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Full text of "S.F. Newsletter (Jan.-June 1904)"

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ESTABLISHED JULY ao. 1856. 



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SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 2. 1904. 



Number 1. 



The s 
Ing. 3 



NEWS LETTER Is printed and published 
Marriott. Halleck build- 



■ y t)i-> proprietor, Frederick 
Sim Franciai 



Ins*, matter. 
■rk Office — ( where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions ami advertising}— 90S Broadway, C. C. Murphy, Represento- 

■: Office— anCornhill. K t'.. England. George street ,\ Oo. 
11 Williams. 10m Sew Y..rk Lite Building. 
M. W. Barber. 715 Exchange Building. 
p. announcements, advertising or other matter intended 
(or puldiention in the eiirrent number of the NEWS LETTER should 
lent to this office not later than 5 p. in. Thursday previous to day 

--'le 



Ella Wheeler Wilcox is to write a play. Xo need 
of that — Ella is a whole show in herself. 



A scientist from Yale is living at the Waldorf in 
New York on $1 a day. Great is science! 

Boston practically refuses to stand for a poultry 
exhibition in Faneuil Hall. How about an eagle 
show ? 



A New York infant is addicted to r.aps that last 
twenty-four hours. Who wouldn't have a baby like 
that? ' 



The race at Ingleside is not to the strong, but to 
the one who has a proper understanding with man- 
agers and bookmakers. 

Our "Happy New Year message" to our sister Re- 
public, the United States of Colombia, will be writ- 
ten on a thirteen-inch shell. 



Two million dollars went to Europe this year on 
the "Christmas steamers." Santa Claus will soon be 
trading his sleigh for an airship. 

Chicago has reached such a point of civic right- 
eousness that she has decided to name no more of 
her public schools after saloon-keepers. 

Snakes killed 22,810 people in India during 1901. 
How fortunate that the serpents most familiar to 
the Caucasian do not bite, but merely terrify. 

Believing that it is better to "boost" than to 
"knock," Congress is getting ready to pry Livernash 
out of the seat that does not belong to him. 

Parkhurst, New York's purifier, rises in his pulpit 
to thunder that "Parsifal" is blasphemy. And godless 
Gotham goes right on paying $10 a seat for the show. 

Though Chicago has raised $600,000 for the perma- 
nent housing of its orchestra, the wits and wags of 
X'ew York keep on poking fun at lakeside table man- 
ners. 



That long-range prophet and philanthropist, W. 
R. Hearst, shrieks in anguish over a massacre of 
Jews which he predicts for a Russian village on 
January 7th. Take another peep behind the veil, 
William, and see what the Democratic Conve. 
is going to do with you in the early sumine 



The artist who tried to blackmail Rockefeller out 

of $50,000 should have reflected that he was dealing 
with the world's greatest artist in acquiring and 
hanging onto wealth. 

A Chicago man, having quarreled with his wife 
the Other daj , over the supplement of a Sunday news- 
paper, killed her and himself. This is yellow jour- 
nalism turned crimson. 



What author would not envy M. l'A'bbe Loisy his 
chance of being listed in the Index Expurgatorius? 
He is sure of at least a paragraph in future editions 
of "Who's Who?" 



A despatch says that a Kentucky mob gathered in 
Jackson and fired hundreds of shots into the ground. 
Don't believe it : Kentuckians don't waste amunition 
in that way. 

In this season of "Peace on earth, good will toward 
men" even the gentlemen engaged in the shipbuild- 
ing combine have left off trying each to prove the 
other a swindler. 




Two Oregoniaris tell of an aerolite that missed 
them so narrowly as to scorch the hair on their 
heads. There's nothing the matter with the lying 
industry in Oregon. 

Too bad that W. J. Bryan did not meet Emperor 
William. There would have been a "talkfest" that 
would make a phonograph parlor sound like a deaf 
and dumb asylum. 

The Ohio young man who fell heir to $80,000 and 
carpeted his rooms with bills of large denomination, 
so that he might walk on money, will soon be sub- 
sisting upon the memory of it. 

Ohio C. Barber, president of the Diamond Match 
Company, was among the rich and prominent citizens 
who sawed wood in Akron for the Salvation Army's 
benefit. He is handier with the coupon scissors than 
the bucksaw. 

Joe Richardson, of Colfax, Washington, wagered 
that he could drink twenty glasses of beer in suc- 
cession. He died at the seventeenth, thus avoiding 
payment of the bet he had made. Some people have 
more luck than sense. 

It is telegraphed far and wide and a South Dakota 
man has been set free after serving a fifteen-year 
term in .State's prison for robbing a mail carrier of 
a two-cent stamp. An inconsequential detail is that 
he killed the postman. 

An Indiana preacher is so wrought up over the 
indelicacies of the waltz that in grim sarcasm he 
suggests as a substitute sofa hugging to appropriate 
,ic. He ought not to be unpopular with the gouty 
members of his flock. 



.STATE.. 



.^A 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



THE KISHINEF BUBBLE. 

It may be that the Christians of Kishinef are mak- 
ing ready to celebrate their Christmas on January 
7th by another wholesale butchery of Jews. This is 
the season when the Hebrew-hating sons of Adam- 
zad spur their souls to high endeavor with the sharp- 
toothed vodki, which a thoughtful Government 
manufactures and sells to them. The baiting of 
Jews at this time of year is a seasonal manifestation, 
to be looked for in kussia as certainly as one looks 
for cold weather in January. Thus far, however, the 
actual indications of a bloody Thursday at Kishinef 
have been visible only to the jaundiced eye of Wil- 
liam R. Hearst, who is afflicted with visions, waking 
and sleeping. Moved by Mr. Hearst's interpretation 
of his own bad dreams and by some knowledge of 
Russian predilections for Christmastide atrocities, 
this Government has made inquiry, and has found, 
as was expected, that there has as yet been no trou- 
ble at Kishinef. The information gathered by the 
State Department so far convinced the Jewish lead- 
ers in this country that they decided at once not to 
trouble the Government at Washington nor that at 
St. Petersburg with petitions until they had reliable 
news that atrocities were in contemplation. 

And yet Mr. Hearst keeps on affrighting all who 
will give him ear with tales of butchery already be- 
gun. He keeps on urging President Roosevelt to 
ride rough-shod over the courtesies prescribed in the 
dealings of nation with nation, and to make it a per- 
sonal matter with the Czar. He keeps on telling how 
the Jews of all Christendom are begging himself and 
President Roosevelt to take the Muscovite bear by 
the throat and pull his teeth. All the time he keeps 
on printing letters and resolutions of thanks to him- 
self for what he has not done and. cannot do, but 
wants the Government to do for him. 

Mr. Hearst would be amusing if he were not so 
malicious and so fatuously persistent. He has in- 
sulted and abused Roosevelt as man and as President, 
missing no chance to revile him. If there should be a 
massacre of Jews at Kishinef during Roosevelt's 
term of office, Mr. Hearst will say that the blood of 
the slaughtered is on the President's hands ; if there 
should be no massacre, Mr. Hearst will garland his 
own brow with new laurels and say "I prevented it." 

When he goes so far as this in self-glorification, 
playing tricks with the sympathies of men, misusing 
the name of humanity for his own cheap, unworthy 
ends, Mr. Hearst ceases to amuse his audience and 
fails to gain pity. It is highly probable that the 
Democracy of the country will before long turn down 
its thumb at him, and so do its part in suppressing 
him. This Kishinef scare is but one of the many 
contemptible things he has done in trying to exalt 
himself from the ranks of American nobodies. It 
is hardly possible that even in his most foolish mo- 
ments he hopes to be nominated. Mention on the 
floor of the Democratic convention would overjoy 
him, since what he is really after appears to be ad- 
vertising and a pretext for singing his own praises. 
Up to now he has achieved this purpose by posing 
in his own limelight as the champion of labor, the 
protector of the poor. By dint of preaching discon- 
tent and anarchy he has won a certain standing 
among the mislead masses of working men who 
have hearkened to the false gospel of unionism. See- 
ing now that the people, aroused at last, are pulling 
down the pillars of that temple, he moves on to an- 
other, and sets up a shrine where he may worship 
himself as the patron saint of the oppressed in all 
lands. Just now he is playing the part of Providence 
in the protecting of the Jews at Kishinef from real 



and imagined peril. 

Very certainly this Government will protest as 
strongly as any Government can against barbarities 
at Kishinef or anywhere else, but what Mr. Hearst 
says or does in the matter is of no importance or 
interest, except in so far as it reveals him further for 
the pretender and charlatan he is. 

WATER GAS POISON. 

It is of vital importance to the people of San Fran- 
cisco that the gas company be required to comply 
with the spirit of its franchise and supply consumers 
with coal gas instead of the deadly water gas, which 
the company persists in doing. Of course water gas 
is supplied because it is very much cheaper to manu- 
facture, which in turn yields the company enormous 
profits, as compared with coal gas, but it is at the 
expense of the health, and already of many lives, of 
every one who uses it. 

Certainly coal gas will kill when inhaled for any 
great length of time, but if escaping coal gas is de- 
tected before it causes asphyxiation, no serious conse- 
quences obtain, or at least no permanent results fol- 
low. But it is not at all so with water gas, because 
of its deadly poisonous substance — a chemical com- 
pound so penetrating and disastrous to healthy phy- 
sical conditions that to breathe it but for a moment 
is to threaten the whole system with physical weak- 
ness, and permanently impair the brain cells more 
especially. The law should make the manufacture 
of water gas for commercial uses a crime, for it is 
a continuous attack upon the lives and health of every 
one who comes in contact with it, and naturally so, 
for its component properties are constantly at war 
with healthy germ life, nor does it need to go to 
the limit of its death-dealing power and asphyxiate. 
A mere whiff of the murderous stuff often so under- 
mines the health forces in the one who breathes it 
that ever thereafter his health is impaired. 

The reason why water gas is such a deadly foe to 
human life and health is because the process of its 
manufacture necessarily makes it so. To make the 
vile stuff, decomposed water in the form of steam is 
forced over beds of red-hot coke, resolving it into 
hydrogen and carbonic oxide, the oxygen being ab- 
sorbed. Then the hydrogen and carbonic oxide are 
driven through a retort in which is vegetable matter, 
including the residue of turpentine distillation, called 
resin, going through the process of decomposition. 
From this mass of decomposed matter the "water 
gas" absorbs enough carbon to render it luminous 
when burned. Thus it is that water gas is a com- 
pound of the deadliest of the poisons produced from 
the decomposition of water and vegetable matter, 
and that is why the mere inhaling of a small quantity 
of it is pretty sure to undermine one's health for all 
time. 

Coal gas is quite a different article. It is the pro- 
duct of dry distillation of coal, the residue being 
coke, but it costs more than water gas, and because 
it does, the gas company is giving the city the most 
poisonous of compounds, that its profits may be 
greater. The trail of this death-dealing monster is 
observable in the daily reports of its havoc in all 
parts of the community. Of course, the Board of Su- 
pervisors could, if they would, oblige the gas com- 
pany's officers to comply with the spirit of their fran- 
chise and supply gas extracted from coal, but it may 
take a whirlwind of public indignation to awaken the 
Supervisors to the enormity of the crime the gas com- 
pany is perpetrating every day. If so, they should 
know that just such a whirlwind is already in process 
of formation. 



129053 



January 2, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






and heartless animals in h„,nan 
fern wrthonl on« tiny thread of human worth or 
moral sentiment to cover their true selves. "Birds 



THE WAY IT IS. 

The once-convicted criminal, Mrs. Botkitl, is given 
a chance to prove that the testimony, direct and cir- 
comstantial, the rulings of the court and the con '," '' " ; "!": r flock together" should he emblazoned in 

duct of her trial generally, which convicted her of u, ' rs , '" Mr ° " ver '"« door through which nun nass 

into the arena of the prize-fight. Figs do no more 
grow on thistle bushes than does the kecordine \n- 
gcl go to a prize-fighl in search of piety, moral 
or self-respect. And what emphasizes the brutal na- 
ture of the spectators is that they will pay laree 
sums ol money, and submit to perplexing inconven- 
iences that the lowest life principles in them may 
have a feast of bruises and blood. 

At one of these exhibitions of brute physical power 
in Sacramento quite recently, one of the principals 
was so seriously pounded that he died the next day 
and in that act be disgraced himself in the estimation 
01 those who saw him receive the fatal blows. He 
should have died in the ring, and in bis last breath 
made an effort to kill his opponent. He cheated the 
on-Iookers out of that much "sport," and he will al- 
ways be remembered by them as a defaulter. The 
man in the ring who gave the fatal blows was the 
principal murderer, but were not the howling specta- 
tors who inspired him by cheers of appreciation to 
redouble his brute force and deal the fatal blow par- 
ticipants in the murder? And are the governing au- 
thorities of the city of Sacramento altogether blame- 
less for the man's murder? On the face of the fact 
that the legally constituted authorities of Sacramento 
graciously granted permission for such an exhibition 
of brute force and a possible murder, a stranger 
would have the right to conclude that the moral 
sense and standard ethical conduct of the authorities 
were no higher nor no lower than those of the prize- 
ring. It is hypocrisy of the rankest sort when muni- 
cipal authorities condemn that which they cheerfully 
permit the doing of. And this applies to San Fran- 
cisco and to every other community that permits 
prize-fighting; besides, legalized prize-fighting is, as 
in the case of the man killed in Sacramento, legalized 
murder, or rather the privilege of committing murder 
by a blow with the fist, is granted. If prize-fighting 
is brutal, then those who permit it and those who 
patronize the business are brutes. That is the logical 
conclusion. Always the social conventions of a com- 
munity may be used to determine the level of moral 
worth and integrity upon which that community is 
dwelling. 

A nineteean-year-old school girl of Chicago has 
been selected to represent the Windy City in a New 
York beauty show. The Chicago press goes into dis- 
tressing detail in describing her charms in terms of 
linear measurement, but maintains a dignified silence 
concerning her feet. 

It was a mighty mean man who paid Senator Till- 
man a bogus $100 bill for a lecture at Savannah, Ga., 
on the race question and it was quite decent of the 
bank on which the bill was drawn to make the 
amount good to the South Carolina satesman. 

The Dutch parliament has voted $1,750,000 to buy 
Krupp cannons. Let there be a prompt revision of 
that lusty song whose refrain says, "Down with the 
Dutch, they don't amount to much." 

An author of the present day, R. W. Chambers, has 
bought him a house in New York for $55,000. And 
still the great army of literati wails in chorus that 
there is no money in writing. 



murder, were all in error from start to finish. In 
other words, she is permitted to try to show that the 
court that sentenced her was a combination of legal 
stupidity and judicial paresis; that the witnesses 
against her were liars, and that the jury was coin- 
1 of a compound of putty and decayed brain cells, 
and hence impervious to the goo-goo eyes of feminine 
voluptuousness in charming presentation. Mean- 
while, or, rather, while her appeal for a new hearing 
was pending, very much of the evidence that con- 
victed her has been "lost, strayed or stolen." with 
no reward offered for knowledge of its whereabouts 
or its return. Great are the technicalities of the law! 
That is to say, they are great in the work of defeating 
justice by the hooks and by the crooks of a sort of 
alleged law or court practice which annuls the pur- 
pose and intent of law and paralyzes the hand of jus- 
tice. 

It is under such conditions that legal technicalities 
have brought convict Botkin smiling and confident 
into court again to hear herself proclaimed an inno- 
cent, virtuous, charming and much abused specimen 
of glorious womanhood. But will all this legal trick- 
ery and debauchery of the high and honorable profes- 
sion of the law avail the Botkin woman anything? 
The chances are that it will. It is simply capable 
lawyers with doubtful codes of ethics on the one 
side, scheming to defeat the operation of law, and 
public indifference on the other side, with a far too 
low appreciation of the sanctity of the mission of 
courts by courts in the middle. The atmosphere in 
and about most of our courts, the criminal courts 
more especially, is not surcharged all the time with 
that high sense of honor which the laws of the land 
provide for. The elevation of a lawyer from the bar 
to the bench is often more political than sentimental 
Not many judges in this community are able, seem- 
ingly, to understand that a judge when upon the 
bench is not of politics nor of social life, nor of friend- 
ship's bonds, nor of any ties that bind him to his 
fellow human beings. He is there as the representa- 
tive of the best, the truest and the loftiest thought 
of the community as expressed in the letter and in 
the spirit of the community's highest standard of con- 
duct of life to see to it that justice between man and 
man be done. As to the average jury, well, history 
and experience does not encourage boundless faith 
in the wisdom or in the integrity of the average jury, 
and because that is true, and' because some judges 
cannot rise to the heights of separateness from per- 
sonal likes and dislikes, and make their court truly 
and honestly and faithfully a court of oyer and 
terminir, the Botkin and similar offenses against law 
and order are permitted to use the law to prevent the 
law's administration. 



A BRUTAL AND MURDEROUS SPORT. 

At best, prize-fighting is a brutal and foul sport. 
However "square" it may be, or however scientifi- 
cally blows are given, the whole business appeals 
only to the lowest and most depraved nature of those 
who participate, either as principals or spectators. 
But low and beastly as was prize-fighting in the long 
ago, its march has steadily been from degradation 
to degradation, and now, in truth, it seems to have 
reached the very bottom where principals and spec- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



THIEVES RUN TO EARTH. 

County Clerk Mahoney has been indicted, as have 
a 1 )t of his aides and strikers, for robbing the funds 
of which he was the official custodian. So far so good. 
Bit what will be the outcome of it all? The law 
is quite ready to open very wide the doors of the 
penitentiary tor the entrance of these plunderers of 
the public's money, but .Mr. Mahoney and his fellow 
culprits only laugh when punishment for the crime 
they have committed is suggested. They seem to 
think themselves superior to the law of the land, and 
that it is impudence on the part of the public to ask 
what has become of its money. It is a reflection 
upon his official and personal integrity. What if 
he and his fellow cracksmen did absorb for their 
personal use about all of the total receipts of the 
County Clerk's office. Did they molest or try to sell 
the office fixtures or rent the room for social' gather- 
ings and pocket the money? 

But there is a deep meaning in Mr. Mahoney 's 
laugh of derision and contempt when punishment is 
intimated for his crimes and misdemeanors, and the 
meaning is that he has the strings of the "push" and 
the "pull" too well in hand to fear any adverse opera- 
tion of the criminal laws of the commonwealth. It 
means that Mr. Mahoney believes that the City Hall 
ring dare not disturb him lest they, too, become in- 
volved. It means that he believes in the mightiness 
of thieves standing together. It means that he and 
his fellow plunderers of public funds believe that 
the courts will find it easy enough to exonerate them. 
It means that the City Hall gang do not intend that 
one of their fellows shall be punished for robbing the 
city or county strong box. This makes the issue be- 
tween the law of the land and the Mahoney gang, as 
to supremacy, quite clear and plain. If the operation 
of the law may be crippled to complete inefficiency, 
why, Mahoney must be recognized as one who is 
superior to law, and one who is not bound by law, 
decency or conscience to respect the property or 
rights of the body politic. On the other hand, if 
public sentiment and the courts insist on adminis- 
tering exact justice, and do administer it, Mr. Ma- 
honey and his co-partners in crime will sojourn for 
a number of years in the penitentiary. There is no 
middle ground. Either Mahoney and his following 
are superior to the criminal laws or they are subject 
to them, and in determining the matter, a big lot of 
law-abiding public sentiment most vigorously ex- 
pressed will exert an influence in criminal court cir- 
cles which no judge or jury would care to antagonize. 
The question at its last analysis is : Shall a robber 
of the public's money be decked with the epaulettes 
of public commendation or with the prison stripes 
of honestly administered criminal laws? 



GOOD MAY COME OF EVIL. 

The parading of several young women up and 
down the sidewalk before a Market-street restaurant, 
and appealing to patrons of such places to boycott 
that particular eating house, presents a spectacle 
that is both disgusting and humiliating. The young 
women who are making their union's appeal to the 
public in voices that set nerves on edge, naturally 
draw crowds of curious and rough men, who indulge 
freely in coarse wit and doubtful suggestions, and 
these crowds also block the sidewalk very much to 
the annoyance of pedestrians. Not one in ten-score 
of such idlers know or care to know anything about 
the merits of the dispute that caused the effort at 
boycotting. An opportunity to exhibit their vulgar 
mannerism is presented, and that is all they want to 



know about the trouble. As for the girls who parade 
the walk and sing of the arbitrary and cruel refusal 
of the boycotted restaurant keeper to let their union 
run his business for him, why, they unsex them- 
selves every time they open their mouths. The ab- 
sence of what is known as "woman's native modesty" 
is conspicuous, and more is the pity that these "per- 
suaders" or "barkers" do not seem to mind putting 
on the necessary bold and persistent facial expres- 
sion. 

One good, however, is likely to come of it all. It 
is beginning to dawn upon both organized employees 
and associations of employers that but for the walk- 
ing delegates of the unions and certain members of 
the Employers' Association it would be an easy mat- 
ter, generally speaking, to adjust differences between 
employers and employees, with little or no loss of 
time to either side. 

The plan suggested is yet crude, but it seems to 
have the elements of success. It includes the recog- 
nition of the unions by the Employers' Association 
and the recognition of the Employers' Association by 
the unions. The next step is to appoint a joint con- 
ference board composed of an equal number of the 
two organizations in interest. This board shall meet 
once a month and discuss the present and possible 
future conditions of their joint interests. This plan 
would, not a few believe, so operate to bring em- 
ployer and employee closer together in each other's 
confidence, which in turn would inspire and stimu- 
late both sides to work in accord to suppress disturb- 
ing influences, even before they evolved into a force. 
The idea is to teach both sides that the doctrine of 
"give and take" in a spirit of earnest purpose to more 
clearly emphasize their independence and yet recog- 
nize the individual rights and award just dues to 
each one in interest. The plan will provide for the 
complete elimination of walking delegates — a class 
of men who encourage discontent because discontent 
is the tool of their trade — and for a board of appeal, 
arbitration and adjustment. As is seen, the plan pro- 
vides for full recognition of labor unions and of em- 
ployers' associations as the basis of their mutual 
efforts to avert strikes by uprooting the cause before 
it bears fruit. To this extent, then, good may come 
of the spectacle of young women parading the side- 
walks as enemies of law and order, and the rights of 
man. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the 

rooms, formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 




SCHAS. KLILUS & COJJ 
EXCLUSIVE^ 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

It's the cut and chic in clothes offered here that give personnel 
to a gentleman's dress, inculcating minor details, devoting time 
and attention to men's clothes only. 

Consequently, modestly claim that our "immediate Service 
Clothes" are superior. Some good dressers have been put wise 
about our shop. "There are others" that ought to know us. 






January a, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A DEN OF THIEVES. 
The revelatio:-- tlitv in tin- New York p 

office surpass anything of the kind in the history of 
VII, from the lowest cuspidor scrubber 
to the Postmaster himself, which include about 1 
empli • ni to have acted either the role of 

thief or victim. The Postmaster not only neglected 
his duties, but permitted another man to draw and 
appropriate his salary. A little syndicate of officials 

ip a scheme to rob the other employees by the 
monthly assessment plan. This device alone netted 

o a year for the little syndicate's pocket change 
account. Sub-stations were hired at rentals several 
times above the asking: price, thus securing a large 
monthly rake-off. In fact, the inspector rinds that 
every department of the office is steeped in thievery, 
anil that scarcely a man holding a position that could 

■ d to increase his income by dishonest methods 
was found to have conducted his trust honestly. The 
pay-roll was found stuffed with hundreds of names 
■ >f people who had no existence at all. Perfidy, false 
swearing, bogus vouchers, bills for goods that were 
never purchased and scores of other devices and 
methods to plunder the Government were discovered 
everywhere. And yet the authorities at Washington 
have known for years that the Xew York Post-office 
had become a den of thieves. 



ENCOURAGE HOME MANUFACTURE. 

The News Letter has for years advocated the pol- 
icy of patronizing home industry, and not without 
results. If all consumers of manufactured articles 
kept this fact in mind, California would rank high 
as a manufacturing State. Mr. Carl L. Schalitz, pro- 
prietor of Sanders & Company's Copper Works of 
this city, gives us valuable information bearing upon 
the much-discussed and often-advertised subject of 
patronizing the home industries and increasing the 
manufacturing importance of the Pacific Coast. San- 
ders & Company have impressed this upon our local 
brewers, and incidentally of the entire Coast, and 
have succeeded in a marked degree in deviating a 
large amount of money, which in past years went 
East, to the local firms. Keep the money at home, 
and keep the local manufacturer busy. We quote 
Mr. Schalitz's words in part: 

"We very recently experienced a marked expres- 
sion of confidence on our ability to manufacture cop- 
per works that compares favorably with (if it does 
not excel) the Eastern product, when the largest 
brewery on the Pacific Coast, the Seattle Brewing 
and. Malting Company, of Seattle, Washington, con- 
tracted with us for an exact duplication of their three 
hundred barrel suthaus now in operation in the North. 
When you consider that a plant of this size consists 
of a 300 barrel copper kettle, mash tub, rice tanks, 
Grant and Pfaffe, and various machinery, you will 
realize what a great stride has been taken in the rec- 
ognition of the value of our home industries. Here- 
tofore the breweries on the Coast have been equipped 
by Eastern manufacturers, but in the future we trust 
this extensive work will remain at home." 

We wish to heartily endorse and congratulate the 
Seattle Brewing and Malting Company for the de^ 
cided steps they have taken in the right direction, 
and we also wish to congratulate Messrs. Sanders 
& Company for their progressiveness in undertaking 
the construction of a plant of this magnitude. 



Visitors to San Francisco never cease to wonder at 

the perfection of Zinkand's, where appointments, service 
cooking, music, and also visitors, are che very best It has 
no equal. 




*^W 



Ruinart 
Cham- 
pagne 

Esto.bll.ihod 1729 

The President's Wine 



"Dry. Fruity — 
JVo Headache 



Varrtey W. Gcskill. 

Special ArphI 

Hllbert Mercantile Co. 

Sole Agents 



JOHN H. TIETJEN COMPANY 



FINE GROCERIES, 

TEAS, WINES 

HOUSE FURNISHING 

ARTICLES 



228 POWELL STREET, S. F. 



Opposite Union Square Market. 



Telephone Main 518 



I California Safe 
* Deposit and 
Trust Co. 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital & Surplus $1,233,723.75 * 



Total Assets 



6.914,424.69 



Interest paid on deposit*, subject 
to check, at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum. 

Interest paid on savings deposits 
at the rate of three and six- 
tenths per cent, per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are author- 
ized to act as the guardian of 
estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented at J6 
per annum and upwards. 



J. Dalzell Brown, 

M&.i\BLger 



i 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 




Tkasurelr 
Wand 



Gdeolt* 



'<ty no wand but Measure's . 




By The Lobby Ghobt 

If we but remain patient we will get all the Fitch 
plays. "The Girl with the Green Eyes" is another 
frothy tid-bit by this most prolific of authors. It is 
in the usual "smart" vein, and the genius for novelty 
is shown at every twist of the action. The story is 
one of a jealous girl, who makes herself most un- 
happy. She is suspicious of her husband, and sees 
every action of his from her own point of view. Of 
course, in the end, she is changed, and when the 
positive evidence against her husband is explained, 
she sees how silly she has been. The dialogue of the 
piece is interspersed with the brightest of sayings, 
and the wedding scene in the first act is prettily 
staged. Fitch is at his best when picturing society 
people and their ways and "Jinny" Austin, her hus- 
band, and her friends, are easily recognized as be- 
longing to the ultra "smart set ' that they are sup- 
posed to represent. 

Fitch's plays lack weight, logic and argument, but 
they are trimmed so prettily that they are restful. 
They contain no problems and are successful in that 
the)' do not compel people to think. They are to 
the drama what William Dean Howell's school of 
writers is to literature. 

The re-opening of the Tivoli in new quarters is 
worth more than a passing note. On Wednesday 
night last week the initial performance was given, 
and the old favorites and some new people were 
most enthusiastically welcomed. Mayor Schmitz 
made a sort of dedicatory speech and expressed the 
sentiment exactly when he said that if the new house 
but sustained the reputation of the old it would be 
supported willingly by the music lovers of the town. 

The piece is a conglomeration of fact and fancy, 
by Ferris Hartman, called "Ixion," and is redolent 
with Hartman atmosphere. There is wit in the lines, 
melody in the songs, and the augmented chorus is 
well trained. The picture afforded by the trans- 
formation scene is very beautiful, and the light ef- 
fects are fine. 

The piece is a typical Tivoli extravaganza, and the 
people are well suited to their roles. The cast num- 
bers many old friends. Anna Lichter and William 
Schuster are familiar faces, and received a rousing 
welcome. Bessie Tannehill, one of the new ones, is 
more than a singer — she can act. She has very little 
to do, but she has the temperament that promises 
something good in the future. Wallace Brownlow, 
the Australian barytone, has perhaps the best-trained 
voice in the company. With two such fine voices 
as his and Cunningham's, we should hear some fine 
solos in succeeding pieces. There is no reason in 
the world, with the friendly backing it has, why the 
Tivoli should not reach unlimited success. The in- 
fusion of new blood into the company should work 
wonders. 

A word for the building itself: It is an airy, cheer- 
ful place, with lots of room. The seats are comfort- 
able and the acoustics perfect. The decorations are 
not prodigal, but they are good, and the elevator to 
the top floor is an innovation. 
* * * 

The second week of "Blue Jeans" at the Alcazar 



continues to attract a large audience. The piece is 
staged perfectly, and a more finished production 
could not be asked for. Eleanor Gordon, as the 
Dutch slavey, has a perfect dialect, and shows her 
remarkable advancement in character work. Harry 
Hilliard, as Ike the Hoosier boy, throws his dignity 
to the four winds, and makes up as the homeliest, 
silliest person to be found in a day's travel. The 
leading people all assume their roles in excellent 
form, and Miss Starr is the most womanly of in- 
genues. The scene she has with her little baby is 
very affecting, and she is never off key for a minute. 
She runs the whole gamut of emotions, from the 
hoyden to the poor wife and mother. The villainy 
of Miss Block is more convincing than most melo- 
dramatic ones, and the thrill of the buzz-saw scene 

makes the up-stairs people happy. 

* * * 

The "road show" is in its second and last week 
at' the Orpheum, and is greatly improved by Victor 
Moore and Emma Littlefield in their skit, "Back to 
the Woods." This same act was seen last year, but 
it is so novel that it is not like a re-hash. The rest 
of the bill is of uniform excellence. 

* * * 

A great treat will be offered to the patrons of the 
Grand Opera House the week beginning to-morrow 
matinee. It will consist of the famous comedian, 
Joe Kelly, the pipe-dreamer, and his merry bunch 
of players, in the musical comedy, "The Head 
Waiters," which for several seasons has been one of 
the greatest theatrical successes of the East. The 
engagement is limited to one week only. Sunday . 
matinee, January 10th, "In Convict Stripes," a pleas- 
ing play of the people of South Carolina, will be pre- 
sented. 

* * * 

"I-O-U" will be presented another week only at 
Fischer's, as the management has decided to close 
its phenomenal run on January 10th. The production 
has met with substantial appreciation from amuse- 
ment lovers, and seems to have lost none of its 
power to please. The piece will be succeeded by 
"The Beauty Shop," a purely local burlesque, written 
by J. C. Crawford, one of San Francisco's best new- 
paper men. The presentation of "The Beauty Shop" 
■will introduce several new principals, including Miss 
Helen Russell, a handsome soprano, in feminine 
leads, and John Peachey, a baritone, who can act as 
well as sing. 



Oriental Goods 

AT WHOLESALE PRICES 
We offer our entire extra fine collection ot 

..Oriental Rugs and Curtains.. 

At 25 per cent 

Discount From Begular Ketail Prices 



We are also sole agents for John Crossley S Son's Cele- 
brated English Carpets. 



CHAS. M. PLUM & CO. 

Cor. 9th and MarKet Sts. 



January a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Mmc. i*atti. the greatest songstress the world has Grar)d Opera House— Special 



J mi II, llt.mr 

MMc. ADELINA PATTI 

(The Bntoi rom) 

Direotjun Rotorl Orau. In Uaoftffemool Kareua it. 

ictor 
l'n ■•- *j. »j >t. a... »*. 1. and m RaIp r>| noat« will b« i>t«ir.n at 

tin- 1...\ ..ill f tti. M 1 ii\ morning. January 4. 

Oat of town mail 01 m pan ted by money order and ad- 

dreaaedto H H Qamiibell. Treasurer Orand Opera House, will 

he Med in 1 1 rii.-r of their receipt and v.-nt^ assigned aa near 

the desired location as pnaaible steltiway piano used. 



Graod Opera hjouse 



ever known, will appear in San Francisco, which she 
■ banner city, on the night of January 

7th and the afternoon of the llth. Manager Fried- 
lander has decided to inaugurate a scale of popular 

prices . from ?i to $5 for the two concerts 

of the peerless diva. When I'atti first began her 
atic career she had to conquer the world city 
by city, for it has a pessimistic attitude toward the 
young phenomenon. Now that she has risen to her 
triumphant position as the world's prima donna, she 
has been hrihed away from her luxurious castU- of 
Craig-y-Nos in Wales to make a truly farewell 

American tour. 

» * * 

The second and last week of "The Girl with the 
Green Eyes" will begin at the Columbia next Mon- 
day, January 4th. 

* * * 

Novelty galore will abound at the Chutes this com- 
ing week. Mason and Filburn, comedy sketch artists, 
will make their first appearance here, as will also 
the Prampkins, colored musical comedians, said to 
be especially clever in their line. The Harrison 
brothers, whose sketch. "A Matrimonial Agency," 
is a scream from beginning to end, will reappear, 
and Joe and Sadie Britton will sing new songs. 
Gardner and Stoddard will offer a new skit, and 
Mabel Lamson, the popular contralto, will be heard 
in new illustrated songs. The animatoscope prom- 
ises a new and amusing series of moving pictures, 
and the amateurs will appear on Thursday night. 

"Ixion" will run but one week longer at the Tivoli, 
and will be succeeded by "When Johnny Comes 
Marching Home," the most successful American 

comic opera ever written. 

* * * 

There will be a complete change of programme at ; cls ,,,, G ,,„ r ,. , ,,„„„.. ,,.,„ 

the Orpheum this coming week, and the features v^rpneuri). o'Farreii st 
announced are all of a high order of merit. Fred 
Hallen and Molly Fuller, Dumitrescu, Van Auken 
and Vannerson, Charles and Minnie Sa-Van, Char- 
lotte Guyer George, Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Deaves, 
Joan Haden's "Cycle of Love," Ernest Hogan and 
Mattie Wilkes will be the new bill. 

(Continued to page 12. 



\\ f.-k H 'k'inninK lo-m..rr. >w Sunil.iv Dial Idea, January 3rd. 
The pipe dreamer. JOE KELLY, and thirty others in the big 

musical cul-iii' 

THE MEAD WAITERS 

Matin.-.- Satnnlav 

PrioesHBreolDKB, I5C, 360, 60c."f»c Matinees ice. 2fic. goo- 
Sunday Matinee. January loth, the sensational drama 

IN GONVIGT STRIPES 

Fischer's Theatre 

"Whence comes this joyous, happy crowd?" 

Asked the man of bilious hue ; 
"The answer's easy" said his friend, 

I've just seen 

1— o— u 

The record breaking musical comedy now in its sixth and last 
week. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Mon- Jan- llth 

THE BEAUTY SHOP 

An incomparable production of a strictly local burlesque. 
Nights 25, 50. and 75c Matinees, 25 and 50c. 

Columbia Theatre. G< ™"- L™^.,,...™. 

Beginning next Monday Jan. i. Second ami last week 
Charles Frohman presents Clyde Fitch's best play 

THE GIRL WITH THE GREEN EYES 

Great east of favorites. Only matinee Saturday. 

Special-Sunday night. Jan. loth. ALBERTA GALLATIN in 
IBSEN'S GHOSTS. 

Monday Jan. 11-MRS. LANGTBY 



betmiun SLouktuM »ml Powull streets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, Jan. s 

A BIG NEW SHOW 

Fred Hallen and Mollie Fuller: Dumitrescu, Van Auken and 
Vannerson ; Charles and Minnie 8a- Van ; Charlotte Guyer George 
The Tobine: Mr. and Mrs. Walter Deaves' Merry Manikins; 
Ernest Hogan and Mattie Wilkes; the Orpheum motion pictures 
and re-productions, for one week only JOAN HADEN'S 

GYGLE OF LOVE 

Matinees every Wednesday. Thursday, Saturday and Sunday. 




WRINKLES and FACIAL BLEMISHES 

Removed by New Process (Guaranteed.) 
Face Massage and Manicuring. 

AT YOUR HOME, 

byfappointment 



MME. H. 
j307 Larkin ft., i 



EASTWOOD 

. P. Tel. Larkin 2646 



C. H. Kehnstrom 

TOKMEBLT I1KD1BI * JOBKIOl 

Tailor. 

PHELAN BUILDING ROOMS 1 2, 3 

TELEPHONE MAIN B887. SAN FRANCISCO 

fjfter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's Catherine plasa after 
the theatre is over. 



.Cnr\\- vrt 1 TV\a*r\'t- va Belasco & Maxee, Proprietors 
^eijCrai ineULrB. Market St.nearEigh{h-Tel. South 335 

Week of Monday. January 4th 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. The greatest of spectacular 

melodramas. 

MONTE GRISTO 

By Alexander Dumas. 

Prices— Evenings 10 to 50c Matinees 10. 15, 25c- 

Week of Jan. llth. THE MOONSHINERS- 

A 1 *-* <* t o v- TiS a.r\ f- v-o Belasco & Mayer. Proprietors 

AlCaZdi 1 IieULre e. D. Price. Gen'l. Mgr, Tel. Alcazar 

Regular matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

One week commencing Monday Jan. 4, a beautiful production 

of the picturesque drama of romance 

A LADY OF QUALITY 

By Frances Hodgson Burnett and Stephen Townsend 
Evenings 25 to 76c. Saturday and Sunday Matinees 15 to 50c 

Mon. Jan. 11— Clyde Fitch's strongest play THE MOTH AND 
THE FLAME. . 

Tivoli Opera House. °° rner Ed M y a8 a o n n d st re ets 

IXION or THE WHEELMAN 

A mythological musical extravaganza in three acts, that is the 
talk of the town. 



Beginning Monday Jan 11. 

WHEN cJOHNNY GOMES 
HOME 



MARCHING 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 




Library r&able 

mmmmmmmmm 



mmmmrn 




"Tolstoy and His Message," by Er- 

An Estimate nest Crosby, is a small volume; 

of Tolstoy. but into it be bas condensed a fine 
sketch of Tolstoy — not only of tbe 
man, but of his thoughts, beliefs and aspirations. 
The following is typical of the book : 

"That the examples of the success of Christ's teach- 
ings should be so few is due to the fact that they 
have been so rarely lived. Count Tolstoy is making 
the experiment to-day, and no one who has visited 
him at his home, as I have had the privilege of do- 
ing, and has looked into his searching eyes under 
their heavy brows, can for a moment doubt his sin- 
cerity. He has stripped his house of everything su- 
perfluous ; there is not a rug on the tloor, not an orna- 
ment on the table; his dress is the peasant's blouse; 
he has become a vegetarian, and touches neither cof- 
fee nor tea nor sugar nor tobacco. . That there is a 
vein of asceticism in all this f am not disposed to 
deny. A German admirer of his bas called him tbe 
John the Baptist of the new religion of the Spirit, 
and if sometimes we are inclined to criticise him for 
denying himself unnecessarily and for making the 
externals of his life a little too bare, we should re- 
member that there was room in the world for John, 
whose food was locusts and wild honey, and for Jesus 
who came eating and drinking, and that wisdom is 
justified of all her children. There is a place in 
our economy for the Tolstoys as well as for the 
Ruskins and Morrises. And if there seems to be 
little art in the exterior appearances of Tolstoy's life, 
it is not because he is not an artist and has not faced 
the question of art and answered it to his own satis- 
faction. But he denies to the art of the day, the lux- 
urious plaything of the exploiting few, all claim to 
be considered as art at all. 

Funk & Wagnalls, New York. Price, 50 cents. 



The nature of "The Science of Study," by James 
G. Moore, is explained by its title. Hinds & Noble, 
New York. $1.00. 



H. L. Piner's "Builder of tbe Beautiful" is a study 
of physiognomy and the other kindred sciences and 
arts of expression. Funk & Wagnalls, New York. 
$1.50 net. 



"The History of the Atlantic Cable" is a carefully 
written history of over-ocean communication. 
D. Appleton & Co., New York. $1.00 net. 



In "Consumption, a Curable and Preventable Dis- 
ease," Lawrence M. Flick, M. D., advances his theo- 
ries, which, if correct, should make him rich. 

David McKay, Philadelphia. $i.co net. 



G. E. Burgin's novel, "The Shutters of Silence," is 
a romance of life in and out of a monastery. Smart 
Set Publishing Co., New York. $1.50. 



Boys will delight in "Ahead of the Arm}'," a war 
story by, W, Q. Stoddard. 

Lothrop Co., Boston. $1.00 net. 



"Irish Life in Irish Fiction" is a very interesting 
discussion of novels dealing strictly with Irish life. 
It is by H. S. Krans. 

The Macmillan Co., New York. 



"From Empire to Republic," by Arthur Howard 
Noll, is a history of the political transformation in 
Mexico. 

A. C. McCJung & Co., Chicago. $1.40 net. 



Senmas McManus is the author of "The Red 
Poocher," a collection of Irish gamekeeper tales. 
Funk & Wagnalls Co., New York. 75 cents. 



The rise and progress of the speed of public car- 
riers is told in "The Story of Rapid Transit," by 
Beckles Wilson. 

1). Appleton & Co., New York. $1.00 net. 



If you can digest the sub-title, "A Manual of homi- 
letics. promenics, archagics, pedagogy, sociology," 
you may be able to tackle the contents of the book it- 
self, which is called "Modern Practical Theology," 
by Professor Ferdinand S. Scbenck, D. D. 

Funk & Wagnalls Co., New- York. $1.00 net. 



"The Alphabet of Rhetoric" is "intended as a 
familiar companion for all that care to speak and 
write correctly." It is by Rossiter Johnson. 

D. Appleton & Co., New York. $1.25 net. 

In "Borlase & Son," by T. Baron Russel, several of 
the characters are in a former novel, "A Guardian of 
the Poor," though the latter book is not in any way 
a sequel to the former. 

John Lane, London. 



"Until Seventy Times Seven" is a religious story 
published anonymously. 

Thomas Whittaker, Bible House, New York. $1. 



"The Art of Living Long" is a new and improved 
English version of the treatise of the celebrated 
Venetian centenarian, Louis Cornaro, with essays 
by Joseph Addison, Lord Bacon and Sir William 
Temple. 

William F. Butler, Milwaukee. 



George Gardner Smith has edited the diary of 
Spencer Kellogg Brown. It reflects the early life of 
Kansas. 

D. Appleton & Co., New York. $1.35 net. 

"Dramana," by Anna Arrington Tyson, is a poor 
attempt at a story of stage life. 

Neale Publishing Co., New York and Washington. 

Vernon Hawtrey has translated "The Life of Saint 
Mary Magdalen" from the Italian of an unknown 
Fourteenth Century writer, with an introduction by 
Vernon Lee. 

John Lane, London. 

The carpet becomes very dirty in winter, but this 

can easily be remedied by sending it to Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street. There the carpet is 
cleansed from every particle of dirt without any injury 
to the fabric, and is returned looking as fresh and new as 
when first put down. 

As long as Techau Tavern exists, people have no 

need to wonder where they will go after the theatre. It 
is the society resort. 



Are you tired? Go to the Post Street Turkish Baths. 



January a, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



SHAKESPEARE OR DANTE. 



A communication lia* been received by the editor 

of this paper, poorly written and signed with an 
ierl name. Thi -tter in this case departs 

from its rule not to answer anonymous communica- 
tor the simple reason that the questioner r< 
the News Letter as authority which is the one 

sensible thing in the letter, which is as follows: 

"There is a question before several young men as 

to whom is greater and more famous. Dante or 
Shakespeare' It was decided to ask the opinion of the 
. and this is the reason that your judgment is 
earnestly requested on this matter. Kindly publish 
the answer as soon as possible in your paper." 

Dante is as famous for his Beatrice as Shakespeare 
is for his Anne: in fact, to borrow a phrase, "they 
mutually surpass each other." It is the same old 



question in another form: which i 
wind or water ; or. which is man's best friend, thi 
or the gun. The 1 n is only 

equaled by the lac! on the pari of the pro- 

pounders. 

"Render unto the things which are 1 

s.ir's." Those who like polenta will still indulge and 
smell of garlic, and swear by Dante to the Inferno, 
and those who Swear by roast beef are not in any 
danger of transferring their affections from the I'.ard 
of Avon. 



The appetising things that come from the broiler at 

Moravian's Grill, in the California Market, are responsible 
fur I he crowd that goes there for luncheon. It has become 
a regular business men's exchange. The quality of the 
chops, steaks, oysters and game served cannot be sur 
passed. More than that, the wants of the guests are at- 
tended to by perfectly trained waiters. 



Rheumatics retelved at the Poat Street Hamraam. 



If you want to read a story that will tingle your nerves and make 
you smell salt water, read 



Ahoy! 

"The Sea=Wolf " 

By JACK LONDON 

Author of "The Call ol the Wild" 

which begins in the January number of THE 
CENTURY MAGAZINE. 

It opens in Snn Francisco Bay— the hero picked up from a 
wrecked ferry-boat by a schooner hound for the sealing grounds 
off Japan,— and the schooner goes, and the hero with her. 
whether he will or not- The captain is the "sea-wolf," a t «i t^ 
Scandinavian, Wolf Larsen, and of all the strange mixtures 
of brutality and self-culture you ever read about. Wolf Larsen 
will stand at the head. He is one of fhe most tremendous 
characters in fiction, and this novel "The Sea- Wolf is going 
to be 

The 

Great 

Magazine 

Serial 

of the 

Year 

Try the January Number. Buy 
It on a news-stand, or better 
yet, subscribe for a year and 
eet the whole story. 

You can subscribe to 
The Century for a year 
beginning with the Jan- 
uary number (contain- 
ing first chapters of 
The Sea- Wolf") and you 
can have the superbly 
illustrated numbers tor 
November and Decem- 
her, 1903, Free of Charee.nnd 
thus begin the volume 
and Begin Every Serial. Two 
free numbers with a 
year's subscription from 
January, liioi- Price 
$4.00. Mention this offer 
in San Francisco News 
Letter and remit to 

THE 
CENTURY CO. 

Union Square, N. Y. 



Besides "The Sea-Wolf" the 

January Century will give you 

An Article on Radium 

Written by its discoverer. 
Mme. Curie. 

An Article on Lhasa, the For- 
bidden City of Tibet 

Written by a man who lived 
there for months. 



'Wee Macg'reeg'or" 



A Capital ' 
Story 

"Wee Macgreegor's New 
Year'd Eve at Grah'paw Pur- 
die's." 

Elliott Flower's Story 

"The Unexpected Strike." 
Roy Rolfe Gibson's Story 

"The Illusionist" 

Ernest Thompson Seton's 
Fables 

With his own Illustrations. 
A Splendidly Illustrated Arti- 
cle on the French Chamber 
of Deputies 

With pictures by Castaigne. 
A Splendidly Illustrated Ar- 
ticle on "An American Palace 
of Art. 

The first complete authorized 
pictorial and literary record 
of Mrs. Gardner's famous 
Museum in Boston. 

A Remarkable Study of the 
Dog by Maurice MaeterlincK. 

And Other Good Thing's 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



A MILLION SAVED IS A MILLION EARNED. 

The problem which has been pored over since the 
days of '49 of saving flour gold from auriferous sand 
and soil has, after years of study, been solved in a 
scientific manner by Mr. C. A. Peer, an expert chem- 
ist residing at Watsonville, Cal., U. S. A. The per- 
fection of the invention at once interested the lead- 
ing financiers of that wealthy city, the result being 
the formation of the Pacific Coast Chemical Gold 
Mining Company of Watsonville, Cal. Its origin 
was unheralded by any notoriety, but the merit of 
the invention forced it into notice so promptly that 
outside of plants in the United States its fame has 
spread abroad, and negotiations are about closed for 
the erection of a large number of plants in Guate- 
mala, C. A. In January, Mr. C. A. Peer, the inventor 
and president of the company, accompanied by Mr. 
George W. Sill, Consulting Director, will sail for 
Australia to close negotiations with a wealthy syn- 
dicate which owns an invaluable concession granted 



hour. The gross average of the gold saved, which 
has hitherto been unavailable, is 95 per cent, which 
at once stamps this process as being practically per- 
fect. 




Watsonville plant of Pacific Coast Chemical Gold Mining Co., 
Watsonville, Cal., U. S. A. 

it by the Australian Government giving it the sole 
privilege to mine for gold along some forty miles of 
beach gold-bearing sand, the tests and assays of 
which demonstrate that it will pay a fabulous profit. 

One machine handles fifteen tons daily, and the 
output can be increased indefinitely by the erection 
of additional machines. The wonder lies in the ex- 
treme simplicity of the invention. The sand is fed 
directly upon the first apron, where a stream of 
water, regulated in force and quantity, carries the 
sand successively over three chemically treated can- 
vas aprons, each placed in a frame with an inclina- 
tion of fifteen inches in six feet. A succession of bur- 
lap-covered sluice boxes carries the tailings away 
and across especially constructed riffles. These 
sluices have a declination of eight feet in twenty- 
four, much more abrupt than that of the ordinary 
sluice, but the flow of water and sand, as stated, is 
so regulated that even the most microscopic particles 
of gold must, in its course, come in contact with 
a detaining surface. 

The corporation is peculiar in the one fact that it 
evidences its confidence in its process to perform all 
it claims by refusing to sell outright its machines. 
They can be leased on royalty only. Further, it will 
on submission to it of samples of sand make tests 
and assays free of cost for responsible parties who 
own sufficient material bearing enough gold to war- 
rant a profit in its working. In a series of tests on 
sand that assayed $3.80 a ton, the highest loss was 
13 cents. 

The fact that this process can and does save gold 
of microscopic fineness is being demonstrated every 
day, and that this corporation affords a mine of 
wealth for mine owner and capitalist is proved every 



Pleasure's Wand. 
(Continued from Page 9.) 

The Alcazar has selected 'A Lady of Quality" for 
the first week of the New Year. It was in this pow- 
erful and picturesque drama of romance that Julia 
Arthur kindled a blaze of enthusiasm at Wallack's, 
New York, six years ago. 'A Lady of Quality," 
with its romantic costuming, clash of steel and tragic 
intensity, will also give capital opportunity to the 
members of the cast. For January nth there will 
be a beautiful production of "The Moth and the 
Flame," a play which has not been equaled for genu- 
ine power and feeling in any of Clyde Fitch's other 
efforts. 

It is gratifying news that arrangements have been 
made for the appearance in this city of Miss Alberta 
Gallatin, in "Ghosts," at the Columbia Theatre, on 
Sunday night, January 10th. The special tour is a 
great success, and the only regrets is that it is to be 
allowed only one performance. 

* * * 

The great society theatrical event of the season 
will be the engagement of the "Jersey Lily," Mrs. 
Langtry, at the Columbia Theatre, commencing Mon- 
day evening, January nth. It will be her first appear- 
ance here for many years, and she will be supported 
by the Imperial Theatre Company of London. The 
first of the repertoire of plays to be presented is 
Percy Fendall's modern comedy, "Mrs. Deering's 
Divorce." 

* * * 

Alexander Dumas"s immortal drama, "Monte 
Cristo," with Herschel Mayall in the great role of 
Edmond Dantes, and the accomplished actress, Eu- 
genia Thais Lawton, in her favorite part of Merce- 
des, will be presented at the Central Theatre next 
week. The production of "Monte Cristo" will be 
complete in every detail, and it will undoubtedly 
take rank as one of the popular triumphs of the Cen- 
tral Theatre. 



The best bit of realism on the Metropolitan Opera 
House stage yet is to be credited to the donkey that 
was assigned to draw the cart for Sembrich. Instead 
of which, the animal simply squatted down on the 
stage and refused to budge. So the curtain had to 
be rung down. And yet some of the ill-humored 
critics say the donkey failed to come up to the level 
of the other artists in the cast. What a lack of ap- 
preciation of the real thing! 



Co-incident with the coming of Tammany into 
power, religious revivals on a big scale for young 
men will be held in Manhattan. But Tammany, in 
spite of the plain inference, cares not who holds or 
attempts revivals, as long as it handles the revenues 
and the jobs, for Tammany relies on the practical 
superiority in the moral line of interest over princi- 
ple. 

Connoisseurs of wine are unanimous in the fact 
that G. H. Mumm Champagne is the acme of perfec- 
tion. It is to be found at the leading clubs and cafes. 



The holiday goods displayed by George T. Marsh & Co., 224 

Post street, are the most tasteful In town. Everything In Jap- 
anese art and brlc-a-brac. 



mrw of F.raplr. takaa 
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M 

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SAN FRANCISCO 

Sa n Francisco. eighth 
city In point of ,«ize In the 
Union, the door to the 
Orient, the metropolis of 
the Pacific Coast, des- 
tined to In* the world's 
greatest city, occupying 
the eno of a peninsula by 
the famous Golden Gate, 
entrance to the world's 
greatest harbor, flanked 
hi and bay, ia con- 
tinually growing south- 
toward SAN 

BRUNO PARK. 



ALL EYES TURN TO REAL ESTATE WHEN SPECULATIVE INTERESTS FAIL 




SAN BRUNO PARK. Junction "S.P. Bay Shore Cut-off." facing San Mateo Electric Railway and S.P. Depot 

S&n Bruno Park is now the scene of the greatest Real Estate activity upon the Pa- 
cific Coast. Since November 17th, the day upon which sales were first made in San Bruno 
Park, over ISO lots have been sold, and the value of our property in that time has in- 
creased 25 per cent. 

Several owners of property in San Bruno Park and vicinity: L. F. Swift, Pres. of 
Swift & Co., Chicago; p. O. Mills, New York and San Francisco; Ogden D. Armour, Pres. 
Armour & Co., Chicago; Daniel Meyer, Banker, San Francisco; W. A. Irwin, Vice-President 
Federal Trust Co., San Francisco; George R. Sneath, Jersey Farm Co., San Francisco. 

George C Brooke, Director Federal Trust Co. 

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References: Bankers Canadian Bank of Commerce; South San'Franciseo Land and Improvement Co., 
which numbers among its Directors the Presidentof the Crown Distilling Co., the manngerof the Anglo- 
Califnrnia Bank, and the following gentlemen : L. F. Swift of Chicago ; President Leroy Hough. General 
Manager Western Meat Co. ; Vice-President Jesse W. Lilienthal. Attorney. Henry J. Crocker; Daniel 
Meyer, Banker; also the California Safe Deposit Co., and W.J. Martin, President South San Francisco 
Railroad and Power Company. Federal Trust Company. 

Send for our map of San Francisco, showing San Bruno Park 

Unusual opportunities for a limited number of energetic men of unquestioned reputation to 
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"Young man, buy real estate In the out- 
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"Few large fortunes can now be made 
in any part of the world except from one 
cause— the rise In the value of REAL, ES- 

lATE -ANDREW OAKNEGIE. 



*4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 




V* 



'Hear the Crier'Mat Vie devil art W 
" One that will play the devil \ jir, with you ' 




Some of the stores instituted a reign of terror dur- 
ing the holiday season in their well-meant but ill- 
directed efforts to suppress petty larceny. I was in 
one of the largest of these stores a few days ago, 
when a lady carried a piece of dry goods away with- 
out its being wrapped up, the crush being so great 
at the counter that she could not afford the time to 
wait. She was immediately pounced upon by a floor 
walker, who accused her point blank of stealing, and 
demanded that she proceed to a certain room to be 
searched. All her denials were met by the most bru- 
tal and coarse rejoinders. Finally she bethought her- 
self to show the salesman the check for the goods 
which she had taken half-unconsciously. He was 
not satisfied with this, but haled her to the clerk who 
had made the sale, and who fortunately enough re- 
membered her. Of course, my friend vows that she 
will never put foot in the store again. There is a 
tremendous amount of stealing, that is true enough, 
but there is also such a thing as reasonable discre- 
tion. 

It seems that every crazy scheme can find people 
ready to help it out for the sake of a little personal 
advertising. It is this human weakness upon which 
Hearst and the yellow papers rely. They can start 
any idea, however absurd, and find prominent citi- 
zens to help it along. Look at the list of distin- 
guished Jewish leaders who have fallen into the 
trap and been used to make space. Dr. Voorsanger, 
however, does not bite as easily as the others, and 
reading between the lines of his contribution one can 
find a piece of very delicate irony at the expense of 
the International Gamboge. 

"The first wife to the rescue!" Such, I opine, 
would be a good title for the sort of farce comedy 
which is being played with one Dr. J. A. Fritz in the 
leading part. His wife Lizzie Fritz had sworn out 
a warrant against him for threats against life. There- 
upon his first wife, Mary Fritz, from whom he had 
been formerly divorced, went on his bonds. Now, 
why did Mary do this? Was it for love of the doc- 
tor, or to mark her approval of his threats against the 
life of her supplanted? In any case, it would seem to 
show that the doctor made a bad exchange, and that 
love's young dream may still have some actual cash 
value. 

Here is a new crime which owes its origin to the 
imagination of the attorney for the Western Miners' 
Federation. John D. Ackerman, attorney and agent 
for the Yellow Aster Mining Company, is accused 
of the direful act of importing laborers into the 
Randsburg district under false pretenses. He has 
been charged once before with the same offense and 
released on habeas corpus proceedings. Surely an 
action for malicious prosecution should lie against 
the union. 

What is going to be done about that turn-table 
at the foot of Market street? As things are, it is a 
hideous nuisance. The cars are stopped for two 
blocks and a half, very frequently, and people are 
obliged to get out and walk in the wet and slush over 
some of the worst pieces of street in the city. The 
whole management is an outrage and would not be 
tolerated in any less easy-going community than this. 



I dropped into Department Two of the Superior 
Court the other afternoon, and there were no less 
than five attorneys all busily engaged in trying a 
case, the value of which to the victor in the suit 
would be about three hundred and seventy-five dol- 
lars. Do you think that all these disciples of Coke 
were eagerly endeavoring to get at the rights of the 
matter? Not they! They were trying to get law- 
yers' fees allowed on the three thousand dollars 
for which suit had originally been brought, which 
suit has offered to be compromised at the rate of 
ninety cents on the dollar. A more disgusting com- 
mentary on the morals of the local bar would be 
hard to find. 

The force of habit or of instinct, it would be hard 
to say which in this case, was never more clearly 
shown than in Market street this holiday season. A 
number of peddlers had mechanical toys vhich they 
were showing off on the pavement, among them 
some mice. It was no uncommon thing to see a 
woman jump three or four feet to one side away 
from the imitation rodents. I heard several scream 
during a stay of a few minutes, and a boy told me 
that one had tried to climb the store window in her 
fright. The boy had red hair and squinted, and 
upon cross-examination would not state positively 
whether the woman ran from him or the mouse. 

Will somebody explain why a charge of disturbing 
the peace is not brought against the raucous-voiced 
females who clamor outside of the boycotted restau- 
rants ? Picketting is, I believe, allowed by the laws 
of this State, but violent and abusive language, even 
when uttered by a woman on the public streets, is a 
misdemeanor. Why does not one of those people 
who are insulted when entering the restaurant swear 
out a complaint? It is our abominable laziness which 
makes the violation of the law so easy and so profit- 
able. One arrest followed by a conviction, and the 
trouble would be at an end. But would the arrest 
be followed by the conviction? There's the rub. 

There is evidently more wrong at the University 
than is generally admitted by the authorities. The 
President appears to have lost his hold upon the in- 
stitution. Even the attitude of the students when 
they meet him on the cars or in the street shows that 
very plainly. A President who does not keep the 
ungrudging respect of his students cannot accomplish 
much, and somehow or other this respect seems 
to be lacking to the President of our most important 
institution. Why is it? Is it possible that ghosts 
can really queer people? 

There is no end to the resolutions of the Board of 
Supervisors, but I should be glad to see them set 
to work really to abolish the masher nuisance. It 
has been more obvious this year than for some time, 
and country girls here shopping for Christmas have 
been subjected to all sorts of annoyances which they 
resent but do not know how to show their indigna- 
tion. Unless the police intervene, male relatives will 
have to do so, though it is not to be expected that 
citizens should do their own scavengering. 

Father Wyman says that the cure for this world's 
ills is matrimony and a large family. The good father 
is in no danger of trying his own medicine, and pre- 
scribing for other ptople is not at all disagreeable. 
Let the reverend gentleman be confronted with an 
overworked wife and a group of little ones whose 
need for shoes is more apparent even than their 
need for Christmas gifts, and he will find that mar- 
riage and t family may be good discipline, but not 
altogether joy. Priests' marriages are very like old 
maids' children — too ideal for practical existence. 



January 2, 1904. 
How San 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
Francisco 

Looks 



«5 



to Me 



By Fernauld Travers, Tourist. 

Editor News Letter I have traveled somewhat in 
in many countries, and tarried in many cities, 
for a chaotic, non-conglomerate mass of men, 
women, and customs. San Francisco appeals to me 
next besl or worst to Port Said or one of 
those pTa< f the Suez on the road to Mande- 

lay. The main charm of the Occident is the 
you-| stoms of the fair sex and devil-may-care 

habits of the men, neither of which are overburdened 
with extra scruples regarding morality or virtue. 
They both, however, like San Francisco, aim to 
maintain the outward decorous form of an inward 
and spiritual grace by conforming as strictlv as may 
he to the forms exacted by society at home in Lon- 
don or in my birthplace. New York. 

Since I have been here I have noted one thing in 
San Francisco's incongruities thai appeals to a trav- 
eled man. I refer to the hospitality offered, some of 
which I found to be genuine and some of which was 
pure and simple toadyism. In the one case it was a 
compliment to the gentleman and the scholar; in tin- 
other case it was a sort of morbid desire to capture 
and display me as a social lion. 

I do not object to being lionized; it is due me; I 
am used to it. My position in the social world war- 
rants it, but I claim the right to choose the cage in 
which I shall be shown. I have been put up at the 
clubs. I trust I shall not be inflicted by being com- 
pelled to register at any more of some of the rooms 
I have been taken to, which I was gravely informed 
was the So and So Club. Of course, you have one 
fairly decent club which approaches my own best in 
London, but you also have some that are the comic 
operas of true clubdom. One chap who lives at his 
club asked me to dine and spend the night with him 
at the jinks. I did so, and enjoyed it somewhat, but 
when he sent his man to attend me in my room be- 
fore retiring, the beggar had a mustache! Think of 
a gentleman's man being allowed to cultivate a mus- 
tache ! It is such bad form that it positively shocked 
me. The same fellow added insult to injury by ap- 
pearing in my room with my peg next morning in 
his slippers — beastly bad manners. I thought of my 
Alexandria and Said experiences, where such things 
are not too common, and at once made up my mind 
that San Francisco clubmen needed a few hints in the 
art of culture. 

The most amusing experience I have had for many 
years came to me at the opening of your opera house, 
the Tivoli. I was invited to be one of a box party. 
J was told that San Francisco's hall-mark of the se- 
lect set is to go late to the theatre and make a noise 
while you are being seated. That this at once stamps 
you as being comme il faut, and also intimates that 
your coat is a good fit and the frocks of the gentle- 
women are imported. 

The Mayor, not a bad looking fellow, made a "few 
remarks," in which he said he had been called a 
"musical Mayor" by some one who had opposed his 
election I am sorry for the bad taste displayed by 
the nominator, but horrified at the worse taste shown 
by the nominee in commenting on it. The remarks 
of the speaker were, however, in tone with the actions 
of the audience. There was nothing but gabble, 
chats, and over-tone remarks all through the evening. 
It called to mind one of my great-aunt's charity ba- 
zars which she holds occasionally at Beechwood, 



York, England, The gentlewomen flock there in 
their finest plumage, ami all talk one against the 
other until the bazar, the opera in this 1 tirel) 

drowned in the .••can of sound, Yea, thi 

one well-bred, is jc full of incongruities and ii 
sistencies that instead of going on I shall remain and 
enjoy them. I told my man to secure me some proper 
apartments, and then I expert I shall have to educate 
the incongruous how to do things as things should 
be .lone. My letter^ and credentials arc ample. :i>. 
has been proven by the attentions afforded me since 
my arrival, and I am BO much amused and delighted 
that I want to show you your idiosyncrasies, your 
bad manners, and I want I" do it in good faith. 

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of a pure, rich, unsweetened condensed milk Is Borden's 
Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream. It Is always available 
for every use to which raw milk or cream Is devoted and 
Is far superior to the average quality of either. Prepared 
by Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 



Tesia Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you will save at least one-third on your fuel 
bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



Dentist, 806 Market, 
teeth extracting. 



Dr. Decker, 

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and you'll take 

Hunter Whiskey 




HILBERT MERCANTILE CO., 
213-215 Market St., San Francisco, 
Telephone Exchange 313. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



LcokorVn 




Of all the notable New Year's Eve entertainrr ents 
given by Mrs. de Young, that of this year take- the 
lead. It was enjoyed by a large company of young 
folks and a few married friends of the hostess.' The 
ballroom, with its handsome stage, partially de- 
stroyed by fire a few months ago, was restored in 
good time for the festivities of the holiday time. 

When Mrs. de Young returned from the East earlv 
in December she brought copies of a number of the 
latest songs, the catchy things that New York is 
humming and to which it is keeping its toes tip- 
tapping. To introduce them, Ernest S. Simpson and 
Will H. Irwin wrote a play called "My Colorado 
Belle" that has proved a most satisfactory setting. 
Charles H. Jones of Fischer's Theatre staged the 
performance; Dr. H. J. Stewart had the direction 
of the music, and Miss Alice Duffy wrote words for 
the New Year's song. 

The play, with its specialties, served to bring out 
a lot of first-class talent among the society folk. Airs. 
.Mark L. Gerstle, who took the part of the heroine, 
gave a performance that the professional world would 
have regarded as above par. Equally successful was 
Mrs. John D. Spreckels, Jr. Her singing of "Cora" 
and "O! Isn't It Perfectly Lovely to be on the Stage" 
were the cleverest kind of imitations of the singers 
who have made such success of them. The cast in 
full follows: 

Gentle C. Breezy, Belle of Cripple Creek, Mrs. 
Mark L. Gerstle; B'ella Donna, a Prima Donna, Mrs. 
J. D. Spreckels, Jr.; E. Z. Breezy, a Colorado Mil- 
lionaire, Mr. Adison Mizner; Jasper Green, a Dra- 
matic Author, Mr. Frank L. Owen ; I. Collier Down, 
a Broken-Down Actor, Mr. W. H. Smith, Jr. ; Sudden 
Smith, Owner of the Tin Bucket Aline. Mr. [. C. Wil- 
son ; Reginald Fitznoodle, That's All. Mr. Joseph 
Rosborough ; Tottie Tiptoes, a Front Row Favorite, 
Miss Ethel Hager ; Dottie Dimple, Miss Pearl Lan- 
ders; Sarah Mony, Miss Constance dc Young; Allie 
Mony. Miss Helen Wagner; Consie Quentlv, Miss 
Mabel Cluff; Apple Sisters (Cora), Miss Kathleen 
de Young, (Seedy) Miss Jane Wilshire ; Evva Dent- 
ly,_ Miss Lucie King; Cora Spond, Miss Ardella 
Mills; Cissy Rhinestone, Miss Frances Stewart; 
Eddy Fie, Mr. Charles A. Shea; Benny Fitt, Mr. 
Charles de Young; Tommy Hawk. Mr. Paul Jones; 
Jay Byra, Mr. J. D. Spreckels. Tr. ; Tack Pott, Mr. Roy 
M. Pike; Dan Deligne. Mr. Burbank G. Somers; 
Dickie Bird, Mr. Power Hutchins; Ouess Knott, 
Mr. Emerson Warfield ; Si Clone. Mr. Leslie Hark- 
ness; Chauncey Footlight. Mr. X. T. Messer. 

The new songs introduced were "The Maid of 
Timbuctoo," "I'm On the Water Wagon Now," 
"Egypt," "Cora." "Little Street in Heaven," "Ma- 
mie O'Hooley," "On the Boulevard," "Drinking 
Song," "O! Isn't it Perfectly Lovely to be on the 
Stage," "Say, You'll be a Friend of Mine," "Mr. 
Breezy," and "Hoop La." 

When the New }Teai' arrived it found the guests 
at supper waitng to give it a rousing welcome. 



holds the unique record of seeing "Dolly Varden" 
the most times. The history goes back to the wonder- 
ful nights at "Herald Square" two winters ago. At 
that time Lulu Glaser was singing herself into a 
new immortality with the New York public. "Dolly 
Varden," a go from the first, was not of the hurri- 
cane sensation sort. "She stole into the hearts" of 
the inhabitants of Manhattan. The tales of her win- 
some charms appeared to be a story that was passed 
on personally by the public. And one day the town 
woke up to the knowledge that Lulu Glaser had made 
good with the great. 

Early in the game, young Curtiss and his chum 
drifted into the Herald Square. They were struck 
with the utter daintiness of Dolly. After that, not 
a week passed without the pals present in front seats. 
Members of the company began to observe the punc- 
tuality. The young men were easily able to repeat 
large sections of the book. The attendance was the 
more remarkable for being a devotion to the ever- 
recurrent melody of the opera. 

After the expiration of the New York season, 
Curtiss saw Dolly Varden for runs in Philadelphia, 
Baltimore, return to the Victoria, New York, again 
at the Grand Opera House, that city, west to Denver, 
and out to this Coast. On the opening night here 
he and his friend were invited in by the company's 
representative in recognition of long and honorable 
attendance. Thursday the two men from the East 
saw dainty Doll)' on the boards for the twenty-fifth 
record time. 

Curtiss thinks it significant that the big Sunday 
stories which are devoted to every phenomenally 
successful show in New York did not come out about 
"Dolly Varden" immediately after its first night, but 
following shortly the time he and his companion be- 
came regular attendants. 

* * * 

Oakland society has rebelled against the new fin- 
ger-bowl fad, or rather what was supposed to be new. 
Recently a swell dinner was given in that "Athens of 
the Pacific," and instead of the usual finger bowl at 
the plate of each guest, there was nothing. A large 
howl of scented water was handed round, and each 
one dipped fingers into it with some misgivings. Yet 
no one balked at this unusual ceremony, not know- 
ing whether it was intended as a joke, a new fad, 
or whether the servant girl had broken the finger- 
bowls and this was used as a make-shift. But after 
discussing the matter, the ladies have decided that 
this innovation is not in good form, that it is de trop, 



"WOLF" 




BRAND 



Harold S. Curtiss is a young New Yorker at pres- 
ent in this city, who, in company most of the time 
with a young man near his own age, in all probability 



BLOOD, WOLFE & CO'S. 

RENOWNED 

"GUINNESS'S STOUT" 

Oldest and best known brand of Porter on the Coast. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO 
Sole Agents. 314 Sacramento St, San Francisco. 



January a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»7 



and ■ ■• objectionable; that it is t<»> promiscu- 

>f all, it is a Chinese custom. Ii 
it is more promiscuous than the Chinese custom from 
which it was evidently borrowed. At the high 
dinners in the Chinese quarters, there are no individ- 
ual finger howls, but several large howls are placed 
near the door, where each departing guest dips his 
fingers into one of them. But all of them do tlOl use 
bowl, as was the ease in the modern Athens, and 
perhaps that is one reason why the esthetic have ta- 
booed the fad. 

* * * 

I find that the average Alamedan is not ungrate- 
ful, and that the citizens of the Island City are thank- 
ful for the action taken by the Board of Harhor 
Commissioners at the instance of the News Letter. 
The wires are now connected, and there is a splen- 
did arc light in the Southern Pacific waiting room at 
the Ferry, and Alamedans read their papers in peace, 
and there is no more groping around in the dark in 
an effort to recognize friend or relative. 

* * * 

The President of the Pacific Coast Commercial 
Travelers' Association is picturesque in language, 
if not in figure. In regard to an assessment for a 
free bed at hospitals, he uses the following verbal 
flow : 

"If a traveling man will not spare the small sum 
of 50 cents a month, the association's dues, with few 
exceptions, he is either a nickel-in-the-slot artist, a 
natural-born miser or a high-born aristocrat, whose 
cowardly nature, in places where he cannot be de- 
tected, scorns joining an association where religious 

lines are not drawn." 

* * * 

Professor Sir William Ramsay, L. L. D., D. Sc, 
Ph. D., F. R. S., who has been invited to visit Cali- 
fornia next year and deliver a course of lectures on 
chemical subjects at Berkeley, is sure to become very- 
popular here. He is one of the greatest living scien- 
tists, a man of splendid character, and is extremely 
affable. The writer for several years had. the honor 
of studying chemistry under him in his laboratories 
at University College, London, and knows him inti- 
mately. His visit will draw great attention to the 
University, and in the course of his lectures he will 
most probably make public the results of some re- 
markable experiments he has been conducting for 
some months past. 

Sir William is the son of the late William Ramsay, 
a distinguished civil engineer of Glasgow, and the 
nephew of Sir Andrew Ramsay, the celebrated geolo- 
gist. He graduated as a doctor of philosophy at the 
University of Tubingen in 1872. For many years he 
was an assistant Professor of Chemistry in the Glas- 
gow University. In 1887 he 'was appointed Profes- 
sor of Chemistry at University College, London, and 
holds that position still. He is a prolific writer on 
chemistry, and a great experimenter. Recently, by 
a series of brilliant researches, he discovered argon, 
helium and crypton, three new gaseous elements, in 
the atmosphere, and he is now experimenting on 
radio-active elements. He is an officer of the French 
Legion of Honor, a' Member of the French Academy 
of Science, and of the Academies of Berlin, Holland, 
Bohemia, Turin, Stockholm, Geneva, and of the 
Royal Irish Academy. All the leading scientific 
societies of Europe have bestowed their highest med- 
als on the great scientist. 

— —Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 
Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 



Union Labor -man Livernash's dine. 

don of Carroll I>. \\ right as one of th< 1 cne 

mies of organized labor is interesting as showing 

the size of the Livcrnastl ears. 



Pears' 

" Beauty is but skin- 
deep " was probably meant 
to disparage beauty. In- 
stead it tells how easy 
that beauty is to attain. 

' There is no beauty 
like the beauty of health" 
was also meant to dis- 
parage. Instead it encour- 
ages beauty. 

Pears' Soap is the means 
of health to the skin, and 
so to both these sorts of 
beauty. 

Sold all over the -world. 



TELEPHONE JAMES 4471 



&f>e WALDORF 

Miss D. Honig 

241-243 GEARY ST. S. F 

The largest hair store iu the United States. The best assort- 
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wigs oi all description— best of hair and finest workmanship. 
Switches all lengths and colors. Pompadours, Janes, Rolls, etc to 
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The best accomodations by thirty expert help in all branches of 
our business. See our specialties on facial and scalp treatment. 

Let us examine your head and tell you the trouble of your hair. 

Hair dressing, manicuring, scalp treatment, facial treatments, 
shampooing, ohiropody etc, at popular prices. 



Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

FINE MERCANTILE LVNCH 

Served every day from 11 to 2 o'clock. Finest 
Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

SEEBA & DOLAN. Proprietors 

312 Sansome street, cor. Halleck, San Francisco. 
Telephone Black 602. 
Red Top Whiskey now on sale. 



The NEW LICK HOUSE GRILL 

LICK HOVSE. SAN FRANCISCO 
"THE PLACE FOR A SUNDAY DINNER" 

A LA CARTE. POPULAR PRICES. 



BAY 
STATE 
CAFE 

N. fl. ADLER, Prop. 



Foreign and Domeitlo Beer, Constantly on 
Draoght 
After-Theatre Parties Served 

with the Daintiest Specialties 
Concert Every Evening directed by SieNom 

PIKTBO MABINO 

Direct Entrance to Lsdlei' Grill on Stockton St. 

29-35-37 Stockton Street 
Tel. Main 5057 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



INSURANCE 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,500,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital J3.0CO.0OO 

Surplus to Policy-Holders 5.022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., 8. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up, $3,446,100. Assets, $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $8,93u,431.41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 

Unexcelled Tor liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building. 

San Francisco. 

or " 

DON'T INSURE— Until you have examined the new 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy. 

Issued Exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 

Assets, $1,250,000. Insurance in force, $20,000,000 

For particulars address the company. Agents Wanted. 
Fair Building. 230 Montgomery Street. San Francisoo 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $67,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St, S. F. 



The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURi', GERMANY. 

Capital $2,250,000 Assets $10,9S4,24« 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 
Pacific Coast Department: 20-1-208 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 




If my memory serves me right, I once wrote about 
the Adjuster. At that time I had learned that he, 
to be successful, had to possess a multiple of the gen- 
ius of a Hawkshaw as a detective and a lawyer, to 
say nothing about a degree in chemistry. The New 
York Journal of Commerce a few weeks ago pub- 
lished in its fire insurance columns the following 
item which it called a new special hazard : 

"The manufacture of formaldehyde, extensively 
used as a preservative by dairymen, brewers, embalm- 
ers and others, involves a decided fire hazard as the 
following process will develop. In the regulation 
plant wood alcohol is fed by gravity from a 500 gal- 
lon capacity steel tank to a half dozen steam-heated 
stills, capacity of each 25 gallons, temperature of 
stills the boiling point of water 212 degrees. The 
Alcohol is rapidly vaporized at this temperature, the 
vapor is then forced by air pressure through a 2-inch 
iron pipe which is heated by a strong gas flame lo- 
cated immediately above stills — allowance being 
made for combustion expansion by quadruple pipes 
fitted in the trunk line, also a relief valve with a 
weight counterbalance connected with a 4-inch pipe, 
leading to outside of building. After combustion is 
produced in the aerated alcohol vapor by the gas- 
heated pipe, it is condensed in a water jacketed con- 
denser; the resultant liquid is further strengthened 
by re-distillation in steam-heated copper stills and 
again condensed, the product being commercial for- 
maldehyde. It will be readily observed that vapor- 
ized wood alcohol under air pressure in a room with 
open gas flame is an extremely serious fire hazard." 

The information, if not the article itself, was fur- 
nished by Inspector Tolley, and while worthy of re- 
production in the special interest of fire insurance 
men and adjusters, shows how varied must be the 
knowledge possessed by the successful Adjuster. 

* * * 

I do not know why, but one week I run into a lot 
of life insurance stories (some of which I have written 
and some only), and the next week it is all fire in- 
surance news, or news connected with the agents 
who devote their money getting ability to that, end 
of the profession. 

* * * 

This week I find the managers all a-buzzing over 
the organization of the Special Agents' Association 
of the Pacific Northwest. 

The Special Agents, or most of them, are in the 
city for the holidays, and if the war paint which they 
wear will stand the Sun and Water, there will be 
some tomahawks out in January at the annual meet- 
ing of the Pacific Underwriters' Association. 

The Pacific Underwriters' Association has been 
venerated on account of its age; it dates back to the 



Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1853 
Capital t3.ooo.ooo- Gross CaBh assets $17,300,000 

Liberal contracts. Favorable Terms. Conference with our Hepre- 
sentatives before concluding short time yearly or long time contracts 
may be to your advantage- 

H. L. ROFF. General Agent; GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropoli- 
tan Manager. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco 



January a, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 



la fire, but in later hu drifted int.> 

I the now and younger 

the continuance 

nc-man idea, 
in a spirit of semi-rebellion, and in a whole 
'dependence, the men behind the puns ii c. 
the Special A| rganize their own association. 

» * « 

It is necessary t.. a full understanding of the con- 
dition that it shall he known that several managers 
red the Formation of the new associa- 
fof the simple reason that they did not wish 
their specials to come to San Francisco from Seattle 
and Portland to attend an annual meeting of the 
iation when they could do the same thing at 
half the expense by being members of the new 
ciation of the North, and they are equally disgusted 
with the one-man state of affairs. 

* * * 

Fire insurance Special Agents as a rule are a bright 
lot of fellows, and encouraged by their employers 
they did not need a second bint to get together and 
organize. 

Their principal howl is that their present secre- 
tary seems to have a mortgage on bis position, and 
that they can't get any public notice except through 
him. On the other hand, I learn that he is a most 
estimable gentleman, engaged in the profession of 
Independent Adjusting, and also is statistician for 
one of the insurance monthlies. 

* * * 

The same monthly was chosen by the association 
at a poorly-attended meeting to be what is termed 
the official journal of the organization. 

Hence the war-paint on the faces of the Specials. 
They are tired of their affiliation with the older body. 
They want a new deal, and their employers are will- 
ing they should have it, and the insurance editors 
are up in arms about the selection of an official jour- 
nal, so that the true inside facts of the case may be 
exposed by one or both of the other journals. 

The annual meeting of the Underwriters' Associa- 
tion used to be held in February, but this year, 
after it was put to a vote, it was decided to hold it 
a month earlier, or in the middle of January, the 
Northwest Specials being in the majority, ruled by 
their votes that it be held in the first month of the 
year, which would enable them to enjoy their holi- 
days in the city and attend the last meeting of the 
old Fire Underwriters' Association, and at one and 
about the same time. 

* * * 

Whether the Fire Underwriters' Association can 
get along and exist without the membership which 
the new association comprises, remains to be seen, 
but wagers are offered, I am told on the street, that 
this is the last annual meeting of the parent society. 

* * * 

The objects of the new association are, as defined 
by the following, identical in principle with the ob- 
jects of the older association: 

1. The fostering of good and correct practices. 

2. The upholding of the honor of the profession. 

3. The promotion of good fellowship among the 
field men of the Pacific Northwest. 

4. The extension of knowledge of advanced meth- 
ods in the insurance business. 

5. The maintenance of Association headquarters, 
where business and social meetings may be held. 

6. The keeping on file of the latest and best insur- 
ance literature, and records of value or interest to 
the members of the Association. 



uspldona 

factory claims in this field. 

8. The general welfare of the tire insurance busi- 

why the need of two bodii 

* * * 

After talking with many managers 1 have reason 
to think that the move i- not any more on the part 
of the Specials than on the pari of the Managers; 
that they, also, are tired of existing conditions and 
nses, and are going quietly to shelve the old as 
BOCl'ation, which has simply deteriorated into a ring. 
and that they take this means of unloading without 
friction. 

* * * 

The one unlucky insurance publication which the 
new association elected should be their official mouth- 
piece damns the now regime by faint praise tauto- 
illy, thus : 

"The constitution and bv-laws of the association 
are probably the most concise and the most flexible 
which were ever gotten up for any society. This is 
right. Tt has been done on ourpose. Their brevity 
makes them elastic, and their elasticity gives power 
for expansion. Hence, the sphere of the good to be 
performed becomes limitless. It encourages every 
member to stimulate the activity of the societv. 
Every member is expected to take the initiative. No 
one will have to depend on the action of the officers 
of the institution. Every one will know that the 
officers are simply elected to attend to the few ad- 
ministrative duties. For real work, for elevating the 
association to its true standard, every member occu- 
pies the same rank." 

When it is understood that this journal is the or- 
gan of its advertisers, the fire insurance companies 
on the Coast, the reports and views that the old as- 
sociation is dead or to be killed are easily under- 
stood, for the journal in question only writes phono- 
graphically. The new organization is not the move 
of the Specials unaided, but of the Specials and 
Managers, and the meeting on January 10th will 
tell the story. The king is dead— long live the king! 



No Dust 
When Dancing' 



Bowdlear's Pulverized Floor Wax Bin s Into the wood and becomes a 
part or the beautifully polished dancing surface. It ma fB no duBt. 
does not rub into lumpaorstlo to the eboea JnBtBprlnl e on and the 
dancera will do the rest. Doew not so!i dresses or clothes of the finest 
fabric 

For Bale by: Mack A Co, Langley & MJohaelB and Bcd'.ngton ft Co., 
Ban FranciBco, Kir*. Geary & Co., Sacramento, and F.W.Braun St Co., 

Los Angeles. 

Bowdlear's Floor Wax 



AMERICAN 4^ f% y* J 

CANNEL LUAL 

Sold by all Reliable Dealers 

CenA DPWADH for any ease of Rheumatism whieh eau- 
VOVV KCWrtKU not be eured with Dr Drummcmd . s 

Lightning Remedies; restores stiff joints, drawn cords, and Hardened 
muscles. Proof from 25 States sent on reauest. Address Drummond 
Medicine C-o. 84 Nassau Street, New York. 

SING FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but on* 
price. All goods marked In plain English figures. 



514 DUPONT STREET, S. F. 



Next to St. Mary'*: Church. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 




Financial 




speculators on other mining and oil boards has re- 
sulted at all times in a flat failure. This may seem 
strange, but it is true, nevertheless. 



The year of 1903 about to close has been rather an 
uneventful one in local financial circles, in the matter 
of market changes. Business in the Board has run 
along in the most placid manner, too placid entirely 
to suit the ideas of brokers who carry on a strict 
commission business. The panicky conditions which 
have shaken the money center of New York failed 
to break the monotony of the zephyrs which breathed 
so gently in the frequented haunts of the local kings 
of finance. It is years since the severity of their sur- 
roundings has been broken in so rude a manner, and 
the last financial shake-up of the kind seems to have 
played such havoc with the vitality of speculators as 
to act as a sure preventative of another outbreak of 
a like serious nature. With money so plentiful as 
it is with the savings banks, reflecting the unprece- 
dented prosperity of the working classes, the vast 
accessions to the corporate wealth of such corpora- 
tions as the Gas and Water companies, represented 
by a new issue of millions in bonds, can be accounted 
for readily. Had local investors confined their opera- 
tion to the local line of bonds and shares, instead of 
patronizing Wall street so magnificently as they 'lid, 
there would have been a good deal more money to 
credit up to this community at the close of the period 
under review. 



The only real feature of the year outside of a pos- 
sible increase in the number of banks, owing to a 
brief repeal of the banking law, which left the bars 
down for a while, and the extraordinary increase of 
capital referred to above, was the merger of the 
big powder-making plants on the Coast, all of which, 
with one or two exceptions, are now controlled by an 
Eastern syndicate. The tendency seems to be in this 
direction, and the incoming year will likely see many 
more industrial plants of one kind or another in 
combine, under the manipulation of Eastern capital. 
Viewed in a certain light, the changes which will 
certainly follow in business methods may be gen- 
erally considered a blessing in disguise. The methods 
of finance in vogue here at present are a little pri- 
meval for the rapid evolution now going on in the 
transformation of a provincial burg into a great me- 
tropolis. • 



The Comstock Market, which has lain in a slum- 
ber for many years, has given signs during the twelve 
months now about ended of an awakening, which 
cannot come too soon. For a long time past the 
management of the mines at Virginia City have been 
modernizing the system of operation of leading 
properties on a scale which will permit them to com- 
pete in regard to cost of mining and ore reduction 
with any of the most progressive companies in the 
world. The result must be that improvements of 
the kind will eventually promote an activity in the 
market, with better prices for the stocks of all the 
leading companies. A good lively market for Com- 
stock shares would be a veritable benefaction for the 
city, and put more surplus money in circulation in 
a month than the "securities" of the so-called legiti- 
mate description would in a year. San Francisco has 
been a slow place since Comstock speculation fell 
flat, and attempts to arouse the same spirit among 



During the past week the Comstock Market ex- 
panded a little again, as if to show its steam-making 
possibilities which all the power the shorts can 
bring to bear does not seem qualified to interfere 
with. The north-end stocks as usual gave tone to 
the market, and the leaders have an undertone which 
indicates a current of strength which it would not 
take much to develop into a vigorous vampire on 
the up-grade. The outlook in Ophir is generally 
believed to be exceptionally bright just now, and 
this would appear to be amply justified by all that 
can be learned from the mines, which is now pro- 
ducing a very handsome grade of ore on a highly 
liberal scale. The middle mines and the Alpha-Bul- 
' lion group are gradually beginning to loom up as 
a powerful factor in bringing about and supporting 
a more active condition of affairs in the market. At 
the present moment indications are such as to war- 
rant the inference that this activity is not so very 
far away as the talent on the bear side of the business 
might suppose. 



The California Gas and Elec- 
Local Securities trie Corporation's statement 
Rule Quiet for November last shows a 

net surplus for the month of 
$37,236, about the average net monthly earnings for 
the past nine months, which amount to $275,736. 
Trading in the stocks has been light during the past 
week, and the same might be said of everything on 
the entire list of the Stock and Bond Exchange, 
which is only natural, considering it is a holiday sea- 
son, when only miserly souls keep up their money- 
grubbing. People of means, who are above the sor- 
did methods of the hungry-eyed squad of profes- 
sional nickel-chasers, do not pretend to take much 
interest in the ordinary investment markets at this 
season of the year, which accounts largely for the 
dull times among the stock-broking fraternity. An- 
other financial statement which has appeared is that 
of the North Shore Railroad for the month of No- 
vember. It shows a deficit for the month of $16,897. 
The net surplus for nine months past to November 
3d amounts to $89,608, an increase of $3,200 over the 
same period last year. 

The market for Tonopah shares 
The Tonopah shows more activity than it has 
Share Market, done for some months past, on 
the strength of the assurance that 
railroad communication will soon be secured with 
the outside world, affording facilities for the cheap 
transportation of ores which has been lacking ever 
since the mines were first opened up. It will make 
a material difference when this camp gets in touch 
with reduction works, and the owners of small mines 
are placed in a position where they realize on their 
ores. Itwill enable them to open up their properties 
to good advantage, and bring money into the camp. 
The only trouble with the share market is the im- 
mense issue of stock which nearly all of the leading 
companies are laboring under. It weighs them 
down and will be a bar to manipulation at all times. 
At least that was the experience of the men who ran 
the Comstock Market in the years gone by. They 
could never have managed matters as they did, had 
the share issue amounted in the millions, or to any 
larger figure than they now do. Just imagine a 
company with a million shares floated, in the public 



January 2. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



ing tl»" " |Morum together to hold an 

annual meeting or elect dil It means 

■ ma) be, holding over \<mt 
in and year out, whether nr not ii may be desirable to 

nncip.il holders of the stock. The management 
of the mines ought to consider this matter and judge 
'" r '■' - it things would not work to better 

advantage 1>y a reduction of the capital stock. 



The Federal Government has knocked one mining 
fake in good style, unfortunately, however, not until 
a «rcat deal of money has been lost In- investors all 
o\cr the country. The property involved lav in what 
i- known as the Wichita Mountains, Okla, which 
have been boomed for some months past "as a gold- 
bearing County." Under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior, a Government assayer visited 
the ground, and after an examination, reported that 
"none of the assays showed ore in the proper sense 
of the word, and that the region has no present or 
prospective value as a mineral producer." 

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT. 

Mr. Paul Gerson begs to state that in response to 
numerous requests he will, on January 1st, open a 
Juvenile Department in connection with his School 
of Acting, and has secured the services of a teacher 
of experience especially qualified for this work, Miss 
Lillian E. Muscio. One of the features of the de- 
partment will be the dancing-class in charge of Sig- 
nora Matildita. In order that each one may have 
his or her proper time and attention, the class will 
be limited to twenty-five. Mr. Gerson will give his 
personal attention to every pupil. For terms, etc., 
call or address the Juvenile Department of The Paul 
Gerson School of Acting, Native Sons' Building, 414 
Mason street. 

The fourth of the series of matinee performances 
by students of the School will take place Friday af- 
ternoon, January 29th, at Fischer's Theatre. A bril- 
liant programme will be presented. The School will 
be assisted by the San Francisco Conservatory of 
Music, this institution hereafter combining its artis- 
tic interests with the School of Acting. 



A CHOICE RESIDENCE SECTION. 

The population of the cities is showing more of an 
inclination all the time to remove to the suburbs. 
Tired 01 the noise, the rush, and the roar of town, 
they are seeking places where they may spend their 
nights in comfort, and where children may be raised 
properly. 

No better residence property has ever been offered 
the people of San Francisco than at San Bruno Park, 
between here and San Jose. The location is ideal, 
with mountains on either side, no fogs, no heavy 
winds, and plenty of soft sunshine. Moreover, the 
train and electric car service that has been estab- 
lished makes it within easy distance of the city. Now 
that the cut-off is to be built, and with the splendid 
service of the San Mateo Electric Road, the time to 
San Francisco will be shortened to fifteen minutes. 
Considering the advantages, the lots there are selling 
very cheap. The property is in the hands of the 
Hensley-Green Company, Department A., Mills 
Building. 



The Japanese art goods displayed by George T. Marsh & 

Co., 224 Post street, are worth your while. Nothing more appro- 
priate could be selected for Christmas gifts. 



Servant Question 

-yrjxiTl settlt 
itsofaras b l 
theWaslxmg * 

arvd 

Cleaning are 

Concerned by 

Supplying •- 

>b\irs 

With 

Pyles Pearliive 

The work will be dorve well 
-e as \]y- safely arvd yov'll 
Rave a 

Gratefxil Servant 



EDUCATIONAL. 



California School of Design 

MARK HOPKINS INSTITUTE OF AR.T 



DRAWING 

PAINTING 



AND 



MODELING 




DECORATIVE 

DESIGNING 



WOOD 

CAR.VING 



Day Classes, Night Classes and Saturday Classes 

For terms and courses of instruction apply to the Assistant Secre- 
tary. Mark Hopkins Institute of Art. California and Mason Sts. 



Dr. H. J. STEWART 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte. Organ. Harmony and Composition 
Special course for singers desiring church appointments 

Studio, 1105 Bush St. 

BEST'S ART 80H00L 

Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, antf llluitratleu 
Lite classes. $3.00 per month. 

937 HARKET STREET 

MISS ROSE BRANDON 

478 EDDY STBEET 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR STUDIO 

Finest Italian Music Direct from Italy, taught 



UuALl) m 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 

Illustrated Catalogue Free 



Miss Ingeborg Resch Pettersen 
Voice Production 

1 1 1 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 



Receiving hours from 2 till i o'clock every day 
except Wednesdays and Saturdays. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



BANKING. 



Wells, Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capita), Surplus and Undivided f$]3 500,000 

Homer S. King, President; F. L. Llpman, Cashier; Frank B. 
King. Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake, Utah; Portland, Or. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General Banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Deposits, June 30, 1303 J ,0,1,290 

Paid-up Capital .000.000 

Reserve Fund 247.657 

Contingent Fund 625.156 

E. B. POND. President; W. C. B. de Fremery. Vice-President; 
ROBERT WATT. Vice-President; LOVELL WHITE. Cashier; R. 
M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— Henry F. Allen. William A. Magee. W. C. B. de 
Fremery, C. O. G. Miller. Robert Watt. George C. Boardman, 
Fred H. Beaver, Jacob Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms 
and farming land in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks 
payable in San Francisco Post-office, or Wells. Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express, but the responsibility of this 
bank commences only with the receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. t and Saturday evenings, for re- 
ceipt of deposits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Mutual Savings Bank; of s»n Francisco 

710 Market St. Opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital (1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 51X1.000 

JAMES D. PrlELAN. President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent; GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice- 
President; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— Jumps D. Phelan, S. Ci. Murphy, John A Hooper. James 
Muilltt, Frank J. Sulliv;in. UmIk-it M./Elruv, Ku<h>l|i|i Spreckels. James 
M- McDonald, Charles Holbrook, 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co.. or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus (2,397,758.10 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits. June 30, 1903 34,819,893.12 

HOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President. Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-president. H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Stelnhardt. Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established in 18S9. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital (15,000,000.00 

Paid-in Capital 3,000,000.00 

Profit and Reserve Fund 450,000.00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbin, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

International Banking Corporator) 

No. 1 WALL ST., NEW YORK. 

Capital and Surplus Paid-in $7,894,400 

Capital and Surplus Authorized 10,000,000 

OFFICERS— William L. Moyer, President; Charles D. Palmer. 
Assistant to President; William B. Wlghtman, Assistant to 
President; John Hubbard, Treasurer; James H. Rogers, Secre- 
tary; John B. Lee, General Manager; William H. Maclntyre, 
Assistant General Manager; Alexander & Green, Counsel. 

BRANCHES— London, San Francisco, City of Mexico, Manila, 
Hong Kong, Yokohama, Shanghai, Singapore. 

AGENCIES— Bombay, Calcutta, Madras, Penang, Rangoon, 
Colombo, Amoy, Canton. Hankow. Tientsin, Tansul, Anping, 
Bakan, Mojl, Saigon, Kobe, Bangkok, Batavia, Samarang, Sou- 
rabaya, and all parts of Europe. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— 32-34 Sansome Street. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- 
tions, firms and Individuals solicited. Loans made on liberal terms 
on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bought 
and sold. Travelers' and commercial letters of credit granted, 
available in any part of the world. Interest bearing certificates 
,if deposit Issued for fixed periods. Interest allowed to banks 
on current daily balances. Special rates given to banks keeping 
accounts with us, and drawing direct on our branches and 
agents throughout the world. 

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 

F. E. BECK, Manager. P. G. EASTWICK, JR., Ast. Mgr 



MOUNTAIN MEADOWS MASSACRE. 

The massacres in Turkey recall the infamous Mor- 
mon massacres of a half century ago. In this historic 
massacre, men, women and children were killed. 
When the Mormons were driven from Nauvoo, Illi- 
nois, for coveting their neighbors' cattle, and because 
of their immoralities, they settled at what is now Salt 
Lake City, and soon organized an independent Gov- 
ernment, styled Deseret. Immigrants from the 
States were plundered as they passed through Brig- 
ham Young's territory; gold-seekers were driven out 
of the country, and many of them were lost in the 
mountains, supposed to be the work of that murder- 
ous band styled the Destroying Angels. Brigham 
Young prohibited prospecting for gold, prophesying 
that the development of the mines would cause the 
country to be overrun with the accursed Gentiles. In 
'this he foresaw the loss of power, and that of the 
Church authorities, over the ignorant fanatics. His 
prediction was almost fulfilled. Finally, the Prophet 
issued an order, so history states, that no more Gen- 
tiles should pass through his territory on their way 
to California. The Nauvoo Legion knew what that 
meant. 

Soon afterwards, in the fall of 1858, there arrived 
at Salt Lake two trains of immigrants — one from 
Mississippi and the other from Arkansas. They had 
united for protection, and numbered about one hun- 
dred and thirty-five. 

The immigrants left Salt Lake by the southern 
route, with the assurance from the Mormon officials 
that they would be given all possible aid. In the 
meantime, a detachment of the Mormon militia, 
known as the Nauvoo Legion, was ordered south- 
ward, under the command of the infamous John D. 
Lee. Orders had also been sent along the road to 
the farmers prohibiting them from selling provisions 
or grain, or even giving water, to the accursed Gen- 
tiles, the enemies of the Mormon Church. 

The disheartened and starving immigrants camped 
at a beautiful meadow about two hundred miles south 
of Salt Lake, to graze their stock and possibly re- 
plenish their almost exhausted store of provisions. 
This is a beautiful and picturesque spot, about a mile 
in extent, with a spring at the base of the hillock. 
Early one morning the immigrants were attacked by 
men dressed as Indians. They wheeled their wagons 
in a hollow square, and defended themselves. The 
camp was surrounded and the supply of water from 
the spring was also cut off. At the end of two days 
a white flag was seen. The immigrants believed that 
relief was at hand. The flag was borne by Mormons, 
who informed the immigrants that they were sur- 
rounded by an immense number of Indians; that 
their condition was hopeless, and that it would be 
better for them to surrender. The immigrants, un- 
fortunately, placed faith in the Mormons, who had 
agreed to escort the Gentiles out of the country — if 
they would also surrender their arms. This the im- 
migrants also unwisely did. The immigrants were 
then formed in lines — the men in one line and tin 
women and children in another. They were marched 
out of their encampment, with an armed Mormon on 
each side. After reaching a point in the woods a 
short distance, at a signal each Mormon turned upon 
the man, woman or child at his side and fired. The 
work was finished with the bowie-knife. The cries 
of the women pleading for their children and babes 
were piteous, and would have moved the heart of 
any one save a fanatic. Mothers pleaded that their 
children might be spared, offering themselves as a 



January 2, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*3 



sacrifice These pleas fen upon hi tone. Chil- 

dren wore Stabbed to (loath while clinging to their 

mothers for safety, and babes were taken from the 
mothers' arms and their brains dashed out against 
a tree. Women were violated, and then murdered 
by the same hrnte, just as the Turks are doing to-, lay. 
Finally, the vengeance of tin- fanatics was appi 
and the massacre ended. ( if the on,- hundred an.', 
thirty-five immigrants, only seven or eight were 
spared, and these were babes and children under ten 
years of age. The children were placed in .Mormon 
families, their names changed and identity lost, with 
the exception of a few instances. I Ine of the eldest 
of the children was reserved by avenging Justice to 
appear as a witness in the prosecution of the leader, 
John P. Lee. nearly twenty years afterwards. Lee 
wa> convicted, and shot on the meadow where the 
massacre occurred. 

The Mormons had disguised themselves as Indians, 
ami for many years it was believed by the outside 
world that it was an Indian massacre. But the accu- 
mulation of evidence and the confessions of some 
of the participants, convict the Mormons of the 
massacre. Furthermore, books in which were writ- 
ten the names of some of the murdered immigrants, 
and Masonic emblems belonging to them were found 
in Mormon families. It was charged by some of 
the assassins that the order to slay the Gentiles was 
issued by the Prophet of the Mormon Church. Copies 
of this order have been printed, while others contend 
that no such order was issued, at least in writing. 
However that be, there is no doubt that the massacre 
was committed by an armed body of Mormon fa- 
natics, who believed that they were acting in the 
interests of their Church as the Turks are now do- 
ing. And this in free America. Small parties were 
subsequently massacred by bands of Mormon fanat- 
ics, individuals who opposed Church authority were 
"blood-atoned,'' and life was unsafe there, until the 
Government stationed troops and batteries of can- 
nons in this modern Turkey. 

It is a blot upon the civilization of the world and a 
disgrace to that country that can never be effaced. 

Humanity shudders at such massacres. It is the 
moral duty of the world to prohibit such outrages 
among any people. The vicious or half-civilized 
people should be put under such controlling power 
as to render such butcherings impossible. 



The last quotation on radium is $148,835 an ounce. 
Eastern people must be reminded by this of the 
coal famine of last year. 

"They are calling for the author. What shall I do? 
Stage Manager — You had better get out of the back 
door as quickly as you can. 

A Question of Construction. 
Bingley — Are Manila brides happy, as a rule? 
Bagley — Well, they generally go in transports. 

Many a man receives the credit' of always having new> 

clothing, when the truth is that this appearance comes 
from his suits being sent regularly to Spaulding's Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works, where they are cleaned and pressed in 
model manner. They also clean gloves, cravats, laces, cur- 
tains and similar articles. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat producing qualities Briquettes are superior 
to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Goal Company, 10 ti and 
Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



BANKING. 



Tbe San Francisco National BaQk 

IN YUKON TEHRITORT-Dnwion And White Horse. 

in I NITKD STATES-I'arthind. Seattle and Skagway (Alaska;. 

Southeast corner of Santiome and Pine Sis., oan Francisco. 

jas. k. uii.MjN. Presiueni; \\ b\. rifcHCfc; j«jilnso*n, Vice- 
Prosident; LLUiS t. CUWGU,U Cuanier; t\ W. \\ ULKUI, As- 
slstant Cut) 

Capital, *6U0.Q00. Surplus and Undivided l'rollts, |196,uoo. 

UlUbtTuKK- \\ imam J, nuttun, C. S. Benedlot, u iliiam 
Pierce johnaun. n. l. jiuuungiuu, George a. iNuwii.Hi, L,«urKe 
A. Pope, JumeH K. Wilson, i.. i. Cuvtgiii. 

AUh,.Vi"y— iNew Xork—llaJiuVer N&uuOaJ uank, Chase National 
Bank. Chemical iSaiioiiui liuiik. not, inn— iNatiouai shuvvmui 
Bank. I'huuueluhla— in. xtM 6t Co. Clucago— CuniiutiUtti i>a- 
Uunat Bu.uk. £>i, i_rOuia— 1 in- Mechanics i>uiik. ivaiiBua City— 

t irsi ^National Bank. JUjuuun— - uruwn, siuuiuy oc Co. Paris 

iUui-ga.11, tiurjea Oc Co. Uen\ «r— ^aliunal Bank ut commerce. 
JolntiuieaburK— Koumaon toouih Airican Banking Co., dinned. 



ltje CaQadiaQ BagK, or Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
J-ii^AjU «JJ?'*'iCJU— 'lUltUiMU. 

Paid-Up Capital, *&,.uu,uuu. Reserve Fund, W.iwu.uuu 

Aggregate resources, over $<u,uuu,uuu 

tt\jx\. ciHiUKcii!; A. cox, Presiuent. 

B. E. Walker, c-eueral Manager. Alex. Buiru, assl Gen. Mgr. 

LuiNDciN uFi-'ick — wj Lomoaru si., E. C 

JNi^W Y.OKK. OKtTCE— 16 ii,xcnaiige Place. 

BRAMCHKti IN BrtiliSH Culumuia-aUui, Cranbrook, 

i? ernie, C-ieenwoou, JLvauiloops, BauysiuiUi, an anal mo, iSeiaun, 

iNew Westminster, V ancuuvcr ana Victoria. 

Aisu 6U oilier uraiiciies, cuvering llie principal points In 
Alaniioua, in. VV. Territories, anu eastern canaua. 
i3Ai.Nii.HiJKS iN LUiMJUiN-Uio Baiia ut lMigia.11 a, Xhe Bank or 
ocuiianu, Lioyua Baiia, Liu., 'Hie union 01 luiiuuh anu amitha 
Ban a, Bid. 
AutoiMS xjS CHICAGO— The Northern Trust co. 
ACrUJJNT'ti liN NEW OJXLEANS— Ahe Commercial National Bank. 
»Atl l-HMnciaou urMtc- 



aiio California Street. 



A KA1NB, Manager. 



London, Paris and American fcianK Lllfllte4 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND BUTTJfiK STS. 

Subscribed Capital, $u,ouu,uuu Paia-up Capital, ja,uiw,00u 

Keaerve Fund, Jl.hw.uuu. 

Head otiice — w Tnreauueeuie ai. t JLondon, E. O. 

AGENTS : New fcork— Agency ox. ine LunUuu, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank, BuxuteU, No. lu Wail sireei, is. X.; Paris— Messrs. 
Bazaru i?'reres at Oie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. .Draw uirect 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credit** issued. 

SiG. URj&ENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. GHEEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALXaOHUL, Cashier. 

The ^oglo-Californian Bar)k, Limitea 

HEAD OFFICE— la Austin Friars, .London, £1, C. 

Capital Authorized $tt,uuu,uuu Paiu-up *l,500,uuo 

Suoscribed a.uuu.uui) Keserve Fund luu.uuu 

The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells Uraiia, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of. credit avail- 
able througnout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 
1GN. STE1NHART, P. N. LlBlENTHAB, Mana gers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTOKS— William Alvord, William Babcock, Adam Grant, 
S. B. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Baldwin, F. Monteagle, Warren D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutcheon, R. H. Pease. 



BON MARCHE CLOTHING REN0VAT0RY 

40 Ellis Street, Booms 14-15-16. 

SUITS CLEANED AND PRESSED $1.00. 

Suits Called for and Delivered Free. feUlTS PKESSED WHILE YOD 
SLEEJt- Kei.aliii.c mil Alterations. OPEb ALL NIbU'JL. We run 
four u aeons, lelephoue Drumm 44, 

La Grande Laundry Tel . Bush n _ 

Principal Office— 23 Powell St. Branch Office— 11 Taylor St. 
Laundry— 12th St., between Folsom and Howard streets. 

~M)LDEN WEST CLOTHING RENOVATORY 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Phone Main 1157. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed O-M) 

Monthly Contracts LM 



PACIFIC TOWEL COMPANY 



No. I Lick Place. 



Furnishes 8 hand or roller towels, $1 per month; 
12 hand or roller towels tl.60 per month. Tsl. 
Main 1780. 



SAN 




Bt The Autoceank 

A great many drivers of automobiles in San Fran- 
cisco have in the past enjoyed the privileges extended 
them by the authorities of the Presidio. The roads 
and drives in the Government reservation are the 
best in the vicinity of the city, where the lover of the 
horseless carriage has been permitted to drive, but 
this privilege will be withdrawn should the reckless, 
careless drivers continue to abuse the favor, and 
thereby not only suffer themselves, but also place 
punishment upon a number of autoists who are con- 
scientious and careful while driving on these roads. 

The members of the Automobile Club are doing 
all in their power to help the Government authorities 
compel reckless drivers to pay more attention to the 
speed limit, and it has been suggested that an "auto- 
light-patrol" be placed inside the reservation so that 
the offenders will oe unable to escape the arrest ami 
punishment deserved. A few arrests would be the 
most effective cure. 



The Automobile Club of California, through its 
president, Mr. F. A. Hyde, is engaged in the com- 
mendable effort to stop reckless driving by automo- 
bile owners and chauffeurs. We do not believe that 
any member of a reputable club will indulge in such 
reprehensible practice, but it is certain that unless it 
is stopped automobiles will be barred from many 
places, and notably from the Presidio. President 
Hyde is sending out a letter from Colonel Morris, 
Commandant at the Presidio, and this letter, together 
with President Hyde's reply, will be posted in all 
salesrooms and garages, and incidentally notice made 
of same in all papers. President Hyde is to be warmly 
commended for the stand he has taken in the mat- 
ter. Only irresponsible and foolish people endanger 
their own and other people's lives, and some means 
should immediately be taken to restrain them. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 2, 1904. 

system. From the engine to the wheel the only bear- 
ings that carry weight are those at angles. Magneto 
ignition is used. 

The Massachusetts Highway Commission has li- 
censed 3,872 operators and registered 3,206 automo- 
biles in the three and one-half months that the auto- 
mobile registration and licensing law has been in 
force. Professional chauffeurs to the number of 678 
have been licensed. The Commission anticipates a 
considerable increase after the first of the year when 
people begin to purchase the new models. Beyond 
a circular which was issued some time ago by anti- 
automobile forces, nothing has been done that would 
indicate further automobile legislation. Automobil- 
ists are satisfied with the law and will probably not 
ask for changes this winter. 

The gala performance given at the Opera in Paris 
on December 16th, by the Automobile Club, proved 
a great success. A novel feature of the evening was 
the ballet with automobiles, which was a gorgeous 
affair. There were four allegorical automobiles, rep- 
resenting the principal European countries. At the 
conclusion of the ballet there was a grand tableau, 
representing the apotheosis of the automobile. 

The question of repairs has caused owners to medi- 
tate and prospective buyers to hesitate in making 
a purchase. Experience is proving that much of the 
repairs is due to the cheap construction of the ma- 
chines. It is the saving in repairs that is causing 
the American automobilists to buy foreign cars. I he 
Mobile Company is adopting a policy which will be 
welcomed by purchasers. This company, which has 
Coast agencies for French cars, the Arrow touring 
car, Pierce stanhope, and the Decauville, will guar- 



Three entries of American automobiles, sufficient 
to form a team, have been made for the international 
Cup race in Germany in 1904. In addition to the en- 
tries of the Sampson and Peerless machines, already 
noted, a third was nominated last week by Peter 
Cooper Hewitt, of the Automobile Club of America. 
Entries closed at the. club at seven o'clock, December 
19th, without any nomination from Alexander Win- 
ton, who had been credited with the statement that 
he would be represented on the American team if pro- 
fessionals were permitted to drive. 

The entry of Mr. Hewitt came as a surprise, few 
of the club members even being aware of the fact that 
he was having a racer constructed from designs of 
his own. In his entry Mr. Hewitt named the Trenton 
Iron Company as builders of his machine, and its 
conditions as practically completed. 

Mr. Hewitt later described his machine as being 
not unlike the new Hotchkiss in some of its features, 
though in designing it he had not followed any model. 
It had been built unusually low, and the center of 
weight is below the hubs. The total weight of less 
than 2,200 pounds is well distributed. The gasoline 
engine of four vertical cylinders is of fifty to sixty 
horse-power normally, but capable of high develop- 
ment. The drive is direct and similar to the Napier 



IF IT ISN'T RIGHT 



IT ISN'T A WINTON 



When you purchase a Winton Touring Car you buy a product pn ived 

in the severest ,,r tei-ts i" I "■ tnistwort hy. durable, servieeaDie. iso 
detail. hoH eve rsligh I., siaiies the scrutiny of our expert engineers 
and testers. Consequently, when the car passes into your nanus 
t is ready to give hard and constant service. 



Price com pi ete 
with canopy top 
full lamp equip- 
ment, etc- 

$2,500 

F. O- B- Cleveland. 
Ohio. 



THfc WINTOn lOukING CAR FOR 1904 

with its galaxy of improvements that mark a new era in automo- 
bile construction, means a cessation or automobile troubles It is 
simple in design and operation— comfortable to its occupants, 
beautiful in appearance— the gentleman's car. 

PiONLER AUTOriOBILE CO. 

901 TO 925 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

Sole agents for the following standard machines 

Winton Motor Carriage Co. 

The J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 
Olds Motor Works. 

Locomobile Company of America 

Baker Electric Motor Vehicle Co. 

Demmerle & Co. Leather Clothing 

WE HAVE MOVED. 




January 2, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



45 



antec purchasers of these cars that repairs will not 

>l an agreed sum per month, accident- excepted. 

Should the repairs be less than the guarantee the 

owner gets the benefit. 

The Mobile Can ! to Major C. 

Men. president of the 1 werfand Freight Trans- 
ompany, a Tierce stanhope, French type. Ma- 
jor Tilden is an extensive dealer in horses and an 
admirer of a good driver. It was with great reluc- 
tance that he decided to replace his line stable of 
carriage horses at his Alameda home, with an auto- 
mobile. He said: "I know that if I buy that machine 
I will have no use for my horses and I hate to give 
them up." Major Tilden is a believer in the future 
of the auto, and he is ready to adopt them in his 
various lines of business as soon as the commercial 
car appears. 

The Mobile Carriage Company has opened its 
branch house at Los Angeles, which will carry the 
same line of cars represented there. Their new ware- 
rooms and garage are at 331 to 333 South Main street, 
adjoining the Van Nuys Hotel. Mr. L. H. Johnson, 
one of the oldest automobile men in Los Angeles, 
has been appointed manager of the branch house. 
It is the purpose of the Mobile Carriage Company 
to develop a plant similar to the one in San Francisco. 



Pioneer Xotes — 

As predicted by some of the automobile dealers 
in San Francisco, the standard touring cars are go- 
ing to be very hard to get this season. Several sales 
of Winton touring cars have been made in Boston at 
premiums of from $200 to $300 for early delivery on 
1904 machines. 

Mr. H. D. Morton, a director of the Pioneer Auto- 
mobile Company, has just returned from an extended 
trip throughout the East, which included the inspec- 
tion of the different factories represented by this 
company. He states that interest in the automobile 
is greater than ever before. All factories manufac- 
turing standard machines have been taxed to their 
limit, and their entire output has been sold. Mr. 
Morton particularly investigated the automobile as 
applied to trucking, and has decided that the auto 
is the future vehicle for freight transportation. He 
states that the Automobile Show to be given in 
Madison Square, New York, in January, 1904, will 
probably surpass the annual show which was held in 
Paris. 

Mr. J. Parker Whitney, the well-known capitalist 
of Boston and San Francisco, has just returned from 
the East, and has placed his order for a 1904 Winton, 
to be sent to his Spring Valley ranch at Rockland. 
Mr. Whitney stopped over at the Winton factory 
in Cleveland on his return to San Francisco, and is 
very enthusiastic over the 1904 models. 



Mr. M. L. Goss, General Sales Manager of the 
Baker Motor Vehicle Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, 
is spending a few days in this city, and is making 
his headquarters with the Pioneer Automobile Com- 
pany. Mr. Goss says that his company has done a 
very satisfactory business during the past year, and 
that the use of electric vehicles is on the increase. 

Jesse E. Poundstone, of Colusa County, has placed 
an order for a Stevens-Duryea. 



Pacific Motor Car Notes — 

A sample of the new Jones-Corbin car has been 
shipped by express to the Pacific Motor Car Com- 
pany, they having been appointed the Coast agency of 
the Jones-Corbin Automobile Company's products. 



This machine weighs i-''»> pounds, has ta hi 
power, and standard gearing, which enables it to 

attain a speed ,if 40 miles an hour. A carload of 
these machines is following the sample by fast 

freight. The sample is on exhibition at the Pacific 
Motor Car Company's office, 49 Citj flail avenue. 

The Pacific Motor Car Company has also added t" 
its line of cars the Crest Manufacturing Company's 
Runabout ; also the Cresl ["onneau Car of same make, 
with forward motors. The same will he on exhibi- 
tion at the Pacific Motor Car Company's garage 
shi irtly. 

The new 1904 St. Louis Tonneau Cars are expected 
daily, and the new four-cylinder model "L" Packard 
will arrive early in January. 

With the above line of standard cars the Pacific 



NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 

Phone. South 1 142 134 to 148 Golden Gate Ave. 

The largest and 
inesl "Garage" in 
the West. 

Our line the highest 
Types produced. 

RAMBLER; KNOX, Waterless; HAYNES-APPERSON 

AUTOCAR.. ..Touring Cars 
TOLEDO....Touring Cars 
PEERLESS....Touring Cars 

Give us a call and we will show you a full line of 
record-breakers. 




Have you seen the 

BUCKBOARD? 

The talk of the town. 
Best Automobile at any 

$425 



price. 
Costs 




STRONG- EASY RIDING-RELIABLE-GUARANTEED 

ON EXHIBIT AT 

SUNSET AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1814 MARKET STREET ■ - • SAN FRANCISCO 

PACIFIC riOTOR CAR CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 

Packard 

Motor Car. 

St. Louis 

Motor Car. 

American 

Motor Car. 

7 ) JONES C0R8IN 

Motor Car. 

Cudell Motor Car 
The above cars exhibited at our repository, 
49-53 CITY HALL AVE. 




26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



Motor Car Company will certainly do an enviable 
amount of business on this Coast. 



The B. F. Goodrich Company, of Akron, Ohio, have 
brought out a handsome little booklet on the Good- 
rich Clincher Automobile Tires— "Six Thousand 
Miles of Triumph." This booklet is illustrative and 
descriptive of the first successful transcontinental au- 
tomobile trip from San Francisco to New York City, 
recently accomplished by Dr. H. Nelson Jackson, of 
Burlington, Vermont. 

The very excellent photographs tell the story of his 
trip in an attractive and amusing manner. We can 
especially cite the picture called "A Soft, Restful 
Spot for the Tires," which makes us wonder how on 
earth the venturesome doctor ever got out of such a 
dilemma. The "Pictures of Roads Through Oregon" 
and "Approaching the Rockies" both testify to the 
splendid qualities of the Goodrich Clincher Automo- 
bile Tires. 



Following is a list of names handed to this depart- 
ment as being recent purchasers of Locomobile cars: 
N. M. Brittin, New York City ; W. J. Kingsland, New 
York City; P. F. H. Eisenmeyer, New Haven, Con- 
necticut; Edward S. Warren, Bridgeport, Connecti- 
cut; Frank H. Holt, Staunton, Va. ; Dr. Stuart Mc- 
Guire, Richmond, Va. ; M. Victor Vallade, Paris, 
France ; J. W. Thompson, Yokohama, Japan ; B. C. 
Wheeler," Shanghai, China; George Henning, Auck- 
land, N. Z. 



Among recent purchasers of Oldsmobiles across 
the bay are Dr. Lill of Oakland and Dennis Diamond 
of Alameda. 



OBITUARY. 



With the passing of Judge Haynes, who died on 
December 22d, the community suffers a distinct loss. 
He was a man of wonderful personal power, and his 
strength in this direction came from his self-con- 
tained mentality. In every situation in which Fate 
placed him, from adult days to old age, he was 
prominent and a power. 

He was formerly a law partner of Judge Holmes, 
former associate of Roscoe Conkling, at Ithaca, New 
York. In 1876 he began the revision of "Estee's 
Pleadings ami Forms." He was then a resident of 
San Francisco. His health compelled him to remove 
to Arizona. Here he became the attorney for the 
Copper Queen Mining Company of Biber; attorney 
for the Tombstone Mining Company, the Santa Fe 
Railroad, and several other important corporations. 
He was appointed County Judge, but declined the 
honor. In 1887 he removed to Los Angeles, where 
he practiced law until his appointment to the Su- 
preme Court Commission. He was always an unas- 
suming and approachable gentleman. 

STILL INNOCENT. 

"Senator, what was the nearest you ever came to 
being bribed?" asked the girl who always blurts 
everything right out. 

"It was the time I voted for the postal box bill 
and received 7.000 shares of stock in the concern that 
was to make the boxes when the bill gave it a monop- 
oly on the business." 

"I should think that was a clear case against you." 

"No. The measure didn't go through and the 
stock never amounted to anything." — Chicago Rec- 
ord Herald. 




San Francisco by Automobile 

RATES LESS THAN CARRIAGES 
CALL 

MOBILE CARRIAGE CO 

Golden Gate and Van Ness Avenues 
" Phones: Larkin 3841— 1*« »lk S086. Downtown Office. Lobby 
Palace Hotel. Phone Bush B69. Von can secure these cars at any 
hotel or cafe by asking for MOBILE CARRIAGE COMPANY- 

SALES DEPABTMENT COAST AGENCIES. 
Pierce Arrow Touring Car [French) price - - $2,650 

Pierce Stanhope (French type) - $1,350 

Northern Runabout (leader in New fork) - $800 

Fine Garage, expert mechanics, guarantee expenses. 
MOBILE CARRIAGE COMPANY 
Golden Gate ami Van Ness Av.-s. ' (pen all night 



THE 




White Garage 

Cor. Market & Franklin 

—Sales rooms— 
300-302-304 Post Street. 8. F 
White Sewing Machine Co 

The 1903 "White" Largest and best cnuipped auto- 

mobile garage on the Coast, Machines of all makes stored and repaired 

ELECTRIC and 

GASOLINE 
CARS... 

A. F. BROOKE RIDLEY, ,8 F ( «^ L M s™ EET 




Telephone South 394 



San Francisco, CaJ. 



VELVET 

LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 

and Women 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make them in 
any style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

H. E. SKINNER CO. 

801 MARKET ST. 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile Co.— 2SS S Market street. Phone John 1601. 
Automobiles stored and repaired, expert workmanship. Gaso- 
line and oil at all hours. Santa. Clara County agents for the 
V» estern Automobile Company and National Automobile Com- 
pany 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN s T h ££|, u the ^a^Mei^ 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the eexual orgmna. 

Send for circular, Kaber, Aifs & Brune, 325 Market St.. S. P- 



U/>e Chocolate Cream 

WHICH MADE 

V« California Famous ^» 

Trial box will convince you. K>-ni to any address [OT30c i in Btamps) 



F. A. Martin 

No. 11, 320 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal 



January a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



a 7 




COLLINETTE. 
H> John Wlowood m The Bmarl Bel 
My garret was an empty place — 
Four walls and nothing more— 
I'ntil the .eet of Collinette 

Tripped lightly through my fioof, 
And lo! The walls were hung with silk 
And silken-piled the floor. 

My cupboard helu a beggar's dole — 

A crust and scanty wine — 
Till, ncath the hand of Collinette. 

My bread was food divine. 
My wine the nectar kings might sip 

From carven cups and fine. 

My Muse was but a beggar maid 
Who whined for scanty fare. 

Till Collinette had drapej her robe. 
And filleted her hair; 

And now, behold, a goddess stands 
Who bids me do and dare! 

I mocked at Love — an infidel! — 

With sorry jests and quips. 
Till Collinette upon my eyes 

Laid Love's own finger-tips; 
And smiled upon me with his smile, 

And kissed me with his lips. 

Oh, you who starve in loneliness, 

Beggar or king, my kin, 
One prayer have I for both of you, 

One hope you yet may win: 
That, some uay, through your open door 

Your Collinette trips in. 



HIS AMBITION. 

By S. E. Riser in The Cosmopolitan 
She thought he rose to make her proud, 
To raise her high above the crowd: 

She thougnt he went pursuing fame 
And striving after wealth to make 

Her glad that she had shared his name — 
She thought he won for her sweet sake. 

He strove with all the wit he had 
To make one who had scorned him sad; 
. He rose above the common crowd 
That sorrow might eat out the heart 

Of one who had been cold and proud — 
To make her weep, he played his part. 

One day wnen Death stood near, he told 
Them why he won renown and gold, 

She that nad shared his wealth and fame 
Fled, broken-hearted, from his side. 

And she that scorned him was aflame 
With foolish joy and worthless pride. 



PRESCIENCE. 

By Rose Mills Powers in Good Housekeeping 
Love, hear the burden of my prayer: 

'Twill not be always thine to woo, 
And lifeless fingers have no care 

If laid therein ue rose or rue. 

Love, hear .ne burden of my prayer: 
Give me to-day to hear thee vow 

How dear my eyes, my lips, my hair, 
Nor wait for Death to teach thee how. 

Love, hear the burden of my prayer: 
Lock me to-day in thy embrace! 

Too late when striving candles flare 
To rain thy kisses on my face! 

Love, hear the burden of my prayer: 
Walk with me gently down the days, 

Lest Death come on us, unaware, 
And point the parting of. the ways. 



SEALSKIN 

JACKETS 

To Order $125 And Up 

Artistic workmanship and perfect fit njuarantefd 
ltemodHln*:. repairing Mid dyeing nt short notice 

POPULAR. PRICES 

Siberian Fur Co. 

Incorporated 

M.nufartJln* FURRIERS 

AD. KOCOVR, Manager 

Formerly cutter with Revlllon Freres, 
Paris. London. New York 

121 POST STREET, Rooms 7 to 11 

SAN FRANCISCO 



J p LACAZE & co. 

French Laundry Work Guaranteed 

The BEST in San Francisco 



TEL. 


EAST 615 




829 SVTTER 


ST 


R. 


McCOLGAN 








REAL 


Estate 


and LOANS 








24 


Montgomery St. S. 

Telephone Main 6516 


F. 



KENNEDY & CO.'S ART ROOMS 



No. 10 Post Street, Directly opposite Shreve's 
Contain a. Latest a.nd Swell Line 
Creations for the Holidays 



of 



Mavis Consolidated Gold 

and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of California. 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will be . levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share for 
development purposes. The ore in sight is practically 
unlimited. When the present issue of stock is exhausted, 
the price will be ralseu to 50 cents a share. 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 Mar- 
ket street, for prospectus, which gives full information. 
VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



^Society 




Dear Bessie: How am I to begin to tell you of all 
that has taken place since I last wrote to you? There 
has been so much that I have actually wished some of 
it could be placed in cold storage to draw upon when 
the dull times come by and bye. There have been 
Sunday teas and week-day teas, luncheons, dinners, 
"at homes," theatre parties, and dances — enough to 
keep up going every minute of the time. 

The Hyde-Smith cotillion came off all right, and 
was one of the pleasantest affairs of the season, 
which you may believe when I tell you I didn't get 
home till nearly five o'clock in the morning. First 
we had dancing, then supper, and last of all the co- 
tillion. The decorations of the ballroom at the Pal- 
ace — where it was given — had a decidedly Christmas 
flavor, with its evergreens, red berries and green 
lights. Gertrude, who led with Ed Greenway, wore 
white crepe de chine, and the favors were pretty, 
though nothing very wonderful, and I got so many 
I am thinking of starting a small curiosity shop. 
Kitty has done nothing but talk of the lovely dance 
at the Occidental on Christmas eve, which was al- 
most exclusively military in character, though all 
the navy chaps that could be mustered were there, 
and just a few civilians to top off with. 

How full this week has been ! So full, half its 
glories cannot be done full justice to in this epistle, 
and I shall have to spin some of them over to next 
week's letter. Let me see if I can remember it all. 
First on the list comes the theatre party at the 
Tivoli — the new house — on Monday night, which 
was the first real big theatre party of the season, 
ad for its inception the thanks are due to Baron von 
Horst, your friend Philip Paschal (who has come 
quite rapidly to the front of late), and Lieutenant 
Fuchs. The idea was first started by them for a 
comparatively limited number of guests, but by de- 
grees it grew and grew, till the list of those who took 
part increased to sixty or more, with Mrs. Eleanor 
Martin, Mrs. Bowie-Detrick, Mrs. H. A. Huntington 
and others as chaperons. It was a very pleasant af- 
fair, ending with supper at the Palace. For Tuesday 
night there was the winter picnic at Mrs. Bowie-De- 
trick's, and we did have the loveliest, jolliest time. 
The whole house was wreathed with evergreens, lit 
with electric lights and red lanterns, and we danced 
in the hall and dining-room — the rest of the rooms 
were for resting between dances — and iced lemonade 
was dipped from a well placed in a nook of the stair- 
way. Nearly all the guests were in duck, and its de- 
lightful informality added greatly to the pleasure of 
the evening. The Friday Fortnightly came off on 
Wednesday evening, and we all missed Mrs. Salis- 
bury, who was not well enough to take her usual 
charge of it, her place being filled by Mrs. Pomeroy, 
and Christine led the cotillion.. 

These were the more important events of the week. 
Now for the minor affairs, if one may dare call them 
so. Cora Smedburg gave a little tea on Monday, 
and it is nice to see her coming out of the shell in 
which she seemed to ensconce herself of late. Mrs. 
Lansing had another big luncheon, and Maye Col- 
burne gave Polly McFarlane a dinner on Tuesday ; 
on Wednesday there was Mrs. Adams's luncheon of 
a hundred or more for Kate Voorhies Henry, and 
Mrs. Harley gave one, too, for Florence Gibbons, 



with Mrs. George Boardman's tea for her prospec- 
tive daughter-in-law, Bernie, to wind up with. Mrs. 
Kittle's tea on Thursday was for her daughter, Mrs. 
Lewis, who is here on a visit to her from Portland. 
Such a lot of teas and egg-nog parties as there 
were yesterday, and to-day Mrs. George Gibbs gives 
a big tea for her newly-arrived niece, Stella Kane. 

We are to have two more army weddings ere long, 
Kate Selfridge and Ethel Kent having announced 
their engagements to Lieutenant Kellond and Lieu- 
tenant Gilbert Allen respectively, both of the 19th 
Infantry. Both prospective grooms have been down 
here from Fort Wright, Washington for the holi- 
days, and, with their fiancees, been much congratu- 
lated. Then the wedding of Mabel Guff and Jack 
Wilson, who announced their engagement at the de 
Young rehearsal last Sunday will, it is said, come off 
very soon; Kate Du Val and Oliver Dibble are to be 
married in February; and think of Kathro Burton 
' being engaged to Lieutenant George Lee of the 4th 
Cavalry ! But her wedding will, of course, take 
place in Washington City, where the Burtons are sta- 
tioned at present. 

There have been several gatherings at the Presidio, 
some exclusively for the wearers of gold lace and 
their families; others where the civilians were also 
made welcome. There was the jolliest kind of a 
hop the same night as Gertrude's cotillion (worse 
luck, for I couldn't go to both), and the 10th Infan- 
try gave a hop Christmas night for the "military 
only." A good deal of talk has been going on all 
through the holidays of the leap year party the army 
girls were to give at the Presidio soon after New 
Year's, and the date has now been set for the 8th of 
January. So many innovations promised, new ideas 
to be carried out were gossiped of, it has set every 
girl on the anxious seat to be there, and I felt like 
doing the two-step down Market street when I heard 
that my name was on the invitation list, so you shall 
hear all about it in the fullness of time. 

Tessie Oelrichs has. come and gone again, making 
such a flying visit that but few of her friends saw 
much of her, and many entertainments planned had 
to be given up. Mrs. Will Tevis captured her for 
a luncheon ; she dined at the Smiths' and also at the 
de Youngs', and appeared in all the glory of a won- 
derful ball gown at the last Greenway dance; she 
was one of Mrs. Eleanor Martin's family dinner party 
on Christmas, and she gave a small dinner herself 
at the Palace, and all is told. 
There is any quantity of things being arranged for 



SHREVE & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS 



??? 



Importers of Precious Stones 
Gold and Silver Smiths 



w 



Post and Market Sts. 



January 3. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



the edification of the I'ctcr Martins, who U1 
here almost any time now. A lot of people have CODM 
back again recently; the MacArthurs and the K 
rcttirnei) from Honolulu last Sunday; Mrs. Hunting 
ton is home from her visit Fast, and Dr. and 
Hopkins arrived last week from their long al 
in foreign parts; the Harry Poetts are also 
from their honeymoon trip to the Hawaiian Islands 
The Jules Bretts, who returned recently from Japan, 
are off a^ain. this time for Cuba, and leave for til 
Fast en route next week. Beatrice Fife is 1" 
fine *incc her return from her trip East, hut socnn 
very glad to be home once more. 

But oh. dear me. isn't it too bad that all our lovely 
button beaux are going to be sent off to the wars— 
which, being interpreted, means Panama. What shall 
we rlo without them? T do hope the Presidio dance 
I told you of will come off before they leave — it 
promises to be such fun. — Elsie. 

The delightful weather was a great drawing card 
for the Hotel Rafael. San Rafael. Several dinner 
parties were given there during the holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Carnegie entertained the 
Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Institution at 
dinner at the Xew Willard Hotel in Washington, 
D. C, on the evening of December 8th. Among the 
guests were Dr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Gilman, and 
Judge and Mrs. W. W. Morrow. Dinner was served 
in the Cabinet room, and the floral decorations were 
chrysanthemums, roses and ferns. Secretary Hav 
was unable to be present. 

"A HAPPY NEW YEAR." 

That is the greeting which one hears on every side 
these days. Happiness for the year to come is the 
thing that all desire, and the greater the regard for 
your friend, the greater happiness you wish for him. 
Happy homes form centers for the dissemination of 
happiness. Several wise people have discovered 
lately that as happy a home as one can find, with 
none of the vexations of tradesmen or of servants, is 
the Hotel del Monte. Under new plans and new 
management arrangements have been made at this 
resort for the especial accommodation of families. 
Three San Francisco households well known in so- 
ciety have gone down there recently to spend several 
weeks, and there are several families from far away 
who have been there several months. It is getting 
to be the popular thing — this life at Del Monte — 
and the exercise and recreation that comes from golf- 
ing, driving and riding is bound to bring health and 
happiness. 

The "Theo" — Popular-Priced French Corset. New 

Fall Models Dip Hip now on display. The D. Samuels Lace 
House Co., Sole Agent. 



WE SEND WEDDING CAKES 
BY EXPRESS 



The Star Hair Remedy — best 01 all tonics and restora- 
tives. Stops tailing hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not 
a dye. At druggists and hair-dressers. Accept no substi- 
tute. Star Remedy Co.. 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



L. & M. Alexander & Co. are located as before, 110 Mont- 
gomery street, and rent and sell typewriters. 



One of the safest and best remedies for biliousness or bilious head- 
ache, is Leipnitz Liver Regulator. It is an excellent alterative and tonic 
to the digestive organs. For sale by Leipnitz & Co. N. E. Cor. Sutter 
and Grant Ave. 



The latest style iu shirts may be found at John W. Carmany's 
Chronicle Building. 



.ilCAKES] 



MAIL "■""""— ■»■.,■— 'nr.i.mr™ 

'035 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOCHA CREAM 
TORTE 

nun Cake fit for ins 
American Table 

SI. {1.51, $2 

Telephone South 713 



DIVIDE : NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings i-ank of San Francisco. 

For the halt year endlnn l> mber at. uos, a dividend has ) n do- 

olared at I he rate of three and twenty one hundredths (n.30) per cent 

Ser annum on all deposits, fi s. juiyable on and after Saturday 

anuarya, isai OEOBOE \ BTOKY. Cashier 

Office— 710 Market st. 



It is no trouble to select holiday presents if you go to George 

T. Marsh & Co. 'a Japanese store, 224 Post street. The stock is 
the most complete in town. Exquisite goods are displayed. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

ECas declared a dividend for the year ending December 81, 1908, of r» 
. per cent on ordinary deposits. G per cent on term deposits :■ n > 1 B per 

cent to stoekholders, free of tnve-. 

1)11. WASHINGTON DODGE. President. 
N'M. COBBIN, See. and den. Manager. 
Offloe— 301 California St.. San Franoisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending December SI, 1908, dividends upon all de- 
posits at the rate of three ami one-iiu:irter (:! 1-4) per cent per annum, 
free of all taxes, will lie payable on and after January 2 mot. 

FRED W. HAY Secretary. 

Office— 222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the hoard of directors of this society, held 
this dav. a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one- 
fourth (3 1-4) per cent on all deposits for the six months ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1903, free from all taxes, and payable on and after.Tanunry2, 1904. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Office— Cor. Market. McAllister and Jones Sts.. San Francisco, De- 
o ember 28. 1903. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

Has declared a dividend for the term ending December 31. 1908, at the 
rate of three and one-quarter (31-41 per cent per annum on all deposits 
free of taxes, and payable on and after January 2. 1904. 

(Signed) CYRUS W. CAR MANY. Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery St., cor. Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December, 1903, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate per annum of three and 
one-half (3 1-2) per cent on term deposits, and three (3) per cent 
on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Sat- 
urday, January 2, 1934. LOVBLL WHITE, Cashier. 

Office— 532 California St., cor. Webb. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with December 31, 1903, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of three and one-quarter (3 1-4) per 
cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Saturday. January 2, 1904. GEO. TOUBNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California S treet. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending December 31, 1903, dividends have 
been declared on deposits in the savings department of this 
company as follows: On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per 
cent per annum, and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3 per 
cent per annum, free of taxes and payable on and after Satur- 
day January 2, 1904. Dividends uncalled for are added to the 
principal after January 1, 1904. ^^^ BR0WN , Manag er. 

Offl ce _Cor ner California and Montgomery Sts. 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

V V o 

Scotch_Whisky 

Importers-MACONDRAY & CO. 



3° 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



nniir 1)1) AC Hay wards Bldg., California and 
IlKAY tlKIIN Montgomery Sts., San Francisco. 
UHA* Mfi\vu. 20B New High Street, Los Angeles. 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



ARTISTIC PORTRAITURE 

Our beautiful $12.00 Art Bromides will be 
made at $5.00 per dozen for a short time 

X5he Imperial Studio 

744 MARKET STREET 

Established 25 Years and Always & Leader 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS m 

PATE'R 

TEL. MAIN 198 - 55-57-59-61 FIRST HT.. '8AN FRANCISCO 

Blake, Moffit ft Towne. Lot Angeles. Cal. 
Blake McFall ft Co.. Portland, Oregon. 



H i for barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

Krl] SnCS Dllliard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 
** makers, canners, dyers, flour mills, foundries, 

laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers, 

Brush flfts., 609 Sacramento St, S. F., Tel. flaln 561 1 



Our Holiday Suggestion 

is that you present yourself as well as your friends with a case, 
containing 12 quart bottles of our pure rich 10 year old California 
"Wines, all of one kind or a selection of Port, Sherry, Angelica 
Muscat, Tokay. Zinfandel, Burgundy, Riesling and Sauterne. 

Price $5.00. Shipped free within ion miles. 

46 ELLIS STREET. S. F. 

Telephone Main 6171 



RATHJEN WINE COMPANY. 



Mantle f®. Son, Inc. 

Haberdashers 

And Dealers In Men's Hign Class Furnishing Goods 

10 Stockton St.. San Francisco. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents 
Oceanic Steamship Company 

GlUingham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens 

THE AWARD AT CHICAGO. 1893. 

"£££$£ P £„ 1X " PARIS ' 190 °- THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 
AWARD. These pens are "the best In the world." 
Sold by all stationers. Sole agent for the United Sta tp* 
MR. HENRY HOE. 91 Joun Street. New York? 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. No. 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




Moves and Countermoves. 

Politics, of course, like business, suffers from the 
holiday dullness, and yet there is always something 
doing. It is only little more than a week now before 
the Mayor will tell a waiting world whom he pro- 
poses to place in charge of the several departments 
of the city Government. The Governor, too, has 
several prizes in his gift to be awarded soon. Presi- 
dent Fitzgerald of the Prison Board reaches the 
end of his term on the 12th ulto, and there are several 
ambitious gentlemen who are anxious for his place. 
It is said, however, that the Governor is more than 
inclined to re-nominate him. It is urged against him 
that he is a Democrat, and that the Boards should be 
Republican. But though nominally Democratic, the 
fact is that the Board has been for years simply the 
reflection of the Governor, and the appointments have 
been made from the executive chamber at Sacra- 
mento, whether Budd, Gage, or Pardee was Governor, 
and the private political views of the members have 
amounted to nothing. Fitzgerald has always done 
what he was told to do ; no man, even if he had voted 
for Fremont, Lincoln and so on down the list to 
McKinley, could have done more. Besides, if Fitz- 
gerald is re-nominated, it will not make as many 
enemies for the Governor as if he gives the place 
to a Republican and thereby disappoints a dozen othe 
Republicans who want the nomination and cannot 
get it. Senator Belshaw wants it, but Belshaw and 
Wilkins of San Rafael, both come from the same 
Senatorial District, and were rival nominees for 
State Senator in the Eleventh District in 1902, 
and to put them both on the same Board would be to 
create endless rows, and Pardee is a man of peace. 
Some man of experience in criminology ought to 
be put on the Board, and the Southern end of the 
State should not be ignored if a new man is to go on, 
and Belshaw is neither a student of criminology nor 
from the South. Dr. Walter Lindley, at present a 
director of the State school at Whittier, would be 
at once an appropriate and wise selection. Will the 
Governor show his wisdom by naming him? 
* * * 

The rumor is revived that Assemblyman Prescott 
of San Bernardino is to be given the position of 
Adjutant-General. He is anxious for the place, is 
devoted to military life, is a veteran of the late un- 
pleasantness with Spain, and is a good disciplinarian. 
The condition of the National Guard is such that a 
change in the office of Adjutant-General is impera- 
tively demanded. General Stone is too busy selling 
cement to give much time to the Guard, and the 
opposition to the militia is such that it cannot afford 
to drag along as it is doing now, or the first thing 
that happens there will be no militia, and no one 
knows when it will be needed, as troubles where it 
might be useful are not improbable in the near future. 
Not only is it in bad shape from the standpoint of 
discipline, drill, etc., but there are a number of otlier 
irregularities that have been allowed to creep in that 
must be suppressed. Thus the officers of some of 
the companies, without a shadow of authority, have 
borrowed money on the credit of their companies. 
The amount in some cases is large, and in at 
least one incident, it is said, the company could not 
wind up its affairs because a debt of this character 
hung over it. The Attorney-General has also held 
that the militia cannot exceed its monthly allowance 
any more than any other State institution, and that 
means very serious embarrassment if some one who 
understands business methods, and who has the lime 
and the desire to put them into practice, is not at 






January i, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3« 



the head of the Guard For those and other reasons 
a new Adjutant-General is needed, and will soon be 
named. 

» » * 

Speaking of the illegally created debts in the Na- 
il Guard reminds me that it is said that the Re 
the University, at least those who were re- 
sponsible for the auditing of the accounts, may be 
asked to make up what the State has lost through the 
defalcation of the Secretary. Tin- Secretary liad no 
bond a- Secretary ; his bond was given while he was 
•ant Secretary, and therefore does not cover 
even in part his more recent stealings. The law re- 
quires him to give a bond, and it is held by some at- 
torneys that those who failed to see that tlie law was 
carried out should make good the loss to the State. 
* * * 

I learn from Santa Clara that the possibility of 
naming a candidate for Congress from that part of 
the Fifth District on the Republican ticket is caus- 
ing much discussion, and that among other names 
that have been suggested is that of Dr. A. E. Os- 
borne, at one time the Superintendent of the Feeble 
-Minded Home at Glen Ellen. Dr. Osborne has an es- 
tablishment at Santa Clara for the care of patients 
similar to the Glen Ellen Home, and has been very 
active in politics since he left the State service. He 
is a member of the Santa Clara town council, was a 
delegate to the State Republican convention, and has 
been for some time more or less prominently men- 
tioned as a candidate to succeed Louie Oneal as State 
Senator. Oneal wants to go back to Sacramento as 
Senator; he and his friends the ex-Mackenzieites 
would tavor running Osborne for Congress to get him 
out of Oneal's way, and as Osborne is persona non 
grata with the Hayes contingent, he could probably 
get the united support of the Republicans of the 
county. He has strength in this city, where he is 
well known, and those who are booming him for the 
place think he will make an ideal candidate, and 
give Wynn a good run for his money. 

I was quite amused to see Congressman Wynn, by 
the way, on the streets during the holiday season. 
As an opponent of the monopolies of the country and 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad in particular, it was 
funny to see him, accepting a pass from them to 
come home for Christmas. A few years ago Wynn 
would have hesitated to have gone to San Jose for 
Christmas, but then he had to pay his fare. Now 
when he has only to ask to receive he comes across 
the continent in a palace car, to eat his turkey in 
San Francisco on Christmas. I do not blame him, of 
course. He is wise to get all he can out of his posi- 
tion while it lasts, but how can his labor constituents 
reconcile traveling on passes with his professions on 
the stump before election? But probably they do 
not try to reconcile them. Consistency is not a thing 
that worries them much, as a rule. 

Besides the position on the State Prison Board, 
the Governor will have the place of Commissioner of 
Public Works at his disposal in March, and the fight 
for the place is already active. It is a place in which 
there is nothing to do but draw your salary. Under 
Budd, the brother of Sam Leake who is the efficient 
editor of the Woodland Mail, was the Commissioner. 
Frank D. Ryan has the place now. Usually, however, 
it goes to editors. But the fact that newspapermen 
and lawyers can fill it successfully shows what a sine- 
cure it is. W. D. Pennycock of the Vallejo Chronicle 
thinks that the salary would help out his editorial 
income very much, and George W. Pierce of Yolo 
would like the $3,000 that it represents, also, and of 



course there are one o T - (WO Candidates in 1 lakland, 
but the Governor has given no hint whom he will ap- 
point. 

* * * 
During the last city campaign, McCarthy, the head 
oi the Building I rades Council, was very conspicuous 
m his advocacj of Henry J. Crocker for Mayor. It 
is now said that he will he rewarded by the Governor 
with tin- position oi Labor Commissioner, a po 

now held In I'. V. Meyers, Whose term expires in 
April. .McCarthy, while not a success at swjnging 
bis followers in line lor Crocker, is nevertheless a 
Strong man in labor circles, and his appointment 
would be popular anion-- thai element, who certainly 
should be recognized in the naming of the Commis- 
sioner. It is said the push and those who represented 
the Republican ticket in the late fight, will do all 
they can to persuade Pardee to give McCarthy the 
place. 

If rumor be true. John P. Irish expects to leave bis 
present position very shortly, and ex-Congressman 
Woods may get the place he so much desires. It is 
said that the Employers' Association, which it is 
claimed numbers several thousand members in this 
city, has offered him the position of manager at a 
salary said to be $10,000 a year, with a guarantee of 
five years in the place. It is proposed to make a 
fight against the unions if they become too aggressive 
this summer, and Irish has been selected as the best 
man that could be secured to lead the fight. He is 
considering the proposition, but as the salary is much 
larger than that he is now receiving, and the duties 
are congenial to him, it is thought he will accept the 
offer. 

* * * 

The new house bought by the State for the Gov- 
ernor in Sacramento nearly resulted in killing him 
and his family. He noticed that the house had a very 
bad odor, and concluded that it was from sewer gas. 
Two Sacramento plumbing experts, however, exam- 
ined the premises, and declared it was not sewer 
gas in the cellar, but bats in the garret, but the Gov- 
ernor took no stock in the bat theory, and sent for a 
San Francisco expert, who at once iocated the trou- 
ble. The Governor and his family narrowly escaped 
an illness, and if he had not been so persistent, 
there is no question but that he and his family would 
have been stricken down. — Junius. 



" BAB'S " 



EPICUR.EAN R.ESTAUR.ANT 

323 LARKIN STREET 



The J&mes H. Ba.bcock Catering Co. 

4O9 GOLDEN QATE AVE. 



WE SEND WEDDING CAKES 
BY EXPRESS 




MAIL n °"'°^' ■"- =^nrwnTiiruT 

1035 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



MOCHA CREAM 
TORTE 

A German Cake fit for any 
American Table 

$1, $1.50, $2 

Telephone South 713 



3* 



SUNBEAMS 



(Stolen from Thieves) 



During the siege of Mafeking, 
one of the officers organized a 
concert or "singsong" to keep up 
the spirits of the men. He discov- 
ered, according to the story as it 
is told in V. C, that the men had 
cause enough for low spirits. Hear- 
of a sergeant in the Highlanders 
who was a good performer, he 
asked the man to contribute to 
the concert. "I'm sorry, sir, but 
I cannot." "Why?" asked the 
officer. "You play some instru- 
ment, don't you?" "I did, sir." 
"What was it." "The bones, sir; 
but I've eaten 'em." 

"Is there anything that I might 
do for you," asked the chauffeur, 
after having demolished the gro- 
cer's store front. "Yes," came the 
caustic reply, "you might give me 
a pane." 

"Is it true that you act under 
instructions from that great cor- 
poration?" "It is emphatically 
untrue!" replied Senator Sorghum 
with indignation. "I think I can 
claim by this time to know just 
about what that corporation wants 
without any instructions what- 
ever." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Kippax — And who is your fav- 
orite author, Mrs. Softly? Mrs. 
Softly — My husband. Kippax — 
Pardon me. I didn't know he 
wrote. Mrs. Softly — Oh, but he 
does, and so nicely — checks ! 

"I'd like to know," began the 
Eden street little boy. "Well, what 
would you like to know?" asked 
his mother. "I'd like to know why 
sweetbreads haven't any brea<l in 
'em and sweetmeats haven't any 
meat in 'em." 



January 2, 1904. 



"So you want a divorce," said 
the lawyer. "Yes, sir, and if I 
don't get it quick I'll land in the 
insane asylum." "What are your 
grounds?" "My grounds are that 
my wife plays the piano from morn- 
ing till night. Week days and Sun- 
days it's all the same, and it's just 
about enough to drive a man crazy. 
Why, I haven't the nerve to look 
the neighbors in the face!" "But, 
sir, vou could hardly call music a 
sufficient cause for divorce; what 
does she play?" "Hiawatha." "Just 
a minute till I speak to the judge," 
said the lawyer, making a wild 
lunge for the door. "I'll get that 
divorce while you wait." 

"I'm so glad you chose the sub- 
ject of 'Chinese Women,' " said 
Mrs. Flushly to Mrs. Gushly, who 



Liebig Company's 

Extract of Beef 

See that the label has 
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genuine 

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For forty years the first 



had just finished reading her paper. 
"The subject is so interesting I 
never tire of hearing about the 
poor things." "Mercy," thought 
the author of the paper. "I hope 
no one else stops to congratulate 
me before I get home. These new 
shoes pinch me so I can't stand it 
another minute." 

"Now that we are engaged," 
said the amateur magician, "I must 
begin to save up for the wedding. 



r 



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ALL DAY FOR ONE DOLLAR 

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A DELIGHTFUL EXCURSION 

Including visit to flLAMEDA, HAYWflRDS, OAKLAND, BERKELEY 

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SOl/THE'RJSr PACIFIC 



zM 



January a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



COCKTAIL 
FACTS 



About 90 of the Cocktails now 
drank are either Manhattans or 
.Martinis; no good bar-keeper uses 
anv bitters but "English Orange" 
in making them. The "CLIB 
COCKTAILS," Manhattans and 
Martinis, are made as they should 
be with English "Orange Bit- 
ters," are properly aged and are 
better than any fresh made cock- 
tail possibly can be. A fresh 
made cocktail is like a new blend 
of any kind, unfit for use. Age 
is what makes a good Punch, 
age is what makes a good Cor- 
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blended whiskey, age is what 
makes a palatable sauce, and above 
all age is what makes a good 
cocktail. These statements can be 
verified by any reputable blender. 

G. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO., M p*y>r.<(»ri 
29 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Hartford, Conn. London 



PACIFIC COAST AOINTB 

5POHN-PATRICK COMPANY 

Bad FrADClMO. Loi ADPeles. 
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BRIE 
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Every mile of the track is 
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signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



Illinois Central Railroad 

Tickets to all points in the 

United States and Europe 

W. H. Snedaker, Gen. Agt. 

639 Market St. Palace Hotel Bldg. 



Don't von think, under the circum* 
stances, that we could dispense 
with the engagement rin^ 
should say not, replied the pros. 
pective bride. "None of \..nr 
sleight-of-hand tricks for n 

Daughter— Mr. Penn draws very 
well, doesn't he, papa? Father 
1 lis pictures arc not so bad, but 
the checks he draws arc no good 
at all. 

"I knows for sartin' Christmas 
can't be fur off now.'' said the old 
darkey, "kaze I been in Marse 
Tom's room clis niawnin' an' de 
jug wuz gittin' mighty low." "! low 
come you knowed dat?" "Kazc it 
tilted so easy." 

Maud — Every one I meet says I 
look ill. Ida — It must be your 
new hat, dear. You don't look 
well in it. 

"It certainly is raining hard," 
remarked the sweet girl. "I'll just 
get an umbrella and have it handy 
for you." "But surely," protested 
her favorite beau, "there's no 
hurry." 'You can't tell when you 
may need it. Father's home to- 
night." 

Tourist— Yes, I knew Bill "Lif- 
ter before he came West. He is 
dead, you say? Cactus Cal — Yep. 
Tourist — Did he — er — die a natu- 
ral death or Cactus Cal — 

Sure, he died the natural death of 
a horse thief. 

Br'er Johnson — You is accused, 
Mistah Jones, ob bettin' on t'ree- 
eard monte an' losin' $90 ob de fes- 
tible money. What has yo' to say? 
Br'er Jones — Well, we is all hu- 
man, an' de game am werry ex- 
citin' ! 

"You're not going to bar me out, 
are you?" the newly-arrived spirit 
pleaded. "Oh, no," -replied St. 
Peter. "You're the street railway 
magnate, aren't you?" "Yes, sir." 
"Well, just hang on to one of 
those straps for an eternity or so." 

Ned — Your Literary Circle is 
making a study of Shakespeare 
now, I believe. Bess — Yes, indeed. 
Ned— And what do you think of 
him? Bess — Oh, we all think he's 
just cute. 

Her Papa — And if I say no ? The 
Suitor — Well, I confess it won't 
have the same effect on me as if 
your daughter said it. 

"They say that he is a fortune 
hunter." "I don't believe it. Why, 
he has proposed to several girls 
who are not worth more than a 
million apiece." 

"Faith, Mrs. O'Hara, how d'ye 
tell them twins apart?" "Aw' tis 
aisy. I sticks me finger in Dinnis' 
mouth, an' if ee bites I know it's 
Moike." 




YV.Tr.v.v.xy.v.tf.y.v.xv.xir.y.yxif.v.tf.ir.v.vxir. 




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Dressy Suits £20 

Pants $4.50 

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best in America. fe 

*) C P"" C cn ' Saved by get-g 
Z ting your suit made byk 

JOE POHEIM I 

IDE TAILOR k 



1110-1112 Market St 



» rr»... 201-203 Montg'y St., S. F.S 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without o harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
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year; four months, $L Sold. byall newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36,B ™ d "> New York 



Branch Office. 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 



OPIUM 



Morphine and Liquor 



Habits Cured Sanatorium 
■ Established 1876 Thou- 
sands having failed else- 
where have been cured by us. Treatmet oan be 
taken at home Write The Dr. J Stsphsns. Co 
Dept-78 Leoanon. Ohio. 



HAND 
SAPOLIO 

Is especially valuable during the 
summer season, when outdoor occu- 
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GRASS STAINS, MUD STAINS 

and CALLOUS SPOTS 

yield to it, and it is particularly 

agreeable when used in the bath 

after violent exercise. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 2, 1904. 



"Good morning!" 

"Good morning, sir,'' I replied 
to a pleasant faced man of about 
40 years of age, as he entered my 
parlor. "Something wrong with 
your eyes, I presume." 

"No," came the decisive answer. 

"Oh, I beg your pardon, but it 
is natural, from training, for me 
to take for granted that any one 
who enters my sanctum has need 
of my services as an optometrist. 
' If there is nothing wrong with 
your eyes, what, then, may I ask?" 

"Glasses." 

"Ah, for some one else or re- 
pair, perhaps," I ventured glad 
that at last I had landed on the 
right track. 

"No, not for some one else, nor 
any repairing. I want a pair of 
glasses — those that hook behind 
the ears, and have rims all around, 
for my own dear little self," he 
went on. 

"But," said I, "you just said 
that your eyes needed no aid — ■ 
may I make an examination?" 

"No, I know that my eyes are 
right, I tell you; I just want a pair 
of glasses." 

"You've got me." And he had ; 
that was true. 

"What do you mean — where is 
the trouble?" 

"Well, your eyes, you say, are 
perfect ; you do not need glasses, 
but you want them for personal 
wear. What number shall I give 
you? What do you want them for?" 

"To make me look honest." 

That settled it. I gave him a 
pair of riding bow frames, for 
which he paid me $6, and he 
went away happy. I was stumped 



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The Only Steamship Line to 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

And Short Rail Line Prom Portland to all Point' 
Em Through Tickets to all Points, all Rail or 
■Immiblp and Rail, at LOWEST RATES 

Steamer Ticket! Include Berth n,d Meali. 

88 COLUMBIA Halli Deo. 29th Jan 8th, 28th. 

Feb. 7th. 17th. 27th. 

88 GEO W ELDER Sal's Deo. 24th. Jaa. 3rd 
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Steamer lallt from foot of Spear St.. 11 a. re 

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Travel by Sea? 

Cy Special vacation and Short 

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Excellent Service, Low Rales Including 
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And to those desiring longer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico- 

for Information regarding sailing dates, etc 
obtain folder 
SAN f-RANCISCu TICKET OFFICES 
4 New Montgomery at. (Palaoe Hotel) 
10 Market St.. and Broadway Vt harves. 

C. O. DUNANN, General Pass. Agent. 
10 Market Street, San FranoiBeo 




SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Trains leave ami are due i •> arrive at 
sAN FKAN4J1SCO. 
(Main Line. Koot of M arket Street t 

LKAVK — Kku.M Dk ceMHKK Z9. V.lQj. — AIIKI VK 

7.00a v'hciivIII«. Winters. Itaiusey. 7 5ii* 

7.QU* Renlcta, Sulsuu. Klmlra and Sacra- 

HH-ntu 7-25p 

7.30a Val It-Jo. Nil i>n. Callstoga, S&lia 

U"*a. Martinez, Sun lUinuii 6.25i» 

730* Miles. Llvermore, Tracy. Lathrop. 

Stockton 7 25p 

8.00a SbastH Express— (Via Davis). 
Williams (for Bartlelt Springs). 
Willows rFrutu. Ued IflulT, 
Portland. Tacoma, Seattle 7.55p 

8. 00a Davis. Woodland. Knlnhts La xllog, 

Marysvlllc. Orovlllc 7-55p 

8-30a Port Costa, Martinez, Autlocb, 
Byron, Tracy, Stockton. New- 
man, Los Banoa. M e n d o t a, 
Armonn, (lanford. V I e at la, 
Porturvllle 4.26P 

8-30* Port Costa. Martinez, Tracy. Lath- 
rop, Modesto, Merced. Fresno, 
Goshen Junction, Han ford, 
VUalta Bakerwfleld 4 55* 

8-30* Nlles, San Jose, Llvermore. Stock- 
ton, (tMiitou), lone, Sacramento, 
PJacervllle. Maryavllle, Chlco, 
Red Bill (T 4-25p 

8.30* Oakdiil«. Chinese. Jamestuwn. So- 

nora. Tuolumne and AngclH 425p 

9 00 a Atlantic Kxpress — Ogdenind Kast. 11.25* 

8.30a Rich nd. Martinez ami Way 

Stations 6 55p 

10.00a The Overland Limited — Ogden. 

Denver. Omaha, Chicago 6.25p 

IO.OUa Vallejo 12.25P 

10.00a Los Angeles Passenger— Port 
Costa. Martinez, Byron, Tracy, 
Latbrop. Stockton. Merced, 
Raymond. Presuo, Goshpn Junc- 
tion. Ilmiford, Lemoorc. Vlsalla. 

Makers Odd. Los Angeles 7-25p 

12 00m Hayward. Nllea and Way Stations. 3-2 jp 
tl.OOP Sacramento River Steamers H1.00P 

3.30c Benlcla, Winters. Sacramento. 
Woodland, Knights Lauding, 
Marys vllie, Oroville and way 
stations ... 1055a 

3.30k Hnyward. Nllea and Way Stations.. 7-65p 

3.30*' fort Costa, Martinez Byron. 
Tracy, Latbrop, Modesto, 
Merced. Fresno and Way Sta- 
tions beyond Port Costa 12-25p 

3.30p Martinez. Tracy. Stockton. Lodl... 10-25* 

4. 00 1- Martinez, Sun I turn mi. Vallejo, Napa, 

Calls toga, Santa Rosa 9 25 a 

4.00p Nllea. Tracy. Stockton. Lodl 4.25p 

4 30i Hayward. Nlles. lrvlngtou, San I 18.65a 
Joae. Llvermore | til, 55 a 

6.00»' The Owl Limited— Sewui n. Los 
lUnos. MeudotS. Fresno. Tulare, 
Bakerstleld. Lob Angeles. 
Golden State Limited Sleeper, 
Oakland to Los Angelc, tor Chi- 
cago, viae. R. I 4 P 8.55* 

5.00c Port Costa, Tracy. Stockton 12.25p 

tB30P Hayward. Nlles and San Jose 7.25* 

6. 00 1- Hayward, Nllea and Sao Jose 9.55* 

6.00c Eastern KvpresB— Dgden, Denver, 
Omaha, St. Louis. Chicago and 
East. Port Costa, Benlcla, Sul- . 
aun, Elintrn, Davis, Sacramento, 
Roc k I 1 n, Auburn, Colfax, 
Truckee, Boca, Reno, Wads- 
worth, Wlnnemucca 625p 

6. 00c Vallejo. dally, except Sunday I , C c B 

7.00p Vallejo. Sunday only f ' D0P 

7 00i ldcbmond, San Pablo. Port Costa, 

Martinez and Way Stations 11.25* 

8-05p Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
ramento, Marysvllle, Redding. 
Portland, I'uget Bound and East. 8-55* 

9.10c Hayward, Nlles and San Jose (Sun- 

day only i 11-55* 



COAST LINE (Narrow Gauge) 

Pont ol Ma r ket Street) 

8.15* Newark, Cent ervi lie, San Jose. 
Felton, Bon tour Creek, Santa 

Cruz nnd Way Stations 5-55? 

t2-16c Newark, Ceutervllle, i-an Joae. 
New Atmailen. Lo* Gatoo, Mellon. 
Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz and 

Principal Way Station-. 1 1 0) 15* 

4 15c Newark, San Jose, LosUatos and \ 18-55 t 

way stations ...'. < :1055a 

09 30p Hunters Train. Saturday only, San 
Joae and Way Stations. Return- 
lng from Los Gain- Snn-my onlv. :7 25p 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

r rum SAN KKANCISCO, Fool ol Mnrket St. (Slip <i 

- t i : 15 V.vti 11:UUa.U. 1.00 300 5 15 cm 

rrom OAKLAND. Foot of Broadway — 16:011 f*:'W 

18:0J 1U:UU*.M. 12 00 2 00 4 00 cm. 

COAST LINE (ltm;id Wailgej. 

ty (Third ami I'own-cnd Streets. ) 

610* San Jose and Way Stations. ... 6 30p 

7 00* San .lose and Way Stations 6 38P 

8. 00* New Almaden (Tu.-a., Frld., only), 4-10p 

8 00a The Coaster— Stops only Sar Joae, 

(■limy (connection for Hoi lis- 
ter). Pajaro. Castrovllle (con- 
nection to and from Monterey 
and Paelttu Grove), Salinas. San 
Ardo, Paso Rubles Santa Mar- 
garita, San Luis Obispo, principal 
stations tbence Surf (Connection 
for Lompoc). principal stations 
thencL Santa Barbara. S>n Buena- 
vi n i ura. Bangui Los Angelua... 10-4S p 
9.00* Sail Jose. Tres Plnos, Cap) tola. 
Sun taCruz.Paciric Grove, Salinas, 
San Luis Obispo and Principal 

Way Stations 4.10P 

10.30* (-an Joae and Way Stations 1-20p 

"i 1 30* Santa Clara, ban Joie. Lo* Gatos 

and Way Stations 7 SUp 

1 30 1 Snn Joae and Way Stations 8 o6* 

o.OOc Del Monte Kxpress— Santa Clara, 
San Jose, Del Monie. Monterey, 
Pacific Grove (connects at Santa 
Clara lor Santa Cruz. Itouider 
Creek and Narrow Gauge Polnta) 
at Gllroy for Hoi lister. Ires 
Plnos. at Castrnvllle for Salinas. 12-15p 

3-30c TresPlnoB Way Passenger.. 10 45a 

4 30p nan Jose nnd Way Stalons +8.00*. 

15 00 San Jose, (via Santa Clara) Los 
Gatos. and Principal Way Sta- 
tions (except Sunday) 9 00* 

l ifji San JoBe and Principal Way Stations {9.40* 
6.L0P Sunset Limited.— Redwo d. San 
Jose, Gllroy.Sallnas. Paso Kobles, 
San Luis Ublspo. Sauta Barbara, 
Los Angeles. Demlng. HI Paso. 
Hew Orleans. New York. Con- 
nects at Pajaro for Santa Cruz 
and at Castrovl'le for Pacific 

Grove and Way Stations 7 10* 

tfi Hi tan Mateo. Beresfor.l. Belmont. San 
Carlos. Redwood, Fair Oaks. 

MenloPark. Palo Alto >6.4S* 

6 ?ll Shd Jose and Way Stations 6 36* 

8-OOp Palo Alto and Way Stations 1J.15A 

11 30i* south aan Francisco. Mlllbnie. Bur 
llngame, Snn Mateo. Bel moo' 
San Carlos. Redwood, Fnir Oaka, 

Menlo Park and Palo Alto 9.45p 

o1130p May field, Mountain View. Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence, Santa Clara and 

S an Jose I9-45P 

A for Mornint; P tor Afternoon. 

I Sunday excepted t Sunday only 

a Saturday only. 
{ Stops at all stations on Sunday. 
I* "Only trains stopping at Valeocla St. southbound 
an* f>: 10 \.m., 7:00a.m., 11 :30a.m.. 3:«0 p.m., «:"«) p.m. aud 

B:0Op.M. ' 

The UNION TKANSKKK COMPANY 
* HI call for and cbet k baggage from hotels and resl 
ences. Telephone, exchange 88. luqulreof Tlckdi 



i., 



i < 



• it- 



vl I 



— don't quite see the point yet. He 
was rational, I feel sure — no freak, 
but really convinced that glasses 
would make him look honest. I 
dreamed of that chap, and in my 
dream I saw a great, magnificent 
concourse of men, each an optome- 
trist, each with a fine physique and 
bearing, and each and every one 
wearing — well, they may have 
been solid gold riding bow spec- 
tacles. 



The goddess of liberty on the 
American coin uttered a hasty ex- 
clamation. "My land !" she ex- 
claimed in a shrill voice. ''They 
will be calling me a Panamamma 
next." 



He was a middle-aged, rather 
seedy looking fellow, who stopped 
to gaze at the casts of Greek stat- 
uary exhibited in the shop window. 
"That feller's likely-looking," he 
ventured to remark to the stranger 
who happened, like himself, to be 
studying the statuary. He pointed 
to a small discobolus. Then he was 
silent for a moment. Finally, as 
he turned away, he burst out: 
"Gosh! What things they do get 
up nowadays !" 



Mrs. Jumpuppe — I wish you 
would stamp the world "sterling" 
on these spoons. Silversmith — I 
can do it, ma'am, but it will punch 
clear through the plating. 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Warr ?„Te d ars 
Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post St.,San Francisco 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 



Annual Subscription. $4.00 







Vol. LXIII 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 9. 1904. 



Number 2. 



V FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and published 
by the proprietor, Frederick Marriott, H 
BuUal S nsome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

PoStofflce as 3S matter. 

New York < Mllct- — (where Information may be obtained regarding 
rlpUons and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, 

Representative. 
London Office— 80 CornblU, E. C, England. Oeorge Street ,\L- Co. 
Chicago Office— J. II. Williams. 1008 New Y"rk Life Building. 
Boston Otnce— M. W. Barber, 715 Exchange Building. 

ial items, announcements, advertising or other matter 

Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 

LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m 

Thursday previous to day of issue. 



"Fireproof," when applied to theatres, appears to 
be synonymous with "fire-trap." 

Canada wants to buy Greenland. All right, if she 
will put her torrid little temper on cold storage there. 

Having heard the venerable diva in still another 
"farewell concert," let lis all pity Patti. 

An Oakland lady is criticised for marrying her 
coachman in a season when chauffeurs are the only 
fashionable thing. 

Right after Christmas Pierpont Morgan has the 
hardihood to say that wealth is more evenly dis- 
tributed than ever. This is too much! 



And now the unblushing Creelman is busy selling 
all over again eye-witness stories of the war in the 
Orient which he never saw. 



Only ninety lynchings in the United States for 
1903 as against ninety-six in 1902. What is this — 
the work of civilization or of the Cordage Trust? 

A Philadelphia skiographer has discovered that the 
X-ray will bleach the blackest negro. Farewell, 
then, to the color line. 



Pennsylvania boasts of a hen that invariably lays 
double-barreled eggs. Pennsylvania is also the only 
State that has a Judge Pennypacker. 

Some Chicago statistician has figured out the 
charitable, educational and similar bequests of the 
United States for 1903 at $76,934,978. Good ! Now 
tell us how much we spent in alimony. 

Another "old prospector" has blown into San Ber- 
nardino with a map of the lost "Pegleg" mine. He 
is being extensively "grubstaked" in spite of his ad- 
mission that he got the document from a medium. 

"The only girl switch-tender in the United States" 
is the title proudly worn by a young lady on the his- 
toric "Baltimore pike." How about the females in 
the hair stores? 



That Admiral Cevera, over whose capture Samp- 
son and Schley displayed such memorable modesty, 
has sent Christmas greetings to the Americans, 
whose acquaintance he. made while a prisoner at 
Annapolis. "We may outdo the Don at fighting, but 
not in courtesy. 



Norway's Parliament has "turned down" fi 
Suffrage by a unanimous vote. Who was it called 
the Norwegians "square-heads?" 



Only drummers who are church members can join 

a new order of travelers called "Gideons," and. It- 
voted to practical Christianity "on the road." What 
would they do to a "Gideon" down in Arizona? 

A mirror that pictures the. faces of the dead is in- 
teresting the good people of Bowdoinham, Me.. If 
we were addicted to the pie-for-breakfast habit, 
doubtless we, too, would believe the story. 

While Grand Army men are objecting to the ex- 
hibition of Quantrell's bones in a Kansas museum, 
the soul of that man-tiger keeps on burning — that 
is, if there be any material hell. 

The Pope has promulgated the somewhat caustic 
comment that there is too much operatic singing 
in the churches and too little real worship. No sin- 
ner may climb to heaven on the chromatic scale. 

A group of estimable ladies will run for one day 
an evening paper conspicuous for its predatory meth- 
ods. Who will have charge of the "graft" depart- 
ment? 



An Alameda drummer with a feeble imagination 
tells of having shot a hawk with four legs. Why 
didn't he take one more bowl of egg-nog and make 
it six? 



Science tells us that out of fifty skeletons measured 
the left legs of twenty-three were longer than the 
right. Evidently there are many of us who contrive, 
to conceal our pulled legs, even after death. 

The New York Court of Appeals has decided that 
a rich man need not pay more than a poor man for 
"the services of a housekeeper, nurse, secretary and 
companion." Oh, fudge! The poor man is generally 
married to his housekeeper. 

A Chicago newspaper which does not like Mayor 
Harrison, jumps on him because he was out duck- 
hunting when the Iroquois theatre fire took place. 
Where it wanted him to be was in the theatre, so 
that it might give him a tender obituary notice. 

An Omaha girl paid a midsummer bet by sitting in 
the snow in her front yard on Christmas day, with 
the mercury at zero, and eating a pint of ice-cream. 
There is one Nebraska girl, we make sure, who does 
not care for anything manufactured in a freezer. 

The gifted Henry Watterson has revenged himself 
upon Professor H. Thurston Peck for a yellow jour- 
nal book review, by calling him "H. Tootsey" Peck 
and classifying him as "an ass and a hoodoo." Go it, 
Kentucky ! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE FERRY NEWS STAND. 

Public attention has been drawn once more to the 
men and the methods of the Harbor Commission by 
the partially smothered controversy over the news- 
stand privilege in the Ferry depot. The facts are 
these: For years. Foster & Orear have held the priv- 
ilege at a rental of $400 a month. Recently President 
Spear, head of the Harbor Board under the Pardee 
administration of State affairs, notified this firm that 
it must get out. ft is declared that he said bluntly 
when pressed for a reason: "1 want it for Rooney, 
my brother-in-law." Rooney has never been a busi- 
ness man farther than his employment as a clerk in 
a wholesale grocery store. Foster & Orear are said 
to have offered at once to pay for their privilege 
whatever increase of rent the Board decreed, inside 
the profits of the business. But no: President Spear 
did not want more rent. He wanted the privilege 
for his own family. Then the news-men offered to 
sell brother-in-law Rooney a one-third interest in 
the business. This was declined on sight. At last 
week's session of the Board, President Spear offered 
a resolution awarding the concession to his brother- 
in-law at $600 a month, and then Foster & Orear 
bid $1180 a month for the privilege. This was not 
accepted, President Spear declaring the amount to 
be absurd. He tried again to jam the'Rooney award 
through, but this was too much for even the seasoned 
politicians of the Board, and the matter went over. 

Here, if we mistake not, is material for a pretty 
scandal. Presumably the holders of the privilege 
are responsible men ; presumably they would not 
have bid $1,180 for what is now costing them $400 
unless they figured on a profit above the advanced 
figure. The people will not care who gets the con- 
cession, but they will insist that the person or per- 
sons to whom it is awarded shall pay not less than 
$1180 a month for it. Most likely, if Foster & Orear 
continue to hold this valuable monopoly at the in- 
creased rents, they will be nagged and harassed into 
giving it up, and then President Spear's needy re- 
lative may get his chance at it. If, on the other 
hand, the Board gives the news-stand to the Spear 
family at $uSo a month, the public will want to be 
assured that there is no rebate — that every dollar 
of it goes where it belongs. Should the Commission 
accept President Spear's novel view that the high 
bid is too large and give the privilege to his relative 
for any smaller sum, we predict acute unpleasant- 
ness for the Board, and for the Pardee administration 
the worst scandal it has had to face. 

The full and detailed truth about the Harbor Com- 
mission would make interesting reading. It is the 
last stronghold of State patronage in the metropolis. 
Theoretically, it may be correct that the State and 
not the city should control the city's water-front, 
since the State, as much as the city, is concerned in 
the commerce that flows through this, California's 
principal port. Practically this system has resulted 
in making the harbor of San Francisco notorious the 
world over for its excessive port charges. It has 
resulted in the creation of a politcal machine, an asy- 
lum for the shelter of politicians and the relatives and 
dependents of politicians, all at salaries far beyond 
the value of their services. It is stuffed with men 
who could not earn a living elsewhere. Most of the 
vast revenue it squeezes out of our commerce is ex- 
pended in salaries for men who do little work <>r 
none at all, and in contracts and purchases of sup- 
plies that stink with fraud. 

Lately, a politician who never did and never will 
do an honest day's work was without a salary. The 
Harbor Board created for him the position of Audi- 



January 9, 1904. 
tor at $200 a month. This farcical fraud upon the 
public attracted little attention. Now comes a still 
greater piece of jobbery, revealed and checked only 
by the clumsiness or boldness of the manipulators. 
We hope it may serve to uncover the obvious rotten- 
ness of the water-front administration. 



SWINDLED AND ROBBED. 

A few months ago the News Letter exposed the 
working and purpose of the so-called "Yril Associa- 
tion," and warned the public to pass it by. A great 
many took the advice, and now they are glad that 
they did. But not a few, mostly women, went head- 
long into the trap and invested all their money — 
poured all they had into the rat hole — and now they 
mourn as only those can mourn who find themselves 
penniless because they permitted themselves to be 
inveigled into a glaring swindle. They deeply regret 
that they did not heed the News Letter's warning, 
"the more so because they knew that it is one of the 
missions of the News Letter to expose frauds and 
ventilate schemes that are intended to hoodwink and 
rob unsuspecting people. 

The Vril Association is out of business. The sev- 
eral thousand dollars that went into its "treasury" 
are exactly where the getter-up and manager of the 
swindle intended at the beginning they should find 
their strong-box. He is not in the city.' He does not 
want to be in the city, nor has he wanted to be in the 
city for several weeks; besides, he does not make 
known his whereabouts, nor does he intend to. Sev- 
eral "lone women" put in their all — some of them 
"investing" as much as $1,000 — under an agreement 
that they should not only make enormous profits, 
but draw a fat salary meanwhile for their services 
to the Association. For a while the pay roll was 
large. Why not? The dupes were simply being paid 
out of their own investments, but all they received 
in salary amounted to only a small percentage of 
what they had invested. And in what did they in- 
vest? In the word of a stranger, who is an accom- 
plished hypnotist, with a tongue that can "wheedle 
with the devil" when it comes to persuasive lan- 
guage, promises and mannerism. But his work is 
done ; he has harvested his crop ; he has gone with 
the golden sheaves, and his dupes have only the stub- 
ble as their own. It is said that the net profits that 
accrued to the "dear, soulful and personally disinter- 
ested humanitarian" aggregate about $8,ooo. He does 
not like the climate of California, so he will return 
to the scenes of his conquest no more forever. The 
scheme was born at a spiritual seance in Denver. 



ROUGH AND RAGGED STREETS. 

About the only thing that San Francisco is doing 
calls for criticism — and severe criticism to the point 
of condemnation — is indifference to the condition of 
some of the principal streets. Rough and untidy 
streets do not really reflect the taste, culture or de- 
sire of the city, but simply displays the incompe- 
tency of those authorities whose business it is to 
remedy the evil, and indirectly may be attributed 
to downright neglect of the people in general to de- 
manding what is their due in the way of clean, well- 
appointed and substantial thoroughfares. The streets 
of a city are the arteries through which the currents 
of business and social life flow, and to clog these cur- 
rents with holes and ridges and ponds of water and 
filth and stray cobble stones and dilapidated and 
straggling curbings is to commit a crime against de- 
cency, self-respect and convenience. 

Take, for instance, California or Sacramento or 
Bush or Sutter streets, say as far out as Larkin, the 



January 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



condition of not one oi tl • m 

se public and offici.il business it is 

1 and inconvenient conditioi 
ibtain. And the wonder is thai property o 
ing on these thoroughfares d.> not ms 
bunion to the negligent authorities until propi 
pairs arc made. It the resident property ownei 
these streets . I i.l but know it. they would see an 
that such dilapidated highways in front of their 

bouses are a reflection upon their taste for the beau- 
tiful and the convenient. Culture and refinement 
do m .t book-learning, nor at an assuring 

bank account. It includes what is p 1 the 

eye. what is not distressing to the nose and what 
does not remind one of the gullies and ruts and 1 
of a neglected mountain road when walking ,,r .'ru- 
ing. The plain fact is. there is altogether too much 
indifference displayed by residents on neglected 
streets to stimulate the authorities to any active 
sense of their duty. What is needed is a vigorous 
protest of increasing vigor and earnestness until 
these thoroughfare evils are remedied by complete 
and substantial renovation. A lick and a promise 
should not be accepted. Let onlv smooth, even and 
clean streets satisfy, and since residents arc entitle 1 
to just such highways, it follows that if thev do not 
have such, the fault is largely their own. 



THE FAR EAST MUDDLE. 

A state of war already exists between Jap^n and 
Russia, but no conflict of arms has yet taken place. 
Russia is maneuvering diplomatically for time, and 
Japan is impatient almost past endurance. Both sides 
understand that the question at issue must sooner 
or later be debated and settled by shot and shell. 
Japan is ready and anxious to go to the field of 
battle, but is restrained for the moment by what is 
called diplomatic courtesy, which enables Russia to 
augment her military and naval strength on the 
ground. But the inevitable is admitted by all ob- 
servers, and only a humiliating back-down by the 
one or the other could avert a clash of arms, and 
neither nation would submit to that. Wild rumors 
of the movement of troops and warships come thick 
and fast, but no overt act has yet been committed. 
A black smoke is ascending, and where there is 
smoke there is fire close by; besides, neither side is 
disposed to extinguish the fire. 

What international complications are likely to 
grow out of it all is now the main question. Germany 
and France do not conceal their purpose to give 
their moral support to Russia. The sympathy of 
England and the United States is decidedly with 
Japan. Of course, it is not sentiment but commercial 
reasons that are actuating these outside nations, but 
just how far they can be interested without becoming 
involved to the extent of armed participation is a 
problem that no one is able to solve at this time. 
It is tacitly admitted by all concerned that Russian 
supremacy won by a victory over Japan would mean 
a serious handicap on British and American trade 
and traffic in Manchuria, Korea and Siberia, with 
satisfying advantages for Germany and France. 
Japanese supremacy would exactly reverse this order 
of tilings. It would seem, therefore, that Germany, 
France, England and the United States are almost 
sure to become actively involved as a matter of self- 
protection in a commercial way. 

Should China join with Japan, as she is morally and 
politically bound to do, lest a victorious Russia 
should absorb still more territory of the Celestial 



here is no doubt that the entire family of 
lirectly or indirectly im 
he "Eastern question" is settled upi 
man ' Hie Washington Government's 

;lu-r with its rather 
li ntification with the "■ >l the 

rs" is likely to yield a harvest of hitter fruit at 
an 1 normous cost. 



CALIFORNIA'S NEED. 
What California is very much in need of is a hoard 
ot fruit inspection— inspection that inspects and 
classifies on merit without fear or favor. There is 
no doubt at all that California fruits suffer in repu- 
tation and in market values in the East because the 
packages arrive without any sort of official cl 
fication or marks to designate their quality. Fruit 

growing has become an enormous business in Califor- 
nia, and it is destined to multiply in volume many 
times over in the nol very distant future. But un- 
less the busimss is safeguarded at every point by 
rigid and competent inspection of these products, the 
general standard of California fruits in Eastern and 
foreign markets is likely to be low. 

This is conspicuously true of grape fruit. Some 
oi the grape fruit shipped to the East is pulpy 
and unfit for marketing, but they are being used to 
represent the best product of the State, nor can this 
commercial dishonesty be overcome by mere protest, 
nor yet by asking that judgment be based upon com- 
parison. Outside consumers want satisfying evi- 
dence that a package of California fruit is exactly 
what it claims to be, and since such guarantee would 
be of little value unless coming from a disinterested 
official source, it would seem to be clear enough that 
if California fruit is to command the full confidence 
of outside consumers and secure their patronage on 
the merits of the consignments, growers should have 
the protection of disinterested inspection by author- 
ity of the State, which would mean the separation of 
the goats from the sheep; which would mean, too, 
that spades would be labeled spades, and that the in- 
spector's stamp on a package would designate cor- 
rectly the quality, variety and quantity of its contents. 
The importance of such inspection is becoming so 
self-evident that fruit-growers should move as one 
man to secure the needed legislation, for they cer- 
tainly should know by experience that the market- 
ing of the lower grades of fruit abroad as the best 
products of the State is gradually creating shadows 
of doubt upon all fruit products of California. This is 
not a surmise, but an actual condition, which will 
grow in disastrous influence if not overcome by 
proper official inspection. 

There is another reason why grape fruit more es- 
pecially should be amply safeguarded. Pulpy and 
otherwise low-grade grape fruit from the Southern 
States and the Mediterranean region is offered in 
Eastern markets under the brand "California." 
Doubtless this is done to discredit California grape 
fruit in the interest of other localities; but no such 
misrepresentation could be made if California grape 
fruit had the official stamp of the State upon it. It 
would be a criminal act to counterfeit it or in any 
way palm off worthless stuff as the real article from 
California. It is not denied by Eastern dealers in 
foreign and Southern grape fruit that the California 
grape fruit is the equal if not the superior of offerings 
from other countries, but they are handlers of other 
fruit, and the California article is too strong a com- 
petitor. Let there be an inspection and the official 
stamp of the State determine the quality and excel- 
lence of California's fruits. 



J SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

WATER GAS: A DEADLY POISON. 
Since it came into the enjoyment of a monopoly in 



the lighting business the San Francisco Gas Com- 
pany has been decreasing the pressure, as well as 
the quality, of the article supplied through its mains, 
and has been increasing the pressure in its literarv 
department. While its gas burns more and more 
dim and deadly, it pours out upon its patrons a flood 
of cheap talk in printed form. Every few days house- 
holders who use gas are afflicted with tracts from the 
gas company, in which they are told with effusive 
friendliness how much they do not know about gas 
and its uses, how pleased the company will be to 
hear their suggestions and complaints, how rejoiced 
it will be to sell them cook stoves and heaters, and 
how, to facilitate their visits, street cars will let them 
off at the door. It is the era of glad hand and bad 
gas. 

But the monopoly's glad hand, like its gas, is bo- 
gus. The citizen with a bill to protest or a complaint 
to register, finds the company's ear as deaf and its 
eye as unseeing as ever. The purpose of its tracts 
seems to be to soothe a rebellious people into accept- 
ance of their lot without complaint. The gas pur- 
veyed by the monopoly is so wretched in quality at 
all times and so lacking in pressure at the times 
when people want to use it, that it would be dear 
at half the price. To burn it is to court blindness; to 
breathe it is almost certain death. Hardly a day 
passes that the Coroner's men do not gather in the 
body of a victim of the lethal carbon monoxide, and 
most of these "gas cases" are accidental. A jet gone 
wrong, a heater tube worn out, a feeble flame blown 
out by the wind, and somebody pays with his life 
for the gas company's criminal disregard of the law 
and of the public's rights — pays with his life the 
profits that the company pockets. Time was when a 
double asphyxiation was an event of sensational pro- 
portions; now "gas cases" come doubly and even in 
triples without provoking more than passing interest. 
And cheap gas is not cheap, after all. No rate- 
payer finds himself paying a smaller bill at 75 cents 
or $1 per 1000 cubic feet of the detestable "water 
gas" than he did when the price was $2 per 1000 
cubic feet and the gas was honestly made from coal. 
Many citizens find "water gas" much more expen- 
sive and far less effective. The old joke about 
lighting a candle by which to see the gas flame is 
almost a reality these nights in San Francisco. 

The gas company may think that it can keep the 
people honey-fuggled by its fool pamphlets into ac- 
quiescence in its new policy, and it may rely in an 
extremity upon the fact that it has no competitors, 
and that the people must have gas. If it proceed 
much farther on these assumptions it will hear some- 
thing drop. The people know the remedy, and when 
they have made up their minds it will be applied. 



AN UNJUST FINE. 

If San Francisco sinned when it re-elected Schmitz 
as Mayor, its punishment has already begun. 

This week the three Union Labor members of the 
Police Commission, Drinkhouse, Hutton and Rea- 
gan, constituting a majority of the Board, found Pa- 
trolman James P. Fogarty guilty of "using unneces- 
sary force in making an arrest," and fined him $10. 
The other member, Howell, dissented, holding that 
the charge of assault and battery and of unlawful ar- 
rest were not sustained, and that the accused had 
shown courage, coolness and fidelity in his conduct 
on the occasion in question. 

The Fogarty case was an outgrowth of the Cloak- 
makers' strike. On the night of December 5th, Sol. 



January 9, 1904. 

Levitus, a member of the striking union, was one of 
the principals in and in front of a Market street 
restaurant, into which a man and woman, errone- 
ously supposed by the Cloakmakers' pickets to be 
patrons of a boycotted shop, had been followed by a 
mob of unionists. Single-handed, Patrolman Fo- 
garty quelled an incipient riot, arresting Levitus and 
one other, after a sharp struggle, in which he was 
obliged to use his club and to handcuff his prisoners. 
The case against Levitus was so plain that a Police 
Court, notoriously tender toward unionism, convicted 
him of disturbing the peace. Now comes Schmitz, 
and through his tools in the Police Commission, con- 
victs the patrolman and fines him for doing his plain 
duty. 

The consequences of this damnable piece of busi- 
ness will probably be serious. No policeman wdio 
wants to keep his star will interfere with the pickets 
and "wrecking crews" and "Hying squadrons" and 
"educational committees" of organized labor unless 
he sees them actually killing people or setting fire to 
houses. He would be a fool if he did. From this 
on, as long as Schmitz and his pack are in power, 
the unionists can do as they please so far as the 
police are concerned — that is, until the tornado of 
public sentiment fast forming shall break and whirl 
them out of the way of our peaceful progress. 

The police courts have rarely failed to turn loose 
union labor men arrested for violating the laws. The 
police have kept a semblance of order by occasional 
use of their clubs and by occasional arrests. Now 
that the Police Commission has plainly informed the 
force that there must be no interference with organ- 
ized labor, even when it assaults peaceable citizens 
and engages in riots, what will happen? We can 
only hope that while their Schmitz has his day the 
unionists will be too busy doing something else to 
take advantage of this situation. If not — well, for 
a time San Francisco will not be a pleasant place 
for decent men and women to live in. 

After we have disposed of Schmitz as Mayor of 
San Francisco, after we have flogged organized labor 
back into respect for the law and for the fundamental 
rights of men, let us not forget the Drinkhouses and 
the others who have snarled loudest in the union 
pack. And let us not by any means forget Patrolman 
Fogarty. Let us one day give him back that $10 
piece, and with it a medal that shall be at once a 
testimonial of public esteem for a good man most 
unjustly humiliated, and a souvenir of an occasion 
when he did his duty most excellently as a citizen 
and as an officer of the law. 




UCHAS. KLILUS & COm 

&£XCL USfVEM 

m GHGRA DE CLOTHIERS 

It's the cut and chic in clothes offered here that give personnel 
to a gentleman's dress, inculcating minor details, devoting time 
and attention to men's clothes only. 

Consequently, modestly claim that our "immediate Service 
Clothes" are superior. Some good dressers have been put wise 
about our shop. "There are others" that ought to know us. 



ECJXAKJFW STTIMEI2.!r 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9. 1904. 

University Gossip 

By the Undergraduate. 

The faculty youngsters .it Stanford have 1 new 
ime that is fascinating as well as thrilling 
railroad track has been laid along the back yards 
of the faculty houses, and the other da) 
Adams of the History Department was horrified to 
his own youngest-born and two other midgets 
indulging in a novel game. They were seeing which 
one could stay on the track longest when the engine 
»> coming, without getting run over. The engine 

•nly a few feet away, and Adams was alt 
shout tor fear he would' distract the children's at- 
tention. They scurried off at the last minute, an,! 
when the professor was through administering the 
rod, he asked : 

"What would you have done if that engine had 
struck you?" 

"hone?" exclaimed the hoy. with a look of fine 
scorn on his small face, "I'd just 'a laid down and let 
the thing pass over me. Shucks! didn't you ever 
see a tramp riding on a brake-beam?" 

And the queer part of the incident is that the child 
really had faith in his ridiculous theory. The fac- 
ulty is now petitioning- the railroad to erect a fence 
along the track, and the railroad is petitioning the 
faculty to hobble the babies. 

* * * 

The Berkeley telephone subscribers are airing a 
grievance that is not a novelty in some other com- 
munities. They want to stop flirtations over the 
telephone. Householders, doctors and business men 
complain that often they can't get the line after seven 
o'clock in the evening because a host of sissy John- 
nies and baby AIary r s utilize the time in striking up 
acquaintanceships over the wire. Even "Central" 
has been known to grow wrathy over some of the 
inane blubberings that are transacted through the 
receiver for hours at a time — and Berkeley "Central" 
does not rise to action on small bait. 

Telephone dates are quite the rage in Berkeley. 
"Ring me up at eight, sure, and tell me what you are 
thinking about," pleads Tommy Traddles to Simper- 
ing Sally, '06; and doctor, lawyer, merchant and 
chief are forced to hold back until Tommy receives 
voluminous electric assurance of her well being. And 
for a "new acquaintance" to be struck up over the 
'phone requires even a longer period. One irate mer- 
chant established himself a detective on the line, 
and is still at work. He takes down the 'phone num- 
bers of the would-be new acquaintances, and vows 
he A'ill make complaint to the proper authorities. No 
other remedy has been offered to abate the nuisance. 
Rubbering over the 'phone is not a pleasing pastime 
for a busy man, but the merchant swears he will call 
on the young ladies himself, and put them to the 
blush, and will send a policeman to the young men. 
He wants to know if he can't have them arrested for 
disturbing the peace ! 

* * * 

During the recent diphtheria scare at Stanford, one 
of the students packed up his grip about examination 
time, and appeared at the parental abode with the 
intelligence that there "was a fever scare at Stanford 
and he thought best to clear out." The old gentle- 
man was on ; he looked down the youngster's throat, 
and announced to the family that "he had it sure." 
Therefore, the absconding student was locked up 
and quarantined, minus tobacco, and was put on a 
soft diet. His fraternity brothers learned of his pre- 



sent, and lad on the old 

tleman to 

"Lord!" ! the bland parent, "YOU couldn't 

drag him out now. if you wanted to. II 

it all is. In- really thinks he's got it, and he won 
unless we feed him through a tube. lie's a rare 

study in Christian Science, anil I've never known 

where he was at before for two weeks at a time." 
The hoy's leave of absence is still in >essi,,n. 

c,it tin- dual nut nf your carpets. Hut don't do it 

with a club, because It's a alow, laborious ami very unsatis- 
factory way You will flnil It more profitable ami satisfac- 
tory <•• have the work done oy the Bpauldlng Carpet Clean- 
ing Company. 363 Tehama street With their Improved 
machinery they make an old carpet look as bright an.l tree! 
as a new one, 



If you want to eat the best, drink the best, and be 

nmiing the best people, go to Teeliau Tavern, which ■ 
onii to no restaurant in San Francisco. It |fl the favorite 
after -the theatre resort, and deserves Its fine reputation. 




Ruinart 
Cham- 
pagne 

Established 1729 

The President's Wine 

"Dry, Fruity— 
JVo Headache 



Varney W. CaskiU, 

Special Agent 

Hilbert Mercantile Co, 

Sole Agents 



- BHP 



JOHN H. TIETJEN COMPANY 




FINE GROCERIES, 

TEAS, WINES 

HOUSE FURNISHING 




ARTICLES 


22£ 

Opposi 


1 POWELL STREET, S. 

te Union Square Market. Telephone 


F. 

tf am 6 l 
8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January g, 1904. 





That eminent statesman and perpetual kicker, 
Sammy Braunhart, is once more upon the warpath : 
and his little axe. which seems undulled by the bard 
knocks of time, is swinging violently around his 
head, seeking the top-knots of those who have dared 
to smile when Sammy has spoken of the "wices" of 
this "vicved" world. Samuel's long: suit, he it known, 
is "wirtue" — not political "wirtue," necessarily, but 
"wirtue" as a general theoretical proposition. Having 
been in public office a decade or more, he has < n 
much of it, no doubt — in others — and thereat has 
marveled greatly. Just now he is seeking; to instil! 
"wirtue" and "wigor" into the Civil Service Commis- 
sion — and with good reason, from his standpoint. 

For the past four years man)' of the Braunhart 
push have been enjoying life at the public crib. It 
maj r not have been a roisterous life, but it was eas- 
ier than cigar peddling. During the days that are 
gone, Braunhart has seen no reason to complain 
against the retention in public office of his particular 
"temporary employees," but now that his people are 
about to be cast out. there is much gnashing of the 
Braunhart teeth. 'Tis not that Sammy cares whether 
the mattress-makers, the sheet turners, the mush- 
cookers and the others of the army of petty job- 
holders are classified and examined, or not, but that 
the new administration should capture all the patron- 
age — there's the rub. So the Braunhart has induced 
the Supervisors to adopt a resolution demanding that 
all the petty jobs — worth from $5 to $30 a month — 
shall be classified, and all the applicants therefor be 
required to tell what they know of the history of 
politics "South of the slot." and of the men that make 
San Francisco great. Sammy is a true friend of his 
country. Being unable to hold the jobs himself, he 
turns reformer, so that if he can prevent it, the Other 
fellow may not have the feeding of many mouths. 
List' to the Braunhart Civil Service chorus: 

The butcher, the baker, the candlestick-maker. 

Are all on the classified list. 
The watchman and fireman, the cook and I he pieman. 

Must do just as Braunhart insists.' 
The porter and painter, the plumber and waiter 

Are examined when he demands. 
Oh, he is getting them all; they crime at his call. 

And he's right up behind the band. 

The kickers and knockers, and growlers, you know. 

May roast him with greatest of ease. 
But Schmitz hasn't a show for municipal dough. 

List' to Sammy: he says: "ff you please, 
No official nor clerk, with a shirk to his work. 

Can bluff Sam with frown or glad hand. 
Oh, Braunhart's getting them all: the) come at his 
call, 

And he's right up behind the band. 
* * * 

Remember W. IT. 1 )aly, "King of the Dudes," who 
used to order six canvasbacks for dinner at the Palace 
Grill, and who incidentally ran the Copper King 
plant? Well, 1 understand he will soon be headed 
this way again, with shekels in every pocket of his 
many suits of clothes, ready to prove to the satisfac- 
tion of any court that he is a very much abused in- 
dividual, and that those English stockholders have 
really deprived him of his mess of pottage. Daly is 
reported to be sojourning at the Waldorf Astoria 



where, it is said, ne has nearly succeeded in aston- 
ishing the New Yorkers — and that is more than 
enough saitsfaction for the ordinary man. More- 
over, it seems he has interested capital in his tale of 
woe, and he will precede quite a strong arrav of bank 
books in an endeavor to do things up at the Copper 
King. As the tale is told, a number of the water 
rights, rights of way and other easements, all of 
which are of great importance to the mine, are in 
I laly's name. When he was superseded, and his at- 
torney transferred the title, deeds and other papers 
to the manager sent out from England, these ease- 
ments were overlooked, and Daly continued to hold 
them. Now, it is said, he proposes to show that the 
lawyer who turned over the papers to the new man- 
ager was the personal attorney of one W. H. Daly, 
and not the legal representative of the corporation ; 
wherefor, says the famous interner of ducks, the 
aforesaid lawyer exceeded his authority, and his ac- 
tions were illegal. For all these reasons. Daly says 
they will have to "show him." Whether his return 
to town be followed by a law-suit or not, the Daly 
presence would do much to cheer the hearts of those 
who ardently admire the beautiful in nature. Verily, 
W. H. has not lived in vain, for he hath done much 
to add to the gaiety of nations. 

* * * 

That great and glorious institution, the Monti- 
cello Club, is on the toboggan. Time was when its 
halls were filled by those who could not crowd into 
the assembly room to extend the glad hand to "the 
canny Scot," and his chief lieutenants. The club 
has really known nights when even the waving of the 
Murphy bandanna would not flag enough card play- 
ers to get up a three-handed game. But "States fall, 
arts fade," and political fame passes as the fog in the 
night. Those wdio once were seekers at the High- 
land court are now running far afield, nosing out new 
places wherein to gain a foothold near the hearth. 
The Monticello halls are deserted; the faithful old 
steward nods before the fire, and dreams of the 
nights when there was ever a crowd around the 
punch bowl, and sighs wearily. He is gray and 
scarred with the marks of many battles (bottles, too, 
mayhap) ; his years sit heavily upon him, and ever 
and anon, in very pity of his lonely old self, he rings 
up the bar register and drinks to the "dear departed." 
Charles is about the last of the Mohicans. 

* * * 

The turning of the Lane was the beginning of the 
end at the Monticellos. It was a long Lane — a mon- 
strous long Lane — but it's a long lane, you know, that 
has no turning. This Lane of the Monticello turned 
so suddenly that the deflection made a break in the 
road. Consequently, many of the so-called Democrats 
who had habituated themselves to the path, were 
switched off at an acute angle, and never since have 
they found their way back. In brief, the Monticello 
Club, once the home of the high joints of Democracy, 
is in the sere and yellow. Around its rooms are heard 
the hollow rumblings that precede dissolution. Its 
members have apparently lost interest in the organi- 
zation, and of course no longer have interest in its 
objects— for both of these latter were buried under 
the ballots of last November. It may be— it is but 
a surmise— vet it may be that the location of the 
club has more than a little to do with its present de- 



January 9, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



key Club, and to reach its p 
■ Jockey Club door. Now, 1 
ticularly when oil- 
men, and for such to be required to pass the di 
the headquarters of the easy money combinati 
reach the quiet rooms in which the inost violent 
11 is a picture of Judge Law lor— oh, it w. 
much! Hence, to avoid temptation, for contamina- 
tion may be in a "touch," the virtuous Democrats 
gradually fell away, until now there remain only a 
n statesmen to uphold the power and the name 
Of the club; likewise, to stall off the collector of 
dues. 

* * * 

To a man up a tree, it seems that little Tommy 
Walsh, recently Registrar, knocked down the 
persimmon in that tilt with the Mayor over the trip 
to Washington with the Kahn-Livernash ballots. 
Walsh was not looking for glory; that statement may 
seem strange, if you know the diminutive Thomas, 
but this time it is true, just the same. He was after 
the mileage and the per diem. Your Uncle Samuel, 
remember, lias plenty of money in the bank, and 
when he sends 'way cross lots for a man, he is will- 
ing to have his guest travel in state. For insisting 
on answering that subpena from the House of Repre- 
sentatives, and standing boldly up for the paramount 
dignity of this great and glorious country, little 
Tommy Walsh will draw down at Washington some- 
thing like $1,200. He will get mileage both ways — 
bow many miles is that? — at twenty cents a mile — 
say about $800 or $900. Then he will be paid $10 
a day while in Washington, and if he can't manage 
to drag that contest along for at least thirty days, 
why, then, Thomas will be a sore disappointment to 
his friends. I think the Government will also pay 
his hotel bills. If it doesn't, it should, anyhow, for 
it is not every day that the law-makers from the 
backwoods of Maine, and the wilderness of Manhat- 
tan can look upon the likes of our little Tommy 
Walsh. A trip to Washington, $900 mileage, ten 
per and all expenses, why shouldn't Schmitz want to 
beat Tommy to it? Can you blame him? Who? 

Why, either of them. 

* * * 

The Public Works Commissioners, with the ex- 
ception of the late Mr. Manson, inspected all the lo- 
cal theatres in town during the week to determine 
for themselves just what additional precautions 
should be taken to prevent the repetition of the Chi- 
cago horror in this city. I think they were satisfied 
— with the exception, of course, of the late Mr. Man- 
son — that our theatres are in good condition so far 
as exits and fire protection go. Speaking of fire pro- 
tection, San Francisco should be thankful for the fact 
that it has an honest man as Chief of the Fire Depart- 
ment. Sullivan's business is to put out fires, and he 
does put them out — excepting, of course, that of the 
late Mr. Mianson, which is unquenchable. Two 
firemen serve every night on the stage of every 
theatre in town, and if they are caught trying to graft, 
even in a small way — bounce — to the woods go they. 
In Chicago it was, and is, different. There, graft is 
King. But in this city, so far as Chief Sullivan's end 
of the fire business goes, graft is dead. Do you re- 
member how Sullivan refused to accept a donation 
of $1,000 from the Fire Commissioners when he 
started on his Eastern trip? Well, that's his way. A 
few months since, he went to the box-office of a 
theatre, accompanied by a friend, and put down the . 
money for two seats. The manager of the house was 
in the office, and recognizing Sullivan, handed him 



k his money. I be 

hed up, thrust the tickets into the th< 

the money back at him, and 

way. He has never been at thai bouse 

and lie scowls when he sees that in an a. 

ay, and the manager cant make it out! 

ially a public officer, should 

refuse theatre tickets is too much for his compre- 
hension. Bui it is that very superiority to craft in 
any form that makes Sullivan the man lie is. If as 
much could be said for some of the Fire Commie 
ers ,the town would have occasion for even greater 
thankfulm 

* * * 
_ When old John Swett said that the recent conven- 
of school teachers was a fake, he spoke the sim- 
ple truth, and every school teacher in town knows it. 
1 bank on old John Swett. He knows bis business, 

and he is not afraid to call a spade a spade, The trou- 
ble with the teachers of San Francisco is that the 
great majority of them do not consider their occu- 
pation a life work; they look on it as a hard, neces- 
sary drudgery, from which, they hope, they will be 
released some lime — by death or marriage. There 
are some who arc above the crowd — men and women 
with ideas. But what good are their ideas to them- 
selves or to any one else? If they dare to publish 
them in the press, or even, forsooth, if. uninvited, 
they should suggest them in writing to the Board of 
Education, wdiat happens? Why, they are sent for, 
taken into executive session, grilled, roasted and bas- 
tinadoed, kicked out, and told to go away back and 
sit down. The result, of course, is that the teachers 
are in a constant condition of terror. It it not sur- 
prising, therefore, that the recent convention was a 
flat failure. Future conventions, also, will be fakes 
and frosts, unless the existing conditions change. 
The martinets in the City Hall are "the responsible 
parties." If they would arouse the teachers to the 
possibilities of their profession, the Directors should 
treat them decently, and not like a lot of empty- 
headed poll parrots who have no ideas beyond vaca- 
tion, flirtation, dollars and dress. 

Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the 

rooms, formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



One of the safest and best remedies for biliousness or bilious head- 
ache, is Leipnitz Liver Regulator. It is an excellent alterative and tonic 
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The latest style iu shirts may be found at John W- Carmany's 
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It is no trouble to select holiday presents if you go to George 

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A rub at the Post St. Hammam will do you good. 



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Telephone South 713 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January g, 1904. 




"Life of William Ewart Glad- 
Life of William stone," by John Morley, is head 
Ewart Gladstone, and shoulders above all histori- 
cal and biographical works. 
That the selection of Morley by the heirs and po- 
litical legatees of Gladstone to write his biography 
was a fortunate one was felt from the first announce- 
ment of Mr. Morley's appointment. Some idea of 
the mere manual labor involved may be obtained 
from the author's statement that in the preparation of 
the work between two and three hundred thousand 
papers have passed under this review. 

To attempt to review these volumes in the space 
at our command would be to attempt to summarize 
the principal events of English history lying between 
the date of Gladstone's election in the year 1832 to 
the year 1894, when he retired from Parliament and 
political life, the world's greatest citizen and Eng- 
land's "Grand Old Man." 

These volumes exemplify that Gladstone was all 
things political. That no single tribute to his great- 
ness should carry more weight than the fact that his 
political positions changed with the changes of con- 
scientious belief. How he was able to retain his fol- 
lowing through all those changes is sufficiently ex- 
plained in the letter from Spurgeon, which we find 
quoted here: "We believe in no man's infallibility," 
he wrote, "but it is restful to be sure of one man's 
integrity." We did not need to be convinced of Glad- 
stone's greatness, Dut we did need an unbiased and 
enthusiastic review of his life. Mr. Morley's gives us 
a new significance of the greatest political figure of 
modern times. 

P. N. P.. 

Doubleday, Page & Co. have 
Novels and Essays issued a beautiful "Golden 
by Frank Norris. Gate" edition in seven vol- 
umes of the novels and es- 
says of Frank Norris. The publication, after death, 
of the complete works of so young an author is war- 
ranted not so much by Norris's literary worth, but 
because he belongs to the existing order of things, 
and consequently still lives. 

In these days of the "get-rich-quick" methods, 
Norris is a voice crying aloud in the wilderness 
against the gods of Chance and Greed. Believing that 
the novelist is a teacher whose supreme obligation is 
to the struggling men and women around him, not 
to the "cultured few," he preached the need of a lit- 
erary conscience, "the responsibility of the novelist 
toward the plain people." 

"It is the demand of the people that produces the 
great writer," he declares, and "the attitude of the 
novelist toward his fellowmen is the great thing; 
not his inventiveness, his ingenuity or verbal dex- 
terity." 

Holding strongly to his belief that an immoral 
man could not be a great writer, Norris lived up to 
his creed as a way of proving it. That this asser- 
tion can easily be proved a heresy mattered not to 
him for his ambition was to dwell upon the hill-tops 
of life. As a critic, he was "a Spartan in morals, an 
Athenian in democratic sentiment," but as an inter- 
preter of men and conditions he was "a Pagan domi- 
nated by the conviction of an ever-coming fate." His 
imagination was bounded by this idea of the inevi- 
table, and his characters struggle hopelessly against*' 
a relentless destiny. 

At twenty, his first article, "Ancient Armor," ap- 



peared in the San Francisco Chronicle, followed 
seven years later by a series of letters from South 
Africa concerning the Uitlander insurrection. Dur- 
ing the next five years he wrote for the Overland 
.Monthly short stories and poems, besides contribut- 
ing occasionally to Eastern magazines. In 1903 he 
published "The Octopus," a book that caused much 
contradictory criticism. But Norris paid no heed to 
the critics; he was launched upon his life work, the 
trilogy that he called "The Epic of the Wheat." 

The second volume of the trilogy, "The Pit," was 
under way and went to the publisher before his death. 
The third volume would probably have been written 
upon the same lines, for Norris had ever before his 
eyes the fortunes of the Plain People, the playthings 
upon this Chequer-board of Nights and Days. Right 
or wrong, Norris felt that he had a message to give, 
and it is the living power of the West that has lost 
an interpreter. 

Doubleday, Page & Co., Publishers. 

In a volume of 172 pages, Mr. 
French Faience. M. L. Solon has condensed a 

history of French Faience from 
its creation to gradual decay and comparatively re- 
cent revival. With great care he has seached bio- 
graphies and records for facts that may be of his- 
torical value to the lovers of ceramics, but onlv where 
beauty of form or color, or the peculiar touch of the 
potter warrants it, does he describe in detail. The 
history of Faience is a record of failures and strug- 
gles, for as a ware for the people it could not com- 
pete with the more delicate porcelains. It is an inter- 
esting fact that the ware as it left the hands of the 
potter has little that is characteristic of the period or 
the maker. Only in glazes and ornamentation can 
the difference between the many faiences produced 
in France be detected, and only in the color and the 
style of decoration can the true be distinguished 
from the counterfeit. Therein lies the fascination of 
this ware to the collectors. 
Cassell & Co.. Publishers. 

The question has been often 

French and English asked: "Why is the furni- 
Furniture. ture of the present day so 

inferior in character and 
form to that of the seventeenth and eighteenth cen- 
turies? 

A satisfactory answer is to be found in a book by 
Esther Singleton entitled "French and English Fur- 
niture." It divides the subject into the following 
periods: "Louis XIII," "Jacobean," "Louis XIV," 
"Queen Anne," "Earlv Georgian," "Louis XV." 
"Chippendale," "Louis XVI."" "Adam," "Heppel- 
white," "Sheraton," and "Empire." The general his- 
torical and social conditions are outlined in each 
chapter, and the characteristics of the furniture and 
furnishings are described. 

There are many interesting facts in the book, which 
is more for the use of people desiring to furnish 
their homes correctly than for the use of collectors. 

McClure, Phillips & Co., Publishers. 



In "The Outlook" of December 3d, Mr. Jacob A. 
Riis begins his talk upon President Roosevelt, with 
the assertion that he does not intend to write his 
"life," but to speak of Theodore Roosevelt as he 
knows him "of his own knowledge or through those 
nearest and dearest to him." 



January 9, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 







Dear Bessie: This has been another livel) week in 
■ >ur swim, and though the dances have nol be< 
numerous as those of lasl week, t ho younges 
rather, I might say, the least seasoned of the girls 
an- commencing to show -igns of fatigue. But ur-i 
lei me hark hack a hit and tell you of the festivities 
which ushered in the New Year. I do nol know 
which of the New Near teas I enjoyed most, for 1 
was at all of them : that is to saj . of those in our set, 
which included the Huntington's, Gertrude Dutton's, 
Mrs. Redding's, Agnes Buchanan's, Mrs. Ed. Schmie- 
den's, Amy Gunn'a and Mrs. George Martin's, where 
og was the beverage dispensed; the daj was 
lovely, and every one seemed to be having a good 

time. The most gorgeous of them all was the Hunt 
ington's, where Marion made her formal debut, bill 
pOSSlbl) the one 1 liked best was that of Mrs. Schmie- 
den, which she gave for her sister-in-law, Mrs. Geo. 
Howard, who looked just as sweet and lovely as 
when, as Nettie Schmieden, she was one of the best- 
liked girls of our set, and oh, what a lovely gewn she 
wore! Amy Gunn had with her a very pretty girl 
from Los Angeles, Elizabeth Gibson by name, who 
is on a visit to Amy. 

Just as I knew it would he, the New Year's eve 
fancy dress party at the Navy Yard was just too 
perfectly delightful for words to express. Christine 
says she never enjoyed anything so much in all her 
life, and that some of the costumes were very pretty 
and others were very odd. Betty Moody's poppy 
dress was much admired, and so was Lucy Coleman's 
flags of all nations, as well as a lot more. The girls 
from town all stayed there over New Year's, and as 
everyone at the Yara kept open house and received 
calls, it must have been very like New Year's calls 
of long ago that Aunt Susie is always talking about 
nowadays. 

Aunt Susie and I had a fine time at Mrs. Gibbs's 
tea on Saturday. As Aunt Susie says, to think of 
all the years Mrs. Gibbs has wasted living so quietly 
without giving the faintest hint of what a charming 
hostess she could be, which she has so delightfully 
demonstrated the past three years. Stella Kane, 
for whom the tea was given, has been here before, 
and was much liked, so of course she received many 
words of welcome. 

There has been a little of everything done this 
week, though of dancing not so much as we had in its 
predecessor. Mrs. Grayson Dutton had a luncheon 
party of twelve at the St. Dnnstan, to open the week 
on Monday afternoon. Then, owing to the uncertain- 
ties of the weather at this time of year, as well as 
the fact that some of the men invited would find it 
difficult to go up to the Navy Yard, the Gaiety Club 
decided to hold its meeting in town instead of at 
Mare Island. Miss Stella McCalla played the hostess 
at Century Hall, on Monday evening, and a delight- 
ful time was enjoyed by all lucky enough to be asked. 
Of course I went to Mrs. Horace Davis's first "at 
home" on Tuesday to greet her daughter-in-law, Nor- 
ris's wife; she' will give another party next week. But 
the great event of Tuesday wa6 the gorgeous dinner 
Mr. Jim Phelan gave in the Red Room of the Bohem- 
ian Club for his niece, Alice Sullivan ; nearly all the 
buds of the season were among the guests, who num- 
bered sixty or more. Mrs. Joe Donahoe had her 
first "at home" on Wednesday afternoon, and there 
were more there than I anticipated, while for the 
evening there were several events on the cards. One 



was ihe wedding of Carrie Ayres ami Dennis Searles, 
which took place at the Vyres temporary home on 

•nn.i Street at nine o'clock. It was rather a 

quiel .iti'.iir; onlv iusl their most intimate friends. 

with Ma\ and Prank King as sole attendants, and 
1 Clampett performed the ceremony. 
Thursday was full to tin- brim of good things. 
(■us Costigan was one ol the hostesses, giving a 

luncheon at tin- St. Dunstan for Margaret Wilson. 

Bertie Bruce Stephenson gave a tea for New. II 
Drown, Maye Colburne following suit with one Eor 
l'olh Macfarlane. Dr. Gibbons and [da gave a dance 

at Cotillion Hall in the evening for the loveliest debu- 
tante 01 the season. Florence Gibbons. Yesterday 
Nellie Oxnard gave one ol her delightful luncheons 

for Mrs. Lewis, who is here from Portland on a 

visit to her mother, Mrs. Kittle, and a gang of us 
met at Ollie Palmer's second at home. 1 had also 
to give a look in at the reception at the Sketch Club, 
and do the first at home of Mrs. Frank Sullivan for 
Alice, and Mrs. Sam Knight's first tea. and finished 
up with the dinner given by Mrs. Irwin for the Nor- 
ris Davises. There is to be a Leap Year tea at the 
Presidio, with Lieutenant Lewis as host, and of 
course all are on the qui vive as to what it is to he 
like. There were two card parties on Thursday of 
last week. Mrs. L. L. Baker was hostess of the six- 
handed Euchre Club, and Agnes Buchanan had one 
of fifty guests to play seven-handed euchre, with 
Gertrude Dutton as guest of honor. 

Terpsichore will have an inning next week, as 
Ruth and Bessie Allen have a dance on Monday even- 
ing, which opens the week famously. Tuesday is to 
be a white letter date, for that night Florence Whit- 
tell is to be given a ball by her uncle George, for 
which the cards were sent out last week. Among 
other things on the carpet is the tea to be given for 
Polly Macfarlane by Mrs. Chris. Reis, on Thursday, 
and another tea for the same little lady on Saturday 
of which Gertrude Palmer will be the hostess. Mrs. 
Frank Deering will also give a tea on Saturday from 
four till seven. 

The Clufr-Wilson engagement is not to be a long 
one, for already the wedding day is named for the 
10th of February. It will be an evening ceremonial 
at the Palace Hotel, with Mrs. Jack Spreckels as 
matron of honor, Pearl Landers, Carrie duff, Helen 



46 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1904. 



and Constance de Young to officiate as bridesmaids, 
and will be quite an elaborate affair. Preceding it 
will come the wedding of Louise Harrington and 
Lieutenant Leahy, which is named for the 6th, I be- 
lieve, but am not quite sure of the date, and we may 
expect to hear of the cards for Bernie Drown and 
Sam Boardman's wedding being out almost any day 
now. 

The arrival of the Peter Martins will become an 
accomplished fact next week, and the gossip is that 
one of the grandest affairs of the season will be 
given by Mrs. Eleanor Martin — who has been keep- 
ing it up her sleeve all these weeks — to give them 
welcome. They are to stay with her, and we may 
look out for lots of good things in every shape and 
form once they are actually here. — Elsie. 



The reception of the Papyrus Club on the last 
day of the year, with an interesting programme, in 
charge of Miss Ella McCloskey. was attended by 
many. The Press Club Quartette, Messrs. King, 
McMillan, Hunt and Keene. rendered "Annie Lau- 
rie," by Bruck, and Lacy's "Simple Simon." Mrs. W. 
S. Leake and Mr. Dorville Libby told some accept- 
able stories, while Alice Carey's "An < Irder for a 
Picture" was spoken by Mrs. W. B. Buckingham, 
and Mine. Caro Roma and Mine, de Seminario 
sang very entertainingly. Benby's "Serenade" was 
sung by Miss Pearl Hassock, with Miss Elma Wood- 
bridge as accompanist. Mrs. Louise Battles Cooper, 
Mr. Charles Sweigert, Jeanne Morrow Long. Mine. 
Tojetti, Grace Loring Williams, Mesdames Briggs 
and Cornwall, Miss Flynn and Miss Helen Suther- 
land, filled the balance of the programme very much 
to the satisfaction of the audience. 

Among the arrivals at the Hotel Rafael during the 
past week are the Following: Mrs. and Mr. B. M. 
Gunn, Mr. and Mrs. M. Posner, F. W. Young, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. M. McDearmoth, Harry Gerdes, Mrs. 
Gironard, Mrs. Chambler, Mrs. J. M. Todd and sons, 
John F. Elliot, H. A. Preston, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liamson, Mort Lawton, W. B. Moore. 

HOTEL CLARENDON. 

The past twelve months have been the hotel era 
of San Francisco. Many good, ami >omc very super- 
ior, apartment houses and hotels have been erected, 
but the leader of leaders is easily accredited to be 
Hotel Clarendon, which opened in June, and which 
has steadily advanced in public favor. The appoint- 
ments of the hotel are so thoroughly modern, and the 
conveniences so many, that a homelike atmosphere 
pervades every floor and every room. The cafe is 
without exception the best in California, and nothing, 
even in best club life, can compare with the quiet 
elegance of the swim and surroundings. Try the 
Clarendon, and you will thank the News Letter for 
the suggestion. 

The "Theo" — Popular-Priced French Corset. New 

Fall Models Dip Hip now on display. The D. Samuels Lace 
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Champagne in all its perfection is the supreme delight 

of connoisseurs. G. H. Mumm Champagne is the favorite 
wine at all clubs and cafes. The importation of this wine 
during 1903 exceeded that of any other champagne. 



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January 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



GREAT PICTURE IS SHOWN HERE. 

The celebrated painting. I !>• 
Hul> 11 on cxhibiti 

:t will l>c shown for a lii 
will doubtless attract much attention. Th< 

". worth seeing many lii 
of a master painter and a piece of realism. I I 
reputation would he secure if lie had never pai 
>thcr picture than tliis. 

"The Blacksmith" is not a huge canvas crowded 
with figures ami overdone by startling effects: noth- 
ing hut a smithy of the old style, with the smith 
hen. ling ever his forge, waiting for lite ir..; 
proper heat. He is the old country blacksmith a 
whose shop you used to play when you were a boy, 
and he wears the same old leathern" apron. I 

ire the douhle-cttd anvil, the barrel tilled with 
scrap iron, the heap of old horse shoes and other 
and ends, the glowing tire, shooting sparks in every 
direction as the smith pulls on the bellows cor. I. 

Upon this simple background the figure of the 
smith himself stands out as if alive. Apparently 
you might walk around him as he prepares to draw 
the hot iron from the fire. You can almost see his 
hairy chest heave and the sweat drop from his brow, 
so real is the effect of Delormc's treatment, and vim 
find yourself waiting and wondering why he does not 
turn from the forge to the anvil and take up the 
hammer lying there on the old splintered block. And 
over this homely and familiar scene streams the sun- 
light through door and window, lighting up the fig- 
ure of the smith and meeting the warm glow from the 
fire. 

Delorme's great picture needs no technical knowl- 
edge of art to enable the spectator to enjoy its beau- 
ties, yet it appeals both to the artist as a master- 
piece and to the layman as a story told with brush 
and canvas and color in the keynote of sympathy 
for human life. One of the artists who spent an hour 
studying it said : "Not one painter in a thousand 
could duplicate the fire reflection upon the face and 
arms of the blacksmith, or the glow of the flame it- 
self. Delorme had to battle with the sunlight effect 
from the windows and the firelight from the forge, 
and his success was genius in its most perfect achieve- 
ment." 

The picture is owned by F. F. Galbraith of To- 
ronto, and is valued at $50,000. The painter, De- 
lorme, was born at Givors, France, in 1842 and died 
in Paris in 1874. 



A 5km of Hr.iutv I* ■ Joy Forever. 



The epicure knows that an oyster should be eaten 

as near the oyster bed as possible, and that the least pos- 
sible time should ensue between the time the oyster is 
"tonged" to the minute of consumption. Moraghan's Oyster 
House in the California M'arket is world-famed as the place 
best to secure the succulent bivalve. The "chef" is pre- 
eminent as a master of the art of cookery, and' no one seek- 
ing satisfaction in oysters will, ever do aught but praise 
Moraghan's. 



One goes naturally to Swain's on Sutter street for a 

good luncheon, There is nothing in town that can compare 
with this place as a place of rest and refreshment atcer 
the toils of shopping. They are always ready to deliver 
ice-cream and pastry— always the best, and their prompt- 
ness can be depended upon. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Full weight 
guaranteed. In economy, cleanliness and heat producing 
qualities Briquettes are superior to coal. Sold only by the 
Tesla Coal Company, -jtn and! Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



D 



R. T. MUX OOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAOICAL BRAUTIFIER. 




1 Tan. lMinplc*. Frrcklaa. 
Moth HaCoho*. Hiu>li an.l Hkln IH«- 
<»■<■•. *■ '■i-milj- 

-..l I* P4> llHM 

I 

ol -iii.Uur name. 

Dr. I*. A, ■ :v lad j • •( the 

hftnHoD (• imlii-nl "A* \<.i| lu-lii'* 

■ ii.'in, I raoomiDsnd ( lour* 
sud'* Cream' m Lba least harmful m 

nit llir si, ma." Pof (.air- 

by nil dranurtii and Pmo y -goo d i 

Dealers In iho United States, Can&ujts 
atiil I'.urope. 

FKRD. T. HOPKINS, i-r.-i'-r 
37<Srcat Jonei ulre^t. ,N Y 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould and Curry Gold and Silver Mining Co. 

l-ocnlioti ...f principal plnce 1 f l>USJ PnnolpQO, «'iil if 111 Loch 

tion ..f works, Virginia < iiy. Storey Oou i v. Ni-vn.ii.. 

Notice in hereby elven Mini »t ft meeting of the Board of Director-, held 
on the Blh day "i January, ISM an assessment -No. 103J of ten cents 
per flmre was u-vied upon tin- enpltal Rtoek <.f the corporation, pnynble im- 
mediately In United EltateS Bold OOlnj to the Sicrctary, at the office of the 
Company, room 69, Nevada Block. No. 8<9 Montgomery street, Pnn 
Francisco, Gal, 

Any slock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE ftth D*Y OF FEBRUARY. 1904, 
will he delinquent, and ndverlised for *ale al public auction; and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on KKlDAY, the 2-ilh day of Februarv 
1901, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of 
advertising and expense* of sale. 
By Order of the Board of Directors, 

J. B. SHAW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 60 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. - 
Yellow Jacket Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

LoL'iHiou of works. Gold Hill.Sloroy County, Nevada. Principal place of 
business. Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting: of the Board of Trustees. of this 
Company neld on the 121b day of December, 1903, an assessment (No. 15) of 
ten cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of the of SAld Company, ay able immediately to the -ecrelary, at 
the office of the Company, or to lames Newlands Jr.. Transfer Secretary, 
Room, 35 Mills Building;, third floor, Mai) Pranuisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
SATURDAY THE 16th DAY OF JANIMRV. 1904, 
will be deemed delinquent, and will be ouly advertbed for sale 
at public auction; rimI umet-s payment Is made before, will 
be sold on SATURDAY, the 20lb day of February 1904. at 
4 o'clock p m. in front of the of lice of the Company, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, toeether with the cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 
W. H. BLAUVELT, Secretary. 

- ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Best and Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, **an Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors 
' d on the llth day of December, 1903, an assessment (No, 83} of ten 
( 10) cants per share was levied upon the capital stonk of the corporation 
Payable immediately, in United states gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
offioe of the Company. 
Any stook upon which this aaie^sment shall rem tin unpaid on 

THE 15th DAY OF JANUARY, 1904, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction; and miles 
payment is made before, will be sold on Friday, the 5th day of February 
1901, to pvy ihe delinquent assessment, together with oosts of ad- 
vertising and "expenses of sale. 

By orJer of the Board of Directors, 

M. JAFFE,, Secretary. 
Location of Office— Room 31, Nevada Blook, 31)9 Montgomerystreet,San 
Franoisjo' Cal. 



Goodman — Do vou ever think of the good old say- 
ing that it's more blessed to give than to receive? 
Pugsley — Yes; when I've got the boxing gloves on 
I do. 



The Japanese art goods displayed by George T. Marsh & 

Co.. 224 Post street, are worth your while. Nothing more appro- 
priate could be selected for Christmas gifts. 




WRINKLES and FACIAL BLEMISHES 

Removed by New Process (Guaranteed.) 
Face Massage and Manicuring. 

AT YOUR HOME, 

by appointment 

MME. H. EASTWOOD 

]307 Larkin St., S. ¥■ Tel. Larkin 26J6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1904. 




>own L,rter 

'ffear the Crier')'. What the devil art thou 
"One that will play the devil, Jl'r. withyou ' 

It is well known and to be regretted that dishon- 
esty is rampant among the university students. 
Scandal after scandal has come and gone; the library 
has complained of stolen books; the students ol 
stolen money, clothes and books, and the lack of 
straightforward manliness has become such a prob- 
lem that the introduction of the honor system is be- 
ing seriously debated. In other words, the college 
authorities, despairing of disciplining the student-. 
are asking the latter to discipline themselves. What 
is the reason? Partly the lack of a strong head. A 
President who calls on the Lord publicly whenever 
he has to face an emergency, and tells twenty-year- 
old boys that he feels as if he could cry every time 
that he is called upon to reprove them, cannot in- 
stil any robust manliness into those whom he is 
supposed to lead. Just imagine the head of a great 
firm who has been obliged to administer a warning 
to a careless clerk adjuring him to be good, and 
wringing his hands over the sin of the youth and the 
painfulness of the situation? It is small wonder 
that our college men, on the completion of their 
course, are less manly than their brothers who went 
to work in the world. Robust leadership of a strong 
man would clear things up morally at Berkeley. 

The days of the lazy student are coming to an end. 
The standard is being raised at both the Universi- 
ties, and henceforward men must work for their de- 
grees. It is none too soon. For several years the 
University students have had a disgracefully eas) 
time. The competition between the two Universities 
has degenerated into the merest advertising and 
scramble for numbers. Methods of touting which 
might have been justifiable in the case of a small auc- 
tion, but were absolutely out of place in university 
matters, had become more and more the rule, till 
a line had to be drawn somewhere, for the reason 
that the depths of vulgarity had been sounded. Now 
the heads of the colleges appear to have awakened 
to the fact that scholarship may serve as well as 
foot-ball games and glee clubs. Henceforward, the 
class room will be of more importance. 

It is not often that pathos troubles the hard heart 
of the Town Crier, but in the case of the death <>i 
Professor Paget, which was followed so soon by that 
of his wife,' his voice cannot be altogether silent. 
Their love is a lesson to all, and a comfort in these 
hard times, when the villainies and the hypocrisies 
of our would-be leaders and exemplars take up too 
much of our notice. The professor devoted his life 
to the payment of a debt which he voluntarily as- 
sumed, and died poor, as fools count poverty, but 
richer in all that good men respect than most ol 
those whom nearlv everybody envies. 

There is much disgust in virtuous Oakland over 
the fact that white girls have been discovered in a 
notorious Chinese place. There is a whole lot "t 
bosh talked about the girls being lured there by a 
Chinaman. Any girl who could be lured into that 
sort of thing by a Celestial photographer is not worth 
much of a fuss. There is very much jubilation in 
the city across the Day that the girls were from San 
Francisco. For once in a chequered career, ( lakland 
is entitled to congratulations. 



When a policeman does his duty as did •Fogarty, 
the community will not stand by and see him pun- 
ished. The judges are afraid of the unions, and 
henceforward it will be impossible to secure any 
justice for the officials who stand for public order 
in tlie face of violence and abuse. The most that 
can be done is to pay their fines for them, and see 
that their good deeds do not entail any suffering. Let 
it be known that wherever a peace officer is punished 
by the local Dogberries for carrying out his duty and 
protecting the citizens, the money will be forthcom- 
ing to pay his fines and to keep him from suffering, 
and we shall be able to maintain the outward sem- 
blance of decency, at all events, in spite of the efforts 
• if our officials and the perjured cowardice of the 
I '"lice Court Judges. 

There is a report, probably malicious, that Mrs 
Schmitz makes her children call their father "Mayor." 
\t any rate, something must be filling his musical 
soul with swelling waves. His idea that he could 
successfully grapple with the Federal authorities 
could only have been born of colossal vanity or an 
equally enormous ignorance. Probably both had a 
share, for the Mayor is a handsome man, and has 
been a little spoiled in his time . It is a pity he did 
not persevere. To have lined up against Congress 
would have taught him his limitations, as it has 
many abler and bigger men. It is getting time that 
our local politicians began to learn that there is a 
] lower in the country, and that their little schemes 
do not include the whole universe. 

We are to be treated to another exposure in the 
matter of the Clunie estate. It is a queer thing that 
our attorneys cannot put through a simple piece of 
business without making everybody who has any 
connection with the deceased ashamed and annoyed. 
The pettifogging which is spreading like a malignant 
disease through the bar of California and particularly 
of San Francisco, will yet destroy the profession. 
The sharp practices which were formerly confined 
to the shyster part of the profession are too generally 
invading the better class of law officers, and the 
whole structure of the legal profession is weakened. 
All this is of comparatively recent growth, for it is 
not many years since our local bar was one of the 
finest and cleanest in the world. 

The Town Crier would like to know how so many 
professional men of standing can find time to be al- 
ways at the race-track. If you are at the Ferry 
Building, you can see them dropping off the cars one 
li\ one and making their way to the boats. Watch 
them at the races, and they are hanging about the 
bookmakers' stands. When these races can have 
such a disturbing influence upon men who have suffi- 
cient balance to have acquired a certain standing, 
what must be the effect upon the callow and the 
weak? There is something unhealthy in our make- 
up when the racing microbe can get so strong a hold; 
and the racing is. generally speaking, not straight, 
cither. 

What's a restaurant? An eating place. What's a 
French restaurant? The answer may be found in 
the list of things to be sold on account of the closing 
of the Maison Riche for running illegal gambling 
games. There are a few pots, pans and kettles in this 
inventory, but it consists mostly of bed-room suites, 
mattresses, sheets, pillow-cases and like fittings. All 
of which proves what I have always maintained — 
that French restaurants are indecent places, unfit 
for the patronage of respectable people. 



January g. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



>3 



How San Francisco Looks to Me 



Bv rnnKuld Travprs. Tovitlal 



It s awfully jolly to me to be able to saj something 
which I know to be right and whichMhe other fellow 
says is wrong. Wrong only because the stati 
Im* tin- objector in a spol which is tender I 
touch. I mean pressure and not "touch" in thi 
Macular of the Coast, which I learn is a slang syno- 
nym for asking a temporary cash accommod 
From a fellow clubman or a friend. In my mingling 
with San Francisco's best of clubmen I learned to my 
the definition of "touch." 1 did not know it be- 
fore, but I do now. 1 have acquired a collection ,,1" au- 
iph cards that in event of a nj one of the artisl 
signers becoming famous I shall recoup tin- u hat to 
me looks like a loss. 1 am really only out a few hun- 
dred dollars, and have had sufficient 'fun studying the 
various methods used by the autograph sellers to 
compensate me tor the expense. F am not, I Batter 
myself, as simple as I look, and I expect the "auto- 
graphs" to be purchased by the San Franciscans who 
made them at cost prices. If not redeemed. I shall 
treasure them as mementoes of my visit, and as an 
evidence of poor judgment. My man has not as yet 
been able to find apartments which suit me, and I 
am terribly unsettled. It is bothersome to a man to 
be compelled to put up with the unhomeness of the 
hotel and the perfunctory "Good evening, sir," of the 
waiters and hall hoys at the clubs. l'" hope to get 
settled quickly, and my own establishment started, 
and then I shall be better able to enjoy the funny 
things I see done by the barbarians of societv at this 
place. 

I had quite expected to have a lonesome New 
Years. I was a stranger in a strange land, and had 
been taken in. A cablegram from the pater, which I 
received in the evening, set me on my feet. I called 
Roger, my valet, dressed and thought T might per- 
chance find some friend at the club who would dine 
with me and help to drown my solitude and end the 
year. I had barely handed my hat and stick to the 
hall-boy when I was greeted by a "Hello, Travers !" 
from a chap whom I met in Scotland, and who is a 
Girist Church-Oxon-Man and an Honor man. We 
dined at my expense, and then called a cab and went 
down to Market street to see the old year die. The 
cabby would not drive fast, and the horse walked up 
one side of the beastly street and then down the 
other. When we finally got to the hotel, I said, "Pay 
him, and let's foot it for a while." 

We did. The experience was anything but pleas- 
ant — the men were so illy-bred that they made vul- 
gar remarks because two gentlemen in evening dress 
were taking a walk. I resented it once, and called 
a "bobby." I repeated to him the insulting language 
of the man who had made himself offensive, and re- 
quested his removal. But all the satisfaction T re- 
ceived from the peace officer was a remark which 
sounded like "G'wan !" I have formed my ooinion of 
San Francisco's constables, and T think they need 
some of England's Scotland Yard Inspectors to 
sharpen them up. I also formed my opinion of the 
young women I saw. They are not a bad-looking 
lot in this city, but I fear that the most of the com- 
plexions I noted would not stand a rain-storm. The 
women were athletic enough in appearance, rather 
too much so, but their gowns were neither fit for ket- 
tledrum, tea or dinner, and much less for the street. 
I think they were all good women. I think this in 
spite of their high-heeled shoes and high-held 



-kirr- They were not the class to raise a nation ot- 
to make a wife. Tin- lack of suggestion in either look 
or action pleased me. hut the la-te displayed in their 
iming was simply perdition. 1 was told by my 
Chum that New Year's eve in your city i- a -'<r\ of 
Mardi Gras. I found out later that It was v 
My pocket was picked of a pair of Dent's and a cou- 
ple Of silk handkerchiefs, while my friend was re- 
lieved of a diamond-studded locket which he wore on 
his fob. Aft,,- we got hack to the hotel, through the 
horn-hlo«ing. confetti-throwing mob, and sat down 
to discuss a bottle "frapped." I even confessed that 

I had enjoyed myself. 1 had seen an innumerable 

lot of prettj girls "en passant": I noted their car- 
riage anil gestures, and they were girls with stride and 
action, with trim hands and ankles, such as I am con- 
vinced is indigenous to San Francisco and Califor- 
nia. I realize that they were not, of course, the kind 
or class that 1 could know, and I do not desire to 
meet them. 1 may look at them and admire them 
as I do my horse for his points, or my dog for his 
affection — but nothing more for Travers. 

EDUCATIONAL. 



California School of Design 

MARK HOPKINS INSTITUTE OF ART 



DRAWING 

PAINTING 



MODELING 




DECORATIVE 

DESIGNING 



WOOD 

CAR.VING 



Day Classes, Night Classes and Saturday Classes 

For terms and courses of instruction apply to the Assistant Secre- 
tary, Mark Hopkins Institute of Art, California and Mason Sts- 



Dr. H. J. STEWART 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte, Organ. Harmony and Composition 
Special course for singers desiring church appointments 

Studio, 1105 Bush St. 

BEST'S ART SOMOOL 

Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, ancf tlluitratliu 
Life classes. S3.00 per month. 

9S7 nARKET STREET 

MISS ROSE BRANDON 

478 EDDY STREET 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR STUDIO 

Finest Italian Music Direct from Italy, taught 



Miss Ingeborg Resell Pettersen 
Voice Production 

1 I I I Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 



Receiving hours from 2 till i o'clock every day 
except Wednesdays and Saturdays- 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1904. 




A TRUSTY TIP TO YOU ON THEATRICALS. 

COLUMBIA— Last week. "The Girl With the Green Eyes," Good 

FISCHER'S— "I. O. n, " Last w k Not up to usual standard- 

TFV0L1— "Ixion." Last week. Mystical extravaganza, Entertaining 
ORAND— .Toe Kelly, "the Pipe Dreamer," in "The Head Waiter." 
GRAND— Special— r.-itii. January nth. 

ORPHEUM— Joan Haden's "1 pole of Love." New 1 am )d. 

alcazar-"A Lady of Quality." Enjoyable. Well put on. 

CENTRAL— "Monte Cristo ' Spectacular. 

California— "Hai'i'v Hooligan." Cartoon play. Amuses children. 

lvric HALL— Burton Holmes, illustrated lectures. 

CHLTES-Tle- BrittOns. 



Patti did not attract a fashionable crowd al the 
( irand Opera House Thursday night. The audience 
did not show disappointment in the weakness of her 
— the voice that once demanded recognition 
from the world — lint it was weak nevertheless. The 
"wise old owl," as Ferris Hartman would say, makes 
no attempt at the higher or lower notes, and sings 
only in the middle scale. There was nothing grand 
nor nothing sweet in her rendition of the programme, 
and yet the aduience applauded — applauded Patti, 
not her voice. 

Although the possessor of a repertoire numbering 
thirty-odd roles, it is a fact that fvfme. Adelina Patti 
has never turned her attention towards the classic 
operas, as "Zerlina," in Mozart's "Don Giovanni," is 
the only classic role which she ever essayed. Masters 
of singing will point out that her avoidance of the 
heavier roles in grand opera is the cause of the long 
preservation of her marvelous voice. Mme. Patti will 
be heard for the last time in San Francisco at: the 
Grand Opera House Monday afternoon, January 
nth, at 2:15. 

* * * 

Adele Block as Clio in "A Lady of Quality" is a 
very pleasing personation. The carpingly critical 
might say that there is a dead level in the voice of the 
Wildan's Diana, but I find on consultation with many 
of those on the foreside of the footlights the "eternal 
feminine" and the rhapsodical youth, that a i 
levelism and intense earnestness are supposed to 
possess consanguinity. Adele Block is sweet, win- 
some, tragic and tantalizing. She has a magnetic 
temperament, which is easily transferred to her au- 
dience. 

Durkin is such a villainously good villain that you 
sorrow at his demise. 

Harry Hilliard is but a poor Lord Osmonde. He 
lacks vim, and his dialogue lacks the btibl.l 
brightness necessary to make it interesting. "The 
Lady of Quality" has been presented here on two 
other occasions, and the Alcazar Company's version 
is as good as any we have seen. 

* * * 

Clyde Fitch might have written "The Girl with the 
Green Eyes" for Ida Conquest and companv. it is 
so well given at the Columbia. Mrs. Thomas Whif- 
fen easily shares honors with Miss Conquest, ami 
Robert Drouet is an associate of wdiich any star 
might be proud. 

* * * 

"Ixion" still holds the boards at the Tivoli to large 
houses. The staging and scenery are excellent. The 
Bothwell Brown'- .lancing class might well be dis- 
pensed with in favor of a professional chorus. The 
dancing class, although well trained, did not give 
satisfaction at the Grand, in "Cleopatra." It does 
not take an audience long to feel the difference, and 



this is because of the lack of professional swing. The 
performance is a generally pleasing one, however, 
and fills the house nightly. 

".Monte Cristo." at the Central, pleases the lovers 
of the 1-2-3 drama, and Herschel Alayall received the 
plaudits of a breathless audience. Eugenie Thais 
Lawton gave a fairly good piece of stage work. Her 
transition from youth to old age shows much pains- 
taking study. The setting is good. 

* * * 

Fischer's Theatre, with "I-O-U" in its last week. 
lias bet n well patronized. The play is not up to tin 
standard of this house, and the company seems to 
be suffering from a sundering of relations. The new 
my, or rather the old company, with a few 
new faces, will take up "The Beauty Shop." This is 
announced as a roaring local farce, with a plot, and 
was written by Mr. J. C. Crawford, a San Francisco 
newspaper man. The only evidence, and the best at 
hand, of the taking qualities of the play is the en- 
thusiasm of all, from scene-shifter to manager. Helen 
Russell will make her first appearance, and judging 
by her photographs, the title of Madame Voluptia. 
the Beauty Doctor, fits her well. Mr. Dill will per- 
sonate the president of the Pretzel Trust. Mr. C. 
Schwabber Pilsener, while Kolb becomes Mr. Jay 
Bierbump Culmbacher. The names in the play bill 

should be enough to fill the house. 

* * * 

At the Central, "The Moonshiners" will be put on. 
This is a melodrama with impressive scenes and mag- 
nificent scenery. The play is located in Virginia, 
and it is said to have had great runs in the the East 
and South. A new comedian will make his initial 
appearance as "Eph, the African." 

A story of cross purposes and conditions gone 
awry is afloat about Fischer's. It is said Barncv Ber- 
nard undertook to obtain a raise in salary that would 
have enabled him to own a string of horses. He was 
signed for a Los Angeles house, and report says the 
Angeleno audiences gave him the frozen face. He re- 
signed, and was looking longingly toward Fischer's 
again. He knew the public wanted him, and he knew 
Fischer wanted him. Fischer knew this, too, but he 
had the Actors' Union on his hands. Amber, Dill, 
Kolb and Winfield filake were all howling for a raise. 
There should be a Hague Tribunal of Arbitration for 
disgruntled actors and managers with Flashton 

< irievance, he of the interviews, as chief arbitrator. 

* * * 

"Als ich Wiederkam," a sequel to "At the White 
Horse Tavern," will be presented at the Columbia 
by the Alameda Lustspiel Ensemble. The cast is 
large, and the very acceptable manner in which "The 
White Horse Tavern" was presented is a guarantee 
of a satisfied patronage. "Als ich Wiedenkam" is 
said to be a very amusing comedv. 
*' * * 

"The Moth and the Flame," one of Clyde Fitch's 
earlier works, a social problem and a play of polite 
manners, is to be the attraction at the Alcazar. This 
play is a strong one, and it should receive excellent 
treatment from the unusually intelligent company. 
Durkin will essay the juvenile, and Mr. Conners will 
take up the part of the villain. The rest of the com- 
pany is nicely cast, and should give a good account 



January 9, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



-I'll- This Irs. Jack" in prepan 

r nearly the v. 

■.I other 1 
Alberta Gallatin .: tour" will be | 

January 10th at the Columbia in lbs 

« * * 

Hoyt's "Trip to 1 hinatown" is the bill for 
week at the California. 

* * * 

Stanislaus Stange and Julian Edwards have 
laborated to write "When Johnn 
Home." and this is to be the next Tivoli bill. This 
distinctly American work is said to have scored greal 
success in the East. There is a splendid pi 
climax and anti-climax. The music is a blendii 
the themes .if the North and the South. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Deaves will present their 
"Merry Manikins " for the entertainment of the 
Chutes' audiences this coming week, and young and 
olil alike will have ample opportunity for laughter. 
I. a Drew and I. a Zone. "The Daffy Dame am 
Tad." promise an amusing act, and the Girdollers, 
ty .acrobats and equilibrists, will contribute the 
athletic portion of the entertainment; Luce and 1 UC 
will otter a comedy sketch, and Mabel Lamson will 
be heard in new illustrated songs. Joe and Sadie 
Britton, the colored dancers, will appear for the 
fourth and last week of an unprecedented engage- 
ment, and the animatoscope will complete the pro- 
gramme with interesting and amusing' moving pic- 
tures. The amateurs will appear on Thursday night. 
The babies in the life-saving incubators are thriving, 
and the collection of animals in the zoo is constantly 

in receipt of rare additions. 

& # * 

The Orpheum bill shows a new company, with 
Henry Thurston, "the man who mystified Hermann," 
played up strong. Wallno and Marinette, Austrian 
grotesques, and Asra, the juggler. Asra is a spec- 
ialist with billiard balls. Fred Hallen and Molly 
Fuller, in their last appearance, will give Cohen's 
successful comedy, "His Wife's Hero." The bill 
throughout seems good, in the advance notes, but it 
will have to be more than good to beat the "Road 
Show." 



15 



Dentist, 806 Market. 
teeth extracting. 



Dr. Decker, 

Specialty "Cotton Gas" 



for painless 



L. & M. Alexander & Co. are located as before, 110 Mont- 
gomery street, and rent and sell typewriters. 



The holiday goods displayeci by George T. Marsh & Co., 224 

Post street, are the most tasteful in town. Everything in Jap- 
anese art and bric-a-hran. 



flfter the Theater 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'8 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest -wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after 
the theatre is over. 



C. H. *R.ehn*rtrotn 

FOBMBBLY BANDBBI A JOHNBOH 

Tailor. 

PHELAN BUILDING ROOMS 1 2, 3 

TELEPHONE£MAIN-SM87, SAN FRANCISCO 



Grv)i Opara House— Special 

MM JOtLINA PATTl 

i ■ - 1 . . r 

lid ,1>l 
■ '.r .III ll|H. r :i II iui 

i in., used 



Grarjd Opera House 



i in (JONUiGT STRIPES 

SSX' Sate .v:;, 1 ,:™", „£■"« ■»«•« ■ «■ 

ONE NIGHT IN cJUNE 
A greal plaj wlthagi | _„.., pnlaI p rioea 



r-ischer's Theatre 

v " cl i i next Mondaj aigb.1 



THE BEAUTY SHOP 



Seats now on Bale. Math BBaturdai andSunday.* 



Columbia Theatre. om " ,, .»<»i*co, 

J I. -B.it. und Managers. 

Beginning next MondayJan.il. 
Matinee Saturday only 

MRS. LANG^RY 

i::v::;';'^!-,':;;- s r ;;;;;;!:;-:^;;;-r'-npany.o f Lon , 

MRS DEERING'S DIUORGE 



Orpheum s °" T '^ amai ^^^"i Mwncnan. 

«- J- O'Farrcll St., between Stookton and Pownll BIreets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, -Tan. 10 

n „ SUMPHOUS VAUDEVILLE 

Howard Thurston: Wallne nn.i Marinette- A<n ■ \vh,-t„ 
pun„ir,.s,„ Van iuken ,,,i VaSnSon;0<liel bLVbS^oSS? 
lotto Guyer George : , )r„hcu,n m.,i i, ,„ pi,,,,', -!,!,' und last week r " 

r-RED HflLLEN AND MOLLY FULLER 

Matinees every W ednesday. Thursday. Saturday and Sunday 



Centra) Theatre. 



Belasco & Mayer, Proprietors 
Market St. near Eighth-Tel. South t 



Week of Monday, January 11th 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

THE MOONSHINERS 

An idyl of the Virginia Mountains 

Prices— Evenings 10 to 60c. Matinees 10, 15, 26c. 

Week of January lsi h 

A B^EAK FOR LIBERTY 



Alcazar Theatre E . DlW&ft^MSLar 

Regular matinees Saturday and Sunday 

One week commencing Monday Jan. 11, first Alcazar presenta- 

TME MOTH AND THE FLAME 

Clyde Fitch's strongest play 

Evenings 26 to 760.. Saturday and Sunday Matinees is to au, 

?ome!i'y y "' F "' 3t time ^ Sa " i^anciseS'oTthe'biuiliant 

MRS. dAGK 

AccounfoYlS"' author ot " Are * ou a Mason?" and "AH On 



Streets 



Tivoli Opera House. c °™er Eddy and 

Matinees every Saturday. Last times of 

IXIOIN or THE WHEELMAN 

Beginning Monday Jan 11, first production in San Francisco of 

WHEN cJOHNNY GOMES MARCHING 
HOME 

A. three act military comic opera by Stanislaus Stange and 
Julian Edwards Martial music. Picturesque scenery /North- 
ern soldiers and Southern sweethearts. '""" 
Usual popular prices— 25c, soc. 75e. 

Columbia Theater— -Special 

Sunday, Jan. 10, one night only. Limited tour 

ALBERTA GALLATIN 

and her New York cast, in 

IBSEN'S GHOSHS 

"The greatest work of the greatest living dramatist"— N. Y. Sun 
First time in San Franoiseo. Monday night January n 
Mrs Langtry in 'Mrs. Deering's Divorce." 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1904. 




Click, click, click, went the typewriter. Marion 
Wesley paused and pushed back her hair from her 
forehead with a tired gesture. Office hours were over, 
but she was clearing up work in connection with the 
employment agency in which she was part manager. 
Suddenly there came a sharp rap. The door opened, 
and a girl whirled in all flying laces and chiffon, ami 
flung her arms round the neck of the soberly-clad 
figure behind the desk. 

"You dear old thing," cried the apparition in a 
slightly high-pitched voice, "I've found you out at 
last. I'd given it up as a bad job when a cute young 
policeman gave me the cue. Fancy if I'd had to re- 
turn to New York without seeing you. Not that I 
should have returned. My dear. 1 cut myself adrift. 
Behold a pauper." 

And the girl in a peach and gray confection swept 
her friend a deep curtsey. By this time Marion had 
recovered her presence of mind and touched the 
electric bell. A grimy-looking office boy appeared 
in answer to her ring. 

"Jones," she said, pulling nut her purse, "go across 
to the A. B. C. shop and bring over tea fur two an 1 
bread and butter, and do not forget the cream." 

"YVahn't you 'ave no kyke?" inquired the youth, 
with an amazed stare at the dainty vision in the chair 
opposite. 

"Yes; cake, of course, and strawberries." promptlv 
responded the newcomer. "Nasty little boy! Why 
do you keep him, Marion?" asked the vision, other- 
wise Pauline Augusta Yanderheim. step-daughter of 
Jabez D. Barnes, of New York. 

Marion Westley smiled at the question. "1 think 
I keep him for the same reason that T bought these 
office chairs — both are cheap. Employment agencies 
«lo not run into wildly extravagant dividends at the 
end of the year." 

"So times are bad. eh? Well, it's lucky T've come 
along to bustle them up." remarked Miss Yander- 
heim. "Now, little boy, you will spill that cream. 
Ah ! 1 knew it." She started up and rescued the tray. 
"I will pour out for you. Sugar ami cream, dear? 
As I told you," she resumed. "I've burned my boats 
— cut the painter — that's the English expression, 
isn't it? And now I'm on my own. You see," she 
continued, sipping her tea serenely, "poppa tried on 
what I hear is a common dodge with parents this 
side. He wanted to fix me up with a husband.." 

"And you did not like his choice?" asked Marion, 
edging in a word with difficulty. 

"My dear. I've never seen him. It was some rich, 
stuck-up Englishman — begging your countryman's 
pardon. I was just to he packed off like a bale of 
dry-goods. I declined even to be introduced to him 
under the circumstances. I told poppa he would cer- 
tainly object to my choosing a new mamma, and I 
had equally strong objections to his selecting a son- 
in-law." 

Marion Westley laid her hand on her friend's arm. 
"I will do my best for you, dearest, you may be 
sure, in memory of the happy days we spent to- 
gether in America. But I used to think that, perhaps. 
there was some one else. Are you sure? Quite sure?" 

The young visitor's lace flushed crimson and she 
snatched her hand away. "You are altogether 
wrong. There never was anything between us." she 
said hotly. "As for earning my own living, I never 



.bought it was so stupid, but I guess there are only 
two things I can do well — ride a bicycle and drive a 
motor car." 

Marion laughed. "Yes, I know your qualifications 
as a chauffeusc. I have them all recorded here, and 
the races you have won for your father. He was 
proud of you, Paula, as proud as though you had 
been his very own daughter. Can't you forgive his 
ambition for you?" 

Marion was doomed to interruptions that after- 
noon, for hardly bad Pauline Yanderheim driven 
away (her ideas of pauperism not being precisely 
practical) than there was another knock at her in- 
ner door. 

"Come in," she called somewhat impatiently. "( >h, 
Donald, is it you?" and her voice changed. "Come in. 
I am glad to see you." 

"So it would seem," answered her cousin, Donald 
Mainwright, discontentedly. "You have taken pains 
enough to avoid me, I think, shutting yourself up in 
a poky little hole like this. Pray, how long is this 
farce to continue?" 

"Farce?" timidly echoed Miss Westley. 

"Yes. farce, Marion. What is the good of hum- 
buggng about with an employment agency when you 
know I am only longing to give you anything you 
want?" 

"Now, Donald, do give up prowling around," she 
continued, smiling. "My work is quite respectable, 
I assure you. Lots of women do this sort of thing 
nowadays. Sit down and tell me about yourself. 
Who is the latest? A little bird whispered that you 
were very nearly annexed in the States." 

"Nonsense!" he protested angrily. "People will 
talk. It was all a mistake. She never cared for me." 

Marion looked at him. smiling at the ingenuous 
confession. What a boy he was, after all! So she 
encouraged him to talk, and soon had drawn out the 
whole of his pitiful tale. "She was the most charm- 
ing being in the world. But she would have nothing 
to --ay to him. "I'm not good enough for her; she i- 
so clever and all that." he concluded sadly. Marion 
listened patiently to the end. "You shall go in for 
some hobby," she counseled. "Why not .cultivate 
your tenants? The proper study of man is man, not 
woman." 

"There now, Marion. That's too bad to hit a fel- 
low when he's down. As it happens, I have taken 
up motoring. I've just got an electric car, a real 
beauty, but I can't find a decent driver. I've adver- 
tised and hunted around for a week. All the fellows 
who apply are such awful cads that I should hate 
to ride with them. I suppose now that sort of thing 
is not in your line?" 

Marion laughed. "Well, hardly," and then she 
paused. A wild idea had flashed into her brain. "It 
happens strangely enough, though, that I have beard 
of a driver only this very afternoon. The — the person 
has won several races and has qualifications that 
are quite unexceptional." 

"What is the fellow's name?" 

"Yanderheim." 

"Oh! American, I suppose? Well, so much the 
better. I wish vent would send word to him to come 
up for a trial trip to-morrow. By Jove, Marion, what 
a brick you are!" 

"For finding you a chauffeur? Well, I hope it 



January 9, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



mav pr 

* • • . , 

"Please, sir. the oar's al the door." 
Donald Mainwrighl looked out on a dense fog de- 
pressing to every sense. But he was anxious to 
try Ins new toy. "All right. I'll come.'' lie answered. 
"Is the new chauffeur here?" 

The valet coughed discreetly. "The new ? ( >h 

sir! if that is the name. sir. An. I a rummy 
name it is. and the rummicst go I ever knew." he 
added in a scandalized aside as he helped his master 
into his big fur and coverall. 

The electric light was switched en in the hall, and 
as Donald Mainwrighl stumbled out into the gloom 
he felt almost blinded by the sudden transition.' -am 
right: go ahead." he said, and away they rushed. 
"I say. do you think it's safe to make quite such a 
pace in the darkness?" he inquired anxiously. 
"Quite safe." 

I he words were simple enough, but he started and 
peered anxiously across at his companion on the 
driving seat. He could make out nothing hut a dark- 
mass surmounted by a white peaked cap. "You have 
won three races in America, I understand." 
"Yes." 

"And you feel quite competent to drive in Lon- 
don J" 
"Quite." 

The machine swerved by a hair's breadth, thus 
just avoiding a lumbering 'bus, and pursued its rapid 
course. They were leaving the crowded streets 
behind them and the fog was lifting. 
"What nationality are you?" 
"American." 

"How long have you been a chauffeur?" 
There was a perceptible pause, and then, "I don't 
know!" 

"You don't know! Whom have you driven for?" 
"My father." 

"Your father? Why, then, how old are you?" 
No answer. 

"How old are you?" he repeated impatiently. 
"Come, I have a right to know," and he laid his hand 
on the driver's arm. 

It nearly cost him an accident, for the jerk of the 
hand on the wheel caused the machine to swerve sud- 
denly aside and nearly sent it against the curb-stone. 
The driver righted it in the very nick of time and sent 
it flying ahead at an increasing pace. Both were 
trembling, but not from fear. In that instant they 
had run under an electric light and caught a glimpse 
of each other's faces. 

"By Jove! It's little Lena," muttered Mainwright, 
and then fell silent in sheer amazement. 

She slowed down the machine and turned to 
him. "Let me tell you how it came about," she said. 
"It was Marion. She sent me your address. I did 
not know who you were. Oh, you must believe that." 
"Of course I believe It. You always did avoid me," 
he answered ruefully. 

She nodded in a gratified manner. 
"Well, I saw you under the electric light as you 
came out of the hall, but you did not see me in the 
fog, and I hoped to get back before you found out." 
"But now I have found you, and you cannot pos- 
sibly escape, and leave me in the lurch. I cannot 
drive myself. Lena, do you remember those days in 
the mountains?" 

"I can't," she said. "Not now. I'm too busy," 
but the car was slowing down and was almost at a 
stop. "There is something wrong. The battery is 
giving out. I wish I had looked at it before we 
started." 



»7 
I don't," said ho. "for nO« you will have to wait 

until you have answered my question, and tl 

why, there is a fresh charge in my 1 

She sighed resignedly. "Well, what is it you want 
to ask v " 

"Do you remember those days on the mountains?" 

"I'm not likely to forget them. I should think." 
she answered, demurely, "considering whom I met 
there." 

"Ah. you mean " 

"Marion Westley, of course." 

"Oh, Marion! Yes, she is a dear, good creature: 
still I do wish vnii had sairl " 

"Who?" 

"Why, me I" 

"You? The idea! Why should 1 remember you?" 

"Ah. why indeed?" he sighed. "1 dare say you for- 
got all about me long ago. But I never forgot you. 
Lena, and I wouldn't even look at any of the New 
York belles. Why, there was one old fellow- he'd 
heard I was heir to a title. I suppose, for he was a 
millionaire — wdio actually proposed to me for his 
daughter. I would not even meet her." 

"What was her name?" asked the chaurfeuse, 
trembling. 

"His name? Oh, Barnes; Jabez Barnes. What is 
the matter?" 

Lena had grown very white. "Then it was you 
whom he meant," she gasped. "I — I never asked 
your name, but I did not want to meet him — the En- 
glishman — and so I ran away and came here and 
asked Marion to find me work, and I couldn't be any- 
thing but a chauffeuse, and Marion sent me to you." 
"By Jove, she did! Well, I always said she was a 
brick, but I never knew just what a brick she was!" 
exclaimed Donald. "And now, let's get in a new 
charge, and ride along and tell her." 

Half an hour later the fog had lifted. Marion 
Westley, glancing out of her office window in Little 
Portland street, saw a motor car glide up and stop 
at her door. There was a girl on the driving seat 
dressed in a big coat and a white peaked hat. A man 
sat beside her. 

Marion sighed and then smiled. "It is quite right," 
she said to herself. "She will steer the car for 
Donald now and always, but he will not know it. So, 
best for both." — Sunny South. 



Teala Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Use 
Briquettes for cooking and "heating, and you will save at 
least one-third on your fuel bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., 
South 95, and your order will receive prompt attention. 



The Oldest and Best 
Known Brand 

DISTILLED BY 

J. J. MEDER & Z00N 




Imported into the TJ. S. since 1819 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Agents Pacific Coast. San Francisco, Cal. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January g, 1904. 




The inevitable has come to 
The Sweepstake Deal pass again. Eastern' folk 
Winds up in Court. get a California mine hand- 
ed out to them for $6,000,- 
000, and they snap it up as a bargain. The fact that 
mines of this value are tew and far between in any 
part of the world did not serve to render them at 
all shy of the proposition, and the sale of a practi- 
cally undeveloped claim at such an extraordinary 
price was heralded all over by that portion of the 
press which would undertake to defend Satan him- 
self if he paid for it. Now they are inclined to tin- 
belief that the mine was salted. Tricks of this kind 
have been played before in California, which is no 
saying, of course, that the Sweepstake property was 
salted. The ruin of the Frenchmen who bought the 
old Succor Flat mine one day and found that it was 
salted within the next twenty-four hours, is sti'l 
fresh in the minds of a good many people. Again, 
the late Melville Attwood had his samples salted on 
him at the time they were doing up the bankers of 
Narbonne, building flumes upside down and playing 
all sorts of pranks down at the Quartz Mountain 
mine. Fortunately, Mr. Attwood was too clever to 
be caught napping, placing little trust in the locks 
and bars on doors and windows of a newly built 
assay house, even although every precaution was 
taken in the way of sealing them up for the night, lie 
took pains the next morning to run the samples 
through the same mesh sieve he had used the night 
before, and to his astonishment found particles of 
the yellow metal which would not pass, on account 
of coarseness, and yet the seals were intact on doors, 
window and chimney. How these samples were 
salted, under the circumstance, was something which 
puzzled the distinguished geologist of over 50 years' 
experience, until the day after his death. Strange 
things do happen in mine promotion sometimes. 

The market for Comstock 
Pine-St. Market, shares is beginning to develop 
a tone which suits everybod3 
in the business except a few short sellers who would 
"bear" a stock for the possible profit of a copper cent. 
These people are, as a rule, outside of the pale of 
legitimate speculators. No one will attempt to deny 
the right of an operator to play any side of the mar- 
ket he may choose. There could be no "bulls" on 
'Change were there no "bears;" the one is of as much 
vital importance to the market as the other. It would 
not be proper, however, to include the so-calle I 
"bears" of Pine street in the same category. They 
are, as a rule, wreckers, pure and simple, striving 
eternally to tear down what others are working to 
build up with the recourse always open of laving 
down their cards when the financial strain becomes 
too heavy, and then it is a case of "'What are von g.,- 
ing to do about it?" in so far as the men on the otfier 
end of the string are concerned. The end of a num- 
ber of these people is in sight, and the street will 
be cleared of them in a few short mouths. Ophir 
is now giving evidence of the reserve force in store 
in the Comstock market, backed by something that 
money on the short encl cannot beat, and that is ore. 
During the week the news that the ledge has been 
widening on the 1800 level, two of the last cars of 
the ore shipped to Selby's giving returns in gold 
equivalent to $111 per ton. "This is the same vein 
that has produced so well in the Con. -Cal. -Virginia 



mine, and which is working north, through the Ophir 
ground, opening out jn size and value all the time. 
Active trading and higher prices along the entire 
list may be anticipated for months to come, with a 
marked increase in the output of bullion from mines 
along the lode, many of which have been idle for 
years. 

Business continues dull in the local 

Local Stocks market fur stocks and bonds, the 

and Bonds, only feature of the week being an 

overplus stock for sale of the S. F. 
1 las and Electric and a decidedly weak tone in Alaska 
Packers. The stockholders of the Gas Companv do 
n6t seem to have profited much from the recent 
manipulation, which struck the Board of Directors 
as such a capable bit of work that they rewarded 
.Mr. President Brown with a small fortune and a 
raise in salary of $25,000 a year. Without attempting 
to enter into the controversv now going on between 
the Company and its clients over the quality of the 
gas it sells, it would strike a man up a tree that there 
is more heft at the managerial end of the business, 
and that perhaps trouble may result from a retrench- 
ment in wages to counterbalance the high salaries 
paid the men who fill leather-backed chairs and travel 
in Europe on leave of absence. One would naturally 
ei insider that, after undertaking the contract to pay 
interest on about three times in excess of wdiat a 
good serviceable plant would cost, that it would be- 
hoove all concerned to devote their energies toward 
the conclusion of work which was far from being 
finished by the operation of tagging on a number of 
millions to an already immense capitalization. All 
facts considered, the wonder is that the stock holds 
up as it does. As a combination, our re-constructed 
Gas Company is anything but a success, and a ques- 
tion suggests itself as to what the majority of the 
present management knows about gas making any- 
way. In bonds there was little done during the week 
and prices show no particular change. 

California ranks second in 
American Production the annual statement of 
of Precious Metals, the approximate distribu- 
tion by producing States 
and territories of the yield of gold and silver of the 
United States for the calendar years of 1902 and 
1903. The output of California for this term is esti- 
mated at $16,535,525 in gold and $407,6^4 in silver, 
trailing along, after the heels of Colorado, which is 
credited with a yield during the same period of $22,- 
000,000 in gold and $7,517,812 in silver. Utah comes 
third with a yield of $5,036,599 in gold and $8,000,000 
in silver; then Montana, with a record of $4,134,367 
in gold and $5,400,000 in silver. Alaska is only cred- 
ited with an output of $6,921,157 in gold and $16,- 
540 in silver. The Stales which show an in- 
crease for the year in the production of gold are 
Idaho, Nevada, Utah and Washington. Alaska. Colo- 
rado, Montana, South Dakota and Oregon show a 
decrease. The total output of gold for the period 
under review was $74,425,340. and of silver $30,520,- 
688. This, in comparison with the previous year, 
shows a total net decrease in the gold production oi 
$5,575,000 and a net increase of $i,tro.ooo in the 
production of silver. The Klondike produced in 
round numbers $12,000,000 in gold against $14,000,- 
000 during the previous year. 



January 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 



The «!«•■ taction in Alaska i 

tributed t.. a short season of water supply. In I 

tributed to the mini 1 
which interfered with production. It is not difficult 

ssign a cause for the decline in the California 
yield. Mining has been practically at a - 
all over the Stair owing t.> labor difficulties, and it 

robable that the production will be still 
before the trouble i* definitely settle.!. \< ii now 
stand-, it is ridiculous to expect thai capitalists will 
risk an investment with the chance of finding them- 
selves tied up some day by tlie miners, who aim to 
dictate in all things the management of the mines. 
Tyranny is the only term to apply to the action, of 
the men. who, if tlie truth were told, are mostly for- 
eigners, with views upon the subject of American 
liberty bordering so close upon license that they will 
have to be toned down considerably before they 
will make the more desirable cla-s of citizens, ft 
only requires a modicum of success upon the part of 
a company or proprietor, and the screws are promptly 
applied, as at the Royal mine in Calaveras County 
and the big copper mines at Keswick. Such a con- 
dition of affairs cannot last for all time, that is cer- 
tain. 



The annual statement of the financial condition of 
of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Association at the 
close of business December 31, 1903, appears in this 
issue of the News Letter. It shows another progres- 
sive year, and a continuance of the prosperity which 
has ever attended the operations of this powerful 
financial institution, and its sagacious management. 
The total assets are now increased to $61,466,590, 
representing a gilt-edged holding of property- in the 
form of real estate and high-class stocks and bonds. 
Itemized, the assets consist of $29,237,007 in promis- 
sory notes secured by first mortgages on real estate : 
$1,151,400 in promisory notes, secured by bonds and 
stocks ; $19,776,933 in bonds of the United States ; 
$8,282,700 in miscellaneous bonds ; $324,686 in inter- 
est accrued on bonds ; $763,000 in real estate ; not in- 
cluded in the land and office building valued at $517,- 
199, with cash on hand amounting to $1,960,012. The 
reserve fund now amounts to $3,283,914.80. With 
such a financial showing and a reputation for conser- 
vative, while at the same time liberal management, 
it is little wonder that the Hibernia Bank maintains 
the confidence of the public as it does. 



MONEY 

Part of Marconi Certificates. Let 
Your Money Work for You 

MARCONI CERTIFICATES will not you from 100 to 1000 
p»r c»r\t better result* than any labor of yours can produce. 

ACT NOW— DO NOT DELAY 

in v ->i for rot u m i - v-'H 

wish to the uniforafffne*. than $'(*>. Price par 

i : price ni.i v ;i.|\ Knee nny d.-.v 

Tli.' Btock "f the British Marconi Oompni ■ and 

and is now selling at *« nr the London Stock Exchange, an advanne ol 

I tics ol the Lmeiinnn « Sompanj are modi 

in.- Marconi 9 r stem Is Indorsed bj buoI 
and Thomas \ Edison and by thenrdftsot the entire world. 1 I 
Marconi and Pupin are the Consulting Engineers --f the Ann 
. , n\ 

itus anon application and poui licited- 

F. P. WARD & CO., Bankers 

CROSSLEY BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Century Building, St. Louis, Mo.; Farmers' Bank 
Building, Pittsburg, Pa.; Land Title Building, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. : Union Trust Building, Cincinnati. 
Ohio; Royal Insurance Building, Chicago, 111. 

Correspondents — Munroe & Munroe, N. Y. 



The gross earnings of the United Railroads for the 
month of November, 1903, show an increase of $44,- 
367, or 9.07 per cent, while for the eleven months 
to November 30th, the gross earnings increased 
$659,209, or 12.12 per cent. 

The German-speaking element in our community 
have suffered a distinct loss in the death of Freder- 
ick W. Barkhaus. He was one of our best-known 
citizens and well beloved by all who ever came with- 
in the circle of his genial influence. He came to Cali- 
fornia around the Horn in 1853. The first few years 
of his life in California were spent in mining. His 
store was a center for a long time for all the culture 
of San Francisco. His great specialty was books in 
the German language, and by this means many of 
the German citizens were thus brought to more than 
a passing acquaintance with the old gentleman. He 
was a Mason and a member of the German Benevo- 
lent Society, besides being a director of the German 
Hospital. He was 67 years of age at his demise. 

-Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



I Mavis Consolidated Gold 

i 
i 

1 



and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of California. 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share for 
development purposes. The ore in sight is practically 
unlimited. "When the present issue of stock is exhausted, 
the price will be raiseu to 50 cents a share. 

Apply to the office ot the company, room 205, 713 Mar- 
ket street, for prospectus, which gives full information. 
VINCENT NEALB, Secretary. 



i 
i 



'California Safe 



i 



Deposit and 
Trust Co. 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital & Surplus $1,233,723.76 f 
Total Assets 6,914,424.59 



Interest paid on deposits, subject 
to check, nt the rate of two 
per cent, per annum. 

Interest paid on savinsrs deposits 
at the rate of three and six- 
tentbs per cent, per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are author- 
ized to ttct as the cruardian of 
estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented at 86 
per annum and upwards. 



J. Dalzell Brown 



1 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Offlee-Starr King Building. 121 Geary St., San Francisco. Booms 
303,304.305. Hours 10 a. m. to 1 p- m., 2 to 1 p. m. Sunday by appoint- 
ment. Telephone Private Exchange 216. Besidence, comer 5th avenue 
and 16th St., Oakland. Telephone. East 36. 



BANKING. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
Moves and 



Wells, Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capital. Surplus and ^divided j £13,500,000 

Homer S. King, President; F. L. Lipman, Cashier; Prank B 
King, Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake. Utah; Portland, Or. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General Banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

San Francisco Savinqs Union 

512 Calif' imia St.. cor. Webb St,, San Francisco. 

E. B. POND. President: W. C. B De FREMEKY. ROBERT WATT. 
Vice-Presidents; Lovell White. Cashier; It. M. Welch, Assist. Cashier 

Dire-tors— E. B. Pond. W. C. B. de Freniery. Henry F. Allen. George 
C. Boardman. Jacob Earth. C O. G. Miller. Fred H. Beaver. William 
A Magee. Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Countrv remit- 
tances may be sent by Wells. Fargo & Co., <>r by checks "f reliable 
Sanies, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of thisSnvings 
ank commences only with the actual receipl or the money. The 
signature of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No 
charge is made for pass-book or entrance lee. 

Office hours: o a. m. to :t p. m. Saturday evening. 6:80 i, , 8. 

Deposits. December :il. 1008 138,292 '.ins 

Guarantee Capital. Paid up 1.000,000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 899,616 

Mutual Savinas Bank of «=«, F«r.oi 9 oo 

710 Market St.. Opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital j,j ,,,,. 

Paid-up Capita] and Surplus 500 01)0 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent; GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER Vice- 
President; C. B. HOBSON. Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphv. John A. Hooper 
James Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy. Rudolph 
Spreckels. James M. McDonald. Charles Holbrook. 
Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells. Fargo & C ■ 

exchange on city banks. 



The German Savinqs & Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SA.y FRANCISCO. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus la 4M.7B1 m 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash ' 1000 000 00 

Deposits. Dec. al, 19U3 Wo4940118 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS-Presldent, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, II. Horstmann; 
Ign. Steinhardt. Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ. X. iihlandt 1 X Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
mann; Secretary. George Toimiy; \wsi-- l:i in S.nvt,,,, \ |[ 

Muller: General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow 



Continental Building & Loao Association 

Established in 1SS9 OF CALIFORNIA. 

= v. ■, ,"1, California Street. San Francisco. OBJ. 

Paid-7n CarJtai 1 ' J15.000.000.03 

r^dia-in Lapnai ■> nru , , M .,, , n 

ProHt and Reserve Fund "..' 4500*10 00 

interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 

on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposils 
Dr. Washington Dodge, President: Wimam Corbin, Secretary 

and General Manager. 



International Banking Corporator; 

NO. 1 WALL ST.. NEW YORK. 
Capital and Surplus Hfitujan 

Cnnital and Sumli,. A,,»i,~..: i ... i . ^.m, n> i 



Capital and Surplus Authorized 



.111.11(111, 000. i II 



Assistant to President; William B. Wightman Assistant ici 
President; John Hubbard. Treasurer; Jant's H Rogerf Secre- 
A ar> ,' : , , ?. B ' V 5 ?; GeneraI Manager: William H. Maclntvre. 

,*l*\"-l' 1 . y.'-'lr'"' JI -M,:,ger: Alexander & Ore,.,,. Counsel. 
BKAiV HES-. London, San Francisco, City of Mexico. Manila. 
Hong Kong, lokohama, Shanghai. Singapore 

™£Si CI ? S_Bon ! bay ; Ca ' c , utta ' Madras, Penang, Rangoon. 
Colombo Amoy, Canton, Hankow. Tientsin. Tansui. Annlng 
Bakan, Moji, Saigon, Kobe. Bangkok. Batavla, Samarang. Bou- 
rabaya, and all parts of Europe 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH-32-34 Sansome Street. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- 
tions, firms and individuals so.iclted. Loans made on liberal terms 
on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bought 
and sold. Travelers' and commercial letters of credit granted 
available in any part of the world. Interest bearing certificates' 
of deposit isued for fixed periods. Interest allowed to banks 
on current daily balances. Special rates given to banks keeping 
accounts with us. and drawing direct on our branches and 
agents throughout the world. 

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 
F. E. BECK, Manager. P. G. EASTWICK, JR.. Ast. Mgr. 



January 9, 1904. 
Countermoves. 

The Secretary of State lias issued a very excellent 
volume, or Blue Book, that will be of interest to 
politicians all over the State. It is very well gotten 
up, and though it is very "fat" matter from the 
printer's standpoint, that is the business of the State 
Printer and not of the Secretary. It is a veritable 
directory of Who is Who, in the political line in this 
O'liiiuonwealth, and except the employees of the 
State Printing Office, who for some reason have not 
appeared in the pages of any Blue Book for several 
years, it contains the names of all the State, Federal 
and Municipal employees, from the President of the 
United States to the driver of the police van in San 
Francisco. As a rule, the addresses of the office 
holders are given ; that is to say, the place from 
which they were appointed, but as the printer evi- 
dently had not enough type to set up the words 
"< oakland" or "Alameda" any more frequently, they 
were omitted when the lists of Harbor Board, State 
institutions, and some federal employees were given. 
The list, however, contains 138 names with the resi- 
dences in Oakland, Berkeley and Alameda, not count- 
ing, of course, those connected with the University, 
and their salaries and wages reach the very hand- 
some total of $197,540. When the employees of the 
Harbor Board, of the Customs House, etc., are added, 
no doubt those figures will be very nearly doubled. 
Xot only does Alameda County figure in the list of 
persons holding positions, the work of which is to 
be done in this citv, but she has proven a perfect 
octopus in grasping offices all over the State, north 
of the Tehachapi. Thus we have Alamedans on the 
Board of Trustees at the Mendocino State Insane 
Asylum, and at Napa they are the only managers of 
the Blind Asylum, and of the Deaf, Dumb and Blind. 
The State University would appear to be a mere local 
institution, as there is only one Regent south of 
the Tehachapi. and only two for the San Joaquin 
Valley. All the rest are either San Franciscans or 
Alamedans. Berkeley is represented on the Board 
of the new Polytechnic School at San Luis ( ibispo, 
and the Superintendent of that institution hails from 
the same classic town. Now as the distance from 
Berkeley to San Luis Obispo is generally supposed 
to be about the same as the distance from San Luis 
Obispo to Berkeley. I would respectfully request 
the powers that be to explain why tin-re is not a 
single man from the Coast cities on the Boards of 
any institution except the Polytechnic School? Why 
not put some Southern men on the Adult Blind 
Board? Why not put some representatives of the 
great Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys on that 
Board, or on the list of Regents to the X T niversity? 
Certainly they would not prove themselves any more 
incompetent than the distinguished gentlemen who 
have allowed the Secretary- of the University to walk 
away with what is now said to be $140,000. 

I beg, also, to call the attention of the Governor 
to the fact that the terms of three of the Trustees 
of the Home for the Feeble Minded have expired. 
His friends say that the Governor has been only 
waiting for a chance to straighten things out there. 
Here is his chance. He cannot pass the responsibility 
to any one else. Let him put men in there who will 
give their attention to the work, who will not pass 
over in silence the suicide of its inmates, who will 
protect poor, unfortunate girls wdien they are unlaw- 
fully removed from the institution. 
* * * 

The defalcation at the State University is likelj 



January 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



thai was originally 
named. Dozens of persons have paid the Secretary 

• •I never bothered about it since, and to 
even if tnej recall the tact, do 1 , M3 any- 

thn.K about it, because they object to the notoriety 
th.it would result While ever> effort is being made 
to mid out what the loss is, the investigation is ham- 
I H * r ' »«ic« of records. Everybody who has 

anj known financial transactions with the Univer- 
sity is being questioned, but even that laborious 
method is proving tar from satisfactory. 

* * * 

The appointment of George Adams in the place 
"i Registrar \\ alsh was not unexpected. A. lams was 
Assistant Secretary of the United Republican League 
but left that organization when the municipal cam- 
paign began carrying with him the records of the 
primary league. He became nominally Vssistant 
Secretary oi the Schmitz Club on Ellis street, but 
really its chief executive officer. He is an energetic 
man. an.l should make a good officer in his new place 

* * * 

The conflict that I predicted between the Governor 

and the .Mayor over the appointment of a successor 
to Justice of the Peace Percy Y. Long is on. and the 
courts will have to decide whether Walter E. Dorn, 
whom the Mayor appointed, or Isadore Golden,' 
whom the Governor named, is the rightful incum- 
bent of the place. Incidentally, the court will de- 
cide the question whether the" Justices are city or 
county officers. The Mayor relies on a late decision 
of the Supreme Court to sustain him, the decision 
which practically gave him the right to remove the 
Health Board. The Governor claims that he has 
the right to name the Clerk, Justices and so-called 
county officers as he is entitled to do in other coun- 
ties where a vacancy occurs. 

* * * 

Long has named Partridge and Brobeck as his 
chief deputies, as was announced shortly after his 
election in this column. His other deputies are all 
men who have not been very prominent in politics, 
and who have to a large extent their spurs to win. 
It is understood that they were his personal choice, 
and that the "push" had nothing to do with the se- 
lections, although Long offered them the right to 
name their men. 

* * * 

Ex-Deputy Clerk Deane is to be the chief deputy 
of Clerk Grief. There will be a number of other 
changes in the office of County Clerk, though Casey 
will remain at the Probate desk, and several of the 
court clerks are to hold over. Grief expects all his 
men to work over-time until the books are up to 
date, and no one will be appointed who only wants 
a place to draw the salary. — Junius. 

The Old Camper 
has lor forty-five years had one article in his supply — 
Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. It gives to soldiers, 
sailors, hunters, campers, and miners a daily comfort, 
"like the old home." Delicious in coffee, tea and chocolate. 



BANKING. 



The San Francisco National Book 

"W'T. K. W u, 

'" "V; 1 1 i..iiM.i..i Prollt», IMC 

rgc A Nowhill, o"or," 



■ 



vhAll, -. 



flunk. 



I'll. 

\ I'.,,:. 

,1 ,, ,l "\ "': «echanlc« Bank Kannu i 
n *VP na ^ •" brown Shi Diet a 

T"be Canadian Bank of Commerce 

w,u, „,,,,,, , s ,,,,, ; , s ,, r ,,, i: , :rmsh ( .,, li]n l 

- '» '■ »MWW ci.noo.ouu 

Aggrega i i i 000 

m.n. ,:- v 'M-': 1 " 1 '-: A. COX, President. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard SI i 

y " , , !l ^.,.',."'' F "''' : ~" ; Exchange Place. 

BHJ I i.sii COLUMBIA- Atlln, Cranbrook 
- rnle. Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmlui, Nanaimo 

New Westminster, vai iver and victoria. 

her branches, covering tie orlnclnal nolntii 

v , v v!v: x '";^'? I | : | : , " :V -"— •" -"' wffiSBoVwf 

\r, -I i v w A a. ES T. P 2. r0and ' B ??""« •">■• Bkagway (Alaska.) 

5r?H "':"■ - v "■ territories, and Eastern Canada. 

BANKERS IN LO.VDUN-The Hank of England, Ihe Bank of 

Scotland. Lloyds Bunk, Ltd.. The Union of London and Smiths 

yank. Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The Northern Trust Co. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS-The Commercial National Bank. 
SAN FRANCISCO 






NEW 
BRANCHES l.\ 



in 



Oi-Hut- 

325 California Street. 



A. KAINS. Manager. 



Limited 



London, Paris and (American Bank 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital. J2.50O.000 Paid-up Capital. $2,000,009 

Reserve Fund. ?1, 100. 000 
Head Office— 10 Threadneedle St.. London. E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London. Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. Manager; „. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The ^oglo-Californian Bank, Limitea 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars. London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000.00 Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund 700,000 

The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

1GN. STEINHART, P. N. L1L1ENTHAL, Manag ers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOS.-o. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord, William Babcock. Adam Grant, 
S. L. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Baldwin, F. Monteagle, Warren D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutcheon. R. H. Pease. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Company will be held at the office of the company, No- 120 Stockton St., 
at 12 o'clock noon, on Wednesday, the 13th day of January, 1904. for the 
election of directors to serve for the ensuing year, and for the trans- 
action of such other business as may come before the meeting. 

PELHAM W. AMES, Secretary. 

San Francisco. Cal-, December 30. 1903. 



Many a man receives the credit of always having new 

clothing, when the truth is that this appearance cornea 
from his suits being sent regularly to Spaulding's Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works, where they are cleaned and pressed in 
model manner. They also clean gloves, cravats, laces, cur- 
tains and similar articles. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

?6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat producing qualities Briquettes are superior 
to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Goal Company, lOt.i and 
Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with December 31, 1903, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of three and one-quarter (3 1-4) per 
cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Saturday, January 2, 1904. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California Street. 

Mrs. Railing — You haven't got that splendid but- 
ler now? Mrs. Parvenu — No, he was a fraud. Mrs. 
Railing — Indeed? Mrs. Parvenu — Yes, he forgot 
himself once and neglected to drop his "h's," so we 
discovered he wasn't English at all. — Philadelphia 
Ledger. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1904. 




Bt The Autocrank 

The Governors of the Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia held a meeting on January 5th, and matters of 
interest affecting the club were discussed. Mr. C. 
C. Moore was appointed a committee of one to inves- 
tigate and report at the next meeting of the Board 
the desirability of holding an automobile exposition 
at the Pavilion some time in the spring. Before any 
definite action is taken, the Club desires to know 
whether sufficient interest will be taken therein by 
the dealers, and must be assured that sufficient space 
will be rented to render it profitable. The exhibition 
will include all kinds of sporting goods, launches and 
automobile accessories. It is proposed to hold the 
exhibition during the whole of one week some time 
within the next three months. 

The question of good roads was discussed, and the 
Governors passed a resolution endorsing the restora- 
tion of the ancient highway known as El Camino Rial 
or the King's Highway, from San Diego to San Fran- 
cisco. Southern California is very much interested 
in this project, and a convention will be held in Los 
Angeles on the 30th inst. to discuss the matter. The 
convention has been called by the Los Angeles 
Chamber of Commerce, and consists of the Board E 
Trade, County Surveyors, the Landmarks Club 
the Los Angeles Highway Commission. Their ef- 
forts will be to build a grand boulevard from San 
Diego to Santa Barbara, and it will lie left to North- 
ern California to continue the road to San Fran- 
cisco. The Automobile Club of California is taking 
an active interest in the matter, and a similar conven- 
tion will undoubtedly be called in San Francisco. 
There is strong hope that the Brownlow Bill appro- 
priating $22,000,000 to aid good roads throughout 
the United States will be passed at this session, and 
if so, it is expected that the Legislatures of the vari- 
ous counties through which this road will pass will 
lend assistance and hasten the completion of the road. 
The old Mission Fathers not only selected their loca- 
tions with wisdom and foresight, but they chose the 
easiest route for building the roads from Mission to 
Mission. In the desire for straight lines, these routes 
have not since been followed, and if El Camino Rial 
is restored, it will afford the most delightful tour 
from San Francisco to San Diego, avoiding mam of 
the hills that are now en route. 

If such a road is completed, there will be stopping 
places all along the route for tourists, and the road 
will be used not only by automobilists but by vehi- 
cles of all kinds. An Eastern traveler coming to San 
Francisco can by easy stages see the most delightful 
parts of California, and carry back with him favorable 
impressions of the country between San Francisco 
and Los Angeles. 

Another interesting subject discussed by the Gov- 
ernors was the matter of a club badge. It was sug- 
gested by the President that there ought to be some 
way of identifying the members of the club wbile 
touring. An esprit de corps among them is in many 
ways beneficial. While there is generally a friendly 
feeling between automobilists, there should be a sort 
of free masonry among the members of the club. It 
makes club membership more desirable and a spirit 
of sociability is created. Mr. R. P. Schwerin left 



for New York Wednesday morning, and while East 
he will decide upon a suitable design for a club badge, 
the same design to be used for a plate to be attached 
to each automobile. Members meeting on the road 
will thus be able to identify each other, and will be 
expected to render assistance in case of trouble. 
There will be three badges of the same design, but 
differing in size, one for the cap, one for the lapel of 
the coat, and one for the automobile. Over a year 
ago a committee was appointed to select a club badge 
and submitted several designs therefor, but the club 
did not seem to be sufficiently interested in the mat- 
ter at that time. The Governors are now taking it 
up seriously, and some design will be adopted in the 
near future. 

The Board of Directors of the Automobile Club 
have presented Mr. J. Kruttschnitt a petition asking 
him to modify the present rule which prohibits the 
transportation of automobiles on the regular ferry 
boats. This petition has not as yet been acted upon, 
but strong arguments have been brought to bear, and 
it is confidently believed that increased privileges 
will be granted in the near future, and as soon as the 
Southern Pacific lines act in the matter, there is 
no doubt but that the other ferry lines will make the 
same concessions. This will be an important gain 
to automobilists, for at present there is no way to 
reach San Francisco from Oakland between 4 p. m. 
and 8 p. m. 



An automobile without a front axle, giving the 
greatest possible speed with the least possible weight, 
so simple in operation that a child might drive it and 
consuming less fuel than any other type of vehicle 
of its power, would seem to be almost revolutionary 
in construction methods, yet all this and more is 
claimed for a machine recently completed by the 



OLDSMOBILE 

1904 ANNOUNCEMENT 

3 MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM. 



1st — Regular Standard Runabout, Price 

F. O. B. Factory $650.00 

2d — Large Motor, new style, Metal 
Hood, French Design, Powerful Light 
Car, Price F. O. B. Factory $750.00 

3d — Four Passenger Tonneau Touring 
Car, Roomy, Luxurious, Strong and 
Fast $950.00 

WATCH THIS SPACE FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS AND CUTS 



PIONEER AUTOHOBILE CO. 

901 Golden Gate Avenue, 

Opp- Jefferson Square. 

We handle only standard Automobiles — Win- 
ton, Oldsmobile, Locomobile (steam and gaso- 
line), Stevens-Duryea, Baker Electric, Vehicle 
Equipment Company. 



January 9, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»3 



■ 

more ii< >\ 
ban anvil 
that has been turned out in this country for a long 
time. Equipped with a thirty-five horse-power ■ 
[r. Christii iction. the machine has 

timed over a measure. I straightaway mile in ; 
seconds, which is at the ra' .five mill 

hour. The remarkable feature "i this will be b 
appreciated when it is understood that the machine. 
in racing trim, weighs only 1,250 pounds. 

Mrs. Henry Meyers, of 1802 Pacific avenue, gave 
an automobile luncheon Sunday in honor of her 
daughter. The party consisted of 20 young ladies 
and gentlemen, who assembled at the residence about 
11 o'clock and awaited the arrival of the cars of the 
Mobile Carriage Co., which were use] for this 

). The trip included the Park. Ocean Boule- 
vard, Ingleside, Cliff House and Presidio, the party 
returning about 1 .30. when luncheon was served. 




James Whltcomb Riley in ;i Haynes Apperson surrey. 



We quote the following from a local contemporary : 
"Jack Winter, the well-known express agent at 
Truckee, Cal., has purchased and installed the first 
auto in Truckee, Cal. The town has suddenly become 
auto struck, and more machines can be sold tnere. 
No light-power cars need apply, as the district is 
mountainous." Now, this is all very well except for 
the interesting fact .that Mr. Winter's machine is 
the very lightest that is made, being no other than 
the Orient Buckboard. It might almost be said that 
nothing but light cars need apply, as Mr. Winter's 
success has led to a number of orders for Buck- 
boards being taken in that vicinity. 



Mr. Byron Jackson, of this city, has just returned 
from a visit to the Olds Motor Works at Detroit and 
Lansing, Michigan. He says that the company has 
doubled the capacity of their factory, and. will be 
in a position to turn cut forty machines a day. They 
will offer to the public three models. First : the 
regular runabout. Second: another runabout, which 
will be larger and have more horse-power; and third : 
a tonneau, which has a carrying capacity of five per- 
sons. 



Mr. Max L. Rosenfeld is a late purchaser of a 1904 
Winton. 

Mrs. V. L. Clement has just returned from a 
week's trip to Santa Barbara, making the trip both 
ways in her new Winton. 



Mr Mr. John F. Mil. am. of the 

I'ioni hure- 

•• N 'irk. It is their intention to 

the different fa vhich 

the Pioneer Automobile Company represents, and 

arm for the opening of the automobile 



The Northern Manufacture 1 >ot r. «it , builJ- 

orthern runabout, state that their new 
ir will he ready for shipment about 
February isth. 



The Mobile Cam as been advised by the 

George X. Pierce Co., manufacturers of the tour- 




San Francisco by Automobile 



KAlhS LESS THAN CARRIAGES 

IT. t 1> I 1 AI.I 

MOBILE CARRIAGE COMPANY, 
Golden Gate and Van Ness Avenues. 



Phones: Larkin 3841; Polk 3086. Down-town 
office : Lobby Palace Hotel, Phone Bush 859. 
You can secure these cars at any hotel or cafe 
by asking for MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. 



SALES DEPARTMENT COAST AGENCIES. 
Pierce Arrow Touring Car (French) price $2650 

Pierce Stanhope (French type) 1350 

Northern Runabout (leader in New York) 800 
Fine Garage, expert mechanics, guaranteed 
expenses. 



MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. 

Golden Gate and Van Ness Aves. Open all night. 



NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CO. 



Phone. South 1 142 134 to 148 Golden Gate Ave. 

The largest and 
inest "Garage" in 
the West. 

Our line the highest 
Types produced. 

RAMBLER; KNOX, Waterless; HAYNES - APPERSON 

AUTOCAR. ...Touring Cars 
TOLEDO. ...Touring Cars 
PEERLESS.. ..Touring Cars 

Give us a call and we will show you a full line of 
record-breakers. 




AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile Co.— 288 S Market street. Phone John 1661. 
Automobiles stored and repaired. Expert workmanship. Gaso- 
line and oil at all hours. Santa Clara County agents for the 
Vv estern Automobile Company and National Automobile Com- 
pany. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January g, 1904. 



cylinder Arrow (French type) touring car, that these 
cars will be shipped to them about the first of May 
This car has four cylinders, which will develop 35 
horse-power and a speed when loaded of over sixty 
miles an hour. It is the purpose of the manufac- 
turers to turn out a car which will come up to all 
requirements. The price will be $4,200 in San Fran- 
cisco. The Mobile Carriage Co. says it will be in a 
position to put up races during the coming season 
which will be well worth the price of admission. 



Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Moore, Jr., have returned from 
New York, and their beautiful four-cylinder Locomo- 
bile is at the Pioneer Automobile Company's new 
garage. They made a trip to Haywards Sunday. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moore will leave shortly for a trip to 
Santa Barbara in their auto. 



Tl.e following list of names, recently handed 
to this department, are purchasers of 1904 Locomo- 
bile gasoline touring cars: Dr. A. E. Hansen, Salem, 
Mass.; George P. Brown, Chicago, 111.; J. D. Mac- 
Calmont. Franklin, Pa. ; C. C. Warren, Waterbury, 
Vermont; C. R. Hooker New Haven, Conn.; Pier- 
pont B. Foster, New Haven, Conn. 

JEAN'S REVENGE. 

An avenger need not necessarily be a naturalist, 
but there are cases where he would take his ven- 
geance more to the purpose if he knew the habits 
of his victim. Lippincott's Magazine tells a story of 
Jean, the French-Canadian gardener who was found 
stamping on a little mound of fresh earth and chuck- 
ling to himself. 

"Ah, m'sieu," he cried triumphantly, "I am not a 
one to be trifled with ! I am a cr-r-r-uel man when 
once I am arouse. M'sieu will remember the mole 
that has long time ravage the strawberry beds of 
madame? Every morning madame she say, 'Jean, 
why catchest thou not that mole?' 

"But the mole was wise ; 'e was queek. Always I 
look and look, but never can I find heem. But at 
last, thees very morning, I catch heem. I hold heem 
tight in my hand — so — and I say : 'Aha-a-a ! Is it 
thou, then, that has vexed madame, and ravaged her 
beds of the strawberry? Aha-a ! You shall repent 
of thees wickedness.' 

"Then I wonder how I shall kill heem. He must 
be punished as well as killed. I wonder and wonder, 
but at last I have the grand idea. Ah, it was cr-r-uel, 
m'sieu, that way I kill heem! But what would you? 
Did he not deserve of the worst? But he will vex 
madame no more. I fix heem. I bury heem alive !" 

The New Year's edition of the San Francisco 
Chronicle is at hand this week, and it is better than 
ever — which is saying a great deal. For a quarter of 
a century the Chronicle's has been the standard an- 
nual of the Pacific Coast, but this number is the best 
on record. It is devoted to a consideration of the 
future of California, showing ways and means by 
which the State may gain a population of twenty 
millions in a century. On this theme, some of the 
most thoughtful men of the State, including several 
profesors of the University of California, have con- 
tributed interesting and seasonable articles. In art 
work, in typography, in make-up, in all the mechani- 
cal factors of a newspaper, it is undoubtedly the best 
thing of its kind ever issued on the Pacific Coast. 



Few come to San Francisco without paying a "visit 

to Zinkand's, which has done so much to establish our 
city's reputation as the best restaurant town in the United 
States. It's t.ne favorite after-the-theatre resort. 



Have you seen the •m? 

BUCKBOARD? 

The talk of the town. 
Best Automobile at any 



price. 
Costs 



$125 




STRONG -EASY RIDING-RELIABLE-GUARANTEED 



-ON EXHIBIT AT- 



SUNSET AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1814 MARKET STREET - - • SAN FRANCISCO 

PACIFIC riOTOR CAR CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 

Packard 

Motor Car. 

St. Louis 

Motor Car. 

American 

Motor Car. 

JONES CORBIN 

Motor Car. 

Cudell Motor Car 
The above cars exhibited at our repository, 
49-53 CITY HALL A VE. 

THE 




White fiarage 

Cor. Market & Franklin 




— Sales rooms— 
300-302-304 Post Street, 8. F 
"White Sewing Machine Co 

The 1903 "White" Largest and best equipped auto- 

mobile garage on the Coast. Machines of all makes stored and repaired 




ELECTRIC and 

GASOLINE 
CARS... 



A. F. BROOKE RIDLEY, ,8 "gfcSi.XS™ 1, 



Telephone South 394 



San Francisco, Cal. 



VELVET 

LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 
and Women 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make them in 
any style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

H. E. SKINNER CO. 

. 801 MARKET ST. 



$500 RE^VARD for an y t,aseof Rheumatism which ean- 
-__^^_^___^^^^^_ not be cured with Dr. Druuimond'- 5 
Lightning Remedies; restores stiff joints, drawn cords, and hardene 
muscles. Proof from 25 States sent on request Address Drummond 
Medicine Co. 84 Nassau Street, New York. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 



Should use DAM1ANA BIT- 
TERS, the great Mexican 
remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 
Send for circular: Naber, Alts & Brune. 325 Market St.. S. P. 



January 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*5 




THE PURPLE ROSE. 

• in 
of the purpla petals I won] I know 

The secret that has darkened every vein 
And fibre of thi • the doll pain 

Of some strange passion in the lone ago? 

Was there some boon the wind would not b 
Some nightingale who never came again 
Into thy garden? blossom, thou hast lain 

All night against the dark, in nameless woe. 

r of mine, O Rose. I know Ihou art! 
As thus I hold tnee with caressing hand. 
I feel thy being with perfume expand. 
1 kiss thy quivering petals wide apart 
And lay my lips upon thy golden heart; 
For I perceive thy soul and understand. 



A VISION. 
Iiv William Canton in Chamber's Journal 
Grasp my hand! 
Hold me fast: 

For I stagger and reel 
At the tumult and splendor of life rushing past 
In a whirlwind of fire. dust, vapor, and thunder; 

For above me and under. 
Upon this side and that, all the sea and the land. 
All the skies, and the gods' starry seats in the skies. 
Spin and spin on tne axle of time like a wheel. 

O my soul in what region unknown, 
Far removed beyond thought, did I see 
The vast shape of a Woman who sat all alone 

With the wheel at her knee! 
And I saw that the wheel was ro.ation of time, 
And the wool of her spinning 
Was life — but the fleece 
Was a secret withdrawn beyond winning. 



HOPE. 
By J. S. Redmayne in Chamber's Journal 
No wintry silence — be it e'er so long — 
But springtime wakes it with the birds' sweet song. 
No day so drear but after frost and snow, 
E'en in far North, the sweetest roses blow. 
No night so long but daylight comes at last. 
And the pink dawn forgets the darkness past. 
No work so toilsome but the task begun 
On earth is finished with the Morning Sun. 
No way so rugged out the wanderer's feet 
Shall walk unweary in the golden street. 
No parting ever but the God of Love 
Shall join the parted — in the land above. 



TO-DAY. 

By Yenita Seibert in McClure's 
O thou, close-wrapped, a goddess in disguise! 
It needs but one determined, fearless stroke 
To tear aside thy gray and homely cloak, 
When lo! like splendid lamps shine thy deep eyes 
On him who has the gift to recognize. 
To-morrow's beauty pales beside thy face 
And Yesterday sinks to her rightful place, 
Forgotten stars that fade at thy sunrise! 

To-morrow is a dream, she is not mine, 

Ano Yesterday is dead and tear-wet clay — 

But thou, born new each morn, deathless, divine, 

ihou rulest life and fate, O great To-day! 

For to the door of Opportunity 

Thou and thou only uoldest forth the key. 



A MAXIM. 

By Fannie Herron Wingaie 
Live for to-day! Wlhy anxious for the morrow? 
Why load to-day with burdens that you borrow? 
Each day, yea, and each hour its own work brings; 
That work well done may lead to better things. 

A simple rule I give to you, 
Though simple, good and true: 
"Just do your best and trust the rest" — 
That's all God as^s of you. 



SEALSKIN 

JACKETS 

To Order $125 And Up 

Artistic workmanship ud perfect fit anarant i 

Bemodellns;, repairing and dyeing at short ■ ■ 

POPULAR PRICES 

Siberian Fur Co. 

Incorporated 



Manufacturing 

AD. KOCOVR. Manager 
Formerly (ratter with Itevillon Freres, 

Paris, London. New York 

121 POST STREET, Rooms 7 to 11 

SAN FRANCISCO 



J p. LACAZE & Co. 

French Laundry Work Guaranteed 

The BEST in San Francisco 



TEL. 


EAST 615 829 SUTTER ST 


R. 


McCOLGAN 




REAL ESTATE and LOANS 




24 Montgomery St. S. F" 

Telephone Main 5516 



KENNEDY & CO.'S ART ROOMS 

No. 10 Post Street, Directly opposite Slime's 

Contain a. Latest and Swell Line of 

Creations for the Holidays 



| Mavis Consolidated Gold 
| and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of California. 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share for 
development purposes. The ore in sight is practically 
unlimited. When the present issue of stock is exhausted, 
the price will be ralseu to 50 cents a share. 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 Mar- 
ket street, for prospectus, which gives full information. 
VINCENT NBALE, Secretary. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1904. 




,^^/'^:V.i-l 



Insurance 



'sS^SHr^m 



■v » *•■» 



The remarks in last week's Insurance Department 
of the News Letter about the organization of the 
Special Agents' Association of the Northwest has 
been characterized as untimely and indiscreet, and 
the objectors are mainly members of the old' asso- 
ciation. The younger blood in both the managers' 
chairs and in the field, are ready either to fight or 
secede at the early annual meeting of the parent as- 
sociation, which is to be held on the 12th and 13th. 
It is safe to prophesv that the Special Agents will 
carry more than one point, and that the new asso- 
ciation will keep growing. 

* * * 

It seems that the News Letter is the only insur- 
ance journal in the city that had the courage to give 
the inside facts of the organization of the new asso- 
ciation, the so-called insurance journals up to this 
writing have been silent. It appears, after further in- 
vestigation, that the fight is not alone amongst the 
Specials, but that the real secessionists are a coterie 
of managers who desire to storm the Sumpter fort 
of the ring power which controls the Fire Underwrit- 
ers' Association, and fired their first shot by the or- 
ganization of their respective Specials into an inde- 
pendent body. 

These insurgents say the rule of the big five must 
be broken, and if not broken in California, the new 
organization will smash it in Oregon and Washing- 
ton. 

The News Letter is not taking up either side of the 
what has hitherto been a private fight, but since it 
has been the means of giving publicity to the affair. 
it is willing to give both sides of the story. 

If vou talk to some of the managers, there is noth- 
ing in the shape of friction ; the sand-paper element 
is eliminated, and conditions in the Association are 
as smooth as the surface of a mirror. Talk to the 
next lot, and they tell you that there will be some- 
thing doing at the annual meeting. 

* * * 

The row is loud and deep. It seems to be a care- 
fully well-laid plan to burst what is termed a ring, 
and the insurrectionists are matching their younger 
brains and diplomatic methods against the en- 
trenched power of the older men and managers, who 
for years have dictated the policy and practice of the 
old association. 

The outcome may create some feeling, but if it 
does, the finality will be a settlement of the smoulder- 
ing differences between the ins and outs, which has 
finally flashed up into the twinkling blaze of the new 
organization. 



To quote last week's News Letter: 
of two bodies?" 



'YVhv the need 



Mr. Stephen D. Ives, vice-president of the Home 
Fire and Marine Insurance Company, has been con- 
fined to his home for some days with an attack of 

La Grippe. 

* * * 

If there be any Special Agent whose manager is 
in San Francisco who is not in town, it is because he 
is adjusting or out of mileage. 



The Maryland Casualty Company of Baltimore 
has re-insured all of the Accident, Health and Plate 
< rlass business of the Union Casualty and Surety- 
Company throughout the United States, and thus 
added a large volume of business to that which it 
already had on its books. The Union Casualty and 
Surety Company has liquidated and is winding up its 
affairs as rapid!)' as possible. The Union's busi- 
ness in California is of a favorable character, and 
under the management of the Maryland's energetic 
president, can be relied upon to make a profit. The 
deal was made very quietly between President Stone 
of the Maryland and President Halls of the Union, 
not a breath of it getting to the public until New 
Year's day, when arrangements had been completed. 
and all the Union policyholders and the agents of 
both companies were officially notified of the change. 

The news came as a surprise, and the sudden, 
though not unexpected ending of the Union made a 
flurry in insurance circles on California street. 

In 1899, a similar re-insurance deal was effected be- 
tween the two companies, whereby the Maryland 
took over all of the Liability business of the Union. 

Among insurance men it is generally believed that 
the second coup would not have been so long defer- 
red had not the Union found that it took more time 
than they bargained for to settle the outstanding 
claims on their old Liability business. 

Just what the "consideration" paid amounted to in 
the recent deal is a matter of conjecture, but it is 
understood that the Maryland received a neat sum 
For extending its protection to the policyholders of 
the involved Union. 

These policyholders should congratulate them- 
selves upon having behind them the resources of the 
Maryland, a company with two and a half times the 
surplus of the Union. It is learned that it is the in- 
tention of the Maryland to push for a large business 
in all its lines. It is well-equipped for the effort. Its 
individual Health policy, the "Acme," is a popular 
favorite, and its "combination accident" policy is so 
liberal that it is the best of sellers. The office of the 
company's General Agent in the Hay wards Build- 
ing is a busy center just now in taking care of the 
excess business caused by the Union's re-insurance. 



The News Letter prophesies a change in the man- 
agement of a big life insurance company. The pres- 
ent incumbent has done well in the war of furnishing 
his offices, but failed in the way of furnishing busi- 
ness. The real active life man can get a chance now 
for a State agency of a life company, which, while 
not being one of the three giants, is a right close 
fourth. 

* * * 

D. Myers, one time president of the Manhattan 
Fire Insurance Company, which was known on Cali- 
fornia street for a brief time, has been acquitted by a 
jury in New York of the charge of larceny from the 
company of some $40,000. Another indictment hangs 
over him, and better luck is hoped for in the next 
trial. 

* * * 

Mr. Fred Bennion has been at the top of the list 
for four consecutive months as a producer of busi- 
ness for the Conservative Life. 

* * * 

Mr. Harry A. Hunsaker has been appointed 
manager for California for the Travelers Insurance 
Company, Mr, Haskell will remain with the com- 
pany. 



January 9. 1904. 



UNNECESSARY REMOVAL. 

Dr. H. A. L. RyfkogeU well known u a bacter- 
ia* written an exhaustive brochure on the 
ndition .>f Laurel Mill Cemetery." It 
should not have been necessary tn call in the aid "i 
■!tar\ expert of I >r. Ryfkogel's standing to prove 
a self-evident fact. Any one conversant with the con- 
dition of the soil, the situation above sea-level, the 
fact that there are no springs in the neighborhood, 
the water .if which is used for drinking purposes: 
that the cemetery is exposed to strong wind-., knows 
the impossibility of contagion or infection. 

The conditions of Laurel Hill Cemetery .ire en 
tirely different from most Uurial places. When 
a body is buried in a grave at Laurel Hill, ample 
space is left hclow for drainage and above for aera- 
tion, reduction and absorption of escaping gases. Re- 
peated visits were made to the cemetery for the pur- 
pose of detecting odors of putrefaction, hut at no 
time could any such be detected. 

Disinterment of bodies that have been buried from 
one month to twenty years were witnessed, and 
odors were only detected when the coffin was ex- 
posed. Decomposition in the sandy soil of the ceme- 
tery is usually complete in three years. 

To meet and refute the charge against Laurel Hill 
Cemetery, contained in the Preamble of said Ordi- 
nance, its Trustees have, at considerable expense. 
had a careful examination of the cemetery lands, its 
methods of burial and disinterment, its location and 
drainage, its soil and water, its atmosphere and pre- 
vailing winds, and obtained a full report thereon. 
The examination by the expert and his assistants ex- 
tended over a period of ten months, and they were 
upon the cemetery lands at all hours of day and 
night, and had full and free opportunity to make a 
thorough and unbiased examination. 

Altogether, Laurel Hill Cemetery is ideal, and, 
further than this, it cannot be said that there is any 
popular clamor for a change. The action of the Su- 
pervisors in passing Ordinance No. 25 is not above 
suspicion, and there are those who claim that some 
expert on "cinch" measures has picked out the Lau- 
rel Hill Cemetery people as proper prey. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. a? 

INSURANCE 
FIRE, MARINE AND. INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 



Phoenix Assurance Company 

OF LONDON 



PROVIDENCE WASHINGTON IN- 
SURANCE COMPANY 



GEO, E. BUTLER, Gen. Agt. 

413 CALIFORNIA ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized If 53 
Capital .*3,ooo,ooo- Gross C'uBh Assets .sn.3oo.ooo 

Liberal contracts, Favor.'ihle Terms. Conference with our Iteprp- 
sentatives before confhuliL^ shore time yeaily or long ume contracts 
may he to your advantage- 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent; GEO. SI. MITCHELL, Metropoli- 
tan Manager. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco 



Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,500,000 

Founded A. D. 17K. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADEI.rHIA. PENN. 

Paid-up Capital tt.OOO.ODO 

Surplus to Pollcy-lloldcrs 6]o22,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., 8. F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 173). 
Capital raid-up J3.44C.10O. Assets. J2t.6C043.36 

Surplus to Policy Holders, J8.33o.431.41. Losses Paid, over J13l.000.000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

PRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 601 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established I860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders. . 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 

Unexcelled Tor liberality and security, 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 



DON'T INSURE— Until you have examined the new 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy. 

Issued Exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 
Assets, $1,250,000. Insurance in force, $20,000,000 

For particulars address the company. Agents Wanted. 
Fair Building. 230 Montgomery Street. San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 



Capital 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 



J67,000,00O 

316 California St., S. F. 



The Thuringia Insurance Company 

OF ERFURT. GERMANY 

Capital $2,250,000 Assets $10,934,246 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St., San Francisco. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 
of Hamburg, Germany. 

N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January g, igo/j. 



STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION AND VALUE OF THE ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF 

THE HIBERNIA Savings and Loan Society 



A CORPORATION 



And Where Said Assets ire Situated, Dated December 31, 1903. 



ASSETS. 
1 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby 

secured, the actual value of which is $29,237,007.58 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows: They are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
are payable to it at its office, which is situ- 
ated at the corner of Market, McAllister and 
Jones streets, in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, and the pay- 
ment thereof is secured by First M'ortgages 
on Real Estate within this State 28,720,007.58 
And the States of Oregon ($242,000.00) and 
Washington $275,000.00). Said Promissory 
Notes are kept and held by said Corporation 
at its said Office, which is its principal place 
of business, and said Notes and debts are 
there situated. 
2 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 1,151,400.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts is as follows: They are ail existing Con- 
tracts, owned by said Corporation, and are 
payable to it at its Office, which is situated 
as aioresaid, and the payment thereof is se- 
cured by "Northern Railway Company of Cali- 
fornia First Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds." 
"Northern California Railway Company First 
Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds." "Pasadena and 
ML Lowe Railway Company of Los Angeles, 
California, 4 per cent Gold Bonds," "San 
Francisco and North Pacific Railway Com- 
pany First Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds." "San 
Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds." "Southern Pa- 
cific Branch Railway Company of California 6 
per cent Bonds," "Southern Pacific Company 
4% per cent Gold Bonds," "Sou. hern Pacific 
Railroad Company of Arizona First Mortgage 
6 per cent Bonds," 'Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company of California Series 'A' 6 per cent 
Bonds." "Southern Pacific Railroad Company 
of California Series 'F and G' 6 per cent 
Bonds." "Southern Pacific Railroad Company 
of California First Consolidated Mortgage 
Series A and B' 5 per cent Bonds." "Sierra 
Railway Company of California 6 per cent 
Bonds." "California Street Cable Railroad 
Company 5 per cent Bonds." "Market Street 
Railway Co. First Consolidated Mortgage 
5 per cent Gold Bonds." "Los Angeles Rail- 
way Company of California 5 per cent 
Bonds." "Los Angeles Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds," "Pacific Electric 
Railway Company of California 5 per cent 
Bonds." "Park and Cil! F'.tise Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent Bonds." "Powell Street 
Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds." "The 
Park and Ocean Railroad Company First 
Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds," "United Rail- 
roads of San Francisco 4 per cent Bonds,' 
"United States 3 per cent Bonds," "Contra 
Ccsta Water Company 5 per cent Gold 
Bonds," "Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar 
Company 5 per cent Gold Bonds," "Oakland 
Water Company 5 per cent Gold Bonds." "Pa- 
cific Light and Power Company of Los An- 
geles. California, 5 per cent Bonds," "Pacific 
Gas Improvement Company First Mortgage 

4 per cent bonds." "San Francisco Dry Dock 
Company 5 per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley 
Water Works First Mortgage I3 per cent 
Bjnds." "Spring Valley Water Works Second 
Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley 
Water Works Third Mortgage 4 per cent 
Bonds," "United Gas and Electric Company 

5 per cent Bonds." "Forty-two Shares of the 
Capital Stock of the Bank of California," and 
"One Hundred and Thirty Shares of the 
Capital Stock of the California Street Cable 



8,282,700.^6 



Railroad Company," the market value of all 
said Bonds and Stocks being ($1,451,759.50.) 
Said Notes are kept and held by said Corpora- 
tion at its said Office, and said Notes, Bonds 
and Stocks are there situated. 
3 — Bonds of the United States, the actual value 

of which is 19,176,933.67 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are 
kept and held by it in its own Vaults and are 
• there situated. They are "Registered 4 per 
cent of 1907 ($16,000,000.00) and 4 per cent 
of 1925 ($2,000,000.00) United States Bonds." 
and are payable only to the order of said Cor- 
poration. 
4 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of 

which is 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are kept 
and held by it in its own vaults, and are there 
situated. They are: 
"Market Street Cable Railway 
Company 6 per cent Bonds". .. .$1,121,000 00 
"Market-street Railway Company 
First Consolidated Mortgage 5 

per cent Bonds" 340,000 no 

"Sutter-street Railway Company 

5 per cent Bonds" 150,000 00 

"Powell-street Railway Company 

6 per cent Bonds" 158,000 00 

"The Omnibus Cable Company 6 
per cent Bonds" 

"Presidio and Ferries Railroad 
Company 6 per cent Bonds".. 
"Ferries and Cliff House Railway 
Company 6 per cent Bonds".. 
"Los Angeles Railway Company 
of California 5 per cent Bonds". 
"Pacific Electric Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds" 

"Northern Railway Company of 
California 6 per cent Bonds"... 
"San Francisco and North Pa- 
cific Railway Company 5 per 

cent Bonds" 

"Southern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany of California 6 per cent 

Bonds" 1.326,000 00 

"San Francisco and San Joaquin 
Valley Railway Company 5 per 

cent Bonds" 

"West Shore Railroad Company 
of New York 4 per cent Bonds" . . 
"Spring Valley Water Works 
First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 
"Spring Valley Water Works 
Second M'ortgage 4 per cent 

Bonds" 

"Spring Valley Water Works 
Third Mortgage 4 per cent 

Bonds" 1,020,000 00 

"Citv of San Luis Obispo 5 per 

cent Bonds" 18,000 24 

"The Merchants' Exchange 7 

per cent Bonds" 400,000 00 

"San Francisco Gas and Electric 

Company 4M> per cent Bonds".. 500,000 00 

5 — Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds Accrued to 

January 1. 1904 $324,686.77 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($391,420 95), and in 
the Counties of Santa Clara ($186,982.69), Ala- 
meda ($159,966 15) and San Mateo ($24.- 
630 23) in this State, the actual value of 

which is 

(b)— The Land and Building in which said 
Corporation keeps Its said office, the actual 
value of which is 

7_Proportion of Taxes for the Fiscal Year 1903- 



S2.ii 10 



26,000 00 



6,000 00 



145.000 00 



300.000 00 



.584.000 00 



f.V.MHHI III! 



111.000 00 
500.000 00 
123.000 00 

462.000 00 



763,000.02 



517,199.24 



January 9. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

1904 chargeable to next half year S3.649.92 

■ ht> condition "f said Una] Brtati la that 

il.l Corporation, and part "f It 

Is productive. 

8 — Cash In United States Gold and Silver Coin 

nelne ti> sal ! rorporatlon. and In It: 

MSSlon. and sltiiau-d at its said (Mil. ■ . m-itial 

ralno i.960.012.61 

Tot.i 61.466.590 27 

LIABILITIES. 
1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting 

to and the acmal value of Willi b l« $58,182,675.47 

The rendition of snid Deposit! is that the] 
an- payable only out of said nssels an. I 

fully secured thereby. 

2— Reserve Fund. S.CIUQ] Value 3,283.914.80 

Total Liabilities 61,466.590.27 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Bv JAMES R. KELLY, President 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By ROBERT .1. TOBIN. Secretary. 
State of California. Citv and County of San Francisco, ss, 

,1AM ES R. KELLY and ROBERT .T. TOBIN. being 
separately duly sworn, each for himself, says: Thai Bald 
JAMES R. KELLY is President, and that said ROBERT J. 

tobin is Secretary of the hibernia sayings and 

LOAN SOCIETY", the Corporation above mentioned, and that 
the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY. President. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 



NEWS LETTER. 



10 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of Janu- 
ary. 1904. 

GEORGE T. KNOX, Notary Public. 

In and for the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half rear ending December 31, 1903. a dividend has been de- 
elared at 1 he rate of three and twenty one hundredths (3.20) per cent 
iipr annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday 
Januarys 19m. GEORGE A. STOBY. Cashier. 

Office— 710 Market St. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

Has declared a dividend for the year ending December 31, 1003. of 5 
per ceut on ordinary deposits. 6 per cent on term deposits and 8 per 

cent to stockholder, free of taxes. • ,_ _ ., . 

DR. WASHINGTON DODGE. President. 
\VM. COHBIN, Sec. and Gen. Manager. 
Office— 301 California St., San Francisco- 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending December 31. 1903. dividends upon all de- 
posits at the rate of three and one-quarter (3 1-4) per cent per annum. 
Free of all taxes, will be payable on and after January i. 1904. 

FRED W- RAY Secretary. 
Office— M2 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the board of directors of this society, held 
this day. a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one- 
fourth (3 1-4) per cent on all deposits for the six months ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1903, free from all taxes, and payable on and alter January % 1904. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Office— Cor. Market, McAllister and Jones Sts.. San Francisco. De- 
c ember 28, 1903. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

Has declared a dividend for the term ending December si. 1903, at the 
rate of three and one-quarter (3 1-4) per cent per annum on all deposits 
free of taxes, and payable on aad after January % 1904. 

(Signed) CYRUS W. CARMANY. Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery St., cor- Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December, 1903. a 
dividend has been declared at the rate per annum of three and 
one-half (3 1-2) per cent on term deposits, and three (3) per cent 
on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Sat- 
urday, January 2, 1904. LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Office— 532 California St., cor. Webb, San Francisco. 

~ DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending December 31, 1903, dividends have 
been declared on deposits in the savings department of this 
company as follows: On term deposits at the rate of „ 6-10 per 
cent per annum, and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3 per 
cent per annum, free of taxes and payable on and after Satur- 
day January 2, 1904. Dividends uncalled for are added to the 
principal after January 1, 1904. DALZEljL BR0WN , Manager. 

Office—Corner California and Montgomery Sts. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



rftlV nillif n«v»«rii» nHla*. > '»iif"rni« anil 
IlKAl KKIIl M.mlKnmory St.. Sun Fmnrl.ro 

uumi IFIW.J. n Nrw ( , 1((h H , r „,., \,„ Ann-les 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



ARTISTIC PORTRAITURE 

Our beaqtlfal $13.00 Art Bromides v 
made ;ii $5.00 i--i doaen tor a short time 

U/ye Imperial Studio 

744 MARKET STREET 

Established 25 Years and Always &. Leader 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DKAI.RRS IN 

^-PAfS'R -a. 

TEL MAIN 198 - 55-57-f>9-61 FIKnT KT. SAN FRANCISCO 

Blake, Moffli A Towne. Lou A nireli>s Cat 
Blake McFall A Co.. Portland, Oregon. 



D„ L r*»r barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

nruSlltS milliard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 

makers, canners, dyers, flour mills, foundries, 

laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 

*hoe factories, a table men, lar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento St, S. P., Tel. /lain 561 I 



Our Ho It day Suggestion 

is that you present yourself as well as your friends with a case, 
containing 12 quart bottles of our pure rich 10 year old California 
Wines, all of one kind. or a selection of Port, Sherry. Angelica 
Muscat, Tokay, ZinfandW. Burgundy, Eiesling and Sauterne. 

Price $5.00- Shipped free within ion miles- 

RATHJEN WINE COMPANY. " ^^K &£ m 



Mantle (<SL Son, Inc. 

Haberdashers 

And Dealers In Men's Hign Class Furnishing Goods 

10 Stockton St.. San Franclsoo. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS- CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

GUllngham Cement 

Market Street* cor. Fremont St 



S>\ NG FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but one 
price. All goods marked in plain English figures. 

614 DUPQNT STREET, S. F. Next to St. Mary's Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND ' 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Franelseo. Tel. No. 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves) 

Young Physician (excitedly) — 
How did you know about me? 
Messenger — Rang all the doctors' 
bells till I found one at home. 

Stella — Cholly hasn't any origi- 
nality. Bella — Not the slightest. 
Why, I submitted his love letters 
to three publishers and they all 
refused them. 

"Is it possible, Miss, that you 
do not know the names of your 
best friends?" "Possible? Why, of 
course it is. I do not even know 
what my own name may be a 
year or so hence." 

Inspector — What do you see 
above your head when you are in 
the open air? Scholar — The sky. 
Inspector — And what do you see 
when the sky is covered with 
clouds? Scholar — My umbrella. 

"Didn't I order two portions ol 
chicken, waiter? " "Yes, sir." 
"Then why is there only one cock- 
roach ?" 

Deacon Jones — Did Mr. Skrim- 
per say anything about a donation 
for the cause? Deacon Brown — ■ 
Oh, yes, he talked beautifully 
about it. Deacon Jones — It is 
almost as gratifying to hear 



Brother Skrimper talk about the 
duty of doing a thing as to have 
him do it. Deacon Brown — I have 
sometimes thought that to him it 
is an even greater pleasure. 

"I owe my success in life to hard 
work," said the great magnate. 
But he neglected to add that it 
was largely the hard work of other 
people. 

The Parson — Dis am mos' posi- 
tively de mos' 'streemly juiciest 
chicking I eber put in mah mouth, 
Brer Jackson. Brer Jackson — 
Yes, sah, pahson ; dat chicking 
wuz raised an' brung up on water- 
millions, sah. 

"Gracious," sighed Mr. De Spep- 
sey, "I wish I could acquire an ap- 
petite." "For goodness sake!" ex- 
claimed his wife, "what do you 
want with an appetite? It would 
only give you more dyspepsia." 

Bracer (tentatively) — No, We's 
hard. Now, with a good friend 
like you it's different. If, for in- 
stance, I should tell you I needed 
a dollar, I know I'd be welcome to 
it. Newitt — Well-er-I don't know 
that you'd be as welcome to it as 
it would be welcome to you. 

Lucile — Were you not embar- 
rassed when young Dr. Jones 
asked you for your hand? Ethel — 



January 9, 1904. 

Bad grocer 
confesses his 
badness by sell- 
ing bad lamp- 
chimneys. 

Macbeth. 

You need to know how to manage your 
lamps to have comfort with them at small cost. 
Better read my Index; I send it free. 

Macbeth, Pittsburgh. 

Dear me, yes! I hardly knew 
whether he wanted to take me or 
my pulse. 

"Doesn't that cook scare you 
when he looks this way?" asked 
the Belgian hare of the young 
chicken. "No," replied the Broiler, 
"but later on I have no doubt he 
will make me quail." 

"Isn't that young Mr. Cleriker 
a clever talker, Laura?" "Do you 
think so, dear! I couldn't help 



w 



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cisco 5.25 p. m. Get full ir>formation arjd tickets at 613 Market Street 

SOX/THB'RM PACIFIC 



=dS 



January 9, 1904. 




overhearing a part of what he said 
last night, and it struck me a-* 
being idiotic." "If you overheard 
what he was saying last night 
then you know that he was prais- 
ing mc." "Well, yes, dear, I gath- 
ered as much." 

Willie — Mamma, I told Aunt 
Helen she grew homelier each day. 
Mrs. Slimson — You didn't tell her 
1 said so, did you? "I had to or 
she would have whipped me." 

"I wonder why Katherine wears 
three veils wrapped around her 
hat and none over her face?" "You 
wouldn't ask if you saw the hat. 
She trimmed it herself." 

Mother — Why don't you behave 
better to your teacher? Tommy — 
Why, I'm as kind to her as I can 
be. Mother — You are ? Tommy — 
Yes'm. Every time she licks me I 
cry out as loud as I kin so's to 
make her believe she's hurtin' me. 
A 




ERIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block- 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



Illinois Central Railroad 

Tickets to all points in the 

United States and Europe 

W. H. Snedaker, Gen. Agt. 

639 Market St. Palace Hotel Bldg. 



B OOO It REASONS: —Best materials. Moat 
I skillfully put together. Strongest, simplest, 
I eosieaL.eveneat. Nevertearsthe shade. Improved 



HARTSHORN 

None centime without 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

PARABLES IN SLANG. 

A very discriminating and ■ 
cal professor at Harvard hat 
cided that slang is pernicious 
"onlj whin it is used \>> pose vul 
garity." For example, we ma 
sumc, when an English girl 
Mirrs ln-r Canadian sister thai she 
bats in her belfry," she is 
uMti!,' language at once "strong 
and poetic." Certainly ii is 
vulgar i" have bats in one's belfry, 
' « e should think it would 
be very unpleasant. The pr> >tVs 
sor warmly commends such ex 
pressions as the glad hand and the 
marble heart, and asserts that if 
such phrases had been used in the 
story of the prodigal son, the lit- 
erature of the Bible would have 
been even more highly commend- 
ed. Let us see how the conclusion 
of the parable would have been 
touched up in up-to-date English, 
according to the latest approved 
Harvard methods : 

"But the father said to his ser- 
vants: Bring forth the glad rags 
and put them on, and put a spark- 
ler on his hand and shoes on his 
feet. 

"And hustle up that fatted calf 
and kill it, and let us feed our faces 
and have a jamboree." 

As for the "elder son," he might 
have been pithily disposed of. We 
may picture him standing moodily 
in the background ejaculating 
"Rats!" 

"I don't know now exactly how 
it happened," Reggie was telling 
his best friend over a game of 
billiards. "I never meant to pro- 
pose, you know — that is, not just 
yet. I wanted to knock about a 
little more. But after we got 
home from the 'theatre and sat in 
the parlor discussing the plot of 
the play I ventured out on thin 
ice and broke through before I 
knew where I was. It came as a 
deuce of a shock, just as I should 
imagine breaking through real ice 
would be. 

"But Jessie was all ready for 
me. She was expecting it. First 
thing I knew she had me by the 
collar and 'landed me on safe 
ground again, but I was engaged. 
No doubt about that. Anyhow, I 
am glad I've got her. Might haye 
lost her. through some slip if I'd 
waited. But I don't want to read 
any more stuff about bashful fel- 
lows stammering out! proposals. 
It's all too easy" 



3« 



The 

Adjustable Beck 
0/ the 

PRESIDENT 
Suspender 

I overcomes every | 

I objection of the 

I ordinary suspender | 

111001 « rati 

111 LRASTI 

Mrt.l trimming* cannot I 
- . any shop, or I 

l>7 mail. ' 

I. ITiCalTtl UPC. (0.. 
R.i!ll. Shirk). Ian. 



Yeast — Did you ever notice 
that when the question about 
obeying is put to women in the 
marriage ceremony sumc of them 
answer louder than others? Crim- 
sonbeak — Oh, yes; I've noticed it. 
The ones who say "Yes" the loud- 
est are the ones who know their 
husbands will never dare to ask 
them to obev. 



S0Z0D0NT 

Pretty Teeth In a Good Mouth 

are like jewels well set. Our best mea 
and women have mode Sozodont the 

Standard. 

BE ST as, TEETH 

iStylisMIC- 50 ! 
Suits ■* 1 

Dressy Suits $20 | 

Pants $4.50 § 

My $25.00 Suits are thej§ 

best in America. s| 

«| I" Per Cent Saved by get-g 

Z ting your suit made byg 

JOE POHEIM £ 

THE lallOR g 

1110-1112 Market St 5 
201-203 Montg'y St., S. F.g 




opium; 



■ Fhade Roller. 

I Liie Bignaiure 



i Morphine and Liquor 

Habits Cured Sanatorium 
I Established 1875 Thou- 
sands having failed else- 
where have been cured by us. Treatmet can be 
taken »t home Write 'he Or. I Stephens. Co 
oeot 7ft l «nannn. Ohio. 

ATHLETES 

TO KEEP IN GOOD TRIM 
MUST LOOK WELL TO THE 
CONDITION OF THE SKIN. 
TO THIS END THE BATH 
SHOULD BE TAKEN WITH 

HAND 

SAPOLIO 

All Grocers and Druggists 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 9, 1904. 



An evening paper stated last 
week that some years ago a "Tory 
orator" attacking a speech of Mr. 
Chamberlain's, "repelled the alle- 
gation and scorned the alligator." 
This slip was really made some 70 
years ago in the House of Com- 
mons by Joseph Hume. There is 
something marvelous in the ef- 
frontery with which such vener- 
able anecdotes are now raked up 
and presented to the credulous 
public with a new dressing. 



John C. Sheehan employs a large 
number of laborers. Most of his 
foremen are Irishmen, but the un- 
derlings embrace men of all nation- 
alities. The other dav one of the 
foremen had use for a maul on a 
certain piece of work. He said to 
a green Irish laborer who was 
near: "Go up where that other 
gang is working and bring the 
maul." In a few minutes the Irish- 
man returned with about twenty- 
five laborers. "What did you bring 
these men here for?" asked the 
foreman. "Sure, you told me to 
bring 'thim all' and I brought ivery 
mother's son of thim I could find, ' 
was the reply. 



"Yes," asserted the admirer, 
"she is an advanced woman. She 
is a credit to the age. None of the 
fads and foibles of latter day fe- 
males attract her. Why, she is 
head and shoulders above dresses 
and bonnets and matinees, and all 
that sort of thing." "I don't know 
about the bonnets and matinees, 
but I saw her last night at the thea- 
tre and she was head and shoulders 
above her dress, just as you claim." 

O. R. & N. CO. 

The Only Steamship Line to 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

And abort Rail Line From Portland to All Poliii. 
Ka.t Tbrooeti Tlok»» to al' Polntt. all Rail or 
Stramahlp and Rail, at LOWEST RATES 

Steamrr Ticket* Include Rertb ai,d Meala 

88 COLOMBIA Salli Jan 8tb. 19tb, !8lb Ffb 

7tb. 17tb 27th March 9th. 

88 GEO W ELDER Sal'a Jan. 8rd. 13th JSrd 
Feb 2nd '2tb 22nd March 4th 

Steamer aalla from foot of Spear St.. 11 a ic 

Why Don't You 

Travel by Sea? 

Special vacation and Short 

Tourist Excursion Trips 
Excellent Service, low Rates Including 

Berth and Meals 

Loa Aneelei", San Dleeo, Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara, Monterey 

Eurea-a Seattle, Tacoma. 

Victoria, Vancouver, eto. 

And to those deslrlne longer, trips to Alaska 
and Mexico* 

For Information regarding sailing dates, etc 
obtain folder 
SAN rRANCISCu TICKET OFFICES 
4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St.. and Broadway vt harres. 

C. D. DUNANN, General Pass. Aeent. 
10 Market street. San Franotso 




SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

TraiiiH leave mitl are due t .. itrri ve at 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Main Line. Koot of Market Street > 

LBAVK — FKuM DttCEMHKIi M. V.'OS. — A Kit I V K 

7.00a V'iCHVllUr. Wiiilern. Kuni*e>' 75 a p" 

7-OJa Renlcla, Sulsuu. Elinlra and Sacra- 
mento 7.25p 

7.30a Vallejo. Napa. t'Hllfiton-i, Ssxta 

I.-.M.. Martinez, San .{union b 25 1 - 

7-30a NlleB, Llverinore, Tracy, Latnrop. 

Stockton 7 25p 

8.00a Shasta ExpreBH— (Via Din-In,, 
Wltllaim (lor Barilett Sprlutfs), 
Wlllowe tKruto. Bed lUuff. 

Portland, Tacuuia, Seattle 7-55p 

8.00a Davis. Woodland. KdIkIub La .ding, 

MaryBVtllc. Orovllle 7-55P 

8.30a Port ..-fin, Martinez, Amlocb, 
ByroD, Tracy. Stockton. New- 
man. Los Banos, Mendota, 
ArmoDli, Hanford V I ■ a 1 1 a, 

Portervlllc 4.25p 

8-30* Port Costa. Martinez. Tracy, Latn- 
rop. Modesto, Merced. Fresno, 
i , ■.■■ii"n Junction, liau ro rd, 

Vlsalla Bakerstlcld 4.55* 

8.30a KMcb. San .lose, Llvurmore. Stock- 
ton, (tMlltuu), lorn-, Sacramento, 
Placervllle Marysvllle, Cblco, 

Red BlufT 4-25p 

8.30a Oakdate. Chinese, Jamestown, 8o- 

norn. Tuolumne and Ann.' In 4 25 P 

9 00a Atlantic Kxpress— Ogdenand But. 11.25a 
9.30a Richmond, Martlm-z mid Way 

Stations 655p 

1000a The Overland Limited — Ogden. 

Denver. Omaha. Chicago G.25P 

10.00a Vallejo 12.25P 

10.00a Los Angelas Passenger — Port 
Costa. Martinez. Byron. Tracy, 
Latnrop. Stockton. Merced, 
Raymond, Fresno, GoBhcn .Junc- 
tion. Hanford. Letnoore, Vlsalla. 

Bakersfleld. Los Annelea 725'* 

1200m Hayward, Nlles and Way Stations. 3 25p 

tl-OOP Sacrnmeoto Blver Steamers M 1 .00p 

3-301' Benhda, Winters. Sacramento. 
Woodland, Knights Landing, 
M ary b v 1 1 1 e, O ru v 1 1 1 e and w ay 

stations 10-55 a 

3.30p Hay ward. Nlles and Way Stations.. 765P 
3 30c Port Costa, Martinez Myron, 

Tracy, Latnrop. Modesto. 
Merced, Fresno and Way Sta- 
tions beyond Port Uosta 1225p 

3.30p Manlnez.Tracy. Stockton. Lodl... 10.25a 
4-OOp Marilnez.Snn Ramon, VnlleJo.Napa, 

CallBtoga, Sun In Rosa 925 a 

400p Nlles, Tracy. Stockton, Lodl 4.25p 

4,3Dp Hayward. Nlles, Iritntflou. Sanj 18.B5a 

Jose. Llverinore ) til 66* 

6.00p The Owl Limited— Newm n Los 
lUmirv \liiii|niu Fre«no. I ulare. 
Bakers deld. Lob Angeles 
Golden State Limited Sleeper, 
Oakland to Los Angele», for Chi- 
cago, via C. R I &P 8.55* 

6.00r Port Coata. Tracy. Stockton 122 jp 

t6 30p Hayward. N1Icb and San Jo«e 725* 

6.00i' Hayward, Nlles and San -lose 9.j6* 

6.00p Eastern ExpreBH— Ogden. Denver, 
Omaha, St. Louis. Cbleago and 
East. Port Co^ta, Bcnlcta. Sul- 
'■uri Elinlra, Davis. Sacramento, 
Rock 1 1 o. Auburn, Colfax, 
Truckec, Bocn, Reno, Wade- 
worth, Wlnnemucca . 6.25p 

8.00p Vallejo dally, except Sunday..., I - -».- 

7-OOp Vallejo, Sunday only f ' 6oP 

7.00p lilebmund. ->au Pablo. Port Costa, 

Martinez and Way Stations 11.25* 

8.06p Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
ramento, Marysvllle, Redding, 
Portland, Paget Sound and Bait. 8-55* 
8.10P Hayward, Nile* and San Jose < mjii- 
, day only i 11.66* 



COAST LINE (Narrow (iausreJ 

Fool o f Ma rket s t reet) 

8-15* Newark, CettlervlIIe, San Jobo. 
Felton, Bouluur Creek, Santa 

Cruz and Way Stations 5-55p 

t2-15»' Newark, Ceuterville, San Jobb, 
New Almaden. Los Gal.o&.F'elton. 
Boulder Creek, Sanra Cruz and 

Principal Way Station- 1 1 55* 

< 16p Newark. San Jose, LosOatos and 1 tg.BS * 
Way stHtlonB 1 :10 55a 

09 30p HunterB Train, Saturday only, San 
JoBe nnd Way Stations. Rcturn- 
Ing from Lqh f.ntr.s Siin'iny only. t7 25p 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

rroniSAIs FRANCISCO, Fool ol Market St. (Sllpo 

-t1:15 y-.vo 11:UUa.m. 100 3 00 5.1&P.M 

trom OAKLAND. Foot of Broadway— ftiiWl fi:»i 

18:03 10:011 a.m. 12 00 200 400p.m. 

COAST LINE (Hroail Hange). 

t&~ ' I'blrd ami t'mTiiHCiid StreetB.) 

8 10a BanJOBeand Way Stations 6 3 Op 

7 00a San Jo»c and Way Stations 5-36p 

8 00* New Almaden (Tues., Frld., only), 4.1Qp 
8 00a The Coaster— Stops only Sar Jose, 

Gllroy (connection for Hoi lis- 
ter), Pajaro, Castrovllle (con- 
aectton to and from Monterey 
and I'm ID'' Grove), Snllnas San 
Ardo, Paso Rolileh Santa Mar- 
garlra. San LuIh OblBpo. prluclpal 
stations thence Surf (connection 
for Lornpoc). prlnct|ial -lutlimn 
thence Santa Bar barn. Sun Muena- 
venitira. SauKus Lob Angeles.,, 10. 45^ 
9.00a San .Iobc Tres Plnos, Caidtola, 
Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Salinas, 
San Lille Obispo and Principal 
Way StatlonM 4-1 Op 

10 30a tan Jose and Way StalloiiB 120p 

11 30* Santa Clara, ban Jose, l.."- Gatos 
and Why atai Ion* 7.30p 

1-30p ban Jose and Way Stations 8.j6* 

OXOp Del Monie JCxpreas— Smiia Clara, 
San Jope. Del Monie. Monterey, 
pRdlle Grove (connects at Santa 
Clam lur Sanla Crnz. Boulder 
Creek and Narrow Gauge Points) 
at Gllroy tor Hullleter, Tres 
Plnon. at Castrovllle for Snllnas. 12-15P 

3-30p TresPlrmsWav Passenger lOd'iA 

4 30p nan Joae and Way St itlona ta.OO* 

t5 00 ban Josv. (via Santa Clara) Los 
Gatus. and Principal Way Sta- 
tions fexcepi Runday) .. i-9.00a 

t 30i ban Jose and Principal Way Stations jg 40* 
6-COp bnnsei Limited.— Redwp d. San 
JoHL-.Gllroy.sallnns, Paso Roliles, 
Sao Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles. Homing. El Paao, 
New OrlennR. New Vork. Con- 
ner!- at Pajaro for Santa Critt 
and at Castrovllle. for Pacific 

Grove and Way Stations 7 10* 

t8 16* ban Mateo.Bere8ford.ltelm.ini. San 

CarloB. Id'ilw 1. Fair Oaks. 

Men lo Park. Pal" Alto t6-43* 

6 ?fi San Jose and Way Stations 6 38* 

9-OOp Palo Alto and Way Stations 1J.1&A 

11 30i* SuUtfa miii Francisco. Mllll>rae. Bur- 
llugatiie. San Mateo, Belmon' 
San Carlos. Redwood, Fslr Oaks, 

Menlo Park and Palo Alio 9.45p 

o11-30p Maylleld. Mountain View, sunny- 
vale. Lawrenie. Santa Clara and 

S»n Jose , .... 19.45P 

A foi Morning P for Afternoon. 

1 Sunday excepted X Mioday only 

a Saturday only 

i bto|> B at all statlonB on Sunday. 
I* Only trains slopping at Valencia St.sourhhoand 
rtr- HI a.m., 7:00a.m., I1:3Ua.m., 3:30 1'.M., 6:30 p.m. and 

8:00 p.m. 

ID. UMO*. lit ANSI- Hi; COM I' A XI 
■ Ml cab tor and i be. k nnggage from tiotela and resl 
^ences. Telephone. eJxcbanire s!3. Inquire of Ticket 



"Hasn't the baby bad the mea- 
sles yet, Air. Popps?" "Sh-sli ! 
Don't speak so loud. Whenever 
lie hears anything mentioned that 
he hasn't got he cries for it!" 

"Say, pa/' queried little Billy 
Bloobumper, "what's an echo?" 
"An echo, my son," replied the old 
man with a sigh long drawn out, 
"is the only thing that can flim- 
flam a woman out of the last 
word." 



The Lady — T gave you a piece 
of pie last week, and you've been 
sending your friends here ever 
since. The Tramp — You're mis- 
taken, lady. Them was my ene- 
mies. 



Miss Youngbud — Did you enjoy 
the play? Miss Elderlcigh — Yes, 
indeed — especially the third act. 
Miss Youngbud — Oh, yes, that 
was the act in which the heroine 
told how she induced her husband 
to propose. 



"Yes," said the sharper who had 
just succeeded in obtaining change 
for a bad ten-dollar bill from a 
guileless old clergyman, "if there's 
anything I like it's pastoral sim- 
plicity." 



Crabshaw — Miss Purseproud 
has taken up philanthropy. Craw- 
ford — Does she really associate 
with the poor? Crabshaw — Well, 
of course she draws the line at her 
poor relations. 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Wa "f„ n fe d are 

Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post St., San Francisco 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 



ESTABLISHED JULY jo. 1856. 



Annual Subscription. $4.00 




News-Better 

(JMifornia jkbbtxtiscx. 




VoL LXIII 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 16. 1904. 



Number 3. 



NEWS LETTER la printed and published 
urday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott, i 
ulMinit. 32i> 8sJisome street. Ban Francisco, Cal. 

Francisco Postofflce as second-class matter. 
■<where Indimiailnn may be obtained regarding 
nd advertising!— 3K> Broadway, C. C, Murphy. 



Int 
LB 
Th 



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Mil Office— U. w. Barber, 7ir> Exchange Minding. 
social items, announcements, advertising or other matter 

for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
TTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m. 
ursday previous to day of Issue. 



So Patti and Langtry bad a quarrel. At their age, 



Soon after the House Committee on Contested 

Elections gets to work, it will be Kahngressinan 
Kahn again. 

Bryan is home again, and the Eastern press re- 
cords the interesting fact that highwater mark on 
the Atlantic seaboard is no higher than usual. 

Panama's unit coin, the 50 cent piece, is made of 
tin alloy and is worth 16 cents in gold — and the peo- 
ple are cheaper than their money. 

Picture cards and candy are used to lure Indiana 
people into revival meetings. It will need more at- 
tractive bait than that to catch grown-up sinners. 

Only wicked and abandoned men will preface a 
spicy story with 'Here's one that comes from the 
Papyrus Club." 

Tar and feathers, liberally applied by an outraged 
Oregon community, turned the leaders of the "Holy 
Rollers" into pickers and scrapers. 

What matters it whether Joan of Arc was French 
or Italian? Saintship has nothing to do with citizen- 
ship. 

While the Government is shooting live dogs out 
of torpedo tubes from its submarines, permit us to 
suggest that the men responsible for the Chicago 
theatre fire are still on earth. 

Kentuckians are exercised over what they think is 
a young volcano blowing chunks out of Sugar Loaf 
Mountain. "Moonshine" will make a man see more 
alarming things than that. 

Max Nordeau, who is a specialist in the matter of 
national consciences, sees dark days ahead for the 
United States. Did somebody sell the venerable 
philosopher a block of U. S. Steel, Common? 

The Housemaids' Union of Orange, N. Y., does not 
ask much — only eight hours' work a day, Sundays 
off, and a half holiday Thursday, use of the parlor 
three nights a week, and use of the piano at all times. 
The family may be permitted to receive company in 
the basement and get its music from a phonograph. 



J. S. Parry, we learn, has pui $5,000 int" a San 
Jose hotel project. If this be our Parry, it might 
be pertinent to inquire what was the matter with the 
colt-peddling industry. 

Out of 70 violent deaths in San Francisco during 
December, ij omplished 

tal and 5 suicidal. Very well might the monopoly's 

poisonous product be called "The Silent Slayer." 

Mr. Hearst, learning that the Democrats of Massa- 
chusetts wanted Olnev [or their standard-bearer, 

threw tits in all of his newspapers, shrieking treason 
through the foam on his lips. 



His Holiness, Pius X, says his remark to the dean 
of the diplomatic corps about not admitting to the 
Vatican women in low-cut gowns, was largely' a 
jest. Even Popes do not care to dictate what mila.li 
shall or shall not wear. 



"Prince Cupid of Hawaii," whose real name sounds 
worse than it looks, spent a night in jail at Washing- 
ton trying to convince the police that, as a delegate 
to Congress, he was exempt from arrest. Not "Prince 
Cupid" hereafter, if you please, but "Prince Stupid." 

Here are the women of France offering us a bust 
of Washington and the Germans grumbling because 
we are a little slow in accepting the Kaiser's gift of 
a statue of Frederick the Great. Speak up, Russia 
and Japan. 

A German editor is doing three months in jail for 
saying that the Kaiser's sole function was to draw 
$10,000 every time he signed a law. What an evil 
day it will be for the press of the Fatherland when 
the Emperor hires him a mind reader ! 

A Federal court has decided that Stratcon's Inde- 
pendence mine at Cripple Creek was not "salted" be- 
fore it was sold to an English syndicate. The in- 
vestors, however, still suffer from that briny taste 
in the mouth. 



Missouri is all puffed up over the fact that she 
stands first as a careful steward in handling public 
money last year, having a postoffice shortage of only 
$10.31. In our last war Missouri was proud of her 
lone white mule. 



A Portland paper has a touching article about "the 
evening grosbecks, the pretty little birds which usu- 
ally visit this city during the winter." That's noth- 
ing. Every winter, especially when there's racing, 
a lot of birds visit us — jailbirds. 

William Randolph Hearst, having devoted much 
time and type to pointing out his own likeness to 
Andrew Jackson, now disinterestedly advises the 
American people to choose as President that one of 
themselves who most resembles Jackson. Whom can 
Mr. Hearst mean? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 



THE NEW CITY ADMINISTRATION. 

Less than ten days of our new city administration 
have passed and already the Mayor whom, in our 
inscrutable folly, we re-elected to the headship of 
the municipality, is defending himself against a 
Board of Supervisors whose first official act was to 
notify him and the public that there would be no 
more charter-smashing, no more "grafting" in the 
Mayor's office. And already Schmitz is in a bad way. 
His attempt to fill the Health Department with his 
henchmen, calling the move "re-organization for the 
sake of economy," is likely to cost him dear in politi- 
cal prestige. The Supervisors took prompt cogni- 
zance of the charter violations involved in this greedy 
grab for patronage, and followed up a vigorous de- 
nunciation by an order for an investigation, which 
the Civil Service "Board was not slow to obey. At the 
same time the Supervisors adopted a report which 
virtually convicted one of the Mayor's pets, the. 
Pound Keeper, of out-and-out crookedness, and then 
rode at a hand-gallop over his veto and took away 
from him the Public Pound, which had long been 
for him and his following a prolific source of dirty 
money. Schmitz had, perforce, to sit in his high 
place as presiding officer of the Board while all this 
was doing. He lost his head and his temper, and 
through his whiskers shouted "Liar!" but to no avail. 

And this is but the prelude. The Supervisors may 
or may not be acting wholly with a view to protect- 
ing the city from the rapacity of Schmitz, but, at 
all events, the public will accept the result and ask- 
no questions about the means. For, in truth, the 
Supervisors and nobody else can saddle and bridle 
the city's broncho of a Mayor. The charter which 
he professes to revere and proceeds to reverse, borne 
out by the reasoning and ruling of the Supreme Court 
gives him power ample enough to please the most 
extreme advocate of one-man authority in munici- 
pal Government. The Mayor has shown no delicate 
hesitancy about using that power. For political pur- 
poses he may truckle to organized labor, but in real- 
ity the unionism which he practices is based on a 
union of which he is all the officers and all the mem- 
bers as well. Save for such checks as the Super- 
visors may put upon him, he may do pretty much as 
he pleases for the next two years. 

And the strength of the Supervisors in this issue 
is at once simple and irresistible. It has no hand 
theoretically in the spending of the city's money, and 
yet it has the first and the last word in making the 
appropriations. Early among the effects of that 
strength, applied in the right place, will be, we pre- 
dict, a- transfer of allegiance in the Commissioners 
from the Mayor to the Money-voting council, since 
without money no man and no Board will try to do 
the city's business. It will not be long, we repeat, 
before the Mayor, having filled all his places, will be 
able to devote most of his time to curling his beard 
and rehearsing the speeches that his able attorney, 
Ruef, writes for his public appearances. 

CONCERNS SAN FRANCISCO MOST OF ALL. 
How much does San Francisco, or indeed any 
American city, profit by the annexation of the Phil- 
ippine Archipelago to the United States? The ques- 
tion is pertinent because this country is spending 
good money and sacrificing the lives of many of its 
people to hold these islands. The query is not pro- 
pounded at this time because any objection is made 
to the policy of expansion, but because it seems we 
are neglecting to secure such benefits as ought to 



United States is getting trade with the Philippines 
amounting to about 50 cents per head of the popula- 
tion of the island, and the reason why it is not more 
is that we have built a tariff wall around our new 
possessions that makes of them a foreign country. 
We are putting ourselves to all the expense of admin- 
istration, defense and policing of the islands, and at 
the same time we shut ourselves out from the ad- 
vantages and profit that ought to flow from the in- 
vestment of the national funds. 

This is the most ridiculous policy that could well 
be devised. We have given to Porto Rico free trade 
with the United States, and the result was that our 
business with that island at once jumped to $15 a 
head of the population. We have given Cuba import- 
ant tariff concessions, and the same results are sure 
to follow. But the Philippines are left to stay out 
in the cold, and San Francisco is the greatest suf- 
ferer from these unreasonable restrictions on trade. 

Now, this is a most important matter for consid- 
eration of all the Pacific Coast delegations in Con- 
gress. Oregon, Washington and California are all 
interested equally in creating the trade with the 
Philippines that properly belongs to us. It is a 
matter for united action, and a statement of the case 
should carry conviction. We do not doubt that 
Congress will act in this regard, and follow the 
precedents established for Cuba, Hawaii and Porto 
Rico the moment that a united demand comes from 
the Pacific Coast for a more enlightened policy, es- 
tablishing more liberal relations with a territory of 
such vast potentialities. 



THE SUPERVISORS' DREAM. 

The memorial addressed by the San Francisco 
Board of Supervisors to Congress, asking for water 
rights on the Tuolumne river in the Yosemite Park, 
is based on a falsehood. The assumption on which 
the whole process of reasoning rests is contained in 
the following paragraph : "Whereas it has become 
manifest that the water supply of this city must 
sooner or later be increased by the addition of a sup- 
ply from the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the se- 
curing of this supply should not be delayed." 

In what way have these facts been made manifest? 
If any such demonstration has ever been made, the 
people of San Francisco have never been advised of 
it. What does "sooner or later" mean? 

As a matter of fact, every householder in the city 
knows that the present water supply is good and suf- 
ficient. The Supervisors know, because it has been 
proved to them and their engineers that the Spring 
Valley Water Company has made provision to in- 
crease the existing supply so that when occasion 
arises there will be sufficient for all the needs of 
2,000,000 people. The Calaveras Valley watershed 
in Alameda County comprises 600 square miles. 
The water from that source is of equal quality with 
any to be found in the Sierra. It comes into the 
reservoirs filtered through gravel — cleansed and puri- 
fied in Nature's filter. This source of supply is close 
at hand and materially lessens the chances of failure, 
owing to the bursting of pipes carrying the supply 
more than two hundred miles under heavy pressure, 
as must be the case if brought from the Tuolumne. 

Congress is petitioned by the Supervisors to set 
aside the ruling of the Secretary of the Interior re- 
fusing to grant water rights in the National Park 
to the city of San Francisco. For many reasons that 
ruling of Secretary Hitchcock is wise, and the Super- 
visors in their memorial failed to meet his reasoning. 



flow from that policy. 

Under the present system of administration theln fact, Congress is petitioned to act on vague and 



January i6. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



• or latci 
allcK iual examination demon- 

be false 

There is another and a higher reason why ■ 
should refuse the petition. The water of the 
utnne is needed for a more beneficial use than 
hich San Francisco can put it. Half a m 
acres of semi-arid but fertile land in the San Joaquin 
Valley are dependent on the Tuolumne river supply 
for their development. That land is worth compara- 
tively little in its present condition. Under a pro ier 
irrigation system its value will increase at least ten- 
fold, and twenty acres will support a family in com- 
fort where now they find it difficult to scratch a liv- 
ing on 300. 

The scheme contemplated by the Supervisors calls 
for the investment of at least $50,000,000. Engineers 
estimates may be something less, but the city would 
be fortunate if that sum were not exceeded. It is 
therefore proposed to duplicate without improving 
the present supply at a cost greater than the Spring 
Valley Water Works has invested. That would be 
a criminal waste of capital to which a practical peo- 
ple like the citizens of San Francisco will never 
give their consent. 

The whole scheme is politics — a political dream 
of half-baked socialists and fanatics working in com- 
bination with others who have axes to grind or pri- 
vate revenges to satisfy. 

NOTHING WILL GET AWAY. 

Mayor Schmitz announced with a flourish of trum- 
pets that he meant to reduce current expenses of the 
Board of Health by $30,000 a year. The manner in 
which this promise was carried out offers an instruc- 
tive example of present administration methods, and 
based on the theory that the people are all fools. 
Schmitz has simply cut off $2,500 a month in one 
place — that makes $30,000 a year — and has added 
$1,800 a month in another. If there has been any 
saving whatever it is only the difference between 
$1,800 and $2,500 a month. But when the end of the 
fiscal year comes it will be found that the appropria- 
tion is exhausted, just the same, to the last dollar. 
If the Mayor allows anything to get away it must be 
like the razor-backed hog of the South — able to out- 
run a nigger. 

LONG-RANGE "AUDITING." 
As the daylight filters into the dark and dusty 
places in the management of the State University, 
matters grow less and less pleasant for the gentlemen 
and others concerned. It is apparent that "pull" and 
politics have played an important part in the affairs 
of the Board of Regents. Otherwise so ordinary a 
thief as the miserable McKowen would not have 
been able to go on stealing for years, until he had 
'transferred from the funds of the institution to the 
leather coin-sacks of the race-track bookmakers a 
sum admitted to be in excess of $50,000. One of the 
convincing proofs of improper influences at work in 
the handling of the University's business has come 
out in the development of the McKowen scandal. 
It is the employment as auditor of one J. J. Herr, 
who has kept on living in Southern California while 
drawing a salary of $300 a year for keeping his ex- 
pert eye and hand on the University's finances. Long 
range "auditing" of that kind does not seem to ac- 
complish much, somehow. It is not of record how 
such a place as Herr holds came to be given to a 
man living five hundred miles away. This smells 
obtrusively of practical politics. Even the Regents 



Herr while checking up the turn of M 

stealings, \\ . 

have shut down on his salarj warrant 

This much, measured against McKo 

stealings, but it will ike the S,...t|i- 

allfornia man move carefully in dealing with the 
next job lie p 

Meanwhile, it is no scent that there is a Swarm of 
applicants for the place that McKowen tilled with 

such profit to the race gambling ring. The delay of 
the Regents in making tin- appointment would seem 
to point plainly to more politic-.. Let the gentli 

of the Board be advised: the public is taking a lively 
interest in the affair-- of the University which its 
money supports, and it will not hesitate 10 censure 
them if they fail to put tin- right kind of a man in 
the place of the one now in jail. It will not 9tand 
for the bestowal of the job on any mere poll ii iatl 
or politician's pet Neither will it take kindly to the 
appointment of any man who, having failed to earn 
a living by independent toil, subsides on patronage 
from friends or relatives with political influence. 
What is wanted is a man young enough to lie keen 
and energetic, old enough to have been proved in his 
honesty. The salary is not large, but it is big enough 
to secure a man of that kind. No other will do. 



A MESSAGE OF IMPORT. 

No sounder, saner text for a sermon can be found 
in all the gospels of all the world's religions than the 
New Year's resolution of a Chicago woman's club. 
Here it is: "There is so much of good in the worst of 
us and so much of bad in the best of us, that it does 
not behoove any of us to say anything bad of any of 
us." 

A trifle more of polishing and this pregnant sen- 
tence might have been brilliantly epigrammatic in 
form. As it stands, it comes near to being a highly- 
condensed composite of the Golden Rule, the Ten 
Commandments, and the Sermon on the Mount. The 
more we read it, the less we think of the wits who 
joke and the philistines who sneer at the Lakeside 
City for its crude modernity and its imperviousness 
to refining influence. A creed like this bespeaks a 
culture moving itself aright in the place whence all 
culture must proceed — the heart. Lived up to, it 
would eliminate from organized society most of its 
malice, much of its lying; it would deliver us from 
the scarlet sin of hypocrisy and commit us to gentle 
speaking and gentle doing; it would send to the limbo 
of fashions forever laid aside the meaningful lift of 
the eyebrow and the shoulder-shrug which is even 
more wicked than the spoken word ; it would banish 
the sting and the stab of the false compliment and 
the polite double entendre through which many 
women and some men wreak their ill-will ; it would 
be the end of the "one hears" and the "they says" 
tittle-tattle compound of venom, envy, spite, conceit, 
and all uncharitableness. 

We know nothing of what this particular women's 
club does with itself from year-end to year-end. Quite 
possibly it is no better in its actual achievements 
than any other of the leisured-class organizations, 
but we shall thank it for at least this one uplifted 
moment when it was above all pettiness and gave 
concrete expression to what stirs vaguely in the 
breasts of us all at holiday time and then is so 
swiftly forgotten. Even if it be by now no part of 
this club's propaganda, yet it cannot have failed ut- 
terly of good. Messages of such import are certain 
of delivery to somebody somewhere. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 



A PAIR OF PROFESSIONALS. 

The State Federation of Labor in session at Fresno 
fought shy of politics and of the plan to entangle the 
organization in the schemes of ambitious politicians, 
but at the same time the body stultified itself by first 
voting down the minority report permitting officials 
of the Federation to accept political preferment and 
then electing Harry Knox, of the Carmen's Union 
of this city, to be State President of the Federation. 
This action was taken in the face of a distinct state- 
ment made on the floor of the convention by Knox 
that he expected to receive a political appointment 
under the municipal administration — an appointment 
which has since been given him by Sheriff Curtis. 

Apart from this stultification of the Federation, 
the choice of Knox serves to illustrate the present 
temper and spirit of organized labor in this city. 
Knox is the disturbing element of the Carmen's 
Union, and almost persuaded his union to go 1 in 
strike at the time the question of wages and hours 
was raised with the United Railroads last spring. 
It was only by the strongest representations urged 
by men in other unions who were convinced that the 
strike would have been unreasonable, unjustifiable 
and without public sympathy that the Carmen were 
persuaded to reject the counsels of violent action and 
accept the plan of arbitration offered by the street 
car company. It is an open secret that a strike on 
the local transportation lines was narrowly averted 
at that time, and it might have been better had it 
come, because Knox and other extremists like him 
would in that case have been taught a lesson that 
they seem to need. 

The choice of Knox for President is fitly supple- 
mented by that of G. B. Benham for Secretary-Treas- 
urer. Benham is a professional labor agitator who, 
as President of the local Labor Council, attempted 
to use his position for his personal political advance- 
ment. Last year he incurred a vote of censure from 
the Council of which he is President, by writing a 
letter recommending Mayor Schmitz for re-election. 
Of course, he expected to get his reward in the shape 
of an easy, well-paid job under the city Government, 
but this attempt to use his position for personal gain 
was too much even for his associates, who are not 
usually squeamish in such matters. In consequence 
of this episode and others of which mure will he heard 
later, Benham became so much discredited among 
the professional labor crowd that Schmitz could not 
see his way to appointing him to anything. Never- 
theless the Federation saw fit to elect him to the 
second office in its gift. Knox and Benham are an 
interesting pair. 

GREAT SAN FRANCISCO. 
San Francisco does no blowing, no spectacular ad- 
vertising, no "what great things I am going to do," 
but goes right along in commercial expansion, indus- 
trial growth and financial strength upon a solid, last- 
ing and profitable basis. And in this mighty upward 
and onward movement the machinery and conven- 
iences of business life are correspondingly improved 
and enlarged so that every new demand of the con- 
stantly widening channels of trade expansion is an- 
ticipated and the needed facilities ready for employ- 
ment. That is the reason why San Francisco is the 
recognized commercial and financial center of the 
Pacific Coast. To be sure, nature has given San 
Francisco extraordinary advantages as to geographi- 
cal position and boundless harbor limits — the one 
natural point on all the Coast for the accumulation 
and distribution of goods and wares from and to all 
parts of the commercial world — and to all this has 



been added the required accessorial factors such as 
transportation facilites, both inland and oceanic, that 
"reach around the world'' and return to the common 
centre — San Francisco. 

But how little is there being said about one of the 
most conspicuous and picturesque, as well as perma- 
nent, additions to San Francisco's expansion. What 
we mean is the multiplying of mighty business 
houses and palatial dwellings. The growth in what 
some call "sky scrapers" is marvelous, and what is 
more, they are coming to be as common and as nu- 
merous as one and two-story business houses used 
to be. In fact, San Francisco may already be called 
a "city of sky scrapers," for they are everywhere, 
either in a state of completion, occupied, or under 
construction. And wdiat is more, tenants are ready 
to move in the moment they are readv for occupancy. 
But the city's expansion in building is by no means 
confined to business houses. Upon every hand all over 
the city, dwellings, apartment houses, hotels and flats 
of unusually large proportions may be seen looming 
or climbing skyward. And the architecture of these 
additions to the city's house facilities is as pleasing 
and attractive as their foundations and superstruc- 
tures are strong, permanent and convenient. In 
short, San Francisco is a worthy rival of the best of 
the commercial centers of the East in the matter of 
noble and commanding edifices for business, resi- 
dence and pleasure, and she proposes to keep right 
on growing in that as well as in all other directions 
of supremacy. 

BUILDING THE POLITICAL MACHINE. 

It is not very long ago since Mayor Schmitz told 
one of the officials of the city Government that he 
was convinced that the people of San Francisco did 
not believe in the enforcement of the merit system of 
appointments under civil service rules. Mr. Schmitz 
gives a pregnant example of action based on this 
belief by his appointment of Williams to be one of 
the Civil Service Commissioners. Williams has no 
fitness for this special function. In fact, his train- 
ing lias been such as to unfit him for a position that 
demands a wide know-ledge of men and affairs. Wil- 
liams is doubtless an excellent book-binder, but he 
knows nothing else. This appointment is simply a 
political job, and was inspired by the fact that he 
happens to be President of the Book-binders Union. 

This appointment is simply a flagrant example of 
the use of administrative powers to build up the po- 
litical machine. In the operation of such a system 
it is not surprising that men like Mershon get on the 
Municipal Commission. 




Jfc&CHAS. KLJLUS & COM 

&£XCL US/VTM 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

It's the cut and chic in clothes offered here that give personnel 
to a gentleman's dress, inculcating minor details, devoting time 
and attention to men's clothes only. 

Consequently, modestly claim that our "immediate Service 
Clothes" are superior. Some good dressers have been put wise 
about our shop. "There are others" that ought to know us. 



1 






January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR. 



Notes From tHe Opera 



IS v HrvrMd Knnild 



Whatever pro and omi opinions people may hold 
• Mme. Patti's farewell tour, there can iic but 
■pinion about tier singing of that outrai 
farewell song. The fact that she sings it . 
pitiable acknowledgment "i the commercial si 

journey throughout the United State:-. It is 
an open secret that when .Madame l'atti - 

the liner bound for home that she will be just 
OO richer than when she landed. The 1 
for her -inking the "Last Farewell" has not been 
told, but there could be no doubt about it in the 
minds of any one who saw .Madame l'atti len\ 
after singing it last Monday afternoon. I' 
she was out of sight of the audience, she held her 
hands up to her ears, as if to shut out the applause 
the people considerately gave her for it, and w hen 
she had reached the wings her hands wefe over her 
eyes as if for very shame. Those who bought 
on the stage saw this, and those near the wings heard 
her say: "There!" as she threw the music on the 
director's table. 

The words are inane, and the music worse, and 
Madame Patti sings them horribly. How could she 
do otherwise! Why, oh why! did she keep to her 
contract? 

Here is the story of the outrage. The man who 
wrote this atrocity also wrote "After the Ball." He 
has money, plenty of it, and is in a measure backing 
the management of the Patti tour. 

He wrote a letter to himself, asking himself to 
write a song for the tour. Then he sat down and 
wrote as vapid a thing as ever passed through the 
press. Madame Patti agreed to place the farewell in 
her repertoire, thinking that surely nothing could 
be written so bad that she could not put something 
into it to make it acceptable. In holding to the agree- 
ment, she has made one of the mistakes of her life — 
a petty one, to be sure, but one that even she cannot 
afford to do — particularly when she is three-score 
years old. The author should be sentenced to life 
imprisonment. He need not think that Madame Patti 

can sing him into fame. 

* * * 

The story of Duss and his decoration has not been 
told until now. When the New York millionaire 
raised his baton over the New York Metropolitan 
Orchestra in this city every one wondered at the dec- 
oration he wore on a gay ribbon in place of his neck- 
tie, after the fashion of an ambassador from France. 
The critics took a shy at it, but no explanations 
were forthcoming, and the decoration remained a 
mystery. Well, it belongs to Duss all right, because 
he helped to pay for it ; the remainder was collected 
among the musicians who play under him and who 
rest contented en route because they know that their 
salary is always as good as paid. Duss always 
squares accounts. 

The decoration came about in this way. One of the 
"first violins" in the orchestra came to him and said 
that the men were desirous of making their leader a 
present, and he thought that it might be well to make 
it something that Director Duss would really appre- 
ciate, and it was thought that the best way to find 
out was to go directly to him. When the question 
was put to Duss, he said that above all he would 
like to have a decoration. The messenger from the 
men was dismayed ; there was not money enough in 
the purse to get the ornament of distinction, and 



the man knew full well that his confreres had already 
I themscl limit of their purse-. I lu-- 

. mm. ami said promptly 
and _. "If tin rtOUgh oil 

hand, I will make up the difference." This the mil- 
lionaire lender did, and as h ran to line de- 

adequately jeweled, lu- had to draw his 1 
for several hundred dollars. Who says that Muss i-. 

vscar the elegant thing ': 

* * * 

tin signals are up at the Tivoli Opera Hoi 
Annie Myers, the peppery SOUbrette of certain 

does not see why the management had to en 

•iia Darker to sing the role of Cordelia Allen in 
"When Johnny Comes Marching Home," and is not 
afraid to say so. She insists that she was already of 
the company and quite willing and capable to take 
the part. As her contract does not admit of talcing 
issue in the matter, she has had to swallow the 
lumps of indignation in her throat and put on the lit- 
tle white breeches that Robert Pemberton, the 
Southern lad. must wear. At any rale, the plump 
Annie may comfort herself with the thought that 
very few women of her age or any other could don 
a boy's tight-fitting wdiite suit and look like anything. 
In it, she is "Just too Sweet for Anything," and no 
one will deny her the title of the fat little l'Aiglon of 
ci miic opera. 

* * * 

It is not an original thing to say that an actor re- 
sembles a soldier on the firing line. In this, more 
than any other, professional duty claims many a sac- 
rifice. George Osbourne, of the Alcazar Stock Com- 
pany, exemplified the old Spartan when, on last Mon- 
day night, after receiving notice of the death of a 
son in an Eastern town, he went on with the rehearsal 
and at night nerved himself to give the audience the 
best piece of acting even so finished an actor as him- 
self could give. The company extended full measure 
of sympathy, but a sense of responsibility to the 
public olid not allow the audience to see the immense 
cloud of grief under which each member swayed 
like storm-swept ships. 

Next door to the Alcazar, at Fischer's, Mr. Kolb 
had been under a doctor's care all night and all day. 
from nine in the morning until five, with a doctor 
in the dressing room, he heroically went through his 
lines. He said afterwards that when the public gave 
such a generous reception to the work of his team 
in "The Beauty Shop," — he said to himself: "Work, 
damn you, work, if you die for it!" 

Get the dust out of your carpets. But don't do it 

with a club, because it's a slow, laborious and very unsatis- 
factory way. You will find it more profitable and satisfac- 
tory to have the work done Dy the Spaulding Carpet Clean- 
ing Company, 353 Tehama street. With their improved 
machinery they make an old carpet look as bright and fresh 
as a new one. 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

V V o 

Scotch_Whisky 

Importers-MACONDRAY & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i6, 1904. 



T5he Minister of Foreign Affairs 



The situation in the Far East is more complicated 
than a week ago, yet it is easier of solution. Tn the 
face of Russia's opposition, China lias signed a treaty 
of commerce with the Uniterl States and also with 
Great Britain, in which those two Anglo-Saxon coun- 
tries are placed upon an equal basis with the most 
favored nation, particularly so in Manchuria. The 
signing of these compacts by China is the equivalent 
of the repudiation of Russia's claims to either owner- 
ship or protectorate of Manchuria. This in the face 
of the fact that Russia is in possession of Manchuria 
with a large army upon the ground to emphasize her 
presence is significant. But what is still more auda- 
cious is a recent declaration of the St. Petersburg 
Government that the Manchurian ports would not 
be opened to the commerce of the nations. The situa- 
tion, therefore, is this: China claims the ownership 
of Manchuria and lias granted the United States and 
Great Britain commercial rights therein, but is un- 
able to deliver the goods, so to speak, by herself. If, 
then, Great Britain and the United States want the 
great commercial advantages which the treaty grants 
they will have to strengthen China's arm against 
Russia. But it so happens that Japan's interests in 
Corea are so important and valuable that she is 
obliged to lead in the dislodgment of Russia in Man- 
churia. In assuming leadership Japan can count 
upon the moral support of the United States and 
Great Britain and a more or less active support fn im 
China. But these allies of Japan will be obliged to 
stand ready with something more substantial than 
moral support if she is likely to fail in the conflict 
against Russia, for Japan's failure to bring Russia 
to terms would mean the annulment of the new 
treaty of commerce and the shutting of the United 
States and Great Britain out of Manchuria at once, 
and out of other Chinese territory in the future. War, 
therefore, between Russia and Japan is inevitable 
unless Russia backs down and retreats from every 
diplomatic and military position she has taken upon 
Chinese territory. Meanwhile, the United States 
and Great Britain will have to keep close to Japan 
with plenty of moral support, and ready to substi- 
tute shot and shell for moral support should occa- 
sion require it. 

Germany has officially announced that she will 
maintain strict neutrality in the event of a Japanese- 
Russian war, but the German war lord is too anxious 
to see himself marching away to war at the head of 
a great armv, and Germany's commercial and terri- 
torial interests in the Far East are too extensive 
and valuable to be left to the tender mercies of the 
uncertainties of war to make the declaration of neu- 
trality effective more than one day at a time. In fact, 
it is believed by many of the most astute statesmen 
of Europe that a Japanese-Russian war would bur)' 
the animosities of centuries between France and Ger- 
many, and that they, with Russia, would form a 
tripple offensive and defensive alliance against the 
Anglo-Saxon nations in every field of commerce, 
even to the extent of armed conflicts, if need be. For 
the present, and probably for some years, the Far 
East is the battle ground for commercial competition. 
After that South America will be the bone of conten- 
tion. Already Germany is quietly establishing col- 
onies in Argentine and other Latin-American States 
for a purpose that no one could mistake. 



The Senate has ratified the Panama Canal treaty, 
and there is now nothing to hinder the French-Amer- 
ican canal ring calling at the Treasury Department 
and pulling out $40,000,000 for division among them- 
selves. The work of construction of the canal may 
be undertaken at any moment the syndicate decides 
to go ahead with a Government-backed business en- 
terprise that can be made to last for thirty years with 
millions and millions of dollars flowing annually from 
Uncle Sam's strong box to the syndicate's pocket. 
The Panama Canal job is the most gigantic Govern- 
ment swindle that history gives any account of. In 
this connection it may be observed that the inside 
history of the "uprising" of the people of Panama, 
which culminated in the founding of the "Republic 
of Panama," has been revealed. The "uprising" was 
confined to eight political agitators out of a job, and 
the mass meeting" and subsequent "convention of 
the people," which proclaimed Panama's independ- 
ence, were composed of those same eight patriots. 
They put the machinery of Government in place un- 
der the protection of the guns of a conveniently pres- 
ent United States warship, and in just three days 
from the eight's declaration of Panama's independ- 
ence, President Roosevelt recognized the new Re- 
public and immediately despatched a minister pleni- 
potentiary thither to represent the Washington Gov- 
ernment at the seat of the new nation. But there is 
more to follow if Roosevelt is elected next Novem- 
ber. Panama is to be declared a territory of the 
United States upon substantially the same basis that 
Porto Rico enjoys. The "manifest destiny" wedge 
will then have entered the Central American States 
to split off other territory as President Roosevelt's 
appetite may crave more outlying possessions. How- 
ever the ides of November may change the pro- 
gramme. 

* * * 

Senator Foraker's attempt to excuse the President 
for his haste in aiding and abetting the Panama revo- 
lutionists is lame, weak and impudent. He says the 
President's quick interference was to "prevent the 
horrors of a civil war," but the assertion is an insult 
to the intelligence of the people, and the President 
should not feel like thanking his Senatorial mouth- 
piece for his monstrous perversion of facts. The 
Republic of Colombia had a large standing army at 
the time of the "uprising" of the eight revolutionary 
leaders quartered in the other States of the Republic. 
The entire military strength of Panama then under 
arms was less than 200 men, and only a small percen- 
tage of them sanctioned the revolution. Senator 
Foraker, therefore, either deliberately falsified the 
affair or was densely ignorant of the facts. Now, as 
a matter of fact, and the evidence justifies the asser- 
tion, the Panama rebellion, the declaration of inde- 
pendence, and the officering of the new Government, 
were all planned and started in their execution at the 
Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York under the pro- 
tection of the police of that city. All the prelimi- 
nary work was done in that hotel by agents of the 
Washington Government and three or four Panama 
"Generals." Haste was then made to issue the pro- 
clamation from Panama soil, but not until United 
States warships had reached the spot to force Colom- 
bia into the background. In fact, the first sect of 
the Panama Government was at the Waldorf-Astoria 



January 16, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



kcr knew, and ho knew 
that not more than 100 of the Panama "am 
men would have taken up arms for the new Rcpnh- 
nd that public sentiment in Panama w 

f preserving the integrity of the United 
mbia, and Senator 1 "raker knew. 
that the Panama revolutionar) leaders were after the 
•o.OOO bonus which tin- United had 

pay for concessions; he knew furthermore 
lie whole scheme was concocted in Washington 
official circles, perfected in the Waldorf-Astoria ho- 
tel in Xew York, and put into execution in Panama 
under the protection of United States warships. The 
wonder is how Foraker dared to utter such a hare- 
face falsch 



AN UNFAIR BOYCOTT. 
The spectacle of one businessman calmly lacing 

the concentrated fire of unionism would be enough 
to stir the Americanism in any breast, one would 
think. Add to it the spectacle of uniformed officers 
of the law standing by while crowds of ruffians do 
their vilest to keep business away from the single- 
handed champion of free labor, and it is almost 
enough to make men doubt the efficiency of our insti- 
tutions. 

These things are to be seen daily and nightly on 
Market street. The one man pitted against all union- 
ism is M. Johnson, keeper of a restaurant. His 
offense against organized labor is not that he pays 
less wages than it demands, not that he refuses to 
employ union men, but that he has put above his door 
the placard ''This is an Open Shop," and declares 
that he has the right to employ and will employ 
union and non-union help without discrimination. 
For this, raucous-voiced men and women "picket" 
his place. "Picketing" means shrieking lies about 
the victim and his business, jeering his patrons, 
threatening them, jostling them, assaulting them if 
the police do not interfere — and often there is no in- 
terference. 

The following was one of the statements posted 
in Johnson's window : 

First — Closed shop agreement forced from indi- 
vidual restaurants by Waiters,' No. 36; Cooks', No. 
44; Helpers', No. no. No Asiatics. 

Second — Partial open-shop agreement between 
Restaurant Keepers' Association and Waiters', No. 
30; Cooks', No. 44; Helpers', No. no, sacrificed; can 
employ Asiatics. 

Third — Complete open-shop agreement between 
the five Tavern and Louvre restaurants, Waiters', 
No. 30; Cooks', No. 44; Helpers', No. no. Can em- 
ploy union or non-union. 

Fourth — No agreement with hotels, boarding- 
houses and many restaurants. Not molested. 

Fifth — Johnson, standing for his constitutional 
rights, is boycotted. 

Labor union, thy consistency is great. 

M. JOHNSON. 
Mr. Johnson declares he will not discriminate in 
favor of nor against any union, neither will he com- 
pel his employes to join any. A comparison of condi- 
tions shows that he pays better than union wages 
by an average of 15 per cent, also gives better than 
union hours, six days constituting a week's work, 
and claims that this all proves the statements of boy- 
cotters on the sidewalk to be malicious falsehoods. 

All fair-minded people ought to show their disap- 
proval of the boycott as un-American and contrary 
to the principles of the United States Constitution 
by patronizing his boycotted open-shop restaurant 
at 725 Market street. 



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Cor. 9th and Market Sts. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 




It is unfortunate for Mr. Ches- 

Varied Types. terton that he made a reputation 
as a journalistic critic through 
his epigrams, which happened to catch the public 
taste as they appeared in the columns of the Daily 
News. His Life of Browning in the "English Men 
of Letters" series proves that he is not merely a 
writer of glittering paradoxes, but a critic with imagi- 
nation, of all critics the rarest type. His new book 
is not only filled with stale epigrams, but the same 
ones are used again and again. The man who makes 
epigrams should have a long memory. 

Mr. Chesterton is extrcmelv modern, and adores 
his own century and abhors any one who woul.l 
fain live in any other. It would be well for him to 
acquire a more finished style — and to get rid of the 
haste that has caused him to allow so many typo- 
graphical errors in this present volume. 

"Varied Types," bv G. K. Chesterton. Dodd, 
Mead & Co. " 

"Borlase & Son," consid- 

"Sweater" Literature, ered as a novel, is dull, 
but as a treatise on Lon- 
don's poor, the sweat-shops and the chicanery of 
commercial life in the neighborhood of South Cam- 
berwell, it is an accurate and valuable contribution 
to "sweater" literature. Borlase & Son is the firm 
name of a drapery emporium which stands as a type 
of a shopping institution known all over London, 
where the employees board on the premises. The 
conditions of life portrayed are, the author declares, 
absolutely veracious. Several of the characters 
made their first appearance in a book entitled "A 
Guardian of the Poor," and published in 1R67 at the 
Sign of the Bodley Head by Mr. John Lane, but there 
is no connection between the two volumes. 

Part of this little volume is 
Ponkapog Papers, devoted to short studies for 

essays, or mere suggestions 
that leave the reader to fill out. Here is one that 
opens the door to wildest conjecture : "Imagine all 
human beings swept off the face of the earth, except- 
ing one man. Imagine this man in some vast city. 
New York or London. Imagine him on the third 
or fourth day of his solitude sitting in a house and 
hearing a ring at the doorbell." There is a charming 
study of Herrick, and a criticism of Emily Dickinson, 
to which her admirers will not agree. Through all 
these Papers runs a vein of humorous leisure that re- 
minds one of the gentle Elia who would have en- 
joyed the thought that out of Ponkapog could have 
come so good a book. 

"Ponkapog Papers.' bv Thomas P.ailev Aldrich. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co.' 

Those who read W. R. Lighton's 
The Ultimate story, "The Ultimate Moment." 
Moment. during its serial publication in 

Harper's Bazaar, will remember 
it for its unique point of view of the value of sim- 
plicity in living. The best portions of the book are 
the descriptions of life on the Nebraska farm, but 
the Omaha scenes are not so well drawn, although 
some of the incidents are stirring and pathetic. The 
inequalities of the story perhaps add to its charm by 
pointing out the beauties more effectively, and its 
style is refreshing throughout. The illustrations by 
A. I. Keller are exceedingly well drawn and appro- 
priate to the text. It is published by Harper & Bros. 



"The Daughter of a Magnate," 
The Daughter of by Frank H. Spearman, has al- 
a Magnate. ready appeared in serial form 

in a popular magazine, and is 
so good that it is welcome in book form. In this 
latest and best story of Mr. Spearman the founda- 
tion is real railroading on the largest and most ex- 
pensive scale, and in it the author shows his intimate 
knowledge of the great problems of engineering, tun- 
neling mountains and filling valleys, and tells of the 
skill of the men whose brains have planned the 
bridges and the trials and daring of. those at the 
lever and the throttle. Through the story runs the 
love romance of a typical American hero and heroine; 
but Mr. Spearman knows more of bridge building 
than he does of love-making. 

He paints the picture of a railroad man's life in 
the following terse sentences: "A hundred times and 
in a hundred ways we gamble with death and laugh 
if he cheat it, and our poor reward is only sometimes 
to win where far better men have failed. So in this 
railroad life two men stand * * * luck or ill-luck, 
storm or fair weather, together. And death speaks 
for one; and whichever he calls it is ever the other 
must answer. And this is duty." 

Charles Scribners Sons, Publishers. Xew York. 

The novel of letters is unques- 
Letters Home, tionably the most difficult nar- 
rative form, yet Mr. Howells 
manages it with delightful ease and vivacity. The 
individuality of each writer is well defined, without 
confusion of point of view or style. Each one, be- 
sides keeping up the story, liberally contributes him- 
self glimpses of his past experience, observations on 
the world about him ; so that from these self-revela- 
tions the reader enters sympathetically into half a 
dozen stories. In life, people are always coming tem- 
porarily together through common interest in an ac- 
tual drama, while at the same time all are busy about 
their own affairs and ready to drift apart as soon as 
the play that has attracted them is over. The rep- 
resentation of this perpetual movement of life is so 
difficult that few novelists ever dream of trying it. 
Mr. Howells has shown himself accomplished in 
such representation over and over again, but has per- 
haps never come so near perfection as in "Letters 
Home." From the purely outside standpoint this is 
the best study of New York that has ever been given 
in fiction, and perhaps Mr. Howells is the only author 
who could give it. 

"Letters Home," by W. D. Flowells. Harper & 
Brothers. 



In "Barbe of Grand Bayou" Mr. John Oxenham 
has written a thrilling melodrama, and has thrown 
an atmosphere of reality around it so that the story 
stands out as one that is exceptional in more ways 
than one. It is the best novel yet from the pen of 
Mr. Oxenham. 

Dodd, Mead & Co., New York, Publishers. 



Albert Lee's latest novel, "The Baronet in Cordu- 
roy," is of the usual style of historical romances. 
The story is in the time of Queen Anne, and Addi- 
son, Steele and Defoe are introduced to give an air 
of reality to the tale. 

D. Appleton & Co., Publishers, New York and 
Boston. 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




A TRUSTY TIP TO YOU ON THEATRICALS. 

CPU hbh I ktra Ocarina ■ tide. 

Fi>*.ms> 1 B ■ ~ 

mtftiEin Good show. T.11 goo 

tivmii >; tondld staffing nnd cnti'hy mnalc. 

cmihwmi 'A Trii. to Chinatown." Van funny. 

UXAtta— > • ■ '■ nl performaoca, "Tha atoth and the Flame 

ii»«M> "Ini A melodrama ol th< - 

CBRUL— The Moonshiner." Ordinary. 

OWIBS— ' Deari Many Manntkins." Excellent 

l»bic HAU-Biirt'iii Holmea' Lectures. Oood. 



The Jersey Lily lias improved. I lor acting is so 
iar superior to her attempts in the same direction 
when she was here before that there is no compari- 
son. Mrs. Langtry, while she does not effectually 
hide her age, is really better looking. If, as one writer 
has put it: "One grows to look like the things one 
looks upon," Mrs. Langtry must look upon things 
that are good and wholesome. 

The English appreciation of what makes for 
crushing beauty was never an American estimate, 
and yet Mrs. Langtry is certainly a very attractive 
woman, and may to-day be classed as a splendid ac- 
tress. A French philosopher has it that "women 
never learn anything that they have not learned ere 
thirty-five." Mrs. Langtry certainly has learned 
much more than anyone could expect, and yet she 
has not mastered the art of graceful locomotion. She 
walks in as charmingly an ungraceful manner as of 
yore. 

It is said, in extenuation, that to walk with mis- 
mated feet is an English prerogative. The Lily 
made a splendid Lady Deering, and Mr. Truesdell's 
Captain Deering leaves little to be wished for in his 
version of Fendall's lines. The rest of the company 
is as good as we have seen for many a day. 

* * * 

Patti has come and gone, and the poor old song- 
bird is only a memory. The pity of it is that the 
hist for money should permit the exploitation of this 
really nice old lady of pleasant memories. People 
went to see Patti, not to hear her sing. And they 
were not disappointed, for she did not sing at all. 
The New York syndicate will be raking over some 
old ladies' home next in an attempt to discover a 
great attraction. 

* * * 

Fischer's was crowded to the doors on the first 
night of "The Beauty Shop," and I will predict a con- 
tinuance of the same good business. The new star, 
Miss Helen Russell, is of the first magnitude, and, as 
a vocalist, easily outshines Amber. Mr. Peachey's 
rendition of "Obstinate Lizzie May" was good, and 
the chorus work excellent. Kolb and Dill are ex- 
cruciatingly funny throughout the new play, and the 
prize-fight, with Ben Dillon as Professor Brannagan 
and Carl Yoho as Pugsy McGenk, is a corker. Miss 
Russell's entrance in her automobile costume is as 
stunning a thing as can well be imagined. She is 
a statuesque woman, and good to look upon. At the 
same time Pll give her a tip to change dressmakers. 

Her song, "Navajo" and Strauss's Waltz Song- 
are things that stay with you. Miss O'Ramey gave 
a highly artistic and finished performance as Sapho 
Sweeney. The music, by Miss Adah Clement, is 
quite pleasing, and the "Matutinal Medley" beyond 
the ordinary. Mr. Crawford, the playwright, is to be 



congratulated on the great success ol a play produced 
under the stress of tin- most trying circumstam 

* * * 

At the Tivoli, "When Johnnj Comes Marching 
Home" is a generally good performance, From a 
musical standpoint we find splendid chorus work 

and stirring words, but the solos are weak. As a 

play, it is better than the usual run of operas. The 

scenery is magnificent and "worth coining mile-, I" 

see." "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" will 
have a lony run. because it touches the "humanities." 
What it lacks in the music 1 in spot si it makes up. 
and gives you measure, overflowing, elsewhere. 

* * * 

Howard Thurston, at the Orpheum, advertised as 
"the man who mystified Hermann," does some aston- 
ishing stunts in the line of prestigiditation. All the 

tricks are well done, and there is an astonishing 
smoothness in his work. There is a black face turn 
in which White and Simmons are the laugh-makers. 
The Tobin sisters are very attractive young persi 11s. 
and the Viennese dancers. Walno and Marinette. 
are clever in their own specialty. There are ten good 
numbers in this week's programme. 

The Grand ( )pera House management has a num- 
ber of good things in preparation. "( )ne Night in 
June," which is the next bill, tells a beautiful story 
of Vermont. As there is a large contingent of the 
Green Mountain people in San Francisco, there ought 




All Want the Best 



in everything. In whisKey 
you get it in 



Hunter 

Baltimore 



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HILBERT MERCANTILE CO., 

213-215 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Exchange 313. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 



to be a good attendance. Laughter and tears are 
closely intermingled, and there is an interesting plot. 
The scenic effects are especially fine. There is a 
church scene, a Vermont farm scene, and a beautiful 
June night. The play will be interpreted to the pub- 
lic by Miss Grace Turner and company. This will 
be followed by W. H. Turner in "David Harum." 

* * * 

Mrs. Langtry's engagement at the Columbia Thea- 
tre will have a change of bill during the latter part 
of next week, as it is announced that only the first 
three nights will be devoted to "Mrs. Deering's Di- 
vorce," and on Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
nights and at the matinee on Saturday, "The Degen- 
erates" will be staged. It will be the first presenta- 
tion here of Sydney Grundy's modern society com- 
edy, and as many have inquired as to the possibility 
of Mrs. Langtry appearing in it here, a series of 
crowded houses may be expected. 

* * * 

The next Columbia Theatre attraction will be "A 
Chinese Honeymoon." It has the biggest record as 
a musical piece of the present epoch. The company 
is large, and there is a galaxy of good names in the 

cast. 

* * * 

The Central is producing one of the old-time piff- 
bang-bing shows that goes with a vim. "The Moon- 
shiners" does not lack in noise and powder smoke, 
and the interest does not wane from start to finish. 

"In Convict Stripes," at the Grand, is drawing a 
crowd. It is a well-acted play, and the staging is 

especially good. 

* * * 

The Alcazar keeps up a rattling Gatling fire of 
good plays. San Francisco has rarely seen a com- 
pany giving a more finished performance. Next week 
"Mrs. Jack" will be presented. This is a wildly far- 
cical frivolity by Grace Livingstone Furniss, odd 
in device, and compelling laughter by sheer absur- 
dity. Those who like George Ade's slang and Hoyt 
types of farce comedy characters will grow merry 

over "Mrs. Jack." 

* * * 

Theatre-goers of San Francisco will enjoy a sur- 
feit of things, if advance agents are to be believed. 
Among the new attractions for the Central for the 
week beginning next Monday night will be that tre- 
mendous New York success, "A Bowery Girl," with 
its great scenic environment and its multitude of 
Gotham street characters. If you want to know how 
politics is done on the Bowery, a liberal lesson is 
afforded by the boss of the Fourth Ward, who is 
also the father of the leader of Bowery society. The 
cast introduces the heir to a Dutch brewery, with 
foaming ambitions ; the unscrupulous lawyer, with 
an eye peeled for questionable business ; the Italian 
padrone and the Bowery Chinaman ; the lost heir- 
ess, the plug-hatted villain with a neglected wife and 
child; the tough girl, with original packages of slang, 
and the street gamins, with their Bowery vernacular. 

A magnificent spectacular production of "Quo 
Vadis" is in preparation for the week of January 
25th. 

* * * 

"When Johnny Comes Marching Home" has cap- 
tured the community, and the Tivoli holds large and 
well-pleased audiences. The music has caught on, 
and "My Own United States," "Kate, my Southern 
Rose," and "My Honeysuckle Girl" is puckering the 
lips of those^hat whistle. Ferris Hartman continues 



the great favorite, and his song, "I was Quite Upset," 

is a great hit. 

* * * 

Barr and La Salle, who are said to present a most 
amusing skit in "The Expressman's Reception," will 
make their first appearance at the Chutes this com- 
ing week. Natalia Delgado, a daughter of sunny 
Spain, will be seen in the fascinating and sinuous 
dances of her native land, and the Girdellers will 
continue their wonderful acrobatic and equilibristic 
performance. La Drew and La Zone, "the daffy 
dame and the tad," will introduce new eccentricities 
in their act; Mabel Lamson, the popular contralto, 
will be heard in new illustrated songs, and Deaves' 
.Merry Mannikins will continue to amuse both young 
and old. The animatoscope will show many interest- 
ing and novel moving pictures, and the amateurs will 
appear on Thursday night. There is no more pleas- 
ant place in San Francisco in which to spend an hour 

than in the zoo at the Chutes. 

* * * 

Although there is no safer house of its size in 
America, the management of Fischer's Theatre has 
leased at a big rental an entire store on Powell street 
in the rear of the house, and will cut through to have 
a large exit from the stage and auditorium, as well as 
from the main entrance. This will make Fischer's 

Theatre one of the safest houses in America. 

* * * 

The Stein-Bretto family, comedy hand-jumping 
acrobats, who created a sensation on their first visit 
to this country two years ago, will reappear at the 
Orpheum this coming week. They perform many 
novel feats, not the least of which is accomplished by 
the woman of the troupe, who carries the three male 
members of the organization off the stage at one 
time. Harry C. Stanley and Doris Wilson will pre- 
sent their little sketch, "Before the Ball." Mr. Stan- 
ley does clever character work and imitates a clario- 
nette to perfection, while Miss Wilson is talented 
and pretty. Kelly and Violette will return with a 
new lot of songs and a wardrobe that is simply daz- 



" BAB'S " 



EPICUREAN RESTAURANT 

323 LARK1N STREET 



The James H. Bibcock Catering Co. 

4O9 GOLDEN OATE AVE. 

Murphy, Grant & Co., 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of fur- 
nishing goods. Patentees and sole manuiacturers of "THE 
NEVER-RIP" OVERALL. The best In the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, velvets, 
silks, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens, etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery shawls, notions, smokers' 
articles, stationery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., San Francisco, Cat. 

C. H. *Rehn*rtrom 

FOKMBELT I1KDIBI A JOIINIOJI 

Tailor. 

PHELAN BUILDING ROOMS 1 2. 3 

TELEPHONE MAIN U». BAN FRANCISCO 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



n 



lin>r in its beauty. This popular tluo of San I r . 

have been iiiectiiiK with great 
cuit. Irving Jones, the unique little colored indi- 
vidual who writes and sings Ins own songs, will be 
i the contributors t" the (unmaking. Howard 
Thurston promises new surprises. White and Sim- 
s, the giMxl old-fashioned negro minstrels, will 
nt a new act in "A Pleasant Evening's Rest." 
and Wallno and Marinette will vary their terpsichor- 
ean evolutions. Asra, the European comedy juggler, 
and the < irpheum motion pictures, showing the latest 
novelties, will complete an unusually interesting pro- 
gramme. 

* * * 

On the occasion of the third anniversary of the 
death of the great Italian composer, ( iiuseppe Verdi, 

a commemoration under the auspices of the local 
Italian "Daily l'ltalia," will be held at the Alham- 
bra Theatre on the evening of Saturday, January 23d, 
the proceeds of which will be entirely given to the 
fund for the Verdi monument to be erected in our 
city. The main attraction will be the first appear- 
ance of the Rjvela Royal Italian Band, directed by 
the distinguished leader after whom the band is 
named. 



Grand Opera hjouse 



OF BENEFIT TO CALIFORNIA. 
The Chronicle Annual for 1904 has met with an 
enthusiastic reception by the public, and the mails 
to the East are burdened with the weight of copies 
going to far away friends and intending settlers. 
This number of the Chronicle has the merit of be- 
ing timely despite the passing of time, and it is the 
best exposition of the advantages of California we 
have yet seen. Mr. Isidor Jacobs contributes one of 
the best articles in the number, "How Canning of 
California Products has Grown into a World- 
Famous Industry." This article is statistical, and yet 
not dry, and it is divided under various heads in 
such a way as to make it intelligible to any reader. 
The Chronicle Annual should be sent to all Eastern 
friends at the earliest opportunity. 

William McMurray, who for many years has occu- 
pied the position of agent of the Southern Pacific 
Information Bureau, has just resigned in order to 
accept the appointment of representative of the new 
St. Francis Hotel, which opens March 1st. Perhaps 
few men in the West have come in contact with a 
wider range of travelers of all nationalities, and he 
has warm friends in every part of the world. While 
not a native son, Mr. McMurray is as enthusiastic a 
Californian as any man who has been born and bred 
in the Golden State. Through his efforts many 
large and important conventions have been held 
in San Francisco, including the recent Bankers' Na- 
tional Conventional. Mr. McMurray has always been 
very popular, and his genial spirit and natural abil-. 
ity insure his success in his new position. 

Few come to San Francisco without paying a \isit 

to Zinkand's, which has done so much to establish our 
city's reputation as the best restaurant town in the United 
States. If s tne favorite after-the-theatre resort. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 

One of the safest and best remedies.for biliousness »5p'o;»H' 
ache, is Leipnitz Liver Regulator. It is an excellent alterative and tome 
to the digestive organs. For sale by Leipnitz & Co. «• *.. cor, outici 
and Grant Ave. 

The latest style in shirts may be found at John W. Carmany's 
Chronicle Building. 

A. rub at the Post St. Hammam will do you good. 






11 KM 11 
ny in th« l«'flutlful i 



ONE NIGHT IN cJUNE 
smuiav Mm;' ■■. \s h Tamer In 



Denial 1 1 



DAVID l-IARUM 



Fischer's Theatre 

Trie BriaUTY SHOP 
A -l.-lik'Mfni and Brer Intereetlrui musical oomedy 

■i"ti;il humor, ivlitrhthil music Beautifully staged. 
Our ■ Oor Popular Prices." 

Hath s Saturday and Sunday. 



Columbia Theatre. °° 



Ctottluli, Marx A Co, 

Lfrtees hmiI M»n*errp. 
Beginning DOXl Monday. 2nd and last «crk. 

MRS. LANGfRY 
Rrel three nights 

MRS. DEERING'S DIUORGE 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights and Saturday matinee. 

First times hero of Sydney i inindy's 

Tl-lb DEGENERaTES 

Sunday .Tan. M— German performance, "Als ieh Wiederkam." 

Jan. 25 — The musical hit. "A Chinese Honeymoon." 



\~/l \Jl ICUIIJ. O'Fmrrell St., between Stockton and Pownll streets. 
Week commencing Sunday Matinee. Jan. 17 

ENTICING UaUDEl/ILLE 

Stein-Bretto Family : Stanley and Wilson; Kelley and Tiolette; 
Irving Jones; Wallne and Marinette; Asra; White and Sim- 
mons; Orpheum motion pictures and last week of 

MOWaRD THURSTON 

Prices, loc, 26c and soc. 

Matinees every Wednesday, Thursday. Saturday and Sunday. 

P.onhrnl Th^rt + r^ Belasco & Mayeb, Proprietors 
V-»«IJLrUI I IltJULTtJ. Market St near Eighth-Tel. South 533 

Week of Monday. January lath 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

The tremendous Eastern hit 

a BOWERY GIRL 

Prices— Evenings 10 to 50c- Matinees 10. 15, 26c- 
Week of Jan. 26th, magnificent production of 

quo uapis 

^1^517^1- Th an I- re* Belasco & Mayer, Proprietors 

MJCaZar ineuCre E. D. Pbice, Gen'l. Mgr. Tel. Alcazar 
Regular matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
One week commencing Monday Jan. 18, first San Francisco pro- 
duction of the cyclonic American comedy 

MRS. dAGK 

By Grace Livingstone Furniss. 

Played for months at Wal lacks' "New York. 

Evenings 25 to 75c Saturday and Sunday Matinees 15 to 60c 

Jan. 25— Henry Arthur Jones' great play 

THE MaSQUERaDERS 

Tivoli Opera House. CornerEd fc n n d street a 

Matinees every Saturday. Beginning Monday Jan 18, 
Second week and tremendous success of 

WHEN dOMNNY GOMES MaRGMING 
HOME 

A three act military comic opera by Stanislaus Stange and 

Julian Edwards. 

Usual popular prices— 25c, 50c, 750- Box Seats, $1. 

fllhambra Theatre Eddy T d nes sts. 

Saturday evening January 23rd. 1004, at 8 o'clock. 

Extraodinary entertainment in commemoration of Verdi's 

death. (Under the auspices of the Daily "L'lTALIA,") 

RIV/ELA'8 ROYAL ITALIAN BAND 

assisted by the soloists F. Avedano, Domenico Russo,. G. S. 
Wanrell, G. Cortesi and Mrs. Lydia Sterling. Selections from 
Aida. Ernani, Nabucco, Lombardi. Trovatore, Rigoletto, Lucia, 
Tannhauser and Mascagni's William Ratcliff. 
Popular prices: Reserved seats 50c and $i. Sale of seats will 
begin Monday Jan. 18th at Sherman, Clay's Music Store. 

er the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless .string 1 band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering place after 
the theatre is over. 



flft 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 




The soldiers at the Presidio arc trying the new, 
ready-made army hash, warranted to keep in all cli- 
mates, to be appetizing and filling, and to be ! 

for jaundice and sore eyes. The Germans have a 
playful way of marching their soldiers scores of miles 
on a vest-pocketful of pills, chemically concentrated 
food, and even if a few men die under the strain. 
the course of science and army reform is considered 
vindicated. We. with our vestiges of the Anglo- 
Saxon appetite, demand a more rilling diet. It must 
not be forgotten, however, that the rations are sam- 
ple rations, and so of extra fine quality. When war 
comes and the soldier absolutely requires his rations, 
they will in all probability be found to be just as rot- 
ten as was the famous preserved beef. Unfortunately, 
neither the Russians nor the Japanese eat hash. 

A minister earns his fee so easily by performing the 
marriage ceremony that he might be expected to see 
that be conforms to the statute. In the Pederson case 
at ( lakland it appears that the license for marriage 
was issued in Oakland and the ceremony performed 
by Reverend J. Fuendeling of the German Lutheran 
Church in San Francisco. It should be well known 
to a minister that a marriage can only be performed 
in the county in which the license is issued. It is 
gross professional negligence on the part of a min- 
ister to allow any woman to run a risk of this kind, 
when a mistake may have such terrible consequences 
for her. 

In one of Gelett Burgess and Will Irwin's latest 
stories there was the account of a San Francisco 
woman who paraded Kearny street on Saturday af- 
ternoon as the advertising agent of a certain women's 
suit-house. Quite a number of young men must be 
following that occupation in the city at present. The 
street corners and the cigar-stores abound in flashily- 
dressed, insolent youths, without visible means of 
subsistence, who insult women, and seem to have a 
pull with the police. 1 wonder if any promises were 
made to this class of loafer prior to the election. 
Every worthless element in the community seems 
to have been seduced in some way. 

What a strong lot, full of personality, were those 
old Californians. Tin- death of the old colored woman, 
".Mammy" Pleasaiice, with all her force and origi- 
nality, recalls some of the most prominent. Senator 
Sharon, Sarah Althea Terry, Judge Terry, Justice 
Field, even Dave Neagle, they were all typical West- 
erners, fiery and ill-balanced, perhaps, most of them. 
but endowed with that most uncommon of qualities, 
independence. The old colored woman who began 
life as a cook was a remarkable character. Overbear- 
ing, self-willed and exceedingly charitable, she was 
quite a person in her own queer wa\ , one of the char- 
acters of a California which is passing very fast. 

It would be just in accordance with the way in 
which we manage our affairs if the bill for the cre- 
ation of a new Federal Judge for the Circuit of the 
United States Couris should fail because the Califor- 
nians are unable to settle on what they want. Four 
separate bills from four separate California legisla- 
tors dealing with the creation of one office for the 
good of the State are a little too many. Some agree- 
ment will have to be reached or the scheme will fall 
through again. 



Mayor Schmitz, it strikes me, is having a hard time 
of it trying to serve two masters. The case of John 
Partridge is one in point. The Mayor's statement 
regarding the Pound Master, as vouched for by Mr. 
Partridge, cannot for a moment be doubted by any- 
one who knows that gentleman. The Mayor in his 
haste to find jobs for every Tom, Dick and Harry 
who peddled tickets for him at the last election, has 
put his foot in it. lie is credited with calling Par- 
tridge a liar. When it is remembered that Mr. Par- 
tridge had witnesses to the conversation referred to, 
and that Mr. Partridge is a respectable business man, 
well-known, and that his word is as good as his bond, 
and that the Mayor is practically unknown save for 
broken political promises, a politician under the in- 
fluence of professional politicians, the public will not 
be slow to judge. 

Nobody hates humbug worse than 1 do, but there 
is a limit in the mater of a wide-open town, or there 
should be one. even under the regime of the present 
Mayor. It's all very well to re-tore the side doors 
and to rebuild the partitions. The people who go 
to those place- generally know why they go and 
whither: even the resurrection of the old gambling is 
not a matter to weep Over. Hut some limit ought to 
be placed upon the cinematographs and picture 
shows. ()ne of these on Kearny street. makes the 
I lalveston Hood an excuse for showing a picture of 
scon- of men and women in a disgusting state of 
nudity. The thing is utterly devoid of art value, and 
should be stopped. 

Why should the tradesmen on California street 
cho-e the particular time when the crowd of com- 
muters is greatest to run their wares out of their 
stores upon the sidewalk? It is funny, but not other- 
wise agreeable to see elderly gentlemen and demure 
typewriters dodging barrows and trucks, and being 
genially abused by hurried workmen. Of course, it 
must be said in defense of the tradesmen that the 
blocks are stupidly left unprovided with an alley. 
Still, one would think some other time might be 
chosen for trundling their wares, along the sidewalk. 

Major Charles L. McCawley, "star dancing man" 
of the Marine Corps, has tripped his way merrily into 
the social service of the Government, being relieved 
of all duties except helping President and Mrs. 
Roosevelt at entertaining. There may be no heroism 
about the two step, but it leads to soft snaps. 

Having been buncoed by an astute bank agent into 
buying a sixty volume set of historical works, "Uncle 
Joe" Cannon paid the money, but indorsed on the 

check: "The 1 ks are not worth a , and are 

high at that." Which didn't help his bank account, 
Inn eased his mind. 

That high-priest of fakers, John Alexander Dow ie, 
is on his way to Australia, via San Francisco. The' 
Antipodeans are welcome to him and to all the 
money he is suspected of having sequestered before 
his "Zion City" was turned over to a receiver. 

Some of our local men would give much for the 
ability of William F. Brown of Oakland, who was 
arrested for begging. He is described as a beggar 
and a gentleman. It is remarkable how often the 
two things seem to go together. 

They are going to decorate the streets of Oakland 
with palm trees, and the Call rejoices thereat and 
claims all the credit. It would be just as we'd for the 
Call to wait and see the palm trees first. 

And so, men arc to receive at leas. Farewell, then. 
to the tea-party am! hail the he-party. 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»3 



How tSan Francisco LooKs to Me 



Bv F*»rn r\ old Triv^T^. Tovtilsl 



Really. I am quite proud; there are three of us in 
just now, all attracting a deal of at- 
11. VVe arc all from England, and m 
rn there. I am here, Raroness Cedarstrom anil 
Mr-. Langtry, and what a sensatii n we are creating 
and how we are toadied to! It is awfully flatter- 
ing; still the American always r. 
as well as genius. 

I was lii|>|H'.l the morning after New Year's even- 
ly man Roger had also been out, and when I 
rani; for him, my tnli was not ready, my linen w. 
laid out. my tweeds were not forthcoming, and my 
- were Mill on tin- tree. I would have dispensed 
with Roger on tin- spot, but 1 did not know if 1 could 
replace him. IK- is an excellent servant. Hi- once 
was man for an officer in tin- Guards; and let me tell 
von that is the onl) school for a gentleman's man. So 
far as 1 allowed him. Roger begged me to pardon 
him. and said 1 had dismissed him for the night after 
I dressed, lie then took a walk and some American 
Scotch whiskey, and added that it hail overcome him. 
My hails were off when I learned this, and 1 ex- 
plained to him the awful effects of drinking American 
h whiskey, which is on the average as much 
like Scotch as paratnne is like ean de cologne, espec- 
ially in places where Roger would buy it. I found 
out by my headache next morning that tippling 
American Scotch is had for a chap's stomach. 1 
finished my hreakfasl, and then took Roger to exam- 
ine some apartments at which he had looked. Things 
went wrong again, and I told him I ought to kick 
him. He did not resent it. That is where army 
training shows. He stands it because he knows that 
if I did kick him it would not hurt him very much, 
and would afford me a small amount of mental pleas- 
ure combined with a slight sensation of physical 
exercise. 

He caused me to waste the entire morning viewing 
impossible cubby holes with higgledy-piggledy en- 
trances, dark halls and passages, and low ceilings — 
really admirable places for one's nieces to play doll's 
House in, but hardly suitable for a Draper's Clerk and 
his wife. 

The tub room of the best out of the lot was there 
for ornament and suggestion only, and no sane ar- 
chitect ever dreamed of any one reallv bathing in it. 
It's rather a reproach on San Francisco. It looks 
as if your citizens regarded their morning tub as a 
task and not an enjoyment. There was not a wine 
closet in the whole of the places we visited, nor 
was there a Mews within easy distance. There was, 
however, attached to each place an impossible fellow 
who called himself janitor. Not one of them knew 
their places. They all knew what I wanted better 
than I did myself, and when I explained, to them 
that Roger would attend to me they seemed to think 
their prerogatives were being usurped. I can't un- 
derstand why the need of a janitor in bachelor apart- 
ments occupied by gentlemen who keep their own 
men. The apartments I viewed all seemed to be 
gotten up for appearance, being adapted to the wants 
of those persons who desire to convey the impression 
that they receive a good income while having a very 
small one. The same shoddy effect which I have no- 
ticed so much before. There must be correct apart- 
ments here somewhere with the conveniences needed 
by a gentleman, a room to wash in, a room for exer- 
cising, a dressing room', a place for Roger, a spare 



room for a friend, .1 sitting, bid and smoking room 

for me — and without the attachment oi a fellow with 

shiny knees and over-run heels, and smells of onions, 
who calls himself in three or four disgusting bro 

anitor. < Ine of tin- nicest chaps 1 have met at 
your clubs says he can put me on to the right thing 
in a short while, a house complete, which is owned 
h\ a friend of his who is going to Europe for a run. 
Really, if what I have seen in the way of places 
land I am tired looking at them 1 he a specimen of 

1 he whole lot. I am impressed that the San Francisco 

gentleman either does no1 know how to live or can't 
afford it if he does. Whefl I get settled and find a 
right servant 1 >r two. things will be different. < >f 
course, select society, as I know it at home in Eng- 
land or New York, is limited here, but I have met 
some gentlewomen that are peerless by their own 
right of beauty and grace, only lacking the ancestry, 
and I have met some men who. riding in the Row. 
would make the chaps on the walk pause and stare. 
'Von have some good horsemen here. The merchant 
.lass, 1 imagine, is more or less transient. At home 
my tradespeople; keep to their shop generation after 
generation. Here I notice in the papers and know 
by the signs on the shops along your principal 
streets that about one in three is holding a closing- 
out sale. Really it looks bad. The classes can't get 
used to their shopkeepers in a day or two, and if the 
shopkeepers are a flit-by-night lot, it seems there 
would not be much confidence between the seller and 
ourselves. I can't understand it. Do they not do 
enough trade? Are their bankers hard on the poor 
chaps? Or is it a game? If it is a game, it is in had 
taste: it causes one to doubt the honesty of the 
tradesman and the stability of the city. Maybe the 
fellows who are retiring from business are going to 
start again, or maybe they desire to get a fresh loca- 
tion. 'Port my word, I don't blame any of them much 
for wanting to get off your main street. It is disgust- 
ingly dirty and wretchedly paved, and the stone 
walks are half wood and it is always dusty if not 
muddy. Maybe that this is caused by the lack of 
attention of your Aldermen, but that, as my friend 
Kipling says, is another story. 



Master of House (to applying butler) — Can you 
open a bottle of beer neatly? Applicant — Urn, not 
so very, sir. You see, I've lived mostly in cham- 
pagne families. 




CAT. ON BARREL 
BRAND 

,» tZZ. \aaa 

"~BOORD & SON 



LONDON/ B>"G. r 



BOORD'S 

OLD TOM, DRY 
®. SLOE GINS 

ORANGE BITTERS, etc. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO.. 

Sole Agents. 811 Sacramento St. S. F 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 




Dear Bessie: Do you bowl? If so, I am sure you 
will envy us the new club which was opened this 
week and promises to be a success. It is on the Gol- 
den Gate avenue side of Jefferson Square, and only 
the wives and sisters and daughters ot the members, 
who are all clubmen — and I suppose their cousins 
and their aunts — are eligible for the privilege of play- 
ing the game. Greer Harrison is the President of 
the Club and Ed. Greenway is one of the directors, 
so you see it is to be very swell. And now, having 
the place to play, parties are being made up to enjoy 
it, and before long there will be one or more clubs in 
full swing for every day in the week. 

When 1 bunched up all the Thursday teas last 
week I omitted to tell you what a charming little 
hostess Bertie Bruce made as Mrs. Ferd Stephenson, 
and her home on Sterner street is such a pretty one. 
Newel Drown was the motif for the pleasant affair, 
and helped her to receive. Another thing I omitted 
to enlarge upon was the Gibbons dance, which, 
though not large, was an exceedingly pleasant one; 
just enough to make dancing comfortable, and the 
supper was delicious. 

Bridge was the game selected by Mrs. Hinckley 
Taylor for her card party on Wednesday, and the 
forty ladies who played it seemed to take to it as 
naturally as ducks take to water ; it will be all the 
rage soon, you take my word for it. The buds, at 
least quite a number of them, were given a luncheon 
by Mrs. Sullivan and Alice on Thursday ; Norma Cas- 
tle gave a large card party in the afternoon. I went 
out to make my tea call at Mrs. Swift's, and found 
her rooms crowded. What a lovely woman she is, 
in looks one of, if not the handsomest of all our 
society dames. Pretty little Helen Bailey is having 
a good time and enjoying herself thoroughly. Mrs. 
Austin Sperry holds her first large "at home" to-day ; 
and to-night Susie Kirkpatrick gives a "kid dance" 
at the Palace — something like what La Jeunesse used 
to be when first started. 

The newly-engaged couple, Mabel Guff and Jack 
Wilson, are going the usual round of being enter- 
tained by their friends. Mrs. Guff gave them 
a big dinner last week; the Blacks a Patti concert 
and supper party ; the Warfields a dinner and theatre 
party; and Airs. Jack Spreckels a luncheon and mati- 
nee party to Mabel on Saturday. Their dinners this 
week included one at the Alexander Wilson's on 
Monday; Pearl Landers gives one next Thursday, 
and Ed. Greenway one on the 2d of February, while 
Jack himself will play the dinner host to thirty of his 
friends on the third. Mabel Hogg's tea last Fridaj 
was the medium chosen for the formal announcement 
of Florence Callanghan's engagement to Vincent ile 
Laveaga, which has been suspected for some time. 
It was quite a pleasant tea, and the floral decoration> 
which were chief!}' red, among the prettiest of the 
season. 

Miss Carrie Gwin had only married ladies at her 
card party last Saturday ; there were three tables, 
and at the game of seven-handed euchre Mrs. Mayo 
Newhall, Mrs. Smedburg and Mrs. Casey won the 
first prizes at each of them. I devoted half an hour 
— all I could spare — on Saturday to the 20th Century 
Club Concert at Lyric Hall, and missed hearing Car- 
rie Little sing, which I regretted, for I hear she has 
improved very much during her stay in Paris. She 
was obliged to postpone the recital she was to have 
given, but I believe it will take place before long. 



Gertrude Smith crops up again as the "entertained" 
at a luncheon to which I have been asked by Mrs. 
Eugene Lent next Tuesday ; Mrs. Ritchie Dunn gives 
a luncheon at the University Club on Wednesday for 
Polly Macfarlane, and Maud Mullins Clarke has a 
card party for Polly on the 21st, all married folks of 
the younger set. Belle Smith gives a tea on Friday, 
and there will be the Friday Fortnightly dance in 
the evening, and Fanny Harris a big luncheon on 
the 28th. The last of the Assembly parties comes 
off on the 29th, so you see there is plenty to do all 
the time. 

I told you I thought the wedding day of Louise 
Harrington was to be the 6th of February, but in- 
stead it is to be on the 2d, and will be, I hear, even 
quieter than was her sister Mary's. By the way, 
the new appointment of Commander Niblack will 
entail a four years' residence in Honolulu, so it will 
be some time ere we see Mary again. 

It has been quite a fad- here of late to entertain 
members of the "Girl with the Green Eyes" com- 
pany; the Jolliffe girls had a tea for two of them, 
Miss Emmett and Miss Bell, and Miargaret Mee had 
Frank Deklin as her guest at a small dinner of eight. 
There was regret that Patti could not accept any in- 
vitations, but Mrs. Langtry is here now, and she may 
be induced to take what the other was obliged to 
decline, as her stay here is to be for some little time. 

Don't you remember all the nice affairs Mrs. Gir- 
ard was so constantly planning when she was at the 
Presidio, and what pieasant parties she gave? Well, 
I am so glad she is back again, and as her husband 
is to be the new chief surgeon when he comes back ' 
from Manila, we may look forward to lots more 
pleasant times. She and her daughter, Mrs. Bush, 
are here already, and are at Fort Mason, where Kitty 
and I are going out to see them to-morrow. Katli- 
erine and Edith Bull came back from their Oriental 
travels by the transport Sheridan which arrived this 
week, and which brought the new regiment that is 
to be stationed at the Presidio, the 28th Infantry, 
and about the officers the girls feel no end of curi- 
osity. 

Bessie Ames has gone from our gaze for awhile; 
she and Mr.s Jack Casserley left for New York last 



Phone 
South 713 

MOCHA 

'CREAM TORTE 

F Most Delicious Cake ever served to 

guests. TRY IT AN0 SEE. 

$1.00 $1.50 $2.00 

P WESTERFELD & CO. 

1035 MarKet St. 

Branch 

863 Market 

St. 



January t6, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'5 



• lay. an. I Bessie at least will not l>c back for 

-hc will spend February with her 

r, Mrs. Woocl, in Baltimore 

The Peter Martins are here at last. They arrived 

last Monday, and now we shall Bee what we shall 

The chatter is that they are to remain lure .1 

long time — perhaps for good and all. 

1 inly think of my nearly forgetting to tell von that 
the long suspense is ended, an,! after main false 
alarms the cards for the wedding of Bernie Drown 
and Sam Doardman are out at last. It seems that 
Bernie was awaiting the arrival of Stella Kane, who 
he one of her bridesmaids, the other three. 
Susie Blanding, Charlotte Ellinwood and Linda Cad- 
wallader, with her sister Newell as maid of honor. 
The marriage will take place at St. Luke's Church 
at high noon on Saturday, the 30th, and a reception 
afterwards at the Drown residence on Jackson street. 
Constance de Young will make her formal debut 
at a tea to he given by her mother next Saturdav af- 
ternoon, the 23d. 

—Elsie. 



The Art Association of San Francisco will hold its 
annual masked ball at the Hopkins Institute of Art, 
on Mardi Gras. which comes this year on Tuesday, 
February Kith. A beautiful invitation has been de- 
signed by Albertine Randall Wheelan, and is now in 
the hands of the engraver. A preliminary meeting 
of the decorating committee, which is composed of 
Mr. John M. Gamble and Harry W. Seawell, has 
been appointed for next week to lay out the scheme 
of color treatment, in ornamenting the halls and 
dancing rooms ; while Henry Heyman has been given 
charge of the music. 

The wedding of Miss Anita Claire Walsh of this 
city and John T. Tyner of New York took place in 
the Swedenborgian Church Wednesday night, and 
was one of the prettiest affairs of the season. The 
bride is a very popular young lady and has partici- 
pated in many charitable affairs in this city. The 
groom is a son of J. R. Tyner, and nephew of As- 
sistant Attorney-General Tyner at Washington, and 
is a junior member of W. L. Growall & Company. 
Miss Marie Aline Walsh, the bride's sister, acted as 
maid of honor, and James E. Knauss as best man. 
The ushers were Dr. William Ellis and Dr. Harry 
Sohr. The wedding reception was held in the par- 
lors of the Colonial Hotel, where Mr. and Mrs. Tyner 
will reside on their return from Southern California. 

Tlie little daughter of Albert L. Farr, the rising 
young architect, passed away on the night of the 13th 
inst. The sympathy of all who know Mr. and Mrs. 
Farr is with them in their sad bereavement. The 
child wes one year old and one of the sweetest and 
most loveable of children. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during the past week 
were: A. Feist, W. L. Dreyfus, Dr. W. L. Louisson, 
M. A. Bremer, Louis Ferrari, R. M. Burgess, O. 
Holmquist, Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Hale, M'rs. F. H. 
Stout, Mrs. E. Smith, Mrs. Shimer, Mrs. Farr, G. 
F. Simonds. 

The California Polo and Pony Racing Association 
will hold a meet at Hotel Del Monte, February 16th 
and 22d. The Southern Pacific will place Pullman 

The "Theo" — Popular-Priced French Corset. New 

Fall Models Dip Hip now on display. The D. Samuels Lace 
House Co., Sole Agent. 



The Star Hair Remedy — best 01 all tonics and restora- 
tives. Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not 
a dye. At druggists and hair-dressers. Accept no substi- 
tute. Star Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



Sleeping tars on their trains from Los Angeli 
Del Monte from the 16th to aad, in order I 
modate those desiring -to attend the races, This fact, 
coupled with the certainty that San Francisco will 

be well represented, assure- a successful week's 

enjoyment at California's famous summer ami winter 

•rt. 




CUCQJ7DT! 

the best" 



JEC 
jyellow Label 



BRJ/T 
Cold Label 



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TELEPHONE JAMES 4471 



X5hQ WALDORF 

Miss D. Honig 

241-243 GEARY ST. S. F 

The largest hair store iu the United States. The best assort- 
ment of hair goods on the Pacific Coast. Ladies and gentlemen's 
wigs ol all description— best of hair and finest workmanship. 
Switches all lengths and colors. Pompadours, Janes, Rolls, etc. to 
to suit everybody in color and tecture. 

The best accomodations by thirty expert help in all branches of 
our business. See our specialties on facial and scalp treatment. 

Let us examine your head and tell you the trouble of your hair. 

Hair dressing, manicuring, scalp treatment, facial treatments, 
shampooing, chiropody etc., at popular prices. 



WARREN APARTMENTS 

S. W. cor. Post and Jones Sts 

Two elegant 8 room apartments now vacant. 
Passenger and supply elevator service. Every 
convenience. 

See janitor on premises. 



SHAINWALD, BUCKBEE % CO., Agts. 

218-220 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 




WRINKLES and FACIAL BLEMISHES 

Removed by New Process (Guaranteed.) 

Face Massage. Manicuring and 

Scalp Massage 

AT YOUR HOME, 

by appointment 

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1807 Larkin St., 8. F. Tel. Larkin 2616 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 




Jim Smith — he of the coal. coke, and pig-iron trade 
— now rests from his labors within the aristocratic- 
precincts of the Pacific-Union Club. And thereby 
hangs a tale. Smith, be it known, is one of the big 
men in the commercial world. When the steamship 
companies, the big hotels, or the large manufactories 
want to increase their visible stock of fuel, they have 
to consider the wishes of this quiet, athletic-looking 
gentleman, who. in his California-street office, holds 
not a few of the strings whereby the output of the 
coal mines is controlled, lie has devoted SO much 
of his time to acquiring fame and fortune in the busi- 
ness world that, although a member of the Bohemian 
and other organizations, he has had but little leisure 
in which to enjoy the comforts of club life. But most 
of his intimates, men like Jack Wilson, R. I'. 
Schwerin, A. B. Spreckels and others are enthusias- 
tic club men. For a long time they importuned 
Smith to permit them to post his name in the Pacific- 
Union. He demurred, for he cares but little for the 
artificialities of life. 

Finally, however, he consented, and his name was 
put up. Xow, that eloquent orator and reformed poli- 
tician, Horace Piatt, is one of the leading lights in the 
big club at Union Square, and he considers it his 
bounden duty to scrutinize carefully the list of pro- 
posed members, and to investigate to the smallest de- 
tail the character, reputation and social standing of 
all men that appear asking admittance. In the old 
days, when Horace and Chris Buckley ran the town 
together — that was before Piatt discovered the gross 
iniquities of Democracy and switched — the blind boss 
impressed upon all his followers the importance of 
finding out everything possible about newcomers in 
the arena, and the necessity of barring those who did 
not bear the ear-marks of subserviency. Piatt saw 
nothing in the Smith physiognomy to indicate that 
the coal dealer would fall clown and worship when 
Horace appeared. It is said the arbiter of the club 
also feared that Smith lacked that full appreciation 
of polished humor and graceful wit that is needed 
to appreciate the subtlety of the Plattonian bon mots. 
Then, again — frightful discovery — it was learned 
that once in the aforetime Smith had had his habitat 
south of the slot. That was enough. Piatt instituted 
a campaign against the unsuspecting dealer in pig- 
iron. 

"Fate tried to conceal him by calling him Smith. 
Ha! Ha!" said Piatt. "He is fuel in which I shall 
temper the bright blade of my a\ it." 

Put Smith's friends are cold, ha-a-rd men. When 
they start in on a proposition they usually see it 
through. So they told Mr. Piatt. They also said 
something about society dudes not being the whole 
works. Piatt simply shrugged his shoulders and 
answered: "I fear me your friend is not to be of the 
select. He has lingered so long in the marts of trade. 
it is now too late for him to be an ornament to this 
organization. We want clubable men. He is only a 
delver after dollars." 

Then the trouble began. The Smith forces girt 
up their loins for battle; Piatt threw off sarcasms 
and witticisms, but they glanced from the armor of 
the enemy. The day for the vote of the directorate 
approached. By this time, it was understood that 
one blackball against Smith would be considered a 
very serious affront by his friends; and those same 
friends are not men who may be affronted with im- 
punity. Piatt commenced to take counsel with him- 



self. It was apparent to him that he had started a . 
losing game, for Horace, remembering the instruc- 
tions of his political teacher, quietly quit. Smith was 
elected by the unanimous vote of the eleven directors. 
Now, the question is: What constitutes a club- 
man? If education, good manners, good taste and 
business success do not make a man eligible to join 
the elect, what does? Mr. Piatt, it is said, will write 
an essay on the subject. It will be put in the box 
under the cornerstone of the new club house, so that 
in the years to come, future historians may learn 
something of the advanced condition of cultured so- 
ciety of the present day, from the standpoint of one 
who has walked along every level in the social struc- 
ture. 

I was looking over a copy of Addison Mizner's 
"Cynic's Calendar." the other day. In my humble 
opinion, it is the poorest apology for what it was evi- 
dently intended to be that was ever perpetrated on a 
confiding public. Xot an original idea is between the 
two covers. Most of the stuff is as flat as stale beer. 
"It's a strong stomach that has no turning," says 
Mr. Mizner. You can see him look around with a 
modest smirk ; you can see him pause for applause. 
"A little widow is a dangerous thing." he says in 
another place, with the calm complacency of one who 
is working off a gold-brick. If the sylph-like, gentle 
Addison would own up and acknowledge how much 
of his stuff he first stole, and then spoiled by bad 
handling, it might make interesting reading under 
the title: "How I tried to be funny, and failed," by 

"One of the many Mizners." 
* * * 

What has come over Judge John Hunt? Once 
upon a time he turned a pretty phrase, and his bright 
things illuminated a club room with a brilliancy 
that rivaled "the bright and the balmy effulgence of 
the morn." But 1 fear tongue or pen — or both — 
have lost their cunning. He is responsible for the 
Family Club's invitation to its Christmas feast. Those 
invitations to Christmas jinks are usually stilted 
things at best. They are forced, the humor is flat, 
and the idea is unprofitable. But these facts do not 
explain Hunt's failure in this game of forcing wit. 
In a wild endeavor to give a flavor of Christmas-tide 
to the club's invitation, he dragged in that poor, un- 
fortunate little fellow. "Tiny Tim." Xot once, but 
thrice, was reference made to the diminutive Timo- 
thy, and "green banks" also appeared four or five 
times in as many lines. As a wind-up. the card-writer 
said: "And as "Tiny Tim says in 'The Christmas 
Carol,' 'Cod bless us all, every one." 

Now, did Hunt think the members of the Family 
Club were unaware that Tim may be found in the 
"Christmas Carol?" If he did think so, why didn't 
he add some information about the Carol? Did he 
mention the "green banks" so frequently because he 
is a fisherman, or did he want to go a-caroling over 
them ? As a friend of young unfortunates, as a pro- 
tector of children, doesn't John Hunt think Tiny Tim 
has suffered long enough? If so, why pull him out 
at every opportunity? I think it would be a fitting 
punishment if Hunt were assigned to conduct the 
luvenile Court — unless he can satisfactorily answer 
my questions and explain his fall from grace. 
* * * 

Did you know that no licenses for new saloons 
have been issued for the past three months? And 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'•"I 3 that .1" a saloon keeper rx 

for a man under 
is liable t.. lose his license? The 

u\U there arc about enough saloons in - 
and they have decided to call a halt. II 
wants loon business these daj 

must buy an interest in an established place, or 
until some liquor seller loses his license. None ol 
them ever quit The Commissioners have also -lint 
down on the straw bond business. Years 

■n keepers in the Tenderloin made large sums of 
money l>_\ Furnishing bail bonds. None of the pro- 
fessional criminals remained in jail more than an 
hour or two after arrest, so complete was the machin- 
ery .if the bail bond bureau. But now, the saloon 
keepers have been given a quid tip that the appear 

ance of their names upon bail bonds will be taken 

by the Police Commissioners as an evidence that they 
are trying to interfere with the successful operation 
of the Police Department — a reason sufficient lor a 
refusal to renew their licenses. There is much com- 
plaint ill the Tenderloin, but the Police Commiss 
era are on the right track. 

* * * 

I have been waiting for some of the daily papers 
to tell that Old tale about the flight of John Benson 

to Denmark, years ago. He was mixed Up in some 
kind of a land fraud, and suddenly decided that a 
trip to Europe would be very beneficial. He wan- 
dered around in Europe for some time, and while he 
was quietly resting in the Kingdom of the Danes, 
some Government sleuth came along, tapped him on 
the shoulder and said Uncle Sam was anxious to see 
him in Washington. Benson appreciated the good 
intentions of his Uncle Samuel, but he said he liked 
Denmark so much he did not wish to move — just 
then. The usual extradition proceedings followed, 
ami Benson came back. That must be over ten years 
ago. Benson was then in business in this city. He 
beat out the case, and came back to San Francisco. 
He knows the land laws backwards, and it is probable 
that the present charge against him will fail of proof. 

* * * 

The principal of the Berkeley High School is out 
against the deadly cigarette. More power to him ! 
Now, if the University authorities would start a 
crusade against tippling, all the school men would 
be afforded protection against the temptations that 
beset those that go down into Egypt. Benjamin Ide 
is an authority on the manners of the ancient Greeks ; 
likewise, he knows things about the old Romans ; 
therefore, he is well aware that "ill fares the land, 
to hastening ills a prey," where the students of the 
humanities, the leaders of the thought of to-day, the 
coming apostles of the "isms" of to-morrow, cannot 
carry home a proper load of rich Falernian without 
attracting the notice of their less learned brethren. 
Knowing that the Benjamin of Berkeley is held in 
high esteem in this land of his adoption, I am con- 
fident that an edict issued by him upon the evil ef- 
fects of promiscuous indulging would attract wide 
attention. As a student of men and manners he 
knows that bad examples may- be set, unwittingly, 
by instructors in the schools who are not able to 
cope as bottle men with the hard-headed men of com- 
merce whom they may meet at the festal board, and 
it is shocking and sad to see one filled with dead lan- 
guages, ancient roots and fizz, spilling things as he 
makes geometrical designs in an endeavor to catch 
a train. Not that such things have happened. Oh, 

Fine stationery,, steel and copperplate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. Stib Francisco. 



»7 

■ then, the) might, you know, and 
warning m time ma) prevent a multitude of p 
bilitii 

« • • 

"Mammy" Pleasance ha- passed to the I 
Beyond. She was one of the shrewdest women of 
her race. For decades in this city, she was more than 

a match for lawyers, detective-, newspaper men. ami 

all whose business it was to trv to ferret out the 

many deals in which her- was the hidden hut di 

ing hand. She was as close-lipped as a double-barred, 
burglar-proof sale: in habit of life she was retiring, 

and the many women, now prominent in society, 1 r 

who-,- mother- may have been prominent during the 

past thirty years, who may haw been aided bj the 

keen colored woman, need have no fears of what -he 

might have told. Her secrets went with her to the 

jrave. Thai she befriended more than one fair slivg- 
gler in the social swim, both with money and influ- 
ence, is well known. To sonic, she gave generously 

in the days of her wealth, but to others she was like 
a leech, draining their very last dollar in pursuit of 
what she considered her rights. To the present 
generation she was best identified as the mistress of 
the unfortunate household of the late Thomas Bell. 
To the men and women of twenty-five and forte 
years ago she was a bright, ready-witted, sharp, bold 
manipulator of anything fr.nn a clam-hake to a stock- 
deal ; from a small tea in a lodging house to an at- 
tack upon a millionaire's stronghold in the Palace. 
Withal, she was one of the most unusual characters 
San Francisco has known. Certain it is, we shall 
never see her like again. 

Pears' 

Pretty boxes and odors 
are used to sell such 
soaps, as no one would 
touch if he saw them un- 
disguised. Beware of a 
soap that depends on 
something outside of it. 

Pears', the finest soap 
in the world is scented or 
not, as you wish ; and the 
money is in the merchan- 
dise, not in the box. 

Established over 100 years. 

A Revelation. 

If there are doubting Thomases' or Maidens fair.or those unfair, who 
fain would he fair, let them use Dr. T. Felix Gouraud's Oriental Cream 
and prove the efficacy of what the proprietor has so long tried to im- 
press on the minds of all. in nearly every dart of the World. As a Skin 
Purifier and Beautifler it has no equal or rival. If the reader 
would prove the virtues of Oriental Cream, use it where .a Scratch 
or slight Cut, or where a Black-head or Pimple is troubling you, then 
vou see its healing and 'purifying qualities — if it does its work well, 
then read the advertisement again for further testimony of its virtues, 
and by using Oriental Cream senew both Youth and Beauty. 
Feud. T. Hophins. Esq.: 

I would like to know the price of One Dozen bottles of your 
Oriental Cream, as I use it and like it. Would like to get a supply to 
take on my tour, soon as possible- Answer and oblige. 

Mhs. Jambs Beowm Pottee, Brevoort House, New York. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 




Inflation seems to be the or- 
The Western Type rler of the day, and the in- 
of Financiering. fection has evidently spread 
to San Francisco, which can 
now point out a financier or two to visiting strangers 
as additional evidence in substantiation of the allega- 
tion thaE this city has at last outgrown the swaddling 
clothes of infancy, and is now bounding over the 
sands of time full of the redundant spirits of youth 
in its spring-time. We can now point to quite a num- 
ber of daring efforts in the line of finance achieved 
here, even if we cannot boast of a right to file a pa- 
tent upon the original conception process. Our lead- 
ing industrials have suddenly assumed the attitude of 
the fabled frog who wished to attain the proportions 
of an ox. Take San Francisco Gas for example : it 
has been inflated with enough air to swell its prop- 
erties from $9,000,000, in itself a pretty steep figure 
for a time-worn plant, up to thirty millions of dol- 
lars. Why was this done? The new management, 
gathered from many different walks in life to become 
full-blown gas experts at a moment's notice, will 
possibly account for this undue excess of hot air by 
an explanation that the money is to be utilized to 
acquire an additional supply of plants, etc., and for 
what? To supply the place of a plant which could 
be installed to-day of modern type at first hand for 
less than the over-valued old rack of patchwork 
which formed the nucleus of a transaction which 
must make the ordinary man of affairs pause and 
ponder over the ways of the great local financiers. 
Supposing some one now starts in to erect a new 
nine million dollar plant, what would become of the 
hot air in the thirty million dollar San Francisco 
Gas and Electric Light Company. It is not particu- 
lar!}' strong on its pegs now, as the market shows for 
itself, and the fact that the whole public, outside of 
the few who have some slock and confidence in a 
management which has so far been accredited with 
nothing outside of a $25000 a year President, who is 
now earning it by doing the grand in a distant land ; 
a list of high-salaried officials, and an output of gas 
which in point of quality does not speak much for 
the reputation of the management as gas-makers. 
Would it not have been better to have thrown the 
weight of expenses into the practical end of the busi- 
ness, instead of putting it out in salaries at a juncture 
in the history of a concern, weighted clown with 
financial responsibilities like this $30,000,000 local 
exhibit in the art of unsatisfactory gas making is 
now, after passing through the hands of the Western 
financier? 

The volume of business for the 
Local Stocks w'^ek has shown some improve- 
and Bonds. ment in bonds, and considerable 

trade has been done in Spring Val- 
ley and Southern Pacific issues. In the share list, 
Gas and Electric and Alaska Packers have had the 
floor. The former is in poor condition, evidentlv. 
When the inside props are withdrawn, down go 
prices, and when a rally comes under the stimulus 
of inside buying, enough stock pours in to convince 
one that if higher prices prevailed, outside holders 
would not take any chances on the city standing the 
raise of interest on the inflated capitalization of 
$30,000,000. If such a very transparent artifice upon 
the part of financial jugglers were allowed to pre- 
vail, any bogus scheme masquerading as a public 



utility could build up its capital to any extraordinary 
pitch by the inflation of prices and expect permission 
to collect a certain rate per cent upon the amount of 
the alleged investment. As for the Alaska Commer- 
cial, the vagaries in that stock are not easily ex- 
plained. Nothing has happened to warrant a decline 
in share values, and the following reactions are only 
natural, only on a minor scale. Spring Valley has 
shown a stronger tone during'the past week under a 
very light demand. Other securities show few 
changes, and they are only nominal. 

The following dividends by lo- 
Dividends Paid cal corporations were paid on 
and Declared. the nth inst. : First National 
Bank of San Francisco, regular 
semi-annual, at the rate of 10 per cent, amounting to 
$75,000: Marin County Water Company, regular 
quarterly, 75 cents per share; Giant Consolidated 
Powder Company, regular monthly, 50 cents per 
share; California Wine Association, regular monthly, 
60 cents per share. The Spring Valley Water Coin- 
pan)' has declared a quarterly dividend of 63 cents 
per share, payable on and after January 20th. The 
People's Home Savings Bank (on liquidation) has 



3 MONEY 3 



Part of Marconi Certificates. Let Your 
Money Work for You. Marconi Certifi- 
cates Will Net You From 100 to 1000 Per 
Cent Better Results Than Any Labor of 
Yours Can Produce. 

ACT NOW-DO NOT DELAY 

S, -nil your check or money order for as many blocks of 20 as you 
wish to the undersigned. No subscription for leas than $100. Price par 
for $5.00 certificates. The price may advance any day. 

The stock of the British Marconi Company was put at $5.oo and 

and is now selling at $-n on the London Stock Exchange, an advam I 

sniper cent. The possibilities of the American Company are much 
greater. 

Tne Marconi svstem is indorsed by such men as Andrew Carnegie 
and Thomas A. Edison, and by the press of the entire world. Edison. 
Marconi and Pupin are the Consulting Engineers of the American 
Company. 

Prospectus upon application and your correspondence solicited. 

F. P. WARD & Co., Bankers 

CR0SSLEY BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Century Building, St. Louis, Mo.; Farmers' Bank 
Building, Pittsburg, Pa. ; Land Title Building, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. ; Union Trust Building, Cincinnati, 
Ohio; Royal Insurance Building, Chicago, 111. 

Correspondents — Munroe & Munroe, N. Y. 

CHICAGO IN LESS THAN 3 D\\=> 

From San Francisco at 10 a. m. 

Chicago, Union Pacific and North- 
western Line 

Pullman fourteen-section Drawing-room and Private Compartment 
Observation Sleeping Cars, with Telephone. Electric reading Lamp-. 
in every Berth, Compartment and Drawing-IlO'>m. P.ulTi-t, tSm«iking 
and Library Cars, with Barber and Bath, Dining Cars— meals a la 
carte. Electric-lighted throughout. 

Daily Tourist Car Service at 6 p. m„ and Personally Conducted Ex- 
cursions every Wednesday and Friday at s. a. m. from San Franolsco- 
The best of everyt hing. 

R. R. RITCHIE, General Ageot Pacific Coast. 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel. 8, F, 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 



declared a dividend t" dec two per 

This payment will make a total of 4'> 

returned to thi ra since the 1 

'd the institution: there arc 
are in litigation, from which it is hoped ll 
to 10 per cent more will be pai I. 



At the annual meeting of the Nevada Xa 
Hank the following directors were re-elected: I 
I.. Flood, H. I". Allen. I". W. Van Sicklen, C. de 
Guigne, Loon Sloss, C. II. Mackay Robert Watt, 
Isais w. Hellman, William Haas, 1. \Y. Hell 
Jr., and John F. Bigelow. The net profits for the 
year were $339,384, out of which dividends amount- 
ing to J per cent were paid, amounting to Is-M >. 
000. The balance. $129,384 was carried forward to 
undivided profits. At the close of business, Decem- 
ber 31. 1903, the total assets amounted to $17,392,573. 
The following officers were re-elected to serve 1 r 

the ensuing year: Isais \Y. Hellman, president: Jol 11 

F. Bigelow, vice-president: I. \Y. Hellman. Jr.. vice- 
president; George Grant, cashier: \Y. \Y. Gavin, as- 
sistant cashier. 



At the recent annual election of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce the following Board of Trus- 
tees was elected: George A. Newhall, president; E. 
R. Dimond, vice-president : C. H. Bentley, second 
vice-president: Frank L. Brown, W. J. Dutton, J. 
A. Folger. William L. Gerstle, Rufus P. Jennings. 
H. D. Loveland, William H. Marston, Thomas Rick- 
ard, James Rolph, Jr.. Henry Rosenfeld. James B. 
Smith, William R. Wheeler, trustees. 



At the first annual meeting of the shareholders of 
the Spring Valley Water Company the following di- 
rectors were re-elected : Charles Webb Howard, A. 
H. Payson, A. Borel, Homer S. King, J. M. Quay, 
F. J. Symmes. Frank B. Anderson was elected to 
fill the vacancy caused by the death of Samuel C. 
Bigelow. 



At the annual meeting of the shareholders of the 
San Francisco National Bank the following Board 
of Directors was elected to serve for the ensuing 
year: C. S. Benedict, William J. Dutton, H. E. Hunt- 
ington, William Pierce Johnson, George A. Newhall, 
George A. Pope, W. H. Talbot, James K. Wilson, 
L. I. Cowgill. The Board subsequently organized 
by electing James K. Wilson president ; William 
Pierce Johnson, vice-president, L. I. Cowgill cashier, 
and W. W. Wolfe assistant cashier. 



The Columbian Banking Company has made a 
further call on its shareholders of $10 per share. This, 
with the $10 assessment recently collected, will make 
the stock $50 per share paid up. 

AN OPEN SHOP. 

All fair-minded people should patronize Johnson's 
Open-Shop Restaurant (boycotted), 725 Market St. 

Ladies— For a good complexion try the Post St. Hammam. 
PROMPT SERVICE 

CENTURY ELECTRIC COHPANY 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobiles. 

Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 
House Wiring and Repairing. 

16-18 SECOND ST. Under Grand Hotel. TEL. BVSH 352 




EDUCATIONAL. 



California School of Design 

MARK HOPKINS INST1TVTE OF AR.T 



DRAWING 

PAINTING 



AND 



MODELING 




DECORATIVE 

DESIGNING 



WOOD 

CARVING 



Day Classes, Night Classes and Saturday Classes 

For terms and courses of instruction apply to the Assistant Secre- 
tary. Mark Hopkins Institute of Art, California and Mason Sts 



Dr. H. J. STEWART 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte. Organ. Harmony and Composition 
Special course for singers desiring church appointments 

Studio, 1105 Bush St. 

BEST'S ART SGIiOOL 

lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, antf Illustrating 
Life classes. S3. 00 per month. 

9a7 flARKET STREET 

MISS ROSE BRANDON 

478 EDDY STEEET 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR STUDIO 

Finest Italian Music Direct from Italy, taught 



Miss Ingeborg Resch Pettersen 
Voice Production 

1111 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 



Keceiving hours from 2 till 4 o'clock every day 
except Wednesdays and Saturdays- 



HEMS 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 

Illustrrted Catalogue Free 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



BANKING. 



January 16, 1904. 
Countermoves. 



Wells, Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capital, Sun.ius and^ndivlded }$|3500,000 

Homer S. King, President: F. L. TJpman, Cashier; Frank B 
King, Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, \ ssl ■■>. i,; 

BRANCHES— New York: Salt Lake, Utah; Portland. Or. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General Banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 California St., Webb St,, San Francisco. 

E. 1!. POND, President; W. C. B DeFREMERY. ROBERT WATT. 
Vice-Presidents; Lovell White. Cashier; K. M, Welch, Assist. Cashier 

Directors— E. B. Pond. W. C. B.deFremery. Henry F. AJlen, George 
C Boardman. Jacob Barth. C. 0. (i Miller. Fred H. Beaver, William 
A. fiffagee, Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country remit- 
tances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & i a checks of reliable 
girlies, payable in San Francisco, out the responsibility of this Savings 
auk commences only with the actual r ipl of the money- The 

signature of the depositor should accompany the Aral deposit. No 
charge is made for pass-book or entrance ree. 

OfB.ee hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p, m Saturday evening, 8:80 to a. 

Deposits. December si, 1903 139 2a a 

Guarantee Capital; Paid up 1,000,000 

Reserve and 1 Sontmgenl Funds - fl.eie 

Mutual Savings Bank of s*n Francisco 

710 Market St.. Opposite Thin], 

1 ; SI. 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 5i«i i»io 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President; S. G. MORPHT, Vice-Pi 
dent; GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier; JOHN \ 'ER Vice- 
President; ('. B. HOBSON. Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, s. G. Murph John A hooper, 
James Mofhtt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook 
interest paid nn deposits. Loans on approved securities 
Deposits maj be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co or 
exchange on city banks. 



The German Savinqs 8> Loan Society 



I I; \XiTSCl '. 



NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

al and S irplus 

Capital Actually Paid-up In fash 

Deposits. Dee. 31. 1903 

i;n OF DIRECTORS— President, Join, Lloyd: First Vice- 
President. Daniel Meyei Second Vice-President. H Horstmann 
Ign. .steinhar.it. Emil Rohte, II. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I N Wal- 
(1 J. W. Van Bergen. 
Cashier, A. II. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A n. 



man a ; 

Muller; 



General Attorney, W. s. G ifellow. 



Cootinental Building & Loan a SM c IM ,„„ 

Established ,,, CALIFORNIA 

_ , ., ■■"' ' am Street San Fn 31 ... Cal 

l u 5f c , ribe J '' P6.000, 

Profit and Reserve Fund 45011011 on 

Interest paid on deposits ... thi rate pel ce c annum 

on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 
Dr. Washington Dodge, Presid.ru; Wiulam Corbln, Seen 

and General Manager. 



International Banking Corporation 

NO. 1 WALL ST., XEW YORK. 

al and Surplus S7 894 100 

Capital and Surplus Authorized '.'.". 10 000 000 00 

OFFICERS— William L. Moyer, President; Charles D Pi 

Assistant to President; William P.. Wightman, Assistant to 
President; John Hubbard. Treasurer: James II. Rogers Secre- 
tary; John B. Lee. General Manager; William II 
Assistant General liana: . . ,v Green Counsel 

BRANCHES— -London, San Francisco, City of Mexico, Manila. 
Hong Kong. Yokohama. Shanghai. Singapore 

AGENCIES— Bombay, Calcutta, Madras, Penang. Rangoon. 
Colombo. Amoy, Canton. Hankow, Tientsin. Tansul, Anping 
Bakan. Moji. Saigon, Kobe. Bangkok, Batavla, Samarang Sou- 
rabaya, and all parts of Europe. 

SAX FRANCISCO BRANCH— 32-34 Sansome Street 

A general banking business transacted n.. ts of corpora- 
tions, firms and individuals solicited. Loans made on liberal terms 
on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bo 
and sold. Travelers' and commercial letters of credit granted, 
part of the world. Interest bearing certificates 
of deposil [sued Cor fixed periods. Interest allowed to banks 
on cun balai s. Special to banks kei 

ci ..I- with us. and drawing direct or r branches and 

throughout the world. 



Moves and 

The first evidences of the effort that the Honor- 
able Mark Hanna is making to secure the Republi- 
can Presidential nomination For himself reached this 
city last week. Letters have been received by 
a number of prominent Republicans, some of 'hem 
members of the Union League Club and others hold- 
ing federal offices, asking what the feeling is inwards 
Hanna's candidacy, and expressing the hope that the 
delegation to the National Convention would go un- 
instructed. Copies of an Ohio paper, containing 
bitter attacks on the President and glowing eulogies 
of Mark, have reached every newspaper office in the 
State, and private letters have been sent to men 
prominent in the financial world asking them to use 
their influence to defeat Roosevelt on the ground that 
he was ;m enemy of capital and the great money in- 
terests nf the country. So far, however, there is no 
sign of any break in the solid Republican column in 

California. Reports sent back to the Hanna 1 mers 

are that the people of this State demand Roi sevelt, 
ami that it would be political suicide to attempl to 
elect an anti-Roosevell delegation to Chicago. A 
prominent member of the Union League told me that. 
while there might be some of its members for 
Hanna. that lhc\ were very few and were not con- 
spicuous in their advocacy of him. The country 
papers have paid no attention to the literature sent 
them from Ohio in Hanna's interests, and the 
moneyed men say that Hanna could not be elected, 
and that the election of a Democrat would unsettle 
the business interests for years. 

The failure of the National Committee to call for 
In election of delegates to the National Convention 
is delaying the issuance of a call for a State Conven- 
tion, and it will not now be held until late in May, 
and probablj no1 until June. Every one must regis- 
ter to vole at the primaries, and since Hanna is an 
avowed candidate for the Presidency, the primaries 
are of much more interest and importance than they 
promised to be when Roosevelt had no opposition. 

The Democrats are at sea as usual. They do not 
seem to know whom tbcv want for President, and 
the fight in their lines will be pro and con Hearst. 
Ex-Governor Budd is to be the leader of the Hearst 
forces, and he is a very shrewd politician, fust who 
will bad the opposition is not vet decided. 
* ♦ ♦ 

The Minnesota Secretary of the new Board of 
Corrections and Charities has already distinguished 
himself in a very remarkable way for an expert who 
was imported to teach the good people of California 
the principles of economy in their public expendi- 
tures. The curious will see in the Blue Hook that 
he is put down as of "St. Paul, Minnesota," an ex- 
traordinarv confession of the incompetency of all 
Califnrnians, since they had to go SO far to get a 
man for the place. Having been elected to the place 
through his Chicago pull, as previously explained in 
this column, he proceeded to bring his family out 
here, and then was about to present a bill to the State 
Treasury, amounting to some $500, for their rem ival. 
But the Board refused to allow that expense bill, al- 
though they agreed to allow another for bis personal 
expenses, amounting to $104.05. It will be noticed 
that he must have come around by the Horn or via 
Siberia, as most people could make the trip from St. 
Paul to San Francisco For much less than that fig- 
ure. However, the cruel Hoard of Examiners would 
nol even allow him the personal account bill, and he 

lias been fi reed to bear bis own traveling expenses. 
( onsidering the way in which this expert has starte 



CORRESPOXDENCE INVITED. 

f. e. it. 1 -J inager. p. g. eastwick. jr.. Ast. Mgr oui to save the State money, it might be well For the 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'1 pet ml of ..!', hi« 

* * » 

The readers o( !iu-< columns will 1 
"I R the |MM, r girl who was 

the Feeble Minded Hon vvho 

refused to return her when she pleadi 
and how she finally in despair committed sui 
They will remember that no investigation of the 
matu-r was ever held by the trn- 
and that one of them, the Reverend Mr. liainc, 
charged the Attorney General's office with hi 
delayed t ■ • inform the Board if it could gel the girl 
back by habeas corpus a charge which the 

ral absolutely denied and showed thai the un- 
fortunate >;ir! was the victim of the neglect of ilu- 
Board of Managers to perform their duty. I 
pears, however, that the King sirl anj another who 
was taken out by the same trustee arc not tin- only- 
girls that have been taken out of the Home l>\ per- 
sons who had no legal right to do so. Annie Kalla- 
way, a Honolulu maiden, is another case to which I 
respectfully call the attention of the Hoard of Trus- 
f the Home for the Feeble Min led, and especi- 
ally of its two clerical members — the Reverend [1 
Lyons ami the Reverend .Mr. Baine. This girl had 
been removed some time ago by an employee of the 
Kip orphanage. Her utter unfitness for outside life 
is known to Air. Holbrook formerly of the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and Sister 
Julia, who is well known to the charitable persons in 
this city as the manager of an Episcopalian Magdalen 
Home. I presume also that Dr. Osborne and his wife, 
the former Superintendent of the Home, and Dr. 
Lauder, can give some information about the girl, 
since, if I am correctly informed, they both refused 
to allow the girl to leave the institution. Do the 
trustees know Where she is now or what has hap- 
pened to her since she left, or who authorized her to 
be taken out? If they do not, they should inquire at 
once. 



Unless all rumors are untrue, there is another scan- 
dal worse than any charged against Dr. Lawler that 
needs their investigation. Why should not the Gov- 
ernor himself give some time to this matter? Is it 
not his interest and duty as Chief Executive of this 
State to look after the welfare of the wards of the 
State, and he can easily ascertain the details of the 
case from the persons named above even if the daily- 
papers do not publish them before this article appears 
in print. 

* * * 

If the Board of Trustees of the Home will not 
act, the Governor can remove them and should re- 
move them. Their terms have expired, and he is 
the principal person to blame if proper trustees are 
not now managing the institution. We believe the 
Governor is too humane a man, and loves his own 
children too much not to protect the unfortunate 
children indirectly confided to his care. This is 
more important than finding out why a Sacramento 
plumber did not know the difference between sewer 
gas and bats. — Junius. 



Testa Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Use 
Briquettes for cooking and heating, and you will save at 
least one-third on your fuel bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., 
South 95, and your order will receive prompt attention. 



BANKING. 



The San Francisco National Bank 












iblnaon 









I~be Canaaiao BanK of Commerce 

With whi, h is amalgamated tha Bank ,,i Britiah Columbia 
, HEAD OFFICE TORONTO. 

1 aid-up 1 apital. j-. 

Aggl 

,, ■- ... , lR0E A ' 

1.. K. Walker. General Vlex. Laird Mar. 

LONDON OFF1C 

,.,, , ., ,,, Nl -" VoliK oil'., 

BRANCHES IX BRITISH COLUMBIA-Atlln, Cranbrook. 

bernle, Orcein 

New Weatmlnsler, Vancouver and vlot, 

principal polnta in 
I.N 1TUKON TERRlTi IR1 -D i w talte Hoi 

in 1 Mil-.. STATES- Portland, Seattle anu Skagwe 
Manitoba, X. w. Territoriea, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS ix LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 

Scotland, Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The rninn <>i London and Smiths 
Ltd. 

AGENTS IX CHICAGO The Northern Trust Co. 
AOENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Hank. 
Son fhanusuu iiHw- 



325 California Street. 



A. KAix.s, Manager, 



London, Paris and (American BanK UuiW 

X. W\ COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 

Subscribed Capital, $2,E Paid-up Capital, $2, ,003 

Reserve Fun, I. (1,100, 

Head Offl« — 1« Threadneedle si., London, 10. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agencj ,,i the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited, No. Hi w.ui street, X. v.: Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Frcres &. Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssoniere. Im.iw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Trav li < 
credits issued 

S1G. GREE'nEBAUM, Manager; ... S. GREEN. Sub-Mana- 
ger J R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The flnglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized Sti.lmO.i .nu l'aid up Jl,r,im. i 

Subscribed 3,uu0,ili>tl Reserve Fund .... 700,000 

The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STE1NHART, P. N. LIE1ENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSi.o. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord, William Babcock. Adam Grant, 
S. L. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Baldwin. F. Monteagle. Warren D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutcheon, R. H. Pease. 



»♦» ♦•♦•♦» «»+»*•♦•♦<>♦• ♦ •+•♦•»•+•*• ♦•♦•♦•♦ 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

*b 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital & Surplus $1,233,723.75 
Total Assets - 5,914,424.59 



Interest paid on deposits, subject 
to check, at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum. 

Interest paid on savings deposits 
at the rate of three and six- 
tenths per cent, per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are author- 
ized to act »h the guardian of 
estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented at 85 
per annum and upwards. 



Dalzell Brown, 

Manager 



|«-g< 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 




Bx The Autocrank 

In my search for automobile news I dropped in to 
see President Hyde of the Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia, and asked him how the club was prospering. 
His remarks were as follows : 

"As to membership we are doing very well, indeed, 
as we now have over 180 on our rolls, and it will soon 
be 200. We are, however, somewhat- particular whom 
we receive, and it is not every applicant who is suc- 
cessful. While we are not a social club, we ought 
not to have any in our ranks with whom we cannot 
associate on terms of equality. The main purpose 
of our club organization is to promote the cause of 
automobiling and to protect ourselves against hostile 
legislation, but incidentally we can enjoy a club run, 
or a dinner, now and then. 

"There are not many, even in the club, who realize 
what a powerful agency for the protection of auto- 
mobilists this club has been. When the new ma- 
chines were first introduced, there was a universal 
prejudice against them, and the first impulse of the 
public was to demand legislation against their use 
on the country roads. Transportation companies 
were afraid of them, and even the country hotels dis- 
couraged them. Against these discouragements our 
club has made a battle. We have employed attor- 
neys to defend our rights before Supervisors and in 
courts, and many an enemy of automobiling has 
been turned into a friend by a little judicious atten- 
tion at the proper time. A. person traveling on the 
county roads can maintain a comfortable rate of 
speed because this club has been vigilant and made 
his fight against four miles an hour when such legis- 
lation was threatened. He can travel in our el. 
streets at 8 and 12 miles an hour, can ride through 
Golden Gate Park and travel on the ferry lines mai 1- 
ly because there has been a strong club organization 
to look after his interests. 

"Ten men organized as a club and working in 1'. e 
name of the club can do more effective work than a 
hundred men can, working singly. I have seen the 
Legislature led to a radical departure in legislation in 
a certain case at the demand of a so-called "club, ' 
which was formed in the interest of one person, and 
numbered, all told, not more than four. 

"Any person who owns an automobile or is in any 
way interested in the sport, ought to belong to the 
Club. The dollar a month is the smallest considera- 
tion. It is numbers that gives influence, and we will 
need powerful influence during the next few years 
to protect our rights and accomplish the objects of 
our organization. We ought to have a State automo- 
bile law, but it would be folly to attempt it until we 
can feel sure that we would "not fare worse than we 
do now. 

"It is a sad fact, but it is true, that our worst ene- 
mies are among the automobilists themselves. It is 
the conduct of a few that makes trouble for the ma- 
jority, and the influence of the club is more powerful 
than the law to prevent the reckless speeding and 
handling of automobiles. 

"I want to see 250 members in our club within the 
near future. They are here, and if the present mem- 
bers will exert themselves, we can have the desired 
number." 



OLDSMOBILE 

1904 ANNOUNCEMENT 

3 MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM. 



1st — Regular Standard Runabout, Price 

F. O. B. Factory $650.00 

2d — Large Motor, new style, Metal 
Hood, French Design, Powerful Light 
Car, Price F. O. B. Factory $750.00 

3d — Four Passenger Tonneau Touring 
Car, Roomy, Luxurious, Strong and 
Fast $950.00 

WATCH THIS SPACE FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS AND CUTS 



PlONtiER AUTOHOBILE CO. 

901 Golden Gate Avenue, 

Opp. Jefferson Square. 

We handle only standard Automobiles — Win- 
ton, Oldsmobile, Locomobile (steam and gaso- 
line), Stevens-Duryea, Baker Electric, Vehicle 
Equipment Co npany. 




We have just received our first car load of the 
1904 model KNOX (waterless) Touring Cars, both single and 
double cylinder types which are now on view at our 
show rooms where we would be pleased to receive 
you and demonstrate their superior qualities and 
simplicity. 

The KNOX (waterless) GOSOLINE AUTOMOBILES are 

known the world over for their simplicity, easy 
operation, durability and easy riding. We are al- 
ways glad to demonstrate the above to any one. 



THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE & MANUFACTURING CO. 

|3<-H8 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE. SAN FRANCISCO. 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*3 




The Mobile Carriage Company, automobile hous 
den Gate Avenue, 120 feet on Gough and Jefferson 

This is considered one of the largest and finest ex- 
clusive automobile houses in America. Great care 
has been taken and much expense incurred to secure 
model construction in every way. The salesroom 
occupies a space of 45 feet on Gough street and 90 
feet on Golden Gate avenue. Posts are placed in the 
dividing line between the salesroom and the garage, 
and the whole roof is trussed on these posts. This 
arrangement gives the garage space an L shape of 
50x137:6 feet and 50x90 feet without a post or ob- 
struction of any kind. The building is being con- 
structed of glass so far as possible, using only posts 
and columns on the outside sufficient to support the 
roof and windows. The color of the exterior is to 
be of pure white. The offices are to be surrounded 
by brass railings and the posts dividing the sales de- 
partment from the garage are to be connected by ar- 
tistic chains. The ladies' and gentlemen's parlors 
and waiting rooms are to be provided with the most 
artistic equipment and furniture. 

The building will be completed and occupied be- 
tween February 15th and March 15th. The directors 
are as follows: J. A. Marsh, president; H. C. Tilden, 
Livingston Jenks, C. K. Harley and C. L. Tilden. 



e and garage, having a frontage of 137 :6 feet on Gol- 
Park, and 137:6 feet on Elm avenue. 

and latest models of fire arms, sporting goods, etc. 
Mr. Skinner has been identified in this city for many 
years in the sporting goods line, and is well-known 
throughout the Pacific Coast, being one of the most 
popular men in this line of business in the city. Dur- 
ing the past 30 years Mr. Skinner has mack- many 
friends among sportsmen, always ready and willing 
as he is to give them pointers as to the different quali- 
ties of ammunition and fishing tackle, used in differ- 
ent sections of the State for various species of game 
and fish. 

Many of his friends have not heard of the change 
which has taken place, and will be informed through 
these columns in the near future as to location of 
his new establishment. It is safe to say that Mr, 
Skinner is one of the best posted men in the country 
on game laws and the different materials used for 
hunting and fishing in the various lakes and hunting 
reserves, and has always been ready to impart infor- 
mation valuable to the sportsman. 



Mr. H. E. Skinner has severed his connection with 
the H. E. Skinner Company. The company will dis- 
incorporate and start under a new name, while Mr. 
Skinner, with his two sons, intend opening up a 
new establishment under the firm name of H. E. 
Skinner & Sons. The new firm will carry all makes 



An interesting exhibit at the automobile show in 
Paris was the Renard trackless train, consisting of 
a number of passenger vehicles drawn by a 60 horse- 
power tractor. The tractor is not exhibited, but the 
method by which the rear wheels of the cars are me- 
chanically driven is shown. An overshaft, univer- 
sally jointed wherever necessary, runs the entire 
length of the train, and communicates the drive to 
under-inclined and universally-jointed propeller 




The Renard Automobile Train 



Latest type of Freak automobile construction. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January g, 1904. 



snafts on each vehicle. The drive is through spur 
gearing contained in a gear box set in the frame of 
each car. 




The Flexbl 
Another machine exhibited at the Paris show was 
the Flexbi. This car lias four steering wheels car- 
ried on spindles set at the ends of a cambered frame 
rocking centrally on the fixed driving axle of the car. 
The steering spindles arc connected to an articulated 
steering gear, so that when the wheels are deflected 
each takes the angle necessary to the curve desired. 
The longitudinal rocking of each side member per- 
mits of any wheel passing over obstacles without 
lifting the car. The steering center of the wheels 
are in the hub centers. 



Ormond-Daytona Beach, Florida, has the reputa- 
tion as the fastest speed course for autos in America. 

Nestman, in a Stevens-Duryea, clipped off a mile 
i' 1 57 I_ 5 seconds, making a new world's record for 
cars of 1,000 pounds and under. He also drove 'his 
machine five miles in 4:57 3-5. 

Cliarles Schmidt, on the Packard Gray Wolf, cov- 
ered the mile in 50 2-5 seconds, and five miles in 
4:21 3-5- 

Schmidt also covered a mile on this course (wind 
blowing) in 46 2-5 seconds, <>r two fractions from the 
world's record on a straight-away" track, same be- 
ing held in France. 

The times developed at the meet were the fastest 
yet made in America, and it is expected that before 
the Florida tournament is over the world's records 
from one to five miles will be held in this country. 




RATES LESS THAN CARRIAGES 

CALL 

MOBILE CARRIAGE COMPANY, 
Golden Gate and Van Ness Avenues. 



Phones: Larkin 3841; Polk 3086. Down-town 
office: Lobby Palace Hotel, Phone Bush 859. 
You can secure these cars at any hotel or cafe 
by asking for MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. 



SALES DEPARTMENT COAST AGENCIES. 
Pierce Arrow Touring Car (French) price $2650 

Pierce Stanhope (French type) 1350 

Northern Runabout 1 leader in New York) 800 
Fine Garage, expert mechanics, guaranteed 
expenses. 



MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. 

Golden Gate and Van Ness Aves. Open all night. 



THE NEW JONES CORBIN 



The sportiest and highest powered 
car on the market. Arrange for 
immediate demonstration. 

PACIFIC MOTOR. CAR CO. 

49 CITY HALL AV£. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



Have you seen the ■jfr-r 



BUCKBOARD? 

The talk of the town. 
Best Automobile at any 



price. 
Costs 



$425 




STRONG- EASY R1DING-RELIABLE-GUARANTEED 



ON EXHIBIT AT- 



SUNSET AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1814 MARKET STREET - - • SAN FRANCISCO 

THE 




White Garage 

Cor. Market & Franklin 

—Sales rooms— 
300-302-304 Post Street. S. F 
White Sewing Machine Co 

The 1903 "White" Largest and best equipped auto- 

mobile garage on the Coast. Machines of all makes stored and repair* d 

ELECTRIC and 

GASOLINE 
CARS... 

A. F. BROOKE RIDLEY, ,8 *g*MSS™* 

Telephone South 394 San Francisco, Cal. 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make tljem in 
any style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

H. E. SKINNER CO. 

801 MARKET ST. 




VELVET 

LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 
and Women 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile Co.— 28S S Market street. Phone John 1661. 
Automobiles stored and repaired. Expert workmanship. Gaso- 
line and oil at all hours. Santa Clara County agents for the 
\\ estern Automobile Company and National Automobile Com- 
pany. 



January 16, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*5 




ALL SAINTS NIGHT. 

It was the nlshi the v. 1 

aints. that I foi 
Bark to mo i .11110 my little son. 
And woo! I know liim not. 

How could I dream thn small (eel bare 

Wore those that, snowy .-> 
We shut from out the Ughl and air 
To find their way to God? 

The randies that I pave to llgl 1 
That darksome road for him. 

He did not bring with him U'.st night. 
And my reft eyes were dim. 

I shut the door against the child 

I would have died to USB; 
What if those feet, by earth defiled. 

Their backward way should 111 

If any child again might come. 

Though he in tatters dressed, 
I'd take him in my empty home 

And rock him on my breast. 



A SOUTHt_..N TWILIGHT. 
By Clinton Bcollard in Smart Set 
A little shallow silver urn, 

High in the East the new moon hung; 
Amid the palms a fountain flung 
Its snowy floss, and there, above, 
With its impassioned unconcern, 

A hidden bird discoursed of love. 

I felt your hand upon my arm 
Flutter as doth a thrush's wing. 
Then tighten. Sweet, how small a thing 
Draws kindred spirits heart to heart! 
More was that hour's elusive charm 
To us than eloquence or art. 



THE TRUANT. 

By Charlotte Becker in the Smart Set 

moonbeam, tell me, have you seen, 
Upon your ghostly way, 

Perchance, a little flower o' Jream, 
That I lost yesterday? 

"Aye, I have seen your treasure, child. 
And safe from harm it lies. 

1 met young Love within the wood, 
Your dream-bower in his eyes!" 



A SONG. 

By Louise Mack in Pearson's 
My heart is empty, empty, 
Swept clear of love and pain. 
I'll hie me to the lilac, 
I'll woo the rose again. 

I'll wander in the starlight 

And lie among the leaves, 

And dream to the night-raindrops 

That beat about the eaves. 

My heart is empty, empty. 
Swept clear of love, and you, 
Who stole me from my lilacs, 
Stole stars and lilies, too. 
You stilled the sighing forests. 
You broke the wind's control, 
And I forgot the sunsets 
Wlhen you were in my soul. 

My heart is empty, empty, 
It holds no more of you. 
Oh, enter, wdnds and sunsets, 
Starlight and rose and dew. 
Ah, faithful ones, forgiving, 
You bend to me once more. 
Though you have guessed the secret 
That hides in my heart's core. 



SEALSKIN 

JACKETS 

To Order $125 And Up 

rVrUstto workmanship and pertool nt guars 
Remodeling*, repairing and dyeing al «h<-rt notloe 

POPULAR PRICES 

Siberian Fur Co, 

Itlfnri 

Mmu'.MuM re FUR.R.IER.S 

AD. KOCOUR, Manager 
Formerly cutter with RevMon Freree, 
Pnris, London, New York 

121 POST STREET, Rooms 7 to 11 

SAN FRANCISCO 



J p LACAZE & Co. 

French Laundry Work Guaranteed 

The BEST in San Francisco 



TEL. 


EAST 61S 829 SVTTEK ST 


R. 


McCOLGAN 




REAL ESTATE and LOANS 




24 Montgomery St. S. F* 

Telephone Main 5516 



$500 REWARD 



for any case of Rheumatism which can- 
,not be cured with Dr. Drummond'g 
Lightning Remedies; restores stiff joints, drawn cords, and hardened 
muscles. Proof from 25 States sent ou reuuest Address Drummond 
Medicine Co. 84 Nassau Street, New York. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 



Should use DAMIANA BIT- 
TERS, the great Mexican 
remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 
Send for circular: Naber, Alts & Brune, 325 Market St., S. F. 



and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of California. 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share for 
development purposes. The ore in sight Is practically 
unlimited. When the present Issue of stock is exhausted, 
the price will be raiseu to 50 cents a share. 

Apply to the office of the company, room 20F Up '^13 Mar- 
ket street, for prospectus, which gives Jjjjfl information. 
VINCENT -ivfEALE, Secretary. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 




^^^ m *^ ^T^? 



Insurance 




The twenty-eighth annual meeting of the Fire Un- 
derwriters' Association of the Pacific is now history. 
It was called to order Tuesday, the 12th inst., at 10 
a. m., and concluded its business affairs on Wednes- 
day, the 13th, at 5 p. m. The following was the pro- 
gramme : 

10:00 a. m. Tuesday — 1. Reports: Secretary- 
Treasurer, Calvert Meade ; Executive Committee, 
W. H. Gibbons; Library Committee, Arthur Brown. 
2. President's address: Whitney Palache. 3. Our 
Library: J. P. Moore. 4. Petroleum and its Relation 
to Fire Underwriting: Albert W. Gunnison. 

2 :oo p. m. Tuesday — 5. Is the Rate Adequate : 
Herbert Folger; 6. Manufacturers' Cost of Replace- 
ment : William Maris ; 7. Adventures of a Daily Re- 
port: R. C. Medcraft. 

10:00 a. m. Wednesday — 8. Safeguards in the 
L T se of Statistics : Professor Carl C. Plehn ; 9. The 
Theatre Hazard: W. S. Duval; 10. The Fire Hazard 
of Electricity : Prof. C. L. Cory. 

2:00 p. m. Wednesday — 11. (a) University Work 
in Insurance, (b) Co-Insurance Clause: A. W. Whit- 
ney; 12. The Fire Hazard of San Francisco: H. Mc- 
D. Spencer; 13. Reports of Special Committees; 14. 
California Knapsack: George F. Grant, Edward 
Niles ; 15. Election of Officers. 

The papers read were of more than ordinary merit. 
Herbert Folger was thoroughly in touch with his 
subject. Medcraft's Adventures of a Daily Report 
was a thoroughly interesting contribution, and the 
papers of Mr. Duval and Mr. McD. Spencer both 
evidenced that an enormous amount of study and 
care had been expended in preparation. The Knap- 
sack, as usual, was full of good things, and Messrs. 
G. F. Grant and Edward Niles as editors are justly 
entitled to all the encomiums passed on the result 
of their efforts. 

The principal officers elected to serve for the en- 
suing year were: Mr. J. L. Fuller, president; Mr. A. 
W. Thornton, vice-president; and Mr. Calvert Meade 
was re-elected secretary. Mr. Palache, the retiring 
president, becomes in the usual order of things the 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. Grant and 
Niles retain their editorship and business manage- 
ment of the Knapsack. The attendance of the mem- 
bers was large and their attention in proportion. 

The smouldering fires of conflict were successfully 
banked by a thin coating of the ashes of policy, and 
only in one or two instances did it threaten to leap 
into flames. The Association departed from its cus- 
tom, which it has been understood for years should 
pertain, in not electing any officer to any position 
in the direct line of promotion unless he resided in 
San Francisco. This time it took Mr Thornton 
from the Northwest and made him vice-president, 
with an alacrity that bespoke a programme. This 
verifies the intimation given in a previous edition 
that the Northwestern Specials were here and pre- 
pared to vote ; and their vote and their numbers re- 
sulted in Mr. Thornton's advancement. It is a wise 
[■-'-"Hon, and was caused by a desire on the part 
'-'e association for amity. The Northwest 
MO b» -.ignition, and Mr. Meade his re-elec- 
Golden Gate anct^ the Cerebus of the Northwest's 



The course of this paper was criticised in the 
meeting, and that vigorously by one of the most re- 
spected members of the Association, who is as posi- 
tive in his nature as he is forceful in his remarks. 
The correctness, however, of the remarks objected 
to was corroborated by the before-mentioned elec- 
tion of Mr. Thornton, and the further fact that it 
caused the Association to get out of the old rut and 
called forth the liveliest speech of the session. 

* * * 

The more sober business of the meeting was cap- 
ped by the regulation banquet at the Maple Room 
of the Palace. The dinner committee in the dis- 
charge of its duties, covered itself with glory and 
filled some of the guests with indigestion. There 
was a friendly spirit (other than that in the bottles) 
around the board, and as the glasses clinked, one 
could feel rates higher, losses lower, and business im- 
proving. The remarks, the jokes, and the guests 
were all in perfect good taste, even if some of the 
latter were not dressed for the occasion. It was a 

love feast, with the sad experiences cut out. 

* * * 

Mr. Palache made an ideal toast-master, and kept 
the gathering full of life in a manner which compels 
the acknowledgment of his ability as a presiding offi- 
cer. 

* * * 

The Indiana Appellate Court, says an exchange, 
has declared that the Northwestern Insurance Com- 
pany must pay three checks, each for $10,000, to Mrs. 
Kate Kidder, and one which the company stopped 
payment when the creditors of the milling company, 
of which her husband had been president, made a 
claim to the insurance money on the ground that the 
premiums had been paid with the money of the mill- 
ing company. The court held that as the company 
had issued checks and taken up the policies it was 
stopped from refusing payment because the issu- 
ance of checks was an independent transaction. This 
is republished because it is a point which is novel 
and is worthy of note by the profession. 
'* * * 

C. A. Mills has left the Union Central. 

* * * 

Thomas H. Bowles, at one time general agent of 
the Mutual Life in Wisconsin, and who tried to bur- 
glarize himself into a position with that company, 
in an official capacity, is reported to be now State 
agent for the Equitable for Michigan. 

* * * 

The directors of the Royal Exchange Assurance 
Company declared an interim dividend of 4 per cent, 
tax free, payable on January 6th. 

* * * 

The insurance press states that another effort has 
been made by outside parties to secure a controll- 
ing interest in the Hanover. The company's stock- 
holders received letters from one F. E. Baker, who 
signed himself "Syndicate Agent." It has been hint- 
ed that Theodore H. Price, who at one time tried 
to secure a controlling interest in the company, is 
behind Baker in the present move. There seems to be 
little chance that the outsiders will win. 



Dr. Decker, 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless 
teeth extracting. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the 

rooms, formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



L. & M. Alexander & Co. are located as before, 110 Mont 
gomery street, and rent and sell typewriters, 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OBITUARY. 



John A. Muir. one of the best-known r.ii'- 

• ■■A away at Loa Vngeles "n the 
Sth. Muir held standing, in the opinion of the r.nl- 
world, only second to II. E. Huntington. Il<- 
began his railroad career as a telegraph opera) 
Rocklin. now famous as the cradle of many cele- 
brated railroad men. He made rapid strides in In-, 
-ion. finally succeeding to the position 
of Division Superintendent of the Southern Pacific 
ipany. This he held until 1902. Upon the ac 
cession of Mr. Hays he severed his connection and 
hecame associated with Mr. H. E. Huntington's Los 
Angeles Railway System. He leaves a widow and 
six sons. 

When Samuel Cutler Bigelow, a well-known han- 
ker of San Francisco, died the other .lay (Januarj 
7th) one of the old school of financiers was lost to 
the world. Mr. Bigelow had reached the ripe old age 
of 80 years. He still looked forward to longer life, 
and a pathetic incident in his taking off was that he 
had just finished a fine new mansion which he did 
not live to enjoy. 

In their 1904 calendar just received, N. W. Aver 
& Son have adhered to their popular conception of 
a business calendar, but have changed the design and 
coloring. The size is the same, about fourteen by 
twenty-eight inches, with large readable dates, hut 
the clay modeled design printed in sepia tints gives 
more prominence to their well-known motto, "Keep- 
ing Everlastingly at it Brings Success" ; not a bad 
thing, by the way, for business people, and most 
other people, to have before them throughout the 
year. It is generally conceded that this advertising 
agency annually expends more money for advertis- 
ing than any other concern of the kind, which fact 
lends interest to their utterances on the subject. Re- 
quests for this calendar addressed to their Philadel- 
phia office, accompanied by twenty-five cents to cover 
cost and postage, will be taken care of for the present. 
Last year the supply lasted barely ten days. 

If Your Physician 

prescribes a milk diet, for its easy digestibility, it will be 
well to use Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream to 
get a ricb, deliciously flavored milk food, perfectly steril- 
ized, according to latest sanitary methods. For general 
household uses. Prepared by Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 



The epicure knows that an oyster should be eaten 

as near the oyster bed as possible, and that the least pos- 
sible time should ensue between the time the oyster is 
"tonged" to the minute of consumption. Moraghan's Oyster 
House in the California Market is world-famed as the place 
best to secure the succulent bivalve. The "chef" is pre- 
eminent as a master of the art of cookery, and no one seek- 
ing satisfaction in oysters will ever do aught but praise 
Moraghan's. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Full weight 
guaranteed. In economy, cleanliness and heat producing 
qualities Briquettes are superior to coal. Sold only by the 
Tesla Coal Company, -jtn andl Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



To get a clear head try the Post St. Turkish Bath. 



Fire, Llghtni' 

The Home Insurai. 

Orga. 




-New York 



Capital $3,000,000. Gu 

Liberal contracts. Favorable Terms. 

sentatives before concluding short time > 

may be to your advantage. 
H. L. ROFF, General Agent; GEO. M. t 

tan Manager. 

210 Sansome St., 



\ -£> ,.*17,300,000 

%, % %. r Eepre- 
^ ^ <t .^ntracts 

ST ipoli- 



-v 

■ St. « 



NEWS LETTER. 

INSURANCE 



*7 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,500,000 

Founded A. D. 17*1. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital (3,000.000 

Surplus to rnllrj -Holders 6]ok]oI6 

JAMES I). BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., & F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Cnpltol raid-up R.44G.100. Assets, t24.662.043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. JS.93u.431.41. Losses Paid, over 1131,000.000 

Pacific Coast Branch : 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, 601 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established I860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders. . 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 

Unexcelled ror liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

DON'T INSURE— Until you have examined the new 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy. 

Issued Exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 

Assets, $1,250,000. Insurance in force, $20,000,000 

For particulars address the company. Agents Wanted. 
Fair Building. 230 Montgomery Street. San Franolsco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital 187,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

OF EEFtTET. GEEM-ANY 

Capital {2,250,000 Asset* $10,934,240 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St., San Francisco. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 16, 1904. 




^ajW 



Insurance 




The twenty-eighth annual meeting of the Fire Un- 
derwriters' Association of the Pacific is now history. 
It was called to order Tuesday, the 12th inst, at 10 
a. m., and concluded its business affairs on Wednes- 
day, the 13th, at 5 p. 111. The following was the pro- 
gramme : 

10:00 a. m. Tuesday — I. Reports: Secretary- 
Treasurer, Calvert Meade ; Executive Committee, 
W. H. Gibbons ; Library Committee, Arthur Brown. 
2. President's address: Whitney Palache. 3. Our 
Library : J. P. Moore. 4. Petroleum and its Relation 
to Fire Underwriting: Albert W. Gunnison. 

2 :oo p. m. Tuesday — 5. Is the Rate Adequate : 
Herbert Folger ; 6. Manufacturers' Cost of Replace- 
ment: William Maris; 7. Adventures of a Daily Re- 
port : R. C. Medcraft. 

10:00 a. m. Wednesday — 8. Safeguards in the 
Use of Statistics: Professor Carl C. Plehn ; 9. The 
Theatre Hazard: W. S. Duval; 10. The Fire Hazard 
of Electricity : Prof. C. L. Cory. 

2:00 p. m. Wednesday — II. (a) University Work 
in Insurance, (b) Co-Insurance Clause: A. W. Whit- 
ney; 12. The Fire Hazard of San Francisco: H. Mc- 
D. Spencer; 13. Reports of Special Committees; 14. 
California Knapsack : George F. Grant, Edward 
Niles; 15. Election of Officers. 

The papers read were of more than ordinary merit. 
Herbert Folger was thoroughly in touch with his 
subject. Medcraft's Adventures of a Daily Report 
was a thoroughly interesting contribution, and the 
papers of Mr. Duval and Mr. McD. Spencer both 
evidenced that an enormous amount of study and 
care had been expended in preparation. The Knap- 
sack, as usual, was full of good things, and Messrs. 
G. F. Grant and Edward Niles as editors are justly 
entitled to all the encomiums passed on the result 
of their efforts. 

The principal officers elected to serve for the en- 
suing year were : Mr. J. L. Fuller, president ; Mr. A. 
W. Thornton, vice-president ; and Mr. Calvert Meade 
was re-elected secretary. Mr. Palache, the retiring 
president, becomes in the usual order of things the 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. Grant and 
Niles retain their editorship and business manage- 
ment of the Knapsack. The attendance of the mem- 
bers was large and their attention in proportion. 

The smouldering fires of conflict were successfully 
banked by a thin coating of the ashes of policv, and 
only in one or two instances did it threaten to leap 
into flames. The Association departed from its cus- 
tom, which it has been understood for years should 
pertain, in not electing any officer to any position 
in the direct line of promotion unless he resided in 
San Francisco. This time it took Mr Thornton 
from the Northwest and made him vice-president, 
with an alacrity that bespoke a programme. This 
verifies the intimation given in a previous edition 
that the Northwestern Specials were here and pre- 
pared to vote; and their vote and their numbers re- 
sulted in Mr. Thornton's advancement. It is a wise 
_ ;^~" f ion, and was caused by a desire on the part 
i the wiiov^e association for amity. The Northwest 
° cured its tW'-Qgnition, and Mr. Meade his re-elec- 
!vy* bv this sop t^ the Cerebus of the Northwest's 



The course of this paper was criticised in the 
meeting, and that vigorously by one of the most re- 
spected members of the Association, who is as posi- 
tive in his nature as he is forceful in his remarks. 
The correctness, however, of the remarks objected 
to was corroborated by the before-mentioned elec- 
tion of Mr. Thornton, and the further fact that it 
caused the Association to get out of the old rut and 
called forth the liveliest speech of the session. 

The more sober business of the meeting was cap- 
ped by the regulation banquet at the Maple Room 
of the Palace. The dinner committee in the dis- 
charge of its duties, covered itself with glory and 
filled some of the guests with indigestion. There 
was a friendly spirit (other than that in the bottles) 
around the board, and as the glasses clinked, one 
could feel rates higher, losses lower, and business im- 
proving. The remarks, the jokes, and the guests 
were all in perfect good taste, even if some of the 
latter were not dressed for the occasion. It was a 
love feast, with the sad experiences cut out. 

Mr. Palache made an ideal toast-master, and kept 
the gathering full of life in a manner which compels 
the acknowledgment of his ability as a presiding offi- 
cer. 

* * * 

The Indiana Appellate Court, says an exchange, 
has declared that the Northwestern Insurance Com-, 
pany must pay three checks, each for $10,000, to Mrs. 
Kate Kidder, and one which the company stopped 
payment when the creditors of the milling company, 
of which her husband had been president, made a 
claim to the insurance money on the ground that the 
premiums had been paid with the money of the mill- 
ing company. The court held that as the company 
had issued checks and taken up the policies it was 
stopped from refusing payment because the issu- 
ance of checks was an independent transaction. This 
is republished because it is a point which is novel 
and is worthy of note by the profession. 

C. A. Mills has left the Union Central. 

Thomas H. Bowles, at one time general agent of 
the Mutual Life in Wisconsin, and who tried to bur- 
glarize himself into a position with that company, 
in an official capacity, is reported to be now State 
agent for the Equitable for Michigan. 

* * * 

The directors of the Royal Exchange Assurance 
Company declared an interim dividend of 4 per cent, 
tax free, payable on January 6th. 

* * * 

The insurance press states that another effort has 
been made by outside parties to secure a controll- 
ing interest in the Hanover. The company's stock- 
holders received letters from one F. E. Baker, who 
signed himself "Syndicate Agent." It has been hint- 
ed that Theodore H. Price, who at one time tried 
to secure a controlling interest in the company, is 
behind Baker in the present move. There seems to be 
little chance that the outsiders will win. 



Or. Decker, 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless 
teeth extracting. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the 

rooms, formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



L. & M. Alexander & Co. are located as before, 110 Mont- 
gomery street, and rent and sell typewriters, 



January 16, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OBITUARY. 

John A. Muir ■m«n rnilro.nl men 

•if t! -,| aw. iv at I ..- \ngcles on tlic 

8th. Muir held standing, in the opinion of the rail- 
world, only second t.> II. I". Huntington. Il<- 
began his railm.nl career as a telegraph opera) 

lin. now famous as the rraillc of many cele- 
brated railroad men. He made rapid strides in his 
sion, finally succeeding to the position 

of Division Superintendent of the Southern Pacific 
Company. This he held until tijoj. Upon the ac- 
cession of Mr. Hays he severed his connection and 
became associated with Mr. H. I". Huntington's Los 

les Railway System. He leaves a widow and 
>ns. 
When Samuel Cutler Bigelow, a well-known han- 
ker of San Francisco, died the other day (January 
jlh) one of the old school of financiers was lost to 
the world. Mr. Bigelow had reached the ripe old age 
of 80 years. He still looked forward to longer life, 
and a pathetic incident in his taking off was that he 
had just finished a fine new mansion which he did 
not live to enjoy. 

In their 1904 calendar just received. X. W. Ayer 
& Son have adhered to their popular conception of 
a business calendar, but have changed the design and 
coloring. The size is the same, about fourteen by 
twenty-eight inches, with large readable dates, but 
the clay modeled design printed in sepia tints gives 
more prominence to their well-known motto, "Keep- 
ing Everlastingly at it Brings Success" ; not a bad 
thing, by the way, for business people, and most 
other people, to have before them throughout the 
year. It is generally conceded that this advertising 
agency annually expends more money for advertis- 
ing than any other concern of the kind, which fact 
lends interest to their utterances on the subject. Re- 
quests for this calendar addressed to their Philadel- 
phia office, accompanied by twenty-five cents to cover 
cost and postage, will be taken care of for the present. 
Last year the supply lasted barely ten days. 

If Your Physician 
prescribes a milk diet, for its easy digestibility, it will be 
well to use Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream to 
get a rich, deliciously flavored milk food, perfectly steril- 
ized, according to latest sanitary methods. For general 
household uses. Prepared by Borden's Condensed M'ilk Co. 



NEWS LETTER. 

INSURANCE 



The epicure knows that an oyster should be eaten 

as near the oyster bed as possible, and that the least pos- 
sible time should ensue between the time the oyster is 
"tonged" to the minute of consumption. Moraghan's Oyster 
House in the California Market is world-famed as the place 
best to secure the succulent bivalve. The "chef" is pre- 
eminent as a master of the art of cookery, and* no one seek- 
ing satisfaction in oysters will ever do aught but praise 
Moraghan's. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$7.50 per ton; half ton ?4; quarter ton $2. Full weight 
guaranteed. In economy, cleanliness and heat producing 
qualities Briquettes are superior to coal. Sold only by the 
Tesla Coal Company, -jtn andl Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



To get a clear head try the Post St. Turkish Bath. 



Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1853 
Capital $3,000,000. Gross Cash Assets $17,300,000 

Liberal contracts. Favorable Terms. Conference with our Repre- 
sentatives before concluding short time yearly or long time contracts 
may be to your advantage. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent; GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropoli- 
tan Manager. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,500,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

I'aid-up Cn pi tat 33,000.000 

Surplus lo Policy-Holders 6.022.01G 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., 8. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital raid-up. 33.446.100. Assets, 324. 662,043.36 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 18,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over 3131,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 601 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders. . 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco. 411 California St. 

Unexcelled: ror liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 



DON'T INSURE— Until you have examined the new 
Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy. 

Issued Exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 

Assets, $1,250,000. Insurance in force, $20,000,000 

For particulars address the company. Agents Wanted. 
Fair Building. 230 Montgomery Street. San Francisco 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 



Capital 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 



367,000,000 

316 California St., S. F. 



The Thuringia Insurance Company 

OF EEFtJBT. gebmant 

Capital $2,250,000 Asset* 310,984,246 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St., San Francisco. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER." 



January 16, 1904. 



X5he Greater Love 



They had been school chums, and unlike most i^irl 
friends', their regard for each other had outgrown 
their short frocks. Hetty Lester was the daring 
spirit of the two. Tall, dark-skinned, black-eyed — 
like Susan in the play — with hair bluey-black as a 
raven's, she looked like a Spaniard, and was know.' 
to all the pupils at Chilcote High School as "the 
Gipsy." She was the leader in mischief and the 
mouthpiece in complaint. Whenever an expedition 
was planned or a difficulty had to he faced. Gipsy 
was always in demand. .Most of the girls feared 
Gipsy, but all of them liked her; she. on the other 
hand, held their likes and dislikes in cool indifference. 
When she accepted the role of leader — which was 
pretty generally whenever a leader was required — 
her orders were issued without the slightest refer- 
ence to their wishes, and they had to obey them, or 
Gipsy, with a grin of her gleaming teeth, left them 
to shift for themselves. 

Out of the whole school she formed but one attach- 
ment, and this was more like the passive acceptance 
of a blind, dog-like worship than a warm-blooded re- 
turn of the attachment which pretty Alice Mar- 
chant bestowed on her. Alice was a contrast to Gipsy 
in every way. She was as decidedly blonde as Gipsj 
was brunette, and she was as timid, trustful and 
yielding as Gipsy was strong, self-willed and self-re- 
liant. 

The affection which Alice bestowed on ( iipsy was 
a source of wonderment to the other girls, who would 
have thought it much more natural bad she been re- 
pelled by Gipsy's brusque and wayward manner, But 
friendship of a strong and lasting character is most 
frequently found between those of contrasting dis- 
positions, and this well-known fact must be held as 
accounting for the fast and firm friendship which had 
sprung up between them. 

Gipsy's relatives were much better off than those 
of Alice, and after the school days were over her 
time was mainly devoted to holiday making. She re- 
membered her little friend with sufficient interest to 
write her lengthy accounts of her continental wander- 
ings and her many holiday jaunts. They w 1 n 
sources of the greatest delight to Alice during the 
period while her parents were anxiously debating the 
question of her future: for Alice's father was but a 
poor country parson, and it was necessary that she 
should choose a profession. 

The choice was at length made, and Mire opened 
a "Translations, Correspondence and Typewriting 
Bureau" in Leicester street. It was a decision ar- 
rived at in accordance with her own wishes, and 
when she was fairly installed as proprietress of the 
two rooms which constituted the bureau, she pluckily 
set herself to work up a clientele. In this endeavor 
she was loyally assisted by all her old school chums 
who had connections in London, for they recom- 
mended the new venture to their acquaintances, and 
by this means helped "Gipsy's friend," as she was 
generally called, to a promising start. 

Gipsy wrote to the bureau several lengthy letters 
in the few months following its starting, and then 
there was silence. A silence for nearly a twelve- 
month, during which Alice prayed for her wayward 
friend, and wondered what she was doing. And then 
one day a stranger called at the bureau and asked 
to see Miss Marchant. Alice had succeeded so well 
by this time that she employed two lad}' clerks, and 



did not see callers herself unless by appointment. 

"The lady said her business was personal, Miss. 
and she has sent in this message." The clerk handed 
a scrap of paper as she spoke. .Mice looked at the 
paper. On it was scrawled in pencil : 

"Gipsy." 

A moment later her quondam friend was shown in, 
and Alice impetuously rushed into her arms. It was 
the old dog-like, blind devotion, the old unthinking 
gladness at her presence. It was the same ecstasy a 
faithful dog might show at the return of a loved mas- 
ter. And then, when the first greetings were over, 
Gipsy had a terrible story to tell, which sent her poor 
little friend into a shiver of apprehension and dread. 

"I have no one to rely on, Alie, but you," she said, 
when her story was told. "It is no use advising now, 
for it's all done and over, and it's no use blaming 
either, for, God help me! I should have to do it, if 
the past year had to be lived all over again. I 
wanted to make a sacrifice for his sake to prove how 
passionately I loved him." 

There was a moment's silence. 

"Where is it?" asked Alice, in a terrified, husky 
whisper. 

"At my rooms." 

"And you want me to keep it?" 

"1 can think of nothing else, Alie, and I can think 
of no one but you to help me. My people have no 
idea of what has happened. You know what they 
are, and 1 simply dread to think what exposure would 
mean." 

"Oh, Gipsy, Gipsy, how sorry I am. I could blame 
you very much, but that I pity you, my poor Gipsy, 
so much more. But he " 

"He loves me, Alie. We are simply injured by 

fate. If be could he would marry me. If I could only 

marry him, heavens! how happy I should be. You 

will help me, Alie?" 

"Yes, Gipsy, I will." 

***** 

Business grew apace at Alice's bureau, and then 
came the great story of her life. 

He was a lawyer with a growing business, and he 
made her acquaintance by a chance visit to the bu- 
reau when he brought some documents to be copied. 
The work was rather particular, and he saw Miss 
Marchant about it. Conversation drifted from the 
work in hand to topics in general, and Alice chanced 
to mention Chilcote High School. 

"My sister was at school there," said he. 

"Your sister!" exclaimed Alice; and then, remem- 
bering his name, "Not Gipsy, surely?" 

But it was Gipsy. The fact led to a closer ac- 
quaintance, the acquaintance to intimacy, and inti- 
macy to love; and then the demon "Rumor" inter- 
posed his poisonous head. 

"God knows, Alice," said he, "I love you as I do 
my life, but I love my honor even more. I have writ- 
ten to my mother about you, but I have only. written 
what my love for you dictated. Why cannot you see 
yourself the anguish this is causing me, and com to 
my rescue by telling me everything?" 

"Show me the letter." she said, stonily. 

It was an anonymous letter, the poignard of the 
civilized assassin. It read: 

"Has Miss Marchant confessed to you that she has 
a child nearly two years of age? Is she a widow? 
Who is its father? Ask her." 



January 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ao 



. '.hen 
at hi 

r.iril." she said, "it is true thai I am rearii 
child, but its ' and I cannot tell it 

wear 
>u that it is not my child, and that I have not 
you suppose in act or thought" 
"But you must tell me the truth." 
"I canni 

"liven though it parts us forever:" 
"Even though it pan- us forever^" 
be it." 

***** 

A month passed — a month of such aiiuni~li and suf- 
fering as Alice never thought the human heart could 
endure, and she had to face all the terrible years to 
come without a hope <ir consolation, save in the 
Jit that she had spared her friend, and saved her 
lover the humiliation of learning his sister's -hame. 
And men one morning she had a visitor; a dear, 
white-haired old lady, in whose sweet features the 
traces of recent suffering appeared to be ineffaceable. 

"1 am Gerard's mother." sai.i she. "and I have 
come to ask you to forgive him. Hetty — Gipsy you 
call her — could not bear to see you and him suffer 
for her sin, and she has confessed the truth to us. 
How noble of you to suffer so much for a friend! 
God has taken one daughter from me, but He has 
given me another. I, his mother, beg you to forgive 
my son." 

"And you will forgive Gipsy, too. Ah, yes, you 
will ; together we will read the stories of sin and for- 
giveness in the old Book, and learn something from 
them. Perhaps we shall learn there the lesson of 
mercy, which is greater than all the wisdom of the 
world." — London Free Lance. 



If you want to eat the best, drink the best, and be 

among the best people, go to Teehau Tavern, which is sec- 
ond to no restaurant in San Francisco. It is the favorite 
after-the-theatre resort, and deserves its fine reputation. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

Has declared a dividend for the year ending December 31. 1903, of 5 
pel nt on ordinary deposits, i; per cent on term deposits and 8 pet- 
cent to stockholders, free of taxes- 

I)];. WASHINGTON DODGE. President. 
WM. COliiSIN, See. and Gen. Manager. 
Office— 301 California St., Sau Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the board of directors of this society, held 
this day. a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one- 
fourth (3 1-4) per cent od all deposits for the six months ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1908, free from all taxes, and payable od and after January 2, 1904. 
liOBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office— Cor. Market. McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco, De- 
cembers, 1903. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

Has declared a dividend for the term ending December si, 1903, at the 
rate of three and one-auarter (3 1-4) per cent per annum on all deposits 
free of taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1904. 

(Signed) CYRUS W- CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery St., cor. Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with December 31, 1903, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of three and one-quarter (3 1-4) per 
cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Saturday, January 2, 1904. GEO. TOURNT, Secretary. 

Office— 526 California Street. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending December 31, 1903, dividends have 
been declared on deposits in the savings department of this 
company as follows: On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per 
cent per annum, and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3 per 
cent per annum, free of taxes and payable on and after Satur- 
day, January 2, 1904. Dividends uncalled for are added to the 
principal after January 1, 1904. „„_,„ „, 

J. DADZBLD BROWN, Manager. 

Office— Corner California and Montgomery Sts. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



GRAY BROS -— - 



KbifE.. California and 
ry Btt,, San Franciaco. 
' gh Street. Ixta Angeles. 



Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



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Our beautiful 912.00 Art Bromides will be 
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DEALERS TN 

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TEL MAIN 19S - 55-57-S9-61 FIKS-T ST. 8AK FRANCISCO 

Blalce. Mofllt* To»ne. Lo» Aofrelrl Cal. 
Blake McPall A Co. Portland, Oregon. 



Rriicriar-.*,?, harbers. bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 
DlUSllCS , '" llaru Ulbl< ». brewers, book binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour mills, foundries, 
laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters 
sboe factories, oiable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush flfts., 609 Sacramento St, S. F., Tel. Main 561 1 



Old Rose Bud Whiskey 

Absolutely the purest on the market 
APPLEGATE <& SONS, Distillers 

Louisville. Ken. Pacific Const Agents 

RATHJEN WINE COMPANY. - ***$$%& &£ 6171 



AMERICAN 

CANNEL 



COAL 



Sold by all Reliable Dealers 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gillingham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



SING FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. "We have but one 
price. Ail goods marked in plain English figures. 

614 DUPONT STREET, S. F. Next to St. Mary's Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. No. 1323. 

B. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




30 SAN 

SHE READ MY PALM. 

She read my palm, and from her 

eyes 
I would have sworn that she was 

wise. 

"Fear not," said she, "though long 

you drop, 
Some day you'll shine way at the 

top." 

For weary years I toiled away ; 
I worked by night, I strove by 
day. 

Yet fame and wealth seemed just 

as far 
Ahead of me as any star. 

All else I bore, nor thought to 

grieve, 
Until my hair began to leave. 

Oh ! then I wept and cursed the 

day 
That palmist maid had crossed my 

way. 

When at the glass I chanced to 

stop — 
Behold! I shone upon the top. 
— Chester Firkins. 



FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves) 

Mamma — Tommy, didn't I tell 
you the other day never to let me 
hear of you playing with those 
naughty boys again? Tommy — 
Yes, mamma ; but you needn't 
blame me if you heard it ; 1 didn't 
tell you. 

Teacher — Johnny, why can't 
you lift yourself by your boot- 
straps? Johnny (promptly) — lie- 
cause I wear shoes. 

Little Margie — I have a new- 
changeable silk dress to wear next 
Sunday — Little Elsie — Pooh, that 
is nothing. All my dresses are 
changeable. 

Little Dot — The paper says they 
are going to build more sky-scrap- 
ers in Chicago. What's a sky- 



January 16, 1904. 



scraper r 



Smill Willie— Oh, 



It is love of virtue, not fear of 
law, that makes civilization. 



sky-scraper is a machine the 
weather man uses to scrape the 
clouds off the sky. 

Sharpe — I wonder why it is that 
minstrel shows are always so 
prominent in autumn ? Whealton 
— 'Because autumn is the chestnut 
season. 

Somehow, it is hard to look up 
to and admire a man who takes 
little, short steps. 



(y\> Cpcfa^ 




The art of cocktail mixing is to so blend 
the ingredients that no one is evident, but 
the delicate flavor of each is apparent. 
Is this the sort of cocktail the man gives 
you who does it by guesswork? There's 
never a mistake in a CLUB COCKTAIL. 
It smells good, tastes good, is good— 
always. Ju S t strain through cracked ice. 
Seven kinds— Manhattan, Martini, Ver- 
mouth, Whiskey, Holland Gin, Tom Gin 
and York. 

G. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO„ Sole Proprietors, 
Hartford New York Iondon 



FAOiriO (JOIST jkOINTS 

SPOHN-PATRICK COMPANY 

San Francisco, Loi Aaaelei, 
Denver, Salt Lake City, Seattle 



Be true to yourself, and you do 
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January 16. 1904. 




COMPAHYi 
EXTRACT 

OF BEEF 



Solemn-faced Man (with news- 
paper) — 'Well, I see there was a 
singular accident at one of the 
slaughter-houses out at the stock- 
yards yesterday. A man who was 
leaning out of an upper story win- 
dow let go and dropped sixty feet, 
and wasn't hurt a particle. Eager 
Listener — Dropped sixty feet 
without getting hurt? Marvelous. 
I don*t understand it. Solemn- 
faced Man — They were pigs' feet. 

"Her death," they say of a 
woman who died lately, "was a 
tragedy." That is nearly true of 
every death. 




ERIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block- 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

"No. Mr Spoonamore. I ni 
could be happy with a man <>i 
your l'.iliit> "My habit*, Miss 
I immi you km 1 

m\ habit-., may I askr" "You hav< 
nol been in 1 hi~ room more than 
half an hour, and in that tune y iu 
have -at on mj sofa pillows, lean 'd 
your head back against my 1 
mg chair tidy, and put you feel 1 n 
my embroidered foot-st 

"Don't you think that woman's 
clever?" "Clever? Why, she's so 
clever she can make all her clothes 
without other women knowing it!" 

Mr. Sparks — 1 have a terrible 
pain in my — aw — head. Miss Snif- 
fer- — There! I knew Sallie Mifkins 
had wronged you. Mr. Sparks — 
Aw. beg pardon. What did she 
say about me. Miss Sniffers — 
She said your head had nothing in 
it. 

She — When you ask papa, the 
first thing he will do will be to ac- 
cuse you of seeking my hand 
merely to become his son-in-law. 

He — Yes? And then She — 

And then you must agree with 
him. He's a lot prouder of him- 
self than he is of me. 

"It was one of the most pa- 
thetic plays I ever saw," said 
young Mrs. Torkins. "I don't see 
why you go to the matinee if it 
makes you cry." "Just because I 
feel bad is no sign I haven't had 
a good time, Charley, dear. You 
know how much you enjoy going 
to the races and coming back with 
the blues." 

"Now," said the lecturer, "sup- 
pose you had been called to see a 
patient with hysterics — some one, 
for instance, who had started 
laughing and found it impossible 
to stop — what is the first thing you 
would do?" "Amputate his funny 
bone," promptly replied the new 
student. 

"Well," said Mr. Polk, for the 
fourth or fifth time, "I must be 
going." "What a queer delusion," 

1; 1 T\/rr„.- "D n*-A • "irnii't-o t-o-alltf 



3' 



Illinois Central Railroad 

Tickets to all points in the 

United States and Europe 

W. H. Snedaker, Gen. Agt. 

639 Market St. Palace Hotel Bldg. 



replied Miss Bord; "you're really 
quite stationary." 

Husband — You don't appear to 
like Mrs. Sweetie. Wife — The 
horrid thing! I hate her! Next 
time we meet I'll kiss her only 
once, and I shan't ask after her 
baby. 

A woman thinks she is having a 
real good time when she can find 
something to cry over without ac- 
tually feeling bad. 

"You say you saw my sister at a 
recent wedding?" "Yes. It wasn't 
very long ago." "But I don't re- 
member that she mentionel seeing 
you." "Very likely. I was only 
the groom." 




"I suppose a fellow ought to 
have a good 'leal of money saved 
up before he thinks of marrying." 
"Nortsensel 1 didn't have a cent 

when I started, and I'm getting 
along fine now." "That so? In- 
stallment plan?" "Yes; and we've 
only been married and keeping 
house for a year, and I've got 
the engagement ring all paid for 
now." 

Tommy Tucker had been hurt 
while performing the act he called 
flipping a freight train. "Will he 
get well, doctor?" distractedly 
asked Mrs. Tucker ; "is he out of 
danger?" "He will get well, mad- 
am," replied the surgeon, "but I 
can't say he is out of danger. He 
will probably do the same thing 
again the first chance he has." 



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201-203 Montg'y St., S. F.g 



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Morphine and Liquor 

Habits Cured Sanatorium 
Established 1876 Thou- 
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ENERGIZES THE WHOLE BODY 

starts the circulation, and leaves a 
glow equal to a Turkish bath. 

ALL GR.OCER.S AND DRUGCIST3 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



"Who's that man you bowed 
to?" "Judge Brown." "He's a 
judge, is he?" "Yes," said the law- 
yer bitterly, for he had just lost 
a case in that court, "he's a judge 
all right, but not a jurist." 

Bookkeeper — That new messen- 
senger spends all his time reading- 
such books as "The Boy Bandit," 
The Proprietor — I can see his fin- 
ish. The Bookkeeper — Where. 
The Proprietor — CTn Wall street. 

Nurse — You'd better not go out 
of the house after dark again. 
Johnny. The bears mighl get you. 
Broker's Son — Huh ! I ain't afraid 
of 'em. My pa says it's the bulls 
what are making the trouble now. 

"How did your nephew's wed- 
ding pass off?" "Just splendid." 
"Were there any contretemps?" 
"I don't think so. I didn't see any. 
You see, we had the church thor- 
oughly cleaned up just before the 
wedding took place." 

Ernie — No, she isn't going to 
marry Claude, after all. Ida — 
But they say he can quote Emer- 
son and Browning. Ernie — Yes, 
but the other man can quote sugar 
and steel. 

"They say that Henry was aw- 
fully frightened when he reached 
the altar." "I don't wonder. Did 
you see the way the bride had her 
hair dressed ?" 

Cumso — Well, voting Frisbie 
will make his way in the medical 
profession. Cawker — Has he got 
a good start? Cumso — I should 
say he had. He was such a prime 
favorite in the college that thev 
made him surgeon to the football 
team. 



January 16, 1904. 



O. R. & N. CO. 

The Only Steamship Line to 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

And Short Rail Line From Portland to all Point 
East Through Tlcketa to all Points, all Rail or 
SUamablp and Rail, at LOWEST RATES 

Steamer Tickets Include Berth n.d Meala. 

88 COLUMBIA Sails J»q. 18th, 28tb. Feb. 7th 

17tb, 37th March 9(b Huh. 

88 GEO W ELDER Sal's Jan. 13th, 28rd, Feb 
tnd.l2th 22nd March 4tb, 14th. 

Steamer aalla from foot of Spear St., 11 a. n 

Why Don't You 

Travel by Sea? 

Special vacation and Short 

Tourist Excursion Trips 
Excellent Service, Low Rates Including 

Berth and Heals 

Lob Angeles, 8an Diego, Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara, Monterey, 

Eiirena. Seattle, Tacoma. 

Victoria, Vancouver, etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico* 

For Information regarding sailing dates, etc 
obtain folder 
SAN FRANCISCO TICKET OFFICES 
4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St., and Broadway Wharves. 

C. D. DLNANN. General Pass. Agent. 
10 Market Street, San Francisco 




SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

TmiuH leave itml tire due Lit ;ini ve m 
sAN FKANClStO. 

(Main Line, Koot of Market Street > 



COAST LINE fNarrow Gauge) 
Foot of Market Street) 



I.K1 



FROM Dkcemiikk 1*9. I!i03. 



A JCM I ' 



7 5ic 
7.25? 
6.25)' 
7 25r 



4.25p 



4.55* 



7.00* Vacavlllc. Winters, Kumucy 

7.0U -. I'.'-iil'-ia, siii-uii, Ehnira and Sacra- 

7.30a Vallejo. Napa, ' ' CallVtoea. 'skxtJi 

Koaa, Martinez, San fiainon 

7.30a Nllea. Llvennore, Tracy, Lathrop, 

Stockron .. 

B-OOa Shasta Express— (Via Davla), 
Wllllame (for liartlelt Springs). 
Willows. tFruto. Ked muff, 

Portland, Tacoma, Seattle 7-5ji 

8 00" Davis. Woodlaud. Knights Landing, 

Marysvllle. Orovllk- 7-55 

8.30a port Costa, Martinez, Antloch. 
Byron, Tracy. Stockton, New- 
man. Los Baooa. Meodota. 
Armona. Hnnford. Vlsalla, 

Porti-rvllte 

8.30a Port Costa. Martinez, Tracy, Lath- 
rop. Modesto, Merced, Fresno, 
Goshen Junction. Han ford. 

Vleslia. Bakerafleld 

8.30a Nlles, Sail .lose, Llvennore. Stock- 
ton. (t.MHton). lone, Sacramento, 
Placervllle, Marysvllle. Chlco, 

Red BlufT 4. 25? 

8.30a Oak'lalf. Chinese, Jamestown. So- 

norn. Tuolumne and Angels .... 4 25? 
900* Atlantic Kxpressr-Otfden in. I Kast. 11.25* 
9.30a Richmond, Martinez ami Way 

Stations 6 55p 

1000a The Overland Limited — Ugden, 

Denver. Omaha. Chicago. 6.25'* 

10.00a Vallejo 12.25p 

10.00a Los Anu'iN-s Passenger - Port 
Costa, Martinez, Byroa. Tracy, 
Lathrop. Stockton. Merced, 
RaymonJ. Fresno. Goshen Junc- 
tion, Ihtnfonl. Lemoore, Vlnalla, 

Bakcr*flftld. Los Angel. -h 7-25«* 

1200m Haywnrd. Nllea and Way Stations, 3.25p 

tl-OOi* Sacramento Rlvor StQameri Ml.OOr 

3-30 1- Ben Ida, Win tern. Sac ram onto. 
Woodland, K nights Lauding, 
Marysvllle, Orovllle and way 

stations I0-55a 

3-30p Hay ward. Ntles and Way Stations.., 755p 
3 30 1 Port Costa, Martin--/, |{> ron. 
Tracy. Lathrop, Modesto. 
Merced, Fresno and Way Sta- 
tions beyond Port CoBta 12.2)P 

3-30p Martinez. Tracy. Stockion. Lodl... 10.25a 
4.00p Marlluez.Sau Itmnou. VtilleJo.Napa, 

Callstoga. Santa Itoaa. 923* 

4. 00p Nlles. Tra.-.v. Stockion. Lodl 4.2jp 

4.30p Hayward. Nlles, Irvlnston, San J 18.55a 

Jose. Llvennore j 111.55a 

5-OOp The Owl Limited— New tn n. Loa 
Banus, Uendota, Fre-no. Tulare. 
Bakerslleld. Los Angeles. 
Golden State Limited Sleeper, 
Oakland to Lob Angele", for Chi- 
cago. vlaC. R I &P 8 55» 

B.OOp Port Costa. Tracy. Stockfm 12 25p 

t6 30p Hayward. Nlles and San .to*e 7. 25a 

600p Hayward. Nlles and Sun JoBe 9.j6a 

6.00p Eastern Express— Opden, Denver, 
Omaha, St. Louis. Chicago and 
East. Port Costa, Heulela, Sul- 
sun. Elmlra. Davfg, Sacramento, 
Rocklln. Auburn, Colfax, 
Truckce, Boca. Ueno, WadB- 

worth, Wtnnemucca 5-25p 

B.OOp Vallejo. dally, except Sunday. 

7 00p Vallejo, Sunday only 

7.00p Klchni'iud, San Pablo. Port Costa, 



8-16* Newark, Oeulervllle. San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and Way Stations 6-65? 

t2-16»" Newark, Centervllle, £-an Jose, 
New Almaden.Lo^ Guiot-. Helton, 
Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz and 
Principal Way Station* tlO-55*. 

4 16p Newark, Sao Jose, LosUatos and I ' 8 5 S \ 

way stations ~l 110 55 a 

OS 30p Hunters Train. Saturdny only. San 
Jose and Way Stations. Return- 
ing from Los Gatos Sunday only. 17 25p 



OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

umSAN FRANCISCO. Foot o! Market St. (SUpd 

- t;:15 9:00 11:W)a.m. 100 300 5-15 f.m 
uiii OAKLAND. Foot of Broadway — t^:U0 (8:01 
IS:Q3 10:00 a.m. 12 00 2-00 4-00 p.m. 

COAST LINE (Broad Jiauue). 
I* - (Third and Townxeud Streets.) 



630p 
536p 

4-IOp 



6 10a San Jose and Way Stations. 

7 LOa San Jose and Way Stations 

8 1.0a New Almnden (Tues.. Frld., only), 
8 00* The Coaster— Stops only Sup JoBe, 

Gllroy (connection for Hollla- 
ter). Pajaro, Castrovllle (con- 
nection to and from Monterey 
and Pacific Grove), Salinas. San 
Ardo, Paso RobleB, Santa Mar- 
garita, San Luis (Jt)lBpn. principal 
stations thence Surf (connection 
for Lonipoc). principal stations 
thenct Santa Barbara, San Mnena- 
ventnra, Bangns. LoB Angeles.., 10-45p 
9- 00* San Jose. Tres Plnoa. Capltola, 
Sail I a Cruz, Pacific Grove, Sal I nae, 
San Luis Obispo and Principal 
Way Stations 4.10p 

10 30a f-an Jose and Way Stations 1.20p 

11 30a Santa Clara, sun .lose. LOS Gatos 

and Wav Stallone 7.30p 

1-301- San Jose and Wny Stations 9.46a 

S-liOc Del Monte -Repress— Santa Clara, 
San Jose, Del Monie, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove (connects at Santa 
Clara for Santa Cruz, Boulder 
Creek and Narrow Gauge Points) 
at Gllroy for HolllBter, Tres 
Plnos. at Castrovllle for Salinas. 12-15p 

3-30p TreB Plnos Way Passpiiper 10 45a 

4 30p san Jose and Way Stiltons 18.00a 

t6 00 - ; '" Jose, (Via Santa Clara) Los 
Gatos, and Principal Way Sta- 
tions (except Sunday) '9.00a 

L iOl san JoseandPrlnclpalWayStatlons 5940* 
6 LUi buneel Limited,— Redwo d, San 
Jose, Gllroy. Sal InaB.PaBo RobleB, 
6an Lnl* Obispo, Snnta Burhara, 
Los Angeles. DemlnfT. E£l Paso, 
New Orleans. New York. Con- 
nects at Pajaro for Santa Crux 
and at Castrovllle for Pacific 

Gn've and Way Stations 

tfl Iti fcaij Mateo.BereBford.Belmont.San 
Carlos. Redwood. Fair Oaks. 

McnloPark. Palo Alto 

6 1 Sun .lose and Way Stations 

600p Palo Alto and Wav Stations 10.16a, 

11 oQf South .-an Francisco. MUlhrae, Bor- 
HnKame. San Mateo. Belmon' 
San Carlos. Redwood. Fair Oaks, 

Menlo Park, and Falo Alto 9.45P 

»11 30p Mayfield, Mountain View. Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence, Santa Clara and 
San Joae J9.45p 



710i 



6.4Sa 
636a 



7.6Bp 



A for Horning. P for Afternoon, 

Sunday excepted 1 Sunday only. 

o Saturday only. 
[■ Stops at all sutlons on Sunday. 

Martinez and Way Stations 11-25a i' Ooly trains Biopplng at Valencia St. soutbhound 

8.06r Oregon & California Express— Sac- ar in a.u.,?:00a.k., 11:30a.m., 3:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. and 

raraento, Harrsrllle, Bedding. 8:00 p.m. 

Portland, Pugel Sound and Kust. 8.55a — 



8-IOp Hayward, Nlles and San Jnae c-nn- 
day only ) 



1 1.56a 



Ibt UNION TKANSFBU COMPANY 
1 01 call for and chei k baggage from hotels and rest 
encea. Telephone, ifixcbange 83. Inquire of Ticket 

UHiiH Inr I'm fn-H-sn-l otn» r n'n-'Ttatlon 



"You have spinal trouble," said 
the physician at the conclusion of 
his examination of the able editor. 
"Well — ah — h'm — doctor," return- 
ed the journalist, "how much do 
you charge per column for treat- 
ment in such cases?" 

Nodd — There are times when a 
man has to lie to his wife. Todd — 
And that isn't the worst of it. Nodd 
— What is ? Todd — There are 
times when he has to tell the truth. 

Mrs. Crawfoot — Ain't you got 
an old. torn-up suit to put on the 
scarecrow? Mr. Crawford — No; 
I'll wait till Hiram gets through 
the cane rush up at college and let 
him send down one of his suits. 



A four-year-old youngster while 
at supper the other evening re- 
quested his brother to help him 
in something and was told that he 
should say, "If you please." So 
he said: "Pass me some of that if 
you please." 

"Long hair on a man used to be 

considered a sign of strength " 

"Well, long hair on some men in- 
dicates that they are too strong to 
work and earn the price of a hair- 
cut." 

Owenlotts (coughing forcedly) 
— I've been advised that a trip 
abroad would be greatly to my 
benefit. Sharpun — Who advised 
you — your lawyer or doctor? 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Warr !ft 6 e d a re 
Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post St.,Sao Francisco 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 



ESTABLISHED JULY jo, 1856. 



Annual Subscription. $4.00 




News Better 




Vol. LXVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 33, 1904. 



Number 4. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LE1TER Is printed and published 
every Saturday by the proprietor, Frederick Marriott. Halleck 
Building. 33.1 Sansomo street. San Francisco. Cal. 

Entered at San Francisco Postofnce as second-class matter. 

New York office — (where Information mav be obtained regarding 
gcripuona and advertising)— 20$ Broadway. C. C Murphy. 
Representative. 

London office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C, England. George Street & Co. 
go office— J. II. Williams. 1"« New York Life Building. 

Boston Ottice— M. W. Barber. 716 Exchange Building. 

All social items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m. 
Thursday previous to day of issue. 



"Citizen" Train has pulled out for the other shore. 

The book trade notes a falling off in the Japanese 
demand for bear stories. 



Friction among the directors is making things 
warm in the National Ice Trust. 



With the Boers colonizing Montana, there will be 
even better times for Oom Clark. 



It's a lucky town that has managed to escape a 
Carnegie library and a Hearst newspaper. 

If you think it true that "the soft answer turneth 
away wrath," just ask the telephone girl. 

In this tough season for actor people everybody in 
the "perfesh" is walking — except the ghost. 

Hetty Green's rent is $19 a month. The luxurious 
tastes of the very rich may well alarm the socialo- 
gists. 

"High finance" in the gas monopoly has caused it 
to fill its stock with hot air and its pipes with cold 
poison. 



William J. Bryan is crouching right next the 
Hearst barrel, gripping firmly a brand-new bung- 
starter. 



Governor Vardaman, of Mississippi, says the ne- 
gro's curse is education. We thought it was the 
color of his hide. 



"Flinch" is the latest ladies' game at the East. We 
hear that it is not played with a hat pin, and leaves 
no black-and-blue marks. 

There is no ground for alarm in the report that 
the eyeglass trust has advanced prices — the an- 
nouncement is entirely spec-ulative. 

When he faces more than four of his fellowmen, 
Hearst is tongue-tied arid his knees knock with 
fright. He proposes to let his money do the talking. 

Professor Gayley of Berkeley, sometimes called 
"Gayley, the Troubadour," has slapped co-education 
on its pretty wrist, barring out women from some 
of his lectures. Having read some exemplars of the 
Gayley English, we congratulate the ladies in the 
case. ' 



Duke, the tobacco magnate wears a celluloid col- 
lar — probably tor tlu- same reason that he puts 
chopped Straw into some of his brands of cigarettes. 

A boycotted restaurant man has been arrested for 
kicking a camera out of the hands of a pestiferous 
union picket, lie should be fined for not kicking 
the picket 



An anxious mother wants the Oakland police to 
find her son whom she describes as "very polite and 
red-headed." Come to think of it, that is an unusual 
combination. 



It is not surprising to learn that a woman figures 
largely in the Mountain Copper litigation. There's 
always a woman in it— even at the bottom of a cop- 
per mine. 



Mayor Schmitz's choice for the head of the City 
and County Hospital may not wipe out the evils, 
but his presence will tend to subdue the newspaper 
critics. He is an unreformed prizefighter. 

"Elijah" Dowie came to town in a palatial private 
car, sought the seclusion of the best rooms of the 
Palace and_ ate a lunch that cost $7.50 a plate while 
"those devils" of reporters cooled their heels outside. 
Now we understand why the press loves Dowie so. 

That sad wag, Colonel J. "Ham" Lewis, greeted 
Perry Heath merrily at Washington the other day 
with "Hello! You rascal." The postofnce and the 
telegraph companies refuse to let us know Heath's 
reply. 

A linguist with a Teutonic name is suing million- 
aire Charles T. Yerkes for $300 for translating a 
Persian prayer woven into a $150,000 rug. He had 
to stand on his head to earn the money, and now he 
must get down on his knees to collect it. 

That West Virginian professor of literature who 
killed himself because a newspaper criticised his 
writings harshly, did not know when the gods were 
being good to him. Many an author pays for all the 
"roasts" he gets. 

A fly-by-night sheet of New York; devoted to so- 
cialism and labor unionism, describes "Big Bill" 
Devery as "a calm, cool, collected, firm, dignified, 
courteous, frank, bright, intelligent a sturdy and ear- 
nestly patriotic American." Devery can't talk much, 
but evidently his money can. 

The regeneration of wicked New York goes for- 
ward a-whooping. Now come the "Daughters of 
the Faith," including women of the best families, 
who will not stand for low gowns, divorcees, bridge 
whist, or any of the joyous beverages. And they do 
say, too, that the Tammany tiger is as meek as a 
reformed tom-catj 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 



THE WATER-FRONT SCANDAL. 

Governor Pardee will do well to give his early at- 
tention to the scandals that are ripening in the State 
Board of Harbor Commissioners. Politically the 
Governor is responsible for this Board's management 
of the city's waterfront. Personally, as well as po- 
litically, he is responsible for Commissioner Spear, 
now President of the Board. Governor Pardee ap- 
pointed Spear, and he has tolerated "Johnnie" Mac- 
kenzie, whose appointment was one of the worst 
things charged up against the Gage administration. 
Both of them are professional and practical politi- 
cians. Both seem to be working the waterfront for 
all it is worth, and if there is anything in the way of 
"graft" that they do not know about, it is a thing 
with no prospect of profit in it. 

The News Letter has already called attention to 
President Spear's proposition to take away the ferry 
news-stand privilege from a firm which has held it 
for nearly twenty-five years and give it to his brother- 
in-law, John F. Rooney, whose best job heretofore 
has been a clerkship in a wholesale grocery store. 
Spear suffered a set-back when the tenants offered 
$1180 a month for the concession against $600 bid 
by brother-in-law Rooney. He refused to permit the 
introduction of a resolution of acceptance, crying 
out that the bid was "absurd" — that nobody could 
afford to pay such a sum. At last week's meeting 
Spear put in and then accepted Rooney's bid of 
$1200 a month, blocking a higher bid from the ten- 
ants by notifying them that there could be no auc- 
tion of the privilege. It is plain that though there 
really is a brother-in-law Rooney, he is only the 
figurehead for Spear and Mackenzie. 

Another dirty piece of business begins to show it- 
self with regard to the public scales on the water- 
front. Nominally the holder of this privilege is one 
Lorentzen, better known in crooked politics as the 
"Banjo-eyed Kid." He is not big enough to hide 
the figures of the "business men" of the Board — 
Spear and Mackenzie. 

Yet another putrid spot in the Harbor Board's 
affairs is in the handling of the "privileges" granted 
to fruit hucksters, whose wagons were driven off the 
down-town streets by the Board of Public Works. 
How much they pay for being allowed to do business 
on the State's property and to whom they pay it are 
matters upon which the Governor might enlighten 
himself and the public. 

Beyond these things is the fact that the Harbor 
Board's payroll is stuffed with useless employees — 
men who would not know how to work if they 
wanted to, men who know nothing about the water- 
front except where the secretary's office is, and that 
only because it is the place where they get their pay 
for doing nothing. It is significant that a number of 
the men who draw fat salaries for little or no work 
are Democrats, kept in their places by the sinister 
influences that have made the Harbor Commission a 
refuge for active and broken-down job-hunters. Per- 
haps the most flagrant case of all is that of Percy 
Henderson, for whom was created the snug berth 
of "Auditor" at $200 a month. The grim humor of 
this appears when it is understood that after the al- 
leged stuffed salary roll is paid, after supplies that 
are not needed — and, as claimed by some, often not 
delivered — are bought at a stiff percentage above 
the highest market price, after the favored contrac- 
tors have had their rake-off, there is so little left for 
permanent improvements that they can be had only 
by discounting the Board's revenues. Moreover, if 
there were any real auditing to do, no sane person 



would select a man like Henderson to do it. The in- 
timation is strong along the front that Henderson's 
activities are confined to keeping shippers and ship- 
masters and holders of privileges from overlooking 
the fact that the "business men" of the Board must 
live somehow. 

When Spear, Mackenzie, et al., are questioned 
about these things on behalf of the public, they reply, 
"What are you going to do about it?" 

Now, speaking for the people of the State, the 
News Letter asks Governor Pardee: "What are 
YOU going to do about it?" 

BEMIRED RESPECTABILITY. 

It is time somebody told to the California Club 
ladies who are going to run the Bulletin for a day, 
to their husbands and to the public, a few unpleasant 
truths. This "woman's edition" scheme is quite in 
keeping with the policy of the most depraved of 
newspapers. It is a bad-faith bargain by which, in 
exchange for a cloak of respectability to hide its 
naked vileness, the Bulletin promises out of its ill- 
got revenues a small sum toward building the ladies 
a clubhouse. The victims of this piece of trickery 
might with equal propriety, take charge for a day 
of almost any uptown bar-room on a similar guar- 
antee. There are few drinking places that do not 
stand higher, in point of morals, than the Bulletin ; 
there are few saloon-keepers who are not of better 
repute than the Bulletin's owners. We can under- 
stand how a group of respectable women might be 
imposed upon in this fashion, because, happily, such 
women know little about the baser things of the 
city's life. But what are their husbands, fathers and 
brothers thinking of that they permit their women- 
kind to be deluded into such a contaminating alliance, 
even for one day? 

Harlotry is too polite a term for the Bulletin's 
business. In politics, in public and private affairs, 
where there is a corrupt dollar to be had, it is now 
on the one side, now on the other — it has not even 
the decency to stay bought. The merchant who re- 
fuses to advertise in it knows what measure of 
abuse and obloquy to expect; the candidate for 
nomination, election or appointment who will not 
pay its price is sure of it rancorous hostility ; its un- 
clean and itching hands are laid upon every citizen 
who has a lawsuit to prosecute or defend, whose 
business or private life has been touched by scandal 
or misfortune. 

It is a matter of common knowledge that no sport- 
ing event of consequence comes off here, no prize- 
fight is conducted, without either substantial pay- 
ment to the Bulletin or endurance of its malignant 
attacks. 

Besides payment in cash, there is only one way for 
people of standing to get even fair treatment from 
the Bulletin, and that is by personal association with 
and consequent social advancement of its managers. 
Most people who are forced to this alternative prefer 
to pay the money. Bad as the Bulletin is, according 
to the not too exalted standard of newspaper morals, 
it is no worse than the men who make its policies. 
They are of the kind who, for money or for social 
advantage, rejoice over the wanton assaulting of 
law-abiding citizens and fulsomely bepraise the cow- 
ardly wielders of pistol and "black jack"; they are 
of the class who make heroes of adulterers and mar- 
tyrs of women caught at their scarlet sinning. And 
it is into an office which houses a policy like this, 



January 23. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






which is infested by men like these, that a company 
table women is to g 
1 me man, husband of a lady prominently men- 
tioned in connection with the "woman's edition" 
me, is reported to have withheld Ids permission 
until it was promised that her portrait would not 
he published with those of the others trapped by the 
Bulletin's bunco game. This was a mere compromise 
with conscience. A braver, wiser man would have 
refused altogether, inasmuch as no woman who re- 
spect- herself or wishes others to respect her, can 
afford to have anything to do with the disreputable 
Bulletin or the disreputables who run it. 

NO HEREAFTER FOR THE SINNER. 

A reverend gentleman of this city. Dr. John Phil- 
lips, addressing his brethren of the cloth at the Con- 
gregational Association, announces that there is 
no future place of punishment for the wicked. Their 
souls, if indeed they have souls, are simply extin- 
guished, blotted out, annihilated. Obviously this 
is a comfortable belief for the sinner, but it does not 
appear commercially sound, or part of the platform, 
shall we call it, of the church. If the wicked are per- 
mitted to believe that there is no hereafter for them 
the inducement to hire a pew becomes slender and 
not persuasive. 

Twenty years ago his brethren would have tried 
the reverend gentleman for heresy, and would have 
almost torn him limb from limb in the name of God. 
To-day they smile with tolerant patronage of an 
amiable weakness which cannot do any harm and 
may amuse an idle moment. Why this change? 
Simply because the churches no longer base their 
appeal on the nameless terror of the Great Perhaps. 
They have become clubs and places of entertain- 
ment. 

"Our guess doll netted us over $400. No one 
guessed the name and I still have the doll," said the 
Reverend Mr. Scaddleberry. 

"It must have had an odd name. What was it?" 

"I didn't name it at all," returned the reverend 
gentleman, with a face that beamed with pious re- 
gard for its owner's clever business sense. 

With such harmless diversions do the descendants 
of the Pilgrim Fathers amuse themselves. There is 
just as good money in guess dolls as in preaching 
hell-fire. 



FUNCTIONS OF THE MERCHANTS' ASSOCI- 
ATION IN POLITICS. 

The people of San Francisco have been given in 
the current month an inside view of the methods of 
building a political machine. They have seen the 
political ring at work without the smallest disguise 
and in direct violation of law, creating that machin- 
ery by which they hope in the future to manipulate 
and control the primaries that will constitute the 
delegates to the party conventions. The clean sweep 
of minor officials made by the Board of Health in di- 
rect contravention of the charter was candidly de- 
scribed under oath by the President of that body 
as simply "a turn of the political wheel." It did not 
appear to Dr. Ward, so far as his testimony showed, 
that he considered it a matter of much importance 
that the charter in letter and spirit positively pro- 
hibits the use of municipal offices as wheels in the 
political machine. In fact, Dr. Ward testified that 
he had not concerned himself about the charter pro- 
visions in this regard at all. 

As we have said, there is no disguise about the 
methods in use other than the petty and transparent 



subtcrfugi lishing certain offices classified by 

the civil service ride, and re-creating the tame offices 
under other 1 I • «huh no classification has 

yet been the Gvil Service Commission. 

rhe only possible conclusion from ihis action is 
that the I Health had a guilty knowledge 

that they wen breaking the law. and sought to 
screen themselves behind a quibble "ii nanus. 

\\ e rejoice to -ee that the Merchants' Association, 
acting through its President, Frank \j. Symmes, has 
taken advanced ground in this matter. The Associa- 
tion is fully aware that the spirit of civil service ride- 
and the merit system has not been honestly observed 
in the past, but the body has waited in a conserva- 
tive and temperate manner until some definite ex- 
ample of lawbreaking was afforded — one that could 
be proved beyond question in a court of law. That 
example is given by the Board of Health in making 
a clean sweep of civil service employees with the 
single purpose of creating a political machine. 

Directly and indirectly there are something like 
2.000 workers dependent on the Board of Public 
Works. The Board of Health controls some 30a 
active political partisans. These form the nucleus 
of the machine. With these and the police and fire 
departments under general control, it can be seen 
how formidable may become the organization that 
is now being built. 

It is this kind of politics which the charter was 
expressly framed to prohibit and prevent, and that 
is the sense in which the Merchants' Association has 
acted. 



AN OFFICIAL CENSOR OF MORALS. 

Mayor Olney of Oakland has directed his police- 
men to raze out from the billboards of that charming 
city the written "damn." He will not even permit 

the half-hearted d n which is a sort of whisper in 

print. It appears that the Oakland bill-boards are 
for the moment emblazoned, or shall we say painted 
red with a high-toned picture showing a scene from 
the forthcoming performance of the "Fatal Wed- 
ding" at one of the local theatres. Under this pic- 
ture was inscribed the words of the heroic policeman 
who appears as the protagonist of the scene, and he 
is saying: "I am damned if I will arrest that man." 
It was a noble sentiment, but the official censor of 
morals could not stand for it all. To satisfy the 
Mayor's nice sense of propriety, strips of white paper 
were pasted over the wretched policeman's profan- 
ity, and Mrs. Grundy, who votes in Oakland, is ap- 
peased. It must have been some man like Olney 
who edited American history and made it look fool- 
ish in the case of Ethan Allen and the surrender of 
Ticonderoga. The amended version says that when 
the English Governor demanded of Allen : "In whose 
name?" the American commander reprlied in the 
stilted and ornamental phrase so appropriate on the 
battlefield : "In the name of the great Jehovah and 
the Continental Congress." What Allen really said 
was : "Come out of there, you damned old rat." That 
is convincing. The other is absurd. But Mayor Ol- 
ney may take consolation with Bishop Taylor, who 
said when he was reproached for his violent treat- 
ment of plain English : "My verb has lost its nomi- 
native, but I'm bound for the Kingdom of Heaven 
just the same." Mr. Olney's nominative has lost 
its verb, but his calling and election is assured. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 



BARTERING THE PRESIDENTIAL NOMINA- 
TION. 

"Seeking the Presidency with cheek and check 
book" is the way a Democratic statesman is quoted 
as hitting off William R. Hearst's impudent preten- 
sions to this high office. That Hearst has actually 
named the price he will pay for the Democratic 
nomination is the conclusion of one of the ablest and 
fairest observers of national affairs. This critic states 
the figure at $2,000,000 — nominally his contribution 
to the Democratic campaign fund in case of his nomi- 
nation, really his bid for the privilege of leading the 
party which he has done and is doing his utmost to 
destrov. Sometime in 1900, it is reckoned, Hearsts 
Presidential campaign was conceived — about the 
time he discovered his middle name and began to 
blazon it in his own newspapers and in such others 
as would sell him space. And $2,000,000 is only part 
of the price Hearst would pay. Already he must 
have spent a sum running into at least six figures 
in organizing "clubs," buying endorsements and 
erecting and maintaining an immense bureau. 

Incidentally Hearst has been trying hard to live 
down the odium that came to him for his share in 
the Buffalo crime. The hand of the disciple, Czol- 
gosz, struck the blow that made McKinley a martyr, 
but the hand of the prophet, Hearst, still drips with 
the blood of the murdered President. Since then 
his ensanguined talons have been carefully gloved. 
He has touched men and things with rare delicacy. 
His papers have breathed unctuous good will to all 
men. He has stopped preaching the gospel of der- 
ringer and dynamite. He has paraphrased Roose- 
velt's epigrammatic advise so thpt it reads: "Speak 
softly and carry a big purse." 

Hearst has the money. He has been so successful 
in buying the brains and bodies of men and women 
and all else that his caprice fancied that he has come 
to believe that there is nothing that is not for sale 
— not even the honor of the nation. He seems to 
have had assurances that his $2,000,000 will buy 
whatever honor the leaders of the Democracy own. 
That may be so. It took some diplomacy to keep 
the convention from going to Chicago, which Hearst 
had selected as the place for the delivery of the 
goods. When St. Louis was named, Hearst shrieked 
in his papers: "Aha! They were afraid of me!" He 
will send his millions and his mercenaries to St. Louis 
the White House. All his money will not be enough 
Democracy. If the convention name Hearst then 
and there will be an end of a party that has stood 
always against all that Hearstism signifies; if it shall 
tell him to go home and devote himself to the joys 
of his numerous firesides, Democracy will once more 
symbolize the national aspirations of a vast body of 
intelligence and patriotic Americanism. The virtue 
of Democracy will be the issue at St. Louis. 

Hearst may be able to buy the nomination, and 
then begin his march at the head of his rabble of pur- 
chasable labor leaders, bridge-burners, bomb-throw- 
ers and boycotters. But he cannot buy his way into 
the White House. All his money will not be enough 
to purchase national forgetfulness that he is still the 
Hearst of the Sausalito orgies, the Hearst who for 
all these years has given his days to public and his 
nights to private debauchery, busy polluting the 
spirit of the press and the morals of the people 
when he has not been cuddling amorously with such 
as the "Sassafras Sisters." He cannot gild himself 
so thickly as to hide the leprous immorality of his 
life as man and boy. No amount of gold will make 
an eagle of this vulture. 



AN EXAMPLE OF LABOR UNION METHODS. 

The evidence produced in the United States Cir- 
cuit Court in support of the petition for an injunc- 
tion to restrain the striking miners at Hodson, Cala- 
veras County, from committing acts of violence 
against men in the employ of the Royal Consolidated 
Company, offers a striking example of union meth- 
ods. The testimony produced shows that a reign 
of terror exists at Hodson, the creation of the miners' 
union, and there is so little concealment about this 
condition that' the affidavits filed on behalf of the 
strikers show but little respect for the court. It is 
in evidence that Charles Wilson, a teamster, was 
forcibly taken from the barn of the company by 25 
of the strikers, who led him to a pond and there 
ducked him by way, presumably, of "peaceful argu- 
ment," to convince him that it was not healthy to 
work for a boycotted employer, in reply to this 
testimony the strikers have 'filed an affidavit depos- 
ing that Wilson went voluntarily with his captors 
and adding that "thereupon one of the affiant's com- 
panions suggested to Wilson that inasmuch as he 
had opposed his fellow-workingmen, he, Wilson, 
could show his sincerity better by washing himself 
clean of all past acts by walking into an adjoining 
pond of water, which Wilson thereupon did, without 
any force or threat made toward him whatsoever." 

Comment is unnecessary on this sort of evidence. 



ON DANGEROUS GROUND. 
It seems to the impartial observer that the Senate 
of the United States is venturing on dangerous 
ground in the case of Reed Smoot, the Senator from 
Utah. The action of the body is obviously inspired 
by a loud popular clamor, which, on examination, 
does not appear to be intelligent. It is not alleged 
in any part of the indictment that Smoot has com- 
mitted a crime. It is proposed to make him an out- 
law on moral grounds because he is believed to 
hold opinions favorable to polygamy. It is not clear 
how those opinions are to be brought home to Smoot 
and if it should prove that he is guilty in this regard 
it is scarcely in accord with American ideas that a 
man should be punished for the opinions he holds. 
In fact, if Senators are to be excluded from their 
seats on purely moral grounds, it may be feared 
that the exclusion act might cover many besides 
Smoot. The Senate has involved itself in the old- 
fashioned confusion between sin and crime, which 
has caused thousands to be burned at the stake be- 
cause of their heretical opinions. But it seems 
rather late in the day to go back to that. 




KCHAS KLILUS & COM 

&£XCL USf\S£M 
HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

We put that Seventy-five and Eighty dollar Effect in our "IM- 
MEDIATE SERVICE CLOTHES," at moderate prices. Cor. 
rect smart dressers Know that our garments are properly balanced, 
correctly styled, with progressive ideas. Being " MEN'S 
CLOTHIERS ONLY" we fit accurately. 






January 23. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



Retrospect on William the Witless 



Editor News Letter — According to 1 be revel. r 
lady-in-waiting at the German Court, a Mine. 
ppingboven, those that dubbed the present Em- 
of Germany "William the Witless," were not 
wide of the mark. He is described as a man 
who is almost afraid of his shadow, a man haunted 
by the fears of hereditary disease and cursed with the 
of ancestry. The Hohenzollcrn blood shows 
its Divine origin in many ways. "They that the I 
love they first make mad." There is a Divine run- 
ning ear and a Divine shriveled arm. a Divine tem- 
per which swears at the "help" and damns all re- 
publics. This divinity calls himself "the annointed 
of God" and the German Empire the "ally of God." 

In one of his prolonged llights in the realms of the 
daffy it seems that William conceived the brilliant 
idea of forcible and armed interference in Cuba, in 
behalf of Spain, just prior to the late unpleasantness 
between the United States and the Dons. This was 
prevented by the cool-headedness of the Chancellor 
of the empire. The revelations of Mine, von Epping- 
hoven throw a new light on the movements of Ad- 
miral Von Diederichs of Manila fame. It can easily 
be conceived where the Admiral obtained the cour- 
age to insult so repeatedly the Americans in general 
and Admiral Dewey in particular. "Like master 
like dog!" A Chancellor's well-timed interference, 
it would seem, saved us the trouble and expense of 
administering a lesson to the Teutonic race, for it 
was well known in Austria and in Germany that the 
Kaiser did look with disfavor on our policy in Cuba 
and the Philippines. 

It will be remembered that an Austrian corvette 
arrived in the harbor of Manila at a time when rela- 
tions between Dewey and Von Diederichs were just 
a little strained. The corvette was a training ship, 
and instead of stopping to secure anchorage from 
the ranking Admiral (Dewey) it passed on up the 
bay until it had attained a position opposite the only 
Austrian war vessel in the harbor, and there pro- 
ceeded to anchorage. 

In a few. minutes an officer from the Olympia pre- 
sented the compliments of the Admiral, and this was 
the message which brought the corvette back to sa- 
lute the Olympia and the American flag: 

"Was it intentionally that the usual salute was 
omitted or was it through ignorance of custom?" 

No explanation was expected, and the only possible 
apology was made. The corvette received her in- 
structions as to anchorage from the American rfaval 
commander, and it was "damn the republic" from 
the Kaiserin Augusta down, and the Austrian's' and 
the Germans drowned their sorrows in Teutonic 
beer. 

Mme. Von Eppinghoven's stories are classified as 
lies and as lese majeste. There are many, no doubt, 
that have doubted the truth of the statements made 
by those that have returned from Manila. There 
are but few who are willing to believe that the Ger- 
man Admiral placed his best gunners at the disposal 
of Jaudenez, and that the guns at Malate were placed 
in position by German officers. There are but few 
willing to believe that the German Admiral' landed a 
whole ship-load of flour, on the pretense or helping 
his starving- countrymen, and then" sold the flour 
through a Swiss firm to the Spaniards at the rate' 
of twenty-seven dollars a sack. .. . 



Further than this, thrre are but few who would be 
willing to believe that when an American, a Mr. 
Brown, agent nf .1 Milwaukee beer firm, having ob- 
tained leave 1 through Mr. Wildman, then Consul- 
General at Hong-Kong) to travel on the Kaiserin 
Augusta from Hong-Kong to Manila, be was subject 
to all sort of indignity, and told that he must remain 
in the limit of bi> cabin, as the United States and 
Germany were on the verge of war. 

There are few of us, if the records were not in ex- 
istence, that would give credence to the story that 
Von Diederichs despatched the Kaiserin Augusta to 
Hong-Kong, after the fall of Manila, against the ex- 
press wish of the American Admiral and contrary 
to all the rules of international courtesy. And this 
was why Berlin had the news before it reached 
Washington. 

There are some people who will deny all these 
things, but there are thousands of men who will re- 
member them, and these are the men who took 
Manila and the men who marched to Pekin. 

There are but few, even in the army, who have 
access to the "dossiers" of the Intelligence Depart- 
ment. It is in these confidential reports that our 
relations with a country that has no love for us, and 
that is ruled by an Emperor who has a mania for de- 
vouring republics when he is not busily engaged in 
throwing a fit or making some compact for the. 
amusement of himself and God, are to be found. 
Hoch der Kaiser! — Bec-de-Fer. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Full weight 
guaranteed. In economy, cleanliness and heat producing 
qualities Briquettes are superior to coal. Sold only by the 
Tesla Coal Company, -jtn andl Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 



Ufye Minister of Foreig'n Affairs 



Events in the Far East the past week have given 
birth to peace rumors that seem, at first glance, to 
be founded in fact, but since all of them come from 
St. Petersburg or other Russian sources, there is a 
suspicion in military and diplomatic circles that the 
Russian Government is merely presenting another 
side of her accustomed perfidy and hypocrisy. The 
signing of a treaty of commerce with the United 
States and England by China was a severe jolt to 
Russia's plans, for the treaty recognizes China's and 
not Russia's ownership and jurisdiction of and over 
Manchuria. For months Russia had fought against 
the signing of this convention, and the belief was 
pretty general that China would yield to the St. 
Petersburg pressure. But in that Russia received a 
greater defeat and a more severe diplomatic shock 
to her ultimate purpose than the sinking of a whole 
squadron of her battle-ships would have inflicted, for 
the compact openly and positively binds England and 
America to China's cause in Manchuria. Naturally, 
Russia would scheme for more time, and she is do- 
ing it under the guise of a "peace sentiment" pro- 
claimed from the throne, but all that is contradicted 
by the rushing of troops to the disputed ground, and 
the "rush" orders for commissary stores from the 
United States and other countries to Port Arthur 
for inland distribution. The Japanese Government 
is placing little or no faith in Russia's peace prom- 
ises, and is rushing preparations for an armed con- 
flict, which all nations admit is inevitable, unless 
Russia backs down and relinquishes her hold upon 
Manchuria. That is the situation at this writing. 
Certainly Russia's new diplomatic play is likely to 
postpone an overt act on her part until Viceroy 
Alexieff's demand for 300,000 troops and more than 
100 warships is complied with, which the Russian 
war and naval departments are hurrying to do. But 
will Japan be inclined to wait for the arrival of Rus- 
sia's re-inforcements? That is the one great ques- 
tion of the hour. 

* * * 

A Mexican high in official and social life is anxious 
about his country because of Yankee aggressiveness. 
He reasons that at the present rate of absorption of 
the agricultural, commercial, industrial, mining and 
transportation agencies of the nation by Americans, 
together with the steady increase in marriages be- 
tween Americans and Mexicans, the time will come 
when Mexico will be so thoroughly Americanized 
that it will become a part and parcel of the United 
States as naturally as it is natural for an apple to 
fall to the ground when ripe. Well, our Mexican 
friend reasons logically, but because Mexican Texas 
became an Ameriacn State with more than 3,000,000 
in half a century, it does not follow that the same 
results are likely to obtain in old Mexico at the same 
or one-tenth that ratio of "Americanization," as he 
calls it. Still, should such results as he fears ever 
obtain, Mexico would be the gainer. There is no 
doubt about that. 

* * * 

Some time ago the powers ordered the Sublime 
Porte to pour a lot of the oil of peace upon the 
wild human billows in Macedonia, Bulgaria and the 
other troubled waters in the Near East, but the 
troubled human waters refuse to be quieted. They 
want war — bushwacking war — and they announce 



that they have no notion of letting up on the Turk 
until he relinquishes all authority over them. But, 
as a matter of fact, the relinquishment of Turkish 
authority is exactly what they do not want. They 
are essentially a people who love the life of the free- 
booter, the highway robber, and the all-round crimi- 
nal, and Turkish rule is the excuse for keeping up 
bands of wandering robbers. No, the life and the 
salvation of most of the inhabitants of that region is 
Turkish rule and Turkish brutality. It is their stock 
in trade in their "national independence" business. 
Law, order and honest avocation do not appeal to 
them. This every missionary who has preached to 
those people knows well ; so do the powers, and that 
is why the powers do not interfere. It is dog fighting 
dog, and in time both dogs will be killed by their 
own teeth. 

* * * 

The creditor nations of Colombia have recognized 
the Republic of Panama because the United States 
has agreed that Panama shall pay her pro rata of 
Colombia's national debt, and also settle with indi- 
vidual creditors. The $10,000,000 which Panama gets 
for canal concessions are not, however, to be diverted 
from the pocket-books of the patriot revolutionists. 
Money for debts abroad will be raised by taxation. 
Boiled down, it simply means that the United States 
agreed to become collector for foreign creditors of 
Panama, and in part of Colombia, in consideration 
of recognition by foreign nations of the independence 
of the Republic of Panama, and give her a small 
horn to toot in the concert of the powers. 

* * * 

Fully, if not more than half of the Jews in the 
world are Russian subjects, and like the Armenian 
subjects of the Sublime Porte, they are the bankers 
and the force behind the great commercial enter- 
prises. They, as well as the Armenians, are the busi- 
ness brains of their country, and it is jealousy of 
their thrift and business sense that is at the bottom 
of their persecution, and not because they are Jews 
or Armenians, but that is the excuse. It so happens, 
too, that when the Czar or the Sublime Porte wants 
to float a loan, the Jew or the Armenian is the first 
one to be invited to finance the scheme. Ingratitude 
is the basest feature of the human heart, and Russia 
and Turkey have more of it than all the other nations 
together. 

* * * 

The Transvaal country is enjoying a degree of 
prosperity and internal tranquility that is not only 
surprising but exceedingly satisfying to the Boers. 
In fact, the Boers now fully realize that British ad- 
ministration of their national concerns means na- 
tional protection, national as well as individual pros- 
perity, and the development of the country's vast 
resources with the Boers themselves the chief bene- 
ficiaries. Unlike our treatment of the Filipinos, the 
Boers were given prompt protection from land 
sharks and wandering "promoters," and every proper 
encouragement was given to them to build up their 
country upon a solid basis for their own good and ad- 
vantage. The consequence is that practically the 
entire Boer population is glad that events brought 
them to the high level of identity with Great Britain's 
mighty family of colonies. 



January 13. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

A CONDITION OF ANARCHY. 



Readers of the daily press ol San Francis* 

nv idea of ttu- conditions of anarchy and 
flat rebellion that prevail in Cripple t'reck, TeOuride 
ami other Colorado towns, whose population is 
chiefly made up of members of the Western Federa- 
tion of Miners. We do DOt get the facts from a 
cowardly press, because the newspapers, so-called, 
fear to give those facts lest they themselves should 
undergo the terrorism exerted by organized labor 
everywhere, terrorism that is the chief and almost 
the only method in use by the unions to compass 
their ends. 

Some of these facts, however, are given in a state- 
ment issued by the Colorado Mine Owners Associa- 
tion and printed in the Congressional Record of 
January 13th as part of the proceedings of the Senate 
on a resolution calling for an investigation of indus- 
trial conditions in Colorado. These facts are suffi- 
ciently striking and even astonishing, as to call for 
notice. The conditions in the mines for a period of 
ten years are summed up in the following paragraph : 

"No parallel can be found for it in the labor history 
of the world unless it be in the Molly Maguire or- 
ganization, which maintained a reign of terror in 
the Pennsylvania coal fields prior to 1877. During 
times of comparative peace the career of this organi- 
zation has been marked by nocturnal assaults and 
secret assassinations, while now and again they have 
broken out into open warfare amounting to insur- 
rection. Whenever a mine owner has assumed to 
stand against their aggressions or to employ as la- 
borers men not members of this organization, his 
life and his property have been forfeit. Criminal, 
cruel, untiring, militant, political parties have obeyed 
their behest, honorable judges have been retired to 
private life for decisions to them obnoxious, courts 
have yielded to their dictates, and sheriffs and other 
peace officers, often selected from their own number, 
have been their willing agents. When an executive 
has been found big enough and brave enough and 
patriotic enough to rise above political expediency 
and take a firm stand in favor of law and order and 
the preservation of those rights guaranteed by the 
Constitution, as did Governor Steunenberg, in Idaho 
in 1899, and as Governor Peabody is doing in Colo- 
rado to-day, protests such as that embodied in the 
resolution under consideration have gone up from 
certain quarters, either inspired by sympathy with 
the acts and purposes of this organization or with 
the hope of obtaining some political advantages 
through them, or, as we trust is the case with the 
present resolution, by ignorance of the facts which 
have engendered the condition." 

By way of further specifications in support of these 
general charges, the statement goes on to tell how in 
1901 during the strike at the Smuggler-Union mine 
in Telluride, an armed body of union men attacked 
the mine and killed and wounded several persons, 
taking forcible possession of the property. Manager 
Collins of the mine was shot in the back and killed 
as he sat at his library table with some friends. 

This cowardly assassination does not by any 
means stand alone. On November 21, 1903, while 
Charles McCormick, superintendent, and Melvin 
Beck, shift boss, of the Vindicator mine were going 
into the sixth level, an infernal machine was ex- 
ploded, by which both men were killed. 

If space permitted, these specifications of crime 
could be extended at considerable length, but for 
the present these will suffice by way of indication of 
the alleged law-abiding and peaceful methods of or- 
ganized labor. 



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ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location ol principal place of business — Han Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting ol the Board of Directors, held on 
the 9th day of January, 1904, an aaeeepment, (No. 60) of ten (10) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, paya- 
ble Immediately In United states told coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, rooms 21-22. Nevada Block, No- 309 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. Cal 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
12th DAY OP FEBRUARY 1904. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless pay- 
ment ts made before, will be sold on FrtlDAY, the 4th day of March, 
1904 to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver 
Maine and expenses of sale. By order of the Board ol Dlreolnrn, 

JOHN W. TWiGGS, Secretary. 
Wm- Jay Smith, Secretary pro tern* 

Office— Rooms 21-22 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 




Lord Wolseley tells the story 
The Story of a of his early military career 
Soldier's Life. from 1853 to the conclusion of 
the Ashantee campaign in 
1873. It is to be hoped that in time he will write 
of the more recent events and of his connection with 
the Boer war. In writing of the Crimea — that end- 
less succession of blunders — Lord Wolseley asks : 
"What about that civil government of ours which 
sent an army to the Crimea without any means of 
carrying either food or wounded men? If the curses 
of brave men affect the future life of those who have 
injured them, many members of the cabinet that sent 
us to the Crimea must now have uncomfortable quar- 
ters somewhere." Neither does he spare the Gener-' 
als and their aides who, in the battle of Inkerman, 
showed their incompetency: "I was shown the graves 
of many gallant leaders who had fallen at Inkerman, 
the battle where we were surprised and our army 
only saved from destruction by the timely arrival 
of French troops to help us. Good heavens ! What 
Generals then had charge of England's only army, 
and of her honor and fighting reputation! Thev 
were served to a large extent by incompetent staff 
officers as useless as themselves ! Almost all our 
officers at that time were uneducated as soldiers, 
and many of those placed upon the staff of the army 
at the beginning of the war absolutely unfit for posi- 
tions they had secured through family or political 
interest. There were, of course, a few brilliant ex- 
ceptions, but they made the incompetence of the 
many all the more remarkable." 

The work is full of entertaining personalia, and 
while not a great military biography, is a straight- 
forward view of a soldier, vigorous and ingenuous ; 
the language is dignified and the narrative is stamped 
with patriotic fervor and the enthusiasm of military 
glory. 

"The Story of a Soldier's Life" (Scribner's") , by 
Field Marshal Viscount Wolseley. 

This is not a tale of the sea, 
The Sailor King, but a moving panorama of the 
courtiers, poets, writers, play- 
ers, women famous for beauty or talent, beaux, wits 
and club gossips of Great Britain in the time when 
William the Fourth was king. 

One chapter deals with the theatre — Macready, 
Fanny Kemble, Edmund Kean — and the first produc- 
tion of "The Hunchback." Another tells of the strug- 
gle in the House of Lords before the passage of the 
"Reform Bill," that saved the country from the revo- 
lutionary wave of '48. Although much of the mater- 
ial in these volumes is familiar to the general reader, 
and the lack of an index is a serious defect, there is 
not a dull page in the work. 

"The Sailor King : William the Fourth : His Court 
and his Subjects." By Fitzgerald Molloy. 2 vols. 
Dodd, Mead & Company, New York. 



Those that admire the great Russian writer, Tol- 
stoy, will no doubt welcome "Esarhaddon." This is, 
in a measure a parable of the Kichinef atrocities. It 
is also, by means of a published correspondence, a 
record of personal opinion by the sage of Yasnava 
Polyana. Needless to say, the opinion, as expressed 
in this compilation, does not agree with the published 
reports of the Russian Government. 

Funk & Wagnalls, New York. Price,, 40 cents. 



The Macmillan Company announces in a late bul- 
letin these books : "London in the Time of the Stu- 
arts," by Sir Walter Besant, $10.50 net. This volume 
is uniform with "London in the Eighteenth Century." 
Fully illustrated from contemporary prints and por- 
traits, and containing a map. Macmillan's Pocket 
American and English Classics. Poems by Edgar 
Allen Poe, edited and annotated by Charles W. Kent, 
25 cents net. The Yellow Plush Correspondence 
Jeames's Diary. The Great Hoggarty Diamond, etc., 
by William Makepeace Thackeray, with illustrations 
by the author and John Leach. $1.00. 



There is another volume (this by Blanche M. Bur- 
bank) published by A. M. Robertson. It is called 
"Reed Notes," and is full of ambitious verse. Some 
of it, indeed, most of it, is good. Witness ye: 

September in a warring mood 
Has hung a signal in a wood — 

A maple branch as red as blood. 
Earth's grief, like Rachel's, soon will sound 
Through naked boughs, a wail profound 
For her dead children in the ground. 
A. M. Robertson, San Francisco. 75 cents. 



"The Testimony of the Suns and Other Poems" is 
a bit of recent verse by George Sterling. It is a 
voice singing in the desert. What a pleasure it must 
be to an overweighted mind, the mind of a busy busi- 
ness man, to find solace in song. Mr. Sterling is 
good at versification, and if he finds one-half the 
pleasure in phrasing and meter the reviewer finds in 
reading his verse, he can safely count that he has 
attained his end. He plays upon a lute of silver with- 
out a rift. 

W. E. Wood, Publisher. Price, $1.25. 



A book that should be tabooed and kept from chil- 
dren is "The Rover Boys on Land and Sea." It is 
one of the Rover Boy's Series, and if this is a sample 
of Mr. Winfield's work, as a writer for young people, 
the quicker the reviewer reads him out of business 
the better. The tale is an impossible one, loosely 
put together, and will give boys a wrong impression 
of life. It is poorly printed on poorer paper, and is 
no credit to the publisher's discrimination or work- 
manship. 

The Mershon Co., Railway, N. J. Price, 60 cents. 



"Proverbs of the People," by Lorenzo Sosso, is at 
hand, and the reviewer is disarmed at the outset by 
the preface of the author, in which he lays no claim 
of originality. Marshall Douglass is the designer of 
the ornamental pages, and A. M. Robertson is the 
publisher. It is a bundle of aphorisms and proverbs 
charmingly modernized, and the book is a bibelot 
that will ornament any study table. 



The News Letter is in receipt of "Municipal Re- 
ports 1901-1902," from Charles W. Fay, Clerk of the 
Board of Supervisors. This report is exhaustive in 
detail, and is of inestimable value to any one inter- 
ested in the city's welfare. The binding of this vol- 
ume is a piece of art work, and reflects great credit 
on the municipality. 

A. rub at the Post St. Hammam will do you good. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Dear Bessie: How on earth all the dances U 
l>o enjoyed, as they deserve to be, next woo'. i~ 
something of a problem, for there will be one every 

night, and then there are a lot of Other affairs, such 
as luncheons and teas, to .till in the hours of the af- 
ternoon. Wontil you believe it is six years since the 
"P.orel hall." which some people talk about as though 
it were the only one which hail ever taken place in 
this little village? Well, it was a pleasant affair. 
and the reason why it has not since been duplicated 
is that the family spent two years in F.urope soon 
after, and since then have been in mourning. But 
now there is another one on the tapis, this tim ■ to 
be given in the new ballroom at the Palace, and of 
course all who are asked are delighted, and will be 
on hand, you may be sure. But let me begin at 
the beginning and tell you a little of what is on the 
bills for next week. 

Frances Harris, whose engagement to Mt. Stunt 
is considered an assured fact, though not yet for- 
mally announced, gives a tea on Tuesday, and in the 
evening the Barry Colemans give a dance in Century 
Hall for Lucy, and Christine Pomeroy. On Wed- 
nesday night there is the Borel ball at the Palace. 
Mrs. John Simpson will give her first large entertain- 
ment this season on Thursday, and instead of a tea 
as usual, it is to be a euchre party," and a large one: 
and in the evening takes place the ball which Mrs. 
Homer King is to give in honor of Miss Herrick. 
On Friday night comes the AssemBly dance, and on 
Saturday the two weddings. Don't you think we 
shall be tired by Sunday? 

I managed three of the teas last Saturday. At 
Gertrude Palmer's, which was given for Polly Mac- 
farlane, Hattie Currier announced her engagement 
to Walter Hale, and was of course the center of a 
congratulating throng all afternoon. From there I 
went to the Livermores, which was a telephone gath- 
ering and extremely pleasant. Then Betty, Mollie 
and I finished up at Mabel Craft Deering's, where 
we had a jolly time, and shall I tell you why? She 
had a lot of men to help in receiving and doing the 
agreeable to the women, and you should have seen 
some of those dear fellows how they did lay them- 
selves out and seemed delighted to do it, too. And 
now mark my words, her example will be followed, 
and hereafter men, when they can be got, will be a 
feature of the receiving parties at teas, and how much 
more pleasant it will be for all concerned. 

We have all been kept pretty busy this week with 
functions, both large and small, and "at homes" 
nearly every day in the week, which take up much 
of one's time to do. Theatre parties have also been 
quite the vogue during Mrs. Langtry's engagement, 
and I have had to refuse becoming an item in several 
from sheer inability. Did you ever know such dear 
people as the Huntingtons? They do so love to en- 
tertain, and they do it so delightfully. This week 
they had a lovely dinner dance on Monday night for 
Helen Bailey — a dozen to dinner and about fifty 
more for the dance afterwards. There is to be an- 
other in two weeks, when Margaret Newhall will be 
the honored one. 

Then on Tuesday there was Mrs. Lent's luncheon 
for Gertrude Smith. Julie de Laveaga Welch made 
her initial bow as a hostess on Wednesday, when 
she gave a tea at the Welches ; it was quite a large 
affair. Mrs. Ritchie Dunn gave a luncheon at the 



Univei ib for Polly Macfarlane, and Mrs. 

< was also .1 luncheon hostess on Wednesday, 

and in the evening the Gaietj ( lub hail their dance 

at Christine Pomeroy's. I ho card patty given by 
Maud Mullins Clarke on Thursday was for Polly 
Macfarlane, and yesterday Belle Smith had a tea. 
I was asked to join a party to go to Del Monte last 
night for the hall which' tin- officers of the 15th 
Infantry gave there in honor of their Colonel, and 
Mrs. Warae, hut had to decline, and oh, was I not 
sorry! But I had promised to go to the Friday Fort- 
nightly. To-day Constance do Young has her C m 
ing out tea, and for to-morrow Mrs. Jack Casserley 
is to treat her friends to a musical tea, something 
a little out of the common run of such affairs, and no 
doubt it will be enjoyable. There has only been one 
wedding this week, that of Caroline Rixford and Cov- 
ington Johnson, and it was a very quiet home affair, 
on Monday afternoon, only relatives and connections 
being among the guests, but those of Mr. Johnston 
were quite numerous, including all the Pringdes. 
Campbells, Averys, Mrs. Meezes, etc. Bishop Nich- 
ols officiated, and the bride, who was robed in white 
satin, had her cousin, Katherine Rixford, for her 
sole attendant ; Covington Pringle was his uncle's 
best man. But next week there are to be two, and 
both on Saturday — Bernie Drown's at St. Luke's 
and Jacqueline Moore's in Oakland, and as luckily 
the hours do not conflict, I shall be able to do them 
both. Jacqueline is to be married at the Church of 
the Advent at three o'clock ; it will be a lavender 
wedding, with a whole string of attendant maids — 



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baltimore. 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO.. 

213-215 Market St., San Francisco, Cat 

Telephone Exchange 313. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



.January 33, 1904. 



eight in _ all. Bernie's is to be at noon, and I hear 
the churbh decorations are to be something exceed- 
ingly hne, but the home reception will be very lim- 
ited .in size. . '\YJ iat * stunning bride she will mike! 
She is so popular, and has such hosts of frienrls, I 
hear that the presents are so numerous they com- 
pletely fill a large room. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin has been doing the honors 
for Mr§. Peter in what she calls a quiet way, but 
you know what her quiet way means. Her telephone 
tea last Friday had all the elements of a more formal 
affair, and the coming dinner will be a- fine one. I 
understand Mrs. Peter has been favorably impressed, 
; and thinks life here for awhile may not be so bad af- 
ter all — but not for a continuance; oh, dear, no! 

Among other dinners of the near future is the 
one which Mrs. George Boardman gives next Mon- 
day night for her son, Sam, Bernie and the whole 
•of their bridal party. By the way, I wonder if 
Frank Winn will arrive in time for it? You know 
he is coming down to be Sam's best man, and Sophie 
told me at the Woods' tea last Tuesday, which was 
a very pleasant one, that there were to be a whole 
lot of them before the dances next week. Apropos 
of dances, the Chesebroughs are to have one on the 
third of February; the last of the Greenway dances 
comes off on the twelfth, and is, I hear, to be even 
better than either of its predecessors, if that can 
possibly be. Mrs. Joe Grant, who is spending the 
winter at the Palace, gives a big dinner that night, 
so that all her guests, of whom yours truly expects 
to be one, will have to do will be to walk from the 
dining room into the ball room. Won't that be 
grand? Mrs. Tim Hopkins is also to have a big 
dinner early in February. 

Alice tells me that Mrs. Horace Hill, who gave a 
luncheon party last week — her first appearance as a 
hostess since her return from her long visit East — 
intends to have a dinner dance ere the season ends, 
which is pleasant news to hear. Mrs. Coolidge, who 
gave so many pleasant parties at the Presidio, and 
later at her home on' Van Ness Avenue, last year, 
has again entered the field with a card party given 
last Monday afternoon, when the popular bridge was 
played. 

There have not been many arrivals.or departures 
of late to note ; Miss Jennie Flood has gone East on 
one of her periodical trips over the road; and Elea- 
nor Davenport is back from her rambles in Oriental 
countries, and will have so much to tell of all she 
saw and'evrjoyed, of which she gave a faint taste in 
her letters, I am impatiently waiting for time to get 
to see her. — Elsie. 



Automobile 'parties' are very numerous at Del 

Monte, enjoying the beautiful, oiled roads. A few 

of those present last week were : L. F. Douglass and 

party, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Mr. and Mrs. L. 

J. Holton and Mrs. Harry P. Miller, San Francisco; 

. Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Chase, San Francisco ; Mr. and 

, Mrs. C. C. Moore, San Francisco. Special trains with 

tourists from the East have commenced to arrive. 

■ One very fine party reached Del Monte last week, 

- consisting .of Corrljijipdore and Mrs. E. T. Gerry, 

I Mr. Peter G. Gerry, Miss Gerry, Newport, R. I.; 

Dr. Robert C. James, New York City. 

List of arrivals this week at Hotel Rafael : A. Feist, 

W. N. Drown, A. McBean, W. A. Sexton, Mrs. F. 

' D. Madison, Mrs. John Partridge, W. Detring, J. 

E. Tomin, A. F. Chamont, A. Cavalar, E. J. Mc- 

. Laughlin, J. J. Garland, H. H. Rosseau, Harold Bolle, 

. M. Welcker and wife. 



MERIT WHERE MERIT IS DUE.. 

The American public is very slow in givi'ng'praise 
to its officials and very quick and unstinted in it- 
denunciation. It is 
always the excep- 
tion that proves the 
rule. The public 
has long ago ac- 
knowledged t h e 
sterling merit of 
United States Dis- 
trict Attorney 
\\ oodworth, but it 
remained for the So- 
licitor General of 
the Treasury De- 
partment to give 
this praise in official 
form. In his report 
fur the fiscal year 
ending June, 1903, it 
is found that Minne- 
Marshall Woodworth. sota heads the list 
for the year, the United States District Attorney's 
office having collected $34,000 in fines, forfeitures 
and penalties in cases wherein the United States was 
plaintiff. The Northern District of California, Mr. 
Woodworth's office, stands second, with $29,000 col- 
lected. During the fiscal year 1901-1902 Mr. Wood- 
worth collected $70,000. The Seventh District of 
New York com'es third, with $28,000. 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1903, the vol- 
ume of business in Mr. Woodworth's office — that is, 
the number of cases disposed of — trebled, notwith- 
standing that the collections fell below those of 1901- 
1902. 





PUFFER 

A DELICIOUS BREAKFAST 
CAKE 

25 Cents 

Beats all .other breakfast rakes 
TEL. SOUTH 713 



TELEPHONE JAMES 4471 

J5he WALDORF 

Miss D. Honig 

241-243 QEARY ST. S. F 

The largest hair store In the United States. The best as- 
sortment of hair goods on the Pacific Coast. Ladies and 
gentlemen's wigs of all description— best of hair and finest 
workmanship. Switches all lengths and colors. Pompa- 
dours, Janes, Rolls, etc.. to suit everybody in color and tex- 
ture. The best accommodations by thirty expert help in 
all branches of our business. See our specialties on facta] 
and scalp treatment. Let us examine your head and tell 
you the trouble of your hair. Hair dressing, manicuring, 
scalp treatment, facial treatments, shampooing, chiropody, 
etc., at popular prices. 



Artistic 

Flower 

Decoration! 



MANNINC'S 

246 Stockton St.. cor. Post 

For Home and Chureh Weddings. 

Receptions. Dinners and Luncheons. 

Novel ideas. Original concept I ina. 

Phone Mala 847 



January 23. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

Pleasure's Wand. 
(Continued from page 15.) 
nny and Emma Ray, popular entertainers, will 
begin a limited engagement at the < >rpheum this 
coming week. Thej promise something entire!) new 
ami a I of .1 rousing welcome; Cordua and 

Maud, who give a most wonderful exhibition of hand 
balancing on the double wire; Duffy, Saw telle and 
Duffy will appear here for the first time in a comedy 
sketch entitled "Papa's Sweetheart"; I >li\er T. Hol- 
den, lyric tenor, formerly with the Castle Square 
Opera Company, ami Miss Winifred Florence, 
prano, who is a niece of the late W. J. Florence, will 
present a romantic comedy operatic sketch. "The 
Fairv of Killarnev." 

* * * 

In next week"s offering, "'The Masqueraders." at 
the Alcazar. Henry Arthur Jones has contributed a 
vital and virile drama of the emotions even more 
convincing than his "Dancing Girl," "Judah" and 
"The Middleman." He has torn the mask from fash- 
ionable English society and revealed the people of 
his story all very real and human, in the nakedness 
of their natural impulses and passions. 

* * * 

What promises to be the most brilliant of the series 
of professional matinee performances yet given by 
the students of the Paul Gerson School of Acting, 
will take place at the California Theatre Friday af- 
ternoon, February 12th. Among the many novelties 
to be offered will be the first performance in the West 
of the third act from Ibsen's "The Doll's House," 
and which will serve to introduce the gifted young 
California actress, Miss Mabel Duffey in the part of 
Nora. "The Jade," a one-act comedy by Ada Lee 
Bascom, will have its first presentation in this coun- 
try. This little playlet made a genuine success in 
London, where it was played all of last season. "The 
Mouse Trap," a one-act comedy by William Dean 
Howell, is another offering; also the first presenta- 
tion in the West of a scene from Lord Lytton's beau- 
tiful play, "The Rightful Heir." A fantasy in one act 
by Ada Lee Bascom, entitled "Bacchante," will have 
its first performance in this country, and will prove a 
decided novelty. Owing to the length of the pro- 
gramme, the curtain will rise promptly at two o'clock. 



There is joy in the camp of the automobilists, and 
among those who drive good horseflesh. This joy- 
ful feeling has been brought about by the opening 
of a new hotel, The Anona, at 2910 San Bruno Ave- 
nue. The opening occurred on the evening of De- 
cember 19th, and was attended by many lovers of 
good cheer. Among those present at mine host Gil- 
let's board were: Colonel A. H. Crane, Harry Pat- 
rick, C. S. Lahanier, R. D. Kennedy, Harry Corbett, 
A. L. Schubert, M. A. Miller, E. K. Earl, D. L. 
O'Brien, Major J. Bean, A. L. Crane, Fred Purdy, 
W. G. Long, George Shaw, C. W. Muller. There was 
speech making an address by the Honorable- Harry 
Mulcreevy and a good supper and dancing. Dr. Milo 
J. Gillete deserves all the success promised the house. 

One goes naturally to Swain's on Sutter street for a 

good luncheon. There is nothing in town that can compare 
with this place as a place of rest and refreshment atcer 
the toils of shopping. They are always ready to deliver 
ice-cream and pastry — always the best, and their prompt- 
ness can be depended upon. 



NEWS LETTER 

A Shin of B>Autr ii a Joy Forvvtr. 

iR. T. FELIX GOURAUDS ORIENTAL 
OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 




tl 



CREAM 



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Skin DImw. 








Hon 




tv .mil ia b.i harml 




n 1* n 








similar num.' Dr. 1 \ 





| .LI to ;i l:i'lv of Mir haut ton 
i;i patient): "A« v.ni l ri ■ ) : 

imp thom. I recommend 'Immt- 
mnt's Cream' :im the leaal harm- 
ful of ail the skin preparation^," 
Kor sal.- by ill <lri.Rjrint«i and 
fanoy-goodi dealers in the 

United St:.t.-s. I'ana-las and Ku- 
rnpc 

FEUD. T. HOPKINS. Prop. 
37 Great Jones St.. New York. 



THE 
FRENCH 
CRYSTALLINE 
PORTRAIT 

THE MOST 
CAPTIVATING and BEAUTIFUL 

PICTURE 

EVER INTRODUCED IN PARIS 
CAN BE HAD AT 




121 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney-at-Law 
Crocker building, San Francleco 




WRINKLES and FACIAL BLEMISHES 

Removed by New Process (Guaran- 
teed.) Face Massage, Manicuring 
and Scalp Massage 

AT YOUR HOME, 

by appointment 

MME. H. EASTWOOD 

1307 Larkin St., S. F. Tel. Larkln 2646. 



The Star Hair Remedy — best oi all tonics and restora- 
tives. Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not 
a dye. At druggists and hair-dressers. Accept no substi- 
tute. Star Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



The "Theo" — Popular-Priced French Corset. New 

Fall Models Dip Hip now on display. The D. Samuels Lace 
House Co., Sole Agent. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 



>own i,rter 

I 'Xtsr tit eritrV.Khtt »* dtrrt trt /*** ' ' 
'OwtlUt mil pit/ IM dml, jlr. witty u ' 



ifc^. 



The news that the conduct of the United States 
Marines at Seoul is unsatisfactory will not come as 
any surprise to those who have observed the deterio- 
ration in the conduct of all arms of the service in 
San Francisco. I am a friend of the United States 
Army and Navy, but as such am obliged to state that 
the condition of the streets leading to the Presidio 
from the city is disgraceful in the early hours of the 
morning. It is no excuse to say that garrison towns 
are always so, for they are not. Soldiers may be 
expected to get drunk, but not to go straggling over 
the streets after midnight. Their resorts are wall 
known, and a corporal's guard to gather them in 
before midnight would confer a favor not only on 
the citizens but the soldiers themselves. Much more 
might be said on this subject, but it will be taken 
up later. 

The eternal feminine must be plotting some new 
mischief. These constant collisions with burglars 
are getting to be monotonous, and, as the professors 
would say, are rising to the importance of social phe- 
nomena. Two school-teachers find a burglar in their 
room and let him go — happy burglar. An attorney's 
wife catches a burglar in the house and swats him — 
happy attorney, for he gets an ad. Free? I don't 
know, but I have my doubts. A singer, engagements 
perhaps slack, whacks a highwayman with her um- 
brella in classic Berkeley — again an ad. and her pic- 
ture. All this happens in one week. When we seek 
for the common factor in these cases by eliminating 
the variables, we find, we blush as we find, advertise- 
ment. Can this be it? 

In Oakland they are troubling their heads about 
the disposal of the city garbage. I fancied that that 
question had long been settled, and that most of the 
Oakland garbage found its way into the Oakland 
restaurants. Such an aggregation of poison-shops 
were never collected under the term restaurant. Am- 
brose Bierce used to say that one could never get 
anything decent to eat in the town, and things have 
not improved since his time. There are an everlast- 
ing number of people in Oakland who are keen to 
look after the souls of its people. Won't some one 
pay some attention to a less dignified but very neces- 
sary part of the ordinary human? 

A certain Robert Goldman of Oakland has been 
acting as Governor of Bockloc in the Philippines. He 
went out to the islands intending to farm, but has 
returned dissatisfied. Quite right, Mr. Goldman. 
The only thing worth farming in the Philippines is 
the revenue, and that can be done better here: 

Our island possessions it's useless to roam — 
For real paying graft, there is no place like home. 

Mrs. Martha E. Bowers, who is charged with 
murdering her husband, has either too great a sense 
of humor or too little. She testifies: "Mv husband 
and I were like two big kids. I always loved him. 
He was always a sickly man, suffering from liver 
and kidney troubles. He had bad night sweats." This 
is just the sort of man that a young woman could 
love. The amount of affection producible by means 
of liver and kidney troubles, not to speak of night 
sweats, should be of a quality which the muse of 
Swinburne would toil painfully to describe. 



The Stanford students do not like good music. 
Only about two dozen of them turned up to a classi- 
cal concert and the long-haired are wailing. Of 
course the vast majority of healthy, husky young 
animals which constitute the student body of the 
University do not care for the classical concert. It 
would be the merest humbug on their part to pretend 
that they did. If we subtract from the ordinary con- 
cert audience the fashionable, the pretentious and the 
merely imitative, we shall find that the Stanford two 
dozen were after all a pretty good average, and there 
is nothing really to complain about. Who would ex- 
change a healthy kid for a Grosvenor Gallery esthete? 

Professor Gayley is holding separate classes for 
men, but declares that he is not opposed to co-edu- 
cation, whereupon the wise spinster remarks: 
Too much you protest, doctor dear, 

'Tis all prevarication. 
No boys! It surely must appear 
There's no co-education. 

Trades unionism has still further terrors in store 
for us. According to an affidavit presented by Judge 
Maguire in the Circuit Court a non-union man volun- 
tarily gave himself a bath in a pond to purge himself 
of the sin of non-unionism, and as a pledge of future 
good behavior. If all the trades unionists turn Bap- 
tists, the prospect will be appalling. The walking 
delegate as a minister of grace would be the crowning 
touch of American humor. There is one thing, how- 
ever, to be said in favor of the innovation — it will 
necessitate an occasional bath. 

"Easy come, easy go," must be the idea of Mrs. 
Gardner Howell, who has howelled herself into no- 
toriety because her husband stayed away one night. 
Now everybody knows, and the lady must be im- 
mensely pleased with herself. But her husband? 
Four days' courtship was all the work he had to do.' 
Now he must recognize the truth of the proverb 
which the Germans sum up so tersely in the expres- 
sion "billig und schlecht." 

I wonder what is getting into the youngsters. The 
pilfering at the Berkeley High School has grown to 
such an extent that strong measures have to be taken 
to put it down. I have already called attention to 
the same feature in the State University, and our 
political life shows the same tendency. The Forty 
Thieves are here all right, but where is Ali Baba 
with his boiling oil? An imprisonment or two might 
straighten matters out. 

Professor George Lemuel Ayres will go down in 
California history as a pedagogue who could not 
stand punishment. His wife, a Santa Rosa society 
girl, practiced physical culture upon his corpus vile, 
and used a spoon with such effect that she cut his 
scalp. This latter action would serve to show that 
it was scientific curiosity rather than vindictiveness 
which impelled her. She was looking for the pro- 
fessor's brains. 

The Actors' National Protective Union has re- 
sorted to egg-throwing as a re-inforcement of the 
genial boycott. The ready employment of this par- 
ticular missile shows at once the sort of offering best 
known to the trades union actors. They have all 
been recipients of the like in their time, and their use 
of the missile in question springs from a personal 
knowledge of its effectiveness. 

Reverend Mark Guy Pearse of London says that 
we in San Francisco do not know what poverty 
means. When the new bond issue is done with, and 
the Mayor has retired satisfied, we shall be convinced 
in the words of the late laureate, "that a sorrow's 
crown of sorrow is remembering happier things." 



January 23. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



>3 



How 5an Francisco Looks to Me 



■v F«r^*\\ild Ttivpfi. Tourist 



No. 4 



One of my friends at the club said to mc the other 
evening that I was correct in my opinion of the un- 
speakable badness of your principal thoroughfare. 
and that the residents of San Francisco also ob- 
jected to its ramshackle condition. This caused me 
surprise, as from what 1 had noted. I was convince. i 
that the San Franciscan will put up with anything 
if he can do as he pleases. 

The next day my friend escorted me to the City 
Hall. I met some of your Aldermen, and saw some 
which, thank heavens. I did not meet. Then I un- 
derstood the whys and wherefores of manv things. 
You people do things in a manner which is not an 
improvement on the manner with which I have been 
familiar in the larger places in England. There the 
men who go in for being Aldermen do so for the 
>ake of the honor, and because they are well educated 
and desire to help to govern their city in a manner 
which will reflect credit on themselves and on the 
town or city in which they live. Here I learn that 
it is quite different. The better classes do not care 
to go in to be elected for any position, since there 
is not any honor in it, but only abuse, and the other 
class not appreciating this element go in on the make. 
The sums of money which have been spent on muni- 
cipal street improvements in your city have cost a 
great deal too much, and the result is plainly and 
painfully noted by a stranger. Here the beautifying 
of your city is no one's business, and hence the rag- 
ged tatterdemallion appearance. In your shopping 
district, little one-floor affairs, with tumble-down 
back parts and plate glass fronts, exist right next 
door to brick and stone buildings. Ragged sunshades 
over the windows of your stores, with glaring adver- 
tisements on them, spoil the appearance of the street. 
Horrible piles of planking, nailed up like a wall 
around vacant premises covered with the most un- 
sightly kind of nightmarish-colored advertising bills, 
show how a place can be ruined. Old men on the 
street, sweeping up the trash with a broom and scat- 
tering mud or dust in every direction, makes one 
feel sorry for the poor beggars. I saw a butcher's 
wagon full of beef the other morning following 
along behind an ash wagon, and the smell of the 
wagon and the dust blowing back over the beef 
behind was simply a lesson on vegetarianism, with 
an emeticy sort of feeling added. Among the duties 
of the modern and -semi-parental form of city Gov- 
ernment is the education of the masses as well as the 
protection of the classes. 

If your citizens do not know any better than to tol- 
erate this kind of thing, they should be taught bet- 
ter. I followed the wagon for two or three squares 
and expected to see a plain-clothes man at least put 
the beef ahead of the ashes, but no, and the people 
going down to their shops and offices never noticed 
it at all. Awful, isn't it? 

I have talked with some of your policemen, and I 
find them quite a decent lot, but not up to the Eng- 
lish force in point of politeness or desire to ac- 
commodate the questioner, but far ahead of any in 
London in point of brogue. I tried one chap, an Ital- 
ian, and he spoke the language. Another addressed 
me in good French, and I offered one man a quarter 
of a dollar in return for his directions, and he refused 
it. Maybe I should have offered him a half. 

There is a similarity, however, in one point. 



The prett\ fjlrl i> most carefully escorted across the 
street here, tin same as elsewhere, and the others 
are allowed t" shift for themselves. 

Y<>u are giving up your time here to making 
money, and that is a bad habit to become fixed upon 
a growing city. It takes all the attention from other 
things which go to make the life of a gentleman 
pleasant. Here you don't breakfast or lunch or dine 
— you just eat. Sour residences are in family hotels, 
and the occupation of Gardener is forgotten. No one 
keeps a ( rardener, so 110 need of Gardeners. The hotel 
life and the money making craze detract from the 
appearance of those who acquire it, and the city 
and its men put on a makeshift, slovenly air, and 
your better growth ceases. You make money, but 
you don't have homes, and when you make your 
pile you'll go abroad or to Xew York to spend it, 
which you wouldn't do if you buildej homes and a 
beautiful city. 



The latest style in shirta may be found at .lolm W. Carmany'i 
Chronicle Building. 



EDUCATIONAL. 



California School of Design 

MARK HOPKINS INSTITUTE OF ART 



DRAWING 

PAINTING 



AND 



MODELING 




DECORATIVE 

DESIGNING 



WOOD 

CARVING 



Day Classes. Nlibt Classes and Saturday Classes 

For terms and courses of Instruction apply to the Assist- 
ant Secretary, Mark Hopkins Institute of Art, California 
and Mason Sts. 



Dr. H. J. STEWART 

TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition 
Special course for singere desiring church appointments 

Studio, 1105 Bush St. 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons In Painting, Drtwlnf. Sketching, an* lllustratlei 
Lilt classes, f 3.00 par month. 

9a7 HARKET STREET 



MISS ROSE BRANDON 

478 EDDY STEEET 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR STUDIO 

Finest Italian Music Direct from Italy, taught 



Miss Ingeborg Resell Pettersen 
Voice Production 

1111 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 

Receiving hours from 2 till 4 o'clock every day 
except Wednesdays and Saturdays. 



*4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 




A TRUSTY TIP TO YOU ON THEATRICALS. 

COLUMBIA— "The Degenerates." An excellent performance. 
ALCAZAR— "Mrs. Jack." A splendidly enacted farce. 
ORPHEUM— A very good show. Many attractive acts. 
CENTRAL— A good performance of "A Bowery Girl." 
FISCHER'S— "The Beauty Shop." Continued crowded houses 
1 GRAND— "One Night in June," Good. 

TIVOLI— "When Johnny Comes Marching Home." Continued success. 
CALIFORNIA— "A Fatal Wedding." Very ordinary and uninteresting. 
CHUTES— Deaves Manuikins. Good. 
LYRIC HALL— Burton Holmes. Entertaining Lectures- 



"The Beauty Shop" continues the attraction at 
Fischer's,, and the management and company are to 
lie congratulated on the visible improvement made 
in "an already smooth production." The pruning 
that has been going on since the first performance 
is appreciated by the public, lor the attendance con- 
tinues very large and enthusiastic. Little Dorothy 
Crawford is to be credited with the suggestion that 
Dill kick Kolb on their emergence from the "thin- 
ning" and "fleshing" works of Madame Voluptia's 
shop. Miss Crawford is a charming maid of twelve 
yeaxs,_.and is. .the playwright's daughter. Her 
brother disputes' the idea with her, and it may be 
,that the scheme of retributive justice came from 
both of them. 

* * * 

At the Alcazar, the best stock company ever or- 
ganized in San Francisco is giving a finished and 
levenly balanced performance of "Mrs. Jack." Miss 
'felock is the personification of the author's ideal, and 
the rest of the company are so nearly letter perfect 
that there is room for praise only, and that, unstinted. 

* * * 

Mrs. Langtry, at the Columbia, grows on on^ 
with further acquaintance. You find yourself catch- 
ing little intonations in the rich voice, something to 
admire in the awkward walk, the set of the head 
crowned with her lovely way of dressing the 
hair, allures, and take it altogether, she becomes to 
you the embodiment of an English beauty. There 
is a subtle magnetism about her, a feline attractive- 
ness, that captivates. Mrs. Langtry has one quality, 
imd indeed this entire company possesses the same 
attribute, a clearness of enunciation that it is a never- 
ending pleasure to the audience. 

The widow of Windsor's son has risen in my esti- 
mation. I used to think he had execrable taste. This 
was hecause of some male friends of his "that I have 
met." There are other men who have raved over the 
Lily of Jersey in time that is past, and I sat back, 
half closed my eyes in a retrospect of nearly twenty 
years, and I am gray and old, and I open my eyes 
and before me is a woman, fifty at least, and looking 
the ideal of Balzac's woman of thirty. And it was 
she who looked much the same so long ago. Mrs. 
Langtry is certainly a wonderful woman. 

Mrs. Langtry's company deserves the thanks of 
theatre-goers for their conscientious work. The per- 
formance of Mrs. Deering's Divorce" was excellent, 
and the same good swing and splendid acting per- 
vades "The Degenerates." 

* * -* 

At the Central "The Bowery Girl" is being given 
ito good audiences, and there is fun a-plenty, a fire 
scene, and the usual powder smoke. This time it is 
a dynamite explosion. 



The Stein-Eretto family, Stanley and Wilson, 
Kelly and Violette, Irving Jones, Howard Thurs- 
ton, Wallno and Marinette, Asra and White and Sim- 
mons continue to entertain the Orpheum audiences. 
There is a vast amount of entertainment in the acts 
of this goodly company, and the house is crowded 
nightly. 

» * * 

"When Johnny Comes Marching Home" has 
marched to some good purpose for the management 
of the Tivoli. The house is packed with enthusias- 
tic audiences. Whatever shortcomings there may 
be in the music are made up in the acting and 
in the swing of the martial airs. Anna Lichter's 
solo, "Fairyland," is a hit, and the magnificent tab.- 
teaux and scenery are a constant source of gratifica- 
tion to the theatre goer. 

* * * 

At the Grand Opera House, "One Night in June" 
is giving pleasure to large audiences. It is a pretty 
play of the old "Green Mountain State," and Mr. 
Holmes and his company give a very acceptable per- 
formance. 

* * * 

After weeks of preparation, "Quo Vadis" is to be 
put on at the Central. The large stage of this house 
lends itself easily to spectacular effects, and it is 
expected that the performance will give the admirers 
of Herschell Mayall and Thais Lawton scope for hys- 
terics. 

* t * 

At the California the "Eternal City" will be put on.. 
Fortunately this play is under the management of 
Liebler and Company of New York, and this surely 
is a guarantee of improvement over the lamentably 
miserable work that lias been heretofore presented to 

the public by the local management. 

* * * 

A magnificent programme will be rendered at 
the Alhambra to-night by Rivelas' Royal Italian 
Band, assisted by a few vocalists, under the auspices 
of "L'ltalia," in commemoration of the death of 
Verdi. The proceeds of the fund will be given in its 
entirety to the Verdi monument fund. The monu- 
ment will be donated to the city of San Francisco, 

and will be an additional beauty in one of the parks. 

* * * 

The Alameda Lustspiel Ensemble is making elabo- 
rate preparations for Sunday night's production at 
the Columbia, and there is every reason to believe 
that the comedy will make one of the biggest hits 
ever known here. The lines are bright and the situ- 
ations highly complicated and amusing. Seats are 

selling very rapidly, and a big house is assured. 

* * * 

"A programme filled with novelties is announced 
at the Chutes for the coming week, one of the acts 
of importance being Montague's Cockatoo Circus 
birds that do everything but talk — and some of them 
do that. Koplin, Fowler and Koplin, society acro- 
batic marvels, will make their first appearance here, 
as will also Dealy and Shean, very clever and origi- 
nal singing and dancing comedians. Barr and La 
Salle will present a comedy paper tearing act, and 
Mabel Lamson, the popular contralto, will be heard 
in new illustrated songs. The marionette entertain- 
ment provided by Deaves' Merry Manikins, and new 
moving pictures shown by the animatoscope, will 



January 33. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTF.R. 



■amine. The -amateurs will appear 
it. The, American. (. liine-e and 
in the incubati 
f leopard in th< 



-.Hon. 



■5 

AN OPEN SHOP 

.Ml fair-mini 
1 ipcii SI)--, raal I), 725 Market 



Honeymoon," which rives its initial 
performance in San Francisco at the Colombia Thea- 
tre next Monday evening is a clean musical comedy, 
different from musical comedies that have been seen 
here this season. It does not depend wholly on one 
or two characters for its success, as the company con- 
tains about twenty principals and carries a chorus 
of over eighty voices. The costumes and scenery 
are said to be the handsomest seen on the stage to- 
day. The music of "A Chinese Honeymoon" is the 
of Howard Talbot, and the books and lyrics 
are from the pen of George Dance. A feature is the 
grand ensemble numbers, particularly the finale of 
the first act, which is the wedding scene, and the 
finale of the second act, "The Feast of Lanterns." 
* * * 

Frederick Belasco. who is now in New York secur- 
ing plays for his stock companies, wires the import- 
ant announcement that he will shortly make the first 
San Francisco production of "Parsifal," a dramatic 
version of Wagner's great religious opera, originally 
produced at Beyrouth and recently such a sensation 
at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. 
The dramatization, he- adds, is nearly completed. As 
Mr. Belasco is in daily touch with his brother, David 
Belasco, it seems probable that the project, when 
fully announced, will prove one of exceptional im- 
portance. 

Kolb and Dill remain first favorites with San 
Francisco's lovers of stage fun, and the work of the 
two comedians in "The Beauty Shop" has immeas- 
urably enhanced their popularity. Ben T. Dillon 
has also strengthened his hold upon the admiration 
of the folk who appreciate artistic versatility. His 
impersonation of Professor Hercules Brannigan is 
one of the: cleverest low comedy bits ever witnessed 
in this city. Georgia O'Ramey loses none of her 
artistic charm in the unenviable make-up of Sapho 
Sweeney, and the Althea sisters are better than ever 
in their songs and dances. It is the general belief 
that "The Beauty Shop" will equal, if it does not 
eclipse, the longest run ever scored at Fischer's. 

The Tivoli management announces the production 
of Strauss's "Gypsy Baron," after "Johnny" will 
have made his farewell march. The stage in the new 
house will lend itself admirably for this opera. The 
"Gypsy Baron" will prove a treat to the patrons of 
the Tivoli. 

„ "Davjd Harum," with its New York production 
and an extremely strong cast, will be presented at 
the Grand Opera House the week commencing Sun- 
day matinee. All of the scenes are laid in.Homeville, 
New;. York, and the play is divided into three acts. 
From appearances it is not unlikely that the play 
will meet with a warm reception here, and its presen- 
tation will be largely attended. Sunday, matinee, 
January 31st, Joseph Arthur's latest success, "Lost 
JRiver," will be elaborately presented. 
* * * 

. Another new and well-known girl is coming, to 
Fischer's Theatre shortly. She is Nellie, Lynch,.. one 
of -the cleverest soubrettes in America. 
(Continued, on. page _iiO 



Grand Opera House 



DAUID hAKUM 

The 1 ■■ ,r ■ 'lit Portrayed bj a lUMrb OMt, with 

» H Turin l' tvfd Harum larrloh Thea- 

* ^..rk where it ran .« Whobj kmmoq. Ht-gular tteturday 
"i:> F 11 Hattnee J an. 31 

LOST RIVER 
Usual popular pi 

Fischer's Theatre 

Third week <>f the enormous success 1 • 

THE BEAUTY SHOP 

Cpmmei s Monday Ninlii Jan. Kbh. The beat musi.-.il oomedj 

pi the year. Ileplete With catchy songs; r.iisk and funny dia- 

logYie, 

Uoa.l original specialties: Beautiful costumes and stage effects 

our "All Star" east. Ever Popular Prices. 

Matin.-.-- Sat nr- 1 ay and Sunday. 



Columbia Theatre. avmM '-%£.\S' iltbtga < 

Tw'i Weeks beginning Monday, January 25. 
Matinee Saturday only-' Messrs. Shubert and Nixon and Zim- 
merman's gorgeously beautiful presentation of I he International 
Musical Comedy Tridmph 

A CHINESE HONEYMOON 

The biggest, best, brightest of them all. 100 people. 

Sunday Jan. 24— German performance. "AIs ich Wiederkani. 1 ' 

. ■■—, — . — , 

0„— .!__. 1 rT\ SiuvrranclKJO'sGrt'arcm Mufrjc Hall. 
I J_>. ICUI I). oFarrell St.. Uetwcoii Stockton uud Powell itreets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee. Jan. 24 

A, PRODIGIOUS PROGRAMME! 

Johnny and Emma Ray; Cordua and Maud ; Duffy, Sawtelle and 
Duffy: Oliver T. Holden and Winifred Florence; Stanley and 
Wilson; Kelly and Violette; Irving Jones; Orpheum Motion 
Pictures and last week of the 

STclN-ERETTO FAMILY 

Prices, loc. 25c and soe- 

Matiness every Wednesday. Thursday. Saturday and Sunday. 

Cor\t ml Th^irr rf=> Belasco & Mayek, Proprietors 
v^feJIJLrU] 1 ntJUUe. Market St. near Eighth-Tel. South 533 

Week of Monday. January 25th ■ 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday- 
The magnificent dramatic spectacle. 

QUO VADIS 

Prices— Evenings 10 to 50c> Matinees 10. 15, 26c 
Week of Feb. 1. IN SIGHT OF ST. PAUL'S. 



Alcazar 



Al^QTciy T"r-» an r- v*a Bblasco & Mater, Proprietors 

MJCaZdr ineutre e. D. Peicb. Gen'l. Mgr. Tel. Alca: 

Regular matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

One week commencing Monday Jan. '25. Henry Arthur Jones" 

Great Play 

THE MASQUERADERS 

"The Alcazar is presenting splendid plays in rapid sucessipn." 
—Post 

Evenings 25 to 75c- Saturday and Sunday Matinees 15-to 50c 
Monday February 1— First time in San Francisco of the delight- 
ful Comedy I 

A COLONIAL GIRL. 

A Romance of the Revolution '-"•'..! 1 

Tivoli Opera House. CornarEd fc n n d st r ee te 

Matinees every Saturday. Beginning Monday Jan 25, 

Third week of the phenomenal success * j ■ '■> " 

WHEN cJOHNNY GOMES MARCHING 
HOM-E 

A three act military comic opera by Stanislaus Stange and 
Julian Edwards. Next 

THE GYPSY BARON' 

Usual popular prices— 25c, 60c, 75c. Box Seats, $1. 

flfter the Theater 

, Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after 
tbe theatre is over. - .•,...,' 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 




A veteran police official was discussing crime with 
me the other day. Every man, you know, talks shop, 
more or less. The conversation had wound around 
from the city's remarkable growth during the past 
decade to the numerous crimes of high degree re- 
cently committed. 

"Men in our business notice the city's growth," 
said the policeman. "We know that criminals are 
flocking here, and that high-grade malefactors are in- 
creasing in San Francisco. This is no longer a vil- 
lage. It is a great city, and our population is not 
less than 340,000. It is on the increase, too. For 
this very reason, there is immediate need for new 
laws giving the police department greater power for 
the suppression or detection of crime. I have been' 
engaged in a number of cases of mysterious murder, 
and I have found that so many opportunities for es- 
cape are afforded assassins, that it is very difficult to 
prove their guilt. The hard cases are those in which 
people, not of the criminal class, remove others on 
whose lives they may have insurance, or by whose 
death they will be benefited financially in some 
other way. These murderers take very good care to 
destroy all evidences of their crimes, and their very 
first act is to destrov the body of the dead. This is 
most easily done by cremation in one of the local 
crematories. 

"The papers referred the other day to the Hume 
case. I know nothing about this affair, except what 
I read ; but as I recall it, it was alleged that an in- 
vestigation into the cause of death was demanded. 
The body, however, had been cremated, and an au- 
topsy was, therefore, impossible. The ease with 
which it is possible in this city to cremate bodies is 
of great assistance to persons who may commit mur- 
der by the administration of poison, for instance, or 
by some other means, which would leave no marks 
of violence. It is easy enough to get a death certifi- 
cate from a physician looking for a fee. The issu- 
ance of a permit from the Health Office is a mere for- 
mality, and it takes not more than a day to remove all 
possibility of discovery by causing the body to be 
cremated. It seems to me that the Supervisors should 
pass an ordinance requiring that all bodies about to 
be cremated should be subjected first to medical in- 
spection, and to an autopsy, except in cases where 
physicians of good standing have been in attendance 
for some time prior to death, and are able to vouch 
personally that death resulted from natural causes. 
Cremation is altogether too popular with heirs to 
large estates, and with others who desire an urn of 
ashes to remind them of the rapid passage of those 
who left their coin behind. It presents an avenue 
through which the most dangerous kind of criminals 
may practically foreclose the possibility of detection. 
Some of the prominent men in the police department 
and some of the private detectives who have been 
engaged in famous murder cases, have given this 
matter considerable attention, and do not be sur- 
prised if an ordinance along the lines suggested is 
soon introduced in the Board of Supervisors. The 
certainty of detection and punishment is the most 
valuable deterrent in the prevention and suppression 
of crime. We must have legal proofs before we can 
hang a man, and those proofs must be obtained be- 
fore the door of the incinerating chamber is closed 

upon the bodies of the dead." 
* * * 

The Democrats now have absolute control of the 



Board of Supervisors. They have the fourteen votes 
necessary to pass bills over the Mayor's veto, and 
they intend, therefore, to make Schmitz as unhappy 
as possible during his second term. The test vote 
was on the pound business. The fourteen votes 
developed, and it is said one more might have been 
had if necessary. Sanderson, Eggers and Alpers are 
now counted with the Democrats, and Baxton may 
join the bunch. Sanderson is a life-long Republican, 
the son of former Mayor Sanderson and brother of 
the late Supervisor Sanderson. The Democrats did 
not have to ask him to come in. He joined them only 
too willingly. Eggers is a Crimmins man. He was 
opposed to the Primary League during the recent 
campaign, and trained with the regular organization. 
He was placed on the Police Committee, which han- 
dles all the big prize-fight permits. Knowing he can 
get nothing from Schmitz, Eggers has joined the op- 
position. It is said that Alpers has been promised 
some sort of patronage to keep him in line. He is 
playing a more desperate game than Eggers, for Al- 
pers has a couple of saloons, and the Police Commis- 
sioners could shut him down almost any time if 
he became too objectionable in the Board. Baxton 
is inclined to the Democratic majority, because it is 
also a question of patronage with him. He can get 
what he wants only through the majority. 

Brandenstein will be the majority leader in the 
Board. Braunhart wants to be, but the others pre- 
ferred Brandenstein. Braunhart is a good parlia- 
mentarian, and he has many excellent ideas, but his 
unfortunate and frequently offensive manner makes 
him impossible for leadership. When Brandenstein 
announced at the first meeting of the Board that the 
Supervisors were the whole thing, and that they 
would take no back talk from the Mayor, he outlined 
a policy that will make the coming two years very 
strenuous for the Supervisors on the one hand and 
the Mayor and all his appointees on the other. Bran- 
denstein would not hesitate to cut off the supplies 
by reducing the appropriations for all the Schmitz 
boards, if by doing so he could control the Mayor 
and the Commissions. It will be a very vigorous 
fight. One object will be to discredit Schmitz, so 
that his re-election as Mayor will be next to impos- 
sible. That result would cut him out as a possible 
candidate for Governor. Brandenstein refused the 
Democratic nomination for Mayor last year, but, it 
is said, he now thinks he sees a chance to make the 
Democratic nomination in 1905 equivalent to an elec- 
tion. He certainly has a great opportunity to show 

what he can accomplish. 

* * '* 

District Attorney Byington has not yet made those 
changes in his staff ordered by McNab on the first 
of the year. The Democratic office holders are sur- 
prised. They did not think Byington had as much 
backbone as he has shown. He has withstood Mc- 
Nab for at least three weeks, wherefore men marvel. 
The Scotchman demanded the heads of Porter Ashe, 
little Johnny Greeley, Hanley and some others. He 
wanted them all served with the blood of decapita- 
tion hot upon them, but the axe has not yet swung. 
Byington sharpened the edge, but he cannot make 
up his massive mind for the delivery of the blow. 
He is in the usual Byington condition — funk. His 
safety is in delay, he thinks. Therefore he delays. 
But McNab urges danger in delay. Then Byington 
promises the heads on the morrow. He gathers 



January 13. 190a. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



fresh courage one night, and so far no heads have 

fallen. Meanwhile, the District Attornc) and his 
staff maintain a state <>f armed neutrality. 

* • • 

Grief, the new County Clerk, deserves more than 
a little praise for his fortitude in withstanding the 
demands made for the restoration of Mahoney, Pren- 
dergast and others of the barnacle type. Crimmins 
could do nothing with him in behalf oi the discred- 
ited men. Grief has a splendid opportunity to make 
a pv.d record. He knows the business; he has com- 
petent assistants, and he can give a business admin- 
istration. Hut — remember this prophecy — he will 
wander hack to Crimmins before the year gets very 
old, or I am much mistaken. 

* * * 

The Union League is getting to be a big organi- 
zation. If it takes over the old Pacific Union build- 
ing it will have the finest quarters, and will be the 
most pretentious of all the political clubs of the 
Coast. George Pippy has been very successful as 
President, and deserves his re-election. Pippy, it is 
said, is in training for a big Federal job in the event 
of Roosevelt's re-election. You remember, he was 
quite close up when Teddy was here. Either Col- 
lector of the Port or Postmaster will satisfy Pippy. 
Of course, Fisk has just taken the latter job, but 
that does not concern Pippy's calculations. Fisk 
would rather go to Congress from the Fifth than 
continue in his present place, and now that Loud 
has been killed off and Wyfln has been lost in the 
shuffle at Washington, a trade might easily be ar- 
ranged whereby the Postmaster would get into the 
Congressional fight and leave the Postmastership 
for some one else. "That some one else is me," 
says Pippy. The rise of the President of the Union 
League should be an example to young men in poli- 
tics. It is not so long ago when Pippy was a court- 
room clerk at the City Hall. He was not a remark- 
ably brilliant clerk; in fact, he is not, in any respect, 
a remarkably brilliant man. But he did his work 
well enough and held his job. Then he got into the 
law, but I have not heard much about him as a bar- 
rister. He was at first Secretary of the Union 
League, and was re-elected a couple of times. Then, 
finally, he became President, and is now in his third 
term. Pippy is a genial fellow, and by giving the 
club a good deal of his time has made himself strong 
and popular in the organization. But it is not all 
for the greater glory of the "Grand Old Party." Not 
if George knows it. Everything comes to him who 
waits. He has been waiting about long enough, he 
thinks, and when the big loaves and big fishes are 
next distributed, you will see Pippy's name promi- 
nently mentioned among the names of those that 
are claiming rewards for long and gallant service. 

* * * 

The Jefferson Square Club is the very latest. It 
seems to be a private corporation organized for the 
purpose of showing the newly rich, who can afford 
to ride in automobiles, just how and when to do the 
proper thing. It occupies the upper floors of a new 
building out on Golden Gate avenue, and it has all 
the appointments of a swell club. William Greer 
Harrison appears as President, and among the offi- 
cers are Colonel Jo. Howell, Judge Kerrigan, Henry 
J. Crocker and Eddie Greenway. There are no dues 
and no initiation fees, but cards of membership have 
been issued to many hundreds of men who are con- 
sidered what Horace Piatt might call "clubable." 
It strikes me that the "club" must be a private busi- 
ness enterprise. I regret to see my old friend Green- 



'7 

■ In- linir ..( life. 
I'atti may not have hecn children to- 

gather, bi bow plainly v 

the passing years have exposed the bald scalp of 
lime II' tat young as he used to be, ami it is 

more than passing jaj to s,-,- him chasing the elu 
sive dollar down a bowling alley. or from a kitchen 
to the cashier's desk, when he might In- so much 
more pleasantly engaged. This new club, you know. 
has a grill. .. ,\ all sort of appointments. It ma\ 
be all right, Eddie, but the selling of chops looks verj 
much like "trade." 

• • • 

Every month, in the Maple Room at the Palace, 
.1 score or two gentlemen gather at an informal din 
ncr to discuss current events. They form the Com- 
monwealth Club. They do not parade their sayings 
or doings in the press, but every now and again they 
issue pamphlets in which are published some of the 
best papers read at the monthly dinners. This club 
numbers some of the most progressive men in town. 
Among them are Mr. Weinstock, of Weinstock, Lu- 
bin & Co., James D. I'helan. Professors Wheeler and 
Jordan, Dr. Burke, Dickie the shipbuilder. William 
Greer Harrison. John McXaught. William R. 
Wheeler, and others. For the men composing it. 
and the topics they discuss, it is the most modest 
organization of the kind the town has ever known. 

* * * 

"Elijah" Dowie has "came." Dowie was here 
years ago. In fact, upon his arrival from Australia, 
he builded in San Francisco his first stepping-stones 
to fame and fortune. He lectured at the Y. M. C. A., 
and succeeded in interesting a few professional 
Christians in his scheme* for reformation, with 
Dowie as chief reformer, selling tickets at the gate. 
He has been repeatedly denounced as a faker, but as 
a business man he could give a year's start in a new 
field to most of our local merchants and then beat 
them out. During the past few months either he has 
been losing his grip or he has been calmly preparing 
for a grand coup. He has sent his family to Eu- 
rope ; his great settlement near Chicago is in finan- 
cial distress, and it is said he is headed for Australia, 
where he expects the fatted calf to be killed upon his 
return home. His successors will be that new sect 
in New England, reported in the papers this week, 
whose basic principle is to grow long whiskers. 
Why? So they may "raise the wind." 



Pine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 




R. B. HAYDEN' 

HAND MADE SOUB MASH 

WHISKEY 



THE FINEST WHISKY MADE 

IN KENTUCKY 
THE HOME OF BOURBONS 

DIBTILLID BT 

GREENBRIER DISTILLERY CO. 

Nelson, Co.. Ky. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Agents Pacific Coast. San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




A new Richard has entered the 

The Unpopular field, ambitious to control the 

Gas Corporation, destinies of the San Francisco 

Gas and Electric Company. A 
change of any kind could only be for the best, and 
there is one thing to be said for the new aspirant, 
Mr. C. O. G. Miller, that his experience has been 
such as to justify the belief 'that he knows some- 
thing about the business and would be a practical 
manager. Mr. Miller expresses himself as opposed 
to" the p61icy which allows a President of the cor- 
poration $25,000 per annum and grants him the priv- 
ilege of touring Europe at a time when the services 
of every officer of the corporation is particularly 
needed. He evidently does not favor the introduc- 
tion of men as heads of departments from other 
walks in life, which certainly do not suggest the 
most intimate acquaintance with the manufacture 
of gas, even if the results of their highly-paid labors 
up to date had not shown that very clearly, to con- 
sumers of a product which is the wcrst ever turned 
out from the gas-works in this city since they were 
constructed. Any citizen who is forced to wend his 
way home late at night from his business will cor- 
roborate this statement, if he has not already com- 
mented upon the subject, after one glance at the 
dismal little glare, "greenery yallery" in color, which 
only serves a turn in making the murkv darkness 
visible, and the surroundings doleful in the extreme. 
The statement of the company's financial claim for 
public support will be of interest when it is filed 
with the Board of Supervisors in due course. The 
extent to which the late inflation of capital will be 
utilized to tap the public purse will be interesting, 
outlining, as it doubtless will, the intentions of the 
promoters to define a valuation of a concern which 
is only really worth what it would cost to replace 
the present plant by new and modern machinery, 
allowing, of course, for the wear and tear of years. 
No one, of course, can attempt to take the figures of 
$3.0,000,000 as a basis of valuation seriously, a bubble 
which will collapse on the first indication of a bona 
fide proposition to establish a new plant. That this 
will come in due time may be confidently expected, 
owine to the very marked unpopularity of the new 
management of the old concern. The only thing 
that can possibly cheek a movement of the kind will 
be a clean sweep of the present officials at the. forth- 
coming election, and the shareholders will see that 
this takes place if they have a due regard for their 
own pockets. 

- ■ The Federal':-" authorities are 
Wild-Cats Begin, doing some good work in 
to Peter Out. rounding up the promoters of 
wild-cat mining schemes all 
over the country. The postal authorities have just 
put und?r arrest the Jaegers of Chicago on a charge 
of using the mails to defraud. According to the 
papers, more than $800,000 is involved, which will 
give an idea of the magnitude of the financial scoops 
of some of these opeiators. Irrespective, however, 
of the Government action, money is not coming in 
so rapidly now. It only takes time and rope enough 
for a wild-cat concern to hang itself, provided its 
members do not decamp too hurriedly in the belief 
that the jig is up. A mine that has no' ore developed 
nor ore to develop, cannot pay dividends, a proposi- 



tion which will not require much verification. They 
may materialize for a time, by robbing Peter to -pay 
Paul, the money received from sales of stock being 
used to bait the trap for a constantly growing crop 
of fools. When this source of supply is stopped, the 
stockholders can whistle for their capital, let alone 
talk of dividends. There are a number of the wild- 
cat flotations nearing this stage in their career, if 
they have not arrived at it, and from now on there- 
is likely to be music in the air. Quite a number of 
complaints are now heard from stockholders, who, 
filled with alarm at intimations of coming disaster, 
are now writing the papers from all over the country 
inquiring whether or no this proposition or that is 
safe, and if the management can be trusted. 

Business on the local Stock and 

Local Stocks Bond Exchange was particularly 
and Bonds. active in bonds during the past 
week, an indication that the appearance of the tax- 
collector is about to make his annual passage across 
the local stage. Many transactions took place, as 
will be found on reference to the list. An upward 
tendency is noted in the Gas Company's shares, 
which suggests the approach of the election, and also 
that money is likely to cut quite an important fac- 
tor in determining the 'result. In other quarters, 
the market showed some* strength, and the spirits 
of operators have risen somewhat above the zero 
mark. On Wednesday last Spring Valley paid its 
quarterly dividend of 63 on the capital stock of the 
company, and the California Powder Company its 
regular monthly dividend of 50 cents per share. 

Ophir came within an ace of 

Pine-St. Market, touching $10 during the past 
fortnight and the balance of 
the market showed a material improvement. The 
advance was too much for the ubiquitous "knocker." 
However, one thing that no so-called "knocker," 
singularly or collectively, has ever been able to do", is 
to block the Comstock market for long when its ac- 
tivity is based upon a genuine ore development. Ac- 
cording to Mr. Clarence Sharon, one of the ultra 
conservative mining men on the Comstock lode, who 
recently examined the improvement on the i, Q 6o- 
level of Ophir, says that tie ore tody had a breadth : 
of 14 leet in the face of the drift, and that values ran 
as high as $400 per ton, the average value being $100 
per ton. As it now stands, the ore body by measure- 
ment is said to exceed in value the Hardy vein in 
1878, when Ophir was quoted at $60. It has, now, 
greater dimensions than that found in Con.-Cal.- Vir- 
ginia in 1886, which sent that stock up to $65 and 
Ophir to $35. This statement appears in the Vir- 
ginia Report, which is edited by men who have 
grown up with the lode and know whereof they talk. 



This would indicate that, so far as Ophir is con- 
cerned, dividends are more likely in. the near future 
than assessments, and it would not B'e surprising 
should one be declared within the coming week. The 
price of the stock has declined recently to more nor- 
mal figures. There is nothing unusual in the flare- 
up, which carried the price on a spurt to the recent 
high figures. When a stock reacts sharply, as Ophir 
did, from a low basis, the public is apt to jump in 
and send prices kiting, taking the market for the 
time being out of the hands of 'inside operators who 



January 33. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTER. 



»9 



arc generally - 
will be rcmernl 

cyond all control, aciiup tn such 
an ungovernable manner that the wealthiest broker 
firms on the street were placed in such ■ position 
that some of the most solvent of them would have 
been forced to the wall, while the weaker concerns 
went down like nine-pins, owing t<> the panicky con- 
ditions. AffaiTs eventually worked into such a State 
that the late James (J. Flood had to be recalled from 
a visit to New York to restore the equilibrium of 
business by the weight of his personal and financial 
influence. Had it not been for his prompt and skill- 
ful action at that time, there would have been few 
of the most powerful operators on the street who 
would have survived the crisis, and that, too, on a 
"bull" market. ■ Of course, as the leader goes, so 
follows the smaller fry. and the balance of the list 
now shows a corresponding decline in sympathy 
with f.iphir. The development in Ophir justified a 
sharp advance in the price of that stock, and now 
that the market has steadied, it will undoubtedly re- 
spond in turn to the showing in the mine, and be 
regulated in its fluctuations by the appearance of the 
mine as the work of opening up the new and prom- 
ising ore body proceeds. The find in itself is one of 
the greatest importance, and there is no telling what 
it may yet develop into in the course of exploration 
in the lower levels of the mine. One would natu- 
rally conclude that a discovery of the kind would 
be one of congratulation on the street, instead of be- 
ing an object of attack. Friends of the Comstock 
will naturally hope that in dimensions it will yet 
open out into a veritable bonanza. 

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT. 
Mr. Paul Gerson begs to state that in response to 
numerous requests he will on January 1st open a 
Juvenile Department -in connection with his School 
of Acting, and has secured the services of a teacher 
of experience specially qualified for this work, Miss 
Lillian E. M.uscio. One of the features of the depart- 
ment will be a dancing class in charge of Signora 
Matildita., In order that each one may have his or 
her proper time and attention, the class will be lim- 
ited to ; twenty-five. Ms - . Gerson will give his per- 
sonal attention to- every pupil. For terms, etc., call 
or .address the Juvenile Department of the Paul Ger-- 
son -School of Acting, Native Sons' building, 414 
Mason, street. The fourth of the series of matinee 
performances by students at Paul Gerson's School 
of- Acting will take placeat-the California Theatre 
on : Friday afternoon, February 12th. A brilliant pro- 
gramme will be presented. The school will be as^ 
sisted-.by. the San Francisco- Conservatory of Music,, 
this institution hereafter joining its artistic interests- 
with the School .of Acting. 

• Alj Seamen r 

know the conjforts of having on hand a supply of Borden's. 
Eagle. Brand Condensed Milk. It can be us,ed so. agreeably, 
for cooking, in coffee', tea and chocolate. Lay in .'a supply, 
fot'ali kinds 'of expeditions. Avoid unknown' brands.' 

,,-r — (Jet the dust .out .of ;. your . carpets.- But don't do it- 
with a club, because it's a slow,: laborious and , very unsatis- 
factory way. ' You will find it more" profitable and satisfac-, 
tbry to tia.ve 'the Work done by the Spaulding Carpet Clean- 
ing;. Company-, ■ 353 Tehama, street.- With- their improved: 
machinery they make an.^old carpet look fas, bright and'jfresh; 
as a new one... . . . ,n?,Ci s - ' V.-...I 

In decol-ating the home tfr cniircrj'for a wecldmg'for dinners. [Iuri- 
che6n or receptions'the' three 'ta'aies-eottipbsifig the firm-gf Manning's. 
<fedorat'o-rs-aiitLBoristS,'-24e«tooktc*'' St" sKo'w the greafWt<Miginali(y 
in-their artistic work. - - ;, ;...'.: 51SW 5tf!i'M" A 



The rapidly tncrea-ing bu." ' '. F. Willcy 

!oalers in and 

'heir having ni'ire 

:\ the) W ill open a branch 

on thi 1 cbruary, 1904; at 11-22 to 1638 Market 

he St. Nicholas Hotel. This firm has 

the . . or the best makes of vehicles manu- 

\mcrica. Their recent importations are 

the swcllcsi and mosl stylish that have ever been 

brought in >an Francisco. 



One of the onfwi and li wg rgmedlsa for bltloniinei head" 

n.-li... 1 1 ..-'ihit'.r [t U ao excellent nlt«rfitiv(Min)l tonid 

to the riiaeetl Pots&lebyL ^ E. Cor. Sutt^f 

-Hi- 1 (irrint Ave. 



3 MONEY 3 



Part of Marconi Certificates. Let Your 
Money Work for You. Marconi Certifi- 
cates Will Net You From 100 to 1000 Per 
Cent Better Results Than Any Labor of 
Yours Can Produce. 

ACT NOW-DO NOT DELAY 

Bend yotir cheek or money order for as many blocks of 20 as you 
wish to the undersigned. No subscription for less than *loo. Price par 
ftirj5.ni rtiii'-at-'s. Tiif price ma v advance any day. 

ThestOckof the British Marconi Company was put at Jr>.no.and 
and is now Belling at $29 on the London Stock Exchange, an advance, of. 
an* percent. The possibilities of the American Company are much' 
greater. ' 

Tue Marconi avstem Is indorsed by such men as Andrew Otfrfiegie 
and Thomas A. Edison, and by the press of the entire world t . Edisonl 
Marconi and Pupin are the Consulting Engineers of the American* 
Company- - . ■ ■ 

Prospectus upon application and your correspondence solicited. 

F. P. WARD & Co., Bankers 

CROSS LEY BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Century Building, St. Louis, Mo.; Farmers' Bank 
Building, Pittsburg, Pa.; Land Title Building, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa.; Union Trust Building, Cincinnati, 
Ohio ; Royal Insurance Building, Chicago, 111. ' 
Correspondents — Munroe & Munroe, N. Y. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Paid-up Capital and Reserve, $1,726,000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator; Gjuardian or Trustees 
Check accounts solicited- Legal depository for money in Probate 
Court proceedings- Interest paid on Trust Deposits and Savings- Ittt 
vestments carefully selected. 

Officers— Frank J. Symmes. President. Horace L, Hill, Vice-Presi- 
dent: 0- A. Hale. Second Vice-President: H. Brunner, Cashier. 



| Mavis Consolidated Gold 

i 



and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of California, 

Location of works, Seneca Mining Distriot, ■ Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will 'be levied. 

5i),000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share for' 
development purposes. The ore in sight 'is practically 
unlimited. When the present issue of stock is exhausted, 
the price will be raiseu to, 50 cents a share. 

Apply to the office of the! company, room 205, 713 Mar- 
ket street, for prospectus,- which gives full information. 
VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 



BANKING. 



Wells, Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO • 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided I <fc I Q Knfl n(l[) 

Homer S. King, President; F. L. Lipman. Cashier; Frank B. 
King, Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake, Utah; Portland. Or. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General Banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 California St.. cor. Webb St.. San Francisco. 

E. B. POND. President: W. C. B De FBEMERY. ROBERT WATT. 
Vice-Presidents: Lovell White. Cashier: R. M. Welch. Assist. Cashier 

Directors— E. B. Pond. W. C. B. deFremery. Henry F. Allen. George 
C. Boardman. Jacob Barth. C. O. G- Miller. Fred H. Beaver, William 
A. Magee, Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country remit- 
tances may be sent by Wells. Fargo & Co.. or by checks of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of thisSavings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The 
signature of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No 
charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m- Saturday evening. 6:30 to 8. 

Deposits. December 31. 1903 $33.232908 

Guarantee Capital. Paid up 1,000.000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 899,510 

Mutual Savirjqs Bank; of s.„ ftumum. 

710 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capita! il 000 000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus .'.' 500'(X>0 

JAMES DPHELAN. President: S. G. MURPHY. Vice-Presi- 
dent: GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier: JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice- 
President; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy. John A. hooper. 
James Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald. Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savinqs & Loan Society 

NO. 52S CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus $•■> i->q 7ki at 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash ' 1 000 000 00 

Deposits, Dec. 31. 1903 aeW.Ml'.M 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS-Presldent, John Llovd; First Vice- 
President. Daniel Meyer: Second Vice-President. H. Horstmann; 
lgn. Stelnhardt. Emll Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow 



Political 



Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established In 1889 OF CALIFORNIA. 

c v. ... J„ California Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital tl5.000.000.03 

Paid-in Capital 3,000,000.00 

Front and Reserve Fund 450 000 00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per "cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; Wiiilam Corbln, Secretary 
and General Manager. 



International Banking CorporatiOQ 

NO. 1 WALL ST., NEW YORK. 

Capital and Surplus $7 894 400 

Capital and Surplus Authorized ...'.'.'.*. io 00(1 '000 no 

OFFICjiRS-Wllllam L. Mover, president: Charles D. 'Palmer, 
Assistant to President; William B. Wlghtman, Assistant to 
President; John Hubbard, Treasurer; James H. Rogers, Secre- 
tary; John B. Lee. General Manager; William H. Maclntyre, 
Assistant General Manager; Alexander & Green, Counsel 

BRANCHES— London, San Francisco, City of Mexico, Manila, 
Hong Kong. Yokohama, Shanghai, Singapore. 

AGENCIES— Bombay. Calcutta, Madras. Penang, Rangoon, 
Colombo, Amoy, Canton, Hankow, Tientsin, Tansui, Anplng, 
Bakan, Moji, Saigon, Kobe. Bangkok, Batavla, Samarang, Sou- 
rabaya, and all parts of Europe. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH-32-34 Sansome Street. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- 
tions, firms and individuals solicited. Loans made on liberal terms 
on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bought 
and sold. Travelers' and commercial letters of credit granted, 
available in any part of the world. Interest bearing certificates 
of deposit isued for fixed periods. Interest allowed to banks 
on current dally balances. Special rates given to banks keeping 
accounts with us, and drawing direct on our branches and 
agents throughout the world. 

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 



F. E. BECK, Manager. 



P. G. EASTWICK, JR., Ast. Met 



W. R. Hearst has telegraphed Gavin McNab, ask- 
ing him to come to Washington to consult about the 
delegation from California to the National Demo- 
cratic Convention, and he has gone East accord- 
ingly. It is understood that when he returns he will 
will bring with him a list of who are to be delegates- 
at-large to the Convention, and also the list of dele- 
gates from this part of the State. He will not be 
back for several weeks. 

* * * 

The announcement that Boss Murphy of New 
York is going to try to force Mayor McCIellan on 
the Democratic party as its Presidential candidate 
raises a very interesting point of constitutional law. 
McCIellan was not born in this country, but in Ger- 
many, though, of course, of American parents. The 
Constitution says only Americans by birth are eli- 
gible to the Presidency, and makes no mention of 
those who are Americans by virtue of the nationality. 
When Crisp was Speaker of the House of Congress 
he was talked of as a Democratic candidate for the 
Presidency, but he was dropped as soon as it was 
pointed out that he was born in England. His par- 
ents were Americans also. There is not much chance 
of McCIellan being nominated, and still less of his 
being elected, as the people of the country are hardly 
prepared to hand over the Government to Tammany, 
but if he were, the question of his eligibility might 
have to be settled by the Supreme Court, and for 
months would be a subject of excitement all over 
the country. 

The latest news of the Hanna boom is that it has 
not been a success, and that the Ohio Senator has 
concluded to keep his word and remain out of the 
fight. The efforts to get votes for him in the Na- 
tional Convention have disclosed the solidity of the 
West for Roosevelt, and even in his own State it is 
said he cannot get the delegation. The only votes 
he could secure would be those from the South, 
which once more raises the question whether the 
system of electing delegates is not all wrong, since 
it gives the South too much power in naming can- 
didates to whom she never gives a vote. That the 
South should have 302 votes, or nearly one-third of 
the convention, is creating great dissatisfaction, and 
a representation based on votes cast and not on 
Congressional representation will be demanded by 
many of the Western States at Chicago this vear. 

* * * 

While Mr. Rooney is securing, by grace of his 
brother-in-law, the right to the exclusive use of the 
depot news-stands, his brother-in-law and Johnnie 
McKenzie of San Jose, also a Harbor Commissioner, 
have formed a company with ex-State Senator Percy 
Henderson, who has been wharfinger to do all the 
weighing of freight on the State wharf property. 
They have formed two companies: the North-side 
and the South-side Scale Companies, and are col- 
lecting six and one-quarter cents for every ton of 
freight that goes over the scales. They have as man- 
ager of the company a thrifty politician from the 
last regime known to local fame as the "Banjo-eyed 
Kid," but who in private life is H. Lorentezen. Every- 
body wondered when Welch was given Henderson's 
job why the latter was kept on the payrolls, and a 
new place created for him at $200 per month. Hen- 
derson is a Democrat, and there seemed no good rea- 
son why Republicans should give political jobs to 
Democrats. But now the cause of the extra $2400 
added to the State payrolls is evident. Charlie and 
Johnnie were taking care of their partner. It is 



January 33, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






said that they make nearly Sjoo per month each ool 
of the scale company, after paying the kid fur hi*. 
services. 

• * • 

My Democratic friend who edits the Oakland Tri- 
hiine is angry with me, and takes me t'> task for say- 
ing that Metcalf wa- Gage's candidate for chairman 
of the last State Convention, and declares that he 
loyal to Pardee, The two statements are nol 
as inconsistent as they might seem to he, because 
loyalty to Pardee seems to have meant disloyalty 
to every one else. Pardee himself set the example 
when, after pledging himself to Flint. Edson and 
Preston in the Palace Hotel, to stand against Gage, 
the latter threw them down and formed another Jeal 
with the then Governor. Metcalf was Gage's candi- 
date, and every one knows that had he beaten Neff 
for the chairmanship Gage would have been nomi- 
nated. Perhaps he did not want to be chosen chair- 
man for that reason, and the Pardee forces secretly 
defeated him. That is a new version of what hap- 
pened behind the scenes at Sacramento, and as it 
comes from an Oakland paper, deserves attention 
both by the Gageites and their opponents. It would 
appear from the Tribune statement that Metcalf was 
put forward to prevent the Gage men selecting a 
candidate for chairman who could win, but with the 
secret understanding that he was to be defeated, so 
as to hurt Gage's prestige. That is the only possible 
explanation of the Tribune's statement that Metcalf 
was true to Pardee and really wanted to defeat Gage. 
Metcalf ought to pray to be delivered from his 
friends and their explanation of his conduct. 



BANKING. 



CULLED FROM "THE MOTH AND THE 

FLAME." 
Katy — Marian looks charmingly, but then she isn't 
so old. 

Ethel — Perhaps not so old as she usually looks. 

* * * 

Mrs. Lorimer (thrice divorced) — I've a perfect 
duck of a lawyer! He made up every bit of evidence 
about my last husbands, and, my dear, it just hap- 
pened to turn out to be true. 

* * * 

Mrs. Lorimer — It's an awful care having a pos- 
thumous child ! 

Marian — A what? 

Mrs. Lorimer — Why, one born after its father's di- 
vorce. 

* • * 

Mrs. Lorimer — Which of the ushers were you en- 
gaged to? 

Ethel — I forget. I flirted with them both so long ; 
but I think it is the right-hand one ! 



The San Francisco National Bank 



i*orn« And IMne Su., San Kranclnco. 
■ I.Mit, WM. P1KB< K J'HNSo.N. Vlcc- 
Alill.l.. Cannier. K. W. wi.H.FK. A»- 



801 

•lalanl 

Capital. kAD.OO*. Burplua nn.l Undivided Proflta, 1196.000 

illam J. Dulton, C. S Benedict. William 
II. K. llutitltiRti.'n. Qturn A. Nowhall. Ueurae 
v '" K Wllaon, I. 1 i-owKiil. \\ . H. TalboL 

rork— Hanover National Hank. 1 baaa .National 
" ank - National hank. himton— Nullonal Shawmut 

hank. I'hllaii ;>hla-l>rcxcl A Co. Chicago— C'onlln.-iiiul .\a- 
tlonal Bank, .si I.ouli»— The Mechanics Bank. Kansas Clly- 
1 irM Natl.-nal hank. London— liruwn. Shipley & Co. ram— 
Morgan. Ilarjcs & Co. I'.nv.r National Bank of Commerce. 
Johannesburg— Robinson South African Banking Co., Limited. 

Tbe Canadian Bank of Commerce 

with which Is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, fc.7uo.u00 Reserve Fund, $3,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over Ji0.uu0.000 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
Walker. General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin. Cranbrook. 
Fernle. Greenwood, Kamloops, LadysmHn, Nanaimo, Nelson, 
New Westminster. Vancouver and Victoria. 

Also Su other branches, covering the principal points In 
IN' YUKON TERRITORY'— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UN1TE~ STATES— Portland. Seattle anu Skagway (Alaska.) 
Manitoba, N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 
Scotland, Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank. Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The Northern Trust Co. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS-The Commercial National Bank. 
SAN FRANUISCO Ot-Hut- 



B. E. 



325 California Street. 



A. KAINS, Manager. 



London. Paris and American Bank. Llullte4 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000 Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,100,000 
Head Office — 10 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris — Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits issued. 

S1G. GREENEBAUM, Manager; *.. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The ^nglo-Califomian Bagk, Limitea 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000.00 Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund .... 7UO.O00 

The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILlENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building 
INTEREST PAID ON DBPOC.o. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord, William Babcock, Adam Grant, 
S. L. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Bclowln, F. Monteagle, Warren D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutcheon R. H. Pease. 



-You've 



* * * 
lost two 



Servant 
ma'am? 

Mrs. Lorimer — Not exactly; another kind of epi- 
demic — the law ! 

* * * 

Marian (disposing of her wedding gifts) — It's like 
the death of some one, isn't it? And after they are 
buried, you have to sort out and put away their 
clothes. This is the death of my marriage and these 

gifts are its clothing! 

* * * 

Fanshaw — Oh! never mind 
means what she sounds like! 



husbands— Gnppc, t Calif on. ia Safe 



Deposit and 



Ethel. She never 



Few come to San Francisco without paying a i isit 

to Zinkand's, which has done so much to establish our 
city's reputation as the best restaurant town in the United 
States. If s tne favorite after-the-theatre resort 



Trust Co. 



Corner 
f California & Montgomery 
Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital * Surplus $1,233,728.75 
Total Assets 5,914,424.69 



Interest paid on deposit*, subjeot 
tu check, at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum. 

Interest paid on savings deposits 
at the rate of three and nix- 
tenths per cent, per annu jo. 

Trusts executed. We are author" 
ized to act as the guardian of 
estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-depclt boxes rented at 8ft 
per annum and upwards. 



J. Dalzell Brown. « 

Ma-rvo^ger p 



2?- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 23, 19Q4. 



OLDSMOBILE 

1904 ANNOUNCEMENT 

3 MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM. 



"1st — Regular Standard Runabout, Price 
F. O. B. Factory $650.00 

2d — Large Motor, new style, Metal 
Hood, French Design, Powerful Light 
Car, Price F. O. B. Factory $750.00 

3d: — Four Passenger Tonneau Touring 
Car, Roomy, Luxurious, Strong and 
Fast • • .$95°-°° 

WATCH THIS SPACE FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS AND CUTS 



PIONLER AUTOHOBILE CO. 

901 Golden Gate Avenue, 

ppp- Jefferson Square. 

We handle only standard Automobiles — Win- 
ton, Oldsmobile, Locomobile (steam and gaso- 
line), Stevens-Duryea, Baker Electric, Vehicle 
Equipment Co npany. 




KNOX (Waterless) 2 Cylinder Touring Car 



We have just received our first car load of the 
1904 model KNOX (waterless) Touring Cars, both single and 
double cylinder types which are now on view at our 
show rooms where we would be pleased ' to receive 
you and demonstrate their superior qualities and 
simplicity. 

The KNOX (waterless) G0S0L1NE AUTOMOBILES are 

known the world over for their simplicity, easy 
operation, durability and easy riding We are al- 
ways glad to demonstrate the above to any one. 



THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE & MANUFACTUfiING CO. 

134-148 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE. SAN FRANCISCO. 




By Tin-: Autockank 

America again possesses the mile straightaway 
record for automobiles. Henry Ford on the famous 
(remodeled) 999 Ford machine, covered a mile over 
the cinder path on the ice of Baltimore Bay in the 
fast time of 139 2-5 seconds, which was official. He 
also made an unofficial record for a mile in 130 llat. 
The former world's record of 46 seconds was made 
over a year ago by M. Augieres on the Dourdan 
Course in France. 



The Park Commissioners have at last decided to 
extend further privileges to automobilists,. Although 
it has not yet been officially announced just what 
these privileges will be, nevertheless, whatever they 
are, they will be greatly appreciated by owners of 
the horseless vehicle. The Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia is determined to see that these privileges are 
not abused. The privilges extended automobiLsts 
at the Presidio for some time were about to be with- 
drawn, but through the efforts of President F. A. 
Hyde and the Governors of the Club, and the sys- 
tematic way in which they brought pressure to 
bear upon the reckless drivers, saved many a lover 
of the sport from losing the "greatest pleasure in and 
about San Francisco — that is, driving along the ex- 
cellent roads of the Government reservation. . 



Much interest among automobilists is being taken 
in the coming Automobile Show to be given by the 
Automobile Club of California this spring. Main 
members of the club, non-members and prospective 
buyers, are waiting to see what improvements are 
to be 'exhibited, and the new 1904 models, before 
purchasing. 

Pie "Autoc'rank" has inquired of. a number of pros- 
pective buyers as to which automobile he prefers, 
and from every one the answer is the same: 'We are 
waiting for the show." 

The "Autocrank" suggests to those anticipating a 
future purchase, and to those now owning machines. 
not belonging to the club, that they make application 
for membership to the club at their earliest conven- 
ience, as much valuable information and materia] as- 
sistance is given a member by a brother member. 
This is invariably the case where one is unacquainted 
with the automobile, and desires to obtain informa- 
tion from those who know and are not in the busi- 
ness. The Automobile Club is the place where, one 
can meet enthusiastic automobilists, and receive 
many valuable details which would be of great help 
to the prospective purchaser. Besides this, material 
assistance can be given the inexperienced owner 
when he is unfortunate enough to meet with an ac- 
cident on the road, or is unable to remedy a fault in 
the working of his machine. This assistance will be 
largely increased when the new club emblem (which 
will be introduced shortly) is attached to each mem- 
ber's machine, permitting the tourist to recognize 
another member on the road who has met with an 
accident. 



Foreign cars are gradually entering San Francisco, 
and ere the summer begins, San Francisco society 



January 33, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»3 



ll-known ; 
• men driving their ' 

Thomas Magec. Jr.. ha» recently purchasi 
French Renault, wl n ro\itc to tin- 

\\ alter Hobart will return from Europe v. 
, rful Mors, such a> is driven l>\ Mr. G 
Whittcll. Jr. 

Mr. Peter Martin lias ordered a big Panhard, 
which will also be here shortly. 



I did not hear whether Mr. Hobart intends starting 
an auto-polo team or will drive his machine a the 
next race meet. 



Ex-Governor James H. Budd has just received 
his j8 horse-power, four-cylinder French Mors. Ac- 
cording to American standard, this car will rate at 
least 45 horse power. Fx-< iovernor Budd was an 
early automobile enthusiast. He has owned several 
machines and has given much attention to the auW- 
rriobile. As a result, he decided to pay the high price 
necessarv to secure a French machine. He speaks 
highly of the Renault and De Dion-Boutong, which 
are precisely the same car as the French Arrow. Ex- 
Governor Budd has also imported a French chauf- 
feur. 





























1 


i^^^^^^^^^^^n^ 








tF 










J 1 


. "* 












♦°^™ 


»— 


"Hs 




















r#- 


















^ 
























B£\ 















The new White Touring Car equipped with limou- 
sine body. 



Mr. J. A. Marsh purchased from the Mobile Car- 
riage Company last week a French Arrow touring 
car, two" cylinder, 25 horse-power, American stand- 
ard. Mr. and Mrs. Marsh were among the first au- 
tomobilists on the Coast. When the little steam run- 
about appeared, they secured one of them. When it 
served its usefulness, it was replaced by a large 
stearrr touring car. " Mrs. Marsh became proficient in 
"the handling of both cars, making trips to the Santa 
Cruz Mountains, to the Yosemite and to Nevada 
City. It was an object of interest in the early days 
to see an automobile, and especially when skillfully 
handled by a,, lady. San Francisco can rightly claim 
for Mrs. M'arsh the distinction of being' the most 
skillful lady operator on the Coast. It is predicted 
that during the coming season there will be many a 
spirited "brush" between the French Arrow and 
other cars. 



■' E. J. Phelps, President of the Minneapolis Automo- 
bile Club, sailed from Boston on the White Star 
liner "Republic" on January 2d, taking with him 



Mr. Phelps will join 

ind from there, with his 

Idrcn. will make .1 lour "i Europe 



Mr. E. I' I'.rincgar and I. F. I ane "f the Pioneer 
Automobile 1 ompany, and Mr. F. T. Dorman ol 
the Pacini Motor Car (ompany. Courtney Ford >>f 



THE NEW JONES CORBIN 



The sportiest and highest powered 
car on the market. Arrange for 
immediate demonstration. 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO. 



49 CITY HALL AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



ONE MILE IN 39 2=5 SECONDS 



THE WORLD'S RECORD 




Breaking the previous mark, held in France by G 3-5 seconds. 

This wonderful official record was made 011 January 

12, l'.ioi, with the 



FORD 



FASTEST. BEST and CHEAPEST AUTOMOBILE in existance 
1904 MODELS ON EXHIBITION AT 

HIENE (SL CO'S. HALL, 

235-237 GEARY ST. . SAN FRANCISCO 



' ■ ■' . 




JfF -J 


1 




1 





LIKE BEING AT HOME 

The "ANONA" 

A First-Class Resort 



Meals at all hours. Reasonable 
prices. Best of Wines and 
Liquors. 



MILO J. OILLETT, Prop. 

2910 SAN BBUNO AVENUE 
Tel. Cap 560 



2 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 



the National Automobile Company, C. A. Hawkins 
of the White Automobile Company, and Cuyler Lee 
of the Cadillac, are now in the East, where they went 
to attend the big shows at New York, Detroit, 
Chicago, Philadelphia and Cleveland, and also the 
race meet at Daytona, Florida. They will undoubt- 
edly make arrangements with the various companies 
they represent to make large exhibits at the San 
Francisco Automobile Show. It is not the club's 
intention to give this show as a money-making 
proposition, but rather for the purpose of interesting 
non-owners and affording opportunities of studying 
the various makes and types of cars. 



A gentleman of Salinas, who already has several 
automobiles in his stable, recently purchased a four- 
cylinder Franklin runabout, in which he left San 
Francisco on Thursday of last week for his home. 



The National Automobile Company reports a very 
satisfactory business for the week past in Knox, 
Toledos and Franklins. They also report that they 
have a car of four-cylinder Pope-Toledos (the mile- 
a-minute car on the road), which they expect to re- 
ceive the latter part of this month. 

Mr. Norman W. Church, of Los Angeles, repre- 
senting this company, has received the first two- 
cylinder Knox touring car, and reports several sales. 



The Mobile Carriage Co. has contracted with 
the St. Francis Hotel for the exclusive right for all 
automobile business in connection with their hos- 
telry. In addition to the large passenger service for 
the accommodation of guests, a buss line will be run 
from the St. Francis to all trains and boats for the 
accommodation of guests. 

Another carload of Pierce Arrow touring cars have 
been received by the Mobile Carriage Company. 
These are in every sense the 1904 model, having the 
Mercedes hood and honycomb radiators. The finish 
is automobile red with black stripings, and makes 
a very handsome appearance. 



"The Anona," a new hotel at 2910 San Bruno 
avenue, recently opened by Doctor Gillete, is becom- 
ing the rendezvous of the owners of automobiles. It 
is easy of access, and there are all sorts of conven- 
iences. It is a fine auto ride to this resort; the best 
of care is taken of machines, and there is an ex- 
perienced mechanic always at hand to attend to the 
wants of the public. The accommodations in the 
hotel itself are very comfortable, and all who have 
tasted of his viands speak very favorably of the gen- 
ial doctor as a bomface. 



• The appetizing things that come from the broiler at 

Moraghan's Grill, in the California Market, are responsible 
for the crowd that goes there for luncheon. It has become 
a regular business men's exchange. The quality of the 
chops, steaks, oysters and game served cannot be sur- 
passed. More than that, the wants of the guests are at- 
tended to by perfectly trained waiters. 



If you want to eat the best, drink the best, and be 

among the best people, go to Techau Tavern, which is sec- 
ond to no restaurant in San Francisco. It is the favorite 
after-the-theatre resort, and deserves its fine reputation. 



PROMPT SERVICE 

CENTURY ELECTRIC COHPANY 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobiles. 

Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 
House Wiring and Repairing. 

16-18 SECOND ST. TJnder Grand Hotel. TEL. BVSH 352 




RATES LESS THAN CARRIAGES 

CALL 

MOBILE CARRIAGE COMPANY, 

Golden Gate and Van Ness Avenues. 



Phones : Larkin 3841 ; Polk 3086. Down-town 
office : Lobby Palace Hotel, Phone Bush 859. 
You can secure these cars at any hotel or cafe 
by asking for MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. 



SALES DEPARTMENT COAST AGENCIES. 
Pierce Arrow Touring Car (French) price $2650 

Pierce Stanhope (French type) 1350 

Northern Runabout (leader in New York) 800 
Fine Garage, expert mechanics, guaranteed 
expenses. 



MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. 

Golden Gate and Van Ness Aves. Open all night. 



Have you seen the 

BUCKBOARD? 

The talk of the town. 
Best Automobile at any 
price. 



"- r.«3S 



Costs 



$425 




STRONG- EASY RIDING-RELIABLE-GUARANTEED 



ON EXHIBIT AT- 



SUNSET AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1814 MARKET STREET - • • SAN FRANCISCO 

ELECTRIC ...d 

GASOLINE 

CARS... 

A. F. BROOKE RIDLEY, ,8 fell street 




Telephone South 394 



(Nr. Usrk.t) 

San Francisco, Cal. 



VELVET 

LEATHER 

SUITS 

for Men 

and Women 



We have these Leathers in 
all Colors. Make them in 
any style and guarantee 
satisfaction. 

H E. SKINNER CO. 

801 MARKET ST. 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile Co.— 288 S Market street. Phone John 1(61. 
Automobiles stored and repaired. Expert workmanship. Gaso- 
line and oil at all hours. Santa Clara County agents for the 
\* estern Automobile Company and National Automobile Com- 
pany. 



January 33. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 




Only tw.i lives dividing 

More and moro every day; 
Only one soul from another soul 

Steadily drifting away 

Only a man's heart striving 

Bitterly hard with its doom; 
Only a hand, tender and bland. 

Slipping away in the gloom 

Nothing of doubt or wrong. 

Nothing that eitner can cure; 
Nothing to shame, nothing to blame. 

Nothing to do but endure. 

The world cannot stand stilJ, 

Tides ebb. and women change; 

Nothing here that is worth a tear. 

Nothing between but the cold world's screen, 
Nothing to lose but a heart. 



"THE HEAVY MISTS TRAIL LOW UPON THE SEA." 
By 51- J- Savage in The Century 
The heavy mists trail low upon the sea, 
And equally the sky and ocean hide. 
As two world-wandering ships close side by side 
A moment loom and part; out o'er the lee 
One leans, and calls, "What ho!" Then fitfully 
A gust the voice confuses, and the tone 
Dies out upon tne waters faint and lone. 
And each ship all the wide world seems to be. 

So meet we and so part we on the land: 
A glimpse, a touch, a cry, and on we go 
As lonely as one single spar in space. 

Driven by a destiny none understand, 

We cross the track of one 'twere life to know, 
Then all is but the memory of a face. 



SONNET TO SILHOUETTE. 
By Harvey Peake in the House Beautiful 

O Ancient Dame of high, degree, 

Grandmother many times removed, 
What is your story? Has it proved 1 

A blessing or a curse to me? 

Was happiness your legacy? 

Or did you sin and woe bequeath? 

Did Passion poisoned tendrils wreathe 
About my noble ancestry? 

What disposition did' you make 

Of Heart? And in long hours of night 
Heard you, at times, Soul's bitter cry? 

Speak you! And my dimmed senses wake! 
Bare all the past and make it light! 

* * * * * * 

By mocking Silence you reply. 



THE KiVAL. 

By Dorothea Moore in Century 
To the church, on her flowery way, 

She tossed me a coin in the throng. 

white little bride, do you think to pay 
With this for a woman's wiong? 

1 picked her gift from the dust, 

Kept it close night and day; 
O white little wife, you can trust 
. My hate to find out a way. 

A baby's fingers, aye, 

His baby upon her breast, 
-Have stolen, all my hate away — 

Rest, little motner, rest. 



vie may he 1 in his w 

but • ni at lca.-t lie baa changed his mind 

telegraphs the < h 
1 Sun, "Howie was 

railing al tlie I ivs, declaring them unclean ami unfit 
ti> help r« - ' ire Jerusalem. To-day (December 13), 
in a scrim hi in Shiloh Tabernacle, he praised tliem 
and said tli.it among tlie best peopl 

earth." \ possible explanation of this change nf 
opinion is indicated !>y a check for (82 sent by the 
rseer of Zion to the publishers of the "Jewish 
Encyclopedia" for a copy of that work, which gives 
a record of the tremendous service rendered by the 
Hebrew race from the days of Abraham to the pres- 
ent. Dr. Dowie received the five volumes so far pub- 
lished a few days before his change of view was pro- 
claimed. 



Visitor — Your church is a beauty. That handsome 
house next door is the parsonage, I presume? Dea- 
con De Good — X-o. Fact is, the parsonage is some 
distance up town, but we intend to make an offer for 
one of these near-by residences soon. "The price 
will be high, no doubt." "Urn — I think not. We 
shan't try to buy until after our new chimes are put 
in." 




CIvICQUPT 
None Other!' 



yellow Label 



BRyT 
Gold Label 



AVignier Qo.DhtfibMn 

Jan Francijco, Cat. 



I Mavis Consolidated Gold 
I and Copper Mining Co. 






Capital Stock $1,000,000. Shares 1,000,000 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of California. 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share for 
development purposes. The ore in sight Is practically 
unlimited. When the present issue of stock is exhausted, 
the price will be raiseu to 50 cents a share. 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 Mar- 
ket street, for prospectus, which gives full information. 
VINCENT NBALB, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 




The fire business of California 
for 1903 is given in the accompany- 
ing table. These figures speak for 

ihemselves. 

* * * 

The December number of the 
Conservative says another claim- 
ant for the original idea of Com- 
bination Life Insurance has been 
heard from. There is enough to 
go round for all the companies, so 
it resolves itself into the question 
of which can get the most of the 
combination pie. Mr. Tupper may 
not or may have originated the 
idea for the Conservative Life, but 
whether he did or not, he applied 
it, and the result is that the com- 
pany of which he is the manager 
came pretty nearly leading the list 
for business written in California. 

* * * 

It will be remembered that Mr. 
Tupper was the author of a splen- 
did advertising scheme which he 
floated by the publication of a 
pamphlet on Rebate, and about 
which he was vigorously compli- 
mented and as vigorously assailed 
by the insurance press. 

* * * 

Mr. Tupper is too brainy a man 
in the life insurance business to 
care what was said about him indi- 
vidually, but he enjoyed what was 
said about the Conservative Life, 
and next to Mr. Torbell of the 
Equitable he has demonstrated 
himself as good as they make them 
in working the press. 

* * * 

The fire at the Iroquois Theatre 
in Chicago closed up the theatres 
until they were inspected by the 
authorities and found safe. San 
Francisco theatres are being 
looked after, and it may be that on 
some of them the insurance com- 
panies will cancel their lines and 
then they will be made safe for the 
public. 

* * * 

While the resorts of the ungodly 
are under the glare of the limelight 
of municipal inspection, why not 
go a little further. There are 
churches, concert halls and other 
halls in San Francisco which in 
event of a panic in a crowded 
house would cause a deadly dis- 
aster. It is better to waste an 
ounce of prevention than adminis- 
ter a pound of cure, and while the 
mood of "safety for the public" is 
on, make a clean sweep and make 
every place of public gathering, 
secular or religious, Jews or Gen- 
tile, safe for those gathered or close 
them permanently. 



.s'lA COMPANIES. 
Sa 



Company. Agent. 

Firemans Fund Louis Weinmann. 

Home Fire and Marine Stephen D. Ives.. 

Pacific Underwriters G. W. McNear. . . 



Francisco 
Premiums. 



California Business. 



Amount 

Written. Premiums. 



Lo^es 
Pai-l. Ratio 



69,527 $ 24,064,972 
39,898 11,176.400 
14,012 4,196,684 



• 421,124 $ 200,134 47.6 



199,137 
74,344 



97,838 49.1 
27,021 36.3 



Totals t 123,437 139,438,056 t 694,605 S 325.293 46.8 



FOREIGN COMPANIES. 



Aachen & Munich 

Alliance 

Atlas ; 

Austrian Phoenix 

British America 

Jaledonian. 

Commercial Union • 

Hamburg-Bremen 

Law Union & Crown 

Liverpool & London & Globe. 

London 

London & Lancashire 

Manchester. . . .'. 

Netherlands 

New Zealand.. 

North British 

N oi tli German 

Norwich Union 

Northern 

Palatine 

Phoenix 

Prussian National ■ 

Royal 

Royal Exchange 

Koine & Maselle 

Scottish Union & National . . . 

State 

Sun Insurance Office 



Cesar Bertheau 

C. F. Mullins 

F. J. Devlin 

Dickson & Theime 

Watson.Taylor, Sperry 

T. J. Conroy 

C. F. Mullins 

R. Herald, Jr 

Catton, Bell & Co 

C. D. Haven 

W.J. Landers 

Wm. Macdonald 

T. J. Conroy 

Wm. Macdonald 

Clinton Folger 

Tom C. Grant 

Walter Speyer 

W. H. Lowden 



Transatlantic. 

1'huringia 

Union 

Western 



W. I. Wilsoi 
C. f. Mullin 

Geo. E. Butler 

W. J. Loaiza 

Rolla V. Watt 

Frank Dickson 

Syz&Co 

T. J. A. Ticdeman.... 

Wm. Macdonald 

C. A. Henry St Co.... 
Edward Brown& Sons. 

V. C. Driffield 

Voss, Conrad & Co. .. 
Catton, Bell St Co.... 
Watson, Taylor, Sperry 



* 49,869 
40,816 
32.465 
3,6 _ >8 
21,269 
29.201 
49,560 
68,8.58 
9,899 
63,656 
81,646 
70,606 
35,981 
'21.024 
21,170 
32,148 
44,673 
27,341 
40,187 
33.075 
43.845 
19,559 
62,653 
68,071 
48,714 
18,869 
12,182 
39.SSS 
22.358 
66,044 
76.683 
20,772 
24,902 



I 8.594,380 
6,278,984 
6,282,750 
4«,865 
4,007,719 
4,906,015 
9,618,121 
7,368,244 
2,705,220 
15,419,864 
10,652,240 
18,505,826 
5,799,895 
3,418,816 
4,133,373 
7,085.313 
6,168,915 
6.133,756 
6,100,163 
6,821,641 
7,968,010 
•4,827,043 
18,207,619 
9,334,354 
6,281,147 
4,792.373 
2,219.703 
7,464.690 
6.114,285 
9,016,955 
11,834,311 
6.363,402 
7,151.085 



141,637 
93,777 
97,46) 
7,026 
74.31! 
79 412 
153.131 
111,932 
40,467 
204,655 
162,206 
19,7,289 
90,819 
46,112 
68,836 
109,624 
87,363 
109,543 
97,767 
92,491 
:82.814 
67,397 
220,143 
134,692 
85,246 
74,067 
33, 10 
126,636 
94,464 
130,830 
183,969 
81,470 
125,051 



49.4 
50.8 
55.3 



69,163 48.8 

63.182 67.4 

63,018 64.0 

1.000 14.2 
30,732 
4 ',394 
84 728 

47,040 42.7 

23,021 50.9 

113,993 56.7 

89,808 65.3 

97,986 50.1 

64, 256 59 7 

28,940 62.7 

68,038 84.4 



52,059 
41,007 

42,807 .39.1 

71,705 73.3 

38.617 41.8 

98,930 74.4 

25,624 37 9 

120,091 .i4.6 

68,005 50.4 

23,133 27.1 

82,233 43.5 

20,070 59,8 
76.779 
64,403 



47. 
10.9 



6 

Os.2 



66,8-7 M.4 

106,029 57.6 

45,532 5 6! , 

42,472 33,o 



Totals 81.272,242 8228,584,213 $3,653,956 81,898,409 63.4 



COMPANIES 



/Elna 

American, Boston 

Agricultural 

American, N.J 

American Central 

- American, Pa 

Assurance Co., of America .... 

Caledonean American 

Citiz. ns 

Connecticut 

Continental 

Commercial Union 

Colonial Underwriters 

Concordia 

Delaware 

Dutchess 

Equitable 

Firemans, Baltimore 

Fire Association 

Franklin 

German American 

German Alliance Ins. Ass'n... 

Germania 

German, 111 

Glens Falls 

Greenwich 

Globe-Rutgers 

German, Peoria 

Hanover 

Hartford 

Home 

Indemnity Fire 

1 ns. Co. of N orth America .... 

tvings County ... 

Mercantile, Boston 

Michigan 

Milwaukee Mechanics 

National 

New York Fire 

Niagara 

New York Underwriters Ag'cy 

Northwestern National 

National Standard 

North German 

New Hampshire 

National Union 

Orient 

Philadelphia Underwriters 

Pelican 

Phenix of Brooklyn 

Pennsylvania 

I'hccnix, Hartford 

Providence Washington 

i.lueen 

Rochester German 

Springfield 

St. Paul 

Spring Garden 

traders 

1'eutonia 

Union 

United Firemans 

Victoria 

Westchester 

vVilliamsburg Citv 

Western Underwriter 



Boardman & Spencer.. 


I 39,455 




10,374 
13,563 


Edward Brown &Sons. 


Christensen, Edw. St G 


13,090 


Christensen, Edw. &G 


11,598 


Edward Brown &Sons. 


18,588 


C. A. Henry & Co.... 


1,527 




6,875 


Palache & Hewitt,.... 


7,119 




24.627 




23,150 
2.613 




G. W. McNear 


7,393 


Frank W Dickson.... 


536 


Edward Brown &Soos. 


9,161 




12,664 
4 134 




C.J. Stovel 


9,898 




21,300 




17,620 




42,965 




4.460 


W. H. Breeding 


36.344 




42,569 






3,962 


Edward Brown & Sons 


5,381 




4,194 




27,479 


Palache & Hewitt 


55,473 


H. L. RolT 


38,229 


W. H. Lowden 


6.213 


Jas. D. Bailey 


28,409 




Christensen, Edw. &G 


10,613 


C. A. Henry Si Co 


7,349 


L. L. Bromwell 


24,755 




27,375 


C.J. Stovel 


5,535 




40,099 




43.323 




16,091 


C A. Henry Si Co 


287 




8,717 


7,278 




11,996 




9,967 




5,765 


Geo. E. Butler 


5,006 


A. C. Olds 


20,809 


Russel W. Osborn.... 


48,493 




24,439 




8,849 




20,810 




10,146 




26,305 


Christensen. Edw. & G 


18,602 


Frank W.Dickson 


3.089 




50,737 




10,808 


Russel W. Osborn.... 


9,351 




7,406 




1,100 


E. E. Potter 


18.314 




14,425 


C. H. Ward 


9,122 



OF OTH 
89,861.243 
2,609,385 
2,263,805 
2,568,628 
2,844,124 
4,374,403 

296,788 
1,017,678 
2.712,324 
6,652,855 
10,822,728 

401 ,653 
2,230,797 

427,357 
1,585,147 
2,930,993 
1 ,600.528 
2,887,788 
8,991,273 
4,130,136 
9,653,321 
2,444,742 
6,815,825 
9,293,398 
4,504,614 
1,177,659 
1,348,979 

453,363 
4,405,769 
14,804,193 
15,316,578 

999,967 
7,381,161 

332,771 
1.834,976 
1,414,096 
8,796,510 
5,985,976 

947,439 
6,266,010 
6,883,303 
6,313,751 
87.283 
1,876,412 
1,877,273 

2,020,299 
1,480,903 

902,642 
3,300,090 
8.845,978 
5,776,680 
1,886,672 
6,684,551 
1,747,998 
4 903,612 
3,128,172 

596,782 
8,978,641 
1,561,284 
1,160,608 
1,108,121 

295,521 
4,452,127 
4,122,610 
2,424,489 



ER STATES 
8 156,202 8 

40.601 

88,234 

38,699 

45,927 

81,213 
4,731 

18,043 

42,599 

111,697 

142,199 

5,686 

39.827 
7,665 

25,657 

49,204 

30,261 

41,885 

63,785 

71,494 
148,961 

38,741 

90,130 
136.928 

69,138 

21,387 

23,482 
6,946 

72,669 
231,016 
271,543 

14,729 

117,164 

3,840 

27,621 

26.M8 
121,959 
113,810 

14,974 

96,800 
107,779 

89,225 
777 

19,059 

29,541 

28,351 

26,295 

15,745 

60,108 
153.501 

93,067 

36,387 

94,946 

27,461 

91,397 

61,699 

9,630 

116,692 

26,254 

17,908 

15,837 
4,331 

70,143 

66,541 

82,777 



87,641 
22,884. 
19,964 
20,925 
22,319 
37,932 

1,966 

7,269 
29,588 
51,721 
86,741 

8,112 
14,603 

1,558 
11,121 
28,827 
22,127 
16,111 
20,299 
66,982 
65.101 
19.804 
15,260 
80,840 
44,695 
15,4-3 

6,367 

4,6.54 
37,165 
84.542 
133,036 

8,188 
73,032 

4,388 

9,455 
18,310 
50,878 
75,637 

8.131 
49,495 
67,-544 
49,320 
216 

6,613 
10,815 



56.0 
56.2 
52.2 
54.0 
48.5 
46.6 
41.5 
40.2 
69.4 
46 3 
60.0 
142.7 
36 6 
20.3 
43.3 
68.5 
78.1 
38.4 
41.2 
79.7 
43.7 
51.1 
16.9 
59.0 
64.6 
72.2 
27.1 
67.0 
51.1 
36.6 
48.9 
55.6 
62.3 
114.2 
84.2 
68.1 
41.7 
6C.7 
54.3 
51.1 
63.8 
55.2 
27.7 
34.8 



61.1 
65.6 
56.1 
45.1 



10,617 38 1 

18.183 6.1.7 

11,930 75.7 

40,616 77.2 

85,278 55.5 
47.580 
23,243 
52,2-6 

12,409 - 

56.209 61.5 

25,521 49.3 

1,679 17.0 

68,964 50.5 

19,281 73.4 

18,826 77.2 

8,029 60.7 

2,982 67.7 

45,487 64.8 

55,776 83.8 

6.591 20.0 



Totals. 



81,086,034 8251,177,477 $3,987,341 *2,106,?05 52.8 



January 23. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Cttfor.l. n..i».« 
*•» rr*»rt«e« Awnl 

OnUTHi'fhtll: H«n.TU MMM l-*«»1 Um«4 m 

M «i:»jh Imwu; r. •<*.■.•• n :<••*< r. « 

tm imsm mi «.< m< nm laiM t'.i 

l*M ... tvtiMA mmm ihiiii uvmi hi 

» I •**>•■ BiaiKI IO0II1 l»OMl ai 

- l<*in*Ml by C"Urte*y <>f PaolDe lipl.Twriter 

* • * 

The statement of the Pacific Coast Casualty for 
the first year of its business shows how a California 
company, hacked with ample and unimpeachable as- 
iinl managed with ability and energy, can be 
made to prow. The Pacific Coast Casualty Company 
had a premium income for the year of almost $103,- 
000.00. This business was secured at full rates, and 
the secret of its acquisition is the influence brought 
to bear through and by its stockholders, who-, 
names are synonymous with wealth, financial 
strength and business success. The company com- 
menced operations with a capital of $200,000 and a 
surplus of $50,000. It has added to the latter $8,715 
as the result of the first year's business. When it 
is considered that this is in addition to the extraordi- 
nary expenses necessary to organization and to the 
placing of a new company in the field, and that it 
is carried to surplus as the net after setting aside 
an ample reserve for losses which may arise, and pay- 
ing losses incurred, it is a truly remarkable feat, and 
one which stamps President Green as among the 
leading financiers and Casualty Underwriters of 
California. The admitted assets of t'~e company ag- 
gregate $315,098.00, or $65,098.00 over and above the 
capital and surplus paid in. It is evident that the 
new coiner in California's Casualty companies is not 
to be overlooked, as good, straight, hard competition 
by the older companies doing business on the same 
lines. 

* * * 

The New York Life, in continuance of its efforts 
to secure federal recognition, has asked Secretary 
Cortelyou, of the Bureau of Commerce, to join with 
the Insurance Department of New York in an exami- 
nation of its affairs. 

* * * 

There are several Accident, Casualty, Surety and 
Life companies which failed to file their preliminary 
statements with California's Insurance Commis- 
sioner on the date prescribed by the California law. 
The penalty is a fine of one hundred dollars per day. 

* * * 

The News Letter regrets to chronicle the death 
of the respected father of Insurance Commissioner 
Wolf. As a tribute of respect, the office of the Com- 
missioner was closed for two days. 

* * * 

The Fireman's Fund held its annual election of 
officers on the 19th. There was but one ticket, and 
the officers were all re-elected.' The usual congratu- 
lations were extended, the usual increase of surplus 
and assets shown. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 

Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1853 
Capital $3,000,000. Gross Cash Assets $i7,soo.ooo 

Liberal contracts. Favorable Terms. Conference with our Ileprr- 
sentatives before concluding short tame yearly or long time contracts 
may; be to your advantage. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent f GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropoli- 
tan Manager. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco 



INSURANCE 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco. Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets. $5,500,000 



Founded A. D. I7W. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

raid-up Capital JJ.000.0O8 

Surplus to Pollry-Holdera 6[o22.016 

JAMES D. UAILET. General Agent. 412 California St., 8. F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up J.1,446.100. Assets. J24.M2.043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, IS.93u.431 .41. Losses Paid, over 1134,000.000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, 601 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1880. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders. . 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD. Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

DON'T INSURE— Until you have examined the new 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy. 

Issued Exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 
Assets, $1,250,000. Insurance in force, $20,000,000 

For particulars address the company. Agents Wanted. 
Fair Building. 230 Montgomery Street. San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 



Capital 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 



J67.O0O.0OO 

31t California St., S. F. 



The Thuringia Insurance Company 

OF ERFURT, GERMANY 

Capital 12,260,000 Assets J10,»S4,24« 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St, San Francisco. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N, Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 



Whispering's from Alameda 



Isn't it a caution, as our grandmothers used to say, 
that every one, or almost every one, is suspected of 
stealing, in the virtuous cities across the bay? It is 
not many days since the society women of Oakland 
instituted a crusade against those who stole purses 
and baubles from the guests at fashionable functions 
among the elite, and now the principal of the Ber- 
keley High School, Professor M. C. James, calls the 
students together and rakes them over the coals for 
stealing from each other. It does look as if no good 
thing could be expected to come out of Alameda 
County. Mr. James, after a lecture upon the heinous- 
ness and vulgarity of such a crime, said in plain and 
unpoetic language that it had to stop. What the 
worthy professor proposes to do is not said, but it 
is unfortunate that you cannot go either to school, 
if you are growing up to know something, or to a 
party after you have "developed into a charming 
belle" without losing all your traps and fripperies. 

* * * . 

Consternation reigns among the members of the 
School Board in Alameda. They are unable to keep 
a woman teacher, even until the end of the first term 
after she takes her seat in the chair of authority. 
And it is all their own faults. It is not long since 
they heartlessly and arrogantly dismissed every 
woman teacher who had passed twenty years of age. 
They held that a woman- over twenty had developed 
a hard expression and was not up in the latest fads 
of education. The Board said, too, that education 
signifies "to lead out," and that the more settled 
"school-ma'ams" had grown to imagine it meant to 
"drive forth." But they are meeting a just retribu- 
tion, or the old teachers say they are, and of course 
they know, for they themselves gave that as a rea- 
son why they should have been retained. They sav, 
calmly, and, I am sure, impartially, that they "knew 
everything there was to know about teaching and 
teachers." 

It is said that every young girl teacher in Alameda 
is engaged to be married, and there is a prospect of 
empty benches staring the School Board in the face 
long before the Easter vacation. The youngsters 
are enjoying the fun immensely. And they know all 
about it. You can trust therrt for that! Every time 
dainty little Miss Smith blushes as Johnny Green 
hands her the letter that she has dropped when she 
heard the Superintendent of Schools coming, don't 
you suppose the whole infant class sees it? I do. 
And there is a ripple of merriment among the par- 
ents, too. It is not so long since many of them were 
young, and some of them were teachers, too. 

* * * 

Oakland society is in a fever of apprehension. The 
exclusives across the bay fear that they may be 
asked to associate with Miss Mary Agnes Red ford, 
a little telephone girl who has lately fallen heir to 
a fortune of $3,000,000, through the death of a griz- 
gled old miner of British Columbia. The miner, deep 
in his tough old heart, held the sentimental memory 
of a courtship between the girl's lovely mother and 
himself many years ago in the wooded wilds of the 
British territory upon the Sound. There was a quar- 
rel, and the woman, in petulant anger, married an- 
other and came to California. Here she sickened and 
died, leaving the baby girl to the care of a cousin, 
a Mrs. Mary Hallahan of Oakland. In the simple 
home with' the three young daughters of her foster 



mother, the child grew to girlhood. She is now six- 
teen years of age and as pretty, dainty and innocent 
as it was her mother's dying prayer to the good Lord 
to keep her. She is the picture of what the mother 
was when she turned her back on the faithful lover 
in the woods of British Columbia. And that is why 
she will be an heiress, for the miner never mar- 
ried and had cherished the memory of a boyish love 
affair through all the dreary years, and his dying 
wish was to endow the girl with money enough to 
make the world her playground if she wished. 

Now that the Roman Catholics and Episcopalians 
■ are both down on the Reverend Ernest E. Baker, 
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Oakland, 
it seems that his stay in that clannish town is only a 
matter of time and endurance. Already the pews of 
his church are more often empty than full, I am told, 
and I also hear that the evening special services that 
used to be so popular and on which occasions the 
big church was wont to be crowded and made as light 
as dazzling electric bulbs could make it, is now as 
dreary as a tomb. It is whispered among the naughty 
ones that the lights are left low so that the shadows 
may look like people. Well, you cannot blame him 
for that. Mr. Baker was always a great one to put 
the best possible light on everything, and a dark lan- 
tern would be the best in that event. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Use 
Briquettes for cooking and neating, and you will save at 
least one-third on your fuel bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., 
South 95, and your order will receive prompt attention. 



Rheumatics relieved at the Post St Hammam 






1 


EictilCTt Ruobi, 6« then 




Wny ill men lhcmld drink 
RUIN ART: 
Good wioe— ■ triced— 

or bring dry, 
Or lot you ihould be 

Ctt my olher icuuu "hy. 


! 

i 


*-4iJXs| 





Ruinart 
Cham- 
pagne 

Established 1729 

The President's Wine 

"Dry, Fruity — 
ffo Headache 



VtLinoy W. Gcskfll, 

Speoial Agent 



Hllbert Mercantile Co. 

Sole Agents 



January 23. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Prop 

15/ 1 

[2,0 KJ 

IO.OOO 

To'" 



PROPOSED RAID ON THE PUBLIC 
TREASURY. 
"We the undersigned respectfully petition tl 

• !•< fix the salaries of the following Govern 
ment officers at the amount indicated under thi 
umii headed "Proposed Salary," to take effect 1 >c- 
ccmbcr 1st, 1904: 

Present 

President $50,000 

Vice-President 8,000 

Each Cabinet Officer 8,000 

Chief Justice 10 500 

sociate Justices 10,000 

United States Senators 5,ooo 

Members of House of Rcp'sent's. 5,000 

The above is a petition being forwarded to every 
newspaper and magazine in the United States l>y 
an Eastern advertising firm. 

The name of a publication is used, "The Sentry 
Box," to foster this raid on the public treasury. The 
claim is made that our federal officials are too mod- 
est to make a demand for a raise of salary, but that 
they must perforce appeal through the medium of 
a third party to the people of the United Slates. It 
is presumed that a certain success attained by the 
proponent of this extraordinary graft, in securing pa- 
tronage for a cereal food, is tantamount to equal suc- 
cess in obtaining a raise in salary for our public ser- 
vants. One of the main arguments used is that liv- 
ing in Washington, forsooth, is double in cost to any- 
where else in the United States. Let those who set 
this rapid pace curb their aristocratic desires. Let 
the public servant live within his income. The 
agency which is backing this propaganda for the 
over-modest officials is using a club over the publi- 
cations addressed in the shape of advertising patron- 
age. The inference is that this patronage will be 
withdrawn unless they get in line behind the raiders 
and push the good (?) work along. 

CUBA AND SENATOR PERKINS. 

The speech of the Honorable George C. Perkins on 
Cuban Reciprocity has been received at this office. 
Senator Perkins has been the recipient of congratula- 
tions of those of all shades of politics for his consis- 
tent and continual advocacy, and the splendid speech 
made by him on this subject. 

It may be said of him that while many may doubt 
the wisdom of the policy advocated, there are none 
who doubt his integrity and his support of any meas- 
ure is a tower of strength. 

The Savage Arms Company of Utica, New York, 
is sending out a beautiful art calendar which is a 
fine replica of an oil painting by Rungins. It repre- 
sents a hunter and horse, with a stag in the fore- 
ground. It is one of the best examples of repro- 
duction we have ever seen. In the same line the J. 
Ayer & Son advertising firm have issued a calendar 
which calls for commendatory mention. This is 
done in the colors of bronze, and represents work 
in relief, showing the two sides of a medal. 

Dr. Decker, 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" 
teeth extracting. 



for painless 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the 

rooms, formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



L. & M. Alexander & Co. are located as before, 110 Mont- 
gomery street, and rent and sell typewriters. 



MANUFACTURERS. 



(iRAV BROS 



IUi»iril< IIUIk . California 

Kh sir.< 1 I ■•« Anirelea. 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



ARTISTIC PORTRAITURE 

Art BromldM win be 
• r dottn for a Rh<>n Unit 

15he Imperial Studio 

744 MARKET STREET 

Established 25 Years and Alwava r» Leader 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IX 

^^PAPE'R — «a> 

TEL. MAIN 138. 66-OT-68-O FIRST ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 
Blake, M..IHt & Towne. Los Angeles. Cal. 
Blake. McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 



n MP L„. ' ••"' barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses. 
IllUMlcS '"""dries, paper-hangers, printers, painters. 
" " billiard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 

makers, canners. dyers, flour-mills, foundries, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento St, S. F., Tel. flain 561 1 



Old Rose Bud Whiskey 

Absolutely the purest on the market. 
APPLEGATE fit SONS, Distillers 

Louisville, Ken. Pacific Coast Agents 



RATBJEN WINE COMPANY. 



46 ELLIS STREET. S. F. 
Telephone, Main 5171. 



AMERIJAN 

CANNEL 



COAL 



Sold by all Reliable Dealers 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents. 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gilllngham Cement. 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



SING FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but one price. 
All goods marked In plain English figures. . 

614 DUPONT STREET, S. F. Next to St. Mary"s Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell 'and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. No. 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




3° 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves) 



"What's the matter?" asked the 
rooster ; "more absentminded- 
ness?" "Yes," replied the hen; 
I can never find things where I 
lay them." 

Doctor— Well, Pat, did you take 
the box of pills I sent you? Pat — 
I did that, yer honor, but I don't 
feel any better; I expect the lid 
hasn't come off yet. 

Ethel's mother told the grocer 
to send her a dressed turkey, and 
when it arrived the litte miss said: 
"Mamma, the turkey isn't dressed 
at al; it's perfectly nude." 

Johnny — They must have an 
awful big baby over at Meeker's 
house. Pa — What makes you 
think so? Johnny — Why, I heard 
ma say to-day that every one in 
the house was wrapped up in him. 
She — Isn't it lovely? Papa con- 
sents. He — Does he, really? She 
— Yes. He wanted to know who 
you were, and I told him you were 
tape clerk at Shrimp & Co.'s, and 
he seemed real pleased. He — I 
am delighted. She— Yes, and he 
said we could be married just as 
soon as you were taken into the 
firm. 

Schoolmaster (to Smith Major, 
who has paid a visit to his old 
school) — Yes, you big men are 
sometimes successful, but it is of- 
ten a case of froth rising to the 
top. Smith Major (seizing the op- 
portunity to pay off old scores) — 
But the dregs always remain at 
the bottom. 

The minenium won't get here in 
our time, but that is no reason 
why we shouldn't try to hurry it 
along. 

"Why did you let him get away 
from you?" thundered the chief. 
' He — er — took a mean advantage 
f me," replied the green detec 



of 



tive. "He ran across the grass in 

the park, and " "Well?" "Well 

there was a sign there, 'Keep Off 
the Grass.'" 

She— Oh, Dr. Pillsbury, I'm so 
anxious about poor Mrs. Perkins. 
She is in your hands, is she not. 
Dr. Pillsbury— She was, but I 
have left off attending her, for the 
present. She— Oh, that's good! 
Shes out of danger, then! 

The Suitor— They say that Love 
is blind. The Heiress— But now- 
adays he has a marvelous sense 
of touch. 

The true poet has a lively imagi- 
nation, and so, too, has the mere 
verse writer, for the latter is apt 
to imagine that he is a poet. 



Again we hear of the incorpora- 
tion of a railroad company for the 
construction of a line from Hud- 
son's Bay to Argentina. There 
will be a branch line to Mars via 
the moon. 

"Josiah," said Mrs. Chugwater, 
"have you ever seen a bureau of 
information?" "Yes." "What does 
it look like?" "You've seen a ta- 
ble of contents, haven't you?" re- 
plied Mr. Chugwater, somewhat 
irritably. "Well, it looks like that, 
only it's larger." 

Young Ardup was looking over 
his accounts. "I find," he mut- 
tered, "I spent last year $165.45 
for beer and cigars and $75 for 
clothing. 1 must 'try to get along 
with tewer new clothes this year! 
"You don't mean to tell me you 
rescued a young lady from drown- 
ing and didn't stop to learn her 
name." "That's what I did. My 
wife was there when I got the girl 
ashore." 

"Bridget, did you hear the bell?" 
"Yessum." "Wliy don't you go to 
the door, then?" "Sure, mum, I'm 
not expectin' anny one. It must 
be somebody to see you." 

"But you don't think he's mer- 
cenary, papa?" "Why, yes, I do! 
I'm afraid he regards marriage as 
a get-rich-quick scheme!" 

"This," smiled the fond young 
wife as she passed a plate of des- 
sert to her husband, "is cottage 
pudding. I made it myself." The 
man tasted of it. "I'd have known 
it was cottage pudding," he as- 
serted. "You would?" she asked 
delighted. "Yes. I can taste the 
plaster and the wall paper. What 
did you do with the shingles and 
the bricks for the chimney?" 

"Ah," she sighed, "the great men 
are all dead." "But the beautiful 
women are not," he answered. 
Then she looked up soulfully into 
his eyes and told him she had said 
it just to be contrary, and not be- 
cause she thought it for a mo- 
ment. 

Benedick— A man naturally re- 
quires a helpmate. I tell you, the 
young man in business who is not 
married is seriously handicapped. 
Sharpe— Quite so! He is at the 
mercy of his creditors, being un- 
able to put his property in his 
wife's name. 

Towne — I could scarcely refrain 
from laughing at Dumley's fiancee 
when she remarked that he was so 
versatile. Browne— Well, he is 
rather versatile. Towne — What? 
He's a regular idiot. Browne — Yes, 
but he's so many different kinds' 
of idiot. 



January 23, 1904. 

You pay five 
times too much 
for lamp-chim- 
neys. 

Buy good ones. 
Macbeth. 

If you use a wrong chimney, you lose a 
good deal of both light ai:d comfort, and 
waste a dollar or two a 3 - ear a lamp on 
chimneys. 

Do you want the Index ? Write me. 

Macbeth, Pittsburgh. 



Husband — I really think you 
you might have had that ball dress 
made a little higher in the neck — 
to say nothing of the back. Wife — 
I'll have it changed if you wish, 
but this stuff costs $10 a yard. 

"Then the reverend gent wanted 
ter know if we wuz a law-abidin' 
community." "And what did you 
say to that?" "I said of course we 
wuz law-abidin' and we'd lynched 
many a feller that wasn't." 

"What's the crowd doing down 
at the courthouse?" inquired the 
stranger. "Oh, they're trying the 
case of Mose Johnson," replied the 
Southerner. "Why, that was the 
man they lynched yesterday, was 
it not?" "Yaas, but to-day some of 
the boys got teched with a foolish 
curiosity to know whether he was 
innocent or guilty, suh." 

Gull — That man you introduced 
me to was telling me how rich his 
people are. Newitt — Who? Hot- 
tayre? Oh, that's his way. Gull — 
He says they'll be famous in the 
financial world if they don't suf- 
fer a change of fortune. Newitt — 
Well, there won't be any change 
in their fortune unless he changes 
his mind. 

"I spent a week in New York 
recently, but it was a disappoint- 
ment to me." "Why so?" "Was 
not in a subway explosion accident 
all the time I was there." "Shake! 
I was in Chicago for three days 
and wasn't held up once. These 
big towns aren't what they are 
advertised to be, by a long shot." 
Mr. Occident — Was there any 
conclusive reason why the Vigi- 
lantes should have hanged that 
poor negro? Quick-Drop Dan — 
I should say there was! There was 
a tree just outside the coon't cot- 
tage and one of the committee had 
brought a rope with him. 






January 23. 1904. 



ENNE1NS 



BO RATED 
TALCUM . 




Toilet 

fiPWDER 



»»<"10 M»»o«. Cuiri.r. 
-I d dfcta. J *t *fc. -At* 



/»«." IV 

Mv Mtb|. SoM mryvrtov. ar 



Knicker — Do you believe in a 
college education"' Bocker — Yes; 
it teaches a boy's father how to 
take care of his money. 

Lena — What made Fred act so 
funny when I accepted him. 
Emma — Oh, he's just in love with 
you. dear. He'll soon get over that. 

"And she said there was worse 
to tell, but she wouldn't say what 
it was." "Oh, I don't believe there 
could be anything worse — if she 
wouldn't tell it." 

Mabel — Did Gladys have a fash- 
ionable wedding? Maude — Very. 
Why, her wedding dress was near- 
ly torn off before she got inside the 
church. 

Mother — Now, Bobby, you must 
not get into any fights with the 
neighbors' children. Bobby — But, 
mamma, I've got to get acquainted 
with them some way. 

Gyer — I hear there is to be an- 
other postal investigation. Myer — 
What's the matter now? Gyer — It 
is reported that a man in one 
branch of the department had a 
chance to acquire a few extra dol- 
lars and didn't. 

"And when you have got the 
number of hours in a working day 
down to the minimum, what then?" 
asked the manufacturer. "Oh, 
then, we'll go in for a thirty-min- 
ute hour," remarked the walking 
delegate. 

"I have looked over the whole 
field," said the young author, "and 
the only thing that pays is a good 
novel." "Wrong again," said the 
philosopher. "What pays better?", 
said the author. "A bad novel," 
said the philosopher. 

"When an enemy smites me," 
said the pious-looking hypocrite, 
"I always turn the other cheek." 
"Why?" asked the man who knew 
him, "do you want your enemy to 
go around with both hands dis- 
abled?" 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I l.TTER. 

Weary Waggles 11. 

won't git nothm' decent in 
Don i I Hil- 

ary 1 lank 

\\ aggies — Ych, and l<\ pot ,1 il,,g 
w'at ain't. 

How many ways can you Serve 

meat?" "Three, mum." "What are 
they?" "Well done, rare, and raw." 

"How does the new cook strike 
\ou, my dear?" asked the he 
the house as he sat down to dinner. 
"She hasn't struck me yet," replied 
the weary other half, "but 1 be- 
lieve she would if I gave her any- 
back talk." 

Elmer (aged five) — Mamma, 
my stomach says it's time for din- 
ner. Mamma — Well, dear, go and 
see what the clock says. Elmer (a 
moment later) — The clock says my 
stomach is ten minutes fast. 

"Pa," said the boy, looking up 
from his book, "what does a man s 
'better half mean?" "Usually, my 
son," replied the father from be- 
hind the evening paper, "she 
means exactly what she says." 

Applicant — And if we want cer 
tain changes made in the flat- 
Janitor — Well, when people want 
'em very bad they generally move. 

Nobody had any idea that germs 
were so good to eat until it was 
learned that more than sixty-mil- 
lion of them are to be found in an 
adult oyster. 

"Well, Freddy, how do you like 
your dinner?" asked the hostess of 
a small guest. "Oh," replied the 
little fellow, "we don't have any 
better at home, but there is more 
of it." 

"Madam," said the facetious 
boarder to the landlady, "are these 
storage eggs?" "I think they must 
be," replied the lady; "you appear 
to have stored away five of them." 

"Say, pa," began little Willie 

again, "why " "Now, see 

here," his pa interrupted. "I told 
you I wouldn't answer any more 
questions. Let this be the last, 
now. What is it?" "I just wanted 
to know, pa, why you don't want 
to answer my questions. Is it 
because you're ignorant, or jest 
because your indigestion's" coining 
on? 



31 




Critic^No, Mr. Smearly, you 
will never succeed as an artist. 
You can't draw. Smearly— Can't 
draw? What's that got to do with 
it? Ain't I in society. 
. . "Did you say there were acci- 
dentals in that music?" asked Mr. 
Cumrox. "A great many," ans- 
wered his daughter, who has mu- 
sical ambitions. "Well, it's a great 
comfort to know that you were not 
doing it intentionally." 




VV.*.¥M¥#.¥V.¥.*.MVV.V.V.*VVVV#*3l. 




Stylish $ 
Suits 



15 



50 



K Samples Sent 
i Free.... 



Dressy Suits $20 

Pants $4.50 
My $25.00 Suits are the* 

best in America. 5 
i\ r Per Cent Saved by get-g 
Z ting your suit made by» 

JOE POHEIM g 

IBB TAILOR k 

s 



11101112 Market St. S 
cer- g r """" 201-203 Montn'v St.. S. F.3 

S0Z0D0NT 

TOOTH POWDER 

For S3 years the Dentifrice of 
Quality. Absolutely Non-Acid 

No Waste. No Grit <,- 
Now Patent Top Can * oc 

TWOMBV & MIHOLOVICH 

THE YELLOWSTONE 

22 MONTGOMERY ST. 

T el. Main U¥l 

"How old does you reckon dat 
mule is?" "Lawd knows. We quit 
celebratin' his birthday w'en Gin- 
rul Lee surrendered." 

Panama has an army, but only 
half of it is standing. The other 
three soldiers are permitted to sit 
down. 



HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

Delicate enough for the softest 
skin, and yet efficacious in removing 
any stain. Keeps the skin in perfect 
condition. In the bath gives all the 
desirable after-effects of a Turkish 
bath. It should be on every wash- 
stand. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUQQISTS 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 23, 1904. 




Double Daily Service to All Points 
East via 

PUEBLO, KANSAS CITY 

& ST. LOUIS 

-Through Pullman Sleeping ears and Ob- 
servation Cafe Dining Cars, with Electric 
Lights and Electric Fans, Scenic Koute 
through Colorado. For tickets, berth reser- 
vations, folders, etc , call on or address 

GENERAL TICKET OrFlCE 

G25 Market Street, ' San Francisco, Cal 
(Palace Hotel! 



O. R. & N. CO. 

The Only Steamship Line to 
PORTLAND, ORF. 

And Short Rail Line from Portland toallFoints 
East. Through Tioketa to all Points all Hail or 
Steamship and Kail at Lowest Rates. 

Steamer Tickets include Berth and Meals. 

S8 OREGON Sails Jan. 2». Feb. 7. 17. 27. 
March 9. 29. 

8S GEO. W. ELDER Saifs Jan. 23. Feb. 2. 
12. 22- March i 14. 24. 

At 9&£&°X is temnorarly in service instead 
of the COLUMBIA. 

''He says he's too busy to do any- 
thing." "I guess he's right." "But 
what is it he's so busy about?" 
"Doing nothing-." 



Illinois Central Railroad 

Tickets to all points in the 

United States and Europe 

W. H. Snedaker, Gen. Agt. 



639 Market St. 



Palace Hotel BIdg. 




ERIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and' dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block- 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Trui ii- leave ami ;u <■ due in xrrlveat 
SAN FHANCISOO. 

(Main Line. Foot of Market Street > 

ha v k — From December l!9. I!i03. — akrivb 

7.00a VHCrivlllu. Winters, Kuiiim<:>'. 7 65p 

7.00a Benlcla, Snl-.uu, Elinlra and S.i.th- 

memo 7-25P 

7.30a Vallejo, Napa, Callstbga. Santa 

Kusa, Martinez, Sun Kninon B.25p 

7-30a Nlles, Llvermore, Tracy, Latbrop. 

Stockton 7 2&p 

8-OOa Shasta Express — (Via Davis, , 
Williams (for Uartlelt Spriugs), 
Willows. tFruto, lied Muff, 
Portland, Tacoina. Seuttle 7.55p 

8.00a Davie, Woodland, KnlghtB La oling, 

Marysvllle, Orovllle 7-55p 

8.30* Port Costa, Martinez, Autlocb, 
Byron, Tracy, Stockton, New- 
man, Loa Banoa, Me n d o t a, 
Armona, Han ford. V I a a I la, 
Portervllle ... 4.25p 

8-30a Port CoBta, Martinez, Tracy, Lath- 
rop, Modeato, Merced, Fresno. 
Qoaben Janctlon, Han f o rd, 

Visalla. Dakersfleld 4.55/ 

8-30a NIleB, San .loBe, Llvermore, Stock- 
ton, (tMllton), lone, Sacramento, 
Placervllle, Marysvllle, Chlco, 
Red Bluff 4.25p 

6.30a Oakdnle. Chinese, Jamestown. 8o- 

nora, Tuolumne and Aiil"'K 4 25? 

9. 00a Atlantic Express— Ogden and East. 11 .25a 

9.30a Richmond, Martinez and Way 

' Stations 6 55p 

10.00a The Overland Limited — Ugden, 

Denver, Oinnha, Chicago 6.25p 

10.00a Vallejo 12.25p 

10.00a Los Angeles Passenger- Port 
Costa, Martinez, Byron. Tracy, 
Latbrop. Stockton, Merced, 
Raymond. Fresno, Oosben Junc- 
tion, Hanford, Lemoore, Vlaalla. 

Bakersfleld, Los Angeles 726p 

1200m Hayward, Nlleeand Way Stations. 3.25p 
tl.OOP Sacramento River Steamers IH.OOp 

3-30p Benlcla, Winters. Sacramento, 
Woodland, Knights Lauding, 
Marysvllle, Orovllle and way 
stations 10-55a 

3.30p Hayward, Nlles and Way Stations.. 7-6&P 

330'' Port Costa, Martin. -z. Byron, 
Tracy, Latbrop, Modesto, 
Merced, Fresno and Way Sta- 
tions beyond Port Costa 12-25p 

3-30p Mnnfnez. Tracy, Stockton. Lodl... 10.25a 

4.00p Martlnez.SauUhimun.ValteJo.Napa, 

Callstoga, Santa ISuaa 9-25 a 

4.00p NIleB, Tracv. Stockton. Lodl 4-25p 

4.30p Hayward, Nlles, lrvlnRtou. San) I8.55\ 
Jone. Llvermore ( t 11.65a 

6.0 Or The Owl Limited— Newm n. Loa 
Banos. Mendom. Fresno. Tulare, 
BakereBeld. Lob Angeles. 
Golden State Limited Sleeper, 
Oakland to Lob Angeles, fur Chi- 
cago, via C. R. I & P 8.55a 

6.00p Port CoBta. Tracy. Stockton 12.25P 

t630P Hayward. Nlles and San Jose 7 25*. 

6. OOp Hayward. Nlles and San .lose 9o5* 

6.00? Eastern Express — Ogden. Denver, 
Omaha, St. LouIb. Chicago and 
East. Port Costa. Benlcla, Sul- 
Bun, Elmlra, Davis, Sacramento, 
Rocklln. Auburn, Colfax, 
Truckce, Boca, Iteno, Wad*- 
worth, Wlnnemucca 5 25p 

8.00p Vallejo. dally, except Sunday... . I , eB _ 

7.00p Vallejo, Sunday only f ' ot,F 

7.00p Ulchmond, *an Pablo. Port Costa, 

Martinez and Way Stations 11.25a 

6.06p Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
ramento, Marysvllle, Red ding, 
Portland, Puget Sound and EaBt. 8.65a 

8.10p Hayward, NIleB and San .1 Be (Sun- 

day only) . 11.66 a 



COAST LINt (Narrow Gauge) 

Foot of Market Htreet) 

8.16a Newark, Cenlervllle. San Jobo. 
Felton. Boulner Creek, Santa 

Cruz and Way Stations 5-55P 

12-16*' Newark, Cenlervllle, San Jose, 
New Almadeo. Los Gntob. Felton. 
Boulder Creek, Sama Cruz and 

Principal Way Stations 110 55* 

4 16p Newark, San Jose, LosUatos and \ 18-55 \ 

way BtatloDB.... ...;. .'. 1110 55 a 

09 30 v Hunters Train, Saturday only, San 
Jose and Way Statlona. - Rcturn- 
Ing from Los Gatos Snn-lny only* 17 26p 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

I- rum SAN t RANClsuO, Fool oi Murket St. (Slip <i 

— tt:15 «:00 U:0Ua.». 100 3.00 5-15 km 

from OAKLAND, Foot or Broadway -- t^Od W:(W 

18:05 10:00 a.m. 12 00 2-00 4-00 p.m. 

COAST LINE (Kruuil Usage). 

Z3/T (Third mul Town -end Streets.) 

GIOa San Jose and Way Stations G30p 

7 00a San Jose and Way Stations 5.36p 

800a New Almadcn (Tues., Frltl., only), 4.10p 

8 00a The Coaster— Stops only Sap Jose, 
Gllroy (connection for Hoi lis- 
ter), Pajaro, Castro vllle (con- 
nection to and from Monterey 
and Pacific Grove), SallnaB. San 
Ardo, Paso Robles. Santa Mar- 
garita, San I. nl:- OblBpo. principal 

. stations thence Surf (connection 
for Lompoc). principal stations 
thence. Santa Barbara, Sun Buena- 
ventura. Saugus. Los Angeles... 10-45p 
8.00a San Jose. Trea PlnoB, Capltola, 
SautaCruz.PaclQc Grove, Salinas, 
San Luis oblBpo and Principal 

Way Stations 4.10p 

10.30a San Jose and Way Stations 1-20p 

11-30a Santa Clara, San .lose. Los Gatos 

and Wav Stations 7.3 Op 

I -30j- San Jose and Way Stations R.jQa 

O.uOp Del Monte Express— Santa Clara, 
San Jose, Del Monte. Monterey, 
Pacific Grove (connects nt Santa 
Clara for Santa Cruz, Boulder 
Creek and Narrow Gauge Points) 
at Gllroy for Holllster, Tres 
Plnos, at Castrovllle for Salinas. 12-15p 

3-30T' Tres Plnos Way Passenger 10 45a 

4 30p Han Jose and Way Stations: 18-OOa 

t6 00' San JoBe. (via Sauta Clara) Los 
Gatos, and Principal Way Sta- 
tions (except Sunday) t9-00A 

b-30)' SanJoseandPrluclpal Way Stations 49 40a 
6-GOp bunst'i Limited,— Eedwo d, San 
Jose. GUroy.sallnaB, Paso Koules, 
San I. uls Obispo. Santa Barbara, 
Los Angeles. Deiillng. Kl Paso, 
New Orleans, New York. Con- 
nects at Pajaro for Santa Crns 
and at Castrovllle for Pacific 

Grove and Way Stations 7-10 a 

tfi 1 1 j San Mateo.Bereaford. Belmont. San 
Carlos. Redwood. Fair Oaks. 

Menlo Park. Palo Alto '6 .45 \ 

6 !0i Ssn Jose and Way Stations 6 36a 

B.OOp Palo Alto and Way Statlona U-15a 

11 .30>" South ^aiiFranclBco. M Illume, Bar- 
Mngame. San Mateo, Belmon* 
San Carlos. Redwood. Fair Oaka. 

Menlo Park and Palo Alto 9-45p 

■ M1.30p Mayueld, Mountain View. Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence, Santa Clara and 

San Jose J9-45P 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. 

' Sunday excepted t Sunday only 

<■■' 8atnrday only. 
( Stops at all stations on Sunday. 
l*~Only trains stopping at Valencia St. sonthhound 
an- : 10 a.m., 7:00a.m., 11:30 a.m., 8:HQ p.m., 6:30 P.M. and 
8:00 p.m. 

The UNION TKANRKBIC OOMI'ANi 
■■ "l call tor and ehe> k baggage from hotels and rest 
.t-'Lues Telephone. Exchange 43. Inquire of Ticket 



Ascum — I suppose you're de- 
lighted that your new baby's a 
girl. Popley — I should say ! I 
hope some day to have the pleasure 
of telling some foreign duke or 
count that he can't have her. 

"Jane, you vex me dreadfully: 
When that very rich Mr. Squintum 
tried to talk to you last night you 
gave 'him the cold shoulder." 
"Well, the other shoulder was no 
warmer, ma." 

Bettor — I thought you said that 
new 2 year old was sure to win. 
Tout — Well, h'd a been all right, 
only he wasn't properly broke. 
Bettor — That's the difference be- 
tween him and me. 




Why Don't You 

Travel by Sea? 

vacation and Short 
Tourist Excursion Trips 

Excellent Service, Low Rates Including 
Berth and Heals 

Lob A nirelen, Stm Dlesro, Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara, Monterey, 

Korean Seattle, Tacoma, 

Victoria, Vancouver, etc. 

And to those desiring- longer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico* 

For Information regarding sailing dates, etc 
obtain folder 

SAN FRANCISCu TICKET OFFICES 
4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St.. and Broadway Wharves. 

C. D. DUNANN, General Pass. Agent. 

10 Market Street , San Franc! so 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Wa "To D & d ars 

Sohroer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post Sl.,San Francisco 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 

mMI rRAt4C|« eo 



Annual Subscription. (4.00 



News Better 

(tfttlifo r n i a \b brvt i s c v. 




Vol. LXVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 30. 1903. 



Number 5. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and published 
rj Saturday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott. Halleck 

Building. JJO Sansomc street. San Francteco, cal. 
Entered at San Francisco Postoffiee aa second-class matter. 
New York Office— < where Information may be obtained regarding 

subscriptions and advertising)— 306 Broadway. C C Murphy, 

Representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C, England. George Street A Co. 
Chicago Offlce-^J. H. Williams, ions New York Life Building. 
Boston Otnce— M. W. Barber. 715 Exchange B.illdlng. 
All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 

Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 

LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m. 

Thursday previous to day of Issue. 

The San Francisco Gas Company goes right along 
relieving the fears of those who worry about over- 
population. 

Men who wear No. 6\ 2 hats are rejoicing over the 
announcement that "Citizen" George Francis Train's 
brain weighed six ounces more than the average. 

Administrationists who applaud the Panama gob- 
ble return thanks to the Creator who made Hay 
while the sun shone. 



Leap year may be the open season for hunting 
bachelors, but the huntresses should not forget that 
there is still a "bag limit" law. 

Senator Hanna ate two big dinners in one evening, 
and then sent for the doctor, who politely called it a 
case of grip, instead of gluttony. 

Statistics show that the tendency of mankind to 
fall off the water-wagon is the chief cause of grass 
widowhood. 



Mirza Ali Asgar Khan, lately Grand Vizier to the 
Shah of Persia, is traveling for his health in any 
country where his royal master can't catch and bow- 
string him. 

Now that the bills are coming in for Langley's 
lame duck of an airship — a contraption that could 
neither fly nor swim — the statesmen at Washington 
have decided that he hypnotized them. 

A device by which you can look down the throat 
and into the stomach has been invented by a Chicago 
man. Let's hope that it will help to check the 
"breakfast food" habit. 

Lieutenant-Governor Willard of Virginia has out- 
run a rabbit in an impromptu footrace. It will be 
a rapid office that gets away from him after this ex- 
ploit. 

While we rejoice over the dying out of the feud that 
kept the Crocker spite fence standing, let us also 
bear in mind that thereby we lose one of our too few 
historical landmarks. 

An estimable Kansan named Hoch has put away 
the crown of the Republican nomination for Governor 
with such firmness that the papers of the Sunflower 
State with one accord said of him : "Hoc der Caesar. 



Two Kentuckians have upheld the honor of their 
country by thrashing four footpads in Paris so effec- 
tually that only two of the Gauls were able to run 
away. 



An out-of-town scribe abuses shamefully an urban 
Colonel because of his ton-abundant locks and whis- 
ker-. We suspect the scribe of hairlessness as well 
as malice. 



A Chicago woman has been adjudged insane and 
there is incidental mention of the fact that for years 
she had smoked a package of cigarettes a day. Cause 
or effect? 



Hearst's New York papers have been awarded the 
city printing. In San Francisco this is a job that 
only the poorest sheet of the lot will accept. 

President Roosevelt and his admirers are said to 
be anxious to get rid of M. Bunau-Varilla as Minister 
from Panama. By all means. We never did care 
for these black-and-tan diplomats, with names that 
sound like some kind of flavoring extract. 



Andrew Carnegie offered the American Society of 
Civil Engineers $1,500,000 for a new building, but 
when the Engineers said that there was a condition 
'with every dollar they sidestepped adroitly. Poor, 
rich old Carnegie! 

A scientist with a microscope has found 6,000,000 
bacteria on a $1 bill. A Morganized public is not 
interested in the bacteria, but it clamors to know 
where he got the bill, not believing that there is so 
much money in general circulation since the bottom 
fell out of the Steel Trust. 



The bright lads of a Pennsylvania district school 
tied their woman teacher hand and foot and threw 
her into a shed, where the temperature was around 
zero while they wrecked their temple of learning. 
Mercifully, the teacher escaped alive; and, unmerci- 
fully, so did the boys. 

The "Sage of East Aurora," who has become rich, 
if not respected, and notorious if not famous, by an 
impudent manner of criticising the morals of his bet- 
ters, has married the lady who was named as co-re- 
spondent when he was sued for divorce. They will 
honeymoon in Timbuctoo to avoid souvenirs from 
his disciples in the shape of eggs and brickbats. 

An evening paper is fussing about an unnamed 
lady who is accused of trying to break into society * 
by inviting to her "functions" people who do not 
know her. Why not? It is thinkable that the peo- 
ple who do know her might not come. And, again, 
society can always adjourn and call the meeting to 
order somewhere else — a practice not unknown in 
politics. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 



GRASPING FOR CITY PATRONAGE. 

That tin angel which tops the City Hall dome 
should be thankful for the fact that hers is a job with- 
out a salary. Otherwise she would have been pulled 
down and somebody else re-classified and re-tilled 
into her exalted place. The marionette who executes 
the will of the Mayor is not permitted to overlook 
anything that looks like patronage. As the News Let- 
ter foretold, the Supervisors have put the Schmitz 
combination on record as deliberate charter-smashers. 
It has exposed their rapacity and their chicanery, 
and with the same movement has done its best to 
keep them out of reaching distance of the public 
treasury. What these pilloried pillagers have had 
to say in their own defense has not helped them. 
It is no excuse for the Health Board foray to say 
that this Supervisor who opposes it has a mother- 
in-law in the pay of the city or that this other one has 
found municipal jobs for a bunch of cousins and 
friends. And if the ingenuity of Ruef has devised 
any better apology than that for what his creatures 
hav3 done in their scramble for the trough, he has 
not divulged it. 

The crux of the situation is the order of the Super- 
visors to the Auditor and Treasurer holding up the 
pay of those henchmen of Schmitz. found to have 
been unlawfully appointed by the Health Board. 
Auditor Baehr has already shown his distrust of the 
Mayor's shifty Civil Service Board, and we believe 
that he will not be coerced or cajoled into aiding 
Schmitz in his scheme of misrule. The order of the 
revenue-voting body should and probably will suffice 
for him. This will throw the burden of proof upon 
the charter-wreckers. 

While the city awaits the untangling of the puzzle 
it need fear no damage through lack of an active and 
efficient Health Board. The illegally appointed 
crowd will go through the motions even if they draw 
no pay, partly for the prospect of a decision favorable 
to them and partly because of the promises of the 
administration, and going through the motions is 
about all any Health Board ever does. The poor 
devils of men and women whom necessity drives into 
the City and County Hospital cannot fare worse 
than the inmates of that foul, mismanaged rookery 
have fared for years. The unregenerate prize-fighter 
to whom Schmitz handed the office of "deputy war- 
den and custodian" will hardly dare to make punching 
bags of the helpless and poverty-cursed patients who 
come under his authority while his chance for a salary 
hangs in the courts. 

Whatever the courts may do in the premises, the 
people look to Auditor Baehr to stand fast. If he 
pays any attention to the threats and persuasion of 
the charter-wreckers, it will be as bad for him as 
for them when the time for reckoning comes. 

A LESSON FOR SAN FRANCISCO. 

According to the Customs House returns, tabu- 
lated by the Treasury Department in Washington, 
the exports from the port of San Francisco in 1887 — 
a fairly average year — were valued at $32,711,507, 
and in 1903 they were worth $33,502,616. From the 
same source of information it is learned that the ex- 
ports from the Puget Sound district, including Seat- 
tle, Tacoma, and some minor ports, in 1887 were 
$1,770,429 and in 1903 they amounted to $32,499,828, 
or nearly as much as the export business of this 
port in that year. 

Making comparison of the import trade, a some- 
what similar condition is observed. In 1887, the Pu- 
get Sound import trade only footed up $347,818, while 
in 1903 it had mounted to $12,177,243. In San Fran- 



cisco the imports in 1887 were valued at $40,707,708, 
while in 1903 they were reported at $36,454,283. 

These figures are misleading in some degree, for 
the reason that for the past three years the Customs 
House has not included in its returns for this port the 
Hawaiian export and import business, which is done 
almost exclusively here. It is estimated that $6,000,- 
000 in round figures should be added to the total of 
San Francisco exports in allowance for the Hawaiian 
export business, and that the import trade from the 
islands amounts to about $10,000,000 annually. Thus, 
in 1900, before Hawaii became domestic territory, 
the exports from San Francisco were $40,368,288 and 
the imports $47,869,628. 

Making all these allowances, we submit that the 
figures still present a startling showing, and one 
that should be matter of grave concern to the mer- 
chants and shipping men of San Francisco. If the 
■ treasury returns are true, the port of San Francisco 
has made a comparatively insignificant growth in 
export and import trade since 1887, while in the same 
period Seattle and Tacoma have advanced from a 
negligible quantity to a position where they nearly 
equal our business. This city is doing a splendid 
business. Of its prosperity there is no question, but 
our good fortune has come to us almost without effort 
of our own. It should be far greater if our people 
would put more work and energy in it. San Francisco 
is the spoiled child of fortune, and has ever been. 
Long ago Bret Harte wrote that the city stands by 
the gateway of two continents, "serene, indifferent 
to fate," waiting for trade to come her way, but not 
putting out her hand to grasp it. Seattle is different. 
That city is nowise indifferent to fate, and is' a natu- 
ral born reacher. Therein San Francisco may learn 
her lesson. 



THE INFINITE VARIETY OF GRAFT. 

The infinite variety of official graft was illustrated 
by a recent debate in Congress on an amendment to 
the legislative, executive and judicial appropriations' 
bill offered by Representative Charles B. Landis, with 
a view to preventing the abuse that has grown up 
in the departments of providing for the use of sub- 
ordinate officials' horses, carriages and liveried coach- 
men, which are employed not on Government busi- 
ness, but for social purposes. In offering his amend- 
ment, Mr. Landis said that if "the horses and car- 
riages," with their coachmen, paid for out of mc.iey 
appropriated by Congress, were lined up on Penn- 
sylvania avenue (Washington) they would extend 
possibly from the White House to the Peace Monu- 
ment." 

Of course, no specific appropriation for any such 
purpose has ever been made by Congress, but Mr. 
Landis explained how the thing was done in these 
words : 

"The expense that is now borne by the Govern- 
ment in this regard has attracted the attention of the 
country, and unless Congress puts some limitation 
upon the expenditure, it promises to became a na- 
tional scandal. I am informed that in the estimate 
made by the head of one of the Departments for the 
coming year, the estimate being made by a gentle- 
man who had not in that capacity made an estimate 
before, there was a provision for seven coachmen. 

"Had he been onto the ropes he would have had 
the estimate specify 'seven laborers,' and after he 
got them would have assigned them to do duty as 
coachmen. This is the way it has been done by the 
heads of other departments for years — 'laborers' 
have been metamorphosed into 'coachmen,' have 
been equipped with silk hats and with boots and 



January 30. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



placed upon the box, where they have done service 
in approved fashion for persons other than I 
mentioned in my amendment; and unless th« 

:11c action in this matter it is only a 
tion of time when all the assistant - 
all the chief clerks, all the clerks — 111 [act, .ill people 
on the Government pay roll, except Senators and 
Representatives, will he riding in carriages guided 
and directed by coachmen, and all the expenses paid 
by the < iovernment." 

Seven coachmen tor one department is a pretty 
fair allowance. In these stylish equipages, paid for 
by Uncle Sam. it was stated on the floor of Cong 
that the wives of subordinate officials might be seen 
any day in Washington making their round of social 
calls. 



NEGLECT OF PACIFIC COAST INTERESTS. 

We have had occasion more than once in these 
columns to dwell on the need of united action among 
the Pacific Coast delegations in Congress touching 
questions that affect the industrial life of the great 
region west of the Rocky Mountains. The resump- 
tion of the duty on coal offers an instance in point. 
The coal output of the Pacific Coast States is compar- 
atively insignificant, and what we use we are com- 
pelled to carry long distances. As if the cost of 
transportation of this fuel were not a sufficient bur- 
den on our industries, we are now compelled in ad- 
dition to pay a duty of 67 cents a ton on every pound 
we use. We say advisedly on every pound, because 
that part of our fuel which is mined in the United 
States pays the duty just the same as that which 
comes from British Columbia or Australia, for in- 
stance. The only difference is that the 67 cents goes 
into the pockets of the mine owner instead of the 
national treasury. The duty is added to the price 
of the home product, because, being sold in competi- 
tion with the foreign coal, any cause which increases 
the cost of one has a similar effect on the other. 

This is a matter of very considerable importance 
to' the industries of the Pacific Coast, and yet there 
was not a word of protest in Congress from any of 
our Representatives. What they need is a steering 
committee to watch the interests of this region as 
they are affected by legislation, and call for united 
action when occasion demands. As things are man- 
aged, Pacific Coast interests are permitted to go by 
default for want of concerted action. Under the 
present system or lack of system, the Pacific Coast 
delegation in Congress is nothing better than a for- 
tuitous concourse of jarring atoms. 

NATIONAL PEACE (?) ASSOCIATION. 
There seems to be something queer about the latest 
element to inject itself into the local industrial situa- 
tion. It was incorporated on January 6th, and chris- 
tened the "National Peace Industrial Association. 
Some excellent and prominent citizens stand as spon- 
sors for it, but there is a suspicion of the syndicate 
about its begetting. Nominally the responsible par- 
ent is P. H. Scullin, who came here unbidden from 
Seattle three months ago. He has described himself 
• as being vice-president of the Carpenters' Union in 
the town he hails from, is the author of a labor ar- 
bitration bill which failed of passage in the last ses- 
sion of the Washington Legislature, and is the self- 
appointed eliminator of boycotts and sympathetic 
strikes from the arsenal of organized labor. 

The aims of the Scullin scheme are beyond cavil. 
No sensible man will object to any bona fide endeavor 
to bring about peace between employer and em- 



I. Hut it is the good faith of th ttion 

do not like the manner 
ent ; we do not like the readiness with 
which Mayor Schmitl has endorsed his "Peace Vs 
not like the choice for its 1 

dencj il. Foulks, Attorney-at-Law 

the • ription Of the gentleman who heads 

Scullin scheme. Now, this Mr. Foulks is more of 

a teacher in a public school than he is a lawyer, lie 
nerally known to be one of the smaller of those 
bandy men who do the odd jobs of the Sehmitz re- 
gime. We suspect strongly that this "Peace Asso- 
ciation" is a clever device of the false prophets of 
unionism; that their real object is to use it for the 
splitting of the Citizens' Alliance to which the indus- 
try of the country has turned for relief from its d.rc 
affliction. Organizer Scullin, with his union labor 
credentials, and his invisible means of support, looks 
to us like a gift-bearing < ircek. When we see in the 
chair of his praiseworthy "Peace Association" a 
factotum of that Mayor who has so bitterly de- 
nounced the Citizens' Alliance for daring to organize 
against organized labor, we are reasonably certain 
that the gift he is preparing to hand us is a hot one. 

DANGERS OF THE EIGHT HOUR LAW. 

The address issued by D. M. Parry, president of 
the Citizens' Industrial Association of America on 
the eight-hour law is a valuable contribution to the 
literature of the labor question, thoughtful, temper- 
ate and judicious. Mr. Parry sees in the agitation for 
a law pledging the Government to an eight-hour day 
on all work done for the national administration not 
only an attack on the liberty of the citizen but like- 
wise a menace to the industrial supremacy of 
America. 

The most telling argument against the legisla- 
tion demanded by the labor unions in this regard is 
stated by Mr. Parry in the following paragraph : 

"I wish also to call attention to the fact that to the 
degree eight-hour legislation is effective to that de- 
gree is the ability of our industries to compete abroad 
diminished. This means less production in this 
country and therefore the employment of less labor. 
Again, the artificial tampering with hours of employ- 
ment in private enterprise inevitably means higher 
prices for commodities for general consumption. The 
cost of production cannot be increased without a 
corresponding advance in prices." 

In a word, the unions demand that American labor 
shall be shorn of 20 per cent of its productiveness, 
and at the same time they desire to add 20 per cent 
to the cost of production. That is the spendthrift 
fashion of burning the candle at both ends, and it 
must prove disastrous to American opportunities for 
foreign trade. This country has got beyond the 
point where the home market was all sufficient to 
absorb the national output of manufactures. We are 
already selling goods all over the world, but the 
prime condition of that business is that we can pro- 
duce as cheaply or more cheaply than our competi- 
tors. How long will that condition continue if we 
increase the cost of production by 20 per cent? There 
never was a business in the world that could stand 
such waste. 

If it be urged that the bill only affects work done 
for the Government, the answer is that the undis- 
guised endeavor of organized labor is to extend the 
restriction to all classes of work. 



Hearst will never have any difficulty in determin- 
ing who was his original and most enthusiastic sup- 
porter for the Presidency. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 



SPARE NEITHER MAN NOR WOMAN. 

Molly Maguire rules in Colorado. Not since the 
days when that name of terror carried its mysterious 
menace of violence, outrage and assassination to the 
people of Pennsylvania has a like condition pre- 
vailed in any American commonwealth. 

We had occasion recently in these columns to 
enumerate a few of the crimes of violence and as- 
sassination committed by agents of the Western Fed- 
eration of Miners in Colorado. In these outrages the 
victims were men. In the latest instance the agents 
of the Miners' Union have attempted to assassinate 
a woman. 

Mrs. Leonel Ross Anthony is the publisher of a 
weekly paper in Denver. She is outspoken and fear- 
less, and is quite as ready to tell the truth about 
capital as about labor when she believes that either 
is doing wrong. But it seems that in Denver no man 
and no woman is free to write or print the truth about 
the crimes of organized labor. The penalty is death, 
to be carried out by the hand of the assassin. 

Mrs. Anthony had received numerous threatening 
letters — anonymous, of course, as is the cowardly 
habit of the slinking assassin — and in these she was 
warned that if she continued to expose and condemn 
the crimes of the Colorado strikers, her life would 
pay the penalty. To these warnings Mrs. Anthony 
paid no attention, and continued to tell the truth in 
her fearless way. 

Mark the sequel. On Sunday night, January 10th, 
Mrs. Anthony answered the doorbell of her house in 
Denver. It was quite dark, and when she opened 
the door, the unknown agent of the union, who came 
there with murder in his heart, fired two shots at her 
from a forty-five calibre revolver. Fortunately the 
shots missed their mark, and less fortunately the 
murderous agent of the strikers escaped in the dark. 

That was in Denver, the principal city of Colorado. 
The police report on the crime says : "From all the 
evidence we can gather from the surroundings, we 
are of the opinion that the man who did the shooting 
was some one not known to Mrs. Anthony, and that 
it was done for revenge with intent to murder." 

In the issue of her paper, the "Polly Pry," follow- 
ing this attempted assassination, Mrs. Anthony ex- 
plains the causes that led up to the crime, and she 
says: 

"I do not know who shot at me. Aside 
from the antagonism these articles may have 
caused, I have no personal enemies that I 
know of. I have never tried to injure any 
man, woman or child? 

What is my crime? 

I have dared to tell the truth about some 
of the labor leaders who are trying to keep 
Colorado in a ferment. 

That is all. 

I believe that the plain American work- 
ing man wants to know and ought to know 
the truth about the leaders who own him 
body and soul. The truth is not always 
pleasant either to him who hears or him 
who tells, but I am going to tell it, Mr. 
Workingman, and if you are the honest, sen- 
sible, self-respecting man I take you to be 
you'll thank me for it. 

There is not one daily paper in Colorado 
that dares to tell the truth about the labor 
situation in this State." 
The News Letter may add that there is not one 
"daily paper" in San Francisco that dares to tell the 
truth about the labor situation in California. 



UNSANITARY RESIDENCES. 

How little the public gets for the $60,000 a year it 
spends on sanitation may be learned from the testi- 
mony of any one who has done his own "house hunt- 
ing." Sinks that sicken with their stench, bath-tubs 
too filthy to wash a dog in, conveniences too profane 
in odor and appearance to be described, are to be 
found in outwardly decent houses in decent neigh- 
borhoods where the "To Let" sign invites inspection. 
Basements dank and mouldy, with rotting boards 
and the refuse of unclean years, and back yards that 
seem never to have been dry or clean, are even more 
common than defective plumbing. 

Much of the responsibility for this state of affairs 
belongs to careless agents rather than penurious 
owners, since there are many non-resident holders 
of rented property and many who live here but do 
not take the pains to inspect what they own unless 
it remain too long unoccupied. The one class must 
depend and the other chooses to rely on others, gen- 
erally real estate firms, to take care of the houses, 
looking to them to keep the income up and the ex- 
penses down. Not unnaturally, the renting agent is 
content to "let things slide," as long as he can keep 
premises rented a reasonable part of the time, and 
as long as the Board of Health does not bother him. 
And Boards of Health are generally too busy with 
doing politics and drawing salaries to nose around 
in houses about which there has been no complaint. 

An easy remedy for what is an evil growing worse 
as houses grow older occurs to the News Letter: Let 
the Supervisors by ordinance make it obligatory upon 
the Health Board to inspect every vacated house or 
other building as soon as it is empty, and prohibit 
its further occupancy until it shall have been put into 
such sanitary condition as will satisfy the Board's 
inspectors. Prospective tenants will not hesitate to 
take advantage of such a regulation, either by in- 
sisting upon compliance with it before they move in 
or by reporting dereliction on the part of the Health 
Board. 

This suggestion we offer not by any means as a 
full or satisfactory solution of the civic problem in- 
volved, but as a half-way measure that will help to 
make this a better city to live in while it is thrash- 
ing out its domestic difficulties. It seems to be fea- 
sible, and we think would be acceptable to all people 
who rent houses and most of those who own them. 

If you want to eat the best, drink the best, and be 

among the best people, go to Techau Tavern, which is sec- 
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after-the-theatre resort, and deserves its fine reputation. 




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January 30. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



AS TO OFFICIAL INSPECTORS. 

The Iroquois Theatre fire at Chicago Ins called 
the attention of municipalities all over the country 
to the various detects in citv Government. The lack 
of protection to the public is apparent in manv direc- 
tions, and in San Francisco, as in other cities, atten- 
tion has been called to the lack of proper safeguards 
to protect the thousands who daily use the public 
elevators. It is true there is a company engaged in 
insuring owners of buildings against loss, through 
damage suits induced by accidents. And in these 
particular buildings there is a rigid inspection of the 
service. This is a voluntary act on the part of the 
landlord and is a measure of self-protection. 

There should be a municipal inspector of elevators 
whose duty it shall be to inspect all of these public 
conveyances. This appointment should be at the dis- 
posal of insurance companies and elevator contrac- 
tors. A mere politician would do more harm than 
good, but an honest and energetic person who is thor- 
oughly acquainted with insurance and buildings 
would be invaluable. 

A step in this direction is sure to be taken after 
a terrible accident has occurred, and many have been 
maimed, crippled or killed. The city of San Fran- 
cisco is guilty of gross carelessness in many direc- 
tions in the care given the public. Hundreds of our 
elevators have not been inspected since first in- 
stalled; many depend on the strength of one flimsy 
Manila rope, while others are utterly unacquainted 
with any attempt at a safety clutch. It is high time 
that those whom the public have entrusted with 
their welfare took so important a matter in hand. 

There is a law on the statute books of this city 
making it mandatory on boarding house and hotel 
keepers not to turn off the gas at the meter during 
the night. The force of gas should remain on all the 
time, and the only protection afforded the consumer 
is to see that his gas fixtures do not leak and that 
the gas is used in moderation. This law was revived 
not long ago, just long enough to obtain "back- 
sheesh" from a few of the owners of second or third 
rate lodging houses in the poorer part of the city. 
Many of the fashionable apartment and boarding 
houses "north of the slot" are managed and owned 
by men and women of such avaricious nature that 
they hold life cheap and gas high, and to-day the law 
is a dead letter. This practice has been the cause 
of many deaths, and the law should be impartially 
and strictly enforced. Who is it that is so lax in 
his duty toward the public that one fashionable 
house after another flagrantly breaks the law and 
boasts of it? Surely some officer of this city is re- 
sponsible for these deaths. Surely some one is cul- 
pably conniving with these proprietors of fashion- 
able boarding houses to circumvent the plain intent 
of the law. Let each one pass it up; let us finally 
get to the Mayor, and ask him, in these measures 
devised for the public's safety, to see that the Czar- 
like power given him by the charter is enforced. 

Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$7.50 per ton; half ton |4; quarter ton $2. Full weight 
guaranteed. In economy, cleanliness and heat producing 
qualities Briquettes are superior to coal. Sold only by the 
Tesla Coal Company, -jtn and Channel. 'Phone South 95. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 



Defense of Raiser WilHelm 



The editor of the News Letter regrets that the 
following letter was not accompanied by the name 
of the writer. Anonymous communications are not 
as a rule accepted. The subject matter, however, 
renders a departure, in this case, possible. However, 
the editor is not responsible for the statements of 
the contributor. 



Editor News Letter: The appearance in your paper 
last Saturday of a certain article entitled "William 
the Witless," by a certain somebody hiding his little- 
identity under the pseudonym of Bec-de-Fer, speaks 
for the free, wide-open policy of the News Letter. 
Therefore, we trust, there can be no objection to the • 
admission of an answer to the poor scurrilities of the 
aforesaid Bec-de-Fer. 

Taking for his stock of "spit-balls" the sensational 
slanders of an angered, disgruntled "Countess." pub- 
lished by a renegade German in New York, and the 
slight unpleasantness between Dewey and Dietrichs 
at Manila, this paretic peasant expectorates stream 
after stream of venomous abuse upon the German 
Kaiser, whom he evidently considers as a personal 
enemy. It has been long since we have read so dis- 
gusting a display of the inflated ignorance, the nar- 
row conceit and brutal blackguardism of the great 
American jingo. As a true American, in the name 
of true patriotism, we protest. We call for the mer- 
ciless suppression of Becs-de-Fer and those of his 
kidney, clamorous creatures who have too long 
made us ridiculous in the eyes of enlightened nations. 
How long this herd of the Know Nothings still sur- 
vives on the kindly soil of our country! 

Germany and Kaiser-baiting have been a particular 
sport of late with certain English and American 
papers. The reasons for this we need not discuss — 
they are obvious enough to all who can see beyond 
a newspaper — trade jealousies, misunderstandings, 
lying telegrams forged in London or Paris, and so 
on; but, as one interested in the good-feeling that 
should exist between these three great nations, we 
sincerely deplore it. It is, however, not the fault of 
the Germans — a kindly, peaceful people. If we have 
lost their respect and esteem it is due to our yellow 
press yelpers and the frenzied fanatics they inocu- 
late with their virus — the Becs-de-Fer. We know 
about this thing. We have studied both sides. 

We know about that Manila madness and the rab- 
ies it engendered in the minds of the mob. Now and 
then it breaks forth, as in this case. The truth of the 
matter, seen from three sides, American, German and 
Spanish, and not through the hot haze of the high- 
strung hysteria of the time, was as follows: 

Dietrichs did not "insult" the Americans, nor af- 
terwards concede to them any "omitted" form or cere- 
mony. The Germans stood firmly upon their rights 
— they were there to protect the interests of their 
countrymen from perils incident to war. After 
Dewey's cheaply-won victory over the ancient tubs 
of Spain, the victor Americans, jubilant, drunk with 
gore and overbearing, as is usual with victors, made 
themselves very disagreeable to the foreign vessels 
in the bay, particularly to the German. This was to 
have been expected from the usual American boast 
of being able to "lick anything afloat"; the everlast- 
ing "chip upon the shoulder," etc. But here Greek 
met Greek; Dietrich was not to be bullied; he acted 



within the law. Uprises on his haunches, daft and 
delirious, every howling newspaper hyena in the land, 
foaming for war with Germany — and the small rats 
and vermin of the press cease not with the cry. Is 
it a wonder that the Germans have lost their liking 
for us, that they are "a nation that does not love 
us?" There is just reason for that; we have met 
their kindly courtesies and international tenders of 
friendship with the most ill-bred ruffianism and the 
outrageous sneers of our delectable journals. We 
tolerate our unutterable Becs-de-Fer when they 
mount upon their hind legs, and, waving great lengths 
of ear, give vent to their brays and battle-yawps! 
Let us be fair, let us divest ourselves of provincial- 
ism ; let us be just ; let us be Americans. We can- 
not afford to despise the good opinion of Germany, 
that land that has given us so great and so good a 
part of our own blood. 

Our foaming friend's idea of Dewey's administer- 
ing a thrashing to the Germans at Manila arouses a 
pitying smile. There we have the jingo in all his 
hideousness, his base and brainless belief that other 
nations would calmly allow themselves to be whipped 
for the increase of his glory. Does this festive tooth- 
Tartar think that in the unfortunate event of a bat- 
tle between the American and German ships that 
Dewey would have got off so easily, if at all, as with 
the degenerate sons of Spain in their helpless hulks? 
Does he think that the Germans shot their guns 
with apple-dumplings or cabbages — or heads of Becs- 
de-Fer? Does he think that, like the poor Spaniards, 
they cannot shoot straight? Does he know that the 
German navy is as good and as large as ours, and 
that, despite jingo belief, its men are better? Does 
he know that our ships are manned by the depraved 
and vice-eaten riff-raff of all nations, who desert by 
scores at every opportunity? Does he know, on the 
contrary, that the German vessels are manned by 
clean, sturdy, healthy and patriotic sons of the 
Fatherland, trained and inured to the sea from early 
boyhood, with true German thoroughness? But 
why speak of thinking and knowing with this fine 
specimen of the genus jingo? 

It is tough truth, but in every port of the world 
the American sailor has the bad name of a bluster- 
ing rowdy and ruffian. As for Teuton fighting quali- 
ties, the last great modern war, we believe, is not 
forgotten, when German arms triumphed so com- 
pletely over the greatest military nation of that time 
— France. We rejoice that both Dewey and Die- 
trichs controlled their tempers; yet, had they not, an 
impartial critic could not but have held the outcome 
doubtful. 

As for the launching of his hinder hoofs at the 
Kaiser, that, too, would cause a contemptuous smile, 
were it not so sad a sign of the dense prejudice and 
infantile ignorance concerning the personality of that 
much-misunderstood monarch. A monarch who. 
says Ray Stannard Baker fa real American) in his 
"Seen in Germany," "is not only a great king but a 
great man." We might cite Poultney Bigelow, or 
other Americans who have left their native ant-hills 
and come in contact with this wonderful and versatile 
ruler, or whose education extends to a knowledge of 
the German tongue. 

The reference to scandals in the Emperor's house- 
hold, to his designs on Cuba, etc., read like the maun- 



January 30, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






dermis of a feeble-minded Maun, The inti | 
purity of the K tic life caun.it ). 

with truth; it i> t'>o well-known; it 1- the 
wholesome life of the true German family. Wil 
helm the Second is indubitably a genius among kings 
— he is truly the father of his people, and hia 
sympathies, his culture, his I keen intellect. 

ispirations, hut above all the tremendous per 
SOnal example of the man. have done more to make 
modern Germany the great nation it lias become, 
than the influence of any other man save that of the 
Titan — Bismarck! It is not too late to recall tin- 
snapping, snarling things that were wont to dart and 
dash about the feet of that great man. as now the) 
spit and snap around the heels of Wilhelm. 

We hold it the duty of every one who knows bet 
ter, of every American worthy the name, to let in 
the light, to suppress, where possible, "this coward 
brood who mangle as they prey" — who villify the 
great ones of the earth and engender animosities and 
hide their craven heads behind a Gallic pseudonym. 
Bec-de-Fer ! We suggest that henceforth our furi- 
ous maligner call himself P.ec-de-Gaz, if he knows 
what that means in French. Excepting its allusion to 
light, it would indeed be appropriate. We delight in 
pricking these gas-bubbles, in destroying their bad 
odors of ignorance and tribal intolerance; it is a 
duty, a delight. 

Let us clear away this rubbish and have air for a 
free breath or two. Let us reach out and rescue our- 
selves from the horrible brain disease of Bec-de-Fer, 
from provincialism, hatred and intolerance. 

— A Countryman of Bec-de-Fer. 






Mr. George A. Newhall's report to the Chamber of 
Commerce, as President of that institution, has been 
rendered. It is a long, interesting and exhaustive 
document. Mr. Newhall does not give himself due 
credit for many of the achievements of the Chamber 
of Commerce. Among the many benefits accruing 
to San Francisco through his efforts individually, 
may be mentioned the retention of the transport ser- 
vice for the United States Government, the decision 
to build a new customs house, and the agitation in 
favor of a merchant marine. Mr. Newhall is the 
style of citizen who is a benefit to the community, 
and his example, in strenuous public effort, should 
result in other men attempting the same course in 
public affairs. There are too few really good men 
who concern themselves seriously with affairs muni- 
cipal. 

Statements have been published that H. Lorent- 
zen, who has a concession from the Harbor Commis- 
sioners for a public scales at Filbert street wharf, is 
in collusion with others for the purpose of graft. Mr. 
Lorentzen says no one is interested with him in the 
weighing on the city front. He pays $20 per month 
rent for space scales occupy, and all the business done 
on the scales is obtained through personal solicita- 
tion. He does not divide the receipts with Speai or 
McKenzie. It costs $100 per month for a clerk to 
attend the scales, while Mr. Lorentzen is out hust- 
ling for orders. The average weighing done over 
the scales when foreign shipping is moving averages 
ioo tons per day, so that a fair living is about all they 
produce. Mr. Lorentzen is a well known politician. 

To those of us "who know," the following story 
is the howlingest joke of the year: "Strange," said 
Senator Foraker to Senator Lodge in the lobby Mon- 
day, "strange how sensitive Morgan is about the 
Panama ditch." "Yes, very. He couldn't be more 
so if it were his own alimentary canal." 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 




The Macmillan Company will 
The Dynasts, bring out next week the first part 

of Mr. Thomas Hardy's dramatic 
triology upon the career of Napoleon. This volume 
begins with the threatened invasion of England, and 
ends with the deaths of Nelson and Pitt, and the 
triumph of Napoleon at Austerlitz. The second part 
will cover the zenith of Napoleon's power; and the 
third his decline with the restoration of the old dy- 
nasty. The English papers have had much to say 
upon this ambitious drama, with its formidable cata- 
logue of 19 acts, 130 scenes, and a cast of historical 
characters too numerous to mention. The deep 
thought, the patient research, the dignity and power 
of the Dynasts will appeal to those readers who have' 
a natural love for the philosophy of history and a 
genuine interest in the great Frenchman's meteoric 
career, but it is too profoundly metaphysical to be 
generally popular, or to lend itself, even in a modified 
form, to stage production. Indeed, the author ex- 
pressly states that it is intended simply for "mental 
performance." Nevertheless, there are passages 
which might be rendered with fine oratorical effect. 
Such, for instance, is Pitt's soliloquy after the news 
of Austerlitz : 

"Defeated — the Allies — quite overthrown 
At Austerlitz — last week." — Where's Austerlitz? 
— But what avails it where the place is now ; 
What corpse is curious on the longitude 
And situation of his cemetery ! . . . 
The Austrians and the Russians overcome, 
That vast adventuring army is set free 
To bend unhindered strength against our shores . . . 
So do my plans through all these plodding years 
Announce them built in vain ! 
His heel on Europe, monarchies in chains 
To France, I am as though I had not been ! 
***** 

Roll up that map ! 'Twill not be needed now 
These ten years. Realms, laws, peoples, dynasties, 
Are churning to a pulp within the maw 
Of empire-making, Lust and personal Gain !" 

"The Dynasts," by Thomas Hardy. Macmillan 
Company, Publishers. 

Although Macaulay, in his re- 
Fanny Burney. view of the "Diary and Letters 
of Madame D'Arblay," left 
comparatively little for the gleaners who came after 
him, yet Mr. Dobson's monograph, admirable in 
every respect, gives us, surely, the last word upon 
the subject, while at the same time it demonstrates 
the excellence of the great essayist. 

It is for what she represents, more than for herself, 
that Fanny Burney deserves a lasting place in the 
muster-role of English letters. So well does Mr. 
Dobson tell his story that we can see the book grow 
under our eyes, and the career of its author unfold 
before us like the plot of a well-thought-out novel. 
"Evelina" is a novel that will never grow old, so 
vitally does it touch upon the clash of classes, and 
so keen is its satire upon those who try to shine in 
the social variety show in inverse ratio to their abil- 
ity to do so. But whether the reader is attracted or 
not by "Evelina," he will delight in Mr. Dobson's 
monograph, for its own sake, and will thoroughly en- 
joy Mr. Hugh Thomson's illustrations in this hand- 
some edition. 

"Evelina," by Fanny Burney. With an introduc- 



tion by Austin Dobson, and illustrations by Hugh 
Thomson. Macmillan Company, Publisher. 



"The Mother of Washington," by Mrs. Roger A. 
Pryor, is a beautifully written and magnificently- 
bound volume. It tells the story of life in colonial 
and revolutionary times in an entrancing manner. 
There are numerous pictures not before published 
and the reading is exhaustive, well written and in- 
teresting withal. 

The Macmillan Co., New York. $2.50. 

"Character: A Model Text Book" is a compilation 
of epigrammatic inanities. It is intended "For the 
use of preachers, Sunday School teachers, parents 
and teachers in training youth in the principles of 
conduct. Also for the use of young people them- 
selves in acquiring a comprehensive basis for true 
living." The publisher says: "It will be impossible 
for any boy or girl who studies this book understand- 
ingly to become a bad man or woman, although they 
may not become great." There is a danger, however, 
that the reader may make a sudden break for an in- 
sane asylum after reading three or four pages, and 
the author and publisher should be restrained by the 
courts. 

Hinds & Noble, New York. $1.50. 



"What is a Kindergarten," by George Hansen, is 
a brochure which explains the idea of the modern 
school for "littlest tots." He calls it "the battlefield 
of man" and "the underground of patriotism." The 
book is a thorough study and should be of interest 
to all mothers and to all teachers. 

D. P. Elder and Morgan Shepard. 



The reviewer is in receipt of a leaflet, author's 
copy, "Poems of Joy," by Alice Kingsbury Crolev. 
The outer cover bears the title "Crickets Chirping'." 
It is a delightful little volume of verse, and should 
meet with a ready sale. It is published bv the Owl 
Press, San Francisco, and is dedicated to Ina D. 
Coolbrith. 



. Bibliographists will be especially interested in the 
reprint of a medieval romance, "The History of Oli- 
ver and Arthur," in a quato edition of 300 numbered 
copies by Houghton, MifHin & Co. (Special Riverside 
Press series.) The translation by William Leigh- 
ton and Eliza Barrett is made from a rare German 
version of the early sixteenth century, which was 
made from the old French, and that in turn from the 
Latin original of an earlier date. In the year 1518 a 
translation in English was printed by Wynkyn de 
Worde, but no copy has been preserved. The new 
edition follows the chief characteristics of the ori- 
ginal, being printed in double columns of black letter 
with rubrication throughout, and is illustrated with 
numerous engravings re-drawn from the old wood- 
cuts of the original. It is printed on hand-made 
paper and bound uncut, with paper label. 

Get the dust out of your carpets. But don't do it 

with a club, because it's a slow, laborious and very unsatis- 
factory way. You will find it more profitable and satisfac- 
tory to have the work done oy the Spaulding Carpet Clean- 
ing Company, 353 Tehama street. With their improved 
machinery they make an old carpet look as bright and fresh 
as a new one. 



Ladles— For a good complexion try the Post St. H 



January 30, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




i^T: 










L/car Bessie: Uhl what a week tins baa been, and 
I do not hesitate to connJe to you the iact that I am 
on the verge 01 that complete exhaustion winch the 
pursuit 01 pleasure sometimes — but not so very often 
111 San trancisco — entails. \\ e who are harden* 
tO SpeaK, have lound it difficult to keep the pace, but 
some 01 the poor little buus have lallen in the race 
and been compelled to retire lor much needed rest. 
1 he business ol tlie week began with the musicale 
at Mrs. jack Lasserlcy s on Sunday alternooii ; 1 
took 111 an hour ot it, Having hrst had a cup ot tea 
and chat with i\aie Vbornies Henry. Her leas are 
very nilornial, but extremely pleasant. Alice, who 
was there with me, went on to Airs. Harry Bates's 
tea, which she has since told me was the jolhest thing 
out — siangy, but very expressive. 1 he liender gins 
gave a lea lor Polly Mactarlane on Monday aiter- 
noon — who talks 01 going home next week. 

Next 111 line ol chanty aitairs comes the perform- 
ance at the Alhambra next Wednesday, which Mrs. 
McLalla is arranging lor the benent ot her pet naval 
club nouse at \ aliejo. 

Frances Harris s tea was the chief event of Tues- 
day alternooii, when her engagement was formally 
announced, so there is another big wedding to Iook 
forward to. Gastronomy was helped along by the 
luncheon Mrs. Gordon Blandmg gave at the Univer- 
sity Glub, and the one Mrs. Ired Tallant had for 
Elsie ; and in the evening there was something of a 
division of attraction between the hop at the Presidio 
with the new set of officers on view, and the Cole- 
man dance at Century Hall, where Christine Pome- 
roy and Lucy Coleman shared the honors. There 
were several luncheons on Wednesday, among them 
that given by Mrs. Ryland Wallace tor Alice Sulli- 
van, and Jennie Blair at the Richelieu for Gertrude 
Smith and Margaret Newhall, who seem to run in 
couples as motifs for entertainments, and later in the 
afternoon came the reception given Mrs. Taft at Cen- 
tury Hall; the J. D. Spreckels had a big dinner in 
the evening, from which the girls and their guests 
went to the Borel ball at the Palace, which was one 
of the best given this season. 

Thursday was seemingly a card day, for there were 
several parties of them, including Mrs. John Simp- 
son's, Gertrude Palmer's and the one which Bessie 
and Delia Mills gave at the Cecil for Polly Macfar- 
lane, and the pleasures of the day wound up with the 
dance at the Homer Kings. Mrs. George Pope's 
luncheon that day was for' Mrs. Peter Martin, and 
was Mrs. Pope's first appearance as a hostess this 
season. 

Mrs. Irwin's card party, which materialized yes- 
terday, was for Mrs. Pacheco, who is here on a visit 
to her daughter, Mabel Tevis, and yesterday was 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin's second at home for her new 
daughter, Mrs. Peter; there were dinners galore, 
with the Assembly dance at night for a finish, and 
to-day there are the two weddings. And just here 
let me tell you something. I think I shall soon be 
telling you of another announcement, and probably 
the wedding of one of the sweetest and best-liked of 
last year's buds; in this instance it will take her away 
from us, and army circles will be the gainers by our 
loss. 

Aunt Susie was among the elderly ladies invited 
to Mrs. Butler's card party last Friday, which she 
gave at her daughter's, (Emmf Breedon) pretty lit- 



'h- In ;.,, 1 [eights. 1 la\ e you 

has the Imelicst view of the bay from 

•■ - ' I should love to git iii them all 

l ln\ played seven-banded euchre, ami the 

prizes were quite handsome. The Wagner house "ii 

Jones street has been taken by the recently arrived 
Mr. and Mr-. Chanslor, who have decided to remain 
an 1 as Mr-. Chanslor is. I hear, fond of enter- 
taining, she will he a welcome acquisition. She gave 
a big card party this week at the Palace, where they 
are at present. Apropos of cards, they are increas- 
ing in popularity as the season draws near its close; 
among the parties on the tapis are Mrs. 1 lopkin- 
the Richelieu, two that Kate Dillon is to give on the 
third and thirteenth of February, and Mrs. Ed. 
Dimond gives one on the eleventh. There are yet 
"thers tii be announced, and when one hears of them 
one is apt tn think the cards have it, then luncheons 
pop up and seem to be in the ascendant. Among 
Milurs. Mrs. Peter Martin is in line for the usual run 
of them ; Mrs. Walter Martin has had one already for 
her sister-in-law; Mrs. Pope, also, had one for her 
sister-in-law, and Jennie Blair is to give one for her 
next Friday. 

Mrs. Casey and Kate Dillon give luncheon parties 
on the ninth and eleventh of February. Music is not 
being neglected in the crowd of other affairs, and the 
Twentieth Century Club's second concert conies off 
at Lyric Hall on the fifteenth. 

There was much disappointment felt at Secretary- 
of War Taft's decision to hurry on East and not wait 
here for the review of the troops which had been 
planned in his honor, because reviews are always 
exciting affairs, and they are so very rare hereabouts. 
Then, too, there had been several invitations to little 
luncheons and "cups of tea" at quarters in the Pre- 
sidio contingent upon the review which of course 
turned to Dead Sea fruit upon our lips when it was 
given up. Amy Long, who was at Piedmont during 
her mother's absence in Honolulu, has gone back to 
her home in Washington City, but I understand 
that both she and Colonel Long are to be here in two 
or three months on their way to a tour in the Orient 
and the Philippines. Millie Ashe Sewell is here on 
a visit to her mother, Mrs. Ashe, and is already the 
motif for entertainment. I have not seen her yet, 
but hear she is looking fine. The Hobarts are coming 
back, I hear, and it is said will soon be with us again. 

—Elsie. 



The ladies of the Commandery Euchre Club will 
give a dinner and card party at the Occidental Hotel 
on February 12th, at which they will entertain their 



SHREVE & COMPANY'S 

H STATIONERY DEPARTMENT £2 

will be opened on Monday, February 1 st. 
It will have in its work rooms complete 
facilities for the production of Fine Stationery 
in all its branches. Exclusiveness will 
characterize the products of this Department 

POST & MARKET STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 



husbands and a few other guests. The affair is in 
charge of Mrs. E. O. Rieser, the President of the 
Club, who will be assisted in receiving by Mrs. A. 
W. Scott, Mrs. A. P. Woodward. Mrs. John Bennett, 
Mrs. A. McFadyen and Mrs. C. L. Haskell. 

List of arrivals at Hotel Rafael: J. T. Bowers, 
Mrs. E. S. Ciprico, Miss F. D. Pratt. Dr. G S. Mill- 
burv and wife, L. M. Upton, Mrs. S. Phillips, Miss 
M. Phillips. Mrs. E. Bass, Mabel Bass, Mrs. E. Stark, 
Miss Stark, Dorothy Wood, Bernardine Becker, John 
Porter, wife and daughter. Miss Bool, \Y. M. Bool, 
A. L. Stearns and wife, Mrs. George Riddell, Vir- 
ginia Braston, S. 1). I'.raston, Mrs. F. P.. Cranston, 
George H. Cutts, E. Herrick Brown, W, A. Allen, 
Mrs. M. Grogan, Miss E. McGuipre, Miss M. A. Mc- 
Guire, W, A. Gates and wife, Frank R. Wehe, Henry 
Gage, N. J. Pickle. 

Edward F. Burns and family are registered at the 
Holland House, New York. 

The California State Conference of State Charities, 
and Corrections will hold its third annual session 
in San Francisco February 21st, continuing for three 
days. 

Mrs. H. N. Cook, now on a visit to the Orient, was 
in Yokohama on the ~th inst. 

It was like the gaiety of mid-summer at Hotel 
Del Monte last Friday evening, when the officers 
and their ladies of the 15th I'. S. Infantry gave a re- 
ception to Colonel Henry C. Ward and Mrs. Ward. 
The attractive halls, parlors and ballroom of the 
hotel were elaborately decorated with greens and 
the flowers that grow the year round in the sur- 
rounding grounds. The very elaborate evening 
gowns of the ladies and the striking uniforms of the 
army men combined to form a most charming spec- 
tacle. Over eightv officers were present, coming not 
only from the army barracks at Monterey, where 



Colonel Ward commands, but from all the army posts 
about San Francisco. The music was excellent and 
the special arrangements made by Manager Snell 
for the occasion were the cause of favorable com- 
ment from all guests. The affair was under the gen- 
eral direction of Captain H. A. Smith, Adjutant 15th 
Infantry. Among the officers and ladies in attend- 
ance were Colonel Henry C. Ward and Mrs. Ward, 
Colonel and Mrs. E. B. Pratt, Major and Mrs. Charles 
Lieut. St. J. Chubb, Major and Mrs. Win. Lassiter, 
Major and Airs. Van Vliet, Chaplain and Mrs. Joseph 
Clemens, Captain and Mrs. Schorffel, Captain and 
Mrs. Edward Lloyd, Captain John Cotter, Captain 
and Mrs. William N. Blow, Captain and Mrs. Willis 
Uline, Captain and Mrs. H. A. Smith, Captain and 
Mrs. William Brooke, Captain F. M. Savage, Captain 
C. H. Bridges, Captain and Mrs. T. R. Harker, Cap- 
tain Bryan Conrad, Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Johnson, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. P. Sargent, Mr. Francis McComas. 

The illuminated cover of the invitation to the 
Mardi Gras Bal Masque (at the Hopkins' Institut of 
Art on Tuesday evening, February 16th) is a dainty 
affair. It represents Art in the guise of a butterfly 
coquetting with a Pierrot. The Pierrot carries the 
tradiional guitar. The colors are a pale lavender 
and yellow. The third page gives a list of names of 
the Executive Committee, Music, Decoration, Floor 
and Reception Committees. 

The bal masque will be a magnificent array of the 
chivalry and fashion of the city. 

The S'ar Hair Remedy — best 01 all tonics and restora- 
tives. Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not 
a dye. At druggists and hair-dressers. Accept no substi- 
tute. Star Remedy Co.. 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



The "Theo" — Popular-Priced F-ench Corset. New 

Fall Models Dip Hip now on display. The D. Samuels Lace 
House Co.. Sole Agent. 



ALL DAY FOR ONE DOLLAR 

SightseeiQg in Beautiful Alameda County 

A DELIGHTFUL EXCURSION 

Including visit to flL^MEDA, HAYWflRDS, OAKLAND, BERKELEY 

and the great 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

With a Substantial Lunch at Hotel Metropole 
Special Electric Car Service. Personally Conducted 

EVERY MONDAY AND FRIDAY 

Leave Sar> Francisco, Ferry Station 9 a. m. Returning, arrive San Fran- 
cisco 5.25 p. m. Get full iQforrrjation and tickets at 613 Market Street. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



January 30. 1903. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

BRUTE FORCE IN FICTION 



ii> 1 

After reading Mr. Millard's review o! Jack Lon- 
don's last book, "The Sea W "It"." one gets the impres- 
sion thai brutality, sledge-hammer language, and ele- 
mental force, arc the characteristics one hopes and 
for in modem fiction. I» it. then, m> much 
worth while to >;ct back to primitive man? 1 >■> cen- 
turies of Hard endeavor to get away ir"in li i ill count 
for nothing? At the best lie is lure, close under t lie 
skin, ready to reveal himself in all his primeval at- 
tributes, at the first unguarded moment. Why hark 
back to the animal? Is the creature SO inviting, SO 
in his magnificent brute strength that one 
must admire, owing to the feeling of kinship overly 
strong at the moment ? 

It is conceded willingly and with enthusiasm that 
London's speech is powerful, that he goes straight 
to the point, that he deals with men and things as 
they are. Could he not give us that force, that vir- 
ility, without the brutality which seems a salient 
part? Other writers have written strong books, their 
intensity carrying one breathlessly from cover to 
cover; their strength and directness calling upon 
the keenest emotions of the reader. 

Do we want an American Zola to show us the 
unlovely side of ourselves? Granted that "women 
squealing like pigs under the butcher's knife" is 
strong, is that the kind ot strength we want that our 
fiction may be enjoyable? It is true that London's 
style has "the force and directness of Kipling's, the 
writer who never wastes a word, who gives you a 
chapter in one sentence. Kipling's strength, how- 
ever, does not degenerate with brutality. He has, 
what London has not yet developed, a saving grace 
of tenderness in the inmost soul of him, which reads 
human nature to the core. The reasons for reading 
books are many; but certainly the book has not 
failed in its mission, whether an intentional one or 
not, which leaves the reader with better courage to 
make the desperate fight between good and evil which 
most of us wage in this warring experience called 
life. Brute force does not triumph at the end; the 
man in his primitive strength falls back helpless be- 
fore the unconquered soul, whose indomitable spirit 
will not down, though body be broken. 

It were a thousand pities if the "divine spark" 
which is undoubtedly Jack London's birthright 
should be dimmed in the lower levels. His strength, 
directness and purity of style will avail him nothing 
later on unless he finds the heart that beats in the 
midst of humanity. The analysts, who dissect one's 
innermost emotions and pry into the thoughts which 
might have been thought, are not the writers who 
appeal to full-lived men and women. They write 
for the introspectives, the motive-seekers, whose 
blood runs thin and cold in their veins. 

Books have been written, and Gilbert Parker's 
"Right of Way" is one, where the interest holds to 
the last page. The desired qualifications are there, 
strength, directness, and more than all, a knowledge 
of the weakness and aspiration, the despair and hope 
of a man's soul, which catches at one's heart-strings 
and brings the tribute of a sigh and wish for some- 
thing better in one's own ongoing. 

Here is a man deliberately throwing away his 
soul, and then, given the chance, of fighting des- 
perately against overwhelming odds to regain it. 
He comes from the battle broken and shattered, but 
triumphant, though victory is dearly won, and no 
reward follows. With such a book, the "red blood" 



'.. opportunity to (brill. bu( beyond 

stimulus which conns from following 

fellow -being through the storm 

ami si ntl) human to be 

find tin' right thing ami hold fast to i(, 

to iace the "bludgeoning* of chance," and not to 

Mini linn against all opposition, is to 
strength and force which is the best of in- 
centives. It is a courage far greater than the brute 
we are told is so admirable, and the man who 

1^ close to the animal shows us no way out of 
ditious with which we in.'i\ be hopelessly struggling. 
The book which comes closest to us. thrill or no thrill, 
is the one which shows- human nature as it is, and 
following the showing, points a Way and gives an 
impetus to our own aspirations and the dire endeavor 
of daily life. 




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OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 

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OEORuE WARREN HOOPER, Lessee. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Poor San Francisco made her prayer, 

With a diffident, tremulous sigh, 
To a man who had promised to treat her fair, 
A big, dark man whom she called her Mayor, 
But he answered her plea with a vacant stare, 

And he winked the other eye. 

Oh, the years we waste and the tears we waste, 

And the excellent things we planned, 
Belong to the trickster who knew how to lie, 
And now we knew that he knew how to lie, 
And we thoroughly understand. 

The case of Attorney Hanlon, against whom one of 
the morning papers brought wrongful accusations, 
is a welcome variation of our usual lorensic proceed- 
ings. The attorney is vindicated (that is very good 
news) for most of them are badly in need of vindica- 
tion ; the yellow press is sufficiently condemned — 
confusion to the yellow press! But Judge Troutt, 
delightful, urbane, rhetorical Judge Troutt! He may 
be a little shaky on probate, but in smooth oratory 
of the later classical or post-Ciceronian variety he 
has "few peers and no equals," as the Irish toast- 
master said of the late General Barnes. "Your re- 
spect for the honorable profession to which you be- 
long, your respect for the Courts of Justice, as well 
as your innate moral sense, would restrain you from 
violating the solemn obligation you assumed when 
you were admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court 
of our State many years ago," said Judge Troutt, 
and he never winked once. 

One Gratiano managed to get himself shot in Oak- 
land last week, and ended his life miserably in the 
Fabiola Hospital. Gratiano managed very badly. He 
should not have had the bad taste to possess a name 
of such merry significance if he could not make bet- 
ter use of it. A Gratiano dead and in Oakland. Why, 
the thing is absurd. He should be alive, fat, with 
creases of good humor in his cheeks. As well talk 
of a thin, teetotal Falstaff as of a dead Gratiano. It 
is an absurdity, a travesty not to be tolerated, and 
the Health Officer should be enjoined from signing a 
death certificate under that name. 

Why should a professor of mechanics receive any 
more consideration than other people, and why 
should the President of the State University inter- 
fere and save a member of the faculty from the pun- 
ishment which he would have had to undergo had 
he been merely an ordinary person? These questions, 
which are agitating the public mind at Berkeley, are 
not capable of a satisfactory answer. It appears to 
be another case of gross favoritism. If Professor 
Wright had not commonsense enough not to practice 
shooting in such close proximity to the college 
grounds, a little education will do him no harm in 
spite of his training as a specialist in mechanics. How 
unfortunate it is that the present regime at the Uni- 
versity should always give the impression that there 
is one sauce for the goose and another for the gan- 
der? 

So vermilion is to be the color of the buildings at 
Berkeley. It is a good idea. The place needs lots 
of blushing for, and as the President won't do it, it 
is just as well that the buildings should. 



January 30, 1903. 

High doings in the Oakland literary set engage the 
attention of the public nowadays. Herman Whitaker 
has managed to get himself arrested for carrying 
concealed weapons, and his case furnishes a beautiful 
example of the consistency of the local police. The 
road which Whitaker had traveled is notorious for 
the number of violent attacks made on pedestrians; 
in fact, its reputation is so bad that the policeman 
who made the arrest declined to leave his beat to 
investigate the origin of a cry of murder which he 
had heard a few minutes before. He had no hesita- 
tion about arresting the writer, however. The moral 
appears to be that in traveling Oakland roads you 
must chose between being beaten to death and ar- 
rest. 

. .And so we are to have a combination of undertak- 
ers, grave-diggers, hack drivers, florists, and Metho- 
dist ministers, all for the purpose of putting an end 
to funerals on Sundays. A glance at this formidable 
"list of employments shows the economic importance 
of the Grim Reaper. To abolish death would, like 
the abolition of alcohol, go a long way towards up- 
setting our trade arrangements. There seems to 
be some reason in this restriction of funerals on Sun- 
days, apart from the fact that Sabbath burials tend 
to curate's sore throat. 

Why do the Presbyterians build their new 
churches to look like financial institutions? Dr. 
Hemphill's Church would make an excellent Stock 
Excnange. It has all the qualities of squareness and 
solidity which should inspire confidence. The solid- 
ity of the Doctor's discourse may be epitomized in 
the structure, but a touch, a slight touch of grace 
would not be amiss in either. The new First Presby- 
terian church at Alameda is being constructed on 
similar lines, and would pass for a substantial bank. 
It is somewhat of a pity, for we have architects cap- 
able of beautiful work. 

If ever a man deserved good luck it is George 
Sterling, and the fact that he has gained applause for 
his first volume of poems is one of those events 
which occasionally happen to brighten the gloom of 
this miserable world. He is a prince of good fellows, 
kind and modest, and possessed of genuine poetic 
force withal. It is pleasant to get away from the 
dirt and slime of our local life and find some quality 
which will give us a position in the world of men. 
If every one did as well for the State as its authors 
and artists, we should need no advertisement. 

"We are carrying out the rules of the Civil Ser- 
vice, we are striving for purity," said the genial 
Mayor, as he flung out a number of trusted old ser- 
vants of the public and thrust in his satellites. "Yes 

you are, like " said the Devil, as he looked up 

wistful and eager. Seeing how fat the Executive 
was growing, and noting regretfully the evidences 
of his robust constitution, Satan retired discomfited, 
and worked off his feelings in banking his fires. 

A diamond thief is said to be operating on the 
Oakland theatre boats. He must be a pretty bold 
sort of a thief, but I don't believe he can make any- 
thing. The Oakland theatre-goers travel in couples, 
and sit so close together that not even a pickpocket 
could get his hand between them. As for stealing a 
diamond stud out of a man's shirt bosom, that is pure 
nonsense — there is always something else in the way. 

Oakland has passed its garbage ordinance. Amid 
a scene of confusion, such as that which marked the 
entrance of Charles I into the House of Commons, 
Citizen Evans protested against the rule of stinks. 
Dornin, however, as champion of the smells, set a 
policeman on Evans, and the latter talked back. Lan- 
guage and odors alike were worthy of the occasion. 



January 30. 1903. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




«3 


How vSan Francisco Looks 

Bv F»Tr\*fc\j!d TftVtlt, To\irl«l 


to 


Me 

No. 3 









Really, don't you know, 1 am feeling finite flatt 
•od in to tell you what 1 think of San Franc 
and San Franciscans, and how they could both be 
improved, and it seems to me that every one tumbles 
over the next fellow to follow out my ideas. I don't 
think that it is so much the News Letter as it is I. 
Travers. Even the public press, vulgar as it is. has 
accepted my ideas. The better class of Americans. 
if there is such, to say nothing of the residents of 
your town, always recognize quality and follow it 
and adore it, and since 1 am the better class. I think 
I may take some credit and allow the Xews Letter a 
little, that I have started the movement for the 
beautifying of your city. As soon as I had explained 
what my ideas were as to making your city pretty, 
your people got together and held a meeting, and 
really their zeal is commendable and most highly 
praiseworthy, and if I remain here a sufficiently long 
period of time, I think I can wake you chaps up. Of 
course they will call me into their councils and I 
shall tell these advocates of a city beautiful just what 
they should do. I can"t say that I want to pose as 
a missionarv out here, but really you have so many 
untamed Ingomars in your so-called social circles 
that I am doubtful if even English Parthenia could 
tame them to the point where they would recognize 
the necessity of not wearing fair leather shoes with 
a Tuxedo coat. It is all a question of ancestry. The 
forebears tell ! I find out here amongst you folks 
scrupulous regard for the ancestry of horses and 
dogs, but when I trv to find out who is who, why, no 
one knows. You have form, books and pedigree 
books, but I failed to make one of your prominent 
bankers understand the other day the value of De- 
bretts. Of course, I know that everything out West 
is crude and new. You have no antiquities, no good 
old families, and no halls or country-seats. Ivy on 
the walls out here is as much a stranger as is a fel- 
low in decent society who eats his fish with his knife. 
By and by, if you will only settle down, I really 
think your charming women will make men out of 
you. Over in England, we say it takes four genera- 
tions to breed a gentleman. I think in my own mind, 
I do really, that you ought to do it here in two gen- 
erations. The first lot of youngsters should be learned 
that they can't eat with a knife or bite off the end of 
their soup spoon or call for champagne with the fish, 
or smoke on the streets when with ladies, or carry 
their gloves in their hands, or masticate gum in 
public, or leave the opera between acts to mingle 
the dram with the drama, or that a top hat can't be 
worn with a sack coat, and that Oxford shoes with 
ribbon bows is not the proper caper for full dress. 
That a Tuxedo coat is solely for a bachelor affair, 
and that a dress coat is imperative when you dine 
where ladies are present. That there is a holy com- 
mandment that you cannot wear jewelry with an 
evening suit any more than you could get Roger to 
give me my patent leather shoes in a squeaking con- 
dition ; that cigarettes are simply an abomination for 
the smoking room, and only about two whiffs is per- 
missible then; that scent on a man is unpardonable, 
and that the odoriferous effect of the hired barber 
chap is disgusting. When the first lot of your young- 
sters have learned these things, they will know a 
whole lot more than their fathers do, and I think 
that they would learn the second generation. Do you 



Anil the seconders would be half decent then. 
anyhow. < >f course. I have not noted all the bad 
manners I have Been among your men. but I have 
suggested that the boy children be taught better, and 
I have noted a few of the coarsest, most obtrusive 
and anorderly, as well as the most common, breaches. 
The really finer manners of my class can only be 
acquired after a long association with well-bred per- 
sonages. I think you are a hopeless mess in this 
respect. You are too old to learn, don't you know ! 
And I can't learn the whole lot of you, anywav. 
I am charmed with your San Francisco women. They 
are far ahead of your men in style and manners, and 
I am really half afraid of some of them, but the ques- 
tion of ancestry would save me anyway, and if I 
married an American, my ancestry would cut me off 
with a shilling. No, nothing serious, don't you know, 
in the matrimonial line about Travers. 



In decorating t he home or church for a wedding for dinners, lun- 
cheon or receptions the three ladies composing the film of Manning's, 
decorators and florists, 2Jfi Stockton St. show the greatest originality 
1 n their artistic work. 



The latest style in shirts may be found at John W. Carmany's 
Chronicle Building. 




CUCQJ70T! 

the best" 



yellow Label 



BRVT 
Gold Label 



v5an Francwco, Cal. 



»«>»»»•«•♦• »•»•»•)♦»♦• 



I California Safe 

♦ 

Deposit aod 
\ Trnst Co. 



♦ 

? Corner 

? California & Montgomery 

t Streets 

* San Francisco, Cal* 



*>*»«i>*-* *i«ia\i 

Capital & Surplus $1,233,723.76 



6,914,424.69 



Interest paid on depoBltn, subject 
to check, at the rate of two 
per cent, per annum. 

Interest paid on savings deposits 
at tbe rate of three and six- 
tenths per cent, per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are author- 
ized to act as the guardian of 
' estates and the executor of 
wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented at 86 
per annum and upwards. 



J. Dalzell Brown. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 




A TRUSTY TIP ON THINGS THEATRICAL. 

ALCAZAR— The Masqueraders. A splendid show. 

CENTRAL— Quo Vadis. Good scenic effects. 

FISCHER'S— The Beauty Shop. Continued success. 

GRAND— David Harum. Quaint, pleasing. 

ORPHEUM— Vaudeville. Strong program. 

TIVOLI— When Johnny Comes Marching Home. Excellent. 

COLUMBIA— A Chinese Honeymoon. Enjoyable. 

LYRIC BALL— Bivela's Band. Good music. 

CALIFORNIA-Eternal City. Fine production. 

CHUTES-Vaudeville. Excellent. 



At the Columbia, the "Chinese Honeymoon" is 
having a good run. The music has been likened to 
that of a three-ringed circus, and it is presumed that 
the author intended to be heard in all parts of the 
house. The loudness of the orchestration makes it 
necessary for the vocalists to strain themselves to 
be heard. Occasionally one of them gets the best 
of the orchestra. This must, under the circumstances, 
be a source of great satisfaction to the entire com- 
pany. Fi Fi, the diminutive waitress at the hotel, 
is the life of the show. Mr. W. H. Clark (the Em- 
peror Hang-Chow) has a voice in keeping with his 
stature. It is a cross between a megaphone and the 
baser notes of a syren. The stage setting is fine, 
and the Chinese elements in this plav lend themselves 
very happily to beautiful effects. The "Samuel Pine- 
apple" of Mr. Henshaw is good. 

"The Masqueraders," as given by the Alcazar Com- 
pany, is the strongest piece of acting in the city this 
week. The first and second acts lead up to the cli- 
max in the third, and the fourth is an anti-climax. The 
third act is tremendous in power. The play is one 
that makes for good moral tone, and there is just 
enough of the salacious in the dialogue to give zest 
to the performance. I have rarely seen anything bet- 
ter than the scene between David Remon, Sir Bricc 
and Dulcie Larondie. Volley after volley of applause 
greeted this gifted trio, and it was well deserved 
praise. Harrv Hilliard's "Montague I.ushington," 
a most difficult part, was well carried. In the part 
of Eddie Remon, Mr. Maher showed a wonderful 
faculty for character work. Mr. Maher is a constant 
surprise. He is most versatile. The work of Miss 
Block (Dulcie) wdiere she arraigns the immorality of 
man, is a piece of sustained emotional acting that 
stamps her as a star of the first magnitude. Tn the 
last act (which, by the way, is an incongruous end) 
Mr. Durkin falls a little short of the character. He 
is slightly too lachrvmose. This should not be sub- 
ject to great criticism, as the part calls for unusual 
emotional power and it is doubtful if the lines will 
permit any other construction. 

* * * 

David Rossi's dramatization of Mr. Hall Caine's 
"The Eternal City" is the go at the California. Any 
of the Liebler productions may be depended upon 
as first class. It is a pity, however, that the stage 
limitations are such that this play cannot be given 
better setting. The California is a poor place for a 
good show. 

* * * 

"The Beauty Shop" continues a prime favorite at 
Fischer's Opera House. Miss Helen Russell's sing- 
ing is appreciated by the large audiences. Peachey 
is singing into popularity, and Georgia O'Ramey is 
a great favorite. This little girl is very clever. Allan 



Curtis's enunciation is improving, and it is hoped 
that by 1905 he will be able to speak plainly enough 
to be heard in the fifth row, back. Kolb'and Dill 
continue to excite the risibilities of enthusiastic au- 
diences. It occurs to me that it is a mistake to sub- 
stitute a new play for "The Beauty Shop" while it 
is still enjoying such prosperity. 

* * # 

"David Harum" and its quaintness as a story or 
play, still holds large audiences at the Grand Opera 
House. While this play is not given witli much ar- 
tistic finish, yet it is most enjoyable, and Mr. X. H. 
Turner is a conscientious, painstaking actor. 

At the Orpheum, the Rays, Johnny and Emma, 
are easily the king-pins. They hold their friends, and 
are making new ones daily. There is a roar of laugh- 
ter from first to last. The rest of the company is a 
fine one and very evenly balanced. 

* * * 

Rivelas Band at Lyric Hall should draw a large 
crowd to-night. The Sextette renders Lucia in a 
fine verve, eliciting salvos of applause. San Fran- 
cisco has an unusual opportunity of showing its ap- 
preciation of fine musical talent. Rivela was formerly 
Ellery's leader, and has culled the best of talent from 
the aggregation formerly under Ellerv. 

* * * 

Johnny keeps right on marching at the Tivoli with 
no abatement in popularity. The house is crowded 
nightly, and there is the usual enthusiastic audience 
to welcome Hartman and the rest. 

* * * 

Wiltqn Lackaye has scored an enormous success 
with "The Pit" in Chicago. The receipts at the Gar- 
rick Theatre have averaged over $1300 a performance 
and the length of the engagement has been extended 
from the four weeks originally booked to nine. Wil- 
liam A. Brady will form a second company to tour 
other large cities, while Mr. Lackaye divides his time 
between Chicago and New York. "The Pit" is com- 
ing to San Francisco. 

* * * 

Following "Quo Vadis" at the Central will come a 
revival of "East Lvnne." Herschel Mayall will have 
the part of Archibald Carlyle, George P. Webster 
will portray Sir Francis Levison, and Eugenia Thais 
Lawton will sustain the dual role of Ladv Isabel and 
Madame Vine. 

* * * 

Again the Alcazar offers a plav new to San Fran- 
cisco. The romantic comedy, "A Colonial Girl," to 
be given next week, is by Grace Livingstone Furniss 
(author of "Mrs. Tack"), and Abbey Sage Richard- 
son. It was originally played with great success at 
the Lyceum. New York, with Virginia Harned and 
E. H. Sothern as the central figures in its delightful 
love story. 

"When Johnny Comes Marching Home" will enter 
upon the fourth week of a most successful run at 
the Tivoli Opera House Monday evening. During 
the extended run of "When Johnny Comes Marching 
Home," the full strength of the Tivoli company is 
preparing for an elaborate revival of "The Gypsy 
Baron." This romantic comic opera by Johann 
Strauss will be staged in a manner hitherto unpar- 
alleled in San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 

inroe, Harry Mack and Nellie Lawi 
will reappear at the < >rpheum this comil 
They will open in their sketch entitle. I " The 

by Charles Howitz. The t\\' 
Stuart Barnes, Robertus and Wilfredo, Johnny ami 
Emma Ray, anil "Casey, the Fireman,' will com 

plcte the bill. 

* • * 

"Quo Vadis" holds the boards at the Central to 
crowded houses. The scenic effects are exceptionally 
fine. 

* * * 

(iuv Wilson and Nellie Daly-Moran promise an 
amusing comedy skit at the Chutes this coming 

week in "Who — Me?" Thej are said to he ver\ 
clever entertainers. Herein a renowned ventrilo- 
quist and mimic, will make his first appearance here, 
as will also a juvenile soprano. Florence Ray field, 
known as "the little l'atti." Mabel Lamson, the popu- 
lar contralto, will he heard in new illustrated songs, 
and Montague's Cockatoo Circus, and Koplin. Fowler 
and Koplin, society acrobats, will appear for the last 

times. 

* * * 

"Roly Poly." a new musical comedy and a satire 
on local society, is to follow "The Beauty Shop" at 
Fischer's Theatre on February 8th. It has an inter- 
esting and cleverly executed plot, with an atmosphere 
of jocality and song that drifts fro mthe race track 
and south of Market to the final act on Nob Hill. 

Joseph Arthur's latest melodrama, "Lost River,'' 
will be the programme at the Grand Opera House 
the week beginning to-morrow matinee. 

* * * 

Weber and Fields and their entire New York com- 
pany, which includes Lillian Russell, Ross and Fen- 
ton, Louis Mann, Peter F. Dailey, will commence a 
two weeks' season Monday night February 8th. Dur- 
ing this engagement there will be Sunday night per- 
formances and Wednesday and Saturday matinees. 
The prices will be $2, $1.50, $1, 75 cents and 50 cents. 

* * * 

The next Columbia attraction will attract much 
attention, as it is a joint starring engagement of 
Louis James and Frederick Warde. These welcome 
players will appear in an enirely new vehicle under 
the title of "Alexander the Great." It is a spectacu- 
lar drama, and six massive scenes are utilized as 
settings for this story culled from the history of an- 
cient Babylonia. 

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT. 
Mr. Paul Gerson begs to state that in response to 
numerous requests he will on January 1st open a 
Juvenile Department in connection with his School 
of Acting, and has secured the services of a teacher 
of experience specially qualified for this work, Miss 
Lillian E. Muscio. One of the features of the depart- 
ment will be a dancing class in charge of Signora 
Matildita. In order that each one may have his or 
or address the Juvenile Department of the Paul Ger- 
her proper time and attention, the class will be lim- 
ited to twenty-five. M'r. Gerson will give his per- 
sonal attention to every pupil. For terms, etc., call 
son School of Acting, Native Sons' building, 414 
Mason street. The fourth of the series of matinee 
performances by students at Paul Gerson's School 
of Acting will take place at the California Theatre 
on Friday afternoon, February 12th. A brilliant pro- 
gramme will be presented. The school will be as- 
sisted by the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, 
this institution hereafter joining its artistic interests 
with the School of Acting. 



»S 



Grand Opera h|ouse 



Intra Mum* t'lli 

LO~>T K.V/ER 

tttv ..f fifty Twn.'nrlon-i 

-■ maki "iiiy. bsclantni 

WtBER & FIELDS 
An.i ihalrantlre Hew Y.rk Company. 



Fischer's Theatre 



*th and laal weak i-.-irinniriK n»>xt Monday. Ooold run for a rani 
so emit n hit has baen made bf 

THE BEAUTY SHOP 

But for tin* tit-w law. standing i" mm would be bJ ;i premiam< 
Beyond dnubl the bout musical comedy ever presented upon any 
stage In "Frisco " Change ol ^■•\\u> and spool a' ties every Mon- 
day night 'lurinji 1 he run <>ur remarkable "Ail st;ir" oast 
Nexl sensation "U< >LY l'< >LY" with tin- first appearance ..r 
KISS mi III. I YHOH 

Hatlnees Saturday Bad Sunday. 



Columbia Theatre. 



CoTTLitH. Makx a Co, 

Li\i**"c§ and Manager!. 

Tonight, Sunday night and all next weak. Matinee Saturdays 
only. The International mnstaal comedy triumph 

A CHINESE HONEYMOON 

Company or 100. 

Feb. 8.-J AMES and WARDE in 

ALEXANDER THE GREAT 



OrTlhPH 1 YT\ San Fraoclsco'eGrcaTost MupIc Halt 



Farrcll St.. betwcua Siockluu unit Towcll street*. 
Week commencing Sunday Matinee. Jan. 81 

A BOUMTEOUS BILL 

Monroe, Mack and Lawrence; The Two Silvas; Stuart 
Barnes: Robertus and Wilfredo; Cordua and Maud: Duffy. 
Sawtelle and Duffy; Holden and Florence; Orpheum Motion 
Pictures and last week of 

cJOHNNY and EMMA RAY 

Prices, loc. 25c and 50c- 

Matinees every Wednesday. Thursday. Saturday and Sunday. 



Cent 



ml TH*=»ri+r*=» Belasco & Mayer, Proprietors 
I 1 NcULrc. Market St. near Eighth-Tel. 8outh 533 
Week of Monday, February 1st 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
The matchless emotional drama 

EAST LYNNE 
Prices— Evenings 10 to 50c Matinees 10, 15, 26c- 
Week of Feb. 8. IN SIGHT OF ST. PAUL'S. 

AlroTdi- TKci/-tt- vd Belasco & Mayer, Proprietors 

MlCaZar ineutre e. D. Pmce. Gen'l. Mgr. Tel. Alcazar 

Regular matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

One week commencing Monday Feb. 1, 

First San Fruncisco production of 

A COLONIAL GIRL 

As originally played by "Virginia Harned and E. H. Sothern 

"The Alcazar is presenting splendid plays in rapid succession." 

—Post 

Evenings 25 to 75c Saturday and Sunday Matinees 15 to 50c 

Mon. 8-Broadhurst's famous farce THE WRONG MR. WRIGHT 

Firsttime by a stock company 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. 0ornerEd fc d streets 

Matinees every Saturday. Beginning Monday Feb. 1. 
Fourth week of the phenomenal success 

WHEN cJOHNNY GOMES MARCHING 

HOME 

A three act military comic opera by Stanislaus Stange and 
Julian Edwards. Secure seats in advance. Next 

THE GYPSY BARON 

Usual popular prices— 25c, 50c, 75c Box Seats, $1. 



fifter the Theater 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Ztnkand Is society's gathering place after 
the theatre Is over. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 




Emile Bruguiere is a militant knight. A wanderer 
from Germany casts a too-admiring- glance upon his 
lady love, and — smash ! — another haughty foreigner 
has been rolled in the dust. Whether the result will 
be an exchange of cards and a meeting in the early 
morn beneath the cypress trees, remains for time 
to develop. Bruguiere's action is of course highly 
justifiable. Any man who looks too long or with too 
much open admiration upon what is another's is apt 
to get into trouble. Especially is this so at Mon- 
terey, where everything should be done with so much 
circumspection. 

And as for Miss Shortridge, only the greatest sym-- 
pathy can be expressed. Some unkind people — there 
are always the envious ones — have said they think 
she purposely egged on the row, so that she might 
be able to be in the reflection fr(5m the lime-light. 
Such a thought is unkind and unchivalrous. More- 
over, it is so much the opposite of the inclinations 
of those who have heretofore made famous the young 
lady's family name that it is, of course, unworthy 
even a passing thought. The marriage of Mr. Bru- 
guiere and Miss Shortridge, it is now said, will be 
celebrated at an early date. 

The young man is a very talented fellow. He will 
have a comfortable fortune, even if he is not inter- 
ested in the hotel St. Francis, as was reported. Bru- 
guiere's money comes from his mother's interest in 
the Sather estate. She was a daughter of Pedar 
Sather, the banker. 

* * * 

No one has expressed particular surprise over the 
discovery that Lunstedt, Grand Secretary of the 
Native Sons, is a defaulter. His defalcation was in 
the very nature of things. He was repeatedly re- 
elected to office ; he kept his end up among the boys, 
and thereby spent more than he could afford; he 
was a good fellow to country members, and he was 
endowed by nature with a very weak character. No 
one ever thought of subjecting his accounts to rigid 
scrutiny, and he was enabled to continue his thefls 
undiscovered for years. The trouble with manj' fra- 
ternal societies is that they seem to consider it a 
reflection upon a financial officer to expert his books. 
The way to crime is made easy, so that the de- 
faulter's tender feelings may not be hurt. Of course, 
Lundstedt will not be prosecuted, and thereby an 
additional premium will be placed on defalcation. I 
wonder if the Native Sons will risk hurting the 
haughty financial honor of other fiduciary agents, and 
will actually insist on balancing their accounts? If 
anything wrong is discovered, "mum" will be the 
word. 

The Lundstedt affair is so similar to McKowen's 
and McKowen's was so similar to Widber's, and his 
was so similar to Billy Vice's, and his was so similar 
to Billy White's of the Board of Works, one could 
but string out the names of the town's defaulters 
until a column was filled. All of them were "good 
fellows"; all of them went the pace; in every instance 
they were implicitly trusted ; and in every instance, 
also, the very last men to suspect them were those 
from whom they stole. In all of these instances, also, 
it was shown that the defaulters had followed the 
very same plan. They kept false accounts, made 
forced balances, and thus imposed upon those who 



were supposed to watch them. Their books were 
experted in perfunctory fashion, and it was not until 
long continued escape from discovery had made them 
careless that they were found out. Were not their 
superiors, or the people whose duty it was to watch 
them, almost as culpable as the thieves, in making 
the thefts possible by long-continued neglect of duty 
in carelessly passing over doctored accounts, or tak- 
ing for granted what should have been proved be- 
yond peradventure? Let me give you a tip. Always 
watch the man who handles the money — particularly 

when he is a "good fellow." 
* * * 

The press reports say Livernash will hold his seat. 
That is characteristic of Livernash. He certainly 
tries to hold anything he ever gets his hands on. But 
what has become of our little Willie Wynn? He is 
said to be in Congress, representing the Fifth Dis- 
trict of California, but no one out here can prove it. 
A terrible suspicion has spread in political circles 
that old man Cannon has suppressed our little Wil- 
lie. There may be some truth in the rumor, for any- 
one who has met Wynn when his talking machinery 
was in prime condition knows that he could not be 
suppressed with anything less than a cannon. 

The Supervisors' "roast" of the Board of Health 
fell rather flat. It deserved a conservative reception. 
Law-abiding citizens will, of course, support the 
Supervisors, or other public officials, when they are 
honestly trying to prevent or undo something ille- 
gal, but the Supervisors failed to point out anything 
illegal in the actions of the Board of Health. The lat- 
ter Board acted in violation of the law in making 
some appointments but the Supervisors did not dis- 
cover the illegalities. They simply made a general, 
condemnatory statement. I wonder if it is possible 
that because Supervisor D'Ancona's mother-in-law 
lost her job as matron ; that Supervisor Payot's son- 
in-law lost his job as Sanitary Inspector ; that Super- 
visor Braunhart's protege lost his job as patrol- 
driver ; that Supervisor Alpcrs expects to get his 
brother-in-law appointed to poundmaster, and that 
Supervisor Brandenstein is in training for the office 
of Mayor — I wonder if these separations of relatives 
from the public crib really had anything at all to 
do with the righteously indignant attitude of the con- 
trolling elements in the Board? 
* * * 

Martin Egan, late of Oakland, will be heard from 
again soon. He is out in Japan or China somewhere, 



RAMSAY" 

ISLAY 
SCOTCH WHISKY 



UNEXCELLED FOR BODY AND 
FLAYOE 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Agents Pacific Coast. San Francisco, Cal. 




January 30. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



camped at ■ telegraph station, waiting for Ihini 

happen. Martin was down in Manila for 
ciatcil Press, bat was ordered to the front a- s.>..n as 
the rumors of war began to assume the tone of proh 
abilities. He should prove a valuable news -man in 
the event of hostilities. During the China-Japa 
war, Egan, who was working on a local paper, wen 
to the Orient on a venture, and sent hack some ol 
the best stuff printed about the war. Upon his re 
turn home, he went to New York, where he was 
given a splendid position with the big news company. 
Then he went to Manila to relieve a correspondent 
who fell out with the army push down there, and 
now Egan is again at the cannon's mouth. Yet it 
is said that nothing good comes out of Oakland. 

* * * 

Another man bound for China and Japan is Har- 
old Bolce, who was also a local newspaper man. His 
purpose is to discuss commercial conditions in the 
Orient for several Eastern publications. The eves 
of the world are now turned toward the great and 
mysterious East, and any man who can tell an inter- 
esting tale of that wondrous land may find a ready 
market for his wares. 

* * * 

Under the new regime, the City and County Hos- 
pital will be under the direction of an interne, electe.l 
as resident physician by the other internes. This is 
the most impracticable scheme ever devised in the 
interests of "economy." It has caused astonishment 
among the medical fraternity, and those acquainted 
with conditions at the hospital, and with the man- 
agement of large hospitals in other cities, criticise it 
as being next to criminal in the opportunities it pre- 
sents for errors that will result in the deaths of 
those unfortunates whose lives will depend upon the 
judgment of a lot of medical students. It is the duty 
of a resident physician to give personal attention to 
every case in a hospital, by directing the nurses and 
the assisting physicians to continue the course of 
treatment prescribed by the visiting chiefs. The 
"resident" is also frequently required to undertake 
capital surgical cases arising from errors of other 
doctors, or that may be brought in from the streets. 
The County Hospital receives hundreds of emer- 
gency cases every month. All these patients need 
the immediate care of competent physicians and sur- 
geons. With a competent medical man at the head 
of the institution, the unfortunates may have some 
chance for their lives. But what will happen when a 
hospital with 500 patients is absolutely controlled 
by a lot of boys just out of college, without any 
experience whatever, and who are empowered hv 
the Board of Health to elect their most popular fel- 
low as resident physician? Will physicians of any 
standing, who may assist at the hospital, submit to 
the direction of a youngster who is always overcome 
by sickness at the sight of blood, anl who loses his 
nerve when he knows he has a hard case? The sur- 
prising thing is that a man of Dr. Ward's executive 
ability should have ever consented to the new plan 
of running the hospital. But that is not the onlv 
surprising thing at the City and County Hospital. 
Elbert and McQuade are also surprises. The former 
was superintendent once before. Those who were 
forced to meet him in that caoacity have not forgot- 
ten it. In a few months, at the longest, Dr. Ward's 
Board of Health will certainlv have cause to remem- 
ber that they were responsible for reinstating^ him. 
As to McQuade! La nguage is powerless in this in- 

Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 



»7 

Mis is the most inexc pointmeat 

cbarj ■ the present administration. He was 

known f< idow an. I bodyguard of 

Martin Kelly. He deserted his old protector t" fol 
low Schmitz; nol that he loved Kelly less, bnl that 
he wanted a job more. It jv .,„ cv ,. n |, c t that Mr. 

Ward never saw McQuade. If be did. ami then » 
tor his appointment, further comment is use). 

Dollmann's Cafe, at 328 Pine street, has hern re 
• •pened by Mr. A. Dollmann. This popular place has 
been completely refitted and is hcing run in first- 
class style. It is conveniently situated, opposite the 
Stock Exchange, and enjoys the patronage of all 
lovers of good cheer. Mr. Pollinatm is a caterer of 
ability, and his main claim to popularity is the exqui- 
site knowledge of pleasing his patronage. A feature 
of the new place is a mercantile lunch served from 
1 1 a. m. to 2 p. m. Here for 25 cents one can have 
the best the market affords, including refreshment. 
In fact, a better quick lunch could not be desired. 

Pears' 

Why is Pears' Soap — the 
best in the world, the soap 
with no free alkali in it — 
sold for 15 cents a cake? 

It was made for a hos- 
pital soap in the first 
place, made by request, 
the doctors wanted a soap 
that would wash as sharp 
as any and do no harm 
to the skin. That means 
a soap all soap, with no 
free alkali in it, nothing 
but soap; there is nothing 
mysterious in it. Cost de- 
pends on quantity; quan- 
tity comes of quality. 

Sold all over tt e world. 




Hotel 
f ^Roof Belleclaire, 



Broadway & 77th St. 

NEW YORK 

Luxuriously furnished room! 
fur permanent and transient 
guests, at moderate prices. 

Orchestra of solo playorfl, 6 p. 
m. till l a. m. 

Restaurant, Palm Boom and 
Cafe gems of artistic perfection. 
Cu'elne and service really de- 
lightful. You will say bo. 

A special feature li our after 
theater suppers 

Billiard parlor for ladles Is 
another pleasant feature. 

Original with the Belleclaire Is 
the refined vaudeville every 
Thursday evening. 

Our gallery of beatlful paint- 
ings, valued at $50,000, la open 
evenings to visitors. 

Affability and courtesy guar- 
- anteed from every Belleclaire 
employo. 

Milton Roblee, Prop. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 




It is hardly correct to allude 
The Passing of to the ill-fated Whitakef 
Whitaker Wright. Wright as a "notorious pro- 
moter of wild cat enterprises" 
in connection with his tragic death in London, follow- 
ing on the heels of his conviction and sentence to 
penal servitude. "Wild catting" was a sin of his 
early life when operating in California some twentj 
years ago, at a period when the ( rolden State was just 
far enough away front the Eastern financial centers 
to afford safer opportunities for milking the public 
than it does in these days of more rapid communi- 
cation. There was nothing of the wild cat 1 rder about 
the Lakeview Consols. These Wcstralian mines were 
inordinately rich, and for years their bullion product 
was sufficient to justify the high prices which ruled 
for the shares. Where Wright and his associates 
make the mistake, ending with a smash in the market 
which enriched a bear clique and brought financial 
ruin and disgrace upon the management, was in not 
keeping as closely in touch with conditions in the 
mine as he should have done for the protection of 
himself and friends. For months before the end he 
was operating over a loaded magazine and unwit- 
tingly went to his fate. His pride doubtless kept 
him silent upon matters which would have done 
nothing to help him out, and would only have made 
him a target for the sneers of a class wdio never for- 
give some phases of the manipulator's art which, 
when ignored, lead eventually to ruin for all. swift 
and irretrievable. The break in the Lakeview Con- 
sols which demoralized the shares was brought about 
by a steady and powerful bear movement of weeks 
in duration. That Wright was the chief sufferer 
showed that he was not in the bear camp, and that 
the bear raid was successful showed that its manipu- 
lators knew more about the true condition of the 
mine than he did, until too late, and then all the 
money he and his friends could raise was insufficient 
to bolster up the concern tottering upon its Founda- 
tion. The financial frauds which are treated judi- 
cially on this side of the Atlantic, do not prevail in 
(ireat Britain, wdiere justice strikes all the harder 
when the accused belongs to a class the members of 
which are expected, from their wealth or position, to 
know more than the criminal sprung from a lower 
grade of humanity. There was something "f the 
heroic about the death of this man, dying as he did 
without a word of recommendation and with sealed 
lips in regard to matters concerning his latter day 
experiences in London, which bore so heavily against 
him. These will now lie buried in the secrecy of his 
tomb. The attempt to implicate other members of 
the directorate in criminal conduct by a portion of 
the English Radical press, can only be regarded as 
a disgraceful exhibition of a discount to the low- 
methods of pot-house politicians, which some years 
ago would have been quickly suppressed by an out- 
raged public opinion. 

The majority of the directors 
The Local Gas of the San Francisco Gas and 
Muddle. Electric Company do not like 

tiie attitude assumed by .Mr. 
Miller, who lias the laudable ambition to preside over 
the affairs of the company. We do not know Mr. 
Miller personally, bul from the fact that he at least 
can boast of an intimate acquaintance with the manu- 
facture of gas, and that his general reputation for 



business probity and experience is good, his election 
should certainly be ensured by a large majority of 
votes at the coming election; that is, if they have 
any regard for their pockets. There is every evidence 
now on hand to convince the most skeptical that 
any change in the managerial department will not 
be for the worse. After permitting the impression 
to get abroad by the publication from time to time 
in all the leading papers of the city that the Presi- 
dent's salary was $25,000 per annum, they now con- 
descend to enlighten people on the subject, to the 
effect that it is only $18,000 per annum. This reduc- 
tion in figures is satisfactory even if only in a small 
degree, being enough to keep the wolf from the door 
of the lucky incumbent. That, however, has no bear- 
ing upon the promised contest for control, and the 
hope can only be reiterated that the coining election 
will result in a sweep which will put the right men 
for once in the right place. ■ 

The Comstock Market is a 
Pine-St. Market, puzzle to dealers just now, its 

actions being diametrically op- 
posed to the news from the mines. It looks very much 
ns though the bears were being rounded up for more 
punishment, although the growling element on the 
street will escape as usual. Talk is their capital, for- 
tunately for the market, and talk is but a slow method 
of depressing prices when it is not backed by money. 
That the market is guided by a strong hand, working 
toward some definite issue, is apparent to all ac- 
quainted with the ways of old-time manipulators. 
They are evidently working some coup, encouraging 
as they are in every way bear attacks which are work- 
ing as usual into their hands, and to the injury of the 
unfortunates on the outside who swallow anything 
they hear as Gospel. Probably some light will he 
thrown upon the matter before long. During the 
week Ophir was placed again upon the list of divi- 
dend payers, after a lapse of twenty years. The 
amount paid was 25 cents per share, with more to 
hear from. 



At the annual meeting of the shareholders of the 
French Savings Bank the following officers and di- 
rectors were elected: Charles Carpy, president; A. 
Legallet, vice-president; Leon Bocqueraz, J. A. l'.er- 
gerot, J. B. Clot, J. S. Godcau, Leon Kauffman, J. J. 
Mack and A. Roose. John Ginty was elected cashier. 



At the annual meeting of the Giant Powder Com- 
pany the old officers and directors were re-elected as 
follows: C. C. Bemis, president; L. F. Monteagle. 
vice-president; C. FT. Phillips, T. B. Pheby, T. B. 
Bishop, lames Smith, and C. H. Crocker. During 
the past year twelve dividends of 50 cents per share 
were paid, amounting to $120,000. Profit and loss 



"BAB'J"' 



Epicurtan "Restaurant 
323 LARKIN STREET 



5/><? James H. Ba.bcock Centering Co. 

212.214 California St. 409 Golden Gate Ave. 



January 30. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»9 



now 

! "K profits over and above dividend! 
I feature of the n 
in the corporation's indcbtedi 



At the annual meeting of the S;i\ in tr- and I 
ty. the following officers wore elected to serve 
for the ensuing year: Arthur A. Smith, president; 
Horace Davis, vice-president; Cyrus W. Carmany, 
cashier and secretary; Edwin Bonncll, assistanl 
cashier: lames I". McGauley, auditor. Directors: 
Arthur A. Smith. Horace Davis, A. X Drown, 
E. Goodman, Willis E. Davis, Edmund C. Burr, Chas. 
K. Bishop, William B. Dunning, Vandcrlynii Stow. 



At the recent annual meeting of the shareholders, 
of the < Iceanic Steamship Company, the followin ; 
directors were elected: Claus Spreckels, J. I ». Spreck- 
els. A. B. Spreckels, Fred Tillman, Jr., W. D. K. (,il>- 

SOn, E. F. Preston and H. E. Bothin. The financial 
statement showed that the expenses for the past year 
were $228,930 in excess of the receipts. The total 
deficit now amounts to $1,734,259. 



The Bank Commissioners have called for a report 
of all the State hanks at the close of business on tl.e 
23d of January. Fifteen days are allowed in which 
to make their reports. 

DEATH OF CHARLES LYONS. 

The business community of San Francisco has suf- 
fered a distinct loss in the death of Mr. Charles Lyons 
of San Francisco. Mr. Lyons was a gentleman of 
splendid presence, and was well liked by all who had 
the advantage of his acquaintance. He was a native 
of London, and he had the cultured manner of the 
best citizens of the English capital. 

Mr. Lyons leaves a large family, and thousands of 
friends who will mourn his loss. Although sixty- 
four years old, at his demise, he had the appearance 
of a man much younger in years, and his end is 
mourned as an untimely one. 

AN OPEN SHOP. 

All fair-minded people should patronize Johnson's 
Open-Shop Restaurant (boycotted), 725 Market St. 

One of the safest and best remedies for biliousness or bilious head- 
ache, is Leipnitz Liver Regulator. It is an excel lent alterative and tonic 
to the digestive organs. For sale by Leipnitz & Co. N- E. Cor, Sutter 
and Grant Ave. 

4 1-2 Per Cent Interest Paid. 

Phoenix Savings B. & L. Association 

Pays 4 1-2 per cent interest on ordinary savings accounts, interest 
compounded semi-annually, and G per cent on term accounts of $100 or 
more, interest payable semi-annually. 

616 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Subscribed Capital M.OOO.OOO 

Paid in Capital l.ooo.con 

Guarantee Capital 2rn>,i)i:o 

Real estate loans made on improved property— Principal and interest 
■ payable in monthly installments similar to rent. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

A. A- Watkins. Vice-President W. W. Montague & Co President 

Charles R. Bishop. Vice-President Bank of California. ...Vice-President 

S. Prentiss Smith, Capitalist Treasurer 

Clarence Grange. Gen. Mgr. Equitable S- & L. Association. 

Portland Secretary and Managing Director 

Geo. C. Boardman, Mgr. jEtna Ins. Co. and Director S. F. 

Savings Union Director 

Chas. T£. Ladd. Banker, Portland, Oregon Director 

Gavin McNab, Attornev-at-law Attorney 

Walter K. Smith Cashier 



Dancing Masters 
Recommend It 

1 

\\ .\ It n, r .,.,»( 

ni»r dti 1 <ii> Into lum 

w 111 .i«. rhi 

■ 

Fur In awl R. it- 

I ' u Braun a. *'<• . ..■■■■ 

Bowdlear's Floor Wa^x 



3 MONEY 3 



Part of Mtrconi Certificates. I et Your 
Money Work for You. Marconi Certifi- 
cates Will Net You From 100 to 1000 Per 
Cent Better Results Than Any Labor of 
Yours Can Produce. 

ACT NOW— DO NOT DELAY 



Send yonroh'-i-k or iTinnt'y m-der for a.s many blocks of 90 as you 
wish i" the undersigned. No subscription for lees than lioo. Price par 
for $5.oo certificates. Tin* price may advance any day. 

The stock of the British DfarconJ Company was put ar le.oo and 

and is now sellinir at I'M nn the London stock Exchange, an adva i if 

34o per cent. The possibilities of the a,mertcan Company are much 
greater. 

Tne Marconi svstem is indorsed by such men as Andrew Carnegie 
and Thomas A. Edison, and hy the prdss of the entire world- Edison . 
Marconi and Pupiu are the Consulting Engineers of the American 
Company- 

Prospectus upon application and your correspondence solicited. 

F. P. WARD & Co., Bankers 

CROSSLEY BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Century Building, St. Louis, Mo. ; Farmers' Bank 
Building, Pittsburg, Pa. ; Land Title Building, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. ; Union Trust Building, Cincinnati, 
Ohio; Royal Insurance Building, Chicago, III. 

Correspondents — Munroe & Munroe, N. Y. 




ARE A NECESSARY FEATURE OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE 

The Otis Antomatic Electric Elevator 

is the latest development of the art of home com- 
fort. It will pay architects to investigate its 
merits before completing specifications for a 
modern house. It is operated by pressing a but- 
ton and will not respond to an interfering call. 
Correspondence invited. 

OTIS ELEVATOR. COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Department: 509-511 Howard St. 
San Francisco. 



AfiPWTSI Drop slow goods. We have the beat sellers on the 
/WJCI^l I 31 market, l'rollts immense. Sample nev, inven- 
tion. 10C Catalog free. -MONARCH V>VELT\ CO. 
Unit I!.. Commercial Bldg., Springfield, Ohio. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 30, 1903. 

BANKING. Sfc e Minister of Foreign Affairs 



Wells, Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided J$|3 ¥ 500,000 

Homer S. King, President; F. L. Llpman. Cashier; Prank B. 
King, Assistant Cashier; Jno. E. Miles, Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York; Salt Lake. Utah; Portland, Or. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General Banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

San Francisco Savinqs Union 

532 California St. cor. Webb St.. San Francisco. 

E. B POND. President: W. C. B De FREMERY. ROBERT WATT. 

Vice-Presidents; T.ovell While. Cashier: R. M. Welcb. Assist. Cashier 

Directors— E. B. Pond W. C. B. de Fremery. Henrv F. Allen. George 
C. Roardman. Jacob Barth.C.O. G. Miller, Fred H. Beaver, William 
A. Magee. Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country remit- 
tances may be scnl by Wells. Fargo A Co.. or by checks of reliable 
Parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
ank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The 
signature of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No 
charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. 

Office hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evening. 0:30 to 8. 

Deposits. December 31. 1903 t33.23-2.floa 

Guarantee Capital. Paid up 1,000,000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 699,516 

Mutual Savinas Bank „f s an Francis™, 

710 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital H.ooo.000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 500 000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President: S. G. MURPHY. Vice-Presi- 
dent: GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER. Vice- 
President; C. B. HOBSON. Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphv. John A. hooper. 
James Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McEIroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald. Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savinqs cK Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guaranteed Capital and Surplus S-M' 1 ^ "fil go 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash f.'ooo.'oOO.OO 

Deposits, Dec. 31. 1903 ,..36.049.49118 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President. Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Stelnhardt. Emll Rohte. H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. William Herr- 
mann: Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney. W. S. Goodfellow. 



Continental Building & Loan A SS oci«ion 

Established In 1S89. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California Street. San Francisco. Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $15,000,000.00 

Paid-in Capital 3,000.000.110 

Profit and Reserve Fund 450.000.00 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; Wiiilam Corbln, Secretary 
and General Manager. 



International Banking Corporatior) 

NO. 1 WALL ST., NEW YORK. 

Capital and Surplus J7.894.400 

Capital and Surplus Authorized 10,000.000.00 

OFFICERS— William L. Moyer. president: Charles D. Palmer. 
Assistant to President; William B. Wightman. Assistant to 
President; John Hubbard. Treasurer; James H. Rogers, Secre- 
tary; John B. Lee. General Manager: William H. Maclntyre, 
Assistant General Manager; Alexander & Green, Counsel. 

BRANCHES— London. San Francisco. City of. Mexico, Manila, 
Hong Kong, Yokohama, Shanghai. Singapore. 

AGENCIES — Bombay. Calcutta. Madras. Penang. Rangoon. 
Colombo. Amoy. Canton. Hankow, Tientsin, Tansui, Anping, 
Bakan, Moji, Saigon, Kobe. Bangkok. Batavla, Samarang. Sou- 
rabava. and all parts of Europe. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— 32-34 Sansome Street. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- 
tions, firms and individuals solicited. Loans made on liberal terms 
on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bought 
and sold. Travelers* and commercial letters of credit granted, 
available In any part of the world. Interest bearing certificates 
of deposit isued for fixed periods. Interest allowed to banks 
on current dally balances. Special rates given to banks keeping 
accounts with us, and drawing direct on our branches and 
agents throughout the world. 

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 
F. E. BECK. Manager. P. G. EASTWICK. JR.. Ast. Mgr 



The more recent of the foreign and domestic en- 
tanglements which our self-sufficient President has 
involved the United States are a purpose in high 
political and commercial life to enjoin the Treasury 
from paying to the alleged Republic of Panama the 
bonus of $10,000,000 on the ground that it would be 
illegal; evidence that negotiations were deliberately 
broken off with Colombia for a Panama Canal treaty 
so as to accomplish a pre-arranged scheme for the 
secession of Panama and the disruption of the Colom- 
bian Republic ; the creation of the office of Minister 
Plenipotentiary to the Republic of Panama, and the 
despatching of such representative to Panama, before 
Congress had conferred the necessary legal author- 
ity ; the setting of unlawful precedents in all direc- 
tions; the severe rebuke and vehement denuncia- 
tion of the President by Yale professors and leading 
citizens of New Haven for being false to his great 
trust and defying law and trampling upon the rights 
of the weak; the insult to the Chief Justice and Jus- 
tices of the Supreme Court by obliging them to play 
second fiddle to representatives of obscure and unin- 
fluential foreign Governments at the President's re- 
ception given in honor of the court; the order from 
the President that hereafter representatives of for- 
eign powers will be required to appear at White 
House receptions decked out in all the gold lace and 
glittering uniforms that they are permitted to wear 
by virtue of their office, and the announcement in 
spirit, if not in words, that the Constitution and laws 
of the United States were never intended to circum- 
scribe or tie the hands of a wise, brave and far-seeing 
statesman as is President Roosevelt. But these are 
not all the "strenuous" things our go-as-you-please 
Chief Executive has accomplished recently for his 
subjects abroad and at home. 
* * * 

The situation in the Far East is as dangerous to 
the peace of the nations in interest as a pine mansion 
would be with a dozen children playing with matches 
and gunpowder in the rubbish room. That war is in- 
evitable no observer of events doubts, but where the 
first shock of battle will be felt is a problem which 
may be solved at any moment. Diplomatic negotia- 
tions between Japan and Russia have reached the 
point of honest pretention of the one candidly telling 
the other that it hasn't a particle of faith in the word, 
promise or integrity of the other. And a foolish 
Russian Prince, who is in a position of official and 
social life at the Czar's court, observed some days 
ago that "it will never do to recognize Japan as a 
really civilized nation and establish corresponding 
relations with her as are maintained between the na- 
tions of Europe." This insane thrust at Japan has 
stirred all classes of Japanese to a pitch of indigna- 
tion that only war will satisfy. Meanwhile, Japan 
and Russia are rushing preparations for armed hos- 
tilities. China is exerting all her influence to post- 
pone, at least, an armed conflict until her own internal 
affairs are upon a stronger footing. However, the 
Peking Government has given Russia to understand 
that in the event of war China will immediately place 
200.000 of her best soldiers at Japan's disposal. Eng- 
land and the United States hav* assured Russia that 
they shall expect all the advantages in Manchuria 
that their treaty of commerce with China provides 
for, and the unqualified position of these two Anglo- 
Saxon nations in the premises is the one thing that 
is causing Russia to hesitate to cross swords with 
Japan. On the other hand, by accepting such a 



January 30, 1903. 



: 'c United and England recognise 

t's jurisdiction over Manchuria, but whicl 
under the jurisdiction of Ru< 

. the United States an, I Eag- 
land have pur imething o( China, l>ut which 

on ,.f Russia, lap. in 1 

rnething quite foreign to the com- 
mercial interests of the two great A n na- 
tions, but such war would, if Japan won. reinstate 
China in Manchuria, and allow' the Peking Govern- 
ment to deliver the goods to the United States and 
England as per commercial treaty. It follows, hence, 
that the sympathy, if not something far more sub- 
stantial, of America and ( ireat Britain will he found 
on Japan's side. for. and only for the reason that there 
will be •money in it" for them. It is pretty well 
understood in diplomatic circles that for the last 
month, anyway, every move of Japan had the 
approval of the Washington and London Govern- 
ments before it was made. And it is also believed 
that it is up to Russia either to fight or agree to with- 
draw from Manchuria. 

* * * 

A new issue has arisen in far Eastern affairs. Japan 
has adroitly taken possession of the Strait of Korea, 
and under more favorable circumstances the move 
would be considered a sufficient cause for a declara- 
tion of war by Russia. The Strait is so located that 
shore and island batteries will give Japan immense 
strategic advantages in a general way, and in particu- 
lar as to a long stretch of Chinese, Korean and Man- 
churian coast line; besides, with the Strait in pos- 
session, or rather commanded by Japanese guns, 
Port Arthur loses much of its offensive and defensive 
importance to Russia, to say nothing of coaling and 
commissary stations for Japan, which the Strait will 
afford close to and between the main land of China, 
Korea and Manchuria and Japan. Japan has not taken 
possession of the Strait as a temporary military 
necessity, but to hold for all time. No doubt Japan 
would not have made such a move had it not been 
secretly approved by at least China, if not by Korea 
as well, and if by Korea it becomes very clear that 
reports of Korea's hostility are put out to mislead 
Russia. In this connection it should not be forgot- 
ten that there is a racial and religious thread running 
through Japanese, Chinese and Koreans, and that 
blood is thicker than water in Asia as well as in Eu- 
rope and America. 

* * * 

Advices from the Latin American States through 
commercial avenues are not reassuring as concerns 
the future of our trade and traffic with those coun- 
tries. The bitter feeling against the United States 
which the shabby treatment of the Republic of 
Colombia by the Washington Government engen- 
dered, is growing and spreading to all classes of 
people. Even in high social life the "Yankee" feels 
a coldness and stiff politeness which is irritating, if 
nothing less. It is said that Spanish and German 
influences are adding fuel to the fire for the purpose 
of securing the commerce hitherto flowing to the 
United States. It is reported also that European 
creditors of the South and Central American Re- 
publics, as well as of commercial companies, have 
given assurance that great leniency would be ex- 
tended if the major portion of the trade interchange 
with the United States is diverted to Europe. The 
policy of the Washington Government in the Panama 
affair seems to be a breeder of anything but favor- 
able commercial relations between us and our sister 
Republics of Spanish America. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. 



31 



The San Francisco National Bank 



n« Sin . San Krai. 

w. «ui,rt, a«- 

lui an. I I i, .! ,1,, $156,000 

in 1. Willi. 1111 
intingln i. hall. Ue.irgo 

-atlonnl 
a 1 • ift mnt 

tel * to. Chicago — Continental 

r.ink Kiinaaa City— 
Dley A Co. lar.a - 
ik nf Comnj 
g Co.. Limited. 



,lank UoMon — N 

■ 
riral National Bank 

111. Ilarjes tk Co. w 

rg-Itoblnnoti South Am. an I 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated the Bank or British Columbia. 
„ ,, „ . TORONTO. 

I aid-up Capital. ».,00,000 ,-.,. F un d, J3.0O0.000 

Aggregate Resource*, over J.u.mG.OOO 

n 1- i.- ,, ! RQB * ' ux - 

u. t. walker. General Manager. Alex. Laird. Asst. Gen. Mgr. 

LONDON OFF1CE-W Lombard St.. E. C. 
00. ^ .„. x !'- w Yl, "K OFFtCE-16 Exchange Place. 
BRAN! BBS IN BRITISH Col.U.M LilA-Atlin. Cranbrook. 

tcrnie. Greenwood. Kamloops. Ladysmii.i. Nanalmo, Nelson. 

New Westminster. Vancouver and Vlctor.a. 

Also SO other branches, covering the principal points In 
IN. YUKON TERRITORY-Dawson and White UorseT 
I.N UNITE*. STATES— Portland. Seattle am, Skagway (Alaska.) 
Manitoba. N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Hank of England, the Bank of 

Scotland. Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union of London and Smiths 

Bank, Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The Northern Trust Co. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS-The Commercial National Bank. 



325 California Street. 



A. KAINS, Manager. 



uiited 



London. Paris and American Bank L|I 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000 Paid-up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund. Jl.luO.000 
Head Office— 40 Threadneedle St., London. E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager; .-. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The flnglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars. London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000.00 Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund 700, OuO 

The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

1GN. STE1NHART. P. N. LILlENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSE -o. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTORS— William Alvord. •.Villiam Babcock, Adam Grant, 
S. L. Abbott, Jr., O. D. Rclowln, F. Monteagle, Warren D. 
Clark, E. J. McCutcheon R. H. Pease. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery Bt., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, sa.ooo.ono. Paid-up Capital and Reserve. $1,725,000 
Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian or Trustee. 
Check accounts solicited Legal depository for monev iu Probate 
Court proceedings Interest paid ou Trust Deposits and Savings. In- 
vestments carciully selected- 
Officers— Frank J. Synimes, President. Horace L. Rill, Vice-Presi- 
dent; O. A. Hale. Second Vice-President; H. Brunner, Cashier. 



Sir Conan Doyle is renewing his attempt to enter 
Parliament through a Scottish constituency, having 
accepted the Unionist invitation to contest the Haw- 
ichburghs. Three years ago he tried for Edinburgh 
and was beaten — by a publisher, too. He has a stiff 
fight before him against one Thomas Shaw, a good 
scrapper. I suggest he call on Shedlock Bones and 
have him crack the combination. Conan Doyle's 
latest stories are so flat that. the infusion of politics 
might gingerize them. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 



1904 WINTON TOURING CAR 




Sample 1904 Winton just received. Orders now 
taken for two weeks' delivery on same. Several 
hundred sold last week in New York at National 
Automobile Show. Delay in placing your or- 
der means a very material delay in the receipt of 
a car. Call in and examine sample and ride in 
the foremost up-to-date American automobile. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 



901-925 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Sole agents for the following standard machines 

Olds Motor Works. 

Winton Motor Carriage Co. 

Locomobile Co., of America. 

The J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 

Baker Electric Molor Vehicle Company. 

Demmerle »V Co-— Leather Clothing 

WE ARE IN OUR NEW QUARTERS 




KNOX (Waterless) 2 Cylinder Touring Car 



We have just received our first car load of ihe 
1904 model KNOX (waterless ) Touring Cars, both single and 
double cylinder types which are now on view at our 
show rooms where we would be pleased to receive 
you and demonstrate their superior qualities and 
simplicity. 

The KNOX (waterless) GOSOLINE AUTOMOBILES are 

known the world over for their simplicity, easy 
operation, durability and easy riding We are al- 
ways glad to demonstrate the above to any one. 



THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE & MANUFACTURING CO. 

I34-M8 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE. SAN FRANCISCO. 




Bt The Autocbank 

There has been so much talk about beautifying 
San Francisco that it is time the Autocrank should 
have a word or two to say. The gentlemen who in- 
tend to improve the appearance of San Francisco 
could make a good beginning by introducing a little 
of their influence with the Board of Public Works 
and get them to pave Market street from the Ferry 
ti 1 Second street. Our main entrance to the city is 
a disgrace; with immense cobble-stones projecting 
in uneven layers, ruining many fine horses, and wear- 
ing on the axles of expensive vehicles — horseless and 
otherwise, and giving our visitor the impression, 
as he rides up Market street for the first time, that 
the whole city is in the same condition. A few dol- 
lars expended on this particular street would be 
greatly appreciated by the . down-town merchants, 
as well as by those who have the best interests of the 
city at heart, and wish our guests to attain the best 
impression possible. 

Automobiles as well as carriages are now being 
used in great numbers by sight-seers, and the routes 
covered by the chauffeurs on their "seeing San 
Francisco" trips are over certain streets and avenues. 
Invariably the visitor is taken along Golden Gate 
avenue from Market to Van Ness. In this locality, 
and even further on, the avenue is in a frightful con- 
dition. Then again out Van Ness avenue, the visitor 
is driven 'to view our grandest boulevard ; here, 
again, especially between Eddy and Geary, the ave- 
nue is simply frightful ; at the street crossings one 
is compelled to be strapped to the seat of his carriage 
or automobile to prevent being thrown out. The 
above are only three instances which 1 care to men- 
tion at this writing, but they are the most import- 
ant for the street department to consider for repairs 
— which certainly ought to be attended to immedi- 
ately ; if not for the benefit of citizens, then it should 
he done to change the impression that is being taken 
abroad by the visitors of San Francisco. 



To think that the demands for space in the enor- 
mous Madison Square Garden could not be met, at 
the greatest of all shows given to one'particular line 
of industry, seems incredible, but such was the case 
ai the big automobile show held in Xew York this 
week. Every available foot of ground in the big col- 
osseum was occupied, and the show was one of the 
grandest successes ever held in America. 

The big manufacturers could not show one-quar- 
ter of their models, and the majority less than half 
of them. 

(die hundred and eighty-five exhibitors made dis- 
plays (15 of which were foreign) showing the enor- 
mous growth of the trade in the United States. 

The attendance was the largest of its kind ever 
congregated at any exhibit given in Madison Square, 
the gate receipts far surpassing all expectation, and 
over $30,000 was taken in for rent of floor space. 

The daily press of New York devoted several pages 
daily to it. greater space even than has ever been 
given a famous horse-show, and has done everything 
possible to promote this industry. 

The big hotels of the metropolis were filled with 



January 30. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTER. 



*3 



from .ill part- ..i tl\<- couiltl 

■ 'linjj them an opportunity 
.1 machine to their likr 

iii San I ■ on a sn 

would afford the Western puhlic an op| 
nitv to become acquainted with the hoi hide 

anil undoubtedly increase the profits ol local dealers 
r cent tin- year over that ol last. 
The New Ynrk Sun. in speaking of the show, lia> 
the following to -ay : 
"Having started from 'scratch' about five years 
allowing the mechanics in other nation- of the 
world handicaps of from 1 to 4 years' prior -tart, the 
automobile industry of the United State- has quite 
caught up. It has closed all intervening gaps and i- 

DOW running with the 'leading bunch' on terms of 
even competition in the race for commercial suprem- 
acy. The fourth annual automobile show that opened 
in Madison Square Garden last night leaves no doubl 

about this. The great exhibition building is al 
most packed with big and little motor vehicles thai 
equal in up to date appearance, general st) le and fin- 
ish, the best of the foreign made cars, and that the 
American machines are the equal in efficiency ha- 
been amply demonstrated. This fact of the Ameri- 
can manufacturer having caught up with the leaders 
in the industry abroad is the most prominent, import- 
ant and interesting one. revealed by the fourth annual 
show. The American manufacturers are no longer 
at scliool in the college of the European industry — 

1903 was their senior year. The present show is their 
commencement exercise. They have learned the for- 
ign methods and the ideas that inspire them. Thev 
are employing them to a considerable extent, but 
there are abundant signs that the American industry 
has entered upon an independent career, which will 
no longer be hampered by servile imitation." 

* * * 

.Mr. Fred A. Jacobs, one of the most prominent and 
popular automobilists on the Coast, who for the past 
two years has been connected with the National Au- 
tomobile Company, has secured the exclusive agency 
for the Rambler automobile in Northern California. 
.Mr. Jacobs has leased the large building at 10th and 
Market streets, formerly occupied by Thomas H. 
I!. Varney 6k Co., and will use these handsome quar- 
ters for salesrooms and garage' of the "Rambler." 

1904 models, of the Rambler touring cars, delivery 
wagons and runabouts will be exhibited at these 
quarters on and after February 15, 1904. 




The 4-cylinder Toledo of 1904— "The Mile a Min- 
ute car." 



A large number of automobile enthusiasts took 
advantage of the nice weather last Sunday and made 
runs along the Bay. A party consisting of Mr. Rich- 
ard Mier,' Mr. J. J. Spieker, Mr. Charles C. Moore, 
Mr. E. E. Stoddard, Mr. George Cameron and Mr. 
H. B. Taylor and guests, in their Winton touring cars 



— WILL BE HERE IN A WEEK- 

THE NEW 1904— Four Cylinder 

PACKARD 

The 04 JONES CORBIN and ST. LOUIS 
TONNEAU a.e here. 



PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO. 

49 CITY HALL AVC. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



TheOldsmobile 

is Built 
on 








'J' he llrst successful automobile 
runaboui wda mode Id our'factory 
in 18HT- Building on this founda- 
ti'-n. 1 he experience of each suc- 
ceeding year has brought the Olds- 
mobile to a higher Standard bf'ex- 
cellent'e. until to-day itstands alone 
asthe world's standard runahout. 

Ask our nearest selling agent, or 
write direct for full information 
;mil booklet to Dept. ifi 

OLDS MOTOR WORKS 

DETROIT, MICH. U: S. A. 

Member Of the Association of Li- 
censed Automobile Manufacturers 
LOCAL AGENTS-PloneerAutoCo.,991 

Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 

Oldsmoblle Company, 243 West 6th St. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



rrniii 



LIKE BEING AT HOME 

The "ANONA" 

A I i si Clns> Result 



Mea's at al: hours. Peis luble 
prices. Best of Wines : nd 
Liquo's. 



MILO J. QILLETT, Prop. 

2010 SAN BEUNO AVENUE 
Tel. Cap Slid 



H 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Marsh made a trip to San Jose 
last week in their French Arrow. \\ hile this was 
largely in the nature of a trial for the new machine, 
the course was covered in an unusually short space 
of time. The return trip was made in less than 
record time, although the road was very heavy. 

On Sunday, Mr. H. C. Tilden and family joined 
a large number of automobilists with their Prencli 
Arrow, in the usual Sunday trip to San Jose. 

Mr. Thomas Magee has just brought to this city 
his French Renault Touring Car. Mr. Magee is 
one of the well-known drivers of San Francisco, but 
when he went East and took a few rides through Cen- 
tral Park and around New York City in Peter Mar- 
tin's Renault Touring Car, he immediately possessed 
himself of this fine car. The Renault has the same 
engine as the Pierce Arrow Touring Car, both manu- 
facturers purchasing their engines irom the De Dion 
people. Air. Magee will make his headquarters with 
the Mobile Carriage Company, the French automo- 
bile house on the Coast. 



Mrs. Langtry, during her stay in the city, took 
man\' automobile rides in one of the elegant gaso- 
line cars of the Mobile Carriage Company. While 
this lady appreciates speed when driving, yet she 
frequently reminded the chauffeur to "go a little 
slower, please," in viewing the sights of the Golden 
Gate. 



In a letter recently received by the Pioneer Auto- 
mobile Company from Mr. E. P. Brinegar, who re- 
cently attended the New York Automobile Show, we 
are apprised of the fact that several hundred Win- 
tons were sold at the Show during the week. Mr. 
Brinegar visited the Winton factory at Cleveland, 
on his way to New York, also the Oldsmobile fac- 
tory at Detroit, and in speaking of these plants, Mr. 
Brinegar seemed confident in the belief that the Olds- 
mobile and Winton people are in a position to make 
immediate deliveries, owing to their late improved fa- 
cilities. Mr. Brinegar expressed himself as being 
more than pleased with the appearance of the two 
new models of Oldsmobiles, which will be on exhibi- 
tion at the Pioneer Automobile Company's new gar- 
age sometime between the 1st and 15th of March. 
A new 1904 Winton Touring Car has arrived at the 
Pioneer Automobile Company's Garage, where it is 
attracting considerable attention. 

Mr. Douglas Watson, who for the past eight 
months has been running a St. Louis Runabout, has 
just purchased a new 1904 St. Louis tonneau. Mr. 
Watson stated that he is very much pleased with 
this car, having completed several successful runs 
around the Bay, and on account of its extra light 
weight and great power has decided to take i; t" 
Europe with him next month. A carload of these 
new machines has arrived here. 



The Jones-Corbin car which arrived a few days 
ago by express, has created a great deal of favorable 
comment, it being unquestionably the Frenchiest lit- 
tle car on the market. It is equipped with forwar.l 
motors and double chain drive, and other French 
features. It is said this sporty little machine has 
wonderful power, and is one of the swiftest light 
cars on the market. 



The well-known automobile experts and repairers, 
Lew T. Andrews and James Kuwan, have taken tem- 
porary quarters at 18 Fell street, phone South 394. 
They expect to have one of the best equipped repair 
shops in the West, when they are permanently lo- 



cated, and will notify the automobile public as soon 
as they are fitted up. Until then they can be found 
at the above address, and will give all work intrusted 
to them full attention. They are skilled workmen, 
and have had experience with all prominent makes 
of American and many foreign cars, and will undoubt- 
edly do well in their new venture. 

Scawksby — That's a great divorce ! Snawksby — 
What divorce? Scawksby — Why, that of Fischer's 
star, Amber, from her husband, the foot-race expert. 
Snawsby — Yes, the separation of Amber from Mere- 
Sham ! 




PIERCE ARROW TOURING CAR (French) $2,650. 

1. It has a French engine and is essentially a French car- 
ta. The manufacturer in France pays a revenue on each horse 

power of engine, conscinicntly all French engines are underated. 

The Arrow Touring Car 1C H, P. French will develop 25 H. P. 

American standard. 
3. A horse power for each 75 pounds weight. It has lightness 
and strength. Easy on tires- 

MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. San Francisco. 



Have you seen the 3ff525T" r 

BUCKBOARD? 

The talk of the town. 
Best Automobile at any 
price. 



Costs 



$425 




STRONG- EASY RIDING-RELIABLE-GUARANTEED 

ON EXHIBIT AT 

SUNSET AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1814 MARKET STREET - ■ ■ SAN FRANCISCO 




ELECTRIC and 

GASOLINE 
CARS... 



A. F. BROOKE RIDLEY, » 8 

Telephone South 394 



FELL STREET 

(Nr. U.rk.t) 



San Francisco, Cal. 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 
San Jose. 

Letcher Automobile Co.— 288 S Market street. Phone John 1661. 
Automobiles stored and repaired, expert workmanship. Gaso- 
line and oil at all hours. Santa Clara County agents for the 
U estern Automobile Company and National Automobile Com. 
pany. 



January 30, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»5 



Political 

The nominating of a Presidential candidal 
creating hut little excitement in Republican cii 

but the Democrats are excited, and warring 
though they had some chance of electing the man 
they may name, ami would all gel Cabinet positions 
result. While Hearst is getting the politicians 
in line very satisfactorily, he is having .1 hard time 
with the Labor vote, and even if he holds it until 
after the St. Louis convention, it will cost him hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars. The Engravers* and 
Printers' Unions threaten him with a strike unless 
he consents to have his comic supplement re-en- 
graved in every city in which he publishes a paper, 
and although he established the Los Angeles paper 
to help them fight Otis of the Times, they insist thai 
he shall concede their demands, which means a 1"-- 
of hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to him. If 
he abandons the supplement the unions will charge 
him with being an enemy of labor equallv as well as 
if he refuses to have it re-engraved, and Hearst, leasi 
of all the candidates for the Presidency, can afford 
to be charged with beinp- an enemy of labor, since 
his friendship for labor unionism is his sole stock 
in trade, and his only claim for being a candidate 
at all. 

* * * 

Another embarrassment is the fact that the lead- 
ers of the unions have practically unanimously re- 
fused to go into politics as a body, or in other words 
to extend the Union Labor Partv to the whole State. 
Hearst's plan was to have a State labor convention, 
I am told by one of his managers, to be held some- 
time in June, and indorse his candidacy for the 
Presidency. Such an action would, it is thought, 
force him on the Democratic party so far as Cali- 
fornia is concerned, and be a strong card to play be- 
fore the National Convention. But all the leaders 
here say very sensibly that they do not believe in 
the unions as unions getting into politics, because 
if they do it would disrupt the organization beyond 
question, and the union strength is not enough to 
accomplish anything alone, without outside aid. The 
plan of a State Hearst labor convention has there- 
fore been perforce abandoned. 

* * * 

The scandal in connection with the news-stand at 
the Ferry Building grows instead of disappears, and 
the public is now asking why the Commissioners 
do not call all bids off and ask for competitive bit's 
from any one who cares to bid? One thing is cer- 
tain, and President Charles Spear might as well un- 
derstand it now as later, that if his brother-in-law 
gets the contract under existing circumstances, the 
public will believe rightly or wrongly that he, Spear, 
is personally and financially interested in the con- 
tract. Is Spear willing to stand in that position be- 
fore the public of California? Does he want the 
Legislature to investigate the matter, as it surely 
will? Can George C. Pardee afford to have his po- 
litical manager connected with a scandal such as this 
promises to be. — Junius. 

Many Appetizing Dishes 
can be made doubly delightful and nutritious by the use 
of Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream, which is not 
only superior to raw cream, but has the merit of being 
preserved and sterilized, thus keeping perfectly for an in- 
definite period. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., proprietors. 



EDUCATIONAL. 



California School of Design 

MARK HOPKINS INSTITVTE OF ART 



DRAWING 

PAINTING 



MODELING 




DECORATIVE 

DESIGNING 



WOOD 

CAR.VING 



Da; Clma. MfW Clc 



and Satarria, Claaac* 



I "r terms and courses of Instruction apply to the Asslst- 
anl Secretary. Mark Hopkins Institute of Art, California 
and Mason sts. 



Dr. ii. J. STEWART 



TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition 
Special course for singers desiring church appointments 



Studio, 1105 Bush St. 



BEST'S ART SOfiOOL 

Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, ant" tiluitratlai 
Life classes. 13.00 per month. 

9J7 HARKET STREET 

MISS ROSE BRANDON 

478 EDDY STREET 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR STUDIO 

Finest Italian Music Direct from Italy, taught 



MIS 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 

Illustrrted Catalogue Free 



Miss Ingeborg Resch Pettersen 
Voice Production 

1111 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 

Receiving hours from 2 till 4 o'clock every day 
except Wednesdays and Saturdays. 



-^-Mothers, be Bure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing 
Syrup" for your children while teething. 



Mavis Consolidated Gold f 
and Copper Mining Co. 

Capital Stock $1,000,090. Shares 1,000,000 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of California. 

Location of works, Seneca Mining District, Yuma 
County, Arizona. 

No assessments will be levied. 

50,000 shares of stock for sale at 35 cents a share for 
development purposes. The ore in sight is practically 
unlimited. When the present issue of stock is exhausted, 
the price will be raiseu to 50 cents a share. 

Apply to the office of the company, room 205, 713 Mar- 
ket street, for prospectus, which gives full information. 
VINCENT NEALE, Secretary. 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 




Mr. Faymonville, vice-president of the Fireman's 
Fund Insurance Company, is about to leave for the 
Philippine Islands to investigate the conditions there 
from the point of view of an expert fire underwriter. 
If found favorable the Fireman's Fund will enter 
that field. 

* * * 

An item in the daily press on the question of fire 
insurance protection, but serves to call attention to 
the unreliability of the Bulletin's knowledge. The 
item is as follows: "Ex-Fire Commissioner M. H. 
Hecht has sent a communication to the Fire Super- 
visors, calling attention to what he considers one 
of the city's greatest needs — a salt water system for 
extinguishing flames. During the four years Mr. 
Hecht was on the board this was one of the things 
he continually advocated. His plan, is to have a 
pumping station at the foot of Market street, with 
mains running up that thoroughfare for ten or twelve 
blocks. Cross pipes could carry the water on each 
side of Market street, as nesded. Such a system 
would be inexpensive, and in time of fire would be 
a great help to the Fire Department. Were such 
a fire as the one that destroyed the Baldwin to start 
the conflagration could be easily extinguished, easily 
paying in a few minutes the cost of construction and 
operation. The water could be used for flushing the 
sewers and sprinkling the streets when not used 
for protecting property." 

This idea of using salt water or ocean water for 
fire extinguishing purposes and for flushing sewers 
and sprinkling streets has been tried so often in other 
cities that experience has condemned it as undesir- 
able. A scheme to provide a sufficient volume of 
water that is pure and not salt to fight conflagrations 
with would be endorsed by the Fire Underwriters 
to the last man. 

* * * 

Whether they would endorse a salt water scheme 
for fire protection is, in the light of past experience, 

verv dubious. 

* * * 

Salt water has the corroding elements within itself 
which destroys mains, hose and machinery, and plus 
this, will do more injury to a stock of merchandise 
by the gallon than fresh water will do by the tun. 

* * * 

After the report of Fire Marshall Towe, in which 
he says that conditions are ripe for a conflagration 
in San Francisco, the question of a sufficient amount 
of water is timely. 

* * * 

It is not, however, within the province of the lay- 
man to discuss this. It belongs to the Fire Under- 
writers and the Fire Department, and when they 
demand added facilities the public will see to it that 
they are provided. 

* * * 

These discussions and suggestions are healthy at 
all times to the body corporate, for the sole reason 
that an ash pile represents so much lost material, 
and material being the product of labor, is wealth, 
and insurance onl)- reimburses to the extent of the 
financial loss to the individual. The true loss is the 
labor and cannot be replaced. 

* * * 

It follows, then, that any proposition calculated to 
reduce the fire waste is, whether perfect or not, in 
the line of advancement. 



The change predicted in the News Letter in the 
local affairs of the Conservative Life has been made. 
Mr. Fred Bennion has been promoted to the position 
of the Montgomery street branch of the company. 
It is understood that the promotion was granted to 
and won on merit. 

The Adjuster, in its initial issue of the year, pays 
the News Letter insurance department a merited 
compliment, it quotes and credits almost an entire 
article published in the News Letter columns. 

The question of national supervision of insurance 
is again up. H. R. 7054, introduced on the nth ult. 
by Representative Morrell, is a bill for establishing 
a National Bureau of Insurance, and so forth. "Be 
it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, That there shall be, and is hereby estab- 
lished in the office of the Director of the Census and 
under his supervision a National Bureau of Insurance. 
The Director of the Census is authorized and directed 
to appoint a superintendent of insurance at an annual 
salary of two thousand five hundred dollars and two 
clerks at an annual salary of one thousand- four hun- 
dred dollars each. The said superintendent and 
clerks shall devote their services exclusively to the 
business of said bureau. Said superintendent shall, 
under the direction of the Census, have supervision 
of all matters pertaining to insurance, insurance com- 
panies, and beneficial orders and associations doing 
business in the United States, or in any State, Terri- 
tory, District, or insular possession thereof." 

The part which is most interesting to fire and life • 
insurance men is found in Sections 4 and 5, and 
which, stripped of verbiage, is: 

"Sec. 4. That after the thirtieth day of June, nine- 
teen hundred and four, no person, firm, or corporation 
shall be allowed to transact the business of insur- 
ance within any State, District, Territory or insular 
possession of the United States until he or it shall 
have previously filed with the superintendent of in- 
surance aforesaid a duly authenticated certificate 
from the proper officer or Department of Government 
of such State, District, Territory or insular possession 
or of some foreign Government, showing that he or 
it has lawful authority to engage in and carry on 
such business under such Government and within its 
dominions. 

"Sec. 5. That no letter, postal card, circular, pam- 
phlet or publication concerning the business of insur- 
ance shall be carried in the mails outside the State 
wherein the same is issued, or delivered by any post- 
master or letter carrier outside the State wherein 
the same is issued, unless the transaction of such busi- 
ness of insurance by the concern, person or persons 
professing or proposing to operate the same is au- 
thorized by the laws of the State, District, or Terri- 
tory in which is located the principal office or place 
of business in and from which the same is issued. 
Any person who shall knowingly deposit or cause 
to be deposited, or who shall knowingly send or 
cause to be sent anything to be conveyed or deliv- 
ered by mail in violation of this section, or who shall 
knowingly cause to be delivered by mail anything 
herein forbidden to be carried by mail, shall be 
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction 
shall be punished by a fine of not less than five hun- 
dred dollars or by imprisonment for not less than 
one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment, for 



January 30, 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»7 



each - >ii violating any of tbr pro- 

tion may be proceeded against l>\ 

nation or indictment and tried and punished 
in either the district at which the unlawful publica- 
tion was mailed or in the one to which it i- carried 
by mail for delivery according to the direction tlien- 

r at which it is caused to be delivered by mail 
to the person to whom it is addressed, 

"Sec. 6. That any person who shall cause to be 
brought into the United States tor the purpose 1 f 
disposing of the same, or who shall cause to he car- 
ried from one State to another in the United States, 
any letter, postal card, circular, pamphlet or publi- 
cation concerning any contract or policy of insurance 
issued by any concern or person which or who is not 
authorized to issue the same by the law- of any State. 
District or Territory, and which or who has not 
procured a certificate of authority to transact such 
business from the proper officers of any State. Dis- 
trict or Territory shall be punishable for the first 
offense by imprisonment for not less than two years 
or by a fine of not less than one thousand dollars. 
or both, and for the second and after offenses by such 
imprisonment only." 

This bill, if it becomes a law, will be the knell of 
fraudulent insurance schemes, and it is to be regretted 

that it is only aimed at this branch of business. 

* * * 

The Fireman's Fund Insurance Company has de 
clared a regular quarterly dividend of $3 per share, 
being at the rate of 12 per cent per annum. On Mon- 
day ten shares of this stock sold on the street at 

$35° P er share. 

* * * 

At the annual meeting of the shareholders of the 
California Insurance Co., the old officers and direc- 
tors were re-elected as follows: L. L. Bromwell, 
president; M. A. Newell, vice-president; J. H. An- 
derson, secretary; A. Herman and F. W. Van Sick- 
len. A dividend of fifteen cents per share was de- 
clared, payable January 25th, amounting to $900. 

* * * 

The forty-first annual meeting of the shareholders 
of the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company was held 
on the 19th inst., and the following directors elected : 
William J. Dutton, Thomas S. Chard, ].JZ. Coleman, 
John Bermingham, F. W. Lougee, John T. Wright, 
Charles R. Bishop, Bernard Faymonville, John H. 
Gardiner, W. H. Brown, and Arthur A. Smith. The 
statement of the condition of the company as of De- 
cember 31, 1903, shows that the past year has been 
most successful. Assets increased $656,232.77 ; re- 
insurance reserve, $255,087.93 ; and net surplus $355,- 
396.98. In 1900 total premiums received amounted 
to $1,900,000; last year they increased to $3,300,000. 

The Board of Directors organized by re-electing 
the following officers: William J. Dutton, president; 
Bernard Faymonville, vice-president; J. B. Levison, 
second vice-president and marine secretary; Louis 
Weinmann, secretary; F. W. Lougee, treasurer; 
George H. Mendell, Jr., assistant secretary; Robert 
P. Fabj, general agent. 

Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1853 
Capital $3,000,000. Gross Cash -Assets $17,300,000 

Liberal contracts, Favorable Terms. Conference^ witn our Repre- 
sentatives before concluding short time yearly or long time contracts 
may be to your advantage. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent; GEO. M. MlTCHELL^Metropoll- 
tan Manager. 

aio Sansome fit., San Francisco 



NSURANCE 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets. $5,500,000 

Founded A. D. 1711. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

raid-up Onpllnl W.000.000 

Surplus to Policy-Holders 6.023.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 412 California St., a F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charttr, A. D. 1720. 
Capital raid-up $.1,440,100. Assets. J24.SK,04';.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $131,010,000 

Pacific Coast Branch : 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, 501 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 4,734,791.00 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2,202,635.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

DON'T INSURE— Until you have examined the new 
Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy. 

Issued Exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 
Assets, $1,250,000. Insurance in force, $20,000,000 

For particulars address the company. Agents Wanted. 
Fair Building. 230 Montgomery Street. San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital »67,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

OF ERFURT. GERMANY 

Capital $2,250,000 Asset* $H>,»:4 21(1 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 30, 1903. 



University Gossip 



By the Undergraduate 



A bran-new fish story is going the rounds at Stan- 
ford University. It has the merit of being true. A 
fish of bulky size and of presumed healthy appear- 
ance, was shipped to the campus the other day with 
a polite, written request that the thing of scales and 
fins be added to Dr. Jordan's already famous collec- 
tion. The fish had been captured in strange waters, 
and was without a title, but it was earnestly expected 
that the learned Doctor would be able to name the 
species. Dr. Jordan happened to be en route from 
the East at the time, and in some unaccountable 
manner the specimen fell into the hands of the Chi- 
nese cook. Hop bing took the note of explanation 
for a bill. He preserved that, but smothered the 
fish in gravy, and served it to the Jordan family for 
dinner. A few hours later, Professor Jenkins of the 
Zoology Department, who had been rofified by card 
of its arrival, came to inspect the specimen. Investi- 
gation brought out the truth, and the Chinese cook 
was called upon to provide a solution of mustard 
and water for each member of the Jordan household. 
Professor Tenkins carried off the bones, but the spe- 
cies is still undetermined. 

* * * 

The Stanford Glee and Mandolin Clubs, which 
have been touring throueh twenty northern towns, at 
a considerable loss to individual pocketbooks, as it 
turns out, are back on the campus with a deficit of a 
cool thousand to their credit. The boys stand good 
for several hundred of this sum, through their de- 
posits, and a final concert to be given at San Jose 
in February will probably supply a few extra dollars. 

* * * 

The faculty edition of the Chaparral, the Stanford 
comic bi-weekly, is to be brought out on February 
10th. This is the first time in the history of the 
university that Dr. Jordan has stepped from the 
thorny path of literature to be a real live editor-in- 
chief of a funny paper. Dr. Jordan has been sojourn- 
ing in the East, but he appointed his staff before leav- 
ing, and they, it is presumed, have most of the copy 
on file. 

* * * 

R. W. Smith, from the engineering department, 
who has gained some fame as a writer for the Ladies' 
Home Journal, is a crackerjack at children's verse. 
Kellogg and Jenkins, from the zoology laboratories, 
are famed in fish lore. Professor Kellogg has a scin- 
tillating sense of humor that mav produce some start- 
ling effects. Newcomer and Alden, from the Eng- 
lish Department, are purists in style, and are consid- 
ered in anything but a jocular light by the stu- 
dents. Gark, from the Drawing Denartment, will 
be in his element in the illustrating line, and Snod- 
grass, despite an entomological correction, is a car- 
toonist of considerable abilitv. The art staff is to 
be assisted by Miss Mary Wellman, a professional 
artist, who is fortunately emploved at the Univer- 
sity. Registrar Elliot and Dr. Angell bring up the 
van-guard, good for almost anything. 

* * * 

Some of the students at Berkeley have been beating 
the street car companies recently by working rather 
an old dodge. It is in the "no change'' racket. A 
student will hop on a car and hold out a ten or a 
twenty dollar gold piece to the conductor. In the 
majority of cases the conductor pleads no change, 



and the student maintains his rights, argues his case 
and generally rides free. But the other day a twenty 
dollar man was held up by a nifty young conductor, 
paid back in his own coin, so to speak. The student 
held out the gold piece, as usual ; the conductor shook 
his head and requested him to get off, change the 
money and take the next car. The student grew 
loudly abusive at this point, and insisted on his rights. 
The conductor argued for awhile, then changing his 
tactics, made a lunge at the twenty and captured it. 
"I'll change it," he said, reassuringly. It was a 
long time coming. The conductor hailed several cars 
on the down grade and made exchanges. He finally 
handed the now thoroughly incensed student nine- 
teen dollars and ninety-five cents in dimes, nickels 
and pennies. The student was forced to ride ten 
squares out of his way in order to count it. The 
conductor, in telling the story afterwards, said : 
"And I shoved in all the queers I had. too." 

Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Use 
Briquettes for cooking and heating, and you will save at 
least one-third on your fuel bill. 'Phone Tesla Coal Co., 
South 95, and your order will receive prompt attention. 



The appetizing things that come from the broiler at 

Moraghan's Grill, in the California Market, are responsible 
for the crowd that goes there for luncheon. It has become 
a regular business men's exchange. The quality of the 
chops, steaks, oysters and game served cannot be sur- 
passed. More than that, the wants of the guests are at- 
tended to by perfectly trained waiters. 



L. & M. Alexander & Co. are located as before, 110 Mont- 
gomery street, and rent and sell typewriters. 



To get a clear head try the Post St Turkish Bath. 




Rutnart 
Cham- 
pagne 

Established 1729 

The President's Wine 

"Dry, Fruity — 
JVo Headache 



Ve.rr.ey W. G&skill. 

Special Agent 



Hllbert Mercantile Co. 

Sole Agents 



January 30. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•9 



TO IMPROVE THE PRESIDIO. 

The bill introduced l>y Senator Perkins providing 
nsiderabte appropriation for the improvement 
of the Presidio reservation is one in which every citi- 
zen of San Francisco should feci a personal inter- 
Naturally the reservation i> one of the most 
beautiful parks included within the limits of any city 
in the world, but little has been done to improve 1 'ii 
nature's handiwork. Senator Perkins proposes that 
this neglect shall cease, and that the national I 
eminent shall undertake to beautify and develop the 
indubitable potentialities of this picturesque ground 
which so long has been suffered to lie fallow and 
grow up wild. The action of Senator Perkins is 
right in line with the movement undertaken by a 
number of our public-spirited citizens to beautify 
and improve the natural capabilities that belong to 
this peninsula that stands by the gate of two worlds 
on a site that for picturesqueness has no equal in any 
part of the world. 

THE FATHEADS' CONUNDRUMS. 

Asked to explain what a buttress is, one boy re- 
plied, "A woman who makes butter," and another 
"A female butcher." 

Teacher's dictation : His choler rose to such a 
height that passion well-nigh choked him. Pupil's 
reproduction : His collar rose to such a height that 
fashion well-nigh choked him. 

A Job's comforter is a thing you give babies to 
soothe them. 

A sky-scraper is an over-trimmed hat. 

Political economy is the science which teaches us 
to get the greatest benefit with the least possible 
amount of honest labor. 

An emolument is a soothing medicine. 

In the United States people are put to death by 
elocution. 

Gravity was discovered by Isaac Walton. It is 
chiefly noticeable in the autumn, when the apples. 
are falling from the trees. 

ANOTHER ABSENTEE PUBLISHER. 

James Gordon Bennett, editor and proprietor of the 
New York Herald, is about to give for public use all 
of his property which lies between Broadway and the 
•Boulevard Lafayette, north of i82d street, Fort 
Washington. To make arrangements for this park, 
which is to be dedicated to the memory of his father 
and which will contain a monument of James Gordon 
Bennett, the elder, he made his recent visit to New 
York. There is already a public monument on the 
property to commemorate one of the last important 
battles engaged in by Washington before he left 
Manhattan Island. The American Scenic and His- 
toric Preservation Society started to raise funds for 
this monument and asked Mr. Bennett's permission 
to erect it on his property. He replied by offering to 
pay for the monument and since then has taken con- 
siderable interest in that section. 

The park as proposed will be just across the Bou- 
levard Lafayette from the upper end of Fort Wash- 
ington Park, which lies west of the Boulevard La- 
fayette and extends from 171st to 183d streets. 

The monument now on Mr. Bennett's property is 
at 183d street, and faces Fort Washington avenue. 
With the exception of Fort Tryon, the highest point 
on Manhattan Island is at this point. 



Dr. Decker, 
Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" 
teeth extracting. 



for painless 



MANUFACTURERS. 



GRAY BROS. 



Mirnrdi Dlils. <"allfornle and 
MonlRniDTj- His . Ban Francisco. 
XB New Hl(h Street, l-os Angelas. 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



ARTISTIC PORTRAITURE 

beautiful |i:.oo Art Iimmldes will be 
made at J6.0O per dnien for a short time 

£f/>e Imperial Studio 



744 MARKET STREET 
Established 25 Years and Always ex Leader 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

VAlVESR 

TEL. MAIN 198. 65-57-59-61 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Blake, Moffit & Townc, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 



r> M ~L«, For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 
firUSrlwS la ur "3rles, paper-hangers, [Timers, painters, 
** billiard tables, brewers, book binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, 

shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

Buchanan Brothers. 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento S(, S. F. f Tel. Plain 561 1 



Old Rose Bud Whiskey 

Absolutely the purest on the market. 
APPLEGATE ®. SONS, Distillers 

Louisville, Ken. Pacific Coast Agents 

RATDJEN WINE COMPANY. « EL ¥5 e f™2w& &. 



AMERICAN 

CANNEL 



COAL 

Sold by all Reliable Dealers 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents. 
Oceanic Steamship company 
Gilltngham Cement. 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



SING FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. "We have but one price. 
All goods marked in plain English figures. 

614 DUPONT STREET, S. F. Next to St. Mary's Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. No. 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 






30 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 30, 1903. 

SUNBEAMS ^ ou can J U( ^S e a woman pretty "So you think it is an advantage 

well by the pictures she hangs on to a boy to be reared in the coun- 

(Stolen from Thieves) . in ?■> ..t i. •> j 

her parlor wall. try? To be sure, answered 

Michael Joseph Barry, the poet. Mistress— I should like to know Farmer Corntossal ; "a boy has a 

Was appointed a police magistrate whit business that policeman has heap better chance in the country, 

in Dublin. An Irish-American in my kitchen every night in the for instance, when a boy is sur- 

was brought before him, charged week'? Cook— Please, mum, I rounded by orchards and melon 

with suspicious conduct, and the think he's suspicious of me neg- patches he can have the stomach 

constable, among other things, lectirg my work, or something. ache without the doctor jumping 

swore that he was wearing a Re- "We get along excellently to- t0 tne conclusion that he s got ap- 

publican hat. "Does your honor gether," he explained. "You see, pendicitis. 

know what that means?" inquired he never borrows anything but Congressman Cannon, white in 

the prisoner's lawyer of the court. U cable, and that's all 1 ever have Park Row recently, stopped to in- 

"I presume," said Barry, "that it to loan." spect the work on the subway, 

means a hat without a crown." "See here," exclaimed the stran- His attention was especially at- 

Doctor— I know just what will ger as he stumbled into his twen- tracted by the large iron cylinder 
help you. You must drink two tieth puddle, "1 thought you said which is kept constantly turning 
cups of very strong tea every you knew where all the bad places over a fire for the purpose of heat- 
morning. Patient — I have done were on this road?" "Well," re- ing gravel. "What do you make 
that for years. Doctor— Then you plied the native who had volun- of it, Joe?" asked a friend. "Rolled 
must stop at once. tec-red to guide him through the pebbles," murmured Mr. Cannon. 

If you ask a man for the date darkness, "we're finding them, "Must be some kind of new break- 

of his birth, he tells you only the ain't we?" fast food adapted for those Italian 

year; if you ask a woman, she "After all, it takes a woman to immigrants, 

never tells you more than the day. urive a bargain." "Unless the bar- At the age of 21 a man knows 

Young Woman ( in a draper's gain should happen to be a horse. ' a lot more about women than he 

shop; — How much is this muslin? "Huh! Did you ever hear of a ever will at any subsequent stage 

The Shopman (gallantly)— One horse that was a bargain?" of his career. 

kiss the yard. Young Woman — i ( • ■ , , »/! .1 . • c • ,. ,.£ 

Very well give me ten yards " V° u Wlsn to reac ' a Magazine that is or interest from cover 

arwI"^S.1: n M d to coverrea d the Feb ™«-y overland monthly 

the bill to my grandmother. CONTENTS: SEE PAGE: 

A judge, pointing with his cane Frontispiece Photo Miss Blanche Cumming. .88 

ic a prisoner before him, remark- California Women and Artistic Photography 

ed: "There is a great rogue at the Henrietta S. Breck 89 

end of this stick." The man re- A California Venice Tom S. Rice 99 

plied : "At which end, your The Plaint of the Passing Peoples. . Vincent Harper 101 

honor?" Colombian Barbarity Arthur H. Dutton 107 

"The longer I live," sighed the Hygienic Conditions of Colombia. . Henry Bailey Sargeant 108 

sage, "and the more' I learn, the In Calm and Storm Edna Kingsley Wallace 109 

more firmly am I convinced that The Far Eastern Situation Edwin Maxey ill 

I know absolutely nothing!" "I McKinley Road E. T. J 114 

could have told you that twenty- A California Minstrel Virginia Garland 118 

five years ago," said his wife, "but Thro' the Golden Gate Lucius L. Wittich 120 

I knew it would be of no use" Curious Facts and Statistical Truths (New York's Historic Land- 

Kitty-So you have been to - mark „ s ) f "V" '_ " ' V- R M- RiSeky Ill 

Paris. You must have had a nice f om £ Cahf °™ an Curiosities 123 

time there, you understand the An Egyptian Enigma ?, lean ?J e £ ' c Le ^ S "! 

language so perfectly, you know. A J 8 ^ 1 *" 1 ' T , K f\l M W P > Sn ll « 

Bessie-Well, the fact is, though J ohn Rlchard Lee ' 6z Arthur D Coulter 133 

you'd hardly believe it, they speak ° f es P air ■ ■ ' : Charles W. Stevenson 36 

such queer French there it's quite A r ° "2 1 Will-i ' • ' J ames M - F , ello p m " " \f a 

impossible to converse with intel- £ Cr y on . *? ^ ' \ * ' rr " ' ' % °/ g r ?/ ■ 4 

ligence The Gree k Theatre at the University of California 

„.„.' ,. , Clotilde Grunsky Fisk 142 

Visitor— You haven t got half Reso i ve Robert B. Grant 145 

as nice a cemetery here as we have The Gold Lad Josephine Coan 146 

in Elmvil e Prominent Citizen Sonnet J 0rv fr e y. Stapp 147 

it wawvniej— .\ , I ve always Swee t Content Alice MacGowan Cooke 148 

heard that the cemetery is the only Men and Women I49 

part of your town that holds out My Valentine M. H. W 153 

re n sWence CementS Permanent The Unfortunate Third Guy Raymond Halifax 154 

«Kr » L""'-- Whence Came the Anglo-Saxon. . H. L. Chamberlain 157 

No, he said, "I'm not sure Washington's Birthday William F. Crane 160 

whether my wife's Christmas gift Mount Mazama Julia P. A. Prather 165 

to me was meant to please me or A Honolulu Banyan Tree l66 

to humble my pride." "What did Book Reviews 167 

she give you?" asked the friend. Kditorialism 169 

"She had a crayon portrait of me „ . . . . , ... r 1 i\/i 

made by an amateur artist." Compare this table or contents with that or other Magazines 



January 30. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3» 



COCKTAIL 
FACTS 



About W of the Cocktails now 
drank arc cither .Manhattans or 
.Martinis: no good bar-keeper uses 
any bitters but ••KnRllsh Orange" 
In making them. 1 he "CUB 
COCKTAILS," Manhattans and 
Martinis, arc made as they should 
be with English "Orange Hit- 
ters." are properly aged and are 
better than any fresh made cock- 
tail possibly can be. A fresh 
made cocktail Is like a new blend 
of any kind, unfit for use. Age 
is what makes a good Punch, 
age Is what makes a good Cor- 
dial, age is what makes a good 
blended whiskey, age is what 
makes a palatable sauce, and above 
all age Is what makes a good 
cocktail. These statements can be 
verified by any reputable blender. 

G. F. HEUBLEIN" & BRO., Sd. mpriaon 

SO Broadway, New York, N". V. 

HAirrrotD, C.)**. London 



SPOHN-PATRICK COMPANY 

BftD FrtoclMO. Lot ADgelei. 
Denier. B.ll Lake CUT. Sr.ltlr 



"Yes, he fooled me completely. 
He had such a smooth way with 
him." "Which proves that the way 
of the transgressor is most suc- 
cessful where it's smooth." 

"Why do you still call her a 
fin de siecle 'girl?" "What's the 
matter with that?" "Why, since 
that means literally the 'end of the 
century girl,' is was only used in 
speaking of girls towards the close 
of the last century." "Well, that's 
when she was a girl." 



THREE 

TIMES A DAY TO 

CHICAGO 

The Only Double Track Railway between the 
Miabouii Kiver aud Chicago- 

THREE TRAINS DAILY 

Via the Southern Pacific, Union Pacific and Cblcazo 
and Northwestern Rys. 

Overland Limited. Vestlbuled. Leaves 
San Francisco at lu.00 a- in- The most 
Luxurious Train in the World. Electric 
lighted Throughout. Buffet smoking ears 
with barber and bath. Bookloveis Li- 
brary. Dining Cars, standard and Com- 
partment Sleeping Cars and Observation 
Cars. Less than three days to Chicago 
without change. 

Eastern Express. Vestlbuled. Leaves San 
Francisco attl-uo p. 111. Through Standard 
and Tourist Sleeping Cars to Chicttgo- 
Diuing Cars. Free Reclining Chair Cars. 

Atlantic Exnress. Vestlbuled. Leaves San 
Francisco at o.uua.m.Slandai'd and Tourist 
Sleepers. 

Personally Conducted Excursions 

Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. 

Best o( everything 

R. R. Ritchie. G. A. P. C. 

Chicago and Northwestern Bys. 
617 Market St. (Palace Hot el) San Francisco 



He -Think tv. 
you n 
I think tu 

the same. 

"I see that Planns. wl 
chitect, 1- buildi 

himself now." "Is I time I 

the victim, "I'll bet he'll 
himseli." 

Arthur Nelstonc ells .1 
yam about Umtali. It was on his 
last visil about the end of 
Happening to enter the first morn- 
ing a well-frequented bar, a 
man came up to him and said: 
"Hollo, Arthur, how are you, old 
boy." Well, after he had chatted 
about old times, he said: "Things 
are awful had here. 1 don't know 
what's coming to this place; we 
are all broke — a large bottle of 
champagne, Miss." Champagne 
was 50s a bottle then in Umtali. 
We talked on for some time of 
how poverty stricken they all were 
and 1 was just thinking of closing 
the conversation when he said: 
"Miss, another bottle, please." And 
that's how it was during my stay. 
They were all broke, but they 
drank champagne every morning. 

Nodd — How is your orange 
grove in Florida getting on? Todd 
— First rate, old man. Why, in a 
couple of years from now I expect 
to have enough oranges to supply 
my table. 

"What makes you think they are 
such rich Americans?" "Because 
they know so much more about 
other countries than their own." 

Mother — Johnny Jones, did you 
get that awful cold out skating? 
Son — Mother, I think I caught it 
washing my face yesterday morn- 
ing. 

"Persons who are complaining 
that they had no good luck last 
year," remarked the Observer of 
Jb-vents and Things, "may console 
themselves with the thought that 
the figures in 1903, added, make 
thirteen." 

Junior Partner (a few days after 
Uiristmas) — I don't think we 
ought to mark these goods down 
to such a figure as that. It's less 
than half cost. We can't replace 
them for double the price. Senior 
Partner — We won't have to, my 
boy. Nobody has any money now. 
. Ascum — Some people are saying 
that you made most of your money 
in politics. Leader — But others 
are saying that I made most of 
my money out of politics. So who 
are you going to believe? 

No man has the heart to say 
"No" when a girl asks if he really 
and truly loves her. 




Silent men seldom contradict 
themselves. 

Many a girl shatters her ideal 
when she marries him. 

Two often cease to be company 
after they are made one. 

It is twice as easy to fool your- 
self as it is to fool other peo- 
ple. 

"How did the parrot come to be 
fined for contempt of court?" 
"Why, when Judge Owl asked him 
if he knew the nature of an oath 
he burst into a perfect roar of de- 
risive laughter." 

A man is sometimes known by 
the things he might have done 
but didn't. 



xxxv.v.Msr.v.v.v.v.'XWJ.M.y.Mir.v.xvM 




Stylish $ 
Suits 



ir 



Dressy Suits #20 a 

Pants $4.50 J£ 

My $25.00 Suits are theg 

best in America. 'n, 

1% P Per Cent Saved by get-g 

Z ting your suit made byS 

JOE POHEIM § 

THE TAIIOR K 

1110-1112 Market St. £ 

Bi 201-203 Montu'v St.. S. F.5 



TWOMEV 4 MIHOtOVICH 



THE YELLOWSTONE 

22 MONTGOMERY ST- 

Tel. Main 14« 

HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

Fingers roughened by needlework 

catch every stain and look hopelessly 
dirty. Hand Sapolio removes not only 
the dirt, but also the loosened, injured 
cuticle, and restores the fingers to 
their natural beauty. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 36, 1903. 




Double Daily Service to All Points 
East via 

PUEBLO, KAN5AS CITY 
& ST. LOU 15 

Through PuUman Sleeping ears and Ob- 
servation Cafe Dining Cars, with Eleetrie 
Lights and Electric Fans, Scenic Route 
through Colorado. Fortickets. berth reser- 
vations, folders, etc.. call on or address 

GENERAL TICKET OFFICE 

G25 Market Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

(Palace Hotel) 



O. R. & N. CO. 

The Only Steamship Line to 
PORTLAND, ORF. 

And Short Rail Line from Portland to all Points 
East. Through Tickets to all Points all Hail or 
Steamship and Hail at Lowest Hates. 

Steamer Tickets include Berth and Meals. 

SS OKEGOM Sails Jan. 2H. Feb. 7 17 "7 
Man.-h 9. 29. 

SS GEO. W. ELDER Sails Jan. 23. Eel.. 2 
12,22. March 4, 14. to. 

SS OREGON is temporarly in service instead 
of the COLUMBIA. 

Guest — This beaksteak is so 
tough the knife won't go through 
it. Head Waiter — Another kniie 
for the gentleman. 



Illinois Central Railroad 

Tickets to all points in the 

United States and Europe 

W. H. Snedaker, Gen. Agt. 



639 Market St. 



Talace Hotel Blilg 




ERIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block- 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

1 mi hi leave ami are due (.<■ am ve ai - 
SAN FKANClJSCO. 
(MulD Line, Koot of Market Street i 



COASTLINE (Narrow Uauce) 
Pool of Market street) 



LEA 



— Fkuu Dkckmhkk ^9. 1U03. 



AKRTVK 



7.00* VHcavIIIc. Wiutera, Kmiiscy 7 55p 

7.uJa i:-Til>;la, Sulsun. Eliiilrn and Siicra- 

tru'Qtu 7.25? 

7.30a Vallejo, Napa, Callstog.i. Saxta 

Itosa, Martinez, Sua iiainon B-25P 

7 30a Niii',-, Llvennore, Tracy, Littbrop, 

Stockron 725p 

8.00* Shasta Express — (Via Davis). 
Wllll.iim (for Itartlett Sprlugs), 
Willows tKruto. ICet] BliiO, 

Portland, Tacoma, Sfiutlo 7.55p 

800a Davis. Woodland. Knights La i ding. 

MaryBvIlle. Orovlllu 7-55p 

8 3 3 a Port Costa, Martinez, Aiilloch, 

Byron, Tracy, Stockton. New- 
man. Los Banos. Mend ota, 
Armona, Hnufurd Visalla. 
Portfrvflle 4.25p 

B-30a Port Costn. Martinez. Tracy. Lath- 
rop, Modesto, Merced, Kreso.0, 
Goshen Junction, Haurord. 
Visalla Itakerafleld 4.55* 

6.30* Nlles, San .lose, Llvermore. Stock- 
ton. (tMlILou), lorn-, Siicriuip-nto, 
Placervllle Marysvllle, Culco, 
llud BlulT 4.25P 

8 30* Oakdnle. Chinese, Jamestown. So- 

nora. Tmdtimtie and Angels 4 23 i' 

9 00* Atlantic Express— Ogden and P;ant. 11-25* 
8.30* Rkhmi.nd, Martinez and Way 

Stations 6 55? 

1000* The Overland Limited — Ugden, 

U'-nver. Oinalin. Chicago 6-25p 



8 16a Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, 
Feltoo. Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and Way Stations 5-55? 

11.16*' Newark, Centervllle, fran Jose, 
New Almaden. Lox Gato&. EM ton, 
Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz and 

Principal Way Stations tl055* 

4 I5» j Newark, San Jose, LosGatos and t 1855 * 

way stations ) 110 55* 

09 30p Hunters Train. Saturday only, San 
Jose and Way Stations. Return- 
ing from Lou Gatoa Snn-iay only. 17 25p 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY. 

MombAN UtANCJSCO, Koot ol Market St. (Slip <i 

-tf:15 «:U0 1I:(K)a.M. 1.00 3.00 6-16 P.M 

rrom OAKLAND. Koot of Broadway -• t«:00 te):0) 

18:0J 1O:0ua.m. 12 00 2 00 400 p.m. 

COAST LINE (Broad «aug«). 

|3T* M'lilrd and rowtmeiid StreetB.) 



12.25p 



Sta- 



. l.odl... 
i.V'alleJo, Napa, 



4 00i- 
4.30p 



6.00 h 



6.OO1 
t6 30> 
6.001- 
6.00 1- 



6 00. 



1225p 
1025* 



9 25* 
4.23P 



Sun | 18 5 
.1 Ml " 



55* 



10-OUa ValleJ. 

10. UO* Los Anpi>li!B Passenger- Port 
Costa. Martinez, Byron. Tracy, 
Lfttbrop. Stockton. Merced, 
Raymond, Fresno. G<mb<'D Junc- 
tion. Hanford, Lemnorn, VlMatla, 

Bakoraflcld. L->» Angela 7 25p 

1200m Hayward. Nlles nnrt Way Stations. 3-2JP 

HOOp Sacramento Rlvi-r St''am.-r«.. ' 1 1 JJp 

3.30c Benlila. Wlnt'-rs. Sacramento. 
Woodland, it nigh ra I. m ling, 
Marysvllle, Oroville and way 

stations 10-55* 

3-30c Havward. Nlles and Way Stations.. 755p 

3 30' Port Costa. Martin z Ihrmi, 

Tracy, Laibrop, 

Merced, Fresno i 

tfons beyond Purt 

330i- Mnrtlnez. Tracy. St. 

4.00c Martinez, San ICamoi! 

Callatoga. Smii" |{i 

NlleB. Tracy. Stockton. Lodt . 
Hay ward. Nlles. Irvln 

.loBe, Llvermore 

The Owl Limited— Ve v-m n L< 
n.n.e M-ndMNi Fre-nn. Tulare, 
Bakersueld. Lob AugeleB 
QoldeQ state Lluiiioi sleeper, 
Oakland to Los Angele-, u>r Chi- 
cago, via C. R I &P 8.55a 

Port Costa. Tracy. Stockton 12-2 iP 

Hayward. N 1 1 «« ami San Jo«e 7 25a 

Hay ward, Nlles and San Jose. 9.j5a 

Sua tern Exprefln— Ogden. Denver, 
Omaha, St. Louis. Chicago and 
East. Port Co»ta. lieulcla. Sul- 
Bun Eliulra, Davis. Sacramento, 
Rocklln, Auburn. Colfax, 
Truckee, Boca, ICeno. Wada- 

wortb, Wlnoemucca 6-25p 

Vallejo dally, except Sunday... I 

7.09P Vallejo, Sunday only f 

7.00' I'lebmond, -an Pablo. Port Costa, 

Martinez and Way Station* 

8-C6c Oregon & California Kxpremt— Sac- 
ramento, Marynvlllc, Redding, 
Portland, Puget Sound and East. 
9.10c Hayward, Nlles and San Ji>se (bun- 
day only) 11-55a 



631p 
636P 

4-IOp 



1045- 



7.60p 



6 10a San Jose and Way Stations 

7 C0a San Jose and Way Stations 

8 00* New Almaden (Tues., Frld.. only), 
B 00a The Coaster— Slops only Sar Jose, 

Gllroy (connection fur Hollla- 
ter), Pajaro, Castrovllle (con- 
nection to and from Monterey 
and Pacific Grove). Salinas San 
Ardo, Paso Rohlet. Santa Mar 
garlta. San Luis oblspo. principal 
stations thence Surf (Connection 
for Lompoc), principal stations 
tbenciSauta Barbarn.San Buena- 
ventura. Saugus Los AugeleB... 
9.00a San Jose. Tres Plnos, Catdtola, 
SautaCruz.PaclOc Grove, Saltnaa, 
San l.nih Obispo and Principal 

Way Stations 4-10p 

I0-30a tan Joee and Way Stations.. 1.20P 

11 30a Santa Clara, >tm Jose. Los Gatos 

and Way Stations 

1 30i Aan Jobc and Way Stations 

6-LUc Del MoQte Kxpress— Santa Clara, 
San Ji'sn. Del Monte, Monterey, 
Pacific Gmve (eonuects at Santa 
Clara lor Sauta Cruz. Boulder 
(reek and Narrow Gauge Points) 
at Gllroy for HoiiMcr. Tres 
Plnos. at Castrovllle for Salinas. 1215p 

3-30p Tres Plnos Wav Passenger 10 45a 

4 30p an Jose and Way St tlons +8. 00a 

1600 ->m Jose, (via Santa Clara) Los 
Gatos, and Principal Way Sta- 
tions (except "tindav) . t-9.00* 

i £0j oan JoBeand Principal WayStatlons {9 40* 
G.lOi bunset Limited.— Uedwo d. San 
Jose, Gllroy, Salinas, Paso Kobles, 
San I. nis tjblspo, Siuita Barliara, 
Los Angi'leB, Denting. Kl Paso. 
Kew Orleans. New rork. Con- 
nects at Pajaro for Santa Cruz 
and at Castrovllle for Pacific 

Grove and Way Stations 7 10* 

t6 It! tau Maieo,lleresror.J.Be1inont.San 
CarloB. Redwood. FHlr Oaks. 

MenloPark. Palo Alto 'B-43a 

6 (i Snn .lose ami Wa> Stations 6 38* 

8 00p Palo Alto and Way Stations 1j.15a 

11 &Qr 3L.uib Min Francisco. Mlllbrae. Bur 
Mngame. San Mateo. Retmon' 
San Carlos. Redwood. Fair Oaka, 

Menlo Park and Palo Alio 9.45c 

"11 30c Mayneld, Mountain View, sunny- 
vale. Lawrence. Santa Clara and 

San Jose 19-45P 

A for Morning P for Afternoon. 

Sunday excepted X milhIa.s only 

a Saturday only 

( Stop* at all stations on Sunday. 
1 1 25a * r Only trains itroi-ping at Valencia St. Bonrhhound 
dr. in *.m„ 7:00*. k., 11:30a. n.,8:30p.M.,6:30P.M.and 
8:00 p.m. 
8.55a 



765P 



lb. UNION Tit ANSI- Kit COMI'ANY 

' ill call lor and cbe< k baggage from hotels and resl 
euces Telephone, exchange K3. Inquire of Ticket 



An Irishman was brought be- 
fore a Justice of the Peace on a 
charge of vagrancy, and was thus 
questioned : "What trade are 
you?" "Shure, now, your honor, 
an' I'm a sailer. "You a seafaring 
man ? I question whether you 
have ever been to sea in your life." 
"Shure, now, and does your hon- 
or think I came over from Ireland 
in a wagon?" 

Maid (to her young mistress, 
who has written a love letter for 
her at her request) — Oh, thank 
you so much, Miss! The letter is 
beautiful. But please don't for- 
get to put a postscript: "Excuse 
bad writin' and spellinM" 




Why Don't You 

Travel by Sea? 

Special vacation and Short 

Tourist Excursion Trips 



t \cc ntnt service, low Rates Including 

Berth and Meals 

Loh Aneele*, San Dleeo, Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara, Monterey, 

Kureka Seattle, Taooma, 

Victoria, Vancouver, etc. 

And to those desiring loneer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico- 

Tor Information regarding sailing dates, etc 
obtain folder 

SAN r-RANClSCu TICKET OFFICES 
4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St.. and Broad was v\ harvea. 

C. D. OUNANN, General Pass. Agent. 
10 Market Street, San Pranclao 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Wan S?& d ar. 

Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post St.3ao Francisco 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 



ESTABLISHED JULY ao. 1856. 
8(L H FRANQ|« eo 



Annual Subscription. $4.00 



News- Jet 

(£idif r n t u XOlve vt i s c r. 




Vol. LXVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 6. 1904. 



Number 6. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.F.1TKR Is printed and published 
rday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott. Hall. . k 
00 Sansome street. San Francisco, Cal. 
Entc; Postofflca ns second-class matter- 

New v 1 where Information may l»e obtained r-cardtng 

subscriptions and advertising)— 3)6 Broadway. C. C H 

e — ■ Cornhlll. E. C. England. George Street & Co. 
i. e— J. H. Williams. P-iv New York Life Building. 
Boston Otnce— M. W. Barber. TIB Exchange. It illding. 
All so.-lal Hems, announcements. advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 5 p. m. 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 

In England the problem is not "How old is Ann?" 
but "Where is Mrs. Maybrick?" 



By punching a dramatic critic, the husband of an 
actress has justified his existence. 

Hands across the sea? Certainly, but if they wear 
boxing gloves we will know which pair to bet on. 

Consignees complain that Russian wheat is dirty. 
The inference is plain — the Russians must garner 
their cereals by hand. 

An unmarried woman in Des Moines has inherited 
$3,000,000, but the fortune hunters need not trouble 
themselves — she is a nun. 



Profound regret is expressed over the suicide of 
VVhitaker Wright, the London swindler — regret that 
it did not happen about seven years earlier. 

Ninety per cent of the missing men in London are 
married. And yet they talk of the down-trodden 
British female! 



Footbinding is going out of fashion in China, but 
highbinding in Chinatown continues to keep the 
Coroner busy. 

Young Mr. Vanderbilt is doing the mile in 35 sec- 
onds in his automobile. We recall that long ago he 
was spoken of as a speedy youth. 

The ballet-girl always has been age-proof, and now 
they are putting her in asbestos tights to make her 
fire-proof. 

Meat-eating, according to a leading vegetarian, is 
the cause of appendicitis. We always thought it 
was due to a congestion in the bank account. 



"Fighting Bob" Evans suggests canteens on men- 
of-war as a means to keep the "jackies" from drink- 
ing deadly wood alcohol from the ships' paint stores. 
Now just watch what the W. C. T: U. does to Fight- 
ing Bob. 

A foolish man in Connecticut, named Gillespie, 
wrote a letter to the press venting his disgust over 
seeing a woman kiss a cat. The lady president of 
the Connecticut Cat Club came back with the crush- 
ing rejoinder that there were worse things than kiss- 
ing cats-^kissing Gillespies, for example. 



"Silver," *nys Col, William J. Bryan, "i- no longer 
the paramount issue." Somebody must have told the 
gifted Nebraskan thai Hearst's campaign fund 
bo passed out in paper money. 

Congress is asked to provide a summer residence 
for the President, and Representative Hearst yells 

that Roosevelt wants a palace. What would Hearst 
prefer — a harem, with silver bath-tubs in it? 



Emperor Menelik is sending President Roosevelt 

two lions as a gift, and in the seclusion of one of his 
flats Hearst is learning how to say "sic 'em" in the 
language of the Abyssinians. 



Jo-Jo, the Finn, whose beard grew all over his 
face, is dead, and now Id's forget to mention him 
when we see a fellow-being with whiskers of the 
lambrequin type. 



A yellow newspaper prints a picture of a lady 
whom a too gay army officer is accused of trying to 
kiss. If it is a fair likeness the officer's sanity is in 
doubt, not his morals. 



Twelve thousand kegs of beer were poured into 
the North river at New York as the result of a brew- 
ery deal. The Schuetzen clubs marked the occasion 
by putting on deep mourning. 



"Prize-fighter Jeffries stops runaway and saves 
woman's life," say the newspapers in big headlines. 
Credit where credit is due : raise his press agent's 
salary. 



Ten thousand women of Massachusetts have peti- 
tioned the Legislature in opposition to woman suf- 
frage. Why should the privileges of the ballot be 
forced on anybody? 

A political function of Republican job seekers at 
Springfield, Illinois, was announced as a "love feast," 
but when it was over the survivors agreed to call 
it a "cannibal island free lunch." 



A Quartermaster's clerk at Chicago has been sus- 
pended for refusing to spell a word the way his chief 
wanted it, and his fate is in the hands of the general 
staff of the army. If only the shade of Webster 
could know about this ! 



■ New York attorneys had a race-track bookmaker 
on the stand, and were prodding him about his busi- 
ness, when he crumpled up the proceedings with the 
declaration : "I get my money as honestly as you 
lawyers do!" 

Cities like New York and San Francisco, which 
are fretting about which side of the street cars should 
stop on, should remember that problem of St. Louis, 
where they didn't stop on either side between ter- 
minals. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1904. 



BURNING HIS BRIDGES. 

Is Hearst — William Randolph Hearst — as bank- 
rupt in fortune as in honor and decency? If not, 
then he is doing some things which, if observed in 
the conduct of a man engaged in a more reputable 
business, would indicate an intention to commit 
fraudulent insolvency, so to say. 

Hearst's inheritance from his father was the San 
Francisco Examiner, and, we may suppose, enough 
money to freak it into its present state of journalis- 
tic unworth. The other properties of the same class 
which he has established or acquired in New York, 
Chicago and Los Angeles, have been run on the same 
plan of brag and bluster on the editorial side and 
plain piracy in the counting room. Hearst's repu- 
tation as a prodigal spender of millions got by 
birth, and his parent's death, is as false as his repu- 
tation for anything mentionable in a mixed company. 
It is true that he has paid big salaries to little men, 
has bought all manner of thinly-gilt bricks, and has 
made a great noise in newspaperdom, but a little 
money goes a long way in that kind of a fake exhibi- 
tion, and without doubt, his yellow head has earned 
a good deal by dint of cajolery and cudgeling the 
business men and corporations of the four afflicted 
cities. But what of his revenue he nas not spent in 
making the people believe him, the Croesus of the 
press, he has squandered in trying to play the big- 
ger game of national politics. How much it has cost 
him trying to tow to port the unfortunate Bryan, the 
derelict of the Democracy, no man but himself may 
say, but unquestionably the amount is a large one. 
From time to time he may have wrung more money 
out of the Hearst estate. It has been said, with 
seeming authority, that his paper has been taken up 
in this quarter, on occasion, just in time to spare 
him exposure that would have tumbled down his 
house of cards. 

Some time ago, it will be recalled, this inheritor 
of not much else besides a newspaper, put the Ex- 
aminer into the hands of a corporation headed by an 
employee of the business office — a move which was 
not regarded at the time as anything more serious 
\than one more of the queer practices of a queer 
young man. Now he has done the same thing with 
his New York sheet, and here, again, the corporation 
has for directors two of his employees and his at- 
torney. The capital, in this case, is placed at $i,oco 
In Chicago he is at the same business. 

What does it all mean? Is Hearst bankrupt, or 
does he expect to be? Assuredly, if he owed the 
News Letter any money, it would be looking for 
something attachable to levy on. Possibly he has 
gone so far in his policy of extension, has so added 
to his obligations, has so many and so heavy credi- 
tors that he is past the point of retreat and retrench- 
ment, and has adopted this plan of incorporation 
to help stave off commercial ruin. Perhaps he has 
so far discounted his expectancy in the Hearst es- 
tate that he has been compelled to this course for 
its better protection. It may be — and this seems 
to us more likely — that his foolish scramble for the 
Presidency is the last card he has to play, and that 
he is getting ready for the utter defeat that will 
inevitably be his portion. 

Hearst, we are informed, has offered the Demo- 
cratic national managers $2,000,000 for the nomina- 
tion. This is a jug-handled proposition, inasmuch as 
what he offers is to spend that sum in trying to elect 
himself if nominated. We would suggest that the 
gentlemen to whom he promises this great sum in 
exchange for the virtue of their party see first of all 
how much property really stands in his name, how 



much money he actually has. This incorporation 
scheme means something unpleasant for somebody's 
interests, and we would not suspect Mr. Hearst of 
trying to pick his own pocket. 

A NEEDLESS SACRIFICE OF LIFE. 

The ever-lengthening roll of men and women who 
lose their lives through one form or another of care- 
lessness in the use of illuminating gas imperatively 
calls attention to one special cause of danger in this 
regard by which considerable numbers of the resi- 
dents of San Francisco are made to undergo a 
wholly avoidable risk. 

We refer to the practice of turning off the gas 
at the meter in the lodging houses. This practice 
is pursued as a measure of economy to prevent pos- 
sible waste by lodgers. It is not an uncommon 
thing for residents of these houses to do a little cook- 
ing on a small gas stove, but this practice is frowned 
upon by landlords, and so they cut off the flow of 
gas all over the house during a large part of the 
twenty-four hours. This, of course, is a measure of 
self-defense on the part of landlords, but it imports 
a danger of very serious character, and for that rea- 
son ought not only to be prohibited, but the prohi- 
bition must be enforced by adequate means. 

The danger from this practice lies in the fact that 
lodgers frequently leave jets burning low while they 
sleep, and when the flow is cut off at the nieter the 
stop-cock of the burner remains open, with the 
result that when the gas is once more turned on 
the room becomes filled with the poisonous fumes. 

It is useless passing an ordinance prohibiting this 
practice unless means are provided to see that the 
prohibition is enforced. That means is easily within 
the reach of the municipal machinery. It should be 
made the duty of policemen on patrol to inspect the 
gas fittings at all lodging houses, and see that the 
law is observed. It is useless filling the city law- 
book with ordinances which presumably are sup- 
posed to work without human agency. To be effec- 
tive the law must itself specify the means of its 
enforcement. 



IMPOSITION UPON CLUB WOMEN. 

In the appearance of the so-called California Club- 
women's edition of the Bulletin, the News Letter 
finds much to make it believe that the warning to 
,the excellent ladies of that excellent club about 
the bunco game that was all set for them came in 
good season. It is plain that many of those whose 
names were used in booming this stupid humbug 
drew out, and that others, unable to do so, merely 
sent in contributions and allowed their names to be 
used in signature. For weeks this delectable sheet 
had been announcing the names of its staff of lady 
editors and gatherers of news, telling with verbose 
reiteration which of them would report the day's 
happenings on the city's waterfront, among the la- 
bor unions, and wherever else news was to be had. 
Most of the departments thus advertised were con- 
spicuously omitted. Obviously, the ladies whom the 
Bulletin had tried to delude into association with it 
for these purposes declined the tasks assigned them, 
and the managers of the slimy sheet did not dare to 
go too far in passing off the work of. its own under- 
paid hacks as the output of the clever clubwomen 
whose names it had used so freely. 

That there .was some degree of this substitution 
swindle, however, we make sure. Inspection of the 
issue shows errors of language, of fact, and of judg- 
ment that cannot possibly be attributed to any 
woman of the California Club, so we may infer that 



February 6. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



the Bulletin's man 

the regular pi 
until like their estimate "i what clubu 

I write. And 11 v In 

they boldly snatch 
handful fn>ni obscure - nd published 

if one or another of the clubwomen, 
muring, though, i>> attach - 
ample, there was a yard-long editorial about 
anybody believe that any woman 
nected with the California Clu1> could have been 
guilty of such vapid idiocy as tliat? This ineffabl) 
dull article read like the theme of a half-baked fresh- 
man in a fifth-rate college, ground <>ut with infinite 
labor from the resources of .1 meager library and a 
meager intelligence, spraddling splay-footed when it 
would he philosophic, and galumphing painfully 
when it would be light and gay. Tins i... lisli ; 
for-the-paper essay, of the kind that all editors know 
so well and loathe so heartily, a tiling with neither 

premise imr conclusion, with. mi bowels or bones, 
may be the Bulletin's idea of what a clubwoman 
would write: it is not ours. We suspect that it was 
quarried whole out of some weekly in Northern Ne- 
braska by an unscrupulous man with a big pair of 
Scissors. 

As to the business side of this affair we hope sin- 
cerely that those ladies who did participate took the 
precaution to have somebody watch the cash drawer 
all the time. 



111 .1 



1 ill-. 



A SHAMEFUL ATTACK. 

Once more the highbinders and head-hunters are 
trying to get the Spring Valley Water Company by 
the throat. It is not beset this year by the jackals 
of Newspaper Row alone. The Mayor and his hun- 
gry henchmen, who throng the City Hall, are busy 
whetting their knives for the slashing. All the indi- 
cations are for a season of corporation-baiting and 
capital-harrying, a season of attempted "hold-ups," 
more daring and more numerous than have marked 
any of the annual periods of rate-fixing. Such a con- 
dition of things does not exist, and would not be en- 
dured anywhere else in the United States. 

Yearly the Spring Valley Company is compelled 
to fight tooth and nail for a rate that will enable it 
to pay the interest on the money it has borrowed 
in order to maintain its business and to render a 
reasonable return to the holders of its stock. Often 
it has been forced to seek the refuge of the courts, 
which have not thus far failed to shield it from the 
attack of wolves in office. Last year it carried to 
the Federal courts its contention for a reasonable 
return, and found no difficulty there in getting the 
protection it asked. This year it is called upon to 
face not only the assaults of a predacious and rapa- 
cious press, but the onfall of an administration whose 
slogan seems to be "For Revenue Only." 

The stranger among us might think that this 
was a company of the robber barons of finance — a 
handful of men grown inordinately and insolently 
rich through control of a public necessity, defying 
the law and defrauding the people by excessive and 
extortionate charges. The fact— and it is within 
the knowledge of every citizen — is that Spring Val- 
ley's stocks and bonds are held by thousands upon 
thousands of investors, rich and poor, high and low, 
most of them San Franciscans. In it are invested the 
patrimony of many and many an orphaned family, 
the estates of widows, the slow savings of working- 
men. No other corporation in San Francisco is so 
widely and fully representative of all conditions and 
classes of the city's people in its security-holders. 



Il\ gr»W 

immunity "Pplv. II 

natural difficulties in finding pure 

• 111 the bare, brOWIl lulls that lie all about the 

nd in bringing it, clear and pure. 

'.huh no man can 

justly complain. All the while, too, it has bad t" 

light for us very life, ceaselessly attacked bj 

incuts as \iei"iis as those which now menace it. 

No one will be surprised to in He the rancorous hos- 
tility toward Spring Valley of those newspapers 
which regard a vested interest as a stage-robber 

.1 heavy expreSS-box. Nor is it disappointing 
to find the Mayor and his merry men lined up with 
th^sc who prey upon corporations and individuals, 
for the last municipal campaign involved n 
with respect to motives or intentions. But it will 
be a distinct disappointment if there shall prove to 
be not en. nigh fairminded and honest men in the 
Board of Supervisors to give the Spring Valley a 
chance to earn for its bondholders their interest 
and for its stockholders a lawful return upon their 
investment. 



WHERE SAN FRANCISCO LAGS. 

George A. Newhall, president of the Chamber of 
Commerce, writes a thoughtful letter on the several 
proposals now mooted for the improvement and 
beautifying of San Francisco. Mr. Newhall is a 
traveled man, who has seen and noted what other 
cities the world over are doing in the same lines, 
and he thinks that what we most need in this city 
is improved and modern streets. There can be no 
doubt that we have neglected our opportunities in 
this regard, and Mr. Newhall's criticism is needed 
and to the point. In his letter, printed in the Bul- 
letin, Mr. Newhall writes: 

"My personal opinion is that the first thing to do 
is to give us good streets, well paved. If the muni- 
cipal authorities feel that they cannot do this at 
once, the work should be proceeded with a little 
at a time, but do it well. Without criticising any one 
I must say that we have no well paved street from 
the Western Addition into the city. Post 'street, 
the natural channel, was at one time in comparative- 
ly good condition, but at present the paving is so 
bad that the average citizen when going by carriage 
receives nothing but jolts. 

This is the eminently practical advice of a man of 
wide experience who is largely interested in the fu- 
ture of San Francisco. It should be heeded. We 
have here the most splendid site for a great city that 
the world affords situated at the gateway of two con- 
tinents and blessed with the finest cnmate. People 
may say what they please about the fogs and winds 
that play over this peninsula, but the fact remains 
that for working purposes there is no other such 
climate on the round globe, because in no other part 
of the world can a man pursue his business and his 
work with so little discomfort or with less adjust- 
ment to his surroundings as in San Francisco. There 
is no other place in the world where the extremes of 
heat or cold do not hamper industry, and increase 
the cost to the producer. But to get the full value 
of our natural advantages we must not neglect ap- 
pliances and means. In this category, nothing is 
more important than well-paved and well-kept 
streets, and we rejoice to see men who hold the po- 
sition of Mr. Newhall taking an active and intelligent 
interest in bringing the citizens to a realizing sense 
of the needs of the time. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1904. 



URGENT N^ED OF FIRE PROTECTION. 

The conditions prevailing in what is known as the 
"boarding-house district," and the danger of fire that 
threatens so much valuable property as well as life, 
make the subject a timely report filed with the 
Board of Supervisors by Fire Marshall Towe, rep- 
resenting the Board of Fire Wardens. These dan- 
gers have long been obvious to everybody, and the 
brain reels in contemplation of the catastrophe that 
may at any moment 'strike. We all know those tow- 
ering structures of wood that almost resemble the 
character of explosives, so inflammable are they and 
so impossible to be saved once a fire gains headway 
in them. Not only are they dangerous to the in- 
mates, but they threaten their neighbors, for these 
buildings are mostly huddled in one quarter of the 
town. We quote from the report : 

"Many buildings have been constructed, under pre- 
vious laws, wholly of wood, even as high as seven- 
stories. They adjoin and abutt together in some 
cases. Many of them are centered on one of the hilly 
districts of our city. It has been the study of this 
Board and of the Fire Department, whose officers 
comprise this Board, how to check a fire once started 
and extending from the building in which it origi- 
nated in what may be termed the boarding house 
district, where the buildings range from three to 
seven stories, and are constructed wholly of_ frame. 
Should a fire start on a windy day it is possible for 
burning embers to be carried blocks away. The de- 
partment would be taxed to its utmost and leave a 
valuable portion of the city at the mercy of a con- 
flagration. This risk is with us every day, and in 
answer to your resolution, we say the danger from 
fire is great — too great to be put in a written report." 

"Too great to be put in a written report" — that is 
a significant phrase, but we all know the dangers at 
which it hints. By way of remedy the Fire Wardens 
declare that in future all buildings outside of the fire 
limits, as well as within those limits, should be "con- 
structed wholly of brick or stone." 

Must the city wait for a disaster involving the 
lives of hundreds, of the destruction of some great 
block of buildings, before these reasonable precau- 
tions are enforced? 



A QUEER TRANSACTION. 

That is a very strange transaction by which the 
State commission for the California exhibit in the 
St. Louis Exposition has granted an exclusive con- 
cession for advertising to a Los Angeles firm. Un- 
der this concession it appears that the grantees are 
just now engaged in holding up the several counties 
and cities of the State, the Boards of Supervisors, 
the municipal governing bodies and the commercial 
organizations, under threat that if they do not pay 
for notice they will be shut out, or at best given 
some sort of perfunctory showing among the stere- 
opticon pictures that are to constitute the vehicle of 
advertisement. 

The State has appropriated $130,000 for the pur- 
pose of advertising resources and industries and nat- 
ural features of California. If that money is not 
sufficient, more can be had, and, in fact, a great deal 
more, but only on the understanding that it will be 
applied for the advantage of the contributors, and 
that no considerable part of it shall be diverted into 
the pockets of private individuals. 

This is the objection to the scheme that originated 
with Commissioner Wiggins of Los Angeles, that it 
puts the most important feature of the whole enter- 
prise in the hands of a couple of smart advertising 



solicitors — his friends — to be worked for their own 
profit. The chief purpose of every exhibit is to ad- 
vertise the State. It was to this end that the Legis- 
lature appropriated $130,000, and for the same pur- 
pose Boards of Supervisors are ready to add contri- 
butions from their county treasuries. But undoubt- 
edly the most effective form of advertisement is an 
illustrated lecture showing industrial and natural 
features. It is this concession that has been 
granted exclusively to Mr. Wiggins' friends. The 
$130,000 exhibit and the California building at the 
World's Fair will be used as the background and base 
of operation for the thrifty schemes of Mr. Wiggins' 
friends from Los Angeles. We are told that San 
Francisco will be permitted by these astute opera- 
tors to appear on the map of California, but appar- 
ently only by sufference. 

The whole proceeding cannot be called by any 
other name than "graft," and it is up to Governor 
Pardee to ask the Commissioners for an explanation. 

A DECAYING MONUMENT. 

The old church of Mission Dolores and the ceme- 
tery at the rear do not seem to be given that atten- 
tion and care which our few remaining historical 
monuments should have. The burying ground be- 
hind the church is overgrown with weeds, and the 
tombstones and other memorials of the dead are suf- 
fered to fall into decay. We realize fully that this 
neglect is no fault of the custodians, the authorities 
of the parish, but is due to lack of funds. We feel 
that money for the patriotic duty of maintaining 
in good condition this interesting monument of the 
life of pastoral California "before the Gringo came" 
falls on citizens of California, out of San Francisco 
more particularly, and some of our public spirited 
native sons or the Society of the Pioneers might do 
well to take the matter in hand. It is a pious duty 
to conserve the few remaining memorials of the 
California on that romantic period. 

No; that low, sad sound from the East is not the 
echo of a distant storm. It is Uncle Russell Sage 
grieving because another man who worked for him 
has sued him and got a judgment. 



We have known about radium for only a little 
while, yet it is claimed that it will turn lead into gold, 
solve the problem of perpetual motion, determine 
the sex of children and cure everything from corns 
to cancer. This is good — as far as it goes, but dare 
we hope that it will rob green onions of their odor 
and prevent trousers from bagging at the knees? 




r CHAS KLILLS & COM 

h.£XCL US/VEM 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

We put that Seventy-five and Eighty dollar Effect in our "IM- 
MEDIATE SERVICE CLOTHES," at moderate prices. Cor- 
rect smart dressers Know that our garments are properly balanced, 
correctly styled, with progressive ideas. Being " MEN'S 
CLOTHIERS ONLY" we fit accurately. 



DCEAKJMy STTI^JXISir 



February 6, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



How 5an Francisco Looks to Me 



Bv F«rrtfivj1d Travft). Tourist 



Positively your climate here drops the t'.,. 

w York, and is almost as pood as that of dear 
nil. If yon only had the roads, the drives, 
the halls, the ancestral home- and the society, I think 
truly I could make up my mind to live among 

- ly as much as six months each year. It will 
take lots of things to make a life's residence endur- 
able here for a man of my refinement and culture. 
Yon are a picture without a frame. You need finish- 
ing up or toning down. You have no drive in San 
Francisco that is used and retained solely for the 
better classes. You need a Rois de Bologne. a Row. 
or a Paseo. You really ought to attend to this. Make 
your Aldermen men set aside an avenue where we 
can ride and drive, and not be annoyed by a COS 

,er's cart or some red-shirted bounder astride 
a wheel. Make it the proper thing to show your- 
- there in the proper style, so that the lower 
s can see the correct thing; educate the beg- 
gars to a higher ideal. If you do, they will really, 
I assure you, train into better footmen, coachmen, 
tigers and butlers for you than they do. I don't 
bother a bit now about your poor service. The chaps 
you have here have not had any chance at all ; the}' 
don't know the glamour, honor and pleasure of serv- 
ing persons of high degree, and I will bet a pony that 
your wealthier classes as a rule don't know how to 
either train or treat a servant ; so, don't you know, 
your servants are rather more of a bore than an as- 
sistance. I really am sorry for them, for I have come 
in contact with some of my friends' men, who look 
real likely if they had not been spoiled in the break- 
ing. If you would get together and import an Eng- 
lish coachman or two, a few footmen and half a dozen 
butlers, the others would copy their ways, and I am 
sure you would find things much nicer. Then guar- 
antee a good livery maker from Bond street enough 
to open a shop here, and have your liveries properly 
done. The liveries I have noted mostly on your 
streets suggest uniforms more than livery. This is 
too bad, don't you see ! A proper livery discloses at 
once to a gentleman the owner of the equipage. By 
all means get some liveries. Your bootmakers are, 
I think, a fairly good lot, and you can get along 
without importing a bootmaker. Get the proper 
coachman, and he will know all about the boots. A 
coachman is necessary — if you can't get a coachman, 
give up your carriage, or drive a cart or gig with a 
tiger. A coachman is a bally lot more than a driver. 
You can spot the right chap at once by the way he 
holds the ribbons, the angle at which he carries his 
whip, and his seat on the box. Roger smiled the 
other day when he told me about a coachman he saw 
lean half over the seat and get his instructions as 
to where to drive, holding his ribbons and whip in 
one hand, and then he drove off without touching his 
hat. Simply wretchedly bad form. Take my ideas, 
won't you, and then when you do things proper, you 
will be noticed. I can spare some time, and don't 
mind going in for a turn-out or two myself, if the 
the rest of us do. 

Of course, don't you know, I can't criticise your 
valuable paper, but the bad form shown in the paper 
in speaking of his Imperial Majesty William, the 
Emperor of Germany, and the poor taste displayed 
by the boor who replied to it, compels me, my dear 
News Letter, to ask you to cease these comments 
on people like the Emperor, The next thing I note 



some person will be publishing some slighting criti- 
n about me. 

I feci lh.it I am appreciated, as I should he, in my 
ideas in trying to improve you, since I was compli- 
mented by Roger bringing to my apartments a let- 
ter which had been sent to me in care of the office 
of this paper. It asks my judgment in a gentle- 
manly sort of manner on the following question: "Is 
a beefsteak considered good form to serve at dinner?" 
Certainly the gentleman who consults me could not 
have asked any better authority, but honoring me by 
asking my advice, he should have enclosed his card. 
This is another evidence of- the lack of form among 
your men. Any well-bred man should know, and 
would know had he mixed in polite society and dined 
out, that serving a beefsteak with dinner would 
strip his visiting list, and cross him off every other 
invitation list in the better circles, if he has ever 
moved there. I am sorry the gentleman who wrote 
the question did not call on me. I would have made 
an exception and seen him. By enclosing his address 
or name of his club he would have enabled me to ad- 
dress him personally. I am not brutal by nature, and 
don't wish to wound any feelings, but a beefsteak at 
dinner would be about as bad form as pouring your 
coffee or icing your Burgundy — and those are two 
pretty bad facers. If I saw a fellow doing these things 
at a table at which I was a guest I should make up 
my mind that he was there by mistake, or else that 
I was; one of us would send regrets the next time 
to that hostess. I am not familiar with the abomin- 
able laches of good breeding perpetrated in the pub- 
lic dining rooms of public restaurants, and it may be 
good form to serve beefsteak for dinner in such 
places. Some one else must judge. It is shocking 
here to note the irreverence with which people eat 
their dinner. Dinner is a function. I think it should 
be approached with formality. It is the expression 
of the physical poetry of life. I think those poor 
persons who have not known the delights of dressing 
and dining should pray to get it in heaven. Some 
blooming poet says: "Life blooms to its richest and 
best." I'll bet that was written after a well-appointed 
dinner. It's most expressive, really. I assure you, 
'pon honor, that no other gentleman appreciates 
dining (used in the most formal sense 'of the word) 
any more than does Fernauld Travers. 



"BAB'J"" 



Epicurtan "Restaurant 
323 LARKIN STREET 



V>he James H. Bibcock Cantering Co. 

212-214 California St. 409 Golden Gate Ave. 



WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

V V o 

Scotch_Whisky 

ImporterS'MACONDRAY «e CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1904. 



Z5he Minister of Foreig'n Affairs 



Events in the Far East the last few days have re- 
vealed a great deal of Russian dinlomatic cunning, 
but it dees not come as a surprise. For several we e k s 
Japan has been fully prepared to throw an army int 
Korea and make that little kingdom a base of sup- 
plies and operations against Russia; what is called 
"diplomatic courtesy" has prevented a foreward 
movement. But all this time Japan, as well as all 
the rest of the world, has been satisfied that Russia 
was complicating the diplomatic prelude to gain 
time to put her Far East upon a strong war footing. 
All that is now accomplished, and the Czar's reply 
to Japan's last note may be expected at any moment. 
Of course, it will be an adroitly drawn document, 
overflowing with "distinguished consideration," but 
its meaning will be that Russia has no idea of giving 
up an inch of Manchuria, and that she will not per- 
mit Japan to dominate in Korea. Then it will be up 
to Japan to make a formal declaration of war, which 
she will make haste to do, and which she may do 
before this issue of the News Letter goes to press. 
It is a mistake to suppose that the "peace party" in 
Russia has at any time been willing to give up Man- 
churia or let Japan have a free hand in Korea for the 
sake of peace. It has been the plan all along of the 
peace party to wear out Japan in a war of diplomatic 
hair-splitting, and thus secure for Russia a still 
firmer hold in the Far East, but all Russia is a unit 
on the question of holding on to Manchuria, and 
gradually weaving a dominating influence in Korea, 
for such dominating influence is necessary to secure 
the Strait of Korea, for the Strait is the Hermit 
Kingdom's Gibraltar. But it so happens that a week 
ago Japan practically took possession of the Strait, 
which gives her a far-reaching advantage, for the 
time being anyway. The forthcoming note from 
Russia, therefore, in reply to Japan's last diplomatic 
effort to secure a permanent footing on the mainland 
will pledge Russia to give up Manchuria or a posi- 
tive refusal to comply with Japan's wishes. I H 
course, Russia will not move out of Manchuria un- 
less forced to do so. 

* * * 

The Czar has quit masquerading behin 1 a satisfied 
smile over the recently signed commercial treaty be- 
tween the United States and China, and he now in- 
timates that he regards the transaction as a "mean 
trick" on the part of the Washington Government, 
especially in attempting to establish consulates at 
the Manchurian treaty commercial centers. But his 
Majesty is willing to let the treaty become operative, 
though between the lines the fact is seen that the 
Czar does not recognize the right of China to make 
a treaty for Manchurian commercial privileges. It 
should not be forgotten, for it may cut considerable 
of a figure later on, that the United States and Great 
Britain utterly ignored Russia's alleged jurisdiction 
in Manchuria, and officially recognized Cbina as the 
only authority that had the right to negotiate- such 
a treaty. It was a slap at Russia's pretentions, and 
.an implied pledge to stand by the Peking Govern- 
ment in the premises. Meanwhile it must not be 
supposed that America and England are inclined to 
forego the commercial advantages granted to them 
in Manchuria by China simply because Russia does 
not like it. Nothing could be further from their pur- 
pose. They propose to establish consulates at the 



Manchurian treatv commercial centers without ref- 
erence to Russia's likes or dislikes. Manchuria is 
too rich and too extensive a field for British and Yan- 
kee commercial and industrial exploitation to run 
away from because of the gnashing of a Bear's 

teeth. 

* * * 

What Germany and France are to secure to them- 
selves from the spoils for practically avowing their 
sympathy with Russia and an implied threat that 
under certain circumstances something more sub- 
stantial than moral aid will be given to Russia, will 
develop later on. But, on the other hand, the Ger- 
'raan Government is confronted by a powerful and 
steadily increasing socialistic party that does not 
hesitate to denounce Russia's aggressive and land- 
grabbing policy in the Far Fast, and its unyielding 
opposition to the Kaiser's political relations with the 
Czar may oblige the Government to at least be ab- 
solutely neutral. 

* * * 

The Republic of Colombia is still bent upon 
thrashing Panama back into the federation, but blus- 
ter and the tramp of soldiers on dress parade is as 
near to a hostile demonstration as the powers that 
be have thus far made in a public way. There is a 
suspicion that some sort of negotiations are going 
on between the Colombian Government and Ger- 
many, more particularly, which contemplate a joint 
interest which will be almost, if not quite, the equiv- 
alent of a European protectorate. If it be true that 
such is the fact, it is made clear that Colombia in- 
tends to trade her independence for a wedge to split 
the Monroe Doctrine wide open, and turn all the 
Latin-American States into so many fields for exploi- 
tation of European nations by running streams of 
immigrants into them for future political govern- 
mental use. Evidently the Colombian political lead- 
ers are willing to bit off their nose to spite their face, 
if only the Washington Government can be involved 
in dangerous complications. 

* * * 

The Philippine Commission reports it does not 
consider the future of our Asiatic possessions at all 
promising. That is exactly how all foreign nations 
have "considered"" the matter ever since the United 
States extended its jurisdiction over the islands. As 
an English statesman puts it: "Your Uncle Samuel 
is trying to make a silk purse out of a pig's ear with- 
out first having acquired some knowledge of the 
business." However, if the United States should be- 
come involved in the Japanese-Russian muddle the 
Philippines will come handy for a military and naval 
base, a "base" that costs several hundred million dol- 
lars is pretty expensive for a Republic that stands 
for peace, human liberty and individual sovereignty 
to indulge in. But be it said to the credit of the Fil- 
ipinos, the Commssion announces that progress, civ- 
ilization, decency, thrift and proper deportment on 
the part of the native men and women are discour- 
aged, handicapped and weakened by vagabond 
Americans who are swaggering all over the islands 
as moral pestilence, commercial rottenness and in- 
dustrial thievery. The colonial experience of the 
United States is amusing to our fellow members of 
the Concert of Powers. 



February 6. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Political 



So far a-; tl- I nominations art 

I. the names that will app 
this fall arc practically decided in the !<• 

■ with the exception of the Second, Fifth and 
Eighth Districts, in which matters are still left 
Gillett will be nominated again in the First, and 
calf goes hack from the Third. Kahn wants t 
his hick again in the Fourth against l.ivcrnash. who 
e renominated by the Democrats, ami 
Needham anil MacLachlan are both certain of 

heir party indorsement. There was some talk 
nt MacLachlan for Senator, hut he has effectually 
put a quietus on that idea by declaring that he could 
not afford to make the race for the Senate and that 
he preferred to return to the Lower House. In the 
Second District, the Republicans must pick out a 
man with more care if they want to win than in am 
other district in the State. In the first place, the 
district has the unpleasant habit of going Demo- 
cratic. Jim Budd was a Congressman from the Sec- 
ond. Caminetti was elected three times. Miron Dev- 
res came from the same district, and now Bell rep- 
resents it. It is true that the district has been 
changed several times since Budd ran, but neverthe- 
it always contains Sacramento, and that is 
where it gets its Democratic majority. Frank- 
Coombs would like to get the nomination again, hut 
Dr. Mathews killed off Coombs politically when he 
called the Congressman "Gloomy Gus." A man may 
survive opposition and bitter enemies, but he never 
can overcome ridicule, if it once sticks, and ''Gloomy 
Gus" has stuck to Coombs ever since Mathews sug- 
gested its applicability to Coombs. Besides, it needs 
an active campaigner, and Coombs is not active. 
Senator Devlin of Sacramento has also been men- 
tioned, and the Bee of that town interviewed him on 
the subject, and printed a column of talk from the 
statesman, but no definite conclusion as to what he 
would do. Those who know best say that it would 
be very hard to elect Devlin because of his record on 
the Prison Board. Everything the Board has done, 
and everything it has failed to do, and its sins of 
omission are even more numerous than its sins of 
commission, would be loaded upon Devlin if he ran, 
and with a popular man like Bell on the other side 
it would be almost impossible to elect him. Then 
there is Charley Curry, Secretary of State. He has 
been talked to, but Charley claims to hail from San 
Francisco, though he now lives in Sacramento. 
Hearst was elected to Congress from New York 
while he claimed to be a Califronian. This State 
is more particular about such things than New York, 
and then there is no tenderloin in California as 
there is in the Empire State, that elects a Congress- 
man by itself, for Curry to buy even if he had the 
means and the inclination, both of which he lacks. 
Besides Curry's eye is on the Governorship rather 
than Congress. Duncan McKinley of Santa Rosa, at 
one time Presidential elector, now assistant U. S. 
District Attorney, is another candidate. McKinley 
is a good campaigner, and would certainly make it 
lively for Bell . He is popular as a speaker, and hav- 
ing risen from the ranks (he was originally a painter) 
he ought to stand well with the labor vote, which is 
a strong factor in Sacramento. 

In the Fifth District, the nomination, now that 
Fiske has accepted the San Francisco Postmaster- 
ship, will probably go to Santa Clara County. Loud 
has been appointed a delegate to the International 
Postal Congress in Rome, which meets sometime 



• 
sim- 

1! grounds The district was tit 
him, the postal employees were opposed to him to 
in, and he wou >\ eak in o 

by a 
'"■nt losii .-. but he canm 

beaten on purely personal grounds and hold his 
own. and -,, f,, r B g CongTI errned, Lotld 

ii of it. As San Francisco has had the honor 

of naming the ( ongTCSStnan so often it is only fair 

that the nomination should go to Santa tiara, and 

there seems 110 great opposition to that idea. If the 
candidate is selected from down the country. Mr. A. 
E, ' Isborne will probably be the man. The condi- 
tion in Santa Clara is peculiar. There has been a 
very bitter tight waged there for years. There have 
been the McKenzie gang and the Hayes anti-gang, 
and neither faction seems able to gain such a de 
cisive victory that their opponents are put com 
pletely out of the fight for good. Unless they stand 
together the Democrats will carrv the county or an 
independent ticket will be elected, as happened two 
years ago when the independents carried everything 
from Sheriff to Charlie Shortridge. 

In the Eighth District there was a very bitter fight 
two years ago. Every county in the district had a 
candidate for Congress, and a dead lock resulted that 
lasted for weeks. Daniels was finally nominated 
through the manipulations of his friend and partner 
in the banking business, Hays of Riverside, who was 
a very shrewd political wire-puller. But Hays got 
mixed up in a land scheme involving the right of way 
of the Salt Lake road, in which he was accused of 
doing up the company, and was forced to make res- 
titution, so he is no longer on hand to help Daniels, 
and the other candidates in the district hope to profit 
by that fact, and prevent the latter's renomination. 
Ex-Senator Smith of Bakersfield is probably the 
strongest anti-Daniels candidate. He has served 
several terms in the Legislature, has friends all over 
the district and put up a good fight 2 years ago. His 
friends say that this year he can win out, as Daniels 
has done nothing particularly for the District since 
he went to Washington. The trouble, however, is 
that Kern County is Democratic, while Riverside 
is largly Republican, and naturally the men who elect 
the Congressman feel that they should have the right 
to name him. Prescott of Redlands, who was a very 
active member of the last Assembly, is also a can- 
didate for Congress from the Eighth, but he prob- 
ably would be willing to take the nomination for 
State Senator to succeed the late Senator Hubbell, 
and wait until 1906 for his Congressional nomination. 
Senator Caldwell, of Riverside, would also like to 
go to Congress, but for personal reasons is not in a 
position, I understand, to fight Daniels, and he, too, 
will be sent back to the Senate. That leaves the fight 
practically between Daniels and Smith, with Daniels 
now in office, which is a big help to get a nomina- 
tion. — Junius. 

AN OPEN SHOP. 

All fair-minded people should patronize Johnson's 
Open-Shop Restaurant (boycotted), 725 Market St. 

If you want to eat the best, drink the beat, and be 

among the best people, go to Techau Tavern, which is sec- 
ond to no restaurant in San Francisco. It is the favorite 
after-the-theatre resort, and deserves its fine reputation. 



Dr. Decker, 

DentiBt, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for palnlesi 

teeth extracting. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1904. 




J. J. Bell won a certain amount 
Mrs. McLerie of popularity and means with 
his first book, "Wee MacGregor," 
but it cannot be truthfully said that he has kept his 
advantage in "Mrs. McLerie." There is no doubt 
of the cleverness of much of the dialogue, but just 
another touch would have made the little work the 
success which it really deserves to be. As it is, 
"Mrs. McLerie" is not convincing — the characters 
lack probability. The work is too evidently made, 
the construction too palpable. Mrs. McLerie is a sort 
of Scotch peasant variety of Mrs. Malaprop, and 
some of her mistakes in the use of words are very 
engaging, particularly when her friend, Mrs. Munro, 
sets out to correct her as she always makes a point of 
doing. A typical instance of the style of the book 
may be found in the following. Mrs. McLerie is 
dwelling upon her husband's aversion to gambling. 
She says: "Mony's the time I've heard him say he 
wad as soon pit money in a horse race as intil a dis- 
ruption sale." 

"Subscription sale." Mild correction by Mrs. 
Munro. 

"Aweil, it's a' yin. An' whit's a rattle (raffle) but 
a disruption sale." 

This is a fair sample of the book, and the reader, 
of this can judge for himself. There is, however, 
a certain quality in the stories which shows that the 
author has possibilities, for he is able to produce a 
certain amount of sympathy and even affection for 
his uncouth Scotch characters. It is a fairly good 
book, which might have been a very good book. 

The Century Co., New York. 

This is the fourth 

Steps in the Expansion volume of a series is- 

of Our Territory. sued by Appleton, the 

said series being called 
"The Expansion of the Republic" series. Oscar 
Phelps Austin, Chief of the Bureau of Statistics, 
Treasury Department, is the author. The story of 
national development is well told, without any nota- 
ble variations from the account usually given in the 
school histories. In fact, the history of the revolt 
of the colonies is stated in terms less broad than those 
usual in the later school histories. The expansion of 
the country and its marvelous development commer- 
cially and as a manufacturing community, is as- 
cribed largely, and no doubt within certain limits 
correctly, to the liberal land policy which has been 
possessed by the United States Government, as well 
as to the advantages which a Democratic State with- 
out military conscription possesses over countries 
which are so hampered. The book will be found a 
readable and reliable text-book for those who are 
desirous of studying the main outlines of the national 
growth. The situations are well chosen and may be 
accepted. 

D. Appleton & Co., New York. 

This forms a volume in the series 

Extinct entitled "The Library of Useful 

Civilization. Stories," and is a very interesting 

and informing little book. The au- 
thor is Robert E. Anderson, who has written a finer 
book on "The Extinct Civilizations of the East." The 
Aztecs, the early Mexicans, and the prehistoric Pe- 
ruvians are considered, and a fairly complete ac- 
count of their mode of life and curious customs is 
presented. An interesting feature of the work is 
the proof adduced in support of the fact that many 



symbols which we are accustomed to regard as ex- 
clusively Christian were employed by several prehis- 
toric American nations whose remains testify to this. 
The Cross, for example, the author states, occurs 
frequently, not only in Mayan sculptures, but in 
the ceremonials of the Aztecs. These people also 
calculated the time with such accuracy that their 
calendar was superior to that existing in Europe at 
that period, so that when the Spaniards visited them 
the reckoning of the latter was in error eleven days 
as compared with that of the nation which they con- 
quered. There are many other interesting facts of 
a like nature in this little volume. 

D. Appleton & Co., New York. 

In a story of the Rome of Nero, 
Lux Cracis. one is sure to find a persecuted 
Christian maiden who is roughly 
wooed by a Roman noble whom she finally converts, 
and a powerful slave whose gladiatorial feats in the 
arena win the favor of the populace and save the 
damsel. "Lux Crucis" is "Quo Vadis" in a minor 
key. Its chief faults are, first, the exaggerated im- 
portance, from the Roman point of view, that at- 
taches to the whole New Testament story. As you 
read the book, you get the impression that the events 
in far-off Galilee are of paramount importance in the 
world of Rome — whereas, the plain truth of the mat- 
ter was that to the Roman official world the whole 
New Testament story was only too prevalently re- 
garded as a mere surface ripple in a distant province. 

Secondly, while Mr. Gardenhire's book could be 
put indiscriminately into the hands of "the young 
person," yet to just this extent it is false to the at- 
mosphere of the time. Nero's court and Nero's age 
were essentially unclean. It is impossible to treat 
of the history and conditions of that period with- 
out coming in contact with much that is repellant. 
The social condition of the women was far more 
complex than it could possibly be to-day, ranging 
through the numerous different forms of marriage, 
to the successive stages of freed woman and slave, 
forming altogether a complex maze in which even 
the most careful student of manners may pardonably 
lose his way. Mr. Gardenshire, however, cannot be 
said to have lost his way, for he has chosen to skirt 
around the maze instead of penetrating it. Neverthe- 
less, it is a book which will undoubtedly enjoy a 
popularity of considerable extent, and will be read 
with genuine pleasure by a large proportion of the 
readers who enjoyed the volumes of Sienkiewicz 
and General Lew Wallace. 

"Lux Crucis." By Samuel L. Gardenhire. Harper 
& Brothers, New York. 

Mr. Jack London's novel, "The Call of the Wild," 
and Mr. James Lane Allen's "The Mettle of the Pas- 
ture," have been placed on the Navy Department's 
List of Books approved for Issue to Ships' Libraries. 

The Macmillan Company, Publishers. 

The Macmillan Company has published Mr. Ed- 
mund Gosse's biography of "Jeremy Taylor" in the 
English Men of Letters Series. They promise for 
some time in February the second and fourth vol- 
umes of Messers. Garnett and Gosse's "Illustrated 
History of English Literature." Mr. Gosse is one 
of the most eminent English men of letters of the 
present day, and a man of singularly varied talents, 
noted for his versatility of knowledge and his charm 
of style. 



February 6. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




\ - 






Dear Bessie: ["he question on ever) 
the Mardi < Iras ball? 
5 1 have said all along there would In 
invitations are quite pretty, and the men I 
made happy with the knowledge that th< 

- they should always have been a'llowi 
I have not yet made up my mind what costume 
to wear, but either of the two I have under consider- 
ation will be worthy of note. 

But let me tell you about Bernie's wedding, for 
I know you want to hear all about it. It took place 
at noon on Saturday at St. Luke's, which is such a 
bright, pretty, warm church it does not need much 
sing to make it attractive. Green and white 
was the color scheme the whole way through — 
(lowers, costumes, etc. — and the decoration was con- 
fined to the chancel, which was a mass of terns and 
St Joseph lilies. To say the church was full is to 
put it mildly, and the usual Lohengrin strains her 
aided the coming of the bridal party prompt! . 
time. Will Page. Percy King and John Lawson, 
who were the ushers, were of course the first to de- 
light our vision, and they had seated us all so grace- 
fully and with such seeming good humor we were 
to see them again. Then followed Newel 
Drown, as maid of honor who looked lovely in white 
crepe de chine and a hat made of lilies of the valley. 
After her came in couples the four bridesmaids. 
Charlotte Ellinwood, Lide Cadwallader, Stella Kane 
and Susie Blanding, also gowned in white crepe de 
chine, but their hats were trimmed with green silk 
and white ostrich tips, and they carried pretty little 
green and white muffs. Bernie and her father came 
last, and I never saw her look better than in her 
bridal robe of white chiffon satin, and tulle veil, 
wreath of white orchids and bouquet to match. Sam 
and his best man — his brother Chauncey (as Captain 
Winn couldn't get leave to come down for it, as he 
sails with his regiment for Manila next month) — 
met them at the chancel, and Bishop Nichols, with 
the assistance of Mr. Weeden, the rector, performed 
the ceremony. After the church service quite a num- 
ber went out to the Drowns for the reception and 
the dejeuner which followed, and then nearly every 
one went out on the front porch to see the happy 
pair depart, and to pelt them with rice. Do you 
know, f never go to a wedding that I do not think 
what a senseless proceeding that is, and far from 
being fun for the bride and groom. Well, Sam and 
Bernie were so active they were soon hidden in the 
depths of the carriage, which was all dressed out 
with tulle and long branches of fruit blossoms, and 
they were in such a hurry to get away the horses 
fairly slid down the hill. You will note by this that 
I did not go over to Oakland to see Jacqueline Moore 
and Jack Valentine joined in wedlock, but Mollie, 
who did, told me all about it, and you shall have 
the benefit of her observations. She said St. Paul's 
church, where the ceremony took place, was profuse- 
ly dressed with ferns and flowers, and the bridal 
party was one of the prettiest she lias ever seen in 
Oakland. Jacqueline, who made a very handsome 
bride, wore white embroidered satin trimmed with 
duchesse lace, and the bridesmaids, Marian Good- 
fellow, who was the first, Anita Oliver, Florence 
White, Edna Barry, Marion Smith, Ethel Valentine 
and fsabelle Hooper were all gowned alike in lav- 
ender chiffon cloth/and wore lavender picture hats; 



ire, who was maid of h 

1 lavender, but she won - >n. of whlti 

his daughter away, and 
Bishop ! 1 t«\ the Rc\ erend 

•11 Shaw, officiated. Then followed the ri 
tion at the home of the Moores, which was .1 verj 

large One. < Ih, 1 forgot I lames Ki una. Ir.-.l Dieck- 

man, Philip Clay, Ed Hume. Arthur Goodfellow, 

Whipple Hall and Stanley Moore were the ushers. 

and Hugh Goodfellow best man: and. by the way, 

the engagement of Isabellc Hooper to WiggingtOn 

Creed was announced at the wedding. 

I went out last Friday afternoon to the charity 
tea given by the ladies at the Presidio; it took plac< 
in the hop room, which was so prettily decorated 
and filled with the pleasantest kind of a crowd. 
Nearly all the army girls were in evidence; Miss 
Bessie Rawles and the recently arrived Miss M 
had charge of the musical part of the affair, and I 
never saw Lily "Tiara look prettier than she did 
as one of the attendant maids who looked after the 
guests. La Jeunesse Assembly dance at the Palace 
in the evening was the last of the season, and was 
very pleasant, but I tell you there were a lot of foot- 
sore girls there after all the dancing they had done 
during the week. Mrs. Voorhies did the principal 
receiving act, and most of the gowns were either 
black or white, with pink or a blue here and there 
to give tone to the picture: but you never saw the 
way Mrs. Peter Martin, who was one of those who 
wore blue — was followed about to see how her gown 
was made and take a few hints therefrom. Sunday 
was rather an off day in the tea line ; that is, there 
were no formal large affairs on hand; the Dickens 
girls, Edna and Helen, had a small one for Miss 
Hollister, wdio is here from the south, and Kitty 
tells me she met quite a number at Kate Henry's who 
had just dropped in for a chat as she did. Philip 
said he had a cup of tea with Mrs. Martin, but did 
not see Mrs. Peter who was one of the house party 
Mrs. Frank Carolan gave for her down at Burlin- 
game. Mrs. Martin gives two dinners instead of one 
as first intended for Mrs. Peter; one came off on 
Thursday and the other will take place next Tues- 
day; feasts, both of them, you can wager a small 
amount. Mrs. Peter has been the guest of honor at 
several spreads of late ; Mrs. Monte Wilson had a 
big luncheon for her on Wednesday; yesterday Mr. 
Jim Phelan gave one of his handsome dinners in her 
honor at the Bohemian Club, and Mrs. Rudolph 
Spreckels gives her a dinner next Wednesday. 

Such a pleasant little dance as we had at Margaret 
Postlethwait's on Monday. They have a very pretty 



SHREVE & COMPANY'S 

STATIONERY 

Invitations to Weddings and all other social 
occasions. Marriage announcements, Re- 
ception and Visiting Cards. Correspon- 
dence papers embellished with monograms, 
crests, et cetera. 

POST & MARKET STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 6, 1904. 



home on Pacific Avenue, and Mrs. Postlethwait 
first had a dinner party of a dozen young people, and 
then a lot more came from the dance, which was 
"awfully jolly, don't you know." Jack Wilson and 
Mabel Guff were responsible for two of the dinners 
this week. Ed. Greenway feasted the groom elect 
at the Bohemian Club on Tuesday night, and the fol- 
lowing one Jack Wilson played the host in honor of 
his bride to be, to thirty of their mutual friends. I 
had all I could do to rush home from Kate Dillon's 
card party, snatch a bite of dinner, and off to take 
in the Naval charity benefit at the Alhambra before 
going to the dance at the Cheesebroughs', which was 
a charming affair. 

Louise Harrington and Lieutenant Leahy were 
very quietly married on Wednesday at her home 
on California street; and to-day is the wedding day 
of Mary Kip, whose marriage to Doctor Ernest 
Robinson will take place at the Cathedral in Omaha 
at noon, with Bishop YVilberforce to pronounce the 
nuptial blessii 1 ' - 

The Hobarts are here already, coming sooner than 
expected. They arrived last Friday, and of course 
Mary Eyre, who went abroad with them, is back too. 
Charlie Baldwin is here on a visit, and looks the same 
as he did before he was married — just a bit quieter, 
perhaps; Mrs. Allen Lewis has gone home to Port- 
land, and Sam and Bernie to Honolulu for their 
honeymoon. Mrs. Nokes has gone to join Jean at 
Fort Russell, as I told you she would some time 
ago, and will remain with her indefinitely. Anna 
Sperry, who went with her, will spend February 
there and then return. 

Bessie Ames did not get off as soon as expected, 
but has really gone now, leaving for the East last 
Saturday. Ad. Mizner has gone off on an automobile 
trip to Los Angeles with Jack Baird — hope they 11 
get back safe. The Whitelaw Reids will soon b e here 
on their annual visit with D. O. Mills ; I heard yes- 
terday that Lillie Lawlor was coming with them, 
but doubt it; she is having too good a time in New 
York. —Elsie. 



the scent of the burning incense and the aromatic 
odor of the punk, gave a faint idea of the charm of 
the Orient. Assisting the hostess in receiving were 
Miss Helen Weidersham and Miss Vera Allen. 

Railroad Row is congratulating Mr. W. W. Web- 
ster of the Missouri Pacific and the Denver and Rio 
Grande, on his engagement to Miss Elise G. Hage- 
dorn, daughter of Mr. Alec. Hagedorn. The young 
people will be married some time in June. 

Miss Ivy M. Bunker, sister of Lieutenant L. C. 
Bunker, is visiting him at San Juan. Miss Bunker 
has been entertained on several occasions at the 
Palace, and at other functions given in her honor. 
She will remain with the Lieutenant until his re- 
turn to the States. 

List of arrivals at Hotel Rafael for week ending 
February 2d : B. M. Gunn and wife, Miss Hawkins, 
Miss McNally, Baroness Von Meyerinck, Dudley 
Gunn, W. H. Mills and wife, Miss Corey, A. Viginer 
and wife, Miss M. Taliferro, H. P. Sonntag, Dr. and 
Mrs. Mohun, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Bigelow, Mr. and 
Mrs. S. M. Rosenbaum, Lewis S. Rosenbaum, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. H. Fritch, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Hirsch- 
man, A. E. Barrett, Mrs. C. A. Grow, Mrs. F. P. 
Stearns, Mrs. Dr. J. D. McGowan, J. W. Ferguson, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brooke, J. A. Jackson and wife, 
G. B. Morris and wife, Mrs. Harold Bolce. 



FOR SALE. 

This superb instrument, in use but a 
Apollo short time, will be sold, on account of 
Grand owner's departure, for a very low figure. 
Player. Cost new $300. Address for further 
Piano particulars, Owner, Room 66, 320 San- 
some street. 



In decorating the Itorae or church fora wedding for dinners, lun- 
cheon or receptions the three ladies composing the Him of Manning's 
decorators and florists, 24C Stockton 1st. show the greatest originality . 
in their artistic work. 



One of the safest and hesr remedies for hiliousness or bilious head- 
ache, is Leipnitz Liver Kegulator. It is an excellent alterative and tonic 
to the digestive organs. For sale by Leipnitz & Co. N. E. Cor, Sutter 
and Grant Ave. 



The Mark Hopkins Institute of Art is in the hands 
of the transformer. All the pictures have been taken 
out of the Searls gallery, and its sombre walls are 
blossoming into the most gorgeous color effects. 
Lavender and gold is the scheme of tints that is 
to transform the dignified institute into a palace of 
delight. All of the boxes are sold, and as many more 
would find eager purchasers if they were to be had. 
Following are the fortunate possessors of these cov- 
eted places: Mrs. James L. Flood, Mrs. Rudolph 
Spreckels, Mr. James D. Phelan, Mr. William Bab- 
cock, Gen. M. H. De Young, Colonel M. H. Hecht, 
Mr. Mountford S. Wilson, Mr. H. P. Hussey, Mr. 
Joseph D. Grant, Mr. Willis E. Davis, Mr. Frank J. 
Sullivan, Mr. J.E.- De Sabla, Mr. Thomas J. Barbour, 
Mr. George H. Lent, Major Darling, U. S. A. 

Among the distinctively original society functions 
of the week was the afternoon affair given on Wed- 
nesday by Mrs. Edgar L. Wakeman, at her home, 
Hill and Noe streets. The invitations read from 2 
to 5 p. m., and some twenty acceptances were re- 
ceived. The scheme of decoration was severely Ori- 
ental ; the daylight was excluded, and the light fur- 
nished by numberless, many-sized and variously 
colored Japanese lanterns. The flowers were aca- 
cias and lilies. These, together with the fine collec- 
tion of rare Japanese prints and exquisite embroid- 
eries collected by Mrs. Wakeman during her last 
year's tour of the Orient, made a riot of color, and 




CROWN CAKE 

A DELICIOUS BREAKFAST 
CAKE 

25 Cents 

Beats all other breakfast cakes 



TEL. SOVTH 713 



Artistic 

Flower 

Decoration 


MANNING'S 

246 Stockton St., cor. Post 

VALENTINE NOVELTIES 
For Home and Church Weddings. 
Receptions. Dinners and Luncheons. 
Novel ideas. Original conceptions. 

Phone Mala 847 






iVRINKLES and FACIAL BLEMISBFS 


Removed by New Process (Guaran- 
teed.) Face Massage, Manicuring 
and Scalp Massage 

AT YOUR HOME, 

by appointment 

MME. H. EASTWOOD 

307 Larkln St., S. F. Tel. Larkln 2646. 



February 6, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE RETORT COURTEOUS. 
The rector of a fashionabl ;>.il church in 

the Western Addition was intoning during 
It was lime for the censer-bearer t.> come fon 
In vain the minister looked for him — he did 

"Where, oh, where is the incense-pot?" lie intoned. 

lit in the vestibule, too darn*d hot," intoned the 
-cr-boy after him. 



Judge Colt of the Circuit Court of the United 
-. district of Massachusetts, deserves the con- 
gratulations and thanks of the American people for 
the broad and sweeping decision rendered November 
9th, 1903. restraining Adams. Taylor Company 

m, Mass.. from using the word "Club" in o n- 
Dection with bottled cocktails. The complainants. 
1 1. F. Hcublein & Brother, have spent much time and 
money in introducing the celebrated Club Cocktails. 
which, like all well-known and staple articles, have 
been more or less imitated. This decision means not 
onlv protection to the maker of the goods, but af- 
- equal protection to the purchaser, and simpli- 
fies the matter of getting what you want and pay 
for. We trust the courts will continue in this good 
work and protect known and established brands 
from the piracy to which they so long have been sub- 
ject. 

Mrs. Alvinza Hayward has placed ten building 
lots on sale. These lots adjoin the Strathmore Ho- 
tel and are situated in a section of San Francisco 
that is rapidly increasing in value. Messers. Bald- 
win and Hammond are the agents, and the sale is to 
occur on February nth, and they will be disposed 
of at auction. This is an unheard-of opportunity 
for some one to obtain valuable property at his own 
price. We predict a large attendance at this sale. 
The terms are easy, 40 per cent cash and the balance 
on time. Those who are looking for excellent invest- 
ments in property, which is bound to increase in 
value rapidly, had better attend this sale. 

To an already large business, with many depart- 
ments, Messrs. Shreve & Company have now added 
the interesting feature of stationery. Rumors of 
further extensions are in the wind. This house is 
often called the "Tiffany's" of the Pacific Coast — this 
statement may be all well enough in the way of an 
average tribute, but we can pay them no higher com- 
pliment than to say that this concern stands alone 
as "Shreve & Company," and needs no "Tiffany" 
comparison to add to its repute as a business house. 

Land on the historic site of Washington's winter 
camp at Valley Forge has been ap