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Full text of "S.F. Newsletter (July-Dec. 1904)"

JUN 1905 




United Crafts and Arts 



ORLOF N. ORLOW, President 



HE making of beautiful furniture and 
decorating of interiors that all things 
in a room may accord with one 
another and express the personality of the dweller 
among them. Estimates given for the asking. 




2203 CENTRAL AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 








fop our bran< 

t o h e op 

80~83Gear>rSi 



ted 

l drvi^ store 
xve d ».ip* 
near Grant Ave. 




<^8i real, genuine, duly 
accredited sandwich mam; 
lMJ!\i.rt: be re^dy to 
promenade t oniKe day 
of the openino^iiIy r 2nd 

The Owl Drug Co. SanFrancisco. 




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WESTERNERS GO TO ST. LOUIS 

fZn for d $ y fi7%n° ing rJ he W ° r L d ' S Fain Californ ^ns can visit St. Louis and re- 
S72SO rlfn , 'h Ch ' ca S° 1 and re * urn . Passing one way through St. Louis, for 

8 Q in fs Tq^ f 'I c *T? TlCketS ° n sale Ju 'y l - 2 - 7 - 8 - 13 > 14 ; August 
8, 9, 10, 18, 19; September 5, 6, 7, 8 and October 3, 4, 5, 6. Your choice of trains 
and routes Ask for details at Information Bureau, 613 Market St San Fmn 
Cisco, or of any agent 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



1305:*;, 




ESTABLISHED JULY ao. 1856. 



Annual Subscription. $4.00 



Vol. LXIX 



s nM r«ANcit eo 

News-Better 

(tfalif or nut5 % b c vt i sr r. 

SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 2. 1904. 




The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER la printed and published 
u V '.^. 8»«"U?"J *>y «•>* proprietor. Frederick Marriott. Hailed! 
Building. DO Sana. .me .street. San Francisco. Cal, 

Entered at San Franclaeo Poaloffica aa aecond claaa matter 

New York Office— (where Information may bo obtained ret.tr.llnR 
na and advertising)- SOS Broadway. C C M irphv. 
Representative. 

London Ofllco— » Cornhlll. E. C. England. George Street A Co. 

AH social noma, announcementa. advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER ahould be sent to thla office not later than 9 a. m 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 

Wise men fight the devil with tire, and the union 

labor "picket" with tire-arms. 

It is fortunate that every now and then a striker 
is Struck g 1 and hard. 



"Togo or not to go" is the way the bottled-up Rus- 
sians at Port Arthur read the Shakespearean line. 

From an oratorical standpoint, "Uncle Joe" Can- 
nun appears to be only a toy pistol. 

San Francisco may not be the largest city in the 
United States, hut it has the littlest Mayor. 



The demand for a uniform divorce law has abso- 
lutely nothing to do with the recent scandals in the 
families of army officers. 

The astute physician who wants to diagnose the 
illness of the high-priced lady star looks in the box- 
office for the predisposing cause. 

It is refreshing to know that the present warden 
of San Quentin can shoot off something beside his 
mouth. 



The newest of musical "boy wonders" is called 
Tada Styka. He is a Pole in spite of a name that 
sounds like the Swedish words for matches. 



Every chapter of the history which the Russian 
Generals and Admirals are making and writing in the 
Orient begins: "I regret to report." 

We can hardly believe that it is Congressman 
Livernash who is writing all the newspaper reports 
about men miraculously recovering their lost wits. 

Almost anything will be forgiven the non-union 
stableman who mixes matters with the "wrecking 
crew" except failure to shoot low and often. 

Hawaii is not too busy suppressing the undraped 
hula-hula to deport the freaky stranger who insists 
on going about with his head and feet bare. 

While Emperor William and Edward the Seventh 
exchanged kingly kisses, it is suspected that each of 
them kept one eye on the bulletins from Manchuria. 

An official inquiry has settled it that the cause of 
the steamer Colon's loss was the taking of observa- 
tions through the bottoms of whiskey gla 



A law compelling steamboat people in put up 
signs warning passengers not to use the hfe-pr 
servers in case of disaster, will meet with public ap 

proval in New York. 

If there were only an "o" between the tun sylla- 
bles of his name. Senator Fairbanks could count upon 
all the votes there are in Arizona. New Mexico and 
the rest of the Southwest. 



There are many people who would not for the 
world u>e such language as Dowie does in speaking 

of the reporters, but still like to read his sulphurous 
remarks on the subject. 



Pretty soon the "Young Napoleon of Journalism" 
will be hunting with a club for the clever person 
who told him that tile 1 'residency was a matter of 
price and not of personality. 

People who have bad business relations with the 
street contracting ring have no difficulty in under- 
standing why those licensed buccaneers should lo- 
cate a red rock quarry as a gold mine. 

It develops that Lily Langtry's present husband 
is a tatooed man. Ultimately he will be useful in 
the side-show as a bread-winner when the elderly 
beauty's charms have ceased to charm. 

As a real neat puzzle, it is suggested that the 
Hearst newspapers ask their readers to guess who 
will be the biggest "sizzer" in the Democratic fire- 
works display at St. Louis on the Fourth of July. 

Hearst is pained over the lack of enthusiasm 
which his practiced eye noted in the Convention that 
nominated Roosevelt at Chicago. Hearst ought to 
be an expert at discovering lack of public apprecia- 
tion. 



There may be a difference of opinion about Sholto 
Douglas's place in the British peerage, but none 
whatever concerning the lordliness of the jag when 
his mother-in-law goes out for one of her Oakland 
celebrations. 




An eccentric Parisienne rides astride, smokes big 
black cigars, tells naughty stories, and dresses in 
red, green and yellow. As soon as she lets it be 
known that she is the eldest sister of Nebuchad- 
nezzar, she will be put with the other loonies. 

Sister Oakland is wrought up over public mention 
of her high taxes, and points pridefully to a race of 
only $2.63. The only other cities in comparison are 
Stockton, which lives on hope ; Sacramento, which 
exists by and for politics ; San Diego, which fattens 
on the tourist; Riverside, which rubs along without 
the saloon, and Fresno, which is one of the lost 
cities of the plain. Our neighbor would have done 
not go into the arithmetic of the argument. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



CLEMENT SCOTT. 

The death of Clement Scott removes ■ from the 
sphere of dramatic criticism one of the best known 
and oldest of critics. As dramatic critic for the 
Daily Telegraph he accomplished much work, some 
of which was of value, some of which was, particu- 
larly, in later da3 r s, absolutely vicious. This is not 
said with any intention of casting reflections upon 
the dead, but as stating what mav be considered a 
fair estimate of his accomplishments. His later years 
were marked, as is too often :he case with, those 
who have enjoyed a certain amount of popular suc- 
cess, by poverty and suffering. But Mr. Scott would 
never complain of neglect. In which respect he was 
much more fortunate than many others who were at 
heart equally deserving. The theatrical profession 
rallied with characteristic generosity to the assist- 
ance of its mentor in distress, and shortly before his 
decease a benefit performance, given in London by 
some of the foremost theatrical people, obtained for 
him a handsome sum of money. 

Clement Scott was unable to grasp the significance 
of the modern problem play. All the names which 
are associated with the recent development of the 
theatre, Ibsen, Suderman, Hauptmann, and the others 
who will readily occur to the reader, were to him 
nothing short of anathema. His attacks upon Ibsen 
have become historical for their ill-judged and crude- 
ly expressed hostility, when the triumph which the 
Scandinavian dramatist has since received is taken 
into consideration. Bernard Shaw was delighted in 
particular with the attack on Ghosts made by Cle- 
ment Scott in the Daily Telegraph for March 14th, 
1901. Speaking of this criticism, Mr. Shaw says: 
"He calls on the authorities to cancel the license of 
the theatre, and declares that he has been exhorted 
to laugh at honor, to disbelieve in love, to mock at 
virtue, to distrust friendship, and to deride fidelity. 
If this document were at all singular, it would rank- 
as one of the curiosities of criticism, exhibiting, as 
it does, the most seasoned playgoer in the world 
thrown into convulsions by a performance which was 
witnessed with approval, and even with enthusiasm, 
by many persons of approved moral and intellectual 
consciousness. . . . His opinion was the vulgar 
opinion." This last sentence practically sums up 
Mr. Scott's power as a critic. He succeeded because 
he could view the stage with the same eyes as the 
majority. 



INJUNCTION AGAINST THE BOYCOTT. 
Since a police force completely controlled in the 
interests of union labor will not lay hands on the 
"sandwich men" and "pickets" through whom the 
detestable boycott is waged, and since no police judge 
can be found courageous enough to deal fairly and 
squarely with such men, even if arrested, it is highlv 
desirable that the civil courts should be invoked. 
No question can exist as to the right and wrong of 
the boycott when it is carried on in the manner most 
familiar to San Franciscans. The man who would 
stand in front of his neighbor's house crying out 
against him, charging him with misconduct, and ad- 
vising all decent people to shun him, or making the 
same denunciation by means of placard or banner, 
would be in jail as soon as his victim could get to 
the Hall of Justice and swear out a warrant. And yet 
this very thing is done daily, with the difference that 
it is the store, and not the home, which is "picketed" 
and "sandwiched." If this be not an invasion of 
rights, then there is no invasion possible, and there 
are no rights to be invaded. A citizen pays taxes 



on his store and goods, and, besides, pays for a li- 
cense which not only permits him to do business, 
but guarantees to him the privilege of doing so, and 
still the policeman on the beat takes no steps toward 
interfering with the "pickets," even if they operate 
in such numbers as to block access to the boycotted 
store and shout so loud as to disturb the peace not 
only of the boycottee, but of his neighbors. 

The illegality of the boycott so conducted is self- 
evident, but until a few days ago no serious or deter- 
mined effort had been made to get the matter before 
the courts, it having been found utterly useless to 
call upon the police or the police courts to prevent 
the labor unionists from forcing their false doctrines 
upon the community. Now, however, appeal has 
been made to the Superior Court to exert its 
authority and issue its process against a peculiarly 
flagrant boycott. A temporary injunction was 
wrung from a judge, who could not or would not 
"sidestep" the issue, and soon after the judge's vaca- 
tion time is over the matter will come for determina- 
tion on its merits, and we shall know speedily 
whether or not this department of the judicial power 
is worthy of public confidence. This case, in which 
the petitioner is a Market-street liveryman, is an ex- 
cellent one for the purpose. Daily, at the hours 
when his patrons were due with their teams, a ban- 
nered, lusty-lunged delegation of striking stablemen 
gathered in front of the "unfair" stable and tramped 
in a circle on the street in such a place and moving 
so close together as effectually to keep customers 
from driving into the barn unless they persisted and 
forced a way through. Those who did so were 
treated to choruses of yells, jeers, hisses and vile 
names. Moreover, the pickets — often two score of 
them together — made all the noise they could, and 
flourished big banners of startling appearance in such 
wise as to set the least timorous of horses to plung- 
ing and rearing. It is this species of interference 
with business that the temporary injunction has been 
checked. We note with pleasure that the Citizens' 
Alliance is vigorously and aggressively interested in 
this action. If it makes this one injunction stick, the 
new organization will have justified its existence 
and done a valuable service to the city. 

A DEGRADING SPECTACLE. 

General Cronje, recently a Boer soldier, hero at 
Magersfontein and a vanquished rebel at Paarde- 
berg, has accepted the offer of an American theat- 
rical manager to try to be an actor. He is to exploit 
himself before the footlights of a St. Louis play- 
house for a stated sum of money per week in the 
leading role in a representation of the fall of the 
stronghold at which he was out-generaled, out- 
fought and shorn of fame as a great General. For 
money, he is going to try to re-open the issues be- 
tween Englishman and Boer, and revive animosities 
that should not be disturbed in their silent tomb of 
forgetfulness, over which are growing the flowers 
of good-will, mutual helpfulness and a desire to re- 
habilitate the waste places in the Transvaal's social 
and industrial concerns. Better for General Cronje 
had a bullet ended his life while defending Paardes- 
berg than that he should parade a mimic presentation 
of that bloody affair before a gaping crowd of sen- 
sation seekers. 

General Cronje's wife is dead, but she figured con- 
spicuously in the Boer war, and she was conducted 
to General Kitchener's tent for an interview after 
the fall of Paardesberg. In the play, some woman, 
for hire, will appear on the stage as Mrs. Cronje, 



July a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



and the ex- Boer General will h 1 

with her that moM '..1 shrink from. Sb 

and 

nakc 

hat the audience 1 • the 

new act-'- nlarity. and incidentally into the 

True, perhaps all too true, homes were ruined and 
family tics were broken all over the Transvaal while 
the war raged, but the Boers wore in a men 

itcd by the admiration of all the world — Eng- 
lishmen, too. for their heroism, thoir unflinching 
■ nd devotion — perhaps a false devotion — 
to their country. But in time they surrendered with 
all the highest honors of war. retaining of > 
their sterling manhood, and for the most part grace- 
fully accepted the inevitable and at once cheerfully 
set about in a healthy co-operative spirit with the VIC- 
• re-build their country UOOII 8 Str inger national 
foundation and to erect a political and social edifice 
that sin . 1 1 rot 1 nly withstand all future int< rnal and 
external storms, but grow more beautiful and more 
satisfying as the years come and go. So nearly all 
Boers felt, and in their acts they gave honest expres- 
sion of their purpose, and in that they showed a qual- 
ity of manhood that will always be one of Great Brit- 
ain's most precious and valuable crown jewels. 

But General Cronje was not as mighty when fac- 
ing a temptation to make money by tearing down the 
white walls of a well-earned reputation for possess- 
ing the chivalry of the true warrior, and dragging 
therefrom the bones of hatred and bloodshed and 
desolate homes — his own home — and rattling them 
before the curious for a handful of gold. He is to 
present the horrors of the Transvaal war — not the 
sunny and comforting side— and drag the sacred 



memories of his domestic life and the loving .-1 

! submit them 
for the applause and approbation of pi 
But will the p' countenance Mich a 

till spectacle? 1 r Terhap- 

Americans, in seeing myself and my followers, will 
more fully understand the sacrifices we made in our 
war." All the world knows of that, but it was lift 

ncral ( ronje to sacrifice himself and the mem- 
ories of a gloriously womanly woman upon the altar 
of cold, selfish and soulless commercialism. 



THE TOY PISTOL. 

Not satisfied with the infernal din and the murder 
ous firecracker, some ingenious and malignant nature 
has invented a toy pistol which is an exact replica 
of a revolver and which shoots a paper wad. Not 
content with making all kinds of instruments that 
torture the eye and the ear, the fireworks fiend has 
made an instrument which enables the small boy to 
blow out eyes and otherwise maim his victim. It 
will be an excuse for other boys to carry the real 
thing — the revolver — and to indulge in murderous 
assaults on other boys and men, with firearms and 
explosive weapons of all kinds. The police should 
be instructed to put a stop to the toy pistol nuisance 
without any delay. Each and every offender should 
be severely punished, and the stock on hand at the 
dealer's should be immediately confiscated. 



Burying a cat alive has brought a careless citizen 
into collision with the police courts. If he had per- 
formed that office for the feline which is guilty of a 
morning paper's "Meows of a Kitty," he would be 
receiving the heartfelt thanks of the community. 




First arrivals of the 1904 Oldsmobile tonneau at Garage Pioneer Automobile Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE CRUSADE FOR GOOD MILK. 

Everybody wants good milk, but everybody is not 
in favor of the heroic remedies proposed by the 
Board of Health for the protection of the people 
from the peripatetic microbe. There is a somewhat 
general opinion that the Board of Health is just now 
more intent on manufacturing a record for itself than 
in protecting the health of the people. If the cru- 
sade for good milk results in the improvement of 
conditions at dairies, well and good : the public will 
be benefited, but men with an appreciation of local 
political conditions, and with a knowledge of the 
past records of those who are directing the crusade 
for pure milk, are inclined to the belief that the gen- 
eral condemnation of the dairies is merely a bluff, 
behind which a political record is in the making. 
Many of the conditions which the Board of Health 
seeks to impose upon the dairymen are impractica- 
ble ; if carried out, some of them would entail such 
great expense that many dairymen would be forced 
out of business, unless they doubled the price of milk. 
Other conditions are reasonable, and should be en- 
forced. Milkers and cows should be clean ; cans and 
wagons should be clean; barns and milking sheds 
should be clean. There is the whole secret of the 
milk business. But to say that barn floors should 
be built of only a certain kind of stone, or imitation 
stone, or that walls should be made of specially pre- 
pared wood, smacks somewhat of the excessive. 
There is some truth, but a great deal of nonsensical 
exaggeration about this microbe business. Is it 
not strange that the "pure country milk," of which 
all the doctors prate, is usually produced under many 
of the conditions which are condemned here? Im- 
provement of conditions is commendable, but no re- 
form was ever successfully effected at one fell swoop. 

The dairymen are not seeking human lives. They 
are not so many Molochs demanding infantile sac- 
rifices. As reasonable men, they are doubtless will- 
ing to accede to reasonable demands, and to do their 
part in improving conditions. The Board of Health 
will have public support in enforcing reasonable de- 
mands, but it should remember that the people of 
this city have had much opportunity to observe 
political manipulations, and they are now quite ex- 
pert in looking through a hole in a grindstone. 

AS TO THE HACKMEN'S UNION. 
The members of the Hackmen's Union have dem- 
onstrated that they are beneath the contempt of all 
right-thinking men. They have carried their brutali- 
ties to the brink of the grave. In an endeavor to 
win a petty point in their conflict with the stable- 
men, they have preyed upon the sorrows of mourn- 
ers at funerals, and at the last moment, when the 
casket containing the remains of a loved one was in 
the hearse awaiting removal to its last resting place, 
these associated ghouls have refused the use of their 
vehicles to funeral parties, unless submission was 
firs'" made to their demands. And their demand was 
that the driver of the hearse, a stableman who owned 
the hearse and the team should give way to a "union" 
driver. That is to say, that they would not permit 
a m»n to drive his own team, even at a funeral. In 
one instance, a sorrowing widow, over seventy years 
of age, was compelled to wait upon the sidewalk be- 
side her husband's coffin until these unsympathetic, 
inhuman brutes had had their way. The stablemen, 
of course, gave way to them to save the peculiar hor- 
ror of a wrangle over the manner in which a man 
should be buried. If anything were needed to show 
the public that unionism, as represented by the hack- 
men, is unworthy of the support of honest men, 
these instances supply the omission. Honest men 



July 2, 1904. 

do not act as did these hackmen. They could have 
announced two or three days before the funerals 
what their proposition would be, and proper provis- 
ion could then h»vp '->een made for the mourners. 
But with the low cunning of small, mean minds, they 
waited until the dead were in the hearse, and the sor- 
rowing relatives assembled in front of the house of 
mourning; then they acted. If unionism has any- 
thing good in it, and we are willing to admit it may 
have its good points, it is deplorable that it is forced 
to find its exponents among such cravens as the 
members of the Hackmen's Union. They have madf 
themselves pariahs ; they are without caste, and fit 
only for public scorn. 

HEARST ON HORSE RACING. 

Hearst's hired men are always putting that ener- 
getic moralist in a false position. One cannot help 
feeling sorry for Willie and his woes. Try as he 
may to show the public what a really good man he 
is, some of his many editors are always upsetting 
his plans. Now, all the world knows that Hearst is 
opposed to horse racing. Ever since August Bel- 
mont flipped his whip at him, Willie has awakened 
to a painful realization of the iniquitous results of 
gambling on the track. The harder Belmont presses 
him over the political hurdles, the keener is the 
Hearst view of the wicked features of racing. Evi- 
dently, the New Yorker has been giving Willie a 
run for his money, for Sunday last the Examiner pub- 
lished a double-barreled Brisbanism with a large 
illustration pointing out the evils of horse-racing. It 
was a strong arraignment of the gamblers and their 
methods, and had it been uttered by a sincere man, 
or published in a paper in whose honesty of purpose 
the people had confidence, it would merit serious 
consideration. But in the very same issue of the 
paper was a local item describing how a barber, by 
the investment of one dollar at Sausalito, had won 
$8,000 ; and another article telling of the money won 
by the public at St. Louis on the day of the handi- 
cap. The tale of the barber's rise to wealth was evi- 
dently designed to attract young men to the pool- 
rooms, for with much detail the writer showed how 
this "bright young man," by "studying form" had 
won a fortune. Of course, Hearst will say that his 
local staff does not carry out his wishes, that he is 
against horse-racing — at present. But the sad thing 
is that the popular disbelief in the Hearst assertions 
of anything even approaching morality is so strong 
where he is best known that no hypocritical preten- 
sions of reformation — made for political purposes 
only — will avail him. The leopard cannot change 
his spots. 




fctCHAS KLILUS & COJ 

&£XCL US/VH 1$ 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

Suggestions of money saving are not the incentives 
we offer to purchase clothes here. It's the creations 
we show that emanate from premier designers, whose 
talents with shears, needle and brain are of the high- 
est class. Correct dressers say, "Immediate Service 
Clothes," for theirs. 



3% 



m 



IS 



July 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




HOTEL VENDOME. SAN JOSE. 



When it's time to fly away. 
Why decide on Monterey? 

When a summer place you choose 

Why insist on Santa Cruz? 



Much the pleasanter place to stay 
Is ill rose-wreathed SA.\ JOSE, 

And no more von '11 care to roam 
Once settled at HOTEL VENDOME. 



A Convention. City 

Time and space, which once placed California at 
a hazy distance from the East and South by almost 
insurmountable obstructions in the way of pleasur- 
able journeying, have been removed by rapid tran- 
sit in railway train service, which now supplies the 
most desirable appointments and luxurious furnish- 
ings of ideal home comforts and conveniences. 
Hence it is that individuals and societies turn their 
faces toward the Golden Gate, land of fragrant flow- 
ers, picturesque scenery, and a quality of hospitality 
that bubbles all the time with the warmest of gener- 
ous and cordial greeting. Californians are glad to 
have "outsiders" visit the State, for many reasons. 
They are proud of their mountains and hills and val- 
leys and ocean-washed shores. They are glad to 
show the marvelous productiveness of soil and the 
countless varieties of the earth's forth-putting. They 
have pleasure in telling the stranger how every month 
in the year brings with it climatic conditions that 
abhor great or abrupt variableness, and which 
merges indoor and outdoor life into an evenness that 
lends to the within-the-home and the broad fields 
one glorious rose-perfumed atmosphere laden with 
the peace that is satisfying. 

For these reasons — and others — by common con- 
sent San Francisco is the recognized ideal city of the 
whole country for the holding of conclaves, con- 
ventions and reunions. And this not only because 
of accommodations that are ample and desirable, but 
because visitors invariably receive a welcome that 
assures them at once that their coming is a sincere 
pleasure to their host. It is the hearty greeting and 
painstaking effort of all the people of San Francisco 
to make the stay of guests reach beyond their 
highest expectations in the city's field of pleasures, 
comforts and sight-seeing that has made "royal wel- 
come and San Francisco" synonymous terms every- 
where. Then, again, unlike nearly every other me- 
tropolis, the coming of conclaves, conventions and 
the like, is not considered as merely a harvest sea- 
son for the gathering in of golden sheaves. Our 
people are glad to greet visitors because they are 
vain enough to want opportunities to expatiate on 
the perfection of their climate and the commercial 
greatness of their city, and to turn the incoming of 
visitors into a selfish struggle for profit is repugnant 



to every man who is at heart a true San Franciscan. 
There are still other reasons why San Francisco 
is desired above every other city in America for hold- 
ing conventions, conclaves and other gatherings. 
Aside from the charm and the hospitality of the city 
proper, little journeys may be taken to points of 
great picturesqueness, wonderful interest and world- 
wide celebrity, and at very little expense. This is 
a "strong point" in San Francisco's reputation as the 
ideal convention city of America, for no other great 
center of social and commercial life has so many 
near-by attractions, and what is more, they are the 
handiwork of nature's god, many of them being 
manifestations of the mightiest of nature's forces 
in an apparent angry mood, leaving giant mountains 
over-hanging deep and awe-inspiring canyons, wide 
wastes of ocean-swept, sandy shores, and wave- 
lashed foundations of cloud-capped promontories, 
and fertile fields of grains and fruits hedged about 
with flowers in endless variety, and all in the land of 
sunshine, where peace and plenty and health and 
joy intermingle their blessings upon guest and host 
alike in the spirit of comradeship. No wonder the 
Knights Templar of the United States will hold their 
national conclave in San Francisco. No wonder 
all associations and confraternities turn their hearts 
and eyes thitherward. No wonder the tourist and 
"world-trotter" feels that he has lost much when he 
passes by on the other side of the Golden Gate, for 
in the language from the street gamin to the lords 
of society and commerce, San Francisco is "IT." 

Ladies— For a good complexion try the Post-St. Hammam. 



HAVE YOU HAD LUNCH AT 



The Red Lion? 



STOCK EXCHANGE BLDG 

Accessible from Pine Street, just below Montgomery, also from Bush 
and Montgomery Streets through the Mills Bldg. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



^fer^^G; 



Signifying in motordon), power, speed and relia- 

th>e result of skill, experience, exceptional 

factory facilities and conservative progression. 



THERE IS NOTHING IN THE AUTOMOBILE MARKET 
that compares in any particular with the model "L" 



AT 



$1350 




AT 



$1350 



Sixteen actual horse-power — 84 inch wheel base — 3 J /i inch tires — sold 
complete with canopy top, beveled plate glass swinging front, four 
lamps and tube horn. It needs only gasoline and a turn of the handle 
to start it. It runs better on sandy roads than most machines do on 
boulevards, and on smooth roads you can pass the $3,000 kind with 
the throttle only half open. Write for art catalogue "NL," and for 
a "Little History" of one of the greatest performances ever made by 
a motor carriage. Both free for the asking. 



THOS. B. JEFFERY $ COMPANY, Kenosha, Wisconsin 

branch Hnirci?« J 302-304 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 
BRANCH HOUSES J ]45 Columbus Av £ Que> BOSTON. 

( Rambler flutoroobile Agency, 10th 6> Market sts. S. F. 
WESTERN AGENCIES^ W. K. Cowarj, Los Aogeles, Cal. 

(.E. R. Cumbe, Denver, Col. 



J 



July 3. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Arcadia Falls. 



THE TUXEDO. 



"The Tuxedo" in the Santa Cruz Mountains, for- 
merly known as the "Arcadia," is delightfully located 
a half mile from the Big Trees. It is new and fully 
furnished with the latest in furniture. It has been 
extensively improved since last season. The baths 
are all porcelain, and the house is electric lighted 
throughout. There is an abundant supply of hot and 
cold water. The resort is situated on the Southern 
Pacific Narrow Gauge, and tickets should read to 
Tuxedo. 



The crowning glory of a visit to San Francisco is 
a trip up the "crookedest railroad in the world" to 
the top of Mt. Tamalpais. It is not to have lived at 
all, or to have lived in vain, not to have witnessed the 
glory of the California sunrise from the top of Cali- 
fornia's most picturesque peak. There are hundreds 
of our citizens who have never been on the top of the 
mountain, and it is to their eternal disgrace. Tamal- 
pais offers a view that cannot be excelled anywhere. 
The Rigi, Mt. Lowe, Mt. Washington and the lesser 
mounts, accessible by rail, are but pigmies when it 
comes to scenic magnificence. The trip up Mt. Tam- 
alpais is the most awe-inspiring and grand that can 
be found in all California, and no citizen is fully a 
citizen until he has experienced the sensation of a 
trip over the "crookedest railroad in all the world." 
The grade is easy and the trip is safe. 




00UB8E I CAUGITT 'EM 



California Northwestern R'y 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OP CALIFORNIA 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS 

FOR THE 

FOURTH OF JULY 

Will be sold from SAN FRANCISCO to the Points named, 



AT GREATLY REDUCED RATES, as Follows: 



FRIDAY 

July 1. 



SATURDAY 

July 2, 



SUNDAY 

July 3, 



MONDAY 



July I. 



ROUND TRIP ROUND TRIP 

Brickyard $ .75 Healdsburg .-. 3.40 

Miller s 75 Lytton 8.60 

St. Vincent 75 Geyserville 3 B5 

lEaacio 90 Preston 5.00 

Novate 1.05 Fountain 5.00 

Burdell i. 2 o Hopland 600 

Petalumn 1.50 Ukiah r, 00 

Penn Grove l.BO Calpella 5 so 

Cotati 1.50 Redwood Valley 5.80 

Santa Rosa 2.00 Laughlin 6.00 

Sebastopol j.jo Ridgewood g.oo 

Fulton 2.60 Willits 6.00 

Windsor 2.95 Sherwood 8.00 

Return Limit, Tuesday, July 5, 1904 



FOR THE SIMMER SEASON 

Special Rates 



ROUND TRIP 

Cloverdale $ 5.00 

Preston 5.20 

Echo 5.60 

Cummiskey 5.70 

Pieta 6.20 

Fountain 6.20 

Hopland 6.60 

Largo 7.00 

El Robles 7.60 

TJkiah 8.00 

Calpella 8.60 

Redwood Valley 8.80 

Laughlin 9.00 

Ridgewood 10.00 

"Willits 10.00 

Sherwood 12.00 

Sehellville 1.35 

Vineyard 1.35 

Buena Vista 



Sonoma 

Verano 

Boyes 

Agua Caliente. . 

Watriss 

Madrone 

Eldridge 

Glen Ellen 

Meacham 

Olivet 

Trenton 

Forestville 

Mirabel Park.. 
Green Valley... 

Hilton 

Korbel 

Guerneville 

Camp Vacation.. 

$1.(15 



D TRIP 

.$ 1.60 

. 1.60 

. 1.65 

. 1.65 

. 1.65 

. 1.65 

. 1.76 

. 1.80 

. 2.50 

. . 2.60 

. 2.50 

. 2.60 

. 2.50 

. 2.50 

. 2.50 

. 2.60 

. 2.60 

. 2.50 



Return Limit, September 30, 1904 

TAKE BOAT AT TIBURON FERRY 

Ticket Offices, 650 Market Street. (Chronicle Building), and 
Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. General Office. Mutual Life 
Building, Sansome and California Streets. San Francisco. 



Jas. L. Frazier. Gen. Manager 



R. X. Ryan. Gen. Pass. Agent. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



E 



H«*rihe CrUrl" -"Whit the deffl »rt tbour 
■0»cih*t will star the devil, tsir. with rou." 



/TOWN CRER 



&* 




£jfcj 



v « 

ujy 



Judge Dunne says that some policemen are more 
dangerous to the community than high-binders.—. 
Daily Paper. 

So His Honor has discovered 

What most of us have known, 
That the really violent criminal 

Is not the thing alone 
Which causes us to live in dread 

And worries without cease. 

There are others just as tiresome 

In the San Francisco Police. 

The big, fat men that dress in blue 
And strut about the street, 
And stoop to pick up trifles 

That are lying at their feet, 
That break their oaths, and work the graft, 

While keeping of the peace— 
The Chinaman's an angel 

To the San Francisco Police. 
Professor Ferri, the eminent Italian criminologist, 
is to visit the World's Fair, and it might be an ex- 
cellent plan to invite him out here to form some con- 
clusions with respect to our more recent criminal 
manifestations. A few months ago we were stiiter- 
ino- from a microbe which, infecting some of our 
male population, sent them forth into the wilds 
and public highways for the purpose of brutally as- 
saulting all the young women they met. lheir re- 
spects to the superior sex were paid by a kick or 
a blow, sometimes full in the face. One of the young 
scoundrels, Blake by name, was found guilty of this 
misconduct only a few days ago. That period of 
genial madness having passed, it has been succeeded 
by a mania for suicide which has seized upon our 
young damsels, and has compelled them to take sud- 
den and abrupt leave of benign life. Neither of these 
phenomena, according to my dull soul, have any ade- 
quate explanation, and the Italian scientist might be 
able to shed some light upon them. 

I notice that the courts are taking criticism to 
heart, and that the jury in the Eppinger case is no 
allowed to separate, but the members are to be kept 
together until they have completed their work in 
the trial. This is a very good beginning. Of course, 
there will be the usual cry that it costs too much 
and as a matter of fact, the bill does come high. But 
saving can be better made by having an able trial 
judge than by placing temptations in the way ot the 
ury There is more money lost by re-trials, neces- 
sary owing to the ignorance of judges, than there 
ever will be through proper precautions with respect 
to the jury. Keep the jury straight and improve the 
judiciary, and you will be more likely to get straight 
as well as cheap justice. . 

An Episcopalian clergyman who committed sui- 
cide the other day contributed rather an interesting 
case to those who are collecting information on the 
suicide question. He was smitten with appendicitis 
and killed himself because he was afraid to face the 
operation. Thus he did for himself the very worst 
that the operation could have done for him, and m 
a much more painful and nerve-racking manner. The 
idea of one's being so much afraid of death as to 
die voluntarily is a paradox which only a very dar- 
ing wit would ventute to perpetrate, but the clergy- 
man in question has undoubtedly shown that such 
a condition of mind may very, well exist. 



Can it be possible that, the Slocum disaster has at 
last awakened our local officials to the necessity of 
making some fresh arrangements in case of an ac- 
cident on our local ferry boats? It would not ap- 
pear to be very probable, and yet I observed the 
other day that they were taking down the old life- 
preservers (in view of their condition, the name is 
really a joke), and replacing them with new ones. 
All these life preservers are made of tubes, concern- 
ing the utility of which, there is, 1 understand, a cer- 
tain amount of doubt. I wonder if there is any 
ground, other than that of cheapness, for preferring 
that material to cork, of which life-preservers were 
formerly made. An enforced excursion in the waters 
of the bay, at the tender mercies of a doubtful life- 
preserver, might furnish all that one would need in 
the shape of exhilaration, if danger is as exhilarating 
as the historical novelists pretend. 

That was a grim joke on the part of a local attor- 
ney to bring suit against Truly Shattuck for services 
rendered in the defense of her mother for shooting 
the former lover of the vaudeville star. The whole 
story is so delightfully of our own particular selves 
that no other place that I have ever heard of would 
produce such a wild and woolly story. But the story 
of the judgment against Truly herself as related in 
the local papers must have some hitch. Many moons 
have come and gone since the little love affair and 
its tragic sequel, and the statute of limitations has 
been running all the while, so with all due deference 
to veracious reporters, I cannot, in the plenitude of 
my ignorance, pretend to understand how it is that 
an attachment could be levied in a suit which on its 
very face was outlawed. The ways of the law be 
strange enough, but simple and plain compared with 
those of the reporters thereof. 

Commissioner Frank Wiggins writes to the Mer- 
chants' Exchange of Oakland : "The intense interest 
shown in Alameda County's display in the Palace of 
Agriculture at the World's Fair, assures great re- 
sults for that county." Can you not picture the 
eager thousands who at considerable trouble and 
some expense have made their way to St. Louis, 
hanging in enraptured throngs over the products of 
Alameda County as displayed in glass jars? No one 
thinks that he has seen the Exposition if he has not 
seen the exhibit of Alameda County, says the Hon- 
orable Commissioner, and he knows very well to 
whom he is writing. Anything more grotesque in 
the way of foolish exaggeration I have never read, 
and it would be well for the credit of Alameda 
County if the Commissioner were invited to put a 
little more common sense into his communication. 

Lots of women in San Francisco who would con- 
sider the cleaning of a stove or the dusting of fur- 
niture miles beneath their dignity, are now turning 
themselves into amateur machine-fitters at the be- 
hest of the Park Commissioners. These require all 
who desire to use the speedway at the Park to so 
perfect themselves in the knowledge of the automo- 
bile as to be able to clean and steer it, and to take- 
care of the machinery. Hence oily hands and dirty 
faces have become almost fashionable. Any sort of 
fad, however dirty or unwomanly, will find its devo- 
tees, who will make sacrifices on its behalf which 
legitimate work would never receive, li you want 
a woman to work hard, call the work fashionable 
play. 



July a, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
» MM « MM « M » 




BLITHEDALE. 

Blithedale is so near to San Francisco tliat it can- 
not be considered any more than a most delightful 
change from the daily routine of life to make daily 
trips, and yet the distance is great enough to give 
one a complete change of climate. Mill Valley is full 
of charming nooks, and one of the most charming of 
these is Blithedale. The natural surroundings are 
extraordinarily beautiful, and the appointments are 
all that can be desired in the way of comfort and 
good, wholesome living. You are not so far away 
from the city but what you may attend a theatrical 
performance and yet return to Blithedale before the 
dawn smiles upon you. 



DUNCAN SPRINGS. 
Duncan Springs is a standard resort for the weary 
business man, and it is situated only two miles from 
Hopland Station on the California and Northwestern 
Railroad. It is near the base of Duncan's Peak, 
which is an elevation of nearly 2,500 feet. The waters 
are magnesia, sulphur, soda and borax. The hotel 
is lighted by acetylene gas, and there are a large 
number of housekeeping cottages. Dancing, croquet 
and shuffle-board form the amusements, while bath- 
ing may be indulged in the Russian river. Mountain 
climbers will find this an ideal resort, and they may 
indulge their pastime to their hearts' content. 

BEN LOMOND. 

In the shadow of old Ben Lomond, three hours' 
ride from San Francisco, and cradled in the heart of 
the picturesque Santa Cruz Mountains, lies the Park 
House and cottages, J. D. Cella, manager. It is sit- 
uated on the banks of the San Lorenzo river, and 
it is a place for rest and thorough enjoyment. It is 
amid the woods, and numerous springs gurgle down 
the hillsides, and the many streams abound in trout. 
There is riding, hunting and fishing, and time never 
hangs heavily on the hands of the guests at the 
Park House. 





High Mark 

When perfeitlon is reached 
the highest mark is touched 

Hunter 
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is perfect In 

Age, Pxirity, Flavor 

Its standard of quality is unique, 
uniform, invariable. It is al- 
ways best by every test. 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO.. 

213-215 Market St., San Francisco, Cat. 

Telephone Exchange 313 



JUST OUT 

The new U. S. 22 Short Smokeless Cart- 
ridges. The best yet. U. S. 22 Short (black 
powder.) The standard brand, always reliable 
and popular. Gall for the U. S. 

UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE CO., Makers 




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1211 SUTTER- STREET, S. 

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F. 



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Park House, Ben Lomond. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



tW<LjbgTsA. 




THE LOOKER-ON 



ITT 



cgtg 



L3 



When Fire Commissioner Barrett interposed the 
other day between his distinguished colleagues — 
Boyne and Parry — he spoiled the makings of as 
pretty a row as the City Hall has known for some 
time. Boyne is remarkable for the intensity of his 
manner and the roar of his voice; Parry is remark- 
able for the fact that when he had an opportunity 
to relieve the city of a score of horses, he was satis- 
fied with only one colt. Ever since that colt affair, 
Parry's stock has been steadily sinking in the Mayor's 
clearing house. Parry has been deprived of various 
honors and privileges, and it is an open secret that 
with the expiration of his term, he will pass off the 
municipal stage. Boyne has been in office only six 
months, and he has decided to keep Parry subdued 
until he passes out. So, when Parry assumed an 
attitude of apparent persecution of a fireman at last 
week's meeting, Boyne jumped him with an eager- 
ness that brought joy to those who have yearned 
for a ton of bricks to fall upon the abstractor of the 
colt, and bury him in the oblivion in which he be- 
longs. Boyne was hammering his desk and roaring 
like a calliope, brow-beating Parry to a stand-still, 
when Barrett interposed. That was the only re- 
grettable part of the affair. If the row had been con- 
tinued without interruption, the men, in their anger, 
might have told each other some plain truths about 
the management of the Fire Department, and thus 
the public, which pays all the bills, would have 
gained considerable knowledge regarding the admin- 
istration of this branch of the city Government. As 
a public-spirited citizen, I hope President Boyne as- 
serts all his prerogatives, and either forces Parry 
to tell what he may have to say, or renders him so 
innocuous that he may be of no further injury to the 
department. 

* * * 

It is a regrettable fact that petty spites have done 
much to injure the Fire Department, since Parry 
was given authority. He is absolutely unfitted for 
executive office, and his appointment is one of the 
mistakes which Mayor Schmitz has had great diffi- 
culty explaining. His persecution of firemen, his 
unjust handling of public business, and his unwar- 
ranted interference with the discipline of the depart- 
ment, have undone nearly all that Chief Sullivan took 
years to build up. The Chief, by the way, is on the 
sick list yet. He has made no public complaint, but 
his friends say that Parryism has had more to do 
with his temporary retirement than anything else. 
% * * 

Another landmark is about to fall before the ad- 
vancing feet of Progress. The old Mint, down on 
Commercial street, near Montgomery, through whose 
portals all the city's distinguished men have come 
and gone for over fifty years past, is about to be 
razed, so a modern building may be erected on its 
site. The Mint was built in 1847, when the water 
came up to Montgomery street, and aside from the 
Mission Dolores, a few adobes at the Mission, and 
the old building at the Presidio, at the head of the 
small parade ground, it is believed to be the oldest 
building in the city. Grant passed many leisure 
hours there when he was an unknown captain in the 
army; Sherman there dreamed of the fair senorita 
in old Monterey, who yet sighs beside her famous 
rose bush for her bold soldier lover who will never- 
more return; in the Mint, the famous miners of the 
days of gold pledged each other in beakers high ; 



there the Bonanza Kings foregathered, and there the 
Vigilantes often met. In later days, Boss Higgins 
held his court in the Mint, and in its alcoved recesses 
put down this man and raised up that. But with the 
growth of the city westward, and the spread of the 
waterfront eastward, the Mint lost caste. Newer 
and bigger bars attracted trade uptown. Then the 
men of the old generation gradually fell by the way- 
side ; those of the new generation had for it no hal- 
lowed spot in their esteem. For ten years past, it 
has simply dragged out an existence, the world for- 
getting, and by the world forgot. To-day it is only 
a relict of former greatness; to-morrow it will be 
merely a memory. 

* * * 

That Taggart divorce trial should prove of more 
than usual interest, even for an army divorce. By 
this time we have become rather accustomed, unfor- 
tunately, to the stories told by army officers and their 
wives, of the "unconventionalities" practiced by 
both parties to the contract for mutual love, esteem 
and protection, and if one were cynical, and inclined 
to measure the morality of army people by the state 
ments made in the divorce courts, of late, a very low 
standard would result. But the Taggart case opens 
a new field. In her sworn answer, filed the other day. 
Mrs. Taggart asserts that her husband, Major Tag- 
gart, transport quartermaster in this city, struck her 
repeatedly, broke her jaw by throwing her against 
a bureau, insulted her times without number, and. 
generally speaking, assailed her with all manner 
of drunken brutality. This from "a gentleman and 
a soldier !" Now, if Mrs. Taggart substantiates her 
statements, of course she will be granted a divorce. 
But what of a husband who has disgraced himself, 
his wife, his family, and the army, as it is said Tag- 
gart has done? Will he be kicked out of the army, 
as he deserves to be, if his wife's charges be true, 
or will he be permitted to resign, to save the service 
further disgrace? There are some army officers who 
take a pride in their profession, and to whom the 
honor of the service is very dear. They owe it to 
themselves to weed out the Taggarts, before they are 
exposed by the press, and ridden out of the service 
on a rail. 

* * * 

That Melbourne MacDowell should have lingered 
long with his friend, John Barleycorn, is not a cause 
of surprise ; but that MacDowell should have so far 
forgotten the manhood that once was his as to permit 
his condition to become a coarse, public jest, is re- 
grettable. Time was when he was considered a 
virile actor, than whom none was better fitted for 
the Sardou dramas in which he and Fanny Daven- 
port appeared so long. But since her death, Mac- 
Dowell has come upon bitter days. He is now at a 
turn in the road when he may yet save himself, by 
an effort, or easily sink into nothingness. Before it 
is too late, MacDowell should remember the fate of 
Xed Buckley, the manliest and most forceful Antony 



RUSSIAN RIVER HEIGHTS 

SUMMER HOME AND CAMP SITES FOR SALE 

On the grandest part of the Russian River. Boating, bathing, fish- 
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call for illustrated literature. 

REAL ESTATE SECURITY COMPANY 



139 MONTGOMERY ST., S. P. 



972 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 



July a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



that ever trod the 

if the past who went rablc ends 

isc of the black bottle. 

* * • 

If the civic department of the California I 
i in its present campaign to secure the pas 
of an ordinance prohibiting the sale 

tn minors, and the use by minors of these distributors 
ck-jaw, the ladies will have rendered inestimable 
ice to the community. The toy pistol is a raven 
ous monster, which, behind its appearance of inno- 
cence, conceals a most deadly purpose. It is an elder 
brother of the red-head, the Chinese bomb, the dou- 
bledieadei and the other combustible conduits of 
noise and destruction with which the misguided 
youth of the land prove their patriotism yearly by 
blowing off their fingers or putting out their 
If all the fireworks in the city could be collected to- 
night, and exploded together on top of Goat Island 
on the morning of the Fourth, then for once we would 
have a reasonable celebration, and all the children 
would be satisfied. 

* * * 

Two recent events have stirred Berkeley society to 
its social center. H. S. Brashfield, chef of the Uni- 
versity of California Faculty Club, has quit his job. 
That's number one. Benjamin Ide Wheeler has been 
taken into the innermost circles of the Republican 
party at Chicago, and has assisted as a philologist 
in the preparation of the platform and other cam- 
paign documents. That's number two. The Univer- 
sity faculty is divided upon the question of the rela- 
tive importance of the two events — for events they 
are, not mere incidents. I am with those who are 
of the opinion that the withdrawal of Brashfield as 
purveyor for the learned epicures is fraught with 
more importance to the college in the foothills than 
the interjection of Wheeler into the Republican 
party. For eight years past, Brashfield has catered 
to the palates of the instructors at Berkeley, and well 
has he succeeded in his task. But success inflated him 
with some idea of his own importance, and when his 
salary of $60 was cut down to $35, a month or so 
ago, he really had the temerity to protest. Evidently 
he is one of those undeveloped souls who do not ap- 
preciate the honor of serving men of distinction. He 
prefers coin to culture. As his protest proved un- 
availing, he resigned. Now he has opened an eat- 
ing house of his own, and hopes to get rich, because, 
says he, the professors were pampered by him ior 
years ; now they can't get along without him, and 
he intends making them pay heavy tolls for his tooth- 
some dishes. He is a deep one, this Brashfield. 

* * * 

But that Wheeler should assist in directing the 
Roosevelt campaign has caused as much surprise as 
the Brashfield defection. Wheeler always had a 
taste for politics. In his Eastern home, before he 
was lured to Berkeley, he was president of his dis- 
trict club. If I am correctly informed, that was a 
Democratic club. Certain it is that shortly after 
he assumed his duties at Berkeley, he delivered an 
address upon "The Young Man in Politics," before 
the Monticello Club of this city, a Democratic organi- 
zation. In those days the Monticello Club had be- 
for it that 01 sj, ht rufur<» which is now spread so re- 
splendently bt-'iii.d U. The Monticello men consid- 
ered Wheeler * Dei'-jerat when he addressed them. 
But that evening ..ay i;ave shown him the error of 
his ways, for he is now, evidently, a red-hot Roose- 
velt Republican. Wheeler and Roosevelt are per- 
sonal friends, and that may explain the former's 
reported activity at Chicago. It would be interest- 



's 



Pears' 

Pretty boxes and odors 
are u^cd to sell such 
soaps, as no one would 
touch if he saw them un- 
disguised. Beware of a 
soap that depends on 
something outside of it. 

Pears', the finest soap 
in the world is scented or 
not, as you wish ; and the 
money is in the merchan- 
dise, not in the box. 

Established over 100 years. 



ing, in any event, to hear what Mr. Wheeler has to 
say on the subject. Does he intend to preach high 
protection, sound money, expansion and the strenu- 
ous life, at Berkeley, or does he really think that the 
scattering Democratic tax-payers who contribute to 
his salary of $10,000 a year are entitled to have in 
the President of the university a gentleman who at- 
tends to the business for which the State pays him, 
and who, in his official capacity, is big enough to 
overlook partisan politics? Of course, Mr. Wheeler, 
as a free American citizen, has an absolute right to 
support and assist the Republican ticket. Such sup- 
port, also, in my opinion, is an evidence of his good 
sense. But Benjamin Ide Wheeler, President of the 
University of California, is not Mr. Wheeler, plain 
citizen, and the former should remember that he 
cannot do certain things without impropriety which 
would be both proper and commendable if done by 
the latter. 

* * * 
Mr. Seymour, who was formerly well known in 
San Francisco as the proprietor of the Russ House, 
was found dead in the waters of Cache Creek. It is 
not established that the food at Bartlett Springs 
drove him to an untimely end, but the fact that his 
body was found only one mile from that resort leads 
us to be very suspicious that the above is true. There 
are many who believe that he was trying to make his 
way to the next camp to obtain a square meal, while 
others think he was driven to the rash act by an at- 
tack of indigestion. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

Cures Poison Oak and all Skin Diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Cooper 



Celebr&tod "KNOX" Hats —Eugene Korn, 726 Market St., 
sole agent; spring styles now open; Derbys, soil hats, gent's and 
ladies' straws. 



You'll never regret a Tislt to Zinkand's, which Is the 

best of San Francisco's atter-the-theatre resorts. It serves 
the most tempting dishes, the best liquors, inspiring music, 
ami is patronized by the smart set. 



H 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



T5he Political Situation 



The Republican Convention in Chicago last week 
carried out the programme wichout a slip in the 
minutest details. Probably no convention in the 
history of either party ever was so quiet and so lit- 
tle disturbed by dissensions. California has every 
reason to feel proud of the part she took in the pro- 
ceedings. While I may be accused of partiality, I 
cannot refrain from saying that I think Knight's 
speech was by all odds the best that was made in 
nominating the ticket. Black said nothing very 
novel or striking, and Beveridge added no new lau- 
rels to his reputation for eloquence by his seconding 
speech. Knight had both the voice and the language, 
and if he had not said that his remarks were entirely 
extemporaneous, I should have thought that they 
came to him while he was spending a week on his 
Mendocino County farm in the woods just before he 
left for the East; there was such an odor of tall tim- 
ber and such a suggestion of country life in them. 
Knight is to speak at the ratification meeting on the 
6th of July. The only trouble is that the Alhambra 
Theatre, which is entirely too small, has been se- 
cured for the occasion. It would have been wiser 
to have had Mechanics' Pavilion, and it could easily 
have been filled. 

* * * 

The Democrats got away with much less fuss for 
the bunch than Ruef excited for himself alone. It 
was a curious aggregation that was named at Santa 
Cruz to give the vote of this State to Hearst, and al- 
though they did not all go, it may be interesting to 
review them. There, for instance, was Delmas. I 
name him first for the reason that he is the only one 
of the bunch who has any particular reputation even 
in California, and curiously enough that reputation 
he owes largely to the efforts of the man whom he 
goes to St. Louis to eulogize, though few people 
would reach the altitude of Christian charity which 
Delmas is displaying when he praises the editor, and 
recalls what the editor said of him some years ago 
in the columns of his paper. It is true that Delmas 
has been credited with saying some things none too 
kind of Hearst, even quite recently, but the exchange 
of letters between the two worthies is, to say the 

least, humorous and entertaining. 
* * * 

Martin Marsh of Los Angeles has been for years 
one of the representatives of the railroad, and his 
support of Hearst is what gave birth to the rumor 
which is true that the railroad people wanted Hearst 
nominated. He has for colleagues Edelman, a den- 
tist, who is so disgusted that he would not go to 
St. Louis at all, and one J. H. McCarthy, of whom the 
less said the better. He used to do politics in San 
Diego before he moved to Los Angeles, and has 
made no bones of the fact that he is in the Hearst 
camp for what there is in it. 
* * * 

W. J. McGee, who wanted to be State chairman of 
the Central Committee, was formerly the partner of 
Camminetti in Amador County. He made some 
money out of the mine, and now lives in this burg. 
He has ambitions, and thought Hearst could help 
him to accomplish them, but like Caminetti, now re- 
grets his foresight was not as good as his hindsight. 
W. M. Cannon thinks he wants to go to Congress, 
but as no one else agrees with him, his thoughts are 



not likely to be realized. T. C. Butler, they say. 
sells good whiskey at Salinas, but as I am not a Ken- 
tuckian, I am unable to either confirm or deny the 
statement. Jasper MacDonald is a mine owner, and 
his personal relations with the Hearsts is such that 
he could not be anything else than a delegate if they 
wanted him. He is in the Tarpey boat, in that re- 
spect. Take them all in all, it is a curious assort- 
ment of delegates, and is a striking contrast with the 
Republican delegation, which included a Governor, 
a judge, an orator of national renown, besides a num- 
ber of other well known men. But even recalling 
that, it is certainly astonishing that some of the men 
who are going to St. Louis to cheer for Hearst should 
be found flocking under his flag. 
* » * 

There are prospects of a first-class struggle over 
the nominations for State Senator in several of the 
districts. In the Third, for instance, Lardner says 
that he can defeat Rutherford, and claims that he 
will have Plumas County, while his opponent will 
have difficulty in securing Sierra. If the counties 
divide evenly, the votes in the convention will stand 
thirteen to thirteen, and a dead lock will be the 
result, with possibly a compromise candidate, but 
Rutherford feels confident that Lardner will get 
only his own county, Placer, which if correct means 
that Lardner is not in it. In the Ninth District, Mar- 
tinelli has Marin County solid, and there seems to l>< 
some prospects of his being able to break into G in- 
tra Costa. The Marin people want Contra Costa 
to give them the Senator on the score that turn about 
is fair play, and that it is Marin's turn now to have 
the place. But there is not much sentiment in poli- 
tics, and Marin stands much better chances of get- 
ting her candidate nominated because Belshaw is 
unpopular in some sections of his own count}' than 
for the reason just given. Belshaw, however, has 
the works, and although he is a great reformer at 
times, like all reformers it is only at times, and he 
wants to go to Sacramento next winter very badly, 
and is going if he can. He will be for Bard if re- 
nominated and elected. 

» * * 

If Knowland gets the Congressional nomination 
in the Third District there will be a chance for some 
one to get to the Senate from the Fourteenth District 
in Alameda. Armstrong has the endorsement of 
Marin for another term, and Thomas H. Lindsay 
wants to go from the Twenty-fourth Senatorial dis- 
trict in this city. He is a Native Son and was the 
original organizer of the Eagles, besides belonging 
to half a dozen other orders, so he thinks he can get 
the nomination without much difficulty. Warren 
Inhn, who has been several times in the Assembly. 



"BAB 'S" 



Epicurtan 'Restaurant 
323 LARKIN STREET 



&/>e James H Bibcock Catering Co. 

409 Golden Gats Ave. 



July a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



take the race aga Flint for 

■unitarian a hard ripht. 

Johc very 

tar with hi- people, while he stands well with 

the powers thai be, who would slu-il no tears 

Flint's retirement. In the new Alameda County 

rict, J. G. Mattos will be the candidate. He is 

by birth, but came to this State when 

he was a boy, and lias hold a number of public 

-. The district where lie lives is Strongly Por- 
tuguese, and he DO doubt will poll a big \ 
« * « 

The selection of Tim Spellacy by the Democratic 

State Central Committee as its chairman was a coup 
of Lane's — Franklin K. — who suggested his name 
the morning he was elected. The country delega- 
tions came to see Lane and ask his ad. 
whom should be chairman, as they did not want Mc- 
( ice. for sonic reason or other, so Lane suggested 
their taking Spellacy. and Spellacy was given the 
place. McNab thought the idea a good one as soon 
as it was called to his attention, and the result is 
that Mr. Spellacy has a chance to show whether 
he knows as much about politics as he undoubtedly 
does about oil. If lie can carry this State for the 
Democratic nominee, he will be able to get the 
nomination for Governor, for from present appear- 
ances he has only fifty or sixty thousand to over- 
come, and a man who can do that can command 
anything the Democrats have to offer. 

— Junius. 




PARAISO SPRINGS. 

This great resort, where miracles of cures have 
been accomplished from the use of the hot soda and 
sulphur waters and baths, is located in the heart of 
the Salinas Valley. Among its many natural charms 
is the large percentage of bright sunny days it enjoys 
during the winter months and its absolute freedom 
from damp, penetrating winds and fogs. One of the 
latest improvements is the large swimming tank, 
which -affords a great deal of amusement to the 
guests. A full corps of skillful masseurs and attend- 
ants to the sick are on hand. Excellent accommoda- 
tions are to be had from $10.50 to $15.00 per week. 
The diseases which the waters cure are indigestion, 
dyspepsia, liver, kidney and bladder troubles, rheu- 
matism and all skin and blood disorders. These 
springs are guaranteed to cure every case of eczema. 
It is a place for invalids, a place for rest and pleas- 
ure. There are beautiful rides and drives, small and 



'S 

■t'ul bathing, lawn tennis 
ird, bowlii music and dan 

The manager, P. W. Schroeder, ' 

lany imprcn ements. Pat 
Sprit .- among the many health re 



VICHY SPRINGS. 
At Vichy Springs there arc a number of spri 
but the principal one is Vichy. There are 
number of baths at Vichj thai the place is n 

Overcrowded, and the bather may enjoy a surfeit of 
the waters. The baths arc so arranged thai the 
bather is supplied with a constantly changing stream 
of water. The "champagne" bath brated all 

over California, and ever afterward referred to by 

the partaker most affectionately. The Ardeche spring 
is largely charged with borax, and is of excee ling 

softness. It has SUCh an effect on the complexion 
and skill that it has come to be known as the "Beauty 
Bath." Vichy Springs is reached by a very short 
trip by stage from Ukiah on the California and North- 
western Railroad. 



The Techau Tavern Is the place to go after the 

theatre. It tops off the evening splendidly. The refresh- 
ments of all sorts are of the best quality and the price 
Is reasonable. 




ALASKA 

REFRIGERATORS 

FOR GROCERS 
BUTCHERS 
FLORISTS and 
HOUSEHOLD - 

TILE, OPAL OR 

ZINC LINED- 
PACIFIC GOAJT AGENTS 

WW-MONTAGUE &C0 

309-317 MARKET ST- 




ARE A NECESSARY FEATURE OP MODERN ARCHITECTURE 

The Otis Antomatic Electric Elevator 

is the latest development of the art of home com- 
fort. It will pay architects to investigate its 
merits before completing specifications for a 
modern house. It is operated by pressing a but- 
ton and will not respond to an interfering call. 
Correspondence invited. 

OTIS ELEVATOR. COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Department: 509-511 Howard St. 
San Francisco. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



Summer Resorts 



fi. SODA, BAy 5 



At the Base of Uncle Sim Mountain, 4100 ft. High. 

ON THE SHORE OF BEAUTIFUL CLEAR LAKE 

Lee D. Cr&Jg, Manager. 

THE GREAT SODA SPRING thfi most exhilarating bath on earth, 
forcing its great volume of Hiehly Carbonated Soda Water up- 
ward through tliH bottom of Clear Lake, is the greatest natural 
wonder of the world. Table as good as can be found anywhere. 

Take Tiburon Ferry at 7 :30 a m„ arriving at Hopland at 11 :28 a- 
m. Thence by Clear Lake and Hopland Stage Line direct to Soda 
Bay. Round trip fare, good for six months, *io.oo. Apply for in- 
formation and accommodations to Chatfleld & Vinzent, Real Es- 
tate, 228 Montgomery St., S. F., or 

LEE D. CRAIG. Kelseyville P. O.. Lake County. 



"NEW" SANTA CRUZ 



Continuous entertainment day and night. 

JUNE, JULY. AUGUST and SEPTEMBER. 

Something doing ail the time. 

New mammoth casino and bathing pavilion; the finest in the 

West. 
New tent city on the beach. 
New 500-foot pleasure pier. 
Daily military banu concerts. 
Dances every evening. 
Brilliant electrical illuminations. 
New and novel water sports, boating and fishing. 
Safest and best surf bathing on the Coast; no undertow- 
Finest climate: grandest drives; largest trees. 
Most amusements of any resort on the Coast. 
Special excursion tickets at reduced rates from all points by 

S. P. Co. to 



NEW" SANTA CRUZ 



The GEYSERS 



The most famous health and pleasure re- 
sort in California. The climate and scen- 
ery are unsurpassed and the waters are 
acknowledged the best on the market. 
Natural mineral, steam and Hammam baths. Swimming lake of tepid 
mineral water. Boating, hunting, fishing, dancing, shuffle-board, 
billiards and croquet. The hotel and cottages have been renovated 
throughout, and new cottages, and afine pavilion built this year. 
There will be a fullv equipped dairy and livery stable in connection 
with the hotel. The hotel, cottages, bath houses and grounds are 
lighted by electricity. The hotel will be supplied with the best the 
market affords. Rates. Sio. $io, $14, %\q per wppk. For further particu- 
lars and booklet, write R. H. Curry. Prop. The Geysers, Sonoma Co.. Cal 



HIGHLAND SPRINGS 

The best of mineral waters, accommodations and service. Table 
unsurpassed. Electric lights, orchestra, swimming, fishing and 
all the popular sports and amusements. Delightful excursions 
on Clear Lake and to other resorts- Terms reasonable. For 
booklet, etc.. address. CRAIG & KERR. Highland Springs. Cal. 



Vichy Springs 

ing. hunting. Crystal Springs' 
A. Redemeyer & Co., Props. 



a miles from Ukiah. Mendocino County. 
Natural electric waters, champagne baths. 
Only place in the world of this class. Fish- 
Accommodations ; table first class. J. 



PARK HOUSE and COTTAGES 

BEN LOMOND, CAL. 

New management. An ideal resort, unsurpassed climate 
drives, fishing and hunting". 

Two hours ride to Bis Basin. Modern prices. 

J. D. CELLA, Prop. 



DUNCAN SPRINGS 

OPEN May 15. Two miles from Hopland. Fine 
medicinal waters. Hard finished hotel. Excellent 
table. Rates $10 to $12 per week. 



Spend Your Vacation 

A great many San Francisco people are planning to spend 
the entire summer at Hotel Del Mo:ite. No other resort In 
California offers suchacomblnation of attractions, sea-bathirg, 
golf, automobiling, tennis, fishing anJ all out of door sports. 
Instead of going from place to rlace seeking comforts, the wise 
ones of society are plannin; alrea Jy to put in several enjoyable 
weeks down at Del Monte by the Sea. Address 

Geo. P. Snell, Manager, Del Monte, California. 

At Hotel Del Monte 



Excellent 

Roads 

Beautiful 

Drives 

Bathing 

Pavilion 
Bowling 

Alleys 

Tennis 

Courts 

Croquet Etc. 



HOTEL VENDOME 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Situated in Vendome Park of 12 
1-2 acres and while secluded.yet 
convenient to all avenues and 
stations, a chaiming resort for 
summer. Automobile Garage on 
the grounds free to guests. 

Prof. Geo. D'Ablaing's Orches- 
tra engaged for summer. 

J. T. BROOKS, Prop. 



paraiso SP r * n £ s 

MONTEREY CO., CAL. 

The most popular sanitary and health resort 
in California. Completely renovated and im- 
proved. No winds or fogs, and surpassingly 
grand mountain and valley scenery. Hot soda 
and sulphur baths, large swimming tank and ex- 
cellent table. Write for booklet and particulars 
to F. W. SCHROEDER, Manager. 



BLUE LAKES 

Boating, Bathing and Fishing, Music, Mineral Spring, 
SendforPamphlet.O.Weisman, Midlake P.0„Lake Co.,orca!l 

on A. K. Happersberger, 1104 MarKet St., S. F. 



BLITHEDALE 



MILL VALLEY 



OPEN MAY FIRST 



Ocean Villa Hotel and Cottages 

On the cliffs at the mnuih of the river. Large, magnificently 

wooded grounds, pn>i usi t Mowers, i-ruiim-i. billiards, 

dancing pavilion, boating ami ha tiling. Row boats free t<> 
guests. For particulars address 

F. V. BERKA, Santa Cruz, Phone Black 256. Free bus. 



July 2. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 








ji 



^SOCIETY 



Dear Bessie: Jul] i- again upon the carpi 

■ : ,U''- the 9 icial side 
ol the 1 1 y approaching stagnation, for tli 

•ill something doing, thai something i- mostly 
for the entertainment of visiting strangers. \nd. 

the way, does it no) seem a pity that those same 
visiting strangers should choose the least attractive 
time 01 the whole year For coming t ■ > see what we 
look like? So it is that what little there was that 
can l>c called gay doings the past week includes Mrs. 

es tail's luncheon for her sister, Mrs. lames Hobbs 
Ed. Greenway's Tamalpais part) for 
Mis- Mazie Callaghan of Boston; the dinner given 
by the Jack Wilsons at the Bohemian Club, also 
for Miss Callaghan; Mrs. Parker's dinner for the 
Harry Williars: the Metcalf dinner in Oakland for 
Paymaster Nicholson of the navy: and Mrs. Leslie 
Merrick's dinner at the Empire, at which Mrs. J. 
K. Berminghara was the guest of honor. Terpsichore 
would find itself out in the cold these days — or nights 
— were it not for the hospitable folks at the Presidio, 
where there was a pleasant little hop last Friday 
night, when the 28th entertained the 10th Infantry. 
on the eve of its departure for its new station, and on 
Tuesday evening the Cavalry officers of that post 
were the hosts of another little dance in the hop- 
room. 

Ollie Palmer gave the loveliest kind of a house 
party at Menlo Park over last Sunday till Tuesday — 
the first. I believe, of a series that she will give every 
week from now on, and great preparations are being 
made everywhere all over the State for the holiday- 
parties, which, from all I hear, will be more gener- 
ally observed that way than ever before. Another 
out-of-town affair of recent date was a lovely garden 
party at Mrs. Grandjean's, in Oakland, last week, 
which was something out of the general run of like 
affairs. In place of having an indoor luncheon at 
the Oakland club-house, the members assembled with 
their baskets of good things, and picnicked in Mrs. 
Grandjean's grounds, she supplying the liquid part 
of the feast, and Mollie said they had a glorious time. 
Two of the June weddings took place this week, 
that of Constance Lawrence and Robert Dean, at 
Calvary Church on Monday evening, being a particu- 
larly pretty one ; the floral adornments of white and 
green were cool and summery, and very effectively 
arranged. Eugenie- Hawes was the maid of honor; 
Beatrice Splivalo and Imogene Ludlum were the 
bridesmaids. The Hellman-Ehrman wedding, which 
came off on Thursday, was a grand affair, as all Jew- 
ish ceremonials of that kind generally are. We are 
all looking forward to the good time we are to have 
at Stella McCalla's wedding at Mare Island next 
month ; army and navy weddings are always such 
pleasant ones, and the coming one promises to be de- 
lightful. Gossip has it that the engagement of her 
sister Lilly to Paymaster Carr will then be an- 
nounced, and I believe that this time gossip has 
something to go upon, and is right. 

The bridegrooms from the East are arriving; 
. George Gardiner, whose marriage to Edith Findley 
is to take place next month, is to be here on the 18th ; 
Eleanor Warner, who is still over in Mill Valley, 
expected Stuart Rawlings from Mexico this week, 
but I have not heard that he has yet arrived. Mrs. 
Noakes and Jean Murphy, who come to officiate at 
Anna Sperry's wedding, are here, and they will stay 



with the Rodgers onl on Broadway until tin- end of 
September. We have had quite a crowd of— shall I 

call them notable-"' in San Francisco this 

Some of them came l>\ way of Australia, including 

"Id Sir Tatton Sykes. who, by the way, seems fond 

of California — he comea here so often — and that odd 
looking female friend who travels round with him; 
and Mr. I'.ulklcy Johnson, who a few years ago cut 

such a swathe at Burlingame. It doe- not seem to 

he known if he intends t" 3taj any length of time, 
or i- merely a bird of passage. Then Bayard Cutting 
and his titled wife. Lady Sybil, have been at Del 
Monte this week, and I hear we are to be fairly over- 
run with visitors in August and September, who are 
coming "thousands strong'." 

The Borels are going abroad again this autumn 
for a visit to their old chateau in Switzerland, but I 
understand they will be back again in time for the 
winter's gaieties. You know, the last time they went 
they remained away two years, and brought home a 
son-in-law. Tn the meantime, the girls arc going to 
Tahoe for the month of July. Clemmie Kip Edie 
is still here, waiting until the hot weather in Wash- 
ington is over before taking her children Last to 
join Dr. Edie, who is likely to be stationed there for 
a long time. As for Mrs. Kip, she is just counting — 
I won't say the days, but the hours — till she gets 
away to join her beloved daughter Mary — Mrs. Rob- 
inson — in Kansas, which she expects to do in Sep- 
tember. 

The Jim Follises, Daisy Van Ness and Ethel 
Tompkins came back last Sunday on the Mariposa, 
from their visit to Tahiti, and you never heard a more 
enthusiastic set of people over the delights of the 
trip and the charms of the tropical paradise which 
lured them across the broad Pacific, advising every- 
one else to go and do likewise. The Jules Bretts 
got away by the Coptic last week for Tapan, where 



TUXEDO 

Formerly Arcadia 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightfully located 
half a mile from and 
run in conjunction 
with Big Trees. New 
hotel newly furnished 
Extensively improved 
since last season. 
Electric lighted. Hot 
and cold water. Por- 
celain tubs. Buy tic- 
kets to Tuxedo, nar- 
row gauge, foot of 
Market street. 

Bathing, Fishing, Hunting, Tennis, Etc. 

Address, Thomas L. Bell, Felton, P. <J. 




ROSS McMAHON 

AWNING $ TENT CO. 

BAGS, TENTS, AWNINGS, HAMMOCKS 
and COVERS 

Mil IT A II Y Folding Cots, Tables, Chairs 
A All^a X t\M\ M. and complete ou tfits. 

Ken ted and sold. Lowest prices 

35 MARKET STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



Mr. Brett will wear the blushing honors of Consul 
to Tokio, so I expect it will be some time till we see 
them again, as they will now have to settle down and 
be quiet for a bit, and not be so constantly on the 
go as they have been ever since they were married. 

I have been hearing lately how comfortably settled 
the Arthur Callaghans (Edna Van Wycke, you 
know) are in Salt Lake City, and that they are quite 
contented and happy in their new locale ; they pur- 
pose paying us a visit ere long, I believe, and we 
shall be glad to see them. We had the Woodburys 
back here during the week, en route from the East 
to Alaska, where the Colonel and his regiment — 
the 3d Infantry — are to be stationed for a couple of 
years at least; their friends did what they could 
for them during their too brief visit. 

I hear that Kate Keyes and Aleck have had a fine 
time in St. Louis, and she hopes the hot weather of 
the East will quite restore her to health before she 
returns for the winter's round of gaieties. Mollie 
Crimmens will be here until August, when she leaves 
for Washington to join Martin, and will take his 
sister, Bessie, with her. Kitty ran down to see Jen- 
nie Crocker the other day at San Mateo, where she 
is one of the attractions of the country ; she has 
just got back from the East, where she very thor- 
oughly enjoyed herself, and will be with Mrs. Eas- 
ton at the old home all summer. The W. L. Merrys, 
so pleasantly remembered by old friends in San Fran- 
cisco, are spending the summer in Boston, and there 
is a chance of seeing Captain Merry out here some 
time during the next two months on a brief visit. 
Elsie Clark, who has been visiting the Henry Spen- 
cers at Woodside since the early spring, is back 
home again for the present; Francis McKinstry has 
been down at Santa Cruz visiting Alice Sullivan ; 
Beatrice Fife has gone to Santa Barbara for a six 
weeks' visit; Charlotte Ellinwood is home from her 
visit to Mrs. Fry at the Bancroft ranch; Bernice 
Landers Johnson is here on a visit to the Landers ; 
she seems very fond of her home in Los Angeles ; 
Susie Kirkpatrick is spending July at Lake Tahoe; 
Gertrude Dutton and Maylita Pease are back from 
Yosemite, full of the pleasures of their stay in the 
valley; Rob Eyre has been away down south with 
Vail Bakewell, the greater part of the month, they 
giving a good part of their time to Coronado, where, 
'tis whispered, they both found very attractive metal. 
The Danforth Boardmans have gone for a passear 
away up to British Columbia. Bertha Dolbeer, the 
Rudolph Spreckels, and Virginia Jolliffe are all to- 
gether in Paris ; the Eugene Lents are at the Ven- 
dome for the next two months. Helen Robinson 
has, I hear, given up her fancy for being a nun, and 
is at home again with her people. — Elsie. 

BIRTHS. 

June 20th — To Doctor and Mrs. Reginald Knight 

Smith, a daughter. 
June 22d — To Mr. and Mrs. George Beardsley, a 

daughter. Mrs. Beardsley was Miss Katherine 

Robinson. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
July 18th (Monday)— Miss Edith Shorbe, daughter 

of Mrs. Susan Wilson Shorbe, to James Steele, 

of Sacramento. 
August 3d (Wednesday)— Miss Stella McCalla, 

daughter of Admiral Bowman McCalla, U. S. 

N., and Mrs. McCalla, to William Chapin— Navy 

Yard, Mare Island. 
August 30th (Saturday) — Miss Edith Findlev, 

daughter of Mrs. Charlotte Findl'ey, to George 

Gardiner — Sausalito. 



WEDDINGS. 

June 25th (Saturday) — At the American Church. 
Geneva, Switzerland, Miss Georgiana Butler, 
daughter of P. F. Butler, to Captain John War- 
ren Jones, U. S. A. 

June 29th (Wednesday) — Miss Mary Maus, daugh- 
ter of Colonel Maus, U. S. A., to Lieutenant Ed- 
gar Fry, 13th Infantry, U. S. A. — Fort Riley, 
Kansas. 

DIED. 

June 25th — At Campbell, Santa Clara County, Mrs. 
Phoebe Painter Pond, wife of Doctor Gardner 
Perry Pond, and grand-daughter of the late D. 
J. Staples, of San Francisco. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael for week ending Tuesday. 
June 28, 1904: Mr. and Mrs. H. Huddleston, Mrs. 
Lang, Dr. A. P. Harvey, Alice Harrison Smith, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. E. Peabody, Mr. and Mrs. B. D. Mer- 
chant, Marjorie Merchant, Mrs. J. Samuels, Simon 
Newman, Mrs. H. M. A. Miller, A. Dalton Harrison, 
Walter Haas, Dr. and Mrs. Albert Abrams, Mrs. 
William Fries, Dorothy Fries, W. M. Fries, Mrs. 
Francesco de Ojeda, Mr. and Mrs. Ashton Stevens. 
Harrv Pendelton, James P. Sweeney, A. Faulini, 
James H. Graham, H. W. Crowell, Mrs. X. M. Cro- 
well, Mrs. H. L. Dodge, Mrs. H. P. Gale, F. S. Mit- 
chel, C. Clerc, Miss L. Hollingsworth, F. D. Bicker- 
ton, John M. Paine, T. W. Carlyle. 

William Pierson Stimson, Master L T . S. A. trans- 
port Logan, was married at noon, Thursday, the 30th 
inst., to Miss Sumner, of Boston, Mass. Captain 
Stimson is one of the most popular captains in the 
transport service, and is spoken of most highly by all 
who know him. The wedding took place at the Epis- 
copal Church, 14th and Valencia, in the presence of 
a few friends, Captain' La Fitte, Dr. Davis, Miss 
Charlotte Stimson, Miss Edith Sumner, and Mr. 
and Mrs. F. B. Lloyd. The captain and his bride 
left on the Owl train for Los Angeles, in which 
vicinity they expect to remain for the next two 
weeks. 

Mr. John D. Spreckels, accompanied by Miss Grace 
D. Spreckels and Mr. James W. Reid, arrived at 
Byron Springs on Friday, remaining over Sunday. 

On Sunday, Mr. F. C. Havens of Oakland brought 
a party over in two of his touring cars. Among the 
party were Mrs. F. C. Havens, Mrs. L. R. Mead, Mrs. 
John C. Klein, Mrs. Wickham Havens, Mrs. F. Wick- 
ham Havens, Mr. Harold Havens, Mr. W. F. Kelly, 
and Mr. J. C. Klein. They made the run from Oak- 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STORAGE. MOVING. PACKING and SHIPPING 

WAREHOUSE: EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built rooms for the Storage of Household Furniture 
Office: POST and POWELL STS. Phone Private 571 



July a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



n three hours and ten minuti 

'■wman .i: ilictli 

:i. M. S. Buckman, Mrs. K: : 
H. Miinson, I >w, I >r. Emil wife 

anrl child, T>r I ih and family, ] r and 

family, I. I.. I.cs^er and son, Miss E. Hawker, Mas- 
tcr Then. Maynar*. Mrs. Philip Hastings, Nana P.a 
ker. Freda Lueders, Carrie Wamstrom, Mr<. II. Rob- 

Camille Robert-. \Y. C. Hofen, II. A. 1 
maun. Charles H. Lunsmann. Mr-. Midler, Henry 

nann, Miss I). Muller, Will I.unsmann. Mr 
Fiappersbexger, Miss .Anita Happersberger, 1 
McTuniss, L. B. Kramer. B. O. Hart and wife, Mrs. 
O. Kerby, Mrs. Theophile Lahaye, Dr. C. Corbierre 
and wife, Miss Mabel Baker. 

The wedding of Mr. Robert Armstrong Dean and 
Miss Constance Violet Lawrence, on the evening of 
the 27th. united two of the fine old California fami- 
lies. Calvary Presbyterian Church was handsomely 
decorated, and the musical selections were delight- 
ful. The bride was given away by General Lucius 
Harwood Foote. The maid-of-honor was Miss Alice 
M. Lttdlum, cousin of the bride. The bridesmaids 
were Miss Eugenie H. Hawes, Miss Beatrice Spliv- 
alo and Miss Imogene Ludlum — a distinguished bevy 
of girls. The groom's best man was Lucien Knight, 
and the groomsmen were R. Carey Van Fleet, Lon. 
Fallonsbee and Tom Denny. Miss Lawrence is a 
charming and accomplished girl, with a college edu- 
cation. The War Veterans, by whom Miss Lawrence 
was adopted when a babe, in recognition of her 
father's and grandfather's bravery, were present at 
the wedding, and saluted her as she passed out as 
a wife. At Mrs. Lawrence's home, a wedding supper 
was served. The happy pair left the St. Francis for 
an extended trip, and upon their return, before set- 
tling in their permanent home, they will probably 
summer at Belvedere. 



If You Want 
a perfect cream, preserved without sugar, order Borden's 
Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream. It has a delightful, 
natural flavor and is superior to the richest raw cream you 
can buy. with the added assurance of being sterilized. Pre- 
pared by Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 



The Star Hair Remedy — best of all tonics and restora- 
tives. Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not 
a dye. At druggists and hair-dressers. Accept no substi- 
tute. Star Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 81. 



"Swain's l'.;ik< ' y. 209 Post street, has always been a synonym for all 
thai is 1. datable and fine in the way of a restaurant and luncheon place 
iu San Francisco, it is as well kuown as San Francisco itself and there 
is not one among the thousands of our business men who will not 
vouch for the excellence of its euisine. 



The latest and best directory published is the San Francisco 
Office Building and Business Directory. For sale at 320 Sansome 
Street. Price $5.00. 2.50. Tel. James 5696, or send postal. 



Decorations for weddings, Cnarlotte F. Williams, room 18, 121 
Post street. 



SCIENTIFIC MASSAGE FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

MARTIN BRAUN, MASSEUR 

Graduate Imperial University Hospital. Vienna, Austria. 

WENBAN BUILDING 

Phone John 7i«l (106 Sutter St.. cor. Mason St. 



NEWTON J. THARP 

ARCHITECT 
131 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



NEWS LETTER. 

A SKin of BtAuir is ft Joy Forvvtr. 



*9 



,R- T. FELIX GOVHAVD5 ORIENTAL CREAM 
OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

■h nn<l 
Hktn 1 
l"h 
lion Ii 




Uute it t.i be gum it in pr 
■ 
similar nam* Dr. I- \ 
■aid i" a lady nf the haul ton 

use itu-m. I recommend 
aud'e Craun' u the leaal harm- 
ful of all th*- Bktn preparation*." 
for Bah' hy nil drueefBtjt and 
fn nry- Roods daajara In t ho 
United Stats*, canadaa ami Bo* 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prep. 
87 Great Jonea St., New York. 



QILDIXO, miMiuHins. CHRIST- 
Mvs. WEDDfNO ft enoujImim 

'.II IS TO ORDER V W 




'.jOt 1 ^ 



I^ssons ctfCN. fiRHcowlc;, 



MO Geary Street 



S.in Francisco 




NEERGAARD'S INSTITUTE OF 
DERMATOLOGY 

Will give FREE a Package of Face Powder and a 
Bottle of Invisible Rouge on Application 



242 POST STREET 



HOURS 9 to 5 



Mme. GEORGETTE GODON 

LADIES' HAT IMPORTER 



Suite 520-621 

STARR KING BUILDING 

121 Geary St. 



Perfect Fitting 

French Nodes 

tt.nd Adaptations 





L FOR THE 

. Regular Army and 




Bk National Guard 


1 j 


BLJj Encampment in August 

gH KHAKI Service Outfits Complete 

k JrL Best quality at lowest figure 

^J | Also Regulation Sabres, Belts and 
1 Puttee Leggings 

B 1 Pettibone Bros. Mfg. Co. 

H \ 19 New Montgomery St., San Francisco 
^■"* t. A. NERNEV, Mjr. tor Pac. Coast 




LADIES I 



Wrinkles and all Facial Blemishes re- 
moved by 
PR.OF. S. DE LOVTSKY 

Latest Parisian Method 

Superfl iour hair removed permanently 
by electrolysis. Also moles, warts, eto. 
Sealp ti'HHrment. and manicuring. Call or 
write 327 Geary St., 8. F. Tel. Black 489ft 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN ®SS? iffi D £ei^ N ^c£ 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual orgaas. 
Send for circular; Naber, Alfs & Brune, 325 Market St, S. F, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capiial and Sumliu 
Total Assets 



*!, 401,160.93 

6,943,782.82 



Interest paid on deposits, 
subject to check, at the 
rate of two per cent per 
annum. 

Interest paid on savings de- 
posits at the rate of three 
and six-tenths per cent 
per annum. 

Trusts executed. We are 
authorized to act as the 
guardian of estates and the 
executor of wills. 

Safe-derosit boxes rented 
at ?5 per annum and up- 
wards. 

Get a box at once and guard 
against loss by Fire or 
Burglars. 

J. Dalzell Brown, 



FOR SALE, 



CONTROLLING INTEREST IN PAY- 
ING COMMERCIAL BUSINESS 



Price $1000 



Incorporated July 1901 



Invite thorough investigation. For further par- 
ticulars or appointment address 

J. J. ADEL 
401 California Street, .S. F. 



VAN AUKEN 
OXYGEN INSTITUTE 

The Only OXYGEN INSTITUTE on the PACIFIC COAST 

If you are ill we can POSITIVELY cure ynu without Drugs. Knife. 
Electricity or Mind Cure. CATARRH, CONSTIPATION. NERVOUS PROS- 
TRATION, Etc-. Permanently Cured. 

Addresses at the offices of San Francisco patients who will gladly 
tell how they vere redtored to health. Oxygen instruments loan- 
ed to all patients treating at a distance. Send symptoms and 
kindly inclose directed and stamied enveloie for particulars. 
Free diagnosis at office from 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 p. m., Sundays ex- 
cepted. Cut this out and remember the hours. Tel. Sutter 3«i 

815 VAN NESS AVF. Near Ellis St SAN FRANCISCO 




Financial 






For Breakfast 


JHL 




^jSfi^s^Ajim 


> For Breakfast 




p For Breakfast 



Pine-St.. Market. The market for Comstock 
shares has been gradually find- 
ing its level, customary at this time of the year, when 
the festive eagle shrieks in bold defi. to the enemies 
of liberty and independence. Incidentally, it might 
be remarked that the modern labor union, with its 
developed ideas on the subject of American liberty, 
where one man has a right to work and another ha* 
not, has given the venerable bird something to pon- 
der about, as well as shriek over in a jubi'ant spirit 
of patriotic exultation. But to continue : There is 
nothing unusual in a decline at this season of the 
year, and it means nothing to the man who does 
not overload his account to the depletion of his 
bank reserve. There is nothing back of the decline 
except sentiment. The mines show no change for 
the worse in the situation, and there is more room 
for an improvement in prices than there is for any 
depreciation. Some of the frenzied mob on the 
street are shivering in their skins lest the Ophir 
stopes should give out. They overlook the fact, or 
more likely do not know anything about it, that 
stopes on one level cannot last forever, but that there 
is such a thing in this case as stopes on levels above 
and below, which only have to be opened up, and 
that there is lots of money to open them up with. 
How in the world the management of this mine is 
able to do as well as it has in keeping up work in the 
present stopes, with an absolute lack of ventilation, is 
surprising. If some of the Pine street kickers could 
be induced to go down on a visit to the mines at 
work in this section of the Ophir ground, it would 
be a safe gamble their stay would be limited to sec- 
onds. After the holidays, a lot of new work will like- 
ly be taken up in connection with the Sutro tunnel 
level, which should help the market out. 

There is one satisfaction 
Local Stock Market, that whether or not the 
market for shares is active 
with money-making opportunities galore for the 
speculative class, the stocks themselves, with few 
exceptions, are grinding out good returns upon the 
investment. There is something better in that than 
in chasing the fleeting changes in the market on a 
bull or bear movement. Undoubtedly business has 
been dull with brokers on the local stock and bond 
exchange, but that does not concern the holders of 
securities. Prices have held steady as a rule through 
all the dull times, and that is all the outsider is con- 
cerned in. For the gambler the times are not pro- 
pitious, but to him other fields are open, with the 
assurance that he will not injure the innocent if he 
should succeed in breaking his own neck financially 
for the good of the community at large. 

Governor Pardee has not 
Where the Hayseed been fortunate in his deal- 
Wins Out. ings with the mining af- 
fairs of the State. Pos- 
sibly, like so many other of the political fraternity, 
he does not recognize the importance of the mining 
industry for the reason that as a rule those connected 
with it have not so much time to pay attention to 
outside interests as the farming and fruit growing 
classes have. Yet the miner is a prominent factor 
in rolling up the aggregated total revenues of the 



July 2. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



their quota ol the annual rot 

lhal ' ■,iatr<l at all by any ill fa 

'" ••>« n that he is entity of iritonti- 

115 tluir clain gnttion. I 

ply following ■ precedent laid down by nearly ever) 
if the men who in the past have filled the office 
hief Executive, with the exception, pcrka: 
■ rnor Waterman, who could personally he held 
answerable to the accusation of being connected by 
distant relationship with the mining business. Hail 
he hecn related any closer than he was. it is doubt- 
ful, considering the lack of attention a mining man 
tended in the State, if he would ever have hecn 
elected to the position of Governor. Without 
CUSSing quite a number of opportunities where the 
Governor since his election could have extended a 
helping hand to the California mining industry, it 
is sufficient to note his selection of mining represen- 
tatives to the St. Louis Fair. The commission repre- 
senting department could have been made up of 
more congenial material, to put it mildly, and had 
the Governor taken counsel with men prominent in 
the business, the exhibit might have had a bettei 
chance to prove successful. As it is. many people 
who have seen it think that California could have 
gone to much more expense in making a display of 
what to the world is always recognized as the chief 
product of • California, and this with all due respect 
to the Honorable, the Chief Executive, and a host 
of people who, although they have never yet crossed 
the State boundary lines since their birth, neverthe- 
less are always the most loud-mouthed in their cen- 
sorship of what is and what is not. To nine-tenths 
of the civilized people of the earth, California is 
known as the "land of gold." Its mines of the yellow- 
metal have been handed down from generation to 
generation of foreigners as one of the world's won- 
ders. The old refrain which ran: 

"There is plenty of gold, 
In the mines, I'm told, 

On the banks of the Sacramento," 

was chanted in every clime under the sun where the 
white man flew his flag, years before the cabbage 
planter and the hay grower got a foothold upon that 
historic soil. But for gold, California to-day would, 
in all probability, have remained in its pristine con- 
dition, one vast cattle ranch, with San Francisco a 
little, miserable pueblo, eking out a scanty existence 
on the movement of hides by the droghers to the At- 
lantic Coast. This is all forgotten now, but only by 
the owners of cabbage and hay-growing patches in 
California, and their friends in this State. But the 
world remembers, and naturally wonders why this 
sudden and inexplicable change of front. Friends of 
the California miner and his mines will read with 
disgust a paragraph now going the rounds of the 
press of the State, in which a correspondent, writing 
from St. Louis, says : 

"The big pieces of ore in the California exhibit, 
while undoubtedly rich in gold, do not appeal to the 
eye like the cabinet gold specimens of Colorado and 
other States." 

And yet the State is alive with "specimen" quartz 
and mines which could rightly be catalogued as "jew- 
elry boxes." 

The gross earnings of the California Northwestern 
Railway Company for May amounted to $121,854, 
an increase of $5,562 as compared with May, 1903. 



earnings incrc 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society has de- 
clared a semi-annual dividend at the n 
cent per annum on all deposits, payable lul\ 1st. 
The rate is the same as that for the six mot 
December 31, 190.V 

r«ney ntli at cot. m window. Tom Dillon. Hitter opp 
:■>>- Hold. 



PhMt, Prime Eichaare 71* 



Oteaa Water •■ Ever; t\—€ 



HOTEL BALTIMORE 

1115 VAN NESS AVE. 

Near Geary atreet. 8nn FranHsco First elnss family hotel with 

all modern oonvenlenno-. Ootelne and terries ■ M**>olal feature. 

American and European plan. Steam heated. Phone* in every 

room. 



THE EL DRISCO APARTMENTS 

PACIFIC HEIGHTS 

Unquestionably the finest apartment house on 
the Coast. 

New and modern suites commanding a mag- 
nificent marine view. 

MRS. N. FOSTER. Lessee 

S. W. Cor. Broderick and Pacific Ave. 



Hotel 'Richelieu 

The leading and finest private family hotel 
on the Pacific Coast. 

1012 VAN NESS AVENUE 

Bet. Geary and O'Farrell Sts. San Francisco, Cal. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST.. near Tremont; BOSTON 

Harvey a Woods, Props. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opp. TJ. S. Treasury, one block from the White House. 

Washington D. 0. The Hotel "Par Excellence" of the 

National Capital. 
First-class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, 
Prop. American Plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

FINE MERcAVIUJ, LVNCH 
Served ever* ohj from u te l o'clock. Ulneet 
Wines, Liquors arid Cigars. 

SEEEA <& POLAN. P.oori.lors 
312 Sansome street, cor, HallecK, San Francisco. 
Telephone, Black 602. 
Red Top Whiskey now on sale. 



For Them Who Appreciate Comfort and Attention 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, San Francisco 

American and European Plan- A Quiet Home 
Centrally Located. George Warren Hooper, Lessee. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



B OOW BO lUd btlt PlMHWt.-TOIi fctOOBE. 



jPLEASURE'S WANDP 




A TRUSTY TIP ON THINGS THEATRICAL. 

GRAND— Mrs. Leslie Carter— "Du Barry"— A magnificent performance, 
magnificently staged. 

FISCHER'S— "The Mormons"— Highly enjoyable operatic farce. 

ORPHEUM-Be sure and see "His Japanese Wife." Valerie Bergere— 
Fine. 

ALCAZAR— "Soldiers of Fortune." White Whittlesey, a splendid per- 
formance and crowded houses. 

TIVOLI— "Robin Hood." a worthy successor of the Bostonians and in 
soma respp cts surpassing the original. 

CENTRAL— "Power of the Cross." up-to-date melodrama. 

CHUTES— Good theatrical bill and several new Zoo attractions. 



Mrs. Leslie Carter's illness has prevented a large 
number of people from enjoying "Du Barry" a sec- 
ond and a third time. It was to be expected that 
human nature would succumb if, in addition to the 
terrific strain of the play, was added the slightest 
physical suffering. Mrs. Carter lives and feels Du 
Barry, and she has the faculty of making her audi- 
ences live and feel with her the horrible scenes of 
the royal bed-room and the subsequent scenes of the 
Terror. 

The news that Mrs. Carter would continue her 
very successful engagement until to-night was re- 
ceived with pleasure by a large number of people. 

* * * 

White Whittlesey is the typical "Gibson man" in 
"Soldiers of Fortune" at the Alcazar, and the story, 
as I predicted, is standing room only, and mighty 
little of that. The Gibson girl and the Gibson man 
of San Francisco is in evidence in the audience. The 
bill of the play calls it a "romance." It is in reality 
a melodrama with a very high tone. Some of the 
repartee seems to be above the intelligence of the 
average hearer, while there are climaxes that come 
very near the tank play. All in all, it is an artistic 
performance by a very good company. The ladies 
in the cast carry their parts very well. Miss Vir- 
ginia Brissac is a welcome addition to the Alcazar 
company. She is petite and winsome and a finished 
actress. Very little could be suggested in improve- 
ment on her characterization of "Hope Langham." 
The "Alice Langham" of Miss Edna Ellsmere was 
also a nice piece of acting. The bill is a very long 
one, and it would take too much of my space to give 
critical judgment on all the characters. 

Whittlesey has caught the spirit of the author to 
the letter. He is the ideal traveled and experienced 
American, the successful jack-of-all-trades, the sol- 
dier of fortune. Conness is to be praised for giving 
a surprisingly excellent "Stewart," surprising be- 
cause everything that Conness does is excellent. 

Maher's appreciation of the filibustering Irish- 
man is a subdued and truthful picture. His "Cap- 
tain Burke" cannot be surpassed. This part shines 
in his hands by its clever color. Nothing is over- 
done. 

* * * 

"Robin Hood" continues to fill the Tivoli nightly, 
and the performance is so good that the opera will 
probably be continued for a long time to come. 

Ferris Hartman is to be congratulated on his 
clever work as stage manager in "Robin Hood." The 
orchestration in the hands of Paul Steindorf leaves 
little to be desired, and the girls in the chorus have 
all been selected because of their physical charms. A 
long time ago — it seems ages — I would have donned 
my "Johnnie clothes" and have sat night after night 
in the first row to take in these physical perfections. 
The Tivoli is demonstrating that a girl with a beau- 



tiful face and shapely legs can sing, and not only this. 
that she is numerous. The Tivoli chorus is certainly 
a beauty show. 

* * * 

At Fischer's "The Mormons" still holds the 
boards. It will continue as the attraction at this 
popular house until and including Fridav night, July 
8th. 

* * * 

This week the Orpheum has been giving us some 
very fine vaudeville. Valerie Bergere's act, "His 
Japanese Wife," brings down the house. The per- 
fume of the Orient is about the dainty little woman. 
Miss Bergere tells the story in a touching, endear- 
ing way, and the settings and her costumes awaken 
and hold the sympathy of her auditors throughout 
the scene. Mr. Keane is a very good actor, and 
takes the part of the husband to perfection. It is 
doubtful if anything prettier than the various pic- 
tures presented in "His Japanese Wife" could be- 
conjured to the mind. Clark's monologue as a sing- 
ing comedian is the hit of the season. 

* * * 

Two acrobatic comedians, Fyne and Dandy, kept 
the audiences at the Chutes chuckling with laughter 
at all performances this week. Trask and Rogers 
proved very clever black-face singers and eccentric 
dancers, and the Musical Harts produced delightful 
music from a number of odd instruments. Lamont's 
Australian trained cockatoos gave an interesting 
exhibition; the petite Fav sisters changed their songs 
and dances, and Hallie White, soprano, was warmly 
applauded for her illustrated songs. 

The Central is doing good business with the 
"Power of the Cross." There is something new un- 
der the sun. The scheme of using wireless telegraphy 
in a melodrama is first introduced in any play in this 
stirring production. There is enough mysticism 
to keep the audience and players busy throughout 
the entire action. There is a mysterious cross which 
acts as a deterrent on a villain about to slay an un- 
happy victim. The victim obtains a respite through 
the religious affright of the villain, and essays to 
escape his attentions by swinging into safety on the 




All the best movements in 
American and Swiss 

WATCHES 

are included in our collec- 
tion. Our name on atime- 
piece insures accuracy. 

!'• ieei consistent wWTJhe highest quality 

Uonm-Drisiol Co. 

1°4-11° Geary iireei 



5: 



July l. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Ha! Tims is the villain 
though h -\ce of mind, he dor 

noiigh of it in time to prevent his being 

haled aw ■■cure dungeon. There is a 

strenuous reporter, and he plays the part of a hero. 

He rushes the climax and saves the heroine. The 

It the Central are enthusiastic, and the 

making big moncv. 

* '• • 

White Whittlesey will continue to charm the large 
audiences at the Alcazar next week. His richly sym- 
pathetic voice will he heard to advantage in "One 
Summer's Pay." This play is by the author of 
"When We Were Twenty-One," and the theme is 
English : the story is pretty and the action hrisk. 
Miss Marie Rawson will make her debut as Whittle- 
sey's leading lady, and curiosity is on the qui vive 
as to her capabilities. "Heartsease" follows. 

* * * 

The bill at the ( Irpheum for the coming week is 
rich and varied. There are some equilibrists, the 
Leigh Brothers, who are said to equal or surpass any- 
thing ever shown here. Gillihan and Murray — sur- 
named the "singers of songs of the Sunny South- 
land" — ought to be excellent to live up to such an al- 
literative allegation. They give black-face dialogue 
and song and dance, and are said to be particularly 
fine in repartee. Inez de Wolf will appear as a 
mezzo-soprano for the first time in San Francisco. 
The public will be pleased to know that that capable 
little woman, Valerie Bergere, is to appear in another 
sketch which is called "Jimmie's Experiment." There 
will be a special matinee on Monday. 

* * * 

On July 9th, Fischer's will inaugurate a new 
season of German comedy work. There are to be 
the two Germans and one Hebrew character, and the 
new artists in this line are said to be the finest that 
money can secure. Bobby North takes the part of 
the Hebrew character, and Rice and Cady are the 
German comedians. 

"A Lucky Stone" is the play that will be put on 
as an opening for the newly re-organized company. 

* * * 

Lotta and Belle Tobin, who present a most pleas- 
ing and refined musical act, will make their appear- 
ance at the Chutes this coming week. Carl Reiter, 
monologist, will also be new. His stories are said 
to be original and indescribably droll. The three 
sisters Kelcey will re-appear after a long season in 
the Eastern vaudeville houses; Trask and Rogers, 
the black-face song and dance team, will change 
their specialty. There will be a magnificent display of 
fireworks on Monday night, in honor of Independ- 
ence day. Argo, the wonderful hypnotic illusion, 
mystifies thousands of visitors to the Chutes every 
week. 

* * * 

"Wedded and Parted" is the catch-line head for 
the play at the Central, and it is full of melodramatic 
situations. It ought to be a fine card for the patrons 
of the up-town house during the week ot the Fourth 

* * * 

The Columbia Theatre remains dark for another 
week, re-opening on Monday, July nth, with charm- 
ing Ethel Barrymore and her entire New York cast 
and production of "Cousin Kate." The comedy is 
from the pen of Henry Hubert Davies, and is cred- 
ited with having achieved the most pronounced hit 
of any play seen in New York last season. The ad- 
vance sale of seats begins Thursday. 
(Continued to page 31.) 



»3 



CAMPING 




park 

hltflt* 

n shorl 1 

S»I|»V LKk Slwt. lac. 
25 M.rlo SI.. S F. 

; \ r*—t •. 1 . 



Alcazar Theatre ■ , B fe*s° * »'«*». Prnpriatora 

iSDolna with ^pociiil [ndapand 
Monday July i. one week Regular matinee* Thursday and 
Saturday. WHITE WHlTTI.Ksm and the aJoaaar Stock Ocm. 
pany In It. V. Esmond's delightful nad>. 

ONE SUMMER'S DfTY 
First appaamnoe oi Mis* ktarle Raw-son. 

Evenings 26 to no, Matinees Thursday and Saturday 91 -. 
Monday. July 11. White Whittlesey in •Heartsease " 



Central Theatre. ^ B fHVP * M iP"- Proprietors 

j*. >-. '■"'uuq. Market St. near Eighth-Tel. South I 
Starting Matinee. Monday. July 4th 
All week. Matinees Saturday and Sunday 
Theodore Kremer's great comedy drama 

WEDDED AND PARTED 

Next— "ALONG THE MOHAWK" 
Prices-Evenings 10 to 50c. Matinees 10. 15. 26c. 



Tivoli Opera House. °°™ r ^LTstreet. 

Third triumphal week ot 

ROBIN HOOD 

Extra grand matinee Monday. July 4th. 

With the great cast of new artists and the famous beauty chorus 

Regular matinee Saturday. 

Usual popular prices. 25. 60 and 75c. 



Fischer's Theatre 

THE MORMONS 

Until July 8th 

Commencing Saturday. July oth. 

Rn™ 1 J?i,L b " ck t0 "°l cl times-" Complete change in company. 
Something new under the sun. First time hereof mlmuy ' 

A LUCKY STONE 

w m ? o?- al nu , rleS0 - u . 6 by Collin Davis and Frank Witmark 
TKei ^ r' a f xt £ a 7 1 . din ,.? r5 '.!: a 5, t: , Dorothy Morton, Noia Bayep. 
tHrH«S?iL?k? ob & North V E,lwln 01ark - Ben Dillon. Boy Alton. 
«*«- , cho,us of 30 pretty girls. A towtr of special- 
ties.. New and striking scenery, costumes, etc. "i""-"" 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. Same popular prices. 



Grar)d Opera hjouse 

Beginning tomorrow (Sunday) matinee 

MB. JAMES NEILL and the original Nelll Company in a 

superb production of Clyde Fitch's patriotic drama 

BARBARA FR1ETCHIE 

Extra matinee Monday, July 4th. Regular matinee Saturday. 

Special Summer Prices— 160. 26c, 50c. 

Best reserved seat in orchestra 50c— No higher. 



Omhpl 1IT\ 8an rranc,flc0 ' sGreat esC Music Hall. 
\si j-n l&u "> O'Farroll St.. between Stoekron und Powell itreels. 
Week commencing Sunday matinee. July 3 

A VAUDEVILLE REVELATION 

J ,el £ hB ro , h r ers l Gillihan and Murray ; Green and Werner ; Inez 
<ie Wolf: Ga-llagher and Barrett; John F. Clark ; The Zaro Triol 
A Trip Through Italy, shown in Orpheum motion pictures, and 
Valerie Bergere, and company presenting 
"JIMMIE'S EXPERIMENT" 
Special matinee July 4th. 

Begular matinees every Wednesday,:Thursday, Saturdays and 
Sunday. Prices 10. 25 and 500 



flfter the Theater 



Go where the crowd goes— to 



ZINKAND'S 



Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after 
the theatre Is over. 



2 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



SHREVE $ BARBER 


CO. 




GUNS 




AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE 


and 




SPORTING GOODS 




739 


MARKET STREET 

PHONE JOHN 4051 


52 1 


KEARNY STREET 

PHONE RED 4322 


H. E. Skinner formerly of H. E. Skinner C& Co 
connected with this establishment. 


is now 




SAN FRANCISCO. 





Mont Rouge Wines 



L1VESM0RE VALLEY, CAL. 



The Finest Wines Produced 
in California •*< ns ^ 



CHAUCHE S BON, Props. 

17 First St. Phone Main 1514 San Francisco 



THE CLUB MAN'S CIGAR 

MADE IN It SIZES 



SIG. CAHEN 

Distributor 

22 Montgomery St., S. F. 

Tel. Main 1273 



Manufactured in TAMPA, FLA. 




J OHN H- TIETJEN COMPANY 

Fancy Groceries, 

California and Imported tOines 

JVetv ~J~tore 

344 Post St., Tel. Main 518, San Francisco 



C, H. Rehnstrom (formerly Sanders & Johnson.) 
E. W. Hagbom, (formerly with James W. Bell &. Co., of New York) 

REHNSTROM $ HAGBOM 

TAILORS 

PHELflN BUILDING ROOMS 1, 2, 3 

Phone Main 6387, Ban Francisco. 



Tales from the Beachers 

The throngs of beachers at Santa Cruz are getting 
throngier every day. and the summer and city hotels 
are preparing for a record-breaking number of guests 
on the Fourth. The sweet summer girl at Santa 
Cruz is as winning, as artful and as numerous as 
ever. She has delicate eyes of satin-blue ; she has 
lustrous orbs of velvet brown, and we don't 
know which of her we love the best. She must 
be keeping that poor kid, Cupid, busy, if all of her 
are as capricious as the one of her who left a leaf 
from her diary lying upon a bench along the cliff 
drive. Of course, a great, horrid man found it and 
read it : 

June 25. — Harry, an ex-fellow. 

June 28. — Reggie, a next fellow. 

Tune 30. — Harold, annexed fellow. 
* * * 

The summer residents at a watering-place but a 
short run from this city were recently treated to a 
quaint little German wedding, and joined heartily 
in showering bride and groom with rice, roses and 
respects. A reporter for a San Francisco paper, 
who was spending a few days in the vicinity, arrived 
too late on the scene to get details from the ladies 
of the household. All had gone with the bridal party 
to meet the train, and only "Coonrod," the genial 
German paterfamilias, was left on guard. The portly 
Teuton was applying oakum to the advantage of a 
boat when the reporter found him. He was smok- 
ing a peculiarly-shaped pipe of the Fatherland and 
filling the air with hazy blue smoke pretzels. 

"Guten morgen," was the salutation of the Knight 
of the Pencil. 

"Goot mornin'," was the reply. 

"Coonrod," said the news-seeker familiarly, "I 
came to write up that wedding." 

"Oh, die Hochzeit (wedding) — you mean der vone 
my Gretel vass in?" 

"Yes," returned the man of letters, preparing to 
write with a quick, pump-hirdle movement. 

"Mr. Spatz, how was the bride dressed? White 
organdie — muslin de soie — green applique — crape de 
chine — Valenciennes lace — renaissance trimmings?" 

Coonrod's face was a blank for a moment. Medi- 
tatively he essayed to repeat: "Vite orkanty — und — 
und — green apple cake." 

Straightening his form and taking the pipe from 
his mouth, he decided: "Nein, nein ; I don't know 
somedings poud der vay dees vomans dress; aber, 
I denk dot der dress vass somedings vite mit purple 
shpecks — und it cost feefty cents a shpeck." 

"The hat?" 

"Her hat vass somedings round like a cheese, und 
hat leedle punches of leedle plue forgot-me-nots on 
it." 

"What about the presents?" 

"Oh, der vass lots of dem — lots of dem, und " 

Here the azure orbs of the Deutscher twinkled like 
blue cathedral glass as he continued in a confidential 
lower tone : "Und der groom gifF der pride a tiamond 
sun-bust." 

"I suppose the wedding march was Mendels- 
sohn's?" 

That was a poser for Coonrod, for he wots not of 
composers, artists or prima donnas. 

"Veil — veil — nein ; veil, I don't rememper alretty 
efferypody who vass dere und played moosick. 
Mappe he vass." 

"Describe the bride's going-away dress." 

"Veil, I haff dot alretty. Dot dress vot I firsi de- 



July 2, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
• 



»5 



Hotel 
Rafael 



<M Kj 



San "Rafael, 



Cat. 




50 MINUTES FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



CLIMATE UNEXCELLED. MAGNIFICENT SCENERY. BEAUTIFUL DRIVES. 
Open the Year Round. Cuisine and Service the Best. Send for Booklet. 



1*. V. HALTOJV, Proprietor 



scriped about vass der pride's get-married-in dress, 
her going-out-away dress, und her shump-on-der- 
train dress. It vas her only goot dress." 

"Mr. Spatz," said the newspaper man, returning 
an almost empty note book to his pocket, "you gave 
the bride away?" 

The effect was magical. The Deutscher's jaw 
dropped. 

"Donnerwetter ! Haff my vife told you dot al- 
retty? Veil, pears you know I tells you — aber, don't 
you neffer print dot. You see, my vife told der groom 
dot Gretel vass only dwenty-four years young. I 
didn't know dot Gretel vassn't counting no more 
burd-days, und I giffed her a vedding present of a 
necklace mit 32 pearls. I told efferypody each pearl 
vass for a burd-day. Dot pride-groom get mat, 
shwear, und I hold him so he don't go home. Gretel 
she cry — und my vife — veil, look at dot ear und dose 
hair vot vassn't on my head not no more. Yaw, 
Misder Noosepaperman, I guess I giffed der pride 

avay." 

* * * 

Most birds don't talk, but one little feathered tat- 
tle-tale told us a story of a Los Angeles bride at 
Monterey. Of course being the honeymoon season, 
Monterey was the one never-to-be-forgotten spot 
in the world. She wrote home to the metropolis of 
the South : "Am having a most delightful time. Ar- 
thur and I have a row every morning before break- 
fast. Minnie." A letter from home was soon forth- 
coming, containing the one anxious query: "How 
do you pronounce 'row'? Father." 

Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

for $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; -uarter ton $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co.. South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



HIGHLAND SPRINGS. 

Highland Springs is one of the resorts of Cali- 
fornia that reminds one of the glories of the land of 
the heather. It is the Scot's highlands again, and the 
enjoyment is as keen as in the land of Rob Roy. The 
house, under the management of Craig & Kerr, is 
one ot the best in the entire State of California, and 
it enjoys a wide reputation for good cheer. It is 
easily reached either by the Southern Pacific Rail- 
way or the California and Northwestern. Driving, 
hunting, boating and lawn tennis may be enjoyed 
to the heart's content. The water contains the very 
best curative properties for the cure of all ailments 
of the stomach. The country abounds in opportuni- 
ties for sports of all kinds, including golf. The house 
is open the year round. 

It must be a very gratifying spectacle for the vic- 
tims of Creed, the special policeman in the employ of 
the North Shore Railroad, that, after being fined by 
the Justice of the Peace for his unwarranted attack 
on Messrs. Geissler and Sherman, in the sum of 
twenty-five dollars, and being discharged from his 
employment by the North Shore Company, the same 
company has seen fit to endorse all his actions and 
re-employ him in the capacity he usurped when he 
attacked the gentlemen mentioned. The commuters 
have been holding indignation meetings every morn- 
ing, and the opinion is generally expressed that his 
re-employment by the North Shore people is an out- 
rageous proceeding. 



You will never wonder where you are going for lunch after you once 
try the delicious oysters or steaks served by Mortighan iu the Califor- 
nia Market. For many years Moraghan has maintaiued a standard of 
excellence that is the delight of epicures. 



26 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

THE SONG OF THE SUMMER. 

There are miles of stately forest, 
With the undergrowth, concealing 
All the magic and the mystery that grow, 
Where Dame Nature weaves in secret 
The warp and woof of being, 
And he must seek the secret who would know. 
For the town can never tell it, 
And the city never shows us 
Where the springs of life and happiness abound, 
Where the branches whisper over 
- And the bracken cracks below us, 
In the open air the treasure may be found. 

There are shoals of gleaming water. 
Where the pebbles send it dancing, 
In the brightness of her noonday summer sun, 
Where the line may wdiistle fairly, 

And the rod spring with the fighting. 
And the blood leap till the struggle's done. 
For the town can never tell it, 
And the city never shows us 
What the joy of life can offer at its best, 
But the open air will whisper, 

And the singing stream below us 
Tell the story of the summer and its zest. 

And for him who hates the labor, 
There are shady arbors cloying, 
Where the hammock swings and sways beneath the 
trees. 
Where the banjo strums its ditties, 

There are love, and youth and beauty 
For him to take, who knows the way to please. 
For the town can never tell it, 
And the city never shows us 
The joy of youth as wine that fires the heart. 
But the open sky will whisper, 
And the merry Cupid knows us 
For the latest summer victims of his dart. 

—Roland Whittle. 



July 2, 1904. 



**i/<«CV> 




Mm 



JVoiv't 

A po\ir Ike 
\ J^f Pearlirve 

\ omKp clothes 
\ dissolve iliixtKe 
\ water before 
PMt(ii\gtKemii\. 

'"% Pe&rlirve 

is harmless 

;; but tkere is a 

' right eo\d a 

wroi\g way for 

/ everythirxg- 

■ Ree^dtke 

n Directioixsi.mtwry 

' imck&ftp) ai\d get 

ike bestresxilts. 

Use 

Without Rubbing, 

olker Soap, or 
kelp of atvy sort. 



AMERICAN BONDING COMPANY. 

The American Bonding Company's monthly "Bul- 
letin" announces a radical innovation in the surety 
business; instead of limiting their liability to "lar- 
ceny and embezzlement," they guarantee the repay- 
ment of losses occasioned by the "personal dishon- 
.esty" of the employee. It has long been apparent 
to those who have studied corporate surety with the 
purpose of determining the possible feature of the 
business that the tendency among State officials. 
Legislature and Judges of courts, is to classify the 
surety business as insurance. This new bond should 
appeal strongly to the employer, as it insures against 
almost every form of loss that he might suffer 
through the bonded employee, without technical le- 
gal limitations. This up-to-date proposition ener- 
getically handled will unquestionably keep the 
American Bonding Company of Baltimore in the 
public eye. The general agency of the company is 
managed by Mr. F. B. Lloyd, 405 Montgomery 
street, whose ability as a manager is evidenced by 
last year's reports of the Insurance Commissioner, 
showing the increased business done by the two com- 
panies which he represents — the New Amsterdam 
Casualty Company premium income in California, 
$45,000, and the American Bonding Company of 
Baltimore, premium income $30,000. 

Nelson's Amycose 

Infallible remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the Skin. ' 



Goodyear s 



"Gold Seal" 



RUBBER GOODS THE BEST MADE 




Rubber Hose, Belting, Packings 

We are headquarters for everything made of Rubber 



GOODYEAR RUBBER CO. 



R. H- Pease, President. 
F. M. Shepard, Treasurer. 
C. F. Runyon, Secretary- 



573-575-577-579 Market Street, San Francisco 



AN ELECTRIC FAN MOTOR 

Will Keep You Cool. Write For Prices 

Na.ilor.al Electric Co, 

455 Sutter Street. Telephone Bush 639 San Francisco 



Murphy, Grant & Co. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of 
furnishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of 
-THE NEVER-RIP* OVERALL. The best in the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, velvets, 
silk, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens, etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, sliuwis. notions, smokers 
articles, statiouery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., S. F. 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms 303, 304, 305. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone, Private Exchange, 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 5th avenue and 16th St., Oakland. Tel. East H. 



July 2, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



*7 



THE APOTHEOSIS OF LABOR. 

The building of the United :t <>n 

r al avenue, where the urn> 

rs. In 
workroom a man may he seen planing a 
with a single long si "i unfan 

ther workman is hewing wood t.i tomi 
a chair. The methods of tlicsc men seem stl 
enough, hut when the finished prodtl 

their labor, the atmosphere of the work-room be- 
comes that of a medieval crafts-shop. Round about 
are massive benches\ tables and chairs, oi a fashion 
belonging to the rugged age of the early Normans. It 
i- not difficult to imagine these long tables in an an- 
cient castle in England, and seated before them the 
knights and their retainers reveling alter a tight on 
the Scottish frontier. And. indeed, such a setting 
awaits these pieces of furniture, wrought in the gro- 
tesque forms of a primitive period, for they are to be 
sent to Mrs. Hearst's castle in the McCloud moun- 
tains, a perfect reproduction of an early Norman 
type. Less fantastic are the models of later periods 
in which craftsmanship attained its apogee. These 
are followed in the outfitting of residences and busi- 
ness offices — hook-cases, shelves, tables, cabinets, 
desks and what not. each created with as separate 
an individuality as though it were a living thing, and 
with its future setting always in mind. 

That all work — if it be truthful, avoiding shams 
and seeking its purest expression — becomes art ; 
that the beautiful is to be found by digging away the 
ornate rather than by covering over the simple ; that 
the useful need not be ugly ; that an understanding 
of these things will do more than anything else to 
quiet social unrest, replacing vain ambition with 
content in wholesome environment- — these are a iew 
of the truths whose expression was called forth by 
Dr. O. N. Orlow, when, coming as a stranger to San 
Francisco, he devoted his time and wealth to the 
foundation of the United Crafts and Arts ; truths 
which, finding their original impulse in California, 
will gain voice here and there throughout the world, 
and gradually achieve that desideratum of mankind, 
the apotheosis of labor. 

HOTEL RAFAEL. 

It is seldom that a resort which embodies all the 
seclusion of a mountain resort and every advantage 
of a fine city hotel may be found at a distance of only 
fifteen miles from a great metropolis. The Hotel 
Rafael is a little city of itself, and its cottages and 
main buildings form a community in which it is a 
source of pride to live. The grounds are embowered 
in roses, and the climate is the best around the bay 
of San Francisco. The Hotel Rafael is one of the 
very finest in the West, and it yields to none in the 
matter of complete modern equipment, in the beauty 
of its grounds, its winding drives, its shrubbery and 
its wealth of flowers, and its twenty-acre park. The 
Hotel Rafael is a credit to California, and its reputa- 
tion has extended beyond the mere local lines — it is 
national. 



There is an establishment in San Francisco that 
has earned a fine reputation in the manufacturing of 
switches and wigs, curls and other hair goods. Gold- 
stein and Cohn are importers of human hair and 
gloves, and they are wholesalers and retailers. They 
are centrally located in the Phelan Building, at 822 
Market street. 



WMtljr Imilalr* hat ititr (qulltd 
Ttll HI st INB 

MURRAY&^ 
LANMAN'S 

FLORIDA WATER 

v - . 

The Perfume of Perfume*. 

R*fr*«hlne, Doightf*iL 

Wllkart cictftkii Ihe Wil Tolkl Water 

I, m< nry. 



4n.irl.l lof MHBP.4Y * UNMAN'S 
Mad Kt lh«l jog let It. 



A NEW COUNTRY OPENED TO THE PUBLIC. 
The California Northwestern Ry. is making spec- 
ial rates this year for the Fourth of July holiday-. 
Tickets go on sale Friday, July 1st, and will he sold 
on the 2d, 3d and 4th, with the return limit Tuesday, 
July 5th. During the past two years the company 
has extended its road from Ukiah to Willits, and 
from Willits to Sherwood, opening a practically un- 
known country. The ride over the mountains affords 
one of the most beautiful trips on the continent. 
Between Ukiah and Ridgewood the road ascends 610 
feet above the sea to 1930 feet. At Willits the eleva- 
tion is 1364 feet, and in the thirteen miles between 
Willits and Sherwood the road ascends 2395 feet 
above the sea at En Cima, the summit, then descends 
into Sherwood Valley, where the elevation is 2290 
feet. The view from En Cima, the summit, covers 
miles and miles of redwood forests yet untouched by 
the axe, and in the distance is seen the Pacific Ocean. 
The special rates given will afford an opportunity 
to take in the grandeur and magnificence of this trip. 



See our 3 months ahead Ideas In hats. 
Palace. 



Tom Dillon & Co., opp. 



The World's Way 
To the World's Fair 



Through Standard aud Tourist Sleepera 



ST. LOUIS . $67.50 
CHICAGO . . $72.50 

May H> 12, 13; 

Jane 1, 3, 15, 16, 22, 23. 



If you are thinking of making a trip East, pie. 
company ing coupon and mail to this office. 



ROUND TRIP 



: (ill out the ac- 



C. A. RUTHERFORD, D. P. A. 
023 Market St., Kan Franotsoo 

I expect to leave for •■ 

about 

Please auote^ndYrip™* 6 - 

Advise me what the Rock Island's through car arrange- 
ments are. Do I change cars? If so, where? 

Mail me a copy of the World's Fair Literature. 

Name 

Street and No 

City and State 

~" C. A. RUTHERFORD, 

District Tassenger Agent. 

623 market Street, Kan Francisco 




28 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NSURANCE 



NEWS LETTER. 

U90 



July 2, 1904. 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,500,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PEXN. 

Paid-up Capital J8.0M.0W 

Surplus to Policy-Holders 6,022,01* 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Aeent 202 Pine St., S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up. S3.44C.1O0. Assets. $24,682,043.36 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $S,93u,431.41. Losses Paid, over J131.O0O.0O0 

Pacific Coast Branch : 

PRANK W. DTCKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 5,172.036 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2.441,485 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manaffer Pacific Department 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 2lfi Sansome Street. 

Unexcelled ror liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 

Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Ofllce: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

DON'T INSUHE— Until you have examined the now 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Pclicy 

Issued exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 
Assets, $1 ,500,000 Insurance in force, $2 1 ,CC0,CC0 

For particulars address the Company Agents Wanted. 
Marion Building lioGearySt. San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool 
Capita] 



Balfour. Guthrie & Co. Agents. 



(0.700.000 

31C California St-, S. F 



Cash Capital, J200.000.00 



Cash Asseti. J321.471.19 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Homo Office, S2S Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, General Liability, Workmen's Col- 
lective, Vessels, Elevators. 

Edmund F. Green, President; Ant. Borel & Co., Treas. William 
M. Plerson, Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane, Secretary; Frank 
P. Deerlng, Counsel. 

MARSHAL A. FRANK, General Agent for California, Hay- 
wards Building. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 

CHAS. P. FONDA 

318 MARKET STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




Mr. John Shehean, the well-known special agent 
of the Home Insurance Company, has recently suf- 
fered under the affliction of the death of his father. 

* * * 

.Mr. Stovell, the well-known insurance broker, has 
left the city for a vacation. He has gone to Big 
Meadows on a fishing excursion. 

* * * 

Mr. Louis Weinmann, the energetic secretary of 
the Fireman's Fund, contemplates a trip to the 
North, to — as he phrases it — "kill deer." 

* * ft 

Mr. Hugh Craig, of the Mitchell Company, is go- 
ing to the mountains on a well earned vacation. 

* * x 

Mr. J. G. Richards, the special agent of the Trad- 
ers, has left the city to tour the Northwestern States. 

* * * 

Mr. Okell of the Employers' Liability, has returned 

from his fishing trip, sans anything except stories. 

* * * 

Mr. George W. Butler is satisfied with his new and 
handsomely-equipped offices, and states that he won- 
ders how he ever enjoyed life on California street. 

Mr. Allen, the successor to Mr. Turner, of the 
Northwestern, seems to be a man that will win out 
amongst the brokers. 

* * # 

Mr. George W. Turner, the ex-manager of the 
Northwestern, it is reported, has gone East. It is 
to be hoped that he took with him a trunk large 
enough to bring back the companies which his merits 
as an underwriter warrants he will. get. 

* * * 

Mr. C. H. Ward, of the German, says he is going 
to the southern part of the State for a rest. 

* * * 

The Budget, published by the Maryland Casualty 
Company in its own interests, discourses on liability 
insurance as follows: 

"Liability insurance is for the purpose of indemni- 
fying the assured against loss actually sustained by 
him ; hence, no payment can be required of the insur- 
ance company except to the assured himself, and then 
only after payment by him to satisfy a legal claim 
against him by the injured person or his legal repre- 
sentative. It is true that this unquestionably cor- 
rect theory of liability insurance is, in practice, fre- 
quently subordinated to convenience of adjustments. 
Probably the vast majority of indemnities under 
liability policies are paid directly by the insurance 
companies to the injured persons. This, however, 
is not because the injured persons have a valid claim 
against the insurance companies, but because it is 
quicker and simpler in most cases than to use the 
roundabout method of requiring the assured to pay 
the injured and then obtain reimbursement from the 
company. Thus the assured is saved all the annoy- 
ance resulting from accidents ; to save which is one 
of the reasons why he insures. 

"There is plenty of good boiler business to be had 
if the agent will only make a proper and determined 
effort to secure it ; and when once secured, the thor- 
ough inspection service we render the assured will 






July a. 1904. 

ii| it. In 
ami the company 
profit 
In the 1 

frecl) t.. tin- Maryland It 
however, in inw ili.it ■ 

of the opportunity t.. gain information fn 

1 • 

The News Letter hat .1 the Investment 

Directory for 11)04 It is a publication .>f mi 
inn the investments of the various life insura 

pan: 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. ^ 

City Index and Purchaser*' (luide 



THE DEATH OF JUNE. 

Grey dust her roses are. 

Fades all her splendor; 
In the ilim West her star. 

Trembling and tender, 
Pales on the brink of space. 

Dying, her merry face 

Laughs with the radiant grace 
Her glad gods semi her. 

All her mad witcher) 

Pleads tor her. going; 
All her sweet vanity, 

Her blossoms glowing — 

Say "June was never true," 
Call her "A wanton shrew." 
All her wild faults we knew. 
And loved her, knowing. 

—Roland Whitth 



THE SANDWICH MAN. 

To all fair-minded men it is gratifying and satisfy- 
ing to see a business succeed in face of the strongest 
kind of unfair and underhanded antagonism. W'e all 
know the severe fight The Owl Drug Co. has made 
for its existence during the past two years, and it is 
indeed a pleasure to see this firm come out of the 
affair stronger and bigger than ever before. The 
< >wl is the first business house in San Francisco to 
take a firm stand against the impositions of organized 
labor. Refusing to force their clerks to join the 
Drug Clerks' Union, nearly two years ago, they have 
been boycotted severely ever since, yet their business 
has continued to grow, until they now have six 
branch stores, all doing an excellent business. 

Next Saturday, July 2d, a new branch store will 
be opened to the public at 80-82 Geary street, east 
of Grant avenue. The manager of The Owl, Mr. K. 
E. Miller, recently returned from the East, wdiere 
he made extensive purchase of drug store necessar- 
ies and luxuries for the new Geary street branch. 

The Owl maintains a buyer in Europe to person- 
ally gather from the factories the latest novelties 
in leather goods, such as purses, bags, chatelains, 
etc. Also fine perfumes, toilet waters, face creams, 
soaps and powders. These goods are shipped direct 
to The Owl, and are placed on sale in San Fran- 
cisco as soon as in New York. 

Since the beginning, The Owl has always carried 
out its policy of cut prices — that means that no mat- 
ter at what price drug-store goods sell for, The < )wl 
cuts the price from 10 per cent to 60 per cent. 

The Owl can afford to do this and make a small 
profit, for its aggregate business is now over $1,000,- 
000 a year. 



1 -i if. vz r.i.-.A' 1 v 1 •-. ■ ■ .-,..., „ m i :w ,- r . 
;*'*. — 'f» m Ac«i l« T Building, mm 1 

"'*• mer-. 

':FJITAinANT-N F. OoC K-Mr «n.| Mason 
• 'r-eta Print* amine and banquet r 
'* A n lllanco » 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. ORKANT. m Ou«rr*ro *tr**L 8*1eetlona on ai . 
any place In In* world. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

MARTIN AR0N8OHN. Notary Public and t\ 8. Pension Attor- 
ney. Ofltc*. CO Market stree-. Room t (opp. Palace Hotell San 
Krai BlaoktMi i ..,,,- .... an] 

no coinml«< 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'8 San Francisco lion Works. IJ4. Sit. J1S Main 
street. Iron work of overr description designed and con- 
structed. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco. California. Loos- 
tlon of works— Vtrglnfn City , Blaraf rounly. Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given Ihsl st n meeting of the Hoard of Director*, held on 
the 10th day of June 1ISH. an ss»cs»mctit. (No. I 8» of ten (10) cent* 
per share was levied jpon the capital stock of tho corporation, paya- 
ble Immediately In I'liiled Mates (told coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, rooms 21 22. Nevada Block. No 309 Montgomery St. 
Han Francisco. C*l. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
15th PAY OF JULY lint, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction: and unle«* pay 
ment Is msde before, will be sold on FrllllAY, the Ml. day of Angus 
I9i' I at 1 o'clock P. M., to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
the costs of advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of 
Dlreotors. 

JOHN W. TWIGGS, Secretary 

Office— Rooms 21-2i Nevada Block. No. 3 r3 Montgomery street, 8an Cren- 
olsco. Hal 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco, California. 

Location of works, Virginia Mining District. Storey county. State of 

Nevada- 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of Director?, 

held on the 1st day of June, 1904. mi assessment (No. Gl) of ten dm oentfi 

fier share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office 
of the Company. Rooms 21-22, Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery street 
San Francisco. Ca!. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE llth DAY OF JULY. 1904, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY.theist day of August. 
1904, to pay the delinquent assessment together with costs of Bdvertis- 
fng, and expenses of sale. 
By Order of the Board of Directors. 

JOHN W. TWIGGS. Secretary. 
Office— Rooms 21-2',! Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. California. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of THOMAS LANIGAN deceased. No. 30564 Dept 2. Notice 
Is hereby given by the undersigned. M. J. Hynes. Public Administrator 
of the City and County of San Francisco, and Ad ninistrator of the 
Estate of THOMAS LANIGAN, deceased.to the creditors of. and all 
persons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with 
the necessary vouchers, within four months after tho first publication 
of this notice, to the said Administrator, at room sen Parrott Building. 
Nos- 825 to 855 Market street, the same being his place for the transac- 
tion of the business of the said estate in the City and Countv of San 
Francisco, State of California. 

M. J- HYNE3 
Administrator of the Estate of THOMAS LANIGAN. Deceased 
CULLINA.N and HICKEY. attorneys for administrator, rooms 507, 6fiH 
669, Parrott building. San Francisco. Cal. 
Dated at San Francisco, June 4, 1904. 



Stockhc Iders' Meeting. 



Allen's Presa Clipping Bureau has removed to the rooms 

formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 240 California street, San 
Francisco. 



Pursuant to an order made by the Board of Directors of the Overland 
Monthly Company, a corporation at a meeting thereof held this day. 
a meeting of the stock-holders of said corporation has been called for 
the purpose of increasing the capital stock of said corporation to the 
sum of Five Hundred Thousand (Jsou.oou.oo) Dollars. Said meeting will 
be held on the eighth day, of July. 1904 at the hour of 3 o'clock, p. m . at 
the office of said corporation, to wit: Room number 11 of the building 
known as 320 Sansome Street, in the city and County of San Francisco 
State of California. 

C. WILLEM8 
Secretary of the Overland Monthly Company, a Corporation 
April 29th, 1904. 



3 o SAN FRANCISCO 

THE GREATEST HOTEL IN THE WEST. 

Hotel management is a science, and when it comes 
to the supervision of a great caravansary like the 
Palace Hotel, the science of management merges 
.nto an art. Ever since the assumption of the man- 
agement of the Palace Hotel by Colonel J. C. Kirk- 
patrick, the hotel has been a splendid money-making 
investment. While the building is of great magni- 
tude, and while its construction was far in advance 
of its day, many of the more modern improvements 
had been omitted. With the march of time, Colonel 
Kirkpatrick has kept pace with every innovation that 
would tend to the well-being and the comfort of its 
patrons. The latest improvement is steam heat in 
every room in the great building. This will make the 
hotel the most perfect in its appointments in the 
world. Steam heat had long been desired by the 
management, and the transformation is now made. 

One by one the magnificent ideas that have gone 
forward to make the Palace a great hotel have been 
inaugurated and carried to completion by the master- 
mind that controls its destinies. 

The great court from a driveway has been trans- 
formed into one of the largest reception salons in the 
world, and its specially designed furniture and car- 
pets excite the admiration of the thousands of guests 
from all points of the compass. The hotel has an 
ice-plant that is large enough in its output to supply 
a small-sized city. It has the most perfect laundry 
system, its elevator and bell-boy service is not to be 
compared. Each room is supplied with a telephone, 
and its linen and napcry is the product of the finest 
of the world's looms. 

Gradually the furniture and carpeting in every 
room in the immense structure has been replaced 
by the specially designed and modern articles, and 
while the change has been going on imperceptibly, 
the attaches and guests have scarcely been aware of 
the movement among them. 

Its kitchen and its grill cannot be surpassed by 
the finest of Gotham's hotels, and it is and always 
has been the rendezvous of the master-minds of all 
nations. Under its roof has been sheltered the men 
and women who make and unmake history, and its 
name is a household word from the farthest East 
to the nearest West. 

To build this repute has not been the work of a 
moment, nor has it been the thought of an hour, but 
the painstaking and conscientious labor of years. It 
is due the specialized genius of the management 
that the Palace Hotel is what it is, and it is due this 
management that San Francisco and its citizenship 
give full and proud acknowledgment. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" 

for your children wn.ie teething. 



NEWS LETTER. 



Wedding and Birthday presents in great variety at (rump's,113 Geary at. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Phoenix Savings, B. & L. Association. 

For the six months ending June 20th, 1004, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the savings department as follows: On term cer- 
tificates, at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum: on ordinary savings 
accounts at the rate of four and one-half U' ; l percent per annum ■ free 
of taxes and payable on and after July 20th. 1004. 

The Phoenix has a guaranteed capital of $200-,000, and a total paid-in 
capital of J1.2iki.ooo. Its Board of Directors are: A. A. Watkins Presi- 
dent; Chas. B.' Bishop. Vice President ; B. Prentiss Smith Treasurer- 
Geo. C. Boardman, Director: Gavin McNab. Director; Chas E Ladd' 
Director. Clarence Grange. 

Secretary and Managing Director. 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 

Illustrated Catalogue Free. 





July 2, 1904. 

BOORD'S 

OLD TOM. DRY 
©. SLOE GINS 

ORANGE BITTERS, etc. 



CAT ON BARREL 
BRAND 



boord & son CHARLES MEINECKE & CO.. 



LONDON, EXG. 



Sole Axents 314 Sacramento St. S. F. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Challenge Consolidated Mining Co. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco. California 
Location of works. Gold Hill. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the 10th day of J tin**, 1904, an assessment (No. 39) of ten cents 
per share was levied upon the capital st« >.-k of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the office 
of the Company. Boom 885, Mills Building, corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streets. San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
13th day of July, 1904, will he delinquent, and advertised for sale at 
public auction; and unless payment is made before, will lie sold on 
WEDNESDAY, the 3d day of August. 1904. to pay the delinquent assess- 
ment, together with the coats of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

C L. McCOY. Secretary. 

Office— Room 335. Mills Building, corner Bush and Montgomery 
streets, San Francisco. California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal plnce nt Im-incsx. Man Francisco. California. Lo- 
oatlon of works, Storey County, Nevad*. 

No' tee in hereby given thai at a meeting of the Board of Director*, held 
on che 15th d*y f June, UOI, an assessment (No. 70) of ten { 10) cents 
per share, was leaded upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
Immediately in United Slates erold coin, to the Heorelary at the office of 
the Company, Room 79 Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco California 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall lemaln unpaid on 
THR 2iHh DAY OF JULY. 1901 
will be delinquent, and advetisfd f°r sale at public auction and unless 
payment Is made before, will be sold on VednesdRy, the 10th day of A ug- 
uu"t 1904, to psy the delinquent assessment together with the costs of ad* 
vertislne and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79 Nevada Block 309 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Chollar Mining Company. 

Looaiion of principal p1a«e of business, San Franolscc, California, Lo- 
cation of wo ks. Storey Countj , Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby (riven that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 9th day of June. 1904, an asr-esr-ment 'No 66) of ten (10) 
cen t* per share was levied unon the capital stock of the coi poratlon. pa> - 
able Immediately In ('■ Ited Stales gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company mom 79 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San 
Franolseo, California- 

Any stock upon which this issesBment shall remain unpaid on 
13th DAY OF JULY. 1904 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at publto auotton; and 
unless payment In made before, will be sold on Wednesday, the 3d 
day of August, 1901. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of adv ert1»1ng and expense* of sale. 

Br order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E ELLIOT. Secretary 

Offloe— Room 79, Nevada Blook. 30'"' Montgomery street, San Fraud* iw 
California 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the board of directors of this society held 
this day, a dividend has been der-lared at the rate of three and one- 
fourth (3M) percent per annum on all deposits fort he six months, end- 
ing June 30. 19114. free from all taxes and payable on and aft**i July let, 

1904, 

ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 
Cor. Market. McAllister and Jones St». 
San Francisco. June 27th, 1904 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending June 3oth. 1904, dividends on ail deposits at 
the rate of three and one- fourth (SKI per cent per annum, free of taxes, 
will be payable on and after July l. L904, 
222 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 



The wine of exquisite quality 
which fits the fancy of those 
who appreciate a contrast. 

HILBERT MERCANTILE CO. 

Psclflo Coast An- 

V. W. CASKILL. Special Agent 
SAN FRANCISCO 



July 2. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTSR 

Pleasure's Wand. 

(Continued from page iy) 
Mr. James Neill, 
and the original Neill Company, will I 
to-morrow (Sunday) matinee ai ■!• 
House, in Clyde Fitch's celebrated unei 
"Barbara Frietchie." The immense r. 1 tho 

Grand Opera House stage will he w ■ this 

production, which will undoubtedly ho the 
effective and complete ever given Barbara Frict- 
chie" in this city. Th n of this pati 

play is particularly appropriate at this season of 
the year, when we celebrate the anniversary of the 
independence of our beloved country. 
» * * 

Mrs. Leslie Carter will appear for the last time 
this afternoon and evening at the Grand » >pera 1 1 
in "Du Barry." 

EMPLOYERS OWE A DUTY TO THE STATE. 

Whenever the peace of the community is threat- 
ened, the militia becomes the strong arm of the 
nation. It is the great balance weight which keeps 
the lawless element within bounds. This is axio- 
matic, and yet the National Guard has suffered more 
at the hands of its friends than from its enmies. 
I-'very penny-a-liner editor of a daily newspaper, 
who never shouldered a musket either as a "tin" or 
a real soldier, finds material for ridicule in the citizen 
soldiery. Instead of praise being showered upon the 
young patriots who don the uniform of blue or of 
khaki, as military men, we find spasms of vitupera- 
tion against "brass buttons and fuss and feathers." 
"Gold lace and brass buttons" is a favorite expression 
of the would-be newspaper wit. Incidental to this 
thoughtless flouting of the men who saved the coun- 
try in the war with Spain, and in all our other wars, 
any adverse criticism of our militia system is an en- 
couragement to strikers and law-breakers, discon- 
tented foreigners and anarchists. 

The employer has a great duty to perform. He 
should encourage his employees to join the militia; 
he should see to it that a proper spirit of patriotism 
is instilled by showing favors to the young man who 
sacrifices himself and his leisure time that property 
rights may be respected. The merchant should give 
such an employee his vacation at full pay during the 
National Guard Encampment. 

When a riot occurs, it is the custom of the business 
man to call for help from the militia, and the business 
man must foster the militia at other times. 



3" 




WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

CLTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

V V o 

Scotch_Whisky 

Importers-MACONDRAY & CO. 



EXTRA TRAIN SERVICE ON THE CALIFOR- 
NIA NORTHWESTERN RY. 

In order to give those who visit the Guerneville 
and Sonoma branches a good long holiday on July 
4th, the California Northwestern Ry. will run on that 
day a special train leaving Camp Vacation at 7:00 
p. m., Russian River Heights 7:10 p. m., Guernewood 
Park 7:15 p. m., and Guerneville at 7:20 p. m., stop- 
ping at Santa Rosa, Petaluma and all intermediates. 
The special from the Sonoma branch will leave (.leu 
Ellen at 8:15 p. m., stopping at Sonoma, Vineburp, 
and other branch points. Both trains will arrive in 
San Francisco at 10:45 p. m. 

The Overworked Eye. 

the Faded Eye. the Bed and Inflamed Bye, the Eye that needs 
care, relieved by Murine Eye Remedy. An Eye Tonic. 



$200 Reward 

For the arrest and conviction of any one as- 
saulting members or employees of this association 
or destroying property belonging to them. 



Report promptly to the Law Department, Citi - 
zens' Alliance, 217 Crossley Building. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

. CITIZENS' ALLIANCE. 




LIKE BEING AT HOME 

The "ANONA" 

A First-Class Resort 



Meals at all hours. Reasonable 
prices. Best of Wines and 
Liquors. 



WLO J. OILLETT, Prop. 

2910 SAN BET/NO AVENUE 
Tel. Capp see 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



WANTED HER TO CONFIDE 
IN HIM. 

"I don't seek your confidence 
enough, Matilda," said Mr. Mud- 
ley, who was experiencing one of 
his periodical spasms of reform. 
"Hereafter I want you to consult 
me about all your little troubles 
and affairs. I wish to take an in- 
terest in everything that interests 
you. Come to me with your 
doubts. Confide in me." 

"Oh, Henry, how sweet of you!" 
exclaimed Mrs. Mudley. "I have 
always wished that we were nearer 
together — that I could consult you 
and lean upon you, as it were." 

"Well, hereafter, always come 
to me," benignly enjoined Mr. 
.Mudley, as he opened the evening 
paper. 

A few moments later Mrs. Mud- 
ley ventured, "Henry, dear." 

"Yes, my love." 

"May I ask your opinion about 
something?" 

"Why, certainly, dear," said 
Mr. Mudley, sitting up straight 
and assuming a judicial cast of 
countenance. "What is it, my 
love ?" 

"Would you make this waist of 
maize peau de cygne. with the ber- 
tha of point d'esprit, trimmed with 
ruches of taffeta, or would you 
have the yoke cut gules on the 
bias, with cuffs of cream Venetian 
over white mousseline?" 

"I believe I'd have it the first 
way, Matilda," gasped Mr. Mud- 
lev, as he looked around for his 
hat. "Guess I'll go down to the 
club for a while." 




OCEAN VILLA AND COTTAGES. 

The ( )cean Villa and Cottages at Santa Cruz are 
enjoying a deserved popularity. Situated in a com- 
manding position at the mouth of the river, upon 
the wave-kissed cliffs, it affords the resident a charm- 



ing perspective. There are large, wooded grounds, 
and the fishing, boating and bathing are fine. There 
is a dancing pavilion, a billiard table, croquet 
grounds, etc. The management furnishes rowboats 
free to its guests. The transportation to and from 
the hotel to trains is free, and the table is fine. 




Ocean Villa, Santa Cruz, Cal. 



July 2. 1904. 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Society is well repre- 

• Hotel Del 

Monte by the sea for the 

h "f July holi 

'•f quiet and restful sport 
cither on the golf lin K — nr 
out "ii the l>ay salmon 
fishing. The baj is alive 

at pre- rut with mackerel, 
salt water trout, salmon, 
rock cod. barracuda, pom- 
pauo. smelt, flounder and 
sole. Salmon fishing par- 
ticularly is a famous sport 
— these tinny rovers are 
easily caught with fresh 
fish bail and bamboo troll- 
ing r.-ds equipped with 
sinker and multiplying 

reel. The ordinary daily catch of a sportsman of fair 
skill is se\en fish, of an average weight of seventeen 
pounds. The salmon run from five to fifty pounds 
in weight. 

You can play golf here all the year around. The 
temperature is never too high for the activities of 
the sport ; cool breezes from the sea are always pres- 
ent and refreshing, and disagreable weather never 
interferes with an appointed game. The links are 
only a short distance from the hotel, and are the fin- 
est on the Pacific Coast. The greens are really green, 
and are the only turf greens in California available 
to the public. 

Tennis is one of the many sports that help to keep 
one in the land of out-of-doors. The courts are well 
laid out with most attractive surroundings. In the 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I 



33 




Hotel Del Monte and Grounds. 



and another is the steadiness of the breezes that 
sweep it. There are numerous glass-bottomed ' 
to be had for viewing submarine wonders of this in- 
teresting body of water, and a fleet of boats and 
launches for rowing and fishing. 



SODA BAY. 

Lee Craig has taken over the management of Soda 
Bay, and this is equivalent to saying "there is an- 
other Richmond in the field." Air. Craig was for- 
merly with Highland Springs, and the liberal man- 
agement and intelligent supervision that character- 
ized that hotel will be in vogue at Soda Bay. Lee 
Craig is the ideal hotel man. with a good word for 
every one, and a hospitality and cheer that knows no 
limit. It is the policy of Mr. Craig to make the re- 




Driveway around Soda Bay. 

pretty club house are many attractions for rainy 
days and evenings. Billiards and bowling may be 
enjoyed, and here the foot-sore golf enthusiast may 
rest and recuperate. 

Laguna del Rey (Lake of the King) covers about 
ten acres. Boats are provided for the use of guests, 
and on moonlight evenings, particularly, rowing is 
a favorite pastime. Rowing and sailing on the bay 
are also pleasant amusements. A delightful trip is 
to sail across to Santa Cruz, twenty-five miles away. 
One ot the great charms of the bay is its smoothness, 



sort known as "Soda Bay" the most popular of all the 
fine resorts situated in the "Switzerland of America." 
It is the intention of Mr. Craig to spare neither effort 
nor expense to provide every accessory to the com- 
fort and pleasure of his guests. 

There are tennis courts, bowling alleys, shulile- 
boards, billiard and pool tables and croquet grounds 
in plenty. There is, in addition, dark rooms for 
amateur photographers. The table is of the very 
best, and the close proximity to the market insures 
the very best of food. 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
EXPOSITION NOTES 



World's Fair Grounds, June 26, 1904. 

The coat-of-arms of the Philippine Islands, 

designed by Tiffany & Co., New York, which has 
been adopted by the Philippine Exposition Board, 
will be used for the first time on the invitations to 
the formal opening of the Philippine section. This 
coat-of-arms shows the American shield, with the 
Tower of Castile and an Ultra Marine Lion. It was 
suggested to the Government by Colonel Clarence 
R. Edwards, U. S. A., Chief of the Bureau of Insular 
Affairs, and according to Dr. Gustave Mederlein, 
meets with the approval of Governor Taft. The 
selection of a flag and coat-of-arms for the Philip- 
pines must be approved by Congress. 

* * * 

The first cantaloupes to be placed on exhibition 
at the Fair were received June 18th in the Califor- 
nia section of the Palace of Horticulture. They are 
of the Netted Gem variety, grown in Riverside 
County, California. 

* * * 

Some fine examples of grain grown in a re- 
markably short season were placed on exhibition in 
the California section of the Palace of Agriculture 
June 18th. The grain was grown in Kings and 
Fresno Counties, California. Several sheaves of 
oats of an excellent quality are shown, which were 
planted April 16th and harvested June 8th of this 
year. Stalks of corn over 10 feet tall, fully matured, 
which were planted April 26th, and cut June 8th, 
are also exhibited. 

* * * 

An orange grove of thirty trees in full bloom 
is a feature of the World's Fair this week. The 
trees, covered with blossoms and filling the air with 
fragrance, are found in front and at each end of 
California's State building. The phenomenon of 
their being in bloom at this season is accounted for 
by the fact that they should have bloomed in De- 
cember and January, hut the plants were "shocked" 
in transplanting and the blossoming delayed. The 
sunshine and recent Missouri showers have given 
energy to the trees, and caused them to bring forth 
a multitude of sweet blossoms. Mr. George Roed- 
ing, Superintendent of California Horticulture, states 
that the trees will, in due course of time, bear fruit. 
» * * 

The University of California Glee and Mandolin 
Club, consisting of twenty-five members, have ar- 
rived at the World's Fair Grounds, and remained 
at the Exposition for ten days, and gave concerts 
during their stay. The leader of the club is Charles 
A. Elston. A. W. Black is the director of mandolin, 
and Albert Elkus is the piano soloist. 

* * * 

The Chinese village on the Pike was opened infor- 
mally to the public last night at 7:30 o'clock. The 
scene was a brilliant one, and the thousands of visi- 
tors who entered within the precincts of the village 
were delighted beyond measure. The two restau- 
rants were crowded by people who enjoyed the many 
delicacies served by the expert Chinese chefs. "Chop 
Suey" was a favorite dish. This is a species of stew 
containing sliced chicken, pork, beef, mushrooms 
and other toothsome condiments. The courtyard of 
the village contained a raised platform, covered by a 
handsome awning. The Chinese theatre was packed 
-nd the excellent troupe, especially imported from 
China, gave splendid performances. A typical Chi- 



July 2, 1904. 

nese orchestra produced the necessary music for the 
play. 

The village is not yet thoroughly installed, and 
there will be many improvements within the next 
week, after which the formal opening will occur, 
and invitations sent out for that purpose. All those 
who had a glimpse of this concession are of the 
unanimous opinion that it is one of the most attrac- 
tive features of the Pike, and is bound to prove an 
unqualified success. It is well conducted under the 
joint management of Mr. Wong Yu Sun of Chicago, 
Captain Fred L. Esola of San Francisco, and Mr. 

Budd, of Boston. 

* * * 

Pressed flowers of every variety, found in Alaska, 
have been added to the exhibits in the Alaskan 
Building. These flowers are pressed by the Women's 
World's Fair Auxiliary, an association organized 
in every city and town in Alaska. 

* * * 

An education exhibit, showing the work of the 
public schools of Juneau and Sitka. Alaska, is one 
of the interesting exhibits in Alaska's Building. 
Specimens of pencil, brush and color work, essays 
and compositions illustrated in colors, and work 
in all branches of school work, from primary to 
high school grades, are shown. 

* * * 

The booth of the Smith-Premier Typewriter Com- 
pany in the Palace of Liberal Arts, has been deco- 
rated with flowers and especially lighted in honor of 
the visit to the building of Honorable Timothy L. 
Woodruff, formerly Lieutenant-Governor of New 
York, who is President of the Company. Mr. Wood- 
ruff was accompanied by William Allan Dyer, of 
Syracuse, N. Y., treasurer of the company, and Wil- 
liam H. Dunfy, manager of domestic sales, with 
headquarters at New York. 

* * * 

Another typesetting machine has just been in- 
stalled in the exhibit of the Unitype Company in the 
Liberal Arts Building. It is the Simplex, and is 
equipped with all the latest improvements which 
the company has recently made. Two machines will 
now be in daily operation in this display. 

* * * 

The Liberty Bell has a rival. The Missouri hell 
is conspicuously displayed in the south hall of the 
Missouri Building, being mounted on a frame which 
is elaborately decorated with American flags. Al- 
though the identity of the bell is generally under- 
stood by the visitors, there is not a day that passes 
that some one does not bestow attention upon the 
Missouri bell that rightfully belongs to the Liberty 

bell, now in the Pennsylvania Building. 

* * * 

George A. Pardee, Governor of California, arrived 
in St. Louis June 27th. An evening reception was 
given in his honor at the pavilion of California. 

* * * 

A loom such as the Chinese use in weaving Chi- 
nese grass matting for floors has been installed in 
the Chinese section of the Liberal Arts Building. It 
is a primitive affair of wood, but the product, a piece 
of which may be seen partly completed on the loom, 
has become very popular the world over, and is 
now a regular article of commerce. A large knife, 
used for splitting the grass, is shown with the loom. 



Dentist, 80' 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker. 

Murket. Specialty "Colton 



Gas" for painless teeth 



July 3, 1904. 

THE GEYSERS. 

It would he liar. I to find • 

l lie 

Francisco. It is in the northwestern part 
•noma 1 mint;. rom 

erdale, and twenty-six mill 
itoga. The springs from which 
re-.>rt lakes its name arc among the i 
ders of California, the steaming wal 
spouting up in a marvelous, almost tern 
fying manner. Their medicinal qualities 
arc supplemented by the bathing facili- 
ties provided by the management. Ham- 
mam baths arc included. The hotel is 
situate. I in the midst of tirs. madrones 
and other beautiful trees, and i- rit, r lu out 
in the heart of nature, ^'ct then 
modern convenience, a plant for making 
ice from the pure mountain water bi 
one of the latest improvements. The 
rooms are newly hard-finished and newly 
furnished. Terms are Sto, $12, $14 and 
$16 per week. Mr. R. H. Curry is manager. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



35 




BLUE LAKES. 

"Bine Lakes" is situated in a region abounding in 
picturesque scenes and possessing a climate remark- 
able for its equable temperature. It is an ideal 
sanitorium and an ideal place for the rest that is 
sought by the worn-out resident of the city. The 
dining room has a seating capacity of 200 people, 
and it is situated on the shore of the lake. There are 




The Geyser Canyon. 



a large number of launches and boats, and the lakes 
have been heavily stocked with trout. The white 
sulphur spring has undergone development, and it 
is now a prominent feature. Parties desiring to 
visit "Blue Lakes" had better write ti> Mr. 0. Wise- 
man for a pamphlet descriptive of this most beauti- 
ful summer resort. 



You will appear to be always wearing new clothing 

if you have your suits cleaned and pressed regularly by 
Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 Stockton 
street. Besides, it manes the clothing last twice as long. 
They also clean gloves, neckties, ribbons, laces, curtains, 
draperies and all such articles quickly and thoroughly. 
Try them once, and you will be satisfied. 



THE CALL 



Has the Largest aod Best Home Circulation 
The Short Story Service in the magazine section 

of the Sunday Call is unsurpassed. There are also 

Numerous Chatty Articles by the best writers on 

topics of interest to everybody. 
The Pictures given away with the Sunday Call, 

absolutely free of charge, are art gems, and are 

framed, preserved and sold in nearly every art store. 

All this in addition to a Superior News Service, boi h 

local and foreign. 

Subscriptions, Dally and Sunday, by carrier 75c. per month. 
Yearly by mall, $8.00. Sunday edition 12.50 per year. The Week- 
ly, J1.00 per year. 
JOHN McNAUGHT, Man'g. JOHN D. SPRECJCELS, Prop. 

The Oakland 



Tribune 



is delivered into more homes of the 
masses and classes of Oakland and 
Alameda County than all other Oak- 
land, Alameda and Berkeley dailies 
combined. Reason — it's the best 
newspaper. 
W. E. DARGIE, Pres. T. T. DARGIE, Sec'y 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



&f>e Minister of Foreign Affairs 



Matters in Manchuria are rap- 
All Eyes Upon idly reaching a temporary cli- 
Manchuria. max, at least, and before this 

issue of the News Letter is off 
the press a great battle may have been fought. 
Goaded on, no doubt, by public sentiment at home 
and the impatience of the war party at the success 
of the Japanese, General Kuropatkin has placed him- 
self at the head of all of his available forces, and is 
moving down the Lao-tung Peninsula. It is a daring, 
unscientific and decidedly weak strategical move- 
ment, which he undoubtedly knows, and fully appre- 
ciates how like risking too much of one's capital on 
the hazard of the die his effort to win a decisive 
victory it is. Survivors of our Civil War will re- 
member how many battles were lost by brave and 
otherwise competent Generals rushing into trials 
of strength under the whip and spur of adverse criti- 
cism and fault-finding in the rear. Moral courage 
is rather more essential in a General than knowledge 
of the science of war. General Kuropatkin, evident- 
ly against his better judgment, has started down the 
Peninsula to prevent a junction of Oku and Kuroki's 
armies, and engage them in detail. He now knows 
that Oku and Kuroki never had any idea of forming 
a junction, but that their maneuvres in that direc- 
tion were a bit of cunning strategy to inveigle him 
into doing exactly what he is doing; i. e., leaving 
Kuroki in close striking distance of his left flank as 
Oku concentrates in his front. At this writing (Wed- 
nesday (Kuropatkin) is trying to strike Oku towards 
the South, and the wily Jap seems to be in no hurry 
to accept battle, for every foot that the Russians 
move southward, Kuroki's opportunity to turn Ku- 
ropatkin's left increases. Should the Russians suf- 
fer a severe defeat they would have to retreat upon 
Liaoyang, fully 150 miles north from Hoi-ching, at 
or near which the battle is likely to be fought, with 
Kuroki's flying columns pressing and harassing 
them all the time. Should the Japanese lose on the 
field, they would still hold more than four-fifths of 
the Peninsula from East to West, and from a few- 
miles below Hoi-ching to Hanshon Hill, a distance 
of nearly 150 miles, with their right resting safely 
on the Yalu river, a goodlv distance above its mouth. 
Such a defeat as the Japanese could be made to sus- 
tain in the coming engagement would not in any- 
wise disturb a single one of their bases of supplies 
between Antung on the Yalu and Dalny, near Port 
Arthur, nor would defeat open the railway to the 
Russians to Port Arthur, much less would it mater- 
ially disturb the existing investment of Port Arthur, 
for so long as the Japanese hold Dalny and Hanshon 
Hill, the latter the strongest position on the penin- 
sula next to Port Arthur, General Stoessel and his 
garrison will remain tightly bottled up. Again, the 
victory of Admiral Togo over the Russian squadron 
last week off Port Arthur, and the utter failure of 
the Vladivostock squadron, with the exception of 
two or three ships, to join the Port Arthur fleet, has 
weakened Kuropatkin's position, for he cannot count 
on help from that quarter. Had Togo been defeated, 
the Russian squadrons would be free to patrol the 
Bay of Korea and the Yellow and Japan Seas, thus 
isolating all the Japanese in the southern end of the 
peninsula, and most likely raise the siege of Port 
Arthur. This will give some idea of the importance 
of Togo's position in Japan's movements in Man- 
churia. It has been clearly shown that the famous 
Cossack cavalry is good for spectacular demonstra- 



tion, and good fighters when they outnumber the 
enemy two or three to one, but when they meet 
anything like an equal number, they run like wild 
asses. The puzzling thing about the Japanese strat- 
egy is that no correspondent nor General Kuropat- 
kin knows whether Japan has only Kuroki and 
Oku's armies on Manchurian soil, or has a third 
and perhaps a fourth army under cover on the east- 
ern side of the peninsula, somewhere between the 
mouth of the Yalu river and Pitseno, Oku's base on 
the Bay of Korea. But the perfect confidence in 
which Kuropatkin is being confronted would indi- 
cate that Oku and Kuroki know what and where 
their backing is. Either that, or they are foolhardy. 

The news from Thibet is 

"Nothing Doing" "nothing doing," but in 

Comes from Thibet, fact, a great deal is being 

done by the British to se- 
cure certain mountain passes and other strategical 
positions. It is pretty generally believed in diplo- 
matic circles that if Kuropatkin wins a crushing 
victory in lie field and the squadrons at Port Arthur 
and Vladivostock succeed in forming a junction, 
Russia will immediately and openly espouse the 
cause of the Llama by sending an army corps against 
the English. But if Jii Japanese are the victors in 
the coming battle thai ! heduled to take place at 
or near Hai-cheng, Thibet will have to rely upon 
her own strength and such Tartars as she may be 
able to hire for military service. For the present, at 
least, the British army of occupation is not likely to 
be seriously disturbed, but preparations for possible 
eventualities arc not to he slackened, for diplomatic 
"distinguished considerations" to the contrary not- 
withstanding, the press of Russia and England 
clearly voice a growing dislike for eacli other, and 
we may be sure that they voice the real sentiment 
of their official nations. In a nutshell. Great Britain 
is in Thibet to stay. Only Russia seriously objects, 
and hence it is for the Czar's nation to acquiesce 
and admit the fact for all time, or undertake to thrash 
England on land and on water. 

Germany had ordered 1,000 
In South Africa, more troops to South Africa 
to help dispossess the natives 
of their lands, and homes, that immigrants already 
on the ground and new-comers may have less diffi- 
culty in securing farms and town sites at the small 
cost of taking possession. That the Kaiser will win 
i>ut there is no doubt at all, for the other nations 
are willing that he should, and he has both the in- 
clination and the soldiers to so beneficently assimi- 
late the natives that in a few years their history 
will be little more than a tradition to be recited to 
the children of a rich, prosperous and exclusive Ger- 
man colony. The moral aspect of the conquest is 
not being considered by religionists or professors 
of statecraft. The Lord Might is in the saddle, as 
far as Europe's eyes can penetrate outlying and de- 
fenseless territory. 



"Out of the Beaten Path," iom Dillon's modern style ' ats. 
Opposite Palace. 

Are you tired? Go to the Post Street Turkish Baths. 



TOf^K.IJ^ 9 -Photographer 

1490 MARKET STREET, ?&,„ s,™,, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

GROUND FLOOR- STUDIO 



July a. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

HOTEL BEN LOMOND 
Three hours' ride 

of the 

River, "i!. of the p 

ni and convenient place, 

ment. I 
- the hot< Is, and n 

the river and surroundir tie \>y nigl 

by da] . 

Forests of redwood skirt the river and cover the 
mountain rom which gurgle numerous 

streams that -warm with trout. Nowhere can the 
pleasure-seeker find greater sport than here. 

Every convenience has been provided for the gui 
from dressing rooms for hathcrs to a dark room 
amateur pilot ographers. 

The tahle furnishes the best the market provides. 



NEWS LETTER. 



J7 




San Lorenzo Creek near Ben Lomond. 

and the dining room service will be the pride of the 
management during the season of 1904. B. Dick- 
inson, the proprietor, will answer any questions. 



FOURTH OF JULY AT DEL MONTE. 

If you want quiet sport, a game of golf on the links, 
a dip in the surf, or salmon fishing on Monterey 
bay, why not go to Hotel Del Monte for your Fourth 
of July holiday? Round-trip rate, including two 
days' board at the hotel, $10. Tickets good leaving 
San Francisco Saturday or Sunday, returning Mon- 
day or Tuesday. 

There has been a change in the proprietorship of 
the Hotel Baltimore. Mr. C. F. Buckley, Jr., is now 
the proprietor, and he has the able assistance of Mrs. 
E. Wendele as manager, with Dr. C. F. Buckley as 
financial manager. There has been a general cleaning 
of the premises, and the house has been put in prime 
condition throughout. The table is as fine as the 
market affords, and there is general satisfaction ex- 
pressed by the many patrons. 

You can never get any satisfaction out of cleaning 

your own carpets. It Is a business which has to be learned, 
and amateurs are not a success at It. Go to Spauldlng's 
Carpet Cleaning Company. 353 Tehama street. The carpet 
will come back to you as good as new. They have a com- 
plete cleaning apparatus. 




Golden Gate Cloak & Suit House 

ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE 
OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF 

Tailor vSuits, 
Jackets ™ 
Skirts 

AT HALF PRICE 



1230-1232-1234 Market Street 



EDISON PHONOGRAPH AGENCY 

PETER BACIOALUPI 

HAS REMOVED FROM 933 MARKET STREET, TO 
THEIR NEW STORE 

784-788 MISSION STREET, S. F. 



Locomotor Ataxia and Paralysis 

POSITIVELY CURED 

REFERENCES FURNISHED TO THOSE WHO ARE 
AFFECTED AND WANT TO INVESTIGATE. 

BRYN MAWR SANITARIUM 

HAYWAR.DS. CAL. 



Bed Eyes and Eye- 
lids, Granulated 
Eyelid8 and other 
Eye troubles cured 



MURINE EVE REMEDY 



38 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 2, 1904. 

BANKING. Testing a Passion 

Mechanics' Savings Bank 

incorporated January a, 1904. For a long time she sat gazing at the back of her 

^esident'james^B^'Gunn v'lc'^Preside'nt'.'Geo.' D*G?ay husband's head. He had impolitely drawn his chair 

Vice-President, Geo. F. Lyon Cashier, Frederick H. Clark J n f ront f l ler anc J was reading the evening paper, 

F. W. Dohrmann. Jr.; George D. Gray, F. M. Greenwood, Jas. J™ left elbow resting lightly on the edge of the table. 

O'B. Gunn, Marshall Hale, G. w. Kline, George F. Lyon, George there was a look of determination and fear in her 

M. Mitchell, Charles C. Moore, Henry T. S-:ott, W. F. Williamson. , t , . , . . . , , .. 

„,_ „ J ' eyes, but her clenched hands showed that nothing 

The Mechanics Savings Bank has opened its doors for a gen- , , . ... , . ,° 

eral Savings and Loan business at the S. W. corner Montgomery could Stop her purpose. bhe arose and Stepped in 

and Bu.h streets, San Francisco, Cal„ May 2, 1904. , ront of h ; m> ]ler si j k skirt brushing his foot. 

San FranciSCO Savings Union . "Ralph, I have a confession to make: I have grown 

tired of you! We have been married for six years — 

632 California St., cor. Webb St., San Francisco. ■ i nn „ rlrao-o-ino- v » 5 i-c ,„,l I n ,-,, c ;,-l- .-,( It ill " 

E. B. POND, President; W. C. B. DeFREMERY, ROBERT slx 'ong, dragging years, and t am Sick Ot It all. 

welch V AlsStanf e casniet-° VELL WH1TEp Cashier; R ' M ' He had laid aside his paper, and was looking up at 

Directors— E. B. Pond, W.' C. B. DeFremery, Henry F. Allen, her. There was something ill his e}'es that cauS'il 

George C. Boardman, Jacob Barth, C. O. G. Miller, Fred H, ■ f_„_ f „ „,-„,, ,„!,:<.„ ~„7l „ »* Cl,„ t-U... „ *. u 

Beaver, William A. Magee, Robert watt. her tace to grow white and set. bhe threw out her 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country nrms; in a rorklpsc crpcturp 

remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks "', . lc "" CB = gcoLuic. 

of reliable parties, payable In San Francisco, but the responsi- You have no doubt become aware of how often 

bility of this Savings Ban£ commences only with the actual re- T , , .-, , -,,.. , , , . . . 

ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 1 have been in Lrrant VVinlates company of late. 

OT™nt"r n ance h fee flrSt deP ° S "' N ° "^^ ' S ^^ ^ "*** b °° k Well > he loves me • 1 lovc him - O h ! h °W l detcst 

Office Hours: a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings, 6:30 to 8. these fetters that bind me to vou. Ralph, do they 

Deposits, December 31, 1903 $33,232,908 , , >. . . , ^-. ,. ' ' ■> 

Guarantee Capital, paid-up l.ooo.ooo never grow hateful to vou .' Don t you sometimes 

Reserve and Contingent Fund. ■ 899,516 w ; sh that yQU had the r ;^ ht tQ ta f <e some oth( , r 

Mutual Savioqs BanK of s.„ Fr.™.*,. £? man in y° ur f ms ' to t clalm her . as J"* L cla j m me? 

7io Market St., opposite Third. ,° f c0 , urse > V™.}™™ not said so in words, but you 

Guarantee Capitol $1,000,000 have been so silent lately — such a bore! 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 50C.O00 xj _ nrn j r larL- pvpc wp» H-iclii'no- lilra st-ire in 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- ner P r OUd, Clark C\CS Were Hashing like Stars 111 

dent: george a .story, cashier; John a. hooper, Vice- the lamplight. She was watching him as a panther 

President; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. i , • -, , 

Directors— James d. Pheian, s. g. Murphy, John a. Hooper, watches his prey, she expected anger, scorn or 

James Moffltt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph r,]p*r\incr T,-v her o-roat crnricp ho tncorl hie r»an»r 

Spreckels, James M. McDonaid, Charles Holbrook. pleading. 10 Her great surprise, lie tOSSeCJ Ills paper 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. t0 t h e floor, and arising, confronted her. 

Deposits may be sent on postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or p* . 

exchange on city banks. ISance, you are a brick! [here was a warm 

The German Savinqs <S Loan Society fl , ush , of , pIeasure in his [„ c - _su ^- a lo ? k of & tha f 

»»•*. "^'""v ^t*«.i. M ^ ^ _w._», ^"" lu v s he bad not seen since their wedding day. Have I 

no. 526 California street, san francisco. ever longed to take another woman in my arms? Oh. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,423,751.60 , ,. "J -. T j. T . , J , 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1,000,000.00 haven t 1? in fact, 1 have done so — many times! 

D «n!™^™^nT« ••■•■••••••••■•••■■••••■■••••••"f °f 9 'f- 18 Your confession has made me bold. I have been try- 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- . r . ... ., -, . T .. ; , 

President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; ing for weeks to tell VOU all, l\ance, but 1 COllld not 

tf?and ei f wNfn^gen 6 ' H ' B ' Ru3S ' N ' uh ^ n ^ L N " Wal " nerve myself to do it. Now I will; I have nothing 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- to fear " 

mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. ,, XT . . r ,, „. . , . , 

Muiier; General Attorney, w. s. Goodfeiiow. JNI o, nothing to tear. brie spoke carelessly, and 
; moving away from him, caressed the polished edge of 

Continental Building <Ss Loan Association the table. 

Established in im of California. "Nance, I met her several months ago. No matter 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cai. wdio she is — the important part of it is that I loved her 

Subscribed Capital $15,000,000.00 t , . T i t i- j *i iA. l t t. J 

Paid-in Capital 3,000,000.00 the moment I saw her. 1 realized then that i had 

P in?erer.,aWde P ^ "ever loved you as a man should love the woman he 

m term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. marries. All these so-called business trips of mine 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbin, Secretory . , „. .. , , tu^i 

and General Manager. have been flying visits to her. dear presence. 1 hated 

, " 7~~Z. ~ ~ ~~. you for keeping me from her. Once — God forgive 

International Banking Corporation me!— once, you know last month when you had that 

no. l wall street, new York. fever, I was wishing that you would — die." His 

capital ano lurpC Authorized -------^S^S voice trembled to a whisper' on the last word. He 

officers— wniiam l. Moyer, President; Charles d. Palmer, elanccd at her from the corners of his eyes and saw 

Assistant to President; William B. Wightman. Assistant to & ■ , . , , 

President; John Hubbard, Treasurer; James H. Rogers, Secre- a tear splash down on her dreSS. 

tory; John B. Lee, General Manager; Alexander & Green, Coun- "Nance!" There was a ring of uncertainty in his 

BRANCHES— London, San Francisco, City of Mexico, Manila, voice 

Hong Kong, Yokohama, Shanghai, Singapore. „. „ , , . . , t(T . , ■ 

AGENCIES— Bombay, Calcutta, Madras, Penang, Rangoon, She Silenced him with a gesture. 1 was Wishing 

Colombo, Amoy, Canton. Hankow. Tientsin, Tansui. Anplng, .< „„„,_ t.u;„„ t^r. " m ,io*l„ "Tlnatli ic innro 

Bakan, Moji, Saigon, Kobe, Bangkok, Batavia, Samarang, Sou- the same thing, tOO, — quietly. .Death IS more 

rabaya, and all parts of Europe. welcome than a loveless life " 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH-32-34 Sansome St. w eicome tiian a io\ eie»s inc. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- Ah! He drew a deep breath and his lips were 

tions, firms and individuals solicited. Loans made on liberal terms , ., ,, T , __, i,„„, ,,„,, r„„i T,-, u- trca Irao t,-, 

on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bought white. 1 know how you leel. lo De lree — tree to 

and sold. Travelers' and commercial letters of credit granted, nr p.. tn Invp tn rlnim another'" He took a stet) 

available In any part of the world. Interest bearing certificates caress, to iO\ e, to Claim anoiiltr . nc tuuk a . ] 

of deposits issued for fixed periods, interest allowed to banks toward her, then paused ; then he went forward and 

on current daily balances. Special rates given to banks keeping ,, ■ j *.i 1 •*. i j *-!.„*- u..~~ K.. !-,<>,. .; 1 . 

accounts with us, and drawing direct on our branches and gently raised the white hand that hung In her Side. 

Torrespondencb invited "Nance, there was a time that when I held you 

F. E. beck, Manager. p. G. EASTWICK. jr., Asst. Mgr. \ n m y arms, the world was forgotten. Xow ' 

~ <-. ~ ^ r "Now," she interrupted, "all that is changed. All 

beCUrity C?aVingS tSanK t l iat we „ ec( \ j s a divorce. I suppose"— enquiringly 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. ",,„.i ,„;h coo ilinnt rliat nr sin II " 

interest paid on deposits, loans made. — v °u will see ahout mat, or snail 

PTRT-^TORS-William Alvord, William Babcock. 8. L. Abbot. Jr. "No, I will, of course." 

£'. Peale.""^: Gra'nt° nteagl6, en D ' C ' ark ' E ' J ' McCutohen ' E She drew her hand from his— not hastily, but with 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 
cncc. "I .mi iv 
>t live. Tl 



July a. 1904. 

a in 
"that lit t T ■ 

I tier pure, um 

I at her for a second, then 
that hunt: on th< 
I them. That sweet, dimpled face, tl 

tad red, puckered lips that had 
learned to lisp the dear w..r.| "Papa" when the 
of Death had closed them forever. Strong .n- 
he was, lie turned away to the win. are. I 

blindly into the darkin 

His wife stood looking at him, a passion in her f.\ 
that would have frightened him had he seen it. 

t went to put some flowers on her grave to-day," 
she continued gently. "The) were lilies— how 
loved flowers, didn't she: I in you remember how 
her baby hands used to t;.he the roses from your 
. how she used t" bury her little nose in the 
scented petals and murmur in delight? Poor, little 
darling, I hope she doesn't know — see what we are 
doing!" 

The mother's voice broke, and she laughed — a 
laugh more bitter than tears. 

Her husband turned and faced her, a restless light 
in his eyes. 

"Would she not rather see us happy than miser- 
able?" he asked. 

She raised one hand to her throat. "Yes." she fal- 
tered, "it is best to be happy." 

His glance traveled toward the clock and she knew 
of whom he was thinking. "It is time for my — er 
— business trip," he said, hurriedly. "I — you know 
how it is — I promised to be with her this evening." 

"And the divorce?" 

"I will see about that in the morning." He went 
from the room, slamming the door behind him. 

For a long time she stood gazing at the baby face 
above her. She heard her husband donning his coat 
and hat, then his footsteps along the hall, and last, 
the closing of the hall door. She tottered to her 
chair, and sinking into it, bowed her head upon the 
table. 

"What have I done?" she moaned, fiercely. "My 
God! I was only trying him!" — Pearl Davis in 
Young's Magazine. 



BANKING. 



4TH OF JULY EXCURSIONS. 

The Lagunitas, Paper Mill, Tomales Bay and Rus- 
sian River offer many delightful places to spend the 
4th of July. Tickets on sale July 1, 2, 3, or 4th, good 
until July 5th, at following round trip rates. Caza- 
dero Big Trees or Duncan's Mills, $3; Monte Rio, 
Mesa Grande, Camp Meeker or Tyrone, $2.50; To- 
males or Camp Pistolesi, $2; Pt. Reyes or Tocaloma, 
$1.25; Camp Taylor, $1.10. Sunday excursion rates 
and trains apply on July 4th. Extra train Saturday, 
July 2d, to Pt. Reyes, at 5:15 p. m. Apply to ticket 
office, No. 626 Market street, San Francisco, for copy 
of "Short Scenic Trips" or "Summer Outings." 



OVERHEARD ON THE PIKE 

Ml*. Easy— "Why should people visiting the Exposition at night, use 
more Allen's Foot- Ease than in daytimeV" 

Miss Foot— "Because under the brilliant illumination of the grounds 
every foot becomes an acre 1" 

Mr. Easy— "Fair, Only fair! Pray, conduct me to the nearest drug 
store and I promise never to accept a substitute for you or for Allen's 
Foot-Ease." 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only $7.60 

per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Pull weight guaranteed. In 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities Briquettes 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 



Wells,Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 

SI3.500.000 



Capital. Surplus end tn.llrlded ( < 



He 

Kins 



n«w transacted. 



"resident, r. I- l.lpmsi 
«hl*r. Jno. E. Ml 

York. Salt Lake, Ota. 
roughout lh» world. 



Oen«ral banking I, .«i 



The S<?n Francisco National Bonk 

riS ib E. Huntington, First V ce-Presldent s p r h 
pSslAn'. "i^-.?.' P °P?,* Talbot. Lumber Dealer.: C S Bend ct 
Newhai" * ?o "w Si 0t T n ,f ?°/. r orge Almer Newhatf 

aSSBHSSF*? 8, --■ ftaaut 

Drexel & co. Chicago-Continental National Bank. St Louis- 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated .the Bank of British Columbia, 
c .j „ „ HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital. J8.7U0.000. ReseVCe Fund, J3.000 000 

Aggregate Resources, over J8O.OO0.O0O 

B F WATT- H -°,"V GEORl i E *• COX - President. 
B. E. WALKER General Manager. Alex. Laird. Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
fcY.'>.P^\„ UI '*1CE-«| Lombard St., E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place 
B *£££ H 5 S IN BRITISH COLUMBlA-AOin aCe Cranbrook. 
nlSli, Greenwood. Kamloops, Ladysmlth, Nanalmo. Nelson 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. ««=i«««i. 

f£J tTm, 1 ^?. 1 ?, T .E"RlTORY-Dawson and White Horse. 

Al^ NI Tn ED ,S 1AT g S - Portland ' Sealtle and Skaguay (Alaska,, 
mi? >. *?"}?;■ Branches, covering the principal points In 
o la * 7?£%„ N - w - Territories, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON-The Bank of England, the Bank of 
lank an Ltd S Tbe U "'° n 0t Lonaon and Smiths 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO-The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW OLREANS-The Commercial National Bank. 
San Francisco Office— 

326 California Street 

A. KAINS, Manager. 



LIulilH 



London, Paris and American Bank. 

N. W. COR. SANSOMB AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, J2.500.000. Paid-up Capital, J2.000 000 

Reserve Fund, Jl, 100,000. 
Head Office— 10 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs 
Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw dlrsct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travslara' 
credits Issued. 

S1G. GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; U. ALTSCHUL , Cashier. 

The flnglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, J6.000.000 Paid-up, J1.500 000 

Subscribed, J3.000.000 Reserve Fund, J7U0.0U0 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

1GN. STEINHART, P. N. LIL1ENTHAL, Managers. 
Officers: Frank J. Symmes, President; O. A. Hale, Vice- 
President; H. Brunner, Cashier. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital J3.000.000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,725,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 
Trustee. Check accounts solicited. Legal Depository for money In 
Probate Court Proceedings Interest paid on Trust Deposits and 
Savings. Investments carefully selected. 

BUSWELL COMPANY 

Bookbinder, Paper-ruler, Printer and Blank 
Book Manufacturer. 
53G Clnv Street 



40 



HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

It makes the toilet something to be en- 
joyed. It removes all stains and roughness, 
prevents prickly heat and chafing, and 
leaves the skin white, soft, healthy- In the 
bath it brings a glow and exhilaration which 
no common soap can equal, imparting the 
vigor and life sensation of a mild Turkish 
v ,ath. All Gporr'is anh Druggists 

SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thl«vesl 

"I hear your engagement is off, 
dear." "Yes, it was a case of 
heart failure." 

Little Willie — What's a canni- 
bal, pa? Pa — One who loves his 
fellow man, my son. 

"Willie, do you want one of 
those Russian blouses?" "No, 
mamma, I'm afraid I might get 
whipped in it." 

First Student — I get all my ex- 
ercise running to chapel in the 
morning. Second Student — Ah, I 
see ! A sort of religious exercise. 

"Lord Oldcastle, however, says 
there are no antiquities in this 
country." "What's the matter 
with him? Hasn't he ever heard 
;>f our infant industries?" 

"Have you been reading any of 
these articles on 'Why Men Don't 
(jo to Church?'" "No. One 
might as well go to church and be 
done with it." 

He — When you are not present 
I grow brave and speak of you as 
Julia, instead of Miss Grant. She 
(coyly) — Then you do not Miss 
me when I'm gone? 

He — I see another naval en- 
gagement is reported. She — More 
fighting? He — I suppose so. The 
captain is engaged to the rear-ad- 
miral's daughter. 

"What do you like most about 
going to Sunday-school, my little 
man?" asked the benevolent 
stranger. "Coming home," the lit- 
tle man promptly answered. 

Mrs. Fresh — Pretty Polly! Pol- 
ly want a piece of cake? The Par- 
rot — Did you bake it yourself ? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 2, 1904. 

THE REQUISITE AT SMART FUNCTIONS 







GIANT STRIDES! 


All Records Broken 


\^k ^ 


■ifVn^Kxy 


R> DISTINCTLY HIGH QUALITY 




I SI 


MOET <& CHANDON 


&&/ " 




"White Seal" Champagne 

Never Varies 


vjK'i'i 


Km 


WHY??? 

Messrs. Moet & Chandon own more vineyards 
than all the leading Champagne houses combined 
and have over 1 1 miles of cellars, the most ex 
tensive in the world. 


cfdfe 


i>feM^ 


Their sales during the Year 1903 were 


j; is§& 


k 'i^r-^^x 


4.013.684 




S 7 / \*^j£jlff\xf 


Bottles, a figure never before reached by any Champagne house 




Ij&KAJ^, -"drjjffl 


This Great House offers its choicest product in 


°<v?) 


^jSsrSr--- *r 


"WHITE. SEAL" 

THE CHAMPACNE OF THE DAY 

:inc coast agents San Francisco, Cal. 


William 


Wolff & CO. PA 



THE REQUISITE AT SMART FUNCTIONS 



First Minister — Mr. Prosy, how 
do you manage to fill your church 
so? I am quite envious of you. 
Reverend Mr. Prosy — Trading 
stamps — ten in the morning, dou- 
ble the number in the evening. 
But, Brother Lastly, we have a 
contract by which no other church 
in town may obtain the stamps. 

"Do you think that honesty pays 
in politics?" asked the young man 
with the alert countenance. ' "My 
friend," answered Senator Sor- 
ghum, "I don't like the style of 
your question. Any man who takes 
up honesty as a speculation is 
liable to get tired of waiting for 
dividends and run to the opposite 
extreme." 

"What is your favorite opera?" 
asked the young woman who was 
trying to make conversation. Mr. 
Cumrox looked startled. "I can't 
say," he answered. "My favorite 
poem is 'The Recessional,' and my 
favorite painter is Rembrandt, but 
I forget what mother and the 
girls told me to say my favorite 
opera is." 



She — Ah ! do you hear that ? 1 1 
must be a band playing Wagner. 
He — No, they are blasting around 
the corner. 

"Oi course, Mr. Brutle may have 
his faults, but he's exceedingly 
swell." "What! The man is noth- 
ing but a common wife-beater." 
"Oh, not common, not at all com- 
mon. He always beats her with a 
gold-headed cane." 

Mistakes a Wife Makes. — When 
she lets the dinner burn while she 
nnds out how the novel turns out. 
When she buys new finery for the 
house and wears shabby, dowdy 
clothes herself. When she neglects 
to give her servants' rooms a home- 
like atmosphere. 

"How do you account for the 
fact," asked the doctor, "as shown 
by actual investigation, that 32 out 
of every 100 criminals in the coun- 
try are left-handed?" "That's eas- 
ily accounted for," said the pro- 
fessor. "The other 68 are right- 
handed." 

Mistress — Do you love babies? 
Maid — Not at $3 a week, mum. 




READ WITH COMFORT 

nnMT e ti S „f?°,.,f?„ 0d ,T eason w i>y anyone should overtax their eyes 
rhJ .-«,,» i= f - becomes deranged. Many do so, however, and 
™ ;« s t ¥'t i?„ a , c i"?. p,1 ? at ' on 0( <nental and physical troubles. The 

IerV« p™2fm d r)' cate °L gan 'i 1 the bodv - Glve " the care ll <*•" 
nntTi q £S^£ lt Ge( ? r se Mayerlt, German Expert Optician. Open 

"-. »°« cl0ck ev enlngs. Consultadon tree. 
„„_■ Ma . vel ; e's German Bye Water makes weak eyes strong. "*"»— — "'" ^- -— *~ 

der n. ye wYn"' r ,? sts tlred , eyes - Prlce 60c - bv ma " 62c. mall o?: sHowmr ffffi-t ob- rrn 
wf„™ ^ ells ' ^argo George Mayerle's Antiseptic Eye-glass Slvirii Yr'« i E?i«Tr »°rT/-^ ^°r 
— — *!!■ 1 1 m i n i m i Wipers Insure clean lenses without scratching. GLASS WIPERS 

GEO. MAYERLE, GERMAN EXPERT OPTICIAN. 1071 MARKET STREET. 2 DOORS FROM 7tK STREET 




July 7. 1904. 

Achilles vu lull 
"When he got out of bed this 
morning," said the great man's 
»nt. "he si ,in a 

tack with his vulnerable heel. 
Fortunately, however, he •! 
repeat the hasty remarks Achilles 
had made. 

Judge Parker commends "hon- 
ud independent," nor organic 
and servile, journalism. In other 
words, like any honest and intelli- 
gent reader, he admires a paper 
which speaks out. whether he 

"Willie, dear," his mother said. 
"I wish you would go out and see 
what all that racket in the next 
bloc« is about." Willie went away 
and returned half an hour later 
with the desired information. 
"There was a deaf and dump cou- 
ple married down there this even- 
ing," he said, "and the boys is try- 
ing to shivaree 'em according." 

"I suppose vou will marry when 
you grow up." said the visitor, 
pleasantly. "No," replied the 
thoughtful little girl, innocently. 
"Mamma says papa is more care 
than the children, so I guess the 
care of my children will be enough 
for me without the care of a hus- 
band." 



BETHESDA 



THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER 



LOUIS CAHEN a SON. 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

418 Sacramento St., San Francisco 




Doable Daily Service to All Points 
East via 

PUEBLO, KANSAS CITY 
a ST. LOUIS 

Through Pullman Sleeping oars and Ob- 
servation Cafe Dining Cars, with Electric 
Lights and Electric Fans, Scenic Route 
through Colorado. Fortickets, berth reser- 
vations, folders, etc., call on or address 

GENERAL TICKET OFFICE 

625 Market Street, San Francisco, Oal. 

(Palace Hotel) 



SAN FRANCISCO NF.WS LETTER 

"There's talk 

■ 

tcr, tli. 

"Mormonism 
isn t it 
Cayenne, "when 

a man. whi r tour n 

contempli 

Mrs. Highmore (with 

To what am I indel 
for tlu- honor of this \ ; sit ? I 
pected i allor- To > our can 
servant, perhaps, madam. I dare 
say she forgo) that you wen- not 
at home. 

Mrs. Hiram Often — And why 
did you leave \<>ur hist place? 
Servant Girl — Me and the woman 
couldn't git along. Her automo- 
bile and mine was different makes. 
an' we was always discussin' about 
'em. 

"Should married women work 
for a living?" asked one of the stu- 
dents. "On the principle that any- 
body who is thrown into deep 
water must sink or swim." replied 
the professor, "doubtless most of 
them should." 

Just as the automobilists were 
about to start on their journey 
across the Sahara a thoughtless 
person in the crowd asked them : 
"What do you expect to feed on?" 
To which they instantly respond- 
ed : "On the sand which is " 

"Oh, I see !" interrupted the 
thoughtless person. "Chestnuts!" 

Singleton — Do you really be- 
lieve living expenses have in- 
creased 25 per cent in the last five 
years? Marryat — What! Why, 
they've increased 100 per cent at 
least. Singleton — Nonsense ! Mar- 
ryat — Not at all. Five years ago 
there was only my wife and I, and 
now there are six of us in the fam- 
ily. 

The Lady (a middle-aged co- 
quette) — Oh, doctor, every time I 
glance into my mirror I find I'm 
looking older. Do tell me what to 
do for it. The Doctor — The rem- 
edy is quite simple, madam. Break 
your mirror. 

A teacher was explaining to a 
little girl how the trees developed 
their foliage in the springtime. 
"Oh, yes," said tne little miss, "I 
understand; they keep their sum- 
mer clothes in their trunks." 

He — Like all young men, I have 
my faults. She — Yes, Mr. Good- 
leigh, but they are so insignificant 
that no self-respecting girl would 
feel justified in marrying you to 
reform you. 



41 



A 




The CLUB 

arc tlic nrlKin.il (rattled Cocktails. 
Sears ol experience have made 
them Trill PERFECT COCKTAILS 
that they arc. Do nnt he lured 
Into buying some imitation. The 
ORIGINAL of anything Is good 
enough. Wien others are offered 
it is for the purpose of larger prof- 
its. Insist upon having the CLUB 
COCKTAILS, and take no other. 

G. F. IIKlllI.EIN A BRO, M/h/rtM 

29 Broadway, New York, N. V. 

Hartford, Conn. London 

pacific coast aoent8 
SPOHN-PATRICK COMPANY 

Ban Francisco. Los Angeles. 
Denver, Salt Lake City. Seattle. • 



"Childhood's hours are the hap- 
piest times of one's life!" sighed 
the disappointed man. "Oh. I 
don't know I" chirped his compan- 
ion. "I don't see but that I can 
watch a ball same just about as 
well as I could forty years ago." 

ST A M M E R? 

We are cured , l»t us pure vou. No Drawl. Si no - 
BONG, Timi-uiat, DfcUas or Hypnotism. Our 
Bpeeialtyls the Science if Speeab for Stammerers, 
"■Hi close, lndfvflilnal intention. Bend fur 
'■Speech Blemishes" and proof of cures. 

NATURAL M-i;i;< 11 At -aiikjiv 

1039 iinst 28th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



TWflMEV t M1HDL0V1CH 



THE YELLOWSTONE 



22 MONTGOMERY ST. 

Tel. Main 1447 



THAT ST. LOUIS TRIP 

TAKE THE BUSINESS LINE 

The Union Pacific 

SAVING 12 HOURS 

Bate only $«7.bo round trip. Through 
first and second-class cars, diners and all 
comforts. Best road and equipment. 
Safest line. Drop a postal and I will cal 
and explain everything- 



S. P. BOOTH, Oen. Atf., U. P. R. R. Co. 

No- 1. Montgomery St. Dan Francisco, Cal 



4 2 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 




MODI 1. II. s HOUSE POWER. 

Price, $950 

Rambler Automobile Agency. '^"S. 5 



Phone South 1iki7 



THE Al/TOCA'R 




AUTOCARS, $1,850 
AUTOCAR RUNABOUT, $1,050 
LIGHT TOURING COLUMBIA $1,900 
COLUMBIA FOUR CYLINDER $4,000 

THERE ARE NO AUTOMOBILES BETTER 



WEST COAST 

606 VAN NESS AVENUE 



MOTOR-CAR CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



If you are contem- 
plating the purchase 
of an automobile we 
wish to call attention 
to the fact that we 
will be In a position 
to supply you with a 
machine which we 
know is superior to 
any other machine 
for sale for less than 
$2000. 
The price will be 

$875 and $975 

The type of engine is 
double opposed cylinder i',-in',i. Every part accessible and dura- 
ble, and for power, and weight, nothing on the market like it. 

HEINE MOTOR CAR. CO. 
235-237 Geary St. Opp. Union Squevre San Francisco 




The CADILLAC 



MODEL B. Price $950 
Wltb Toaaeau $1050 




August 8th from Del 
JVlonte to 12th and 
Broadway. Oakland, 6 
hrs. 5min Octoberinth 
the same run was made 
in 5 hrs. 38 miu. with- 
out stopping the ear or 
r.-fllling with gasoline 
or water, breaking all 
records. The only suc- 
cessful tour of thn 
Yosemite Valley was 
made by a party of i in 
a Cadillac. 




CUYLER LEE, Agent. 201-203 Larkin Street. S. F. 



By Thi Autoobauk 

By the time the News Letter is in the hands of its 
readers, L. P. Lowe, chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Automobile Club of California, will 
have gone over the route of what is termed the pro- 
posed endurance run to Los Angeles. 

Last Tuesday he stated he would leave on the fol- 
lowing day for the South in one of his automobiles. 

* * * 

The officers of the club have had a conference 
with the representatives from the South, which has 
been very satisfactory. The Los Angeles officials 
are very enthusiastic over the scheme, and are work- 
ing hard to make it a success. 

* * * 

The title of endurance is very misleading, for it 
will not be so much a test for the machines as it will 
be of the power of the driver to bring his vehicle 
to a certain finish in a given time, with the least 
number of stops for repairs. In fact, the officers are 
planning to make it possible for women owners to 
take part. Stops will be allowed which are not made 
for repairs. 

* * * 

The officers report that since last Saturday, the 
number of applications for membership have been 
most flattering. 

* * * 

It is very pleasing to the members of the club to 
hear of what the officers are planning for their pleas- 
ure, but it is all a little too hazy. As yet no definite 
date has been set for the big run or for the Del 
Monte meet. 

The month of June has passed without a club 
event, and from the condition of affairs it will cer- 
tainly be three weeks before the run can take place. 

A certain warm place is said to be paved with 
good intentions. 

* * * 

Work should at once be started on the big race 
meet which is programmed for September. A suc- 
cessful event cannot be handled in a day. And as 
it stands now, there are but sixty days before the 
first of September. 

What might be termed a declaration of independ- 
ence on behalf of automobile owners has been made 
by Winthrop E. Scarritt, president of the Automo- 
bile Club of America, following what he considers 
persecution by local authorities. He declares illegal 
arrests of motorists have been made in New Jersey 
and elsewhere, and in the former State he has insti- 
tuted a $10,000 damage suit against the town mar- 
shal, who arrested John A. Hill, a member of the 
club. In his statement, which is of interest to every 
owner of an automobile, President Scarritt says : 

"On behalf of the automobilists generally I wish 
to make our position clear. First of all. we are net 
disregardful of the rights of other users of the high- 
way. We desire to obey the laws of our State, not 
only in their letter, but in their spirit. But in our 
willingness to obey the laws, we do not propose to 
abrogate our common rights on the highway or sub- 
mit to outrage and persecution by that class of petty 
and ignorant village officials who do not know the 
law which they profess to enforce, or, if they do know 



July a. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



' \\ •• 1 

W <■ will 

* • • 

Although there I 

in the vicinity of New Y..rk is 

l>> the action of those i» charge ol 
A. T. Stewart, which 

land on Hampsteail Plains. I.. I., between Floral 
Park and Hicksville. Primarily t.. develop the prop 
erty, a boulevard 200 feel wide will be built, the cen 
u-r of which will include a special roadway 41 
wide for the exclusive use of power-driven machines, 
which can be speeded without fear of arrest or infrac- 
tion of speed laws, and where record trials and races 
can be held under favorable conditions. Work will 
be started within a couple of months, according to 
the engineers, and the course should be rea.lv before 
the opening of another driving season. 

* * * 

Mr. E. P. Brinegar, President of the Pioneer Au- 
tomobile Company, is in receipt of a telegram from 
the WintoJn Carriage Company at Cleveland, Ohio, 
to tin- effect that the War Department has placed 
orders for two Winton touring cars, one of which is 
to he used by the Atlantic Department and the other 
by General McArtlmr. in the maneuvres of this State 
and National troops in August. 

The Department in Washington have hecn trying 
out the different makes of automobiles during' the 
past year, and the Winton touring car was chosen 
on account of its power, durability of its working 
parts, and simplicity of control. 

The car to be used by General McArthur is fitted 
to be used as either a telephone and telegraph office 
or a repair car. Provision has heen made for the car 
to carry a folding table, wire, insulators, brackets, 
hammer, nails, a digging bar, pliars, block-and-tackle 
and six lance poles, two box relays, one sounder, one 
Service telephone, one two-line telegraph switch- 
hoard, two conductor's lanterns, eight cells of dry 
battery, one field buzzer, two calcium carbide gen- 
erators, pencils, telegraph message blanks, etc. 

A complete record will be kept of the number of 
miles the car runs, the fuel consumed, number of days 
or hours in which the machine is out of commission, 
due to accident or wear, and in fact, such complete 
data as will enable the War Department to judge as 
to whether automobiles are practical for army usage. 

The experiment will be watched with a great deal 
of interest, as this is the first attempt made in this 
country to use automobiles for this purpose, although 
in France they are being extensively used. 

* * * 

Mr. J. H. Flood, together with his wife and 
Mrs. William H. Taylor, Jr., in their new four-cylin- 
der Toledo, and Mr. E. W. Hopkins, W. H. Taylor, 
Jr., and Sam Hopkins, on a new 1904 Packard, made 
the trip from Menlo Park to Del Monte last Sunday 
in four hours and .five minutes. This establishes a 
record for the distance. 

* * # 

A number of Stevens-Duryea enthusiasts, resid- 
ing across the bay, made a run through Oakland, 
Alameda, Haywards, and other adjacent towns on 
Sunday last. Among those in the party were Mr. 
George H. Strong, Miss Georgie Strong, Dr. A. L. 







PIERCE 

STANHOPE 

'l '-•" W 1. 1 T*» 

• U Mh To* 

1. A !■»«., u:.,i Htanhop*. with VletnrU lop and atrnmmo- 
d«Mn« four ptrsona. 

t It ha* an I borse-power *na1na of lr.» D» r>k>n Fr»tKh 
tjro* 

I. It la **p«etallr dealcned for phr«l<-an*' u»». urlm two 
hour* per dar. 

4. ft I* compact In construction. •ymm«trtr*l In ■ 
and beautiful In general finish. 

I. It wa» In the Knduranc* Hun. Now York to l'lll«t. ir,. 
SOO mile*, and won hitch rank. 

Watq *BHI>» Ull KIM, i«K ln«> SI.tM.M 

NORTHERN HI MBlllT Mt.M 

MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. Golden Gale A»e. & Gnujrh St.. S I . 



» J. rPiniM, 



I I iHtPHtN 



Central Automobile Co. 

1185 MarHet St. S. F. 

The most Commodious Garage In the Center of the City 

Expert Flench and American Mechanics. 

Repair Work on Imported and American Machines Guar- 
anteed. Charges Reasonable. 

New and Second Hand Automobiles Bought, Sold and 
Exchanged. 

PHONE JESSIE 3336 



COMMERCIAL MOTOR CAR and BOA [ CO. 

AUTOMOBILE SUNDRIES AT 
WHOLESALE and RETAIL 

Manufacturers of the 

COMMERCIAL TOURING CARS, RUNABOUTS, DELIVERY CARS 
AND HOTEL COACHES 

The lightest and highest powered Marine Motors In California 

128-130 FREMONT STREET. S. F. 



AUTOMOBILE 

81 CITY HALL 


REPAIRS 

AVE. 


De J 


Dion Plugs and Porcelains— Elect 
best made— Batteries. T 


ic Wiring for An 
ires, etc. 


use 


Tel 


ANDREWS, KEENAN & 
South 1039 


BLASAUF 

San Francisco, 


Cal. 



WE ARE SELLING al reduced BARGAIN prices very desirable 

AUTO-CARS aJso 

RAMBLERS, NORTHERNS, FRANKLINS, OLDSMOBILES 
with Lanterns, Rugs, Caps and Sundries 

Call and see them at 
NATIONAL AUTO. ® MFC. COMPANY 

134 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



SECOND HAND 

AUTOMOBILES 



F. H. LUCKHABDT 
20 GOLDEN GATE AV£. 

WITH 
CALIFORNIA AUTO EXPRESS CO 



44 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 



Cunningham, Dr. Chamberlain, William H. Taylor, 

Mr. and Mrs. Eloise Merriman. 

* * * 

Mr. H. H. Owens, of San Francisco, made a trip 
to Del Monte Saturday in a Cadillac, taking his 

father and mother home. 

* * # 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Moore made a trip around 
the bay on Sunday last in Mr. Moore's Winton tour- 




The above is a picture of Mr. Charles Mifflin Ham- 
mond, a brother-in-law of President Roosevelt, and 
Mrs. Hammond, in their new Model B Cadillac, just 
before leaving San Francisco for Upper Lake. 

Mr. Frank H. Johnson, of San Rafael, and his 
father, made an extensive tour of Marin County last 
Sunday in a Cadillac. 

The roads in and about Contra Costa County are 
becoming better known every week, and are pro- 
nounced exceedingly good by automobilists. There 
are many places out of Byron Springs where one can 
spend the day very enjoyably. 

* * * 

The Heine Motor Car Company is building a 48 
horse-power car in this city, with which they expect 
to make a splendid showing. The new vehicle will 

be completed by September 1st. 

# * # 

New Model B Cadillac touring cars were deliv- 
ered last week to Dr. Conrad Weil, of San Francisco ; 



SUNDAY'S 



AUTOMOBILE 

SAN JOSE 



TRIP TO 



means a delightful trip and an appetite that calls for something 

substantial. 
Automobilists 
are invited to 
visit the LA- 
MOLLE GRILL, 
where every 
viand is a de- 
liKht, every 
wine a treat 
for connois- 
seurs- P. Moot- 
mayeur, Prop., 
was for years 
Chef at Del- 
monieo's and 
the Maison 
Riche. 

LAMOLLE GRILL, 36*38 Nortb First Street, Sao Jose, o dp . Victory Theatre 




PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 




WINTON 



VWINTON/sKING, 
Longlivethe A 
King 



The Winton makers are delivering ten Win- 
ton Cars every day. A good many other makers 
are delivering promises. You can't ride on a 
promise. A Winton will take you anywhere. 
Price complete with canopy top, full lamp equip- 
ment, horn, etc., $2,650. Carloads already deliv- 
ered. Also agents for Oldsmobile, Locomobile, 
Stevens-Duryea and Baker Electric. 

901 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 

Los Angeles Branch, 420 South Hill St. 




"THE WORLD'S BEST" 

POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

G. A. BOYER, Manager 



134-148 Golden Gate Avenue 

PHONE SOUTH 1142 



July 2. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Mr. I tine, of I 

i-hrr. of San J 

* « « 

Mr Richard I Mier and fan 
Sunday last in 
touring car. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. |. | Valentine, ol < takland, ami 
Good fellow, made a tour through Marin 1 • 
■ lay in a Cadillac. 

* 

Mr. A. Michelin, Inn.! .»i tin- Michelin house in 
Paris, manufacturers ol the famous Michelin tin-, 
will shortly visit America with hi- brother, and visit 
the World's Fair at St. Louis. Extensive prepara- 
tions have been made for a reception, with a dinner 
at the Waldorf-Astoria, and a special train from New 
York t.. St. Louis under the supervision of Mr. X'i>r- 
ris X. Mason. President of the United States Agency 
of the Michelin Tire Company. 

* * * ' 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Joy, their daughter Myrtle, 
and Mrs. Joy's father. \V. P. Grainger, arrived at 
their home in Watsonville from San Francisco last 
Thursday evening, June i6th, in Mr. Joy's Winton 

touring car. Mr. Joy. in speaking of the trip, charac- 
terized it as the best ride he has ever taken — one 
without a single disagreeable accident. The trip 
was a record-breaker, the number of miles of ground 
covered being one hundred, and the time four hours 
and twelve minutes. 

* * * 

O. Greenwald of San Rafael returned last Thurs- 
day, after a two weeks' successful tour south, in his 
White steam touring car. The motorist went through 
Monterey, Salinas, Santa Cruz, King City, Paraiso 
Hot Springs, Pacific Grove, and other towns along 
the route. The roads were generally poor, the sand 
being very deep, in some places almost impassable. 
The seventeen miles between King City and Paraiso 
Hot Springs is a miserable stretch, covered with 
deep sand. The gasoline obtained in this countrv is, 
as a rule, very poor, but taken all in all, the outing 
was a very pleasant one, the auto not giving a bit of 
trouble the entire fortnight. Mr. Greenwald left in 
his White again this week for a tour to Santa Rosa, 
Napa Soda Springs, and other towns'in that vicinity, 
and will be accompanied by Mr. Rich in his touring 
car. After the northern journey, Mr. Greenwald is 
looking forward to a very pleasant run to Los An- 
geles in his steamer. 

* * * 

W. B. Glidden has accomplished quite a bit of 
touring of late in his White, and last Saturday made 
the trip to Niles and back without any difficulty and 
not the least incident to mar the pleasure of the 
journey. Mr. Glidden is seriously thinking of tak- 
ing in the endurance run to Los Angeles in July. 

* * * 

H. P. Teichner, of the White Automobile Com- 
pany, spent last Saturday running a car about Oak- 
land, and on Sunday, with a party of friends, enjoyed 

a run over the nice roads to Haywards. 

* * * 

The White garage on Franklin and Market streets 
was desolate last Sunday, nearly every car being out. 
The usual number of White owners did not go out 
of town with their cars this week. 



45 




LIME CAI 



Which ol ihc Locomobile Twin*. Reliability or Simplicity. 
Is more itlraclite? 

Reliability and Simplicity are the naoal lm> 
Dortant qualities in any far. Baal exempli- 
fied in the Locomobile. Front vertical motors 
only. Prices, $-ji<ni op A.1 present writing 
our 4-oyl, ear holds N. x.-Boston Beoord in 
both directions. 



Both r mis wen made by purchasers 

driving their own ears. 

THE LOCOMOBILE CO. of America. Bridgeport, Cono. 

Branch Offices: N. Y-. Broad wav and Tr.th Si. 
PhilB., 348 North Broad St.; Chicago, L8W 
Michigan Ave. : Bridgeport. Factory a' Sea- 
aide Park ; Boston, ir> Berkeley Si . 
Member Association of Licensed Automobile AfirVi. 



HOTEL VENDOME 



SAN JOSE. CAL 



New Automobile Garage 

open at all hours, and in charge of competent 
men. Free of charge to guests. All roads in 
Santa Clara Valley open to automobiles. Easy 
run to San Jose in 2 hours and a half. 

J. T. BROOKS, Manager. 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 

Storage, Repair and Supply Stations. 

San Jose. 

GEO. H. OSEN & CO., 13-15-17 W. St. John St.. San Jose. Com- 
plete Repair Shop. Large stock of auto supplies. Storage sta- 
tion, etc. Agents for Winton, Locomobile. Oldsmobile, etc. 



W. A. Plummer 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

TENTS. AWNINGS. HAMMOCKS 

111 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 
Telephone Main 549 



Eyes Irritated by Wind 

Mineral laden poisonous dust, and strong sunlight, need care. 
Murine Eye Remedy soothes Eye pain and cures Inflammation. 
Redness, Itching, Granulated and Weak Eyes. Murine is an 
Eye Tonic; an aid to those wearing glasses. 



REMOVAL NOTICE 



PATRICK & CO.. have moved to their new 
quarters 111-113 BANSOME STREET, where a 
complete line of Rubber Stamps. Stencils. Seals, 
Metal Checks, Box Brands, etc.. can be found. 



4 6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 




ERIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block- 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 Market St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



"There is the head of the house 
of Astorbilt." "Indeed! And who 
is the gentleman with her?" 




Summer 

Vacations 

Travel by Sea 



Excellent Service, Low Rales, Including Berth and Meals 

Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Taeoma 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 

Alaska atid Mexico. 

Alaska Excursions, 190-4. The palatial excursion 
Steamship. Spokane will leave Taeoma. 
Seattle and Victoria. July 5. 19, Aug *2, Hi. 
For Information regardinesaiHne dates etc.. obtain folder 
SAN FRANCISO TICKET OFFICES 
i New Montgomery St. ( Palace Hotel ) 
10 Market St. . and Broadway Wharves. 

C. D. DUNANN. General Pass. Agenl . 
10 Market Street, San Francisco 



THREE 

TIMES A DAY TO 

CHICAGO 

The Only Double Track Railway between the 
Missouri Iiiver and Chicago. 

THREE TRAINS DAILY 

Via the Soul hern Pacific, Union Pacific and Chlcaco 
and Northwestern I.ys. 

Overland Limited. Vestibuled. Leivcs 
Ran Francisco at lo.OO a. in. The most 
Luxurious Train in the World. Electric 
lighted Throughout. Buffet smokingcais 
with barber and bath. Booklovers Li- 
brary. Dining Cars. Standard and Com- 
partment bleeping Cars and Observation 
°_?5*- V e l 8 thaD three days to Chicago 
without change. 

Eastern Express. Vestibuled. Leaves San 
Francjsuo at 6.00 p. m. Through Standard 
and Tourist Sleeping Cars to Chicago. 
Dinmg Cars. Free Eeclining Chair Cars. 

Atlantic Express. Vestibuled. Leaves San 
Francisco at 9.00 a-m.Standard and Tourist 
bleepers. 

Personally Conducted Excursions 

Wednesdays. Thursdays and Fridays. 

Best oi everything 

R. R. Ritchie. G. A. P. C. 

Chicago and Northwestern Bys. 

«I7 Market St. (Palace Hotel) San Francisco 



Trfttme leava and are dn. 
U> arrive at 

^1 SAN FRANCISCO. 

Fbom Jvnx 19. 1904 

Fkeet Depot 

(Foot of Market Street i 

■"ate - MAIN LINE7 




Coast Line 

Narrow Gauge 

(Foot of Market Street) 



7.00a Vacavlllf. Win tern, Kumsey 7 BOP 

7.00a ~ 
7.30a 



720 p 



Runlcta, Ghnlraand Sacramento 
Vallejo. Napa, Callntoga, Santa 
Hosa, Martinez. San RamoD 6 20p 

7.30a Nllea,Tracy, Lathrop, Stockron.... 720P 

P.OOa Shaata ExpreaB — (Via Davla), 
Williams (for Bartlett Springs), 
Willows. tFruto, Ked Bluff, 
Portland, Tacoina, Seattle 7-50p 

8.00a Davis. Woodland. Knights Landing, 

Marysvllle. Chico. Orovllle 7.50p 

P.30A Port Costa, Martinez, Antloch, 
Byron, Tracy, Stockton, New- 
man, Los Banos, Mendott, 
Armona, Hnnfurd, Vlsalia, 
Porturvtlle *. 4.20p 

* 30a Port Costa, Modesto, Merced, 
Fresno, Goshen Junction, Han- 
ford, Vlsalia, Bakersfleld 4-BOp 

' 30A Nlles, San Jose, Llvermore, Stock- 
ton, (tMllton). lone, Sacramento, 
Marysvllle. Chlco, lied Bluff .... 4.20P 

F 30A Oakdale. Chinese, Jamestown, So- 

nora, Tuolumne and Angel b 4 20 p 

9 00a Atlantic Express— Ogden and BaBt. S-20p 

9.30a Richmond, Martinez and Way 

Stations - BBOp 

1000a The Overland Limited — Ogden, 

Denver, Omaha, Chicago 6-20P 

10.00a Vallejo 12.20P 

10.00a Lob Angeles Passenger — Port 
CoBta, Martinez, Byron, Tracy, 
Lathrop. Stockton. Merced. 
Raymond. Fresno, Goshen Junc- 
tion. Hnnford, Lemoore, Vlsalia, 

Bakersfleld. Lob Angeles 7-20P 

12.00m Hayward. Nlles and Way Stations. 3.20p 

1-OOp Sacramento River SteamerB 111. OOP 

5-30P Ben Ida, Winters. Sacramento. 
Woodland, Willows, KnlgblB 
Landing, Marysvllle, Orovllle 
and way stations 10 50a 

.* 30p Hayward, Nlles and Way Statlona.. 7-B0P 

3 30p port Costa, Martinez, Byron, 
Tracy, Lathrop, Mod csto, 
Merced, Berenda, Fresno and 
Way Stations beyond Port Costa 12-20p 
He Valley, via Berenda and 



330P 

A COP 



4 OOP 
4 31P 



t .C0p 
6 30p 
t.OUP 
I OOp 



6. 00p 
7. OOP 
/.OOP 



806p 

MOP 



Wa 



■i hi a 



8.50a 
10.20a 



___.rilnez, Tracy, Stockton, Lodl... 
Martinez, Sau Ramon, Vallejo.Napa, 

Callstoga, Santa Rosa 9 20a 

Nlles, Tracy. Stockton. Lodl 420p 

Hayward. Nlles, Irvlngton, San I t8.50A 

Joae. Llvermore | t 11.611a 

I'ne Owl Limited — Newman, Loa 
Jtiinos. Mendoia. Fresno, Tulare, 

Bakersfleld, Los Angeles 8.50a 

Port Coata. Tracy, Stockton 122QP 

Hayward, Nlles and San Jose 7.20a 

Hayward, Nllea and San Jobo 9 

Eastern ExpreBa — Ogden, Denver, 
Omaha. St. Louis, Chicago and 
East, via Martinez, Stockton, 

Sacramento, Colfax, Iteuo 12.60P 

Vallejo. dally, except Sunday..., I ■> cn « 

Vallejo, Sunday only f ' &UP 

l.lchrnoutl, Sau Pablo, Port Coata, 

Martinez and Way stations 11.20a 

Reno Passenger— Port Coata, Sul- 
biiu. Elmlra, Davis. Sacramento, 
Truokee, Lake Tnhoe. Reno, 

Tono|»ah. Sparks 7-BOa 

Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
rnmento, Marysvllle, Redding, 
Portlnud, Puget Sound and East. 8.50a 
liny wnrif, Nlles and San Jobc (Sun- 
dayonlyt II. SO/ 



7.4Ba Santa Cruz ExcurslonfSunday only) 81 Op 
B.IBa Newark. Oentervllle, San Jose, 
Fel ton, Boulder Creek. Big Basin, 
Santa Cruz and Way Stations... 6 65 p 
T9-16A Alvarado. Newark, San Jose, Loa 
Oatos.Glenwood, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Big Basin, Santa Cruz... 8 10p 
i 2 1 6p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, 
New Almaden.Los Gatos.Felton, 
Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz and 

Principal Way Statlona 10 -,5a 

4 16p Newark, San Joae, Loa Gatoa t8 55a 

4-IBp Wright, Boulder Creek and Santa 

Cruz. Saturday and Sunday only. 68 66a 

COAST LINE (KmmhI Unnice). 

\iT i Third and Tow nne nd Streeta.) 

6 10A San Jose and Way Stations 6 3 r p 

•7 00a San Jose and Way Stations 6-40P 

7.15a Monterey and Santa Cruz Excur- 
sion (Sunday only) 10 30 p 

B.IjOa New Almaden (Tuee., Frld.. only), 4.10p 
8 00a The CoaBter— San Jose, Salinas, 
San Ardo, Paso Roblee, Santa 
Margarita. San Luis Obispo. Santa 
Barbara, San Buenaventura, 
Montalvo, Oxnard, Burbank, Loi 

Angeles 1Q.45P 

B.OOAGIIroy, Holllster, CaBtrovllle, Del 
M >nte, Pacific Grove, Surf, Lorn- 

poc 10.4Bp 

9.00a San Jose. Trea Plnoa, Capltola, 
SautaCruz.PaclucGrove.Sallnaa, 
San Liiie* oblBpo and Principal 

Wnv Stations 4-10P 

1 0-30A san Jose and Way Statlona 1.20P 

11 30a SaDta Clara, San Jose, Los Gatoi 

and Way Stations 7.30 ■• 

\ZCp Kan Jose and Way Statlona 8 36 

1 3 OOp I »'■ l Monte Express— Santa Clara, 
San Jose, Del Monte, Monterey, 

PaclflcGrove 121 jF 

3 -30p Burllngame, San Jose, Gllroy, Hol- 
llster, Trea Plnos, Pajaro, Capl- 
tola, Santa Cruz, CaBtrovllle, 

Salinas, PaclflcGrove 1045a 

4.30p Pan J ose and Way Statlona t8.00a 

'5 OOP Santa Clara. San Jose, Los Gatoa, 
Wright and principal Way Sta- 
tions (except Sunday) i9-00a 

B30p San Jobc and Prlnc I pul Way Stations 19-40 a 

6 46p Sunset Express.— Redwood, San 

Jose, Gllroy.Sallnas.Paso Koblea, 

San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 

Los Angeles, Deinlng. El Paso, 

New Orleans. New York 7.10/ 

6. 45p Pajaro. Capltola, Santa Cruz. Cai- 

trovllle.Del Monte.PaclflcGrove. 10.45p 
t6 IBp taij Mateo. Beret* ford. Bel nion i, San 
CartOB, Redwood, Fair Oak*, 

MenloPark. Palo Alto 16.46a 

6 30 p San Jose and Way Statlona e 36a 

8. 00p Palo Alio and Way Statlona 1016a 

>1 -30p Soiiiii SauFranclsco, MUlbrae.Bnr- 
llngame, San Mateo, Belmont, 
San Carlos, Redwood, Fair Oaka, 

Menlo Park, and Palo Aito 9.45p 

<<11.30p Maylleld, Mountain View, Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence, Santa Clara and 

flap Jo bc (9.45p 

n 

The UNION TKANSKEK COMPAN \ 

v- ill cab tor and check baggage from hotel* and real 
•lencea- Telephone, Exchange S3. 



A for Morulng, 




P for Afternoon 


ibnndav 


excepted. 




t Sunday only 


a Saturd 


*y only. 




b Monday only. 


{Stops a 


all statlona 


on 


Sunday. 



v.v.*.ir.M.v.tfir.y.xtr.ir.v.y.ir.ir.v.v.ir.ir.tr.ir.xirxiL 




Stylish $ 
Suits 



15 



50 



Dressy Suits $20 § 

Pants $4.50 S 

My $25.00 Suits are thejij 

best in America. fc 



25! 



Per Cent Saved by get-g 
I ting your suit made byR 

TJE TAILOB ft 

1110-1112 Market St 3 
201-203 Montg'y St.. S. F.3 



O. R. & N. CO. 

The Only Steamship Line to 
PORTLAND, ORE 

And Short Kail Line from Portland to all Points 
East. Through Tickets to all Points all Bail or 
Steamship and Rail at Lowest Kates. 
Steamer Tickets include Berth and Meals- 
SS OREGON Sails liar. 28. April 7. 17. 27. May 

'SS' GEO. W. ELDER Sails March 23. April 

2, 12. 22. May 2. 12, 22. 

S. F. BOOTH. General Agent 
No. l Montgomery St. San Francisco. Cal. 



JOE POHEIM 



Mrs. Haggard — Do you know, 
myself and my daughter are of- 
ten mistaken for sisters. Mrs. Gay 
— Ah, the dear girl must be study- 
ing too hard, don't you think! 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Wa "S?&ir. 

Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post St„San Francisco 

The Cecllian, the Perfect Piano Player 



July 7. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



47 




SPRING AT THE VILLA CONTI 

' >t Time and Nature still the fairest daughi 

Low-voiced Repose! Here tln>u .l>st ever dwell, 
While Fancy wills no mure t-i wander on. 
With how few simples dost thou steep the si 

Holding in soil suspense. 
Like pauses in the tolling of a 1 .oil . 
The beauty coming and the beauty gone. 
Nothing is here hut woods and water. 

Spaces and stone, and 1 sculptor's wit 
Simply to fashion it 
In one long line of many niches. 
Whose fountains are fed by the rushing riches 

That bowl to bowl, from the woodland pool 

Fall in a rhythm clear and strong. 

Singing to Nature lier eldest song. 

Prattling their paradox — rest fully restless. 
( ) March, with never a moment zestless, 

Xor the sun too warm nor the shade t< cool ! 
< 1 May. and the music ot birds now nestlessl 

Conic soon and brood o'er the woodland pool ! 
(For lover or nightingale wdio can wait? 
Whenever he Cometh he cometh late). 
The light plays over the ilex green. 
Turning to silver the sombre sheen. 

And Spring in the heart of the day doth dwell 
As the thought of a loved one dwells with me, 

And only three cypresses to tell 
"This is not Heaven, but Italy." 



AT THE WOOD'S EDGE. 

By Iiigiam-.Ciovkt-tt in Li|pil colt'b 
Here by the rail fence, broken, old and gray. 

Here on a bank of sunbright lusty green, 
Where tall, brown weeds mark well the fieldward 
way, 
With cowbeb bridges, silver swung between 
Where dwarf oaks are and straight, white sycamores, 
And brightness drips from lovely greenbrier 
eaves — 
How sad, how sad, along the forest floors, 
The sighing, sighing of the falling leaves. 

A memory, wafted from the lips of Youth 

Across the fields, now grown so strangely sweet, 
Where Hope walked gleaning, like another Ruth, 
And smiled to see my eager following feec, — 
The Lark's voice comes ; then Silence folds her wings 
And falls as swiftly as a watching hawk, 
While one small voice amid the dead grass sings, 
And, bolder grown, the gossip rivulets talk. 

"EARTH'S FLOWERS MOST RARE." 

By Margaret Fuller iu Century 

Up troop the children to the hills, 
While still the slopes are hoar, 

To seek the first bud of the spring 
Where it was found before ; 

And I, in whom remembrance is 

The comforter of pain, 
Come to you blindly, knowing this, 

I never come in vain. 



TKLKPIIORI SOI Til t» 

Gilbert SSI Stoll 

STORAGE 

roe. p»«ncn »« rropu 
STORAGE. PACKING and SHIPPING 

on h 1 

ROOM 84. MURPHY BUILDING. 1236 MARKET ST. 

WABSHOI 

COLDLNCAIE a VAN NESS AVES.. SAN FRANCISCO 

NOTICE TO HORSE OWNERS 

JEPSON BROS. COMPANY. Inc.. makers of fine har- 
ness and Importers of English Saddlery, will, now be 
found at 110-112 MARKET STREET, where you will 
find the finest and largest stock of everything for the 
horse, show-ring and stock-farm. Telephone Bush 661. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TIWNE 

DEALERS IN 

^^VAVE'R — «* 

Blake, Motrin A Towne, Los Angeles, Cat. 
Blake, McFall ft Co.. Portland, Oregon. 
TEL, MAIN 199. 55-57-59-61 KlHST ST.. SAN FRANCISCO. 



D e*U*\ For DarDers - bakera, bootblacks, bath-houses. 
KrilSllcS laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
*/■ u^u%.o Milliard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanarv Brothers 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento St, S. P., Tel. /lain 50 1 1 



Old Rose Bud Whiskey 

Absolutely the purest on the market. 
APPLEGATE (B. SONS, Distillers 

1/oulsYllle, Ken. Paclflo Coast Agents 

RATHJEN WINE COMPANY. « ELL T I .1ep^ E Ma 1 8 ri fm. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents. 

Oceaalc Steamship Company 

GUUncham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 

5IN0 FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but one price. 
All goods marked In plain English figures. 

614 DUPONT STREET, 8. F. Next to St Mary's Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Maaon, San Francisco. Tel. Main 132*. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 



•~"~; 



4 8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2, 1904. 




Casino and Tent City, New Santa Cruz. 
NEW SANTA CRUZ. 

People of the State at large who are not familiar 
with the work done by Mr. Fred Swanton and his 
committee will find that a close study of the cam- 
paign for a "New Santa Cruz" is simply the result 
of judicious and continuous advertising. The arrivals 
at Santa Cruz Beach and Tent City bear eloquent 
witness to this fact. The arrivals at the new resort 
for the past week aggregate more than three hundred 
registered guests. 

Some time ago, a number of energetic citizens 
banded together for the purpose of letting all the 
world know the advantages of Santa Cruz. The 
movement was christened "New Santa Cruz," and 
the coterie of strenuous gentlemen consisted of the 
brightest business minds of the city by the sea. The 
result of a campaign among themselves was the 
building of a magnificent Moorish pavilion and a 
Tent City, that rivals, if it does not surpass, the 
advantages of Coronado. Indeed, so successful has 
been the State and National advertising campaign in- 
augurated by the committee that Santa Cruz is now 
known as the "Atlantic City of the West.'' 

The pavilion is ideally situated on the shores of 
the ocean, and back of this is a long stretch of com- 
fortable tent dwellings. These will serve as houses 
for the city-wearied who are seeking the ocean 
breezes and the bathing at this justly celebrated re- 
sort. Santa Cruz has made a great reputation with 
the public by its handling of the various conventions 
held there this year. There has not been one word 
of complaint. Unlike the condition in most cities 
during convention times, the advent of great crowds 




has not had the effect of a doubling or trebling of 
prices for accommodations of the stranger. The 
universal comment has been "Santa Cruz knows 
how to do things, and does them well." 



Original designs In menu and tally cards. Charlotte -P. Wil- 
liams, room 18. 121 Post street. 



JP LACAZE &co. 

French Laundry Work Guaranteed 

The BEST in San Francisco 

TEL. EAST MS 829 8VTTER ST 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 



Has declared a dividend for the term ending June sn. 1904. nt the role 
of three and one-quaiter I:) 1 .,) per cent per annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, and payable on and after July '. 1904 

/ 'VOT'V A 

101 Montgomery St.. eor. Sutter. 



CYKUS W. CARMANY. Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association 

Has declared a dividend of eight per cent per annum on Class "A" 
and "F" stock, six per cent, on term deposits and five per cent on or- 
dinary deposits, for the six months ending June SO. 1904 

WASHINGTON DODGE, President. 
Wdi. COUISIN. Sec. and Gen'l Mgr. 
Cor. alifornia and Battery sts.. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the halT-year ending June 3o, 1904, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and one-unarter ct'i ) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, free of taxes; payable on and after Friday. Julv I. 1004; 

710 Market St.. San Francisco. GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June 30. 1904. a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and one-quarter is'*) percent per annum on all de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday. July 1. 1904. 

526 California St. GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mechanics' Savings Bank. 

For the half-year endiDg with June 30, 1904, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three and one-quarter (3>.* (per cent per annum on 
all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Friday. July l. 1904. 

FREDERICK H. CLARK. Cashier. 

S. W. Corner Bush & Montgomery Sts. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the soth of June. 1904. a dividend has 
been declared at the rate per annum of three and one-half 13 1-2) rer 
cent on term deposits, and thrpe (3) per cent on ordinary deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Friday. July l. 1904. 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier. 

632 California St.. cor. 'Webb. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending June 80. 1904. dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department of this Company as fol- 
lows; On term deposits at the rate of 3 r.-io per cent per annum, and 
on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3 per cent per annum, free of taxes, 
and payable on and after Friday. Julv l, 1904. 

J. DAL/ELL BROWN. Manager- 

Cor. California and Montgomery Fts. 



OUR STANDARDS 



Sperrys 



Family. 



Pavilion, New Santa Cruz, Cal. 



Drifted Snow. 
olden Gate Extra.. 



vSperry Flour Company 



PALACE HOTEL 






val plan: - 
. the FINEST IX THE V\ 

THE EMPIRE PARLOR; the PALM 

with Billiard 
Mr the ladies; tin XV 

P.\RL< IR; the LADIES* WRITING ROl 

and numerous other modern improvements 
getlicr with unexcelled cuisine and the most 
convenient location in the city— all add much 
to the ever-increasing popularity of this most 
famous HOTEL. 




THE SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

IN THK VAULTS 

CALIFORNIA 

SAFE 

DEPOSIT 

and 

TRUST CO. 

Only cost $5.00 per year, and upward 



Why then worry over the safe keeping of your 
valuables and important papers. 



Cor. California & Montgomery Sts. 



College 
San Rafael 



MR YOUNG LADIES 

Cooducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic. Full col- 
lege course of studies. 
Modern building; steam 
heated. Unsurpassed 
beauty and healthfulness 
Address, 

Mother Superior 



College Sao Rafael 
.Sao Rafael, Cal. 











U/te 






Denver & Rio Grande System 






"The Scenic Line of the World." 






Pullman and Ordinary Sleepers 
Through Without Change to 














DENVER. OMAHA. 




A 


KANSAS CITY. 


Three 


Perfect 


CHICAGO, and 


Fast 


Dining 


ST. LOUIS. 


£xpresa 


Car 


J& & 


Trtvlna 


Service 


Persona.lly Conducted 
Tourist Excursions 


Dclly 






Doily. 






For 


Lowest Rates. Bleeping Car Reservation 


md 




Handsomely Illustrated Books of Travel.... 






Call on or Address 






W. J. SHOIWELL. General Agent 






625 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 











HERE'S YOUR CHANCE FOR A FOURTH 0' JULY OUTING AT 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 




THE FOURTH O' JULY Falls on Monday, so why not Spend Two or 
Three Days at this Famous Resort? K"* K"* 

GOLF, BOATING, BOWLING, SALMON 
FISHING, SURF and POOL BATHING 

Del Monte and Its Joys are for Everyone—Bear that in Mind. You 
Can Dress as You Please and Do as You Please. Under the New 
Management this Resort has become the Most Popular of California Resorts 



$ 1 0.00 



ROUND TRIP TO DEL MONTE AND 
TWO DAYS' BOARD AT THE HOTEL 



Tickets good going on any Train Saturday or Sunday Morning, return- 
ing Monday or Tuesday. Same rate good any Saturday or Sunday, 
returning Monday JO JO JO 




House-Maid's Knee 



Jeffries sings: 

"A horse may get the glanders, 

And a chicken have the pip, 
The sober citizen may wilt 

Under the shock of grippe, 
But a pugilist who's weary 

And the "ready" does not see, 
May take to bed and treatment 

For — a — house — maid's — knee. 

When the treasury is empty, 

And the money's not in sight, 
There is every sort of reason 

Why a fellow should not fight, 
And if the cause of laggardness 

You dolts should wish to see, 
Why, we develop suddenly 

A- — case — of — house — maid's — knee. 



"Go East, go West, you'll find us all 

Do just about the same, 
When the fight will bring no money in 

We quit and say we're lame. 
For an empty treasury to us 

Is bad as bad can be, 
So we ask your kind, good favor, 

For — our — house — maid's. — knee. 

"And 'Frisco is our paradise, 

So if we can't collect, 
We just go out of business — 

For what else could you expect? 
But when the fall comes round again, 

And brings prosperity, 
You'll see how we'll recover 

From — a — house — maid's — knee. 




IN MARIN COUNTY. 
And the sunshine slips through the boughs, 

And gold is the place of its falling, 
Gold where the wild doves murmur and drowse, 
And gold is the coo of their calling. 



Price per copy, to centr 



ESTABLISH KD JULY 20. 1856. 



Annual Subscrir 





S ItETTER 



v^->- 



Vol. LXIX 



(JMifjormu XiUurlisjcr. 

SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 9. 1904- 




Number 2. 



The 8AN FRANCI8CO NEWS LETTER Is printed and publlshr-l 
•very Saturday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott. Halleck 
Building 1 . IS) Sansome street. 8an Francisco. Cal. 
Entered at San Francisco Posloffice as second class matter 
New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— ?« Broadwav. C. C Murphy, 
Representative. 
London Office— » Cornhlll. E. C, England. Qeorire Street A Co 
All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than » a. m 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 



It will take more than a cloudburst t" wash the 
taste of Mormonism out of Utah's mouth. 



True patriotism is not sold by the bunch nor light- 
ed with a punk. 

A noisy Fourth of July is a matter of firewater, 
rather than of fireworks. 



The dryer the year, the more moisture there was 
in the Eppinger wheat. 

Nowadays coy candidates don't keep their ears to 
the ground, but to telephone receivers. 

When the club ladies said the toy pistol had to go, 
it went — off. 



The Citizens' Alliance appears to have succeeded 
not only in opening the shops, but in shutting the 
mouths of the labor agitators. 

A Methodist preacher in Delaware is on trial for 
speculating in stocks. Needless to say, he lost when 
he speculated. 

When Elijah Dowie got home, the faithful of Zion 
City showered him with roses. In Australia he spent 
much of his time dodging eggs. 

Statesmanship lies not so much in oratory as in 
being able to tell from the "plunk" how much there 
is in a campaign barrel. 

Was it the Grand Jury or the Grand Jury's other 
half that ruled against the employment of a steno- 
grapher by that body? 

We are waiting patiently for the genius who will 
give to the world a firecracker at once popular and 
noiseless. 



With Champion Jeffries newly married and chal- 
lenger Munroe newly engaged, the wedding ring 
seems to be more attractive to the jaw-fighters than 
the prize-ring. 

The good people of St. Louis are beginning to 
suspect that Santos Dumont slashed his own balloon, 
and that, after all, his dirigibles are not airships, but 
hot-airships. 

Nan Randolph, in jail for killing her paramour in 
a cab, wants to be a nun. Nan Randolph at liberty 
will probably decide in favor of the vaudeville stage 
as against the convent. 



High politics is invariably transacted with sound- 



less 11 



Mint Director Roberts may be right whin he 9a) a 
that the Government will coin no more silver dollars, 
but it is encouraging t" reflect that there arc enough 
on hand t" be worth scrambling for. 

The New Jersey man who has not been asleep for 
ten years does not say so, but it is a cinch that there 
1ki> been no bickering in his family about who should 
get up first and call the servant girl. 

A Texas millionaire, whose fad is collecting skulls. 
has gathered only 348 of them in seventeen years. 
Things are not what they used to be down on the 
border, 



"Lord" J. Talbot Clifton declares that a man can 
be a gentleman without being a lord. He does not 
need to say a word to prove the converse of this 
proposition. 

It seems almost too good to be true that Vancou- 
ver "hold ups" relieved a party of bookmakers of 
$8,000. The "long and short man" of the road have 
the public's permission to go right on doing business 
with the "long and short man" of the betting ring. 

A bright young reporter informs us through a non- 
sensational newspaper that a pack of wild dogs in- 
fests Golden Gate Park. One shudders to think of 
what fierce creatures may inhabit the remoter sand- 
dunes. 



The very latest thing in science is that under 
chloroform certain metals and flowers cease to emit 
"N" rays. The world waits with bated breath to 
hear the effect of chloroform on Limburger, and also 
on the young onion. 

An Oakland man is looking for his wife, whom he 
describes as "medium-sized and plump, with a slight 
squint in her eyes," and a preacher who, he says, 
is "a tall, lanky man, with lantern jaws and eyes 
sunk in their sockets." It is certain that he will not 
find the missing pair in any beauty show. 

In a spirit of false economy the Fire Commis- 
sioners have taken steps to remove the special 
police arrangement at the local theatres. This move 
is an idiotic one, and in view of the Iroquois Theatre 
disaster, if any accident should occur by which lives 
will be lost, the Police Commissioners will be held 
strictly to account. Instead of removing the police- 
men the Commissioners should add to the force on 
hand, so that in case of a panic the people may be 
controlled. This move on the score of economy is 
about the most stupid and criminal thing the Police 
Commissioners have ever had in contemplation, and 
the mere force of protesting public opinion, univer- 
sal as it is, should prevent its carrying out. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July g, 1904. 



WHEN THE STATE CRIES FOR HELP! 

Good health is maintained in the human body by 
the recognition and the keeping of Nature's man- 
dates. The slightest infraction brings a swift pun- 
ishment. 

The fabric of society is held together only by the 
fear of consequences attendant on the infraction ot 
man-made laws. The business-man breaks the laws 
as far as he can. He makes his arrangements with 
other business men, and, by combination, he robs 
the public. Becoming bolder, he assays a larger and 
a more criminal combination, and the law, embody- 
ing the will of the aroused and injured public, 
smashes the Merger. Individually, he sometimes at- 
tempts to enlarge the bounds of what is usually 
termed legitimate business, and he evolves schemes 
of "get-rich-quick variety," and here he comes up 
against the law, representing the people and their 
will, fortified by the power of "conservative money. 
In this case, the business man who has a license to 
exploit the people by the slower method, is keen to 
follow up the intruder to the bitter end, because he 
feels the newer'method is an invasion- of his rights. 

The more ignorant element and the less protected 
of the people band themselves into unions that they 
may prey on the business man and on their own 
class with impunity. In strikes and lockouts the 
union man goes beyond the bounds, at times. An- 
swering the call of his wilder nature, he gropes for 
the help of the instrument that is nearest at hand, 
the instrument he understands, FORCE. Right here 
he steps beyond the pale. 

The law itself is at times at fault. Of itself it rep- 
sents nothing. Behind man's written mandate there 
must be the ability to enforce it to the letter. 

The law-breaker knows that in times of peace 
the more efficient is the police system of a country 
or a State, the more respected is the expressed will 
of the people, the LAW. Every one knows that once 
the police is powerless, and times of riot and sedi- 
tion at hand, that the business man, the professional 
man, the writer, members of the great non-co-oper- 
ating middle class, rush to the State with a cry 
for the MILITIA. The executive arm of the State 
is wanted. Action, quick and sure, is needed! The 
State, aye, the Republic, is in danger! 

And they that thus cry aloud in their extremity, 
they that speak of property and of the State's de- 
fense of property rights, who are they? 

During times of peace, during times of prosperity 
and quiet, the business and the professional man has 
been busy. His main ambition has been to as far 
as possible emasculate the militia. He has refused 
to allow any one in his employ to join the State's 
troops. Why? Because it meant a vacation. Why? 
because very often drills and parades interfered with 
"business!" To-day it is business howling for an 
efficient militia service. Tacitly and with malice 
aforethought, the conservative element sins when it 
derides the National Guard, and it must pay the pen- 
alty! 

Every business and professional man should make 
it one of the rules of his house to encourage young 
men to join the National Guard. 

Every father should teach it as a lesson of patriot- 
ism to his son to be a member of the militia. 

Every patriotic woman should find it a source of 
pride that her husband, father or brother is a mem- 
ber of the State militia organization. 

If the above were so, there would be less infraction 
of the law and a better patriotism. The foreigner 



in the ranks of the labor element would be deterred 
from acts such as those that have disgraced Colo- 
rado recently, and California in the not very remote 
past. 

The parade on the Fourth of July showed the full 
strength of the National Guard in San Francisco. 
The citizen soldiery trudged along over the cobbles 
mindful of the fact that the ranks were depleted, not 
by war, but by the indifference of some, the con- 
tumely of others, and the enmity to all order, the 
hatred of authority of the anarchistic labor union. 
This should have been an object lesson to the busi- 
ness man! 

All honor to the decimated battalions. All shame 
to our business men ! All shame to the Labor Unions ! 

The men who stand to uphold the law, the militia 
of California, are being won from their duty by the 
criminal indifference of the business man, and by 
the insidious and criminal warfare waged upon their 
membership by the foreigners who compose the la- 
bor unions ! 



SAN FRANCISCO'S NEED. 

The Japanese Government has ordered the pur- 
chase of 10,000 American horses for its cavalry ser- 
vice. The British bought thousands of American 
horses and mules in this country during the Boer 
war. Both Germany and France draw largely upon 
the United States for artillery and cavalry animals 
before and during the Franco-Prussian conflict. In 
fact, America is the one desirable supply market for 
Europe for not only animals, but breadstuffs and 
meats. Asia must always depend upon this country 
for pretty nearly all her imports. At this time the 
Japanese and Russian Governments are large buyers 
of army supplies and ordnance, and San Francisco 
is the one point where all this "truck" is accumulated 
for ocean shipment. But San Francisco is merely 
a middle man for much of this export business, when 
it should be "first hands" for a great deal of it. 

Geographically, San Francisco is situated in the 
center of the great highway between Europe and 
America and the Orient. Its position is not only 
naturally so, but its natural facilities for handling 
sea-bound and sea-coming trade and traffic are 
scarcely equaled by any other commercial center in 
the world. Added to these are man-made facilities 
in the way of railway transportation which makes 
this city the focus on the Pacific Coast of thousands 
of miles of rail lines leading from and to every cen- 
tre of business in the United States, Canada and 
Mexico. All these vast necessities and conveniences 
are here, but there is one other thing needful. San 
Francisco should be the centre of an extensive manu- 
facturing district, and there is no reason why it 
should not be. The raw material is obtainable, and 
the skill and labor necessary to reduce it to finished 
product can be had at any time. Then why is it that 
some of the enormous holdings of capital in this city 
is not diverted in that direction? The demands o( 
the Orient and the islands between are bound to in- 
crease every year. This insures a profitable market 
and a permanent market for every kind of industrial 
goods and wares and breadstuffs. It follows, then, 
that there would be little or no risk in investing 
monev in industries, while the chances for large 
profits would be almost, if not quite, a certainty on 
every article of manufacture. Why not utilize all 
these advantages and give up the idea that it is the 
province of San Francisco to be merely a receiving 
and forwarding merchant for the products of other 
cities and towns? 



July 9. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NlWS I.KTTKR 

MERCHANTS AND THE RACE TRACK. 



The manipulator-. 
fraud- thai 

preparing 1 the 

he public during the fall ami w 
meet that many notorious 1.. *. «k u ■ 

track fob confined 

their energies to the Eastern ra< . 

ir. bringing with them many 
high pedigree, and that, withal, the forth- 
?ig meeting will be probably the gi in the 

ry of the turf in California. "Greatest" in this 
ection docs not refer to the development of 
: to any benefit of any imaginable descrip 
lion which the presence of the expected crowd of 
gamblers and touts will confer upon the community; 
but it means greatest in the extent "i the amount of 
ng which the bookmakers and other manipula- 
fondly hope will mark their advent at fngleside. 
They are even now gleefully chuckling in anticipa- 
tion of the golden harvest to be gleaned from the 
"suckers" they expect to lure to the track-. These 
enterprising gentlemen have no illusions: they are 
in the race-track business for money, and for money 
only. To that end, in their code, of morals, all means 
are justifiable. Now that their advance agent has 
announced the general plan for the fall and winter 
campaign, we would again urge upon the merchants 
of this city the absolute necessity of united action 
if they would protect themselves from the usual 
series of embezzlements that are always coincident 
with the races. In Chicago, all the big insurance- 
companies, all the big department stores, and many 
of the great mercantile establishments, have notified 
their employees that "playing the races" will mean 
instant discharge, without explanation or exception. 
The Merchants' Association should start a similar 
movement here. If its 1200 members, or even half 
of them, would issue notices against playing the 
races, the pirates at the track would soon depart, 
lor their main support comes from the employees of 
down-town houses. Without them, the gamblers 
would have no visible means of support. 



SCANDALS AMONG THEATRICAL PEOPLE. 

For no better reason than that this is the "silly 
season" in the newspaper offices, the pensters of the 
daily press seize with avidity upon any cheap liaison 
of cheap actor people as the text for a sermon deal- 
ing with the morals of the stage. That the subject 
is one to be treated with circumspection we are re- 
minded by the recent death of an English dramatic 
critic who was eminent and pre-eminent until he 
delivered himself of a too-sweeping philippic con- 
cerning the relations of the sexes behind the scenes. 
Most of these sermons are the sheerest rot, so far 
as they pretend to analyze and dissect and account 
for instances of misbehavior. They are also false 
in so far as they assume that the people of "the pro- 
fession" are or ought to be different from any other 
set of people. In truth, it is only scandals and not 
scandalous conduct that are more common among the 
men and women of the theatrical life. A scandal is 
a misconduct plus ink and type and paper, or a lot 
of clacking tongues, and unless they get sensationally 
into the divorce courts, the misbehaviors of mere 
people who are not connected with the stage nor 
otherwise in the public eye, are not esteemed worth 
the blazoning of the press. Binks, the butcher, runs 
away from his own family with the family of Spinks, 



r. and unl 

but the neigh! it it l'.nt 

san of th< 

nty doll. 11 and finds brr own 

lid have an "affair" with ■ bailing 
man who is not much higher up the salary scale, the 
pictures of both the sinnerg are villainously n 

i in the sensation loving pre-.-, with graphic 

tits of the whole shabby, sordid busi 
sprinkled with the tears ur bespangled with the an- 

omments of the leading man 
The annals of any rabbit-warren of 8 boarding houst 
or apartment house would furnish just as much 
material of the same kind as any theatre, if only the 

ins concerned were known, even by name. t.. 
the general public, for whose delectation such m< 
.ire dished up. 

The difference between the stage folk and other 
folk is not one Of morality, but of publicity. Where 
the obscure person seeks to cover up the iniquities 
and obliquities of his domestic relation, the perswn 
who cams his living on the far side of the footlights 
rarely dodges, and often courts the attention of the 
press and of the public, realizing that nothing can be 
SO disastrous to him as to have his name left out of 
the prints. Men and women, the playerfolk live upon 
the public and subsist by publicity. It is good for 
them to be praised in type, not so bad to be damned,, 
and, worst of all, to be overlooked. They are like a 
certain much-abused police judge whose memory still 
lives about the hall of justice. It is related of him 
that one morning he beckoned up to the bench a 
newspaper reporter, and asked him anxiously : "What 
have I done?" The penciller replied: "Nothing that 
I've heard of; we haven't said anything unpleasant 
about you, have we?" The magistrate put a world of 
feeling in his voice as he answered : "No ; you haven't 
said anything of me for a week, pleasant or unpleas- 
ant. Nothing hurts me so much as to be ignored. 
Make it pleasant, if you can ; unpleasant, if you must : 
but mention me." 

The readers of newspapers who pay heed to the 
theatrical scandal and the sermon on the theatrical 
scandals, should remember always that the press 
agent's business is to get his people mentioned — 
pleasantly if he can, unpleasantly if he must. 



THE SOUTH PORTLAND'S CASE. 

About eight months ago the steamer South Port- 
land was wrecked on the Oregon coast, and twenty 
lives were lost. The usual investigation was held 
by the Federal officials, who inquire into marine dis- 
asters — the Inspectors of Hulls and Boilers — and af- 
ter a careful inquiry they have rendered their deci- 
sion. They have suspended Captain James B. Mcln- 
tyre, master of the lost steamer, for two years, the 
time running from November, 1903. In their report, 
which in effect is similar to the findings of fact made 
by a court, the inspectors say that the navigation 
of the steamer was negligent and unskillful ; that she 
was sent full speed ahead in a dense fog; that had her 
engines been stopped and due diligence observed, 
"I believe every soul on the South Portland could 
have been saved." It was also found that, after it 
had become apparent that the steamer would be 
wrecked, Captain Mclntyre left his ship on the first 
boat lowered over her side. Instead of remaining by 
his vessel until the end, doing what he could to re- 
assure and aid his passengers, the Captain, contrary 
to all the traditions of the sea, left his vessel in the 
first boat. Twenty passengers went down to their 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July g, 1904. 



deaths because of the negligent and unskillful man- 
agement of the ship, but the Captain lives, despite 
the shame that should overcome him. In view of the 
findings of the Inspectors in the South Portland case, 
it is difficult to understand the process of reasoning 
by which they concluded that full justice would be 
done and the morale of the service maintained, by 
the levying of the very inadequate punishment to 
which Captain Mclntyre has been subjected. It 
appears that, as master of the ship, he was respon- 
sible for the loss of twenty lives. His punishment 
is suspension for two years — at the rate of about one 
life to a month. Such a punishment in such a case 
is a mere travesty on justice. Were it not so tragi- 
cal, it would be comical in its ludicrousness. It 
seems to be in the nature of licensing a ship captain 
to be guilty of criminal negligence so gross as to be 
unpleasantly akin to murder. If, for the loss of 
twenty lives, Captain Mclntyre is put on the stocks 
for only two years, will it- follow on this precedent 
that for the loss of forty lives, another Captain will 
be suspended for only four years; and so on, in like 
proportion, the term of suspension being determined 
by the number of lives lost by reason of negligent 
and unskillful navigation? The Inspectors of Hulls 
and Boilers do not seem to fully appreciate the grav- 
ity of the responsibilities of their office. A sea cap- 
tain who deserts his ship and his passengers should 
not be allowed to ever $et foot again upon a bridge; 
a sea-captain whose negligence and lack of skill 
causes the death of twenty beings who entrusted 
their lives to his care, should be barred forever from 
the service. If the Federal Grand Jury would file 
informations for manslaughter in such cases, the ef- 
fect would be beneficial alike to seafaring men, to 
passengers, and to all who go down to the sea in 
ships. 



HEARST FAILS THE NOMINATION. 

The News Letter will have been printed before 
the nomination of a Democratic standard-bearer by 
the St. Louis Convention. Nevertheless, Hearst is 
a bad loser. It was foreordained that his foolish 
scramble for the Presidential nomination should end 
in an inglorious tumble. Long oefore he went to 
St. Louis, it was apparent that he had with him and 
behind him only the rag-tag and bob-tail of the 
Democracy, the purchasable and the negligible ele- 
ments of the party which he afflicts. Long ago the 
News Letter put its finger on the vital weakness of 
his fight, and prophesied precisely what has come 
to pass — that no matter how disrupted and disor- 
ganized the Democratic party might be, it would 
not consider seriously as an aspirant for its leader- 
ship a man so lacking as Hearst is in the decencies 
of citizenship and in the attributes of American 
manhood. Jtiy the time it reached the Convention 
City, his expensive and elaborately decorated boom 
was so flattened out to the thickness and consistency 
of a pan-cake. His "rooters" could find nobody to 
listen without laughter to their silly yells; his cam- 
paign managers could get into none of the important 
caucuses or councils, and only the leg-pullers of his 
entourage were able to do business — and that with 
the same old leg. No reader of Hearst's five or seven 
or nine "great newspapers" — we have his own word 
for their greatness — could have failed to notice the 
collapse of the young wind-bag of journalism. It 
began when the delegates commenced to assemble. 
From vain-glorious boasting and stupidly untruth- 
ful reports and patently absurd predictions, all aimed 
to convince himself and his public of his eminent 



fitness and his certain assurance o\ preferment. 
Hearst fell in a day to yapping at the heels of Par- 
ker and to piteous begging of the scattered malcon- 
tents not to go near the band wagon. There was not 
much in the wind-bag — not even much wind. But is 
it cause for unmixed rejoicing that Hearst was 
squelched so early? Would it not have been better 
for the peace and quiet of the country if he had ac- 
tually been nominated and then — as would inevi- 
tably have happened — so completely and summarily 
turned down at the polls that his candidacy would 
have stood as the monumental folly of American 
politics? By some, it is held that Hearst will now 
continue to plague us quadriennially with his out- 
cries, and that between whiles he will busy himself 
preaching his favorite gospel of discontent and class 
hatred, striving to tear apart the Democracy and fuse 
it with the misled labor unionists to the end that 
he may ultimately sit in the seat of power which no 
such vile body as his has ever desecrated and dis- 
graced. Very possibly this is so, but his nomination 
would have been too much dishonor for a party fath- 
ered and fostered, for the most part, by high-minded 
patriots — too much dishonor for a nation like this. 
We would rather endure Hearst as the "largest 
leased" aspirant for the nomination, shrieking every 
four years for another chance, than as a nominee, no 
matter how certain and crushing his ultimate defeat. 
And now we shall see how Hearst "supports" the 
ticket. It was while he still tossed in delirium and 
still dreamed his insane dream that he voluntarily 
pledged himself to stand by the party and the nomi- 
nee. It is not likely that his "support" will bring 
much comfort or many votes to the Democratic 
standard-bearer, for Hearst was never loyal to any- 
body or anything. 

Upward of $1,000,000 was paid out in dividends by 
local incorporations during the past month. A sin- 
gle mining company paid out $300,000 of this sum. 
This payment was made by the Calumet and Arizona 
Copper Company. The quarterly dividend of the 
San Francisco Gas and Electric Company is nearly 
$200,000, being at the rate of 5 per cent per annum. 
Thirteen oil companies, most of them operating in 
the San Joaquin Valley, disbursed $108,000 in divi- 
dends during the month. 

The succulent oyster and the finest cookery of all kinds is the 
motto of Moraghan's Oyster House In the California Market. All 
things in season, and the best the market affords, is no idle boast 
at this place. Moraghan's stands for reputation, hence the qual- 
ity of the viands he offers the public. The chef is one of the 
best In the city, and the place enjoys a splendid popularity. 




fljJCHAS. KLILUS & CO 23 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

Suggestions of money saving are n^t the incentives 
we offer to purchase clothes here. It's the creations 
we show that emanate from premier designers, whose 
talents with shears, needle and brain are of the high- 
est class. Correct dressers say, "Immediate Service 
Clothes," for theirs. 






July 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE THUGS OF THE UNIONS. 
During the past week. 

the charge. Ireqw 
. that a certain percentage of the union men 

en their numl 
their victims, and who v 
hardl m the threshold of murder. Tin. 

striking hackmen, or stablemen, are now in jail, 
with brutal assault, with intent ' 
great bodily harm, anil one charged with an attempt 

immit murder. In both incidents they displayed 
rank cowardice, and 'lid not give the their 

attacks any opportunity for defense. Again, the in- 
cident similar in that the assailants 
their heel* as soon ;is assistance was summoned by 
the calls for help. Probably the more vicious of the 

assaults was that made by John Walsh and Ro- 
meo Fabbri, striking hackmen. upon W. D. Kent, a 
young non-union hack driver. Kent is a cripple, and 
is hardly able to defend himself against one a 
ant, but both the hrutal strikers assaulted him. They 
the hour of midnight, and a lonely spot on 
Fifth street, for the time and place of the assault. 
While being taken to jail, one of the thugs asked 
Kent not to prosecute him, because, he said, "We 
were detailed on this case to get you, and we had to 
do it." Here is an admission made by a hired ruf- 
fian, a midnight assassin caught red-handed in his 
crime, that he was "detailed" to commit the assault. 
and he "had to do it." This is certainly sufficient to 
satisfy any man of unprejudiced mind that the strik- 
ers are waging a desperately vicious campaign, in 
which secret assaults and sudden attacks made by 
hrutal thugs, are the main features relied upon for 
success. But the days of midnight assassins have 
passed in this city, and those wdio in this day proclaim 
a propaganda of crime have no place in this com- 
munity. A little "Cripple-Creeking" would have a 
very beneficial effect. 



EXPOSITION NOTLS 



ELEVATOR INSPECTION. 
Again and again, the News Letter has spoken of 
the necessity of the appointment of an inspector of 
elevators. At a meeting of the Board of Supervisors 
last week, these gentlemen, spurred on to some sort 
of action by the frequency of accidents, undertook 
to remedy the evil by first attacking the side-walk 
lift. It transpired, in the course of an investigation, 
that a "Mr. W. J. Hellman is "side-walk elevator in- 
spector," and his report confirmed everything we 
have had to say on this subtject. He said : "He bail 
examined 116 elevators, and that about one-half of 
them were not constructed in accordance with the 
ordinances. He had notified the owners of their 
neglect in every instance." So far, so good, but how 
about the Ignoble Dodos who compose the Board of 
Works, or the gentlemen of the Board of Supervisors 
as to the passenger elevators of the city? One of 
these days a frightful accident will fill the columns 
of our papers, and then there will be a rush and a 
hubbub to place the blame on — some one who is only 
distantly responsible. 

One goes naturally to Swain's 209 Post St.. for a good luncheon. 

There is nothing in town that can compare with this place as a place 
of rest and refreshment after the toils of shopping. They are always 
ready to deliver ice-cream and pastry— always the best, and their 
promptness can be depended upon. 



St. Louis, July 2, 1904. 

California's State Building on "The I rail 
tractive agricultural exhibits in tin- W01 
Palac rriculture, were dedicated June 28U1 

with appropriate ceremonies bj Governor Pat 

•'•i by tin California Commissioners and 
World's Fair offici fornia's free-handed 

pi tali ty was everywhere manifest, and the throngs 
of invited quests were royally entertained. The 

dedication of the California Agricultural exhibit- 
first on the programme. It was conducted by I 
enior Pardee, whose brief but telling address was 

responded to by President Francis, of the World's 
Fair, it; an address, complimenting tin- great State 
of California on her wonderful resources as shown 
in the beautiful exhibits. 

The dedication of the California Golden Wine 
Temple in the Palace of Agriculture was a very in- 
teresting event. Mrs. Pardee, wife of California's 
rnor, christened the Golden Temple with pure 
California wine, amid plaudits of tin- assembled 
throngs. 

Grape vines with rich leaves and clusters of grapes 
hang from the centre pavilion to the outside walls. 
Two attractive nooks have been reserved, one as 
the office for Ferdinand A. Haber. chief of the De- 
partment of Viticulture of California, who is in 
charge of the wine exhibit, and the other as a sam- 
ple room where visitors may enjoy the pure, life- 
giving wines of California. 

This wine exhibit is an object lesson to the world, 
by which California seeks to teach temperance and 
health by the freer use of pure wine. 

The Golden Wine Temple was placed at the 
World's Fair by California wine growers and wine 
merchants. It is a unique and beautiful creation, 
due largely to the efforts and zeal of Chief of Viti- 
culture Haber, who worked out the color scheme 
and prepared the interesting wine exhibit. 

California claret punch, cake, nuts and oranges 
were served at the Wine Temple dedication, after 
which the California State Buildin? was dedicated, 
and Governor Pardee and the California Commis- 
sioners held a reception for the invited guests. At 
the head of the line of reception stood Governor and 
Mrs. Pardee. 



Eugene Korn, the well-known hatter of San Fran- 
cisco, left for New York Thursday, where he will se- 
lect his fall goods. 

In the pursuit of happiness we are apt to follow 
manv false clews. — Puck. 



Fancy vests at cost, see window. Tom Dillon, Hatter Opp- 
Palace Hotel. 



Ladies— For a" good complexion try the Post-St. Hammam. 



HAVE YOU HAD LUNCH AT 


The Red Lion? 


STOCK EXCHANGE BLDG 


Accessible from Pine Street, just below Montgomery, also from Bush 


and Montgomery Streets through the Mills Bldg. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 




Om P LIBRARY TABLE 




Ralph Henry Barbour au- 

Tr e Book of School thor of "Behind the Line." 
and College Sports. "Weatherby's Inning," 

etc., with the editorial as- 
sistance of Ralph D. Paine, Edward N. Robertson, 
W. A. Scheck, Jr., R. T. Abercrombe, and others, 
has published a much-needed book of school and col- 
lege sports. The book is dedicated to "Sport for 
Sport's Sake," a dedication which is by no means 
out of place as a protest against the tendency of 
modern sport to run into professionalism. The games 
considered are American Football, Baseball, Track 
and Field Athletics, Lacrosse, Ice Hockey, Lawn 
Tennis, and the Harvard-Yale agreement is set out 
in full. 

Paine, of Yale '94, is the author of the American 
Football introduction to the book. In 1873 Yale, 
Princeton, Columbia and Rutgers got together in 
New York, and established a set of rules which gave 
the original impetus to inter-collegiate football. This 
game was a sort of adaptation of the English Asso- 
ciation rules, and Harvard afterwards adopted the 
Rugby rules, which became gradually modified into 
the game as now claimed, and which Mr. Paine 
claims, "is as far in advance of the old Rugby game 
as the railroad was ahead of the stage coach in sci- 
ence and ingenuity." In defense of the game against 
the charges that it is extremely dangerous, Mr. Paine 
says: "It is true that whenever there had been a 
larger percentage of football hurts in preparatory 
schools than in colleges,- it has been because the 
younger players had not trained properly, had made 
the mistake of playing with teams too heavy for 
them, or had thought they could play as hard and 
as fast and as long as the older and more seasoned 
members of the college teams." 

The division entitled "Track and Field Athletics" 
is edited by W. A. Scheck, Jr., Harvard '05. He gives 
much space to the discussion of the crouching start 
for long distance races, invented by the famous 
sprinter Lee, who had this to say of it : "The beauty 
of this start is that there can be no false motion, no 
backward step when the pistol .cracks. You dig your 
holes for your feet and place your fingers on the 
mark, and lean all your weight upon them, witli the 
upper body out over the mark. The instant you lift 
your fingers from the mark you begin to fall forward, 
and you must run and run hard, or you will. fall on 
your face. That it is the natural and proper way to 
start, its universal use proves." 

The book makes a handy manual. It is well illus- 
trated, and the rules which it gives with respect to 
diet and physical training should be found of im- 
mense benefit. 

D. Appleton & Co., New York. 

Louis Tracv. the author 
• The Pillar of Light, of "The Wings of the 

Morning," has here writ- 
ten the story of a light-house. Without echoing the 
statement of the publisher's circular that it is as ex- 
citing as fascinating, the implication, of course, in 
such a circular being that it is both, the story has 
sufficient interest to make it an agreeable companion 
for a few hours' desultory reading. It is not to be 
supposed that the author himself would claim more 
for it than that, and in these days of pretentious 
writing, when novels are more bread than sandwich, 
it is no slight recommendation. The writing cannot 
be said to be even passably good. There is a sort of 



school-boy method of handling the English which 
produces first hilarity and then an insuperable melan- 
choly on the part of the reader. Incidents come and 
incidents go, but the style wails a sulky dirge all 
through the story. Take this for a piece of conver- 
sation fresh out of the mouth of an ordinary English- 
man, and imagine what you would think of the per- 
son who sprung it on you : "These things are not 
in mortal kin. Indeed, hardly say that my allowance 
of one-third of the family revenues was barely suffi- 
cient to maintain a junior in the diplomatic service. 
Yet I married, Heaven help me, in the pursuance of 
an ideal, only to find my ideal realized, after 
much suffering on lonely rocks and bleak head- 
lands." A little conversation of that sort would go 
a very long way, and this book has a great deal too 
much. As a creator of a story, Mr. Tracy is well up 
to the average, but he has quite a great leeway to 
make up before he acquires the art of literary ex- 
pression, if it is an art and not a gift in the first place. 
Edward J. Clode. New York. 

Anna Yeaman Condict is the authoress of a book 
called "My 'Lil' Angelo." It is published by the 
Appleton Company. The stories have some merit, 
from what is understood in newspaperdom as human 
interest stories, but compared with "Lovey Mary" 
or "Mrs. Wiggs" the book is rather a monotone. 



Dr. Decker. 

Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 




For Breakfast 
For Breakfast 
For Breakfast 




ARE A NECESSARV FEATURE OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE 

The Otis Antomatic Electric Elevator 

is the latest development of the art of home com- 
fort. It will pay architects to investigate its 
merits before completing specifications for a 
modern house. It is operated by pressing a but- 
ton and will not respond to an interfering call. 
Correspondence invited. 

OTIS ELEVATOR. COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Department: 509-511 Howard St. 
San Francisco. 



July q. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE COLONELS CRITICISM. 
A rather humorous incident occurred 

lilt tlic.v 

imincntl] ! with 01 

Fran 

anything, from a play to bad butter. He • 
front chair at a local theatre. Everything seemed 
to meet with the entire approbation of the mil 
man until the end of the second act, where the 
t it til pazelles introduce a fainting duet. Th< 
onel observed each acti>r hearing up a fainting dam- 
n each arm and made the comment : "Kathi r 
• Irawn." 

About an hour after the play the Colonel was 
painfully and slowly wending his way up the incline 
on Masonic avenue. Down the steep groaned a fur- 
niture wagon, gorged with a car^'M of chairs, tables, 
etc.. piled perilously high like a Chinese pagoda. The 
load lurched from side to side, shaking the holder of 
the ribbons like an elephant driver in his howdah. 
To make matters worse, one of the horses started t" 
kick strenuously. The driver was in sore st rails. 

"Keep them in the middle of the car-track !" shout- 
ed the Colonel as if directing the movements of a 
squad. 

"B-o-O-m! Zi-p-p-p!" went the load down the hill. 
striking the pace that kills. The lady who was hav- 
ing her furniture assigned to 1 lakland, rushed hreath- 
lessly after her property and wailed at the top of her 
voice: "That's what I git for hirin' a cheap man." 
A coterie of ladies, pale-faced and fearful-eyed, 
watched the furniture van from the area of a room- 
ing house midway along the hill. 

"Cra-ack! Sma-a-s-hh !" spilled the furniture at 
the bottom of the grade. 

"Oh, he'll be killed!" shrieked one fair damsel, as 
she fell into a faint. In a trice, the gallant Colonel 
was at her side, supporting her on his good left arm. 
"O-o-ch !" wailed another dame, as she fell like a 
frost-bitten geranium on the sword arm of the man 
of arms. Those who fell were many ; and those who 
still retained their composure were set at their wits' 
end to know what the Colonel meant by his apparent- 
ly irrelevant remark: "Now, I'll be derned if that was 
over-drawn !" 



THE NATIONAL GUARD ENCAMPMENT. 

As it is not generally understood, a few words are 
in point in regard to the encampment of the militia 
this year. The camp will be at the Henry Ranch. 
in San Luis Obispo County, and it will be a camp 
of instruction under the supervision of regular offi- 
cers, with General MacArthur in supreme command. 
All branches of the State service, inclusive of cavalry, 
infantry, artillery and the signal service, will par- 
ticipate with regiments of the regular army assigned 
for this purpose. This encampment will be of incal- 
culable benefit to the militia, and as any improve- 
ment in the service is of benefit to the entire com- 
munity, it is also indirectly of immense benefit to 
every merchant and employer in California. It is 
hoped that every employer will extend permission to 
and urge attendance by his employees who may be 
members of the Guard. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only $7.50 

per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Full weight guaranteed. In 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities Briquettes 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 



P«M». fn. ■ * i ,,».. r . n* 



ftt»« »mv .• I 



HOTtL BALTIMORE 

Ml* V»* *WS 4W 

■**n Fr«n>M- . 1 «nh 

• -i-~- i'»I feature 
Hi •■am h**lo«1 PfcOOM in 



THE EL DRISCO APARTMENTS 

PACIFIC HEIGHTS 

Unquestionably the finest apartment house on 
the Coast. 

New and modern suites commanding a mag- 
nificent marine view. 

MRS. N. FOSTER. U«* 
S. W. Cor. Broderick and Pacific Ave. 



Hotel ^Richelieu 



The leading and finest private family hotel 
on the Pacific Ooast 



1012 VAN NESS AVENUE 



Bet. Geary and OTarrell Sts. 



San Francisco. Cal. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont; BOSTON 

Harvey ® Woods, Props. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opp. V- S. Treasury, one block from the White House. 

Washington D. C The Hotel "Par Excellence" of the 

National Capital. 
First-class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, 
Prop. American Plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



For TfaoM Who Appreciate Comfort and Attention 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, San Francisco 

American and European Plan. A Quiet Home 
Centrally Located. George Worren Hooper. Lessee. 



Murphy, Grant & Co. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of 
furnishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of 
"THE KEVER-RIP" OVERALL. The best in the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, velvets, 
silk, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, .linens, etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawls, notions, smokers' 
articles, stationery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., S. F. 



Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

FINE MERCANTILE LUNCH j 
Served every any from U to t o'clock, finest 

Wines, Liqucrs arid (.'igars. ' 

SEES A (Sl l»vUM. P>oort»tors j 

312 Sansome street, cor, Halleck, San Francisco. | 

Telephone, Black 602. ] 

Red Top Whiskey now on sale. [ 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July g, 1904. 



»j PLEASURE'S WANDPiT^ 



V* ober bo wtnd but PltMUrtV-Toy Moors. 



A TRUSTY TIP ON THINGS THEATRICAL. 

ALCAZAR— "One Summer's Day"— Fine, the talk o" the town. 
G11AND— James Neill and Edythe Chapman— Barbara Frietehie. good. 
CENTRAL— "Wedded and Parted." clever and affecting melodrama. 
FISCHER'S— To-night, new company and "The Lucky Stone" 
TIVOLI— "Robin Hood." a splendidly beautiful musical production. 
ORPHEUM— A uniformly good bill. Valerie Bergere. See below. 



The James Neill Company is putting on a very ac- 
ceptable "Barbara Frietehie." Mr. Neill has suc- 
ceeded in giving this very well written play with a 
vast amount of local color. The ladies in the cast 
exhibit a soupcon of too much drawl, but as that 
seems to be accepted as typically Southern, mayhap 
it is excusable. The Barbara of Miss Edythe Chap- 
man is a very fine performance, barring the exag- 
gerated drawl. Mr. Neill lias not much to do, and 
this he does fairly well. At times there is a fine lack 
of interest in what is going on around him that sug- 
gests the presence of thoughts. In the scene in the 
Lutheran minister's house, when Barbara is sitting 
out the wait for the sky-pilot with her lover, the 
lover's eyes were anywhere but where they should 
have been. At times he studied the wall paper of the 
old Southern mansion in such an interestedly critical 
manner that it suggested the intention of joining the 
paper hangers' union. Mr. Neill is blase, but despite 
his lack of attention to Barbara, the play was smooth 
and highly enjoyable. The audiences are large, and 
if the rest of the season produces as well acted plays 
it will be most successful. 

X * * 

Miss Bergere has scored another triumph at the 
Orpheum in "Jimmie's Experiment." She is bewitch- 
ingly sweet in her gymnasium togs, and her acting 
cannot be surpassed. The plot of the little sketch is 
trite, but, as Doctor Johnson hath it: "That which 
is good is never old." 

* * * 

It would be difficult to specialize the charm that 
captivates in Valerie Bergere. She has a Franco- 
Milesian accent, a very heavy voice and a splendid 
vivaciousness, and — she charms. She is by no means 
a beauty ; she has "une joli frimousse, mais pas de 
beaute, sinon celle du diable," as my friend Gaston 
would say, but she is an actress from her skyward 
nose to her high-arched feet. "Jimmie's Experi- 
ment" is worth going miles to see. The Leigh 
Brothers are fine in their acrobatic specialty, and the 
bill at the Orpheum is a splendid one, with the ex- 
ception of the singing of that magnificent piece of 
stage furniture, Inez de Wolf. She splits the atmos- 
phere nightly with a megaphono-mezzo-soprano. 

* * * 

At the Central, "Wedded and Parted" is making 
large audiences weep long, sad, wet weeps. The play 
is cleverly put together, and the trials and tribula- 
tions of a much-wronged woman, draw the sympa- 
thy of the audience. It is a pleasure to note that 
everything finally comes out in fine shape. The hero- 
ine welcomes the husband and the villainous "vil- 
lainess" dies. Niobe would have enjoyed the Cen- 
tral to an excruciating excess this week. 

* * * 

"The Mormons" still holds the crowds at Fischer's, 
and the action of the skit is very smooth and catchv. 

* * * 

Miss Rawson, the new leading lady at the Alca- 
zar is like the play, "One Summer Day," a breeze 



from the hayfield, a zephyr from the clover. She is 
a very attractive woman, and has found a place in 
the hearts of the people at her very first appearance. 
White Whittlesey is at the very top of the profes- 
sional ladder. It has been said in the past that he 
was no actor; merely a good-looking man, with a 
magnificent voice. He has shown that he is more 
than this — he is an actor, a good one, and he may be 
classed with Drew, Miller and Sothern. 

"One Summer's Day" is a sweet, refined, clean 
play, and it is given by the Alcazar company in an 
incomparable style. 

* * * 

Miss Rawson, at the Alcazar, is one of the few 
women who possess the art of dressing to such a 
degree that "rags are royal raiment." 

* * * 

Edythe Chapman will take the part of the fiery 
Corsican at the Grand next week, and as she is a 
very capable woman, we may expect a new concep- 
tion of this very difficult part. 

* * * 

Oza Waldrop has been away for more than one 
year, and comes back to the Alcazar in time to take 
a part in "Heartsease." The original "Heartsease" 
music will be given by a corps of selected musicians 
under the able batonage of S. Homer Henley. 

* * * 

The Alcazar management promises a season of 
treats. "Heartsease," "The Prisoner of Zenda," 
"Rupert of Hentzau," and some new plays. 

* * * 

The Central will conjure the crowds with "Along 
the Mohawk," for next week. The play is full of in- 
teresting situations, and natural ones, too, and the 
hero is a newspaper man, the editor of the Mohawk 
"Beacon." He plays a star part between factions 
in an embittered quarrel during elections. The he- 
roine of the play is a girl reporter, who has been 
befriended by the editor of the "Beacon." Says an 
Eastern paper: "To a quiet country village came one 
pure soul and one serpent, at one time; the one, to 
love ; the other, to destroy. The serpent stung, but 
stings don't last where folks are good — and only once 
in a while one meets the bad along the Mohawk." 
Now, isn't that recherche and sweet ; isn't it soul- 
stirring and thrilling? It gives you a chance to be 
an aggressive approver of virtue and a top-liner for 
the suppression of vice. The only evil element in 
the whole production is that it may induce more of 
the genus young-person-just-out-of-school to write. 

* * * 

"The Night on the Board Walk," by the Zarrow 
Trio, at the Orpheum, is the cleverest and funniest 
bicycle stunt I have ever seen. It is to laugh and to 
marvel. 



"BA3'i"' 



Epicurtan "Restaurant 

323 LARKIN STREET 



T3he James H. Bibcock Catering Co. 



409 Golden Gate Ave. 



July 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



. and 1I11* 1* the fil 
limit 

hnically as a comedy in thr. 

which Ethel Barrymon 
will appear at the Columbia Theatre commencing 
next night. Miss Barrymi I 

the title t idded much t>> her already firmly 

i reputation, while the play itself has 
) all the critics in Kate" was 

nally produced in London, is the work Ol Huberi 
Henry Da vies, a young tnglish playwright, and has 
had a long run on the other side of the water. 

* * * 

Tli v will shortly pti; oil "The V« hirl of the Town" 
at Fischer's Theatre. tV musical comedy that hi 
a whole year's run at the Casino in New York. 
ScenicaUy it will excel all previous efforts at this 

house. 

* * * 

At the 1 irand Opera House. Mr. James Xeill will 
put on "Mr. Barnes of New York." This play will 
probably till the house, as the popular prices are an 
innovation that meets with universal approval. Be- 
sides, the company is a good one — quite as good as 

many dollar companies. 

» * • 

Dorothy Morton has rented one of the largest and 
most beautiful mansions in the city, as she remains 
here for a whole year, and she expects to entertain 
lavishly. 

* * * 

Rice & Cady are the only team of German comed- 
ians outside of "Weber & Fields, who ever appeared 
in New York city. They have played in every oik 

of Weber & Field's pieces. 

* * * 

"A Lucky Stone" will be presented at Fischer's 
to-night, and will mark the first night of the ap- 
pearance of Dorothy Morton, the new prima donna; 
Xora Fiayes, a charming soubrette ; Rice and Cady. 
two clever German comedians; and Bobby North, a 
Hebrew character impersonator. The piece has a 
plot full of irresistibly funny dialogue. It is said to 
be replete with good music and clever specialties. 
The new songs will soon be whistled on the streets, 
for they are sure to be popular, catchy and well ren- 
dered. There are two excellent scenes in "A Lucky 
Stone." The first plays in the Board of Trade build- 
ing in Chicago, and the second in Golden Gate Park, 
in front of the Museum. The authors, Collin Davis 
and Frank M. Witmark, have supplied the play with 
innumerable novelties that are wholesome, enjoyable 
and full of strikingly funny situations. Dorothy 
Morton will take the audience by storm, by her 
charming personality and her singing and acting. 
She possesses a voice of splendid range and rich 
quality, and has temperament, and, above all, knows 
how to act. ' 

(Continued to Page 30.) 



MISS CAROLINE HALSTED LITTLE 

Will Receive Pupils in Singing 

The Roosevelt 

546 Sutter Street, Room 58, on Tuesday and Friday 
Oakland, 3621 Broadway, Monday and Thursday 



Tivoh Opera house. 0mmt *t 

• all «ti*r|, 

ROBIN HOOD 



Wltti K»» 



inning 

•Iwar* 
inlay 



Fischer's Theatre 

Triumphant «w-n*M of 

A LUCKY STONE 

8opronnnnr«Ml hr pr^s rth.l piil'llf* A nniflknl <'<>cktall In two 
lin I>n\iH an-1 Frank Wltmnrk. Oproarknii ly funny. 
Killed with novelties nn-1 thin remark aMe mat : 

thj Morton. Hon Bans, < «;irritj Btstan, itim ,v cady. 
union. 
The only tthonu "f tort! R«x1 flay "Whirl of the Town-" 
Mat inf ft Saturday and Sunday. Same popular prices. 



Graod Opera House 



Tremendous success ..f Mil. -JAMBA NElLLand the original 
Neil! Company. Weak U-giniiing tomorrow (Sunday) matinee 
Mr. Neillin a magnificent production of Archibald Clavering 
< inn ther's dramatization of his own famous story 

MR. BARNES OF NEW YORK 

Regular matinee Saturday. Sunday Matinee. July 17th, 

"THE COWBOY AND THE LADY" 

Special Summer Prices— 15c. 26c, 5oc. 

Best reserved seat in orchestra 5oc— No higher. 

0„ n l_ ~. . y- » Sao rntDCIKo's Greatem Manic nail. 
' p/llCUflJ. O'Farrelt Bt.. between Stockton and Powell itrr«u. 
Week commencing Sunday matinee, July 10 

A STUPENDOUS SHOW 

Le Roy and Clayton; Estelle and Babette D'Arville; Cunning- 
ham and Smith; arry Seoback ; Leigh Brothers; Giltihan and 
Murray; Green and Werner: Lowe and last week of 

VALERIE BERGERE & CO. 

presenting, up to and including Wednesday evening, "Billie's 
First Love" and for the remainder of the engagement. "His Jap- 
anese Wife.'* 

Regular matinees every Wednesday, Thursday. Saturdays and 
Sunday- Prices 10, 35 and sue 



Columbia Theatre. 



Gottlob, Marx A Co, 

Leasees and Managers. 

Opening of the new season. Next Monday. July nth. 
Matinee Saturday only. Charles Frohman presents 

ETHEL BARRYMORE 

in Hubert Henry Davies' comedy 

COUSIN KfTTE 

Original New York east and production. 

A \t-c\ ~70k v Thonh vex Bklasco A Mayer, Proprietors 

/-UOdZ,cir ineutrc E. D. Price, Gcn'l. Mgr. Tel. Alcaiar 

Monday July 11, one week. Regular matinees Thursday and 
Saturday. WHITE WHITTLESEY and the Alcazar Stock Com- 
pany in romantic comedy, 

HEARTSEASE 

By Clia?. Klein and J. I. C Clarke. Exquisite production. 
The original music. 

Evenings 25 to 75c. Matinees Thursday and Saturday 25 to coc 
Monday. July 11, White Whittlesey in "The Prisoner of Zenda." 

Ponrrnl TY*i&n+re± Belabco & Mater, Proprietors 

^er)Lrai 1 neULre. Market St. near Eighth-Tel. South 58 

Starting Matinee. Monday. July 11th 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday 

The tremendously successful comedy drama 

ALONG THE MOHflWK 

Next-"ROBEET EMMETT" 

Prices— Evenings 10 to toe- Matinees 10, 16, alio. 

f^fter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe ZInkand Is society's gathering place after 
the theatre Is over. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 



E 



HcirThi* Crltr?" -"wiut ttw d«rf< *rt tb>» 

Oncttut VUI PUkT the d«vlt, tflr. with rou." 



7TOWN CRIER 



iV--rvr~tf <ta 



The Eppinger case so far shows that lots of allow- 
ance lias been made for the swelling of the grain. 
This is really a very nice point. The idea, as it ap- 
pears from the evidence, is just about as follows: 
You have a certain amount of wheat; you wish to 
make this amount appear as large as possible ; there- 
fore, add one-third to it. When pressed for a reason 
why the one-third has been added, reply that it has 
been done to make allowance for the swelling of the 
grain. When asked how you know that the wheat 
swelled so much, reply candidly that you don't know. 
This seems to be very absurd, but as a matter of fact, 
it is the art of modern finance put in simple terms. 
Endeavor to impress people with the idea that you 
possess more than you really have, and get as much 
money on your fraudulent stocks as you possibly can. 
And under these circumstances, there are still people 
who expect prosperity to continue. If all the Eppin- 
gers of the last few years were placed in the dock,, 
what a surprising collection of well-known people 
there would be I 

"The Detectives Lose the Gates Boys' Trail" — 
such is the enlivening note which meets our eye in 
the morning paper, and we only wonder why it is 
worthy of notice at all. As if our detectives ever did 
find any one's trail in particular, or rather, having 
found the trail, did they ever find anything- else? 
This detective business had better be stopped. It 
has outlived its usefulness here, at all events, if it 
ever possessed any. Our detectives are, for the most 
part, a set of self-advertising humbugs, who in co- 
operation with the daily press set themselves delib- 
erately to work to delude the public. Look over the 
list of crimes perpetrated during the last twelve 
months, the authors of which have not been discov- 
ered, and proof will stare you in the face of the crass 
stupidity of the detectives and the ease with which 
even an ordinary criminal may fool them. 

Now begins an epidemic of street-car hold-ups. 
The fashion for this sort of thing surely cannot hold 
out very long, because the rewards are so slight. But 
the fact that it occurs at ali, and that there are men 
sufficiently bold to take chances for the sake of the 
exceedingly small reward to be obtained from hold- 
ing up a street car is full of unpleasant suggestion of 
the disorderly state of the city, and does not promise 
any very great delight when the dark nights begin 
to come and the chances of trouble are increased. 
A wide-open town, where property is insecure and 
life always in danger, is the ideal towards which our 
Mayor has directed his efforts, and his worst enemy 
could not deny that he has succeeded very well. 

At last, one is able to say truthfully a good word 
for the University. The University correspondence 
classes which have been instituted for the benefit of 
the farmers and their education in the science of their 
business, is one of the most enterprising and useful 
efforts heretofore made by any college. Judging by 
the interest taken in the work by those in whose be- 
half it has been set on foot, it would appear that ex- 
cellent results should be manifested. It is to be feared, 
however, that the President, with his usual acquisi- 
tiveness, will attempt to monopolize all the glory, 
and that the Agricultural Department will, as has 
happened before, be robbed of the praise and recog- 
nition which properly belong to it. 



I was under the impression that the municipal offi- 
cers were making rather a good thing out of their 
tenure of office. Either that is not the case, and the 
fat rewards are all monopolized by those high in au- 
thority, for there can be no doubt that stealing is go- 
ing on, or one good thing causes its proprietor to 
crave for another. Thus, two members of the Fire 
Department have been adding to their regular gains 
by the peddling of lottery tickets on the raffle plan. 
The prize was to be a piece of land, but when the 
raffle came to be settled up, it was found to be just 
as rotten as the city Government itself. The firemen 
are declared to have acted in bad faith. What else 
could be expected. Could any one who holds any 
position in the present city Government be expected 
to act fair in anything? It is rather hard on the 
winner who invested his money and took his chance, 
but then, the management of the municipality, from 
the Mayor down, is rather hard on all of us. 

The City and County Hospital people must have 
curious ideas of the fitness of things when they place 
dangerous lunatics together under such circumstances 
that one has practically every opportunity to beat 
another to death. It seems from the published ac- 
counts of the affair, that both patients were known 
to be out of their mind and irresponsible, and yet 
they were placed together in the same room without 
anj' watch and so little regard that the more violent 
was able to kill the weaker with his bare hands be- 
fore he could be interfered with. We know that the 
Receiving Hospital is a dangerous place, for we have 
had several proofs of it, but that the City and County 
Hospital should be turned into a dangerous Bedlam 
is a new proof of the wicked negligence of our offi- 
cials. It will soon come about that the poorer part 
of our population had better commit suicide in order 
to avoid worse evils. 

The grand arch over the main entrance to Stanford 
University is almost complete. I have not seen the 
piece of work, but imagine that the decorations of it 
must be somewhat as follows : university professors 
in chains, led by the President, bearing a fish on a 
platter inscribed with the words "Fishes do not talk" ; 
a further allegorical design of academic liberty, with 
a scroll on which appears the words, "Death is prefer- 
able to Liberty, as being quieter." The famous Presi- 
dential motto, "If there is any complaint to be made, 
take it out of the English," is emblazoned in great 
letters. There are many more interesting features 
of the arch, but reference to them is forbidden, for 
Stanford University is a thing to be admired and not 
criticised. 

A boiler maker employed locally has proved to be 
Harold de Swelle, who was a member of the "Blue- 
beard Company" at the Iroquois Theatre at the time 
of the fire. He fled here, being convinced that the 
company would be proceeded against in connection 
with the disaster. It was a queer idea and worthy of 
his craft. But the sad thing about the matter is that 
now that his fears have been dispelled, he will give 
up the boiler-making business and take to the stage 
again. Boiler-making is a good, healthy, noisy busi- 
ness, which produces some results of benefit to so- 
ciety. Acting will only compare with it on the ground 
of noise, and even there it is second rate. It is to 
he hoped that the Thespian will stick to his boiler. 



July 9. 1904. 



EFF 



W J . 



• 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«3 



society .$Srs&*<Prff- 




Dear Bessie: San Fra- 
crt t' • least the early part of it. r 

all tli ife c"'"K 'i for the 

lore, and they have all been delightful, if what the 
enth' he relied upon, while 

the 1 ill been full to overflowing 

the cream of the crowd, as 
is always the case at that most charming placi 
San Rafael, tennis was the watchword, and its 

•lhlcd in numbers from all over the S 
Let me see if I can give you an idea of where some 
of the folks were this week. The Del Monte tran- 
sient crowd included (■done! and Mrs. Preston, die 
Worthy Ames. Mrs. Malcolm Henry. Fd. Grecnwav. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. II. Wilson, the Belchers. Jennie 
Flood. Sallie Maynard, the N'ohle Fatons. J. D. 
Sprcckles and Grace, the Penis Searles. Helen Wag 
ncr. Henry Duttons. Kate Dillon. Miss Cosgrove, the 
Douglass Watsons. Jeanette Hooper, Sam Buck- 
hees. Tom Magees, Silas Palmers, etc. Such a lol 
of them went down in their own or friends' automo- 
biles that the road was fairly alive with them, and 
many a nice little race was run en route. Then at 
Menlo Park and San Mateo, the Gus and Will Tay- 
lors, Walter Hoharts. Martins. Harveys. Baylards, 
and Parrotts, had friends; Joe Rosborough, as I told 
you. had a house party up at Lake Tahoe : the A. W. 
Foster had a big one at Willits: Claire Chabot one 
at St. Helena, and there were no end of them at San 
Rafael. Ross, and Sausalito; the Bernie Drown 
Boardmans were at San Rafael with papa George, 
for the Fourth. 

As for gav doings in town, there is mighty little 
to be lold. Mrs. Arthur Wallace had a pleasant lit- 
tle tea the other day; Mrs. Henry Dutton a luncheon 
partv of twelve, followed by bridge: Gertrude Dut- 
ton gave a "Yosemite" dinner on Wednesday, and 
Mrs. William Perkins gave a luncheon at her San 
Mateo cottage for her sister, Mrs. Wessel of London, 
who is here on a visit. 

The Voorhies' guest. Miss Katherine Wright. 
proves to be a charming girl, and has been made a 
good deal of during her visit to San Francisco. She- 
was the bright particular star of the recent hops at 
the Presidio, and was the life of the dainty little 
supper party given bv Captain Johnston, who, by 
the way, does not, I hear, leave for the East quite 
so soon as he anticipated, which none of his friends 
and admirers growl at. you may be sure. Miss 
Wright and her aunt, Mrs. Coulson, who is traveling _ 
with her, will sail for the Orient on the Korea to- 
day. There was a big crowd down at the transport 
dock last Saturday when the Buford sailed for 
Alaska with the 3d Infantry, under command of 
Colonel Woodbury, and the Sherman, with a big 
lot of army folks, got off for Manila, among them 
Brigadier-General Coxe, who has been.here so long: 
and Captain Robert Lee Hamilton of the 22d Infan- 
try, and his pretty bride, were also passengers. The 
Woodburys and Major Plummer, who went to 
Alaska, were, as you know, well liked during their 
previous station here. All the chief army officials 
at army headquarters have been on the go of late, 
consequent upon the selection of camp sites for the 
troops on the Rancho del Encinal, and the Presidio 
will soon wear the quiet, dead-and-alive aspect so 
familiar to our eyes before the Cuban war. Apro- . 



t the army. Nina Gordon, who ua<. a gu< 
the V a the Pn 

here again on her brother and his wit 

lighted lo be h 
Just hei it, we ha\ ■ 

tcttc Club, Of whirh Philip Paschal is B shining light. 

I expect it will he quite a feature at tin coming win- 
musical gatherings, for already it i^ in demand 
at out-of-town parties, and the members are aj 
obliging that they will lie very popular. 

Wedding postponements seem to be the fad of the 

hour. Great has been the chatter since it became 
known that the splicing of Susie I'.landing and Knox 
Maddox is postponed, some say for years — at any 
rate, for several months — and the charming bride- 
elect is off to Europe for a further re^t. The cause 
of Anna Sperry and Clarence Carrigan's postponed 
nuptials can be laid at the door of official duty. I 
have not heard how this will affect the attendance 
of Jean Nokes Murphy when the time for them 
come. 

Lutie Collier is still East, where she will stay un- 
til her father and mother join her there in Septem- 
ber, when they will return together: Mrs. Mollie La- 
tham, who has been up at Clear Lake with the Col- 
liers for several weeks, conies home in a few days, 
I believe. Just think how pleased Amy Requa 
Long's friends are to hear that she is to be .one of 
them once more. Colonel Long is to be promoted 
Brigadier-General and retired, and gossip has it that 
they will make their future home in California, which 
is becoming more and more popular every day with 
army people as a place of permanent abode. The 
Rawles' home out on Pacific Heights is Clearing com- 
pletion, and will be a gem when ready for their oc- 
cupancy. Every one is glad at the recovery of Mrs. 
Greenleaf, senior, from her recent appendicitis trou- 
ble, for she and General Greenleaf are very popular 
with their friends, and especially so at Berkeley, 
wdiere they were among the first of the army people 
to locate, and it is now quite an army centre. Airs. 
McClung, Gladys and Alma Home are at the Ber- 
keley Inn, across the bay, within easy access of their 
friends, who are so fond of them all. 




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Donm-Drisiol Co. 

1°4-11° Geary Sired 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 



Ethel Barrymore is to have no end of a good time 
during her visit to San Francisco. You know what 
a favorite her uncle, John Drew, is with the Burlin- 
game set, and they are all going to lay themselves 
out and do their level best to give the sweet little 
actress the time of her life on the Pacific Coast. Mrs. 
Schwerine got back from Honolulu last week in time 
to meet Mr. Schwerine on his return from his Eastern 
business trip, and both of them are off to their future 
home in Portland, Oregon. Laura Farnsworth, who 
has been up at Mount Shasta on a visit of several 
weeks, went over to Sausalito for a visit directly she 
returned home ; Georgie Spieker, who has just got 
back from her Yellowstone trip, and Mabel Toy, 
will make two of a party that leaves for St. Louis, 
and then on East for a trip early in September, ex- 
pecting to return about the end of October. Norma 
Castle is at Rowardennan, where she will stay dur- 
ing Juiy. Emily Wilson, who has been down at 
Burlingame with the Scotts, went over to San Ra- 
fael for the 4th ; Mrs. Eleanor Martin was over, too, 
for the holidays, and when she returned to town, 
brought with her Alice Burke, the Irish beauty, who 
leaves for home the end of the month, and who, vou 
may be sure, will have a fine time with her before 
she departs. 

—Elsie. 



BIRTHS. 

June 28th — At the Navy Yard, Mare Island, to Lieu- 
tenant and Mrs. MacArthur, a son. 

July 2d — In Oakland, to Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. 
Parcells, a daughter. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Belle Gerstle, daughter of Mrs. William Gers- 
tle, to Mortimer Fleishhacker. 

Miss Louise Stephenson, of Portland, Oregon, to 
Lieutenant George E. Kumpe, 28th Infantry, 
U. S. A. 

WEDDINGS. 

June 30th (Thursday)— Miss Beatrice Winifred 
Robinson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
Robinson of Benicia, to Julian W. Farnsworth 
of San Francisco. Noon, at St. Paul's Church, 
Benicia. 

July 6th (Wednesday)— Miss Marv L, Caldwell to 
Lieutenant Peyton G. Clark, U. S. A. 1321 
Sutter street. Noon. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
July 13th (Wednesday)— Miss Mary Bright, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. James Maxwell Wallace,' to Lieu- 
tenant Gilbert A. McElroy, U. S. A. Sweden- 
borgian Church, Washington street. 4.30 p. m. 
DIED. 
June 30th— Mrs. William Norris, formerly the widow 
of the Reverend Thomas Starr King, and mother 
of Mrs. Horace Davis. 



Robert Doak, Miss Agnes Bode, C. Sawers, Otto H. 
Greenwald, Sir Henry Heyman, H. Field, Mrs. W. 
Noon and daughter, Mr. Julius Abrahamson and 
wife, Miss Mathilda Abrahamson, Mrs. L. M. Hays, 
N. Rosenbaum, Mr. N. Rosenbery, Miss Jennie 
Rosenbery, Mrs. A. Seligman. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending July 
Sth: Mr. E. Dubedat, Mr. W. Barlon, Mr. L. Boc- 
queraz, Mr. H. Long, Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Tetley, 
Mr. R. Frowenfeld, Mr. and Mrs. E. Pond, Mr. P. 
S. Baker, Mr. C. Brandensten, Mr. G. J. Janes, Mr. 
C. G. Kuehn, Mr. J. F. Cassell, Mrs. H. M. A. Miller 
and family, Misses Raas, Mr. G. E. Crothers, Mr. and 
Mrs. E. Mandel and son, Mr. S. J. Hirschman, Mr. 
E. H. Kinney, Mr. E. Gayness, Mr. H. C. Pendleton, 
Mrs. B. Watkins, Mr. E. P. Finigan, Mr. C. Foley, 
Mr. B. Cornell, Mrs. G. Selfridge, Miss E. J. Wilson, 
Miss C. Wilson, Mr. P. D. Kahn, Miss Wertheimer, 
Mr. J. Wertheimer, Mr. Isaac Upham, Mr. I. O. Up- 
ham, Mr. A. Farchini, Mrs. M. B. Robson, Miss H. 
Robson, Mr. J. Hart, Mr. J. H. Fallis, Mr. E. Julihn, 
Mr. N. P. Nye, Mr. Hoffeumaner, Mr. R. Schubert, 
Dr. H. Brunn, Mr. M. H. Bremer, Mr. E. Elliott, Mr. 
G. S. Elliot, Mr. M. A. Edwards, Mr. A. L. Schoen- 
feld, Misses Edwards, Mr. E. Marks, Mr. G. Roos, 
Mr. J. F. Bowie, Mr. R. W. Harrison, Mr. A. H. 
Weis Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Howe, Mr. G. Carrington, 
Mr. W. G. Stone, Miss R. S. Heaton, Mr. A. H. Bra- 
bant, Mr. C. Cameron, Mr. S. Igstadter, Mr. L. 
Rosenblatt, Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Baldwin, Mr. D. Mc- 
Gavin, Mrs. Long, Miss Yost, Mr. R. Cabrera, Misses 
Cabrera, Mr. W. A. Miller, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Jaeg- 
ding, Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Natch, Dr. A. J. Younger, 
Mrs. C. B. Russell, Miss M. Russell, Mr. P. McCart- 
ney, Mr. P. Murdock, Mr. C. Lumbard, Mr. S. E. 
Pope, Mr. R. T. Crowford, Mr. C. Poma. 

The Star Hair Remedy — beet of all tonics and restora- 
tives. Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not 
a dye. At druggists and halr-dressers. Accept no substi- 
tute. Star Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



"Swain's Bakery. 209 Post street lias always been a synonym for all 
that Is nalatable ami line in the way of a restaurant and luneheon place 
in San Francisco. It is as well known as San Francisco itself and there 
is not one among the thousands uf oar business men who will not 
vouch for the excellence of its cuisine. 



Wedding and Birthday presents in great variety at Gump's. u:} Geary st 



A rub at the Post-st. Hammam will do you good. 



The following guests arrived at Paraiso Springs 
during the last week: A. W. Blow, Mrs. E. T. Breen 
R. Rayne, Jr., J. E. Breen, A. J. Cleary, Jenne Levi- 
son, J. F. Kelly, Margaret Howard, P. Claudius Mr 
and Mrs. W. W. Burnett, Jennie C. Dunphy, Mr 
and Mrs. James Conlin, John W. Smith, M. Lange 
and wife, C. S. Boching, M. G. Gowswell, Fred G 
Plumme, J. S. McCormicK, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Fay 
Budford Fay, Ella Schroeder, William Schroeder' 
Mr. and Mrs. P. G. Dunkan, Harry Block, I. s! 
Rosenbaum, Pauline Einstein, Mrs. William Martin 
Miss Alice M. Martin, Ethel Dorn, Mrs. Mary 
Lucky and children, Mrs. E. Kohlberg and family, 





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the fancy of those who 
appreciate a contrast. 

Bilbert "Mercantile Co. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

VCW. GasKill 

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July 9. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

A $500 VEST ON PARADE. 

There were large doings .in tlir t« 
July 4th. when I'rr.l ! 
in the parade with a jolly crowd- 

•liat the pi«)iic \c-t lie \\ nc<l cifjlit but 

liich were set with flawl 
• -nt trip in tl 
Mr. Hotaling since his return takes quite an inter 
n the whisky business, lie was inied 

by the manager of the advertising department of A. 
I'. Hotalii Mr. Alfred McKinnon. who ap 

t.i have taught Fred a few new tricks in adver- 
Kirk Whisky. 

having Mr. Hotaling wear his $501-) vest 
in the parade, "Sink" McKinnon, as 1 e is familiarly 
called, had the beautiful touring car gorgeously deco- 
rated with Bowers, which read "Old Kirk" on either 
side. 

Purine: the display of fireworks, the novel stunt 
introduced by Mr. Hotaling and "Rink" was a large 
set piece at the end of the pleasure wharf, a picture 
in fire of purity, above it reading "Hotaling's Old 
Kirk Whisky" — was received by the applause of Un- 
people at the Casino. This was undoubtedly one of 
the most original "ads." on the Pacific Coast, and 
Mr. McKinnon is entitled to credit n>r the able man- 
ner in which he carried out the idea. 



A POST OFFICE "FRAUD ORDER." 

The Postoffice Department at Washington is rub- 
bing California of untold thousands through their 
fool order that the names of postoffices shall be run 
together into one word, as Lamesa for La Mesa, 
and scores of other beautiful names mutilated in this 
way. There is a money value to names. This is 
proven by the statistics of the "copyright" depart- 
ment, and suits brought by tradesmen all over the 
country. California names help to advertise her re- 
sources, and to draw settlers. In an article on the 
origin and history of California names, now running 
in the Overland Monthly, the author says: "Back of 
the days of gold are the golden days of the Missions, 
when names were given that are as perfectly adapted 
to the land of sunshine and flowers as the Mission 
architecture is to the landscape, and California is 
beginning to awaken rapidly to the utility of beauty, 
to the fact that the names and forms of things may 
have the symmetry of rhythm and music, and prove 
as attractive as fruit and flowers in drawing the 
better class of immigration." The action of the 
postoffice department is pure vandalism — nothing 
more nor less. Some fool clerk, with a pin-head 
brain, has figured that some time, and a few gallons 
of ink, may be saved by writing Agua Alta "Agualta" 
and Big Trees "Bigtrees." Why not Sanfrancisco? 
Sacre! To Alcatraz with him! 

The statement showing the condition of the San 
Francisco Savings Union as of June 30. 1904, as com- 
pared with the same date in 1903, shows an increase 
of $936,354.14 in total assets. Deposits have in- 
creased $867,304.61, and reserve and contingent 
funds $52,220.16. 



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i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 



£f/>e Political Situation 



While the great meeting at the Alhambra of course 
was the opening of the campaign in the sense of the 
endorsement it gave the presidential and vice-presi- 
dential nominees of the party, yet the campaign 
proper will not be started for either party before 
September. In the first place, it will be the end of 
August before the Congressional and Legislative 
tickets are named, and there cannot well be a cam- 
paign until all the candidates are in the field. Again, 
it is getting more. and more the custom to have short, 
red-hot campaigns instead of long, tedious and tire- 
some fights, in which everybody gets tired of the 
whole business of politics. More than this, the issues 
this time are not of a character to require any "edu- 
cation" of the voter. The only issue is the record of 
the president. In the South, of course, there is never 
any discussion of national issues — the primaries are 
the only real elections they have there, and even they 
are confined to one party. If Roosevelt ever had any 
chance to get votes south of Mason and Dixon's 
line, he lost them the morning he asked Booker 
Washington to lunch with him. He does not deny 
that he not only invited Washington to lunch, but 
that the colored man accepted the invitation and that 
they ate together. That settles it for the South. 
They approve of Roosevelt's treatment of the Pan- 
ama question. They have only words of praise to 
say of his policy of giving judgeships in that part of 
the country to respectable Democrats rather than to 
disreputable Republicans. They are none of them 
free traders, except the politicians, and those who 
have no material interests at stake, and the Demo- 
crats are no more for free trade than the Republi- 
cans, as everybody knows ; they like what Roosevelt 
did in the Venezuela matter ; they have no objec- 
tion to his Philippine policy ; they come very much 
nearer admiring him for what he has done than they 
ever did Cleveland ; but the color question is still a 
burning issue with them, and for that they would 
sacrifice the whole world and every material inter- 
est they have in this, and spiritual interest they may 
expect to have in the next, and therefore they are 
against Roosevelt to a man. The politicians, who 
have for some time seen that the South was drifting 
away from the Democratic party, have made of the 
negro issue an affair that is really absurd. They 
have even in Maryland passed a law providing for 
separate cars for colored persons, and the other day 
forced a colored potentate and his suite who were 
visiting the World's Fair to travel in these segre- 
gated coaches. They want separate churches for the 
colored people, and presumably they will decline to 
be saved if the good Lord insists upon their dwelling 
in the same Heaven with a person who in this world 
had a black skin, or a partly black one, even if the 
lighter shades were contributed by their own family. 
The South, therefore, is solid, and its solidity is all 
against Roosevelt. 

* * * 

Some Democrats fancy that the negro issue is go- 
ing to lose Roosevelt a great many votes in the rest 
of the country, and that even here in California he 
will lose thousands of votes because he took lunch 
with a man whom a president of a Southern college 
has acknowledged is the ablest man the South has 
produced since the War. Whenever you find a Cali- 



fornia Democrat holding that idea, however, it is 
generally a case of the wish being father to the 
thought, and every time I have investigated, 1 have 
found the wisher a Southern Democrat. If the Demo- 
crat can bring nothing against Roosevelt more seri- 
ous than the Washington eating incident, he will 
carry every Northern State. People in California 
do not like Chinese, but they are not going to vote 
against a man who, as President, has invited the 
Chinese Minister, or some visiting Chinese Prince 
to the White House, and possibly eaten with him. 
The West is more progressive and broad than the 
South about such matters, ami that is why it is rich 
and prosperous, and the South, with as many, and in 
some cases more advantages, is the most backward 
section of the Union. 

* * * 

The Democrats can hardly raise the Panama Canal 
issue in California very successfully. They tried 
something of that kind four years ago with the Phil- 
ippine policy of the administration, with the result 
that the Republicans gained 18,000 votes over the 
election of 1896. There is no use talking about the 
tariff, for, as Tom Geary said at Santa Cruz, in May, 
when the platform was under discussion, a free trade 
plank would bury the Democracy out of sight in this 
State. I was told by one of the leaders of the De- 
mocracy that the laboring classes did not like Roose- 
velt. If they do not, they are not very grateful, con- 
sidering what he has done for them. And the Demo- 
crats have no candidate upon whom they can make 
any 'anti-Roosevelt campaign on his labor issue. 
What, then, can they find to fight about? I have 
asked their own leaders, and, as I have said, one says 
the negro question, another his labor record, and 
another the Panama Canal, but it does not look to 
a man up a tree as though a great many votes could 
be won on any of those issues. 

* * * 

From present appearances, neither party in Cali- 
fornia this year is going to have a very large cam- 
paign fund. One party, the Republican, will, as 
usual, have its headquarters at the Palace, and the 
other equally as usual at the California. The unusual 




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July 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«7 



features will l>c that Jake Stop: 1 Mill hr 

with the Rcpublicai VI. McCabt will m 

with the 

• • • 

All that leads mi 1 \\.>r.l tboul the news 

that has already drifted l>ack from the Di 
delegation that went m St. Louis. What it > l i < 1 and 
what it «liil not accomplish every one who read! 
daily papers knows, but that it had a row on from the 
time it left the mole, and that Tarpcy continui 
be personally disagreeable t.> McGee and Mo 
all through the trip, is not as well understood, per- 
haps. That the trip was a frost, every one admits. 
» • > 

It having been practically settled that Senator 
Know-land i> to go to Washington in December to 
succeed Secretary Metcalf. all the rest of Alameda 
County now wants the place that Know land leaves 
vacant. E. K. Taylor, tor instance, who was Senator 
from Alameda in the thirty-third and thirty-fourth 
cms of the Legislature, wants to go hack, and he 
seems to have a very good hacking to his aspira- 
tions. City Attorney Simpson thinks he would like 
Senator Simpson as well, for they have a way 
in Alameda of giving one man several places, for 
numerous as are the candidates the county produces, 
the population being small and the public offices 
many, they are obliged to give one man several to 
prevent anything getting away from the county. R. 
B. Tappan. also, was announced as a candidate, but 
a leading political luminary of Alameda says he will 
not run. Of course, it is nearly two months before 
the nominations will be made, so that the list is 
likely to contain half a dozen more names before 
that time. There must be as many candidates as fac- 
tions, and that alone means quite a list in itself. 

* * * 

There is some quiet talk as to who will be the 
twenty gentlemen chosen by the two parties to repre- 
sent them on their electorial tickets. Bulla is pretty 
certain to be one of the Republicans named, and the 
Democrats are thinking of honoring the memory of 
Stephen M. White by putting his brother on their 
ticket as one of the Presidential electors. It certainly 
would be a graceful tribute to a very worthy states- 
man ; besides, Ed. White would be popular where 
he is known, and while the popularity of a Presiden- 
tial elector should have no effect on the ticket upon 
which his name appears, as his duties are merely 
pro forma, and he is only a machine to register the 
people's will, yet we can all recall how one man 
as a Presidential elector ran 40,000 ahead of his ticket 
some few years ago, simply because his name and 
that of the candidate for the Presidency in the same 
party were practically the same, so the personnel of 
the elector, or at least his name, certainly is of some 
importance, and no man in politics in California ever 
was more generally admired by friends and foes than 
Stephen M. White. 

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i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 




FINANCIAL K#<i 




A prominent foundry man 

Labor Troubles Dull in this city, who is inti- 

Mining Work. mately connected with the 

mining of the State, 
said the other day, in reply to a question as to the 
condition of the industry that it was very dull indeed, 
and seemed to be dying out all the time. This he 
ascribed to the existing labor troubles. The prop- 
erties now running had, in many cases, to be kept 
open at all Hazards, but people who were on the out- 
side were not taking any chances of getting trapped. 
This seems likely enough, and there certainly is not 
the enquiry there was for mining properties in this 
State. There are a number of mines working, no 
doubt. All the larger ones have in turn been tied up 
by labor unions, and have had either to fight their 
way through or pungle up. Only rich corporations 
can afford to fight the demands made upon them, 
while those without a surplus in their treasury have 
had to surrender to the modern knights of the road. 
There is little difference between the old-time 
method of applying the bell-shaped muzzle of a blun- 
derbuss to a man's temple and the modern way of 
ruining him financially for failure to respond to the 
cry of stand and deliver. Both systems are calcu- 
lated to empty the pockets of the victims. Of course, 
such proceedings will not be tolerated forever, and 
the withdrawal or refusal of capital for mining enter- 
prises is the inevitable result. Who but a fool or a 
combination of fools would allow themselves to be 
persuaded to invest money on a large scale in the 
purchase of property in a State where the miners are 
in a position to run things to suit themselves, and to 
order the hiring or discharge of this man or that. 
Compliance of one demand for higher wages is in- 
variably followed by another, until the owners either 
consent to turn over the working profits to their hired 
help or close down the mine. The tyrants have even 
gone so far in case of rebellion against their impera- 
tive commands as to enforce the shutting down of the 
pumping plant, allowing the mine to fill with water 
and doing damage at times which takes a large ex- 
penditure of money and time to repair. Before any 
marksd activity need be expected in mining through- 
out California, there will have to be some arrange- 
ment effected which will ensure capitalists against 
the tyranny to which those who are now tied up in 
the business are subjected. There is no sense in 
a man free from the thrall running his head into the 
noose. Better by far it is to exercise a judgment 
which counsels patience until the feelings of discord 
and discontent now existing between labor and capi- 
tal are swept away than to get enslaved by a power 
which apparently recognizes no bounds of limitation 
and is actuated solely by the infamous "rule or ruin" 
policy. 

With the opening of the 
The Comstock Market. Comstock share market 
after the midsummer 
holidays, there are hopes of better times on Pine 
street. There are some important matters arranged 
which ought to re-awaken public interest in what 
can be rightfully determined the greatest mineral 
lode the world has ever known. They talk aboiK 
one or two other developments of the kind in ancient 
history as leading the Comstock in point of merit, 
but it all resolves itself into talk when it comes 
down to facts and figures. There should be opportu- 



nities for money making in all the listed shares. 
Work is about to be taken up in new ground all along 
the lode, and the success already attained in Ophir 
shows the chances which are still left for the uncov- 
ering of new bonanzas. 

There will be some changes now in the superin- 
tendency of mines, owing to the death of Mr. Ryan. 
Mr. James McKinty, an able ana competent man, 
who for years has acted as assistant to Mr. Ryan, 
has been appointed superintendent of Con.-Cal.- 
Virgima, Ophir and Andes. Mr. Archie McDonnel 
will be superintendent of Mexican, and Mr. Frank 
Higgison will take charge of Hale & Norcross. The 
death of Mr. Thomas Cole, President of Bullion, will 
likewise bring other changes. Mr. Charles Hirsh- 
feld has been elected president of Bullion, and Mr. 
W. C. Ralston a director. Mr. Ralston also enters 
the directory of Alpha and Exchequer as vice-presi- 
dent and director in both companies. 

The local stock market for 
Local Stock Market, stocks and bonds opens 

the closing half of the year 
with a wide field for improvement over the opening 
six months. There is no reason why business should 
not improve with the brokers of this exchange. There 
is money by the million lying idle in town, awaiting 
investment, and it does not reflect much credit upon 
the enterprise of our financial grandees to pick up a 
paper and read that English capital is about to step 
in and purchase interests which could be just as eas- 
ily acquired here if the people were so disposed. It 
is a strange affair, no matter how it is regarded, for 
San Francisco to go a-begging for capital, with her 
banKs laden down with gold coin. It is time our 
financiers waked up. 

A lamentable occurrence dining the week just 
passed was the untimely demise of Mr. Joseph R. 
Ryan, the well-known and high-respected Comstock 
mining superintendent. His passing, sudden and un- 
expected as it was, was a severe shock to a host of 
friends and acquaintances who sincerely regret the 
loss of a man of sterling worth ; able in the profession 
in which he had attained front rank ; of modest bear- 
ing withal, and a kindly disposition which won the 
confidence and esteem of all who knew him, rich and 
poor. Now that he has crossed the big divide, the 
honored memory of Superintendent Ryan will long 
survive him, a fact which must prove consolatory to 
those he has left behind to mourn their bereavement. 

The statement of the Hibernia Savings and Loan 
Society, showing its condition as of July 30, 1904, 
as compared with that of the same date in 1903, 
shows an increase in total assets of $2,263,869.83. 
Deposits are $2,236,738.02 greater, $27,131.81 has been 
added to the reserve fund. In addition to this $105,- 
123.97 ' las been written off the amount at which the 
bank premises stand on the books of the corpora- 
tion. 

The statement of the German Savings and Loan 
Society, showing its condition as of June 30, 1904. 
is an excellent one. As compared with that of June 
30, 1903, total resources have increased $1,800,308.01. 
deposits have increased $1,753,122.06; $25,000 has 
been added to reserve and $10,000 has been written 
off the bank premises. 



July 9, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

STATEMENT 



«9 



OF THE CONDITION ANO VALUE OF THE ASSETS ANO LIABILITIES 

-OF— 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

(A CORPORATION) 

AND WHERE SAID ASSETS ARE SITUATED 
DATED JUNE 30, 1904 



ASSETS 



1 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, 

the actual value of which Is $32,649,459.88 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts Is us follows: They are all existing Con- 
tracts, owned by said Corporation, and are pay- 
able to It at its Office, which is situated at the 
corner of Market, McAllister and Jones Streets. 
in the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California, and the payment thereof Is secured 
by First Mortgages on Real Estate within this 
State ($32,137,469.88), and the States of Oregon 
(J237.000.00) and Washington ($275,000.00). Said 
Promissory Notes are kept and held by said Cor- 
poration at its said Office, which is its principal 
place of business, and said Notes and debts are 
■ there situated. 
2 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, 

the actual value of which Is 757,075.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts is as follows: They are all existing Con- 
tracts, owned by said Corporation, and are pay- 
able to it at its Office, which is situated as afore- 
said, and the payment thereof is secured by 
" Northern Railway Company of California First 
Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds." "San Francisco and 
San Joaquin Valley Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds," "Southern Pacific Railroad Company of 
Arizona First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds," 
"Southern Pacific Railroad Company of California 
Series "F and G' 6 per cent Bonds." "Sierra Rail- 
way Company of California 6 per cent Bonds," 
"Pacific Electric Railway Company of California 5 
per cent Bonds," "Los Angeles and Pasadena 
Electric Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds," 
"Park and Cliff House Railway Company 6 per 
cent Bonds," "United Railroads of San Francisco 
4 per cent Bonds," "United States 3 per cent 
Bonds," "Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Com- 
pany of California 5 per cent Bonds," "Pacific Gas 
Improvement Company First Mortgage 4 per cent 
Bonds," "Spring "Valley Water Works First Mort- 
gage 6 per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley Water 
Works Second Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds," "United 
Gas and Electric Company 5 per cent Bonds," 
"Forty-two shares of the Capital Stock of The 
Bank of California" and "One hundred and thirty 
shares of the Capital Stock of the California Street 
Cable Railroad Company," the market value of all 
said Bonds and Stocks being ($892,534.00). 

Said Notes are kept and held by said Corpora- 
tion at its said Office, and said Notes, Bonds and 
Stocks are there situated. 
3 — Bonds of the United States, the actual value of 

which is 16,796,830.32 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are kept and 
held by it In its own Vaults and are there situated. 
They are "Registered 4 per cent of 1907 ($13,500,- 
000.00) and 4 per cent of 1925 ($2,270,000.00) United 
States Bonds," and are payable only to the order 
of said Corporation. 
4 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of which Is. 8,496,806.79 
The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are kept and 
held by it in its own Vaults and are there situated. 
They are: 

"Market Street Cable Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent Bonds" $1,121,000.00 

"Market Street Railway Company 
First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per 

cent Bonds," 340,000.00 

"Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per 

cent Bonds," 150,000.00 

"Powell Street Railway Company 6 

per cent Bonds," 158,000.00 

"The Omnibus Cable Company 6 per 

cent Bonds," 82,000.00 

"Presidio and Ferries Railroad Com- 
pany 6 per cent Bonds," 26,000.00 



"Ferries and Cliff House Railway 
Company 6 per cent Bonds." 6,000.00 

"Los Angeles Railway Company of 
California 5 per cent Bonds," 145,000.00 

"Pacific Electric Railway Company 6 
per cent Bonds," 300,000.00 

"Northern Railway Company of Cali- 
fornia 6 per cent Bonds." 684,000.00 

"San Francisco and North Pacific Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds." 389,000.00 

"Southern Pacific Railroad Company 
of California 6 per cent Bonds," 1,286,000.00 

"San Francisco and San Joaquin Val- 
ley Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds." 111,000.00 

"West Shore Railroad Company of 
New York 4 per cent Bonds." 600,000.00 

"Spring Valley Water Works First 
Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds," 123,000.00 

"Spring Valley Water Works Second 

Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds," 462,000.00 

"Spring Valley Water Works Third 
Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds," 1,020,000.00 

"City of San Luis Obispo 5 per cent 
Bonds," 15,750.21 

"The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent 

Bonds," 700,000.00 

and the "San Francisco Gas and 
Electric Company 4 *£ per cent 
Bonds," 495,000.00 

5 — Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to July 

1. 1904 292,507.04 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated In the City and County of 
San Francisco ($326,075.70), and in the Counties 
of Santa Clara ($160,892.37). Alameda ($154,527.50), 
and San Mateo ($15,226.58), in this State, the ac- 
tual value of which is 656,722.15 

(b) The Land and Building in which said Cor- 
poration keeps its said Office, the actual value of 

which is 471,596.47 

The condition of said Real Estate Is that it be- 
longs to said Corporation, and part of it Is 
productive. 

7 — Cash In United States Gold and Silver Coin, be- 
longing to said Corporation, and in its possession, 
and situated at its said Office, actual value 1,684,595.88 

Total Assets $61,805,593.53 

LIABILITIES. 
1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and 

the actual value of which is 58,468,656.19 

The condition of said Deposits is that they are 
payable only out of said Assets and are fully se- 
cured thereby. 
2 — Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3,336,937.34 

Total Liabilities $61,805,593.53 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

State of California, City and County of San Francisco, ss, 

JAMES R. KELLY and ROBERT J. TOBIN, being each 
separately duly sworn, each for himself, says: That said JAMES 
R. KELLY is President, and that said ROBERT J. TOBIN is 
Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
the Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing state- 
ment is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 1904. 

GEO. T. KNOX, Notary Public 
In and for the City and County of San Francisco. State of 
California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 




THE LOOKER-ON 




The celebration of the Glorious Fourth was within 
reason, so far as fireworks and their attendant noise 
and accidents were concerned. Of course, the small 
boy was out in his multitude, but he was far more 
restrained than usual. Consequently, there were 
fewer accidents and fewer fires. Next year, I hope, 
the police will issue an edict warning the small boy 
against placing explosive caps on the car tracks, and 
against exploding fireworks on streets on which 
cars run. Let the lads go on the cross streets. Peo- 
ple seated on the outside of the cars are subjected 
to great annoyance by the explosion of the caps be- 
neath their feet, and by being made the targets of 
burning firecrackers. 

The parade made a good show. It was short, but 
yet long enough, and as it was a strictly military 
parade, aside from the tax-eaters in carriages who 
were displayed for the edification of the assembled 
tax-payers, it made a good impression. It was most 
fitting that the column should be led by a genial 
undertaker as Grand Marshal, and closed by the 
equally genial Public Administrator. Most of the 
men between the undertaker and the Public Admin- 
istrator had held public office, now hold public office 
as they " 'opes to be" public officers. The true pa- 
triot cannot be suppressed. 

* * * 

The City Attorney has informed the Board of Su- 
pervisors that Hock's bill, by which it was proposed 
to take from the Board of Police Commissioners the 
sole right to issue liquor licenses, is illegal, as it is 
in direct conflict with charter provisions. Of course ! 
The City Attorney knows his business, and he also 
reads the News Letter, for his opinion, sent down last 
week, agrees fully with my comments on the Hocks' 
bill, published in these columns on May 28th last. 
At that time, I pointed out that the suggested ordi- 
nance had one fatal defect — that the power it pro- 
posed to confer was in excess of the powers of the 
Supervisors, for the bill was amendatory of the char- 
ter. Mr. Hocks will have to get up some scheme 
that will hold water, at least, if he wants to corral 
the liquor interests for political purposes. Adverse 
criticism on his bill was made not because of any 
antagonism against Hocks, who is a good-enough 
fellow in his way, nor from any particular admira- 
tion for the Police Commissioners, who are just as 
bold a bunch of "four flushers" as the town knows, 
but rather from an abiding respect for the written 
law and something of disgust for those who are al- 
ways trying to punch holes in the charter. If the 
good citizen who is constantly complaining about 
conditions political would have more respect for the 
laws that exist, we would have no need for new ones 
to improve us, or our surroundings. We have enough 
laws to serve for a thousand years, but not one in a 
score are obeyed. There is a big book full of penal 
ordinances and police regulations, but no one pre- 
tends to give them any attention. And along comes 
Hocks, a member of the city's legislative body, and 
proposes an ordinance that is absolutely in conflict 
with the organic law of the municipality. As the 
fellow said after tramping ten miles over a dusty 
road, it makes me tired. 

* * * 

Another San Franciscan is making a name for him- 
self in the Orient. The latest bidder for fame is W. 
C. Bunner, an old time member of the Press Club, 



who is now hobnobbing with the leading General of 
the revolutionists, who propose turning the ancient 
Chinese Empire upside down, and dumping the pres- 
ent Ming dynasty, root and branch, into the outer 
darkness. Bunner is an excellent Chinese scholar. 
He learned the rudiments of the language in the 
course of his business in this city, and then studied 
it for years. He had many offers from Chinese mer- 
chants to represent them in foreign countries, but 
always declined them. Now, it seems, he proposes 
utilizing his talents. He lias been through the in- 
terior of China, has thoroughly investigated condi- 
tions in the disaffected provinces, and sends word 
that the often reported uprising is an existing fact. 
The revolutionists have well-trained armies, modern 
arms, plenty of money, and intelligent leaders. Bun- 
ner says the world will hear from them. The Chi- 
nese scholar and correspondent is a cousin of Bun- 
ner, the late well-known editor of Puck, author of 
"Short Sixes," and other delightful sketches. The 
local newspaper man had the sad duty of escorting 
across the continent the remains of his famous 
cousin, who died while on a visit to the coast some 
years ago. Bunner's brother, a surveyor, fell off 
the Sacramento bridge, and was drowned about four 
years ago. A sister of the adventurer in China is 
Miss Minnie Bunner, who gained some fame as a 
book reviewer, and as one of the original bachelor 
girls. She and Miss May Townsend were great 

chums. I think they did Europe together. 

* * * 

"Pop" Sullivan has closed down his "mercantile 
lunch," and yearning has therefore filled the stomachs 
of the many two-bitters who were wont to hurry to 
"Pop's" board as soon as the fire-bell tolled the hour 
of noon, and there rapidly mingled large sections of 
his lunch in their vast interiors. After figuring on the 
proposition for many years, "Pop" has decided that 
the lunch business does not pay. Therefore, his 
cooks and waiters are now seeking other jobs, his 
pots and kettles are empty, and his signs are down. 
It is with sorrow that the news is received along the 
line, for the fear is great in the minds of the hungry 
that other places will follow Sullivan's lead, and that 
the "mercantile lunch," one of San Francisco's most 
famous and deservedly popular institutions, will be 
soon numbered among the things that were. We, 
who have this long time agone assimilated with our 
systems choice selections from every mercantile 
lunch from Pauper Alley to "Pop's," will feel that the 
liberties of the sovereign American citizen have been 
struck a solar plexus blow if the feeds are removed 
— except as nature intended their removal, by hun- 
gry men with stray quarters. "Pop" Sullivan, as a 
true patriot, should repent his "rash act," and again 
set up the steaming soup pot and the juicy roast 
upon his board. The eyes of a city are upon you. 
"Pop." Beware the people in their wrath. 

* * * 

So the prodigal has returned. Talbot Clifton is 



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REAL ESTATE 

139 MONTGOMERY ST.. S. F. 



SECURITY COMPANY 

OR 972 BROADWAY, OAKLAND 



July 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



more an: 
with the passing years! Nine 

nic hid 3 — no liar ettef kllOWD II 

than that nl the tall younf hman. 

Ho did everything that any enterprisii s man 

might icted to do to call attention to himself 

and his utter disregard for the rules that hem in 
mere commoners unconnected with those in high 
place. He broke conventionalities; he broke gla 
he l>rokc the record a- a consumer of lone;, cool 
drinks in a Hanimam. and of short, fiery drinks and 
frequent sparkling drinks in other places; when 
things were dull, lie tried a new pony, and broke 
either a leg or an arm. of himself or his mount: he 
broke "White Hat" McCarthy into the ways of the 
world from a Clifton point oi view, and he wound up 
his meteoric career by almost breaking himself. Oh, 
yes, the whole town knew his name in full. But now. 
when he returns to tell of his many 'scapes mid flood 
and held, the Examiner headlines him backwards as 
"I. ( "litton Talbot." Such is fame! To be stricken 
on the field of battle, and to have your name juggled 
in the despatches. Hearst's people should have 
known better, too, for was it not the "Admirable Clif- 
ton" who succeeded our own Willie as proprietor of 
that famous red room on the top floor of the old 
Maison Richer Ask "White Hat" McCarthy. He 
was housekeeper, guide, companion and friend for 
Clifton, and what he don't know about the red room 
is but poor telling. But one tale never was told in 
full. That was the story — don't you remember, Clif- 
ton — about the little French girl wdio was employed 
as a dressmaker or milliner in the building opposite 
the Riche, and whose pretty face was sometimes 
seen at a window on a line with the windows of the 
red room ? And she was guarded by a very virago 
of an old girl — remember her, Clifton ? And there 
were attempts at communication, and the strong- 
minded and fierce-tongued duenna went on the war 
path, and there was "something doing." Then there 
was — but that's another story, and it's all long ago, 
anyhow, and since those days Clifton has searched 
the world for new sensations. He has toured the 
Orient as only he could do it ; he has been up on "the 
roof of the world," and has set his bold glance upon 
the sacred city of the Great White Llama; he has 
tramped up and down, from Greenland's icy moun- 
tains to India's Coral strand ; the glories of Ormus 
and of Ind have been his ; he has hobnobbed with the 
Sphinx, and upon Euphrates' ancient shore has 
dropped a tear upon the grave of Adam ; every "bally 
thing" in Europe and in Asia palled upon his highly- 
trained taste, and when all else failed him, he set his 
face westward, and hied him to the little old city 
by the Golden Gate. And then, after crossing the 
world to get here, to have his once famous name 
printed backwards ! Ach, Louie, it iss too much ! 

Hinc illae lachrymae ! 

* * * 

The return of Clifton somehow reminds me that a 
famous French editor, named Gaston, who was in 
town last week, said, after only two days, that San 
Francisco was more like Paris than any other city 
in America. Apres vous, Gaston. Paris is really 
more like San Francisco than any other city in 

France. 

* * » 

Chief Wittman has returned from the East filled 
with ideas of greatness, and loaded down with much 
millinery. At his suggestion, the Police Commis- 
sioners have ordered him to wear, when in full dress, 
a cap built on the plan of a British General's cap, 
and covered from visor to mandarin's button with 



Cold lace and I'rin- 

have similar caps, with a pound 

lace and fixings, and the Lieutenants will al 

head gear oi new design, startling enough in 

pearance to immediate! worshipful al 

tention of the peaceful citizen. Lieutenant < 01 

it is said, by special permission, will wear the unl 
form of an Admiral of the fleet, when on par. id 
fore the new uniforms appear, the police will }i 
the passage of an ordinance making ii a misdemi 
for any person to sell a cap once worn by the Chief 
or any of his Captains. The other day an ordinance 
was passed making it a misdemeanor for an) |" 
to sell a policeman's star. So many .stars were stolen 
and sold that something had to he done i" pr 
the men. So a new law was enacted. That i- SO 
easily done. But now, if the police are to wear a 
pound or two of gold upon their caps, their headgear 
will certainly need ample protection. It is bad 
enough to steal a policeman's star, but when it c 
to lifting a bejeweled official cap, built on the plans 
of the covering of a British General, the light- ring 
gentry should call a halt. If they carry the thing too 
far, the Chief will get mad, and some of them may 
be jailed as horrible examples. 

* * * 

If Mrs. Nat Messer brings to an issue in court the 
claims she makes against the father of the late Chas. 
E. Hayes, as administrator of the latter's estate, the 
trial will prove of more than usual interest, for all 
the people involved are very well known. Mr. Hayes 
was killed in a runaway accident in the Park in 
March of last year. He and Mrs. Messer were en- 
gaged to be married. She now proposes suing his 
lather to recover $75,000, the value of certain se- 
curities which, she says, belonged to her, and which 
she had given her intended husband for safe keeping. 
They were found in his strong box, but are claimed 
by the administrator as part of his son's personal 
estate. The tragic death of his son was a severe 
shock to the elder Hayes, from which he has not fully 
recovered. 

* * * 

The most interesting feature, to my mind, of this 
row between George D. Collins and Police Com- 
missioner Hutton is the appearance as attorney for 
Hutton of Gavin McNab and Tom Riordan. Now, 
how can you beat that combination ? Of course, 
Hutton got his case switched to another court, and 
equally, of course, Collins quit. He knows when 
he is up against a strong combination. Hutton has 
shown himself to be a pretty good politician. When 
appointed Police Commissioner, he was considered 
a strong Schmitz man. But it was not long until lie 
kicked over the traces. It is said he figured that 
Schmitz would be beaten for re-election. But when 
Schmitz came back with an increased majority, Hut- 
ton sent some overtures of peace and promises of 
support. Schmitz can get along without him soon, 
so Hutton really does not know how he stands on 
the Mayor's books. To show he has some strength, 
however, he engaged McNab, the Democratic boss, 
and Riordan, chairman of the Republican County 
Committee, as his attorneys in the Collins contro- 
versy. For a sea-lawyer, Hutton does pretty well. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

Cures Poison Oak and all Skin Diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Coopor 



Cslebreitad "KNOX" Hats —Eugene Korn, 726 Market St.. 
sole agent; spring styles now open; DerDys, son nats, gent's and 
ladles' straws. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
INSURANCE 



NEWS LETTER. 



July g, 1904. 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,500,000 

Founded A. D. 17M. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital J3,on».60l 

Surplus to Policy-Holders 5, 022, OH 

JAMliS D. BAILEY. General Agent 202 Pine St., S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up. J3.446.100. Assets, $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over J134.O0O.0OO 

Pacific Coast Branch : 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 18J0. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 5,172,036 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2,441,485 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street, 



Unexcelled ror liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 



The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 



Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

8an Francisco. 



of California. 



DON'T INSURE— Until you have examined the now 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy 

Issued exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 

Assets, $ 1 ,500,000 Insurance in force, $2 1 ,0CO,CCO 

For particulars address the Company Agents Wonted. 
Mariou Bu ilding no Geary St. San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool 
Capital trt.Trinrvin 



316 California St., S. F 



Cash Aisete. $321,471.11 



Balfour. Guthrie A Co. Agents. 
Caen Capital, $200,000.00 

PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Home Office, 82! Montgomery St, San Francleco. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, General Liability, Workmen's Col- 
lective, Vessels, Elevators. 

M E< y?J222 F V < ? reI 5' p , r « SI <Jent; Ant. Borel & Co., Trea.. William 
M. Pierson. Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane. Secretary; Frank 
F. Deerlng, Counsel. 

warts^ Bunding ^ FHANK ' 0ener »' Agent for California. Hay- 



FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 

CHAS. P. FONDA 

318 MARKET SIHn. f A K FF/HC1SCO. CAL 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. ScMessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St, S. F. 







murance 




The fire underwriters generally arc pleased that 
the first half of the year of California and the Pacific 
Coast business is closed. It has been to many offices 
a scorcher. It has seen the quitting of more com- 
panies than it is pleasant to remember, and has wiped 
a good many contingent commissions. The insur- 
ance men are, however, a lot of men whose very busi- 
ness renders them ardent optimists, and no sooner 
is one bad streak passed than they take a fresh grip 
and convince themselves that the future will bring 
them enough good luck to more than balance the 
bad of the past. The figures when given out will tell 
the story, so far as the public is concerned, and if 
the losses incurred could all be made public, a better 
estimate of true conditions could be formed than 
can be obtained when losses paid are the basis of the 
judgment. 

* * * 

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition, in spite of all 
the boasted fire protection with which it was to be 
provided, has set the hearts of those carrying the line 
fluttering more than once. The losses already in- 
curred have commenced to cut into the possible 
profits, and while the fires which have happened, so 
far as can be learned, have been generally confined 
to the buildings in which they originated, it was only 
under favorable conditions that such good luck hap- 
pened. The reports to hand indicate the need of a 
thorough system of inspection to co-operate with the 
fire department. 

* * * 

The News Letter has fought for years in this 
State the get-rich-quick concerns. They are now 
getting too bold, and are robbing the public once 
again. James P. Young began operations in this 
city with the Columbia Diamond Contract Company, 
but the postal authorities took a hand, and under a 
charge that he was using the mails for fraudulent 
purposes. He was also connected with a scheme 
called the American Insurance Association. This 
was blighted in its birth. He then went into a 
racing scheme, and is now under arrest in New York, 
charged by a woman in San Francisco with having 
robbed her of some eight or nine thousand dollars. 
He fled to New York to escape arrest. It is this class 
of schemers that bring discredit on the good reputa- 
tion of insurance. It is astonishing to find men of 
common sense, professional men and others who 
would join in a diamond scheme in order to get a dia- 
mond for less than cost, and help to bunco his friends 
by the use of his name. He or such would not patron- 
ize a racing syndicate, yet the one is no worse than 
the other. The man who patronizes the one is as 
loose in his sense of honor as the one who patronizes 

Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1863 —„„.,. ™„, 

Sapltal $3,000,000. Gross Cash Assets. ns,040,783.9» 

Liberal contracts. Favorable Terms. Conference with our Repre- 
'entatives belore concluding short time yearly or long time oontraots 
nay be to your advantage. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent; GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropolis 
• in Manpj;&r. 

210 Sansome f>t., San Francisco 



July 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR 



J 3 



participate are either swindl windled. 

* • • 

The next nrr of tliis Mate should el 

.1 law which, in common with th< 

uild prevent these schemes 

robbing the idi nt in tln> M.tt<- \\li.> .1 

morally infirm that they cannot protect themselves. 

* « • 

the first time in many years, llii- cit) 
any serious conflagration as the result oi the Fourth 
oi July celebration. The number ol alarms 
eleven, and the losses traceable to fireworks arc 
practically nil I. The heavy fog may be credited in 
some measure with this result, hut had a fire Once 
got started in the congested district, with the 
that was blowing, there would have been a big ash 
pile. It is more by good luck than good manage- 
ment that San Francisco escaped a conflagration, for 
never in the principal streets of the city was such 
a reckless use of fireworks ever ohserved. 

* * * 

The returns from other cities are not in at this 
writing, hut whilst we were lucky, it is a sure bet 
that the big average of loss will he maintained by 

excess losses in other places. 

* * * 

It is a subject of comment among the plate glass 
men as to who pays for the firing of the cannon in 
the City Hall park of Oakland which shattered the 
plate glass fronts for some blocks. 

* * * 

Mr. Sloan, of the Boole-Sloan Company, is on his 
way to Xew York for a business trip of importance. 
If he has gone after anything, it is safe to say that 
he, with his customary success and energy, will 

bring it back. 

* * * 

Senator M. S. Quay was insured in at. least one 
company. He held a paid-up policy in the United 
States Life, and it provides for the payment of $20,- 
000. 

* * * 

Baltimore is still before the eyes of the insurance 
men. Manager Albert Blauvelt, of the Western Fac- 
tory Insurance Association, who went to Baltimore 
to investigate the ruins for members, has made his 
report. He says in part : 

"The idea of an incombustible city should not be 
entertained at all. All that economy demands 
against conflagration is that the fire department ser- 
vice be made more positive for difficult buildings and 
that the spread of large fires be reduced sufficiently 
to admit of fire department success despite occa- 
sional unavoidable delays." 

He then draws the following deductions: 

"All congested city districts are conflagrative. 

"The degree of resistance to spread of conflagra- 
tion is practically as if the construction were about 
two-thirds Drick and one-third frame. 

"The prevention of unendurably frequent confla- 
grations is dependent on a margin of less than a quar- 
ter of an hour in which to secure or set up for fire 
department success. 

"An incombustible city is impracticable. 

"To remove the principal limitations of fire de- 
partment service is impossible. 

"An ideal fire department could not cope with a 
• hot-blast conflagration. 

"A city might be far from incombustible and yet 
be incapable of developing a fire boring, or hot-blast, 
conflagration. 



"The prr-cnt art of lire departnit 
•.amed. though it- 

!>c removed. 
"An) measure "r meat burn 

ing district must he so applied that no building ha\ 
ombustible construction "r . 

I." 

• • » 

Incendiary tire- are growing so numerous in the 
Middle West that the underwriters have resolvi 
take sonic means more vigorous than her 
check the perpetrators or punish them. 

Floating Spots, Dim Vision, 

and weak eyes, cured by Murine Eye Remedies. A home eure 
for eyes that need care. No smarting; soothes eye pain. A' 
Tonic. 



W. A. Plummer 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

TENTS, AWNINGS. HAMMOCKS 

111 CLAY STREET. SAN FRANCIS 10. 
Telephone Main 548 



Stockholders' Meeting. 

Pursuant to an order made by the Board of Direetorsof the Overland 
Monthly Company, a corporation at a meeting thereof held this day. 
a meeting of the stock-holders of said corporation has been called for 
the purpose of increasing the capital stock of said corporation to the 
sum of Five Hundred Thousand Uboo.uou.oo) Dollars. Said meeting will 
be held on the eighth day of July, mi at the hour of 3 o'clock, p. m. at 
the office of said corporation, to wit: Room number 11 of the building 
known as 320 Sansome Street, in the city and County of San Francisco 
State of California. 

C. WILLEMS 
Secretary of the Overland Monthly Company, a Corporation 
April 29th. 1904. 

DIVIDEND NOTICR 
The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

Has declared a dividend of eight per cent per annum on Class "A" 
and "F" stock, six per cent on term deposits and Ave per cent on or- 
dinary deposits, for the six months ending June 80. 1904 

"WASHINGTON DODGE. President. 
Win. COKB1N. Sec. and Gen'l Mgr. 
Cor. California and Battery sts.. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending June 3D, 1904, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Depaitment of this Company as fol- 
lows: On term deposits at the rate of 3 ii-10 per cent per annum, and 
on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3 per cent per annum, free of taxes, 
and payable on and after Friday. July l. 1904. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 

Cor. California and Montgomery fcts. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Phoenix Savings, B. & L. Association. 

For the six months ending Juneaoth, 1904, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the savings department as follows: On term cer- 
tificates, at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum ; on ordinary savings 
accounts at the rate of four and one-half (4>fi ) per cent per annum ; free 
of taxes and payable on and after July 20th, 1904. 

The Phoenix has a guaranteed capital of $iOO,ooo. and a total paid-in 
capital of $1,200,000. Its Board of Directors are: A. A, Watkins, Presi- 
dent; Cha-. R. Bishop. Vice President; H. Prentiss Smith. Treasurer; 
Geo. C. Boardman. Director; Gavin McNab, Director; Chas. E. Ladd, 
Director. Clarence Grange. 

Secretary and Managing Director. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the board of directors of this society held 
this day. a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one- 
fourth (8X) percent per annum on all deposits for the six months, end- 
ing June 30, 1904, free from all taxes and payable on and aftei July let. 
1904. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 
Cor. Market. McAllister and Jones Sts. 
San Francisco, June 27th, 19()4 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending June 30th, 1904, dividends on all deposits at 
the rate of three and one-fourth (3U) per cent per annum, free of taxes, 
will be payable on and after July l, 19U4. 
222 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

WEAK MEN AND WOMEN ®j& a iffi "gSfb.SZ. 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 
Send for circular; Naber, Alfs & Brune. 326 Market 8t., S. P. 



2 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 




MODEL H. 8 HORSE POWER. 

Price, $950 

Rambler Automobile Agency. 133 c£"\oih. ST 



Phone South 1007 



THE AX/TOCA'R 




AUTOCARS, $1,850 
AUTOCAR RUNABOUT, $1,050 
LIGHT TOURING COLUMBIA $1,900 
COLUMBIA FOUR CYLINDER $4,000 

THERE ARE NO AUTOMOBILES BETTER 

WEST COAST MOTOR-CAR CO 

606 VAN NESS AVENUE - - SAN FRANCISCO 



If you are contem- 
plating the purchase 
of an automobile we 
wish to call attention 
to the fact that we 
will be in a position 
to supply you with a 
machine which we 
know is superior to 
any other machine 
for sale for less than 
$2000. 

The price will be 

$875 and $975 

The type of engine is 
double opposed cylinder 4^x1.^. Every part accessible and dura- 
ble, and for power, and weight, nothing on the market like It. 

HEINE: MOTOR CAR CO. 

235-237 Geary St. Opp. Union Square San Francisco 




The CADILLAC 



MODEL B. Price $950 
Willi Tonrteau $1050 




August 8th from Del 
Monte to 12th and 
Broadway. Oakland. 6 
hrs- oinin October 18th 
the same run was made 
in 6 hrs. 38 min. with- 
out stopping the car or 
re Ulling with gasoline 
•r water, breaking all 
records- The only suc- 
:essful tour of the 
Voseinite Valley was 
made by a party of i in 
a Cadillac- 



CUYLER LEE, Agent. 201-203 Larkin Street, S. F. 




Bt The Autochart 

L. P. Lowe, chairman of the executive committee 
of the Automobile Club of California, arrived safely 
at Los Angeles last Saturday, going over the route 
of the special run which is to be held this month. 

Mr. Lowe, in speaking of the trip, states: "My trip, 
as a whole, was very satisfactory. The greatest dif- 
ficulty we encountered was the lack of signs pointing 
the way to the cities en route. A man can go almost 
anywhere providing he is sure that he is on the right 
road. We lost considerable time through this trou- 
ble. Our trip was not made with the idea of estab- 
lishing records, as we made almost minute notes 
along the way regarding road conditions, grades, etc. 

"As a rule, the roads and grades are good. We 
made Salinas the first night, San Luis ( )bispo the 
second, and Santa Barbara the third. On some parts 
of the road we made as high a speed as 40 miles an 
hour. The hardest roads we encountered on the 
trip were between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara. 
On the average, I think that the northern part of the 
State affords better highways than does the southern 
part. The worst stretch of road on the whole trip 
was near Kings, on the Salinas river. A bridge is 
badly needed at that point. The improvement of 
350 or 400 feet there would aid materially in making 
a better road. 

"Only one accident marred the trip. That was 
when nearing a culvert. We misjudged the distance, 
and when we hit the culvert we broke a spring. It 
took fifteen minutes to repair this break. Each morn- 
ing I had my car carefully overhauled and cleaned, 
and I found that it paid to do so." 

Mr. Lowe made the trip in a White steamer, and 
was accompanied by his brother, S. C. Lowe, and a 
chauffeur, Bert Dingley. 

* * * X 

Automobilists of the East and on the coast seeking 
explanation of the popular prejudice against their 
favorite method of locomotion, should cease their 
applause of Mr. Harkness long enough to consider 
certain things connected with his remarkable 
achievement. Mr. Harkness, it appears, covered the 
234 miles between Boston and New York in 6 hours 
and 55 minutes, which is 1 hour and 53 minutes less 
than the previous fastest time between the two 
places. The average speed, including two break- 
downs and several delays, was 36.72 miles an hour. 
The average running speed, not counting stops, was 
45 miles an hour. Over certain down-grade stretches 
of road, the speedometer indicated a rate of 80 miles. 
In such manner was a huge machine, whose impact 
would have killed a dozen men, hurled through the 
air. So did Mr. Harkness rip through Worcester and 
Springfield and along the country highways which 
were carrying their Sunday burden of miscellaneous 
vehicles. It is set down as a special triumph of the 
daring chauffeur that he evaded the police along the 
route, and escaped punishment for fracturing the 
laws of half a hundred cities and towns. 

* * * 

The local club has not as yet commenced prepara- 
tions for the race meet in September. It looks as 
if there would be no meet, or else it will take place 
later. 



July 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



>5 



The automobile was the main attraction in the 
• July para.lc at Santa t'rti/. There 
• Wintons, and two ran 

in the line, beautifully decorati 

This was tin- tir>t time that many of thl 
folk had seen a horseless carriage Fully 1 

people witnessed the parade, 

* » » 

Mr. and Mrs. W. II. Taylor "i Oakland recent I) 
made a trip from Oakland to Byron Springs in Mr. 
Taylor's Stcvens-Duryea automobile in three hours, 

which is record time. 

* * • 

Among the owners of Pope- [oledos that wen 
over the holidays were: 
James 1.. Flood and family recently toured t" 

Del Monte. 

Mr. George I'. Fuller has been touring all through 
Sonoma. Napa ami Lake Counties. 

Col. I''.. I''. Preston ami family have toured to Did 
Monte, ami spent Fourth of July there. 
« * » 

Dr. James Ward, president of the Hoard of Health, 
lias established a new record in the automobile busi- 
ness. He recently purchased two Pierce Arrow 
touring cars from the Mobile Carriage Company, 
which he is to use in his practice. Tie finds that the 
use of the automobile means a saving of about one- 
third of his time, and to a physician with so large 
a practice, this means a great deal. This is the lie- 
ginning of an automobile stable which, no doubt, 
will be followed by other prominent and busy physi- 
cians. 

* * * 

John B. Kelly of Portland, Oregon, has just tele- 
graphed for another White touring car, to be shipped 
to him immediately. He was fortunate in getting 
in his order at this time, as the White Company has 
just received a fresh carload. 

* * * 

A party of Winton enthusiasts drove their ma- 
chines to San Mateo on Sunday last. Among those 
in the party were P. L. Pettigrew, R. J. Mier 
and family, Charles C. Moore and family, Max 
Schwabacher and family, John Brenner and J. J. 

Spieker and family. 

* * » 

Among the late purchasers of the Pope-Toledo 
cars is Dr. P. S. Bruguiere. 
» * « 

The home office of the Locomobile Company states 
a road meet was held lately under the auspices of the 
Automobile Club of Bridgeport. The half-mile track 
was in pretty poor condition. The following races 
were run off: 

Special five-mile race. — A. L. Riker (gasolene Lo- 
comobile) beat H. A. Budlong (Buffim) by one-half 
mile. Time: 9:15. 

Two mile race, steam cars. — Dr. E. Perry, (Loco- 
mobile), 2.ny 2 ; D. C. Carson (Locomobile), 2.17^; 
W. H. Baldwin (Stanley). 

Three mile race for two-cylinder gasolene run- 
abouts. — Mr. Kellogg (Locomobile, 9 h. p.), time, 
8.5; T. H. McDonald (Winton, 20 h. p.). 

One mile speed judging contest. — In this event 
the winner was to be the one finishing the closest 
to six minutes for the distance (20 miles an hour.) 
The race was won by A. L. Riker's gasolene Loco- 
mobile, finishing one second within the proper time. 

Five mile race. — A. L. Riker, J. Murray Paige, Ar- 
chibald McNeil, Jr. All cars were gasolene Loco- 
mobiles. Time : 9.32 3-5. 




■THE WORLD'S BEST' 

POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR ,C0. 

G. A. BOYER. M.nngcr 

134-148 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, S. F. PHONE SOUTH 1142 



PIERCE 
STANHOPE 

Prloe $1,330 Without Top 
$1,450 With Tod 

1. A beautiful Stanhope, with Victoria top and accommo- 
dating four persons. 

2. It baa an 8 horse-power engine of tbe De Dion French 
type. 

3. It Is especially designed for physlcans' use, saving two 
hours per day. 

4. It Is compact In construction, symmetrical In outline 
and beautiful In general finish. 

6. It was In the Endurance Run, New York to Pittsburg, 
800 miles, and won high rank. 




PIERCE ARROW TOURING CAR French 
NORTHERN RUNABOUT 



S2.650.00 
800.00 



MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. Golden Gate Ave. & Goug h St., S F. 



T. P. JARVIS 



W. J. PREEL1N0 



P. L. CHAPMAN 



Central Automobile Co. 

1185 MarKet St. S. F. 

The most Commodious Garage in the Center of the City 

Expert Fiench and American Mechanics. 

Repair Work on Imported and American Machines Guar- 
anteed. Charges Reasonable. 

New and Second Hand Automobiles Bought, Sold and 
Exchanged. 

PHONE JESSIE 3336 



AUTOMOBILE 


REPAIRS 


81 CITY HALL 


AVE. 


De Dion Plugs and Porcelains— Electric Wiring for Auto use 


best made— Batteries, Tires, etc. 


ANDREWS, KEENAN & 


BLASAUF 


Tel. South 1039 


San Francisco, Cal. 



WE ARE SELLING at reduced BARGAIN prices very dejirable 

AUTO- CARS svlso 

RAMBLERS, NORTHERNS, FRANKLINS, OLDSMOBILES 
with Lanterns, Rugs, Caps and Sundries 

Gall and see them at 
NATIONAL AVTO. <& MFG. COMPANY 

134 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN PEANOISCO, OAL. 



SECOND HAND 

AUTOMOBILES 



F. R. LUCKHARDT 
20 GOLDEN GATE AV£. 

WITH 
CALIFORNIA AUTS EXPRESS CO. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 



The Pope-Toledo Touring Car Company have re- 
ceived specifications of the 70 h. p. Pope-Toledo com- 
bination racing and touring car, which is claimed 
by the manufacturers to be the fastest car in the 
worlo, this car having covered one-half mile under 
favorable conditions in Toledo in 23J4 seconds. Mr. 
Boyer reports orders taken for three of these ma- 
chines. 



The following runs were made by the White tour- 
ing cars : 

William Letts Oliver left last Saturday for a run 
to Monterey. Mr. Oliver's intentions are to tour 
about Del Monte, returning in about two weeks. 

A. C. Aiken has made an interesting run to Gilroy. 

E. B. Stone, of Oakland, last week ran his auto to 
Ben Lomond, and drove, in all, about 140 miles. 

Miss Kathrine Dillon and a party of friends en- 
joyed a run to Monterey. 

Mrs. Dr. Russell Cool made the trip to her summer 
home at Los Gatos. 

John D. Spreckels and his family left last Friday, 
and ran as far as San Jose that night in their auto. 
On Saturday they continued the journey to Mon- 
terey, where the party remained over the Fourth. 

Winfield Davis left last Friday for a three days' 
run north, going as far as Sacramento. 

Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson, after a two weeks' 
sojourn at her summer home near Gilroy, made the 
run to San Francisco last week. 

Alexander Young, of Honolulu, who left this city 
recently for the islands, writes in part of his arrival : 
"The car landed early in the day, and in less than 
half an hour after was steaming all over town. In 
the afternoon a trip was made to the Pali, and at 
easy speed the car returned to King street, occupy- 
ing but three-quarters of an hour on the round trip 

* * * 

On June 19th, a 7 h. p. regular stock Stevens-Dur- 
yea automobile climbed Mt. Washington in 48 min- 
utes and 30 seconds, breaking the best previous rec- 
ord held by a 20 h. p. car by nearly an hour; Nest- 
man drove, accompanied by A. G. Batchelder as timer 
and observer. They had dinner at the Summit 
House, and returned to the foot of the mountain in- 
side of 2y 2 hours. This is a remarkable performance 
when you consider the road is 8 miles, and there is 
a rise of 787 feet to the mile. The surface was very 
rough. The timing and arrangements were person- 
ally inspected by Harlem W. Whipple, of the Ameri- 
can Automobile Association, and when the record 
was made, three other cars were present, the occa- 
sion being the inspection of the famous Mt Wash- 
ington toll road, the top of which is 6293 feet above 
sea level. It is there the first annual national hill- 
chmbmg contest will occur on July nth to 16th 

* * * 

The Pope-Toledo Touring Car Co. have en route 
trom the factory thirteen four-cylinder cars and it 
goes without saying that thirteen automobilists will 
be made happy. 

* * * 

Mr. S. E. Slade, president of the S. E. Slade Lum- 
ber Company, recently purchased a Pierce Arrow 
touring car from the Mobile Carriage Co., which he 
has taken to his home at Menlo Park. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company received a car- 
load of twelve Oldsmobile runabouts last Saturday 
These machines have already been disposed of as 
follows: George H. Osen of San lose, three; Walter 
J. Hansel of Stockton, two; G. C. Schelling of Santa 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 




WINTON 



VWINTON/sKING, 
Long five the A 
King 



The Winton makers are delivering ten Win- 
ton Cars every day. A good many other makers 
are delivering promises. You can't ride on a 
promise. A Winton will take you anywhere. 
Price complete with canopy top, full lamp equip- 
ment, horn, etc., $2,650. Carloads already deliv- 
ered. Also agents for Oldsmobile, Locomobile, 
Stevens-Duryea and Baker Electric. 

901 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 

Los Angeles Branch, 420 South Hill St. 



HOTEL VENDOME 



SAN JOSE. CAL 



New Automobile Garage 

open at all hours, and in charge of competent 
men. Free of charge to guests. All roads in 
Santa Clara Valley open to automobiles. Easy 
run to San Jose in 2 hours and a half. 

J. T. BROOKS, Manager. 



SUNDAY'S 



AUTOMOBILE 
SAN JOSE 



TRIP TO 



means a delightful trip ami an appetite 



that calls for something 
substantial. 
Automobilists 
are invited to 
visit the LA - 
MOLLE GRILL, 
where every 
viand is a de- 
light, every 
wine a treat 
for connois- 
seurs. P. Mont- 
mayeur, Prop-, 
was for years 
Chef at De!- 
monieo's and 
the M a i s o n 
Riche. 

LAMOLLE GRILL, 36-38 North Pint Street, San Jose. opp. the Victory Theatre 




July 9, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTKR. 



'7 



■ Petaluma, one; 1 S 
K V Hendri 

I . II 1 athei 

* . • 

Prank Garbutt chipped another second off thi 
i Ins pet, the Snowball, 

urday. A week ago he tore off a circuit in the - 
time of 1. 15. but announced himself as willing to 
a little faster if the machine could stand it. "1 think.' 
said Mr. Garbutt, as he removed a few poun 
dust, a pint of cylinder oil and a couple of washers 
from his hair. "I think that pretty soon I will he able 
to 'I" it in 1 M4 or better." That was liis statement 
the week previous, and last Saturday be made £"'"1 

* • • 

Hal. Shields, a 14-year-old boy, last week success 
fully passed the Park examination in a White tour- 
ing car. Young Shields, who is the son of A. M. 
Shields, manager of the Equitable Life Insurance 
Company was right at home in his father's big car. 
and to the complete satisfaction of Mr. Saville. th 
Park examiner, he put the car through the various 
tests. 

* * * 

A four-cylinder Pope- Toledo car has been deliv- 
ered to Mr. Schilling of < Oakland. 

* * * 

Mr. W. T. Robertson, of Alameda, California, last 
Friday took a party of friends from Oakland to San 
Jose, by way of Niles in his Winton touring car, mak- 
ing the trip in the remarkably fast time of one hour 
and thirty minutes. The return trip, over the regular 
route, was made in the record time of one hour and 
thirty-five minutes. 

* * * 

Automobiles will be quite generally used in San 
Francisco during the coming winter, which is indi- 
cated by the fact that the Pope-Toledo Touring Car 
Company have taken several orders for limousine 
bodies for their four-cylinder cars. 

* * * 

The Mobile Carriage Co. has been recently advised 
by the Pierce factory that they will soon place on the 
market a four-cylinder Pierce Arrow touring car, 
from 20 to 24 h. p., French, which will sell for 
$3,000. They will also continue to manufacture the 
large four-cylinder Arrow which will sell for about 
$4,500 with the top. The two cylinder car is rapidly 
disappearing in the East, and the demand is running 
almost exclusively to four-cylinder high-grade cars. 



ABOUT TOILET POWDERS. 

With a toilet powder, as with almost everything 
else, it is essential to be sure that you get an article 
of high merit. Mennen's Toilet Powder is a trade- 
marked article, which has for years been recognized 
by physicians as the best preparation made. The 
absolute purity of its ingredients and the exercise 
of the greatest care and skill in its manufacture have 
given the product of the Mennen Company a quality 
of uniform excellence. That is why your physician 
recommends it. For your protection, Mennen's face, 
the trade-mark of the Mennen Company, is on the 
cover of every box of the genuine. All first-class 
dealers carry Mennen's Toilet Powder and will sup- 
ply it if you insist. 

Strong Sunlight, Wind and Dust. 

Cause Eye Strain, Granulation and Redness. Murine Eye Rem- 
edy restores, cures Eye diseases, soothes Eye pain, aids those 
wearing glasses; doesn't smart. A favorite toilet requisite. 




Which ol Ihe Locomobile Twins. Reliability or Simplicity, 
Is more attractive? 

Reliability and Simplicity arc the most im- 

Kortant qualities in any car. Best exempt- 
ed in the Locomobile. Front vertical motors 
only. Prices. $ , 21fHi up At present writing 
our 4-eyl. car holds N. Y. -Boston Record in 
both directions. 



T Both records were made by purchasers 
driving their own ears. 

THE LOCOMOBILE CO. of America, Brldzeporl, Conn. 

Branch Offices: N. Y-. Broadwnv and 7Gth St. 
Phila.. 2411 North Broad St.: Chicago. 1354 
Michigan Ave. : Bridgeport. Factory at Sea- 
side Park : Boston. 15 Berkeley St. 

Member Association of Licensed Automobile frffrs 



PROMPT SERVICE 

Qkttlurg Elrrtrir (Enmpanu. 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobiles. 
Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 

House Wiring and Repairing. 
16-18 SECOND ST. Under Grand Hotel. TEL. BUSH 352 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 

Storage, Repair and Supply Stations. 

San Jose. 

GEO. H. OSEN & CO., 13-16-17 W. St. John St., San Jose. Com- 
plete Repair Shop. Large stock of auto supplies. Storage sta- 
tion, etc. Agents for Winton, Locomobile, Oldsmobtle, etc. 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide 



BERQEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladies and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT— N. E. Cor. Eddy and Mason 
streets. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone. Main 
429. A. B. Blanco and D. Brun. 



POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 



W. F. GREANT, 838 Guerrero street. 
any place in the world. 



Selections on approval: 



NOTARY PUBLIC. 

MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public and U. S. Pension Attor- 
ney. Office, 632 Market street, Room 8 (opp. Palace Hotel) San 
Francisco. Tel. Black 5541. Loans on any securities at lowest terms 
no commissions. 



BOILER MAKERS. 



P. F. DUNDON'8 San Francisco lion Works, 314, 316, 318 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and con- 
structed. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 



Fourth of July Absurdities 



THE MAYOR AND THE PARADE. 

Do you think we keep the jolly Fourth for glory? 

Do you think we all parade to hear in mind 
The birth of national freedom, and the story 

Of the part we took in freeing humankind? 
If you do you'll find you're very much mistaken. 
And you're falling into error's gloomy pits, 
For the whole complete parade 
Seems to show that it was made 
To gratify the vanity of Schmitz. 

You should see him riding gaily with his Mrs. 

Six horses at the least at his command, 
A-taking off his hat and blowing kisses, 

And driving far ahead of all the band. 
The battle-flags are waving and are flying. 

The soldiers march triumphant as you please, 
And the eager Mayor is bowing and is trying 

To catch a cold, his hat off, in the breeze. 
For he takes his hat right off, 
Though he has a wretched cough, 
And your very heart would bleed to hear him sneeze. 

I never saw a single objecl cheer him, 

But the Mayor kept bowing bravely, like a sport, 
Not a single cry or cracker came a-near him, 

But the Mayor was humble as a slave at court. 
He was playing that he was a mighty person, 

He was happy in the playing at the game. 
He did not seem to know there was a curse on 
The very slightest mention of his name. 
We are cattle in his eyes, 
For he's very far from wise, 
Though he fancies that he owns us just the same. 
* * * 

A PATRIOTIC SPANISH GUN. 
(The old Spanish gun at Oakland was fired by 
some roisterers, and the concussion broke one thou- 
sand dollars worth of glass. — Daily Paper.) 
Verily we are the people, 

And none can approach us for noise. 
What are your stately hidalgos, 

To the fire and the strength of our boys? 
We take her and load to the muzzle, 

We fire for the frolic and fun, 
And accomplished more harm in a minute 
Than the dons in a battle have done. 

Oh gun, if our Dewey had had you, 

And turned on an enemy's fleet, 
No matter what metal he carried. 

The foe would have surely been beat. 
We are the lords of creation, 

And never our triumph shall cease, 
We have broken no end of store windows 

And frightened the Oakland police. 

Why Modify Milk 
for infant feeding in the uncertain ways of the novice when 

ill T U n I 6 T a J?., Wlth you a su PP>y of Borden's Eagle 
Brand Condensed Milk, a perfect cow's milk from herds 
of native breeds, the perfection of infant food' Use it 
for tea and coffee. " 



pfface Ur 3 m ° ntbS ahead ldeaa ln hats " Tom DI1 '°n & Co., opp. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Challenge Consolidated Mining Co. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco, California. 
Location of works. Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice is herebv given, that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the loth day of June, 1904. an assessment (No. 39) of ten cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold r-oin. to the Secretary at the office 
of the Company. Room 335, Mills Building, corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streets. San Francisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
13th day of July, 1904, will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at 
puhlif auction ; and unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
WEDNESDAY, the 3d day of August, 1904. to pay the delinquent assess- 
ment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors- 

C L. McCOY. Secretary. 

Office— Room 335. Mills Building, corner Bush and Montgomery 
streets, San Francisco, California. 



P^SwSt! 18 fOF weddtn * s ' Cnarlotte F. Williams, room 18, 121 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place ot business, San Francisco, California- Lo 
cation of works. Storey County, Nevada. 

Notloe la hereby Given that at a meeting of the Board of Director*, held 
on the 15th day «f June, 1904, an' assessment (No. 70) of ten (10) oents 
oer share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
Immediately In United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the office of 
the Oomoany, Room 79 Nevada Block. 809 Montgomery street, San Fran* 
clsco California- 

Any atoek upon which this assesNraent shall lemafn unpaid on 
THR 20th DAY OF JULY. 1904 
will be delinquent, and adve>tlsed for sale at public auotion and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on Wednesday, the 10th day of a ug- 
eu°t 1904, to pay the delinquent assessment together with the costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Dlreotors. 

OHAS. E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79 Nevada Block 309 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Chollar Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco. California. Lo- 
cation of wo-ks. Storey County. Nevada. 

Notloe Is hereby (riven that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 9th day of June. 1904, an anfe*- inert (No. 66) of ten (10) 
eents per share was levied unon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able Immediately in Vi ited States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the company, room 79. Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street. San 
Franolsoo. California, 

Any stock upon whloh this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
13th DAY OF JULY. 1904 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at nubile auction: and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on Wednesday, the 3d 
day of August, 1904. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
com of adv ertMng and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E ELLIOT. Secretary 

Offloe— Room 79. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francl«co 
California 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Virginia City, Storey County. Nevada. 

Notloe la hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Dlreotors. held on 
the 10th day of June. 1904, an assessment. (No. 118) of ten (10) oents 
D^r share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, paya- 
ble Immediately In United "tatea gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, rooms 21-22, Nevada Block, No- 309 Montgomery St. 
San Franolsoo. Cal. 

Any stock upon whloh this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
15th DAY OF JULY 1904. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless pa y 
ment is made before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the Bth day of Augu s 
1904 at 1 o'olook P. M.. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with 
the oosts of advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of 
Dlreotors, 

JOHN W. TWIGGS, Secretary 

Office— Rooms 21-32 Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco, California 
Location of works. Virginia Mining District. Storey county. State of 
Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that, at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the 1st day of June, loo-t, an assessment {No. fit) of ten (10) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office 
of the Company. Rooms 21-22. Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE nth DAY OF JULY/1904, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY.the 1st day of August, 
1904. to pay the delinquent assessment together with costs of advertis- 
ing, and expenses of sale. 

By Order of the Board of Directors. 

„■„■■« JOHN W. TWIGGS. Secretary. 

Office— Rooms 21-22 Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery street. San 
Francisco. California. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTT1 K 






SPEECHLESS LOVE. 

Bl Atf 

"Who art thou, child, 
What i* thy name, thou little, songless I 
.Vow hither drawn my comfort to 

•t, ah. I know not Who thi U art. 
Thine eyes are bright, and I can hear t!r 

Beat very wild." 

Quiet to sit, 
Full of the strange, sweet language silence speaks, 
This is his power. From far hij,'h mountain peaks 
He hath it. ami through all infinity. 
Whether the sun deeoy or shadow he. 

He guardeth it. 

"O little one. 
O little one! The world is large and cold. 
Then let the melancholy world run old. 
But take my frozen hand unto thy breast, 
And tell me once the only name, the best, 

Ere die the sun." 

His eyes aflame 
Are wide and wet. Noon's light is on his hair. 
He would away, afar, he knows not where. 
But still he sits and keeps his secret well. 
And breaks his heart with what he will not tell. 

Yet names no name. 



ADIEU TO GIRLHOOD. 
By M. Cannnh in Century 
Y\ hen, waked on summer morns from dreamles 
sleep, 

I fold my hands and all quiescent lie, 
With docile heart, watching the cloistral sky 
A-tremble with the dawn, hearing the cheep 
Of young, young birds, or tinkle of the slice]) 

Beyond the hill, oh, then from far and high, 
And tides of yearning wonder o'er me sweep. 

But yestermorn, before the soft wings came 
In the expectant dawn, wild music crcpl 
Within my soul; and, unsought, past me swept 

Thy face, ihine eyes, 'mid swift, tumultuous flame. 
Then, then, I could not pray, but long I wept. 

Burned and bewildered by a sudden shame. 

HER ANSWER. 

By May Ellis Nichols in Good Housekeeping 
You say I never tell you, dear, 

How much I love you. Do you know 
The ripples break the surface clear, 

The deeper currents run below? 
Some things there are from words apart ; 

The mystery of maternity, 
God's work of grace within the heart, 

And love, like love I bear to thee. 



VALEDICTION. 

By Margaret Fuller in Centuiy 

"Be tranquil, love, and face the truth : 
The parting hour is here ; 

I cannot stay, you may not come — 
Death hath an heavy ear." 

Her head from off his shoulder slippec 
And dropped down like a tear. 



$200 Reward 

For the arrest and conviction of any one as- 
saulting members or employees of this association 
or destroying property belonging to them. 



-p— -_ 






Report promptly to the Law Department. Citi- 
zens' Alliance. 217 Crossley Building. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

CITIZENS' ALLIANCE 



NOTICE TO HORSE OWNERS 

JEPSON BROS. COMPANY, Inc., makers of fine har- 
ness and Importers of English Saddlery, will now be 
found at 110-112 MARKET STREET, where you will 
And the finest and largest stock of everything for the 
horse, show-ring and stock-farm. Telephone Bush 651. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

Blake, MofBtt & Towne, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 
TEL. MAIN 199. 65-57-59-61 FIRST ST.. SAN FRANCISCO. 



n L For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

nrilSnBS laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
*" " billiard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 

makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers 

Brush flfts., 609 Sacramento St, S. P., Tel. flain 561 1 



Old Rose Bud Whiskey 

Absolutely the purest on the market. 

APPLEGATE & SONS, Distillers 

Louisville, Ken. Pacific Coast Agents 

RATHJEN WINE COMPANY. 



46 ELLIS STREET, S. F. 
Telephone, Main 6171. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents. 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Glllingham Cement. 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St 



SINQ FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but one price. 
All goods marked In plain English figures. 

614 DUPONT STREET, S. F. Next to St. Mary's Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, Ban Francisco. Tel. Main 1323. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 



Pleasure's Wand. 

(Continued from Page 11.) 
Nora Bayes, the new soubrette at Fischer's Thea- 
tre is the owner of "Gestonck, ' a Japanese poodle 
that has taken many first prizes in the East. I am 
toM the name of the kiyi has nothing to do with per- 
fume, and that the word is not a mixture of German 
and English, but a Japanese proverb which means — 
much to a Jap and little to a Russian. 

* * * 

Henry Miller will be supported by a strong com- 
pany during the engagement he is to play this year 
at the Columbia Theatre. Mr. Miller will give us the 
great English success, "David Entangled." Its first 
American production will take place in this city. 
New York will see it in November. 

"The Wizard of Oz" will be one of the early attrac- 
tions at the Columbia Theatre, where some of the 
big musical comedies are to be seen during the com- 
ing season. "The Sultan of Sulu" will be staged 

here later in the vear. 

* * * 

"Robin Hood" enters upon its fourth week at the 
Tivoli Opera House on Monday evening. The pros- 
pects for a long run are just as bright as they were 
when the curtain descended upon the performance 
upon its opening night, and every person in the 
huge audiences is full of enthusiasm about the beau- 
tiful stage pictures, the superb singing and the gen- 
eral superior excellence ol "Robin Hood." The 
Tivoli's musical forces work with a greater vim than 
ever, and give a thoroughly delightful account of the 
beauties of "Robin Hood." Messrs. Berthald, Duns- 
mure, Cunningham and Schuster keep up the stan- 
dard of work, and Misses Mason, Condon and Tenne- 
hill vie with their male associates in sweet singing 
and sprightly acting. Mr. Cunningham has earne.l 
the thunderous plaudits of large audiences all week, 
and easily divides the honors with Dunsmure, the 

splendid basso. 

* * * 

Belle Gordon, the phenomenal athlete, will make 
her first appearance at the Chutes this coming week. 
Brandow and Wiley, the colored entertainers, will 
make their re-appearance, and the remainder of the 
programme will include Belle and Lotta Tobin, the 
musical experts; Carl Reiter, the monologist ; the 
three sisters Kelcey, eccentric comedy singers and 
dancers; Hershal Stein, the baritone and song illus- 
trator; and the animatoscope, showing new and 
amusing moving pictures. Argo, the new illusion, 
is proving a great drawing card, and the Zoo is 
crowded with interesting animals. 

* :'fi * 

Walter Le Roy and Florence Clayton, who made 
a hit here two years ago in "Hogan of the Hansom," 
will return to the Orpheum the coming week. Thev 
will present an original Irish comedy entitled "A 
Horse on Hogan," said to be even funnier than their 
first effort. Estelle and Babette D'Arville, acrobatic 
dancing girls, will make their first appearance in 
San Francisco. George W. Cunningham, one of the 
original "Brutal Brothers," and Miss Geneva Smith, 
a sprightly comedienne, will present, with the assist- 
ance of their trained dog, "Zero," a rapid-fire talking 
and comedy act, entitled "A Perfect Paradise." 
Harry Seeback, the bag puncher, will make his first 
appearance. For her third and last week, Valerie 
Bergere will present up to and including Wednesday 
evening, "Billy's First Love," and for the remainder 
of her engagement, "His Japanese Wife." 



WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

V V o 

Scotch_Whisky 

Importers-MACONDRAY & CO. 



THE CALL 



Has the Largest aod Best Home Circulation 
The Short Story Service in the magazine section 

of the Sunday Call is unsurpassed. There are also 

Numerous Chatty Articles by the best writers on 

topics of interest to everybody. 

The Pictures given away with the Sunday Call, 

absolutely free of charge, are art gems, and are 

framed, preserved and sold in nearly every art store. 

All this in addition to a Superior News Service, both 

local and foreign. 

Subscriptions, Dally and Sunday, by carrier 75c. per month. 
Tearly by mall, J8.00. Sunday ediUon J2.60 per year. The Week- 
ly. $1.00 per year. 
JOHN McNAUGHT, Man's;. JOHN D. SPRECKELS, Prop. 

The Oakland 
Tribune 

is delivered into more homes of the 
masses and classes of Oakland and 
Alameda County than all other Oak- 
land, Alameda and Berkeley dailies 
combined. Reason — it's the best 
newspaper. 
W. E. DARGIE, Pres. T. T. DARGIE, Sec'y 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

GET THE HABIT 

of using our Press Clippings in whatever diversion you may be 
interested and you will marvel at the results. The ' Argus" has 
many eyes, you only two. so let ua do the work for you. Send 
five dollars for a final order with your desired instructions. We 
will do the rest and benefit you in many ways. 

Argus Press Clipping Bureau 

Otto Spengler. Director 
352 Third Ave - - - New York. City 



AN ELECTRIC FAN MOTOR 

Will Keep You Cool. Write For Prices 

National Electric Co. 

455 Sutter Street. Telephone Bueh 639 San Francisco 

NEWTON J. THARP 

ARCHITECT 
131 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



C. H. Rehnstrom (formerly Sanders & Johnson.) 
E W Hagbom, (formerly with James W. Bell & Co. of New York) 

REHNSTROM $ HAGBOM 

TAILORS 

PHELflN BUILDING ROOMS 1, 2, 3 

Phone Main 5387. Ban Francisco. 



FOR SALE 



Jury 9. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

OBITUARY. 

Mr. Thomas Cole. 

Mr 
l hU 
well. Ho had a - restitution, .in. I wan 

credited with many • In', 

II,' passed away suddenly. Mr. Cole was \u 
interested in mining, and was ,mc of the familial 
hinirts of California. Mo man over stood high 
the estimation of the mining and financial world, and 
lie was president of the Julia t onsolidated, the I • 11 1 - 
lion Mining Company and the < lmllar. He lea 
widow. Mrs. Mary Estellt I lole : three daughters 

J. I. Searle, Mrs. H. D. Lombard and Mi 
\Y. Cole : also one son. Rudolph Y. Cole. 



3' 



One of the pleasantest events of the year was tin- 
dinner on the Fourth of July, given by the Conti- 
nental Building and Loan Association and members 

at the St. Francis Hotel. -This dinner was a very 
good business idea, as it brought together an organi- 
zation, many of whose members are not residents of 
this city, and who otherwise would not enjoy one 
another's acquaintance. To Secretary William Cor- 
hin belongs the credit of the design of the menus ami 
the invitation cards, and under his supervision the 
decoration of the banquet tables. The Colonial fea- 
ture was in no instance forgotten, and this was par- 
ticularly felicitous, as it symbolized the staunches! 
Republic the world has ever known, and the strong- 
est of all Building and Loan Associations. 

R. E. Johnston announces an extraordinary musi- 
cal event for January 20th at Carnegie Music Hall. 
New York. On this occasion an orchestra of 100 mu- 
sicians will be engaged, and Ysaye and d'Albert will 
be the conductors and soloists. Ysaye will conduct 
a symphony, and also for d'Albert's solos, and d'Al- 
bert will conduct a suite, and also for Ysaye's solos. 
It is said in musical circles that this will be an event 
that will create intense interest. Ysaye makes his 
first appearance in this country on November 18th, 
which happens to be his 43d birthday. 



The Techau Tavern rs the place to go after the 

thentre. It tops off the evening splendidly. The refresh- 
ments of all sorts are of the best quality and the price 
is reasonable. 




Fairchild 

TO ORDER 

French Corsets 

Shirt Waist Suits 

Artistic Shirt 
Waists 

Fit and satisfaction guaranteed 



1211 SVTTER. STREET, S. F. 

Phone Larkin 862 



Red Eves and Eye- 
lids. Gran u 1 a t e d 
Eyelids and other 
Eye troubles cured 



MURINE EYE REMEDY 



CONTROLLING INTEREST IN PAY 
ING COMMERCIAL BUSINESS 



Price $1000 



Incorporated July 1901 



Invite thorough investigation. For further par- 
ticulars or appointment address 

J. J. ADEL 
401 California Street, 5. F. 



Mont Rouge Wines 



LIVESMORB VALLEY, CAL. 



The FiQest Wines Produced 
in California np v< v« 



CHAUCHE & BON, Props. 

17 First St. Phone Main 1514 San Francisco 



JUST OUT 

The new U. S. 22 Short Smokeless Cart- 
ridges. The best yet. U. S. 22 Short (black 
powder.) The standard brand, always reliable 
and popular. Call for the U. S. 

UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE CO., Matters 



REMOVAL NOTICE 



PATRICK & CO,, have moved to their new 
quarters 111-118 SANSOME STREET, where a 
complete line of Rubber Stamps, Stencils, Seals, 
Metal Checks. Box Brands, etc-, can be found. 




GOODYEAR'S 

"GOLD SEAL" 

RUBBER 000DS THE BEST MADE 

Rubber Hose, Belting and Packings 

We are headquarters for everything made of Rubber 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO. 

R. H. Pease, President. 

F. M. Shepard. Jr., Treasurer. 

<J. F. Runyon, Secretary. 

573-575-577-579 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



32 



SaN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 



Stage Gossip 



Every time Mrs. Leslie Carter looms across the 
horizon, stories of her making for the histrionic 
world are told and retold, and the gossipy public can 
improve upon the wildest tales of the enterprising 
press agent. Her coming to Dave Belasco a good 
many years ago is well remembered by some of the 
students of his school of acting who were green with 
envy that they were not heroines of a sensational 
divorce suit and had not a wonderful thatch of bright 
red hair, so that they, too, might succeed. 

It was not so hard to see Belasco in those days as 
now ; he was having his own struggles. At any rate, 
word came up to the little school under the eaves 
that a lady wished to see Mr. Belasco. He hastened 
down, and upon his return was flushed with excite- 
ment, and said : 

"My caller was a lady fresh from a much-talked- 
of and much-written-about Chicago divorce case. I 
will make her act. Mark me." 

He did. The press agents have let slip stories 
aboui hair-pulling and other equally erratic discipline 
accorded the lady from Chicago, hut the truth is that 
Belasco made an actress of her by patience ami the 
domination of his own will. To-day, even though 
Mrs. Carter may be considered as a "finished pro- 
duct," her continued and every-day success is still 
dependent upon Belasco. When he is not about, her 
performances are tame compared with what they are 
when he is in the wings. The story is told that one 
evening last year the first act of "Du Barry" was 
played before Mrs. Carter knew that Belasco had ar- 
rived quite unexpectedly. The remainder of the 
performance went up several keys. Perhaps, Mrs. 
Carter is dog-tired of "Du Barry," as well she might 
be after three years of it, and it takes the "eye of the 
master" to keep up her interest ; perhaps it is a case 
of the mice playing a bit when the cat's vigil is over; 
but at any rate, it is not difficult to explain why some 
people like the play and some do not — why some 
think Mrs. Carter is perfection and others are keenly 
disappointed. The latter have seen her on the "off 
nights." Belasco has not been in San Francisco dur- 
ing the season, but Mrs. Carter's interest in "making 
good" with the San Francisco audiences has some- 
what made up for the absence of the master-hand. 

Personally she is "variable" with her support. 
Sometimes she is imperious and exacting, and again 
as easy and affable as if she were in her own home 
and the players were her guests. On the whole, she 
is popular with her company. 

Before "Du Barry" came to San Francisco, the 
company played one-night stands for nine weeks. 
Think of that, girls who long "to go on the stage." 
Mrs. Carter on the top-most round has to keep up 
this "circus-like" pace. Even her three maids do 
not make this kind of traveling and wcrk any easier. 
Whether leading lady or super, the train brings them 
into towns in the ghost hours, and frequently a es 
them away at the shivery hours of dawn. After all 
this, Mrs. Carter is entitled to be sick, even in s 1 im 

portant a place as San Francisco. 
* * * 

Blanche Bates has been trying through a long 
summer rest in California to fortify herself f r ; n- 
other season of "The Darling of the God ." — the 
third. She says that she is so tired of playing 
Madam Butterfly that she runs during her vacation 
from anything that remotely suggests Japan. But as 
there is no lack of public interest in the heart-break- 
ing story of the pretty Japanese, the "Darling of the 



Gods" is booked again. Blanche Bates is storing up 
a new stock of enthusiasm for these coming months 
of its repetition. While she has been in this city this 
year, Blanche Bates has been the guest of congenial 
friends at their town and country houses. She says 
that there is no place in all the world where she can 
recuperate so thoroughly as in her own California. 

* * * 

Apropos of "Madam Butterfly," here is a little un- 
written story : Blanche Bates refused to go to Eng- 
land to play it. That was a great opportunity to miss 
and one that few actresses would have foregone. 
Miss Bates admitted that she wanted to be heard in 
England, the height of ambition of every American 
actress, but she says that she does not care to go 
there with her personality so lost as it is in the 
Japanese make-up. She says that she prefers to go 
to London "in her own face," adding the while that 
though it may not be much of a face, it is hers, and 
that in a new country she would rather come in closer 
personal contact with the people. She wants to be 
Blanche Bates to the. Londoners — not "Madam But- 
terfly." 

* * * 

When Managers Leahy and Strine of the Tivoli 
Opera House decided that the old "family" had to be 
broken up, they tried to be as courteous and consid- 
erate as possible to those who must go. It appears 
that all went well until Annie Myers' turn came to 
put her head under the guillotine. She showed fight, 
and told the management what she thought about 
them. It is recorded that she had a great glee all 
to herself the week that "Sergeant Kittie" wound up 
disastrously. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

for $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; "uarter ton $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co.. Soutn 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



"Out of the Beaten Path," lorn Dillon's modern style 
Opposite Palace. 



ats. 



Are you tired? Go to the Poat Street Turkish Bath». 




Hotel 
Belleclaire, 

Broadway & 77th St. 

NEW YORK 



Luxuriously famished roomi 
fur permanent and transient 
guests, at moderate prloea. 

Orchestra of solo playors, 6 p. 
m. till 1 a. m. 

Restaurant, Palm Room and 
Cafe. gems of artistic perfection. 
Cuisine and service really de- 
lightful. Tou will say so, 

A special feature la oar after 
theater suppers 

Billiard parlor for ladles U 
another pleasant feature. 

Original with the Belleclaire Is 
the refined vaudeville every 
Thursday evening. 

Our gallery of beatlful paint- 
ings, valued at £50,000, Is open 
evenings to visitors. 

Affability and courtesy guar- 
anteed from every Belleclaire 
employe. 

Milton Robloo, Prop. 



TOJVK.IJV, -Photographer 



1490 MARKET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

GROUND FLOOR. STVDIO 



Between 

7th and 81b Strttts 



July q. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

" 5/>« Advantage of Democracy" 



NEWS LKTTK.R. 



33 



The people of Bavaria dc mendmetX 

their Constitution which will enable them 
lu-ir mad long.— Dail) Paper. 

The people of Bavaria 

Are troubled in their mind — 
The) ilish king they don't know what to do 

ah. mt. 

lie i> slightly utT lu> balance, 

If you knew him you would find 
Him <|uite the queerest monarch that yon knew 
about. 
He piles up heaps of strawberries 
And leaves them in the park. 
His friends must keep an eye on him 

And guard him after dark. 
His subjects dare not watch him 
When he's shooting at a mark. 
For fear that he might miss and leave a feu about. 

< >h. a monarch queer and strange, 

With a life that's full of change, 
And freak and wanton folly they have got, 

For he has his little fancies. 

And with all the circumstances 
Perhaps it would be better he were not. 

The folks of San Francisco 

Have a monarch of their own, 
A monarch not so crazy as the other. 

But a monarch much more dangerous, 
As all of you would own. 
If you knew his swarthy Honor and his brother. 
He does not pile up strawberries. 

But other matters more 
To his private wealth and betterment. 

Which leave the public sore. 
But still it serves the public right — 
They had their chance before, 
A chance with votes his Honor's clique to smother. 

Oh, a monarch queer and strange, 
One who likes a little change. 
And boodle, loot and plunder, we have got, 
Though you couldn't call him crazy, 
For a monarch he's a daisy, 
And it surely would be better he were not. 



The Examiner, with its usual ability in the line of 
securing evidence from ex-convicts and escaped jail- 
birds, finds it very convenient to use evidence no 
self-respecting journal would use, in any event, to 
slander the Citizens' Alliance. It makes the state- 
ment, unsupported by any other evidence except that 
of one A. M. White, that the Alliance stands ready 
to buy the services of murderers to kill off union men 
at a cost of twenty-five dollars a head. While we 
consider the charge exorbitant, we also know that 
this man White is said to be an ex-convict, and, 
knowing this, it is very hard to realize that any one 
will believe such a lie from such a source. We do 
not believe the public can be taken in by such a 
threadbare story. We are living in California, not 
Colorado, and the style inaugurated in that unfortu- 
nate community by the Examiner's friends, is not 
fashionable. 




The Champatrne You Toast 
Your Friends With 

CLICQUOT 

SEC BRUT 

Yellow Label Oold Label 

A. VIQNIER CO., Distributors 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EDISON PHONOGRAPH AGENCY 

PETER BACIGALUPI 

HAS REMOVED FROM 933 MARKET STREET. TO 
THEIR NEW STORE 

784-788 MISSION STREET, S. F. 



Locomotor Ataxia and Paralysis 

POSITIVELY CURED 

REFERENCES FURNISHED TO THOSE WHO ARE 
AFFECTED AND WANT TO INVESTIGATE. 

BRYN MAWR SANITARIUM 

HAY WARDS. CAL. 



Golden West Clothing Renovatory 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Phone Main 1157. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed $1.00 

Monthly Contracts 1.60 



La Grande Laundry 



Laundry— 12th St., between Folsom and Howard Sts. 
Principal office— 23 Powell St. Branch office— 11 Taylor St. 
Tel. Bush 12. 



Bon Harche Clothing Renovatory 

40 Ellis Street, Rooms 14-15-16. 

Sulla Cleaned and Pressed Sl.00 

Suits called for and delivered free. SUITS PRESSED 

WHILE YOU SLEEP. Repairing and Alterations. OPEN 

ALL NIGHT. We run four wagons. Telephone Drumm 44. 



Pacific Towel Company 



No. 9 Lick Place. 
Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, $1 per month; 
12 hand or roller towels, $1.50 per month. Tel, Main 

17S0. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the rooms 

formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 California street, San 
Francisco. 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco 
Rooms 303, 304, 305. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.. 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone, Private Exchange, 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 6th avenue and 16th St., Oakland. Tel. Eaai 36. 



34 



ENNEN S ?K e m d 
10WDER 



1 PRICKLY HEAT i~S5» 
I CHAFING, and SJ 
SUNBURN, "'^Sr 

Removes ill odor of perspiration. De- 

^—^ lipbtf ul after Shaving. Sold everywhere, or 

recelp! of 25c Get Mcnnen's (the original). Simple Free. 

GERHARD MENNEN COMPANY. N—fcrh. N.J. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

SUNBEAMS 



July 9, 1904. 




WORDS THAT MOVE. 

I've heard a campaign orator 

To soaring heights orate, 
I've heard a poet-lecturer 

Sing hymns at Heaven's gate : 
But pshaw! their feeble eloquence 

Just bores me as a rule, 
For I'm the man who used to drive 

A Colorado mule. 

"Blank! blank! Back! 

You balkin' lunatic. 
You double-barrelled cross be- 
tween 

A jackass and a kick — 
Blank ! back ! whoa ! 

You stampin', starin' fool !" 
That's the kind of talk that drives 

A Colorado mule. 

To drive a coach and four-in-hand 

Requires a manner swell, 
To drive an automobile right 

Takes gasoline and smell. 
To drive a modern battleship 

Demands a courage cool — 
It takes a finer skill to drive 

A Colorado mule. 

•Tdank! blank! whoa! 

You palpitatin' squid; 
You gee-hawed, buck-sawed, low- 
browed. 

Idiotic pyramid! 
Blank ! back ! whoa ! 

You wabble-legged fool !" 
That's the kind of steam that 
drives 

A Colorado mule. 

— Wallace Irwin in N. Y. Globe. 



Visitor — I've just been to make 
my first call on Mrs. Johnson. 
Lady of the House — So glad, dear. 
Poor thing, she's glad to know 
any one ! 

Mrs. Homer — Have you noticed 
how weary and worried Mrs. 
Goodwin looks of late. .Mrs. 
Neighbor — Yes, poor thing: she 
has quit doing her own work ami 
is trying to keep a hired girl. 

Miss Golding — Do you think it 
is my money that attracts him? 
Miss Prettymaid — Shouldn't won- 
der. He told a friend of mine that 
he had about made up his mind 
to marry yon. 



(Stolen from Thl»v«»l 

Tommy — < iracious ! See how 
dirty your clothes are. Won't 
your mother be mad. though, 
when you go home? Willie — No, 
she won't. She bought a box of 
"Imperial Grease and Dirt Eradi- 
cator" from a peddler to-day and 
she ain't had a chance to use it 
yet. 

"I wonder why Mr. Carnegie 
says he attributes his success to 
the fact that he was able to employ 
men who were clever than he 
was." "You wonder why he says 
it?" "Yes." "Because he knows 
that they can't ask him for an in- 
crease of salary now." 

Stranger — I am told that it is 
easy for a woman to get a divorce 
in this State, but difficult for the 
men, so as to discourage them 
when they thought about it, and 
made it easy for the women, so 
they wouldn't care about it. 

"Charley Brokeleigh tells me 
his ancestors were early settlers 
here." "Yes? Well, Cholly isn't. 
I'm his tailor." 

"Are you fond of music?" asked 
Miss Cayenne of her guest of hon- 
or. "Very." "Then I won't ask 
Mr. Biggins to sing." 

"The report of the peach crop 
failure hasn't had much effect on 
the market." "No; the peach crop 
failure hasn't been a success this 
season." — Judge. 



" CLEANLINESS " 

Is the watchword for health and vigor, com- 
fort and beauty. Mankind is learning not 
only the necessity but the luxury of clean- 
liness. SAPOLIO, which has wrought 
such changes in the home, announces her 
sister triumph — 

HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

A special soap which energizes the whole 
body, starts the circulation and leaves an 
exhilarating glow. A U grocers and druggists 

"You must not imagine," she 
said, "that I would consent to be 
your wife simply because I have 
let you kiss me." "Oh, of course 
not," he replied, "but I wish you'd 
tell me something. Are you letting 
me kiss you because you like it or 
because you want the practice?" 

Mrs. Sniffen — Did that Lumtum 
girl ever succeed in reforming her 
husband? Mr. Sniffen — Not com- 
pletely, although I hear that she 
has reached that point where he 
can resist everything but tempta- 
tion. 

Stalket — Headley says my im- 
personation of Caesar last night 
was absolutely real. Manning — 
Guess that's so; everybody I've 
met says it certainly was not act- 
ing. 

Mother — Yes, children, you may 
run out and play on the railroad 
tracks, but be sure and keep off the 
streets, or the automobiles will get 
vou. — Puck. 



THE REQUISITE AT SMART FUNCTIONS 




GIANT STRIDES! 

All Records Broken 

E*» DISTINCTLY HIGH QUALITY 

— or — 

MOET <& CHANDON 
"White Seal" Cl "-p^»' 

Never Varies 



WHY??? 

Messrs. Moel & Chandon own more vineyards 
than all the leading Champagne houses combined 
and have over I 1 miles of cellars, the most ex 
tensive in the world. 

Their sales during the Year 1903 were 



4.013.684 



Bottles, a figure never before reached by any Champagne home 
This Great House offers its choiceii product in 

•WHITE SEAL" 

THE CHAMPAGNE OF THE DAY 

William Wolff & Co. pacific coast acents San Francisco Cal 

• mm J 



THE REQUISITE AT SMART FUNCTIONS 



July 9. 1904. 

A SENSIBLE MOTHER 

Proud cl h«r children's teeth, consult* a 
denttit and knra lhal 0M beauty of perma- 
nent teeth depands on the care taken o( the 
Ant act. 

SOZODONT 

Liquid and Powder 

should be used. The Liquid to penetrate into 
the little crevlcea and purify them: the 
Powder to polish the outer surface and pre- 
vent the accumulation of tartar. 

3 FORMS : LIQUID. POWDES. PASTE. 



"Yes." said little Albert's father, 
"it is estimated that there are at 
a million microbes on a dol- 
lar bill." "Geel" said the as 
ished child, "is then- ten million 
microbes on a ten dollar bill ?" 

Scribbles — I think I'll write a 
sonnet to Miss Lovey. Crittick — 
Don't do it. It may turn her 
against you. Scribbles — T though! 
she liked poetry. Critick — So she 
does. 

She — Do you really enjoy whist, 
Mr. Finesse? He — Do I enjoy it? 
Xot at all, madam ; not at all. I 
play a distinctly scientific game. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

The theatn, is a 

- 

but titer , redtllOUS if 

limits which [lid RlUiagl 

collectivel) 10 

individual Mai 

in consult 1- it a bail Mgn 
to lose more thai it raro, 

especially if be ; n I. < >. 

I '.'-. Certain parts ol the stage 
are held ti> be unlucky by all 
tors. rhc center is not one of 
these. An actor's idea of Hades is 
a revolving stage on which there 
is 11 • » center. 1 Iscar I laninierstein 
is a hard-headed man of dramatic 

affairs, yet he always has a sense 
of impeding disaster when there 
are thirteen people in the audience. 

Although Joseph Murphy doesn't 

care any more lor a nickel than a 

farmer does for a yoke of steers, 
he considers it unlucky to fall 
asleep in a cab and lose his valu- 
ables. Friday is regarded univer- 
sally as an unlucky day for busi- 
ness ventures. William H. Crane 
will not even buy a drink on Fri- 
day. Not to be mentioned in the 
newspapers is an evil omen any 
day of the week ; and the hotel man 
who assigns to an actor a room 
with a broken mirror loses a cus- 
tomer. — Puck. 



35 



BETHESDA 



THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER 



LOUIS CAHEN a SON. 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

418 Sacramento St., San Francisco 




Double Daily Service to All Points 
East via 

PUEBLO, KANSAS CITY 
a ST. LOUIS 

Through Pullman Sleeping cars and Ob- 
servation Cafe Dinine Cars, with Electrio 
Lights and Electrie Fans. Scenic Route 
through Colorado. Fortickets, berth reser- 
vations, folders, etc.. call on or address 

GENERAL TICKET OFFICE 

626 Market Street, San Francisoo, Cal. 

(Palace Hotel) 



THE DEADLY RABBIT. 

A correspondent of tbe Wash- 
ington Post in a late issue tells 
of a rabbit which killed a hound 
with one blow of its claws. A rab- 
bit is more dangerous than is real- 
ly thought. It will be remem- 
bered that last winter on Pocosin 
Creek, Mr. Tohn Hobbs, while 
hunting rabbits, had his dog rim 
one in a hollow log. As he stooi°d 
to peep into the log the rabbit 
leaked out full against Mr. Hob'^s, 
breaking his nose and knocking 
him upon bis dog with such force 
as to crush that animal to death. 
The rabbit escaped. We don't 
know as to the truth of the story 
in the Wasbineton Post, but Mr. 
Hobbs is a living but disfigured 
witness of the tragedy on Pocosin 
Creek. 



Nell — You are simnlv makinsr a 
fool of Mr. Saphedde. Relle— Oh, 
well, I'm probablv saving some 
other girl the trouble. 



r 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name of Stewart 
Hartshorn on label. 

Wood Rollers. Tin Rollers. 




The 

Busy 
Man 



with ranch <>n hi* iHh 
1 an relieve ihr strain great- 
ly by wearing 

"Lightweight' 

President I 

Suspenders 

lot. Cool — slylish 
Vlceable. Guaranteed - 
Satisfaction, a new pair or your money 
back. 50cand$l. Any store or by mail 



Politician — The trouble is that 
some of the candidates are not 
well enough known. Correspond- 
ent — Yes, and others are too well 
known. — Puck. 

President of Girls' Club— Well, 
girls, we have forty dollars in the 
treasury — how shall we spend it ? 
Chorus — Oh, let's get up a charity 
ball!— Puck. 

ST AM M E R? 

We are cured, let ub cure you. No Drawl, Sing- 
Sonoj Time-Beat, Drugs or Hypnotism. Oar 
specialty is the Science of Speech for Stammerers 
with close, individual attention. Bead for 
''Speech Blemishes" und proof of cures. 

KATVRAL SPEECH ACADEMY 
1032 East ?flth Rt.. Lob Angeles, Pal. 



TWOMEY ft MIH0L0VICH 



THE YELLOWSTONE 

22 MONTGOMERY ST. 

Tel. Main Uit 



THAT ST. LOUIS TRIP 

TAKE THE BUSINESS LINE 

The Union Pacific 

SAVING 12 HOURS 

Bate only $67.80 round trip. Through 
first and second-class cars, diners and all 
comforts. Best road and equipment. 
Safest line. Drop a postal and I will cal 
and explain everything. 



S. F. BOOTH, Gen. kit., U. P. R. R. Co. 

No. I- Montgomery St. Dan Francisoo. Cal 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 9, 1904. 




ERIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block- 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St.. San Francisco, Cat. 



Mrs. Benham — Do you think a 
Mormon who has ten wives can 
be really happy. Benham — Well, 
lie has ten chances to my one. 




Summer 

Vacations 

Travel by Sea 



Excellent Service, Low Rates, Including Berth and Meals 

Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Tacoma 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 

Alaska and Mexico. 

Alaska Excursions, i%4. The palatial excursion 
gteatnehip, Spokane will leave Tacoma, 
Battle ami Victoria, July 5. 19, Aug 2, 16- 

or information rejrardinc sai line dales tic. ofciain (older 

SAN FRANCISO TICKET OFFICI S 
4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St . and Broadway Wharves- 

C. D. DUN ANN, General Pass. Agent. 
10 Market Street, San Francisco 



THREE 

TIMES A DAY TO 

CHICAGO 

The Only Double Track Railway between the 
Missouri River and Chicago. 

THREE TRAINS DAILY 

Via the Southern Pacific, Union Pacific and Chicago 
and Northwestern I.ys. 

Overland Limited. Vestlbuled. I ves 

Kan Francisco at lu.oo a. m. The mosl 
Luxurious Train in the World Eleetrio 
lighted Throughout. Buffetsmokinecaia 
with barber and bath. Booklovers Li- 
brary. Dining Cars, Standard and Com- 
partment Sleeping f'ars and Observation 
Cars. Less than three days to Chicago 
without change. 

Eastern Express. Vestlbuled. Leaves San 
Francjsuoat6.00p. m. Through Standard 
and Tourist Sleeping Cars to Chicago. 
Dining Cars. Free Reclining Chair Cars. 

Atlantic Express. Vestlbuled. Leaves San 
J rancisco at 9.00 a.m.Standard and Tourist 
Sleepers- 

Personally Conducted Excursions 

■Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. 

Best of everything 

R. R. Ritchie. G. A. P. C. 

Chicago and Northwestern Bys. 

♦17 Market St. ( Palace Hotel ) San Francisco 




Train*, leave and are due 
10 arrive at 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

From Jdly 3, 1901. 

Fkbby Depot 

(Foot of Market Street > 



Coast Line 

Narrow Gauge 

(Foot of Market Street) 



M A I N LI N E. - arrive 



7ZC A 
t XCa 



P.OOa 
P.30A 

P.30A 
f.30A 

B-3PA 

9-OPa 
9.30a 



10.00a 
10.00a 



12.00m 

h.oop 
3.30P 



3.30P 
4oop 



4 0CP 
4 3CP 



tB30P 
G-00P 
E.OOp 



G.OOp 

7.0CP 
7.00P 



8.05P 

8-Ot.P 

) 

P.ICp 



Vacavllk*, Winters, Rumscy 7 50p 

Henlcla, Klmlraand Sacramento , 7.20P 
Vallejo, Napa, CallHtotfii, Santa 

Kusa. Martinez. Sun Itnmon 6 20p 

NII**b. Tracy, Latbrop, Stockron 7-20P 

sonata Expreais— (Via Davla). 
Williams (for Bartlett Springs), 
Willows tFruto, Uctl Bluff, 

Portland. Tacoma. Seattle 7.50p 

Davis. Wood land. Knleliin Landing, 

MnryBviiie, Chico, urovllle 7-50P 

Purl Costa, Martinez, Ant loch. 
By run. Tracy. Stockton. New* 
man. Los llanos, Memlota, 
Armona. Hanford, VI sal la, 

Porturvllk* 4.20P 

Port C"sta. Modesto, Merced, 
Fresno, Gosoen Junction, Han- 
ford. Vltoilla. Hnkcrsllcld ... :.. 4.50P 
Nll.s, Suit Joae. Llverraore, Stock- 
Ion, (t Mil toil), lone, Sac nun en to, 
Mmysvtlle. Chlco. Itud ItlulT .... 420P 
Oakdaie. Chinese, .larncstuwn. So- 

nora, Tuolumne and Angels ... 20 p 
(Atlantic Express— Ogdcu i md Bast. 5 20p 
Richmond, Martinez and "Way 

Stations 6.50P 

The Overland Limited — UfEdeo, 
Omaha, Chicago, Licuvcr, Kansas 

City, St. LouIb B.20P 

Vallejo 12.20P 

Los AnpelL-B FiiBHenncr — Port 
Costa. Martinez, Byron. Tracy, 
Lathrnp. Stockton. Merced, 
Raymond. Fresno. Goshen Junc- 
tion. Hnnfordj Lcmoore, Visalla, 

Bakeraftcld, Los AiircIpb 7.20p 

Hay ward. Nlles and Way Stations. 3.20P 

BacramenIO Itlver Steamers II LOOP 

Ben Ida. W Inters. Sacramento. 
Woodland. Willows, ICulglits 
Landing, Marysvllle, Orovillc 

and way stations 1050a 

Wayward, Nlles and Way Stations.. 7.B0P 
Mar Line/., mi n limnon. VnlleJo.Napa, 

Caltetona, Santn Nona 9 20a 

Nllea, Tracy. Stockton, Lodl 4.20p 

Hayward. Nlles, Irvlngtun, San J 18.50a 

Jose. Llvermore | I 11.50a 

The Owl Limited — Newman, Loa 
ItanuB. Mendota. Fresno. Tulare, 

Bakersileld. Los Angeles 8-50 a 

Hayward. Nlles and San Jose 7 20a 

Hayward. Nllea and San Jose 9-jOa 

Eastern Kx press — Ofcdcn, O in ah a, 
Chicago, Denver. Kaunas City, 
St.Loula, via Marline/, BtOCktOU, 

Sacramento, Colfax, Reno 12.50p 

Vsllejo, daily, except Sunday I 7 p n . 

Vallejo. Sunday only f ' 0UP 

Itlchinond, San Pablo, Port CoBta, 

Martinez and Way Stations 11.20a 

Keno Passenger, — Port Costa, Sul- 
bud, Clmlra, Davis. Sacramento, 
Truckeo, Lake Taboo, Reno, 

T ah, sparks /.60a 

Port Costa, Martinez, Byron, 

Tracy, Latbrop, Modesto, 

Merced, llercnda, Fresno and 

Way Stations beyond port Costa 12 20p 

FoBumltc Valley, via Be rendu and 

Wn* i 9.60a 

Martinez. Tracy, Stockton 10-20a 

orecon & California Express— Sac- 
rumen to, Marysvllle, Redding, 
Port laud, I'nget Sound and East. 8. 50a 
liny ward, Nlles and San Jose (Sun- 
dill nil i 11 50a 



7.46a Santa UruzExeiirtdouiSunday onlyj 8.1 Op 
1-1 6A New ink. CentO n [lie. Sun Jose, 
Feltou. Boulder Creek. BlgB.ir.lu, 
Santa Cruz nn<l Way Stations... 6 B5p 
19.15a Alvnrado. Newark. Sun Jose. Los 

Oatoa,01en^ I, Fojton, Boulder 

Creek, Big BaBln. Santa Crux... 8-10p 
ii-16p Newark. Ccntenllle, San Jose, 
New (Aimarfon. Los Guto^Fefton, 

Boulder < r. ■•■',:. Santa Cruz and 
Principal Way Stations I0.S5a 

6 IFp Newark. San Jose. Lob (iatos f8.5E>A 

4 15p » ■ >-■!■! Boulder Creek and Santa 

Crn/. Saturday and Sunday mily. ^8.65a 

COAST LINE (Uronin.aiwo). 

tW~ (Third a nd ro wiiHcnd Streets.) 

I, 1 ft.i ■ ■ :: i ■ ■ ' lid W ..I V Still lulls, 6 -Vp 

7 00a San , lose and Way Stall. .in 6 40p 

7.16a Monterey and Santa Crur Excur- 
sion (Sunday only) 10 30p 

81.0a New Almnden fTucs., FTld., only). 4-IOp 

e 00a The Coaeter— Bai< Jtmo, sniinae, 
San Artlo. Paso Itolilou, Simla 
Margarita. San Lulfl iHiiapo. Santa 
Barbara, San Buena\ entura, 
Montalvo. Oxunrd. Hun. auk. Lob 
Angeles 1045P 

6.00a Gih-fv. HolllBter. Caetrovliie. Del 
M .ii. te, Paclilc Grove. Surf, Lom- 
poc 1045p 

9.00a Wan Jose. Trea PlnoB. C«[dtola, 
Sunt n I'm /,.1'm Hl.fii.ive.SulInas, 
San I. ni- Olilepo and Principal 

W i> Stations 4-10p 

10.30a tan J use and Way Stations 120P 

1130a Santa Clara. San ,)o«c. Los Gatos 

and Way Stal * , 7. 'Op 

1 3Cp Sun Jose and Way Stations 8 36a 

t3 CLp In! Monte Kxpreaa— Santa t'larn, 
S«n Jose. Del Monte, Mtinterey, 

Pacific Grove 121&P 

3-30p Burllugame, Ban Jobo. Gllroy, Hoi- 
llster. ires PInOB, Pajoru, Capi- 
tota, Santa Cruz, Castrovllle. 

Salinas. Pacific Grore 10 4^ a 

4 30p an Jose and Way Stations 18. 00a 

<6 OOP Santa Clara, ruin Jose, Lot tintos, 
Wright and principal Way Sta- 
tions (excepl Sunday) t 9.00a 

;5 3 0p tun J use and Prlnelpa I Way Stations :9 40 a 

b <6p Sudbi'I Express.— Urdu i. Sun 

JoBe.Gllruv.Salliiiis.fuso Itobles, 
San Luis Uhlsno, Kiiuta Barbara, 
Los Anpeles, Dnnlng. Kl Puso, 

New Orlenna New York 710a 

645p Pajaro. Capltoln, Simta Cruz. Caa 

trovllle.Dcl M >ntc.PnclflcOrove. 10.45p 

ft 16p ■ ai. Muleu.Bciiflord.Behnt.ni,Sau 
tarloh, Redwood, I-nlr Uuks 

Menlo Park. Palo Alto '6.4 3 a 

6 30p San Jose and Way Slut Ions 6 3'>A 

800p Palo Alio and Wnj Stations 10.15a 

11 .30p South San Francisco. Mllliirne. nur 
llnganie San Mateo UHmoDt, 
Ban Carlos. Itrdwood, Fall Oaks, 

Menlo Park anil Palo Alio 9 45p 

"11 30- May field. Mountain View, sunny 
vale, Lawrence, Santa Cluru and 

San Jose |9 45p 

A for Morning. P for Alternoou 

t Sunday excepted I Sunday onlv 

. Saturday onlv '' Monday only. 

ifatoin' a' al station" on Sunday. 

Tin- i' * »«»* 1'ICANsl'KK COAII'ANi 
will call tor mid check liaggage from hotels and reul 

denccs Telephone, ..xchangesa. 



»c»c»c*:»:*:y.a/:ac^2rC^^3fyarC3»:arw:^aC8/:w:»cafit Q 




sStylish $ 
Suits 



15 



50 



Dressy Suits ?20 § 
Pants $4.50 }* 

^7 525.00 Suits arethe^ 
best in America. fe 
' Per Cent Saved by get-ftj 
• ling your suit made byR 

JOE POHE1M | 

THE TAILOR k 

i Samples Sent 1110-1112 Market St. 5 

201-203 Monttjv St., S. F.g 



25! 



. R. & N. CO. 

The Only Steamship Line to 
PORTLAND, ORE 

And Short Rail Line irom Portland to all Points 
East. Through Tk-kets to all Toiuts all Bail or 

Steamship and Kail at Lowest Bates. 

Steamer Tickets include Berth and Meals. 

S8 OBEGON Sails Mar. 28. April 7, 17, 27. May 
7. 17, 27. 

SS GEO. W. ELDEB Sails March 23. April 

2, 12. 22. May 2. 12. 22. 

S. F. BOOTH, General Agent 
No. 1 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Have you ever played the 
races?" "No; but two men 
dragged me into an alley one night 
and took my money away from 
me.'" 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS ^fe-L 

Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post St„San Francisco 

The Ceclllan, the Perfect Piano Player 



July 9. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



5/>o Minister of Foreign Affairs 

The rvi nt ;l 
Worry for Europe 

the Turk- 
ish SulUn ill ignoring t lit- comp.i 

secure to in- subjects, in Armenia, n 

liettcr treatment and more personal safety at the 

ban.! 

territorial Governors are in full sympathy witl 
Sultan's secret orders to the Kurds and Turkish 
lars • Christianity, and every other form of 

religion that conflicts with" the Koran\- dogmas. This 
ly work his hired butchers are doing every day, 
and in the most brutal and fiendish way that could 
be imagined, nor is there a nation in Europe that is 
willing to risk possible consequences and interfere. 
The United States have been appealed to "in the 
name of Christianity and humanity" to put a stop t" 
these butcheries, but this nation is in the "concert 
of powers." and our State Department is not .1 
erty to do more than file diplomatic protests. But 
it is not the killing of Armenians that is bothering 
diplomatists so much. What is worrying thei 
how to shape events so that when the day comes for 
crushing Turkish power in Europe, each diplomatist 
may get the lion's share of the spoils for his nation. 
More than half a century ago the Czar of Russia 
prophesied that the Turks would some day be driven 
out of Europe, and that a terribly destructive war 
between the nations of Europe over the division of 
the abandoned territory would ensue. It is agreed 
in the governing circles of Europe that were it not 
for possible entanglements with Russia or Japan, 
which not a few diplomatists believe to be inevitable 
if the Russo-Japanese war continues a year, the na- 
tions would operate against Turkey in concert, as 
they did in China awhile ago, but with the fear of 
being involved in the East Asia war, it could hardly 
be supposed that any nation would care to have a 
Turkish iron in the fire. On the other hand, were 
the nations not so tied, the Sultan would be behaving 
himself fairly well. He is one of the ablest and alto- 
gether the most unscrupulous and beastly statesmen 
of modern times. All his life he has fed his mind and 
heart on treachery, falsehood and hypocrisy. 

The visit of King Edward to 
Edward and the the Kaiser has confirmed a few 
Kaiser. things that the public of Eu- 

rope and America were al- 
ready satisfied were facts. First, that there is an 
Anglo-Japanese alliance ; second, that there is an 
Anglo-French compact; third, that the Kaiser is in- 
tensely pro-Russian, and has been trying all along 
to find ways and means to strengthen the Musco- 
vite's hands and weaken Japan's. He made a great 
mistake when he tried to wean King Edward over 
to the Czar's cause, for quickly thereafter the Anglo- 
French agreement was made, which holds France 
to a neutral position, and what especially pleases the 
French Government is the agreement provides that 
when Russia and Japan are tired of fighting, the 
Paris Foreign Office will handle the negotiations, 
and sit in judgment, so to speak, which suits French 
vanity, to say nothing of the opportunity afforded 
to make herself "solid" with Japan. The people of 
Colombia are running a revolution, and the rebels 
expect help from one or two of their Latin neighbors. 
It all grew out of a disgust because the Colombian 
official heads did not go to war to force Panama back 
into the federation. As such a war would have meant 
a war with the United States, most people — sensible 



! to think (he official h 

prudence by "swallowing the insult 1 

t one. they hi 
finding a pretext. The curse ol all the I atin \ 
that they have too manj 

of a • 

Affairs in Manchuria the 
Affairs in the week have been prett) mud 
War Belt. old story, ["he Japan* 

in doing things contrary to the 

plans prepared for them by the Russians. No . 
battle has been fought, but a number of pretty sharp 

gements have taken place, with considerable 
on both -ides. The account, of the fapanese 
s, a- sent out from St Petersburg, show that 

more than 50.000 of them have been killed or wound- 
ed >ince Kuropatkin started south. That is to say, 
he has already knocked out fully One-third of the 

enemy's entire force. But in the face of all this. 
Kuropatkin is not now marching to the south, but 
to the north to protect his headquarters and 
of operations at Liaoyang, which is quite north of 
the point where he was going to annihilate 1 Iku's 
army, and then turn and drive Kurokj Out of the 
country. These things Kuropatkin failed to do. and 
he will have good luck if he reaches Liaoyang with 
his army in fighting trim. But the rainy season has 
set in for a month or six weeks, and the chances are 
that there will be little else than heavy skirmishing 
meanwhile; but Kuropatkin wires his Emperor that 
during the wet season the enemy will undoubtedly 
be immensely weakened by disease — and the Czar 
believes it, which is good for Kuropatkin's epau- 
lets. To sum up the events of the week, Kuropatkin 
failed in his march southward to accomplish a single 
one of his purposes, and was forced to return in the 
direction of his base in considerable haste. The 
Japanese have not only held all their ground on the 
Peninsula, but have thrown some of their lines for- 
ward. They have secured a footing on the heights 
south of and within some seven or eight miles of 
Port Arthur, and have lost no positions on their 
northern lines of investment. On the water side, 
a small sea fight is almost of daily occurrence, but 
nothing decisive is reported. Either the Russian 
squadrons are very much weaker than they are re- 
ported to be, or else their Admirals are afraid to 
come out and face Togo's ships. 



Original designs In menu and tally cards. 
Hams, room 18, 121 Post street. 



Charlotte F. Wll- 




R. B. HAYDEN 



HAND MADE SOUR MASH 



WHISKEY 



THE FINEST WHISKY MADE 

IN KENTUCKY 
THE HOME OF BOURBl MS 

DrBTILLKD BT 

GREENBRIER DISTILLERY CP. 

Nelson, Co., Ky. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
Agents Pacific Coast. San Francisco, Cal. 



3« 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. Clubmen Who 



July 9, 1904. 

Can Cook 



Mechanics' Savings Bank 

Incorporated January 21, ISM. 



Capital Stock paid up 

President, James O'B, Gunn 
Vice-President, Geo. F. Lyon 



J260.000.0O 

Vice-President, Geo. D. Gray 
Cashier, Frederick H. Clark 



DIRECTORS. 

F. W. Dohrmann, Jr.; George D. Gray, F. M. Greenwood, Jas. 
O'B. Gunn. Marshall Hale, G. VV. Kline, George F. Lyon. George 
M. Mitchell, Charles C. Moore, Henry T. S^ott, W. F. Williamson. 

The Mechanics' Savings Bank has opened its doors for a gen- 
eral Savings and Loan business at the S. W. corner Montgomery 
and Buah streets, San Francisco, Cal., May 2, 1904. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 California St., cor. Webb St,, San Francisco. 

E. B. POND, President; W. C. B. DeKKEMERY, ROBERT 
WATT, Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE. Cashier; R. M. 
WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. DeFremery, Henry F. Allen, 
George C. Boardman, Jacob Barth, C. O. G. Miller, Fred H. 
Beaver, William A. Magee, Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo &. Co., or by checks 
of reliable parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsi- 
bility of this Savings Ban* commences only with the actual re- 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 
company the first deposit. No charge is made for pass book 
or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

Deposits, December 31, 1903 $33,2:;2,9os 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up ; l.ooo.OOU 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ' 899.516 

Mutual Savings BanK of s*n Franoisoo 

710 Market St., opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 600,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent; GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice- 
President; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McEIroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonaid, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent on postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 626 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,448, 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, Juue 3utn, W04 186,573,015.18 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Steinhardt, Emll Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established in 1SS9. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $15,000,000.00 

Paid-in Capital 3,000.000.00 

Profit anr Reserve Fund 450.000.00 

Interes aid on deposits at the rate of per cent per annum 
>n term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbln, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

International Banking Corporation 

NO. 1 WALL STREET, NEW YORK. 

Capital and Surplus $7,894,400 

Capital and Surplus Authorized 10,000,ouo 00 

OFFICERS— William L. Moyer, President; Charles D. Palmer, 
Assistant to President; William B. Wightman, Assistant to 
President; John Hubbard, Treasurer; James H. Rogers, Secre- 
tary; John B. Lee, General Manager; Alexander & Green, Coun- 

BRANCHES— London, San Francisco, City of Mexico, Manila, 
Hong Kong, Yokohama, Shanghai, Singapore. 

AGENCIES— Bombay, Calcutta, Madras, Penang, Rangoon, 
Colombo, Amoy, Canton, Hankow, Tientsin, Tansul, Anplng, 
Bakan, Moji, Saigon, Kobe, Bangkok, Batavia, Samarang, Sou- 
rabaya, and all parts of Europe. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— 32-34 Sansome St. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- 
tions, firms and individuals solicited. Loans made on liberal terms 
on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bought 
and sold. Travelers' and commercial letters of credit granted, 
available in any part of the world, interest bearing certificates 
of deposits issued for fixed periods. Interest allowed to banks 
on current daily balances. Special rates given to banks keeping 
accounts with us, and drawing direct on our branches and 
agents throughout the world. 

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 
F. E. BECK, Manager, P. G. EASTWICK, JR., Asst. Mgr. 



By Lady Algy. 



Culinary arts are not confined to the skirted sex. 
There are any number of chefs in the smart clubs 
who do not belong to the "union," and the only 
"cards" they can show are the kind that the maid 
carries into the drawing-room on a silver salver. 

These society cooks are divided into three classes: 
those who can prepare a dinner, from roast beef to 
repartee ; those who can only hold services over the 
chafing dish; and the chaps who know the gentle art 
of mixology! 

The season for this last stunt is now on. Much 
inocuous punch and otherwise is brewed in the shade 
of our deep verandas. Whist ! while I tell you some- 
thing — the "otherwise" sort seems most in demand. 
The apple toddy which the Bohemian Club is going 
to dispense in the cool of the evening at their sum- 
mer clubhouse is brewed after the famous recipe 
of the late "Joe" Tilden, well beloved among Bohe- 
mians. The Tilden toddy does not need to defend its 
claims for superiority — it is strong enough to speak 
for itself ! "Two quarts of whisky, one quart of 
brandy, and a pint of rum diluted with water to 
taste," reads the recipe, and "go slow with the 
carafe," advises the chief mixerologist of the club. 
Six hard, juicy apples must be baked to a turn and 
punctured with a dozen cloves. The apples are 
placed in a stone jar, the toddy, sweetened to taste, 
poured over, and the jar tightly covered. The mix- 
ture must stand at least a week. When it mellows, 
it is guaranteed to make care and trouble pack their 
things and depart. 

Uncle George Bromley has been on a milk diet 
for several years, so it is always his duty to drive 
the cow into pasture on state occasions ; in other 
words to make the milk punch. His recipe is for a 
large number of people, but the quantities can be de- 
creased in proportion to the amount wished. Pour 
the juice of two dozen lemons, a generous amount 
of grated lemon peel, six bottles of rum and an equal 
amount of water, over three pounds of sugar. The 
mixture must stand until the sugar is entirely dis- 
solved. Then add two quarts of boiling milk, and let 
it stand twenty-four hours. His brand of milk punch, 
must be strained through a cheese-cloth bag, of 
course. Those who have tasted Uncle George's 
punch declare it makes the ordinary milk-rum-egg 
punch taste like baby's Dottle. 

John Drew introduced a sautcrne cup among the 
Blingumitcs who entertained him, which has become 
famous in that aristocratic burgh. One bottle each 
of sauterne, Apollinaris and champagne, a wine-glass 
of chartreuse, and two tablespoons of sugar will do 
the business. 

The famous claret cup which Bret Harte used to 
brew for his cronies has found its way into many 
of our clubs and homes that love good cheer. A 
recipe in his own handwriting reads: "Claret cup can 
only reach expectations when cucumbers are in sea- 
son. Three thin slices of cucumber and a sprig or 
two of verbena give it a flavor that nothing else pro- 
duces. Rub six lumps of sugar in a bit of grated 
lemon rind, dissolve the sugar in a glass of sherry, 
and the juice of one lemon. Place in a jar, add a 
bottle of claret, the verbena and cucumber. Ice and 
lei stand for bouquet. When ready to serve, add one 
bottle Appolinaris." 

Among the chafing dish experts, "Addie" Mizner 
takes the bun. According to his own Limericks: 



July 9. 1904. 

Thi ■ 1 lair maid name. I I 

Wlii. «.ni up in trie great Ferris Wheel; 
1 >n the thirty-fourth round 

lown at the groun 
And it est her an eighty-cent meal.'' 

Which, it tnijjlit have added, was not cooked undci 
His bonillabaise might have in- 
keray'a ballad, but let amateurs beware, 
only the expert who can concoct bouillabaise in a 
chafing dish — the novice is bound to strife .1 1 roppcr. 
If you have mastered the caprices of the chafing 
try thi-., ami you will realize why the Frenchman 
loves his bouillabaise even as tin- New Englander 
loves his Boston baked beans. The meat of a crah 
an. I a cup full of shrimps chopped line and moulded 
into very small croquettes — the size of a walnut — 
can he prepared beforehand. They should stand 011 
a platter which has been heated and rubbed with 
garlic. When hunger announces the hour, arrange 

the chafing dish and fry these balls in butter until 
they are light brown. Remove and put in the dish 
two onions, two cloves garlic chopped tine, one-quar- 
ter pound of butter, salt and pepper. Fry crisp, and 
add a deep sea flounder. Rock-cod, young sturgeon, 
striped bass, or any other firm-fleshed fish will do 
as well. Season with juice of half a lemon, two 
glasses of white wine and a fresh bay leaf. Cover 
with water and cook fast until the fish is almost ten- 
der, then add the meat balls previously prepared, a 
teaspoon of saffron, and one of chopped parsley. 
When done pour over slices of stale French bread. 

Raphael Weill's prowess as a chef is too well 
known to permit of elaboration. He frequently goes 
to one of our famous French restaurants, and with 
his own hands prepares a choice repast for a few 
favored guests. One of his famous dishes in season 
is quail stewed slowly in equal parts of oil and 
vinegar. For each quaif, put in one onion, and be 
careful that the pot is closely covered. 

San Franciscans have very cosmopolitan palates. 
French, Spanish and Italian dishes appeal to us al- 
most as much as the pies mother used to make. 
Rissotto is a popular Italian dish, and here is the 
recipe Andrew Sbarboro recommends. Fry two 
onions in butter, add one cup raw rice and cover with 
beef stock. When the rice is done, add some highly- 
seasoned tomatoes. Before serving sprinkle with 
grated Parmesan cheese. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTI.k 



39 



Nelson's Amycose 

Infallible remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the Skin. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital and Surplus 
Total Assets 



$1,401,160.93 
6,943,782.82 



Interest paid on deposits, 
subject to check, at the 
rate of two per cent per 
annum. 

Interest paid on savings de- 
posits at the rate of three 
and six-tenths per cent 
per annum. 

Trusts executed. "We are 
authorized to act as the 
guardian of estates and the 
executor of wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented 
at $5 per annum and up- 
wards. 

Get a box at once and guard 
against loss by Fire or 
Burglars. 

J. Dalzell Brown, 

N&neitfer 



BANKING. 



Wells.Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital. Surplus and Undivided 



lirpl 
P 



rnllt.« 



$13,500,000 



Homer 8. King. President; l\ 1.. I.lpman, Cashier; Frank H. 
...*• A™ 1 ' 1 *"' .Cashier: Jno. K. Miles. Assistant i ashler. 



HI 

n csa 



-Now York; Salt Lake. Utah. 

la throughout the world. General banking bual- 



Tbe Son Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pino Sta.. San Fran. 

JAS. K. WILSON. President: WM. PIERCE JOHNSON, 
President; LEWIS I. CUW'Oll.l., Cashier; F. W. WOLFI 
slslant Cashier. 

Capital. $500,000. Surplus and Undivided Prollts, 1165.000. 

DIRECTORS— William Pierce Johnson. Vlce-Prest. Willamette 
Pulp and Paper Co.; Wm. J. Dutton. President Flremans Fun. I 
Ins. Co.; H. E. Huntington. First Vice-President S. P. K. It . 
Geo. A. Pope, of Pope & Talbot, Lumber Dealers; C. S. Benedict. 
President Hastings Clothing Co.; George Aimer Newhall, H. M. 
Newhall & Co.; W. H. Talbot. Capitalist; H. D. Morton. Presi- 
dent W. T. Garratt & Co. James K. Wilson. President. 

AGENTS— New York: Hanover National Bank, Chemical Na- 
tional Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— 
Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— 
The Meohnnfea 1 National Hani.- Sanaa* City— Firs! National l!:ink 
London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes A Co. 
Denver — National Bank of Commerce. Johannesburg— Robinson 
South African Banking Co., Limited. 



The Canadian Bank; of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, $8,700,000. Reserve Fund, J3.000.000 

Aggregate Resources, over $80,000,000 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. WALKER, General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook, 
Fernle, Greenwood, Kamloops. Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Skaguay (Alaska). 
Also 80 other Branches, covering the principal points in 
Manitoba, N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 
Scotland, Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank, Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW OLREANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
Sar\ Francisco Office— 

325 California Street. 

A. KAINS, Manager 

London. Paris and American BanK lulol 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,100,000. 
Head Offlce-^IO Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R . ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The flnglo-Californian Bank, Limitea 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 Paid-up, $1,600,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 
Officers: Frank J. Symmes, President; O. A. Hale, Vice- 
President; H. Brunner, Cashier. 



Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIRECTOKS-William Alvord, William Baboock. S. L. Abbot, Jr.. 
O. D. Baldwin, L. F. Monteagle. Warren D. Clark. E. J. McCutchen. B. 
H. Pease, J. D. Grant. 

Central Trust Company of California 

43 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,725,000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator. Guardian or 
Trustee. Check accounts solicited. Legal Depository for money in 
Probate Court Proceedings Interest paid on Trust Deposits and 
Savinga. Investments carefully selected. 



40 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

U/te Otit-Door Art League 



July g, 1904. 



The Out-door Art League of Mill Valley, assisted 
by Mrs. Lovell White, President of the larger league 
in this city, and by summer residents of the Valley, 
who become temporary members upon the payment 
of a small fee, have undertaken an important work. 
Viewing, as they do, with alarm the disappearance 
of the wild flowers from the hills and dales, the 
League has inaugurated an educational propaganda 
which it is hoped will bear immediate results. The 
season is too late to hope for much this year, but 
before another spring comes around, there will not 
be many visitors to the Valley who will not be 
asked to spare the wild flowers. The campaign will 
be carried on similarly to that instituted a few years 
ago by the New England people, who have met with 
considerable success in saving their "native plants." 

Visitors to Mill Valley will be asked not to pick 
the wild flowers, which wilt almost immediately, and 
which in most instances are thrown away directly. 
If they wish to possess some of the wild flowers. 
they will be asked to pick a few, which, artistically 
arranged, are much more effective than en masse, 
and they will be requested not to pull up the plants 
by the roots. They will be told that a few years 
ago, where whole hillsides and fields were covered 
with flowers, not one remains, because the plants 
have been ruthlessly torn up, preventing the reseed- 
ing. The children of the valley will be taught to 
prize the wild flowers, and not to pick them as they 
have done in former years. 

Another plea will also be made for more judicious 
cutting of the wild huckleberry that is being brought 
into San Francisco in such quantities. Tt is said 
that the slopes of Mount Tamalpais are being de- 
nuded of this beautiful shrub, which under the most 
favorable conditions is a slow grower. In striving 
to protect the beauty of the mountain, the people 
of the valley are looking forward to the time when 
Mount Tamalpais will be made a public preserve. 

Another chapter has to be written about the con- 
troversy between the members and the ex-members 
of the Pacific Coast Woman's Press Association. It 
tells of the formation of a new organization — "The 
Writers' Club of California" — in which the mem- 
bership will be composed of men and women, albeit 
the club has been founded by the latter. 

At the time Mrs. Marian Beattie Foster and Mrs. 
Mate H. Cartwright were summarily expelled from 
the Pacific Coast Women's Press Association, in- 
dignation meetings were held at the residence of 
Mrs. Emeline M. North. The protests of these 
forty or fifty members did not bring about the re- 
instatement of these two well-known members, 
charged with disregarding the expressed will of the 
Association in not seeing to it that the society's 
choice for a place on the executive committee of the 
International League of Press Clubs was made final. 
The result of this action has been the filing of two 
suits for heavy damages by Mrs. Foster and Mrs. 
Cartwright, which will come up in the near future 
for trial. 

At the time of the indignation meetings, there 
was some discussion as to the advisability of forming 
a new society. This was not done until June. The 
first meeting, held at the Palace Hotel on June 14th, 
was for the purpose of outlining a constitution and 
by-laws. These were adopted at the second meeting 
held June 21st, at the same place. The name was 
decided upon; the members voted to present them- 



selves for admission to the International League of 
Press Clubs, and the following officers were elected : 
Mrs. Mate H. Cartwright, president ; Mrs. Maria 
Freeman Gray, vice-president ; Mrs. Marian Beattie 
Foster, secretary ; and Mrs. E. M. North, treasurer. 
Twenty-six members have already signed the ros- 
ter. 



You will appear to be always wearing new clothing 

If you have your suits cleaned and pressed regularly by 
Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 Stockton 
street. Besides, it manes the clothing last twice as long. 
They also clean gloves, neckties, ribbons, laces, curtains, 
draperies and all such articles quickly and thoroughly. 
Try them once, and you will be satisfied. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. WInslow's Soothing Syrup" 

for your children wn.ie teething. 



TUXEDO 

Formerly Arcadia 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightfully located 
half a mile from and 
run in conjunction 
with Bie Trees. New 
hotel newly furnished 
Extensively improved 
since last season. 
Electric lighted. Hot 
and cold water. Por- 
celain tubs. Buy tic- 
kets to Tuxedo, nar- 
row gauge, foot of 
Market street 

Bathing, Fishing, Hunting, Tennis, Etc. 

Address, Thomas L. Bell, Felton, P. U. 




VACATION 1904 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION * 

"Vacation" is issued annually by the 

California Northwestern 
Railway 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OP CALIFORNIA 

and is the standard publication on the Pacific Coast 
for information regarding 

MINERAL SPRING RESORTS, COUNTRY 
HOMES AND FARMS, WHERE SUMMER 
BOARDERS ARE TAKEN, AND SELECT 
CAMPING SPOTS. 

This year's edition "Vacation 1904" contains over 
ISO pages, beautifully illustrated, and is complete 
in its detailed information as to location, accommo- 
dations, attractions, terms, etc., with terms from 
^7.00 per week up. 

To be had at Ticket Offices 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Building), and Tihyron Fetry foot of Market Street; General 
Offi.e, Mutual Lile Building, comer of Sansome and 
California Streets, San Francisco. 

Applications by mail will roroive immediate response 

J. L. FRAZIER R.X.RYAN 

Gen. Manager Gen. Pan. Agt. 



BESTS ART SCHOOL 

Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketching and Illus- 
trating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET 



Price per copy. 10 centr. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 

8 *N rwAnei teo 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




Kettbr 



Vol. LXIX 



(£alifxrnna A^Jkrjcrtisjcr. 

SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 16. 1904. 




Number 3. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and published 
every Saturday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott. H:\ll.rk 
Building. MO Sansome street. San Francisco. Cal. 

Entered at San Francisco Postoffice as second class matter 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained ranrdlng 
subscriptions and advertising)— y« Broadwav. c ('. Murphy, 
Representative. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 9am 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 



The "Sphinx of Esopus" likes yellow money as 
much as lie detests yellow journalism. 

The campaign that begins with a shriek is generally 

the one that ends with a low, sad moan. 



There is no close season for automobilists, as far 

as the country constable is concerned. 

The marriage bureau is an article of household fur- 
niture filled with domestic infelicity. 

War experts suspect that the destination of Rus- 
sia's Baltic fleet is the place most remote from Japan 
that the Czar's experts could find on the map. 

The "gent" who rustles the corpses" of the city's 
indigent dead, and buries them three in a grave, 
ought to be thankful that lifeless paupers tell no tales. 

One grocer with a gun and a disposition to shoot 
it, is a better guarantee of i quiet neighborhood than 
two more policemen on the beat. 

The most that the witnesses for the Stablemen's 
Union in the boycott case will concede to non-union 
men is the right to live without working. 

The divorce record would seem to show . that 
catch-as-catch-can matrimony is the best cooler for 
the affections. 



The Government wants to know just what saki is. 
Well, according to white men back from the Orient, 
it's double-distilled essence of trouble. 



The "Sage of Wolfert's Roost" may not be the most 
popular man in New York politics, but he has not 
forgotten how to count a majority. 

Colonel Bryan, having helped to pull the gold plank 
out of the St. Louis platform, carefully left the hole 
there, with no red light hung up to keep Parker from 
walking into it. 

"Hearst a Good Loser" is a headline re-printed in 
the $1,400,000 candidate's newspapers. He proves it 
by the promptness with which he rips the winner up 
the back. 



The only "unbought and unbuyable" Iowan at St. 
Louis has been and will be severely disciplined for 
commenting in such terms upon the difference be- 
tween himself and the other members of the delega- 
tion. 



According to a French surgeon, appendicitis can 
he avoided by adopting a vegetable diet. This i-. an 
improvement on the earlier method "f putting your 
property in your wife's name. 

Bryan, we are informed, "got away from his at- 
tendants," and went from .1 sick bed to harangue the 
I K-mocratic Convention just once more. He will 
never get away from his economic delusions. 

Oakland's Health Board had the nerve and g 

sense to use the plain Anglo-Saxon verb when it put 
up "no spitting" signs. Nobody who prefers "ex- 
pectorate" is affected by the warning. 

The Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York protects 
its rich male patrons from the light-fingered ladies 
of the neighborhood, to the advantage of both their 
morals and their pocket-books. 



With a snickersnee in his left hand, his pockets full 
of knock-out drops, and his fountain-pen loaded with 
invisible ink, editor Hearst sits down to write his 
dear friend Parker into the Presidency. 



"A newspaper free with every twenty-five cent 
purchase" is the latest scheme of the Eastern genius 
who evolved the trading stamp. Wait until the gen- 
tlemen of the press get at him ! 

"Bob" Cook may be famous for his coaching of 
college athletes, but it is doubtful, judging from his 
own experience, if he is qualified to teach young men 
how to get along with their life-partners. 

Many and many a man has had his ears burn at the 
telephone, and has blistered his tongue trying to ex- 
press his opinions to "central," but it remained for 
an Oaklander to lose his life while trying to keep his 
'phone bell from ringing. 

The heart failure that troubles the head of the 
ruined house of Eppinger evokes no sympathy from 
those whom his methods brought near to the kind 
of failure that involves calling upon a referee in bank- 
ruptcy. 

With a railroad running into Modoc County, it 
will soon be proclaimed that this outpost of savagery 
is being civilized, and its residents will soon cease to 
say of an objectionable person that he "ought to be 
assassinated." 

Right in line with Hearst's policy of petting Par- 
ker with the left hand and smiting with the right, 
comes the fulmination of Bryan that he will support 
Parker, and in the same breath says that Parker 
represents everything that is bad and rotten. Bryan 
has ever been a white elephant, and it is too bad the 
Convention did not read him out of the party, root, 
mouth and baggage. 



HEARST ON HORSE RACING. 



July 16, 1904. 



THE ANTI-RACE TRACK CRUSADE. 

At last the anti-race track crusade has commenced 
in earnest. In all the great cities of the country, 
efforts are now making by public-spirited men to 
suppress the institution, which has dong and is doing 
more to corrupt the youth of the land than any other 
combination of evil circumstances from which we 
suffer. The News Letter views these efforts with 
supreme satisfaction. We have raised our voice and 
our pen these many years against the robbers of the 
race track; time and again, until reiteration became 
tiresome, have we warned the public against these 
freebooters, who, under the protection of what we 
consider a most unwise, it not illegal ordinance, wait 
like so many footpads behind the race track fence, 
prepared to rob their foolish victims. It is gratify- 
ing to now receive the assistance of some of the great 
journals of the country, and the more direct aid of 
business men in the crusade against the race track. 
From New York to San Francisco, employers are 
now preparing to take united action against the race 
track evil. As we suggested some time since, and 
again only last week, this is a work in which the Mer- 
chants' Association should take a willing and a promi- 
nent part. Again, we suggest that the directors of 
the Association submit the race track question to the 
members, to the end that a plan may be formulated 
for the protection of employers, and a rule adopted 
for the dismissal of employees contributing in any 
form to the further upbuilding of the gamblers. 

Some such action by employers will soon become 
absolutely necessary, for the surety companies of 
the entire country have announced that, hereafter, 
without notice, they will cancel the bonds of all their 
"risks" found to be engaged in race-track gambling. 
The surety companies have had occasion to formulate 
statistics for ascertaining the proximate causes lead- 
ing to embezzlements, defalcations and suicides by 
bookkeepers, cashiers, confidential clerks and others 
for whose honesty the companies have gone bail. It 
has been found that nine men out of every ten who 
are guilty of defalcation, begin their downward 
careers at the race tracks. This is no mere guess 
work, but it is a finding of fact nride by companies 
which have hundreds of thousands of dollars invested 
in business, and which find it necessary for their own 
protection to trace crimes to their source. 

These facts are presented for the consideration of 
the Merchants' Association, for without the support 
of the employees of the members of the Association, 
and of other merchants and business men, the gam- 
blers would be forced out of business. They thrive 
only when they have a full supply of daily victims. 
Take them away, and the gamblers' occupation would 
be gone. They know each other too well to try to 
cut each other's throats. 

Now is the time for the merchants to take up this 
important matter, for the race track combination is 
now preparing for the fall and winter campaign. In 
this connection, it is suggested that the Association 
strike at the root of the evil by doing what it can 
to prevent the publication of racing news in the dailv 
press. It is noticeable that some of the respectable 
daily papers, while joining with the News Letter in 
condemning the race track and all its attendant evils, 
continue, nevertheless, to aid the gamblers by pub- 
lishing long accounts of their doings. 

A newspaper honestly in favor of the suppression 
of a most vicious evil should not hesitate in refusing 
its countenance to the evil-doers. "It is doubtful if 
any one thing contributes so much to the. mania as 



the newspapers," says Mayor Carter H. Harrison, of 
Chicago, in a current magazine. "They may preach 
editorially against the pool room, but they continue 
to be the strongest ally and supp rter. It would be 
possible to operate pool room-; and hand-books with- 
out newspapers, but it would not be possible to spread 
the mania so broadly, and so tin roughly, without 
the aid of some widely-circulated medium which 
carries day by day the suggestion that wealth can be 
made by hazard." 

Therefore it is that we ursje the Merchants' Asso- 
ciation to take up th ; s question and push it to a suc- 
cessful conclusion. Let the employers act first, and 
then go after the daily newspapers. They are alwav- 
ready to listen to reason when the argument is pre- 
sented by big advertisers. 

THE POLICE AS KIDNAPPERS. 

The suit of Miss Emily M. Harrigan against tin- 
police officials to recover $20,000 for illegal arrest 
should result in an interpretation of the law that will 
show our somewhat arrogant policemen that citizens 
have some rights that even policemen must respect 
Miss Harrigan was commissioned to obtain from a 
pawnbroker a typewriter, for which she was given 
the pawn ticket. She came here from Santa Rosa to 
execute her commission. After leaving the pawnshi p 
she was arrested and sent to the City Prison. The 
alleged ground of her arrest was the suspicion that 
she had stolen the typewriter, but no charge was 
placed against her name on the prison register. She 
was placed in a cell, refused permission to communi- 
cate with her friends, and was subjected to much 
shame and humiliation. After about sixteen hours' 
imprisonment, she was released, the police having 
found out that she was not .-) thief, but a very respect- 
able young woman. Now, she wants damage, ami we 
hope she will win her suit. 

For many years we have criticised the illegal 
methods of the police department, as illustrated in the 
Harrigan case. Time and again, the police have kid- 
napped people upon the public streets, placed them ii 
cells, refused to permit them to communicate with 
friends or lawyers, subjected them to all manner of 
inquisition, and finally released them, without even 
an apology. All this has been done in direct viola- 
tion of the letter of the law, which requires a perso 1 
under arrest to be taken forthwith before the nearest 
magistrate and charged with the crime for which he 
has been placed under restraint. P>ut the victims of 
the officers are not charged with any crime. The 1 
police simply take them to jail, lock them up. and 
when ready, release them. It is kidnapping, pure 
and simple. If the police would only ask ransoms 
for their victims, we might invite Raisuli to come 
here and join the force. 



THE MAN WITH THE GUN." 

"The Man with the Gun" is a factor of consequence 

in the problem of keeping the peace in a "jumping 
off place" like San Francisco. The police and the 
police courts have not proved themselves adequate 
to the task, as witness the daily record of "hold-ups" 
and of like crimes involving pre-determined violence. 
As conservative and able a minister of justice as 
Superior Judge Lawlor said from the bench the other 
day, in passing sentence on a pair of murderous bur- 
glars : 

"If the Chief of Police, when dealing with offend- 
ers in the winter months, when these characters come 
from all parts of the country to this favored commit- 



July 16, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Sit* 

waylaid at his own d'»>r l>\ 
a band of young ruffians- .; makes no difference tliat 
the) iteura and not mals, nor thai 

they sought blood and not moni 
them low with a well-aimed bullet. Being a iv-p 
of the law. which failed t" guard him front violence, 
both actual and imminent, this citizen promptly gave 
iclf up when he learned that his shot had ' 
bly fatal effect. It is probable that he wiil go 
free, and that the young thugs will be brought 
to trial tor the assault which might have been mur- 
derously successful Inn tor the citizen's unusually 
marksmanship, but whether or not these things 
come to |, ;l ss. this -'Man with the Gun" has well 
earned the thanks of his neighborhood and of the 
whole community for having set a wholesome exam- 
ple to others who may be attacked, as he was. and fi r 
having struck fear to the hearts of the lawless. 

Judge Lawlor's advice to the police may readily 
be made applicable to the body of the people: let 
every citizen who has legitimate business abroad 
after nightfall take his cue from the citizen who has 
put one thug out of business — let him not wait for 
the policeman, who is seldom within call when 
needed, but protect himself, and do it as effectually 
as his accuracy of aim will permit. A few more 
citizens with revolvers and nerves in good working 
order will make this a far less desirable "hang out" 
for the toughs and the thugs who are driven into the 
metropolis by the first rains of winter. 

It is not pleasant to know that the streets on which 
children play in perfect freedom while the daylight 
lasts, streets lined solidly with the homes of law- 
abiding men, streets traveled by cars every few min- 
utes until far into the morning, become, as soon as 
night falls, the prowling places of thieves armed and 
ready to kill — that peril lurks in every shadow. Ad- 
mittedly it would take a great many more police- 
men than San Francisco has, or is likely to have, in 
order to make these streets as safe at midnight as 
at noonday, but meanwhile the men of the city can 
do a good deal toward bringing about that condition. 
There is no more effective deterrent of night-walking 
hoodlumism and thuggery than that applied by the 
citizen who, on Monday morning, shot one of his 
assailants into a state of repentance and harmless- 
ness. 



ARBITRARY DICTATION OF ORGANIZED 

LABOR. 

No case of greater concern to the public has been 
before the courts recently than that in which the 
unions are trying to defend their right to drive out 
of business by force employers who stand for the 1 
"open shop" and against the arbitrary dictation of 
organized labor. It is clear already that the best tes- 
timony for the livery-stable keeper selected to fight 
out the boycott matter comes from the boycotters 
themselves. They are succeeding admirably in "giv- 
ing away" the inwardness of unionism. The leader 
of the Stablemen's pickets, in particular, has proved 
a source of discomfort and annoyance to the lawyers 
whp are earning fat fees by their efforts to uphold le- 
gally the doctrines of the unionists. This man, whose 
disposition for lawlessness was made plain while 
he was on the stand, appears to have been chosen 
for his position as generalissimo of the shooters and 



inything except it 

-lions put to him by the "o| 

thing 

but the truth, ami s., denied the legal right 

with bis empl 
and hours. Also, this gent of ;i witness made if 

■ lit declaring that, in bis view and in the 
1 view, "the employer hail 110 right to run our 

busim 

This, then, is the union view: the employer may 

-i the money, may find tie patronage, may pay 
the taxes, the bills, and the wages, but it is not his 
establishment to such an extent that he may pre- 
scribe what work his employees shall do, what hours 
they shall labor, or what shall be their remuneration. 
In those respects, which would seem to be of some 
importance to the man whose money is hazarded in 
the venture, it is "our business,'' which is to say the 
business of the union. In other terms, what the 
unions are contending for in this boycott case is the 
establishment of the principle that whenever an em- 
ployer takes on a union man he must dismiss all his 
non-union help — for he cannot dismiss the union 
man — and must engage in their stead only unionists, 
and then surrender to them control of the enterprise 
as far as the doing of and the paying for the work 
involved in it is concerned. As the candid leader of 
the Stablemen's boycotting brigade puts it: 

"The union will not permit him (the employer) 
to order a man who is engaged in one class of work 
to another class, for then one man might be holding 
two jobs. For example, we do not permit a harness 
cleaner to touch a horse as a hostler." 

Besides these interesting revelations, it has come 
out in other testimony that the gangs of "pickets" 
filled the air with loudly-shouted names too vile to 
print, and unequivocal threats of murder aimed at 
the non-union men hired to take the places of striking 
unionists, and at private watchmen who were obliged 
to display weapons in order to prevent the threats 
from being carried out. 

Undoubtedly this is a case that is worth the fullest 
publicity. 



DECLINE OF UNIONISM. 

A good deal less noise is heard these nights from 
the halls and the back rooms where the labor mis- 
leaders were mouthing it so loudly a few months 
ago, and a good deal less truculence is being dis- 
played even by the most rabid unionists. The Labor 
Clarion, organ of the walking delegates and the 
strike breeders and the boycotters, prints in its cur- 
rent issue long lists of unions which persist in ignor- 
ing the requests of the Labor Council for data neces- 
sary to the conduct of that central body, as well as 
requests for expressions of opinion on issues of inter- 
est and importance to unionism. A considerable num- 
ber of organizations which were active enough a year 
ago, are now making no effort to keep up appearances 
and do not pretend to hold meetings any more. 
Others with hundreds of members — on paper — can- 
not drum up enough men on meeting nights to get 
lawful quorums. These conditions — and the most 
ardent supporter of the cause cannot deny them — 
are accompanied naturally by a moderation of acri- 
mony and violence among the false prophets who 
have been doing their utmost to embroil employer 
and employed. They have let up a little in their cam- 
paign of arrogance against those who have work to 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



give and money to pay for it. The bedeviling of 
business men is not so common as it was earlier in 
the year. 

If evidence were lacking of the change in our in- 
dustrial conditions, it coulci be found in the deter- 
mination of the union leaders to hold no Labor Day 
parade this year. These parades are avowedly 
demonstrations of strength, intended to show the 
numbers and the political importance of the union- 
ists. Heavy fines and threats of discipline usually 
suffice to bring out every man in the ranks who can 
hoof it over the cobbles, and then, to swell the to- 
tals, all the apprentices are scattered through the 
processions and enumerated just as if they were 
voters. Even after this stuffing, labor leaders and 
the labor organs multiply actual figures by two or 
three or four when they give out their totals. But 
this year the files are so shrunken that the men who 
pull the wires and make the puppets dance, will take 
no chances on a public exhibition of weakness. 

Though it may be that the blight on unionism is 
due, in part, to a belief that a long season of unexam- 
pled prosperity is to be followed soon by a period of 
lean years — a condition toward which organized 
labor was, indeed, rapidly driving the country — the 
closest observers of the local situation see- in this 
sudden languishing of the labor propaganda the early 
results of the Indianapolis movement out of- which 
grew the Citizens' Alliance. Even the wrong-headed 
men who used to foam at the mouth over what they 
called "Parryism." call it so no longer. They are 
convinced, it would seem, that the investing class 
which is the backbone of our population, and its head 
and arms and legs as well, is determined that its 
prosperity, which means the prosperity of the coun- 
try, shall not be checked by a handful of self-seekers 
preaching doctrines hateful to the spirit of our in- 
stitutions. The Citizens' Alliance began to win from 
the moment that it pointed out that every man with 
a dollar in the savings bank was an investor, and 
thus an employer, as well as an employee. It has 
kept on winning, by putting up a strong fight in the 
courts, in the press, and everywhere else, for the 
right of every man, union or non-union, to work and 
to live. 



COLLEGES AND BUSINESS. 

"Is a collegiate education necessary to a successful 
business career?" That question is going the rounds, 
and while colleges are saying "yes" in a loud voice, 
experience in the business world is saying "that de- 
pends." And it does depend, and all depends upon 
the kind of a man the college has graduated. It is 
hard to transform a pig's ear into a silk purse, and it 
is equally difficult to conduct a business enterprise 
on a college education alone. To the extent that the 
college trains a man to think for himself, to dig into 
the law of cause and effect ; to master his imagina- 
tion when it runs to air-castle building, and to un- 
derstand that business success depends upon hard 
work, close application and mindful of the little things 
in trade activities, it certainly is a great help. The 
desirability of a college education lies not in the fitting 
it gives one to survey the field of commerce, but in 
a broader and clearer comprehension of the relation 
between goods and wares and mental activity. The 
college-bred man who was taught that history, phil- 
osophy, classical literature, physical science, art, 
music and the like are merely helps to distinguish 
between debits, credits, losses and profits, because 
the mind has been trained to grasp and solve prob- 



lems, should make him the best kind of a business 
man, if he has the taste, the natural ability and proper 
energy. But a college education without these quali- 
ties is a disadvantage rather than a help, for then 
the inclination is to make the education a means of 
mental recreation, pretty much all the time, to the 
neglect of the business enterprise. 

The successful business man first is in love with 
his venture ; second, he studies it in every one of its 
details ; third, he is a close observer of the market 
fluctuations; fourth, he looks for a reason of the fluc- 
tuations ; fifth, he makes haste to profit by his conclu- 
sions ; sixth, his one suprems purpose is to so buy that 
he may sell at a profit ; seventh, that expenditure in 
conducting the business must come from the first 
profits, and that his profits are the margin that ac- 
crues between expenditure and income, and eighth, 
in believing in himself, in his venture and in the rea- 
sonableness of his plans. A college education is an 
every-day help to do all these things, but of itself it 
will not nor could it do a single one of them. Should 
the holder of a college diploma enter the commercial 
world and undertake to conduct his enterprise on 
the line of book-knowledge, he would "go broke" in 
a short time, but if he will utilize his mental training 
to strengthen his common sense and judgment, he 
will find that the years spent in college were a most 
profitable investment, both as helps in formulating 
plans, and in affording him pleasing mental enter- 
tainment and recreation. 

On the whole, then, a college education is of great 
advantage in the channels of business activity. But 
that is supposing it whets the wits, gives to ambition 
increased desire to succeed, causes the mind to un- 
derstand more clearly that close application is es- 
sential, and enthuses the whole man with an honor- 
able intention to become not only wealthy from his 
own exertions, but to be worthy of being referred to 
as "one of the solid men of the community." Yes, 
secure a college education before entering the field 
of merchantable commodities, but do not let what the 
books or professors say be your absolute rule and 
guide in the conduct of your business venture. It 
is in the school of experience and observation that 
business knowledge is obtained, but a college diploma 
if honestly earned should knock off many of the rough 
corners of a life spent in the world's markets of buy- 
ing and spelling. 



"Out of the Beaten Path," xom Dillon's modern style '.ats. 
Opposite Palace. 




KCHAS. KLILUS & COS 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIEAS 

Suggestions of money saving are n^t the incentives 
we offer to purchase clothes here. It's the creations 
we show that emanate from premier designers, whose 
Lalents with shears, needle and brain are of the high- 
est class. Correct dressers say, "Immediate Service 
Clothes," for theirs. 



BCEAGyWWISJLIE>ir 



July 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ILWCnSUlff LIBRARY TABLE Cm) 




This volume h.is thi mi!> title 
As a Chinaman "V ni His I 

Saw Us. a Friend at Home," and hence 

the book may be considered as 
the frank expression >>f the opinions of an edui 
Chinaman with regard to persons an. I things which 
be observed during a long sojourn in tliis country. 
The preface claims for it that it is the tti< >-t caustic 
treatment of America and tin- Americans which has 
appeared since Mrs. Trollope wrote "The Domestic 
Manners of the Americans" in 1832. The claim is 
fairlv well supported, for many of the criticisms are 
notably just, some few extravagant, and a large num- 
ber very amusing. The worst of it is that the mOSI 
galling criticisms evidently proceed from a person 
exceedingly well versed in our ways and manners, 
who must have spent many years in the country, and 
had the advantage of association with the best societv 
which the country can offer, that of the social and 
high official class in Washington and the most select 
ami exclusive in New York. 

The writer is said to have graduated from a well- 
known college, after he hail attended an English 
school, and took special courses of study at a German 
University. There is no doubt that he is a man of 
broad and scholarly attainments, and possessed of 
much culture, besides a keenness of observation 
which would have done credit to the famous Max 
O'Rell, whom he resembles in many respects, except 
that he is really more candid and perhaps a trifle 
more malicious, for the knowing Frenchman never 
went too far, as he always had his eye upon a public 
who would pay to hear him lecture, provided that 
their self-esteem was not too severely wounded by 
his writing. One constantly feels a certain doubt 
as to whether it is really a Chinaman who has writ- 
ten the book, because the point of view is so fre- 
quently that of the European upper classes, but 
again the doubt seems to be resolved, and the name 
of the publisher is a sufficient guarantee in itself 
against the perpetration of a practical joke upon the 
reader. 

Some of the statements are very sweeping, yet 
with sufficient truth in them to make them bitter, 
thus : 

"In the great middle class of the American men, I 
find much to admire; half-educated, despite their 
boasted school system, they put up, to quote one of 
them, 'a splendid bluff' of respectability and morality, 
yet their statistics give the lie to it. Their divorces 
are phenomenal, and they are obtained on the slight- 
est cause. If a man or woman becomes weary of 
the other, they are divorced on the ground of in- 
compatibility of temper." 

In speaking of the science of medicine as practiced 
in this country, our Chinaman, who comes from a 
land where the most grotesque remedies are the only 
pharmacopoeia of which the inhabitants have any 
knowledge, finds this to say: 

"In no land under the sun are there so many ig- 
norant, blatant fakers preying on a people, and in no 
land do you find so credulous a throng as in America, 
claiming to represent the cream of the intelligence 
of the world, they are so easily led that the most im- 
possible person, if he be a good talker, can grow 
abroad, and by the use of money and audacity, secure 
a following to drink his salt water, paying a dollar 
a bottle for it, and sing his praises." This is suffi- 



ly annoying, but the perspicacity and essential 

fairness of the Chinaman peep out at once in the fur 
thcr statement: "Of the best physicians in America 

I cannot say enough in praise. I was most impi 
with their high sense of honor." 

Perhaps the closest piece of observation is that 
on American authors, to have written which not only 
great powers of generalization, but a keen, critical 
faculty must have been employed : 

"The American authors, especially novelists, who 
contribute the majority of authors, are by no means 
all well educated. Many appear to have a faculty 
story-telling" which enables them to produce 
something that will sell: hut that all American au- 
thors, and this will surprise you, are included among 
the great scholars is far from true. Some, yes, many, 
are deplorably ignorant in the sense of broad learn- 
ing, and I believe this is a universal, national fault." 

Space will not permit of any further quotations, but 
it may be easily seen that the book is interesting and 
possesses unusual merit as the unbiased observations 
of an Asiatic, the point of view of the cultured in- 
habitant of that continent, never having heretofore 
been placed before us in so attractive a form. 

Published by D. Appleton & Co., New York. 

"Poems all the Way from Pike," is a collection of 
ballads and verses by Robertus Love, and has a 
motto: 

"I come from old Missouri, 
All the way from Pike." 

As poetry of any distinction, the book has no pre- 
tensions whatever. Some of the verses are sweet 
enough, and deal with bucolic subjects and country 
people in a simple and direct style. Though not in 
any way remarkable, it is a wholesome and respect- 
able addition to the growing mass of American local 
poetry. 

Published by the Pan-American Press, St. Louis. 

Leo Tolstoi, in his recent book, "What is Art?" 
holds that "the purpose of human life is the brotherly 
union of man," and that art must be guided by this 
perception — that "the art of the future is not the pos- 
session of a select minority, but a means toward per- 
fection and unity." He points out the connection be- 
tween science and art, and says that science should 
deal with the great problems of human life and serve 
as a basis for art. 

Funk & Wagnalls Co., Publishers, New York. Price 
80 cents. 



HAVE YOU HAD LUNCH AT 



The Red Lion? 



STOCK EXCHANGE BLDG 

Accessible from Pine Street, just below Montgomery, also from Bush 
and Montgomery Streets through the Mills Bldg. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



i WtallSllf FINANCIAL 




The Dolores, Limited, has held 

English to Own its first statutory meeting in 

Dolores Mine. London. This is the English 

company which is about to take 
over the shares of the Dolores Mines Company, which 
is an American concern, organized some time ago to 
absorb the holdings in Mexico of the Dolores Mining 
Company, a California corporation which gained con- 
siderable notoriety out here by a tiff among the own- 
ers, which ended in court proceedings. A Scotch 
company, with its headquarters in Glasgow, owners 
also of the Jumper mine in California, were inter- 
ested in the Mexican property, and got a small pro 
rata when the sale took place, in the neighborhood 
of £20,000, while the manager on his part got some 
hundreds of thousands of dollars. Those who are in 
a position to know, claim that under the original con- 
tract between the company and its manager, a Scotch- 
man named P. J. Gow, that the dividend ought to 
have been made the other way, Gow getting his com- 
mission at the rate of 10 per cent, and the sharehold- 
ers of the Jumper the balance, but the directors of 
that corporation did not view the matter in that 
light, and compromised the matter. The proceedings 
in connection with the settlement between these 
directors and their erstwhile manager, was a strange 
one throughout, and it is a wonder that some one or 
other of the shareholders had not the nerve to probe 
the matter to the core in so far as the action of their 
representatives was concerned. Some people on the 
other side feel justified in using harsh names in de- 
scribing Alnerican mine managers, but if the truth 
were told at times, a practical application could be 
readily found for the proverb dealing with people 
who live in glass houses. The report of the chairman 
at the meeting of the Dolores, Limited, speaks very 
highly of the mine, which we believe is correct. The 
property was a wonder trom the start, paying back 
all the expenses attached to the cost of opening on 
the original prices paid for the mine. If it continues 
to maintain this record it will prove a remarkable 
mine. Mr. J. B. Farish, the well-known American 
mining engineer, is now president of the corporation, 
a fact which will doubtless recommend the proposi- 
tion to the English investor. Some of the original 
shareholders may regret selling out, but under exist- 
ing conditions, perhaps it was just as well. Mr. J. 
Gordon Hardy is the newly appointed manager at 
the mine, for which a mill and reduction works have 
just been ordered. Only the richest class of ore has 
so far been shipped to the smelters, the balance, ag- 
gregating about 11,500 tons, averaging $49 per ton, 
remaining on the dump. 

It seems that we have not heard 
Use of Ore as the last of the wonderful ore from 
Medicine. the Mariposa mine, which was ad- 

vertised far and wide as radium 
until local scientists took a hand in the game and ex- 
ploded the theory. Another use has now, it is said, 
been discovered for the ore, which, ground up and 
used as an application, is expected to act as a curative 
agency. This will probably create another battle 
among the brainy apostles of chemistry, who will 
naturally delve hard and deep into the ore analyses 
for a solution of the varied chemical combinations 
which might be made to bear individually upon the , 
many ills which man is heir to. There is no mystery *j 
about the component parts of all this ore. It has* 
been analyzed at home and abroad, with the result' 



that zinc, iron, lead, copper, antimony and arsenic 
are represented in the soluble portion, and water, 
barium sulphate, alumina and silica in the insoluble. 
Banum is found in quantity, representing 46.07 per 
cent, and zinc 20.75 P er cent. The Engineering and 
Mining Journal of New York, in commenting upon an 
analysis made by its staff, remarks that the composi- 
tion of the mineral is not definite, and galina, stibnite, 
chalcopyrite and other sulphides are very apt to occur 
as associates." The luminescent constituent of the 
(ire is zinc blende. 

The deal between the Mountain 
New Smelter for Copper Company of Keswick 
Bull's Head. and the owners of the land pur- 
chased some time ago at Bull's 
Head, near Martinez, has been closed, and a new 
smelter will go up at once to handle the ores from the 
big mines in Shasta County. The owner of the 55 
acres sold gets from between $50,000 and $65,000, 
almost as much as he paid for the entire 155 acres 
months ago. Besides, this leaves him 100 acres for 
further use. The Copper King smelter is in this 
vicinity, and it is said that Daly, its manager, at one 
time could have bought the entire 155 acres for $35.- 
000. It would have been a common sense proposition 
for the Copper King Company to have sold their 
smelter to the Mountain Copper. It is understood, 
however, that they asked too stiff a figure. They 
never will get such a chance again to get rid of a 
white elephant. It strikes one as rather curious that 
during its nine years of operations at Keswick that 
the English company never before tried to save the 
fumes, which the country-side claimed was so dam- 
aging to crops and vegetation of all kinds. What an 
immense amount of money must have escaped up 
those flues at the rate of, say, several hundred tons 
of sulphuric acid per clay, which is said to be the ap- 
proximate equivalent of the fumes hitherto dispensed 
in fine air. 



The Comstock market is dull. This is owing to a 
combination of circumstances, unavoidable, but not 
such as to cause any prolonged interference with the 
course of business. The favorable conditions at the 
mines are expanding all the time, and the market 
must derive the benefit before long. 



The Tonopah market has been working at a lower 
range of values lately. The camp, however, is bust- 
ling with activity over the opening of the railroad 
which will put the mine owners in clover. The enor- 
mous share issues of the companies operating in the 
local market must act as a drag sooner or later. There 
is no sense to the proposition, but this will be found 
out in time by the operators, most of whom are com- 
paratively new at this branch of business. 

Ladies— For a good complexion try the Post-St. Hammam. 



THE CLUB MAN'S CIGAR. 

MADE IN 18 SIZES 



SIG. CAHEN 

Distributor 
22 Montgomery St., S. F. 

Tel. Main 1273 



Manufactured in TAMPA, FLA. 




July 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE WILLIAMS AND BEALE CAS 

In reply to many inquiries. th< • will 

that the 

- II Wil 
liams anil 

lit made upon him in his home 
l>y Williams and Bcale on thi mbcr 

• pending before Ju notion ii>r 

a new trial. The readers <>i the News Letter will re- 
memher that the C»S a jury in 

tember, 1903, the jury returning a verdict in favor 
ot Mr. Marriott, and against Williams alone, for 
r8o. No verdict was rendered for >>r against 
Beale. Subsequently, Williams gave notice of his 
intention to move for a new trial, and afterwards pre- 
pared a statement of the case to be used "ii the hear- 
ing of his motion, or on appeal, if the motion be de- 
nied. Mr. Marriott's attorneys have endeavored for 
several weeks to have the motion heard by Judge 
3, but Williams has succeeded ill postponing the 
hearing until after his vacation, owing to the fact 
that his principal attorney has been engaged in the 
trial of another case. It is expected that the motion 
will be heard in August or early in September, and 
if Judge Sloss shall deny a new trial. Williams will 
appeal to the Supreme Court from the order refusing 
the new trial. 



THE LIGHT THAT FAILED. 

The light that failed was not hidden under a bushel. 
Hearst's light has failed, but it burned a fierce yel- 
low while it lasted. In his fall he has dragged 
Bryan down, for which let us give thanks. It is of 
interest to dissect the many causes that went to snuff 
the saffron light of Hearst. 

Hearst was beaten, first and foremost, by the gen- 
ius of Brisbane. The Brooklyn Eagle directed pub- 
lic attention to the young man behind the Hearst, 
and the public was not slow in accepting a self-evi- 
dent fact. The public accepted Mr. Brisbane as the 
brains, and then forgot Hearst whenever it read any- 
thing especially clever, and Brisbane was credited 
with many things written by others. 

Another element that went far to defeat the yel- 
low pest was the enmity of newspaper men. In 
moments of hysterical generosity, Hearst has at times 
paid newspaper men immense sums of money, which 
at other times he filched back as only Hearst knows 
how. In San Francisco, Andrew M. Lawrence, of 
unsavory memory, established a system of tyranny, 
with the result that there is a legion with a thousand 
hammers waiting any and all opportunities to land a 
blow on the Hearst head. Unfortunately for him, 
these newspaper men are all of them in touch with 
the scandals of his life, and the result is that a silent 
wireless telegraph has continually whispered : 
"Would you nominate a man for President to whom 
you would not introduce your wife, your sister or 
your mother? Would you nominate a man for Presi- 
dent who made you uncomfortable whenever seen 
with a woman? Would you nominate a man whose 
companionship with a woman made you just a little 
suspicious of his intentions?' These are the elements 
that caused the political light to fail, and the same in- 
fluences are having effect on the "Yellow Pest's" 
financial standing. Requiescat in pace. 




ILkvaJfote 



»BI « XKE&SAtY FEARRE OF MODERN ABtllllKll B 

The Otis Automatic Electric Elevator 

is the latest development of the art of home com- 
fort. It will pay architects to investigate its 
merits before completing specifications for a 
modern house. It is operated by pressing a but- 
ton and will not respond to an interfering call. 
Correspondence invited. 

OTIS ELEVATOR. COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Department: 509-51: Howard St. 

San Francisco. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 



Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital and Surpix* 
Total Aisett 



i\, 401, 160.03 
6,94J,7S2.M 



Interest paid on deposits. 
subject to check, at the 

rate of two per cent per 
annum. 

Interest paid on savings de- 
posits at the rate "i 1 In, . 
and six-tenths per sent 
per annum. 

Trusts executed. We art- 
authorized to act as the 
guardian of estates and the 
executor of wills. 

Safe-deposit boxes rented 
nt ?5 per annum and up- 
wards. 

Get a box at once and guard 
against loss by Fire or 
Burglars. 

J. Dalzell Brown, 

Na.nag«r 



THE CALL 



Has the Largest arjd Best Home Circulation 
The Short Story Service in the magazine section 
of the Sunday Call is unsurpassed. There are also 
Numerous Chatty Articles by the best writers on 
topics of interest to everybody. 

The Pictures given away with the Sunday Call, 
absolutely free of charge, are art gems, and are 
framed, preserved and sold in nearly every art store. 
All this in addition to a Superior News Service, both 
local and foreign. 
Subscriptions, Dally and Sunday, by carrier 76c. per month. 
Yearly by mall, 18.00. Sunday edition 12.60 per year. The Week- 
ly, (1.00 per year. 
JOHN McN AUGHT. Man'g. JOHN D. SPRECKELS. Prop. 



The Oakland 



Tribune 



is delivered into more homes of the 
masses and classes of Oakland and 
Alameda County than all other Oak- 
land, Alameda and Berkeley dailies 
combined. Reason — it's the best 
newspaper. 
W. E. DARGIE, Pres. T. T. DARGIE, Sec'y 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



€T/?e Political Situation 



The Democrats declare that they are pleased with 
the nomination of Parker, yet it is undeniable that 
their pleasure does not lead them to give vent t<> much 
enthusiasm. His telegram has not helped his popu- 
larity either, for most people credit it to directions 
sent him from his discoverers at St. Louis, or else 
to reading the editorials in the New York papers. 
Among the crowds who watched the bulletin hoards 
not a cheer went up when he was named, and no one 
expressed the slightest gratification at the selection 
the Democracy had made. Outside of a few men who 
would vote for any one labeled "Democrat," no one 
even announced that he would vote for the Judge. 
The rabid labor element considers the turning down 
of Hearst as a personal insult to themselves, and 
they will vote for Debs, who was nominated several 
months ago by the Socialists. The conservative 
wage earners will give their ballots to Roosevelt. 
Curiously enough, the extremists among the union- 
ists, with characteristic inconsistency, are opposed 
to Roosevelt for the very thing among others which 
the Examiner says is the most creditable act of his 
administration, and which undoubtedly lost him the 
support of the trusts — his intervention in the coal 
strike. That has been forgotten by the radicals, 
because he refused to violate the Constitution by 
turning over the National Printing Office to the 
unions, and because he does not send Federal troops 
to Colorado. They cannot understand the difference 
between the intervention of Cleveland in Illinois in 
1894, and the present condition in Colorado, and as 
they are never true to their friends, nor reasonable 
on any subject, they are opposed to the President. 
Though not many people seem to know it, Debs has 
been running for President for a number of years. 
His vote four years ago was 87,814. He seems to be 
a sort of Dr. O'Donnell in National politics, and is a 
perpetual candidate. In California four years ago he 
got 7,554 votes, so when the returns are all in next 
November it will be possible to see exactly what this 
radical element amounts to. 

The action of the Convention in practically declar- 
ing for the gold standard, leaves Senators Teller and 
Dubois, and ex-Senator Turner and other former 
Republicans who joined the Democracy on the silver 
issue, in a curious position. They now have no rea- 
son to remain with the Democrats, and if they do, 
there is an absolute certainty that their States will 
not follow them. Washington, Colorado and possibly 
even Nevada, are now all certain to give their votes 
to Roosevelt. Nevada gave Bryan 6,439 plurality in 
1896, but only 2,498 in 1900. With the silver ques- 
tion eliminated, there should be no trouble in over- 
coming that plurality, even in the small vote of the 
State. Roosevelt is known to be a warm friend of 
the West, and he has taken a stand in favor of irri- 
gation which Parker, who knows nothing of the 
West, could never occupy. All the Western inter- 
ests now are Republican, since the influences thai 
would prevail at the White House with a man as 
President who has never crossed the Mississippi 
would clearly have but little sympathy with this end 
of the Continent. 

* * * 

One of the funniest things of the Convention, and 
it was the most humorous political gathering known 
to history, was the speech of Hobson, which the 



Convention cheered to the echo, that it was a Demo- 
cratic President who alone had courage to order out 
troops to fight the labor unions. That was certainly 
extraordinary doctrine for a convention before 
which Hearst was a candidate, and that the Conven- 
tion received the remark with a cheer showed how 
much real sympathy the Democracy has with the 

very element it pretends to love so dearly. 

* * * 

No one need be surprised at the announcement 
that George A. Knight is a candidate for the United 
States Senate. The only reason why he was not men- 
tioned long ago was because he came from the North, 
as I have said in these columns before, and there is 
a rule in this State to choose one Senator from the 
North and the other from the South. It is a tradition, 
however, that has given this State a number of very 
poor representatives in the upper house of Congress, 
and the sooner it is done away with the better. If 
California has good material for both Senators in 
Del Norte County, or if she should have two of her 
ablest men residing in San Diego, there should be no 
hesitation in sending them where they can do the 
State the most credit and honor. Brains do not de- 
pend on geographical location, and other States an- 
not so foolish as California in this respect. Both the 
Alabama Senators come from the same town, Selma, 
a town of 8,000 population. Both the Indiana Sena- 
tors come from Indianapolis; both the New York 
Senators from New York City; both the Oregon 
Senators used to be not only from Portland, but 
were law partners in that city, and Oregon was bet- 
ter represented than she ever was. Washington has 
the same geographical idea as California, and as a 
result has at least one Senator who is as much of a 
stick as one of his California colleagues; in fact, it 
is the States which are looking for brains, not locali- 
ties, when they seek a Senator, which amount to 
anything in the councils of the nation. We make the 
same mistake in California when we choose Govern- 
ors, and the Gubernatorial record ought to show us 
the fallacy of the scheme. We are too big to be so 
petty in our politics. This does not mean that Knight 
should necessarily be chosen Senator, but it does 
mean that if he is the best man in the State for the 
place, the fact that he lives in San Francisco should 

not make him unavailable. 

* * * 

Editor Otis, of the Los Angeles Times, whose dis- 
like of Congressman McLachlan amounts to a mono- 
mania, is almost daily nominating some new candi- 
date as his opponent. His last effort in that line is 
the suggestion in the Times that Reverend John L. 
Pitner, pastor of the principal Methodist Church in 
Los Angeles, should lie nominated by the Republi- 
cans, instead of re-nominating McLachlan. The sug- 
gestion does not evoke even the little enthusiasm 
that Otis's nominations are wont to cause. Must 
people believe that the moral condition of the com- 
munity is such that it affords ample occupation for 
conscientious clergymen, without their meddling in 
politics, though some of our local brethren of the 
broadcloth have lately indulged in Senatorial endors- 
ing. The less the clergy meddle in politics the bet- 
ter it will be for religion, and I may add for polities, 
also. 

I am told that when the Governor returns home 



July 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



lu- will make a number oi appointments thai 

•imc. I am glad of it, (■•: 
rnins hitns la) ing in 

nation 1- j the tin 

time. Inn in politics it i< the thief "i popnlaritj : it 
neither please- tlic man who is in ami knows lie miul 
it. or the man who is out and h jet in, 

ami it angers the fellows who eventually get left. The 
if due appointments is quite large. I notice, foi 
instance, that the Labor Commissioner's time has 
expired, ami that the Governor has the appointing of 
In most States this is a verv import 
ant office. In this State it could he made a very ini 
portant office if the right man is placed in it. As il 
now amounts to as little as the legal advisor of the 
Board of Health, who only draws his salary. 
The Labor Commissioner is the man who should sup- 
sweating" in the shops, if there is anything of 
the kind going on in the State. He should see that 
all the lahor laws are lived up to. He should aid and 
the Health Officials in visiting tenements, etc. 
In fact, he has plenty to do if he will only do it. It 
is a place to which a labor man should be appointed, 
not a lawyer, nor a man who knows nothing of the 
work he is to perform, and who is in no wise inter- 
in it. I do not know why the present Com- 
missioner was appointed, probably the Governor, 
who appointed him. may, though I doubt it. I think- 
that Dan Kevane is the only personage who could 
unravel that mystery ; but whatever the cause for 
his appointment, there is no question but there exists 
abundant cause for his removal, and the Governor 
cannot get his knife out too soon. 
» * * 

The next session of the Legislature is going to be 
lively, for besides the Senatorial contest, there is 
going to be an effort made to create a new county. 
County fights are always interesting, and generally 
they are so strenuous that they only are allowed to 
appear in the political arena occasionally. I think 
the Riverside County fight was the last one that en- 
livened this State, although the bills and notes that 
were given and created when Glenn County was 
carved out of its neighbors, are still the subjects of 
litigation in some of the courts. The new county is 
to take a piece of Placer, a corner of Sierra, and 
more or less of Nevada, and it is to be one of the 
leading issues in the Senatorial campaign in the 
Third District. Mr. Rutherford stands for the new 
county ; Senator Lardner stands for no division ; at 
this writing, Rutherford seems to have the lead, 
though it appears that the delegates in the convention 
will be equally divided, if the reports from the four 
counties in the district are correct. 
* * * 

The most authentic reports from Los Angeles are 
that Dr. Lindley will be the Republican candidate 
for Mayor this fall, and that General Otis is going to 
support him in the Times. To those who know how 
bitter and unreasoning Otis's hatred of the Lindley 
family was, and how he literally frothed at the mouth 
when Hervey Lindley 's name was mentioned, will be 
surprised at the last part of this announcement. The 
Doctor, if he runs, will have the support, no doubt, 
of Walker Parker, and a number of other men whom 
Otis hates, including James McLachlan, the Con- 
gressman, and if he supports their candidate, especi- 
ally when the candidate bears the hated name of 
Lindley, it will be positive evidence that the age of 
miracles is not passed. 

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Orchestra of eolo players, 6 p. 
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Restaurant, Palm Boom and 
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Cuisine and service really de- 
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A speolftl feature la our after 
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Billiard parlor for ladles t« 
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Original with theBelleclalrels 
the refined vaudeville every 
Thursday evening. 

Onr gallery of beatlful paint- 
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Red Top "Whiskey now on sale. 
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312 Sansome street, eor. Halleck, San Francisco. Tel. Black mi 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 




Dear Bessie: The Columbia was alive with theatre 
parties on Monday night, for not alone every one in 
town, but all Burlingame, San Mateo and Menlo Park 
came up to greet Ethel Barrymore, and what a wel- 
come she did receive; she has hardly a spare minute 
disengaged during her stay in San Francisco. The 
only question is, will she be able to accept half the 
hospitalities offered to her. 

So many houses are closed up for the summer that 
their owners who come to town for a day find it more 
convenient to lunch down town, and therefore it is 
that one sees many little parties at luncheon hour 
at the Palace and the St. Francis; in fact, quite a 
number of regular lunch parties are given at both 
every week. The Baroness Von Schroeder over from 
San Rafael, and Mrs. Eleanor Martin en route from 
there to San Mateo, both gave luncheon parties at the 
St. Francis this week. It was quite a marvel to see 
there were so many in the city as Mrs. Martin man- 
aged to secure for the tea she gave the other day for 
Alice Burke and Kitty Wright (and perhaps Miss 
Alice is not having a good time with that same 
genial dame), and best of all, there were so many 
men, from General Shatter down to Philip Paschal, 
and they all seemed to enjoy it, too. 

There have not been so many out of town parties 
given as one was led to expect earlier in the season, 
but Betty tells me that July — or what is left of it — 
will be more favored. Jennie Crocker opened the 
ball, so to speak, giving a "bathing party" one even- 
ing last week, and great was the gathering of her 
country neighbors thereat. 

Ella Morgan's luncheon over at San Rafael was one 
of the prettiest this season, the talk being chiefly 
about Tahiti, Ethel Tompkins and Mrs. Jim Follis, 
who were her chief guests, apparently unable to 
think of anything else. Can I include Oakland in out- 
of-town country affairs? If so, let me mention the 
"kaffee klatch" given by Mrs. Koenig last Saturday 
for Mrs. Herbert Gaskill. 

It would seem that matrons of honor are to crowd 
out the maids in future ; Mary Wallace, who was mar- 
ried last Wednesday, had four of them — no less — and 
five bridesmaids. The wedding took place in that 
pretty little Swedenborgian Church out on Washing- 
ton street, and was one of the most attractive affairs 
of the summer season. 

Celia Tobin's engagement to Charles Clark was 
one of the announcements of the week, and the San 
Mateoites are delighted at the prospect of having so 
popular a mistress at the erstwhile Hobart villa. 
Anna Sperry's wedding will, 'tis said, come off on 
time, after all, Clarence Carrigan having effected 
some arrangement with one of his brother officers, 
so that official duty will not interfere with the date 
originally set for the marriage. But only think of 
George Marye going off and getting married in Eu- 
rope to his brother's widow. Every one regarded 
him as a confirmed old bachelor, but, you see, every 
one is sometimes mistaken. I met Mrs. Monroe 
Salisbury the other day, looking almost like herself 
again, and she seemed delighted to be once more up- 
on her native heath — San Francisco. Will she re- 
sume her supervision of society the coming winter? 
Not yet decided, but she was much missed last sea- 
son. 

More changes at the Presidio. As has been 



thought for some time past, we are to lose the 28th, 
which is going before long to North Dakota, and in 
its stead the 21st is coming from Fort Snelling. ( )ne 
of its officers, Captain C. R. Howland, is here already, 
and is much liked. In the meantime, it is very quiet 
out at the post, so many of the officers having gone 
to target practice, the maneuvre camp down south, 
etc., there is hardly a baker's dozen of them left "on 
guard." All the girls are glad to hear that Lieutenant 
Leigh Sypher is coming back from Honolulu to the 
Presidio, for he was one of the best-liked button beaus 
when he was stationed there before. Apropos of 
popular beaus, poor Burbank Somers — what a popu- 
lar chap he was, not so very long ago, in our social 
world ; and now, alas ! so soon to leave us ; I under- 
stand there is not a shadow of hope for him. And is 
it not something too dreadful about poor Bertha Dol- 
beer, who apparently had everything in the world to 
live for? It seems only the other day I was telling 
you what a jolly good time she was having. 

"Seeing friends off" is becoming quite the correct 
thing. Down at the transport dock twice a month 
there is always a big crowd of army folks to bid other 
army folks adieu, and when the Korea finally got off 
last Tuesday, the saloon resembled an afternoon tea, 
so many were there to say farewell to Miss Kitty 
Wright and her aunt, Mrs. Coulston, who have gone 
to Manila after a very delightful visit here to the 
Voorhies. Burlingame has been doing itself proud 
in entertaining Mrs. Lily Langtry's present husband, 
Captain Hugo de Bathe, who has been here a couple 
of weeks or so, being treated for blood poisoning 
from tatooing done in the South Seas. 

There is always lots of things being done down at 
Burlingame, and from there to Menlo Park, and that 
they don't suffer for lack of fun by any manner of 
means; Fred Kohl's wife is said to be a great acquisi- 
tion, and adds materially to the pleasure of the gather- 
ings of the country-side. The Harleys have a very 
pretty little place over at San Rafael, and have a suc- 
cession of visitors every week. Stella Fortman says 
she never enjoyed anything more than her visit there 
last week, and Ida and Margery Gibbons have been 
there more recently. How happy Margery does look ! 
And such lovely, dainty things as she and her sisters 





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July i6. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



arc r 

hut Inwn at I li \\ itli S11 

the j' 'icintoi! at her 

<linp on I Bernie Board man 

1 news received of Mr--. Drown - 
improvement in health : they will not he homi 
Like the Sam Boardmans, the N 
have the parental abode while thi 
Mr. and Mrs. Horace Davis 
contemplating a year's tour of Europe, leaving dur- 
ing the nexl few weeks. Wouldn't you like ; 
The Hager girls, who in other years have 
SO much tii make tilings lively here, there and 
where, are among the quietest of the quiet this sum 
mer; Ethel lias hecn up at Staggs Leap with Mr-. 
Chase, ami is. 1 hear, going to Del Monte. 1 don't 
know what Alice intends to do. The Jack Wilsons 
were so enamoured with Yosemite that Mollte tells 
me they are going — have gone, I believe — to the val 
lev for a second visit; Charlotte Ellinwood, Leontine 
Blakeman and Belle Marines have all been at the \ en- 
dome ; Fanny Danforth is up at Tahoe. 

Dick Tohin has been having a dandy time down in 
the Southland, from what I hear: Ethel Lewis is go- 
ing to Manila for the trip. 

The turning point seems to have been readied, and 
from now on there will be more return-, to town than 
departures to record; Mrs. McKinstry and Francis 
are back again from Santa Cruz, where they have 
spent several weeks ; the Fcrd Stephensons, wdio have 
been up at Tahoe. are home once more; the Conrad 
Babcocks are here from Fort Assiniboine, and are 
over at San Anselmo — or Ross, much the same thing 
— with the Eells. I understand that Agnes Simpson 
1'artridge's present visit from Japan is explained in 
the anticipated gift the stork is to bring her in Au- 
gust, so we shall have her with us a couple of months 
longer, perhaps three. Mrs. Richardson Clover and 
the girls got off for Manila by the Korea last Tues- 
day : Mrs. John Boggs is to make a new move, going 
to the I'alace Hotel. Alice is up at Mount Shasta; 
( irace Spreckels has gone to Tahoe for a week's stay. 

— Elsie. 



BIRTHS. 



July 6th — To Mr. and Mrs. E. O. McCormick, a son. 

[ulv 9th— To Mr. and Mrs. William Flush, of Pied- 
. mont, a daughter. Mrs. Hush was Miss Julia 
Talbot of San Francisco. 

Recently at Los Angeles— To Dr. and Mrs. Guy 
Hunt Cochrane, a daughter. Mrs. Cochrane was 
Miss Alice Cowan of San Francisco. 
ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Celia Tobin, daughter of the late Richard To- 
bin and Mrs. Tobin, to Charles W. Clarke. 

Miss Meta Graham, daughter of General and Mrs. 
William M. Graham, to Lieutenant Lewis W. 
Cass, 13th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Miss Mary Turnbull, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wal- 
ter Turnbull, to George R. Murphy, of New 
York. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

July 20th (Wednesday)— Miss Eleanor Warner, 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Alexander Warner, to 



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WEDDINGS. 
July -'')th (Wednesday) Mi-- Eleanor 

daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Moseley, U. 5. 
A., and Mrs. Mo-eley. to Arthur Thomas Harri- 
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July l-'th i Tuesd.v. Edith Norcross, daugh- 

ter of Mr-. I >. C. Norcross, to John L. Howard. 
Jr.. of Oakland. St. Luke's Church. 9 a. m.; 
Miss Susan Bixby to Doctor Ennst Bryant. 
Long Beach. Xoon. 

DIED. 

July 9th — In New York, Mi-s Bertha Dolbeer, daugh- 
ter of the late S. F. Dolbeer, of San Francisco. 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 1 6, 1904. 



>TOWN CRIER W, ->r-* ^A 



E 



;Mt«*« Crlir;' .-'Wkit lh< dorll «it ikmr 
Oo.lk.1 will rttrttu davll. air. .nb tou .- 



Judge Lawlor's advice to people who are molested 
in the streets of San Francisco by footpads to shoot 
the head off the footpad, may be good, but that it 
should ever have to be given is a disgrace to the city. 
Here we are, half a million of people in a modern 
community, and the only means of self-protection 
which the judge can suggest is that we revert to the 
customs of a time when there was no organized Gov- 
ernment, and the bully and pistol man were masters 
of the situation. Such advice is the negation of gov- 
ernment. It is an admission that the courts and the 
Police have failed to perform their first and most 
necessary duties. This does not. reflect upon the 
value of the suggestion, which, under the circum- 
stances, is perhaps the best that could be made. It 
may easily be imagined, however, that the sight of 
grave and respectable citizens going solemnly about 
with double-barreled shotguns over their shoulders 
to repel possible footpads, is not very likely to add 
to the attractions of San Francisco in the eyes of the 
outer barbarian. 

So Miss Claribel David, whom the newspapers de- 
scribe as having the degree of L.L. D., though where 
she picked it up in California would be hard to say, 
seeing that the degree is not conferred here, made 
an appearance the other day as lawyer for the defense 
in the Police Court. It is impossible that she should 
have found a harder place in which to begin. The 
worst of the matter is that she got her man off. If 
charming young ladies are going to add to the per- 
plexities of none too wise and far too indulgent police 
judges, it is just as well that the rest of us should 
know, so that we may emigrate, for convictions will, 
under such circumstances, grow steadily fewer in 
number, until the criminals at liberty will hustle us 
on the sidewalk. Lady lawyers, for pity's sake, re- 
frain from police court practice. Take up probate 
work if you can, and have your cases set before Judge 
Coffey, and may the Lord have mercy on your souls. 

Professor Albert A. Stanley, who is lecturing on 
music at the summer school at Berkeley, has been 
pointing out the antiquity of trades unions of musi- 
cians, this class of workers — I beg pardon, artists- 
having always had a great dislike for "unfair music." 
Free fights have not been uncommon between the 
regular and the "unfair ' musicians for some six 
hundred years. It has remained for San Francisco, 
however, to put a fiddler in the executive seat of the 
municipal Government, and to show that while one 
may be lively at beating time, he may at the same 
time be a dead beat. Union music is always expen- 
sive, even though it is not always good, but not until 
recently has it been shown how great an attraction a 
city treasury may possess for a second-rate fiddler. 
As far as money is concerned, there can be no ques- 
tion that the Mayor is a good conductor. 

To mention a very small matter, yet one to which 
I have called attention before, still another charge is 
pending against Theodore Lowe, the proprietor of 
the "Raven," a small local magazine. This time he 
is accused of getting money from his typewriter, a 
young woman, on false pretenses. Lowe has escaped 
conviction every time, as yet, but the proverb about 
the pitcher going too often to the well should prove 
true in the long run even in his case. 



This is a great country, and a very rich one. but it 
lias no room in it for a poor old woman, nearly blind, 
whose only hope of comfort in life lav in her being 
with her four daughters, residents of San Francisco. 
Mrs. Quintero came up from Mexico to find a home 
for the few years that are left to her, for she is over 
seventy years of age, and being destitute, was ordered 
to be deported. She did not even have an opportu- 
nity to visit the home of her daughters, but was kept 
on board, pending the investigation which was made 
of her case. It was finally decided that the country 
was not rich enough to run the risk of her becoming 
a charge on the community, so she was promptly 
sent back to Mexico and poverty. It is probably all 
right, and quite sound from an economic point of 
view, but I cannot help thinking that I would rather 
not be the immigration officials, particularly if they 
are in the habit of going to church. Some of the 
things that they will hear cannot contribute to their 
peace of mind. 

The absence of a certain pastor from Oakland is 
variously attributed to the leader of his choir, a lady 
who happens to be absent from that city also, against 
whom her husband has brought suit for divorce, and 
a hypnotist. It may be the hypnotist, of course, par- 
ticularly as he is also charged with being a sociolo- 
gist and hypnotism in conjunction with sociology 
should have no end of possibilities for evil. The ways 
of the hypnotist be devious and strange, but none the 
less peculiar are those of the female leader of the 
choir. Any man who has managed to get entangled 
between two such forces should be in a rather pre- 
carious condition, and the philosophical outsider 
will be apt to think that his wife and two children 
have got well clear of him. 

Lawyers should take heart and look forward to the 
future in this city with more hope. The number of 
marriages is increasing, and though business is by 
no means all that it should be, there is ground for 
some degree of confidence, not altogether buoyant 
confidence, but steady and encouraging hope. True, 
the increase this June has only been sixteen over the 
number recorded last June, but even this is some- 
thing to be thankful for in these days of Presidential 
elections and commercial depression. An increasing 
marriage rate implies also an increasing rate of 
divorce, and this, of course, indirectly implies an in- 
crease in the law business, and the law business at 
present would welcome waking up from any quarter. 

There is still more trouble at the Emergency Hos- 
pital, due to the disgusting management of which 
I have already called attention several times. Julius 
Wolff was taken there in an unconscious condition 
a few days ago, and his case was diagnosed by Dr. 
Boscowitz as one of simple drunkenness, whereas 
he died shortly after from a fracture of the skull. The 
United Spanish War Veterans, of which organization 
Wolff was a member, are getting up a petition to 
have the conduct of Boscowitz investigated. It is to 
be hoped that their efforts will have some effect, and 
that a searching and honest inquiry may be made 
into the conduct of a department of the city Govern- 
ment which has been notoriously lax, not to say 
worse, for the taint of dishonesty is too recent to be 
forgotten. 



July !6. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

ROW IN THE WORLDS FAIR COMMISSION 
There seems il in 

were more picturesque than the 
ly. but the} quarreled continually 
each other with neglect of duties and waste of mi 

and had nothing t«> show t'"r their work but tl 
\>i champagne dinners, travels in Spain, and 

- Fourth of July displays and celebrations, with 
mil as an adjunct. 
Tin mmissioners seem to have con- 

fined then alifornia brand of the "sp.irk 

ling," and to entertain with the supplies sent from 
tlii-; State. They have also kept up the traditions of 
their predecessors in quarreling, and have, if possible, 
made themselves even more ridiculous than the 
Parisian crowd. It appears thai the trouble at St. 
Louis now is. of all things under the snn. a question 
of precedent among the women of the party. K. B. 
Willis one of the best-known newspaper men in the 
State, for years editor of the Sacramento Bee, and as 
quiet and inoffensive a person as one would meet in 
a day's journey, was the secretary of the Commis- 
sion. The Southern representative is Wiggins; 
retary of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, a 
good rustler, but a man who loses no opportunity to 
push his section ahead at the expense of the rest of 
the State. It appears the Commission and the Secre T 
tarv lived in the California Building, and were sup- 
posed to eat and associate together, the women put- 
ting in their time shaking hands with the visitors. 

Mrs. 'Wiggins thought '.hat Mrs. Willis did not 
shake hands often enough, and she undertook to tell 
her so. and to lecture her for her lack of attention to 
her social duties. Naturally, Mrs. 'Willis resented 
this impertinence, and thereupon the Wigginses de- 
clined to dine with the Willises, and even to speak 
to them. Willis very sensibly concluded to get out 
of the mess bv resigning and allowing the Governor 
to name some one else in his place. 

All the reports that come from St. Louis show that 
instead of working in harmony, the Commissioners 
arc continually at loggerheads, and now comes this 
absurd affair as a climax to the whole absurdity. As 
the present Commissioners are to represent the State 
at Portland, also, the Governor should call them to 
time, or else remove them. Perhaps if they sent 
their families home there would be more harmony, 
and certainly much more money to be spent for the 
purpose for which it was appropriated, the attracting 
of attention to California by an exhibition of its pro- 
ducts, not by an exhibition of bad manners. 

Mark Twain used to say that railroads "ought to 
pay a man to do the kicking." Phis sage remark- 
has been reversed in practice by the Southern Pa- 
cific Company. This was the first of all railroads in 
the United States to adopt a system of inspectorship 
to see to it that all men in all departments are doing 
their duty. The Southern Pacific now pays "men 
to kick so you do not have to kick." 

Nelson's Amycose 

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NEWS LETTER. 



«3 



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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



ot*r bo wind tart PI«Miu»'*-Toi« Moo»« 



A TRUSTY TIP ON THINGS THEATRICAL. 

COLUMBIA— Ethel Barrymore,"Cou9in Kate"-you cannot make a mis- 
take in going. 

GRAND-James Neill, "Mr. Barnes of New York"— Only a (air show. 

ORPHEUM— Valerie Bergere and a fine vaudeville bill. 

ALCAZAR— Whittlesey. " Heartsease "—Splendidly acted, superbly 
mounted, a fine play. 

CENTRAL— "Along the Mohawk"— A iairly enjoyable comedy drama. 

TIVOLI— "Kobin Hood"— a capable company in a magnificent opera. 

FISCHER'S— New company jumps into popularity— "The Lucky Stone.'' 
good card. 

CHUTES— A good vaudeville bill and new attractions in the Zoo 



-^PLEASURE'S WANDPg JV J 



The White Whittlesey engagement is a magnifi • 
cent triumph for the brilliant young actor. Recall 
after recall, and after every act, has marked the third 
week of the summer engagement in "Heartsease." 
Thunderous applause, the clapping of hands and clat- 
ter of canes and feet, the delighted bravas of the 
hundreds, is the record for every night. Mr. Whittle- 
sey's interpretation of the character of Temple is 
simply flawless. The rollicking young "Captain 
O'Hara" of Mr. Maher was enjoyable to the last 
degree, while Mr. Conness as the villain-in-chief, 
"Sir Geoffrey Pumfret," is deserving of special men- 
tion. Mr. Scott's "Padbury," while quite acceptable, 
was at times slightly exaggerated, and the roles un- 
dertaken by Mr. Harry Byers and Mr. Vivian suf- 
fered in a limited extent from the same cause. Mis-- 
Adele Belgarde easily carried the honors among the 
women as "Lady Neville," and of the "Honorable- 
Miss Neville" of Miss Rawson, "je ne sais quoi dire." 
Voice, gesture and carriage seemed out of tune. The 
incidental music to "Heartsease" is a keen delight to 
all. The costuming and the scenic arrangements are 
above criticism. I had almost forgotten Oza Wal- 
drop, and that surely would have been a sin. Her 
presence on any stage is like a cooling breeze. She 
is the personification of innocence and youth, a fra- 
grant little violet. 

* * * 

"Cousin Kate" is a delightful play by that Prince 
of Critics, Hubert Henry Diavies, formerly on the 
staff of the News Letter. Since his advent in Gotham 
he has been heard from, and his visit to London has 
added laurels to his fame. He has written several 
plays, but the most successful of them all is "Cousin 
Kate." "Cousin Kate" has one real serious scene. 
The rest of it is of the boarding school variety, but 
a good, enjoyable type. It is breezy and restful, and 
after a surfeit of plays that "apotheosize" the bad 
there is in woman, albeit attractive, it is a pleasure 
to sit through a bunch of really and truly good pic- 
tures which appeal to our better selves. Miss Ethel 
Barrymore, pet of society, and the ultra exclusive 
literary and artistic two hundred and ten of New 
York, is simply and unaffectedly delightful. The 
company in support is very good, and gives very gen- 
eral satisfaction to crowded houses. 

* * * 

Fischer's has come into its own again. The man- 
agement has been successful in securing not only a 
burlesque that is full of sparkle and cleverness, but 
players to interpret the witticisms and sing the songs. 
"The Lucky Stone," written by Collin Davis and 
Frank Witmark, seems to have come by its name 
rightly, and the little house on O'harrell street ap- 
pears to be in for a long season of prosperity. The 
company is almost entirely new, and consists of a 



strong combination of very clever people. Dorothy 
Morton, the leading lady, has been a stranger to San 
Francisco for some time, but she jumped into the 
hearts of her audience from the start, and never after- 
wards lost her hold on them. She has a clear, well- 
rounded, beautifully trained voice, and in "Cupid and 
I" and "Gambia," distinctly scored, but her song "A 
Bit o' Blarney" was the hit of the evening, and the 
number of people whistling and humming it after the 
show was simply a forerunner of its future popular- 
ity. Cady and Rice are a clever team, and worked 
themselves quickly into favor. Bobby North, the new 
Hebrew comedian, showed that he has a whole lot 
of good stuff in him, and will run Bernard a very close 
second before he gets through. Miss Nora Bayes 
scored a complete hit. This young lady is full of 
surprises. During the first act she seemed to be 
holding herself in a bit, but she certainly let herself 
out in the second, and her tough girl is as pretty a 
take-off as can be seen in a day's march. 

Dillon and Clarke remain with the company that 
already works like a team. The piece itself, while 
needing trimming, is clean-cut and far above the av- 
erage. The scenic effects have been well thought 
out and are all cleverly handled. 

* * * 

At the Central, "Along the Mohawk" is pleasing 
the audiences with a lot of quiet comedy and much 
of human interest. There is a clever bit of acting 
by Mr. George Nichols. He appears as a political 
trickster, and does his part in a masterly manner. 
Herschell Mayall takes the part of the country editor 
indifferently well, and wins the plaudits of his audi- 
ence. Miss Lawton, in a not very difficult role, car- 
ries her share of the plav well. 

* * * 

"The Whirl of the Town" is the catchy title of the 
big burlesque which is to follow the "Lucky Stone" 

at the Fischer house. 

* * * 

Valerie Bergere, the clever young actress, opened 
the week at the Orpheum with a clever little sktch, 
entitled "Billie's First Love." Miss Bergere has 
won the hearts of all the San Francisco theatre-going 
public, and her little skit, "His Japanese Wife," 
which is on the bill for to-night and to-morrow, is 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STORAGE, MOVING. PACKING and SHIPPING 

WAREHOUSE: EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built rooms for the Storage of Household Furniture 
Office: POST and POWELL STS. Phone Private 571 



July 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«5 



ami I tetch, 

Why tin> should tx the title 
inc. The marvel, and thi 

rarely equaled '>n the i 

villc stage. The week's bill 

• • » 

the bill at the Tivoli, and a- I 
predicted, it is likelv to continue f.>r some tin 
it 1- immensely popular, and ranks with the best \v.<rk 
ever done by the 'Bostonians." Time lias given the 
Tivoli rendition a swing and an "ensemble that no 
traveling company could ever acquire. 

* * • 

The Grand announces the Janus Will Company in 
"The Cowboy and the Lady," in which Nat Goodwin 
and Maxine Elliot: juch a distinct sui 

For the matinee of Sunday, the -'4th. Mr. Neill will 
give US his great success, "A Gentleman of France.*' 




Miss Dorothy Morton, the new prima donna at 
Fischer's Theatre, has a world-wide reputation, hav- 
ing successfully appeared in nearly every principal 
comic opera and burlesque in the past ten years. Miss 
Morton just returned from a most successful season 
in London. 

* * * 

The second and last week of Ethel Barrymore's 
engagement at the Columbia Theatre commences 
next Monday night. The brilliant actress and her 
splendid company have achieved a most pronounced 
success in Hubert Henry Davies' comedy, "Cousin 
Kate." The advance sale of seats for the remaining 
nights is very heavy. 

* * * 

The very capable company now playing at the 
Tivoli has a magnificent production in preparation. 
"The Toreador" will far surpass anything in the 
musical line ever attempted in San Francisco. 

* * * 

In "The Prisoner of Zenda" next week, Whi:e 
Whittlesey will be revealed at his best, for his gal- 
lant presence and magnetic personality precisely fit 
the double role of the Red Elphberg King and the 
polished English gentleman. 

(Continued to Page 19.) 



Fischer's Theatre 

DtaiaUttol Kcmarkahl* »on«i of 

A LUCKY STONE 

Th» mkrfnslT fiiinir Iim' llln l>«\(» and Frank Wit- 

mark and thin admlrnl.lc company 



dliia: Bnhhy 



Behrew comedian: 

Oreat .-horn.. <-f thirty r-' thiiiKi i,> 

in— ■ 

• Nlnlr I Snliirdar and Sunday 

iiii.ir.Mi ni Matinee 



; lay 'Whirl of the Town." 



GraQd Opera hjouse 



Of MK IAMKS NKII.I. 
ind th.' original Nelll Company 
Week bMlnnlnc tomorrow. Rundny matinee 
Mr. Nelll in n pictures. pie ami perfect production of Nat Good- 
win's creat hit 

THE COWBOY AND THE L0DY 

8unday matinee. July wrh-A GENTLEMAN OF FRANCE 

Regular matinee Saturday. 

Special Summer Prices— 150. 25c, 60c. 

Beat reserved seat in orchestra 60c— No higher. 

("Jt-r-^h^l jf-pv San Fruocinco'-Greairst Mu»tc Hall. 
V-/I yj\ ICUI I). oTarrcIl St.. between StOOkMq and PowpII itrrau. 
Week commencing Sunday matinee, July 17 

VAUDEVILLE'S ZENITH 

Rose Coghlan and Company ; Julian Rose ; the Mysterious Zan- 

zlgs; Musical Klelst: Estelle and Babette D'Arville: Cunnlng- 

ham and Smith ; Harry Seeback : Orpheum Motion Pictures and 

last week of Le Roy and Clayton. 

Coming- CHARMION 

Regular matinees every Wednesday, Thursday. Saturdays and 

Sunday- Prices 10, 26 and toe 



nx & Co. 

aces and Managers. 



Columbia Theatre. GOTT "' 

Beginning next Monday. July 18th, 
Second and last week 
Charles Frohman presents 

ETHEL BARRYMORE 

In her greatest comedy success 

COUSIN KflTE 

By Hubert Henry Davies 

July 25— Henry Miller in "Mice and Men" 

Alra7a v Th on f- vo Bblabco «fc Mater. Proprietors 

MlCazar I neaCre E. D. Pbice. Gen'l. Mgr. Tel. Alcazar 

Monday July is. one week. Regular matinees Thursday and 
Saturday. WHITE WHITTLESEY and the Alcazar Stock Com- 
pany in Anthony Hope's fascinating romantic comedy, 

THE PRISONER OF ZENDA 

Marvelous scenic effects. A great cast. 

Evenings 25 to 76c. Matinees Thursday and Saturday 25 to 50c 
Monday. July 25. White Whittlesey in "Rupert of H entzau." 
Sequel to "The Prisoner of Zenda" 

Cr>r\\- rr\ 1 Thontro Bklasoo & Mayes. Proprietors 

^.eQtrai 1 neULre. Market St. near Eigh£h-Tel. South 53 

Week starting Monday evening. July 18th 

Mammoth and magnificent production of the greatest of all 

Irish historical dramas 

ROBERT EMMETT 

Irish songs, jigs and reels and panorama of Irish scenery 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday 

Prices— Evenings 10 to eoc- Matinees 10, 16, 26c- 



Tivoli Opera house. 



Corner Eddy and _ 

Mas 



Vlason Streets 
Evenings at 8 sharp. Fifth big week 
Beginning Monday. July 18th, of the reigning Tivoli triumph 

ROBIN HOOD 

With the great cast, and the beauty chorus. 

Promenade Circle, 3d floor. Smokers paradise. Elevator always 

running. Usual Tivoli prices, 26. 60 and 75c. 

Seats always selling— Only matinee Saturday 



flfter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand la society's gathering place after 
the theatre Is over. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 




THE LOOKER-ON 




Those foreigners to whom the Board of Health has 
leased the City Emergency Hospital have been get- 
ting into more trouble. It seems that Dr. Pawlicki 
demanded a fee from one Steven Maliche, because 
the doctor had attended Steve at the hospital. -Ma- 
liche says he refused to produce, and just to show he 
wasn't afraid, he told the tale to an unastonished pub- 
lic. Unastonished because we have become quite 
accustomed to these stories of small graft among the 
employees of the Board of Health, and it takes more 
than an additional tale of the same old sort to astonish 
us these days. Pawlicki denies that he tried to graft 
on Maliche; he likewise denies that grafting is in his 
line ; he also denies that he is engaged in any kind 
of a skin game. But, then, what would you expect? 
I think that Pawlicki should be "held for observa- 
tion." 

* * * 

That is what Dr. Boskowitz does when he has a 
hard case at the hospital. Boskowitz is another shin- 
ing light in the bunch. He had a case which looked 
somewhat doubtful, so he held the man "for obser- 
vation." While the patient was held, he died from a 
fracture at the base of the brain, which Boskowitz 
had overlooked. The fracture was discovered by Dr. 
Bacigalupi at the Morgue, who promptly exposed 
the dereliction of Dr. Boskowitz. Dr. Jiminini and 
Dr. Poliaski and Dr. Chereghinisky and Dr. Esrher- 
aldi agreed that Dr. Boskowitzsky was to blame in 
the matter, so they have placed a taboo upon him be- 
cause — why? — he was found out. That Emergency 
Hospital bunch is a great combination. It should be 
put in a box-car and sent to St. Louis as a California 
exhibit. 

* * * 

Professor Arrhenius, of Sweden, who is lecturing 
on physics at the Summer School of the Berkeley 
University, is somewhat astonished because his lec- 
tures do not attract more of the scientific men of the 
State, and particularly more of the instructors from 
our schools, big and little. He expressed the fear, 
the other day, that California is a few laps behind in 
the race for scientific development. Our standards, 
he says, were not high enough for us to appreciate 
thoroughly the more advanced scientific theorists of 
Europe. About fifteen years hence, he thought, we 
would be about ripe enough to fully appreciate the 
honors conferred upon us, when gentlemen famed 
for their learning in the old world cross an ocean and 
two continents for the mere purpose of sitting down 
beneath our oaks and telling us some few things we 
don't know. Professor Hugo de Vries, the famous 
Dutch botanist, has also expressed privately some 
disappointment arising from the multitude of women 
in his audiences at Berkeley, and the noticeable ab- 
sence of those whose botanical learning is worthy of 
consideration by one as eminent as himself. Both 
these complaints seem to be well founded. It did not 
require the complaints of learned men from Europe 
to inform critical observers that Berkeley, though 
well advertised of late, is far from what it should be 
as an institution of learning. There are many fine 
buildings, magnificent natural advantages, a staff that 
compares well with most of the big schools of the 
country ; a large attendance and good advertising — 
all the details of a well-organized plant — but some- 
how, the business does not seem successful when 
judged by experts. There are too many people at 



Berkeley who seem to consider their sojourn there 
merely in the way of a vacation ; there are too many 
instructors who seem satisfied to vegetate in a quiet, 
genteel sort of way; there is too little of the true 
spirit which should permeate and animate a real in- 
stitution of learning. But then, Berkeley has this 
magnificent satisfaction, which the distinguished 
visitors from abroad should not forget when lament- 
ing the absence of what they might have expected — 
Berkeley's President assisted at the nomination of 
a President of the United States ; Berkeley's President 
is responsible for the phraseology of parts of the Re- 
publican platform; Berkeley's President, in the 
event of Roosevelt's re-election, may be selected to 
represent the United States in one of the European 
countries, so ably represented now at Berkeley by 
the savants. In which latter event, Berkeley will 
not have struggled in vain. What more could mere 
scientists and delvers in theories expect? 

* * * 

He was a little fellow, and his fond mamma, be- 
cause he had fat, chubby legs, gave him only half 
measure in the way of stockings. You've seen that 
queer style, of course. It was on one of those cold 
afternoons of last week that a passer-by, seeing the 
sturdy little chap, with his legs bared to the winds 
and fog, said : 

"Aren't your legs cold, little man?" 
"Cold? Huh ! no," the youngster answered. "I was 
horned that way." 

* * * 

A good story is attributed to the Captain of one 
of the army transports. During the Spanish war his 
ship carried from this port a heavy load of ammuni- 
tion for Dewey's fleet at Manila. In the cargo was an 
assorted lot of gun cotton, fulminate of mercury, dy- 
namite, and a lot of big, loaded projectiles for the big 
guns. The captain lost a few pounds of flesh and 
turned a little greyer on the way to Manila, for be- 
sides the stuff under the hatches, he had 1500 wild- 
eyed volunteers aboard, and he expected almost any 
night to find himself bound skyward with the bunch. 
At Manila, a detail of jackits from the fleet was sent 
to the transport to unload the ammunition. They 
dropped the first sling of cartridges just as it was go- 
ing over the side. The captain nearly had an attack 
of heart-failure, for the gun-cotton was down below. • 
Presently the jack in charge of the detail absently 
dropped a. six-pound projectile down the open hatch. 
It fell with a bang like the crack of doom on the deck 
thirty feet below, but did not explode. 

"Great Jehovah, man !" yelled the captain, who was 
now on the verge of manslaughter. "What in Luzon 
are you doing? Don't you know the gun-cotton's 
down there?" 

"Why, that's all right, sir," said the Jackie. "Those 
projectiles are warranted not to explode, sir. unless 
dropped over thirty-five feet, sir. and it's only thirty 
feet down to the bottom from this hatch, sir. Why, 
there's no danger at all, sir." 

"What, five feet, five feet," the captain roared ; 



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139 MONTGOMERY ST., S. F. 



972 BROADWAY. OAKLAND 



July 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«7 



me and heaven, you clumsy lul>- 
Five icci he damned. I want sea-room ' 
il adrift. Five feel I Ye ear out of here, 

y.ui swab. I'll do mv own measuring when I prepare 
it." 
And the swab cleared out in a series of rapid jumps. 
The captain unloaded the rest of the cargo himself, 
and he ! II of it. 

* * • 
Another unpleasant scandal comes out of the 
French Hospital. This time it is the complaint of 
laughters that they were not informed of their 
mother's condition, and that, though they had called 
repeatedly at the hospital, and had taken rooms with- 
in a block of the institution so as to be "ear • luir 
mother, they knew nothing of the Seriousness of her 
condition nor of her death, until hours after she had 
passed away. Then, the first knowledge they received 

was from a gentle-voiced man of quiet hut persistent 
manner who called upon them, told them their 
mother had died at 5 o'clock in the morning, and — 
presented the card of an undertaker. That was some- 
what ghoulish, to say the least. The hospital authori- 
ties, or the hospital doctors, may not be "standing in" 
with the undertaker, but the whole business has a 
very unpleasant look. The French Hospital has had 
more than its share of gratuitous advertising, arising 
from bad management, undignified quarrels among 
the staff, rows between the head nurse and her as- 
sistants, and fierce annual squabbles among the mem- 
bers of the association. All those things may be at- 
tributable to the proverbial excitability of the French 
nature, but there is nothing exciting about the early 
morning visit of the advance agent of an undertaker. 
That is a little too much. The line must be drawn 
somewhere. 

» * * 

The creditors of the San Francisco Furniture Com- 
pany, an insolvent corporation, stand to lose over 
$11,000 because a bond given to insure the honesty 
of the receiver is among the things that were. The 
bondsmen, or the alleged bondsmen, were sued on the 
bond : a certified copy of it was produced in court, 
but the bond itself, which had been on file in the 
County Clerk's office, was not to be found when 
wanted. Of course, no one knows what became of it ; 
no one knows whose was the hand that abstracted it. 
But the public does know that too many important 
papers have disappeared from the County Clerk's 
office at moments most opportune for people who 
would have been mulcted but for the "loss" of the 
documents. This is not a reflection on the present 
County Clerk, who, so far as I have heard, has given 
satisfactory service. It is rather a criticism upon the 
somewhat loose manner in which legal papers are 
handled at the City Hall. The County Clerk should 
institute reformation in this matter, and detail a 
trusted employee to inspect papers when given out 
and when returned. Lawyers should be required to 
receipt properly for them, for there are not a few prac- 
titioners at our bar who are not above suspicion. 

Mayor Olney of Oakland says that city's prison "is 
not fit for human beings to live in." The same com- 
plaint about our County Jail is made by people sent 
there for rest by a paternal municipal Government. 
They all want to get out. 

* * * 

Bill Garfield, a noble red man who received a lib- 
eral education at Carlisle School, has been arrested 
at Ukiah for forgery. Bill is one of the best exempli- 



Pears' 

W liy is Pears' Soap — the 
best in the world, the soap 
with no free alkali in it — 
sold for 15 cents a cake? 

It was made for a hos- 
pital soap in the first 
place, made by request, 
the doctors wanted a soap 
that would wash as sharp 
as any and do no harm 
to the skin. That means 
a soap all soap, with no 
free akali in it, nothing 
but soap; there is nothing 
mysterious in it. Cost de- 
pends on quantity; quan- 
tity comes of quality. 

Sold all over tbe 'world. 



fications of the advantages of converting the noble 
red man to the ways of civilization. His only trouble 
is that the education he received was a little too lib- 
eral. It has shown some of its disadvantages by slop- 
ping over. But consider, brothers, how much better 
it is for the peace of the quiet burg of Ukiah that 
Bill simply took to raising the checks of the good 
people of that village rather than their hair. Educa- 
tion of the Indian may, therefore, have its advan- 
tages, though, it must be confessed, the educated In- 
dian is not yet fully appreciated. Upon his return 
from St. Louis, the late Congressman from the Fourth 
District may address the braves of the Irosquaw Club 
upon the moral degeneracy of the aborigine who has 
been subjected to modern environments. 
* * * 

The shooting affair late Sunday night, arising from 
a row among a number of young men who became 
very boisterous on the cars, returning from the beach, 
causes me to urge again that the Park Commissioners 
and the Chief of Police should give more attention to 
the rowdyism frequently prevalent at the ocean beach 
in the evening. Upon nearly every pleasant evening, 
hundreds of people take car rides to the beach. Those 
who remain on the cars show much wisdom, for they 
are comparatively free from the insults of the hood- 
lums who delight in hanging about the terminus, in- 
tent upon assaulting inoffensive people, or with the 
more vicious purpose of following unsuspecting wan- 
derers over the sands until they reach some seques- 
tered spot, where the villains knock them down and 
rob them. It is but seldom that a policeman is seen 
on the beach. Several should be there every night 
during the summer. If the Chief of Police cannot 
spare them, then the car company should send special 
officers to the terminus to protect its patrons. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

Cures Poison Oak and all Skin Diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Rheumatics relieved at the Post St. Hammam. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



Society Notes 



A pretty wedding was that of Katherine Trevathan 
and Walter G. Haxe, last Monday noon. The cere- 
mony was performed at the Hotel Dufferin, in the 
apartments Mr. Haxe had prepared for his bride. The 
marriage was expected in the near future, but was a 
surprise — the lady having just returned from a five 
months' trip East. Only the immediate family were 
present. Many varieties of flowers were used in beau- 
tifying the apartments. After congratulations were 
extended, all present sat down to a wedding luncheon, 
when the health and happiness of the couple were 
merrily toasted. 

Major and Mrs. Charles R. Krauthoff are touring 
Southern California. 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Barker, Mr. and Mrs. F. F. 
Bostwick, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. House and Mr. Clifford 
H. House, are at Lake Independence, where they 
have rented a cottage for the month of July. 

The following guests are recent arrivals at Blue 
Lakes : W. H. Johnson and wife, Miss L. T. Heard, 
F. L. Fisher, Dorsan Nichols and wife, Win. E. 
Eager, Mr. T. P. Emigh and wife, Miss Edith Emigh, 
Miss M. G. McNamara, Miss Annette McNamara, 
Mrs. Ashworth, Mrs. Frederick, Miss M. L. Fred- 
erick, C. L. Frederick, A. Scheppelman, A. Torres, 
Miss S. Schwabacher, Miss Stella R. Schwabacher, 
Frank Schwabacher, Miss Ruth Ayden, Miss T. Mc- 
Lellan, Miss T. Doyle, Miss K. Haggerty, Miss L. 
McCarthy, Miss F. Morey, Miss M. Zmudowski, 
John G. Rapp and wife, M. A. Lippitt, Miss T. Dovle, 
Dr. F. J. Tillman, Robert Duke, Dr. and Mrs. T. B. 
Roche, J. L. Bond, P. Connolly, O. L. Blackman, 
Charles Levy, C. Chianumet and wife, W. P. Mariner 
and wife, R. N. Langland, John Gustlefran, Albert 
Matteson, Bert C. Pollack, Victor Pollack, Hazel E. 
Brower, Frank E. Dashiell, Estelle M. Brower, John 

B. McGuffin, Mrs. Oppenheimer and family, J. Nis- 
son and wife, Leo. E. Greenhood, Dr. Maurice S. 
Green, C. L. Dreyfus, Julius Lemle, Miss Laura 
Meyer. 

The following guests registered at the Paraiso 
Springs recently: Mrs. Bertha Shutze, Miss Stella 
Shutze, Miss E. J. Dorn, Mrs. C. H. Joost, W. H. 
Tobias, Miss Bertha Tobias, Mrs. and Miss T. J. 
O'Hara, Mrs. I. G. Treadwell, D. D. Collins, J. Bate- 
man, Mr. B. Hallgarten and wife, Isabel J. Murphy, 
Thomas D. Riordan and wife, A. Block, W. A. Irvin, 
E. Brammer, Mr. Theo. Dierks and wife, Miss Olga 

C. Dierks, Miss Irma Dierks, N. Rosenberg, A. Selig- 
man, F. W. M. Lange and wife, J. W. Smith and 
wife, C. S. Boching, M. Q. Boswell, Fred Plummer, 
J. M. Commik, Mr. and Mrs. E. Fay and son, E. L. 
Kolberg and wife, M. Nickels, A. Linberg. 

Miss Charlotte Williams has gone to Guerneville, 
where she will remain for three weeks. While there, 
Miss Williams will make pen and ink sketches of the 
surrounding country under the guidance of Mr. L. P. 
Latimer, the well-known artist. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending July 
12, 1904: Dr. Chauteau, Mr. R. Bocqueraz, Mr. G. 
E. Crothers, Mrs. H. Pottinos, Mr. E. Dubedat, Mr. 
C. Clere, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Nourse, Mr. F. S. Mit- 
chell, Mr. J. Gallois, Mi. S. Newman, Mr. L. E. Van 
Winkle, Mr. P. S. Baker, Mr. L. L. Roos, Mr. A. Far- 
chini, Mr. A. O. Lindstrom, Mr. A. Emerson, Miss 
E. Samuels, Mr. J. E. Hayden, Mr. C. T. Hamilton, 
Mr. J. H. Lombard, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Browne. 

William Martin, Surgeon L T . S. N. (retired) has re- 
turned from Europe, after a visit of seventeen months.. 



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among the sanitoriums and hospitals of the old 
world. Dr. Martin is domiciled at the Bohemian 
Club. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Farquhar in New York 
was brightened by the advent of a son, July 7th. 
Mrs. Farquhar was Miss Marion Jones, daughter of 
ex-Senator John P. Jones, of Nevada. 

Dowie had a rather chilly reception in dear old 
London, don't you know. He's coming back to 
America, the land of the free and the home of the 
graft. 

The Star Hair Remedy — beet of all tonics and restora- 
tives. Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not 
a dye. At druggists and hairdressers. Accept no substi- 
tute. Star Remedy Co., 1838 Polk street Tel. Sutter 31. 



Wedding and Birthday presents in great variety at Gurap*s.H3 Geary 8t 



Original designs In menu and tally cards. Charlotte F. Wil- 
liams, room 18, 121 Post street 



July 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 



Pleasure's Wand. 



(Continued from Page 15.) 

EmmaCotrcI) and \ntonio Van (iofrc. wl 

'ii them fame all over the ■>• 
will make tluir tir>i- appearance a) ''■ 
coining week. The) give 1 posturing exhibition, and 
me wonderful balancing. Fred I lined 

be new, and promise a diverting 
formance. Belle Gordon, the athlete, will 

skillful bag-punching, and Lotta and Helle Tobin, 
the musical experts, will introduce several novi 
in their act Brandow and Wiley, the colored couple, 
will change their songs and dances; Herschal Stein, 
the baritone, will be hear 1 in illustrated songs, and 
the animatoscope, with many surprises in the way of 
moving pictures, will complete a very fine pro- 
gramme. The Zoo has lately added to its attractions 
two young leopards, imported direct from India, and 
a splendid specimen of the Nubian chacnia, and many 
novel features have been introduced in the ride 

"Down the Flnme." 

* * * 

The Orplieum announces the coming of Rose Cogh- 
lan in vaudeville next week. If it were not that it is 
., rise, as far as financial results are concerned, 1 
should he tempted to say "( hie by one the roses fade." 
In a clever sketch called "Between Matinee and 
Night," she will be supported by a capable company. 
This sketch is said to have achieved a notable suc- 
cess in the East. Miss Coghlan appears as "Mrs. 
Sheldon." an actress, and the action takes place in 
the dressing room at "Wallacks." Add to the above 
an unusually fine vaudeville programme, and it may 
be easily predicted that crowded houses will greet 

the performers all the week. 

* * * 

Herschell Mayall will essay the part of "Robert 
Emmett" in the play of that name at the "Central." 
next week. The many new features that are to be 
introduced should crowd the house. The orchestra 
has been drilled in Irish music, and the Irish bagpipe 
will be heard. There is to be a battle scene, and the 
popular songs of the "Green Isle" are to be sung 
by capable artists. The scenery is to be in keeping 
with the rest of this production. There will be an 
Irish kitchen modeled on the typical kitchens of. the 
Irish peasantry. The play has a record of one hun- 
dred and fifty nights in New York City. 

The popularity of the James Neill engagement is 
ever on the increase. Mr. Neill has dropped the 
lackadaisical style, and in "Mr. Barnes of New York" 
gave evidence of the genius that is in him. The Neill 
Company acts so wel'l that there is but little to criti- 
cise adversely. It is an excellent combination, and 
the public is showing its appreciation by large houses. 



SANTA CLARA COLLEGE 

Studies will be resumed on AUGUST 2, 1904. 
For further particulars address 
ROBERT E. KEJNNA. S. J„ SANTA CLARA, CAL. 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketching and Illus- 
trating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET 



On the Wing 



i\fl- hkr ll 
Over the O.ntinfnt the Atne-i- 
^ .n 1 in tli-m m'S Whl-kry 



9 





Hunter 

BeJtimoro 

Rye 



has founded a new type, 
a new name for what is a 

Pure, Old 

Mellow 

Product. 

A good Ihng passes 
from lip to lip. 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO.. 

213-216 Market St., San Francisco, Cat. 

Telephone Exchange 313 







\ 




\ 
<? 

Q 


\ 



^<^m 



DIVIDEND IJOTICE. 
Phoenix Savings, B. & L. Association. 

For the six mouths ending JunelZOth, 1904, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in ihe savings department as follows: On leim ter- 
tilleates. at the rate of live (6) per cent per annum ; on oidinary savings 
aeeouuts at the rati* of four and one-halt UM percent per annum; liee 
of (axes and pa) able on and alter July 2fith. L9Q4. 

The Phoenix has a guaranteed capital Of fc00,000. and a total paid-in 
capital ot 91,200,000. U h Buurd of Directors are: A. A. Watkins, Presi- 
dent; (_!ha*-. It. liithop. Vice l'rt sident : h. 1'ientiss fcmjih. Treasurei ; 
Geo. O. Boardnian, Director; Gavin ftlcNab, Diieetor; Clias. F. Ladd, 
Director. Clarence Grange. 

Secretary and Managing Director. 

DIVIDEND NOTICF. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

Has declared a dividend of eight per cent per annum on Class "A" 
and "F" stock, six per cent on term deposits and live per cent on or- 
dinary deposits, for the six months ending June 3u, 1904. 

WASHINGTON DODGE. President. 
Wni. CoHiilN. Sec. and Geu'l ligr. 
Cor. California and Battery sts., San Francisco. 



city Index and Purchaser*' Guide 

BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladies and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT— N. E. Cor. Eddy and Mason 
streets. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, Main 
429. A. B. Blanco and D. Brun. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

MARTIN ARONSOHN, Notary Public and U. S. Pension Attor- 
ney. Office, 632 Market str^e - ., Room 8 (opp. Palace Hotel) San 
Francisco. Tel. Black 6541. Loans on any secur iiiet at It-west turns 
qo commissions. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. P. DUNDON'S San Francisco lion Works, 314, 316, 318 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and con- 
structed. 

WEAK MEN AND WOMEN fS S e . D £Si AN kS£; 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual orjaas. 
Send for circular; Naber, Alfs & Brune, 326 Mark.t St, 8. F. 




THE PASSING OF AN ASS (Elaine 



But when the Hearst sun set far underground, 
Then certain grafters slowly with bent brows 
Accompanying, the sad chariot bier, 
Passed in their sorrow through a crowd that laugh'd 
Gay pleasure, to that stream whereon the barge 
Palled all its length in yellow samite lay. 
There stood the life-long creature of the gang, 
Loyal, the dumb young servitor, on deck, 
Winking one eye, as though he laughed a bit. 
So the sad grafters from the chariot took 
And on the yellow decks laid him to rest, — 
Set in his hand an onion, o'er him hung 



Sheets of his papers, br 
And tried to steal his p 
"Willie, farewell forevi 
"Farewell, dear Willie,' 
Then rose the dumb yo 
Oared by the dumb, w 
In his right hand an o 
A mortgage, his two e 
And all the coverlid w; 
Tucked to his chin, and 
Even his face, and tha 







p-tO-Date) (With Apologies to the Sha.de of Tennyson) 



ed with yellow lies, 
;e, and said to him : 

and again 
arted all in tears. 
2f servitor, and the dead 

upward with the flood — 
'ii, in his left 

sticking up — 
nade of lies, 

was full of spots, 
DUd donkey voice 



Was silent. It was clear that he was dead, 
And that he would not wake until the trump. . 
And that dumh servitor was seen to smile 
A cruel, mocking smile, as though he knew. 
And as he rowed he rattled golden coins 
That in his pocket made a cheerful chink, 
And as he rowed he winked the other eye. 
And so the corpse of him who sought to rule, 
Went upward with the flood, the flood called salt, 
And every scoundrel who had yearned for graft 
Wept at the passing of the Yellow Ass. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO 




NEWS LETTER. July 16, 1904. 

R.e-e'n force the National Guard 



Santa Cruz Mountains. No staging-. Table first- 
class. Electric lights, boating, swimming, fishing, 
hunting, tennis and ping-pong. New management. 
See booklet S. P. Co., 613 Market street, or Hotel 
Ben Lomond. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place ot bustneM->. Man Francisco, Calif<irnfa lo- 
cation of works. Storey County, Nevadn. 

Notice is hereby sriven tha 1 »t a meeitner of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 15th day i June, l 04, an assessment (No. 70* of ten (10) cetit- 
per share, was levied up mi the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
Immediately In United States erold coin, to the -ecretarv at the ofiice of 
the ■ onapany. Room 79 Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, Han Fran- 
cisco California 

Any stock upon which this as^es^ment shall lemain unpaid on 
TI1R 2'Uh DAY OF JULY. 1904 
will be delinquent, and ad ve tisfd f-r sale at public auction and unle*s 
payment is made before, will be i-old on WedneHdHy, the 10th day of ■ ue- 
B:u«t 1904, to pay the delinquent assessment together with the cost* of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Direotors. 

OHAS. R. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79 Nevada Block 309 Montgomery Street. San frarteNcn. 
Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment .' No 10B 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied July 9. 1904 

Delinquent in office Aug. 9, 1904 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Aug.stj, 1904 

J. B. SHAW. Secretary. 
Office— Room 69. Nevada Block, No- 309 Montgomery street. San 
Francisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Julia Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 35 

Amount per share 3 cents 

Levied July 7.1904 

Delinquent in office '. Aug. 7, 1904 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Sept. 1. 1904 

J. STADTFELD, Jr.. Secretary. 
Office— Boom 56. No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing yearand the 
transaction of such other business as maybe brought before the meet- 
ing will be held at the office of the company, No. 298 Steunrt street San 
Francisco on Monday the 1st day of August, 1904 at 11 o'clock a m' 
AUGUSTUS TAI'LOE. Secretary. 



J OHN M- TIETJEN COMPANY 

Fancy Groceries, 

California and Imported tCfines 

JVekv ~ytore 

344 Post St., Tel. Main 518, San Francisco 



Unless the next encampment of the National Guard 
of California is more largely attended than hereto- 
fore, this important arm of protection may lose all 
Federal support in the matter of arms, uniforms and 
quartermasters' supplies. The reason that the sum- 
mer encampments are not as largely attended as they 
should be is that the business men of this city and 
State do not show a proper appreciation for the main- 
tenance of a system of well-organized militia. Instead 
of encouraging their young employes to become 
members and attend the drills and the encampments, 
they show their indifference, or even opposition. The 
present troublous times should awaken the business 
public to a realization that cur militia should be more 
strongly organized. It is not only a matter of local 
and State pride, but one of defense. 

One point cannot be too strongly impressed upon 
the business men whose lives and property in times 
of great danger are protected by the National State 
Guard. During their attendance at the summer camp 
of instruction, the men are paid only forty-three cents 
a day. His employer does not pay him his salary dur- 
ing this time. So the patriotic militiaman must 
stand the loss. In the meantime, he is drilling and 
perfecting himself in the duties of a soldier more for 
the benefit of his employer than for himself. For this 
time spent in the service of the State, he receives 
about $6. It would be but equity if the business men 
shared in the expense of drilling and equipping mili- 
tiamen for the defense of their own property. They 
should show their appreciation of the patriotism of 
the young men by contributing enough to the "war 
chest" to raise the daily pay of the men from the 
pittance of forty-three cents a day to about what he 
would earn at his regular vocation — say about $3 a 
day. The soldier should not be expected to live en- 
tirely upon glory. He receives pay only when called 
out to the Camp of Instruction. The remainder of 
the time devoted to drills goes to the good of the 
cause. It is his own time given to the public and to 
his employers. The business men certainly should 
not object' to contributing as a bounty fund during 
the encampment. The militia are paid by the Fed- 
eral Government, in the absence of an appropriation 
from the State. This is a queer state of affairs ! There 
is a State law authorizing appropriations for the 
maintenance of a State National Guard, but our 
Legislators, in the plenitude of their perverseness, 
regularly fail to vote the appropriation. 

Until the Legislature shall make an appropriation, 
as authorized by law, the merchants and business men 
generally should contribute toward such a fund. 
& The labor unions are opposed to the formation of a 
National Guard for the defense of the property of the 
people. They use their influence to prevent mechan- 
ics and laborers, generally, from joining. In addition, 
some business men are not only indifferent, but when 
the hours of drill or public parade conflict with those 
of the employer's establishment, he discourages the 
attendance of the militiaman. The result is that many 
of the companies are reduced to "skeletons," and re- 
cruiting is now necessary. 

Membership and attendance are necessary to suc- 
cess, not only at drills and parades, but during the 
encampment for military instruction. This latter is 
the most important of the duties of a soldier, and it is 
especially so now, since it is required that the State 
Militia must attain a required standard of efficiency 
in order to receive aid from the National Government 



Jury 16. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

If it bib, the Government m 

and ' 

tkirw It is. t! 

■ <-r. that the busim 

.in J be j>r- >mpt 111 

ition with final 
mum - ml demanding necessary 1> _ 

tion. 

:uakc the work more effective, cir. 
grant two weeks' full pay to their employees wh 
;he encampments — as a pension for their 

ite for the past year. Mr. H. I 
manager of Sunset Photo Engraving Company, 
iircctcd all militiamen in li 'iim-nt to 

attend the encampment, the salaries to be paid in full. 
The News Letter hopes to be able t'> publish a list 
of all the large firms of San Francisco in the same 
cause. 



A Contrast 



(A yellow mastiff was found whining by the side 
of a suicide in the Park on Saturday. — Daily Paper. 1 

A dog is much inferior — 

Our learned writers know it — 
To the lord of all creation called a man. 
For the latter is superior, 

He can demonstrate and show it, 
And he always has been since the world began. 
For to stay by friends in trouble 
Is a doctrine that's exploded, 
And a corpse is only good to put away, 

Human friendship is a bubble — 
Human constancy corroded — 
They are marks of lower animals to-day. 



NEWS LETTER. 



n 




(Brother is arrayed against brother in the Hagan 
family of undertakers in a dispute arising over the 
burial of the city dead. — Daily Paper.) 

You must bow in adoration 
Of the gallant human creature 
Who is evidently better than the brute, 
You can see his elevation 

In his every noble feature, 
And his noble disposition made to suit. 
He is stronger, he is wiser 

Than his poor inferior brother — 
He is made of stuff that's infinitely fine. 
He is cleaner, he is nicer — 

And men work for one another 
Much more readily than dogs will do, or swine. 

In the growing frequency of runaway marriages 
among the well-to-do, the economist will observe not 
a falling away from regard for the institution of 
matrimony, but a sign of the "cutting down" which 
precedes a period of financial contraction. 

Short Suburban Trips 

The best short trip around the Bay district is lhat to Mill Valley. 
Rosa Valley or San Rafael via Bausalito Ferry and the North bhore K. 
B. A modern third rail electric system with standard Kniige douhle 
track and up-to-date appliances. Ferry derails at 6.30; 7. Id: l.4t\; 8.30; 
9 15; lo.oo; li.oo; 11.40: a. m.; 12.20; 1.00; 1.45; 2.30; 3 ifi:4.oo: 4.36: 5.15; fi.Bu: 
6.2ft; T.lfij 8.16; 9:00: 10.20; 11.35 p. m. Trips oeeupyhg 30 n.imius to 1 
hour. Return on any of twenty trips during day. Fares 25c to 50c 
round trip. (Mt. Tamalpais $1.00.) Tickets and time cards etc.. at North 
Shore Information Bureau, 626 Market Btreet. 



Fat Folks 



For Sale 



A beautiful suburban home. 

Complete in every detail. 

Fifteen minutes from Ross, Marin County, Cal. 

An hour from San Francisco; half an hour 
from San Rafael. 

Situated at the foot of Mt. Tamalpais, and 
commanding an unsurpassed view of its crest and 
wooded canyons. 

Comfortable, roomy residence. 

Spacious grounds in a fine state of cultivation. 

Comprises over 1,000 acres of the most pictur- 
esque and accessible part of Marin County, gen- 
erously watered and timbered, and extending 
from Ross Valley nearly to Fairfax. 

Is offered as a whole or in two parts. 

Property of the estate of Janet S. Porteous, 
deceased, offered for sale by order of the execu- 
tors. 

For further particulars apply to 

THOS. MAGEE $ SONS 

5 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 



ri reduced my weight 70 pounds, lust o im-hes, waist 6 inehesjind hips 
H inches in a whort time by a guaranteed harmless remedy without 
exercise or starving. I will tell you all about it. Enclose stamp. Ad- 
dress Mrs. E. B. Richards. 225 E. 9th street, Riverside, Cal. 



Murphy, Grant & Co. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of 
furnishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of 
-THE NEVER-RIP" OVERALL. The best in the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dr^ss goods, velvets, 
silk, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, Hnens, etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, sliawis, notions, smokers' 
articles, stationery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bush Sts., S. F. 



\ 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 




MODEL M. 8 HOUSE POWER. 

Price, $950 

Rambler Automobile Agency. ' 



Cor- 10th. 



Phone South mm 



THE AX/TOCA'R 




AUTOCARS, $1,850 
AUTOCAR RUNABOUT, $1,050 
LIGHT TOURING COLUMBIA $1,900 
COLUMBIA FOUR CYLINDER $4,000 

THERE A.KE NO AUTOMOBILES BETTER 

WEST COAST MOTOR-CAR CO 

606 VAN NESS AVENUE - - SAN FRANCISCO 



IE you are contem- 
plating the purchase 
of an automobile we 
wish to call attention 
to the fact thit we 
will be in a position 
to supply you with a 
machine which we 
know is superior to 
any other machine 
for sale for less than 
52000. 

The price will be 

$875 and $975 

The type of engine is 
double «pposed cylinder 4%x4& Every pnrt accessible and dura- 
ble, and lor power, and weight, nothing on the market like it. 

HEINE MOTOR CAR. CO. 
235-237 Geary St. Opp. Union Squ&re S&n Francisco 




The CADILLAC 



MODEL B. Price $950 
With Tonoeau S1050 




August ath from Del 
Monte to 12th and 
Broadway, Oakland, G 
hrs. 5min October lath 
the same run was made 
in 5 hrs. 38 min. with- 
out stopping the car or 
refilling with gasoline 
or water, breaking all 
records- The only suc- 
cessful tour of the 
Yosemite Valley was 
made by a party of 4 in 
a Cadillac- 



ClYLER LEE, Ajenl. 201-203 Larkin Street, S. F. 




OBSERVATION AUTO. RUN. 



By L. P. Lowe. 

Chairman Executive Committee Automobile Club 

of California. 

First day. Wednesday, June 20th, San Francisco 
to Salinas. — Left San Francisco 8:15 a. m., arrived 
Salinas 5:40 p. m., distance noYa miles, total elapsed 
time 9 hours 25 minutes, stops 3 hours 25 minues, 
actual running time, f> hours 25 minutes, average 
speed per hour, elapsed time 11.74 miles, average 
speed per hour, actual running time 18.44 miles. 

The principal points between San Francisco and 

Salinas are Colma, San Mateo, Belmont, Redw 1. 

Menlo, Palo Alto, Mayfield, Mountain View, Santa 
Clara. San Jose, Coyote, Madrone, Morgan Hill, San 
Martin, Gilroy, Sargeants and San Juan. 

The condition of roads from San Francisco to San 
Mateo are rough for about 14 miles, sand in spots; 
San Mateo to Menlo, fair; Menlo to Mayfield. semi- 
rough: Mountain View to Madrone, fair: Madrone 
to Morgan Hill, semi-rough ; Morgan Hill to San 
Martin, fair; San Martin to San Juan, good ; San Juan 
to Salinas, fair. 

The San Juan grade is encountered between San 
Juan and Salinas. The grade on the north side is ; 1 
mile long, over steepest parts, and on the south side 

1 ' 4 miles. The grades range from 5 to 18 per cent. 

* * * 

Second day, Thursday, June 30th, Salinas to San 
Luis Obispo, via King City. — Left Salinas 6:26 a. m.. 
arrived San Luis Obispo 6:29 p. m., distance 148^ 
miles; total elapsed time, 12 hours 3 minutes; stops, 

2 hours 38 minutes; actual running time, 9 hours 25 
minutes; average speed per hour, elapsed time, 12.34 
miles; average speed per hour, actual running time, 
18.08 miles. 

The principal points between Salinas and San Luis 
Obispo are Chualar, Gonzales, Soledad, King City, 
Jolon, Bradley, San Miguel, Paso Robles, Templeton 
and Santa Margarita. 

King City is i ; >4 miles oft" the main road (opposite 
side Salinas River, crossed by bridge), but it is ad- 
visable to include this point, as it is the first town of 
any importance after leaving Salinas, and there is no 
other point until Jolon is reached. A short distance 
beyond King City the road branches, and is un- 
marked. Take road nearest river. Between King 
City and Jolon, the Jolon grade is encountered. It 
is about 1 '4 miles to the summit (not measured), and 
grades run from 8 to 12 per cent. 

The condition of roads from Salinas to Gonzales is 
fair ; Gonzales to King City, all kinds in short 
stretches ; King City to Jolon, good ; Jolon to Bradley, 
good, but dusty; Bradley to Paso Robles, good, ex- 
cept fording Salinas river; Paso Robles to San Luis 
( Ibispo, fair, rough in spots, dusty and some sand. 

About 5 miles below Bradley the bed of the Salinas 
river is crossed (dry at this season of the year), and 
the sand was quite deep for a distance of about 400 
feet. 

Between Santa' Margarita and San Luis Obispo 
the Cuesta grade, several miles long, is encountered, 
the grades running from 8 to 12 per cent. 

Third day. Friday. July 1st, San Luis Obispo to 
Santa Barbara, via Santa Ynez. — Left San Luis 



July 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*S 



m.. arri\««l Santa !'..ir! .-»r.» 5 

I tunc 1 1 how 
"'">" t! running time 

f* It" i per hour, ela 

time. 1 1.63 mill ..I per li-mr. actual run 

principal points ;ir«- \ inde, Nip 

1 Maria, ' iarcy, I 

• I Gocleta, (Gaviota ami Naples mere- 
ly railway stati 

The condition of roads from San Luis Obisp 
Krrovo Grande is rough sand; Arr'>\,i Grande t" 
Niporno, rough — fair; Nipomo I" Santa Maria, good: 
Santa Maria River; Santa Maria to Garey, semi- 
rough; Garey t" Gaviota, fair — good — fair; Gaviota 

!■■ Naples, g I; Naples to Santa Barbara, fair — 

dusty. 

Approaching Santa Maria, tin- lied of tin- Santa 
Maria river is crossed (dry at this season of the year} 
and there is considerable deep sand, Inn by keeping 
to the side hut little difficulty is encountered. 

It is not necessary to go via Santa Ynez, and about 
four miles can be saved, hut i> advised to do so 1 n 
account of blacksmith shop. etc.. if necessary, there 
being no other until Goeleta 1 .s 5 ' -• miles) i^ reached. 

The run must he made via Santa Ynez, Gaviota 

I'ass. the other and shorter mountain road to Santa 

Barbara being closed to automobiles. The Santa 

'Ynez-Gaviota Pass is several miles long-, with grades 

running from 8 to 12 per cent. 

The road reaches the Pacific Ocean at Gaviota and 
runs on an overhanging bluff along the ocean to Na- 
ples, a distance of about 17 miles. This bluff is crossed 
by numerous washes from the mountains, and the 
road drops rather steeply in and out of these washes 
with short grades of from 8 to 20 per cent. 

* * ;: 

Fourth day, Saturday, July 2d, Santa Barbara to 
I. os Angeles, via Calobasas and Hollywood. — Left 
Santa Barbara 5:15 a. m., arrived in Los Angeles 
(corrected time), 3:45 p. m., distance 117^ miles, 
total elapsed time, 10 hours 30 minutes, stops 2 hours 
18 minutes, actual running time 8 hours 12 minutes, 
average speed per hour, elapsed time, 11:15 miles, 
average speed per hour, actual running time, 14.28. 

Principal points. — Summerland, Carpinteria, Ven- 
tura, New Jerusalem, Calabasas, Hollywood. 

The condition of the roads from Santa Barbara to 
Ventura is fair — good; Ventura to New Jerusalem, 
semi-rough; New Jerusalem to Calabasas, fair; Cala- 
basas to Hollywood, rough — fair; Hollywood to Los 
Angeles, fair — good. 

At Carpinteria the road leaves the ocean and turns 
towards the mountains and travel is via the Casitas 
Pass for many miles. Two ranges are crossed with 
grades running from 8 to 16 per cent, and numerous 
small streams are forded. Emerging from the Casi- 
tas Pass, follow the right-hand road to Ventura. 

From New Jerusalem to Hollywood, a distance of 
about 6v/> miles, via the "old grade," no place of im- 
portance is passed, and no supplies save water are 
• to be had. From New Jerusalem to Calabasas tne 
road is through the Conejo Pass. The grades are not 
very long, but steep in places, and the highest grade 
reading of the trip — 22 per cent — was here encoun- 
tered. The general run of the grades are, however, 
from 8 to 16 per cent. 

The run was made via the "old grade," but there 
is a new grade through the Coneja country, said to 
be much easier and several miles shorter, which was 
missed owing to a misleading sign board. 

Hollywood is a suburb of Los Angeles. 

San Francisco to Salinas, 110^ miles; Salinas to 



^S5?Tr? 






td** 


"THE WORLD'S BEST" 

POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR CO. 

G. A. BOYER. M.nagrr 

1*4-148 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, S. F. PHONE SOUTH 1142 




PIERCE 
STANHOPE 

Price $1,350 Without Top 
$1,450 With Tod 

1. A beautiful Stanhope, with Victoria top and accommo- 
dating four persons. 

2. It has an 8 horse-power engine of the De Dion French 
type. 

3. It Is especially designed for physlcans' use, saving two 
hours per day. 

4. It Is compact In construction, symmetrical In outline 
and beautiful In general finish. 

6. It was In the Endurance Run, New York to Pittsburg, 
800 miles, and won high rank. 

PIERCE ARROW T0URINQ CAR Prench • - S2.650.00 

NORTHERN RUNABOUT 800.00 

MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. Golden Gate Ave. & Goujrh St., S F. 



W. J. PREEUNG 



P. L. CHAPMAN 



Central Automobile Co. 

1185 MarKet St. S. F. 

The most Commodious Garage in the Center of the City 

Expert Fiench and American Mechanics. 

Repair Work on Imported and American Machines Guar- 
anteed. Charges Reasonable. 

New and Second Hand Automobiles Bought, Sold and 
Exchanged. 

PHONE JESSIE 3336 



AUTOMOBILE REPAIRS 

81 CITY HALL AVE. 

De Dion Plugs and Porcelains— Electric Wiring for Auto use 
best made— Batteries. Tires, etc. 

ANDREWS, KEENAN & BLASAUF 
Tel. South 1039 San Krantisco, Cal. 



HOTEL VENDOME 



SAN JOSE, CAL 



New Automobile Garage 

open at all hours, and in charge of competent 
meu. Free of charge to guests. All roads in 
Santa Clara Valley open to automobiles. Easy 
run to San Jose in 2 hours and a half. 

J. T. BROOKS, Manager. 



J 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



San Luis Obispo, 148J4 miles* San Luis Obispo to 
Santa Barbara, 130^ miles ; Santa Barbara to Los 
Angeles, 117.M5 miles; total, 506^ miles. Total 
elapsed traveling time, 43 hours 11 minutes; actual 
running time, 32 hours 35 minutes; average speed 
per hour elapsed time, 11.74 miles; average speed per 
hour, actual running time, 1 5. 55 miles. 

* * * 

No special speed attempts were made, though ad- 
vantage was taken of good and safe stretches of road. 
Regular noon-day stops were made for luncheon, and 
frequent other stops to read "odometer," make 
records and take photographs. A careful record was 

made of running time and stops. 

* * * 

Mr. Frank E. Hartigan, manager of the Mobile 
Carriage Company, has gone East to place orders h r 
cars for the balance of this year and 1905. The Pierce 
Arrow touring cars - have made a very good record on 
the coast, and the prospects are such as to justify the 
Mobile Carriage Company in placing one of the 
largest orders, $150,000, that has been placed by any 
automobile concern at one time, outside of New York. 
The cars will be principally of the four-cylinder type, 
ranging in price from $3,000 to $4,500. 

* * * 

Samuel Buckbee had a "perfect run" to Del Monte 
last week, where he spent several days touring about 
in his White Automobile. Mr. Buckbee has only 
lately become an ardent admirer of the White, and 
has so far been more than delighted with the work- 
ings of his car, which has never yet failed to bring 
him to his destination in due time. 

* * * 

Hal. Shields, San Francisco's youthful motorist, 
is seen on the streets down town or out by the Park 
almost daily, running his father's big White touring 
car. 

* * * 

Miss K. Dillon, of this city, left last week for a 
run to Santa Barbara in her White touring car. She 
intends to do quite a bit of touring in the Southern 
part of the State before her return. 

Gilman Lambert, the well-known real estate man, 
is another late purchaser of a White touring car. 

* * * 

Twenty-four of the twenty-nine concerns belong- 
ing to the Association of Licensed Automobile 
Manufacturers were represented at the regular 
monthly heart-to-heart talk of the members at Buf- 
falo, says the N. Y. Mail and Express. 

It was frankly confessed that tardiness in getting 
out the cars this spring had cost many sales and pre- 
vented many owners from changing their 1903 models 
for 1904 cars. It is said that there will be no such 
delay of the 1905 output, that orders are already be- 
ing placed with material and parts makers, and that 
most of next year's models will be ready for the 
agents before the shows begin. 

There will be few changes in 1905 cars. American 
makers believe that they are now building along the 
proper lines, and so the changes will be for the most 
part merely in the details. Our makers have made' 
great advance in the building of high-powered cars, 
and now the four cylinder machines are fully five 
times in number those of this type of 1903. 

* * 

The News Letter warns automobilists to shy at the 
town of Sausalito. The fool trustees of that town re- 
cently passed an ordinance taxing automobiles $3 
per year for the maintenance of machines in Sausalito. 
The constabulary have not stopped at enforcing the 
ordinance as regards local residents, but have recent- 




4 Cylinders 

Sample Car due July 22nd 

30 Horse Power 

Side Entrance Tonneau 

Early Deliveries 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 



901-925 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND: 



350 lOih STREET 



SECOND HAND 

AUTOMOBILES 



SUNDAY'S AUTOilOBILE 


TRIP TO 


SAN JOSE 




means ft dpliehtfnl trip and an appetite that ealls for something- 


i H 


substantial. 






Automobilists 






are invited to 




1 i-iJ IMfB t? J ^^BL^Vbi 1 i 


visit the LA* 




ll'llBr. iMBWhPLf 1 1 


MOLLB GRILL. 




w£l?<*wft3HSj'inl 


where every 
viand is a d*- 
liKht, every 
wine a treat 
for connois- 
seurs. P. Moot- 
mayeur, Prop., 
was for years 
Chef at Del- 




l^^ip 


monieo'a and 

the Mais o n 




Riche. 


LAMOI.IE GRILL,'36-3I North Flrst'Street,! Sao Jose, op 


>.l be Victory Theatre 



F. H. LUCKHARDT 

20 GOLDEN GATE AV£, 

WITH 
CALIFORNIA AUTO EXPRESS CO 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 

Storage, Repair and Supply Stations. 

San Jose. 

GEO. H. 03EN & CO., 13-15-17 W. St John St.. San Jose. Com- 
plete Repair Shop. Large stock of auto supplies. Storage sta- 
tion, etc Agents for Wlnton, Locomobile, Oldsmoblle, etc. 



W. A. Plummer 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

TENTS. AWNINGS. HAMMOCKS 

111 OLAY STREET. SAN FBANCISCO. 
Telephone Main 649 



Julv 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



I_V |r 

entering the town with 

liccnsi-. 1 1 al 

■n automobil< - 
.1 merrj lime. 

ite beyond argument the in- 
ter highways, Albert R. Shattuck, chairman 

immittee ol the Automobile Club of 

America, will take a State Senate committee on an 
automobile tour over the roads ol New Vork, Mew 
Jersey. Connecticut and Massachusetts. It will l>e 

gin on Julv nth. and will extend over more than Poo 

miles of highway. Four motor cars will he empl 

to carry the eight investigators. This might l>e di ne 

in California with good results. 
* * * 
An automobile record from Chico, Butte County, 
to ( Iroville, has just been established by Phil Pennick, 

of Chico. who made the trip of twenty-four mil 
just an hour and five minutes. Pennick left Chico 
just at sundown, and arrived in the county-seat be- 

for it was time to lisjht the lamps on the front of the 
machine. The feat is all the more remarkable when 
it is known that beside the driver the machine con- 
tained .Major Joins ami family, of ( Iroville, and Mis- 
Jessie Martin of Stirling City. The road tor a short 
distance out of Chico is very good for fast time, but 
beyond that portions of the road are very poor, and 
over such places Pennick was forced to slacken the 
speed of the automobile. 

» * * 

The executive committee of the American Automo- 
bile Association took upon itself recently to declare 
off the scheme for the merger of that organization 
with the American Motor League through the fol- 
lowing statement, signed by Harlan W. Whipple, the 
A. A. A. president: 

"The proposed merger between the American Au- 
tomobile Association and the American Motor 
League will not take place, since the committees 
which were appointed to draw up a constitution did 
not agree, this agreement on a constitution having 
been a condition precedent to the proposed merger." 

* * * 

A recent development in automobile manufacture 
which is of much importance is the automatic starter. 
A New Jersey Company has introduced two distinct 
styles of automatic starters for gasoline motors, one 
being an electric and the other a spring or mechani- 
cal device. The electric starter consists of a dynamo 
motor and a set of storage batteries. The latter fur- 
nish current to the motor which "cranks" the gaso- 
line engine. After the car attains a fair speed the 
function of the motor is reversed, and receiving power 
from the engine, it, as a dynamo, recharges the stor- 
age batteries. 

* * * 

Beginning at sunrise on the morning of October 8th 
the great automobile race will be held over a course 
on Long Island, with the W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., tro- 
phy as first prize. The race will be over a course of 
not less than 250 miles and not more than 300, and, 
according to the deed of gift, which is just given out 
by the A. A. A. racing board, the contest will be open 
to the world, although only ten men from any one 
country will be allowed to compete. 

Eyes Irritated by Wind 

Mineral laden poisonous dust, and strong sunlight, need care. 
Murine Eye Remedy soothes Eye pain and cures Inflammation. 
Redness, Itching. Oranulated and Weak Eyes. Murine Is an 
Bye Tonic; an aid to those wearing glasses. 







Which of the Locomobile Twins. ReliabHIly or Simplicity, 
Is more attractive? 

Bellabillty and Simplicity are the most im- 
portant qualities In any car. Best exempli- 
fied in the Locomobile. Front vertical motors 
only. Trices. S310Q up At present writing 
our i-cyl. car holds N. Y. -Boston Record 
both directions. 



Both records were made by purchasers 
driving their own cars. 

THE LOCOMOBILE GO. of America, Brldecport, Conn. 

Branch Offices: N. Y.. Broadwav and Tf.th St. 
riiila . 210 North Brnnd St.: Chicago. 1354 
Michigan Ave. : Bridgeport. Factory at Sea- 
side Park ; Boston, lfi Berkeley St. 
Member Association of Licensed Auto mob He Af/rs. 



NEW and 

SECOND HAND 

Automobiles 

BOUGHT, SOLD and EXCHANGED 

NEW 1904 OLDSMOBILE RUNABOUT 

NEW 1904 WTNTON 

1904 KNOX, nearly new 

1903 STEVENS-DURYEA, in excellent 
condition. 



Also Extensive List of Machines in good Condition 



J. J. ADEL, Automobile Broker 
401 California Street, San Francisco 



Room 22. Phone Main 115 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO 
EXPOSITION NOTES 



NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, igo i 



World's Fair Grounds, July 7, 1904. 

American tapestry weaving, an industry that 

has been established and developed in this country 
since the World's Fair at Chicago, is shown in its 
perfection in the Palace of Varied Industries, in the 
exhibit of William Baumgarten & Co., whose looms 
are located in Williamsburg, N. Y. Art connois- 
seurs pronounce the American product equal to that ■ 
of the finest French and Flemish establishments. 

Three typewriters, valued at $1150 each, have 

just been added to the exhibit of the Oliver Type- 
writer Company in the Pslace of Liberal Arts. All 
have mother-of-pearl keys, and the parts usually 
nickel-plated on a machine are in either gold or sil- 
ver. One is finished in gold and white, another in 
gold and blue, and the third in silver and red. 

A press bureau has been established in the 

Stockton section of the California exhibit. Colvin B 
Brown, secretary of the Stockton Chamber of Com- 
merce, is in charge of the Bureau. It was decided 
to meet in the Nebraska Theatre regularly every 
Tuesday at 9:30 a. m. 

The complete process of irrigation as prac- 
ticed in California, can now be seen in the Riverside 
County exhibit. 

The fine collection of Tiffany jewels was 

placed on display in Gallery No. 29 in the Central 
Structure of the Art Palace this nv rring. These 
jewels, which are valued at over $50,000, include jew- 
elry, fine pottery and vases. A large Sixteenth Cen- 
tury Spanish collar and pendant, with carved geld 
enamel figures and rose diamond settings, is a feature 
of the display. 

r The Robin Conveying Belt Company, of New 

York, has in its exhibit a large apparatus which 
shows the process of conveying materials by means 
of belts. 

The Lidgerwood Manufacturing Company, of 

New York, has an attractive display, which consists 
of a 30-foot table, on which is a model conveyor, run 
by electricity. Also a logger and skidder, which 
conveys miniature logs back and forth, showing the 
working of the apparatus. 

■ A gravity conveyor, resembling a small scenic 

railway, is in operation in the exhibit of the Alvey- 
Ferguson Company, of Louisville, Ky. The demon- 
stration consists in carrying boxes to different places 
by their own weight. 

Press and die machines, pulleys, pneumatic 

hammers, punches, drilling machines, polishers, 
threaders, speed regulators, precision machines, wood 
cutting apparatus, looms, refrigerating engines, and 
all kinds of gas engines, may be seen performing 
their different functions. 

The Otis Elevator Company is putting in regu- 
lation elevators which will run to the top of the build- 
ing. 

The 27000 h. p. steam turbine which is be- 
ing erected by the General Electric Company, of 
Schenectady, New York, will be running in a' few- 
days. 

John H. Patterson, the philanthropic president 

of the National Cash Register Company at Dayton 
Ohio, has decided to send to the World's Fair at his 



iftkey worvt get yo\i 

pe&rlirve 

l-see if 



iKey doKl 
say tKc\! 
w&shirvg wiiK 
Soap is loo hard for 

Any Woraari 



e&rlirve 

Makes WomartsWork of Washing 



own expense 1,000 of his employees in the great fac- 
tory. Mr. Patterson has just finished two weeks at 
the Fair, and declares it to be the greatest school 
that has ever been created in the world. Each head 
of department and assistant and their wives, and each 
of the 600 girl employees are to be the guests for two 
weeks of Mr. Patterson at the Fair — he to pay their 
railroad and sleeping car fare and their admission 
to the grounds while in St. Louis. This means that 
the company intends to present to its employees as a 
reward for faithful services and as incentive to future 
good work, through the education to be obtained at 
the Fair, a total of $14,000 in prizes. 

When asked for his object in such an undertaking, 
Mr. Patterson said : "I intend to send my people to 
the World's Fair because it is right, and because it 
pays. I say my people, because we are all one, a 
united, happy family. I want them to see the best 
the world has produced. I want them to learn every- 
thing they possibly can learn. I believe that a visit 
to the St. Louis Fair will do more for us than any- 
thing else that could be suggested. I know we will 
be fullv repaid for everything we do by the increased 
intelligence that will come to our workmen through 
the education they will receive at the World's Fair, 
which to me is the greatest and grandest school in the 
world. I only regret that it will so soon pass away." 



Dentist. 806 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker. 

Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 



See our 3 months ahead ideas in hats. 
Palace. 



Tom Dillon & Co., opp. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup" 

for your chlldre i wi..,e teething. 



WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN- 

V V o 

Scotch_Whisky 

Importers-MACONDRAY & CO. 



July 16. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NEWS LET! 



*9 




IF THIS WERE FAITH! 

Thp I 

If tli is were enough, 
That I sec things bare to the buff 
And up to the buttocks in mire. 
That I ask nor hope nor hire. 
Not in the husk, 
Xor dawn beyond the dusk, 
Nor life beyond death: 
' lod ! If this were faith ! 

Having felt Thy wind in my face 

Spit sorrow and disgrace. 

Having seen Thy evil doom 

In Golgotha and Khartoum, 

And the brutes, the w>>rK of Thine hands, 

Fill with injustice lands 

And stain with blood the sea. 

If still in my veins the glee 

Of the black night and the sun 

And the lost battle run ; 

If. an adept, 

The iniquitous lists I still accept 

With joy, and joy to endure and be withstood, 

And still to battle and perish for a dream of good: 

God! If that were enough! 

If to feel in the ink of the slough 

And the sink of the mire 

Veins of glory and fire 

Run through and transpierce and transpire, 

And a secret purpose of glory fill each part, 

And the answering glory of battle fill my heart ; 

To thrill with the joy of girded men, 

To go on forever and fail, and go on again, 

And.be mauled to the earth and arise, . 

And contend for the shade of a word and a thing not 

seen with the eyes, 
With the half of a broken hope for a pillow at night 
That somehow the right is the right, 
And the smooth shall bloom from the rough : 
Lord ! If that were enough ! 



FAME. 
By Thomas Bicket in Cosmopolitan 

A mighty sea, surging and roaring past, 
Where towering billows leap 
On the open deep, 

On, to an unknown coast. 

A tiny drop, that rides a seething crest, 
Up from the wild sea thrown 
A moment high, alone, 

Then, in the vortex — lost. 



ALMS. 

By Florence Earle Coates in Harpers Monthly 
A beggar, bent beneath the weight of years — 

To wretchedness inured, half reconciled, 
Entreated help, and I could give but tears ; 

Yet grateful looked the man on me and smiled. 



$200 Reward 

For the arrest and conviction of any one as- 
saulting members or employees of this association 
or destroying property belonging to them. 






(IWI 



Report promptly to the Law Department, Citi- 
zens' Alliance, 217 Crossley Building. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

CITIZENS' ALLIANCE 



NOTICE TO HORSE OWNERS 

JEPSON BROS. COMPANY, Inc., makers of fine har- 
ness and Importers of English Saddlery, will now be 
found at 110-112 MARKET STREET, where you will 
find the finest and largest stock of everything for the 
horse, show-ring and stock-farm. Telephone Bush 651. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

Blake, Moffli t & Towne, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 

TEL. MAIN ISO. 55-57-59-61 FIRST ST.. SAN FRANCISCO. 



n t For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

Kril^tlPC laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
u *■'-'"*»■» billiard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento 5 , S. F., Tel. .lain 561 I 



Old Rose Bud Whiskey 

Absolutely the purest on the market. 
APPLEGATE ® SONS. Distillers 

Louisville, Ken. Pacific Coast Agents 

RATHJEN WINE COMPANY. 



46 ELLIS STREET, S. F. 
Telephone, Main 6171. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS- CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents. 
Oceanic Steamship Company 
Qllllngham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St. 



SING FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but one price. 
All goods marked In plain English figures. 

614 DUPONT STREET, 8. F. Next to St. Mary's Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, Ban Francisco. Tel. Main 1323. 

E. BRIDGE. Proprietor. 




3o 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



INSURANCE 



FIRE, MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,850,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, TEXN. 

Paid-up Capital 18,000.000 

Surplus to Policy-Holders 6,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent 202 Tine St.. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up. $3,446,100. Assets. $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch : 
FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, OT Montgomery Street 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAL'L F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 5. i ; 2.030 

Surplus to Policyholders.. -'.441.485 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager Pacific Department 
COLIN M. BOTD, Agent for San Francisco, am tjum-onje Sireel 

Unexcelled ror liberality and security. 
LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Offlce: 

Pacific Mutual Bulldln», 

San Francisco. 

DON'T INSUEE— Until you have examined the now 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy 

Issued exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 

Assets, $ 1 ,500,000 Insurance in force, $2 1 ,CC0,CC0 

For particulars address the Company. Agents Wanted. 
Marion Building 110 Geary St. San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool 
Capital .'. $6,700,000 



316 California St-. S. F 



Balfour, Guthrie & Co. Agents. 

Cash Capital, $200,000.00 Cash Assets, $321,471.19 

PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Home Offlce, 328 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, General Liability, Workmen's Col- 
lective, Vessels, Elevators. 

Edmund F. Green, President; Ant. Borel & Co., Treas. William 
M. Pierson, Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane, Secretary; Frank 
P. Deerlng. Counsel. 

MARSHAL A. FRANK. General Agent for California. Hay- 
wards Building. 



North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Ag't, 304 Montgomery St., S. F 
FIRE EXTINGUI S H^eTrS 

CH AS. P. FONDA 

3I8 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




^^t^^&mxiStx 



nsurance 




It is rumored that the German Underwriters, the 
annex of the Milwaukee Mechanics Insurance Com- 
pany, is to be capitalizeu and made a stock company. 

* * * 

The Canadian Credit Indemnity Company of To- 
ronto, Canada, with a capital of $1,000,000, has just 
been organized to write employers liability and 

credit indemnity. 

* * * 

The Metropolitan has just issued a partnership 
policy for one hundred and five thousand dollars in 
favor of the Hilbcrt Mercantile Company — $35,000 
each on the life of the company's president, vice- 
president and secretary. 

* * * 

Mr. A. C. Olds, of the Phoenix of Brooklyn, is in 

Seattle. 

* * » 

Mr. George J. Wellington, the president of the 
Louis L. Janes Company, and the sprinkler author- 
ity, is on a business trip to Washington. 

* * :. 

The United States manager of the Caledonian, Mr. 
C. H. Post, and Mr. Atwood, the secretary of the 
Rochester German, are in the city. 

* * * 

President Irvin of the Fire Association is to take 

a two months' vacation on the Continent. 

* * * 

The Mutual Life has determined to cease doing 
business in Germany. This action, according to 
I 'resilient McCurdy's statement, was brought about 
by the arbitrary actions of the German Government. 
Mr. McCurdy says: "We are confronted as a sine 
qua 11011 for admission to the empire with the demand 
that the management of the company shall be prac- 
tically turned over to the authorities of the German 
empire. This we respectfully and positively decline 
to do." Now, whether the Mutual is different to the 
other American life companies doing business in the 
German Empire, or the other companies different to 
the Mutual, remains to be seen. If one American 
Company can "be taken and the other left," it would 
lead to the suspicion that the German Government 

is playing favorites. 

* * * 

President John A. McCall, of the New York Life, 

sailed last week for Europe. 

* * * 

The Insurance Times is responsible for the follow- 
ing: "A machinery insurance company, capitalized 
at $2,000,000, goes by the name of Stuttgarter Mit- 
und Ruckversicherungs-Aktiengesellschaft. This is 
not the stutterer's name for it, either." If it ever en- 
ters this State, the office doors of California's Insur- 
ance Commissioner will have to be enlarged to per- 
mit of its admission. 

* * * 

Underwriters in this city are discussing just what 
the purchase of the American by the Manchester had 
to do with the Manchester absorption by the Atlas. 
That the Manchester lost money by the transaction 
goes without saying. The home office of the Atlas 
is still sphinx-like in its silence as to what is to be 
done with the Manchester business and agents in this 



July 16. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

l><- maintained 
there will not be any no 

them. 

* • • 

Mr. Ian tome, who has won tame on the 

reful and able life il 
ippointed general agent for the Fidelity Mutual 
Insurance Company. Mr. Rathbun has gone t" 
rado with the Equitable. 

* • • 

The National Surety Company has just gone 
through another examination by the Missouri I; 
ance Department. The result was that the condition 
of the National was found to he hetter than pr.i 
statement, its assets and surplus being considerably 
greater, and all its liabilities correctly set out. 

* * V 

The Pacific Mutual is to open a department in Chi- 
cago for its intermediate business. 

* * » 

The Merchants of Newark, which was at 
time doing a nice business on this Coast, and which 
closed business in 1902, is to be re-organized, and 
will again try to do a general business. 

* * * 

The notorious Old Wayne Life of Indiana has es- 
caped the bone-yard, and is re-organized. The re- 
cei\er of the old, old Wayne has, however, begun 
suit against former President Stewart and former sec- 
retary Gilmore and their wives for sixty thousand 
dollars alleged to have been misappropriated by them. 

* * * 

Mr. William Sexton, general adjuster for the Fire- 
man's Fund, has gone on a flying trip to the East. 

* * * 

Fire Chief Croker of New York gives the following 
advice as to what should be done by persons confined 
to a building in which there is a fire : Keep cool and 
wait for the firemen. Open window top and bottom. 
Don't jump till the last minute. Don't cling to fire- 
men on the ladder. Jump for life net as if diving into 
water. In smoke-filled room lie on the floor. Above 
all — wait for the firemen. Undoubtedly this is good 
advice, but it could be improved on by commencing 
with the advice: "Get out if you can." 

* * * 

The combined assets of the three largest life insur- 
ance companies of New York amount to $1,135,699,- 

743- 

* * * 

The National Surety Company has issued a sched- 
ule bond covering the officers of the fraternal, society 
known as the Modern Woodmen. The maximum lia- 
bility of the bond is $11,000,000; the individual lia- 
bility is limited to $250,000. 

* * * 

The Equitable Life has served the following notice 
on its home office employees : 

"Dear Sir — For reasons that seem proper to the 
officials of the society, you are hereby notified that 
your presence on a race track, in a poolroom, or in 
future to be seen in company with persons whose 
business it is to place bets on horse races, will be 
counted sufficient excuse on which to request your 
resignation from the affairs of the society. 

"To make it certain that the excuse of not haying 
been duly notified as to this new ruling of the society, 
and for future reference, you will kindly place your 
proper signature on this communication and return 
it to the office of the general manager." 

It might be a wise thing for all the companies to 



VS LETTER. 



3» 



•III men. I 

. . 

... 

^.111 1 : 

* * * 

Mr yell known in San Fran 

Bailed tor Europe a short tune ago. 1:. 

k a policy oi insurance on hi-, In. 
half a million dollars. 

* * • 

The Hanover Fire of New York has reduced its 
semi-annual dividend from 5 to 4 per cent, owing to 
Baltimore loss 

* * » 

The State of Minnesota has just place. 1 $4,50 
insurance on its institutional buildings at an average 
rate of one and one-quarter per cent, for three years. 



Always Insist upon having 
The Genuine 

MURRAY & 

LANMAN'S 
Florida Water 

The most refreshing and 
delightful perfume for the 
handkerchief, toilet and bath 



TOflK_IJW, Photographer 



1490 MARKET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
GROUND FLOOR STVDIO 



Between 

7th and 8th Streets 



PRESS 

GET 



CLIPPING^ 

THE HABIT 



of using nttr Tress Clippil gs in whatever diversion you may be 
Interested iiud you will marvel at the results. The "Aigtts" has 
mam eyes, yon only two. so let us do the work for you. Send 
flv-. dollars for a final order with your desired instruct ions. We 
will do the test and benefit you in many wa>s. 

Argus Press Clipping Bureau 

Otto Speugler, Director 
3S2 Third Ave . . . New York. City 



AN ELECTRIC FAN MOTOR 

Will Keep You Cool. Write For Prices 
National Electric Co. 

465 Sutter Street. Telephone Bush 639 San Francisco 

NEWTON J. THARP 

ARCHITECT 
131 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



C. H. Rehnstrom (formerly Sanders & Johnson.) 

E. W. Hagbom, (formerly with James W. Bell & Co., of New York) 

REHNSTROM $ HAGBOM 

TAILORS 

PHELfIN BUILDING ROOMS 1, 2, 3 

Phone Main 5387, San Franclaco. 



lied Eyes and Eye- 
lids, Gran u 1 a t e d 
Eyelids and other 
Eye troubles cured 



MURINE EVE REMEDY 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



A Bank of England Yarn 



By Alexander Del M&r 



It was told at Delmonico's in New York: the 
speaker, a well-known mining engineer; the occa- 
sion, a supper; the party, a few professionals. 

"Some years ago," said the engineer. "I received 
orders from a London banking house to examine cer- 
tain tin mines in California and communicate result- 
by cable. The house was of the highest character, 
the fees were liberal, and [ started at once. My in- 
structions were to proceed to a place that I shall name 
Bolton, on the Southern Pacific Railway, where 1 
would meet with a guide to the mines. 

"At Bolton 1 was met by Judge Sharpe with a 
buggy and a double team, and was rapidly driven to 
Premiscal, where the Judge had a ranch in which we 
put up over night. 1 spent the following two days in 
examining the property and mining resources and 
completing my field-notes. Judge Sharpe was anxious 
to know what I thought of the property, but he got 
nothing from me: so back we went to Bolton, where 
I took the railway to San Francisco. 

"Upon crossing from Oakland to that city 1 was 
surprised to find at the Market-street ferry-house my 
old friend General Touchinson, who greeted my re- 
turn with an effusiveness that at once put me on my 
guard. So glad to see me back; hoped I had enjoyed 
my trip to New York; and would I lunch with him 
next day at the Poodle Dog? This capped the cli- 
max. Touchinson wasn't a mean man ; but the Poodle 
Dog! Well, that evidently meant something, but 
what it turned out to be I never for a moment sus- 
pected. < If course 1 accepted. 

"On the morrow 1 accompanied the General to the 
Poodle Dog. The General was a bulky, white- 
bearded veteran, dressed in black broadcloth and 
while necktie, an insurance president, the very pic- 
ture of commercial probity and domestic respectabil- 
ity — in short, one of the solid men of the West. We 
chatted gaily 011 the- way.- had lots of local gossip 
to communicate, shoved in a slice of church matters, 
and even essayed a joke or two. < )bserving the 
painful results on his features which followed this 
last attempt. I considerately led the conversation 
back to parish affairs, wondering all tin- while what 
the old man was up to. [ had once made an appeal 
to a committee of the California Senate in behalf of 
fair play to the 'foreign' insurance companies. Some- 
thing about insurance, 1 inwardly conjectured. 

"In we went and sat down at a cosy, round table 
in a favorable light, the < ieneral politely handing me 
the bill of fare for a choice of viands. I selected a 
small steak and returned him the menu. 

" 'No, no,' he objected. 'Nothing of that sort. 1 
don't see you every day; so we must have something 
more ceremonious. Mere, landlord! What have you 
that is rare and tasty?' 

"It was in vain that 1 protested. He would have 
his own way, and ordered terrapin soup, canvasback 
duck, champagne, and all the rest of it. Then I knew 
that the business was serious. So 1 bucked sharply 
at the champagne, and swore I was a blue-ribbon. 

" 'Since when?' asked the old pard, with an incred- 
ulous laugh. 

" 'Well, since this morning, if you like,' was my 
reply. 

"Pie saw that I meant it, and desisted ; just making 
a pretense of tasting the liquor himself. 

"With coffee and cigars came the business. He said 



that he had long desired to have made a thorough ex- 
amination of quartz mines he owned near Reno, 
Nevada, and had finally made up his mind that I 
was the man to do it. Now, for an old friend, what 
would my charge be? 

" 'I low deep is the mine? I asked. 

"1 fe didn't know. 

" 'Has it been worked; has it any hoisting machin- 
ery ?" 

"It hadn't been worked; and it had no hoister. In 
truth, he didn't know much about it. All he knew 
was its name — it was called the Maryland. I must 
take my chances and suggest a fee that would cover 
them. 

"Concluding that the mines were a mere prospeel 
and easily surveyed, I mentioned at haphazard a 
thousand dollars .and traveling expenses, a sum to 
which he at once agreed. 

" 'Let me see.' said the General, reflectively, and 
bedding up his fingers to count: 'Twelve times one 
■ ire twelve. That's twelve thousand dollars. One 
traveling expense covers the lot. When can you 
start v 

"I didn't understand. The General benignant!)' 
explained: 

" 'You see, there are altogether twelve mines, ail 
named after the Southern Stales, commencing with 
'Maryland' and ending with 'Texas.' One thousand 
dollars each makes twelve thousand ; half in advance, 
1 suppose; the usual terms. Now when can you 
start ?' 

"1 knew that the General was responsible; I knew 
that in his fight against the local insurance companies 
he had not been afraid to spend money for profes 
sional aid ; but twelve thousand dollars for a week's 
services in Nevada — this looked queer. However, 
not to stop the Pactolian flood, I replied that I could 
start on the morrow. 

" 'Well, you see,' said the General, gazing absentl) 
at the pattern on the wall-paper, 'the money for your 
lees is to come from London: and I may not get a 
cablegram until the day after to-morrow. How 
would that suit you?' 

" 'Oh, then, you are offering these Nevada mines 
in London?' 

"'No; at least not at present. That will depend 
upon your report.' 

"'Then what has London to do witli my fees;' 

"'That's just it! That's the 'point,' responded the 
honest old General. 'The fact is, that in addition to 
the Nevada gold mines I own an interest in some 
California tin mines down at Premiscal.' 

"I started. 

"'And these mines are being offered in London, 
with an almost certain probability of their accept- 



'"BA'B'S" 



Epicurtan "Restaurant 
323 LARKIN STREET 



15he Jeemes H Bibcock Catering Co. 



409 Golden Gate Ave. 



July .6. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

Much -l<|..n.K upon ll 

will 
• : and ju« . offi 

' l»c 111 a position t.> |>a\ down \ <>nr 
for the Nevada «->rk.' 

I I presume yon .1" nol know the name u( this 

!' replied the (lencral, hiking a 1 >it confusctl. 
" "Well, you'll n<> doubt l<rirn it in lime.' I r 
ing for my hat. 'Meanwhile, you will be 
enough to consider that Nevada journey quite im- 
hlc," and I walked out of the Ptodlc ! 
" \- I passed the door, I heard an angry and baf- 
tied voice exclaim: 'Landlord! bring me the l>ill!' 
and that is the las) I ever saw or heard of Touchin- 

"That night I cabled to London: 'Premiscal mines 
undesirable at any price. Owners unreliable. Do 
nothing until I report in person. St?rting Saturday 

for London.' 

"A fortnight later I was in St. Swithin's Lane; and 
the sale of iFc Premiscal mines fell through. 

"Shortly after t hi> time I was invited to dine with 
the Governor and director- of the Bank of England 

at tin refectory in the hank. There were present at 
the function the Governor, Mr. Collet, the ex-Govern- 
ors Grenfell and Gibbs (afterward Lord Aldeuham). 
Karon A. F. de Rothschild. John S. (iilliat- and some 
fifteen or twenty other gentlemen. The conversa- 
tion turned upon the future production of gold. As 
it was known to several of those present that I had 
visited the principal auriferous districts, my opinion 
on the subject was asked by .Mr. Gibbs. 

"'For the next five years.' said I. 'my estimate is 
about one hundred twenty-five million dollars a year.' 

"And what proportion of this will California 
yield ;' asked .Mr. Collet. 

" 'About a million dollars a month,' I replied. 

" 'Let me see,' said Mr. Collet, calculating, 'twelve 
times one are twelve ' 

" 'Not always,' I interrupted. 

"The whole party turned toward me. 

" 'Not always,' I repeated, 'for I remember an oc- 
casion when twelve times one came to nothing.' 

" 'A mining yarn,' suggested one of the directors. 
I nodded assent. 'Oh, well, then, let's have it.' 

"Then I told them my story of the Premiscal mines. 

"That year I had more mining commissions than 
I could execute. When I returned to California I 
had twenty-five thousand dollars in bank, every 
penny of it honestly earned. I tell you, boys, it 
pays." — Exchange. 

The Perfection 
of a pure, rich, unsweetened condensed milk is Borden's 
Peerless Brand Evaporated Cream. It is always available 
(or every use to which raw milk or cream is devoted and 
is far superior to the average quality of either. Prepared 
by Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 



VS LETTER. 



33 



You can clean a carpet at home by the expenditure 

of a lot of strength, patience and time. Then it won't be 
a successful job. It's a lot more sensible to send it to 
Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Co., 353 Tehama street, and 
if you try them once you will . never go back to the old 
clothes-line and stick way. They clean carpets thoroughly. 



Quality is the keynote of the management at Techau's 

Tavern, where everybody who is anybody goes after the 
theatre. This restaurant has taken the lead and is keeping 
it. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

for $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; -uarter ton $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co.. South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 




EDISON PHONOGRAPH AGENCY 

PETKlt B.U'Ili.VLUri 

HAS REMOVED FROM 933 MARKET STREET, TO 
THEIR NEW STORE 

784-788 MISSION STREET, S. F. 



Locomotor Ataxia and Paralysis 

POSITIVELY CURED 

REFERENCES FbRMSHtD TO THOSE WHO ARE 
AFrECTED AND WANT TO INVESTIGATE. 

BRYN MAWR SANITARIUM 

HAYWARDS, CAL. 



Golden West Clothing Renovatory 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Phone Main 11:7. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed $1.00 

Monthly Contracts 1.50 



La Grande Laundry 



Laundry— 12th St., between Folsom and Howard Sts. 
Principal office— 23 Powell St. Branch office— 11 Taylor St. 
Tel. Bush 12. 



Bon Marche Clothing Renovatory 

40 Ellis Street, Rooms 14-15-16. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed il.00 

Suits called for and delivered free. SUITS PRESSED 

WHILE YOU SLEEP. Repairing and Alterations. OPEN 

ALL NIGHT. We run four wagons. Telephone Drumm 44. 



Pacific Towel Company 



No. 



Lick Place. 



Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels, ?1 per month; 
12 hand or roller towels, $1.50 per month. Tel, Main 
17S0. 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms 303, 304. 305. I lours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone, Private Exchange. 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 5th avenue and 16th St., Oakland. Tel. Ease 36 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



NO. 13 IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 

Queen Victoria once asked Ambassador Choate 
if Americans believed 13 to be an unlucky number. 

"No, your Majesty," he replied, "we do not, for 
the eternal foundations of our republic were built 
upon the number 13." 

Let us see what Mr. Choate referred to. In the 
first place, America was discovered on the eve of the 
13th day of the month, and the original republic con- 
sisted of 13 colonies. The first official stars and 
stripes adopted June 14, 1777, had 13 stripes and 13 
stars. Our national emblem — the American eagle — 
requires 13 letters to spell it, as does the motto on 
our seal — E Pluribus Unum, and of the great seal of 
the United States, Annuit Coeptis. 

The first word to pass over the Atlantic cable was 
sent on the 13th day of the month, and on Friday at 
that. The silver quarter in your purse is not consid- 
ered a "hoodoo," yet 13 is written all over it. Above 
the bead of Liberty are 13 stars, the eagle bears an 
olive branch with 13 leaves in one claw and 13 thun- 
derbolts in the other. On his breast is a shield bear- 
ing 13 bars, and from his beak streams a ribbon with 
our motto containing 13 letters. Each wing has 13 
feathers, while, as you know, it takes 13 letters to 
spell quarter dollar. 

The war of 1776 was called revolutionary, and was 
not unsuccessful because spelled with 13 letters. Our 
flag was saluted by 13 guns when Washington raised 
it — yes, and by 13 cheers. The American navy had 
just 13 vessels at the outset — no more — and the 
founder of it, John Paul Jones, was not unlucky be- 
cause of the letters of his name. He was exactly 13 
years old when he first came to America, and was the 
first to carry the 13-starred flag to victory, and to 
have it saluted by a foreign power on the 13th day of 
the month. Perry's great victory on Lake Erie was 
won on the 13th day of the month, and the Stars and 
Stripes raised over Sumpter on the 13th. 

It would seem that the evil omens attached to the 
number 13 merely hint at the retribution which over- 
takes those who profane that which is essentially 
sacred. 

Reverend Minot J. Savage in a sermon on "Super- 
stitions" declares that he never found 13 unlucky ex- 
cept on one occasion when he owed a bill for 13 dol- 
lars and had but 12 with which to meet it. 

We all know that rooms in hotels, staterooms and 
sleepers bearing the number 13 are not taken from 
choice by the average person. A traveling man ar- 
riving late at a hotel was assigned to room 13. "X", 
you don't," said he, "I'll sleep on the billiard table 
or office floor first." Tne clerk with a merry twinkle 
sent him to 94, and the guest failed to add the figures 
together. 

In the life of Richard Wagner, 13 played a part. 
He was born in 1813, the numerals of which added 
make 13; he finished "Tannhauser" April 13, i860, 
and it was performed for the first time March 13, 1861. 
He died February 13, 1883 — a most unlucky thing for 
the world at large. — Boston Brown Book. 



Murine as an Eye Tonic 

has won a prominent place on the dressing table of the elite; 
restores normal conditions and natural brilliancy to a Faded 
Eye, gives comfort to the Tired and Inflamed Eye. 



One goes naturally to Swains 209 Post >t\, for a good luncheon. 

There is nothing in town that van eouipaiv with this place as a place 
of rest and refreshment after the toils i f slio] pii g. Ihty aie always 
ready to deliver ice-cream and pastry— ulwais the best, and their 
promptness can be depended upon. 



MT. SHASTA 



SUMMER RATES 



Fishing, hunting and camping facilities make 
the Shasta region most satisfactory as an 
outing place. There are no better trout 
streams than those about Shasta, and you 
are always in easy reach of direct communi- 
cation with the city. 

Tickets at Red viced Rentes 

Make Access Easy for 

Everybody 

Ask for a Shasta folder. It is illustrated, 
and will give you full information about 
every part of the Shasta country. Free 
from any agent, or Information Bureau. 

613 Market Street 

Southern Pacific 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau has removed to the rooms 

formerly occupied by Bradstreet's, at 230 California street, San 
FranciBco. 



California Northwestern Ry. 

The Picturesque Route of California 

Deer Hunting 

The best Fishing and Hunting in California is along 
this Road, within a few hours' ride of San Francisco. 
The DEER SEASON opens July 15th in Mendocino County; 
August 1st in Lake County ;July 15th in Sonoma County ; 
July 15th in Marin County- 

BLACK BASS FISHING 



Opened July 1st. These are plentiful in the Russian 
River, particularly in the vicinity of Guerneville and 
Camp Vacation. 

TAKE YOUR ROD— Our Rivers and Streams are full of 
Trout. 

TAKE YOUR GUN and get a Deer. Many are now being 
seen daily. 

The Game Laws are enforced along this Road. Consult 
"VACATION 1904*' to be had at the offices of the Company. It will 
tell you where you can camp or board, and be near your game. 

Ticket Office, «50 Street (Chronicle Building), and Tiburon Ferry. 
General Office. Mutual Life Building, corner Cali- 
fornia and Sansome sts.. San Francisco, Cal. 



/. L. FRAZIER 

GerCl Manager 



R. X. RYAN 

GetVl Ptin'r Agt, 



July 16, 1904. 

HAND 
SAPOLIO 

!]>• valuable iluring the 
jummcr season, when outdoor occu- 
pations and sports are most in order. 
GRASS STAINS, MUD STAINS 
and CALLOUS SPOTS 
yield to it, and it is particularly 
agreeable when used in the bath 
after violent exercise. 
ALL QROCERS AND DRL'QUISTS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
SUNBLAMS 



35 



Hope is the dream that keeps us 
whistling on the road to sorrow. 
The morning sunshine makes 

the brightest star- in our lives loo!< 
dipt. 

The hills of Life look inviting; 
but how few of us feel like shout- 
ing halleluiah when we reach the 
top. 

'I he devil is never as Mack as 
he's painted; but he's still black 
enough ti> deceive the best of the 
saints on a dark night. 

It isn't always the longest plat 
form that contains the most meat. 

Man's lot would be a much hap- 
pier one if women were barre I 
from national conventions. 



BETHESDA 



THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER 



LOUIS CAHEN ® SON. 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

418 Sacramento St., San Francisco 




Double Daily Service to All Points 
East via 

PUEBLO, KANSAS CITY 
a ST. LOUIS 

Through Pullman Sleeping cars and Ob- 
servation Cafe Dining Gars, with Electric 
Lights and Electric Fans. Scenic Eoute 
through Colorado. For tickets, berth reser- 
vations, folders, etc., call on or address 

GENERAL TICKET OFFICE 

62S Market Street, San Francisco. Oal. 

(Palaoe Hotel) 



IftloUn from Tb • • • 

"It used to be." growled the 
husband, "thai night their 

daughters how 1 Then. 

when people COIll ll r\ ant. 

as we can't, the wife would take 

hold of things, and all went we I 

1 must sa) I do,,: scC w hat tin- 
next generation will do 
iu\t generation will be all rii^ht ." 

retorted his wife, opening some 
canned meats. "The mothers -i 
to-day will teach their daughters 
how to hunt for cooks."- |udge. 

Barber — It's funny you should 
be bald so young. Victim— Yes? 

M\ brothers are the same way. 

Barber — Strange! I wonder wh) 
it is? Victim— Well, if you won't 
say anything more about it. I'll tell 
you. [ honestly believe it's because 
our hair tell out. 

Pendennis — I've made an awful 
mi-take. 1 sent a messenger boj 
up to Miss Cashley's with a lot of 
flowers, thinking it was her birth- 
day, and now I learn that her 
birthday is to-morrow. Waring- 
ton — That's all right ; the messen- 
ger hoy may get there in time. 

Doctor — As yi u live in the city. 
I wouldn't advise the sea level for 
a vacation. You need a change of 
altitude — so go to the mountains. 
Patient — But. doctor, you seem to 
forget that I've been living in a 
skyscraper hotel. 

Mrs. McCall — I'm so sorry I 
shan't meet your husband, Mrs. 
Clubb. I'm told he's a man of such 
fine presence. Is he not? Mrs. 
Clubb — Well, really, I know very 
little about that. I'm more familiar 
with his absence. 

"Why can't you marry me? It 
is true I'm not enormously rich, 
still I have an income plenty bis 
enough to support us nicely." 
"Yes,- but think how ridiculously 
small the alimony allowance out of 
it will be." 

"Can you direct me, my man," 
asked the English tourist, "to a 
place where one may get a good 
drink?" "Well," replied the thirsty- 
native, "I kin direct you to a 
place where two may get a good 
drink." 

Si Hawfoot — Here, what you do- 
ing' Willie Misser — I'm waiting 
to see if any fanner goes toward 
that animal with a milk pail, be- 
cause that's the way I can tell 
whether it's a deer or a cow. 

Father — But I am afraid he is 
a young man of fickle character. 
Daughter— Oh, no, he isn't, father. 
Why, he has smoked the same 
brand of cigarettes for nearly six 
months. — Puck. 



ORDER SOME 

It 



Club Cocktails" 



SENT HOME TODAY. 

__ Vou will th. ■ 

r own >i.|,-i.., r .| .1 
n Iter on Ittail 

the world. Acnckuilii 
.1 blend ..f different Ho. 

prove with age. 

Hi- " Club Cockl.il. " 

are made ..i ii„. 1, ., .,, 

weight ;* to 1 me ,t * u rc- 
no-iit. No guesswork 
about tin in. 

.\-k your husband at 
dinner which he prefers 
— .1 Manhattan, Martini, 
Whiskey, Holland (.in, 
Tom Gin, Vermouth i»r 
York. 

l-'o lile 1 1 nil 1 ,n, ■ 

and liualers tteiusnUr, ur 

VMM.' I.. 

G. F. Heublein & Bro,, 

29 Broadway, N. V. 
and Hartford, Conn. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

SPOHN-PATRICK COMPANY 

San Franclsc-o, Los Aogples. 
Denver. Salt Lake City. Seattle. 




Men marry by accident ; women 
by design. 

His wife never displays 'any 
tact : either she makes a fool of 
herself by sitting up for him, or 
shows her negligence of his com- 
fort by retiring. 

The world is divided into two 
great classes : the woman who 
loves him and the woman he loves. 

You can save time with the new 
postage stamp by sticking the let- 
ter up in the right-hand corner of 
it. 

ST AM M E R? 

We are cured , l^t us cure you. No Drawl, Sing- 
song, Timh-Bea/t, Duuas or Hypnotism. Oar 
specialty is the Solenoe ».f Speech for Stammerers, 
with close, lndavEilnal attention. Bend for 
''Speech Blemishes" nud proof of cures. 

NAT UK A I, )> 1>KECH ACADEMY 

1032 East 28th St., Los Angeles, Oal. 



THAT ST. LOUIS TRIP 

TAKE THE BUSINESS LINE 

The Union Pacific 

SAVING 12 HOURS 

Kate only $67.50 round trip. Through 
first and second-class cars, diners and all 
comforts. Best road and equipment. 
Safest line. Drop a postal and I will cal 
and explain everything. 



S. F. BOOTH, Gen. Aet.. I). P. R. R. Co. 
No. !■ Montgomery St Dan Franoisoo, Cal 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



/ M b 



BRIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New- 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block- 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



Lusher — Old man Grouchcr has 
a coin that is 2,000 years old. 
Rusher — I suppose it will be 2,003 
years older before he spends it. 




Summer 
Vacation 

Travel by Sea 

Excellent Service, Low Rales. Including Berth and Meals 

Los Angeles San Diego b'aiila Ciuz 

Santa Barbara Blunieiey 

Eureka Seattle launa 

"Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 

Alaska and Mexico. 

Alaska Excursions, 1904. The palatial excursion 
Steamship, Spokane will leave Tacoma, 
Seattle and Victoria, July 19, Aug 2. 
For information regarding sailing dates etc., obtain folder 
SAN PRANCISO TICKET OFFIlES 

4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Bote!) 
10 Market St., and Broadway Wharves- 

C. D. DUNANN, General Passenger Agent. 
10 Market Street. San Francisco 



THREE 

TIMES A DAY TO 

CHICAGO 

The Only Double Track Railway between the 
Missouri Itiver aud Chicago. 

THREE TRAINS DAILY 

VI. the Southern Paclllc. Union Pacific and Cnlcact 
and NonbweMirn I ya. 

Overland Llmlled. Vesllbnlcd. Leavi s 
San Francisco at lu.0D a. m. The nn.st 
v "^"Sl? Tra L" '" tno World. Electiic 
lighted Throughout. Buffet smoking ca r s 
with barber and bath. Booklovers Li- 
brary. Dining Cars. Standard and Com- 
partment bleeping Cars and Observation 
Cars. Less than three days to Chicago 
tttthou* change. 

Eaatera Eipress. Vestlbuled. Leaves San 
Frane.sco at 6.00 p. m. Through Standard 
and Tourist Sleeping Cars to Chicago. 
Dining Cars. Free Reclining Chair Cars. 

Atlantic Express. Vestlbuled. Leaves San 
Francisco at 9.uu a.m.Standard and Tourist 
oleepers. 

Personally Conducted Excursions 

Wednesdays. Thursdays and Fridays 

Best of everything 

R. R. Ritchie. G. A. P. C. 

Chicago and Northwestern Rys. 
•17 Market St. (Palace Hotel) San Francisco 



/^t N*\ Train* leave and are. dn« 
^y / <TTT>N'\ to arrive at 

ImUAVS^tJZi SAN FRANCISCO. 

^1*\ ^T — /#>./ Fkob July 8. 1904. 

\-?7lfTf y First Depot 

->S_}^^ (Foot of Market Street.) 

■- ,T « - MAIN LINE. - ahriv. 

7 00a VacaTlUe, Winters, Rutnsey 7 50p 

7 0f>A Benlclft, Klmlraand Sacramento . 7.20P 
7 30a Vallejo. Nupa, (/allBtojju. Santa 

Uohr. Martinez. San Ramon S 20p 

7 30a NIleB.Tracy. Lathrop, Stock:on..„ 7.20P 
6.00a Sbnata Express— (Via Dai-Is), 
William* (for Bartletc Springs). 
Willows *Fruto. Ked Bluff, 

Portland. Tacouia, Seattle 7-BOp 

B.OOa r>aviB. Woodland, Knlgbta Landing. 

Maryevllle. Chlco. Orovllle 7-50P 

8-30A Port Costa. Martinez, Antlocb, 
Byron. Tracy, Stockton. New- 
ma n Los it ii a us, Mentlot*, 
Arinona, Han ford. V i s a 1 1 a, 

PoricrvlHe 4 20P 

P -SOA Port Costa. Modesto, Merced, 
Fri'Buo. Goshen Junction, Hun- 

ford. Vlsntln. RakersHeld 4.50P 

P.30a NlU'S. Sun .lose. LIvermore, Stock- 
ion. { l Milton), lone. Sacramento, 
Mnrysvllle. Chlco. Ked 111 u IT .... 4.20P 
8-3PA Oak-lnie. Chinese, Jamestown. So- 

nortt. Tuolumne and An eels 20p 

9 0Pa Atlmiik- Express— Ogiku and East. B-20p 
9.30a Richmond. Martinez and War 

Stations B-50P 

10 OCa The Overland Limited — Ogden. 
Omaha. Chicago, Denver, Kansas 

Ctiv. St. Louis 6 20p 

1000a Vallejo 12.20P 

10.00a Los Angeles Passenger — Port 
CoBta. Martinez. Byron, Tracy, 
Lathrop, Stockton. M creed, 
Raymond, Fresno. Goshen Junc- 
tion. Hunford, Lerooorc. VI sal la. 

Bakernfleld. Los Angeles 7.20P 

1?.00m Hay ward. Nllcsand Way Stations. 3.20P 

M OOP Bacrnmt'nloUlver Steamers til. OOP 

3-30P Benli-la, Winter*. Sacramento. 
Woodland, WIMowh, K ii I l- 1KB 
Landing, Marys vllle, Orovllle 

and way stations 10 50* 

3-30P Haywnrd.Nllesand Way Stations.. / 50p 
A OOP Martinez. Snn Uiinioii.VulleJo.Napa. 

Callfltoca. sun i.. Kuan 9 20a 

4 CCp NUes. Tracy. Stork Lodl 4.2Cp 

4 ilPHayward. Nlles. lrvln,,'lon, San 1 t8B0A 

Jose. LIvermore 1 111.50a 

( 00p The Owl Limited— Newm*n. Loa 
Uanos. Mendoi a. Fresno. Tulare, 

B&kersueld. Los Angeles 8-50a 

'£ 30p Uaywanl. Mies aud San Jose 7 20a 

I (jOp May ward. Nllesaiid San Jose 9 a0* 

t GCp Eamern Expr. bb— Ugden. Omaha, 
Chicago. Denver. Kausas City, 
St. Louis, via .Mari Inez. Stotkton. 

Sacramento, Colfax, Reno 12 50p 

B.OOp Vallejo. dally, except Sunday.,.. I , ,-„„ 

7-OCp Vallejo, Sunday only f ' 50P 

7.00P 1. 1. -inn. ,11. 1. san Paldo, Port Costa, 

Martinez and Way Stations 11.20a 

7C0pKcuo Pasnenger— Port Lost-i. Sul- 
bd.II. Kimira, Davis. sncraaicDto, 
Truckec, Lake Tahue. Reno, 
Tooopnh, Sparks ?.B0a 

8 06p Port Costa, Martinez. Byron, 

Tracy, Lathrop. Modesto, 
Merced, Berenda, Fresno and 
Way Stutlons beyond port Costa 12 20p 

8-OBp VuHtmitr Valley, via Berenda and 

Wawuua 8.60a 

8.05p Martinez. Tracy, Stockton 10 20a 

8-Olp Oregon & Callfonila Express— Sao- 
, ram en to, Marynv1llc, Redding. 
* Portland. Puget Sound and East. 8.50a 

F.1fp Hay ward, Nllee and Sau Joae{Sun- 

din only 1 11 -60a 



Coast Line 

Narrow Gauge 

(Foot of Market Street) 



7 4'. a Sunt 11 1'riizExcurcloniSundnyonly) 8-1 OP 
I 1lANiu.uk, Oentervllie. San Josh, 
r. Iton. BoulderCreek. Blglliihln. 
Santa Cruz ami Way Stations... 5 BBp 
t9-15a Alvi.rndo, Newark. Sun Jose. Los 
(.iituB.GIenwood. Felton. Boulder 
Crei-lc, Big Baetn. Santa Cruz... 8-10P 
'1 Up Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, 
New Almaden. Los Gat,o». Felton. 
Boulder Creek, Sanin Cruz and 

Prlnelpal Way Stations 10 SSa 

' ir p Newark, 6an Jose, Los Catos 18-BSa 

4.1Gp Wrlnht, BoulderCreek and Santa 

Cruz. Saturd ay and Sunday only. 68.5&A 

COAST LINE (Broad ...nme). 
Itr i riilnl im.i l'.MVnneml Streets.) 

6 10a San Jose and Way Stations fi 3'p 

'7 00 a San .lone and Way Stations . 640P 

7 15a Monterey and Santa Cruz Excur- 

sion (Sunday only) 10 30p 

8.\>0a New Almaden (Tues., Frld.. only). 4.10P 
6 00a The Coaster— Sar Jose, Salinas, 
San Ardo, Paso RoblCB, Santa 
Margarita. San Luis oniapo.Sauta 
Barbara, San Buenaventiira, 
Montalvo, Oxnard, Bur<>ank. Los 

Angeles I045P 

B.OOa Gllroy. Hulllsler. Caetruvllle. Del 
Monte, Pacific Grove, Surf, Lom- 

poc 104BP 

9.00a 6an Jose. Tres Plnos. Capitola, 
8aotaCruz. Pacific Grove, Salinas. 
S n Lois Ohlspo and Principal 

U i> Statlono 4-IOp 

10-30A i-an Jfse and Way Stations 1.2QP 

11 it a Santa Clara, San Jose. Los Gatos 

and Way Stations 7.J0p 

13Cp San Jose and Way Stations 8 36a 

t3 LLP Del Monte Express— Santa Clara, 
San Jose, Del Monte, Monterey, 

Pacific Grove. 12-1&P 

3-30P Burllngame. San Jose. Gllroy, Hol- 
llBtcr, Tres PlnoB, Pajaro, Capi- 
tola, Santa Cruz, Castrovllle, 

Salinas, I'aclfic Grove 10 45a 

4 30p an .lone and Way Stations 8 00a 

•5 00p Santa Clara, -mi Jose, Lob Cntos, 
Wright and principal Way Sta- 
tions (except Sunday) '9-00 a 

>6 ?0p tan JoseandPrlnclpalWayStatlons '.9 40a 

b 45p Sunset Express. — Redwood. San 

Jose, Gllroy, Salinas, Paso Robles. 

San Lulu oblspo. Santa Barbara, 

Los Angeles, Demlng. Kl Paso, 

New Orleans. New York .. 7.10a 

64Bp Pajaro. Capitola. Santa Cruz. Cas 

trovllie.Dei MuDte.PaclHv Grove, 10-4Sp 
16 IBp ; "■■ Mateo.BereBford.Belniuni.San 
Carlos. Redwood. Fair Oaks 

MenloPark. Palo Alto >6.4ia 

6 30 p San Jose and Way Stations 6 3Sa 

800p Palo Alto and Way Stations U 15a 

11 .30p &uuih Sau Francisco, Mlllbrae. Bur 
llngame, San Mateo, itelinont, 
ban Carlos. Redwood. Fair Oaks, 

Menlo Park, and Palo Alio 9.45p 

"11 30p Maytluld, Mountain View. Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence, Santa Clara and 

San Jose .... 19 4Sp 

A for Morning. P ror Afternoon 

t Sunday excepted t Snndav onlr 

e. Saturday onlv b Monday only 

<biopw ar uli aiatluns on Sun Jay. 
Th* UN|*»* IKANSI'KI. l.:«»ftl 1AM 
will call for and check baggage from hotels and re*i 
dencea Telephone, u.xcbange S3. 



v.VM.v.ir.V3r.v.v.v.tr.%r.if.v.vy.ir.if.vYirMV*M 




sStylish $ 
i Suits 



15 



50 



Dressy Suits $20 
Pants $4.50 



My $25.00 Suits are thej* 
best in America. fe 

UrPir Cent Savtd by get-g 
' Z ting your suit made byR 

JOE P0HEIM I 

THE TAILOR R 

1110-1112 Market St S 
201-203 Montn'v St., S. F.S 

www* j» js^isjt jewA /syi/iWM/iyi* 



» Samples Sent 
> Free.... 



O. R. & N. CO. 

The Only Steamship Line to 

PORTLAND, ORE 

And Short Rail Line from Portland to all Points 
East. Through Tickets to all Points all Rail or 

Steamship and Rail at Lowest Rates. 

Steanu-r Tickets include Berth and Meals. 

8S OREGON Sails Mar. 28. April 7. 17. 27. May 
7. 17. 27. 

88 GEO. W. ELDER Sails March 23. April 
2. 12. 22. May 2. 12. 22. 

S. F. BOOTH. General Agent 
No. l Montgomery St. San Francisco. Cal. 

Irregular Conjugation. 

Jug- 
Jag- 

Jugged. 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS w,u r&ir. 

Sohmer Piano Agency 
308-312 Post St.,San Francisco 

The Ceclllan, the Perfect Piano Player 



July 16. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS Ll.TTKK 

The Smart Set end the Stage Lion 



By Lady Algy. 

The society moth i- ■gain fluttering around the 
candle— ami that "little can. lie throw 
beams" as iar as Burlingame this tune. "1 wan' 

leet my friend, Mi.-s Barrymore 
Eleanor Martin, and the Scotts and the robins, 

- and the Carolans. and the rc-t of the gilded 
clan leak sugary cordiality over the charming Mi~~ 
P.arryniore. 

Time was when the smart set blinked at familiarity 
with footlight favorites. But that was in the 
when we still wrote ourselves as provincials by de- 
clining to meet Mrs. Langtry. It was on tin 
of her first visit here, and the Jersey Lily wore the 
friendship of the Prince of Wales on her sleeve. But 
that made "no never mind" with our Puritanical aris- 
tocracy, who snubbed her royally at Del Monte and 
refused to go to a dinner a rich bachelor proposed 
in honor of the English favorite. 

But the "world do move." and the dining and win- 
ing of Melba and Fritzie Scheff, and other operatic 
headliners. with a tenor in their past, was sanctioned 
by the presence of conservative mammas and their 
debutante daughters. In the A. B. C. days of San 
Francisco society, it was considered daring to enter- 
tain Patti herself. Mrs. de Young always gave the 
diva a splendid dinner, to which the guests went as 
timorously as they would beard a Barnum lion in 
his den. That viewpoint is now as obsolete as horse- 
cars or habit-back skirts. To-day our society leaders 
scramble to entertain the actor-folk who have 
achieved social distinction in New York or London. 
In London, by the way, the shortest cut to the smart 
set is via the stage or the studio. It is much easier 
for talented people to be Englished into society than 
for the merely moneyed. 

It was in London that Ethel Barrymore first did 
the society act. She was playing small parts with 
Henry Irving, and was warmly received by the Ir- 
ving-Terry admirers. Her engagement to young Ir- 
ving was announced, and the smart set showered 
them with attentions. But their romance soon struck 
a cropper, and after the engagement was broken, Miss 
Barrymore left Irving's company. She lived in Lon- 
don with a young sister of Ferris Hartman, and the 
two have been as close friends ever since as the 
here, there and everywhere life of the stage permits. 

Miss Barrymore has been climbing the stage lad- 
der for about seven years, and in that time she has 
managed to scale social heights as well. In Newport, 
she is a Little Sister to the set that dangles dolls 
along the beach and dines with educated monkeys. 
Her plays have had such long runs in New York that 
she has had much time to give to society, and she 
has been made much of by them. Her stay in San 
Francisco will not permit lionizing to the extent 
some of our hostesses would like to indulge in, but 
Miss Barrymore will probably get as much of that 
sort of thing as she cares about. 

Probably no actress has ever so completely won 
the hearts of our society people as Margaret Anglin. 
She had not the Drew prestige which props Ethel 
Barrymore's social status. That first stock season 
that she played among us, we knew her only as an 
actress who had just attracted attention by her work 
in Rostand's "Cyrano." Every one acknowledged 
her magnetic charm, but her clothes — Ow ! There is 
no gainsaying the fact that Miss Anglin was a bit 
dowdy in those days, and there is no disputing the 
fact that many women look to the stage for sartorial 



37 

•rlv. who 
k for il 

■ 

•1 Prolunancd into lovely plu 
that wiry manager realiies tin- val 
\ll of which ii ,rguo that Margaret Anglin 

I into our smart - 
ertainty b< idiih 

ning, hut no amount of dry >uld have 

"."ii her the social position Bh« enjoys "in ! 

Mrs. Pat Campbell and Mr-. Fiske belong to 
snubocracy— in other words, they snub any attem i 
to shower social honors on them. Mrs. Fiske was ill 
while she was out In re. go ill that -he spent her days 
at a sanitarium. She did not have to send the >■ 
"declined with tlianks" replies, as every one knew 
the state of her health. Mrs. Leslie Carter i- an 
top-liner who does not go into society. "Sour grap S." 
says the smart set, sotl,. vice. But tl e truth of the 
matter is. Mrs. Carter clues not give a tig for anything 
society may say — she lives and breathes the part s! e 
is playing. Her illness while here was said to be 
the result of lack of fresh air. she certainly get- 
enough exercise on the stage. But it is rarely that 
Mrs. Carter can be coaxed out even fur a drive, ."-he 
spends all her time reading up books em the "perio 1" 
she happens to he playing. 

Much ink has been spilled over woman's tinkind- 
ness to her own sex. but it is an indisputable fact that 
society women have "taken up" many more actre -e- 
than actors. The actors are received at the chibs. 
are invited to "stag" dinners, but how many of them 
are taken home to dine? The Matinee Hero may have 
a plump mail thickly larded with "mash'.' notes, but 
how many crested invitations to visit at town and 
country homes does he receive? It is only for the 
Matinee Heroine that the smart set has hung out its 
golden latch key. 



Fiud all that is good in restaurants and club them 

together, and you «et the Zinkaud. There is no other place 
like it for excellence or seivice and of viands. The best 
food and the best music in town are to be had there. 



The succulent oyster and the finest cookery of all kinds Is the 
motto of Moraghan's Oyster House in the California Market. All 
things in season, and the best the market affords, is no Idle boast 
at this place. Moraghan's stands for reputation, hence the qual- 
ity of the viands he offers the public. The chef is one of the 
best In the city, and the place enjoys a splendid popularity. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only $7.5"> 

per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Full weight guaranteed. ,n 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities Briquettes 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 




^"RAMSAY" 

ISLAY 
SCOTCH WHISKY 



UNEXCELLED FOR BODI AND 
FLAVOR 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 



Agents Pacific Coast. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



38 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July i6, 1904. 

BANKING. 5>>e Minister of Foreign Affairs 

Mechanics' Savings Bank . 

Uncle Sam may well exclaim, 

incorporated January 21, 1904. Uncle Sam's "How sharper than a serpent's 

Capital stock pata up j250,ooo.oo Thankless Child, tooth it is to have a thankless 

Preaident, James O'B. Gunn Vice-President, Geo. D. Gray child.' And when it is seen 

Vice-President, Geo. P. Lyon Cashier, Frederick H. Clark that the insolence of the child is backed up by a 

directors. threat to thrash its papa, the scene becomes too 

ridiculous to be funny, and too absurd to cause seri- 

F. W. Dohrmann, Jr.; George D. Gray, F. M. Greenwood, Jas. ^ ,. «, T , . r, ..... , ,. r , -,-, ... 

O'B. Gunn, Marshall Hale. G W. Kline; George F. Lyon, George Otis thought. It IS the little and youthful Republic 

M. Mitchell, Charles c Moore. Henry T. s-ott, w. F. Williamson. of Panama that is the thankless child, and "sassy 

' ' , ,_ . ' . , to its God-father. The Washington Government or- 

The Mechanics Savings Bank has opened Its doors for a gen- , . ... .. , . . ° .... . . 

eral Savings and Loan business at the S. W. corner Montgomery Offed a while ago that certain modifications an.l 

and Bush streets, San Francisco, Cal.. May 2, 1904. changes be made in the surrounding, and upon a 

— ' given hill not far from the town of Panama. When 

San FranciSCO taav inqS Union the engineers undertook to obey the order, a few days 

632 California St., cor. Webb St., San Francisco. a <ro the official head or heads of the new Ren lib lie 

E. B. POND, President; W. C. B. DeFKEMERY, ROBERT d » U ' l ". C Ollicidl neau Ol licaus Ol llic licv. ixcptllJllc 

watt, Vice-Presidents; lovell white, cashier; R. M. swore in Castilhan and manv other kinds of Spanish 

^e^tors^B^Pondfw/ C. B. DeFremery, Henry F. Allen. that the United States should not touch as much as 

George CBoardman Jacob Barth Co. G. Miller, Fred H. a D ] a de f grass or a rock or a tarantula on or about 

Beaver, William A. Magee, Robert Watt. , . b , , ... , . , . . . 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country that particular hill, and forthwith Generals came 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co.. or by checks i ■ • r *t i_ i . • ■ „i 
of reliable parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsi- rushing in from the marshes and mountain jungles 
bility of this Savings Bamt commences only with the actual re- fo fr pr their swords in the comintr strnt'irk- with the 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- lo oncr ul< - lr sworus in uic coining struggle win tut 
company the first deposit. No charge is made for pass book " 1 ankee nation. When the powers that be 111 Pall- 
or entrance fee. ., ., , . ,, <* ■ 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. satufday evenings, 6:30 to 8. ama, the same gentlemen who got the $10,000,000 

Gu^Stee J cSp&rpaid"up"::::;::::::::::::::::::::::;:;:::'t«iS« canal purchase money, were informed that the i-.ni 

Reserve and contingent Funds ' 986,038 in question was located in the canal zone, and was a 

Mutual Savinqs BanK of s an f»™,soo P art °. f the S \"P °f. land f ceded \° the United States, 

y ' swearing and rattling ol sword scabbards became 

Guarantee Capital" .^"^If.^. .°™°**..?*™. Jl.000.000 more vociferous than 'ever, the defenders of the infant 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus sas.uoo Republic declaring that zone or no zone, the sacred 

Deposits over 9.t.iKJ.U00 . P . & .. . . , . 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President: S. G. MURPHY, vice-Presl- rights of the young nation could not be trampled up n 

dent; GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier; JOHN a. HOOPER, Vice- with imminitv lie I'nrlp Sam or anv other llrobditr- 

President; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. wltn »"P" mt > Dj uncle Sara or an\ ouier i.romn 

Directors— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, nag or bv Lilliputian. 1 hen thev filed a protest with 
James Moffltt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph .., . ■ ,,. • , ■ • , * ,,. •„„- 
Spreckeis, James M. McDona.d, Charles Hoibrook. the American Minister and went home, rolling cigar- 
lnterest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. prtps pn route Tt is helieved that conservative din- 
Deposits may be sent on postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or etttb en route. It IS Denc\ ca trial conservative tup 

exchange on city banks. loiliatic action will avert armed hostilities lictwecll 

The German Savmqs d> Loan Society 1C two e P u 1CS - 

J " J General Kuropatkm continues to 

NO. 526 California street, san Francisco. T n E ast Asia. concentrate his forces rearward 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus S2.ux.948.13 t :.,,-,,.,„,,. „,l,.„ 1,,. ostein 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash l.ooo.ooo.uo Oil Laaoyang, W IH rt IK esian- 

Deposits, Juue 3utu. 1904 *3B.578,oi6.i8 H s hed his headquarters and base of operations when 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- i,„ t„„l. ramm ,„,| „f tl,» Russian armv in nersop 

President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; lle took Command Ot the Russian army HI person . 

Ign. steinhardt, Emli Rohte. H. B. Russ, N. ohiandt, l. N. Wai- This falling back, retreat really, is a confession that 

ter and J. W. Van Bergen. , . . b , ' , , . -i ;- . . - , . i ♦!,„., 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- his march southward lo strike dencial I Iku, and .! en 

mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. t-.,rn iiirl Hpfpot r,pnpral k'nroki was a dismal failure 

Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. turn and llcleat uenerai rvllIOkl, was d uisiiiai idiiiiie, 

because the Japanese proved themselves to be more 

Continental Building & Loan Associate than a raatch for hin \ The J a i >an f se have extended 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA. ^™ h "« \° COVeI " ^"J* ?*> HbIm from DOTttl to 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. south, but of course much ol this distance is made up 

Subscribed Capital J15.000.000.00 r _„„„_,! „„„,,„;„. t },.. Tnmnesp hold ill «r ll e 

Paid-in Capital 3,000,000.00 ot rugged mountains, tnt Japanese noiding u t 

Profit anr Reserve Fund... . •••••■•■■ •■• 450,000.00 passes in force. This enables them to concentrate at 

Interes .aid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum paoo^o ..v- ... , • ., ■ 

»n term and 6 per cent on ordinary deposits. any given point without the Slavs knowing anvtnulg 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbln, Secretary , , ,•, ,, „ ,i„m-, n,^^..,^-li ^ ^^oc U is tliis 

and General Manager. about it until they dash tlirotlgll a pass. It 1S_ tills 

■ advantage the Japanese have that so bewilders Kuro- 

Intemational Banking Corporation patkin. He cannot even make a reasonable guess 

no. l wall street. NEW YORK. when or where Kuroki will lead his entire army 

Capital and Surplus '. j7,894,40o through one of the passes. For this reason, no doubt. 

Capital and Surplus Authorized 10,000,000.00 rr ~ t \ ■ i, od . - ,,,„[,,.l.>rl (-,-, rp <-nnp..nt no- it T inn- 

OFFICERS-William L. Moyer, President; Charles D. Palmer, kumpatklll has concluded to re-COlH ellt rate at L,iao 

Assistant to President; William B. Wlghtman, Assistant to vane and nuttinc himself em the defensive. Oblige 

President; John Hubbard, Treasurer; James H. Rogers, Secre- ) an &- dml puuni,, uimacii un c v , ,_, 

tary; John B. Lee, General Manager; Alexander & Green, Coun- the lapanese to come to ground Ot Ills Own selection. 

8 BRANCHES-London. San Francisco. City of Mexico, Manila, Thus, with this retrograde movement and the wet 

Hong Kong, Yokohama, Shanghai, Singapore. wpithpr there is not likelv to be a great battle in 

AGENCIES-Bombay, Calcutta, Madras. Penang. Rangoon. weatlier, inert lb not iikci.\ uc a ea »« 

Colombo, Amoy, Canton, Hankow. Tientsin, Tansui. Anping, the northern division of the peninsula lmmediaeei J . 

Bakan, Mojl, Saigon, Kobe, Bangkok, Batavla, Samarang, Sou- r ., ,, , ^c .u rt ^«.,;,i^,,U tli« I-n-ionpsp arp 

rabaya, and all parts of Europe" In the south end of the peninsula the Japanese art 

SAN francisco pranch-32-34 Sansome St. slowdv but surely Hearing Port Arthur proper. Dur- 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- s'owiy uui sul "; "™ o i i j 

tlons, firms and individuals solicited. Loans made on liberal terms jpo- the past week they have captured several ad- 

on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bought fe . ' ... „„ i,;ii^ ^l,,,^,-^ ,^, ,.i-l,, ,1 imr il>,. 

and sold, u'ravelers' and commercial letters of credit granted. vanced positions Oil hills almost o\ ei looking tl.i 

available in any part of the world, interest bearing certificates ofrnntrhnld \t nresent the lanancse are conducting 

of deposits issued for fixed periods, interest allowed to banks StrongllOId. .U present ti e jdpaiiesc ait e mine uns, 

on current daily balances. Special rates given to banks keeping a sie^e but thev seem to he waiting t"l" an opportu- 

accounts with us, and drawing direct on our branches and f * . A , • r„,_„ , i„ ( i,.. ,il,.r Inn, I 

agents throughout the world. mty to assault the place in torce. I >n the oihct Hand, 

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. , - p,,..;,.. nr ,. ,-,,„rident that thev Call hold out Ull- 

F. E. BECK, Manager. P. G. EASTWICK, JR.. Asst. Mgr. the KllSSians arc LOIinaeilt tlldl nicy can iioiii mil 



July 16, 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

til lh. 

tli, 
.ui\ thousand mill 
and ll ■ the Jai 

th of which ■ 
formidable obstructions 10 remi 
i\ e thus far had 1 
and what is equally important, have 

ilship, celerity of movement, 
boundless patriotism, braver) and physical endur- 
1II ,,f which i> a startling revelation t,, Europe 
and America. •.,> much so thai statesmen are wonder- 
ing wliat Russia's defeat may mean to the powers 
sometime in the future. 

Concerning Japan's marvelous 
Will it be Asia military development in the last 
for the Asiatics? third of a century, and the pi s- 
sible influence of that nation 
on international concerns in the no) distant future, 
diplomatists differ widely. Bui generally speaking, 
there is fear that the time is not far off when Japan 
will raise the cry of "Asia for Asiatics," and that the 
theme will become a might) center of thought ami 
action all over Asia — Asia, upon whose broad lands 
more than 800,000,000 brown and yellow people dwell, 
ami who, at their last analysis, are found to he ultra- 
clannish. In this, alarmists see much danger to 
European and American civilization, and to the 
Christian religion. Practically the whole of this 
more than one-half of the world's population are non- 
< hristians, and millions of them hate the very name 
of Christianity. And as if to intensify this growing 
suspicion and uneasiness in Christian countries, a 
prominent Japanese statesman said a few days ago 
that "Asiatics have far more to fear from the white 
race than the white race has from the 'brown and 
yellow peril.' " The idea he seemed to want to con- 
vey was that with Japan in the lead, the white race 
should, for prudential reasons, consider that it has 
vastly different propositions to deal with than it had 
a half century ago, because Asiatics now know their 
own worth and strength, and intellectual and physi- 
cal ability to enforce all reasonable demands for 
separateness from Europe and the Americas. But 
no careful observer has seen any signs or inclination 
on the part of either Japan or China to ever want to 
raise the cry of "Asia for Asiatics. ' In fact, the sal- 
vation of those nations depends upon close commer- 
cial relations with the white race. 

The rumor from the 
Slavs to Invade India. Russian side in Man- 
churia that Kuropatkin 
is perfecting plans to invade India, so soon as his 
trouble with Japan is over, and the confirmation ol 
the charge that Russia is backing the Dalai Lama 
in his war upon the British, are not incidents that are 
calculated to help in the work of maintaining peace 
among the nations. To this, or these, firebrands may 
be added the recent utterances of the Austrian Em- 
peror in which he went out of his way to express his 
contempt for the "yellow and brown men," and inti- 
mating that they should not be recognized as having 
any rights that white men are bound to respect. Evi- 
dently the demon of war, devastation and destruction 
is loose in Europe, nor does there seem to be any de- 
sire to hamper his going to and for and up and down 
the nations. 



VI LETTER 



39 



BANKING, 



Wells,Fargo & Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital. Surrhi. and Undivided 
Fronu 



;$i3,500,rj 



Homer 8 Mm. President: P, I., l.limnn. Cashier; Frank II 
,.*• **»l"l«nt ("ashler: Jno E. Miles. Assist, 
HHANCHES— New York; Sail Lake. Utah; Portland 
correspondents throughout the world. General banking busl- 
naaa transacted. 



The Sen Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of 8ansome and Pine 8ls.. 8an Francisco. 

JA8. K. WI1.SON. President; W.M. PIERCE JOHNSON, 
ITealdent; LEWIS I. CUWG1LL. Cashier: K. W. WOLFE. As- 
sistant Cashier. 

Capital. $500,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits, $106,000. 

DIRECTORS— William Pierce Johnson. Vlce-Prest. Willamette 
Pulp and Paper Co.; Wm. J. Dutton. President Flremani Fund 

Ins. Co.: H. E. Huntington. First vi President s P it R 

Cieo. A. Pope, of Pope & Talbot. Lumber Dealers; C. S. 1!, ml,, t 
President Hastings Clothing Co.; George Aimer Newhnll. II. M. 
Newhall & Co.; W. H. Talbot. Capitalist; II. D. Morion. Presi- 
dent W. T. Oarratt & Co. James K. Wilson. President. 

AGENTS— New York: Hanover National Rank, Chemical Na- 
tional Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Rank. Phlladelphla- 
Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— 
Tie- M ■,, .,.:,] Hani Ennsa- Pity— First National Honk 

I.ondon— Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan. Harjes & Co. 
Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Johannesburg— Robinson 
South African Banking Co.. Limited. 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which ts amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, $8,700,000. Reserve Fund. $3,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $80,000,000 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. WALKER, General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlln, Cranbrook. 
Fernle, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Skaguay (Alaska). 
Also 90 other Branches, covering the principal points In 
Manitoba, N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 
Scotland, Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank, Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW OLREANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
San Francisco Office— 

325 California Street. 

A. KAINS, Manager 



London. Paris and American bank 



1. 1,., ,ted 



N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,100,000. 
Head Office— 40 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssoniere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The flnRlo-Caiiromian Bank., Limitea 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 Paid-up, $1,500,000 

Subscribed. $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 
Officers: Frank J. Symmes, President; O. A. Hale, Vice- 
President; H. ■ Brunner. Cashier. 



Fancy vests at cost, see window. Tom Dillon, Hatter Opp. 
Palace Hotel. 



Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIBECTOBS-William Alvonl. William Balcrek. H I,. Abbot. Jr.' 
0. D. Baldwin, L. F. jJtoiiti'iiKle, Wurreu D. Clark. E. J McCutchen. E. 
H. Pease. J. D Grant 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,726,000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator. Guardian or 
Trustee. Check accounts solicited. Legal Depository for money in 
Probate Court Proceedings Interest paid on Trust Deposits and 
Savings. Investments carefully selected. 



40 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 16, 1904. 



DEDICATION OF NAVAL CLUB HOUSE. 

Of far more than passing interest is the dedication 
of the Naval Club House at Vallejo. Quite imper- 
sonal are the invitations which come from the "Wo- 
man's Committee of the Naval Club House of Val- 
lejo." It is true that this committee upon occasions 
has acted with great efficiency, assisting with benefits 
for the fund and interesting friends wherever possi- 
ble. Truth to tell, however, practically all the credit 
for- this splendid accomplishment belongs to Rear- 
Admiral and Mrs. Bowman H. McCalla. 

They watched the U. S. Navy filling up with the 
most interesting American boys, and from long ex- 
perience they knew that if something were not done 
for them, they would go the way of the traditional 
"Jack Tar." The McCallas were anxious to do 
something to preserve the integrity of these promis- 
ing boys, who, because they sailed from one end of 
the world to the other, could not have a home, and 
who, the moment they had "shore leave," walked 
directly into the clutches of the unscrupulous. While 
in the East, Mrs. McCalla made herself verv familiar 
with every phase of the construction and mainte- 
nance of the Brooklyn Sailor's Club, given by Miss 
Helen Gould, and was ready to handle the work in- 
telligently in California. 

Admiral and Mrs. McCalla, knowing the need of 
a similar institution at Vallejo, cherished the hope 
that they would be able to assist in its establishment. 
Their time came. After the Spanish-American war, 
when Admiral (then Captain) McCalla received his 
prize-money, amounting to $7,500, he added consid- 
erable to it, and purchased the site of the handsome 
building in Vallejo which will be dedicated to-day, 
and turned over to the Naval Department of the 
Young Men's Christian Association 'for administra- 
tion. This latter procedure will be in accordance 
with the plans at the Brooklyn Club House. The 
Young .Men's Christian Association have the ma- 
chinery and executive force for the conduct of such 
large and unusual households as will be gathered un- 
der that roof. 

After Captain McCalla bought the lot, Mrs. Mc- 
Calla, with her husband's sympathetic co-operation, 
commenced to raise the necessary $40,000 for the 
erection of the building. Personal friends con- 
tributed amounts, the local committee which Mrs. 
McCalla formed managed two large entertainments, 
at one of which the programme was given by the 
naval cadets of Yerba Buena Island. All this was 
nothing like enough for the important work. Unos- 
tentatiously, Mrs. McCalla succeeded in getting loans 
at nominal interest, so that the work should not be 
delayed. These amounts will be paid in good time. 

The new building, which is four stories high, is 
handsomely and suitably equipped and furnished 
from basement to garret. Besides the bedrooms, 
which will be let to the men at small prices per night, 
they will have a restaurant, library, living room, 
theatre, bowling alleys, and a savings bank. This 
latter feature in the Brooklyn House has been emi- 
nently successful. 

This enterprise, this effort to make of the United 
States sailors all they are capable o'f being, should 
make the institution tenderly cherished by the peo- 
ple of this State. They could not make a better in- 
vestment as loyal and patriotic citizens. The Naval 
Club House is not a charity, for the enlisted men will 
pay for all they get, and give something besides, but 
Uncle Sam does not pay them a large enough salary 
to build a place for themselves. 



< 



SPENCERI AN 
T© PEN CO 

JiliOYA L_ 



A Perfect Pen 

Everything necessary to produce a perfect pen is applied in the 
making of 

Spencerian Pens 

The best of skilled labor, the best of modern machinery, the best 
steel the world produces; with the result that Spenceiian Pens 
are the wear-well" pens of the market. Samples for trial. 12 
different numbers, for 6c in stamps. 

SPENCERIAN PEN CO., 349 Broadway, NEW YORK 



VAN AUKEN 
OXYGEN INSTITUTE 

The Only OXYGEN INSTITUTE on the PACIFIC COAST 

If you are 111 we can POSITIVELY cure you without Drugs, Knifp, 
Electricity or Mind Cure. CATARRH, CONSTIPATION, NERVOUS PROS- 
TRATION, Etc. Permanently Cured. 

Addresses at the offices of San Francisco patients who will gladly 
tell how they were redtored to health. Oxygen instruments loan- 
ed to all patients treating at a distance. Send symptoms and 
kindly inclose directed and stomped euveloje for particulars. 
Free diagnosis at office from 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 p. m., Sundays ex- 
cepted. Cut this out and remember the hours. Tel. Sutter 3411 

815 VAN NESS AVE. Near Ellis St. SAN FRANCISCO 




For Breakfast 
For Breakfast 
For Breakfast 





L FOR THE 

Regular Army and 




m National Guard 




AJf Encampment in August 
~~wL KHAKI Service Outfits Complete 
Bft Best quality at lowest flcure 

( 1 Also Regulation Sabres, Belts and 
1 Puttee Leggings 

t / \ Pettibone Bros. Mfg. Co. 

It 1 19 New Montgomery St.. San Francisco 
^■k^ T. A. NERNEY, Mjr. (or Pac. Coast 



The GEYSERS I 



The most famous health ana pleasure re- 
sort in California. The climate and scen- 
■ry are unsurpassed und the waters are 
acknowledged the besr on the market- 
Natural mineral, steam and Haminam bath*. Swimming lake of tepid 
mineral water. Boating, hunting, fishing, dancing, shuffle-board, 
billiards and croquet. The hotel and cottages have heen renovated 
throughout, and new cottages, and anrv> pavilion built this year. 
There will be a fully equipped dairy and livery stable In rnnvectton 
with the hotel. The hotel, cottages, hath houses and groundp are 
lighted by electricity. The hotel will be nupplied with the heM the 
market affords. Rates. $io, *p?. $14, *ifi per week. For further pnrtieu- 
lars and booklet, write B- H. Curry, Prop. The Geysers. Sonoma Co., Cal- 




c 



B 
< 

E 
o 



M 



s 

u. 

fa 

C 
« 
C/3 



O 
1) 

to 

a. 

.£ 
3 



Price per copy. 10 cents. 




Vol. LXIX 



ESTABLISHED JULY ao. 1856. Annual Subscription. *4.oo 

SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 23, 1904. 




Number 4. 



The 



KKW8 I.KTTKK Ik printed and publish. -.1 

h> the proprietor. Frederic* Marriott. Hill lock 

iiiniitii:. »» Sansome street. San Francisco, <".ii 

Entered .it San Francisco r.tsloMI ti.r 

New York onii ie>- iwh.-rr information may be obtained renrdlnf. 

KutuKi-rtptionK 1111,1 advertlstna:)— M Broadu ■ C. Murphy, 

Renn 
London llffler — 3» t'ornhtll. B. 1'. Knglun.l. Qoorg* Btnssl A- Co 
All koi in 1 items, announcements, advertising ><r other matter 

Intended for publication In the current number of the NKWS 

I.KTTKR should tie sent to this office not later than 9 a. m. 

Thursday previous to day of Issue, 



If poker is wickedness, betting on the races is 
lunacy. 



Washing it in a silver bath-tub will not help a 
speckled reputation. 



The new "Panama Canal Zone" is a girdle about 
America's slender waist. 



The kind of tree that would look best in City Hal 
Square is the itching palm. 



Whom God hath joined, the Superior Court is 
busy putting asunder. 

Surety bonds on men who "p' a y tne ponies" ought 
to be made payable in Confederate money. 



Russian slaughter of Japanese troops is reported 
daily by truthless telegraph}'. 

The pool-room is the place where suckers swim 
when there is no race-track handy. 

There is no room for exiled Nebraska prairie- 
chickens on the perches of "Wolfert's Roost." 

Yellow journalism is densely silent upon the sub- 
ject of boating conditions on Salt River. 

The "trust" on the elusive dollar of commerce is 
the one in which statesman Bryan exhibits the live- 
liest interest. 



Santos Dumont has gone back to Paris, taking 
with him his trusty pocket-knife, but leaving his 
slashed air-ship behind. 

Are there any more yellow editors with long 
purses, long ears and ass-pirations for the Presi- 
dency? 

San Francisco is preparing to prove her theory 
that while a Good Templar may be good, the Knight 
Templar is better. 

Judge Parker is warned that if he keeps on taking 
his morning swim at Esopus, Willie Hearst will tie 
knots in his undershirt. 



A "strike sympathizer" is a disorderly person not 
connected with a union who does its murdering and 
maiming for nothing, out of an overmastering sense 
of his obligation to the "wrong that needs assist- 
ance. 



The trouble with Hears) was that when one of 
his leg-pulling editors whispered in his ear, he 
thought there was a hurricane blowing. 



By this time Hearst is probably satisfied that the 
Tarpeian Rock is the kind that is put in the toe of 
i stocking. 



Paregoric has been filed away with painkiller, gin- 
ger and peppermint as excuses that will not do to 
account for crapulence among Oakland policemen. 



While Hearst mourns and mourns and mourns, 
the leg-pullers are engaged in adding up the columns 
on the "put in" side of their bank books and looking 
around for gilt-edged real estate. 

Judge Parker remains hidden in his cyclone cellar 
until the coast is clear of the kind friends who, hav- 
ing failed to do him up at St. Louis, are besieging 
him at Esopus with offers of "support." 



An unappreciative nation is vexed with Grand 
Duke Boris of Russia because, thinking the war with 
Japan was a mere comic opera affair, he took along 
to the front a complete chorus of the liveliest maidens 
in the business. 



Esterhazy declines with Gallic politeness to go 
back from the safety <>f England to testify in the re- 
opened Dreyfus case. Esterhazy has helped in the 
production of the Franch brand of justice, and knows 
exactly what he is about. 



Another "monkey dinner" — in Paris this time — 
suggests the hope that if the anthropoid ape can be 
bred with the pithecoid man of the smart set, we 
may get something so near the missing link as to 
prove absolutely the theory of evolution. 



The Prohibition delegate whom the Oakland police 
picked up with his credentials in one pocket, an 
empty bottle in another, and the contents concealed 
in his midst, should not be ill thought of; he was 
only looking for local color to decorate his speeches 
with. 



The "Turtle" is a saloon that runs fast enough 
without a license, and the "Fawn" is another that 
displays more of the characteristics of a wolf than 
of a young deer, wherefrom it would seem that there 
is not much in a name when it comes to thirst em- 
poriums. 



Having harassed a big British copper company to 
the limit with senseless strikes and lawsuits, the 
town of Keswick is shocked and grieved to learn 
that the company is preparing to move into a com- , 
munity not so completely dominated by walking 
delegates and grafters. Public sympathy somehow 
does not gush out to stricken Keswick. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



SAUSALITO: THE RENDEZVOUS OF THE 
VICIOUS. 

Marin County, with every advantage of climate 
and diversified scenery to make it one df the State's 
choicest and most popular playgrounds, suffers seri- 
ously because of the vile element that takes toll and 
tribute of all who must use one of its two gateways. 
Sausalito ought to be one of the best suburban towns 
in California ; in fact, it is among the worst. On its 
heights, called locally "the hill," there arc pretty 
homes dwelt in by decent people, but these would be 
glad to exchange their property for real estate a 
little further away from the freebooters who have 
made the name of the place malodorous. The low- 
lying water-front of this hill-set, bay-girt suburb is 
the resort and stamping-ground of the outcasts 
whom the other communities in this part of the 
State will no longer tolerate. Here the pool-room 
evil, which even "wide-open" San Francisco could 
endure no further, flourishes by license and permis- 
sion. With it are associated every species of cold- 
blooded graft and crooked gamble that could be 
found in the newest and rawest of frontier communi- 
ties, and as an inevitable concomitant, the popula- 
tion of the Sausalito water-front is as tough a riff- 
raff as ever got together in one municipality. And 
the Government of Sausalito is absolutely in the 
hands of this riff-raff, who run it for the protection 
of the pool-rooms and the other rottenness that fes- 
ters on the Marin beach. It is the kind of Govern- 
ment that protects the thug and despoils the decent 
man. It lives and thrives by and for evil-doing. Woe 
betide the citizen without a criminal record and with 
a purse in his pocket, whom misadventure has 
stranded over night on the Sausalito water-front. 
If he cannot be lured into one or another of the dens 
that line the main street, there to be plucked by de- 
vice or by "doping," or even force, while the "offi- 
cers of the law" look on, then the officers themselves 
frequently take a hand and relieve him of his money. 

One of the many schemes by which the unfortu- 
nate stranger, chance-detained in Sausalito, is held 
up is an ordinance levying a tax of $3.00 a year on 
every automobile owned or temporarily located in 
Sausalito. It has been perverted into a device for 
fleecing the traveler. Many a San Franciscan whose 
machine has been held in this stronghold of robbery 
by an empty gasoline tank or a tire gone wrong has 
had to pay the tax or submit to arrest and to the 
confiscation of removable parts of his car at the 
hands of a ruffian wearing a constable's star. 

And the corruption that breeds and makes its home 
in Sausalito is permeating all of Marin, debauching 
its politics, making criminals of its young men, and 
driving elsewhere the people and the money that 
would otherwise help to swell its assessment roll and 
build up its population. The water-front crowd of 
Sausalito — which means the pool-room crowd — is 
the most powerful element in the public affairs of the 
county — so powerful that the only wonder is that 
decent men are ever elected to or will accept office 
in Marin. It is Sausalito that furnishes the bulk of 
the county's criminal business, its murders, its hold- 
ups and its robberies. It is Sausalito that provides 
a refuge for the Harveys, the Darouxes and the Syl- 
vas and all that ilk. it is to Sausalito that the de- 
tectives of San Francisco and Oakland go when they 
are casting about for the trail of any thug fleeing 
from the law. ■ 

The revenue from the gamblers at Sausalito may 
add materially to the income of Marin, but it sub- 
tracts from her standing among the communities 



of the State and from her ultimate prosperity. The 
resources of the county are vast and varied, its rail- 
road facilities are of the very best, its beauties of 
scenery and the attractions of its climate are hard 
to be equaled, but between it and the rest of the 
State lies the plague-spot, Sausalito. We hope that 
some day, and soon, the respectable citizens of Ma- 
rin will wake up to the fact that most of the ills 
which afflict them come from the tolerance of the 
pool-rooms on the water-front at Sausalito, and will 
wipe out the evil. It will be a red-letter day in the 
history of Marin when the law-abiding voters, who 
are assuredly in the majority, go to the pplls and elect 
an administration pledged to drive the gamblers and 
the grafters out of Sausalito and out of Marin 
County. Once the issue is put squarely to the peo- 
ple, there is, no doubt about the result. 

RACE TRACK MEN TABOOED. 

The officers of one of the big life insurance com- 
panies of the East believe that persons whose busi- 
ness it is to place bets on horse races are evil asso- 
ciates. They also believe that evil association cor- 
rupts good morals. Therefore, they have warned a. I 
their many hundreds of employees that "Your pres- 
ence on a race track, or in a poolroom, or, in future, 
to be seen with persons whose business it is to place 
bets on horse races, will be counted sufficient excuse 
to request your resignation." Similar action has 
been taken by other great insurance companies, by 
the banks, department stores, and many of the retail 
establishments. This is a sensible and practical 
manner of attacking the race track evil. By putting 
the taboo upon the race track gambler himself, he, 
and not the field of his operations alone, is marked 
for disapproval. To be seen in his company is to 
be considered evidence of an inclination for evil 
ways, and will be proof sufficient to cause prompt 
dismissal, without excuse 01 explanation. The gam- 
blers frequently boast of the amount of capital their 
enterprise represents ; but Morgan, the pirate, like- 
wise boasted of the wealth he accumulated along tne 
Spanish main some years ago. The race track men 
are his natural successors in business. Their 
methods are the same; their results are the same; 
only in point of attack do they differ. Morgan killed 
his victims without delay, and took their money af- 
terwards ; the thieves of the race track take their 
victims' money first and then force them to commit 
suicide. The modern pirate does his work with less 
butchery, but with more refinement of cruelty, for 
he attacks the moral, instead of the physical, man. 
Now, as in the days of Morgan, men who associated 
with him or his cut-throats, were considered fit vic- 
tims for the hangman ; so, in the present day, men 
who associate with race track gamblers should be 
kicked out of all decent employment. Local mer- 
chants should follow the plan of the big insurance 
companies. 



MILKING THE COW. 

A Board of Health which began its career by im- 
pudent defiance of the law, and has shown its wolfish 
tendencies at least once a week ever since, is now 
engaged in what appears to be a stupendous game of 
graft. The dairymen of the county, who have in the 
aggregate an invested capital of more than $40,000,- 
000, have been selected as the likeliest victims, and 
the squeeze is being applied. In the end — and this 
is a prophecy without condition or limitation — the 
milk sold to the house-holders of San Francisco will 
cost them considerably more than it does now, and 



July J3. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



■iter than it * 

m/ '- 
•\ ill be putting tip 1 ".it- 

The milkmen arc far from being saint-, ami I 
tin mean rleanlincs* 

lie public to complain about the qtial- 
I the milk sold to it. and often with g.xi.l r. 

• the Health Board raiders will not be 

I by any interposition of public sentiment I hat 

- why the artist- in grafting who 

planned this foray selected the dairymen for the 

official hold-up. 

It must he ptain to any person of common sense 
that compliance with the restrictive regulations 
adopted and promulgated by the Health Board for 
the conduct of the dairy business would mean bank- 
ruptcy at the present price of milk, and precious lit- 
tle profit at twice the existing figure. If the Condi- 
with relation to bacteria in milk were what the 
political doctors in the Health Board declare them to 
-in Francisco would have been a deserted city 
many years ago. Its people to the last man would 
have been wiped out by the pestilent germs that are 
alleged t" swarm by the billion in every cup of milk. 
That the Board is making a bogy out of the little 
understood but much-dreaded germ theory is known 
to everj physician with wit and learning enough to' 
practice bis profession, and, for that matter, to every 
layman who has given the matter intelligent atten- 
tion. But the Health Board is banking on the ig- 
norance of the general public and upon the vulner- 
ability of the dairymen, and it will win. 

Already the milk dealers are taking steps to hoist 
the price of the article which they sell. Then there 
will be a division of the plunder, and the raid will 
have been accomplished. Not then or at any other 
time will milk be drawn from the cow under the 
rigid rules laid down by the Health Board, nor will 
there he any milk cooled or put in cans or carried or 
delivered under such highly aseptic conditions as 
the scientific grafters pretend to think necessary to 
the life and health of the public. 



CAUSE OF LABOR RIOTS. 

The meat packing house strike has reached the 
"dignity" of a riot at several centres of the industry, 
and presumably the walking delegates and the other 
professional disturbers of the peace and welfare of 
labor are happy over the wreck and ruin they have 
already wrought in otherwise happy homes, to say 
nothing of the misery and hunger and distress that 
may be in calamity's store for their dupes. 

These disturbers of labor's even tenor of existence 
say they are opposed to rioting. They lie. If they 
do not win at the first onslaught upon the employer 
they encourage rioting. Why, they have to invite 
the most terrible exhibitions of anger and lawless- 
ness to hold their job. No employer of men in 
America is or need be dependent upon unions for 
labor. There is always enough who are not members 
of unions to quickly take the places of strikers and 
rejoice at the opportunity for employment. But if 
they were allowed to do so, the unions would quickly 
disintegrate, and the walking delegates would have 
to go to work at something other than that of jaw- 
smiths, or starve. Hence the necessity of instigating 
a riot to prevent willing hands from employing them 
at honest labor. 

Rioting, lawlessness of all kinds, and killing or 
maiming of willing workers is as necessary to the 
walking delegate as the unions are, forfrom the lat- 
ter he gets his job to do nothing but make mischief, 



anil from thr rioting he get- the powt 

which prevents willing worl 
desired employment leai 

• >r beaten into insensibility. Then why should not 
walking delrg.nr> be held for thi they insti- 

ithers t" commit? Too I"tig have thi 
interest- of the people ami the right of those i" labor 
who wish to labor been subject t" the cruel and mcr- 

- intrigue- of walking delegate- In incite wai 
tween employer and employee. The great body •>!' 
laboring men and women— including -killed la! 
arc honest, sober, frugal and industrious, and but 
for the poisonous influence and brutal and -elfish 
purpose- of walking delegates they would have no 

difficulty in quickly ami amicably settling differences 

between themselves anil their employer-. The won 
der is they do ii"t -ee this — that they do not see that 

rioting is the last resort of a union's strike. 



THE HILLSIDE CLUB'S WORK. 

The Hillside Club of Berkeley has undertaken a 
most commendable work in endeavoring to arouse 
the property owners and home builders of the uni- 
versity town to an appreciation of the possibilities 
for heautification presented by their unusually at- 
tractive surroundings. Although the club is just 
now restricting its initial endeavors to the improve- 
ment of the district north of the university grounds, 
the suggestions presented in the circular issued by 
its President, Charles Keeler, appeal with such force 
to all lovers of nature that there is no doubt that the 
work of the club will bear good fruit, not only 
throughout Berkeley wherever its ideas may be ap- 
plied, but in other towns throughout the State. It 
is proposed, for one thing, to get away from the 
checker-board effect presented by streets laid out 
at right angles, without regard to natural contour, 
and to give particular attention to the preservation 
of all natural advantages. The Hillside streets will 
wind up the heights on easy grades, here crossing lit- 
tle streams, and there finding shelter in the shade of 
a spreading oak. Much attention will be given to 
tree planting, no unit less than a block being consid- 
ered. Hawthorns, birches, palms and other trees 
will be used, and a general color scheme will be de- 
veloped by planting flowering shrubs and vines by 
the block. By setting houses back from the street 
line, and planting lawns in front, it is hoped to secure 
the effect of a great garden in each block. The Hill- 
siders also give suggestions on architecture, advising 
the types of Swiss chalets, old English, old Nurem- 
burg, old Italian and old Spanish houses. The gen- 
eral plan is as simple, but in effect as beautiful, as 
that outlined by the News Letter some months ago 
in an editorial on "The City Beautiful," in which we 
advocated just such action, in small communities, 
particularly, as the Hillside Club has inaugurated in 
Berkeley. We hope the Club will receive from the 
Berkeleyans the active co-operation which it certain- 
ly deserves. 

This is the year of strenuous candidates. The pub- 
lic knows the habits and the private life of Roosevelt. 
He is strenuosity personified. Fairbanks is known 
to be an able exponent of the active outdoor life, and 
an admirer of physical development. Davis, who was 
once a brakeman, now a coal trust baron, who is sec- 
ond on the Democratic ticket, is 81 years old, takes 
horseback rides of fifty miles in length, and is as 
fresh and frisky as a young colt. He is younger in 
appearance than his clever son-in-law. Senator El- 
kins. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



AIDS TO BUSINESS EXPANSION. 

Nearly every city of importance has a merchants' 
association, although the organization is known by 
various names, but the real or alleged purpose of 
them all is identical, which is to foster and encour- 
age trade expansion by invading new territory. But 
in some cities the association is little better than a 
mutual admiration society of prosperous merchants 
who do not want their trade preserves intruded upon 
by new and more active competition. The greatest 
labor such associations perform for the public good 
is on the occasion of the annual banquet, when toasts 
complimentary of the solidity of financial standing 
of the members are drunk, and even more compli- 
mentary responses delivered in the spirit of "our 
self-sufficiency." But it is true, nevertheless, that 
associations of business men have been the force and 
influence back of every incentive in the conspicuously 
successful commercial center that made it aggressive 
and persistent in reaching out into new fields for trade 
conquest, but not, however, losing sight of trade al- 
ready acquired. And in the latter field is where such 
an organization finds need of vigilance, for other 
trade centers are ever battling for an opening for en- 
trance. It must be remembered that capital, whether 
it be in loanable money or represented in commercial 
commodities, has no conception of human sympathy, 
charity or the brotherhood of man. It is the one 
soulless thing in the universe, except those who wor- 
ship it abjectly and slavishly as the supreme object 
of adoration. 

Now it is to increase individual holdings of this 
soulless thing that merchants associate themselves 
together in an organization that an organized effort 
may be made continually to induce the soulless thing 
to come and abide with them and not with all the 
community. 

Perhaps the most powerful "merchants' combine" 
for trade expansion, while at the same time fostering 
and nursing that which is already in hand is the 
British combination of bankers, merchants and ship- 
owners. So persistent and watchful is this associa- 
tion in its battle for trade expansion and the preser- 
vation of spoils of former commercial supremacy, 
that every day in the year there is merchandise in 
transit on the high seas in British bottoms valued at 
from three-quarters of a billion to a full billion dol- 
lars. And all this is the outgrowth of the persistent 
efforts of an association of business men that is not 
very unlike the San Francisco Merchants' Associa- 
tion, nor are their methods of working materially 
different. It is essential to the well-being and pro- 
gress of a trade center to maintain such an organiza- 
tion, but unless it works dilligently for the good of 
all the business interests of the city, its existence 
is a positive disadvantage. 



HAVE WE GOOD MANNERS? 

Bishop Hamilton, of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, complains that Californians have no man- 
ners ; that is, that any manners they have are bad 
manners; that we lack in culture and refinement, 
and that we present, otherwise, many of the faults 
common to frontier settlements the world over. But 
softly, my Lord Bishop ; softly, sir ! What are we to 
understand by this, your criticism ? And it be a ques- 
tion of manners, sir, we will break a lance with you, 
but if it be a matter of morals, why, then, mayhap, 
there is but small margin for argument, and, more- 
over, it is in the line of your calling, and so, it may 
be, you are the better judge. But "manners" was the 
word, as we understand you. Now, "good manners," 



says Swift, "is the art of making those people easy 
with whom we converse," and, "by manners," said 
Addison, "I do not mean morals, but behavior and 
good breeding, as they show themselves in the town 
and in the country." Is the lack of good manners, 
then, the indictment upon which we are arraigned? 
We plead not guilty, my Lord Bishop, and we ask 
for specifications of the charge. We gamble, you 
say; and gambling is vulgar; it is not polite. In this 
we agree with you, but is that not more a matter of 
morals than of manners? The best society, you say, 
never gambles. But what, then, is the best society? 
What is the standard of comparison? By "best" do 
you mean the gold-plated Four Hundred, or the most 
moral society, composed, say, of devout church mem- 
bers, who really practice what they preach ? If the 
latter, does the mere absence of gambling make it 
the "best" society? And if it be a matter of manners, 
are the non-gamblers of better manners than the 
gamblers? We fear not ; aye, more, we fear much for 
the laurels of the devout, if it be a mere question of 
manners between them and the gamblers. You know 
we all think that Satan presents himself in the guise 
of a most pleasant gentleman with perfect manners. 
His ability to make it easy for people with whom he 
converses, makes it easy for him to gather victims. 
We take it, by Lord Bishop, that "morals" is the 
word you meant, and not "manners," when you 
criticised us. But then, is it good manners to say 
your neighbor is a man of bad morals? No, perhaps 
not when only individual reference is made, but when 
one refers to an entire community, the question 
broadens, and the offense is not so direct. It may 
be that our morals need mending. The morals of 
most cities need mending, and we are not so bad. 
at the worst, as many of our neighbors of the East 
and Europe. The conditions from which much of 
our bad morals arise may be easily changed by clos- 
ing down what is now a "wide-open town." But 
that we have bad manners, my Lord Bishop, we must 
deny. We may be perfectly devilish, but it is all in 
a gentlemanly way, you know. 

Uruguay has put in a bid for recognition as the 
Ireland of the New World in the shape of a potato 
that knocks the spots out of the Irish tuber and has 
a perfumed blossom to boot. 



Newspapers which pride themselves on their Eng- 
lish, learned at 'ome in dear h'old H'england, go on 
calling the police detention register the "detinue 
book." 




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Clothes," for theirs. 






July 33. «9«4- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



JLm^mp library table ciaa/^s£baa 



The «cvcnth volume ol thh 
The Jewish markablv interesting and 
Encyclopedia. lently edit dealing 

Jewish history, biograph 
much else concerning that race, has now made its 
appearance. More than four hundred scholars and 
[lists arc taking a hand in the preparation of the 
work, and the editorial board includes some of the 
illustrious names in modem scholarship and 
Biblical research, the projector and manager editor 
being Isidore Singer. 

The present volume begins with a history of the 
lews in Italy. It is stated that the number of Jews 
in the time of the Emperor Claudius in Italy was so 
gTeat that that monarch, although desirous of expel- 
ling them, did not venture I At one time 
they had several synagogues in Rome. The spread 
of the Cabala in the sixteenth century and the rise 
of pseudo-Messiahs is an interesting- episode in the 
history of the Italian Jews, and is well narrated. To 
come down to modern times, we find an excellent 
biography of Marcus Jastrow, the American scholar 
and rabbi, who died October 13. 1903. This able and 
energetic apostle of liberty had had much trouble 
in Europe, for bis synagogue was at Warsaw, and he 
was a champion of the Poles. After many vicissi- 
tudes he finally settled in Philadelphia, where he 
spent much labor in organizing the American Jews, 
'hie turns the pages of this volume, and life after 
life such as this stares at you from the print, the story 
of heroes and martyrs, of scholars and patriots, 
whose names have never even been heard by the vast 
majority, and whose deeds form part of the brilliant 
and imperishable history of this most peculiar and 
dramatic of peoples. 

The alphabetical arrangement which places geo- 
graphical and historical names in close conjunction, 
adds to the interest of the book. It is a sort of 
mosaic, in which the modern and the ancient are set 
together — faded bits of historical lore, bright patches 
of idealism, the coarseness of avarice, the blood of 
martyrdom, all combining to make a wonderful 
whole. For example, there is a splendid reproduc- 
tion of the Wailing Place, Jerusalem, as painted bv 
Bida; then one turns a few pages further on, and 
finds a photograph of Sir George Jessel, the famous 
English Master of the Rolls, and one of the greatest 
equity judges- that ever sat on a bench. I wonder 
how many attorneys are aware that Sir George Jes- 
sel was a Jew? 

How many Americans, for example, know the 
story of Philip J. Joachimsen, jurist and communal 
worker, who was born at Breslau and emigrated to 
New York, where he was admitted to the bar in 1840. 
He organized and commanded the Fifty-ninth New 
York Volunteer Regiment, and was injured at New 
Orleans. He was brevetted Brigadier-General for 
his services, then resuming his practice, was elected 
Judge of the New York Marine Court. He was first 
President of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum, and organ- 
ized the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society for 
Children in New York. Here is a life full of varied 
activity, the story of a man who was at the same 
time soldier, jurist and philanthropist, and who=e 
very name, by reason of his race, is hidden from the 
great mass of us. The pages of this book show trie 
same story many times repeated, the story of the 
'poor Jew who, escaping from the persecution and 



ditions in his moden 

tanaged to reach this country, wl here 

laboring under the social stigma which his race and 
religion have placed upon him, he hs 1 an 

honorable position for himself and brought benettt 
and distinction, even, upon hi- adopted country. 

.ill this fascinating historical and bio 
graphical material, this volume contains much infor- 
mation on Jewish ritual and ceremonies, a complete 
account of the sacred books, and much valuable lore 
of philology and philosophy. The pictures are ex- 
cellent, and the typographical production of the very 

clearest and best, This is but 0116 volume of a scr- 
1 ach number of which has so far been at least 

as interesting as the present one, and the whole 
combined constitute as remarkable and perfect an 
encyclopedia as has ever appeared. 

Published by Funk & Wagnalls, New York. 

This story is somewhat of a 

The Lure o' Gold, surprise to us who are ac- 
customed to read Mr. Bailey 
Millard's sagacious and frequently profound literary 
criticism in the Sunday paper. There is not a touch 
of the critic or philosopher in this his latest book, 
which is purely and simply a story of adventure, 
upon which it is impossible to dilate at any length 
without spoiling the tale, a thing which would oe 
unkind, to say the least, for the story is really a very 
good one. There is lots of "go" and energy in the 
story; it is brimful of incident; it is healthy in tone, 
and full of the spirit of adventure and the tang of 
the sea. It should prove to be very popular. As for 
any distinctive literary merits, this particular style 
of narrative does not lend itself very readily to lit- 
erary refinement. 

E. J. Clode, 156 Fifth avenue, New York. 

"Connectives of English 
Connectives of Speech," by James C. Fernald, 
English Speech, is a book of unquestioned im- 
portance, invaluable to all per- 
sons who desire to speak the English language effec- 
tively. The book gives definitions, with the correct 
usage of prepositions, conjunctions, relative pro- 
nouns and adverbs, as far as pertains to their office 
as connectives in the construction of English phrases 
and sentences, indicating such prepositions as should 
be used after verbs and those concerning which ques- 
tions are likely to arise. It is a companion to the 
dictionary. 

Funk & Wagnalls Co., Publishers, New York. 
Price, $1.50. 



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Accessible from Pine Street, just below Montgomery, also from Bush 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 




THE LOOKER-ON 




Old memories of entertaining gossip are recalled 
by the announcement that the handsome and dash- 
ing Mrs. Marceau, or rather, Mrs. Fennell, or to be 
exact, Mrs. Fiske-Marceau-Fennell, is about to make 
another man happy by conferring upon him her 
hand and her companionship. Her next husband, it 
is said, will be a New Yorker of some wealth and 
prominence, who has long admired her, and who, 
after an arduous suit, now claims her for his own. 
The coy and blushing bride was well known here 
some years ago as the wife of Colonel Marceau. the 
photographer. Before joining hands with him, she 
had been the widow of Fiske, of Fresno, a very well- 
known man in his day. Her marriage to Marceau 
was celebrated at Santa Cruz during an encamp- 
ment of the National Guard there. Marceau was a 
Colonel on the Major General's staff, and the wed- 
ding was made a great occasion by his fellow-offi- 
cers. Their ladies were not quite so enthusiastic, 
and stories were told of the way some of them held 
aloof from the bride. But then, there is always so 
much jealousy, you know, among the dear girls that 
no attention should be given this gossip, that comes 
up out of the past. The Colonel was a handsome 
man ; he was generous, had plenty of money, and 
cut quite a figure himself. Some time after their 
marriage, the Marccaus toured the Orient. Upon 
their return, Mrs. Marceau exhibited many very 
handsome souvenirs of their travels. It was not long- 
after that when their troubles began. Finally they 
were divorced. Then followed the sensation caused 
by the kidnapping of their child by the Colonel. Af- 
ter the fire that destroyed his place of business in 
the Phelan Block, he left the city, and has never 
been seen here since, except for a short stay. Mrs. 
Marceau's third husband was a young man named 
Fennell. He didn't last long. The Fennels took a 
house out near the Park, in the neighborhood of 
Ashbury Heights, and they managed to get their 
names in the newspapers more than once. Mrs. Fen- 
nell (or Marceau, or Fiske), has resided in the East 
during the past few years. She is a handsome 
woman, of dashing manner, a good dresser, and will, 
doubtless, prove successful in her next matrimonial 
venture. 

* * * 

Chris. Buckley, "the blind boss, ' appeared before 
the Supervisors last week, and petitioned for a re- 
duction of the assessment on his property at Market 
and Spear streets, from $99,000 to $75,000. His pres- 
ence was an object lesson in the progress of the 
community from the days when he owned the city. 
There may be to-day conditions which are about 
ripe for heroic methods of reformation, but they arc 
as petty larceny to highway robbery when compared 
with the methods of Buckley in his prime. Every- 
thing was fish that entered his net, and in every 
haul there were numerous fat suckers. Some of 
the profits of his boodling are represented in fine 
business property, in li is handsome residence on 
O'Farrell street, in his Livermore ranch, and in Los 
Angeles realty. Buckley is easily worth from half 
to three-quarters of a million, and possibly his ac- 
counts need seven figures for their total. He is now 
a retired capitalist who, like all the other capitalists, 
has a horrible fear of paying too much taxes. He 
goes to church, and he bears all the- conventional 
marks of high respectability. In the shade of his 



advancing years, Chris. Buckley is enjoying all the 
material comforts that should attend one whose 
strongest days were given to the development of 
municipal politics, in which, our statesmen say, all 
good citizens should participate. He made many 
good citizens, and he saw to it that they all partici- 
pated. Now he is enjoying the fruits of his patriotic 
endeavors with ease and dignity. Verily, virtue is 
its own reward. 

» * » 

By all means, the State Prison Directors should 
establish at San Quentin a weekly newspaper for the 
benefit of the gentlemen who have been sent to that 
fine summer and winter resort for the benefit of their 
health and the good of the State. The convicts have 
petitioned for a newspaper, and they should have it. 
Wherein lies the benefit of high teas given on the 
terrace in front of the Warden's house, by the War- 
den's wife, unless the convicts learn from their own 
private, official journal, just who were there and 
what they wore, and what they said? After long 
endeavor, the Prison Directors have succeeded in 
establishing for San Quentin the reputation of being 
the most popular prison in the country. Life there is 
one long, pleasant dream. Crooks who have once 
partaken of its pleasures have been known to cross 
the continent just to pass behind the walls once 
more. So considerate are the officers of the tender 
feelings of their wards that the latter use all the 
opium and tobacco they want; accumulate knives 
and other deadly weapons against the harvest time, 
and work as long or as little as may please them. 
Of course, they should be permitted to publish their 
own weekly paper. It could be made self-supporting 
by the advertisements of the Chinese lottery and gin- 
sliee dealers who do most of the convict business. 
The gentlemen in stripes should also be given more 
marmalade : they should be supplied with fans and 
ice-water in this warm weather, and the minstrel 
troupe should be required to give Wednesday and 
Saturday matinees every week. Then the compul- 
sory bathing rule should be repealed. It is an out- 
rage to compel an American citizen to cover himself 
with soap and water once a week. It dampens his 
dignity. The Prison Directors are on the right 
track. If they only continue in their present course, 
the population at San Quentin will increase so rap- 
idly that the Directors will have to ask for a greater 
appropriation, and thus arouse the envy of members 
of other State boards, all of whom are anxious to 
show how their institutions grow under their cozen- 
ing care. 

* * * 

George T. Marye has done the unexpected — he 
has become a benedict. That is certainly unex- 
pected, for he has been wedded so many years to 
"the simple life" that no one thought he would ever 
change his course. I have always thought Marye 
one of the most conservative men in San Francisco. 
Although a charming gentleman among his inti- 



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July 33. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

manner In. I ahotil it inch an air 



• who met him for the first iim< 
'ink him. at tl 
rich, cultured, well 1 
man of the world; hut In- ilways 

him. Whenever I saw Marye, I always t!' 
h are the vagaries of the mind ol that ile.ir ..l I 
tlrman, Dr. Bonte, who was secretary of the 
I'niversit) Regents many years. Whenever Dr. 
Bonte read to the Regents a communication upon 
Ct, however simple, hi- manner W 
his voice BO lull and -trong and resonant, 
and his intonation- so precise that one was almost 
I to feel that the fate of tin- nation depended 
upon the matter in hand. To hear I >r. Bonte read 
the minutes of the Regents was a liberal education. 
One could not imagine him otherwise than as the 
embodiment of high personal dignity, as rigid and 
as unbending as a marble statue. I think Marye 
must have envied Bonte. 

• • • 
many have been the stories about the intended 
departure of Raphael Weil that clubmen will re- 
ceive with much satisfaction the latest tale — that he 
will return from Paris during the Fall, and will re- 
main here for some time. Weil is one of the old- 
time club men. and no more deservedly popular man 
is 'Known in club-land. If 1 were asked to name off- 
hand the two most clubable men of San Francisco 
1 would promptly say: "Raphael Weil and Major 
Rathbone," or "Major Rathbone and Raphael Weil." 
If any reader of this column has any other candi- 
date or candidates, "trot 'em out." 
» * * 

A saffron-colored youth has been "in the jut;'' 
over in I lakland for a fortnight, simply because he 
appropriated a buggy-robe, the property of Chris. 
Buckley, by whom the young man was employed at 
Livermore. The prisoner claims to be the youngest 
son of Dhuleep Singh, of Lahore, and be throws at 
the Police Court clerk the name of Ramama Ara- 
mancha Singh, Prince of Lahore. On the strength 
of the name, an (lakland woman proposes to get him 
out of his trouble. But to think of Chris. Buckley 
jugging an Indian Prince! When Chris, preceded 
Sam Rainey across the line in the days of the Wal- 
lace Grand Jury, did he ever think he would live to 
arrest any man — and a Prince at that — for lifting a 
buggy robe? But then, mayhap, it was that famous 
Braunhart buggy-robe which "Buck" values above- 
red gold. 

* * * 

Edouard Cucuel, who has returned home with Eu- 
ropean laurels upon his brow, wrote many letters 
to the News Letter while an art student in Paris, de- 
scriptive of that Bohemian round of work and pleas- 
ure which was afterwards elaborated in "Bohemian 
Paris of To-day." He is now one of the most suc- 
cessful of the younger illustrators of Europe, where 
he has made American methods appreciated. 

* * * 

If you ride south on a Larkin street car, and trans- 
fer at Ellis to electric car going down town, you 
have to trot over the cobbles, cross in front of the 
heavy electric car, and climb up on its right-band 
side, because the gates on its left-hand side are 
closed. Again, if you ride north on a Larkin street 
car, and transfer to the electric car at O'Farrell, you 
have to cross directly in front of the electric car to 
get to the open gate on its right-hand side. Now, I 
am not particularly timid, but I have an inborn ob- 



< If course, ih. motorman •■■ 

:t, but neither he nor the conduct! you 

when you .ire under the motorman's from window, 
and therein 1- the danger arising from the regulation 
which requires transferring passcngi 1 - in 

front of ,1 waiting car before tin \ cm board il 

I understand, are to present passengers from 
Stepping on .1 parallel track, up.ni which an unseen 

car may be approaching. But on Elli from 

Devisadero to Hyde, and on O'Farrell street, from 

to Devisadero all the cars run the same way. 
So why not open all tli n those two line-, 

between I be street- named? This suggestion is of- 
fered 10 the editor ol "Transit Tidings, who. | learn 

from his July issue, is anions the many thousands of 
my readers. 



"Transit Tidings" is a little journal that is doing 
much to minimize the natural friction thai ensues. 
011 the one hand from disordered stomachs, and 011 
the other, from arbitrary rules and the mi- -construc- 
tion of orders from headquarters of the United Rail- 
mads. It i- the still, small voice, the conscience of 
the corporation, which speaks to the men and the 
public, voicing the kicks of the Community, the griev- 
ances of the grouchy, the praise of the pleased, and 
the remarks of the reminiscent. It is a free publica- 
tion, and it contains no advertising. It admonishes, 
in a quiet, dignified way, the errors of its servants, 
and is a medium to which the traveler may always 
appeal if he is honest in his adverse criticism of the 
company. It is a better appellate tribunal than an 
individual official, and it is an absolutely unbiased 
judge. Its principle seems to be that the most ef- 
fective service is the most profitable service, and 
"Transit Tidings" is good tidings for the public. 
It ought to be read by all patrons of the United Rail- 
roads. All you have to do is to reach for it in any 
car belonging to the company. 
* * * 

The Reverend Jefferson E. Scott, through the me- 
dium of the Methodist Ministers' Association, has 
warned the women of America against the soft- 
voiced, smooth-tongued, languid-eyed, long-robed 
Hindoo priests, who are abroad in the land seeking 
converts and gold. Dr. Scott says, practically, that 
they are "a bunch of Indians." I wonder to which 
tribe of the smooth-tongued and soft-voiced Indians 
belonged that Oakland preacher whose disappearance 
the other day was simultaneous with the disap- 
pearance of a pretty member of his congregation? 



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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



&/>e Political Situation 



A gentleman who is in politics, and has been in it 
to the extent of making a living in a political posili> n 
for thirty years, astonished me by announcing that 
McKiniey carried Doth North Carolina and Florida 
at the last Presidential election, Since then I have 
heard some remarkable statements by usually well- 
informed persons on this subject, and I think that 
perhaps it will not be uninteresting if this week 1 
give a few facts and figures about the last two or 
three elections. I shall include the election of 1X92. 
because the Democracy this year seems to want to 
make comparisons with that year under the impres- 
sion that Parker is as strong as Cleveland, and that 
the Judge can hope to do as well this year as the 
ex-President did twelve years ago. Cleveland in 
1892 carried 26 States, Harrison 18, and Weaver 6. 
Bryan four years later carried all the States that 
Weaver carried, except Oregon, which gave Weaver 
one vote. Deducting the votes of Idaho and Wyom- 
ing, which did not vote in 1888, as they were not in 
the Union, Cleveland got less popular votes in 1892, 
when he beat Harrison overwhelmingly, than he did 
four years before, when Harrison defeated him very 
badly. It was the stav-at-home vote in 1892 that 
defeated the Republicans. 

Bryan in 1896 carried 22 States, as follows : Ala- 
bama. Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia. Idaho, 
Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi. Missouri, Montana, 
Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, 
South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, 
Virginia and Wyoming. Bryan received 176 elec- 
toral votes and McKiniey 271, but McKinley's plu- 
rality was only 603,854, and a change of something 
over 32,000 votes in certain States would have elected 
Bryan. Four years later Bryan carried Kentucky, 
which in 1896 went to McKiniey, but he lost Kansas, 
Nebraska, South Dakota, Utah, Washington and 
Wyoming, and only got 155 electoral votes to 292 
for McKiniey, the largest electoral vote ever received 
by a Presidential candidate. Grant had 286, how- 
ever, in 1872, which, considering the size of the elec- 
toral college thirty-two years ago, was relatively a 
bigger vote than McKinley's. In 1900 Bryan received 
144,792 less popular votes than in 1896, and that fall- 
ing off was almost entirely in the South, where in 
every State he lost enormously, except Kentucky, 
which he carried in the last election, and Missouri, 
where he held his own. That evidently does not in- 
dicate that Bryan is as strong in the South as he is 
generally credited with being. The total vote cast 
in 1896 was 13,923,378, and in 1900, 13,961,566, the 
increase being in the North and West. If the South 
had cast as many votes in 1900 as she did four years 
before, the vote of the country would have reached 
very nearly 14,500,000, as Virginia showed a falling 
off of 130,000, Texas of 132,000, Tennessee of 50.000, 
Alabama and Louisiana of 35,000, and North Caro- 
lina of 40,000. In the West, Oregon dropped 13,003 
and Nevada 119, and California only added 7,000 
comparing the two Bryan-McKinley votes with each 
other. This year the negro question should bring 
out a full Southern white vote, and New York ami 
the East will no doubt oe thoroughly canvassed, so 

that the vote should not be far from 15,000,000. 
* * * 

As the Republican platform calls attention to the 



suppression of the negro vote in the South, it may be 
interesting to know that California and Mississippi, 
both with the same electoral vote, cast in 1900, 303,- 
793 and 59,103 respectively. A Mississippian has, 
therefore, five times as much power and force in the 
Federal Government as a Californian. Alabama and 
.Minnesota have the same electoral vote, yet the for- 
mer only casts 159,583 votes to 316,311 in the latter; 
so an Alabaman has twice as much voice at the polls 
as the Minnesotan. Georgia and Iowa are as poten- 
tial in electing a President, but it takes 530,800 votes 
to elect the thirteen electors of Iowa and only 122,- 
715 votes to accomplish the same results in Georgia. 
Washington casts 107,524 votes, and has five 
representatives in the electoral college, while Loui- 
siana gets nine with 67,904 votes, and Arkansas nine 
with 127,866 votes. New Hampshire, with 92,352 
popular votes, has one less electoral vote than 
Florida gets with 38,031 voters, and the eleven 
States which formed the old Southern Confederacy 
have 120 electoral votes, although they cast only 
about 400,000 more popular votes than the State of 
New York, which has only 39 ; it is therefore per- 
fectly true to say that a Southern voter has three 
times as much power and influence in the Govern- 
ment as a Northerner or Westerner. Instead of 98 
members of Congress on the basis of their vote, they 
sin mlil nt it have to exceed 33. The easiest way to re- 
move this inequality in Presidential elections is to do 
away with the Electoral College, and have the Presi- 
dent elected by popular vote. 

* * * 

Of course, as all the States are entitled to two elec- 
tors to represent their two Senators in the Senate, 
two votes must be taken from the electoral vote of 
each State when the number of votes each Congress- 
man represents is discussed. In Mississippi not a 
vote was cast for a Republican Congressman in 
1902, and not a vote for any one but the Democratic 
candidates for State officers. John Sharpe Williams 
was complimented by having 1,433 °f n ' s neighbors 
take the trouble to vote for him, an entirely unneces- 
sary proceeding, as if he had voted for himself he 
would have been elected, there being no other candi- 
date. In this State, about 40,000 votes were cast in 
the Fifth Congressional District, and even in Ne- 
vada it takes ten thousand votes to elect a Congress- 
man. In Georgia, the Mississippi condition of af- 
fairs is duplicated ; in Florida it is the same story ; 
in South Carolina and Louisiana about the same, the 
opposition being only nominal in a few districts; in 
fact, it takes very nearly as many Californians to 
elect eight Congressmen as it does Southerners to 

elect 98. 

* * * 

The able editor of the Call told his readers the 
other day that they contributed about two cents a 
day to the support of the Government. He based 
his statement on the figures of the new Bureau of 
Statistics, which published a table showing that the 
annual per capita expenditure of this country for the 
Federal Government was $7.97, but as the tax is not 
collected per capita, it seems to me that it is mislead- 
ing to estimate it that way. The Government re- 
ceives its income from four principal sources outside 
of what it collects as postage, and which, of course, 
depends entirely on the number of letters a person 



July 13. 1904. 

■ 

irvl miacellaneoua, whi, | 
cliult ami other similar 

items. The money paiil for lamK of CJ 'iirsr. romc- 
only out of thr j>.>ckct of thosr who buy the 
anil the miscellaneous largely from those who ,ir 
those t«" items, like that of tin- 
office, may be dismissed from tl I Govern- 
ment for the average citizen. Those who neither 
ilrink. ii'>r u>c tobacco nor oleomargarine, contribute 
nothing to the internal revenue, ami those who do 
use those luxuries do nol seem to feel the tax very 
onerous, judging from the quantity of intoxi' 
and tobacco they consume. Even tbe customs are 
paid by comparatively few persons, for the average 
American to-day uses very little that is imported, 
except perhaps sugar and rubber. The customs col- 
lected average only $3.17 per capita per year. SO if 
all the 80.000,000 people in the country paid their 
proportional share, it would only be about 8 mills a 
day. but as they use so few imported articles, the 
vast majority of the women, children and many of 
the men do not spend more than two or three mills 
a day in support of the Federal Government. The 
drinkers and smokers pay forty per cent, but on this 
Coast, where we have our own wine, our own sugar 
and many of us use nothing imported at all, we con- 
tribute absolutely nothing to the support of the 
army, navy and other Federal expenses. 

* * * 

Senator Bard has been traveling around the State 
with State Senator Rowell of Fresno, as though his 
own weight were not enough, and he needed the 
most unpopular man in the Legislature to make his 
canvass more difficult than it already is. Kern 
County has endorsed Bard, which was done not be- 
cause Kern admires Bard, but because ex-Senator 
Smith of that County was one of the coterie who 
originally discovered Bard, and he had to approve of 
his own acts. Orange, also, for the same reason, has 
promised Bard her vote. So the Senator has two 
votes. Humboldt has pledged her three votes to 
Knight, so that so far as pledges go, Knight is in 
the lead. 

* * * 

Kern County did something more remarkable 
than endorsing Bard, however. Indeed, it did one of 
the most absurd things that has ever been recorded 
in politics. It passed a resolution declaring that 
the acts of Congressman Daniels were most satis- 
factory, and then (although Daniels is a candidate 
for re-election), it endorsed the candidacy of Senator 
Smith for Daniels' place, and pledged him the Kern 
County delegation. There is consistency for you 
with a vengeance. 

Marin County has re-nominated Assemblyman 
Olmstead and pledged its delegates in the Senatorial 
district convention to E. B. Matinelli, of Marin 
County, against Belshaw of Contra Costa. If Bel- 
shaw can hold Contra Costa County in line, he can 
get the nomination, and if he is elected, Bard will 
have another vote. — Junius. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ti 



The Old Camper 

lias tor forty-flve years Lad one article in his supply — 
Doiden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. It gives to soldiers, 
sailors, hunters, campers, and miners a daily comfort, 
"like the old home." Delicious in coffee, tea and chocolate. 




o 



M) Ocmtbfcs 



A*E A KKESSARV FEATURE OP K0DE8N ARattTtCTlRE 

The Otis Antomatic Electric Elevator 

is the latest development of the art of home com- 
fort. It will pay architects to investigate its 
merits before completing specifications for a 
modern house. It is operated by pressing a but- 
ton and will not respond to an interfering calL 
Correspondence invited. 

OTIS ELEVATOR. COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Department: 509-511 Howard St. 
San Francisco. 



THE CALL 



Has the Largest ar>d Best Home Circulation 

The SHORT STORY SERVICE in the magazine section of 
the Sundav Call is unsurpassed. There are also NUMEROtiS 
CHATTY ARTICLES by the best writers on topics of Interest 
to everybody. 

The PICTURES given away with the Sunday Call, absolutely 
free of charge are art gems, and are framed, preserved and 
sold in nearlv every art store. All this in addition to a SUPER- 
IOR NEWS SERVICE, both local and foreign. 

Subscriptions i^ally and Sunoay, by carrier 75 cents per month. 
Yearly by mail. 18.00. Sunday edition, $2.50 per year. The 
Weekiy. $1.00 per year. 

JOHN McN»uGHT, Manager. JOHN D. SPRECKELS, Prop. 



The Oakland 
Tribune 



is delivered Into more homes of the masses and 
classes of Oakland and Alameda County than all 
otner Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley dallies com- 
bined. Reason— It's the best newspaper. 



W. E. DARGIE, Pres. 



T. T. DARGIE, Sec'y. 



TOflK^Ifl, Photographer 

1490 MARKET STREET, SfS„st«* 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



GROUND FLOOR. STVDIO 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

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interested and you will marvel at the results. The ' Argus" has 
many eyes, you only two, so let us do the work for you. Send 
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will do the rest and benefit you in many ways. 

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ARCHITECT 
131 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



EI 



Oxtltul Till M>r «M <Kvll. <lr. • Mk ro» " 



/TOWN CRIER 




C2ja 



V JJj 



A bunch of green peas 
By a lady was sent : 
She thought they would please, 
But he would not relent. 
And the pretty defendent was crushed. 

If the Judge was ashamed 

Of the bunch that was there — 
And he had certain reason, I think, 
He was not to be blamed 

For the flowers, I declare, 
When they saw him turned delicate pink. 

We are getting on. The prisoners at San Quentin 
are contemplating publishing a paper on their own 
account, and have applied to the Directors of the 
Prison for permission to purchase a printing plant. 
What a nice lot of educated criminals we have, and 
what credit it implies for the system of public school 
training! Education was to be a panacea for crime. 
The extinction of ignorance was prophesied to mean 
the extinction of crime. The fallacy of this reason- 
ing should now be apparent to the most stupid. Our 
convicts have not used their education to keep them 
out of prison, but would like to employ it for their 
amusement while in that restraint which is neces- 
sary to the safety of the rest of us. The Board of 
Directors, in an excess of humanitarianisfn consid- 
ered the request seriously. Presently, we shall have 
our learned criminals clamoring for a branch of the 
University Extension. 

There is no ordinance which can hold against the 
ignorance of a Professor of Jurisprudence, as was 
shown in the case of Professor Carey Jones, of the 
State University, who was recently arrested for rid- 
ing his bicycle upon the sidewalk. The Justice of the 
Peace, before whom the case was tried accepted the 
plea of the learned jurist that he was ignorant of the 
ordinance, and then suspended sentence. Whether 
it was the position of the defendant or the surprise 
of the Justice at his plea of ignorance, does not ap- 
pear, but in any case, a grievous miscarriage of jus- 
tice occurred. Still, there is some humor in a Pro- 
fessor of Jurisprudence going back upon the old for- 
mula, "Ignorantia haud excusat." It is to be hoped 
that the Professor will remember his own plea when 
he comes to handle his classes next term and mitigate 
his severity. 

The Chinaman is becoming more and more of a 
factor in the world. The recent advice of the Minis- 
ter of Mexico to his fellow countrymen who are resi- 
dents of that country to cut off their queues and 
marry Mexican women, to settle down and make 
themselves citizens, is a startling change from the 
former exclusive aloofness which the Celestials were 
wont to cultivate. Employment of the Chinese in 
South Africa has given them another advertisement, 
and if the labor unions persist in stupidly forcing an 
issue here, the bars may be let down. The opening 
of the Orient is producing unexpected results, and 
not the least of them the rise in importance if the 
Chinese. 

The death of a sailor in the United States Marine 
Hospital owing to the mistake of a nurse, must not 
be laid at the door of the nurse. It is admitted that 
she was not a graduate nurse, and is only twenty 
years of age. Surely the Government can provide 
trained nurses for its hospitals, or is it only another 
case of pull? 



The Board of Health reports that San Francisco 
is in an excellent condition as regards the health of 
the inhabitants. Physicians are complaining that 
there is no work for them to do, and measures will 
have to be taken to work this Board into some signs 
of activity. As soon as its officers get really down 
to work, there is some hope of a change, and if the 
slackness continues, no doubt a few cases of bubonic 
plague can be successfully faked up, which will give 
the city that reputation abroad which the Board has 
always wished that it should enjoy. In the meantime. 
it would be gratifying to learn that the milk supply- 
is purer in quality ; also, how much the last pretend- 
ed raid cost the dairymen. 

Fleishman, the defaulting cashier who stole three 
hundred thousand dollars from a Los Angeles firm, 
is said to be very despondent, somewhere in South 
America. A man who stole that amount and was 
still in San Francisco, would have no need to be dis- 
couraged. The numbers of first-class attorneys who 
would rally to his assistance would constitute almos 
a rush, and the efforts of respectable citizens to be 
placed on the jury would be excruciatingly energetic. 
Fleishman is reported, however, to have lost his 
money. That is almost as bad as can be. The les- 
son to defaulting cashiers would seem to be in the 
first place that they should not go to South America, 
and, secondly, and more important, that they should 
not lose their savings. 

A woman in Los Angeles has been bidden by devils 
to dig, and dig she did, in a most surprisingly vigor- 
ous manner. It is a pity that these spirits do not 
appear in larger numbers. The trouble with great 
numbers of our population is that nothing human 
can ever make them dig, and unlike the scriptural 
gentleman who was unable to perform this necessary 
function, they are not ashamed to beg. A supply of 
devils calculated to set upon the walking delegates 
and to direct their flagging energies into channels 
of honest employment, would be an unmixed bless- 
ing, and I know of nothing in the Immigration Law 
to prohibit their being landed. 

Attention has been called to the unfortunate do- 
mestic affairs of trade union leaders. Quite a num- 
ber of instances have recently occurred to show that 
these gentlemen, who talk so loudly of justice to the 
employee, are apt to treat their one employee, their 
wife, in a way which no employer of labor would 
think of treating them. The latest example is Cook, 
President of the Plasterers' Union, of Fresno, whose 
wife shows very conclusively that he was in the habit 
of running an "unfair house." 

The idea that children are a good speculation re- 
ceives a severe shock in the case of Mrs. Ann Lewis, 
an old lady of eighty, who died in the Yuba County 
Hospital. Her son was notified of her desperate 
condition by registered letter, and would not trouble 
even to reply. It is a misfortune that the county 
should relieve such a despicable hound of his duty. 

The good folks of Oakland must be getting a little 
tired of their crusade against the Contra Costa 
Water Company. Now the Assessor has placed a 
merely nominal assessment upon their franchises. 
The municipalities should learn that it requires a 
little more than a handful of amateur politicians to 
contend against astute business men. 



July 33. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NEWS LETTER 



«3 



Ift^k-hV&ri society c feM^fM#i 



Dear Bessie: \\ en 
Shortx r Warner. thi- iniyht easily lx 

the « 1 nl It-— t week "i the summer, for there 

• 'tally nothing bcinf 

ivc a luncheon yesterday for Mr- 

•t paid San Francis 
I, long time, but for the other affair- we 
arc indebted t" our military friends; .1-. for instance, 
the lovely little hop at the Presidio last Friday night ; 
the wedding anniversary celebration held l>\ • 
tain ami Mr-. Schoeffel at the toth Infantry can 
men! on Monday night: and Mr-. Torney's car. I 
party at the Presidio on Tuesday night. Edith's 
wedding was a very quiet one at the family home on 
Gough street, where Archbishop Montgomery per 
formed the ceremony between her and James Steele; 
the invitation list was limited, and the bridal jiart \ 
a small one. Margaret Eastman was maid-of-honor, 
the two little White children, Inez and Ruth, flower- 
hearers. and Campbell Shorbe host man. 

The next night — Wednesday — Eleanor Warner 
and Stuart RawlingS, were married at the Warner 
residence on Franklin strict, the Reverend John 
Hemphill officiating. It was rather a large affair, 
and the reception was well attended. The floral 
decorations were lovely, and the bridal party charm- 
ing; Helen Davis was the maid-of-honor, lane Raw- 
lings and Alice Warner the other attendant maids. 
It is too bad that we .shall lose Eleanor, but her fu- 
ture home — at least for a time — is to be in Mexico. 

Next to come off will be the wedding of Grace 
Martin and William Home, which is named for three 
o'clock in the afternoon of the third of August, at 
the old Hyde mansion on Geary street, where her 
father and mother were also married. Charlotte El- 
linwood's engagement to Robert Greer caused no 
end of a sensation when it was made known last 
week, just too late to tell you of in my last letter. 
It was whispered at one time that she was to be 
lured away, and lost to her friends in San Francisco, 
but this sets all such fears at rest, and gives us the 
prospect of another jolly wedding, for all the func- 
tions she is concerned in are jolly affairs, and 'tis 
thought it will be very soon. They are sure to be 
entertained extensively, for they are both such popu- 
lar folk — in fact, the party-giving for them has al- 
ready' begun,, for Harry Holbrook, who is always in 
the van in such affairs, opened the ball with a thea- 
tre and supper party the night the engagement was 
regularly "out," the Hutch set being the favored 
guests, and there are heaps more on the tapis. Susie 
Blanding's engagement to Knox is really at an end, 
and she has gone off with Mrs. Mosely for a trip 
abroad. It will be some time till we see her again, 
but that it will be a whole year, as at present is the 
cry, I do not in the least believe. Knox looks dismal 
— do you wonder? Alice Rutherford is, I hear, to 
be an August bride at Newport, where the George 
Crockers have taken a cottage for the autumn months 
— and that she is to have the most gorgeous kind of 
a wedding. 

Anna Sperry's nuptials do not, I understand, come 
off till September, and Jean Nokes Murphy has put 
off her coming until then for her visit to the Rogers. 
I do not think there is a better satisfied woman in 
the State of California than Mrs. McCalla at the com- 
pletion of her pet work — the Seaman's club house 
at Vallejo, last Saturday, for which she has worked 



ntiringly. \ whole crowd of u- wenl up to the 

it which Bishop 

Morcland with the assistance "i < haplain 

McAllister from the \a\\ Yard. There was music 

and addresses, and the delicious luncheon given b) 

■ ll.i was not tin' least enjoyable part of the 

performances. Of course, I am going down to 

the garden fete at San Mateo to-day, which ha- been 
arranged for the benefit "f San Mateo's Free Kinder 

gartcn. It i- to be held this afternoon and evening 

at Mr-, lord's pretty villa, and the indications are 
that we are t>> have a rousing good time. The young- 
sters are to have their inning- to-day. but to-night 
will be for the elders, and a lot of nice things arc 
promised them. The Bohemians are hard at work 
preparing for their mid-summer jinks, with the dedi- 
cation .,1' their new club house up in the redwoods, 

and what do you think of this for richness? Redding 

and Cowles coming, and W'iltsee already here. But 
ii seems that after all we arc not to have one of the 

promised lions, and that Santos-Dumont will not 

make one of Joe Redding'.- traveling party hither- 
ward at this time. In his stead comes Northrop 
Cowles, after an absence of some years, and will no 
doubt be made much of by bis bohemian friends. 
Marie Zane Cowles is in Paris, and has with her 
Mrs. Allan Wallace for cpiite a stay. 

I hear that Lieutenant Shinkle is not going East, 
after all, and we were all about to congratulate Mar- 
jorie on his being transferred to a battery that would 
station him at Fort Miley. But for some reason it 
failed of accomplishment, and now the story goes 
that he will soon be off to the Philippines. It is too 
bad if it be true, for Fort Miley is one of the prettiest 
little posts to live at. 

Jackie Haines came home on the last transport, 
and has been received with open arms, for he was 
always a great favorite hereabouts; he has been 
staying with the Voorhies since he came. 

The Selby girls — Florence and Mabel — who re- 
turned last week from their trip abroad, where they 
were under the care of their grandmother, dear old 
Mrs. Selby, are quoted as saying there is no place 
like California, and are very happy at being home 
once more; but for all that, I would not be too much 
surprised at hearing of their going off again before 





Bolim 'f 
Bristol Co. 

Our tasteful display of 

Pearls, Diamonds 
and Precious Stones 

is unusually rich and brilliant 

Ic^rJJo OeaiySireei 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



14 

very long — the bee of travel, once acquired, is a diffi- 
cult one to get rid of. Mrs. Pomeroy and Hattie 
have gone East for a few weeks' touring to New York 
and elsewhere, taking in St. Louis on their homeward 
trip in September. They left last Tuesday, picking 
up Christine at Reno, where she had been with the 
McCutcheons during Hattie's illness. I expect they 
will have the loveliest kind of a trip — they have 50 
many friends everywhere. Mrs. Jack Johnson has 
had Pearl Landers down at Del Monte with her; 
the Tom Magees are over at Fruitvale this summer, 
touring round the country as fancy dictates in their 
automobile. You would be surprised at the gi 
popularity of the machine this summer as a mean 
of locomotion; parties of from four to a dozen are 
made up, and off they go to some one of the resorts 
for a few days' stop ; it would be an ideal way 1 4 see 
ing and enjoying the country if the mads were 
only tolerably decent. The Spreckels have had any 
number of parties, as well as the Buckbees; Kate 
Dillon is now doing the southern part of the State 
in her auto, along with "Pat." Cosgrove : and Dick 
Pease has. 1 hear, taken his up to Oregon with him, 
where they are to spend the next two months. Quite 
a number, as I have at different times told you. have 
gone to see the wonders of the St. Louis Exposition. 
which is, I hear, very much like all of its predeces- 
sors. But the majority have chosen September as 
the month for their visit, when the weather will be 
the best suited to our California endurance. Even 
Philip Paschal, who is always in the fashion, has de 
cided for September to join the throng, and expi 
to be away until November, with his friends in the 
East. The Colliers, who have been up at Mount 
Shasta, leave the beginning of September for St. 
Louis and Washington City, and will bring Sadie 
back with them when they return late in the autumn. 
Laura Farnsworth is over in Sausalito for a two 
months' visit: Celia Tobin is back from Santa Bar- 
bara; Carrie Merry is in town with Grace Martin; 
Bessie Palmer has returned from her visit to the 
Bixbys at Long Beach, and Bessie Coghill is hack 
from Napa. Florence P-cs has been down at San 
Jose with her mother all summer; Eleanor Daven- 
port and her mother went up to Independence Lake 
this week, and will In- away the whole of August. 
going, on their return, to their new home on Pacific 
Avenue. There are a lot of pretty homes being built 
overlooking the Presidio and the sea, but 1 venture 
to say none of them will be more attractive than I In 
bijou of a home that Doctor Morton Gibbons ami his 
sweet little wife are about to build away out on 
Washington street. Tin young medico is quite an 
expert in the use of carpenter's tools, and you should 
see the lovely set of dining-room table and chairs of 
dark wood and leather to match that he has made 
himself; they are very handsome. I tell you, he is a 
handy chap to have around. The northern end of 
Van Ness avenue is becoming quite an army settle- 
ment, so many of the cloth being new dwellers there. 
You see, it is convenient to port Mason and the bou- 
levard which leads to the Presidio, etc. The last to 
join the colony are Major and Mrs. Lea Febiger, 
who have taken one of the houses Henrv Botliin 
lately built near Union street, and. as you know, the) 
are all a hospitable lot of folks. The Coplidges, who 
do a lion's share in that way, are going off for a trip 
East to help the General on the road to convalescence 
after his late severe illness, and we shall be glad to 
see them back again, some time in September. Mrs. 
Chandler Ploward has arrived from China, but wdl 
soon be off again in her travels, as she and Gladys 
leave next week, I believe, for a tour of the Euro- 



July 23, 1904. 



pean Continent, and it is probable she goes home by 
Suez and not by San Francisco — it is not yet decided, 
however. Mary Nichols is happy, entertaining the 
sister of her fiance, Philip Lansdale ; she is with the 
Nichols down at San Mateo. I hear she is a very 
handsome girl, and already much liked. 

—Elsie. 



BIRTHS. 
July 10th — To Doctor and Mrs. Emmett Rixford, a 

son. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 
Miss Charlotte Ellinwood, daughter of Doctor and 

Mrs. Charles N. Ellinwood, to Robert P. Greer. 
Miss Margaret Hubbcll, daughter of Major Flubbed, 

V. S. A., to Captain James A. Woodruff, U, S. 

A., son of General and Mrs. C. A. Woodruff. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
August 3d (Wednesday) — Miss Grace Martin, 

daughter of Mrs. Camillo Martin, to William 

Home. 519 Geary street. 3 p.m. 
WEDDINGS. 
June 28th — In Berlin, Mrs. Marie D. Marye, of 

Washington. D, C., to George T. Marye, of San 

Francisco. 
July 19th (Tuesday) — Miss Edith Shorbe, daughter 

of Mrs. J. de B. Shorbe, to James Steele of Sac- 
ramento. 2501 Gough street. 9 p. m. 
July 20th (Wednesday) — Miss Eleanor Warner, 

daughter of I )r. and Mrs. Alexander Warner, to 

Stuart Rawlings, of Mexico. 2323 Franklin 

street. 9 p. m. 

DIED. 
July 17th — At Montclair, New Jersey. Miss Man 

Lake, daughter of the late Judge Delos Lake, of 

San Francisco. 



Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Browne, I. E. Browne, Airs. 
1. E. Byrne, Mr. |. E. Byrne. W. A. Tavler. J. M. Cas 
tello, D. M. Bereton, John W. McCormick, Dr. A. B. 
Grossej C. T. Hamilton, R, M. Smith, Miss E. Dorn, 
Stella Schutze, Mrs. Bertha Schutze, Mrs. 1. G. 
Treadwell, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. O'Hara, Miss Bertha 
Tobias, M. Tobias, are at Paraiso Springs. 

The following were at Pine Lakes last week: Mrs. 
I. Strauss, Miss Olga Strauss. A. C. McColgan, II. 
W. Felton, W. S. Tilton, George L. Murdock, Misses 
Gussie Tanforan and Millie Tanforan, Mrs. J. I). 
Lehman, Mrs. A. If. Ricketts, H. R. Cooper. George 
1 [ammersmith. 




, — . 



Fairchild 

TO ORDER 

French Corsets 

Shirt tVaUt Suits 

Artistic Shirt 
tOaists 

Fit and satisfaction guaranteed 



1211 SUTTER. STREET. S. F. 

Phone Larkin S6i 



July 33. 1904- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



«s 






A SHIn of Br.iutr ti • Joy Forvvtr. 



DR. T. FELIX (.olHUirs ORIENTAL CREAM 
OR MAGICAL BEAl'TIFIER. 






Uhe Price of Prunes 

(California musi Supp • it h pruni 

Daily IV 

• I the ta! 
at the ilrnm with rapture \\ 
ghbor, rush t'> tell your neij 
a treat to every child! 
tlie bon-fire burn triumphant. 
your joy in 
For the Lord lias looked upon you — 
He will raise the price of pr-- 

When the bitter East is bendi 

Underneath its load of sno 
Joy supreme will be attending 

California, I trow. 
Loud the laughter, long thi 

Through the merry w i ns, 

vanish to the devil — 

God has raised t! e price of prunes. 

ne may talk of harvests golden, 

Yellow miles of bending grain; 
Circumstances still embolden 

- to sing this one refrain : 
Sing your praises to 

As the Latin poet croon-. 
Things will come our way. for certain. 

When we rais if prunes. 

Fat Folks 

iduced my weight Be mds, husl six inches, waii 

Inches and hips ! uirteen h >n ti by n (ruarnnteed tiarm- 

Iass remedy withonl exercise orntnrvlng. I will tell you all about it. 
Enclose stamp- Address Mrs. E I; Richan r oth street. River- 

Bide, Cat. a. 

t ■ ..» 

Four clothing will last longer it yon ha 1 

1 1 b S] laulding 1 ! Cleaning ai 

]j; Stockton street. They clei lothlng i> 1 ithiy contract. 

They .-ilso clean gloves, neckties, curtains, lace and all Bueh 

articles, calling for and deliv< It's tnn] to 

tronlze them. 



Teals Briquettes, 1I10 popular domestic fuel, ar 1 

per ton; bait ton $4; quarter ton $2. Fill) weight guaranteed In 

omy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities Briqueth 
are superior to coal. .Sold only by the Tests Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel, Phone South 95. 



The Star Hair Remedy — besl or .ill tonics and 1 

Stops falling hair; euros dandruff, restores color " a d ■ 

AI druggists and hair dressers. Accepl no substitute. 
Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Suttei 3) 



Original designs in menu and tally cards. Charlotti ' 

Williams, mom Ik. 121 Post street. 



SCIENTIFIC MASSAGE FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 

MARTIN BRAUN, MASSEUR 

Graduute [m penal University Hospital, Vienna, Austria. 

WENBAN BUILDING 

Phone John 7jsi BOOfiutter St.. <:<-r- Mason St. 











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. New York. 



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DERMATOLOGY 


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of Fin e Pi wd( t 
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LADIES' II \T IMPORTEB 



REMODELING. 



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MISS CAROLINE HALSTED LITTLE 

Will Receive Pupils in Singing 

The Roosevelt 

546 Suiter Slreft, Room 58, on Tuesday and Friday 
Oakland, 3621 Broadway, Monday and Thursday 



JOHN M- T1ETJEM COMPANY 

Fancy Groceries, 

California and Imported ^€Oinej 

JVeiet ~/~tore 

344 Post St., Tel. Main 518, San Francisco 




L4DIES! 



Wrinkles ami ail Facial Blemishes re- 
moved by 
PROF. S. DE LOUTSKY 

! itesf Parisian Mellioil 
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h -i ■■; i in-. ; A.tao moles, warts, etc. 
s.-.'ihi ti- ■ ■!!:■. .i. and mani'-uring- Call or 
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Red Eyes ami Eye- 
lids, Gran u 1 a t e d 

Eyelids ami Other 
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i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



Improve the State Militia 



The condition of the State Militia is not all that it 
should be. Professional and business men should 
make a combined effort to place the California 
Guardsmen in a stronger financial and numerical con- 
dition. All that our young men ask is encourage- 
ment, but they are entitled to more. The members of 
the militia should be given special privileges. Em- 
ployers should discriminate in their favor. Military 
service appeals naturally to young, active and ambi- 
tious men, and that has always been especi- 
ally true in the West, which has always had a large 
and prosperous militia. Six years agQj when the 
Spanish war broke out, California had two regiments 
in the field and ready to start for Manila before any 
Eastern State had one regiment mobilized ; thou- 
sands of her young men volunteered, and the diffi- 
culty was in picking the best among so many good 
soldiers. But our guardsmen do not get the encour- 
agement they deserve. On the contrary, they are 
met on one side by the active opposition and avowed 
hostility of unionism, and en the other by the indif- 
ference and penuriousness of the business commu- 
nity. It is an extraordinary fact that the merchants 
and business men of California are so blind to their 
own interests, so indifferent to the welfare of the 
State in which they have so much at stake, that 
they play by their selfishness into the hands of those 
who avowedly are their bitter enemies. The only 
piece of political insanity that equals it is when the 
prohibitionists vote with the saloon keepers against 
high license. 

The unions are opposed to the militia. Why? 
Because, evidently, the militia stands in the way of 
their committing unlawful acts, for it does not in- 
terfere with those who are law-abiding, and who do 
not take part in riots and cause turmoil and excite- 
ment ; therefore, by their very opposition to the 
militia, and also the regular army, the unions practi- 
cally say : If we coula get rid of you and your gun, 
we would do as we please, and repeat the record of 
the French Revolution here in America. While there 
are thousands of union men that are law-abiding and 
reasonable, they somehow never seem to get to the 
top and never control the unions. It is the agitators, 
the rioters, the anarchists who inevitably come to 
the front the moment that union trouble begins. The 
unions never punish any of their members for vio- 
lating the law, even if they go to the extent of mur- 
der. They justify every extreme, if it is performed 
by one of their members. The daily records of the 
courts in this city show that, and what they justify 
and applaud in the individual, they never have, and 
are never likely to, condemn in the crowd. ( inly 
the militia stands between this State and anarchy, 
and the unions for that purpose are busy doing 
all they can to destroy the militia. It would seem 
as though that fact would lead the conservative and 
law-abiding element in the community to lend every 
help and encouragement to the soldiers, but on the 
contrary, they throw every obstacle in the way of 
their employees enlisting. The majority of emplov- 
ers refuse to grant their employees pay while tne 
boys are in camp ; they refuse to give them the time 
for drill and parade, and they are as niggardly in 
contributing to their pleasures and comforts as 
though it were a church collection. If the public 
does not take an interest in the militia its members 
cannot be expected to care for the welfare of the 
public. A Nevada County company wishes to dis- 
band for this very reason. One of the County papers, 



commenting on the request of Company I to be dis- 
banded, says: "The company has the confidence that 
soldiers should have in their officers, and they are 
in thorough harmony with their men. The simple 
fact is that there is not enough interest taken in the 
Company by the community to keep it in existence, 
and the burden of maintaining it has fallen on a very 
few men." The Nevada County story can be repeated 
here. It can be repeated in every town and city in 
the Slate with a militia company. It is the men 
most vitally interested in keeping the companies up 
to their full standard who are the most miserly in 
the treatment of the soldiers. Every employer 
should gladly give his employees all the opportunity 
needed, without loss of money or time, to take part 
in the militia drills, exercises and encampments. The 
boys who join should be favored and commended for 
their patriotism and public spirit, and not only should 
they not lose anything by putting on the uniform, 
but they should be highly acclaimed and substan- 
tially recompensed for doing so. The men who will 
not give their employees the time to attend the drills, 
parades, etc., who will not allow them their wages 
wdiile at encampments, who discourage their men 
from joining, should be marked men in the com- 
munity, and should be held up to public execration as 
unpatriotic, selfish fellows. 





GOODYEARS 

"GOLD SEAL" 

. RUBBER GOODS THE BEST MADE 

Rubber Hose, Belting and PacKings 

We are headquarter* tor everything made »f Rubber 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO. 

B. H. Pease, President. 

F. M. Shepard, Jr., Treasurer. 

C- F. Runyon, Secretary. 

573-575-577-579 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



REMOVAL NOTICE 



PATRICK A CO.. have moved to their new 
quarters 111-113 SANSOME STREET, where a 
complete line of Rubber Stamps. Stencil*. Seals, 
Metal Checks. Box Brands, etc.. can be found. 



July »3. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Society and the Savant 



n 



By the Undergraduate. 

Somebody must 

i\v<lcr. I''anr\ such .111 asinine paragraph 
his punctuating the societ) • n in the 

silly season : 

"There are a thousand students al the I'nr. 

alifornia summer school. The) arc old meii. 

young Mien, bachelor maids, married women. l>o\- 

aml girls, and an interesting number of delightful 

professors from all over the United States. I hear 
that several of the unmarried lecturers are reallv 

charming, and are greatly sought after bj the women 
students. It isn't surprising that they are in demand, 
for they are clever in every way. 

"There arc Henry Morse Stevens of < Ixford, Mor- 
ris Morgan of Yale, Archie Coolidge of Harvard, an I 
Jerome Lanfield of Berkeley — could a brighter quar- 

tet he found in the United States: I don't know 
whether they are married < .r not. hut they are splen- 
did men. and all have a keen sense of humor. You'd 
really have thought so if you could have seen them 
at Del Monte recently. They were a happy addition 
to the hotel, and were greatly missed when they left 
there a few days ago." 

The bright particular sentence in this collection of 
grammatical gems is: "I don't know whether they 
are married or not, but they are splendid men. anil 
all have a keen sense of humor." There's meat in 
that sentence, methinks! It's easily appreciated if 
you read it backwards or upside down. Even then 
you're not very certain if the lady means that they 
are "splendid men," in spite of the fact that she docs 
not know "whether they are married or not"; or if 
she wishes to imply that their sense of humor is de- 
pendent in some way on their matrimonial status. 

The society garrulator — William Dean Howells 
delivered himself of that noun, and it dove-tails into 
the vocabulary as neatly as its sister-adjective "gar- 
rulous" — is in a chronic state of gush, so it is not sur- 
prising that she should become enthusiastic over the 
summer school lecturers. But somehow, one resents 
a name like Henry Morse Stevens dripping from a 
slushy pen. Professor Stevens is a man who stands 
for the very best in our college world. His influence 
is not bounded by the Berkeley class-room and the 
campus, but reaches into the far corners of the aca- 
demic world. His attitude toward the students can 
be read between the lines of the dedication of this 
year's Blue and Gold : "To Henry Morse Stevens, 
In No Spirit of Mere Formality." Fancy a man of 
Professor Stevens's age and attainments being writ- 
ten up like any callow society youth "doing" Del 
Monte! 

After jumbling the information that she doesn't 
"know whether they are married," that they are 
"splendid men," and that they "all have a keen sense 
of humor" into one sentence, the "Chaperon" coyly 
says to her readers : "You'd really have thought so 
if you'd seen them at Del Monte recently." Can't 
you just hear "Jerry" Lanfield chuckling over it? 
"Tommy" Sanford's laugh must have. hit the high 
places in the Faculty Club when he read the Chap- 
eron's comments. Professor Sanford would have 
made a fine fifth to that "bright quartet." "Tom and 
Jerry" is a proverbial combination, so small wonder 
"Tommy" Sanford and "Jerry" Lanfield usually 
go dilly-dallying arm-in-arm. Their fondness for 
their liquid namesake as illustrated in their 



Itluc and Gold" might give ihr "( hai- 
•i|> o n thnr do 

nth. 
cording to the "Chaperon," the women at the 
stunt- : arc most discriminating. It is the 

unmarried lecturer" who is "sought after.' Now. 
\our regular blown-in-the-bottle brand baa 

or "profs" regardless of mat! 

Stanford, 
for instance, who had the women all burning ini 
at his altar in spite of the fact that he was a married 
man. There art- two or three married men at the 
I Diversity of California, whose lecture rooms are 

always crowded to the brim with co-eds. It's the 
mality of the professor, not his marriageable 

qualities, that appeals to the co-ed. l'.ut the summer 
school student differs from the co-ed. by — several 
\ears. In the terse argot of the campus, summer 

school is distinctly Pelicanese. Now. a Pelican is a 
ijirl who is ,,1,1 enough to know better, but sb,- goes 

to college jnst the same, and swallows more learning 
than is good For Strong teeth. She has reached the 
age where she can't afford to waste time on hopeless 
material, so the "unmarried lecturer" is probabl) as 

popular as the "Chaperon" says he is. But I'll lay 
odds he'll be glad when summer school is over, and 
the Pelicans depart in single bliss. 




Hospitality's Cheer 

In all social cheer hospitality's 
motto is: 

The Best for the Guest 

The superb qtia'ity of 

Hunter 
Whiskey 



makes it the first sought- 
and the first bought. 



H1LBERT MERCANTILE CO., 

213-215 Market St., San Francisco, Cat. 

Telephone Exchange 313 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



P^„..^ w * w ^>-To» m.q,j PLEASURE'S WAND ^ 





TRUSTY TIPS ON THINGS THEATRICAL. 

TIV0L1— "Bobio Hood"— A splendid pel 1 : 

GRAND— James Neill in "The Cowboy and thi 

ALCAZAR— "Prisoner of Zen da' —a very even : show. 

CENTRAL— "Roberl Emmett"— crowded houses. 

FISCBER'S— "The Lucky Stone/"— a lucky hit [0 

ORPflEUM— A very fine vaudeville bill— Bo 



Of all the thousands who have enjoyed reading 
the "Prisoner of Zenda," and the hundi have 

seen it on the stage, there is a verj lai irtion 

that knows nothing of the sequel of the play, li may 
In- because of this that the attendance at the Alcazar 
was unusually large (tor an "Id play) ail the week. 
Whittlesey made a very acceptable "Red Elphbi 
Conness a splendid "Hentzau," Ruth Allen 
thetic and beautiful "Amelia," Fred Butli 
•"Colonel Sapt," and Juliet Crosby a verj sweet 
and popular "Fla\ ia." 

The scenery throughout was new and n. rtii ularly 

appropriate, and the costuming excellent. The play 
went with a swing' all the week, except that 
was a tendency to melodramatic posing and rather 
loud oratorical flights. Contrary to expectations, 
it was Miss Crosby who held the others <- 
reasonable appreciation of the size of the house. I ler 
very pleasant voice was modulated to Ml the fur- 
thest corner, and yet she never shrieked nor did 
she ever overstep the limits of rational work. 

Butler's "Sapt" would have been far 1 1 live 

if he hail taken a leaf from the little lady's book. 
Maher's "Bertram Bertrarid" was as good 
work as any he has ewer done, but he 1 visil 

some artist's Studio and watch the I of a 

mahl-stick. His manipulation of a painters tools 
was one of the finc-t specimens of unconscious hu- 
mor I ha\ e r\ er seen. 

* * * 

Ethel Barrymore has addi d to her laurels while in 
San Francisco. She is certain!) one of the very few- 
actresses that is above adverse criticism, and any- 
thing Favorable, if unleashed judgment was given 
rein, would sound like fulsome praise or adula 
She is a capable and conscientious artist. She- 
lias two very good plays in "Cousin Kate" and "Car- 
rots," and she is as good as the plays. \\ hen 
think of ii, how few, how very few. actors or ac- 
tresses are as good as then- plays. "Carrots" wins 
by its simplicity, and when you add to ibis the sym- 
pathy-provoking voice of a prett) and ' ■ < in 
tual woman, you have tl the Barrj 

success. Hubert Henry l)a\ics — late dramatic 
critic of the News Letter — could not wish for a bit- 
ter exponent of Ids admirable work. \\ hen 
leaves for the East, Aiiss Barrymore takes our h 
with her. We shall always recall her work as a 
restfully sweet remembrance. 

* * * 

"Robert Emmett" is filling the Central with enthu- 
siastic audiences I'll, throng joins tin i r mall 

the mimic emotions, and it is quite as good a 1 

as the stag, performance to watch tin pi >pli ["he 
Irish dances were encored until the merry da 
girls were ready to drop with fatigue. 

The performance of the "Lucky Stone" at bis- 
cher's improves as the weeks roll on. Miss Morton 
is very popular, and she has the ability that Few 
of the Weberfieldian type possess. She can sing. 



I he public is not slow to appreciate the fact, and the 
"A Bit o' Blarney," is only one among catchy 
hal ill I iers are whistling and hum- 

ming. Miss Morton's dresses arc marvels of beauty, 
the env> of all milliners. Npra Hayes 
is a very clever young woman, and she has caught 
on with .1 ice. She is most self-conscious, 

- the whole of the stage. If she would 
adency she would be above criti- 
cism. She is a wild, rollicking girl, of the type that 
s, |,ut at limes she is inclined to find the stage 
mall For elbow room. Her personality fills it 
from on,- end to the other. Dillon has acquired the 
logue" habit, and he wanders about the 
if his mind was busily engaged somewl 1 n 
in the Santa Cruz Mountain ring the cuni- 

form inscription on a redwood tree. Rice and ( ady 
are tin I German comedians 1 have seen at this 

lions. 1 is a far better comedian than Kolb, and 

the Hebrew dialect work of Bobbj North is splen- 
did, lie enunciates a trifle too rapidly in com. 
tional parts, but his sinu se, ' arl Yohe 

has a peculiarly ungrateful part as "Gambia Siffi." 
It is nothing to which may be added nothing in an 
rt to make somethi 

"The ( owboj and the Lady" was greeted at the 
Grand Opera House all week by crowded houses. 
James Xeill ami Edythe Chapman played the two 
principal roles, and Miss Chapman especially did 

well. 1 1 on,, of Clyde Fitch's efforts at 

a Western play, h is different from other Western 
plays, luit that is about all that can be said for it. 
Mr. Neill's company is more than good enough for it. 
Ihc ch( ap prices have served to make a ven 
fill Si I. for 50 cents is surely low 

enough foi cli 1 iple and plaj s 1 if si >me rank, 

"A Gentleman of France" follows.. 
* * * 

A problem play pruned down to a 20-minute aci 
for vaudeville purposes is the latest in the line of 

1 iit.d at ill- 1 irphi 11111. Rose Coghlan, 

the legiti star, was introduced as a headliner on 

the local variety stage. The piece, "Between Mati- 
nee and Night," deals with the matrimonial adven- 
tures of an actress, and vaguely tells of the monoto- 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STORAGE:, MOVING. PACKING »nd SHIPPING 

WAREHOUSE: EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built rooms for the Storage of Household Furniture 

Office: POST and POWELL STS. Phone Private 571 



July 33. 1904. 



SAN franc: 



lu-r : 

that tilt- 
to t! 

where, alter letting the child go, the 
up for the par 

leav< • amuse her au 

ami airy role, although her heat 

Ian has fine artistic emotional talent, 
bod) kn"\\-. and this kin. I of role is the worl 

Her support rformance 

received with liberal applause. The vaudeville 
performance is an excellent one, and is quite in 
ing with the recent standard at the < trpheum. 

* * * 

"Robin II 1" continues the popular card at the 

Tivoli. Judging by the crowds that see this - 
nightly, it would seem as if all San Francisco had 

been to the Eddy Street house several tinier. The 

patronage is so great that 1 shouldn't be surpt 
if "Robin Hood" broke the Tivoli record. 

* * * 

Extensive preparations are going on for 
Whirl of the Town," the big musical production that 
is to follow "A Lucky Stone'' at Fischer's. Scenic 
artists are at work in several of the theatres prepar- 
ing the scenic and stage paraphernalia. The c. 
the largest ever seen on Fischer's stage. 

* * * 

James Neill will produce at the Grand I 
House to-morrow matinee and all next week Harriet 
Ford's dramatization of Stanley Woman's popular 
story. "A Gentleman of France." Sunday matinee. 
July 31st. "Shenandoah" will be revived. Thi 
cial summer prices of 15c, 25c, and 50c. have been 
a successful innovation, crowding the house almost 
every night. 

* * * 

White Whittlesey's engagement at the Alcazar 
is a series of brilliant successes, and his nightlj 
greeting testifies to the depth and sincerity of the 
popular regard. "Rupert of Hentzau," in which 
Whittlesey appears next week, has never been acti -1 
at the Alcazar, and it will have added interest be- 
cause it follows in natural sequence close upon tin 
present revival of "The Prisoner of Zenda." Air. 
Whittlesey will appear August 1st as Claude Alel- 
notte in a special revival ot Bulwer's "The Lady oi 
Lyons," and Eugenie Thais Lawton will make hci 
first appearance at the Alcazar as Pauline. 

* * ■£ 

The Central Theatre will have a powerful melo- 
dramatic attraction for the week beginning Monday 
night in Scott Marble's masterpiece, "The Gates of 
Justice." Throughout the play runs a beautiful love 
story, and there is a wealth of excellent comedy in 
tlie piece. "The Gates of Justice" lias had tremen- 
dously successful runs throughout the East, and it 
is expected to make an immense hit at the Central 

next week. 

* * * 

Henry Miller opens the Columbia Theatre Mon- 
day night with "Mice and Men." Mr. Miller will 
have a role well-suited to his art, and will have the 
assistance of a well-selected company. 
(Continued to page 22.) 



NEWS LBTT1 

GraQd Opera Mouse 



e GENTLEMAN OF FRANCE 

hi 



»9 






o» I 



r#l| •:rr#W. 

LUSTROUS VAUDEVILLE 









ROSE COGHLAN ACQ.. 

1 bandar, (Saturday) and 

, js and no 



Columbia Theatre. "" 



i Mftntjnrft. 
Befrtnnlog M<>mluy. Jul] 
Hal 11 a only 

I h annual engagement si this 1 1 
d presents 
HENRY MILLER 

■■mil his npany in Madeleine Li tte Riley's 

London and New York sucoesa f\n\ time In Ban Francisco- ] 

MICE AND MEN 
"The b 1 mi men gang aft a-gley." Burns 

Alrav?, r Thf^rthr^ Bblasco* Haxkb, Proprietors 

Monday, July as— one week, 

win n<; win rn,j>k, ami the Alcazar Stock Company 
■ flrsi time al i he a lot 
RUPERT OF HENTZAU 
1 to "The Prisoner oi Zenda"— By Anthony Hope 
Monday. August 1- Whit-- \\ ditt l.-sey. presenting in compliance 
with numeruus requests -"The Lady .,f Lyons." 

ilngs 36 to 76c. Matinees Thursday and Saturday 26 tosoc 
Kegulur matinees Thursday and Saturday 

C,G>ntrci\ Thpntrp -Bmluoo & Maykk. Proprietors 
o^ijliui i iicuuc. Maritet tit. near Klghth-TeJ.aouth »a 

Week starting Monday evening, July 36th 

The powerlul American melodrama 

THE GATES OF JUSTICE 

A thrilling story of the Pennsylvania coal fields. 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday 

Prices— Evenings lfl to sue. Matinees 10, ib, 36o- 



Corner Eddy and 

Muson Street* 



Tivoli Opera House. 

Last nights Farewell performances. The superb Tivoli presen- 
tation of 

ROBIN HOOD 

In preparation a stupendous production of the great New 
York and London success 

THE TOREADOR 

With the great east, ami the beauty chorus- 

Promenade Circle, 3d Boor, Smokers paradise. Elevator always 

running. Usual Tivoli prices. '25. CU and 7Se. 

Beats always selling— Only matinee Saturday 

Fischer's Theatre 

And still they come. Crowded at every performance 

A LUCKY STONE 

The hit ot years. Eunny to the last word. 
These artists can't be excelled. 

Dorothy Morton, Nora Bayes, Itice & Cady, German come- 
dians; Bobby North. Hebrew comedian; Edwin Clark, lien 
Dillon, Garrity Sisters. A chorus never equalled here. Jammed 
with novelties and specialties. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Same popular price. "Whirl of the Town," next 
A monster production. 

fitter the Theater 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after 

the theatre is over. 



20 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

mm 



July 23, 1904. 



FINANCIAL 




It looks just now as if some 

Old-time Vagaries of the enemies of the honest 

Dispelled. miner, resident in "Little 

Holland," behind the shelter- 
ing dykes of the Sacramento, are in danger of being 
literally washed out of house and home by the rising 
tide of progressive development in their vicinity. 
The shepherds of the anti-debris cult have at last, it 
is said, bowed down to the golden calf, owing to the 
gradual conversion of their flocks, leaving their 
apostle, the voice that has cried so long and so vehe- 
mently from a wilderness of ideas, fed on absurdities 
which served to provide the modern substitute for 
the "locusts and wild honey" of the long-haired dis- 
ciples of the Baptist leader to mourn departed hopes. 
Even the historic village of Marysville seems threat- 
ened with renovation if the golden drift from the 
Sierras can be traced that far. Dredging has taken 
the place of the giant and debris, that terrible 
bugbear which has haunted the valley folk for years, 
is in a fair way to disappear forever. Experience 
has convinced the unbiased minds among the or- 
chardists and green stuff cultivators that the common 
sense idea of clearing the ground of its golden treas- 
ure before devoting it to agricultural purposes, does 
not detract from its value as a producer, but im- 
proves it to a wonderful extent. Besides, the whole 
count}' in the vicinity benefits by the distribution of 
money for labor and other expenses connected with 
the operation of a dredger. In time, there will not 
be a foot of ground which can show any value in 
gold that will not be turned over, orchards and 
everything disappearing nefore the dredge, to be re- 
stored later on in more magnificent proportions. < H 
course, this sounds like high treason, heresy or what- 
ever the old gentlemen on the other side of antedilu- 
vian ideas choose to term it. They have been the 
bitter opponents of the proposition ever since peo- 
ple began to invade their ancient territory, and while 
life lasts, their savage attacks will continue on all 
who advocate it. However, all is plain sailing now 
for the dredger and its opponents, to their dreams 
of a half century gone by. 

The fire which swept the 
Pine Street is Dull. Union hoisting works out 
of existence, in the early 
part of the week, fortunately did not injure the shaft. 
Had it done so, the consequences reflecting upon the 
local share market would have been incalculable. As 
it is, a little delay will be the only result, and the 
business will soon recover from that. The plant 
was fully insured, and so far as financial loss is con- 
sidered, it would be trivial, if there is any at all. 
Arrangements have already been made to erect a 
new hoist at once, and work will be rushed upon it, 
as every day the shaft is closed down delays opera- 
tions underground, which can only be carried on to 
good advantage from this point. The unfortunate 
occurrence afforded an opening, of course, to the 
bear clique, which everlastingly hammers the mar- 
ket in an effort to break prices back upon every ad- 
vance. Stocks in this case, however, did not go back- 
very far, for the good reason they did not in the ma- 
jority of cases have to go back very far to get off 
the board entirely. Prices cannot be said to be very 
high when a stock like Ophir, paying 25 cents per 
share per month, is quoted close to $2. The trouble 
with Pine street just now is that it is overrun with 
small people, whose aim is to get something for noth- 



ing, spending most of the time while searching for 
a layout of the kind in abusing the market, the mines 
and all connected with them. It is all the same 
when prices are high up or low down, the same old 
droning wail can be heard on the street of the mis- 
erere chanted by the survivors of the spirited opera- 
tors of the past, a living embodiment of doubt and 
fear, with the markings of an ever-present woe upon 
their faces. Still, work progresses on the lode with 
good results and the market drags along for the time 
being, a market which will live with its spells of ac- 
tivity and its reverses in the years to come, when the 
present brood of care has plodded on its weary way, 
and reached that bourne whence there is no return. 
The history of the Comstock Lode has yet to be 
made. 

"A Constant Subscriber," 

Some High-Priced one of those chaps who al- 
Metals. ways manages to keep the 

query column of a news- 
paper fully engaged, and who invariably borrows or 
steals the paper in return for the courtesies extended 
through its columns, desires to be informed which 
is the most expensive metal. This is a difficult ques- 
tion to answer. There are so many metals known to 
science now as "rare" which are worth many times 
their weight in gold. There are close upon fifty of 
these high-priced varieties, and values are generally 
regulated when they rise into the millions by the 
method adopted in figuring them out. Thus we have 
franium, zinconium. thallium, thorium, gallium, irid- 
ium, palladium, and many others, which could be 
utilized in the arts and sciences, quoted at anything 
from Si. 000,000 upwards. Gallium, which is wanted 
badly for mirror-making, a metal so soft that it 
melts in the hand, and highly superior to quicksilver 
in the manufacture of mirrors, is now valued some- 
where near £4,500,000. For this reason, gallium 
mirrors are scarcer than green geese in the local 
market. This for the benefit of our earnest enquirer 
aforementioned. 

The Tonopah market has 

Tonopah Shares slacked up a little. The stocks 

Not so Active. are new to the people of this 

city, and a good all-round boom 

on the Comstock would quiet this new gamble, with 

their absurdly large capitalization, materially. There 

is a scarceness, too, in manipulation, and the modern 



Q 



WHITE HORSE 
CELLAR" 

Scotch Whisky 



ra 



IN CASES ONLY 
NEVER IN BULK 



Try it once and you wi'l never use any other brand 



Kl 



CHARLES MEINECKE 
&, CO. 

Agents Pacific Coast 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Q 



July 33. 1904. 

in tl» 

are e xc ep ti ons in this 

they arc pointed out, it will I that ihc\ 

>me time ur another in their career Iratcn 
with the Simon pure article mi Pine, or. -till farther 
back, on California Mrcct. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A summary of the salea in the New Y.'t-k Si 
Exchange for the tir.-t half of the current calendar 
year shows 50,675,596 shares of stock ami - 
000 par value in bonds. Sales of stocks fell from 
over 12.000.000 shares in January, or a monthly a\- 
of 10,107,220 shares in the first four months, 
to an average of a little over - 
May and June. Bond sales dropped from $79,92 
in January to $48,742,300 in June. Business through 

OUt the month of lime was unusually light as cum 
pared with the same month in previous years. 
Against less than 5.000,000 shares of stock sold last 
month, there were 15,535400 shares sold in the same 

month last year, while the -ales of bonds were $57, 
944,500, or $9,000,000 more than last month. The 
San Francisco stock market is not the only dull one 
in America this year. Xew York has something to 
complain of also in this respect. 



At the regular annual meeting of the Alaska- 
Treadwell Gold Mining Company the old hoard of 
directors was unanimously re-elected, as follow-: 
William Alvord, E. W. Hopkins. H. H. Taylor, !•'. 
W. Bradley and A. T. Corlnis. At a meeting to be 
held to-morrow the old officers will be re-elected, in- 
cluding William Alvord as president; H. H. Taylor, 
vice-president, and A. T. Corbus secretary and treas- 
urer. 



Official figures of the South African Rand gold 
output for June, 1904, places it at 308.219 ounces, 1 r 
nearly 12,000 ounces less than the London estimate 
made on July 1st. The June total shows a decrease 
of 6261 ounces from that of May, but a gain of 8,534 
ounces over April. 



A better demand for bonds has cheered the droop- 
ing spirits of dealers in local stocks and bonds, and 
the feeling is better on the street in this branch of 
investments. 

Dr. Decker. 

DenUst, 806 Market. Specialty "Cotton Gas" for painless teeth 
extracting. 



See our 3 months ahead Ideas In hats. Tom Dillon & Co., 

opp. Palace. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" 

for your children while teething. 



SANTA CLARA COLLEGE 

Studies will be resumed on AUGUST 2, 1904. 
For further particulars address 
R.OBERT E. KENNA. S. J„ SANTA CLARA, CAL. 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching and Illus- 
trating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET 



$200 Reward 

For the arrest and conviction of any one as- 
saulting members or employees of this association 
or destroying property belonging to them. 



Report promptly to the Law Department, Citi- 
:ns' Alliance, 217 Crossley Building. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

CITIZENS' ALLIANCE 



NOTICE TO HORSE OWNERS 



JEPSON BROS. COMPANY, Inc., makers of line har- 
ness and Importers of English Saddlery, will now be 
found at 110-112 MARKET STREET, where you will 
And the finest and largest stock of everything for the 
horse, show-ring and stock-farm. Telephone Bush 661. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

Blake, Mofflti & Towne, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 

TEL. MAIN 199. 65-57-59-61 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



U f For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

nniSflGS laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
l " MJ,,VJ billiard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy- 
makers, canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries. 
shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buchanan Brothers 

Brush Hfts.. 609 Sacramento St, S. P., Tel. flaln 561 1 



Old Ro e Bud Whibkey 

Absolutely* the purest on the market. 

APPLECATE ® SONS, Distillers 

"Louisville, Ken. Pacific Coast Agents 

RATHJEN WINE COMPANY. " 6 ^ele^on^Mafn flh. 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents. 
Oceanic Steamship Company 
Olllingham Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St. 



SINCi FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but one price. 
All goods marked In plain English figures. 

614 DUPONT STREET, S. P. Next to St Mary's Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. Main 1328. 

E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
Pleasure's Wand. 



July 23, 1904. 



(Continued from page 19.) 

On Monday night, during the premiere of the 
"Prisoner of Zenda," Juliet Crosby was surprised 
by floral testimonials in large quantity. Whittlesey 
has a long reach, and despite this fact, he found it 
difficult to handle all the flowers that came over the 
footlights at one time. He was forced to make sev- 
eral trips from the smiling and bowing lady to the 
forefront of the stage, returning each time with 

heavily laden arms. 

* * * 

Mary Mannering, it is said, is to add to the popu- 
lation of her country, in the very near future. Cer 
tain dates have been canceled, and it is doubtful if 
Mrs. Hackett will be seen on the stage for a year to 
come, at least. 

# :!: # 

Charmion, the young woman who turned \c. 
York upside down a few seasons ago with her dis- 
robing act on the flying trapeze, will return to her 
native State, and make her first appearance in nearly 
seven years at the Orpheum, this coming week. Since 
leaving here, she has become famed as the 
graceful and daring trapeze performer in the world, 
and has been the headliner in the principal places 
of amusement in England and on the Continent. The 
Empire Comedy Four, .Messrs. Evans, Cunningham, 
Jenny and Roland, will make their initial bow in this 
city. The distinguished grand opera artists, Edith 
Decker, dramatic soprano, Domenico Russo, tenor, 
and Sig. Abramoff, basso, will be heard in tile prison 
scene from "Faust." Altogether, the Orpheuro will 

present an extraordinary bill. 
* * * 

Capital entertainment has been provided fur the 
coming week at the Chutes. Derenda and Green, 
renowned from England to Australia as comedy jug- 
glers, will be new, as will also John J. Sully and 
Blanche Phelps, who will present their original 
comedy skit, "The Irish Orator." "Mike" Foster's 
dog will make his first appearance ai the Chutes, 
and Lotta and Belle Tobin, the accomplished instru- 
mentalists, will play for their fourth and last week. 
Emma Cortrely and Antonio Van Gofre, the wonder- 
ful balancers and posturers: llershal Stein, the bari- 
tone singer of illustrated ballads, and the animato- 
scope, showing many new and amusing moving pic- 
tures, will complete a new and interesting pro- 
gramme. The amateurs will appear on Thursda) 

night. The three baby lions, recently born in the zoo, 
promise to be a great attraction. The Pneumatic 
Symphony Orchestrion discourses delightful music 
every afternoon and evening in the Chutes cafe. 
* * * 

The final performances of the triumphal run of 
"Robin Hood" are announced at the Tivoli, and the 
big stage of the Eddy-street opera house will shortlj 
be occupied by the scenes and incidents of the great 
English musical comedy, "The Toreador." Several 
new principals, have been engaged for the produc- 
tion. It has to its credit a run of two years in 1 on- 
don, six months in Xew York, and other long runs 
in principal Eastern cities. 

■ * * * 

Contracts will be signed in a few days for a con- 
cert tour of America, to be undertaken by Fannie 
Fraacisca, the prima donna, who has been winning 
fame for some seasons back in Europe. Fraiicisca 



is now one of the reigning favorites in all the great 
continental cities, and her achievements in the grand 
opera productions during the past season, at Amster- 
dam have won for her the greatest possible recog- 
nition. 

* * * 

El Dorado Parlor of the Native Sons has bought 

out two nights, Tuesday and Wednesday. August 
<;th and 10th, at Fischer's Theatre, to see "The Whirl 
of the Town." the next great production at this 
House. 

* * * 

The dizzy little dancer. Flossie Hope, is coming 
back to Fischer's Theatre, and will make her first 
appearance in "The Whirl of the Town." when she 
will lie seen in a new ballet dance. 

* * * 

Da Motta, the Portuguese pianist, has met with 
immense success in Berlin. Da Motta is pianist to 
the King of Portugal, and as a celebrated artist from 
that country has newer visited us, there is much 
curiosity to hear R. E. Johnston's new discovery, 
whom he claims to be truly great. Da Motta will 

appear in several joint recitals with Ysavc. 

* * * 

VTsaye's original contract for fifty concerts has been 
filled, and his manager. R. E. Johnston, has arranged 
with him for an additional fifty concerts, it being 
understood that the last fifty are to net one hundred 
thousand dollars. This is more than double the 
amount of money ever paid a violinist by any mana- 
ger in this country. 

* * * 

Henry Miller and his company are now in San 
Francisco, actively rehearsing the production of 
"Mice and Men." which is to be seen here with the 
same cast announced for the opening night of the 
Miller season at the Columbia Theatre. 

The period in which "Mice and Men" is laid is 
[786. Some quaint costuming is revealed during the 
course of the play's four acts. 

The Fruiterie is meeting with marked success in 
the distribution of high-class fruits to high-class 
trade. The Fruiterie is modeled after the finest 
establishments in Xew York, London and Paris. A 
Specialty is the supplying of fancy baskets of fruit 
for tourists arriving and departing. 



Jim 




The CHAMPAGNE 
quisite quality which fits 
the fancy of those who 
appreciate a contrast. 

liilbert Mercantile Co. 

Pacific Coast Agents 

V. W. GasKill 

Special Agent 



-"•A;;tf'K-;' ■■•'• 



!!H 



#■0 







July ij. 1904. 



SAN : tfp 



'3 



Triennial Conclave Numbor 
OVERLAND MONTHLY 




A CALIFOKNIA CAS CO 

ARTICLES OF INTEREST TO EVERYBODY 



7~rrrtrrz: 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ . j^r~~—zz: 



ARE YOU A MASON? 

READ THE AUGUST OVERLAID MONTHLY 

Portraits of Prominent Knights TempSar 



15c Per Copy, $1.50 Per Year 



2 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



h #C7WteM*~-,$I NSURANCE ffgiiijl]^^ 



The only certain thing about the disposition of the 
Manchester and its business that cah be learned so 
far is that the agents of the Manchester are taking 
care of its insurances in other companies. The policy 
of the Atlas in failing to make public some plan of 
action in regard to the handling of the absorbed 
company's affairs is generally conceded to be short- 
sighted. Nothing definite can be learned from -the 
local offices of the Atlas or the Manchester, any 
enquiry being met with the prompt reply "that there 
is nothing new." Announcement has been made 
in New York that the Eastern manager of each com- 
pany has been appointed joint managers of the 
Atlas and Manchester. This means one office and 
one management, and is in line with the policy pur- 
sued by the English companies in the Palatine mat- 
ter. In San Francisco, for the first six months of 
this year, Mr. Conroy, Pacific Coast manager for 
the Manchester, increased its premiums nearly 
$8,000 dollars over the income for the same term of 
last year, and if the agencies are consolidated it will 
fall rather hard on Conroy & Brooks. The Cale- 
donian will, with the Rochester German, naturally 
inherit a large portion of this increase upon renewal, 
even if there be no action taken via the cancellation 
route. The long-continued visit to this city of V. S. 
Manager Post of the Caledonian, and Mr. Atwood, 
secretary of the Rochester German, naturally leads 
up to the surmise that there is something doing. 

* * * 

Mr. Henry K. Field, the General Agent of the New 
England Mutual Life Insurance Company, has suc- 
cumbed to the strain of a too close attention to busi- 
ness, and has been compelled, under orders of his 
physicians, to take a vacation, with absolute rest 
and quiet. He has gone to his country residence up 
the . bay. 

A new surety company, to be called the Metro- 
politan, with a $500,000 capital and a $50,000 surplus, 
is being organized in New York City. 

* * * 

The annual report of the Liverpool ■ and London 
and Globe shows premium receipts of more than 
$10,000,000 in 1903, and despite its heavy losses in 
the big conflagrations in this country, the claims last 
year fell to 50.4 per cent of the premiums and ex- 
penses to 32.2 per cent. The Liverpool and London 
and Globe's premiums on San Francisco business 
increased from $28,090 for the first six months of 
1903 to $39,000 for the first six months of 1904. 

* * * 

A novel bond has just been furnished by the Aetna 
Indemnity Company to the amount of $100,000 to 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company to insure com- 
pletion of the North River section of the New York 
tunnel within three years, by the O'Rourke Construc- 
tion Co. The premium paid is understood to be 
about $10,000. 

* * * 

Mr. W. W. Cleveland has been appointed special 
agent for the old Franklin, under Manager Grant. 

* * * 

Mr. George Cator has been elected President of 
the American Bonding Company of Baltimore, vice 
Mr. James Bond, retired. Mr. Cator, who has been 
a director of the American Bonding Company from 
the date of its founding in 1894, is a prominent finan- 



cier of the Monumental City, and a director in a num- 
ber of large institutions. 

The News Letter has discovered another curio in 
the name list of freakily-named insurance companies. 
This time it hails from Austria, and is written as 
the Riunione Adreatica de Sicurta of Trieste. The 
reason that the name is written is that it means 
lock-jaw for the one who tries to speak it. 

* * * 

Mr. G. C. Champion, who at one time was con- 
nected with the Union Casualty and Surety Com- 
pany, has taken charge of the Accident Department 
of the Pennsylvania Casualty Company, under Man- 
ager N'ason. 

* * * 

There is a well-defined rumor on the street affect- 
ing a change in the management of a well-known life 
insurance company. The details are not known at 
this writing, but there will be a first-class opening, 
with a first-class company, for a first-class man. 

* * * 

The Conservative Life announces the sad news 
of the death of Mr. A. A. Butler, its assistant superin- 
tendent of agencies. Mr. Butler died at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., and his demise, while still a young 
man, will be regretted by all who knew him. 

* * * 

The Canadian Insurance Department reports the 
net amount of insurance in force at the close of last 
year was nearly $550,000,000, or $102.10 per capita. 
Eight millions of dollars were paid in premiums dur- 
ing the year. 

* * * 

The fatherly officials of this city are now wrestling 
with the question of bonds for themselves and for 
their hired help. As the daily press puts it: "The 
Union Surety Company, having gone into the hands 
of a receiver, and the Empire Company having with- 
drawn from business in California, the committee 
recommended that the officials bonded by those com- 
panies, among whom are Commissioners Casey, 
Parry. Hutton and Supervisors Bent and Finn, be 
requested to file new or additional bonds. Pound- 
keeper Irwin is bonded for $5,000 by the Empire 
State Surety Company, but he is not recognized by 
the Supervisors. It may be that the recent trouble 
between the city of San Jose and the Fidelity and 
Guarantee Company, in regard to the payment of its 
bond given to insure the faithful discharge of a 
San Jose city employee's duties, and which has not 
been definitely settled, has served to stir up the 
Supervisors of this city to overhaul bonds on file. 
It serves to show that the affairs of this municipality 
are administered in a most lax manner, since the 
bonds referred to are in companies whose bond 
would not be accepted by any bank in the city which 



WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 

V V o 

ScotchJAfhisky 

Importers-MACONDRAY & CO. 



July a 3 . 1904. 



\ what it »j« doing. The Widber claim wan 

paiil. but the l>'>n. I was in company, an.! 

therein lies the difference between ihc I'nion 

nalty Company's contracts and the contracts 

corporation no longer doing business in thi- State 
• « • 

Richard A. Moiur.lv. the grand man ..f the grand 
old Mutual, in his letter defining In- reasons t'^r the 
withdrawal of the Mutual from Germany, -tnke .1 
fairly high m>tc of Americanism. He says: "Leav 
inp aside the discussion of technical questions, I 
to the consideration of the important principle 
involved in thi> proposition. Briefly, thi> i- the sur- 
render of the privileges, duties and powers of the 
board of trustee- of this company to the Imperial 
Supervising Office. 

"Since the company was originally expelled from 
Prussia in (895, the principle involved has been 
practically the same as it is to-day. and it is against 
this principle that the Mutual Life has persistently 
and constantly contended. To agree to make the 
management of the company subservient to any gov- 
ernmental regulations which now exist or may at 
any time hereafter he imposed by the German Em- 
pire, or subservient to the will or political aims of 
the Imperial Chancellor, without the right of re- 
course to any court of law, and under penalty of ex- 
pulsion and the confiscation of business established, 
wotdd be beyond the legal authority of the present 
board of trustees, and if attempted, would he a de- 
parture from principles which are natural, and are 
as old as the foundation of this country as an inde- 
pendent republic." There is a wide margin of dif- 
ference between this company and the other company 
doing business abroad, which, when war was de- 
clared between the United States and Spain, in 1898, 
issued a circular from its Madrid office saying: "The 
Xew York Life Insurance Co.. consequent to its es- 
sential character, mutual and international, and in its 
capacity of administrator of the interests of its cli- 
ents, their families and properties, declares by the 
present that it annuls, under the present circum- 
stances, the restrictions respecting the service in 
arms, contained in the life policies issued to Spanish 
subjects. Therefore, what Spanish subject soever 
who may have a policy in force in the New York, 
may without fear of prejudicing his insurance and 
without paying more premium than that stated in 
the policy, accept military service during the present 
war. He may consequently be sure that in the event 
of his death in the war, the company will not refuse 
to pay the insurance on the life of one who died in 
the performance of his duty. 

"The company declares further that all possible 
facilities will be given to the Spanish insured in or- 
der that they may keep their policies in force. If 
said holders of policies should find themselves in 
difficulties regarding the payment of their premiums 
at the time they become due, the company will make 
loans for the payment of said premiums whenever 
the value of the policy permits." The course of the 
one company was American, the course of the other 
company was that of a "copperhead." 

By G. C. France. 
Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance. 

The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organ ized 1863 _.„ ftJn —_ M 

Capital 13,000,000. Gross Cash Assets. juunmw-w 

Liberal contracts. Favoriihle Terms. Conference with our Kepr>>- 
sntatives before concludiug short time yearly or long time contracts 
nay he to your advantage. 

H. L. ROFF. General Agent; GEO. II. MITCHELL. Metropoll- 
' »n Man^*r, 

210 S«,ns,ome St., San, Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

INSURANCE 



»5 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets. $5,850,000 

Itoundad a. i>. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, I'ENN. 

Pnld-up Capital J.1O00O00 

Burplm i" Polley-holdern ""....".."7m 

.IAMKS I>. BAII EY. < ;.-,,< r:, I Agwit, U Pine St.. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 17S0. 

Capital Paid-up. S3.44li.ino. Assets. $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy-holders. SS.9C0.IS1. 41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN nn.l PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 5,172,036.00 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2,441,485.00 

BENJAMiN J. SMITH. Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD. Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. . 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

DON'T INSUEE— Until you have examined the new 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy 

Issued exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 

Assets, $1,500,000. Insurance in force, $21,000,000 

For particulars address the Company. Agents Wanted. 
Marion Building 110 Geary St. San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,0110 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

Cash Capital, $200,000.00 Cash Assets, $321,471.19 

PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Home Office, 328 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, General Liability, Workmen's Col- 
lective, Vessels, Elevators. 

Edmund F. Green, President; Ant. Borel & Co., Treas. William 
M. Pierson, Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane, Secretary; Frank 
P. Deerlng, Counsel. 

MARSHAL A. FRANK, General Agent for California, Hay- 
wards Building. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Agt, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 



FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 

CHAS. P. FONDA 
3|8 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL, 



26 



MANIA ALAMEDIANA 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 23, 1904. 

The Union Iron Works launched the U. S. ar- 



The city of Alameda is cursed by an emasculat] 

Board of Trustee-;. Not content with a subserviency 

that is the equal of must slavish obedien e, w\ 11 il 

comes to annexing the propertj of the p r the 

benefit of the corporate bo lii 5, m I 

cessive taxation, the Trustees are now going 

with some of the most stu] id sumptuary li 

ever enacted by any civic corporation. 

There is to be a limit placed on the number of 
chickens a man may own in 1 1 if the unb 

dead." Some ancient mariner has regi kic 

because the squab in some adjacenl lol did ci 
night and did bill in the daw and another of the 
worthy citizens turns his attention to a "sq 
or pidgeon foundry, which adjoins his ind 

thereupon flies to the Trustees for relief. And th in 
the aggregation of subservient fossils 'li - 

cuss the question of encouraging race suic 
the domestic doves. 

Recently another idiotic piece of leg 
enacted which provides that the citi 
the rubbish in any vacant lot adjoining I ierty. 

This is supposed to be amide protection Fn 
vastating grass tir'-, and -r es the small bi 
ployment during the dog day-. It also incr 
chance for the careless to burn up 1 fi 
dollars of property on the land that is nol Ins 
This law is as stupid as the makers th reof, and v ;!| 
not stand in court. Even a San Francisi 
judge would deny it a hearing. R-ecentl} i 
proposed that the Trustees pass a rescript p 
for the abolition of the hen it of an owl who nigl 
disturbed the sleep of a doctor of thi 
suasion. It is not stated if the police 
the vocal apparatus of the night-bird, or whether 
moral suasion was to be employed, li is said thai 
lawyer Mastick intends bringing in a bill of pai 
lars providing for the careful removal ol 
From the eucalyptus tree-, as it disturbs hi 

The California Canneries Co. has removed its 
offices to 203 California - orner Front 

again hold the record (which has bei 
eral years) of loading the first n 

of canned fruits For England. Thi 
on" the "Auldgirth," For Liverpool, about 
cases. 



You can clean a carpet at home by the e: 

of a lot of strength, patience and time. Then it won't be 
a successful job. It's a lot more sensible to send 
Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Co. 353 Tehama street 
if you try them once you will never go back to the 
clothes-line and stick way. They clean carpets thoroughly. 



New Suburban District. 

The Whites Hill Tunnel ol the North Shore B. B. Is nearl; mpleted 

and will reduce the running time between San Francis 

north or Fatifax by ir. hi 1.1 is minutes. This will liriug Si 

nimo. Laenniias, Camp Taylor, Tocaloiiia and Point Be 

reasonable distance tot suburban homes. Ahead) lorti ol the 

Maillai'd estate at Lagunitas has beeD nut on the mai 

lots and others are bound to follow, i rtaiulj It a choice section ol 

Bunny Marin county and the demand for sites over then 

very rapidly. The North Shore Railroad lias been thoroughly equipped 

both 011 its electric and steam lines. 



— No one is unhappy who dines at Moraghan's Oyster House The 
effects (it a good dinner are obvious directly you find one 1 
patron's for he is sure to be happy and well fed. Avoid no. 
what is best, for that is the secret of happiness and Ho a I ill 

help you solve the secret. Luncheon at Moraghan'e is a daily li 



■ Decorations for weddings. Charlotte F. v. 

121 Post street. 



mored cruiser "South Dakota" on Thursday of this 
week. It was christened by Miss Grace Mac Her- 
ried. 



Nelson's Amycose 

ri h. Sore Throat and Inflammations 
-kin. 



. — 5v it, is headquarters for those who 

1 wholesome cooking. lee cream, water 
phi mi- and are promptly 
tsof the city. 



FOR SALE 



A BEAUTIFUL SUBL1IBAN BOME IN MARIN COUNTY 

Complete in every detail. 

minutes from Ross, Marin County, 1 'al. 
An hour From San Francisco; half an hour 
from San Rafael. 

Situ -ted at the foot of Mt. Tamalpais, and 
an unsurpassed view of its crest and 
iVOO id 1 an; ons. 

able, roomy residence. 

Spacious grounds in a fine state of cultivation, 
cr 1. 000 acres of the most pictur 
and accessible part of Marin County, gen- 
ii and timbered, and extending 
from Ross Valley nearly to Fairfax. 
Is offered as a whole or in two parts. 

iertj of the estate of Janet S. Porteous 
red for sale by order of the execu- 
tors. 

1 1 further particulars apply to 



THOS. MAGEE $ SONS 

5 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

Corner 
California & Montgomery 

Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Capital and Surplus 
Tolal AascIs 



Si. 401,160.93 

0,«13,7ti2.»2 



In It- rest paid on deposll 
eubji cl to 1 heck, a i the 
rate two pei cent per 
annum. 

. .. 
pOSil rate Of three 

. . . ■ 

W> are 

i in acl as the 
1 . h 11 of estal es and 1 ■ 

I Wills. 

rented 

. i ■ :, per a nn ira a nd up- 
■ 1! - . 
G« 1 .'i box at one 

1 Inst i«>ss by Fire or 

I ■ 

J. Dalzell Brown, 

Mft.na.fi6T 



"Out of the Beaten Path," iom Dillon's modern style us 
Opposite Palace. 



C. H. Rehnstrom (formerly Sanders & Johnson.) 

E. \\\ ll.i' bO I fl Bel] A 1 '■- ...I \rv, Yorkl 

REHNSTROM $ HAGBOM 

TAILORS 

PHELfIN BUILDING ROOMS I. 2. 3 

Phone Main 53S7. San Francisco. 



July 13. 1904. 
The Illegitimate 
Continuous 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



'7 



Performance 



The curse of a gTeat city 
crlv protect tl from tli< 

on the crumbs from 1 

■ elcmcnl i~ that which pui incnl 

ihe children of tlie street. Recently then 
developed in all the larger towns of the count) 

ially in California, thi 
down thespian, the continu rmancc !■ 

These theatrical ventui 

ng Inn the breeding ln-11 holes of vice. The 
character of the performances is bad enough, but ii 
is the life behind tl that appalls the mi 

Voung .yirl-. scared) out of short clothes, are 
"broken" in to the life of actresses. These poor 
creatures arc not fitted with brains to stand th< 
and tear of the life the) so lightly cho ollow, 

and as a rule the firsl sup is a step toward a life of 
shame, and not toward the life they have dreamed 
was so alluring. It is one of the conditions imp 
by the management <>f many of thi es that the 

budding maidenh 1 that is bidding for preferment 

shall permit the "management" a private vie 1 
the charms that will catch the future audience, b 
hind the glare of the footlights. These poor girls 
are coarse-handled and mauled as cattle are mauled 
by the purchasing butcher, and with less mercy. The 
cattle, however, are very soon thereafter relieved 
by death. It is the slave mart of the modern large 
city, and on the altar of art. as bespoken by the con- 
tinuous play-house, the virtue ot little children is 
immolated. It is high time that the Supervisors 
place some restraint on the granting of new licenses 
and that a rigid censorship be made effective in the 
existing houses. In this case, it is not the children 
of the rich who suffer, and the model Government 
of San Francisco, with its labor union Mayor, 
should look after the virtue of the people's children. 
the daughters of the lowly. 

The legitimate playhouse costs from between 
$2,000 to $3,000 a week to run, with only nine or ten 
performances, while the nickelodeon is operating at 
the expense of a few hundred dollars, and gives from 
30 to 40 "shows." 

On last Saturday and Sunday, I know of one con- 
tinuous performance house that sold out over four 
reels of 1,000 tickets, each of which at ten cents 
brought in a tidy revenue of over four hundred dol- 
lars, or more than sufficient to pay rentals, salaries, 
etc., leaving the receipts of the previous days of the 
week clear velvet. With five of these "shows" run- 
ning in close proximity to Market street, and sev- 
eral scattered throughout the populous sections of the 
city, it is no wonder the big theatres complain of the 
lull, and the managers pull their hair in trying to 
solve the problem of how to pull out, in view of their 
light receipts and heavy expenses. 



Ella Russell, the dramatic soprano, will appear 
on several programmes with Ysaye in San Francisco. 

Do Your Eyes Itch and Burn? 

Murine Eye Remedy is an Bye Tonic. Cures Sore Eyes. Rests 
Tired Eyes. ■• 

Find all thai is good 1:1 restaurants and club them 

together, and you get5the : Zinkand. There is no other place 
like it for excellence of service and of viands. The best 
food and the best music in town are to be had there. 



Murphy, Grant & Co. 

Imi 

1 rorld. 

I 

ruli >if I<tv, «h;itri-. ii"ti'>rifl. sni 

*rt 1 under vear, hosier?, whito goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bash Sts., S. F. 



Locomotor Ataxia and Paralysis 

POSITIVELY CURED 

REFfcRBNL-tS FURNISHED TO THOSE WHO ARE 
AKrEl.TED AND WANT TO INVESTIGATE. 

BRYN MAWR SANITARIUM 

HAYWAR.DS. CAL. 



THE CLUB MAN'S CIGAR 

MADE IN IS SIZES 



SIG. CAHEN 

Distributor 
22 Montgomery St., S. F. 

Tel. Main 1273 



Manufactured in TAMPA, FLA. 




JUST OUT 

The new U. S. 22 Short Smokeless Cart- 
ridges. The best yet. U. S. 22 Short (black 
powder.) The standard brand, always reliable 
and popular. Call for the U. S. 

UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE CO., MaHers 



ANNUAL MEETING. 
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of theRisdou Iron and Loco- 
motive Wcrks for the election of Trustees for ihe enduing year and the 
transaction of such other business as may be brought before the meet- 
ing will be held at the office of the company. No. 29B Steuart street. San 
Francisco on Monday the 1st day of August. 10Q4 at 11 o'clock, a m. 

AUGUSTUS TAYLOE. Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Phoenix Savings, B. & L. Association. 

For the six months ending June2oth. 1904, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the savings department as follows: On term cer- 
tificates', at the rate of five (6) per cent per annum; on ordinary savings 
accounts at the rat' 1 of four and one-half U 1 ;) percent per annum ; free 
of taxes and payable on and after July Qitth, lfHJi. 

The Phoenix has n guaranteed capita) of $200,000. and a total paid-in 
capital of $l.2ii(.UJiK>. Its Board of Directors are: A. A. Watkins, Presi- 
dent: Chat-. B. Bishop. "Vice President; t*. Prentiss Fmith, Treasurer; 
Geo. C, Boardman. Director; Gavin McNab. Director; Chas. E. Ladd, 
Director. Clarencp GraDge. 

Secretary and Managing Director. 



EDISON 



PHONOGRAPH 

PETEE BACIGALUPI 



AGENCY 



HAS REMOVED FROM 933 MARKET STREET, TO 
THEIR NEW STORE 

784-788 MISSION STREET, S. F. 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



ENNEN S KSSSS 
\ToiLET 
fcOWDER 



I PRICKLY HEAT, 5 

I CHAFING, and •; 

SUNBURN, "Vi"^ 

Removes ill odor ol perspiration^ De- 

r ll htful •frer Solving. 5old everywhere, or 

[SIlleTTr'rcceipi of 25c. Get Menneo'a (ibe origlnii). 5impfc free. 






GERHARD MENNCN COMF*J4Y,N<»tfk.M.J. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN 
GERMANY. 

English is to be in future an op- 
tional subject in all the public 
schools in Germany. This result 
has largely been brought about by 
a petition addressed by the Dres- 
den schoolmasters' association to 
the government school inspectors, 
the following declarations being 
favorably received : First, English 
is the most widely used civilized 
language in the world. Second, it 
is the most important language 
for Germany's international trade 
relations. In Dresden, especially, 
the knowledge of English is of 
great advantage to shop-keepers 
and commercial men, owing to the 
important Anglo-American colony 
there. Third, English deserves 
preference over French on account 
of its literature, which (a) excels 
that of France both from an ar- 
tistic and moral point of view ; (b) 
appeals more nearly to our senti- 
ment and understanding as that of 
a Germanic people; fc) has played 
a prominent part in the develop- 
ment of our own literature. Fourth, 
English is not inferior to French 
in educative value. Fifth, in the 
teaching of English the readily 
learned grammatical forms of the 
language enable the time allotted 
to its study to be spent in attain- 
ing the most important object in 
teaching a foreign language — the 
power of its free use in speech and 
writing. This is not possible in 
French, owing to the difficulty of 
its grammar. It is to be noted, 
however, that by a new law, poli- 
tics cannot be discussed in Ger- 
many at public meetings in any 
language but German. 



"I never saw such beautiful 
teeth and magnificent eyes as that 
gir! has," said the young man who 
raves. "Indeed?" answered the 
cold-blooded person. "Didn't you 
notice them?" "Certainly not. I 
am neither a dentist nor an ocu- 
list." 



Sooner or later the patient tax- 
paver is called upon to foot the 
bills. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thl«v«»l 

A little maid of seven summers 
had been busy for an hour dressing 
and undressing her pretty doll, but 
tiring at last she sat with folded 
hands gazing fixedly in the glow- 
ing fire in the grate. Looking up, 
finally, with a thoughtful expres- 
sion on her face, she said: "Mam- 
ma, if I get married when I grow 
up, will 1 have a husband like 



papa: 



The mother turned, and 



looking down into the earnest 
eyes of the child, answered with a 
smile : "Why, yes, dear, if you get 
married you will have a husband 
like papa." The little brow 
clouded. Again she asked : "If I 
don't get married, will I be an oil 
maid like Aunt Nellie?" "Yes, dear, 
you would be an old maid," an- 
swered the mother, laughing at 
her rather complex question ; "but 
whatever put such thoughts into 
that little head?" But the child 
didn't laugh ; she only looked grave 
and said, dejectedly : "Well, it's 
a pretty tough world for us wo- 
men, ain't it?" 



ATHLE,TE,S 

TO KEEP IN GOOD TRIM 
MUST LOOK WELL TO THE 
CONDITION OF THE SKIN. 
TO THIS END THE BATH 
SHOULD BE TAKEN WITH 

HAND 
SAPOLIO 

All Grocers and Druggists 

Lakeside (in Eighth avenue res- 
taurant) — I see you have a sign 
requesting gentlemen to remove 
their hats. Waiter — Yes ; we 
found it necessary. Lakeside — 
Just like New York. Why, out in 
Chicago we never think of sitting 
down to a meal without taking 
off our hats and coats. 

If the average man wishes to 
know how little he has to do with 
running this government of the 
people, by the people and for the 
people, let him try to break in 
where a dozen or two of the lead- 
ers are agreeing upon what is to 
be done. 



r 5 CENTS PER COPY. 



$1.50 PER YEAR. 



Overland Monthly 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF THE WEST 

AUGUST, 1904 

CONTENTS: 

In Hoc Signo Vinces By a Knight Templar 99 

Day Herman Kittredge 104 

San Francisco as a Convention City. .W. A. Bissell 105 

The Loring Club J. M. Scanland 107 

The Newspapers and the Philippines. . Pierre N. Beringer 117 

Up Japan's Sacred Fujiyama Ernest Williams Hewson 119 

Eajrly California Journalism David E. Gordon 128 

When the Bees Got Busy 

Cordia Greer Petrie and Leigh Gordon Giltner 131 

A Romance of Gold William S. Rice 134 

The Dragon Boat Festival in China. .Charles E. Lorrimer 136 

The National Politics Game Henry Bailey Sargeant 140 

A Naval Officer's Troubles Arthur H. Dutton 145 

The Colombian Army and Navy. . . .Arthur H. Dutton 158 

In the Lime Light 151 

The Suez Canal G. P. Blackiston 153 

Deader'n a Mackerel James M. Fellom 156 

Electrical Displays in San Francisco. .James M. Scanland 159 

When California is in Holiday Attire. . Isaiah Choynski 164 

Some Japanese Letters Margaret Perry 171 

"Talofa" Marion Drewe 172 

How to Photograph the Grand Canyon. .J. Torrey Connor 176 

History and Origin of California Names and Places 

G. E. Bailey 183 



July 13. 1904. 

TEETH Or CHILDREN 

Few mother* kno» how vitally Imr 

cur of ■ child'* first ie«th Th« 
bMuty of the pcmunonl set depend* aJmoat 
entirely upon II 

SOZODONT 

TOOTH POWDER 

used with SOZODONT Liquid, prevents 
•ccumulaBon of tartar, yet t-clr,jr free from 
grit does not scratch the enamel. Do not 
experiment on baby's lecth. Insist on 
SOZODONT. 

J FORMS. LIQUID POWDER. k-ASTB. 

An extra piece of ice was want 
\n ice wagon was at a neigh- 
bor's door, l>ut there was no small 
coin in the house wherewith to pay 
for the desired article. "Well, never 
mind." said mamma, "you run out, 
Blanche, and get a nickel's worth: 
the man will trust you until to- 
morrow.'' Now, Blanche was n< 1 
accustomed to dealing on credit, 
and did not take kindly to the idea, 
but was moving; very slowly to 
do her mother's bidding, when 
some words in large letters on the 
top of the wagon attracted her at- 
tention and suggested an unan- 
swerable objection. "But he won't 
do it, mamma! Look there on the 
wagon ! It says. 'Not in the trust.' 



BETHESDA 



THE GREAT AMERICAN 
MINERAL WATER 



LOUIS CAHEN a SON. 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

418 Sacramento St., San Francisco 




Double Daily Service to All Points 
East via 

PUEBLO, KANSAS CITY 
a ST. LOUIS 

Through Pullman Sleeping cars and Ob- 
servation Cafe Dining Cars, with Electric 
Lights and Electric Fans, Scenic Route 
throueh Colorado. Fortickets. berth reser- 
vations, folders, etc., call on or address 

GENERAL TICKET OFFICE 

625 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

(Palace Hotel) 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTKR. 
A POPULAR SONG. 

enough 

rad 

\nd drinking a pitcher of cream. 
I tumbled in be. I with a pain in 
my head 
When a nightmare loped into 
m\ dream. 
1 thought I wa- downtown and 
rode "it the 
("I'was a nightmare, I beg to rc- 
ll i. 
\\ hen 1 saw with surprise twenty 
brokers arise 
And olTcr a lad) a seat ! 

My nightmare, my nightmare 
Behaved in a curious wav. 
Twas a horse and a horse, an I a 
nightmare, of course, 
For such thin-- never happen 
by day. 

Second Verse. 

1 thought 1 weni in a show mi 
Broadw ay 
In a two-dollar orchestra chair. 
I confess 1 don't know what they 
did in the show, 
('Twas a nightmare, again I 
declare) ; 
At the third act the Manager came 
on the stage 
And said. "If this burlesque's a 
bore, 
All you folks have to say is you 
don't like the play, 
And we'll give back your cash at 
the door." 

A nightmare, a nightmare . 

On a highly improbable tack. 
Was the time ever known when 
the Syndicate's own 

Desired to give anything back? 

Ongcore. 
(Accompanied by applause, vio- 
lets and other missiles.) 

I went to the White House for 
something to write 
And put in my popular song. 
There the President stood, as a 
President should, 
While delegates came in .1 
throng. 
"O please run for office !" the dele- 
gates said, 
And pleaded and wept and per- 
spired. 
But the President said, with a 
shake of his head, 
"I really can't run — I've retired." 

A nightmare, a nightmare 

Wherein many marvels wer; 
done — 
Oh, when, day or night, did the 
President say 
He was ever unwilling to run? 
— Wallace Irwin in Life. 



The 

Busy 
Man 



wilh mu<li on hi* Omuklro 
can relieve ihc strain great- 
ly by wearing 

"Lightweight' 

President I 

Suspenders 

2 oz. Cool — stylish — ser- 
viceable. Guaranteed — 
Satisfaction, a now pair or your money 
back. 50c and $1. Any store or by mail 



Tin: c. a. , in. \n 



i.n Mi-ii. re. 



Shinestand Customer — Why do 
\ < > n charge only a nickel for a 
shine, my lad? Shinestand Kid — 
So that tli' guy wid only a dime t' 
Spend will have a nickel left fer a 
tip — see? 



We all have our troubles, not the 
least of which is having to listen 
to other people's. — Puck. 



f: 



SiE* 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear tlie script name of Stewart 
Hartshorn on label. 

Wood Rollers. Tin Rollers. 




ST AM M E R? 

We are cored, let qb cure yon. No Drawl. Sinu- 
Sono, Time-bbat, Drugs or Hypnotism. Oar 
specialty is the Solenee of Speech for Stammerers, 
with close. Individual attention. Send for 
''Speech Blemishes" and proof of cures. 

NATURAL M'IKdl ACADEMY 

1032 Bast 28th St., Los Angeles, Oal. 



THAT ST. LOUIS TRIP 

TAKE THE BUSINESS LINB 

The Union Pacific 

SAVING 12 HOURS 

Bate only W7.50 round trip. Through 
first and second-class cars, diners and all 
comforts. Best road and equipment. 
Safest line. Drop a postal and I will cal 
and explain everything. 



S. P. BOOTH, Ocn. Act, U. P. R. R. Co. 

No. 1- Montgomery St. Dan Pranoisoo, Cal 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 




Which of (he Locomobile Twins. Reliability or Simplicity, 
Is more attractive? 

Reliability and Simplicity are the most im- 

gortaut qualities in any car. Best exempli- 
ed in the Locomobile. Front vertical motors 
only. Prices, $2100 up. At present writing 
our4-cyl. ear holds N. Y. -Boston Record in 
both directions. 



Both records were made by purchasers 
driving their own cars. 

THE LOCOMOBILE CO. of America, Bridgeport. Conn. 

Branch Offices: N. Y-. Broadwav and 7Gth St. 
Phila.. 249 North Broad St.; Chicago, 1354 
Michigan Ave. ; Bridgeport. Factory at Sea- 
side Park; Boston, 15 Berkeley St. 
Member Association of Licensed Automobile M/rs, 



NEW and 

SECOND HAND 

Automobiles 

BOUGHT, SOLD and EXCHANGED 

NEW 1904 WINTON 

1904 KNOX, nearly new 

1903 STEVENS-DURYEA, in excellent 
condition. 



Also Extensive List of Machines in good Condition 



J. J. ADEL, Automobile Broker 
401 California Street, San Francisco 



Room 22. Phone Main 115 




By the Autocrank. 

There will be automobiles of all shapes and sizes 
in the World's Fair touring event. Great touring 
cars of sixty horse-power and lively little road>ters 
will gu from New York, from Brooklyn, from Bos- 
ton, from all the Eastern cities and the towns, from 
the Middle States, the Western States and the South. 
They will go in clubs and singly. They will go by 
seven or more different routes. They will travel 
distances of twelve hundred miles or more, and be on 
the road seventeen days or iess, according to the place 
whence they start. At almost every cross-road re- 
cruits will be added to the main body of automobiles 
stretching on toward the exposition. 

Five hundred automobiles — perhaps more — will ar- 
rive in East St. Louis August 10th. It will be the 
biggest automobile tour for numbers and distance 
combined that has ever taken place. It has been fig 
ured out to a nicety just how many miles will be made 
each day on each route, and the hotels where the 
tourists will stop for the night, and the stations 
where short rests will be taken, are already selected. 
At convenient intervals garages and repair shops will 
be located, and pilot cars will lead the way, strewing 
confetti all along the main routes so there will be no 
mistaking the proper course. 

In laying out a schedule for so many different au- 
tomobiles coming from so many different points, a 
good knowledge of the roads and the capabilities of 
the touring cars must of necessity have been the 
basis of the general arrangement. On the main line 
— from New York to St. Louis — the start will be 
made on Monday, July 25th. 

While the pleasure of a tour like this was not 
overlooked, the American Automobile Association 
had as the main view the amount of good that is 
likely to accrue to the sport of automobiling. Not 
only will it be a great demonstration of the possi- 
bilities and pleasures of touring, but it will be of 
the most value in stimulating the good roads move- 
ment and other matters of benefit to the pastime. 

All the routes that have been selected are pictur- 
esque, and have been especially chosen with a view 
to the good roads that lay along the way. The route 
between New York and St. Louis, which is the main 
line, will be used by many of the tourists entering 
on branch routes along the line of travel, and the 
members en route will be constantly increased. 

It is probable that at the conclusion of the St. Louis 
tour, several of the most notable advocates of good 
roads, including Senator Latimer, Martin Dodge 
and others, will be taken eastward on the National 
Highway by St. Louis automobilists for an inspection 
of the roads. The start on this trip will be made 
from Vandalia or Terre Haute, and it is expected 
that it will result in demonstrating many facts re- 
garding the present condition of the roads. 

The run will be made under the direct supervision 
of the touring committee, of which Augustus Post is 
chairman. Mr. Post has worked day and night for 
the success of the tour. With his famous White 
car he has gone over a great part of the road along 
the various routes, making a minute study of the con- 
ditions, and visiting the different local committeemen 



July 33. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



3« 



He has inspected tnr roads and talkol 

that the Automobile < lnt> of Indiana ■• 
-nice I'u I .mi of China, and participati 

the rim t! 

return. 
While the committee baa noi I from 

the t«nir. it i* already known 
that - inguished ilists will make the 

run. An- I. Glidden, chairman of the 

ommittee. who. from St. Louis, will start 
by way of San Francisco on his automobile tour of 
the world. Then there will be Wilson T. White. 
Harlan W, Whipple, president of the American Au- 
tomobile Association: John Farson, of Chicago, who 
attained considerable notoriety by offering St. 1x10.000 
for a perfect servant sjirl ; Mr. Shanley, of Newark, 
who will drive W. K. vanderbilt, Jr.'s, bit; racer that 
made the record, and many others in different parts 
of the country. 

* * * 

Three years ago a wheelman rode from Stockton 
to the Yosemite Valley in sixteen hours, making 
what was then thought a record that would stand 
for many years. It will, perhaps, remain as the bicy 
cle record for many years to come, but that will be 
all, lor last Friday morning an automobile arrived 
in the Valley, after making the trip in twelve hours, 
actual running time. The machine was a 1904 Win- 
ton touring car, of twenty horse-power, and was 
driven by Mr. Fernando Nelson of San Francisco. 
M. Fisher and Mr. Nelson's two sons. Will ami 
Frank, accompanied them. They traveled only early 
in the morning and late in the evening, so as to avoid 
meeting teams. The time made by Mr. Nelson is 
four hours faster than the trains and stages make. 

* * * 

Miss Fannie Colby is one of the latest San Fran- 
cisco owners of a White car. Last Sunday she made 
the trip to San Jose and back with the greatest suc- 
cess. 

* * * 

Mr. S. G. Buckbee has just returned from Mon- 
terey in the White car which he has been for the past 
week enjoying at Del Monte. He has made several 
runs from that point as a center, and, of course, hav- 
ing had an exceptionally pleasant time. 

* * * 

Mr. E. P. Brinegar, President of the Pioneer Auto 
Co., and Mr. J. F. McLain, Manager of their Los An- 
geles branch, will attend the maneuvres of the army 
at Paso Robles in August, at which time the depart- 
ment will make a test of the usefulness of a Winton 
touring car especially built for army service, and 
when the future of the automobile for army usage 

will be decided. 

* * * 

Mr. A. A. Haas now has his White touring car at 
Del Monte ; he is using it daily, and visiting all of 

the surrounding country. 

* * * 

Mr. H. D. Ryus, manager of the White Garage at 
Los Angeles, was in town last Sunday, Monday and 
Tuesday. He was particularly glad to welcome the 
numerous people to whom he has sold White cars, 
and says: "One thing pleased me, and that is, not 
one person to whom I sold said he wished he was 
quit of his bargain." They are all delighted, and the 
cars are doing fine work. ' Mr. Ryus says that Los 
Angeles is doing a splendid business, and the White 
car holding its own without any effort. 




4 Cylinders 

Sample Car due July 22nd 

30 Horse Power 

Side Entrance Tonneau 

Early Deliveries 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 



901-925 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND: 350 10th STREET 



SUNDAY'S AUTOMOBILE TRIP TO 
SAN JOSE 

means a delightful trip and an appetite that calls for something- 




m "" "" 


■rfn 


A 11 torn obi lists 
are invited to 
visit the LA 
MOLLE DRILL. 
where every 
viand is a de- 
light, every 
■wine a treat 
for connois- 
seurs- P. Monf- 
maycur, Prop., 
was for years 
Chef at Del- 
monico's and 
the Haison 




LAMOLLE GRILL, 36-38 North First Strut, San Jose, or. 


P. the Victory Theatre 



SECOND HAND 

AUTOMOBILES 



F. R. LUCKHARDT 

20 GOLDEN GATE AVfi. 

WITH 
CALIFORNIA AUTO EXPRESS CO 



AUTOMOBILE DIRECTORY. 

Storage, Repair and Supply Stations. 

San Jose. 

GEO. H. OSBN & Co., 13-15-17 W. St. John St.. San Jose. Com- 
plete rapair shop. Large stock of auto supplies. Storage sta- 
tion, etc. Agents for Winton, Locomobile, Oldsmobile, etc. 

AN ELECTRIC FAN MOTOR 

Will Keep You Cool. Write For Prices 
National Electric Co. 

455 Sutter Street. Telephone Bush 639 San Franolsco 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 23, 1904. 

Several automobile manufacturers are now de- 
livering cars over the road instead of shipping them 
by rail. Purchasers of automobiles now ask that the 
machines be delivered at their doors, whether it be 
500 or 1,000 miles, and the salesman invariably re- 
plies "Certainly," calls a chauffeur, and the machine 
is shipped. Road deliveries in this way require no 
trouble at all. The filling- of the gasoline tanks and 
oil tanks is all that is necessary. The road trip 
really benefits the machine. The New York and Chi- 
cago agents of the auto-car have steadily brought 
all the machines over the roads from Ardmore, Pa., 
and are said to have delivered over 200 machines in 
this way. Customers have been taken along, and on 
the trip up have been so thoroughly instructed in the 
handling of the cars that at the completion of the 
trip all have been thorough drivers, capable of tour- 
ing anywhere. Haynes-Apperson cars are likewise 
delivered everywhere within reason, and the rail- 
roads are not troubled at all with them. 



THE AX/TOCA'R 




AUTOCARS, $1,850 
AUTOCAR RUNABOUT, $1,050 
LIGHT TOURING COLUMBIA $1,900 
COLUMBIA FOUR CYLINDER $4,000 

THERE AttE NO AUTOMOBILES BETTER 



WEST COAST 

606 VAN NESS AVENUE 



MOTOR-CAR CO 

SAN FRANCISCO 



If you are contem- 
plating the purchase 
<>f an automobile we 
wish to cull attention 
to the fact thit we 
will be in a position 
to Bupply you with a 
machine which we 
know is superior to 
nny other machine 
for sale for less than 
$2000. 
The price will be 

$875 and $975 

The type of engine is 
double opposed cylinder 4&X4&. Every part accessible and dura- 
ble, and tor power, and weight, nothing on the market like it. 

HEINE MOTOR CAR. CO. 
235-237 Geary St. Opp. Union Square S&n Francisco 




W. J. FREELING 



P. L CHAPMAN 



Central Automobile Co. 



1185 MarKet St. S. F. 

The most Commodious Garage in the Center of the City 

Expert Fiench and American Mi-chants. 

Repair Work on Imported and American Machines Guar- 
anteed. Charges Reasonable. 

New and Second Hand Automobiles Bought, Sold and 
Exchanged. 

PHONE JESSIE 3336 



( )ne hundred thousand dollars lias been spent by 
the Olds Motor Works in new equipment this sea- 
sun. One new building, on an average, has been 
erected each month, and a force of carpenters and 
masons has been kept constantly employed during 
the season. With the immense facilities at their 
command now, the works will deliver cars promptly 
from this time on, especially the light touring cars 
and the standard runabouts. 

* * * 

Frank Nutt, of New York, drove a Haynes-Apper- 
son light touring car in the Mount Washington hill- 
climbing contest. He wiH use the same machine on 
the St. Louis run. Mrs. Nutt will accompany her 

husband. 

* * * 

The Haynes light touring car has much the same 
outward appearance as the Runabout of 1903, but of 
higher power and capacity, and distinctly a powerful 
touring car, not a runabout — the most highly devel- 
oped car of its type — the perfected product of the 
oldest makers of motor cars in America. 

* * # 

An interesting addition to the automobile litera- 
ture of the country is entitled "Physician Ride Thy- 
self." The Knox Automobile Company of Spring- 
field, Mass., are the publishers. The booklet dea's 
with the subject from the pen of a physician, and is 

authoritative. 

* * * 

Mr. Byron L. Jackson, of this city, has just re- 
turned from an extended trip throughout the East. 
He visited the Winton factory, and has the honor o r 
being the first San Francisco man to ride in the four- 
cylinder Winton touring car. The Winton factory 
is very busy building these machines, and there arc 
over one hundred on their floor being put together. 

* * * 

Telegrams have been flying fast and furious be- 
tween San Francisco and Cleveland since the depart- 
ure of Mr. Max Schwabacher's new four-cylinder 
Wintcn tonring car, from the factory. This car was 
shipped on the 8th inst, and has been watched very 
closely by both Mr. Schwabacher and the Pioneer 
Automobile Company, who are congratulating them- 
selves upon the fact that Mr. Schwabacher's car is 
one of the first finished by the factory. 

* * * 

Three more carloads of Otdsmobiles have arrived 
at the Pioneer Automobile Co's San Francisco store, 
and two car-loads at their Los Angeles branch. The 



July j 3 . 1904. 

route 
afferent stores Dennu Diamond, "f 
vale, received .1 new 1 Hdsmohilc tonneau <>n 
rilay last This is the third Oldsmobile Mr I >ia 
I has purchased from the Pioneer \uton 
pany during the last twelve months. I >r, I >. \ 
inta Clara, purchased an 1 Hdsmohilc 
tonneau from the Pioneer Automobile Compan) last 

week. 

» * * 

Mr. George \Y. Story, who made a trip from Loa 
Angeles to San Francisco in his Winton touring car, 
remained here a week, ami departed on Sunday last 
for I .■ >s Angeles. 

* * « 

The Vanderbilt cup, the prize in the internati 
team race to be rim in this country on 1 October 8th, 

i^ now on exhibition in the Window of Tiffany & 
New York. The cup :- ,^i inches high, including 

its ebony base, contains 481 ounces of silver, .in ! 
has a capacity of i,, • , gallons. The trophy is of sim- 
ple and classic design. ( in one side in relief is a 
presentation of Mr. Vanderbilt driving his 90 horse- 
power Mercedes, which scored the World's mile 
record of 39 seconds at < Irmond. ( In the other side 
is the following inscription: "Challenge cup pre 
sented by W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr.. to the American 
Automobile Association, under deed of gift, to be 
raced for yearly by cars under 1,000 kilos. Won 

by ." A wreath of laurel encircles the rim. Mr. 

Vanderbilt declines to state the cost of the trophy. 

* * * 

"I am always at a loss to understand why automo- 
bilists do not make more use of luncheon and tea 
baskets," says a writer in the New York Globe. 
"When I note my 'bubbling' confreres taking their 
meals in all sorts of out-of-the-way road houses, I 
congratulate myself on my al fresco meals. For two 
persons and a chauffeur, a 'tea' at a country inn 
averages from $1.50 to $2. The cake is. made with 
margarine and various kinds of nauseous patent 
yeast raisers. For 50 cents for the three I can turn 
out a most tempting and delicious afternoon tea, 
consisting of tea, with ad libitum cream, rich cake, 
and bread and butter, which would give an appetite 
to an angel. In the luncheon basket I take along 
cold chicken and ham, crisp French rolls, new-made 
butter and cream-cheese, a fresh salad, stewed fruit, 
and clotted cream, and for ourselves a small bottle 
of sparkling Moselle, and a bottle of beer or cider 
for the chauffeur. Here we have a meal fit for Lucul- 
lus, and capable of infinite variety from day to clay, 
at about half the cost of the execrable meals fur- 
nished at the wayside hotel. My husband and I 
found on our daily trips that our 'teas' alone, with 
tips, amounted to $6 weekly. Providing them from 
our tea basket, the weekly cost is about $3 for most 
sumptuous and delicious little meals eaten on a 
sunny or shady bank, according to the temperature." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Strong Sunlight, Wind and Dust. 

Cause Eye Strain, Granulation and Redness. Murine Eye Rem 
•dy re.torei, cures Eye diseases, soothes Eye pain, aids ihuse 
wearing «la»se»; doesn't smart. A favorite toilet requisite. 



PItOMPT SERVICE 

(ikettittrg ELertrir. Company 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobiles. 
Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 
j House Wiring and Repairing. 

16-18 SECOND ST. Under Grand Hotel. TEL. BVSH 3S2 




"THE WORLD 



POPE TOLEDO TOURING CAR CO. 

G. A. BOYER. M.napr 

134-148 OOLDFN GATE AVENUE, S. F. PHONE SOUTH 1142 



PIERCE 
STANHOPE 

Price 51.350 Without Top 
$1,450 With Too 

1. A beautiful Stanhope, with Victoria top and accommo- 
dating fOUT persons. 

j. it h:is an 8 horse-power engine of the De Dion B*rench 
type, 

3. 11 Is especially designed for physicians' use, saving two 

hours per day. 

i. It is compart in construction, symmetrical in outline 
and beautiful in general finish. 

5. It was in the Endurance Run, l\ew York to Pittsburg, 
800 miles, and won high rank. 




PIERCE ARROW TOURING CAR French 
NORTHERN RUNABOUT 



S2.650.00 

800.00 



MOBILE CARRIAGE CO. Golden Gate Ave. & Gough St., S F, 



AUTOMOBILE REPAIRS 

81 CITY HALL AVE. 

De Dion Plugs and Porcelains— Electric Wiring for Auto use 
best made— Batteries. Tires, etc. 

ANDREWS, KEENAN & BIASAUF 

Tel. South 1039 San Francisco, Cal. 



HOTEL VENDOME 



SAN JOSE, CAL 



New Automobile Garage 

open at all hours, and in charge of competent 
me.i. Free of charge to guests. All roads in 
Santa Clara Valley open to automobiles. Easy 
run to San Jose in 2 hours and a half. 

J. T. BROOKS, Manager. 



THE, CADILLAC 




MODEL B. Price $950 
Whb Tonneau $1050 

August sth from Del 
Monte to 12th and 
Broadway. Oakland. 
6 hrs. 5min October 
18th the para ft run 
was made in 5 hrs. 38 
min. without stop- 
ping the ear or refill- 
ing with gasoline or 
water, breaking all 
records- The only 
successful tour of 
the Yosemite Vulley 
was madft by a party 
of 4 in a Cadillac-, 



CUYLER LEE, 

Agent 

201-203 Larkin St, 
San Francisco 



! — ; — = 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



5>6e Price They Paid 



By Ele&nore F. Lewys 



"Hurry up, Johnnie, or we won't be in time to see 
the coffin!" and the speaker, a thin, worried-looking 
woman twitched the coat of her toddling offspring 
and dragged him impatiently along the sunny street. 
A long, winding, narrow street, with houses em- 
bowered in roses on either side. 

Roses! They covered the windows, the roofs, the 
fences. They even, growing bold in the glorious 
spring air, crept through the fence bars and turned 
up impertinent faces on the very sidewalks under 
your feet. A town of flowers and vines, green, creep- 
ing things, rioting in untrimmed freedom ; great 
feathery, plumey branches of locust trees meeting 
over the roads, little gurgling brooks running across 
them, an almost overpowering odor of mingled bloom 
greeted you wherever you turned, a very Naples for 
the wealth of blossoms lavishly outspread before 
you, and yet underneath, almost imperceptible- I e- 
hind the heavy breath of flowers, a strange, latent 
sense of danger, the inevitable impression always 
lurking near great earthly beauty of any kind, the 

"Smell of the mold above the rose." 

That this feeling does not only strike the stranger 
within the gates of this California mining town is 
evidenced by the lives of its inhabitants; their crav- 
ing for excitement, the thoughtless, yet morbid, in- 
terest that causes them to make gala occasions of 
funerals ; the knell-like, warning minor note in their 
discordant dance music, and the reckless "Eat, drink 
and be merry, for to-morrow we die" expression in 
their death marches ; the dread knowledge that at 
any time, in the midst of the noon bustle of its queer, 
crooked little "up-town" streets, or sounding out 
loud and clear at midnight, blanching the faces of 
merry dancers, waking the more sluggish stay-at- 
homes, the shrill whistle of the mines may blow, tell- 
ing of death and disaster among their kindred, grub- 
bing like moles in the earth's bowels, for their dearly 
bought gold. 

This Nevada County town is unique in itself. What 
other place in the union posts funeral notices with the 
words: "Everybody invited to attend," on the end 
of the sheet, on fences, the walls of shops, or any 
other conspicuous place that can be had for the pur- 
pose? And treats the whole of the funeral ceremony 
as if it were some pleasurable event? When such 
an occasion occurs, the whole village turns out, the 
r.-vajority wearing white gloves, laughing and chatting 
gayly. 

The children of our neighborhood had a peculiar 
penchant for sitting beside the grave-digger and 
watching with interest each shovelful thrown up. 
After the funeral, the carriages and hearse go back 
through the town at a run. 

To these people, the "flower pieces" on a coffin ap- 
peal to them as beautiful, when the feathery pines, 
swaying against the sky, the great plumes of wild 
white lilac, the waving green of wild pale green oats, 
the hundreds of ferns and flowers to be found in can- 
yon and on hill, are spread before their blinded eyes, 
unseen, unappreciated, misunderstood. 

For them, the rather stiff climb up "Alta" Hill, 
back of the town, could not be repaid by the great 
panorama seen from the top of it. When this is 



reached, and the expanse of country looms up around 
you, the beauty is so great, and you yourself feel so 
small, amidst the vastness of it, that you catch your 
breath with the wonder of it. 

Imagine, first, fields of pale green oats, broken here 
and there by huge hemlock, spruce and pine rees; 
farther on, purple-shadowed hills, clothed to il.=ir 
summits with the same forest-giants, and then back 
of these the majestic Sierras, covered with their blan- 
ket of eternal snow, lying asleep against the bosom 
of the blue sky, and yet seeming to breathe forth a 
commanding : 

"Hush ! Look up ! Worship." 

***** 

The village gossip leaned over her front gate, 
delighted to impart information to any "tenderfeet" 
who might chance by, as we had, a small dog "yap- 
ping" at her feet, and in the rear, two children gaz- 
ing at us with wonder-wide eyes, between bites of 
huge pieces of "saffron cake." 

"Saffron cake" is a product peculiar to that particu- 
lar village, and not to be had elsewhere in the coun- 
try. It is a bright yellow compound, filled with "lit- 
tle red shavings of a shiny hue," as Harold Chan- 
ning puts it, "smelling like nothing else under heaven 
or on the earth; a curious, haunting, antediluvian 
taste." 

The natives of this queer little hamlet (mostly of 
Cornish descent) revel in it, as they do in "meat pas- 
ties" and "clotted cream." What wonder, then, with 
such a diet as this, combined with tightly closed 
windows, very little healthful exercise, and drinking 
water from wells sunk beneath the graveyard, that 
even in the mountain air the complexion of the ma- 
jority, are muddy and colorless? And that rheuma- 
tism, diphtheria and typhoid fever abound? 

It was only within the last few months that any 
pretense of a sewer system was inaugurated, the 
drain from the houses flowing along the gutters of 
the streets. 

"Lands, yes, I have lived here all my life," our in- 
formant was saying. "I even met Mark Twain once, 
but if I do say it, although he did write amusingly, 
he was the 'slowest coach' I ever struck. Then, you 
know, this is Bret Harte's country, but I guess things 
has changed since his time. Take the mines, for in- 
stance. Most of them are lit with electricity, and 
the 'cage' that goes down the shaft is just like a 'lift' 
in those high buildings ot yours" (having come from 
San Francisco, I was some way looked upon as re- 
sponsible for the town) "they can stop anywhere 
when wanted, just as elevators do, and go so fast 
that you can't make out men's faces working in the 
different tunnels as you drop down or fly up." 

Our informant paused for breath, and then her 
quick eye catching sight of a vision in pale blue silk- 
crepe, with chiffon hat to match, her good-natured 
volubility changed to wrath : 

"Do you see that?" she exclaimed, nearly loud 
enough for the well-dressed young woman on the 
other side of the street to hear. "It's a puzzle to out- 
siders how the miners here dress their women-folks 
as fine as they do on $3 a da}'. Why, they think noth- 
ing of paying $50 for a frock, or $20 for a hat. And 
how do they manage that, on the pay?" I Terr 
her voice sunk to a hissing whisper: "Some of the 



July a 3 . 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



35 



•u . where the men are 
examined before they leave the mines. Dinner |>.ui-. 
convenient sometimes, though." 

"Then again," sin- went on, after watching tl«- 
flutter oi the l>luc >ilk petticoat (how incongruous it 
seemed, trailing in the dusty village 
>>re 1- red, the men cover it up, and work 

away from it. By ami by the mine Stops paying, and 
\fter a while tne men apply for 'tribute 
work' •.!> the same mine. That is. the) get !>ai'l BO 
much percentage on the ore they dig out. Then the 
hidden vein comes to light again, and 1 1n- plotters 
make a rich haul. 

"There was a big law-suit lure some time ftgO be- 
tween two mines — the Pennsylvania and the \Y. Y. 
O, I >. 1 Work Yotir Own Diggings.) Tiny worked 
into each other's property, and got 30 close that just 
a thin wall divided them, so their voices and the 
sound of pickaxes could he heard from either side. 
One man made a h«>le hit: enough to look through, 
and thine:.' 1 got to he pretty hot for a while. But the 
Pennsylvania won. 

She paused again, for a moment, and let retrospec- 
tive eyes rest on the little sun-flecked hrook. running 
along one side of her garden. A most important 
little stream, hastening by with small, soft chuckling 
sounds, as if it were murmuring to itself: 

"1 have come a long, long way, from the tops of 
those great mountains that you can see at the end 
of the street ; and I have to reach a big river that 
will take me to the sea; so don't try to stop me. I 
must hurry, hurry, hurry." 

"Do you remember that awful accident in 1889? 
No? There was a grand open-air ball that night, 
and in the midst of it the whistles of the mines blew. 
Of course, the dance broke up, and every one flew to 
the Empire, where the accident had occurred, to find 
it had been caused by a fire. Several men were 
killed, others maimed. Then when the pumps 
stopped, the mine was flooded, and professional divers 
from San Francisco had to be engaged to find the 
bodies." 

She caught her breath with a little gasp, and stared 
down the rose-embowered street. "That's how I 
lost my first beau," she added, softly. "But the man 
I married is a bookkeeper. I don't go much on 
mines any more." 

And then, with a shrug: "Lands, though, we have 
to get used to it." 

if. $ if if- if 

That night, as we watched the sun set, from our 
favorite point of view, a uttle pine-crowned hill, from 
whose top we could look down upon the pretty town 
nestled in between the mountains, a thin, white mist 
formed over the graveyard back of the village, grow- 
ing denser as the sun sank and night crept into the 
valley. 

A scientist would have termed it a malarious 
miasma rising from the cemetery and the stagnant 
pools of water in the creek near by ; but to us it had 
another meaning, symbolical of the scarred earth's 
expression : 

"You tear and rend at my vitals for treasures; and 
in return, I take yours." 

Stealthy, ethereal, wraith-like, and yet vengeful, 
unrelenting, inevitable, winding like a shroud among 
the lonely pine-trees ; the Spirit of the Mines ! 



MT. SHASTA 

SUMMER RATES 



Fishing, hunting and camping facilities make 
the Shasta region most satisfactory as an 
outing place. There are no better trout 
streams than those about Shasta, and you 
are always in easy reach of direct communi- 
cation with the city. 

Tickets at Reduced Rentes 

Make Access Easy for 

Everybody 

Ask for a Shasta folder. It is illustrated, 
and will give you full information about 
every part of the Shasta country. Free 
from any agent, or Information Bureau. 

613 Market Street 

Southern Pacific 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

tor $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Use Briquettes lor 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Cog,! co,. South 95, and your- prder will 
receive prompt attention. 



California Northwestern Ry. 

The Picturesque Route of California 

Deer Hunting 

The best Fishing and Hunting in California is along 
this Eoad. within a few hours' ride of San Francisco. 
The DEER SEASON opens July r>th in Mendocino County ; 
August 1st in Lake County ;July 15th in Sonoma County ; 
July 15th in Marin County. 

BLACK BASS FISHING 



Opened July 1st. These are plentiful in the Russian 
Eiver, particularly in the vicinity of Guerneville and 
Camp Vacation. 

TAKE YOVR ROD— Our Rivers and Streams are full o 
Trout. 

TAKE YOUR CVN and get a Deer. Many are now being 
seen daily. 

The Game Laws are enforced along this Road. Consult 
"VACATION 1904" to be had at the offices of the Company. It wil 
tell you where you can camp or board, and be near your game. 

Ticket Office, 660 Street (Chronicle Building), and Tiburon Ferry 
General Office, Mutual Life Building, corner Cali- 
fornia and Sansome sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



/. L. FRAZIER 

GenH Manager 



R. X. RYAN 

Gen' I Pass' 'r Agt. 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



^jffly> 



BRIE 
RAILROAD 

The most delightful scenery 
between Chicago and New 
York City. Limited trains 
every morning, afternoon and 
evening, with through equip- 
ment for Buffalo, New York, 
Albany and Boston. Highest 
type of Pullman and dining 
car service. 

Every mile of the track is 
protected by the safety block- 
signal system. 

A. C. HILTON 

Paclflo Coast Passenger Agent 
330 MarKet St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



The squalls of the sea of matri- 
mony have never been so perilous 
as to deter a woman from taking 
the last boat out. 




Summer 
Vacation 

Travel by Sea 



Excellent Service, Low Rates, Including drill and Mealg 

Los Angeles Sim Diego !*iiiiiji CltiZ 

Santa Barbara Men titty 

Eureka Seattle Tat-uDia 

Victoria Vancouver J.te. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 

Alaska and Mexico. 

Alaska Excursions, 1904. The palatial excursion 

Steamship, Spofeanp will lea\e Tacuma. 
Seattle and Victoria. July 19, Aun ■>■ 
For Information reeardlnf sailing dates etc., obtain folder 
SAN FRANCISO TICKET OF I It I J 
4 New Montgomery St. U'ahn-< H».tH) 
10 Market St. .and Broadway Wlitmep. 

C. D. DUN ANN. General Passenger Agent. 
10 Market Street, Sun Francisco 



-1HL- 



North=Western Line 



Russia=Japan Atlas 



Send ten cents in stamps to R. R. 
Ritchie, No. 617 Market street, 
San Francisco, for Russo-Janan- 
War Atlas issued by the 
Chicago and Northwestern 
Railway, three flue colored maps 
each 14-20, bound in convenient 
form for reference. The Eastern 
Situation shown in detail with 
tables showing relative military 
and naval strength and financial 
resources of Russia and Japan. 

R. R. RITCHIE, G. A. P. C. 

Chicago and Northwestern Railway 

617 Market St., S. F. (Palace Hotel) 



s^K H"ils. Trmlm leave and are da« 
^SV*<TTr>v\ to Rrrlve at 

(° f ™*^ \-J\ SAN FRANCIS< 

I ' A "5rJ ~~7# * / FBOM JtJLT 18. 1904 

.^•*^^i\/ Fkrrv Depot 

*£_}J>^ (Fool of Market Street) 

~-» - MAIN LIN E. - ahritk 

7 ODa on-.iviiir. WhiHTB, llmnsey 7 60p 

7 0' a lli'iili'.ln, Kliiiirn ami Sn.miiM-nro . 7-20P 
7 30a f.iih.ju n (1 ]„i, , .iilstoii.t. Santa 

idi««. Martinez. Sun Itnmon 6-ZOp 

7 ?Ha »fl»9.Trao» L'tihrop, Stock ■>».... 7 20p 
8.0fA ti..-ln Kxprv»H — < Via DnvU). 

« Ullnim dor Harden Sprluinl, 

Willows <K rnto, fted IthilT. 

Portlaml, Tacuma. SfHtlle 7.50P 

P.COa liHVla Wooillaml Knlulifn Urnllng. 

MaryBvllle. Ch cu. urovlllti 750p 

F.30A I'iiH rjOfltJk Miirtlnrz. A 11 1 Inch, 

Uj run. Tracy. Sioi Icion, New- 
man Los llx n is, Muii'lota, 
Armonn, Mnufonl, Vleulla, 
l'Drtirvlllf ... 4, 'Op 

p 3rA 1 -n C'>st«. McidcBto, Me reed, 
Fresno, (Josin*n Junction, Hud- 
ford. VUalia I Inker* field 4 50p 

f 3rA S Ilea, Sim .low.-. Mvennoro. Stuck 
ton, (tMllton). lone, Situ rumen to, 
MnryBVlUe. Chlco. lied uiuiT .... 4.20p 

P3Ta ' ink'liiie. Chinese, Jamostown. So- 

num. TaOllliniic Hlitl Anceln .... 4?0p 

9 PfA AM.inilcKxpn'x..— OK'ltn in.l Iviit. 5 20P 

S.3CA Itlchnmild, Martinez nod Way 

Statlona 8 50p 

ir.crA tii.' Overlnml Limited — Ogden. 
Oinalni, OtllciiKu. Ucuver, Kansas 

Utv. St. Louie 620p 

10-DrA Vnllejo I2.20P 

IO.OLa Loh Anpi-lf* PaBaciigor — Tort 
coBta. Afftrtlnez. Byron, Tracy. 
Lathmp. Siockton. M freed, 
UuymoQil. FreHiio. Gosuen Junc- 
tion, llmtfonl. Lrinoore, Vistula. 

nakersnehl. Lin Angeles 7 ?0p 

12.00m lliiyward. Nllestui.l Way St.atlnm. 3.20P 
'1 OfP S ..rumen to Ulv.r Stf itinera 1 1 1.0 JP 

3 31 P M'nl.fa. Winter*. Snci iinii'ittO, 

u liana, WlMows, Kulvrliis 

I ■hi. in ic, Mnryavllle. Orovllle 

uml way "tntlons I 50a 

33Pp ilnvwnnl. Nlli'nnn<l Wuy StiillonB.. 7-BOp 
A CCP Mi\rilni , 7..SitiiK.iiiii)ii.VnllL-Jo,Napa, 

(-iiIMuka. Saudi UuHft 9 20a 

4 OCp Slli's. Tiiu-v, Stnckin... Lodl 4-2JP 

4 3tPihivw.ini. Nlli'B, Irvlniit.in, Sun I t8&0A 

Jose, Llvermore ) I 11.53a 

EOCp 1 tie uwi Limited— Newman, Los 
li.in.iB. Mcndom. Frenno. Tulare, 

It ukc rail old. I. on AnR«len 8. 50 a 

15 30p Hnyward. NUbb and Kan .lone 720a 

G I 1. n Hay ward. NlleHiiiid San .lose 9j0a 

6.0LP Raxtern Express— Opdea, unintiu. 
Cliliairo. Oenver. Kansas City, 
Si LojIb. via Man Inez. Stockton, 

Bacraineato, Colfax, itcno 12.60P 

6. OCp Vall.-Jo, dally, except Sunday... I 7 cn _ 

7-OCp Vallt'J... Sunday only f ' oup 

7.00P l.lch d. San Pablo, Port Coeia, 

MT'tm'z and Way StntlonB 11.20a 

7.00plu-nu Passenger— Port toata, Bui 
sun, id mini, Davis. SneramontOi 
Truckec, Lnke Tahue. lU'no, 

ToDOJ-ah, Sparks 7.50a 

BOBplurt CosUi, MartlnPZ, Byron, 
Tracy, Latlirup. ModcBtO. 
Merced, Berctida, Fresno nud 
Way Stations bcyoud Port Coma 12.20P 

8-05p Voscnilte Vallrv, via Itrti'iidil and 

Wawona 8-50A 

8.05P Martinez. Tracy. St.. t-kion 10-20A 

8.0tP Oregon * California Kxprean— Sac- 
raineuto, Mary uvl lie. Bedding, 
Portland, Puget Sound and titiut. 8 50a 

B.ICp May ward, MIIcb and San .IoBe(Sun- 
day only) 11-50A 



Coast Line 

Narrow Gauge 
(Foot of Market Street! 



745a Santa Cruz Excursion! Sunday only) 81 Op 
b-lbA Newark. Ceniervllle. San June, 
Feiton, Boulder Creek, Dig Hu-in, 
Santa Cruz and Way Stations... 5 55p 
T8-15A Alvaradi*. Newark, San Jose. Los 
Gatos, Glen wood, Felton, ituuidur 
Creek, Uli: Banln. Santa Cru/... 8-10p 
t215P Newark, Ceutervllle. San Jose. 
New Aimadcii. LOB GatOB.Feiton, 
Bouldur Creek, Santa Cruz uud 

Principal Way Statlona 10S5a 

4 IFp Newark. San Jobc. Lob Gatos I855A 

4.15p Wrijrht, Boulder Creek ami Banta 
Cruz. Saturday anil Sunday only. &8-6SA 

COAST LINE (Broad faaiim). 

%i T \ riilrd ami fu wii Ht-ml StieetH.) 

6 10a San .lose and Way Stations 6 30p 

17 00a San Jose and Way Statlona 640p 

7.15a Monterey and Santa Cruz Excur- 
sion (Sunday only) 1030p 

8-OOa N.'w Alinnden (Tues., Frld.. only). 4-IOp 
8-bOAThe Coaster— Sao Jose, Salinas. 

Sun Ardo. I'h.^o It. 1 1. lea. Santa 
.Mirtrarlia. San l.uls oiilBpo. Santa 
Barljara, San Buenaventura, 
MontfllVO, Oxtiard, Lturbank, Los 

Angeles I045P 

8.00a Gllroy. Bol lister. Ciistrovllle. Del 
Monte, PaclUc Grove, Surf, Lom- 

poc 10.45P 

9.00a *»n Jose. Tres PlnoB.Watsnnvllifi, 
Card tola. Bnnta Cruz, Purl He 
Grove. Sallnaa Sun l.ultt t>l)ls])0 
and Prlnulpa w.iv Statloue. ... 410p 
10-3Ca gan J^se and w»y stations 1.20p 

113lAStiuta Clara. San Jose. Lob Gatos 

and Whv Station^ 7.30p 

l-3tP San Jo^c and Wuy Stations 8 36a 

t3.blp i>h Monie Kxpreu (except Sun- 
day)— Simla Clara, San Jose, 
Watson \ ill.-. Banta Cruz. Del 
Monte, Monterey Pacific Grore. r 1 2- 1 5p 
5-30p BurilDgjame, Shu Joae, Gllroy, Bol- 
ilBter, Tree Plnos.PaJaro.Wateon- 

vllle. Capltola, Santa Cruz. Caa- 
trovlIle.Salinaa, Pacific Grove... 10 45a 

4 30p -hi> June and Way Stations t8 00A 

t5 00p Simla Clara. San Jose, Los Gatos. 

\\ iik'ht and principal way sta- 
tions (exeepi Suudoy) '9 00a 

(5 30p Sbd Jose and Principal Way Stations ;940a 

5 45 p fcunact Bxprese.— Hedwood, San 

Jusc, Gllroy. Sal Iiihs, Paso Uolilea, 
San i.nii- (Julano, Banta Barliant, 
Los Angeles, i)emlng. 101 Paao. 

N.w on. b. New York.. ... 7-10a 

6.45P Pajaro. WatSOnvllIe, Cnpl(..i a l ----- 
Santa Cruz. CaBirovflle. Del J-Ils'^E 

Monte. Pacific Grove JT10.4SP 

16.16 " i' Mateo, lleresford.Uelinout.San 
tarlOB, Kedwood, Fatr Oaks, 
MenloPark. Palo Alto i8-46a 

6 30 p bun J cm- and Way Stations 6 36a 

8 OOp I 'nio Alto and Way Stations 10.16a 

11.30p South San Francisco, Miui»rac. Hur 

llUKatuu, San Mateo, Belmont, 
San (JarloH, Redwood. Fair Gaks, 

Meulo Park, and 1'nlo Alio 9.46p 

all 30 Maytleld. Mountain View, Sunny- 
vale, Lawrence, Santa Clara and 

an Joae 1946p 

A (or Horning, P for Afternoon 

t Sunday excepted 1 Sundav only 

u. Saturday onlv b Monday only. 

[Bin p w at nil stations on Sun Ihv. 

Tm imu 1 liANsi Kit COAIFAJSlir 

will call for and cheek baggage from hotels and resi- 
dences Telephone, exchange & 



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O. R. & N. CO. 

The Only Steamship Line to 
PORTLAND, ORE 

And Short Rail Line from Portland toall Points 
East. Through Tickets to all Points all Rail or 

Steamship and Rail at Lowest Rates. 

Steamer Tieketw include Berth and Meals. 

8S OREGON Sails Mar. 28. Arril 7. 17. 27. May 

'SS GEO. W. ELDER Sails March 23. April 

2. 12. 22. May 2. 12. 22. 

S. F- BOOTH. General Agent 
N'i I >lonlg--mo'v St S;i n I'timi-fsm. Cn' 

Ted — What became of liis sum- 
mer hotel that failed because the 
place was so unhealthy? Ned — 
Oh, he is running it now as a sani- 
tarium." — Judge. 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Warr Sf& d ar. 

Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post St.,San Francisco 

The Cecillan, the Perfect Piano Player 



July 33. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



37 




THE HOROSCOPE. 



Hr Kl».i lliirkt'r 111*11 

O radiant angel of my ruling star! 
Read mc the story of the horoa 
That sent Love to me, for I darklj gr 

Before the secret of the calendar 

That ushers in to-morrow. Is is far — 
The day that wears my diadem of hope, 
When I shall know Love's plenitude and scope 

And all its hidden wonders as they arc? 

How- blinded are we mortals by our birth ! — 
As impotent in rapture as in sorrow 
The capital of Destiny to borrow. 

Whatever wealth our future may be worth. 

And though I gave the glory of the earth, 
I could not buy one whisper of to-morrow ! 

EVE. 

By Elizabeth Harman in Godey's 

Outside the fast-closed gates of. her lost home 

Lay hapless Eve ; 
And in her new, unequaled agony 

She moaned: "Relieve, 
O God, this pain! Have pity on my lot!" 
The great God heeded not. 
The sun shone on in heartless brilliancy ; 
The weary day dragged itself slowly by; 
But in the evening, — hark ! A feeble cry ! 

God's curse hath been forgot, 
And past alarms. 

Eve glories in her lot— - 

Her child is in her arms. . 



A SONG OF SUNSET. 

By Katharine Pearson Woods in Harper's llonihly 

The sky was aflush with an eager joy 
O'er the mountains steady and still ; 

A-glow with glory, the golden west, 

The south was a rose on the mountain's breast. 

tls the heart of age as the heart of a boy, . 

That a man should yearn for an infant's- toy? 
Yet love must have her will !) 

When the rose, has burned to a patient gray, 
When the west was poor and cold, 

Strong, softly steadfast (tho* "night be drear!) 

The veiled blue hills wore a valiant cheer. 

(For having is better than hope, they say; 

And who shall grieve, that, at close of day, 
A young love came to the old?) 

UNFORGETFULNESS. 

By Margaret Fuller in Century 

Knock at my heart, and I will ope 

To Unforgetfulness ; 
Breathe on my brows, and from your own 

Will fall my hands' caress; 

Ask of my eyes, and mine shall veil, 

Too faint to seek or chide; 
Kiss — and within your will I lie 

Like seaweed in the tide. 



VAN AUKEN 
OXYGEN INSTITUTE 

The Only OXYGEN INSTITUTE on the PACIFIC COAST 

[f yon are III we o&d POSfllYtt.1 own com irlthonl lima*. Knffr. 

lUAKRII. CONSTIPATION. NERVOtS PROS- 

tiutuin. Etc., Permanently Cured. 

AcJdrwwea at 1 he offices of Ban rranelaco natienta who will Klndlr 
toll how they were restored to health. Oxygen instrument* loan- 
edtoall patients treating al a distance. Bend aymnfama and 
ktndlf Incloee directed and stamped envelope for inrtlculnrs. 
Free diagnosis at office from 3 to B and 1 to a i>. m , Sundays ex- 
cepted. Cut this mil and rr-mcml.fr the hours. Tel. Sutter .1411 

815 VAN NESS AVF. Near Ellis St SAN FRANCISCO 



nratfsL 


For Breakfast 




f For Breakfast 


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\e- -- . iff F^JBtje? 


S& For Breakfast 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment , No- ios 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied July 9, 1904 

Delinquent in office Aug. 9, 1904 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Au«.30, 1904 

J. B. SHAW. Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, No- 309 Montgomery street. San 
Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Julia Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. SB 

Amount per share 8 cents 

Levied July 7.1904 

Delinquent in office Aug. 7, 1904 

Day o( sale of delinquent stock Sept. 1, 1904 

J. BTADTFELD, Jr.. Secretary. 
Office— Room 66, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal. 



City Index and Pu rchasers' Guide 

BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Booms for ladies and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT— N. E. Cor. Eddy and Mason 

streets. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, Main 

429. A. D. Blanco and D. Brun. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

MARTIN AROHNSON, Notary Public and U. S. Pension Attor- 
ney. Office, 632 Market street, room 8, (opp. Palace Hotel) San 
Francisco. Tel. Black 5541. Loans on any securities at lowest 
terms ; no commissions. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, 318 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and con- 
structed. 

WEAK MEN AND WOMEN f^ gj =£5"*$^ 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 
Send for circular: Naber, Alfs & Brune, 325 Market St., S. F. 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, lal Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms 303, 304, 305. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone, Private Exchange. 216. Resi- 
dence, corner 5th avenue and 16th St., Oakland. Tel. East 36. 



38 SAN FRANCISCO 
= BANKING. 

Mechanics' Savings Bank 

Incorporated January 21, 1904. 

Capital Stock paid up J250.000.00 

President, James O'B. Gunn Vice-President, Geo. D. Gray 

Vice-President, Geo. F. Lyon Cashier, Frederick H. Clark 

DIRECTORS. 

F. W. Dohrmann, Jr.; George D. Gray, F. M. Greenwood, Jas. 
O'B. Gunn, Marshall Hale, G. W. Kline, George F. Lyon, George 
M. Mitchell, Charles C. Moore, Henry T. Siott, W. F. Williamson. 

The Mechanics' Savings Bank has opened its doors for a gen- 
eral Savings and Loan business at the S. W. corner Montgomery 
and Bush streets, San Francisco, Cal., May 2, 1904. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 California St., cor. Webb St., San Francisco. 

E. B. POND, President; W. C. B. DeFREMERY, ROBERT 
WATT, Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. 
WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. DeFremery, Henry F. Allen, 
George C. Boardman, Jacob Barth, C. O. G. Miller, Fred H. 
Beaver, William A. Magee, Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks 
of reliable parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsi- 
bility of this Savings Bum; commences only with the actual re- 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 
company the first deposit. No charge is made for pass book 
or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings, 6;30 to 8. 

Deposits, June 3U. 1904 33.y08.594 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up I,000,0u0 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ' 985,083 

Mutual Savings Bank of s&n Frar.oi.oo 

710 Market St., opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 535.0OU 

Deposits over .9.1 ihj.uoo 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent; GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice- 
President; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Mofiltt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, • Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonaid, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent on postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

NO. 626 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,448,948.13 

Capital Actually Paid-up In Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, June 3uth. 1904 $30.613. ul5. 18 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, John Lloyd; First Vice- 
President, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmann; 
Ign. Steinhardt, Emil Rohte, H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Wal- 
ter and J. W. Van Bergen. 

Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herr- 
mann; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. 
Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established In 1S89. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital $16,000,000.00 

Paid-in Capital 3,000,000.00 

Profit anC Reserve Fund 460,000.00 

interea ..aid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
m term and 6 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbin, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

International Banking Corporation 

NO. 1 WALL STREET. NEW YORK. 

Capital and Surplus J7.894.400 

Capital and Surplus Authorized 10.000.o0u.00 

OFFICERS— William L. Moyer, President; Charles D. Palmer, 
Assistant to President; William B. Wlghtman, Assistant to 
President; John Hubbard, Treasurer; James H. Rogers, Secre- 
tary; John B. Lee, General Manager; Alexander & Green, Coun- 

BRANCHES— London, San Francisco, City of Mexico, Manila, 
Hong Kong, Yokohama, Shanghai, Singapore. 

AGENCIES — Bombay, Calcutta, Madras. Penang, Rangoon, 
Colombo, Amoy, Canton, Hankow, Tientsin, Tansul, Anping, 
Bakan, Mojl, Saigon, Kobe, Bangkok, Batavia, Samarang, Sou- 
rabaya, and all parts of Europe. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH— 32-34 Sansome St. 

A general banking business transacted. Accounts of corpora- 
tions, firms and individuals solicited. Loans made on liberal terms 
on approved securities. Foreign and domestic exchange bought 
and sold. Travelers' and commercial letters of credit granted, 
available in any part of the world, interest bearing certificates 
of deposits issued for fixed periods. Interest allowed to banks 
on current daily balances. Special rates given to banks keeping 
accounts with us, and drawing direct on our branches and 
agents throughout the world. 

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED. 
F. E. BECK, Manager. P. G. EASTWICK. JR.. A»8t. Mgr. 



NEWS LETTER. . July 23, 1904. 

57>e Minister of Foreign Affairs 



Events the past week 
Diplomatists Anxious have aroused a feeling 
and Troubled. of anxiety in the diplo- 

matic world, the like of 
which has not been experienced since Togo attacked 
the Russian squadron at Port Arthur. The center 
of the apparent storm covers all the nations, and the 
cause of it was the passing of the Dardanelles of a 
Russian gun-vessel from the Black Sea Squadron 
in direct violation of a compact between the Turkish 
Government and the other nations. According to 
that agreement, the Sublime Porte should have sent 
the Russian warship to the bottom of the Dardanelles 
if it persisted in making the Mediterranean. Again, 
the Anglo-Japanese compact binds the United States 
and Great Britain to prevent Turkey granting per- 
mission to Russia to pass warships or war muni- 
tions through the Dardanelles during the existing 
Russo-Japanese war. Some ten days ago two Rus- 
sian fast-sailing liners, guised as hospital ships, 
sailed through the Dardanelles without protest from 
even Japan, but no sooner were these vessels in neu- 
tral waters than they were armed and sent to the 
Red Sea to prey upon Japanese commerce. That 
bit of sharp practice being so successful, the Russians 
concluded to strain the situation a little more by 
boldly sending a ship of the Black Sea fleet through 
the forbidden connecting link between the Black 
Sea and the seas and oceans of the outer world. 
Japan lias now filed a vigorous protest against all 
this seeming favoritism for Russia, and the protest 
is aimed directly at the Anglo-Japanese signatory 
nations; i. e., America and England. The anxiety 
and uneasiness in European diplomatic circles comes 
of uncertainty as to what America and England will 
do in the premises. Only a few weeks ago Russia 
semi-officially announced that she should at once 
detacli a gun-vessel from the Black Sea squadron 
and send it through the Dardanelles in spite of any 
objections the Porte mieht raise, but in the same 
sort 01 semi-official diplomacy the London Govern- 
ment gave it out pat that should a Russian warship 
of the Black Sea squadron pass the Dardanelles, a 
British ship would send it to the bottom of the Medit- 
erranean so soon as it reached those waters. The 
attempt was not then made Dy Russia. But now it 
has been successfully made, and three of the Czar's 
war cruisers of the Black Sea fleet are on the high 
seas as privateers. Diplomatists are divided in opin- 
ion as to what international complications may grow 
out of the incident. Some hold that it was a delib- 
erate move on the part of Russia to force the two 
Anglo-Saxon nations to expose the exact meaning 
and scope of the Anglo-Japanese treaty, even if it 
obliges them to openly, and with force if need be. 
espouse the cause of Japan. Of course, that would 
mean the arraying of all the nations on one side or 
the other on the Far Eastern question. Other diplo- 
matists are inclined to the opinion that the St. Peters- 
burg Government had a "hint" from London and 
Washington that nothing more than a vigorous, but 
altogether diplomatic protest would be made should 
some of the Black Sea warships "escape" to the open. 
( if course, the Sultan would have to be a party to 
the "hint," while none at all would be needed from 
France, Germany and Austria, for they are in sym- 
pathy with Russia. There are still other diplomatists 
who predict "dreadful happenings" if the Anglo- 
Saxon nations have been faithless to Japan. Thev 
believe it will culminate in China's abrogation of 



July 33. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



her neutrality agreement on Ihe ground that if the 
Anjfl would betray Japan, they would l>c- 

• I that the safety ol both Japan and 
China ir..m European and American treachery lies 
in an offensive and defensive alliance to finally in- 
clude Asiatics generally. But no doubt this third 
of diplomatists arc needless!) alarmed, and \<-t 
what they tear has been predicted more than once 
in the last fifty years by students of national unfold- 
ment the world over as an inevitable coming event. 
But it is a bridge that need noi l>e crossed yet awhile 
— at the same time it is well to remember that every 
one "t the great nations is in a state of preparedness 

for eventualities; especially are their navies ready to 

sail in any direction on notice. In this connection, 
the ruling of the German Government is interesting, 

that only a real warship has the right to arrest anil 
search a merchantman, and even then, mails and mer- 
chandise must he examined on hoard the captured 
ship, and only such articles as arc clearly contraband 
removed. And it is of interest, too, t • > see that the 
British Government proposes to act in accord with 
Germany concerning the conduct of tlie Russian pri- 
vateers that are operating in the Red Sea. 

The situation in the war zone 
The Situation in is substantially unchanged. ex- 
East Asia. cept that both sides have about 
reached the point where a bat- 
tle of mighty proportions must be fought, or one or 
the other fall back to avoid a conflict, which would 
show weakness and fear. Both sides are receiving 
reinforcements, and for the first time Kuropatkin is 
in numerical strength to risk a big battle. Meanwhile, 
the Japanese are successfully clearing the peninsula 
of Russians, and forcing them back upon Liaovang, 
which has been all along Kuropatkin's chosen battle- 
ground for the first great conflict. The Russian 
General is showing decidedly more readiness to en- 
gage the enemy, and the Japanese are enthusiasti- 
cally gathering themselves in for the fray. The 
main lines are almost in artillery touch, and unless 
heavy rains intervene or one side withdraws to post- 
pone an engagement of magnitude, news of a great 
destructive and decisive battle may come any day. 
Some military experts believe that Kuropatkin will 
withdraw his forces at the last moment to Mukden, 
some sixty miles to the north, or perhaps to Tiding, 
about the same distance still further north, before 
offering battle. At Tieling his right would rest 
upon and be protected from a flank movement by 
the Liao river, besides the topography of that region 
would favor him. But that would mean the aban- 
donment of the entire Lioa-tung peninsula, and the 
Japanese might conclude to be content with the oc- 
cupation of that territory, and sit down and wait for 
Kuropatkin to return and attempt to drive them out. 
The Peninsula is in the shape of an inverted triangle, 
whose base and sides are each about 250 miles long, 
and which, together with Korea, controls the entire 
sea-front of East Asia, except that bordering on 
China and on Siberia north from Vladivostock. And 
as the Japanese strategy unfolds there are indications 
that all movements have been made for the ultimate 
purpose of getting possession of the Peninsula. But 
Port Arthur must be taken, for it is the key to the 
Peninsula's more than 600 miles of seaboard. 



39 



BANKING. 



Fancy vest* at cost, see window. Tom Dillon, Ratter Opp. 
Palace Hotel. 



Wells.Fargo 6c Co., Bank 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital. Surplun and Undivided 
Proflta 



;$I3,500,000 



Ladles— For a good complexion try the Post St. Hammam, 



Homer 8. Kin*. President: F. L. Llpman. Cashier; Fronk II 
K n«. Assistant Cashier: Jno. E. Miles. Assistant Cashier. 

BRANCHES— New York: Salt Lake. Utah: Portland. Ore. 

Correspondents throughout the world. General banking busi- 
ness transacted. 

The Srn Krancisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts.. San Francisco. 

JAMBS K WILSON, President; w.M. PIERCE JOHNSON 
• •resident; LEWIS 1. COWQILL, Cashier; F. W. WOLFE, As- 
sistant Cashier. 

Capital, 1600,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits. $165,000. 
Mora— William Pierce Johnson, Vlce-Pres't. Willlnmette 
Pulp and Paper Co.; Wm. J. Dutton, President Flremans Fund 
Ins. Co.; H. E. Huntington. First Vice-President S. P. R. R. : 
Geo. A. Pope, of Pope & Talbot, Lumber Dealers; C. S. Benedict. 
President Hastings Clothing Co.; George Aimer Newhall, H. M. 
Xewhall 4 Co.; W. H. Talbot, Capitalist; H. D. Morton, Presi- 
dent w. T. Garratt & Co. James K. Wilson, President. 

AGENTS— New York: Hanover National Bank, Chemical Na- 
tional Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— 
Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— 

The Mechanics' National Bank Kansas City— First National Bang 
London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 
Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Johannesburg— Robinson 
South African Banking Co., Limited. 

Tne Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, $8,700,000. Reserve Fund, $3,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $80,000,000 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. WALKER, General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook. 
Fernie, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skaguay (Alaska). 
Also 90 other Branches, covering the principal points in 
Manitoba, N. W. Territories, and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 
Scotland, Lloyds Bank, Ltd., The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank, Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW OLREANS— The Commercial National Bank. 
San Francisco Office— 

326 California Street 

A. KAINS, Manager. 

London. Paris and American Bank LluliW 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,100,000. 
Head Office— 40 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssoniere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSC HUL, Cashier. . 

The flnRlo-Calif-ornian Bank, Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— IS Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 Paid-up, $1,600,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 
Officers: Frank J. Symmes, President; O. A. Hale, Vioe- 
Preslderit; H. Brunner, Cashier. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. __ 
INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. LOANS MADE. 
DIBECTOES-William Alvord. William Babcock, S. L. Abbot 
O. D. Baldwin, L. F. Monteagle, Warren D. Clark, E. J. McOutehen. B. 
H. Pease. J. D. Grant. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,726,000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator. Guardian or 
Trustee. Check accounts solicited. Legal Depository for money la 
Probate Court Proceedings Interest paid on Trust Deposits and 
Savings. Investments carefully selected. 



40 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 23, 1904. 



EXPOSITION NOTES 



World's Fair Grounds, July 14, 1904. 

The fire-arms exhibit of the War Department 

is one of the great points of interest in the Govern- 
ment Building, especially to foreign army men, as 
well as men of our own army and militia. The very 
latest models of all the ordnance in use or to be put 
in use by the Government is shown, as well as every 
phase of the manufacture of much of the army equip- 
ment. 

The display of rifles includes over 200 models, 
showing the evolution of fire-arms from early times 
to the present perfected rifle that is being manufac- 
tured at the rate of 200 a day for the use of the army 
and militia. 

The new Springfield rifle is said to be the most ser- 
viceable and powerful miliiary rifle in the world. It 
embodies the best features of the Krag-Jorgenson and 
the Mauser and weighs less than nine and one-half 
pounds. 

The fancy rifle shooting exhibitions by Ad. Topper- 
wein, of the Winchester Repeating' Arms Company 
at the rifle range west of the Palace of Forestry, Fish 
and Game, are attracting large crowds. The exhibi- 
tion includes shooting at stationary and moving 
targets of all sizes and at various distances. 

A model of the largest floating dry-dock in this 

country has just been completed in the Palace of 
Liberal Arts, and is now on exhibition there by the 
State of Louisiana. It is a model of the Government 
dock at Algiers, near New Orleans. This dock is 
525 feet long, and has a capacity of 15,000 tons, be- 
ing large enough to dock any vessel in the United 
States Navy. It was built by the Maryland Steel 
Co., of Sparrows Point, Md. 

An ingenious device for testing typewriters is 

shown in the Liberal Arts Building by the Oliver 
Typewriter Co. With it the keys of a typewriter 
are struck 900 times in one minute, putting every 
part of the machine in operation for the purpose of 
testing the mechanism to detect any possible flaw- 
before the machine is sent out from the factory. 

An extra fine exhibit of lemons is being shown 

by California in the Palace of Horticulture, the fruit 
being from San Bernardino County. Chemists say 
the California lemon contains 14 per cent more acid 
and 16 per cent more juice than lemons grown in any 
other locality. 



Quality is the keynote of the management at Techau's 

Tavern, where everybody who is anybody goes after the 
theatre. This restaurant has taken the lead and is keeping 



W. A. Plummer 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

TENTS. AWNINGS. HAMMOCKS 

111 CLAY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 
Telephone Main 549 



Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

PINE MERCANTILE LUNCH served every day from 11 to 2 
o'clock. Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 
Red Top Whiskey now on sale. 
SEEBA « DOLAN. Proprietors 

312 Sansome street, cor. Halleck, San Francisco. Tel. Black 002 







Santa Cruz Mountains. No staging. Table first- 
class. Electric lights, boating, swimming, fishing, 
hunting, tennis and ping-pong. New management. 
See booklet S. P. Co., 613 Market street, or Hotel 
Ben Lomond. 



The GEYSERS 



The most famous health and pleasure re- 
sort in California. The climate and scen- 
ery are unsurpassed and the waters are 
acknowledged the best on the market. 
Natural mineral, steam and Hammam bath*. Swimming lake of tepid 
mineral water. Boating, hunting, fishing, dancing, shuffle-board, 
billiards and croquet. The hotel and cottages have been renovated 
throughout, and new cottages, and aflno pavilion built this year. 
There will be a fullv equipped dairy and livery stable in connection 
with the hotel. The hotel, cottages, bath houses and grounds are 
lighted by electrlcitv. The hotel will be supplied with the best the 
market affords. Rates. $m. %\% *u. *lfi per week. For further particu- 
lars and booklet, write It H. Curry, Prop. The Geysers. Sonoma Co.Cal- 



Phone, Private Exchange 706 



Ocean Water on Every Floor 



HOTEL BALTIMORE. 

1015 VAN NESS AVE. 

Near Geary street. San Francisco. First class family hotel with 
all modern conveniences. Cuisine and service a special feature. 
Steam heated. Phones in every room. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST.. near Tremont, BOSTON 

Harvey 3 Woods, Props. 



Hotel "Richelieu 

Having renewed our lease and thoroughly renovated this hotel 
we will continue making this the best and leading family hotel 
on this Coast. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU CO., Van Ness Ave. 



HOTEL GRANADA, 1000 Suiter St. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opp. TJ. S. Treasury, one block from the White House- 
Washington D. C. The Hotel "Par Excellence" of the 
National Capital. 
First-class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, 
Prop. American Plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



For Those Who Appreciate Comfort and Attention 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, San Francisco 

American and European Plan. A Quiet Home 
Centrally Located. George Warren Hooper, Lessee. 




c 
Id 
r/5 



id 



O 

a 

2 
"3 
O 



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Price per copy, 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY ao, 1856. Annual Subscription, $4.00 



NE\t s B ET.TBR 



- 



^~s 



(fltolifjornia AdJojcrtisjcr. 




VoL LXIX 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 30, 1904. 



Number 5. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKK Is printed ud published 

every Saturday by the proprietor. Frederic* Marriott. Halleck 

Building. 330 Sansome street. San Fran 
Entered at San Francisco Postofftce as lus. matter. 

N.-w York Office— (where Information ma ■ il regarding 

subscriptions and advertising)— 206 Broadway. C C. Murphy, 

K.'lTesentatlve. 
Ixmdon Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C England. Ctoorge 8 
All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 

Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 

LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 9 a. m. 

Thursuay previous to day of issue. 

Berkeley is rejoicing in the advent of a mountain 
lion as a pleasing diversion from the midsummer 
gathering of Eastern educational lions. 

With eight-foot fences topped by barbed wire en- 
tanglements, the Southern Pacific testifies to its high 
esteem for and confidence in organized labor. 



"Mice and Men" is a good enough title for a play, 
but think how "Mice and Women" would draw the 
bald-headed brigade. 

A dry-goods house advertises "something new to 
take the place of rats for the hair." What can it be 
— mice? 



Jurors who are domiciled at a high-priced hotel 
are likely to look leniently upon the criminal mani- 
festations of "high finance." 

Petticoat squabbles, as usual, are making things 
interesting in the California section at the St. Louis 
fair. 



"The Man Behind" the firing line of Russia's army 
— a man with a long string of titles — has got away 
with $4,000,000 of the nation's Red Cross fund. 

A Russian general, whose name does not matter, 
pauses long enough in retreating to tell a correspond- 
ent that the Japs are too slow and too cautious, and 
moreover can't shoot. 



It is to be hoped for the sake of the "manly art" 
that the finger which the pet alligator bit was not 
one of those which pugilist Munro uses in operating 
his typewriter. 

"Mosquito-chasers," who keep the blood-suckers 
off railway laborers in Louisiana and Texas, want a 
"raise" of fifty cents a day, and point to the bumps 
on their persons as proof that the work is worth it. 



From Esopus to Oyster Bay, Judge Parker wig- 
wags his regrets that Roosevelt fell off his horse. 
The strenuous one will be equally polite when his 
adversary's morning swim is spoiled by a cramp. 

A negro non-unionist with a pump-gun has done 
much to convince the packing-house strikers of St. 
Joseph, Mo., that physical force ought not to be em- 
ployed in the settlement of labor difficulties. Three 
of the pickets who "argued'' with him are likely to 
die. 



Convicted twice by Cook, she still has hope 
That she may even now avoid the n 
And Commonsense, ashamed, her vision screens, 
While Justice nods, and Mrs. Botkin leans. 



A husband who liked pastry, but did not care for 
lemon pie as a face plaster, has asked the Superior 
Court to divorce him from the lady who threw it. 



Now that the chorus girls have joined the ranks of 
organized labor, woe to the manager who provides 
for the ballet anything but union tights! 



The discovery of another Mammoth Cave in Ken- 
tucky is most timely. Hearst needs a large hole in 
the ground into which to betake himself with his 
blighted aspirations and his lamentations. 



Since a California woman has cornered the coal 
supply of Nevada, we submit anew the declaration 
that one of the chief charms of the gentler sex is its 
trustfulness. 



A man at St. Louis slapped sister Carrie Nation, 
and now a Kentucky saloon-keeper has knocked her 
down with a chair. Either the South has gone back 
in its chivalry, or it doesn't consider Carrie a lady. 



Grand Duke Boris has withdrawn from a campaign 
which involved nothing more warlike than retreating 
in good order, and is at liberty to supervise the seri- 
ous business of hair-pulling in his harem. 



"Marching through Manchuria" does not verbally 
fit the music, but otherwise it might be sung with 
eminent appropriateness to the tune which Sherman's 
army made historically possible. 



Swallow? Swallow? Could there be a lovelier 
appellation for a Prohibition candidate? And the 
handle to it is "Silas," which is so much like "Silent" 
that the name seems too good to be accidental. 



"Oom Paul" Kruger put his faith in the Lord and 
his money into Continental securities, of which he 
leaves $5,000,000 worth to show his relatives that he 
was a wiser man than he looked. 



A snake on the road caused a horseback accident in 
Shasta County, but the rider would rather have seen 
the serpent where it was than entwined among his 
"day after" dreams. 

Folk is the kind of Missourian who does not ask 
any one to show him, and that is why the Missouri- 
ans who need to be shown are offering him the gov- 
ernorship. 

The great-grandfather who forgot the name of the 
great-grandmother whom he was to marry, started 
a little late in the "Happiness Handicap," but the 
despatches say he is blissful. 



4 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 

"BY THEIR FRUITS YE SHALL KNOW 
THEM." 



A month has passed since the News Letter began 
a propaganda for the better understanding of the 
duties of the people toward the State Militia. The 
public has been aroused, other newspapers have taken 
the cue, and the general movement for the disband- 
ment of the Guard, through the efforts of the leaders 
of labor unions, has received a serious check. 

The community is thinking, and thinking hard. 
It knows that the disturbing factor, the destroyer of 
property, is continual agitation, and that quiet and 
content, civic happiness, and an acceptance of con- 
ditions, means that the labor agitator has lost his job. 
The people know that labor agitation has cost mil- 
lions of dollars in the past few years. They know, 
too, that those leaders and their irresponsible foreign 
following, are the element who desire to see the end 
of the militia system. The people need the militia, 
and they are deciding to help increase its efficiency. 
Recently one of the largest commercial bodies in 
San Francisco issued a circular calling on its mem- 
bers, who comprise the largest employing class in 
the city, to grant all members of the Guard a vacation 
and some of the business houses have decided to pay 
the members of the militia full salary, for the duration 
of the encampment. This is good patriotic work, 
and the thanks of the community are due the Mer- 
chants' Association and the Citizens' Alliance for the 
stand taken at the News Letter's suggestion. 



The Government of the United States is spending 
a vast amount of treasure and the War Department 
has its general staff busy devising stuff for the im- 
provement of the regular army, and the militia of the 
country. The various States are making efforts to 
meet the general Government half way, and the busi- 
ness world is being appealed to, through its sense of 
self-preservation and its patriotism, to encourage the 
youth of the country to enroll itself among the citi- 
zen soldiery. It is a duty all citizens owe the flag. 
We have an insidious element at work trying to un- 
dermine the strength of the country — there is an 
underhanded effort continually aiming to emasculate 
the militia; there is a continuous effort to minimize 
patriotism. This propaganda aims to teach the lower 
classes of the benefit of concentrated effort to despoil 
those who have for the benefit of those who have not. 

Every business man should encourage the young 
men in his employ to join the Guard of the several 
States. The efficiency of the military police is the 
safeguard of the nation from the aggressions of the 
anarchist. It is the bulwark that protects the home 
of the law-abiding citizen from the onslaught of the 
rabble, the organized mob and its leaders, the labor 
agitators and walking delegates. If the business man 
refuses (and there are many who do refuse) to 
allow their men the privilege of a vacation to attend 
the combined maneuvres in the various States, the 
work of the general Government is all in vain. 

There are anarchistic circles in the various States 
and in our large cities that teach that allegiance to 
the flag, to good government, and respect for law and 
order, is the least of the considerations that go to 
make good citizenship. The work of those "groups" 
is insidious, silent and secret, and there are members 
of the various "groups" who are also members of la- 
bor unions. In the labor union the delegate of dis- 
order and anarchy has his work cut out for him ; he 
spreads discontent and trouble, be feeds fat on the ills 
of the community, and stands with leaking, envious 



July 30, 1904. 

fangs waiting the day of division that he fanatically 
believes is to come as a result of his labors. 

There is but one thing the anarchist fears, and 
that is the armed majesty of the law, and law's 
power to punish. Remove the protection of the na- 
tion, as exemplified by the militia and the army, and 
you have rampant crime. Let every business man 
ponder well upon the question; then let him decide 
for the future weal or woe of the country. There 
is to be an encampment at the Henry Ranch in San 
Luis Obispo County; the employer in ban Francisco 
and in the State at large should see that there is a 
large attendance. It's up to him. 

ABOUT WARTS AND MOLES. 
If you have any warts or moles, prepare to shed 
them now. Dr. Keen, an eminent physician of Phila- 
delphia, has awakened to the fact that warts and 
moles are evil things, lurking in our integumentary 
covering with the malign purpose of doing us up 
when we are not looking. He read a learned paper 
on the subject before the American Academy of 
Medicine, and his words of warning have started a 
new cult among the medical men. "Many of our 
warts and moles," said Dr. Keen, "are congenital ; 
others, which for years, mayhap, have been satisfied 
and innocent sojourners upon our outer selves, will 
take exception, sometimes, to the weight of clothing 
placed upon them, to rubbing, itching or other irri- 
tation, and will, without warning, lift up an angry 
head, grit their teeth, and determine to get even for 
the indignities to which they have been subjected. 
Then is the time to look out for them, for unless they 
be nipped in the bud, they will start a-growing, and 
they will grow and grow, until they may become bul- 
bous appendages instead of dimpled adornments." 
But, says our mentor of Philadelphia, the way to get 
ahead of them is to get them when they are young. 
To wait until they begin growing, he says, would be 
waiting too long. Therefore, his advice is to remove 
them with the skin in which they grow before any 
malignant change occurs ; that is, cut their heads 
off while they sleep, as it were. It seems taking an 
undue advantage of a little wart, or a nice, golden- 
brown mole to subject it to the knife in its early 
youth. But it may be better so. It is sad, though, 
after all these years. Many people consider moles 
lucky; the poets have sung of them; Shakespeare 
compares them to the spots at the bottom of a cow- 
slip; the Arabian Nights are filled with mention of 
their wondrous beauties — and now along comes a 
man from Philadelphia who says they are devilish. 
sly little things, and we would be better without 
them. They have taken away our cherished vermi- 
form appendix ; they have amputated our warts ; 
they are now after our moles. Gentlemen, we must 
call a halt on these doctors. There is only a little 
of us left. 

All the fun of the fair, with a dash of the midway 
thrown in, is to be seen at the beach. The Ocean- 
side Improvement Club has a long list of grievances, 
one 01 the chief of which is the fact that ladies almost 
in a state of nature add to the gaiety of nations by 
their antics on the beach. The Park Commissioners 
are going to put it down with a strong hand, and it 
really is very shocking. But what is this Oceanside 
Improvement Club, which breaks in on the gaiety of 
nations. Is it a branch of the Purity Alliance? 

Santos Dumont is not going back to the World's 
Fair. Can it be that things in St. Louis are not 
"high" enough for him? 



July 30. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

THE TEVIS AQUARIUM. 
In memory of his father, the late Lloj 
Dr. Harry Tevis propose! donating Golden 
Park an aquarium which will be without equal in 
the world. John Galen Howard, aupi irchi 

ite University, is now preparing < 
ii>r the groat structure, the erection and establishment 
<>i which will cost a very large sura of money. In 
selecting an aquarium for his father's memorial. Dr. 
Tevis hit upon a most popular project The p 
bility of establishing an aquarium in the l'ark has 
turn favorably discussed for years. The only draw- 
back was the lack of funds. Dr. I'evis will carry out 
his plans without much regard for COSt, the main idea 
being to establish something greater than anything 
else of its kind in the world. Naples and New York 
will be both surpassed. The water in the various 
tanks will be maintained at the normal temperature 
of the native waters of the fishes placed behind tin- 
glass. There will be great pools for the larger sea 
animals; wonderful submarine growths will he made 
to flourish, and the aquarium, from present accounts, 
will be, without doubt, one of the lamous show places 
of the world. The people of the citv are to be con- 
gratulated upon the promised magnificent addition 
to their great pleasure grounds. 

THE PACKING HOUSE STRIKE. 

One pregnant sentence stands out of the early ne- 
gotiations of the packing-house strike which centers 
at Chicago. It was uttered by Donnelly, the head 
of the striking labor organizations. Employers and 
those in charge of the interests of employers will do 
well to paste it in their scrap-books for use when 
they themselves come into collision with other Don- 
nellys. At the very outset, when the strike was 
hardly under way, a lawyer representing the Armour 
interests called up the high and mighty Donnelly by 
telephone and suggested the advisability of a con- 
ference. Leader Donnelly curtly and coldly refused, 
saying to the attorney: "WE WILL NEVER Do 
BUSINESS WITH ANY WALKING DELE- 
GATE OF THE BOSSES NOR WITH ANY- 
BODY BUT PRACTICAL PACKERS." 

There it is crystallized, condensed and clear-cu:; 
the employee will not do business with anybody bu t 
his employer when it comes to settling a strike. Ever 
since labor troubles began, one of the prime conten- 
tions of the union agitators has been that employers 
must not try to make agreements concerning wages 
or hours or anything else with their employees direct, 
but must always deal with them through the walk- 
ing delegate of some committee or officer of the 
union. In view of Donnelly's plain declaration, it 
would seem either that organized labor has under- 
gone a change of heart, or that it will not concede 
to the employer the right which it demands for itself. 
In either case, Donnelly has furnished the employ- 
ing interests of the country with an excellent prece- 
dent to cite when this question comes up elsewhere, 
as it surely will. 

Still another interesting utterance from the lips 
of the inspired Donnelly is the statement that the 
strikers in this instance will not consider any propo- 
sition to arbitrate their differences with the packers 
unless it be first expressly agreed that, no matter 
' what the award, it shall not carry any reduction of 
wages. If this means anything, it is that the strik- 
ing employees of the stockyards, who have made the 
issue one of. wages alone, have not faith enough in 
the justice of their cause to let it go to a jury on its 



NEWS LETTER. 5 

meril hat the decision must be in their 

• will not be finding upon them. 
Thl strike has already provided us with 

some convincing evidence that when the ardent ad 
• unionism say and write that labor wants 
and will conntenant 1 win 

Is. they he. and know that they he. Aside from 
outrages which thej charge, as usual, to "union sym 
pathizers," tin leaders will now have to explain the 

attitude of the strikers at St Paul who have lined up 

daily in front of the struck establishments, refusing 
ingress to employees not involved in the difficulty, 

and even defying sheriff, mayor and police. 

I'be truth is. unionism is in its last ditch. It has 
d to care about appearances or for diplomacy, 
and in its desperation is betraying the hrutalitv 
which it once made a pretense of denying. The men 
who called out the packing-liou.se employees know 
that they are beaten, and have told the strikers that 
they must save themselves. The consequence, we 
fear, will be bloodier doings than have yet been re- 
corded. 



A NEW USE FOR FOG. 

There are few thoroughfares in the world which 
present as magnificent a vista as that offered by Mar- 
ket street, and few sights in the city impress the 
visitor like that great perspective, extending to the 
ferry tower in one direction, and to Twin Peaks in 
the other. It is a sight which the native points out 
with pardonable pride, and being anxious of course 
to turn the stranger's eyes from the wretched pave- 
ment, there was nothing until recently which an- 
noyed the native so much as a wreath of fog obstruct- 
ing the western outlook. But now all this is changed 
and blessed is the lowcry day — for if it be clear, the 
eye must rest upon the huge advertisement of a pro- 
prietary mineral water which now disfigures Twin 
Peaks with its ugly white letters, large enough to 
be legible for several miles. If there ever was a le- 
gitimate call for the boycott, this seems to be it, for 
surely the ruthless advertiser who seizes upon the 
very landscape, marring its most beautiful features 
with hideous evidences of the commercial spirit run 
mad, should be made to feel the cold shoulder of neg- 
lect. We have grown used to advertisements almost 
everywhere — even upon our thealre curtains — but 
upon the landscape, really this is too much. 

BUSINESS MEN'S ASSOCIATIONS. 

San Francisco business men are steadily learning 
the benefits of associating themselves for the good 
that they can do the city and State. Members of 
these associations entertain opinions so broad and 
liberal that no place is left for fear that the competi- 
tion of newcomers will restrict or diminish their own 
volume of trade. On the contrary, they believe that 
business expansion without limitations is helpful to 
all lines of industrial products and commodity dis- 
tribution. They know that San Francisco's position 
in the channels of commerce makes this city the natu- 
ral focus for trade and traffic from and to every point 
of the compass ; that transportation facilities by land 
and by water are equal to several times over the 
demands that are made upon them, and that any in- 
crease in the volume of commercial operations would 
only serve to enlarge the territory, making San Fran- 
cisco its chief selling and buying market and money 
supply center. They are actuated by the spirit of 
progress that sets no bounds to trade expansion. 
They would have more industrial plants and mercan- 
tile competition. They would have two blades of 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 



grass grow on the spot where but one now grows. 
They know that every new venture that is upon a 
sound financial basis and conducted in the spirit of 
honest rivalry, creates new business in every direc- 
tion, which adds to the existing volume and gives 
greater emphasis to the distinguished features of 
facilities, location, climate and the boundless fields 
for commercial exploitation of San Francisco. 

These are some of the reasons why San Francisco's 
Merchants' Association is conspicuous in leading the 
people at a rapid but conservative pace up to a bet- 
ter appreciation of San Francisco's trade and indus- 
trial possibilities, and at the same time awakening the 
people of the whole State to the importance for their 
own good and profit of encouraging the quality of 
immigration that by its industry and frugality would 
add to the social and agricultural and commercial 
and mechanical and intellectual well-being of the 
commonwealth. 



A NEFARIOUS HEALTH BOARD. 

The rottenest spot in a rotten city Government is 
the Health Doard. Here Schmitzism is at its worst 
and boldest. If it were not for the sturdy resistance 
of those Supervisors who are standing firm for hon- 
esty and decency, the political doctors and their 
swarm of associate grafters would have their 'arms 
to the elbows in the municipal cash box. As it is. 
they are trying every trick and device known to the 
"crooked push" of the City Hall to pull down the 
opposition, and get at the money. So far they have 
met with little success — so little that in their greed 
for coin they have organized and are engaged in the 
raid upon the dairy industry. Supporting them pub- 
licly in all that they do or attempt to do in defiance 
of the charter and of public sentiment is the thick- 
skinned and conscienceless Schmitz, who is proxi- 
mately and ultimately responsible for this predacious 
gang. 

Of the Health Board itself there is little that need 
be said, but that little is not good. Its members are 
physicians who stand no higher professionally than 
they do politically. Some of them talk windily about 
the large sums they are losing by "giving their time 
to the public," but it is to be noted that none of them 
is clamoring to have his resignation accepted. They 
manifest so little knowledge of or regard for the laws 
of the city that they may be fairly suspected of equal 
ignorance and contempt so far as the rules and ethics 
of their profession are concerned. 

But the appointees of this Health Board are be- 
yond the limit. Chief of them is that Dr. Ragan, who 
lived in the shadow of Sam Rainey, and whose name 
still stands on the records of the Grand Jury and 
the Police Court in connection with one of the most 
infamous and notorious School Boards San Francisco 
has ever had. Ragan, the School Director, was al- 
most continuously before the public under a fire of 
accusation which left his reputation full of shot holes. 
He was arrested for soliciting a bribe from an appli- 
cant for a teacher's position, but the case was dis- 
missed "for lack of prosecution," the complainant 
having "disappeared." Later he returned and swore 
to the statement that Ragan had hired him to go 
away. A Grand Jury, investigating as most Grand 
Juries do, had previously declined to indict Ragan 
for the same offense, holding that the evidence was 
insufficient. It did not affirm its belief that Ragan 
was innocent. 

Still another Health Board appointee is that Dr. 
Lawlor who was scourged out of the Home for 
Feeble-Minded Children at Glen Ellen, after an in- 



vestigation which revealed a long series of monstrous 
brutalities practiced upon the State's witless and 
helpless wards. Later, the same State administration 
which had made him master of the Glen Ellen cham- 
ber of horrors, gave him a job at San Quentin, from 
which public opinion forced his discharge as soon as 
it was made known that he was Lawlor of Glen Ellen. 
Now he is safe in a position of authority over the 
helpless people in the County Hospital. 

It remained for Schmitz's Board of Health to re- 
call Ragan, the Raineyite, School Board Ragan, from 
the obscurity into which he had been driven, and to 
provide a refuge for the brutal Lawlor with a good 
salary attached and a chance to practice the humani- 
ties upon the stricken men and women whom poverty 
and disease drive into our public hospital. 

A few weeks ago, the Health Board cut down the 
maximum number of patients at the City and County 
Hospital to 425, on the ground of a reduced appro- 
priation. At the same meeting, it raised the salary 
of Ragan $65 a month, and hoisted the pay of other 
officers all along the line. Steadily, from its first day 
in office, this Board has been smashing the civil ser- 
vice system into smithereens, and dancing on the 
fragments. 

These are but a few of the Schmitz Health Board's 
many iniquities. Others of them the News Letter 
will touch upon hereafter. What it has cited should 
be enough, in all conscience, to make every taxpayer 
clap his hands in applause whenever those Super- 
visors who do not like the way the Mayor and the 
Health Board do business stand up in meeting and 
say so. 

Those irrepressible officers of the Thirteenth U. S. 
Infantry have broken loose again. This time Lieu- 
tenants Smith and White are charged with being the 
scandal manufacturers. It is said they took over to 
Angel Island a couple of innocent young things who 
knew no better than to try to dance a fandango in 
light attire. They aroused the camp, and the officer 
of the day shipped the fairies forthwith in a launch 
that brought them back to town. Now, Smith and 
White are awaiting the day of reckoning. The Thir- 
teenth surely bears an unlucky number. It had the 
nasty Robichon affair, then the death of Captain 
Wild, and now comes this escapade of the two giddy 
lieutenants. It is about time that the Thirteenth made 
an example of somebody. 

Fancy vesta at cost, sea window. Tom Dillon, Hatter Opp. 
Palace Hotel. 




fcJCHAS KLILLS & COJJ 

&£XCL d/J7 KE& 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

Suggestions of money saving are not the incentives 
we offer to purchase clothes here. It's the creations 
we show that emanate from premier designers, whose 
talents with shears, needle and brain are of the high- 
est class. Correct dressers say, "Immediate Service 
Clothes," for theirs. 



July 30. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Companions to the Rich 



Bv Lfedv Algv 



The limelight has been turned with scorching 
fierceness on Miss Warren, the companion of ill 
Bertha Dolbeer. It will glow to white heat when the 
inevitable will contest is hung on a court clothes-line 
accustomed to family washing of this kind. The fact 
that has so far made the greatest dent in the minds 
of the uninitiated is the niche a companion can earn 
for herself in a wealthy household. Because Bertha 
Dolbeer loved Miss Warren $700,000 worth, a great 
many young women fancy that a companion's walk 
in life is bordered with roses from which the thorns 
have been carefully culled. 

Before these "poor but proud" damsels run away 
with this idea, it might he wise to test the theory bj 
some Other standard than Miss Warren's position. 
Hers was an unusual case. She came into a family 
where death had stalked in its most hideous guise — 
a mother hastened to the Great Beyond by suicide 
and a son clashed to his death by accident. Miss War- 
ren was mother, sister and brother to Bertha Dolbeer. 
And when the father died, she tried to fill that 
vacancy, too — but the heart of the girl was broken, 
and her spirit bent out of the normal. She sought a 
cruel death, and left the bundle of her worldly wealth 
to her loved companion. During her life, too, she 
proved that Miss Warren occupied no mere hireling 
position in the family. Miss Warren had the place 
of honor at the few society functions that shattered 
the gloom of the Dolbeer home — and Miss Dolbeer 
accepted few invitations that did not include Miss 
Warren. 

But such a state of affairs is rare as peace in a 
Central American republic. There is just one other 
conspicuous case in San Francisco that I know of 
wdiere the companion has been boosted to the social 
status of her employer. As a rule, a companion is 
much older than her charge, and would not care to 
enter into the social frolic. But "Katie May" Dillon 
chose as her companion Patricia Cosgrave, a young 
woman of her own age, and the two have been in- 
separables ever since. Miss Dillon made it clear to 
her friends that it was a case of "invite me, invite 
my companion," so Miss Cosgrave was bidden 
wherever Miss Dillon's sparkling presence was de- 
sired. They toured the world without carrying any 
excess luggage in the way of a married chaperon, and 
together they have sipped of all the joys of a gilded 
bachelor girlhood. Miss Dillon's approaching mar- 
riage will probably make little difference in their 
relationship. 

But then, you have every shred of testimony that 
the defense can offer in support of the theory that a 
companion's lot is first cousin to that of an heiress. 
The average companion's lot in America is not nearly 
so pleasant as her European sisters. In Europe, 
where caste is rigid, a companion, if she is of fine 
birth and noble breeding, cannot lose her claims to 
distinction and is accorded a clearly defined position 
in the household. But in America, where there is 
but one great caste, and that moneyed, a companion, 
whatever her family 'scutcheon, is de-classed at once 
and her position subject to the whim of the household 
in which she casts her lot. I remember Madame Pa- 
get's wrath at the treatment accorded a French girl 
of noble family, who came out here to graft a French 
accent on the stubborn tongues of the children of a 



ComstOCk millionaire. Madame PagCt'a husband 

was then head at the French Department at the Uni 
vcrsity of California. The young lady came out from 

Europe under the chaperonage of Mine. Paget, and 

was taken by her to the Pine street mansion of her 
would-be employer. "< If course," said the "loidy" o 

the house, "I don't expect the young lady to eat at 
the regular servants' table, She can have her meals 
with my maid, who is French, too, and will be good 

company for her!" Madame Paget was a regular 
grenadier of a woman, and could pulverize with a 
look. When she added a volley of franco- American 
the victim was totally squelched. In this case, the 
victim never did recover — but was wont to exclaim: 
"Madame Paget expected me to treat that French girl 
just like a lady!" As the French girl was poor rela- 
tion to half the Faubourg St. Germain, she had some 
claim to being treated "just like a lady" by this ex- 
Diana of the Wash-tubs with a Corns tock crest. 

Excepting in unusual cases, the average governess 
or companion in San Francisco is on the uncertain 
plane that keeps her "between the devil and the deep 
sea." She doesn't belong to the duster and dishpan 
brigade below stairs nor does she belong to the 
"folks above stairs" either. She flounders around in 
the unsteady strata between these. On the social 
menu she is neither "fish, fowl, flesh, nor good red 
herring." And to such an unsatisfactory, frequently 
humiliating position, the governess and companion 
must bring a cargo of virtues, cardinal among which 
is an unfailing good nature proof against wear, rust, 
and moths. She must have a great deal of "savoir 
faire," speak a foreign language or two, play the 
piano, paint, embroider and what not. For all of 
which she is not usually paid a salary much above 
that of an ordinary servant — minus the perquisites in 
tips and hand-me-downs with which domestics pad 
out their incomes. 

With all the shortcomings of the position, there is 
a scramble to get such berths. Young women who 
have been brought up for the social whirl and are sud- 
denly deprived of the wherewithal, snatch at a chance 
to become a governess or companion with an idea 
that the smarts of such a position are less keen than 
those in the public glare. 

.but verily, the lot ot the stenographer is "clear 
cream cheese" in comparison. 

Nelson's Amycose 

Infallible remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the skin. 



HAVE YOU HAD LUNCH AT 



The Red Lion? 



STOCK EXCHANGE BLDG 

Accessible from Pine Street, just below Montgomery, also from Bush 
and Montgomery Streets through the Mills Bldg. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 



J5hQ Political Situation 



Matters political are now centering around the 
Senatorial campaign, which will occupy more at- 
tention in this State in one way than the Presiden- 
tial contest, which, so far as California is concerned, 
will be very much one-sided. Frank Flint came up 
from the South last week, and spent a day or two 
shaking hands and looking after his fences. The an- 
nouncement that George Knight is a possible and 
even probable candidate has alarmed the Southern 
statesmen, and they are anxious to have it under- 
stood that the next Senator must be a Southern man. 
Flint says that the several candidates from south of 
the Tehachapi will agree to let the man having the 
most votes stand as the Southern candidate, and 
that the Xorth will then be expected to give him the 
necessary votes to elect him. That is alright from 
Flint's standpoint, but Bard and Oxnard and other 
minor lights have not said amen to Flint's pn - 
gramme, and as he himself has a very good chance 
to be the man with the most votes in the South, they 
look upon his scheme as rather an effort to do them 
up before they get well started in the running. So 
far, Bard has the votes of Orange County, and Flint 
will probably have those of Los Angeles. Riverside 
has joined with Orange, but even then Flint is a 
long way in the lead, conceding him Los Angeh s, 
and Oxnard does not apparently figure at all. The 
Flint scheme would entirely eliminate both of Ins 
principal rivals at the very start, and would deprive 
them of votes which Bard, at least, has north of the 
mountains. Bard has the vote of Kern County, if 
the Assemblyman should be a Republican ; he lias 
Rowell's vote from Fresno, and perhaps the Senator 
may be able to secure him all the votes of Fresno 
County. He is also said to have scattering votes in 
other parts of the State. Cndoubtedly, Bard's 
strength north of the Tehachapi is greater than 
Flint's, while it is equally probable that Flint has the 
most votes in the seven Southern counties. Bard's 
friends naturally ask why should Bard agree to throw 
away his Northern strength to please Flint, ami 
there does not seem to be any good reason. If the 
majority of the Northern members of the next Legis- 
lature want Bard, why should they not have him? 
It is no answer to say that the people of Los Angeles 
do not want him, or prefer some one else; because 
it should never be forgotten that we are to elect 
through the Legislature a Senator for and from Cali- 
fornia, and not for and from Los Angeles, a fact 
the enterprising citizens of that thriving town should 
not forget. They are a good part of the common- 
wealth, no doubt, but they are not the whole State 
yet, for we still have Alameda. 
* * * 

And that leads me to emphasize again the point 
I made a week or two ago, and that is, that the Legis- 
lature should pick out the best man for Senator in 
the State, even though he should be found sitting 
on the top of Alt. Shasta or residing below sea level 
in Salton. California should get over her provincial- 
ism and elect her State officers and representatives 
for their brains, and not their geographical locality. 
Undoubtedly the announcement that Senator Tom 
Flint is to try to go to the State Senate again instead 
of Warren John, means another vote for Bard, as 
Flint must vote for Bard to save his own face, while 
John would give his vote to some one else, as Bard 
is not his style by any means. 



The candidacy of Knight still continues to be very 
active, and the Senator and Assemblymen who have 
announced that they will be for him if he is a can- 
didate, still cling to their colors. One of them at 
least, is known to be for Knight, under any and all 
circumstances, and none of the rest want to vote for 
Bard. All the junior Senator's strength seems to 
lie in those parts of the State where the Senators and 
Assemblymen voted for him originally, and who 
therefore feel bound to saddle him upon the State 
again to prove that they were not wrong in the 
choice they made of a successor to Steve White. They 
are willing that the State .should suffer to prove their 
wisdom. That is the explanation of the indorsement 
that Bard has gotten in Orange, Riverside and Kern 
Counties, and which he. will probably get in Fresno. 
* * * 

Flint evidently thinks he can make it, or he would 
not have resigned his position as attorney for the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. He seemed very well 
pleased with the result of his trip to San Francisco, 
and says, of course, that he expects to win. Knight's 
candidacy is considered, in the South, simply as a 
preparation for his entering the contest with Pardee, 
Perkins, Metcalf, and half a dozen others four years 
hence. One of the amusing features of the Senatorial 
campaign so far, is the announcement that big, stout 
(T would not be rude enough to say fat J Tom Lewis, 
of Los Angeles, who loves nothing better than a big 
dinner and a good story, has come out for Bard. What 
Tom wants (he is from Kentucky, and always wants 
something) I do not know, but he would never have 
gone into the bran business unless he had assurances 
that he would be liberally rewarded for the company 
he is forced to keep while in that occupation. 

* * * 

I asked a prominent Democrat whom his party was 
going to name for Presidential electors. He told 
me he did not know exactly, but that among the 
names mentioned he heard those of Ld. White, Sena- 
tor White's brother, J. V. Coleman of this city, 
Franklin K. Lane, also of this town, Tom Geary and 
ex-Senator Priske of Nevada County. He himself 
favored putting General Greene of Colusa on the 
ticket as the most rabid Democrat in the State, and 
as the Democrats have not many offices to distribute 
around at present, they might add Ed. Leake of the 
Woodland Democrat. South of the Tehachapi, 
there is even a greater scarcity of material than in 
the N'orth, but if the Democracy wants a thoroughly 
representative candidate from that section, what is 
the matter with Tom Savage? 

* * * 

The Republicans might put 011 John D. Spreckels, 
as he was unable to go with them to Chicago, and 
eight years ago his father filled the place most satis- 



"BAB\S*" 



Epicanan "Restaurant 
323 LARKIN STREET 



&/>e James H. Bibcock Catering Cc 



409 Golden Gats Ave. 



July 30, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTKR. 



mince from ihc San Joaquin Valley, 
but tlicrc -11 for a number of amb 

:o announce ttirir wi-|i imong the four 

hundred and seventy-six citizens of the Unil 

who will rote for a President o( tlii- Republic next 

•10 of the number, by the way. will get 

a trip Fast at the expense of the Federal Government 

the prize may be found worth striving for by 

ambitious Califomian. The World'- Fair will 

he over before that time, however. 



At the two Santa Cruz Conventions, both the great 

politieal parties will nominate their candidates for 

errcss, although the Republicans in the Eighth 

District will probably have a previous convention 

at Santa Ana. when they will make their nomination 
for Congress, leaving it for subsequent confirmation 

at Santa Cruz, so that there may be no legal techni- 
calities in the way. The Eighth District fight is now 
entirely between ex-Senator Smith of Kern and Sena- 
tor Ward of San Diego, and from present appear- 
ances Smith will he the nominee, nlthough Ward is 
putting up a good tight. McLachlain in the Seventh 
goes hack with the opposition of General Otis to 
help him carry the district by a big majority. In the 
Sixth there is a good deal of satisfaction with Need- 
ham, but he will probably be renominated. In the 
Fifth District, the candidacy of Dr. A. E. Osborne 
of Santa Clara looks very favorable, and undoubtedly 
Santa Clara will give him her vote if the rest of the 
district will agree to let her name the candidate. 
Countryman and Charlie Shortridge are also among 
the candidates, but neitner of them have the elements 
of strength that the Doctor possesses. Shortridge 
is a State Senator, and is drawing the salary of Build- 
ing and Loan Commissioner, so he seems to be rea- 
sonably well provided for, and there is no question 
but that he would not be able to poll by a long way 
the full Republican strength of the district. There 
is a bitter fight, as usual, in Santa Clara between the 
"goo-goos*' and the "push," alias the Mackenzieites. 
The "goo-goos" are on top at present, as they are 
the Hays party, and have the city Government of 
San Jose, except the City Clerk. But if the Republi- 
cans are to redeem the Fifth District they must not 
be annoyed by the family quarrels in San Jose. They 
must agree to unite on a Congressman and continue 
their fight in other directions, if they please. The 
push want Senator .Oneal re-nominated for the State 
senate; the "goo-goos" want Lyons, the brother-in- 
law of the Hayses, As Oneal is very nearly a twin 
of Mackenzie, the row is practically a family one, 
and if the Democrats are sharp, they will win the 
Senatorial contest, as neither faction would support 
the candidate of the other. 



In the Fourth District matters seem to be as yet 
chaotic and uncertain, but in the other three districts, 
the Republican candidates are as good as nominated.. 
The Democrats have only positively decided upon 
Bell, for it is more than doubtful if either Livernash 
or Wynn get a re-nomination. No one wants to run 
in either the Eighth or Seventh Districts,, but the 
Superior Judge of Madera is'iirged to be a candidate 
against Needham in the Sixth. Ex-Congressman 
Caminetti Has concluded not to, be a candidate in the 
First; and who will be nominated against Knowland 



imination ih.»i 1- certain to end in 
Junius. 



t 




THE CALL 



Has the Largest aod Best Home Circulation 

The SHORT STORY SERVICE in the magazine section of 
the Sundav Call Is unsurpassed. There are also NUMEROUS 
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JOHN McN^UGHT, Manager. JOHN D. SPRECKELS. Prop. 



The Oakland 
Tribune 



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classes of Oakland and Alameda County than all 
otner Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley dallies com- 
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T. T. DARGIE, Sec'y. 



PRESS CLIPPINGS 

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REMOVAL NOTICE 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 




THE LOOKER-ON 




The trial of Jacob Eppinger cost us something over 
$8,000 in coin, and a good deal more in self-respect. 
The jury disagreed, as might have been expected, 
and, I presume, Eppinger will be tried again. If the 
trial judge again imprisons the jurors, the board bill 
will once more run up into the thousands, and a sec- 
ond time the taxpayers will enjoy the luxury of en- 
deavoring to convict of a penal offense a man who 
has held high place in the commercial world for years 
and who commands much money. The jury will dis- 
agree a second time, or it will acquit, and in the long 
run the charge against Eppinger will fail. It will 
fail, just as any charge of embezzlement, misappro- 
priation or anything else made against a rich man. 
will fail in San Francisco. Our system of jurispru- 
dence is so well perfected that the lawyers who know 
the ropes can take any kind of a criminal case and 
win out. So certain are they of results that, with a 
mass of uncontradicted evidence against them, they 
have been known to bet on their success before the 
case was called. 

Under these conditions, what good comes of lock- 
ing up a jury in a high-priced hotel, at the city's ex- 
pense, during the course of a long trial? The seclu- 
sion does not assist the course of justice. It seems, 
rather, to have the tendency of embittering the jurors 
against the court. The defense argues that the jurors 
are badly treated ; that because some one is accused 
of a crime, the twelve men chosen to determine his 
case are made prisoners, while the accused is at lib- 
erty. The average jurist, under this argument, is 
easily convinced that he has a grievance against the 
court. What, then, is the solution of the jury ques- 
tion? It lies with the judges. Let them insist on get- 
ting better material for jurors. 

* * * 

Look at the Grand Juries we have. Review the 
list of the present Grand Jurors, and find out how 
many of them have served as Grand Jurors during the 
past ten years, and how many others were placed on 
the present panel by judges who had been asked to 
list their names. The Grand Jury, of late, has been 
used for political purposes only. The present Grand 
Jury, judging from its personnel, will be also used 
for political purposes only. Time was when it was 
considered something of an honor to be appointed a 
member of the Grand Jury. But times have changed, 
and the Grand Juries of to-day. so far as they may be 
of benefit to the city, are naught but farces. 

* * * 

The Munro-Jeffries contest is agitating the prize- 
fight promoters. It gives them good cause for agi- 
tation, for it promises to be one of the richest plums 
at which the gamblers have had a chance for some 
time ; and, moreover, it promises, also, to be one of 
the last big fights to which our frequently-swindled 
public will contribute. When the fight became 
doubtful, some weeks since, I pointed out that the 
manipulators were much dissatisfied with the small 
amount of money in sight, and that they were intent 
on a plan to convince the public that the miner really 
had a chance against the Los Angeles grizzly. Since 
the postponement, by the use of the daily press, the 
prize-tight managers have deftly spread the impres- 
sion that Jeffries stands a good show of getting whip- 
ped. This is to attract the crowd, for the people will 
always pay to see a champion beaten. The odds in 
the pool-rooms have also shortened, so that the ver- 



similitude of probability may attach to the tale of 
Munroe's wonderful prowess. But, my brethren, 
it will be the same old fake, and the dear people will 
be swindled as of yore. We have "stood for" the 
prize-fighters more than any other community in the 
world, but we are rapidly getting weary of them. 
They know that, and therefore they have determined 
to take in as many dollars as possible when Munroe 
and Jeffries meet. It may be their last chance. 

* V * 

By the way, has it occurred to any one else that 
Jimmy Coffroth, the prize-fight manager, occupies 
a somewhat anomalous position? He is secretary of 
the Superior Judges, a position which one would 
naturally think would require a man of education, 
studious habits, and some degree of personal refine- 
ment. Mr. Coffroth may possess all these attributes, 
but for a long time past he has given most of his at- 
tention to prize-fighting. Just now he is also promot- 
ing the interests of the Belvedere, the O'Farrell street 
dive. What can the public expect from judges who 
select such a man as their confidential representative? 
I wonder if Jimmy's hold on the vote in the Tender- 
loin has anything to do with his hold on his job as 
Secretary to the judges? 

* * * 

Some one has said that when doctors disagree, 
honest men may get their dues, li this be true, then 
we should sooner get an inside view of the Board of 
Health's milk crusade, for Dr. D'Ancona, of the 
Board of Supervisors, and Dr. Poheim of the Board 
of Health, have disagreed most violently over a ques- 
tion of fact. Poheim charged that some Supervisors 
were using their offices to get jobs among the China- 
town "wrecking" crew. D'Ancona denounced the 
statement as a lie. Thereupon Poheim said he would 
see D'Ancona "outside." Whether he did so, or 
whether D'Ancona saw him first, deponeth sayeth 
not. But "the situation is delightful," as it stands, 
and if the row will only continue, all the truth may 
come out. I think D'Ancona was at fault in his con- 
troversy with Poheim. The former has been a mem- 
ber of the Board of Supervisors for some years, and 
knowing his present colleagues as he does, he should 
have hesitated long before denouncing as a lie the 
statement that some of them were grafting. Prob- 
ably, by this time, he has reached the same conclu- 
sion himself. Then, again, D'Ancona is physically 
too small a man to call a man as big as Poheim a liar. 
Now, if it had been Braunhart who passed the lie, 
there would have been "something doing," for 
Braunhart is a warrior of great renown, who, like 
Samson, has slain his thousands with his jawbone. 

* * * 

Judge Dunne astonishes me. From the bench last 
Mondav morning he stated that a grand army of 
grafters and crooks seemed to be encamped around 
the Hall of Justice, intent upon preventing the cer- 
tification to the Superior Court of transcripts of the 
testimony taken in felony cases in the Police Courts. 



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972 BROADWAY. OAKLAND 



July 30. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

Mi- remark referred particular)) 
charge of murder agjunsi Mrs. Botkin. Thai 
heard in the Police 1 « >>irt bo many months a^" thai 
:icn the date, but ll raphic 

reporters have never written up the trans 
Wherefore, Judge Dunne i> indignant. I am afraid 
tin- judge i- rather slow. Why should he now express 
surprise over conditions that have existed this long 
time in the building so ironically called the Hall of 
Justice? That grafters make that place their stamp 
'•'K ground is well known. Can it be possible thai 
Judge Dunne is bold enough to direct public atten- 
tion of the "peculiarities" ol the Botkin cases? It is 
Idom that any Judge has backbone enough 1 
and denounce the people that interfere with 
court proceedings that Dunne's attitude causes some 
surprise. The Botkin cases, you know, have been 
peculiar. I have pointed out some queer things about 
the course of this woman through the courts. Sin- 
was convicted months ago on the tirst murder charge, 
but her motion for a new trial has been pending be- 
fore Judge Cook a Ions; time. It is announced he will 
render a decision on that motion earlv next month. I 
wonder! Mrs. Botkin says she does not want Judge 
Dunne to try her on the second charge of murder. I 
don't blame her. She wants Judge Cook to try her 
again. Nothing; more natural. 

* * * 

The "dressless drama" is just now in vogue at the 
Orpheum. Rose Coghlan got down to the corset 
protector, and left something to the imagination ; 
hut now comes a trapeze performer, who easily out- 
strips Coghlan. and casts aside in succession skirt, 
bodice, corsets, and all the unmentionables in an en- 
deavor to give a gasping audience its money's worth. 
Vaudeville is getting close to a "skin" game. 

* * * 

Supervisor Boxton is a man after my own heart. 
Like the bold soldier that he is, he has boldly an- 
nounced his plan of campaign as a City Father, and 
in open board has declared that he has not only been 
able to get a few jobs through his political pull, but 
that he intends going after more, and getting them, 
or learning the reason why. Boxton evidently knows 
why he was elected a Supervisor. 

* * * 

Dr. Archibald R. Ward, of the Department of Agri- 
culture at Berkeley, knows a bad egg when he sees 
it. So much does he know about them that he is 
about to issue a pamphlet on the subject. He will 
also tell us something about consumptive chickens 
and warn us against them and their fruit. We do 
not invite the knowledge, nor do we appreciate it. 
We have been warned about the microbes in our milk, 
about the germs in our cream, about tuberculosis in 
beef and trichinae in pork, about the danger that lies 
in the meat of spring lamb, and the sure death that 
follows the mastication of calves. We read daily of 
deaths from the eating of doctored berries, and of the 
pains that accompany canned goods ; mushrooms, 
our guardians tell us, are filled with terrible things 
called ptomaine, that will certainly get us if we 
don't watch out; .We know that our drinking water 
is an animated' Aquarium, filled with divers jiggers, 
coffee is slpw^'Slficide, and we can find no consolation 
in whiskey, niide- from molasses, coffee beans, a 
dash of red pepper and a squirt of alcohol. As if 
all this we:fe not enough, along comes this man in 
Berkeley who would deprive us of our morning eggs 
and our fried chicken. Out upon him ! Here goes for 
"two on the pan, straight up." A short life and a 
merry one. 



NKWS LETTER. 



Pears' 

The skin ought to be 
clear ; there is nothing 
strange in a beautiful face. 

If we wash with proper 
soap, the skin will be open 
and clear, unless the 
health is bad. A good 
skin is better than a 
doctor. 

The soap to use is 
Pears'; no free alkali in it. 
Pears', the soap that 
clears but not excoriates. 



Sold all over the world. 



Ethel Barrymore is said to be quite ill. It is to 
be hoped she will recover during her present rest, 
and be able soon to resume her place upon the boards. 
It was during a visit to California that her mother 
died at Santa Barbara, only a few years ago. Ethel 
was a little girl then, and after her mother's death, 
was quite alone in the Southern town. A prominent 
resident of Santa Barbara gallantly escorted her to 
Los Angeles, whence she went East to her relatives. 
* * * 

I have received a circular from a charitable fellow 
in Chicago, signed "E. Lagerholm," in which he 
offers to give me $50 for $1. On reading this promis- 
ing circular, it seems that it is misdirected, and should 
have been sent to the Post-Office Inspector, instead. 
Accordingly, I have favored him by sending it to that 
official for investigation. One of his liberal offers 
is "the old reliable system of beating the races," for 
which he asks me $10 as a tip. This is too much or 
too little. There is no way to beat the Emeryville 
races, except by sandbagging the book-makers, and 
I am not a slugger. Another sure thing is an instru- 
ment for locating gold and silver ore and lost or 
buried treasures. For this conjuror's wand he asks 
the small sum of $12. He offers me a bargain in a 
secret which he says is "no fake." It is a method by 
which I can tell if "strangers or acquaintances are 
telling the truth." .This is offered at a sacrifice— only 
$1. This is easy. I know that he is not telling me 
truth, and thus can save 'the $1. This all-round faker 
also has a scheme by which one living in a section 
populated by negroes "can make $50 to $200 a month 
easy." The negro is an easy and shining mark for 
the swindler, and the field, it seems is never worked 
out. Not long ago, a fellow was driven out of Mis- 
sissippi for selling libelous pictures of President 
Roosevelt to some negroes. Persons- receiving such 
circulars should send them to the Division Postal 
Inspector. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

Cures Poison Oak and all Skin Diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

——Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper 
& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 




;;H«Wjlw Crl«£» ."What the d«r" »n tb.,u>' 
Oselllal -Ml «•> the Je. II. air. Vuk rou.™ 



,/TOWN CRIER 




r^^, 



■^1 



Professor Turner of the University of Wisconsin 
declares his intention of making a one-ring circus 
out of his classes in American history and himself be- 
coming ringmaster, borne of the teachers, who are 
attending the summer school, have complained of the 
flirtations and antics which go on in the class-room. 
This flirtation is about the only wholesome thing 
about the summer school fad. It almost makes one 
weep to think that young people, in a life so short, 
should waste the days of summer in listening to the 
speeches of self-conscious and priggish professnrs. 
There is much more good to be obtained in life than 
that. Even the reprehensible prac'ice of flirting has 
no doubt some compensation, and many an over- 
worked young teacher will derive more advantage 
both for herself and her classes from a little innocent 
flirtation than from many hours of book-learning. 

They must be booming California quite energeti- 
cally in St. Louis. A half car of watermelons flavored 
with several kinds of California wine, was consumed 
on the lawn adjoining the California building. We 
are informed that many prominent Californians were 
present, and that they pronounced it one of the pleas- 
antest affairs that has yet graced the California build- 
ing. It is a little difficult for a dull mind like my own 
to understand how the eating of California water- 
melons (properly flavored; by prominent Califor- 
nians in St. Louis, can advertise the State to the be- 
nighted foreigner. This question of advertising the 
resources of our State is. as a matter of fact, always 
more or less unintelligible. But what a commentary 
on the "affairs" in the California building when eat- 
ing half a carload of melons (properly flavored) is 
"one of the pleasantest." 

There is a certain degree of reasonableness in the 
attitude of Jim Durgin, professional criminal and 
dead-beat, who has had himself committed to jail 
for willfully breaking a window. He said: "I've got 
tired of laying out on a hard board every night, and 
taking a chance of some hobo murdering me." Wise 
Jim Durgin! No longer will the hard board hurt his 
delicate limbs; he will be warmly-clad, well-fed and 
treated with a consideration which seldom falls to 
the lot of the innocent. What drove Durgin to jail 
is precisely what drives so many people to suicide — 
fear of the ordinary burden of life. 

There is some reason why care should be taken 
that the city is not overrun with incompetent physi- 
cians, though, as a matter of fact, there are but very 
few occupations in which fraud runs rampant more 
than in medicine. The prosecution of such a man as 
Dr. Schmoll, however, upon the charge that he prac- 
ticed without a license, when, as a matter of fact, he 
came out to lecture at Cooper Medical College, and 
diagnosed without pay, is nothing but a disgrace to 
the physician who pushed the charges, and who well 
deserved the implied condemnation which his meth- 
ods received at the hands of Judge Fritz. 

It will soon be worth while to belong to the San 
Francisco Labor Council. Of course, it is well recog- 
nized that the sittings of that body make a perpetual 
circus, but the introduction of a few dainty ballet 
girls should add considerably to the liveliness of that 
too serious body. The chorus girls' union has sent 
delegates, and all sorts of delegates and fascinating 
problems respecting padding and make-up will be 
suggested by the innovation. 



Superior Judge Mahon of Bakersfield is a very il- 
logical person and very indiscreet, moreover. A 
certain Mr. Cowan, having been convicted of man- 
slaughter for the killing of a negro at Mojave, was 
recommended by the jury to the mercy of the court. 
The judge thereupon gave the convicted person the 
absurdly inadequate sentence of eight years at Fol- 
som. There is nothing new in this — our judges do it 
all the time, and the rest of us pay the piper. But 
this particular judge told the jury that they had no 
right to recommend to mercy, and after saying this, 
reduced the sentence in accordance with the wish of 
this jury. Could anything be more ridiculously 
weak? If this sort of thing keeps up, we had just as 
well make our courts a refuge for jurists in the first 
stages of paresis. 

The health of the citizens, according to medical 
authority-, appears to be dependent upon the outcome 
of a dispute between the Board of Supervisors and 
the Board of Health. The rule about honest men 
coming into their own when rogues fall out, does not 
seem to operate here, for the only objects which will 
benefit are the bacteria. The Board of Supervisors, 
it is stated, have so tied up the Board of Health that 
all the endeavors to improve the supply of milk have 
proved futile. Is the Board of Health covering its 
failure, or is there no more money to be made out 
of the dairymen? 

The claims come tumbling merrilv in against the 
estate of Miss Dolbeer. A reading of the will is suffi- 
cient to show the regard in which that young 
lady held her relatives, for her mention of them is 
but slight. In fact, this is apt to cause the trouble, 
if any reallv arises. Moral : If you do not wish to 
leave money to a relative, say so expressly, for you 
may depend upon it that the relative's pride will not 
interfere with an attempt to break in and take money 
from your corpse, money, too, that he knows as well 
as possible he would have been refused had you 
lived. 

Is it cruelty for a wife to throw a lemon pie at her 
husband? This may depend upon the quality of the 
lemon pie. Some lemon pies are so small that the 
greatest cruelty would consist in causing them to 
be eaten. But when the wife who bombards her hus- 
band with lemon pie also pours over his head the 
contents of a coffee not, including the grounds, this 
further assault may be taken as showing conclusive 
evidence of a cruel and vindictive disnosition, taking 
into further consideration also that the lady used a 
calendar with striking effect. Matrimony, locally 
speaking, is becoming a strenuous profession. 

Some of our local army officers are creating such 
an amount of scandal at present that it might actually 
pay the Government to discover a war In which their 
encreies might be more profitably exercised. The 
rollicking, genial military man of a half-century ago 
has had to give place to a dreary. German sort of 
individual, with views upon the philosophy of war 
and the necessity of a Board of Strategy. This in 
itself is enough to drive an ordinary fighting man in- 
to hysteria. May we, therefore, ascribe the wildness 
of some of the officers to a natural revolt against a • 
regime of ultra-puritanism ? 

Jacob Eppinger's "spells" appear to have spelled 
him out of danger of the penitentiary, 



July 30. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«3 



iaw>-M^H society ,&-#% 



- 



Dear Bessie: This has been an->llicr dull « 
il not for the recent engagements thai 
announced, there would be little tor socjet] to chat- 
ter about in cither town or country. Last week was 
decidedly one oi announcements, and though folks 
ree prepared for sonic of them, still I 
think there is always .1 soupcon of surprise felt when 
the interesting news actually becomes public prop- 
erty; there were those of Kate Dillon to Lieutenant 
Emory Winship; Mrs. Josephine dc Greayer to t ap 
tain Rowan of tlie 19th Infantry; Lita Gallatin t" 
Doctor Harvey : and of Mabel (,111111 to I tocti r Thayer 
of 1'orto Ric". and in a few weeks she and licr mother 
depart for there to pay him a visit. The news of Kate 
Dillon's engagement seems to give great satisfaction 
to her friends, and the warmth of the congratula 
she received at her little tea on Thursday were most 
sincere. The wedding is to come off in the very near 
future, I believe, just when is not yet made public, 
nor who are to be her bridesmaids. Charlotte Ellin- 
woods is named for August, and her selections arc 
already made and known — I.eontinc. of course, will 
be her maid-of-honor, with Kate Dillon. Ethel Cooper 
and Minnie Xash among the bridesmaids. Charl 
Russell's wedding is to be in October — so 'tis said — 
until which time the De Sablas will remain at San 
Mateo, not coming to town till November, but it will 
be a most quiet affair. And there is another ruptured 
engagement this week, too, the one between Stella 
McCalla and William Chapin being declared off. I 
have not heard any particulars — only the fact. 

But let me tell you of the jolly 7 time we had up at 
Mare Island the other night. You know they are al- 
ways getting up something out of the common run 
up there, and this time it took the form of a leap year 
hop, and I tell you it was lots of iun the way the men 
made the girls dance attendance upon them, and the 
recent arrival of two gunboats from China added to 
the number of officers already on hand. 

Another recent arrival was Alice Cutts Mayer, 
looking as pretty as a picture, who has come all the 
way from Malta to spend the greater part of the com- 
ing year with her mother, while her husband is away 
cruising, and perhaps Mrs. Cutts is not delighted to 
have her back with her again. Friday I went over to 
Oakland to a 500 party Belle Nicholson had, and then 
to a tea Mrs. Miller gave for the Selby girls; just 
got in by chance, as I did not know about it, but it 
was very pleasant and informal. Charlotte Ellin- 
wood had a little tea on Saturday; Juliet Garber had 
one yesterday over at Claremont, and there was an- 
other lovely hop at the Presidio last night, all the 
officers in garrison, of the 10th and the 28th Infantry, 
the Artillery and the Hospital Corps, uniting in play- 
ing hosts. Baron von Horst is back again solus, his 
wife remaining in Germany. He arrived in time to 
arrange a dinner d'adieu given at the Colonial for 
Captain Fred Johnson, on Saturday evening, of which 
Kate Henry was the chaperon. Maye Colburne, who 
has gone to Agua Caliente, gave a small dinner for 
Major Stephenson before she left town. It is quite 
a heart-break to the girls to lose two such popular 
button beaux at the same time as Major Stephenson 
and Captain Johnson; Major Stephenson has done 
so much entertaining at the Presidio, especially his 
little suppers after the hops, that he will be terribly 
missed; he goes East with the 28th Infantry. Cap- 
tain Fred Johnson departed on Monday, taking in Mt. 




.1 and the Yellowstone region on his w 
new post Fort Totten, New York. 

August, now almost here, promises to be a month 
•■•d tunes for all — for the women and some of 
the men at Del Monte and lor a big crowd of men up 
in the Redwoods, where the Bohemians are to make 
merry to their hearts' content. Kitty has been telling 
of all the good tilings to be done in the way of am 
meiit. and thinks it real mean of them to keep it all 
to themselves, and not ask some of the fair sex to 
enjoy it, too. 

I think every one is pleased to hear that Admiral 
and Mrs. Class arc among the latest to join the ser- 
vice colony at Berkeley, tor since his return from his 
last cruise, the Admiral has made known his decision 
of there making his future permanent home. They are 
both capital company, and Mrs. Glass is a charming 
and untiring hostess. Fred ( .reenway has got as far 
as Xew York on his way home from abroad — you see 
he did not go to Japan after all — and after he ex- 
hausts the pleasures of Gotham ami takes a look at 
the exposition at St. Louis, we are to have the pleas- 
ure of gazing upon him once more. Marietta Havens 
is home again from her Eastern trip ; Grace Spreck- 
els has got back from Tahoe ; the Van Wycke girls — 
Laura and Nannie — are having a pleasant visit in the 
Santa Cruz Mountains. We are to have Mollic Dut- 
ton home again next month, and Bessie and Marion 
Huntington in October; Grace Jones has gone with 
her mother to Santa Barbara for a couple of weeks' 
stay. The De Youngs are in New York on their way 
home from their trip to Europe, and are looked for 
here next week. Mrs. Chandler Howard and the 
girls leave for Europe — where they intend to remain 
a year probably — on Monday next. The McGavins 
have gone to Tahoe for a fortnight; Betty Ashe is 
spending the summer at Watsons; Ethel Barrymore 
is up at Calistoga, staying with Mrs. Joe Tobin, who 
is an old friend of hers. — Elsie. 



Following are the late arrivals at Paraiso Springs 
from San Francisco: L. Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. M. 
Durall. Mrs. William Griswald and daughter, J. H. 
Helms, J. B. Cavanaugh, S. Brizzolara, Ed. F. Arm- 
strong, N. A. Gosliner, E. Fay, wife and son, Mr. and 




Hotel 
f ^Roof Belleclaire, 



Broadway & 77th St. 

NEW YORK 

Luxuriously furnished rooms 
for perwabent Htij transient 
KueBis, at moderate prices. 

Orchestraof boIo playore, 6 p. 
m. till 1 a.m. 

Restaurant, Palm Room and 
Cafe geniB of artlsiio perfection. 
Cu'elite and aervlce really de- 
lightful. You will say bo. 

A Bppclal feature It our after 
theater suppers 

Billiard parlor for ladles fl 
another pleasant feature 

Original with the Belleclaire Is 
the refined vaudeville every 
Thursday evening. 

Our gallery of beatlful paint- 
lugs, valued at (50.000. li open 
evenings to visitors. 

Affability and courtesy guar- 
anteed from every Belleoialre 
employe. 

Milton Roblee, Prop. 



14 



Mrs. Johannissen, Mr. and Mrs. James Macky and 
son, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Owens, Mr. and Mrs. R. S. 
Browne, Jack Browne, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Bvrne. W. 
A. Taylor, J. M. Costello, J. O'Brien, D. M. Brereton, 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Riordan, Miss Murphy. 

Mr. Henry T. Scott, president of the Union Iron 
Works, entertained a party of twenty people at 
luncheon in the cafe of the Hotel St. Francis, July 
21st, in honor of Miss Herried, who christened the 
"South Dakota." Those present were Miss Herried, 
Mr. Henry T. Scott, Mrs. Logan, Governor Herried, 
Mrs. Fee, Mr. Crane, Miss Logan, Mr. Nash, -Mr. 
Brown, Miss Johnson, Mr. Pippy, Mrs. Nash. Mr. 
Fee, Mrs. Crane, Mr. De Pue, Captain Logan and 
Mrs. Herried. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 



BIRTHS. 

July 23 — To Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering, a daugh- 
ter. Mrs. Deering was Miss Mabel Crafts. 
ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Kate Dillon, to Lieutenant Emory Winship, 
U. S. N. 

Mrs. Josephine de Greayer, to Captain Andrew S. 
Rowan, 19th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Miss Alma L. Mitchell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
F. D. Mitchell, to Walter D. Wood. 

Miss Mabel Gunn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. 
Gunn, to Dr. Edwin A. Thayer of San Juan, 
Porto Rico. 

Miss Lita Gallatin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Gallatin, to Dr. Willis P. Harvey. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

August 3 (Wednesday) — Miss Mary O'Sullivan to 
Oscar Sutro ; Miss Elizabeth Rowe, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Everett Fish, to Alexan- 
der Campbell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. 
Campbell. Manchester-by-the-Sea, Mass. 4 p. m. 

August 11 (Thursday) — Miss Mabel McDonald, 
daughter of Colonel and Mrs. Mark McDonald, 
to William Hamilton. Mabelton, Santa Rosa. 
WEDDINGS. 

July 19 (Tuesday) — Miss Francis Grow, of Berkeley, 
to Lieutenant Beverly C. Daly, 13th Infantry, 
U. S. A. Church of the Advent, Oakland. 8 p. m. 

June 1 (Wednesday) — Clara Viola Sawyer, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo S. B. Sawyer, to Mr. 
Edward Francis Bishop. 

DEATHS. 

July 26 — Emma Hanchett-Rutherford, wife of Geo. 
Crocker, Newport, R. I. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending July 
26th : Mr. S. L. Hyman, Miss Pearl Landers, Mr. F. 
A. Woodward, Mr. R. Hvman, Mr. W. G. Hyman, 
Mr. H. Zeile, Mr. J. Zeile, Mr. W. - . Harvey, Mr. and 
Mrs. L. B. Feigenbaum and child, Mr. G. Rich, Mr. 
J. Dillon, Mr. S. D. Roth, Mr. J. L. Cross, Mrs. A. C. 
Whitney, Mr. L. Lowndes, Mr. C. Kaiser. 

The informal reception at the Crafts and Arts, un- 
der the able direction of Professor Orlow, on last 
Tuesday night, was a great success. W. J. Hynes, 
genial and kind-hearted Will, assisted by Miss Kath- 
ryn Madden, did much to while the time away by 
giving selections from "The Geezer," "Babes in Toy- 
land," "I Can't Do the Sum," "The Laughin' Coon," 
and a recitation, "The Auto." Miss Amalia Jacoby 
was heard in "Calm as the Night," Bohm ; "May 
Morning," Deiza, with Mr. C. Riedlinger as her ac- 
companist. The surprise of the evening came in the 
matter of refreshments which were served in the 
craftsman's workshop, upon wooden plates, and 
the drinkables from tin cups. It was the crafts- 





Mr. W. J. Hynea 



Miss Kathryn Madden 



man's noon-day lunch, reproduced in every detail, 
for the delectation 01 the assembled friends of the 
Crafts and Arts. The company gathered around the 
craftsman's bench on the rough wooden stools of the 
shop, and the eatables were passed in from the ad- 
joining garden. The smell of the drowsy evening 
flowers mingled with the good cheer. The entire 
workshop was artistically decorated with cut flowers. 

A banquet was tendered last Tuesday night to the 
Hon. Rene Halewyck, Consul for Belgium and Act- 
ing Consul for the Netherlands at the Port of San 
Francisco, by his admiring friends and fellow coun- 
trymen. The banquet was in celebration of the Con- 
sul's decoration by the home government by the or- 
der of Orange Nassau. A notable company of gentle- 
men was present to testify to the worth of Mr. Hale- 
wyck. Among these were: W. B. Chapman, Paul 
Bellemans, Lionel A. de Posh, Jules Clerfayt, Leon 
Andre, C. Willems, A. Van der Naillen, Sr., A. Van 
der Naillen, Jr., Enrique Gran, Charles D. Taylor, 
Wellesley Moore, A. b. Groh, Henry Van Cortebeek, 
A. Desaeyher, R. Wysem, Edmond Godchaux, Felix 
Santailier, H. Lund, Paul Kosakevitch and Louis 
Bartlett. 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marsh have returned from 
a delightful trip to the St. Louis Exposition, and 
have taken up their summer home near Blythedale. 

Mr. R. Isenbruck and family have just returned 
from Lake Tahoe, and are now at home. Mr. R. Isen- 
bruck is connected with W. J. Wolf, who is the gen- 
eral agent of the Densmore Typewriter firm, known 
as the Standard Typewriter Exchange. 





Bokm T 
i#) Bristol Co. 

Our tasteful display of 

Pearls, Diamonds 
and Precious Stones 

is unusually rich and brilliant 

jc^-jjo Ceary Street 




July 30. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Mrs. Johnston, v. 

with ,|,lc r ,. a . 

littery. Mrs Johnston maki 

when it i- added 
makes it her object t.> tit .1 hat pi 
then- should !><• joy among the women who 

jhionably and comfortably "c \ proper 

tit adds much to the comfort .>i the wearer and to 
the poise of thi wearer's head. Mrs. Johnsl 
dition to the splendid hat stock procured in the 
picked up some swell novelties thai will undoubtedly 
please the women of the Pacific t 



The Continental building and Loan Association i- 
one of the great institutions of the West. It lias 
grown to a most commanding position. It lia - 

quered opposition by its methods, and it ha; 
growing, adding to its importance and its capital, un- 
til the opposition institutions are but pigmies in com- 
parison. It lias built or has assisted to build ,?io 1 
homes. Counting five inhabitants to each home, il 
will lie realized that this company has been instru- 
mental in building a city of homes which, if brought 
together, would equal Stockton in size. While other 
companies have abused the Continental for its enter- 
prise, it has accumulated a cash capital of three and 
one-third million dollars and a suDscribed capital of 
sixteen millions. While this is a tribute to the en- 
terprise of the management, it is also an acknowl- 
edgment of the thrift and the far-sightedness of the 
people of California. 

There seems to be a" general, but erroneous, impres- 
sion that the Parisian jewelers are superior to all 
others in craftsmanship, and that those fortunate ones 
whose jewelry was "made in France" are to be con- 
gratulated upon possessing articles of superior beauty 
and finish. However near to the truth this may have 
been formerly, it is by no means the case to-day. In 
this art, as in so many others, the American crafts- 
man has advanced to the highest grade of efficiency. 
The most delicate and graceful designs are executed 
in a masterly manner, which combines strength and 
utiljty, while sacrificing nothing conducive to light- 
ness and daintiness of effect. There can be found no 
better illustrations of the high standard to which 
American jewelers have attained than in the tasteful 
assortment of jewelry shown by the Bohm Bristol 
Co., in their new Geary street store. Many of their 
pieces of jewelry are marvels of skillful workman- 
ship, which may well stand comparison with the best 
French productions. 

The Star Hair Remedy— best of alt tonics and restoratives. 

Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not a dye. 
At druggists and hair dressers. Accept no substitute. Star 
Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



If 26 years constant patron atre by the most exclusive people in 

this city is any test of excellence, then Swain's must be considered as 
perfect. Their pastry is delivered to the swellest houses in town, and 
they are always ready to give the best at their place on Post street. 



"Out of the Beaten Path," j.om Dillon's modern style 
Opposite Palace. 



.ats. 



Decorations for weddings, Charlotte F. Williams, 121 Post street. 



MASSAGE AND MEDICAL GYMNASTIC 

For Ladies and Gentlemen 

MARTIN BRAUN, MASSEUR 

Graduate Imperial University Hospital, Vienna, Austria. 

WENBAN BUILDING 

Phone John 7181 606 Sutter St., cor. Mason St. 



A SKtn of Bcantr If • Joy Fotvvtr. 

>H T. FELIX GOURAUDS ORIENTAL 
OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 




»5 



CHEAM 



lUm-^rw Tun. rimi>l^«. Frtek- 

)rm. Moth l'.\t< hrn. lU*h «tld 

Hkln | liBonoo*. «n<l rvrn Wrm- 

l»h on 

Uon. 

• nnd )•« «•> hArmleai* wf 

tii«i** it to i»- fnr>- if i« properly 

I ii>' counterfoil <>f 

similar rUUnt It 1. .\ 
jmld to n lu.ly ..f tlin hJ 
<a patient): As ><>u ]n«llf*i» will 
UN th*>m. I rcriimmfiiil 'I-nir- 
fcUdVt '"rennV an the \otu>t harm- 
ful of nil the nkln preparations." 
For sale hy all druggists and 
fancy -Roods dealers In the 
Tnlted states. Canada* and Eu- 
rope, 

PCTO. T. HOPIHtfS, Pro*. 
27 Great Jones St.. New York. 



SEND 

Your Typewriter Repair Work to 

Standard Typewriter Exchange 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 
General Agents for DENSMORE TYPEWRITER 



209 SANSOME STREET S. F. 



TEL. MAIN 5967 



Mme. GEORGETTE GODON 

LADIES' HAT IMPORTER 



REMODELING 



Suite 520-521 

STARR KING BUILDING 

121 Geary St. 



Perfect Fining 

French Modes 

a.nd Adaptations 



GILDIMO. MONOGRAMS, CHRIST- 
MAS, WEDDING & ENGAGEMENT 
GIFTS TO ORDER V-V- 




lf,SS0H3 ClVF.rJ . flRJtfc DOllf.. 
HO Geary Street San Francisco 




LADIES! 



Wrinkles and ail Facial Blemishes re- 
moved by 
PROF. S. DE JLOVTSKY 

Latest Parisian Method 

Super fl iouq hair removed permanently 

by electrolysis. Also moles, warts, ete. 

S^alpt !■•■■* i inBnt find manicuring. Call or 

write 327 Geary St., S. P. 1'el. Black ww 



MR. 


ALBERT 

ARCHITECT 


FARR 


REMOVED 




120 SUTTER ST. 



Red Eyes and Eye- 
lids, Gran u 1 a t e d 
Eyelids and other 
Eye troubles cured 



MURINE EYE REMEDY 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 




Vacation Joys 



With the heat of summer and the natural laziness 
of the dog-days comes the listlessness of the silly 
season. There are certain pleasures connected with 
vacation that have been pictured by the artist as "Va- 
cation Joys." The Meat Baron suns himself while 
the price of meat soars higher and higher. The Walk- 
ing Delegate watches the flight of the High Price 
Balloon with equal complacency. It is no concern 
of these two worthies that the populace of the over- 
crowded East stifles with the heat and suffers with 
starvation. They are partners in crime. The Walk- 
ing Delegate is waiting for the pay that is sure to 
come from the Meat Baron, whose profits are in- 
creased by the agitation, for he is not at all slow in 
making a profit over the necessities of the people. 
The Meat Baron is complacent because he knows that 



after the strike he will manage to keep prices above 
the lowest limit reached since the Spanish-American 
war. It gives him an opportunity to unload vast 
stores of embalmed goods as well. The poor, starving 
wretch— THE COMMON PEOPLE— grovels about 
with the empty dinner pail, and he is reminded of the 
Du Barry's invitation, to "eat cake if you cannot have 
bread or meat !" 

Over in a corner sits dejectedly the Apostle of An- 
archy ; momentarily he has forgotten his apostleship ; 
he mourns during the silly season over the loss of 
a million and a half dollars spent in a futile endeavor 
to capture the Presidency. Out of the discontent of 
the people, when vacation is over, the Yellow Pest 
will again begin the propaganda of evil council in the 
hope of garnering the dollars of the poor. 



July 30. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Condition of Son Qvjervtin 



«7 



When • :tic.il schc Sena- 

tor Feltoti 
the appointment of an 

of San Qucntin. the News Letter, in company with 
the Governor of the State, protested. Governor Par 
dec took the position that lie has always taken sine. 
his advent into the Gubernatorial chair, namely, that 
the ilircctors and trustee- of ]>it!>!ic institutions must 
sponsible for the management of them, and thai 
therefore they must control the appointments of their 
subordinates; so. though Warden Thompson was. in 
the Governor's opinion, not the man for the plan. 
yet having voiced his views on the subject, he offered 
no further objection to the former's appointment. 
That the Governor was entirely disinterested in the 
matter is evident, for Thompson is an Alamedan, 
and would therefore naturally be the Governor's 
choice; that he was correct in his estimation of 
Thompson's fitness for the place is now demonstrated 
when it appears that the prison must face a deficit 
of $90,000, and the employees may have to wait six 
months, until the Legislature meets, to get their 
money. It is said that the prison lias $130,000 worth 
of grain bags on hand, which, for some trivial reason, 
the Warden failed to sell. However that may be, 
he has clearly demonstrated his utter incompetency 
for the position he holds, and should be removed. 

Warden Thompson knew his own unfitness for the 
place when he took it, and wisely endeavored to 
make up for what he did not know by retaining on the 
pay roll those who did have the experience and 
know ledge that he lacked ; but here again Felton step- 
ped in and insisted on the appointment of political 
hangers-on, to please this State politician or that, 
with the usual result that nearly all the good work 
that has been done under the former administration 
has been undone, and the prison is rapidly getting ti I 
the condition of Folsom under the late Warden Wil- 
kinson. 

A prison should be a reform institution. Did any 
one ever hear of a prisoner being reformed at San 
Quentin under the present management? When 
Martin Aguirre had charge, opium smoking was sup- 
pressed and morphine fiends were reformed. How 
many reformations have Thompson and Felton ac- 
complished with their politics? Under Aguirre the 
men had to work, even if they were engaged in mak- 
ing furniture for governors ; now idleness is the rule. 
Under Aguirre the institution came nearer paying 
than it ever did in its history ; now it has the biggest 
deficit in its history. Aguirre was a man who had 
spent a life-time in managing criminals. Thompson 
is a man who has spent a life-time in running eleva- 
tors. No question but that Aguirre, as a consequence, 
made the best Warden, and we do not doubt that 
Thompson would make the best elevator manipulator 
— but running elevators is hardly the place to learn 
penology. 

We understand the Governor is on his way home ; 
let him give his attention to the condition of the in- 
stitutions under his care at once. There is nothing 
that more vitally demands his attention, of that he 
may be sure, and nothing that as Governor he should 
spend more time in regulating. Pull off your coat, 
Governor, and go to work, and the News Letter will 
do all it can to help and encourage you. 



Dentist, 806 Market, 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker. 

Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 



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BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DEALERS IN 

^^PAPE'R — ^ 

Blake. Moffllt & Towne. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 
TEL. MAIN 199. 65-57-59-61 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



n L For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, 

nrUSflcS laundries, paper-hangers, printers, painters, 
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shoe factories, stable men, tar-roofers, tanners, tailors, etc 

Buch&nan Brothers 

Brush rifts., 609 Sacramento St, S. F., Tel. Haiti 561 I 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 
General Agents. 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Qllllnghom Cement 

Market Street, cor. Fremont St. 



SINCi FAT & COMPANY 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar. We have but one price. 
All goods marked In plain English figures. 

614 DUPONT STREET, S. F. Next to St. Mary's Church. 



ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLES. 

423 Post street, between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. Tel. Main 1323. 

E. BRIDGE. Proprietor. 




SANTA CLARA COLLEGE 

Studies will be resumed on AUGUST 2, 1904. 
For further particulars address 
ROBERT E. KENNA, S. J.. SANTA CLARA, CAL. 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketching and Illus- 
trating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 



« ober do wind but RmuA^ Tom Uoobb. 



TRUSTY TIPS ON THINGS THEATRICAL. 

ORPHEUM— CharmioQ, Rose Coghlan— A generally ffnod bill. 
PlSCHER'S-"The Lucky Stone."— Funny skit, well put on. 
GRAND— "Mr. James Neill, "A Gentleman of France." well'worth seeing. 
ALCAZAR— White Whittlesey— "Rupert, of Hentzau." crowded houses. 
CENTRAL— Company in "Gates of Justice"— stirring melodrama. 
COLUMBIA— Henry Miller— "Mice and Men". An epigramie and intel- 
lectual treat. 
TIVOLI— "Robin Hood"— Unabated succeps— end of phenominal run. 
CHUTES— A very good vaudeville bill--Baby Leopards in the Zoo. 



^PLEASURE'S WAND|Ig"F 



"Rupert of Hentzau" has been called a morbid pro- 
duction, but in the Whittlesey version there is n til- 
ing of the kind apparent. The "Prisoner of Zenda" 
has an idiotic ending, and so has the sequel. Apart 
from this, the play is one of the most en oyable seen 
this year. Mr. Whittlesey's crazy king of Ruritania 
is a fine study in character. The droopy eyelid of tiie 
nerve-racked monarch, the shambling gait, the ever- 
recurrent picture of the Zenda ghost, the trembling 
fingers, the shifty eye. the furtive, hunted expression 
and the general fearsome condition, is a very fair 
picture of some of the insane monarchs now reigning 
in the various effete kingdoms that go to make the 
German Federation. The lightning changes made by 
Mr. Whittlesey in the assumption of the characters 
of Rassendyl and the Red Elphberg, are wonderful. 
It is not the simple mechanical change of costume, 
but the subtle modulation of the voice, the change 
in facial expression, the alteration in gait and deport- 
ment that carries the audience. Conness' picture of 
"Rupert of Hentzau" was a splendid piece of acting, 
and this capable young actor has risen mightily in the 
estimation of the public as a result. The company 
throughout is doing very excellent work, and crowd- 
ed houses nightly testify to the ability of the Alca- 
zar's fine aggregation of talent. I am glad to note 
that there was a marked effort to avoid the melo- 
dramatic which so marred the rendition of the "Pris- 
oner of Zenda." 

* * * 

Mr. James Neill has scored a great triumph at the 
Grand in "The Gentleman of France." His "Gaston 
de Marsac" is the best thing he has given us during 
this engagement. He is assisted by a very capable 
company, and merits the very generous applause he 
has had all the week. Mr. Neill is so good a Marsac 
that the rest of the company is dwarfed. He is to 
the manor born, while many of his support may be 
scented from Market street as graduates from south 
of the slot, to whom no amount of lace gives the ap- 
pearance of birth and standing. Miss Chapman's 
Mademoiselle de la Vire was a capable piece of act- 
ing, and the principals throughout were quite in 
keeping with her conscientious work. The court la- 
dies and gentlemen, however, bore the impress of 
Tehama street, beneath the finery of Henry 111 
courtiers, and here and there a mannerism that be- 
speaks Silver street crops out. The performance 
throughout was good nevertheless, and the onlv real- 
ly bad acting was by the orchestra. This combina- 
tion of creators of discord should receive the atten- 
tion of the management. It is torture for any one 
with a sensitive ear to sit through the entre acts. 

* * * 

The middle-aged philosopher, Mark Embury, in 
the play "Mice and Men," as given us by Mr. Miller, 
at the Columbia, is a masterly production. He exem- 
plifies the obtuseness of learning. He shows us also 
the man of letters, more resourceful, under trying 



circumstances, than would another be less gifted. Mr. 
Miller has caught the character of the philanthropist 
who wishes to raise a wife by hand and books to a 
nicety. There be those among the San Franciscan 
theatre goers that enthuse not over "Mice and Men." 
It is not wicked enough, it is not salacious enough, 
and it makes men think. If there is one thing my 
fellow citizens hate, and this is characteristic of all 
Californians native or by adoption, it is to be made 
to follow a plot that is full of intellectual word play. 
And yet "Mice and Men" is full of interesting situa- 
tions. It is an absolutely true story. It has happened 
in the lives of many men, and it might as well have 
been located in this day and hour. 

The Captain George Lovell of Mr. Tiden was a 
very good and particularly youthful piece of work. 
He has a laugh that is infectious; he lets you think- 
of intrigues and love affairs galore bv his very in- 
flection . 

When you couple this happy faculty with the lus- 
cious blonde beauty of Miss Heyer, in the character 
of Joanne Goodlake, you have a combination for men- 
tal possibilities in the line of intrigue that is hard to 
beat. 

Miss Jessie Busley takes the part of Pesjgv. "Lit- 
tle Britain," and takes it well. She is not beautiful, 
and she exemplifies a contained type, the very essence 
of the story of the waif who has become the ward 
of the philosopher. It is worth going miles to see 
and hear the little lady in the last act when the full 
effect of the munificent gift and self-abnegation of the 
genial scholar bursts upon her. Her smile is simply 
seraphic. 

* * * 

At the Orpheum, Miss Coghlan is giving us some 
very good acting in "The Ace of Trumps'." She is 
ably supported by Mr. Lynn Pratt. Charmion has 
been adversely and undeservedly criticised for her 
specialty. It is not a bit bad or nasty, and those who 
turn up their noses at such clever work are hyper- 
critical. Hers is a fine stunt, and it brings down the 
house. 

. * * 

At the Central, "Gates of Justice" holds the boards. 
There is a new soubrette, Verne Castro by name, and 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Inc. 

STORAGE, MOVING. PACKING and SHIPPING 

WAREHOUSE: EDDY ST., near Fillmore 

Separate built rooms for the Storage of Household Furniture 
Office: POST and POWELL STS. Phone Private 571 



July 30, 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 



:.ls fair to become a nv>st popular addition t 
Justice"" is a melodran 
intense interest. The clientele of the Central .is 
displays its approbation or disapproval of the - 
ments expressed in the stirrinp theme in unur 
able si| 

* • • 

The "Lucky Stone" still holds the boards 
cher's. This little >kit has wonderful drawil 
and the houses are crowded nightly. 

« » * 

The Tivoli could go on indefinitely with "Robin 
Mood." as it has been sung to a limit house almost 
nightly. It is fitting that this successful staging of 
"Robin Hood" take place in San Francisco, as it i^ 
here the original Rostonians. now stranded in Mos- 
quito-land. made its greatest successes. I would sug- 
gest that the able management send for Barnabee, 
and that they give us a revival of the De Koven opera 
to put the grand old man on his feet again. 

* * * 

Another beautiful and talented young woman has 
just been added to the principals' roster of the Tivoli 
company, whose past and present career justifies the 
prediction that San Francisco music lovers are soon 
to hear one of the cleverest and brightest singing 
comediennes who ever appeared here. The artist in 
question is Miss Mary Young, who has just arrived 
in the city and is busily engaged in rehearsing the 
part of Dora Selby in "The Toreador," which has its 
premiere at the Tivoli on Monday evening next. Miss 
Young is of the petite style of feminine beauty, with 
a figure as trim as a yacht, a wealth of dark brown 
hair, a bewitching face, a pair of glowing dark eye*. 
and an abundance of ability. She is both singer and 
actress, and is equally at home among the scenes and 
harmonies of a musical comedy or a romantic drama. 
Miss Young has just closed a very successful engage- 
ment as leading woman with the Albee Stock Com- 
pany in Providence, R. I., one of the best dramatic 
organizations in the United States. Miss Young is 
very artistic in her methods, and combines a charm 
of a finely trained voice with acting ability of the 
highest order. 

* * ::■ 

"The Toreador," one of the most successful English 
musical comedies in the long list of London produc- 
tions, will have its first presentation on the Pacific 
Coast at the Tivoli Opera House on Monday evening 
next, August 1st. Four new principals have been 
added to the company. They include Miss Mary 
Young, Miss Carrie Reynolds, Mr. Melville Ellis, 
who was a member of the original cast of "The 
Toreador," in both New York and London, and Mr. 
John P. Kennedy, also a member of the original 
"Toreador" cast in New York. 

* * * 

What the management claim as the acme of all 
their productions will be "The Whirl of the Town," 
a gigantic spectacular burlesque that is to be seen 
here for the first time at Fischer's Theatre on next 
Monday night, August 1st. It is in three acts, written 
by Gustav Kerker and Hugh Morton. The public 
may reasonably expect something better than the 
ordinary in a musical sense in the "Whirl of the 
Town," as Gustav Kerker has never done anything 
that is bad in this line. Hid music is always musical, 
which is more than can be said for the majority of 
composers for the hermaphroditic productions intro- 
duced by the Weberfields. 

(Continued to Page 22.) 



Orpht 



ttr»Mt 

■MG NEW ACTS---4 



Mir Ugl I « Ml lUKh I 

Ml .iii-I laflt w-fk • ■( 

Edit!) Decker; Domenico Russo arjd Sig. 
flbramoff 

: mnlino.ii> ovorr Wndneadar. Thurwlay. Saturdaya anil 
Hun. In> Prion* in. It anil loo 



. Mint * Co. 
Leami .rttl Vinirn 



Columbia Theatre. Oo 

Beginning M ind last week 

CharloH Frohnian praMnti 

HENRY MILLER 
in Hadslslnfl Looettc BUey'a London and Sew York success 

MICE AND MEN 

Matinee Saturdays only 

Monday Aug. x~ Henry Miller In "Joseph Entangled." 

Alravar* Than t- ►-£* liELAsm ,v Mayeii. Proprietors 

MlCdZdr 1 neuire E. D. Piuck. (.Jen'l. Mgr. Tel. Alcazar 

Monday. Auk. i— one week. 

Regular matinees TharBday and Saturday 

Ei Dings 36 to 760. Matinees Thursday and Saturdays to 50c 

WHITE WHITTLESEY and the Alcazar Stock Company 

Present a magnificent scenic revival ol 

THE LADY OF LYONS 

First appearance or Eugenie Thais Law ton at the Alcazar 
Monday, August 8— White Whittlesey, in Sheridan, or "The 
Maid of Bath." Paul M. Potter's comedy of manners of a cen- 
tury ago. 



Cent 



rn ) TY^&rttre* Belasco & Hayek, Proprietors 

r Ul II 1CU LIC. Market St near Eighth-Tel- South 63 

Week starting Monday evening. Aug. 1st 

Kirk La Shelle's powerful American heroic drama 

SERGEANT JflMES 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday 

Prices— Even ings 10 to fioc Matinees lo. is. 26c- 

Aug. n-A BUNCH OF KEYS. 



Tivoli Opera House. °° rner Ed ^ a8 a o n n d str ee u 

Beginning Mondayevening Aug. 1st., first production in San 
Francisco of the London and New York musical sensation 

THE TOREADOR 

By Ivan Caryll and Lionel Mancton. 

With the great cast, and the beauty chorus. 

Promenade Circle. 3d floor. Smokers paradise. Elevator always 

running. Usual Tivoli prices, 26. 60 and 75c. 

Seats always selling— Only matinee Saturday 



Fischer's Theatre 



The eventof events. Commencing Monday Aug l. 
Gigantic spectacular burlesque production. 

THE WHIRL OF THE TOWN 

MoBt beautiful and funniest of all New York Casino successes 
Cast of unexcelled artists Dorothy Morton. Nora Bayes, Flossie 
Hope. Rice & Cady. Bobby North. Edwin Clark, Ben Dillon, 
Lionel Lawrence. Prize singing chorus of forty, so novelties 
and new specialties. 

Reserved Seats: Nights 26, 60, 76e- Saturday and Sunday Mati- 
nees. 26. 50c. Children at matinees 25, ioe. 



GraQd Opera House 



Week beginning tomorrow, Sunday matinee 

MR. JAMES NEILL and the original Neill Company, in Bronson 

Howard's famous military drama 

SHENANDOAH 

Regular matinee Saturday. 
Special Summer Prices— 15c, 26c, 50c. 



flfter the Theater 

Oo where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering place after 
the theatre la over. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 



h ffijUtex^- .tl NSURANCE fWPgf ¥^ 



Judging from the literature sent out by the different 
life insurance companies, it is rather hard to guess 
which will secure the greatest benefit from a college 
course of insurance. It is indeed a poor institution of 
learning nowadays that does not give its students a 
course of lectures on life insurance, and it is a poorer 
one that cannot secure the president of a life insur- 
ance company to play the star part; whether the 
students learn or not, the company heralds at once 
through every channel that its president delivered the 
lecture, and this is followed later by a printed copy 
of the same, with a request "that if favorable com- 
ment is made," a marked copy be sent to the company. 
The company is therefore ahead. It secures the ser- 
vices of the student agents, warns them against the 
evils of rebating and twisting, instructs them that the 
company of which the speaker is the representative 
is the great and only, and turns them loose on the 
public to get business at the regular rates of com- 
mission. Thus the college course gains for the corn- 
pan)' unlimited free advertising and an unlimited 
corps of student agents, and all at the cost of a lec- 
ture. For shrewd advertisers, the life insurance men 
are to be awarded the palm. 

I find that the same desire to talk to beginners and 
to charm the fellow out of a position into treading 
the thorny path of insurance soliciting, is not con- 
fined solely to the life men (although I believe they 
originated the idea). It has infected the surety men, 
and the minds of the ignorant are now being filled 
with chunks of advice as to how to make money 
through the various channels of casualty, surety, bur- 
glary or accident insurance. 

* * * 

If this idea keeps on spreading, it is safe to say 
that the forthcoming volume (already in preparation) 
by the editor of a San Francisco insurance periodical 
will meet with a ready sale. It is to be entitled "Every 
Man His Own Insurance Agent : or, How to Cut 
Rates and Rebate with Safety." The marine men and 
the fire men do not appear to have yet contracted 
the lecture fever or the university course idea. This 
may be accounted for, probably, by the fact that the 
marine men go it blind and guess, and that the fire 
men have nothing individually to say, their business 
being managed by the compact, and the principal 
thing which bothers them is how, to the best ad- 
vantage, to discourage the new man and to freeze out 
the broker. 

* * * 

In the meanwhile, the granting ot diplomas or com- 
missions goes merrily on to those who have attended 
the university course of lectures, and they are duly 
qualified to sell something they don't and can't un- 
derstand to the man who does not know what he 
wants or receives. 

* * * 

The English Blue Book, Part 1, which gives the 
statistics on railways in Great Britain, gives some 
facts that are of interest to those engaged in accident 
insurance. It shows that for 1903 there was a marked 
increase in the numbers killed and injured last year 
as compared with 1902. From accidents to trains, 
rolling stock, permanent way, etc., 25 passengers were 
killed and 769 injured, being an increase of 19 killed 
and 37 injured — 1902 having been an exceptionally 
favorable year in this respect. By accidents from 
other causes, 123 passengers were killed and 1,912 in- 
jured, the same number, curiously enough, having 



been killed in 1902, when 98 fewer were injured. Of 
persons passing over level crossings, 73 were killed 
and 39 injured — increases of 16 and 17 respectively. 
The total from all causes to all classes of persons, in- 
cluding servants of companies or contractors, was 
1,159 killed and 6,785 injured, increases of 63 and 124 
respectively. 

* * * 

The San Francisco offices of the Atlas and Man- 
chester are still without definite instructions as to the 
conduct of their office, owing to the merger of the 
two companies. The general opinion now is that the 
Atlas will get what business the Manchester has left 
and that the Manchester agency will be discontinued. 

The Marine Insurance Company's agents are prin- 
cipally occupied just now in marking up rates on 
bottoms and cargoes that have sailed or are about 
to sail to Japan. This, combined with taking in pre- 
miums, has made their lives for the past week any- 
thing but monotonous. 

An Iowa insurance journal recently published a 
list of Iowa Mutual Insurance Companies which 
had failed or quit. The list is: American Mutual Fire 
of Des Moines, Citizens' Mutual of Waterloo, Com- 
mercial Mutual of Des Moines, Davenport Mutual 
of Davenport, Iowa Mutual Fire of Des Moines, Iowa 
Merchants' Mutual of Sioux City, Merchants and 
Manufacturers of Clinton, Mutual Fire of Des 
Moines, Mutual Artisans of Muscatine, Mutual Guar- 
antee of Clinton, National Church Mutual of Lisbon, 
National Mutual of Council Bluffs, Northern Mutual 
of Sioux City, Reliance Mutual ot Dubuque, Safety 
Mutual of Sioux City, Underwriters Mutual of Sioux 
City, Millers and Manufacturers Mutual Fire of Des 
Moines. With this record in view, made in a State 
the laws of which are more favorable to this class of 
so-called insurance, is it not a wonder that the com- 
monsense of the business man can still be dulled to 
the extent of buying shoddy for all wool or gilded 

clav bricks for the real article. 

* * * 

Insurance Commissioner E. Myron Wolf has re- 
voked the license of the Imperial Marine Insurance 
Company of Tokio. The company was represented 
by Macondray & Co. The" cause given for the revo- 
cation by the Commissioner is that California has a 
retaliatory law, and since Japan exacts a deposit from 
all American companies, it was in keeping that Cali- 
fornia should exact a deposit from the Japanese under 



"WOLF" 




BRAND 



BLOOD, WOLFE &, CO'S. 

RENOWNED 

"GUINNESS'S STOUT" 

Oldest and best known brand of Porter on the Coast, 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO 
Sole Agents. 314 Sacramento St., San Francisco. 



July 30, 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

«h* law above rcftrrcl to. Should thr- nonet 

it to keep i>n in tin* same line, he will err 
panic among some of Ihe foreign managei 

* * • 

The Registrar of joint companies in 1 .rc.it Britain 

is about to eirpunge from the records a few Hritisli 
companies, which will be of benefit to both British- 
nd Americans. In the list of the dead and 
wounded are the following: The I'rown Life \ 
ancc Company. Provident Fire Insurance Company, 
Standard Tire Office, Trident Marine Insurance I 
pony, Manchester Underwriters' Association. Smock 
Owners' Mutual Insurance Company, Pndsey Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, Sun Plate <~dass Insurance 
Company, some of which names have a familiar 
sound. 

* * * 

A Los Angeles man has paid to the Fire Associa- 
tion's conscience fund the sum of $250. out of which 
he claims he defrauded the company in the settlement 
of a claim some years ago. The story is evidently 
true, for several reasons: the amount is small enough 
to fit Los Angeles, and the man who is foolish enough 
to beat a company out of $250 and ass enough to re- 
turn it. is usually senile enough to live in a slow place 
like Los Angeles. 

* * * 

The X'ews Letter some time ago chronicled the 
successful running down of one Hunter, alias Hunt, 
by the Fidelity Mutual Life, who had tried to de- 
fraud the company in Texas. It is to be regretted 
that after all the expenses and the trial, Hunt or Hun- 
ter is to go free, and a paragraph in an exchange 
states: "William A. Hunter, alias Hunt, who was 
sentenced to serve five years in the Texas penitentiarv 
for attempting to swindle the Fidelity Mutual Life 
out of $15,000 by disappearing after insuring his life 
for that amount, has been set at liberty, the Criminal 
Court of Appeals having reversed the judgment of the 
trial court. The company had not paid the money, 
and the court ruled that Hunter did nothing toward 
getting any benefit from the policy, so far as the 
records of the case disclose." Evidently the intent 
to commit a crime goes but a little distance in Texas. 

By G. C. France. 



There are a large number of medical preparations 
that are being denounced to the public through the 
efforts of the newspapers of the country, and it has 
been conclusively shown by analysis and otherwise 
that there are hundreds of such preparations that 
have no value whatever. Now and again comes a 
preparation that is indorsed by physicians, and whose 
merits are so pronounced as to merit the endorse- 
ment, despite the fact that physicians are never given 
to saying anything good of advertised remedies. 
"Hydrozone" and "Glycozone" have been advertised 
by the owners during the last year, and previously 
had been in use with the endorsement of physicians 
for years. It is doubtful if there ever has been dis- 
covered two such wonderful remedies as "Hydro- 
zone, and "Glycozone." Their wonderful curative 
properties are known and appreciated by doctor and 
patient. 

. Fat Folks 

I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six inches, waist six 
Inches and hips fourteen inches in a short time by a guaranteed harm- 
less remedy without exercise or starving. I will tell you all about It. 
Enclose stamp. Address Mrs. E. B. Eiehards, 226 E. 9th street. Biver- 
iide.Cal. . ... ... -• . .._...-.,. ... 



NEWS LETTER. a, 

INSURANCE 

FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $5,850,000 

F.,ui,.l..l A |i. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF 1'im.Al'KU'MIA. PENN. 

Tntd-up Cnpllnl El OOn (TO 

Surplus to Poticy-holdiri s.on.ou 

IAMBS I> BAII i:v. QmraM Agent. JOS Pine St.. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up. $3.4ir,.l<lo. Assets. IM.eK.ftB.36 

Surplus to Policy-holders, B,KD,43L4L Losses Paid, over »1M, 000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, 50] Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets 5,172,036.00 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 2,441,485.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD. Agent for San Francisco. 216 Sansome Street. 

Unexcelled tor liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 
Home Office: 
Pacific Mutual Building, 
San Francisco. 

DON'T INSURE— Until you have examined the new 

Combination Life, Accident and Health Policy 

Issued exclusively by the 

Conservative Life Insurance Company 

Assets, $1,500,000. Insurance in force, $21,000,000 

For particulars address the Company. Agents Wanted. 
Marion Building 110 Geary St. San Francisco 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 



Cash Capital, J200.000.O0 



Cash Assets, {321,471.19 



— Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 
tor $7.50 per ton; half ton $4; quarter ton $2. Use Briquettes tor 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal go,, §guth. 95, and your order will 
receive prdmpt attention. 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

Home Office, 328 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Employers' Liability, Teams, General Liability, Workmen's Col- 
lective, Vessels, Elevators. 

Edmund F. Green, President: Ant. Borel & Co., Treas. William 
M. Pferson, Vice-President; Franklin A. Zane, Secretary; Frank 
P. Deering, Counsel. 

MARSHAL A. FRANK, General Agent for California, Hay- 
wards Building. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlessinger, City Agt, 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 

F I RE EX TINGUI S H E RS 

CHAS. P. " FONDA 
318 MARKET STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



22 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Pleasure's Wand. 



July 30, 1904. 



(Continued from page 19.) 

Mr. Neill will begin the fifth week of his engage- 
ment to-morrow (Sunday) matinee at the Grand 
Opera House with a beautiful and complete produc- 
tion of Bronson Howard's delightful military play. 
"Shenandoah," which is acknowledged to be by tar 
the best of the many dramatic compositions dealing 
with the Civil War! Mr. Neill will play the hero, 
Kerchival West, which is one of his cleverest and 
most popular impersonations, and to Edythe Chap- 
man is allotted the charming role of Gertrude Elling- 
ham, in which she is sure to give a thoroughly satis- 
factory account of herself. 

* * * 

Bulwer-Lytton's "The Lady of Lyons," in which 
White Whittlesey apears at the Alcazar next week, 
will long remain a classic among the romantic plays, 
and the most potent and appealing love story enacted 
upon the st^ge. Whittlesey, with his charms of 
manner, voice and presence, is an ideal Claude Mel- 
notte. No romantic actor finds his mission quite 
fulfilled until he has depicted the heart struggles of 
the despised gardener's son, the vengeful masquerad- 
ing prince, and the repentant soldier whose valor 
wins forgiveness for the deception he has practiced. 

* * * 

Dorothy Morton has a new song, "The Little 
Brown Jap," that she will sing in "The Whirl of the 
Town," at Fischer's Theatre, and that is said to be 

the biggest song hit in yerrs. 

* * * 

One of the strongest bills ever offered at the 
Chutes is announced for the coming week. Camp- 
bell and Johnson, comedy bicyclists, late of the Zar- 
row trio, will make their first appearance here, as will 
also Charles P. Lowe, without doubt the world's 
greatest xylophone soloist. James T. Dervin, a mimic 
and ventriloquist of renown, and Edna Grant, a petite 
and pretty character dancer, will also be new, and 
Mabel Lamson, the popular contralto who won favor 
at the Chutes for many months as a singer of illus- 
trated songs, will reappear after an extended and suc- 
cessful Eastern tour. John J. Sully and Blanche 
Phelps, in a new sketch, "The Irish Oratory." 

* * * 

Olive May and John W. Albaugh, Jr., will make 
their first appearance in this city at the ( Irpheutn this 
coming week, presenting Grant Stewart's amusing 
comedietta. "The Girl from Kansas." Miss May 
scored her greatest success in Augustus Thomas's 
"Arizona," and Mr. Albaugh made his big hit in 
"Colorado," by the same author. McCabe, Sabine 
and Vera, eccentric comedians of renown, will also 
be new here. They will offer their latest creation, 
"The Arrival of Kitty McCarthy." Les Olopas, di- 
rect from Berlin, will give their musical equilibristic 
novelty. Mr. Olopa balances an upright piano on 
his head while playing a cornet solo, and his better- 
half indulges in specialties equally extraordinary. 
Florence, George and John Hughes, refined musical 
artists, will also make their initial bow here. 

* * * 

San Francisco and the Pacific Coast have cause for 
congratulation in the fact that Kyrle Bellew and his 
gentlemanly burglarious Hornung-Presbrey play. 
"Raffles, the Amateur Cracksman," are to make a 
tour of the Pacific Slope next season, being booked 
at the Columbia for the first two weeks in September. 



Henry Miller will continue in his production of 
"Mice and Men" for another week. On Monday, Au- 
gust 8th, Mr. Miller will bring out as the second and 
last play of his season, Henry Arthur Jones's London 
success, "Joseph Entangled." Charles Frohman se- 
cured the play for presentation by Henry Miller, sur- 
rounded by Hilda Spong, Jessie Busley, Stanley Dark, 
Frederick Tyler, and other people who are to appear 
in the American premiere of the play in San Fran- 
cisco. 

» * * 

"Sergeant James," Kirke La Shelle's new, big, 
heroic drama, will be the attraction at the Central 
Theatre for the week beginning next Monday even- 
ing. It is described as a romance of the enlisted man. 
The author gives a picture of the home life of "the 
man behind the gun," and furnishes a glimpse of the 
stable quarters of a cavalry camp as they actually 
exist. 

* * * 

Ysaye returns to this country next season to play 
fifty concerts, under the direction of his former man- 
ager, R. E. Johnston. 

A movement is on foot to send Mr. Ysaye on a 
tour for one month with an orchestra directed by one 
of our foremost conductors, the tour to extend west 
as far as the Missouri river, and embracing all the 
large cities. 

* * * 

Hilda Spong traveled direct from London to this 
city, stopping but one day en route. New York saw 
the star player for a few hours previous to her board- 
ing the train for the West. She will be in the cast 
of "Joseph Entangled," when it is seen here, and also 
in New York. 

* * * 

"The Sultan of Sulu," with his old high hat and his 
inclination to test to the limit the American cock- 
tail, will be a jolly visitor to San Francisco before 
verv long. His retinue includes a long line of fun- 
makers and pretty girls. 

* * * 

It is said that the Kansas cyclone scene in the 
"Wizard of Oz" fairly eclipses any stage effect in- 
troduced to the public since modern mechanism has 
been working wonders in the presentation of plays. 



SUNSET MAGAZINE. 

Mr. C. S. Aiken, the able editor of "Sunset" Maga- 
zine, again shows his knowledge of the sort of litera- 
ture that goes to make an attractive publication. In 
the August number he has collated the features that 
will please a large clientage. There is an authorita- 
tive publication on the maneuvre camp at Atascadero 
that should be of great interest to all Californians. 
The sketch of Victor Metcalf, the new Secretary of 
Commerce and Labor, is timely and interesting. 
"Bill Magee of Pine Nut" is a story by Sam Davis, 
our old bunch grass friend, and the sketch of the 
great mineral find in Nevada, south of Tonopah, at 
Goldfield, will instruct, entertain and allure. There 
are a number of short stories that speak well for Mr. 
Aiken as a man of rare discrimination when it comes 
to the selection of popular fiction. The cover of 
"Sunset" is a dream in blue and yellow, and the de- 
sign is simple and artistic. 

Mr. W. J. Wolf, general agent for Densmore Type- 
writer, is spending a few weeks of much-needed rest 
at Camp Taylor, Ca\. 



July 30. 1904. SAN FRANCISCO 

A BANNER MAGAZINE. 

The entire force at •' Hand 

Monthly 

order came from the in 
free copies, cut down the exchan| 

thai are possible prevent the tiMi.il flow of 

alimentary magazines from •' 

for he order w.i- the fact that the "Triennial I 
clave Edition" bids fair to l.e the beat -.Her ..f any 
issue in many years. Many of the new have 

Bold out. 

It is well known that even in the inner circl 
Templarism there has been many a doubt cxpr. 
on certain facts chronicled as history, and couple. I 
with the story of the < )rder. In "In Hoc Siipio Vin- 
ces," the author tells what he knows about "Templar- 
ism," and as he is one of the highest officers in the 
< >rdcr. his version of the rise of the organization must 
be accepted. Because of the near approach of the 
Conclave, the article in the Overland Monthly In- 
comes of paramount interest to all. hence the rush for 
copies. Another reason for the unusual demand i- 
the feature made of the Loring Club, and from the 
many members of this and kindred musical organi- 
zations have come calls for copies of the book. The * 
Overland Monthly for August is a marvel in maga- 
zine publishing. It is printed throughout on the 
finest coated paper, and might be termed an edition 
de luxe. 

Mr. W. A. Bisscll has an article on "San Francisc 1 
as a Convention City." which is a masterlv essav on 
the subject. San Francisco is fast coming to be 
known as "the Convention City," and such articles 
as Mr. Bissell's have the stamp of authority, for he 
is the Assistant Traffic Manager of the Santa Fe 
Railroad. Torrey Connor, the versatile writer, gives 
her impressions of the Grand Canyon of Arizona. 
through a set of fine photogravures, and an article 
entitled "How to Photograph the Grand Canyon." 
Miss Marion Drewe has a very pretty little descrip- 
tive story of Samoa. This is illustrated with en- 
gravings made from paintings by the author, and 
hand engraved. 

"Up Japan's Sacred Fujiyama" is an article written 
and illustrated by Ernest Williams Hewson, on the 
sacred mountain of Japan. Mr. Charles Lorrimer con- 
tributes a fine article on the Dragon Boat Festival 
in China. Mr. Lorrimer has been the Manchurian 
correspondent of the Overland Monthly, and his ar- 
ticles on the Far East are always read with interest 
by the patrons of the great Western magazine. 
"Early California Journalism" will interest the many 
readers of the Overland Monthly in Northern Cali- 
fornia, as it deals with the life and work of a remark- 
able character in the early journalism of the State. 
John Rollin Ridge was a full-blooded Cherokee In- 
dian, and one of the most remarkable men the State 
of California has ever known. 

The August number of the Overland Monthly con- 
tains a symposium of educational articles. The Suez 
Canal, The Colombian Army and Navy, An Officer's 
Troubles, When the Bees Got Busy, Professor 
Baileys article on "The History and Origin of Cali- 
fornia Names and Places" and a number of other ar- 
ticles, go to make up a number of the Overland 
Monthly for which there is a demand that has well- 
nigh exhausted an unusually large edition. 

Quality is the keynote of the management at Techau's 

Tavern, where everybody who is anybody goes after the 
theatre. This restaurant has taken the lead and is keeping 



NEWS LETTER. , 3 

THE UNION THAT FAILED. 
inffeur from t hicago lay panting full 

.1 ly in the tonnran had give: 

When a fellow in a buggj drove up beside the way 
\111l stopped to watch the couple and hear what they 

might - 
The language which was uttered beneath the stalled 

machine 
Cannot in cold, unfeeling and dreadful type be - en, 

Kut tl ibbed OUt sadly, as -he wiped away the 

brine : 
It seems we've bent a union on this blanked machine 
of mine." 

"Tell the people in ("hicago." she said, "when you 

get there. 
That I'm going to St. I.ouis. going down to see the 

fair : 
I'h. we Started out SO bravely, both expecting we 

conl, 1 run 
To Peoria or Pekin before the day was done; 
We whizzed along like sixty for twenty miles or 

more. 
I'd never thought existence was half so sweet before, 
I '.nt just as I had mentioned how grand it was, how 

fine, 
We bent that foolish union on this blanked machine 

of mine. 

"Tell the people, if they ask you, that I failed to 

knock on wood 
When I boasted, though I ought to have known very 

well I should; 
My chauffeur is a good one — ah, poor fellow! hear 

him groan — 
I hate to go and leave him to get skinned up here 

alone; 
He has bruises on his elbows, he has lost a finger- 
nail 
In endeavoring to fix things, but his efforts don't 

avail ; 
And to think that all this trouble," she concluded 

with a whine, 
"Should be caused by one weak union on this blanked 

machine of mine. 

The chauffeur went on working underneath the 

stalled machine : 
"Once," he said, "my soul was stainless, once the 

clothes I wear were clean ; 
Once I'd skin upon mv knuckles, but that happy time 

is past — 
Dash this double dashed arrangement — ah! I've got 

it loose, at last — 
I've a notion to knock forty kinds of holes in this old 

trap " 

Then there came a loud explosion like a sudden thun- 
der-clap, 
And the torn and bleeding chauffeur lay beside the 

road supine, 
While the lady sailed off, wailing: "Dash that old 

machine of mine." 

— Chicago Record-Herald. 



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24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 30, 1904. 




FINANCIAL 




California still maintains the 
The Nigger in position of the original and per- 
the Woodpile. sistent advocate for the crea- 
tion of a National Department 
of Mines and Mining. In fact, California, while it 
undoubtedly will meet with the support of the West- 
ern States as a matter of courtesy, is still almost 
alone in the demand for such an institution, unless 
the responsive note of acquiescence which follows 
throughout the West each time the demand is reiter- 
ated by the local organ of the prime movers in the 
scheme can be accepted as such. The persistency of 
this demand in face of the silence maintained else- 
where, including the National Capital, suggests at 
once the manipulation of some political figurehead 
who is desirous of stepping into the nice-salaried posi- 
tion of secretary of the new department. It would 
be only natural to assume that some consideration 
would be given the plea that California was first in 
the field to suggest the proposition, and that a claim 
made for recognition in the first distribution of the 
loaves and fishes would be conceded. This is all 
right, and a department of the kind would be all 
right, but why not carry out the plan honestly and 
above board, and name the weaving spider behind 
the scenes. He might be all right, too, even if his 
method of reaching out in an underhanded matter is 
not calculated to inspire much confidence in an alto- 
gether upright character. It might be that the News 
Letter would take the greatest possible pleasure in 
backing up this ambitious personality for the office 
of Secretary of a Department of mines, which on gen- 
eral principles it favors, and again it might not, rest- 
ing upon the old-time principle of political prefer- 
ment that the office should seek the man and not 
the man the office. Let us have an honest exhibition 
of the true facts of the case, and the name of the 
clever seeker after what might easily be converted 
into an unalienable, highly-paid sinecure, which will 
permit the proposition being stamped as straightfor- 
ward, at any rate. Then in case the scheme carries, 
and the aspirant wins out, the youth of the country 
can be directed toward an exhibition of what can 
be done by steady effort, and the plotting ambition 
of an inventive genius with the proper appreciation 
of the modern idea of securing otium cum dignitate, 
without a personal expenditure of money or labor. 
The fate of the proposition has just been deftly 
placed in the hands of the American Mining Com- 
gress, which will meet in Portland, ( )regon, Au- 
gust 22, 1904. We shall then see what we shall see. 

The fact that the hot air in- 
The Decline in jected into Alaska Packers 
Alaska Packers, stock, many moons ago, is be- 
ginning to leak out, is giving 
the old granny gossips on the street a chance to air 
what they know and do not know about the cause 
which has just produced the effect. It will be remem- 
bered that not so long ago and preceeding the rise in 
values now lamented by some people, there was a 
proposition on foot to combine the northern salmon 
canneries. This plan was only evolved to a certain 
extent, and among the companies which was not 
turned over in toto to the proposed combine was the 
Alaska Packers. Of course, they considered the mat- 
ter, and even went the length of putting a price upon 
the plant, but nothing came of the trade. During the 
period of negotiations and the formation of this par- 



tial combine afterwards effected, Alaska Packers com- 
menced to ascend the scale of values on small pur- 
chases. The large holders of the stock on their part 
exhibited no interest either in the proposed deal nor 
in the action of his stock. As a matter of fact they 
were well aware that they owned a big, valuable and 
paying property, and their actions so far as they were 
made public clearly showed that it was immaterial to 
them whether the combine stepped into their shoes 
or did not. That ever-watchful eye of the outside dol- 
lar chaser saw a chance for a speculative killing, and 
began to pick up any little lots of the stock offering 
from small holders, who did not hesitate to let go 
as the buyers, bidding for a stock closely held by 
what could almost be considered a private corpora- 
tion, raised the price upon themselves. This is the 
stock now coming back again, values returning to 
the original basis as sales are made by holders who 
have been scared by reports of a short pack for the 
year, which in so far as this company is concerned, 
are not correct. The inside now takes as little inter- 
est in the decline as they did in the advance. The 
stock will not go below a certain figure, and it is ex- 
tremely doubtful if any of the original holders have 
even taken advantage of the advance to profit by it. 
Outside speculators created the boom in 10-share 
purchases, and now they are knocking the amount 
of their own shares, which they neglected themselves 
when they bought it. The stock is as good an invest- 
ment as it ever was, and the men who own it on a 
large scale are neither complaining nor inviting the 
confidence of the speculative public, who made the 
trouble in this case by themselves and for them- 
selves. 

The Comstock market is in a 

Comstocks Still weak condition, and the heart 

Rule Dull. 01 the small people on the street 

is again down in their boots. 
This is their invariable condition. Be prices up, their 
suspicions keep them awake nights with dreams of 
horror only equaled by those inspired by a descent m 
values toward bedrock. To analyze the situation 
from a disinterested standpoint, it is better in many 
ways than it was some weeks ago. Work of import- 
ance has progressed further, and while some delay 
is taking place in securing the ventilation of Ophir so 
that work may be carried on then to advantage, 
which it cannot be just now, the ore reserves in the 
mine are not exhausted by any means to an extent 
which should frighten dealers out of their holdings. 
The drift to connect the Ward shaft with the Com- 
stock tunnel has been started, wnich means that it 
will not be long now until the extraction of low- 
grade ores from the central mines begins. The whole 
trouble is that the mines for the time are not lead- 
ing the market, and until they do, individuals will be 



WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN- 

V V o 

Scotch_Whisky 

Importers-MACONDRAY & CO. 



July 30. 1904. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



at the mei 

which bins one day and •-< lis the 

Tonopan Shares Tonopah sl.ar - have disap- 

Quicting Down. their hoi 

at a time when they should 

all theories in the busii ilation. Whai 

influenced the set-back it would be difficult t" 
but those who are in a positii n to know, blame the 
over-capitalized condition of the companies. The 
attention of the man gcr of these concerns has been 
called to this matter before in these columns, but 
without avail. There is one argument in favor of 
such a condition from the manipulator's standpoint, 
and that is it will perpetuate him in office. Never in 
the world will a quorum In- her to hold an 

election, and 1 - nee it will be a case of hold- 

ing on, which certainly will not be much of a benefit 
to shareholders should they desire t' • oust 
director who is guilty of bad conduct. As ior the 
mines, reports come in as big as ever, new strikes be- 
ing told of almost daily. Still, prices hang lire, which 
seems strange. 

Business in the local market for stocks and bonds 
has improved considerably during the week, and 
bonds especially have been in demand, with large 
transactions. Gas and Electric has sold higher, and 
Spring Valley lower. 



«S 



U/>e Bold Russian Admiral 

Heave ho ! An admiral bold am I, 

And I rule the roaring sea; 
Whenever a warship happens by, 

Why, I up with the steam and flee. 
Whenever a gun sounds over the deep, 

Away to the port I go. 
Where the grim torpedos sneak and creep, 

I keep away, it I know. 

But if ever a merchant ship I view, 

Then is the time for fun — 
I rush my ships o'er the silent blue 

And fire the deadly gun. 
For a merchant ship, that can't fight back, 

Is the ship that I crave to see, 
And an unarmed vessel gives no lack 
Of glorious victoree. 

Heave ho! Our ships are beached and sunk 

Where we met with Togo's might, 
But our officers, when they are drunk, 

Are aching for a fight, 
And an unarmed ship with a merchant crew 

Is the sport which we all desire. 
So I riddle the vessels through and through 

With the hail of my deadly fire. 

Heave ho ! Then toast the navy brave 

Of Russia's noble Czar, 
Wherever the .Russian banners wave 

It's there that the heroes are. 
Our navy falls 'neath hostile shell, 

Our armies flee on land, 
But the Russian sailor knows the smell 

Of goods that are contraband. 



See our 3 months ahead ideas in hats. 

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Tbm Dillon & Co., 



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Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" 

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quisite quality which fits 
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lilbert Mercantile Co. 

Pacific Coast Ajenta 

V. W. GasHill 

Special Agent 




26 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

A LETTER. FROM SPRINGFIELD 



The whole point of the joke lay in the fact tliat 
George was a straight fellow. He was a regular Sun- 
day school model. He had always been dutiful to his 
parents, he didn't drink, except a little in a friendly 
way, he never bet higher than a box of cigars, and he 
left women severely alone. If we had chosen any- 
other fellow in the crowd as the victim of the joke, 
the letter would have been more or less appropriate ; 
but applied to George, it was excruciatingly funny. 
That was why we lay on the window seat and rolled 
in ecstasy when Perkins proposed it. 

George was engaged to a girl in Springfield, Ohio, 
He met her at a summer place in his junior vacation, 
and they were engaged before the end of the season. 
All this we found out afterwards, for George ne\er 
talked to us about her. We never had seen her pic- 
ture, and we didn't even know her name ; but we were 
sure there was a "she," for her letters came regularly, 
one a day, addressed in a scrawly, girly hand, and 
postmarked "Springfield." If that daily letter failed 
to materialize by five five o'clock, George would make 
some excuse to go down town after dinner; and when 
we swept down the street, four abreast on our way 
to Bishop's refined vaudeville or the College Tavern, 
we'd run up against him standing in the post-office 
line. Later when he joined us at Bishop's, he would 
be wrapped in such an atmosphere of content that our 
joshing had no effect on him whatever. Ye gods ! 
what it is to be in love ! 

It was at one of these times that Perkins started 
the joke. George hadn't drawn anything in the five 
o'clock mail, and had started down to the post-office 
in hot haste after dinner, leaving us to occupy nis 
room. We preferred to piTt up in George's room be- 
cause it had the best window seat in the house, and 
two Morris chairs. Sometimes our preference made 
it inconvenient for George; for, unlike the rest of 
our crowd, he put in a little study occasionally. He 
never had the heart to turn us out, though. When nc 
wanted to work, he would gather up his duffle and 
turn in with one of the freshmen. 

Well, we sat around that night with the smoke o? 
our post-prandials curling towards the ceiling, and we 
said how hard George took it when there wasn't a 
letter, and how tough it was to oe in so deep ; and 
we wondered a little what the girl was like, and Whit- 
temore said she probably wore glasses and asked 
George if she was tne first girl he had ever kissed. 
And Stanley said it would be a good stunt to abstract 
her letters from the mails for sever