner, 
and in the evening there was the wonderful fireworks 
which Harry had been getting up for their pleasure 
and amusement for dear knows how many weeks 
past. The party included among others, the Gus 
Costigans, Charlotte Ellinwood, Captain and Mrs. 
Cloke, and Edith Findley, Leontine Blakeman, Harry 
Holbrook, etc. 

The James Donahues, who are out here from 
Chicago, were given a house party at San Rafael by 
the Baroness von Schroeder; Kate Duval had one 
also at her country home in Napa; Blanche Bates 
was one of Dick Hotaling's house party in Marin 
County; Sallie Maynard spent the Fourth at the 
Will Fisher ranch; Elsie Door at Duncan's Mills; 
Pearl Landers with the de Youngs at San Rafael, 
where Adah Howell was also a guest; Bessie Ames 
at Larkspur; the Danforth Boardmans at Bolinas; 
the Sam Buckbees and Eugene Murphys were among 
those at Del Monte. 

The wedding of Clara Swigert and Lieutenant 
Oliver P. Hazzard, U. S. A., is to take place next 
Wednesday, the gallant groom, who is in the Sec- 
ond Cavalry, coming all the way from Vermont, 
where he is stationed, to San Francisco to claim his 
bride. The wedding festivities are to be held in 
the Arthur Moore house on Pacific Avenue, which 
Colonel Swigert has taken for the summer months, 
and will no doubt be a very pretty affair, as army 
weddings usually are ; they are to leave immediately 
after for Fort Ethan Allen. 

But tell me, what do you think of all these sudden 
marriages that are taking place? Daisy Parrott and 
Parker Whitney set the fashion, so to speak, and 
there seems to be plenty willing to follow their ex- 



ample. I heard a nun My the other evening 
dinner party that 1 w but w ! 

of tb noth- 

COme on the | 

all concerned. 1 > do feel -on 

the I ually looks so 

jl) uncomfortable, an. I if on,- dare Bay it, 
like a fish out of water. However, there arc degrees 
in all things ; one can be married quietly, if they wish. 

not as if the) were ashamed of what they wcp 
: afraid of being found out 
Everybody has been talking of the way in which 
Beryl Whitney and that young Graydon, who was 

out here some time ago — don't you remember him 
at that tug party up to the Navy Yard? — you surely 
must — walked off and got spliced without so much 
lying "by your leave" to parents or guardians. 
And just think of Will Hush, who married a Miss 
Julia Talbot, after a few days' acquaintance "unbe- 
knownst" to any of his own people! Who would 
have expected such behavior from him: 

The wedding of Viola Picrcy and Will Burnett 
was a surprise, to say the least, as I do not suppose 
there were a baker's dozen of her acquaintances who 
had known of their even being engaged. Still, though, 
the marriage was a quiet one; it took place in her 
own home, and Viola wore the regulation white 
bridal robe, this time of chiffon, and wedding veil. 
Neither bride nor groom had any attendants ; there 
were only a few present at the ceremony, which was 
performed by Father Cottle. Then there is another 
thing. Do you think the passing of the tea cup as 




Way Ahead 



When perfection is reached. 
that ends It. It is thus that 



Hunter 
Whiskey 



on its quality and purity has 
passed the goal in the race. 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO., 

213-215 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Exchange 313. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 



an engagement present is regretted by either the 
donor or the recipient? I don't. I have heard so 
many complaints on both sides — first from those who 
feel compelled to send them the moment the an- 
nouncement is made; second, by those who get them 
at having to "reciprocate" some day. I heard one 
girl say not long since : "Just look at this rubbishy 
lot of cups I have been sent; who wants them? I'm 
sure I don't," and that is the feeling of nine-tenths 
of the girls who get these articles of affection from 
their friends. Now, one side complains that flowers 
are really more expensive; the other, that flowers are 
so perishable — so why send anything at all? It is 
a custom that might well be honored in the breach. 

I had a little note from Kitty, who is at Del Monte, 
full of the delights of the reception given at the 
camp by Major and Mrs. Lassiter to Admiral and 
Mrs. Trilley; the Trilleys, you know, are spending 
the summer at Pacific Grove. I think I told you of 
our loss of part of the 19th Infantry, whose officers 
made things so pleasant at the Presidio during the 
past few months. They went off to Vancouver liar- 
racks last month, with the hope that it was to be for 
a time only, and they would soon come back again. 
But this week, off goes the 2d Battalion to the same 
place. They did want to stay here awfully bad, but 
now I daresay we bid them adieu for a long, long 
time. Our French residents are rejoicing over the 
coming of the French cruiser Protet, it is so long 
since one of that nationality has been in port. The 
ship and its officers had a gala time of it at Coronado 
and from all that I heard from there 1 gathered that 
pleasant parties on board may be looked for here 
while the ship is in our harbor. 

Bessie Bowie arrived during the week on a visit 
to Fanny and May Friedlander, and 1 understand it 
was the kindness of Mrs. Fred Sharon that enabled 
her to take the trip. Bessie has been hard at work 
since she went abroad, and no doubt we shall have a 
chance of hearing how she has benefited by foreign 
instruction during her stay. I do not suppose we 
shall ever have Juliet Tompkins back in California; 
she had already become quite wedded to New York, 
and now that she has been made assistant editor of 
Everybody's Magazine, of course the chains which 
held her there have been strengthened, and save 
an occasional visit, California will know her no more. 

Mrs. Preston is back from her trip to Tahiti, and 
the Silas Palmers have returned from their honey- 
moon spent in Honolulu ; we are to have Sophie 
Pierce Brownell and her medico husband with us 
again next month, and thev will bring a little daugh- 
ter with them, but it is on the cards that we are not 
to see the second of the Edie infants as soon as was 
thought, as I hear Doctor Edie's orders to Monterey 
have been countermanded, for which I am sorry, but 
it is only another illustration of the uncertainties 
of army life. There is a good deal of chatter going 
on again about Howard and Bernie, but neither of 
them can be caught with either a yea or a nay, so 
time alone will tell how much fire there is behind 
all the smoke. 

Lake Tahoe is the happy hunting ground for a 
large percentage of our smart set this year ; in fact, 
I have never known so many of them as are there 
already or going later on. Let me see — there are the 
Brighams, the Babcocks, the Will Tevises, who are 
to have Mrs. Monte Wilson as one of their guests ; 
Mrs. Poole, the Gordon Blandings, I. W. Hellmans, 
Ed. Schmiedells, Albert Dibblees, Homer Kings, 
Horace Hills, George Pinckards, Blakemans, Blan- 
chard Chases, Frank Griffeths, Arthur Pages, and 



so on ad infinitum. The Chauncey Boardmans are 
there camping with a party of friends, and have Mrs. 
Sanchez with them. 

The O'Connor girls, who were up for a brief visit, 
have gone back to Coronado; Maylita Pease has 
been staying with Kate Selfridge in the country, and 
is now off to Portland for a visit of several weeks; 
.Marietta Havens is back from her visit to Honolulu, 
and like all the rest of the girls who go over there, 
is full of the delights of the place and the many en- 
joyments of the trip. The Monteagles are at Blythe- 
dale again this year; you know, they just swear by it, 
and go there every summer, and the Millers are 
also there this season ; Bishop Moreland and Mrs. 
Moreland were in town last week on their way to 
Inverness in Marin County, where they will spend 
several weeks. Howard Veeder has gone to his mine 
in Calaveras ; Knox Maddox and Ed. Eyre are at Ta- 
hoe ; Fred Greenwood at Monterey. ELSIE. 



Among recent arrivals at the Hotel Belvedere we 
note: W. F. Goldsborough, Mrs. M. T. Reading, John 
F. Siebe, A. Thorne, Jack Adler, Herbert Kuhlmann, 
Mrs. H. Kuhlmann, Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Coppuck, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Kroenke, Edward Mohrig, Jr., 
Frederick Roeding, E. C. Denigan, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Dickson, W. A. Kalin, E. Keeler. 

Several automobile parties have visited Belvedere 
the past week, en route to and from San Rafael. 

Viscountess Deerhurst, formerly Miss Bonynge 
of San Francisco, has won great praise for her suc- 
cess at the hospital bazaar held in London on July 
4th. She introduced American methods and captured 
the crowd. 

There are, as usual, quite a number of army and 
navy people at the Occidental. 

Among recent arrivals at Laurel Dell we note: 
F. J. Agnew, Dr. C. D. Gorton and wife, Eugene Cole- 
man, J. W. Elstren, Edwin Bachman, T. D. Fitz- 
patrick, M. E. Keegan, Mrs. M. T. Gillon, Elizabeth 
J. Gillon, Ethel Gillon, W. G. Magnin. 

Among the guests who attended the dinner given 
at the Hotel Rafael by Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Dean in 
honor of their daughter Flelen's birthday, were Mr. 
and Mrs. F. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Anderson, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Dean, Dr. and Mrs. Grant Sel- 
fridge, Dr. and Mrs. H. C. Kenssted, Miss M. Toy, 
Miss Wilson, Miss Elsie Sperry, Miss Gertrude Van 
Wyck, William B. Collier, Athol McBean, Baldwin 
Wood and H. L. Baker. 

British Consul-General C. W. Burnett was the 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Mulcahy for luncheon 
on the Fourth. 

Mrs. L. L. Baker gave a tea at the Hotel Rafael on 
the 6th. Among those present were : Mrs. M. P. 
Jones, Mrs. W. J. Somers, Mrs. Adam Grant, Mrs. 
S. Hoffman, Mrs. W. E. Dean, Mrs. W. L. Dean, 
Mrs. Porter, Mrs. William Gwin and Miss Gwin. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Burns entertained a house party 
over the Fourth at their home in San Mateo. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Parrott and family of San Mateo 
are spending the summer at Del Monte. 

Major Lewis Smith, U. S. A., and Mrs. Smith are 
at Del Monte. Mrs. Arthur Bird, daughter of Mr. 
\V. S. McCormick, the wealthy banker of Salt Lake, 
is there. Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Oyster are also here for 
the summer. 

Among those who spent the Fourth at Del Monte 
were Mr. C. R. Splivalo and family, Mr. and Mrs. S. 
C. Buckbee, Mr. and Mrs. Horace L. Hill and Horace 
Hill, Jr., Mr. W. W. Carson, Miss Helen Wagner, 



July n. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



"I Mr. and Ml 

ach is growing in popularity. Many 
•n San Francisco ukc advantage of bath- 
sailing and fishing to he found tit. 

in A. Darling, of Rutherford, California, 
her daughter, Mr-. l..i Montague, at Del 
Monte. 



A CABLEGRAM TO MANILA. 

Congratulatory messages have been flashed from 
all parts of the United States to Manila ami Guam 
within the past few days, and the cable has been 
opened for business between the United States and 
Honolulu. 

By the courtesy of Mr. Clarence H. Mack-ay. the 
N'cw.- Letter was enabled to send a cablegram to 
Manila over the Pacific Commercial Company's wire. 
The News Letter congratulated the merchants of 
Manila on the closer bond of union between the 
Philippines and the mainland. It ran as follows: 

San Francisco, Cal., July 4th, Chamber of Com- 
merce, Manila. — The foremost weekly of San Fran- 
cisco, the "News Letter," sends compliments and 
congratulations to the merchants of the farthest 
United States. MARRK ITT, Publisher. 

The time of transmission of the original message 
was five minutes, and the reply took exactly nine and 
one-half minutes to cross the seas. The reply was : 

News Letter, San Francisco — We appreciate your 
felicitations and join you in dedicating this splendid 
work of Commercial Pacific Cable Company' as a 
monument to American industry and enterprise. 
American Chamber Commerce, 

GREEN, President. 

Below is given a facsimile cut of the undulations 
of the message on the tape at the receiving office. 
The divisional marks in the first two lines of the mes- 
sage as given in the cut show clearly the various 
letters composing the words of the message. 




The Star Hair Remedy — Best of all tonics and re- 
storatives. Stops falling, cures dandruff, restores color. 
Not a dye. At druggists and hairdressers. Accept no 
substitute. Star Remedy Co., 386 Geary street. 



»9 

A ,>Kin nf llcauty U ■ Joy Inrotr. 

DR. T. FKLIX OOURAL'D'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAOICAL BEAUT1FIER. 

■ 

iMWnnl T»n. Pimple*. PrrcklM. 

M-.th PfMofcM, Ra*1i mi..1 Skin IM** 

MM*, Mid •▼try MemMi ..n hMnij 

- detooUon, it btt »t....<i Dm 

iMlof MfMTSMldtfl c. hit mi. Ira* w« 

l»«to II to Ik« unroll (a prop«r|y m»v.o. 

I • rf rt t of *) ml Ur name. 

I>r. 1,. A. »,.>..- mid t-. * | n ,i r ,.( n,, 

liivil I*. n ! n pntirnl [ "*Al |TOrJ faltlti 

will dm Uwnw I Mo oni nnmd 'Gouf 

OD* n- Ihl leifl harmful q| 

All the Akin preparation*." For *nlc 
by All druggiaU and Fancy -good* 
Owllll i» the United State-. Canada* 
htm) Ktiropo. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great .Tonc» street, N Y. 




S. SCHLAMM..... 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

First-class Workmanship and Fitting at 
Reasonable Prices. 

Military, Naval aod Society Uniform Equipments a Specialty 

140 Phelan Building, San Francisco. 
Cor. Market and O'Farrell Sts. Tel. Red 6921. 



Hitchcock nilitary Academy 

SfIN RAFAEL. CAL. 

SEPARATE BUILDING FOR LITTLE 

. . . BOYS . . . 

Xmas tern) will begin Aug. I7th. 

EIGHTH YEAR. 

'"Beaulieu" 

Boarding and Day School for Girls 
2601 COLLEGE AVE. BERKELEY CAL. 

A L McCULLOVGH, Principal 
Catalogue furnished on application. Telebone Mat-on 1686. 



BEST'S ART SGIiOOL 



Lesionl In Painting, Drawing, 
Lilt claiiet. 13.00 per month. 



Sketching, antf Illustrating 



937 nARKET STREET, 



WRINKLE* 



"Have your Hardwood Floors reflnished," Bush & Mal- 

lett Co., 328-330 Poat St. 



LI vl nf? proof of our marvellous skill In removing wrinkles on exhibition 
from 1 to & daily- Sluoo reward for a case we cannot eure. 
Importers of "Every thine for the Face." 
Torranoe's Boudoir Wrinkle Plasters Si a box. 
Torrance's Boudoir Tan Plasters 6tca box. 
Samples 10c- Stamps booklet. Established 1£G7. Phone Black 1535. 

SUR.NEY-TOR.R.ANCE, Skin Specialists- 
+08 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Facial Blemishes Removed 

Wrinkles, yellow and flabby skin, birth marks, smallpox pittings and 
scars scientifically removod without outting. massage, electricity or medi- 
cine; special demonstration this week. 
WHAT ladles say about DR. WILLIAMS' treatment: 
My wrinkles, yellow and flabby skin have disappeared, my health Is 
be' ter and my eyesight is greatly Improved. 

(MRS.) L. BOWMAN. 
My skin is getting bette'- every day, and it ts a real pleasure to look in 
the glass and see it free from every blemish- 

(MRS.) M. B. UHLITZ. 
I more than appreciate what you have done for my face. 

(MRS.) S. O. ACHTJFF. 
Call or write DR. L. WILLIAMS. 871 Geary St. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 



BANKING. 



Th>e San Francisco Natiooal Book 

Southeast Corner of Sansome and Fine Sts., San Francisco. 

JAS. K. WILSON. President; WM. PIERCE JOHNSON, Vice- 
President; LEWIS I. COWGiJLL, Cashier; F. W. WOLFE, As- 
sistant Cashier. 

Capital, $500,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits, $180,000. 

DIRECTORS— William J. Dutton, C. S. Benedict, William 
Pierce Johnson, H. E. Huntington, George A. Newhall, Orestls 
Pierce, George A. Pope, James K. Wilson, L. I. Cowglll. 

AGENTS: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National 
Bank, Chemical National Bank. Boston— National Shawmut 
Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas Clty-- 
Flrst National Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris- 
Morgan, Harjes & Co. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. 
Johannesburg— Robinson South African Banking Co., Limited. 

Th)e Caoadiar) BaoK of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— Toronto. 
Paid-up Capital, $8,700,000 Reserve Fund, 83.000.000 

Aggregate Resources, over $7u,ooo,000. 
HoN. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. Walker, General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard Street, E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlln, Cranbrook, 
Fernle, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanalmo, Nelson, 
New Westminster. "Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 
Also 80 other branches covering the principal points in 
Manitoba, N. W. Territories and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of 
Scotland, Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union 0: London and Smiths 
Bank, Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The Northern Trust Co. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE- 

325 California Street. 

A. KAINS, Manager. 

London, Paris and American Bank UuJlte6 

N. W. Cor. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Pald-Up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $l,lou,oui). 
HEAD OFFICE— 40 Tnreadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can BanK., Limited, No. 10 \all street, N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Fr res & Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissonlere. Draw direct on 
the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits issued. 

S1G. GREE.>EBAUM, Manager; H. T. 3 ^REEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 



Central Trust Co., of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,726,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 

Trustee. 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money in Pro- 
bate Court proceedings. Interest paid on trust deposits and 
savings. Investments carefully selected. 

OFFICERS: 
Frank J. Symmes, President; A. poniatowskl, First Vice-Presi- 
dent; Horace L. Hill, Second Vice-President; H. Brunner, Cashier 



CoQtinental Building & LoaQ Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California St. , San Francisco. Oal. 

Subscribed capital $15 OOO.oro.OO 

Paid in capital 3,000,000.00 

Profit and reserve fund 450,ot0.00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of fi per cent per annum on term, 
and 6 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodee, President- William Corbin, Secy and Gen- 
eral Manager. 



The flnglo-Californian BaQk, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin briars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized J6.0UU.000 Paid-up 1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund 700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
r ney, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

1GN. STE1NHART, P. N. L1L1ENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., MUls Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord, William Babcock, Adam Grant, 
S. L. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Baldwin, F. MonMagle, Warr«n D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutchen, R. H. Pease. 




IMPROVEMENTS 




The offices of Superintendent of .Buildings and 
Chief of the Bureau of Streets were abolished by the 
Hoard of Public Works at its last meeting. While 
tins action will cause respectively frank Schmitz 
and Benjamin Heath, Jr., to seek other employment, 
their combined salaries of $4,800 saved to the city 
is worth considering, ft is the intention that this 
money shall be used for the purposes of street re- 
pair and improvement, for which the present appro- 
priation is entirely inadequate, that is, if we may 
judge by the condition of the streets. 

'f he Board of Public Works has also ordered that 
bids be taken upon the repairing of forty sidewalks 
which have sunken or are otherwise in bad condition. 
The owners of the property in front of which these 
sidewalks are located are forced to pay for the work 
done upon them, but the walks are laid under the 
supervision of the city. While this work is pending, 
it seems an appropriate time to suggest once more 
that all sidewalks on exceedingly steep hills be cor- 
rugated. Some of the property holders have already 
done this voluntarily, and the great convenience of 
the roughened pavement in these places would justify 
the city in requiring that this be done wherever 
needed, ft would preclude many accidents and much 
laborious climbing. 

• • • 

The recent Supreme Court ruling in the case of the 
San Francisco and San Afateo Railway Company 
against Joseph H. Scott, Tax Collector for the city 
and county of San Francisco, is unfortunate in that 
it involves a loss of revenue to the city. The decision 
is that where an electric street railway operates in 
more than one county it is legally subject to taxa- 
tion only by the State Board of Equalization. The 
taxes paid are then apportioned among the various 
counties traversed in proportion to the road's mileage 
in each, rather than according to the value of its 
property in each, which is manifestly unjust. Six 
Justices of the Supreme Court, however, have con- 
curred in this ruling, and the one dissenting voice 
was that of Chief justice Beatty, who is strongly 
opposed to the decision, not only on the grounds that 
it entails a loss of revenue to San Francisco, but be- 
cause he believes that it will encourage railway com- 
panies to avoid taxation wherever possible. 

* * • 

In a splendidly written article contributed to the 
Figaro (Paris) Jean Izoulet waxes eloquent in true 
French fashion over the great future of the Pacific 
Ocean. He sees the decadence of Europe and the 
transfer of the earth's commercial center of gravity, 
so to speak, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. 
Russia and America he declares to be the coming 
nations, the two that will rule the world. Accord- 
ing, too, to his deductions, which seem thoroughly 
logical, the same causes which made New York the 
metropolis of America are slowly transferring the 
seat of commercial supremacy to San Francisco. 
While our Eastern friends may not care for the con- 
clusions of the brilliant Frenchman they are never- 
theless correct, and show a remarkable insight into 
the way events are shaping themselves. 



July ii, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



ti 



Everyone has a right to share the elation of the 
real estate men who are just now rejoicing over the 
fact that during the first halt of 1903 the agg: 
transfers of San Francisco real estate wore higher 
than for any other half-year period daring thi 

of the city. Fur the six months ending July 1, 
|, the total real estate sales amounted I 
000. This by a little over Sj.ooo.ooo thi 

responding period of last year and is over $5,000,000 
greater than during any other similar peri"!. This 
is an infallible proof of steady and increasing pros- 
perity. The figures in real estate mortgages and re- 
leases are also interesting in that they would tend 
to indicate a similar fact. During the half year just 
ended, the amount loaned on real estate was $18,000,- 
000, and the amount released was Si 2. 700,000. These 
figures are also far in excess of those for the same 
length of time at any previous period. The number 
of buildings now in course of construction here is 
also larger than at any other time, and this, it must 
be remembered, at a time when growing labor agi- 
tation makes capital somewhat timid about invest- 
ments. 

A Sovereign Remedy. 
Dr. Parker's Sure Cough Cure; one dose will stop a cough. 
It never falls. Try It Price, 26 cents. For sale by all 
druggists. 



BANKING. 



"The place to buy Hardwood Floors," BuBh & Mallett 

Co., 328-330 Post St 



The Smith-Premier Is the standard typewriter, and 

embodies the good points o* all typewriting machines. 



People depend 
upon the 



1 90,000 
Oakland Tribune 

for all the news of the day. 

The TRIBUNE is the home paper of Oakland 
and Alameda County, and has no rival in its field. 

The TRIBUNE publishes, exclusively, the full 
Associated Press dispatches. 

All society events of the week are mirrored in 
Saturday's TRIBUNE. 

Local and State politics receive attention by 
special writers in the same issue. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending: June 30* 
1903. at the rate of three and one-quarter (3%) per cent per annum on ail 
deposits, free of tuxes, and payable on and after July 1, 190.1. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bexr the same rate of d vidend as the 
principal from and after July 1, 1903. 

OTRU9 W. OAHMANY, OaBhler. 

Office — 101 Montgomery street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernla Savings and Loan Society. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market, Mc- 
Allister and Jones streets, S.,n Francisco, June :0 1903. 

Ata regular meeting of the Board < f Directors of this Society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and oue-eigbt (3 1-8) 
per cent per annum, on all deposits for the six months ending June 
30. 1903, free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1903. 

Robert J, Tobln Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending June 30, 1903, dividends have been 
declared on deposits in the savings department of this com- 
pany, as follows: On Term Deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent 
per annum, and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3 per cent 
per annum, free of taxes, and payable on and after "Wednesday, 
July 1, 1903. Dividends uncalled for are added to the principal , 
after July 1. 1903. J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 

Office— Corner California and Montgomery Sts. 



Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank 

SAN fR*N<ISOO 

Capital. Surplus, end Undivided i (It Ml Ml 
Profit.. , *■».»▼•,••» 

»■ King. Pre.l.le, i: K 1 II, .„„„. r..|,|, r; r t . n , B. King. 
A..I ' «-l,lrr. Ii„. (- Mm.. A..I Cuhltr. 

BK.ANCHES.-New TorL; Salt Lake. Utah: Portland. Or. 

C»rr..|^nrt»m. throughout th« world. General banking busl- 
u... transacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

631 CALIFORNIA 8TREET. 

Deposits June 30th. I<«0 133 041 ttn 

Paid-up capital iobi'So 

Reserve Fund m- aw 

Contingent Fund ».i'utt 

5xE',=.ES N ,£- President: W. C. B. DeFREMERT. Vice-President: 
R . OBE ,P. T „J VA1T - vlce-rresldent; LuVEl.L WHITE. Cashier; R. 
M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— Henry F. Allen, William A. Magee. W. C. B. De 
Fremery, C. O. G. Miller, Robert Watt. Oeorge C. Boardman. 
Fred H. Beaver. Jacob Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and (ansa 
and farming lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks 
payable In San Francisco postoltlce, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express, but the responsibility of this 
bank commences only with the receipt of tho money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: I a. m. to 3 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for re- 
ceipt of deposits only 0:30 to 8 o'clock. 



The Bank of California, San Francisco 

FOUNDED 1884. 

Capital J2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, July l, 1903. (4.386.086.72 

William Alvord, President; Charles R. Bishop, Vice-President; 

Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; Irving F. Moulton, Cashier, 

S . a , ra H ,- Daniels, Assistant Cashier; vim. R. Pentz, Asst. Cashier. 

Allen M. Clay, Secretary. 

DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord, President; James M. Allen, Attorney-at-Law ; 
Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; William Babcock, President 
Parrott & Co.; Charles R. Bishop, Capitalist; Antolne Borel, 
An -S' B ° rel & Co., Bankers; Warren D. Clark, Williams, Dlmond 
ft Co.; George E. Goodman, Banker; Adam Grant, Murphy, Grant 
& Co.; Edward W. Hopkins, Capitalist; John F. Merrill, Hoi- 
brook, Merrill & Stetson; Jacob Stern, Levi Strauss & Co. 

Foreign and domestic exchange bought and sold. Commercial 
and travelers' letters of credit Issued, available in all parts of 
the world. 

Correspondence solicited. Accounts invited. 

The Germar) Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 62« CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82.397.768.10 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1913 31,819,8 3.12 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann, 
Ign. Steinhart, Emll Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Vv al- 
ter, and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; A stant Cashier, William Herr 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Mulier; General -attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of san Franoisoo 

710 MARKET ST., OPP. THIRD. 

Guaranteed $1,000,000 

Paid-up capital and surplus 440,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President; 
GEORGE A STORT, Cashier; JOHN A HOOPER, Vlce-Pres't. 
C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. i'helan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Momtt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Charles 8. 
Neal, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbroolc. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo 4 ^o., or 
Exchange on city banks. 

International Banking Corporation 

Capital and Surplus Paid-in 6,783,000 

Capital and surplus Authorized 10,000,000 

NEW YORK Of-* ICE— NO. 1 Wall Street. 
William L. Moyer, President; James H. Rodgers, Secretary pro 
tem; John Hubbard, Treasurer; John B. Lee, General Manager; 
William Maclntyre, Assistant General Manager. 

BRANCHES— London, City of Mexico, Singapore, Hongkong, 
Manila. Shanghai, Yokohama, Bombay, Calcutta. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— Nos. 32-34 Sansome St. F. E. 
BECK, manager; P. G. EASTWICK, JR., Cashier. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of Corpora- 
tions, Firms, and Individuals solicited. Commercial and trav- 
elers' Letters of Credit Issued, available in any part of the world. 
Cable Transfers, Foreign and Domestic Exchange and Bullion 
Dought and sold at current rates. Collections effected. Interest 
■marine certificate, of deposit Issued for fixed periods. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, i9<>3- 




The Timber Hog 
Rampant. 



Eastern monied men were 
disposed to invest heavily in 
timber lands on the Pacific 
Coast, and they have picked 
up quite a lot of it. No sooner had their disposition 
been detected, and the fact that they meant busi- 
ness, than the hoggish nature of the owners began 
to rise to the occasion. Prices far in excess of pres- 
ent values were asked for the lands, and the trade 
was flattened out at once. Somehow, a lot of people 
on this Coast, who know about as much in regard to 
the outside world beyond the State limits and often- 
times county lines than they do the New Jerusalem, 
have got an idea that they can buy and sell an East- 
ern man or any other outsider, for that matter, and 
that all the smartness and business acumen on earth 
is centered in this little mud-puddle. That's what 
knocks the little game now and again, and that is 
what has knocked the trade in California timber 
lands. The prospective buyers have vacated this 
field, and are now operating to better advantage up 
north in Vancouver and Alaska. A large sale was 
reported in this direction the other day, amounting to 
over $1,000,000, which might just as well as not have 
been landed in California. 

Whitaker Wright wishes to 
The Scape-goat of get back to England, tired of 
Plunderers. the juggling of the lawyers 

with the courts in New York, 
which only protracts the matter, with no possible 
hope of ultimate escape. He has waived all his 
rights, it is said, much against the wishes of tweedle- 
dum and tweedledee, who represent him before the 
courts, in an effort to end matters as soon as possible. 
It will not take long to reach a decision in his case 
once he lands in England, where the wheels of justice 
are not to be blocked by technicalities, and where 
no pettyfogging system of high or low degree can 
tangle up matters in a court proceeding which takes 
time everlasting to unravel in the interests of some 
criminal. He would be apt to find himself in the 
dock, a companion instead of acting as counsellor 
and friend. Wright has developed the fact, since the 
bubble burst in the Lake View consols, that there 
were people mixed up in the deal many times worse 
than himself, and it can only be hoped that the testi- 
mony on trial will show up the truth of the matter 
and shift the blame equally as responsible as those 
of the individual now acting as scape-goat. 

Business on the market for 
Pine-St. Market. Comstock shares has been a lit- 
tle quiet since the opening after 
the holidays, which is always to be expected until 
the brokers and dealers get into the collar again in 
good shape. There is every reason, however, to ex- 
pect more activity and a higher range of prices before 
long. The condition of the mines certainly justifies 
these expectations. The situation at the "south-end 
continues very hopeful, while at the north-end Utah 
and several other mines promise well. In Andes 
the shaft is in good working condition, and the man- 
agement is gradually getting things straightened out 
preparatory to making a systematic investigation of 



the prospects in this mine at depth. There are many 
people who take quite an interest in the future of this 
property, owing to the wide belief that good ore like 
that in the adjoining bonanza group of properties 
will be found there some day. Drifting on the vein 
in the 600-level of Potosi will begin in a few days. 



This was a short week on the local Stock and Bond 
Exchange, and consequently the showing of business 
has been light. In bonds trading was especially quiet. 
In the industrial shares, such as water and lighting, 
the tone was firmer, but the latter was not so rigor- 
mis as might have been expected from the recent turn 
"f events. 



The gross earnings of the California and North- 
western Railway for May show an increase of $21,- 
5J2, and the net S3. 138 over the same month in 1902. 
Eleven months' gross earnings to May 31, 1903, in- 
creased $157,003. and net an increase of $10,369. The 
surplus for eleven months amounted to $27,793, an 
increase of $12,338. 



The Mission Bank has been granted a license by 
the Bank Commissioners, and will open for business 
on July 15th. 



The newly organized Board of State Bank Com- 
missioners have elected J. Cal. Ewing secretary. 



The Nevada National Bank has declared a semi- 
annual dividend for the half year ended June 30, 1903, 
at the rate of 7 per cent per annum, payable July 15th. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 
Streets 
T San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital * Surplus $1,233,723.76 



Total Assets 



6.914,424.69 



Interest paid on deposits, subject 
to check, at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum. 

Interest paid on savines deposits 
at the rate of three and slx- 
tentbs per cent, per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are author- 
ized to act as the cuardian of 
estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented at So 
per annum and upwards. 



J. Dalzell Brown, 



Manager 



Pacific States Mining & Investment Co. 

Established 1892. 
326 Post St. San Francisco. European office, 64 Kaiser Wilhelm 
Street, Hamburg. 
This company has agents or brokers and own offices in the 
principal cities of America and Europe. Stock issues taken 
over for sale. Stocks underwritten and guaranteed by gold 
bonds. Choice stocks for sale. Legitimate mining, oil and agri- 
cultural and industrial enterprises financed and promoted. 
Publishers of the "Pacific States Investor," the leading financial 
paper of the West. Strictest confidence observed in all com- 
munications or inquiries. Bank references. 

Rheumatism Cured in Three Days 

AZTEC OINTMENT 

CURES GUARANTEED 
213 Starr King Bldg. - - - San Francisco, Cal. 



'uly ||, 1903. 



The annual meeting of the 
The London and London and San Fran- 
San Francisco Bank. CISCO Bank x\.i- held rc- 
ntly in London, th< 
tiring djrectors, Arthur Scrivener an.l Ch. .|<- 1 iuigne, 
being re-elected- The statement for the year s! 
that after providing for had and doubtful debts 
rebate of interest and all charges at the head office, 
there remained a profit for the year ended March 31, 
go6, making, with £4,896 brought for- 
ward from last account, £31,822 available for ap- 
propriation, (if this £16,800 was absorbed by the 
payment of two half-yearly dividends at the rate of 
6 per cent per annum: £ 10,000 was added to the re- 
serve fund, which amounts to t .25,000, leaving 
22 to he carried to profit and loss new account. 
The gross profits for the year amounted to £65,051 : 
expenses and taxes £38.124: leaving a net profit of 
,026 for the year. 

Under date of July 7th, the super- 
A Fine Grade intendent of the Mavis Cons. Gold 
of Ore. and Copper Mining' Co.'s mines 

in Arizona Territory, writes as 
follows: "Notwithstanding the extreme heat, the 
sinking of two shafts, one near the "Raven" oil 
shaft and one near the "Mavis" old shaft has been 
commenced. The assays received from the mine for 
the month of June show that the ore is holding well 
up, and is really better than was anticipated. They 
are twenty-six in number, 20 for gold and 6 for cop- 
per. The average for gold is $11.33 ar| d f° r copper 
9.5 per cent value, $26.82, making a total average 
value per ton of $38.15." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. a3 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide. 



The last report from the Paymaster mine, made 
by A. G. Cushman, President of the company, says 
the shaft is down 100 feet deep on the footwall of the 
ledge which crops out on the surface. North and 
south drifts have been run on the 50 foot and 100 
foot levels. These drifts and the shaft as well are, 
it is claimed, in ore for their entire depth, while the 
ledge is said to be two feet thick in contact between 
lime and porphyry. Preparations are now being made 
to stope ore, and it is expected that shipping will be- 
gin in June. The Paymaster mine is located at the 
south end of Lone Mountain, 22 miles in a direct line 
from Tonopah. 



OBITUARY. 

Nathaniel Palmer Cole died on Monday evening at 
his country home in Ben Lomond after a two weeks' 
illness. He was seventy-two years old. 

Mr. Cole came to California from Oxford, N. H., 
in 1864, an d re-organized the N. P. Cole Furniture 
Company. In 1871 it was re-organized under the 
name of the California Furniture Company, which 
sold its good will in 1900. He was for many years 
a director of the Donohoe-Kelly Bank, and was one 
of the executive officers of the Society for Prevention 
of Cruelty to Animals. He was deeply interested in 
the Valley Road, and took a prominent part in non- 
partisan municipal Government. He was an earnest 
Congregationalist. He was for many years treasurer 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, and of the 
Pacific Theological Seminary. He leaves a widow 
and eight children. 



Messrs. Durphy & Dickerman announce in a most 
artistic folder that they have taken the Pacific Coast 
agency of the Smith Premier Typewriter. They have 
opened new and elaborate offices at 105 Montgomery 
street. 



BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Room» for Utile* and hunlllee 

Private entrance Arademy Building, 3.12-334 Pine *■ 
below Montgomery. John Bergei, Proprietor 
POODLE DOG RESTAURANT, N. K. corner Eddy and Ma- 
son Sts. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, 
Mai n 429. A. B. Blanco * D. Brun 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY, 838 Guerrero street Selections on appro- 
val; any place In the world. 



NOTARY PUBLIC. 
MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public and U. S. Pension At 
torney. Office at Lincoln Investment Co., 620 Market St. 
opp. Palace Hotel. Tel. Bush 518. Residence 415 Van Ness. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 116, 31» 
Main St. Iron work of every description designed and 
constructed. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best and Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of prinoipal placo of business, San Franoisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works-Virginia District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors 
held on the 12th day of June, 1903, an assessment (No. 81) of fifteen 
(15) oents per share was levied upon the aapltal stock of the corporation 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
offioe of the Company Room 33, Nevada Bloak, 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

THE 17th DAY OF JULY, 1903, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auotion; and unless 
payment is made before, wil] be sold on Fri day, the 7th day of August 
1903, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors, 

M. JAFFE., Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Franoisco 
California- 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher and Mides Consolidated Mining Co. 

Assessment No. 32. 

Amount per share 5 cents 

Levied June 26, 1903 

Delinquent in office July 29, 1903 

Day of sale of delinquent stock August 18, 1903 

E. B. HOLMHS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Franclsoo 
Cnltfomlft. 

RESTAURANTS. 



BAY 

STATE 

RESTAURANT 

N. n. ADLER, Prop. 



Ladies' Grill. 

Private Rooms. 

Elegant Apartments. 

Open All Night. 
Private entrance, O'Farrell, near Stookton 
Main entranoe 

29-35-37 Stockton Street 
Tel. Main 50S7 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Every delicatessan. 

Domestic and Imported Beers. 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



BOB KERN 



PHONE MAIN 1316 



J. H. PEIN 



"Bob Kjem *fS2 Co. 



THE BOVQVET 
SALOON 



634 Market Street 



S&.r\ Franoisc* 



Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

FINE MERCANTILE LVNCH 



Served every day from 11 to 2 o'clock. Finest 
Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

SEEBA <& DOLAN, Proprietors 

312 Sansome St., cor. Halleck, San Francisco. 
Telephone Black 602. 
Red Top Wblskey now on sale. 



2 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July II, 1903. 




Insurance companies of all kinds, by virtue of their 
business, are the greatest respecters of life and prop- 
erty, and it must sadden them greatly to observe the 
homicide, arson and mangling of persons with which 
the alleged patriotic always celebrate the glorious 
Fourth. This latest "celebration" can boast more 
than the usual number of casualties. The fire insur- 
ance companies are the greatest sufferers, and one 
of the most disastrous fires offered up on the altar 
of patriotism was at St. Joseph, Mo., where the com- 
panies must re-imburse the Hammond Packing Com- 
pany to the extent of about one million dollars for 
the burning of their plant. In this connection, an 
idea occurs to the News Letter which we would hum- 
bly suggest to our insurance friends. It is that poli- 
cies of all kinds contain a clause annulling the lia- 
bility of the company from the 1st to the 10th of 
July, inclusive. Such a clause would not stand the 
test of the courts, perhaps, but it woud certainly do 
its mite towards restraining those who love their 
country from expressing their devotion in such py- 
rotechnic and destructive terms as to make others 
hate it. 

* * • 

The Santa Rosa fire, supposed to have originated 
from fire-crackers, will entail a large loss to the 
insurance companies, but a still greater one to the 
owners of the property destroyed, as only a small 
proportion of it was insured. The total loss is esti- 
mated at about $110,000. 

* * * 

Within the past ten days, Wheatland has added 
about $350,000 to the fire losses of the State, and the 
burning of Governor Pardee's building on San Pablo 
avenue, Oakland, represents a loss of about $30,000. 
The property was fully insured, but several of the 

tenants who sustained" losses were not insured. 

• * • 

Crop insurance has always been regarded by the 
companies as exceedingly hazardous, and a rate of 
four per cent has heretofore been charged for this 
class of policy, but now many of the leading insur- 
ance agents declare that the" recent fire on Union 
Island will compel the companies to raise rates on 
hazards of this class, or at least upon such isolated 
wheat fields as those that burned. The origin of the 
fire has not yet been accounted for, but between 7,000 
and 8,000 acres of grain were destroyed and the con- 
flagration, after raging all day, was not brought un- 
der control until night. A conservative estimate 
places the loss at $150,000, and many of the leading 
companies are involved. 

• • • 

The Studebaker fire, which burned the four-story 
brick building, corner Tenth and Market streets, on 
last Wednesday morning, represents in all a loss of 
about $135,000, which must be attributed to defective 
electric wiring. When electricity first came into 
general use for lighting purposes, underwriters 
everywhere confidently expected a material reduc- 
tion in fire hazard, but as this did not result, all kinds 
of rules were formulated, in hope of bringing it about. 
Underwriters' Associations throughout the world' 
now furnish complete sets of rules for the safe in- 
stallation of electrical equipments, and where these 



are conscientiously followed, there is always a smaller 
number of fires from these sources. In most progres- 
sive cities the rules of the underwriters in electrical 
matters generally become a city ordinance, and often 
the other safety precautions suggested by insurance 
companies are made part of the municipal building 
laws. In San Francisco, however, the underwriters 
have carried on their fight for the reduction of fire 
hazard without the assistance of the city, but it is 
said that they will shortly ask for municipal co- 
operation in their commendable work. 
« • • 
J. G. W. Cofran, Chicago manager of the Hartford 
Fire Insurance Company, is in San Francisco spend- 
ing his vacation. Mr. Cofran was at one time the 
local agent of the Hartford in this, his former home, 
and for several years he has always spent part of the 
summer in San Francisco. 

• • • 

The fire loss of the United States and Canada dur- 
ing April shows a total of $13,549,300, against $13,- 
894,600 for the same month in 1902. For the first 
four months of the present year the aggregate losses 
were $52,714,100, against $61,984,500 for the same 

period in 1902. 

• • • 

Louis Rosenthal has been appointed general agent 
for the Swiss Insurance Companies, combined, in 
place of Syz & Co., former representatives of the 

companies. 

• * * 

The Independent Fire Insurance Company is in 
process of organization in New York. It will have 
a capital of $500,000 and a paid-up surplus of a like 

amount. 

« * • 

Hartford will probably be the place where the 
National Association of Local Agents will meet in 
August next. 



All Seamen 
know the comforts of having on hand a supply of Borden's 
Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. It can he used so agreeably 
for cooking, in coffee, tea and chocolate. Lay in a supply 
for all kinds of expeditions. Avoid unknown brands. 



Mavis Consolidated Gold 
and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Slock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000. 

Q Incorporated under the laws of the State of Cali- 

• fornia. 
Q Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 

• County, Arizona. 
h No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share 
for development purposes. The ore in sight is prac i- 
cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock is 
enhausted, the price will be raised to 60 cents a 
share. 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 
t Market street, for prospectus which gives full Infor- 
T mation. 

VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. 

SING FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but on* 
price. All goods marked In plain English flgurss. 



614 DUPONT STREET, 8. P. 



Next to BL Mary's Church. 



July n, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»S 



UNDER THE BIG ELM TREES. 

l"n<lcr the big elm tr< 
All in the summer brei 
Where BUOligbt Rashes in pate! 
Where maidens are making mat 
It's ho, and away for San Jo 
To Vendomc I'll hie myself to-day 
I'ndcr the big elm trees, 
All in the summer hreeze! 



JULY EXCURSIONS. 

On Friday the Xorth Shore R. K. offers reduced 
rates to Russian River and Giant Redwoods, 
until Monday. On Saturday or Sunday round trip 
to Camp Taylor, Tocoloma or Pt. Reyes, Si : Camp 
Pistolesi. Si. 50; Camp Meeker. Monte Rio, Mesa 
Grande, $2; Duncan's, Watson's, Cazadero, $2.50. 
Good hotels; grand scenic trip; hunting and fishing. 
Trains leave at 7:45 a. m. and 5:15 p. 111. Friday. <<r 
8 a. m. Saturday and Sunday; also 10 a. m. Saturdav 
and Sunday as far as Pt. Reyes. Information Bu- 
reau, 626 Market street, San Francisco. Phone, Pri- 
vate Exchange 166. 



The Bay State Restaurant, at 29 to 37 Stockton 
street, and 109 O'Farrell street, has been entirely 
renovated. The dining room, now twice its former 
size, has been decorated in the finest of the frescoer's 
art. The cuisine is unsurpassed in the city. There 
is now no bar on the premises. The management is 
giving special attention to theatre trade, and is serv- 
ing nothing but imported beer. Mr. N. M. Adler, 
the proprietor, has spared no expense in fitting up the 
restaurant in first-class style. Those who love good 
music will be pleased to know that a Hungarian or- 
chestra is in attendance every evening. 



Nelson's Amycose 
Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the Skin. 



Elegant designs In Hardwood Parquetry at Bush & 

MaUett Co., 328-330 Post St 



PROFESSIONAL 
SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDQE 

Attomey-at-Law 
Crocker building, San Francisco 



BUSWELL COMPANY: 



Bookbinder, paper-ruler, printer and Blank- 
Book Manufacturer. 



636 Clay street 



INSURANCE. 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St, S. F. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of llverpool. 

Capital 187,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie fc Co., Agents. 816 California St, 8. F. 



NSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE OOMPANY OF SAN FRANOISOO, CAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 

PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) of LONDON, ENQ. 

C. F. MULL1NS. Manager. 416-416 California St, 8. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE. 



Founded A. D. 17M. 

Insurance Oompany of / lorth America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PBNN. 

Pald-Up Capital M, 000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California 8t, 8. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D., 1720. 

Capital Pald-Up, 63,446,100. Assets. 624,662,043.1* 

Surplus to Policyholders. $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, oyer 6134,000,000 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager. 601 Montgomery Street. 

HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Ne\A/ Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF NEW ZEALAND. 
Capital. 66.000.000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDER!! 

Office In company's building, 812 California street 

CLINTON FOLGER, Acttne Manaeer. 
The Lambla Realty Co., City Agents, 605 California Street 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go 

OF HAR-.ORD. Established 1850 
Capital 11,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Paclflo Dep't 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St 

Unexcelled for liberality and security 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutua! 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building 

San Francisco 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT. GERMANY. 

Capital 62,260,000 Assets »10.I84,M» 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manager. 
Pacific Coast Department: 201-208 Sansome St., San Francisco. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 
of Hamburg, Germany. 

N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St. S. F. 



26 If 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 



HOTELS. 



Salt Lake 



OT YSNEwHOTELf^ 




Don Porter. 




RIGGS HOUSE 

Opposite U. S. Treasury, one block from the 
White House, Washington, D. C. The Hotel 
"Par Excellence" of the National Capital. 

First class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, Prop. 
American Plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

" Hotel 

^Roof Belleclaire, 

Broadway & 77th St. 

NEW YORK 

Luxuriously furnished rooms 

fur permanent and transient. 
guests, at moderate prices. 

OrcheBtraof solo players, 6 p. 
m. till la. m. 

Restaurant, Palm Room and 
Cafe gems of artistic perfection. 
Cu'eine and service really de- 
lightful. You will say so. 

A special feature Is our after 
theater suppers 

Billiard parlor for ladles I- 
another pleasant feature. 

Original with the Belleclaire Ik 

the refined vaudeville every 

Thursday evening. 

fi Our gallery of beatlful paint- 

;UJf iDgs, valued at $50,000, Is open 

" evenings to visitors. 

Affability and courteBy guar- 
,y*-anteed from every Belleclaire 
employe. 

Milton Roblee, Prop, 



Hotel Richelieu 



Hotel Granada 



1012 Van Ness Ave 1000 Sutter St. 

The management of the Hotel Richelieu wishes to an- 
nounce to Its friends and patrons that it has purchased the 
property of the Hotel Oranada, and will run the latter on the 
same plan that has made the Richelieu the finest family ho- 
tel In San Francisco. HOTEL RICHELIEU CO. 




HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 

A HIl'Ii Class Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate rates. 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 
W. Johnson Quinn, Proprietor. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietor.. 



More Quacks and More Tricks. 



By Jean Phillips 

Did you ever meet a "ladies' specialist"? Well, if 
you once met him you'll never forget him. It's doubt- 
ful if he ever had a patient in his life who is so thor- 
oughly lady-like. He can lisp, and mince, and tip- 
toe, and modulate his voice, and droop his eyes with 
any old belle of the century before last, and he beat 
John Hoover at the trick of looking into my eyes 
and holding my hand ; and that's saying a good deal. 
And if I had not had enough flattery dished out to 
me by the other fakers whom I've been interviewing 
to give an ostrich indigestion, one of these fellows 
would make me believe that I was a re-incarnation 
of Helen of Troy with every organ seriously indis- 
posed. Before he got half-way through with my 
seriously indisposed self, and all the refined jargon 
he threw in, I longed for a small boy to say: "If 
you've got half of them things, you're surely on the 
bum !" Still, as a general thing I hate slang. But 
the monotony of his nicety was so nerve-splitting 
that if I'd had the slightest practice I could swear. 

I knew that there was not a thing the matter with 
me except an extremely tired feeling produced by 
the large variety of freaks, fakers and quacks in the 
shape of "scientists." "painless dentists," "exponents 
of dramatic art," "seeresses of Egypt,'' and "doctors, 
doctors, doctors of every known and unknown 
variety who had been taking me in for the last few 
months. Heaven knows that was sufficient to give 
me locomotive-attacks — or whatever the doctors call 
the disease that poor men get when rich men get 
appendicitis. Still, the "doctor" with the rose-leaf 
nails and brilliantined whiskers, Svengali eyes and 
low. sweet voice, discovered that I was on the verge 
of destruction from heart-disease, with intimate and 
close calls from a large circle of acquaintances in the 
shape of microbes of tuberculosis, poverty of the 
blood and a budding cancer somewhere or other, to 
be determined later by an X-rav examination. 

"All these ailments are not apparent to you, nor 
have you dreamed that such germs were in your sys- 
tem, but with you they are hereditary — perhaps two, 
perhaps three generations off, but nevertheless in 
the blood ; and the pity of it is that they should seize 
on you ! ON YOU !" said the "doctor," in a voice 
vibrating strongly with pity, as he sighed out and re- 
peated : "The pity of it! The pity of it!" He 
strongly conveyed the impression that the poor old 
world would lose a gem were I to pass out. Posi- 
tively, this fellow's voice, well-prepared as I was for 
it. was so full -of suggestion that I thought I felt my 
ancestral microbes dancing a Highland fling all over 
in}- sadly "indisposed organs." And a reminder of 
cancer shot forth from a tiny corn in the northwest 
angle of the lower left-hand corner of my small toe 
that kept me speculating on what old turtle of an 
ancestor before the flood could have bequeathed me 
such an inheritance. I knew that not one since left 
me anything — with the exception of a good pair of 
lungs, the nerves of a race-horse, and appetite for 
pate-de-fois-gras and chiffon dresses and a cheese- 
cloth income. Up to the last generation, if they were 
wise, they could have coined money as advertise- 
ments for health food, as they only died of accident 
or old age. 

Still, there I was with microbes to burn. "But I 
can eradicate them without knife or operation. My 
medical skill, coupled with my magnetic, sympathetic 
love for women who suffer, particularly one whose 



July ii, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ideal nature so thoroughly harmonizes with my Own 
that the oneness seems complete as soon as 111 
rested ■>!! jrou," said the "doctor." as he looked with 
a tender, sympathetic gaze at me, the while 1 
his polished thumbs gently pressed my pulse, and the 
other diamond decked hand caressed his polished 
whiskers. 

"And the cancer, doctor ':— and the nasty microbes! 
— without a knife or any — or any horrid thini 
faltered. "Yes, my child, yes! Trust me! he 
answered. "And the money, doctor?" "Well, say 
$150 down, and the rest as we progress. It will be 
easy. Trust me, child! Trust mel You look as 
if you could bring patients. I'll make it easy ! "Till 
to-morrow — aravour!'" said this exquisite quack, as 
he smiled me out. He is about thirty-two years old, 
and smooth as hair-oil. 

The next on my list turned out to be a different 
specimen. What little hair he had looked like car- 
rots after a hard frost; his eyes matched, so did his 
skin. He was scrawny but persuasive, and his Eng- 
lish was more difficult to understand than when he 
first came from Germany years ago. He discovered 
that it pays to be a foreigner. He discovered an en- 
tirely new combination of diseases that had me in 
their clutches. Spinal-meningitis was edging up 
close, and rheumatism was surely in my blood, just 
waiting for a chance to crop out. "In vact, I vind 
dot you haf most of sometings but consumption, and 
your liver vos mit the wrong place," said my con- 
soling friend. 

"But my heart, doctor — how is it? And do you 
think I have any trace of cancer?" I asked. He looked 
down at me as if he were peeking through a key-hole, 
then listened with his ear close to the little trap- 
door of my heart. 

"Dot vos all right; just a little too big, maybe, vor 
the rest of you; but all right just the same; and there 
vos no cancer, never ! My wybrations vill make you 
— vot you say? A new woman; and my massage is 
just vot vill cure you in not much time. How much 
vill I charge? One hundred dollars vor two months. 
Maybe my wybrations cure then — maybe a little 
more long. You bring some one sick — I give you 
per cent. No? I have much magnetism. No? You 
vill be all right!" 

The next was an older man, and a Yankee, who 
should have had better sense, but he said : 

"Your chances are slender at best. You need my 
vibration treatment, and my science of colors. These 
things are not fully understood, but they are a com- 
bination of the Natural and Divine. You sit there 
and I'll hold your hands, and look into your eyes, 
and gradually your ills and troubles will disappear, 
and they are many, but it's better not to think of them 
even by name," he said. 

"But is not that hypnotism or Christian Science? 
Will that kill microbes and cancer, and things?" I 
asked. 

"No ; it's de-hypnotism, Divine vibrations, my own 
science of healing through colors and Natural and 
Divine gifts. You are hypnotized into the belief 
that you have diseases. I will cure you of that while 
you look in my eyes, hold my hands and have perfect 
faith in me." 

Well, that would not seem hard work, only I didn't 
have the time. He was tall and straight; his fea- 
tures rather fine ; his eyes dark and bright, and his 
hair long, gray and curly. "Good to look at?" Well, 
yes ; but vanity and faker crayoned in very large let- 
ters all over him. 

There were a dozen other "doctors," and everyone 



with Ins own personal and private way of extracting 

1 ■ corn to 1 cancer; from an ingi 
ing toe-nail to your last dollars, without pain or 
bloodshed. And besides knowing all the 
the ladies' specialists" always have magnetism and 
sympathy on tap. 

They use many schemes to attract patients, Mich 
.1- advertising, getting up classes to BtUdl 
hypnotism, personal magnetism, or any old ism that 
will draw a crowd. But their favored method is to 
have a lot of idle women who need a little pin-money 
around boarding houses, hair-dressers, beauty-doc- 
tors, women who sell oil or mining stocks, lodging 
houses, etc., talk about them, and tell what wonder- 
ful cures these quacks perform on them, and how 
they were cured of all the diseases on the faker's 
calendar by their pet quacks. But the "lady special- 
ist's" most profitable patient as well as advertiser, 
is the well-to-do old woman whom he is making 
young, and whom he will marry in the sweet by-and- 
bye ; and he will, too, if he cannot get her money 
beforehand. Then for once in his life he will get his 
name and his picture in the daily papers without cost. 
But by that time he has opened up somewhere else, 
with another name and another set of whiskers, and 
a brand new set of vibrations and victims galore. 

"After the theatre, then to the Teehau." That's what 

Pepys would have said in his diary, if he had lived in San 
Francisco. He knew the best in his day, and Techau's the 
best of your day. Best quality at reasonable prices. 



McCoy's New 
European Hotel 

250 Bast, South and 
West front rooms. Hy- 
draulic Passenger eleva- 
tor. Kates, Jl per day 
and upwards. Fire-proof 
building. Fire alarm call 
In each room. First- 
class restaurant con- 
nected. 

WM. McCOY, 
Owner and Proprietor. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Cor. Clark & Van Buren 

Streets. 




WEAK MEN AND WOMEN t^ERsAh, 



DAMIANA 
BI ITERS, the great Mexican 
remedy. GIvcb health and strength to ihe sexual organs. Depot a 
323 Market St., San Frauoisco. Send for circular. 



'Bon Marc he Clothing P^en o h) afory 

40 Ellis Street, Rooms 14-15-16. 

SUITS GLEANED AND PRESSED $1.00. 

"nits Called for and Delivered free. SUITS PRESSED WHILE YOU 
SLEEP. Repairing and Alterations. OPEN ALL NIGHT. We run 
Jour waeona. Telephone Drumm 44. 



La Grande Laundry TeL Bush 12. 

Principal Office— 23 Powell St. Branch Office— 11 Taylor St. 
Laundry— 12th St., between Folsom and Howard Streets. 

GOLDEN WEST CLOTHING RENOVATORY 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Phone Main 1167. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed $1.0* 

Monthly Contracts 1.60 



PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY 



No. t Lick Place. 



Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, $1 per month; 
12 hand or roller towels J1.60 per month. Tel. 
Main 1780. 



28 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Employment Agency " Sharks." 



July ii, 1903. 



There are thirty-two employment agencies in this 
city. Some of them conduct business fairly, but most 
of the agents are sharks in human skins. The outer 
and inner walls of the agencies are plastered with 
placards in all colors, drawn with a free hand in 
letters of all sizes, and in spelling like that in the so- 
called comic supplements of the Sunday papers. 
When the laboring man enters an agency he opens 
his mouth and reads : "Fifty wood-choppers wanted 
in Humboldt; wages, $3 a day. "Twenty-five lum- 
bermen wanted in Oregon ; wages, $3 to $4 a 

day." "Miners wanted in Southern California; wages, 

$3 a day." "Carpenters wanted in ; wages, $2.50 

and board." 

When the laborer has swallowed these figures and 
selected the job at the highest wages, and which. he 
thinks is the easiest, he approaches the shark. "Yes, 
you are just in time — sure thing. Go right up there 
now, and you'll get it ! All you have to do is to pay 
us one dollar for the information. 

This looks easy, and the dollar is paid. The agent 
gives to the applicant a receipt for the money, on 
which is written the name of the distant employer — 
or, rather, the man who is supposed to want labor- 
ers. Fifty men may be wanted at a point in Oregon, 
and one hundred may apply to the agency. Each 
man pays his $1 fee, and starts for the promised job. 
When they arrive, some are hired,, perhaps, and the 
majority are not. In this receipt, the agent promises 
to refund the $1 if presented within ten days after 
issued, and provided that the contractor has written 
on the back of the receipt that he had not given work 
to the applicant. This seems fair, but the applicant 
does not know that the agent has made an "over is- 
sue," or sent two or three times the number of men 
that the contractor asked for. He is, therefore, out 
his expenses and the $1. He would lose more money 
if he were to return from a distant point in Califor- 
nia or Oregon to sue for his outlay. He may send 
his receipt back to the agency and request the $1, 
according to agreement, but the mails are irregular, 
perhaps, and the deluded laborer hears nothing from 
it. 

In some instances, laborers have been sent to points 
in search of jobs that existed only on paper in the 
intelligence office. The person to whom he was sent 
did not exist. It would not pay the laborer to return 
and prosecute the shark, and perhaps he could not get 
back. So the shark is safe in most instances. But he 
takes a great many chances, and is sometimes caught. 
A few weeks ago, the license of one of these fellows 
was revoked by the Police Commissioners. Com- 
plaints came in thick and fast, and sufficient evidence 
against him was soon found. Detectives are at work 
on other agencies. 

At nearly every meeting of the Police Commission- 
ers there are complaints filed against some of these 
agencies — some of them are letters from people who 
have been sent into the country in search of a mythi- 
cal job, and many of them are from people in the 
city. In the language of one of the officials : 'We 
have a roar here at nearly every meeting!" These 
deluded people also make a "roar" almost daily to 
Captain Martin, Chief of Detectives. Some of these 
men report that they have gone to the agency and 
asked for the return of the $1. The shark would 
make various excuses, and finally resort to abusive 
epithets and intimidation, for these sharks affect the 
bully, and swear like other pirates. 

A man in the city sends word to the agency that 



he wants a cook, bottle-washer, stableman or servant- 
girl. The agent sends as many as apply, getting $1 
from each. He gives a receipt, agreeing to return the 
$1 if the applicant does not get the position, provided 
the receipt is returned within two days, and that the 
applicant has not been employed. 

The disappointed applicant comes back with the 
receipt and then the bullying and swearing of the 
agent begins. This is getting money under false 
pretenses, but the disappointed applicant does not 
care to take the trouble of prosecuting, and applies 
to one of the agencies that does business fairly. These 
sharks, however, do not practice their petty swindles 
on Chinamen. They have heard of highbinders, and 
they know that ever)' John has a cousin, and that he 
is liable to feel an iron bar some night which he car- 
ries under his shirt, for a Chinaman never forgets a 
swindle, no matter how small. 

The Italian "bosses" have reduced the employment 
business to a system little better than train-robbing. 
This business is conducted by individuals, known as 
"bosses," and not licensed agents. The boss charges 
the laborer $5 for getting the place for him, and an 
additional $1 a month as long as he holds it. Some- 
times, a gang of laborers are sent from one point to 
another in the same vicinity. This change of place 
is construed as a new job, and the "boss" receives 
another $5 from each of the men. The employer is 
not supposed to lose anything by winking at this 
change. Sometimes the men are discharged, and 
others put in their places — each paying $5 for the 
job. The oftener men are discharged and others em- 
ployed, the more numerous are the $5 fees, and the 
greater the division between the contractor and the 
Italian boss. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat producing qualities Briquettes are superior 
to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th and 
Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



At the first banquet given bj the 
cltliept of the City of Chicago to 



President Roosevelt 

on bti Weitero trip, at the Auditorium Hotel, April 
2nd, the only wloe and wsi 

Ruinart Brut '93 



The President's Wine 



VARNEV W. GASKILL. Special Agent 
With HlLBBBT MXBOANTTLK Co., Importer!. 
Tetepbone Exchange 313. Ban Francltco, Cal. 



HENRY ROMEIKE 

The first established and moat complete 

Newspaper Cutting Bureau 

IN THE WORLD 

The Press Cutting Bureau which I established and have car- 
ried on since 1881 In London and 1884 In New York, reads, 
through Its hundreds of employees, every newspaper and peri- 
odical of Importance published In the United States, Canada 
and Europe. It la patronized -y thousands of subscribers, pro- 
fessional or business men, to whom are sent day by day news- 
paper clippings collected from all these thousands of papers, 
referring to them or any given subject 

33 UNION SQUARE NEW YORK 

Established, London, 1881; New York, 1884. Branches: London. 
Paris, Berlin, Sydney. 



July ll, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




bT ARTItt'H iBKEMLn 

During the recent holidays many automobilists 
took out-of-town trips in their machines. S. !.. Starr 
and Mrs. S. [.. Starr in a Winton touring rar. accom- 
panied by George Starr and Mrs. George Starr in 

another Winton, started on tin- eve of the Fourth fi r 
Del Monte. C. C. Moore and Naval Constructor 
Zahm made a trip to Santa Cruz during the holidays, 
returning on Sunday evening. 

At last the automobile is to receive the sanction 
of a body of municipal officials of San Francisco. The 
Hoard of Fire Commissioners has advertised for bids 
for an electric automobile for use in the San Fran- 
cisco Tire Department. The vehicle is to have a 
speed of twenty miles an hour on level ground and 
must possess considerable hill-climbing powers. An 
electric machine capable of covering a mile in three 
minutes is a pretty speedy vehicle of its class and 
is quite expensive. Pids closed yesterday, July 10th. 

Frank E. Hartigan, manager of the Pacific Coast 
branch of the Mobile Company of America, has re- 
turned from a trip to Southern California, where he 
made arrangements for an automobile stage line be- 
tween Santa Maria and Guadaloupe in Santa Barbara 
County. The service will be maintained with one 
Mobile wagonette. The road is level and in excellent 
condition, so that good speed can be made. A round 
trip was made as a test. The ten miles from Santa 
Maria to Guadaloupe in the wagonette carrying- 
twelve men weighing 2160 pounds, was accomplished 
against the wind in 28 minutes. The return trip to 
Santa Maria with the wind occupied 25 minutes. The 
service is certain to give satisfaction to all 'concerned, 
for the road being level and good, the machine will 
wear well and will need little repairing. The busi- 
ness is regular, and has hitherto required ten horses 
and three drivers to accomplish it. 

Large hotels are certain to adopt the automobile 
for their passenger business. As things stand at 
present, a big hotel like that at Del Monte, for exam- 
ple, is obliged to maintain a stable of a hundred or 
more horses, which are kept busy during a few 
months of the year, but during the remaining seven 
or eight months are almost idle, eating their heads 
off. The automobile, when it is not needed, is oiled, 
covered with a cloth and stored away. It needs no 
food and costs little or nothing for storage. All that 
is necessary is to keep it from damp and rust. When 
the season comes round again, it is brought out and 
put into commission. 

On Wednesday evening the Automobile Club of 
California held a moonlight run through Golden 
Gate Park to the Cliff House, starting from the cor- 
ner of Van Ness and Golden Gate avenues. 

A Winton touring car recently traveled from Soda- 
ville to Toriopah, over a very rough country. 

Mrs. Hearst has recently purchased a covered body, 
like that of a brougham, for her Winton Car. it 
seats two, has windows at the sides and in front, and 
a rail for baggage at the top. It is entered by a door 
in fronb The chauffeur sits outside in front to the 
right of the door. 

Another attempt is being made to cross the con- 
tinent in a self-propelled vehicle. At 1 p. m. on 



29 

Monday, L I.. Whitman and E. .1. Hammond of 
Pasadena started from this , it\ on a transcontin 

journey in an 1 lldsmobile, which was brougl 
from Southern California l.v steamer. The details 
of the journey were planned by 1.. I.. Whitman, who 
is tin- owner and operator of ,,■■ car. with the at 
ance of E, P. Brinegar, 'Ik- representative of the l "Ids 
Motor Works on the Pacific i loaat. Before departing 

the automobilists drew up near the New City Hall, 
and had a photograph made, showing E. I". Schmitz. 
the Mayor, in the act of handing to I.. I.. Whitman 
a letter addressed to the Mayor of New York. The 
automobilists" plan was to go to Sacramento, t! 
to Reno, thence to W'innemucca, following in a gen 
eral way the tracks of the Central Pacific and Union 
Pacific Railroads. The Oldsmobile weights 850 
pounds, ami carries 300 pounds of clothing and pro- 
visions. The weight of tin- two automobilists is about 
350 pounds. The machine will run about a hundred 



MARSH MOTOR CYCLE $125 




The Marsh 3 H. P. motor cycle is the most 
practical motor cycle in the world. It is guar- 
anteed for one year, also has a guaranteed speed 
of forty miles an hour. Write for full information, 
catalogue, etc. 

MOTOR CTCLt MFC. CO. Brockton, Mass. 



UNIVERSAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 

137 to 151 FIRST STREET 



The only thoroughly equipped 
factory on the Coast. Every 
facility for quick repairs, paint- 
ing, etc ... . 



LARGE STORAGE ROOM. 



Triple "P" Compound 

A perfect puncture healer and rubber peraerra- 
tlve for : : : : j 

— single: tube tires — 

Write for circular. 



COMPLETE 

REMEDY 

FOR 

PUNCTURES 

Geo. T. Moore Co. 1622 Market St. S. F. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July li, 1903. 



miles without the necessity of recharging the tanks 
with gasoline. The automobilists think that a light 
machine like the Oldsmobile will have a great ad- 
vantage over a heavy car, as it can be pushed ahead 
if it should break down, or if the supply- of gasoline 
should fail. A large box fastened behind the seat 
contains the things that are absolutely necessary for 
the journey. It is expected that the trip will be 
made in about sixty days. 

The greatest success in crossing the United States 
in a self-propelled vehicle has been achieved by Geo. 
A. Wyman, who started from San Francisco on the 
afternoon of May 16th on a California motor-bicycle. 
He rode to Sacramento, thence over the Sierra 
Nevada range to Reno, Nevada. From Reno he pro- 
ceeded to Humboldt, thence to Battle Creek, and 
thence to Ogden, Utah. The sand of the Nevada trails 
was so deep and impassable that he rode nearly all 
the way over the railroad ties. From Ogden he 
crossed the Rocky Mountains to Cheyenne, Wyom- 
ing, where he arrived June 5th. Thence he preceded 
to Egbert, Wyoming; thence through Pine Bluffs. 
Kimball, Sidney, Ogalalla, Maxwell and Kearney, 
Nebraska, to Omaha, which he reached on June nth, 
having ridden most of the way from Cheyenne along 
the railroad track. Thirty days after starting from 
San Francisco he rode into Marshalltown, Iowa. He 
found the roads of Iowa and Illinois, which are 
chiefly of "blue gumbo," in bad condition from the 
continued rains. Wyman has now surmounted the 
greatest difficulties of the trip, and will almost cer- 
tainly accomplish the long journey. Whether he 
reaches New York or not, his ride from San Fran- 
cisco to Marshalltown in Iowa on a one and one-half 
horsepower motor-cycle in thirty days is quite a re- 
markable performance. 

Another attempt to cross the continent is being 
made by Dr. H. Nelson Jackson, of Burlington, Ver- 
mont, who started from San Francisco on May 23d 
in a 20-horsepower Winton touring car. It is re- 
ported that he reached Pocatello, in Idaho, before 
June 15th, and great hope is expressed of his accom- 
plishing the long journey. As no details are fur- 
nished, it is not evident how he managed to nego- 
tiate the deep and supposedly impassable sands of 
the Nevada Desert. 

Attempts are made from time to time in this coun- 
try to invest the family that happens to be occupying 
the White House with the same sort of importance 
that is attached to an European Royal family. The 
doings of the provincial attorney whom the political 
bosses or the death of his predecessor have raised 
to the office of Chief Executive are minutely chroni- 
cled. The dogs, cats, ponies and pet animals of his 
wife and children are photographed and scattered 
broadcast through the illustrated periodicals. The 
fads and fancies of his middle-class female relatives 
are described at great length and with much har- 
rowing detail. When the idea of Miss Alice Roose- 
velt going to the coronation of King Edward the 
Seventh was suggested, hysterical newspapers began 
to talk of her being received as a Royal Princess" A 
little while ago stories were constantly appearing in 
the journals about her having bought an automobile, 
in which she scooted about the national capital at 
a great rate. It is now said that the machine was 
sent to her by a pushing drummer for an automobile 
factory, with the request that she make use of it, and 
with a delicate for indelicate") intimation that she t 
could keep it without paying for it, if she liked to do 
so. But the enterprising auto-man was reckoning 
without his host. When President Roosevelt heard 



of the matter he not only refused to let Miss Alice 
accept the gift, but insisted that the usual rent should 
be paid for it. However, even thus the drummer re- 
ceived a good deal of free advertising, which was, 
of course all that he was after. ■ 

Thomas D. Wood, a rich man of Pittsburg, accom- 
panied by George J. Kaime, recently made a trip 
from Santa Barbara to Oakland in an auto-car. 
Santa Barbara was left at 4.45 in the morning, the 
automobilists arriving at Naples at 5.50 a. m. ; at 
Gaviota at 8.30 a. m. ; at Los Olivos at 10.30 a. m. ; 
at Santa Maria at 1.25 p. m. ; at San Luis Obispo at 
4.50 p. m. They left San Luis Obispo at 7 o'clock 
next morning, reaching Paso Robles at 9.15 a. m. ; 
and King City at 5.50 p. m. King City was left at 
4.20 the next morning, Soledad being reached at 



THE CADILLAC 

Second Sand 
OLDSMOBLES, $450 

MOBILES $400 to $450 

Regardless of price, 
the most capable au- 
tomobile made. 

With tonneau. $950.00. 

AGENTS 

WESTE'RJf AUTOMO'BILE CO. 

S01-203 LARKIN STREET. 8. F. 




Price. $850.00. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 

Successors to Locomobile Co., of the Pacific. 

1622-1628 Market St., S. F. 

Jobbers and Dealers—Automobiles and Accessories 
SELLING AGENTS 

Winton Motor Carriage Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Locombile Co., of America, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Olds Motor Works, Detroit, Mich. 

Vehicle Equipment Company, New York. 
Electric Trucks, Etc. 

Demmerle & Co., Leather Clothing 



NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 




Phone. South I 142 134 to 148 Golden Gale Ave. 

The largest and 
finest "Garage" in 
the West. 

Our linethe highest 
types produced. 

RAMBLER; KNOX, Waterless; HAYNES-APPERSON 

AUTOCAR.. ..Touring Cars 
TOLEDO....TourIng Cars 
PEERLESS.. ..Touring Cars 

Give us a call and we will show you a full line of 
record-breakers. 



July n, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Gilroy at noon, and San Jose at 3 p. m. San 
loft at 7.35 and Oakland reached at 10.15 
'ic following moraine 

th Americans and Rritisbers came off prw.rlv 
in the race for the Gordon Bennett Cup in Ireland. 

ite the croaking e of the French aut 

hile papers, the Gallic race did best of all the com- 
petitors, for all of them finished. ' if the American 
team not one finished. Mooers and Winton Failing 
through "derangement in the mechanism of their 
cars." and Owen covering only five out of seven la;>- 
of the course. The winner was Jenatzy, a German, 
who covered the distance of 370-4 miles in 6 hours 36 
minutes q seconds. Knocking off the fraction and the 
seconds. 370 miles were covered in 396 minutes, or 
at a speed little short of a mile a minute, though the 
competitors were compelled to slow down in passing 
through the towns and villages en route. De Knvff, 
Farman and Gabriel, the French representatives, 
finished second, third and fourth, only one minute 
separating De Knyff and Farman. The Englishman. 
Jarrott, met with an accident through the steering 
gear getting out of order while the car was at full 
speed. The Napier car ran right into a bank at the 
side of the road and was broken in two. Jarrott 
sustained a broken collar-bone, and his chauffeur a 
broken jaw and collarbone. Stocks' car was also 
disabled, but he was not hurt. The other two Ger- 
man representatives, Baron de Caters and Foxhall 
Keene. retired on account of the breaking of the axles 
of their cars. Edge, the English holder of the cup, 
covered the course, but came in long after the race 
had officially ended. The Frenchmen received the 
prize presented by the Hon. Scott-Montague, M. P., 
to the team all the members of which finished. The 
Germans won the trophy with the only man of their 
team who completed the course. Only one English- 
man finished and not a single American. The contest 
lasted from 7 in the morning until 7.30 at night. The 
rivalry between De Knyff (French) and Jenatzy 
("German) was intense, both waving their hands 
wildly in acknowledgment of the spectators' cheers, 
and driving furiously. De Knyff crossed the finish- 
ing line a minute or two ahead of his rival, but, as 
he had made an earlier start, his time for the whole 
course was not quite so good. 

Allen's Preas CHpplns Bureau has removed to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 Califor- 
nia street. San Francisco. Cal. 



Examinations Free. 

DR. F. A. OLISE * SONS 
Eye-aleht specialists. 1023 Market Street, S, F. 
"I wish it were possible to make all the people 
who have lmperleot vision, understand what nerfeot work you are dolntr 
In fittlne glasses. The ariasses you prescribed for my wife and two 
daughters are entirely satisfactory. Relntr master of your profession you 
oueht to do a fine business here in San Franoisco. Yours truly, 

JAS. W. HARRIS. Sunt. Oal. St.. R. R. Co. 





A. E. BROOKE RIDLEY, 18 'SJrS.Sg 



ELECTRIC and GASOLINE 

CAR.S 

WELCH GASOLINE TOURING 

CAR. 

CONRAD LIGHT GASOLINE 
RUNABOVT 

FELL STREET 



Telephone Sooth 894 



San Francisco, Cal. 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile CO.-288 S. Market St., Phone John 1661 
Automobiles stored and repaired. Expert workmanship Gaso- 
line and 1 oil at all hours. Santa Clara agents for the Western 
Automobile Company and National Automobile Company. 



PACIFIC HOTOR CAR CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 

m^^s? Packard 

^^^lS% j Motor far. 

I. *Vrft St. Louis 

Motor Or, 

American 

■tola Car. 

) JONES CORBIN 

ItOtOI <ar. 

Cudell Motor Car 
The above cars exhibited at our repository, 1814 
Market Street. 




HAVE YOUR AUTOMOBILE EQUIPPED WJTn 

Diamond Tires 



HIGHEST GRADE-LONGEST 
LIFE-MOST MILEAGE-CAUSE 
LEflST TROUBLE ** *A *A 

Catalogs and literature from 

8 Beale Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



"Nothing so rare o-s resting on Air" 



Pneumatic 
Cushions 



For Yacht, or Launch 

For Automobile or Carriage 

For Office Camp or Home 



FOB 8ALE IN 'FBIBGO BT 

SKINNER & CO., 801 Market St. S. F. WEEKS & CO., 81 Market St- 



UCK, CRflSH 
and KHAKI SUITS 

BICYCLE SUITS 
'Wgtigu&BvK to order. 

ALL KINDS Or BAND SLUTS 

FINE TAILORING A SPECIALTY 
79 Flood Building. Prjone Brown 196. S. F. 




VELVET 

LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 
and Women 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make then) in 
any style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

H. E. SKINNER CO. 

801 MARKET ST. 



THE CALIFORNIA DOOR CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

DOORS, WINDOWS 
and BLINDS 

20 and 22 DRUMM ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

TELEPHONE DHUMM 178. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SOUTHERN PACI FIC 



TralnF leave and are due to arrive at 



MAT»~ ' '— FBOM Jun tt. MW. — AMXCTM 

7.00a Beaicla, Sulsun, Elmlra and Sacra- 

merit" 7.2Bf 

7.00a VacaTlUe, WlnterB, Ramsey. 7.26? 

7.30a Martinez, San Ramon, vallejo, 

KapR. Callfltogft, Santa Roea G2Bp 

7.30a Nllea, Lathrop. Stockton 7-26f 

1.00 a D»t1b. Woodland, Knights Landing, 
Maryeviile. Orovllle, (connect* 
at MaryBvllle for Grldley, Biggs 
and Cblco) 7-66r 

|.00a AtlftDtlcExpress-OgdenandEaai. 10.26a 

|.00a Fort Coeta, Martinez, Antloch. By- 
ron, Tracy, S to ckton.Sacram en to, 
Los Banos, Mendota, Haniord, 
YlBBlla, Porterville m 4,26p 

1.00* Port Coata, Martinez, Laihrop.Mo- 
deeto, Merced, Fresno, Goshen 
Junction, Haniord, Vlsalla, 
Bakersfleld 5.25p 

|-J0a Shasta Express— Dawls, Wllllami 
(lor Bartlett Springs). Willows, 
tFruto, Red Bluff, Portland 7.56p 

8-30* Niles, San Jose, LIvermore, Stock- 
ton.Ione.Sacrnmento.PlacervIiie. 
MarysTllle, Chlco, Red Bluff 4.25p 

830a Oakdale. Chinese, Jamestown. 8o- 

nora, Toolnmne and Angels 425p 

B.OOa Martinez and Way Statlone 6 B5p 

10.00a Vallejo 12-25f 

410.00a Crescent City Express, Eastbound. 
—Port Coma, Byron, Tracy, La- 
throp, Stockton. Merced, Ray- 
mond, Fresno, Hanford, Vlsalla, 
Bakerineld, Los Angeles and 
Few Orleans. (Westbound ar- 
rlTes as Pacific Coast Express, 

Tta Coast Line) f130^ 

1000a The Overland Limited — Ogden. 

Denver. Omnha, Chicago B.26p 

1200m Bayward. Nlicsand Way Stntlons. 3.25p 
tl-OOp Sacramento River Steamers til OOp 

3-30r Benlcla, Winters, Sacramento. 
Woodland, Williams, ColoBa,Wll- 
Iowb. Knights Landing. MaryB- 
vllle. Orovllle and way stations.. 

3-30p Bayward, Ntles and Way Stations.. 

4. OOp Martlnez.BnuRHmon.ValleJo.Napa. 
Callstoga, Santa Rosa 

4-00p Martinez, Tracy.Latbrop.Stickton. 10 25* 

4. 00p Nllei, LIvermore. Stockton. Lodl.. 4.2Bp 

4,30p Bayward. Nllce, Irvington, San) 18.56a 
Jose, LIvermore f 111.66a 

64J0p The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tnlare. 
Bakersfleld, Los AngelcB; con- 
nects at Saugus (or Santa Bar- 
bara B-66a 

6-OOr Port Costa. Tracy, Stockton, Los 

Bboob 12-26p 

t5-30P Nllea, San Jose Local 7.26a 

6.00p Bayward. Nllea and San JoBe 10.26a 

6.00f Oriental Mall — Ogden, Denver, 
Omaha. St. Louie. Chicago and 
East. (Carries Pullman Car pas- 
sengers only out of San Fran- 
cisco. Tonrlat car and coach 
passengers take 7.00 p. u. train 
to Reno, continuing tbence In 
their cars 6 p.m. train eastward.. 
Westbound, SunBet Limited.— 
From New York, Chicago, New 
Orleans, El Paso, Lob Angeles, 
Fresno, Berenda, Raymond (from 
Vosemlte). Martinez. Arrives. 

7 .OOp Ban Pablo. Port Costa, Martinez 

and Way Stations 11.26a 

J7.00p Vallejo 7.66p 

7 .00p Port Costa, Benlcla, Sulsun, Davis, 
Sacramento, Truckee, Reno. 
Btops at all stations east of 
Sacramento 7 5g 4 

B.06p Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
ramento, MaryBvllle, Redding, 
Portland. Puget Soond and E«st 8.65a 

tB.lOi Bayward, NlleB and San Jose (Sun 

day only) (11 55 4 

11.26p Port Costa, Tracy, Lathrop, Mo- 
desto, Merced, Raymond (to Yo- 

eemlte), Freano 12 26p 

Banford, VlBalfa, Bakersfleld 6.2&T 



Main Line, foot of Mark» 
N E (Narrow Gauge) 



SAN FRANCISCO, 

COAST LI- 

Foot of Market street) 

(Foot of Market Street ) 



10.65a 
7.65p 



926a 



4.26p 



8.25a 



i7-45a Santa Cruz Excursion (Sunday 

on 1 y ) 18.1 Op 

8-16a Newark. Centervllle. San Jose, 
Felton. Boulaer Creek, Santa 

Cruz and Way Stutlons 6 26p 

'2. 16c Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, 
New Almaden.Los GntOh.Felton, 
Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz and 
Principal Way Stations 1056a 

4 IBp Newark, San Jose, Loa GatOB and 
way stations (on Saturday and 
Sunday runs through to Santa 
Cruz, connects at Felton for 
Boulder Creek, Monday only 
fn>m Santa Cruz). +8.56 a 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

From SAN FRANCISCO, Fool of Market St. (6IIp*> 

-tf:15 9:00 11:00a.m. 100 300 6-15p.m 

From OAKLAND. Foot of Broadway — 16:00 18:00 

tS:05 10:00 a.m. 12 00 2-00 4.00 p.m. 

COAST LINE (HroaiMJauge). 

(Tblrti and TiWi^eml Streets.) 

6-10a San Jet-rand Way StailoDB 730f 

17 00a San Jose and Way Stations . 6.30P 

'7 00a New Almadeo M 10r 

17.16a Monterey and 6anta Cruz Excur 

Blon (Sunday only) i8-30r 

o8.00a Coon Line Limited— Stops only San 
Jose.GJlroy.Holllster.Pajaro.Caa- 
trovllle. BallDae, San Ardo, Paao 
Roblee. Santa Margarita. San Luis 
OblBpo,(prlncIpal stations tbence) 
Banta Barbara, and Los An- 
geles. Connection at Castrovllle 
to and from Monterey nnd Pacific 
Grove and at Pajaro north bound 
from Capttoia and BantaCruz... 
84HU Ban Jose. TreB Plnos. Capltola. 
6nnttiCruz.PflcIfle Grove, Sal Inns, 
Shu Luis Obispo and Principal 

Intermediate Stations 

Westbound only. Pacific Coast Ex- 
nress. — From New York, Chicago, 
New Orleans. El Paso. Los An- 
geles, Sanla Barbara. Arrives.. 

1030a Ban JoBe and Way StatlonB ... 

11.30a Ban Joee. Los Gatos and Way Sta- 

tlons 6.36p 

al.30p Ban JoBe and Way 6tatlons x 7 00p 

2. 00p Ban Jo6e and Way Stations {9. 40a 

\3.00f Del MoDte Express— Ssnta Clara, 

San Jtee. Del Monte. Monterey, 

Pacific Grove (connects at Santa 

Clara for Banta Cruz, Boulder 

, _„ CTeek and Narrow Gauge PolntB) 112-16? 

oaJ&Ov BnrliDgnme. San Mateo. Redwood. 
MenloPark. Palo Alto. Mayfleld, 
MountalD View, Lawrence, Santa 
Clara, Ban JoBe, GlJroy (connec- 
tion for HolllBter, Tres PInos>, 
Pnlaro (connection for Watson ■ 
vine. Capltola and Santa Cruz), 
Pacific Grove and way stations. 
Connects at CaBtrovllle for Sa- 
linas 10.45a 

o4-30p Ban Jose and Way 6tntions 8.3Ba 

ptBXOp San Jose, (via Santa Clara) Los 
GntoB, Wright and Principal Way 
SiaUone M.00i 



1046P 



4.1 Op 



1.30P 
1.20* 



■ ' > 110. . . »■■#«».,.,. »...»,.»,,. rfl nflA 

ci6.30) San Jose and Principal Way Stations +8 00* 

ot616) SanMateo.BereBford.Beimont.San 

Carlos, Redwood. Fulr Oaka, 

MenloPark. Palo Alto +6 4Ba 

G.30J BanJoBeand Way Bunions.. Oflj 

o7.00p BnDset Limited, Kastiiuand.— San 

Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los 

AngeleB. Kerning. E] Paso. New 

Orleans. New York. (Westbound 

n «« ^anivet- vlHSanJcaquInVallcy) .. ,/-8-25a 

8. 00p Palo Alto 8ndWay6taIIons........ WAsl 

«11-30i Mlllbrae, Palo Alto and Way Sta- 

tlOOe ifl ARm 

all Mr Mlllbrae, Ban Jose and Way Sta- 

Mom to 4j r 

The UNI* N TfAN&FER COMPANY 
will call for and check baggage from hotels and 
residences. Telephone. Exchange J-8. Inquire 
of Tlcliet Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 
No day coaches run between 8an Francisco and Reno 

Bandar.' "tSundiy^xMnted "? SnndJ Sat r day a " d 9unda r <>"*■ } S ^vs at all Stations on 
Pted. J Sunday only, a Saturday only, d Connects at Goshen Jc. 



with trains for Hanford, Vlsalla. 

vinll*™ ™tt™sZk d'L£ Stlf , " D „ a " y ««Pt Saturday. » Via Sai-JoSSi 
row Qauee. ° nly - Co °necle. except Sunday, for all points Nar- 



/•Tuesda'yandFrrda';.""'. ™ -£ lY,'l mo J t?'.. V, "'»'> via . Saneer. 



First Citizen— What do you 
think of this idea of an army of 
the unemployed marching to 
Washington? Second Citizen— 
That's nothing new. It happens 
every four years. 

Most of us am philosophers nuff 
to expect a pain occasionally, but 
what makes us mad am dat it al- 
ius comes in de wrong place. 

The man who knows how to se- 
lect the psychological moment for 
bestowing a tip so that he will get 



O. R. & N. CO. 

THE ONLY STEAMSHIP LINE TO 

PORTLAND, ORE 

And Short Kail Line Prom Portland to all Points 
Bast. Throueh Tickets to all Points, all Rail 
or Steamship and Ball, at LOWEST RATES. 
Steamer Tickets Include Berth and Meals. 
SS. COLUMBIA Sails Feb 2 12, 22. Mar. 4, II. 

24. 
SS. GEO. W. ELDER Sails Feb 7. 17. 27. Mar 

9, 19, 29. 
Steamer sa ils from foot of Spear St.. 11 a. m 

the most benefit from it is wise 
enough to take his place in the 
diplomatic corps. 



July ii, 1903. 

CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTERN 

RAILWAY CO. 

lessees 

SAN FRANCISCO & NORTH PACIFIC 

RAILWAY COMPANY 
Tlburon Ferry, Foot of Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 
WEEK DATS— 7:30. 8:00. 9:00, 11:00 a. m.: 
12:35. 2:30, 3:40. 6:10, 6:60. 6:30 and 11:30 
p. m. Saturdays— Extra trip at 1:30 p. m. 
SUNDAYS— 7:30, 8:00. 9:30, 11:00 a. m.; 
1:30. 2:30, 3:40, 6:10, 6:30, 11:80 p. m. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
11:16 a. m.; 12:60, V-M, 3:40. 6:00, 6:20, 
WEEK DATS— 6:05, 6:60, 7:36, 7:60. 9:20, 
6:25 p. m. Saturdays— Extra trip at 
1 :15 p. m. 
SUNDATS— 6:60. 7:35, 9:20, 11:15 a. m.; 1:46, 
3:40. 4:50, 5:00, 5:20, 6:10, 6:25 p. m. 
•Except Saturdays. 



Leave 
San Pt'cIbco 



Tn Effect | 
May 3, 1903 I 



Arrive 
San Fr'olsco 



Week I Sun- 
Jays I days 



I Des'natlon 



Sun- 1 Week- 
days I Day 8 



7:30a 
8:00a 
2:30p 
6:10p 



7:30a 
8:00a 
9:30a 
2:30p 
6:10p 



Ignaclo 



7:45a 
8:40a 

! 10:20a 
6:00p 
6:20p 
7:25p 



7:45a 
8:40a 
10:20a 
6:20p 

I 7:25p 

I 



7:30a 
8:00a 
2:30p 
5:10p 



I 7:30a I 



Novato 
i Petaluma 
and 
I 5:10i> I Santa Rosa| 



8:00a 
9:30a 
2:30p 



7:45a 
10:20a 
6:20p 
7:25p 



i 



7:45a 
10:20a 
6:20p 
7:25p 



7:30a 
8:00a 
2:30p 



I 7:30a 
I 8:ft0a 
I 2:30p 



I Fulton I 
I I 



10:20a I 10:20a 

7:25p I 6:20p 

7:25p 



7:3' 
2:30p 



2:30p 



I Windsor I 
I Healdsburgl 
1 Lytton 
I Geyservillel 



10:20a 
7:26a 



I 10:20a 
I 7:25p 







1 Cloverdale i 


1 


7:30a 
2:30p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


1 Hopland | 10:20a 
| and Uklah | 7:25p 


1 10:20a 
I 7:25p 


7:30a 


7:30a 


| Wllllts | 7:25a 


1 7:26p 


8:00a 
2:30p 


3:00a 
2:30p 


1 1 10:20a 
j Quernevlllel 7:26p 


1 10:20a 
I 6:20p 


8:00a 
5:10p 


8:O0a 
5:10p 


I Sonoma 1 8:40a 
I Glen Ellen I 6:00p 


1 8:40a 
| 6:20p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


I I 10:20a 
| Sebastopol I 7:25p 


| 10:20a 
| 6:20p 




«5£^. Why Don't You Travel 
by Sea? 

Sbecial Vacation and Short 
Tourist t:\curston Trlbs. 

Excellent service, low rates, including berth 
and meals to Los Ancelef , San Dleeo, Santa 
Barbara, Santa Cruz, Monterey, EureEa, 
Seattle, Tacotna, Victoria, Vancouvrr, etc. 
And to those desirine loneer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico- 

SAN FRANCISCO TICKET OFFICES— I New 
Montgomery St. i Palace Hotel ) 10 Market St 
and Broadway Wharf. For information re- 
garding sailing dates obtain folder. 

C. D. Dl'NANN, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

10 Market Hreel, San Francisco 

HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

Delicate enough for the softest 
skin, and yet efficacious in removing 
any stain. Keeps the skin in perfect 
condition. In the bath gives all the 
desirable after-effects of a Turkish 
bath. It should be on every wash- 
stand. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUQQISTS 



July ii, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



33 



A BATHROOM and BARBER. 
ELECTRIC FflNS. LIBRARY, and 
DINING C&R ^ ^ v< 

are special features on the 
ELECTRIC LIGHTED 

OVERLAND 
LIMITED 



Vlfl 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Less tharj 3 days to Chicago. 

Two Other Through) Trains Daily 

Personally Conducted Tourist Excursions 

Weekly, 

S. F. BOOTH, General Agent, 

1 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE 

TO 

All Points East 

VIA 

Pueblo, 

Kansas Gity 

& 

St. Louis 

Through Pullman Sleeping cars and 
Observation Cafe Dining Cars, with Elec- 
tric Lights and Electric Fans, Scenic 
Route through Colorado. 

For tickets, berth reservations, folders, 
etc., call on or address 

L. M. Fletcher, 

Pacific Coa.st Agent, 




30 Montgomery St. 



8ar\ Francisco, Gal 



CHICAGO 



IN LESS THAN 



3 DAYS 



FROM SAN FRANCISCO AT 10 A.M. 

Chicago, Union Pacific and North- 
western Line. 

Pullman fourteen-sectlon Drawing-Room ana Private 
Compartment Observation Sleet.ng Cars, with Tele- 
phone. Electric Reading Lamps In every Berth, Com- 
partment and Drawing-Room. Buffet, Smoking and Li- 
brary Cars, with Barber and Bath, Dining Cars — meals 
a la carte. Electric-lighted throughout. 

Dally Tourist Car Service at 6 p. m., and Personally 
Conducted Excursions every Wednesday and Friday at 
8 a. m. from San Francisco. The best of everything. 



R. R. RITCHIE, 83E , c£2t Ht 

617 Market Street, Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



We invite your inspection of our new 
and latest styles of Carriages, Traps, etc.. 
just arrived from the East. 




Our WickerCarriages and Pony work 
a specialty. 

O. F. Willey <& Co. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Fine Carriages, Harness, "Robes and 
tO hips of E-dery "Description. 

NEVADA BLOCK No. 317 Montgomery St. 

San Francisco. 



34 



SOZODONT 

Pretty Teeth in a Good Mouth 

are like jewels well set. Oar best men 
and women have made Sozodont the 
Standard. 

BEST «- TEETH 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

halting places for refreshing drinks 
have proved the salvation of sev- 
eral statesmen who in rash mo- 
ments have put themselves in the 
way to be invited to share a walk- 
ing trip with the President, lo 
bolt straight up a hill thick with 
laurel and hazel underbrush and 
tangled with wild blackberry vines 
is a trying ordeal, especially to 
men unaccustomed to exercise." 



July ii, 1903. 



WHEN THE PRESIDENT 

TRAMPS. 

Washington people often won- 
der, says a writer in the Philadel- 
phia Saturday Evening Post, why 
in their numerous outings along 
the suburban roads they never 
meet President Roosevelt except 
on horseback or in a carriage. It 
is said that the President never 
starts from the White House on 
foot ; of course he takes long walk- 
ing tramps whenever he can. 
Stories are told of how he returns, 
his shoes and clothing giving un- 
mistakable evidence of a long and 
vigorous tramp. The writer con- 
tinues: 

"When determined on a long 
walk he is driven to some point in 
the wooded environs of the city, 
where, after dismissing the driver, 
he disappears, returning many 
hours later, sometimes with dust, 
cobwebs, grass stains, and forest 
mold from head to foot. 

"Dr. Gifford Pinchot and other 
scientists who sometimes accom- 
pany the President can readily ex- 
plain why eager carriage riders 
never enjoy meeting him. It is 
simply because he strikes right 
out through the woods and across 
fields, turning aside from everv 
beaten path. There is scarcely any 
part of the beautiful woodlands 
within a day's tramp from the 
White House which the President 
has not already become familiar. 
With special particularity he has 
located many fine springs. These 



'ALWAYS® 
j INSIST UPON HAVING^ 
THE GENUINE 

iMURRAY&l 
UNMANS 

FLORIDA WATER 



THE MOST REFRESHING AND 
DELIGHTFUL PERFUME FOR THE 
HANDKERCHIEF. TOILE T AN D BATH. 

""""""" I 



An astonishing amount of cor- 
ruption in the jN'ew York labor 
movement seems to have been re- 
vealed by the investigations of 
District- Attorney Jerome. Several 
weeks ago, Mr. Jerome declared 
before the Central Federated Union 
that evidence was in his possession 
showing that more than one walk- 
ing delegate in New York city was 
using his position to line his own 
pockets. He has followed up his 
statement by securing the arrest 
of Samuel J. Parks, business agent 
of the Housesmiths and Bridge- 
men's Union and of Richard Car- 
vel business agent of the Derrick- 
men, Riggers and Pointers' Union. 
Both men are charged with ex- 
tortion in accepting checks to call 
off strikes. It appears that Parks 
himself admits the receipt of $2,000 
from the President of the Hecla 
Iron Works, Brooklyn, as the price 
of a strike settlement in April, 
1902, but he claims that the money 
was used for union purposes. The 
district attorney on the other hand 
alleges that this is "but one of a 
number of similar transactions in 
which we have reason to believe 
that the defendant has been in- 
volved," and declares that Parks 
has accumulated wealth on the 
strength of his trade-union leader- 
ship. Mr. Jerome further instances 
the case of a recent strike during 
the erection of the Union Club 
building in New York, charging 
that about $17,000 was subscribed 
by employing cabinet-makers and 
decorators, and by the club itself, 
and was turned over to five walk- 
ing delegates, who "deliberately 
sold out" the Almagamated Paint- 
ers and Decorators' Union. 



"But if the professor is so ab- 
sent-minded that he can't remem- 
ber his own name, why doesn't he 
write it on a slip of paper and carry 
it with him?" "He tried that, but 
he found that he couldn't read his 
own writing." 



We may blush for some of the 
pioneers of civilization, but, for- 
tunately, the advance agent is not 
the whole show. 



GOOD ltEASOX8: — Best materials. MOHt | 
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easiest.evenest. Nevertearsthe shade. Improve) 

HARTSHORN 

Pbade Roller. None genuine without 
the signature « 



He was sent on an assignment 
to a Ladies' Guild, and arriving 
there after the meeting was over, 
asked one of the fair sirens what 
the subject of the paper was that 
had been read. The mother ans- 
wered that Mrs. Soandso had ob- 
liged with a treatise on "The 
Skeleton in the Cupboard." "Great 
Scott!" ejaculated the reporter, 
"that's the first time I ever heard 
of ghost stories being told at a 
mother's meeting!" 



Have you 
a friend 

in Chicago or Boston 
or Kansas City or any- 
where else, for whom 
you want to buy a ticket 
to this city? 

If you have, call at 
this office and let us 
arrange matters for you. 

You deposit with us 
enough money to cover 
transportation, as also in- 
cidental expenses of the 
journey, we do the rest. 



F. W. Thompson, 
Gen'l Western Agt. , 
623 Market Street, 
San Francisco. 




scs:5(3/:2f5f3/:'/K2/:5/:3f3/:«2/:i/:3/;3/;3/:3/:5/:3C5/;?/:^3t 




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Pants £4.50 
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best in America. 



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JOE POHEIM 



ting your suit made byS 

THE HIM* K 

J Samples Sent mo.1112 Market St S 

5 201203 Montg'y St.. S. F.g 



OPIUM 



Morphine and Liquor 



J Habits Cured Sanatorium 
■ Established 1876 Thou- 
sands having failed else* 
where have been cured by us. Treat met can be 
taken at home Write Tha Dr. J Stephens. Co. 
Oept. 78 Lebanon, Ohio. 



July ii, 1903. 



S2QO 

Padishah 




rut 

B<il 
lo« 

Jf.eled 

Witch 

Hide 



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ALL JEWELERS 

Illustrated Booklet 
on request, showing 

COLORED 
FANCY 
DIALS 

The New England 
Watch Co. 

Factories— 
Waterbury. Conn. 

Offlcei- 
New York, Chicago, 
San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Ven ve ged vot vo vut vr 
chenerallv doand vant id. 

Knowledge is von ve learn to 
forg doan't do us any 

go 

Efery man dot is approachable 
wis nod touchable. 

I know a man dot rinds all dcr 
latest novels und sdill cats pie mit 
a knife. 

Der viskey nt* to-day is dcr head- 
ache uf to-morrow. : 

Be goot und you vill he habhy. 
but you von't ged your name in 
der papers very often. 

Vun reason ve doan'd like der 
man dot talks abouid himself is 
because we dink be should be talk- 
ing abouid us. 

Money ain'd eferyding in dis 
vorld, but id takes a man mit 
money to believe so. 

A literary sneerer is a man dot 
tried to do vot he sneers ad und 
bit his tongue. 



35 



According to A. Conan Doyle, 
an old novelist is as rare as an old 
worker in white lead. He thinks, 
consequently, that' the author's 
trade should be scheduled among 
the dangerous trades. It seems, 
too, to be all on account of the old 
story, which is nerves. Novel 
writing he would have us believe, 
is nerve tissue in the concrete, or 
at least in black and white, which 
is very much the same thing — to 
some of us at least. Addressing 
the Authors' Club the other night 
Sir Conan said they all knew what 
"it was to sell their nerves for a 
livelihood. One could not both 
sell them and have them, and possi- 
bly the want of them was occa- 
sionally manifest to the world. 
The tragedy of their profession was 
that they lived many lives in the 
characters they created — in the 
joys and sorrows they depicted. 




Th«* *»h>- lomr ihop- 
kcrpro do not sell 

President 
Suspenders 

is they mnkc more 

money on imitations. 

Fifty cents und a dollar. 

w pa«t prvpaM frttw 
lliilBTCTV « lo.ro. 

Mil. -hlrl. ,. *•... 



A newspaper man living in a 
moderate sized flat was asking his 
landlord the other day to allow him 
to defer payment of his rent for 
a week or two. To the tenant's 
delight the landlord consented; in 
fact, the scribbler's pleasure was 
so manifest that the landlord took 
him aside and gave forth words of 
philosophy in this wise : "My dear 
sir, there are three people who 
ought to be in your confidence, if 
you wish to get on in this world. 
First, your rector, who should, or 
ought to know all about your re- 
ligion ; second, your doctor, who 
should or ought to know all about 
your health, and lastly your land- 
lord, who should and does know 
all about your financial position!" 



"I was looking for you and your 
automobile yesterday on the 
speedway, but you weren't out, 
were you ?" "Huh ! I was out three 
different ways. First I was out in 
it, then I was out of it, and when 
it finally struck a tree and blew up 
I was out on it about $600. 



The faculty of Ruskin Univer- 
sity, at Glen Ellyn, 111., has started 
an anti-divorce movement which 
encourages the study of psychol- 
ogy as the panacea for the evil. 

The theories of the faculty are 
set forth thus : 

To discourage divorce girls 
should be taught psychology ; 
should take a course in house- 
wifery; should study: (1) domestic 
book-keeping, (2) cookery, (3) 
English grammar and literature, 
(4) art in nature. 

Should not study: (1) Stenog- 
raphy, (2) mathematics, (3) for- 
eign or dead languages; must not 
be business women, but home 



New 
Overland Service 

From San Francisco to Chicago. 
Three fast trains every day. Time 
— less than three days. Route — 
Southern Pacific, Union Pacific 
and the 

Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railways. 

Leave San Francisco 8 a.m., 10 a.m. 
and 6 p. m. Through trains to 
Union Passenger Station, Chicago. 
Tickets, berths or information at 

635 Market Street, C. L. CANFIELD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. General Agent. 



Burlington 



3 times 
every week 

Personally Conducted Excur- 
sions leave Los (Angeles Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Thurs- 
days, and from San Francisco 
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fri- 
days. 

Tourist Sleeping car service 
to Chicago, St. Louis and 
Boston. 

Daily Pullroan cars San 
Francisco to Chicago. 

631 Market St. 

Under Palace Hotel 

San Francisco 



W. D. SANBORN. 



General Ageru 



53 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July ii, 1903. 




AT LAST. 

Julia O. B. Door in Smart Pet 

I dreamed last night that thou didst fly to me 

With outstretched hands, crying: "At last, at last!" 

Then time and space were not. The changeful past 
Fled far, as pale wraiths from the sunrise flee. 
Death bared no flaming sword 'twist thee and me; 

Thou wert alive! Thy lips were warm on mine. 

Thy dark eyes shone, and those strong arms of 
Held me close clasped, in worldless ecstasy. [thine 

O love, dear love, we have been parted long! 

The tides of life and death have borne us far 

Each from the other. Where the immortals are, 
Thou wearest still, exultant, lithe and strong. 

Thy crown of youth, resplendent as the star 
That sang for very joy earth's matin song — 

While I. still loitering in life's dim maze. 

Grow old and wan, remembering other days! 



THE FLOWER OF MEMORY. 
Priscilia Leonard in Harper's Bazaar 

O haunting perfume of the rose, 

What makes your charm so subtle sweet? 
Not scented petals that unclose, 

Trembling, the summer breeze to greet. 
Not fragrance from your folded heart 

Breathed forth, at twilight, to the dew, 
Nay — but the memories that start 

As Love — and Grief — bend over you. 



AT NIGHTFALL. 

Charles Hanson Townein Woman's Home Companion 

I need so much the quiet of your love, 

After the day's loud strife; 
I need your calm, all other things above, 
After the stress of life. 

I crave the haven that in your heart lies, 

After all toil is done; 
I need the starshine of your heavenly eyes. 

After the day's great sun! 



OMISSION. 

Theodosia Harrison in Harper's Bazaar 

The certain thing I did not blurs the sun 

And glooms the way I go. 
I doubt me if the saddest sinning done 

Could haunt and hurt me so. 



ANOTHER DAY. 
Cora A. Matson Dolson in Good Housekeeping 
It is Another Day; and we may leave 

The erring, and the darkness, and the doubt: 
The Night, the blessed Night, has come between 
And shut them out 



OWN A HOME 



IN 
BEAUTIFUL 



CAMP MEEKER 



free of fog and wind, 700 lots sold, 250 cottages built. Lots 
$10 up, cottages built by proprietor, $50 up. Boating, bath- 
ing, tenting, free. Sawmill, depot, stores, post office, ex- 
press, telephone and hotel on ground. Via Sausallto Ferry. 
Address M. C. MEEKER, Camp Meeker. 



BLITHEDALE 

Marin County, California. Opened April 15th. 

Hotel bus meets train at Mill Valley Station. 






*±-.~-.<- .*-. 




Near Mt. Shasta 

3,555 fe»t above the 
level of the sea, on the 
western side of Mt. 
Shasta lies Sisson's Tav- 
ern nestled among the 
pines of the Sierras. Tel- 
ephone, telegraph and 
daily mail; a half mile 
from the railroad station 
with free bus meeting all 
trains. Maguificen t 
scenery, mild, refreshing, 
healthful climate, pure 
air and lots of comfort. 
Bisson's Tavern is not a 
place for dress or society 
but rather a resort itbert 
quiet and comfort and 
peace have precedent. 
The Tavern is large and 
comfortable and hard fin- 
ished throughout with 
polished floors. The table 



m 






board Is delicious, the 
dishes are dainty and 
served in a moat inviting 
manner. Fare $12.00 for 
round trip and $1.60 ad- 
ditional for sleeping car 
accommodations. Rates 
$2.50 per day or $14.00 
per week and upward. 
For information call at 
Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Information Bur- 
eau, 613 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Peck's 
Tourist Information Bur- 
eau, 11 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, 
or Traveler's Informa- 
tion Bureau, 630 Market 
Street, San Francisco, or 
at 410 South Broadway, 
Los Angeles, Cal. For 
accommodations address 
Mrs. L. M. Sisson, Sis- 
son, Cal. 



MUS. L. M. SISSOJ*, VROT 

SISSON, CAL. 



Hotel Ro warden nan . 

EtN LOMOND, Santa Cruz Co. 

Open June ist, under entirely new 
and progressive management. 

The starting point for the Big Ba- 
sin. Cuisine and service equal to 
the best in San Francisco. 

Special attention given to private 
dinner and supper parties. 

Orchestra during entire season. 

The prettiest club house in the 
state. 



A. C. ROSCOE, Manarer. 



H. F. ANDERSON, 



Vichy Springs 



3 miles from TJklah, Mendocino Co. Natural 
electric waters, champagne baths. Only place 
in the world of this class, Fi-lilnir, hunting. 
Crystal Springs. Accommodations; table flret 
class. 

J. A. Kedemeyer & Co., Props. 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 



1856. 



Annual Subscription. $4.00. 




i&ixlil xrrwmjQfrjerti s*r» 




Vol. LXVII. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 18, 1903. 



Number 3. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and pub- 
lished every Saturday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott. 
Halleck building. 330 Sansome street. San Francisco. Cal 

Entered at San Francisco 1'oslorflce as second-class matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy. 
Representative. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C, England, George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication in the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m. 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 



The Colombian Senate is dead against the Can?!. 
Evidently sufficient money has not been spent in 
Columbia. 



Is the pipe line to Poinl Richmond a .-.no 
i 'pinions are divided, but the question will be settled 

next week. \'n« thai the line is finished, there i-. a 

rumor thai production is insufficient, 

Poultney Bigelow has been divorced. We wonder 
if that Fact will make any difference to his friendship 
with the German Emperor who affects a certain con- 
ventionality in such matters. 



Between highway robbery in Oakland and dia- 
mond stealing in Los Angeles, young California is 
showing a quite distressing amount of energy. 



The farmer who shot a man who lay on the operat- 
ing table in a surgeon's office evidently did not in- 
tend to take anv chances. 



The usual list of drowning casualties accompanies 
the reports of the summer resorts. There is always 
some sort of fly in the ointment. 



The heterogenous collection of opinions which Liv- 
ernash collected for the carmen's case shows that he 
is no better lawyer than journalist. 



Chief Justice Brewer declares that every man who 
assists at a lynching is a murderer. We knew that 
already, but it does not stop lynching. 



Two co-eds. in Chicago kidnapped and hid success- 
fully two of their fellow-students of the complimen- 
tary sex. Now what did they want with those boys? 



It is now said that the President will forward that 
miserable petition if the American Jews insist. Who 
will be good enough to help the President out of the 
mess ? 



First the Post Office, then the Smelter Combine 
—where is all the corruption going to stop? If it 
keeps up some national substitute for lynching will 
be found. 






A Baptist minister's daughter, fifteen years old, 
climbed out of the window and joined her lover. Tt 
would appear as if Baptists were as human as the 
rest of us. 

The Hawaiian experiments in wireless telegraphy 
have not succeeded. The Hawaiians accordingly 
give greater subsidies. The Islanders are good 
sportsmen, anyway. 

Denver has lost $25,000 through defalcations and 
gross carelessness, as revealed by the books of the 
City Clerk. Denver is comparatively lucky; man) 
other cities have lost much more — some of them not 
far from here, moreover. 



The Aganiomermis calicis is warranted to kill Jer- 
sey mosquitoes. It is a parasite. We have lots oi 
parasites at the City Hall and no mosquitoes, only we 
give our parasites a shorter name. 

This week's news shows that the Americans are 
acquiring great influence in the conclave of Cardi- 
nals. \'Ve shall soon be Pope-makers, even if one 
of the Popes does not come from this side. 

Life possesses unthought of capacities for trouble. 
To our other industrial troubles a strike of nurses 
has been added. The striking nurses at Fabiola won ; 
nothing is said of the patients, however. 



At the Presbyterian Union one speaker said we 
are in need of a gospel of love; about the same time 
Judge Lawlor declared that our greatest need was 
a whipping post. What are we to believe? 

It is said that the new comet can he seen without a 
glass. Of what, is not stated. Moreover, without a 
glass the comet is only a blur. Hence, the time-hon- 
ored way of seeing comets will be probably kept up. 



General Miles is still good for plenty of work. If 
Von Moltke had been obliged to ride ninety miles 
in nine hours and ten minutes in order to prove his 
fitness, we should never have heard of Sedan. 



The case of the two young girls who, with their 
span of horses raced the police through Santa Bar- 
bara, shows that woman is progressing. She is just 
where the ordinary male undergraduate was a hun- 
dred years ago. 

The Examiner has an opinion on the speed of war- 
ships. Admiral Bradford's opinion, which coincides 
with that of the Examiner, has been telegraphed by 
"leased wire, the longest in the world." Clever Ex- 
aminer, sagacious Admiral ! 

Our real opinion of the Russian may perhaps be 
gauged from the fact that a wholesale business in 
The fraudulent naturalization of immigrants of that 
nationality has been carried on in the State of Wash- 
ington. 

Still more complications in the Philippines. Col- 
lector Shuster's decision that foreigners under con- 
tract cannot come to the islands is regarded as dis- 
criminatory against foreign capitalists. Sagasta must 
be happy in heaven these days. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



OUT OF DATE FANATICISM. 

A despatch from the other side of the Atlantic an- 
nounces that the Orangemen held their annual par- 
ade in Belfast upon Monday last, and that no less 
than 100,000 men were in line. It seems surprising 
that this remnant of fanaticism still remains among 
the sturdy descendants of a race which has made its 
mark in the world wherever it has penetrated, and it 
would be difficult to find a locality within or outside 
of civilization where the North of Ireland man is not 
very distinctly in evidence. And yet withal their hard 
commonsense and acuteness in adapting themselves 
to situations, and to the manners and customs of 
whatever nationality abroad they may cast their lot 
among for the time being, they still adhere at home 
to ancient practices which one might suppose would 
have died out under the ameliorating influences of 
advanced education and the improved conditions of 
life compared with that of generations gone by. The 
East Indian fanatic no longer throws himself be- 
neath the wheels of Juggernaut in the name of re- 
ligion, and other spectacles of horror, relics of the 
dark ages, have been swept away by the advance- 
ment of a more highly cultured civilization, but the 
Orangeman still remains to prove the contradictory 
characteristics existing among the human race, 
where the born leader at times is seen to fall back 
among the led. There is nothing in these Orange par- 
ades consistent with the spirit which actuates the 
world to-day. They represent principles which are 
absolutely repugnant to people of all religious per- 
suasions. They can only be described as peace-dis- 
turbing, strife-creating displays, amounting to a 
practical defi, which those of another belief are not 
slow to take up. Belfast, so often alluded to as the 
modern Athens, rich, progressive and prosperous, 
should absolve itself now and forever from these 
breaches of decorum which year after year make its 
people the subject of wondering comment the world 
over. There is nothing enlightening about such a 
display of narrow-minded bigotry which could. well 
be left for an inferior race whose actions, free from 
retaliation, could be overlooked with the contempt 
which is now felt for these 12th of July parades. They 
represent no religious principle worthy the name, 
and as for honoring the "great, pious and immortal" 
King William, they are paying respect to about as 
mean a piece of mortality as ever walked this foot- 
stool of the Almighty. 



Rome. And while they have supreme contempt for 
such idiotic flattery, they are not at all slow in profit- 
ing by it, for the good of their church, and that it does 
help them to get a tighter hold upon things here, 
but not in Rome, there is no doubt at all. There are 
quite enough — too many — "lovers of my country" 
to rejoice that the United States has become so 
powerful in the world that even the Vatican and the 
College of Cardinals stop to listen to and heed the 
wishes of the world's greatest Republic. What ut- 
terly absurd nonsense ! Rome plays politics in this 
country for influence for all time and of the expanding 
brand at that, while nearly all American politicians 
think they play Rome for influence at the polls for 
one election. 

It is absolutely silly, idiotic and stupid to think 
for a moment that the United States has any voice 
at all, or the slightest influence in the conduct of the 
"business" of either the occupant of St. Peter's chair, 
of the College of Cardinals, of any department of or 
any of the machinery of that politico-religio power. 
But, as a matter of historical fact, every other re- 
ligious organization would have its Vatican and Car- 
dinals and subordinate the political machinery of 
every nation and community to church authority if 
it could, but only the Vatican of all religious centers 
knows the when, the why and the way, which are 
absolute authority at the head and perfect discipline 
all the way down to the humblest layman, all work- 
ing to just one end, which is universal belief that no 
man of high or low degree is necessary to the Church, 
but the Church is absolutely necessary to every hu- 
man being, because it holds the key to heaven. Could 
our Washington Government have influence at the 
headquarters of such an organization? The stream 
of influence runs in this, not in that direction. 



AS TO THE VATICAN. 

Not a few American newspapers pretend they see 
the hand of America will be conspicuous in shaping 
events and policies of the College of cardinals when 
it assembles to elect a new Pope, but such talk is 
supremely idiotic. In the first place, the United 
States has but one Cardinal, and in the second place, 
it would make no difference if there were twenty 
American Cardinals. The United States has never 
had a particle of influence at the Vatican, but the 
Vatican has always exerted a powerful influence in 
America's official political concerns. The Pope, then 
the King of Italy as well, was the only power on 
earth, that recognized the Southern Confederacy as 
an independent Government, and in making that fact 
known he addressed Jefferson Davis as "illustrious 
President." 

Of course, the American Catholic hierarchy, as well 
as the Vatican, know perfectly well that these news- 
papers are trying to "play politics" by magnifying the 
influence the Catholic clergy of this country has at 



FOR JAPAN OR RUSSIA? 

The United States is rapidly drifting towards the 
point in the affairs of the Far East where the Wash- 
ington Government will have to join hands with 
either Japan or Russia. It is no doubt true that if 
it were a mere matter of sentiment the people of this 
country would prefer Russia to Japan. For a cen- 
tury Russia has entertained a most friendly feeling 
for the United States, and at least on one occasion 
the Bear served this country well in making a naval 
"demonstration" as a warning to Great Britain. But 
in recent years commerce has been cutting the cords 
of sentimentality and binding nations together with 
the chains of mutual commercial advantage and gain, 
and it is those chains that are drawing the United 
States away from Russia to Japan, and so far as cold 
commerce is concerned, no trade centre in this coun- 
try is as much interested in the premises as San 
Francisco. 

The Siberian Railway will open up a grain and 
live-stock country, whose length and soil production 
may be likened to a grain belt machinery across the 
United States from the Atlantic to the Pacific, with 
climate and soil substantially the same as is found 
in the Dakotas and Minnesota. Of course the first 
purpose of the Siberian Railway is a military rapid 
transit road from all the large trade centers of Euro- 
pean Russia to the Empire's remotest possessions in 
Asia, and the second purpose was boasted at the 
beginning of the enterprise to be to open up the vast 
grain regions lying between the termini which would 
eventually control the breadstuff markets of the 
Orient, if not of the world. The taking of Manchu- 
rian territory gives this great railway the nearest 



July 18. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ible cut to the waters of the Pacific Ocean. With 
the Manchurian ports closed against other countries, 
naturally Russia would eventually control the cream 
of all the commerce of China, and exert a great in- 
fluence in India. And it might come to pass that 
ships would load with wheat at Port Arthur and sail 
away to San Francisco for a market, and not only 
wheat, but all kinds of industrial products. 

Now, it is to prevent Russia dominating in the 
commercial channels of China and India — the whole 
of the Orient, in fact — that Japan is putting herself 
upon the best possible war footing, and since the 
United States is as deeply interested in the premises 
as Japan, and since, further, Japan only insists that 
all the ports of China and Manchuria shall be open 
to all comers, herself wanting no special privileges, 
it seems very clear where this country should be 
found in this great struggle of Russia to practically 
wall in China and Manchuria for her own use, and 
to keep other traders out. The closing of these 
ports to America would mean an enormous reduction 
in the San Francisco-Oriental trade and traffic. Japan 
asks for the right to be a competitor, and Russia de- 
mands that she shall have it all. That is the situa- 
tion. Our duty in the premises is clearly defined 
by Russia. 

MOB VIOLENCE AGAIN. 

Again the war between the unions and the em- 
ployers, a war which for the most part smoulders be- 
neath the surface, in the form of boycott and black- 
list, has flared out into active hostilities in the streets 
of Chicago. The police were attacked with bricks 
and replied with revolvers, the inevitable rush of 
the mob, with its invariable sequel of full ambulance 
wagons and a victorious police-force ensued, and the 
attempts at physical violence subsided in dreary fail- 
ure. But it must not be supposed that such incidents 
are closed with the end of the immediate conflict. 
Resentments are engendered and fierce hatreds be- 
gotten which will most certainly come forth in their 
appointed time to work woe and perhaps to endanger 
the very stability of the Republic itself. 

These collisions between the police and military on 
the one hand, and large bodies of civilians on the 
other hand, must be stopped. They point the way to 
worse than confusion, they carry within them the 
promise of class-conflicts, which no democracy can 
experience and live. 

Some way must be found of reconciling these ap- 
parently antagonistic interests. This is the task 
which confronts statesmen and economists. It is 
their work to find a path which will lead to a solution 
of the difficulty. But in the meantime, it must be dis- 
tinctly understood that mob violence will not be tol- 
erated for an instant, and that street demonstrations 
and civic disorder will be put down at all hazards. 

A SUBJECT FOR LOMBROSO. 

Contra Costa County has furnished a specimen of 
criminal precocity which is worthy to rank among 
the most conspicuous examples of the kind, and 
should have a place among the most startling phe- 
nomena of Ferri or Lombroso. Some few weeks ago 
a girl, Mary Silva, twelve years of age, was found 
chained to a tree in the Contra Costa hills. She 
stated that she had been dragged from her horse 
by two men and suffered wrongs and indignities 
which she described with the greatest detail. The 
whole county was scoured for the miscreants, and as 
the community was very much stirred up, threats of 
lynching were openly made, and for the time being 



the life of the occasional wayfarer was not an insur- 
able risk. As the days went by the p m to 
Ct the story, and finally became I that 
_irl had manufactured the whole thing out of 
her inner consciousness. Finally she confessed. It 

turns out that she has faults ,.t her Own I nceal, 

and that John Diaz, a laborer employed on the farm 
of the girl's father, fastened her to the tree at her own 
request. 

When it is remembered that this girl is only twelve 
years of age, that she has no reason as far as we 
are aware to blame her environment, that her condi- 
tions of life have been at least normal, and, judged by 
ordinary standards, fairly comfortable, we see how 
difficult a problem is presented by the inherent ten 
deney of certain types to criminal habits. The slow 
upward march of humanity is offset by a retrogress- 
ive movement, which causes individuals sometimes 
whole species, to retrograde, and we have here an ex- 
ample of such retrogression, accompanied perhaps 
with mental deficiency. It is inconceivable that this 
miserable child can ever be of any use either to 
society or to herself. In face of facts such as these 
the optimistic vaticinations of "humanity-intoxica- 
ted" philanthropists show entire banality, and lack of 
grasp of the difficulties of the problem. 



A CURIOUS OMISSION. 

There is a small sensation in the Merchants' Ex- 
change, for the fact that the nominating committee 
did not place the name of the present President, 
George W. McNear, on its list of candidates, while 
of course the nominating committee is responsible 
only to the membership at large, its action causes 
very many uncomplimentary remarks from some of 
the oldest and heaviest members, as well as among 
the various mercantile interests of the city. The 
Merchants' Exchange is a large body, and has many 
diversified interests and men who have their 
own objects to obtain, and for this reason should be 
extended the usual business charity ; but to the cas- 
ual observer who noted the fact that during the in- 
cumbency of President McNear and the present 
board, the Exchange has been ususually progressive 
and has arranged for the erection of a magnificent 
new building which, when completed, will vie favor- 
ably with any similar structure in the United States. 
The claim that George McNear is one of the "big 
four," and therefore responsible for, or implicated 
in a way in the Eppinger failure, is the merest rot. 
Mr. McNear is one of the heaviest operators, for the 
reason that he himself had the brain and foresight 
to operate properly and timely, and by good judg- 
ment and attention to business taken advantage of 
the natural laws of speculation successfully, and by 
dint of perseverence and perspicuity, placed himself 
at the head of the western grain operators. All know 
his methods will stand the searchlight of public in- 
vestigation, and his position in commercial circles 
is unassailable. In the project of the new building 
he associated himself with the strongest financial 
element in the Exchange, and the other directors, 
on learning the action of the nominating committee, 
were so displeased that they desired to withdraw 
their names, but Mr. McNear, in his broad-minded 
way,' requested them to remain in office to carry out 
the successful completion of the large projects inau- 
gurated by the board during his presidency. 

Annie Ross, the paramour of the murderer Walker, 
is to have six months' imprisonment. If this is all 
she will receive, Justice is more than "slow-footed." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1 8, 1903. 



THE FIDDLING BROTHER. 

It is always so, when a house is divided against 
itself, and because the house is divided the expected 
has come to pass in organized labor circles. The 
brother who fiddled himself to the highest place 
in labor's favor and onto the toga, or cap and bells, 
as you like, of the office of Mayor of San Francisco, 
is now not only in disgrace in his old home of labor 
unionism, but the brethren are stamping him with 
the hob-nail boots of their tempestuous indignation. 
In short, labor-unionism now brands and cross-cuts 
their fiddling brother with the word "traitor." and 
.are going to send him forth into the world clothed 
in the galling robes and chains of his brethren-.' 
supremest contempt. 

The hypnotic spell which the fiddler's "old rosin 
and bow" move over unison is broken, and it now 
realizes the depth and height of its then credulity. 
But it took a lot to break the spell, though from the 
standpoint of reason and commonsense, which is 
located upon the mountain that overlooks the val- 
ley below, where the "ism" dwells, it has been ob- 
vious from the moment the fiddler put down his bow- 
to take up the scepter of mayoralty that unionism 
had been sold for less than Esau got for his interest 
in Abraham's immense and valuable estate. But 
unionism knows all about Brother Schmitz now, and. 
in the language of cruel law, when it tells a man to 
get his neck ready for the hangman's rope, "may the 
Lord have mercy on your soul" — Eugene's political 
soul, of course. 

But it is not altogether the fiddler's alleged perfidy 
that is stirring things in labor circles, or rather his 
so-called betrayel, but there would have been little 
or no commotion had it not been for the several labor 
strikes during the last two years. You see. these 
strikes unearthed a whole lot of ambition, and now 
this ambition is seeking a vent in politics. The "whoa, 
gee, haw" profession has developed several gentle- 
men with pronounced political aspirations, and the 
"punch, brothers, punch, punch with care" fraternity, 
also finds that recent strikes have evolved a job lot 
of aspirants for everv known or probable municipal 
office, and what the fiddler did they believe they 
could do if the fiddler is crucified upon the cross of 
his swelled-outness and buried in the potter's field of 
being caught in the act. Of course every one of these 
new discoveries of personified political wisdom and 
honest}' and virtue are or will be labeled "Reformer." 
But, anyway, labor unionism has decried that 
Schmitz must play scapegoat and hie himself to the 
wilderness of political oblivion, wearing the collar 
of political damnation. 

ANOTHER MARINE RISK. 
Owners of American-going vessels will evidently 
have to calculate upon another risk in the future 
than simply that of damage to ship or cargo. The 
value of a sailor's life or limb will now receive some 
recognition, judging from recent legal decisions 
which have awarded pecuniary satisfaction in dam- 
age suits of the kind. The owners of an American 
vessel have just been mulcted in, the sum of §2,500 
for the failure of, the captain to leave his course 
and put into a way port because a sailor had broken 
his leg, and a permanent injury had been inflicted by 
the rude surgery on ship-board. This was in Hono- 
lulu, where another vessel, the Susie Plummer. 
just been attached by the authorities upon the suit 
of relatives of a sailor who fell overboard and was 
drowned, asking compensation in the sum of $25,000 
from the owners. They claim that the foot-rope was 



weak, and that his fall from the yard-arm was due 
to this fact. These are novelties in the way of liti- 
gation, and it will be interesting to note the develop- 
ment of the new field for the operators of the sea- 
lawyer's friend, the land-shark, who fattens off the 
spoiling of men of the sea. There is one thing certain, 
had the system prevailed in the past, captains being 
liable for the death of men at sea, the merchant fleets 
of the world would never have gained its present pro- 
portions. The really well-found ship is even to-day 
in the minority, and a captain who substitutes new 
gear for the aged material in use, until forced to do 
so by a tendency for the ropes and sails to fall to 
pieces of their own accord, would not hold his posi- 
tion very long, being looked upon as a wastrel by 
a penurious management. Then, sailors have always 
hitherto been regarded as a cheap commodity, and 
their passing by accident at sea has never excited 
much comment. A mere mention in the log that 
John Smith, A. B., had been washed overboard, or 
had been sent below to Davy Jones's locker with a 
10-pound shot as company in his canvas sacking, was 
all required in compliance with the Merchant Ship- 
ping Act, and the incident was considered closed. 
Now, however, the disposition will be to hold the 
owners responsible, which will be rather awkward 
at times if the suit goes the wrong way, and the 
court holds that the ordinary foremast hand is worth 
more to his relatives dead than he ever was alive. 
A few fatal accidents on a voyage, with a prevailing 
low rate of freight, may serve to put a ship so deeply 
in debt that she can never clear herself. 



TAFT'S CABLEGRAM. 

Governor Taft of the Philippines may lose his 
official head for making his first dispatch over the 
new cable an earnest protest to President Roosevelt 
against the iniquitous tariff which Congress has im- 
posed on Filipino products. The Philippines are as 
much the territory of the United States as Arizona 
and New Mexico are, and it would be no more un- 
just to levy a tax on the products of those territories 
that are destined for the States than it is to impose 
duties on the products of our Philippine territory. 

But our high protectionists are not looking for 
opportunity to deal justly with the people of the 
United States or of any other country. They are the 
embodiment of greed and selfishness — legalized rob- 
ber}' — and if they could they would serve California 
just as they are serving the Philippines. Does any- 
body imagine for a moment that the fruit trusts of 
the South-east would hesitate to make California 
fruit pay a high duty to enter Eastern markets if 
they could? That is exactly the spirit of the Ding- 
ley tariff, and in the case of the Philippines it is ap- 
plied viciously. 

San Francisco wants open and free doors at even- 
port on the Pacific Ocean, and especially at Manila. 
But products of the archipelago are not permitted 
to come to San Francisco unless they pay a high duty 
for the privilege, and this thieving duty is preventing 
trade expansion in the Philippines, and San Francisco 
is being hurt by the insane and greedy policy of the 
few Eastern high-protectionists who seem to have 
strings tied all over the Washington Government. 
Governor Taft is to be congratulated for his bravery 
in making his first message over the new cable tell 
all the world how brutally and viciously the United 
States is robbing and plundering the people of one 
of its own territories. It is to be hoped that he will 
keep the cable hot sending protests against this rob- 
ber's raid on the people of our Philippine annex. 



July 18. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE WEIRD DREAM OF MR. POCOCK. 



By Jr\s I'nrii m 

In this month's number of Pearson's Maga 
Mr. Roger Pocock published a storj descripti 
a late visit he claims to have made to the 1 irand 
yon of the Colorado. It's more than likely that Mr. 

ick iliil make the visit, did see tin- sights that 
he so well describes, did "t"' >r two days sit on the 
brink of the canyon trying to understand!" tor noth- 
ing in the line Of pipe dreams that J ever hear,! of 
could make a man of Mr. Pocock's fine ability do such 
wonderful gymnastic flip-flops in mathematics, un- 
less it was owing to the vastness of the canyon, or 
the intoxicating air thereof. Following are a few 
lines from Mr. Pocock's description that might ac- 
count for his state of mind. Xow, understand! he 
saw all this after "black night had fallen." for here 
is what he says: "Black night had fallen, and tin 
trees seemed to come right at us out of the gloom. 
Then suddenly we saw the red afterglow shining 
through the very roots of the pines ahead, and we 
came to the edge of the world. So we looked over 
the brink of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado, the 
greatest chasm in America, the crowning wonder of 
the whole world. We looked down over the edge 
into fathomless, empty space. One step more and 
one would fall — would keep on falling for a long time 
— minutes, perhaps, or hours, days, years, ages, for 
ever and ever. I had looked over cliffs before but 
this was eternity." 

Xow that was what one might call right smart, 
seeing after "black night had fallen," but that's noth- 
ing when compared with Mr. Pocock's figures, for 
he continues : 

"All human sense of measurement was lost, for 
this 'Gap in the World,' six thousand feet deep and 
twelve miles wide, reached away for six hundred 
miles." It is quite true that he has lost all human 
sense of measurement, for he tells us that : "In all, 
thirty-six million cubic miles of solid rock have been 
ground in this vast mill, and hurled into the Gulf of 
California." 

Now, the Gulf of California is only one hundred 
and twenty-five thousand square miles, and averages 
one mile deep; but were it eight miles deep, the 
thirty-six million cubic miles (think of it!) of ground 
rock hurled into it by Mr. Pocock's imagination 
would cause a mountain two hundred and eighty 
miles high to rise over its entire surface. The Gulf 
of California would have to be two hundred and 
eighty-eight miles deep to contain all this debris. 
Then the water forced out of the Gulf would cover 
the entire surface of the United States, including 
Alaska and Hawaii, to a depth of ten miles. 

Now, Mr. Roger Pocock saw all this, and he could 
not have been near Chinatown either — for days and 
clays. While I've lived on the verge of it the better 
part of my life, and never even saw an afterglow shin- 
ing through anything, once "black night had fallen." 
Yes, and I did considerable meandering about Colo- 
rado, too, just about that season of the day ; and as 
for the mathematics? Oh, well — but how did you 
do it, Roger? How did you do it?. But, no: never 
mind; I won't ask you. I'll swallow it whole, Roger! 
Only, as a man and a brother, tell me — even in a 
whisper, what brand of poppy juice you gave to the 
infallible, lynx-eyed divinity — the copy-reader? 

Dr. Decker, 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless 
teeth extracting. 




Glerv Gecrry 

Old Highland Scotch 



FOR. BON VIVANTS 



TILLMANN (SL BENDEL 

Purveyors to tKs PACIFIC SLOPES TR.ADE 



C. H. *Rehnftrom 

FORMERLY 6ANDERS & JOHNSON 

Tailor. 

PHELAN BUILDING ROOMS 1, 2, 3. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6387, SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year and I lie 
transaction of sueh nl tier business as may he brought before the meet- 
hit;, will he held at the office of the company, No. 283 Kteuart street. Kan 
I'laiu-iseo. on MONDAY, the Bid day of August, mil. at 11 o'clock, A. M. 
AUGUSTUS TAYLOR, Secretary. 



WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

{LTD.) OF AKSBMIN. 



Scotch Whisky 

Importers • MACONDRAY &. CO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1 8, 1903. 




Tkasurelr 
Wand 



OJeolq r 



fcoley no wand but Pleasure's 




By Barton Pittmas 
Amelia Bingham, with the assistance of her ex- 
cellent company, has undoubtedly made an indelible 
impression upon San Francisco, but it is a question 
whether it would not have been better for her to have 
played "The Climbers" for the entire engagement 
rather than offer "A Modern Magdalen" for the third 
week. Still, Haddon Chambers' play, which 
closes to-night at the Columbia, gives Miss Bingham 
opportunity for the display of a mild versatility. The 
play has about it that snappy, up-to-dateness also 
characteristic of "The Climbers," but it has not the 
keen satirical setting. The author perhaps did not 
even attempt this. He has been content with a play 
which points a moral. The story is that of a beautiful 
voung girl, the daughter of a bibulous and Micawber- 
like father, and also afflicted with a most unsympa- 
thetic stepmother. The girl's name is Katinka, and 
the others in the home life, as depicted, are a younger 
sister and a boarder, a poor young student who loves 
Katinka. The invalid sister is all that binds Katinka 
to her unhappy home and it is because of this sis- 
ter's ill-health and need that Katinka finally accepts 
the attentions of a young man about town, whom she 
has repulsed for many months. With his assistance, 
she becomes a music-hall favorite, and maintains her 
family in luxury, her father meantime allowing the 
impression to prevail that it is he who is responsible 
for their sudden affluence. There is another man. 
a wealthy money-lender, who wants to wed Katinka. 
but she rejects his offer to become the companion of 
the man who places her in the music-hall world. 
Meantime, the devotion of her first lover, the poor 
young student, never wavers, and at last he points 
her to the pathway of reparation and the closing 
scene finds her ready to accompany him to Cuba 
and become a nurse in the army. The play has a 
few redeeming scenes, but with a supporting cast 
comprising Wilton Lackaye and Bijou Fernandez it 
could not but succeed. Miss Fernandez has onlv a 
minor part, but Lackaye is the father. He is just 
as good in this part as in his New York original part 
of Blinker. This reminds me that "A Modern Mag- 
dalen" has been persistently advertised as having 
run for 400 nights in New York. Now, San Francisco 
accepts or rejects a play irrespective of its success 
in the Eastern metropolis, so the point being imma- 
terial, it seems to me that the press agents might 
divide the number of nights by eight and thereby 
come a little nearer the truth. If mv memorv server 
aright, New York did not take kindly to the piece, 
and after a brief run Miss Bingham substituted in its 
stead the already established New York favorite, 
"The Climbers." The invalid sister, in this latest 
Bingham play, makes her first appearance in a hi^h 
"choker," with her trim figure gracefully contained 
in a pair of tight corsets, suggesting anything but 
ill-health. There is another inconsistent feature of 
the play, almost too revolting for contemplation, and 
that is where Katinka's father comes to the place 
where his daughter is carousing with her companions, 
views her shame with complacence, and even joins 
in the revels. On the whole, "A Modern Magdalen" 
has proven pleasing, but few will regret that it is 



to give place to another Fitch play next week, "The 
Frisky Mrs. Johnson," which everyone hopes will be 
as good as "The Climbers," and which is really much 
better — that is, according to the press agent. 

As Juliet, Nance O'Neil is simply impossible. This 
is putting it gently. She has filled the California all 
of the past week, which is a public tribute to her 
undoubted genius in other roles, and the well wishers 
of the young California girl hope that she will not 
be so ill-advised as to attempt Juliet during her ap- 
proaching New York engagement. In nearly all of 
her other characters Miss O'Neil rises to greatness, 
but her almost masculine strength, deep voice and 
gigantic figure, suggest anything but the love-lorn 
Italian girl of fourteen summers. The Romeo of E. 
J. Ratcliffe, the Mercutio of Charles Millward, and 
Peter, as played by the inimitable Stockwell, nearly 
redeemed the play. The uniform excellence with 
which the previous O'Neil productions have been 
staged made the laxity in the stage setting of "Romeo 
and Juliet" the more conspicuous. To-night she pre- 
sents Macbeth, which closes her engagement to-mor- 
row night. The role of Lady Macbeth should suit 
her, and those who have seen her in the part pro- 
nounce her work truly worthy of Nance O'Neil. 
■ • ■ 

White Whittlesey in "The Prisoner of Zenda" has 
delighted Alcazar audiences all week, but while the 
matinee-idol has held his own much of the success 
must be attributed to Anthony Hope, the author : 
Edward Rose, the dramatist who has turned the 
Hope romances into an excellent play, the Alcazar 
management, which always stages and presents 
everything in the best possible manner, and the sup- 
porting company, many of whom pressed White 
Whittlesey closely for his laurels. The fanciful king- 
dom of Ruritania was made real, and kings seemed 
rational, tangible entities all the week at the Alcazar. 
Personally I missed in Mr. Whittlesey the virility 
which made the work of Edwin T. Emery as Captain 
Hentzau stand out and while he was gentle enough 
in all of the emotional scenes, he seemed scarcely 
strong enough for the more strenuous work for which 
the part calls. Bertha Creighton, as the Princess 
Flavia, was a delight, and while we will all miss Oza 
Waldrop, the other women in the cast acquitted 
themselves with fair credit. Fred J. Butler made an 
excellent Colonel Sapt. The piece is one of the best 
and most pleasing in every way that the Alcazar has 
offered for some time, and the fact that it is crowded 
nightly shows that the public agrees with me in this 

much at least. 

* • • 

James Corrigan's engagement at the Central closes 
to-night, and during all of this week he has been 
appearing in "Muldoon's Picnic," an uproariously 
funny and nonsensical farce, which gives the great 
character-comedian just the chance he requires to 
entertain to the best of his ability. The Belasco & 
Mayer management seems to possess the happy fac- 
ulty of giving its patrons just what they want, of 
which no better evidence is needed than the success 
of "Muldoon's Picnic," and in fact of the whole Cor- 
rigan engagement. The specialties in this piece are 
not the least of its charms, and where Ernest Howell 
and Elmer Booth introduce the trick automobile the 
audience goes wild with delight. 

• * * 

The new burlesque at Fischer's is now in its first 
week, and it seemed destined to delight from the 
start when it opened to an audience which tested 



July 18, 1903. 



bAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



the capacity of the house. The piece is a tr 
upon "The Three Musketeers" and "Under the Red 
Robe," but the name or character of a Fischer bur- 
lesque matters little, tor they are all just what l< 
of light fun are seeking. Kolb & Dill and all of the 
other established favorites appear in the piece and 
Misses Hope and Emerson are especially delightful 
in their imitation of the Cherry Sisters. If its present 
popularity continues, the piece will surely have a 

long run. 

• • * 

The Orpheum, as usual, has been crowded all week, 
Mabel McKinley continuing the bright particular 
star of the occasion. Charles Dickson and company 
offered a new sketch "Heart to Heart Talks," which 
was well received. Nell McEwen, an exceedingly tal- 
ented young woman, who seems to divide her time 
between vaudeville and "the legitimate" is conspicu- 
ous in the cast. Hodges & Launchmere ; Mosher, 
Haughton & Mosher; Julian Rose, De Kolta, and 
Young & DeVoie are the others in the excellent bill 

offered. 

• * * 

The Chutes this week offers many delightful novel- 
ties. Among the new people are Harry and Carrie 
La Kola, the three Malverns, Krafft and Daley, and 
Alvino. Van Fossen and McCauley will change 
their songs and dances and George Hanlon and his 
company will appear for the last times. The ani- 
matoscope will show new and amusing moving pic- 
tures, the amateurs will appear on Thursday even- 
ing, and the electric fountain will play on Saturday 
night. The three baby tigers, now on exhibition in 
the zoo, are a great card. 

• • • 

Dr. Alex. J. Mclvor-Tyndall has abandoned his 
Eastern tour and will spend the summer months on 
the Coast. Since his visit here in the winter, the cele- 
brated telepathist has filled engagements in the Ha- 
waiian Islands and the South, everywhere attracting 
large audiences. He returns to San Francisco to give 
a series of Sunday evening lectures at Steinway Hall, 
on the theories and principles of Psychic Science. The 
fame which Dr. Mclvor-Tyndall has attained 
throughout the world is due to his unassuming, ear- 
nest manner, no less than to the wonderful power of 
mind, which he demonstrates so entertainingly. The 
subject for the lecture to be given the coming Sun- 
day night will be "Life Secrets." The lecture will 
be illustrated by a demonstration of the power 
of thought. Sunday evening, July 26th, Dr. Mclvor- 
Tyndall will talk on "The Thought that Kills." 
(Continued to page n.) 

SteinWay Hall 223 Sutter Street 

BDNDAT JULY 19tlt— 8:15 P. M. 



DB. ALEX, J. MoIVOB 




TYNDALL 



LIFE'S SECKET8 followed by experiment! In 
THOUGHT-FORCE and TELEGRAPHY 



Tickets 25, 50 and 75 cents 



flfter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string; band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering- plico after 
the theatre la over. 



Central Thpntrp | " ium * "•?«. rrop*. u. t i.t in^, 

v&l^l-lUI lllCUire. opp. City 11.11. Hions South 5JI 

Weekfurllnf Monday. JulyMth, IMS Mellnive Saturday and Bund.y 
M.goirioanl spectacular production of Qotbe'i Immortal drama 

FAUST 

Great mil Spendld sconery. Wonderful And startling electrical tod 

nieoaBDicii cruets. 

Next— Toe Lion's Heart. 

Prices: Breofogs 10c to50o. Matinee*, lOo, 15c, 35c. 



Hscher's Theatre 

Fischer's shows are all good, but toll oaa surpasses, 
It tickles the mairoiis and pleases the lasses, 
Never anything here bo liked by the masses 
And It's praises are sung by all sorts and classes. 
A tremendous combination bill 

UNDER THE RED GLOBE 

and THE THREE MOEKEETEKS everything new everything • bit 
Everything raasniacont. Tne same popular prlcoB. Come early to secure 
Beau, Ai ' standing room only" will aurely rule, 

Reserved Seats Nlgbt prices 25-50-750. Sat. A Sun. Matinees 
J5-50O. Children at Matinees 10-250. 



Grand Opera rjouse 



n A l £! 1 u *,"£ 6e 5 a ' ul, day. Beginning tomorrow nlgbt, RAYMOND and 
CAVfcKLrandourBuperb New York Company In the famous musical 
eccentricity 

IN WALL STREET 

New specialties, songs, dances. New march of beantlf ul girls. 
Everything novel and beautiful. 
Prices: 25c, 50o, 75 cts. 



California Theatre. 

Tonight and tomorrow night farewell of Nance O'Nell. 

Monday eveniny— July 20th, an auspicious event— opening of the summer 

stock season. First appearance here of the great 

NEILL-MOROSGO COMPANY 

presenting for the first time on any stage at prices less than two dollars, 
Marlon Crawford s delightful romantic drama 

IN THE PALACE OF THE KING 

Next— Genevieve Halne'B Bociely play Hearts Aflame. In preparation 
Janice Meredith. Special summer prices. Entire lower floor 75c. Bal- 
cony, 60c. Gallery 25c. Bargain matinees every Thursday 25 and 50c, 



Tivoli Opera House. ME8 - '"75Z£™£i mtK 

Commencing Monday evening July 20th Saturday matinee. 

Bpertal engagement of CAMILLE D'ARVILLE to appear in Smith and 

DeKo veu'e comic opera 

THE HIGHWAYMAN 

supported by the entire Tivoli company. EDWIN STEVENS as Foxy 
Qulller. ' 

Popular prices 25. SO and 75c. Telephone Bush 9. 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

O'Farrell St., between Stockton and Powell streets. 



OrpheuiT) 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, July 19. 

NEW ATTRACTIONS 

Ethel Levey; Claude Gllllngwater and Company; Orpheus Comedy Four; 
The Three Polos; GeomeW. Hunter; Bailey and Madison; Hodges and 
and Launchmere; the Blograph and last week of 



DE KOLTA 



Usual matinee and prices. 



Columbia Trjeatre. ^ OBl ES.*.^*.^ 

One week beginning next Monday. Matinees Wednesday and Saturday, 

AMELIA BINGHAM 

and her company will present for the first time here Clyde Fitch's latest 
comedy success 

THE FRISKY MRS. cJOHNSON 

Monday July 27— Last week of Amelia Bingham season. 



Alr»'S7'Jt- T"h on f" m Bklasoo & Mates, Proprietors, 

/-\.lUd.£.CXI 111CULIC E.D. Prick, Gen Manager. Phone Alcazar 

Regular matinee Thursday and Saturday. Week commencing Monday 

evening next July 20, 

Owing to the enormous demand for seats 

WHITE WHITTLESEY , 

Will appear for a second week In the superb production of 

THE PRISONER OF ZENDA 

First time at popular prices. Evening— 25c to 75c. Matinees Thursday 
and Saturday 15o to 50o. July 27— Hall Calne'a THE MANXMAN. It* 
first produotlon in San Francisco. m 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 




To save the "landmarks" of the State 
The chorus girls will give a show, 

And spend the profits small and great 

That the poor "landmarks" may not go. 

The girls adore those grand antiques, 
And all things modern they despise. 

And so to save the old-time stunts 

They'll kick and make those google-eyes. 

( ) tell me, tell me, footlight elves, 

What do you mean by "landmarks." pray' 

Are you referring to yourselves 
Or to the 'dobes of Monterey? 

There is a man in Oakland who is known to the 
police as "the musical maniac." Whenever he hears 
a musical instrument played in his neighborhood he 
is possessed of an insatiable desire to steal it. I, too, 
am a "musical maniac." The sound of a trombone 
being played under my bedroom, a piano next door, 
a violin in the chamber above, and a barrel organ on 
the pavement below, drives me into violent spasms, 
I am seized with trembling and cold sweats, and 
unless I exert supreme control, I cannot resist the 
temptation to pounce on these noise-makers and put 
them permanently hors-de-combat. I move that Gam- 
mon be given a pension and turned loose in my neigh- 
borhood. 

I see that in the Examiner this week Dismal Dav- 
enport has a page scrawl entitled "What Russia 
Needs is Yellow Journalism." Thanks to a just anil 
impartial Providence that remark was made by a 
hired joker in the Hearst paper, and will be said 
nowhere else. There is Nihilism enough in Russia 
already without Willie's howling lies to aggravate 
the conditions. Russia has intrigues, modified serf- 
dom, Jew massacres, blizzards, Slavic tyranny — but 
thank God it has not yellow journalism. Still, if il 
had there would be some good things about it. If 
Hearst should go to St. Petersburg he would be 
promptly sent to Siberia — which would be a line thing 
for America, but a demnition bad thing for Siberia. 

"What's the matter with the California poet" If 
the value of a poem is to be measured in heart beats 
the home product seems to get there with bells. Tt 
has been less than a summer's moon since Clarence 
Urmy of the San Jose prune belt brought a weeping 
sweetheart all the way from the East by means of a 
little lyric which appeared in a current magazine. 
And now John Vance Cheney has gone ami got a 
lady stuck on his verse and has married her. I won't 
say that the brand of verse which is packed in Cali- 
fornia is the best in the world, but 1 do claim that 
it has a certain matrimonial quality which would 
recommend it as an exhibit at the St. Louis Fair. 

Last week a boy named Kilroy blackened the eye 
of a lad named Weiner because, he alleged, Kilroy's 
brother had been shanghaied and sent out of port by 
Weiner's father. I do not know if the charge is true, 
but if it was. I think that Weiner St., was the man 
that should have his eye blackened. Our water front 
is rotten with crimps and forced seamanship and sub- 
sequent brutality on American ships is more common 
than it should be. 



The goods of William W. Hart, U. S. A., are be- 
ing withheld by the customs officials because the gal- 
lant soldier has been trying to smuggle in' dutiable 
goods. The case of Captain Harts is so like many 
others that it is almost commonplace. The fact re- 
mains that this officer of the United States army has 
been deliberately trying to break a law of the coun- 
try which he is sworn to serve. If he cannot keep 
the covenant set by his superiors how can he expect 
his men to respect his own commands? If Captain 
Hart and those whose example he copies had thought 
of this before leaving Manila, perhaps there would 
be les> smuggling. 

Well, they seem to be trying hard to blow up a 
little excitement over the corning "contest" between 
VTonologist Corbett and Actor Jim Jeffries, but the 
public doesn't seem to be going into apoplexy over 
it. Bluff and advertise as they please, Corbett's 
backers cannot make him out other than he is — a 
man whom fast living and slow training has put years 
behind the battle. If the fight is a fair one it will be 
too one-sided to amuse those who have the brutality 
to care for this sort of thing. The public, however, 
i> still patiently eager to be duped, and there is still 
hope of a good fake — to the satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. 

What are the Prison Directors doing to insure 
Warden Aguirre's successor a trained, competent, 
firm and merciful man as the situation demands? Are 
they really, truly sorry about those nasty stories 
concerning the late prison management, and do they 
sincerely wish to improve the conditions? Being an 
idealist, I hope so, but being a man of experience, I 
fear that the Directors are thinking more of politics 
I ban penology. A man may be a first-rate Republi- 
can or a lily white Democrat, and yet be a sufficiently 
bad warden for a State's prison. If San Quentin 
really needs reform now is the time to do it. It is 
up to the directors. 

There it is, right in cold type, sab, how Robert E. 
Lee Sellers of Knoxville, Tenn., sah, pursued the 
girl he loved, sah. clear from the South to Los An- 
geles, sah. and there, at the point of a gun, took her 
away from her father and big brother and married 
her in cold blood. Contrary to most newspaper 
stories this tale is less sensational than it ought to 
he. I can scarcely believe that a young Lochinvar 
can come out of the South and take a bride by main 
strength without shooting her father, knifing her 
brother and killing six niggers, Mr. Seller's action 
is a disgrace to the Fust Families, sah-! 

In a speech before the W. C. T. U. of Berkeley, 
a Mrs. Carrie B. Young attacks President Benjamin 
Ide Wheeler unmercifully for smoking cigarettes 
in public, drinking in public, and in fact committing 
practically all of his social crimes and moral misde- 
meanors publicly. For the crimes as crimes. Mrs. 
Young has nothing to say; wherefore, Judging by 
analogy, the lady's idea of a sanctum of privacy must 
be one permeated with the fumes of opium and lit- 
tered with whiskey bottles. 

By the omission of a line of type containing an al- 
lusion to Pontius Pilate, Father Yorke was made re- 
cently by the Examiner to say that Christ was of a 
wavering character and not strong enough to do the 
thing that was right. The good Father headed for 
the Examiner and proceeded to give an antithetical 
exposition of poor I 'date's chief characteristics in a 
way that made every man there long for even such 
privacy as was insured in the bedroom of Jonah. It 
seems almost like an anticlimax to admit that the 
error came out only in the Oakland edition. 



July 18, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Tonopah—Tonopah 

INVEST NOW IN TONOPAH CENTRAL MINING STOCK 

Advanced in Price Jan. 15 from 25c. to 50c. a Share. Sure to go to Par. — $1 per share — soon. 















»# 



5 f#>\\s!'«l 

<S^ ?* v v r i 

4 i $ § i^ 



S* Si'? 



|J,„M 






No risk whatever in investing in stock in the Tonopah Central Mining Company. It's hound to douDIe 
and quadruple in value very soon. 100,000 shares of Treasury stock are being sold WHOLLY FOR THE 
PURPOSE OF DEVELOPING THE PROPERTY. 

The Company owns Eight of the best located claims. The ore is rich in gold and silver. Work is 
now going rapidly forward. A double compartment shaft is now down 90 feet, fully timbered through- 
out. The following extract is from the Mining and Engineering Review, and bears out the claims of 
eminent experts that the Tonopah Central Mining Company's property is more favorably located than 
any of the other properties in the Tonopah District: "Another rich strike has been maae in Tono- 
pah. This time it is in the main shaft of the California Tonopah, which adjoins the Tonopah Central 
(formerly known as the St. Patrick Group.) A ledge of ore has been opened up which goes over $500 
per ton, and is in direct line with the Tonopah Central Ledge." 

The stock of this company is non-assessable, with a par value of $1.00 per share. The location of 
the company's mine on the slope of Butler Mountain, between the famous Mipah ledge and the rich 
strikes of Gold Mountain indicates that its stock will be a dividend paying investment, and that it will 
have an early increase in value. 

A hoist capable of sinking to a depth of 350 feet has been installed, and it is only a matter of a 
short time when the ledge will be encountered. The California Tonopah struck their ledge at a depth 
of 127 feet, and it is 40 feet wide, and is continued through the properties of the Tonopah Central Min- 
ing Company. 

All stockholders participate equally in the profits of the company. 

Investors in shares of this company have no taxes, no assessments, fines, interests or liabilities of 
any kind to pay. 

The shareholders' interests are mutual and collective. There is no preferred stock, inasmuch as the 
original stockholders have placed all their stock in escrow there to remain until the mine is on an 
absolutely dividend paying basis. 

No safer or more profitable investment can be made than is offered you in the shape of stock in the 
TONOPAH CENTRAL MINING CO. Address all communications and make remittances to 



OFFICES 401-2-3 CALL BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



J. H. N. CLAUSEN, Assistant Secretary. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher and Mides Consolidated Mining Co. 

Assessment No. 32 

Amount per share 5 cents 

Levied June 20, 1903 

Delinquent In offlee , July 29, 1903 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Aueust 18, 1903 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 50. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Co. 

Assessment No. 130 

Amounts per share 10 cents 

Levied July 10, 1903 

Delinquent In office August 14, 1903 

Day of sale of delinquent stook September 3, 1903 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 14, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Prancisoo, Cal. Location of 
Works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that, at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 7th day of July, 19P3. an assessment (No. 59) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, 
payable Immediately, In United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company,rooms 21 and 22, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE lllh DAY OP AUGUST, 1903, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and until 
payment Is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 31th day of 
August, 1903, to pay the delinquent assessment together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Directors- 

JOHN \V. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Office — Rooms 21 and 22 Nevada Block. 399 Montgomery Street. San 
Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 




Library&abk 




By Roland Whittle 

It is a question if the con- 
A Japanese Garland, tinual reading of children's 

books does not have a de- 
structive effect upon the critical and intellectual 
qualities of a child. What is not the best is at the 
best only second best, and the constant steeping of 
the youngster in a bath of the second best is 
likely to produce a second best youngster. Our 
children never read the best nowadays, but there -is 
no use in croaking, the demand has arisen for chil- 
dren's books, and following hard on the heels of 
that demand races the supply. "A Japanese Gar- 
land," by Florence Peltier, published by the Lothrop 
Publishing Company, Boston, is one of the latest re- 
cruits to the army of children's books. It is a bash- 
ful recruit, but none the less valuable on that account, 
and there is every ground for hope that this lady 
will in the course of time accomplish some really 
good work of the class which she evidently prefers. 
This present volume, and we take it that it is a first 
attempt, gives some pretty legends of Japanese 
flowers. The way in which the stories are introduced 
is a little roundabout. A Japanese Boy, adopted into 
an American family, tells them to his American 
friends. This is slightly unreal, for I do not know any 
American children who would sit still to hear such 
stories, let alone from a Japanese play-fellow. Those 
American children are a pious wish of the writer. 
The matter is interesting, but as has been already re- 
marked, chiefly as promise. 

"A Man Overboard" is one 
A Man Overboard, of the series of novelettes 

which the Macmillan Com- 
pany has recently published, the first of which series 
is called "Philosophy Four," and has been already 
reviewed in these columns. The names of the au- 
thors are sufficient guarantee of the excellence of 
the literary quality, but it may be well doubted if 
this form of writing is altogether satisfactory from, 
an artistic point of view. Thus the present novel- 
ette is written by Marion Crawford, and those of us 
who are accustomed to the decorous and somewhat 
long-drawn-out stories of this semi-feminine writer 
do not feel altogether at home with him when he 
experiments in the short and vigorous. It is an eerie. 
impossible tale of the ghost of a washed overboard 
sailor. There is perhaps a little too much self-con- 
scious, newly-acquired knowledge of sea-terms, and 
a trifle overdoing of the vagaries of the spirit of the 
drowned tar. A short sketch of Mr. Marion Craw- 
ford's biography appended to the volume tells us that 
he ascribes his profession as a writer to his success 
with "Mr. Isaacs," the Indian novel which took the 
world by storm, otherwise he might have been a 
professor of Sanskrit, the teaching of which language 
had long been a pet idea of his. 

"The Fighting Chance," 
The Fighting Chance, by Gertrude Lynch, is 
called the Romance of 
an Ingenue. It is published by the "Smart Set," 
and the cast of the author's mind mav be easily 
judged from the preface. This is the kind of modern 
hyperbole in which she indulges: "The inviolate se- 



The domestic method of carpet-cleaning is very unsat- 
isfactory. The expert is always ahead. If you are incredu- 
lous give Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Company. 353 Tehama 
street a trial, and you will see the difference between the 
real thing and the imitation. All the best machinery used 
in the work by Spaulding's. 



Nelson's Amycose 
Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the Skin. 



crecy of- the preface allures one to say many things. 
It is a reliquary where the most sacred thoughts and 
emotions may be shewed free from intrusion. One 
may apologize, retract, explain, deny; one may even 
be egotistic and never have to blush for lack of con- 
trol. It is safer than a diary, for a diary tempts 
curiosity, which a preface never does." That ought 
to tell the reader what he may expect — a kind of 
plush design of the old Yellow Book pattern on a 
fustian of the merest commonplace. It is a 
political novel, without any politics really worth the 
name, an olla podrida of ready-made sentiment, vul- 
gar ideals, and exaggerated talk. This may appear 
to be harsh criticism, but let any one with any liter- 
ary taste at all read the following and the justice of 
these strictures will at once be evident: "Mrs. de la 
Mar was worldly to the core ; but even a woman of 
the world may have her suspicions lulled by one 
who seems to have no ulterior object in life but eat- 
ing nougat, chasing a ball on the links, or playing 
blind pig with a man old enough to be her father." 
Is not that writing cheap enough, and it is by no 
means an extreme example. 

"The Unwelcome Mrs. Hatch," 
The Unwelcome Mrs. Burton Harrison's novel- 
Mrs. Hatch. ette, cannot be praised very 

highly. It is a good enough 
book for the summer girl to read languidly as she lies 
in a hammock, and it may be stated frankly that the 
girl will not care whether she finishes it or not. The 
lady, divorced, not through her own fault, they never 
are in this kind of work, who arrives on the scene 
just about the time that her young daughter, now 
aged twenty or so, is about to be married, is getting 
a trifle played out as a stock character, and a little 
change in the manners and customs of the innocently 
divorced would not be out of place. When the 
divorced lady in question attends to the dressing of 
her daughter for the hymeneal sacrifice in the capac- 
ity of a servant, our hearts ought to glow with all 
the ecstasy of the cannery girl at the melodrama. 
But it does not. Perhaps so many attacks of this sort 
have tended to indurate the organ, for this novelette, 
with all its pathos, or so-called pathos, does not even 
cause a passing feeling of interest in the characters. 
It is so obviously made to order, so unmistakably 
turned out for the trade. There is one merit which 
"The Unwelcome Mrs. Hatch" possesses — that is, 
brevity. It is only two hundred pages long, and 
sells for a dollar and a quarter. One cannot help 
thinking that if Mrs. Harrison had as much talent 
as her publishers have enterprise, the days of Ameri- 
can literary supremacy would indeed have arrived, 
and we should hail her the Mrs. Humphrey Ward of 
New 'York society, without the crushing sense of 
propriety possessed by the Briton. D. Appleton & 
Co. have the honor to publish it. 

Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat producing qualities Briquettes are superior 
to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th and 
Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



July 18, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Pleasure's Wand. 



The much-heralded Neill-Morosco Compart} fol 

('Neil at the California, inaugurating 

the season of summer stock on Monday nighl next. 

An extensive and delightful repertoire has been 

planned, comprising "In the Palace of the King." 
"Janice Meredith," "A Royal Family," "Mrs. Pane's 
Defense," "Notre Dame" and "Hearts Aflame." The 

opening piece will he "In the Palace of the King," 
popularized here by Viola Allen. It is a Marion 

Crawford story tilled, it will be remembered, with the 
intrigues, murders, and strangely tangled love affairs 
too often characteristic of royal life. A production 
magnificent in every detail is promised, and the cast, 
it would seem, is thoroughly adequate. Lillian Kem- 
ble will have Viola Allen's part; George Spencer 
the role of Don John, and Elsie Esmond will play the 
blind girl. Miss Esmond is new to San Francisco, 
name and fame are hers in the East on account 
of her impersonation of Lygia in "Quo Vadis." and 
Bonita in "Arizona." Frank McYickars, H. S. Duf- 
tield and Phosa McAllister are three old favorites 

who are numbered in the cast. 

* • * 

( hving to the prenomenal success of "The Prisoner 
of Zenda," which has tested the capacity of the 
Alcazar for each performance during the past week, 
Manager Price has concluded to continue the An- 
thony Hope piece for another week. This is ex- 
tremely gratifying to those patrons of the Alcazar 
who have as yet been unable to secure seats for the 
performance. It has been quite generally advertised 
that "The Manxman" would follow "The Prisoner of 
Zenda" next week, but this change in the bill will 
delay the presentation of the Hall Caine play until 

the week beginning July 27th. 

* * * 

"In Wall Street" is the next offering of the Grand, 
and begins to-morrow night. It is almost useless 
to mention the Eastern success of the series of en- 
tertainments now being presented at the Grand, for 
they have achieved such a substantial hold upon 
San Francisco that their New York record is of little 
consequence. Raymond and Caverly are just as well 
liked here as were the Rogers Brothers in New 
York in their palmiest days, and Cheridah Simpson 
and the other principals of the cast have sung and 
danced their way into popular favor. One reason 
why the Rogers Brothers' plays, as presented here, 
draw such crowded houses is that they, in the par- 
lance of the Mission district, "deliver the goods." 
The management gives' what is advertised in the way 
of costumes, scenery, pretty women, good acting 
and truly laughable comedy. All kinds of novelties 
vri'l characterize the new piece, and if it is up to 
the standard of those already presented it will be all 
that could be demanded. 

* • * 

The most notable event in the history of the Cen- 
tral Theatre will be the magnificent spectacular pro- 
duction of Goethe's immortal drama, " Faust," with 
which the new season will be inaugurated next Mon- 
day evening. Herschel Mayall will make his initial 
appearance as the leading man of the new Cen- 
tral organization, and his opening role will be the 
famous one of Mephisto. The drama has a fascina- 
tion at once powerful and terrible. "Faust" may 
be counted on to break all records for packed houses 
at the Central Theatre, and tickets should be or- 
dered early. 



Five new and entertaining announced at 

the Orpheum for this coming week. Ethel l 
the vivacious singing and dan unedienne; 

Claude Gillingwater, in "The Wrong Man"; the 
Orpheus Comedy Four, who have a (jreat mi 

reputation in the East; the three Polos, graceful and 
daring acrobats; and George W. Hunter, a 

li.in and raconteur, are the new entertainers. 

De Kolta, the wonderful juggler; Bailev and Madi- 
son, the grotesque eccentrics, and Hodges and 
Launchmere will continue for the coming week; the 
hiograph, with new motion pictures, will complete 

a varied and interesting programme. 

• • • ' 

Camille D'Arville returns to the stage after an ab- 
sence which everyone justly considers too long, and 
happily enough, her reappearance is to be in "The 
Highwayman," which opens at the Tivoli on next 
Monday evening. Miss D'Arville formerly owned 
part of this opera, and it was her first great success, 
Edwin Stevens has the role of Foxy Quiller, and the 
other Tivoli favorites will be seen to advantage. The 

piece will doubtless have a long run. 

• . * 

Edward Davis will appear at the MacDonough 
Theatre, Oakland, during the week of July 20th in 
conjunction with the Mordant-Humphrey company 
in an elaborate production of his own play, "The Un- 
masking." It promises to be a gala event. 

• * • 

Henry Miller and Margaret Anglin will play a 
mid-summer engagement at the Columbia, and their 
repertoire will comprise "The Taming of Helen," 
"The Lady of Lyons," "Camille," and possibly sev- 
eral other favorites. 



Zinkand's has made its own place. All that is good 

to eat or drink can be obtained there. The best viands and 
good music ought to be enough for any one, and the crowds 
of patrons show this to be the case. 



Fine stationery, steei andl copperplate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



A Beautiful 

D&ncing Surface 



I ■ obtained on the floor of any ball or ball-room by the uae of Bowd- 
lear'a Pulverized Floor Wax It will not ball up on tbe aboea nor 
lamp on the floor; makes neither dirt nor duet, but forms a perfect 
danclngsurface. Does not solldresses or clothes of the finest fabric. 
For sale by Mack & Co., Langley and Michaels and Redtngton & 
Co., San Francisco; Elrk, Geary & Co., Sacramento and F. W. Braun 
& Co., Lob Anseles. 

Bowdlear's Floor Wax 



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who have imperfect vision, understand what perfect work you are doing 
In fitting classes. The classes you prescribed for my wife and two 
daughters are entirely satisfactory. Being master of your profession you 
ought to do a fine business here in San Franoisco. Yours truly, 

JAS. W. HARRIS. Supt. Cal, St., R. R. Co. 




WEAK MEN AND WOMEN t^We^af^Xt 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. Depot a 
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13 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 




1 have just heard of a Yosemite tragedy that did 
not get into the daily newspapers. Nearly every- 
body who has been to the Yosemite knows Sharkey, 
the maker of mosaic trinkets and furniture, who 
for years has catered to the wants of tourists. So long 
has he been there that he is entitled to a share of the 
famous, though slowly-accumulating "Landmarks 
Fund." He has put up an odd and beautiful dwelling, 
furnished inside with inlaid woods — altogether 'a 
most artistic production. 

Despite his talents, Sharkey has always had more 
or less trouble with the Yosemite Commissioners. 
The natural beauties of the famous valley are not 
sufficient stimulation for him, and he became an 
occasional devotee of Bacchus. This was not to the 
liking of the Commissioners, who time and again 
suspended his privileges, but always allowed him to 
remain. Last year, though, they set their several feet 
down firmly and vowed that Sharkey should return 
no more to the valley. 

This spring, though, just before the influx of 
tourists commenced, Sharkey appeared again, and 
in order to placate the Commissioners, brought with 
him a wife — a neat, demure, tidy little German 
woman — and announced that he had given up the 
drink for good. So the commissioners relented again 
and Sharkey settled down for his summer's work. 

Everything went along smoothly. Sharkey was 
industrious and sober, and his wife became a general 
favorite. It was noticed, though, that she would dis- 
appear for a week at a time, and finally the secret 
leaked out that she was a confirmed toper. Then she 
appeared in public intoxicated once or twice, and the 
Commissioners had Sharkey on the carpet again. 
Then he became angry, and blurted out that she was 
not his wife, anyway — that he had tried to reform her, 
but saw it was no use, so didn't care what became of 
her. She learned what had happened, and committed 
suicide by taking wood alcohol. 

Sharkey has been banished again, for what the 
Commissioners assert is the last time. As it is, the 
rule that the owner of a house in the Yosemite must 
occupy it part of each year or it will become State 
property, Sharkey is wondering how he can obey 
the Commissioners and still retain possession of 
his building. 

• * * 

"My brother, the Mayor," as Frank Schmitz says, 
"is certainly a man who should pray night and day 
to be delivered from his friends. First it was Mr. 
Casey; then it was Mr. Hutton, and now it's Mr. 
Mershon. So it's not all beer and skittles with 'My 
Brother, the Mayor,' No, indeed; the poor man is 
having rather a hard time of it, and I think Abe Ruef 
should come forward and take his share of the kicks 
as he has been taking more than his share of the half- 
pence, for all of the offices not occupied by His 
Honor's family and friends have been filled by Abe's 
men, as everyone knows. Oh, Gene ; if your judg- 
ment in civic matters is as poor as it is in the choice 
of friends, our poor city is out of luck, for they have 
been a sorry lot; and if a man is judged by his friends 
'my brother the Mayor needs more than apt quota- 
tions from Shakespeare to clear himself. Of course, 
ex-Civil Service Commissioner Mershon is the worst 



specimen that has come out of the political ooze of 
the Schmitz-Ruef administration so far, but there is 
no telling what a little investigation would bring 
forth if San Francisco could stand the odor. Now, 
your Honor, I suggest, as a means of self-protection, 
as you have not enough brothers to fill the offices left 
vacant by your one time friends, that you charter 
a steamer and bring out a cargo of the Schmitzes 
from the old country and keep them on tap in cases 
of emergency. Or, better still, while resignations 
are so fashionable around the New City Hall, and so 
highly recommended by yourself, why not make a 
long-suffering people grateful and present your own 
with a few bars of march music, and the appropriate 
title of: "When Gene went Marching Home." 

• * * 

Not long ago I gave what I believed was due 
thanks 1o the Board of Health for its endeavors to 
support the law with regard to the registration of 
births, the neglect of which gives a fine opportunity 
to scoundrels to profit by the breaking of the law. 
It also robs many an heir of his birthright, and the 
kind of heirs who most need the law's protection, 
too, and it advertises San Francisco as a veritable 
death trap, and keeps on so advertising it as such 
every day. Last week I counted the number of 
deaths and the number of births for three days, and 
they ran as follows : First day, fifteen deaths and one 
birth ; second day, fifty deaths and two births ; third 
day, forty-seven deaths and two births. That comes 
near being the average for every day. So it's quite 
evident that the resolution of the Board of Health 
was either a plain, ordinary fake or a bluff that the 
law-breakers realize that they need not respect. Gen- 
tlemen, if you mean to keep your threat to punish 
these law-breakers you will have to do more than 
pass resolutions; and if you wish to appear honest 
you had better get in and do it. 

♦ • * 

They're telling a good story in Oakland about a 
man on our side of the bay. 

It seems that the Judge heroically withstood the 
sideshows. Even Charity and "French Doughnuts" 
failed to tempt him, and he walked past the Country 
Store three times before he invested a dime. When 
he did, he drew a free sample of sun cured tobacco 
and a combination number 33. 

Now that combination number was one of six 
advertised as good on a half ton of Sperry's best. 



Established in California 
...for thirty-five years... 



■dnL 



Repository in San 
Francisco at Mar- 
ket and Tenth Sts., 
has been rebuilt 
• and enlarged, mak- 

ing it the finest car- 
riage salesroom in 
the United States. 
Five hundred styles 
of vehicles shown, 
probably more than all other stores in town com- 
bined. New things in robes and whips. 

STUDBBAKBR BROS. CQ 

Market and Tenth Sts. 

Telephone Prlv.te 6S4 



July 18, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'3 



The Judge was in excellent spirits— he went round 
the corner and argued the thing out. 

"Ten hundred weight divided by . Yes, there 

ought to he three titty-pound sacks to his share." 

He invested another dime and another. The third 
Jit again a lucky number on the Hour. Si\ 
sacks for 30 cents was not a bad investment, but the 
Judge was not going to be rash. 

The next day he went around to his friends. II. 
sold the six sacks at a dollar each, and made them 
sjgn a contract to take it. Then he wired down to 
Capitola to save him a room for Sunday. 
__ Saturday night the Judge appeared a"t the Street 
Fair. He walked with the stride of a millionaire 
straight to the Country Store. 

The clerk stared at the coupons. "Well," he asked, 
"where are the rest of the numbers?" 

"Good land, man I" snapped the Judge. "How do 
I know? These call for six sacks of flour! That's 
what I'm after!" 

The clerk grinned. "Humph !" he said. "I guess 
you didn't understand. Why, that's a combination ! 
You get one — two — you even get five of the num- 
bers, and you get — left ! You draw all six, and you 
get the Sperry donation! See!" 

• * » 

Some clubmen were discussing the Hearst boomlet 
and the cynical hypocricy of the yellow fellow, 
when a distinguished raconteur told the following 
story which illustrates about as well as anything I 
have heard the tawdry policy of William Randolph 
Hearst. 

"I have noticed with secret amusement," said the 
old lawyer, "that whenever Hearst has had himself 
written up in the paper lately, he has had his per- 
sonal morality and abstinence set forth in glowing 
terms. Among other things it is impressed on the 
audience that Willie neither smokes nor uses intoxi- 
cating liquors. This righteous talk, in the face of 
what is actually known about Hearst's life, reminds 
me of what I once saw in the Superior Court. A small 
boy, who was a pretty tough customer, was brought 
by his father before the court to be sent to the re- 
form school. The Judge didn't want the boy to be 
punished without cause, so he had witnesses called 
to prove that the boy was as bad as he was painted. 
The testimony proved that he was worse. He stole, 
he beat his little sister, he told malicious lies, he set 
things afire, he broke windows, he was the leader 
of a gang of amateur highwaymen — in fact, he had 
committed enough crimes to keep him in jail for a 
thousand years. The Judge got through with the 
testimony, then shook his head. "Young man, you're 
a pretty hard nut," he said. "What have you got to 
say in defense of yourself?" The kid put up a pitiful 
whimper, and turning to the Judge, he said extenu- 
atingly, 'Please, Jedge, I don't smoke nor swear.' 

"This reminds me of Hearst, who, knowing it's no 
use to defend his larger actions, publishes abroad 
to the world that he neither smokes, chews or spits." 

• • • 

Amelia Bingham, at the Columbia, has a distin- 
guished girl with her, and this girl bids about even 
for Miss Bingham's popularity. Her name is Bijou 
Fernandez. Miss Fernandez, I believe, is a daugh- 
ter of a Spanish nobleman of decimated fortune but 
untarnished splendor — untarnished, in fact, even un- 
to the second generation. Bijou rules as sublimely 
in the social court as she does on a slanting stage, 
and she is as pretty close at hand with her own com- 
plexion as she is to the gallery gods in her grease 
paint. 



Pears' 

" Beauty is but skin- 
deep" was probably meant 
to disparage beauty. In- 
stead it tells how easy 
that beauty is to attain. 

'There is no beauty 
like the beauty of health" 
was also meant to dis- 
parage. Instead it encour- 
ages beauty. 

Pears' Soap is the means 
of health to the skin, and 
so to both these sorts of 
beauty. 

Sold all over the world. 



! California Safe 



Deposit and 
Trust Co. 

$> 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital & Surplus $1,233,723.76 



Total Assets 



5,914,424.59 



Interest paid on deposits, subject 
to check, at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum. 

Interest paid on savings deposits 
at the rate of three and six- 
tentbs per cent, per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are author- 
ized to act as the guardian of 
estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented at 85 
per annum and upwards. 



J. Dalzell Brown, 

Manager 



1^f\ (\f\f\ persons in Alameda 
/\j)\j\J\J County rely upon the 

Oakland Herald 



FOR ALL THE NEWS 

THE HERALD is absolutely the Home Paper of 
Greater Oakland and of Alameda County. 

THE HERALD publishes each day complete for- 
eign, cable and domestic telegraphic news. 

THE HERALD records fully each day, and par- 
ticularly on Saturday, the doings of Greater Oakland 
Society. 

THE HERALD is without question the best ad- 
vertising medium in the County of Alameda. 

SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDQE 

Attorney-at-Law 
Crocker building, San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



Californians in South Africa. 
A Few Notes. 



By Adrian Hofmeyr. 

[Dr. Adrian Hofmeyr, of Cape Colony, South Af- 
rica, ex-Peace Commissioner, gives to the News Let- 
ter a few notes of interest in reference to the Cali- 
fornians in South Africa, the trade conditions, etc. 
Dr. Hofmeyr lectured in England and in Scotland 
in 1901-1902, for the Royal Geographical Society. 
He is a noted explorer, is connected with important 
business enterprises in South Africa, and was closely 
associated with Cecil Rhodes in his Northern Expan- 
sion of South Africa. Dr. Hofmeyr was born a Brit- 
ish subject in Cape Colony in 1854. He is of Hugue- 
not and Holland ancestry, and is descended from one 
of the oldest families in South Africa, the family of 
Hofmeyr having lived there one hundred and sev- 
enty-five years.] 

Of the Americans now in South Africa the larger 
number comes from California. Foremost among 
them are Gardiner Williams, John Seymour and Ar- 
thur Webb, as engineers, and they are better known 
than any English engineers out there. In fact, all 
of the Californians who are engaged in mining have 
attained prominence because of their experience and 
good business qualifications. They are also well- 
received socially, are good men, and are highly re- 
spected. 

Mr. John Hays Hammond, who went to Johan- 
nesburg as an engineer in the gold-fields, was very 
successful. He became implicated, however, in politi- 
cal matters — the Jameson raid, as it is called — and is 
now in New York. He was one of the most experi- 
enced engineers in that country, and one of the 
most foremost and enterprising men. It is very 
likely that he will return there soon. 

Mr. Gardiner Williams, the foremost of all the 
Californians, and of all the mining men in that coun- 
try, went from California to Kimberley about twenty 
years ago, under engagement as an engineer in the 
diamond mines at Kimberley. He succeeded Mr. 
Rhodes as general manager, and is the most promi- 
nent man in Kimberley, next to the late Mr. Rhodes. 
He is the moving spirit of the place, and has done 
more toward its advancement than any one else, ex- 
cepting his employer. He has accumulated a for- 
tune, and receives a salary of about $50,000 a year. 
He has several sons and daughters, and his family 
live in comfort and luxury in a magnificent mansion. 
His eldest son, Alpheus, is an ens-ineer at Kimberlev, 
is a worthy successor to his talented father, and bids 
fair to make a brilliant record. The family occa- 
sionally visit the United States, but they consider 
Kimberley as their home, and no doubt they will 
permanently reside there. His family, now in New 
York, (or were recently) have expressed a desire 
to return, as they are "home sick." Mr. Williams 
accumulated an immense fortune there, I believe, and 
himself and his family are naturally attached to the 
city in the development of which he did so much. 
The climate is milder and brighter than that of Cali- 
fornia, and there are no sudden changes of weather. 
And as there are excellent schools in Kimberley, 
and all the comforts and luxuries of life, they natu- 
rally prefer to remain where their greatest interests 
are — the scene of Mr. Williams' great success. 
Mr. Arthur Webb, a Californian, is an experi- 



enced mining engineer, and is doing good work at 
Johannesburg. He is prominent in mining circles, 
and is well liked by all and possesses the confidence 
of the public. 

Mr. Garthwaite, another Californian, is an engi- 
neer in one of the principal gold mines in Rhodesia, 
and has made a success. 

These gentlemen are experienced and trustwor- 
thy, and have done much toward the development of 
the mining industries of the country. Being on the 
spot, and with their experience, they take advantage 
of any mining 'boom' and know about when the boom 
will take place. The mines are in a very prosperous 
condition,, and their scientific and comparatively 
economical development is mainly due to the engi- 
neers. While the majority of engineers are from 
England, there are also a number of Californians who 
are equally as experienced, and a few of them are 
more widely known than the English engineers, as 
stated. 

Another of the Californians was Mr. Joseph Cle- 
ment, an experienced engineer, who, unfortu- 
nately, was killed during the war. He had volun- 
teered in a British Engineering Corps, and while 
engaged in repairing a bridge near Bloemfontein, he 
was killed together with Mr. Jack Seymour and sev- 
eral Englishmen. Mr. Clement held a high place as 
engineer in the mines at Johannesburg, and was well 
liked by his business associates and many friends. 
Air. Seymour also held an important position, and 
was a man of much promise. His death was exceed- 
ingly regretted. 

Engineers of experience and reliability, and who 
come well-recommended, have no difficulty in find- 
ing permanent and lucrative employment. The low- 
est salary paid is, I believe, about $5,000 a year for 
an experienced man. There are a number of Cali- 
fornians in South Africa whom I have not met, as I 
most generally meet only those connected with min- 
ing. There are two brothers named Pickstone, from 
San Jose, who are engaged as managers of some 
of the fruit farms of Mr. Cecil Rhodes, near Cape 
Town. They are excellent horticulturists, and have 
other interests in addition. Cape Town and its 
vicinity has an equitable climate, and is specially 
adapted to fruit growing. All of that country is 
well-adapted to horticulture — from Cape Town to 
Johannesburg, one thousand miles, the climate does 
not vary over ten degrees. Johannesburg is 6,000 
feet above sea-level. I understand there are a num- 
ber of Californians engaged in the fruit business in 
that section. 

There is a great deal o£ mining machinery ship- 
ped from California to the South African gold fields. 
A great deal is also shipped from England. Agri- 
cultural implements in large quantities are also im- 
ported from California. Horses and mules are im- 
ported from California in large numbers, this being 
the best market. Several of the importers are Cali- 
fornians. They import fine race-horses, trotting 
horses, and also mules for the farms. The Hall 
brothers are Californians, and are extensive horse- 
dealers. The demand for horses and mules is increas- 
ing. 

Lumber is also imported in large quantities from 
California, especially Oregon pine, which is used for 
flooring and ceilings. The Cape is an excellent mar- 
ket, and among the heavy shippers is Mr. William 
Taylor of Oakland. The houses in that country are 
of brick and stone." 






July 1 8. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»5 



We prefer to import lumber and conserve our 
magnificent forests. That is why we import lumber 
from California. We have a Department of Forestry 
anil the law for the preservation of trees is very 
stringent. As the demand for lumber incn 
builders must look elsewhere. This is. I think, a 
wise provision, and I often tell my audiences, in lec- 
turing, that we prefer to buy our timber rather than 
destroy our noble forests. 

Kimberley is more prosperous than ever, and the 
gold mines also at Johannesburg are producing hand- 
somely. The Kaffirs who work in the mines receive 
about one dollar a day and board and lodging. There 
are about fourteen thousand of them employed in 
the diamond mines, and about 100,000 in the gold 
mines. The white population of the city of Kimber- 
ley is about 60,000, and of Johannesburg about 100,- 
000. In Kimberley there is an ample supply of good 
water which is pumped from the Vaal, eighteen miles 
distant. We have electric lights, tram-cars, excellent 
hotels, and three daily newspapers, printed in Eng- 
lish and in Dutch. 

The threatened emigration of the Boers will not 
take place — the emigrating fever has about died out. 
A few may leave gradually, but there will be nothing 
like a general emigration. The movement is unpopu- 
lar; public sentiment is against it; and the leaders 
of the country have argued with the dissatisfied ele- 
ment, and convinced them that they can do better 
in their own country, where they are familiar with its 
conditions, than in strange lands among strange peo- 
ple. 

The people of South Africa are great sportsmen. 
Hunting, shooting and racing find many devotees, 
whilst the younger generation is passionately de- 
voted to all English outdoor games, such as cricket 
and football. Social life has a great charm — our 
climate, the nature of the country, the scenery, added 
to the character of the people — both Briton and Boer 
— are hospitable to a fault, and make life out there 
really worth living. 



EVERYBODY HAPPY. 

"I never had a pleasanter week than I had at Hotel 
Vendome, San Jose," said the Solid Citizen to the 
Pioneer, when they met on 'Change. "It was pretty 
quiet in San Jose when I was there in '5 !" replied 
the Pioneer, trying to be facetious. "It's quiet there, 
now," said the Solid Citizen, "but it's the right sort 
of quiet. You can do anything you please — ten-pins, 
golf, automobiles, driving, walking, or you can sit 
still on the big porches and talk to the best sort of 
people. It's all right. I'm going back." "Me, too !" 
said the Pioneer. 



The Presbyterians at the late Assembly prayed 
for the confusion of Mormonism. The Mormon 
street missionaries, who infest Post street in the 
early evening, are praying for the overthrow of 
Presbyterianism. It recalls Ambrose Bierce's famous 
bon mot — "Poor old God !" 



There is some complaint because the Chinese 
lottery places are so greatly patronized by white men. 
In the first place, it is the fault of the Police that 
the places exist; in the second, they are almost the 
only places in town where the gambling is straight. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
Cures Poison-Oak and all Skin Diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



-Are you tired? Go to the Post-St. Turkish Baths. 



TAPESTRY 

PAINTINGS 



Spacial designs for special rooms furoisbed. 

2000 tapestry pairjtiogs to choose frorrj. 

38 artists employed, irjcluding gold medalists 

from tbe Paris Salop 

Stained Glass, Relief, Carpets, Furniture, Parquetry 

Tiles, Window Shades, Art Hangings, 

Draperies, Etc., Etc. 



RIISSUN TAPFSTRY For Wal1 Hangings in colorings to 
i\UJJI*Pl IAILJIIVI ma t c h all kinds of woodwork, car- 
1 'is and draperies. To be pasted on like wall paper, 52 
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Burlaps, and has taken the place of Burlaps in private 
homes, being softer, smoother and more rich and restful. 
\\ e commend these most highly. We have made special 
silk draperies to match them. Send for samples. 

Gobelin Art Crfi.lfniK For Wal1 Hangings and Dra- 

uuu.liu ftl I vrcdlUu!). peries. We have them in styles 
ot Grecian, Russian, Venetian, Rococo, Dresden, Festoon 
Marie Antoinette, Indian, Calcutta, Delft, and we have dra- 
peries to match. Send for samples. 

Will PAPFRS New styles, designed by gold medal ar- 
il hl,1v irtlLUJ. tigts _ See our Antic , uep jietalic. French, 
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Utt A PFRIF's We have draperies to match all kinds of 
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you want to spend, you must have harmony in form and 
color. Send for samples. 

FRFF If you wm send us * he floor Plans of your house 

1 IVLL. we will send you free a color scheme, illustrated 
by samples themselves. (Regular charge for this is $25.00). 
Tell us what you want on the walls of the principal rooms- 
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THllrtl slx 3 nour tapestry painting lessons, in studio, 
JWIIUUL* $5.00. Complete written instructions by mail, $1.00. 
Tapestry paintings rented; full size drawings, paints* 
brushes, etc., supplied. Nowhere, Paris not excepted, are such 
advantages offered pupils. New catalogue of 175 studies, 
25c. Send $1.00 for complete instructions in tapestry paint- 
ing and compendium of studies. 

Tanpsrrv Material*; ^". e manufacture Tapestry Mater- 
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Send $1.50 for trial order, for two yards of 50-inch wide No 
6 goods, worth $3.00. 



Doulhitt's Manual of 
Art Decorations. 



When in New York do not fall t visit our house. 



JOHN R D0UTH1TT, 

THE DOVTHITT BUILDING 

273 Fifth Avenue, near 30th Street, NEW YORK. 



16 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Moves arvd Countermoves. 



July 1 8, 1903. 



A Representative Citizen for Mayor. 

As the time approaches to line up candidates for the 
city election, the names of many men good, bad and 
indifferent are suggested for the position of Mayor 
of San Francisco. Among those prominently known 
and well qualified is Edward H. Aigeltinger, ex- 
member of the Board of Supervisors, who stepped 
in as chairman of the finance committee of that body 
when the problem of liquidating the indebtedness of 
the corporation was a matter of much concern to the 
merchants who supplied the city. Mr. Aigeltinger 
solved the problem, paid the indebtedness and made 
a lasting record as a man of affairs. His name is 
mentioned by some of the most representative citi- 
zens, who know his worth and ability, and they aver 
that as he was so conscientious as a Supervisor, he 
would make an ideal chief executive of the city. Mr. 
Aigeltinger's young manhood was spent in San Fran- 
cisco, and he has been engaged in business here 
since he was 19 years of age, and has been in all his 
business affairs thoroughly reliable and has from time 
to time enlarged his business, so that he is now one 
of the heaviest dealers in his line in the city. In 
case Mr. Aigeltinger would decide to stand for the 
nomination on the Republican ticket as candidate for 
Mayor he would have the assistance of some of the 
largest interests in the city. He is a member of the 
Merchants' Exchange, Builders' Exchange and Asso- 
ciation, San Francisco Hay Association, President of 
the Golden Gate Driving Association, connected with 
a well-known financial institution, and member of 
several fraternal organizations. His dealings with la- 
bor organizations have been most agreeable, and they 
as well as financial interests would be sure of fair 
treatment at his hands as executive of the city of 

San Francisco. 

• • • 

Though it is months before the Senatorial contest 
will occupy public attention to any great extent, the 
politicians are already gossiping about candidates. 
Senator Bard will not say that he is a candidate, nor 
deny that he may be. His reticence in the matter 
is construed by his friends as meaning that he does 
not care for the place, but will accept it if the people 
of the State insist ; while his enemies say that he is 
not going to come out as a candidate unless he is 
sure of being re-elected. Probably, as is the case in 
most matters of the kind, friends and enemies are 
partly correct. If Bard retires he does not leave 
many visible successors, although when the time 
comes no doubt there will be candidates enough. 
U. S. Grant, Jr., is eliminated from the running, as 
he wants to be vice-President, and he can hardly ex- 
pect to carry the Senatorship in his pocket while 
he chases the higher office. Ex-Governor Gage would 
not object to the place, but he is already largely a 
has-been in politics, like his predecessor fromPasa- 
dena. It is likely the candidate will be a new man. 
Henry T. Oxnard, the beet sugar king, is most gen- 
erally mentioned for the place. Oxnard is a very 
pleasant fellow, spends his money in good style, 
which no Senator from this State has done since 
Stanford died, and has shown himself an astute ooli- 
tician since he managed to defeat the Cuban Reci- 
procity Treaty with the President behind it. He 
would not have the opposition that Bard would meet 
with, but on the other hand, he has resided so little 
in the State that it would seem like a second case 
of Senator Brice of Ohio, who was practically a 
third Senator from New York. 



Excursion Eeist 

I am organizing an excursion to points East, 
to leave San Francisco August 18 to 19; August 
25 to 26. 

Rates for round-trip tickets will be exception- 
ally low. Stop-overs granted also. 

Write me when you intend going, and I will 
quote rates, with folders and map of route. 

F. W. PRINCE. 

641 Market Street. San Francisco. 



Phonb Main 1221 



Breaefa&t From 5:30. 



Lunch From 11 



Iiannigan's Cafe J and Grill 

FINEST BRANDS OF WINES 
AND LIQUORS 

W. N. HANNIGAN. PROP. - 120-126 CALIFORNIA ST.. 8. F. 

BAY 

STATE 

RESTAURANT 

N. n. ADLER, Prop. 



Ladled' Grill. 

Private Rooms. 

Elegant Apartments. 

Open All Night. 
Private entrance. O'Parrell, near Stockton 

Main entrance 
29-35-37 Stockton Street 

Tel. Main 5057 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Every dellcatessan. 

Domestic and Imported Beers. 



Lunch 

Cole 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



BOB KERN 



PHONE MAIN 1316 



J. H. PEIN 



Have You Noticed 

That the Sunday Call is publishing in two, or at 
most three issues, a complete novel? 

"To Have and to Hold." 

"When Knighthood Was in Flower" 

"Lazarre" 

"The Octopus" 
and a half-dozen others of the leading popular novels | 
have already appeared. 

In addition, short stories by the best writers ap- 
pear every Sunday. 

Subscribers thereby secure one or more $1.50 
novels without charge, besides having at hand the 
best newspaper published in San Francisco. Then, 
too, every six-months' subscriber can secure a copy 
of the CRAM ATLAS of the world (regular price 
$800) for $1.50, or a $2.00 Cook Book for 50 cents. 



RESTAURANTS. 



'Bob Kjern S3L Co. 



THE BOUQUET 
SALOON 



634 Market Street 



SOkn Franclsce 



Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

FINE MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Served every day from 11 to 2 o'clock. Finest 
Wines. Liquors and Cigars. 
SEEBA e£ DOLAN, Proprietors 

312 Sansome St., cor. Halleck, San Francisco. 
Telephone Black 602. 
Red Top Whiskey now on sale. 



July 18, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 




_>*£ ^_L^ 



ociety 






Dear Bessie: I have an engagement to tell you of 
this week which seems to have caused some little 
surprise, though why it should is not very clear. 
It has been more than hinted at for several months 
past, but is now formally announced. Kate Robinson 
is the bride-to-be, and the happy man is George 
Beardsley, who made such a name for himself as 
no end of a good fellow over at Sausalito last year. 
There is some talk, I understand, of his becoming 
one of the resident circle over there, which includes 
the Costigans and Claude Hamilton, but I hardly 
think it so; anyhow, nothing will be decided upon 
till after the wedding, which is to take place this 
autumn. The Robinsons, you know, have been living 
in the Jarboe cottage at Santa Cruz for several weeks 
past, but Mrs. Jarboe, who it was thought would 
make her home in New York, has come back again 
to her old love, California, but whether Santa Cruz 
or San Francisco is to be her abiding place I have not 
heard. 

Although apart from Clara Swigart'fe wedding 
there, are none exactly on the carpet, the future is 
not without promise. In August there is to be the 
wedding of Bertie Bruce and Ferd Stephenson, which 
is to be a church ceremonial, and in August also, 'tis 
said, we are to have that of Therese Morgan and Nor- 
ris Davis, and great things are expected; then, again, 
'tis also said it will not come off earlier than Novem- 
ber. Therese has her trousseau all completed and 
packed away. Only a few have seen her "things" as 
yet, but those who have fairly rave over them. Then 
early in September — I do not know if the date is set 
or not — but it will be somewhere near the first, I un- 
derstand, the Flint-Apperson wedding will take place, 
and Mrs. Hearst is to give her niece a grand send-off 
and then she herself will be off for a trip to Japan, 
where she will remain till the close of the year. 

The McCallas have gone and the Millers have come, 
and thereby we are both the losers and gainers here 
in San Francisco. Kitty went up to Mare Island for 
the sail loft-dance last week, and heard all about the 
dinner given the night before at the bachelors' mess 
in honor of the Miller girls, which was a very swell 
affair. One feature of the sail-loft reception was the 
presentation to Mrs. Miller of a silver bowl from the 
ladies at the Yard, Mrs. Zahm, she said, making the 
presentation in some very prettily chosen words. 

There was quite a discussion among the girls at 
the cosy tea that Charlotte Ellinwood gave last Fri- 
day on the subject of the last fad of going bare- 
headed on horseback ; but there was so much for and 
against it no definite decision was arrived at. I do 
not, however, think it will be generally accepted by 
the women— with the men it is another story alto- 
gether. On Thursday a lot of us girls went out to 
see the baseball game at the Presidio, between the 
Coast and the Field Artillery; Kitty White Feeter 
is still at the Presidio, her husband having exchanged 
from the 19th to the 7th Infantry, but that regiment 
is booked for the Philippines, and it is only a question 
of a few weeks, I believe, till we bid them adieu also. 
Bettison left for West Point this week ; the Wyoming 
has also gone from our gaze, and the Santa Barbarites 
will have the felicity of seeing her for several weeks 
to come. 



The Josselyna have had a succession of house par- 
tics, small in size, but pleasant all the same, and I 
believe intend to keep them up all summer. The 

rge Martins arc going there soon, and the Mur- 
phys are booked for later on. Mollie is. of course, 
having the usual splendid time in Honolulu, ac- 
corded to all the girls who go over to the Islands 
from here, but Mrs. Hatch, whom she went to visit, 
is a great favorite, and her guests are sure of en- 
tertainment among her friends there. Tarn McGrew 
has arrived from that Island Paradise, and is to spend 
some time in San Francisco before he goes on to 
his studies in dear, gay, delightful Paree. Meantime 
his friends are making much of him while he is here. 

I saw Jacqueline Moore the other day just home 
from an automobile trip up in the Lake region ; she 
is quite wild over the delights of that mode of 
locomotion, the only drawback being the poor roads. 
Apropos of the auto, I am sure you will be sorry to 
hear of the misfortune that has befallen poor Ethel 
Hager. While she was "doctoring" her machine down 
at Monterey last week, some part of the machinery 
hit her a blow, breaking her arm. She was very 
plucky and made light of it, but it is really too bad, 
for she made things so jolly down there. Dottic 
Eells has come back from her visit to the Conrad Bab- 
cocks at Fort Assiniboine; she says she had no end 
of a good time, but all the same I think she is not 
sorry to be in the white settlements again. 

There have been a lot of people up on the Mc- 
Cloud river this summer, and now the whole Taylor- 
Hopkins outfit are going there — papa Hopkins has 
a cottage in that region — to spend several weeks. 
They were there last year and the most marvelous 
tales were wafted this way of the catches of fish made 
by the girls, so I daresay there will be more to be 
heard in the same strain ere long. 

Linie McLaren has taken her interesting family of 
young people up to Guerneville for the month of July, 
and Christine Pomeroy is there also, though she and 
her mother are almost due at Lake Tahoe; the W. 
J. Irwins have been among the throng at that de- 
lightful sheet of water — Tahoe — this month ; Laura 
Van Wycke is there now, and so are the George 
Boardmans. Cora Smedburg, who has been keeping 
very quiet the past year, has been making quite a 
long visit to Ethel Tompkins in Ross Valley; her 
brother, Captain "Ren," and his wife, who sail for 
the Philippines in August, are to spend the interven- 
ing time until the day of departure at the parental 

Mavis Consolidated Gold I 
and Copper Mining Co. J 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000. £ 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of Cali- • 

fornia. Q 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma m 
County, Arizona. . Q 

No assessments will be levied. • 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share Q 

for development purposes. The ore in sight is prac'.i- • 

cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock is /) 

enhausted, the price will he raised to 50 cents a 

share. () 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 * 

Market street, for prospectus which gives full infor- A 

mation. m 

VINCENT NBALE, Secretary. A 



*<z±m<^m<±>9 < ^*<±m<2* -c* »<^%^^%<^%<^m<^^^9 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1 8, 1903. 



abode; the Ashton Potters, who are also birds of pas- 
sage to Manila, are here now. 

The Bowens and Anna Head left on Wednesday 
last for a long absence in Europe; Helen and Edna 
Dickens are down at Santa Barbara visiting the 
Stows, and having such a good time, as they express 
it; Mary Voorhies has been staying with Frances 
Harris at Menlo Park, and has since then been at 
Blithedale; Mr. and Mrs. Jack Spreckels are home 
from their visit to Coronado ; the McBeans are back 
from San Rafael ; Mrs. Jessie Bowie-Detrick, who has 
been visiting Mrs. Willie Howard at San Rafael, re- 
turned to the city early in the week, and the Latham 
McMullins, who have been paying a long visit to 
Santa Barbara, are again in town. 

Boating, fishing and riding combine still to rend.er 
Hotel Belvedere one of the favorite summer re- 
sorts. The place is a whirl of amusement, and some 
of the most prominent society people are always to 
be found there. 

Mrs. Emma G. Butler entertained at luncheon at 
the Hotel Rafael on Tuesday Mrs. Frank Johnson, 
Mrs. F. H. Lefavor, Mrs. William Gwin, Miss Gwin, 
Mrs. Adam Grant, Mrs. W. J. Somers, Mrs. M. P. 
Jones, Mrs. George D. Toy, Mrs. H. C. Breeden, 
Mrs. W. E. Dean, Mrs. W. L. Dean, Mrs. H. P. Sonn- 
tag, Mrs. L. L. Baker, Mrs. Porter, Mrs. Grant Sel- 
fridge, Mrs. E. H. Hedges, Mrs. F. H. Green, Mrs. M. 
Casey, Mrs. F. H. Anderson. 

Miss M. Toy, at the Hotel Rafael, gave a luncheon 
on Monday to Miss H. Baker, Miss Gertrude Van 
Wyck, Miss Edythe Sonntag, Mrs. Grant Selfridge, 
Herbert Berker and Stanford Gwin. 

Miss W. P. Fuller and Miss Florence M. Bailey 
ran down from Burlingame to Del Monte in Mr. 
Fuller's Winton. They are staying at the hotel. 

Mr. Roy M. Pike, Mr. Percy Pike and Mr. H. D. 
Bell are having fine times at Del Monte. 

Among the guests at Del Monte are W. L. Porter, 
W. W. Carson, Mrs. G. P. Hayne and family of San 
Mateo, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Moore and Miss Wagner. 

Among visitors at the Occidental Hotel arc F.. 
Burton Holmes of Chicago, James A. Wilder "I 
Honolulu, Frank Donahue, a newspaper proprietor 
of Australia. 

Among the recent visitors from San Francisco at 
Byron Hot Springs are J. Ricard, T- E. Meyerstein, 
H. A. Clarke, A. L. Peyser, Archie Muscat, W. T. 
Mahoney, Mrs. Joseph Newman, L. Dresner, J. G. 
Burton, J. L. Cahill, H. Rostenberg, J. H. Kingman, 
Joseph May, H. Ramsdell, Colonel F. M. Coxe. 

Over six hundred people attended the garden fete 
in the grounds of George T. Marsh at Mill Valley. 
The purpose was the raising of a fund for a village 
drinking fountain for man and beast. The grounds 
were beautifully illuminated, and pretty girls in Jap- 
anese costume provided refreshments in dainty little 
tea houses. Howard Scott and his assistants offered 
a brew which was more seductive and potent than 
tea. A natural amphitheatre was constructed by 
erecting a platform for the orchestra and the plavers, 
sitting in a semi-circle on the hillside. The Orpheus 
Club opened the programme. George C. Borneman 
and William H. Sieberts gave a German-Irish sketch. 
Miss Jean Logan rendered a Japanese dance ; Howard 
Scott gave a monologue, and Jack Cathcart sang Irish 
songs. A very clever travesty on "Florodora" was 
rendered by Miss Rogers, Miss Mead, Miss Logan, 
Rita Hanna, Howard Trull, and W. H. Siebert. The 
affair was a splendid success. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Barker, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
L. House, Mr. and Mrs. Frank F. Bostwick have 



gone to Glen Alpine Springs, where they will spend 
the month of July. 

A very pretty marriage 'took place at the Palace 
Hotel, Wednesday, July 15th, Mr. Frederick Alfred 
Marriott and Miss Marion Isabel Merriman being 
the contracting parties. Rev. Dr. R. C. Foutc per- 
formed the ceremony. Mrs. Marriott is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Merriman of Mt. View, 
Santa Clara County. The newly married couple left 
Thursday for Southern California, where the honey- 
moon will be spent. 

It is almost time for the August hegira to Del 
Monte to begin, and the Costigans are among the first 
to turn their footsteps that way, where I believe they 
are to remain several weeks. The Breedons have 
got over to the Hotel Rafael at last; they have been 
looked for since early in the season. Jack Casser- 
ley and his wife are there, also, while Mrs. Casserley, 
the elder, and Daisy, are to spend the rest of the sea- 
son at the Beylard cottage at San Mateo, I hear, 
while the owners are off on a coaching trip down 
South. Duplessis is a crack whip, as no doubt you 
remember; you surely have cause to think so, but 
whether he is taking a pay party or just a few guests, 
does not seem to be known. Azalia Keyes was doing 
Spain at last accounts, and laying in a stock of man- 
tillas and fans as mementoes of her visit; the Aleck 
Keyes are talking of a trip to the Yellowstone, and 
then to Howell Mountain for awhile. 

Dr. Byron Haines and his daughter, after a month 
spent in visiting various cities in the East, returned 
last Friday. 

Mr. S. Gump and wife left last Saturday for Tahoe, 
where they will spend their vacation. 



Genuine 
Alteration Sale 

Suits, Coats, Waists, Etc. 

Immense 
Reductions 

We will occupy our entire 
building as soon as altera- 
tions are corrjpleted ^e n^ 

Armand Cailleau, Inc. 

312-114-116 KEARNY STREET. 






July 18, 1903. 

Apropos of Labor Agencies. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

EDUCATIONAL. 



19 



Last week the News Letter had an article op 
ploy men t agencies, in which an account v 
of how agents and employers stand in — the ag 
receiving; live dollars for procuring a man a job, the 
employer discharging him within a few days, and 
the two of them dividing the money. 

This is an old practice, and I recall hearing of a 
case in which the employer was somewhat woi 
He ran a lo<ja;inp; camp up in Sonoma County, em- 
ploying a larsje number of men — also a man cook to 
prepare meals for them. He had a new cook about 
once a week, dividing with the employing agent the 
fees the men paid for a few days' work. 

One day, shortlv after noon, a new cook appeared 
at the cook-hous.e, and announced to the man already 
there that he had come to take charge. The incum- 
bent expressed considerable surprise, saying that he 
had been there only a week, then recalled the fact 
that the man before him had held the job a similar 
length of time. The two of them talked it over, and 
concluded that they were victims of a game of graft. 
So they put their heads together and planned re- 
venge. 

At last they formed a plan and proceeded to carry 
it out. Procuring a big wash-tub they filled it nearly 
full of flour, then stirred in water until they had 
a fine mess of dough. This they managed to get into 
the oven. Next they built up a roaring fire, which 
they kept going for a couple of hours. Then they 
fished the half-cooked mess out, and by means of a 
plank rolled it onto the dining-room table. They 
picked up their blankets then and strolled off for new 
pastures, feeling well repaid for their trouble in imag- 
ining the wrath of the boss when he would find no 
cook, a cold stove, and nothing but a huge lump of 
soggy dough for his hungry crew's supper. 



The S. & G. Gump Co. will hold their annual mid- 
summer sale beginning on Monday next, July 20th. 
at their store 113 Geary street. The reputation of 
this store is sufficient guarantee of the artistic excel- 
lence of the articles which will be offered for sale. 
There is a marked reduction in all prices and the 
opportunity is an excellent one for those who wish 
to secure valuable art products at reasonable prices. 
The sale will include glassware, ornaments, bric-a- 
brac, crockery, cabinets, tables and all similar arti- 
cles. 



Ex-Bank Commissioner Kevane will test the new 
law. He threatens to bring suit to enjoin the new 
Commissioners. He has made a demand on the 
State Comptroller for a warrant for his salary as 
Bank Commissioner. The Commission was abolished 
by act of the last Legislature. His demand upon the 
Comptroller was refused, and suit will be brought to 
test the validity of the new law which abolished the 
old Commission. 



Many Appetizing Dishes 

can be made doubly delightful and nutritious by the use 
of Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream, which is not 
only superior to raw cream, but has the merit of being 
preserved and sterilized, thus keeping perfectly for an in- 
definite period. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., proprietors. 



The Star Hair Remedy — Best of all tonics and re 

storatives. Stops falling, cures dandruff, restores color 
Not a dye. At druggists and hairdressers. Accept n 
substitute. Star Remedy Co., 386 Geary street. 



Hitchcock Hilitary Academy 

SflN RAFAEL. CAL. 

SEPARATE BUILDING FOR LITTLE 

. . . BOYS . . . 

Xmas terrrj will begin Aug. 17th. 

EIGHTH YEAR. 

'"Beaulieti" 

Boarding and Day School for Girls 
2601 COLLEGE AVE. BERKELEY CAL. 

A L MoCVLLOVGH, Princjpa.1 

Catalogue furntaaed on application. Telebone Mason 1686. 

BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, anc" illustrating 
Life classes. $3.00 per month. 

9a7 HARKET STREET, 



nun 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 

Illustrated Catalogue Free 



WRINKLES 



Living: proof of our marvellous skill In removing wrinkles on exhibition 
from 1 to 6 daily- 81000 reward for a case we cannot cure. 
Importers of "Everything for the Face." 
Torrance's Boudoir Wrinkle Plasters 8l a box. 
Torrance's Boudoir Tan Plasters 5Lc a box. 
Samples 10c* Stamps booklet. Established 1867 . Phone Black 1535. 

SUR-NEY-TOR-R.ANCE, Skin Specialists' 
408 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



.5*. SCHLAMM..... 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

First-class Workmanship and Fitting at 
Reasonable Prices. 

Military, Naval and Society Uniform Equipments a Specialty 

140 Phelan Building, San Francisco. 

Cor. Market and O'Farrell Sts. Tel. Red 6921. 



"Bon Marc he Clothing R^eno-Oatory 

40 Ellis Street, Rooms 14-15-16. 

SUITS CLEANED AND PRESSED $1.00. 

luits Called for and Delivered Free. SUITS PRESSED WHILE YOU 
SLEEP. Repairing and Alterations. OPEN ALL NIGHT. We run 
lour wagons. Telephone Drumm 44. 



La Grande Laundry 



Tel. Bush 12. 

Principal Office— 23 Powell St. Branch Office— 11 Taylor St 
Laundry— 12th St., between Folsom and Howard Streets. 



GOLDEN WEST CLOTHING REN0VAT0RY 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Phone Main 1157. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed IJ-00 

Monthly Contracts 1-50 



PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY 



No. » Lick Place. 




Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, $1 per month; 
12 hand or roller towelB $1.60 per month. Trt. 
Main 1780. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



BANKING. 



Th)e San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast Corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. 

JAS. K. WILSON, President; WM. PIERCE JOHNSON, Vice- 
President; LEWIS I. COWGILL, Cashier; P. W. WOLFE, As- 
sistant Cashier. 

Capital, $500,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits, $180,000. 

DIRECTORS— Wllllan J. Dutton, C. S. Benedict, William 
Pierce Johnson, H. E. Huntington, George A. Newhall. Orestis 
Pierce, George A. Pope, James K. Wilson, L. I. Cowglll. 

AGENTS: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National 
Bank, Chemical National Bauk. Boston— National Shawmut 
Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City-* 
First National Bank. London — Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris- 
Morgan, Harjes & Co. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. 
Johannesburg— Robinson South African Banking Co., Limited. 

T^e Canadian Bank, of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. ' 
HEAD OFFICE— Toronto. 
Paid-up Capital, 88,700.000 Reserve Fund, 83 000.000 

Aggregate Resources, over $70,000,000. 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. Walker, General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard Street. E. C. 
NEW TORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlln, Cranbrook, 
Fernle, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmlth. Nanalmo, Nelson, 
New "Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 
Also 80 other branches covering the principal points in 
Manitoba, N. W. Territories and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England. The Bank of 
Scotland. Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank. Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The Northern Trust Co. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE- 

326 California Street. 

A. KAINS. Manager. 

London, Paris and (American Bank Llullted 

N. W. Cor. 8ANSOI1E AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, 82.600,000. Paid-Up Capital, 82,000,000 

Reserve Fund, 81,100.000. 
HEAD OFFICE— W Tnreadneedle St.. London, E. C. 
AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank, Limited, No. 10 ~\all street, N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Fr res & Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissonlere. Draw direct on 
the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits Issued. 

SIG. GREE.,EBAUM. Manager: H. T. S ^REBN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 



Central Trust Co., of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital 83.0O0.0OC 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,726,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 

Trustee. 
Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money In Pro- 
bate Court proceedings. Interest paid on trust deposits and 
savings. Investments carefullv selected. 

OFFICERS: 
Frank J. Symmes, President: A. Poniatowskl. First Vice-Presi- 
dent; Horace L. Hill, Second Vlce-Presiaent; H. Brunner, Cashier 



Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California St. . San Franeisoo, f!al. 

Subscribed capital $15,000,000.00 

Paldtn capital , 3,000,000.00 

Profit and reserve fund .^ ... 450,000.00 

Interest paid on deoosita at the rate of 6 per cent per annum on term, 
and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodee, President- William Corbln, Seoy and Gen- 
eral Mana&rer. 



The r^Og'o-Californian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin i-'riars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 86,000,000 Paid-up 1,500,000 

Subscribed 3.000,000 Reserve Fund 700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
r ney, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord, William Babcock, Adam Grant 
S. L. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Baldwin. F. Monteagle, Warren D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutchen, R. H. Pease. 




Those well-meaning persons who, under the mis- 
nomer of temperance, advocate entire abstinence 
from the use of all alcoholic liquors, might do a little 
practical good by doing all in their power to estab- 
lish throughout the city free drinking fountains. All 
American cities are especially lacking in conveniences 
of this class, and San Francisco can boast only two 
public drinking places in the business portion of the 
city. A number of clean and inviting drinking foun- 
tains, kept in a sanitary condition, would not only 
add to the general health of the city, but would dimin- 
ish the custom of drinking in saloons. The Mer- 
chant's Association has seen this point, and is doing 
all in its power to bring about the desired result, but 
assuming that the advocates of so-called temperance 
would like to do some practical work, here is their 
chance to co-operate in bringing about a desired re- 
form. 

* • * 

At the present rate, San Francisco will soon rival 
New York and Chicago in sky-scrapers. Work will 
shortly be started on a new sixteen-story fire-proof 
office building on the site of the old Baldwin Annex, 
next to the new Flood building now in course of 
construction. The site is the property of "Lucky" 
Baldwin, who will tear down the old structure and 
add another palatial office building to San Francisco's 
growing list. The Crocker heirs are also arranging 
for the construction of a ten-story building in the 
heart of the retail district. The site which they will 
thus improve is the northwest corner of Post street 
and Grant avenue. The new building will be chiefly 
devoted to offices, although the ground floor will be 
rented to a retail mercantile concern. 

* * * 

Plans for the new jail which is to be built adjoining 
the Hall of Justice were yesterday completed by City 
Fngineer Girunsky. The building will have a 100- 
foot front on Merchant street, running through to 
Washington, where it will occupy the same space 
with a depth of 137 feet along the side of Dunbar al- 
ley. It will be six-stories high, constructed of sand- 
stone and brick, with terra cotta trimmings. There 
will be 210 cells, all constructed of steel plates. A 
bridge will connect the third floor of the jail with the 
second story of the Hall of Justice, thus facilitating 
the transfer of prisoners one from the other. The 
entire cost of the new jail will be $410,000. 

* • • 

The Merchants' Association, which four years ago 
started a very successful crusade against the net- 
work of overhead wires which are a menace to San 
Francisco, is again using its best efforts to secure a 
complete underground electrical system for this city. 
At the time the agitation was first started, San Fran- 
cisco was but following in the footsteps of New York, 
Boston and other great cities which had already in- 
stituted the conduit system, and the success of the 
Merchants' Association did not extend beyond the 
down-town district. It now seems that, in the mean- 
time, the pole and wire nuisance in all of the resi- 
dence districts has grown, and is still growing at a 
most annoying rate. All of the corporations using 
wires were prompt to comply with the city ordinance 



July 18. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ai 



of 1899 by removing the overhead wires and pi.lcs 
from the down-town districts, and the great forest 
of poles which has since sprung up among th< 
donees is partly attributable to the five competing 
light companies which have since combined. 'There 
now seems a fair chance of thinning out the objeo 
tionable poles and gradually introducing the under- 
ground conduit system everywhere in the city. Mr. 
I.. M. King, secretary and superintendent <>l" the 
Merchants' Association, suggests that, pending the 
placing of all wires underground, he believes it would 
be well for the city to erect the only set of poles 
permitted, renting to all companies the support for as 
many wires as they require. The News Letter 
agrees with him as to the feasibility of this plan. The 
work of placing the electric wiring of the city under- 
ground should be done as speedily as possible, and 
one phase of the matter upon which no one has as 
yet touched is the reduction of fire hazard which 
would result. In addition to being too often respon- 
sible for fires, such a network of overhead wires as 
we have in some portions of San Francisco are a seri- 
ous detriment to the fire department in extinguishing 
fires. Success to the Merchants' Association and all 
of its co-operators in the good work in hand. 

A Sovereign Remedy. 
Dr. Parker's Sure Cough Cure; one dose will stop a cough. 
It never falls. Try it. Price, 25 cents. For sale by all 
druggists. 



BANKING. 



The Smith-Premier is the standard typewriter, and 

embodies the good points a' all typewriting machines. 



1 90,000 



People depend 
upon the 



Oakland Tribune 

for all the news of the day. 

The TRIBUNE is the home paper of Oakland 
and Alameda County, and has no rival in its field. 

The TRIBUNE publishes, exclusively, the full 
Associated Press dispatches. 

All society events of the week are mirrored in 
Saturday's TRIBUNE. 

Local and State politics receive attention by 
special writers in the same issue. 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate oi JOHN R. DENNIS. Deceased. Notice Is hereby given by the 
undersigned. JOHN FARNHAM, Administrator of the EBlate o' JOHN R. 
DENNIS, Deceased, to the creditors of, and all persons having: claims 
aeainst the said deceased, to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers. 
within four months after the first publication of this notice, to the said 
Administrator, at Room 79 Chronicle Building:, junction Kearny, Geary and 
Market Streets, San Francisco, the same belnt his place for the trans- 
action of the business of the eald estate in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California. 

JOHN FARNHAM. 
Administrator of the Estate of. JOHN R. DENNIS, Deceased.. 
Dated at San Francisco, July 4. 1903. 

CARLTON W. GREENE. 
Attorney for Administrator, 
Rooms 78-78-79. Chronicle Building:. 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of WILLIAM JACOBY, Deceased. Notice is hereby grtvon 
by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM, Administrator of the Estate of 
WILLIAM JACOBY, Deceased, to the creditors of and all persons 
having: claims ag:atn°t the said Decmoed. to exhibit them with the neces' 
■ary vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this notice, 
to the said Administrator, at Room 79, Chronicle Building:, junction 
of Kearny. Geary and Market Streets the same being: his place for the 
transaction of the business of the said estate In the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California. 

JOHN FARNHAM. 
Administrator of the Kstate of WILLI A M JACOBY. Deceased. 
Dated at San Francisco, July 4, 1903. 

CARLTON W. GREBNE 
Attorney for Administrator 
Rooms 73, 76 and 79 Chronicle Buildlne 



Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Capital, Suirlus^and^Undlvlded . J] 2,000,000 

Homer S King-. Preeidci I : P. I., tlpinan, Csshlcr: Frnnk B. King, 
Aast Cashier;. Jno. K. Mills. Atsl. Caehler. 

BRANCHES.— New YorL; Salt Lake. Utah; Portland, Or. 
OrrMpnndrnta throughout the world. General banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Deposits June 30th, 1903 J33.04I.I90 

Paid-up Capital 1.000,060 

Reserve Fund 217,657 

Contingent Fund 6/6,166 

E. P. POND. President; W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vloe-Presldent; 
ROBERT WATT. Vice-President; LOVELL WHITE. Cashier; R. 
M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— Henry F. Allen, William A. Magee, W. C. B. De 
Fremery, C. O. G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, 
Fred H. Beaver, Jacob Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms 
and farming lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks 
payable In San Francisco postofflce, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express, but the responsibility of this 
bank commences only with the receipt of tho money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: t a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for re- 
ceipt of deposits only 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

FOUNDED 1864. 

Capital 12,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, July 1, 1903. 84.386.086.72 

William Alvord, President; Charles R. Bishop, Vice-President; 

Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; Irving F. Moulton, Cashier, 

Sam H. Daniels, Assistant Cashier; Win. R. Pentz, Asst. Cashier. 

Allen M. Clay, Secretary. 

DIRECTORS: 
William Alvord, President; James M. Allen, Attorney-at-Law; 
Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; William Babcock, President 
Parrott & Co.; Charles R. Bishop, Capitalist: Antolne Borel, 
Ant. Borel & Co., Bankers; Warren D. Clark, Williams, Dlmond 
& Co.; George E. Goodman, Banker: Adam Grant, Murphy, Grant 
& Co.; Edward W. Hopkins, Capitalist; John F. Merrill, Hol- 
brook, Merrill & Stetson; Jacob Stern. Levi Strauss & Co. 

Foreign and domestic exchange bought and sold. Commercial 
and travelers' letters of credit Issued, available In all parts oi 
the world. 
Correspondence solicited. Accounts invited. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 628 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,397.768,10 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June30,19t8 31,819,893.12 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann, 
Ign. Stelnhart, Emll Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter, and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; A stant Cashier, William Herr 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Gobdfellow. 

Mutual SaVingS Bank, of San Frarvolsoo 

710 MARKET ST., OPP. THIRD. 

Guaranteed 81,000,000 

Paid-up capital and surplus 440,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President; 
GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vtce-Pres't 
C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Jfhelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Charles S. 
Neal, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & v^o., or 
Exchange on city banks. 

International Banking Corporation 

Capital and Surplus Paid-in 6,783,000 

Capital and Surplus Authorized 10,000,000 

NEW YORK OFFICE— NO. 1 Wall Street. 
William L. Moyer, President; James H. Rodgers, Secretary pro 
tem; John Hubbard, Treasurer; John B. Lee, General Manager; 
William Maclntyre, Assistant General Manager. 

BRANCHES — London, City of Mexico, Singapore, Hongkong, 
Manila, Shanghai. Yokohama, Bombay, Calcutta. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— Nos. 32-34 Sansome St. F. E. 
BECK, manager: P. G. EASTWICK, JR., Cashier. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of Corpora- 
tions. Firms, and Individuals solicited. Commercial and trav- 
elers' Letters of Credit Issued, available in any part of the world. 
Cable Transfers, Foreign and DomesUc Exchange and Bullion 
bought and sold at current rates. Collections effected. Interest 
■earing certificates of deposit Issued for fixed periods. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 




The ghosts of the various East- 
High Gas Now. ern combines which from time 
to time have been dragged 
across the local stage for the benefit of bewildered 
shareholders of the S. F. Gas and Electric Company, 
will now be retired to their several closets. They are 
no more. The little game of the connubiators has 
wound up, as might naturally be expected, by the 
absorption of the Spreckels plant for $6,000,000. Li 10k- 
ing at the proposition in one light, on the absorption 
of the S. F. Gas and Electric Co. b}' the Spreckels 
concern, surveying it in another and recognizing the 
fact that out of the $8,000,000 bonds issued to buy out 
the last named company, Mr. Spreckels takes no less 
than $5,000,000. No person who ever gave the mat- 
ter a thought expected to see things work out any- 
way different than they have. As if any combination 
of sane individuals in the East or elsewhere would 
for a moment consider the purchase of an industrial 
concern of such magnitude, fighting for its life 
against a new and powerful organization like the 
Independent. The working out of the certificate 
holders in the $90 a share escrow pool that will be 
the next interesting and amusing portion of the pro- 
gramme. There is no reason why they should not 
draw down their $90 per share, those who have 
stayed in unless of course the old clique of connubia- 
tors feels like letting them take their stock back again, 
which they have the right to do under the contract, 
having no further use for it. Another way of looking 
at this little side issue, and possibly the correct way, 
is that this stock was simply corralled to ensure the 
control of sufficient stock to carry the election, the 
uninitiated jumping at the bait in the form of a high 
price, even with a "may or may not" attached to the 
option. No one possibly will ever know how many of 
the old-time shareholders were scared out of their 
holdings by the Machiavellian operations of the mar- 
ket manipulators. People who invest in what are 
generally ranked as stable, high-class securities as 
water and gas, are not usually of a speculative ten- 
dency nor posted on the ways of the street. When 
they get mixed up, as they were in the case of the 
S. F. Gas and Electric, it naturally follows they get 
rattled, and then the wolves batten on the sheep-fold. 
However, that quarter of the vineyard has been 
worked for all it is worth, and now attention will be 
paid to the dear public, who are in excellent position 
to be worked for the last cent thev can stand. Not- 
withstanding the fact that the old'eompanv cleaned 
up $40,000 profits last month, tinder all its burdens 
and a low-priced product, they have already ap] 
the lash to the consumer bv jumping the* price of 
50 cent gas to one dollar. Householders, foolish to 
go to the expense of putting in new ranges on the 
strength of a drop in the price of gas, can now be- 
gin figuring on the proposition whether it will not 
be cheaper to fall back again upon coal or oil distil- 
lates. It is pleasant in one way to know that the 
consolidation has been effected, but the unreasonable 
and unjustifiable raise in the price of gas, tantamount 
to a breach of faith with the consumer, is not at all 
a subject for congratulation. It is just possible a 



reconstruction of the Board of Directors may intro- 
[Jduce an element therein which will feel it their duty 
"fito maintain a conciliatory policy toward their cus- 
'.Ttomers, and make the old institution popular with the 
masses, which it has never been under the past re- 
gime. 

The local market for stocks and 
Local stocks in bonds has been quiet during the 
Light Demand. past week, with a very light 
demand. This is not altogether 
surprising after the way in which the owners of gas 
stocks were slaughtered lately. Such a lesson as this 
is calculated to awaken investors to the fact that 
what they have been educated in the past to recog- 
nize as staple and secure investments have degener- 
ated under the manipulation of the latter-day manage- 
ment into as risky a venture as the most skittish wild- 
cat ever floated on a mining exchange. Industrial 
shares with such a reputation can only expect atten- 
tion from people of a gambling disposition. It would 
be idle to hope for an investment in them by the 
trustees of estates or the wards of minors. The re- 
sponsibility would be too grave even if a regular run 
of dividends are guaranteed, while the returns are 
apt to be blotted out at short notice by a sudden de- 
cline in the share values. Prices remain unchanged. 
Bonds are in light demand. The annual meeting of 
the shareholders of Spring Valley has been adjourned 
until Jul}'- 29th, without voting on the question of 
transferring the property of the corporation to a 
new company. 

The habitues of Pine street are 
Pine-St. Market, still facing the regular summer 

conditions of trade in the min- 
ing stock market. A mid-summer racket on a stock 
exchange in any part of the world is about as scarce 
as the defunct donkey of proverbial fame, and San 
Francisco is not and never has been an exception 
since the history of its exchange transactions began 
to run. While quiet, the market exhibits nevertheless 
a firmer undertone, which can be accepted as indica- 
tive of an active and progressive condition of affairs 
on the Comstock, which will naturally be reflected 
later on in the development of business on the street, 
with increased values. When pumping in the deep 
levels begins again at the C. & C. shaft, which will 
probably be about the beginning of next month, an 
improvement should take place in the market. News 
from Utah indicates that this mine will be an ore pro- 
ducer before long, and the situation reported at other 
points along the lode is most encouraging. 

The channel has at last been 
An Enterprising cut in the Thistle mine, owned 
Scotch Company, by a Scotch corporation, by 
the tunnel which the company 
has been driving for two years past. This tunnel 
is 8x8 and 5480 feet long. An upraise will now be 
made about 600 feet to cut the channel, the gravel 
• of which has in the past been found very rich in 
gold. The tunnel was driven under the management 
of Mr. C. B. Wingate, who represents the Scotch 
owners on the Coast. The Thistle mine, located near 
Gibsonville in Plumas County, was paying hand- 
somely when work through the shaft had to be 
closed down, owing to the heavy influx of water. 
All means of handling the water were tried and failed, 
and it became a question of either running this 
long tunnel or abandoning the property. The owners 
were plucky enough to tackle the expensive tunnel 
proposition, and it will be hoped that their enter- 
prise will be rewarded with rich gold discoveries. 



July 18, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«3 



The Bank of 
California. 



Russian Bank 
With Local Agency. 



The stockholder.-; of the Ba 
California have decided to in- 
crease of the capital st-ick of the 
bank from 20,000 shares ol 
each to 30,000 shares of $100 each, or in other \ 
from $-',000,000 to $3,000,000. This stuck w ill bi 
d of ratably to stockholders of record at the 
of business August 1, 1903, at $300 per share. Sub- 
scriptions must be made on or before September 15. 
1903, and payments for the new stock must be made 
on or before October 1, 1903. Stockholders not wish- 
ing to take advantage of their right to subscribe may 
assign the same. This action upon the part of the 
bank was necessitated by the increased demand for 
money for legitimate purposes, and for the purpose 
of carrying out to the best advantage the business 
policy of the institution. 

The Comptoir National of 
d'Escompte de Paris will 
have the name of its local 
branch changed within the 
next three months to that of the Russo-Chinese Bank. 
This heavy concern, with head offices in St. Peters- 
burg, is about to establish an agency here to facili- 
tate the growing business of the city with the Orient. 
It has already branches in the principal cities of 
Japan, China, Manchuria and Siberia. It was this 
bank which backed the Trans-Siberian Railway, and 
its interests are heavy in the larger class of financial 
operations which Russian enterprise is now exploit- 
ing at points innumerable all over the dominions of 
the Czar. Outside of the name, it is not thought there 
will be any changes in the management of the local 
concern. 

A circular letter issued by J. 
A Promising Oil M. Wright, President of trie 
Property. Fulton Oil Company to its 

stockholders, states that the 
production of the three wells now open is 1,000 bar- 
rels of oil daily. Work on Nos. 4 and 5 is progress- 
ing, and upon final completion of No. 3, No. 6 will be 
started promptly. Two reservoirs of 100,000 barrels 
capacity each will be constructed, and a contract has 
been let for the erection of two 70 H. P. boilers as the 
beginning of a power plant for the operation of the 
wells. A pipe line will shortly cross the 'land of the 
company, so that no trouble need be expected. 



Dividends were paid on the 15th inst. as follows: 
Contra Costa Water Co., monthly, 32 cents; Port 
Costa Water Co., 30 cents ; United Gas and Electric 
Co., 15 cents; Bank of California, quarterly, $4 per 
share; Presidio R. R. Co., monthly, 20 cents; and 
Nevada National Bank, semi-annual, $3.50 per share. 



The Mission Bank is now open for business in its 
new building on the corner of Sixteenth street and 
Julian avenue. This bank is organized by the Bank 
of California, which owns the majority of its stock 
and controls its policy. The new institution, with its 
powerful backing, will undoubtedly win a large pub- 
lic patronage. It certainly has a large and prosper- 
ous section of the town in which to operate. 

Michael Casey does not appear to have had enough. 
His struggles with the Mayor have only whetted his 
appetite for more rows. He is now engaged in a dis- 
pute with the Grand Army about the erection of a 
Court of Honor for the visitors. He has ordered the 
workmen from the building. It is a poor business but 
hospitality appears to have fled from the City Hall 
with the other virtues. 



^ALWAYS 

'INSIST UPON HAVINCf 

JHE G ENUINE 

I MURRAY ft 
UNMANS 

FLORIDA WATER 



THE MOST REFRESHING AND 
DELIGHTFUL PERFUME FOR THE 
HANDKERCHIEF.TOILET AND BATH. 



City Index and Fur -chasers' Guide. 

BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms tor ladies and families. 
Private entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, 

below Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT, N. E. corner Eddy and Ma- 
son Sts. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, 
Main 429. A. B. Blanco & D. Brun. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY, 838 Guerrero street. Selections on appro- 
val; any place in the wo rld. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public and XJ. S. Pension At- 
torney. Office at Lincoln Investment Co., 620 Market St, 
opp. Palace Hotel. Tel. Bush 518. Residence 415 Van Ness. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314, S16, 318 
Main St. Iron work of every description designed and 
constructed. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best and Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors 
held on the 12th day of June, 1903, an assessment (No. 81) of fifteen 
(15) cents per share was levied upon the capita] stock of the corporation 
payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company Boom 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

THE 17th DAY OF JULY, 1903, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at publio auotion; and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on Fri day. the 7th day of August 
1903, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors, 

M. JAFFK,, Secretary. 

Office — Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Franolsco 
California- 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. ~ 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal plane of business. San Franolsco, California, Lo- 
cation of woi ks, Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 12th day of June 1903, un assessment (No. -J3) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the aoiporation, pay- 
able Immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, room 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San 
Franolsco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall rema'ln unpaid on 
17th DAY OF JULY, 1903 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at publio auotion; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on Friday, the 7th 
day of August, 1903, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors, 

A. W. HAVfiNS. Secretary 

Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco 
California 

Pacific States Mining & Investment Co. 

Established 1892. 
326 Post St.. San Francisco. European office, 64 Kaiser wllhelm 
Street, Hamburg. 
This company has agents or brokers and own offices In the 
principal cities of America and Europe. Stock issues taken 
over for sale. Stocks underwritten and guaranteed by gold 
bonds. Choice stocks for sale. Legitimate mining, oil and agri- 
cultural and industrial enterprises financed and promoted. 
Publishers of the "Pacific States Investor," the leading financial 
paper of the West. Strictest confidence observed in all com- 
munications or inquiries. Bank references. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1 8, 1903. 



I Mavis Consolidated Gold 

and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000. 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of Call- 

fornia. V 

(} Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma m 

• County, Arizona. Q 
A No assessments will be levied. • 
m 50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share A 
a for development purposes. The ore In sight Is prac'.i- • 

V cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock Is A 
? enhausted, the price will be raised to 50 cents a « 
Q share. A 
9 Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 « 

V Market street, for prospectus which gives full infor- A 

• mation. • 

VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. J 




CALIFORNIA LlfllTED 



TO CHICAGO BY WAY 
OF THE GRAND CANYON 
OF flRlZONIA : : 



Santa Fe 



Murphy, Grant & Co., 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of fur- 
nishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of "The 
NEVER-RIP" OVERALL. The best in the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, vel- 
vets, silks, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens, etc. 
Blankets, calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawls, no- 
tions, smokers' articles, stationery, underwear, 
hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., San Francisco, Cai. 



INSURANCE. 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 17S2. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St.. B. F. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co 

(Limited) of 1 lverpool. 

Ca P ,tal W7,0O0,O0O 

Balfour. Guthrie fc Co., Agents. sie California St., S. F. 



Insurance 



iiSKSSH-fFoF 



"r 




San Luis Obispo swells the California fire losses 
for this month by a disastrous conflagration, which 
occurred there on Wednesday last. The loss is roughly 
estimated at $150,000, and the property was pretty 
well insured. Spontaneous combustion is the sup- 
posed origin of the fire, which destroyed a large sec- 
tion of the business district, spreading so rapidly that 
the fire fighters were unable to cope with it. 

* * * 

The Supreme Court of the State of Montana has 
just rendered a decision which involves the taxes in 
that State, and proves of general interest, owing 
to the results which it may bring about. The de- 
cision is that insurance companies operating in that 
State are liable for taxes upon the excess of premiums 
received over losses and expenses in the country 
where their agents conduct the business. The decis- 
ion is regarded there as a very important one, and 
may greatly increase the revenues of every county 
in the State of Montana. The decision was rendered 
in the case brought against the Northwestern Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Company, a test suit. 

* * * 

The past few weeks have witnessed the birth of 
two new fire insurance companies, the Tide-Water 
Fire Insurance Company, incorporated in Maryland, 
and the Chesapeake Fire and Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, licensed in the State of Virginia. The former 
has a capital of $100,000, and Cowperthwaite, Fox & 
Co., of New York, have taken the general agency. For 
the present this company will confine itself to the 
Eastern field, although it is the expressed intention 
of its promoters to finally establish agencies in the 
West. The Chesapeake Fire and Marine Insurance 
Company will confine its attention to writing prefer- 
red and sprinkled risks within the State of Virginia. 

* * * 

The total amount of the fire losses in the United 
States and Canada during the month of June, as com- 
piled by the National Board of Fire Underwriters, is 
$14,684,350. It is estimated that July figures in the 
United States alone, will far exceed this, as we have 
the conflagrations of "the glorious Fourth" to com- 
pute therein. 

* * * 

W. G. Tarnnder, editor of the Pacific Underwriter, 
has just recovered from a protracted spell of pneu- 
monia. He is spending his days of convalescence at 
Watsonville, California, where his physicians say 

that a few sun-baths will restore his health. 

* * * 

Insurance men are gratified to find that two of the 
largest local losses reported of late are not so great 
as was at first commonly supposed. One of these is 
the fire which occurred at 321 Sansome street on June 
18th. The damage to the stock of Cunningham, Cur- 
tiss & Welch will not exceed $80,000, making about 
fifty per cent of the insurance carried by the firm. 
The loss will probably be settled some time next 
week. The fire in the plant of the Studebaker Car- 
riage Co., corner 10th and Market streets, has also 
proven less disastrous tban was originally reported. 
The adjustment of the loss has not yet been com- 
pleted, but the companies interested state that it will 
not exceed fifty per cent of the insurance carried. 



July 18. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



as 



An early morning fire occurred in the Ashv 
Hotel "ii Mason street, near Geary, last Wedm 
The building' is frame, and is only' a partial loss. The 
repairs necessary and the total loss to the proper 
estimated at about $3,500. The insurance earn 
$2,500. The lodging house is filled with roomers, 
nearly all of whom were forced to make a hast;, 
in night dress, but no one was killed or injured. 

• • • 

It is rumored that the recent consolidation of the 
gas interests of San Francisco, which resulted in 
an increase in the prevailing rates, may cause a cor- 
responding raise in the rates of fire insurance. Should 
the underwriters see fit to adopt such a course, they 
will be perfectly justified in doing so, owing to the 
fact that the revised gas rates will cause many fami- 
lies to return to the use of coal-oil lamps, which will 
greatly increase the fire hazard in a city which con- 
sists so largely of frame buildings. It is to be hoped, 
however, that few will return to these primitive 

methods of lighting. 

* • • 

The California Supreme Court has rendered a de- 
cision of great interest and importance to life in- 
surance companies, and one the tendency of which 
will be to cause prompt cancellation in future of those 
policies upon which premiums remain unpaid beyond 
the regulation time. The decision rendered is in the 
suit of Emily C. Thomas against the Northwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance Company to recover the face 
value of the policy which she held on the life of her 
husband. The decedent had paid but one premium, 
and at the time of his death owed the company two 
half-yearly premiums. As the policy was not can- 
celed, the court holds that the company had waived 
its right to declare the policy forfeited for non-pay- 
ment, and so must pay the face of the policy to the 
beneficiary named in it. 

There is a gang of small boys in Oakland, bound 
by an oath, after the dime-novel pattern, who are 
robbing and molesting the travelers of the dormitory 
burg. Still there are philanthropists who do not re- 
gret the abolition of corporal punishment as prison 
discipline. May such fall into the hands of the 
gang. 

The beef trust has been feeding twelve students 
at Washington with its preserved meats. The stu- 
dents are alive and some have been able to take a 
vacation. Either the students are tougher or the 
meat has improved since the Spanish war. 



INSURANCE. 



Petaluma is growing quite progressive. There is 
an agitation on foot to abolish the slot-machines, and 
the proprietor of an evening paper has refused to 
sign the schedule of the typographical union. Now 
that Petaluma is moving, Milpitas may take the hint, 
to say nothing of San Francisco. 

If you have not lunched at Moraghan's you have not 

tasted the delights of the best oyster house on the Pacific 
Coast. Everything is of the very test. One need never 
be afraid of what they get to eat at Moraghan's. It is above 
suspicion. The best motto as regards food is the best, and 
you get it at Moraghan's. 

"After the theatre, then to the Techau." That's what 

Pepys would have said in his diary, if he had lived in San 
Francisco. He knew the best in his day, and Techau's the 
best of your day. Best quality at reasonable prices. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 

To get a clear head try the PoBt-St. Turkish Baths. 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 3AN FRAhGI8CO. GAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $4,000,000 

PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) of LONDON, ENQ. 

C. P. MULLINS. Manager, 41J-41S California St, 8. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE. 



Founded A. D. 17H. 



of North flr 



nsurance Oompany ot i lorth i lmenca 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PBNN. 

Pald-Up Capital $8,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,022,018 

JAMBS D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D., 1720. 

Capital Pald-Up, J3.44S.100. Assets, $24,882,043.16 

Surplus to Policyholders, $8,830,431.41. Losses Paid, over 1134,000,000 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager. 601 Montgomery Street. 

HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

_. _ . OF NEW ZEALAND. 

Capital. $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDER. 

Office In company's building, 812 California street. 

CLINTON FOLGBR, Aotlnit Manaeer. 
The Lambla Realty Co., City Agents, EOS California Street 

Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Dep't 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St 

Unexcelled for liberality and security 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office : 

Pacific Mutual Building 

San Francisco 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT, GERMANY. 

Capital $2,260,000 Assets $10.»84.*fc 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manager. 
Pacific Coast Department: 201-208 Sansomr St, San Francisco. 

North German Fire Insurance Go. 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St. S. F. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



UNREST. 

Why need I fear immortal wrath 

For worldly snares? 
Why need I keep in virtue's path. 

When no one cares.'' 
Why should I rein my nature in — 
Whip hack the passion that within 
Surges and seethes with thoughts of sin, 

When no one cares? 

Why must I keep from love's embrace 

Because of shame? 
Why turn aside my heated face — 

Am I to blame 
That all. the life within me cries 
For love, and lips that kiss their sighs 
Till heart unites with heart — and dies; 

Am I to blame? 

If God this nature gave to me — 

The fruit it bears. 
Must all be gathered from the tree, 

There's no one cares. 
So why should arms clasp empty air? 
Why hunger for the fruits that's there? 
I'll eat my fill — 'tis my affair! 

For no one- cares. 
— Kate Prince in Vanity Fair 



OBITUARY. 
John Carver Winans, secretary of the Realty Syn- 
dicate, died on Friday, July 10th. His end was sud- 
den and unexpected. Air. Winans was born in New 
York on November 2, 1828. He was the son of John 
C. Winans, a distinguished merchant. In 184' 1 he 
came to California, and engaged in mining, and after- 
wards became a merchant in Sacramento. In [852 
he came to San Francisco, where he purchased a seat 
in the Stock Exchange in 1862. He made his home at 
Menlo Park for many years, but in 1894, on the death 
of his wife, removed his residence to San Francisco, 
where he has since resided. He was a member of the 
Bohemian Club and took great interest in the annual 
jinks. Mr. Winans belonged to the Merchants' As- 
sociation and the Pioneers' Society. 

DANGEROUS LENIENCY. 

In the estimation of Police Judge Fritz, a line 
amounting in all to $150 is sufficient punishment for 
a brute like Evans, the saloon-keeper who beat the 
woman with whom he lives on several occasions and 
wantonly tore out great handfuls of her hair, and not 
content with this, kicked the mother of this woman 
unmercifully. It is well known to everybody that 
Evans will not even pay this fine, but that he will 
wring the dollars from the miserable women who 
haunt his place, and who ply their abominable trade 
by means of such as he. In the face of these facts, 
Judge Fritz has the impudence to confront the pub- 
lic with a defense of the man whom it was his duty 
to judge, and imposes a fine which is merely a rec- 
ognition of Evans' influence. We need a judge in 
Fritz's place whose sympathy with the criminal 
classes is less evident. 



The old charges that American officers looted a 
public building after the surrender of Manila is be- 
ing revived. We can forget the Manila looting if 
the Quartermaster's Department has stop].,,. its 
usual predatory habits. 






•. ",.«,<>•-.. -— ..■^->*>-.w— <-.Ct 





Near Mt. Shasta 

3,555 feet above the 
level of the sea, on the 
western side of Mt. 
Shasta lies Sisson's Tav- 
ern nestled among the 
pines of the Sierras. Tel- 
ephone, telegraph and 
daily mail; a half mile 
from the railroad station 
with free bus meeting all 
trains. Magnificent 
scenery, mild, refreshing, 
healthful climate, pure 
air and lots of comfort. 
Sisson's Tavern is not a 
place for dress or society 
but rather a resort (there 
qniet and comfort and 
peace have precedent. 
The Tavern is large and 
comfortable and hard fin- 
ished throughout with 
(polished floors. The table 



a 



board is delicious, the 
dishes are dainty and 
served in a most inviting 
manner. Fare $12.00 for 
round trip and $1.50 ad- 
ditional for sleeping car 
accommodations. Rates 
$2.50 per day or $14.00 
per week and upward. 
For information call at 
Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Information Bur- 
eau, G13 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Feck's 
Tourist Information Bur- 
eau, 11 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, 
or Traveler's Informa- 
tion Bureau, 630 Market 
Street, San Francisco, or 
at 410 South Broadway, 
Los Angeles, Cal. For 
accommodations address 
Mrs. L. M. Sisson, Sis- 
son, Cal. 



1WRS. L. M. SISSQtfi, VROV 

SISSON, CAL. 



BLITHEDALE 

Marin County, California. Opened April 15th. 

Hotel bus meets train at Mill Valley Station. 



HENRY ROMEIKE 

The first established and most complete 

Newspaper Cutting Bureau 

IN THE WORLD 

The Press Cutting Bureau which 1 established and have car- 
ried on since 1881 In London and 1884 In New York, reads, 
through Its hundreds of employees, every newspaper "and peri- 
odical of Importance published In the United States, Canada 
and Europe. It is patronized -y thousands of subscribers, pro- 
fessional or business men, to whom are sent day by day news- 
paper clippings collected from all these thousands of papers, 
referring to them or any given subject. 



33 UNION SQUARE 



NEW YORK 



Established, London, 1881; New York, 1884. Branches: London, 
Paris, Berlin, Sydney. 



BUSWELL COMPANY; 



Bookbinder, paper-ruler, printer and Blank- 
Book Manufacturer. 



536 Clay street. 



July 18. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




QOLF 

PINO-PONO 

SWIMMING 



AUTOMOBILES 
NEW ANNEX 

NEW LANA1 



BALLS ALL SUMMER 
ON THE GOLF LINKS 
OF HOTEL VENDOME 
NO PLACE LIKE IT 



TENNIS 

BOWLING 

ORCHESTRA 



GEO. P. SNELL 

MANAGER 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 



Pacific Congress Springs 

SABATOGA. SANTA CLARA CO., CAL. 

A charming resort In the foothills of the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. Six miles from Los Gatos. Hotel with all mod- 
ern Improvements. Finest mineral waters in California. 
Address, d.. R. RAND, General Manager. 



Vichy Springs 



3 miles from Uktah, Mendocino Co. Natural 
electric waters, champagne baths. Only place 
In the world of this class. Fishing, hunting. 
Crystal Springs, Accommodations; table first 
class. 

J. A. Redemeyer & Co., Props. 



GO TO 

HIGHLAND SPRINGS 

FOR HEALTH and PLEASURE 
Rates $10 to $16 per week 
CRAIG & KERR, Managers. 



BEN LOHOND 

Park House and Cottages. An Ideal resort, 
unsurpassed climate, drives, fishing and hunt- 
ing. Two hours' ride to Big Basin. Moder- 
ate prices. 
ROBERT GAT, Proprietor. 



BAY STATE HOUSE and cottages 

MRS. L. MATHISON, Proprietress. 

A CHARMING SUMMER AND WINTER RESORT 

Santa Crnz, Cal. 



Anderson Springs 

Only natural Mineral Steam 
Baths in Lake County 

14 distinct mineral springs of 8 different characters, hot 
and cold. Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. Board: $10 to $14 
per week. Address, J. Anderson, Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

Fare— San Francisco to Springs and return reduced to $8. 
Send lor circular. Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 
320 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



/f0T££ B£W£fflf6m? 




Santa Cruz Mountains. No staging. Table first- 
class. Electric lights, boating, swimming, fishing, 
hunting, tennis and ping-pong. New management. 
See booklet S. P. Co., 613 Market street, or Hotel 
Ben Lomond. 



Laurel Dell Lake 



THE SWITZERLAND 
OF AMERICA 



This beautiful lake resort Is the only pleasure and health 
resort In the State that has Its own mineral springs and a 
chemically pure spring. 

Boating, swimming, marine toboggan, croquet, bowling, 
new livery tally-ho coach, saddle horses. Largest dining- 
room In Lake County. Pamphlets at Peck's, 11 Montgom- 
ery St., and railroad office, 650 Market street. 



Laurel Dell, Lake County. 



EDGAR DURNAN, Proprietor. 



WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California. 

Best summer and winter resort. Beautifully situated at 
the foot of Taylor Mountain, two and one-half miles from 
Santa Rosa. Hunting, fishing, croquet, billiard and all kinds 
of amusement. Pine drives, scenery unsurpassed. Fresh 
fruit, cream, butter, eggs; free camping. Circulars, full par- 
ticulars, .Travelers' Bureau, 630 Market street. Special rates 
on Sunday, round trip $1.50. Rates— Board, room and bath 
included, $8, $10. $12, per week. Special rates to families; 
'bus meets trains at Santa Rosa. Mrs. H. A. D. Fleming, 
Prop. Box 155. 



Tuxedo 

FORMERLY ABOADIA 

Santa Cruz Mountains. 

Delightfully located 
half a mile from and 
run In con j unction 
with Big Trees. New 
hotel newly furnished. 
Extensively improved 
since last season. 
Electric lighted. Hot 
and cold water. Por- 
celain tubs. Buy tic- 
kets to Tuxedo nar- 
row gauge, foot of 
Market street. 

Bathing, Fishing, Hunting, Tennis, Etc. 

Address, Thomas L. Bell, Felton, P. O. 




28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



The Effective " Tub-Gown." 



By Lady Amy 

"Rub-a-dub-dub, three gowns in a tub," is a song 
most any woman can sing these days, when the scim- 
piest summer outfit contains at least half a dozen of 
the new "tub" dresses. They do wash beautifully, 
but the rub comes in afterwards, when the laundry 
bill must be paid. The day before the Hopkins' party 
left for Prosser, where they always go for a taste of 
roughing it in outing togs, I saw Helen Taylor at 
the Burlingame club house in a white linen "tub" 
dress that was a dream. I heard a man say that a 
"simple shirt-waist suit like that was worth all those 
ruffly things put together. The cost of the linen 
alone, with its hand-embroidery, would not leave 
much more than car-fare out of a hundred dollars. 
But it makes the imitation linen, with machine-made 
embroidery, look ashamed of itself, and even the or- 
gandies have to hang their ruffles in comparison to 
such linen smartness. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin has been visiting at her son's 
country place, and she went in for the picnics and 
coaching parties and auto trips with all her custo- 
mary spryness. One night the Martins were giving 
a little dinner party and the guests were all gathered 
in the dining room waiting for Mrs. Eleanor, who 
finally appeared dressed in a black tulle gown, 
shirred from hem to throat and sparkling with jet. 
"My, but you look corking to-night !" ejaculated Mrs. 
Walter, as grandmamma Martin came into the room. 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin laughed with the rest of the 
guests, where a matron of her years a decade ago 
would have been shocked at a compliment sheathed 
in slang. 

Mrs. J. J. Moore, among the beautiful clothes she 
has taken to Del Monte, has a crash gown that is 
altogether out of the ordinary. It misses its destiny 
in the tub by a silk lining and taffeta trimmings, 
which give it a tailored air crash gowns do not usu- 
ally strive for. But this one of Mrs. Moore's makes 
a bid for sartorial smartness and achieves it, too, 
with a blouse jacket cleverly touched up with black 
taffeta and a skirt showing distinguishing touches 
of the same material. Mrs. Moore wore with this 
gown a big black picture hat that was immensely 
becoming. She has also a black dinner gown that is 
acknowledged the handsomest thing in black that has 
been worn at Del Monte. It is crepe de chine, won- 
derfully trimmed with jet motifs. Her beautiful neck 
and arms are covered with the sheerest of cobwebby 
lace. It is considered bad form to wear a low-neck 
gown in a hotel dining room, so these transparent 
yokes and sleeves are the compromise affected by 
almost every one. No one whose social position is 
all wool and a yard wide has appeared this season 
in a decollete gown, though several aspirants have 
appeared at their first dinner with low-cut gowns 
only to promptly realize their mistake. Until last 
season Edna Hopkins-Taylor used to dare conven- 
tionality and appear at Del Monte in low-cut dinner 
dress. She is the only one of the Hopkins girls who 
can becomingly dispense with a transparent yoke. 
Georgie misses the required plumpness that decollete 
requires, and Helen has a little scar on her neck that 
she fancies forbids such dressing. But nothing pre- 
vents Edna from indulging her taste for the decol- 
lete. Last season, however, she refrained from wear- 
ing them. But Mrs. Will has some high-neck gowns 
that are pretty enough to compensate for the charms 
they hide. There is one white mull with a little pink 



embroidered wreath in it that is a sermon on exqui- 
site color combination. Just shut your eyes and try 
to imagine what color would go best with a pink and 
white mull. Of course, you'd never think of yellow; 
no one but a Parisienne would. Yellow it is on 
Mrs. Taylor's gown, yellow applique lace that is met 
at the knee by a foam of inch-wide Valenciennes 
ruffles billowing down to the bottom of the skirt. 
A sash of broad satin ribbon shading from rose pink 
to white is a feature of the gown ; it is tied as all 
proper sashes of the hour must be knotted. No more 
flaunting long ends to the tipmost flounce of the 
skirts. Instead, the sashes have short ends, perky 
little affairs as curt as you please. These are called 
"Bob" sashes, a name suggested by the bob-tailed 
horses. 

Mrs. Palmer and Mrs. Eugene Murphy of course 
attract attention wherever they go, and a deal of 
pretty bridal finery these two young matrons have. 
Mrs. Palmer has a pongee silk gown that would 
make even a clothes-hater gush. The pongee is en- 
crusted with sprigs of dainty blue flowers and lace- 
trimmed, of course. There is a yoke of blue chiffon 
which makes this gown a thing apart among pon- 
gees. 

Frances Murphy has a white mull dress and a 
"baby" hat, both most captivating. The "baby" 
hat is one of the round ruffled affairs without tilt or 
trapping that little girls used to call their own, but 
evidently the grown-ups are going to adopt them, 
with Mrs. "Gene" to pioneer the way. The ruffles 
are of thin white lace, and a bed of pink roses nestles 
down in the crown. 

Mrs. Joe Tobin has a white organdie dress to wear 
at the Del Monte meet, which is going to cause a 
flutter. From the knee to the hem the skirt looks 
as though it were trimmed in solid rows of feathers, 
and the deep yoke has the same appearance. But the 
feathery effect is gained by ruches of tulle cleverly 
arranged to look like the softest moultings of a bird's 
wing. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco, Cal. 



At tbe Drat banquet given by tbe 
oltHeni of the City of Chicago to 



President R.oosevelt 

OD ble Western trip, at tbe Auditorium Hotel, April 
2nd, tbe only wine QBed whi 

Ruinart Brut '93 



The President's Wine 

VARNEY W. GASKILL, Special Agent 

With Hilbkbt Mkboantilz Co., Importerl. 
Telepbone Exchange 81S. Ban Fraoclaco. Cal. 



Rheumatism Cured in Three Days 

AZTEC OINTMENT 

CURES GUARANTEED 

213 Starr King Bldg. - San Francisco,';C:il. 



July 18, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



29 




Arthur Ikrkbslkt 



The Packard car which started from San Iran 
on Saturday, June 20th, with M. C. Krarup of The 
Automobile (New York), and E. T. Fetch of the 

Packard factory, has reached Omaha, when last I 
heard of it. Telegrams were sent daily to the Pack- 
ard factory at Warren, Ohio, and have been mailed 
from Warren to this city. The various telegrams 
were dated as follows: Carson. Xev., June 24th ; 
Wadsworth, Xev., June 26th: Lovelocks, Nev. June 
27th; Winnemucca, Xev., June 28th; Wells, Nev., 
and Elko, Xev., July 1st: Tecoma, Xev.. July 2(1; 
Promontory, Utah, July 3d; Salt Lake City. Jury 4th, 
5th and 6th ; Tucker. Utah, July 7th. 

The telegram from Carson, Xev., says that the 
travelers drove from Placerville to Sugarloaf on June 
23d. and passed over both summits on June 24th 
without hitch, rising- 1800 feet in one hour, and drop- 
ping 2,400 feet in 37 minutes; also 800 feet in 9 min- 
utes. The message from Wadsworth says that the 
car arrived there in first-class condition, having trav- 
eled twelve miles per gallon of gasoline. On July 
2d the car reached Tecoma, Nev., having traveled 
eighty miles during the day, roads otherwise good 
being spoiled by a new railway cut. The hills at 
Tecoma were the worst encountered. One, about a 
hundred yards long, measured 22 degrees by the 
clinometer, or 39 per cent. This hill was taken in 
three bursts. Lovelocks, Xev., was reached by the 
aid of canvas and push, but without outside assis- 
tance. On arriving at Salt Lake City on July 4th, 
the car was attached, a writ of attachment having 
been issued on a suit brought by Roberts, the man 
who first laid out the transcontinental route, and 
who was grievously disappointed when, he was not 
accepted as guide. It was thought, best, however, 
and most likely to conduce to a successful accomplish- 
ment of the task, to take off the tonneau and carry 
only two persons. M. C. Krarup of The Automobile 
was taken as historian, photographer and observer, 
and E. T. Fetch as operator. The car was released 
from the attachment on July 6th, and proceeded on 
its journey. At Tucker, Utah, the car was mired for 
forty minutes in an overflowing irrigating ditch, but 
the automobilists contrived to jack and chain the 
vehicle out of the quagmire. 

Two car-loads of Cadillacs reached San Francisco 
about twelve days ago, and all have been delivered 
to purchasers who were anxiously awaiting their ar- 
rival. The well-known attorney, George A. Knight, 
and George Plummer, the ship-chandler, are among 
the owners of Cadillacs. 

Ground has been broken for the new building to be 
erected on the corner of Golden Gate avenue and 
Octavia street for the Pacific Automobile Company, 
and the work will De pushed rapidly to completion. 
Many letters of congratulation have been received 
by the projectors from friends in the Eastern States 
and elsewhere in the country. It is intended that the 
establishment shall be the best-equipped of its kind 
in the United States. It will occupy a lot 137 feet 
6 inches by 145 feet, and will have a floor space of 
more than one hundred thousand square feet. 

F. E. Lathe, formerly Superintendent of the Moyea 



Automobile Company's factor) at New Y..rk. has 

ntly arrived here, having iition 

of Superintendent of the Mechanical Department of 
the Pioneer Automobile Company. The Moyea 1 
I'.my has a reputation second to none in the Eastern 
States as builders of automobiles. 

Miss Barnhardt of Stockton recently purchased 

the handsome Locomobile which the COmpan) 
brought out here as an exhibit. It is painted pure 
white, has brown leather trimmings, and is probably 
the handsomest automobile on the Pacific Coast, 

At the present time no fewer than three automo- 
biles are endeavoring to cross the continent from 
San Francisco to Xew York. Mention lias already 

been made of the Packard touring car. Dr. J. Nel- 
son Jackson is making his uav across the continent 
in. a Winton touring car, and has left ( Imaha on his 
way to Xew York. He and his companion bad some 
thrilling experiences before reaching Omaha, one 



><?>* 



MARSH MOTOR CYCLE $125 




The Marsh 3 H. P. motor cycle is the most 
practical motor cycle in the world. It is guar- 
anteed for one year, also has a guaranteed speed 
of forty miles an hour. Write for full information, 
catalogue, etc. 

MOTOR CYCLE UFO. CO. Brockton, Mass. 



UNIVERSAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 

137 to 151 FIRST STREET 



The only thoroughly equipped 
factory on the Coast. Every 
facility for quick repairs, paint- 
ing, etc ... . 



LARGE STORAGE ROOM. 



Triple "P" Compound 

A perfect puncture healer and rubber pereerva- 

tlve for : : : : I 

SINGLE TVBE TIRES 

Write for circular. 



COMPLETE 

REMEDY 

FOR 

PUNCTURES 

Geo. T. Moore Co. 1622 Market St. S. F. 



3° 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



of which was being without food or water for 36 
hours. L. L. Whitman and E. J. Hammond of 
Pasadena are trying to accomplish the transconti- 
nental trip in an Oldsmobile, having the idea that a 
light runabout should travel faster than a heavy tour- 
ing car, and that it can more easily be got out of diffi- 
cult places. From the accounts so far received Whit- 
man is getting through the Nevada desert without 
serious difficulty, and expects to beat the records of 
the heavy cars. It is said that a bet of $500 that 
Whitman will beat the heavy machines has been 
made by an enthusiast in this city. 

Nearly two weeks ago T. L. Oddie reached Tono- 
pah in the first automobile ever seen in that town. 
Mumford steered the Winton touring car and made 
the trip from Sodaville to Tonopah, a little more than 
sixty miles, in a running time of 5^ hours, or -at a 
speed of nearly twelve miles an hour. A speed of 
eight miles an hour was kept up even in the deepest 
sand. John Y. McKane of Rossland, B. C, was also 
of the party. The arrival of the auto in Tonopah was 
eagerly awaited and excited great interest. 

Last week Frank E. Hartigan, manager of the 
Mobile Company of America in San Francisco, paid 
a visit to Napa City, where he sold a Mobile trap 
having a seating capacity of nine passengers. It will 
be used to convey passengers from Napa City to the 
Soda Springs, the Asylum and other places in the 
neighborhood. The Mobile Company has many in- 
quiries about the establishment of automobile pas- 
senger lines, but is very careful to investigate the 
conditions of each case and to abstain from supply- 
ing machines for use over routes where they would 
not give satisfaction. 

F. H. Foote of this city has placed an order for 
F. H. Foote of this city has placed an order with 
the National Automobile Company for a Franklin 
four-cylinder machine. This is an air-cooled gaso- 
line car manufactured at Syracuse, N. Y. The 
National Automobile Company finds that there is 
quite a demand for 4-cylinder cars, having received 
orders for three within the past fortnight. Nine car- 
loads of machines are en route from the Eastern fac- 
tories, consigned to the National Automobile Com- 
pany. The cars carry more than fifty machines, hav- 
ing a value of more than $75,000. 

The Knox Automobile Company won first prize in 
the commercial vehicle contest recently held in New 
York, and will shortly have on the market a light 
delivery wagon. The first wagon of this type is ex- 
pected to reach San Francisco about October 1st. 

The Pacific Motor Car Company, of which Harold 
B. Larzalere is manager, will soon move into its new 
quarters on City Hall avenue. . The establishment 
is being fitted up at a cost of more than $6,000, and 
will have a floor space of about 7,000 square feet. 
It will be provided with lockers, dressing-rooms and 
other conveniences. 

Douglas Watson has bought a St. Louis car. The 
day after the purchase was made, the owner, accom- 
panied by Harold B. Larzalere, made the run from 
San Francisco to Monterey in 6 hours 15 minutes, 
going over the San Juan hill in 22 minutes. 

The first car-load of Jones-Corbin motor-cars is 
expected to reach San Francisco shortly. This is a 
gasoline machine manufactured in Philadelphia, and 
the local agency for it is in the hands of the Pacific 
Motor Car Company. 

It seems that Jenatzy, who won the Gordon Ben-\ 
nett cup for Germany, is a Belgian, and his name has 
long been a familiar one in French automobile events. 
He took part in the Ardennes Circuit race last year 



in a car of his own make, and was doing excellently 
when one of the front wheels broke while he was 
going at full speed on a straight road. The car ran 
on three wheels for some hundreds of yards, and 
then turned completely over, cutting Jenatzy on the 
head and hurting his mechanician seriously. 

The recent race in Ireland for the Gordon Bennett 
cup is described as the' greatest ever run for that 
trophy, and probably the greatest as a test ever run 
anywhere. The course traversed pastures and farm- 
ing land, ran between hedges, and here and there 
through villages. Tents and temporary stands for 
spectators dotted the course, which was guarded by 
five thousand members of the Royal Irish Constabu- 



THE CADILLAC 




Second Hand 
Oldsmobiles, $450 

Mobiles $400 to $450 

Regardless of price, 
the most capable au- 
tomobile made. 



Price. $850.00. With tortneau, $950.00. 

WESTE'R/f AUTOMOBILE CO. 

M1-20S LAKKIN STREET. 8. F. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 

Successors to Locomobile Co., of the Pacific. 

1622-1628 Market St., S. F. 

Jobbers and Dealers— Automobiles and Accessories 
SELLING AGENTS 

Winton Motor Carriage Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Locombile Co., of America, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Olds Motor Works, Detroit, Mich. 

Vehicle Equipment Company, New York. 
Electric Trucks, Etc. 

Demmerle & Co., Leather Clothing 



NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 

Phone. South I 142 134 to 148 Golden Gate Ave. 

The largest and 
finest "Garage" in 
the West. 

Our line the highest 
types produced. 

RAMBLER; KNOX, Waterless; HAYNES-APPERSON 

AUTOCAR.. ..Touring Cars 
TOLEDO... .Touring Cars 
PEERLESS.. ..Touring Cars 

Give us a call and we will show you a full line of 
record-breakers. 




July 18, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



J' 



lary. The course was in the shape of an irr. : 
figure 8. one loop of which was covered four anil the 
other three times. The Frenchmen on the race com- 
mittee protested against the Mercedes cars used l>v 
all three German competitors on the ground that they 
were fitted with Michelin tires, the rules requiring 
that the cars must be made entirely in the countrj 
which they represent in the races. Michelin is a 
French manufacturer, but the tires for the German 
cars were specially made in Frankfort by German 
workmen and of German material. As Michelin 
not positively guarantee that the air-valves were of 
German manufacture, the tires were ruled out. and 
the German cars were fitted with tires of undoubted 
German manufacture throughout. All the French 
connoisseurs held that the American cars, while suit- 
able for track-racing, were too light for the Gordon 
Bennett race. Before the race the Frenchmen, and 
particularly Gabriel, were the favorites, being mas- 
ters of difficult road work. The Americans, though 
skillful, were regarded as novices. How just these 
anticipations were is shown by the result, all the 
Frenchmen finishing, and none of the Americans 
completing the course. 

On the days preceding the race the automobilists 
were much bothered by small boys, who crowded 
round any machine at rest. S. F. Edge's chauffeur, 
however, got the best of them. He put the high ten- 
sion current wire into the ground, so that, when anj' 
of the boys touched the machine they received an 
electric shock. If they stroked Edge's terrier, "Bully," 
sitting on the machine, the strokers were shocked, 
though the strokee seemed to suffer no discomfort at 
all. 

Alexander Winton and Percy Owen, two of the 
American team that will try to win the Gordon Ben- 
nett cup, reached Ireland some little time ago. Win- 
ton says of the roads : "There could not be better 
roads. They are as good as any roads I ever saw or 
traveled over. There is only one difference, and that 
is that probably they are not quite so wide. There 
are no such roads in the United States." There are 
twelve contestants, England, France, Germany and 
the United States having three representatives each. 
The cars will be started in the order in which the 
countries are named,, at intervals of seven minutes. 
The care that will be taken to prevent accidents 
may be inferred from the fact that more than seven 
thousand policemen and soldiers will be employed in 
guarding the road. The race took place on Thursday, 
July 2d. 

Dr. William E. French of Washington, D. C., evi- 
dently believes that the "peeler" of the National Capi- 
tal is a very flirtatious person, for he complains that 
under the new regulations, "a policeman, seeing a 
pretty girl in an automobile will be able to call upon 
her to stop, and can make her stop and engage in 
conversation with her. This ... is an outrage 
which we will not submit to." Here I often see 
Bobbies not merely talking to well-dressed women, 
but helping them across crowded streets with a great 
display of gallantry. Nor do I observe that the 
women resent the familiarity. I suppose that the 
girl met on Washington streets is not essentially 
different from the one seen on Market or Kearny, 
and is prepared to "stand for" as much familiarity. 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile Co.-2S8 si Market St.. Phone John 1661 
Automobiles stored and repaired. Expert workmanship. C*aso- 
ilne Md oil at all hours. Santa Clara agents for the Western 
Automobu" Company and National Automobile Company. 



PACIFIC HOTOR CAR CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 
f^Bb'^^k^' Packard 

LI. » llE^a^ st - Loui5 

* i^» -^* "^^""^""L Motor Cur. 

*V American 

Motor Car. 

) JONES C0RB1N 

Motor Car. 

Cudell Motor Car 
The above cars exhibited at our repository, 1814 
Market Street. 



4V*S 




HAVE YOUR AUTOMOBILE EQUIPPED WITH 

Diamond Tires 



HIGHEST GRADE-LONGEST 
LIFE-MOST MILEAGE-CAUSE 
LEflST TROUBLE ** ** ** 

Catalogs and literature from 

8 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



"Nothing so rare a.s resting on Air" 



Pneumatic 
Cushions 



For Yacht, or Launch 
For Automobile or Carriage 
For Office Camp or Home 



FOE SALE IN 'FBISOO BY 

SKINNER & CO., SOI Market St. S. F. WEEKS & CO., 81 Market St. 



DUCK, CR^SH 
and KHAKI SUITS 

BICYCLE SUITS 

Jtyfify&'bPt to order. 

ALL KINDS OF BAND SUITS 

FINE TAILORING A SPECIALTY 
79 Flood Building. Pbone Browrj 196. S. F. 




VELVET 

LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 
and Women 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make then) in 
any style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

H. E. SKINNER CO. 

801 MARKET ST. 



ELECTRIC a.nd GASOLINE 
CARS 

WELCH GASOLINE TOURING 
CAR. 

CONRAD LIGHT GASOLINE 
RVNABOVT 



A. E. BROOKE RIDLEY, ,8 r g?*32P XT 




Telephone South 894 



Ban Francisco, Cal. 



33 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



GRAY BROS. 



Haywards Bldg., California and 
Montgomery Sts., San Francisco. 
205 New High Street, Los Angeles. 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1899 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 389 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

TATE'R 

TEL. MAIN 198 - 55-57-59-61 FIRST ST.. 'SAN FRANCISCO 

Blake, Mofflt & Towne. Los Angeles. Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co.- Portland, Oregon. 



H i. ^ or barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

KfllCtlAC billiard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 
mm*, m^uw makers, canners, dyers, flour mills, foundries, 
laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush flfts., 609 Sacramento St, S. F., Tel. Haiti 561 1 



Phone Main 153. Established 1862 

RUBBER TIRES 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-59-61 Minna St., 
between 1st and 2nd. One block from Palace 
Hotel 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union 
Club cor. Post and Stockton. Tel Main 153. 
Every vehicle quisite for business or pleas- 
ure. Special orders tor Four-in-Hands. J. 
TOliKINSON. Proprietor. 



Mantle <<§L Son, Inc. 

Haberdashers 

And Dealers In Men's Hign Class Furnishing Goods 

10 Stockton St.. San Francisco. 




J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS- CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

GlUingham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



Joseph Qillott's Steel Pens 

THE AWAED AT CHICAGO. 1893. 
'l^SAJ 10 PRIX" PARIS, 1900. THE HIGHEST POSSTRT v 
A ^ D ,- T , hese P e " 3 , ar « "tee best in the worto?." BLE 
Sold by all stationers. Sole agents for the United States 
MR. HENRY HOE, 91 Joiin Street, New York 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. No. 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




FATHER YORKE AND THE TRUTH. 



By a New Zealand Catholic. 

Some time ago, shortly after the death of Queen 
Victoria, the Rev. Father Yorke delivered a lecture 
in .Metropolitan Temple in this city, entitled "God 
Save the Queen," and if the report of same as pub- 
lished in the San Francisco Examiner be -true, then 
a more cruel arraignment and wicked condemnation 
of one who had passed from this world has seldom 
or ever been uttered. That the Reverend Father was 
guilty of wilful and corrupt falsehoods on the occa- 
sion in question, I, though a Catholic, have no hesi- 
tation in saying. Further, one was surprised and 
pained to find that a priest of the Church of Rome, 
who is presumed to tread in the footsteps of his 
.Master, and who poses for all that is good and chari- 
table in Christianity, should in this instance have for- 
gotten that old, old maxim, namely: "Say nothing 
of the dead but what is good." That a defense of 
her late Majesty, in regard to her attitude towards 
the Roman Catholic Church, is altogether unneces- 
sary, religion being as free during the past fiftv years 
throughout the British Empire as within the United 
States of America. The very fact that at the time of 
her Majesty's death, over one hundred and seventy 
archbishops and bishops ruled over the spiritual 
wants of the millions of Catholics scattered through- 
out the British Empire, and who, one and all, will 
testify to the glorious rule of her whom they claimed 
as their liege lady and sovereign. Further, are we to 
accept the utterances of the Reverend Father Yorke 
before those of the venerated Pontiff who rules over 
the Catholic Church throughout the world. Every- 
one knows of the sincere regard and veneration of the 
Holy Father for her late Majesty, and who on receiv- 
ing the news of her death, at once knelt and "offered 
prayers for the repose of hcf soul." Had she been 
the creature as pictured by Father Yorke in his lec- 
ture, would this Bishop of Bishops (who is the very 
mirror of truth and justice), have acted as he did, and 
especially toward one who was the acknowledged 
head of the Established Church of England, and 
consequently not in communion with the Holy See. 
A thousand times no. It simply comes to the one 
point, who are we to believe, "the Holy Father or 
Father Yorke?" Several significant facts have arisen 
since the delivery of the said lecture, namely, that 
whenever the name of the Rev. P. C. Yorke has been 
submitted to the Holy See for appointment to any 
vacant Bishopric in this country, that name has in 
every instance been ignored, notwithstanding the 
learning and prestige of this would-be Bishop in this 
country. The arm of the Church is long and reach- 
ing, and rest assured that Rome has not been kept in 
ignorance of the vindictive sayings of his reverence 
from Galway. One of my chief reasons in addressing 
you on this matter is to bring before your readers 
the following circular which was issued by the Cath- 
olic Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand, on the 
occasion of her late Majesty's Diamond Jubilee, and 
which in fact expresses the entire sentiments of the 
Catholic Bishops throughout the British Empire in 
regard to the late beloved Queen : 

"The Pro Cathedral Christchurch. 
"Feast of St. George, 

"April 23, 1897. 
"Reverend and Dear Father: On the 20th day of 
nex June her most gracious Majesty, the Queen, will 
have attained the sixtieth year of her reign. That 
reign itself has been one of the most illustrious in 
the annals of our eventful history. She whom the 



July t8, 1903. 



SAK FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



33 



Almighty has chosen to rule during s>> long I 

is deservedly looked up to by all as a model Queen 

and mother, whilst amongst the noblest of hi 

•anils without a rival. Since the advent oi Queen 
Victoria to the throne of Great Britain, our Holy 
Church has made many and noble conquests through- 
out the Empire, whereon the sun never srt.-. (■ran 
tude for these and other no less striking conquests 
obtained throughout the world should he uppermost 
in our breasts. We claim to be loyal and grateful 
subjects. Does it not then behoove us to he amongst 
the first to offer up fervent prayers to the Throne 
of the Most High in thanksgiving for all the bless 
received during the last hall century and decade of 
years. Should we not humbly beseech the King 
of Kings to continue to shower down upon our gra 
clous Queen His choicest gifts with every true hap- 
piness in time and eternity? I know well. Reverend 
and dear father, and dearly beloved children in Jesus 
Christ, that you need no direction from your Bishop 
to urge you to fulfill your duty in this respect. But 
it is my pleasing duty to direct that a solemn Te 
Deum be sung in all the churches and chapels of this 
diocese on the occasion of the coming Jubilee, that is 
to say, on the 20th June. Together with the Te 
Deum, the versicles and prayers pro gratiarum ac- 
tione, will be recited or sung in thanksgiving for the 
many blessings we have received during the record 
reign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, whom may 
God long spare to rule over her devoted subjects." 
(Here follow other matters.) "With the request 
that you will read this circular in all your churches 
and chapels the first Sunday after you will have re- 
ceived it, and wishing you and yours every blessing, 

"I remain, Reverend and Dear Father, 
"Yours faithfully in Christ, 

"JOHN JOSEPH GRIMES, 
"Bishop of Christ Church." 

Should any of your readers desire to obtain a copy 
of the foregoing circular, the same may be had on ap- 
plication to His Lordship the Bishop of Christchurch, 
New Zealand. I would have written to you some 
time ago in regard to this matter, but have waited 
until I had a copy of the circular. Further, it is a 
matter that can be taken up at any time, for truth 
must always prevail, and assuredly the memory of 
her late Majesty is as green to-day in the hearts of 
her people as when she ruled over that vast Empire, 
on which, as the good Bishop states, "the sun never 
sets." 

We take pleasure in notifying our readers who are 
going to the country for the summer months that the 
SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER can be sent 
to them at ANY POINT by mail. 

Send address to office, 320 Sansome street, and 
prompt service will be made. 



No man who values his personal appearance can afford 

to be Ignorant of the fact that his clothes may be perfectly 
cleaned and his appearance materially improved by people 
who have made that kind of work a specialty. Such people 
are Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing "Works, 127 Stockton, 
who also clean gloves, cravats, curtains and such articles. 
They call for and deliver goods. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you will save at least one-third on your fuel 
bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



HOTELS. 







Don Porter. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opposite U. S. Treasury, one block from the 
White House, Washington, D. C. The Hotel 
"Par Excellence" of the National Capital. 

First class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, Prop. 
American Plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



Hotel Richelieu 



Hotel Granada 



1012 Van Ness Ave 1000 Sutter St. 

The management of the Hotel Richelieu wishes to an- 
nounce to its friends and patrons that It has purchased the 
property of the Hotel CJranada, and will run the latter on the 
same plan that has made the Richelieu the finest family ho- 
tel in San Francisco. HOTEL RICHELIEU CO. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 

A High Class Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate rates- 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 



W. Johnson Quinn, Proprietor. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietor*. 




McCoy's New 
European Hotel 

250 East, South and 
West front rooms. Hy- 
draulic Passenger eleva- 
tor. Kates. $1 per day 
and upwards. Fire-proof 
building. Fire alarm call 
in each room. First- 
class restaurant con- 
nected. 

Wi*l. McCOY, 
Owner and Proprietor. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Cor. Clark & Van Buren 

Streets. 




all 

jmiiiliili 



SING FAT & COMPANY 



Phinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but one 
price All goods marked In plain Englleh figures. 



614 DUPONT STREET. S. F. 



Next to St Mary'i Church. 



34 

THE LIFE OF A SEED. 

The United States Department 
of Agriculture is making experi- 
ments for the purpose of determin- 
ing the extreme vitality of seeds. 
Over a hundred species of plants 
have been packed in a soil consist- 
ing of dry clay enclosed in pots, 
and buried varying depths under- 
ground — eight sets at a depth of 
six inches, twelve at a depth of 
tw ; enty, and a third set of twelve 
at a depth of three and one-half 
feet. At the end of one, two, three, 
five, seven, ten, fifteen, twenty, 
twenty-five, thirty, forty and fifty 
years a set from each depth will 
be exhumed and tested. The result 
of the experiment is likely to be 
of extraordinary value to agricul- 
turists, both commercially and 
scientifically. Incidentally, it may 
be recalled that authentic cases 
are on record which prove that 
certain seeds have the power of 
sprouting after having been buried 
for long periods of time, reliable 
tests having shown that twelve out 
of twenty-one species have the 
power of germinating after twenty 
years. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



Mr. Carnegie predicts that North 
America and Great Britain will one 
day be one country, but he fails 
to specify which will be the one. 



:ennens ! bes5e 



j mailed on receipt of : 



iTPiLET 



I PRICKLY HEAT, 
I CHAFING, and "=■" 
SUNBURN, ■".,■£. 3£™ ' 

Removes all odor of perspiration. De- 
lightful after S having. Sold everywhere, 017 
Get Menncn's (the original). SwipU Free., 



GERHARD MENNCN COMPANY. Ntwuk. N.J 



New 
Overland Service 

From San Francisco to Chicago. 
Three fast trains every day. Time 
—less than three days. Route- 
Southern Pacific, Union Pacific 
and the 

Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railways. 

Leave San Francisco 8 a. m., 10 a.m. 
and 6 p. m. Through trains to 
Union Passenger Station, Chicago. 
Tickets, berths or information at 

635 Market Street, C. L. CANFIELD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. General Agent. 



JHE (LUB « COCKTAILS^* 



For the 

Vachl ' ; >3"CV»i»C,iV : u' r ~ Manhattan 

Camping g^, K<^H Martini. 

P3rl »' ^wB ^->1fc&m*^^ IU 'J^ *J?5Sld Whiskty, 

Summer • _^Bt >FJ : 1 %JpHKKf2l ' 'M-^J^^. Holland 

H ° lel - ti^»W^ StJW * -aifcW/ . od&V- 

Flshing J - , ~ £T^, - ^.W^' rum Gin, 

Party, _ J »:_,,. • Vermouth 

Mountains, IIX --. 4, y^^^V v^T ^^a. Wj anl j 

Seashore, 4^^^" iS ■ BV Mnl York, 
or the 
Picnic. 



All ready for use, require no mixing. Connoisseurs agree that of two cocktails made ol 
the same material and proportions, the one bottled and aged must be the better. For sale on 
the Dining and Buffet Cars of the principal railroads of the U. S., and all druggists and dealers. 

AVOID IMITATIONS G. F. HEUBLEIN &. BRO., Sole Props. 

29 Broadway. New York Hartford, Conn 20 Piccadilly. W. London, Eng 

PACIK1C COAST AGENTS 

S P O H N-P ATR.ICK COMPANY 

San Francisco, Seattle, Denver, Salt Lake City. 











in mim: t ' ,t £.J^ 




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w 'j* ^^mgr-' 


HP 


... 


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<£/ 





Among the humors of the late 
war the following incident well de- 
serves to be recorded. The true 
Irish flavor about it is equal to 
anything in Lever's novels. I may 
say that this narrative comes from 
an officer of whose veracity and ac- 
curacy I am perfectly satisfied: 

"Some time in the year 1901 a 
certain regiment .of Irish Yeo- 
manry arrived at Springfontein, 
under an officer well known as a 
good sportsman in his county in 
Ireland. On his arrival he was or- 
dered to join a column in the neigh- 
borhood of Smithfield, some forty 
miles distant. He started with his 
men to find the column. This, 
however, like many things in South 
Africa, was more easily ordered 
than executed. In a country in 
which you can hide 100,000 men 
in a ten-mile square, and lose them, 
it was not surprising that he was 
unable to find a column of 500 men. 
After wandering for a few days 
aimlessly, the colonel thought it 
better to return, and he and. his 
gallant men struck the railway line 
some four miles south of Spring- 
fontein. 

"As soon as the force was per- 
ceived the nearest blockhouse 
opened fire on the Yeomanry. The 
gallant colonel, who had come out 
to fight and was not going to be 
disappointed if he could help it, at 
once saw his opportunity. He put 
his men in skirmishing order and 
made a determined and well-con- 



ceived attack on the offending 
blockhouse. The noise of battle 
awakened the attention of the near- 
est blockhouse on the north side, 
which also promptly opened fire 
oil the right flank of the Irishmen. 
The battle continued merrily for 
two hours or so, and a spirited as- 
sault was about to be made on the 
first blockhouse by the Yeomanry 
when an armored train arrived on 
the scene, and the nature of the 
conflict being discovered, stopped 
the hostilities. The colonel of the 
Yeomanry being asked why he had 
returned the fire of the blockhouse 
replied in excited accents: "Be- 
gorra, they fired on me men !" It 
is said he was ordered to go to 



%:v.v.v.^.vvxv.v.v.^j.^j^jx%v.%^j.^j.v. 




Stylish $ 
Suits 



15 



50 



Dressy Suits $20 § 

Pants S4.50 * 

My $25.00 Suits are the« 

best in America. & 

O [" Per Cent Saved by get§ 
Z ting your suit made byS 

JOE POHEIM I 

THE TAIIOB S 

1110-1112 Market St S 
201-203 Monts'v St.. S.F.g 



&emxxxtf&tfxxxwexmtfKKKKiat# 



OPIUM 



Morphine and Liquor 



Habits Cured Sanatorium 
'Established 1876 Thou- 
sands having failed else- 
where have been cured by us. Treatmet oan be 
taken at home Write The Dr. J Stephens. Co 
Oept. 78 Lebanon, Ohio. 



[uly 18, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



35 



$200 

Padishah 




The 
Best 

Lo» 
Priced 

Jeweled 

Watch 

Made 



Non-Magnetic 

Metal Silver Case 

Polly Guaranteed 

For sale by 

ALL JEWELERS 

Illustrated Booklet 
on request, showing 

COLORED 

FANCY 
DIALS 

The New England 
Watch Go. 

Factories— 
Watertury, Conn. 

Offices— 
New York, Chicago, 

Sao Francisco. 



J retoria to explain matters, but his 
ingenuous reply so charmed Lord 
vitchener that nothing further was 
ever heard of the "battle of Spring- 
bntein." 



During the latter portion of his 
,ife, declares a writer in Every- 
jody's Magazine, Emerson seemed 
to live much in the world of souls, 
md came back with difficulty to 
:ake cognizance of physical affairs. 
To illustrate this these incidents 
ire narrated: 

At the time of the Millerite ex- 
citement he was walking one day 
down Bromfield street, Boston, 
when he met one of his friends, 
who remarked : "This is the day 
when the world is to come to an 
end, according to the Millerites." 
The Sage of Concord looked re- 
flectively at his friend for a mo- 
ment, and replied : "Ah, well, we 
can do without it." 

It is also told of him that one 
very hot day Oliver Wendell 
Holmes was standing on the cor- 
ner of Tremont and School street, 
mopping his brow, holding his hat 
in one hand, with the mouth up. 
Emerson coming along and seeing 
a venerable man with his hat thus 
outstretched, dropped a quarter in 
it, and walked on, without recog- 
nizing the genial Autocrat of the 
Breakfast Table. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen From IMaTH.I 

"Madam," began the famished 
hobo. "\\ ell?" snapped the crusty 
housewife. "Madam, if 1 learned 

to bark like a dug would you let 
me live in do kennel en feed me 
as high as yer do dat dog?" 

Romantic Young Lady (spend- 
ing summer on a farm) — Just hear 
how those old trees in the orchard 
moan and groan in the storm, like 
the crying of a lost soul.' Small 
Boy — Well, I guess you'd make 
a worse racket if you were as 
full of green apples as they are ! 

First Farmer — Say, Zeke, who 
was that feller doin' all that laugh- 
ing 'cause you bought a gold brick? 
Second Farmer — He's the city ga- 
loot that thinks he's getting heal- 
thy on the Sulphur Spring water 
that he's buying a barrel a lick from 
my mill pond. 

"I'm sorry to hear your wife is 
suffering from her throat. I hope 
it's nothing serious." "No, I do 
not think so. The doctor's forbid- 
den her to talk much. It'll trouble 
her a great deal, I expect, and she 
won't be herself for some time." 

Rosenstirn — Abrahams, dit you 
hear about Loewenstein? Abra- 
hams — No, vat iss it? Rosenstirn 
— He hass hat hiss oppendix taken 
from him avay. Abraham — Iss it 
possible? Didn't it vas in his vife's 
name? 

The burned child dreads the fire, 
but the fleeced lamb goes out and 
accumulates some more wool. 



Have you 
a friend 

in Chicago or Boston 
or Kansas City or any- 
where else, for whom 
you want to buy a ticket 
to this city? 

If you have, call at 
this office and let us 
arrange matters for you. 

You deposit with us 
enough money to cover 
transportation, as also in- 
cidental expenses of the 
journey; we do the rest. 




Rock Island! 
r ' System l 



F. W. Thompson, 
Gen*l Western Agt., 
623 Market Street, 
San Francisco. 



HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

Fingers roughened by needlework 

catch every stain and look hopelessly 
dirty. Hand Sapolio removes not only 
the dirt, but also the loosened, injured 
cuticle, and restores the fingers to 
their natural beauty. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS 




Miss Uptosnuff — Yes, Clarence 
has been duly inspected by the 
whole family, and it has been offi- 
cially declared that I may marry 
him. It is clearly proved that 
none of his folks are connected in 
any way with the United States 
postal department. 



3 times 
every week 

Personally Conducted Excur- 
sions leave Los flngeles Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Thurs- 
days, and from San Francisco 
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fri- 
days. 

Tourist Sleeping car service 
to. Chicago, St. Louis and 
Boston. 

Daily PuHrrjan cars San 
Francisco to Chicago. 

631 Market St. 

Under Palace Hotel 

San Francisco 



W. D. SANBORN. 



Gervera.1 Agent 



3» 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 18, 1903. 



SOUTHERN PACI FlC 



Trains leave and are due to arrive at 



— Feom Jutb tl. 1KB. — 



SAN FRANCISCO, Main Line, foot of Mark. 

COAST LINE (Narrow Gauge) 
,-_f-i Foot of Market Street) 



Beniciii, SuIbuo, Elmlra and Bicn- 

mento 7-26> 

7.00a Vacavllle, "Winters. Rumiey. 7.26r 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 



QToot of Market Street ) 



7.56? 

10.26* 



7.30a 

Napa, CaiUtOEH, SanU Rosa 6.26r 

7.30a Niles, Latbrop. Stockton 7.26r 

8-00* DavlB,"Wood]and, Knight* Landing, 
Maryevllle. Ororllle, (connect* 
at MaryavlUe for Grldley.Blggi 
and Cbico) 

«.00a Atlantic Exprese-Ogden and East 

800 a PortCoBta, Martinez, Antloch. By- 
ron, Tracy, Stockton, Sacramento. 
Los Banoo, Mendota, Hanford, 
Tlealla. Fortervllle m 4.26? 

8J0a Port Costa, Martinez, Latbrop, Mo- 
desto, Merced, Fresno, Qoehen 
Janctlon, Hanford, Vlealla, 
Bakerefleld 6.26P 

1.30*- Shasta Express — DartB. "Wllllami 
(for Bartlett Springs). Willows, 
tFruto, Red Blnfl. Portland 7.66p 

8.30a Niles, San Jose, LIvermore, Stock- 
ton, lone, SRcrnmento,Placerrllle, 
MarysTllle. Chlco, Red Bluff 4-2Bp 

8.30a Oakdale. Chinese, Jamestown. So- 

nora, Tuolumne and Angele 4 25p 

9.00a Martinez and Way StatlODB 6 6Sp 

10.00a Vallejo 12.26p 

dIOJJOA Crescent City Express, Eastbonnd. 
—Port Costa, Byron, Tracy, La- 
tbrop, Stockton, Merced, Ray- 
mond, Fresno, Hanford, Vlsalla, 
Bakerefleld, Los Angeles and 
New Orleans. ("Westbound ar- 
rives as Pacific CoaBt Exprees, 

via Coast Line) «1-30p 

10.00a The Overland Limited — Ogden, 

Denver, Omnba, Chicago 6. 25? 

12.00m Hayward. Nllesancl Way Stntlons. 325p 
tl.OOP Sacramento River Steamers t11-00p 

330p Benlcia, Winters, Sacramento. 
Woodland, WIlllamB, Colusa.Wil- 
lows, Enlgbts Landing. Marya 
vllle. Oroville and way stations. . 

330p Hayward. Niles and Way Stations.. 

4C0r Martinez. Ban Ramon, ValleJo.Kapa, 
Callstoga, Santa Rosa 

4. 00p Martinez, Tracy.Lalbrop, Stockton 

4-00p Niles, LIvermore. Stockton. Lodf.. 

4.30p Hayward, Niles, Irvlngton, San I 

Jose, LIvermore f til 65a 

6.00p The Owl Limited— FreBno. Tulare, 
Bakersfleld, Lob Angeles; con- 
nects at SaugUB for Santa Bar- 
bara 8.66a 

6.0Dp Port Costa, Tracy, Stockton, Lob 

BanoB 12.25P 

t6.30p Nlles. San .lose Local 7.25a 

B.OQp Hayward. NUeB and 6an Jose 1026* 

G.OOp Oriental Mall — Ogden, Denver, 
Omaha. St. Louis. Chicago and 
East. (Carries Pullman Car pas- 
sengers only out of 6an Fran- 
cisco. Tourist car and coacb 
passengers take 7.00 p. 11. train 
to Reno, continuing tbence In 
their cars 6 p.m. train eaptward.. 
Westbound, Sunset Limited.— 
From New Tork, Chicago, New 
Orleans, El Paso. Los Angeles, 
Fresno. Berenda, Raymond (from 
Tosemlte), Martinez. Arrives.. 

7-COp Ban Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez 

and Way Stations 11.26a 

J7-00P Vallejo 766p 

7-OOp Port Costa, Benlcia, Sulbun, Davis, 
Sacramento, Truckee. Reno. 
Stops at all Btatlons eaBt of 
Sacramento 7 65* 

8.06p Oregon & California ExpreBB— Sac- 
ramento, MaryBvllle, Redding. 
Portland. Puget Sound and East. 866* 
18.1 Op Hayward, Niles and San JoBe (Sun- 

day only) 111 kr A 

11.26p Port Costa, Tracy, Latbrop. Mo- 
desto, Merced, Raymond (to To- 
semlte), Fresno 12 25p 

Hanford. Vlsalla, Bakersfleld 5 26f 



J746* Santa Cruz Excursion (Sunday 

only) 18.1 Op 

8.16a Newark. Ceniervllle. Ban Jose, 
Felton. Booloer Creek. Santa 

Cruz and Way Shillons 6 25? 

t2-16p Newark, Ceniervllle. San Jose, 
New Almaden.Los Galos. Felton, 
Boulder Creek, Banta Cruz and 
Principal Way Stations 1055* 

4-16P Newark, San Jose, Los Gatoa and 
way stations (on Saturday and 
Sunday runs through to Santa 
Cruz, connects at Felton for 
Boulder Creek, Monday only 
from Santa Cruz).. tB.66 a 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

From SAN FRANCISCO, Foot of Market St. (Slip*) 

— T7:15 9:00 11:00a.m. 1 .00 300 6.16p.m 

From OAKLAND. Foot of Broadway —tfi:00 18:00 

t8:05 10:QUah. 12 00 2 00 4.00 P.M. 

COAST LINE (Kronil Uauge). 

(Third and Tnwnnend Street s.) 

6.10* San Jen- and Way Stations . 7-30P 

7 00.-. San Jose and Way Stations . 6 30p 

H 00* New Almaden /4.10? 

1?.1$* Mont ere; and Banta Cruz Excur 

eiun (Sunday only) 

o8-00a Costt Line Limited— Stops only San 
Jose.GIlroj.HollIster.PaJaro.Caa- 
trovllle, Salinas, San Ardo. Paso 
RobleB, Santa Margarita, Ban Luis 
OblBpo.(prlnclpal stations tbence) 
Santa Barbara, and Lob An- 
geleB. Connection at CastrovlHe 
to and from Monterey and Pacific 
Grove and at Pajaro north bound 
from Capitola and Banta Cruz, 
8.00* San Jose. Tres Pinos, Capitols, 
Banta Cruz. Pacific Grove, Salinas, 
Sun LulB Obispo and Principal 

Intermediate BtatlODP 

Westbound only. Pacific Coast Ex- 
Dress.— From New York.Chlcago, 
New Orleans. El Paso, Los An- 
geles, Santa Barbara. Arrives.. 

10.30* San Jose and Way Stations 

11-30* San Jose. Lob Gatos and Way Sta- 

„ __ tlons b.36p 

°JI-30p San Jose and Way Stations x 7 00p 

2.00P San Jose and Way Buttons 5940* 

\3.00p Del Mome Express— Santa Clara, 
Ban J<.Be. Del Monte, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove (coDnectB at Santa 
Clara for Santa Cruz. Boulder 
„« m „ Creek and Narrow Gauge Points) 112-16P 
064QP Burllngame. Sbd Mateo. Redwood, 
Menlo Park. Palo Alto Mayfleld, 
Mountain View. Lawrence, Santa 
Clara. Ban Jose, Gllroy (connec- 
tion for BolllBter, Tres PIuob), 
Pajaro 1 connection for Watson- 
Tllle, Capitola and Santa Crux), 
Pacific Grove and way Btatlons. 
ConnectB at Castrovllle for 6s- 

Unas , 10.46a 

,2"5£ p Ban Jose and Way 8tatloDa 8.36* 

ot6410p Ban Jose, {via Banta Clara) Los 
Gatos, Wright and Principal Way 

Btatlons r9 00* 

8.2Ba °ig'20) SanJoseandPrlDClpalWayBUtlons t8 00* 
©1616* SanMateo.Bereaford.Belmont.San 
Carlos, Redwood, Fair Oaks. 

_ ,„ . Menlo Park. Palo Alto t8 4Sa 

S-5S 1 ' 5* D j08e ind w «y Stations B 38a 

o7.00p Sunset Limited, Eaetbound.— San 

Luis Obispo, Banta Barbara, Los 

Angeles, Iteming. El Paso. New 

Orleans, New Tork. (Westbound 

a „-. ¥> ' nlT , (!8,,, 'SHnJ«qolDVonry) .. -/-8.25a 

, 8 ,'££*!> loAIto "DdWayStallons........ «Ob 

nll^Oi Mlllbrae, Palo Alto and Way Sta- 

tlons .......... | q jc, 

«11»PMUlbr.e. Ban Josi ' and Way *BU- 

-a°is t»MT 



10.651 
7.BBP 

9.26» 

10.251 
4.25P 
18.66a 



18 30p 



10.46P 



4.10P 



1.3DP 
1.20P 



4.26i- 



TheUNKN TRANSFER COMPANY 

will call for ard check bare-ore from hotels and 

residences. Telephone. Exchange I 3 li.auiie 

of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 

information. 

?No day coaches run between San Francisco and Reno. 

S„r,d» f ? r M t'?™5; P tOT Af ' ern °° n - / Saturday and Sunday only. 8 Stops at all Stations on 

ShS„,Lr?.n 5 A VI C u » Su j">» «">!»• "Saturday only, d Connects at Goshen Jc. 

with trains for Hanford, Vlsalla. At Fresno, for Vlsalla via Sanger, e Via Coast Line 

vlnev 1 S n too. r s d a 8 „^ nT Arr,V ,l^ a Ni i e "- ■ " D . a,ly eICept Saturday! t» Via San Joaoufn 
rowlauee. " Conneel8 ' eIce '> 1 Sunday, for all points Nar- 



Another important announce- 
ment at the Berlin chemical con- 
gress was that made by Professor 
Markwald, who exhibited polo- 
nium, a new elementary substance 
discovered by Professor and Ainu-. 
Curie, of Paris. Scientists as vet 
understand too little of the mar- 
velous properties of this new ele- 
ment to venture more than a vague 
prediction of what spheres of fu- 
ture usefulness it may fill, but it 
is not improbable that it may be 



found to perform the present func- 
tions of the so-called Roentgen or 
X-rays far more powerfully and 
without the somewhat cumbrous 
apparatus now essential to their 
use. In a much higher degree even 
than radium is possesses the prop- 
erty of shining in the dark, and 
although it is known that actual 
particles infinitisimally small are 
being shot out from it continually. 
seem to exhaust itself or lose its 
luminous power. 



CALIFORNIA NORTHWESTEhN 

RAILWAY CO. 

lessees 

SAN FRANCISCO & NORTH PACIFIC 

RAILWAY COMPANY 

Tiburon Ferry. Foot of Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 

WEEK 'DAYS— 7:30, 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 a. m.; 
12:35. 2:30, 3:40, 6:10, 6:60. 6:30 and 11:30 
p. m. Saturdays— Extra trip at 1:30 p. m. 

SUNDAYS— 7:30, 8:00. 9:30. 11:00 a. m.; 
1:30. 2:30, 3:40, 6:10, 6:30, 11:30 p. m. 
SAN RAFAEL 10 SAN FRANCISCO 

11:16 a. m.: 12:50, »2:00, 3:40, 6:00, 6:20. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:05, 6:50, 7:36, 7:60, 9:20, 

6:25 p. m. Saturdays— Extra trip at 

SUNDAYS- 6:50, 7:35, 9:20, 11:16 a. m.; 1:46, 
3:40, 4:50, 5:00, 6:20, 6:10, 6:26 p. m. 
•Except Saturdays. 



Leave 
San Fr'clsco 



In Effect | 
May 3, 1903 | 



Arrive 
San Ft'cIslo 



Week 
Jays I 



Sun- 
days 



Sun- 
days 



Week 
Day 8 



7:30a 
8:00a 
2:30p ■ 
5:10p 


7:30a 
8:00a 
9:30a 
2:30p 
6:10p 


Ignaclo 


7:45a 
8 :40a 
10:20a 
6:00p 
6:20p 
7:25p 


7:45a 
8:40a 
10:20a 
6:20p 
7:25p 


7:30a 
8:O0a 
2:30p 
5:10p 


7:30a 
8:00a 
9:30a 
2:30p 
5:10p 


Novato 

Petaluma 

and 

Santa Rosa 


7:45a 
10 :20a 
6:20p 
7:25p 


7:45a 
10:20a 
6:20p 
7:25p 


7:30a 
8:00a 
2:30p 


7:30a 
8:00a 
2:30p 


Fulton 


10:20a 
7:25p 


10:20a 
6:20p 
7:25p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


| Windsor 
7:30a | Healdsburg 

' Lytton 
2:30p 1 Geyservllle 

1 Cloverdale 


10:20a 
7:25a 


10:20a 
7:25p 



7:30a 
2:30p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


1 Hopland 
1 and Uklah 


10:20a 
7:25p 


| 10 :20a 
| 7:25p 


7:30a 


7:30a 


| Wllllts 


7:25a 


1 7:26p 


8 :00a 
2:30p 


8:00a 
2:30p 


1 GuernevlUe 


10:20a 
7:25p 


1 10:20a 
| 6:20p 


8:00a 
5:10p 


8:00a 
5:10p 


I Sonoma 
| Glen Ellen 


8:40a 
6:00p 


I 8:40a 
| 6:20p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


| Sebastopol 


10:20a 
7:26p 


10:20a 
6:20p 




c>^ Why Don't You Travel 
by Sea? 

Special Vacation and Short 
Tourist Excursion Tri|>s. 

Excellent service, low rates, Including berth 
and meals to Lob Angeles, 8an Diego, Santa 
Bbrbara, Santa Cruz, Monterey, EureKa, 
Seattle, Tacotca, Victoria, Vancouver, eto. 
And to those desiring longer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico* 

For information regarding sailing dates 
obtain folder. 

SAN FRANCISCO TICKET OFFICES 

4 New Montgomery St. v Palace Hotel) 10 
Market St., and Broadway Wharf. 

C. D. DUNANN, Gen- Pass. Agent. 

10 Market Street, San Francisoo 



O. R. & N. CO. 

THE ONLY STEAMSHIP LINE TO 

PORTLAND, ORE 

And Short Ball Line Prom Portland to all Points 
Eaat- Through Tickets to all Points, all Rail 
or Steamship and Ball, at LOWB8T RATES. 
Steamer Tiokets Inolude Berth and Meals. 
SS. COLUMBIA Sails Feb 212,22. Mar. 4, II. 

24. 
88. GEO. W. ELDER Sails Feb 7. 17. 27. Mar 

9, 19, 29. 
Steamer sails from toot of Spear St., 11 a. m 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 



Annual Subscription. $4.00. 




Vol. LXVII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 25, 1903. 



Number 4. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and pub- 
lished every Saturday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott, 
Halleck building, 320 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal 

Entered at San Francisco Postofflce as second-class matter. 

New York Office— (where Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, 
RepresentaUve. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll, E. C England, George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m. 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 



Hawaii is enjoying all the benefits of advanced 
civilization — she is confronted by a deficit. 



Dawson City is smitten with a desire to emulate 
Oakland. It is to have a Carnegie Library. 



Trades unionists are in a pretty poor way when 
they are obliged to resort to the use of bad language 
to women. 



The Dairymen's Association would not endorse 
pure milk. How could they? Most of them don't 
know what it is. 



The great New York building trades lock-out has 
been closed by arbitration. It should have begun 
in that way. 

A San Francisco bell-boy was recently arrested 
and a "jimmy" found in his possession. Most bell- 
boys steal more pacifically. 



If Sir Thomas Lipton is satisfied with the showing 
made by his new boat, it does not seem that we have 
any reason to complain. 



The Supervisors must be art connoisseurs or they 
would hardly venture to pronounce so learnedly on 
the value of the Huntington pictures. 



It is said that General Botha will seek election to 
the British Parliament. We hope he will be elected. 
Nowhere else will he find his level so rapidly. 



Our hospital arrangements leave much to be de- 
sired. Two patients escaped in one week. Needless 
to say they were both poor. 



A girl in Berkeley demands $25,000 for breach of 
promise. It is vacation time, and there is a falling 
off in the number of girls, hence the price. 



A local chorus girl complains that her wardrobe 
has been stolen. We thought that a chorus girls' 
wardrobe would be too slight to make a fuss about. 



Mascagni is a positive glutton for litigation. He 
has already quarreled with the city of Pesaro, and has 
had a row with everybody from the Prefect to the 
humblest policeman. He is threatening to return 
here. The maestro is making the world pay through 
the nose for his genius. 



Now that Father Caraher lias been cited for con- 
tempt of court he will perhaps learn that the most 
self-righteous and self-important are subject to the 
laws of the land. 



The beauty of a high protective tariff is seen in the 
fact that at twenty-one ports of entry, salaries and 
incidentals tote up to ten times the returns. What 
is the reason — folly or thievery? 



After all this talk about the qualities of radium it 
is rather discouraging to learn that nothing is really 
known after all. The scientists, in their desire to 
knock one another, have contradicted everything. 



A San Francisco Justice of the Peace has decided 
that a kiss is not valuable consideration for a note of 
$120. Henceforth ladies who want pay for their 
kisses must demand cash down. 



The risks of novel writing increase. A sea-captain 
has sued a publishing firm for $10,000 because the 
name of the ship in which a captain behaves in a 
cowardly fashion is the same as his own. 



The Russian has the best of it so far. Cassini states 
that the petition will not be received, and that the 
Manchurian port question is still unsettled. The 
bear-shooting expedition is so far not a success. 



The Oakland small boy is a wonder. Two weeks 
ago he was busy doing a little highway robbery on 
his own account. Last Saturday a crowd of him got 
together and made the police a present of a burglar. 



The Turkish Government, green with envy at the 
superiority of Russia in methods of torture,' has 
caught a professor and is putting him through the 
paces in prison. We have heard no complaints from 
the undergraduates. 



Ex-Premier Dunsmuir of British Columbia has 
queer notions of things. He kept five hundred people 
out at sea till two o'clock in the morning to please 
a whim. It is satisfactory to know that he had to 
hide from the crowd. 



Rochefort out-yellows all the yellow journals. 
He is now claiming that the French Government is 
in league with the Vanderbilts in the Fair case to 
destroy liberty in France. Rochefort is too old for 
that sort of thing; he grows tiresome. 



The immigration laws this week have barred out 
a confidential clerk of the Produce Brokers' Company 
of London, and a distinguished Chinese scholar who 
was going to do special work at Yale. But Hungar- 
ians, Poles, Greeks, Sicilians and Croats, unkempt, 
ill-fed, predestined victims of poverty and disease, are 
arriving by thousands. Funny thing the law, isn't 
it? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



THE FOXES DOUBLE IN VAIN. 
Jake Eppinger, a leading spirit in the notorious firm 
of Eppinger & Co., and still by the grace of the grain 
fraternity a member of the Produce Exchange of this 
city, has been indicted by the Grand Jury for obtain- 
ing money on false pretenses. It is just possible that 
Herman Eppinger will meet with a like fate at the 
hands of the same body of citizens, who can be con- 
gratulated upon having sufficient back-bone to do 
their duty regardless of the influences which have 
undoubtedly been at work to cow them. The mere 
fact that this firm has not been summarily expelled 
from the Grain Exchange shows that they have sym- 
pathizers in the community who overlook the moral 
view of the case, and are ready to condone its pecul- 
iarly offensive phases, patent enough to every honest- 
minded citizen of all ranks and callings in this com- 
munity. What with the Eppinger failure and the 
light-weight scandal now developing, the grain ex- 
porter of San Francisco will soon have a nice reputa- 
tion with dealers abroad, and surprise must be ex- 
pressed that the Exchange does not in its own inter- 
ests clear its membership of every name tainted with 
the slightest suspicion of unfair dealing and dishon- 
est practices. The course of the proceedings in the 
criminal courts against Jake Eppinger will be closely 
watched by citizens, few of whom look for a convic- 
tion, seeing that the accused does not belong to the 
impoverished class, and does not lack supporters 
and possibly admirers among those who discriminate 
between the man who gets away with a million and 
the wretch who steals to provide bread for a starving 
family. To these abnormal-minded individuals the 
one is unfortunate and the other a low-lived thief. 
For the one, friends stand ready with bail money, 
while the cell awaits the other, and this in a land 
which loudly vaunts of its "justice for all." It is 
seldom, however, that retribution does not clog the 
footsteps of rascals who go unwhipped of justice. 
Like the fox who escapes with life the hunter's trap 
to carry a scarred hide through life, the rogue once 
caught but unconvicted, suffers the contumely of 
mankind to a depth which checks all opportunity of 
exercising his thieving propensities in the future on 
an extensive scale, the hardest punishment an un- 
striped felon can suffer. Whether the firm of Ep- 
pinger & Co. gets off eventually unscathed or not, 
the developments which have already resulted from 
the investigation of its affairs will have one good 
result in putting outside dealers in grain upon their 
guard in the future, and by compelling the enactment 
of governing rules to prevent any trouble of the kind 
in the future, clear the atmosphere more effectively 
than anything else could have done in such a short 
space of time. 

THE DEATH OF THE POPE. 

The fight which the aged Pope had so -resolutely 
waged with death, could have had but one termina- 
tion. The age of the Pontiff prohibited any result 
other than dissolution. So to-day Leo XIII lies dead 
in the Vatican. 

In his person there passes from the sphere of ac- 
tive life not only one of the greatest Pontiffs but one 
of the most wonderful of men. Statesman and poet, 
priest and politician, he was in all these diverse forms 
of human activity, conspicuously able. The keen in- 
tellect and the marvelous sympathy which made 
him at one and the same time master of the intrica- 
cies of every subject which he took in hand, and 
a beloved pastor of the most influential and 
numerous branch of the Christian Church, never once 



faltered, and when he faced the common enemy he 
did so with a mild courage, and a sweetness of dis- 
position which show that he chose his name "Lion" 
appropriately, and that he tempered his natural com- 
bativeness with the restraint of a thoroughly trained 
and humble spirit. 

It will be many years before the mass of men thor- 
oughly appreciate the colossal magnitude of the work 
which Leo has accomplished. He came to the throne 
when the Papacy was staggering under a succession 
of blows, each of which had appeared likely to be 
mortal. The Revolution in Italy had destroyed the 
old position of the Vatican, a new King reigned in 
the Eternal City, and the whole situation was fraught 
with dangers and perplexities. The Church herself 
was in some confusion for the new dogmas which 
had been promulgated by Leo's predecessor had 
caused a certain amount of discussion and several 
minor schisms were threatening and in some places 
had actually taken place. The air of Europe was full 
of revolt, and the wave of materialistic atheism 
which had swept over the civilized world as a result 
of the teachings of Renan and others, and the new 
discoveries of the evolutionists, threatened to sub- 
merge everything in its path. The Church was 
considered the symbol and the leader of reaction, 
and the leaders of the progressive parties in Europe 
were strongly anti-ecclesiastical. 

From this position Leo extricated his church with 
skill and courage. He did not yield to the new King- 
dom of Italy, but remained a "prisoner in the Vati- 
can," and the hermit of the Church made his place of 
imprisonment an enormously more powerful court 
than that of his rival in the Quirinal. He took the 
leadership in a great measure from the hands of 
the popular anti-church party, and placed the church 
at the head of a large contingent of the progressive 
element. He lived to see the reaction in his favor 
take place. Germany is allowing the banished Jesuits 
to return, and France must in the very nature of 
things see the folly of the course which she is pur- 
suing. Such are a few of the results of the wise policy 
of this man. His great work in the Church, his 
varied literary labors, his discreet attitude on sub- 
jects of burning controversy, and his friendship for 
the United States, all these would take a library to 
discuss. With the death of Leo XIII the Church 
loses a great pastor and the world a wonderful man. 



A FIENDISH SYSTEM. 

The system of selling a debtor's services to the 
highest bidder until the sum' of the price paid per 
day or month is equal to the debt and cost of judg- 
ment has been in operation in one or two of the 
Southern States for some time, but the Federal 
Courts have taken a hand in the iniquity, and several 
convictions have already been secured. It is no ex- 
cuse for such cruelty that the debtors are negroes. 
The system is brutal and at war with every principle 
of our Government, and every buyer and seller of 
such "goods and chattels" should have a long term 
in the penitentiary. Nor is it any excuse for the ne- 
farious practice because such a system of debt col- 
lecting prevailed at one time in nearly all the States. 

The peonage system is better calculated than any 
labor system to crush out all sense of manhood and 
individuality. In fact, it is far worse than ownership 
of labor, for the latter secures a home of some sort 
and more or less to eat in old age, while the former 
send the peon adrift, homeless and hungry when he 
can no longer serve his employer profitably. The 
tendency toward the peonage system in the Southern 



July 35, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



States has been observed for some years, anil it is 
encouraging to know that the Federal courts an' 
making life decidedly uncomfortable for those en- 
gaged in the dreadful business. 

But in this connection it might be well to call at- 
tention to the fact that the Southern States did not 
adopt the system, except in isolated cases, until the 
United States acquired the Hawaiian Islands, and 
recognized the prevailing contract labor system, a 
system of labor control far more brutal than the 
peonage system, and infinitely worse than African 
slavery in the South. The Hawaiian system gave the 
overseer or foreman of labor the right to arrest with- 
out warrant and imprison a laborer for the slightest 
inattention, and still more, the imprisoned man had 
to pay the expense of such imprisonment, and add 
to his time of service the days or months he was so 
confined ; and again, if a contract man lost time 
through illness, the time so lost had to be made good 
before his contract could expire by limitation. It was 
the worst form of slavery known to civilization, and 
it had the protection of President McKinley's admin- 
istration. It has been modified, but it is still so bar- 
barous that it is a disgrace to the United States. 

Since the Federal Courts have taken a hand in 
the Southern way of collecting debts from negroes, 
a pronounced movement has been inaugurated to 
make a fight to have the Chinese Exclusion Act re- 
pealed. If successful, the plan will be to refuse to 
employ any labor other than Chinese and the better 
class of negroes, hoping by that means to force all 
worthless negroes to immigrate or starve. Undoubt- 
edly that would settle the farm labor problem in the 
South for all time ; but where would the worthless 
negroes go? Well, that would be largely their own 
business. 



TAKING IN THE STRANGER. 

Among the various tricks which have been named 
in these columns in connection with the slot ma- 
chines, there is still another out of which possibly a 
greater revenue is extracted than from the mechanical 
adjustment of the machine to suit the nefarious pur- 
poses of its lessee. This is as follows : At nearly 
every cigar stand it will be noticed two machines 
are placed. One is more conspicuous than the other 
and hence attracts the innocent stranger. He puts 
nickel after nickel in the machine with nothing but 
the most unsatisfactory results. It could not be 
otherwise, for the machine is so fixed that it will not 
yield any of the larger prizes. The stranger drops 
probably a quarter in nickels, then buys his cigars 
over the counter, so that the store-keeper makes his 
profit at both ends. 

The second machine is kept by the cigar nian for 
his regular customers. He will tell you if you are 
a constant purchaser, not to play the first machine, 
because you have a better chance on the other. ; it 
is, as he puts it, a better machine, as if there could 
be any difference between them if they were equally 
fair. The fact is, the whole machine industry is a 
fraud from beginning to end, and the result will be 
that no one but the most green and stupid boys will 
put any money on the game. A fair game of chance 
finds no particular opposition from us, whatever 
moralists may say, for the gambling instinct is inher- 
ent, and will find expression even if it be only by 
sticking a pin in the Bible to hit a stray text, but the 
manner in which these slot devices is worked consti- 
tutes the boldest and basest theft. 



WORK OF THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. 

William M. Bunker, the Washington represen 
tative of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
made a report on Tuesday afternoon which should 
yive a great amount of satisfaction and is eloquent 
of the wisdom of .that body in sending a representa- 
tive to Washington. The establishment of the new 
Department of Commerce and Labor with Secretary 
Cortelyou at the head, has been accomplished, and 
now employs over fourteen hundred people in con- 
nection with its work. As the speaker pointed out, 
the early endorsement which San Francisco gave to 
the new department has operated largely in favor of 
the city with the Government. Owing largely to 
the efforts of the representative of the Chamber of 
Commerce, the Customs House appropriation was 
increased by half a million, and we shall have a 
good building in every way worthy of the city. 

The speech was, however, significant of much 
larger things, and deserves especial commendation 
for the far-sightedness and accurate economic judg- 
ment of the speaker. He showed in a few telling 
phrases that California has in reality passed through 
an economic revolution in the last two years. The 
discovery of the uses of fuel oil and the ability to 
transmit electricity economically for long distances 
have caused California to bound from a purely pas- 
toral state to one w'hose possibilities of industrial 
advancement are absolutely unlimited. As the price 
of certain staples for the world-market are fixed 
at Chicago, and the price of other commodities for 
the same market at New York, so in no long period 
of time San Francisco will be the central point which 
will fix prices for various commodities. San Francisco 
said the speaker, is the "focal point" for the Asiatic 
campaign. That means that the future is with us, 
as the present possibilities of European trade are 
practically exhausted. The four thousand tons of 
flour which the Corea took out is prophetic of the 
commerce which will flow from this port. 

The Chamber of Commerce is to be congratulated 
upon its enterprise, by which it has made the whole 
community its debtor. 



THE NEEDED WHIPPING POST. 

Judge Lawlor struck the right key-note when he 
urged from the bench the other day the necessity for 
the old, time-honored and useful whipping-post. The 
cowardly wretch who will strike or abuse a woman, 
and the robber who uses violence in pursuance of his 
criminal career, should one and all receive the lash 
at the hands of some muscular official whose sense 
of duty is not liable to suffer from an attack of weak- 
ness, precipitated by the suffering he inflicts. Lon- 
don killed out garrotting in the short space of a few 
weeks, after months of fruitless endeavor, by a lib- 
eral use of the cat. There is nothing like it to strike 
terror into the heart of the most hardened criminal, 
and no mock sentimentality should be allowed to 
interfere with its revival in such cases as those men- 
tioned by Judge Lawlor. Sympathy with criminals 
such as that exhibited by the Reverend Dwight E. 
Potter of Oakland, who begged for executive clem- 
ancy for the wretch Fisher, a natural-born criminal 
and the brutal murderer of his wife, is misplaced, 
and either shows that the individual who interferes 
in a case of the kind is either an idle meddler, aching 
for public notoriety, or one whose sense of the rights 
and wrongs of humanity is very badly warped. 



BRYAN'S TACTICS. 

William Jennings Bryan is swinging around the 
circle hunting for opportunities to jab the poison ar- 
rows of his wrath into the side of Grover Cleveland. 
His idea seems to be to destroy Cleveland even if he 
destroys the Democratic party in the effort ; but Mr. 
Bryan is playing with a very dangerous boomerang, 
and it is sure to return and smite the thrower to his 
political death. Cleveland may be loaded down with 
political and party imperfections, but it is silly for 
a man of Bryan's record of "rule or ruin" to try 
longer to influence public opinion. 

For several years Bryan managed by spectacular 
oratory and bold dashes here and there to conceal the 
fact that in reality he is his party's hoodoo, but he 
rushed too. rapidly from platform to platform, and 
now he is being measured by his real worth by his 
party, and hereafter he will be as a wind-storm try- 
ing to uproot Gibraltars. More is the pity that some 
men, like Banquo, do not know it when their brains 
are out, for they only disturb and frighten weaklings. 

Now Bryan has little or no influence in the Demo- 
cratic party. His followers are mostly Populists — a 
class of political entities that are all things to all men 
for the main chance. Mr. Bryan knows that he can 
neither get the nomination next year for himself, nor 
"throw" it to anyone, but he may be able to get 
enough delegates to the convention to disturb things 
for the moment, but the ranks of the real Democracy 
will sweep him and his Populistic following back into 
the arms of Populism, where he and they do now 
and always have belonged. William Jennings Bryan 
is not a Democrat. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 25, 1903. 

THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



A TEST OF STRENGTH. 

A fight is on in Chicago between certain shippers 
and the Teamsters' Union which is likely to force 
a test of strength between unionism and employers. 
It needs no guessing as to the final outcome. Union- 
ism will go to the wall, for the courts and the State 
and national Governments are bound by the demand 
of the spirit of law and order to sustain the employers. 
This is so because unionism in Chicago now practi- 
cally declares that no man shall seek or obtain em- 
ployment in his individual capacity — in his capacity 
of a sovereign citizen of the United States. He must 
first unite himself with a labor union, and then work 
or not work as the union orders him. His right to 
determine for himself what is best for him is denied, 
which means that he has no legal or moral right to 
support himself and family by his labor unless he is 
permitted to do so by organized labor, which is a 
close corporation, operating in defiance of every 
essential feature of our system of Government. 

Perhaps a better time could not have been chosen 
for the settlement of the question of whether or not 
labor unionism may deprive a man of the right and 
liberty to employ his brain and brawn for such com- 
pensation as is satisfactory to himself. There is no 
scarcity of men in Chicago who are willing to become 
teamsters, but if they accept the employment they are 
mobbed, simply because they insist upon their lawful 
right to determine for themselves what the terms 
of their employment shall be. If the Constitution 
and laws of the land are not something worse than 
mockery, they will not stop to count the cost of main- 
taining non-union men in their effort to enjoy the 
rights of free and independent citizens of the United 
States. Let the test of strength come swift and posi- 
tive. 



In the Chronicle of last Sunday appeared an excel- 
lent article under the above title, in which a very com- 
plete survey of this interminable topic was discussed. 
Among the causes which operated to bring about the 
separation of the colonies, the learned editor places 
as most important the habit of self-government which 
had of itself, according to the article, produced the 
desire for independence. The same causes, it is con- 
tended, will tend to bring about the disintegration 
of the present British Empire. But it should be clear 
that this argument is not effective, when it is remem- 
bered that under the present arrangements between 
the home country and the colonies absolute freedom 
of local self-government is frankly conceded. It is 
strange that the writer of the article in question, who 
is known the world over as a most competent econo- 
mist, did not lay greater stress upon the economic 
circumstances which preceded the revolt. The great 
mass of restrictive legislation which encumbered 
colonial trade was at once the cause and the justifi- 
cation of the revolt. ■ A subject America could not 
develop its own material resources, hence the country 
had to be free, particularly when in spite of restric- 
tion commerce grew, and the commercial class gained 
in influence and importance. 

Economic disputes are capable of easy settlement, 
the editor maintains, but as a matter of fact, that is 
just what they were not when we consider the theory 
of colonial Government which was the guiding idea 
of statesmanship in that time. If we dispell all sen- 
timent and concentrate our mind upon the material 
facts the solution of the question is not hard. 



FAGGOTS TO BURN OUR CITY. 

San Francisco is in some ways the worst built city 
in the world. She is nine-tenths composed of wooden 
buildings which, aside from being unbeautiful to look 
upon, are unsafe to live in. A stranger recently stood 
on a high hill overlooking our city, and remarked 
unsympathetically : "What a beautiful blaze that 
whole thing would make!" His guide, however, was 
patriotic enough to inform him that the building ma- 
terial, though wooden, was nearly all redwood, which 
is entered on the building ordinances as "fireproof 
material." This, although not entirely true, is partly 
so, as the wood of our native big trees contains but 
little sap and burns with extreme slowness. This 
quality of the redwood has saved our city from sud- 
den destruction many a time, and our fire department 
has done the rest. How many of us know that a 
building custom is creeping into our wooden city 
which is sure to cause its fiery doom if it is not dis- 
couraged quickly? The custom is nothing more nor 
less than the substitution of pine for the "fire proof" 
redwood of less recent times. The habit of buying 
pine lumber for construction is becoming more and 
more general ; dealers are bidding for its purchase, 
and contractors are favoring it. The result no cool- 
headed citizen can help foreseeing. It is like inviting 
a fiery ruin upon us. The boom which San Francisco 
is now undergoing is the greatest she has ever seen, 
but it would be better if the sand dunes were left 
bare and unimproved than that they be clothed with 
so many architectural torches. The progress of our 
city depends not alone on quantity; quality has much 
to do with it, and it behooves our public men to see 
to it that there is a reform in this quarter. 

The newspapers have a chip on the shoulder for 
all objectors to the occupation of the new Islands off 
Borneo, but it does not appear that anyone objects. 



luly 25. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A SILLY PROPOSITION. 

Protectionists who oppose reciprocal trade rela- 
ions with Canada and at the same time advocate the 
nnexation of that country, do not seem to regard 
onsistency as a necessary item in their business. But 
hen, consistency and high protection have noth 
1 common. Consistency is honesty and protection 
3 dishonesty ; hence, they could not be expected to 
maintain much of a comradeship. By annexing Can- 
da, the United States would become responsible for 
ler enormous debt, cost of maintenance of another 
olonial Government and all other responsibilities and 
xpenses now carried by Canada without increasing 
>ur commerce over what it would be under a fair 
nd reasonable trade treaty. Certainly Canada would 
ben help carry the burden of maintaining the United 
itates Government, but her own enormous burdens 
rould have to be carried by the united countries, 
I'hich would be for the United States like paying out 
il.25 to get a return of $1. 

The fact of the matter is, these high protection 
dvocates of the annexation of Canada are figuring on 
tealing the public farming lands and forests of Can- 
da, and the only way that trick can be done is 
hrough annexation and trusting to the Washington 
jovernment to shut its eyes until the theft is fully 
onsummated. And then to what proportions our 
lour, lumber and fish trusts would assume! But it 
o happens that the only way Canada could be an- 
lexed to the United States would be by the force of 
.rms with Great Britain and all her colonies, with 
heir nearly 400,000,000 people, including India, up 
a arms opposing. And again, Canada does not want 
.nnexation. As a witty Canadian puts it : "We might 
onsider a proposition from the United States to 
.nnex themselves to us under our form of Govern- 
nent, but we are not quite ready to commit national 
uicide by rushing into the arms of 'your Uncle 
iamuel.' " 

But Canada and the United States should have 
eciprocal commercial intercourse, and all in both 
•ountries, except the trusts, would be greatly bene- 
ited by such relations, but our high protectionists 
>bject, because reciprocity with our northern neigh- 
>or would benefit the general public more or less at 
he expense of their* extra profits. But the United 
states will have no reciprocal trade relations with any 
:ountry so long as the high protectionists "run 
:hings" at Washington. President Roosevelt started 
n with a flourish to establish something of that sort 
with other nations, but he was quickly sat down upon,- 
md so hard that not a whisper about "reciprocity" 
las escaped his dentificial mouth since. Be it remem- 
jered that the "Society for the Defense of High Pro- 
.ection," and not the people are running the machin- 
:ry of Government just now. Canada knows that, and 
>nly laughs when asked to "come and be one of us." 



Many Beverages 
ire so vastly Improved by the added richness imparted by 
lie use of Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. The 
Sagle Brand Is prepared from the milk of herds of well- 
led, housed, groomed cows of native breeds. Every can is 
;ested and is therefore reliable. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

lactory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
leating, and you will save at least one-third on your fuel 
illl. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 96, and your order will 
ecelve prompt attention. 



Mavis Consolidated Gold 

and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000. 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of Call- 

• fornia. 
(> Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 

• County, Arizona. 
A No assessments will be levied. 

_ 50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share 

A for development purposes. The ore in sight is prac'.l- 

>1 cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock is 

? enhausted, the price will be raised to 50 cents a 

V share. 
? Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 

V Market street, for prospectus which gives full infor- 
? mation. 
Q VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. 



CALIFORNIA LIHITED 



TO CHICAGO BY WAY 
OF THE GRAND CANYON 
OF 0RIZONIA : : : 



Santa Fe 



C. H. *Rehn*rtrotn 

FORMERLY 8ANDEE8 & JOHNSON 

Tailor. 

PHELAN BUILDING ROOMS 1, 2, 3. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 5S87, SAN PEANCISCO 



ANNUAL MEETING. 
Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year and the 
transaction of such other business as may be brought before the meet- 
ing, "will be held at the office of the company. No. 289 Steuart street, San 
Francisco, on MONDAY, tho.3rd day of August. 1903. at H o'clock. A. M. 
AUGUSTUS TAYLOE. Secretary. 



UVM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

{LTD.) OB" AMX&BWMK. 



— — Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the 
•ooms formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 Callfor- 
ila street, San Francisco, CaL 



Scotch_Whisky 

importer* • MACONDRAY & CO. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 




Tkasurelf 
Wand 

Ofeciey no wand but Pleasure's .* 

"* — Tom Stoon .~<r.^k 




By Baeton PlTTMAN 

The Neill-Morosco Company inaugurated the sea- 
son of summer stock at the California this week in 
a production of "In the Palace of the King." Viola 
Allen appeared here in this piece about two years 
ago, and while it would not be reasonable to expect 
a production so elaborate, the cast of the Neill- 
Morosco Company does not suffer in the least by the 
comparison. Beautiful Lillian Kemble as Dona M'aria 
Dolores, plays the part just as well as Miss Allen 
did, and has the advantage of being younger and 
prettier than her predecessor. George Spencer is a 
graceful and pleasing Don John and Elsie Esmond 
as the blind sister of Dona Dolores acquitted herself 
with great credit. Joseph Dailey played "Adonis," 
the jester, with a delightful pathos, but the true sig- 
nificance of the character seemed beyond the audi- 
ence. Fanny Meadows played Queen Anne, wife of 
Philip II of Spain, and played it with a strange ele- 
phantine grace which elicited the laughter of the 
audience as she entered and ascended the throne. 
Sixteenth century queens may have walked like that, 
but I doubt it. The first week of the Neill-Morosco 
Company has proven most successful, establishing 
Lillian Kemble, Elsie Esmond, George Spencer, 
Joseph Dailey, H. S. Dumeld, and others as local 
favorites. The last performance of "In the Palace 
of the King" is to-morrow night. On Monday night 
"Hearts Aflame" will be presented. This is a play 
of modern social life in New York, written by Gene- 
vieve Haines and something on the Clyde Fitch style. 
After next week the new play at the California will 
start on Sunday instead of Monday evening. 
* • • 

"The Frisky Mrs. Johnson" was presented all week 
at the Columbia by Amelia Bingham and company 
with great success. It is another Fitch play, almost 
up to the standard of "The Climbers." The scenes 
are laid in Paris at the present time, and the charac- 
ters are mostly American and English, one French 
Count furnishing the local color, and color of a pro- 
nounced and peculiar kind. too. Miss Bingham, in 
the title role, is perhaps more happily cast than in 
any of her previous plays. It is also gratifying to 
see Lackaye in a part that is not despicable. The 
piece is merely an old theme re-dressed. The time- 
honored expedient of the letter has an important part 
in the plot. The young wife of Frank Morley is 
guilty of infidelity, and when her husband suspects, 
"the frisky Mrs. Johnson," who is her elder and wid- 
owed sister, assumes the blame and pretends that 
the fatal letter, which comes unaddressed, is intended 
for her. 

The younger sister at last confesses, refusing to 
accept the magnanimous sacrifice made for her when 
she realizes that it would imperil Mrs. Johnson's 
happiness. Lackaye is the lover of Mrs. Johnson, 
and while the audience is rejoicing over the happy 
consummation of their affection, the younger woman 
is cast off by her spouse, and while this is displeasing 
the construction of the play will allow no other de- 
nouement. Frances Ring is decidedly at her best as 
Mrs. Frank Moreley. Abingdon is successful as the 
injured husband, and Bijou Fernandez plays her bit 



.in a way that makes us wish she had a more import- 
ant role. Next week's repertoire is arranged as fol- 
lows : "The Climbers" on Monday, Thursday and Fri- 
day evenings and Wednesday matinee ; "The Frisky 
Mrs. Johnson," on Tuesday, Wednesday and Satur- 
day evenings and Saturday matinee. Miss Bing- 
ham's engagement will be followed by Ezra Kendall 

in "The Vinegar Buyer."- 

• • • 

The double burlesque of "Under the Red Globe" 
and "The Three Musketeers," at Fischer's, continues 
to pack the house nightly. From present indications, 
it would seem that the piece is destined to have a 
long and successful run. Its successor, however, is 
being rehearsed. It is also a double travesty, "The 
Big Little Princess" and "Quo Vass Iss." 

• • * 

The Central offered "Faust" all this week, and the 
piece delighted all who saw it. Herschel Mayall 
played Mephistopheles, and did it so admirably that 
he was many times called before the curtain. Lewis 
Morrison occupied a box on the opening night, and 
in his curtain speech, Mayall modestly attributed his 
own rendition of the part to Mr. Morrison's coaching. 
Eugenia Lawton was an adequate Marguerite. The 
Brocken scene came up to the expectations awakened 
by the advertising it had had. 

Next week's offering at the Central, beginning on 
Monday evening, is a romantic melodrama entitled 
"A Lion's Heart." Herschel Mayall will have the 
leading role, and as the piece is of just the character 
which will suit the Central patrons, it is safe to pre- 
dict another big success. 

• • • 

The second week of "The Prisoner of Zenda" was 
as enthusiastically attended as the first, and next 
week's play, beginning on Monday evening, will be 
"The Manxman." The Alcazar management pre- 
sents it for the first time in stock, as the enormous 
royalty demanded by the author, Hall Caine, has 
heretofore precluded others from doing so. White 
Whittlesey will have the rugged and tender role of 
"Pete Quilliam," and the other Alcazar favorites will 
be happily cast. "The Manxman" will doubtless 
have a successful run, for as a play it is as pleasing 
as "The Christian," and it will be put on with that 
minute attention to detail so largely responsible for 
the success of the Alcazar productions. 

• • • 

Camille d'Arville in "The Highwayman" at the 
Tivoli all week has demonstrated that her long ab- 
sence from the stage has not in the least impaired 
her ability as an actress or a singer. The ovation 
which greeted her on the opening night has scarcely 
subsided all week, and both in the dress of Lady Con- 
stance Sinclair, and in the male garb she assumes. 
Miss d'Arville, though stouter than in the past, is 
thoroughly pleasing in appearance. Her voice is in 
good condition. Edwin Stevens is good as Foxy 
Quiller, and Ferris Hartman has only a small part, 
which he renders well. The opera is well staged and 
is to be continued next week. 

• « « 

The Grand has again changed the bill and the 
offering is "In Wall Street." This is another one of 
the bright musical comedies of the Rogers Brothers 
series, in which Raymond and Caverly have the 
funny Dutch parts. Anna Wilks, the little soubrette, 
is an established favorite here, and in her new role of 
the private detective she divides honors with Ray- 
mond and Caverly. Cheridah Simpson still holds 
her own, and Herbert Sears is excellent as the 



July 25, 1903. 



bAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



mining broker. The costumes and the girls are as be- 
witching as ever. 

• • « 

The Chutes during the coming week offer.'- four 
new acts, all said to possess great merit. They arc 
the three Kuhns, novelty musicians; Maude Still, a 
dainty soubrette ; Zeno, the magicians: and Mexius 
and Mexius. the clown and his dog. The three Mal- 
vcrns and Alvino, each entering the entertainment a 

little, will remain at the Chutes for another week. 

• • • 

The four new acts which the Orpheum offers are 
Mine. Konorah, the lightning arithmetician; the 
monologist James J. Morton : Mascart's dogs and 
monkeys ; and Claudius and Corbin, banjoists, for- 
merly with Primrose and Dockstader. Claude Gil- 
lingwater's comedietta, "The Wrong Man," Ethel 
Levy, the comedienne, the Orpheus Comedy Four, 

and the three Polos, will appear for the last time. 

• * * 

Dr. Mclvor Tyndall will lecture at Steinway Hall 
on to-morrow evening on "The Thought that Kills," 
and his subject for the Sunday evening following, 
which will be August 2d, is "Is Telepathy a. Lost 
Art or a Development?" The series of lectures by this 
eminent thinker seem greatly appreciated by all of 
those who are interested in the so-called occult prob- 
lems and the higher ethical development. On last 
Sunday evening, choosing for his subject "Life Se- 
crets," Dr. Mclvor Tyndall packed Steinway Hall 
with appreciative hearers. The key-note of his teach- 
ing seems to be that man's complete understanding 
of what we term spiritual laws is as much a part of 
his natural heritage as is his ability to grasp physi- 
cal laws. 

• * * 

Anticipation runs high over the approaching en- 
gagement of Henry Miller and Margaret Anglin. 
They will appear at the Columbia in an extensive 
repertoire. Charles B. Dillingham, who is coming 
rapidly to the front as an impresario, is managing 
the joint starring tour. 

(Continued to Page 11.) 

font-mi Thontca Belasco ft Marer, Prop,. Martet Streat. 
>->Kr)trul incUtre. opp.Clty Hall. PnoneBoutli6B3. 

Weekitarttng Monday, July 27th, 1903. Matinee, Saturday and Snnday 

The brilliant actor, 

MR. HER8GHEL MAYALL 

8 o pported by the superb Central T heater Stook Company, 
In the powerful romantic drama, 

THE LION'S HEART 

Prices: Evening! 10c to 50a. Matinees, 10c, 160, 250. 
Week of August 3rd. Zorah. 

Sutro Heights 

Saturday and Sunday afternoons and evening?, August 1 and 2, 1903. 
4 open air performances. Monster testimonial to NANCE O'NEIL who 
will make her flrit appearance bb Rosalind In a magnificent production of 
Shakespeare's comedy 

AS YOU LIKE IT 

A apendld oast, Including JAMES J. COKBETT as Charles the Wrestler. 
Reserved seats, SI; Box chairs, Si. 50. The sale of seats will begin at Sher- 
man. Clay and Co.'s Music House Monday morning, July 27. 

SteinWay Hall 223 Sutter Street 

SUNDAY JULY 26th— 8:15 P. M. 
DR. ALEX, J. MoIVOB 

TYNDALL 

will talk on 

THE THOUGHT THAT KILLS 

Followed by demonstrations of the power of the sub- 
conscious mind Tickets 25. 50 and 75 cents. Box office 
open 10 to 4 Saturday. Sunday eve. AuguBt Sod, is 
Telepathy a Lost Faculty, or a Development . 



Fischer's Theatre 




All pratan Fischer's this week, call as bene f to tors. 

For our wonderful show and sterling actors. 

We'Ta abown lots of good things, bat the aew bill's tbs beat. 

In specialties, dance*. »<>ogs sod tipto date Jest. 

Our grrai combination bill 

UNDER THE RED GLOBE 

WITH 

THE THREE MUSKEETERS 

The show that bit them bard. Same popular prices. 
Magnificently staged and acted. 

Reserved Seats Night prices 25-50-750. Sat. ft 
15-600. Children at Matinees 10-250. 



Bun. Matlceei 



GraQd Opera liouse 



Only Matinee Saturday. Just what the public want. 

Tonight and every night. RAYMOND and CAVERLY and oar superb 

New York Company la the merry Bparkllng musical eccentricity 

IN WALL STREET 

New specialties, songs, dances. New march of beautiful girls. 
Prices: 25c, 50c, 75 cts. 



California Theatre. 



Tonight, tomorrow night last of "In the Palaoe of the Rlng,";as pre- 
sented by the famouB 

NEILL-MOROSGO COMPANY 

Monday evening, July 27th, first time here of Genevieve H aloe's modern 
society play 

HEARTS AFLAME 

This scored ablgsnccesB In v ew York last season and Is one of the gems 
of the Nelll-Morosco repertoire. 

Next— Commencing Sunday night, Aug. 2. Paul Leicester Ford's thrilling 
and delightful story of the Revolution— Janice Meredith. 



Tivoli Opera House. MKS - 



All next week. Saturday matinee. 



Ernestine Kreltng. 

Proprietor and Manager 



Special engagement of CAMILLE D'ARVILLE to appear In Smith and 
DeKoven's co rule opera . 

[THE HIGHWAYMAN 

supported by the entire Tivoli company. EDWIN STEVENS as Foxy 

Quliier. 

Popular prices 35. B0 and 75o. Telephone Bush 9. 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 
'Farrcll St., between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Orpheun). J? 

Week commencing Snnday Matinee, July 26. 

VALID VAUDEVILLE 

Mme. Konorah; James J. Morton; Macart'B Dogs and Monkeys; Clandiu" 
and Corbin; Ethel Levey: Orpheus Comedy.Four; The Three Polos; Th° 
Blograpb and last week of 

GLAUDE GILLINGWATER Z> GO. 

Usual matinee and prices. 

Columbia Theatre. GOT ™ B ' t^. & ^.n^.. 

Beginning Monday July 27th. fifth and last week of 

AMELIA BINGHAM 

Monday. Thursday and Friday nights and Wednesday 

THE CLIMBERS 

Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday nights Saturday matinee, THE 
FRISKY MRS. JOHNSON. Aug. 3.— Ezra Kendall In, The Vinegar Buyer. 



A \r* ****<* v TKdnhro bxlaioo ft matib, Proprietors. 

/WCcLXcLl 1 UCUirc E. D. Thick, Gen Manager. Phone Alcazar 



and her Company, 
matinee 



Regular matinee Thursday and Saturday. 

evening next July 27, 

The distinguished romantic actor 



Week commenolog Monday 



WHITE WHITTLESEY 



In Hall Celne'a marvelouf play 



THE MANXMAN 

As given In England by Wilson Barrett. Its first production In San 
Francisco. 

First time at popular prices. Evening— 25o to 75c. Matinees Thursday 
and Saturday l*o to 50c. Aug. 3.— A Marriage of Convenience. In pre- 
paration—The Dairy Farm. 



f?fter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering pl-xts attar 
the theatre la OTer. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



1 





own \~rter 

'Xear the CricrKWhtt the devil art thou 
"Onelhat wilt play tbedevil , sir. M'thyoi.- ' 



Is Mrs. Charles W. Spaulding a Mrs. Svengali? 
That's what Miss Maud Davis' mother says, and she 
said it in the Examiner, which is always right. It 
seems that Maud was engaged to a nice young man 
named Desmond D. Boyer, and all of a sudden she 
changed her mind about caring for Desmond, and 
went to live with Mrs. Spaulding. Then Mrs. Davis 
said that Maud was hypnotized, and an Examiner 
reporter heard it, and the report was worked up i-nto 
a good article for a dull Monday. It is an important 
scientific matter now to really know whether Maud 
is hypnotized or not. If not, she has simply changed 
her 'mind, as is a woman's privilege; if she is, every 
woman in the future who gets tired of her beau and 
goes to live with a ladifriend is in a trance ami not 
responsible. 

This is not an isolated instance — I wish it were. 
Two young women went out to get one of those 
heterogeneous compounds known as a French dinner 
last Sunday night, "and after the carousing was r 
they took their unsteady way homeward. They wan- 
dered aimlessly through town, and when they were 
picked up by the police they were both in such a 
condition that one of them had to be sent to the Re- 
ceiving Hospital and the other to the city prison. 
Without the French restaurants' blind for drunken- 
ness and immorality, this case, and a thousand worse 
ones, would never come up. If the gentlemen of 
the cloth want to "investigate," here is a cause worthy 
their mettle. 

Now that Major Tompkins of Oakland has been 
chosen warden of San Quentin, I might as well tell 
him — by way of congratulation — that he has a large 
and thankless job on his hands. It is no fun to act 
as professional corrector of the criminal class 
best, and in this State it is an especially ticklish job. 
The Major will have plenty to do to remain an hon- 
1 st man in the position, and with politicians pulling 
him hither and yon there is small chance of his know- 
ing whether he is afoot or on horseback, unless he 
has cast-iron nerve. If he is kind to the prisoners 
there will always be some soreheads to say that he 
is lax. If he is severe the old yell "cruelty" will go 
up. Congratulations. Major. 

I am very glad to see that there was a boy present 
the other day patriotic enough to thrash the French- 
man who trampled on the American flag. But I am 
not, however, letting my patriotism get the better 
of my logic. The French sailors, we must remem- 
ber were doing honor to our flag a few moments 
before the fight ensued, and if they had not been 
jeered at while in the act of waving the national em- 
blem they probably would not have given rein to their 
Latin tempers and trampled on the colors. I am proud 
of the patriot who put in an uppercut for our lienor, 
but I am ashamed of the American asses who in- 
spired in the Frenchmen a disrespect for our flag. 

Grover Cleveland is in luck. His wife presented 
him with the long-hoped-for boy, and Bryan made 
one of bis roaring attacks on him on the same day. 
These events combined to display the ex-President's 
characteristic virtues of perseverance and patience. 



Of course, Michael Casey, in "improving" Third 
street into an impassable rubbish heap, is abusing 
his office, but what could you expect of a professional 
agitator who has gotten himself into office by means 
of such bloody mischief as the 'longshoremen's 
strike which he and Yorke and a few more bullies 
stirred up? Casey, as president of the Board of Pub- 
lic Works, has no time to see that the boulders, 
houses, teams and building materials are removed 
from the middle of Third street. He is busy after 
graft, as he and his ilk will always be, to the certain 
aggrandizement of themselves and the shame of the 
American commonwealth. 

The papers are full of lots of new and exciting 
stuff about the eminent gentlemen of the ring, Mono- 
logist Corbett and Actor Jeffries. We hear daily ac- 
counts of their doings that nearly give us heart fail- 
ure. Corbett is actually punching the bag, Jeffries 
is really taking five-mile runs over the hills! Now, 
that is what I call originality. Prize fighters have 
never done those stunts before, and so there is a 
good and sufficient excuse for taking a page of type 
and illustrations daily telling about it while the news 
of the foreign nations is cut down to a quarter of a 
column or crowded out altogether. 

A University of Wisconsin professor dropped dead 
while taking a bath. In Missouri, where custom tran- 
sitions are rapid, this would not have been considered 
especially startling, but it puts Wisconsin in a new 
light of advancement. Once the philosophers anti- 
thetically proclaimed a purity of soul by a filthiness 
of body; later the monasteries secured their odor of 
sanctity by ablutionary abstinence. But custom, like 
the vermiform appendix, gradually outrides its func- 
tion, and when put to its former uses, kills. The Wis- 
consin professor's reversion to this dead fallacy was 
meted a terrible, but a just fate. 

A double-ended snake has been found at Half- 
moon Bay, and scientists say that it is quite unac- 
countable that such a reptile should have been found 
there. I do not think so. The habitat of the double- 
ended snake depends not on the climate, as is gener- 
ally supposed, but on the saloon regulations prevalent 
in the neighborhood. I have known varieties of 
"snake juice" to have been sold right here in San 
Francisco which have produced, not only double- 
ended snakes, but purple rats, green monkeys and 
eleven-tailed lizards as well. Half-moon Bay should 
be investigated by the Epworth League. 

Mrs. Hazel Brown, a ballet dancer, had another 
lady arrested this week because, she says, the defend- 
ant deprived her of her clothes. I don't quite see 
what Mrs. Brown has to get huffy about. I never 
before heard that it made a ballet dancer angry to 
deprive her of her clothes. In fact, the most success- 
ful ladies I have seen in this capacity have worn 
the least clothing. I should think that Mrs. Brown 
would regard anyone who would steal her clothes 
as a professional benefactor — but then, there is 
really no accounting for the moods of women. 

Sacramento has an infant prodigy in the shape of 
Hazel Schad Steiner, who has a voice of such wonder- 
ful range that she can run a scale from lower A flat 
to high C in less time than it takes most children to 
hold their breath. She can hit almost every letter 
of the musical alphabet with her eyes shut and her 
month open, and can do vocal stunts that would make 
a woman of twenty-five cough up a tonsil. I think 
I will take up a collection and get Hazel's voice 
fixed. 



July 25. 1903. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

THE LEADERS OF FASHION. 



By Lady Algy. 
Where, oh, where, do all the pretty gowns come 
from? From San Francises dressmakers, of course, 

answer the sweet belles in tune. And indeed most 
of them do, for we have modistes who make the for- 
eigners mind their seams and sashes. 1 know a half 
dozen fashionables who went abroad this year and 
brought their satins and chiffons home to be made 
it]) instead of patronizing the French couturieres. 
I hey didn't do it to economize, either, but because 
they have learned that the local modistes are just as 
chic and study a great deal harder to please than do 
the Paquins and Worths. When Carrie Taylor was 
buying her trousseau, she took the advice of Mrs. 
Fred McNear and others who had had experience, 
and bought all her clothes here, though she was go- 
ing to Europe immediately after her marriage to Mr. 
Xewhall. One of the California colony who saw her 
in Xew York wrote that Mrs. Newhall was the most 
smartly dressed woman at Delmonico's, where the 
bride and groom dropped in for luncheon. Mrs. Xew- 
hall had on a camel's-hair gown of an elusive shade of 
brown. The striking part of the gown was the big 
tan linen collar embroidered in pink and black and 
blue, and decorated with black buttons embroidered 
in pink and blue. Mrs. Newhall is not a beauty, 
though she has as much claim to the title as most 
"society page beauties," but she has a stunning figure 
and knows how to carry off her clothes, which is 
proven by the fact that the lunchers at "Del's" sat 
up and took notice of her. 

By the way, if you want to catch fashion by the 
forelock, take note of the fact that camel's-hair is 
going to be the accredited fabric for fall and winter 
wear. There will be other materials putting forth 
a strenuous bid for popularity, but camel's-hair will 
leave them all a lap behind in the race. 

The de Guigne girls are attracting much attention 
at Del Monte, for they are buds billed to bloom in 
society this winter. Marie Christine, the elder one, 
is another of those belated buds who have had to 
change debutante finery suddenly for mourning. She 
was to have made her debut last year, but on account 
of a death in the family the event was postponed, 
and now the two sisters will come out together. As 
they belong to the Parrott family, they are assured 
dinners and dances and teas without end. Miss de 
Guigne has a quaint style of dressing that differen- 
tiates her from the ultra modish. She has a mauve 
organdie that is the daintiest and most picturesque 
thing I've fixed my eyes on for many a day. The 
skirt is made of three deep flounces, giving the effect 
of. three separate skirts, each one trimmed with a 
band of lace whose irregular edge is criss-crossed 
with narrow white satin ribbon. The sleeves follow 
the quaint lines of the skirt and consist of two 
flounces, the second one falling below the elbow. 
Miss de Guigne wears a picturesque shepherdess hat 
with this costume, and she looks fetching and old- 
fashioned enough to be set in the cabinet with the 
Dresden ware. 

Her sister, Miss Josephine, a piquant little Frenchy 
beauty, affects white. She has a little white bunga- 
low silk that always raises a crop of admiring com- 
ment whenever she wears it. Bungalow silk is a 
novelty which is really not silk at all, but a sort 
of mull silk flecked. The skirt of Miss Josephine's 
gown has three broad bands of white lace at gradu- 
ated intervals, and the space filled in with ruffles of 
white gauze ribbon. The waist has the ubiquitous 



transparent yoke and a deep collar with the seductive 
gauze ruffles like those on the skirt. 

I have already described one or two of the pongee 

gowns that have made a dent, but one of the girls 

who was at Mrs. Frank's luncheon tells me that 1 
have really missed seeing "the" pongee of the sea-on. 
Mrs. Fred McXcar wore it at the luncheon, and rap- 
tures were generously besprinkled oxer it. The skirt 

is a sim-plaited accordeon that was especially besom- 
ing to Georgie McXear. and the blouse showed some 
sort of marvelous French trimming in blue and pon- 
gee shades. 

Mrs. Latham McMullin wore one of the new crash 
dresses to the luncheon Mrs. Frank Carolan gave 
Genevieve Carolan the other day in San Rafael, and 
the gown made a genuine hit. Mrs. Carolan, w ho has 
very decided opinions in the matter of dress, was the 
most enthusiastic about it, and declared it was the 
prettiest crash gown she has seen. Instead of the 
conventional one-color background, Mrs. McMullin's 
gown had a big pale blue dot about as large as a quar- 
ter scattered over the crash. The skirt was trimmed 
with real Clunie lace, and the blouse was ornamented 
with applique of taffeta with blue motifs. A big bow 
of white satin ribbon caught to one side of the waist 
and with ends falling down the front of the skirt, was 
out of the ordinary, for sashes have been discarded 
for a long time. 




Glen Gs^rry 

Old Highland Scotch 



FOR. BON VIVANTS 



TILLMANN (SL BENDEL 

Purveyors to tK» PACIFIC SLOPE TRADE 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 





Library&abk 



By Roland Whittle 

Some extracts have already been 

As it was in made in the News Letter from 

the Beginning. Joaquin Miller's latest book, "As 

it was in the Beginning," for the 
purpose of showing the central idea of the poem, 
which is the support of the much-talked-of propa- 
ganda of the President with reference to "race sui- 
cide." The theme is such an unusual one for poetical 
purposes that there is little wonder that the major- 
ity of the critics have so far fastened upon it with 
peculiarly slack grasp, as if they were doubtful what 
kind of a creature they were called upon to investi- 
gate, and with what amount of approval their efforts 
would be viewed by the cultured and discriminating 
East, which has not, after all, sufficient self-con- 
fidence to adopt anything startlingly new. But, 
viewed merely as a poem and apart from the theme, 
the Californian bard has accomplished a remarkable 
piece of work. Not that it is by any means even. 
Now and again words, and in some places whole pas- 
sages, strike the ear somewhat unmelodiously, but 
this is for the most part merely because they contrast 
with the tremendous -quantity of good, and stately 
verse which is to be found throughout eighty-eight 
long pages of poetry. 

From California to Alaska, from Alaska to Japan, 
thence to the Hawaiian Islands and back again to 
the Golden State, the characters take their way, and 
each step of their Odyssey is marked by gems of 
verse, many of which will live, or ought to do so, to 
mark the spots where the poet lingers in his narra- 
tive. The poet takes up the cudgels for the natural 
beauties of California as against the merely artistic 
marvels of Europe in these words : 

"What's Berlin, Dresden, sorry Rome, 

But traps that take you unaware? 

Behold those paintings, right at home, 

Where nature paints with patient care 

Such splendid pictures, sea and shore, 

As all the world should bow before 

Such pictures hanging to the skies 

Against the walls of Paradise, 

From base to bastion as should wake 

Piave's painter from the dust : 

Such walls of color crowned in snow, 

Such steeps, such deeps, profoundly vast, 

As old-time Art had died to know, 

And knowing, died content, as he 

Who looked from Nimo's steep to see, 

Just once, the Promised Land, and passed ! ' 

The colossal mysteries of Alaska, that terrible land 
with its eternal snows, has a great fascination for 
our poet, and he dwells in strong verse upon the 
awfulness of that country. Thus : 

"To see, to guess the great white throne, 

Behold Alaska's ice-built steeps 

Where everlasting silence keeps 

And white death lives, and lords alone 

Go see God's river born full grown — 

The gold of this stream it is good, 

Here grows the Arks' white gopher wood — 

A wide, white land, unnamed, unknown, 

A land of mystery and moan. 



But the story passes from this sterile wilderness, 
where, however, the sun of spring has at last dawned, 
and at one leap transports us to Japan, the fondness 
of the poet for which land is unmistakable. He here 
finds an inspiration for some of the most beautiful 
lines upon the subject which is nearest his heart. 

"And wee, brown wives on hig'n, wild steeps 
Of terraced plot and bamboo patch, 
•Where toil, hard toil, incessant keeps 
Sweet virtue, sweet sleep and a thatch, 
They hear and hold, with closer fold, 
Their bare, brown babes against the cold. 

They croon and croon, with soothing care, 
To babes meshed in their mighty hair, 
And loving, crooning, breathe a prayer." 

These are some characteristic extracts. It is not 
pretended that they are the best in the book, but 
they are fairly typical of the kind of verse with which 
Mr. Miller enriches his theme. It is the fashion to 
make somewhat light of our poets, and to deny them 
the praise which' is their simple meed until we are 
assured by those who are reckoned elsewhere as 
authorities that our praises are not misplaced. It 
may safely be asked when within recent years a task 
of the magnitude which has been attempted here 
has been better accomplished. The theme is a modern 
one, the characters are of to-day; the very lands 
which are described are as far as the vast majority 
of us are concerned, entirely new — that is, they pos- 
sess no historical significance for us. Their names 
invoke no memories ; no halo of romance hangs in 
their syllables. Few poets would have dared to ven- 
ture into paths so untrodden, where the interest of 
the reader and the success of the venture depend al- 
together upon the actual power of the writer to hold 
the attention of the reader and the strength of the 
verse. 

It has been the habit of poets to express their 
thoughts in terms of by-gone ages, and to revert to 
the age of chivalry or even more remote epochs, in 
order to throw the glamour of an artificial romance 
over their efforts. This William Norris did in the 
"Earthly Paradise," where "the idle singer of an 
empty day," was content to make himself known in 
the terms and atmosphere of a prehistoric period, in 
which the very dress of the actors carried with it 
a certain poetic value, and contributed to the general 
effect. Mr. Miller attempted a much more difficult 
task than that, and his success, if his work is judged 
on fair, broad lines, and not in a niggling, carping 
spirit, cannot be gainsaid. 



W 



'ALWAYS 

)1NSIST UPON HAVING 

JHE G ENUINE 

MURRAY & 
LANMANS 

FLORIDA WATER 



THE MOST REFRESHING AND 
DELIGHTFUL PERFUME FOR THE 
HANDKERCHIEF. TOILET A ND BATH. 

'I' li ' i ni iir l ii ll T l i i i ir i ll ii i i i ii i i l ii iii i i iiin i i i ni"^ii™; 



July 25, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



The Henley-Stevenson 
Episode. 



Now that Henley :-. lead, 
the unconscionable gossips 
of the daily press an 
viving the legend that he 
stabbed his friend Stevenson in the back by his 
famous article on the dead novelist. The idea is 
most absurd. Henley was loyal to Stevenson, the 
man, and he was sufficiently loyal to stand ti|> and 
protest against the stupid semi-idolatry with which 
a portion of the smaller literati were endeavoring 
to smother the name of the novelist. He knew 
Stevenson as a man, and he knew that nothing was 
more absurd than to place him on a pedestal of false 
glory, and to attribute to him a character over which 
a very archangel might weep with envy. The Stev- 
enson boom had to be shattered if Stevenson him- 
self, for Heaven knows he was never a hypocrite, 
was to receive fair play. Henley, whose straight- 
forwardness and candor made him a very knight- 
errant of the truth, flung his spear first at the idol. 
The curled darlings of the salons shrieked with out- 
raged sentiment at the daring act of impiety, but 
Henley, who had faced far more formidable foes, was 
unaffected by the outcry. Now he is dead, and if the 
two meet in the Beyond, each is man enough to un- 
derstand. 



Pleasure's Wand. 



It is a work of supererogation for the university 

professors to seek the extermination of children by 
means of careless handling of Paris green, as they 
seem to be doing at Watsonville. They were sent to 
kill the codlin moth ; they should confine themselves 
to their work. 



An excellent programme was presented at the < lr- 
pheum last week, marked by the usual large attend 
ance. Hodges and Launchmere, George \\ . Hunter, 
DeKolta, Bailey and Madison, Ethel Levey, Claude 
(iillingwater, the Orpheus Corned} lour, the three 
Polos, and the biograph Furnishing the entertainment, 
Claude < lillingwater's sketch was "The Wrong Man." 

quite a clever little corned} skil of New York life. 

* • « 

The world-renowned "Hen llur" will be presented 
in this city for the first time in the early fall. ( krtt- 
lob, Marx ec t'o. have arranged to bring the enor- 
mous production here for a four weeks' run, and will 
use the Grand Opera House for the purpose, as no 
other stage in town would be large enough to ac- 
commodate the scenery. 

* * * 

'Wilton Lackaye is to star next season in "The 
Pit." He is one of America's really great actors. 
William A. Brady will manage the tour. 

* * * 

Richard Golden, who will be "King Dodo" for 
Henry W. Savage next season, is now engaged in 

building a summer home at Port Washington, L. I. 

* * * 

A great testimonial will be tendered Nance O'Neil 
at Sutro Heights on next Saturday and Sunday af- 
ternoons and evenings, August 1st and 2d, in the form 
of an elaborate open-air performance of "As You 
Like It." Miss O'Neil will appear in male garb for 
the first time. Her excellent support has been aug- 
mented by James Corbett, who will play the wrestler. 



r 



JUST READY 



Mr. JACK LONDON'S 

NEW NOVEL 



The Call 
of the Wild 




Illustrated in Colors, Cloth, $1.50 




Perrault. 



Franfois. 

AeK any booKseller 
for it, or 



"JACK LONDON has written the romance of a dog's life with 
a vigor, insight and dranutic power which no other similar tale except 
'Bob, Son of Battle' approaches in interest and literary quality ... but 
it is above all an absorbing tale of wild life, full of pictorial power and 
abounding in striking incidents of frontier town, camp and adventure." 

—HAMILTON W. MABIE 



THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 



€>€> FiftH Avenue 

New Yorh 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 25, 1903. 



" v r:..'^-.^: l; v-. ■■■ [ - ■■ 










Admiral Fulton G. Berry, 

Hero of many raisins, 
Unto his fame, unto his name, 

Raise we our diapasons. 

In his good yacht the ".Fresno" 

Sailed he from; 'Frisco Bay; 
No pennant higher, no raisins dryer, 

Than Admiral Berry that day. 

But a gale sprang up in the ocean 
And threatened to do him harm, 

And the hero of many raisins, 

He wished he was back on the farm. 

Now Admiral Fulton G. Berry, 

His nautical labors done, 
Is out with the raisins in Fresno 

A-drying himself in the sun. 

• • * 

The strike craze has at last reached the newsboys, 
and for the past week their familiar cry of "Here's 
yer ev'nin' paper — five cents!" has not been heard. 
People who have been besieged by these boys have 
marveled much at this silence, which it seems has 
not been explained by any of the dailies, though they 
are always on the look-out for news. The boys have 
declared a boycott on the Post and the Bulletin. 
Some time ago the publishers of the three morning 
and the two evening papers raised their prices on 
subscription and street sales, owing to the increased 
cost of white printing paper. Before the increase the 
price of the morning papers to the newsboys was two 
copies for five cents, and the big Sunday paper, with 
the funny supplement, sold at the same figure. The 
morning papers are still sold at two for a nickel, but 
the price of the Sunday paper is increased to three 
for ten cents. The newsboys say they have no kick 
coming against this, and continue to sell the morning 
papers, but boycott the evening sheets, which for- 
merly sold at three for five cents, and have increased 
the price to two for five cents. For the past week 
there has not been a San Francisco evening paper 
sold in the streets by any member of the Newsboys' 
Union. A lone woman, however, defies the strikers, 
and takes her stand on Market street, near Newspaper 
Corner, and cries out the Bulletin. Business has been 
so brisk with her that she brings her baby down-town 
in its carriage and wheels the little kid along the 
pavement while she cries the paper. In addition, her 
little daughter of about six years carries an armful 
of papers, and they make many sales in the late af- 
ternoon hours when the commuters are rushing for 
the Oakland ferry. While both papers are boycotted, 
the boys seem to have a special grievance against 
the Post, and even this woman who defies the strikers 
will not sell the Post. The boys carry the war into 
the very home of the Post, and when a delivery 
wagon starts out from the pressroom, a gang with 
sharpened knives start in pursuit, unmindful of the 
wide-awake policeman who stands at the basement 
door. With their knives the boys cut the bundles 
from the wagon and throw them into the street, 
when the papers are torn up by other boys follow- 
ing in the wake. Of late, knives are in demand among 



the newsboys, and some of them have borrowed 
their mother's scissors. They have declared a war 
to the knife, and the knife to the hilt. 

A few days after the strike was declared, someone 
with speculation in his eye, persuaded the newsboys 
that they needed an organ, without which their strike 
would probably fail. In an evil hour they listened to 
the whisper of the tempter, and a sheet called the Re- 
port was the result. So far, it has had a contrary 
effect, by widening the breach. At the time of the 
walk-out the Newsboys' Union was said to have 
about $1,000 in the treasury. How much, if any, of 
this sum the new paper has secured for aggravating 
the strike may never be known. The newsboys will 
probably learn that it is more profitable to sell than 
to publish a newspaper. 

For many years, and up to the time of the unfor- 
tunate appearance of the dropsical "supplements," 
the evening and morning papers sold at the uniform 
price of three evening papers for five cents, and two 
morning papers for five cents. In those days the 
papers were smaller, and the publishers and the news- 
boys made money on sales. If the funny supple- 
ments, with their impossible cartoons and milk-and- 
mush special articles, were eliminated, no doubt the 
readers would be better satisfied, and there would 

be peace between the publishers and the' newsboys. 

... 

The arrest and imprisonment of Lucien Mas and 
his confederate, Frederic, at Paris, on the charge of 
perjury, will probably put a stop to the appearance 
of other "eye witnesses" to the accident in which 
Charles Fair and his wife were killed. Months after 
the occurrence these fellows appear upon the scene 
and swear that they were riding by on their bicycles 
at the time of the accident, and stopped only long 
enough to see that Fair was dead and that his wife 
died a few moments afterwards. Then they rode on 
and were silent for months. However, the Fair heirs 
are not disturbed by the statements of these fellows, 
nor the threatened revelations to be made in their 
behalf by the Paris newspapers, which have espoused 
their very shady cause. Captain Seymour, formerly 
Chief of Detectives of this city, and now one of the 
managers of the Fair estate, recently went*to France 
and visited the scene of the accident. He made a 
thorough examination of the surroundings and closely 
questioned the peasant, Mrs. Houdet, on whose prem- 
ises the accident occurred, and who claimed that 
she witnessed it. Captain Seymour states emphati- 

Established in California 
...for thirty-five years... 

Repository in San 
Francisco at Mar- 
ket and Tenth Sts., 
has been rebuilt 
and enlarged, mak- 
ing it the finest car- 
riage salesroom in 
the United States. 
Five hundred styles 
of vehicles shown, 
probably more than all other stores in town com- 
bined. New things in robes and whips. 

STUDFBAKFR BROS. CQ 

Market and Tenth 5ts. 

Telephone Private 634 






L 






July 35, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'3 



cally that these men did not see the accident 
were there any bicyclists on the premises at the time. 
The peasant woman stated to him that no one except 
herself and husband, was on the ground at the time. 
The Fair heirs will not compromise with these new 
claimants — they have nothing to compromise, but on 
the contrary they will defend their property rights 
to the utmost. Captain Seymour seems to be satis- 
fied with the evidence that he obtained in France. 
and says he is not at all uneasy at the threatened 
suit of Mas and his associate. The point in the 
case is that if the wife survived the husband, Fair's 
millions will go to her heirs instead of to his rela- 
tives. 

• • • 

Apropos of the new Tivoli, one of our ex-State 
Representatives will be glad that the seats are to be 
enlarged from eighteen inches to twenty-four. One 
night, during the last opera season, he fitted his am- 
ple proportions carefully into his allotted space. Just 
beyond sat a portly dowager with her slip of a daugh- 
ter. 

The atmosphere was oppressive, and by the time 
the curtain had risen on the second act, the dowager 
felt a clutching need of her smelling salts and the 
night air. 

"Pardon me," faintly murmured the widow. 

"Madam," gasped our gallant ex-representative, 
"allow me!" He struggled to rise, but the tenacious 
arms of the Tivoli seats were unrelenting. 

Things began to grow exciting. Collamarini was 
sharing the attention. The "ex" looked apoplectic, 
and the dowager — — 

"Madam," he panted at last. "It's no use. You'll 
have to climb over." 

• m « 

They say widow's' weeds are always becoming, but 
it's the exception which proves the rule. A certain 
modiste on Sutter street has had palpitation of the 
heart for days over the arbitrary will of a promising 
patron. 

"Madam" had sent out somie obituaries in crepe 
on approval. The maid had tip-toed to the darkened 
room where the widow was hobnobbing with Grief. 

"It's the bonnets," whispered the maid. 

The widow was helped before the glass, and lan- 
guidly submitted to the fitting. One after another 
of the creations were tried and discarded. Her 
lethargy dropped. She arose at last, towering like 
an indignant goddess in her wrath. 

"There's no sense in it !" she blazed. "One might 
as well mutilate their body like the wives of the 
Hindoos as to wear a black bonnet. I will not look 
one whit uglier than nature intended I should. Take 
them away, Jeanette ! Take them away !" 

"Madam" is wondering how white crepe will ans- 
wer for mourning. 

• * * 

Sydney Robertson, the newspaperman, is a native 
of Ireland, and not long ago he got a leave of absence 
from his paper to take a spin back to the old sod. 
He was so pleased with the Emerald Isle that he con- 
tinued his vacation some weeks longer than he at 
first contemplated, visiting the Lakes of Killarney, 
and saw enough to make him regret that he had ever 
come away. All over Ireland he was looked upon as 
a great curiosity and reverenced accordingly as "the 
young man from Calyforny." Everywhere he went 
he was asked remarkable questions about the strange 
tropical fruits which are supposed to be hanging from 
every bow here, the golden pebbles which the peas- 
ants had heard were strewn along the Pacific strands, 
and the wild Indians which, as they imagined, danced 



sliest dances all up and down Market street. Mr. 
Robertson answered all these queries with true Irish 
nature, and the pose of "the young man from 
1 alyforoy" suited him pretty well, till one night, 
when he was invited by a friend to go with him and 
sec an old-time wake which was being conducted in 
a neighboring cabin over the body 'if a young girl. 
It was not hard to locate the place of mourning, for 
the shrieks and wails of the hired mourners were aud- 
able for rods. When Robertson entered there were 
six or eight old women seated about the coffin wail- 
ing industriously, for they were paid for the job. Some 
of them were merely giving vent to noises, and others 
were lamenting in words, calling upon the deceased in 
endearing terms. One of the old women who seemed 
to be out of ideas to wail about, looked up and saw 
the Californian, and the sight seemed to give her fresh 
inspiration. "Wake up, darlint, wake up !" she en- 
treated; "open yer pretty eyes and see the young man 
what's come all the way from Calyforny to see ye !" 
This was about enough for our hero, and he was soon 
on his way back to "Calyforny." 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
Cures Folson-Oak and all Skin Diseases. Sold by all drugrfsts. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



-Are you tired? Go to the Post-St. Turkish Baths. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

tj? 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital & Surplus $1,233,723.75 
Total Assets • 6,914,424.69 



Interest paid on deposits, subject 
to check, at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum. 

Interest paid on savings deposits 
at the rate oi three and six- 
tenths per cent, per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are author- 
ized to act as the guardian of 
estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented at $5 
per annum and upwards. 



J. Dalzell Brown, 

Manager 



persons in Alameda 
County rely upon the 



1 70,000 
Oakland Herald 



FOR ALL THE NEWS 

THE HERALD is absolutely the Home Paper of 
Greater Oakland and of Alameda County. 

THE HERALD publishes each day complete for- 
eign, cable and domestic telegraphic news. 

THE HERALD records fully each day, and par- 
ticularly on Saturday, the doings of Greater Oakland 
Society. 

THE HERALD is without question the best ad- 
vertising medium in the County of Alameda. 

SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney-at-Law 
Crocker building, San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



Equal 



Rights for Labor and 
Capital. 



By William Gbeeb Habrison 

(Mr. William Greer Harrison suggests a Court of 
Arbitration as the better way to settle all questions 
between employee and employer. His views, written 
especially for the News Letter, are expressed in the 
following clearly and forcibly written article :) 

The position of the workingman in this com- 
munity is of great interest to all men who take lime 
to think for themselves. The rights of the working- 
men are now fairly well established. These are 
briefly : 

1. The right to organize for protection in the mat- 
ter of wages, hours, etc. 

2. The right to fix the value of their labor. 
These are basic rights common to all classes of 

labor. There is an inherent, if unwritten right, to 
get out of their capital, which is labor, all that it can 
be made to produce. I am something of a working 
man myself, and demand not merely daily bread, but 
daily recreation and pleasure. I want not merely 
comfort, but also some of the luxuries of life. I want 
time to read, to converse, to improve my mental 
nature, and I also want physical comfort — the en- 
vironment of the beautiful, the inspiration of art, and 
the association with richer, stronger and more highly 
cultivated minds. I want all these things, and so 
long as I can earn them, I have a right to them. But 
I can have them only by recognizing the same right 
as common to every wage earner. What I demand 
for myself I must consistently give to others. 

If, however, I press my natural rights beyond the 
legal limits, made necessary by the constitution of 
society, then I am at fault. In order that I may de- 
rive the largest benefit from my inherent rights, I 
must be prepared to sacrifice a percentage of them, so 
that the machinery which protects them may be kept 
in operation. It is a grave question with me as to 
whether any condition justifies idleness. Whether 
any human being has an inherent right to strike, be 
it capitalist or laborer, is not clearly established. But 
since society has accepted strikes in the form of shut- 
ting down or going out, I accept the social law as 
for the present answering every doubt. There is 
amongst workingmen a feeling that capital is alto- 
gether opposed to their claims. I do not think any 
employer of labor is seriously opposed to labor 
claims. Indeed, for many reasons employers recog- 
nize the value to them of labor organizations, and 
in many ways encourage them, because of the greater 
convenience of dealing with organizations rather than 
with individuals. But capitalists do object to the 
transfer of their business to their employees. They 
object to the pressure of the dictation so constantly 
used by organized labor. This objection is only an 
evidence that the employer is human, and his objec- 
tion is based upon the right which society has de- 
clared to be his, as much as it is the property of 
labor — the right which we understand as freedom of 
action. 

The great trouble — the real difference which keeps 
or appears to keep labor and capital apart — is not a 
lack of sympathy, but the lack of proper machinery 
to bring the two parties into harmonious action. 

I think strikes under all conditions are foolish and 
wasteful, but in the absence of a proper medium of 
adjustment they seem to be necessary. 

To me it appears that nine-tenths of the strikes and 



lockouts have been settled after long periods of idle- 
ness and great suffering, at the point where they 
began. I regard a Court of Arbitration as the proper 
machinery to be used in connection with all labor 
differences. Such a court, properly constituted, 
should obviate the necessity for periodical suspension 
of industries. As to the position of labor in this city 
I am advised by many households that living charges 
have increased during the past three or four years 
some tw r enty-five to thirty per cent. Such an increase 
is of course felt most by the smaller wage earners. 
Again, we are a luxurious people. We live richly. 
We have not reached the pinching point. We are 
not careful of the pennies. There is something in the 
climate, in the mixing up of types which makes us 
all extravagant in our expenditures and large-minded 
in our desires. Where wine and olives grow the 
people become artistic; where a love of art exists 
people are lavish in their expenditure, and their de- 
sires are not limited. 

It is not possible to prevent the labor class feeling 
as others feel. They must of necessity be influenced 
by the generous temperament of their fellows. They 
also have desires and ambitions, and where these 
can be gratified by an expenditure of their own earn- 
ings, the laborer has a full right to the beautiful in 
art, to the pleasures of a cultured life, and no one is 
warranted in opposing a very natural outcome of 
peculiar conditions. But the demands of labor must 
be made through legitimate channels. My judgment 
is, however, that San Francisco wages cannot be 
based upon Eastern wages. The conditions being 
different, we must pay more here. But wage-earners 
must themselves be content with less than their de- 
sires call for, because there is always the possibility 
of work being sent elsewhere. 

But I turn with a positive conviction that a Court 
of Arbitration would deal wisely with all labor ques- 
tions without suspension of labor, and without the 
misery which accompanies the suspension. The 
court being established, both parties prepare a state- 
ment of the differences; the court acts as any other 
court would which takes evidence — gives full judg- 
ment and the law enforces that judgment, whatever 
it may be. Meanwhile the men go on with their work. 
If the decision is in their favor, its findings bear date 
as from the date of appeal. No time, no money, is 
lost; no suffering endured, no class feeling intensified, 
no waste of strength, no loss of values. Justice is 



Midsummer 



Clearance Sale 



Large Discount on Everything 



S. (Si G. Gump Co. 

113 Geary Street 



' 



July 25. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 



done, and that i> what both labor and capital sliouM 
re. 
1 u course, the functions of such a court would !>>• 
peculiar, but surely there arc enough clever men in 
the labor organizations, and as well as with capital, 
to prepare rules for the governing of such a court. 
Is it not worth trying? 



HERE'S MONEY TO 'NEWS LETTER" 
READERS. 



To determine the value of advertising in the New s 
Letter, we publish a coupon which is good for 10 per 
cent of the price of any piano purchased at our San 
Francisco retail store on or before August 1st, 1903. 

Bear in mind that this coupon will be accepted the 
same as money and need not be presented until af- 
ter the piano is selected. 



We are closing out just now over three carloads of 
the very choicest regular $400 pianos for $285, on 
payments of $35 down and $10 per month. 

We have also a large assortment of regular $300 
pianos for $196, on payments of $26 down and $8 per 
month. 

In second-hand instruments we have an endless 
variety, among them a Roenisch Upright in good or- 
der, $65. 

Schwechten upright, large size, $105. 

Bush & Gerts, beautiful walnut, $190. 

Kimball upright, used two years, worth $450, now 
$265, and many others too numerous to mention, 
among them one Kranich & Bach, one Hale, two 
Steinways, one Harman, one fine Decker, one A. B. 
Chase, one Schubert, one Lester, one Kroeger, etc., 
at prices ranging from $115 up. 

Organs. 

A great variety of new and second-hand_ organs, 
parlor and chapel styles, at greatly reduced prices. 
Square Pianos. 

Quite a number of square pianos at virtually your 
own price. We want them out of our way. 

Remember the place: Pommer-Eilers Music Co., 
San Francisco's "busiest, largest and best" wholesale 
and retail piano dealers, No. 653 Market street, di- 
rectly opposite the Chronicle Building, below the 
Examiner. 

* ?j=* *** #*** * * * # % 

COUPON. * 

* News Letter — 7 18 '03. * 

This due bill presented at our retail sales * 

* department, 653 Market street, at any time be- * 

* fore August 1st, 1903, will be accepted as cash * 

* payment equal to 10 per cent of the price of * 

* any instrument selected out of our stock. 

* POMMER-EILERS MUSIC CO., largest ex- * 

* elusive Western Piano dealers. * 



BEAUTIFUL BABY TO BE ADOPTED, less 
than three months old, and of most refined parentage. 

A beautiful Pease Baby Grand ("the smallest 
ever") can be seen at -POMMER-EILERS MUSIC 
CO.'S STORE, and is included in the above offer. 
This beautiful little grand will be taken by the first 
person who sees it, and if you ever want a piano of 
this kind, now is the time. The above coupon is good 
for the first payment of 10 per cent of the price, and 
the balance at $18 a month. 
POMMER-EILERS MUSIC CO., 653 Market St. 



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Tell us what you want on the walls of the principal rooms- 
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Tapestry paintings rented; full size drawings, paints, 
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We manufacture Tapestry Mater- 
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foreign goods and half the price. Book of samples, 10 cents 
Send $1.50 for trial order, for two yards of 60-inch wide No. 
6 goods, worth $3.00. 



Douthitt's Manual of 
Art Decorations. 



Tapestry Materials. 



When in Now York do not fall to visit our house* 



JOHN F. DOUTHITT, 

THE DOVTHITT BUILDING 

273 Fifth Avenue, near 30th Street, NEW YORK. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



Moves and Countermoves. 



The big dailies have not said much about it, but the 
politicians have been quietly discussing the turning- 
down of Johnnie McKenzie's sister at San Jose. Miss 
McKenzie was the principal of the Kindergarten De- 
partment of the State Normal school. She had two 
teachers to assist her. The Board met, cut down her 
salary $400 a year, and discharged her two assist- 
ants. What makes the affair more suggestive is the 
fact that the Governor presided at the meeting. It 
has long been whispered that when the arrangement 
was made that gave Pardee Gage's votes at the State 
Republican Convention, one of the requirements de- 
manded of the present Governor was that he should 
stand by McKenzie. Of course, the truth or falsity 
of the rumor is one of those things which no fellow 
can find out, but it is given as an excuse for McKen- 
zie's re-appointment as Harbor Commissioner. Per- 
sonally, I do not think there is anything in it, for it 
is a well-known fact that McKenzie gave up every- 
thing and threw over all his friends to save himself, 
which would hardly have been necessary if he had 
the assurance of the place. At any rate, the exper- 
ience of Miss McKenzie is taken to mean that her 
brother has no influence with this administration, 
and that he is no longer a political factor to be reck- 
oned with. 

Writing of San Jose politics reminds me of another 
little matter that took place there the other day which 
may engage the attention of the whole State and per- 
haps the nation, before it is finally settled. The 
newspaper writers and teachers in San Jose are or- 
ganized as unions, and at the recent election of 
officers of the Federated Trades Council the presi- 
dent of the Newspapermen's Union, James H. Mor- 
rison was chosen president. Among the members 
of the Teachers' Union was Professor E. E. Newell, 
principal of San Jose Night School. Recently he was 
discharged from his position by the Reform School 
Board, which went into office at the time that the 
Hayes brothers defeated McKenzie and carried the 
City Government. They promised at the time to 
eliminate politics from the schools, but as no charge 
was made against Professor Newell, it is evident that 
like many other politicians, the Hayes brothers have 
not kept their promises. The matter has been called 
to the attention of the Teachers' Union, and also of 
the Newspapermen's Union, of which Newell, who 
was the correspondent for a San Francisco paper, 
was also a member. It is said that the Federated 
Council may start a strike, since the two unions are 
members of that body, and as San Tose has once en- 
joyed the novelty of a students' strike, as a result of 
the acts of the McKenzie school board, it is likely to 
experience a teachers' strike when school begins, as 
a result of the act of the anti-McKenzie board. It 
is said, too, that the experience of Miss McKenzie 
is to be considered by the Council also, and that of 
several janitors and others who were either dis- 
charged or reduced. That will bring the Governor 
into the muddle, as he is ex-officio a member of the 
Normal School Board, and presided at the meeting 
in which the changes were made. 

Senator Selvage of Humboldt was in the city last 
week, looking after the appointment he wants as 
Code Commissioner. He does not expect to get it. 
however, saying that he understands that the Gov- 
ernor is going to give it to ex-Senator Davis of Ama- 
dor. He does not like to see the prize slip from his 
grasp willingly, however, and says frankly that it is 



time that Humboldt should be recognized. He says 
Amador does nothing for the party, and that he 
thinks the splendid vote Humboldt gave Pardee 
should not be overlooked. The Governor is not wor- 
rying about the vote this or that county gave him 
last fall at present. He thinks a great deal of Davis 
and the Amador statesman had to look over all the 
laws passed by the Legislature before he signed them 
last winter. At that time it was whispered that Davis 
was to be Code Commissioner and Davis so told his 
Amador friends. 

When the Governor was in Oakland recently he 
let drop the information that he had selected a can- 
didate for the position of Secretary of the State In- 
sane Board. It is said that he told a friend who ap- 
proached him on the subject that he had already 
selected the party for the place ; that it was a selec- 
tion from Oakland, and that the appointment would 
be made next month. The political gossips have it. 
that the new Secretary is to be Jim Oliver, at present 
Clerk to the Board of Prison Directors at San Quen- 
tin. 

For Adjutant-General, Colonel Pippy of the Union 
League Club is said to be slated to succeed Adjutant- 
General Stone, although Stone expects to succeed 
himself. A few days, the first Sunday I think it was, 
after the election, Stone went over to Oakland and 
took dinner with Pardee. He had a long talk with 
the Governor-elect, and announced when he came 
back that he felt certain of remaining in his place. 
Since then he has not felt so certain, though publicly 
he pretends to be certain of a new four-year com- 
mission. 

RESTAURANTS. 



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Breakfast From 5:30. 



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Hannigan's Cafe and Grill 

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Telephone Black 602. 
Red Top Whiskey now on sale. 






July 25, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»7 




Dear Bessie: This old town is almost as dull as the 
skies that cover us, and every one is supposed to ho 
away; but one is actually surprised at the number of 
one's friends there are to be met in the course of an 
afternoon ramble. Informal teas are quite the correct 
caper just now, and the girls give them every few 
days — just ask a few over the phone, and have a 
breezy chat while they sip their tea and nibble at their 
cakes. They are really very jolly little affairs. Ber- 
nie Drown, Maude Clarke, Cora Smedburg, Elsie 
Sperry, Marjorie Gibbons, Edith Kierstedt, who is 
back at Fort Miley from San Rafael, and Emily Wil- 
son have had them so far. The funniest kind of topics 
get started sometimes ; for instance, some of them 
were talking the other day of how odd it was so many 
army officers chose Judge Advocates for their best 
man. and wondering if they thought by so doing they 
would have legal sanction to the affair ! Don't you 
remember that Captain Howard took Major Hull up 
to Sacramento to support him — as the saying is — 
when he married that pretty little girl who so sen- 
sibly came out from Boston for the ceremony instead 
of making the Captain go East to have it per- 
formed. Well, last week Hull's successor at head- 
quarters, Major Morrow, who is an awfully nice fel- 
low, let me tell you, went to Pacific Grove to act 
as best man to his friend, Lieutenant Love of the 9th 
Cavalry, at his marriage to Miss Eliza Lawrence. I 
hear the wedding was a very pretty one, taking place 
at the little Episcopal chapel at Pacific'Grove, and the 
bride had Miss Laura Farnsworth as her sole attend- 
ant. After the knot was tied, there was a reception 
and breakfast at the new barracks at Monterey, where 
the groom is on duty as well as the bride's brother, 
Lieutenant Charles Lawrence of the 14th Infantry. 

When I spoke last week of the weddings we are 
to have the next few months, I quite forgot those of 
Vesta Shortridge and Emil Bruguiere in October, for 
which I hear Mrs. Allan Wallace is coming out to 
officiate as matron of honor, and the nuptials of 
Genevieve Carolan and Harry Poett ; and again I say 
to you, wait, and you shall hear of an engagement 
ere long for which you are not prepared. We are all 
much interested in an engagement that has become 
known here this week. I mean that of Miss Eliza- 
beth Young to Lieutenant John Hemay of the 226. In- 
fantry. She was a great favorite here when she was 
at the Presidio, and later at Fort Mason while her 
father, General Young, was in command of this De- 
partment, and all her friends are delighted. I wonder 
will she have as pretty a wedding as did her sister 
Marjorie two years ago at Fort Mason when she mar- 
ried Dr. Gibbons of Philadelphia? Everybody is 
glad that Anna Head's troubles are so happily at an 
end, and that she will soon be married to the man of 
her choice, to whom she has been so constant all 
these years. Lieutenant Jephson paid San Francisco 
a visit many years ago, when he was the guest of the 
Heads, and when almost immediately after his arrival 
his engagement to Miss Head was announced it 
caused quite a flutter, as did the breaking of it sub- 
sequently, no one knew why. By the way, I hear 
the date for the Flint-Apperson wedding has been set 
for the 15th of September. 

There does not seem to be much else to scribble 



all. nit than the movings around ,>f one's friends, and 
a stray morsel of gossip that floats about I >h, 
the changes always going on in military circlt 

re there arc s.> many retirements taking place 
in the army it is almost next to impossible t.> keep 
track of them all. < )ne result has been the loss at 
the Presidio of several delightful entertainers. Take, 
for instance. Mrs. Rice, who left us in the spring, and 
now Mrs. Coolidge is also going. However, those 
who will as a consequence get a step up the ladder, 
and who will still remain in the service, are happy; 
Colonel Lockwood is one, and Colonel Tom Barry is 
another. 

There has been a succession of disappointments 
among those at Lake Tahoe who have been looking 
forward this month to a gay time and lots of fun. 
In the first place Mr. Gordon Blanding developed a fit 
of illness which necessitated a warmer climate, and 
so he left there soon after their arrival, and has gone 
to Santa Barbara, and it was a question if the new 
launch should be used until his return. Then jovial, 
kind-hearted Dr. Brigham, who always makes life 
so pleasant for his friends, was stricken down with 
paralysis, and for a time it looked very uncertain 
what the outcome would be, so under these circum- 
stances you can think how dull folks have felt, and 
worst of all, the genus man — young man — is said to 
be a scarce article around those diggings. 

Your friend Alice Meyers, who has been visiting 
her mother, Mrs. Cutts at the Navy Yard for several 
weeks, left for the East last week, and sails from New 
York for Antwerp, where she will join her husband, 
who is there on the Brooklyn as Captain of Marines. 
She had a party of friends up to bid her good-bye at 
Mare Island, among them Edith, who said they were 
all joshing Turner Messersmith for the way in which 
he lost a package of presents for his cousin Alice, 



Babies! Babies! 

PHOTOGRAPHING 

Babies 



Our new arrangements are now complete 
for photographing babies and restless 
children. These Beautiful 
PhotograpHs catch the sweetest 
expression of the little ones which will be a 
joy forever. These Wonderful 
Pictures are gems of the photographic 
art. To demonstrate our new Process 
we agree to photograph 5 of the most 
restless children that can be found in the 
city Free of Charge (14x17) size. 
Make your engagements. 



Photographic Co. 
121 Post St. 




i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



which had been entrusted to his care to take up to 
Mare Island. But you know how absent-minded lie 
is, and he hadn't the faintest idea what had become 
of it. 

Mrs. John F. Swift has gone to New York and next 
week sails for Europe to attend the meeting of the 
Executive Board of the National Council of Women, 
which will be held in Dresden in August. She is the 
President of the American branch, and she is so 
bright and so handsome 1 am always glad when such 
a specimen of an American woman comes promi- 
nently forward in foreign parts. 

Our latest elopers are here. Tom Graydon and 
wife, nee Beryl Whitney, arrived upon the scene last 
Friday, coming for the parental blessing on the 
bride's side of the house, which was not withheld 
them, and now all things being serene, they will spend 
some time at Del Monte. 

Mrs. Davenport and Eleanor have chosen the new 
steamer Siberia, which sails on the 8th of August, 
for their trip to Japan, and we shall not see them 
again all winter, as they remain in Oriental waters 
until spring. Louise La Montaigne is to be another 
Japanese tourist, but she does not expect to go until 
later in the year, and then will make a tour of the 
world before she comes this way again. She is look- 
ing very handsome in spite of the trials and troubles 
of life that have of late been her portion. 

I tried to get out of the fog and gloom of San Fran- 
cisco the other day and went over to Oakland, but 
found it just as bad the other side of the bay. I made 
some visits, but was disappointed not to see -Mice 
Doubleday, who is here with the Moffitts for a few 
weeks while George is off at the Antipodes, but she 
was up at St. Helena with the Chabots, who have a 
lovely place there, so I must only go again. She was 
always a dear, and we were so sorry to lose her when 
she married and went East to live. May Cheatam is 
another one lost to sight who is here, and staving 
with her mother Mrs. Denman. She and Captain 
Frank came back from the Philippines by the last 
transport, and he is on his way to Washington City 
before being finally stationed somewhere. She says 
she enjoyed her life over there, but is not sorry to be 
home ; in fact. I have yet to see the first person who 
says otherwise coming from our new possessions. 
We are all preparing to give a warm welcome to 
Sophie Pierce Brownell, who will soon be here. I >r. 
Brownell has taken Mrs. Davenport's house on 
Broadway while she is off on her travels, and as the 
Brownell's are bringing a little daughter to introduce 
to their friends, their home-coming is impatiently 
expected. Kate Dillon will be home in September, 
and will be very welcome, for she intends to make 
her handsome house, with its beautiful view of the 
bay the center of gaiety after her return. Her sister 
Gertrude, who is to be one of next winter's buds, will 
return witli her. The Maurice Caseys are back from 
San Rafael. 

I forgot to tell you that Frances Bruce came back 
on the transport Thomas last week. You know, after 
her marriage to Lieutenant McMullin they went to 
the Philippines, and now they are home again. He 
is on sick leave and is in the hospital at the" Presidio, 
but it is nothing very serious, I believe. Anyhow! 
they will remain in San Francisco some time." The 
Longs are still here, just back from a trip south. 
Colonel Long will return to duty in Washington next 
month, but his charming wife talks of remaining in 
California a bit longer. There is some talk of both 
the Borels and the Josselyns giving San Francisco 
the cold shake next winter and going abroad ; I have 



not been able to verify either report, but in the mean- 
time they are having jolly little parties in the country, 
as if leaving us was the last thing in their thoughts. 
The George Newhalls had reached London town 
when last heard from. Birdie Fair-Vanderbilt and 
her entourage are back again on this side of the At- 
lantic, and I heard the other day they were coming 
to pay San Francisco another visit but I cannot credit 
it. Bishop and Mrs. Nichols are back from their trip 
East, and Mrs. Nichols will soon be superintending 
the Bishop's residence, which the Episcopalians are 
at last going to build for them on Webster street. 
Bessie Bowie has been ill ever since her return, and 
is, I hear, under the most positive orders not to open 
her lips in song while she is in San Francisco. Mary 
Kip is also home from her trip East, but I have not 
yet seen her. Helen Wilder is here on a visit from 
Honolulu, and Ruth McNutt has returned from her 
visit to Texas. Elsie Sperry goes up to Humboldt 
with her father and mother for a month ; Maylita 
Pease has gone with the rest of the family, including 
her grandmother, Mrs. Ogden, to spend August in 
Oregon ; Sadie Collier will stay with Daisy Van Ness 
in Xapa all through .August ; Mrs. Emily Hager-Dean 
has been at Monterey with her sister Ethel ; Mary 
Harrington has been visiting the McCallas at Mare 
Island ; the Frank Griffins are off to Lake Tahoe, 
where Bessie Mills and her mother have been this 
week ; Helen Wagner is at Del Monte with her sister, 
Mrs. Moore ; Emily Wilson has been down at the 
Josselvn's. and so has Gerald Rathbone; the Dixon 
Hewetts are the guests of the Rudolph Spreckels 
this week; Fred Greenwood has gone with his auto 
to Santa Barbara to take in the sports there. Maye 
Colburne is a veritable will-o'-the-wisp this summer, 

A Skin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckle*, 
Moth patches. Bash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and deHes detection. It has stood the 
test of 55 years and is so harmless we 
taste H to be sure i t is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. I,. A. Sayre said to a lady of the 
haut-lon (a patient): "As you ladies 
will use them. I recommend 'Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all druggists and Fancy-sroodB 
Dealers in the United States, Canada* 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r. 
37 Qreat Jones street, N. Y. 




Have You Noticed 

That the Sunday Call is publishing in two, or at 
most three issues, a complete novel? 

"To Have and to Hold." 

"When Knighthood Was in Flower" 

"Lazarre" 

"The Octopus" 
and a half-dozen others of the leading popular novels 
have already appeared. 

In addition, short stories by the best writers ap- 
pear every Sunday. 

Subscribers thereby secure one or more $1.50 
novels without charge, besides having at hand the 
best newspaper published in San Francisco. Then, 
too, every six-months' subscriber can secure a copy 
of the CRAM ATLAS of the world (regular price 
$800) for $1.50, or a $2.00 Cook Book for 50 cents. 






July 25, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



the way slu- flies about from one place to the other, 

sipping the sweets from every blossom ai 
lingering long with any of them. 

Among the guests at the Hotel Ben Lomond we 
notice II. K. Macbeth, Ed. Leszynsky, O. G. Scott, 
Mrs. M. t ;. Pozzo, Samuel M. Samter, Frank \Y. 
Rounthwaite, K. B. Hollingsworth, Mrs. I. Peltier, 
Mrs. Heath, Leopold Weil. 

The following from San Francisco are staying al 
the Hotel Rowardennan: Mr. and Mrs. Young, Mrs. 
Milton D. Garret, Mr. and Mrs. William Hallech 
Denting, Mr. W. A. Anderson, Mr. George Ra 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Sullivan, Miss Frances Sulli- 
van. Ada Sullivan, Gladys Sullivan. Noel Sullivan, 
Miss A. B. Turner, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Gregory, 
Dr. and Mrs. Carl Wilson, Mrs. William Ede, Mrs. 
D. E. Moore. Mrs. H. L. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Dela- 
montanya, Mr. F. E. McNear, Mr. Frank Vail and 
wife. Miss Tony Hubbell, Miss B. F. Harville, Mar- 
garet, Joseph. Helen and F.arbara Harville. 

Guests registered at Hotel Rafael from San Fran- 
cisco are as follows : S. W. Cowles, Dr. Victor G. 
Vickie, Mrs. A. R. Reynolds, C. H. Merrill, Dr. G. W. 
Duncan, Miss Inez Struch, C* G. Frollis, Donald 
deV. Graham, Miss Frances M. Stewart, Mrs. C. P. 
Kudleberger. 

On July 17th, Mrs. Maurice Casey entertained at 
luncheon and cards Mrs. S. Hoffman, Mrs. Frank 
Tohnson, Mrs. H. Lefavor, Mrs. L. L. Baker, Mrs. 
Adam Grant, Mrs. F. H. Green, Mrs. E. W. Hedges, 
Mrs. H. C. Breeden, Mrs. Emma G. Butler, Mrs. H. 
P. Sontagg, Mrs. George D. Toy, Mrs. M. P. Jones, 
Mrs. H. J. Somers, Mrs. W. E.'Dean, Mrs. William 
Gwin and Miss Gwin. 

At the Occidental are Mr. Sigimoto, his wife and 
his daughter, very prominent Japanese, who are on 
the way to their home in Cincinnati ; Mrs. E. I. Jones 
and daughter, who are returning from a six months' 
trip in the Orient, and Mrs. W. F. Cody, the wife of 
"Buffalo Bill," with' her daughter, Mrs. Bool. 

Hotel Belvedere remains a point of attraction to 
San Francisco people, and not even the waning sea- 
son diminishes its charms. 

Julius Israel, assistant cashier and secretary of the 
Union Trust Company, is spending a well-earned va- 
cation at Blue Lakes. 

The tide of festivity runs high at Del Monte. 
Nearly everybody is there, and golfing and automo- 
biling fill the days. 

Abovit forty young people of the city were at the 
Saturday night dance at Hotel Belvedere, when all 
present pronounced it one of the jolliest affairs 
of the season. The dancing lasted till midnight. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Scott, Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Hecht, Professor A. B. 
Arnold are at Hotel Belvedere. 

Mr. W. Dutton, president of the Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Company, has returned to San Francisco 
from a visit to the principal capital cities of the 
East. 



EDUCATIONAL. 



Hitchcock Hilitary Academy 

SflN RAFAEL. CAL. 

SEPARATE BUILDING FOR LITTLE 

. . . BOYS . . . 

Xmas tern) will begin Aug. 17th. 

EIGHTH YEAR. 

'"Beatilieu" 

Boarding and Day School for Girls 
2601 COLLEGE AVE. BERKELEY CAL. 
A L McCVIXOUGH. Principal 

Catalogue furnished on application. Telebone Mason 1666. 

BEST'S ART SOflOOL 

ancf Illustrating 
937 HARKET STREET, 



Lessom In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, 
Lite classes. $3.00 per month. 



mm. 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 
Illustrated Catalogue Free 



WRINKLE* 



Living: proof of our marvellous skill In removing: wrinkles on exhibition 
frt m 1 to 5 daily- $1000 reward for a, case we cannot cure. 
Importers of ' Everything: for the Face." 
Torrance's Boudoir Wrinkle Plasters 8l a box. 
Torrance's Boudoir Tan Plasters 50c a box. 
Samples 10c- Stamps Booklet. Established 1S67. Phone Black 1535. 

SVR.NEY-TOHR.ANCE, Skin Specialists- 
408 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



S. SCHLAMM..... 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

First-class Workmanship and Fitting at 
Reasonable Prices. 

Military, Naval and Society Uniform Equipments a Specialty 

140 Phelan Building, San Francisco. 

Cor. Market and O'Farrell Sts. Tel. Red 6921. 



Hon Marche Clothing R*.eno%)atory 

40 Ellis Street, Rooms 14-15-16. 

SUITS GLEANED AND PRESSED $1.00. 

Suits Called for and Delivered Free. SUITS PRESSED WHILE YOU 
SLEEP. Repairing and Alterations. OPEN ALL NIGHT. We run 
four wagons. Telephone Drumm 44. 



La Grande Laundry 



Tel. Bush 12. 



Principal Office— 23 Powell St. Branch Office— 11 Taylor St 
Laundry— 12th St., between Folaom and Howard Streets. 



THE WISE AUTOMOBILE. 

His auto stopped with a sudden pop, 
And refused to go further that day; 

For autos, like other folks, love to stop 
At the Vendome in San Jose ! 



The Star Hair Remedy — BeBt of all tonics and re- 
storatives. Stops falling, cures dandruff, restores color. 
Not a dye. At druggists and hairdressers. Accept no 
substitute. Star Remedy Co., 386 Geary street. 



GOLDEN WEST CLOTHING REN0VAT0RY 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Phone Main 1167. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed flM 

Monthly Contracts 1.50 



PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY 



No. I Lick Place. 



Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, (1 per month; 
12 hand or roller towels S1.60 per month. T«! 
Main 17(0. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
BANKING. 



July 25, 1903. 



Tbe San Francisco National Bar)k 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. 

JAS. K. WILSON, President; WM, PIERCE JOHNSON. Vice- 
President; LEWIS I. COWGILL, Cashier; F. W. WOLFE, As- 
sistant Cashier. 
. Capital. $500,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits, $180,000. 

DIRECTORS— William J. Dutton. C. S. Benedict. William 
Pierce Johnson. H. E. Huntington, George A. Newhall, Orestls 
Pierce, George A. Pope. James K. Wilson, L. I. Cowgill. 

AGENTS: New York— Hanover National Bank. Chase National 
Bank, Chemical National Bank. Boston— National Shawmut 
Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City- 
First National Bank. London— Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris — 
Morgan, Harjes & Co. Denver— National Bamc of Commerce. 
Johannesburg— Robinson South African Banking Co., Limited. 

Tbe Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— Toronto. 
Paid-up Capital, $S.700.000. Reserve Fund. $3,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $70, 000. 000. 
HON. GEORGE A. COX. President. 
B. E. "Walker. General Manager. Alex. Laird. Asst. Gen. Mgr. 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard Street. E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranhrook, 
Fernie. Greenwood. Kamloops. Ladvsmith. Nanaimo. Nelson. 
New Westminster. Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 
Also SO other branches covering the principal points in 
Manitoba. N. W. Territories and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England. The Bank of 
Scotland. Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank. Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The Northern Trust Co. 
AGENTS IN I\.c.W ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
SAN FRANCISCO OFFIC*- 

S25 California Street. 

A. KAINS. Manager. 

London. Paris and American Bank UdlW 

N. W. Cor. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital. $3,500,000. Pa'd-Up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund. $1,100,000. 
HEAD OFFICE— 10 Threadneedle St.. London. E. C. 
AGENTS: New York — Agencv of the London. Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y. : Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct 
on the prlnclnal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits issued. 

STG. GREENEBAUM. MANAGER; H. S. GREEN. Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

Central Trust Co., of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Pald-uo Capital and Reserve 1.725.000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 
Trustee. 

Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money In Pro- 
bate Court proceedings. Interest paid on trust deposits and 
savings. Investments carefnllv selected. 

OFFICERS- 
Frank J. Symmes. President; A. Ponlatowskl. First Vice-Presi- 
dent; Horace L. Hill. Second Vice-President; H. Brunner, Cash- 
ier. 




IMPROVEMENTS. 




Continental Building & Loan A*™~<*ti™ 

Established in 18S9. OF CALIFORNIA. 

S01 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $15.ooo,oon oo 

Paid-in Capital 3.000.000.00 

Profit and Reserve Fund 450.00O.0O 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term, and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge. President. William Corbln. Secretary 
and General Manager. 

The floelo-Californian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized {3,000.000 Paid-up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 Reserve Fund 700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord. William Babcock. Adam Grant, 
S. L. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Baldwin, lf\ Monteagle, Warren D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutcheon, R. H. Pease. 



If James Merwyn Donohoe could have foreseen the 
treatment which would be received by his gift to the 
city at the junction of Market and Battery streets, 
the donation would probably not have been made. 
The gift in question is the beautiful bronze group 
which stands at the junction of these streets, sur- 
rounded by a basin of water in which several sprays 
play from the mouths of bronze fish. The whole is 
a credit to the sculptor Douglas Tilden, and elicits 
great admiration from strangers, who often join with 
the home folks in deploring the fact that the basin is 
a receptacle for trash and' refuse of all kinds. The 
News Letter suggests that the fountain be removed 
entirely, and that in its stead the bronze group be 
surrounded by a flower-bed. Facilities for watering 
the Howers are already at hand, and by this alteration 
what is now an eyesore to the city might be trans- 
formed into what its donor originally intended. 
» * • 

City Engineer Grunsky has prepared plans for the 
new sewer system which San Francisco has so long 
and so sorely needed, and which the News Letter 
has so persistently advocated. The approximate cost 
of the new system is estimated at $7,250,000, and will 
perhaps take several years from the time it is begun 
to complete. Under Mr. Grunskv's estimate there 
will be about 120 miles of new pipe laid, and the sys- 
tem contemplated, it is claimed, will be adequate for 

fullv fiftv vears to come. 

• « • 

Alission street is coming to the front so rapidly 
as an important business thoroughfare that the agi- 
tation for the widening of the street is apt to culmi- 
nate shortly. The Sidewalks are 19 feet wide, and 
it is the proposition of most of the property holders 
that 4 feet be cut from each side-walk, thus increas- 
ing- the width of the street 8 feet. 

• » * 

The realty market shows a steady demand for hold- 
ings ranging from $10,000 to $50,000. Building opera- 
tions are also as active as they have been for some 
months past in this citv. San Francisco is undoubt- 
edly enjoving a boom, but it is a boom in the_ nature 
of a healthy normal growth rather than the inflated 

kind. 

• • • 

The most important sale of real estate reported 
during the past few days is the purchase of the south- 
east corner of Tessie and Third streets by A. Aronson 
for $200,000. The lot measures 69 by 83 feet, and the 
building now standing there pays a rental of $726 per 
month. This, however, will be removed to make place 
for a more modern building which Mr. Aronson pur- 
poses constructing. 

As an evidence of the State's growth, comes a re- 
port from Sacramento that the taxable property of 
California has increased nearly $ioo,ooo.poo within 
the last year. The actual increase shown in property 
valuation is $32,385,055, but the fifteen other coun- 
ties vet to be heard from, it is estimated, will bringf 
the increase up to the hundred' million mark. Such 
remarkable growth in the wealth of a_ State has sel- 
dom before been shown in so brief a time. 



July 25, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*i 



Thirteenth street no longer exists save in the mem- 
ory of its residents. The Board of Supervisor: 
changed the name of that thoroughfare to Duboce 
avenue. The reason given for the change is that ;i 
majority of the influential inhabitants of that neigh- 
borhood wished it. Whether or not superstition 
played a part in the bringing of the petition before 
the Supervisors iias not been stated, but if other 
cities with numbered streets follow San Franr 

example. the result will be most annoying. 

• • • 

The Supervisors have received from the Board of 
Public Works a detailed recommendation for the im- 
provement of streets in the wholesale district. While 
this is a step in the right direction, there is no reason 
to confine the improvements to one district. The 
Xews Letter has often pointed out the disgraceful 
condition of many of our important thoroughfares, 
but the stereotyped reply to every request for a gen- 
eral overhauling of streets is that the city cannot 
afford it. Under present conditions, this is un- 
doubtedly true, but we are yet infants in the school 
of municipal learning, and the time will undoubtedly 
come when the city's revenues will be expended for 
the city's maintenance, rather than for the enrich- 
ment of a predatory set of politicians. 

• • * 

The petition of the Emporium Company to erect 
a safety station in front of its place at its own expense 
has just been refused by the Board of Public Works. 
Personally, we think the request far more reasonable 
than the one granted to change the name of Thir- 
teenth street, and we trust that the proposed station 
may yet be built. Market street at that place is usu- 
ally crowded with vehicles, and the comfort of pedes- 
trians should be considered by the Board of Public 
Works. Perhaps, however, the members of that 
august body are anxious to emulate the example of 
Paris by abridging the rights of the pedestrian for 
those of the vehicle drivers, or perhaps the Empor- 
ium lacks the political pull of the man who presented 

the petition to change the name of Thirteenth street. 

• • • 

Work has been started on the new belt railway to 
run from the Pacific Oil Company's plant to Point 
Richmond, via Castro, Molate and San Pablo points. 
About 300 men are employed, and the improvements 
in all will cost about $500,000. The belt line will con- 
nect with the Southern Pacific and Santa Fe tracks, 
and will run through the proposed new freight ter- 
minus of the former road. 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of JOHN R. DENNIS. Deceased. Notice is hereby 
given by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM, Administrator 
of the estate of JOHN R. DENNIS, Deceased, to the credi- 
tors of, and al persons having claims against the said deceased. 
to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers, within four months 
after the first publication of this notice, to the said Adminis- 
trator, at Room 79, Chronicle Buud.ng. junction Kearny, Geary 
and Market streets, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his 
place for the transaction of the business of the said estate in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 

JOHN FARNHAM. 

Administrator of the Estate of JOHN R. DENNIS, Deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, July 4, 1903. 

CARLTON W. GREENE, attorney for administrator. 

Rooms 73, 76 and 79, Chronicle building. 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of WILLIAM JACOBY, Deceased. Notice is hereby 
given by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM, Administrator 
of the estate of WILLIAM jACOBY, Deceased, to the credi- 
tors of, and all persons having claims against the said deceased, 
to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers, within four months 
after the first publication of this notice, to the said Adminis- 
trator, at Room 79, Chronicle Building. Junction Kearny, Geary 
and Market streets, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his 
place for the transaction of the business of the said estate in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 

JOHN FARNHAM, 
Admtnlstraotr of the Estate of WILLIAM JACOBT. Deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, July 4, 1903. 

CARLTON W. GREENE, attorney for administrator. 

Rooms 73, 76 and 79, Chronicle building. 



BANKING. 



Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capital, Surplus, and Undivided ) SP 000 00(1 

Hoirnr s. Kins. President ;F. I.. Llpman, ('ashler: Frank B. 
King. Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Mills. Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake. Utah; Portland. Or. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General Banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Deposits, June 30, 1903 $33,041,290 

Palp-up Capital 1,000.000 

Reserve Fund 247,657 

Contingent Fund 625,156 

E. B. POND. President; W. C. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President; 
ROBERT WATT. Vice-President; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. 
M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— Henry F. Allen, William A. Magee. W. C. B. De 
Fremery, C. O. G. Miller, Robert Watt. George C. Boardman, 
Fred H. Beaver, Jacob Barth. E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms 
and farming lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks 
payable in San Francisco postoffice, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express, but the responsibility of this 
bank commences only with the receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for re- 
ceipt of deposits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

FOUNDED 1864. 

Capital $2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, July 1, 1903, $4,386,086.72 

William Alvord, President; Charles R. Bishop, Vice-President; 

Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; Irving M. Moulton, Cashier; 

Sam H. Daniels. Assistant Cashier; William R. Pentz, Assistant 

Cashier; Allen M. Clay, Secretary. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord. President; James M. Allen, Attorney-at-Law ; 
Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; William Babcock, President 
Parrott & Co.; Charles R. Bishop, Capitalist; Antoine Borel, 
Ant. Borel & Co., Bankers; Warren D. Clark, Williams. Dlmond 
& Co. ; George E. Goodman. Banker ; Adam Grant, Murphy, Grant 
& Co.; Edward W. Hopkins, Capitalist; John F. Merrill, Hol- 
brook, Merrill & Stetson; Jacob Stern, Levi Strauss & Co. 

Foreign and domestic exchange bought and sold. Commercial 
and travelers' letters of credit issued, available in all parts of 
the world. 
Correspondence solicited. Accounts invited. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,397,758.10 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1903 34,819,893.12 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Steinhart, Emil Rohte, H. B. Buss, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter, and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank; of s an Francisco 

710 MARKET ST., OPP. THIRD. 

Guaranteed $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 440,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHT, Vice-President; 
GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER, ViceAPres't; 
C. B. HOBSON. Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Charles S. 
Neal, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook, 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

International Banking Corporation 

Capital and Surplus Paid-in $6,783,000 

Capital and Surplus Authorized $10,000,000 

NEW YORK OFFICE— No. 1 Wall Street. 
William L. Moyer, President; James H. Rodgers, Secretary pro 
tem' John Hubbard, Treasurer; John B. ^ee, General Manager; 
William Maclntyre, Assistant General Manager. 

BRANCHES— London, City of Mexico, Singapore, Hongkong, 
Manila, Shanghai, Yokohama, Bombay, Calcutta. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— Nos. 32-34 Sansome St. F. E. 
BECK, manager; P. G. EASTWICK, JR., Cashier. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- 
tions, firms and individuals solicited. Commercial and trav- 
elers' letters of credit issued, available in any part of the world. 
Cable transfers, foreign and domestic exchange and bullion 
bought and sold at current rates. Collections effected. Interest- 
bearing certificates of deposit issued for fixed periods. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 




The statement of the earnings 
Bleeding their of the Gas and Electric Corn- 
Customers Now. pany in June last shows a gross 

of $95,556.45. After paying in- 
terest upon underlying bonds and the interest upon 
corporation bonds, the net surplus was $30,107. For 
the four months ended June 30th, the net surplus, 
amounted to $135,468. With such a showing with 
the average rate to the consumer of 50 cents per 
1,000 feet, it is pertinent to inquire the reason for 
doubling the price of the product and taxing the con- 
sumer such an outrageous sum for what has ni >\v 
become a necessity of life. Can it be possible that 
a new operation is in view, after the last Machiavel- 
ian game has been closed, to bulldose customers to 
a point when endurance will cease to be a virtue, and 
a demonstration upon the part of the public may force 
the city to step in and pay through the nose for the 
combined plant? It begins to look as though 
this was the programme now in hand. 

As work progresses in the Tono- 
A Coming pah-Central mine in the bonanza 
Bonanza Mine, mining camp at Tonopah, the in- 
dications grow more favorable 
for a valuable ore discovery as depth is attained, cor- 
roborating the opinion we have already expressed in 
regard to the very promising mineral location. Ac- 
cording to the latest report from the Superintendent, 
the shaft has been sunk eight feet within the last two 
weeks, making in all up to date a total depth attained 
of 163 feet. The formation is changing for the better 
all the time, getting harder and more compressed. The 
material is well mineralized, and is still stained with 
manganese and iron. On the 450-lcvel of the Cali- 
fornia Tonopah adjoining to the north, a ledge of high 
grade ore, 40 feet wide, has been cut, running north 
and south, which undoubtedly will be encountered 
in time as the shaft goes down in the Tonopah Cen- 
tral ground. It is hoped, however, by the manage- 
ment that before this level is reached, that the ledge 
cut in the California-Tonopah ground on the 130-foot 
level, where it was 70 feet wide, will be cut in the 
process of sinking the shaft. The ore from this ledge 
at a depth of 200 feet in the California-Tonopah 
ground, ran from $400 to $2,000 per ton. From the 
mineralized character of the formation in the St. 
Patrick claims, which constitute the bulk of the hold- 
ings of the Tonopah Central Company, it is confi- 
dently believed that this ground will be still richer 
than the neighboring location. All these locations 
are on the direct lead of the main ledges of the big 
Tonopah bonanzas, the Mizpah. Burrow and Frac- 
tion mines, and from the discoveries already made in 
adjoining ground of the California-Tonopah it is 
pretty safe to assume that they will carry right 
through from the north to the south lines" of the 
Tonopah Central. The management of this vast 
property is to be congratulated upon the common- 
sense they have shown in selecting the southern 
section of the ground as the location for their main 
shaft. The working shaft of their neighbor is just 
close enough to the Central's north line to prospect 
that end of the property, while their own shaft will 
develop the southern section a very and effective 



way of proving the value of the ground at a mini- 
mum cost. The attention of the leading mining 
men of the cam]) is now centered upon the work go- 
ing on in the Tonopah-Central group. This is shown 
by a statement which appeared in a recent issue of 
the Tonopah Miner, noting the interest taken in the 
work of development going on in this property, 
its peculiarly favorable location, and the very positive 
indications that in it will be found a continuation of 
the high-grade ore veins which have served to build 
up the fame of the wonderfully rich district in such 
a comparatively short space of time. We feel more 
sanguine than ever of the bright future in store for 
the Tonopah Central property, and for this reason 
have no hesitancy in recommending the shares of the 
company as an investment, especially under the able 
and conscientious management of the men who now 
control its destiny. 

The Pine-St. Market is still suffer- 
Rout the ing from the usual mid-summer dull 

Rascals Out. spell. It- does not weaken much,, 
however, from any pressure of sales, 
bears being scarce here. The few remaining can be 
found in Virginia, in some cases with their knees 
below the desks of Comstock companies who are 
nursing the vipers which make no scruple of running 
the mines and management down surreptitiously 
upon every opportunity. An example made of one 
or two of these ingrates, who would bite the hand 
that feeds them, and has fed them for years past, 
would do much good by way of an example to others 
who are inclined to follow in their footsteps. These 
individuals are doing all they can to tear down what 
the people of this city are paying money to build up. 
The Savage Company levied an assessment this week 
of 10 cents per share. 

The following letter 

The Norwegian Mine from C. M. Hatcher & 
of Tuolumne. Co., of Boston, promot- 

ers of the Norwegeian 
Mine of Tuolumne County, in response to an article 
which appeared in the financial columns of the News 
Letter recently, is self explanatory, and is published 
in justice to the firm : 

Boston, June 20. 1903. 

Editor News Letter — Our attention has been called 
to an editorial in a recent issue of the News Letter 
in re the Norwegian dividends. We believe it is 
due to the company, as well as to ourselves, that ex- 
planation be made. We appreciate the kindly be- 
lief expressed relative to the possibilities of the mine 
and also plead guilty to the authorship of the adver- 
tisement copied, but the fact remains that the com- 
pany has not paid dividends, nor do we consider it 




-v-X Great Mistake 

women &.re 
"down" on 
washing 
powders. 
They tried 
some, were 
dissatisfied, 

.and claim 
that all pow- 

Iders are poor. This is wrong. 
PEARLINE is not like other 
powders. Test it for washing. 
Compare the soap paste made 
from PEARLINE with that 
made from arvy other soap 
powder or washing powder. 672 
, ASK A FRIEND , 



We did not have 
any idea that 
PEARLINE was 
such a labor- 
saver as it is. We 
shall use no other. 
Rev. M. E. B. 



July 35, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LE1TER. 



33 



111 condition to do BO at the present time. 1 lie 9 
ment was the result of the misinterpretation oi a 
code telegram sent to our office by a member of "iii- 
company who was in California. As soon as we 
were informed of our error we promptly notified 
most interested, and a similar explanation was 
made to every prospective purchaser that there should 
be no further misunderstanding. We realize the 
criminality of a company paying dividends from the 
sale of shares, and the character of the Norwegian 
officers is sufficiently good to give assurance that 
they would he panics to no such deal. We acknowl- 
edge the mistake on our part, but can positively as- 
sure you that it was an error, caused, as stated above, 
wholly by the misreading of a telegraphic mess 
We trust you will give this letter the same promi- 
nence which was given the original article. 
Yours Truly, 

C. M. HATCHER & CO. 



It would seem that the min- 
Union Labor ing industry of California is 

Troubles Check doomed to surely suffer a set- 
Mine Investment, back just at some period when 
everything looks most en- 
couraging in the way of the development of public 
interest in our mines. The present efforts of the men 
to control their employers predicates a position of af- 
fairs which is abnormal and cannot endure for any 
length of time. The temporary success attained so 
far by the weak-kneed attitude of a few mine owners 
at different points along the lode, cannot be accepted 
as an assurance of permanent benefit to either one 
side or the other. The principle back of the demand 
and compliance upon the part of employed and em- 
ployer is wind, and those who sacrifice principle for 
momentary gain are only cutting a switch for their 
own backs in the long run. We are a little surprised 
to see wealthy and powerful companies swinging into 
line at the first crack of the whip for a six months' 
lease of good will upon the part of the operators. 
Independent proprietors are not usually so complai- 
sant to demands of the "stand and deliver" order. Of 
course there may be some reason back of such a sur- 
prising exhibition of complacency not made public 
to account for the action of these managements. It 
only means delay in bringing matters to an issue, 
and in defining the relative position of the mine owner 
and employed. This question must be decided sooner 
or later, and there seems to be no object in postpon- 
ing a settlement every timie a crisis occurs, by grant- 
ing concessions which only terminate in renewed de- 
mands and new impositions. It will be taken for 
granted that in nearly every instance, the companies 
concerned have in the past acted' fairly with their 
employees. The "strike" fever is prevalent, and it- 
would seem that the only reason for the men walk- 
ing out at the Mother Lode mines is a desire upon 
the part of the employed to assert their dominance 
and acquaint the management with the fact that they 
are simply permitted to run their mines on sufferance, 
about the only tenure now granted the property 
owner in California who is dependent upon labor. 
This situation of affairs is not doing the mining in- 
terests of the State any good. Investors are not dis- 
posed to place their heads within the lion's jaws. As 
observers, they witness the helpless, dependent posi- 
tion of owners of this class of property with every 
dollar invested at the mercy of men supported out of 
the exchequers of the comipanies, they do not hesitate 
to hamper and annoy at every available opportunity. 



The risk of investing in California mining pro] 
under such conditions is top great to warrant contem- 
plating buyers taking any chances which they, 
innately for themselves, are yel in ;i position to avoid. 
I he best policy, with a view to the future prosperit) 
of this branch of industry would I the issue 

now, to a definite and final determination. 



The reports of the State Hoard of Hank Commis- 
sioners are now coining in, showing the financial Con- 
dition of the California hanks up to the close of busi- 
ness on June 30, 1903. The nine savings banks of San 
Francisco show total resources on that dale valued 
at S1M.v75.Uj7, an increase over the statement of 
I lecember 31, 1902, of $7,212,907, and $12,697,193 over 
that of August 23, 1902. The fifty-seven savings 
banks doing business outside of San Francisco and 
within the State show an aggregate gain for the per- 
iod under review of over $7,000,000 in resources, and 
of $6,900,000 in deposits. During the half year, foul 
new banks have started in business. The total re- 
sources of these banks amount to $67,391,648. The 
deposits amount to $60,673,933. 

The total resources of the twenty-three commercial 
banks of San Francisco on June 30th last were $110,- 
687,734.05, an increase of $6,450,389, as compared 
with the last statement published on August 23, 1902. 

Business continues very dull on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange. In shares, Spring Valley advanced 
to 86 under light sales, closing firm. Lighting shares 
were in light demand. Sugar shares were better, 
under an improved demand. Alaska Packers sold 
down to 149, and reached to 150^. In bonds the 
transactions were lighter than they have been for 
many a day. A sale of California Bank stock is re- 
ported on the street at $550. The following dividends 
were paid on July 20th. Spring Valley, regular 
monthly, 42 cents per share ; California Fruit Canners 
Association, regular monthly, 60 cents per share; 
California Powder Works, regular monthly, $1 per 
share. 



A special meeting of the shareholders of the 
Security Savings Bank has been called for September 
23d to vote on a proposition to increase the capital 
stock of the corporation from $300,000 to $1,000,000. 
This would bring the capital up to $1,000,000, of 
which only $500,000 would be issued at present. 



Because of 1 In ir cunHtrnct 

PRESIDENT 
SUSPENDERS 

lit vc most 

f Comfort & Service Guaranteed 
"All breaks made good'' 
''President'* on buckle means 
"Cannot rust" 50c. and Sl.00 

Any shop or by mall prepaid 

The C. A. Edgarton Mfg. Co. 

Box 241-M Shirley Mass 

Send 6c. for Catalogue. 



Pacific States Mining & Investment Co. 

Established 1892. 
326 Post St., San Francisco. European office, 64 Kaiser Wllhelm 
Street, Hamburg. 
This company has agents or brokers and own offices In the 
principal cities of America and Europe. Stock Issues taken 
over for sale. Stocks underwritten and guaranteed by gold 
bonds. Choice stocks for sale. Legitimate mining, oil and agri- 
cultural and Industrial enterprises financed and promoted. 
Publishers of the "Pacific States Investor," the leading financial 
paper of the West. Strictest confidence observed In all com- 
munications or Inquiries. Bank references. 



2 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



Mavis Consolidated Cold 
and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000. 



I 



Incorporated under the laws of the State of Cali- 

• forma. 
Q Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 

• County, Arizona. 
ft No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share 
for development purposes. The ore in sight is prac i- 
cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock is 
enhausted, the price will be raised to 50 cents a * 
share. /) 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 # 

Market street, for prospectus which gives full infor- A 

mation. a 

VINCENT NBALE, Secretary. T 

City Index and Purchasers' Uuide. 

BERGEZ RESTAURANT — Rooms for ladies and families. 
Private entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street. 

below Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT, N. E. corner Eddy and Ma- 
son Sts. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, 
Main 429. A. B. Blanco & D. Brun. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY, 838 Guerrero street Selections on appro- 
val; any place in the world. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public and U. S. Pension At- 
torney. Office at Lincoln Investment Co., 620 Market St, 
opp. Palace Hotel. Tel. Bush 518. Residence 415 Van Ness. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 216, 318 
Main St. Iron work of every description designed and 
constructed. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN Sftl^.^.^ 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. Depot a 
323 Market St., San Prauolsco. Send for circular. 



Murphy, Grant & Co.. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goous. Manufacturers of fur- 
nishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of "The 
NBVER-KIP" OVERALL. The best in the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, velvets, 
silks, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawls, notions, smokers' 
articles, stationery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



INSURANCE. 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St., S. P. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Go 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capltal 567,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St, S. F. 







nsurance 



a i - 




It is estimated that the fire insurance premiums for 
the entire Coast country during the year 1903 will 
be $16,500,000. The loss ratio to date has been about 
63 per cent, and at the present rate the business will 
represent a balance on the wrong side of the ledger 

to the companies interested. 

* • • 

Insurance Commissioner E. Myron Wolf of this 
State reports that with the assistance of ex-officio 
Insurance Commissioner S. H. Nichols of Washing- 
ton, he has just made an examination of the books 
of the Conservative Life of Los Angeles, and that 
the statement filed by the company with the State 
Department of California on December 31, 1902, is 

correct. 

* • * 

The Equitable Life Insurance Company has with- 
drawn from Germany. No official reason has been 
given for the company's action, but it is pretty gen- 
erally attributed to the fact that the German laws 
discriminate against all foreign insurance companies. 

* * * 

Rev. C. M. Sheldon, one of the religious sensation- 
alists of the day, announces that he will now start 
a life insurance company which will insure only 
Christians and teetotalers. Sheldon has gotten more 
free advertising than any other man in the United 
States, and it is safe to predict that his company will 
prove a financial success, for a time, at any rate. The 
difficulty would seem to lie in determining who are 

the Christians. 

* • • 

Health insurance is comparatively new, and yet 
its popularity is steadily on the increase. In 1902 
the premiums received for this class of insurance 
reached $571,000, while the losses were $253,000. 
The general average for the past four years shows a 
kiss ratio of 44 per cent, which means that the com- 
panies will have to increase rates if they wish to 
make money. Such action, however, would tend to 
abate the growing belief in this health insurance, so 
the companies engaged in it are now in a dilemma. 

* * • 

When the piers of several transatlantic steamship 
companies burned at New York, in 1900, every one 
predicted that the lesson would be heeded, and that 
in future all piers would be made as nearly fireproof 
as possible. Another disaster in the same line has 
occurred in New York, entailing a loss of over half 
a million, and still the wooden piers prevail. San 
Francisco also has material for some beautiful con- 
flagrations around the water front. 

* • ■ 

Insurance companies are participating most liber- 
ally in the Grand Army celebration of next month. 
So far the subscriptions exceed $1,500. 

* * * 

The Provident Life and Trust Company of Phila- 
delphia has just commenced the erection of perma- 
nent quarters in Tacoma. The building will be ten 
stories high, entirely fire-proof, and the company 

will rent it as an office building. 

* • • 

The contract for furnishing this year's requirement 
of hose to the city fire department falls to the lot 



July 35, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



of the Goodyear and the Bowers Rubber Companies. 
The cost to the department will be 60 cents per 
and the size of the hose is -' ; ; 4 inches, with 3-inch 

couplings. 

• • • 

J. W. G. Cofran, Chicago manager of the Hartford 
Insurance Company, is protracting his vacation visit 
in this city. 

• • * 

For a while last Tuesday evening it looked as 
though the splendid fire-proof Rialto office building, 
on the corner of New Montgomery and .Mission 
streets, would be completely destroyed, and many 
of those occupying offices therein believed that es- 
cape would be impossible, owing to the way smoke 
was rushing up the stairways and elevator shafts. 
The fire department, however, did most creditable 
work, and soon had the fire extinguished. No one 
was injured. The damage to the building and con- 
tents is estimated at about $40,000, fully covered by 
insurance. The fire is supposed to have originated 
in the basement occupied by Yawman & Erb for the 
storage of furniture. This goes to show that even 
though a building may be of fireproof construction, 
the contents is often quite sufficient to cause a disas- 
trous fire. The damage to the building will not ex- 
ceed $2,000. 

• * * 

The Fireman's Fund Insurance Company has just 
declared its quarterly dividend of 12 per cent per an- 
num, payable on July 22d. The amount of the divi- 
dend will be $30,000. President Dutton of this com- 
pany, whom the News Letter recommended as a pos- 
sible candidate for Mayor, is still making a sojourn 

in the East, but is expected to return shortly. 

. * * * 

W. G. Taffinder, editor of the Pacific Under- 
writer, is expected home shortly from Watsonville, 
where he has been spending the convalescent period 
following his recent illness. 



»S 



A MODEL HOME BUILDING SOCIETY. 

The success achieved by the San Francisco and 
Suburban Home Building Society, which has just 
announced a large dividend from profits on its first 
year's business, shows what can be accomplished 
by careful and experienced management. Their plan 
of centralization has certainly proven a great success, 
the idea of combining all the branches of the build- 
ing business under one management is one upon 
which Mr. Joseph A. Leonard, the manager, has 
effected a great saving in the operating expenses. 
The society is its own real estate broker, architect, 
builder, money lender, insurance agent, and finally 
it has effected an arrangement with a reliable old- 
line life insurance company, whereby it secures life 
insurance for its home buyers, payable in small 
monthly installments, so that at any time during the 
period of installment paying for their homes, that 
they should die, the mortgage would be cancelled. 
It can readily be seen that all the profits from these 
various branches of business connected with home 
supplying enables the society to supply its customers 
with their homes for less money than is usually done, 
and at the same time make larger profits for its in- 
vestors than those doing only one branch, such as 
the money lending or the home building. 

Zinkand's has made its own place. All that is good 

to eat or drink can be obtained there. The best viands and 
good music ought to be enough for any one, and the crowds 
of patrons show this to be the case. 

A rub at the Post-St Hammam will do you good. 



INSURANCE. 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRAhGISCO. GAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $4,000,000 
PALATINE 

Insurance Company (Limited) of LONDON, ENG. 

C. F. MULLINS. Manatrer, 416-418 California St, S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Oompany of J lorth America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Eoyal Charter, A. D. 1720. 

Capital Paid-up, $3,446,100. Assets, $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $8,930,431.41 Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch : 

FRANK W. ' DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF ilEW ZEALAND. 
Capital. 15.000.030 UNLIMITED LIABILITY ur SHxhtHOLUOi. 

Office in company's building, 312 California St. 

CLINTON FOLGER, Acting Manager. 
The Lambla Realty Co., City Agents, 505 California St. 

Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOTD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY. 

Capital $2,250,000 Assets $10,984,246 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 
Pacific Coast Department:— 204-208 Sansome street, San Francisco 

North German Fire Insurance Go. 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



OBITUARY. 

Major William B. Hooper, for many years manager 
of the Occidental Hotel, died in this city on July l6th, 
after a lingering illness of more than six months. 

Major Hooper was born in Richmond, Virginia, in 
1835, and came to this State in the early years of the 
gold excitement. He embarked in commercial enter- 
prise, and in a short time owned a business which 
had connections in Tucson, Guaymas and San Fran- 
cisco. Later he relinquished his business to become 
lessee of the Occidental Hotel. When the Civil War 
broke out he joined the California Volunteer Regi- 
ment, and reached the rank of .Major. On his re- 
turn he again assumed the management of the ( )cci- 
dental, and made it the recognized hostelry for army 
and navy officers and ecclesiastical and fraternal 
leaders. He was a very conspicuous member of the 
Episcopal Church, and Bishop Nichols showed 
marked respect at his funeral. The attendance at his 
obsequies included some of the most active and con- 
spicuous leaders in church and social affairs. The 
pall bearers were: Representing the Loyal Legion, 
Commandery of California — Colonel W. R. Smed- 
burg. Colonel C. Mason Kinne and General C. A. 
Woodruff; California Volunteers of the Civil War — 
Major H. A. Gorley. Grand Army of the Republic — 
C. W. Gordon. Episcopal Church of this diocese — 
William Babcock, A. N. Drown and C. D. Haven. 
Trinity Episcopal Church — Walter E. Dean. Colonel 
J. V. D. Middleton, Robert Bruce, John Landers and 
Messrs. Deal, Kane and Earl. The remains were 
taken to Cypress Lawn Cemetery for interment. 



SPECIAL MEETING. 
Spring Valley Water Works. 

Office of the Spring Valley Water Works, J 26, 1903.— To the Stock- 
holders of the Spring Valley Water Works: Notice is hereby given that 
a special meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water Works 

is called to be held at tl Bice of the Spring Valley Water Works, at 

room 3. sixth [] ■. 126 Stockton St., in the city and county of San Fran- 
cisco, Oal„ the same being the principal place of business of said Spring 
Valley Water works and being the building where the board of directors 

usually i! ts, tor thepurpose of determining whether the s kholders 

of said Spring Valley Waterworks holding of r .1 at least two-thirds 

of the issm 'i I capital stock will consent tome sale, assignment, transfer 
ami conveyance by said Spring Valley Water Works to the Spring Valley 
Water Company of its business, franchises and all its properties, as 11 
whole, and that the said meeting will be held on Wednesday, the 15th 
day of July. 1903, at 12 o'clock, noon. PELHAM W. AMI'S. Secretary. 

The above meeting ■was adjour 1. by a resolution duly passed and 

adopted thereat, to Wednesday, the 29th day of July. 1908, at ii m„ at 
the same place. 

Dated July 16th, 1908. ri'1,11 UI W. AMES, Secretary. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Savage Mining Company. 

Location ol principal place of business — San Francisco. California. Loca- 
tion of works — Virginia City, Storey County. Nevada 

Notice Is hereby erlven that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the 21at day of July, 1903, an assessment, (No. 110) of ten (la) cents 
per Bhare was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, paya- 
ble Immediately In United states eold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the oompany, room 21-22 Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery St., 
San Franolsco, Cal 

Any stock upon whtoh this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
25th DAY OK AUG0ST 1903, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction: and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 15th day of September, 
1903. at 1 o'clock to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of 
Directors. 

JOHN W. TWIGGS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 21-22 Nevada Block, No. 3U9 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
olsco, Cal 



Ejcamtnations Free. 

DR. F. A. CLISE &. SONS 
Eye-sight specialists. 1023 Market Street, S, F. 

I wish it were possible to make all the people 
who have Imperfect vision, understand what perfect work you are doing 
In fittlne glasses. The classes you prescribed for my wife and two 
daughters are entirely satisfactory. Being master of your profession you 
ought to do a fine business here In San Franolsco. Yours truly. 

JAS. W. HARRIS, Supt.Cal. St., R. R, Co. 






Sisson 



Near Mt. Shasta 

3,555 feet above the 
level of the sea, on the 
western side of Mt. 
Shasta lies Sisson's Tav- 
ern nestled among the 
pines of the Sierras. Tel- 
ephone, telegraph and 
daily mail; a half mile 
from the railroad station 
with free bus meeting all 
trains. Magnificent 
scenery, mild, refreshing, 
healthful climate, pure 
air and lots of comfort. 
Sisson's Tavern is not a 
place for dress or society 
but rather a resort where 
quiet and comfort and 
peace have precedent. 
The Tavern is large and 
comfortable and hard fin- 
ished throughout with 
jpolished floors. The table 



board is delicious, the 
dishes are dainty and 
served in a most inviting 
manner. Fare $12.00 for 
round trip and $1.50 ad- 
ditional for sleeping car 
accommodations. Kates 
$2.50 per day or $14.00 
per week and upward. 
For information call at 
Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Information Bur- 
eau, G13 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Peck's 
Tourist Information Bur- 
eau, 11 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, 
or Traveler's Informa- 
tion Bureau, G30 Market 
Street, San Francisco, or 
at 410 South Broadway, 
Los Angeles, Cal. For 
accommodations address 
Mrs. L. M. Sisson, Sis- 
son, Cal. 



AfRJ. L. M. SISSOJV, T'ROT 

SISSON. CAL. 



BLITHEDALE 

arin County, California. Opened April 15th. 

Hotel bus meets train at Mill Valley Station. 



HENRY ROMEIKE 

The first established and most complete 

Newspaper Cutting Bureau 

IN THE WORLD 

The Press Cutting Bureau which I established and have car- 
ried on since 1881 In London and 1884 In New York, reads, 
through Its hundreds of employees, every newspaper and peri- 
odical of Importance published In the United States, Canada 
and Europe. It Is patronized -y thousands of subscribers, pro- 
fessional or business men, to whom are Bent day by day news- 
paper clippings collected from all these thousands of papers, 
referring to them or any given subject 

33 UNION SQUARE NEW YORK 

Established, London, 1881; New York, 1884. Branches: London, 
Paris, Berlin, Sydney. 

BUSWELL COMPANY: 



Bookbinder, paper-ruler, printer and Blank- 
Book Manufacturer. 



686 Clay street 






July 35, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




50R?S 




U/07XL fimlavmv 




Santa Cruz Mountains. No staging. Table first- 
class. Electric lights, boating, swimming, fishing, 
hunting, tennis and ping-pong. New management. 
See booklet S. P. Co., 613 Market street, or Hotel 
Ben Lomond. 



Laurel Dell Lake 



THE SWITZERLAND 
OF AMERICA 



This beautiful lake resort Is the only pleasure and health 
resort In the State that has Its own mineral springs and a 
chemically pure spring. 

Boating, swimming, marine toboggan, croquet, bowling, 
new livery tally-ho coach, saddle horses. Largest dining- 
room in Lake County. Pamphlets at Peck's, 11 Montgom- 
ery St., and railroad office, 650 Market street. 



Laurel Dell, Lake County. 



EDGAR DURNAN, Proprietor. 



WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California. 

Best summer and winter resort. Beautifully, situated at 
the foot of Taylor Mountain, two and one-half miles from 
Santa Rosa. Hunting, fishing, croquet, billiard and all kinds 
of amusement. Fine drives, scenery unsurpassed. Fresh 
fruit, cream, butter, eggs; free camping. Circulars, full par- 
ticulars, Travelers' Bureau, 630 Market street. Special rates 
on Sunday, round trip $1.60. Rates— Board, room and bath 
Included, $8, $10, $12, per week. Special rates to families; 
'bus meets trains at Santa Rosa. Mrs. H. A. D. Fleming, 
Prop. Box 165. 



GOLF 
PING-PONG 

SWIMMING 



AUTOMOBILES 

NEW ANNEX 

NEW LANAI 



BALLS ALL SUMMER 
ON THE GOLF LINKS 
OF HOTEL VENDOME 
NO PLACE LIKE IT 



TENNIS 

BOWLING 

ORCHESTRA 



GEO. P. SNELL 

MANAGER 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 



rCAPITOUn 

The Atlantic City of the Pacific Coast, 
Zyi Hours Ride from San Francisco. 

Salmon fishing now at Its best. 

Hotel accommodations for joo guests. 
Hotel rates from $1.50 per day upwards — 
$i; per week. Hotel Orchestra— Marine 
Band — River Lake for boating and bathing 
—Fine Beach and Surf Bathing— Bowling- 
Naphtha Launches — Electric Railroad to 
Santa Cruz. The greatest place in the 
world for children. 

July, August and Sept., ideal months. 

For Cottages snd Tent Grounds, addrsss F. 
Rbanihr; For Hotel, R, M. Bkiare, 
Capitola, Cat. For General Information, 
Peck's Information Bureau, ii Mont- 
gomery Street, San Francisco. 



Pacific Congress Springs 

SARATOGA, SANTA CLARA CO., CAL. 

A charming resort in the foothills of the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. Six miles from Los Gatos. Hotel with all mod- 
ern Improvements. Finest mineral waters In California. 
Address, H. R. RAND, General Manager. 



Vichy Springs 



3milea from Ulciah, Mendocino Co. Natural 
electrio waters, champagne baths. Only place 
in the world of this class. Pishinc, hunting. 
Crystal Spring's. Accommodations; table first 
class. 

J. A. Redemeyer & Co., Props. 



GO TO 

HIGHLAND SPRINGS 

FOR HEALTH and PLEASURE 

Rates $10 to $16 per week 

CRAIG & KERR, Managers. 



BEN LOHOND 

Park House and Cottages. An Ideal resort, 
unsurpassed climate, drives, fishing and hunt- 
ing. Two hours' ride to Big Basin. Moder- 
ate prices. 
ROBERT GAT, Proprietor. 



BAY STATE HOUSE and cottages 

MRS. L. MATHISON, Proprietress. 

A CHARMING SUMMER AND WINTER RESORT 

Santa Cruz, Cal. 



Anderson Springs 

Only natural Mineral Steam 
Baths In Lake County 

14 distinct mineral springs of 8 different characters, hot 
and cold. Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. Board: $10 to (14 
per week. Address, J. Anderson, Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

Fare— San Francisco to Springs and return reduced to (8. 
Send for circular. Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 
320 Sansome St, San Francisco. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



EASY DEER HUNTING. 
There is nothing that affords so much pleasure to 
the busy denizen of the city as the killing of a deer. 
How joyfully and buoyantly he will carry to his camp 
or summer boarding house a load that in the city he 
would consider fit only for a horse. With what pride 
he will show it to his friends and dilate on the details 
of his successful hunt. And if ladies be present, he 
soon begins to feel himself a hero. 

For how many months does this "tale of his shoot" 
interest himself, if not his friends? His recital may 
vary, but no matter how many he may tell of having 
seen after shooting this one, and how easily he could 
have brought them down (but not how many he may 
have, shot at) he will invariably wind up by stating 
that he is a "gentleman sport," and would not kill 
more than one, that being sufficient for the time for 
himself and friends. 

To kill a deer is an ambition we all. possess. We are 
never too old or too young for this sport. If we could 
only jump up and "get there" quick ! In this respect 
the residents of the bay counties have the advantage 
over the residents of any other part of the United 
States. Mendocino and Sonoma Counties are practi- 
cally a deer park, and only a few hours' ride from 
San Francisco. Leaving San Francisco in the morn- 
ing, the hunter reaches Willits in the heart of Mendo- 
cino County, in time for dinner, and Geyserville, 
Cloverdale, Hopland. Ukiah and other intermediate 
rail points considerably earlier. If he does not plug 
a deer that evening he is in good shape for an early 
morning start. The deer throughout this section, 
along the California Northwestern Railway, are more 
plentiful this season than for years. The game has 
been well protected. So many of the farmers take 
boarders they have learned the value of deer as an 
attraction, and have joined hands with the law in pro- 
tecting them. 

The open season for deer in Sonoma County is 
from July 15th to August 31st inclusive, and in Men- 
docino County until September 30, inclusive. 

"Vacation 1903," issued by this company, tells 
where the hunters can stop, terms, etc. 

If you have not lunched at Moraghan's you have not 

tasted the delights of the hest oyster house on the Pacific 
Coast. Everything is of the very best. One need never 
he afraid of what they get to eat at Moraghan's. It Is above 
suspicion. The best motto as regards food is the best, and 
you get It at Moraghan's. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat producing Qualities Briquettes are superior 
to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th and 
Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



The domestic method of carpet-cleaning is very unsat- 
isfactory. The expert is always ahead. If you are Incredu- 
lous give Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Company, 353 Tehama 
street a trial, and you will see the difference between the 
real thing and the imitation. All the best machinery used 
in the work by Spaulding's. 



"After the theatre, then to the Techau." That's what 

Pepys would have said in his diary, if he had lived in San 
Francisco. He knew the best in his day, and Techau's the 
best of your day. Best quality at reasonable prices. 



No man who values his personal appearance can afford 

to be ignorant of the fact that his clothes may be perfectly 
cleaned and his appearance materially Improved by people 
who have made that kind of work a specialty. Such people 
are Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 Stockton, 
who also clean gloves, cravats, curtains and such articles. 
They call for and deliver goods. 



At tb. flnt b.nqnet given by tbc 
CU1..D. of th.Cltj of Chicago to 



President R.oosevelt 

on b it Wimrn trip, >t the Aadltorlum Howl, April 
3nd, the only wine need wet 

Ruinart Brut '93 



The President's Wine 



VARNEY W. GASKILL, Special Agent 
With Hilbiht m»boantilb Co., Importers. 
Telephone Excb.nge 818. Ben Frmnoleoo, C.l. 



Rheumatism Cured in Three Days 

AZTEC OINTMENT 

CURES GUARANTEED 



213 Starr King Bldg. 



San Francisco, Cul. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher and Mides Consolidated Mining Co. 

Assessment ■ ■ .. . No. 32. 

Amount per share 5 cents 

Levied June 26, 1903 

Delinquent in office July 29, 1903 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Auguii 18, 1903 

E. B. HOLM* S, Secretary. 
Office— Room 60, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco 
California. ^^ 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Co. 

Assessment. No. 130 

Amounts per share 10 cents 

Levied July 10, 1903 

Delinquent In office • August 14, 1903 

Day of sale of delinquent stock September 3, 1903 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 14, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
California 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco. Cat. Location of 
Works— Virginia City, Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice U hereby given that, at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 7th day of July, 1903. an assessment (No. 69) of ten (10) 
cent* per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, 
payable Immediately. In United Statss gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, rooms 21 and 22, Nevada Block .309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 11th DAY OF AUGUST. 1905. 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public suction, and until 
payment Is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 81th day of 
August, 1903, to pay the delinquent assessment together with the 
cast of advertising and expenses of sale- By order of the Board of 
Directors- 

JOHN W. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Offloe— Rooms 21 and 22 Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery Street. San 
Franc! ico. Cal. 



1 90,000 



People depend 
upon the 



-Rheumatics relieved at tbe Post-St. Hammam. 



Oakland Tribune 

for all *he news of the day. 

The TRIBUNE is the home paper of Oakland 
and Alameda County, and has no rival in its field. 

The TRIBUNE publishes, exclusively, the full 
Associated Press dispatches. 

All society events of the week are mirrored in 
Saturday's TRIBUNE. 

Local and State politics receive attention by 
special writers in the same issue. 



July 25, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




By Akthir Inkiusiky 

The meet of the Automobile Club at Del Monti 
promises to be highly successful. It is believed thai 
about fifty automobiles will be gathered together, of 
which number more than half will be from San Fran- 
cisco. E. Courtney Ford. vice-President of the Au- 
tomobile Club of California, is Captain of the run, 
and will be assisted by B. D. Merchant and N. T. 
Messer, Jr. The San Francisco automobilists will 
be joined at San Jose by owners from Berkeley, Oak- 
land, Alameda, Mountain View, and by members 
of the San Jose Automobile Club. The automobilists 
from San Francisco are at liberty to journey to San 
Jose as and when they please, either by way of Oak- 
land or through San Mateo. Those wdio go across 
the bay will take the 3 p. m. Oakland Creek ferry 
boat, and will make their way to San Jose one by 
one. Thursday night will be spent at the Hotel 
Vendome. On Friday morning, August 7th, an early 
start will be made from San Jose, and at San Juan 
a rendezvous will be held, at which the route to Mon- 
terey will be determined. Luncheon will be taken at 
San Juan, and Del Monte will be reached in ample 
time for dinner. On Saturday the final match of the 
polo tournament will be witnessed. On Sunday 
a run will be m'ade over the Seventeen-Mile Drive, 
which is said to be probably the finest marine 
boulevard in the country. On Monday the automo- 
bilist, panoplied in leather coat and goggles, will be 
seen in all his glory. In the mOrning there will be 
hill-climbing contests for a trophy ; and in the after- 
noon nine or ten events will be held on the race- 
track'. 

These will include races for cars of various weights 
and type, an event in which each car will be driven 
by its owner, an obstacle contest, and an open-for-all 
race. Cups have been offered by F. A. Hyde, presi- 
dent; Courtney Ford, vice-president; and E. P. Brine- 
gar, secretary of the Automobile Club of California ; 
by C. C. Moore and the White Sewing Machine Com- 
pany. L. P. Lowe, the son of Professor Lowe, has 
offered a handsome cup for the Owners' Race, the 
distance of which has not yet (July 20th) been deter- 
mined. On Tuesday the motorists will enjoy an al 
fresco luncheon, which will conclude the meet. After 
this the motorists may stay on at Del Monte or re- 
turn to their homes at their pleasure. A few cars 
will be sent down to the meet by freight, but it is 
believed that the great majority of owners will make 
the trip by road. 

Dr. Nelson Jackson of Vermont arrived in Chicago 
on July 20th in the Winton touring car in which he 
is making the transcontinental trip from San Fran- 
cisco to New York. 

The White Sewing Machine Company will move 
into its new quarters at Market, Franklin and Page 
streets in a few days. The garage occupies 125 feet 
on Franklin street, 60 feet on Market street and 60 
feet on Page. It has a cement floor, with automatic 
machines for measuring and supplying gasoline, cylin- 
der oil and lubricating oil, so that the measuring is ex- 
act, there is no leakage, and no loss by evaporation. 
Walter Grothe, the chief engineer, has returned from 



the White factory in ( 'ic\ eland, ' >., with »ix thousand 
dollars' worth of tools, including lathes, drill-prc 
and special tools for repairing all kind-, of aut< 

bill's in the most rapid and efficient manner. 
believed that, when this equipment is install.'. 1. the 
White Company will be able to execute repairs, not 

■ >nly 011 machines of its own manufacture, but also 
on all gasoline cars and steam wagons of the shell 
boiler type, with greater quickness than has hitherto 
been possible on this Coast. 

R. P. Schwerin of San Mateo has bought a Winton 
touring car and has driven it to the Hotel Del Monte, 
where he expects to keep it until after the tourna- 
ment of the Automobile Club. 

Brainerd F. Smith of Folsom, is in San Francisco, 
and is using his Locomobile constantly for outings. 

A carload of Oldsmobile rigs reached this city last 
week. One has been delivered to Douglas H. Hardy, 
of San Rafael. A carload of Winton machines ar- 
rived in San Francisco last Monday. The cars will 
soon be in the hands of purchasers. 

Last Saturday, R. M. Hotaling, with Dr. and 
Mrs. Cool, and Miss Blanche Bates, made a trip in 
a Winton car to Mrs. Cool's place near Los Gatos, 
returning on Sunday to San Francisco. 

O. D. McNab went to San Jose on Sunday with a 



MARSH MOTOR CYCLE $125 




The Marsh 3 H. P. motor cycle is the most 
practical motor cycle in the world. It is guar- 
anteed for one year, also has a guaranteed speed 
of forty miles an hour. Writeforfullinformation, 
catalogue, etc. 

MOTOR CYCLE UFO. CO. Brockton, Mass. 



UNIVERSAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 

137 to 151 FIRST STREET 



The only thoroughly equipped 
factory on the Coast. Every 
facility for quick repairs, paint- 
ing, etc ... 



LARGE STORAGE ROOM. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



party in a Cadillac tonneau, going via San Mateo 
and returning via Oakland. Though the roads for 
the first fourteen miles out of San Francisco are 
rough, the trip was a pleasant one. 

The contract for the electric buggy for the Chief 
of the San Francisco Fire Department has been 
awarded to A. E. Brooke-Ridley. It is to carry two 
persons, to be capable of a speed of a mile in ttiree 
minutes, able to climb a 20 per cent gradient, and to 
possess a radius of action of 40 miles. It is to be the 
most powerful electric automobile buggy that has yet 
been built, and is being constructed specially accord- 
ing to plans and specifications furnished by the Fire 
Chief. It will be built by the Electric Vehicle Com- 
pany ol Hartford, Conn., and will be delivered in four 
or five weeks. 

The most powerful and speedy automobile regu- 
larly kept in stock in this country is the White steam 
touring car. To secure the greatest possible light- 
ness, the body and mud-guards are of aluminum. It 
has a chainless drive, impervious to dust and mud. 
The engine is compound and is in front of the car 
under a hood; it is capable of running from 12 to 20 
miles, according to the difficulty of the road, on a 
gallon of gasoline. It has 4-inch clincher tires manu- 
factured by the B. F. Goodrich Company of Akron, 
Ohio. It will carry five persons comfortably, and yet 
the weight of the whole car is only 1600 pounds. This 
weight is distributed equally on the four wheels, 
making it easy to steer and insuring a minimum of 
wear and tear on the tires. It is a wheel-steerer and 
has a wheel throttle. A remarkable feature of the 
car is the mechanism whereby the compound engine 
can be changed into a single one by depressing a 
lever with the foot. Thus four times the normal 
power necessary for a special effort to draw the car 
out of deep sand or mud, or to carry it up hills of an 
unusual steepness, where the ordinary motor car 
would have to be towed. John D. Spreckels. Dr. \V. 
Tevis and other people for whom the best is good 
enough, rather happy possessors of cars of this type. 
Among the others are A. B. Hammond of the Ham- 
mond Lumber Company, and H. L. Ricks of Eureka. 

The Packard car which started on June 20th from 
the Pacific Ocean for New York, is getting along 
famously, and is practically certain to accomplish 
the feat. A telegram from Price, Utah, July 8th, says 
that the 63 miles from Tucker to Price were accom- 
plished in 13 hours, and that unbounded surprise was 
expressed at the car coming through Soldiers' Can- 
yon, which no one thought could be traversed in an 
automobile. At Green River, Utah, the sand was 
the worst encountered. At Thompson's, Utah, it 
was possible to make only four miles an hour, the 
roads being washed away. To reach Grand Junction, 
Colo., the car "snailed all night through desert 
washes." Here the rear tires, quite worn out by 
travel over the rocky ledges, but having done ad- 
mirable service, were replaced by new ones. On the 
way to Rifle, Colo., the travelers were caught in the 
rain, on the top of Slippery Canyon, where the grad- 
ient is 20 per cent. The wheels were chained, and 
the descent was made with caution, 82 miles being 
traversed during the day. Glenwood Springs was 
reached at 11 a. m. Here the automobilists were re- 
ceived by Senator Taylor and James W. Abbott, the 
chief representatives to the west of the Rockies of the 
National Highway movement. While the travelers 
were feted the car "Pacific" was put into trim to take ' 
the Leadville elevation. Gypsum, Colo., was reached 
on July 15th. A 40 h. p. Winton car, owned bv G. 
W. Woods of Denver, was found wrecked at the 



Detsero entrance to the Grand Canyon of Colorado. 
Assistance was offered, but the case was hopeless. 

The Electric Vehicle Company is building a new 
gasoline car, a "full line" (to speak commercially) of 
which will be on the market next year. 

Harold B. Larzalere, manager of the Pacific Motor 
Car Company, started on Friday evening, July 17th, 
for Sobre Vista, Sonoma County, to deliver a Pack- 
ard car to Rudolph Spreckels. The machine is run- 
ning well, and has successfully climbed some grad- 
ients of 30 per cent. 

The new garage of the White Sewing Machine 
Company is said to be the largest and best-equipped 





THE CADILLAC 




i^tf^^^H^H 


Second Hand 




> > r < ^T * 


Oldsmobiles, $450 
Mobiles $400 to $450 




^ ^Bp^^IJS 


Regardless of price, 
the mjst capable au- 
tomobile made. 


Price. $850.00. With tonneau. $950.00. 

WESTEHJV AX/TOMO'BILE CO, 

201-203 LARKIN STREET. 8. F. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 

Successors to Locomobile Co., of the Pacific. 

1622-1628 Market St., S. F. 

Jobbers and Dealers— Automobiles and Accessories 
SELLING AGENTS 

Winton Motor Carriage Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Locombile Co., of America, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Olds Motor Works, Detroit, Mich. 

Vehicle Equipment Company, New York. 
Electric Trucks, Etc. 

Demmerle & Co., Leather Clothing 



NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 



Phone. South 1 142 134 to 148 Golden Gate Ave. 

The largest and 
finest "Garage" in 
> } the West. 

Our line the highest 
types produced. 

RAMBLER; KNOX, Waterless; HAVNES-APPERSON 

AUTOCAR. ...Touring Cars 
TOLEDO.. ..Touring Cars 
PEERLESS.. ..Touring Cars 

Give us a call and we will show you a full line of 
record-breakers. 




July 25. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



to the west of Cleveland. Among owners of the new 

White touring; car in addition to those already named 
arc 1 IresteS 1'icrcc. Captain of the * (akland I iolf Club : 
1 l'.Ianey. of San Jose, and W. Mead of Los \n 
geles. Eleven orders for cars of this type ar>- in 
hand and will be filled as soon as possible. 

L. H. Gillespie, of Fruitvale, has purchased a Loco- 
mobile, and Percy L. Pettigrew of San Francisco has 
acquired a Winton touring car. The following have 
recently become possessors of Oldsmobiles: Merrill 
& Hansell of Stockton; Lillie Brothers of Lodi; Dr. 
1 1. F. Chalmers of Niles; D. T. Dempsey of San 
I'rancisco: M. O. Harley". a Woodland hanker; W. 
H. Hunt of San Jose : C. A. Le Baron of Valley Ford, 
and L. W. Edwards of San Francisco. • 

The motor car in which the Belgian Jenatzy won 
the Gordon Bennett cup for Germany in the recent 
race in Ireland was owned by an American, Clarence 
Gray Dinsmore, who lent it to the Dainler Company 
when the factory of that firm, in which were the cars 
intended for use in the International race, was de- 
stroyed by fire. Automobile Topics becomes some- 
what hysterical over this kindness, saying "this was 
chivalrous, and could not be duplicated in any other 
kind of sport." I do not exactly know what is meant 
by the pretentious and much-abused word "dupli- 
cate," but, assuming it to mean that a similarly gen- 
erous act is impossible in any other sport, I beg leave 
to doubt the truth of the statement. A boat or a pair 
of sculls might be lent to a competitor in a boat-race, 
or a pony to a player in a polo match. If Automobile 
Topics meant that an example of similar generosity 
cannot be found in any other sport, then I say that 
I feel certain that men have lent each other trie neces- 
sary paraphernalia for taking part in other competi- 
tions. But probably the writer in Automobile Topics 
did not know what he meant, and merely used a vague 
word without any exact idea of its connotation. He 
goes on further to observe: "As such, it (the loan of 
the auto) should do much toward popularizing the 
sport itself." Again I do not catch the meaning of 
the writer, for I do not see in what way the loan of 
an article by one man to another can cause the fickle 
breezes of popular favor to blow or refrain from 
blowing, on anything. Automobile Topics, in its 
effort to curry favor with the rich, and to say things 
that it supposes will be pleasing to them, writes a 
good deal of nonsense, and badly-written nonsense 
at that. 



When the Chinese immigration officials at this port 
have nothing else to do for the commonwealth they 
take it out in insulting educated Chinese gentlemen 
by classing them as coolies. Teng Hwee Lee, a Yale 
graduate, and a more cultivated and enlightened 
American than the red-tape reelers who are holding 
him, is detained on the Doric because he has not the 
papers with him which prove that he is not a coolie. 
Mr. Teng has languished for days on the Doric 
waiting for release, and it now looks as though he 
would have to return to the Orient on the next 
boat. 



PACIFIC HOTOR CAR CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 

Packard 

. ' fj "-* Motor Car. 

' St. Louis 

Molor Cur. 

American 

Motor Cttr. 

) JONES CORBIN 

Motor Car. 

Cudell Motor Car 
The above cars exhibited at our repository, 1814 
Market Street. 




HAVE TOUR AUTOMOBILE EQUIPPED WITH 

Diamond Tires 



HIGHEST GRADE-LONGEST 
LIFE-MOST MILEAGE-CAUSE 
LEflST TROUBLE ** <* ** 

Catalogs and literature from 

8 Beale Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



"Nothing so rare &s resting on Air" 



Pneumatic 
Cushions 



For Yacht, or Launch 
For Automobile or Carriage 
For Office Camp or Home 



FOB SALE IN 'FEI800 BT 

SKINNER & CO., 801 Market St. S. F. WEEKS & CO., 



DUCK, CRflSH 
and KHAKI SUITS 

BICYCLE SUITS 
7T// ^-^J^H^mm. to order. 

ALL KINDS Of BAND SUITS 

FINE TAILORING A SPECIALTY 
79 Flood Building. Prjone Browr; 196. S. F. 




VELVET 

LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 

and Women 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make then) in 
any. style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

H. E. SKINNER CO. 

801 MARKET ST. 



Fine stationery, steel andl copperplate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jote. 

Letcher Automobile Co.— 288 S. Market St.. Phone John 1661 
Automobiles stored and repaired. Expert workmanship. Gaso- 
line and oil at all hours. Santa Clara agents for the Western 
■ Automobile Company and National Automobile Company. 



ELECTR.IC and GASOLINE 
CARS 

WELCH GASOLINE TOURING 
CAR. 

CONRAD LIGHT GASOLINE 
RVNABOVT 



A. E. BROOKE RIDLEY, « 8 F § LL M S EET 




Telephone Booth 894 



Ban Fnnolico, Cal. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



nnii7 nn/vp Haywards BIdg., California and 
IlK A I KKIIN Montgomery Sts.. San Francisco. 
UM«» Ul\VU. 205 New High Street, Loa Angeles. 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers In Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1S99 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 389 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

TEL. MAIN 198 - 55-57-59-61 FIRST ST.. 'SAN FEANCISCO 

Blake, Mofflt ft Towne. Lob ADffelea, Cal. 
Blake, McFall ft Co.. Portland, Oregon. 



T% L, ^ or barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

nrtlSnGS "illiard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 
*■** **^uv»j makers, canners, dyers, flour mills, foundries, 
laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento St, S. F., Tel. Hain 561 1 




Phone Main 153. Established 1862 

RUBBER TIRES 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-59-61 Minna St., 
between let and 2nd. One block from Palace 
Hotel 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union 
Olubcor. Post and Stockton. Tel Main 1S3. 
Every vehicle quisite for business or pleas- 
ure. Special orders lor Four-in-Hands. J. 
TOMKINSON. Proprietor. 



Mantle <<& Son, Inc. 

Haberdashers 

And Dealers In Men's Hign Class Furnishing Goods 

10 Stockton St.. San Francisco. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company 
GUllngham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens 

THE AWARD AT CHICAGO. 1893 

'l^^r? PR ^ X " PARIS ' W 00 - THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 
AWARD. These pens are "the best In the world." 

^He'n^HOE. !l 0l !on-rStree't . r Ne h ,* SEE* ***"■ 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND I 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. No. 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




WHY SOCIAL DISTINCTIONS CLASH IN SAN 
FRANCISCO. 



By Jean Phillips. 

Decidedly there is trouble ahead for some one, but 
whether it be for high society or for the women who 
serve it no one knows. This clash means much to 
the dignity and digestion of the woman who works, 
and the woman who works will not have her dignity 
or digestion interfered with by any one — not in Cali- 
fornia. The Princess of Burlingame is accused of 
setting this new Californian fashion and of precipi- 
tating this late trouble, and all because food of the 
cheapest quality is purchased for the noble kitchen. 
This fashion of docking supplies is spreading fast to 
' the plebeian, but wealthy kitchens of the untitled 
Four Hundred," hence the grief and indignation, the 
sly laugh of the French butlers and the sad, regret- 
ful reminiscences of the cooks. 

A short time ago a half dozen trim, straight, well- 
rounded, well-laundried girls, with bright complex- 
ions, made a call at the country residence of the elite. 
All Burlingame turned its neck to get a good look, 
as the young women were unknown to the Four Hun- 
dred. They were just as well dressed for a hot sum- 
mer's day, and they were certainly just as pretty as 
the girls on the drags on the links. Still, to a close 
observer, they lacked something of the vere-de-vere 
cast that marks the upper ten. What was it? You 
could tell by the well-fitting shirt waist whether their 
face or back was turned toward you, and they walked 
instead of striding along. Of course they attracted 
attention. Pretty soon they were seen off the main 
drive in quiet conversation with a few elderly women 
who were known to be the cooks of the oldest in- 
habitants of Burlingame. At this the Four Hundred 
laughed loud and long. It was a good joke. The se- 
cret was out. Cook was holding a morning reception. 
But for some reason cook looked grieved. 

All this time Gaston was looking through a rose 
hedge at the bevy of pretty girls and almost wild for 
a flirtation ; still, Gaston's etiquette would not permit 
him to intrude. But he quickly pounced upon the 
cook before she could enter the door, and kissing both 
her hands, she exclaimed : "Ah, mon Dieu ! Zee do no* 
lofe zee poor Gaston. There was Mademoiselle 
Mamee making sapphire eyes to me from zee other 
side of zee hedge, and my dear madame, who call me 
one son, would not present me, and I cough and 
cough so you know I was there. For lofe of Made- 
moiselle Mamee I go out and die one death !" said the 
susceptible young butler. 

"Oh, go on with ye, ye hathen ! Sure, my Mamie 
wouldn't look the same side o' the road ye'r on ; but 
ye'r a good boy, Gasty, if ye are a Frinchman, and 
more's the pity. But I've no heart to-day for foolish- 
ness," said the cook, as two tears stole slowly from 
the corners of two eentle blue eyes. 

"Is Mademoiselle Mamee going to marry one mil- 
lionaire, and not listen to poor Gaston?" asked the 
Frenchman. 

"No, indeed ; sure it's worse than that. My Mamie 
and them other girls are going to form a working 
Ladies' Union, whatever that is, for the bettering of 
their condition, and all because the Princess has set 
the style about puttin' chape things to ate in the kit- 
chen, and all of the mistresses are a-followin' of her. 
Sure, it's changed the world is entirely. Them girls 
was the nicest girls in California before they took to 
marrying millionaires and foreigners. Sure, it's lit- 
tle good them same foreigners ever brought to any- 



July as, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



33 



one, only puttin' foolish notions and things into their 
heads about chape food and the like Sure, it's little 
distinctions their dear ma and myself made in all 
them years that are gone, when we had our fine cup 
of tay, nice and snug and friendly in the kitchen. And 
now there's my girl a-lormin' of a union again her 
girls." 

Now, Gaston whispered: "Be comforted, madamel 
Zere eez no nobleman ; zere eez no Prince ; zee one 
and only Prince he die in one big river at Leipsic, 
fighting for our great Napoleon. There was one 
leetle boy, but — he had not one papa. So there eez 
no Prince! And there eez no distinction !" 

The exact psychological reason why the lady was 
comforted is not so easy to explain, but she was, for 
she was laughing and blushing as she boxed Gaston's 
ears, and saying: "Go on with ye now, ye young 
hathen. Sorry a sight of my Mamie will ye get again ; 
for ye look more like a Prince than yer master do, the 
Lord save us ! and sure that wouldn't do atall, at all !" 

It's all very well to laugh at this new union that is 
talked about, and to blame one woman for starting 
the trouble, but where will it end? Mrs. Mark Hop- 
kins, rest her soul with all her millions, tried to serve 
the kitchen with poor food, and a beautiful time she 
had of it. The help made life miserable for her until 
she left San Francisco. But then, Mrs. Mark could 
never lead any fashion, and it died out. Now, how- 
ever, social economy and social distinction is fast 
becoming a disease with our young millionaires, and 
before they know it they will be in the hands of a new 
union that will make all the other unions look like 
a pleasant dream. 

No, ladies, it's too soon to draw European lines ; 
better wait another generation, and study a little so- 
cial diplomacy, or you'll be studying how to do the 
family washing out in the rose arbor one fine morn- 
ing, for help is scarce. 



Nelson's Amycose 
Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the Skin. 



Dr. Decker, 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless 
teeth extracting. 



The Smith-Premier Is the standard typewriter, and 

embodies the good points of all typewriting machines. 




Hotel 
Belleclaire, 

Broadway & 77th St. 

NEW YORK 

Luxuriously furnished rooma 
fur permanent and transient 
gueBts, at moderate prices. 

OrcneBtra of solo players, 6 p. 
m. till 1 a. m. 

Restaurant, Palm Room and 
Cafe gems of artistic perfection. 
Cu'elne and service really de- 
lightful. You will say BO. 

A special feature Is our after 
theater suppers 

Billiard parlor for ladles 1b 
another pleasant feature. 

Original with theBelleclalre Is 
the refined vaudeville every 
Thursday evening. 

Our gallery of heatiful paint- 
lneB, valued at $50,000, 1b open 
evenlngBto visitors. 

Affability and courtesy Ruar- 

jpR-anteed from every Belleclaire 

employe. 



HOTELS. 







Don Porter. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opposite U. S. Treasury, one block from the 
White House, Washington, D. C. The Hotel 
"Par Excellence" of the National Capital. 

First class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, Prop. 
American Plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



Hotel Richelieu 



Hotel Granada 



1012 Van Ness Ave 1000 Sutter St. 

The management of the Hotel Richelieu wishes to an- 
nounce to its friends and patrons that it has purchased the 
property of the Hotel GJranada, and will run the latter on the 
same plan that has made the Richelieu the finest family ho- 
tel in San FranciBco. HOTEL RICHELIEU CO. 




HOTEL EMPIRE 



Broadway 



and 63d St. 
New York Gity 



A Hlerh Class Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate rates. 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 



W. Johnson Quinn, Proprietor. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



McCoy's New 
European Hotel 

250 East, South and 
West front rooms. Hy- 
draulic Passenger eleva- 
tor. Bates, ?1 per day 
and upwards. Fire-proof 
building. Fire alarm call 
In each room. First- 
class restaurant con- 
nected. 

WN1. McCOY, 
Owner and Proprietor. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Cor. Clark & Van Buren 



21mm 



Streets. 




SING FAT & COMPANY 



Milton Roblee. Prop. 614 DUPONT STBEBT. S. F. 



Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but on* 
price. All goods marked In plain English figures. 

Next to St Mary's Churoh. 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 25, 1903. 



A SONG OF SPEED. 
The Automobile. 



In the Eye of the Lord, 
By the Will of the Lord, 
Out of the Infinite 
Bounty dissembled, 
Since Time began, 
In the Hand of the Lord, 
Speed ! 

Speed as a chattel : 

Speed in your daily 

Account and economy ; 

One with your wines, 

And your books, and your bath — 

Speed! 

Speed as a rapture : 

An integral element 

In the new scheme of Life 

Which the good Lord, the Master, 

Wills well you should frame 

In the light of His laugh 

And His great, His ungrudging, 

His reasoned benevolence — 

Speed ! 

Speed, and the range of God's sky 

Distances, changes, surprises ; 

Speed, and the hug of God's winds 

And the play of God's airs, 

Beautiful, whimsical, wonderful. 

Wife — Oh, John, you've waked 
the baby. Husband — Serves him 
right. He kept me awake all last 
night. 



ENNEN'S ?fe E £ 



*>^"Afc 



^TPILET 



I PRICKLY HEAT, &s™' 

I CHAFING, and — ""'' 

SUNBURN, -i-i. JE™ • 

Removes all odor of perspire Hon. Do- 

^ Ujtbtfai alter Shaving. Sold everywhere, or/ 

mailed on recti pi of 2Sc. Gel Mermen's (the original). Simple Frte-t 

i GERHARD MENNEN COMP»-NY.N«w.jk.N.J. J 



New 
Overland Service 

From San Francisco to Chicago. 
Three fast trains every day. Time 
—less than three days. Route- 
Southern Pacific, Union Pacific 
and the 

Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railways. 

Leave San Francisco 8 a.m., 10a.m. 
and 6 p. m. Through trains to 
Union Passenger Station, Chicago. 
Tickets, berths or information at 

635 Market Street, C. L. CANFIELD, 
SAN FRANCISCO. General Agent. 



WE HEREBY CONDEMN, repudiate and openly challenge 
as false and malicious, all statements to the effect that 
SOZODONT , the well-known dentrifice, is or ever was acid 
or contains any ingredient injurious to the teeth or mouth. The 
origin of these statements has been traced to certain irresponsible 
and unprincipled persons desiring to benefit thereby. We, there- 
fore, publicly state and stand ready to prove SOZODONT to be 
not only non-acid but an acid destroyer, for by its alkaline reaction 
it neutralizes all destructive mouth acids. This statement is cor- 
roborated in hundreds of letters from our most eminent dentists. 

HALL <2L RUCKEL, New York. 

We will mail complete analysis to your dentist upon receipt 
of his name. 



It is a general principle of the 
law relating to sales of goods that 
in a sale of goods by sample the 
vendor warrants the quality of the 
bulk to be equal to that of the sam- 
ple. This principle has been re- 
stated with emphasis in the case 
of Talcott vs. Henry et als., recent- 
ly decided by the New York Court 
of Appeals. In this case, it ap- 
peared that the appellant, upon re- 
ceipt of samples of fancy worsteds 
from a firm in Bradford, England, 
ordered a large quantity of the 
goods, giving the numbers of the 
samples and the weight per yard. 
The material after its arrival was 
cut and sold by the appellant, but 
his customers complained of the 
quality as defective, and he was 
obliged to make rebates. The 
Bradford firm, upon his complaint, 
took the ground that he should 
have protested immediately upon 
the receipt of the goods. In a suit 
brought by the English manufac- 
turers for the value of the goods, 
they recovered a judgment in the 
trial court, which was affirmed by 
the Appellate Division of the Su- 
preme Court, but this judgment 
was reversed by the Court of Ap- 
peals, which held that upon a sale 
of samples there is an express war- 
ranty that the goods are equal in 
quality to the sample furnished. 
The rule is the same whether the 
goods are in existence at the time 
of the contract of sale or are to 
be manufactured at some subse- 
quent period. If, the court holds, 
the goods when delivered, do not 
equal the sample, the buyer need 
not return them in order to recover 
for the breach of warranty, but he 
can recover for the difference be- 
tween the qualitv called for by the 
sample and that of the goods re- 



ceived at any time he desires to 
make such an application to the 
seller or to the courts. 



Wife — John, I wish you would 
mind the baby for an hour or two. 
I'm going down-town to have a 
tooth pulled. Husband (inspired) 
— You mind the baby, my dear, 
and I'll go down town and get a 
couple of teeth pulled. 



Rube ( to Dan who has just come 
out of the water into which he had 
fallen) — How did you come to fall 
in the river? Dan — Didn't come 
to fall in the river. Came to fish. 




«tftfM3£tf«V«^«««3f.5C«5/:S«3f3Ctftf»l!* 




Stylish $ 
Suits 



15 



50 



Dressy Suits #20 
Pants $4.50 



8 
1 



My $25.00 Suits are the« 

best in America. 
C ' >er ^ en ' Saved by get-(^ 



ing your suit made byS 
1 

THE HI10R K 

1110-1112 Market St S 
201-203 Monte/y St., S. F.S 



i Samples Sent 
i Free..., 



JOE POHEIM 



OPIUM 



Morphine and Liquor 



Hablli Cured Sanatorium 
I Established 1876 Thou- 
sand* ha vine tailed else- 
where have been cured by us. Treatmet can be 
taken at borne Write Ths Dr. J Staptisnl. Co 
Dspt. 78 Lsbanon, Ohts. 



July as, 1903. 



12QS 

.Padishah 




Tha 
Beit 
loo 
Priced 

Jeweled 

Witch 

Made 



Non-Magnetic 

Nickel Silver Case 

Fully Guaranteed 

For sale by 

ALL JEWELERS 

Illustrated Booklet 
on request, showing 

COLORED 
FANCY 
DIALS 

The New England 
Watch Go. 

Factories— 
Waterbury, Conn. 

OHlces- 

. New York, Chicago, 
Sao Francisco. 



One Sunday evening as the peas- 
ant and his wife sat at the door to 
enjoy the weather, a whippoorwill 
began singing and made most deli- 
cious music. 

"How sweet !" sighed the peas- 
ant. 

"What melody !" sighted the 
wife. 

"It makes one forget the weari- 
ness of the day." 

"It surely does. I could listen to 
it for hours." 

The owl had been resting in a 
tree above their heads, and as he 
heard the words of praise he 
cocked up his eye and said to him- 
self: 

"So they go in for the lullaby 
business, do they? I didn't look for 
it, but if it is songs they want then 
here goes." 

"Great snakes! but what is 
that?" exclaimed the peasant as the 
bird above him drew in his breath 
and let go. 

"It's that terrible owl again !" 
replied his wife when she had 
picked herself up off the grass. 

"Well, I'll give him to under- 
stand that he can't jump the boots 
off me with no such music as that. 
S'death, but I thought a menag- 
erie had broken loose !" 

And the peasant thereupon got 
his gun and shot the bird and 
brought him( down. 

"Alas !" cried the owl, as he flut- 
tered about, "but this is my reward 
for seeking to give you pleasure !" 
Moral. — "Oh, you were singing, 
were you?" replied the peasant. 
"Well, you should understand that 
while most of us love music, it 
makes quite a difference who does 
the singing." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen Kr..ui niltlSJSj ) 

A married editor soliloquizes 
thus of the gentler sex: "There is 
gladness in her gladness when 9he 
is glad, there is sadness in her sad- 
ness when she is sad, but the glad- 
ness of her gladness and the sad- 
ness of her sadness are nothing to 
her madness when she's mad. 

Mifkins — You have used the 
word "donkey'' several times in 
the last ten minutes. Am I to un- 
derstand that you mean anything 
of a personal nature. Bifkins — Cer- 
tainly not. There are lots of don- 
keys in the world besides you. 

Farmer Hornbeak (in the midst 
of his reading) — Wa-al, I'll say for 
him, the editor of The Plaindealer 
can be the sarcasticest feller I ever 
saw when he tries. Mrs. Horn- 
beak — What makes you say so, 
Ezry? Farmer Hornbeak — Why, 
in this week's issue the department 
entitled "Local Intelligence" is only 
about three inches long. 

Bacon — That family next door is 
the limit for borrowing things. Ma- 
con — What have they been after 
now. Bacon — One of their lady 
guests at dinner on Sunday forgot 
her teeth, and they came over to 
borrow my wife's. 

"I thought I'd drop in and tell 
you what your hair restorer did for 
a friend of mine," said the visitor. 
"When he started using your elixir 
there were only a few hairs on his 
head, but now it is completely cov- 
ered." "Indeed?" exclaimed the 
patent medicine man. "Yes, by 
six feet of earth." 



35 



Have you 
a friend 

in Chicago or Boston 
or Kansas City or any- 
where else, for whom 
you want to buy a ticket 
to this city? 

If you have, call at 
this office and let us 
arrange matters for you. 

You deposit with us 
enough money to cover 
transportation, as also in- 
cidental expenses of the 
journey; we do the rest. 



jRocKlslandii 
1 System [ \ 



F. W. Thompson, 
Gen'l Western Agt., 
623 Market Street, 
San Francisco. 



HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

It makes the toilet something to be en- 
joyed. It removes all stains and roughness, 
prevents prickly heat and charing, and 
leaves the skin white, soft, healthy. In the 
bath it brings a glow and exhilaration which 
no common soap can equal, imparting the 
vigor and life sensation of a mild Turkish 
tath. All Grocers and Druggists. 




3 times 
every week 

Personally Conducted Excur- 
sions leave Los flngeles Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Thurs- 
days, and from San Francisco 
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fri- 
days. 

Tourist Sleeping carservice 
to Chicago, St. Louis and 
Boston. 

Daily Pullrnan cars San 
Francisco to Chicago. 

631 Market St. 

Under Palace Hotel 

San Francisco 



W. D. SANBORN. 



Genera.! Agent 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



Trains leave and are due to arrive at 



M ATjl" — y*OM JUT» M, WW. — JJLMf 

7.00a Benlcla, Sulsun, Elmira and Sacra- 
mento 7-25f 

7.00a Vaeavllle, "Wtnteri, Ruroaey. 7.26F 

7.30* Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, 

Napa, CalletOBTa, SaoU Ron 6.25* 

7.30a Nlles, Lathrop, Stockton 7-25r 

1 .00 a Darli, Woodland, Knight* Landing. 
Marysvltle, OroTllle, (connecU 
at Marysvllle for Grldley, Blggi 
and Chlco) 7.66* 

8 00a AtlantlcExpreeB— Ogden and East. 10.26a 

I4)0a Fort Costa, Martinez, Antloch, By- 
Pon,Tracy,Stockton,Sacraniento, 
Lob Banos. Mendota, Banford, 
Y leal la, Portervllle m4,25* 

WJOa Fort Costa, Martinez, Lalhrop, Mo- 
desto, Merced, Fresno, Goshen 
Junction, Hanford, YtBalla, 
Bakerefleld 6.25f 

t~30A Bhasta Expreaa — DrnvlB, wniinmi 
(for Bartlett Bprlogs). WlllowB, 
tFrnto, Red Bluff, Portland 7.66p 

8. 30* Nlles, Ban Jope, Llvermore, Stock- 
ton, lone, BacrHmento.Placervllle, 
Marysvllle, Chlco, Red BlofT 4.25p 

8.30a Oakdale. Chinese, Jamestown. 8o- 

nora, Taolomne and AngeU 425* 

6.00a Martinez aDd Way Stations 6 55p 

10.00a Vallejo.. 12.25* 

410.00* CreBcent City Express, Eaatbonnd. 
—Port Costa, Byron, Tracy, La- 
throp, Stockton, Merced, Ray- 
mond. Fresno, Hanford, Vlealla, 
Bakenfleld, Los Angeles and 
New Orleans. (Westbound ar- 
rlT« as Pacific Coast Express, 

via Coast Line) «1.30> 

10 00a The Overland Limited — Ogd en, 

Denver, Omaha, Chicago 6-26* 

12.00m Hayward. Nlles and Way Stntions. 3.25* 
tl-JJOP Sacramento River Steamers tll.OOP 

3-30p Benlcla, Winters, Sacramento. 
Woodland, Williams, Colusa, Wil- 
lows, Knights Landing. Marys- 
vllle, Orovllle aDd way stations.. 

3.30p Hayward, Nlles and Way Stations.. 

4.00p Martinez, SnnRHmon.Vallejo.NBpa. 
Callstoga. Santa Rosa 

4-00p Martinez, Tracy, La tbrop.Stock ton. 

4-OOp Nlles, Llvermore. Stockton, Lodl. 



SAN FRANCISCO, Main Line, foot of Mark*- S 

COAST LINE (Narrow Gauee) 

Foot of Market Street) 



(Toot of Market Street.) 



4.30 r Bayward. NIleB, Irvlngton, San I 18.56a 
Jose, Llvermore I til. 65a 

6.00p The Owl Limited— Fresno, Tulare, 
Bakerafleld, Los Angeles; con- 
nects at Saugus for Santa Bar- 
bara 8-66 i 

6-OOf Port Costa, Tracy, Stockton, Los 

Banos 12. 26* 

t6.30p Nlles. San Jose Local 7.26a 

6.00p Hayward. NileB and Ban JoBe. 10.26* 

6-OOp Oriental Mail — Ogden, Denver, 
Omaha, 8t. Louis. Chicago and 
East. (Carries Pullman Car pas- 
sengers only out of San Fran- 
cisco. Tonrlst car and coach 
passengers take 7.00 p. m. train 
to Reno, continuing thence In 
their cars 6 p.m. train eastward . . 
Westbound, Sunset Limited.— 
From New York, Chicago, New 
Orleans, E) Paso, Lob AngeleB. 
Fresno, Berenda, Raymond (from 
ToBemlte), Martinez. Arrives.. 

7-OOr Ban Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez 



and Way Stations H 26a 

17.00* Vallejo 7,B6p 

7-OOp Port t'oBta, Benlcla, Sulsun, Davis, 
Sacramento, Truckee, Reno. 
Stops at all stations east of 

Sacramento 7-6&A 

8-06p Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
ramento, Marysvllle, Redding, 
Portland. Paget Sound and East. 8.66a 
IS.IOp Hayward, Nlles and San Jose (Sun- 
day only) 11165 a 

11.26p Port Costa, Tracy, Lathrop, Mo- 
desto, Merced, Raymond (to To- 
Bemlte), FreBno 12 26p 

Hanford, VlBalla, Bakenfleld 6.2Br 



17.46a Santa Cruz Excursion (Sunday 

only) J8.10P 

8.16a Newnrk, Cenlervllle. Snn Jobo. 
Felton, Boulocr Creek, Santa 

Cruz and Way Stations B 25p 

12-16* Newark, CentervUle, San Jose, 
New Almnden. Lob GiitOfe.FeltOD. 
Bouldir Creek, Santa Cruz and 
Principal Way Stations 10-56a 

4. 16* Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos and 
way etatlons (on Saturday and 
Sunday rune through to Santa 
Cruz, connects at Felton for 
Boulder Creek, Mondxy only 
from Santa Cruz) 18-56 a 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

From SAN KKANCISL'O, Foul at Market St. (SIIpS) 

— 1?:15 9:00 11:00a.m. 1.00 300 6.16p.m. 

From OAKLAND. Foot of Broadway — f6:00 J8:00 

18:05 10:00 a.m. 12 00 200 400 p.m. 

COAST LINE (Kron.MJaiige). 

(Third awl TowiiHtiud Streeta.) 

6.10a San Jose and Way Stallone .. 7.30p 

1700a San Joec nnd Way Stations 6 3Dp 

'7 00a New Almaden M 10p 

17.16a Moniercy and Santa Cruz Ex car 

elen (Sunday only) 18.3Qp 

oS.OOa Coast Line Limited— StopBonly San 
Jose.Gllroy.Holllster.PaJaro.Caa- 
trovllle, Salinas, San Ardo, Paso 
BobleB. Santa Margarita, San Luis 
Obispo, (principal statlonstbence) 
Banta Barbara, and Lob A n- 
geles. Connection at Castrovllle 
to and from Monterey nnd Taclflc 
Grove and at Psjaro north bound 
from Capltola and BantBCruz.... 
&410a San Jo&e. Tres Plnos, Capltola, 
Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Salinas, 
Ban LuIb Obispo and Principal 

Intermediate Stations 

Westbound only. Pacific Coast Ex- 
crete— From New York.Chlcago, 
New Orleans. El Paso. Los An- 
geles, Santa Barbara. Arrives.. 

10-30a SanJoBe and Way Stations 

11-30a San Jose. Los Gatos and Way Sta- 

tlons B.38P 

a i-30 p Ban JOBe and Way SUtlons x700p 

2. D0p Ban Jose and Way Stations 59.40a 

'1i3.00PDeI Monte Express— Santa Clara, 
c Ban Jose. Del Monte, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove (connects at Santa 
Clara for Santa Crnz, Boulder 
_»_ Creek and Narrow Gauge Points) t12-1BP 
ofl-SUP Bnrllngfimc, San Mateo, Redwood, 
Menlo Park, Palo Alto, May field, 
MountalD View. Lawrence, Santa 
Clara. San Jose, Gllroy (connec- 
tion for fl cluster, Tres Plnos), 
Palaro (connection for Watson- 
vllle, Capltola and Santa Cruz), 
Pacific Grove and way stations. 
Connects at Castrovllle for Sa- 
linas 1045a 

SHS* Ban j08e and Wa 7 Btattona '.'. 8. 36a 

0tb4JOP Ban Jose, (via Santa Clara) Los 
Gatos, Wright and Principal Way 

6latlons 18 00a 

.26a °i|-30 J SanJoeeandPrlnclpalWayStattoDP tfl.Q0l 
016-16* SanMateo.Beresford, Belmont. San 



10.65a 
765p 

9.26a 

10.26a 
4.26p 



10-46p 



4.1 Op 



1.30p 
1.20p 



4.26p 



t.San 

Carlos, Redwood. Fair Oaks. 

_ »„ MenloPark. Palo Alto tB.46a 

6-30J Ban Joec and Way Stntions fi 36a 

o7-COp Bnnaet Limited, Eastboond.— San 

Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los 

Angelee, Demlng. El Paso. New 

Orleans, New York. (Westbound 

« «« „ arrlTeevi »SiinJo8qoJnValley)... rr8.25a 

^•6S'Ef\? fc AIto "dWayStaftoM.. ...... 10.16a 

wll-SOi Mlllbrae, Palo Alio and Way BU- 

tlOUB .......... ffl Afi-m 

all «p Mlllbrae, Bsn Jos* "aid Way*Bta'. 

Uo ni M . 1 .... f ,. r .... iS-46> 

TheUNliN 1MN&FER COMPANY 
will call for and check baeeaee from hotels and 
residences. Telephone. Exchai ee ) 3. Inquire 
of Ticket Afirents for Time Cards and other 
information. 
*No day coaches run between San Francisco and Reno. 

s.. JL f ° r M ? r « ln 5" P f ° r Af L ern ?^ n - * Saturd «y and Sunday only. \ Stops at all Stations on 
*xHH??™ itlo * Su S dai ; e ^ ce .?. te ^ X Sund 5 > T onjy ' c a Saturday only, (i Connects at Goshen Jo. 
with trains for Hanford, Vlsaha. At Fresno, for VI* alia via Saneer € Via Coa B t Tine 

vlnfv^ "SS ^i dB ?' nT Arri ^ ^ Ni i ea " . " D ^ i,y " Ct - pt S^urda": W Via San Joan u fn 
rowSute °" ' ^""^'"^tSiiiiday. for all points Nar- 



Brown — I tell you, you must be 
careful what you say at our place. 
Our youngsters are all ears. Jones 
(absently) — I noticed 'em, me boy, 
I noticed 'em. 

School Teacher — Now, tell me, 
Johnny, who it was that felt so 
glad when Christopher Columbus 
announced that he had discovered 
America. Johnny — J. Pierpont 
Morgan. 



"Let my sighs plead for 
me!" The beautiful wretch looked 
up at him wonderingly. "Why, 
you're no bigger fool than any of 
the others !" she exclaimed, 
naively. 

Boarder Brown — Mrs. Jones, I 
can't cut with this knife. Doesn't 
the scissor-grinder ever pass your 
house? Mrs. Jones — Oh, yes. Mary 
pass Mr. Brown a pair of scissors. 



CALIFORNIA 



July 25, 1903. 
NORTHWESTERN 



RAILWAY CO. 
Lessees 

SAN FRANCISCO & NORTH PACIFIC 

RAILWAY COMPANY 
Tiburon Ferry, Foot of Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. 
WEEK DATS— 7:30, 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 a. m.; 
12:35, 2:30, 3:40, 6:10, 6:50, 6:30 and 11:30 
p. m. Saturdays — Extra trip at 1:30 p. m. 
SUNDAYS— 7:30. 8:00, 9:30. 11:00 a. m.; 
1:30. 2:30. 3:40, 6:10, 6:30. 11:30 p. m. 

SAN KAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
11:15 a. m.; 12:50, «2:00, 3:40, 6:00, 6:20, 
WEEK DAYS— 6:05, 6:60, 7:36, 7:60. 9:20, 
6:25 p. m. Saturdays— Extra trip at 

1 :I5 p, m. 
SUNDAYS— 6:50, 7:35, 9:20, 11:16 a. m.; 1:46, 
3:40, 4:50, 6:00, 6:20, 6:10, 6:26 p. m. 
•Except Saturdays. 



Leave 
San Fr'cisco 



In Effect | Arrive 
May 3, 1903 | San Ft Cisco 



Week I Sun- | I Sun- | Week 

Jays I days | uesnatlon | days | L)ay s 



7:3fla 
8:00a 
2:30p 
6:10p 



7:30a 
8:00a 
9:30a 
2:30p 
6:10p 



Ignaclo 



7:45a 


7:45a 


8:40a 


8:40a 


10:20a 


10:20a 


6:00p 


6:20p 


6:20p 


7:25p 


7:25p 





7:30a 
8:00a 
2:30p 
6:10p 



7:30a 
8:00a 
9:30a 
2:30p 
6:10p 



1 


7:45a 1 


Novato 


10:20a 


Petaluma 


6:20p I 


and 


7:35p 


Santa Rosaj 


1 



7:45a 
10:20a 
6:20p 
7:25p 



7:30a 
8:00a 

2:. ""P 



7:30a 
8:00a 
2:30p 



10:20a 
! 7:25p 



10:20a 
6:20p 
7:25p 



7:30a | 

2:30p | 

I 





| Windsor 






7:30a 


Healdsburg 
' Lytton 


10:20a 


I 10:20a 
1 


2:30p 


1 Geyservllle 
* Cloverdale 


7:25a 


| 7:25p 

1 



7:30a 
2:30p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


1 Hopland | 10:20a 
1 and Uklah | 7:25p 


1 10:20a 
| 7:25p 


7:30a 


7:30a 


I Wllllts | 7:25a 


| 7:26p 


8:00a 
2:30p 


8:00a 
2:30p 


I | 10:20a 
| Guernevlllel 7:25p 


1 10:20a 
I 6:20p 


8:00a 
6:10p 


8:00a 
6:10p 


) Sonoma 1 8:40a 
I Glen Ellen | 6:O0p 


1 8:40a 
1 6:20p 


7:30a 
2:30p 


7:80b 

2:30p 


I 1 10:20a 
1 Sebastopol 1 7:26p 


1 10:20a 
| 6:20p 




^ Why Don't You 

Travel by Sea? 

Speclul Vacation and Short 

Tourist Excursion Trips 

fxcellent Service, Low Bates Including 
Berth and Meals 

Los Aneeles, San Dieeo, Santa Cruz, 

Santa Barbara. Monterey, 

Eureea. Seattle, Tacoma. 

Victoria, Vancouvtr, etc. 

And to thoBe desirine longer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico- 

For Information regarding sailing dates, etc. 
obtain folder 

SAN FRANCISCO TICKET OFFICES 
4 New Monteomery St. K Palace Hotel) 10 
Market St.. and Broadway Wharf. 

C. D. DLNANN, Gen- Pass. Aeent. 

10 Market Street, San Francisco 

O. R. & N. CO. 

THE ONLY STEAMSHIP LINE TO 

PORTLAND, ORE 

And Short Rail Line From Portland to all Points 
East- Throuich Tickets to all Points, all Rail 
or Steamship and Rail, at LOWEST RATES. 
Steamer Tickets Include Berth and Meals. 
SB. COLUMBIA Sails Auk. 1, 11, 21. 31. 
S3. GEO. W. ELDER Sails July 27. Aug:. 0, 16 26. 
Steamer sails from toot of Spear at., 11 a. m 



Price per copy, 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 



Annual Subscription. S4.00. 




Vol. LXVII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST i, 1903. 



Number 5. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and pub- 
lished every Saturday by the proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 
Halleck building. 320 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal 

Entered at San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 

New York Office— (where information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, 
Representative. 

London Office— 30 Cornhill, E. C. England, George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication in the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m. 
Thursday previous to day of issue. 



The green apple season is in full swing, and the lit- 
tle white hearse jogs on its regular summer excur- 
sion. 



There is a scarcity of men at Newport. Heaven 
be thanked ! Only thus do we learn that we have 
some value. 



When all other means of discipline fail, try 
ptomaine, appears to be the conclusion of the Whit- 
tier authorities. 



The strike of the lineman has some advantages, 
among others the voice of central is for the moment 
still, in many places. 

Mrs. Stanford has more communications to make 
on the Ross incident. It is strange that some people 
cannot let sleeping dogs lie. 



Four positive recognitions of one man in Stockton 
as four different persons, are eloquent of the relia- 
bility of the ordinary witness. 

An Examiner headline says that Fort Ross "fairly 
reeks of historic interest." The delicate phraseology 
is eloquent of the atmosphere of the paper in ques- 
tion. 



One of the German attaches is going to Manila 
and back in a U. S. transport. Poor chap, he is to 
be made a sort of vicarious atonement for the sins of 
the Kaiser. 



A demand has arisen for the family Bibles of Boers 
looted in the war. It would be a good joke if the chap- 
lains of the conquering army were found to have 
taken them. 



The suburbanites of Alameda and Berkeley seem 
to have no end of trouble with the railway. What a 
lot of trouble the road could get rid of by losing one 
of the morning boats. 

More indictments are to be issued in the matter of 
the postal scandals. Our knowledge of the way of 
idictments, where the indicted have money, does 
ot lead us to hope overmuch. 

Hawaii will send no dancing girls to the exposition 
St. Louis. Report has it that tourists are so 

imerous in Honolulu that none of the dancers can 
spared. 



Danville, Illinois, is offering a pretty spectacle ol 
civic disorder. These things are dangerous, and must 
be put down. The only satisfaction is the bravery of 
the sheriff. We are a nice set of people to send pro- 
tests to anybody. 

The first of the accidental shootings which occur 
every deer season has taken place. It is a curious fact 
that the cool-headed hunter is just about as safe as 
a Malay running amuck. A whole country-side is 
not broad enough for him. 

At last some understanding has been reached as 
to the fees of Justices of the Peace. Henceforth the 
wayfarer may go along in peace, without fear of ar- 
rest, on the simple ground that the justice and the 
constable want to divide the fees. 



The automobile has no respect for persons. After 
damaging a number of capitalists and aristocrats, it 
has devoted its attention to the stage, and caught Lil- 
lian Russell and Blanche Bates at one swoop. It is 
hard to say how much is auto and how much press 
agent. 

Thirty thousand school marms at the convention of 
the National Education Association have proved too 
much for dear old Boston. The shocked inhabitants 
of that city should have seen about three hundred of 
them on the way to the Philippines a couple of years 
ago. 



What a glorious American politician King Edward 
would have made. It is really a pity that his glad- 
hand activities should be thrown away on a stolid set 
of islanders. We have known men in Sacramento 
to get rich on half his geniality, and not a quarter 
of his genuine good nature. 



The mutiny on the British ship "Leicester" will 
teach captains that San Francisco hoodlums and Ari- 
zona cowboys do not make good sailors. It was a lit- 
tle unnecessary of these desperadoes, after crippling 
the captain and killing the mate, to cheer for the 
American flag. Such patriots would look better at 
the end of a yard-arm. 

A Turkish cruiser at Cramps has been "christened" 
by an American woman. We wonder how a Moham- 
medan ship with a Christian name will get on. It is 
a question whether its Moslem mess will not be al- 
lowed wine, on the ground that they are in posses- 
sion of the goods of the infidel. Modern trade makes 
old distinctions more than a little ridiculous. 



The widow of a deceased San Francisco Judge re- 
cently pleaded and won her own case in court. The 
Tudge, it is said, complimented her. Long practice 
has evidently initiated her into the mysteries of the 
judicial temperament. If the shade ofher husband 
could revisit us, his opinions on the subject would be 
worth while. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



A HINT TO THE VISITOR. 

The great commercial and money center is also the 
center of individual wealth and individual poverty. 
It is here that extremes meet, but by no means upon 
a common level. It is here that churches and kindred 
christianizing machinery are most numerous, and 
here, too, are found the greatest opposing forces to 
religious thought and moral unfoldment. It is here 
that virtue and vice, nobility and the degradation of 
character are seen in their beauty and in their ugli- 
ness. It is here where true art, true philosophy and 
true ethics are seen in their inspiring splendor, and 
here, too, are seen the hideousness of debauched art, 
degrading philosophy and veneered ethics. Here 
the learned and the ignorant, the cultured and the 
coarse, the polished and the rough, the good and the 
bad, the saint and the sinner, dwell together with el- 
bows touching, yet as far apart in purpose and char- 
acter as heaven is from the under world. But who, 
by merely observing the external, as strangers must, 
can tell which is gold and which is tinsel? 

In all that goes to make up a great commercial 
and money center, San Francisco is the recognized 
head and front in all the Pacific Coast country. 
Necessarily, then, more pitfalls, more alluring in- 
fluences, more fascinating situations of danger, and 
more to appeal to man's lower nature, as well as 
more that is good and wholesome, abound here than 
elsewhere on the Coast. And because San Francisco 
is the recognized center in the Coast country, it is 
but natural that young men and women students of 
art, music, literature and philosophy in the interior, 
should flock here to spend their summer vacation 
to profit by personal contact with our best. It 
affords a rare opportunity to be taught bv those who 
know, but sometimes — all too often indeed — is this 
knowledge bought at a price that bankrupts virtue, 
character and self-respect. 

What the News Letter particularly refers to is the 
dangers that He in the way of these students from 
the interior — dangers that are hidden, in the blinding 
light and seductive music of tinsel's social life. Tt 
is hard for most people and impossible for many to 
see at a glance that tinsel is not gold, and lack of 
keen discrimination, or "I am not afraid" has been 
the rock upon which many a good and noble char- 
acter has been wrecked in San Francisco, while here 
in honest endeavor to ascend higher toward the soul 
of knowledge and wisdom and accomplishment. The 
avenues that would lead these students into the dance 
of character and reputation death are most alluring, 
and "I want to see the sights" waxes the floor of the 
avenues and adds ardor to the voluptuous and sen- 
suality of the music of deaths' dance. That man 
or woman does not live who can enter anv one of 
these gilded or semi-gilded avenues of social life 
and return from thence clean and sweet and peaceful 
of heart and mind. 

But these avenues do not all begin under spectacu- 
lar displays of electric lights over the doors where 
moral death discourses music and serves refresh- 
ments to the tune of clinking wine glasses. Most 
of them have the ; r beginning in true and good social 
life, but onlv the spiders in that life know where they 
start and whence they lead. These spiders are known 
as "fashionable young gentlemen who have the entre 
to our best society." All spiders are not web-makers 
and webs are to catch flies. It is to warn social flies 
to beware of social spiders that the News Letter 
lifts its voice of warning — flies who sing such idiotic 
braggadocio and insane curiosity tunes as "I am not 
afraid" and "I want to see the sights." But most 



of those who enter these gilded avenues are led by 
their native innocence and trustfulness, and, too, they 
are, without knowing it, a shining mark for "fashion- 
able young men of the world who have the entre to 
the best society." 

Now the pith and marrow of all this is that no 
young woman should come to San Francisco or any 
other city to spend her vacation without having a 
determined, critical, Argus-eyed common sense, and 
yet a broad-minded chaperon — one who knows when 
and where to stop, and has the firmness to say "We 
stop right here." This is not in any sense intended as 
a reflection upon the nobility of character of our 
country cousins, nor yet of their self-sufficiency, but, 
it is to warn against influences so cunning and so 
cold and calculating of purpose that occasionally one 
who was born and reared in the city's whirl of social 
life is inveigled into entering these gilded ways to 
the music of death's character and reputation dance. 

QUACKERY EXTRAORDINARY. 

One S. E. Buswell has brought suit for damages 
against the World Drug Company on Market street 
for injuries received by him through noxious drugs 
sold to him by the defendant company. He bought, 
according to his allegations, what this store called 
"Dr. Lamont Hair Tonic and Dandruff Cure." 
Directly he applied the stuff blisters broke out on 
his head and face, and his health suffered. He was 
handed over to the care of a certain Dr. John J. Rich- 
ardson, the consulting physician of the store, who be- 
gan applying internal remedies with such success that 
Buswell, according to his statement, became sali- 
vated and suffered from blood and skin disorders. So 
far as appears, this is an excellent case for dam- 
ages, and it is hoped that the Drug Company will be 
severely mulcted unless they can show any reason to 
the contrary. There is too much of this sort of thing 
and the sooner an example is made the quicker the 
end of the rascality. . I 

A SLUMMING KING. 

King Edward has been doing a little slumming in 
the cities of Ireland. Nor did he do it to the music 
of a brass band or the clanking of the swords of an 
escort, but he just donned the dress of a plain, every- 
day citizen and went about on the "lower levels" of 
society to see for himself what and who constitute 
that factor in the population of his kingdom. He 
went, not out of curiosity, but to acquire such knowl- 
edge as would be useful to him in adopting ways 
and means for the betterment of the conditions of 
existence of his lower level people, and "slumming." 
though it may be called, the purpose was laudable 
and the people he visited may be sure that good to 
them will follow their king's call. 

As Prince of Wales, King Edward did a lot of 
slumming in perhaps all the cities of Europe, and not 
without a very broad and thick streak of curiosity, 
yet who shall say that his slumming then was not 
only educational, but so much so that he was moved 
by the wretchedness and misery he then encountered 
to delve into the very depths of the mode and conduct 
of life of that element in his own domain for that ele- 
ment's best good. A more upright, forceful and pains- 
taking ruler does not grace a throne in all Europe 
than King Edward of Great Britain, and what is 
more, in the family of crowned heads he has demon- 
strated by kingly acts and suggestions that he is the 
ablest statesman and most conservative ruler of them 
all. 

So, when some of our preachers of righteousness 



August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



condemn King Edward for "slumming," they must 
have in mind the Parkhursts of the American pulpit, 
who have in their day done an immense amount of 
slumming. And not only so, but it must have been 
done out of pure curiosity, since they had no power 
or influence to change the conditions they found, 
while England's King has both, and seemingly a 
very decided inclination and purpose to profit by what 
he saw in a most substantial way for the uplifting of 
the moral tone and the social betterment of those 
fields of degradation. Let his critics in our goody- 
goody circles of spectacular but sham piety hold their 
peace. They talk too much and too loud with nasal 
mouths. Let them go to. 

IS THIS GRAFT? 
■ What is the Promotion Committee doing with the 
large sums of money placed in its hands? There is 
no question that the committee has been liberally 
supported, for its purpose appeals naturally to all 
who have business or professional interests in the 
northern part of the State. Regular monthly con- 
tributions are paid into its exchequer, and the press 
has been most liberal with special articles writ- 
ten and printed supporting the work of the com- 
mittee. Now, the contributors have no means 
of knowing how these funds are expended. The offi- 
cers of the committee have everything in their own 
hands. This does not imply that the committee is 
not doing its duty, but merely that we have no means 
of knowing that it is doing it. At intervals we are 
informed that so many thousand letters of inquiry 
have been received, and so many thousand answered ; 
that so many pamphlets or pieces of descriptive mat- 
ter have been distributed through the mails, and other 
evidences of activity of that sort displayed. But we 
are not told whence the descriptive matter is ob- 
tained, nor how much money this expenditure of en- 
ergy actually involves. The press has not been back- 
ward in the past in support of the Promotion Com- 
mittee, neither will it in the future, but assurances 
must be given that the Committee is really doing 
its work, and not playing fast and loose with the 
money which has been subscribed. 

For these reasons, therefore, and in the interest 
of the State, we call upon the Promotion Committee 
to come out into the open and show how its funds 
are being used. The salaries of its officers and the 
modes of expenditure, as far as is consistent with the 
work of the committee, should be made public, and 
if there is any hesitation in regard to these mat- 
ters it is feared that a wicked and censorious world 
will put the worst possible construction on mat- 
ters. 



Stoo.ooo in excess of the original estimate. One 
would begin to think that some one in the Board was 
1 specailly interested in the improvement of this 
particular knob of land. The majority of taxpayers 
would favor Supervisor Wilson's amendment, which 
was so promptly snuffed out the other day, to cut 
■ lit all these ornamental features and confine the ex- 
penditures to a new hospital, new schools, and a new 
sewer system. The wiseacres interjected for the 
nonce as interpreters of the necessities of the hour, 
are now on record with an allotment of only $1,621,- 
000 for the repairs and improvement of streets, which 
are in an absolutely disgraceful condition, while the 
parks are allowed $2,325,000. There is a common- 
sense showing for you, which will not likely mitigate 
the result at the coming election, when citizens stamp 
their seal of approval or disapproval upon the wisdom 
of placing millions in the control of men of such men- 
tal calibre. No one, however, could afford very well 
to argue that they are not possessed of esthetic tastes 
if their views upon practical business are open to 
discussion. 



OUR ESTHETIC SUPERVISORS. 

In September meetings will be held to vote upon 
the purchase of the Geary street road by the city, 
and the bond election which will authorize the twelve 
pending public improvements suggested some weeks 
past when the estimate was published. At that time 
the News Letter took the Board of Supervisors to 
task for their lack of fitness for demonstrating the 
value of public utilities in a manner which would win 
the confidence of electors and get their votes in favor 
of the proposition, judging from the adoption of a 
resolution to spend some $490,000 for the improve- 
ment of Telegraph Hill and only allotting $500,000 
for a new City and County Hospital. Since then the 
members have taken the hint, and appropriated 
$1,000,000 for the hospital, but at the same time run- 
ning up the fund for Telegraph Hill park nearly 



WHY THIS HESITATION? 

Herman Eppinger, another of the notorious firm of 
Eppinger & Co., whose recent failure outranks, in 
point of vicious rascality any affair of the kind ever 
yet reported in the commercial world, has been held 
to account by the Grand Jury, which has indicted 
him for obtaining money under false pretenses. This 
makes two out of the precious triumvirate corraled, 
with every possibility that a few more of the combina- 
tion will be called upon to face a legal investigation 
in courts. More light continues to be thrown upon 
the rascally methods of business carried on by this 
firm, under the eyes of their fellow members of the 
Merchants' Exchange, which still maintains them as 
associates notwithstanding exposures which make the 
outside world gape with amazement, and wonder how 
such things can be, and whether dummy scales arid 
false balances, devised for the robbery of the farming 
classes, are more common in this city than is gener- 
ally supposed. What can have engendered the pre- 
vailing sympathy among a certain class of grain deal- 
ers for these men caught in their villainy? Is there 
anything to be feared as a result of doing their duty 
as honest men and clearing the rogues off the floor, 
or is it a case of the fellow feeling which makes one 
wondrous kind. In most failures of this sort, and 
under circumstances not half so scandalous, the prin- 
cipals make every effort to escape from the scrutiny 
of the people among whom they have passed as 
honest. But not so with the Eppingers — they remain 
to brazen out their shame, safe in the belief, possiblv, 
which seems pretty near correct, that they, with all 
their rascality staring the public in the face, are just 
as much entitled to hold their heads up and frequent 
the halls of commerce as the men who tolerate a con- 
dition of affairs which reflects sadly upon their sense 
of what is right and wrong from a moral standpoint. 



Three young boys of Vermont, having read of col- 
lege hazings, tried the game on a nine-year-old com- 
panion and roasted him to death. Who can henceforth 
deny the benefit which our universities bestow on the 
community. 



There are to be more Scheel concerts in San Fran- 
cisco. We hail them with delight, not only because 
of the music, but remembering the glorious rows 
which accompanied the last Scheel season. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



THAT FOLSOM OUTBREAK. 

No matter if all the escaped prisoners are killed 
or captured, the disgrace of the Folsom penitentiary 
delivery remains upon the whole State. But such a 
culmination of the iniquity, and robbing and plunder- 
ing that has been permitted in that and other State 
institutions was the legitimate outcome. Recent in- 
vestigations proved beyond the shadow of a doubt 
that its management had been dishonest and rotten 
for a long time, and where such a code of official duty 
is maintained, one should not be surprised at any 
happenings. 

l J erhaps Warden Wilkinson may be able to show 
clean hands as to his responsibility for the wnolesale 
outbreak and escape of more than a dozen convicts, 
but at this moment there appears not the shadovv of 
an excuse for him. The fact that convicts could 
assemble in sufficiently large groups to discuss plans 
and ways to successlully take possession of the 
prison's armory, and not only arm themselves, but 
make prisoners of several officials, including the War- 
den himself, and carry them off, is sufficient evidence 
that the responsible head of the institution was either 
grossly incompetent or criminally negligent. But in 
either event, it is clear that the Warden is a con- 
spicuous misfit in the position he holds, and that in 
spite of the coat of whitewash the Legislature gave 
him a few months ago, black spots of gross and reck- 
less and indifferent management have and do now ap- 
pear everywhere in his official conduct. 

It is folly, it is idiotic to say that the happening 
could not have been prevented. Certainly it 
could not have been prevented under the go-as-you- 
please system of management and discipline, but the 
law does not provide for such a system, nor does the 
law contemplate the entrusting of such responsibili- 
ties into the hands of officials who are so indifferent 
to the public good as to make such a disgraceful 
spectacle possible. Nearly all convicts are daring 
men and always quick to take even desperate chances 
to gain their freedom. All this the officials of the 
penitentiary knew perfectly well ; hence the wonder 
that convicts were permitted to trample all rules of 
discipline and obedient conduct under their feet and 
meet in convention to decide upon ways and means 
to overthrow the institution itself. 

An investigation will follow as a matter of course, 
but the humiliation and indignation of the public is 
too keenly felt to warrant even an attempt at hunting 
for excuses. The force of officials was ample to en- 
force discipline, and had they been performing their 
sworn duty, such an outbreak would have been ut- 
terly impossible ; therefore the only reasonable con- 
clusion is that willful, gross and criminal negligence 
of duty prevailed throughout the institution, or else 
more incompetent and reckless management could 
not have been obtained. This is too black a stain 
upon the administration of Governor Pardee for him 
to entertain for a moment any sort of a proposition 
that contemplates the concealment of the facts. The 
Governor is the man to make the first move, and 
any tardiness on his part will show that politics 
dominate law and order with the official head of 
the commonwealth. 



Oakland furnishes unending funds of amusement. 
This week a man was sentenced to thirty days for 
stealing chickens from his mother's yard. The 
Roman parent saw him go without a quiver, and the 
chickens, which figured as Exhibit A, cackled noisy 
approval. 



STRANGE RAILROAD ENTERPRISE. 

There are no less than four railroads in the United 
States which expend a portion of their energies and 
a considerable amount of money in publishing maga- 
zines. These magazines are given to the public as 
literary matter, and are suggestive of the ordinary 
monthlies in the form of production and the illus- 
trations and contents. But they are in reality pro- 
duced to serve advertising purposes, and the literary 
matter is merely incidental, in fact, the losses on 
these magazines, which are very considerable, are 
charged to the advertising account on the books 
of the companies. They are published at a loss, and 
they go into competition with other regular literary 
publications for advertising, which as a rule they 
procure at almost any rates the advertiser may see 
fit to offer. Where they get any large amount of 
advertising, it is usually by offering to the advertiser 
liberal railroad concessions on his general business, 
but it must be said that when a bargain has been 
made with this understanding the advertiser has to 
pay extraordinarily large amounts for his advertising 
in the railroad magazine. 

There is still another side of the question. These 
so-called magazines are admitted to second-class 
matter rates on account of the literary matter con- 
tained in them, which is supposed to entitle them to 
the consideration of the postal authorities in this 
regard. But if this literary matter be subtracted, 
the remainder constitutes simply an advertisement, 
and as such is by no means entitled to second-class 
rates. When it is remembered that the deficit in 
the postal department arising from the loss on sec- 
ond-class matter affects the rates on ordinary postage 
adversely, it will be seen that this is a matter of 
public interest. 

FAITH AND STUPIDITY. 

Our great and good Secretary of State, and presum- 
ably the President himself, continue to cherish the 
fond hope that Russia will relent after a little while 
of bluster and abandon Manchuria, or at least open 
all the doors of that rich country to the commerce 
of the United States. The faith the Washington 
Government has in Russian pledges is amazing, but 
as a matter of fact the Bear has never yet given a 
stringless pledge that he would give this or any other 
country a fair commercial standing in his recently 
stolen possessions in Asia, but somehow our rulers 
fail to see how their requests could be disregarded by 
"our natural ally." It is passing strange how fond 
our State Department is of royalty-made taffy, all 
the more so because we have to pay for the molasses 
and pull it into eatable consistency. 

And meanwhile our wise ones seem to fail to see 
that Great Britain and France are slowly but surely 
coming together on a diplomatic and shot and shell 
basis that means England and France, with possibly 
Japan, to pull certain chestnuts out of the fire, as one 
nation against all comers. Only a few weeks ago 
France began to turn its back upon Russia and face 
England, and now it is a cordial hand-shake and 
secret conventions with an air of satisfaction on 
both sides that seems to mean a combination for 
conquering in any and all fields of trade, traffic, land- 
grabbing, and whatever else that comes handy and 
is worth the effort. But of course we have our Philip- 
pines to fall back upon for consolation, and there 
is a whole lot of that article in our possession if we 
can forget the cost and maintenance of the experi- 
ment. 



August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A HINDU DOCTOR ON THE PLAGUE. 



By Juim Pum 



The tables are being turned on us at last, and very 
justly so. From India, the ancient, has come a mis- 
sionary, one who should do us no end of good. This 
gentleman from India is Doctor S. B. Mayak, a noted 
physician of Bombay. He did not come exactly to 
save our souls; he is really too wise, too modern and 
too learned for that. No, that is not what Doctor 
Mayak came to teach us; but after being earnestly 
requested to do so he pointed out to us a good way 
to save our bodies, and that by the methods of sani- 
tation, and he says in the simplest, most unaffected 
language that if we do not pay heed before it is too 
late the price we will pay for our neglect will be a 
fearful one. 

When Doctor Mayak arrived from India he was in- 
vited by many physicians to make an examination of 
the plague bacillus, as they infested the few Chinese 
who died here of the supposed plague. He accepted 
the invitation, and Doctor Blue of the Health Depart- 
ment of the U. S. Navy, and his assistants, gave him 
every opportunity and a full history of the disease 
as it existed here. He insisted that there has not been 
so far any case of plague in Chinatown. The bacilli 
were of many and fatal disease, but not of plague 
such as it exists in India or any other country, and 
he gives reasons that even a layman can understand. 
He says it is impossible for a Chinaman to carry the 
disease in his person on the long voyage from China 
without its manifesting itself on the way, as the incu- 
bation period (the period in which the disease is 
more or less latent in the body) never exceeds ten 
days. But it could be brought in merchandise, as 
it probably was brought to India. In that case it 
would develop in many localities, and would have 
become epidemic. Instead it was sporadic, and those 
who congratulated themselves on having wiped it 
out by means of disinfectants do not fully compre- 
hend the deadly nature of the plague once it gets a 
lodging place. Nothing short of actual destruction 
by fire of the infested localities ever succeeded in re- 
moving the disease permanently. 

Cases occur year after year in the same locality 
in Bombay where it was once severe, and in the same 
houses, in spite of all disinfectants. The rainy season 
does not have any influence on the plague, as virulent 
epidemics have swept certain districts of India dur- 
ing the seasons when they had two hundred inches 
of rain. 

The form of plague, such as was claimed existed 
in San Francisco, is highly infectious, and makes its 
appearance year after year, one month earlier each 
year. 

"No," said Doctor Mayak, "you've not had the 
plague, but it's marvelous if you do not have it. When 
you do, there will be no controversy. You'll all know 
it, for if it does come in the present unsanitary 
condition of Chinatown, before you can stop it, half 
of your beautiful, healthy city will be wiped out. By 
care, with regard to merchandise and immigrants' 
clothing you can prevent it, but once here, your doc- 
tors will change their minds about what the plague 
really is. Nothing that the best medical skill known 
to foreign or native physicians has been left undone 
in Bombay and all large cities of India ; yet the mor- 
tality reached from four to five hundred a day, and we 
have no such filth as you have in Chinatown. The 
law would not permit it. The law would step in and 



regulate the landlords who own Chinatown before it 
is too late. 

"But," concluded the doctor, "nature will send you 
a warning a week or SO ahead ; the rnts will die by the 
hundred; then look out, and get out, for it's about 
your only chance.'' 



' 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 

Mavis Consolidated Gold 
and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000. 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of Cali- 
fornia. 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 
No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share 
for development purposes. The ore in sight is practi- 
cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock is 
enhausted, the price will be raised to 60 cents a 
share. 
? Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 
V Market street, for prospectus which gives full infor- 
? mation. 
Q VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. 



CALIFORNIA LlfllTED 



TO CHICAGO BY WAY 
OF THE GRAND CANYON 
OF flRIZONIA : : 



Santa Fe 



C. H. *Rehn*r1rom 

FOBUKBLT BANDHRB & JOHNSON 

Tailor. 

PHELAN BUILDING ROOMS 1, 2, 3. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6S87, SAN FRANCISCO 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OT ABIBDIIK, 



ScotchJJVhisky 

importers • MACONDRAY & ca 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 




'Pleasure's 
Wand 



GJkobey 



y nowand 6ut?/easun's . 

— Tern Jioort. 




By Baeton PlTTMAN 

White Whittlesey at the Alcazar is at his best as 
Peter Quilliam in "The Manxman," and an enthusias- 
tic audience has greeted the piece at every perform- 
ance this week. The play itself is not as stirring as 
"The Christian," Hall Caine's first great dramatic 
success, but it is a moral lesson as powerful as llaw*- 
thorne's "Scarlet Letter." The scenes are on the lit- 
tle Isle of Man, and the characters are Peter Quilliam, 
an illiterate member of nature's nobility; Philip 
Christian, his cousin, and afterwards Deemster ef the 
island, and Kate, the girl whom both men love. Peter 
goes away to Africa, and returns after making his 
fortune. In the meantime Philip has promised to act 
as Kate's protector. He learns to love her, and his 
devotion culminates unhappily for all when Pete 
returns and claims his promised bride. She would 
have married Philip even then, save that ambition 
prevents his asking her. The child is born, and Peter 
is radiant, until his wife leaves him, and after a few 
weeks returns to get the child and tell him that it 
is not his. He does not understand that she has gone 
to Philip, and even writes letters to himself with her 
name signed, thinking that his showing them will 
stop the gossip. In the last act Philip confesses, and 
although Pete's first impulse is to kill his betrayer, 
he finally sees himself as the real interloper, and with 
a supreme renunciation, leaves the country, leaving 
Kate and the baby to Philip. Pete is almost super- 
human, but Whittlesey makes it convincing. Bertha 
Creighton portrays the sufferings of Kate most real- 
istically, and Philip is well taken by Charles Wyn- 
gate. Oza Waldrop and the other members of the 
cast do clever work. No one should miss this play, 
but the injunction scarcely seems necessary, as no 
one is missing it. 

* * * 

The Neill-Morosco Company has been drawing 
good houses in "Hearts Aflame" at the California. The 
piece is not great, but it is interesting, and it caught 
the popular fancy in New York at the time the Fitch 
star was in the ascendency, because doubtless it 
also aspires to be the epigramatic and up-to-date 
sort. The only relevance that the title seems to have 
is shown when the heroine, who is deserted by her 
worthless husband, and has learned to love another, 
says something about hearts aflame with love. Paul 
Charteris, the leading part, is well played by George 
Spencer, and Lillian Kemble is the injured wife, Mrs. 
Harmony. She is so pretty and so clever that she de- 
serves always to play better parts than this. The 
real hit of the play is Elsie Esmond as Alison Deyo. 
This is the part that Bijou Fernandez created and 
made famous in New York, and Miss Esmond shows 
remarkable versatility in making so much of it. A.iora 
Andrews, as the music hall girl, has only a bit which 
she does nicely. The piece is well staged and seems 
to have pleased. 

"Janice Meredith" is next week's offering at the 
California, beginning on Sunday evening. It is .<aid 
to be an excellent dramatization of Ford's novel, 
which bears the same name. It is a story of the 
American Revolution, a stirring and patriotic tale 



which will furnish parts in which all of the luminaries 
of the Neill-Morosco company may shine. Lillian 
Kemble in the title role will be delightful if colonial 
dress becomes her as well as 15th century Spanish, 
and George Spencer will doubtless be up to expecta- 
tions as the hero. The week following "A Royal 
Family" will be given. 

* * * 

"A Lion's Heart" at the Central, a melodrama of 
an intense and quite original sort, has proven a strong 
drawing card all week. It is the romance of a lion- 
tamer, a part in which Herschel Mayall wins great fa- 
vor. The prologue shows behind the scenes at a cir- 
cus, and the four acts of the play give opportunity 
for some excellent staging of which full advantage 
is taken. The story is one of love and revenge, just 
the kind the Central clientele relishes. Eugenie Law- 
ton, Myrtle Vane and the other members of the excel- 
lent Central stock company contribute largely to the 
success of the piece. 

"Zorah" is to be next week's offering at the Central. 
It is a melodrama written by the talented Edwin Ar- 
den, a story of Russian persecution of the Jews. 
In view of the recent Kischinef massacres, this piece 
seems most timely, and the indications are that it 
will have an enormous success. Herschel Mayall's 
part is that of a Jewish Rabbi. Excellent special scen- 
ery has been prepared. 

* * * 

The Orpheum presented a thoroughly attractive 
bill this week, and as usual, the performances were 
given to packed houses. Mme. Konorah, the light- 
ning calculator, is a marvel. James J. Morton, the 
monologist, also proved delightful, but the dogs and 
monkeys have made such a sensation that they will 
not be soon forgotten. Claude Gillingwater's sketch, 
"The Wrong Man," was also most amusing. Ethel 
Levy, the Orpheus Comedy Four, and several other 
clever specialties, contributed to the excellence of 
the programme. Next week's bill, beginning on Sun- 
day afternoon, promises to prove most interesting. 
Mascart's dogs and monkeys remain, also Claudius 
and Corbin, the banjoists ; James J. Morton, the 
amusing monologist, and Mme. Konorah. These are 
already established favorites. The Kaufman troupe 
of bicyclists, who have toured the world since their 
original success here ; the comedians Larry Dooley 
and James Tenbrooke, and Roberts, Hayes and Rob- 
erts, singers and dancers, are the new features of 
the excellent programme offered. 

* * * 

There is but two weeks more of the present bill at 
Fischer's, and then follows, beginning August 10th, 
"Quo Vass Iss" and "The Big Little Princess," an- 
other double travesty. The continued success of the 
Fischer burlesques is ample proof that there are many 
persons whose sole ambition in the amusement line 
is to laugh, view pretty women and enjoy music. The 
Weber & Field's burlesques seem all to be received 

with equal favor here. 

* * * 

The Amelia Bingham season at the Columbia ter- 
minates to-morrow evening, giving place to the 
world-famed wit and droll monologist, Ezra Kendall, 
in a rural comedy, "The Vinegar Buyer." The char- 
acter which Mr. Kendall portrays in this is something 
similar to the types endeared to us by the pen of 
James Whitcomb Riley. Herbert Hall Winslow aptly 
describes the piece as "a license for laughter in three 
acts." Kendall has a host of friends in this city, and 
the advance demand for seats indicates a successful 
engagement. The piece is a new one, but if half the 






August i, 1903. 



good things said about it elsewhere be true, Columbia 
patrons may anticipate one of the most delightful 
offerings of the season. Kendall brings a well chosen 
and adequate supporting company, the tour being un- 
der the management of Leibler & Co., who, in lan- 
guage more expressive than elegant, invariably "de- 
liver the goods." 

• « • 

The great success of Camille d'Arville in "The 
Highwayman," at the Tivoli has, as might have been 
expected, caused the management to continue the 
piece. The tuneful Smith and DeKoven opera has 
proven a triumph not only for Miss d'Arville, but Ar- 
thur Cunningham, Edwin Stevens, Annie Meyers, 
Bertha Davis, Edward Webb and others in the excel- 
lent cast have added to their popularity. 

• * * 

The popularity of the Rogers' Brothers' series of 
plays at the Grand continue unabated. "In Wall 
Street" enters on the third and last week of its run 
to-morrow night, and on August 9th will be followed 

by "In Harvard." 

• * * 

White Whittlesey has but a fortnight more at the 
Alcazar, and next week, by way of contrast to recent 
serious work, will be devoted to one of the merriest 
and most sparkling comedies of modern life, "The 
Butterflies," by Henry Guy Carleton, a play of social 
life, with its contrasting scenes laid in San Augus- 
tine, Florida, and Lennox, Mass. Mr. Whittlesey's 
engagement has proved a triumph throughout, and 
the varied roles in which he has appeared leaves no 
question as to his versatility. For his farewell week, 
August 10th, there will be a big revival of "The Three 
Musketeers," after which the much-discussed rural 
play, "The Dairy Farm," will be given with the same 
cast that is'to be sent on tour. Then begins the an- 
nual engagement of the favorite actress, Miss Flor- 
ence Roberts. 

• * * 

The open-air performance of "As You Like It," 
tendered as a testimonial to Nance O'Neil, promises 
to be a gala occasion. Miss O'Neil will be Rosalind 
for the first time, and James J. Corbett will play 
Charles the Wrestler. Three performances will 
be given at Sutro Heights this afternoon, to-morrow 
afternoon and to-morrow night. Seats are now on 
sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s. 

(Continued to page 15.) 

SteinWay Hall 223 Sutter Street 

Popular Sunday Night, Psychological Lectures. 

SUNDAY ADSUST 2nd-8:S0 P. M. 

DR. ALEX. J. McIVOB 

TYN DA L L 

-will talk on 

"TELEPATHY— la It a Lost Faculty, or a Development 

Followed by demonstrations of the power of the bud 
conscious mind Tickets 25, 50 and 75 cents Box office 
orjen 10 to 4 Saturday. Sunday eve. August 9th, "The 
Power of Persuasion " 



&AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Graod Opera House 




Sutro Heights 



Satnrdayand Sunday afternoons and evenings, August 1 and 2. 1903. 
Sopra "air performances. Monster testimonial to NANCE ONEIL who 
will make her first appearance as Rosalind In a magnificent production of 

shakewMre80 ° med AS YOU LIKE IT 



epandld cast. Including JAMES J. CORBETT as Charles the Wrestler 
iserved seats »1 and $1.60, Box seats »2. General admission 50c. 



A 
Reserved 



flfter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and anjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand 1» society's gathering; pliot after 
the theatre la oyer. 



Only VUtlnce Saturday. UpRlnntng tomorrow Sonday oltht lot week. 
Of thedrllghtfu) mu.lc.l rtc -nlrlclty 

IN WALL STREET 

Sunday n'gbt, August 'Jtli, first prodacitnn of the Rogers Hrolhcr's suc- 
cessor last season 

IIS HARVARD 

Gorgeous scenery and custumes. Augmrnied cs«. 
Prices: 25c. 50c. 75 CIS. 



California Theatre. 

Tomorrow night Sunday, August 2nd. The Incomparable 

NEILL-MOROSGO COMPANY 

Presenting Paul Leicester Ford b matchless romance of the American 
Revolution 

cJANIGE MEREDITH 

A. deilghtfa! and stirring Btory of the days when Washington croised the 
Delaware. FIrBt time ticre at popular prices Next— Robert Marshall's 
comedy romance. "A Royal Family." 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mrs. Ernestine Keeling, 

Proprietor and Manager 

Tonight, Sunday night, and all next week. Third week of the special 
engagementof r 

GAMILLE D'ARVILLE 

In DeKoven's comic opera 

THE HIGHWAYMAN 

EDWIN STEVENS aB Foiy Qulller and special cast throughout a great 
performance. 

Popular prlceB-25c, 50c, 75c. Telephone Bush 9. 



and Powell streets. 



OrnblPl lrTi San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall 
vi (-'iit.wilj. o'Farrell St.. between Stockton ai 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, August 2. 

VIGOROUS VAUDEVILLE 

The Kaufmann Troupe; Dooley and Tenbrooke; Roberts, Hayes and 
Roberts; George Austin; James J. Morton; M»ecarts Dogs and Monkeys; 
Claudius and Corbln; The Blograph and last week of 



MME. 

Usual matinee and prices. 



KONORAH 



Columbia Thpnlrp somos, ham « oo, 

>~>^i Ul liuia 1 AjlcSU LI C. Lessees and Managers. 

The comedy event of the year. Beginning Monday Angnst 8. 
Matinee Saturday only. The comedian you all know 

EZRA KENDALL 

as Joe Miller In Herbert Hall Wlnslow's funny three act play. 

THE VINEGAR BUYER 

Management Llebler & Co. 

Alr?,7?ir Thianhm Bblasoo & Maybe, Proprietors. 

/ni«^cXZ.CLI llltSULrtJ K . D. Pbice, Gen Manager. Phone Alcazar 

Regular matinee Thursday and Saturday. One week commencing Monday 

evening next Aug S, 

Positively last but one of 

WHITE WHITTLESEY 

The delightful modern comedy. 

THE BUTTERFLIES 

First time at popular prices. Evening— 25c to 750. Matinees Thursday 
and Saturday 13c to Stic Aug. 10. The Three Musketeers. Aug. 17. 
Special production of The Dairy Farm. Aug. 31, Miss Florence Roberts. 

r^nhml' Tr-ianTm Belasco A Mayer, Props. Market Street. 
OttfajLlUl lliyULit,. opp. City Hall. Phone South 588. 

Week starting Monday, Aug 3rd, 1903. Matinees Saturday and Sunday 
Edwin Arden's powerful Ruaplan drama 

Z O R A H 

With 

MR. HERSGHEL MAYALL 

and the superb Central Stock Company. 
Monday August 10— MAN'S ENEMY. 
Prices: EvenlngB 10c to 50a. Matinees, 10o. 15o, 25o. 



Fischer's Theatre 



There's a jolly good time, wltb applause long and bard, 
O'er our "All Star" etiat's work — Kolb & Dill & Bernard, 
There's a rattling good song by Maude Amber and Blake, 
Hermeen also appears and wltb Whelan take the cake. 
Lest week of the great combination bill 

UNDER THE RED GLOBE 

WITH 

THE THREE MUSKEETERS 

And the same popular prices. Look out for tbe next production. 

Will prove another sensation. 

Reserved Seats Night prices 25-SO-750. Sat. A Sun. Matinees 

.ttf-SOc. Children at Matinees 10-250. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 




i 

■ 



own %~rier 



'Hear the Cncrl'.tfhat the devil art <hou 7 
"One that will play the devil , j/r, tvilhyou ' 




Thirteen little jail birds 

Flitted from the jail; 
Fourteen hundred deputies 

Gunning them like quail. 

Flitting through the timber, 
Scooting through the brush, 

Where the twigs are plenty, 
Where the leaves are lush. 

He who shoots a jail bird, 

Bringing home the same, 
Will declare the jail bird is 

A lively breed of game. 

Cardinal Oreglia has a relative who is chef in a 
San Francisco hotel. With all due reverence to 
the Church of Rome, I do not believe that the Car- 
dinal is dishonored by his relationship to the kitchen. 
"It is only three generations from shirt sleeve to 
shirt sleeve," says an American philosopher, and it 
would seem that the rule holds good in Europe as 
well as in America. There are plenty of noblemen 
driving cabs and waiting on table in this free land 
of ours, and so long as they resist the temptation of 
becoming walking delegates I shall bare my head 
to their industry. It is the imitation baron with 
the imitation greenback that jars me in my bump of 
reverence. 

I am told that Harry Hewlett of Stockton is more 
gifted with ardor than with diplomacy. His manner 
of wooing is leonine but not gentlemanly. He wished 
to impress his languish merit upon a lady of his ac- 
quaintance, who was living in a flat opposite him on 
O'Farrell street, so he broke into her house in the 
dead of night and persuaded her to call on him. To 
make his persuasion more forcible, he seized her by 
the hair and dragged her over the cobbles. The nice 
young girl was clad in a kimono at the time. Perhaps 
that's the way they make love in Stockton, but San 
Francisco is a jay town. Harry ought to be locked 
up and fed something soothing. 

Well, an average of one murder a month in San 
Francisco for the past year — pretty good, isn't it? I 
once hinted as to the direst cause for San Francisco's 
huge percentage of criminality. Let me repeat it 
now. Low license in saloons. Our license is the lowr 
est of any city of its size in the country. As a con- 
sequence our per cent of immoral saloons and bad 
whiskey is the largest. High license pays for a large 
and expensive police force, and grubs up the poverty- 
stricken dives which breed criminals and vice. AY ill 
Father Caraher put this in his holv pipe and smoke 
it? 

Judge Beatty, shake! You are not only an eminent 
jurist, but a fearless gentleman. You have gotten 
commonsense out of the tangle of law and have de- 
cided that a labor union as a body cannot destroy any 
more property or cause any more public calamity 
than another kind of mob. Such a temperate decision 
is wholesome in a day when the rioter crows 
apoplectic in the cause of incendiarism and riot, and 
Hearst defends negro burning in the hope of politi- 
cal appointment. 



Of course I take the statement of T. J. Newman, 
keeper of a sailors' crimping boarding house, for what 
they are worth. Newman, being in court with a 
charge against him, declared that Mr. Bennett, Brit- 
ish Consul to this port, had offered him (Bennett) 
the privilege of consular protection at a rate of $5 a 
head for every sailor shipped out of his joint. I believe 
Mr. Bennet, and, personally, I am sure that he has 
too much sense, as well as too much honor, to make 
any such silly proposition. Besides he has denied it. 
I also know the kind of men who keep crimping 
boarding houses. 

Hooray for annexation, civilization, forgery and 
kindred crimes. Hawaii has become annexed, Hawaii 
has become civilized and Hawaii is turning out coffee- 
colored absconders as good as any. Solomon Meheule, 
a full-blood Kanaka, an official in the House of Rep- 
resentatives at Honolulu, is charged with burning up 
the papers which show the expenditures of certain 
politicians during the last term. Good! No white 
man could have done better. Next we know the Ha- 
waiians will have Newport, race-suicide and a post- 
office scandal. 

It is said that two business men, W. I. Sedgley and 
R. B. Mott, are accused of stealing: the town of Inter- 
national, and warrants are out for their arrest. I 
don't believe in this business of stealing towns, 
matches, souvenir spoons and other small articles. 
There are several hamlets lying loose about this State 
tiny enough to be slipped into one's pockets and no 
questions asked, but iust the same I think they ought 
to be protected. Mott and Sedgley ought to be 
searched, and if the town is discovered on their per- 
sons they should be given six weeks for petty larceny. 

A Pasadena woman who had been dumb for years 
fell down stairs last week and suddenly recovered 
her powers of speech. I suppose her husband ought 
to be congratulated, but it all depends on the ladv. 
Tf her natural gifts of oratorv and invective were like 
unto those of some women I wot of, I'm certain that 
it would have been just as well had she been a little 
more careful about slipping. In fact there are some 
ladies of my acquaintance who might fall upstairs 
and lose their voices and the neighborhood be satis- 
fied with laying the accident to profit and loss. 

It's a great thing, isn't it, brother laborers, to see 
a son of the soil get his work-worn hands on a little 
nublic money. Benefactor Casey of the Board of 
Works is a wholesome example. He may serve but 
one term, but he hopes to get rich during that period, 
if machinery and grab politics can do him any good. 
Father Yorke, show us something besides rascals 
and boodlers at the head of union affairs, and you will 
make us believe that unionism 1 , as it is conducted, is 
anything else than an affront to decency. 

California has been disgraced. Ed. Fidler, a gen- 
tleman who beat his wife, was gotten after by a mob 
last week. Neither the fact that he beat his wife or 
that he was gotten after by a mob was disgraceful, 
but that the mob failed to Ivnch him is a shame to 
the sportsmanship in our State. We Californians 
can't even hang a poor, cringing wife-beater. We 
should import a few niggers and encourage an im- 
portant industry. 

Some Merced children have been accused of train 
wrecking. There is some talk of sending the brats 
to the reform school. Save yourself the trouble, gen- 
tlemen — these children are already past the reform 
school stage. In crime, as in art, genius needs no edu- 
cation. 



August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Gowns and Things 

By La i>y 

This week has seen any number of out-of-townites 

in the city doing the rag-tag and bob-end of their 
summer shopping. This is the season of their discon- 
tent, for wardrobes planned for the whole summer 
are beginning to fray at the edges, and a new outlay 
of ribbons and fol-de-rols is necessary. The rag-fair, 
as the cynic would call it, formally opens at Del 
Monte with the carnival of sports in August, so 
clothes must be ready to put their best ruffle forward 
then. This mid-season shopping has called out the 
swagger street gowns in force. They are street 
gowns planned for just such occasions as this, and are 
almost all made in stunning coat effects, so that my 
lady may leave her summer home or hotel in a cool 
shirtwaist and don the jacket when she gets to town. 
I saw Mrs. Chansler the other morning; she looked 
even more stunning than when as Hattie Kimball 
she set the pace for the Oakland fashionables. She 
had on a blue gown with a long bloused coat belted 
in at the waist. The material showed a little fleck 
of white that looked as though she had been caught 
in a light snow-storm. The ornaments on the coat 
were buttons, but such buttons as a mermaid would 
shed her scales for. They were made of the most 
exquisite shell, shading from green into warm ivory, 
and dangling from this shell were other tiny shells, 
each one as exquisite in coloring. These buttons are 
large as a dollar, but they must cost a good many 
dollars for they are genuine novelties, quite the most 
exclusive thing in buttons I have seen. 

Mrs. Chansler has one of the black crepe de chine 
gowns without which no woman's wardrobe is com- 
plete these days. Nothing is more serviceable than 
a crepe gown of this sort. It is just the proper thing 
for a hotel dinner gown. It can be tucked into a 
suit-case when one comes up to town on a little jaunt, 
and there's never a crease to betray that it has been 
folded up. I counted five of them- in the Grill last 
week, and it was pretty much of a toss-up which was 
most lorgnetted. But my particular fancy strayed to- 
ward the black crepe worn by Mrs. Chansler and a 
black mousseline that Mrs. A. B. Butler had on. The 
black mousseline was a pattern gown, and the em- 
broidery which stood out in dainty relief on the soft 
black background was the finest sort of handwork. 
Mrs. Butler was out shopping the next morning in 
a brown veiling gown trimmed in brown lace that 
attracted a great many admiring glances, though I 
could not waste the oh my's ! on it that the black 
gown had brought forth. 

For some time I've had a feeling in my bones, par- 
ticularly in the crazy-bone, that sleeves were going 
to pack their fullness and move up from the elbow. 
And the other day I saw Gertrude Campbell in a 
gown that fulfilled my clairvoyant "hunch." Gertrude 
always patronizes the swellest modistes, so the inno- 
vation in her sleeves must be taken as authentic proof 
that the dressmakers are going to try to again in- 
troduce sleeves that bulge at the shoulder. The fash- 
ion arbiters know that they can only ring on these 
changes to slow music. If they try an innovation 
too suddenly on the fair sex they balk and refuse to 
accept it. The designers are too clever to attempt 
such a thing now — they accustom the ladies to a thing 
by gradual and subtle stages. Just watch them out 
of the tail of your eye and see how cleverly they 
manipulate until we take to sleeves full at the shoul- 
der as naturally as we do now to those that puff at 
the elbow or hang in a shower of ruffling. Heaven 



forbid that the monstrous things of seasons agone 
should come in again to offend sane taste. Nothing 
could be prettier or more graceful than the pr. 
sleeve arrangement, and we ought to cling to them 
desperately. Miss Campbell's gown, which made me 
trim my sails to this subject was of course the merest 
foreshadowing of big sleeves at the shoulder, but it 
was a shadow that casts coming events before. The 
gown \v;is made in jacket effect, and was of very strik- 
ing material — a green plaid trimmed with the black 
and white salvage edge of the goods. 

Tahoe has something new under its sun in the way 
of a pongee gown which Miss Lena Blanding is wear- 
ing. If you have any admiration left for pongees 
prepare to shed it now. We have had pongee shirt- 
waist suits and pongee blouse coats galore, but it has 
remained for Miss Blanding to come out in a jaunty 
pongee box coat trimmed with huge pearl buttons. 
The skirt to this swagger little coat shows the pon- 
gee in sun-burst accordeon plaiting which is the con- 
ventional thing for that sort of skirt. But the pongee 
box-coat is in a class by itself. 

Mrs. Joseph Grant wears a blue tailor suit when she 
comes to town, which is the last word on style. The 
blue- cloth is embroidered with purple violets, not 
the big California sort, but the deep Russian violet 
that is as royal in color as the robes of the Czar. 
The skirt is further trimmed in spike-like effects of 
taffeta, and the jacket shows some of the same sort 
of garniture. 

Black and white check silk gowns are serviceable 
run-abouts, and some of them have distinguishing 
touches that remove them from the commonplace, 
an odium attached to the majority. Mrs. Gus Taylor 
has a very striking costume of this genus which she 
wears a great deal when she comes up to town. Mrs. 
Taylor's skirts are always conspicuously clinging, 
drawn in close to the knees and then flaring gener- 
ously. Mrs. Joe Tobin affects the same cut skirt, 
and like Mrs. Taylor wore this style long before it 
was adopted by other posteresques. Now that Paris 
has discarded the sheath skirt for long, unbroken 
lines, most fashionables will take that cue. But I 
doubt whether either Mrs. Taylor or Mrs. Tobin will 
discard it. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you will save at least one-third on your fuel 
bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



Allen's Press Clipplns Bureau has removed to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco, Cal. 



I 

: 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

*& 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital & Surplus 
Total Assets 



$1,233,723.76 

5,914,424.59 



Interest paid on deposits, subject 
to check, at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum, 

Interest paid on savings deposits 
at the rate of three and six- 
tenths per cent, per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are author- 
ized to act as the guardian of 
estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented at 86 
per annum and upwards. 



Dalzell Brown, 

Ma^rvevger 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 




Library&ahle 




By Roland Wuittle 

Mr. James Franklin Cham- 
How We Are Fed. berlain has, through the 
Macmillan Company, pub- 
lished one of the very best books for young people 
which it has lately been my good fortune to read, 
and as one who spent more than a decade in teach- 
ing, I claim to know something about books of that 
kind. It is entitled "How We are Fed," and is mod- 
estly termed a geographical reader. Here a mistake 
has been made, for that savors at once of school, 
and Mr. Chamberlain, who has the Department of 
Geography in the State Normal School at Los An- 
geles, should know as well as any one the effect of 
that idea on childish likes and dislikes. If it had 
been got up as a presentation book and called the 
story of something or other, I can well imagine that 
it would have been an immensely popular book with 
the youngsters. In fact, on trial, it goes beautifully. 
Mr. Chamberlain says, with perfect truth, in that de- 
lightfully solemn tone, which is approved by univer- 
sity authorities the world over, and which it takes 
such a dreadful time to get rid of: "Far too little is 
done in our schools to acquaint children with their 
relations to the great industrial and social organi- 
zation of which they are members. Even grown 
persons have, as a rule, a very indefinite knowledge 
of these relations." In fact, there is a great deal of 
information in this little work for which everyone 
would be the better. It would be really good fun to 
examine some of our leading business men as to its 
contents, and see how little they really know with 
regard to the food supply outside of their own spec- 
ialty; as for the university professors, they would 
be completely out of the running. The work can be 
thoroughly recommended, and if it does not become 
a recognized handbook, it will be no fault of the 
author. 

Another book published by 
Mrs. Pendleton's the Macmillan Company 1 it 
Four-in-Hand. always seems to be the Mac- 
millan Company nowadays) 
is the last, "so far, of their novelette series. This 
is a bright, clever story by Gertrude Atherton, 
entitled "Mrs. Pendleton's Four-in-Hand." There 
was something about the form of these novel- 
ettes which did not apeal to me, and I was sufficiently 
frank to say so with reference to some of the pre- 
decessors of this series, for the writers were so used 
to longer methods that these short stories by no 
means displayed their powers to the best advantage. 
There is no such objection to this latest publication of 
the series. Mrs. Atherton is just as clever in this 
style of work as in larger volumes, which give freer 
play to her wonderful powers of description. She is 
sharp and keen, "malicious," say her enemies, but her 
enemies may well rage, for there is no question at 
all that Gertrude Atherton is, judged by every canon 
of literary art, the ablest woman novelist in the Eng- 
lish tongue. She does not preach, for that may the 
saints be blessed! She has no propaganda, for whicfl 
our most devout thanks are due her. Having got rid 
of these impedimenta, and not having the slightest 
idea of helping a poor humanity, which is already 



preached to death, she has some little time to pay at- 
tention to her art. And here we get just what we 
had a right to expect from this class of reading a 
bright, interesting, clever and at times sparkling tale. 
There is just about an hour's reading, and that is 
long enough for any self-respecting and sensible man 
to spend at this time of the year. There are a few 
biographical notes at the end of the book, which are 
very interesting, but I should like to suggest that 
these notes are degenerating in the later volumes in- 
to obvious advertising. This is unnecessary and un- 
wise. 

Bernard Pick. Ph. D. D. D., 

The Essence of publishes a translation of 

Christianity. Cremer's famous reply to Ham- 

ack on the Essence of Chris- 
tianity. The work is exceedingly technical and very 
hard reading, and there is no reason to believe that 
it will find much of a sale outside the students of tech- 
nical theology, which appears to be a very barren and 
somewhat uninteresting field. Nobody but a German 
could have written the thesis in question, which is 
peculiarly interesting to a student of national traits 
as showing the peculiar faculty of the German for 
steeping himself in abstractions. The further away 
from the concrete and practical the happier appears 
to be our German scholar, a state of mind which will 
explain many of the peculiarities of modern German 
political notions. Incidentally this tendency to ab- 
straction shows the fundamental difference between 
the Anglo-Saxon, whether in the United States or 
elsewhere, and the Teuton who dwells beyond the 
Rhine. The very problems which concern their com- 
mon religion, as in this case, are so differently com- 
prehended and considered that an agreement in point 
of view is unimaginable. While by no means con- 
vinced of the practical value of the work, the skill 
of the translator still appeals to me, and the con- 
scientiousness with which he has accomplished a diffi- 
cult task deserves every commendation. It is pub- 
lished by the Funk & Wagnalls Company. 

"The Mystery of Murray 

The Mystery of Davenport," by Robert Nel- 

Murray Davenport, son Stephens, is called a 

story of New York at the pres- 
ent day. To tell the truth, it is a pretty thin mysterv 
and not much of a story. One of the most curious 
of phenomena in connection with the vast mass of un- 
distinguished fiction which is thrown upon the mar- 
ket is that the writers of most of it show no improve- 
ment. Now, as the old schoolmaster would say, if a 
man made fifty wheelbarrows, one would naturally 
expect the fiftieth to be better than the first. But 
this rule does not appear to apply to the writers of 
modern fiction. In a large number of cases, their work 
not only does not improve, but shows unmistakable 
signs of deterioration, and from a careful worker 
our writer soon becomes a mere literarv hack. Now, 
without any injustice, or even undue severity, it must 
be said that our author has not done what should 
have been expected of him. There are not less than 
seven novels credited to his name, and his present 
style of writing is a complete exposure of the slight 
demands of the reading public. If a practiced hand 
in any other profession were to show such results 
as the product of his experience, he would soon find 
it difficult to maintain himself at his occupation, Pub- 
lisher] by Page, Boston. 



Dr. Decker, 

DeDtlst, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless 
teeth extracting. 






August i, 1903. 



Judge Murasky has been petitioned by the Three 
Hay Liquor Cure Co., Incorporated, to grant an in- 
junction against "Dr." J. |. McKanna to prevent him 
from using the name of that firm. This is merely 
a temporary relief measure, asked by the plaintiffs 
pending the trial of the $200,000 suit for alleged libel 
which they have also brought against "Dr." ttfc- 
Kanna. It seems that the Three Day Liquor Cure 
Co. was incorporated under the laws of this State 
and that subsequently the defendant came from the 
East and established himself in the same business 
that of curing inebriates. He at first used the name 
Three Day Liquor Cure in his advertisements, and 
published in the daily papers certain statements to 
which the established firm objected and for which 
the)- brought suit. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

THE GREAT MAN HUNT. 



11 



A great many brave men have been pursuing other 
men through California's mountain counties, during 

past week. A search of another and plcasantcr 
sort is that of the vacation idler, seeking a hotel or 

M that suits him. He's hound lo find whal I 
after if he goes to Hotel Vendome, at San lose. All 
attractions and comforts are there. 



The June output of the Rand mines was 238,320 
ounces of gold, against 234,125 ounces in May. 



In addition to its regular superior news service, THE 
SUNDAY CALL is now publishing the latest and best 
novels complete in two or three editions. 

HALF HOUR STORIETTES— the choicest obtainable. 

Have you read "Letters by a Self-Made Man to His Son?" 
They have been published every Sunday in the CALL. Then 
there is the Comic Supplement, which is really funny. 

A puzzle page for the children. 

Something good for everybody, and in addition to all 
these the PICTURES— real art products— ready for fram- 
ing. It all goes with the regular subscription price. 

Daily and Sunday delivered by carriers — 76 cents a 
month. 



FIRST EDITION, OF 10 OOO^OPIESrEXHAUSTED. 
SECOND EDITION, 10.000 COPIES, ON ThjE PRESS. 

Mr. JACK LONDON'S New Novel 

The Call of the Wild 

"The whole story is 
vital with interest," 

— N. Y. Herald. 

"A Tale that is literature . . . the unity of its plan and the firmness of its execution are equally 
remarkable ... a story that grips the reader deeply. It is art, it is literature. . . It stands 
apart, far apart . . . with so much skill, so much reasonableness, so much convincing logic." 

— New York Mail and Express. 

"JACK LONDON is one of the very few younger writers who are making enviable records 
for themselves. . . . The literary quality and virile strength of his stories increase . . . for 
the present at least he is without a rival . . . His latest volume is his best ... in the pictur- 
esque and imaginative quality of the born story-teller. . . . The book is a series of remarkable 
pictures . . . but above all it is a picture of dog life that in its wonderful imaginative quality 
stands quite alone . . . possesses an originality and a sort of virile poetry . . . altogether a 
most exceptional book. . — New York Commercial Advertiser. 

"A BIG STORY in sober English, and with thorough art in the construction ... a wonderfully 
perfect bit of work ... a book that will be heard of. The dog adventures are as exciting as 
any man's exploits could be, and Mr. London's workmanship is wholly satisfying." 

— The New York Sun. 

"THE STORY IS one that will stir the blood of every lover of a life in its closest relation to 
nature. Whoever loves the open or adventure for its own sake will find "The Call of the 
Wild" a most fascinating book." — The Brooklyn Eagle. 

Illustrated in colors by a new process. 
Cloth, i2mo, gilt top $1.50. 

For sale by ail booksellers. Published by 

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY, NEW YORK. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



L.U-. ■ 



hooker On 



w^^^g 




It is a mistake to think that war is all made up 
of fighting. Indeed, quite often our boys have a good 
deal of fun mixed in with their tilts with Filipinos, 
and the following incident is one of them. In fact, 
there are two of them, come to think of it. 

Early in 1899, tne Eighteenth Infantry was driving 
the Filipinos before them, somewhat slowly but sure- 
ly. They were at Jarro, a few miles from Iloilo, and 
hurriedly threw up breastworks, finding a good part 
of their material close at hand in a great warehouse 
where an immense amount of sugar had been stored 
away in sacks, against a rainy day, as it were. They 
at once used the sacks of sugar to build up the 
breastworks, and none too soon, as the fight began 
immediately. A great re-inforcement of the Filipinos 
having come to the aid of their brethren — so, too, did 
the rainy day, for no sooner had the fight gotten well 
under way than it began to rain, and very soon a 
perfect deluge of sweetness was flooding our men out 
of the trenches. The unaccustomed torrents were 
bad enough, but when the men were drenched to 
the skin with syrup — sticky, hot, sickly syrup at that 
— it was too much. "Why," said a young officer 
who was present at the fight, "the Filipinos couldn't 
drive us out, but the sugar and water did. We were 
fairly glued together, and I'll be shot if those niggers 
didn't see our predicament, and tne humor of the 
thing struck them so forcibly they were unable to 
take advantage of it. They laughed so heartily that 
if it was anything less than war we would have 
shaken hands there and then, and said the drinks were 
on us. But as it was, we had to drag ourselves apart, 
and out of the mess of sweetness, and chase the poor 
devils farther and farther along. I tell you, it's hard 

to fight an enemy who is convulsed with laughter." 

• • * 

The special writers of the San Francisco news- 
papers have missed a great chance in the Folsom 
prison escape. Few events in California history have 
furnished such a chance for vivid, brilliant, interesting 
newspaper stories than that dramatic break for lib- 
erty, with the accompanying terror and confusion 
inside the prison. Yet the "stories" published in all 
the newspapers have been decidedly commonplace. 

The last big "criminal" story of the kind — the 
Evans and Sonntag chases — made two newspaper 
reputations. First, there was the sensational feat of 
poor old "Petie" Bigelow, who, while all the deputies 
of the State were hunting the two noted outlaws, 
found them and interviewed them. How he did it 
no one knows to this day. On the same chase, Charles 
Michelsen found a lead which he is working vet in 
the magazines — the "bad man" of the West. 'Most 
of his material he got at that time from the man- 
hunters on the Evans-Sonntag chase. 

* * * 

There is a good old saying that "extremes meet at 
the borders," so what wonder that a colony of liter- 
ary people should encamp this summer at Glen Ellen 
on the land adjoining the "Home of the Feeble 
Minded." 

Now there happens to be a pond, on the camp 
ground, and on that pond there's a raft built expressly 
for the use of women and children. It is so nicely 
balanced that an extra pound or two at either end will 



completely capsize it, which is quite as it should be, 
when one is looking for "material" and "strong situa- 
tions." 

One day recently the wife of our best-known short 
story teller and his two babies were out for a row. 
At the other end of the raft a majestic woman, also 
a writer, was poling. Of course it was in the deepest 
part of the pond that the babies escaped from their 
mother. They crowed and held out their arms, as 
they toddled toward the lower end of the raft, and a 
cold plunge. The majestic woman had her wits with 
her. At precisely the artistic moment she stepped 
down into the water. It rose, till the dimple in her 
chin barely showed above it. 

The mother screamed ; the babies pounded their 
chubby fists in glee, but the writer waded to shore 
with all the dignity with which she might have 
crossed a ballroom. 

On the bank the father stood waiting. He clasped 
her dripping hands in his. "What can I do to thank 
you?" he cried. "I must make you the heroine of 
another novel!" 

* * * 

Mr. Ned Fay broke the record for trap-shooting at 
Ingleside last Sunday. He killed ninety-nine live 
birds out of a hundred. This is the greatest gun rec- 
ord hitherto heard of. 

* * * 

San Francisco is a great city, and she beats the 
world in entertaining, from the individual pilgrim 
to the conclave composed of tens of thousands. But 
grand, mighty and glorious in all her ways as our city 
is, she is lacking in one or two things needful. In 
the first place, there is not another city in this coun- 
try so poorly provided with public drinking foun- 
tains. There are very few watering places for ani- 
mals, and man has to go distressingly thirsty, or run 
into the nearest saloon and pour down a glass or two 
of beer, or take a drink of whiskey for the sake of 
the water that goes with it, which means that the 
municipality is deliberately leading people into temp- 
tation. Let there be plenty of drinking fountains, and 
at convenient places. But there is another crying 
need that is even more pressing. Every city that 
the Looker-On knows anything about, except San 
Francisco, maintains at the public's expense retiring 
places conveniently located on the principal thorough- 
fares. Strangers complain of this negligence, and 
with not a few of them the impression prevails that 
the absence of such conveniences is for the deliberate 

Established in California 



LA 



...for thirty-five years... 

Repository in San 
Francisco at Mar- 
ket and Tenth Sts., 
has been rebuilt 
, and enlarged, mak- 
ing it the finest car- 
riage salesroom in 
the United States. 
Five hundred styles 
of vehicles shown, 
probably more than all other stores in town com- 
bined. New things in robes and whips. 

STUDBBAKER BROS. CQ 

Market and Tenth .Sts. 

Tel.Dhon. Private 6M 



August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«2 



purpose of forcing men into saloons, where, as a 
matter of politeness or as an obligation, they must 
buy a drink or a cigar. The cost of such public con- 
veniences and that of public drinking fountains would 
not be great. Such negligence, if that is a good way 
to put it, is not calculated to make strangers fall in 
love with our city. 

* * * 

Mrs. Pettee, the lady who has recently started 
some kind of charitable institution whereby per- 
functionary judgment is passed upon parents and 
children judiciously taken from their charge, some- 
times finds herself in a quandary whose solution con- 
sists of finding beds for twenty or thirty children 
whom she has collected during the day. Last week 
the good lady telephoned to a friend to tell her of the 
latest trial. 

"I have seven children," she moaned, "that I have 
taken away from a perfect brute of a man ; but now 
I don't know what to do with them. I can't take the 
little dears home with me," she added apologetically. 

"Why didn't you let him keep them ?" asked the 
friend. 

"Why? Why! The great brute had seven more," 
exclaimed the irate lady. 

"Take them to the Matron's Ward of the City 
Prison," suggested the friend. 

"They won't have them there," replied the philan- 
thropist. 

After much parleying, the friend agreed to arrange 
for the seven children taken from the bosom of their 
family, and with many thanks and "not-at-alls" the 
telephones were hung up. 

Two hours later the friend's phone rang again. 
A trembling voice was at the other end. 

"Well, dear, what is it now?" asked the friend. 

"The brute — the brute " sobbed the lady philan- 
thropist. 

"The brute again? What has he done now?" 

"He — he's sent me the other seven." 

* * * 

A hardware store in the city is advertising a neat 
contrivance to take one's summer vacation. It's a 
burglar alarm to be "worn" on the door of one's room 
and it's safe to say that its inventor was not a Bene- 
dict. 

A Pacific avenue man who has recently taken upon 
himself the "vows of the tied," determined last week 
to surprise his wife at- Santa Cruz. He came home 
with tints and tones beneath his eye, and a strip of 
courtplaster over his forehead. He tells the story 
briefly. 

"It was late when I got there. Her door was un- 
fastened. 'Whiz-z Whir-r-r!' I thought it was an 
alarm clock! Then I saw her! I felt her, and I saw 
stars ! I heard her, and I felt and saw every man in 
that hotel from the proprietor down to the porter ! 
I'd trust my wife to go to Jericho with that contri- 
vance !" 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
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Fine stationery, steel and! copperplate engraving. 

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The domestic method of carpet-cleaning Is very unsat- 
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lous give Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Company, 353 Tehama 
street a trial, and you will see the difference between the 
real thing and the imitation. All the best machinery used 
in the work by Spaulding's. 



-Rheumatics relieved at the Post-St Hammam. 



Pears' 

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soap that depends on 
something outside of it. 

Pears', the finest soap 
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money is in the merchan- 
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Established over 100 years. 






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FOR. BON VIVANTS 



TILLMANN (SL BENDEL 

Purveyors to the PACIFIC SLOPE T R. A D E 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



THE GRAY CAT'S WORK. 



By Eleano r e F. Lewys. 

A shadow crept behind the man, but when he 
paused and glanced backward, it disappeared under 
the wall that divided the two gardens. 

The dim light glimmering from one of the upper 
windows of the flat told Annersley that his wife 
had waited up for him. 

A helpless sort of rage filled him at sight of it. Was 
there anything, he thought, more tiresome, hopeless, 
sickening, than the knowledge that the person you 
have ceased to love, still loves you? Surely nothing, 
except, perhaps, the knowledge that you are legally 
tied to such a person, when you are madly infatu- 
ated with some one else. 

Annersley at last succeeded in fitting his latch 
key into the lock (after many fruitless attempts), and 
stumbled up the steps. He did not see the gray form 
that slipped in after him, and stationed itself in a 
huddled heap at the top of the long stairs. He only 
saw, as he passed into the lamp-lighted sitting-room 
the face and form of the woman he had married, and 
contrasted them mentally with the face and form 
of the woman he had just left. 

Her gray hair had once been that soft-shaded 
bronze that we seldom see, except in pictures, and 
her glowing skin had faded into a grayish neutral 
shade like her hair. She moved in a quiet, depressed, 
stealthy way, and reminded one of soft gray velvet, 
only with a latent vibrant life in it; suppressed, dull, 
morose, on the surface, but behind all this the power 
that never slept; that never forgot; the power that 
would one day spring! 

And out of all this gray softness, two strange, 
greenish-yellow eyes, with yellow glints in them, the 
only gleam of color in the dull monotone of her ap- 
pearance. 

She glanced up and smiled as her husband entered 
the room, but her smile was sad, and half suppressed, 
seemingly like her nature. Her husband passed on, 
with simply: "Why do you wait up for me, Enid?" 
and closed his bedroom door after him. 

From the open window the night breeze stole in, 
with a faint reminder of flowers on its breath. The 
woman dropped her head on her arms. The per- 
fumed wind grew stronger, until it swayed the lace 
curtains back and forth, and flickered the yellow- 
shaded lamp that stood near by. It blew her silky 
wisps of hair over the dreamer's slim fair arms, and 
caressed her long throat like cool, soft hands. 

It brought her, for one brief, delicious moment, 
to a green, sheltered nook near the country road, 
that wound in and out among the hills like a pale 
ribbon. Over her, the yellow jasmine blossomis 
dropped their soft petals on the golden brown hair. 
But she was not alone, as now. Some one's dark 
head was dangerously near her bright one, and two 
eager hands grasped her's, and a trembling mouth 
begged her to "tell him if she really loved him?" 

The man flung open the window and let the moon- 
light stream in. He was back again in imagination 
in the cozy little dressing room of his inamorata. The 
latter sat on a table near him, swinging her limbs 
(such pretty limbs as they were, as roundly turned 
out as the legs of a piano!) and holding a cigarette 
between two full red lips. Her figure was perhaps 
a little too stout for what an artist's eye would con- 
sider real beauty, but less weight would mean to 
Cecilia a more limited diet, and such a proceeding as 
limiting her appetites or desires in any way would 
have appeared as perfectly ridiculous and unneces- 
sary to the little dancer. 



Life was a picnic, or a jolly good play. "Eat, 
drink and be merry, for to-morrow" the curtain 
drops ! 

***** 

The empty rooms struck a chill to Annersley's 
heart as he passed through them. There was the 
inevitable little note on his pin cushion, signed sim- 
ply "Enid." 

"Well, I might have known it would come sooner 
or later," he thought, wearily ; "she must have found 
it out some way or other. Trust these quiet women 
for that. At all events, I have the satisfaction of 
knowing that she went alone." And he dropped into 
a chair and laughed mirthlessly. 

Something on the floor caught his eye. A half 
burned sheet of notepaper, which the draught from 
the open door had blown onto the carpet. 

The hand-writing was strangely familiar. And 
over there, near the bureau, lay a man's half-worn 
glove. 

* * . * * * 

The pretty little buffet in the oak-paneled dining 
room was always well stocked. "My dear," a well- 
meaning old lady had once said to Enid, just before 
the latter's marriage, "better let your husband have 
all he wants at home, than have him go elsewhere 
for it. They will drink, the best of them!" 

And so, with the help of the friendly buffet, An- 
nersley had managed to make himself royally drunk. 

He lay on her bed, breathing heavily, with a little 
knot of ribbon she had worn clasped to his breast. 

The house was still as Death itself. Even the 
distracting pianist in the flat below had ceased mur- 
dering Etude No. and was in the arms of Mor- 

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August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«5 



pheus. So the dark form that crept up the stairs 
stealthily, along the empty hall, with its moon-beam 
flecked carpet, and through the open door, had noth- 
ing to fear from anything human. 

The sleeping man was not conscious of the soft 
jar of the bed, as something lithe and agile sprang 
on it. Only, as that Something crept closer to his 
open mouth, his breathing became fainter and more 
irregular until it ceased altogether. 

The dim light of dawn, touching vaguely all the 
familiar objects in the room, fell upon the quiet 
figure on the bed, on the hands still clasping the lit- 
tle knot of ribbon over the cold heart, and threw a 
more ghastly meaning over the convulsed face. 

For the gray cat had done its work. 



Pleasure's Wand. 

(Continued from page 7.) 
"Little Blossom," the coon shouter and the girl who 
made Grauman's famous, will be at the Chutes next 
week. She is not "featured" on the programme, but 
she is a headliner in public interest nevertheless. Les- 
ter and Curtin, Hathaway and Walton, Hank Whit- 
comb, the three Kuhns and Zane, are the other enter- 
tainers offered. The Chutes has a host of other at- 
tractions as well as its excellent vaudeville perform- 
ances. There is, of course, the Animatoscope and the 
incubators, each with a small tenant, are a never fail- 
ing source of delight. 

* * * 

Dr. Mclvor Tyndall's lecture at Steinway Hall last 
Sunday evening was well and appreciatively at- 
tended. The psychological subjects treated were 
given practical and scientific demonstration, with the 
assistance of some of San Francisco's leading physi- 
cians, who were seated on the stage. The subject of 
next Sunday evening's lecture is : "Telepathy : Is it a 
Lost Faculty or a Development?" Dr. Mclvor Tyn- 
dall is arousing great interest in subjects commonly 

termed abstruce. 

« » » 

It is not at all improbable that "The Eternal City" 

may visit the Pacific Coast this season, the demands 

from that quarter persuading the management to turn 

a listening ear. If that be the ultimate conclusion, 

it will probably be the early part of February before 

the journey is undertaken, the Western trip being 

made via Denver and Salt Lake, and the return via 

the Northern Pacific. 

Miss Eleanor Robson, who was pretty badly broken 
down physically, and in her nervous system, by the 
superhuman tasks undertaken by her last winter and 
this spring, has been finding rest, strength and gen- 
eral physical improvement at Aix-le-Bains, France, 
where she has been stopping practically ever since 
she landed in Europe. It had been her intention to 
visit at the old home in Lancashire, but the English 
climate this summer has been quite disagreeable and 
too variable for recuperative demands. About the 
first of August she will seek a satisfactory English 
Watering place, and there remain until her return to 
New York, which she expects to reach about the mid- 
dle of September. 

* * * 

Henry Miller and Margaret Anglin are preparing 
to give San Francisco a surprise in the shape of a new 
play purchased by Miss Anglin from an American girl 
in Paris. 

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JOHN F. D UrHITT, 

THE DOUTHITT BUILDING 

273 Fifth Avenue, near 30th Street, NEW Y0BK. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



Moves and Countermoves. 



Seated in one of those grand arm-chairs which land- 
lord Kirkpatrick has provided for the guests of the 
Palace, the other day I chanced to have for a neigh- 
bor, Doctor — well, never mind his name. Suffice it 
that he is assistant physician at one of the State in- 
stitutions. The genial doctor had just had lunch at 
the Grill and needed no invitation to enter into a 
very entertaining chat about politics and politicians. 
The Governor had just announced his appointment 
of Bank Commissioners and members of the Charity 
Board, and I forget what else, and the Doctor began 
commenting on them. Said he : 

"Pardee is slow about making appointments, but 
when he makes them they are above criticism. He 
has named good men for all these places, and now I 
do hope that he will be able to get down to the actual 
management of the State institutions. They need it 
badly. Under Gage the appointments were rotten. 
There is no other word for them. There, for instance, 
is Doctor Stone, who was appointed Superintendent 
at Napa Insane Asylum. Stone was always a Demo- 
crat and was the Chairman of the Democratic County 
Central Committee at Marysville. Kevane, who ran 
Gage, and who was a Democrat, as you know, wanted 
a young fellow named Kelly put in as Secretary at 
Napa. Why, there are various rumors, but I do not 
care to discuss them. Dr. Gardner, who ruled Napa 
like an autocrat, would not be dictated to, and as a 
result the young fellow did not get his job. Stone had 
wanted to be appointed second assistant physician 
at Napa, but Gardner would not give him the job, 
insisting that he must take third assistant and work 
up. Stone then went to Gage with a lot of stories 
about Gardner, and with the help of Kevane, from 
whom he agreed to take orders, he was promised by 
the late Governor the Superintendencv at Napa. But 
Stone could not hold the place, not being qualified 
under the law, which requires the Superintendents 
to have experience in insanity matters, and Stone 
never had a case of insanity in his life. If Gardner 
was displaced as Superintendent at Napa, it was cer- 
tain that he would make a legal fight and probably 
keep Stone out, on the ground of incompetency. At 
Napa, however, as first assistant physician, was Dr. 
Dozier, who was a bitter enemy of Gardner, and who 
was very anxious to succeed to his place if only for 
a day. Dr. Dozier was approached, and told that if 
be would agree to resign as soon as he was asked he 
would be given Gardner's place. Dozier agreed, and 
was made Superintendent. Gardner could not kick 
because Dozier was clearly eligible to the place, and 
when the time came to get rid of him and give 
the place to Stone, who meantime had been given a 
place on the famous Plague Board at ten dollars a 
day and expenses, Dozier resigned, Stone got the 
place, and there was no one to raise the question of 
his eligibility. As soon as Stone got in he gave 
Kevane's friend Kelly the Secretaryship, saying to 
the man whom he discharged, a most competent man 
named Tohnson, 'You have got to go, not because you 
have done anything wrong, but because I have to 
give Kelly the job. I have orders!'" 
* * * 

Finding my medical friend so ready, I asked him 
if he knew anything about the appointment of any 
other persons under the Gage regime. "Yes," he said. 
"There was Crowley, who has a job at the Ulchh 
Asylum. Crowley was a student with a lot of other 
fellows at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, of 
which Winslow Anderson, of the Governor's staff, 



is President. Anderson is very anxious for the social 
position which the staff gave him, and as a conse- 
quence was only too ready to take orders from Gage. 
Kevane wanted Crowley graduated, because among 
other reasons, Crowley is a Democrat, but some of 
the Physicians at the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons were unwilling to agree to his getting a 
diploma, and several other students were in the same 
boat. Anderson ignored the views of his colleagues 
and gave them their parchments, with the result that 
a split occurred in the College, and a number of 
prominent instructors resigned. That is the real sec- 
cret of the row in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons. It is politics, pure and simple." 



"After the theatre, then to the Techau." That's what 

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August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 




Dear Bessie: Only just think! We are to have 
Fritz Scheel back here for a season of symphony con- 
certs, and those who like that kind of music are sim- 
ply wild with delight, and can talk of little else. You 
know what I think on the subject. The directors are 
not going to wait until the winter for their concerts, 
but will have them right now, and they are to be 
given at the Grand Opera House commencing toward 
the end of this month — on the 20th, to be perfectly ac- 
curate. I give you this first as the most important 
piece of news, for it is awfully quiet just now. Mollie 
says it is the lull before the storm, but it seems to 
me rather early for any kind of a storm, social or at- 
mospheric. I fancy weddings are the first things we 
shall have to enliven us, and I hear that Kate Robin- 
son and George Beardsley have decided to be married 
in September, and go housekeeping in a flat on Sut- 
ter street. 

Such a succession of gay doings as there have been 
at San Rafael — I mean ladies' parties, luncheons and 
cards. Mrs. Dean, Mrs. Breedon, Mrs. Southard 
Hoffman, Mrs. Grant, Mrs. Toy and Mrs. de Young 
are all unceasing entertainers on these lines, and 
gather a lot of their friends around them. I have 
been over to some of them, and glad to see what a 
reviving interest Miss Carrie Gwin is taking in peo- 
ple and things. You know, at one time she seemed 
not to care for anybody or anything, but her trip 
East did her a world of good. The Carter Pomeroys 
are not going to Lake Tahoe, I believe, but will spend 
the rest of the summer at San Rafael; Mrs. Walter 
Dean and Helen are, I hear, to spend this month 
at Tahoe, which is the loveliest of the twelve there, 
and then back to San Rafael for a month before re- 
turning to town for the winter. You never saw a hap- 
pier woman than Mrs. Chamberlain, and her delight 
in the possession of her baby boy ; she is over in San 
Rafael, but is most impatiently waiting till she can 
show her treasure to Colonel Jack, who is still in the 
Philippines. 

The. jolliest place to visit these days is the Navy 
Yard — there is always so much going on — dinners, 
dances, luncheons, cards, etc. The sail-loft dance 
last Friday night was one of the loveliest I have 
been at ; the McCallas always infuse so much vitality 
into everything in which they take part, and it was 
the first since their arrival there as residents. Mattie 
Milton, the Harrington girls, and Gertrude Eells, 
came up, too, and oh, there were such loads of button 
beaux, both army and navy, as well as a few civilians. 
The officers of the French ship Protet, which had 
such a great "success" at Coronado last month, gave 
a tea on board last Saturday. I asked Bernie, who 
was there, how it compared with those on the New 
York, for instance; she did not commit herself by giv- 
ing any answer, but I hear it was very pleasant. 

The girls have all been getting ready their best 
bibs and tuckers for Del Monte, where the usual week 
of sports is about to begin. But, my dear, it is al- 
most like wasting one's sweetness upon the desert 
air — there has been such a plentiful Jack of beaux at 
all the summer resorts this year. However, at Del 
Monte it is different, for there are always Eastern 
people to be met there, and that m'akes up in a degree 



for "homo folk-." Daisy Casserly. Virginia Jolliffe. 
Mac Colburne, the Tom Graydons, the I'arkrr Whit- 
neys are among those «1„, will be there. There has 
boon n emw.l •<! spnrt lovers down at Santa Barbara 
the past week to augment those remaining of the 
crowd that has thronged that "paradise by the sea." 
as Tom calls it. this summer. You see. there have 
been polo and golf matches, water carnivals, and sich, 
and jolly times generally. Ed. Greenwav, Mary Bur- 
ton Harrison and her guid mon, Frank Carolan". Tom 
Driscoll. the Beylards, and others from Burlingame 
way. were among them. Mrs. Beylard was, however, 
there, owing to the illness and death of her aunt. Miss 
Sarah Poett, who has made her home with her sister, 
Mrs. Reddington, for years past. 

We have been delighted to hear this wedk that 
there is every probabilitv of Colonel and Mrs. Cool- 
idge remaining in San Francisco, now that the Col- 
onel has been promoted and retired — that is, make 
their home here. Mrs. Coolidge is so kind to the 
girls, and gives such delightful parties! Then the 
Rawles, another charming .family, are already build- 
ing out on Green street, as Mrs. Rawles- savs she 
wants to live within sight of the water; Mrs. Rawles 
has been seriously ill, but is better; they have been 
living in the Trilly house on Fillmore street all sum- 
mer, but when the Trillys return from Pacific Grove, 
will go to Santa Barbara till their new house is ready 
for them. Apropos of army folks, the big charity 
card party which was to have been held at the Pre- 
sidio last week but postponed until this, came off on 
Thursday last. 

Mrs. Van Wyck had one of her entertainments for 
the Daughters of the Confederacy last week, which 
I hear was very pleasant. You know she is one of the 
staunchest Confederate ladies that we have here, and 
she is never so happy as when she is doing something 



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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



to aid some of those less fortunate than herself. 
Nanny has had a delightful visit East, as well as with 
her sister in Oregon, but will soon be home now. 
Laura has been up at Tahoe most of this month. 

Maud Simpson has returned from Japan, where she 
expected to remain a year on a visit to Bishop and 
Mrs. Partridge, but she has evidently tired of the 
Orient, for she is home again within six months. Her 
sister Agnes — Mrs. Partridge — came over with her, 
arriving last week, and does not seem to mind cross- 
ing the broad Pacific from the frequency with which 
she takes the trip. She says she likes the surround- 
ings of her home in the Orient, but I think it an awful 
shame to bury that beautiful woman in Japan. 

The Fred Low house on Gough street has been get- 
ting coats of paint inside and out, which looks as if 
we are to have them with us this winter, for early 
as it is there are lots who are already talking of the 
coming season as though it were close at hand. The 
Lows, you know, Flora especially, are very fond of 
Monterey, and practically live at Del Monte the 
greater part of the year with occasional visits to town, 
so if they can be coaxed to remain with us there are 
loads of their friends who will be glad. And Harry 
Tevis is having more alterations made in the old home 
up on Taylor street hill. Some of the conundrums of 
the day are : Will he ever get it quite to his taste, 
and is there a she for whom it is all being done? It 
is nice to have lots of money to do just what you like 
with, isn't it? 

But I say, wouldn't you like to be Mrs. Stanford? 
She is going to start on a tour of the world pretty 
soon, leaving the beaten track somewhat by going 
first to Australia, and expects to be gone a year. It 
must be lovely to travel under her circumstances — 
loads of money, and not having to count the cost 
of anything. Raphael Wei! left last week for one of 
his periodical visits to his dear Paree. Ethel Harri- 
son and her mother have gone, sailing from New 
York this week for bonnie Scotland, where they are 
to stay some time, and then to England, so it will be 
a year or more till we see them again. 

The Kirkpatrick girls are muchly separated this 
summer. Ruth is at Salt Lake with her mother; Con- 
nie has been up at Carson for some time, and Mary 
remains quietly at home here. Sallie Winslow is up 
at Tahoe, and so are the Coopers; the Eugene Mur- 
phys have taken possession of their cottage at P.ur- 
lingame; the Girvins and the Whittells are among 
those booked for Del Monte for August, and I believe 
Leontine Blakeman is to be there after her return 
from Lake Tahoe. The Chauncey Boardmans are 
home from their camp at Tahoe, reporting having had 
a lovely time, and the Phil Lilienthals have returned 
from their trip to Europe. We are to have the Pey- 
tons in town again this winter, as they have taken a 
house on Pacific avenue; they have been in San lose 
all summer. And now having begun my letter with 
a piece of news, I shall close it with another, which is 
that the engagement of Charlotte Russell and Clem- 
ent Tobin, which has been rumored for some time, 
has just been formally announced. 

ELSIE. 



The Misses Boyken, Miss Edna Mohr, Miss Edna 
Thode, Miss Anita Habenicht, George Habenicht, 
Mark W. Lillard, Byron W Buchanan, Barclay Hen- 
ley, Jr., Misses Speyer, are a few of those who make 
up the young people who are staying at Hotel Belve- 
dere. 

The season is still at its height at Capitola. Salmon 
is still running in the bay, and catches are extraordi- 



nary, hardly any one coming in without a fish. 

Mr. Rene Nagelmackers, of the International Sleep- 
ing Car Company of Europe, son of Mr. George Nag- 
elmackers, president and founder of the above men- 
tioned company, is engaged to be married to Miss 
Helen Dalziel, daughter of Mr. Davison Dalziel, the 
well-known financier of London, formerly of San 
Francisco. The wedding will take place in London 
in September next. 

Mr. Samuel M. Shortridge returned Wednesday 
of this week from a visit to Lower California, Ense- 
nada, San Quentin and the southern part of the State,' 
where he has been during the past two weeks. Mrs. 
Shortridge in the meantime has been at San Jose. 

Guests registered at the Hotel Rafael for week end- 
ing July 28th from San Francisco are: Mr. and Mrs. 
Carter P. Pomeroy, Miss Harriett Pomeroy, Miss 
Pomeroy, W. T. Bowers, R. Carlton Knight, Mrs. 
George Huntsman, Miss Helen W. Thomas, Jas. P. 
Sims, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Furman, Miss L. Swans- 
berg, William D. Forbes, Bernett Southard, Miss 



Ruinart Champagne 

ESTABLISHED 1729 



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THE PRESIDENT'S WINE 



DRY, FRUITY-NO HEfqD(qCrjE 



VARNEY W. GASKILL 

Special Agent 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO. 

Sole Agents 



August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



McDonald, Miss Rlythc McDonald, Mrs. E. F. 1 
Miss Lewis. Mrs. C. Cutter. Miss Pearl P. Landers, 
Frank R. Kincr. 

Among the arrivals at the Occidental Hotel this 
week arc: A. Robinson and family, Honolulu: Mrs. 
I. A. Slopper and family, Honolulu: Mrs. E. S. 
Cutiha and son. Honolulu. 

The Hotel Rafael is the center of much sjaietv. The 
summer season is still in full swine:, and the San 
Francisco people who have made the hotel their head- 
quarters for the summer seem loath to leave. 

Del Monte is at the very height of summer fes- 
tivity. Society is largely represented, and the com- 
ing automobile contests are already awakening great 
interest. 



A VISIT TO THE GEYSERS. 

I have just come down from the Gevsers, where T 
have had one of the jolliest and most satisfactory 
holidays. The stage ride from Cloverdale is through 
a wonderfully beautiful canyon, and not the least 
pleasing feature of the trip was the thoroughly care- 
ful and competent drivers which are emploved in 
Humbert's stages, so that there is added a complete 
sense of safety to the delight of the ride. 

Mr. Feraud and his wife are most genial hosts, 
and Mr. Coblantz, the general manager, formerlv 
chef at Marchand's, a most competent caterer and 
chef. The table thus is furnished with the best and 
most seasonable which the market affords. 

The Gevsers have their own vegetable gardens, 
in which all the vegetables and berries are raised. The 
hotel has been hard-finished, re-carpeted and refur- 
nished throughout. New bath houses have been con- 
structed, and the old ones rehabilitated. There is a 
fine swimming pool and excellent trails have been 
made through the canyon, so that the marvelous 
geysers can be seen and enjoyed in comfort and 
safety. 

They have their own ice plant and electric light 
plant, so that the hotel and grounds are lighted with 
electricity. The season has been a very lively one, 
with dancing and music. The Gevsers have never 
been as popular as they are now. Since the season 
opened, venison has been regularly on the table, for 
there are olentv of deer in the hills. There is no end 
of good fishing, the stream's being full of trout. Af- 
ter looking back on my trip T can say confidentlv 
that it was the pleasantest I have ever taken. 

ELSIE. 



The days of alchemy are again being revived. One 
chemist claims to have discovered the secret of mak- 
ing life, another the next important secret of making 
gold. Who said "Fake?" 

Merchants, business and professional men in the neighborhood 
of Batterv and California streets, need not. s»n np town for lunch. 
Thev can per. th« best the market affords served in sppptizinc 
stvle at the Vienna Csfe, 22 a California Street, cor. "Battery. Mod- 
erate prices. Tel. B'acfc 2533. FredriV Hartwig, Prop. 



The Star Hair Remedy — Best of all tonics and re- 
storatives. Stops falllns. cures dandruff, restores color. 
Not a dye. At druggists and hairdressers. Accept no 
substitute. Star Remedy Co.. 385 Geary street. 



BLITHEDALE 

Marin County, California. Opened April 15th. 

Hotel bus meets train at Mill Valley Station. 



ART 

EUREKA 
RANGE 

— PERFECT IN 

Design 

Construction 
Operation 

Sold by all first-class dealers 

Send for Catalogue 

W. W. MONTAGUE & COHPANY 

309-31T Market St. S. F- 




EDUCATIONAL. 



Hitchcock nilitary Academy 

SflN RAFAEL, CAL. 

SEPARATE BUILDING FOR LITTLE 

. . . BOYS . . . 

Xmas tern} will begin Aug. 17th. 

EIGHTH YEAR. 



"Tleaxilieti* 



Boarding and Day School for Girls 
COLLEGE AVE. BERKELEY CAL. 



2601 

A L NcCVLLOVGH, 

Catalogue furnished on application. 



Principe.. 1 

Teleronp ttipon 16B6. 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, 
Life classes. $3.00 per month. 



antf Illustrating 



927 nARKET STREET, 



WRINKLES 



Living proof of our mat villous skill in remoilne: -wrinkles on exhibition 
fr< m 1 to 5 daily- $K0M i eward for a case we cannot cure. 
Importers of "Everythine for the Face." 
Torrance's Boudoir Wri"kle Plasters 8l a box. 
Torrance's Boudoir Tai Plasters SLcabox. 
Samples 10c- Stamps booklet. Established 1E67. PhoneBIack 1536. 

SU R. NEY-TO R. R ANCE, Skin Specialists- 
408 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




The Reason Why 

so many second hand ma- 
chines are on the market is 
because more and more peo- 
ple[are realizing the wonder- 
ful work of the 



er 



OS (JUAETBB MOXIOH OTHD IU1 WOrK Ul II1C 

Smith Premier Typewrit 

On approval for a postal. 
DURPHY & DICKERHAN 

105 Montgomery St. - - San Francisco 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



BANKING. 



Tbe San Francisco National Book 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. 

JAS. K. WILSON, President; WM. PIERCE JOHNSON. Vice- 
President: LEWIS I. COWGILL, Cashier; F. W. WOLFE, As- 
sistant Cashier. 

Capital. $500,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits. $180,000. 

DIRECTORS— William J. Dutton, C. S. Benedict. William 
Pierce Johnson, H. E. Huntington, George A. Newhall. Orestis 
Pierce, George A. Pope, James K. Wilson, L. I. Cowglll. 

AGENTS: New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National 
Bank, Chemical National Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis — The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City — 
First National Bank. London — Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris — 
Morgan. Harjes & Co. Denver— National Banit of Commerce. 
Johannesburg— Robinson South African Banking Co., Limited. 

Tbe Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— Toronto. 
Paid-up Capital. J8.700.000. Reserve Fund. $3,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $70,000,000. 
HON. GEORGE A. COX. President. 
B. E. Walker. General Manager. Alex. Laird. Asst. Gen. Mgr. 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard Street. E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin. Cranhrook. 
Fernie. Greenwood, Kamloops. Ladvsmlth. Nanaimo, Nelson, 
New 'Westminster. Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 
Also 80 other branches covering the principal points In 
Manitoba. N. W. Territories and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England. The Bank of 
Scotland. Lloyds Bank, Ltd.. The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank. Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The Northern Trust Co. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
S»N FRJNCISCO 0FFIC*- 

325 California Street. 

A. KAINS. Manager. 

London. Paris and American Bank ,,..,„„,, 

N. W. Cor. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $5,500,000. Paid-Up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,100,000. 
HEAD OFFTCE-^10 Threadneedle St.. London. E. C. 
AGENTS: New York— Agencv of the London. Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cle. 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct 
on tbe principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits Issued. 

STG. GREENEBAUM. MANAGER; H. S. GREEN. Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

Central Trust Co., of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1.725.000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian ' or 
Trustee. 

Check accounts solicited. Legal depository for money In Pro- 
bate Court proceedings. Interest paid on trust deposits and 
savings. Investments carefully selected. 

OFFICERS- 
Frank J. Symmes. President; A. Ponlatowskl. First Vice-Presi- 
dent; Horace L. Hill, Second Vice-President; H. Brunner, Cash- 
ier. 



Continental Building & Loan a«.«imi.„ 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 

301 California St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $15,000 ono 00 

Paid-in Capital 3,0OO.nnn 00 

Profit and Reserve Fund 450.000 00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term, and 5 per cent on ordinary denosits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President. William Corbln. Secretary 
and General Manager. 

The flnelo-Californian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London. E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid-up $1500 000 

Subscribed 3.000.0(10 Reserve Fund '70o!oo0 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts 
makes telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS— William Alvord. William Babcock. Adam Grant 

S. L. Abbott. Jr., O. D. Baldwin. i>\ Monteagle. Warren n 

Clark, E. J. McCutcheon, R. H. Pease. ' 




IMPROVEMENTS. 




From the unprecedented boom of the last half year 
the real estate market seems to have subsided into 
a healthy activity which indicates that many in- 
vestors are still in the market, but that there will be 
no reaction from the present favorable trade condi- 
tions in real estate. For the week ending last Satur- 
day, thirty-five building contracts were recorded, 
representing a total expenditure of $180,000 for the 

contemplated improvements. 

* * * 

Competitive bids for tbe construction of the new 
Customs House on Battery street are going in rapidly 
to Washington, where all bids must be received not 
later than December 16th. The building is to be 
five stories and fireproof, and to cost $1,440,000. The 
competitors for the contract are each submitting 
original designs, without receiving further instruc- 
tions regarding the requirements. Many local ar- 
chitects are offering plans. 

* * * 

The new postoffice, situated on the northeast cor- 
ner of Mission and Sixth streets is nearing comple- 
tion. Even with the scaffolding around it, the build- 
ing gives evidence of great architectural beauty. 
When finished, it will be one of the best equipped 
as well as one of the handsomest postoffices in the 
United States. This is no more than fair, as the 
postoffice now in use would be a disgrace even to a 
small lumber camp. 

* * * 

After negotiations, covering a period of about one 
year, the Mining Stock Exchange on the south side 
of Pine street, between Montgomery and Sansome, 
has been sold to Marion Leventritt and his associ- 
ates. The delay in the transfer of the property 
was due to the fact that several of the persons whose 
signatures were to be secured, proved hard to find. 
The price paid for the property was $300,000. The 
building is old style in every respect, with spacious 
offices such as do not characterize the modern office 
building. Leaventritt and associates intend spend- 
ing $200,000 remodeling the building, to which five 
stories will be added, and which will be modernized 
and equipped with elevator service. 

* * * 

The bond issue within four decades will have cost 
the city $31,162,830.13, which is figuring the interest 
at 3/^ P er cent. The city needs the money to be 
raised in this way, and while the entire amount is to 
be expended in improvements, the sewers, hospitals, 
schools and streets should have the first considera- 
tion. Let us hone, too, that before the end of the 
forty years, San Francisco will have profited by some 
of tbe lessons in municipal Government already 
given. Recent revelations show that the politicians 
now in charge at the City Hall seem to have no use 
for the city's revenues other than to spend them for 
the reward of their own henchmen and the enrich- 
ment of themselves. Our large and ever-increasing 
army of tax-parasites has been for some time the 
marvel of other cities, and now that the Honorable 
Michael Casey's statement of the increased salaries 
for the present fiscal year in his department has 
been made public, it seems indeed time to call a halt. 



August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•1 



The statement which Casey has filed with the ( ivil 
Service Commission and the Auditor show an annual 
increase in the salary list of the Board of Public 
Works of $9,985. This amount is made up chiefly 
by various individual raises of salary of from one hun- 
dred to eight hundred per cent. "Turn the rascals 
out" is a slogan which has been used effectively 
more than once, and it may be the battle cry of 

the next municipal election. 

• • • 

The recent report made by Secretary McCarthy of 
the Fire Department is to the tax-payers about the 
most gratifying revelation made for some time in 
the matter of city expenditures. For the fiscal vear 
just ended, the report shows an expenditure for the 
maintenance of the fifty-eight companies composing 
the fire department of $112,805.28. as against $230,- 
073.74 for the fifty companies of the department in 
1895-6. Each fiscal year during the intervening time 
shows a decrease of expenditures up to the time of 
the figures quoted. Economy in any part of the city 
Government is a rarity, and this decrease in tax- 
squandering must be attributed to Secretary McCar- 
thy himself, who since his installment has insisted 
upon the reduction of all contracts to writing, an in- 
novation in the fire department, and has also been 
most circumspect in the purchase of live stock and 
supplies. 

If You are Looking 

for a perfect condensed milk preserved without sugar, buy 
Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream. It is not only 
a perfect food for infants, but its delicious flavor and rich- 
ness makes it superior to raw cream for cereals, coffee, tea, 
chocolate and general household cooking. Prepared by 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 



BANKING. 



A rub at the Post-St. Hammam will do you good. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Savage Mining Company. 

Location ol principal place of business — flan Francisco. California. Loca- 
tion of works — Virginia City. Storey County. Nevada 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of directors, held on 
the 21st day of July, 1903. an assessment. (No. 110) of ten (10) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, paya- 
ble Immediately In United states gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the oompany, room 21-23 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery St.. 
Han Francisco, Oal 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
25th DAY OP AUGUST 1903. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction : and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY.the 15th day of September, 
1908. at 1 o'clock to pay the dellnauent assessment, together with the 
oust of advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of 
Dlreotors. 

JOHN W. TWIGGS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 21-22 Nevada Block, No. S09 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
elsco, Cal 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of JOHN R. DENNIS, Deceased. Notice Is hereby 
given by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM, Administrator 
of the estate of JOHN R. DENNIS, Deceased, to the credi- 
tors of. and al persons having claims against the said deceased. 
to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers, within four months 
after the first publication of this notice, to the said Adminis- 
trator, at Room 79, Chronicle Bund.ng, junction Kearny, Geary 
and Market streets, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his 
place for the transaction of the business of the said estate in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 

JOHN FARNHAM, 

Administrator of the Estate of JOHN R. DENNIS, Deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco. July 4, 1903. 

CARLTON W. GREENE, attorney for administrator. 

Rooms 73, 76 and 79, Chronicle building. 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of WILLIAM JACOBY, Deceased. Notice is hereby 
given by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM. Administrator 
of the estate of WILLIAM JACOBY, Deceased, to the credi- 
tors of. and all persons having claims against the said deceased, 
to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers, within four months 
after the first publication of this notice, to the said Adminis- 
trator, at Room 79, Chronicle Building. Junction Kearny. Geary 
and Market streets, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his 
place for the transaction of the business of the said estate in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 

JOHN FARNHAM, 
Admlnistraotr of the Estate of WILLIAM JACOBY. Deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, July 4. 1903. 

CARLTON W. GREENE, attorney for administrator. 

Rooms 73, 76 and 79. Chronicle building. 



Wells. Far^o & Co. Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Capital, Surplus, and Undivided i J|7(WU)(WM) 

Homer S. King, Presidents. L. Llpman, (^ashler; Frank B. 

King. Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Mills. Assistant Cashier 
BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake. Utah; Portland. Or 
Correspondents throughout the world. General Banking busl- 

neaa transacted . 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Deposits, June 30, 1903 $33 041290 

Palp-up Capital 1,'oooioon 

Reserve Fund 247 657 

Contingent Fund 62s!l56 

E. B. POND. President; W. C. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President; 
ROBERT WATT. Vice-President; LOVELL WHITE. Cashier; R. 
M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— Henry F. Allen. William A. Magee. W. C. B. De 
Fremery, C. O. G. Miller, Robert Watt. George C. Boardman, 
Fred H. Beaver. Jacob Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms 
and farming lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks 
payable in San Francisco postofflce, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express, but the responsibility of this 
bank commences only with the receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. "m. and Saturday evenings, for re- 
ceipt of deposits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

FOUNDED 1864. 

Capital $2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, July 1, 1903, $4,386,086.72 

William Alvord, President; Charles R. Bishop, Vice-President; 

Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; Irving M. Moulton, Cashier; 

Sam H. Daniels. Assistant Cashier; William R. Pentz, Assistant 

Cashier; Allen M. Clay, Secretary. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord, President; James M. Allen, Attorney-at-Law: 
Frank B. Anderson, Vice-President; William Babcock, President 
Parrott & Co.; Charles R. Bishop, Capitalist: Antoine Borel. 
Ant. Borel & Co., Bankers; Warren D. Clark, Williams. DImond 
& Co.; George E. Goodman. Banker; Adam Grant. Murphy, Grant 
& Co.; Edward W. Hopkins. Capitalist; John F. Merrill. Hol- 
brook, Merrill & Stetson; Jacob Stern, Levi Strauss & Co. 

Foreign and domestic exchange bought and sold. Commercial 
and travelers' letters of credit issued, available in all parts of 
the world. 
Correspondence solicited. Accounts invited. 

The German Savinqs & Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,397,768.10 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1,000.000.00 

Deposits, June 30, 1903 34,819,893.12 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Steinhart, Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter, and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny: Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow.. 

MutUal SaVingS Bank, of San Francisco 

710 Market St , Opn. Third 

Guarantee Capital «1,000.0'0 

Paid up Capital and Surplus «W.non 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY. Vice-President; 
GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vlce-Pres't; 
C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, 
James Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Charles S. 
Neal, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

International Banking Corporation 

Capital and Surplus Paid-in $6,783,000 

' Capital and Surplus Authorized « 000,000 

NEW YORK OFFICE— No. 1 Wall Street. 
William L. Mover, President; James H. Rodgers. Secretary pro 
tern - John Hubbard, Treasurer; John B. ^ee, General Manager; 
William Maclntyre, Assistant General Manager. 

BRANCHES— London, City of Mexico, Singapore, Hongkong, 
Manila, Shanghai, Yokohama, Bombay, Calcutta, 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— Nos. 32-34 Sansome St. F. E. 
BECK, manager; P. G. EASTWICK, JR., Cashier. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora.- 
tions, firms and individuals solicited. Commercial and trav- 
elers' letters of credit Issued, available in any part of the world. 
Cable transfers, foreign and domestic exchange and bullion 
bought and sold at current rates. Collections effected. 'Interest- 
bearing certificates of deposit Issued for fixed periods. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 




Financial 




A New Departure 
in Mine Promotion. 



Lying about three miles 
north of Tonopah, and 
within the Tonopah district, 
have been discovered re- 
cently some very rich and promising ledges. The for- 
mation of the country is identical with that in the now 
famous Ray district, and the ledges which have so 
far been uncovered contain ores of a similar character; 
equally as rich in silver and gold as the Ray ores, 
while at the same time carrying a high percentage of 
lead and from 12 to 15 per cent copper. A number 
of these properties have been taken up by prominent 
mining men and active work is being carried on. Two 
of the most promising claims, and upon which two 
large ledges have been uncovered in a number of 
places, disclosing valuable ores, have been acquired 
by Robert B. Smith, ex-Governor of the State of Mon- 
tana; T. T. Lyon, George F. Halla, San Francisco, 
Cal., George F. Blakeslee, George E. Kramer, Tono- 
pah, Frank G. Kauffman, miner, and a number of 
associates, all mining men of experience, who have 
organized the Desert King Mining Company of Tono- 
pah for the purpose of thoroughly developing the 
same. It is the intention to commence sinking as 
soon as machinery and materials can be gotten upon 
the ground, continuing until a depth of five hundred 
feet has been reached, and at the same time drift and 
cross-cut from each one hundred foot station. They 
feel confident that with such development they will 
have a property that will rank among the large and 
profitable mines of Tonopah. For the purpose of as- 
sistance in the matter of this contemplated develop- 
ment, the company propose to offer a limited amount 
of their treasury stock for sale, and so confident are 
the officers of the company that they have a property 
of unquestioned merit that they have arranged with 
the Pacific Underwriting and Trust Company for 
an issue of $100,000. Gold bonds, bearing 2 r 4 per 
cent interest, which will be offered subscribers of 
their stock as security therefor, the idea being to se- 
cure every purchaser of their stock against the possi- 
bility of loss of principal, and at the same time offer 
them every opportunity of large eains incident to 
successful mining enterprise. The idea has been suc- 
cessfully employed in industrial propositions, but is 
new as applied to mining, and the application of it 
by the Desert King Mining Companv, showing as 
it does the faith of the companv in its properties, 
should be met with favor by the investing public. 
The company has opened offices at JOO Parrott Build- 
ing, with Mr. Frank G. Kaufman its Fiscal Agent in 
charge, who will take pleasure in answering all in- 
quiries concerning the property and plan of operation. 
The proposed organization of the 
Spring Valley Spring Valley Water Works will 
Reorganized. be carried into effect. More than 
102,000 shares of the stock, out of 
a total of 140,000 shares issued, having voted to that 
effect at a meeting held on Wednesdav last. This 
involves the transfer of all property, rights and busi- 
ness of the present corporation to the Spring Valley 
Water Company, the new corporation formed with a 
capital of $28,000,000 in stock, and an issue about to 
be made of $28,000,000 in twenty year four per cent 



bonds, to take up all the outstanding bonds of the 
old concern and pay its debts. The bond issue will 
be placed with the Union Trust Company of this 
city as trustee of the mortgage. It is understood 
that the holders of one share of the old stock will 
receive in exchange two shares of. the new. 

Had there been a break in the 
Pine-St Market. Pine-street market last week 

like that which occurred in 
New York, what a howl would have gone up from the 
moralists and parasites, especially from those good 
good-goodies on the Comstock, whose existence de- 
pends upon the life of the mines they deride on every 
opportunity. Possibly, had this market gone down 
out of sight temporarily, they would have been more 
happy from a financial standpoint, than they would 
be aid it advance, every dollar of rise making them 
feel as if the bottom had dropped out of their bank 
account. Business here continues quiet, as it always 
is at this season of the. year, but prices show few 
changes. Dealers are anxiously awaiting news of 
the pumps starting up again at the north end. This 
will likely occur somewhere about the first of the 
coming month. 

The suit of B. W. Gamble vs. 

Wants a Change the owners of the Silver Peak 

of Venue. mine, is evidently still pending, 

from the fact that the plaintiff 
is now petitioning the Supreme Court for a man- 
damus to compel Judge Murphy of Esmeralda 
County to transfer the case to some, other county in 
this State on the ground that he is diqualified to try 
the case. We trust the appeal will have some effect 
in enabling justice to be done in this suit, which has 
tied up a valuable property for years past. It does 
not follow that if the owners are millionaires that 
this should militate against the interests of a poor 
man and keep the scales of justice hanging in the bal- 
ance for years. People are beginning to talk about 
the dog in the manger policy which has kept this 
property in the background for years past, the owners 
unwilling to either work it themselves or to let others 
work it. 



P. N. Lilienthal, manager of the Anglo-California 
Rank, has returned from an extended trip through 
Europe. 



We have seen the new subscription fee of twenty 
dollar cash shares just issued by the La Zacualpa 
Rubber Plantation. This is the best investment pre- 



.5\ SCHLAMM..... 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

First-class Workmanship and Fitting at 
Reasonable Prices. 

Military, Naval and Society Uniform Equipments a Specialty 

140 Phelan Building, San Francisco. 

Cor. Market and O'Farrell Sts. Tel. Red 6921. 



Pacific States Mining & Investment Co. 

Established 1892. 
326 Post St., San Francisco. European office, 64 Kaiser Wllhelra 
Street, Hamburg. 
This company has agents or brokers and own offices In the 
principal cities of America and Europe. Stock Issues taken 
over for sale. Stocks underwritten and guaranteed by gold 
bonds. Choice stocks for sale. Legitimate mining, oil and agri- 
cultural and Industrial enterprises financed and promoted. 
Publishers of the "Pacific States Investor," the leading financial 
paper of the West. Strictest confidence observed In all com- 
munications or Inquiries. Bank references. 



August i, 1903. 



sented the public for a long time. The iflcurity is 
first-class and the investment carries fust sufficient 
element of speculation to give the investoi 
opportunity lor an enormous increase on his in 
ment. It eliminates the great risk of buying stock. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LE1TER. 



The long-expected assessment in the North Shore 
stock has arrived at last, but not so heavily as the 
prophets of the street have predicted, being only at 
the rate of $5 per share, which will make it easier 
for shareholders than if they had been held up for 
the $10 which had it would be the amount of the lew. 
The June statement shows an increase in the gross 
earnings of $12,481, and in earnings over operating 
expenses of $8,245. 



33 

Business on the local Stock and l'..>n<l exchange 
was dull during the past week, both in the share list 
and 111 bonds. There was no special feature in the 
market ol any kind, with little or no demand. 

Out of $1,000,000 authorized issue of 30-year 5 per 
cent bonds, the Northern California Power Company 
is offering $200,000 worth for sale. 

There is much satisfaction evinced by the members 
of the Merchants' Exchange on the fact that William 
Babcock has been elected president for the ensuing 
year. He was vice-president of the Board of which 
George W. McNear was president, and as they 
worked most harmoniously together Mr. McNear is 
to be congratulated on so worthy a successor. 



Tonopah==Tonopah 

INVEST NOW IN TONOPAH CENTRAL MINING STOCK 

Advanced in Price Jan. 15 from 25c. to 50c. a Share. Sure to go to Par. — $1 per share— soon. 




# ^ <? ^s 

4 f $& & 



No risk whatever in investing in stock in the Tonopah Central Mining Company. It's bound to double 
and quadruple in value very soon. 100,000 shares of Treasury stock are being sold WHOLLY FOB THE 
PURPOSE OF DEVELOPING THE PROPERTY. 

The Company owns Eight of the best located claims. The ore is rich in gold and silver. Work Is 
now going rapidly forward. A double compartment shaft is now down 90 feet, fully timbered through- 
out. The following extract is from the Mining and Engineering Review, and bears out the claims of 
eminent experts that the Tonopah Central Mining Company's property is more favorably located than 
any of the other properties in the Tonopah District: "Another rich strike has been maoe In Tono- 
pah. This time it is in the main shaft of the California Tonopah, which adjoins the Tonopah Central 
(formerly known as the St. Patrick Group.) A ledge of ore has been opened up which goes over $500 
per ton, and is in direct line with the Tonopah Central Ledge." 

The stock of this company is non-assessable, with a par value of $1.00 per share. The location of- 
the company's mine on the slope of Butler Mountain, between the famous Mipah ledge and the rich 
strikes of Gold Mountain indicates that its stock will be a dividend paying investment, and that It will 
have an early increase in value. 

A hoist capable of sinking to a depth of 350 feet has been installed, and lr is only a matter of a 
short time when the ledge will be encountered. The California lonopah struck their ledge at a depth 
of 127 feet, and it is 40 feet wide, and is continued through the properties of the Tonopah Central Min- 
ing Company. 

All stockholders participate equally in the profits of the company. 

Investors in shares of this company have no taxes, no assessments, lines, Interests or liabilities of 
any kind to pay. 

The shareholders' interests are mutual and collective. There is no preferred stock, inasmuch as the 
original stockholders have placed all their stock in escrow there to remain until tie mine is on an 
absolutely dividend paying basis. 

No safer or more profitable investment can be made than is offered you in the shape of stock in the 
TONOPAH CENTRAL MINING CO. Address all communications and make remittances to 



OFFICES 40J-2-3 CALL BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



J. H. N. CLAUSEN, Assistant Secretary 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



Mavis Consolidated Cold 
and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000. 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of Cali- 
fornia. 

Location of works. Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 
A No assessments will be levied. 



I 



I 

£ 

a 
• 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share Q 

for development purposes. The ore in sight is prac i- • 

cally unlimited. When the present issue of stock is A 

enhausted, the price will be raised to 50 cents a 9 

share. A 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 o 

Market street, for prospectus which gives full Infor- A 

mation. m 

VINCENT NEALE. Secretary. J 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide. 

BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladies and families. 
Private entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street 

below Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT, N. E. corner Eddy and Ma- 
son Sts. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, 
Main 429. A. B. Blanco & D. Brun. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY, 838 Guerrero street Selections on appro- 
val; any place in the world. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public and U. S. Pension At 
torney. Office at Lincoln Investment Co., 620 Market SL, 
opp. Palace Hotel. Tel. Bush 518. Residence 415 Van Ness. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314, J16, 318 
Main St. Iron work of every description designed and 
constructed. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN IWI^h.^,^ 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs Drpot Bt 
823 Market St., San Frauolsco. Send for circular. 



Murphy, Gran! & Co.. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goous. Manufacturers of fur- 
nishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of "The 
NEVER-RIP" OVERALL. The best In the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, velvets, 
silks, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawls, notions, smokers' 
articles, stationery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney-at-Law 
Crocker building, 8an Francisco 



INSURANCE. 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 17S2. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St., S. F. 




Insurance 



aii£2s£3^% 



Tf--- 




The annual meeting of the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters of the United States was held in New 
York on May 14th, and the official report of the pro- 
ceedings has just been issued. The members assem- 
bled at the offices of the New York Board of Under- 
writers, 32 Nassau street, where the proceedings were 
followed by an elaborate banquet. The reports made 
by the various committees were exhaustive and inter- 
esting and covered all of the multitudinous subjects 
concerning the business of fire insurance. The com- 
mittee on lighting, heating and patents submitted 
a report interesting not only to underwriters, but to 
the general public as well, in that the methods rec- 
ommended for the elimination of fire hazard are 
simple and easily understood. The report states 
that acetylene, improperly used, is about the most 
dangerous form of lighting, and it is urged that all 
acetylene generating machines be entirely detached 
from the building in which the light is used. The 
clear and beautiful light given by acetylene caused 
it to become a very popular method of lighting when 
at first introduced, but subsequent fires resulting 
therefrom have diminished its use. The National 
Board of Fire Underwriters stands for the best prac- 
tices in fire insurance, and each annual meeting of the 
organization shows an increased tendency among the 
companies to adopt the best methods in handling 
business as well as in eliminating fire losses. 

* * * 

Mr. William G. Taffinder, editor of the Pacific Un- 
derwriter, returned to the city several days ago, af- 
ter an illness and a convalescent vacation. Mr. Taf- 
finder reports the entire restoration of his health, and 
has resumed his editorial duties. 

* * * 

Insurance Commissioner E. Myron Wolf has been 
served with papers in a suit brought by the Mutual 
Reserve' Life Insurance Co. of New York for $200,000 
damages alleged to be due the company because of 
the Commissioner's refusal to grant the Mutual Re- 
serve a license to do business in this State. Appli- 
cation for a writ of mandate was also made. Mr. 
Wolf states that he at first refused the company's 
application to enter the State because they had not 
complied with the requirements, and that they will 
be granted a license as soon as it can be legally al- 
lowed them. The application of this company was 
first submitted to Commissioner Wolf last October, 
and the commissioner claims that the fact that they 
have not long since been admitted to the State is their 
own fault. Since taking office, Commissioner Wolf 
has insisted upon a strict observance of the law, and 
while many Eastern and foreign companies have 
been denied the California license, the Mutual Re- 
serve is the first company to take the matter into 
the courts. The decision will be watched with great 
interest. The Commissioner states that with a larger 
appropriation for expenses, his office could do far 
more effective work in weeding out the unreliable 
companies. Mr. Wolf attended the last session of the 
Legislature, and applied unofficially for a larger ap- 
propriation, which he saw could not be granted, as 
the disposition was not to increase the tax rate. 



August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»S 



Lu-K\vong-Way has succeeded Lui-Men as agent 
of the l'o-On .Marine & Go Down Insurance Company 
of Hongkong. He has offices at 715 Commercial St. 

"Go down," it seems relevant to explain, means wan- 
house in all Oriental countries. 
* * * 

Litigation over the life insurance of suicides con- 
tinues a flourishing business, notwithstanding the 
fact that the courts have many times settled the mat- 
ter by establishing precedents. It seems a pity that 
some definite and permanent understanding cannot 
be reached on this point, but while it is manifestly 
unfair for a man who contemplates suicide to insure 
his life, it is equally unjust for a company to repu- 
diate the policy of a man who has paid his premiums 
up to the time he took his own life, perhaps in a fit 
of temporary insanity. Rev. C. M. Sheldon's com- 
pany, to be established at Kansas City, will be run 
on strictly altruistic principles, it is alleged. It would 
therefore be most interesting to know whether or not 
the Reverend and notorious gentleman intends to con- 
test the policies of suicides. 

Sailors have heretofore been prohibited life insur- 
ance risks, and until recently the company employing 
them could not be held responsible for their accidental 
death at sea. The American courts, however, have 
lately rendered several decisions granting damages 
to the heirs of deceased sailors whose death was 
shown to be due to the employer's carelessness. It 
is an interesting question wihether the precedent 
established in this way will not cause life insurance 
companies to accept the sailor on the same terms 
that those engaged in other hazardous occupations 
are accepted. Eliminating the feature of accidental 
death through marine disaster, sailors should prove 
exceedingly good risks, as most of them are long-lived 
and healthy. 

Zinkand's has made Its own place. All that is good 

to eat or drink can be obtained there. The best viands and 
good music ought to be enough for any one, and the crowds 
of patrons show this to be the case. 



INSURANCE. 



"Bon Marc he Clothing P^-eno-Oatory 

40 Ellis Street, Rooms 14-15-16. 

SUITS CLEANED AND PRESSED $1.00. 

Suits CaUed for and Delivered Free. SUITS PRESSED WHILE YOU 
SLEEP. Repaiiii.g and Alterations. OPEN ALL NIGHT. We run 
four wagons. Telephone Drumm 44. 



La Grande Laundry Tel . Bush n . 

Principal Office— 23 Powell St. Branch Office— 11 Taylor St 
Laundry— 12th St., between Folsom and Howard Streets. 



GOLDEN WEST CLOTHING RENOVATORY 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Phone Main 1167. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed fl.00 

Monthly Contracts 1.M 



PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY 



No. t Ldck Place. 



Furnishes ( hand or roller towels, $1 per month; 
12 hand or roller towels 91.50 per month. Tsl. 
Main 1710. 

Ejramtnation-r Free. 

DR. P. A. CLISE & SONS 
Eye-sight specialists. 1023 Market Street. S, F. 
"I wish it were possible to make all the people 
who have Imperfect vision, urderstand what perfect work you are doing 
in fitting glasses. The glasses you prescribed for my wife and two 
daughters are entirely satisfactory. Being master of your profession you 
ought to do a fine business here In San Francisco. Yours truly. 

JAS. W. HARRIS. Supt. Cal. St., R. R. Co. 




FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMANS FUND 

IN3URANOE COMPANY OF 3A.N FRANCISCO. GAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Company of I lorth America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022,01$ 

JAMES D. BAILET, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

Royal Exchangi Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 

Capital Paid-up, $3,446,100. Assets, $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $8,930,431.41 Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch : 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

MeW Zealand Insurance Company 

OF ii EW ZEALAND. 
Capital. 15,000.000 UNLIMITED liABIli It ur SHAHe.rlU1.llcn.. 

Office in company's building, 312 California St. 

CLINx'ON FOLGER, Acting Manager. 
The Lambla Realty Co., City Agents, 505 California St. 

Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

Bntish and Foreign Marine Insurance Go. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $67,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St, S. P. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY. 

Capital $2,250,000 Assets $10,984,246 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 
Pacific Coast Department:— 204-208 Sansome street, San Francisco 

North German Fire Insurance Go. 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



OBITUARY. 

Rev. Robert Chester Foute, D. D., for ninetem 
years rector of Grace Episcopal Church, died on July 
23d. The cause of his death was apoplexy. 

Dr. Foute was born in Tennessee, and became a 
naval cadet at Annapolis in 1857. During the Civil 
War he took sides with the Confederate States, en- 
tered the navy as a midshipman, and commanded one 
of the guns on the Merrimac during her fight with the 
Monitor. At the close of the war he went to Europe, 
where he married the niece of General Phil Kear- 
ney. He was called to Grace parish in 1884, and re- 
mained in charge until his death. He was pron - 
nently mentioned for the vacant bishopric of Hawaii, 
but declined to leave San Francisco. He leaves a 
wife, a son and a daughter. 

His funeral took place on Monday. The honor- 
ary pallbearers were : Representing the standing com- 
mittee of the diocese of California, clerical memlier-, 
the Rev. E. L. Parsons, the Rev. Dr. Bakewell ; lay 
members, A. N. Drown, C. W. Haven, William Bab- 
cock, Admiral Kempf. The vestry/ of Grace Church 
was represented by L. M. Ringwald and William 
Mintzer, wardens, and William K. Crocker. Thomas 
P. Woodward, Kirkham Wright, A. B. McCreery, 
George B. Hooke, Herbert Folger, William M. Given. 
W. S. Tevis. The interment, which was private, was 
at Cypress Lawn Cemetery. 

Gilbert Palache, for over thirty years a member of 
the firm of H. M. Newhall & Co., and very highly es- 
teemed in business circles, died on July 17th at his 
residence on Eddy street. 

Michael Donoghue, the oldest employee of the First 
National Bank, died this week. Air. Donoghue had 
been in the bank's service for thirty one years. He 
was a native of Armagh, Ireland, and came to Cali- 
fornia in 1861. In the same year he entered the ser- 
vice of the bank and worked there steadily until a 
month ago, when his wife died. 

He leaves two daughters, Cecilia and Katherine 
Donoghue. 




Near Mt. Shasta 

3,555 feet above the 
level of the sea, on the 
western side of Mt. 
Shasta lies Sisson's Tav- 
ern nestled among) the 
pines of the Sierras.^Tel- 
ephone, telegraph and 
daily mail; a half mile 
from the railroad station 
with free bos meeting all 
trains. Magnificent 
scenery, mild, refreshing, 
healthful climate, pure 
air and lots of comfort. 
Hsson's Tavern is not a 
place for dress or society 
but rather a resort «here 
quiet and comfort and 
peace have precedent. 
The Tavern is large and 
comfortable and hard fin- 
ished throughout with 
polished floors. The lable 



a 




board is delicious, the 
dishes are dainty and 
served in a most inviting 
manner. Fare $12.00 for 
round trip and $1.50 ad- 
ditional for sleeping car 
accommodations. Kates 
$2.50 per day or $14.00 
per week and upward. 
For information call at 
Southern Facinc Kail- 
road Information Bur- 
eau, 613 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Feck's 
Tourist Information Bur- 
eau, 11 Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, 
or Traveler's Informa- 
tion Bureau, 630 Market 
Street, San Francisco, or 
at 410 South Broadway, 
Los Angeles, Cal. For 
accommodations address 
Mrs. L. M. Sissou, Sis- 
son, Cal. 



MH.S. L. M. SISSOJV. T'ROT 

SISSON. CAL. 



15he POTTER ^ 



vv 



1 " 


H*^B PVim^inJ 
■ ■ ^WPWfin— Tii m 

I iiTtnrnr i irjgj 

11 II II iitP 


■S- ■ - Hi] 


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fill •. ij imnr 

ii ..•v-?5Br.- 




«*«--« ^ jj 









THE NEWPORT 

OF THE WEST 

Special summer 
rates of $2.50 
per day and up. 
Arrjerican pi aQ 
only. AsK for 
rates . . . 



^-^ 



SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 




August i, 1903 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




lff0T£L fiWZOJVWZ? 




Santa Cruz Mountains. No staging. Table first- 
class. Electric lights, boating, swimming, fishing, 
hunting, tennis and ping-pong. New management. 
See booklet S. P. Co., 613 Market street, or Hotel 
Ben Lomond. 



Laurel Dell Lake 



THE SWITZERLAND 
OF AMERICA 



This beautiful lake resort Is the only pleasure and health 
resort in the State that has Its own mineral springs and a 
chemically pure spring. 

Boating, swimming, marine toboggan, croquet, bowling, 
new livery tally-ho coach, saddle horses. Largest dining- 
room in Lake County. Pamphlets at Peck's, U Montgom- 
ery St., and railroad office, 660 Market street. 



Laurel Dell, Lake County. 



EDGAR DURNAN. Proprietor. 



WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California. 

Best summer and winter resort. Beautifully situated at 
the foot of Taylor Mountain, two and one-half miles from 
Santa Rosa. Hunting, fishing, croquet, billiard and all kinds 
of amusement. Fine drives, scenery unsurpassed. Fresh 
fruit, cream, butter, eggs; free camping. Circulars, full par- 
ticulars, Travelers* Bureau, 630 Market street. Special rates 
on Sunday, round trip $1.50. Rates— Board, room and bath 
Included, $8, $10, $12, per week. Special rates to families; 
'bus meets trains at Santa Rosa. Mrs. H. A. D. Fleming, 
Prop. Box 155. 



GOLF 
PING-PONG 

SWIMMING 



AUTOMOBILES 

NEW ANNEX 

NEW LANAI 



BALLS ALL SUMMER 
ON THE GOLF LINKS 
OF HOTEL VENDOME 
NO PLACE LIKE IT 



TENNIS 

BOWLING 

ORCHESTRA 



GEO. P. SNELL 

MANAGER 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 



rCAPITOiA-i 

The Atlantic City of the Pacific Coast. 
%Yz Hours Ride from San Francisco. 

Salmon fishing now at its best. 

Hotel accommodation b for joo guests. 
Hotel rates from Ji.jo per day upwards — 
$1$ per week. Hotel Orchestra— Marine 
Band — River Lake for boating ami bathing 
— Fine Beach and Surf Bathing — Howling — 
Naphtha Launches — Electric Rail mad to 
Santa Cruz. The greatest place in the 
world for children. 

July, August and Sept., ideal months. 

For Cottages ^nd Tent Grounds, addrsss F. 
Reaniekj For Hotel, R. M. Bkiare, 
Capitola, Cal. For General Information, 
Peck's Information Bureau, ll Mont- 
gomery Street, San Francisco. 



Pacific Congress Springs 

SARATOGA, SANTA CLARA CO., CAL. 

A charming: resort In the foothills of the Santa Cruz 
Mountains. Six miles from Los Gatos. Hotel with all mod- 
ern Improvements. Finest mineral waters In California. 
Address, r£. R. RAND, General Manager. 



Vichy Springs 



3 miles from Ulciah, Mendocino Co. Natural 
electric waters, champagne baths. Only place 
in the world of this class. Fishing, hunting. 
Crystal Springs. Accommodations; table first 
class. 

J. A. Redemeyer & Co., Props. 



GO TO 

HIGHLAND SPRINGS 

FOR HEALTH and PLEASURE 

Rates $io to $16 per week 

CRAIG & KERR, Managers. 



BEN LOflOND 

Park House and Cottages. An Ideal resort, 
unsurpassed climate, drives, fishing and hunt- 
ing. Two hours' ride to Big Basin. Moder- 
ate prices. 
ROBERT GAT, Proprietor. 



BAY STATE HOUSE AND cottages 

MRS. L. MATHISON, Proprietress. 

A CHARMING SUMMER AND WINTER RESORT 

Santa Cruz, Cal. 



Anderson Springs 

Only natural Mineral Steam 
Baths In Lake County 

14 distinct mineral springs of 8 different characters, hot 
and cold. Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. Board: $10 to J14 
per week. Address, J. Anderson, Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

Fare— San Francisco to Springs and return reduced to J8. 
Send for circular. Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 
320 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




SWEET ADVENTURE, CALL NO MORE. 
Juseph BllbSell Tailor in toeiibuei'o 

Sweet adventure, call no more, 
O let us dream upon the shore! 
Dream, and watch the boats come by 
Up bluer waters than the sky, 
Dazzling as lilies on the blue. 
Laden with love, a maiden crew. 
That whistle and sing an old romance 
Till the idle oars seem like a dance, 
And we would follow and woo: 
'Tis young love ferries heaven o'er, 
But let us dream upon the shore, 
Call no more! 

Call no more, O sweet and wild, 

Adventure, lest at length beguiled 

We tempt the oars, we die away 

Across the mirrored day, 

Float and wander into the dark 

Of the hill-reflection, whither — hark! 

How faint and far the osprey shrills 

Wheeling over the farther hills, 

And over the wood-mere he can see, 

Where the orchid blooms, and we would be! 

Lure us not from the dreaming shore. 

Dear adventure, call no more, 

Call no more. 



UNDERSONGS. 

Arthur Stringer in Smart Set 

In Summer didst thou never dream alone 

Beside some woodland stream that crept o'er stone 

And shoal and root in tinkling waterfalls, 

While from a meadow came the far-off calls 

Of piping birds across the wind-blown flowers, 

And deep-toned bees droned down the lazy hours? 

There, buried 'neath the daisies' waving heads, 
Deep in the clover's spangled whites and reds. 
Didst thou ne'er read some poet's golden page, 
M'ellow and pensive with the dust of age, 
Till woodland bird and bee and tinkling brook 
Blent with the music of the poet's book? 

And hast thou turned to that same page again, 

When earth has lost the old, familiar, strain 

Of mingling stream and noonday bee and bird, 

And in regretful undersongs still heard 

The droning wings and mellow-fluted notes 

In lingering echoes from those silent throats? 

And hast thou ne'er still heard the murmuring stream 

Creep thro' the music of the poet's dream? 



LOVE'S MIRACLE. 
William Murton Payne in Aliat lie 

'Tis not the touch of hands, 'tis not the light 
Shining from eyes that ardently do gaze 
On the beloved face, 'tis not the praise 

Of spoken words or sung, that may aright 

Reveal the spirit's worship; these give sight 

Of Love's fair flower and tender leafy sprays; 
But Love's fruition must be found in ways 

More subtly sought and moods more recondite. 

'Tis rather in the hours when far apart 

From the dead sight of uer whose very thought 
Hallows the soul, the hours with memories fraught 

With yearnings filled, when to the eyelids start 
Unbidden tears; Love's miracle then wrought 

Touches with fire the altar of the heart. 



THE PLOUGHMAN. 
Edwin Cailile Litsey in New England Magazine 
He draws a jagged wound across Earth's tender breast, 

And drops to warm embrace the grains of corn. 
With salve of sun and rain the wound is gently dressed, 
Then — miracle of God — a crop is born! 



August i, 1903. 

persons in Alameda 
County rely upon the 



1 70,000 
Oakland Herald 

FOR ALL THE NEWS 

THE HERALD is absolutely the Home Paper of 
Greater Oakland and of Alameda County. 

THE HERALD publishes each day complete for- 
eign, cable and domestic telegraphic news. 

THE HERALD records fully each day, and par- 
ticularly on Saturday, the doings of Greater Oakland 
Society. 

THE HERALD is without question the best ad- 
vertising medium in the County of Alameda. 

Rheumatism Cured in Three Days 

AZTEC OINTMENT 

CURES GUARANTEED 

213 Starr King Bldg. - San Francisco, Cel 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher and Mides Consolidated Mining Co. 

Assessment No. 32. 

Amount per share 5 cents 

Levied June 26, 1903 

Delinquent In office July 29, 1903 

Day of sale of delinquent stock August 18, 1903 

E. B. HOLMI-S. Secretary. 
Office— Room 50. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Co. 

Assessment No. 130 

Amounts per share 10 cents 

Levied July 10,1903 

Delinquent In office August 14, 1903 

Day of sale of delinquent stock September 3. 1903 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 11, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
Works — Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given (hat. at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 7th day of July, 19<'3. an assessment (No. 59) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, 
payable immediately. In United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, rooms 21 and 22,NevadaBlock.309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment Bhall remain unpaid on 
THE lllh DAY OF AUGUST. 1903, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and until 
payment Is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 31th day of 
August, 1903, to pay the delinquent assessment together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale- By order of the Board of 
Directors- 

JOHN W. TWIGG-i. Secretary. 

Office —Rooms 21 and 22 Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery Street. San 
Francisco, Cal. 



1 90,000 



People depena 
upon the 



Oakland Tribune 

for all + he news of the day. 

The TRIBUNE is the home paper of Oakland 
and Alameda County, and has no rival in its field. 

The TRIBUNE publishes, exclusively, the full 
Associated, Press dispatches. 

All society events of the week are mirrored in 
Saturday's TRIBUNE. 

Local and State politics receive attention by 
special writers in the same issue. 



August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Kv ARTIirn IHKIB&LKY 

The meet of the Automobile Club at Del Monte 
from the 7th to the 12th of this month promises t,> be 
an even greater success than its promoters expected. 
The interest in it is increasing, and names of owners 
who intend taking part in the run are received daily. 
Though some details of the arrangements have been 
given from time to time in this column, it may be 
well fas this is the last issue that will be published 
before the run begins )to recapitulate. Next Thurs- 
day, August 6th, the automobiles which intend to 
reach San Jose by way of Oakland and San Leandro. 
will leave San Francisco by the 3 p. m. Oakland Creek- 
ferry boat, and will proceed to San Jose as they 
please. The automobilists will spend that night at 
the Hotel Vendome. On Friday morning, having 
been joined by members of the San Jose and Alameda 
County Automobile Clubs, they will run to Del 
Monte, arriving there in good time for dinner. On 
Saturday, August 8th, the automobilists will attend 
the last day of the polo matches and pony races. On 
Sunday, August 9th, a trip will be made in the after- 
noon over the Seventeen-Mile Drive. It is also likelv 
that those motorists who intend taking part in the hill 
climbing contest on Monday will spend some of the 
Sabbath hours in tuning up their machines and seeing 
that their hearts, lungs and other vital organs are 
in good trim. On Monday, August 10th, beginning at 
10 o'clock in the morning, there will be a hill-climbing 
contest at Carmel Hill. This is open to all machines 
and the prize is a silver trophy given by E. Courtnev 
Ford, vice-president of the Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia. 

In the afternoon, beginning at 2 o'clock, a pro- 
gramme of nine races will be given on the Del Monte 
track, which is said to be in excellent condition. A 
few changes have been made in the events since the 
circular was issued. The programme now stands as 
follows : 

1 130 p. m. — First race, two miles, for gasoline ma- 
chines only, 1200 pounds and under— For a silver tro- 
phy given by the Pioneer Automobile Company. 

2:00 p. m. — Second race, two miles, open, for ma- 
chines 1200 pounds and under — For a silver trophy 
given by George E. Middleton. 

2 :2o p. m. — Third race, five miles, open, for ma- 
chines 1500 pounds and under; for a silver troohv 
given by the automobile department of the White 
Sewing Machine Company. 

2:45 P- m - — Fourth event, one-mile obstacle race — 
For a silver troohv. 

3:15 p. m. — Fifth race, five miles, open, for ma- 
chines 20 h. p. and under — For a silver trophy given 
by the National Automobile Company. Unless there 
are three or more starters in the event, it will be 
consolidated with the seventh race, and the trophy 
will be presented to the winner of that event. 

3:45 p. m. — Sixth race, ten miles, open, for ma- 
chines irrespective of power or weight — For a cup 
offered bv F. A. Hyde, president of the Automobile 
Club of California. 

4:15 p. m. — Seventh race, five miles against time — 
For a silver trophy given by F. A. Jacobs. Entries 



hi this event arc subject to the conditions laid down 
With regard to the fifth race: viz.. that it may be 
made an open event for cars of 20 h. p., or under. 

4:45 p. m.— Eighth race, five-mile handicap, open 
t<> all machines having participated in any of the 

fore 8 For Del Monte ir..phv, which must 

be won twice on the Del Monte track by the same 
person before becoming his absolute property. 

5:00 p. m. — Ninth race, five-mile handicap for own- 
ers exclusively, open to all machines. Dealers or 
any one connected in any way with the automobile 
industry will be positively prohibited from taking 
part. The prize will be a silver trophy presented by 
L. P. Lowe. 

On Tuesday, August nth, the automobilists will 
leave the Hotel Del Monte at 9:30 a. m. for Point 
Lobos, where luncheon will be served. They will 
return at their pleasure. This will end the official 
list of events, and on Wednesday the motorists will 
start for home. 

The list, which is being added to every day, of au- 
tomobilists who will make the trip to Del Monte, 
several days ago included the following names : 

From San Francisco — E. P. Brinegar, G. A. Boyer, 
H. T. Bradley, J. Dalzell Brown, W. H. Deming, J. 
D. Grant, Walter Grothe, C. A. Hawkins, F. A. Hyde, 



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UNIVERSAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 

137 to 151 FIRST STREET 



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factory on the Coast. Every 
facility for quick repairs, paint- 
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3° 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



Joseph Holle, Byron Jackson, H. S. Jerome, F. A. 
Jacobs, R. C. Lennie, L. P. Lowe, C. C. Moore, B. 

D. Merchant, F. A. Marriott, Charles Middleton, 1'. 
H. Parrish, Sydney L. M. Starr, James Spear, J. D. 
Spreckels, W. H. Talbot, William Von Voss, J. M. 
Wilkins, W. J. Wagner, D. Watson and G. VVhittell. 

From Alameda — John Conant, G. D. Cummings, 
L. A. Hicks, W. E. Knowles, H. Dana. 

From Watsonville — J. S. Menasco. 

From San Jose— Dr. J. L. Benetti, E. T. Sterling, 
President of the San Jose Automobile Club, and Dr. 

E. Wislocki. 

On Monday, July 27th, the case of P. F. Rockett, 
who was arrested for violating clause 8 of the new 
automobile ordinance passed by the Supervisors of 
Marin County, was heard before T. J. Lennon, Super- 
ior Judge. P. F. Rockett had been released on a writ" 
of habeas corpus, and was discharged after the near- 
ing. The clause forbade the operating of an automo- 
bile on any of the roads of Mann county "between the 
hours of sunset and sunrise." Judge Lennon held 
it invalid, not that it is simple nonsense and means 
nothing, but for the queer legal reason that it fails 
to particularize the day or days during which the 
prohibition may be effective. To the non-judicial 
mind the mere fact that a phrase is but sound and 
fury, signifying nothing, would seem to be sufficient 
reason for regarding it as wholly inoperative and 
void, but to a man on a Judge's seat this would seem 
too obvious and simple a means of reaching a decis- 
ion. The Board has, however, wrestled with the prob- 
lem of expression again, and has prepared a new- 
clause to take the place of the one recently deter- 
mined by the Superior Judge to be void. The new 
clause took effect on Monday last. During the hear- 
ing of the case the Judge expressed the opinion that 
the law-making body of the county has the power to 
pass such a provision (even if it is unable to express 
it in intelligible English) and said that, unless a pro- 
vision passed by the Board should be shown to be 
manifestly unreasonable, he would not set it aside. 
The Judge further said that, in his opinion, the "sun- 
set and sunrise" provision is a proper police regu- 
lation, and that he would deny any petition for a 
writ of habeas corpus based on the same grounds as 
the one before him. The Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia has thus gained the result it desired, and will 
be able to appeal to the Supreme Court on the denial 
of its petition for the writ of habeas corpus when an 
automobilist has been arrested for violation of the 
ordinance as amended. Mr. Hawkins, the attorney 
for the Automobile Club, says that the club will stand 
to its guns, and will seek a decision as to the validity 
of the new provision from the highest court of the 
State. 

Harold B. Larze'ere, who had been at Sobre Vista, 
Sonoma County, for some days, was arrested on Mon- 
day night for violating section 4 of the new ordinance. 
He was returning from his trip when a constable 
stopped him and inquired for his Marin County per- 
mit. This H. B. Larzelere did not possess. He was, 
accordingly, haled before Justice of the Peace Pryor 
and was admitted to bail. 

The Packard car "Pacific," which is making a 
transcontinental journey, was at Red Cliff, Colorado, 
on July 17th, where slippery steep hillsides made pro- 
gress slow. At Tennessee Pass, on the way to Buena 
Vista, Colorado, both mud chains were broken. On 
the way to Florissant, Colorado, the car suffered the 
second tire puncture since leaving San Francisco. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado, was reached on July 19, 
and Denver on July 20. Twenty miles before reach- 



ing Denver the travelers were met by the Denver 
Automobile Club. Fetch, the operator, being worn 
out with his efforts, it was determined to stop at Den- 
ver for two days' rest. 

The Pacific Motor Car Company expects to be in 
its new quarters, 49, 51 and 53 City Hall avenue, 
next week. 

The Electric Vehicle Company, of Hartford, Conn., 
has sold sixteen electric delivery wagons to R. H. 
Macy & Co., of New York. 

A Chicago Major, J. Fulmer, now a resident of Los 
Angeles, on July 17th entered the Yosemite Valley 
in an automobile. He is said to be the first motorist 



THE C A7> ^LL AC 




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Oldsmobiks, $450 

Mobiles $4(I01« $450 

Regardless of price, 
the most capable' au- 
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Price. $850.00. With tonrteau. $950.00. 

WESTER/* AX/TOMO'BILE CO. 

2U1-JIB 1.AHK1N STREET. 8. F 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 

Successors to Locomobile Co., of the Pacific. 

1622-1628 Market St., S. F. 

Jobbers and Dealers— Automobiles and Accessories 

SELLING AGENTS 

Win ton Motor Carriage Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Locombile Co., of America, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Olds Motor Works, Detroit, Mich. 

Vehicle Equipment Company, New York. 
Electric Trucks, Etc. 

Demmerle & Co., Leather Clothing 



NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 

Phone. South I 142 134 to 148 Golden Gale Ave. 

The largest and 
finest "Garage" in 
the West. 

Our line the highest 
types produced. 

RAMBLER; KNOX, Waterless; HAYNES - APPERSON 

AUTOCAR... .Touring Cars 
TOLE DO. ...Touring Cars 
PEERLESS. ...Touring Cars 

Give us a call and we will show you a full line of 
record-breakers. 




August i, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



who has accomplished this trip. James G. lair, Jr., 
and "Charlie" l-'air made an attempt several years 
ago in a gasoline carriage, but the machine broke 
down at Hazel Green. Oliver Lippincott, the well- 
known photographer, also made an unsuccessful at- 
tempt to enter the valley in a horseless carriage. The 
"Major" was accompanied by Mrs. Fulmer, Mi.ss \. 
L. Wade, and A. C. Stewart. Alter making a careful 
study of the roads, they journeyed by the Wawona 
route, experiencing no mishap at all. The machine 
was a gasoline one of 63. 2 h. p., with adjustable gears 
for mountain climbing. The worst parts of the trip 
were over the desert from Antelope to Tejon and 
across the hot sands of the Bakersfield plains. The 
heat was so great that the insulation round the spark 
coils began to melt, and it was necessary to cool it 
by pouring water on it. Near Newhall the steepest 
grade during the trip was encountered, and the trav- 
elers had to get out and walk. The Tehachapi moun- 
tains were crossed without accident, and the steep 
grades at Chinquapin were negotiated without seri- 
ous trouble. The travelers were the first to ride 
through the Sequoia Grove near Wawona in an auto- 
mobile. The party intends to spend some time in the 
Valley and to return to Los Angeles by way of 
Stockton, San Francisco and the Coast roads. 

The Locomobile Company of America has been 
doing a great deal of night work on its plant, and 
is now turning out a large number of gasoline cars. 
The factory at Bridgeport, Conn., is always open 
to inspection and may be reached by yacht or rail. 

W. S. Arnold, the well-known chauffeur, will jour- 
ney to Del Monte next week in a Winton touring car, 
1903 model, and will make arrangements with a 
party desirous to go and return by automobile. 

Moraghan's in tbe California Market is the best place for oysters 
and grill in town. Large and small Eastern and Caiifornian oysters 
clams, salads, vegetables, omelettes, chops an! steaks are all to be 
had in the greatest variety and of the best quality. The wine list 
is complete and includes the bestimported and Caiifornian liquors. 
No better salads are made any wheie. 



PACIFIC flOTOR CAR CO. 



Nelson's Amycose 
Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the Skin. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Consolidated Cal. & Virginia Mining Co. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. 
Location of Works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that, at a meeting of the Board of Di- 
rectors,, held on the 24th nay of July 1903, an assessment 
(No. 20) of twenty-five (25) cents per share was levied upon the 
capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately, in United 
States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the company. 
Room No. 29. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
28th DAT OF AUGUST, 1903 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on FRIDAY the 
18th day of September, 1903, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. By 
order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 

Office— Room No. 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, 
San Fr ancisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, for the election of Trustees for the ensuiug year and toe 
transaction of such other business as may be brougt before the meet- 
ing, will be held at the office of the company. No. 280. Steuart street,ban 
Francisco, on MONDAY, the 3rd day of Aueust. 1903. at ll o'clock, A. M. 
AUGUSTUS TAYLOR. Secretary. 

AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile Co.— 288 S, Market St., Phone John 
Automobiles stored and repaired. Expert workmanship. Gaso- 
line and oil at all hours. Santa Clara agents for the Western 
Automobile Company and National Automobile Company. 



Pacific Coast Agents. 




Packard 



Motor Car. 

St. Louis 

Motor Car. 

American 

Motor Car. 

) JONES C0RBIN 

Motor Car. 

Cudell Motor Cap 
The above cars exhibited at our repository, 1814 
Market Street. 



HAVE YOUR AUTOMOBILE EQUIPPED WITH 

Diamond Tires 



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LIFE-MOST MILEAGE-CAUSE 
LEAST TROUBLE ** <A *A 

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Pneumatic 
Cushions 



For Yacht, or Launch 

For Automobile or Carriage 

For Office Camp or Home 



FOR SALE IN 'FRISCO BY 

SKINNER & CO., 801 Market St. S. F. WEEKS $ CO., 81 Market St. 



DUCK, CRflSH 
and KHAKI SUITS 

BICYCLE SUITS 
'WMWWW. to order. 

ALL KINDS OF BAND SUITS 

FINE TAILORING A SPECIALTY 
79 Flood Building. Prjone Brown 196. S. F. 




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LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 

and Women 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make then) in 
any style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

II. E. SKINNER CO. 

801 MARKET ST. 




ELECTRIC a.nd GASOLINE 
CARS 

WELCH GASOLINE TOURING 
CAR. 

CONRAD LIGHT GASOLINE 
RVNABOVT 



A. E. BROOKE RIDLEY, > 8 F &\£I£ EET 

Tol.pbone South 894 Ban Franolaoo, Cal. 



3» 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August i, 1903. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



/*I|iV I1TIAC Hay wards Bldg., California and 
IlKa I liKIIN Montgomery Sts., San Francisco. 
«««* UM\v,j, 2O6 New High Street, Los Angeles. 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1899 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 389 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

TATE/R 

TEL. MAIN 198 - 55-57-59-61 FIRST ST.. 'SAN FRANCISCO 

BJalte, Moffit & To woe. Los Angeles. Cal. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland, Oregon. 



n 1* tor barber3 > bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

KrilCfiPC billiard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 
l/j, m*jliv,j makers, canners, dyers, flour mills, foundries, 
laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush flfts., 609 Sacramento St, S. F., Tel.flain 5611 




Phone Main 153. Established 1862 

RUBBER Tl RES 

TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

Nos. 57-59-6 1 Minna St., 

between 1st and 2nd, One block from Palace 
Hotel 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union 
Olubcor. Post and Stockton. Tel Main 153. 
Every vehicle quisite for business or pleas- 
ure. Special orders lor Four-in-Hands. J. 
TOMKINSON. Proprietor. 



Mantle <x§L Son, Inc. 

Haberdashers 

And Dealers In Men's Hign Class Furnishing Goods 

10 Stockton St.. San Francisco. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS- C