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Full text of "S.F. Newsletter (July-Dec. 1905)"

2007 1201720 7 

California State Library ^ T^ \ T^ ~\ r 



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Devoted to the Leading' Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 



PRICE 10 CLSia. 



San Francisco, Saturday July I, 1905 



J4 PER YHAK 



T HE P ERFECTED D UNLOP 
Z 1 .ACHABLE TIRE 



HAS REVOLUTIONIZED THE TIRE INDUSTRY 




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BOSTON NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA BUFFALO CLEVELAND DETROIT 

CHICAGO MINNEAPOLIS DENVER ! ST. LOUIS SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES 

These Tires were used by Hamlin & Whitman on their record run from Los Angeles to San Francisco. 



75he 

iPalace 

Hotel 



"Ghe popular recitals of classical 
music given twice da.ily in the 
Paila.ce Hotel Court are drawing 
forth much appreciative comment. 
If you have not heard them you 
have missed a treat. 



We invite your inspection of our new and 
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Our Wicker Carriages and Pony work a' 
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IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



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and WHIPS of Every Description 



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Under St. Nicholas Hotel. 



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Shoshone Bullfrog 
flirting Company 




SHOSHONE BULLFUOG MINE. OKE VALUE *74.80 AT DEPTH OF 5u FEET. 



One of the largest and most conspicuous veins of 
the field is the talc vein which traverses through 
Ladd and Montgomery Mountains and reaches far 
away across other mountain chains. It is a singular 
fact that while there is no evidence of the presence of 
gold in this vein, so far as can be seen with the eye, 
assays have run high into the thousands of dollars 
a ton, and large shipments of the ore are being made. 
It is necessary for the rock to be hauled by team 
1 20 miles to Las Vegas, from which point it is sent 
by rail to Salt Lake. . As the ore thus sent averages 
over $500 to the ton, it is evident that even by this 
expensive method of operating there is large profit. 

It is on this ledge that two of the greatest produ- 
cers of the field are located, the Montgomery and Na- 
tional Bank, and into this vein the Montgomery Tun- 
nel has pierced over 90 feet without having found the 
foot-wall.. To the northeast from this great exhibit 



in the Montgomery Tunnel the vein extends across 
the seven claims of the Shoshone Mining Company, 
giving to that company one of the greatest prospects 
in Southern Nevada, with 2,500 feet on the vein. 
These claims are the Lily Langtry, Julia Marlowe, 
Mary Mannering, Edna Edwards, Cissy Loftus, 
Vista Tilly and Maude Adams. At many points on 
these claims the overlying float has been removed, 
showing the vein of talc in place just as it lies ex- 
posed on neighboring claims. 

As development work on the Montgomery-Sho- 
shone has proceeded, the market value of the stock 
of that company has advanced steadily, until it now 
commands over $2.75 a share. There is no reason 
to doubt that the same rapid rise in values will result 
from the development of the Bullfrog Shoshone, 
while the wide range in market values offers an allur- 
ing opportunity for investment. 



ROBERT ROMER & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 

612 Mills Building. San Francisco 



Price per Copy. 10 cents. 



137590 

"STABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. Annual Subscription, $4.00. 








(fitdit & rwif%0Jbuerli sjer. 




Vol. LXXI. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY i, 1905. 



Number 1. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and published 
every Saturday by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, Halleck 
Building, &u Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Entered at Ban Francisco Fostoriice as second-class matter. 

New York olHce— (where information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— a>6 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, 
Representative. 

London Office— 30 Cornhill. E. C, England, George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 

;nled for publication in the current number of the NEWS 

LETTER should be sent to this office not later than » a. m. 

Thursday previous to day of issue. 

"I lie sixteen-inch gun has been condemned by 

the ordnance experts as being too big a bore. 

The Slate's dental experts keep on gnashing 

their teeth at each other. 

President Hadley, of Yale, thinks some college 

men are too good. President Hadley is a dazzling op- 
timist. 

The Vice-President's wife has been given her 

degree of Master of Arts, and thus the excellent Mr. 
Fairbanks shines anew by reflected light. 

Shasta County grasshoppers- are reported by 

Shasta County liars to be eating clothes off the line. 
This is a yarn that won't wash. 

The citizen who wants a divorce because his 

wife talks Spanish might try making her "walk Span- 
ish," as is done with unruly small boys. 

Oil drillers have found sharks' teeth in a Coal- 

inga well. Some dealer in petroleum securities must 
have been careless with his artificial dentistry. 

What the administration really wants is some 

heavy-weight to sit on Secretary Taft and keep him 
from boiling over. 

Washington has decided officially that the 

nickel has no "heads" or "tails." Invitatons to 
"match" for the carfare may now be regarded with 
distrust. 

Two of Stanford's former professors have 

gone wrong mentally at the East — one from love 
and the other from love of that which makes us wear 
old clothes. 

Somebody ought to start a fund for the relief 

of the poor, crippled prize-fighter who bit off the end 
of his tongue and is thus disqualified from plying his 
trade any further. 

A New York man is trying to convince the 

President that the department which scatters Uncle 
Sam's "seeds of kindness" is doing a little grafting 
on the side. 

John D. Rockefeller's latest is the making of 

jokes at a Baptist prayer-meeting, referring to him- 
self as a "selfish monopolist." No wonder the 
prayer meeting laughed ! 

A local preacher, speaking on the subject "The 

Woman with the Painted Face," had much to say in 
favor of female suffrage, whose typical advocate is 
a woman with a hand-painted reputation. 



The "Schmitz machine" seems to be something 

used in the manufacture of jute bags. 

Lawyer Collins ought to be handled by the 

courts with freight hooks instead of gloves. 

The Mayor devotes his days' to closing schools 

and his nights to opening dives. 

Every day is a Fourth of July in the Russian 

cities, where the bomb supply equals the popular de- 
mand. 

Let it be hoped that the "fight to a finish" at 

Reno next week will be the finish of professional 
pugilism. 

The fire-cracker fiend's hereafter will be spent 

in a place where he won't have to worry about rain 
interfering with his celebration. 

There are now almost enough administration- 

ists across the bay to warrant the organization of a 
San Quentin branch of the Schmitz Central Club. 

-It ought to encourage the W. C. T. U. to read 

that a San Franciscan has promised the Lunacy Com- 
mission to try to get along on only ten drinks a day. 

Arizona will wait until it sees what the admin- 
istration is going to do about returning Geronimo 
before it presses its claim for Statehood any further. 

San Jose school ma'ams are forbidden to 

marry, on the theory, apparently, that there's nobody 
like an old maid for raising children. 

The arrival of the Teutonic lady who practices 

medicine, wears her hair short and smokes cigars, 
indicates that the United States enjoys no monopoly 
of the "new woman" idea. 

The Englishman who is growing jet-black 
roses ought to find a market for them in Russia, 
where the aristocracy has a good deal to wear mourn- 
ing for. 

With the announcement that the Republican 

League has lighted its lantern and is looking for an 
honest man to run for Mayor, comes an indisposition 
on the part of prominent citizens to go out of town 
for the summer. 

Kitchener of Khartum says war between 

England and Russia over India is inevitable. We 
had thought it was about time for John Bull to climb 
into the ring and begin punching the groggy Mus- 
covite. 

The up-country prize-fighter who eloped with 

a twelve-year-old girl can have a nice warm suit of 
tar and feathers for nothing if he will stop running 
long enough to let a deputation of fellow citizens 
catch up with him. 

Clubladies who have devoted themselves to 

sponging out the "color line" are invited to corre- 
spond with Charles W. Chestnutt, the mulatto lec- 
turer, who declares that intermarriage is the best and 
most probable solution of the negro question. 



4 SAN FRANCISCO 

FRAUD FULLY EXPOSED BY THE 

SAN FRANCISCO BOARD OF HEALTH. 

As noted in last week's issue of the News Letter, 
the swindling nostrum called "Liquozone" has re- 
ceived attention at the hands of the Board of Health. 
The action of the Health Officer, Dt. Ragan, and the 
Board was prompt and decisive. After careful analy- 
sis, the stuff was unqualifiedly condemned by the 
Board, and the Chief of Police and the Health De- 
partment have been acting cojointly. 

The report of the Health Officer was dated June 
14th, and by the time of the 22d the druggists of San 
Francisco had all been notified by the police to dis- 
continue the sale of this poison, except for external 
use only, and Liquozone is now being sold in San 
Francisco only with its new label, in addition to 
the lying labels of the manufacturers, all bottles sold 
in this city and county are marked "poison" and 
"for external use only." The News Letter congratu- 
lates the Health Department and the police for their 
prompt action in this matter. The manufacturers 
of Liquozone denounced the News Letter when we 
began to expose this fraud. The researches of the 
Board of Health and of the News Letter on this 
matter both brought the same results, and we are 
pleased at our success in forcing this poison off the 
market. 

The Health Department has won its first case 
against the butchers who have used preservatives 
and adulterants. Three cases were tried before Police 
Judge Cabaniss, and three butchers were found 
guilty. In consideration, however, of their agreeing 
to use no more preservatives, and the fact that they 
stated they had believed preservatives harmless, 
the court did not fine them, but allowed them to 
go with a warning. Judge Cabaniss clearly defined 
the nature of an adulterant, and stated that in future 
dealers brought before him, who were addicted to 
this pernicious practice would be shown no mercy. 

The Health Board is to be congratulated on the 
outcome of these cases. The crusade against adul- 
terated foods is assuming huge proportions all over 
this country, and we are glad that the officials of 
San Francisco are not backward in protecting our 
citizens against unscrupulous manufacturers and un- 
scrupulous dealers. The public has little knowledge 
of the extent of the business that was done in San 
Francisco in adulterated foods, and medicines of the 
Liquozone class before the Board of Health came to 
the News Letter's assistance. Still, the snake is not 
yet quite dead. That is to say, adulterated foods arc 
still on the market, but the most harmful of the 
remaining dangers is not an adulteration. It is 
canned goods. Certainly canned goods should lie 
wholesome, and they are when put into tin cans. But 
there are canneries that use the poorest quality of tin, 
which is, in reality, not tin at all, but a cheap coating 
of a composition that is mostly zinc and lead. Cans 
of this kind cost but little, comparatively speaking, 
and when canned goods are offered at a small advance 
on the cost of the raw material, one should shun 
them. Perhaps it is not generally known that the 
British Government, which is the largest buyer of 
American canned meats, furnishes the tin from the 
Welsh factories, and will not permit an ounce of 
food to be put in American cans because of the lead 
that is used for the coating. 

But no doubt the Board of Health will very soon 
devote some time to the investigation of canned 
foods, and when it does the public will be treated to 
some surprises. The poison from lead or zinc coated 
vessels is rather more deadly than Liquozone. Any 



NEWS LETTER. July 1, 1905. 

food that has acid in it, or is likely to ferment, will 
quickly assimilate the poison in the lead, but it can- 
not very well be detected by the coloring of the food. 
The field of these villainous makers of poison-bear- 
ing foods and medicines has not yet been covered, 
but it will be, and when the Board of Health is 
through with it, the public may feel secure that the 
label on foods and drinks will tell the truth. 

THE STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

Enough has come out concerning the unhappy con- 
ditions in the State Board of Examiners not only to 
warrant, but to demand, such an inquiry as Governor 
Pardee has ordered. The administration cannot afford 
anything that savors of suppression or "whitewash." 
An impeachment of one of its quasi-judicial com- 
missioners is an impeachment of the whole machine 
by which the State is governed. Whereupon the in- 
quiry, in order to satisfy the people and to re-estab- 
lish public confidence in the integrity of the adminis- 
tration, must be conducted with open doors, must be 
of the broadest possible scope, and must be most 
minute and searching in its methods. 

In this scandal, as it happens, the accusations are 
fathered by members of the Board itself — a condi- 
tion of rare occurrence in matters of this character. 
Reputable practitioners holding office in this commis- 
sion have not hesitated to charge a majority of the 
Board with dealing in examination questions with 
candidates for certificates to practice dentistry. By 
itself, this accusation would suffice to put the Board 
on the rack and to make it imperative upon the Gov- 
ernor to turn his searchlight upon the accused and 
the accusers, but there is "worse and more of it" in 
this scandal. The charges, whether formally pre- 
ferred or not, include also direct accusations of falsi- 
fication of the Board's official records, of holding 
back the results of examinations for reasons yet to 
be developed, and of manipulation of the funds of 
the commission. Behind all this and more serious 
than any of the other charges, is the sinister intima- 
tion that there has been flagrant misuse of the 
Board's powers of investigation and punishment with 
relation to alleged illegal practitioners. Intimations 
along this line go so far as to create the suspicion that 
there has been an attempt to erect a sort of dentistry 
trust, excluding from practice all new-comers who 
would not submit to the arbitrary exactions of the 
examiners. Two significant facts have been noted 
by those who are watching this scandal : one that the 
accused majority has been dodging, quibbling and 
twisting in order to avoid an inquiry, and the other 
that the members of the majority of the Board ac- 
cused of wrong-doing are, with a possible exception 
or two, men of no eminence in the profession. One 
of the accusers is related to have taxed one of the ac- 
cused openly with having belonged only recently to 
a peripatetic band of medical and dental fakers which 
operated along the country circuits under the title 
of the "Kickapoo Indian Medical Company." Still 
another fact alleged against the Board is that, as at 
present constituted, its records arc kept in the pock- 
ets of its secretary, who lives and does business in 
a remote interior town a dozen miles from a railroad. 

Apparently it is the intention of the Governor to 
give this scandal the fullest possible ventilation. If 
politics shall be permitted to play any part in the 
inquiry, if the investigators are hampered in any way 
in their' efforts to get to the bottom of the conditions 
that have bred the scandal, there will be some book- 
keeping to do on the debit side of the administration's 
account with the public. 



July i, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

RED LETTER YEAR FOR COUNTY HOSPITAL 

There is a inillciiiuin at hand in the Citj and 
ital. For the first time within the 
memory of man. it is closing us fiscal year without 
one dollar of debt to be carried over. This is particu- 
larly and peculiarly interesting in so much as the 
warden, Martin Fleming, responsible for this ex- 
cellent showing, is a Schmitz appointee. It goes 
to prove, however, that it is possible for a man to be 
alone, even in the crowd of a corrupt administration. 
This red letter year for the City and County Hos- 
pital does not mean that the patients have had all 
that they should have ; it does not mean that there 
has been adequate service either in the matter of 
nurses or other attendants, but it means that Warden 
Fleming has done the very best any mortal man could 
with the amount of money at his command. The 
hospital and finance committee of the Board of 
Supervisors were sufficiently convinced of the war- 
den's good faith to give him some money from the 
emergency fund during the last few months of the 
year to carry on the good work instituted. This 
all means that the hospital will have all the full bene- 
fit of the apportionment for the coming year; there 
will be no "dead horse" to be provided for. 

One of the interesting phases of this heretofore 
unheard-of showing is that almost $1,200 was saved 
in salaries. It is not easy to conceive a plan in poli- 
tics which cut off any of the feeding at the public 
trough. 

With this start the coming year ought to be in- 
finitely better than the last. The apportionment for 
subsistence is larger than formerly. Through the 
intervention of the City and County Hospital com- 
mittee, an extra $5,000 has been set aside for the 
special open-air treatment of tuberculous patients, 
and another $5,000 for ward equipment. Add to 
this a fairly liberal allowance for repairs both inside 
and out, and the City and County Hospital, a year 
hence, is going to be a much better place to be sick 
in than it ever has been. There is the usual cry 
that the fare is poor at the hospital ; that the patients 
do not get what the doctors order for them, but even 
that short-coming must improve with the wave of 
reform that has swept over the City and County Hos- 
pital. Perhaps the day will come when this institu- 
tion is out of politics, that the standard will be as 
high as that of the City and County Hospital of St. 
Paul. Private patients are glad to pay for the 
care it is possible to get there. 



PHANTOM CLUBS. 

Whatever else the present Grand Jury has done or 
failed to do, it has at least done the municipality good 
service in taking the cover off the Schmitz machine 
and letting us see the wheels go round. The Mayor 
has been publicly exhibited in the act of squeezing 
out of the city's employees, big and little, well paid 
and ill paid, the fund with which he plans to cam- 
paign for another season near the sources of "graft." 
It is characteristic of the man and the machine that 
the squeezing agency should be boldly stamped with 
his own name — the "Schmitz Central Club." 

According to an abundance of testimony, practi- 
cally every employee and officer drawing pay out of 
the municipal treasury is compelled to give up to 
the collectors of this phantom "club." Most of them 
do not know who its officers are, where it is supposed 
to meet, or what are its objects. The word has gone 
all through the City Hail, the Hall of Justice, the 
Almshouse, the jails and the engine houses that 



NEWS LETTER. 5 

everybody who wants t.. hold his job will do well to 
"belong." And "belonging" means merely that he 
must have his $2 or his $10 ready when the col! 
of the "Schmitz Central Club" pays his monthly visit 

l'p to this time the administration has not tried to 
deny the facts. It has defended itself by declaring 
that city employees have the same right as other 
men to belong to and contribute to political clubs. It 
has not attempted to deny the levying of assessments 
through the "Schmitz Central Club" and other ways 
for the purpose of attacking the civil service pro- 
visions of that very charter which the Mayor has 
twice solemnly sworn to uphold and defend. And in 
truth, denial would be useless. This administration 
is so openly committed to a policy of graft, extortion 
and vindictiveness that it could only make itself ri- 
diculous by pretending any regard for the funda- 
mental civic virtues. The spoils theory in politics 
was never more clearly demonstrated than it has been 
during the two terms of Schmitz. He has made no 
bones of appointing men of obvious unfitness, because 
of "services rendered," or of keeping in their places 
men caught violating the law. Repeatedly he has 
announced that public records would be closed to 
men and newspapers that opposed him. He has ve- 
toed appropriations for the express reason that they 
were so framed as to uphold the merit system and in 
his official and personal speeches and documents he 
has missed no opportunity to attack the charter pro- 
visions which keep him from perfecting and perpetu- 
ating his machine. Now he is convicted of taking 
toll from every city employee over whom the shadow 
of his authority hangs for the base purpose of de- 
bauching voters and election officers in order to get 
another term in the office he has disgraced. 

There seems to be no likelihood that the grafting 
done in the name of the "Schmitz Central Club" will 
lead to any punishment. Report has it that the col- 
lectors have gone into hiding until such time as the 
Grand Jury has turned its attention to some other 
manifestation of the administration's crookedness. 
There is nobody to indict or impeach but the Mayor 
himself, and as usual he has managed to keep within 
the letter of the law. 

THE FOURTH OF JULY. 

It needs no formal proclamation to announce 
that the country is on the eve of another Independ- 
ence Day. The small boy is doing that right nobly 
with crackers, caps and other noise-making imple- 
ments and devices. This is as it should be, nor should 
he be restrained — -encouraged, rather to "make things 
roar." The fire-cracker and its kindred explosions are 
fires upon the altar of the young heart's patriotism, 
and let us older ones admit the fact that on the "glo- 
rious Fourth" our own hearts dance with gladness 
as the rockets' red glare proves that our flag is still 
there. But the small boy and the large boy and the 
grown man is an abomination and a dangerous nui- 
sance when he persists in using a pistol or gun. He 
is not patriotic. He is actuated bv no noble senti- 
ment. " He simply wants to frighten people. Of 
course his gun is never loaded, but it often is. Any- 
how, he should be suppressed, and will be unless the 
officers of the law neglect their duty. Let the boy 
with cap and fire-cracker alone, but run in the boy or 
man who uses pistol or gun. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE "FREE SAMPLE" SWINDLE. 

If there is no existing law, let the city's lawmakers 
make haste to enact one that will put a stop to the 
cus om of makers of patent medicines, food products, - 
soap and the like, of flooding doorsteps and hallways 
of private and public buildings with "samples" of 
their "wonderful discovery." There are plenty of 
people silly enough to believe every word the flaming 
wrapper of a "cure all" sample says, and gulp down 
the mixture in confidence that it will quickly accom- 
plish all that it "guarantees" to do. The free dis- 
tribution of all such nostrums is not in the interest 
of good health or good morals, but it is good for the 
undertaker. Perhaps such a law might be considered 
as operating against the liberty and freedom of the 
citizen. Well, it is a function of Government to 
arbitrarily guard the people against danger when 
they do not have sense enough to guard themselves. 
Medicines are to cure ailments, and the man who 
conceals his formula is a rascal on general principles. 
It is evidence that no one would take his stuff if the 
ingredients were known, so he plays upon ignorance 
and credulity, nor are home-made testimonials want- 
ing, and especially and conspicuously fiendish is he 
when he tries to enveigle the unwary into buying his 
vile preparation by feeding them on "free samples." 

Free samples of foods are not so bad at the mo- 
ment, for generally great care is taken to make the 
samples of the very best and most wholesome ma- 
terials. But look out for fraud, if not for poison, 
when you go for a full package. The sample was 
merely a bait. The chances are that its contents are 
in no way related to the contents of the full package. 
There are legitimate ways of acquainting the public 
with inventions and discoveries, and a "good thing" 
that is given away to prove it is a "good thing" is 
usually found to be a villainous lie when one digs 
down into its merits. Let a stop be put to this 
"medicine" and "pure food" sample business, and let 
it be done right away.. 

OPEN WIDE THE GATES. 

The question of excluding the Chinese on trivial 
grounds has reached President Roosevelt, and the 
indications are that he will apply the broad, liberal 
and comprehensive principle of immigration to which 
the nation has adhered since its beginnings. Hither- 
to the officials who have in hand the enforcement of 
the Exclusion Act have given to it the narrowest and 
most literal interpretation they possibly could. In- 
deed, they seem to have been guided by prejudice 
rather than by justice and common sense. We might 
go further and say that the Government officials on 
the Pacific Coast have lifted their voices above the 
din of the idiotic hue and cry against Chinese immi- 
gration, and in a way have kept the fires of hatred 
aglow. Now that they have been called down by 
the President, and ordered to consider and act with 
reference to the position of the United States in the 
family of nations, presumably they will hereafter in- 
terpret the law in the light of its broadest and most 
liberal meaning, rather than by what they would like 
the law to be. 

To put it bluntly, the solution of the farm labor 
question, as well as the question of labor for public 
improvements by chartered companies, lies almost 
wholly in such modification of the Exclusion Act as 
will insure an ample supply of such labor. The sooner 
the nation turns a deaf ear to the sentimental and il- 
logical cry that with an open door such swarms of 
Asiatics would come that in a little time they would 
monopolize all the avenues of skilled and unskilled 



July i, 1905. 

labor employment, the better off will the whole coun- 
try, especially the Pacific Coast and the Southern 
States, be. There is no truth at all in the assertion 
that the Asiatic will work for almost nothing. He 
demands the highest wages paid, but when he agrees 
to give his services for a stipulated wage, he faith- 
fully and honestly performs his part of the contract. 
More is the pity that so much cannot be said of 
other nationalities, but the reason is they deem a 
"union" essential to the stability of opportunity to 
work, whereas it operates to create suspicion of the 
integrity of the employer, and causes him to be sus- 
picious of them. The Asiatic preserves his individ- 
uality and makes his own contracts, and at the end 
of his term of service he "strikes" as an individual 
for more pay, if he wants more. Meanwhile he can 
be relied upon to the uttermost, and for that reason, 
and because the labor of other nationalities hedge 
themselves about with the spirit and bonds of col- 
lectivity as an ever-threatening force, the Asiatic 
should find our gates wide open to him. And before 
the other nationalities protest, let them consider that 
they themselves are to blame, for their arbitrary and 
uncertain methods, and the want of sacredness of 
contracts, have necessitated the introduction of Asi- 
atic competition in pretty much all the fields of un- 
skilled labor. 

But there are other and still greater reasons why 
the Exclusion Act should be radically modified. Asia 
is America's one future field of commercial expan- 
sion. This is admitted by all business men and 
statesmen. The Asiatics are as smart as the "Yan- 
kees" in the world's markets ; moreover, they are 
quite as sensitive, and we may be sure they do not 
understand reciprocal trade relations to mean that 
they may be branded as unworthy of our soil, and at 
the same time humbly bow down in abject obedience 
to our lordly and overbearing commands. They are 
getting tired of being obliged to stand upon the side- 
walk and begging us to sell them our goods and 
wares or buy theirs. They demand that they be 
ushered into the counting-room and be permitted to 
have the "run of the store," so that they may make 
their selections according to their own judgment. And 
especially is the Pacific Coast interested in having all 
obstacles removed that would in any degree give of- 
fense to the people of Asia, for to Asia and to no 
other land, can the coast country look for a market 
whose demands will always be more than it can sup- 
ply. But we must deal with the people over there 
in the spirit of mutual co-operation, good-will and 
business equality. 




SjCHAS. KLILUS & COJJ 

&£XC£,USIVE% 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

This Ready-Made Clothes Progression has had our 
close attention for many years. We claim the distinc- 
tion of being the "Parent" of this advanced art. Our 
garments tower far above all others. Smart, correct 
dressers have appreciated our ideas of Modern 
Clothes Building by their almost unanimous support. 
Are you a smart dresser.' 






July i, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



CULINARY TOPICS AND TABLE FASHIONS 

WRITTEN FOR THE NEWS LETTER BY CORNELIA C. BEDFORD 



A CHERRY LUNCHEON. 
["he season for cherries is so brief that instant ad- 
vantage must l>e taken of it. and the suburbanite or 
country house-keeper who has the good fortune to 
have a red cherry tree in full bearing will want to 
celebrate her good fortune by giving a luncheon to 
a few choice friends. 

When looking over the contents of her china closet 
she will do well to set aside for use pure white dishes 
—if any color must appear, a pale green is the one 
tint which will best harmonize with the glowing red 
of the fruit, and cut glass is always in order. For 
favors tiny baskets of green-tinted wicker chip of 
prairie grass in its natural color Would be admirable, 
filling each to overflowing with the glossy cherries. 
As a center-piece take a low, round basket of plain 
weave and heap it with large, perfect clusters of the 
cherries, stems downward, stand on a white embroid- 
ered doily and edge it with white roses each in a 
cluster of its own foliage. The place cards are best 
plain white. In planning the menu serve the cherries 
in as many ways as possible; the one given here ad- 
mits of their own appearance with each course. 

Cold Cherry Soup 

Bread Sticks Roast Almonds 

Creamed Lobster in Paper Cases 

Finger Rolls Radishes Dressed Cherries 

Broiled Lamb Chops Cherry Sauce 

Green Peas Potato Balls 

. Cherry Salad Mayonnaise 

Finger Wafers 

Frozen Cherries Sponge Cake 

Creamed Cherries Cherry Nectar 

To prepare for ten persons, take for the soup two 
pounds of sour or Morello cherries. Stone one-quar- 
ter of them and drop into a syrup made with one pint 
of water and one cupful of sugar. Boil gently for 
five minutes, then set aside to cool. Pound the re- 
mainder, stones and all, mix them with three pints 
of water and sufficient sugar to sweeten palatably — 
the exact quantity depending upon the acidity of the 
fruit. Boil until the pulp is very soft, add one table- 
spoonful of arrow-root dissolved in cold water and 
simmer until clear, then rub through a sieve and chill. 
To serve, drop the whole fruit in the tureen and pour 
the strained soup over them. A little claret or Rhine 
wine may be added if liked. 

Jordan almonds are long, smooth and thin-skinned, 
and so are generally preferred for salting or roasting. 
Drop a half pound of them into a saucepan of boiling 
water, let stand for half a minute and drain — this 
removes much of the skin discoloration and leaves 
them whiter. Cover a second time with boiling water 
and boil for about three minutes; drain, chill in cold 
water, then remove the skins, pulling them off like 
a glove. Spread thinly on a flat pan and stand in a 
warm place or the open oven, turning frequently un- 
til quite dry. Sprinkle them with a tablespoonful of 
melted butter and turn through repeatedly until all 
are slightly greased. Spread again on the pan and 
place in a very moderate oven. Examine frequently, 
and remove as they turn a pale fawn color. When 
cold they will be crisp and delicious. Two one- 
pound cans of lobster meat or four pounds of live lob- 
ster will be required for the second course. If can- 
ned, open, turn out and aerate thoroughly for two 
hours before using; the whole lobsters must be boiled, 



coled, opened and the moat extracted, ( ul into suit- 
able pieces— 1 here should be fully two cupfula and a 
half. Have ready one cupful and a half of hot milk. 
In a saucepan put two scant tablespoonfuls each of 
butter and flour, one-half teas toonful of sail and the 
same amount of paprika. Stir over the lire until melt- 
ed and bubbling, then gradually add the mill, 
tinning to stir until the sauce is thick and smooth. 
Add the lobster meat, a salt-spoonful of made mus- 
tard, more salt and paprika if needed, and stand over 
hot water for ten minutes. Just before taking from 
the fire add the yolks of two eggs beaten with two ta- 
blespoonfuls of cream and one teaspoonful of lemon 
juice. Fill little paper cases with the mixture and 
sprinkle the top of each with some of the lobster 
coral, or, if there is no coral, a little paprika. The 
radishes should be of as deep color as can be had; 
the sour cherries are pitted, dressed with a French 
dressing and served in little china shells or garnished 
with their own leaves. The cherry sauce served 
with the chops will probably be new to many. It 
comes to us from across the ocean, where it is much 
esteemed as an accompaniment to lamb. To prepare 
it, boil gently together a scant quart of cherries, three 
cupfuls of water and three whole cloves. When the 
cherries are very soft, rub all through a sieve and re- 
turn to the fire. When simmering, add a tablespoon- 
ful and a half of flour smoothly blended with a little 
cold water and stir until thickened. Drop in one 
tablespoonful of butter, a third of a teaspoonful of 
salt, and stir and cook slowly for ten minutes. If 
necessary, it may now be placed over hot water until 
needed. A moment before taking it from the fire add 
the strained juice of a large lemon and three table- 
spoonfuls of claret. 

To cut the potato balls expeditiously, a special 
utensil called a potato ball cutter is needed ; failing 
this, cut in small dice. Drop into boiling salted water 
and cook until tender, but unbroken, then drain. 
Drop over them two tablespoonfuls of butter cut in 
bits and shake occasionally until it is entirely ab- 
sorbed. When they are turned into the serving dish 
sprinkle with a very little finely chopped parsley. 

To make the salad take three pints of the largest, 
best cherries, remove the stems and carefully pit 
them ; in each insert a shelled hazel nut, then stand 
on ice to chill. For the mayonnaise stir two raw tgg 
yolks with a scant half teaspoonful of salt; add slowly 
a little chilled olive oil — perhaps a teaspoonful al- 
together — until the yolks begin to thicken. Continue 
to add more oil, a few drops at a time, until the mix- 
ture is very thick, then stir in a few drops of lemon 
juice. Alternate oil and lemon juice until almost a 
pint of the oil has been used and the mayonnaise is 
thick and jelly-like. To put the salad together, make 
cups of blanched lettuce leaves, put a large spoonful 
of the cherries in each, add to the mayonnaise a cup- 
ful of stiffly whipped cream, and heap some of it over 
each dish of salad. 

To make two quarts and a pint of the frozen fruit, 
boil together for five minutes one pound of sugar and 
one quart of water. Put three pints of stoned sweet 
cherries through a fruit chopper or a coarse sieve, add 
to the syrup, stir thoroughly and set aside. When 
cold add two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice and a cup- 
ful of ice water and freeze, stirring in when half frozen 
the white of an egg whipped to a meringue with two 
tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. 



8 

An 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



English Girl Criticizes 

San Francisco Society 



(The editor has received a number of anonymous letters protesting 
Misa Trevelyan's communications. It is not for the editor to 
take sides in this case as the opinions of Sliss Trevelyiin are over 
her signature ' The News Letter will give space to those who wish to 
disprove the statements of Miss Trevelyan providing the utenaturea 
of the authors accompaules the letters as a guarantee of good faith. I 

The other day I was an interested spectator at a 
game of golf played on the Del Monte links. The 
contestants were girls who are anything but duffers 
at the game, and yet they would never be tolerated 
on English links on account of their unsportsmanlike 
behavior. They were horribly caddish and rude to 
each other. They have evidently not vet learned how 
to lose like gentlemen — that first and most important 
of all lessons in an)' sport. I left them squabbling 
over some point or other, and retraced my way to the 
veranda, where an old dowager was playing solitaire 
with her thoughts. In the order of Ancient Dames 
of San Francisco Society there are certainly some old 
war horses who have a frisky gait that would do 
credit to a debutante. This one is always ready for 
a dance, a dinner, a drive or a picnic, and yet the girls 
tell me she was a belle when the "water came up to 
Montgomery street," or some such nonsense. How- 
ever, she is really remarkably old, and should jolly 
well like to know just how many birthdays she has 
celebrated. I heard some one ask her daughter-in- 
law this very question, and the young matron re- 
sponded: "I have never been able to trap her into 
telling. Once I asked her whether she had ever 
seen a century plant bloom, and she told me not to 
be impertinent." It seems strange that American 
women should be so touchy about their age. In 
Britain that sort of thing is an open book that any 
one may consult. 

Well, this well-preserved antique had just been re- 
stored by a nap, and in answer to my question as to 
who was the golf chamnion out here, she unlocked 
all the stories of conquests since first the game was 
introduced in this part of the world, and I found it 
to be mainly a recital of bickerings and quarrels, 
each set "booing" the players outside its particular 
pale, instead of losing the fine lines of caste in the 
sport and applauding the player in best form. 

As I have hinted before, the true spirit of sport 
languishes in this air. The American women love 
to think that they have cornered all the brain and 
brawn spilled out of Pandora's box, and they are al- 
ways ready to bear false witness to their feats. Note 
the sangfroid with which the public and the press 
boldly announce that "a little California girl is show- 
ing the world how to play tennis." This "little Cali- 
fornia girl" is Miss May Sutton, the daughter of an 
English gentleman, and I believe that she herself 
was born in England. It is true that she has passed 
most of her life in Southern California, but her train- 
ing has been that of an English girl. I have had the 
pleasure of meeting the charming Sutton sisters, and 
though they have been transplanted from British 
soil, they show all the marked English traits of char- 
acter, and would never be mistaken for American 
girls. And on such small ground as protracted resi- 
dence in a place, Califorma builds its claims to pro- 
ducing the champion lawn tennis player. This claim, 
like lawn tennis, requires as much alacrity in return 
as vigor in service. We English, when our American 
friends crow over May Sutton, should rub in the fact 
that she is not really an American after all. 

I must acknowledge that the California girl rides 
fairly well, but when it comes to the sport of riding 
to hounds, I doubt whether she would be in at the 



July i, 1905. 

death with the fearless English woman, who excels 
in this sort of thing. However, the women out here 
wear their riding togs rather well, and their horses 
are decently groomed. The grooms appear to be for 
the most part imported from England, but somehow 
English servants seem to lose their form the minute 
they leave their native land. They lapse in manner 
and deferential speech, and they forget the little 
niceties of apparel. 

Whatever sport the American girl indulges in she 
wants to be an adept at once, and as a rule she has 
not the patience to really master it. She is such a 
figety creature, ever jumping from one hobby to an- 
other that I wonder she rides horseback as well as she 
does. If one does not compare them by the high Eng- 
lish standard, there are some very good riders here. 
Mrs. Walter Martin sits her horse well, and Mrs. Jack 
Spreckels has a very good seat. Miss Helen de Young 
is really a fine horsewoman, and so is Mrs. Stephen- 
son, whom I saw cantering around Mill Valley no; 
long ago. Miss Alice Hoffman, to my mind, is the 
best whip I have seen out here, but she does not look 
as well on horseback as holding the lines. 

Girls out here seem to take no interest whatsoever 
in horseracing. Every one of consequence goes to the 
races in London, and it makes me awfully homesick 
to get letters describing the gay times during the rac- 
ing season. Lots of my friends over there own horses 
which thev race, though not always under their own 
name. I know one woman who was £10.000 ahead 
on her stable last year. But I am told that here 
only common people attend the races, and that it is 
awfully bad form to be seen at them. That seems 
a shame, for racing is one of the most fascinating 
inventions to make life quiver with interest, whether 
it pays interest on your money or no. But perhaps it 
is just as well that the races are not de rigeur in 
miir polite society, for the women would probably 
not know how to lose and win like gentlemen at this 
any more than they do at other sports. They have 
not the spirit of the lady who. when told that she 
had lost everything, even her diamonds, on a horse, 
said : "I will buy paste and begin over again." 

— Constance Trevelyan. 




That our garments have maintained a char- 
acteristic individuality for graceful shapeliness (and 
the retention of their shapeliness through a long 
period of service) has been due, we take it, to the 
fact that, -while purchasing only from the very test 
of good clothes makers, we have taken the extra 
precaution to dictate the various materials that are 
used in their manufacture. 

An example worthy of emulation by our 
competitors. 



Helle 



Ir 



& Frank, 
Clothiers 
Market Street and Grant Ave. 



July i. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Every morning at eight o'clock the ferry house ia 
filled with a flock of sir]*; and nun. carrying hooks, 
pencils, and neat brown paper packages, presumably 
luncheons. Where are they all going, do you ask ? 

Why, to Summer School, of course. 

"Why am 1 going?" brightly answered a pretty. 
auburn-haired girl. "Why, I want to make the cred- 
its. I was ill last winter, and had to drop my univer- 
sity work, and so 1 am making it up. My friend?" 
(turning to her companion in gray) "Oh, she's not 
a college woman: she goes to the Normal School, 
but the summer work here is so good that she prefers 
it to a vacation." 

"Is for me." confessed, gaily, a stunning vision in 
black and white, "I just Bunked last year — too much 
fun, I guess!" But she is having "fun" now, one no- 
tices, with a different escort every morning, all "per- 
fectly devoted." Indeed, the trip across the bay may 
with justice be labeled "Co-education I." 

To see the army fill the Berkeley train, one would 
think that all the Summer School students cross the 
bay daily. But the fact is that those who do are lost 
in the crowd already there. 

Of these, many are "Pelicans." Just what this spe- 
cies of humanity may be, they are reluctant to ex- 
plain, over at Berkeley. But when one considers the 
eager attitude, mental and physical, of the veteran 
teacher, the all-devouring hunger, gathering up 
"methods" and tucking them away for further use, 
perhaps one can understand how this term came to 
be applied to the ever-present "school-ma'am" (all 
hail to her!) who sacrifices her opportunity for a 
much-needed rest in order to do better by her "grade" 
in the fall. 

It is remarkable how many of these pioneer teach- 
ers one meets at Berkeley. Products of the past gen- 
eration, they still keep mind and eyes bright, enter- 
ing into the youthful amusements and gaieties with 
a spirit which endears them to the trembling fledg- 
lings soon to follow where they have led. 

The fledglings themselves have pretty good times 
at Summer School. Among the crowd of strangers, 
the' Berkeley under-graduate can do anything he or 
she pleases without fear of being conspicuous. The 
other day one young girl was heard to say to another : 
"Have you ever been in that building?" 

"What, the Engineering Building? Why, girls 
never go there !" was the shocked reply. 

"I know it, but I'm just dying to go. Come on — 
they'll think we are Summer School people." 

With a gasp, the other agreed to this bold proposal, 
and off the two went, to pry happily into every cor- 
ner forbidden during the regular term, and to lay 
all blame on the poor outsiders. 

There are, indeed, several places in which girls 
are not allowed at Berkeley. There is an unwritten 
law, dating, according to one pretty Berkeley girl, 
"from time immemorial," that of the two flights of 
steps at the back of North Hall, one shall be reserved 
for men. During the college year this is easy enough. 
The word soon spreads among Freshmen, timid by 
nature and training. But "pelicans" are less easily 
influenced, and during the first week of Summer 
School the poor male creatures have a hard time. 
They try posting notices : "No girls allowed I" "Ladies 
requested to keep away!" "Reserved seats!" But 
past these signs sail serenely the matron and the 



maid, and poor masculinity finds at last that the only 
to have the steps is to hold them. Every spol is 
continuously full, as far as possible. < hie would 
feel sympathy for them if they were not quite so un- 
happy. 

Yet they do not continue this abnormal masculine 
attitude beyond the steps. ( )n the contrary, Co-edu- 
cation II is one of the summer courses — not down on 
the schedule, but carried on daily. One section meets 
on the terrace of the Library Building, one on the 
way from North Hall to East, between classes, one 
under the blue gums in the noon hour — in fact, the 
sections meet all over the campus, and most of those 
registering for the course earn their credits. 

The work done in other departments, however, is 
also very attractive. One does not wonder that so 
many students take it. With famous professors fro. 11 
all over the country to inspire and help students in 
their chosen work — some of them getting lost in the 
Berkeley jungles on the way to classes during the 
first day or two — with some of Berkeley's own staff 
to supplement or ably to carry on the work, with the 
utmost of effort required and the utmost of assistance 
given, with walks, picnics, excursions, open to all — 
with all this — Summer School is a help to every "peli- 
can" and an enjoyable time for most of the under- 
graduates. K. K. 

Now, when you want the best goodies — "just 

like mother used to make," go straight to Swain's 
Bakery, 209 Post street, and when you get there you 
will find an assortment of cakes and pies that even 
"mother" would prefer to her own make ; besides, the 
several kinds of ice cream and dainty desserts 
will round out the other things to your complete 
satisfaction. 

Townsend's California glace fruits, in fire- 
etched boxes, are shipped to all parts of the world. 
The new store is located at 767 M,arket street, be- 
tween Third and Fourth streets, two minutes' walk 
from Call building. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup' 

for your children while teething. 



DIAMONDS 

UNMOUNTED OR SET IN THE MOST 
MODERN DESIGNS. WE ARE SHOWING A 
COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF THE 
CHOICEST GOODS AT THE FAIREST PRICES 

Our Store Will be Closed on Monday and Tuesday 

Bohm-Bristol Company 

JEWELERS, SILVERSMITHS 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

104-110 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1905. 




Our Glasgow friends, who 
Scotch Investors have never failed in snarling 

in Fresno Copper, themselves up in some min- 
ing enterprise or another are 
now questioning their prudence in tackling another 
California proposition, known as the Fresno Copper 
Company, Limited, and as usual the News Letter is 
appealed to at the last moment for information on the 
merits of the investment. Little thanks one gets 
advising a set of folk like the Glasgow investors, 
after the way they allowed themselves to be pulled 
around by the nose in the case of the Jumper, follow- 
ing the beck and call of a board of directors which 
permitted their manager, under contract and in face 
of specific terms in this contract, to get away with 
the kernel of the nut while they got the shells. We 
know nothing about the Fresno Copper Company's 
property, outside of the prospectus, but from this, 
as usual, one learns much which will be of interest 
to people here, who are quite as ready to pick up a 
good copper mine at any price, without the owners 
having to appeal for capital to Scotland, or any other 
section of the earth. We learn that the vendor of 
the property is the California Copper Syndicate, 
which asks £105,000, or in round figures, $525,000; 
that the total issued capital of the vendor company 
was $140,660, or £28,332, and that the shareholders 
of the new Glasgow concern, the Fresno Copper Com- 
pany, Limited, is incorporated with a capital of 
£175,000, or in round numbers $875,000. There are 
three experts mentioned as having exanfined and re- 
ported on the property "on the instructions of Mr. 
Vercoe, on behalf of the vendor." Mr. Vercoe is 
mentioned further on in this prospectus as the largest 
shareholder in the Board of Directors of the vendor 
company, the Californian Copper Syndicate, the hold- 
nigs therein of the directors, being quoted respective- 
ly as follows: "Mr. Graham £250; Mr. Kidston 
£789; Mr. Bellairs, £1,000, and Mr. Vercoe £10,- 
600." It is noteworthy, in turn, that the directors of 
the Fresno Copper Company, the Glasgow purchaser 
of the California Copper Syndicate Company's prop- 
erty and rights, are evidently the same people, named 
as follows : John H. N. Graham, W. H. Kidston, Ed- 
mund Bellairs and H. B. Vercoe, M. I. M. E., who is 
also managing director. This would seem a most ex- 
traordinary method of floating a company, altogether 
one sided when the interest of the outside investors 
is concerned. However, this does not seem to have 
struck the listing committee of the Stock Exchange 
as peculiar in the least, and the stock has already sold 
as high as $11 per share. 

In point of merit, the prospectus shows that the 
property consists of 80 acres of patented ground, 16 
miles northeast of Fresno, but as the reports of the 
experts are dated in 1901, they cannot be considered 
in a discussion of values at this late date, as undoubt- 
edly many changes have taken place since then, 
when the Fresno Copper Company was promoted at 
a share valuation of $875,000. Mr. Lang is quoted 
to the effect that there are net values in sight of 
$720,000." Mr. Stoneham says : "The present work- 
ings (this was in July, 1901) show fully 100,000 tons 
of ore in sight." Mr. Wheeler, August 14, 1901, 
says : "I am convinced that this property can be made 
one of the largest producers of copper on the Pacific 
Coast." At that period the property was only opened | 



to a depth of nearly 200 feet, with three veins, of 
which, according to Mr. Lang, 200 feet in length 
had been proved, and accepting his estimate of total 
ore values "in sight," if the public of Scotland had 
subscribed in full for the whole of the 175,000 £ 1 
shares, they would have paid the vendors a nice little 
profit of $155,000 for the privilege of taking the ore 
out, turning it into coin, proving thereby that the 
expert estimates were accurate in the main. Of this 
capital, however, at the time of flotation, only 30,- 
000 shares were issued. 105,000 shares were to be al- 
lotted to the California Copper Syndicate in payment 
of the purchase price, the remaining 25,000 shares be- 
ing offered to the public, putting, if all were taken, 
the sum of $105,000 for working capital in the hands 
of the holders of the 105,000 shares — the vendors of 
the old California Copper Syndicate still in control of 
the property sold by them to the Fresno Copper Co., 
and fortified therein by the money provided by a mi- 
nority of shareholders. Now, the Scotch sharehold- 
ers are anxious over an influx of stock on the mar- 
ket since the price has run up in value, although last 
month the quotations were considerably lower than 
they were in March last, when they were well over 
the 405 mark. As a Glasgow contemporary, in con- 
menting upon a circular issued by the company, in 
answer to some complaints, says: "In spite of the 
favorable nature of some of the contents of the docu- 
ment, the shares have continued to be sold, and the 
price has further declined. What the market is ask- 
ing is, who are the sellers, and why are the sales be- 
ing made?" The proper thing to do, in view of the 
fact that in so far as the documents in our posses- 
sion show, the outside shareholders have not yet 
had an independent examination made of the prop- 
erty. They should request permission from the man- 
agement to send a man of their own selection down 
the mine to make a report. In addition, they are cer- 
tainly entitled to representation on the board of direc- 
tors. If shareholders do not look out for themselves 
in the matter of the management of the companies 
they are concerned in, they have only themselves to 
blame if things do not go right with them. 



Starr <& Dulfer 

SAN FRANCISCO and TONOPAH 
STOCK COMMISSION BROKERS 

Tonopah, 

Goldfield, 

Bullfrog 



OFFICES 



Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco; Tonopah, Nev. 
II. W. Ilellman Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Members— S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. 



July i. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



Prices rule fairly steady in the 
Pine-St. Market, market for Comstock ghat 

with business a> it usually i> 
at this season of the year. The winze in Ophir, 
the -moo level, is still carrying down the ore opened 
up in sinking from the aooo level, and it is still, at 
latest accounts, strong in the lace of the south Uriti 
from the southwest drift from the bottom of the 
winze on the .moo level, which is now out a distance 
of 50 feet. From the south-end comes the report 
that the west drift on the 1200 level of Caledonia has 
encountered the west wall of the lode, and that it has 
been Stopped. A wide Stretch of vein matter, encoun- 
tered in the course of running this drift, will now be 
explored, as it has already developed some inter- 
esting features. The Board will close on July for 
the mid-summer vacation. 

On the Tonopah-Goldficld-Bullfrog list the better 
class of stocks have all developed more or less 
strength, and in the majority of cases the advance has 
been well maintained. The upward movement in 
Montana is accredited to rumors of a dividend to be 
declared about July 10th. Midway is taking out some 
rich ore on the 300 level. In the Goldfiekl group, 
Sandstorm has been firmer on the news of the recent 
improvement in the mine. The movement in Bull- 
frog stocks has been rather slow, and it is now claim- 
ed that the trouble arises from the difficulties encoun- 
tered in the way of transportation facilities. Work is 
still being prosecuted at new camps along the line 
of proposed railroad extensions, and some good finds 
have been reported. 

FAT FOLKS. 

1 reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six inches, waist 
six Inches, and hips fourteen inches in a short time by a guar- 
anteed harmless remedy, without exercise or starving, i will 
tell you all about It. Enclose stamp. Address MRS. E. R. RICH- 
ARDS. 225 EAST NINTH ST., RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA. 



Dentist, 8C 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker 

Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street, San 

Francisco, deals In all kinds of newspaper information, business, 
personal, political, from press of State, coast and country. Tel. 
Main 1042. 






of perfection, ^p 
Essential to the c 
enjoyment' oP 

any fanetlon 
ft HII/BWT 

WE/ilGAtiTlhLG' 

PACIFIC COAST AGEHTJ ! 

VWGajkin-Speoial-Ao? ! 
/;.:__;Sa n FrancUco : __^ 




The Fruit erie 



FRESH VEGETABLES- FRESH FRUiTS 

Our products are of the highest quality. 
Our customers are among the best families. 



MAY 
GEO BRITNEK. PrtP. 



WE SERVE YOU? 
Telephone East 1188 



1239 POLK STREET 




Ifwe could meet you face 
to fac« and tell you of all 
p«ln« we hive t«Ken to 
produce a whlsKv tK«t 
would appeal to the hearts 
oT pood fellows, you would 
call for Old KirK every 
time. WE. Know of its mer- 
it* and are maKing an ef- 
fort to have you appreci- 
ate them. ■ 

A. P. Hotalintf (& Co. 

San Francisco. 



iV 00 



WE BUY AND SELL 



Comstock. Tonopah, Goldfield and 
Bullfrog Stocks 

ZADIG & COMPANY 

306 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of— San Francisco Stock Exchange. 
California Stock and Oil Exchange. Merchant's Exchange. 



UNITED BANK & TRUST CO. 

Pays TWO Per Cent on Check Accounts 
in excess of $300.00. Pays FOUR Per 
Cent on Savings Accounts. Investors 
are requested to call and investigate at 
Main Office 



238 BUSH ST., M M, 



or Ml slon Branch 



1 6TH, MARKET AND NOESTS. 



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J. C. Wilson 



Banker and Broker 
LOCAL AND EASTERN STOCKS AND BONDS 

490 California Street, San Francisco 

Telephone Main 3070 



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Address for Circular of Information or call at main offices: 

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ST. CECILE APARTMENTS 

115 FELL STREET. Above Van Ness and MarKet St. 

Thoroughly modern. Elegantly furnished. Sunny 3 
room and bath apartments. Special rates for summer. 

MRS. M. E. BROWN, FORMERLY OF THE BROWNING 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1905. 




To a looker-on, the most interesting spectacle in 
town just now is that presented by the reformers of 
the Republican League in their endeavors to select 
incorruptible men to aid them in "turning the rascals 
out." The managers of the League have published 
the names of their representatives in each district, 
and the public has stopped to applaud the excellent 
judgment which has led the Leaguers to select in 
every case the very men who can aid them best not 
only to win at the primaries, but to fill the people 
with enthusiasm for their ticket in November. As 
one reads the names of the chosen warriors, many of 
whom have fought for the glory of their country in 
years that are gone, no doubt can remain that they 
represent all that is pure and noble and patriotic and 
self-sacrificing in the ranks of local Republicans. To 
be numbered among them, is an honor. Their deeds 
are renowned; their valor has been proved ; their hon- 
esty is famed, and from Butchertown to San Quentin 
men speak of the many great and bold things they 
did in the yester-years before misguided, though well- 
meaning men enacted the primary law. It is always 
invidious to draw comparisons, and it is particularly 
difficult to pick from such a bunch one who, by his 
service, may be considered entitled to the job of bell- 
wether. It is with some hesitation, therefore, that in 
coming to name these bold banner bearers I mention 
first the veteran Martin Kelly— "Honest Martin." a 
true soldier who more than once has stood in the 
breach when his country was in danger; a thoughtful, 
earnest man, who permits nothing to get between 
him and the performance of his duty to the State ; 
upright, sober, truthful, honest as to-morrow, a sim- 
ple, sturdy man, whose word is as good as his bond, 
and whose bond is as good as Amalgamated Copper ; 
charitable to a fault, as generous with the money ol 
others as he is extravagant with his own, never 
weighing the difference between a bit and a quarter 
when duty calls, and withal a man of parts. So fear- 
less has "Honest Martin" shown himself in the midst 
of the foray that in dense districts south of the slot 
— where he is best known in admiration of his cour- 
age — he is sometimes called "Fire Engine Kelly." 
This soubriquet is given him in honor of the heroism 
he once displayed in preventing a fire engine running 
away with him. To the redoubtable Kelly, the re- 
formers of the League have given over the Twenty- 
eighth District, confident that he will lead to success 
the delegates pledged under the League's banner to 
fight until the polls close for all that is pure in poli- 
tics. "Honest Martin" will be supported by other 
valorous patriots. For instance, there is Billy Har- 
rington, who has been a politician since the water 
came up to Montgomery street. One of his chief 
claims to consideration at the hands of the party is 
that once upon a time he perforated a part of 1\ 
anatomy with a bullet. The country has ever since 
deplored Billy's poor marksmanship. Then there is 
"Colonel" Martin Brady, who gained the plaudits 
of the multitude and the undying admiration of the 
"push," of which he is such a glorious example, by 
beating the anti-prize fight bill at Sacramento. The 
Brady is a thing of beauty. As a product of metro- 
politan politics, he is well worth embalming in the 
Park Museum to excite the mystified wonder of fu- 
ture generations. The Colonel is so earnest a re- 
former that for at least two years past he has con- 
ducted a night school where citizens who knew what 



they wanted to do, but didn't know how to do it, 
have flocked to gain knowledge and experience. 
Lolonel Brady has earned well deserved fame as an 
instructor. His pamphlets, "First Aid to the Re- 
former" and "What to do in Emergencies," have 
gained very wide circulation. The fact that his late 
colleague, the lamented Professor S. Patsy Carroll, 
collaborated with the Colonel in the preparation of 
the pamphlets, added much to their popularity. That 
other well-known Colonel, Jack Tyrrell, is also named 
among the army of the League. He will aid Colonel 
D. M. Burns to instill purity into the body politic. 
Nor is that well-known reformer, "Little Philly" 
Crimmins, to be forgotten. Although he did not 
achieve the dignity of a personal appointment, as 
Kelly did, he is represented among the apostles of 
purity by Pat. Prendergast, who has the letters 
"P. C." branded on his collar, and by that long- 
winded Supervisor, Fred Eggers, the friend and pro- 
tector of all prize fighters — who fight in his club. 
And there are others: Jessie Marks, the unsullied: 
Jack Hoey, who goes to Sunday School every week ; 
Jerry Lucey, who was honored by being appointed 
chairman of the Committee on Public Morals, of the 
Assembly, and whose grog shop is one of the tough- 
est south of the slot — "et ad nauseam." Oh, it is a 
beautiful galaxy of simon-pure reformers! The gen- 
tlemen who organized the Republican League and 
launched it on the sea of politics should be proud of 
their work. With men of the Kelly stripe as officers, 
and with the Luceys and Hoeys and Marks and Pren- 
dergasts and Bradys composing the crew, of coins. 
it is what the last named Colonel would term a 
"singe" that the banners of the League will rest upon 
the ramparts of the City Hall next November. I can 
just see the civic associations, the good government 
clubs, the amalgamated ministers and the other com- 
binations of the wholly good following "Honest Mar 
tin" Kelly at the primaries and at the polls. Reform ! 

It is to laugh. 

* * * 

A waiter, homeward bound, heavily laden with ac- 
cumulated tips, was stopped by a footpad and rob- 
bed of a couple of hundred dollars, the result of a 




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July 



'905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



night's careful attention t<> diners. The footpad 
every cent, leaving the waiter weeping and penniless 
Well, of course I don't stand for footpads, as a rule, 
but in this case — in this ease — I think the gentleman 
of the highway was but the instrument of just retri- 
bution. 

• • • 

Hadley, of Yale, says he thinks a superlatively vir- 
tuous boy is almost as dangerous to the college com 

munity as a hoy with very had habits. A man may 
be b ys lie. especially if he is a college man. 

He deplores the fact that some college men are so 
damned good they are really unfit for the world. 

The} set up certain standards, and when they find 
their standards are not attained, they flop down in 
the ditch, defenseless, a victim for whatever lion 
may come along seeking something to devour. Had- 
ley did not use that language, but that is what he 
meant. His language is more suggestive than em- 
phatic, as might be expected from a college professor 
discussing such a topic. Instead of saying that the 
superlatively good boys are usually sapless milk- 
sops, Hadley says they are shocked at the wicked- 
ness of the world, and find themselves left without 
"inner defenses." Now, I don't know what he means 
by "inner defenses." That is a figure of speech, no 
doubt, beneath which lingers the idea that the boy 
without the aforesaid defenses is a blooming ass, 
doncherknow. But whatever may have been meant 
by the reference, it is certainly refreshing to know 
that somewhere' there are college boys who are super- 
latively, painfully good. If any such there are at 
Vale, they are gentle daisies, born to blush unseen. 
They should hie them hence, while yet there is time, 
before the bloom may be ruffled upon their maiden 
cheeks. Yale must be peculiar in their possession. 
The superlatively good college boy is a genus un- 
known at Berkeley. There the degrees are fair, bad, 
rotten. The superlatively good does not exist. And 
it -may be just as well. We have trouble enough keep- 
ing tab on those we know are bad. If we were also 
troubled with the fear that the presence of a multitude 
of the superlatively good was fraught with danger to 
the commonwealth, we would, perforce, go and bag 
our heads, so that our eyes, unaccustomed to the ob- 
servation of innocence in modern college life, might 
not be shocked or strained by the unusual sight. We 
recommend to the associated students at Berkeley 
thorough study of the remarks of Professor Hadley. 
If the superlatively good, as he says, constitute a new 
and distinct danger in college life, why, have at them, 
my lads. 'Tis your duty to lead them astray, to take 
them out, and get them full, and have fun with them. 
They must be saved from themselves, that the college 
itself may be saved. This is the new philosophy. Its 
principles are convincing, its logic alluring, its prac- 
tice filled with consciousness of a righteous duty 
well performed. Beware the unco' guid ! There is 
danger in them. 

•■■ * * 

Signboards at the Park announce that "Six miles 
an hour is the limit of speed allowed by bicyclists." 
Now, what I want to know is, when did the bicy- 
clists allow themselves that limit of speed, and 
whether they allowed it only when they are by them- 
selves or when others are with them. The sign says 
plainly enough that the speed limit is allowed by bi- 
cyclists. Therefore, of course, they must have al- 
lowed it. I suppose they met at the Park and decid- 
ed that six miles an hour was fast enough for them 
to go, and allowed themselves that allowance. Of 
course, if the Park Commissioners had anything to 



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do with the sign they would make it clear that any 
allowances allowed in the Park are allowed by the 
Commissioners and by no one else. Making all due 
allowances, therefore, for what would have been 
done by the Commissioners if they had allowed the 
six mile limit, I am of the opinion they would have 
granted the fixed limitation to the bicyclists. But it 
occurs to me that the Commissioners might not have 
allowed anything, though they may have permitted 
something. 

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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



U«»a»w4y a jTOWN CRIER 



July i, 1905. 







Of all the things remarkable 

The summer season brings, 
There are a few, yes, one or two, 

The poet never sings. 
But the queerest and the strangest, 

It's incumbent to report, 
Is the conduct of the married 

At the holiday resort. 

The people who in town are strict 

And quiet as can be, 
Behave when in the country 

With outrageous levity. 
And though the muse is willing 

All their doings to report. 
My blushes draw a curtain 

O'er the holiday resort. 

The members of the Los Angeles Chamber of 

Commerce who sold the passes given them by Sena- 
tor Clark are quite in the forefront of the modern 
crowd. The proper way to get things out of life 
nowadays is to rob, and, if possible, to rob your 
friends. If ingratitude can be added to the robbery, 
so much the better chance of advancement. The Los 
Angelenos are wise in their generation. They should 
all get on. 

So the Board of Health, the virtuous Board of 

Health which has been taking such an interest in the 
food of the people, and which has managed to gain 
for itself a number of compliments in respectable 
quarters, is being actually found out. Blackmail and 
extortion are queer ingredients to mix with pure 
foods. A little oleomargarine in the butter might 
perhaps be not so unhealthy after all as a corrupt 
and crooked Board of Health. 

George Collins is being sued for rent. This 

is rather a commonplace and sordid sort of stunt on 
the part of one who has given us such dashing in- 
stances of independently individual conduct. We had 
expected better things, or at least more inspiring, 
but the inventiveness of the most facile must some- 
times have lapsed. We await the next appearance 
with absorbing interest. 

Grave argument is made on behalf of the rights ■ 

of pickets. Pickets is a military term, and the very 
use of "it exhibits the condition in which we find 
ourselves. It will strike future historians as a little | 
queer that ostensibly responsible men should be al- 
lowed to make arguments in favor of the perpetuat- 
tion of civic strife. It is a pretty commentary upon 
the way in which we are supposed to maintain order. 

A woman has a penchant for stealing other 

people's names, and it is accounted to her for un- 
righteousness. Morals vary in terms of environment. 
Strange to say, this using of other people's names is 
one of the commonest phenomena in pseudo literary 
circles, and stealing other people's works is at least 
as common. Outside of these charmed circles, how- 
ever, you cannot be too careful. 

There is another new pest in the vineyards. 

The idea of rural delights begins to assume the gro- 
tesque. Even the blessed vegetables are affected 
with bacteria, and one cannot cut a cabbage without 
fearing that the existence of some interesting poly- 
syllabic creature has thereby been brought to an un- 
timely close. But existence in the city is no better. 
The municipal government still persists. 



—Attacks by thugs in the open street, invasion 

of private residences by armed house breakers, thiev- 
ery rampant, and the lives of the citizens insecure, 
all point to the era of delight in which we live. But 
the police are zealous, and arrested two young men 
who were trying to get into their own house. Let us 
be thankful — things might be worse. 

The race track seems to be as destructive in 

Los Angeles as here, and as productive of the kind of 
cattle who get themselves into difficulties and then 
leave their families to bear the brunt of it all. It is 
all very well to say that it serves the asses right, but 
it too frequently results in merely relieving the asses 
of the burden of maintaining their families. 

-Unicinariassis is the name of a highly unpleas- 
ant disease which is spreading in our vicinity through 
the good offices of our fellow subjects from Porto 
Rico. As a reward of imperialism, it should be emi- 
nently satisfactory to the jingoes. It is a hooked 
worm, and would appear in this case to have caught 
the annexationist angler. 

The Union Labor party is said to be prepar- 
ing for the primaries. "Remember Rebstock" would 
be an appropriate motto to place in their committee 
rooms. It had better be clone in the chief of the 
European languages; otherwise it would fail of be- 
ing comprehended by the mass of the labor represen- 
tatives. 

The sentence of Rebstock to three years in San 

Quentin, in spite of the recommendation to mercy 
of the jury, deserves every commendation. It takes 
a strong Judge to disregard a plea of that sort. We 
wonder how long it will be before the inevitable 
pardon releases all the gangsters from their unfor- 
tunate position. 

It is to be hoped that it was distinctly pointed 

out to the three hundred editors who visited Oakland 
last week that there is not a decent place in the en- 
tire town to get a meal. Such a lesson would not 
be without effect, for next to the publisher, the edi- 
tor is the most voracious glutton known. 

The Department of Agriculture at Berkeley 

has been considering the problem of the transporta- 
tion of peaches, which evidently shows the interest 
taken by the faculty in comfortable traveling of the 
co-eds. But why should the Agricultural Department 
be especially interested? 

A Berkeley merchant complains that he was 

fired at five times by a high-binder, who missed every 
shot. The days of Chinese Exclusion are surely num- 
bered if the shooting powers of the highbinder have 
fallen so far. The President as usual has hit the 
psychological moment. 

An investigation of certain fossil rocks is to 

be made by the University of California. It is to 
be hoped for the sake of our common humanity that 
the investigators will manage to keep their hands 
off the heads of departments. 

A committee of three is to be appointed to in- 
vestigate the charges of graft against the Dental 
Board. It is to be hoped that the committee will 
look closely enough to discover and remove the gold 
filling. 



July i. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA. 



»5 




- 



Tlic accompanying- cuts were run by mistake last 
week as a portion of an article on El Carmelo-by-the- 
Sea, the hotel of Pacific Grove. They, however, rep- 
resent a portion of the beautiful scenery near Car- 




mel-by-the-Sea, the interesting town which the Car- 
mel Development Company is making, popular 
amongst college professors, artists, poets and others 
of esthetic tastes. There is no hotel called El Car- 
melo-by-the-Sea at beautiful Carmel-by-the-Sea ; it 
is at Pacific Grove. 



JULY OVERLAND MONTHLY. 

The July number of the Overland Monthly is one 
of the most interesting issues of that always popular 
magazine. The leading article is descriptive of a trip 
through the waters of Alaska in a canoe. The article 
is beautifully illustrated. The Asiatic Giant is held 
up to the gaze of the white race to be measured for 
the danger that lurks in him. The forests and lakes 
of the Pacific Coast are talked about, and there is a 
lay sermon on immortality; also the story of the 
pa'ssing of the Spanish in California, with more than 
twenty other equally interesting articles, besides fic- 
tion and poetry. 

The students and faculty of the University of 

California gave Dr. Ludwig Boltzmann a royal wel- 
come upon his reaching the. campus the other day. 
As is well known, Dr. Boltzmann comes all the way 
from the University of Vienna to teach advanced 
students something of physics during the summer 
session. Although the whoie range of physics will 
be touched upon, the principal subject will be thermo- 
dynamics. Force being-' the- "seed -of physics," the 
students will have the opportunity of their life to 
study the subject in its deeper meaning. The wisdom 
and the liberality of President Wheeler in securing 
the presence of Vienna's most distinguished physicist 
is already attested by the enthusiasm with which Dr. 
Boltzmann was received by the students and the 
public. ■' 

Tesia Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only *7.W 

per ton; half-ton. M; quarter ton. $2 Full weight guaranteed If 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities. Briquette 
are superior to coal. Sold only hy the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 



$15.00 

for the ROUND TRIP to the 

Calaveras Big Trees 



A splendid opportunity to see the 
country made famous by Bret 
Harte's stories. 

TABLE MOUNTAIN, "JIMTOWN," 
STANISLAUS RIVER, ANGEL'S CAMP 

The great mining country of 
Calaveras County and one of the 
greatest Big Tree groves. 

LEAVE TODAY 
ARRIVE 10:30 NEXT FORENOON 

The route is via Oakdale, 
Jamestown, Angel's and Mur- 
phy's. Only 22 miles stage ride. 
Interesting scenery all the way. 
The Mammoth Grove contains 
trees nearly 100 feet in circumfer- 
ence, and is one of the finest of 
the groves. Fine hotel and many 
fishing streams. 

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M. E. Mayer, of the Belasco & Mayer enterprises, 
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tion. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




Tkarsurels 
Wand 



Oft oin no wand but Pttasun'a ■ 




If Harriet Ford and E. F. Boddington, who wish to 
be known as the dramatists of "Audrey," now being 
produced at the Alcazar, had mixed a little "pre-di- 
gested breakfast food" into the story they might have 
brought forth a sound play instead of a dramatic nar- 
rative of rambling incongruity. But they digested 
the plot of the book neither before nor after. As a re- 
sult, the show is affected with a lumpy feeling, like 
under-done cake, and the audience gets an acute at- 
tack of dramatic indigestion. One needs the salvation 
of a blue pill. 

A rescuing grace by which Ford and Boddington 
are forgiven is the acting of Lillian Lawrence in the 
difficult role of Audrey, in which she ascends from 
the mere leading lady of a stock company into the 
qualities of a star, a morning star, which Audrey is. 
She combines all the idealism of a romantic tempera- 
ment and theatrical instinct, so necessary to Audrey, 
3"d the hall mark of a clever artist. She beats the 
usual two-dollar star. Don't mind the dramatists — 
go to see her. 

"Audrey," the play, is developed according to no, 
as yet, discovered dramatic law, and proceeds as 
little under the dramatic unities as the union rules 
'show over at 1 1 130.) This was due to an effort to 
merely embalm in dialogue the story of the book. 
At any rate, there is lots of fun, as any play with lots 
of sentiment and lots of action is lots of fun. You 
see, the plot turns on Audrey's love affairs. Her par- 
ents were killed by Indians; she is adopted by a min- 
ister's family, and loved by a gentleman who thinks 
he also loves another girl. Hugon, a prosperous In- 
dian, is madly gone on Audrey, and swears that Mar- 
maduke Haward shall not get her. Audrey's rep. is 
meanwhile attacked; Haward falls ill, and there is 
all sorts of trouble. The Indian almost kills some- 
body, and finally failing, kills himself, with Haward 
running up in time in his right mind — getting Au- 
drey. A sympathetic wail was the first thing that 
gushed on me. "Audrey," a play with an ingenue 
lead, is very much on the wail. The hero-ine comes 
on to whine. You are filled full of premonitions. I 
was quite prepared for grim death, ghosts or witches. 
The characters say "sn-natch !" and "be-e-witched !" 
and hiss through shut teeth. A chill creeps down 
your spine. You grip Mr. Belasco's seats. "Audre\ " 
abounds in thrills. The climax of terror is held in, 
the tip of the last tableau, which is my chief complaint 
on its construction, but you sit gasping till the cur- 
tain falls. It is a big burlesque on life, but it is high- 
ly entertaining. Don't be a critic, and you'll enjoy it 
— be-e-utifully. Of the evening, Howard Scott was 
the leading man ; also of the play, if to be leading man 
means Best Actor, the one who compels applause 
whenever he steps on and off the stage. His Jean 
Hugon, the desperate Indian, was masterly. Sad to 
say, the calcium couldn't discover John Craig, for 
the nonce. He seemed uninterested and vigorless, 
dreaming, doubtless, of Boston, where he is said to 
be going. He excelled in the single apostrophe to 
Audrey at the end of the third tableau. 

Great beauty exists in the character of Audrey, 
who is a "dream child," child of fate, wishing over 
and over for her mountain home, with appealing pa- 



July 1, 1905. 

thos, fully brought out by Lillian Lawrence. She 
brings artlessness to the role, art concealing art. She 
is winsome, sympathetic, holds the audience under a 
spell of tears almost shed, and she thrills mightily 
when, in a dramatic scene, she rises to higher vein. 
She has the artist's touch, and there is always the 
latent strain of tragedy. She is an idealized Audrey. 
She shines in scenes with Scott, for these two stage 
folk glimmer very much in the fashion of co-stars. 
Mary Young added to her reputation as Evelyn 
Byrd, a stuck-up lady, and Adele Belgarde fully 
held her own as Deborah Darden. A characteristic 
charm was given to the part of Mrs. Stagg by Eliza- 
beth Woodson. The rest of the support was capable, 
and the tableaux setting, especially in the brilliant 

scene of the Governor's ball, was of a fetching order. 

* * * 

"Speech!" called some one when T. Daniel re- 
sponded the third time to the rather mild applause 
after the second act of "Ranson's Folly," at the Co- 
lumbia, and so T. Daniel spoke. And T. Daniel 
again "knocked" his company. Now what do you 
think of that? On the whole, we think this rather 
unmerited, for his support isn't half bad. Eleanor 
Montel, as Mary Cahill, is winsome and natural. Her 
father, "Jeff" Cahill, played by Mark Price, although 
perhaps a little stereotyped and stiff in the beginning 
of the play, warms up towards the latter part, and 
elicits applause. Lawrence Sheehan, as Sergeant 
Clancy, is especially good (notably his rich brogue), 
and he makes the most of his few lines. And the 
same can be said of Captain Chase, who, in addition 
to this, is very good-looking. T. Daniel himself is 
well-suited to the part of Ranson, the spoiled darling 
of his millionaire father, and the whole cast deserves 
a larger house than they have been playing to. 

* '* * 

"Camille" is one of the most difficult characters 
that the actress of the first class has to deal with. 
The entire action of the play is intense, and the theme 
is everywhere exacting. The severe, the emotional 
and the serene have to be interblended. and at the 
same time each in its turn must be conspicuous and 
pronounced, without marring the pattern of the 
whole. Perhaps the most difficult part to portray is 
that which requires the maintenance of the dignity. 
grace and refinement of cultured and wealthy social 
life, while living in the squalor of abject poverty. 
But in this and in several other trying, as well as the 
more pleasing situations that are injected by circum- 



C. H. REHNSTROM, 
Tailor 

wishes to announce his arrival from Europe with a com- 
plete line of 

Summer Novelties 



You are cordially invited to inspect the same at his new 
quarters in the 

Mutual Savings BanK Building 

MarKet, Kearny and Geary Streets 



July i. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



stances into Camille's strange life, amid tem 
and sunshine, Florence Robi he role at 

the California Theatre with considerable abi 
Her earnestness and pains-taking commend 1 
the audience, and for that reason every one is will- 
ing tn mildly criticise when she fails h the 
heights thai the situation demands. The audien 
drawn to the woman herself, and it sympathizes 
where in some other comparisons would lie hurtful 
to her. The support did the best it could, no doubt. 




One of the De Serris' 
Orpheum next week. 



bronze and marble statuary at the 



»7 

■ marvelous feats of strength in pyramid building 
that it has ever been mj pleasure to witness. The 
tumbling of each member of the troupe pr. .\c> that 

every one is an expert in his line. 

irge W. Day. "in cork." was well received hv 
his old friends, and no doubt gained the admiration 
of many who had never seen him before. 

"The Wrong Man" is a clever sketch by Gilling- 

water and Company, which keeps its interest from be- 
ginning t" end. Mr. ( iillingwatcr is "leading man" 
of the little play, and is equal to the part. He is 
supported by a clever young woman who plays the 
part of the stage-struck married lady with an am- 
bition to be a star actress. The sketch is a whole 
drama in itself. The Wilson "trio" proved to be 
■Wilson "singular." The comedian may need the 
other two to give him courage, but he is the whole 
show and creates all the fun. 

Lillian Shaw is the best of the hold-overs, and 
sings even better than last week. Her character work 
is splendid. 

* * * 

"Down Mobile," at the Central, depicts plantation 
life in its various phases, and Mr. Simmer's acting, 
in a dual role, gives the performance an interest 
that it would not have with a less finished artist. 
As a whole, the play is highly entertaining, which is 
materially added to by strong and realistic scenic 
effects. •.. 

* * * 

Maud Williamson and Alfred Woods in "The Best 
to Win," are about the worst ever attempted to win 
the favor of the San Francisco public. When we are 
forced to witness such attempts we are. inclined to 
endorse the idea of the old gentleman who honored 
us with his company at this performance. He said : 
"Don't you think it would be a good scheme to pen- 
sion these dear people and save future generations 
the infliction of their so-called art?" There is noth- 
ing to the play, nothing to the acting, and nothing to 
the audience, so why say anything about nothing- 
ness? The critic is disarmed by the very helplessness 

of his victims. 

* * * 

"Up York State," at the Alcazar next week is a 
comedy with a dash of melodramatic incident. After 
this will be an elaborate production of Colgate 
Baker's "The Heart of a Geisha," a drama of modern 
Japan, which will reveal the quaint and fascinating 
little dancing girls of the Orient in a new light. This 
drama comes in between the regular stock offerings 
and the dramas of romance selected for White Whit- 
tlesey, who is soon to begin his annual engagement. 
There will be a Fourth of July matinee on Tuesday. 



Eight Arabs dressed to the name is the best fea- 
ture of the new-comers at the Orpheum this week. 
Acrobats, as a rule, do not interest me, but I must 
confess that these Arabs are. wonderful. They do the 




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18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1905. 



Florence Roberts has but two more weeks at the 
California Theatre. "Zaza," David Belasco's remark- 
able emotional comedy-drama, will be the offering 
for next week, and "Tess of the D'Urbervilles," 
dramatized from Thomas Hardy's famous novel, will 
be the bill for the final week. Next week will posi- 
tively be the last opportunity to see Miss Roberts in 
this role, as next season she goes under new manage- 
ment, and will devote her time to other plays. 

* * * 

The bill for Fourth of July week at the Central 
will be "Chattanooga," which is claimed to be the 
finest American war drama ever written. The story 
is laid during the scenes of the Rebellion, and has a 
thread of romance running through it. There will 
be clanging of sabres, a military air throughout, 
splendid costumes of the soldier boys, and in a word, 
all that could stir patriotism in an audience will be 
given in this play. Special matinee on July 4th. 

* * * 

Alphonse Czibulka's comic opera, "Amorita," will 
receive its initial production at the Tivoli next Mon- 
day night. It will be given with a very strong cast : 
Barron Berthald will appear as Fra Bombarda, and 
the role of Angelo will introduce Rosemary Glosz, a 
soprano who enjoys a splendid reputation in the East 
and has the advantages of youth and good looks. 
Aida Hammi will have a splendid opportunity as 
Amorita. Grace Palotta is cast as Forterbraccio, and 
Teddy Webb is to be Sparaccini. William Schuster 
will be Castrucci, and Aimee Leicester, his wife Per- 
petua. There will be a holiday matinee of "Amorita" 
next Tuesday, July 4th. 

* * * 

T. Daniel Frawley will continue to appear in "Ran- 
son's Folly," at the Columbia Theatre all of next 
week. There will be a special matinee on July 4th. 
The final performance of Richard Harding Davis' 
American army play will take place on Sunday night, 
July 9th. 

The announcement is made that a season of Yid- 
dish performances will be given at the Columbia 
Theatre commencing Monday night, July 10th. Man- 
ager Glickman, of Chicago, has rented the playhouse 
for a series of performances, and will bring his play- 
ers here direct from Chicago. Nine performances 
will be given during the first week. The opening 
play is to be "Gabriel." This will be repeated on Tues- 
day night. Other plays to be staged during the week 
are "The Golden Country," "The Jewish King Leah," 
"The Jewish Priest," "Kol Nidrey," and "The Inter- 
rupted Wedding." The prices are to range from 25 
cents to $1. Seats are already on sale. 

* * * 

George Parsons and Georgie Drew Mendum will 
begin an engagement at the Grand Opera House to- 
morrow (Sunday) matinee, in the American drama 
by Sidney S. Toller, entitled "The Belle of Rich- 
mond." Summer prices, 25 and 50 cents, will prevail 
during this engagement. There will be a holiday 
matinee Tuesday next, July 4th. 

* * * 

A decided novelty is promised in the De Serris 
Art Studies, which will be shown for the first time in 
San Francisco at the Orpheum Sunday afternoon, 
July 2d. Fifteen celebrated European models, direct 
from Paris, will give living reproductions of famous 
bas reliefs and groups of statuary. Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick Voelker, musical artists, will be new. Mr. 
Voelker is a distinguished violinist, while Mrs. Voel- 
ker is an accomplished accompanist. Zazell and Ver- 



Columbia Theatre. 



non, known as "The tourist and his valet," will re- 
appear. This time they bring with them a supporting 
company, and will present their original comedy pan- 
tomime entitled "The Elopement." Schepp's Dog and 
Pony Show, a school of equine and canine scholars, 



Grand Opera House 

Week beginning tomorrow. Sunday matiDee. 
The brilliant comedians GEORGE PARSONS and GEORGIE 
DREW MENDUM supported by an excellent company in Sid- 
ney S. Toller's stirring American play 

THE BELLE OF RICHMOND 

Holiday matinee next Tuesday. Usual matinee Saturday. 
Summer prices, 25c and 50c Sunday matinees, July 9, 
Archibald Clavering Gunter's sentimental ."arce, 
"The Deacon's Daughter," 

GotTi.ua. Marx & Co, 

1. 1't'i't! mid Manajrert- 

Tonlght, Sunday night and all next week. Special matinee 
July 4th 

T. DANIEL FRAWLEY 

in Richard Harding Davis' success 

RANSONS FOLLY , 

Special summer prices— Orchestra Si. bo. Orchestra Circle, $1; 

Balcony 76 and 50 cents; Second Balcony, 25 cents. 

Matinee Saturdays. 

July 10— Glickman's Yiddish players from Chicago. 

Alr-a-7-ar T~h*ant-r^ Bjlabco ft Matkb, Proprietors 

MlOdZcir 1 neutre E. D. Pbicb. Gen'l. Mgr. Tel. Aleawr 

Week commencing Monday, July 3d. Begular matinees Satur- 
day and Sunday Extra 4thof July matinee Tuesday 
The Alcazar Stock Company in the realistic small town eomedy 

UP YORK STATE 

With its great 4th of July picnic scene 

Evenings 25 to 75 cents. Matinees Saturday and Sunday 2i to 

50 cents. 

July 10-W. H. Crane's OK PROBATION. July 17-Colgate 

Baker's new Japanese play. THE HEART OF A GEISHA. 

California Tbeater ffi^fc™;" 

Tomorrow night and all next week 
Mr. Frederic Belasco presents 

FLORENCE ROBERTS 

in David Belasco's famous emotional comedy-drama 

ZflZfq 

in which the gifted actress has scored her most brilliant 
triumph. Matinees 4th of July and Saturday- 
Farewell week commencing Sunday, July nth Miss Roberts in 
TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES. 

t""*o|-\t- rrt I THArffr^ Belasco & Mayer, proprietors 
^ y, ; Lrui l IlfcSULre. Marketst.. near lth. Phone South 63 3 

Week beginning July 3rd. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Special Matinee July 4th 

Lincoln J. Carter's greatest play and the finest American war 
drama ever written 

CHATTANOOGA 

Patriots rally ! Enthusiasm ! 

Magnificent scenic effectsl Thrilling climaxes! 

Next-Under the Dome. 

Prices evening 10c to 50c. Matinees 10c, 16c, 260. 

Tivoli Opera House. °° rn " ^^ strMtM 

Beginning next Monday night. 

Holiday matinee next Tuesday, July 4th. 

Magnificent production of Alphonse Czibulka's comic opera 

fJMORlTA 

With BARRON BERTHALD. 

First appearance of ROSEMARY GLOSZ, Soprano. 
All the Tivoli favorites in the cast. Matin»e Saturday. 
Usual Tivoli prices, 25. go and 75 cents. 

OrpheUlT). bet. Stocktonand Powell Sts. 
Week commencing Sunday matinee. July -} 
Special matinee Tuesday. Jul) 4th. 

A VAUDEVILLE CELEBRATION 

Henrlettede Serris' Bronze and Marble Statuary: Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederick Voelker; Zazell and Vernon Company: hehejrp's 
Dogs and Ponies; Eight Bedouin Arabs; George W. Day; Wil- 
son Trio; Orpheum Motion Pictures and la#t week of 

CLAUDE GILLINGW^TER & CO. 

Regular matinees every Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and 
Sunday. Prioes— loc. 250, soo. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July l, 1905. 

will appear tor the first time in tins city. Claude * i i 1 - 
lingwater, the troupe of eight Bedouin Arabs, < •■ 
W. Day, i" a complete change of songs and stories, 
and the Wilson trio of German comedians, will be 
the holdovers. There will be a special matinee at 
the » >rphenm on Tuesday, the 4th of July. 
* • * 

Diversified entertainment is promised at the Chutes 
this coming week. Chiquita, "the living doll," will 
continue her pretty performance, and William Tomp- 
kins, the topical talker, will discuss the sense of non- 
sense. Charles and Edna Harris, refined character 
sketch artists, and Leon and Bertie Allen, vocalists 
of renown, will entertain. On Tuesday evening 
there will be a display of fireworks, in honor of In- 
dependence Day. Babies, in the life saving incuba- 
tors, are again on exhibition. 



'9 



It is never wise to buy real estate until the 

title is made clear beyond the possibility of a doubt. 
Nor can every one trace a title accurately. Long 
experience and great familiarity with title records 
are necessary to insure a correct abstract. The Cali- 
fornia Estate and Probate Company has the confi- 
dence of the entire community, because it has fully 
mastered the intricacies of the "ins and outs" of the 
records of property transfers. When it delivers an 
abstract no one questions its correctness. Then, 
again, the company saves its patrons from 25 per cent 
to 50 per cent of the usual fees by including legal 
and kindred services in the charge for the abstract. 



Not only does the News, Stationery and 

Supply Company, 527 Montgomery street, carry a 
large line of stationery, office supplies, cutlery, no- 
tions, etc., as well as all periodicals, but it executes 
all kinds of printing, and does engraving work fully 
equal to the best that could be found anywhere. And, 
again, one need not bother to send to the publisher 
for publications, for this company has arranged to 
attend to all that. Just drop in at 527 Montgomery 
street and see for yourself. 



Do not throw away your soiled gloves or cra- 
vats or laces, nor yet your "a little dingy" suit of 
clothes. Just send them to Spaulding's Cleaning and 
Dyeing Works, at 127 Stockton street, and in a few 
days you will have them back — and you will be 
amazed to see how fresh, clean and new they look. 
Not only look, but are. 



SPECIAL RATES FOR THE HOLIDAYS. . 

On the California Northwestern Railway tickets 
will be sold at greatly reduced rates on July 1st, 2d, 
3d and 4th, with return limit July 5th. EXTRA 
SERVICE JULY 4th. On Tuesday, July 4th, a 
special train will leave Camp Vacation for San Fran- 
cisco at 7 :oo p. m., stopping in transit at Russian 
River Heights, Guernewood Park, Guerneville, and 
all intermediate points. From Glen Ellen a special 
will leave at 8:15 p. m., stopping at Agua Caliente 
Springs, Royes Hot Springs, Verano, Sonoma, Buena 
Vista, Vineburg and all intermediate points. At 1 1 :oo 
p. m. a special train will leave Napa for San Fran- 
cisco. 



Teala Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

for JV.BO per ton; half ton, Si; quarter ton, $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking aiid heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



The Domestic Garbage Burner 




This is the wayithe 20th century 
housewife disposes of garbage 



is a device which is 
attached to ranges, 
cook stoves, gas 
stoves and gasoline 
stoves. There is a 
special device for phy- 
sicians. There is 
positively no odor with 
this in operation. This 
Burner will fit any 
stove or range. The 
cost is within the 
reach of all. 



FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS ADDRESS 

Geo. W. RoseKrans, Agent 

713 James Flood Bldg. San Francisco 



3ave the fronts of the Packages. We pay money for the Three B'.- 



PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR 

Boston Brown Bread 
Plnm Pudding 
Griddle Cakes and 
Muffins 

AiK your grocer for it 

PUT UP IN RED PACKAGES 
AND IN 10 POUND SACKS BY 




^^.^u.^ 



Allen's B. B. B. Flour Co. 

Pacific Coast Factory ... SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Mail us live 2 cent stamps and we will scad Sample Package prepaid 



TEL. PRIVATE EXCHANGE 218 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 



STARR KING BUILDING 
121 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASERS' GUIDE 

BERGEZ RESTAURANT— Rooms for ladles and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

POODLE DOG RESTAURANT— N. E. Cor. Eddy and Maioo 
streets. Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, Pri- 
vate Exchange 429. A. B. Blanco, Proprietor. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314, SIC, 811 Mala 
street. Iron work of every description deslgmed and ob- 
structed. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




The San Francisco society girl has just had a 
great, juicy, sugar-coated compliment handed out to 
her in a Vienna paper. Under a nom de plume, an 
Austrian nobleman has been writing a series of ar- 
ticles on American impressions, and one of his latest 
remarks, Englished out of its Teutonic haze, sounds 
good to California ears. "The San Francisco girls." 
says this critic, "are so much handsomer than the wo- 
men of any other American city that one might say 
the Creator had practiced on the rest of them, and had 
then made the maiden of the Pacific Slope in the full- 
ness of His experience. She is not better groomed 
than the New York girl, but she is a much finer speci- 
men physically than New York produces. I expect- 
ed to find the Spanish and Mexican imprint much 
more clearly marked, but as a matter of fact one 
meets more blondes in San Francisco society than in 
other American cities. They have more dash than 
the Viennese, but not as much subtle charm." And 
here the critic begins to throw some left-handed 
"swaps," so we won't quote any further. 

It is rather strange that in this land, whose broad 
acres once belonged to the Spanish, there are so many 
golden locks, and they're not bottle-blondes either. 
Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Gus Taylor, Mrs. Norris 
Davis, Mrs. Fred McNear, Mrs. George Pope, Mrs. 
Latham McMullin — one might fill this column with 
leaders of the smart set who are on the blonde col- 
oring. 

* * * 

At high noon on Wednesday, Miss Marie Louise 
Parrott, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Paid win 
1'arrott, became the bride of Francis J. McComas. 
Reverend Dr. Clampett tied the knot in Trinity 
Church. Society has been eagerly looking forward 
to this affair, and even many of those who had al- 
ready left town hastened back to be present at this 
occasion. The church looked very beautiful, although 
simplicity reigned supreme. A bank of Bermuda 
lilies hid the altar, while quantities of palms and 
other greens were used to decorate the rest of the 
church. The bride's only attendant was her cousin, 
Miss Christine dc Guigne, who acted as maid of 
honor. Willis Polk came up from the country with 
his wife to act as Mr. McComas' best man. Mr. Chas. 
Field, Enrique Grau, Athole McBean and Dr. Harry 
S. Kierstedt were the four ushers. The prominent 
society girl made a most charming- bride. Her gown 
was a creation of real lace and chiffon. She wore a 
long tulle veil, fastened with orange blossoms, artd 
carried a shower bouquet of white orchids and mai- 
den-hair fern. After the ceremony, a large wedding 
breakfast was given at the Hotel Richelieu. Be- 
sides the- bridal party, other relatives and some very 
- close friends were present. Mr. and Airs. McComas'' 
honeymoon will be a short one, and then the young 
couple will make their home here. 
* * * 

Oakland society is looking eagerly forward to tin- 
wedding which will take place early in July at the 
beautiful residence of Mr. and Mrs. George Wheaton, 
oh Lake street. The interesting parties for whom the 
bridal knot will be tied are Miss Ella Sterett and Mr. 
Edwin Barbour. Miss Sterett is a niece of Mrs. 
Wheaton, and well known in Oakland, The vo 



couple will afterwards make their home in the city 
across the bay, and the friends of both arc delighted 
at the prospect of keeping them in their midst. 

* * * 

Miss Winifred L. ( isborne and Everett J. Brown 
were married in Oakland Wednesday evening. Both 
are well known and popular in Oakland society. 
Their relatives and a few intimate friends were the 
only witnesses of the ceremony, which took place at 
the bride's home, 953 Madison street. The Reverend 
W. Hobart officiated. Miss ( Hsborne was formerly a 
teacher in the Oakland High School. While a stu- 
dent at the University of California she was one of 
the most popular girls of her class. Mr. Brown is 
Deputy District Attorney of Alameda County. He 

is a graduate of the University of California. 

* * » 

Richard Burke and his son, William Burke, will 
soon leave for San Luis Obispo County, wdiere they 
will visit at the ranch of the Baron and Baroness von 
Schroeder. The Burkes arrived in San Francisco 
a few weeks ago from their home in Ireland. Ever 
since they took rooms at the Occidental, society has 
been formally and informally entertaining these 
prominent strangers. Mrs. 1 lowney Harvey will soon 
return from the East, and will make one more to en- 
tertain the Burkes. 

* * * 

The luncheon which Mrs. John A. Darling gave 
at the Occidental last Saturday was a most enjoy- 
able affair. Mrs. Chas. S. Sumner, the wife of Major- 
( ieneral Sumner, was the guest of honor. Some 
twelve or fourteen other guests enjoyed Mrs. Dar- 
ling's hospitality. Mrs. Eleanor Martin. Mrs. Thos, 
B. Bishop, Mrs. Morris, Mrs. Moale, Mrs. Buchanan. 
Mrs. Henry L. Dodge and Mrs. Gale had the pleas- 
ure of meeting Airs. Sumner. 

* * * 

There was something new in San Francisco last 
Saturday night. For want of a better title, the func- 
tion was called a Progressive Dinner, and consisted 
of a single course at nine different restaurants. The 
progressive feature was accomplished by means of 
the palace trolley car, San Francisco, which carried 
the diners from their first course at the Union League 




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EDDY & FILLMORE STREETS. Tel. West 828 



July i. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



(lul) to the last cniir.se at the Cliff House. 1 
whi> constituted the part] were Mr. and Mrs ' 
Weaver, Mr. and Mr-. /.. S. < ather. Dr. and M :■ 
M. Rood, l>r. and Mrs. 11. S. Stern. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wendling, Dr. Raymond Russ, Mr-. Rae Felt, 
of Eureka, Mr. and Mr>. \\ . F. Bogart, Mr. and Mr-. 
Horace Orear, Mr. and Mr-. S. W. Morsehead, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. M. I.aralne. Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Phillips, 
Mr. and Mr-. Frank Cooper, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
lloft Seely. 

* » * 

tin Tuesday last, Miss I'helan, James 1). l'helan 
and Miss Mollie Dillon left for Europe. The party 
will spend a few months traveling about, but have 
set no definite time for their return. Miss Phelan's 
health has not been the best this last year, and it is 
hoped that she will benefit by the trip. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Eastland (Miss Helen Wag- 
ner; were delightfully surprised to meet Miss Helen 
and Miss Constance de Young in New York. The 
party had some enjoyable times together before the 
Eastlands left the city. From New York the young 
couple went to visit the Parker Whitneys in their 
beautiful summer home in the Maine woods. This 
delightful visit with the Whitneys will terminate the 
Eastmans' honeymoon, and they will soon start for 
home. 

* * * 

Hosts of friends welcomed Miss Ella Bender on 
her return from the East last week. For the last year 
Miss Bender has been traveling in the East, and San 
Francisco has felt the loss of this favorite -greatly. 
Such a very clever and fascinating woman can ill 
be spared by society. While East, Miss Bender was 
a guest of Honorable and Mrs. J. Sloat Fasset, both 
in their beautiful home in Elmira and in New York 
City. Miss Bender promises to make merry in San 
Francisco for a while now, and not fare forth on any 
more journeys for some time to come. 

* * * 

The engagement is announced of Miss Mabel 
Handy, daughter of the late Dr. J. C. Handy, to Ed- 
ward C. Mau, of San Francisco. 

* * * 

Colonel George W. Macfarlane entertained the 
Griscom party during their stop at Honolulu, on 
their way to Japan. Mr. C. A. Griscom is head of the 
great international shipping trust, and sailed on the 
Siberia from this port. During' his short stay in 
Hawaii he was much entertained, and sent on his way 
rejoicing. 

* * * 

Earle Talbot is the happy recipient just now of 
congratulation on his engagement to the beautiful 
Miss Helen Scoville of New York. The engagement 
was quite a surprise to society here, but not at all 
to be wondered at, for Miss Scoville is already famed 
for her beauty and her charm of manner. Some 
weeks ago she came West to visit Mrs. Amy T. Tal- 
bot, the mother of her fiance. The young people met 
in New York, and only recently became engaged. It 
seems the "wicked fairy" did not assist when Fate 
lavished her gifts upon the bride-to-be. She is not 
very tall, but most graceful, with light brown hair and 
dark eyes, and a most perfect complexion. 

There promises to be a decrease in the number of 
teas and afternoon functions given in honor of Miss 
Leslie Green of Berkeley, for Howard Huntington 
has arrived from Los Angeles. Now Miss Green's 



friend- are planning dinners and larger affairs that 
will include Mr. Huntington and Ids friends, t'nfor- 
tuna.cly, Mr. Huntington's stay lure will be a very 
shori •>ne. 



\ jovial time is awaiting tin- motor enthusiasts, 
who are planning to spend the Fourth of July in a 

run down to Del Monte. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hol- 

brook, Dr. Harry Tevis, Miss 1,1 eckels and 

Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield Baker are those who will 
work off their overflow of patriotism in this entertain- 
ing fashion. 

* * • 

Another long-to-be-remembercd dinner took place 
at the Bohemian Club on last Friday night. Some 
seventy-five members welcomed William Winter, 
the famous critic. Graceful and witty speeches 



Champagnards 

Dessert Frangais Sup^rieur 

No function complete without them. Served with 
champagne or other wines, or with punches and 
creams or alone. The daintiest dainty. 

Depots: BIBO-NEWMAN CO.; SWAINS or 

Franco-Swiss Biscuit Companie 

(Sole Manufacturers) 
1804 SUTTER ST., S. F. Phone Scott 1517 



Try Our 



StanfordRichmond Coal 

From the Richmondvale District 
Newcastle, N. S. W., Australia. 

Intense heat, little ash, and no clinKer. 
Direct from the mine to the consumer. 



SOLD TO TRADE ONLY. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT AND 

SEE THAT YOU OET IT. 



Richmond Coal Co. 

Agents 



MISS GE'RT'RWDE ELLIOTT 

Puptl of Marchesl and Bouhy 

Teacher of VOICE AND PIANO 

ROOSE^EI/T BUIL.DING, 546 SUTTER 3T. 



Dr. H. J. STEWART 



TEACHER OF VOCAL MUSIC 

Pianoforte. Organ, Harmony and Composition 
Special course lor singers desirine church ap- 
pointments. 



STUDIO: 1105 BUSH ST. 



Best's Art School 



Lessons in Painting, Drawing, Sketching and 
Illustrating. Life classes, $3.00 per month. 
927 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1905. 



marked the evening in honor of the distinguished 
visitor. James D. Phelan, William Greer Harrison, 
John McNaught, John C. Wilson and Joseph D. Red- 
ding were among those who made fitting remarks. 
Mr. Winter made a most interesting and appropriate 
speech. His hosts were more than charmed with his 
rare and pleasing personality. 

* * * 

The friends of Miss Helen Chesebrough were de- 
lighted to welcome her on her return from her Eu- 
ropean tour. She arrived with Miss Mary Eyre, 
Mr. George Pinchard and his son, Eyre. Mrs. Pin- 
chard and her younger son, George, will remain in 

Paris for some time. 

* * * 

Mrs. Amy L. Talbot and Miss Amy Talbot were at 
Hotel Vendome, San Jose, last week. 

* * * 

Arrivals at Hotel Del Monte for the week ending 
June 25, 1905: Misses Alice and Florence Schroth, 
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Young, Samuel G. Buckbee, W. 
A. Van Vleet,'Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Brown, Miss Car- 
rick, C. S. Aiken, Sherwood Hopkins, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. J. Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Swinnerton, Win. 
H. Crocker, Mrs. L. B. Miller, Mrs. E. Critcher, John 
C. Currier, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Hale, Miss Rountree, 
J. C. McElroy, Mrs. C. Breon, Mrs. L. Dzregal, Mr. 
and Mrs. George J. Taylor, M. D. Green, A. A. Wat- 
kins, Francis J. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Williams, 
W. R. Wheeler, San Francisco. Mrs. H. G. Bond, 
Mr. and Mrs. Marshal Bond, Paston Swift, R. C. 
Barclay, Santa Clara ; H. W. Judd, Watsonville ; Dr. 
H. E. Piper, Tonopah ; Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Heibbron, 
Sacramento ; Mr. and Mrs. Horatio B. Hackett, 
Judge and Mrs. John McLeary, Philadelphia. 

* * * 

The Hotel Rafael and grounds are crowded every 
day. A large number of San Francisco people visit 
their friends at the hotel and enjoy the beautiful sur- 
roundings. Arrivals at the hotel during the week 
ending June 27, 1905 were: i\lr. and Mrs. G. H. Ty- 
son, Mr. G. Sutro, Miss L. Peterson, Mrs. T. Sutro, 
Mrs. W. H. Bremer, Miss H. M. Bremer, Mr. F. 
King, Miss R. Newman, Mrs. C. C. Butler, Mr. A. 
McBean, Mr. C. Burnham, Mrs. A. Schwabacher, 
Mr. L. A. Schwabacher, Mr. J. Gallois, Mr. S. Rau, 
Mr. W. L. Oliver, Mr. M. Michelson, Mr. G. A. Mag- 
nin, Mr. and Mrs. Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. I. Free- 
man and family, Mr. and Mrs. J. Magnin and son, 
Mr. P. S. Baker, Mr. R. Bocqueraz, Mr. M. E. 
Pinckard, Mr. R. Spreckels, Miss A. McNally, Mr. 
C. G. Kuehn, Mr. H. M. Barksdale, Mr. C. L. Reese, 
Mr. W. H. Dutton, Mrs. E. K. Upham, Mrs. E. M. 
Miller, Mrs. L. M. Page, Mrs. T. A. Keables, Mr. and 
Mrs. K. Soughimoura and child. 

Not in many days has there been so much 
interest manifested in any guest stopping at the 
Palace Hotel as has been created by John L. Sulli- 
van and his manager, Frank Hall, of New York. 
John L. continues to be the admired of the younger 
generation who worship him as the one-time invinci- 
ble hero of the prize ring. Hall, with his Kohinoor, 
as big as an English walnut, dazzles the bell-hops, 
and even made Dick, the head porter, blink. Dick 
carries a rock himself, which is no slouch. It is al- 
most pitiable to hear John L. prate about his prowess. 
* * * 

The advance guard of the unofficial portion of 
the Taft party arrived here Tuesday morning, and 
put up at the Palace Hotel. I suppose the news- 



papers will keep the able Secretary of War busy ex- 
plaining his speech on Chinese Exclusion. Will peo- 
ple never learn that what may seem a paramount is- 
sue here often is never heard on the other side of 
the Rockies. 



Dr. and Mrs. H. Isaac Jones will leave on the 
5th of July for their mountain home, Casa de la Loma 
Prieta, Santa Cruz Mountains. They will be accom- 
panied by a party of friends from San Francisco and 
Oakland. Dr. Jones will resume practice on the 1st 
of August. 

* * * 

There was a banquet at the Palace Hotel 
Thursday night, given by the Knights of Columbus. 
It was a sort of closing peal of the merry chimes of 
the celebration in this city for the delegates. They 
had a good time, even to the delegate who lost him- 
self five times in two days in the Palace Hotel cor- 
ridors. 



If you want one of the most enjoyable outings 

at exceptionally reasonable rates, take the Wawona 
Route to Yosemiite, via the Mariposa Big Trees. It 
costs only $48.50, including rail and stage transporta- 
tion and sleeper each way. The outing tickets are 
good for four days among the Big Trees, carriage 
drives and trail trips to Mirror Lake, Vernal Falls, 
Nevada Falls and Glacier Point, with the very best 
hotel accommodations without one cent of charge 
above the price of the ticket. Ask at the Southern 
Pacific Office, 613 Market street, for particulars. 




Hunter 
Baltimore Rye 

The Perfect Type of 
The American Gentleman's Whiskey 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO. 

136-14-1 Second Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Private 313. 



July i. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
June .'4 (Saturday)— Misa Mabel Hend) to Mr. Al 

bcrt Weber. Miss Katlierinc Forresl Chapman, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Forresl Chap 
man of Ontario, to Harold William Crowell. 
June 28 1 Wednesday) — Miss Winifred Osborne to 
Everett J. Brown, both of Oakland. Miss Marie 
Louise l'arrott to Mr. Francis J. McComas. Mis- 
Susie Howard of Los Angeles to E. Avery Mc- 
Carthy. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Ella V. McCloskey and Mr. John Jacob Apple, 
both of San Francisco. 

Miss Ella Sterett and Mr. Edwin Barbour, of Oak- 
land. 

Miss Helen Scoville, of New York, and Mr. Earle 
Talbot of this city. 

ENTERTAINMENTS. 

June 23 (Friday) — The Bohemian Club tendered a 
dinner to Mr. William Winter. 

June 24 (Saturday) — Mrs. William Lindsley Spen- 
cer gave a theatre party at the Majestic. 

June 25 (Sunday) — Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a din- 
ner in honor of Miss Phelan. 

June 26 (Monday) — Mrs. John A. Darling gave a 
luncheon in honor of Mrs. Charles S. Sumner. 

Euclid was laying down the axiom that two 

parallel lines can never meet. "That doesn't matter," 
sniffed the financial magnate, "you can merge them?" 
Herewith the mathematician sadly turned to the mul- 
tiplication table for consolation. — Puck. 



33 



a \ 



THAT.S YOU 



Pee^rlirve 
... . W/\««r\in('i 



Powder 

Doyo\ithiiylcitwo>ild have 
been, so widely imitated if 
not justified 

v Claims 



— Freddie — What's a pedestrian, dad Cobwigger 
— He's a man who can't afford an auto. — Puck. 



Moraghan's Oyster Stalls in the California 

Market grow more popular every day. That is be- 
cause of the excellence and promptness of the service, 
and the fresh and pure quality of meats, oysters and 
other foods that he serves. 



The Star Hair Remedy— best of all tonics and restoratives. 

Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not a dye. 
At druggists and hair dressers. Accept no substitute. Star 
Remedy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mechanics' Savings Bank. 
S. W. Cor. Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
Tor the half year ending June SO, 1905. a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and one- half (3 1-2) per cent per annum upon all 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1905. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate of interest as prin- 
cipal from July 1, 1906. Interest is allowed from date of deposit. 
JOHN U. CALKINS. Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Central Trust Company of California. 

42 Montgomery Street, cor. Sutter Street. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1905, a dividend has been declared 
on the deposits in the savings department of this bank, as follows: 
On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent per annum, and on or- 
dinary deposits at the rate of (3 1-4) per cent per annum, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1906. 
FRANK J. SYMMES. President. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 

626 Market Street, opp. Palace Hotel. 
For the half-year ending June 80. 1905. a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of th i en and one-half (31-2) per cent per annum on de- 
posits, free of all taxes, payaule on and after Saturday, July l, 1905. 
W- E. PALMES, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Cor. Market. McAllister and Jones Sts-. San Francisco, June 28. 1905 
At a regular meeting of theBoard of Directors of this Society, held 
this day. a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one- 
half (3 1-2) per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months end- 
ing June 30, 1905. free from al) taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 
1905. ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 



Lighting Troubles 

Quickly remedied ' if you will phone Exchange 8. You 
should have superb service, brilliant electric lights, 23 
candle power gas. We have a full corps of 

Expert Inspectors 

At your service day or night. Let us know if anything is 
wrong. 



&/>e GAS Co. 

415 POST STREET 

EXCHANGE 8 



DON'T BREAK YOUR BACK 



operating an old 
fashioned Gas 
Range. 

"REAL ECONOMV' 
GAS RANGES 

have elevated 
oven and broiler. 

Ask the 

GAS CO. 



"REAL ECONOMY" GAS RANGES. 
1 




fc-Hqf 



to show you the 

'REAL ECONOMV" GAS RANGE in operation. 



24 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Round About Town. 



July i, 1905. 



This is Shocking to Everybody. 

A story is going around among the gossipy ones 
that is said to have had its start in so dignified a 
place as the Century Club. Wherever it began, it 
has got going anyhow, and when winsome dames nar- 
rate it with bated breath, the decorous ones hold up 
their hands in holy horror. Can it be? No! Impos- 
sible! But it is sworn to solemnly, and two of our 
well-known society girls have become the sponsors 
for its actual occurrence. That I can certify — anxious 
as I was to disprove the truth of it. Well, these two 
girls returned not so long ago from Europe. While 
driving in the Paris Bois, they met a lady from San 
Francisco, high up in the local blue book, also driv- 
ing. She was an old friend, and of course there was 
a glad re-union. This lady had gone abroad for a 
trip of two years, and she found Paris SO fascinating 
that she stayed twelve months there alone. The three 
ladies from far San Francisco had a good time going 
about in the city of the boulevards. The art galler- 
ies were places of frequent visits. One day the}' vis- 
ited the new salon, and there were thrown into rap- 
tures over some startling pictures. One that arrested 
the immediate attention of the three was a superb 
conception of "The Descent from the Cross." I he 
Madonna's face seemed particularly young, hand- 
some and spirituelle. The two girls were cast into 
raptures. Their lady companion was also affected 
by the sight of the picture. She examined it atten- 
tively with her lorgnette, and then remarked: "What 
a sad subject! This woman's husband must have 
been murdered." The girls were carried home on a 
stretcher. 



Sam's Original Remedy. 

There are certain things in San Francisco of which 
I am not fond, and I know you will agree with me I 
was put inslantl\ in mind of them the other day when 
shown how to give my troubles a long vacation. All 
you need is a switch board. 

Before one of these keys to the electrical situation 
I saw his excellency, Sam Friedlander, standing. B,,ih' 
hands were held out complacently and grasping the 
brass projections under the knobs. He was the 
image of faith, looking with gaze benign at the wall 
as though about to enter the first stage of a trance! 

new 



What's up? Was the gentleman taking the 
electric treatment for neurasthenia? 

"Please tell me what you are doing?" said 1 "1 
am getting nervous. It isn't suicide, is it? I don't 
want to have to ring up the Coroner's office, even for 
an exclusive story." 

"Fleas,'' replied Friedlander, from his electric 
dream. Ihe answer was oracular, and therefore 
with mixed meaning. 

"Please explain," said I. 

"Well, you see, whenever they trouble me, I stand 
just here; I wet my fingers, grasp hold, get the shock 
and presto! the flea is as dead as a nail. It's great' 
Try it. You can enjoy the current, but a flea can't 
Anyway, they never return to the rendezvous any 
more. ' 

This is advice to be salted down. 

— The Inquisitor. 

Perhaps capital and labor would get along 

better together if about one-half the people who are 
trying to reconcile them would stop. — Puck. 



Presidio Terrace 



A GOOD TIME TO BUILD 

Get your house under cover in the sum- 
mer. Now is the time to secure a lot 
in Presidio Terrace. Only 35 lots left. 
Don't wait until your summer trip is 
over. We will reserve a lot for you 
without cost for a reasonable time, 
and if you don't want it you need not 
take it. 

SEND FOR 
ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET 



Baldwin & Howell 

25 Post St., S. F. 




TOM 

DILLON 

SCO. 

OPPOSITE 

PALACE HOTEL 

1905 SPRINO STYLES 



INVESTMENT 
57o Per Month 

SAVED ON THE COST IN BUYING THE 

Alaska 
Refrigerator 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



W. W. Montague <& Co. 

309-311-313-315 317 Market St., S. F. 



July i. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



35 




THE CITY SLEEPS. 
Br Charles Ma t.ml Boblu-uu I 1 1 '<<■ 1 •■it 1. -. .w 

The city sleeps and dreams, and dreams are sweet. 

I low dark and still the street! 

At peace, the citizens all silent lie; 

There is no restive eye; 

The breath is calm, no hurried feet go by, 

Night falls, and rest is sweet. 

The strife and struggle of the garish day, 

The world of work and play, 
The turmoil and the fighting — all is past. 
Nor loves nor hates outlast 

The wondrous shadow of the truce that's cast 
When night puts all away — 

As if the citizens were only boys 

Grown tired of tasks and toys, 

And seeking loving mother's knee, that there, 

With bedtime kiss and prayer, 

They might forget the daylight's little care 

And surfeiting of joys. 

O peaceful stars, compassioning, watchful eyes, 

Make low the lullabies 

That in vast unison the planets sing; 

Let them wake not, nor bring 

Too soon the pitiless, mad dawn on wing 

That, gleaming, stirs the skies! 

And thou, pale moon, pass on with silent tread — 

Thou'st seen the world to bed. 

E'O ye, mild winds, snuff out her little light 

With big clouds soft and white, 

As she upon the sleeping world shuts tight 

The door, her "good-night" said. 

And ye black rivers, rolling to the sea, 

Roll on most quietly, 

Lest ye may wake the city, lying still, 

Unconscious of the ill 

Or good the morrow may bring forth to fill 

Its cup — blest mystery ! 

And last, O Father of the world, look down 

With pity, not with frown, 

And guard the city, proud and rich and great. 

Forgot is its estate; 

In childlike innocence, immaculate, 

It sleeps— Thy Peace its crown! 

AUTUMN LIFE. 

By R. B. W.. in Metropolitan 

Trance, like the mellow air doth hold 
The sorrow of the passing year; 

The heart of Nature groweth cold, 
The time of falling snow is near. 

On phantom feet which none may near 
Creeps— with the shadow of the hill— 

The semblance of departing cheer— ,1 

But beauty's soul abideth still. _ / 



The guarantee of the "Clicquot Quality" of every bottle of 

Vve. CLICQUOT Champagne 



is in this LABEL: 



Refuse 
substitutes. 




AYIGNIERG*- 

-SAN mANCIMCO • 

SOLE AGENTS TOR THE MCinC COAST 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

Of 301 California street. San Francisco. Cal. 
Has declared for the six months ending June 3n. 1005. a dividend of 
5 per cent per annum on ordinary deposits. 6 per cent on term depos- 
its, and 6 per cent on monthly payment investments- Tnterest on de- 
posits payable on and after, Tnlv 1st. Interest on ordinary deposits 
not called for will be added to the principal and thereafter hear Inter- 
est at the same rate. 

DR. WASHINGTON DODGE. President. 
WILLIAM CORBIN. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

101 Montgomery street, corner of Sutter, 
Has declared a dividend for the term ending June 30. 1906. at the 
rate of three and one-half f8>a) per cent per annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Saturday. July 1. 1906. 

EDWIN BONNELL, Ass't Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French Savings Bank. 

For the six months ending June 30. 1905, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three and one-half (3>a) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on or after July 1, 1905. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

632 California Street, corner Webb. 
For the half year ending the 30th of June, 1906, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate per annum of three and six-tenths (3.60) per oent 
on term deposits, and three and fifteen one-hundredths (3.15) percent 
on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, 
July 1, 1905. 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

626 California Street. 
For the half-year ending June 30. 1905, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and one half (SK) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday. July 1. 1906. 
GEORGE TOTJRNY. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

Corner California and Montgomery streets. 
For the six months ending June 30. 1905, dividends have been de- 
clared on the deposits in the savings department of this company as 
follows: On terra deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent per annum, and 
on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3*4 per cent per annum, free of 
taxes, and payable on and after Saturday Julv 1. 1905. 

J. DALZELL BROWN. Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

316 Montgomery street. 
For the half year ending June 30. 1905. dividends upon all deposits at 
the rate of three and ■■ne-auarter (8)0 per cent per annum, free of 
taxes, will be payable on and after July 1, 1906. 

FRED W. RAY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

710 Market street, San Francisco- 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1905. a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three and one-quarter (3?i) per oent on all deposits, com- 
pounded semi-annually and free of taxes, payable on and after Satur- 
day, July 1, 1905. 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 

Silver Dollar Wine Rooms 

Seeba & Dolan, Proprietors. 
FINEST WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS. 

312 SANSOME ST, Cor. Halleck, 
Tel. Black 602. San Francisco, Cal, 



2<5 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1905. 




The preliminary report of New York Superintend- 
ent of Insurance Hendricks on the Equitable, is out. 
It is as full of criticism and reprobation as an egg is 
of meat. The lash of the department is laid on in 
smooth terms, but the sting and mark can plainly 
be discerned. The memory of the president founder, 
Mr. Henry B. Hyde, is jostled around in a way calcu- 
lated to make the ordinary memory hunt a quiet cor- 
ner by itself and shrink into the obscurity from 
which the report dragged it. The living 'backs of 
Mr. James Hazen Hyde and Mr. Alexander must still 
be and will likely continue for years to quiver under 
the knouting administered by Superintendent Hen- 
dricks. Mr. Hendricks declares his faith in the ab- 
solute solvency of the association, and there ends 
the sugar. From thence on he wields a big stick 
and wields it most unmercifully, for as a rule the cold 
truth is always more or less brutal. In his report 
he serves the whole truth, verified by copies of the 
documents he criticizes. He says: "No superficial 
measures will correct the existing evils in this so- 
ciety. A cancer cannot be cured by treating the symp- 
toms. Complete mutualization with the elimination 
of the stock, to be paid for at a price only commensu- 
rate with its dividends, is, in my opinion, the only 
measure of relief." His findings are "That all who 
took part in the deals of the James H. Hyde and as- 
sociates syndicate should be compelled to pay back 
the sums received by them. This is only very mild 
punishment. That the leases between the society 
and its subsidiary companies are all one-sided, unfair 
and unjust to the society. That the only thing that 
will restore confidence and benefit to the company 
would be the elimination of stock control, and what 
I deem of equal importance, the elimination of Wall 
street control. That there can be no question of the 
wisdom of prohibiting the investment of life insur- 
ance companies in subsidiary moneyed and business 
corporations, controlled by life companies, which oc- 
casion the carrying of large balances for the benefit 
of those companies and of the stockholders, who are 
largely associated in the management of the society. 
That James H. Hyde's authority continued to in- 
crease, and he proceeded to use the society and its 
assets more and more, as if they were his own, until 
he was checked by the demand for mutualization and 
his retirement. That James Hyde, with Alexander, 
was cognizant of, and approved, the various subsid- 
iary undertakings criticised, and by reason thereof, 
has failed to meet the obligations imposed upon him 
as chief officer of the society, and it is an open ques- 
tion whether he is not disqualified under section 36 
of the insurance laws from hereafter holding any 
office in a life insurance company, as well as all the 
other officers and directors who participated in these 
unlawful transactions. That it is important that the 
next Legislature should take into consideration the 
question of the investment of the funds of life in- 
surance companies, and establish a standard of in- 
vestment. That the report, with a copy of the evi- 
dence taken on this investigation, will be transmitted 
to the Attorney General for such action thereon as 
he may deem proper." 

The lease question is the most direct evidence in 
the report as to the magnitude of the graft which 
existed in the upper office of the Equitable. It is 



shown that the Mercantile Safe Deposit Company of 
New York, the Equitable Safe Deposit Companv of 
Boston, and the Missouri Safe Deposit Company of 
St. Louis, all subsidiary and affiliated companies to 
and with the Equitable, were simply organized, man- 
aged and run to the loss of the society and to the 
personal gain and profit of the higher officials of the 
association. That they were, in fact, organized, and 
the leases made with the especial view to rob the 
Equitable. The question of the profits on the various 
syndicates with which the officers of the Equitable 
were connected is shown to be another graft, but not 
of so great an amount nor for so long a period as 
the leases and stock of the trust companies. These 
were "steady milkers," and never went dry. The 
salary of $100,000, as paid to James Hazen Hyde, 
vice-president, is criticised in a manner to make that 
gentleman's twenty-seven-year-old pompadour stand 
straighter than ever. The question of who paid for 
the Cambon dinner is definitely settled — it was Mr. 
James Hazen Hyde, the host. The report says : "He 
drew from the society's treasury $12,800 to pay the 
bill, with no other authority than his own." The 
juggling with the question of how to get rid of the 
item of advances in the statement is fully set forth, 
and it is a trick that Lawson will revel in. 

Mr. Hendricks turns the matter, as far as he has 
gone, over to the Attorney General, which means 
that something will be heard to fall, other than the 
heads already in the basket. Mr. Hendricks, in this, 
his preliminary report, has peeled the coat off the 
Equitable. With the aid of the law he has invoked, 
he will, it is safe to say, before he is through, strip 
it to the hyde, and while the process may not be fit 
for delicate eyes to see, the body will be clean when 

he finishes. 

* * * 

Vice-President Woolbridge of the Columbian Na- 
tional Life was instantly killed recently by being 

thrown from an automobile. 

* * * 

The first fireworks fire to be reported happened on 
the 27th. From now on they will not be so scarce. 

In this connection Captain Porter of the Fire Un- 
derwriters Inspection Bureau has issued the follow- 
ing notice, which cannot be given too much publicity: 
"In view of the near approach of the Fourth of July 
with its attendant conflagration hazard, it is desired 
to call attention to the following simple precautions, 
some of which can be adopted to advantage by every- 
one. If you have private fire apparatus, see that the 




BOTH ORIENTAL AND DOMESTIC 
AT 




261 GEARY STREET. 



UNION SQUARE 



July I, igos- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






hose, tire pails and extinguishers arc in serviceable 
condition. If you have none, this is an excellent time 
■ protect your property. It you have a small 
hose, attach it In the most available place. Mativ 
kinds of business require the use of pails, tank 
barrels, while stores, stables and dwellings all have 
pails in use. Fill these with water and dispose them 
advantageously during this dangerous time. If you 
have gratings in the sidewalks over basement open- 
ings, or have outside basement doors, remove all rub- 
bish, and if possible close them over temporarily to 
keep out fireworks. Wet down wooden sidewalks 
and planked areas; also under open sidewalk grating, 
and use enough water to run through the cracks so 
as to wet the chips, papers, etc., underneath. Remove 
all packing boxes, goods in cases and rubbish from 
sidewalks, areas and roofs. If any boxes are neces- 
sarily left outside, pile them snugly and see that no 
packing material is exposed. Ascertain location of 
key of nearest fire-alarm box." These suggestions 
are worth remembering, not only on or about the 
4th day of July, but for the other 364 days of the 
vear. 

» * * 

The Governing Committee, it is understood, is 
hard at work, and the several members of the same 
are giving valuable time, thought and labor to the 
necessary preliminary work. The very best things 
are hoped for, and there is manifested on the street 
a desire to give it full scope and a fair field and no 
favor. 

* * * 

The Investment Directory of Insurance Companies 
for 1905, published by the Insurance Press, of New 
York, and compiled by Actuary Wolfe, is to hand. 
To banks, trust companies and life insurance men the 
book is more than valuable as affording a standard of 
values of the various securities owned by life insur- 
ance companies. 

» * « 

President Chase of the Hartford Fire Insurance 
Company, who, during his eighty years of life, has 
achieved fame as one of the master fire underwriters 
of this country, took unto himself his third wife in 

Hartford on the 22d instant. 

* * * 

Mr. Benjamin J. Smith, of the Connecticut, is vis- 
iting the home office of the company at Hartford. 

* * * 

The gentlemen of the insurance clique who have 
the time and means to take their pleasure without 
considering the expense, are vieing with each other 
just now in telling fish stories. It is passing strange 
that of all the phenomenal catches that have been 
made, they have all been consumed as fast as caught. 

None were in evidence. 

* * * 

The Pacific Mutual Life is holding its annual con- 
vention of the "General Managers' Association of the 
Pacific Mutual Life," at Detroit. Michigan. The 
attendance is large, and representatives from the 
home office will attend to the furnishing of enthu- 
siasm. 

* * * 

Mr. Robert W. Neal, publisher of the Pacific Un- 
derwriter, is registered at the Allyn House, Hartford, 

Conn. 

* * * 

The annual convention of the International Asso- 
ciation of Accident Underwriters will be held at the 
Royal Muskoka Hotel, Lake Muskoka, Canada, July 
18-21. 



»7 



INSURANCE 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $6,500,000 

Founded A. D. 179:.'. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital nnivinnn 

Surplus to Policy-holders ......'." '.'..'.'. " '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. [ \ \ '. \ '. 6.S.01I 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent. 202 Pine St., S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 

SlfJSlJSi . Pa J?"V7 P ' W^ 6 ' 100 - Assets, J24.662.04S.35 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch : 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgr». 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Assets •••■•••■ 5.340.136.94 

burplus to Policyholders . . 8,414,921.16 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager jeaclfic Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. Agents. 310 California St.. S. F. 



Cash Capital, $200,000. 



Cash Assets, $394,164.15 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
Head Office. Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Workmen's Col- 
lective, Vessels. Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers— Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice- 
President; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; 
F. P. Deering, Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edw. L. Brayt&n, J no. C. 
Coleman, F. P. Deering, E. b. Green. I. W. Hellman. Jr., Geo. 
A. Pope, Henry Rosenfeld, A. A. Son, Wm. S. Tevls. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 
Home Office: 
Pacific Mutual Building, 
San Francisco. 

PHENIX 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF BROOKLYN, NEW 1 0RK 
J. H. LENEHAN, Gen. Agt., CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast 

KOHL BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



Manheim, Dibbern & Co. 

STOCK AND BOND BROKERS AND GENERAL IN- 
SURANCE AGENTS. 

217 Sansome St. San Francisco 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1905. 



DE DIETRICH 
AUTOMOBILES 




DerQonstratioQ Car-30 h. p. 
hjas arrived. Mr. Paul Koecrjlin, 
Pacific Coast Representa- 
tive, now at H°tel Marie flntoi- 
rjette, Van Ness Ave., San Fran- 
cisco, will be pleased to give 
demonstrations to prospective 
buyers. Appointments by tele- 
phone or letter. 



BUICK 



Guaranteed 22 H. I\ Price $1400. Below is the 
record of stock cars at Eagle Rock Hill Contest. 
November 24. 1004. 




BUICK, Mm $1400, 22 H. P. 



Pope Toledo.. 
Mathewson .. 

Thomas 

Columbia 

Franklin 

Rambler 



Time 2.18 2-5 
Price H. P. 

$3500 



$5000 
$3000 
$4000 
$1050 
$1350 



24 
24 
40 
30 



Time 
2.15 4-5 
2.21 1-5 

2.42 4-6 
2.63 4-5 
4.08 3-6 
5.25 1-5 



CUTLER LEE, Agent for California 

359 Golden Gate Ave., Sao Pr. nclsco. 1032 So. M in St., Los Aneeles 



The 1905 




Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring Car 



Has Arrived 



Call and see it. 



Rambler Automobile Agency. au ^^ !t - 

Phone South 1007. 




GREAT WINTON "A" 

HORSEPOWER IS HERE 

Eats up the hills easily, quietly. Nothing like it 
in the market for the money. 

Nearly a half hundred Wintons sold in Cali- 
fornia this year. Every owner perfectly satisfied. 
You know what this means. Look this car up 
carefully. It will pay you. 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

901-925 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 

Oakland Agency 

MULLER MOTOR CAR CO., 124-140 12th Street 



FRANKLIN MOTOR CARS 



GUARAMEED FOR I VEiR 
AIR COOLED OP COURSE 




12 h. p. Runabout— Price $1,660 

4 Cylinders. Nickle Steel Construction Throughout. Ab- 
solutely the Speediest Runabout Built. 

F. WORTHINGTON BUTTS 
148 GOLDEN GATE AVE. Phono South 1142 



X5he Cameron 




Model L, 12-15 H. P. 1150 lbs. Price $1150.00 



Shaft Drive. 

Air Cooled. 
Road Clearance 9 In. 

Motor in Front. 
Never Necessary to 

crawl under car. 
Pacific Coast Branch 

The James Brown 
Machine Co. 

Manfs. and Agts. 
t CITY HALL SO. S. P. 

Other Models 

$875 to $1350.00 



H. ISAAC JONES, M. D. Eyt>, Eur, Not* »»d Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Frfcnclaco 
Rooms 303. 304. 305. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment. Telephone. Private Exchange, &(. Real- 
dence, corner 5th avenue and 16th street. Oakland. Tel. Knot M 



July i. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




The Autocrank. 



I he new Pennsylvania dyer made the 905 mile run 
between New York and Chicago recently in 1; hours 
ami ^ minutes. "How .lid we do it? Oh, I don't 
know." commented the engineer who finished the 

great run. "There is a lot of balloon juice in all 
that gag about the steady hand on the almighty throt- 
tle and a watchful eye on the glistening ribbons ol 
steel reaching out into the unutterable darkness. 1 
read railroad stories regular, you know. To tell 
you the truth, we ran under orders, let her out as u.' 
were told, and got there. Automobile break that 
record? You make me laugh. One of them puny 
toys wouldn't have enough left of it after a thousand 
miles at our speed to sell for junk. You'll never see 
it. my boy — they may do great stunts down along 
them sand dunes with a bunch of petticoats cheerin', 
but not in real life. I've been railroadin' for forty 
years, and I know about these things." 

* * * 

That the young king of Spain has just bought an 
American-made automobile may be considered as a 
sign of the complete restoration of good feeling be- 
tween the nations recently at war, but it is equally 
significant as a tribute to our motor cars. King 
Alfonso ordered a Columbia machine with the regu- 
lar American equipment, and the vehicle is a very 
handsome one, being painted black, with dark green 
panels, while the running gear is carmine, with black 
striping. The upholstering is in light Bedford cord. 

* » * 

For a period of sixty days from' to-day the automo- 
bilists of San Francisco are to be allowed the use 
of additional drives through Golden Gate Park. All 
motorists should comply strictly to the State Auto- 
mobile Law, and the regulations governing the op- 
eration of the horseless carriages on the park roads, 
in order that no trouble will o'ffcur during this proba- 
tionary period. 

* * * 

Thomas W. Lawson again breaks into the sport- 
ing game with a $5,000 offer for the best automobile 
mile under 53 seconds during the eight days' auto 
meet at St. Paul, from July 4th to 13th. 

* * * 

Barney Oldfield is out with the statement that 
within two years he expects to see automobile track 
racing prohibited on any courses except those es- 
pecially built for it. He adds that the game is des- 
tined to become a great sport, and that many special 
tracks will be built for it. 

* * * 

Senator Felton and Dr. W. S. Thorne enjoyed a 
most delightful automobile trip last week, when they 
left San Francisco in a double Victoria Columbia on 
a tour of inspection of the new electric shore railroad 
to Santa Crttz. They proceeded to the "Tent City" 
by way of Pescadero and remained over night at the 
Sea Beach Hotel, the headquarters of the Automobile 
Club of California on the recent run. The following 
morning the automobile was started for San Jose, 
and with the roads in splendid condition this proved 
an extremely pleasant journey. Before returning to 
this city Senator Felton's beautiful home in Mcnlo 
Park was visited. 



WHAT 

Influenced the Selection of 

Diamond 

Wrapped Tread Tires 

As the Exclusive Equipment of all Ameri- 
can Cars in the Gordon Bennett Cup Race. 




CHOICE of tire equipment was made bv the builders and 
owners of the American cars entered in the Gordon-Ben- 
net cup race only after rigorous investigations. 
Always a mighty factor in motoring, the importance 
of right tire equipment in an event of this character 
could scarcely be over-estimated. 

No one realizes this more than the builders of the cars which 
would represent not only themselves, but all America in the 
great international contest. 

And they closely studied not only the tires of different makes, 
but visited and inspected une factories where they were pro- 
duced, and mentally measured the makers, too. 

They weighed not only the brains of different establishments, 
but they put performance against performance and record against 
record both as to the tires and as to the men who produced them. 

The showing made by the Diamond wrapped tread construc- 
tion in the Ormond Florida races, in January, which was equaled 
by no other make, American or foreign, was considered. 

The thorough test of Diamond wrapped tread construction, 
which even then (March) had proved every claim for it, in the 
wear and tear of California's year-around season, was weighed 
in the balance against the results similarly shown by other 
1905 productions. 

The consensus of the judgment of all American automobile 
manufactures that Diamond wrapped construction was and is 
right, as shown by these tires being the equipment on AS MANY 
CARS AS ANT OTHER TWO MAKES COMBINED, at the au- 
tomobile shows, was remembered. 

The facilities THE DIAMOND RUBBER CO. afforded for all 
usei's of its tires in the Vanderbilt cup race last fall and the 
ability and willingness of the company to give full value and a 
square deal to every patron, was also a factor, though other tire 
makers offered to provide at the race exactly the same accommo- 
dations. 

Price cut no figure. 

Diamond wrapped tread tires were eventually selected by every 
American entrant in the greatest motoring event the world has 
yet known, because they were found to be 

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST ON EARTH. 



The Diamond Rubber Co. AKRON, OHIO. 

San Francisco Branch- -408 MISSION STREET 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Steadily the automobile is crowding along the 
horse. It has been decided to build a garage to ad- 
join the stables and tanbark arena of the Brooklyn 
Riding and iJriving Club. This organization is com- 
prised of the most enthusiastic horsemen and horse- 
women in the City of Churches. 

* * * 

Interest grows apace in numerous of the towns of 
California, and many sales are being made. "There 
afe now fully 25 autos owned in Petaluma," says the 
Argus of Petaluma, "and probably no city of this 
size in California has such a record. Nearly all of 
the autos are big cars, and automobiling is on the 
increase in this city. Webb & Madison received a 
fine big red Autocar for Will Newburgh, and an Au- 
tocar runabout for H. B. Higbee. Autos are getting 
so numerous here that few of the local horses are 
afraid of them, and the 'honk-honk' of the auto horn 
can be heard almost any time in any part of town." 

* * * 

According to Herbert Lyttle, one of the Americans 
who will drive in the Ueunett cup race next Wednes- 
day, the Auvergne course favors the cars of medium 
horse-power, and he thinks he has a fair chance of fin- 
ish first. "Tires are going to play a very important 
part in the race," writes Lyttle, "and the contestant 
who cares for his tires may win, even though his 
car is not so fast as those driven by his competitors. 
On such a course a good, reliable car is to be pre- 
ferred to one that makes high speed spasmodically, 
A good steady run of the 340 miles is what will win, 
in my opinion." 

* * * 

Motoring is on the boom tip north, and a recent is- 
sue of the "Victoria Times" says in part: "That 
Victoria has the automobile craze this season has 
been fully demonstrated. From a city of compara- 
tively few machines a year ago, the place has grown 
to one of considerable importance in auto circles, 
there being as fine a lot of cars here now as can 
be seen anywhere on the continent. Victorians wait- 
ed until after the experimental stage had been passed, 
then they acquired the most up-to-date and comfort- 
able machines in the market. There are three of the 

White steam touring cars in this city at present. 

* * * 

Fernando Nelson and M. Fisher, accompanied by 
their families, left this week in their Winton touring 
cars or respectively model A and B, for a trip into 
the southern part of the State. Both motorists had 
jusl returned from an extended run through the 
Napa Valley. 

* * * 

Another local enthusiast has made the run to Los 
Angeles. Harvey Dana and family arrived safely 
in the southern part of the State a few days ago, 
having made a perfect trip in their Pope-Toledo tour- 
ing car. 

Since its arrival on the Coast, the Cameron has at- 
tracted much attention, and is proving to be a very 
popular car. Mr. J. S. Brown, manager of the Pa- 
cific Coast branch of the James Brown Machine Co., 
reports that the Cameron has been making an excel- 
lent showing in the East. A stock car of 16 h. p. 
won the second prize at the Worcester hill climb 
against many higher-powered and more costly cars 
of both foreign and American make, climbing a mile 
on a heavy grade in 1.41. 

* * * 

Cuyler Lee, California agent for the Cadillac, has 
sold one of these runabouts to the Fresno Home 



July 1, 1905. 

Packing Company, which concern will use the car 
in its business. 

* * * 

Mr. A. S. Kerry, an auto enthusiast of Seattle, ac- 
companied by a party of his friends, left for a trip 
to Portland recently in his White steam touring car, 
and arrived there without accident. 

* * * 

Charles C. Moore, of the executive committee of 
the A. C. C, went on a trip to Santa Cruz last week 
in his model C Winton. Mr. Moore also purchased 
a model B Winton this season. 

* * * 

A number of automobile trips are being made to 
the Yosemite Valley, and Mr. and Mrs. John Harlem 
of Los Angeles are touring here in their White 

steam machine. 

* * * 

F. L. Hansen and a party made a trip around the 
bay last Sunday in Mr. Hansen's new Winton touring 

car. 

* * * 

C. E. Miles, who has been touring over two months 
in his Cadillac, returned to San Francisco last week. 
He covered over 3,000 miles on the trip, and with the 
exception of tire^punctures, he had no trouble of any 
kind with his Cadillac. 

Special Sales Department 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUNDRIES 



FOR SALE.— 1904 White Steamer, newly painted, top and lamps, 

etc., fully equipped $1,000 

\\ a Stanhope $300 

St. Louis Touring Car $900 

Agents for Packard, Stevens-Duryea and Thomas Flyer, Pa- 
cific Motor Car Co., 49 City Hall avenue. 

ARE you going on a tour? Don't forget Weed's Chain Tire 
Grip (prevents machine from skidding.) Does not affect the tire. 
Can be put on or removed in 5 minutes. See agents, 105 Front St. 

WANTED.— If you have a second-hand automobile you wish 
to sell, write Yosemite Motor Works. 123 City Hall avenue, San 
Francisco. Edward Mohrlg, Manager. 

WANTED.— Buckboard in good condition. Will pay about $100. 
Ad dress Box 6. this office. 

WHY use Eastern Dry Batteries? The Bull Dog Dry Cell is 
the best made for automobiles and is "fresh," being manufac- 
tured in San Francisco by Pacific Carbon and Battery Co., 105 
Front street. 

EXCHANGE.— Fine thoroughbred trotter for runabout in good 
condition. Value $500. Address Box 10. this office. 



FOR SALE.— 1903 Winton, excellent condition. New tires. Open 
to offer. Box 10. News Letter. 

NEW— Knox runabout cheap. Owner has purehaded larger car. 
Address Box 17, News Letter. 

WANTED.— Small car in good condition, gasoline preferred. 
Box 12, News Letter. 

FOR SALE.— A "Duryea" automobile in perfect condition; has 
never been used. Three cylinder. 12 h. p. Holds six people. A 
bargain. Owner leaving city. 1814 Market street, S. F. 

FOR SALE.^Locomobile steamer, In fair condition. Price $175. 
Address Box 13, News Letter. 

WANTED— Autocar. Kambler, Cadillac or Buckboard; must be 
cheap and in good condition. Box 14. News Letter. 

$275.— Buckboard in good condition; owner leaving State. Box 
16, News Letter. 

A Model K 1904 Rambler, warranted to be in first-class shape. 
R. W. O'Bannon. Holllster, Cal. 

WANTED.— Every automobile owner to increase power of his 
machine 15 to 25 per cent by equipping it with a **SchebIer Car- 
buretor." For information and prices see agents, 105 Front St. 



PROMPT SERVICE 

(Erniurg Elrrtrir fflnmpattg 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobiles. 

Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 

House Wiring and Repairing. 

Nn, 28 SFCOND ST. Under Grand Hotel. TEL. BVSH 352 



July i. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3« 





cj 




'3l 


■ * ^M 


L (A 


Hfe3 








f9^ .; 


1 ^v B 


tQ Jl 






j^B 














k^^^*"" 


I-"-v 



The above illustration shows Mr. C. B. Myers 
seated at the left, and his assistants, all of whom 
have made better than three minute records in put- 
ting on Diamond clincher tires. 

* » * 

Parisian sportsmen were astonished the other 
morning when they heard of the arrival of C. B. My- 
ers and five American tire mechanics, who had been 
sent by the Diamond Rubber Company, of Akron, 
Ohio, to take care of the tires fitted to the American 
cars in the Bennett race, which takes place July 5th. 
This is probably the first time that such men have 
been sent so far for the sole purpose of doing tire 
repair work, if this should be necessary. All three 
American cars in the big race are equipped with 
Diamond wrapped tread tires, and the Diamond Rub- 
ber Company will see to it that the operators want for 
nothing in the way of tire equipment, in the Vander- 
bilt cup race of last October the facilities and atten- 
tion given the users of Diamond tires by the com- 
pany caused much favorable comment. 

* * * 

In the preliminary trials on the Bennett course, 
Diamond tires ha"ve made a most excellent showing. 
*-* * 

Recent sales of the Pioneer Automobile Company 
are an Oldsmobile French type runabout to Joseph 
Rose, and a model C Winton to F. N. Cooper of 

Monterey. 

* * * 

R. D. Chapin, general sales manager of the Olds 
Motor Works, is in Portland, en route to this city. 
He is expected to arrive in San Francisco in a few 
days. 



2 " 5PEMCERIAN 



Good Writing 

paper is one thing, good ink is another; and fine penmanship 
is still another, but all of these go for naught without 

SPENCERIAN PENS 

They are the one necessary article to accomplish good re- 
sults in writing. Every variety at all stationers. Samples 
for trial, 12 different numbers, for 6 cents in stamps. 

SPENCERIAN PEN CO., 349 Broadway, NEW TORK 



Hf*4,.irtcr« lor Pro! cttlir CblnsWr 

DRS. BROWN 6> LEANER 

SVRGEON CH1R0P0DI6T 

llrel) whole (palnlOM) without knife. bun- 
Ions ami Ingrowing nails cured by B sporinl and palnle<t:t 

treatment. 

Hoars: • lo 6 r- ". ! ilnrdi) «,•(•• p. m. and ft t« II p. ip. 

6 GBA.'R.y STUEET 

Telephone BLACK 2702 Junction Geary and Kearny 



Murphy, Grant & Co. 

Importers of staple and fancy dry goods. Manufacturers of 
furnishing goods. Patentees and sole manufacturers of 
"THE NEVER-RIP" OVERALL. The best in the world. 

Gloves, suspenders, laces, ribbons, dress goods, velvets, 
silk, flannels, oil cloths, cottons, linens, etc. Blankets, 
calicoes, umbrellas, cutlery, shawis, notions, smokers* 
articles, stationery, underwear, hosiery, white goods. 

Cor. Sansome and Bash Sts., S. F. 




HIGH 
CLASS 
WALL 
PAPERS 

AT ALL PRICES 

Interior 
Decorating 
Ideas and 
Estimates 
Furnished 

L. Tozer & 
Son Co. 

Retail Salesroom 

110 GEARY ST. 

2nd Floor 
Wholesale Department 

762-7*4 Mission 
Street 



GERMEA 



-FOR- 



BREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKB MERCANTILE CO., Ajents 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN *%$& Th. ^I^Me^n 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 
8end for circular. Naber, Alfs and Brune. 3M Market St., 8. F. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1905. 



Resorts and Hotels 



VACATION 1905 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 

"VACATION" is issued annually by the 

California Northwestern R'y 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 

and is the standard publication on the 
Pacific Coast for information regarding 

MINERAL SPRINGS RESORTS. 
COUNTRY HOMES AND FARMS 
WHERE SUMMER. BOARDERS 
ARE TAKEN. AND SELECT CAMP- 
ING SPOTS. 

This year's edition "VACATION 1905" contains 200 
pages, beautifully illustrated, and is complete in its 
detailed information as to location, accommodations, 
attractions, etc., with terms from $7.00 per week up 

To be had at Ticket Office, 650 Marketstreet. (Chronicle Building 

and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market street; General Office 

Mutual Life Building, corner Sansonie and 

California streets, ban Francisco 

Applications by mail will receive immediate response 



J AS. L. FRAZIER, GerCt A/an. R, X. RYAN, Gen'l Rmss'r Agent 



Rest a Few Days 

A great many San Francisco people spend days and weeks 
during the fall and winter at Hotel Del Monte. No other 
resort In California offers such a combination of attrac- 
tions—sea bathing, golf, automoblllng, bowling, tennis, fish- 
ing and all out-of-door sports. Instead of going from place 
to place seeking comforts, the wise who enjoy out-of-door 
life arrange to put In many enjoyable weeks down at Del 
Monte by the sea. Address George P. Snell, manager, Del 
Monte, California. 

At Hotel Del Monte 



KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS 

For particulars inquire at PecK's Tourist 
Bureau, 11 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Vichy Springs 

3 miles from Ukiah, Mendocino County. Natu- 
ral electric waters, champagne baths. Only place 
in the world of this class. Fishing, hunting. 
Crystal Springs. Accommodations; table first- 
class. J. A. Redemeyer, Prop. 



....Hotel.... 
ROWARDENNAN 

"In ike Mountains by ike Sea' 1 ' 1 

Reservations may be made upon ap- 
plication to 

Wm. G. Dodge, Lessee. BEN LOMOND, CAL 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST.. near Tremont, BOSTON 

Harvey 9 Woods, Props. 



Camp Curry 

Only camp electric lighted 
Sets the best table 
Has the highest paid chef 
(white) in 

Yosemite 



^ TUXEDO v 



The leading hotel and resort place of the 

Santa Crux Mountains 

7 miles from Santa Cruz; 73 miles from San Francisco on 
the main line of the Narrow Gauge R. R. It's popular be- 
cause It's new. modernly appointed and of easy access, and 
because It has more natural attractions on Its own reser- 
vation and around It than any place in these mountains. 
Write for booklet. 



FRANCIS W. SMITH. Mgr. 



FELTON P. O* 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

NO STAGING 

The nearest hot natural sulphur springs to San Francisco. 
The largest mineral water swimming tank In the State. 
Everything first-class. Address: Theo. Richards. 

Agua Callente, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



July i. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



33 



Book Reviews 

The 'Trying Lesson," as translated by Mi-- Agnes 
Tobin, i< an excellent performance of a very difficult 

piece of work. N'o one who lias not tried to render 
the Italian verse of Petrarch, a curiously modern 
poet, into adequate English verse, has any idea of 
the almost impossibility of the task. It i> to the 
credit of Miss Tobin that she has managed to pre- 
serve the spirit of the verse and much of the harmony 
even in our rougher tongue. The "Flying Lesson" 
consists of ten sonnets, two canzoni, a ballata, and a 
double sestina. Attention may be called to the fol- 
lowing: 

"Ah. me! how long one stands 
Hoarding one's heart's best treasures — till, pell-mell 

Sudden they flash between the hapless hands 
As from Danaids' sieve the water fell." 

This is a beautiful renuering, though the use of the 
word "Danaid" as a contraction of "Danaides" is 
hard to justify. Take the line: 

"She shines the whitest burning seraph down," 

and it will be found impossible to improve upon it. 
A few noticeable lines from the ballata are : 

"Oh, Love ! When lilies flower, 
And my great hope with joy the whole earth sows, 
Why hide they her whose touch healed all my woes? 
Ah, most disdainful death!" 

A stanza from the sestina runs : 

"I have been out with joy, and strong and gay 
Now I lie close to sorrow, and these nights 
Double my pain, Sestina, and thy verse. 
My sad heart doubly changing my sad rhyme — 
My food was hope that now is grief and moan, 
No shield have I from death save cruel Death." 
William Heineman, London. 




Hotel 
' ^Roof Belleclaire, 

Broadway & 77th St. 



NEW YORK 

Luxuriously furnished room* 
for permanent and transient 
gueiti, at moderate prices. 

Orchestra of floloplayon, « p. 
m. tllll a. m. 

Restaurant, Palm Boom and 
Cafe, gems of artistic perfection. 
Cuisine and Mrrlce really de- 
lightful. Ton will mt so. 

A special feature Is oar after 
theater suppers 

Billiard parlor for ladles is 
another pleasant feature. 

Original with tneBeileclalrals 
tbe refined Tauderllla «rei7 
Thursday arenlng. 

Our gallery of beatlful paint- 
ings, ralued at 150,000, Is open 
•renings to Tlsitors. 

Affability and courtesy guar- 
anteed from erery BeUeolalre 
employe. 

Hilton RoblM, Prop. 



For Those Who Appreciate Comfort and Atlentloa 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 
American and European Plan. A Quiet Home 
Centrally Looated. Gwrie Warren Hooper, Less. • > 



ONE OP THE LOVPUPST SPOTS ON EARTH 

ANDERSON SPRINGS. LAKE COUNTY 

Beautiful foreat, strenm 

and fulls, 'iniiitii'fiii walks 
anil .Irlve l huiiiing nnil 
splendid trout llshlng 
Hunt at hand. Hotel 
ami cottages. No winds 
or fogs Best medlrdnal 
wall- rand tlieonl). natural 
sulphur steam hntli.. in 
county. Tulu alsc Ilat.'s 
fj per day, tin to »u per 
week. Baths free. 

Further Information, 
PEOK'B lit: RK AC. 11 
Montgomery at., fl. P. 
Information Burenu. 613 
Market at.. 8. F. News 
Letter. :i2o Sansome st, 
or address J. ANDER- 
SON. Anderson Springs. 
Middletown P. O.. Lake 
County, Cal 



rv-72, -■ 



KOVND TRIP TICKET, 557 



Byron Hot ^Spring's 

AMERICA'S GREATEST SPA 

The great health and pleasure resort of California. Here you 
can find rest, amusement, and regain your health. The sur- 
rounding country Is beautiful at this season of the year. The 
hotel table Is sumptuous. It's the only place in the world where 
you can get a hot mineral bath in porcelain tubs without leaving 
the hotel. If you can't spend a long period here, take advantage 
of the week-end excursion, $7.60, all expenses paid, Friday to 
Tuesday inclusive. Includes railroad fare, two days' board at 
the hotel, use of mineral waters, and baths and hot mud baths, 
and stage fare to and from station to hotel. 



HOTEL VEND0ME 

vSan Jose, 

Situated in Vendome Park of twelve acres. A 
charming Summer and Winter resort. Both city 
and country advantages. Automobile garage on 
the grounds free to guests. 

A Large Bathing Pavilion on the Grounds 

Bowling alleys, tennis, etc. New auto road map 
of the county mailed on application. 

J. T. BR.OOKS. MB.rve.eer 



The Anchorage 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

4 miles from Alma Station, S. P. C. R. R. Alti- 
tude 1900 feet. Among pines and redwoods; 
pure air; pure water; pure food. Rates $10 to 
$12 per week. New cottages, gas-lit. Trains 
met by appointment at Alma'. Address Gifford 
Hall, Patchin P. O., Santa Clara Co., Cal., or 
Peck's Bureau, 11 Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opp. TJ. S. Treasury, one block from the White House. 
■Washington D. 0. The Hotel "Tar Excellence" of tha 
National Capital. 

First-class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, 
Prop. American Plan, $3 per day and upwards.* 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July i, 1905. 

BANKING. U/te Minister Of Foreign Affairs 



The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. 
James K. Wilson, President; Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-Presi- 
dent; C. K. Mcintosh, Vice-President; F. W. Wolfe, Cashier; 

C. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital, $500,0(iu. Surplus and undivided profits, $180,000 

Directors— William Fierce Johnson, Wm. J. Dutton, Geo. A. 

Pope, C. S. Benedict. George Aimer Newhall, W. H. Talbot, H. 

D. Morton, C. K. Mcintosh, James K. Wilson. 

Agents — New York— Hanover National Bank, Chemical National 
Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel 
& Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— Mechan- 
ics' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- 
sas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. 
Paris — Morgan, Harjes & Co. Johannesburg — Robinson South 
African Banking Co., Ltd. 



The Cek.n©Ldian Bankof Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated the Bana of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, $S.700.ooo. Reserve Fund, $3,500,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $90,000,000. 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. WALKER. General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C. 
NEW YORK; OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— A tlln. Cranbrook, 
Fernle, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 
Also 92 other branches, covering the principal points In 
Manitoba, N.W. Territories and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 
Scotland. Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. The Union of London and Smiths 
Bank. Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

San Francisco Office 325 California Street. 
A. KA1NS. Manager. Bruce Heathcote, Asst. Manager. 

London, Paris and American Bank. Ltd. 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital. $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,00(1 

Reserve Fund, $1,100,000. 
Head Office— 40 Threadneedle St,, London, E. C. 
AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank. Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere, Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world. Commercial and Travelers' 
credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Mana- 
ger; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Authorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve 1,725,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or 
Trustee. Check Accounts solicited. Legal Depository for money 
in Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposits 
and Savings. Investments carefully selected. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., opposite Third. 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus 665.000 

Deposits, over A. 500. 000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President; S. G. MURPHY. Vice-Presi- 
dent; JOHN A. HOOPER. Vice-President; GEORGE A. STORY 
Cashier: C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffltt, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo A Co., or 
•xchan« on city banks. 



The Anglo-Californian Bank. Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000 Paid-up, $1,500,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers", and Issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART. P. N. LILIENTHAL. Managers. 
T. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 

The German Savings c* Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,474,518.82 

Capital Actually Paid-up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Deposits, December 31, 1904 37,281,377.60 

HOARD OF DIRECTORS— John Lloyd, President; Daniel Meyer, 
First Vice-President; Emll Rohte. Second Vice-President.; Ign 
Stelnhart, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Till- 
mann, Jr., E. T. Kruse. 

A. H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; Wm. Herrmann, Asst. Cashier; 
George Tourney, Secretary; A. H. Muller, Asst. Secretary; W. 
S Gnodfellow, General Attorney. 



Diplomatic circles are kept 
Complications that pretty busy these days. The 
Complicate. assurances given to Ger- 

many by the Czar are that 
Russia has no ulterior purpose in having a large army 
on the Poland-Prussian frontier, that it is merely a 
prudential measure to be prepared in the event the 
rioting in certain cities of Poland should assume the 
magnitude of a revolution, and that so soon as order 
obtains the troops will return to their respective bar- 
racks. But although there are more than 50,000 men 
of Poland defying the authorities, it is in no sense a 
revolution ; besides, not many of them are armed, 
and were they equipped with the best of modern war 
machinery, it would avail them nothing against Cos- 
sacks and artillery, for they are without trained sol- 
diers for leaders. The "uprising" so far is several 
thousand dissatisfied workingmen, who have adopted 
the Chicago strike methods, which is that the "out- 
break" or "revolution," in Poland, is nothing more 
nor less than a wild and reckless mob, marching un- 
der the red flag of anarchy, though calling themselves 
socialists, and destroying property. But back of it 
all will be found a socialistic influence that wants no 
sort of Government or law or order in Russia other 
than they would themselves formulate. In short, 
the trouble in Poland is a labor strike under social- 
istic leaders and the red flag of blood and destruction. 
Even were the uprising to assume the dignity of a 
revolution it would not have the sympathy or good 
will of any one in that or in any other country, other 
than the socialist and the anarchist. This the Czar 
knows, and because he knows, his subordinates are 
magnifying the danger for the excuse it affords for 
concentrating a large military force on the German 
border, the diplomatic world is uneasy lest there be 
an ulterior purpose in establishing a large camp in 
Southern Russia. There are those who think they 
see in the Poland affair an excuse to mobilize an 
army there so as to be in a position to threaten Ger- 
many with invasion should events warrant the Kaiser 
in turning his back upon Russia. Diplomatists know 
that the Franco-Russian alliance is still effective, 
though not so strong as it was. They know that it 
will require the nicest kind of wire pulling to keep 
France and Germany apart. The Kaiser wants a war 
with France, and the French population the past week 
has shown a very pronounced desire to accommodate 
him. In the event of a war, France would have the 
right to demand material aid of Russia. Should the 
Kaiser protest against the Franco-Russian agreement 
obtaining in reality, it might anger the Czar, and he 
might resent it by throwing the Poland army across 
the line into Germany. In that event the most curi- 
ous international complications would arise. Great 
Britain is pledged to stand by France in the Morocco 
affair against Germany, and that affair is the only 
excuse the Kaiser has for picking a quarrel with 
France. The British-Japanese agreement binds Eng- 
land to stand by Japan as against Russia. In 
case of war, it would be a Franco-British-Russian al- 
liance against Germany, a British-Japanese alliance 
against Russia directly and against France indirectly, 
and an alliance between Germany and such nations 
as she could induce to join her against the Franco- 
British-Russian combine as to France, and witli 
Russia as to Japan. How could the situation be more 
mixed uo? 



The Morocco Affair 
at the Danger Point. 



July i. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

France has acceded 
Germany's demand to sub- 
mit the Morocco affair to 
a commission, but takes 
great pains to assure Germany that the French Gov- 
ernment will take no backward step from its original 
'ii to dominate in the public concerns of Mo 
to the extent of maintaining law and order, 
protecting the persons and property of foreigners, 
encouraging the expansion of Moroccan commerce, 
and introducing industrial enterprises. To accomplish 
all this, enough French soldiers will be quartered in 
Morocco to prevent the Sultan running things in the 
future as he has in the past. The position of France 
has the full endorsement of Great Britain. So sure 
was the Kaiser that his bluff would win that on his 
visit to Morocco a month or so ago he boldly went 
over the head of France and negotiated with the Sul- 
tan direct for certain commercial concessions and the 
ceding to Germany of a fine harbor on the Pacific 
Ocean side for a naval station. In these negotiations 
the Sultan not only violated his compact with France, 
but under the Kaiser's picturesque and aggressive 
influence, notified President Loubet that he had 
greatly modified the Franco-Moroccan agreement, 
and that, too, without stopping to consult France. 
If France is going to "stand pat" on her original con- 
tract with the Sultan, Germany's deal, including the 
Pacific Ocean harbor, will be disregarded by France, 
with Great Britain at President Loubet's back. The 
chances for war between France and Germany are, 
therefore, good enough to warrant immediate pre- 
paredness. One or the other will have to eat a lot 
of crow to prevent it. If France backs down, her 
degradation would be great. If the Kaiser yields and 
cancels his Moroccan contract, he will be looked upon 
as a bluffer, braggart and carpet-knight without 
backbone. Whatever else the Kaiser may be he is not 
a carpet-knight, nor is he afraid of any man or nation 
on earth. President Loubet might deem it the wiser 
course to yield much for the sake of peace, but the 
people of France are taking the matter in hand, and 
public sentiment is rapidly growing in favor of a 
war to a finish with Germany, and this sentiment is 
intensified by the knowledge that England can be 
relied upon to stand by France. The situation is. 
like this : the Kaiser wants a brush with France, and 
the people of France are becoming more and more in- 
clined to accommodate him in spite of Loubet's ultra- 
conservatism. 



NEWS LETTER. 



35 



Japan and Russia have named their peace commis- 
sioners, "subject to revision." The gathering will be 
in Washington, but it will be impossible for the 
commissions to get together until sometime in Au- 
gust. Meanwhile a great many things might happen 
to make it unnecessary to hold a conference. Marshal 
Oyama is rushing the details of movements that may 
crush General Linevitch, or he may himself have to 
retreat. It is clear that the Russian war party is do- 
ing its best to defeat the purpose of the peace com- 
mission, and it is equally clear that Japan is killing 
time to stave off the Washington meeting. It is 
significant that both parties to the proposed confer- 
ence are averse to an armistice pending the conclu- 
sions of the commission. The fact is, all these pre- 
parations to arrange for a basis of a peace agreement 
are in deference to the United States. President 
Roosevelt's suggestions met with favor and the in- 
dorsement of public opinion the world over. Neither 
Russia nor Japan could afford to ignore them, but 
neither has nor does either want peace just now. 



Japan is all prepared to strike the most telling blow 
ol the war. If < Kama's strateg) wins, all a peace 
commission could do WOuld be to accept Japan's ul- 
timatum, or adjourn and let the fighting go on. If 
1 lyama is driven hack — he could not be crushed — 
Russia would not engage in peace talk for the pres- 
ent at least, Not in Washington, but in Manchuria, 
peace terms will be agreed upon, or at least there is 
where the data for discussion will be made, and it is 
likely to be made any day. 

It is not good domestic economy to go to the 

expense of a new carpet, when Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works, at 353 Tehama street, will clean 
your old one so perfectly that you would hardly 
know yourself that it was not direct from the carpet 
maker. 

BANKING. ~ 

Sa.n Francisco Savings Union 

632 California St., cor. Webb St., San Francisco. 

E. B. POND, President; W. C. B. DeFREMERT. ROBERT 
WATT, vtce-Presldents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. 
WELCH, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. DeFremery, Henry F. Allen. 
Wakefield Baker, Jacob Barth, C. O. G. Miller, Fred H. Beaver, 
William A. Magee, Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks 
of reliable parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsi- 
bility of this savings bank commences only with the actual re- 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 
company the first deposit. No charge Is made for pass book 
or entrance fee. 

Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings, 6:30 to 8. 

Deposits, Dee. 11, 1904 133,940,131 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up 1,000.001 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 97«.T*t 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital J17.000.O00 

Paid-in Capital 3,500,000 

Profit and Reserve Fund 460,000 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbln, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

Security Servings Bank 

316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000.00 

Paid-up Capital 500,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 265,000.00 

Banking by mail a specialty. 

Directors— William Babcock, Parrott & Co.; S. L. Abbott, Se- 
curity Savings Bank; O. D. Baldwin, O. D. Baldwin & Son; Jos. 
D. Grant, Murphy, Grant & Co.; E. J. McCutchen, Page, McCut- 
chen & Knight; L. F. Monteagle, Capitalist; R. H. Pease, Pres. 
Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warren D. Clark, Williams, Dimond & 
Co.; James L. Flood, Capitalist; J. A. Donohoe, President Dono- 
hoe-Kelly Banking Co.; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob Stern, 
President Levi Strauss & Co. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 



Corner 

California and Montgomery 

Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CAPITAL and SURPLUS 
TOTAL ASSETS 



SI.4I1.I6I.M 
6,»43,78Z.SJ 



Interest paid on deposits, sub- 
ject to check, at the rate of 
two per cent per annum. 

Interest paid on savings de- 
posits at the rate of three and 
six-tenths per cent per 
annum. 

Trusts executed. We are 
authorized to act as the 
guardian of estates and the 
executor of wills- 
Safe deposit boxes rented at 
$5 per annum and upwards, 

Get a box at once and guard 
against loss by Fire or Burg- 
lars. 

J. Dalzell Brown 

M&.r\&.gor 



California Home Building Loan Company 

No. 7 Powell Street 

5 per cent Interest paid on Savings Accounts. 6 per cent on Term 
Accounts of $100 or more. Loans made on Real Estate, repay- 
able in monthly Installments under definite contract. 

OFFICERS— P. B. Roberts, President; F. M. Parcells, Vice- 
President; R. L. Handy, Secretary; Joseph Hutchinson, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS— P. B. Roberts, F. M. Parcells, Joseph Hutchin- 
son, James Frazer and Charles J. Robinson. 



36 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Lewis and Clark Centennial > 



July i, 1905. 



The Portland harbor presents a war-time appear- 
ance just now, for three of Uncle Sam's warships are 
anchored in the river, and the booming of big guns 
reverberates from the wharves to the grounds of the 
Exposition. The ships at anchor in the harbor, which 
compose part of the United States Government's 
magnificent display at the Coast Fair, are the pro- 
tected cruisers Boston and Chicago, and the torpedo 
destroyer Perry. They will remain indefinitely, pos- 
sibly for the whole Exposition period, and certainly 
for several weeks. 

The three vessels are anchored just above the steel 
bridge, opposite the heart of the business center of 
the city. They may be visited from one to five o'clock 
every afternoon, and hundreds of people have taken 
advantage of the opportunity to go aboard and see 
how Uncle Sam's jackies live, and to study the meth- 
ods of warfare. The Boston was one of Dewey's 
vessels in the battle of Manila Bay, and the Chicago 
has the distinction of being the nucleus of the pres- 
ent great White Squadron. The Chicago has an arma- 
ment of four eight-inch and fourteen five-inch guns, 
nine six-pounders, two one-pounders, two Colt's au- 
tomatic, and one three-inch piece for duty ashore. 
During the stay of the warships in the Portland har- 
bor, Admiral Goodrich, who commands the squadron, 
has given orders that there shall be a number of ex- 
hibition drills by marines at the Exposition. The 
drills are held on the plaza at the head of Lakeview 
Terrace and on the Government Peninsula, and are 
of great interest. 

Towns and cities of the State of Washington 

began their special days at the Portland Fair last 
week. June 27th was Oklahoma Day, and Governor 
Ferguson of that territory, with many citizens, were 
in attendance. June 30th was Woman's Day, and July 
1st is Tacoma Day. The American Library Associa- 
tion convention begins its sessions Monday, July 3d. 
On the Fourth of July there will be a grand celebra- 
tion of Independence Day, with a great display of 
fireworks in the evening. 

July 12th will be Advertising Men's Day at 

the Lewis and Clark Exposition. The Pacific Coast 
Advertising Men's Association will be in session on 
that date. This association is working along very 
broad lines for the promotion of the coast and its 
products, and for the elevation of advertising and the 
ljetterment of the craft. 

Everybody who has visited the Lewis and 

Clark Exposition pronounces the Trail "the best 
ever." There are thirty shows, a«d you can see them 
all for about $7. The prices range from ten to fifty 
cents. 

The National Good Roads Convention opened 

in Portland June 21st. Thousands of delegates from 
all over the United States, many with their families, 
are attending the convention and taking in the big 
Fair. 

The price of admission to the Lewis and Clark- 
Exposition on Sundays has been reduced to twenty- 
five cents. The weekly admission remains at fifty 
cents. On Sunday, the gates open at noon and close 
at 1 1 -.30 p. m. 

The attendance at the Lewis and Clark Expo- 
sition is increasing daily. Excursions are run every 
day from one or more cities in the Northwest, bring- 
ing many people to the Fair. 



SPECIAL NUMBER 

SUNSET 
MAGAZINE 

FOR JULY 



COVER DESIGN— In Sight of Mt. Hood a Hundred Tears 
A E° W. H. Bull 

FRONTISPIECE— Opening Day at the Lewis and Clark Ex- 
position 

OVERLAND A CENTURY AGO Reuben Gold Thwaites 

THE OREGON EXPEDITION'S HISTORIAN 

H. Morse Stephens 
Til 10 OREGON SIERRA (Verse) Joaquin Miller 

THE GREAT NORTHWEST CENTENNIAL.-A series of 

articles on the Lewis and Clark Exposition, by 

Frank L. Merrick, Manager, General Press Bureau. 
Henry \V. Goode. President and Director-General. 
Hon. George E. Chamberlain, Governor of Oregon 
Hon. Albert E. Mead. Governor of Washington. 
H.>ii. John H. Mitchell, United States Senator from 

Oregon. 
Wm. W. Wheelwright, President Portland Chamber 

of Commerce. 
6. W. Allen, President Portland Board of Trade. 
Robertus Love, Assistant Manager. General Press 

Bureau. 
J. H. Cradlebaugh, Salem, Oregon. 

OREGON (Verse) Alice E. Tully 

CHATAUQUA BY THE SEA John Ivey 

.MINING IN OREGON Emma Seckle Marshall 

WOOD-CALL (Verse) j na Coolbrlth 

SUMMER IN SIERRA SNOW LAND. .Charles Wesley Reed 

CALIFORNIA'S GARDEN CALENDAR. .. .E. J. Wlckson 

WHEN THE PRINCE CAME (Serial Story— Chapter II).. 
Flora Haines (Mrs. Loughead.) 

THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION.... May L. Chenev 

LITTLE STORIES OF THE WEST 

Howllsh Wampo's Warning (J. W. Redlngtonj— Money 
Makers of Goldfleld (K. R. Casper)— The Piute War (J 
H. Cradlebaugh)— In Old Coloma (Heatherwlck Kirk.) 

THE COURSE OF EMPIRE 

An Academy Hotel— Railroad Philanthropy— A Floating 
Flyer— International Conference on Agriculture— Sierra 
Club Outing— California Roads (F. J. Brarahall)— New 
Gasoline Motor Coach— Portland, the Place for Investment 
—The Big Meadow Country— Hotel Lincoln, Seattle. 

PLAYS AND THE PLAYERS 

"Every Man in his Humor," Presented at Stanford Uni- 
versity (Kalherine Chandler)— Julia Marlowe and Her Art 
(Peter Robertson)— Successful Grace Field (Isabel Fraser) 
-Portraits of Maud Williamson, Elmer Booth. Nellie 
Lynch, Theodore Gamble, Grace Hopkins, Frederick 
Warde. 

BOOKS AND WRITERS 

"The Flying Lesson." by Agnes Tobln (Henry Anderson 
Lafler)— A Story of the Middle Northwest, by Alice Winter 
(A. J. Waterhouse)— "Impressions of Uklyo-ye," by Dora 
Amsden (Morgan Shepard)— "Hecla Sandwlth," by Ed- 
ward Uflington Valentine— "The Delta Lands of Califor- 
nia," by A. A. Martin— "Gridley and Vicinity"— "The Re- 
treat of a Poet Naturalist." by Clara Barrus— Portrait of 
Agnes Tobln— J. K. Gill's SUNSET Window. 

SUNSET RAYS 

In the Woods of Oregon (Mrs. L. R. Osborn)— Woeful Wli- 
lle (A. J. Waterhouse)— The Glow-worm (Elwvn Hoffman) 
—Good Time Comln' (A. J. W.)— Yes. He Knows (A. J 
W.)— The Things We Earn (A. J. W.)— A Little Girl I 
Knew (Flora I. de Wolf)— My Ship That Never Comes 
(June McMillen Ordway)— The Busybody (Drawing and 
Verse by Childe Harold)— The Bottle-man (Alberta Ban- 
croft)— Responsive Hearts (Martha Shepard Lipplncott)— 
The Wild Wind and the Valley (Ethel L. Preble)— Under 
the Evergreens (Augusta Kling)— Where the Sun Rests 
(George Blrdseye.) 



NOW ON SALE 






July i, 19 o5. SAN FRANCISCO 

AN APPEAL FROM MISS ROBERTS. 

July i. |i 
To my Friends and Patrons, the Public and Thea 

goers of San Francisco- 
Pear Friends : 

In the last few years I have appeared before you 
in many characters and met with much success, for 
which I am gratefully indebted to your kindness and 
encouragement. Hitherto I have depended upon 
my own efforts to achieve the results, but now I am 
about to appear before you in a new role, in the great 
drama of life, as a supplicant and beggar in the 
mighty cause of charity and justice, and must ask 
you, dear friends, to become members of the cast. 
and help the play along. I shall do ray part to my 
utmost ability, and if you do yours, of which I have 
no doubt whatever in my heart, we are sure to achieve 
a success for which we will all be proud and happy. 

I desire to give a benefit performance at the Cali- 
fornia Theatre on Friday afternoon, July 4th, for Mr. 
Hobart Bosworth, the young gentleman who sup- 
ported me during my engagement last August and 
September at the California Theatre, and who has 
been stricken with the dread disease, consumption, 
and incapacitated from performing his duties in the 
great labor of life. During his career of ten years on 
the stage as a member of the Augustin Daly Com- 
pany and as leading man with Henrietta Crossman, 
Julia Marlowe and Mrs. Fiske, Mr. Bosworth was 
ever ready with his own purse and labors to help his 
fellow-man, and now that misfortune has overtaken 
him, no one is more entitled to a benefit than he. 

The programme in detail has not been completed, 
but I assure you that it will be one of the most 
unique and interesting entertainments that has ever 
been given in San Francisco, and as soon as it is 
ready will be announced. In the meantime, I will 
be grateful to all friends who desire to subscribe in 
any such sum as they may feel justified for seats, 
which will not be less than $1.50 each, and shall be 
glad to receive checks or money orders through the 
mail for same, addressed to my care, at the Califor- 
nia Theatre. 

Respectfully subscribed, 

FLORENCE ROBERTS. 



NEWS LETTER. 



37 



The Sunset Magazine for July is an exception- 
ally good number. Its pages are largely devoted to 
the Lewis and Clark Exposition, and to the great 
Inland Empire, of which Portland is the metropolis. 
Necessarily the articles are descriptive, and so graph- 
ically are the stories given in word pictures that one 
is almost constrained to "go and see for myself." 
The July number should become a fixture in the his- 
torical and statistical departments of every library. 
But enough of the magazine is given over to high- 
class fiction, travel, industry and poetry to make the 
book a rounded out whole of choice literature and me- 
chanical skill. 



L. F. Lastreto, accompanied by Mrs. Lastreto, 

left for Europe on the 29th. They will make an ex-' 
tended tour of the continent, and later will visit Italy 
and Spain. Mr. Lastreto has retired from active 
business, and will be remembered as one of the pio- 
neer importers and exporters of this city, and was 
for some years connected with the diplomatic corps 
as Consul of Equador and Nicaragua. 

Nelson's Amycose, 

Infallible Bemedy lor Catarrh. Sore Throat and Inflammation? of 
the Skin. 





1 








KlTATfO »UT NEVGR IQUAlL* 

THE GENUINE 




' 






Murray SLanman's 

Florida Water 






\ 






The Perfume of Perfumes 

mrRMHiNa, diliqhtful 
Wltheut exception the best 
Toilet Water In tht World 

ABK TOTJB DBCOOIBT FOH 

MURRAY A LANMAN"S 

ASt> BX> TBiT TOTJ GET IT. 


1 



NOW'S YOUR CHANCE 

to visit the 

YELLOWSTONE 
PARK 



The Southern Pacific will now sell round trip ex- 
cursion tickets to Yellowstone Park. The route 
is via Ogden, thence to Monida, through the 
park by Concord Coach to Gardiner (spending 
several days among the geysers and other won- 
ders') then over the Northern Pacific through 
Spokane and down the Columbia River to Port- 
land, returning via the Shasta Route; or vice 
versa. 

$65 ROUND TRIP 

Allowing stop-overs within 90-day limit. This 
is the greatest trip of the year. The route taken 
is through the grandest of scenery, and best of 
service is given both by rail and stage. Make 
your plans now, and get full information from 
agents. 



Southern Pacific 

San Francisco Office— 613 MARKET ST. 
Oakland Office-12 SAN PABLO AVE. 



A BARGAIN 

$1600 summer home in Santa Cruz mountains. c> 4 ' acres, 9,^ 
aores improved: prunes and apricots; balance wood*. 3 miles 
south of Alma on county, watered, rnarl. Modern house of 6 
rooms and bath, water piped to all buildings, runnine stream, 
pond and redwood grove all close to house, daily mail and but- 
oher. Must sell, family reasons. Address Owner. Alma, Oal. 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July i, 1905. 



"Well, what will you do 

now? Marry again?'' "No, I shall 
have a lover. I want something 
that will last." 



For Women 
and Children 
Traveling Alone 

G7?c Rio 
Grande 
Scenic Line 
Excursions 

JUST FILL THE BILL 

Personally Conducted to 
the East 

NO CHANGE OF CARS 

Details— alao free books of 
travel, handsomely illustrated, 
may be had of ' 

W. J. SHOTWELL, GerverB.1 Agent 
DENVER AND Rl» ORANDE R. R. 

625 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




ABOUT 
YOUR 
TRIP 
EAST 



When planning your Eastern trip, the 
question always arises: "How shall I 
go?" Let me offer a suggestion. The 
Missouri Pacific operates both Pullman 
and Tourist Sleepers through from 
California to Kansas City, St. Louis 
and Chicago without change of cars, 
which carry you through the world- 
famed scenery of Colorado by day- 
light. Dining and cafe cars on all 
through trains; service a la carte. 

Write us for our lowest rates and 
handsomely Illustrated books of travel. 



W.J. SHOTWELL, General Afcnt 



625 Market St. 



San Fr»nolsoo 




Bioelle 



ALL THE YEAR 
ROUND TOURS 

Travel by Sea 



la, Low Bats, Including Berth and Meal, 



Los Angeles San Diego SaDtaCruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Taconia 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 
Alaska and Mexico. 

F.r Information warding Balling dates etc. .obtain (older 

SAN FRANCISCO TICKET OFFICES 
« New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St. , and Broadway Wharves. 

0. D. DTJNANN. General Passenger Ageut 
10 Market Street. San Francisco 



The J. Llewellyn Co. 

Successors to (he G. W. Clark Co. 
DEALERS IN 

Artistic Wall Papers 

and Window Shades 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 

Sun Francisco 

Wall Paper Stio» Rooms: 530 SUTTER STREET 

Phone Main 715 

Oakland 

Wall Paper Show Rooms: 473 FOURTEENTH ST. 

Phone Main lion 



Farmer Jean — Father, you 

have not given me a penance for a 
long time now. Parish Triest — Xo, 
ni) son. not since you married. 




CV.V.KKK 

15 



.Stylish Sir-5o- 
r Suits 

Dressy Suits I20 

Pants $4.50 J 

My $25.00 Suits are the| 

best in America. $ 

Per Cent Saved by gtt-g 

ting your suit made byS 

E »-. JOE POHEIM S 

N LS Til Ultll R 

I Sam.lu Sent 1110-1112 Market SL X 

3 hr ** •- 201-203 Mont<y St.. S. r.5 



25 




Trains leave ami arc due 
HV^ to arrive ni 

" SAN FRANCISCO. 

roi I 
routcsJ I From Jukk ^ , <(05 

tS*/ Fkhry Depot 

(Foot of Market Street.) 

LKAVH-^ MAIN LINE. -AHUIT K 

7.00a Bin i Ira, Vacnvlllc. Winters, Rumrey 7-48p 

7. 00a lilchmund. Benlcln, Sacramento, 

tiulsun mid Way Stations 7 28p 

7.40a Vuii. -J... Napa, CallBtoga, Santa 

Uosa. Martinet, San Rnmua 6.08P 

7.40a N lies, I'll.' n ^aii ton, LI v er in ore, 

Tracy, Lntbrup, Stockton "\28p 

8.00 a Shusi ii Express— (VI* Davis). 
Williams, Willows, tFrnto. ICed 
Blun, Purtlnnd, Tacoma, Seattle. 7 48p 

8. 00a Davis. Woodland. Knights Landing. 

Mnryevllle. Orovllle 7 48p 

820a Murllm-z, AotluCh. Byron, Tracy, 
Stockton, Newman, Lob Harms, 
Mendota, Aruionn, llanford, , A r. 0n 
VIhrIIb. P..rt-rvllle \ a J„ 

8.20a Ton Co*tn. Laihrop. Merced. Mo- ' * q0P 
desto, Kiiynn.iid, Fresno. Han- 
ford. Vlsulln. llakcrslleld 4 48p 

840a Niks, San .lose, Llvermore, Stock- 
ton (IMIlinn), Valli-y Spring, 
lone, SinTiiniento, Placervllle, 
Colfax. Marysville. Red Bin IT .... 4-08P 

8 40a Oak dale. Chinese, Jamestown, 

6 ra. Tin. limine ami Angela... 4-08P 

B.^OAAtlantlcKxpresa- ogdm ami Rut. 4-28p 

9 40a Rlcl nd, Port COStn. M artl n BI 

and Way Station! (tConcord) .... 6-48p 
10 20a Vallejo, Daily. Napa, Sunday only 748P 
10.20a Lom Angclc» Passenger— Port 
Costa, Martinez, Byron, Tracy. 
La tor op, Stockton, M erred, 
Raymond, Itch no, Goshen .1 unc- 
tion, lltiiif.ird. Lcinoore, Vina) la, 

link.' Blind, laos Angeles 7.08P 

10.20a El Paso, Kmisus City, St. LouIm and 

Chicago 7.08P 

11. 00a The Over d Limited —Omaha. 

Chicago. Denver. Kan-uiB City... B-4>P 
11.40aNII<*. sun .l., «e aDd Way Stations. .. h8p 
tl.OOpSacraincnt" Kl v. - r Steamers HI. 00p 

340p Dcnlcla. winters. Sacraimnto. 
Woodlund, Knlglits Landing, 
Marysville and Orovllle 10 48a 

340pMiiv wur.l, Siles, and Way Stations 7 4Bp 

4. 00p V» i i. ■,... Martinez, Snn Kainon, 

Napa. CnllfitoKB, Santa Uosa 9-28A 

4.00pNI1cs. Tracy, Stockton. Lodl 10 28a 

4.40pllay\vanl. Nlles, Irvington. Sunt 18.48a 
Jose, i iv.rmore I 111.48a 

5.00PThc Owl Limited — Newman, Los 
I'.iiii'is. Mi-inl.it.. i. Fresno, Tulure, 
Bakerslleld. Los Angeles 8 48a 

S.OOpClilcag.. and St. Loots Special— E) 
I'hmi, Kansas City, St. Louis and 
Chicago 8.48A 

'5 20pIIa\ ward, Mlt'sand San .lose 7.08a 

520p \ allejo. Port Costa, Beulcia. Sul- 

siih. Sacramento 11.28a 

6.00pEiii-i<tii KxprcHh— Omnbn. Chicago, 
Denver, Kansas City. St. Louis, 
MarLlinz, Stockton, Sacramento, 
■Reno. Sjinrks, Montello. Ogden .. l 2 48p 

6.20pllaywunl, N lennnd Sun Jose 9 48a 

7-OOp N'-ii'* Passenger— Port Costa, Be- 
nlcln, Sit I nun, Klin Ira, Dixon, 
Davis. Sacramento, Sparks. Tono- 
pnii, Goidfleld ami Heeler 7-08A 

7.40pP"M Costa, M.irllncz.Hyroii.Tracy, 

Modesto, Merced, Fresn 12-08p 

7-40P Yi.ihi-ntlii* and Msrlposa Die Trees 

(via ICaymond Waworia ft ule).. 8-48a 

7.40pVall.'j... Sunday only .... 11. 28a 

8.20P<»rrg v i allfomla Express— Sac- 

raiinnin, Maryavlllo, Redding, 
Portland, Pugct Sound anl Raat. 848a 

8-OOp Hay w aril. Mies and San .lone (Sun- 



COAST LINE (Narrow l.auge). 

(Foot of Market Snot.) 

7 -46a Snnia Cruz BxcDFSton (Sunday 

only) 9 1Gp 

8.16AN'wnrk, Centervllle. San .lose, 
FHi'in. Boulder Creek, Santa 

Crnz and Wny Stations 6 B6p 

t9.15ANewnrk, San Jose, Felton, Boulder 

Creek Santa Cruz t7 69p 

t2-16pN e w ark. Ccniervllle, San Jose, 
■New A 1 made n L"-< .aim, Felton, 
lloulder Creek. Simla Croz and 

Principal Way Stations 10. 65a 

4-1 5p Newark. San Joae, Lob Gatos, 

Wright 18 55a 

416pS nunlay and Sunday for Felton, 
i toiiMi-r f'r.-i'k, Santa Cruz ^8 55a 

coast line mniMi num. 

EST" (Third an.l Ti.wnwi-nd Streets.) 

6 I Pa Sun .lose and Wi.v BtHtluDI G 30p 

I7."CA Sail .lose and Way Si at lone 6 40p 

71 5a Monterey. Santa Cruz Excursion 

(Sunday only) 10.1 Op 

8. C a Ni'w Almoden (Tncs., Frl.. only).. 4 10p 
600a l'li<- Coaster Bnn Jose, Salinas. 
San Ardo. Pn»o Roliles, San I a 
Margarita, Snn Luis Obispo, 
Guadalupe. Gavlotn, Santa Bar- 
bara. San Biienawnliira, Oxnard. 

Mnrinink, Lob Angelei 10 30p 

80PA(illr.iv. lIulM-tiT CnsirovUlc, Del 
Monte, Pacific Grove, Surf. 

Lorn poo 1030p 

B.rOASan Jose, Tres Piims. Wntnonvllle. 
Capitol a. Santa Cruz. Paclflc 
Grove, Bnltnaa, Ban i.ule Obispo 

mid Principal Waj Stations 4-1 Op 

tfl.COA Los Gatos, n'rlgjlt H-.uidcr Creek. 
i la Santa Clara and Xarrow 
Gauge T74PP 

10 3PASltn .louc and Way Si at Ion* 1 20p 

11 3"ashii Jose and Wnj Stallone 7.4Pp 

2 15pSnu Jose and WBJ SmuIodb 8. 36 a 

t3 00pi'ei Monic Express— Santa Clara, 

San .1 0*Q, W iM.tn 111^. Santa 
Cras. I>el Monte, Monterey 

Pnrlflc Grove t12.16P 

tS.OOpLoK Gatos, Wright. Boulder Creek, 
Santa Cruz, via Santa Cl»ra and 
Narrow Gang.- 10 45a 

5 30pSi.iitb San Fnmelsco. San .Jose. 
Gtlroy. Holllster. Tre« Plnos, 

■WatsonvllK'.Cupll "la Santa Cruz, 

Ballnaa, Monterey, Paclflc Grove. ip.45"a 

4.3^PSan Joie and Way Stations 17.55a 

16 OOPSiinta Clara. Sun .lose, Los Gatos. 

Wright .. . O.-'-A 

t5-3PpSan. Inland Principal Way Stations !J.40a 
B-45pSunH''t Express— Ue d w ood, Snn 
Jose, Gilroy. Salinas, Pbho 
Rohlea, San Luis OhlHpo, Santa 
Barbara, Ion Angelcn, Denilng. 
El Paso. New OrleniiR 9 10a 

6 45pu Paso, Kansim City, St. Louis, 
Cblcago 10.30p 

6 45pPaJaro, Walsonvllle. Capltoln, 

Santa Cruz CaBtrovllle, Dell IIP.ITp 

Mont.-. Fuel tie Grove ( t10-30P 

IB-16pSan M-leo. Bereaford, Belmont. 
Ban Carlos. Redwood. Kair Oaks, 

Meiilo Park. Palo Alio IB4GA 

6.3rp^an Joae ami Wav Btatlona G3Ga 

80 p Palo Alton dWayStstlona 1p.16a 

1 1.3 P South San Frnneisco, Ml librae, Bur 
llngame. San Matett. Bclnn Dl 
Sun CerloB, Redwood. Fnh-oakB, 
M.-nlo Park and Pa'o Alto 945p 

11 ,3Pp8atUrdoyi only for Mnj Held, Moun- 
tain View, Siiun\ vuii-. Lawrence. 
Santa Clara and Ban .lose .. .... :9 45p 

OAKLANO HARBOR FERRY 
i Foot of Mnrhei st.) 
|715am. 9.00 a. m. 1 1.00 «.m. 

1.00 p m 3 00 p.m. 5. IB p.m. 
A for Morning, P for Afternoon. 

(Sunday excepted tfinnday only. 

b\\ lay only. 

jl'al ly, and Bluow at all statlona on Sunday. 
The 1INKI> ntANSKBII M)MI ANY 
■wtl' cnM for and cheek hagirnge from hotels and 
renl'lenepo Tclcnhine RvehanffS t "' 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS '•"fffcia, 

Sohrr.rr Piano A&ncy 

308-312 Post St. .SanFraocisc* 



Received Gold MedaJ— Highest Award World'! Pair, St. Loula, DM. 



July i. 1905. 



Lea & Perrins' 
Sauce 

tmi oniC">*i wonct5TCQSHinc 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

pensc of the building material, la- 
bor, etc . wonderful fig- 
ure- result. I en thousand nun 
hewing cedar? bearers of 
burdens, 80,0 o hewers of stone, 

overseers, all of whom were em- 
ployed for seven years, and ii| ■■ >n 
whom Solomon bestowed over 
£6,000,970. If their daily food 
was worth 50 cents, the sum total 
for all was £63,877,088 during the 
time of building. The materials in 
the rough are estimated as having 
been worth £-'.545.337.000. This 
gives a total, just for tin's much of 
the expense, which by no means 
expresses the whole cost, of £10.- 
719,760.261, or about $52,117,0^4,- 
867.46. 



39 



The Peerless Seasoning 

Rare piquancy is give.i loChafin^ Dish 
cooking by using 

LEA & PERRINS- StUCC as a sea- 
soning. Welsh Rarebit. Lobster a la 
Newburg, Mushroom Saute. Stewed 
Terrapin, etc-, to be perfect must have 
at least a dash of it. It adds enjoyment 
to every dinner. 

John Duncan's Sons. Agents. New York. 






COST OF SOLOMON'S 

TEMPLE. 

A noted statistician and investi- 
gator who has lots of time for such 
work, has been doing some figur- 
ing on the cost of the Temple of 
Solomon, and says few people, 
even in these days of palmy ex- 
travagance and millionaire display, 
have an adequate impression of 
the enormous cost of the great tem- 
ple. According to Villalpandus, 
the "talents" of gold, silver and 
brass were equal to the enormous 
sum of £6,879,822,000. The worth 
of the jewels is placed at a figure 
equally as high, says the Philadel- 
phia Record. The vessels of gold, 
according to Josephus, were valued 
at 140,000 talents, which, reduced 
to English money, was equal to 
$575,296,203. The vessels of silver, 
according to the same authority, 
were still more valuable, being set 
down as worth £646,344,000. 
Priests' vestments and the robes of 
singers, £2,010,000, and the trum- 
pets £200,000. To this add the ex- 

ATHLETES 

TO KEEP IN GOOD TRIM 
MUST LOOK WELL TO THE 
CONDITION OF THE SKIN. 
TO THIS END THE BATH 
SHOULD BE TAKEN WITH 

HAND 

SAPOLIO 

All Grocers and Druggists 



(Translations from German and 
French newspapers for "Tales.") 

She — You know, judge, our 

characters are different, and I do 

not want to be in his way He — 

Yes, your honor, she is peculiar, 
and 1 don't want to interfere — — 
Judge — I understand. You ask for 
a divorce out of pure love ! 

"But, doctor, how does it 

happen that after so many years' 
practice you have no honorary de- 
gree?" "Ah, I have so many ene- 
mies in this world!" "And in the 
next world ?" 

He — Your new costume is a 

real poem. I have only one fault 
to find with it. You've cut out 
too much. She — Oh, that's poetic 
license. 

Mr. Newlywed — This roast 

chicken is tough as the devil ! Mrs. 
Newlywed — Oh, George, you 
should not speak so of the dead ! 

"What a beautiful hat you 

are wearing to-day." "I'm glad 
you like it. You have such good 
taste." "Yes, I had one just like it 
— last year." 

— ' — "I say, Jenkins, I'm in a 
temporary embarrassment? You 
you lend me ten dollars " "Only a 
temporary embarrassment You 
are much luckier than I am!" 

The Judge — Was your 

chauffeur guilty in this accident? 
The Prisoner — No, your honor, 
the victim was run over in entire 
compliance with the ordinances. 

"What color does Madame 

wish me to give her hair to-day?" 
"Black, please; I am going to a 
funeral." 

Heiress — Dta you like my 

fiance's looks? Friend (examining 
photograph) — Yes — he's worth the 
price. 

He — All the evil in the world 

comes from you women ! She — 
Yes, even men ! 



Hydrozone 

Cures 

Sore Throat 

A Harmless Antiseptic. 

Endorsed by the medical profession. 
Send ten cents to pay postage on 
free trial bottle. Sold by Lead- 
ing Druggists. Not genuine unless 
label bears my signature : 

64F Prince St., N. Y. 

Write for free booklet on Rational Treat- 
ment of Disease. 



Countess — Oh, your Royal 

Highness, just look at the baron- 
ess ! Isn't she shockingly decol- 
lete for such a scrawny old thing? 
Prince — Yes, she's making a great 
show of nothing. 

Jackson — I don't see why 

you should be dissatisfied. You 
got fifty thousand dollars with 
your wife. Wasn't that enough? 
Johnson — Oh, the money was 
enough, but the wife was too much. 

I say, Jean, won't you lend 

Paul a fiver?" "Does he need it 
badly?" "I should say so! He 
wants to pay back what he owes 
me." 

First Lady — I wonder why 

the judge deferred sentence until 
to-morrow? Second Lady — Prob- 
ably he wanted to talk the case 
over with his wife. 

Sergeant — Why didn't you 

stop those students when they be- 
came so noisy? Policeman — I tried 
to. I arrested four of them — but 
they wouldn't come along with me. 

Clare — But, my dear, it is 

a secret. I vowed on my honor 
never to tell. Marie — Well, I'm 
listening! 

Authoress — How is it, 

Anne, I find you reading novels, 
instead of working? Servant — 
Oh, mum, but I never read yours! 

He — How are your cousins 

getting on? She — Oh, very well. 
Lucy is engaged to Charlie Lite- 
wate, and Maud also has a child. 

"Lucy, how would you de- 
fine a 'fragment?'" "A love story 
in which the lovers don't quarrel." 






)=sHg^: 



yj&~° 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name or Stewart 
Hartshorn on label. 

Wood Rollers , Tin Rollers. 




4 o 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




You Can Become An 

Army or Navy 
Officer 



If you are a persevering, moral young 
man, between the ages of 17 and 35 
years, possessing a good common school 
education and passing the necessary 
physical examination. 

Further particulars for four cents in 
stamps, by" addressing, 



H. W. PHILLIPS, Louisville, Hy. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves..) 



Marie (after the honey- 
moon) — Max, dear, here is the tree 
under which you kissed me for the 
first time. Max — You're always 
raking up old memories. I'll have 
that tree cut down. Marie (after 
the tree has been cut down) — Do 
you remember, Max, dear, this is 
the very spot where the tree grew? 
Tableau. 

— i — Grinnard Barrett — Hamfat- 
ter has just bought a farm. E. For- 
est Frost — Does he know anything 
about farming? Brinnand Barrett 
— Lord, yes! Why he played in 
"The Old Homestead" and "Way 
Down East" for years. — Puck. 

Lady — What is it, little boy? 

Boy — I come to claim de reward 
you offered for de return of yer 
canary. Lady — But that is a cat. 
Boy — Yes, but the canary is inside 
de cat. 

Teacher — Now, Tommy, 

what is the meaning of the word 
"purchase?" Tommy — Don't know, 
ma'am. Teacher — Well, if your 
papa gave your mother $io to go 
and buy a new hat, what would 
your mother do? Tommy — Have 
a fit, I guess. 

Bilkins — What ! You did 

not strike back when he slapped 
you in the face? Filkins— How- 
could I? I had my umbrella in one 
hand and my gloves in the other. 

Impecunious Friend (to 

business man) — What! With a 
big business like this you can lend 
me only five dollars? I am going 
to report this to Bradstreet's. 

Mamma — Here comes your 

father. See how cross you've made 
him. Now, go and tell him you're 
sorry. Tommy — Say, pop, I'm 
sorry you're so blamed cross. 



Suitor — Fifteen thousand 

dollars ! A splendid dowry, Mr. 
Isaacstein ! But you know your 
daughter is decidedly plain. Isaac- 
stein — Veil, den, I make it tventy 
tousand. Suitor — By Jove ! 

Twenty thousand ! She's not so 
bad looking, after all — but still she 
is hardly beautiful. Isaacstein — 
Vat? Den I make it tventy-five 
tousand dollars ! Suitor — My dear 
Mr. Isaacstein, what a wonderful 
beauty doctor you are ! 

Mrs. Neurich — Jane, why do 

you allow the children to make so 
much noise? The Nurse — I'm 
sorry, ma'am, but they won't mind 
me. Airs. Neurich — Of course not. 
Don't I pay you to mind them? 

"What was it that prevented 

the duel this morning? Did one 
of the principals fail to show up?" 
"No, but the) forgot the cinemato- 
graph." 

"Say, old man, I have a ter- 
rible thirst." "Pardon me, my boy, 
a thirst is never terrible." 



July i, 1905. 

Professor Chalkdown — Now 

what little boy will make up a sen- 
tence illustrating the meaning of 
the word "triangle?" Little Sammy 
— Well, if grubs won't ketch 'em, 
try angle-worms." — Judge. 

Settlement Worker — What 

a well-behaved little boy he is? The 
Burglar's Wife — And lie comes by 
it natural, mum ; his poor father 
never failed to have a sentence re- 
duced owing to good behavior. — 
Puck. 

Howell — I consulted a clair- 
voyant when I was in Utah. Pow- 
ell — Was she any good? Howell — 
She ought to have been ; she was a 
seventy-seventh daughter of a 
seventy-seventh son. — Puck. 

He — Why do you have all 

that fruit on your new hat? I do 
not like it. She — Well, I couldn't 
very well have it trimmed with 
stuffed goose, even if you do like 
that better. 

Referee — But if your hus- 
band does not support you proper- 
ly, how can you wear such expen- 
sive gowns? Plaintiff — Why. 
Henry, you ought to be the last 
person to ask me such a question? 

Fair Enthusiast — Congratu- 
lations, my dear Mr. D'Auber. 
Your picture is beautiful — and so 
different from your others ! 

"Are you fond of music, 

doctor?" "Yes, but don't let that 
interfere with your singing." 

Once upon a time there was 

a chauffeur who had celebrated the 
third anniversary of his service. 

Modern Poet (to his bride) 

— Don't worry about our future. 
I get thirty cents for every dash I 
make. 

Uncle—Why don't you call 

oftener on your aunt? Niece — I 
simply can't uncle. She's always 
at home. 



BANG Mi 

Ks 




Open Cveninps 
and Sunday . 
preceding the 4— I 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Lomllonol principal pl»,-e o( InislnMa. Han Francisco. California 
Location of work*. Mtorvy County. Narad*. 

. - 'hatata meeting ..( the fl.*r.l ol Director* 
bald on the s'h !v • v an assessment (No. sjt of is canto 

Kr «h*r» «u nraMn 

'•nl State* g«»l.l coin, to the s«.t. .inn nt the office 
ill. Room T». Nevada Block. No. *» Montgomery street 
San Franclaco. California 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall rsmaln unpaid on the 
loth DAY OF .H'LY. 1M6 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at miHle auction and unless 
payment Is made before will be sold on Monday, the 31st day of 
July. i»«, to psr the delinquent assessment, together with cost 
of advertising Ami expenses of sale. 
Br order of the Board of Directors. 

OHAB. D. OLNEV. Secretary. 
Office— Room 79. Nevada Block. 909 Montgomery St.. San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco. California. 
Location of works. \ irniniu District. Storey Count v. Nevada. 

Notice is hervbr eiven, that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the '.mi- I day -tf June, 1005, an assessment (No. K8) often (10) cent a 
per share was levied upon the capital [stock of the corporation, paya- 
ble Immediately In United Btates gold coin. to the Secretary at the office 
of the Company, Room 33. Nevada Block. No. 300 Montgomery street. 
Ban Francisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on th* 
7th DAY OF JULY. 1905 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on Friday, the '28th 
day of July, 1905. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors- 

M. JAFFE, Secretary. 

Office— Room 33, Ne ada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street. San 
Francisco. California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco. California 
Location of works. Virginia City, 8torey County. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors. 
held on the 6th day of June 1905. an assessment (No. 2) of 10 cents. 

f»er share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
mmediately in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office 
of the Company. Room 22, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 11th DAY OF JULY. 1905, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on Tuesday, the 1st day of August 
1905. to pay the delinquent assessment together with costs of adver- 
tising, and expenses of sale. 
By Order of the Board of Directors. 

JOHN B. TWIGGS, Secretary. 
Offioig— Room 22, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Franclseo. California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Challenge Consolidated Mining Co. 

Assessment No- 41 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied May 12, 1904 

Delinquent in office June 14, 1904 

Day of sale of delinquent stock July 7. 1904 

C. L. McCOY. Secretary. 
Office— Room 335. Mills Bide., Montgomery and Bush streetB. San 
Francisco. Cal. 



R. 1SBNBRUCK 




General Agents. Densmore Typewriter 
Machines Rented. Repaired and Inspected 



StaLtida^rd 

Typewriter 
Exchange 



Dealers in Standard Type 
writers and Typewriting 
Supplies- 



Competent Stenographers 
furnished without charge 
at short notice. 



209 Sansome St., Sb 
Frcnclsco, C.l. 

Phone Main 5967 



UNION LUMBER COMPANY 

REDWOOD AND PINE LUMBER 
Railroad Ties, Telegrapn Poles, Shingles, Split Shakes, Etc. 
Main Office, 207-208-206 Crocker Bldg., Tel. Private Ex. 624. 

Yards and Planing Mills. 
Sixth and Channel Stmts. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BLAKE, IttOFFITT S TOWNE 

— riAi.ni in — 

Blake. Moffltt A Towns. Los Angel**, Cal. 
Blake. McFall * Co.. Portland Oregon. 
TEL. MAIN 19». 6&-67-&S-61- FIR8T ST.. BAN FRANCISCO 



For barber*, bakers, bootblack*, balh-houa** 
n«.»,criac"" lndr '"' D*.per-hangers, printers painter* 
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Vol. LXXI. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 8, 1905. 



Number 2. 



The SA.V FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and published 
every Saturday by the Proprietor. Frederick Marriott, Halleck 
Duildlng, 320 Sansome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Entered at San Francisco Postoflice as second-ciass matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, 
Representative. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England, George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication in the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 9 a. m. 
Thursday previous to day of issue. 



At all events the bivalve of Oyster Bay is no 

clam when it comes to conversation. 

-Xobody has seen the big whale in the bay ex- 



cept enterprising boatmen with launches to let. 

If Sweden and Norway ever come to blows 

it will be a "Finnish fight." 

The Government is reported to be trying to 

find a lid that will fit the pot at Hot Springs, Ark. 

The stores are advertising "ladies hand bags," 

but no tailor will pay for mention of gen'st knee bags. 

Twenty drinks a day is inconsistent with good 

husbandhood, according to the judgment of the Su- 
perior Court. 

There won't be any big boating places on the 

Russian river this year ; the ranchers united in damn- 
ing the dam. 

Any patriot without a job is willing to help 

Roosevelt conduct the affairs of the State Depart- 
ment. 

A Los Angeles teacher has been caught in- 
structing the young idea not to shoot, but how to 
steal. 

The impression is steadily gaining ground that 

if President Roosevelt really wants that Panama ditch 
he will have to dig it himself. 

A celebrated "steeple-jack" has furnished an- 
other of life's ironies by falling down stairs and kill- 
ing himself. 

A variation from the routine of Fourth of July 

casualties was introduced by an Oakland boy who 
managed to save his fingers, but killed his father. 

Governor Pardee is building a political "den" 

in the yard of the Executive mansion at Sacramento. 
One of the specifications calls for wtalls without ears. 

Down in Honolulu the home rule candidate 

was badly defeated, which is not hard to account for 
when it is understood that his name is Poopoo. 

The California woman suffragists in Oregon 

are reporting progress. It is very good news that 
they have nothing worse to report. 

A company of New York philanthropists has 

opened a five cent restaurant. It is a safe guess that 
Uncle Russell Sage and Hetty Green know the street 
and number. 



A company of benevolent Frenchmen is 1 « .« ik- 
ing for foreign capital to finance an inventor who an- 
nounces that he can transmute any old metal into 
gold. 

A young man at Redding has lost his arms, 

but found a sweetheart. Well, we suppose that there 
can be some kind of a courtship under these condi- 
tions, but 

The problem at Palo Alto is : Shall the tele- 
graph poles be white and square or round and green? 
We move that it be referred to the Department of 
Aesthetics at Stanford University. 

Two new States have joined Indiana in putting 

the ban on the cigarette. This is a hard blow for 
the villain of the play who must now decide between 
being real devilish with a cigar or a pipe. 

The Grand Jury's expense account may be 

overdrawn, but it has three convicted felons to its 
credit, and Maestretti had to gnaw one of his paws 
off to get out of the trap. 

Californians back from the Portland Fair say 

with disgust that the Trail runs from the Young 
Woman's Christian Association headquarters to the 
Salvation Army barracks. 

The Death Valley plunger can get the support 

of the female suffragists for any office he wants. The 
other day he carelessly tossed his wife $175,000 and 
told her to go shopping. 

The sportive Oaklander who paid $200 in the 

police court for a souvenir from a Park peacock's tail 
is trying to think up a new version of the adage which 
says that "Fine feathers make fine birds." 

Oakland seems to be eternally bothered with 

the garbage question. I do not suppose that there 
ever was a city in which people seemed to live more 
consistently in their own filth. 

So Collins has to support his first wife. No 

doubt it is a little hard, but a lawyer should know 
that a wife is apt to be expensive. Next to a non- 
wife, it is probably the most extravagant luxury ex- 
tant. 

The expenses of the Grand Jury are mounting 

up, and it may be insinuated in all kindness that so 
far the game does not appear to be worth all the ex- 
pense of preserving. But like a young doctor, we can 
only stand by and wait for accidents. 

A local outfit of "healers" announces that it 

can cure the ills of body, mind and'soul by "vibra- 
tions." This suggests that vibratory treatment 
amounting to a "shake-up" might be good for what 
ails San. Francisco. 

The capture of a catfish wearing a pair of gold- 
rimmed spectacles is vouched for by a Methodist 
clergyman of New Jersey. How the shade of Ana- 
nias will welcome this parson's soul to the other 
shore ! 



4 San Francisco news letter, 

a word to the general government 

The News Letter set the pace for a liberal modifi 



cation of the Chinese exclusion law, and it is comfort- 
ing to know that President Roosevelt, in a genera! 
way at least, and the agricultural interests of the 
Pacific Coast in a direct way, are now in accord as 
to what should be done in the premises. They cor- 
dially indorse the News Letter's position, which is 
that the immense field of unskilled labor in the Coast 
country is suffering for a reasonable supply of such 
labor as Americans refuse to give. Although the 
mining and lumber and fishing industries of the Pa- 
cific Coast are almost beyond computation, they are 
dwarfed by the possibilities of the agricultural. The 
Pacific Coast is essentially an agricultural region. 
No greater wealth is to be found than in the products 
of the ranch, farm and orchard. But this great wealth 
will lie unsecured and as a mere possibility until re- 
liable and reasonably cheap labor is secured to de- 
velop it. There are millions of acres of rich grain and 
fruit lands that must necessarily lie idle and unprofit- 
able until the question of labor supply is settled per- 
manently, and there are two ways to settle it. First, 
by obliging land owners to rely upon the caprice of 
American labor and its proneness to take advantage 
of ripened crops and a scarcity of labor to demand 
a scale of wages that would leave no profit, if not a 
loss, indeed, to the farmer. Second, by enabling farm- 
ers to draw upon the labor class of Asia. 

The hue and cry of organized labor that any modi- 
fication of the exclusion act would have a tendency to 
lower Ae dignity of and cheapen labor to the detri- 
ment of American workingmen, is but the boisterous 
ranting of agitators, and has no foundation in fact. 
Perhaps it would interest these labor agitators, who 
know nothing whatever of the conditions in the rural 
districts, to know that the most reliable labor that 
California ranchers has is the tramp or hobo element. 
In its aimless wandering up and down the country, 
sometimes it can be persuaded to work in the orchards 
or grain fields, but as a rule the earnings of a few 
days, or weeks at most, are all they desire, when 
they abruptly quit and resume their vagabond life. 
No one would call such labor at all reliable. When 
prices for gathering fruit are very high, often whole 
families in the near-by towns will go to the ranches 
and remain the season out, bringing with them camp 
equipages, but so far as the profits of the rancher are 
concerned, he might as well let his fruit or vegetables 
rot in their place. Many are the prune and other or- 
chards in California that have been destroyed as such, 
and the land put to grass for grazing purposes. The 
manual labor question on the Pacific Coast submits 
a distressing condition, not a theory, to the Govern- 
ment at Washington for its immediate consideration. 

And the question is simply this: Shall foolish sen- 
timent, unwarranted prejudice and antagonism to 
the fundamental principles of the Declaration of In- 
dependence continue to obtain to the admitted in- 
jury of a vast area and millions of citizens of the 
United States, or shall common business sense be 
permitted to solve the problem once for all in the 
spirit of justice and according to the ethics of com- 
mercial usages? This assertion may be made without 
qualification : until the question of a sufficient supply 
of common labor is settled, and settled in a way that 
shall forever guarantee a supply fully equal to the 
demand, the Pacific Coast will be unable to increase 
its volume of soil products. Millions of acres of the 
richest ranch lands in America will remain in their 
wild and unproductive state, and lands already in 
cultivation will continue to yield at an expense of 



July 8, 1905. 

cultivation and harvesting that returns no adequate 
compensation for the capital invested and the labor 
of supervision — indeed, a deficit as often as a reward 
in profits comes as a consequence of the uncertainty 
of labor and its unreasonable cost when obtainable. 
May not the Pacific Coast request, nay, demand, 
that its boundless possibilities be no longer dwarfed 
and handicapped by unreasonable sentimentalism on 
the one hand, and by the mischief-making and tyran- 
nical power of labor unionism on the other? Cali- 
fornia and all the coast country plead for simple jus- 
tice at the hands of the general Government. These 
vast interests insist that it is the duty of the powers 
at Washington to recognize and respect their rights. 
With no intention of being satirical, the News Letter 
would suggest to the Washington authorities that the 
States of the Pacific Coast should at least be as fa- 
vorably considered in the matter of labor as is so 
cheerfully accorded to the nation's outlying terri- 
tories, where commerce and agriculture are largely 
speculation — not lofty occupations, as in the coast 
country. 

JOHN HAY. 

The historian will give John Hay a conspicuous 
place in the roll of American statesmen. He was not 
born great, but he achieved greatness by studying 
and mastering the problems of State with which he 
had to do. John Hay was essentially a student of 
the science of government and international law, and 
above all, he was a humanitarian in the deeper and 
truer meaning of the word. His field of public ac- 
tivities was mostly in the world of diplomacy, to 
which he brought his own high standard of honesty 
of purpose. In no sense was he a diplomatic trick- 
ster. He did not agree with the diplomatic doctrine 
that words are for the purpose of misleading and con- 
cealment. His methods were direct and to the point. 
Ambassadors and plenipotentiaries knew that they 
need not look between the lines for a hidden meaning 
to his utterances. It was that characteristic of Sec- 
retary Hay that impressed foreign ministers. They 
were taught to expect open, direct and sincere inter- 
course, and they were never disappointed. 

Prior to the assumption of the Portfolio of State by 
Mr. Hay, the custom was to follow the European sys- 
tem of diplomatic intercourse of concealment, intrigue 
and cunning, wherein social life and the wives of 
ministers were powerful factors. Mr. Hay put an 
abrupt stop to all that. Foreign representatives must 
come to him and discuss questions of State in the 
same spirit of honesty and truthfulness that two 
business men would discuss a proposition in which 
both had direct interest, and each of whom desired 
to help remove any existing or threatening obstacles 
to amicable relations and mutual helpfulness. That 
is why President Roosevelt was the only head of a 
nation in the world that could suggest to the Em- 
perors of Russia and Japan that the best interests of 
humanity as a whole and of the several nations, de- 
manded of them an earnest and honest effort to try 
to reach a common ground upon which to meet and 
reason together on terms of peace. Each knew, as 
did all the world, that the United States had no 
ulterior purpose, no scheme to benefit this nation, 
no desire other than a sincere wish to serve both of 
the warring nations for their own good. For this high 
standing in the confidence of the nations, to Secre- 
tary of State John Hay belongs the honor, and which 
should secure to his memory the distinguished con- 
sideration of his fellow citizens. 

John Hay's private life was hedged about by the 



July 8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 

highest ideals. Always his going and coming was in 
the sunshine of moral and intellectual worth. The 
nation is better and stronger for John May being a 
citizen of it. Humanitarianism is a mightier force 
in the world than ever before because of his espousal 
of its cause. He gave a lustre to the administrations 
oi Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt which time 
will not efface. But more than all that, John Hay 
was a type of American manhood which should 
stimulate the youth of America to aspire to reach 
his high level of achievement. 



A POLICEMAN'S BRUTALITY. 

One of the relatively insignificant instances of 
municipal misgovernment that showed above the sur- 
face last week was that of policeman Kramer, charged 
with brutally mishandling two women of the streets. 
The evidence against him was direct, conclusive and 
abundant. It was shown beyond any question that 
Kramer, while off duty, boozing his tortuous way 
homeward in civilian dress, had fallen in with the 
unfortunate victims of his brutal frenzy, had walked 
with them for several blocks, and had then turned 
upon them with alcoholic lack of reason and with the 
ferocity of the brute mad with whiskey and the sense 
of unrestrained authority. There was a cloud of 
sober, respectable witnesses to tell how Kramer ham- 
mered one of the women until her screams aroused 
the neighborhood, how he assaulted citizens for ask- 
ing him to be satisfied with arresting his victims, and 
finally threw one of them into the patrol wagon with 
the bruised and frightened women. And all the while 
his language to the women and the witnesses was of 
. the vilest — enough to have warranted any one hear- 
ing it in arresting the arrester. Later in the morn- 
ing, it was plainly proved, the hoodlum out of uni- 
form was about police headquarters so completely 
drunk that there could be no doubt about his condi- 
tion. But the "drag" and the "pull" of the police de- 
partment were at work to save Kramer. It appears 
that he was accompanied in his debauch and its se- 
quel by another policeman off duty, the brother of 
Chief Dinan's running mate on the force, one Wren. 
This other star-bearer is affected differently by 
liquor, becoming merely more stupid and not mur- 
derous when in his cups. He stood by, a witness to 
all of Kramer's brutality, and was merely a silent 
and inactive accessory. But to save the Chief's 
friend's brother, Kramer had to be let down easy, 
and so, when it come to punishment, the burly bully 
and beater of helpless women was fined $100 — the 
penalty policemen without influence are made to pay 
for going to sleep while on patrol duty, for excess 
of zeal in dealing with citizens or for taking too 
many doses of the policeman's favorite remedy, 
"Jamaica ginger." 

It is to be said to the credit of the Police Commis- 
sion, which acts as judge and jury in cases of this 
kind, that one of its members had the courage to pro- 
test against such cheap licensing of crime among the 
men sworn to prevent crime. This member must 
have felt, as all citizens familiar with the facts feel, 
that if policemen are to be armed and clothed with 
large and summary authority, they must be held 
sharply to the performance of their duties and must 
be disciplined for breaches of the peace even more 
severely than the drunken citizen who goes on the 
rampage. Otherwise the public will be justified in 
regarding the preservers of its peace as more danger- 
ous than the criminals whom they are supposed to 
hold in check. 



THE FOURTH OF JULY. 

Tuesdays celebration in San Francisco compels 
comment on the decline of patriotism in which San 
Francisco shares with the other large cities of the 
United States. The paucity of the 'parade." the ab- 
sence of decorations, the entire lack of interest in the 
languid sidewalk crowd that watched the few per- 
spiring marchers, the apathy of the few who attended 
the "literary exercises" because the show was free, 
and because it was cooler indoors than outside, the 
cheap, brief exhibitions of fireworks— all these were 
symptoms calculated to make the American wonder 
what has become of the intense, eager, spontaneous 
patriotism which used to be — and not very long ago 
— one of the boasts of the Republic. 

This rapidly developing indifference to the very 
gospel of our civilization calls for the best thought 
of those interested in and responsible for our civic 
health. Patriotism is indeed at ebb tide when the 
most sacred national anniversary goes almost un- 
marked by the people, poor and rich alike. Possibly 
there will be a return and renewal of the Fourth of 
July spirit when the tide flows back again, but mean- 
while the question seriously presents itself, what 
has become of the popular reverence for the dearest 
traditions of the Union? Some may ascribe the de- 
cline of patriotic enthusiasm to the fact that here, as 
in most of the large American cities, we have a popu- 
lation too rapidly cosmopolitanized — that there are 
too many of us newly adapted into the faith to cherish 
or care for or understand the cost and the value of 
such traditions as that which the Fourth of July 
stands for. Others may see in the ignoring of the 
rites by which we have yearly testified to our devo- 
tion to the principles of this Government a passive 
protest against the evil conditions that afflict practi- 
cally all the greater municipalities of the country. 
Incivism breeds not only corruption but incivism. A 
third possible diagnosis is that in this age of reason, 
of competition and of individualism there is not room 
or time for sentimentalism, even toward the conse- 
crated monuments of liberty, and that when a holiday 
comes, men and women owe it to themselves to seek 
rest and recreation rather than to go "whooping it 
up" over something that happened more than a hun- 
dred years ago. 

Whatever the cause, the manner in which San 
Francisco kept this last Fourth of July was full of 
reason to make the belated patriot of the older school 
mourn the decadence of the times. The coming of a 
three-ring circus or a convention of the Ancient Or- 
der of Any Old Thing would have meant more people 
on the streets, more interest, more cheers, more deco- 
dations. The "day we celebrate" simply gave the 
townsman a chance to go fishing, swimming, automo- 
biling, or to the baseball game. At the beginning of 
the week a few — a very few — clergymen remembered 
that the anniversary of the nation's birth was at hand 
and preached about it, not glorifying the deeds of 
our patriot forefathers, but glooming over the cor- 
ruption and greed of this day and generation. Per- 
haps their pessimism was justified. 

The Governor of Indiana knows how to do 

things. He wired the sheriff of a county to stop 
gambling at the race track, or he, the Governor, 
would wire the sheriff's dismissal from office. The 
gamblers lit out and the sheriff holds his job. 



6 SAM FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Liberty's Opportunity in Russia 

By Thomas B. Wilson. 

The uprising in Southern Russia has reached the 
magnitude of a revolution, but it has not assumed the 
dignity of an organized purpose. Now it is a wild, 
reckless mob, actuated by hatred. It may yield to 
discipline and become an army bent upon the over- 
throw of the government. All depends upon the vital 
question of a leader capable of such a gigantic under- 
taking — a man who can transform the unwieldy 
masses into a well appointed force, and substitute 
patriotism for personal hatred. Now it is an upris- 
ing of traitors of their country. Are they capable and 
willing to abandon their thirst for lawlessness and 
yield to the loftier spirit of patriots bent upon estab- 
lishing a better government and a better order of 
things for the good of all the people? The answer 
will come from the events of the immediate future, 
but there are small hopes for anything better than has 
been since the revolt began a few months ago. 

At the very beginning the uprising fell under the 
diabolical and love-destroying influences of the 
preachers of the doctrine of anarchy and socialism, 
and it is still directed by those enemies of govern- 
ment under law and order. Hence the sympathy and 
good-will of those who detest the autocracy of Rus- 
sia at home and abroad are withheld, because the 
tyranny of mob rule is far more to be dreaded than 
the absoluteism of a Czar. For this reason a leader 
must be forthcoming who is actuated by the noblest 

and truest principles of government, and who has the 
moral courage to grapple with the existing temper of 
the discontents, and the genius to mold it into a 

concrete military and moral force that is willing to 

sacrifice much to better the conditions of existence 

for their descendants, rather than for themselves. 

With such a leader, a constitutional form of govern- 
ment for Russia would be assured at the outset. 

though it might take years of struggle and enormous 

loss of life to accomplish it, but the price would not 

be too high. The price of liberty is always high, and 

those who are willing to pay the price are the truest 

of true patriots. They are humanity's political 

saviors. Has Russia enough such patriotism to make 

a revolution successful? It is doubtful. At least as 

yet there has been no evidence of it, nor of the ap- 
pearance of a man upon the scene possessed of the re- 
quirements of leadership. No people ever had more 

cause to revolutionize their system of government 

than have the Russians. 

Whether the Czar himself is responsible or not 

for the lies that were sent out from Odessa bearing 

the official stamp of his government concerning the 

mutiny on the battleship Kniaz Potemkine, the fact 

remains that the Consuls of all the nations at the 

port of Odessa were officially authorized to announce 

to their respective governments that the mutineers 

had surrendered the ship without conditions, when, 

in fact, so great was the disaffection in the squadron 

that not only did the crew of the Kniaz Potemkine 

not surrender, but for prudential reasons the Admiral 

of the squadron dismantled all his ships and disar- 
ranged the machinery so that they could not be used 

by the insurgents. This monstrous falsehood was 

officially announced as a positive truth to our State 

Department. What action our government will take 

to resent the insult remains to be seen, but surely it 

is an affront that should not be let go without notice. 

Here was a palpable matter in which American com- 
merce in the Black Sea had deep interests. If the in- 
surgents were likely to be at liberty to roam the sea 

at will and confiscate the ships and cargoes of neu- 



July 8, 1905. 

tral countries, surely American merchants should 
know it. But while it was absolutely true that the 
Potemkine was free to go where she liked and cap- 
ture and appropriate American merchantmen, the 
Czar deliberately lied. He told our State Depart- 
ment that the Potemkine was safely back in his 
squadron, and that there was not the slightest danger 
to American shipping in the Black Sea. Nations have 
gone to war for much less treachery. The fact is, at 
least that Potemkine and one torpedo' boat are, 
according to international law, piratical crafts 
on the Black Sea and every harbor and every mer- 
chantman on that sea are at their mercy. Why this 
bold, fiendish and wholly inexcusable lying? 

But to return to the situation in Southern Russia. 
Scarcely ever before were conditions so favorable for 
a successful revolution in any country. Fully one 
hundred thousand men in Southern Russia alone are 
ready to take up arms against the existing govern- 
ment. Every ship of the Black Sea squadron could 
be put in commission in a week in spite of their offi- 
cers. Where in the history of the world did a revo- 
lutionary movement have such a nucleus of an army 
and navy to concentrate upon? Then, again, the great 
wheat and oil regions of Russia border upon and have 
the Black Sea as their only outlet to the markets of 
the world. Very true, there are railway lines reach- 
ing out by their connections to the Baltic Sea and the 
Atlantic Ocean, but neither grain nor oil could 
bear the cost of rail transportation. Thus, then, the 
conditions are all that could be desired for a success- 
ful revolution, except in one thing — a competent 
leader with competent subordinates. But there is 
something else needed that is quite as essential to 
success as capable leaders, and that is the sympathy 
and moral influence of tyranny-hating and liberty- 
loving people, much of it in a substantial way, the 
world over, and without which success could hardly 
be hoped for. The something else that is absolutely 
necessary is the immediate hauling down of the red 
and bloody flag of anarchism, which is now flying 
on land and on sea, and the substitution for it of a 
battle flag that waves for liberty, human rights and 
equality before the law. Next, relegate or stamp out 
the socialistic influences. These two political isms 
stand for far more danger to human liberty than the 
concentrated tyranny of the long line of Romanoffs 
ever did or ever could. With a competent and patri- 
otic leader, and the elimination of anarchistic and so- 
cialistic influences, a revolution in Russia would cul- 
minate in a constitutional monarchy, with the rights 
of the people fully recognized. 




UCHAS. KLILUS 6'COJJ 

&£XCL US/VE,1& 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

This Ready-Made Clothes Progression has had our 
close attention for many years. We claim the distinc- 
tion of being the "Parent" of this advanced art. Our 
garments tower far above all others. Smart, correct 
dressers have appreciated our ideas of Modern 
Clothes Building by their almost unanimous support. 
Are you a smart dresser? 



1 



[JCIEAKJM^ STTIRJE.E/ir 



July 8. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



The Evolution of a Young Thing 

By Elcanore F. Lewys 



Kiev had just left the house of a friend of her 

mother's, and the latter was intensely chagrined at 

the unabashed frankness of her offspring's immature 

opinion on things in general and art in particular. 

"My dear." she said, admonishinglv. to the slim- 

yed, half-grown young' thing at her 

. "how often must I tell you that the truth is nol 

to be spoken at all times? " 

The Young Thing kicked a pebble savagely with 
the toe of her uncomfortable new shoes and thrust 
out her lip : "If you don't speak the truth at all times," 
she answered, uncompromisingly, "then you're a liar! 
And the pictures were hideous. Why did she ask 
me what I thought of them if she didn't want me to 
tell truly if I liked 'em? And they were hideous! 
Did you ever see blue sheeps?" 

"I will never take you visiting with me again," 
was the reply her mother vouchsafed her. 
_ On the front steps of their home, ranged side In- 
side, were the spoils of the Young Thing's morning 
among the flowers. Great red and white fuchsias, 
with all their stamens pulled out except two, which 
made such pretty slippered feet! Tiny sticks thrust 
through their slim-waisted bodies for the arms, and 
hyacinth blossoms jauntily set on their heads for hats. 
In the fish pond near by sailed little pea-pod boats, 
with rose-leaf sails, laden with fuchsia passengers. 

"What will your father say to this?" exclaimed her 
long-suffering parent. "You know how angry he 
gets when you pull so many flowers !" 

The Young Thing looked up wonderingly. "Why, 
those are fairies," she said. "And by-and-bye, to- 
night, when it gets all dark, they will fly off. I always 
leave them here, and in the morning they are all 
gone !" 

"You mean the gardener sweeps them away," ans- 
wered her mother angrily, and went on into the 
house. 

"What funny people grown-ups are," thought the 
Young Thing to herself, gathering up her "fairies" 
to hide them in the crevices of the rockery. "You 
must tell big whoppers to be polite, and they smile 
at you! And if you think nice little white 'magina- 
tions you get scolded for it." 

As the Young Thing grew up, and the slim legs got 
longer and longer, her big eyes opened wider than 
even at the funny "grown-ups." 

Once when she rushed headlong into the sitting- 
room where the family was assembled after supper, 
and announced reproachfully that "the poor gray cat 
was out in the wood-shed borning kittens, and mama 
said that all babies came down from Heaven !" she 
wondered exceedingly at her hasty suppression and 
the disgrace following, when she was ignominiously 
bundled off to bed. 

"Don't you know, child, that you mustn't speak of 
such things?" asked her mother, when she came to 
tuck her in for the night. But she was only greeted 
by two big eyes swimming in tears, and the eternal 
question: "Why? Why did God make things that 
you mustn't speak of? Then they must be bad! And 
God must be bad, too !" 

By the time the long pig-tail was tucked up on the 
top of her head, and her skirts were made to come 
modestly over her knees, the Young Thing (now be- 
ginning to feel very old) was always spoken of as 
"an awfully queer girl. Always says what she thinks, 



you know. But she isn't half as awful .is she used to 
be! She was the worst kid !" 

"1 have two souls." said the Young Thing to her 
self, leaning over the railing of her balcony that 
opened oil of her little room, and gazing through the 
leaves of the great loquat tree that grew beside it, 
into the yellow glow of the evening sky. "One is 
a little, mean gray creature (I won't let it get alto- 
gether black) that smiles when it wants to swear, and 
pretends not to see things that are right under its 
horrid nose, because it wouldn't be polite if it did, 
and lets rude remarks slip off like water from a duck's 
back when it wants to kick people. And lies! Oh, 
how it lies! And the people that it lies to know that 
it is lying, and it knows that they know it ! And the 
big, big things of life that should be up-rooted and 
searched into and talked of between people, so that 
they could be improved, with no false modesty and 
fool blushes and giggles, it avoids as it would the 
plague! Because as it grows older it hates to be 
called queer. How I despise it, little, measley, cow- 
ering gray creature. 

"And my other soul is clean and white and open- 
faced, and it is full of great dreams, and it lives all 
by itself out somewhere in the blue, blue ether, where 
it can look down at the earth, that is so small ! So 
small that my white soul has to laugh. Like a little 
brown ball, whirling around and around, and never 
getting anywhere, just like a kitten after its own 
tail! And no one ever touches my white soul, be- 
cause it knows that the only true happiness is found 
in solitude !" 

By-and-bye, the Young Thing could not be called 
by that name any longer, because she had become a 
full-fledged woman. A woman whom most people 
(the ones who thought they knew her best) spoke 
of as "really quite charming," some even going so 
far as to call her "sweet." 

And the Young Thing herself? Well, the little, 
measley, cowering gray creature was so much in the 
ascendant that she could laugh amusedly at the utter 
eclipse of the white, open-faced soul, living all by 
itself in the blue, blue ether, and watching the funny 
little world whirling around and around, like a kitten 
after its own tail ! 



It is not good domestic economy to go to the 

expense of a new carpet, when Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works, at 353 Tehama street, will clean 
your old one so perfectly that you would hardly 
know yourself that it was not direct from the carpet 
maker. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street. San 

Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper Information, business, 
personal, political, from press of State, coast and country. Tel. 
Main 1042. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only $7.5P 

per ton; half-ton, $4; quarter ton, $2. Full weight guaranteed. I' 
economy, cleanliness and heat producing qualities. Briquette 
are superior to coal. Sold only by the Tesla Coal Company, 10th 
and Channel. Phone South 95. 



Dr. Decker 

Denttst, 806 Market, Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 
extracting. 

Mothers, he sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" 

for your children while teething. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Culinary Topics and 

Ta.ble Fashions 



July 8, 1905. 



A RED, WHITE AND BLUE DINNER. 
Cornelia C. Bedford. 

It is by no means a difficult task to use the na- 
tional colors for room and table decorations. Our 
flag lends itself as a graceful drapery, and the heat of 
summer weather gives an abundance of flowers wear- 
ing the right colors, scarlet and white geraniums, 
carnations of both colors, salvia, white sweet peas and 
roses, the blue lobelia, blue and white ageratum, for- 
get-me-not, bachelor's button, larkspur and corn- 
flower — any of these may be selected for dining room 
and table. If a set of centre-piece is desired for the 
latter, a low, rectangular pan can be filled with damp 
moss or sand, and a miniature flag worked out in it 
in flowers; or a large star-shaped pan can be filled 
in the same manner. 

While vegetable colorings will change food to al- 
most any hue without a decidedly deleterious effect, 
good taste decries the use of blue in edibles, hence 
the china, or that used for one or two courses, may 
be of that color. For the meal itself select a menu 
which will be neither too elaborate or too heating. 
The Fourth of July dinner of a half century ago was 
lamb and green peas, and she who could have both in 
perfection was envied, for the food resources of to- 
day were unknown then. We may retain these dishes 
— adding others appropriate to the season. 

Cold Cherry Soup 

Broiled Salmon Cutlets Potato Roses 

Dressed Cucumbers 

Crown of Lamb with Peas 

Rice Croquettes Stuffed Peppers 

Frozen Raw Tomatoes 

Cheese Biscuit 

Frozen Raspberry Roll Fancy Cakes 

Frozen Punch Coffee 

For the croquette mixture boil one cupful of rice 
in salted water for five minutes, then drain, turn into 
a double boiler on the fire. Have ready one cupful 
of well seasoned, stewed and strained tomato, and one 
cupful of good clear soup stock. Mix and heat these, 
and add a portion at a time to the rice, allowing it to 
cook in Until the liquid is absorbed before more is 
added. Occasionally stir lightly with a fork. When 
all the liquid has been taken up by the rice and it is 
tender, add more seasoning if needed, a half teaspoon- 
ful of onion juice, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley 
and the beaten yolks of two eggs. Turn through for 
two minutes longer, then take from the fire, turn in- 
to a fiat greased pan, and set aside until morning. 

The frozen tomatoes, which come on as a salad, 
must next be prepared. Pare them with a sharp 
knife rather than scald. Cut the firm pulp very fine, 
carefully discarding seeds and draining off all liquid. 
For one quart soak one-quarter of a package of gela- 
tine in one-quarter of a cupful of cold water and melt 
over a gentle heat. Season the tomatoes highly with 
salt and cayenne, add two tablespoonfuls of tarragon 
vinegar and the melted gelatine, and pack in a mold 
with a tightly fitting cover. Pack in ice and salt for 
two hours and a half, and serve with a thick mayon- 
naise, into which is stirred one-fourth of its hulk of 
whipped cream, surround the frozen mold with a bor- 
der of lettuce leaves. 

As a stuffing for the peppers, score the ears of corn 
and scrape out the pulp. Season it with salt, and for 



each cupful add a half teaspoonful of onion juice, one 
tablespoonful of melted mutter and a beaten egg. 
Cut the tops from the peppers, remove seeds and 
veins and fill with the corn mixture. Stand upright 
in a deep dish, and steam or bake in a moderate oven 
until the centers are baked firm. This will take from 
twenty-five to forty minutes, according to the heat 
applied. 

The fruit punch is best made early in the day, so 
that the flavor may be well blended and the drink 
thoroughly chilled and iced. Take one cupful each of 
currant, raspberry and pineapple juice, add sufficient 
simple syrup (granulated sugar and water) to 
sweeten well ; set aside until chilled. At serving time 
add one quart of ice water and a quart of Apollinaris. 
There now remains the meat, peas, fish and pota- 
toes to be provided for. Cut the fish selected in pieces 
suitable in size for individual services. Season light- 
ly with salt and pepper, and lav each on a piece of 
writing paper which has been brushed with melted 
butter. Fold over the paper and pinch the ends that 
the fish may be entirely enclosed. These are to be 
broiled at the last moment and served on a platter 
garnished with potato. The latter calls for a quart or 
more of hot mashed potato well seasoned, and to each 
quart of which is added a quarter of a cupful of hot 
milk a tablespoonful of butter and two well beaten 
eggs. This is turned into a pastry hag and pressed 
out on a greased pan in the shape of roses : dabble 
these with a little beaten egg and brown them in the 
oven. The cucumbers are sliced, mixed with French 
dressing, and served in small dishes. 

The meat requires a hot oven with a time allow- 
ance of eighteen minutes to the pound : the tips of the 
bones should be wrapped in paper to prevent burning. 
The peas are cooked as usual, and in serving turned 
into the center of the meat. The rice is molded in 
croquettes, egged and crumbed and fried a golden 
brown in deen smoking hot fat. 



Nelson's Amycose, 

Infallible Remedy 'or Catarrh. Sore Throat and Inflammations of 
the Skin. 




That our garments have maintained a char- 
acteristic individuality for graceful shapeliness (and 
the retention of their shapeliness through a long 
period of service) has been due, we take it, to the 
fact that, -while purchasing only from the very best 
of good clothes makers, we have taken the extra 
precaution to dictate the various materials that are 
used in their manufacture. 

An example -worthy of emulation by our 

competitors. 

Heller isf Frank, Inc. 

Clothiers 

Market Street and Grant Ave. 



July 8, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Methods of Clairvoyants— How Tricks are Turned 

By the Clairvoyant 



We, the dupes of to-day, are not new in the Geld. 
Soothsayers have held sway over the credulous for 
decenials of centuries. Asti were favored 

prophets in ye olden time. The stars were supposed 
to be stuck in the skies merely to control destinies. 
( mly a few astrologers hold forth in San Francisco. 
1 me of them, now out of business, gave me a few 
tips (for a consideration) concerning ways and 
means. It seems that horoscopes are cast from cut 
and dried printed matter, according tc birthdays. 
There is a painful similarity between most of these. 
As much as possible is put in each one, in the hope 
that some of it may fit each person in part, at least. 
Clever astrologers vary these from time to time in 
case clients compare notes. A New York publishing 
house supplies directions and charts. The stars are 
being given a long, long rest. Any bright boy, or 
one of average intelligence, may, by this patent, be- 
come an expert astrologer in a week. 

Astrologers are a bit out of date, though. Clair- 
voyants, seers, palmists, spiritualists and healers are 
more popular. Tricksters all ! I am willing to take 
my oath on forty Bibles that a genuine prophet does 
not exist in this precinct. Prof. Khiron's little bunco 
game is typical of all the others. Moreover, visiting 
these fakers frequently proves a dangerous pastime, 
as some women may testify to their sorrow. If you 
must visit these tricksters, keep to the ones on the 
broad highways ; stear clear of the side streets. Al- 
ways give a fictitious name if asked to write it for a 
test. Your real name will not assist the "fates" one 
bit, and may find its way into the "Medium's Blue 
Book." 

"The Medium's Blue Book" is a triumph in modern 
business methods. It is of special value to spiritual- 
istic mediums. In it are contained names, addresses 
and peculiarities of citizens who are much given to 
visiting mediums. Added is a list of the "deaths" in 
each family, with "causes of death" attached. A new 
medium coming to the city invariably employs a 
"spotter." A "spotter" is a man who knows the de- 
sired class of dupes by sight. They go over the book 
together. The medium sends his card to a hundred 
or more addresses. It is then highly probable that 
a few of these desired persons will appear at each 
seance. The "spotter" spots them. It is then that 
"little Annie, who died of pneumonia in New South 
Wales" sends a message to "Uncle John." Uncle 
John, if not hopelessly superstitious, may put it down 
to mind-reading; but genuine mind-readers are few 
and far between in San Francisco. Most so-called 
mind-reading is trickery pure and simple. If you 
are at this seance and do not get a "test," you maj 1 
be sure that your name is not written down in the 
Blue Book, and you would better clear out while 
there is yet time. 

There is a cheerful fraternity spirit existent among 
these fakers. Prof. Niblo, who holds forth in the day 
time, may casually advise you to attend Madam 
Young's seance on a certain evening. He has learned 
your name and a few facts regarding you. He tele- 
phones Madam Young that a "Mr. So-and-So, with a 
dear mother recently deceased," is to visit her on a 
certain evening. Madam Young does the rest. You 
get a bona-fide "spirit message" from your mother. 
The tricks seem so simple when disclosed it seems al- 



; a shame to tell them. I always fancied that 
'hese spiritual magicians, something on the 

"nlcr of Kellar. but they .io not understand ill. 
elements oj -..-called magic. They use a feu simple 
chemicals in painting "spint pictures," but ti 
about all. A medium's apparatus is extremely sim- 
ple — almost as simple as the dupes he takes in. 

OBITUARY. 

Will S. Green, editor of the Colusa Sun, a distin- 
guished newspaper man, and a recognized political 
leader in California, is dead at the ripe old age of 
72 years. Mr. Green came from his native State. 
Kentucky, to California in 1849, ail( J immediately be- 
came identified with the public concerns of his new 
home. And from that day until he was called hence 
from St. Luke's Hospital last Sunday, his life was one 
round of noble deeds. In all things he was actuated 
by a lofty purpose. He believed in and lived the 
"heart doctrine," and always his pen and voice were 
lor bettering the conditions of existence of those 
whose struggles in life were in the paths of rugged 
hills. Mr. Green's wife and several children survive 
him. 



Frederick L. Macondray, a well-known and highly- 
esteemed citizen of San Francisco, died in Manila 
last Sunday. He was the senior member of the firm 
of Macondray & Company, shipping and commission 
merchants. A few years ago he went to Manila to 
superintend the firm's business in the Philippines and 
in the Far East generally. He leaves a widow and 
two children. For a man of only thirty-seven years 
of age, Mr. Macondray had reached far up the ladder 
of commerce. 



FAT FOLKS. 

I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six inches, waist 
six inches, and hips fourteen inches in a short time by a guar- 
anteed harmless remedy, without exercise or starving. 1 will 
tell you all about it. Enclose stamp. Address MRS. E. K. RICH- 
ARDS, 225 EAST NINTH ST., RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

for $7.50 per ton; half ton, $4; quarter ton, $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking lu.d heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



Inexpensive Jewelry 
and Silverware 

IS QUITE AS MUCH IN OUR LINE AS THE 
MORE ELABORATE AND EXPENSIVE SORT. 
LOW PRICED ARTICLES OF GREAT MERIT 
MAY BE FOUND IN ALL OUR DEPART- 
MENTS. 

Bohm-Bristol Company 

JEWELERS, SILVERSMITHS 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

104-110 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

fa 



July 8, 1905. 




The news of the sudden demise of Colonel Jeffer- 
son E. Doolittle came as a shock to his many friends 
all over the continent. He was probably one of our 
best-known and one of the most popular of our local 
mining men, and his loss will be deeply regretted by 
all who knew him, and who appreciated the man for 
his ability and kindly, honorable disposition. 



It is now in order to look 

The Resurrection of for the resurrection of all 

Old-Time Mines. the old Nevada mining 

camps on the strength of 
the boom which has followed the discoveries at Tono- 
pah, Goldfield and Bullfrog. Belmont, Tuscarora, 
Ryepatch and many other camps whose names one 
could conjure with some thirty years ago. As it 
is, the drift is now toward Panamint, and a little 
smoke can be seen in that direction, which may yet 
be followed by a flame. Poor old Candelaria is now 
a back number, evidently for the reason that gold 
is now king in Nevada, where for so long silver 
reigned supreme. Wonders seem never to cease just 
now in connection with the mining revival, and even 
over the line in California the fever has broken out. 
The Excelsior mine, in Meadow Lake District, which 
in the past has broken every one who has stayed with 
it long enough, excepting "old man" Hartley, who 
inherited nearly all the camp, after its sky-rocket 
career in the hazy past, has found another friend and 
backer in one of the Godbees of Salt Lake City. The 
luck of this family in mining is proverbial, and it 
may follow them to Meadow Lake, where the ores 
have, so far, always proved an enigma in the matter 
of treatment to one after another of the mining men 
who have tried to work them. Many of these men 
were thoroughly competent in their profession, but 
one after another threw up- their hands in disgust and 
left the camp, recognizing that they had something 
yet to learn. Another mine to be re-opened is the 
Banner mine, which Senator Belshaw is going to take 
in hand. This mine has been given up in despair by 
men who took it up some time back in face of the 
historical fact of its wealth in gold in the upper work- 
ings when the property was first worked. All old 
mines, resurrected by men of modern ideas, do not 
prove failures, and in evidence of this fact, the Em- 
pire Gold Mine of Sierra county. This property, one 
of the oldest in the State, which under its new man- 
agement of San Francisco people seems destined to 
rank soon among the big bullion producers of the 
State. 

The market for Comstock 
Pine-St. Market, shares has been closed down 

during the week just past for 
the holidays, and in consequence there are no quo- 
tations given. The latest reports from the mines 
are good, and the ore in Ophir continues to hold 
in the winze now down over 20 feet from the 2100 
level, and in the south drift from the same level, 
which has been carried in to a distance of 60 feet. 
At the other points of interest along the lode, pre- 
parations are still going on to get at the deep levels, 
where, after the experience in Ophir, there seems 
every reason to believe large and valuable bodies of 
ore will be found. 



The trade in Tonopah-Goldficld-Bullfrog shares 
has been lighter than usual, as only the S. F. Tonopah 
Exchange has been open for business. Many of the 
brokers in the big exchange, taking advantage of the 
holiday, left on a visit to the new camps, and their 
experience will doubtless help them out in business 
when they take it up again. The weather at Bullfrog 
has been hotter than is comfortable of late, and work 
will be checked to some extent in this district until 
cooler weather sets in. Goldfield shows an improve- 
ment, and good strikes are reported in many quar- 
ters. The "nigger in the woodpile" suggested in 
these columns when the North Star mine was closed 
down, has materialized, evidently. It took four days 
after work was started up again to strike a ledge 
which looks strong enough to send all the bears in 
Christendom back to the woods. 



F. H. Oliphant, special agent of the Geological 
Survey, has collected statistics of the oil industry in 
the United States during 1904. His figures show that 
California is the leading State in oil production, hav- 
ing 29,649,434 barrels to its credit, valued at $8,265,- 
434, the average value being .279 cents per barrel. 
Texas produced 22,241,000 barrels, valued at .367 
cents a barrel. Oklahoma and Indian Territory 
jumped from 139,000 barrels in 1903 to 1,366,000 
barrels in 1904. Ohio was next to Texas last year 
with 18,876,000 barrels; West Virginia, 12,644,000 
barrels; Pennsylvania, 11,300,000 barrels, and Indi- 
ana 11,339,000 barrels. The total production of the 
United States last year was 117,063,421 barrels. 



The Lida Sunset Gold Mining Company is a new- 
organization which has just been perfected, and 
which bids fair to soon become one of the properties 
of that section. The property is known as the Wise- 
man group, and is composed of seven claims located 
three miles north of the town of Lida, and contains 
140 acres. There are three well-defined veins on the 
property averaging in width from 10 to 20 feet, and 
nearly every foot of which carries values of more or 
less gold. 



Starr (EL Dulfer 

SAN FRANCISCO and TONOPAH 

STOCK COMMISSION BROKERS 

Tonopah, 

Goldfield, 

Bullfrog 

OFFICES 

Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco; Tonopah, Nev. 
II. W. Hellman Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Members— S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. 



July 8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

The Eureka Sentinel, in commenting upon the 
Michigan method of protecting miners, which the 
Letter discussed at length a few W( 
U the s.une system were employed m \<". 
the mining fakers in this State would go OUl 

ind on the other hand the tax rate would 



ti 



down so rapidly that in a little while only those en 

d in mining 'business' would feel the burden of 
taxation. In Michigan the word of the mining it" 
moter is taken on the question of values, and the 
properties they are engaged in floating are taxed at 
the valuations placed upon them by the promoters 
themselves. What an enormous revenue Nevada 
would have if the big mining companies operating in 
this State were taxed according to the valuations 
given by their promoters in their prospectuses, ad- 
vertisements, reports, etc. I" 



OLD KIRK 
WHISKEYi 



The case of Gamble vs. the Silver Peak Mining 
Company, of Nevada, is now before the United States 
Court at Carson, and a stay of go days from June 
18th last has been granted for the purpose of taking 
additional testimony. This suit has been dragging 
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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1905. 




The news comes from Butte that John H. Sheehan, 
a tailor, once well known to fame as a member of 
the notorious Solid Seven of the Board of Super- 
visors, has lost a peculiar looking law suit brought 
by him against a Montana mining man. It appears 
that the Montanan, while looking for experience in 
this metropolis, met two elegant gentlemen with 
whom he visited the room of one of their friends. 
There, says the man from Butte, he was buncoed. 
He gave the bunco men a promissory note, and on 
this Sheehan sued as an innocent purchaser. Sheehan 
was one of the band of which Devany, Delancy, Smith 
and others were members. If any bunco men, or deal- 
ers in gold bricks, were on the line when Sheehan was 
in flower, they left town light handed if their game 
was good. Sheehan, ex-Supervisor, is a painful mem- 
ory of things that were. 

* * * 

There is surely a nice bunch in the City Hall. 
Here, all along, I have thought, of course, that only 
the Schmitz men were engaged in graft and gouging. 
Mr. Andrews said so, and having faith, I believed. 
You see, Mr. Andrews is in a position to know. But 
now, what is our amazement to be told that Dr. 
Dodge's deputies have been also concerned in politi- 
cal assessments. To the real political reformer, 
there is nothing quite so heinous as a political as- 
sessment, and when thai assessment is levied by the 
reformer's opponent, or for his benefit, it becomes 
a crime of the deepest dye, and the collector of the 
dough is put down as a man fit lor strategems and 
spoils. So Mr. Andrews and all of us meant it when 
we denounced the Schmitz Central Club and its 
methods. But what about the Dodge business? Well, 
we think Dodge has been Assessor long enough, 
Again, we think the public should not be deceived, 
and that we should hew to the line, let the chips fall 
where they may. Incidentally, we know a man who 
would be just as good an Assessor as Dr. Dodge, 
and what's more, he is a Republican, and known as a 
"safe, conservative man." It is rumored that the 
Crand Jury's report on the Assessor's office will not 

pulsate with enthusiasm. 

* * * 

Samuel Cohen had a pretty wife, also a friend 
named O'Brien, who, Cohen thought, possessed some 
wealth. Cohen entertained an idea that O'Brien and 
the madam were too intimate. He charged O'Brien 
with over-friendliness; then demanded money; and 
then, QTBrien not having produced, Cohen shot him. 
The last act aroused the just indignation of Judge 
Mogan. In holding Cohen to answer, Mogan de- 
nounced him as a blackmailer. Mogan is the judge 
for me. These impecunious husbands with pretty 
wives are getting a little too fresh. Unless they are 
restrained, what will become of our boasted liberties? 

* * * 

A big whale floated into the harbor a day or two 
ago. It upset a couple of fishing smacks, destroy ed 
hundreds of dollars worth of nets, and startled the 
marine population generally. The Bulletin 
Schmitz imported the whale to destroy local indus- 
tries. I saw it in the "Boughlen," so it must be so. 

* * * 

The Board of Education has received S195 from 
on anonymous donor. It was marked "restitution.'] 
That means, of course, that some one who held out 
that amount when he needed it, now needs it no 



longer, and therefore may listen with the appreciation 
of rectitude to the pleadings of his conscience. Queer 
thing, isn't it, that as soon as a crook gets rich his 
conscience always leads him to return small amounts? 
if he is a wholesale grafter, he can square himself 
with his conscience by building churches or endow- 
ing colleges, or sending missionaries into Africa, or 
reading the Scriptures to a Sunday-school class. Thus 
he not only assures himself that he is an honest man, 
but he really makes other people believe it. And, 
my boy, as long as other people believe it, why, what 

more can be asked by any latter day philosopher? 

* * * 

I or one, I hope that attorney Cannon will prose- 
cute unrelentingly those High School students who 
kidnapped his step-son and ran him across town. Of 
course the parents of the boys say the lads meant 
nothing wrong. The same statement has been made 
frequently by the parents of university boys who have 
made the night joyous by stealing signs and break- 
ing windows, and have enjoyed the day by smashing 
the windows of railroad coaches, as has been done 
at Berkeley on many occasions. The boys at whom 
the Cannon is aimed are embryo university boys. 
They commenced their law-breaking about a year 
earlier than usual. They should be punished severe- 
ly now, else they will develop into "respectable" 
hoodlums. The law breaking of a well dressed lad 
is considered simply an act of mischief without mal- 
ice. The same act, done by a lad in ragged trousers 
is considered pure malice undiluted. The law should 

bear equally on both. 

* * * 

Our barbarous, uncivilized celebration of the 
Fourth has again claimed its victims. The maimed, 
the halt and the blind follow in procession after King 
Firecracker. The dead are laid away, and we are 
once more ready for our next celebration of Inde- 
pendence Day. If the fool-killer was ever on earth, 
he certainly left enough of his disciples in the United 
States to last for a decade to come. The manner in 
which our "best citizens," year after year, endeavor 
to outdo one another in the making of noise to the 
great*"- glory of the screaming eagle, passes all un- 
derstanding. It is the most foolish and most repre- 



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July 8. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



-iblc method of honoring a nation's glory tl 

'•> crack-brained enthusiasts. We smile 
ndingly at the Giinese who , 

to drive away their devils at the c 
ment of their new year. We commiserate the condi- 
jnorance of the heathen who seek 

- by burning ill-smelling punk b 
their horrid images, but at the same time we rather 
envy their possession of bombs that explode like .1 
ten pounder, and of immense crackers that go off like 
a roar of artillery. It is easy, you know, to see the 
mote in our neighbor's eye. I hope that in the time 
to come some sane man with backbone enough to 
withstand the opposition of the little-minded, will 
arise in our halls of legislation and bring about the 
passage of a law which will make the selling of fire- 
crackers, bombs and all their ilk on and about the 
Fourth a misdemeanor, punishable by fine and im- 
prisonment, and their explosion promiscuously in 
all our streets a high crime and misdemeanor, for 
which hanging, drawing and quartering shall be the 
only punishment. 

* ': * 

The re-appearance of John L. Sullivan in San Fran- 
cisco brings to mind his greatest histrionic feat in 
Australia, where on one occasion he literally brought 
down the house. 

Jimmy MacMahon, then a leading theatrical mana- 
ger, thought it would be a paying idea to import Sul- 
livan, for prize-fighting had always been a popular 
pastime in the Colonies. He argued, with some show 
of reason, that large audiences would willingly part 
with their coin for the sake of seeing Sullivan on the 
stage, and that the play would be merely a subsidiary 
matter. As he had not much faith in the fighter's abil- 
ity to remember his lines, he had a small part especi- 
ally written. All John L. had to do was to walk on 
the stage resplendently attired in evening dress, his 
diamond reflecting the lime light — Sullivan positively 
refused to go on without the precious gem — recite a 
few lines, and then, donning a leathern apron, pose 
as the village blacksmith. There was an anvil handy, 
on which the pugilist might strike resounding blows 
with a mighty sledge hammer, the while the audience 
gazed in admiration at his powerful biceps. 

The scheme would have worked all right, and Mac- 
Mahon would have gathered in countless shekels, had 
it not been for the proverbial hospitality of the Aus- 
tralians. They took Sullivan so warmly to their bos- 
oms, and introduced him to so many beauteous bar- 
maids that when the night of the opening performance 
came round the hero of the forge was nowhere to be 
found. Hansom cabs scoured the city in vain, and 
in despair the management, after resorting to every 
delaying device known to stage craft, ordered the 
curtain rung up. The gallery was in an uproar be- 
cause of the lengthened wait, and it looked as if the 
whole performance would be wrecked, when, at the 
usual moment, the great pugilist appeared. He stag- 
gered to the center of the stage, his crush hat tilted 
to one side, his white tie awry, swinging his mighty 
sledge hammer as if he meant to brain some one. 
The gallery roared as the fighter swayed unsteadily; 
in vain the prompter prompted and the stage mana- 
ger swore in the wings. Sullivan had clean forgotten 
his part. At last he dropped his hammer, and, shak- 
ing his massive fist at the shouting gallery boys, ex- 
claimed in a voice which made itself heard even above 
the tumult, "I'll put a head on some of you ducks!" 
If Sullivan had learned nothing else, he had learned 
Colonial slang pretty quickly, for "ducks," an almost 
obsolete term, dates back to the old convict days, 



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when criminals transported to Botany Bay were 
known as "Sydney ducks." But Sullivan's knowledge 
of local slang did not aid him much; the episode 
closed the performance, and it also ruined John L.'s 
career in the Colonies, for after this insulting refer- 
ence to the convict origin, which every good Aus- 
tralian desires to forget, theatre goers would have 
nothing to do with the show, and the venture ruined 
MacMahon. 



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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1905. 



^MKatwy^TOWN CRIER ML>r-ZT7X 



An energetic gentleman orated on the Fourth 
With more than usual energy and power ; 

He sent the burning eloquence most brilliantly forth, 
He talked for rather more than half an hour; 

And all that he did utter was a string of lurid phrases 

With a wealth of glowing adjectives that fairly blinds 
and dazes, 

Of high faluting epithets and coruscating phrases, 
For he had the gift of gab by natural dower. 

But the energetic gentleman was a judge upon the 
bench, 
He'd a splash or two of dirt upon his ermine, 
And the justice he administered had somewhat of a 
stench 
Which reminded one ■ unpleasantly of vermin, 
So the high faluting orator who talked so loud and 

brave, 
Was nothing but a coward and a poltroon and a slave, 
However he may argufy, gesticulate and rave 
With his empty vapid platitudes and sermon. 

Another fake pugilist game is scheduled for 

the month, and the crowd of innocent San Francis- 
cans will part as pleasurably as heretofore. The queer 
turns which innocence takes and the way in which 
it comes out in the most unexpected places is at least 
as baffling as the streaks of vice which crop out in 
the most promising soil. Some one should write a 
brochure on "innocence revealed, or the pugilistic 
innocents of San Francisco." 

The Bartlett case is discovering the graft of 

the medium. Of course graft is graft, a somewhat sa- 
cred thing, but the mean way in which this is worked 
should provoke reprisals that will tend to the in- 
crease of the prison population. The prosecution of 
a grafting medium by a set of grafting officials and 
her final shipment to a grafting prison ought to be 
very satisfactory to a grafting public. 

The domestic condition of San Francisco re- 
ceives another illumination in the Talbot divorce 
case. No one can question the variety of life here ; 
if variety is the spice of life, we must be a regular 
grocery. But there comes a time when the kaleido- 
scopic changes are too bewildering, and even spice 
grows to be a little unwholesome. 

Mayor Schmitz says: "I know it is hard to 

stand by and see them trying to take away your liv- 
ing." There is a sort of prophetic sadness about this 
remark. It is a "hardness" which the Executive will 
himself experience some day next fall. But I trust, 
yet fear, that his Honor has secured that living for 
one short life at least. 

Manners change. A local gourmand of liquors 

employed a time-honored classical way of preparing 
for a new load, and as a result, his wife promptly ob- 
tains a divorce. Imperial habits are not to be imi- 
tated by the modern citizen even at the respectful 
distance of two thousand years. 

The Healdsburg ranchers are opposed to a 

big dam. It does not, however, appear whether their 
opposition is based upon religious or commercial 
grounds. Seventh Day Adventism at Healdsburg 
naturally suggests the former, but an intimate know- 
ledge of the Healdsburg farmers inclines me to give 
the verdict to the latter. 



Lawyer George D. Collins may be a tricky 

rogue — and he seems to be on the road to conviction 
of worse things than that — but the ease with which 
he befools the courts, dodges justice and cheats the 
law is rather an indictment of our judicial system 
than testimony to Collins' abilities. It is well enough 
to be cautious in dealing with an accused criminal as 
slippery as this one, and it is undeniably the part 
of wisdom to give him plenty of rope, in order that 
he may be his own hangman, but there seems to 
be something amiss with the machinery of the courts, 
else he would have had to face the ultimate issue 
before now. 

A pretty case is that of Dr. Arthur Marten, 

who, it has been decided by the U. S. Circuit Court, 
has been illegally confined in Mendocino Asylum. 
The doctor has brought action against the State 
Board of Examiners for damages. Under ordinary 
conditions one would say that we should learn the 
truth about these lunacy cases, but the condition of 
the courts forbids buoyant hope. 

A horde of screaming kids in possession of the 

thoroughfares of the metropolis of the Pacific is not 
a pleasant spectacle, and should tend to make us a 
little ashamed. But the sight of other people being 
teased is a gratifying spectacle, and we never con- 
sider how soon we may have to pay the piper. 

The Indian Commissioner at Riverside is 

anxious to cultivate the artistic side of the Indian. 
One way to do this would be to restore the tomahawk 
and set the Indian loose after the Commissioner. Art 
would be restored and athletics, which all familiar 
with the Greeks know is one side of art, be cultivated. 

Who says that the children have not the best 

of things? Their luncheons at the Park have been 
halved in price and undiminished in quantity. I won- 
der if the same sort of a scheme applied to the child- 
ren themselves would result in a solution of Mr. 
Roosevelt's problem of race suicide. 

It would be interesting to know just how many 

violations of the law which require a trial for a 
lunatic there are, and what right the Superintendent 
of a lunatic asylum has to promise to release a patient 
upon condition that he is shipped out of the country. 
The Filipino students at Berkeley are alarm- 
ing the authorities by the publication of their views 
on independence. Surprise is natural. Unselfish 
patriotism is a scare commodity in the local univer- 
sity, and to tell the truth is not particularly cultivated 
by the authorities. 

The Chief of Police is not in favor of appoint- 
ing additional detectives and secret service men at 
additional rates of pay. Quite right, too. It has not 
yet been shown that those we have are any too effec- 
tive. 

Two sisters who cannot find an honest lawyer 

are about to undertake their case themselves. They 
may find that it pays better to recognize a little dis- 
honesty. 

The South is moving. A white man has been 

sent to the penitentiary in Mississippi for assaulting 
a negro woman. But why did they not lynch him, 
as they do negro men? 

We read that the tired pastors are to take a 

rest. Are we to assume that the evil will cease work- 
ing? 



July 8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

A RINGING LETTER. 
The following open letter to the editor of th 
Francisco Bulletin has the right rjng, and no 
it fully and clear!} voices that side of public 
merit which always stands lor law ami order. There 
is the sound logic of ages of experience in th 
gestion of President George that with the Cil 
Alliance fully as strong and determined as are the 
labor unions, both sides would quickly appreciate the 
importance of the one having due respect in all things 
for the other, which, like nations, would resort to 
conferences and compromises to avoid open hostili- 
ties. Certainly it means force met by force, but it 
would be force guided by reason and respect for the 
power of the one and the other. 

June 29th. 
Mr. Fremont Older, Editor Bulletin, City— 

My Dear Mr. Older: My heart goes out to you in 
this your hour of distress, but you will pardon me if 
I indulge in a sarcastic smile on the side. You com- 
plain because you cannot get police protection, and 
bitterly deplore the attitude of a city administration 
that deliberately incites riot with a view to taking 
advantage of a public sentiment that forbids visiting 
violence upon ignorant children and blindly zeal- 
ous women. But, my dear Mr. Older, let me tell 
you on the quiet, for the last sixteen months I have 
been contending against conditions of this sort con- 
tinually, and sorry to say that I have not found a 
daily paper in the city of San Francisco willing to 
present my side of the question. Every day a column 
of so-called labor "news" is published in the daily 
papers, misrepresenting the industrial situation, and 
going before their readers continually undenied. You 
know how it is yourself now, and I believe you will 
appreciate the tremendous odds that I have had to 
meet here upon the coast, not as a "union busting 
proposition," but as an institution of defense against 
the lawlessness of misguided and indecent unionism. 
I have no fault to find with a good share of the peo- 
ple who belong to unions, because they would do the 
right thing if they were given a chance to do so, just 
as they would to-day get together and frown down 
the recognition of such an irresponsible thing as a 
Newsboys' UJriion. 

You have done everything in your power to court 
the friendship of the unions, believing that our side 
of the house would overlook your eagerness to add 
a few names to your subscription list, to please the 
advertising men of the big stores, but now, when the 
broad and conservative element of unionism should 
come to your rescue and put a stop to this lesson in 
lawlessness among the newsboys (who will have to 
be met later on in life in some other form of indecent 
unionism), they leave you to fight a one-sided battle 
without even so much as offering the word that 
would stop it all. You would not be suffering to-day 
if those placed in charge of the city Government 
would enforce law and order. This brings me to a 
circular I issued on April 15th, which has been com- 
mented on quite extensively, but which has never 
yet been printed in full in any paper. In that circular 
I advised Democrats and Republicans to get regis- 
tered, go to the primaries, and fight the battle for 
a decent administration of the laws. Perhaps I went 
a little farther than I was warranted by advising those 
who spent their summers away to come home and to 
investigate the registration laws, and if lawful, vote 
where they do business. This last suggestion was 
well meant and made purely in the interest of de- 
cency, with the hope that the city might be rescued 



NEWS LETTER. 



:S 



irom a gang ot pirates who use the police force prin- 
cipal!) to protect law breaking unionists, discredited 
ni union men. 1 have been compelled to 

practically maintain a police lone of my own 111 order 
to protect the 17,000 members of the Citizens' Alli- 
ance oi San Franci 

1 his leads me to another topic, and I trust you will 
forgive me lor referring to it. I am charged with 
trying to drag the Citizens' Alliance into politics 
beg to inform you, sir, that this Association, which 
1 have the honor to represent, is not in politics and 
cannot be dragged into politics, but will go on in the 
even tenor of its way fighting the battles of its mem- 
bers regardless of the whines of interested politicians 
and would-be reformers who yell lustily about their 
not being members of the Citizens' Alliance and who 
charge us with trying to precipitate a "class strug- 
gle 111 this community because we ask the courts 
to stop lawlessness. If these people would urge the 
unions to abandon their lawless practices they might 
be warranted in asking this Association to let up in 
its defense of its members "until after election," to 
the end that certain would-be reformers (who public- 
ly upbraid the Alliance), might succeed in defeating 
Mayor Schmitz. Personally, I would rather see 
Mayor Schmitz re-elected than some jelly-fish re- 
former anxious to forward his own political interests 
by pretending to be a peace-maker, with a view to ul- 
timately putting the Citizens' Alliance out of busi- 
ness. I know where Schmitz stands. 

The Citizens' Alliance has not failed in one of its 
prosecutions in court, and it has had the entire city 
administration to fight. It has fought the conditions 
successfully and can continue to fight them success- 
fully no matter who is elected Mayor of the city of 
San Francisco. Speaking for myself (and not the 
Citizens' Alliance), I had rather continue to fight 
along the lines I have established and know what I 
have got to contend with than see the opinion created 
through the election of a "reformer" that the unions 
had been whipped and the time had arrived for the 
Citizens' Alliance to go out of business. With a re- 
form Mayor bent on forwarding his own political 
interests through pandering to lawless leaders of 
unionism, the time would soon arrive when the gener- 
ous people who now support the Citizens' Alliance 
would erroneously arrive at the conclusion that the 
end had been reached, and all was over but the shout- 
ing, and the Association would then go to pieces, 
and, four years from now, the employer side of the 
question would be up against the strongest revival on 
the part of the unions they have ever yet been called 
upon to meet. 

I make this plain statement of facts so that people 
may know. I have no political ambitions.. I am sim- 
ply here to make a success of a. movement that I 
have thought out and which I believe to be the only 
solution of the industrial question, namely, the crea- 
tion of an organization on our side of the question 
as complete and thorough in every detail as the or- 
ganization of labor. When there is perfect organiza- 
tion on both sides, then may we hope for the birth 
of the spirit of respect for both sides on the part of 
each, which will result in a sentiment that favors 
thinking out labor difficulties before trying to fight 
them out, The Citizens' Alliance has held to these 
methods, and its battles have been fought through the 
courts. If the unions have gotten the worst of it 
there, it should be plain to the average citizen that 
they got it because they deserved it. 

Yours very truly, 

HERBERT GEORGE, 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Pleasured 



Wand 



O/eoiey no Hand but P/casure 's . ' 




Have a divorce, my friend; help yourself, for ten. 
■What a glorious hubbub there'd be in town, from 
the elected environs of Pacific Avenue to the Latin 
quarter litter if, by newspaper ads., by flaring street 
placards this delicious, scandalous information were 
set forth, signed "Eugene Schmitz, Dictator," thusly, 
to wit: "Hereafter in this, my City and County of 
San Francisco, anybody may have a divorce on pay- 
ment to the Municipal Boodle Guarder of 10 sequins; 
without two weeks' notice, 20 sequins; re-marriage, 
30 sequins. Pay up." Grand, glorious! What a 
kick of feeling joy by'Mesdames Smarty Setty, Stage 
Struck, et al. Exhilarating wa-hoo whoops of free- 
dom given! A wild, joyous kick like the kind Aimec 
Lester executed at the Tivoli. For with a similar 
announcement by the Dictator of Florence begins 
that glad and tuneful comic opera, "Amorita." Flor- 
ence promptly gets one. Love as you please! Away 
old husbands! Banish wives! Amor shall reign, 
the Only! 

"The worm has turned." How it happened, I don't 
know. The fact is this : there's a good show at last 
at the Tivoli. Tell it in Gath and Oakland. A really 
good show — I mean one 'way up, beside the "Maid 
Marion" of Grace Van Studdiford, but in originality 
a genius or so above it. A theme of rattling interest 
is "Amorita." It is something new in comedy. In- 
stead of being padded to a finish, it rises continually 
to increasing interest with a smashing finish, amid 
divinest melodies, sweetest love, profoundest in- 
trigue, like some opera you dream about, but never 
hear. Angelo. a banished artist, trips one day into 
ancient Florence to sec his sweetheart. Amorita; he 
comes across intended papa-in-law mixing up in a 
fierce plot with a fop. a "dizzy blonde," done by 
Tcddv Webb, and a perfect fit ; they scheme to get 
back- "the original ruler, the Duke de Medici. Angelo 
sw -i )es papers that could easily cost papa-to-be his 
precious head. While firecrackers are booming out- 
side, within the Tivoli black conspiracy is hatched. 
Enter a sort of peripatetic conspirator, all black, with 
wizard's hat, who walks in jig time. A grotesque 
creation, one of the most original devices ever got 
to the stage. Oh, that rag time walk! 

Sad to tell, Angelo i^ clapped in prison, but won't 
peach on sweetheart's papa. Will die first! Pros- 
pects are bright for dying; Schmitz — I mean Fra 
Bombarda, the Dictator — hands out a certain finish 

de-ath. But Angelo is still taking enough interest 

in the short comedy of existence left him to bluff 
papa ; under fear of exposure, makes him bring Amo- 
rita, and then marries her out of hand. The Floren- 
tine Schmitz, then, will cut off Angelo's head sure 
enough — to get the girl, of course — when the author 
of the opera rushes in suddenly, saves the innocent 
and overturns cruelty. Is this not your sequin's 
worth, sir? 

No singer ever shone more luminous than does 
Grace Palotta. as Forterbraccio. Her personality 
adds a golden lustre to the opera. She has sparkle, 
poise, splendid bearing, combining with a winning 
voice the cleverness of a natural actress. Her hand- 
ling of the chorus is skillful beyond the usual; she 
gives to her theatrical duties a dash of manner that 



July 8, 1905. 

throws a splendid finish into the whole production. 
A girl worthy of much. 

A sudden frigidity, alien to a somewhat warm 
evening, emanated from the stage when advertised 
Rosemary Glosz hit the public boards. She should 
get banted down a bit — several bits. The advice is 
confidential. Despite this frosty start, as Angelo, 
she came to the front, took on some better looking 
and becoming bridal clothes, and warbled with a cred- 
itableness that brought her much applause. It would 
seem that nothing were destined to thwart the com- 
plete success of the opera. Luck reigns with "Amo- 
rita." Barron Berthold has a trap door in his voice, 
through which his tenor makes occasional descents 
under the stage. But it surprises by taking occa- 
sionally return trips to the scene of things. A de- 
fect this man of fine presence and acting ways may 
be able to overcome. Oh, Barron, try for me — if not, 
for the other fellow and yourself. 

That last act! Amorita, wooed in her wedding 
dress before her lover's prison by the Dictator! A 
fine dramatic scene, with two fine people. No love 
scene in Robin Hood is finer. There the opera rises 
to its height, the libretto lives. Angelo comes out of 
the prison, adding to fine dramatic effect. Then, 
oh, horrors ! As Miss Glosz runs to a fine exit — 
kerplunk she goes ! A ripple runs over the audience. 
The divine Angelo took a tumble on unromantic side 
scene planks. But we recover from the disaster, the 




Adelaide Manoia, who will appear with Max Fieman. at theOrpheum 
next week. 



July 8, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Duke's soldiers return in the nick of time, and with 
■ truly brilliant ensemble this production 
rita" takes i among the sui 

Teddy Webb told mi lanager n< 

that "Amorita" had n.u been presented hei 
ten years. Abroad it Lore the name of "Witsuntide 
in Florence"— curious, isn't it?— and follows the his- 
torical fact of the Duke de Medici, the monk who 
became a Dictator, all in the city of Florence. 

P. (, 

* « * 

The Alcazar is drawing good houses, as it should, 
for one of the most delightful entertainments of the 
on is being presented by a company of not mere- 
ly actors, but of artists— at least as to several of 
them. "Up York State'' is the name of the play, and 
there is a wholesomeness in the thread of the story 
that fully equals the plays of Sol Smith Russell. 

Country life is faithfully depicted without strain- 
ing to make it unnatural. The movement, the action 
and the presentation of the several scenes suggest 
careful preparation and painstaking acting. John 
Craig is a born Darius Green, which makes his ren- 
dering of the part truly artistic. The Misses Law- 
rence, Woodson and Allen are conspicuously good 
in their roles, and in fact the same may be said of 
the entire company, which seems to have been se- 
lected to fit the several roles, or rather the play to 
have been written to fit them. 

* * * 

At the California, Miss Roberts reached the heights 
of her genius, and they were dizzy heights, in "Zaza." 
Her support was strong and faithful, and gave herself 
and her role a setting that brought out all the force 
of character of the actress, and gave to "Zaza" a pre- 
sentation that was superb to the most minute detail. 
A performance this (Saturday) afternoon and even- 
ing will close Miss Roberts' engagement in San 
Francisco for the season. 

* * * 

The Orpheum show this week opens with Schepp's 
dogs and ponies. These animals are past masters of 
the feats of trained quadrupeds, so do not miss the 
first act at the Orpheum. The holdovers are the 
best of the new bill, which comprises the eight Bed- 
ouin Arabs, the best of the kind ever seen in San 
Francisco, George W. Day, Gillingwater & Co., and 
the Wilson trio (I mean Wilson solo.) Henriette de 
Serris' bronze and marble statuary, presented by a 
number of Parisian models, are most beautiful, and 
hold the audience to the last minute. The Zazell and 
Vernon Company, pantomimists, are amusing, and 
succeed in pleasing the audience. Frederick Voelker, 
accompanied by his wife, is a master of the violin, 
but the gyrations of his head and body are painful. 
Mrs. Voelker, however, is most graceful and pretty 
at the piano. 

* * * 

"The Belle of Richmond" is not a great play in it- 
self, but it is great in its purpose, which is to allow 
no man, woman or child to even entertain a passing 
thought of the blues, of low spirits or of sour temper. 
It is a rollicking swing of grotesque and charming 
situations, which at once fasten the attention of the 
audience and holds it throughout. It may be said 
that the play is made great by exceedingly clever and 
enthusiastic acting. Miss Albertson is a finished ar- 
tist, and should have a far better role than the "Belle 
of Richmond," but as that is the best the play affords, 
she is obliged to "climb down to it." As a whole, the 
company is good at fun-making, and plenty of fun 
is produced. 



«7 



The Central Theatre has an exceptionally [ 
play this week. "Chattanooga" seems to be easy work 
for the Central's company of players. The scene in 
which a company of soldiers attempt to take a bridge, 
which is held by the enemy, is thrilling. The ex- 
citement of the roar of battle and the mad rush of the 
boys in blue was "simply great," as a voice from the 
balcony informed me. True Boardman scored a 
1 ess as the superstitious young man. Mr. Gamble 
and Miss Hopkins were wcli received. 
* » * 

The next bill at the Central will be Scott Marble's 
gem, "The Heart of the Klondike," the story of which 
was taken from the early history of the great Alaskan 
gold fields. The mining camps and all their quaint 

OrpheUIT). bet . stookton and Powell Sts. 
Week commencing Sunday matinee. July 9 

AN EXTRAORDINARY BILL 

Max Figman. Adelaidb Manola and Company; Godfrey and 
Henderson; Harper, Desmond and Bailey; Henriette dp Ferris' 
bronze and marble ntatuary; Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Voelker; 
Zazell and Vernon Company; Schepp's Dogs and Ponies: Or- 
pheum Motion Pictures and 

THE HAZARDOUS GLOBE 

Regular matinees every "Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and 
Sunday. Prices— 10c. 25e. 50c. 

Grand Opera House 

Week beginning tomorrow. Sunday matinee. 
The brilliant comedians 

George ParsoQs & Qeorgie Drew Mendum 

in Willie Collier's great comedy success 

A TURKISH TEXAN 

Special summer prices, 25c and 60c Matinees Sunday- 

Alra73K Th c\n f- ro Belabco * Mayeb, Proprietor* 

/-\lL.dZ,cir ineUCre E. D. Pbiob. Gen'l. Mgr. Tel.Alrawr 

Week commencing Monday, July 10. Regular matinees Satur- 
day and Suuday. 
The Alcazar Stock Company in Wm. H. Crane's comedy success 

ON PROBATION 

Last times of Craig, Hilliard and Miss Woodson. 

Evenings 25 to 75 cents. Matinees Saturday and Sunday 2* to 

50 cents. 

July 17-Oolgate Baker's new Japanese play. THE HEART OF 

A GEISHA. Juliet. Oro by a* KohammaSan. 

Soon-WHITE WHITTLESEY. 

California Tbeater L E e ^e a el^ e an^er 

Farewell week. Tomorrow night and all next week 
Mr. Frederic Belasco presents 

FLORENCE ROBERTS 

in her remarkable emotional triumph 

TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES 

dramatized from Thomas Hardy's famous novel by Lorrimer 
Stoddard 

Extra— Friday af'ernoon. July 14. Florence Roberts' testi- 
monial benefit to Hobart Bosworth. The notable program will 
include Miss Roberts, Lewis Morrison, Paul Gerson, Herschel 
Mayall, Lucius Henderson and others. 



Central Theatre. 



Belasco & Mayer, proprietors 
' Phoi " 



Market st.. near tth. Phone South 5S 3 
Week beginning July 10. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Scott. Marble's tremendous melodrama of life in the frigid 
gold fields. 

THE HE0RT OF THE KLONDIKE 

Thrilling situations, exciting climaxes and a wealth of beauti- 
ful soenery showing the great sluice box with its torrent of 
real water. 

July 17th.— Engagement extraordinary. The great and only 
JOHN L. SULLIVAN. 
Prices evening 10c to 60o. Matinees 10c, i5o, 25c. 

Tivoli Opera House. 0acmtX ^Sfn t ^. 

Last week begins next Monday night of Czibulka's comic opera 

flMORITA 

Matin«e Saturday. Usual Tivoli prices. 26. 50 and 75 cents. 
Next— Kate Condon, Arthur Cunningham. Barron Berthald 
and a splendid cast in the Bostonians great triumph 

ROB ROY 

Produced under the stage direction of Max Freeman. 

FirsUime at popular prices. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



and beautiful scenery will be seen in characteristic 
manner. On Monday, July 17th, the great and only 
John L. Sullivan will be seen at the Central in a 
brand new melodrama which has made a hit in the 
East, called "Fast Life in New York." 

* » * 

"On Probation" is to have its first stock presenta- 
tion at the Alcazar next Monday night. Its scenes 
are laid at Monte Carlo and in the pleasure resorts 
of the Swiss Alps, and a variety of picturesque char- 
acters are combined, such as a Russian nobleman, a 
Spanish senorita, a fiery Portuguese and an Italian 
waiter, who has masqueraded in America as a for- 
tune-hunting count. Juliet Crosby, whose triumph 
in "Madame Butterfly" is fresh in mind, will create 
the complex role of Kohamma San. Will R. Walling, 
leading man of the Yorkville stock in New York City, 
and now here upon his vacation, is specially engaged 
for the American diplomat. To follow conies the 
great popular favorite, White Whittlesey, in "For- 
tunes of the King." 

» * » 

Frawley's engagement at the Columbia Theatre 
comes to a close with the coming Sunday night's 
performance of "Ranson's Folly." This engagement 
closes the regular season of the house, which re- 
opens late in the month with Ezra Kendall in his 
new comedy. Other attractions to soon appear are 
Madge Carr Cooke in "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage 
Patch;" May Irwin in "Mrs. Black is Back," and 

Eleanor Robson in "Merely Mary Ann." 

* * * 

Max Figman, one of the best comedians on the 
stage, Adelaide Manola, a charming young actress, 
and their supporting comedy company, will present 
their one-act comedy, "Catching a Husband," at the 
Orpheum Sunday afternoon. Harry Earle Godfrew 
and Veta Henderson promise a surprise in their one- 
act fantasy, "A Daughter of the Gods." The Hazard- 
ous Globe will be a novelty. Circling and revolving 
the interior of a transparent globe will be a young 
man on a motor cycle, in a thrilling and death-defying 
plunge. Harper, Desmond and Bailey, colored per- 
formers, will make their first appearance in San 
Francisco. Henriette de Serris will show many new 
pictures. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick. Voelker will 
change their selections, the Zazell and Vernon Com- 
pany and Schepp's dogs and ponies, and the Orpheum 
Motion Pictures will complete the programme. 

* * » 

Commencing at the Sunday matinee, and thereaf- 
ter every afternoon and evening for two weeks, Both- 
well Browne's musical extravaganza, "Princess Fan- 
Tan," with a cast of three hundred juveniles, will be 
the attraction at the Chutes. The brightest and best 
trained youngsters in San Francisco will take part. 
The amateurs will appear as usual on Thursday even- 
ing, incidental to the production of the extravaganza. 
Chiquita, "the living doll," the babies in the life- 
saving incubators, and other features are great at- 
tractions at the Chutes. 

* * * 

George Parsons and Georgie Drew Mendum will 
begin the second week of their engagement at the 
Grand Opera House to-morrow (Sunday) matinee, 
the programme for which will be the Oriental farce in 
three acts, entitled "A Turkish Texan," by Willie 
Collier and George Parsons. The stage settings, cos- 
tuming and effects will be of Oriental magnificence, 
and a feature of the second act will be a party of 
Turkish dancing girls. The cast will include, besides 
Mr. Parsons and Miss Mendum, P. S. Barrett, Arthur 



July 8, 1905. 

Boyce, W. R. Abram, Sterling Whitney, Fred Kava- 
nagh, John Ravold, Charles Campbell, Marie Baker, 
Bonnie Stockwell, Louise Brownell, Edith Campbell 
and Fred Wilson. 

* * * 

The next Tivoli production will be DeKoven and 
Smith's romantic comic opera, "Rob Roy," which 
will be remembered as one of the "Bostonians great- 
est successes." It will be staged by Max Freeman, 
who has been permanently engaged by the Tivoli 
management. It was Mr. Freeman who staged the 
original production of this phenomenally success- 
ful opera. 



POINTS OF INTEREST. 

It is by no means an unusual thing for strangers in a city to 
be more familiar with its landmarks and points of interest than 
are the residents. This arises no doubt from the fart that lim- 
ited time compels the stranger to visit such places without delay, 
while the resident may defer it indefinitely. It seems remark- 
able, however, that any resident of San Francisco should be 
anything less than familiar with such a store as that of the 
Bohm-Bristol Co., yet a well-informed San Franciscan was heard 
to ask, recently, in what business this company is engaged. For 
the benefit of such of our readers as are not fullv Informed, we 
wish to state that the Bohm-Bristol Co., at 104 to 110 Geary street. 
was the leading house of jewelers and sil"ersmlths of Denver. 
Colorado, for twenty-five years before It opened its San Fran- 
cisco store on April 23rd, i9U4. This thoroughly reliable house 
carries an exceptionally complete and artistic assortment of 
gold Jewelry and silverware, and a truly wonderful selection of 
precious stones. From the gojd or silver trifle suitable for a 
mere remembrance, to the most important presentation pieces, 
their stock affords the widest selection at the most reasonable- 
prices. Such an enterprise, involving, as it does, so large a capi- 
tal, and appealing directly to the artistic taste of our citizens, 
should prove an interesting feature of our city's growth. 



YOU CAN EAT 

"POI" 

The National D ish of the Hawaiian* 

With Relish 

A natural health food 
A'great delicacy 

A godsend to people wrlm 
suffer from dvspepsia- 

For sale by 
GOLDBERG. BOWEN a CO. 

or sent prepaid on receipt 
of 60c by 

HAWAIIAN POI FLOUR CO. 

HONOLULU, H. I. 

Lutted's Hawaiian "POI" 




"Free from the care which wearies and annoys. 
Where every hour brings its several joys." 



"AMERICA'S 

SUMMER 

RESORTS." 



This is one of the most complete publications of its 
kind, aod will assist those who are wondering where 
they will go to spend their vacation this summer. 
It contains a valuable map. in addition to much in- 
teresting information regarding resorts on or reached 
by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 

A copy will be sent free, upon receipt of a two -cent 
stamp, by George H. Daniels. General Passenger 
Agent, New York Central and Hudson River Railroad 
Grand Central Station, New York. 



July 8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

AND NOW IS THE TIME. 



19 



Persons contemplating buying a home, or ha 
a little money for investment, would do well to run 
over to Bay View Park, via the Key Route, just b< 
yond Berkeley. The site of the Park could not be 
improved upon for healthfulness, beauty ■> 
and attractiveness of surroundings. Only fifty 
minutes are consumed between the Park and San 
Francisco via the Key Route, whose accommodations 
and time schedules are not surpassed anywhere by 
rapid transit railways. 

But the real interest that centers in Bay View Park 
is that building lots cost from $100 to $200 on easy 
payments for the whole lot against $250 to $300 
the foot front in Golden Gate Park and the Presidio 
districts, with as much time consumed and not nearly 
as desirable car facilities in going to and fro as to 
Bay View Park. It is doubtful if this opportunity 
to secure a home at such small cost will last long. 
The tendency of small house-holders is to reach out 
where a greater area of land may be secured at fig- 
ures that would justify the investment, and since 
the Bay View Park district is so liberal and satisfy- 
ing in opportunities to provide oneself with a hand- 
some home at very low cost, it is reasonable to sup- 
pose that prices for lots will go higher in the near 
future, for the influx of home-seekers is by no means 
on a small scale. 



The closing of a successful year at the Califor- 
nia College of Palo Alto, California, was marked by 
the first graduation exercises ever held by an institu- 
tion of this kind. Various subjects were treated, 
showing portraits in goodly variety of pose, lighting 
and expression, of groups and single figures, flowers, 
trees and plants, interior and exterior views, land- 
scapes, marines, etc. These were printed in aristo, 
platinum and carbon — all being mounted in quiet, 
esthetic tones and styles appropriate to the subject. 
So well known and popular has this western institu- 
tion become that enrollment applications for the fall 
term, which will open on the 4th of September, be- 
gan coming in over two months ago. 

The statement of the condition and value of 

assets and liabilities of the Hibernia Savings and Loan 
Society show that great institution to be in a still 
increased financial condition. The assets are now 
placed at $62,913,649.03, of which amount the deposits 
amount to $59,439,417.50. This society is indeed a 
credit to San Francisco, and it certainly is one of the 
greatest savings banks in the country. It is a work- 
ingman's bank in the truest sense, and has enabled 
hundreds of people to acquire homes and bank ac- 
counts. 



Museum Lecturer — The bearded lady's hus- 
band has been dead only two months, yet she's spruc- 
ing up again. Manager — What are the symptoms? 
Museum Lecturer — Why, this afternoon she appears 
on the platform with her whiskers trimmed Vandyke 
stvle.— Puck. 




L E PAGE'S GLUE 



STRONGEST 

INTHE 
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Does not set quickly like the old style glue, 
and has four times the strent'tli <ufncial 
test, 1 in. eq. hard pine butted, registered 
1G201DS. bet ore parting). Used by the best 
mechanics and m Irs. the world over. I nval- 
uable in household use, for Furniture. 
China, Ivory. Books, Leather.and w herever 
a strong adhesive is desired. 1 oz. bottle 
or collapsible self-sealing tube (retails 10c) 
mailed lor 12e.ifyourde.iler hasn't our line. 
If PACE'S PHOTO PASTE, 
2 oz. size retails 5c. ; by mail, 10«. 
without If PACE'S MUCILAGE, 

This Label. 2 oz. size retails 6c ; by mall, 10c. 

RUSSIA CEMENT CO.. 143 Basex Ave.. Glooceiter, Olai*. 



"Bui the railroad men sn\ th« Interstate I 

mcrcc Commission has had very few complaints from 

shippers." "[ dare say the shippers know hrttor than 
to complain." — Puck. 



Only 

Forty Sites 

For Your Selection 



in the first and only residence park in 
San Francisco. Prices run as low as 
$100 per front foot. Send for our beau- 
tiful illustrated booklet telling all about 
this select home proposition. 

Presidio Terrace 

adjoining the Presidio Wall, facing 
Washington street. $50,000 spent in 
beautifying this tract. 



Baldwin $ Howell 

25 Post St., S. F. 



GOOD COOKS 

All good cooks insist on having a gas range. Bakes 
better, broils better, roasts better. 

RANGES AT COST 

$10 DOLLARS A MONTH 

SERVICES FREE 

&/>e GAS Co. 

415 POST STREET 

EXCHANGE 8 



DON'T BREAK YOUR BACK 



"REAL ECONOMY" GAS RANGES. 



operating an old 
fashioned Gas 
Range. 
"REAL ECONOMY" 

GAS RANGES 

have elevated 

oven and broiler. 

Ask the 

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to show you the 
"REAL ECONOMY" 
GAS RANGE in op- 
eration. 
ECONOMY STOVE CO. Detroit. Mich. 

H. A. POTTER, Pacific Coast Agent. 52 First St., San Francisco. 




20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1905. 




d^i^t: 




Miss Alice Roosevelt was of course the sensation of 
the week. Society had its chance to stroke her mane 
at Mrs. Eleanor Martin's reception, and everybody 
with a capital E came flying back into town to attend 
the reception. Miss Roosevelt is not nearly so pretty 
as her pictures imply, but she has the New York man- 
ner and charm. Her gown was very stunning, and 
she stood the ordeal of meeting droves of strangers 
as a president's daughter should. She was cordial 
without slopping over, and those who expected a dose 
of haughty shoulder were agreeably surprised. 

Mrs. Walter Martin was the most conspicuous 
member of the receiving party, outside of Miss Roose- 
velt. She was stunningly gowned, and looked more 
beautiful than I have ever seen her. Mrs. Eleanor 
Martin showed the nervous strain of entertaining 
her distinguished young guest, and for once seemed 

fagged out. 

* * * 

June and her brides are numbered with the past, 
and July has been ushered in with more sunshine than 
is good for the complexion. Celebration of the 4th 
drove many city summerers to seek pleasure in the 
country nooks. The suburban resorts have been over- 
flowing with guests. San Rafael seems to be growing 
daily more popular — with her golf links, tennis courts 
and delightful drives. Week-end parties are quite 
the thing just now. Each Friday and Saturday sees 
off a great many of the favorites whose ties to the 
city are too tight to be cut for the lighter frivolities 
of life. At each station the cordial hosts gather to 
meet the evening trains, but the stunning equipages, 
the high-stepping horses that used to champ at their 
bits in the old days, are growing scarce, and the auto 
is the thing. Yet the thoroughbreds lent an air, and 
even those who are not devoted lovers of horses real- 
ize that automobiles cannot suffice in everv way. 

* * * 

Fine fishing is drawing a good many lovers of that 
sport to Capitola. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hobart are 
among the several San Franciscans who are reveling 

in fly hooks and fishing poles. 

* * * 

Mrs. Hyde-Smith sailed Saturday on the steamer 
Mariposa for Tahiti. She will only be gone about 
six weeks, but this will give her a ten days' stop-over 
at the island to witness the celebration of the fall of 
the Bastile, which the natives hold after their own 

style. 

* * * 

The Misses Jolliffe have departed to spend a month 
or so in the Spreckels' country home in Sonoma. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels themselves are spend- 
ing this month at Del Monte. 

* * * 

San Rafael had a merry time last week. On 
Wednesday the long-looked-forward-to golf tourna- 
ment came off. The club house held a host of gay 
guests who had come to see the contests, while smart 
traps and autos dotted the environments everywhere. 
This was the third regular competition of the Cali- 
fornia Women Golfers' Association, and every year 
the interest waxes more keen. Many society women 
are beginning to take an active interest in this sport. 
Among the contestants on the golf links were Mrs. 
Lawrence T. Scott, of the Burlingame Country Club, 



.Miss Florence Ives, Miss Edith Chesebrough and 
Mrs. W. S. Porter. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Gwin, Stanford Gwin and Miss Gwin 
mailed for Europe last Saturday, to be gone until 
September. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. George S. Fife and Miss Beatrice Fife 
air entertaining Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Foster at 
their Palo Alto home. 

.Miss Maye Colburn has left the "Abbey" in Mill 
Valley to pay a short visit at Mrs. Barry Baldwin's 
beautiful summer home in Napa County. Her mother, 
.Mrs. George Lyman Colburn, v> ill remain at the "Ab- 
bey." Lvery year the Colburns spend several pleas- 
ant months among the redwoods 0/ Mill Valley. 

* * • 

At noon on Friday last, Miss Nina Otis Eldred 
became Mrs. Philip Bancroft. The ceremony took 
place in Christ's Church, Coronado. The altar was 
hidden under a wealth of beautiful tropical flowers, 
and luxurious green disguised the whole church. Af- 
ter a four weeks' honeymoon the young couple will 

come to this city and settle at St. Dunstan's. 

* * * 

When Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Wheeler left two 
weeks ago for their beautiful summer home, "The 
Bend," on the McCloud River, their two eldest daugh- 
ters did not accompany them. For the past two 
weeks Miss Lillian and Miss Olive have been the 
guests of Mrs. F. G. Sanborn. They remained here 
so that they might finish the school term, and left 
with Mrs. Sanborn to join their parents. Mrs. San- 
hi Tn will only remain about ten days at "The Bend." 

Hospitality and good cheer are tendered each year 
to a favorite few in this ideal summer home of the 
Wheelers, and these "favored few" come away with 
the most pleasant recollections of their hosts and the 
beautiful McCloud. Dr. Van Dyke often speaks of 
the happy days he spent a; "The Bend" last year. 
Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin Ide Wheeler usually spend 
some time with these friends during each summer 
season. 




PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO.. Inc. 

STORAGE. MOVING. PACKING AND SHIPPING 
Separate rooms built for the Storaee of Household 
Furniture. 



OFFICE AND 

WAREHOUSE 



EDDY & FILLMORE STREETS. Tel. West 82o 



July 8, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



The Gua Taylors, the Will Taylors and 
started this week on an automobile trip 
Cntz. 

* * * 

Mrs. C. R. Splivalo, of Belmont, announced the en- 
gagement of her only daughter last Thursday in a 

very unique fashion. Many of lu-r intimate friends 
were bidden to a luncheon at the beautiful home in 
Belmont, and when the guests were seated around 
the prettily decorated table, the secret was disclosed 
by the invited cards of the two young people found 
tied together in the daintily sketched envelope which 
marked each guest's place. The engagement was such 
a complete surprise to every one present that the 
congratulations and good wishes for the bride-to-be 
were all the more hearty. Miss Splivalo is a graduate 
of Van Ness Seminary, but did not put her books en- 
tirely away when the school door closed behind her. 
Among her friends she has always been a great favor- 
ite on account of her interesting personality, accom- 
plishments and charm of manner. Those who ride 
with the Burlingame Club consider her a fearless and 
graceful horsewoman. 

While visiting in Honolulu, Miss Splivalo met 
Lieutenant Shoemaker. He has a host of friends in 
this city. At present he is on the cutter "Bear" in 
Alaskan waters. The young officer is most highly 
esteemed in the revenue service. The wedding will 
not take place until some time in October. 

* * * 

Many of the popular girls who are spending the 
summer in town were away visiting friends over the 
Fourth. 

Miss Florence Cole was the guest of Miss Eliza- 
beth Mills in San Rafael. 

Miss Mabel Hogg was also the guest of friends in 
the country for a few days this week. 

Miss Maizee Langhorne visited at Menlo Park. 

* * * 

In some quarters, no doubt, the arrival of the Taft 
party at the Palace Hotel in this city was a less mo- 
mentous event than the spectacular entre the week 
previous of John L. Sullivan and his diamond studded 
manager, Frank Hall, Esq., of New York. As a sort 
of fitting wind-up to the celebration of our national 
holiday, the Taft party was taken to the hotel in 
imposing style in automobiles and tally-hos. It was 
certainly a very important event for San Francisco, 
and it is to be hoped that the recent visits of cabinet 
ministers, Senators and Representatives will in sortie 
way redound to the material good of this Western 
gateway of the Republic. 

* * * 

1 notice that Colonel Kirkpatrick, manager of the 
Palace and Grand Hotels (and possibly, too, of the 
Fairmount, in prospective), has been agitating the 
manifestation of active interest in getting national 
conventions to meet here. The railroads, always 
eager for the "long haul," will second all such efforts. 
It is worth while to be a convention city, and hardly 
less to have the reputation of being one. San Fran- 
cisco should, by this time, have aroused itself from 
the false idea that it is too metropolitan to need care 
about attracting business. A few more enterprising 
people like Kirkpatrick and Sbarboro and Jennings 
and the others working for promotion, will do much 

for the city. 

* * » 

Miss Ursula Stone is another young favorite who 
will soon be led to the altar. Lieutenant Daniel Ed- 
ward Shean, Sixteenth Infantry, U. S. A., is the for- 
tunate man. Miss Stone is a grand-daughter of the 



ai 

late Reverend Dr. and Mrs. A. I.. Stone, and a niece 
of Mrs. I.. 1.. Baker. The .harming Mrs. Thomas 
Durragfa is a sisteT of the bride to-be, Miss Stone is 

a graduate of Miss West- School, and very popular 
with her San Francisco friends. Lieutenant Shean 
is now in the Philippines, where Miss Stone and her 
mother will journey in the fall. The wedding will 
take place some time this winter. 

Menlo Bark is gay this season. The Callaghans are 
occupying their beautiful new home, and at present 
are entertaining Lieutenant and Mrs. Raby. The 
Vincent de Lavcagas and Andrew Welshes are also 
helping make merry at Menlo. 
* * * 

Mrs. T. W. Hazlett and Miss Hazlett, of San Ber- 
nardino, former Supervisor William H. McCarthy 
and wife, Mrs. H. McCarthy, Mr. and Mrs. Alf. Cha- 
mont, of Inverness, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Smith, of 
Pasadena, Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Hall and Miss Hall of 
Phoenix, Arizona, are a few of the people who came 
to the city to spend the Fourth and who were regis- 
tered at the Palace. 

» * * 

Such a bunch of bankers as have been enjoying the 
good things of life at the Palace Hotel lately. One 
could not begin to name them all, but on one day there 



A SKin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever. 
k R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 



OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 




ORIENTAL CREAM 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freck- 
les, Moth Patches, Bash and 
Skin Diseases, and every blem- 
ish on beauty, and denes detec- 
tion. It has stood the test of 
56 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly 
made. Accept no counterfeit of 
similar name. Dr. L,. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut ton 
(a patient): "As you ladies will 
use them, I recommend 'Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harm- 
ful of all the skin preparations." 
For sale by all druggists and 
fancy-goods dealers in the 
United States, Canadas and Eu- 
rope. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop. 
87 Great Jones St.. New York. 



Champagnards 

Dessert Francais Superieur 

No function complete without them. Served with 
champagne or other wines, or with punches and 
creams or alone. The daintiest dainty. 

Depots: BIBO-NEWMAN CO.; SWAINS or 

Franco-Swiss Biscuit Companie 

(Sole Manufacturers) 
1804 SUTTER ST., S. F. Phone Scott 1517 



Try Oxir 



Stanford'Richmond Coal 

From the Richmondvale District 
Newcastle, N. S. W., Australia. 

Intense heat, little ash, and no clinKer. 
Direct from the mine to the consumer. 



SOLD TO TRADE ONLY. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT AND 

SEE THAT YOU OET IT. 



Richmond Coal Co. 

Agents 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



were Thomas W. Griffiths, of Dallas, Tex., H. E. 
Casteel of Rock Island, (J. J. Woodward of Fresno — 
all heavy-weight financiers, and that is only a fair 
sample. How many bankers come here and are not 
identified by the hotel reporters of course I can't ven- 
ture to say. 

* * * 

The comment of Colonel Kirkpatrick about men 
who refuse to remove their hats in the Palace Hotel. 
Palm Garden, reminds one that in the East men are 
much more punctilious about such seeming trifles 
than they are here. Carelessness about the little 
proprieties of life is what give the West the name of 
being "wild and woolly.'' 

* * * 

.Airs. H. H. Norton and daughter, of Leadville, 
Colo., and Miss D'Arcy Gaw of San Jose, recently 
spent some days in this city at the Palace Hotel. 

* * * 

Col. W. H. Holabird, the veteran promoter and 
real estate operator, came down from the Klamath 
country last week with glowing accounts of the 
progress his company is making in that reclamation 
district. He says it will be the sportsmen's paradise 
as soon as the country can be opened. Holabird's 
railroad will probably be called the "California North- 
Eastern." Mrs. Holabird joined her husband here last 
Monday. 

* * * 

Senator Thomas Flint of San Juan returned the 
first of the week from Xew York City, and found his 

wife and child waiting at the Palace to greet him. 

* * * 

Francisco Arbuco and wife, wealthy people of Bu- 
enos Ayres, have been at the Palace this week. They 
are going all around the world, and are traveling in 
considerable state. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Lugsdin, Miss Lugsdin, J. W. 

Wood and Miss Wood, having been away for sonic 

weeks, have returned to this city, and are once mure 

comfortably settled in their permanent quarters in 

the Palace Hotel. 

* * * 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Beatrice Splivalo, daughter of Mrs. C. R. Spliv- 
alo. of Belmont, to Lieutenant Francis Rowlc 
Shoemaker. 

.Miss Mabel Handy, daughter of the late Dr. J. C. 
Handy, to Edward Charles Man. 

.Miss Meredith Ball to Mr. Taussig, son of (a itain 
E. 1). Taussig, of Mare Island. 

.Miss Elizabeth Maude Pratt, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. George ( >. I 'rati, of < (akland, to David Wil- 
liamson. 

Mrs. Madge E. Gray to Robert P. Warren. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

June 28 (Wednesday) — Miss Alice Campbell to Mr. 
Walter Macfarlane in Honolulu. 

June 29 (Thursday) — Miss Jean Montgomerv Dun- 
can to Mr. William Knowles, of Oakland. 

June 29 (Thursday) — Miss Aileen Towle to Lieu- 
tenant Howe McClure in Sacramento. Miss 
Mary Adams Fassett, daughter of Mrs. James 
Fassett, to Mr. S. J. Sutherland. 

June 30 (Friday) — Miss Nina Otis Eldred to Mr. 
1 'hilly Bancroft. 

Inly 1 (Saturday) — Miss Georgia Coralre Morse to 
Janu'S Maynard, Jr. 

ENTERTAINMENTS. 

June 28 (Wednesday) — Mrs. Edward Pond enter- 



July 8, 1905. 

tained at a bridge party in San Rafael. Mrs. Wil- 
liam Ede gave a luncheon. 

June 29 (Thursday)— Mrs. Ralph Phelps, of Ber- 
keley, gave a reception in honor of Miss Green. 
Harry Pendleton gave a supper at Hotel Rafael. 

June 30 (Friday)— Miss Hella McCalla, of Mare 
Island, gave a luncheon in honor of Mrs. John 
Frances .Marshall, Jr. Mrs. David Bixler gave a 
tea in honor of her three nieces, Miss Helen 
Hyde, Mrs. Edwin F. Gillette and Mrs. Will H. 
Irwin. 

July 1 (Saturday) — Mrs. Babcock gave a tea in San 
Rafael in honor of Mrs. Soughimoura of Japan. 
Mr. and Mrs. James B. Stetson gave a dinner in 
honor of (leneral and Mrs. Gordon, of Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

July 7 (Friday) — Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a recep- 
tion in honor of Miss Alice Roosevelt. 
* * * 

Mrs. Marius S. Koshland, Miss Margaret Kosh- 
land, Daniel E. and R. J. Koshland are at the Hotel 
Rowardennan, Ben Lomond. 



' Those whn upnr my flwitehes have the appearance of 

p.ip.eePsinK luxuriant hair. I can match any shade ami 
texture of hair with the finest pure French hair 
switches. Finest natural \vig.s and toupees. 

Hair gnnils of every description. My new Shampoo 
roomsiftiiil Facial Massage parlors are the mo«t 1 er- 
feetly equipped in the city. Hair Dressing, Dyeing 
a' d Hleaehing. Manicuring and Ma»s;it>''-. 




Quintonica fnr the hair. 



Mall Orders Pilled. 



GLEDERER^ 

r ^ 1*3 STOCKTON ST. / f 



MARE 
MONEY 
BUILDING 
HOUSES 

Building homes on the installment plan is 

the safest and most profitable business that 

you can put your money into. 

San Francisco, Oakland, Alameda and 

Berkeley are being built up almost entirely 

in this way. There is no better field in the 

country for making money in building 

operations. 

Many men have made fortunes at it. By 

becoming a stockholder in the Suburban 

Building and Land Company you share in 

the profits of its building business. 

Send for folder that tells all about it 



THOS. H. GUPTILL, Sec. 
615 Examiner Building. S. F. 



July 8. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending Inly 

4. 1905: Mr. P. S. Baker, Mr. A. Weihe, Mrs. VV. li. 
Bremer, Miss II. Bremer, Mr.-. J. F. Greig, Mrs. J. 
E. Miles and daughter, Mr. G. A. Magnin, Mr and 

Mrs. G. E. Davis. Mr. II. II. Rolfe, Mr. an,! Mr- A. 

5. Wollberg ami family, Mr. S. Wollberg, Mrs. H. 
Rolfe, Mr. \Y. 1 ,. Knowlton, Mr. K. Nicholson Mr. 

S. M. Henry, Mr. I'.. F. X.mrsc. Mrs. I'.. Long, Miss 
Yost, Mr. ami Mrs. S. Dusenberg, Mr. II. S. I >usen- 
berg, Mr. I. Strassburger, Mr. E. M. Pomeroy, Mrs. 

E. I-. Goldstein, Mr. ami Mrs. J. Frowenfeld and 
family, Or. ami Mrs. A. Garceau, Miss ( ,. II. Smith, 
Mr. ami Mrs. H. C. Breeden ami child, Mr. ami Mrs. 

F. 1 llder, Mr. ami Mrs. F. L. Rosenthal, Misses 
Rosenthal, Mr. F. Rosenthal, Mr. P. I 1 .. Anspacher, 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Hvinan and family, Mr. C. E. 
Schneely, .Mr. C. Kenyon, Mrs. N. L. Dodge, Mrs. N. 
P. (laic. Dr. V. G. Vecki, Dr. A. Weis, Mr. S. Rau, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. lames, Mrs. R. Greenbaum, Mr. 
C. 1'.. Russell, Mr. ami Mrs. R. V. Whiting, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. A. Marriner, Miss Marriner, Miss K. Strick- 
ler, Mr. C. R. Gardner, Mr. C. Burnham, Mr. C. G. 
Kuehn, Miss Valleau, Mr. C. P. Murdock, .Mr. and 
Mrs. 11. Kiersted, Mr. R. T. Crawford, Miss H. Calla- 
more, Miss K. C. Pierce. 



Miss J. Wilhoit, .Mrs. A. H. Hill and Miss B. A. 
Pratt from Stockton, Miss Sarah Haste and Miss 
Louise Haste from Pasadena, Mrs. E. D. Adams from 
Sacramento, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hale, Miss Roun- 
tree, Col. J. C. Currier, I. C. McElroy and T. A. Gulli- 
for from San Francisco, J. T. Turpin, George T. 
Emerson and Miss K. Emerson from Chicago, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. W. Brownell and Mr. and Mrs. E. E. 
Brownell from Woodland, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Kirk- 
wood, Miss Cooper Marion Kirkwood and Miss M. 
Kirkwood from Mountain View, Miss E. E. Graham 
and Miss O. Graham from Washington, D. C, Mrs. 
L. D. Davis and Miss Davis from Salt Lake City, W. 
W. Osborne and wife from New York, and A. Tozie- 
nitz and sons from Eagle's Pass, Texas, are at El Car- 
melo, Pacific Grove. 



Miss Agnes Marie Noonan left Wednesday evening 
for an extended tour of Southern California. 



33 



The cost of a visit to the Yosemite Valley is 

now within the reach of all. The small price of 
$48.50 includes railroad accommodations with sleeper 
as well as stage transportation, provided you take 
the Wawona Route, via the Mariposa Big Trees. The 
outing tickets are good for four days among the big 
trees, carriage drives and trail trips to Mirror Lake, 
Vernal Falls, Nevada Falls and Glacier Point, with 
the very best hotel accommodations without one 
cent of charge above the price of the ticket. Ask at 
the Southern Pacific Office, 613 Market street, for 
particulars. 

Moraghan, in the California Market, comes 

nearer knowing what people want to eat and how to 
prepare it than any other restaurateur in the city. 
Every day his tables seem to be perfect, but the 
next day there is a fresh delicacy, and the service is 
always faultless. It is a charming place to lunch 
or dine or breakfast. 



The Star Hair Remedy— best of all tonics and restoratives. 

Stops falling hair, cures dandruff, restores color. Not a dye. 
At druggists and hair dressers. Accept no substitute. Suir 
Kem9dy Co., 1338 Polk street. Tel. Sutter 31. 



NOW'S YOUR CHANCE 



to visit the 



YELLOWSTONE 
PARK 



The Southern Pacific will now sell round trip ex- 
cursion tickets to Yellowstone Park. The route 
is via Ogden, thence to Monida, through the 
park by Concord Coach to Gardiner (spending 
several days among the geysers and other won- 
ders) then over the Northern Pacific through 
Spokane and down the Columbia River to Port- 
land, returning via the Shasta Route; or vice 
versa. 

$65 ROUND TRIP 

Allowing stop-overs within 90-day limit. This 
is the greatest trip of the year. The route taken 
is through the grandest ot scenery, and best of 
service is given both by rail and stage. Make 
your plans now, and get full information from 
agents. 



Southern Pacific 

San Francisco Office— 613 MARKET ST. 
Oakland Office— 12 SAN PABLO AVE. 



The Fruit erie 



FRESH VEGETABLES. FRESH FRUITS 

Our products are of the highest quality. 
Our customers are among the best families. 
MAY WE SERVE YOU? 



0F0 BUI NEC, Prop. 



Telephone Cost 1188 



1239 POLK STREET 




TOM 

DILLON 

SCO. 

OPPOSITE 

PALACE HOTEL 

1905 SPRING STVLBS. 



2 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

STATEMENT 



July 8, 1905. 



Of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 



OF- 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY 

A CORPORATION 

and Where Said Assets are Situated 
DATED JUNE 30, 1905 



ASSETS 

1— Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, 

the actual vaiue 01 which is $33,216,584.87 

The condition ot saici irromissory i\otes ana debts is 
as loiluws; 'iiiey are all existing contracts, owned by 
said corporation, ana are payable to it at its office, 
which is situatea at the corner 01 Market, McAllister 
ana Jones streets, m tne City ana county ox San Fran- 
cisco, btate ot caniornia, ana tne payment tnereot is 
secured by hrst mortgages on real estate within this 
State (,* Ui i,84o,iK>'i.6ij. and the States 01 Oregon Uito,- 
uou.uuj ana wasnmgton (W7j.ouu.uu.) Said x-romissory 
Notes are kept ana neid by saia corporation, at its said 
office, which is its principal place 01 business, and 
saia Notes and aebts are tnere situated. 
2— Promissory Notes and tne ueuts tnereby secured, 

the actual vaiue ot wnich is 470,900.00 

'ihe condition oi saia jfromissory Notes and debts 
is as loiiows: They are ail existing contracts, owned 
by saia corporation, and are pa^auie to it at its office, 
which is situatea as aioresam, ana the payment tnere- 
ot is securea oy "j.\orthern i-tanway company of Cali- 
lorma hrst mortgage o per cent uonus, "e>an Fran- 
cisco and San joayum Valley Railway Company 5 
per cent bonus," "southern Pacltic Kaiiroaa company 
of Arizona per cent Donds," "Southern ir-aciuc xtail- 
roau Company ot cainornia benes F ana G' 6 per 
cent bonas, " "Oaklanu Transit u per cent bonus, " "Los 
Angeies ±-acific nan road company oi cainornia 5 per 
cent oonas, ' "Parit ana Cliff jciouse Railway Company 
6 per cent bonus," ' United ixaiiroaus oi san Fran- 
cisco 4 per cent bonus, ' "United Estates 3 per cent 
bonds," "Pacihe Gas improvement company First 
Mortgage 4 per cent bonus," "Spring Valley Water 
VVoiks First Mortgage 6 per cent uonas," "Spring 
Vaiiey Water Wonts Second Mortgage 4 per cent 
bonds," "Forty-two shares of tne capital stock, of the 
Bank of California" and "one Hundred and thirty 
shares of the capital stock of the Caiiiornia Street 
Cable Railroad Company," the market value oi all said 
bonds and stocks being j6G4,40i.^ij. Said i\otes are kept 
and held by saia corporation at its said office, and said 
Notes, Bonds and btocks are there situated. 

3— Bonds of the United States, the actual value of 
Which is 16,073,978.92 

Ihe condition of said bonds is as lollows: They be- 
long to said corporation, and are kept and held by it 
in its own vaults and are there situated. They are 
"Registered 4 per cent of 190 < \,*l2,ooo,uuo.Wh and 4 per 
cent of 19^5 ($3,ti20,00U.uu) united states bonds " and are 
payable only to the order ot said corporation. 

4 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of which is 10,293,469.82 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: They be- 
long to said corporation, and are kept and held by it 
in its own vaults and are there situated. They are: 

"Market Street Cable Railway company 6 
per cent bonus" $1,121,000.00 

"Market Street Railway company First 
Consoliaatea Mortgage 6 per cent bonds" 340,000.00 

"Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per cent 
bonds" 150,000.00 

"Powell Street Railway Company 6 per cent 
bonds" 158,000.00 

"The Omnibus Cable Company 6 per cent 
bonds" 82,000.00 

"Presidio and Ferries Railroad Company 6 
per cent bonds" Z3.000.00 

"Ferries and Cliff House Railway Company 
6 per cent bonds" 6,000.00 

"Los Angeles Railway Company of Califor- 
nia 5 per cent bonds" 145,000.00 

"Los Angeles Pacific Railroad Company of 
California 6 per cent bonds" 100,000.00 

"Northern Railway Company of California 



6 per cent bonds" 

"San B^ranclsco and North Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent bonds 

"Southern Pacific Railroad Company of 
California 6 per cent bonds" 

"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley 
Railway Company 5 per cent bonus" 

"West Shore Railroad Company of New 
York 4 per cent bonds" 

"Spring Valley Water Works First Mort- 
gage 6 per cent bonds" 

"Spring Valley Water Works Second Mort- 
gage 4 per cent bonds 

• Spring Va..ey Water Works Third Mort- 
gage 4 per cent bonds" 

"The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent 
bonds" 

"San Francisco Gas and Electric Company 
4% per cent bonds" 

"City and County of San Francisco 3% per 
cent bonds' ' 

"City of Vallejo 5 per cent bonds" 

And "City of San Luis Ooispo 5 per cent 
bonds" 

5— Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to July 
1, 1905 

6— la) Real Estate situated in the City and County 
of San Francisco ($148,857.32), and in the counties of 
Santa Clara ($137,315.45), Alameda ($145,871.70), and 
San Mateo v+1*. 64^.42), in this otate, the actual value 
hi which Is 

(b) The Land and Building in which said corporation 
keeps its said office, the actual value of which Is — 

Ihe condition of said real estate is that it belongs to 
said corporation, and part of it is productive. 

7_ Cash in United Slates Gold and Stiver Coin, be- 
longing to said corporation, and in its possession, and 
situated at its said office, actual value 1,644,840.18 

Total Assets $62,913,649.03 



584,000.00 

384,000.00 

866,000.00 

111,000.00 

500,000.00 

123,000.00 

462,000.00 

1,020,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

495,000.00 

1,622,800.00 
65,000.00 

13,500 JS 



445,687.89 
471,452.76 



LIABILITIES 

1— Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to 
and the actual value of which Is $59,439,417.52 

The condition of said deposits is that they are pay- 
able only out of said assets and are fully secured 
thereby. 

2— Reserve Fund, actual value 3,474,231.51 

Total Liabilities $62,913,649.03 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

*>y ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary 



State of California, City and county of San Francisco, ss. 

JAMES R. KELLY and ROBERT J. TOBIN, being ench sepa- 
rately duly sworn, each for himself, says: That said JAMES R. 
KELLY is President and that said ROBERT J. TOBIN is Secre- 
tary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, tne 
corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement 

rUe * TAMES R. KELLY. President 

* ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 1905. 

GEORGE T. KNOX. Notary Public 
In and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California. 



July 8. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Li 



as 



Jar 




A YOUTH AND A MAID. 

Br The Peeker In Town Toi log 
They sat together 

All alone, these two; 
A subtle something 
Them together drew. 

He took her hand, that 
Surely was not much ; 
And yet, poor girl, she 
Trembled at the touch. 

Her flesh was tingling, 

Brain was in a whirl. 
It was the dawning of 

Passion in a girl. 

A thrill toward knowledge, 

Yet at the same time 
A shrinking from it. 

Joy and pain sublime. 

She did not and she 

Could not understand ; 

And yet she felt her 

Heart and soul expand. 

The maiden looked up, 
Met his eyes and read 

In them the thoughts that 
Lips had left unsaid. 

She dropped her glance then, 

With a crimson cheek ; 
They sat together 
And they did not speak. 

EARTH'S IMPERFECT MAP. 
By Nixon Waterman 
I try to be proud of my fellow men 

And the victories they have won, 
I have stood amazed at times and gazed 

At the great things they have done. 
This strange old earth of which they knew 

so little at the start, 
With subtle skill they have conquered, till 

They have learned it all by heart. 

But, hold ! Not all, for I grieve to say 

That, while they have mastered lots, 
Our latest maps still show two gaps, 

Two dark, untraveled spots ; 
Two chilly points men have not reached, 

For, though they have tried and tried, 
The frigid zones the Frost-King owns, 

Their progress have denied. 

We found the Equator long ago 

And tracked it to its lair, 
Earth has no spot so piping hot 

But men have ventured there. 
And sometime, in the years to come, 

On Fame's bright page we'll meet 
The valiant souls who found the poles 

And made our map complete. £ 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

or 311 California rtreet. ^n Franotseo. Oal. 

lla« doctored! fur the six month" ending .Inn* :»• "■,.•, a dividend of 
spit ''»ni i.»r annum ,.,,,, r.iirnrr .|-i .. .«n«. aparcanl nntarn ilepne- 
l>*. ami <■• per cent on m mthlj payment Investments rnr»re«t nn de- 
posit. naraMe on anil nft.T .Tnlr i„t Interest ..n ..r,l|.,,,rr ili.po.Ua 
not ontlo.i for will he n.llo.1 to the principal ninl thereafter bear Inter- 
est at the snmo rate. 

W^XIAMCO,!i;;N^!■eS; Tn>i, ' l ' , ' , ' , • , ' '"* 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

lni Montgomery street, cornero' Sutter. 
Has declared a dividend for the term ending June 30. i<m« at the 
rateorthreo and one-hn'f 'Wrier eent per n'.nuiii on nil deposits free 
of taxes, parable on and after ^atnrrjnv jni v 1 look 

EDWIN B0NNFLL. Ass't Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
French Savings Bank. 

Forthoeix months ending June 3n. ions, a dividend has been de- 
elared at the rate of three and one-ha'f '3 !■*> por eent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on or a 'tor j.,i v 1. lanr,. 

LEON BOrQUERAZ. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

Corner California and Montgomery atreets. 
For the six months ending June 3n. 1905, dividends have been de- 
clared on the deposits in the savine-s department of this company as 
follows: On term deposits at. the rate of 3 a-10 per eent per Bnnum. and 
on ordinarv deposits nt th- rate of airier cont ner annum, free of 
taxes, and payable on and after Snt"rdnv. Jnlv 1. iqok. 

J DsLZET.L BROWM. Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

316 Montgomery street. 
For the half year ending Jun«» 30. ions dividends upon all deposits at 
the ra*e of three and "ne-nnarfer fa^l pei- cent per annum, free of 
taxes, will be payable on and after July 1. 151ns. 

FEET) W. BAY. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

710 Market, street, San Francisco. 
For the half-year ending June an. 1905. a dividend has heen deolared 
at the rate of three and one-ouarter (SK) per eent on all deposits, com- 
pounded semi-annually and free of taxes, payable on and after Satur- 
day, July 1, 1906. 

GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mechanics' Savings Bank. 

S. W. Cor. Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
For the half vear ending June sn, 1901s. a dividend has been declarer? 
at the rate of three and one. half (3 1-2) per cent per annum upon all 
deposits, free of taxes, payahle on and after July 1. 1905. Dividends 
not nailed for are added to and hear the same rare of interest as prin- 
cipal from July 1, 1905. Interest is allowed from date of deposit. 

JOHN C CALKINS, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Central Trust Company of California. 

42 Montgomery Street, cor. Putter Street. 
For the half year ending June 30. 19ns, a dividend has heen declared 
on the deposits in the savings department of this hank, as follows: 
On term deposits at. the rate of 3 6-10 per cent per annum, and on or- 
dinary deposits at the rate of (3 1-4) per cent per annum, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Saturday. July 1. 19or. 

FRANK J. SYMMES. President. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 

626 Market Street, opp. Palace Hotel. 
For the half-year ending June 30. 1906. a dividend has heen declared 
at the rate of threo and one-half (3 1-2) per cent per annum on de- 
posits, free of all taxes, payaole on and after Saturday. July 1. 1905. 

W. E. PALMER, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Cor. Market, McAllister and Jones Sts-, San Francisco. June 28, 1905 
At a regular meeting of theBoara of Directors of this Society, held 
this day. a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one- 
half (3 1-2) per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months end- 
ing June 30, 1905, free from all taxes, and pavable on and after July 1, 
1905. ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

H. ISAAC JONES, H. D. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Office— Starr King Building, 121 Geary street, San Francisco. 
Rooms 303. 304, 305. Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2 to 4 p. m. Sun- 
day by appointment Telephone, Private Exchange, Jit Reel- 
dence, corner 6th avenue and 16tli street, Oakland- Tel. But M, 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1905. 




Mr. Tiedeman, of the Scottish Union and Na- 
tional, has returned from a swing around the North- 
west. 

* * * 

The insurance fraternity was mostly out of town 
from Friday of last week to Wednesday of this. Santa 
Cruz seemed to be the point of attraction for the fish- 
ermen and the cricketers. 

* * * 

All the fire offices, with but two exceptions, signed 
the agreement to close on the 3rd. It is imagined 
that these two offices will find a little drop in the re- 
ceipts of their reciprocity business if — they have any 
lo drop. 

* * * 

Mr. Leslie Bates of the Stovel Agency is fishing the 
streams of the Santa Cruz Mountains. 



Secretary .Morton of the Equitable has opened re- 
trenchment operations. In a statement issued by him 
he made public the fact that Senator Chauncey M. 
Depew and David B. Hill would no longer receive 
their retainers of $20,000 and $5,000 a year respective- 
ly after July 1st, and in addition, George M. Squire, 
who has been receiving $1,000 a month salary, al- 
though he retired from the society some time ago, 
was given a similar notice. 

* * * 

The Buffalo, New York, capitalists, not content 
witli their experience in insurance, are organizing a 
life company with $2,500,000 capital. It will be the 
Buffalo Life or the Buffalo Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, and the advertising literature will com- 
mence witli the celebrated question: "Are you a Buf- 
falo?" 



Mr. Frank W. Dickson, of the Royal Exchange, 
has veen visiting his principal agencies in Colorado. 

* * * 

Mr. Hoadley, son of President Hoadley, of the 
American of Newark, is on the Coast. 

* * * 

Mr. Frednenfeld, vice-president and general mana- 
ger of the Queen City Insurance Company, of Sioux 
Falls, is in San Francisco, making arrangements to 
enter his company. It is understood that the appoint- 
ment is already made. It is to be hoped that the 
company will join the Board, for the pickings will be 
slim and the profits less for it if any other course be 
adopted. 

* * * 

The Rocky Mountain district specials are about 
to reorganize the defunct Field Club. It may be that 
this field needs a fifth wheel to its wagon, but for no 
other reason does it need a field club. 

* * * 

The Equitable since 1859 nas P a 'd to stockholders 
in dividends $345,647. It has paid to policyholders 
for dividends during the same time $79,659,929. Its 
total payments to policyholders aggregate $476,483,- 
419. 

* * * 

Manager Curtis, of the Providence Washington, 
has refitted the offices which he leased in the London 
and Liverpool and Globe building. They are now 
light and airy and fitted for the convenient transaction 
of the business of the Providence Washington. 

* * * 

Messrs. Merrill Curtis and Hayne have received 
from Gordon & Frazer the exclusive city agency of 
the American. 

* * * 

The European contingent of San Francisco Fire 
I'nderwriters are returning. Manager Havens of the 
L. & L. & G. is here. Manager Watt is in "our own 
I'nited States." President Dutton of the Fireman's 
Fund, when last heard from, was at Lucerne gazing 
at the Lion. 

* * * 

Assistant Secretary Mendell of the Fireman's Fund 
has returned from New York after enjoying the de- 
lights of Tuxedo and the famous links at that spot. 



It is evidently taking a great deal of energy, time 
and expense in the Western Union field to get rid 
of the Connecticut. Manager MacDonald, who re- 
signed, seems to have a grip on the affections of the 
agents, and appearances indicate that the Connecti- 
cut agencies are not being resigned as fast as the 

Union desires. 

* * * 

The Mutual Life has made a demand upon the New 



In Three Words 



It takes but three short 
words without superla- 
tives to define the su- 
periority of 




y^NTfy 



™«U»-.'-.. r«K»RK 



Baltimore Rye 

^ eOTTLCOBV * 

WMUnahan&SON. 

baltimore- 



Hunter 

Baltimore 

Rye 



VIZ: 

The Perfect 

WhisKey 



H1LBERT MERCANTILE CO. 

136-141 Second Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Private 313. 



July 8, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



York Insurance Department for an examination at its 
hands. The work is now under wav. 

• • • 

Chi it the first half of the year an 

tirnated at S2.500.ooo. An exchange comments as 
follows: "Losses have been unusually heavy in the 
West in the first half of 1905, and a concensus of opin- 
ion of Western managers puts the average loss ra- 
tio of their departments at between 60 and 65 per 
cent. January and February were months of unusu- 
ally heavy losses. February being not only the worst 
February for most companies in the history of their 
departments, but the worst month for many. The 
record has not been so bad since then, but not many 
companies can show much of a profit. There is gen- 
eral complaint, also, that premiums have not shown 
so much of a gain as had been hoped. In Chicago, 
the losses for the first half of the year are estimated 
at $2,500,000, which is above the normal. The bulk 
of these came in January and February. Most of 
the agencies complain of a falling off in premiums 
lately, for which the strike is regarded as responsible. 
The fire losses for the United States and Canada for 
the first half of the year are estimated at $93,000,000, 
as compared with $79,000,000 for the same months 
in 1903 and $172,000,000 last year, which includes the 
Baltimore, Rochester and Toronto conflagrations. 
This year's losses are considerably ahead of the nor- 
mal. 

* * * 

The fire alarms turned in from 8:30 a. m of July 
1st to 8:30 a. m. of the 5th, numbered about 70. 
Forty-six of the fires were caused by fire works. On 
the Fourth there were 47 alarms, and of these about 
33 were caused by fire works. Most of the damage 
was on roofs, where shingles had caught. Fortunate- 
ly the activity of the fire department prevented any 
of the fires gaining headway, and the losses will be 
small in comparison to the alarms. 

* * * 

Again may San Franciscans congratulate each 
other. In spite of all the warning and policing year 
after year, the deadly fire cracker and the soaring 
rocket gets in its work and causes a wasteful destruc- 
tion of property without benefit to any one except the 
dealers in explosives. If fire works must be set off, 
it should be in districts in which no damage could be 
done, and under police supervision. 



27 



The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Capital $3,000,000 

Gross Cash Assets 17,300,000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourn- 
ers anywhere In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance 
against loss by Are, lightning, wind-storm or tornado. Indemnity 
for loss of rental income by fire or lightning. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent 

GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropolitan Manager. 

!10 SANSOME ST. SAN FRANCISCO. 



GERMEA 



-FOR- 



BREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE CO., Azents 



INSURANCE 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $6,500,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital Mnnnnnd 

Surplus to Policy-holders .....'..;'.";'.".'."""""*«58S 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 202 Pine St.. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 
Capital Paid-up, J3.446.100. Assets. J24.662.043.35 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over J134.O0O.OO0 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manage!;, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgr«. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Asse . ts •• 5.340.136.94 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 3,414,921.16 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOTD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $6,700,00* 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 



Cash Capital, $200,000. 



Cash Assets, $394,164.15 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
Head Office, Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

Employers' Liability. General Liability, Teams. Workmen's Col- 
lective. Tessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers— Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice- 
President; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; 
F. P. Deering, Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edw. L. Brayton, Jno. C. 
Coleman, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, I. W. Hellman. Jr., Geo. 
A. Pope, Henry Rosenfeld, A. A. Son, Wm. S. Tevls. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

PHENIX 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 
J. H. LENEHAN, Gen. Agt, CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast 
KOHL BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



lanheim, Dibbern & Co. 

STOCK AND BOND BROKERS AND GENERAL IN- 
SURANCE AGENTS. 



217 Sansome St. 



San Francisco 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1905. 



FROM BOTTOM TO TOP 

That is the record made in one year by 

The Hartford Perfected Dunlop Tire 

To attain this result we did not have to provide our Demonstrators with copies of letters from in- 
terested dealers damning other types NOR did we give our men sections cut from rival tires so pre- 
pared as to weaken them. 

ALL FAIR METHODS having proved futile to stem the wave of popularity THE HARTFORD 
PERFECTED DUNLOP TIRE now enjoys, ONE COMPETITOR has furnished his salesmen with 
prejudiced letters and fake sections decrying this tire. 

We welcome honest criticism, but protest against FAKIR methods. 



THE HARTFORD RUBBER WORKS COMPANY, Hartford, Conn. 



NEW YORK 

BOSTON 

PHILADELPHIA 

ST. LOUIS 



BRANCH HOUSES 

BUFFALO 
CLEVELAND 
DETROIT 
KANSAS CITY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

CHICAGO 

.MINNEAPOLIS 

DENVER 

LOS ANGELES 



DE DIETRICH 
AUTOMOBILES 



Demonstration Car- 30 h. p. 
rjas arrived. Mr. Paul Koechjin, 
Pacific Coast Representa- 
tive, now at Hotel Marie (Antoi- 
nette, Van Ness Ave., San Fran- 
cisco, will be pleased to give 
demoostrations to prospective 
buyers. Appointments by tele- 
phone or letter. 




The 1905 




Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring Car 



Has Arrived 



Call and see it. 



Rambler Automobile Agency. '"'cT""^ 1 

Phone South 1007. 



X5he Cameron 




Shaft Drive. 

Air Cooled. 
Road Clearance 9 In. 

Motor in Front. 
Never Necessary to 

crawl under car. 
Pacific Coast Branch 

The James Brown 
Machine Co. 

Manfs. and Afrts. 
R CITY HALL SQ. S. P. 



Model L. 12-15 H. F. 1150 lbs. Frice $1150.00 



Other Models 
$875 to $1350.00 



July 8. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



29 




org* I >. Shadburne, Jr., who Is a recent convert 
of the automobile in this city, after his first trip by 
auto into Santa Cruz County last month, has become 
extreme!) fond of touring. lie left a few days ago in 
his Autocar nmahout, ami expects to tour for the 
next three or lour weeks. His itinerary takrs him 



The Autocrank. 



Automobile prices are to be maintained m 191 6 by 
standard American constructors. Many of the best- 
known makes of cars will be advanced in price. More 
expensive material and better workmanship ari 

d to cause a general raising in cost. This in- 
teresting information has been brought out as the re- 
sult of publication in numerous of the Eastern papers 
of the news that a Western manufacturer will place 
10,000 two-cylinder runabouts on the market at $400 
each. Several of the most successful automobile 
manufacturers in the United States protest that it 
would be impracticable for any maker to turn out a 
reliable runabout to sell for $400. They allege that 
good tires alone will cost almost half that amount, 
and the materials that enter into the construction 
of a car will cost more than the other half. 

"The high-grade automobile of to-day," remarked 
a prominent motor car builder, "costs 50 to 75 per 
cent more than it did a few years ago. This is be- 
cause it is made better. The workmanship is 100 per 
cent better, and with the advance in wages, costs 125 
per cent more. The material used is more expensive. 
Much finer equipment is demanded. The life of a 
car must be at least twice what it was a few 
years ago. Good tires are very expensive to buy, 
while a cheap tire will break even a bank. I do not 
know of any licensed makers who will reduce their 
prices fir :yo6 or who will put out low-priced cars. 
Most of them will advance their prices." 

Automobile users are looking for quality and com- 
fort, ability and durability. They have learned to dis- 
criminate. The "masses" cannot afford automobiles 
at any price. The expense of operating and maintain- 
ing an automobile has got to come down before the 
"masses" can indulge. 

* * * 

Another San Franciscan who resides at Menlo 
Park, C. W. Griffin, has launched into motoring with 
a four-cylinder Autocar, and enjoys touring about 
San Mateo County more than ever now that he owns 
a horseless carriage. 

* * # 

Isaias W: Hellman, Jr., his wife, John Fleming 
and Miss Jacobi, are enthusiastic over their run last 
week to Byron Hot Springs in Mr. Hellman's new 
Columbia automobile. The trip is a most popular one 
with local motorists, and at present the roads are in 
elegant condition. 

* * * 

Prince Henry of Prussia,' brother of Emperor Wil- 
liam, will take part in the Herkomer automobile en- 
durance run, which will be held in Germany this sea- 
son. 

* * * 

If present plans and specifications do not go awry, 
San Jose will be equipped with one of the finest au- 
tomobile police patrols on this coast. "I do not think 
that anything better could be done," said Chief Car- 
roll of the Garden City when asked in regard to the 
proposed automobile. "While we are keeping up 
with the progress of other cities, we are also install- 
ing an appliance that would be of great help to us in 
the catching of criminals." 



Just As We Expected 

Just as every man thoroughly familiar 
with ALL MAKES of tires, expected, and it 
couldn't be otherwise. 

CABLEGRAM 

4H SW 28 

From Clermont Fd June 20-05. 
To The Diamond-Rubber Co. 
"DIRUBCO" Akron, Ohio. 

Both Pope-Toledo cars passed 250 
mile non-stop eliminating trials. 
Your tires gave better satisfac- 
tion than any tires used in French 
trials . 
710 a Lytle & Dingley. 

Lytle and Dingley are the drivers of the cars named, in the 
Bennett cup race. Their cable refers not only to the tires on 
THEIR OWN cars, but to the tires used by the cars of every 
country in the preliminary trials for the great race. 



The Diamond Rubber Co. AKRON, OHIO. 

San Francisco Branch— 608 MISSION STREET 




GREAT WINTON "A" 



40-50 
HORSE POWER 



IS HERE 



Eats up the hills easily, quietly. Nothing like it 
in the market for the money. 

Nearly a half hundred Wintons sold in Cali- 
fornia this year. Every owner perfectly satisfied. 
You know what this means. Look this car up 
carefully. It will pay you. 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

901-925 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 

Oakland Agency 

MULLER MOTOR CAR CO., 124-140 12th Street 



3° 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1905. 




Cadillac machines and party who participated in automobile run at Marysville, Cal. 



first to Vallejo, then to Napa, Calistoga, Harbin 
Springs, Howard, Seigler, Adams, Glennbrook, High- 
land Springs, Lakeport, Laurel Dell, Blue Lakes and 
Ukiah, returning by way of Hopland, Healdsburg, 
Cloverdale, Petaluma and Santa Rosa. 



The contention of some farmers that rural high- 
ways are for the use of horses which, boiled down, 
means for farmers alone, is about as reasonable as 
would be the proposition that the city streets are for 
the use of city folk, and that farmers, when they visit 
the cities to see the sights, ought to keep in the air. 

* * * 

Another sad charge has been brought against the 
motor car. It interferes with religion and ministerial 
duties. A pastor of Indiana owns an automobile. 
Some of his flock say he rides in it too much and neg- 
lects his duties. When a vote of the congregation 
was taken on the subject, however, the majority stood 
by the minister, and so indirectly another victory for 
the automobile was scored. 

* * * 

At a dinner given by the parents of a bright little 
girl to some of their friends a number of toasts were 
given. After the older ones had finished, the young 
girl stood up, held her glass of water high, and said : 
"Here's to the auto. May we hear its toot in time to 
scoot." 

* * * 

San Francisco can soon boast of another fine auto- 
mobile garage, the home of the Rarig Automobile 
and Garage Company, which they are having built 
on Folsom street near Fourth, at a cost of over $30,- 
000 for the building alone. The premises will be 
occupied within another week, and the new concern 
will be prepared to enter the automobile business on 
this coast, not only with one of the handsomest and 
most improved repositories for motor cars in the 
United States, but also with one of the most popular 
machines on the market, the Queen. The line of 
Queens is the most complete ever manufactured in 
America, and being well adapted for the conditions 
prevailing in California, success will without question 
be with the Rarig Company from the start. The site 
on Folsom street was selected by the new automobile 
concern for its headquarters on the Pacific Coast on 
account of its proximity to the business center and 
its convenience to the residents of Burlingame, San 
Mateo, Menlo Park, and the peninsula in general, 
as it will afford those people the convenience of hav- 
ing their automobiles kept within a few moments of 
the depot. 



The autoists continue to enjoy the run between this 
city and Los Angeles. W. P. Boland and several of 
his friends arrived here last week, after a most inter- 
esting run from the southern city in their model C 
Winton. Mr. Boland stated that good time was 
made on the run, and the way the Winton climbed 
the steepest of grades without any difficulty was a 
surprise to all of them. Besides Mr. Boland there 
were D. S. Dimond, J. W. McDonald and T. C. Bo- 
land. 

* * * 

"The Record," of Helena, Montana, in a recent is- 
sue, contained the following item : "From Butte to 
Helena in virtually four hours, or practically the same 
time as is called for in the schedule of Great Northern 
passenger trains, has been accomplished by a party 
of Butte autoists. The trip was made without a 
hitch, except for the fast time made by the White 
steamer, which fairly sailed over the level prairies, 
where they were encountered, and in coming down 
the sinuous mountain roads went even faster, accord- 
ing to some of the occupants. Not an accident of 
any kind marred the journey, and the time made 
eclipses all former records by more than two hours. 
Considering that the main range of the Rocky Moun- 
tains was crossed, the trip is considered little short of 
marvelous." 

* * * 

The R. H. Peases are taking a Stevens-Duryea to 
Portland with them, and expect to tour quite exten- 
sively up north. 

* * * 

A. James, of Hilo, Hawaii, still autos in the White 
Stanhope that he purchased in 1901. He writes that 
he has never paid out a dollar on the machine for 
repairs in all those years, and the car has been in 
constant use, having run thousands of miles, "and 




BOTH ORIENTAL AND DOMESTIC 
AT 




126 GEARY STREET. 



UNION SQUARE 



July 8. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

.still running," says Mr. James, "and barring two 

slight tire troubles, 1 have never been detained on the 

one minute. The only kick I have is thai 

not a 1905 touring oar (White, of COUr* 

* » * 

Hugo Mullcr of Oakland, Carl Shilling, E. Aiken 

and R. Williamson made a trip to Santa Cruz on Sun- 
day last in a model C Winton touring car. and al- 
though they were not out tor a record, the fast time 
of five and one-half hours was made. The run was 
made by way of the Hotel de Redwood, and proved 
a most enjoyable one. 

* * * 

A very pleasant tour has just been completed by E. 
Courtney Ford and A. B. Costigan in a four-cylinder 
Stevens- Huryea car. They left Sunday morning for 
Sausalito, and from there started for Cloverdale. ar- 
riving early in the afternoon. Monday morning was 
spent on the Geyser road fishing, returning to Clover- 
dale for lunch. Napa Soda Springs was reached in 
time for dinner. The next morning they took a spin 
to Calistoga, leaving there in the afternoon and arriv- 
ing in Woodland the same evening. The only dis- 
agreeable part of the entire trip was that on account 
of the high water they were compelled to ship the car 
some twenty miles via rail. They left Sacramento 
after lunch and arrived in this city at 10:30. The 
roads out of Sacramento for some twenty miles are 
something fierce; the rest of the way in, although not 
interesting, is fairly good for automobiling. 

* * * 

Dr. Chamberlain last week took a flying trip to 
Ben Lomond in his White touring car. Mrs. Mary 
Armstrong who, with her mother, is visiting Califor- 
nia, continues to tour in her White steam car, despite 
the fact that she ran her car all the way to San Diego 
and return, and also spent some little time traveling 

about the southern part of the State. 
» * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company last week sold 
a new Oldsmobile French type touring car to M. R. 
Lamb of this city; an Oldsmobile two-cylinder car 
to J. E. Schellenger of Biggs; two Oldsmobile light 
tonneau touring machines to F. N. Isaac of Hanford ; 
a model C Winton to R. Jacks of Monterey, and a 
French type runabout to William Jacks, also of Mon- 
terey. Mr. Lamb is on a trip to San Diego in his new 
auto. Both Mr. Isaac and Mr. Schellenger ran their 
automobiles home after their purchase. 



NEWS LETTER 



FRANKLIN MOTOR CARS 



GUARANTEED FQR 1 YEtR 
AIR COOLED OP COURSE 




12 h. p. Runabout— Price $1,560 
4 Cylinders. Nickle Steel Construction Throughout. Ab- 
solutely the Speediest Runabout Built. 

F. WORTHINGTON BUTTS 
148 GOLDEN GATE AVE. Phone South 1142 




Climbing 
steep grades, or under 
other severe conditions of 
travel, the Cadillac not only reaches its own 
destination without annoyance, but is a "friend in need" 
to others. Whatever the test, there is power enough and 
to spare. Simplicity and accuracy of construction re- 
duce the liability to damage or derangement of mechan- 
ism so low as to make the Cadillac almost trouble-proof. 
The money-saving in consequence of this, combined with 
remarkably low cost of fuel and lubrication, make the 
Cadillac the most economically maintained of all motor 
cars. Ask any Cadillac owner. His expense book is our 
best advertisement. 

Model F— Side-Entrance Touring Car. 
Model B— Touring Car, detachable tonneau. 
Model E— Light, Powerful Runabout. 
Model D— 4-Cylinder, 30 h. p. Touring' Car. 

Write for catalog AE and address of the nearest dealer. 

CADILLAC AUTOMOBILE CO., Detroit, Mich. 

Member A. L. A. M. 



Special Sales Department 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUNDRIES 

FOR SALE.— 1904 White Steamer, newly painted, top and lamps, 

etc. , fully equipped $1,000 

White Stanhope $300 

St. Louis Touring Car $900 

Agents for Packard, Stevens-Duryea and Thomas Flyer, Pa- 
cific Motor Car Co., 49 City Hall avenue. 

ARE you going on a tour? Don't forget Weed's Chain Tire 
Grip (prevents machine from skidding.) Does not affect the tire. 
Can be put on or removed in 5 minutes. See agents, 105 Front St. 

WANTED. — If you have a second-hand automobile you wish 
to sell, write Yosemite Motor Works, 123 City Hall avenue, San 
Francisco. Edward Mohrig, Manager. 

WANTED.— Buckboard in good condition. Will pay about $100. 
Address Box 6, this office. 

WHY use Eastern Dry Batteries? The Bull Dog Dry Cell is 
the best made for automobiles and is "fresh," being manufac- 
tured in San Francisco by Pacific Carbon and Battery Co., 105 
Front street. 

EXCHANGE.— Fine thoroughbred trotter for runabout in good 
condition. Value $500. Address Box 10, this office. 

FOR SALE.— 1903 Winton, excellent condition. New tires. Open 
to offer. Box 10, News Letter. 

NEW— Knox runubout cheap. Owner has purchased larger ear. 
Address Box 17, News Letter. 

WANTED.— Small car in good condition, gasoline preferred. 
Box 12, News Letter. 

FOR SALE.— A "Duryea" automobile in perfect condition; has 
never been used. Three cylinder, 12 h. p. Holds six people. A 
bargain. Owner leaving city. 1814 Market street, S. F. 

FOR SALE,— Locomobile steamer, in fair condition. Price $175. 
Address Box 13, News Letter. 

WANTED— Autocar, Rambler, Cadillac or Buckboard; must be 
cheap and in good condition. Box u. News Letter. 

$275.— Buckboard in good condition; owner leaving State. Box 
1G. News Letter. 

A Model K 1904 Rambler, warranted to be in first-class shape. 
R. W. O'Bannon, Holllster, Cal. 

WANTED.— Every automobile owner to increase power of his 
mnchine 15 to 25 per cent by equipping it with a "Schebler Car- 
buretor." For information and prices see agents, 105 Front St. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 8, 1905. 



Resorts and Hotels 



VACATION 1905 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 



"VACATION" is issued annually by the 

California Northwestern R'y 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 

and is the standard publication on the 
Pacific Coast for information regarding 

MINERAL SPRINGS RESORTS. 
COUNTRY HOMES AND FARMS 
WHERE SUMMER BOARDERS 
ARE TAKEN. AND SELECT CAMP- 
ING SPOTS. 

This year's edition "VACATION 1905" contains 200 
pages, beautifully illustrated, and is complete in its 
detailed information as to location, accommodations, 
attractions, etc., with terms from $7.00 per week up 

To be had at Ticket Ofll«e, 650 Marketstreet, (Chronicle Buikliniq 

and Tiburon Ferry, loot of Market street : General Office 

Mutual Life Building, corner Sansome and 

California ytreets. ban Francisco 

Applications by mail will receive immediate response 



J AS. L.FRAZIER, Ctn-lMan. 



R. X. RYAN, Gen'IPns'r Agtnt 



Rest a Few Days 

A great many San Francisco people spend days and weeks 
during the fall and winter at Hotel Del Monte. No other 
resort In California offers such a combination of attrac- 
tions — sea bathing, golf, automobiling, bowling, tennis, fish- 
ing and all out-of-door sports, instead of going from place 
to place seeking comforts, the wise who enjoy out-of-door 
life arrange to put in many enjoyable weeks down at Del 
Monte by the sea. Address George P. Snell, manager, Del 
Monte, California. 

At Hotel Del Monte 



KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS 

For particulars inquire at Peck's Tourist 
Bureau, II Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Vichy Springs 

3 miles from Ukiah, Mendocino County. Natu- 
ral electric waters, champagne baths. Only place 
in the world of this class. Fishing, hunting. 
Crystal Springs. Accommodations; table first- 
class. J. A. Redemeyer, Prop. 



....Hotel.... 
ROWARDENNAN 

11 In the Mountains by the Sea" 

Reservations may be made upon ap- 
plication to 

Wm. G. Dodge, Lessee. BEN LOMOND, CAL 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST.. near Tremont, BOSTON 

Harvey a Woods, Props. 



Camp Curry 

Only camp electric lighted 
Sets the best table 
Has the highest paid chef 
(white) in 

Yosemite 



v TUXEDO *> 



The leading hotel and resort place of the 

Santa Crux Mountains 

7 miles from Santa Cruz; 73 miles from San Francisco on 
the main line of the Narrow Gauge R. R. It's popular be- 
cause it's new, modernly appointed and of easy access, and 
because it has more natural attractions on Its own reser- 
vation and around It than any place In these mountains. 
Write for booklet. 



FRANCIS W. SMITH, Mgr. 



FELTON P. O 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

NO STAGING 

The nearest hot natural sulphur springs to San Francisco. 
The largest mineral water swimming tank In the State. 
Everything first-class. Address: Theo. Richards, 

Agua Callente, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



July 8. 1905. 

CALIFORNIA'S GREAT RESOURCES 

IN BUILDING MATERIAL 

California semis out all over the world a 
many hundreds <<f thousands of dollars each year 

for building materials, which arc produced in great 
abundance and diversity right in this State, says an 
article issued by the California Promotion Commit- 
tee. Take our building materials, such as granile, 
for instance: though there are a great many others 
which can just as properly be mentioned, California 
produces as tine granite as any region in the world. 
California granite is found in great quantities and in 
many sections of the State, yet last year from Scot- 
land alone there were imported no less than $13,557 
worth of granite. From England alone California 
imported, in 1904, $26,867 worth of fine bricks ; from 
Belgium and Germany. $261,526 worth of cement, 
and also from Belgium $1,374 worth of glass sand. 
From Italy, $16,300 worth of marble was imported, 
yet California's wonderful marble deposits are not 
excelled. Our marble deposits occur in great abund- 
ance and with remarkable diversity of coloring and 
character. Besides the imports of mineral building 
materials mentioned, and which have come from 
other countries, as well as from those given, Cali- 
fornia has imported many other structural minerals. 
During the last two years there were imported into 
this State by rail 142 carloads of bricks, 2531 tons 
of clays, 4770 tons of cement, 210 tons of granite, 
6629 tons of gypsum, 29 tons of lime, 3761 tons of 
marble and onyx, 204 tons of macadam, 2080 tons of 
paint, 151 1 tons of building stone, 45 tons of slate, 
6040 tons of soda, etc. Within the last two years, 
California builders have imported from other States 
18,000 cubic feet of sandstone, 17,000 cubic feet of 
granite, and 37,000 cubic feet of marble and granite, 
a total of 72,000 feet, which is 72,000 cubic feet more 
than should have been imported. In the two years, 
23,000 barrels of cement were imported. 

California can herself produce all the building ma- 
terials required for her own use, and in addition this 
State should send building minerals all over the 
world. This is shown by the fact that in the last 
two years California produced approximately 800,- 
000 cubic feet of sandstone, 850,000 of granite, and 
200,000 of marble. Since 1893 more than a million 
thousand bricks have been made in California. 

California has tremendous resources in structural 
minerals. All we need are the quarries and the kilns 
to supply the demand. 

Nearly every one suffers from dyspepsia — 

some occasionally and some all the time. But there 
is no reason why one should continue to so suffer un- 
less one prefers to. But look not to drugs or drink 
for help. Look to "Poi," which is the national dish 
over in Hawaii. For generations the Hawaiians have 
cultivated and eaten this food, and as a consequence 
they know little or nothing of our national ailment — 
dyspepsia. It is a natural health food of great deli- 
cacy. The well known grocery firm of Goldberg, 
Bowen & Co., of San Francisco, has accepted the 
agency for this part of the United States, and it will 
pay any one to write the agents for full particulars 
concerning "Poi." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



33 



For Those Who Appreciate Comfort and Attention 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

SAM FRANCISCO 
American and European Plan. A Quiet Home 
Centrally Looated. fleone Wtmn Hooper, Um • 



ONE OP THE LOVELIEST SPOTS ON EABTTi 

ANDERSON SPRINGS. LAKE COUNTY 

BMntifdl forest. i-t'«r.in 
an. I fulls, ilelfitl.t ful walk* 
nix) drive . hiinriDK ami 
M'len.Iii. trout flnhins 
rlicht at hand. Hotel 
nn-1 '■'ittfigpM. No winds 
or togs. Best medicinal 
water and t he only natural 
sulphur steam baths in 
county. Tulm alec Rates 
»2 per .lay. $w to *U per 
vv'-k . Baths free. 

Further Information. 
PECK'S BUREAU. 11 
Montgomery St., 8- P. 
Information Bureau. 613 
Market nt, 8. F. Newe 
Letter. 320 Sansome St. 
or address J. ANDER- 
SON. Anderson Springs. 
Middletown P. O.. Lake 
County. Cat 

ROUND TRIP TICKET, $7 




Byron Hot Sp ring's 

AMERICA'S GREATEST SPA 

The great health and pleasure resort of California. Here you 
can find rest, amusement, and regain your health. The sur- 
rounding country is beautiful at this season of the year. The 
hotel table Is sumptuous. It's the only place in the world where 
you can get a hot mineral bath In porcelain tubs without leaving 
the hotel. If you can't spend a long period here, take advantage 
of the week-end excursion, $7.60, all expenses paid, Friday to 
Tuesday inclusive. Includes railroad fare, two days' board at 
the hotel, use of mineral waters, and baths and hot mud baths, 
and stage fare to and from station to hotel. 



HOTEL VENDOME 

5an Jose, 

Situated in Vendome Park of twelve acres. A 
charming Summer and Winter resort. Both city 
and country advantages. Automobile garage on 
the grounds free to guests. 

A Large Bathing Pavilion on the Grounds 

Bowling alleys, tennis, etc. New auto road map 
of the county mailed on application. 

J. T. BROOKS. Mn.nb.tfar 



The Anchorage 

. Santa Cruz Mountains 

4 miles from Alma Station, S. P. C. R. R. Alti- 
tude 1900 feet. Among pines and redwoods; 
pure air; pure water; pure food. Rates $10 to 
$12 per week. New cottages, gas-lit. Trains 
met by appointment at Alma. Address Giffbrd 
Hall, Patchin P. O., Santa Clara Co., Cal., or 
Peck's Bureau, n Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opp. U. S. Treasury, one block from the White Honae. 

Washington D. C The Hotel "Par Excellence" 01 th» 

National Capital. 
First-class in all appointments. O. G. Staples, 
Prop. American Plan, $3 per day and upwards.* 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
Reminiscences 



By Ben C. Truman. 

Del Monte, July 4, 1905. 

Some year or so ago, while sojourning at this 
"Queen of American Watering Places" for a few days 
for the first time in sixteen years, my mind went hack 
to the opening dance in June, 1880, and I presented 
the readers of the News Letter with some reminis- 
cences thereupon. A greater and more brilliant gath- 
ering was at the Fourth of July dance that followed, 
just a quarter of a century ago. My! that is a long 
time, but to many of us it has passed quickly, and, to 
not a few, enjoyably, and to some extent gloriously. 
And yet, what changes have taken place, and es- 
pecially in our own local human family. "Why," I 
said to a lady who was a girl in short clothes here in 
1850, "I knew you as a little miss who used to play 
in the sand boxes that Mr. Crocker had made for the 
children." "Yes," she replied, "but I am a grand- 
mother now." It was a whole chapter in my life, 
with no mention of thin gray hair, silvery mustache, 
failing eyesight and other disorders. 

But to return to that dansante of a quarter of a 
century ago. It was the finest that had ever been seen 
in California, and the women were the most superbly 
gowned and the men were all in evening attire. There 
was a fabric called nun's veiling in those days which 
was the mode of modes. In the morning it appeared 
in modest kiltings and draperies, and had a subdued 
charm befitting an informal garment: in the evening 
it was gaily trimmed with lace or festooned with 
silken surah. I remember a very beautiful girl from 
Oakland named Miss Wadt, and there were Dora 
Miller, Mary Eddy, Blanche Miller. Miss Dodge, 
Miss Crocker, the Misses Holladay, Miss McDowell. 
Miss Sinton, Miss Staples, Carrie Pierce, and some 
others, all in nun's veiling. Mrs. Drury Melone had 
lately returned from Europe, and had brought with 
her a number of Paris costumes, one of which she 
wore at this Fourth of July ball of a quarter of a cen- 
turv ago. Mrs. Charles McLaughlin was a wonder- 
ful dresser in those days, and she wore on this occa- 
sion a marvel of white silk or satin trimmed with car- 
dinal velvet and point lace, and embroideries of old 
gold. Mrs. J. F. Houghton was also a superb dresser, 
and on this occasion wore a Paris gown of gendarme 
blue silk trimmed with gold lace. Mrs. Rutherford 
was exceedingly pretty and girl-like in a lavender 
silk, trimmed with violet bows and point d'applique. 

Mrs. Sanderson was present — Sibyl was a glowing 
foud — and appeared young in a blue silk, trimmed with 
lace. And there were Mrs. Whitney, the handsome 
wife of the handsome Dr. Whitney, in black and white 
striped silk; Mrs. Phelan, in black satin : Mrs. Rosen- 
stock in black satin trimmed with Chantilly lace ; 
Mrs. Low in lavender surah and purple satin trimmed 
with point lace : Mrs. Scott in white brocaded silk ; 
Mrs. Hawes in black brocaded satin ; Mrs. Kautz in 
salmon-colored satin ; and then there were Mrs. 
Hearst, Mrs. Tevis, Mrs. Stewart, Mrs. Pierce, Mrs. 
Severance, Mrs. Moor, Mrs. Sutro. Mrs. Staples, Mrs. 
Taylor, Mrs. Crocker, and a hundred others superbly 
gowned, but just how has passed from my memory, 
but I do call to mind short and stout Mrs. Spaulding 
in an elaborate costume of cardinal red and ecru and 
court train. 

One of the tasteful and beautiful dressers of the 
early days at Del Monte was Mrs. J. H. Jewett ; Mrs. 
Head was always snugly and acceptably attired ; Mrs. 
McMullin made a dignified impression in black ; Mrs. 
S. W, Holladay was impressive in black; Mrs, Sutro 



July 8, 1905. 

was always richly attired ; Mrs. Buford, of the army, 
dressed in fine taste ; Mrs. Cook, a most prepossess- 
ing blonde, wore elegant dresses, one I remember 
being an embroidered crepe, trimmed with point lace 
and real pearl, and was very fetching. Mrs. Le Bre- 
ton, formerly Nopie McDougall, was one of the most 
beautiful women in America, and dressed in excellent 
taste; Mrs. Hooker, nee Bessie Stewart, had a capti- 
vating manner, and got herself up in great shape ; 
Mrs. I'helps looked every inch the wife of a commo- 
dore; Mrs. Wallace, a Mrs. Crane of Oakland, Mrs. 
Taft, Mrs. McNulty and Mrs. Hayes were all good 
dressers. 

The beaux of the early days of Del Monte ranged 
all the way in age and amplitude from Chris. Froelich 
to Obadiah Livermore, and their favorite wines were 
champagnes, sec. Harold Wheeler and Carey Fried- 
lander were never accused of an excess of reserve, 
and were very hand}' in doing the many little acts of 
politeness that most women like and appreciate. Dr. 
Younger could pay compliments with the rapidity of 
a buzz-saw, and as he was equally fluent in French, 
Spanish, German and English, such old steadfast flat- 
terers as Ogden Hoffman, Drury Melone, S. W. San- 
derson, A. L. Tubbs and Irving M. Scott were in- 
variably left at the distance post. By the way, one 
of the greatest flatterers of women this coast has ever 
known was Lloyd Tevis. Had Tevis been capable 
of linguistic cleverness, Younger would have been so 
dislant a second that he would have taken himself 
to the Paris boulevards a decade before he did. 

A favorite means of transportation between San 
Francisco and Del Monte in the '8o's and '90's was 
the train which left San Francisco at half-past three 
every afternoon, and arrived at Del Monte at about 
seven. It was called the "Daisy Train" by Mr. Judah, 
who talked the running of it into Mr. Crocker, who 
was always willing to do anything to advance the 
glory and patronage of Del Monte, and it was at that 
time the fastest on the Pacific Coast. It also landed 
passengers in San Francisco a little after nine each 
morning. The first stopping place was San Mateo, 
and at this point there would emerge a number of 
solid men of California of that day — conspicuously 
Alvinza Hayward. one of the first millionaires on the 
Pacific Coast, and at that time owner of the most 
remarkable gold mines in the world up in Amador 
County, low-grade of rock, but deep and never shy; 
John Parrott, good-looking, elastic of step, well-man- 
nered and well-dressed, also a millionaire and owner 



C. H. REHNSTROM, 
Tailor 

wishes to announce his arrival from Europe with a com- 
plete line of 

Summer Novelties 



You are cordially invited to inspect the same at his new 
quarters in the 

Mutual Savings BanK Building 

MarHet, Kearny and Geary Streets 



July 8, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

of a quicksilver mine in Lake County; Mr. Reding- 
ti>n, also owner of a quicksilver mine in Lake County, 
not a millionaire, but with enough coin of the realm 
to keep the wolf from the door, a wholesale merchant 
of excellent standing; Henry Barroilhet, a hanker, 
with a severe, leathery, furrowed lace, who had a 
handsome wife and two or three hundred thousand to 
the good, and imported his own clarets and burgun- 
dies, and kept his face good and red by regularly test- 
ing their excellence; Captain Billy Kohl, a veritable 
American nobleman, a big owner in the Alaska Fur 
Company, a prince of good fellows, a superior judge 
of Kentucky wine and the Rheims article, and the 
possessor of a lovely and noble wife, a boy of nine- 
teen, and two daughters; "Willie" Howard, hand- 
some and suave, jocund and sunshiny, with a million 
— to get; William Corbet, owner of an elegant place 
at Oak Grove, where he had a number of fine horses, 
an invalid wife, and three stunning daughters, and a 
good balance in the Bank of California. 

Four miles further along was Belmont, the abiding 
place at that day of the widow of the great Ralston, 
where champagne and truffles, Chablis and champig- 
nons were concomitants of every meal, and where 
Sharon gave General Grant a $20,000 entertainment 
in 1879; where Timothy Guy Phelps surveyed his 
patch of eighteen thousand acres of choice land, 
pitied the poor and downtrodden, and braved the 
vicissitudes of life with an agricultural report in one 
hand and the Congressional Globe in the other ; where 
cynical but radiant Nat Brittan wondered whether 
Frank Elliott ever told the truth about bass catching, 
or Virgil Williams ever saw a ray of sunshine, or Reu- 
ben Lloyd ever went home if any one would sit up 
all night with him at the Bohemian Club, and play 
cinch at a quarter a hand, and rendered under Caesar 
the things that were Caesar's, and so forth. But the 
"Daisy" stopped for none of these. 

Redwood City, 28 miles from San Francisco, was 
the second stopping place, where Moses Hopkins, on 
account of his brother Mark having left no will, 
came into possession of a few cool hundreds of thou- 
sands and had driven a homestead stake, married and 
smiled the smile that knew no cunning; handsome 
Jimmy Robinson, of mixed Castilian and New Eng- 
land blood, who had just taken for wife one of the 
prettiest girls in California, and others of the Hawes 
family. 

Three or four miles further and Menlo Park was 
reached, where No. 48 took a brief breathing spell 
and some water, and here alighted a goodly bunch 
— almost always James Flood, the bonanza million- 
aire, who was met by Miss Jennie and her mother, 
full of smiles for every one they saw; Colonel E. E. 
Eyre, who had generally tucked three or four ambro- 
sial cocktails under his belt, and was as radiant as a 
brew of Bohea; Michael Castle, a merchant, not of 
Hibernian extraction, and Mrs. Castle, a beautiful 
descendant of Leah ; Milton S. Latham, then in the 
zenith of his fame and prosperity, and his accomplish- 
ed and beautiful second; Charlie Felton, jocosely but 
aptly termed the Napoleon of the (last) Legislature, 
who was generally met by his daughter, who was just 
sweetly blossoming into womanhood, and there 
were the Days, the Hechts, the Colemans, the Stan- 
fords, the Peter Spreckelses, the Selbys, the Ather- 
tons, the Butterfields, and many others, including 
genial old Edgar Mills. J. J. McDonough, wife and 
daughter, W. G. Adams and his three good-looking 
daughters, and last, but not least, in well-sustained 
self-wisdom and circumscribed political importance 
and a willingness to make any sacrifice that exacted 



NEWS LETTER. 



35 





Die champagne 
of perfection 
Essential to the 
enjoyment 7 oP 
any function 

HILBERT 
MDilCANTILL© 

PACIFIC. COAST AGENTS j 

VW-Ga,sW]l-Speci a l.A^ } 



no sacrifice, Hon. John T. Doyle, who had the honor 
of being the father of eight fine children. 

The "Daisy" dropped a good deal of its precious 
freight daily at San Jose — often Drury Melone and 
his wife, Banker Pierce and his remarkably beautiful 
daughters, Senator Ryland, a man of much political 
power and graciousness a quarter of a century ago, 
and many others, while such old fellows as Jim Sar- 
gent of San Juan, Dr. Ford of Watsonville, Henry 
Miller of Gilroy, Jesse D. Carr of Salinas, Deacon 
Jacks of Monterey, went farther on. Some of these 
travelers between San Francisco and Del Monte are 
still habitues of the communities that have known 
them so long and so well, but the larger part has been 
quietly laid away in silent sarcophagai, while the 
thunderous "Daisy" speeds furiously along twice 
daily a thoroughfare embellished by orchard and 
field, vineyard and flower, city and town, villa and 
homestead, unconscious of the skeletons that line its 
subterranean way. 

Townsend's California glace fruits, in fire- 
etched boxes, are shipped to all parts of the world. 
The new store is located at 767 Market street, be- 
tween Third and Fourth streets, two minutes' walk 
from Call building. 



GRAND CLEARANCE SALE OF 

Oriental Rugs 

At 40 per Cent Discount 
on our Sale Prices 

To make an effective clearance sale and realize 
cash, we are giving actual 40 per cent discount on 
every rug. 



MIHRAN'S, 205 Post St. 

The oldest and most reliable rug house. 



36 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 8. 1905. 

BANKING. tSto Minister Of Foreign Affairs 

The Sern Francisco National Bank The first official step towards 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Franclaco. ln the Direction the Russo-Japanese peace COtl- 

James K. Wilson, President; Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vlce-Presl- of Peace. ference has been taken hv thp 

dent; C. K. Mcintosh, Vice-President; F. W. Wolf*. Cashier; icicm.e lias uccn ta K en Dy tne 

c. l. Davis, Assistant Cashier. announcement of the names of 

Capital, $500,000. Surplus and undivided profits, $180,000 tn „ wn t| PmPn ivhn ,.,:ii r»firi.e»nt tU a r.-,^i^ ;„ :„ 

Directors— William pierce Johnson, Wm. J. Dutton, Geo. a. lne gentlemen wno win represent the parties in in- 
D° P Mo«on; c e K d Mci?tSs r f e j^mes" K.'wns'in^ "' Talbot ' H " terest at the convention, which will be held in Wash- 
Agents— New York— Hanover National Bank, chemical National ington early in August. Meanwhile hostilities may 

Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel „-_„„ • at u.. • *.u i. vi -j • i*i 1 

& Co. Chicago-Continental National Bank. st. Louis-Mechan- cease in Manchuria, though neither side is likely to 

ics' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- K e harred from rereivino- reinforrpmpnts anH stinnlips 

sas City— First National Bank. London-Brown, Shipley & Co. uc udr 'f u irom recen mg reimorcements ana supplies. 

Paris— Morgan. Harjes & Co. Johannesburg— Robinson south According to General Linevitch's last announced re- 

r can an ng p 0rt tQ ^^ Czar, Marshal Oyama has so extended his 

lines in an envelopment movement as to materially 

The Ca.ne.dian Bankof Commerce narrow the Russian front at the expense of strategic 

with which is amalgamated the Ban* of British Columbia. positions which give the Japanese the advantage. 

Paid-up capital. g.!eo^. OFFIC ^ TORO £.™rve Fund, j3.50o.ooo That is to sa > r . Oyama has secured positions on the 

Aggregate Resources over j90.ooo.ooo. Russian front and flanks which would make it an easv 

HON. GEORGE A. COX. President. . , . . , . T — .. , . , J 

B. E. WALKER. General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. matter tO Completely isolate VladlVOStOCk, and make 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St., E. C : t Hiffirnlr W T inovirr-Vi fr. rparti Horhiti ,"n ntp r»f 

new tork office— 16 Exchange Place. n dimcuit ior i.inevitcn to. reacn narDin in case oi 

branches in British COLUMBIA-Atiin. Cranbrook, defeat. These strategic positions make it quite pos- 

Fernie, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmlth, Nanaimo. Nelson, .. f ., T o i a -i # r 

New Westminster, Vancouver and victoria. sible for the Japanese to agree to an armistice wlth- 

in united STATES^-pJrTian^seattie a^S'skagway (Alaska), out weakening their lines, but merely postponing the 

M^n S i?ob 9 |, oth N er w br T n err , ifo'r,es C0 rn r d ,n 6as t ,^n caSSSff 1 POlnt ' , '" inevitable should hostilities be resumed. Undoubt- 

bankers in London— The Bank of England, the Bank of edly Ovama and Linevitch would take advantage of 

Scotland, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. The Union of London and Smiths J .,.:.. - ... ., . r ... 

Bank, Ltd. possibilities of peace and lie on their arms for a while. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. f h-.i. l-nrmi that a hat-rip nndpr nrpspnt formations 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS-The Commercial National Bank. tor Dotn know tliat a hattle under present iormations 

■>■ Frm.isoo offi». 325 California street. would probably entail a loss to the two armies of not 

a. kains, Manager. Bruce Heathcote, Asst. Manager. f ar f ronn a quarter of a million men. Necessarily, it 

~~~~ Z ~ would be the decisive battle of the war, so far as the 

London. Pa.ri« and American Bsvnk. Ltd. Russians are concerned, for if Linevitch is crushed, 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. ; t _._„|J r _l,_ t 1 n . <~7ar until npvt snrinff to nut an- 

Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital. $2,000,000 ll would take tlie L zar until next spring to put an 

Reserve Fund, ti 150.000 other armv in the field. What mystifies Russia, as 

Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. n „„ *.*-„M„ m ;i;+ n ,„ avr * a rt-c ~ic ...Vipt-p Ar\ curh 

AGENTS-New York-Agency of the London, Paris and Amerl- well as outside military experts, IS Where flO SUCtt 

can Bank. Limited, No io Wail street NY.; Paris-Messrs hordes of Tapanese come from? It is conceded that 

Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct »".'»'.".. J"!- 1 " *- 

on the principal cities of the world, commercial and Travelers' Oyama has not less than half a million men under his 

c 1ig 3 GREF.NEBAUM, Manager; h. s. green, Sub-Mana- immediate command, and there is no attempt to deny 

ger; r. altschul, Cashier. tnat an en ti re lv separate army of over one hundred 

~~ ~~~ thousand men is moving northward along the Korean 

Central Trust Company of California border, but in Manchuria. Moreover, as a newspaper 

Authorized Capital "^ !". 6 ^.. 8 ?::. 8 ^..^ 8 -." .' 6 . 00 -. js.ooo ooo correspondent puts it, "there seems to be^as many 

paid-up Capital and Reserve !....!."!! l7k!ooo m en in Tapan as there was before the war." As yet 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or ,, T * ,~ . .„,, „ rt4 . :„Ai^^t- a A imr rip 

Trustee, check Accounts solicited. Legal Depository for money the lapanese Government has not indicated any ae- 

In Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposit* .:„ ';.. _„ ormisticp nendinf the neace negotiations, 

and Savings. Investments carefully selected. Sire tor an armistice penning tile pedLC ucguuauuua. 

The indications from St. Petersburg clearly show 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco that the Czar is now honest and sincere in his efforts 

710 Market St., opposite Third. to secure peace. This is shown by two events this 

Guarauteed Capital $1,000,000 week War Minister Sakbaroff. who has been the 

& topi,af :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;::::::::::;::::::S: recognized leader of the war party, has resigned .,n- 

Depnsits July i. loos 9,069,Ma j r Dre ssure from the throne, and upon sounding the 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President: S. G. MURPHY. Vlce-Presl- C,Cr P 1 ^"' 1 - " UI " , , ,' , P. f 

dent: JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President; GEORGE A. STORY, ahllV it W3S found to be loval to the Core and trUSt- 
Cnshler; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. :, . t . i„ 0) . j„„„„ This thp CVar is assured 

Directors-James D. Phelan. 8. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, worthy to the last degree. i his, tne t_zar is assured. 

James Moffltt. Frank ,T. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph , n ,p nn s that the armv Can be depended upon in his 

Spreckels, James M. McDonald. Charles Holbrook. means tnat inc ctiiiiv <-« y y „_J„, 

interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. efforts to bring about a better teeling and under- 

.x^h.ng. S on a c y ity e b.nk. by P ° s,a ' "^ ^^ ""^ * C ° ' m standing between himself and the people, as now in- 

dicated by the removal of Sakharoff and the turning 

The Anglo-CoLliforniOLn Bank. Limited down of the war party. It is believed that the Czar 

head office-is Austin Friars, London, e. c. will stand firmly against the Sakharoff ring and call 

Capital Authorized. »6.ooo,ooo Paid-up, $1,500,000 _,._i. nlpn P c rv P Witte to his side. This is still tur- 

Subscrlbed. $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 Slicn men as ut » mi « " <.„„;„„ Kl„nr1v 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sella drafts, ther made clear by the Czar hliuselt 111 saying Ollintiv 

makes telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit avail- , ,, t_ u u~ «.. .,,-,-.. Icii.-p t^ nrpvpnt further 

able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans that there should be an armistice to pre\eni iurtiici 

money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. , „ c „l„ cs hlnndshed ninlomatists think they see 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL. Managers. and USeleSS DlOOdSnea. uipiuiiittim t „„J,-_„ 

t. friedlander, cashier. nl t^jg declaration signs of a secret understanding 

The German Savings & Loan Society" ^^^SS^^^^S^^ 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. baSIS OI peace terms sndii uc, j, _.u__ tl„ n 

Guarantee capital and Surplus *a,60o.M8.« tion of plenipotentiaries having little to do other than 

capital Actually Paid-up ln Cash 1,000,000.00 arranging the details and such other formalities as 

Derosits, June 30. loos 37.7S8.67».i7 he reduired to make the document ready for 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— John Lloyd, President; Daniel Meyer, ' ld -> . _ ' , .._ . „_ TTmr.prors The dismissal 

First Vice-President: Emll Rohte. Second Vice-President.; Ign. the Signatures of the two Umperors. 1 lie uioimoaoj 

Stelnhart. N. Ohlandt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Till- c cS.V.^rr.ff «-liirb denriveS the war party ot OttlCial 

mann. Jr., E. T. Kruse. Ot Saknarou \\ nn-u l i„,. u,, ^f tnp armv to 

A H. R. Schmidt, Cashier; Wm. Herrmann. Asst. Cashier; standing, and the undoubted loyalty OI tne army 

George Tourney, Secretary; A. H. Muller, Asst. Secretary; W. , order of things, together With the dlSgrace- 

8 Goodfellow, General Attorney. u,< - " cvv 



July 8. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



lul fact that the insurrection has fallen compl 
into the hands of socialists and anarchists, pre 
the possibility of the outbreak assuming the dimen 
lignit] of a revolution. 

What is most worrying the diplomatists of the neu- 
tral nations is a possible, a probable, some believe, 
alliance between Russia and Japan as a part of the 
peace conditions, for their permanent supremacy in 
Asia. Neither nation could ever hope to acquire new 
territory outside of Asia. European spheres of in- 
fluence in China are antagonistic to both Russia and 
Japan, and since they were acquired by threats of 
war. naturally China would favor a Russo-Japanese 
alliance if it gave her assurances of protection against 
Europe. Undoubtedly China would agree to the 
division of .Manchuria between Russia and Japan for 
guaranteed protection against Europe, and the price 
would not be high, seeing that the Peking Govern- 
ment had already lost Manchuria before the Russo- 
Japanese war. The assertions that have been com- 
ing from Tokio the past year to the effect that Japan 
had no idea of permanent occupation of any part of 
Manchuria were and still are diplomatic trickery. The 
underlying cause of the war was the pressing neces- 
sity of Japan for more territory for her overcrowded 
population. The acquirement of Korea and a large 
slice of Manchuria was as necessary to Japan as the 
acquirement of Florida and the trans-Mississippi 
country was to the United States. There would be 
no occasion for surprise, therefore, if the Russo-Jap- 
anese peace treaty should provide for a defensive and 
offensive alliance between them as to the Far East, 
but the sanction of commercial treaties by either 
party with the other nations of the world. The enor- 
mous area of the grain lands of Siberia are of little 
value without an opening to the Pacific below the ice 
belt. At present it is for Japan to say if such an 
opening may be had. It is for Russia to say whether 
or not Japan will have to maintain a large standing 
army to protect her subjects in Korea and Manchu- 
ria. That Japan intends to stay in her acquired ter- 
ritory there can be no doubt, for already trade and 
commercial privileges have been granted in per- 
petuity to Japanese merchants. Of course this means 
that Japan intends to protect them against any force 
that might undertake to dislodge them. 

Trouble between France and Germany has been 
indefinitely postponed by the former finally agreeing 
to submit the Moroccan dispute to an international 
commission without strings or mental reservation. 
But no one believes that either party will long adhere 
to the decision, for Germany is scheming for control, 
and France is scheming to retain her hold on that 
country. There seems to be no middle ground for 
settlement other than the abandonment by both na- 
tions of all plans for supremacy. But Great Britain 
will have to be considered by the commission, for 
John Bull's identification with the business meant 
the cream of the profits for himself if France contin- 
ued her protectorate, and he will get none at all if 
Germany dominates the Sultan. Sweden and Nor- 
way are talking of an amicable settlement of their 
differences, but both are hastily getting on a war 
footing. 



NEWS LETTER. 37 

BANKING. 

Sevn Francisco Sewings Union 

U2 California St.. cor. Wel.b St.. San Francisco. 

E. B. POND. 1'roMcnl; W C. H. DeFKEMERT. ROBERT 
WATT, virr-rrraldents: LOVBU, WHITE, Cashier; R. M. 
WELCH. Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— E. B. Pond. W. C. B. DcFrcmery, Henry F. Allen. 
Wakefield Baker. Jacob Barlh. C. O. O. Millar. Fred H. Beaver, 
William A. Magee, Robert Watt. 

Receives deposits and loans on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co.. or by check! 
of reliable parties, payable In San Francisco, but the responsi- 
bility of this savings bank commences only with the actual re- 
ceipt of the money. The signature of the depositor should ac- 
company the first deposit. No charge Is made for pasa book 
or entrance fee. 

Office Hours— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings. «:30 to 8. 

Deposits, Dee. »1 1904 133, WO, 131 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up l.oOO.OO* 

Reserve and Contingent Funds t76.10t 

Continental Building 6. Loan Association 

Established in 185H. OF CALIFORNIA. 

301 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital J17.WW.000 

Paid-in Capital 3,500.000 

Profit and Reserve Fund 460,000 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 8 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbln, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

Security Sewings Bank 

316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000.00 

Paid-up Capital 600,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 265,000.00 

Banking by mail a specialty. 

Directors— William Babcock, Parrott & Co.; S. L. Abbott, Se- 
curity Savings Bank; O. D. Baldwin, O. T>. Baldwin & Son; Jos. 
D. Grant. Murphy, Grant & Co.; B. J. McCutchen, Page, McCut- 
chen & Knight; L. F. Monteagle, Capitalist; R. H. Pease, Pres. 
Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warren D. Clark, Williams, Dimond & 
Co.; James L. Flood, Capitalist; J. A. Donohoe, President Dono- 
hoe-Kelly Banking Co.; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob Stern, 
President Levi Strauss & Co. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

Corner 
California and Montgomery 

Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CAPITAL and SURPLUS $1,411, 160.90 
TOTAL ASSETS . 6.943,782.83 

Interest paid on deposits, sub- 
ject to cheek, at the rate of 
two per cent per annum. 

Interest, paid on savings de- 
posits at the rate of three and 
six-tenths per cent p • r 
annum. 

Trusts executed. "We are 
authorized to act as the 
guardian of estates and the 
executor of wills. 

Pafe deposit boxes rented at 
$5 per annum and upwards. 

Get a box at once and guard 
against loss by Fire or Burg- 
lars. 



J. Dalzell Brown 



M«xr\agtr 



California Home Building Loan Company 

No. 7 Powell Street 

5 per cent interest paid on Savings Accounts. 6 per cent on Term 
Accounts of $100 or more. Loans made on Real Estate, repay- 
able in monthly installments under definite contract. 

OFFICERS— P. B. Roberts, President ; F. M. Parcells, Vice- 
President; R. L. Handy, Secretary; Joseph Hutchinson, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS— P. B. Roberts, F. M. Parcells, Joseph Hutchin- 
son, James Frazer and Charles J. Robinson. 



A BARGAIN 

$1500 summer home in Santa Cruz mountains, 6X acres, 3>a 
aores improved :, prunes and apricots; balance woods. 8 miles 
south of Alma on county, watered, road. Modern house of 6 
rooms and bath, water piped to all buildings, running stream, 
pond and redwood grove all olose to house, daily mail and but- 
oher. Must sell, family reasons. Address Owner, Alma. Cal. 



Do not throw away your soiled gloves or cra- 
vats or laces, nor yet your "a little dingy" suit of 
clothes. Just send them to Spaulding's Cleaning and 
Dyeing Works, at 127 Stockton street, and in a few 
days you will have them back — and you will be 
amazed to see how fresh, clean and new they look. 
Not only look, but are. 



TEL. PRIVATE EXCHANGE 216 



Dr\ Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 



STARK KING BUILDING 
121 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



"I wonder why you never 

heai of pig doctors." "I suppose it 
is because pigs can be cured even 
after they are killed." 



For Women 
and Children 
Traveling Alone 

6V>e Rio 
Grande 
Scenic Line 
Excursions 

JUST FILL THE BILL 

Personally Conducted to 
the East 

NO CHANGE OF CARS 

Details— also free books of 
travel, handsomely Illustrated. 
may be had of 

W. J. SHOTWELL, Genero.1 Agent 
DENVER AND Bit GRANDE R. R. 

625 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




ABOUT 
YOUR 
TRIP 
EAST 



When planning your Eastern trip, the 
question always arises: "How shall 1 
go?" Let me offer a suggestion. The 
Missouri Pacific operates both Pullman 
and Tourist Sleepers through from 
California to Kansas City, St. Louis 
and Chicago without change of cars, 
which carry you through the world- 
famed icenery of Colorado by day- 
light. Dining and cafe cars on all 
through trains; service a la carte. 

Write us for our lowest rates and 
handsomely Illustrated books of travel. 



W.J. SHOTWELL, General Afent 



623 M.rket St. 



San Francisco 




ALL TBE YEAR 
ROUND TOIRS 

^ Travel by Sea 

BzcellMt SarTlce, Low Rites, Includlm Berth «nd Mali 

Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Taeoma 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 
Alaska and Mexico. 

For inlormetlon retarding salllm dates clc.obnln folder 

SAN FRANCISCO TICKET OFFICES 
< New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St. . and Broadway Wharves. 

0. D. DDNANN. Genera' I'assenger Aget.t 
10 Market Street, San Francisco 



"What was the cause of 

your barn burning down?" asked 
the drummer. "Sparks from the 
railroad, stranger," drawled the 
farmer. "You used to blame it on 
tramps." "Railroads have more 
money than tramps, stranger." 

"Why am I like a pin?" ask- 
ed Mr. Jones triumphantly, of his 
wife. He expected she was going 
to say, "Because you are so sharp," 
and he was simply paralyzed when 
she replied: "Because if you should 
get lost it wouldn't be worth while 
to spend time looking for you." 




15 



50 



July 8, 1905. 

*v.v.v.v.v.v.irv.ir.v.ir.%r.%r.%r.v.vv.M.v.v.v.tr.VM. 

^Stylish 
Suits 

Dressy Suits $20 

Pants $4.50 » 

My $25.00 Suits are the* 

best in America. jj 

1 r Per Cent Saved by gft-g 

Z ting your suit made byS 

JOE POHE1M |5 

TBI mm K 

> Sim.iw Suit 1110-1112 Mirket St S 

«S " 201-203 Monte'y St.. S.F.g 




Train a leave 11ml nre due 
to arrive at 

-I SAN FRANCISCO. 

N&SHAST 

Fsom Juns 25. lu05 
^^^T^^Sy Fhrrv Depot 

^ tv 1 L ^ (Foot of Market Street.) 

LKAvg - MAIN LINE. - ARitiTiT 

7.00a Kiinli 11, ViK-iivllk-. Winters, Rumtey 7.48p 
700a [tlchiiioud, Be 11 Ida, Sacramento, 

Bulsunand Way Stations 7-28p 

7.40a Vallejo. Napa, Callstoga, Santa 

Kuan. Martinez, San flamon 6-OBp 

7.40a Nlles, Flensnutoii, LI v er 111 ore, 

Tracy, Lathrnp. Stockton ?.28p 

8.00a Sbnsnt Express — (Via Davis). 

Williams. Willows. tFmto. Ked 

BliilT. Portland, Taeoma. Senttle. 7 48p 
8.00A Davis, \VMO,llun<I.Knlgl|[H landing, 

Mnryevllle, orovtlle 7 48p 

6.20a Mart z. Antlnch, Byron, Tracy, 

Stockton, Newman, Los llanos, 
Mendotn, Arnionn, llnnfurd, . A no „ 
ViHalla, PortcrvMe ... X \A P „ 

8.20a Port Costa, Laibrop. Merced. Mo ' * 4BP 
desto, Itnyinund, FreHno, Hnu- 
ford. VIsHiia. Bakenfleld ... 4 48p 

6 40ANIieB, San ,lo«e, Llverinore, Stock- 
ton (iMiu-ui). Valley Spring, 
lone, Sacramento, Placen llle, 
Colfax. MaryflvlUe. Red BmfT 4.08p 

840AOiikiia!c. chlneee, Jaineatown, 

Simi.ra, Tuolumne nnd Angels... 4.08p 

8- r 0A Atlnntk Uxpreaa— Ogden nnd Rait, 4.28P 

9-40a Rich nd, Port Co- in. Mar tinea 

and Way siailnns (tConcord) 6-4BP 

10 20a Vallejo, Daily. Napa, Sunday only 7-48P 
10.20a Los Angele* PnsuruitLT- Port 
Costa. Milliliter,. Byron, Tracy, 
Lathrop, Stockton, Mereed, 
Knj iiimid. Kri'sno, Goshen dune- 
linn, Hanrurd, Lemoore. Vlsnlla, 

Bake fll.i.l, Los AtiKCk-8 7 08p 

10.20a Fl Paso. K minis City, St. LouIb and 

Chicago 7.C8P 

11.00a The Overland Limited — Omaha, 

Chicago. Denver, Knnnjis City.., B-41p 
1140aNM<h. s.ui Jnae and Way stations. ^ -,Bp 

fl .OOP Sacramento Hlver Stenmcrs ill. OOP 

3 40p Bi-nlcla. wintere, Sacramento, 
Woodland, link-Ills Landing, 
Murysvllie nnd Urovllle 10 48a 

3-40pllnywHr.l. Nllea, and Way Stations 7 48p 

4. OOP Val lojo, Mm liner. San Itmnon, 

Napa, Callstoga, Smitn Rosa 9.28a 

4.00pNIU-h. Tracy, B took ton, LodI 10 28a 

4.40p Hay ward, Nlles, Irviogton, Sunt 18. 48a 
Jose, Llvennore > % 11.48a 

6-OOptuu Owl Limited— Newman, Loi 
Ban 08, Mcudotn, Fresno, Tulare, 
Bakermicid Lob Angeles 8.46a 

C-OOr CIiIcm^.i nnd si. i.ouls Special— Kl 
Paso, Kansas City, St. Louis and 
Chicago B48a 

t6.20pllavwi.i-.i. Miinand San Jose 7.08a 

620p\b11.-j ( ,. l-uit Costa, Bcolcla, Sul- 

ami. Siicnimcnto 11.28a 

6. OOP I'-";- i.rm I'.xiti ss— Omaha. Chicago, 
Denver, Kansas City, St. I. mils, 
Martinez, Stockton, Sacramento, 
-Reno. Sparks. Mnntello. Ogden .. 12-48P 

6-20p liny word. N les and San Jose 9 48 a 

7.00pI:<-iio PncKi-nger— Port Costa. Be- 
nlcla, Sulsun, F-lmlra, Dixon, 
Dm Is, Sacramento, Sparks, TODO- 
pith. Goldfl.-id ii nd Keeler 7.08a 

7.40pPt<n Cn-ta, MurUne?,. Myron, Tracy, 

Modesto. Merced, Fresno .... 12-08P 

7.4rpTo»i>mHf and Mirliwn Big Trees 

(via Kttyinond-Wawona Route).. 8 48a 

7-40pViil].Jn. Bunday only 11.28a 

8.20pOregon ,v i nil fori) la ExprosB— Sac- 
ram en to, Murysvlllc. Redding, 
Purtland. Puget Sound an l Bast. 848a 

8. 00p Hay ward, Nlles and San Jose (Sun- 



COAST LINE (Nnrnm (Jaiige). 

(Punt of Market SliCt.) 

7.45a Snntn Cruz Excursion (Sunday 

only) 9 16p 

8.15a Newark. Centcrvll U-. San Jose, 
Felton. Boulder Creek, Sn.un 

Cruz and Way Buttons 5 55p 

t9-15A Newark, San Jose. Felton, Boulder 

Creek Santa Cruz t7 69p 

t2-15pN e w ark. Cenlervlllc, San Jose, 
New Alinaden.L'is (rains, Felton, 
Bmilder Creek, Santa Cruz and 

Principal Way Station 10.65a 

4.1 5p Newark. Sun Juse, Loa Gatoa, 

Wright t8 65a 

4.15pSiiiirday snd Sunday for Felton, 

Bimliler Creek. Santa Cruz &8 65a 

COAST LINE (ID-lid «.niiui>). 

t ri ililnl F\n.i T .wn-.ml Streets.) 

6 10A Sun J use and W»v Stations 6 30p 

l7-r»nASnn Jose and Way Stntlons 6 40p 

7.15a Monterey. Bnntfl Cruz Excursion 

(Sunday only) 10 10p 

8-0PA\ew Alnnidrn (Tues.. Frl„ only).. 4-10P 
8.00ATIie Coa-ter Snn Jose, Salinas, 
San A i do. Paso Rohles, Santa 
Margarita, San Luis Obispo, 
Gundalupc, Gavlota, Santa Bar- 
burn, Snn Buenaventura, Oxnard, 

Burlmok, Los Angeles 10-30P 

6.00AGIlr..v, HolllBter, Castrovllle, Del 
Munte, Pad tic Grove. Surf. 

Lonipor 10 30p 

S.rOASnii Jo«P, Tres Finos. Wntsonvllle, 
Capttola. Pantn Cruz. Padtlc 
Grove. SnlitinB Snn Luis Obispo 

and Prlnclpnl Way Stall -lifl 4.10P 

t9.C0A '-"" (-ntoH. Wright, Boulder Creek, 
\ In Santa Clara and Narrow 
Gauge t7.4f»P 

10 30a San .lose and Way Stations 1 20p 

11 -30a Sun dose and Way Stations 7.4flp 

2 16pSiiii JoiC and Way StailotiB 8. 36a 

t3 00PD«l Monte lCv press— Santa Clara, 
San Jose. WiUonvRle, Santa 
Cruz. Del Monte, Monterey 
PaelncGr ve t12-15p 

t30npLo- Cutow. Wright, B-utder Creek, 
SantiiCruz. via Santa Clara and 

Narrow Gauge 10-45A 

S30pSoii(H Sun Fmiidsco. San JoBe, 
Gllroy. Holllster. Tres Plnos, 
WAtaonvlllo.CHpltola. Santa Cros, 

SallnaB. Monterey. Pacific Grove. 10.45"* 

4 3°PSan Join ami Way Stations t765A 

15 OOpSui.ifi Clara. Sau Jokc. Los Gntoa, 
Wright . tg.'^A 

15.3rp Snn Io«c nnd PrlnclpnlWny Stntlons id. 40 a 

6. 45 p Sunset Rxpreea — Re d wood, San 

June, Gllroy, Salinas, Paso 

RoMes. Snn Lnls Oldspu, Santa 

Barbara, I os Angeles, Demlng, 

Kl PaBO, New Orleans 9 10a 

B45pFI PaSO, Kansas City, St. Louts, 

Chicago 10 30P 

6 45p Pa Jam, W a tso n v 1 1 1 e. Cn pi tola, 

Bnnta Cruz Caetrovllle, Del I JI^.ICp 
Monie. PaclOc Grove f H0.30P 

16 15pSi.n M-teo, Beresford, Belmont. 
s hi Carton, F.'dwuMd, Fnlr OakB. 
Menlo Pork. Palo Alto t6-4fiA 

63~PS:in .lose nn-1 Way SlallonB 6.36a 

8-0 P"nlo Alton dWnvSttlona 10.15a 

11.3 P South Snn Frnnelsco, Miiihrae. Bnr- 
llngiuiie. Snn Mateo. Beln. out. 
San Curl. s. Redwood. Fnlr()«ks, 

Menlo Park and t'n'o Alto 9.45P 

11 ,3'pSaturdaya only fur Mnj Held, Moun- 
i ii in \' lew. sin. m vnii-. Lawrence, 
Sunn Clara ami Sun .l.^e _^. .... 19 46p 

"OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 
i Fool of Marhei St.) 

t 7. 16 *. m. 9. 00 am. II.OO'.m. 

1.00 p m. 3.00 p.m . 6.15 p.m. 
A for Morning. P for Afternoon. 

tSutiilay excepted tSundny only. 

EfMoudny only. 

{Dally, and stop" nt all stntlons on Sundny. 
Tbe I- >IO • . * n» Kl *i»1 ANT 
will call for and check bAggnge from hotels and 
resiliences Telephone. Exchange 8S 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS W "^«ir, 
Sohmar Piano Aftncy 

308-312 Post St.,San Fraocisc* 

Received Gold Medal— Highest Award World's Fair. St. Louli, UN. 



July 8. 1905. 

The charm of her smile 
is in her pretty teeth. 
Sensible girls know the 
value of 

SOZODONT 

Liquid. Powdtr or Past*. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves.) 

"Don't talk to me about the 

receipts in that magazine," said 
Mrs. Lane, with great energy. 
"Wasn't that the very magazine 
that advised me to put on that 
sody solution and leave the table- 
cloth out over night to take off 
those yellow stains?" "I'm inclin- 
ed to think it may have been," said 
.Mrs. Lane's sister, with due meek- 
ness. "I sent you a. number of 
them in the spring, I remember." 
"Well, and what happened?" ask- 
ed Mrs. Lane, with rising wrath. 
"Didn't the stains disappear?" ask- 
ed her sister. "Disappear!" said 
Mrs. Lane in a withering tone. "It 
was the table cloth that disappear- 
ed. I don't know anything about 
the stains." 

"Well, pa," said Phyllis 

Foddershocks, as her father ap- 
peared in the doorway, carpetbag 
in hand, "how did you enjoy your 
trip?" "Fine, Phillie, fine!" said 
the old man. "And did you sleep 
well in the sleeping car?" "Wall, I 
can't say's I did. I'm a purty big 
man, and I did have a heap o' trou- 
ble gittin' inter that there little 
hammock." 

"Pa," said the farmer's boy 

who had been studying astronomy 
at college, "have you heard about 
Mars changing color?" "Gosh, no!" 
exclaimed the old man, in startled 
tones. "She hadn't changed color 
when I saw her out in the barnyard 
five minutes ago." 

Politics would be improved 

by abolishing the system of dum- 
my office holders. — Puck. 

HAND 

SAPOLIO 

It ensures an enjoyable, invigor- 
ating bath ; makes every pcK 
respond, removes dead skin, 

ENERGIZES THE WHOLE BODY 

•tarts the circulation, and leaves a 
glow equal to a Turkish bath, 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGIST* 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



For a time wc stood without 

uttering a single word, stunned to 
Silence by the incomparable maj- 
esty of the mighty cataract. The 
American was the first to speak. 
"What a waste!", he exclaimed, 
with profound emotion. He made 
a few hasty figures on a scrap of 
paper which lie had in his hand. 
"Do you know!" he said, looking 
up a moment after, with flushed 
face and brightening eye. "there's 
power here, if 11 were to be con- 
verted into electricity and applied 
to industrial uses, to earn money 
enough to force ten families of 
three daughters each, or fifteen 
families of two daughters each, in- 
to New York society?" Under the 
spell of that vast mass of falling 
water we could believe him. Any- 
thing seemed possible. — Puck. 

"I must confess," remarked 

Mrs. Crabbe, "I don't believe there 
ever was a really perfect man." 
"Well," replied Mr. Crabbe, "Adam 
would have been perfect, I suppose 
if Eve had only been made first." 
"How do you mean?" "Well, she 
would have bossed the job of mak- 
ing Adam." 

Short — Hello, Long! Where 

are you going? Long — I'm going 
over to the post-office to register 
a kick against the miserable deliv- 
ery service. Short — What's the 
trouble. Long — Why, that check 
you promised to mail me ten days 
ago hasn't reached me yet ! 

Johnny — Paw, did Moses 

have the dyspepsia like what you 
have got? Father — How on earth 
do I know? What makes you ask 
such a question? Johnny — Why, 
our Sunday-school teacher says the 
Lord gave Moses two tablets. 

"Did you go into that specu- 
lation you were talking about?" 
"Yes." "What do you expect to 
realize from it?" "Just at present 
there's a strong prospect that I 
may realize what a fool I was." 

"Science has proved," said 

the professor of astronomy, "that 
there is no water at all in the moon. 
Now, what do you deduce from 
that?" "That there is some excuse," 
replied the freshman, "for its get- 
ting so full regularly." 

Mrs. Van Shimmer — Little 

boy, how would you like to go on 
my Fresh Air Outing next week? 
Reddy McTurk— Outer sight, lady, 
but me brudder he needs fresh air 
more 'n me. He's a ticket chopper 
in de subway. — Puck. 

Where an author has noth- 
ing to conceal, and wishes to con- 
ceal it under the guise of some- 
thing, he just naturally drops into 
poetry. — Puck. 




"PHE preliminary zest to a viva- 
cious dinner is supplied by 
CLUB COCKTAILS. No made- 
by-guesswork cocktail can be as 
satisfactory. The flavor, taste, and 
strength of CLUB COCKTAILS 
are unequalled. Choice liquors, 
delicately blended and aged to a 
mellow body, make CLUB brand 
peculiarly fit for home dinners. 
Just strain through cracked ice 
and serve. CLUB is the cocktail 
for the knowing ones. 

Seven kinds — Manhattan, Martini, etc. 

C. F. HEUBLE1N & BRO., Sole Proprietors 

Hartford New York London 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 1 

SPOHN-PATRICK COMPANY 1 

San Francisco. Los Angeles. 1 

Denver, Bait Lake City, Seattle. I 

There is a floor walker in 

one of the large dry-goods stores 
in this city whose great toes point 
toward each other in the most 
friendly manner. "What will you 
have, madam?" said he to an old 
Irishwoman, who was looking 
hopelessly around. "Calico." 

"Walk this way." "Walk that way, 
is it! Sure, I'd hive ye know, sur, 
that my legs is not built that way, 
sur, and I couldn't walk that way 
if you'd give me the whole sture, 
sur." 

"Can't yer do a little some- 
thin' fer an old soldier?" whined 
Tired Tiffins. "Well, I don't 
know," replied the portly citizen. 
"If you can show your discharge 
papers, I may do something for 
you." "I hain't been discharged yet, 
boss," said the hobo. "It's a sol- 
dier of fortune I am." 

"Pa, here's a piece in the 

paper about parasites. What is 
parasites, pa?" "Parasites, my boy? 
Why, parasites are the people who 
live in Paris. Think you ought to 
know that, and you in the third 
reader!" 

The first thing we know 

there will be so much sympathy 
extended to the colossal industrial 
sharks by the rank and file of that 
class as to result in the putting in 
the field of a tainted money ticket 
in 1908. — Puck. 



40 



Why Pay to 
Go< to College? 

Every unmarried American boy 
between the ages of 17 and 23 years i 
who possesses a good common school 
education, andean pass the necessary 
physical examination is eligible to 
ttend 

West Point or 
Annapolis 
Academies. 



The government gives them a 
military and academic course cover- 
ing four or more years, and allows 
each student an annual salary of 
about $500, which is more than ample 
to meet all required expenses. At the 
end of his course he may resign, and 
enter any profession or trade though 
a commission awaits him as an officer 
in the army or navy. 

Further particulars for four one 
cent stamps, by addressing. 

H. W. PHILLIPS, 
Louisville, Ky. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Aunt Caroline, from beyond 

the suburbs, was looking at the ani- 
mals in one of the cages. "What 
sort o' critters be they?" she asked 
the attendant. "Cinnamon bears, 
ma'am, ' he replied. "They don't 
smell a bit like cinnamon," com- 
mented Aunt Caroline, passing on 
to the next cage. 

Benedict (with his youngest 

in his arms) — They do say the lit- 
tle fellow looks like me. Jones— 
Oh, well, I wouldn't mind what 
people say. The best way is not 
to notice 'em. 

-"Yes," declared Mrs. En- 



July 8, 1905.. 



He was a good natured Ger- 
man, and his face fairly beamed as 
he walked into a drug store. The 
first thing that caught his atten- 
tion was an electric fan buzzing 
busily on the soda counter. He 
looked at it with great interest, 
and then turned to the clerk : "Py 
golly !" he said, smilingly, "dat's 
a tam'd lifely squirrel vot you got 
in dare, ain'd it?" 

Dumley- — I never saw a 

man like Brixton to drift away 
from the subject under discussion. 
Barrass — As, for instance? Dum- 
ley — I just asked him what he was 
doing the night I saw him down 
the road, and he evaded an answer 
by remarking that he had known 
people to get rich by tending to 
their own business. I have no 
doubt he has, but why should he 
mention it at that time? 

"Don't be so lazy. There's 

plenty of room at the top, and you 
are clever enough to get there." 
"But," replied the lazy genius, 
"think how clever of me to find a 
place at the bottom where there 
isn't so much room." 

Her Husband — Now, there 

is Mrs. Meekler. I know that she 
makes all her own clothes, yet you 
never hear her say a word about it. 
Mrs. Marter — Humph! It isn't 
necessary. — Judge. 



ENNETVS 



BORATES 
TALCUM 






351 LET 

Powder 



J PRICKLY HEAT,; 

I CHAFING, and : 

SUNBURN, -Vi-S 

Remove, ill odor Of peraplntlon. De- 

r lisbtlu! liter Solving. Sold everywhere, or 

1 receipt of 2Sc Get Mermen", (the original} SmpU Frtt. 
G1.HHARD MENKEN COnPANr.tw*trk.NJ, 



peck, "my husband and myself are 
partners. What's mine is his." 
"Especially, I presume," murmur- 
ed Mrs. Hammerfest, "when it 
comes to opinions." 

"I heard him tell a story at 

the club last night, and he ought 
to make a fine cashier." "Why so?" 
"He couldn't possibly be short in 
his accounts." 

Mrs. Henpeck — I have come 

to the conclusion Mr. Henpeck 

— Thank Heaven ! 



Old Hunks (sitting for his 

photograph) — Well, ain't you 
ready? What are you waiting for? 
Photographer — A little pleasanter 
expression, please. Mrs. Hunks 
(who is standing at one side) — 
He's got his pleasantest expression 
on, Mr. Smith. I guess you didn't 
notice how he looked when we 
came in. 

"But," objected the heiress, 

"I have been accustomed to every 
luxury." "That's all the more rea- 
son why you should marry me," 
replied the impecunious suitor. "1 
am a luxury myself." 



15 CENTS PER COPY. 



♦1.50 PER YEAR. 



Overland Monthly 

JULY, 1 905 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE OF THE WEST 

CONTENTS: 

Canoeing Through Southeastern Alaska 

By Laura W. Maxwell 5 

Electricity as Applied to Agriculture. . By L. Ramakers 15 

What Matters It? By Eleanore F. Lewys 20 

Epic of the Oak, The By Ray E. Chase 21 

Nobler Part, The By Florence Rosina Kecne 26 

Passing of the Spanish in California, The. .By Dolores Estrada 28 

On a Lumber Schooner By Margaret Troli 31 

Woman, Her Part in the World's Progress . . By Austin Lewis 34 

Asiatic Giant, The By Thomas B. Wilson 39 

Lay Sermon on Immortality, A. ... By Armond, Layman 41 

North Countrie, The By Nellie Rickey 45 

At Parting By Stanley Coghill 48 

Crows of Ensenada, The By Virginia Garland 49 

World, The By Sadie Bowman Metcalf 51 

Intrigues of a Modern Uriah Heap, The 

By John F. Hanlon 52 

Legend of Gold, A By Laura Alton Payne 55 

Claim in the Wilderness, The By Alex. R. Schmidt 58 

Miniature Lakes of the Sierra Nevada . ; 

By Marion Randall ! .65 

Curious Facts About Cork By J. M. Scanland .69 

White Moose, The By Jean X. Bonneau ..'. ..71 

Editorial Opinion 76 

After Every Storm By Aloysius Coll 78 

With the New Books By Armond 79 

Possibilities of Astoria, The By Mark Sullivan 85 

Home-Makers' Eldorado, The By Frederick Alfred Marriott. . .91 




FOG O' FRISCO 

By M. Elizabeth Burns Howell, in August 1903 Overland Monthly. 



I dreamed a dream of 'Frisco town: 
A tropic sun was beating down, 
And every leaf burnt sere and brown 
Where once was green. 

The dust lay deep upon the street; 
Hot stones did scorch wayfaring feet, 
And sky and pavement seemed to meet 
In one white glare. 

There was no wind, there was no sea, 
Nor cooling rain on land or lea; 
And friendly fog had ceased to be — 

torrid town! 

I heard the little children cry; 
Dogs lolled dry tongues from throats as dry; 
And limp-winged birds refused to fly — 
Fierce Fire was King! 

Where had been joy and song and praise, 
The crowd went mad with curse and craze, 
And when I thought of other days, 

1 cried aloud! 

Fog o' 'Frisco, rolling down, 
Come and cover up the town! 
Cover up the dirt and sin, — 
Damp the dust and drown the din! 

Fog o' Frisco, sweet as rain, 
Come and cure this fever pain; 
Pain of struggle, pain of strife, 
Pain of death and pain of life! 

Fog o' Frisco, robe of gray, 
Come and veil the garish day! 
Veil the gaudy, tinsel toys; 
Quell the clamor, lull the noise. 

Fog o' 'Frisco, mantle meet, 
Come and cover up the street; 
Hide where wanton Pleasure stalks — 
Wanton winks and wanton walks. 



Fog o' 'Frisco, blessed boon, 
Come and quench this blaze of noon! 
Break the brazen, burnished glare, 
Fan the fainting, famished air! 

Fog o' 'Frisco, call thee curse? 
Thou art healing, like a nurse; 
Come with cooling finger-tips — 
Touch our thirsting, parching lips! 

Fog o' 'Frisco, breathing balm, 
Come and bring us rest and calm; 
Rest from angry, aching heart; 
Rest from trembling tears that start! 

Fog o' 'Frisco, comrade kind, 
Come again with Western wind; 
Blow upon our burning brows — 
Cool sea-waves on pushing prows. 

I dreamed again: The sea returned 
And blazing sun no longer burned 
Came wind, came fog for which men yearned, 
And all was glad. 

My dreaming done, I waked from sleep, 
The vision pondered long and deep. 
Nor scarce could know to smile or weep 
At all it meant. 

But when I ventured forth again, 
And met with fog and mist and rain, 
I thought upon my dream of pain, 
And blessed the day. 

Fog o' 'Frisco, faithful friend, 
Do thou bless us till the end; 
Then when shines new Eden Day, 
Thou dost need no longer stay. 

Fog o' 'Frisco, soft as night, 
Soothe and rest us till the light 
Pure with peace and love shall dawn, 
All our sin and sighing gone! 



$15.00 

for the ROUND TRIP to the 

Calaveras Big Trees 



A splendid opportunity to see the 
country made famous by Bret 
Harte's stories. 

TABLE MOUNTAIN, "JIMTOWN," 
STANISLAUS RIVER, ANGELS CAMP 

The great mining country of 
Calaveras County and one of the 
greatest Big Tree groves. 

LEAVE TODAY 
ARRIVE 10:30 NEXT FORENOON 

The route is via Oakdale, 
Jamestown, Angel's and Mur- 
phy's. Only 22 miles stage ride. 
Interesting scenery all the way. 
The Mammoth Grove contains 
trees nearly loo feet in circumfer- 
ence, and is one of the finest of 
the groves. Fine hotel and many 
fishing streams. 

Southern Pacific 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE 

613 MarKet St. 



OAKLAND OFFICE 

12 San Pablo Ave. 



The Domestic Garbage Burner 




This is the way the 20th century 
housewife disposes of garbage 



is a device which is 
attached to ranges, 
cook stoves, gas 
stoves and gasoline 
stoves. There is a 
special device for phy- 
sicians. There is 
positively no odor with 
this in operation. This 
Burner will fit any 
stove or range. The 
cost is within the 
reach of all. 



FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS ADDRESS 

Geo. W. RoseKrans, Agent 

713 James Flood Bldg. San Francisco 



NOW'S YOUR CHANCE 



to visit the 



YELLOWSTONE 
PARK 



The Southern Pacific will now sell round trip ex- 
cursion tickets to Yellowstone Park. The route 
is via Ogden, thence to Monida, through the 
park by Concord Coach to Gardiner (spending 
several days among the geysers and other won- 
ders) then over the Northern Pacific through 
Spokane and down the Columbia River to Port- 
land, returning via the Shasta Route; or vice 
versa. 

$65 ROUND TRIP 

Allowing stop-overs within 90-day limit. This 
is the greatest trip of the year. The route taken 
is through the grandest oi scenery, and best of 
service is given both by rail and stage. Make 
your plans now, and get full information from 
agents. 



Southern Pacific 

San Francisco Office— 613 MARKET ST. 
Oakland Office— 12 SAN PABLO AVE. 



Save the fronts of the Packages. We pay money for the Three B'e 



PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR 

Boston Brown Bread 
Plum Pudding 
Griddle Cakes and 
Muffins 

1 Ash your grocer for it 

PUT UP IN RED PACKAGES 
AND IN 10 POUND SACKS BY 



Allen's B. B. B. Flour Co. 




Pacific Coast Factory 
Mail us five 2 cent 



SAN JOSE. CAL. 

and we will send Sample Package prepaid 



Price per Copy. 10 cents. 




:STABLISHED JULY ao. 1856. Annual Subscription, $4.00. 



AH rr»ANCi« Co 




<tf alif oxnmXbbzxti sjer. 




Vol. LXXI. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 15. 1905. 



Number 3. 



I hi- SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER is printed and published 
every Saturday by the Proprietor. Frederick Marriott, Halleck 
l:ulldlng. 3-V Sansome street, San Francisco. Cal. 

Entered at San Francisco Postofflce as second-class matter. 

.New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy. 
UcpresentaUve. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England, George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
intended for publication in the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 9 a. m. 
Thursday previous to day of issue. 

Where there's a will there's a way — for some 

lawyers to make easy money out of it. 

It is worse than pulling teeth to get at the truth 

in the State Dental Board scandal. 

San Mateo County is bidding for fifty-round 

prizefights, and otherwise showing a willingness to 
figure as the "Bad Lands" of California. 

Xo small boy but one of exemplary behavior 

would have hanged himself ; the other kind leave such 
matters to the State. 

Court records in the sensational Dodge-Morse 

divorce tangle in New York go to show that ice-king 
Morse was a chilly husband. 

One young lady gives up millions to become 

an actress, and another holds on to her fortune and 
becomes an actor's bride. 

The record-breaking special train of Death Val- 
ley's "Cowboy Croesus" ought to have been called the 
"Alcohol Unlimited." 

— ; — Alameda, having failed in a crusade against 
the cigarette, has gone into a campaign aimed at the 
kind of weed that grows in vacant lots. 

It has been discovered that electric light grows 

plants. Some electric light plants grow dividends 
and some don't. 

It was an evidence of the fitness of things that 

the Spaniards at Barcelona should give a bull fight 
in honor of John Bull's naval squadron. 

The crew of the Kniaz Potemkine mutinied be- 
cause of the soup, and now the men of a British mer- 
chantman have deserted because they got no soup. 

All over this glorious land ambitious officers 

of the army and navy are busy burying their "pulls" 
so deep that Theodore the Good can't smell them out. 

Lawson's vocal chords went out of business 

after two speeches at Kansas City, but he still is able 
to make a typewriter buzz with lurid language. 

The basis of a high-school fraternity seems to 

be a handful of letters out of the Greek alphabet and 
a group of youngsters who don't love their teachers. 

Queer things have been happening in a Ber- 
keley man's household. A snake was caught eating 
the pets in his aviary, and the next day he was worry- 
ing the police with a story about the theft of $2,000 
worth of jewelry. Here's matter for a Sunday sup- 
plement article. 



The policeman who regulates the conduct of 

young people found courting on the benches in the 
Park is known as the "spark arrester." 

In building the house that collapsed and killed 

two men. too much money went into the pockets of 
the Board of Works and too little into braces and 
underpinning. 

Bigamist Collins may be, as the police de- 
scription of him states, very lame, but he had no trou- 
ble in beating Justice by miles in the San Queutin 
handicap foot race. 

Male and female students at the Yale summer 

school will swim in the same tank, the shyness and 
the modest scruples of the former having been over- 
come. 

A Pennsylvania man confesses that he poisoned 

one of his sons because he was "not bright." From 
the fact that there was $500 insurance on the boy's 
life, it appears that the trouble was not hereditary. 

Booker T. Washington has taken his nose out 

of the negro problem long enough to stick it into 
the Chinese exclusion matter, shouting "fair play for 
the coolie." 

Japan has taken to christening new warships 

with flights of doves instead of bottles of champagne. 
The little brown man is not without a sense of hu- 
mor. 

A New York corporation lawyer has given up 

a practice of $300,000 a year for an $8,000 judgeship. 
It won't be hard to break any will that he may make 
for himself. 

Fossil-hunters have found in Nevada the re- 
mains of a prehistoric sea serpent which was forty 
feet long and had a big nose. Perhaps the "Carson 
footprints" were not a sage-brush joke after all. 

It is not significant of anything, of course, but 

it is curious that a lady lecturer on female suffrage 
is named Mrs. Carrie Catt and another who special- 
izes on social purity is Mrs. Mary Teats. 

Mayor Schmitz mourns and mourns and 

mourns because the merchants did not invite him to 
clink glasses with Secretary Taft. Wouldn't that 
have been a lovely sight — the lid-sitter and the lid- 
lifter banqueting elbow to elbow? 

Johan Hoch, convicted wife murderer, asks the 

public to give him $1,000 so that he can appeal his 
case. Gentlemen who have picked out losing num- 
bers in the matrimonial lottery will have the first 
chance at Hoch's subscription list. 

The Mayor of Oakland proposes to get rid of 

all the incompetent street cleaners. It is to be pre- 
sumed that his clearing the socialist orators from the 
streets is his first step towards getting clean thor- 
oughfares. 



4 SAN FRANCISCO 

MANY WHERE THERE 

SHOULD BE BUT ONE. 

The world has got to call a halt to permit its right 
ha id of charity to know what its left hand is doing, 
and to let its head govern the impulses of its heart. 
Individuals and some organizations have taken this 
right-about-face, and are doing their part of the 
world's work for the submerged tenth so as to save 
generations of paupers by rescuing the first to fall 
behind in the race of life. But the individuals and the 
few organizations cannot do much until all others 
awake to a realizing sense of the harm that is being 
done by its indiscriminate alms-giving, to say noth- 
ing of the unnecessary tax upon the resources of 
the community. 

Almost unseen and almost unheralded, a movement 
destined to sweep the country is surely taking form. 
but ahead of it must come the all-necessary propa- 
ganda of education. This movement is getting 
strength in the conferences of charities and correc- 
tions, in the various associated charities in the chari- 
table and philanthropic organizations in which men 
and women of superior intellects have their hands 
on the wheel. Among the notable conferences that 
are working to save unfortunates to themselves and 
to the community is the one on the schedule of im- 
portant gatherings at the Lewis and Clark Exposi- 
tion. 

According to the old, the pernicious indiscriminate 
giving, too many men and the women who found life 
a struggle made a profession of begging, and a profit- 
able one it became. As far as this city is concerned, 
the Associated Charities, with its complete system 
of investigation, has succeeded in making this pro- 
fession not altogether remunerative. But with its 
limited finances it was not able to carry the work 
it commenced to a logical conclusion, except in iso- 
lated cases. Little by little it is adding to its field 
of usefulness by getting employment for the dere- 
licts, by holding families together, by getting homes 
for children when the family is broken up, by giving 
judicious emergency help by providing district nurses 
in case of desperate illness, and by giving its counte- 
nance and support and the result of its study of cases 
to the movements everywhere that are trying to solve 
the problem of saving weak citizens, and money to 
the more thrifty and fortunate. 

The people of every community will have to put 
aside creed and class distinctions, and work for the 
good of the community as well as for the individual 
case, before the greatest possible good will be ac- 
complished. The union of the forces for good will 
solve the problem. 

San Francisco has a case in point which the stu- 
dent of conditions may think about. Away back in 
the first years of this State a Protestant orphan asy- 
lum was established in this city on the handsome site 
where it still stands, in Haight street. The State 
has always given its pro rata for the care of the 
children, and almost every man or woman of means 
who has passed away since then has left something 
to the orphans, with the result that the institution 
is liberally endowed. Within the last decade the 
Episcopalians decided that they wanted an orphan- 
age themselves, and so they raised a large amount 
of money and took all the children of their faith and 
herded them by themselves. In turn came the Metho- 
dists and the Presbyterians, each making its own or- 
phanage. Besides this there is a non-sectarian or- 
phanage in this city, conducted as a means of liveli- 
hood for those running it. The result of all the divis- 
ion of energy and income is unscientific and bad eco- 



NEWS LETTER. 



July is, 1905. 



nomics. The Protestant Orphanage Asylum is not 
doing the work of which it is capable, and all because 
the children, all praying to the same God, must do 
it according to a sect formula. The question of creed 
has divided the orphans into sects, but that is not the 
lesson to be drawn from this fact. Separated as they 
are, the cost of maintaining these children is far 
greater than it would be if they were all housed to- 
gether, or under one management. 



A GOOD LESSON TO THE PUBLIC. 

Attorney George D. Collins and his inamorata are 
now safely out of the reach of California courts, but 
he stayed among us long enough to afford an object 
lesson as to the monstrous imperfections of the codes 
of this State. A distinguished lawyer, whose con- 
tempt for the statute laws of California was as great 
as was his reverence for and understanding of the 
principles of the common law, in which lies the es- 
sence of human wisdom, used to say that there was 
no section of any of our codes through which any 
competent practitioner could not drive a coach and 
four. Collins, the fugitive, lived royally by applica- 
tion of this same knowledge, coupled with a deprav- 
ity as complete as that of his worst client. Know- 
ing that the laws made and re-made every second 
year by the motley crew assembled in the Capitol 
at Sacramento are in hopeless conflict with them- 
selves and with the Constitution, and balking at no 
meanness of chicanery or cozenrv, Collins made a 
hugely profitable business out of the defending of 
caught criminals. Falsehood he had always on tap, 
perjury he held in reserve, and whenever it was need- 
ful to his cause he was ready to purloin papers or 
tamper with records. 

There is something excessively rotten about our 
laws and the methods of their administration, or Col- 
lins would have been driven from the bar long before 
he took to law-breaking on his own account. There 
is nobody in the profession here, no judge now on 
any local bench, but knows, and has long known, 
just how 1 crooked Collins was in his practice, and 
yet he was tolerated, and even feared, until entangle- 
ment with a pair of wretched females led him to vio- 
late openly the law which he had both courted and 
despised. 

Doubt of Collins' guilt on the bigamy charge there 
could be none. He confessed it over and over again 
during the weeks and months when he was putting 
up technicalities to be knocked down, and securing 
delay after delay for not one of which was there 
the shadow of an excuse. Not once did he meet or 
evince a willingness to meet the issue squarely. 

Perhaps Collins may never be brought again into 
the jurisdiction of the courts in which for so long he 
trifled insolently and contemptuously with the law, 
and perhaps it will be just as well. With his outlook 
on life and the creature of shame for his company, a 
punishment from which there is no appeal, will 
swiftly overtake him. But he ought to be kept in 
mind whenever next time we elect legislators or 
judges. Laws and courts that permit such a profes- 
sional career as that of Collins cannot be much re- 
spected, even by those who choose to see in every 
statute enacted an expression of the people's will, 
and in every judge elected a minister of the most sa- 
cred function of government. Pettcr laws must be 
made by better men than we are in the habit of let- 
ting the politicians send to Sacramento, and courts 
worthy of confidence and respect must be presided 
over by better men. 



July 15. 1905 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

THE ETHICS OF RETALIATION. 

Relaxation is one of the unwritten laws of human 
kind, nor is there a man-made power in the world 
strong enough to prevent its operation, [ndeed, no 
one would ask to have obstacles put in its way, much 
.isk for its annulment. Turning the other clink 
beautiful sentiment lor idealists to clothe in 
rhyme and .sing their verses in the depths of the 
pathless woods. Bui even then the "other cheek" 
sentimentalist would fling his effusion to the ground 
to be free-handed to retaliate upon the wandering 
mosquito that dared to lunch on the blood in his face 
or hand. The right to "kick back" is an inalienable 
one, and the inclination to do it is inborn in every- 
thing that thinks. In exercising that right, one is 
moved by a sense of justice, and he deems himself 
the proper tribunal to inflict the required punishment. 
The law of retaliation provides for construction, de- 
struction and reconstruction. It is the supreme law 
of nature, and wdiat or who could survive the an- 
tagonisms that confront mankind all the time if it 
were made inoperative? Tit for tat is an edict from 
the throne of justice, nor would its repeal be possible 
without first depriving man of all sense of self-re- 
spect. 

The boycott is a method of retaliation, but gener- 
ally it is a low and cowardly way of "getting even," 
though every man is a boycotter every day of his 
life, and in death he would refuse his patronage to 
an undertaker whom he had a grudge against. When 
a boycott is "installed" by a business firm against 
another firm because the other firm refuses trade in- 
tercourse on the reciprocal lines of mutual helpful- 
ness — "I tickle you and you tickle me" — it is healthy 
and justifiable retaliation. If both are agreed that 
each would profit by trade interchange, but the one 
denies the right of the other to enter his store upon 
an equal footing with other commercial people, and 
at the same time demand the right to have free 
course in the excluded man's store, would not the 
excluded man have the moral and legal right to sever 
all trade relations with his self-superior neighbor, 
and thus retaliate by boycotting him ? He certainly 
would not only have such right, but unless he were 
a very contemptible creature he would play the game 
for all there was in it. 

Now, Chinese merchants the world over, outside 
of the United States, have instituted a boycott against 
trade intercourse with America in the spirit of honest 
and manly retaliation because this nation has brand- 
ed the labor class of their fellow countrymen as be- 
ing utterly unworthy of and unfit for us to gaze upon, 
much less hire to do our menial work. This act of 
exclusion all Chinamen, of high and low degree, take 
as a personal insult, and being human beings like 
ourselves, make haste to retaliate by installing the 
boycott machinery against us. They know, as well 
as we do, that there are millions of acres of rich agri- 
cultural land on the Pacific Coast that are not only 
unremunerative, but are altogether worthless as 
wealth producers because American labor unions will 
not permit wages for such labor as the products of 
the soil can afford to pay. They know that the labor- 
ing class of their fellow countrymen could come here, 
and while vastly improving their own condition of 
existence, put every one of these idle acres under a 
high state Of profitable cultivation. This exclusion 
of them is deemed unjust and not in harmony with 
our boasted "welcome to' all the world." But what is 
still more, they do not feel like maintaining trade 
interchange relations with a people who are 



entirely labor-union ridden that they dare 
not assert a little bit of their alleged "right' to life. 

liberty and the pursuit of happiness." Is it not quite 
tiatnrnl that Chinese business men all over \ si., 
should feel disinclined to maintain relations with a 
le who repudiate and denounce and exclude their 
fellow Chinamen as being a moral pestilence, low and 
degraded human beasts, and their presence in Ameri- 
can fields of labor a menace to virtue, honesty and the 

rights of labor? This dog-in-the-manger policy of 
our Government is likely to make more sudras than 
prosperous American farmers of our Pacific Coast 
landed owners. The question is: "Is labor unionism 
in the United States bigger than the Government 
and the rights of the people?" 



POLITICAL CLUBS. 

Citizens who are at all interested in the fight for 
"a clean city and a clean government," will not allow 
themselves to be deceived by the attempts of the cor- 
ruptionists to undermine the Republican League by 
the erection of the various districts of "independent" 
clubs, so-called. These are the weapons by which 
the "push" leaders, with whom the League has re- 
fused to associate are seeking to beat it into conces- 
sions. They are the rallying points of the schemers 
and manipulators whom the League intends to put 
out of politics. When the primary comes, these "in- 
dependent" clubs will be found pulling and hauling 
and "stuffing" in the interests of the administration, 
and when the election is held they will be the agencies 
for a concerted attempt to boost Schmitz into another 
Mayoralty term. 

Prompt and drastic action has been taken in the 
case of the attempted revolt in the Forty-second dis- 
trict. Here the trouble-maker was one McGowan, 
an out-and-out agent of the crooked bosses as against 
the League. He talked hard and loud about his de- 
sire for reform, professing hatred of the corruption- 
ists and loyalty to the League's principles to the end 
that he was allowed to go on the District Committee. 
Immediately he began to try to enlarge that body 
in order to fill it with the very men the' League de- 
signs to remove from contact with the machinery of 
politics. Failing in this, he mutinied in the open. 
The next day he was read out of the League, and now 
he is at liberty to go back where he came from and 
where he belongs. 

This McGowan is of no personal or political conse- 
quence, but his offense and punishment bring promi- 
nently to the attention of the voters the manner in 
which the administration campaign of skullduggery 
is being pressed forward. His case is a warning to 
decent citizens to keep away from the independent 
clubs. 



The dastardly scheme of the Ruef-Schmitz 

machines to prejudice labor unions against the San 
Francisco Bulletin has been smashed into smithereens 
by San Francisco Typographical Union No. 21, by 
officially announcing that the Bulletin is not only 
sound to the core as a union printing office, but is in 
honest sympathy with organized labor. This places 
the responsibility for the news-boys' strike against 
the Bulletin exactly where it belongs, and showsup 
the machine as about the worst enemy labor unionism 
has in San Francisco. A little of the same kind of 
exposure by other unions would help in landing Ruef 
and his brigade of putty followers outside of the field 
of influence in the city's political concerns, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



JUST SUPPOSE. 

The Supreme Court has granted the Police Depart- 
ment the right to raid ordinary houses of prostitution, 
but just suppose that a police drag-net should be cast 
over San Francisco's tenderloin, as was done in Phil- 
adelphia recently! In proportion as this is a town 
without a lid, while Philadelphia has been claiming 
and proclaiming a certain degree of respectability, 
the haul here would probably be larger and would 
contain more fish of size and quality than the net re- 
sult in the Quaker City. And the biggest captures 
would be made in the so-called "French restaurants" 
— an institution said to be peculiar to this latitude 
and longitude. Down-stairs in these resorts Re- 
spectability sups at the next table to the painted cheek 
and the peroxided hair. Upstairs — well, it is an ax- 
iom of the red-light district that with every floor the 
price of entertainment increases and the moralities 
decrease. People who would not dare to frequent a 
known house of assignation have learned that noth- 
ing unpleasant happens in a French restaurant or 
that if it does, Gaston and Alphonse would swear 
that it didn't, for the first and last thing about places 
of this class is secrecy. Stewards, waiters, elevator 
men and all are well selected and well paid for dis- 
cretion. Only now and then does some tragic thing. 
some crime or casualty, disclose to the world a 
glimpse of the under life of these haunts of the vo- 
luptuaries. 

Besides, there are the less discreet resorts — the 
back rooms of the saloons, the lower and inner sanc- 
tuaries of the music halls, the "no questions asked" 
lodging houses and the open and notorious houses 
with the awnings that dot the night-life district. 
With these and the restaurants, what fishing for the 
police net-casters! 

As to the efficiency of these drag-net raids on the 
Philadelphia plan, there ought to be no question 
Shame there would be, suicides perhaps, divorces and 
wrecked homes, but after such an experience and its 
blistering publicity, it would be a woman both bold 
and bad who would peril her reputation in the dis- 
trict of wickedness until the last raid had been for- 
gotten. And no objection to drag-netting on the 
score of danger to innocent people will hold water. 
Innocent people are not to be found within the sweep 
of the netsmen at any time. Good women do not go 
above the cafe floor of the "French restaurants." in 
the back rooms of saloons or to free-and-easy lodging 
houses except on slumming tours, and then in such 
company as to be exempt from the operations of the 
raiders. 

One must regret that San Francisco shows no pre- 
monitory sign of such spasms of virtue as are con- 
vulsing Philadelphia. We have as much and more 
of evil, public and private, but we are not getting 
alarmed about it. Indeed, we seem rather to enjoy 
it. There seems to be no danger of the drag-net here. 

JAPANESE MERCHANTS. 

It is all well enough for the Japanese in Japan to 
puff up themselves, assume an arrogant attitude if 
they want to. Indeed, they have some excuse for be- 
lieving themselves a very superior people, for their 
achievements in war and in the industries have been 
great. But when they reach America they should try 
to be civil, at least, and not conduct themselves in a 
way that suggests the thought they do not believe 
Americans have any rights that a Nipponese is bound 
to respect. Their impudence and aggressiveness 
have reached a point where America would be justi- 
fied in enacting exclusion laws to apply to them that 



July 15, 1905. 



would be far more exacting than was ever thought of 
for the exclusion of the Chinese. Not all Japanese in 
America are unworthy of our respect, but there are 
more than enough who are not to justify the rigid 
exclusion of more than ninety per cent of them. 

The class of Japanese whom the News Letter 
has in mind just now is the merchant class. Before 
the Russo-Japanese war. this class imported goods 
and wares that were, in some respects, new in our 
markets, and the disposition was prettv general to 
give them liberal patronage, both because of their 
curiously wrought articles, and of their uniform po- 
liteness and gentlemanly bearing. But the successes 
of their country on battlefields and on the water have 
SO turned their heads that they have, or many of 
them, become unbearable, both as to their trade 
trickery and as to their personal deportment. Very 
many of their "importations" are goods and wares 
ol American manufacture, but labeled ".Made in 
Japan," nor do they deal in any line of goods that is 
not fully covered by American merchants — by men 
who are identified with our business, social and po- 
litical institutions, and who should in all reason, be 
preferred above these imported and swelled up 
bunches of impudence, insolence and doubtful mor- 
als. It is the fact that it is not quite prudent for a 
lady to go unattended into many of the Japanese 
stores. They are almost sure to have to encounter 
.glances, advances and a familiarity that is sugges- 
tive. If they refuse to purchase for any reason, they 
are almost sure to be insulted by abrupt abuse or 
vile insinuations. These facts are well known by 
very many of our women, but be it said to their credit 
that they never return for a second experience. How, 
then, a lady can venture into one of these places to be 
measured for a garment is a mystery. It seems to 
be true that these Japanese merchants prefer the trade 
of women of doubtful character. First, they like 
such customers because the moral atmosphere of such 
women is in harmony with their own, and second. 
they can exact higher prices from such customers. 
Anyway, many of the Japanese stores are not fit 
places for a lady to enter; besides, their goods are 
marked higher than in the American stores, and to 
patronize them is to encourage those things which are 
a positive hurt to American social life. 

FAT FOLKS 
1 reduced by weight seventy pounds, bust six inches, waist 
six Inches, and hips fourteen inches in a short time by a guar- 
.1 nil 11! harmless remedy, without exercise or starving. I will 
(ell you all about it. Enclose stamp. Address MRS. E. R. RICH- 
ARDS. 225 EAST NINTH ST.. RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA. 




&JCHAS. KLILUS & COJJ 

&£XCL US 1 1/£& 

H IGH GRAPH CLOTHIERS 

This Ready-Made Clothes Progression has had our 
close attention for many years. We claim the distinc- 
tion of being the "Parent" of this advanced art. Our 
garments tower far above all others. Smart, correct 
dressers have appreciated our ideas of Modern 
Clothes Building by their almost unanimous support. 
Are you a smart dresser.'' 






July 15. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



^eta^.tr.-r^TOWN CRER JBL>T-£Z7a 



My lady boaghl a score of gown9 

I" wear 011 summer outings, 
A score of blues and grays and browns, 

And still she went with doubtiri 
She fancied she was poor and mean, 

In fact a tritk- shabby, 
And that it was too plainly seen 

IUt husband's purse was flabby. 

My lady took her score of gowns, 
lust what she wore I know not, 

She called with many gibes and frowns 
The company a slow lot, 

But on tho>e gowns i must declare 

My mind's a little gone, 
For when 1 saw her anywhere. 
She'd very little on. 

Well, really, we have a guard at Falsom active 

and sharp enough to shoot an escaping convict. This 
is such a novel departure from the ordinary methods 
of prison guards that it should meet with some ap- 
propriate recognition. It is said that the officials 
have tried to keep the shooting secret. Why they 
should wish to do anything so absurd passes compre- 
hension, until one comes to consider that they are 
officials. 

The case of the man who has served five years 

at San Quentin unjustly upon the false testimony of 
a girl calls attention to the care which should be 
exercised in receiving such testimony. Only lately 
at Berkeley a similar instance occurred, and but for 
the discovery of the girl's lack of truth, some innocent 
person might have suffered. A young human female 
is a dangerous thing. 

The fact that it is possible for a mad dog to be 

at large in the Park and subject children to the dread- 
ful risks of contact wiih such an animal, should call 
the attention of the authorities to the necessity that 
some precautions should be taken to guard against 
the depredations of the dangerous canine. The ordi- 
nary risks of city life are sufficient without this addi- 
tional danger. 

Mrs. Charlotte Perkins Gilman, formerly Stet- 
son, whom once Bierce in a fit of humor nicknamed 
the "Colonel," is coming here again. It will be inter- 
esting to see if she has softened with years. She has 
a caustic tongue, and if it were turned loose on some 
of the scoundrels who still keep in power in spite of 
their misdeeds might accomplish something. 

The hunting faculty is so inherent in the Seton 

Thompson (or is it Thompson Seton) family that they 
cannot leave that little amount of ten thousand dol- 
lars in the Gallatin estate alone. The account of the 
incident will probably appear from the pen of the 
eminent litterateur as a story entitled "Human Jack- 
daws, or How We Acquired." 

It is said that the Santa Fe will make Chicago 

from Los Angeles in forty-five hours. , We _ cannot let 
this pass without some apprehension, for it is really 
embarrassing to be so near to Chicago as all that. 
A combination of the teamsters of the two cities 
would be a calamity compared with which the war 
in the Orient would be fun. 

It is said that the system of rushing is to be 

put a stop to at Stanford. Supposably this marks 
an era of development, a kind of humanizing ten- 
dency, but is it not a little hard on the co-eds. ? 



It is said that a black man in the interior i- 

turning white, and that he will die in the pr. 
We recommend his example to the Mayor. If he 
can perform the miracle of turning white, we are 
quite willing that he should take the consequences, 
if they are unavoidable, A dead while Mayor might 
not be altogether unsatisfactory, 

1 wonder why the trustees of Stanford Uni- 
versity appear so anxious not to carry on the enquiry 

in the ( ioebel matter? It has a somewhat shady look, 

as it appears at present, and it is to the interest of 
the gentlemen in question to clear it up as quickly as 

possible. In these evil days, any tendency to balk 
inquiry is looked upon with suspicion. 

To those who have an inherent belief in the 

honesty of human nature, it must come as a shock 
that thirty conductors will be discharged from the 
Southern Pacific for dishonesty. It appears that even 
good pay will not ensure honesty. It is a hard whack 
at those who believe that everybody can be made 
good by- making everybody prosperous. 

The Berkeley woman who pounded her 

drunken husband into sense by means of wet towels 
seems to have hit on a method which should have 
possibilities. There is more in a licking than we 
moderns altogether admit. The cure should be ap- 
plied in a strong form to those. who are drunk with 
the ill-gotten gains of fraudulent office-holding. 

Another fake hypnotist has been caught, this 

time caught drunk. But that will make no difference 
to the hordes of stupid and irreclaimable asses who 
will venture their money on the next long-haired and 
long-syllabled mystic who comes along. To appeal 
to common sense in these matters is futile, and to 
appeal to the law is even worse. 

The Supreme Court has swept away Judge 

Cook's injunctions, and in so doing has decided not 
to recognize the obvious. Very well, if the courts 
are determined that our streets shall resemble those 
of London, I suppose we have no reason to complain 
though it is a little hard on our wives and daughters. 

The visit of Mr. Taft and the consequent 

speechmaking has left Professor Moses explaining. 
Here is the reason of his comparative failure in the 
Philippines. He is a professor and not a statesman. 
The latter has long ago learned the folly of explana- 
tions. 

The State Board of Dental Examiners is still 

making a pretty exhibition of itself. It is just as 
well to point out that the idea of obtaining fraudu- 
lent affidavits is a very old one, and as a matter of 
fact has never been known to work well. 

Dr. Beatrice Hinkle objects to registering her 

attendance at her duties. It is a puzzle why any one 
should object to putting their zeal and energy on rec- 
ord. Discipline hurts no one but the undisciplined, 
and surely Dr. Hinkle, with all her professional at- 
tainments, is not anxious to go in that category. 

So a wireless svstem is to be introduced be- 
tween here and the Orient. It of course has its ad- 
vantages. The longest leased liar in the world will 
no longer have a monopoly of falsehood. 

The omissions of the invitations to the Taft 

dinner show that the manufacturers of this city are 
laudably particular as to the people with whom they 
put their feet under the mahogany. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July .5, 1905. 



An English Girl Criticizes San Francisco Society 



1 



I^The editor has received a number of anonymous letters protesting 
Miss Trevelyan's communications. It is not fort the editor to 
take sides in this ease as the opinions of Miss Trevelyan are over 
her signature- The News Letter will give space to those who wish to 
disprove the statements of Miss Trevelyan providing ithe signatures 
of the authors accompanies the letters as a guarantee of good faith. I 



The reception given by Mrs. Eleanor Martin the 
other night was a very tidy little affair, and in spots 
had quite the air of a London function. I don't know 
when I've seen San Francisco society look so smart. 
Many of the men actually looked well groomed. As 
a rule your men have a hit or miss appearance that be- 
speaks a careless valet or none at all. Of course, 
there are lots of Englishmen, decent chaps at that, 
who are invited around, who cannot afford a man. 
but somehow they get their clothes on so that they 
don't look as though they had shuffled into them in 
the dark. Why the San Francisco man should be 
such a mussy creature, I'm sure I don't know, unless 
it is that Heaven ordained him as a mere foil for the 
women. However, the other night there were num- 
bers of studies in black and white done according to 
Poole, and the effect was positively stimulating in 
contrast to the badly groomed men who frescoed 
every other function of the season. 

The women, too, looked unusually well, but that 
will-o'-the-wisp known as "distinction" eludes most 
San Francisco women. They wear gorgeous clothes 
that are not a single lap behind the Paris fashions, 
and they wear them with grace and ease. Then ans- 
wer me, you who can, why there are so few women 
here who stand out in a drawing room as having one 
jot more of distinction than their neighbors! Perhaps 
it is that personality is the main ingredient that 
makes for distinction, and American women bundle 
theirs out of sight under a weight of finery. Miss 
Roosevelt, in that original black and white gown of 
hers, was a far more striking figure than many a more 
beautiful woman in her conventional Paris binding. 
She has a distinctive personality, and she knew bet- 
ter than to swathe it in a distracting gown that, after 
all, is first cousin to every other frock in the room. 
"Why, her gown looked like a white shirt-waist and 
skirt," I heard one woman say in disgust. She her- 
self was bedizzened in spangled pink satin, and 
naturally the artful simplicity of Miss Roosevelt's 
gown was lost upon her. 

The provincial spirit, like murder, will out, and 
never was it shown more clearly than by the guests 
who came early and criticized audibly because the 
President's daughter did not arrive until very late. 
Some of them even flounced out of the house in dis- 
gust, saying the}' wouldn't wait an)' longer for 
"Princess Alice." Miss Roosevelt is evidently accus- 
tomed to social customs as they obtain in the best 
drawing rooms the world over, so of course she didn't 
put in an appearance until after ten o'clock. 

The boasted democratic spirit of America is a bub- 
ble that one might prick with every turn of the pen. 
"America wouldn't walk across the street to see the 
whole royal family," an American girl once said to 
me in London, and yet at a Charity Bazaar, where 
the Princess of Wales presided, I had to positively 
hold back my American friend to keep her from hang- 
ing around the Princess until she became a nuisance. 
Why, all America would stand on its hind legs and 
gape at Royalty if it had half a chance. So deep is 
this instinct of obeisance to any ruling family implant- 
ed in all nations that the Americans take as much 



interest in the comings and goings of the President 
and his family as if they were annointed by the Lord 
instead of elected by the people for a short term 
of office. If Miss Roosevelt were really "Princess 
Alice," her visit in San Francisco could not have ex- 
cited more interest. From the moment she arrived 
the Palace Hotel was crowded with people who were 
willing to loiter there all day in the hope of catching 
a glimpse of this important young person. The very 
air of the city was pregnant with that indefinable 
restlessness occasioned by the sudden advent of per- 
sonages of great distinction. 

I must admit that Miss Roosevelt carried the situa- 
tion with dignity and grace, and her "performance" 
was a very creditable one. We were rather disap- 
pointed in her looks, though by this time we should 
know that the fact that a girl is heralded through- 
out America as a beauty does not imply that she has 
more than an average amount of good looks. The 
fiction, so fiercely supported by Americans, that all 
American girls are pretty, really reflects discreditably 
on American girls, for one comes to this country with 
an idea that beauty runs riot, and finding there are 
millions of plain girls, even homely ones, in this land, 
one becomes captious and critical, and fails to accord 
the beauties one meets due homage. You feel as 
though you had been cheated am how, and refuse to 
give the handsome contingent their just due. 

San Francisco hugs this fallacy of pretty women to 
its bosom with pitiful persistency. You are aggres- 
sively told by people who have never been outside 
the boundaries of the State that there are more beau- 
tiful women to the square foot in San Francisco than 
anywhere else in the world. This sort of braggado- 
cio makes the stranger look with resentful eye on 
the passing show of women. As a matter of fact, 
there are anv number of pretty women in San Fran- 
cisco, and not a few beautiful ones, but in perfect 
truth there are just as many plain people per square 
foot as anywhere else in the world. 

— Constance Trevelyan. 



Oysters ami shell fish are good the year round 

in Snn Francisco, but it is important that you dine 
at a first class restaurant— such a place as Moraghan's 
in the California Market. 



C. H. REHNSTROM, 
Tailor 

wishes to announce his arrival from Europe with a com- 
plete line of 

Summer Novelties 



You are cordially invited to inspect the same at his new 
quarters in the 

Mutual Savings BanK Building 

Marhet, Kearny and Geary Streets 



July 15. J905 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




He came into the office with a faltering step. He 
was bronzed and "bearded like the pard." His eyes 
were strained, and the .-kin about them was swollen 

and red. and seemed covered with blotches. lie 
looked like a man who had traveled far. and on his 
way had encountered many adventures mid Hood and 

field, the overcoming of which had left him devoid of 
strength, but filled with supreme satisfaction for 
that he was alive. He sank into a chair and sighed. 

"How now, my gay buck," I challenged ; "why 
this air of despondency, this general appearance of 
last week, this evidence of a busted institution? 
Whence comcth thou ?" 

"We know not whence we come." said he, quoting 
this from old Omar, "but I, for one, know why. The 
why is that I have been and gone and had a vacation." 
And again he sighed and stretched his weary legs. 

"My boy, my boy," he continued, "look upon me, 
who was once considered elegant and debonair ; be- 
hold this bunch of whiskers concealing my damask 
cheeks; look upon these bunged up lamps surrounded 
by prickly, itching skin; behold my abject condition, 
reduced to a frazzle, and then, my boy, before going 
on your vacation, why — don't. Tis a delusion and a 
snare ; a game against which many men go to their 
undoing, and there is no telling what the end may be." 

"Well, tell me about it," I said. And he did, 
thusly: 

"I went to a place in the mountains fifteen miles 
from the nearest town, with one mail a day, some 
days, and with no connection by wire or 'phone with 
the outer darkness. You see, I wanted to get close 
to nature. Well, I got close up, all right. See thai 
eye? Poison oak! Oh, nature just got attached to 
me. But it was a beautiful spot. You coirld sit on 
the piazza and view a magnificent expanse of valley 
and mountain. The first two days I doted on it. 
Then I gradually came out of my trance. It was 
about this time that I got a pain in the back from hill 
climbing. The man told me it would be all right- 
muscles soft, you know, and all that. My lungs were 
covered with two inches of dust, and as for my 
clothes— why, they were simply out of sight. I was 
a perambulating section of the landscape, a part of 
nature, as it were. But, as I said, about the third 
day I commenced to sit up and take notice. I noticed 
an absence of cream on the creaking board. The 
man was sorry, but his cream cows had run dry.. 
Then I noticed an absence of fruit. Again the man 
was sorry, but he had sold all his fruit just before 
I came up. I noticed a peculiar packed-in-sawdust 
taste about the eggs. The man was sorry some 
more. The trouble was that his hens refused to lay, 
and he had to take in eggs over the trail. I com- 
menced to feel sorry for him. He did the best he 
knew. He faithfully served strenuous ham, gamey 
corn beef and horse carrots three times a day. He, 
said that diet was good for cold weather, and for 
two weeks it was cold. But then came that scorcher 
that preceded the Fourth. It was with us for twelve 
days. It was fierce. So was the board. The same 
old thing. It was too hot to move, and too hot to 
eat. Oh, nature was asserting herself. I walked up 
the hills and down again, and sweated off ten pounds. 
The man said it was good for me. When I asked for 
ice water, he told me there was nothing more danger- 



ous in hot weather. He could not think of permitting 

me to endanger my life. That fellow was a bird— 
.1 bird from Connecticut. He charged for everything, 

from carrying in your trunk to driving you out of his 
place, lie must have made a small fortune on me 

alone, and there were twenty-five other seekers after 
nature at the place. Presently, after I had been 
soaked with nature for two weeks, an unholy yearn- 
ing for the flesh-pots of Egypt came over me. I would 

dream of the grill room. ( In the hills I imagined 
every little creek was filled with ice-cold beer. My 
man had beer — because I brought some in with me— 
but he had no ice, except semi-occasionally some- 
times. 1 thought of you, my friend, and though I 
knew that it was exceedingly hot in town, I also 
knew you were down in the coolest part of the cellar 
with your beak deep in the thickest part of the foam, 
while I sweltered with nature on the hillsides, dusty, 
disgusted, with nothing to drink but tepid water, 
and nothing to eat but dishes fit for a hungry plow- 
man. Now, the plowman may homeward plod his 
weary way to his hot boiled dinner with the mercury 
quivering at 98, and the honest son of the soil may 
know he is assisting in upbuilding the State by over- 
turning the soil ; so the orchardist may virtuously get 
red in the face while struggling with salt-horse, or 
what tastes like it, but as for me, I'm not for the tall 
pines any more — me for the coolest spot in a civilized 
town, with a little old mint julep in my fist and more 
in the making. Nature is a great institution, my boy, 
and she has my very great respect, but from now on 
I cut her off my visiting list. Before coming here 
I telephoned Pierre that I was back, and that you and 
I would be at his place to-night for dinner. Are you 
on? Well, I guess yes! My boy, my boy, we will 
drink to old Russell Sage and his favorite toast, 
'Down with vacations !' " 

With which my friend poulticed his poisoned eye, 
and after shaking some of his mountain dust over my 
desk, journeyed out into the street, where the roar of 
the cable, the whirr of the trolley, the clanging of the 
bells, the noise and the shouting were to him sounds 
as joyful as a voice crying in the wilderness to a 
lonely wanderer. 



Punch Bowls 
Lemonade Sets 
Claret Pitchers 

IN THE FINEST CUT GLASS AND SILVER 
DEPOSIT WARE. 

Bohm-Bristol Company 

JEWELERS, SILVERSMITHS 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

104-110 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



io SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

It is said the painters at Mare Island are on the 
verge of insurrection because, forsooth. Admiral Mc- 
Calla has ordered that hereafter they shall throw 
paint until the whistle blows at five o'clock. Here- 
tofore, they have been permitted to quit work some 
five or ten minutes before 5, so that they would have 
time to clean their brushes before the whistle sound- 
ed. The)' thus beat the Government out of ten min- 
utes a day or an hour a week. That does not seem 
much, but where 40 or 50 painters all do the same 
thing, that means a loss of 40 or 50 hours a week. 
A regular working day covers eight hours. A loss 
of 40 hours is therefore equal to a loss of five work- 
ing days for one man. This is more than even 
the Government can afford to lose. Moreover, there 
is no good reason why the painters, and all the other 
mechanics, should not work the full time for which 
they are paid. Admiral McCalla simply demands 
full value from them. This is just from every stand- 
point, and no honest mechanic can maintain other- 
wise. 

* * * 

There seems to be considerable scandal about the 
State Board of Dental Examiners, but at this writing 
our Grand Jury has taken no notice of the stories of 
graft and corruption. Can it be that the eminent 
tooth extractors have developed a strong pull? 

* * * 

The Democracy really intends holding a conven- 
tion. The directing influences have apportioned 339 
delegates among the various districts, and some of 
the unregenerate from the dark places really seem 
to think they will have something to say about 
something in November. It is the opinion of all men 
who keep tab on local political conditions that about 
the deadest thing in this city to-day is the local 
Democracy. All that it has to entitle it to a second 
thought is the possession of a few offices. The As- 
sessor, the Sheriff, the Recorder, the Coroner and 
most of the Supervisors are Democrats, but verj few 
of them won on his party nomination alone. This 
year, of course, the plan is to combine the alleged Re- 
formers of the Republicans with McNab's Demo- 
cratic Reformers, and divide the honors. The only 
trouble about the success of this scheme is that Ruef 
is in the field against the Kelly-Crimmins reformers. 
and will certainly have much to say about the action 
of the Republican Convention. To the real simon- 
pure reformer, there is no difference between Kelly- 
Crimmins and Ruef. It may be taken for granted that 
the honest Republican reformer who really under- 
stands local politics will not vote at the primaries. 
What's the use? He can't win in any event. The 
writing on the wall shows the whole plan is cut and 
dried. Ruef or Kelly will control the Republican 
Convention, under "inspiration." Ruef will also 
control the labor convention. Where, then, will the 
McNab men get an indorsement after the Demo- 
cratic convention has gone through the formula of 
nominating them? A fusion ticket? That's a dream. 
A non-partisan convention? Another dream. I If 
course, a non-partisan convention may be held, and 
a fusion, combination, non-partisan ticket may be 
put up. That is the story now being told in whis- 
pers to men who are trying to become wise politically. 
But the men in the "know" need not be told that 
the fight will be between Schmitz and a Republican 
nominee for Mayor. Some of the McNabites are try- 
ing to urge a Democratic nominee for Mayor on a 
fusion ticket. Their choice is a Supervisor — Bran- 
denstein, D'Ancona or Comte. The trouble with 
the scheme is that the Republican reformers are not 



July 15, 1905. 

reformers enough to nominate a Democrat, as long 
as there are Republicans on every block. Now, I am 
no prophet nor the son of a prophet, but just watch 
the returns on primary day. If Ruef gets a working 
minority in the Republican Convention, and the pres- 
ent probabilities are that he will, just lay a few bets 
on Schmitz. Why? Because Ruef will name the Re- 
publican nominee for Mayor, or he will give over the 
naming to others, another way of getting the same 
result — the nomination of a man whose name south 
of .Market will be as popular as that of Taft in an 
anti-Chinese convention. 

* * * 

There have been determined doings up at the 
( ilympic Club these last days. The special prepara- 
tions have been on account of the athletic events pull- 
ing off at the Portland Fair. San Francisco is deter- 
mined to take all the honors coming to her. For this 
reason, the party that has already gotten away to 
Portland is of special interest. "Jack" Gleason, the 
club leader, was at the head of it, with De Witt Van 
Court, taking along the club's prize men of the fist, 
"Willie" Dwyer, who has won in the 125 pound class; 
"Bob" Lundie, the present light-weight champion of 
the Pacific Coast, and Al. Kaufmann, our herculean 
( Ilympic heavyweight, who has so fulfilled the prom- 
ise in him that he has taken Sam Berger's place at 
the club. This is the glorious galaxy we sent up to 
defend our amateur honor at the great fair for the 
Northwestern championship. The club is getting it- 
self into a qui vive humor for the tournament it is 
arranging to take place here on the 20th of the month. 
At its own expense, it is displaying the patriotism 
of bringing down the winners of the Portland tour- 
nament to edify local fans. Expectations are that 
with this cream of the victors the Olympic will out- 
Portland Portland. 

* * * 

Dr. J. Gibson Carroll, recently arrived in town from 
the North, and with offices at the Southern Pacific 
headquarters, is here to take care of Portland Fair 
interests, but he is more interesting to us as a future 
resident of this city. On his mission, he has become 
so infatuated with San Francisco that he intends 
to make it his future home. He has been looking this 
way for some time, and the city has made good with 
him. He is a physician of thirty years standing. Dr. 
Carroll says the attendance at his big show has ex- 



Tfie KNABB 

is the PIANO ^ 

Quality 




The possession of 

a KNABE Piano 

is an honor to 

its possessor and 

an evidence g/~ 

Culture and 

accurate musical 

judgment. 

Our Special Piano Proposition will 

enable any onvt}f ordinury m«an« to ^huy a KNABE on 

very convenient terms. Inquh-ey*?/- it at once 

^ficAH%y'a.Q«Ui\ (oy »«Mgg&! St. 



July 15. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ti 



ceeded hi ilions, 419,000 being the June at- 

tendance, whereas about one-fourth .1- man) were 
looked for — going far ahead in proportion to Mir- 
rounding population of other fairs. 

The daily press is guilt] "i another wired error, 
coming this time from the top end of the coast. The 
unqualified assertion is made that the la>i survi 
the Perry Japan expedition has just died in I iregon. 
While San Francisco is not jealous of dead men. she 
claims the living that she has, and one of thi 
very much a survivor of the Perry Expedition. Nor 
if he suffering from ill health. He is Charles Alpers, 
band-leader on Perry's flagship, the "Mississippi." 
He is wealthy, has resided here for forty years, lead 
the famous old "Alper's Band," and has many curious 
relics, seen by the writer, of the famous enterprise in 
which he was engaged. Other survivors are invited 
to come on. 

* * * 

Xat. Goodwin is not "the only pebble on the 
beach," nor did he discover Sheehan's tavern and the 
Pacific Ocean as he claimed. The real discoverers 
are several young newspaper men in town, who felt 
the necessity of acquiring rigorous health to stand 
the strain of their fatiguing occupation. Instead of 
whiling away spare hours amid the atmosphere of 
billiards and cigarette smoke, they concluded not to 
grow old before their time, donned bathing suits out 
at an outlying tavern, jumped regularly into the cold 
salt water, and built up even faster than the spar- 
ring Goodwin. Dyspeptic tendencies vanished, the 
hue of health dawned, and several pillows were res- 
cued from copy-batting insomnia. This is one of 
the truest and most enterprising tales about the quest 
for health. The reformers included a man from the 
Chronicle, one from the Examiner, two from the 
Associated Press, and one from the independent 
field. They say there is nothing like it. 

* * * 

The quiet end of things is about reaching its height 
dramatically, but it is going to be the very gladdest 
season of the year to the theatrical folk. Better than 
Christmas, for they are going to just shut up shop 
and hike out to the woods on a vacation. Theatrical 
people are associated with the idea of ceaseless, per- 
petual beings, but this time they will break the 
record. Florence Roberts is going to forget all about 
it, and will seek the quietest spot on the map. Clar- 
ence Ravelin, on the closing of the California, will 
hunt out the beauties of the woods and mountains of 
Vancouver. On returning, he goes to Mendocino 
County in search of game. He is an excellent shot, 
and is already expecting to clothe the walls of his 
office in deer skins. 

* # * 

During the week of the Fourth, on which date 
Secretary of War Taft and party arrived at the Pal- 
ace Hotel, that caravansary was one of the places on 
which all eyes were centered. I happened to have 
the good luck to see the Secretary in the corridor 
just as a friend asked him how he was situated. 
"Fine," replied Taft, with a large, hearty way. "I 
have room 199 on the first floor, away down at the 
end of this young town." And he went on to tell 
what handsome quarters he had, and how nicely Miss 
Roosevelt was taken care of at the further corner of 
the Palace on the third floor. It occurred to me that 
few of our own people really know what a big house 
the Palace is. With its 1015 numbered rooms, it is 
really a city in itself. It has its own laundry, its 
own ice plant, its own water works, its own compress- 



Pears' 

The ingredients 
in many soaps, re- 
quire free alkali to 
saponify thern. 

The rich, cool 
lather of Pears' does 
not result from free 
alkali, fats or rosin. 

Pears' and purity 
are synonymous. 

Matchless for the complexion. 



ed air plant for cleaning and power, and I might go 
on enumerating until I became exhausted. Miss 
Roosevelt's rooms at the Palace were a bower of 
beauty. They were kept generously supplied with 
flowers, and the young lady gave every evidence of 
being highly satisfied with her surroundings. She 
took her dinners in the Palm Garden, and was the 
center of attraction, except when occasionally she 
slipped away for a quiet stroll or a ride in the auto- 
mobile placed at her disposal. Assistant Manager 
Mullan told me the other day that he had 150 more 
guests than he had last year on the same date. The 
Palace keeps well filled, and is a very profitable insti- 
tution. I hear that at the meeting of the directors 
a few days ago several important matters were dis- 
cussed, and that various improvements in the prop- 
erty may be looked for during the coming year. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

Cures Poison Oak and all skin u.seases. Sold by all druggists. 

Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

for $7.50 per ton; half ton, $4; quarter ton, $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and "heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street, San 

Francisco deals in all kinds of newspaper information, business, 
personal, political, from press of State, coast and country. Tel. 
Main 1042. 

pine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 









WIDELY 
IMITATED BUT NEVER EQUALLEC 

THE GENUINE 






Murray SLanman's 

Florida Water 




wflW 




The Perfume of Perfumes 

REFRESHING, DELIGHTFUL. 

Without exception the bes 
Toilet Water In the World 

ASK TODK DBDGGMT FOR 

MURRAY A LANMAN'S 

AND IBB THAT TOTJ GET IT. 








J 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1905. 



The Inner Life of the Geisha Girls 



"The geisha girls have shown themselves to be 
among our country's most devoted patriots. Many 
of them sold their rings, watches and most expensive 
finery in order to contribute the proceeds to the Red 
Cross fund. There are also a number of cases of 
girls who have sold themselves to geisha companies 
and who have given the government the price of their 
bondage." 

The above is an extract from a letter written by a 
Japanese gentleman of Tokio to Colgate Baker, 
author of the new Japanese drama, "The Heart of a 
Geisha." It seems that the geisha girls have played 
quite a prominent part in domestic affairs since the 
war with Russia began. At a mass meeting of the 
Shimbashi geisha in Tokio, seven hundred of the 
fascinating Oriental sirens voted to devote twenty- 
five per cent of their earnings to the Red Cross fund. 
The Shimbashi geisha earn from twenty-five to 
twenty-eight cents an hour, and generally are em- 
ployed about twelve hours a day, so the total sum ac- 
cruing to the government from their efforts will be 
considerable. The Yanagiwara geisha, who number 
almost as many as Shimbashi, arranged a series of 
mammoth entertainments for the benefit of the war 
fund, and the total sum of money obtained amounted 
to over $5,000. 

The inner life of the geisha world is a sealed book 
to the American public. Most absurd and fantastic 
notions have obtained among foreigners concerning 
the beautiful dancers and singers of Nippon. In "The 
Heart of a Geisha," much that has hitherto been 
made a mystery of concerning geisha life is revealed 
on the stage as the drama progresses. A search- 
light is thrown on the morality of the ( )rientals. The 
audience will see the geisha on a festival night as she 
postures in the dance to the twanging of samisens 
and the "banzais" of revelers. Then they will be 
taken into the very holy of holies, the private apart- 
ment of one of Tokio's geisha queens, and asked to 
share with her her joys and sorrows, her jests and 
her heartaches. Later the banquet room of one of 
the most famous tea-houses in the capital is shown, 
with a glimpse of the debauchery that is part of 
Japanese life. The other acts carry the heroine to 
her inevitable tragic end, in which there is an element 
of happiness, despite its pathos. 

The way in which the geisha of Japan live is most 
interesting. The girls are boarded and cared for by 
their owners. As a rule, all the girls belong to one 
company, or one man, live in the same house in a cer- 
tain quarter of the town. Every geisha owner is 
affiliated with a headquarters bureau, called a Ken 
Ban. A printed list of all geisha registered for duty 
is issued by the Ken Ban at noon every day, and 
distributed through the city at tea houses, the thea- 
tres and hotels. Thus, when a gentleman arrives at 
a tea house to dine, the Ken Ban list, with the girls' 
names on it, is handed to him. It is the custom of 
Japanese gentlemen to summon those geisha girls 
with whom they are acquainted, but should they not 
know any of the girls, the tea house attendant may be 
trusted to suggest that "O Che San is very pretty," 
etc. There are three principal classes of geisha in 
Japan to-day. These classes are divided according to 
ao-e. The youngest are called the maike, and their 
ages are between twelve and sixteen. The next 



class are commonly referred to as geike, and their 
ages are between sixteen and twenty-two. The girls 
over twenty-two are called obasans, which means 
grandmothers, an appellation that certainly does not 
fit them, except in respect to their knowledge of the 
ways of the world, and wicked man in particular. 

It is quite erroneous to define the geisha as a 
dancer or a singer. All geishas are both dancers and 
singers, but the dancing is left to the younger girls 
to do. The correct definition of the geisha is a "pro- 
fessional entertainer." Her accomplishments arc all 
acquired with a view of entertaining gentlemen on 
pleasure bent. The art of conversation, the quip and 
jest, the smile and the seductive glance, are all stud- 
ied with minutest care by the geisha. In fact, as a 
conversationalist, on almost anv Japanese topic, on 
literature, music, painting and poetry, the Japanese 
geisha certainly shines. Because of these accomplish- 
ments of mind and wit, her company is so eagerly 
sought by the Japanese gentleman. The home life 
of the Japanese woman is so repressed that no man 
can find in domestic society the brilliancy and mental 
exhilaration that he is able to enjoy in company with 
the dazzling geisha. It is not strange that the geisha 
should come to play a most important part in Jap- 
anese affairs. Many a diplomatic secret is whispered 
in the dainty ears of the Shimbashi Cleopatras. 



It is into this almost impenetrable fairyland of the 
geisha world that the audience will lie taken in "The 
Heart of a Geisha," which will be presented by Fred- 
erick Belasco at the Alcazar Theatre next week. 
Miss Juliet Crosby, whose previous success in por- 
traying Japanese character has won her much praise, 
will play Kohamma San, one of the geisha belles of 
Tokio, about whom the play centers. 



If you want to eat the best, drink the best, and 

be among the best people, go to Techau Tavern, 
which is second to no restaurant in San Francisco. It 
is the favorite after-thc-theatre resort, and deserves 
its fine reputation. 



The guarantee of the "Clicquot Quality" of every bottle of 

Vve. CLICQUOT Champagne 



is in this LABEL: 



Refuse 

substitutes. 



tf^AVIGNIERG*- 

i \s'"'V/'l -SAN FRANCISCO* 

"* SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



R.OY w. n. 

SMITH ®. HARTLEY 

High-class furnishing goods. Shirts to order, 
ported Materials. 


1m- 
3010 


106 

SAN FRANCISCO 


THIRD 

CAL. 


STREET 

PHONE MAIN 



July i 5l 1905 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

G/>e Golden Balcony 

fly Eleanore F. Lewys. 
I lu\ sauntered up Kearnj stn 1 the Rower 

baskets overflowing with spring loveliness, 



«3 



ven 

and breathing forth from the masses of violet and 
narcissus blooms a faint, tantalizing suggestion of 
low-lying, lush meadows, misty, oak-crowned hills 
aml wide, green spaces. 

1 lu- late afternoon was warm, and yet sparkling; 
it had been one .11" those all too infrequent days thai 
arc grudgingi) bestowed upon us sometimes in the 
late spring, interspersed among our days of wind and 
fog and murk skies like rare jewels set in the graj 
of gun-metal. 

1 in |>ast the shops that gradually grow more ding) 
and "cheap-John" as California street is approached. 
until they reached the little square of green graced 
by Stevenson's statue, bordering that enticing, mys- 
terious, filthy, picturesque blot upon our city called 
"Chinatown." 

She had promised to take a "Chinese tea" with 
him as a novelty, and so they walked on up Clay 
street to Dupont, and turned into that particular tea- 
house that has become immortalized to the reading 
world by Frank Morris's "Blix." 

For a while the girl walked around the banquet 
hall in a sort of childishly artistic delight, until she 
spied the blue and red discords in the shape of 
chandeliers hanging overhead. "Oh, dear," she 
sighed, "if only they had real Chinese lanterns! Isn't 
it a shame?" 

The man watched her in a sort of languid admira- 
tion. She was only eighteen, and he was forty-five. 
She was very small, petite, black-haired and violet- 
eyed — Irish eyes, "put in with a dirty finger." 

She dabbled in art, was something of a sculptress, 
and lived all by her little lonely in a big, sky-lighted 
studio somewhere out on Sutter street. She appar- 
ently had neither kith nor kin; she lived a life of ut- 
ter Bohemianism, and yet nothing but good could 
be said of her, so softly did evil slip away from her 
innocent solitude, so hedged around did she appear 
by some special guardian or" Providence. 

She looked upon him, one of her few intimate men 
friends, as a sort of hero, the large, blonde, weary- 
eyed heroes that Ouida loves to tell of. 

But then, you kpow, she was only eighteen. 

Presently the little tea service was brought in, 
and her attention was drawn from the decorations 
of the place to its edibles. Everything struck her as 
deliciously interesting — the dwarfed preserved or- 
anges, the ginger with its brown syrup, the funny 
cakes, the salted almonds, and lastly the queer little 
tea cups. 

She was a novelty to the man, as the place was 
to her. Accustomed to blase, artificial, tiresome 
"society" maidens, this little girl of moods and frank- 
ly unconcealed emotions appealed to him as a picture 
of realistic lights and shadows appeal to the artist- 
soul. 

Their chatter ceased for a while, but each seemed 
conscious of the other's thoughts. Once, when their 
fingers touched in passing something, the girl felt 
a strange, new, uncomfortable thrill steal over her, 
that puzzled her long after it had passed. 

As a rule, she was most utterly and childishly in- 
different to men. They were, of course, very amus- 
ing at times — like the theatre at its best. That was 
all. But this man was different ; his unemotional na- 
ture piqued her; she wanted him to like her, love 
her. If he glanced or spoke to another woman, she 
felt a strange hatred against the latter. 



And now. unwillingly, her glai from his 

ng, clean-shaven chin 1 > his curved, thin, rather 
satirical lips, to his eyes, thai mel hers in a sudden. 
compelling, warm look, thai yel had something re 
tful in 11 — 

Afterwards he mentally kicked himself for the 

blunt, crude, blurted sentence that fell upon the 

stillness of the room like the jarring sound of break- 
ing crockery: "You know I am married?" 

* * » * * 

She had gone home thai evening and laughed. The 
joke was certainly on her. She laughed even after 
she had curled up in her little while, lonely bed. and 
the whole afternoon became hazy to her, like a golden 
misty dream. 

She had so often been admonished in her baby days 
"not to play with lire." Well, she would play with it 
to some purpose now, even if she burned her own fin- 
gers in the playing. 

* ' * * + * 

How those few years in Europe had changed her! 
Self-contained, her various feelings (if they were 
still left her) controlled, suppressed, by several sea- 
sons spent in playing her part iu that big game of 
bluff called "society." 

She stepped out on the balcony of the tea-house 
and looked over the trees of the small park, over the 
gray roof of the City Hall, over the smoky blue of the 
bay to the green misty hills of Oakland. And the 
man watched her. 

Evidently she luxuriated in a satiety of worldly 
goods. Her chic gown had all the style and "atmos- 
phere" of one of Redfern's. From the toe of her 
small patent leather to the top of her drooping pic- 
ture hat, her whole appearance breathed of a woman 
of fashion, of the world, or, as Chimmie Fadden 
would put it, "a t'oroughbred." 

He drew nearer to her, and his glance swept over 
her pretty, svelte form, up to her white neck, her lit- 
tle chin, her mouth. Her mouth, with that well-re- 
membered dimple lurking in one corner. Was it 
not his now? 

Some remembrance of a time that existed before 
those alien years thrilled him. He was alone now, 
to claim her if he would. If he would ! 

How he would, with his devotion, annihilate those 
years of her loneliness ! 

And then her softly-modulated voice broke in upon 
his thoughts : 

"Is it not getting late? 1 was to meet my husband 
at the ferry at six!" 



Dentist, 8 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker 

Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 



Manicuring 

AS IT SHOULD BE DONE. We don't cut the cuticle. 

LADIES and GENTLEMEN 

Who enjoy having [heir nails cared for, but have suffered 
at the hands of inexperienced or careless manicurists are 
invited to call and inspect our methods. We can please 
you. We treat the nails. 

LADIES 25c. GENTLEMEN 50c. 

o7WR. C&, c7MRS. 

A. F. COSGROVE 

110 GEARY ST. Entire 5th Floor. SAN FRANCISCO 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN &<£{* X D £2r A M«g£; 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 
Send for circular. Naber, Alfs & Brune. 325 Market St., S. F. 



H 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July is, 1905 




The market for Comstock 
Pine-St. Market, shares opened active, with a 
strong undertone, after the holi- 
days. This is only an indication of better times in 
the near future. Prices for the leading Comstock 
shares must do better before long, despite all the 
whining of the croakers, who, with the knockers, 
have dominated the street for such a long time past. 
At the north-end of the lode, Ophir ought to be sell- 
ing for a sum represented in double figures. It is 
a mine in every sense of the word, and makes the best 
showing ever developed on the Comstock since the 
bonanza days. Besides this, it has established the fact 
that high grade ores exist in the flooded section of the 
Comstock, stimulating the other companies to prose- 
cute work in this direction. Con.- Virginia, which 
looks as though it were on its last legs, will surprise 
the natives some day. Those who are playing the 
stock for a dead one will find out their mistake when 
the awakening comes, and ore crops up suddenly in 
one of the deep levels lately drained. The middle 
mines are selling absurdly cheap just now. In Sav- 
age and Norcross the management is working slow- 
ly but surely for ore which awaits development, and 
is well known to exist on the 1630 level of the Sav- 
age mine.. This same ore runs into Norcross, and 
was tapped there recently, at the time tine strike of 
high grade rock was announced. When air is avail- 
able, which it will be immediately, the ore reserve 
will be found more extensive than many imagined, 
and then see whether these stocks will be kicking 
around the street for nothing as at present. As all 
of this ore will be mined in the future through the 
Sutro Tunnel, which will bring about a vast saving 
on the old-time cost of extraction, allowing the corn- 
panics a good profit, which will go a long way in 
reducing the levy of assessments which have been 
necessarily heavy for some time past, owing to the 
large amount of money required for the installation of 
modern machinery of the most approved design. The 
same situation exists in the mines located in the 
vicinity of the Ward shaft. In these there are large 
bodies of ore which will pay well to-day, and which 
should be heard from soon, now that the shaft has 
been placed in such good condition. At the south- 
end the west branch of Old tjncle Sam Channel has 
been cut again, this time on the 1250 level of Cale- 
donia. It was from this channel that the Relcher 
and Crown Point took out so much money in years 
goiie by, while at work in the upper levels. The great 
Crown' Point bonanza was taken out of the east 
branch. This channel forks at a certain depth, one 
branch swinging ofif toward the old Baltimore ground 
in American Flat. Some day an enterprising com- 
pany will run in from the Alta shaft and tap these 
mines at depth, draining them so as to get at the rich 
ores known to exist in nearly all of the American Flat 
mines. This proposition has cropped up at intervals 
during the past twenty-five years, and it will yet be 
carried. People who talk about the Comstock being 
a dead issue, and that it will go out of sight, eclipsed 
by new finds in other sections of the State, are a set 
of ignorants who know nothing of the matter they 
have the temerity to discuss, their knowledge being 
limited to street talk, which is simply buncomb. The 
Comstock will live and flourish when the present gen- 
eration has passed to that realm where a broker's 



call for more margin is never heard, and the tongue 
of the street gossip is at rest. 



The market for the Tonopah-Goldfield-Bullfrog 
shares is again going full blast, with prices quite 
firm and in active demand for all the better class of 
stocks. The heat has been infernal during the past 
three weeks up in these mining regions, and in con- 
sequence work has been delayed considerably. Even 
there a number of new strikes are reported in the 
several camps, and some new and interesting finds 
have been made. A number of the brokers took a 
trip through the districts during the holidays, and 
returned highly pleased with what they saw. This 
experience will enable them to speak advisedly on 
the merits of the mines, and place them in position 
to operate on a safer basis than when they were 
playing against something in the clouds. There are 
at many of the mines large reserves of ore already 
for shipment, and when these begin to move a new 
line of dividend paying shares ought to be in evi- 
dence. The midway has its new shaft in place, 
and it is said ore shipments will soon begin again. 



What is said to be the largest tin producing section 
'if the world is now undergoing a close investigation 
by scientists of the United States Government. The 
tin placers are, it is said by these experts, mostly 
found on Lopp Lagoon, an arm of the Arctic ( (fcean, 
and this is the location of the properties of the Pacific 
Tin Mining Company, now owned and about to be 
operated by a company formed in ibis city by promi- 
nent men of means. Here, it is said, the main de- 
posits are of free tin on the stream beds, ranging from 
10 to 30 feet in depth to bed rock. The percentage of 
ore varies from 10 to 40 pounds to the cubic yard, 
and the creek deposits range fromi 100 to 600 feet 
wide. It is claimed that millions will be taken out in 
tin every year, while the gold in the deposits will be 
equally large. 



Great Britain has passed a law similar to that re- 
cently enacted by the California State Legislature, 



Starr <& Dulfer 

SAN FRANCISCO and TONOPAH 

STOCK COMMISSION BROKERS 
Tonopah, 

Goldneld, 

Bullfrog 

OFFICES 

Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco; Tonopah, Nev. 
II. W. Hellman Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Members— S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15. 1905 

dealing with the publication of false and mislead- 
by tlio promoters of companies. It 

will nut be healthy in the future over there for the 

of individuals who would perjure thcmsi 
to make the dishonest money which enables them 
to keep up appearances. Nine "tit of every ten of the 
prospectuses which appeared in connection with the 
flotation of properties picked up in this State during 
the past would, if rightfully interpreted, have suf- 
ficed to send those connected with their construction 
to jail. The issue will have to be squarely laced he- 
fore a London criminal court, and there no equivo- 
cations or trifling with the law is permitted. When 
a man says a mine will pay dividends before a pick 
has hardly been struck in the work of development, 
he is making a statement lie cannot substantiate, and 
the jail across the water will yawn for him. It will 
be hoped that the law enacted here will also prove a 
deterrent for the criminal element, which has thrived 
for years past by picking the pockets of the ignorant 
who believed in the false reports regarding property 
values which were spread broadcast for their mis- 
doing. 

COMMITTEE ON CONVENTIONS 

WILL DO VIGOROUS WORK. 

The Committee on Conventions of the California 
Promotion Committee has started a vigorous syste- 
matic campaign to bring conventions to San Fran- 
cisco. President Roncovieri of the Board of Educa- 
tion, Superintendent of Schools Langdon, Dr. Dohl- 
mann and Mr. McDonald appeared before the Na- 
tional Educational Association in its convention at 
Ashbury Park the week beginning July 3d, and in- 
vited the delegates to come to San Francisco in July, 
1906. On behalf of the Committee on Conventions 
they assured the delegates of the halls necessary to 
meet the demands of the convention and of the proper 
entertainment and outlay as represented in cash es- 
timated by Mr. Langdon at $25,000. The members 
of the National Educational Association were unani- 
mously in favor of California, and it is believed that 
the executive committee will decide on San Fran- 
cisco. The Committee on Conventions also assured 
the National Buttermakers' Association of $5,000 for 
premiums and cash prize awards. A large 
amount of literature and refreshments were sent to 
Ashbury Park. The following letter sent out by the 
committee requests every one desirous of inviting de- 
sirable conventions to San Francisco to get in touch 
with the Committee on Conventions : 

"At a recent meeting held at the headquarters 
of the California Promotion Committee there was 
formed a Committee on Conventions of the Califor- 
nia Promotion Committee. This committee on Con- 
ventions consists of twenty-five men whose financial 
standing and interest in the community makes it a 
representative body. It is the purpose and object 
of the Committee on Conventions to decide what 
conventions it is desirable to invite to California, and 
then having decided that such a convention is de- 
sirable, to extend an invitation for this convention 
to meet in San Francisco or such other city as may 
be selected, and to take means so that when the con- 
vention does come to this State it will be properly 
entertained. For a long time we have felt the need 
of such a committee on conventions. There has been 
a need for some organized efifort on the part of a 
committee whose sole effort should be designed for 
this most important line of work." 



5 




Hotftltng ilandi for (food 
whiihr. 

llolnlinit «t artdi for • 
house with m ropulatlon. 

Old Hii-K stands for purify 
In whlVHy. 

A. P. Hotallntf <H Co. bach 
it with their rnpulalion. 

Write for a\ sample demi- 
john of the finest whisKy 
on the marKel. 




OLD KIRK 
WHISKEY! 



WE BUY AND SELL 



Co in stock, Tonopali, Goldfield and 
Bullfrog Stocks 

ZADIG 6. COMPANY 

306 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of— San Francisco Stock Exchange. 
California Stock and Oil Exchange. Merchant's Exchange. 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange 






J. C. Wilson 






Banker and Broker 






LOCAL AND EASTERN STOCKS AND 


BONDS 


490 California Street, San Francisco 






Telephone M 


ain 


3070 



William S. Thomas, C. E., E. M. 

MINING^AND CONSULTING ENGINEER 
Prompt and Reliable Assaying 

Rhyolite, : : : : Nevada 



HIGH-CLASS SOLICITORS 

with good business acquaintance 
can secure management position in 
branches of established Bank and 
Real Estate Corporation. Address 

Box B., S. F. News Letter, 320 Saosome Street. S. F. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Lo- 
comotive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year and 
the transaction of such other husiness as may be brought before the 
meeting, will beheld at the office of the company. No. 2!>8 Steuart St.. 
San Francisco, on MONDAY, the 7th day of August, 1906, at 11 o'clock 
A- M. AUGUSTUS TAILOR, Secretary, 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




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Juliet Crosby, as Kohamma Sao in 
Alcazar next week. 



The Heart of a Geisha." at the 



The Willie Collier ghost is walking at the Grand. 
It is cavorting all over the stage. A very substantial 
ghost it is, thoroughly fleshed and adapting its prance 
to the George Parsons jig. Jolly good ghost ; it winks 
and blinks and twinkles ; gets naughty, quickly re- 
forms; is serious-ridiculous — for that's the Willie 
Collier kind, and the brand is the best. 

There's something else at the Grand. It's the 
G. D. Mendum manner. Mendumism is rampant. 1 
should say triumphant. When she comes in, you know 
it's Georgie, "daughter of a noble line," and you know 
she knows it. She acts up to it. She's Georgie and a 
Drew, a Mendum and a Perkins. Naturally, one 
who is all this gloriously combined galaxy must ex- 
pect much of herself. But one sitting of "A Turk- 
ish Texan" will show even the gentleman from Mis- 
souri that she thoroughly lives up to those expecta- 
tions. My private opinion is that she's rather 
"skyed" — to speak artistically — for the full appre- 
ciation of the hoi polloi. Her finesse and temper are 
wasted on the man off the street. She has a thousand 
subtleties of tone ready in her register. They're al- 
ways bubbling up from the chest in a happy, surpris- 
ing, original manner. She is pumping animation all 
the time right from the firing line. Keep your eyes 
and ears fixed for the pop, pop, pop. An audience 
able to fill most theatres, but snugly tucked in the 
front rows of the Western Mammoth Cave — the 



July 15, 1905. 

Grand Opera House — could not help feeling the good 
effect, but they didn't seem to grasp the splendid 
Georgie Mendum personality. The Bohemian Club 
should have filled the boxes. Del Monte and Bur- 
lingame ought to divide up the pit. Pacific Avenue 
should fill the balcony, with nothing else than Nob 
Hill in Nigger Heaven. Had this been the case, 
gifted Georgie would have come into her own. 

Alas, 'tis the sill}' season, as newspaper men say 
about summer with things theatrical — time of sea- 
serpent stories and farces. The most gilded stars 
are glad for a chance to look at full houses of even 
the hoi polloi. Georgie Drew seemed absolutely 
happy. Even the brilliancy of George Parsons could 
not interfere with it. She raced and romped and lan- 
guished ; fainted, jumped and danced; loved, drank 
and grew affected in full farce time. She heroically 
followed the complete line of stunts assigned by Par- 
sons and Collier. She wasn't "fased;" she didn't even 
stop to breathe. She just lunged gracefully ahead, 
and I tell you every speech was an "end drop" ball. 
She caught it, swung the sphere to first, and — the 
Turkish Pride is out. Fast ball, start to finish. 

Parsons left no regret for the absence of Collier. 
Xor did he seem affected by his play suggestion. 
"When a man marries, they say he is capable of lov- 
ing many." But he smacked Georgie on the lips so 
often the audience gut jealous. The beautifulest mix- 
up of a plot you ever ran across, travesty travestied. 




Bertie Fowler, the merry monologue maid, who will 
Orpheum next week. 



spin rams at the 



July 15. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'7 



erything sticking out 1 the 
pretending in the right fashion of the 

mother name of "A Turkish Texan" 1 
"The Wrigglers." Everything and evcrybi 
gone 'loco" (as they say now of an erring 
"loco" twice times over. Captain Smith, of IVxas 
can't gel liis uncle's $.15,000,000 estate unless he mar- 
ries three certain Turkish beauties; but he ; 
Ellinsworth's daughter; the lord is a snob, and unless 
Smithy can get uncle's millions he is broke. The 
fight for wife and fortune furnishes one of tin- most 
absorbing stage themes imaginable. If a far. 
ever he taken seriously, I'd say that the conversion 
of Lady l'.eckctt by flattery to Smith's way of think- 
ing, gave a situation true to life, rising above farce 
level to the comic satire of the drama. For my part. 
I hope to see Miss Georgie D. Mendum again — a se- 
rene star in conicdv. P. G. C. 
* * * 

It was fitting that Florence Roberts should reserve 
her Dest effort for "Tess of the D'Urbervilles." Her 
personation of "Tess'' is in many respects superior to 
any we have ever seen. Mrs. Fiske, in her palmiest 
days, has not done anything that is better. In fact, 
the mimic play, after the killing of Alec D'Urberville, 
was a revelation in tragic acting that has seldom been 
equaled on any stage. Miss Roberts' "Tess" is a 
unique conception and artistic to the most infinites- 
simal degree. Nothing is forgotten. I compared her 
cold and passionless Tosca to the wonderfully sym- 
pathetic rendition of the heroine of Thomas Hardy's 
very natural tragedy. And if Miss Roberts showed 
her ability in this play, what shall I say of the ladies 
and gentlemen (assisting the little lady) who cre- 
ated such an impression on the California audience. 
There was not a single rift within the lute. The dif- 
ferent characters were faultlessly portrayed, and the 
"John Durbeyfield" of Wr. William Yerance aston- 
ished his hearers by its finish and the inimitable his- 
trionic ability of this truly great actor. Herschel 
Mayall was another surprise, and his portrayal of 
Alec D'Urberville left nothing to be desired. The 
entire company, from the merest child to the star 
herself, seemed to be imbued with the idea of making 
this showing of "Tess" the best that San Francisco 
has ever witnessed. The Florence Roberts engage- 
ment goes out in a blaze of glory. 

The Alcazar is keeping abreast of the very best 
stage presentations. "On Probation," which is real 
comedy, and in which W. H. Crane made fame a few 
years ago, is drawing full houses, as it should. In it- 
self the play is charming, and with John Craig, Harry 
Hilliard and Elizabeth Woodson in the leading roles, 
the action and rendering of the theme are intensified 
to a degree that keeps the house in a hilarious state 
throughout. The Alcazar management seems to know 
exactly what the public wants, and in order to keep 
the pace, next week, for the first time, "The Heart 
of a Geisha" will hold the boards. A great week is 
expected, for the play is said to be something wonder- 
ful in theatricals. 

The patrons of the Orpheum were sure to find 
something in the pleasing and varied bill this week to 
"strike" their fancy. Shepps' dogs and ponies, Za- 
zell and Vernon Co., pantomimists, the Henriette de 
Serris marble and bronze statuary, Frederick Voelker, 
violinist, with Mrs. Voelker as accompanist, and the 
Orpheum motion pictures, all holdovers, continued to 
find favor with the audience. Chief among the new 
attractions were Max Fixman and Adelaide Manola, 



in a laughable one-act comedy. "Catching v litis 
band." ThU >ketih deals with the trials of a 

lorn maiden whose lover is too bashful t>> pro] 
ami was well presented by Mr. Figman and Miss 
Manola. and their supporting company. "Wizard 
Stone" ainl Miss Irene performed a startling 

batic feat, riding about the interior of a cage-like 
steel sphere on bicycles. Godfrey and I lend. 

nted an amusing one-act fantasy, "A Daughter 
.if the Gods." The colored entertainers, Harper. 
Desmond and Bailey, met with popular favor at - 
their songs and dancing receiving considerable ap- 
plause. 

* * * 

A concert was given by the Regimental liand of the 
League of the Cross at the Chutes last Tuesday even- 
ing as a finale to a gala day at the same place. The 
concert was the feature of the day's interesting pro- 
gramme. Until recently the merits of this band were 
known and appreciated only by its friends, but so 
rapidly has it forged its way forward in the musical 
world that to-day there are few bands on the coast 

Grand Opera House 

Beginning Monday evening July 17. 1906. Mats. Sat. and Sun. 

GLICKMAN'S YIDDISH PLAYERS 

From Glickman's Theatre. Chicago. 

Monday. Tuesday— ALEXANDER. Prince of Jerusalem. Oper- 
etta io 4 acts, by Lateiner. 

Wednesday. Thursday-EABBI OSHEK IN AMEBICA. comedy 
in 4 acts with music. 

Friday. Saturday. Sunday— JEWISH HAMLET, a moderniza- 
tion of Shakespeare's Hamlet, with music in one act. 
Saturday mat. and Sunday mat.— KOL NIDBEY. 

Prices— 25. 35, 60. 75c. and $1. 

Al^o-rov Thonl-m Bblabco * Mayeb. Proprietor! 

Alcazar ineacre e. d. pbioi. Genu. Mer. t«i. Aieai»r 

Week commencing Monday, July 17. Regular matinees Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

The Alcazar Stock Company. Magnificent production of Col- 
gate Baker's 

THE HEART OF fl GEISHA 

A drama of modern Japan. Juliet Crosby as Kohamma San. 
Next-The favorite romantic actor, WHITE WHITTLESEY, 
in Hackett's 

FORTUNES OF THE KING 

Evenings 25 to 75 cents. Matinees Saturday and Sunday 25 to 



Cerjtral Theatre. 



Belasco Id Mayer, proprietors 
Market St.. near Ith. Phone South 633 

Week beginning July 17. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
The great and only John L. Sullivan in tho latest Eastern melo- 
dramatic success 

FAST LIFE IN NEW YORK 

Sensational sparring bout between John L. Sullivan and Jack 
McCormick who is destined to be the world's next champion- 
A play full of life and ginger. See Sullivan as Mike Hennessey. 
Next— Herschel Mayall in Blue Jeans. 
Prices evening loo to 60c. Matinees 10c, 16c, 260. 



Corner Eddy and 

Maion Street* 



Tivoli Opera House. 

Beginning next Monday night. Superb production of De Ko- 
ven and Smith's romantio comic opera 

ROB ROY 

The Bostontans' great success. 

Reappearance of Kate Condon, Arthur Cunningham and Am a 

Liohter. A splendid oast. 

Proline! ualer the stige direction of Max Freeman. 

First time at p>pular prioes. 

Matin«e Saturday. Usual Tivoli prioes . 25. 50 and 75 cents. 

OvrsK^iiKTs O'Farrell St., 

rpneun). bet. Stockton and Powell Sts. 
Week commencing Sunday matinee, July 1G 

FEATURE UPON FEATURE 

De Koe Trio; Talbot and Rogers; Bertie Fowler; Max Figman. 
Adelaide Manola and Company; The Hazardous Globe; God- 
frey and Henderson; Harper. Desmond and Bailpy: Onlifi'm 
Motion Pictures and last week of BEI>EIF.a TE DE SlIIBIb' 

BRONZE and MARBLE STATUARY 

Regular matinees every Wednesday. Thursday. Saturday and 
Sunday. Prioes— 10c, 26c. 50c. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1905. 



which can eclipse it either numerically or artisti- 
cally. Their director, E. G. Williams, has drilled this 
colossal aggregation of young musicians efficiently, 
and is entitled to great credit. The rendition of each 
number on the programme was vociferously applaud- 
ed by a large and enthusiastic audience. 

"Heart of the Klondike," at the Central Theatre, 
lias proven a drawing card this week, notwithstanding 
the warm weather. The scenery is the best part of 
the show, however. The scenes of mining camps and 
of the mines themselves are worth a visit to this 
theatre. Of course there are many thrilling climaxes 
and strong melodramatic situations, which make you 
grip the sides of your seat, while the gallery gods 
cheer and pass judgment on the merits or demerits 
of the play and players. 

"Princess Fan Tan" is filling the Chutes Theatre 
nightly. This aggregation of juvenile players is 
remarkably well trained and is giving a performance 
equal to many first-class extravaganza shows. Eunice 
Gilman, Marie Nicholls and Marie Straub are entitled 
to especial mention. "Princess Fan Tan" will 
be repeated every afternoon and evening until Sun- 
day, July 23d. Chiquita, the "living doll." Annie 
Redline, the plump lady, and the babies in the life- 
saving incubators, are great attractions at the Chutes, 
and the amateurs will appear on Thursday night. 




John L. Sullivan. Central Theatre 
John L. Sullivan will be seen at the Central next 
Monday night in one of the leading roles of a sensa- 
tional melodrama called "Fast Life in New York." 
The great and only John L. states that he'll hand a 
sleeping potion to the melodrama in about four 
rounds. During the play he will box a little with his 
sparring partner, whom some think will be the next 
champion. The entire Central Company will be in 
the cast. There are several sensational scenes, many 
strong climaxes, and laugh-getting comedy. 
* * * 

The De Koe trio, direct from Paris, will make their 
first appearance in this city at the Orpheum Sunday 
afternoon. Walter J. Talbot and John 1'. Rogers 
will offer an entirely new singing and talking act that 
has made a great hit in the principal vaudeville 
houses of the East. Bertie Fowler, monologist, prom- 
ises a distinct surprise. Hcnriette de Serris' living 
bronze and marble statuary will give a faithful re- 



production of the Native Sons' statue, corner of Mar- 
ket and Mason streets. Max Figman and Adelaide 
Manola, Wizard Stone and Irene Stone, Harry Earle 
< rodfrey and Veta Henderson, and Harper, Desmond 
an«l Bailey will be holdovers. 

* * * 

Ezra Kendall will be the inaugural attraction of 
the new season at the Columbia Theatre. It is now 
announced that the Columbia management has se- 
cured the spectacular musical production of "Wood- 
land" for an early date. The appearance of May Ir- 
win, after an absence of a dozen years will be hailed 
with delight by her innumerable admirers. Her play 
is called "Mrs. Black is Back," and a more fitting 
hide for the display of her inimitable talents could 
hardly be imagined. 

* * * 

De Koven and Smith's comic opera, "Rob Roy." 
will be produced next Monday night at the Tivoli 
under the stage direction 01 the famous Max Free- 
man. "Rob Roy" was one of the Bostonians' greatest 
triumphs. A lively vein of comedy runs through this 
opera, and is chiefly supplied by the turncoat Provost 
of Perth and Sandy MacSherry. the Town Crier. This 
will be the first production anywhere of "Rob Roy 
at popular prices. 

* * * 

Glickman's famous Yiddish players from Glick- 
man's Theatre, Chicago, will begin a season at the 
Grand Opera House next Monday night. The follow- 
ing is the repertoire for the week: Monday and Tues- 
day nights, "Alexander, Prince of Jerusalem," an op- 
eretta in 4 acts by Lateiner ; Wednesday and Thurs- 
day nights, "Rabbi Osher in America." a comedy in 
four acts, with musical accompaniments and effects ; 
Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights, "The Jewish 
Hamlet," a modernization of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" 
with music; Saturday and Sunday matinees, "Kol 

Xidrey" will be performed. 

* * * 

"The Heart of a Geisha," at the Alcazar next week. 
will be the event of the mid-summer theatrical season. 
It will be the most important new production at this 
theatre since the famous success of "The First Born." 



BEAUTY OF LANDSCAPE. 

Art in the home is not the only care of the house- 
holder nowadays. Beauty of landscape and marine 
view are objects for the home-seeker, coupled with 
ideal surroundings and convenience to the commercial 
centers, and yet not to be too expensive, for the aver- 
age business man cannot place all his ready money 
in his home. The price of land in the choice sections 
of San Francisco ranges from $100 to $200 per front 
foot, making the total cost of a fifty-foot lot any- 
where from $2,500 to $5,000. But there is land to be 
purchased in the suburbs for a greatly less price. 
Among these we find that lots can be purchased in 
Bay View Park, which is situated just beyond Ber- 
keley on San Pablo ave.. and reached via the Key 
Route by county line car on San Pablo ave. in fifty 
minutes. The small price, of $100 to $200 per lot 
makes it possible for a San Franciscan to build a 
home where surroundings, marine view and landscape 
are a bonus and not to be outdone by the choicest citj 
location. There arc other places that can be recom- 
mended, but there is none Holding all the requirements 
of the ideal home, for in Bay View Park one may en- 
jov flower gardens, lawns, fruit trees, poultry, and 
in fact the comforts of a country home while within 
fifty minutes from business or employment. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1905. 




The Martin reception brought society to town from 
the four corners of California, but people have again 
scattered far anil wide, for ii is still the "shank" of 
the summer, and far too early for the smart set to 
coalesce in town. Unfortunately for the gayety of 
the nation, this has been a "coming and going" sea- 
son, no one "staying put" in one place long enough 
to make iliings go with sustained zip. Burlingamc 
has been shorn of its most active leaders, who have 
listened to the call of Europe; the residents of Menlo 
Park have flitted about with unusual alacrity: even 
those whose hearts are usually true to Del Monte 
have fluttered about here and there in search of varied 
pleasures. The Hopkins family have hied to Port- 
land to take a peep at the Fair. The Jack Spreckels 
have gone to Coronado. The — but the wdiereabouts 
of society folk is so varied that there is not space in 
this column to dilate on the matter. But in a few 
weeks everybody will be at Del .Monte, and society 
will enjoy a little concentrated, double-distilled sport. 

* * * 

Mrs. J. J. Moore has been wearing some awfully 
stunning gowns at Del Monte, and is by far and 
away the handsomest woman at Monterey. Pearl 
Landers, who is visiting the Emil Bruguieres, is at- 
tracting a great deal of attention, not only on account 
of the chic little figure she cuts, but because a cer- 
tain dashing young eligible follows so assiduously in 
her train that society is straining its eyes to see when 
a brilliant will shine on her "To Let" finger. Miss 
Landers is one of the daintiest girls in society, and 
though she is not a beauty, she has a saucy, debon- 
nair way that is pretty without being pert, and 
places her high on the list of favorites. 

* * * 

I hear that Kathleen de Young is very anxious to 
stay in Europe and study music for the next few 
years. She is undoubtedly talented, and would like 
"to consecrate her life to interpreting the masters, but 
her parents object to her denoting herself so entirely 
to the art, and Miss Kathleen will be allowed to pur- 
sue music as an accomplishment, not a profession. 

Xot long ago I attended a meeting of a musical 
club which is composed of the must talented people 
in town. The subject of society girls and music came 
Up, and every one was united in their verdict that 
the De Young girls are the most musically gifted in 
the smart set, with little Kathleen leaving her sisters 
far behind in the art. She will probably take little 
interest in society when the time for her debut ar- 
rives, though after the plunge she may. like her sis- 
ter Constance, take easily to the stroke. Constance 
de Young was also averse to the ways and wiles of 
society, and she wanted to go to P.rvn Mawr or Vas- 
sar, but the family persuaded her to make her debul 
instead, and she is now not only reconciled but shows 
a great deal of girlish enthusiasm in the doings of 
her set. The De Young? expect to return from Eu- 
rope in the earlv fall. 

* * * 

Very intimate friends of the De Cuigne family 
have known for some weeks that Miss Josephine's 
engagement to Vicomte Phillipe de Tristan would be 
announced this week. Josephine de Guigne, with her 
sister Marie Christine, made her debut last winter 
at a ball given by her grandmother, Mrs, Abby Par- 



rott, and the news that she is so soon to wed a French- 
man and depart for his home in Paris, is received with 
a tinge of regret — for Miss de Guigne will be sincere- 
ly missed by the exclusive set in which she moves. 
She is a pretty girl, a dark, vivacious French type 
'I beauty, and as she has been educated abroad, will 
lit without any readjustment into the sphere in which 
her marriage takes her. 

* * * 

The marriage of Mavlita Pease and Arthur Watson 
was celebrated with as little pomp and ceremony as 
possible. Indeed, Miss Pease wished to keep the 
affair a secret, and announcement of the marriage 
was not to be made until after the knot was securely 
tied, but somehow the secret slipped a cog a day or 
two before the ceremony. Only the relatives and 
most intimate friends were bidden to the wedding. 
Miss Edna Middleton acted as maid of honor, and 
Douglas Watson, the groom's brother, was best man. 

Ruth McNutt, who lias just returned from Europe, 
which she toured with the Ashton Potters and Robin- 
son Rileys, made her first formal appearance at the 
Martin reception. In the crush, which extended into 
every corner of the house, no one stood out very con- 
spicuously, but it was plainly to be seen that Miss 
Ruth is not suffering from a broken heart. She is 
as rosilv handsome as ever, and if her heart was even 
bent by breaking her engagement, it has sprung back 
to the normal. She will remain in town, breaking the 
monotony by frequent trips to the resorts and week- 
end visits at country homes. 

* * * 

Miss Daisy Van Ness is another popular girl who 
has completed her wander-year, and is being wel- 
comed home. She spent a great deal of the time in 
Washington, where the Van Xess family have hosts 
of friends. One of the pleasantest jaunts was a trip 
to Florida, wdiere she visited the famous resorts, and 
was also a guest at several old Southern plantations. 
Miss Daisy comes direct from Newport, wdiere, with 
Mrs. Shatter Howard, she has been the guest of the 

latter's mother. 

* * * 

The Turn Eastlands are still in .Maine visiting the 
Parker Whitneys. They are having such a gay time 
that they are loth to leave- for California, but no 
doubt we shall welcome them home before long. 



FOR INFANTS OR ADULTS 

LUTTED'S HAWAIIAN 

"POI" 

Is an Ideal Health Food. Strength- 
ening, Refreshing. Delicious. A 
Boon to Dyspeptics and Invalids. 

For sale by 

GOLDBERG, BOWEN S CO. 

or sent prepaid "ii receipt 
of 60e by 

Hawaiian Poi Flour Co. 

HONOLULU, H. I. 

LUTTED'S HAWAIIAN "POI" 




July 15. 1905 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
July 11 (Tuesday)— Miss MayJita Pease, dai 

of Mr. and Mrs. K. H. Pease, to Arthur \\ 
ENTERTAINMENTS. 
July 10 (Monday)— Mrs. Gaston Ashe gavi .1 

Hon in honor of Mr. and Mrs.. Porter Ashe. 
Inl\ 1 1 (Tuesday > — The Misses Snell were "at home" 

in Berkeley in honor of Mrs. Cary, of Baltimore 
July 14 (Friday) — Mrs. II. E. Huntington gave a 

large luncheon in honor of Miss Leslie Green. 
August 1 (Tuesday) — Mrs. Philip Galpin will 

a luncheon. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 
Miss Josephine de Guigne, daughter of Christian de 

Guigne and granddaughter of Mrs. Abby Par- 

rott. to Vincent Philippe de Tristan, of France. 



31 



The San Rafael Improvement Club is a progressive 
organization in a common sense sort of a way. It 
deems the prerequisite thing to do is to make their 
town clean and beautiful and keep it so. That not 
only conduces to health and pleasure, but is a stand- 
ing invitation to the world of recreation and rest 
seekers to spend a season in the little city. As to 
accommodations, they are ample. For instance, the 
Hotel Rafael. It is situated upon a picturesque 
site, and conducted with reference to securing the 
greatest comforts possible to its guests. Indeed, it 
is doubtful if there is a better appointed hostelry in 
California. It has become a fad for San Franciscans 
to go over on Saturday evening and remain until 
Monday, and it pays in every way to do so. A ride 
of forty-five minutes across the bay adds materially 
to the outing, but the real incentive to spend "over 
Sunday" at the Hotel Rafael is the splendid accom- 
modations, service and pleasing surroundings ; be- 
sides, the patronage of the hotel comes from the very 
best people of San Francisco, and from tourists who 
know where to find just such comforts as Hotel Ra- 
fael always affords. 

The following are new arrivals at the hotel : Mr. C. 
G. Kuehn, Mr. B. Wood, Mr. G. L. Edie, Mr. C. G. 
Follis, Mr. A. Betzel, Mr. J. E. Miles, Miss Jacobson, 
Mr. S. Rau, Mr. M. Michelson, Mr. L. S. Williams, 
Mr. and Mrs. T. Bates, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Serra, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hardy, Mr. LeRoy Leonard, Mrs. A. 
L. Lowenthal, Mr. T. F. Ena, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. 

Britten. 

; * * * 

Arrivals at Hotel del Monte for the week ending 
July 9, 1905 : From San Francisco — Mr. and Mrs. W. 
S. Porter, Dr. and Mrs. B. MacMonagle, Dr. and Mrs. 
Henry Kirsted, Athole McBean, W. T. Barton, AU. 
drich'Barton, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Magnin, Mr. and 
Mrs. G. G. Schmieden, Mr. and Mrs. M. Gerstle, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. S. Lilley, G. A. Boyer, E. Courtney Ford, 
Mrs. J. A. Ford, J. L. Eastland, Mr. and Mrs. Perry 
Eyre, Mrs. Adolph Rood, George H. Roos, Mr. and' 
Mrs. G. A. McArthy, Mrs. Austin Tubbs, Dr. and 
Mrs. J. L. Benepe, G. Sutro, Mrs. J. J. Moore, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Wagner. From San Mateo — John 
Parrott and family. From New York— Mr. and Mrs. 
George Crawford. From London — J. H. Manners. 
From Pennsylvania — Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Murphy. 

There were fifty-three San Franciscans registered 
at Hotel Tuxedo on July 1st. This hotel is located in 
the Santa Cruz Mountains. 

Dr. Nat T. Coulson has re;-. '.Filed from Byron 
Springs. 

The Star Hair Remedy is the best tonic t p^'nres fnlnr. »fnris falling. 
Drueerists, hairdressers. Accept no substitute- Star Bemedr Oo-, 
1338 Polk street, telerhone East 4625. 



MARE 
MONEY 
BUILDING 
HOUSES 

Building homes on the installment plan is 

the safest and most profitable business that 

you can put your money into. 

San Francisco, Oakland, Alameda and 

Berkeley are being built up almost entirely 

in this way. There is no better field in the 

country for making money in building 

operations. 

Many men have made fortunes at it. By 

becoming a stockholder in the Suburban 

Building and Land Company you share in 

the profits of its building business. 

Send for folder that tells all about it. 



THOS. H. GUPTILL, Sec. 
615 Examiner Building. S. F. 



Mr. Gotrox — When I was your age, sir, I did 

not have a dollar ! Cholly Gotrox — Well, dad, when I 
am your age, I probably won't have a dollar ! — Pttck. 

Miss Sinclair — Wha' didn't he mahry dat Coo- 
pah gal? Mr. Frothingham — Oh, she done flunk at 
de lastest minute — wouldn't lend him a dollar foh t' 
git de license wif. — Puck. 



Champagnards 

Dessert Francais Superieur 

No function complete without them. Served with 
champagne or other wines, or with punches and 
creams or alone. The daintiest dainty. 

Depots: BIBO-NEWMAN CO.; SWAINS or 

Franco-Swiss Biscuit Companie 

(Sole Manufacturers) 
1804 SUTTER ST., S. F. Phone Scott 1517 



Try Q\ir 



Stanford=Richraond Coal 

From the Richmondvale District 
Newcastle, N. S. W., Australia. 

Intense heat, little ash, and no clinKer. 
Direct from the mine to the consumer. 



SOLD TO TRADE ONLY. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT AND 

SEE THAT YOU GET IT. 



Richmond Coal Co. 

Agents 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July is, 1905. 



T5he Strike on the Lucky Sign 



By Robert L. Dunlap. 

Lincoln was tired. It had been a long, hard climb 
around the shoulder of the mountain and the sun was 
hot. In front of him he saw a narrow shelf of rock, 
with a wall rising like the back of a chair. He drop- 
ped the burro's halter strap over a limb in a half hitch 
and sat down. It was very still ; he heard the hum of 
some insect as it passed him on busy wings. The 
past rose before him. Long ago the "Times" had sent 
him to Pullman to report the fire. He had found the 
town in ashes and the prospect of securing accommo- 
dations poor; but after he had written and filed his 
story, he remembered that a friend of his lived near 
the town, and he went there. And that evening in the 
parlor he had met her. 

She had come from her Eastern home to regain 
her health, which had suffered from an attack of fever, 
she told him ; and as he looked on her slender but 
graceful figure, he told her she had chosen well. Un- 
consciously, he had formed an ideal conception of 
such a woman; and having found her, he delayed his 
departure long enough to tell her something of his 
ambitions and secured permission to visit her soon. 
He went ; and the world looked so much better to him 
than it had ever looked before, that he was much 
surprised at the change. 

And then, one day, he took her hands in his and 
told her he loved her. She did not try to withdraw 
her hands; and raising her eyes, said simply: "I am 
glad you love me, dear. You have made me very 
happy." And in that moment an infinite happiness 
came to Tom Lincoln, as' it comes but once to any 
man. 

They were very happy until a letter came that 
called her home. Resigning himself to the inevitable, 
Lincoln accompanied her to the train and saw her 
white handkerchief flutter out of sight. She was his 
promised wife, and in two months he would go 
East to claim her. 

Two days later he wrote to her. A week passed 
and no answer came. In an agony of suspense he 
wrote again. Often he thought he would go to her 
and ask for an explanation; but each time he told 
himself, "It is useless ; if she will not write, she would 
not see me." And in that view of the case he felt 
helpless. 

One day he realized that his health was breaking. 
He consulted a doctor and the man of medicine ad- 
vised change of scene and employment. With little 
faith in the doctor's advice, but an intense longing 
to get away from the familiar scenes which had be- 
come so hateful to him, he drew his balance from the 
bank, resigned his position and started. A few 
months of travel exhausted his funds, and the neces- 
sity of employment presented itself. 

He knew something about mining and the freedom 
of the life appealed to him; and so he had wandered 
from camp to camp, from Arizona to Klondike, and 
back again, sometimes in possession of a few hundred 
dollars, often much less, but always restless. And as 
he leaned against the rock and gazed across the rag- 
ged summits of the Trinity mountains, he thought 
bitterly that ten years were gone, and his accumula- 
tions consisted of a burro, a rifle, a roll of blankets, 
some food, a little money, a few tools and a trouble- 
some memory. 

His head was turned slightly to the right. On a 
line with his vision stood a large pine. As his care- 



less glance rested on the tree, he became vaguely 
conscious that one of the limbs was different from 
the others. Suddenly he sat erect and gazed at that 
limb with wide eyes. It was peeled and pointed. 
Stripped of its bark and twigs, outstretched like an 
arm, it pointed silently but eloquently to something 
across the canyon. Lincoln rose, and walking quickly 
ti> the burro, returned with his field glass. Stepping 
back on the rock, he swept the opposite mountain- 
side. 

Suddenly, his heart bounded. Half a mile away 
stood another large pine, and again he saw a limb 
pointing forward, this time at right angles to the 
first one. The second tree was due north of the first 
by the compass. Closing the glasses in their case with 
a snap, he returned to the burro. "Caesar, my boy/' 
he said, "this thing must be investigated." 

Looking upward, he saw that the top of the moun- 
tain was about fifty yards distant, and the ground 
seemed to be open. After the manner of men who 
are much alone, he said aloud: "This thing evidently 
indicates the direction from some point behind me to 
one in front. How far in front and what is indicated 
I must find out. But I must first find the starting 
point." He climbed to the summit, and just back 
from the slope, saw a monument such as miners use 
to mark the boundaries of a claim. Examining it 
closely, he saw that the topmost rock, a long, narrow 
one. pointed directly to the top of the tree that ha 1 
first attracted his attention. "This," he said, "is 
the beginning; now for the end." 

Glancing at his watch, he saw that it was four 
o'clock. Across the creek which flowed at the foot 
of the mountain on which he stood, the country was 
open, and seemed to offer a desirable camping place, 
and he started down at once. He found an ideal spot 
in a grove of trees on the edge of the opening. Just 
in front of camp, a large tree stood alone in the open, 
ami from its base flowed a clear spring. Lincoln un- 
packed the burro, watered and fed the animal anil 
prepared and ate his supper. 

As the sunbeams broke oyer the range to the east, 
he left camp, and armed with his revolver and a light 
axe. went directly to the second tree. The sign was 
about forty feet from the ground, and pointed south- 
west. Half a mile away in that direction, and almost 
in line with camp a heavily-timbered range ran down 
to the creek. Coming out. Lincoln had avoided the 
ridge by keeping close to the creek, and then climb- 
in- the hill beyond it. "I must have passed close to 
the sign coming out," he said, starting back. The 
brush was thick and the ground rocky, hut in half 
in hour he reached the top of the ridge. Consulting 
the compass, he found he was too far east, so he 
walked carefully forward, watching closely. 

Presently he saw the sign; this time it consisted 
of three limbs in a vertical line, pointing directly to- 
ward camp. Beyond the sign, with the exception of 
the hillside immediately below him, the country was 
treeless; and he soon satisfied himself that the sign 
was not repeated there. "Good," he said. "Now tor 
dinner, and then an exploration of the woods beyond 
camp." The meal over, he made a careful examina- 
tion of the trees there, but found nothing. 

lie then went back midway between camp and the 
sign of the three limbs, and surveyed the open hills 
critically. Suddenly he understood the significance 
of the three limbs. ' He stood on an open ridge; be 
hind him was a similar one, and in front toward the 
sign, a third. "Almost." he said. Turning to the west 
he looked up the hill, and saw, a hundred yards away, 
a break in the contour of the ridge. "Ah." he thought, 



July 15. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Ic would help me now." He climbed the lull, 

and - if a level pi mnd, 

about an acre in extent Behind tlii> the b 

erpcndicularly about forty f< 

lething near the wall attracted his attention, 

ami he went closer to examine it. There were a lew 

in the form of a rectangle, and scattered i 
lay the remains of a roof. "A cabin — curious," he 
though) ; an.! then in a flash he comprehended. The 
signs, the cabin, and famed in song and story through- 
out California for two generations, the story of the 
Lost Cabin Mine. 

Going back to camp, he brouglu his gold pan. and. 
starting at the outer edge of the little flat, began a 
matic search for colors. Water was tunning 
down the hill beyond the slide, and there he w. 
the dirt. The first pan from the rim of the break 
showed a single color. One from a few feet inward 
showed three, and the third, still nearer the bank, 
several. Lincoln dropped the pan, and, going cl 
to the wall, began a careful examination of the ground 
there. 

Presently something attracted his attention, and 
he Stooped and picked it up. It fell heavy and looked 
a dull yellow. Turning toward the sun, he examined 
it closely, his heart beating an alternate tattoo of 
hope and fear. The side which had lain uppermost 
was worn smooth by the action of the elements ; the 
other, which had been imbedded slightly in the 
ground, was sharp with innumerable needle-like 
points, and its color a bright yellow. It was about 
two inches in diameter and three eighths of an inch 
thick. Lincoln looked at it long and earnestly; turned 
it over once — twice ; then threw his hat in the air 
and gave a shout that awoke the slumbering echoes 
and sent them reverberating from canyon to cliff. 

He held in his hand a gold nugget, thrown straight 
up from the bowels of the earth, and the needle points 
were the sign that told him he had found it where 
first deposited, as any rolling or washing would have 
worn both sides smooth. 

Without a backward glance, he took his pan and 
started for camp. "No need to look further. What 
I want now is help," he said. It was Saturday, and 
Lincoln knew that the miners would congregate at 
Panville on Sunday, and he hoped to meet Hammond 
of the Golden Fleece mine there. He felt that Ham- 
mond was the one man in the district he could trust. 
Hammond was a gentleman by nature; a man of re- 
finement and honor. When Lincoln arrived, the first 
man he saw was Hammond, sitting on the hotel 
porch. They went in to supper together, and Ham- 
mond saw the animation in his friend's face. "Struck 
anything, Tom?" he asked. "I will have something 
to say to you presently," answered Lincoln quietly. 
They crossed the street together, and Lincoln bought 
cigars. Passing one to Hammond, he said: "Come 
upstairs." 

They entered Lincoln's room, and he closed and 
locked the door, and taking an envelope from his 
pocket shook out the nugget and handed it to Ham- 
mond. The latter stepped to the window, and his 
eyes kindled as he examined it. "By Jove, Tom it s 
a beauty. Tell me how you found it," he said. Ihey 
sat down, and Lincoln told his story briefly. Ham- 
mond listened closely, and when Lincoln fimshecl he 
grasped the latter's hand, and said heartily : 'Old 
man, I congratulate you with all my heart. Without 
a doubt you have found the Lost Cabin mine." "Now, 
Hammond," said Lincoln, "I want two men who can 
work and keep quiet, if well paid; two pack mules, 
some tools, powder, etc., and we shall soon know 



»3 

whether I have found anything •« not. "You -hall 
have ii ." was the answer, 

\t ten o'clock the loll.. wing Monday, a shaft 

i on the Lucky Sign Lode. Even the two old 

-. who had been selected b) Hammond for their 

long experience, coolness and ability ;.. hold their 

tongues, I. came excited .1- the beautifully defined 

walls developed with every stroke of the pick, and 
the) saw that the vein matter was ed of onlj 

three elements: tale, decomposed quartz and pure 
gold: and when toward the close of the third day's 
work the great pocket was cleaned out and the glit- 
tering mass of string gold, worth a fortune, was all 
on the surface, all three men weir \ er\ much excited. 

Very quietly the find was transferred to the Golden 

Fleece and consigned to Selbv's smelter with Ham- 
mond's monthly shipment. Lincoln next turned his 
attention to the construction of a substantial shaft. 
house, office and dwelling. The work was pushed 
day and night, and within a month he was able to 
hand the keys to his foreman and turn his face to- 
ward civilization. 

During the pressure succeeding the strike he had 
no time to think of other things. But now, as he sat 
in the Pullman and the Overland swept down the 
Sacramento Valley, his mind reverted to the mystery 
that shrouded his life, and it clamored for solution 
with an insistence that would not be stilled. As the 
conductor came into the car at Oakland mole to dis- 
tribute ferry tickets, Lincoln's resolution crystalized. 
"When does the East-bound leave for Chicago, con- 
ductor?" he asked, as that official approached. "Sun- 
set Limited leaves Oakland mole every Wednesday 
at 6 p. m." "Thank you," said Lincoln. 

It was a warm autumn noon when Lincoln entered 
the principal hotel in the little town in eastern Iowa. 
A mellow haze softened the lines of the rolling hills, 
and he felt somehow that everything about the place 
was just as he would have wished. After dinner he 
sat down on the porch, lighted a cigar and leaned 
back in his chair with a feeling of perfect rest and 
contentment. Now that he was there at last, his fears 
and anxieties vanished, and he felt in some vague way 
that, be the result what it might, he should find peace. 

He had no trouble to secure the address of Judge 
Maynard, and he sent Alice a message containing the 
words : "I shall call this evening unless you forbid." 
He reasoned that if she were willing to see him, it 
would be best to prepare her for his coming. If there 
were obstacles to their meeting, there would be 
plenty of time to ascertain what they were. 

When Lincoln stepped from the gravel walk to 
the porch of Judge Maynard's home that evening, the 
door opened from within before he could ring, and 
once more he stood face to face with the only woman 
he had ever loved. The old love-light was in her 
eyes and there was no need for explanations. With- 
out a word he took her in his arms and all the bit- 
terness of the past vanished with that caress. 

The story of their mutual disappointment was soon 
told. A silly and jealous girl had written Alice that 
Lincoln had only trifled with her affections, and, un- 
fortunately, Alice had believed. 

When the Legislature met last winter there was 
no more prominent member of the State Senate than 
the Hon. Thomas Lincoln, and no one listened to his 
speeches with closer attention than his wife, which 
he considered a compliment. His constituency is 
satisfied, too, for the miners believe that much of 
the legislation favorable to their interests was se- 
cured through the efforts of "the Senator from 
Trinity." 



24 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 15, 1905. 



JULY 

OVERLAND MONTHLY 

NOW OUT 



CONTENTS 



Canoeing Through Southeastern Alaska 

By Laura W. Maxwell 5 

Electricity as Applied to Agriculture. .By L. Ramakers 15 

What Matters It? By Eleanore F. Lewys 20 

Epic of the Oak, The By Ray E. Chase 21 

Nobler Part, The By Florence Rosina Keene 26 

Passing of the Spanish in California, The. .By Dolores Estrada 28 

On a Lumber Schooner By Margaret Troli 31 

Woman, Her Part in the World's Progress. .By Austin Lewis 34 

Asiatic Giant, The By Thomas B. Wilson 39 

Lay Sermon on Immortality, A. ... By Armond, Layman 41 

North Countrie, The By Nellie Rickey 45 

At Parting By Stanley Coghill 48 

Crows of Ensenada, The By Virginia Garland 49 

World, The By Sadie Bowman Metcalf 51 

Intrigues of a Modern Uriah Heap, The 

By John F. Hanlon 52 

Legend of Gold, A By Laura Alton Payne 55 

Claim in the Wilderness, The By Alex. R. Schmidt 58 

Miniature Lakes of the Sierra Nevada 

By Marion Randall 65 

Curious Facts About Cork By J. M. Scanland 69 

White Moose, The By Jean X. Bonneau 71 

Editorial Opinion 76 

After Every Storm By Aloysius Coll 78 

With the New Books By Armond 79 

Possibilities of Astoria, The By Mark Sullivan 85 

Home-Makers' Eldorado, The By Frederick Alfred Marriott. . .91 



THE BEST IN THE WEST 



July 15. 1905 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Culinary Topics and 

Table Fashions 



Cornelia C. Bedford. 

1 Hiring the hot days of July ami August when our 
main desire is to keep as cool as possible, the thought 
of cooking and the temperature associated with it 
I- not altogether pleasant. Clever inventors have 

done much to add to the comfort of kitchen work. 
yet in many houses the wood or coal stove must he 
used throughout the \ ear. As yet electricity i- ; 1 
costly and electrical contrivances are within the 
reach of few homes; in small communities gas is not 
on tap. hut the humble coal oil stove ought to be 
a part of the furnishing of every farm house kitchen. 
It has its disadvantages, yet with careful handling 
will accomplish much. In its least expensive form 
it burns with a yellow flame, but the new wickless 
style has a clear blue flame similar to gas, and gives 
a more intense heat. Such stoves furnish a heated 
surface of limited area, and this is a great disadvan- 
tage, as water in quantities must be heated separately, 
yet by careful planning in advance, good and satisfy- 
ing dinners may be served without the accompani- 
ment of a broiled housewife. Here are a few menus 
to suit the varying conditions of town and country, 
shore and mountain. 

A CITY MENU. 

Iced Melons 

Broiled Steak Grilled Potatoes 

Green Peas 

Ripe Tomato Mayonnaise 

Wafers Cheese 

Fruit Ice or Ice Cream 

Fancy Cakes Coffee 

This menu is planned with reference to the use of 
a gas stove with broiling oven or separate attach- 
ment. The potatoes have been boiled whole on Sat- 
urday ; they are now cut lengthwise in thick slices, 
spread with soft butter, sprinkled with salt and pep- 
per and arranged in a fine wire broiler. Light one 
top burner; in a saucepan melt a large tablespoonful 
of butter, add a half teaspoonful of salt, one-quarter 
of a teaspoonful of pepper, a lump of sugar and the 
washed peas. Stir and shake for three or four min- 
utes until they are a more vivid green than before, 
add two tablespoonfuls of Water, cover them partly,- 
turn down the flame until they are simmering gently. 
They should be done within half an hour unless quite 
old. When they have cooked fifteen minutes, light 
the broiler and push the potatoes under it. By the 
time they are nicely colored on both sides, the broil- 
ing compartment will be very hot. Season the steak 
and quickly put in, turning several times; it will 
take from five to eight minutes according to thick- 
ness. The platter and other dishes if placed over an 
unlighted top burner will heat from the broiler below. 
During their cooking the peas may need another 
spoonful or two of water to keep them from burning; 
add no more than this, and they will be pronounced 
superior in flavor to those which have been cooked in 
a large quantity of water. It is to be presumed that 
the dessert will be ordered from outside the house, 
and that the other courses are served cold. 
A COUNTRY MENU. 
Cold Fruit Soup 
Chicken Fricassee Buttered Potatoes 

Spinach 
Cucumber and Lettuce Salad 

Tapioca Custard _ Coffee 



35 

For this dinner either a wood or two burner oil 
stove cm be u>ed. ( n Saturday prepare any berries 
m season, measure and mash them, add an equal 

quantit) of cold water and simmer until the pulp 
can be pressed through .1 sieve. For each quart allow 

one teaspoonful of arrowroot dissolved in cold water; 

add to the reheated pulp a pinch of salt ami sufficient 
sugar to make palatable, but not too sweet. Stir 
until slightly thickened, then boil gently until clear. 
Instead of arrowroot two tablespoonfuls of sago can 
be added, and the boiling continued until tin- sago is 
transparent. 

The soup is served very cold in tall tumblers or 
glass cups. ( )n Saturday the spinach is picked over, 
washed until free from grit and sand, and boiled in 
plenty of salted water until tender, then pressed free 
from liquid and set away. The chicken is cleaned, 
disjointed and cooked in enough boiling water to 
partly cover until almost ready to fall from the bones, 
then cooled and put aside. The tapioca custard is 
also made, poured into the serving dish and placed 
in the refrigerator. If a wood stove is used, it must 
be started almost an hour before dinner. In one kettle 
boil the water for the potatoes, which have been pared 
and cut in inch dice that they may cook quickly. 
When tender, they are drained, seasoned, a spoonful 
of butter cut into bits dropped over them and the 
partly covered saucepan drawn back to keep warm. 
A cream dressing is made with equal proportions of 
the chicken liquor and milk, one heaping tablespoon- 
ful each of butter and flour being allowed for a pint ; 
in this the chicken is reheated. One or more spoon- 
fuls of butter with salt and pepper to taste is melted 
in a third saucepan and the spinach heated in it. 
While these are being prepared, the water is heating 
and the coffee is made. 

A SHORE DINNER. 

Raw Clams 

Panned Fish Creamed Potatoes 

Stewed Tomatoes 

Lettuce Salad Cheese Crackers 

Berries Coffee 

An oil stove can be used for the above 
menu, and prepared for a family it is natural to 
suppose that two or three burners would be em- 
ployed. In using gasoline, from five to ten minutes 
are needed to properly light and heat the burners. 
Supplies at the shore of necessity differ greatly from 
those found inland, and we are glad to have fish which 
we are assured has not seen cold storage to dim its 
flavor. Almost any kind of fish are capable of fillet- 
ing—that is, the fish is skinned and the flesh cut away 
from either side of the backbone in long strips or fil- 
lets ; flounders are especially suitable, but many other 
varieties may be similarly treated. After this is done 
the fillets are washed and dried ; for deep frying they 
should be egged and crumbed ; for panning they are 
seasoned and quickly cooked in a little salt pork fat 
or other grease, turning as soon as one side is nicely 
browned. The potatoes which are served with them 
have been previously cooked and diced; they are 
heated in a saucepan in which a cream sauce has been 
made; the tomatoes have been stewed on Saturday, 
and now only need reheating. While the mam part 
of the dinner is being eaten, water is being heated 
and the coffee is quickly made. 



Nelson's Amycose, 

Infallible remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 



of the Skin. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1905. 



FROM BOTTOM TO TOP 
That is the record made in one year by 

The Hartford Perfected Dunlop Tire 

To attain this result we did not have to provide our Demonstrators with copies of letters from in- 
terested dealers damning other types NOR did we give our men sections cut from rival tires so pre- 
pared as to weaken them. 

ALL FAIR METHODS having proved futile to stem the wave of popularity THE HARTFORD 
PERFECTED DUNLOP TIRE now enjoys, ONE COMPETITOR has furnished his salesmen with 
prejudiced letters and fake sections decrying this tire. 

We welcome honest criticism, but protest against FAKIR methods. 



THE HARTFORD RUBBER WORKS COMPANY, Hartford, Conn. 



NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
PHILADELPHIA 
ST. LOUIS 



BRANCH HOUSES 

BUFFALO 
CLEVELAND 
DETROIT 
KANSAS CITY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

CHICAGO 

MINNEAPOLIS 

DENVER 

LOS ANGELES 



DE DIETRICH 
AUTOMOBILES 




DeroonstratioQ Car-30 h. p. 
rjas arrived. Mr. Paul Koectyin, 
Pacific Coast- Represerjta- 
tive, qow at riotel Marie (Antoi- 
nette, Van Ness Ave., San Fran- 
cisco, will be pleased to give 
demonstrations to prospective 
buyers. Appointments by tele- 
phone or letter. 




GREAT WINTON "A" 

HORSE POWEH IS HERE 

Eats up the hills easily, quietly. Nothing like it 
in tiic market for the money. 



Nearly a half hundred Wintons sold in Cali- 
fornia this year. Every owner perfectly satisfied. 
You know what this means. Look this car up 
carefully. It will pay you. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

901-925 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



PJOMPT SERVICE . 

(Erntnrtj Elrrtrir fflnrntratuj 

Supply Electric Batterlea for Automobiles. 

Best Repair Sh.ip in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 

House Wiring and Repairing. 

No. 28 srCOND ST. Under Grand Hotel. TEL. BUSH 3S2 



July 15. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



37 




The Autocrank. 

A widespread interest in railroad circles attaches to 
the experiment of the Santa Fe in its project to insti- 
tute an automobile freight and passenger service be- 
tween the towns of Ivanpah and Bullfrog in the min- 
ing regions of Nevada. This is a novel departure in 
the traffic and operative practice of steam railroads. 
and with the success of the venture it is possible that 
automobiles may be brought into general use among 
railroads as valuable feeder adjuncts of the already 
established lines of travel. A valuable feature of the 
automobile feeder is that it will enable a railroad to 



in the Chronicle of last Sun. lay. 'After the record 
breaking number of alarms on the Fourth of July. 
the battalion chiefs agreed, as one of them expn 
it. that the horse-hauled runabout was simply not in 
it with the automobiles now in use. In view of the 

beat of the day and the frequent responses to alarms, 
each automobile was able to ,h< the work that would 
have worn out a half-dozen horses." 
* * * 

Two prominent Seattle automobilists, L. P. Enos 
and R. G. Kimble, sailed from that city recently for 
a tour around the world in an automobile. They are 
going to do newspaper work, and expect to tell the 
story of their travels in a syndicate of newspapers. 
They sailed directly to Nagasaki, Japan. From there 
they will go to Shanghai, China, and then to Italy. 
From Italy they tour Switzerland, France and Ger- 
many, finally winding up their European tour in 
England. They will sail from Liverpool for New 




An Instantaneous Photograph. — A great finish at the recent Readville auto meet in which H. P. Maxim, 
driving a Columbia, smashed the world's record in a five mile race for two cylinder stock touring cars. 



capture the carrying business and serve an outlying 
district which springs into prominence and import- 
ance with the mushroom growth of mining camps 
during the busiest portion of the usual boom and 
without the long delay incident to building. And if 
there is any uncertainty as to the permanence of the 
camps the railroad can withdraw its auto-trains 
should the camp die out, and establish them else- 
where in some more promising district. In short, 
there seems to be a wide field for the use of the auto- 
trains in the West as feeders of steam roads. 
* * * 

Though San Francisco was the first to adopt the 
speedy motor car for use of its .fire chiefs, and while 
there are fire departments in, other cities of the 
United States which boast of an automobile, this me- 
tropolis was the first to adopt more than one auto- 
mobile, having had three Autocar runabouts to ans- 
wer alarms since last January. "The use of the auto- 
mobile in the San Francisco fire department has al- 
ready demonstrated its worth," writes H. A. French 



York, and then go across the United States to Seat- 
tle. They expect to be gone about nine months. 

* * * 

The Los Angeles Times, in a recent issue, had the 
following brief comment of the club runs held by 
the A. C. C. : "The Automobile Club of California gets 
up a run to some point near San Francisco every 
month. These runs are largely attended, good feeling 
is promoted, and considerable touring interest re- 
sults from them. It might be a feasible scheme 
here." 

* * * 

A. D. Bowen, vice-president of the new Ocean 
Shore electric road, recently went on a trip by auto- 
mobile to Santa Cruz. Upon his return, he suffered 
a severe attack of "mobilitis," and it was not long 
before he possessed one of the self-propelled. Mr. 
Bowen has already made several tours of inspection 
in his Autocar, and is delighted with the success he 
has in covering a great deal of territory in a short 
time. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO HEWS LETTER. 



July is, 1905. 



The municipality of Antwerp, Belgium, has re- 
cently made tests looking toward the substitution 
of motor traction for horse traction in the transpor- 
tation of freight to and from the docks. The trials 
so far have given satisfactory results. Thus, for in- 
stance, it has been found possible to convey loads 
of 5 to 7 tons by motor trucks from the docks to 
their destination in 12 minutes, while with horse trac- 
tion one hour was required for the same work. If 
the continuation of the trials should prove as suc- 
cessful, the city intends to use motor trucks exclu- 
sively in dock haulage. 

* * * 

Uncle Sam is planning an exclusive automobile 
speedway for his soldiers. A seven-mile highway 
along the Jersey coast from Sandy Hook to High- 
land Beach, through the Government reservation, 
will be constructed for the exclusive use of the army 
officers and their friends. The road will be specially 
adapted for automobiles. 

* * # 

It is with pleasure that I chronicle the purchase of 
an automobile by J. E. Tutt, a prominent rancher 
near San Jose. Mr. Tutt is not of the motorphobia 
kind of farmers, and is rapidly learning to run his 
four-cylinder Autocar, from which he anticipates a 
great deal of pleasure. 

Dr. Knudsen, of Honolulu, has just arrived in San 
Francisco with his White car model E, which he pur- 
chased from the Von Hamm-Young Company of that 
city. He reports the company doing a splendid busi- 
ness, and all the users very enthusiastic. The doctor 
expects to spend a week or ten days in San Francisco 
and vicinity, and then run his car down to Los An- 
geles, where he expects to spend quite a while. 

* * * 

R. P. Schwerin and Miss Roosevelt, with friends, 
spent the evening of the Fourth touring the city in 
a Winton. F. Nelson and M. Fisher in their Winton 
machines are on their way to Los Angeles. Mr. Nel- 
son has a model A and Mr. Fisher a model B. S. 
Hammond and a number of friends enjoyed a fine 
run in his model C Winton, touring first to Santa 
Cruz and then around Monterey. E. L. Stewart, of 
Denverton, has owned his Winton but three weeks, 
yet he has toured nearly 1500 miles, and a punctured 
tire has been his only trouble. 

* * * 

Owners of White cars in the Northwest territory 
have been very active of late, and several remark- 
able tours are credited to these popular steam ma- 
chines. H. B. Rector, of Seattle, and Messrs. Purdy, 
Loggie and Henderson, of Bellingham, Washington, 
drove from that city to Vancouver, B. C, making the 
return trip on the following day. The old reliable 
White made the round trip of 130 miles without a 
hitch, and the party was much pleased with the work 
of the machine. 

* * * 

Paul Koechlin, his wife, the Misses Adel and 
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Marriott, enjoyed a three days' 
outing last week in the big, powerful French automo- 
bile, the De Dietrich. They toured through Ala- 
meda, Santa Cruz and Santa Clara Counties, and the 
trip was one of unalloyed pleasure and success, not 
an accident marring the entire journey. In fact, for 
the past fourteen months this De Dietrich machine 
has not required a solitary repair. 

* * * 

An invitation is extended to all interested in the 





RI 


JOS 


New Orientals just received. Largest and best 


variety we ever had. 


m j0. 


^^t€ii / tW£4^ 


261 GEARY STREET. UNION SQUARE 



horseless carriage and its progress in San Francisco 
to visit the home of the Queen automobiles in this 
city. The Rarig Automobile and Garage Company, 
in order that the Queen line of motor cars may be 
properly looked after on the coast, have erected on 
Folsom street, near Fourth, one of the finest garages 
in the country, and this week moved into their hand- 
some new quarters. The Queen automobile has given 
universal satisfaction throughout the East. It not 
only has an abundance of power, but is very durable 
and capable of standing up under even the most se- 
vere conditions. 

* * * 

A model B Winton purchased from the Pioneer 
Automobile Company last w*eek by Mr. Linton of 
Wadsworth, Nevada, will be used in carrying pas- 
sengers in the Sage-brush State from Wadsworth to 
Olinghouse. R. R. Bray, of San Jose, also purchased 
a model B Winton, which he will use in the rent ser- 
vice in this city. The machine will be kept at the Pio- 
neer garage, and can be secured at all hours. 

* * * 

Webb Jay, at the national championship meet in 
New York on July 4th, drove his 15-20 h. p. White 
car a mile in the phenomenal time of 48 3-5 seconds, 
the fastest time ever made in the world for a mile on 
a circular track. 

* * * 

R. D. Chapin, general sales manager of the Olds 
Motor Works, Detroit, has been spending a few day; 
with the San Francisco agency, looking over the au- 
tomobile situation. He is very much pleased with the 



The QUEEN 



EXCELS FOR PRICE, POWER 
AND PERFECTION 




The Model E, Queen Touring Car has is actual horse power with 
two opposed cylinders and a weight of leoolbs- All the working 
parts throughout the maohine ar<> well proportioned and have a 
surplus of strength. Speeds. 3 to 40 miles per hour; seats five 
people, double side door entrance, all speeds on one lever, fin- 
ished i n roya! Dlue with cream colored gearand well upholstered 
in the finest of black leather. Why pay twice as much for a car 
when even at that price it will not compare with the Queen? 

RARIG AUTOMOBILE & GARAGE CO. 

827-833 Folsom Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



July :s. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



business done ilurinj; the season, and the outlook for 
the future. This, he claims, has been il 
m the histor) oi the < Hdsmobile. 

* * * 

mtomobiles and )>art> of same from 
the United States for the month <.»i May. 1905, aj 
gated in value $291,681, an increase " ; over 

the same month last war. During the eleven months 
ended with May. 1905, the exports reached a total 
value of $2,167,744, an increase of $453,937 over the 
.same period ended with May a year ago, and more 
than double the aggregate for the eleven months 

ended with May, 1903. 

* * * 

As the public becomes accustomed to the presence 
of the automobiles in the public highways the out- 
cry against the machines is dying out to a great ex- 
tent. The history of the bicycle is going to be re- 
peated in the case of the automobile. Twice as many 
autos are in use this year as last, but the complaints 
are not anywhere near as numerous and the feeling 
against the machines is not nearly as bitter as it was. 
The fool record breakers will have to be suppressed 
just as the bicycle scorchers were, and then we will 
hear no objections to the use of the machines on all 

the public highways. 

* * * 

Mr. Kipling says that motorists now "move in the 
odor of sanctity." The next time an automobile passes 
you will realize what sanctity smells like. 

It isn*t necessary to look at the world through 
rose-colored spectacles ; auto glasses will give a very 
bright view. 



29 




Hotel 
f'VooF Belleclaire, 



Broadway & 77th St. 

NEW YORK 

Luxuriously furntnbed rooms 
fur permauent and transient 
guests, at moderate prices. 

Orchestra of solo players, < p. 
m. till la.m. 

Restaurant, Palm Room and 
Cafe gems of artistic perfection. 
Cuisine and service really de- 
lightful. Ton will say so. 

A special feature Is our after 
theater suppers 

Billiard parlor for ladles Ifl 
another pleasant feature. 

Original with thoBeileclelre Is 
the refined TaudeTlUe every 
Thursday erenlng. 

Our gallery of beatlfnl paint- 
ings, yalued at 150,000, Is open 
erenlngs to visitors. 

Affability end courtesy guar- 
anteed from every BeUeolalre 
employe. 

Hilton Roble*. Flap. 



S>6e Cameron 




Shaft Drive. 

Air Cooled. 
Road Clearance 9 In- 
Motor in Front. 
Never Necessary to 
crawl under car. 
Pacific Coast Branch 

The James Brown 
Machine Co. 

Manfs. and Agts. 
« CITY HALL SQ. S. ». 



Model L. 12-15 H. P. 1150 lbs. Price $1150.00 



Other Models 
$875 to $1350.00 



RITIflC (,,,!>r v".'" '.' ". " r ,, . r ." - " * ■ 



November u. i»ot. 




BUICK, Price SI inn. 22 H. P. Time 2.18 2-5 

Price H. P. Time 

PopeToledo »3r.oo 24 2.154-5 

Mi.lhewaon tsooo 24 J.21 4-6 

Thomas $3000 40 2.424-6 

Columbia $4000 30 2.63 4-6 

Franklin $ir» 10 4.08 3-6 

ltambler $1350 1G 5.26 1-5 

CUYLER LEE, Agent for California 

359 Ooldeo Gale Ave., San Frmcisco. 1032 So. M: In St., Los Angele 5 



The 1905 

Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring Car 

Has Arrived 

Call and see it. ^^_ 

Rambler Automobile Agency. ,m ^S T - 

Phone South 1007. 



Special Sales Department 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUNDRIES 

FOR SALE.— 1904 White Steamer, newly painted, top and lamps, 

etc., fully equipped $1,000 

White Stanhope WOO 

St. Louis Touring Car $900 

Agents for Packard, Stevens-Duryea and Thomas Flyer, Pa- 
cific Motor Car Co., 49 City Hall avenue. 

ARE you going on a tour? Don't forget Weed's Chain Tire 
Grip (prevents machine from skidding.) Does not affect the tire. 
Can be put on or removed in 5 minutes. See agents, 105 Front St. 

WANTED.— If you have a second-hand automobile you wish 
to sell, write Yosemite Motor Works, 123 City Hall avenue, San 
Francisco. Edward Mohrig, Manager. 

WANTED.— Buckboard in good condition. Will pay about $100. 
Address Box 6, this office. _ 

WHY use Eastern Dry Batteries? The Bull Dog Dry Cell is 
the best made for automobiles and is "fresh," being manufac- 
tured in San Francisco by Pacific Carbon and Battery CO., 105 
Front street. 

EXCHANGE.— Fine thoroughbred trotter for runabout in good 
condition. Value $500. Address Box 10, this office. 

FOR SALE.— 1903 Winton, excellent condition. New tires. Open 
to offer. Box 10, News Letter. 

NEW— Knox runabout cheap. Owner has purchased larger car. 
Address Box 17, News Letter. 

WANTED.— Small car in good condition, gasoline preferred. 
Box 12, News Letter. 

FOR SALE.— A "Duryea" automobile in perfect condition; has 
never been used. Three cylinder, 12 h. p. Holds six people. A 
bargain. Owner leaving city. 1814 Market street, S. F. 

FOR SALE.— Locomobile steamer, in fair condition. Price $176. 
Address Box 13, News Letter. 

WANTED— Autocar. Humbler, Cadillac or Buckboard; must be 
cheap and in Kood condition. Box 14, News Letter. ^^ 

$275.— Buckboard in good condition; owner leaving State. Box 
16, News Letter. 

WANTED —Every automobile owner to increase power of his 
machine 15 to 25 per cent by equipping it with a "Schebler Car- 
buretor." For information and prices see agents, 105 Front at. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1905. 




The Queen City Fire Insurance Company has 
appointed Mr. Paul M. Nippert as Pacific Coast man- 
ager. Its capital, now $200,000, is to be at once in- 
creased to $300,000, with $30,000 surplus, and it will 
enter Oregon, Washington, Colorado and Utah. It 

is to be operated strictly as a compact company. 

* # * 

Mr. William Sexton, chief of the Adjustment Bu- 
reau of the Fireman's Fund, has returned from his 

trip to Alaska. 

* * * 

The Security of Baltimore is to enter Utah. 

* * * 

The committee of twenty at New York has decided 
to confine its investigation for the present to the 
following places: Baltimore, Brooklyn, Berkeley, 
Boston, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Detroit, Alameda, 
Sacramento, Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis, St. Paul, 
Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Tacoma, Spokane. Denver, 
Omaha, South Omaha, Kansas City, Louisville, 
Scranton and Oakland. How sad for Oakland. 

Insurance Commissioner Cutting of Massachusetts 
is credited with the following story, says the Indica- 
tor: "A fellow came to me the other day to complain 
that he had paid to a smali company in premiums 
nearly the face of a $200 policy. 'As I have got noth- 
ing for my money, I have made a formal demand to 
have part of my premiums returned,' he said, with a 
defiant air. 'Do you carry any insurance on your 
furniture?' I asked, to which he replied in the af- 
firmative. 'Ever have a fire?' 'No.' 'Well, you never 
thought of demanding some of your fire insurance 
premiums back, did you? What you ought to have 
done was to have died within a few weeks after you 
took out your policy. Then you would have been 
ahead of the company. But you insisted upon living, 
and in spite of the fact that you have had protection 
all these years, you are not satisfied." Funny fellows, 
those New Englanders. It is safe to say the "fellow" 
thought he was being equitableized. 

* * * 

Mr. A. L. Vorys, the superintendent of insurance 
for the State of Ohio, has been appointed to serve his 

third term. 

* * * 

A standard form of tornado policy has finally been 
agreed upon by the companies interested. This form 
will be the only tornado policy in use. and is to go 

into effect at once. 

* * * 

The Eagle Fire of New York has entered Colo- 
rado, and appointed Lehnian and Stewart of Denver 
as general agents for that State. 

In May the Conservative of Los Angeles wrote a 
business of $1,790,000. 

The Equitable and its troubles still keep in the lime 
light on the center of the stage, and Mr. Gage E. Tar- 
bell manages to keep in view at the same time. In 
his July letter to the agency force of the society, he 
grabs, with a pen in each hand, the opportunity to 
laud Mr. Morton. He throws himself on the bosom 
of Mr. Thomas F. Ryan and calls him pet names, a 
course, it will be remembered, that is not steered l>\ 
the Superintendent of Insurance of New York. Next 



he smears the entire agency force with a heavy coat- 
ing of the most fulsome flattery, and thanks it in 
his usual manner for the still increasing business ot 
the society, and then those who know wink the other 
eye. Here is an extract from his letter, which is both 
apology and confession : "Remember that the mis- 
takes that have been made have been individual rather 
than corporate ; that already Mr. Morton has started 
a policy of reorganization, of retrenchment and of 
reform ; that already the tide has turned in favor of 
the Equitable; that already thinking people are com- 
ing to the conclusion that they will now prefer to 
have their assurance in the Equitable because it will 
be cleansed and purified, and because, as stated above, 
they have every reason to believe that the Equitable 
is hereafter to be managed solely and absolutely in 
the interests of its policyholders." There is a lot of 
food for thought in this extract, almost as much as 
there is cause for laughter in this: 

"You will also be glad to know that there are 
seventy-two agencies in the United States and Can- 



HOT-WEATHER SPECIAL 

Gas Ranges CHEAP 

Full size 16 inch; No. 2140 Reliable Gas Range 
— four top burners, including double burner and 
extra simmering burner, and two ovens for bak- 
ing and broiling. We GUARANTEE THEM. 

ONE WEEK ONLY $15.00 

REGULAR $19.00 RANGE 

SERVICES FREE. CONNECTIONS FREE 

MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS 

Ghe GAS Co. 

415 POST STREET 



DON'T BREAK YOUR BACK 



"REAL ECONOMY" GAS RANGES. 



operating an old 
fashioned Gas 
Range. 
"REAL ECONOMY" 

GAS RANGES 

have elevated 

oven and broiler. 

Ask the 

GAS CO. 

to show you the 
"REAL ECONOMY" 
GAS RANGE in op- 
eration. 
ECONOMY STOVE CO. Detroit. Mich. 

H. A. POTTER, Pacific Coast Agent. 52 Fint St., San Franc Leo. 




July 15. 1905 SAN FRANCISCO 

ada whose paid business to date shows •■ 
over the same |>irii«i of last year, and - ■• one 
agencies that show an increase in issued bus 
the same period '>f last year." I< the moon ma 
en-en cheese? Hay by day tin- evidence of the rotten- 
•f the old management of the Equitable 1- be- 
coming more offensive. Names that have stood high 
aro trailed in the mud, and reputations arc being 
smashed to pieces. It will be time enough t.> n 
increased business after the public lias become con- 
vinced that it knows all there is to know, and after 
it becomes* convinced that the new men in the saddle 
are more than a mere change of men and stand Fi 
change of methods. 

* * * 

Press notices and despatches as collated by the 
fidelity department of the Fidelity and Casualty Co. 
for the month of May. 1905. indicate defalcations as 
follows: Hanks $391,551.61, building and loan asso- 
ciations, benevolent societies and institutions 
$3,626.30, court trusts $6,000, federal and State $82,- 
765.02, tirms anil corporations $75,151.86, insurance 
companies $7. 148.27, municipal $5,000, transportation 
companies $2. 548, miscellaneous, $26,375.11, total 
$600,166.17. 

Mr. Robert \Y. Xeal, publisher of the Pacific Un- ■ 
derwriter, has returned from his Eastern trip. 

* * * 

Another mutual fire insurance company is gone. 
This time it is the Merchants' Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company of Indiana. It is in the hands of a receiver. 

Ohio's State Fire Marshall teaches in his last slip 
something about the chemistry of the kitchen. He 
says: "Matches are unsafe in a kitchen, unless kept 
in a metal or stone container, because a match may 
ignite spontaneously in a temperature of no degrees 
Fahrenheit, a heat that may be reached on bake-day 
or wash-day. Greasy rags or paints are liable to 
take fire in such a temperature, and will certainly ig- 
nite if but little air can reach them. The coal oil can 
should not be kept in the kitchen, but in a cool place. 
There Is no safe place for the use of gasoline for 
cleaning purposes but the open air. A pint of it in a 
closed room will make 200 cubic feet of air an explo- 
sive compound through the vapor it gives off. It 
must be kept in a cool place and in gas-tight contain- 
ers. A leaking reservoir or pipe in a gasoline s^ve 
will soon cause loss of property or life, or both. 



J. DILHAN 



Park 



Riding 
School 





ED ANOLI1 


"^*ir '2^* 





RIDING LESSONS, JUMPING LESSONS, 
TANDEM LESSONS, TRAINING, BOARDING 



2934 FULTON ST. 

Telephone West 83. 



Between Fifth aud 
Sixth Avenues. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



NEWS LETTER. 31 

INSURANCE 

FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAWS FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $6,500,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital $3 000 00* 

Surplus to Policy-holders .'.'.' 5^022.0H 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent. 202 Pine St.. 8. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 

Capital Paid-up. 13,446.100. Assets. J24.662.043.J5 

Surplus to Policy-holders. $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON, Local Mgr». 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Asse J s 5.34<Vi3°.94 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 3,414,921.16 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital J6,700,OO0 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 



Cash Capital, $200,000. 



Cash Assets, J394.164.15 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
Head Office, Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Work- 
man's Collective. Vessels. Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice- 
President; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; 
F. P. Deering, Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edw. L. Brayton, Jno. C. 
Coleman, F. P. Deering, E. b: Green, I. W. Hellman, Jr., Geo. 
A. Pope, Henry Rosenfeld, A. A. Son, Wm. S. Tevis. 

Unexcelled foi liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

PHENIX 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 
J. H. LENEHAN, Gen. Agt., CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast 

KOHL BUILDING. SAN FRANCISCO 



Manheim, Dibbern & Co. 

STOCK AND BOND BROKERS AND GENERAL IN- 
SURANCE AGENTS. 



217 Sansome St. 



San Francisco 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 15, 1905. 



Resorts and Hotels 



VACATION 1905 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 



"VACATION" is issued annually by the 

California Northwestern R'y 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 

and is the standard publication on the 
Pacific Coast for information regarding 

MINERAL SPRINGS R.ESOR.TS. 
COUNTRY HOMES AND FARMS 
WHERE SUMMER BOARDERS 
ARE TAKEN. AND SELECT CAMP- 
ING SPOTS. 

This year's edition "VACATION 1905" contains 200 
pages, beautifully illustrated, and is complete in its 
detailed information as to location, accommodations, 
attractions, etc., with terms from $7.00 per week up 

To be had at Ticket Office. 650 Market street. (Chronicle Building) 

and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market street: General Office 

Mutual Life Building, corner Sansonie and 

California streets, ban Francisco 

Applications by mail will receive immediate response 



J AS. L.FRAZJER, Gen' 1 Man. 



R. X. RYAN, Ctn-lPmu-r Agent 



Rest a Few Days 

A great many San Francisco people spend days and weeks 
during the fall and winter at Hotel Del Monte. No other 
resort in California offers such a combination of attrac- 
tions—sea bathing, golf, automoblllng, bowling, tennis, Ash- 
ing and all out-of-door sports. Instead of going from place 
to place seeking comforts, the wise who enjoy out-of-door 
life arrange to put In many enjoyable weeks down at Del 
Monte by the sea. Address George P. Snell, manager, Del 
Monte, California. 

At Hotel Del Monte 



KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS 

por particulars inquire at Peck's Tourist 
Bureau, 11 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Vichy Springs 

3 miles from Ukiah, Mendocino County. Natu- 
ral electric waters, champagne baths. Only place 
in the world of this class. Fishing, hunting. 
Crystal Springs. Accommodations ; table first- 
class. J. A. Redemeyer, Prop. 



Camp Curry 

Only camp electric lighted 
Sets the best table 
Has the highest paid chef 
(white) in 

Yosemite 



v TUXEDO v 



The leading hotel and resort place of the 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

7 miles from Santa Cruz; 73 miles from San Francisco on 
the main line of the Narrow Gauge R. R. It's popular be- 
cause It's new, modernly appointed and of easy access, and 
because it has more natural attractions on Its own reser- 
vation and around it than any place In these mountains. 
Write for booklet. 



FRANCIS W. SMITH, M*r. 



FELTON P. O 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

NO STAGING 

The nearest hot natural sulphur springs to San Francisco. 
The largest mineral water swimming tank In the State. 
Everything first-class. Address: Theo. Richards, 

Agua Caliente, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST.. near Tremont, BOSTON 

Harvey a Woods, Props. 



ST. CECILE APARTMENTS 

115 FELL STREET. Above Van Ness and Market St. 
Thoroughly modern. Elegantly furnished. Sunny 3 
room and bath apartments. Special ratei for summer. 

MRS. M. E. BROWN. FORMERLY OF THE BROWNING 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opp. V- 8. Treasury, one block from the Wlilte House. 

Washington D. <J. The Hotel "Par Excellence" of the 

National Capital. 
First-class in all appointments. O G. Staples, 
Prop. American Plan, $3 per day and upwards.* 



July 15. 1905 




NEWS LETTER. 



33 



THE LOST HERITAGE. 

By Theodosla Garrison In The bniarl i-tt 

The close companionship of earth. 

Its tenderness and might. 
These things were ours by blood and birth. 

By heritage and right. 

We were born brothers to the wood. 

And in our veins there ran 
The fire of joy and hardihood 

Which is the blood of Pan. 

The language of the leaves was ours, 

And ours the kindred tie 
That told us in the lightless hours 

What strange, wild mate went by. 

Yet, brothers of our heritage, 

What is there left to-day? 
We sold it for a petty wage, 

For servitude and pay. 

Stone upon stone our cities grow 
Mask-like on earth's shamed face; 

We cause our kindred's overthrow 
To build our hinds a place. 

Crowded and cringing and content 

We cry from mart and door, 
"Behold the pottage excellent 

We sold our birth-right for!" 

We have forgotten day by day 

That once we walked elate, 
How all majestic was our sway, 

How mighty our estate. 

This be our shame — to doubt their worth 

Who one day understood 
The close companionship of earth, 

The high hills' brotherhood. 

TO A CHILD. 

By Sophie Jewett in ScribDer's 
The leaves talked in the twilight, dear ; 

Hearken the tale they told : 
How, in some far-off place and year, 

Before the world grew old, 

I was a dreaming forest-tree, 

You were a wild, sweet bird 
That sheltered at the heart of me 

Because the north wind stirred. 

How, when the chiding gale was still, 

When peace fell soft on fear, 
You stayed one golden hour to fill 

My dream with singing, dear. 

To-night, the self-same songs are sung 

The first green forest heard ; 
My heart and the gray world grow young 

To shelter you, my bird. 



ONE OP THE I 0\ ■ IEST SPOTS ON EABTB 

ANDERSON SPRINGS. LAKE COUNTY 

Henutlful fon^r. Ftr*nm 
an- 1 falls, delightful walks 
ami dtire . nuuun« and 
splendid tmut fishing 
rich, at hand. Hi-iH 
and cottages. No winds 
or fogs. Itfst medicinal 
water and iheonly natural 
sulphur steam baths In 
county. Tuba alac ■ Uatea 
ft? per day. *io to *n per 
week. Baths free. 

Further information, 
PECK'S BUREAU. 11 
Montgomery at..- 8. P. 
Information Bureau. 613 
Market st. 8. F. Newa 
Letter. 320 Sansome at. 
or address J. ANDER- 
SON. Anderson Sprinjis. 
Middletown P. O.. Lake 
County. Cal. 

ROUND TRIP TICKET, $7 




Byron Hot Spring's 

AMERICA'S GREATEST SPA 

The great health and pleasure resort of California. Here you 
can find rest, amusement, and regain your health. The sur- 
rounding country Is beautiful at this season of the year. The 
hotel table Is sumptuous. It's the only place In the world where 
you can get a hot mineral bath In, porcelain tubs without leaving 
the hotel. If you can't spend a long period here, take advantage 
of the week-end excursion, $7.50, all expenses paid, Friday to 
Tuesday inclusive. Includes railroad fare, two days' board at 
the hotel, use of mineral waters, and baths and hot mud baths, 
and stage fare to and from station to hotel. 



HOTEL VENDOME 

vSan Jose, 

Situated in Vendome Park of twelve acres. A 
charming Summer and Winter resort. Both city 
and country advantages. Automobile garage on 
the grounds free to guests. 

A Large Bathing Pavilion on the Grounds 

Bowling alleys, tennis, etc. New auto road map 
of the county mailed on application. 

J. T. BR.OOKS. M».nMM 



The Anchorage 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

4 miles from Alma Station, S. P. C. R. R. Alti- 
tude 1900 feet. Among pines and redwoods; 
pure air; pure water; pure food. Rates $10 to 
$12 per week. New cottages, gas-lit. Trains 
met by appointment at Alma. Address Gifford 
Hall, Patchin P. O., Santa Clara Co., Cal., or 
Peck's Bureau, n Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



For Those Who Apnreclilt Comfort ud Atlentioi 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 

American and European Plan. A Quiet Home 
Centrally Louated. Gesrje Warren Hooper, Leant 



34 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

An Anglo-American Defends 

»San Francisco Society 



To the Editor of the News Letter: 

Perhaps you will not consider it out of place for me 
to take advantage of your courteous note at the head 
of an article in your issue of July ist, by Miss Con- 
stance Trevelyan, under the caption of "An English 
Girl Criticizes San Francisco Society." 

In the first place, let me say that I am myself a 
transplanted Englishman. At the same time I may 
say "it pleases me to crow" over the fact that one 
can from personal choice become American by adop- 
tion. Except for the enlightenment of some English 
readers who chance to take up this week's News Let- 
ter, it is hardly necessary to point out the fact that 
the great majority of Americans to-day were born in 
some European country, a goodly number in England 
itself. 

Anglo-Americans at least could not read .Miss 
Trevelyan's impertinent remarks upon the women of 
San Francisco without a feeling of contempt for the 
author of them. When Miss Trevelyan next goes to 
Del Monte she would do well to take with her a note 
book and a camera. In the note book she could write 
down some of the most unsportsmanlike things she 
chances to hear; with the camera secure pictures of 
unsportsmanlike scenes. Before airing her opinions 
in the local press it might broaden them a little to first 
transplant herself to one of the famous English links, 
taking with her another note-book and her camera, 
using them in like fashion. By comparing the notes 
and the pictures. I am pretty certain that the lady 
would learn that even in good old England mam 
unsportsmanlike things were tolerated which she had 
not previously troubled herself to take note of. To 
any one who has watched games on English play- 
grounds it is unnecessary to say that many scenes 
are far from sportsmanlike. 

Miss Trevelyan claims to confine herself to the 
criticism of so-called society. In reality she pours 
out the language of a class of English who regard 
things American with intense jealousy. As it is only 
too evident that Miss Trevelyan oversteps her 
bounds, it cannot be out of place to call to mind se\ 
eral national and international events in which Eng- 
land has not always shown herself able to lose like 
"a gentleman." 

The yacht races for the America's cup are not al- 
together beyond the memory of Americans. We can 
still recall the noble Dunraven, a society gentleman 
with many sympathizers in England. It is also pos- 
sible to recall the jealous way in which Englishmen 
criticized the continuous victories of the American 
yachts. How often did our English friends claim 
that "it wasn't fair" in connection with the races off 
Sandy Hook? And how many London papers tried 
to claim the races because Barr was at one time a 
Scotchman? And the latest ocean race is now claimed 
by the London press as really an English victory, 
because the Atlantic was designed in Scotland and 
sailed by a Scotchman. Really the English do not 
know how to lose like gentlemen. 

ft cannot be venturing too far off the course to 
recall the international cricket matches of a few years 
ago between Australia and England. England had 
been faring rather badly. A brilliant idea struck the 
unsportsmanlike committee of the Marylebone 
Cricket Club, who select the All-England team. They 
decided that a certain Indian prince, Ranji Sinji. was 



July 15, 1905. 

an Englishman. That he had learned some of his 
cricket at Cambridge. Ranji was acknowledged to 
be the finest individual cricketer of the season in 
England, yet there was considerable argument as 
to whether he should be included in a team represent- 
ing England. But the objectors were dubbed "Lit- 
tle Englanders," ami Ranji played for England as an 
Englishman. We can" only hazard a guess what the 
English press would have said if Australia had se- 
lected an American Indian who had played cricket 
at a Sydney college. And yet Miss Trevelyan insists 
on rubbing in the fact that Miss Sutton is not after 
all really an American. 

Again, two or three years ago, there was quite a 
little nervousness in England about a certain boat 
race held annually at Henley on Thames, It was 
suggested by leading papers of London that the com- 
mittee should restrict a certain race to British teams, 
as it was feared the Americans might cone over and 
take away with them the honors of one of the chief 
events. It was claimed that, after all. 1 lenlev Re- 
gatta was an English affair and did not concern the 
dangerous Americans. 

But aside from the field of ordinary sport, it is 
interesting to recall the period of distress for Eng- 
land when the Boers held the empire at bay. To show 
that even in sportsmanlike England there arc those 
who have not learned the first and most important 
lesson in any "sport." we have only to call to mind 
the reasons advanced to account for the defeat of 
British arms in South Africa. Again and again 
were British legions driven back by a handful of 
Boers. The pick of British troops were outclassed 
by a handful of the farmer soldiers of the veldt. And 
not until the empire poured into South Africa an 
army almost as large as the Boer population of the 
republics did the game turn in favor of the sportsman- 
like. The most terrible thing Englishmen — some 
Englishmen — could say of the Boers was that "they 
didn't come out into the open to fight." Because 
they were intelligent enough to do something the 
British did not expect of them, the Boers were dub- 
bed cowards by many English papers and many Eng- 
lishmen, for no other reason than choosing to fight 
from behind a rock rather than in the open. When 
England next goes to war with France, is it to be 



Servaivt Question 

-you'll settle 
itsofaras . 
IheWashing = 

and 

Cleaning aire 

Concerned by^ 

Supplying 

\b\irs 

With 

PyleS pearli 

The work will be doae well 
-easily -safely &^d yoxi'll 
have a 

Grateful Servant 



July 15, 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



flint before commencing operations she will 
ma i>i English forts dismounted and 
ight into the open? Will her troops b< irdered 
not to take advantage of position? Really, Miss 
Trevelyan, we Americans should insist on rubbing 
it in thai after all there are some people in England 
"who have not yet learned how to lose like gi 
men — that first and most important of all lessons in 
any sport." 

Ami. oh. Miss Trevelyan, have you never observed 
the society ladies of London's West-end, how after 

the age of 25 they seek the finest of enamels for the 
face; a little later choice hair dyes; and all the time 
the youngest looking Parisian hats; all with the ob- 
vious intention of making the false witness they bear 

as to their age less obvious ? In many society homes 
of England the birthday book that is "on tap" is 
generally one that fails to tell the story of those of 
the present generation. It is safe to state that as 
many dames in Britain as in America who are 25 
to-day will still be 25 ten years hence, according to 
the open book, unless paint and powder, hair dyes 
and young looking hats are forbidden by the State. 
It was an awful day for the world at large when the 
fathers of America signed the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. They evidently failed to foresee the pos- 
sibility of a future generation employing English 
grooms. It is really sad that the grooms of England 
should leave their native land and so soon lapse in 
manner and deferential speech. Still Americans can- 
not forget that our early fathers were considered by 
George III to have committed the same crime of 
lapsing in manner and deferential speech. It is a 
sign of decadence when a man learns that he needs 
no longer fear to be first of all a man. Oh, ye im- 
ported grooms of England, why not heed your an- 
cient masters? Bring up a groom in the way he 
should go, and he will not depart therefrom. 

After all is said and done, both in England and 
America the main bulk of the people know how to 
play the game, win or lose. It is the few who are 
ever trying to find an opportunity to be small and 
contemptible who succeed in getting into print com- 
parisons like Miss Trevelyan's, comparisons that are 
equally odious to both sides. Perhaps some such 
San Francisco society ladies are not all they should 
be on the links at Del Monte. But generally speak- 
ing, the ladies of San Francisco know "how to play 
the game like gentlemen." Is it not so, Miss Tre- 
velyan ? 

Very truly, 

L. A. IRELAND. 
San Francisco, July 10, 1905. 



35 



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36 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July i S( 1905. 
BANKING. U/ta Minister Of Foreign Affairs 

The Setn Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. The capture of Sakhalin 

James K Wilson, President; Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vlce-Presi- Russia Loses TerritOrv Island hv the L 11WSP 

dent; C. K. Mcintosh, Vice-President; F. W. Wolfe, Cashier; , xciiiuuiy isianu uy me Japanese 

c. l. Davis, Assistant Cashier. to Japan. is prettv sure to eomnli- 

Capital. $600,000. Surplus and undivided proflts, $180,000 » j j i "-"'"P" 

Directors— William Pierce Jounson. Wm. J. Dutton, Geo. A. cate and delay peace lie- 

D op MoVto^; ? en rc dk McV;,;;x -yre^wnsoT H - Talbot ' H - p tiatio " s - .it is the firs i invasion of Rii ' s * iai > ter »- 

Agents— New York— Hanover ..atlonal Bank. Chemical National tOry, and Since Japan officially announces that sin- 
Bank. Boston— National Snawmut Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel int^nrlc *-,-, 1-i^Ll fk fl ,V1 1 „„ „ .. r .i_ 

& Co. Chicago-continental National Bank. St. Louis-Mech.in- mienas to Hold the island as a part of the empire, 

les' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- Russia will have to admit the fact at once nr derlinp 

sas City-First National Bank. London-Brown, Shipley &. Co. . .. . * . u L .. * l ulu - c u r UCCline 

Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. Johannesburg-Robinson South to participate 111 peace negotiations until ail effort 

African Banking Co., Ltd. is made t0 retake the territ ory. The value of Sakha- 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce lin to Japan and the loss of it to Russia is immense. 

With which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. The southern end of the island almost connects with 

head office— Toronto. the main land of Yeso, and runs thence in a north- 

Paid-up Capital. $8,700,000. Reserve Fund, $3,500,000 westerly direction for over six hundred miles narnllpl 

Aggregate Resources, over $90,000,000. nrrarcii) uncciion lur over SIX Hundred miles parallel 

hon. george a. cox, President. to an « completely covering the water-front of Siberia 

B. e. WAL^, o GeneraiMa^er io Aiex. a I^l t rd. AsBt Gen. Mgr. that distance, giving Japan the complete mastery of 

new york officjS— 16 Exchange Place. every foot of both shores of the Sea of Tapan practi- 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin. Cranbrook. „„]]., ,!<.,. _f f L. c„„ „r ril u 4. 1 1 i • ' \n 1- 

Fernie. Greenwood, Kamloops. Ladvsmith, Nanaimo. Nelson, ta "> also °< tile Sea Ot UKhOtSK, and making \ ladl- 

iN^Ko'rT^SiTORY-DawsSrJr-wSte.Horse. V ° S '° ck »«erly worthless as a military and naval 

in united states— Portland. Seattle and skagway (Alaska.) station. Sakhalin has a width ranging from twenty 

Also 92 other branches, covering the principal points in .„ ,-,«o 1,,,,, I,- 1 m^r, „„,1 :..-• j- 

Manitoba. n. w. Territories and Eastern Canada. to one hundred miles, and maintains an average dis- 

bankers in LONDON-The Bank of England, the Bank of tance of about fifty miles from Siberia. It seems the 

Scotland, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. ne Union of London and Smith s -, ,-, , J , . . "-*-""" "«; 

Bank, Ltd. - s t. Petersburg government had no intimation of 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. lanan's nnrnose until a Jurcre Imrlintr nirtv , n „,,,„J 

agents in new ORLEANS-The commercial National Bank. J a P dn s purpose until a large landing party appeared 

•u Fran«i*o» Off,«. 325 California street. before the garrisons and announced that they had 

A. KAINS. Manager. Bruce Heathcote, Asst. Manager. come to Stay. Of course the garrisons did not re- 

London. Paris and American Bank. Ltd. sist the invaders. It would have been foolhardmess 

n. w. cor. sansome and sutter sts. to do so. .Next to winning over Korea, the capture 

subscribed capital, $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 of Sakhalin is altogether the most far-reaching stra- 

Head Offlcef^^an^f -Kndon, E. C. tegic ™tory ftP" ^f £<* -on. * * the jnvaston 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Amerl- and the acquisition of Russian territory. But the 

can Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. ~ a ..„- ac .* ui„„, tu„ + T>. .„,.:« :„ c~. 1 . ^ 4. :*.l.~ *. 

Lazard Freres & Cie. 17 Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct Severest blow that Russia IS forced to accept Without 

on the principal cities of the world Commercial and Travelers' resentment in the Sakhalin affair? lies in a scheme 

credits issued 

sig. greenebaum. Manager; h. s. green, sub-Manager; the Czar has been holding back for an emergency. 

r. altschul. Cashier. ,\_nd tne scnenle was tn j s . j n t | le event Russia should 

Central Trust Company of California be obliged to pay a large indemnity to Japan, the 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. Czar intended to transfer Sakhalin to Japan in lieu 

Authorized capital $3,000,000 of a cash indemnity, but the clever Tapanese have se- 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve $1,725,000 1 it. ■ 1 11* 1. a , ,, ■ , -. t-n 

a .... 11. . „ c-„„„.,,„, »^~i„i„ t >„.„- r...„Jl cured the island bv strategy, and the indemnity bill 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian or . J . ■ - J 

Trustee. Check Accounts solicited. Legal Depository for money Still stands. There IS no doubt at all that Sakhalin 

in Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposits • ,„_ rt j, ,,.-.__ tri Tan-in il, an ™,- cacli InHomnitv 

and Savings, investments carefully selected. ls WOrtll more to Japan llian atl\ casll indemnity 

r~ — J-- — would be, but her cunning has given her the island. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco leaving her free to demand a few hundred million dol- 

710 Market St., Opposite Third. lars in addition. And what is true of Sakhalin is 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 . , . .. - , , . , • , t-» ■ 

Paid-up Capital 300,000 true of the railways in Manchuria which Kussia m- 

lS.?JLra."jiiy"i.""u6B' .:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::".':: S ,S5 tended to use to a PP ease Japan, japan is already in 

james d. phelan. President; s. g. murphy, vice-prcsi- possession of their most valuable mileage. Thus 

dent; JOHN A. HOOPER. Vice-President; George" A. STORY, t> • , J *. 1 : .ID r ;„„:«_ 

cashier; c. b. hobson, Assistant cashier. Russia is forced to go before the Peace Commission 

Directors-James d Phelan s. g. Murphy John a. Hooper shorn of the verv things she proposed to offer Japan 

James Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Rudolph . . - .0 [ j 

Spreckeis, James m. McDonaio, charies Hoibrook. m the wav of indemnity. All this puts a new and a 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. . «. ■ r -^ .i,„ • ..„.•„ „,v,: rt u :„ 1:1. l,, 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co.. or most perplexing face to the si nation, which IS likely 

exchange on city banks. to cause a tangle in the negotiations that may make 

The Anglo-Californian Bank. Limited a P eace a g r « me nt a very difficult thing to accom- 
plish. All seems to hinge upon how much more 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C , -i- .• i-> • f 1 1 1 u 1 1 

capital Authorized. $6,000,000 paid-up, $1,600,000 humiliation Russia can stand, and how much gold 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 Japan will demand as the price of peace. 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- China can alwavs be depended 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans , , ■ 

money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. China Trying to upon to plav the cunning act. 
1GN. STEINHART. P. N. L1LIENTHAL, Managers. »»• t u . 1 ' .»» »„ ,.!,« „„,. ,,• 

T. friedlander. Cashier. Mix In. but in such attempts she ne\ cr 

— — — — — — — — before was brought up with a 

The German Savings S. Loan Society round turn as m tne \\ n \ c g ame s he has just been 

526 California st.. san francisco. "frozen out" of. In her most bland and serene diplo- 

Guaranteed capital and surplus $2,500, 098. 12 . . . ^ e ^ 

capital actually paid up in casn l.ooo.uw.'m niatic cleverness she requested a tew days ago to 

D B'o°ARb J OF 3 iS',RScTORS^ J ohn--LioVdr-presiden?!' 7 f>an.i; have a representation on the Russo-Japanese peace 

Meyer, First Vice-President; Emil Rohte, Second Vice-President; commissirm The Czar promptly acquiesced, but 

Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter. N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Bergen. F. i i i T1 -r l ■ „^,,„ r .,.„ .„■ 

Tillman. Jr.. E. T. Kruse. [apan s reply was a stunner. 1 he 1 okio government. 

A. H. R. Schmidt. Cashier; Wm. Herrmann. Asst. Cashier; ; n orarpfiil nolite btlt cutting lailL'UafC informed 

George Tourny. Secretary; A. H. Muller, Asst. Secretary; W. S. '" g raLeIlH ' P°»ie, Dill CUUlllg IdngUAgc, lui l« 

Goodfeiiow, General Attorney. t] le Peking authorities that inasmuch as China had. 



July i 5> :90s SAN FRANCISCO 

always fallen on her knees before Russia, t | lat 9 |, c 

••ffort to reclaim Manchuria, that sh< 
s; ill and niereU looked on while Russia was robbing 
Japan of Port Arthur after the Chinese-Japanese war. 
that Japan. Rat-footed and alone, was retaking Man- 
churia for China's good, and that owing to China's 
severe neutrality in the present war. Japan could nol 
■• hat business China could possibly have in the 
premises at this stage of the game, and therefore 
would not for one moment permit a representative of 
(_ hina to have even indirect association with the com- 
mission. It is believed in diplomatic circles that Rus- 
sian influence was back of China's request, thinking 
that the Peking government could be used against 
Japan on the commission. If it was a Russian scheme 
it has failed of its purpose, and both China and Rus- 
sia have received a rebuke that ought to teach them 
a lesson. Japanese statesmen and generals and ad- 
mirals do not seem to know how to make mistakes. 

What is calling for 
Re-grouping of Nations, the closest attention of 

the diplomatic world 
just now is the certainty of the re-grouping of the 
(lowers in alliances that will necessarily sever many 
existing "close relations" and re-adjust them on wide- 
ly different lines. For many years to come, Russia 
is not likely to be considered seriously, except to meet 
and defeat her intrigues. It is admitted on all sides 
that the United States and Great Britain have, and 
will, exercise their supremacy in the concerns of in- 
ternational interests. So close, indeed, have these 
two nations become that the London government 
has practically surrendered to Canada the adminis- 
tration and superintendence of the empire's naval and 
military concerns in Canada, because hereafter it will 
be co-operation rather than antagonism between 
them. The re-grouping brings the United States, 
Great Britain, Japan and France into close treaty re- 
lations. This is considered but natural, seeing that 
the possessions of England, America and France in 
the Far East demand a sort of interdependence which 
necessitates treaty specifications. Naturally Japan 
would be a partner in the "understanding." It is 
necessary, too, that the United States, England and. 
France sees to it that Morocco does not fall under 
German influence. It is important that Germany does 
not have a free hand in Africa. It is not to the in- 
terest of Japan that German influence be extended in 
the Far East. It is necessary that England should 
have a tighter grip on India, and it is of paramount 
importance to have our own possessions in Asia 
safeguarded at every point. And all this will require 
a re-grouping of alliances which shall recognize the 
Anglo-Saxon alliance as the pivot, and the Anglo- 
French and Anglo-Franco-Japanese alliances neces- 
sary to the best good and safety of all concerned. It 
is not denied anywhere that the Anglo-Saxon influ- 
ence is dominating in the international concerns of 
the powers, nor is it denied that France and Japan 
now belong in the Anglo-Saxon group. Such a 
grouping is forced by recent events. In India an in- 
surrection of considerable magnitude is being incited, 
presumably by Russian agents. China seems to be 
falling under Russian influence, and the same intrigu- 
ing is creating an ill feeling against Japan in Korea, 
while the Peking government is throwing out hints 
that France should be dispossessed in Cochin-China. 
In self-defense, the United States, England, France 
and Japan must have a mutual understanding, and it 
is this understanding that will insure peace. 



NEWS LETTER. 



37 



BANKING. 



SblA Francisco Stvvlngs Union 

w.1.1. si . Ban I'r.in 

,.. K .J& !'." N1 '' IT. si.l.iit . W. C. II DeFremery. ROBERT 

.>.:,TT:, v '" '' r '" '"-• ' -"VIM. 1. wi i e r; u U. 

\\ Kl < II. Assistant Caahler 

pirectore-E 11 Pond, u c B DeFreitaery, Hen 17 F. Alien. 
Wiiki-ni'M Baker, Jacob Barth, . O. <:. Miller, Fred 11 Beaver 
William A Magee, Robert 

deposits and loans on real ■ Country 

remittances may be scut by Wells, Fargo A <'>>.. or bv checks 
"f roll payable In ,S;m Francisco, but the responsi- 

bility of this savings tmnk commences only with the actual re- 
il the money. The signature <>f the depositor should ac- 
comoany Ihe lirst deposit. No charge Is made for pass book 
• t entrance fee. 

Office Hours—!! a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings. 6:30 to 8:00. 

Deposits, December 31, 1004 J33.940.132 

Guarantee Capital, Paid-up 1. 000.000 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 976.109 

Continental Building 6. Loan Association. 

ibllahed In I8S9. OF CALIFORNIA 

801 California Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital j17.000.000 

Paid-in Capital 3,500.000 

Profit and Reserve Fund 450.000 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President: William Corbln, Secretary 
and General Manager. 

Security Scvings Bank 

316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 500,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 265,0o0 

Banking by mail a specialty. 

Directors— William Babcock, Parrott & Co.; S. L. Abbott, Se- 
curity Savings Bank; O. D. Baldwin, O. D. Baldwin & Son; Jos. 
D. Grand, Murphy, Grant & Co.; E. J. McCutchen. Page, McCut- 
chen & Knight; L. F. Monteagle, Capitalist; R. H. Pease, Pres. 
Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warren D. Clark, Williams, Dimond & 
Co.; James L. Flood. Capitalist; J. A. Donohoe, President Dono- 
hoe-Kelly Banking Co. ; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob Stern, 
President Levi Strauss & 00. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

Corner 

California and Montgomery 

Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CAPITAL and SURPLUS $1,411,169.90 
TOTAL ASSETS . 6.943,782.83 

Interest paid on deposits, sub- 
ject to check, at the rate of 
two per cent per annum. 

Interest paid on savings de- 
posits at the rate of three and 
six-tenths per cent per 
annum. 

Trusts executed. We are 
authorized to act as the 
guardian of estates and the 
executor of wills. 

flafe deposit boxes rented at 
$5 per annum and upwards. 

Get a box at once and guard 
against loss by Fire or Burg- 
lars. 



J. Dalzell Brown 



Mf&.r\*if«r 



California Home Building Loan Company 

No. 7 Powell Street 

5 per cent interest paid on Savings Accounts; 6 per cent on Term 
Accounts of J10Q or more. Loans made on Real Estate, repay- 
able in monthly, installments under definite contract. 

OFFICERS— P. B. Roberts, ..resident; F. M. Parcells, Vice- 
President; R. L. Handy, Secretary; Jos. Hutchinson, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS— P. B. Roberts, F. M. Parcells, Jos. Hutchin- 
son, James Frazer and Charles J. Robinson. 



A BARGAIN 

$1500 summer home in Santa Cruz mountains, 6K acres, 3K 
acres improved: prunes and apricots; balance woods. 3 miles 
south of Alma on county, watered, road. Modern house of 6 
rooms and bath, water piped to all buildings, running stream, 
pond and redwood grove all close to house, daily mail and but- 
cher. Must sell, family reasons. Address Owner, Alma, Gal- 



TEL. PRIVATE EXCHANGE 216 



Dr\ Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 



STARR KING BUILDING 
121 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



3* 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



The man who intends to die 

in the last ditch is not quite so for- 
midable as the man who is willing 
to die in the first ditch. — Puck. 



For Women 
and Children 
Traveling Alone 

&he Rio 
Grande 
Scenic Line 
Excursions 

JUST FILL THE BILL 

Personally Conducted to 
the East 

NO CHANGE OF CARS 

Details— also free bookeof 
travel, handsomely illustrated, 
may be had of 

W. J. SHOTWELL. Gonerel Agent 

DENVER AND Bit UKANDE R. R. 

625 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




ABOUT 
YOUR 
TRIP 
EAST 



When planning your Eastern trip, the 
question always arises: "How shall I 
EO?" Let me offer a suggestion. The 
Missouri Pacific operates both Pullman 
and Tourist Sleepers through from 
California to Kansas City, St. Louis 
and Chicago without change of cars, 
which carry you through the world- 
famed scenery of Colorado by day- 
light. Dining and cafe cars on all 
through trains; service a la carte. 

Write us for our lowest rates and 
handsomely illustrated books of travel. 



W.J. SHOTWELL, General Agent 



625 M.rkot St. 



San Francisco 




ALL THE YEAR 
ROUND TOURS 

Travel by Sea 



Eicelleit S«rYlc«, Low Rites. Including Berth md Meal, 



Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Tacoma 

Victoria Vancouver Kic. 

And to those desiring longer trips to 
Alaska and Mexico. 

For Information retarding galling dales elc.oblalo lolder 

SAN FRANCISCO TICKET OFFICES 

• New Montgomery St. (Talace Hotel) 
10 Market St. , and Broadway W harveb. 

0. D. DUNANN. Geneia' 1 assenger Agent 
10 Market Street. San FYanoisco 



The J. Llewellyn Co. 

Successors to tbe 0. W. Clark Co. 
DEALERS IN 

Artistic Wall Papers 

and Window Shades 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 

San Francisco 

Wall Paper Show Rooms: 530 SITTER STREET 

Phone Main 715 

Oakland 

Wall Paper Show Rooma: »3 FOURTEENTH ST. 

Phone Main mi* 



July 15, 1905. 
iiXKiMXiar.VMXV.v.v.v.v.v.ir.MMV.XKiat 

$>ir-50 



The Lad\- (to applicant) — 

Why did you leave your last place: 
The Maid — Why did your last maid 
leave you ? 




Stylish 
Suits 



15 



Dressy Suits $20 

Pants $4.50 J 

My $25.00 Suits are theS 

best in America. K 

1 C Per Ctnt Saved by get-g 

JL ting your suit made bvS 

JOE POHEIM 

Tit mill 
1110-1112 Market SL 
201-203 Monts/y St.. S. F.i 



gWMAMAXXmjrjr/tmA 




Train*, leave ami tir#- rtu 
to arrive at 



COAST LINE (lurrnn llnii E K|. 
(Fu.it of Murker. Sheet.) 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



7.45a Sun in Cruz Excursion (Sunday 

only) 916p 

8.1 5A Newark, Ceiitervlll.-, San .lose, 
FcltoD. Boulder Creek, Santa. 

__ . „. , „ e Cruz and Way Stations 6 65p 

Fkom June: £>. I'KtS f9.16ANi-wurk, 6an Jose. Felton, Boulder 

Fkhry Pbpot Creek. Santa Cruz t7 69p 

,„ ... . t2.1BpNewark, Ccnlervllle, Sao Jose, 

(Fool of Market Street.) New Ahnaden. LosGatos, Felton. 

lkavr — " tin a 1 iG — it M c .„„,,, Boulder Creek. Santa Cruz and 

MAIN LI NE. - *""' T » Principal Way Stations 10.55a 

7.48P 4. 16p Newark. Snn .June, Los Gatos, 

ht t855A 



7.00a Kin. ira. Vacavllle, Winters, Bamrey 

7.00a ittchmond, Uciiluia, Sacramento, 

bulHim and Way Stations 7 28p 415pSaiurday and Sunday for Felton 



6.08P" 
t .28p - 

7-48P 
7 48p 



4- r 8p 
4.48p 



4 48p 



4.08p 

4.08p 



7.40a Vallejo, Na|.it. r:.iii8t.ot,a, Santa 

• „ Robs, Marrincz. San Itamun 

7.40a Nlles, PleAsantou, Mvermore, 
Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton 

8.00a Shasta Express — (V I a I) a v 1 r ), 
Williams, Willows, tPruto, lied 
Bluff. Portland, Tacoma, Seattle. 

8. 00A Davis. Woodland. Kntfclits Landing, 
Maryevllle, orovllle 

8.20a Martinez, Anilocb, Byron, Tracy. 
Btockton, Newman, Lob Banns. 
Mcnduta, Arinonn, It an ford, 
Vlsalla. Portervllle 

8.20AP'>rt Costa, Laiiirop. Merced. Mo- 
desto, Raymond, Fre-no. iMn- 
ford, Vlwalla. Bakerslletd ... 

8.40a Kilcs, San .lose, LI verm ore, Stock- 
ton (tMllton), Valley Spring, 
lone. Sacramento, Plaecrvllie, 
Col rax, Maryevllle, Bed Bluff.... 

8.40a Oakdale, Chinese, J Bines to wn, 
Sonorn, Tmdiimnfl and Angela, ,, 

8.P0A Atlantic Kk press- Ogden and RfiSt. 

9.40a Richmond. Purt Co-ta. Martinez 
and Way Stations (tConcord) .... 

10 20a Vallejo, Dally. Napa. Sunday only 
1020a Lob Angeles Passenger — Port 

Costa. Martinez, Byron, Tracy, 
Latbrop, Stockton, Merced, 
Raj mond, F resno, Goshen Junc- 
tion. Honford. Leiimore. Vlsalla, 
Bake nllcld. L<ie Angeleu 

10.20AEI Paso. Kansas City, St. LouIb and 
Chicago 

11.00a The Overland Limited — Omaha! 
Chleago. Denver, Kansas City... 

1 1 40a Nllns, San .lone and Way Stations. 
tl-OOp Sacramento River Steamers .... 1 11. OOP 

340p Benlcla, Winters. Sacramento, 
Woodland. Knights Lauding, 
Maryavllle and Orovllle 10 48a 

3.40p Hay ward, N lies, and Way Stations 7 48p 

4-OOp Vallejo, Martinez, San Ramon, 

Napa, CalUtoga, Santa Rosa 9.28a 

4.00pNlles. Tracy, Stockton, Lodl 10 28a 

4.40pllayward. NIIcr, Irvingtou, San) 18.48a 
■Iobc, Llvennore 1 11148a 

B.OOpTIic Owl Limited- Newman, Los 
Banos, Mendotn, Fresno, Tulare, 

HiikerslleM. Los Angctes 8-48A 

1 .St. Louis Special— El 
Paso. Kansas City, St. Louis and 

Chicago 

t620pHavwniil. NlhHiind San .lose! 

6.20p Willcjo. Port Costa, Benlcla, Sul- 
eun, Sacramento 

8.00p r^ifteni KxprcBs— omnlifl, Chicago, 

Denver, Kaunas City. St. Louis. 

Martinez, Stockton, Sacramento, 

- «„ Reno, Sparks, Montello. Ogdeu .. 1248p 

6.20P Hay ward, N leu and San Jose 9 48a 

7.Q0PI.CHO Passenger— Port Costa, Be- 
nlcla. SiiImmi, Rim Ira, Dixon, 
Dai Is Saeraiii. mo, Spark*. Totio- 

pah, (Joldnetd and Kcelcr 

7.40PPort Costa, Martinez. Byron, Tracy, 

Modesto. Merced. Fresno 
7.40PYosemlte and Mariposa Itlg Trees 

tvln Itnj .1 Wawonn Route).. 

7.40pVaiiejo. Sunday only ,1 28a 

8-20P Oregon & California Express— Sac- 
ramento. Mm ys vllle. Bedding, 
Portland, Puget Sound and Rait. 8 48a 
8. 00p Hay ward, Mir- aud San Jose (Sun- 



BoiildiT Creek. Santa Cruz &8 S5a 

COAST LINE (Broad Uange). 

tJT (Third and Townseml Streets.) 

6.10a Snn Jose and W»j Sim Ions 6 30,- 

l7"0ASan Jose and Way SiatloiiB 6 40p 

7-15A Monterey. Santa Cruz Excursion 

(Sunday only) 10.10p 

8-OPaNcw Almadcn (Tnes.. FrL, only).. 4.10p 
8.00a The Coaster San Jose. Salinas. 
San Ardo. Paso Hohles, Santa 
Margarita, San Luis Obispo, 
Guadalupe. Gavlota. Santa Bar- 
bara. San Buenaventura, Oxnard. 

Burbank, Los AngclcB 10 3G> 

8.00AGMroy. Holllstcr, Castrovllle. Del 
Monte, Paclilc Grove, Surf, 

Loinpoc. ... 10-30P 

9-COASan Johp, Tres I'Idor. Watsonvllle. 
Cnpltola. Santa Cruz, Pacific 
Grove. SiiHiu.s. San Luis OhUpo 

ii Principal Way Stntlo 



4.28p +9.C0aL> 



7 08p 
7/Bp 



1.4 3 p 
-,8p 



4.10P 



B.OOpCIHc: 



' Gatos, Wright. Boulder Creek, 
la Santa Clara aud Narrow 

6.48p Gauge t7.4Pp 

7.48p 10 30a San Jose and Way Stallone 1 2PP 

11 30A Sau Jose and Way Stations 7.4Pp 

2 15pSan J use and Way Stations 8 36a 

t3 OOP Del Monte Express— Santa Clara, 
San .lose. w.tMmvliie, Santa 
Cruz. Del Monte, Monterey 

Pacific (Jr. ve t12.15P 

t3.00pLosr,atoK. Wright. B.ulder Creek. 
Santa Cruz, via Santa Clara and 

Narrow Gauge 10.45a 

530pS.iiih San KranclHcn. San Jose, 
Gllrny. Hulllster, Tres Plnos, 
Watsonvllle. Cnpltola. Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey. Pacific Grove. 1P.45~a 

4-30pSihi Joae and Way Stations 17 55^ 

16 OOP Santa Clara, Snn Jokc, Los Gatos. 

Wright :.. . 19. <- A 

55.3PP San Jose and Principal Way Stations {J-43* 

6.45PSunset Express— Re d wood, Snn 

Jose. G I troy, Salinas, Paso 

Rohles, San Luis OldRpo. Sauta 

Barbara. Los Angeles, Demlng, 

El Paso, New Orleans 9 10* 

B4Bpi i Paao, Kansas City, St. Lonls, 

Chicago 10 30P 

646pl'aJ"ro. Watsonvllle, Capitols. 

Santa Cruz. Castrovllle, Del I J1*.1CP 

Monte. Pacific Grove f t10-30p 

Ifi.lSpSnn Mateo, Beresford, Belmont, 
S1.11 Carlos. Redwood. Fair Oaks, 

Menki Park. Palo Alto 1G-4PA 

B.3PpSan Jose an.t Way Stations 6-3RA 

8.0 p Palo Alto a M d Way St tions 1i.16a 

113 P South SnnFrnnefsco. Mlllbrae. Bur- 
llngaini'. Snn Mateo, Belmont. 
San Curios. Redwood. Fair Oaks. 

Mi-nlo Park and Pa'o Alto 8.45p 

11.3 r P Saturdays only for May Held, Moun- 
tain View. Sunnyvale, I.nwrcncc. 
Santa Clara and San Jose ... .... 9 45p 



8.48a 
7.08a 



11 28 a 



7.08a 
12-08p 
8.48a 



OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 

• Fool of MtiTHCl St.) 
(7.15a.m. 9.00a.m. 11.00a.m. 

1.00 p m 3.00 p.m. 5.15 p.m. 



A f 


ir Morning. P for Afternoon. 


tSum 


ay excepted tSuuday onlv. 


/.Mon 


lay only. 


{Hallj 


, and stops at all stations on Sunday. 



will call for and ch< 
residence* Tetenh' 



II »l - ANY 

>-k baL-caice from hotels sod 
ie K\elianL*e as 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Wa "I?«L. 

Sohmer Plane Agency 

308-312 Post St.^an Frsnci.cs 



Received Gold Medal— Highest Award Worlds Fair. St Loula. IXM. 



July 15. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Lea & Permits' 
Sauce 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

The Peerless Seasoning 

This bottle with lha label bearing the signature, 
Lea & Perrins, is familiar to the public, having 
been on the market for more than seventy 
years. As a seasoning it improves more dishes 
than any other relish ever offered to the public. 
Soups, Fish, Meats. Game. Salads, etc., are 
made delicious by its proper use. 
LEA & PERRINS' SAUCE adds enjoyment 
to every dinner. 

John Dunr.-m's Sons, Agents, New York. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stol«n from Thieves.) 

Crusty Boarder — I suppose 

you've got the same old ham and 
eggs for breakfast again? Waitress 
— No, sir; not this morning. 
Crusty Boarder — Thank Heaven 
for that ! What have you got, 
then? Waitress — Just ham, sir! 

"Do you think that music 

is of any practical benefit in life?" 
"Well," answered Miss Cayenne, 
"judging from the photographs of 
eminent violinists, it must keep the 
hair from falling out." 

Old Lady Passenger on Em- 
pire State Express (anxiously) — 
Does this train stop at New York? 
Brakeman (cheerfully) — Well, if 
it don't, ma'am, you'll see the big- 
gest smash-up you ever heard of. 

"Yes, Laura, he said Lis 

heart was in my keeping." "Take 
my advice, dear, and tell him you 
are not running* a storage ware- 
house for damaged goods." 

The Parson — What were 

your father's last words? Peck, 
Jr. — rie didn't have any. Mother 
was with him at the finish. 



HAND 
SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

Delicate enough for the softest 
skin, and yet efficacious in removing 
any stain. Keeps the skin in perfect 
condition. In the bath gives all the 
desirable after-effects of a Turkish 
bath. It should be on every wash- 
stand. 

ALL QROCERS AND DRUGGISTS 



Addemup, who had taken a 

day off to attend the bookkeepers' 
picnic, was displaying his agility 
by climbing a tree. He fell in such 
a way that his foot caught in a 
fork of a tree, and there he hung 
head downward, ten feet from the 
ground. "Help me down !" he ex- 
claimed in a voice of agony, "for 
heaven's sake! My fountain pen 
is leaking!" 

"Just because I come home 

late at night," complained Jones, 
"and in spite of the fact that I've 
got a good excuse, you treat me 
like a dog." "Well," said his wife, 
sarcastically, "you remind me of 
a dog — a pug dog." "What do you 
mean, madam?" "Oh, don't get 
loud. Your tale's so twisted, that's 
all." 

Mrs. Flyte^Oh, I got a lot 

of the loveliest window curtains at 
half price! Mrs. Thotmuch — Why, 
I thought you had just fitted out 
your house with curtains. Mrs. 
Flyte — Oh, yes, but I suppose now 
we shall have to rent a house with 
more windows in it. 

"I admit," said Mr. Pomus, 

"that I'm rather conceited, but 
that's not such a great sin, after 
all." "No, it's only wretched bad 
taste in your case,' replied Sinnick- 
son. 

"Does your wife insist on 

having the last word ?" said the 
man who asks impertinent ques- 
tions. "Certainly not," answered 
Mr. Meckton. "She doesn't have to 
insist." 

Young Mother — It's awfully 

hard to think of a name for a baby 
or a dog, isn't it? Old Friend — 
Ordinarily, yes ; but every one will 
be Togo now. 



39 

"Yonder," said the part) of 

the hon-. 
which I was born, \\ .■ Ii\ 
the firsl il-or. McHooth Ranting- 
[i lian, - 1 upied 
the upper apartments, Mr was 

")l\ 1 famous actor, but a sin- 
gularly fortunate man." "Then." 
responded the party of the second 

lart, "you were born under a lucky 
siar. eh:" \. I',.— The manage- 

nent beg-; to state that it considers 
.his one of the most elaborately 

worked out jokes we have pro- 
luced tins season. 

( 'f :i lengthy production, en- 
titled "The Century's Song." the 
author writes : "The poem repre- 
sents the work of twenty of the 
best years of my life; but it has 
been declined by all the publishers, 
and I am now in poverty and des- 
pair." No wonder. Twenty years 
on one poem ! Just suppose he 
had been splitting rails or sawing 
wood at a dollar a day, six days in 
the week, for that length of time? 

"Lady," said Hungry Hig- 

gins, "I'd thank yer fur a meal — " 
"Ah !" exclaimed the bright house- 
keeper ; "you are one of these af- 
ter dinner speakers." "Not exact- 
ly, lady, or I wouldn't be so hun- 
gry. I ain't got so much as a chest- 
nut about me." 

"Gobbleton has a disgusting 

habit of answering a question by 
asking another. Ever notice it?" 
"Why, no, not particularly. Let's 
try him — here he comes. Oh ! Gob- 
bleton, can you lend me $5?" "Take 
me for an easy mark?" 

Fair Devotee — I don't see 

any way to raise our church debt 
except to have a lottery. Minister 
(shocked) — That will never have 
my sanction, madam, unless you 
call it by some other name. 



RATIONAL TREATMENT 

OF 

Stomach Diseases 

MEAN* : 

Discard Injurious Drugs 

USE 

%cozone 

A Harmless Powerful Germicide 

Endorsed by Leading Physicians. 

Send twenty-five cents to pay postage 
on Free Trial Bottle. Sold by leading 
druggists. 

MOT GENUINE WITHOUT MV SIGNATURE: 

64F PRINCE ST., NEW YORK. 

White foh Frk Booklet on Rational Triatmikt 

OF OlHASE. 



4 o SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Lewis and Clark Centennial 



July is, 1905. 



That the Lewis and Clark Exposition will 

prove to be a notable success from the point of at- 
tendance is practically a foregone conclusion, though 
it has been open less than a month. Approximately 
1,800,000 people live within 500 miles of Portland. 
Since opening day, June 1st, the daily attendance 
at the Fair has averaged 14,127. The city of Port- 
land has about 140,000 inhabitants. Chicago, at the 
time of the Columbian Exposition, including its im- 
mediate suburbs, contained practically as many peo- 
ple as dwell within Portland's 500 mile radius. Yet 
for the first month of the Chicago Fair the daily at- 
tendance ran from 19,524 to 30,929, excepting one 
special day, when 62,000 people were present. For 
the first twenty-two days of the Portland Fair, end- 
ing with June 22d, the admissions aggregated 310,- 
795. Of these, 160,798 were paid admissions, averag- 
ing 7.309 P ai<J admissions daily. As the Fair goes on, 
the pass admissions will decrease, and the paid ad- 
missions will increase. 

During the Exposition the public has an op- 
portunity to learn a great deal concerning the Gov- 
ernment's gigantic irrigation projects in the West. 
At the Exposition there is one entire building devoted 
to this subject. Models and photographs of some of 
the great land reclamation projects, upon which 
more than $30,000,000 will be expended within the 
next few years are shown, and lectures on the sub- 
ject are delivered by Edmund T. Perkins, a skillful 
civil engineer in the service of the Government. This 
is the first time that irrigation has received such at- 
tention at any exposition. 

One of the most notable visitors at the Exposi- 
tion last week was W. R. Shannon, of Fowler, Cal., 
who is the son of George Shannon, the youngest 
member of the Lewis and Clark exploring parly of 
a hundred years ago. George Shannon was known 
as "the boy Shannon," on account of his youth. Af- 
ter the expedition he became a lawyer, and was a 
distinguished jurist in Missouri. lie remembers 
hearing his father tell thrilling tales about his ex- 
periences on the long journey from St. Louis to the 
mouth of the Columbia, which the Fair at Portland 
is commemorating. 

Trail Day, when the amusement street of the 

Exposition was dedicated, was postponed one week, 
from June 24th to July 1st. The change was made 
in order to allow several shows which were estab- 
lished on the shore of Guild's Lake after the Trail 
had grown its original quarters on the Bridge, to get 
ready for the opening. On Trail Day there were 
speeches and a big parade. 

The biggest patriotic celebration ever held in 

the West was that at the Exposition on the Fourth 
of July. The commercial organizations of the city 
and the management of the Exposition co-operated 
in making the celebration an uproarious success. In 
the evening there were elaborate pyrotechnic displays 
on Guild's Lake, and Mount Hood was illuminated 
by the use of a great quantity of red fire. 

Rabbi Emil G. Hirsch, of Chicago, probably 

the most distinguished rabbi in America, preached 
in the Auditorium at the Fair on Sunday, July 2d. 
Sunday services at the Exposition are held at four 
o'clock in the afternoon. The gates are opened at 
noon and the Sunday admission has been reduced 
to twenty-five cents. The Trail shows are not per- 
mitted to run on Sundays. 






Ao .■--■- -. 



MM, 



PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO.. Inc. 

STORAGE. MOVING. PACKING AND SHIPPING 
Separate rooms built for the Storage of Household 
Furniture. 

ofp w e »r a p n h d ouse EDDY & FILLMORE SI BEETS. Tel. West 828 

In the Idaho building there is a pyramid of 

nearly pure lead ore, which weighs 60,000 pounds. 
A single specimen weighs 10,000 pounds. Idaho pro- 
duces annually forty per cent of the lead mined in 
the United States and twenty-seven per cent of the 
world's supply. 

In the Foreign Exhibits building there is a 

reproduction of Raphael's "Sistine Madonna,'' done 
entirely in needle-work. The reproduction was made 
by a young German girl, Fraulein Clara Ripberger, 
and is considered the most wonderful example of art 
needle-work ever created. 

Friday, June 30th, was Vancouver Day. Peo- 
ple of the historic town of Vancouver, Washington, 
to the number of nearly two thousand swarmed into 
the Fair grounds in the morning and paraded with 
banners and badges. "Vancouver Grows Without 
Watching" was the slogan of the Vancouver people. 

Saturday, July 1st, was Tacoma Day at the 

Fair, and a big delegation of Tacoma boosters at- 
tended the Fair on that day. Tacoma has been much 
in evidence ever since the opening of the Exposition 
by reason of its catchy motto, "Watch Tacoma 
Grow." 

Seattle Day was one of the biggest days at 

the Fair. The northern metropolis sent several 
hundred citizens to attend the exercises. 



Section. 
Essential to the v 
enjoymenfjai^ J 
anyfunjmon ' 



: ^ft hilbwmt:' 




£fEkO^TILk©f 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS; 

VWGajkill. Special Ad?': 
San fj.&£Gi aco. , __ j 




s & 



is « 



o 

T3 

"o 

H 



o 






Price per Copy. 10 cents. 



ESTABLISHED JULY ao. 1856. Annual Subscription. $4.00. 




News l|p|TBR 




Vol. LXXI. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 22, 1905. 



Number 4. 



IN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and published 
I Saturday by the Proprietor. Frederick Marriott. Haileek 
liullil nsome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Entered .it San E>*ra.ncisco roslottice as second-class matter. 
.\ew York OIBce— (where Information may be obtained regarding 
BCflpttona and advertising)— 2W> Broadway. C. C. Murphy. 
Kvpresenlatlve. 

London office— 30 Cornhill. E. C, England, George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
intended u.r publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should be sent to this office not later than 9 a. m. 
Thursday previous to day of Issue. 

1 iold lias been found in Golden Gate Park in 

addition to that contained in its official designation. 

Indian Territory wants statehood. If it gets 

what it wants it will be the State of last resort. 

Another economical citizen has cut his own 

corn and then sent for the doctor to remove the rest 
of the leg. 

The only mystery about the "cowboy Croesus" 

is what wild-cat mine he is helping some promoter 
to sell. 

The kind of family tree one does not boast 

about is composed of three pieces — two upright and 
the third horizontal. 

Hearst never will be able completely to for- 
give Cleveland for having been President of the 
L'nited States. 

An elderly party in Oregon, afflicted with curi- 
osity, investigated personally and found that not 
truth but death lay at the bottom of his well. 

Senator Tom Piatt says he will be content if 

he can live five years longer ; before then he will have 
had the privilege of seeing those love-letters in print. 

Telegrams from Kansas indicate that the 

father of General Funston still has on tap some of 
the fighting spirit that has made his soldier son fa- 
mous. 

Having concluded arrangements with a syndi- 
cate of newspapers and a publishing house, the inde- 
fatigable Peary has started out to find the North 
Pole again. 

The deep silence which shrouds Senator De- 
pew may mean the incubation of a new funny story 
or of something that will explain his financial rela- 
tions with a much-troubled insurance company. 

In the same day we learn that tropical laziness 

is due to a bug and that the Panama Canal authorities 
have cabled to the United States for thirty-eight tons 
of insect powder. 

While automobilists are contending for the 

two and four passenger records between here and 
Los Angeles, Lawyer Collins holds the two-wife rec- 
ord between this city and British Columbia. 

A prince of the house of Esterhazy is going to 

erect in Transylvania a temple exactly like that of 
King Solomon. Ladies who like what they see in 
their looking glasses are figuring on whether or not 
he will want anybody to take the role of Queen of 
Sheba. 



The young couple who married al a drug store 

in SausalitO were perhaps not merely silly, ll is 
ably the only place in the small town not in need 
of a disinfectant. 

Published portraits of the "eleven most popu- 
lar young ladies of the Northwest" who visited us 
lately, show that popularity is not at all a matter 
of pulchritude. 

The lady who shot her 'husband in the back 

of the head as he lay in bed, and then set up the plea 
of self-defense, has provided a difficult job for the 
lawyer who undertakes to prove it before a jury. 

Intelligence from Nevada about the capture 

in the Carson river of a fish with nine hairy legs, will 
puzzle those scientists who do not learn that humor- 
ist Sam Davis caught it with a hook and line and his 
own high-geared imagination. 

A San Francisco policeman served for eight 

years on the force without taking a drink, touching 
tobacco or using a rjrofane word — and then he died 
of typhoid fever. The W. C. T. U. is welcome to use 
this information as it may see fit. 

The clergyman who objected to Rockefeller's 

money because it was "tainted" was roundly abused 
from most of the other pulpits of his denomination, 
and yet another preacher who wrote asking for a lit- 
tle of the same brand of coin lost his seminary job. 

The Mayor's evening organ speaks with tears 

in its voice of De Bernardi, "King of the Newsboys," 
as "this brave little lad," forgetting that only a few 
days ago it pictured him as wearing a huge mus- 
tache. 

It does not seem to be a good year down in 

the prune belt for elderly husbands with beautiful 
young wives. One such has been shot to death by 
his help-meet, and another's yoke-mate is gunning 
for him in the divorce court and the newspapers. 

— —So Mayor Schmitz went out of the State, in 
violation of the charter, in order to accept an "ova- 
tion" at the hands of a bunch of Nevadans. It is 
doubtful if any California community would give him 
an ovation at the present price of eggs. 

The new Secretary of the Navy may not be 

up on navigation, but when it comes to naming col- 
liers for the government service he will not permit 
their titles to be drawn out of the wrong end of the 
classical dictionary. 

The Board of Public Works, which is as tin- 
clean as the streets it is supposed to take care of, de- 
serves to have its official nose rubbed in one of the 
dirty places that disgrace the city's leading thorough- 
fares. 

"Making his ante good" is the way wicked peo- 
ple speak of Rockefeller when they see him at a 
prayer meeting. The very rich, the very poor and 
the very good find life's highway a rough road to 
travel. 



4 SAN FRANCISCO 

THE CITY HALL RING AND THE PEOPLE. 

1 he registration books are closed, and next will be 
the primaries. He is not a good citizen who fails 
to register, and he who fails to vote at the primary 
is very far from being loyal to our system of govern- 
ment. All voters know that it is the primary and not 
the general election that elects; or at least that is 
the way of if in San Francisco under the Schmitz- 
Ruef machine. These worthies know very well that 
the average business man does not take the trouble 
to vote at the primary, but that he is pretty sure to 
vote his party's ticket at the general election. Because 
this is so, the Schmitz-Ruef machine is enabled to 
control the primary election, which secures the tri- 
umph of its candidates before the nominating con- 
vention. Hence voters who neglect the primary vir- 
tually indorse the machine's nominations in advance, 
and commit themselves to its support. With such 
conditions prevailing, and a little money for beer and 
liquors, the easiest thing to accomplish in San Fran- 
cisco politics is the foisting of a machine-made ticket 
upon the party, tor which the majority of the party 
will vote. The wonder is that capable business men, 
many of whom count their wealth by the million dol- 
lars, will permit themselves to be thus hoodwinked 
in every election year, and sLranger still is the fact 
that they know perfectly well that a dishonest admin- 
istration, of the public concerns of the city would be 
impossible, if they would absent themselves from 
their places of business for a few minutes to vote at 
the primary. 

And always and always and forever these same 
merchants — and the better class of the people — may 
be seen and heard abusing and denouncing the "ring" 
from the hour it takes over the offices for its pilfering, 
thieving and plundering management of the citj 's 
affairs. But in all reason they should not do that, 
for by their own indifference and neglect they made 
the election of the "ring" possible. Now. this is al- 
together true: A stranger would be warranted in be- 
lieving that the Schmitz-Ruef machine is composed 
of San Francisco's representative men, and he would 
also have the right to infer that the commercial in- 
tegrity of our business men, and the moral sense of 
our social world, are in harmony with the "ring's" 
honesty and morals, else, he would reason, the "ring" 
would not be chosen to conduct the affairs of the 
official city. Refusal to prevent the approach of an 
evil is to welcome its coming. If the "ring" is elected 
at the general election, it will be because the majority 
of the voters are morally and commercially on a level 
with it. 



DEBAUCHERY PERSONIFIED. 

.Mrs. Gustav Hueter of San Jose, young, handsome 
and gay, preferred a strong, active and good-looking 
doctor of medicine to her polished, gentlemanly .nil 
aged husband. She and her lover often came to San 
Francisco to enjoy each other's society. They finally 
grew bold enough to transfer the meeting place fro n 
San Francisco to Mrs. Hueter's home. There they 
were detected — discovered. Naturally the husband 
protested against such wantonness, such perfidy) 
such treachery on the part of the wife, and for ob- 
jecting to her vileness, she killed him, it is alleged; 
As to her wretched deception and degradation, the 
woman does not deny. Rather is she pleased that she 
lived a life of debauchery. This is the history of the 
case as thus far revealed. 

The woman denies that she killed her husband — 
that he was murdered by another or that he killed 
himself, all of which makes it clear that upon up- 



NEWS LETTER. July 22 , 1905. 

braiding his wife for her beastliness he was shot for 
his pains. Only husband and wife were present at 
the scene, which was stormy, no doubt. A gun was 
handy, as is always the case on a ranch. But it is 
kept close at hand to protect the home against tramps 
and other vagabonds— not to kill any member of 
the family. 

The facts seem to be, are, indeed, by Mrs. Hueter's 
own confession, that in her rage at being detected in 
her faithlessness, she preferred to kill her husband 
rather than longer listen to his denunciation of her 
infamous conduct ; besides, now that exposure would 
make further meeting with her doctor lover impos- 
sible, which enraged her to the point of frenzy, why 
should she not commit murder in the spirit of hatred 
and revenge? Such an act would be natural in such 
a woman. 

Such are the facts. And is there enough maudlin 
sentimentalism that is born of "a fellow feeling makes 
us wondrous kind" in the community to save this 
wretch from the gallows? Shall such an embodiment 
of falsehood, hypocrisy and fiendish heartlessness be 
glorified or made to pay the penalty of its beastliness? 
Decent people have but one answer. Let retribution 
follow close upon the heels of the wrong. 

METHOD OF ELECTING U. S. SENATORS. 

The case of the reformers who do not cease to 
clamor for a change in the methods of electing U. 
S. Senators seems to be proving itself. With one 
member of the American House of Peers, as it has 
been called, convicted of a felony in misuse of his 
high office for the behoof of a ring of land-grabbers 
and another, to all intents and purposes, silent under 
a charge of gross betrayal of a great private trust, 
matters are not going very well with the membership 
of the nation's central council. 

Assuming that there are Senators who gain the 
toga without the expenditure of any money what- 
ever, it would be difficult to find one who holds office 
with no bargain of influence or patronage to be ful- 
filled before his term expires. It is notorious that 
our State Legislatures are selected with reference to 
almost every other qualification than patriotism or 
understanding of and devotion to the principles of 
law and government. It is notorious, too, that in a 
year when a United States Senator is to be elected 
the awarding of that prize is the issue above all is- 
sues in the nomination and election of Legislators. 
The aspirant for a toga who refuses to go dickering 
with promises or something more substantial among 
the big and little bosses who determine the person- 
nel of the Legislature, may as well stay away from 
the State House when it comes to the choosing of a 
Senator in Congress. No man ever went to Washing- 
ton as a Senator except by the operation of his own 
or somebody else's political machine. No political 
machine ever existed without patronage or money, 
and most of them require a great deal of both. 

Unquestionably the election of Senators by direct 
vote of the people would not purify the upper house 
at Washington ; probably the bosses and the machines 
would, as now, do the nominating and the electing 
of most of the members of that august body, but 
there would be the possibility always for the people 
10 put into the Senate chamber, when they desired, 
a man bound by no bargain beyond his pledge to 
them. It would be possible, always, for the people 
to send back to private life at the end of his term 
any Senator so much as suspected of public or pri- 
vate wrong-doing. And that would be something of 
an advantage. 



July 12, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

THE TROUBLE WITH SAN FRANCISCO 
1 Francisco has the reputation for being 



incrcial center of great enterprise and foresight, which 
ts true enough in a general way, but in some ways 
there is an immense amount of short-sightedness. 
There are business men in San Francisco who have 
been identified with the commercial expansion of the 
city for many years, and who arc enthusiastic ad- 
mirers of San Francisco's present and prospective 
greatness, but who. un though tedly, no doubt, are 
crushing worthy local enterprises to the wall ever) 
day. For instance, large orders tor job printii 
East every month for execution, and at the expense 
of the home printing industry. Nothing is saved in 
cost nor is better work or material secured in the 
East. It is simply a foolish habit, but it is one that 
is a positive hurt to our local printing houses. There 
is no reason why San Francisco should not maintain 
as extensive industries of this kind as will be found 
in the East, and such establishments would be here 
but for this unbusinesslike, if not disloyal, discrimi- 
nation against the printers' art at home. It certainly 
is high time that our business houses should help 
build up their neighbors, rather than crowd them 
close to the wall by taking from them patronage that 
would enable them to extend their field of labor. 

But this neglect of home industries is by no means 
confined to job printing. There are only four or five 
shoe factories on the coast, and they are small con- 
cerns, because the coast merchants persist in passing 
by on the other side of them to patronize Eastern fac- 
tories. There is no reason in the wide world for this 
other than a grossly mistaken notion that Eastern 
leather goods are cheaper and better, which is not true 
in any sense. But for this rank discrimination, San 
Francisco would now have shoe factories that would 
compare favorably with the largest in other countries. 
Then there is the silver and gold-ware industry. The 
mechanical skill and artistic culture in these lines 
are equal to the best in the East or Europe, never- 
theless the best ware comes from the outside because 
of the insane belief that the imported is better than 
the domestic. 



MUNICIPAL REFORM. 

San Francisco is probably as sick as any of the 
other diseased municipalities of the country, but she 
has this saving grace : that she knows it, is afraid 
and ashamed, and is trying to find a cure. Most of 
the other sinful cities of the United States won't ad- 
mit that there is anything the matter with them, and 
resent inquiry about their civic health. Corruption, 
as it is found in the larger centers of our population, 
does not mean a lack of prosperity, but generally 
quite the reverse. "Business is good ; everybody's 
making money" is the report from the rottenest of 
the cities— from New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, 
Cincinnati and all the other strongholds of graft. The 
people "higher up," who sit at the receipt of customs 
in the City Hall where graft is enthroned, are far too 
shrewd to let the pinch of their systems be felt by 
any one class. The motto of the corrupt boss, who 
knows his business, is : "Give 'em something for their 
money and they won't holler." So even in those cities 
where everybody pays tithes of crookedness to some- 
body, the victims of graft are slow to be convinced 
that there is any need of reform. They are living and 
working and having a good time, and thinking not 
at all of stolen franchises, bribed councilrnen, extor- 
tionate water and gas rates, corrupted judges or 
manipulated legislatures. 

But San Francisco is, and has long been, convinced 



of a condition of inward rottenness, and h.i> been and 

'king for a cure. The new charter, which gave 

the city power to emploj her own diagnosticians and 

surgeons, was the first step toward radical treatment. 

! he next in importance was the amendment of the 

primary election law- essential)} a San Francisco 
measure— which for the First time made it possible for 
the municipality to punish those caught committing 
frauds upon the preliminary expressions of the popu- 
lar will. The town is full of W'ymans an. I Steffenses 
who were fortunate enough to have com ileted their 
"rough work" before the new law became operative. 
And the elements in the community that were at 
work for years trying to get home rule with central- 
ized authority and to protect the primary ballot boxes 
from the rowdies and the stuffers are busy again 
probing for the root of the evil, whose worst symp- 
toms are found in Schmitzism, and trying to provide 
an adequate remedy. Very likely that remedy when 
it is found will prove to be something in the nature 
of a civic calomel-and-jalap mixture, efficacious to 
purge the municipal liver and stir it into a condition 
of activity from which the civic conscience will not 
be exempt. We may well look to the Merchants' 
Association and to the elements which have fused 
with it for the beneficent purposes of the Republi- 
can League for such further excision, cautery and 
medication as are needed to carry out the treatment 
begun with the new charter and the new primary 
law. These same elements have accomplished all 
that has been done to this date toward redeeming San 
Francisco from the hands of the thugs who live by 
and upon mis-government. They may with safety 
be trusted to do all that can now be done toward 
eliminating the rascals from the problem of munici- 
pal government. The rest of us can afford to go to 
the polls on primary day and endorse all that the 
Association and the League have proposed. 

LIFE SACRIFICED TO INVENTION. 

It will doubtless be a good, long time before air- 
ships are as cheap, convenient and safe to travel in 
as trolley cars. Until then we may expect to have 
every now and then such shocking tragedies as that 
which caused the death of a navigator of the air at 
Santa Clara on Tuesday. It is the way of the world 
that the pioneers of human progress must pay and 
pay terribly for every step of advance. Most of the 
actual discoverers and inventors of the things of the 
world's wants are rewarded for their labor and their 
sacrifices by being scorned and ignored until they 
have achieved something, and after that by being 
robbed of patents and profits. Not a few of them 
have paid the ultimate price that was exacted of the 
young demonstrator at Santa Clara. 

There will be no lack of wiseacres to shake their 
heads over the latest airship fatality and say that it 
was never intended that man should travel anywhere 
but on the surface of the earth ; there were many 
such doubters and disbelievers to cry doom and dis- 
aster upon the beginnings of steam-driven boats and 
carriages. They belong to the same class of cross- 
roads philosophers and pessimists which did its ut- 
most to keep the bicycle off the highways, and is now 
yielding stubbornly to the advance of the automobile. 
In spite of them and in spite of casualties like that at 
Santa Clara, however, the devoted volunteers who are 
busy with the problem of the air will go on spending 
their substance in the building of airships and their 
lives in the sailing of them until the laws of gravity 
have been so construed that the title of mankind to 
the realm of the birds is clear and certain. 



£ SAM FRANCISCO HEWS LETTER 

1HE CHINESE EXCLUSION RING. 

ll is the mal-administration of the exclusion act 
ather than the act itself that is just now agitating the 



Chinese government, and Chinamen in America and 
elsewhere. Certainly they consider the act. as they 
have the right to do, a Hat denial of the obligations 
of a common humanity, and a contradiction of the 



July 22, 1905. 
exclusion act became operative when there was as 
many Ghinamen in America as now, nor was it ever 
easier for a Chilian, an to enter, if he will pay the 



fundamental principles of this Government, which * arm laborers, railway builders, irrigation ditch di 



arc proclaimed to be upon the broadest lines of 
humanitarianism. The colonies did not seek inde- 
pendence for their own people alone. The pur- 
pose was to build up a great nation from the indus- 
trious and frugal the world over. This principle 
of the Republic's theory of government was made 
conspicuous until after several great national and 
State public works were completed by Chinese la- 
bor, when the Asiatics were brutally discriminated 
against. Cut discrimination was not inaugurated 
against them because they were too aggressive or 
too unreliable, for they are neither, but because 
their coming presented an opportunity to rob them, 
if only the Government would supply the neces- 
sary machinery, which it did. 

The exclusion act was not, therefore, established 
to exclude Chinamen, but to make them pay large 
sums of money into the pocket of the "ring" for 



price. 

The amazing thing is that the public joins in this 
hue and cry, and at the same time nearly breaks its 
neck to secure Chinamen for cooks, house-servants, 

ig- 



gers and laundrymen; also to raise vegetables for 
the housewife's supply market. Is it Surprising thai 
Chinamen all over the world are protesting against 
our way of dealing with them ? 



The following is one of the many letters of com- 
mendation of the News Letter for" its stand in the 
defense of the agricultural interests of California on 
the farm labor question. Undoubtedly our corre- 
spondent voices the sentiments of agriculturists gen- 
erally on the Pacific Coast. The burning question 
with them is how to procure reliable and painstaking 
labor whose wage demands will not absorb all the 
profits : 

Santa Barbara, July 15, 1905. 

To the Editor of the News Letter: 1 am so de- 
lighted with your excellent articles on the Chinese 



Exclusion question. It is well to do all in our power 
trie privilege of entering the country. And to cover to keep our Government from making itself ridicu- 
up the villainous scheme, labor organizations were ' ous in breaking the law. We do need help so ter- 



induced by false pretenses to raise the hue and cry 
against Chinese immigration on the ground that 
it was a menace to American labor. This distor- 
tion of the facts created a foolish sentiment, and 
the public generally raised its voice for an exclu- 
sion act, but the public shut its eyes to the fact 
that the "labor" that was so solicitous for the pro- 
tection of "American labor" was itself mostly Huns, 
Italians and Spaniards of the labor class, very much 
of it not naturalized, hence having no voice in this 
country's affairs. Back of this element were the 
professional labor agitators, who kept labor in a 
stale of excitement and hatred of Chinese, and back 
of it all was the "exclusion ring." The methods 
of this "ring" arc so brutal and corrupt that long 
ago they became a public disgrace. The train and 
stage robber at least has nerve and takes chances. 
The "exclusion ring" has neither, but it is none 
the less a thief and robber. .Moreover, its rami- 
fications are by no means confined to the Pacific 
(oast entry jiorts. It extends along the Canadian 
and Mexican borders, the Gulf of Mexico and the 
Atlantic Ocean. In fact, it surrounds the I'nited 
States. 

It is not the purpose of this "ring" to exclude 
Chinamen, but to make them pay for a favorable in- 
terpretation of the exclusion act, and for putting its 
"t >. K." upon certificates of character, etc. "Rea- 
son to believe" that the holder of a certificate should 
be deported is where all the black-mailing lies. To 
believe or not to believe is conditioned upon the 
ability and willingness of the Chinaman to pay for 
"reason to believe" or "reason to disbelieve." When 
an applicant is unable or unwilling to pay the price, 
or is utterly unworthy of entry, he is deported to 
the discordant yelping of "outraged American la- 
bor," which is taken up by the credulous public, 
and the "ring" is patted on the back for its "pa- 
triotic vigilance." Thus the exclusion act is the 
most monumental humbug of the several humbugs 
that the public is endorsing. Again, let it be said 
that the exclusion act is not to exclude Chinamen, 
but to give opportunity to a thieving "ring" to 
rob them. There never has been a time since the 



ribly. I am a nervous wreck from over-work. I have 
been doing the work in my grove and garden for 
over six weeks, rather than see ten years of labor on 
the place thrown away, and I an old woman of 
'kd years of age. My home is a burden to me. instead 
of a olessing, as it should be. I thank you with all 
mv heart for vour good work. 

MRS. M. M. CHILI). 



Peary is going to make another dash for the 

North Pole. A dash, a rescue party and donation-, 
for the survivors are the international farce comedy. 
If you want to know all about the North Pole, just 
start the report that it discounts the Nevada gold- 
fields. The boys will make a clash that will stay 
dashed. 



When it is remembered that the Black Sea 

squadron of a dozen ships ran away from one rebel 
ship, the wonder is what use Russia has for war- 
ships, unless to save Japan the trouble and expense 
of building boats of her own. 

Dirt throwing is pretty lively in our Panama 

\enture, but not from the ditch. 




ItCHAS. KLILUS & COM 

&£XCL US/VlJk 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

This Fall's Clothes we now present with new fash- 
ion plates (that bear the crest of originality) are so 
constructed as to give the wearer that herculean ef- 
fect without the aid of a mattress of padding. This 
is Clothes Science, and will be appreciated by gentle- 
men who understand. 






July it. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



EJ ^aaaa-,^ .jTOWN CRIER 



When you've spcnl your lime and monej 

And you've lost your patience, too, 
When you're feeling rather funny, 

And, in fact, a trifle blue; 
When your wife has raised the thunder, 

And your landlord's raised the rent. 
Then it isn't anj wonder 

That you're sorry thai you went. 

For the little social lifting 

That you thought that you would get, 
Will not stand a careful sifting, 

And you say. lest you forget, 
That ill the coming season 

You will never, never roam. 
That you're satisfied your reason 

Bids you keep yourself at home. 

The prettiest, and all round the most disgust- 
ing effect commercially of the numerous defalcations 
of municipal officers is to be seen in the fact that the 
National Surety Company has listed city, county and 
State treasurers and tax-collectors as extra risks, and 
has cancelled all business with such officials. When 
the officers of a democracy are not regarded as a le- 
gitimate risk by a reputable company the worst has 
happened. Not even the greatest enemy of our insti- 
tutions could say worse about us. 

The Aubury Act appears to be designed_ to 

make war upon the fraudulent operators of mining 
stocks. So far it is a good thing, but the eternal ques- 
tion arises as to how far men can be relieved from 
their own folly. There will always be dupes, law 
notwithstanding, and it is more than questionable 
whether a none too honest Legislature can supply 
them with that which nature has denied. 

The Coroner's Jury has found that the present 

system of building inspection is insufficient. Any 
fool could have said that. The question is, how is it 
to be remedied. Then we are at once face to face with 
the same old graft fact which cannot be got rid of 
but looms up like an everlasting nightmare. All the 
regulations in the world cannot make up for a lack 
of men. 

Two thousand dollars a year has its claims 

upon the attention of even such distinguished men as 
compose the bench of the Court of Appeals. The ef- 
forts which these worthy jurists are expending to add 
that amount to their salaries bears eloquent testi- 
mony to the energy which has brought them to then- 
present exalted position. 

A prisoner at Oakland is afflicted with coma 

so that he cannot talk. Judging by the effect which 
the talking of most prisoners has upon their future, 
this particular person would seem to be fortunate. It 
should stand him in better stead than a lawyer. 

A large number of Russians are to settle m 

Southern California. It may be supposed that they 
will be found to be ardent opponents of Japanese im- 
migration. 

Frenzied Finance Lawson is in a bad way. 

The Populists of Nebraska are giving him the cold 
shoulder because he is too radical for them. Inats 
tough on the Boston man. 

China is quite willing to give us a whole lot 

of open doors, but the "glad hand" must go with 
every opening. 




At last the Stale Board of Prison Din- 
have arrived at the Conclusion thai the methods are 
obsolete. This is just what we. with persistent im- 
pertinence, have been insisting upon for venrs. It 
is to be hoped, however, that such changes as are 
made will not he in the direction of maudlin senti- 
mentality, for such a condition would be worse than 
that which we now have. 

If we want an example of the sillv snobbish- 
ness which is prevalent in all ranks of our society 
to-day, we can find it in the attempt of certain pri- 
vate soldiers to have their uniforms so made as to be 
nndistinguishable from those worn by their officers. 
This desire to be something different than one is, is 
responsible for more than half the crime. 

The poor cows in Alameda County are now ac- 
cused of harboring tuberculosis. Once, in our in- 
fancy, we believed in Boards of Health. Now the 
operations of the city outfit have led us to look upon 
them as the inventors of convenient and harmless 
diseases. Between the cows and the Board of Health 
we should say that the latter was the worse touched. 

A twenty per cent increase in the valuation of 

the property of those who have refused to obey the 
summons of the Board of Supervisors, sitting as a 
Board of Equalization, seems to show that the Board 
is hard up, and that some officials find the regular 
pickings inadequate to their demands. 

The arrest of one of the gypsies for misde- 
meanor embezzlement is a good thing. That mal- 
odorous and impertinent crowd should be driven into 
decent ways of livelihood or away from the neigh- 
borhood. They are a pestiferous nuisance, and so 
are all who put their trust in them. 

A Fresno painter is in trouble for proposing to 

bribe the Fresno Board of Supervisors. That comes 
of proposing. If he had only gone ahead and done it, 
the whole Board would have been interested in cov- 
ering his movements. The experience would not be 
novel enough to keep them awake. 

Collins in Victoria complains that the Bench 

and Bar and the citizens of San Francisco are all 
against him. To a reflecting person this would ap- 
pear to be an eminently satisfactory reason why he 
should be sent back. Think of the chances which he 
would have of a campaign of conversion. 

The well-known, pungent wit of Judge Coffey 

will have an opportunity to express itself in a worthy 
fashion when that jurist returns and finds that the 
hated divorce suits have been placed on his calendar. 
It will be a bold attorney who will present an account 
on the first morning of his Honor's arrival. 

The prayer of Miss Calhoun that the Lord will 

have mercy on the soul of a theatrical manager is 
altogether superfluous and ridiculous. It transcends 
the powers of the Almighty to grant the request, see- 
ing that theatrical managers have no souls. 

It is rather a commentary on the enthusiasm 

connected with the return of the body of Paul Jones 
that we are so poor here that we could not afford to 
illuminate the dome on the anniversary of the fall 
of the Bastille. 

Thev are still troubling about the Board of 

Dental Examiners. Why not call it a simple case of 
gold filling and let the matter go at that? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 




(The editor has received a number of anonymous letters protesting 
Miss Trevelyan's- communications. It is not for the editor to 
take sides in this case as the opinions of Miss Trevelyan are over 
her signature- The News Letter will give space to tho^e who wish to 
disprove the statements of Miss Trevelyan providing the signatures 
of the authors accompanies the letters as a guarantee of good faith. I 



Mr. L. A. Ireland, who walked over me hobnailed 
in last week's issue of the News Letter, calls himself 
a '"transplanted Englishman." The fact that he is 
transplanted has plainly not interfered with his root- 
ing deep in American manners and customs. He be- 
longs to the class of More-than-Americans who, not 
content with severing their allegiance to their mother 
country never lose a chance to throw mud at their 
native land. Inconsistent America hugs these adopt- 
ed sons to her bosom, and yet when the tables are 
turned and an American chooses to live in England 
she heaps abuse and vituperation on his head. You 
may remember the Bret Harte incident in Kipling's 
American Notes. The famous author told a news- 
paper man that California was hallowed ground to 
him on account of Bret Harte. 

"Well," said the reporter, "Bret Harte claims Cali- 
fornia, but California don't claim Bret Harte. He's 
been so long in England that he's quite English." 

This "vast provincialism," as Kipling calls it. is 
typical of the American attitude. Bret Harte did not 
give up his American citizenship, but he chose to 
live in England, and therefore forfeited the admira- 
tion of his countrymen. A member of a wealthy and 
powerful American family recently declared his in- 
tention of becoming a British subject, and the long 
finger of American scorn will always point across 
the nond at him. 

How about it, America? Unless two and two make 
six I cannot see why the expatriated Englishman is 
deserving any more admiration than the expatriated 
American. The Morc-than-Amcrican Air. Ireland 
cannot read my "impertinent remarks upon the wo- 
men of San Francisco without a feeling of contempt 
for the author of them." Fortunately for Mr. Ireland's 
feelings he has been allowed to spread his contempt 
over several columns and no doubt he feels relieved. 

Mr. More-than-American Ireland suggests that "in 
good old England unsportsmanlike things are tol- 
erated, which I have not troubled myself to take 
note of." I should be pardoned on the score that in 
Fngland you have to "take the trouble" to pick out 
the flaws in sportsmanlike behavior, while here un- 
sportsmanlike scenes are so common that they hit 
you between the eyes though you may be looking the 
other way. I have yet to hear and see things on any 
of the English links which constantly offend the ear 
and eye on the California links. 

Mr. More-than-American Ireland reminds me that 
the society ladies of London's West-end employ arti- 
ficial aids to beauty. This no doubt is apropos of 
some remarks of mine anent the adjustable complex- 
ions of the San Francisco women. Undeniably there 
are English women who use cosmetics, but their name 
is not legion as out here. Englishwomen who resort 
to make-up when they are going to some evening 
function would never think of appearing on the street 
in a drug store complexion. I scarcely think there 
pre many society women in San Francisco who would 
commit such a faux pas, but the middle class and re- 
sectable Californian does not hesitate to wear the 
sign of the rouge pot on her face in broad day-light. 
The amount of paint and powder displayed on the 



streets here is dazzling even to New York eyes, so 
small wonder it amazes and disgusts foreigners. 

Mr. More-than-American Ireland is quite right in 
insisting that there are as many dames in Britain as 
in America who are 25 to-day and will still be 25 
ten years hence. The dislike of growing old is an 
international complaint, and veracity on that point 
a failing of the sex in all climes and countries. But 1 
do maintain that the average Englishwoman grows 
old more gracefully than the average American. Re- 
pose is almost obsolete in America, where animation 
frequently approaches St. Vitus dance. The women 
show the marks of this nervous, restless life as they 
begin to grow older, and one sees countless middle- 
aged women with more crows-feet and wrinkles than 
are coming to them. In Philadelphia you see charm- 
ing old ladies who have mellowed into prettiness. 
Philadelphia is not counted a "hustler" as American 
cities go ; indeed one constantly hears facetious re- 
marks about "sleepy" Philadelphia, yet it is too bad 
that other American cities do not have enough of 
the Philadelphia flavor to keep the women from fray- 
ing out so early in life. Even the petted darlings 
born with golden spoons who fancy that the whole 
earth in general and American men in particular are 
just made for their footstools wear a discontented, 
worn look in middle life. "Hustle," that watchword 
of the American man, has affected the American wo- 
man, too. She "hustles" for her pleasures, rushes 
around at a nerve racking gait in an effort to corner 
the best things in life, and every year writes its aim- 
less story on her brow. The restlessness and discon- 
tent of the spoiled American woman make her look- 
old long before her time. 

Mr. Ireland seems to be under the impression that 
the imported English servants lapse in manner and 
speech because in this glorious land of the free and 
home of the brave they learn that they need "no 
longer fear to be first of all a man." If adopting the 
impudent, flippant manner tolerated among the ser- 
vant class in America makes for manhood, then in- 
deed the English servants have bettered themselves. 
If doing their work in a slovenly, careless manner 
means emancipation, then indeed they have escaped 
the thralldom of servility. 

— Constance Trevelyan. 



-REMOVED- 



C. H. Rehnstrom & Co. 



Tailors and Importers 

HAVE MOVED TO NEW AND PERMANENT 
QUARTERS IN THE 

Mutual Savings Bank Bldg. 

Market, Kearny & Geary Sts. 



July 22. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

6 




m Davis of Nevada has been fishing. \\ henever 
Sam goes fishing the world, the flesh and frequently 
the devil are astonished by his catch. Sam believes 
in pulling forth from the might] deep tin- secrel 
manifestations of nature, and preserving them For 
the benefit of science. If science won't stand for the 
catch. Sam puts it into a chowder and enjoys physi- 
cally that which weaker philosophers refuse to enjoy 
from a purely intellectual standpoint. Thus 
the wise man of Carson give Strength to the ancient 
saying that the seat of man''-, wisdom is his stomach. 
But he is persistent in his attentions upon science. 

notwithstanding the calls of the stomachic pan oi 
his nature. Davis is no vulgarian, living for himself 

alone. Whatever he cannot eat he readily ships to 
the Smithsonian Institute, to be studied by the sa- 
vants in the hope that they may discover it and give 
it a name. According to the veracious Davis, he has 
just shipped to Washington a wonderful creature 
hooked by him in the Truckee. It is about two feet 
long, looks like a fish, has nine legs with which it 
tried to run away after its captor had landed it on 
the bank, and sports a rudder-like tail, flanked bv 
two wings. Sam says that after he had taken the 
hook from the thing's mouth it would run off a few 
feet and climb on a tree and bark. It did this several 
limes, until it got a good look at its captor. Then it 
saw the man behind the hook was Sam Davis, and it 
dropped dead. The story of Mr. Davis is vouched for 
by several eminent Nevadans. Strangely enough, 
they disagree about the color of the animal, some 
saying it was pea green and others averring it was 
lobster red. Davis says the animal changed color 
several times. It should be stated that Mr. Davis 
and his friends are very temperate men. 

* * * 

Rose Brown, who lives under the shadows of Ber- 
nal Heights, complained to Judge Cabannis that a 
neighbor kept roosters that crowed at early and un- 
usual hours of the night and morning, thus disturbing 
Rose's sweet slumbers. Cabannis, who is equal to 
any emergency, ordered the rooster crowing stopped 
until after the primary election. There is a time for 
everything, says Cabannis. 

* * * 

The Hebrew Free Loan Association is said to be 
one of the city's most worthy charities. Its object 
is to assist worthy Isrealites with loans not exceed- 
ing $25, without charging interest and without se- 
curity. It has thus loaned over $30,000 during the 
past eight years, and its losses have been nominal. 
Such an association deserves praise. While consid- 
ering it, I cannot refrain from wondering whether it 
includes among its members any of those speculators 
on human weakness who make a business of loaning 
money to city employees at 20 and 25 per cent a 
month. This is said, too, with all respect for the 
members of the association. The shaving of the war- 
rants of city employees has become an evil which 
needs a strong hand td remedy it. The greatest suf- 
ferers are firemen, policemen, laborers, street-sweep- 
ers and others who receive moderate salaries. Most 
of these men have families to support. It may be 
admitted that they are morally weak, that they lack 
strength of character, that their will power amounts 
to nothing. Were they not weak men they would not 
be constantly in debt. But the laws are made to 



eel the weak from the strong, and when a law 
giving such protection is lacking, something else is 

needed to protect the weaklings. The business of 
lending monej to citj employees i- legal, and under 

our liberal system of jurisprudence an. agreed rate 
of interest may be charged, Hut it is certainl) un- 
conscionable to charge a debtor 25 per cent a month 

on a petty loan, obtain from him as interest more 
than twice the principal, and then suddenly seize his 
warrant for non-payment of the original amount. 
The heads of the various city departments should do 
all they can to discourage tlte mone) brokers who 
now prey upon the city employees. 

* * * 

The Secretary of Agriculture has ordered that 
hereafter cans of peas colored with sulphate of copper 
shall be distinctly labeled so as to show that fact; 
Strawberry jams shall, when necessary, bear a sign 
showing they are artificially colored, and the canned 
mushroom of commerce shall be marked "stems and 
scraps." Mr. Wilson knows his business. It is 
much more satisfactory to an epicure to know he is 
eating sulphate of copper with his peas than to keep 
wondering whether that new taste is simply from an 
extract of zinc ointment or is caused by the dissolu- 
tion of the solder in the pot in which the peas were 
boiled. As long as we have to eat this doctored stuff 
let us get the names of the adulterants correct. A 
study of the Wilson labels on canned goods should 
afford a good primary education in chemistry. 

* * * 

Jimmy Britt tells a good story on Nat Goodwin, 
the actor who is just now trying to reduce his flesh 
at the ocean beach. Britt and Goodwin are compan- 
ions in the exploitation of the public, and they like 
to interchange confidences on the easiest ways of 
getting rich. Goodwin, says Britt, advises the latter 
every time he meets the boxer to retire from the ring. 

"It's a brutal business, Jimmy," says Nat. "You 
have made much money, and you should get out of 
the business now. You are a young man, and there 
is yet time for you to reform, beco ne respectable and 
go on the stage." 

"Oh, I don't want to interfere with your prospects, 



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Nat," Britt usually answers. "Suppose we each stay 
with our own line. Live and let live, you know." 

Britt thus continues his story: "Whenever Nat 
meets me he hammers away, telling me I should quit 
hoxing. I commence to get sore. One afternoon we 
went into Techau's for lunch. As we discussed the 
same old story, I noticed the steward showing around 
two ladies, evidently strangers. As they passed near 
our table I heard the steward say: 'That's Jimmy 
Britt, the boxer.' Presently the women sat down, 
not very far from us. We could not help overhear- 
ing their conversation. One of them said: 'Well, he 
looks the part.' 

"'Hear that, Jimmy?' said Nat; 'they're talking 
about you.' 

" 'Yes, he has a brutal face' said the other woman, 
and then Nat gave it to me some more. 

" 'I tell you, Jimmy.' he said, 'you should quit this 
fighting business. It shows on you just as that wo- 
man says. Get out of it before it is too late.' 

"'Isn't it a pity,' 1 heard one of the women say, 
'that a man should sink as lie has done In fighting like 
a bull dog. Just look at his face.' 

"Well, it was making me sore. 1 said l" Nat: 'I 
can't stand for this any more. I'm going.' And 1 
jumped up. grabbed my bat and overcoat, and leaving 
Nat at the table, walked out, giving the women a 
glassy stare. As I passed them, they were looking at 
Goodwin, and I beard one say: 'Wonder if lie's mar- 
ried? Do fighters get married?' 

"'Married! Of course,' said the other. 'Why, I 
could see that the little fellow with the overcoat who 
just passed is his son.' " 

A bunch of beauties from Mormondom were in 
town during the week. They were the products of 
a beauty show at Salt Lake, their pulchritude winning 
for them a trip to the Portland Fair and a journey to 
this city. Whether or not they came to town as ac- 
tive inducements for our young nun to join hands 
and hearts with the descendants of Brigham Young 
and Joseph Smith remains to lie seen. The beauties 
of Utah may be all right from a Salt Lake point of 
view, but as for me, our native product is quite satis- 
factory. 

* * * 

Registration for the primary election to he held 
next month closed last Wednesday. Judging from 
the interest taken in registration, the vote at the pri- 
mary will be unusually large. This indicates great 

activity among Republicans and labor union n. 

The Democrats have become so Few they are no 
longer considered seriously. There is no contest ill 
the union labor party regarding the renoniination of 
Mayor Schmitz, but there is considerable rivalry 
over the honor of voting for him in I he labor con- 
vention. The real fight at the polls next month will 
be between the various wings of the Republican 
party. On the surface there are only two wings— 
the Reufites and the anti-Ruefites. the "Reformers" 
and the anti-adminislralion men. lint i: is well 
known by politicians that beneath 'he surface in 
most of the city's eighteen districts there are cur- 
rents and counter-currents that must be taken into 
account in forecasting the result. Ruef will put up 
a fight all over town, but will confine bis energies 
particularly to half a dozen districts. One of the 
main contests will be in the Thirty-sixth, where las 
year Supervisor Fred Eggers beat the Ruef forces. 
Eggers has been marked for slaughter, and if Ruef 
gets bis scalp great will be the rejoicing among the 

administration men. Eggers is fighting for his po- 



NEWS LETTER. July 22, 1905. 

litical life, for if he is defeated in his own district 
all his chances of the nomination for sheriff, if they 
ever existed, will go glimmering. He will not even 
go back as Supervisor to band out prize-fight tickets. 
Another great battle will be fought in the Thirty- 
eighth, where Macstretti will contest the field against 
bairfax Wheelan. In this fight no quarter will be 
asked. Every man has been numbered, and the vote 
will probably be the largest ever cast in the district 
at a primary. In the Forty-second, Senator Keane 
says he will do things to old Jack Tyrrell, the white- 
headed veteran, who with Eddy Conroy has for years 
constituted the marching force of Dan Burns. Tyrrell 
now has a water front job. liis fight with Keane 
means, therefore, that Pardee is out against Ruef. 
The Reformers will try to hurt Ruef in his own dis- 
trict, but there he is too strongly intrenched to be 
injured. Withal, the situation is delightful. In some 
districts, as for instance, the Thirty-seventh, now 
controlled by Postmaster 1'isk, it is thought a com- 
promise ticket will prevent a contest. From all in- 
dications, Ruef will get quite a bunch of delegates 
with which to effect deals whereby he may secure 
Republican nominations for some of bis friends. It 
is said be will not try to force Schmitz cm the Repub- 
lican convention. It is even said be invites a square 
fight on two tickets. In such a contest the "Reform- 
ers" see their only hope of defeating the Mayor. The 
strange thing is that Ruef and Schmitz seem as eager 
for such a fray as do their opponents. Meanwhile 
the anti-Schmitz men have not yet agreed on a man 
for Mayor. The woods are full of statesmen who are 
"among those mentioned," but aside from Treasurer 
McDougald, Fisk's man, one has yet to hear of an 
eligible who is willing to bead the hosts in November. 
As for McDougald, his chances of nomination are de- 
cidedly slim. He does not appeal to the conserva- 
tive Republican element, because bis main strength 
is said to be with the laboring people. Wise politi- 
cians figure that the laboring men would not support 
him as a Republican nominee. To a looker-on, there- 
fore, it seems that control of the Republican conven- 
tion and the nomination of a fusion non-partisan 
ticket is not enough. There is urgent need of a nomi- 
nee for Mayor. In the words of the old song, who is 

"the man for Galway?" 

* * * 

The presence of about one hundred and twenty- 



m KNABE 

is the riANO&r 

Quality 



The possession of 

a KNABE Piano 

is an honor to 

its possessor and 

an evidence of 

Culture and 

accurate musical 

•judgment. 

Our Special Piano Proposition will 

enable any onejj/ : ordinary mean.* to 

very convenient term*. Inquli-e^ySi* it at once 




July 12, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



n 



five medical men gave a distinct professional 

to the Palace Hotel atmosphere the beginning of this 

week. The doctors came down from Portland in a 
special Pullman train, where thej licld their bus 

•ns. Dr, Frederic Holme Wiggin chaperoned 

the party and looked alter their welfare. The I'alace 

management took unusual pains to make the si-it of 
the medical men pleasant, and the resident physicians 
added something to the Sugar coating of the recep- 
tion. The medical profession is learning to look on 
this climate as one most favorable for neurotic com- 
plaints. 

* * * 

Charlie, the Chinese youth of some fifty summers, 
who looks after the daily renovation of the Palace 
Hotel court and Palm Garden, has been decked out 
in new silk togs by Colonel Kirkpatrick. Charley 
always wears his best, and in his many colored rai- 
ment is a spectacle of importance and complacency 
worth going to see. 

* * ■■ 

Johnny Morris, a little news boy in the employ of 
the Palace Hotel news stand, found a wallet in the 
corridor of the hotel the other day, and turned it over 
to room clerk McCullough, who returned it to the 
owner. It contained about $300 in bills and a bunch 
of railroad passes. Johnny was rewarded with sev- 
eral of the bills. 

* * * 

I noted some time ago that it is becoming fashion- 
able for women to travel alone and unchaperoned. 
The Palace Hotel register has contained the names 
of many ladies in the past week who have left their 
Eastern homes and husbands or fathers to enjoy the 
delights of travel while the men folk were piling up 
dollars. Our American women are nothing if not 
enterprising. 

Edward Webb, as he appears on the programmes 
and such places, but with whom the public has a 
speaking acquaintance as Teddy, was the most puz- 
zled man on the Rialto last week. What do you think 
it was all about? It was because of his part, to be 
sure, but you need not imagine there was a stumbling 
block in the matter of acting to this versatile thespian. 
He had to pass out a part to himself in "Rob Roy" 
that calls for the use of three different dialects. Do 
not believe, either, that this feazed Teddy. He did 
not tremble at the thought that he must get up and 
spiel in Cockney, then gracefully switch to the 
brogue of the bagpipe, finishing up with a little of the 
Lowlander. Not Teddy ; right there our operatic 
hero was at home. From his London experience he 
has the Cockney down fine, and is a natural adept 
at Scotch. "But," said Teddy, "with those three 
parts facing me, I didn't know what to train on. If 
I began on English ale, I would certainly have to 
end with Scotch whiskey." Webb is a bit of a wag. 

As I go about among the theatrical people, I 
thought it would be interesting to jot down what 
these hard workers are going to do at the end of the 
season, when they give over amusing people and be- 
gin to have a little fun of their own. The private fam- 
ily of George Parsons, which means George Drew 
Mendum, and himself, are scheduled for a lot of hard 
work, but they are going to get one good breath of 
fresh air. They are quite tired out with the hard 
work of the season, and will soon set out for New 
York. This means a lot of rehearsal for them there, 
but at the first convenient moment they are going 
to go over to John Drew's place at East Hampstead, 
and there among the sea breezes that blow about 
Marblehead and Nantuckett have a delightful family 



re-union. "But," said the pleasant Mr. Parsons, "1 

don't go away from San Francisco before the fight — 

yotl may he Mire •>! that.' We always hold our 

or-, if not b\ beauties, then l<\ the n-t. Parsons will 

ack in this citj m September, opining up at the 

Columbia. Here is a variety that makes fascinating 
the life of the successful actor. Miss Mendum's 
home is in Boston. 

* * * 

The many friends that have been made by John 
Craig in his long engagement here will be glad to 
learn of his affection for this city, and that the affilia- 
tion made is backed by substantial evidences of re- 
gard. He will return here next summer, thinking 
there is no finer place in the country to soend a vaca- 
tion, and may also act. He has invested in local 
property, the lots neighboring Xat Goodwin's, and 
there are a couple of other theatrical people in town 
who are neighborhood owners. Craig's immediate 
plans are interesting, as they include a tour of Cali- 
fornia. He is lucky enough to have a Boston friend 
who is in the mining business, and never having seen" 
a real mine, Craig goes with him first to the Tonopah 
district. There he will affix a miner's lamp to his 
hat and descend into the deep ground ; the experience 
will be novel to the leading man, but that is the sort 
of sensation he is looking for. When he has in- 
spected Tonopah, he and his friend go to Santa Bar- 
bara, thence visiting the resorts of Santa Cruz and 
Del Monte: "I want to see California," said Mr. 
Craig, "and I am just going to do so. Afterwards, 
we take in the Portland Fair, and then I open up in 
Boston in September." Mary Young, Mr. Craig's 
wife, has received an offer from Providence, where 
she has made good before, and travels straight East 
to take up her work. Harry Hilliard has the good 
taste to spend his vacation touring the interesting 
places of the State. 

* * * 

They never say die at the Olympic Club. They are 
always doing things, and are now expecting to get 
away with the track honors of the country. Eight 
men, who are going to compete for the A. A. U. 
championships at Portland, some of them of univer- 
sity fame, have been in the hands of trainer Roger 
Cornell, and Max Rosenfeld, who has arrangements 
in charge. This is one of the strongest athletic teams 
ever sent out of here, and they are all working up to 
their records. There is Norman Dole, of Stanford, 
famous for his world's record pole vault; P. C. Ger- 
hart and C. L. Parsons, the flat men. The rest of 
the athletes are : Charley Hall, the jumper ; F. Bur- 
gers, an old-time athlete; Alfred Glarner, Alfred 
Plaw and Victor Sidga, hero of the hurdles. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

Cures Poison Oak and all skin „.seases. Sold by all druggists. 

Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 




Choicest of Orientals and plenty of them. 
Big variety of other kinds, too. 




261 GEARY STREET. 



UNION SQUARE 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 



POLITICS AND FICTION 



By Thomas B. Wilson 



"The genius of the Roman race," says C. \\ . lint- 
son in "Beginnings of Civilization," "was primarily 
neither literary nor artistic. It was political, and its 
only creative power lay in the domain of law." 

The Roman theory ol government was funda- 
mentally right, nor have its principles been materially 
changed by modern civilization, but they have been 
greatly obscured by political fiction. Fundamentally, 
the Romans were right because their politics did not 
go beyond the realm of the affairs of Slate, and the 
relation of the individual to the State. Their politics 
found no room in the enactment or in the operation 
of law for fanciful speculation. The gods had their 
own sphere of action, and the State had its own. 
There was no conflict of authority. The government 
was conducted with reference to the concerns of this 
world only. -Cut the principles of civil government 
and the conduct of State affairs have been gradually 
yielding to the fanciful and fictitious in politics ever 
since the creative power of the State began to be 
circumscribed by political romancing. The domain 
of politics to-day is not necessarily in the domain of 
law. Statecraft is now largely a trade, and its tools 
are such implements as will serve to weave threads 
of economic fiction about the body politic that it 
may forget its real self in the glamour of its own 
novelties. 

Political science does not work out problems of 
government in the laboratory of the imagination. 
Vitalized fiction and fanciful idealism are Punch 
and Judy to the true student of the philosophy of 
civics. In 1896 and again in 1900 the people of the 
United States came very near accepting political fic- 
tion as the standard and measure of the nation's 
reality. In those years a romance of political falla- 
cies got such a hold upon the people that by mil- 
lions they embraced a glaring economic contradic- 
tion and believed to be a revelation of Divine wis- 
dom. Afterward some of them ascertained that they 
had been political reeds shaken by the oratorical 
wind of vitalized economic emotional fiction. 

Law is, or should be. enacted upon the immov- 
able basis of justice and ethics. When upon such 
basis, it reflects the truth, the honesty and the cul- 
ture of true politics, and whatever is added to that 
basis is fiction, which is vitalized and clothed with 
the power of romance in ratio to its acceptance by 
the people. The professional political orator is a 
romancer. He does not have to know anything 
about the facts of the science of government or the 
philosophy of politics, lie is often called a "spoil- 
binder," which means that his stock in trade con- 
sists of graceful poise, polished rhetoric and enthu- 
siasm. He stands for the lowest ami most danger- 
ous in the nation's political life, for in him may 
be found the embodiment of that principle of gov- 
ernment which holds that the "spoils oi office" 
should be the inspiration and incentive to seek of- 
fice. 

In the United Slates politics is a game between 
two or more parties. Usually the third and fourth 
parties are organized by "business" politicians for 
the purpose of selling the vo.es of their "follow^ 
inn" to one or the other of the leading parties. But 
those who s,_dl are no worse than those who buy. 
Of course the object of those in office is to keep 



from being supplanted by those who are striving 
for supremacy. The tokens, chips or whatever you 
like to call them, are the. voters who are held" in 
line by the fiction of politics. They are fed on 
fairy stories that idealize the party, and they like 
iln diet. Brass bands, the firing of cannon, bon- 
fires and the like are political fiction. It may be 
called political fiction illustrated in colors. Very 
true, the name of the story always is. "( >ur Policy," 
and occasionally the thread of a ready sound ami 
wise policy may he detected. The characters may 
he relied upon to be real personages in our politi- 
cal life, but they talk and act fiction. The climax 
is developed at the polls and consummated by don- 
ning the robes of office. And that is the chapter, 
the last chapter, in which the fiction in politics melts 
away into a memory, and the real looms up in the 
shape of lofty and self-sacrificing patriotism ( !) sit- 
ting upon the bench of authority. The show, the 
fiction, the performance, is then over. The brass 
bands are mute, the cannon is spiked, and the bon- 
fires are out — until the next election, when the same 
old characters reappear in new political fiction and 
romance. 

Politics in San Francisco is just now the kind of 
fiction that is denied the privilege of the mails. Xol 
that the thread of the story is wanting in thrilling 
situations, but because the theme of the romance 
attempts to clothe vice in the garments of virtue, to 
the end that decorated evil may he accepted by the 
people as their standard of conduct in their politi- 
cal concerns ami social Functions. the leading char- 
acters in the San Francisco political fiction story are 
a fiddler, and a polished villain, who is the 
boss. Between the fiddler, who is a putty man, 
and the villain of the romance, there is an array of 
characters who represent in themselves every phase 
of political and social degradation, the whole form- 
ing a spectacular presentation of vice from the sneak 
thief to the robber of the public treasury. From 
the view point of the highest level of honest poli- 
tics, the Ruef-Schmitz political romancing look-- as 
if it were presenting ever) side and characteristic 
of the lowest levels of political and moral debauchery. 

If you want to eat the best, drink the best, and 

l.e among the best people, go lo Tecliau Tavern, 
which is second to no restaurant in San Francisco. It 
is the favorite after-the-thealre resort, and deserves 
its fine reputation. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, nre only $7.50 

per ton; hair ton. iA: Quarter tun. ?:'. Full weight guaranteed, in 
, my, cleanliness and heai-produclng qualities, Briquettes 

are superior to coal. Sold only by lie T. sin Conl Company, 10th 
and Channel, r hone South On. 



Mothers, be sure and use Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup" 

for your children while teething. 



The guarantee of the "Clicquot Quality" of every bottle of 

Vve. CLICQUOT Champagne 



is in this LABEL: 



Refuse 

substitutes. 




AVIGNIERG>- 



SAN FRAMCISCO' 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



July 22. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»3 



conditions of 



tli 



rougi 



Sequence 

Eleanore F. Lewys. 

When Doris Lester's engagement to Leonard Dale 

announced, "society' approved it. Had they 

known each o her from the days "i" their childish 

ibbles and makings-up over the back fence? \nd 

Leonard's persistent wooing certainly deserved its 

reward. 

society." that superficial dame who judges only 
from exterior- and considers diving below the surface 
of things in general no) onlj a bore, but also "bad 
form," knew nothing of the underlying 
this affair. 

For the coup d'etat sprung into existem 
the explosion of a lamp. 

Ever since the first years of Doris's young lady- 
hood, she had found in Leonard a devote.'! chevalier. 
All through his college life, with its attendant es- 
capades 1 which were always hushed up, as Dale's 
father was well supplied with "filthy lucre,") Leonard 
invariably returned to the sweetheart of his child- 
11 1, penitent, persistent and masterful, and inci- 
dentally was always met with the same answer: 

•■They were too young. They did not know their 
own minds yet. She did not love him," ad infinitum. 

And then the lamp, a most important factor in this 
Came of Hearts, obligingly exploded and threw its 
burning oil deep into the pretty brown arms of Miss 
Lester. 

And the burns refused to heal. 

Doris and Leonard were both very dark. Their's 
was the hue of olive-skinned Spaniards ; dark, flashing 
eyes : black hair. And so, when Leonard proposed 
to donate some of the flesh of his arms to be grafted 
onto Doris's, what wonder that his heroic proposi- 
tion was gratefully accepted, not without, however, 
a little mild protestation on her part. 

And what wonder that the young lady in the face 
of this evidence of his great regard for' her, meekly 
succumbed, and granted him his heart's desire? 

And yet, had some one of the uninitiated been [ires- 
en t at the operation (when D«ris, with her senses 
steeped in an anaesthetic was happily oblivious to 
the whole proceeding), would they not have specu- 
lated as to the absence of the chief instigator, and the 
apparently unnecessary presence of a litter of squirm- 
ing, tan-colored, blunt-headed little animals, resem- 
bling baby rabbits? 

She stood before the mirror in her bed-room, with 
the sleeves of her pink kimona pushed up to the 
shoulder, staring with horror-stricken eyes at her 
naked arms. For where the grafted flesh had healed 
over the scars of her burns, appeared a soft white 
fuzz, hardly perceptible, and still eloquently indica- 
tive of the rabbit's blood that flowed within her veins. 
The door behind her opened and closed again, and in 
the mirror her eyes met those of her husband's. No 
words were spoken, nor were they needed, for in ans- 
wer to her gaze, accusing, sadly disillusioned, tragi- 
cally contemptuous, his own fell, and he left the room 
as he had entered it — in silence. 

Her physician half raised the pillow to mercifully 
smother the breath of the creature that lay looking 
up at him, a creature half rabbit, half human, with 
great, staring black eyes, holding his in the fascina- 
tion of the horribly repulsive, and his arms dropped. 

There was -the rush of flying garments behind him, 
and the mother came into the room. 

"Kill it!" she cried, savagely, her eyes flaming, the 



crimson of fever on her cheeks, and the rebellious an- 
guish of a greal tra ed in her poor haf 

face. "Kill it ! Ah, you are afraid I toward! [Will 
do it!" 

With superhuman strength she clutched the pillow 
from him and pressed it down, down over the dread 

fill face, the open, gasping mouth and the black, -till- 
ing eyes. 

* * * * 

At the \ asylum there i- a patient who never 

knows the tantalizing relief of a lucid moment : who 

raves incessantly, ami with a violence that nearly 

severs her racked soul from her racked body, and who 
cmplains of a Thing, half rabbit, half human, that i- 
forever following behind her. pulling at her skirts and 
uttering strange cries. 

TO PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 
Physician occupying his offices only three hours 
daily (2:30 p. m. to 5:30 p. m.) desires to sub-let re- 
maining hours of day and evening to responsible 
physician. Central location. Address. "Physician," 
Box 6, S. F. News Letter. 



To hunger and thirst for the best there is to 

eat and drink is natural, but the man who does not 
lunch at Moraghan's Oyster Stalls in the California 
Market has no such hunger, for Moraghan serves only 
the very choicest. 



Dentist, S 
extracting. 



Dr. Decker 

Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 




Hospitality's Cheer 

In all social cheer hospitality's 
motto is: 

The Best for the Guest 

The superb quality of 

Hunter 
Whiskey 



makes it the first sought 
and the first bought. 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO. 

136-144 Second Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Private 313. 



July 22, 1905. 




State Mineralogist Aubery 
Wash-tub Operators is after the manipulators of 
in .Danger. the "wash-tub" on the 

stock exchanges, and lie- 
promises 10 make it lively for any one who engages 
in the operation if he can lay his finger on them. This 
is an old custom on all exchanges, but before the in- 
troduction of the immense number of outside stocks, 
mining and otherwise, it was seldom if ever prac- 
tised. In dealing with the better class of stocks, it 
is rare that any "washing" is done, and then only 
when it becomes necessary to make a quotation for 
the guidance of holders of the security. In this there- 
is no harm done to any one. However, when the sys- 
tem is resorted to for the purpose of selling the stock 
of some worthless wild-cat, the Exchange itself 
should be one of the first to assist in stamping out 
the nefarious practice. Its privileges are then being 
used to further the end of men who should be ranked 
with the "get-rich-quick swindlers, who find it 
cheaper and almost as effective to advertise their base 
goods through the medium of an official stock list 
as through the business columns of a paper, where 
the fact that it then takes the form of an advertise- 
ment is, or ought to, suffice to put investors on their 
guard. The trouble in securing a conviction is cer- 
tain to be a most difficult matter, recognizing the fact 
that the dupes of the share fakers are usually more 
inclined to conceal their mistake than to bear wit- 
ness in a case calculated to expose their stupidity 
and rank cupidity to the world. It is in order, never- 
theless, to wish Mr. Anbury success in his efforts to 
check such methods, which militate, were the truth 
told, against a legitimate industry and the business 
of the brokers who wink at the underhand work. 

The arrival of Daniel Guggen- 
Selby Smelter to heim, head of the Guggenheim 
Be Modernized. Exploration Company, and 
chairman of the executive board 
of the American Securities Company, now in control 
of the Pacific Coast smelters, including the Selby 
works, and the fact that his mission here is to modern- 
ize the refinery of the last named concern, will stamp 
as correct the statement which originally appeared in 
the News Letter to the effect that Mr. John Hays 
Hammond closed the deal on behalf of the Guggen- 
heim syndicate during his last visit to this city. The 
question of ownership is now settled beyond perad- 
venture of doubt by the present turn of events, and 
the proprietary interest established by the changes 
about to be inaugurated in the plant. The Guggen- 
heim interest in the Oroville dredging properties 
about to be turned over to the Venture Corporation 
is not a small one by any means, and this is only one 
of the many interests owned in this and other Western 
States by this wealthy and enterprising firm. Judg- 
ing from the material and expensive improvements 
about to be inaugurated at the Selby smelter, it is 
intended to be made one of the leading plants of the 
country. 

The Comstock market, outside 
Pine-St. Market of Savage and Norcross, contin- 
ues weak, and taking into con- 
sideration the absolutely determined value of the ore 
discovery in Ophir. the fact can only be ascribed to 
manipulation for some purpose not apparent for the 
moment. An attempt is suggested by the determined 



effort to depress values that there is some plan on 
foot to secure the shares of some other mine or mines 
prior to a bull move, which is predicated by the favor- 
able conditions which now prevail, not only in Ophir, 
but at other points along the lode. The strength in 
Savage and its neighbor is due to the fact that a 
move has been made at last to attack the ore body, 
known to exist on and above the level of the Sutro 
tunnel. These stocks will sell higher when this im- 
portant work is more advanced, and other stocks in 
the vicinity are in line-to follow suit, all the work in 
this quarter being directed toward the exploitation of 
large reserves of low grade ores which, with the sys- 
tem of mining now inaugurated, can be extracted and 
milled to good advantage. The determined manner 
in which the majority of the shareholders in the Com- 
stock mines freeze on to their shares undoubtedly 
has much to do with the delayed activity in the 
market, as a large amount of many of the companies' 
shares are now out among the people. Everything 
now indicates a "hull" market in the future. When 
it will start is something no one outside of a favored 
few are ever likely to find out, until it is upon them. 



The movement in the Tonopah-Goldfield-Hullfrog 
group is still comparatively light, although the mar- 
ket for these shares is well sustained by buying or- 
ders, which, however, is limited to the better class of 
shares. In the meantime, the news from the mines 
is decidedly favorable, nnd before the fall arrives, 
many more mines will be added to the list of pro- 
ducers and the number of dividend paying properties 
will be larger. This will bring grist to the mills of 
the brokers, and a lively season of trading can be 
anticipated. 



Gold dredging in California is the subject of a 
very interesting bulletin just issued by the Califor- 
nia Slate Mining Bureau. It gives very fully in detail 
a history of this industry which is proving one of 
the most lucrative branches of mining ever yet taken 
up here. According to this bulletin the output of 
gold from this source alone in 1903 was $1,415,119, 
the dredges along the Feather river in the neighbor- 



Starr (BL Dulf er 

SAN FRANCISCO and TONOPAH 

STOCK COMMISSION BROKERS 
Tonopah, 

Goldfield, 

Bullfrog 

OFFICES 

Merchants' Exchange Building, Sao Francisco; Tonopah, Nev 
H. W. Hellman Building. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Members— S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. 



July 22. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IuhmI of Uroville being accredited with $1,3 
the .<. inuumt. It is shown that in tin 

riit twenty-five dredge"! wen- in 
three wore at work near Folsom, mn- in Siskiyou. 

mi Trinity, and one in Yuba County, in 
Now there art- 28 dredges in the Oroville district, 
five at Folsom, our in Calaveras, two in Trinit) 
in Siskiyou, and two in Yuba, making a total of 
dredges. A few more years will see this numb 
dredges quadrupled, and at work all over the north- 
ern portion of the State, and the business itself rank- 
ing as one of the most important in the State. 



The owners of the bitj gold dredging properties in 
the vicinity of Oroville and along the banks of the 
Feather and Bear rivers have, it is said, closed a deal 
with the big Venture Company of London to sell 
their holdings for a sum said to amount to $3,000,000. 
These valuable properties have developed a large 
amount of gold in reserves, and the new purchasers 
are likely to make big money out of their investment. 
There are now. it is said, eight dredges already/ at 
work on these properties, and orders for six more 
have been placed. According to the report received 
here of the sale, the stock of the company incor- 
porated in London to bt'-- these properties has already 
been fully subscribed. 

BAY VIEW PARK HOMES. 

L!ay View Park, adjoining Berkeley and reached 
by the Key Route and San Pablo avenue county line 
car, had many interested visitors last Sunday. 
But, for that matter, no day passes without people 
from San Francisco, Alameda, Oakland and Berkeley 
going to the Park to see what they can see. As is 
generally known, Bay View Park is becoming the 
centre of what in time will be a little city of homes, 
and not a few families are taking time and opportunity 
by the forelock, so to speak, to secure the more eli- 
gible locations. The association that has the matter 
in hand had been casting about for a long time for 
a location for home building that would secure the 
ideal site as to the lay of the land, climate and con- 
venience to car lines for suburban homes, and at the 
same time near enough to the business centers of the 
cities named to make going and coming inexpensive 
and comfortable. Bay View Park was finally selected 
because it possessed every requisite advantage for 
home building which, together with the rapid transit 
facilities of the Key Route boats and the fast cars of 
San Pablo road, left nothing more to be desired. Then 
again, the interests of families desiring to erect homes 
of their own were considered when it was decided to 
place the cost of a whole building lot at a less price 
than real estate could be had by the foot front in any 
of the outlying districts of San Francisco, while the 
transportation fares would not materially differ. All 
things considered, therefore, it would seem like a 
useless expenditure of one's savings to invest in lots 
at very much more per foot than the entire cost of a 
Bay View Park building site. The difference in cost 
would come very handy in building a better house 
and beautifying the grounds. And, moreover, what 
could be more conducive to health and afford more 
delightful daily recreation than crossing the bay on 
one of the Key Route's floating palaces? 

To be sure, it takes twelve to fifteen minutes longer 
to reach the other side, but the luxuriously furnished 
cars of the Key Route and the rapid running makes 
the car ride practically the continuation of the boat 
ride. But of course the greatest pleasure one would 
find would be in reaching his own home amid flowers 
and fruits away from the dust and noise of the city. 



l/T?.°ID 




WE BUY AND SELL 

Com stock, Tonopah, Goldfield and 
Bullfrog Stocks 

ZADIG & COMPANY 

306 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of— San Francisco Stock Exchange. 
California Stock uud Oil Exchange. Merchant's Exchange. 



William S. Thomas, C. E., E. M. 

MINING AND CONSULTING ENGINEER 
Prompt and Reliable Assaying 

Rhyolite, : Nevada 



INVESTMENT 
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SAVED ON THE COST IN BUYING THE 

Alaska 
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309-311-313-315-317 Market St., S. F. 



The Fruit erie 



FRESH VEGETABLES. FRESH FRVITS 

Our products are of the highest quality. 
Our customers are among the best families. 
MAY WE SERVE YOU? 
GEO BR1TNEB. Pr.p. Telephone East I lit 1239 POLK STREET 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 





White Whittlesey, who will beeiu an engagement at the AJcazar 

July 3lBt. 

* * * 

I felt terribly human this week at the Alcazar. I 
felt the full depth of human pity. 1 was not ashamed 

to own it. VI) heart simply overflowed with it. And 
I was so moved by the sight of a very human spec- 
tacle — a human heart taken up to the high raptures 
of heavenly bliss, and then sent down to the nether 
hell of sadness and despair, while being tortured on 
the way down. The heart of a woman it was — a Gei- 
sha girl — and if you have a vibrant chord of sympathy 
in your nervous make-up, it will thrill for her, or 
else \ <ui are not human. 

( Ine other thing affected me at the Alcazar, the 
verj opposite of the first. It was inhumanity. I had 
to hate somebody. I couldn't hate Horton. the lover 
— one felt sorn for him; nor Karon Sanda, the evil 



influence— it wasn't his fault. Problem: what to 
hate? So I just got in and hated the world, hated it 
hard, and wanted to hit it. Haled intelligent Ameri- 
cans for snobs who wanted to separate mated lovers, 
hated Japan for customs that caused the separation, 
and the entire civilization of cant that says conven- 
tionality must be rated above human emotion. Down 
with it! 1 am a very Nihilist against it! And if you 
listen to the Geisha girl's history you will add to mine 
your breath of malediction. 

A simple, strong, effective play is "The Heart of a 
Geisha," and there's a heap of comedy till the end. 
As usual, an American lands up in Japan, gets into 
a Geisha tea house, where the girls are raising jov. 
Enters the innocent scion of the Eagle. "Have you 
ever played with Geisha?" is artlessly queried of him. 
He never has. "The beginning is easv enough; the 
trouble is to stop." And with these words the plot 
begins. Listen, ladies, our hero begins The Game. 
He meets the girls and starts thinking, and the sur- 
roundings don't remind him of home till arch Ko- 
hamma San appears, and then 'tis love, ardent, pas- 
sionate — to the last curtain. It reminds me — 1 speak 
advisedly — of Sapho purified in about a thousand 
dilutions of mutual love. Circumstance of meeting, 
the devoted, brief alliance, the tragic separation, re- 
call Daudet's story. I was always able, unlike some 
highly virtuous critics, to get up sympathy over 
Sapho. How infinitely more regarding refined Ko- 
hanima San ! But — back to work. 

Listen to the Jon Keeno Song! Thinking the for- 
eign complications might be too much for me. I took 
along a friend versed in the Japan end. The girls got 
to singing a gleeful song, ripcty rip, beginning "Jon 
Keeno. Jon Keeno." It winds up, "Yokahama — 
Nagasaki — Hey!" My friend started from his seat. 
"Is it possible:'' he cries. That was exactly wdiat I 
was wondering. The girl in the middle of the ring 
pulls off her coat: second "hey" anil she pulls off tin- 
other, till she stands before us in the sweetest white 
and pink — and then runs swiftly down center, off 
stage. "Well," said my friend, "she didn't have the 
nerve. They don't stop so soon over in Japan." This 
game the ( ieisba girls play is like the "e-ni-mi-ni-mo 
— out you go" of our childhood. Only the Geisha 
girl — she is counted all the way out. 

One scene epitomizes all the sweetness of line, its 
trust and sublimity, above all other things 1 have ever 
seen rendered dramatically. We are in Kohamma 
San's a lartment. Morton is saying he will soon have 
good news. "1 don't want nothing new!" says she. 
Just love; just the man — no change. Was plaintive- 
ness ever greater than this desire for tranquil happi- 
ness? Kohamma is incarnated vividly by Miss 
Crosby. Adele Belgarde, as the American girl, im- 
parts to her role the finest culture and feeling 1 have 
ever observed from that lad v. 1'. G. C. 



LIQUOR HABIT 

This seems impossible but is God's truth. This treatment has 
never failed in a single case. 24 hours after you come, you go 
away permanently cured. 

CURED IN 

THE DR. CARSON ONE DAY LIQUOR CURE CO. 

Offices— 604 Montgomery St.. cor. Clay. Black 643. 

Sanitarium— gig McAllister near Franklin. South 714 

24 HOURS 



July 33. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 




La Belle Estellita, the famous Spanish dancer, who will 
appear at the Orpheum to-morrow afternoon. 
* * * 

Before a large, distinguished audience "Rob Roy," 
ever rich in humor, apt of plot, thrilling with har- 
monious Highland melodies, experienced a hurricane 
presentation at the Tivoli. It was like old times. 
Not a vacant seat was left at the rise of the curtain. 
Delightful to state, "old favorites," as our grand- 
fathers called them, had returned. A triumph such 
as the Bostonians knew in their salad days was 
evoked by way of greeting. Arthur Cunningham, 
dashing, fulsome, with romantic voice of eight months 
ago, received repeated rounds of inspiring encore. 
San Francisco warmed up quite in an unnatural way. 
Anna Lichter, another wanderer come back to our 
appreciative bosom, got several large helpings of the 
salad. With notes fetching and exquisite, she shared, 
at least, in the honors accorded Kate Condon. I must 
give, however, the fun hit of the evening to his ex- 
cellency, Teddy Webb. With his Highland fling, de- 
livered a la Honolulu, he made the sensation of the 
night. By inimitable business, a killing rendition of 
his lines, he kept his house in a whirlwind uproar. 



nk Hayes, .ill legs and mouth, tn 
himself into the corned) emotions of all beholders. 

I" p< : in "esprit" of per f ormance, in her 

Grace i'.ilr.tta put herself 
higher up as a -tar nf musical comedy. She lived 
through every instant of the show, made people for- 
get the name of trouble, and in her Grenadier song 
rose to an enviable height of vocal artistry, Nor must 
I forget the churns -that chorus which would win 
admiration on that little alley called Broadway. 

There is no doubt about it. Glickman's Yiddish 
players presented an operetta, "Alexander, Prince of 
Jerusalem," at the Grand Opera House Monday and 
Tuesday that is worth going a long way to see and 
hear. The scenes and incidents are conspicuously 
i >riental. but that only adds interest as the story is 
unfolded. From a musical point of view, no room 
tor harsh criticism will be found. Indeed, grand 
opera would be a fitter presentation for such artists 
as Miss Clara Ralfalo, M. Goldberg and David 
Schoenholtz. Each of them is ,1 thorough musician, 
possessing a voice that shows the highest culture. 
The acting is natural and good, but like sensible art- 
ists that they are, their aim is to tell the story in the 
music of song rather than in stage effects and unnatu- 
ral poises of body and swinging of legs and arms. 

There is variety at the Orpheum this week. The 
hold-overs and the new-comers are of equal import- 
ance in the make-up of the bill. The singing and dia- 
logue work of Bertie Fowler is excellent, while her 
stage mannerisms pronounce her an expert. Harper, 
Desmond and Bailey, colored entertainers, are very 
good and amuse the audience to the exploding point. 
Talbot and Rodgers, formerly San Franciscans, made 
quite a hit, and were well received by their old ac- 
quaintances. Max Figman and Adelaide Manola 
gave a brief little comedy called "Catching a Hus- 
band," which is one of the best turns on the bill. The 
life-daring bicycle act of Wizard Stone and Irene 
Stone continues to startle the audience, and the 




Anna Lichter, the favorite soprano, who is singing the role 
of Janet in "Rob Roy" at the Tivoli. 



IB 



San Francisco news letter. 



De Koe trio of European acrobats do clever bal- 
ancing tricks, the junior member of the team show- 
ing marked ability. 

* * * 

Curiosity is one of the most powerful of the in- 
centives to human action, nor does it make a great 
deal of difference what the nature of the thing or in- 
cident is that calls the curious to rush to it. That is 
why even standing room only could not be had by 
belated people at the Central. The herculean ex-prize- 
fighter, John L. Sullivan, was appearing in "Fast 
Life in New York," and all the town wanted to see 
the physical giant. Although he did his part very 
well, he is in no sense a finished or polished actor, 
but he is painstaking enough to suggest an honest 
effort to get the most out of his role, aullivan knows 
the worth of stage effects, and hence the ring and its 
belongings and scenes were very realistic, which so 
pleased the audience that the walls of the building 
were in danger of being thrown down by the ap- 
plause. The other members of the troupe did their 
parts exceedingly well. 

* * * 

So great has been the success of Bothwell Browne's 
Japanese musical extravaganza, "Princess Fan Ian," 
that it will be continued for one more week at the 
Chutes. Nearly three hundred clever children lake 
part in the production. The "Champagne Dance." 
participated in by twelve pretty misses, the ballet of 
"the early and olden days," and the "Song of Six 
Cities," are but three of the twenty specialties with 

which the extravaganza is enlivened. 

* * * 

Ezra Kendall is to present his latest success, 
"Weatherbeaten Benson," during his forthcoming en- 
gagement at the Columbia Theatre. Kendall used 
this comedy success all of last season, and under the 
direction of Liebler & Company will come, supported 
by a strong company. Kendall's engagement opens 
on Monday, the 31st inst. Seats go on sale next 

Thursday. 

* * * 

"The Heart of a Geisha" will continue at the Al- 
cazar Theatre for one more week. White Whittlesey 
reappears on July 31st. 

* * * 

Ibsen's famous psychological study. "Ghosts," is 
to be given a special production by l.elasco, Mayer 
& I 'rice, with Harry Mestayer and a special company 
in the cast. Supporting Mestayer will be seen such 
well-known Eastern artists as Kale Dalglish, (irace 
Goodall, Edwin B. Bailey and Robert Wayne. The 
performances will be given at the California'Theatre. 
matinee and night, on Saturdav. |ulv 29th. 

* * * 

Mariska. Hungarian prima donna, is to appear at 
Fischer's Theatre next week. 

* * * 

Hersehel May all will make his reappearance at the 
Central Theatre on next Monday night in the leading 
role of Joseph Arthur's comedy drama, "Blue Jeans." 
This bill is one of the best ever ottered by the Central 
management, and should prove an immense drawing 
card for the week. The music selections have been 
arranged with care, and should please, as the orches- 
tra has become a feature of the Central under the 
capable management of W. ( 1. Callinan. 

* * * 

S. Miller Kent, who occupies a foremost position 
among the leading men of the legitimate stage of 
America, will make his firs': vaudeville appearance in 
this city at the ' Irpheum Sunday afternoon. He will 



July 22, 1905. 

appear in a new and clever one-act playlette by Byron 
Ongley, entitled "Just Dorothy," and will be accord- 
ed capable support. La Belle Estellita, who is hailed 
in the old world as the legitimate successor to Car- 
mencita as a pantomimic terpsichorean artiste, will 
present some of the dances that have gained her fame 
on two continents. The Messenger Boys' Trio, com- 
posed of Thomas Dunne, William Howard and Eu- 
gene Howard, and singers and parodists of renown, 
will be new to San Francisco. 

* * * 

1 >c Koven & Smith's comic opera, "Rob Roy," 
continues to pack the Tivoli at every performance. 
It enters on its second week Monday night with a 
certaintv of a long and successful run. 

* * * 

To-night (Friday), to-morrow and Sunday nights 
Glickman's Yiddish players will appear at the Grand 
( )pera House in the "Jewish Hamlet," and for Sat- 
urday and Sunday matinees they will present "Kol 
Nidrey." The programmes for next week will be as 
follows: Monday, "Jewish King Lear;" Tuesday, 
"Gabriel ;" Wednesday. Thursday and Friday, "The 
Jewish Vice King," which is said to be a more inter- 
esting and intense play than "Kol Nidrey ;" Satur- 
day. "Sulamith, Daughter of Jerusalem," and Sunday, 
"Joseph in Egypt." For the Saturday and Sundav 
matinees "The Jewish Priest" will be given. 



A\ra-7c*r TKflnhpQ BilabcO A Mateb. Proprietor* 

rtltvd/.ctr lneatre e. D. Pbio*. Gen'l. Mgr. Tel. Ali-»iar 

Week commencing Monday, July 24. Regular matinees Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

The Alcazar Stock Company. One more week of the sensa- 
tional success 

THE HEART OF (\ GEIShjfl 

Colgate Baker's romance of modern Japan. 

Juliet Crosby as Kohamma 8au. 

July 3i-The favorite romantic actor. WHITE WHITTLESEY. 

in Hackett's 

FORTUNES OF THE KING 

Evenings 25 to "5 cents. Matinees Saturday and Sunday 26 to 
50 cents. 

C or\t ml Th**n1-r^ Belasco & Mayer, proprietors 
^^IJLTUJ 1 MOULT*?. Market St.. near Ith, Phone South 633 

Week beginning July 24. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Joseph Arthur's masterpiece. The thrilling comedy drama, of 
reputation. 

BLUE JEANS 

Reappearance of the favorite actor. Hersehel Mayall. 

Wonderous scenic effects, quaint comedy and tremendous 

heart interest. The great saw mill scene. 

Special engagement of Agnea Rauken to play the role of June. 

Next-The Cattle King. 

Prices evening ioc to sue. Matinees loc. 16c, 26o. 

Tivoli Opera House. °° rn * r Ed M a£n d 8 tr..t. 

Second week begins Monday night. 

De Koven and Smith's romantic comic opera 

ROB ROY 

The Bostoniane' great success. 

Enthusiastic reception of Kate Coudon. Arthur Cunningham 

Anna Lichter. Frank R. Hayes. 

Produced under the stage direction of Max Freeman. 

First tim« at p ipular prices. 

Matin«e Saturday. Usual Tivoli prices, as, so and 76 cents. 

O rn hpi irr. O'Farrell St., 

r \Ji lOUn;. bet Stockton and Powell Sts. 

Weekcommenoing Sunday matinee. July 23 

e VAUDEVILLE FESTIVAL 

Mr. S. Miller Kent and Company : Wilton Brothers: Messenger 
Boys Trio: La Belle Estellita; De Koe Trio: Bertie Fowler; 
Talbot and lingers; Orpheum Motion Pictures and last week 
of HENRIETTE DE 8ERRI8' BRONZE AND MARBLE 
ST ATU AR 1 . 

Resr'Har matinees every Wednesday. Thursday. Saturday and 
Hunday Price*— inc. '25c. 50c. 

Grand Opera House 

GLICKMAN'S YIDDISH PLAYERS 

Second ween begins Monday night. 

Special ei gauenient of Mine. Bertha Tanzman. 

Monday. Tue-Iay-TEWISH KING LEAR. GABRIEL. 

Weli^s av, Thursday, Friday-JEWISH VICE KING, ibetter 

than h..| Nidrey ) 

Saturday . siinday-SULAMITH. Daughter of Jerusalem. 

Saturday ni.it. and Hunday mat.— THE JEWISH PRIEST. 
Coming— Denis O'Sullivan. 
Prices— 26. :15. en. '6e. and »l. 



July 27. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



PRODUCTION OF TIN IN 1904. 

During 1904 the production of tin "re in the United 
States amounted to 159 short tuns, which contained 
from 40 to 70 per cent of metallic tin and wer< 
tained from deposits near Gaffney, South 1 arolina; 
Tinton, South Dakota, and Buck Creek, Alaska. 

Nearly all of this tin ore was shippi . land 

for smelting. Although about 40 per cent of the tin 
produced in the world is consumed in the United 
States, there has been practically no production of 
the metal in this country until the last year or two. 

During the last few years the production of tin in 

the world has not been equal to the demand, and the 
accumulated stocks of tin that have been held in 
various countries have become very much diminished 
since 1890. ( )ne of the chief reasons for this in- 
creasing demand for tin is the large growth of tin- 
canning industry, and also of the use of tin boxes and 
cases in shipping sundry articles. 

< In account of the demand for tin and the high 
price it brings, a new industry was started a few years 
ago, which is known as "detinning" tin scrap, and this 
has now become of considerable importance in the 
United States. Many hundred tons of metallic tin 
and chemical salts of tin, chiefly chlorides, are pro- 
curable each year from the chemical or electrolytic 
treatment of new tin scrap, which is obtained from 
tin can and fruit can factories. 

( in account of the value of the metal tin, it is pos- 
sible to work very low grade ores if they occur in 
quantity, and usually little difficulty is experienced in 
cleaning and concentrating a tin ore so as to obtain 
nearly pure concentrate. Cassiterite, a tin oxide, is 
the usual tin ore. Although the American produc- 
tion has thus far been very small, it may be the be- 
ginning of what may become an important industry 
in this country. 

Dr. Joseph Hyde Pratt, of the United States Geo- 
logical Survey, who has written a brief report on the 
production of tin in 1904 for the Survey's annual vol- 
ume, "Mineral Resources of the United States,'' 
states that the total production of tin in the world 
in 1904, exclusive of the production in China, was 
92,243 long tons. The product comes mainly from 
the Malay States, Banka and Billiton, Bolivia, Eng- 
land and Australia. A very small quantity _ is also 
produced in Austria, Germany, Japan, Mexico and 
America. There was a slight decrease, amounting to 
1650 long tons, in the estimated production of tin in 
1904 as compared with 1903. The consumption of 
tin in 1904 is estimated at approximately 94,755 tons, 
which is 2,512 tons more than the actual production. 

The tin imported into the United States for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1904, amounted to 40,832 
short tons, valued "at $21,486,311. The greater part 
of the tin consumed in the United States is produced 
in the Malay Peninsula. 



Manicuring 

AS IT SHOULD BE DONE. We don't cut the cuticle. 

LADIES and GENTLEMEN 

Who enjoy having their nails cared for. but have suffered 
at the hands of inexperienced or careless manicurists are 
invited to call and inspect our methods. We can please 
you. We treat the nails. 

LADIES 25c. CINTLEMEN 50c. 

cTWR. ffl. cTWRS. 

A. F. COSGROVE 

110 GEARY ST. Entire 5th Floor. SAN FRANCISCO 



MARE 
MONEY 
BUILDING 
HOUSES 

Building homes on the installment plan is 

the safest and most profitable business that 

you can put your money into. 

San Francisco, Oakland, Alameda and 

Berkeley are being built up almost entirely 

in this way. There is no better field in the 

country for making money in building 

operations. 

Many men have made fortunes at it. By 

becoming a stockholder in the Suburban 

Building and Land Company you share in 

the profits of its building business. 

Send for folder that tells all about it. 



THOS. H. GUPTILL, Sec. 
615 Examiner Building. S. F. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 8 

Amount > ar share JO cents 

Levied July 1, 1905 

Delinquent in office Aug. A, 1905 

Day of sale of delinquent ttock Aug. 22, 1905 

E. L. PARKER. Secretary. 
Office— Room 14, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Julia Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 2 

Amount per share 3 cents 

Levied July 12, 1906 

Delinquent in office Aug. 15, 1905 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Sept. 4, 1906 

J. STADTFELD Jr., Secretary. 
Office— Room 66. No- 809 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Oal. 




PIEKCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO.. Inc. 

8TOKAGE, MOVING. PACKING AND SHIPPING 
Separate rooms built for the Storage of Household 
Furniture. 



OFFICE AND 

WAREHOUSE 



EDDY & FILLMORE STREETS. Tel. West 828 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 




A week or two of "roughing it" is now on the pro- 
gramme of a successful summer season. Society has 
learned the lesson of contrast, and realizing that the 
conventional joys stale unless jolted now and then, 
they are taking to the woods to get "next" to nature. 
A great many people have permanent camps, where 
they can run when the shut-in life palls. E. W. Hop- 
kins has a camp on Boca, where he takes his family 
for two or three weeks of every year, and there they 
get a whiff of the Sierra outdoors, which braces them 
for the strenuous life of society women. 

There are any number of these permanent camps 
scattered along the Russian River. Several promi- 
nent Bohemian Club members have pitched wickiups 
near the grove, where the followers of the Owl hold 
their midsummer jinks. The Fields have one of the 
most complete canvas country homes in the State. 
There are something like a dozen tent bedrooms, each 
one as daintily and completely furnished as in any 
country home; a library, living room and all the 
other accessories of a house are found in this ideal 
camp. The week of the Fourth the Fields entertained 
Joe Redding, Dick Hotaling and a score of con- 
genials. With Charley Field as master of ceremonies 
a celebration was held thai will go ringing down the 
memories of the guests as the "greatest ever." 

The Adirondacks are honeycombed with camps 
that are log or canvas palaces, and it seems a pity 
that more Californians shim Id not realize the possi- 
bilities and delights of this sort of summering — camp- 
ing, with all its privations and hardships eliminated, 
and yet enough of the llavor left to give it a tang. 
Sleeping out of doors acts as a sedative on jangling 
nerves, and at least pari of every summer should be 

spent in this way. 

* * * 

The marriage of Mrs. Caroline Martin and John 
Dahlgren, a well-known young Washington attorney, 
came as a bolt from the blue, so carefully had Mrs. 
Martin held the lid down on her matrimonial inten- 
tions. Since the death of her second husband, Henry 
McLean Martin, her name has at various times been 
coupled with distinguished men who at various times 
paid her court during her long residence in Washing- 
ton, but their suits did not prosper. Mrs. Martin had 
been spending the summer in San Francisco, and a 
day or two before the wedding the Maryland attor- 
ney joined the Martin party. Her most intimate 
friends did not suspect until eight o'clock on the 
evening of the marriage that Mr. Dahlgren came in 
the guise of a bridegroom. Those who received tele- 
phone summons to be at the Swedenborgean Church 
at 9 o'clock to witness the ceremony were Mrs. Thur- 
low McMullen, Mr. and ,.[:... John F. Boyd, Miss 
Louise Boyd, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Keeney, Mrs. 
Kent, Horace Piatt, John Piatt, Mrs. Corbet, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. J. Bartnett, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hall, Miss 
Mary Callaghan, Henry Callaghan, Robert Huie, 
Mr. Henry and Dr. Healy. Mr. and Mrs. Frances 
Grace, the daughter and son-in-law of the newly-made 
Mrs. Dahlgren, were evidently delighted with her 
choice. 

Mrs. Dahlgren has been married twice before. As 
a girl, Caroline Colton was one of the belles of San 
Francisco, and with her sister, the late Mrs. Critten- 
den Thornton, she queened over the beautiful Colton 



home on Nob Hill, which for so many years has stood 
with barred doors, a stately reminder of the past. 
While still in her teens .Miss Caroline married Dana 
Cook. Shortly after their daughter, Theodosia, now 
Mrs. Grace, was born. Mr. Cook died, leaving his 
widow a handsome fortune. Her second husband, 
Henry McLean Martin, died about ten years ago. 
A daughter by this marriage is Miss Katherine Mar- 
tin. The Dahlgrens are very prominent in Washing- 
ton society. Mr. John I)ahlj, r ren's grandfather was 
Admiral Dahlgren, and his family has always had an 
enviable place in the diplomatic and social life in 
Washington. Although many years her husband's 
senior, Mrs. Dahlgren is a very handsome and young 
looking woman. 

* * * 

Just as soon as Miss Leslie Green becomes Mrs. 
Howard Huntington, the young couple will leave for 
a tour of Europe, and while they are honeymooning 
on the continent a handsome home will be erected 
for them in Los Angeles. Plans for the house are 
already being perfected, and if carried out, it will 
certainly be the most beautiful place in the South- 
land. As Miss Green's married sister also lives in 
the South, she has small regrets about making her 
future home there instead of in San Francisco. 

* * * 

, Mrs. H. M. A. Miller has returned from a trip to 
Alaska, having abbreviated her visit in order to come 
home and assist at the preparations for the marriage 
of her niece. Miss Leslie Green, to Howard Hiinting- 
ton. 

* » * 

James 1). Phelan and his sister. Miss Mollie Phe- 
lati, write that they are having a delightful time in 
Berlin, though they were a bit disappointed in not 
finding Mrs. Charlemagne Tower, wife of the Ameri- 
can Ambassador to Germany, in Berlin. Mrs. Tower 
and her children are summering in the Harz moun- 
tains, and it is possible that the Phelans may join 
the Towers there. Mrs. Charlemagne Tower was 
Miss Gertrude Smith, of Oakland. She was equally 



next Monday JULY M 

we shall inaugurate a 

Building Repair Sale 

which should prove intensely interesting to every lady in 
San Francisco and vicinity. 

As a result of the fire which occurred in the adjoining 
building on July 5th, several of our departments were 
flooded and extensive repairs rendered necessary. To 
make room for these, for 2 weeks we will offer unprecedented 

Bargains 
In Every Department 

affording opportunity to replenish china closets and kitchen 
outfits at from 15 to 50 per cent less than regular prices. 

See Monday Papers for Details 

NATHAN-DOHRMANN CO. 

122-132 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



July 32, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



.ir in San Francisco society, and it has n 
>ncd any surprise among her friends that she 
lias been able to help her husband fill his place in the 
diplomatic world with such faultless grace and tact, 
for she was always a girl with an umisuall 
and charming manner. 

» » » 

Miss Helen Daly, a popular and accomplish^ 
ciety girl of Oakland, became the bride of Herman 
J. Leffman, of San Francisco, last Saturday evening 
at Mission Dolores Church. Mr. Leffman is a well- 
known business man of San Francisco, and his bride 
istcr of Mrs. Charles B. Tomson, proprietor of 
Castle Rock. 

* * » 

Mrs. l'hebe Hearst who, since her arrival from 
Washington, has been dividing her time between her 
hacienda at Pleasanton and San Francisco, has de- 
cided to leave shortly for Wyntoon, her beautiful 
country home on the Wheeler estate near Shasta. 
Mrs. Hearst will entertain President and Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Ide Wheeler, who later on will visit the Chas. 
Stetson Wheelers at The Bend, which is one of the 
most attractive country homes in California. 

* * * 

Arrivals at Hotel Del Monte for the week ending 
July 16th : Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels and fam- 
ily, Dr. and Mrs. MacMonagle, Mrs. Joseph Donohoe 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. McVittrick, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Oxnard, J. S. Rathbone, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mark Gerstle, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Scott, Maud C. 
Scott, Leland Scott, Miss Bunker, Mr. and Mrs. 
Adolph Roos, Sherwood Hopkins, Miss Mabel L. 
Becker, Miss Florence Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Parrott and family, Mrs. R. G. Hayne, Robert Y. . 
Hayne, C. de Guigne, Vc. and Vtesse. de Tristan, 
Captain A. H. Payson, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Grey, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Jones, Dr. and Mrs. H. L. Be- 
nepe, Mrs. Anna Gordon, San Francisco ; Mr. and 
Mrs. H. S. Manning, H. S. Manning, Jr., Russell A. 
Bliss, Arthur J. Ryan, New York. 

* * * 

The luncheon given last Friday in the Palm Gar- 
den of the Palace Hotel by Mrs. H. E. Huntington 
in honor of her prospective daughter-in-law, Miss 
Green, of Berkeley, was one of the most delightful 
and distinctive affairs of the season. Mrs. Hunting- 
ton is a charming and accomplished hostess. It was 
a small affair, only forty covers being laid. 

Recent arrivals at Hotel Rafael during the past 
week were: Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Watson and children, 



YOU CAN EAT 

"POI" 

The National Diih of the Hawaiian! 

With Relish 

A natural health food 
A great delicacy 

A godsend to people who 
suffer from dyspepsia. 

For sale by 
GOLDBERG, BO WEN « CO. 

or sent prepaid on receipt 
of 60c by 

HAWAIIAN POI FLOUR CO. 

HONOLULU, H. I. 

Lutted's Hawaiian "POI" 




•1 

K. Abel. Miss K. V. Hvina.i. Mr. M H. I'inck- 
ard, Mr. I'. S. Baker, Mr. 1,. SutTO, Mr. M. S Latham. 
Mr. S. Mines. Mr. I'. D. Knhn. Mr 1 I S.lmeclv. 
Mr. M. Howe. Mr. I. II. Toler, Mr. 11. I. Mitchell, 
Mr. J. L. Franks, Mr. II. Bremer, Mr. F. I>. Coch 
rane, Mr. J. S. Cochrane, Mrs. A. A. I'atTt. Miss S. 
Coffin. 

* * * 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
July 17 (Monday)— Mrs. Caroline Colton Martin to 

John Dahlgren, of Washington, 1). C. 
July 18 (Tuesday)— Miss Leontine Denker of Los 

Angeles, to Dr. Giannini of San Francisco. 
July 19 (Wednesday) — Miss May O'JDonnell to J. 

Campbell Shorb at St. Mary's Cathedral. Miss 

F.Ila Sterrett. niece of Mrs. ( uorge Wheaton, of 

Oakland, to Edwin Barbour. 

ENTERTAINMENTS. 

July 16 (Sunday) — Mrs. Charles Lyman Bent gave a 
tea in honor of Mrs. Hayley Bennett of Little 
Rock, Arkansas. 

July 18 (Tuesday) — Mr. Herman Oelrichs gave a 
yachting party at Santa Cruz, followed by a din- 
ner. 



Briggs — There go two of as thorough men of 

the world as I ever saw. Griggs — Where have they 
lived? Briggs — Well, one of them has traveled 
around the world all his life, and the other has stayed 
home in his native village and thought about it. 

The Star Hair Remedy is the best tonle; restores tolor, stops falling 
Druegisti, hairdressers. Accept no substitute. Star Remedy Co.. 
1338 Polk street, telephone East 4625. 



Berthing Sviits 

Underwear 
Sweaters 
Hosiery . 

FOR MEN AND WOMEN 




KNITJTINGCO. 



60 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Open Saturdays till 10 p. m. 



Try Our 



Stanford=Richmond Coal 

From the Richmondvale District 
Newcastle, N. S. W., Australia. 

Intense heat, little ash, and no clinKer. 
Direct from the mine to the consumer. 



SOLD TO TRADE ONLY. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT AND 

SEE THAT YOU OET IT. 



Richmond Coal Co. 

Agents 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Seal Skin Garments a Specialty 

It affords me much pleasure 
to announce that the latest 
styles for season 1905-1906 
have arrived, and I am now 
prepared to execute orders 
for fashionable fur garments 
nf all kinds at short notice. 
• Best Quality, Correct Style 
and Perfect Fit. 
My fur garments are guar- 
anteed to give eDtire satis- 
faction, because they are 
made of the very best quality 
of skins, by the most compe- 
tent furriers, fashioned after authentic styles, and fit perfectly. 
Therefore they, look well, fit well and wear well. 

RE-DYEING, REPAIRING AND REMODELING 
of earments to the latest styles receives the same careful atten- 
tion as new work. 

H. OSWALD, Reliable Furrier 
637 O'FARRELL ST. Tel. East 8848. SAN FRANCISCO 




THE 

FOUR.- TRACK 

NEW* 

The Great Illustrated Magazine of Travel and Education 

150 or More Pages Monthly. 

Its scope and character are indicated by the follow- 
ing titles of articles that have appeared in re- 
cent issues; all profusely illustrated. 

Eleven Hours of Afternoon Cy Warman 

The Americanization of Paris Alex. Hume Ford 

Bummer in Winter Minot J. Savage 

Where Blue Met Grey— Poem Thomas C- Harbaugh 

Rome Animal Models Julia D. Cowles 

Where Every Prospect Pleases... Kirk Monroe 

New England Witchcraft M. Imlay Taylor 

Time Defying Temples Allen Day 

NewYorkFrom An Air Ship BerthaSmith 

A King on American Soil T. D. MacGregor 

New Zealand T- E Donn« 

The Limited Express— Poem Nixon Waterman 

Tent-life Sir Edwin Arnold 

The Nub End of Canada Frank Yeich 

Corral and Lasso Minnie J. Reynolds 

Santo Domingo Frederick A. Ober 

Single Copies 10 Cents, or Ji.oo a Year; 

Foreign Countries Sl.50. 

Can be obtained of newsdealers, or by addressing 

GEORGE H. DANIELS, Publisher 

Room No. 14 A. 7 East 42d Street. New York 



GERMEA 



-FOR- 



BREAKFAST 



THE JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE CO., Awntt 




TOM 

DILLON 

SCO. 

OPPOSITE 

PALACE HOTEL 

IMS SPRINO STYLES 



July 22, 1905. 

Culinary Topics and 

Table Fashions 
PICNIC LUNCHEONS. 



By Cornelia C. Bedford. 

We are all better physically and mentally for a 
day now and then spent close to nature, with cares 
and responsibilities put aside for a few hours. Also, 
there is nothing more enjoyable than a picnic in 
some cool, pleasant spot, providing details have been 
planned beforehand and the day is propitious. Un- 
fortunately, some of us have become prejudiced 
against such outings because they bring to us memo- 
ries of sticky or insipid luncheons and the dreariness 
of uncongenial company. Where people are brought 
together en masse, the result is likely to be the re- 
verse of pleasant to many ; unless details are thought 
out, there is often discomfort which cannot be averted 
or overcome. 

The man or woman who has had experience in 
planning such outings will first of all limit the num- 
ber of invitations — more than a dozen entails the 
carrying of too large a quantity of food. The spot 
selected should be planned with reference to its shade 
and accessibility either by carriage or on foot from 
station or trolley line. A cool spring near at hand is 
desirable, but it should not be patronized unless its 
purity is assured. Several days ahead of time, the 
menu should be planned, the list of necessarily edibles 
made out as well as lists of utensils and such other 
articles as are liable to be needed ; then, if each article 
is checked off as packed, no indispensables will be 
missing when called for. When carriages are to be 
used, two hampers or baskets should be provided, 
one for utensils and dishes, etc., the other for food ; 
if, however, the carrying must be divided among the 
various members of the party, have on hand a num- 
ber of stout cardboard boxes of convenient size. 
When dishes, utensils, etc., must be reduced to the 
lightest proportions for hand carriage, provide paper 
or wooden plates and paper napkins; both of these 
articles are now made in artistic shapes and designs. 
Telescope drinking cups or bright new tin ones will 
not be found amiss, and the loss of a few new tin 
spoons will not be a grave matter. When a table 
cloth is to be used, one of bright red and white will 
be found better than a plain white one, as the grass 
makes the latter appear dingy. Of utensils, a pocket 
alcohol stove and a tin pail will make good coffee, 
providing the ground bean is tied loosely but se- 
curely in a muslin bag. A tin pie plate or two will 
prove just the thing for scrambling eggs, making a 
rabbit or frying cold potatoes. 

The way in which a lunch is packed is largely re- 
sponsible for its appearance at the time of serving. 
Even when daintily prepared, careless packing will 
prove ruinous to otherwise delicate dishes. For this 
reason it is well to erase from the menu all such ar- 
ticles as would be easily crushed or broken. Food 
should be firmly and compactly put up to ensure 
satisfactory carriage. In wrapping the edibles, 
waxed or paraffine paper should be freely used — a 
ream of five hundred medium sized sheets costs con- 
siderably less than a dollar, and is sufficient for a 
whole summer's outings ; it is much better than the 
usual unglazed light brown or white paper, as it ex- 
cludes odors ami keeps the food in good moist condi- 
tion. 

As for the menu itself, it will of necessity vary ac- 
cording to the whereabouts of the party. City dwell- 
ers have command of the best markets and can levy 



July aa. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

on all varieties of food, whether in "r ,>m ■ 
If the gentlemen <>f the party arc t.> tish and wi 
terwards prepare a (ire, a special hot course can be 
planned for and the necessary utensils added t,> the 
supply basket. Certain staples, such as fried chicken, 

COld meat-. Stuffed or plain boiled eggs, Sanch 
and fruit are sure to be relished when properly pre 
pared, and to these substantial can be added such 

things as the locality and the ingenuity of the ho 
will furnish. All of the following dishes arc suitable 
for picnic luncheons: 

Meats. — Fried chicken, disjointed before conking; 
roast chicken cut in portions before packing; broil,-, 1 
chicken ; rare roast beef cut in wafer-thin slices, then 
piled compactly and wrapped in paraffine paper; 
baked or boiled ham sliced or minced; sliced boile-l 
tongue. 

Fish. — Cold boiled or broiled salmon with mayon- 
naise in a bottle ; cold boiled lobsters or crabs ; spiced 
cold fish ; keiller sprotten or sardines in tins. 

Eggs. — Hard boiled ; deviled ; stuffed ; scotched, 
potted. 

Salads. — Potato; potato and egg; stuffed tomato 
or pepper; chicken and other meats in season; cold 
slaw- ; fruit ; dressing, preferably a cooked one, is 
packed separately. 

Cake. — Any kind of loaf cake or the same kinds 
baked in individual molds; no jelly or layer cakes. 

Miscellaneous. — Salted nuts, olives, pirn olas, pot- 
ted or fresh cheese, strained and bottled fruit juices 
with sugar syrup in separate bottle, pickles, cloth, 
napkins, dishes, silver, cups, salt, pepper, alcohol 
stove, matches, saucepan or pot, comb and brush, 
soap and towels, arnica, mustard, court plaster. 

It is seldom convenient or possible to carry butter 
in bulk, and for this reason sandwiches cannot well 
be eliminated from the menu. To have them in the 
best possible condition the bread should be at least 
one day old, and an oblong loaf will usually cut to 
the best advantage. With the butter worked until 
soft enough to spread easily, the filling in readiness, 
with an extremely sharp knife cut off the crust from 
the end of the loaf. Spread the cut end with butter, 
using a broad-bladed knife, then cut off a very thin 
slice. Before cutting the second slice spread its but- 
tered face with some of the filling. Pair it with the 
first slice, press together and cut into any desired 
shape. Repeat in this order until the necessary num- 
ber of sandwiches are made. Whatever the filling, 
it will be found best to have it so prepared that it 
can be smoothly spread on the bread. Cold meats or 
other similar firm ingredients should be put through 
the food chopper so as to ensure being finely and 
evenly chopped. In packing a quantity of sandwiches 
line the box with paraffine paper, then with a napkin 
or cloth which has been dipped in cold water, then 
wrung as tightly as possible ; this will keep them in 
the best condition. 

When salads are to be taken, cut the cooked meats 
or vegetables in half-inch dice — when the food chop- 
per is used the effect is too much like hash. Add the 
seasoning and pack in glass jars; lettuce should be 
thoroughly washed, wrapped in a wet cloth, then in 
heavy paper and kept as cool as possible. The dress- 
ing should be put up in a separate jar and added to 
the salad just before it is served. As heat and the 
motion due to carrying. may tend to make the oil in a 
mayonnaise separate, it is safer to carry a cooked 
dressing. 



NEWS LETTER. 



n 



Gees Range 



Special No. 3 



2\*^ RELIABLE. Fiill-alzo.l 1,-,-lnoh itas range, i lop burners an, I 
•immering burner, loTena tor baking ami broiling Bin* plun- 
lahed iteel ami doable asbestos lining, Ouanmt i perfect 

luik.T*. Tills week only 



$15.00 



REGULAR $19.00 RANGE 

SERVICES FREE. CONNECTIONS FREE 

MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS 

&/>e GAS Co. 

415 POST STREET Exchange 8 



DON'T BREAK YOUR BACK 

operating an old "REAL ECONOMY" GAS RANGES. 

fashioned Gas ' 

Range. 

'REAL ECONOMY" 

GAS RANGES 

have elevated 

oven and broiler. 

Ask the 

GAS CO. 

to show you the 
"REAL ECONOMY" 
GAS RANGE in op- 
eration. 
ECONOMY STOVE CO. Detroit. Mich. 

H. A. POTTER, Pacific Coast Agent, 52 First St.. San Francisco. 




Waiter— You haven't paid for the two cock- 
tails you've had. Spunger — I don't understand you. 
Isn't this a roof garden ? Waiter — Sure it is. Spun- 
ger — All right, then, the drinks are on the house. 



Townsend's California glace fruits, in fire-etched boxes, are 

shipped to all parts of the world. The new store ib located at 767 
Market street, between Third and Fourth streets, two minutes' walk 
from Call building. 



J. DILHAN 



ED. ANGLIM 



Park 
Riding 
School 




RIDING LESSONS, JUMPING LESSONS, 
TANDEM LESSONS, TRAINING, BOARDING 



2934 FULTON ST. 

Telephone West 83. 



Between Fifth and 
Hixth Avenues. 

San Francisco, Ca'. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 



THE INFERNAL FEMININE. 

That time-worn phrase, "the eternal feminine," if 
examined in the light of the context in which it gen- 
erally reposes, will be found to read "the infernal 
feminine." And why? Because the gentlemen who 
have made history fiction and fiction history prefer 
to believe that mankind in general is the victim of the 
evil tendencies of "le beau sexe," which the French- 
man puts in the masculine because he firmly believes 
that the beauty of the female is only a reflection of 
his. I may be wrong about this ; I cannot verify it, 
but, if it is inaccurate, it may be regarded as an ex- 
ception to all the other statements I am about to 
make in this paper. 

All men seem, in the abstract, to prefer that the 
eternal feminine should be infernal. In fact, they 
seem to take no interest in any lady of the past unless 
she has a very well-defined past. Is it strange, then, 
that the makers of literature, who lay the foundations 
of history, should always darken their heroine's char- 
acter just a little, even when the ladies in question 
acted from motives which, at the worst, might be 
called diplomatic? 

***** 

The motives of the heroines of history, the men's 
heroines, have been so misunderstood that when the 
feminine is infernal it is because she wants to treat 
the densely stupid male sex according to his preju- 
dices. She stoops, with an apology to Diana, to con- 
quer the animals. — Maurice Francis Egan in August 
Smart Set. 



HOME LIFE OF RUSSIANS. 

The daily life of a Russian couple of the wealthier 
classes is singularly regular and monotonous, vary- 
ing only with the changing seasons. In summer the 
lord of the house gets up about 7 o'clock and puts on, 
with the assistance of his valet de chambre, a simple 
costume, consisting chiefly of a faded, plentifully 
stained dressing gown. Having nothing in particu- 
lar to do, he sits down at the open window and 
looks into the yard. Towards 9 o'clock tea is an- 
nounced, and he goes into the dining room — a long, 
narrow apartment, with bare wooden floor and no 
furniture but a table and chairs. Here he finds his 
wife, with the tea urn before her. In a few minutes 
the younger children enter the room, kiss their papa's 
hand and take their places around the table. As this 
morning meal consists merely of bread and tea, it 
does not last long, and all disperse to their several 
occupations. 

Somebody has unearthed from the files of the 

Scientific American this little item, of present inter- 
est, which was printed in the issue of September 2, 
1868: "In cutting some timber in Omaha, a few days 
since, a bullet was found imbedded in the trunk of 
a rock elm. The grains which had overgrown it show 
that it must have been deposited there sixty-two 
years ago, a time when the country had not yet been 
visited by any white man except the explorers, Lewis 
and Clark." 



In Boston the other day a young lawyer who 

spends the most of his time trying to seem busy and 
prosperous, went out for a while, leaving on his door 
a card neatly marked: "Will be back in an hour." < )n 
his return, he found that some envious rival had in- 
scribed underneath, "What for?" 



It is always a pleasure to know that a business 

or professional man has advanced, and it is for this 
reason that the many friends of Dr. George H. Pow- 
ers are congratulating him upon acquiring the select 
and handsomely furnished offices in the Dana build- 
ing, rooms 41 and 43, 218 Stockton street, opposite 
the St. Francis Hotel. Dr. Powers is an expert ocu- 
list and aurist, and his services have been in such de- 
mand that he was compelled to move from 533 Sutter 
street to more commodious quarters. His new office 
telephone is East 1073. 

"You say that broker robbed Jones of his wife's 

affections?" "Same thing. He robbed him of his 
monev." 



Lake Tahoe 



The Gem of the Sierras 



This greatest of mountain lakes is 23 miles 
long and 13 miles wide. It is surrounded by 
a doz en smaller lakes, in all of which is the 
best of fishing. The region is famous for its 
fine resorts and invigorating air. 

Why Not Go? 

From May to October you can get round- 
trip excursion tickets at low rates— tickets with 
stop-overs from 10 to 90 days. Or if you are 
going East and want to stop at Tahoe a few 
days, you can easily arrange to do so. The 
round-trip from Truckee to the lake, with a 
70 mile steamer ride, is only $5. Ask agents 
for illustrated folder and full particulars. 

City Office, 613 Market St. 



Southern Pacific 



"Is she looking for a husband?" "Yes — the 

one that deserted her a year ago." — Smart Set. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stock holders of the Risdon Iron and Lo- 
comotive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year and 
the transaction of such other business as may be brought before the 

meeting, will be held at the office of the company. No. 298 St tt st 

San Francisco, on MONDAY, the 7th day of August, 1905. at n n'ornck 
A. M. AUGUSTUS TAYLOR. Secretary. 

"ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher & Mides Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 37 

Amount per share r, cents 

Levied July ti. 1906 

Delinquent in office Aug. 8. 1005 

Day of sale of delinquent stook Aug. 28. 1906 

E. B. HOLMES. Secretary 
Office— Itrjom no, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



July aa. 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

Methods of Mediums 

THE AGILE MIND READER. 

Newspapers and magazines teem with articles 
claiming that mind reading is an established fad ; 
therefore, he or she who tell-, us facts or fancies con- 
cerning our past or present is termed a mind reader. 
People who are not superstitious, who pride them- 
selves on their disbelief in things occult, are of the 
o linion that most mediums are gifted mind nailer.-.. 
"( >h. he read my mind." they Say; "that is all there 
it." 

Now I. tor one. would like to put an advertisement 
in these columns: "Wanted — A real, genuine mind 
reader." for 1 have yet to run across one. although 1 
have been investigating the matter for months. Hud- 
son, in his "Law of Psychic Phenomena,'.' states that 
mind reading can be done, and tells how. It is done 
through the subjective mind, he states: but his logic 
is too deep for the average person — even the fakers 
can't put it into practice. It looks all right in print, 
but it don't pan out, somehow. I have waded through 
six other books on the subject, but the only witch- 
craft I have learned is — well, I'll pass it along. Mind 
reading, so-called, as far as I can find out, is trickery 
pure and simple. It is a matter of sleight-of-hand, 
impression paper or mirrors or merely keen guess 
work. You have observed probably that the profes- 
sional mind reader usually asks you to write, in order 
that he may read your mind. He gives you back 
exactly what you write, although you keep the paper 
in your own possession (presumably.) He reads the 
paper, not your mind. He does it by foul means, of 
course. Here are some of the methods: 

The confederate method may be worked in a dozen 
different ways. A magnifying glass in the ceiling 
helps out, when the victim writes on a table directly 
under it. The medium usually leaves the room while 
you write. His confederate on the outside gives him 
the desired information. A hollow leg of a table is 
another vehicle. Have the table top fiat, lay on it a 
piece of white silk attached to a string that slips down 
the hollow leg. A piece of impression paper is laid 
on the silk. A thin cover is next laid over the table. 
The victim writes, the impression is made, the con- 
federate pulls down the string, and there you are. This 
is too elaborate to be practicable in most cases. A 
simpler plan is to use sleight-of-hand or some other 
fake to exchange the paper for a dummy. The latter 
method is a favorite with San Francisco mediums. 
Madam Lynn does it clumsily; Prof. Livingston is 
fairly clever at it. "Sealed ballot reading," it is 
called. These tricks are sold by one concern at a 
dollar a trick, so for one dollar you may graduate in 
one branch of mediumship. Most mediums employ 
the same trick over and over. The secret ballot trick 
may be worked without a confederate. Most mediums 
read rapidly — a glance at the paper suffices. 

Numerous slate writing methods are in vogue. 
Here is a clever one. A medium coats a slate with a 
thin solution of paste. Writing on a slate thus pre- 
pared may be washed off with a sponge wet in alco- 
hol. The slate will look clean, but the writing will 
reappear when the alcohol evaporates. This trick 
may be employed in a number of ways. 

Earle, the slate writer, employs a clever ballot read- 
ing trick. Visitors are permitted to write questions 
on slips of paper. The slips are collected in a hat 
which is never out of sight of the audience — appar- 
ently. But for all that, Earle manages to effect an 
exchange. He passes the real slips to a confederate 



NEWS LETTER. 



»5 




PAGE'S MUCILAGE 



■mil 



<l In - ,.- 
■' .11 llirt •; 

nnwi pftpm, f in 

or wnl t'j rum I r, 
pmu. piniaarKir) 

LT Page's Photo Paste. 

aoz. Mm rfUDUtr.: by mail. 10c. 

L E PAGES GLUE^ST 

"* ■ by mull. 1?,-. 



•"Itl^orlutw*. lot: 



— ^— — ■ ■'.. ruHUIV. I'X'.T tlT I 

m "ii mm ro.. I4i !», i,... in..,.., 



behind the scenes, and burns the dummies, thereby 

convincing his audience that he plays fair. The con- 
federate reads the slips and telegraphs their gist to 
Earle, one after the other, through .1 secretly arranged 
system. Earle walks up and down, giving forth his 
knowledge and mystifying his guests. 

Anna Eva Fay. the great mind reader, uses an im- 
pression paper stunt, when she reads minds on the 
wholesale plan. The audience is invited to write on 
anything, on theatre programmes, lluir cuffs, what 
not : but cunning little pads are passed out for per- 
sons who have nothing to write on. The pads are 
fixed up with impression paper. The slip is torn off, 
and the writer puts it in his pocket, but the impres- 
sion remains on the pad ! The pads are all returned 
to Miss Fay. The people who write on the pads 
(needless to remark) are the only ones who get ans- 
wers. 

I It is disappointing to learn that there is no magic, 
no black art in any of these stunts. The tricks all 
seem woefully simple when disclosed. We wonder 
that we didn't guess them ourselves without being 
told. Take care, then, that the next fa^e mind reader 
does not fool you as completely as the last one did. 

.If you run across a real one, please let us know. 



Tom Johnson announces that he does not want 

to be President. That puts him out of the Presiden- 
tial business, for he himself was the only voter who 
ever thought of voting for him for President. 



It is not good domestic economy to go to the 

'expense of a new carpet, when Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works, at 353 Tehama street, will clean 
your old one so perfectly that you would hardly 
know yourself that it was not direct from the carpet 
maker. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

for $7.50 per ton; halt ton, $4; quarter ton, $2. Use Briquettes for 
cooking and heating, and you will save at least one-third on your 
fuel bill. Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will 
receive prompt attention. 



GRAND CLEARANCE SALE OF 

Oriental Rugs 

At 40 per Cent Discount 
on our Sale Prices 

To make an effective clearance sale and realize 
cash, we are giving actually 40 per cent discount 
on every rug. 



MIHRAN'S, 205 Post St. 

The oldest and most reliable rug house. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 




The financial strength of the Equitable Life, nor 
its hold upon the confidence of the public, wen- weak- 
ened at any point l>\ the reckless and unbusiness-like 
management of its former directory. Rather did the 
exposure of their careless methods prove the Gibral- 
tar-like strength of the institution. However, a point 
had been reached when the best interests of the 
policy-holders, as well as the public generally, de- 
manded a radical change, not only in the personnel 
of the governing board, but in the methods of con- 
ducting the concerns of the association. New blood, 
the vigor of younger men and the experience of man- 
aging great business enterprise--, together with the 
highest integrity, were needed, and when this fact 
was fully realized, those in interest made a clean 
sweep, and put such men as Grover Cleveland. Judge 
O'Brien and George Westinghouse in the directory, 
with Paul .Morton as the active directing head of the 
organization. This change in the personnel of the 
directing authority immediately restored the needed 
confidence; still no one ever entertained the thought 
that the "( lid and Reliable Equitable" had been im- 
paired in any of its vast and complicated ramifica- 
tions. The past was all right, but the iresent anil fu- 
ture needed to be belter safeguarded by the highest 
quality of experience and honest) of purpose. 

All these things are now accomplished in the 
presidency of Paul Morton, who resigned from Presi- 
dent Roosevelt's cabinet to assume the general diree-- 
tion of the affairs of the Equitable, and in the pres- 
ence of such men as ex- President Cleveland consti- 
tuting the directory. At no time in its history was 
the Equitable upon a stronger foundation, nor were 
its interests in the hands of men in whom the public 
has more confidence. The future of the Equitable is 
as sure of permanency, as sure of firmness and as 
sure of stability as the everlasting bilk. Always it 
has stood at the head of life insurance companies 
the world over. There it still stands, and there it 
will continue to stand, and it stands upon its own 
merits and upon its own accumulation of financial 
strength. If its foundation or superstructure had 
been weak at any important point, or in any particu- 
lar feature, it could not have withstood the storm of 
contention and personal ambition that have swept 
over it the past year. But it was so much stronger 
than its enemies that they, not it, hail to perish. 

Some of those who have been superceded in the 
management do not take kindly to the new order of 
things, which provide for a trusteeship, but as the 
trusteeship is simply an additional safeguard, their 
objection is not well founded, for how could an insti- 
tution that is the insurer of hundreds of thousands 
of men and women and the custodian of their money, 
be too carefully safeguarded? Perhaps it is not gen- 
erally known that the Equitable Life Insurance Com- 
pany has a dual nature, yet it is duality in unity. It 
has a share capital or stock feature which makes it 
a company, but its policy issuing feature is on the 
mutual plan, which provides that all revenues go to 
the mutual side after interest on the stock is paid. 
Hence, as a stock company, it has millions of mutual 
money back of it to secure the interest on the stock, 
and as a mutual company it has hundreds of thou- 
sands of members and millions of money to preserve 
the integrity of the stock, which is the foundation 
upon which the mutual has been erected. The world 



never has and probably never will see another insur- 
ance company like the Equitable for strength and 
permanency. 

* * * 

The recent appointment of Gordon & Erazer as de- 
partment managers of the Pacific Department of the 
American of New Jersey, has been followed by the 
appointment of Mr. George 0. Hoadley as assistant 
manager. .Mr. Hbadley is the son of the president 
"t the company, and his advent on the coast is taken 
to mean more than appears on the surface. 

* * * 

General agent Yates, of the Austin of Texas, has 
removed his offices to 219 Sansome street. 

* * * 

The total premiums paid by the citizens of the 
State ot .Missouri for the year 1904 exceeded twenty- 
seven million dollars. The Pacific Mutual of Cali- 
fornia does almost $150,000 a year in premiums in 
that State. The Fireman's Fund gets over $60,000 in 
premiums. The Home Fire and Marine receives over 
$42,000 in premiums, and the Pacific Surety is also 
doing a fair business in the old Missouri. The insur- 
ance contracts of the companies who maintain their 
home offices in this city are evidently popular in that 
Slate. The fees received by the Insurance De- 
partment exceeded $51,860. 

* * * 

Colonel Win. Macdonald, of the London and Lan- 
cashire, is taking his vacation along the line of the 
Canadian Pacific in British Columbia. 

* * * 

Manager Watt, of the Royal and Queen, returned 
from his tour of the continent, rested and with a store 
of more than his normal energy. 

* * * 

General Agent C. J. Stovel is back in the city from 
an extended vacation. 

* * * 

The P. M. Nippert Company has taken into its 
emplo) Mr. S. \Y. Johnson as manager of its bond 
department. Mr. Johnson was at one time with the 
National Surety. 

* * * 

In insurance circles the State of 'Wisconsin is the 
best advertised State in the Union. It is now in the 
throes of giving birth to a plan to enable the State 
to go into the business of insurance on its own ac- 
count. Its insurance commissioner appears to get 
anything from the legislature which his fancy leads 
him to desire. He has bully-ragged the Equitable. 



SPENCER 
TO PEN CO 

JO rov-^ 



Afsl \ 



A Perfect Pen 

Everything necessary to produce a perfect pen Is applied in the 
making of 

SPENCERIAN PENS 

The b> at of skilled labor, the beat of modern machinery, the best 
steel the world produces; with the result that Spencerlan Pens 
are the wear-well pens of the market. Samples for trial vi dif- 
ferent 1 umbers, for Ge in Btampa 

SPENCERIAN PEN CO., 349 Broadway, NEW YORK 



July 12, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



a 7 



He has attacked the fratcmals, he has Bmashed field 
clubs of tiro specials, and what he lia* not done or 
will do Heaven alone knows, hut won't tell. As .1 
press agent he is without a peer, ami it is a wonder 
he does not get into the business. 

* * * 

Nathaniel T. lames, the marine insurance man. 
has moved his office from Sansome street, and is now 
located in the Rialto building. 

* * * 

Another life company, this time the Capital Life, 
of Denver, has been organized by Colorado business 
men with Sjoo.ooo capital, which is to be incn 
to $300,000. This is Denver's second life company 
organized within a few months, the other being the 
Colorado National. 

A member in the Canadian Parliament, speaking 
recently on a bill affecting life insurance, is reported 
to have said, after discussing his subject: "Behind 
all this there is another question which 1 shall merely, 
allude to, without in any way outlining a policy on 
the part of the Government. It is a matter which will 
have to be considered one of these days ; that is to 
say, whether the time has not come when a govern- 
ment, without interfering with the work of the com- 
panies which are now in existence, should or should 
not provide those of its people, who choose to ask 
for it with life insurance guaranteed by the State. 
That is a question of great moment, a question on 
which I have, and I think my honorable friend op- 
posite has also, bestowed some attention in time past, 
and it is a question which may very well engage the 
attention of this honorable body and other bodies 
occupying a cognate position in the legislature." It 
was Sir Richard Cartwright who made this state- 
ment, and it is full of portent. Canada will naturally 
follow New Zealand, and it looks as though the hon- 
orable gentleman had a bee in his bonnet which 
buzzes the song of government insurance. Here in 
the United States we are trending rapidly to federal 
supervision, and the question of government insur- 
ance has been discussed more in the past six months 
than in the previous six years. 

* * * 

The way they do it in Great Britain is illustrated 
by the following item, culled from an English insur- 
ance paper. It says : "Mr. T. S. Appleton, it is stated, 
is to be the first managing director of the Monarch 
Assurance Company, Limited — recently registered 
with a capital of £18 — at a remuneration of £400 
per annum. The company has power to transact all 
kinds of insurance except life. If the past is any 
guide to the future, the Monarch will at least provide 
insurance journals with a considerable amount of 
copy." The Monarch Assurance Company, Limited, 
with a capital of $90 and a salary account to start 
with of $2,000, is a good old thing to leave alone. Still 
it will only be a short time before, in the list of insur- 
ances on losses, will be found the name of the Mon- 
arch. It is evidently one of the kind organized for 
export and to "hand across the seas." 



INSURANCE 



The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Capital $3,000,000 

Gross Cash Assets 17,300,000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourn- 
ers anywhere In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance 
against loss by fire, lightning, wind-storm or tornado. Indemnity 
for loss of rental Income by fire or lightning. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent. 

GEO. M. MITCHELL, Metropolitan Manager. 
JU> SANSOME ST. SAN FRANCISCO. 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $6,500,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital tS,000,00# 

Surplus to Policy-holders 6.022.0H 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 202 Pine St., S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720. 

Capital Paid-up, |3.««.ino. Assets, J24.662.04S.W 

Surplus to Policy-holders, 18,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Mgrs. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1IM. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Asse ts 5.340.I36.94 

Surplus to Policyholders . . 3,414,991.16 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Department. 
COLIN M. BOTD, Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital J6,700,00l 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., 8. F. 



Cash Capital, $200,000. 



Cash Assets, $394,164.16 



PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
Head Office, Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Work- 
men's Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers— Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice- 
President; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; 
F. P. Deerlng, Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edw. L. Brayton, Jno. C. 
Coleman, F. P. Deerlng, E. h: Green, I. W. Hellman. Jr., Geo. 
A. Pope, Henry Rosenfeld, A. A. Son, Wm. S. Tevis. 

Unexcelled for liberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

_____ 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 
J. H. LENEHAN, Gen. Agt., CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast 
KOHL BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



Manheim, Dibbern & Co. 

STOCK AND BOND BROKERS AND GENERAL IN- 
SURANCE AGENTS. 



217 Sansome St. 



San Francisco 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 



Automobile Photographs 

A SPECIALTY 

DEVELOPING, PRINTING AND MOUNTING, IN- 
TERIOR AND EXTERIOR WORK GUARANTEED. 
PRICES REASONABLE. 



J. D. Mehrten 



114 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



The QUEEN 



EXCELS FOR PRICE, POWER 
AND PERFECTION 




The Model E, Queen Touring Cur has in actual horse power with 
two opposed cylinders and a weight of lfiOO lbs. All the working 
parts throughout the machine ar.- well proportioned and have a 
surplus of strength. Speeds, 3 to 40 miles per hour; seats live 
people, double side door entrance, all speeds on one lover. Mu- 
lshed in royal olue with cream colored gear and well upholstered 
in the finest of black leather. Why pay twice as much for a car 
when even at that price it will not compare with the Queen? 

RARIG AUTOMOBILE $ GARAGE CO. 

827-833 Folsom Street. San Francisco, Cal. 




Model L.12-15 H.P. 1150 lbs. Price $1150.00 



QlJIi.I\ record of stock cars at Eagle lkek Hill Contest, 

** w * wm » November 24. 1004. 




T5he Cameron Shaf,Dr 7 ir c.o..d. 



Road Clearance n In. 

Motor in Front. 

Never Necessary to 

crawl under car. 

Pacific Coast Branch 

The James Brown 
Machine Co. 

Hants, and Agte. 
8 C1TV HALL SO. S. P. 

Other Models 
$875 to $1350.00 



BUICK, Price SHOO. 22 H. P. Time 2.18 2-S 

Price H. P. Time 

Pope Toledo $3600 24 2.15 4-6 

Mathewson $5000 24 3.214-5 

Thomas $3000 40 2.42 4-6 

OohirnMa $4O00 30 2.63 4-5 

Franklin $lf.50 in 4. oh 3-6 

Rambler $1350 10 5.25 1-5 

CUYLER LEE, Agent for California 

359 1,.. Idea Oale Ave.. Sin Prunctsco. 1032 So. M in St., Los Angeles 




The Autocrank. 

That poor Los Angeles-San Francisco automobile 
record lias been set up and knocked down again, un- 
til it is really time for the humane society to step 
in and stop the cruel sport. .Local chauffeurs and 
motorists of the South have played ten-pins with 
the coast running time until one wonders why it is 
they let the jaunt alone as long as they did. The 
belief is that some one of the half-dozen who have 
avowed intentions of still further lowering the rec- 
ord will do the stunt in less than a day before another 
month has rolled around. 

* * * 

"Mad 1 known what hardship it meant. 1 would 
never have made the trip, and 1 think it my duty to 
warn other motorists away from the Yosemite." 
Thus spoke Robert Hancock, a well-known sports- 
man of San Francisco, upon his return to this city 
last week from a trip to the Yosemite Valley in his 
big automobile. "1 would certainly advise all auto- 
mobilists to refrain from attempting to motor to the 
valley." said Mr. Hancock. "The roads are in no way 
tit for a motor ear, being hilly and full of rocks. Then 
we met with much trouble in avoiding stages. The 
horses were all afraid of our machine, and on several 
occasions we came very near meeting with Serious 
accidents while trying to pass on the narrow roads." 

Mr. Hancock went into the valley by the Big I >ak 
I'lal road, a highway that has n < > t Keen used much 
in recent years, hut which he heard was passable in 
an automobile. 1 1'e soon found out, however, that 
the road was anything but suitable for motor cars. 
* * 

C. H. Wall, one of < takland's wealthy residents, is 
anticipating some extensive tours throughout Cali- 
fornia, now that his forty horse-power Columbia 
machine has arrived from the Last. Mr. Wall made 
a trip to San Jose last Sunday in his new auto. Ib- 
is an ardent enthusiast of the motor car. despite the 
fact that he formerly owned a large and exceedingly 

rine stable of burses. 

* * * 

Automobilists of California and this city in par- 
ticular are rejoicing over the proposed construction 
of a fine modern highway from San Jose into the Big 
Basin, in the heart of the redwoods in the Santa Cruz 
Mountains, where the State of California, at a cost 
pf SJ50.000, has acquired a park. The present road 
i- a soft dirt one. ami the Santa Clara County au- 
thorities, to show their appreciation of the work, 
intend spending at least $10,000 upon it. The entire 
roadbed, when completed, will cost about $35,000. 
It will be ten miles long, width of 22 feet, and an ef- 
fort will be made to maintain the grade at five and 

Line-half per cent. 

* * * 

The American automobile companies are invading 
Mexico now to a great extent, and most of the repre- 
sentative manufacturers have agents in that country 
looking after their interests. The number of auto- 
seen on the streets of the principal cities. 1 am told. 
compares favorably with cities in this country. There 
are hundreds of high-grade machines in .Mexico City, 
while all other cities in the Republic have score- 
of these pleasure and time-saving vehicles. There 



July 22. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 






• present in Monterej some ol the finest and 
nachines ever turned oul b) a factory, and the 
•1 the horn and the whiK ..1 the ma'chim 
be heard and seen at almost any hour of thi 
Ilurr an- many high-grade machines expected 
placed in use in Monterey within the next 
months, and the wealthier class of people of thai 
citj who have been accustomed heretofo 
dine in soft-cushioned Victorias and other vehicles 
drawn b) horses will soon take to au.'omobiline 

* * * 

Arrangements are nearly complete for La Coupe 
des Pyrenees, the automobile tourist competition 
which Marts from Toulouse on August 20th, return- 
ing there on August 27th, after traversing practically 
the whole French side of the Pyrenees. The 
are fixed for each day and town, the event being no 
a -peed but a reliability contest. 

* * * 

In about another month, the owners of garages and 
salesrooms will be figuring profit and loss: some will 
go out of business and the rest will be consulting 
architects with a view of putting up larger buildings. 
Such is life! 

* * * 

A paradoxical claim is made that the new course 
selected for the Yanderbilt cup race is safer because 
the turns are more dangerous. The argument is tha t 
the sharpness of the new turns renders them just 
enough dangerous to compel caution on the part of 
the drivers, who will slow down before taking the 
turn, whereas on the old courses they made the turns 
at full speed and took chances. 

* * * 

Mr. Hill, of Leavitt & Bill, arrived home last Thurs- 
day in his "Reo," after a five weeks' trip through the 
Southern part of the State, going as far south as Los 
Angeles. He had a most successful trip, selling sev- 
eral Reo's and appointing agents for the sale of his 
machine en route. 

L. A. N'ares, with his thirty horse-power Pope- 
Toledo touring car, holds the record between Los 
Angeles and San Francisco. Mr. Nares left Los An- 
geles Sunday morning, July 15th, at 4 o'clock, with 
Burr Frayer, R. W. Fowler and Tony Nichols, and 
arrived in San Francisco on Monday morning at 4 150 
a. m., covering the distance in 24 hours and 54 min- 
utes. Now that Mr. Nares has gone o^er the course, 
he believes he can easily lower the time to 20 hours 
and 30 minutes, and if any one breaks his record he 
will make the attempt again. The run from Los An- 
geles to Santa Barbara was made in the phenomenal 
time of 4 hours and 57 minutes, having spent 20 min- 
utes to repair a tire puncture. In going over the 
rough roads into Santa Barbara they broke the rear 
spring, which, delayed them 2 hours and 28 minuses 
in Santa Barbara. They had no further trouble on the 
road, excepting another broken spring coming from 
San Jose to San Francisco. They had no mechanical 
troubles of any kind in the entire trip, and it may be 
many; a'' day before this record is beat.. ■ 
, * * * 

Among the sales of motor cars being made through- 
out the State, I notice numerous of the machines are 
purchased for use in business, and as i have remark- 
ed on previous occasions, there is no doubt but what 
the future of the automobile lies in the commercial 
vehicle. Only last week the Pioneer Fruit Company 
of Sacramento purchased a second Autocar runabout. 
M. Williamson, who is using the first machine pur- 
. chased by this concern, has. had great success in cov- 




Climbing 
steep grades, or under 
other severe conditions of 
travel, the Cadillac not only reaches its own 
destination without annoyance, but is a "friend in need" 
to others. Whatever the test, there is power enough and 
to spare. Simplicity and accuracy of construction re- 
duce the liability to damage or derangement of mechan- 
ism so low as to make the Cadillac almost trouble-proof. 
The money-saving inconsequence of this, combined with 
remarkably low cost of fuel and lubrication, make the 
Cadillac the most economically maintained of all motor 
cars. Ask any Cadillac owner. His expense book is our 
best advertisement. 

Model F— Side-Entrance Touring Car. 
Model B— Touring Car, detachable tonneau. 
Model E— Light, Powerful Runabout. 
Model D— 4-Cylinder, 30 h. n. Touring' Car. 

Write for catalog AE and address of the nearest dealer. 

CADILLAC AUTOMOBILE CO., Detroit, Mich. 

Member A. L. A. M. 



Special Sales Department 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUNDRIES 



FOR SALE.— 1904 White Steamer, newly painted, top and lamps, 

etc., fully equipped $1,000 

White Stanhope $300 

St. Louis Touring Car $900 

Agents for Packard, Stevens-Duryea and Thomas Flyer, Pa- 
cific Motor Car Co., 49 City Hall avenue. 

ARE you going on a tour? Don't forget Weed's Chain Tire 
Grip (prevents machine from skidding.) Does not affect the tfre. 
Can be put on or removed in 5 minutes. See agents, 105 Front St. 

WANTED.— If you have a second-hand automobile you wish 
to sell, write Yosemite Motor Works, 123 City Hall avenue, San 
Francisco. Edward Mohrig, Manager. 

WANTED.— Buckboard in good condition. Will pay about $100. 
Address Box 6, this office. 

WHY use Eastern Dry Batteries? The Bull Dog Dry Cell is 
the best made for automobiles and is "fresh," being manufac- 
tured in San Francisco by Pacific Carbon and Battery Co., 105 
Front street. 

EXCHANGE.— Fine thoroughbred trotter for runabout In good 
condition. Value $500. Address Box 10, this office. 

FOR SALE— Ranbler 1905, excellent condition. New tires. Open to 
offer. Box io. News Letter. 

NEW— Knox runabout cheap. Owner has purehaaed larger ear. 
Address Box 17, News Letter. 

WANTED.— Small car in good condition, gasoline preferred. 
State price. Box 12. News Letter. 

FOR SALE.— A "Duryea" automobile in perfect condition; has 
never been used. Three cylinder, 12 h. p. Holds six people. A 
bargain. Owner leaving city. 1814 Market street, S. F. 

FOR SALE.— Locomobile steamer, in fair condition. Price $175. 
Address Box 13, News Letter. 

WANTED— Cadillac or Buckboard; must be cheap and in good 
condition. Box 14, News Letter. 

$275.— Buckboard in good condition; owner leaving State. Box 
16, News Letter. 

WANTED.— Every automobile owner to Increase power of his 
machine 15 to 25 per cent by equipping it with a "Schebler Car- 
buretor." For information and prices see agents, 105 Front St. 



3° 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 



ering his territory, and says he could not now do 
without his automobile. 

* * * 

Another prominent local resident has entered the 
motor car ranks. Edward Hinds last week purchased 
from the Rarig Automobile and Garage Company a 
Model E. Queen touring car, and on Sunday morning 
after but one lesson ran the auto without a mishap 
to Belmont. Mr. Hinds was accompanied on his in- 
itial auto trip by Mrs. Hinds, who found the machine 
so simple in its operation that she ran it part of the 
way. 

* * * 

To run an automobile five thousand miles with the 
expense practically nothing is quite a record. This 
nevertheless is claimed by S. F. Neal of Sacramento, 
who last week arrived in this city in his Model C. 
Winton touring car. Mr. Neal is very well pleased 
with his car. 

* * * 

Captain H. D. Ryus and F. C. Fenner, in the lat- 
ter's White steam runabout, which machine is at- 
tracting so much attention in Southern California, 
recently made the run from Los Angeles to Palm- 
dale, out on the desert, in the fast time of 4 hours and 
20 minutes. This is a new record for the run, despite 
the fact that the autoists went 8 miles out of their 
way. 

Fred A. Jacobs, who still holds the four-passenger 
automobile record between Los Angeles and San 
Francisco, with his 18 horse-power Rambler, will 
soon take another try at the record, and is confident 
of lowering the time he made on his first run. The 
wonderful trip made by Mr. Jacobs between the two 
cities is still the talk of the local motorists. His tro- 
phy of $100 to any machine costing less than $2,650 
which breaks the record of his Rambler has not vet 
been won. 

* * * 

The newspapers are exceedingly enthusiastic 0' er 
Webb Jay's recent remarkable performance in cover- 
ing a mile on a circular track in 48 3-5 seconds. The 
July 8th issue of "Automobile Topics" says: "\\ ebb 
Jay and his White steamer was the star on both 
days. He won three races on Monday and two on 
Tuesday. He cut the world's record from 52 i-s sec- 
onds to 48 4-5 seconds. He won the Thomas trophy 
for the Chicago club, and credited himself with four 
points in the championship contest." 

* * * 

A 30 horse-power Pope-Toledo competed in a very 
interesting race in Columbus, Ohio, recently. At the 
beginning of the race it rained, and the auto went 
through the fence, it requiring three hours to repair 
it. Yet the car covered 828 miles, and if the condi- 
tions had been better, would have easily beaten the 
1,000 mile record. The fastest mile made by the 
Pope-Toledo was 1 minute 3 seconds, and "many 
miles were covered by this car in 1 minute and 10 sec- 
onds. 

* * * 

It has often been said that the old Bullet, built by 
Alex Winton several years ago, is the fastest machine 
in the world. The recent performances of this ma- 
chine at the St. Paul tracks certainly gives reason for 
such a statement, when Earl Kiser, practically a new 
driver, won a gold and a stiver cup, his time luing 
5:11, and defeating the keen Barnev ( lldfield. 

* * * 

Diamond tires, which were fitted on all three 
American cars in the recent Gordon-Bennett cup 



race, enabled the automobiles of this country to do 
a thousand per cent better than ever before, and for 
the first time in history an American car finished, 
The American drivers had less trouble with tires than 
did any of the drivers of foreign cars. As compared 
with results in the Gordon-Bennett race in the past, 
the entire American showing was distinctly credit- 
able, for never before have American entrants made 
so much as a respectable start. 

* * * 

R. D. Chapin, of the Olds Motor Works, Mr. 
Thomas, manager of the Tamalpais Railroad, E. P. 
Brinegar, President of the Pioneer Automobile Com- 
pany, and C. B. Kaufman, recently made a trip from 
Mill Valley to the top of Mt. Tamalpais in thirty-five 
minutes in an Oldsmobile railroad car. The trip was 
made to try out a new car which had recently been 
shipped to the Mt. Tamalpais Railroad Company, 
and it has proven very successful. 

* * * 

San Francisco will no doubt soon have a first-class 
and magnificent outlet. The deplorable condition of 



THE SILENT MILE-AMINUTE CAR 




HOLDS LOS ANGELES TO SAN FRANCISCO WORLD'S RE- 
CORD, 24 HRS. 54 MINS. MADE BY A REGULAR STOCK CAR. 

Sfte POPE-TOLEDO 

Demonstrations by appointment with 

THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 

134-148 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



The 1905 

Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Tourinf Car 

Has Arrived 

Call and see it. 

Rambler Automobile Agency. UJI c * A r w i^j ST 

Phone South 1007. 



IVOMPT SERVICE 

(Ernhtrrr Ulfrtrir Company 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobiles. 

Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 

House Wiring and Repairing. 

No. 28 SFCOND ST. Under Grand Hotel. TEL. BV8H S32 



July 22, 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



31 



the c\its from this cit) fdi driving ai 
hindered the pleasure of motoring 
this side of the bay. The automobile 1 
fornia wants 350 public spirited men. whether 
nioliilists or not, t" subscribe $100 each, and th< 
levard is then assured. The proposed boulevard will 
be from the Corbett road, extending through the 
Spring Valley land t'> School street, > olma, thei 
the County road, thence to Market sir.,:, to San 
Bruno road and thence t<> Grand avenue. Smith San 
Francisco. Such a boulevard, "ii which heavy team- 
ing will be prohibited, will m>t onl) enhance the 
value of the in ami outlying propert) of San Fran- 
cisco, but will prove an added attraction to thi« 

Now is the opportunity for all those who have been 
crying for this outlet for years to step forward and 
help those who are doing the work. The Supervisors 
of San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties are being 
aroused to make a perfect road from the end of tin-* 
boulevard to San Jose, and are working in harmoin 
with this movement. 



The outing season is here with all the oppres- 
siveness of city life, and the invigorating delights of 
mountains and forests. But nowhere will one find 
a more ideal outing spot than the awe-inspiring and 
picturesque Yosemite. And what makes the Valley 
all the more inviting is the low cost of the pleasure. 
For $48.50 one may have a four days' outing in the 
Yosemite without one nickel of additional expense. 
That is to say, $48.50 includes rail transportation, 
hotel accommodations, carriage drives and trail trips 
to Mirror Lake, Vernal Falls, Nevada Falls and Gla- 
cier Foint, with the best things to eat the market 
affords all the time, and at the expiration of the four 
days one finds oneself at home full of vigor and happy 
of mind for the trip. Of course all this means that 
the ticket should read via the Wawona route. But 
the gentlemen in charge of the Southern Pacific's 
offices at 613 Market street will cheerfully acquaint 
you with all the particulars and furnish you with such 
discriptive printed matter as you would want before- 
hand to outline the trip and the scenes en route. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street, San 

Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, business, 
personal, political, from press of State, coast and country. I el. 
Main 1042. 



Great Winton "A" 




40-50 
HORSE POWER 



IS HERE 



Eats up the hills easily, quietly. Nothing like it 
in the market for the money. 

Nearly a half hundred Wintons sold in Cali- 
fornia this year. Every owner perfectly satisfied. 
You know what this means. Look this car up 
carefully. It will pay you. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

901-925 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 




The Cleanest 


Tire Record in 


the 


Gordon 


Bennett 


ndtc 
was made by 



Diamond 

WRAPPED TREAD CONSTRUCTION 

CABLEGRAM 

From Clermont Ferrand, July 6, 1905. 5:43 PM 

•'DIRUBCO" The Diamond Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio. 

Best record any other tires in Gordon Bennett race was two 
complete changes. Diamonds on my car lasted whole four 
rounds with only one change very pleased. H. H. Lytle. 

Diamond tir.»s on Tracer's Locomobile and Dingley's Pope-Toledo 
'lit HijuHlly well. 

For the first time in history an American finished in the great in- 
ternational event. 

It marks a distinct victory for the American Automobile industry, 
(Mid every American can conscientiously take off his hat to it- 

And the showing made by Diamond tires in this race was the BEST 
ever made by *NY tire, AMERICAN OR F0REION, in THIS or any PREVIOUS year. 

The Diamond Rubber Co. AKRON, OHIO. 

San Francisco Branch— -608 MISSION STREET 



DE DIETRICH 
AUTOMOBILES 



Absolutely every extra part required 
can be delivered immediately 




MR. PflUL KOECHLIN 

Pacific Coast Representa- 
tive, now at Hotel Marie Antoi- 
nette, Van Ness Ave., San Fran- 
cisco, will be pleased to give 
demonstrations to prospective 
buyers. Appointments by tele- 
phone or letter. 



^B 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 



Resorts and Hotels 



VACATION 1905 

IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 

"VACATION" is issued annually by the 

California Northwestern R'y 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 

and is the standard publication on the 
Pacific Coast for information regarding 

MINERAL SPR.INGS R.ESOR.TS. 
COUNTR.Y HOMES AND FARMS 
WHER.E SUMMER. BOAR.DERS 
ARE TAKEN. AND SELECT CAMP- 
ING SPOTS. 

This year's edition "VACATION 1905" contains 200 
pages, beautifully illustrated, and is complete in its 
detailed information as to location, accommodations, 
attractions, etc., with terms from $7.00 per week up 

To be had at Ticket Office, 650 Marketstreet. (Chronicle Building) 

and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market street; General Office 

Mutual Life Building, corner Sansome and 

California streets. Ban Francisco 

Applications by mail will receive immediate response 

JAS. L.FRAZIER, Cen'IMan. R.X.RYAN, Gcn'l Pt&r Agent 



Rest a Few Days 

A great many San Francisco people spend days and weeks 
during the fall and winter at Hotel Del Monte. No other 
resort in California offers such a combination of attrac- 
tions—sea bathing, golf, automoblllng, bowling, tennis iish- 
lng and all out-of-door sports. Instead of going from place 
to place seeking comforts, the wise who enjoy out-of-door 
life arrange to put In many enjoyable weeks down at Del 
Monte by the sea. Address George P. Snell, manager. Del 
Monte, California. 

At Hotel Del Monte 



KLAMATH HOT SPRINGS 

For particulars inquire at PecK's Tourist 
Bureau, II Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Vichy Springs 

3 miles from Ukiah, Mendocino County. Natu- 
ral electric waters, champagne baths. Only place 
in the world of this class. Fishing, hunting. 
Crystal Springs. Accommodations; table first- 
class. J. A. Redemeyer, Prop. 



Camp Curry 

Only camp electric lighted 
Sets the best table 
Has the highest paid chef 
(white) in 

Yosemite 



*• TUXEDO *• 



The leading hotel and resort place of the 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

7 miles from Santa Cruz; 73 miles from San Francisco on 
the main line of the Narrow Gauge R. R. It's popular be- 
cause It's new, modernly appointed and of easy access, and 
because It has more natural attractions on Its own reser- 
vation and around it than any place in these mountains. 
Write for booklet. 



FRANCIS W. SMITH. Mgr. 



FELTON P. O 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

NO STAGING 

The nearest hot natural sulphur springs to San Francisco. 
The largest mineral water swimming tank in the State. 
Everything first-class. Address: Theo. Richards, 

Agua Callente, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST.. near Tremont, BOSTON 

Harvey 3 Woods, Props. 



ST. CECILE APARTMENTS 

115 FELL STREET. Above Van Ness and MarKet St. 

Thoroughly modern. Elegantly furnished. Sunny 3 
room and bath apartments. Special rates for summer. 

MBS. M. E. BROWN. FORMERLY OF THE BROWNING 



RIGGS HOUSE 

Opp. U. S. Treasury, one block from the White House. 

Washington D. 0. The Hotel "Par Excellence" of the 

National Capital. 
First-class in all appointments. O G. Staples, 
Prop. American Plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



I 



July 32. 1905 




NEWS LETTER. 



33 



THE LAND OF MAKEBELIEVE. 

IT HclilcKui.l- Hi .lh..r. NM IbllstV 

Where is the land of Makebelieve, 
The happy land of Makebelieve ? 

I used to know its haunted streams. 
Its people fashioned out of dreams. 
Who played with me in wondrous ways, 

Throughout the short and sunny days 
That gild the land of Makebelieve, 
That happy land of Makebelieve. 

Where is the land of Makebelieve, 
The strange, strange land of Makebelieve: 
I cannot find the path of gold 
That led so straight in days of old. 
Deep, deep within its hidden glades 
Where fairies lurked within the shades — 
The silver shades of Makebelieve, 
The strange, far land of Makebelieve. 

Where is the land of Makebelieve, 
The long-lost land of Makebelieve? 
Do the same spirits haunt it still 
With whom I wandered there at will? 
Sometimes at night I see the way — 
Alas! it vanishes by day! 
I cannot get to Makebelieve, 
That dear, lost land of Makebelieve ! 

Where is the land of Makebelieve, 
The faerie land of Makebelieve? 
I hear two children, hand in hand, 
Leap, laughing, on its pearly strand ; 
I strive to follow — it may not be ! 
The gates are fastened close to me. 
I may not go to Makebelieve, 
My faerie land of Makebelieve. 



I HAVE NO HOUSE FOR 

LOVE TO SHELTER HIM. 

By Willa Sibert Cather 

Since thou cam'st not at morn, come not at even ; 

Let night close peaceful where it hath begun. 
Affrighten not the restful stars from heaven 

With futile after-glimpses of the sun. 
My heart inclines me, but my lands are wasted, 

My treasure spent, and evening closes dim ; 
Spring's fair demesne the chilling. frost hath tasted — 

I have no house for Love to shelter, him. 

No raiment fair to clothe his limbs so tender; 

No spiced wines to cool his burning lip ; 
No garlands wherewithal to crown his splendor; 

No lute to tune to songful fellowship. 
No pillow for the twilights of his dreaming; 

No roses on these brows, with winter grim, 
Wherewith to strew his couch, as were beseeming — 

I have no house for Love to shelter him. 

Ride on, and tarry not, O kingly stranger ! 

This darkened chamber is a house of prayer; 
A place of vigils, and to youth a danger — 

'Twas fair at morning, but thou wert not there. 
Who wooes the sapless winter for his lover, 

Or hangs his garlands at a cloister grim? 
Oh! bid me not my nakedness discover — 

I have no house for Love to shelter him ! 



0>F OF Tilt I 01 Mil ST MSIts ill | mill 

ANDERSON SPRINGS. LAKE COUNTY 

■t-eam 
an I r.,'K .|.'llBhif»l aralkn 
a» -I -Irivp . hill tlnil an. I 
«|.lrri.||.| lioiil n.hln« 
right at han. I Hotel 
Uaces. No wli n> 
or ton |i„.t medicinal 
waterandthaonlf natural 
aiili.hur steam betl 
OOODty. Tul.e alsi- Hates 
»• perdu, >m to ti< per 
Unthsfree 
Further Information, 
PECKS BI'BKAP. 11 
Montgomery at., 8. P. 
Information Bureau, r.ia 
Market at . R. F. Newa 
Letter. 320 Sanaoma at, 
or address J. ANDER- 
SON. Anderaon Springs. 
Mlddletown P. 0.. T,aUe 
County. Cal 

ROUND TRIP TICKET. $7 




Byron Hot Spring's 

^AMERICA'S GREATEST SPA 

The great health and pleasure resort of California. Here you 
can And rest, amusement, and regain your health. The sur- 
rounding country Is beautiful at this season of the year. The 
liotel table Is sumptuous. It's the only place in the world where 
you can get a hot mineral bath In porcelain tubs without leaving 
the hotel. If you can't spend a long period here, take advantage 
of the week-end excursion, $7.50, all expenses paid, Friday to 
Tuesday Inclusive. Includes railroad fare, two days' board at 
the hotel, use of mineral waters, and baths and hot mud baths, 
and stage fare to and from station to hotel. 



HOTEL VENDOME 

£an Jose, 

Situated in Vendome Park of twelve acres. A 
charming Summer and Winter resort. Both city 
and country advantages. Automobile garage on 
the grounds free to guests. 

A Large Bathing Pavilion on the Grounds 

Bowling alleys, tennis, etc. New auto road map 
of the county mailed on application. 

J. T. BROOKS. Maaaln 



The Anchorage 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

4 miles from Alma Station, S. P. C. R. R. Alti- 
tude 1900 feet. Among pines and redwoods; 
pure air; pure water; pure food. Rates $10 to 
$12 per week. New cottages, gas-lit. Trains 
met by appointment at Alma. Address Gilford 
Hall, Patchin P. O., Santa Clara Co., Cal., or 
Peck's Bureau, 11 Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



ForTbon Who Appreciate Comfort ind Altentltl 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 
American and European Plan. A Quiet Home 
Centrally Located. George Warren Hooper, Lewie 



34 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 22, 1905. 



Reminiscences of Early Californians 

By Major Ben C. Truman. 



As San Francisco has been an American city for 
more than half a century, and as nearly all of the men 
whom we have termed pioneers were between twenty 
and twenty-five years of age before setting out for 
California, the presumption that not many of them 
are living is strictly correct. And while the '50's took 
away not a few, and the '6o's more, a majority of the 
successful men of '49 and '50 lived well along into 
the '70's and '8o's, and even the '90's saw a goodly 
number of the elderly disciples of Pactolus that had 
not joined the innumerable caravan. 

A number of pretentious thoroughfares perpetuate 
the names of many of the earlier prominent residents 
of San Francisco, all of whom are now dead. Mont- 
gomery street, which was the leading thoroughfare 
for twenty odd years, was so-called in honor of the 
sailor who first raised the stars and stripes in the 
bay of San Francisco, July 9, 1846 — Captain John 
B. Montgomery, U. S. N., who died a commodore a 
long time ago. Dupont street (that was — now Grant 
avenue) was named after an admiral (then commo- 
dore) of our navy. Jones street also perpetuates the 
name of a (then) commodore of our navy, (though 
this has been denied), and Stockton street the same. 
Portsmouth Square was so called after the old United 
States sloop-of-war Portsmouth, at the request of 
Commodore Sloat, and Powell street after a surgeon 
in our navy. The United States army was not for- 
gotten by early surveyors and other godfathers of 
San Francisco streets, conspicuously Scott, after 
General Winfield Scott ; while Kearny street holds 
in memory the intrepid young officer who lost an 
arm in Mexico, and who, as a major-general at Chan- 
tilly, gave up his life for his country. Mason street 
was named after Colonel (since General) R. B. Ma- 
son, who was military governor of California in 1847. 
The street called Stevenson was named after Colonel 
Jonathan Stevenson, who arrived in San Francisco 
with a crack regiment in 1847. One of the captains 
in this regiment was Joseph L. Folsom. a 
West Pointer, from whom Folsom street received its 
name. Geary street was called after the then (1849) 
Postmaster John W. Geary, who had served in the 
Mexican war and afterwards became Mayor of San 
Francisco. Subsequently he was appointed Governor 
of Kansas by President Pierce, and during the civil 
war he served as a major-general in the army of the 
Potomac for three years, and later with Sherman's 
army in front of Atlanta, and wound up a distin- 
guished career as Governor of Pennsylvania. 

Washington street perpetuates the name of the 
immortal Washington, Father of his Country, and 
Polk, Taylor, Fillmore, Pierce and Buchanan after 
five of our Presidents. 

Vallejo street was named in honor of an old Mexi- 
can general of that name, and Sutter after General 
Sutter, one of the most picturesque and highly-re- 
spected persons who has ever lived in California. 
Fremont, "the Pathfinder," another picturesque char- 
acter, also has a street named after him. Another ro- 
mantic person was Taibot M. Green (some say it 
was not Green), whose name has been respected by 
a thoroughfare. What has been for many years 
Waverley Place was at an earlier day known as Pike 
street, by request of A. J. Bowie, who thus sought 
to perpetuate the maiden name of his wife. Town- 
send street was named out of respect to Dr. Town- 



send, who had died of cholera in 1850, greatly beloved 
and lamented. Hayes street was named after Tom 
Hayes, a somewhat notorious character, who was 
County Clerk of San Francisco for several years, and 
fought a duel with little Johnnie Nugent, of the Her- 
ald, and gave him a serious wound, and was one of 
Terry's seconds in the Broderick-Terrv duel. There 
are some who may claim that this street was named 
after Colonel Jack Hays, a redoubtable Texas ranger, 
and first sheriff of San Francisco, but such is not the 
fact. Franklin street was named after the illustrious 
Benjamin, printer, philosopher and statesman. 

Gough street was named after Charles H. Gough, 
a Maryland lawyer; Ellis after Alfred J. Ellis; Haight 
after Samuel W. Haight, and Post after Gabriel B. 
Post, popular pioneers. 

William M. Eddy, the second (or third) surveyor 
of San Francisco, gave his own name to a prominent 
thoroughfare. He also honored Edwin Bryant, the 
first alcalde of San Francisco, who was elected in 
1847, after having served in Fremont's army ; Thos. 
M. Leavenworth, the second alcalde; Samuel Bran- 
nan, who was once the richest man in San Francisco; 
and Frank Turk, a Connecticut lawyer, who lived to 
a ripe old age, after having fought a duel with another 
attorney named O. C. Hall, and experiencing more 
ups and downs than an elevator. Eddy gave McAl- 
lister street its name in honor of United States Dis- 
trict Judge McAllister, father of the late distin- 
guished lawyer, Hall McAllister; Cutler, also a law- 
yer; Julian, an army officer, and for many years 
stationed at Benicia ; and Marion, an Episcopal 
clergyman, who will be remembered by some as the 
first rector of the Church of the Advent. 

Jasper J. O'Farrell was also an early surveyor, 
and honored a street with his own name. He also 
remembered W. D. M. Howard, who built the first 
pretentious dwelling house in San Francisco. George 
Hyde, one of the most popular of all early timers, 
was honored by a friendly surveyor, and so was Ed- 
ward Harrison, who was once Surveyor of the Port 
of San Francisco, and afterwards a merchant in the 
firm of De Witt & Harrison. 

Van Ness avenue was later called after a worthy 
Mayor of that name on account of an ordinance he 
had previously urged through the Supervisors while 
a member of that body. And Clay and Webster 
streets perpetuate the names of the two greatest of 
American statesmen. 

Many of the officers who became great command- 
ers, or who otherwise distinguished themselves dur- 
ing the Civil War, had been stationed at or had been 
residents of San Francisco at an early day. Grant 
himself was a captain, who had served brilliantly in 
Mexico; Hooker, whose spectacular battle in the 
clouds on Lookout Mountain in November, 1863, ex- 
alted himself as a splendid corps commander, was 
keeping a billiard saloon in San Francisco at the com- 
mencem'ent of hostilities ; Sherman had been a banker 
and not a very good one in the early days; Custis 
Lee was a lieutenant on the staff of General Clark, 
Commandant of the Department of the Pacific ; 
Stoneman, since Major-General of Cavalry in the 
army of the Potomac, Military Governor of Virginia, 
Commander of the Department of Arizona, Railroad 
Commissioner and Governor of California, was a lieu- 



July 21. 1905. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ml and quartermaster lure in "4 ■, 
I'hcison, who was killed while commanding the army 
at .the battle of Atlanta on July 33, 
.. was also a lieutenant, and SO B \rmi- 

stead, who was killed at I iettysbui 

ral; De Russej was .1 colonel in th< Engineer 
ps, and became more prominent afterward; 
Keyes, who commanded a corps under McClellan in 
\ irginia, was a captain: Winder and Merchant were 
captains of artillery; I leintzleman. who became a 
major-general early in 1861, was a captain. General 
VVinfield Scott paid San Francisco a \i-ii in 1858, 
Albert Sidney Johnson, who was killed on April 6, 
1862, while commanding the Confederate army near 
Pittsburg Landin.tr. was commandant in 1801. and 
succeeded by E. V. Sumner. General fohn II. 
king, who had distinguished himself in the array of 
the Cumberland, came in December, 18/36. The great 
Thomas, and then Schofield, the hero of the battle of 
Franklin, came afterward. 

And there are numbers who read this reverie who 
will remember when "Commodore" David G. Farra- 
gut commanded at Mare Island; Admiral McDougal, 
who was then a captain, will also be remembered; 
and also Lieutenants Alden and Morris, wdio became, 
one a captain and the other a commodore during the 
Civil War, Morris going down with his ship, the 
Cumberland, in Hampton Roads. 

It was not until after the Civil War that San Fran- 
cisco entered conspicuously into a transition state. 
and then not so perceptibly as immediately following 
the completion of the Union and Central Pacific Rail- 
roads. As late as 1867 there were not twenty preten- 
tious buildings on Montgomery, California, Bush 
and Kearny, the four leading streets; and there were 
no handsome dwellings. Nearly all of the saloons — 
the Hank Exchange, Barry & Patten's, Occidental, 
Cosmopolitan and Lick bars, the Alhambra, Blos- 
som's, Mint and many others — charged 25 cents a 
drink, which included beer or champagne, although 
"bit houses" were springing up', and some of them 
served elaborate lunches. And that reminds me that 
the lunches served at the "two-bit bars" were some- 
thing so enormous as to paralyze the new-comer, 
who had often paid as much as a dollar for so liberal 
a gastronomic offering, with no potable "on the side." 
But there sprang up more and more "bit houses," 
notably Collins's, corner California and Montgomery, 
two places opposite the Occidental, one in the Russ 
House, and one opposite, and a "hole in the wall" 
opposite the Lick; and one by one the 25-cents-a- 
drink places joined the procession, and to-day only 
the Palace Hotel bar charges the old-time price. 
Really good cigars cost 25 cents, which were no bet- 
ter than the straight ten and two for a quarter now. 
All the barber shops on these four streets charged 
25 cents for a shave and 50 cents each for shampoo 
and hair-cut. Newspapers were ten cents each, or 
if you had no correct change 15 cents, as there were 
no nickels as late as 1866-69. A custom-made suit 
of clothes at Tobin's cost from $75 to $100; a silk 
hat at Fisher's $10, and a pair of calf-skin boots of 
Kelly's, $20. All men's underwear and furnishing 
goods at Orr & Atkins fifty per cent more than in the 
East. The lowest hack fare was $2.50, but the hacks 
would carry four a long distance for that rate. A 
team for the Cliff House over a toll road — and there 
was no other drive — was $10. There were what were 
called "steamer days," three a month, when all bills 

Nelson's Amycose, 

Infallible remedy for Catarrh, Sore Throat and Inflammations 
of the Skin. 



35 

payable. The savings bank, paid ten per cent 
a year interest, and the lord only knows what they 

Charged. Ibcatrc , .rices were about the same as ,„ 

the East at that day. and all matinees also as i„ 

the states —were 50 cents. In iMfrfy there were 

three places ot amusement— Maguire's < )pera House 

Washington street, near Montgomery; a larger thea- 
tre on Montgomery, near Washington ; an, I Maguire's 
Academy of Music, on Pine street, near Montgomery 
and there was a vaudeville house, where drinks were 
served, on Kearny, near Washington, called the Bella 
I mon. I he Alhambra I Iiush-St. Theatre) was 
opened m 1868, the California in 1869, and the Stand- 
ard later. The Grand ( Ipera House and the Baldwin 
I heatre came soon afterward. The leading first- 
class hotels were the Occidental, Lick and Cosmopoli- 
tan— the latter on the corner of Bush and Sansome. 
I he Occidental (the unanimous opinion of all trav- 
elers) set the finest and most liberal table in the 
world, and got all the army and navy people and the 
majority of other choice patronage ; the Lick was an 
elegant, quiet house— a high-toned family hotel, say; 
and the Cosmopolitan drew the high-class brokers' 
and miners; the Russ was known as a second-class 
hotel that set a first-class table and made lots of 
money. The Brooklyn, on Bush, was first-class Euro- 
pean, and the International, a cheaper hotel on the 
same plan. The leading restaurants were Marchand's 
and the Poodle Dog, the best in the world for the 
price ; Campi's was also the best in any land for the 
price ; then there were the Nevada, the Occidental 
and two or three other restaurants that served a wine 
dinner for 50 cents that had no equal for the money 
in the world — a meal that would have cost $1.00 at 
Morelli's, $1.25 at Martinelli's, and $2 at Del Monico's 
in New York, and even more at any as good restau- 
rant in Paris or Vienna. 

The prominent preachers in San Francisco in the 
'6o's were Archbishop Alemany, Bishop Kip, and the 
Reverends Starr King, Stebbins, Stone and Scott. 
The leading bankers were Ralston, Latham, Tallant, 
Pioche, Sather and Parrott. The principal dry goods 
stores were Austin's, Samuels's, the White House 
and City of Paris. Newhall, Duncan and Eldridge 
were prominent auctioneers. Sharon, Tevis, Dewey, 
Logan, Jim Keene and Joe Jones were leading brok- 
ers ; Tucker and Seamans were popular jewelers. But- 
ler and Caswell were the principal milliners. Gray 
and Sherman & Hyde were music dealers. There 
were many writers, of course, and among those I 
met and remember were George Fitch, Benjamin F. 
Avery, W. C. Bartlett and Sam William's, of the 
Bulletin ; Brooks, Evans and McComb of the Alta ; 
Dr. Gunn, of the Times ; McCarty of the Flag ; Mar- 
cus D. Boruck of the Spirit of the Times ; John Nu- 
gent of the (resurrected) Herald ; Loring G. Picker- 
ing, Jim Ayres and the two Barnes's of the Call ; and 
also Henry George, Bret Harte, Charlie Webb, the 
brothers Ford, J. Ross Brune, Theodore Hittell, 
Cronise, Ned McGowan, Steve Massett and others. 
The completion of the transcontinental railroads 
in 1869 was of immense benefit to San Francisco, al- 
though it did much to remove considerable of its old- 
time flavor. 



r 



y^srzte&ft'. 



utf^Z- 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name ot Stewart 
Hartshorn on label. 

Wood Boilers Tin Rollers. 




36 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 22, 1905. 

BANKING. &/>* Minister Of Foreign Affairs 



The SclIi Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco. 
James K. Wilson, President; Wm. Pierce Johnson, "Vice-Presi- 
dent; C. K. Mcintosh, Vice-President; F. W. Wolfe, Cashier; 

C. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier. 

Capital, Jl.000,000. Surplus and undivided profits, $315,000. 

Directors— William Pierce Johnson, Wm. J. Dutton. Geo. A. 
Pope, C. S. Benedict, George Aimer Newhall, W. H. Talbot, H. 

D. Morton, C. K. Mcintosh, James K. Wilson. 

Agents— New York— Hanover national Bank. Chemical National 
Bank. Boston— National Shawmut Bank. Philadelphia— Drexel 
& Co. Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— Mechan- 
ics' National Bank. Denver— National Bank of Commerce. Kan- 
sas City— First National Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. 
Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. Dresdner Bank, Berlin. 

The Canadian B».nk of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 
Paid-up Capital, $8,700,000. Reserve Fund, $3,500,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $90,000,000. 
HON. GEORGE A. COX, President. 
B. E. WALKER, General Manager. Alex. Laird, Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E. C. 
NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 
BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook. 
Fernie, Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanalmo, Nelson, 
New Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria. 
IN YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 
IN UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska.) 
Also 92 other branches, covering the principal points in 
Manitoba, N. W. Territories and Eastern Canada. 
BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, the Bank of 
Scotland. Lloyd's Bank, Ltd. he Union of London and Smith's 
Bank. Ltd. 
AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 
AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

■*m Fr*n«la«* Off!** 325 California Street. 
A. KAINS, Manager. Bruce Heathcote, Asst. Manager. 

London. Pe^ris and American Bsvnk, Ltd. 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTER STS. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,150,000 
Head Office-^0 Threaaneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris and Ameri- 
can Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. 
Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct 
on the principal cities of the world Commercial and Travelers' 
credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager; H. S. GREEN, Sub-Manager; 
R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Au thorized Capital $3,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Reserve $1,725,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian or 
Trustee. Check Accounts solicited. Legal Depository for money 
in Probate Court proceedings. Interest paid on Trust Deposits 
and Savings. Investments carefully selected. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., Opposite Third. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 300,000 

Surplus 300,000 

Deposits, July 1. 1905 9,969,223 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Presi- 
dent; JOHN A. HOOPER. Vice-President; George A. STORY. 
Cashier; C. B. HOBSON, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 

The Anglo-CeLlifornifk-n Bank. Limited 

HEAD OFFICE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized. $6,000,000 Paid-up, $1,500 000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, 
makes telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit avail- 
able throughout the world. Sends bills for collection, loans 
money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL. Managers. 
T. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 

The German Savings 6, Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guaranteed capital and surplus $2,500,098 42 

Capital actually paid up in casn LOOoiooO 00 

Peposits, June 30. 1905 37 73s'67 9 17 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— John Lloyd, President; Daniel 
Meyer, First Vice-President; Emil Rohte, Second Vice-President- 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bergen f' 
Tillman. Jr., E. T. Kruse. 

A. H. R. Schmidt. Cashier; Wm. Herrmann. Asst. Cashier- 
George Tourny. Secretary; A. H. Muller, Asst. Secretary; W S 
Goodfellow, General Attorney, 



The appointment of De Witte 
Fresh Issues in on the peace commission with 
Europe. full authority to bind the Rus- 

sian government to any agree- 
ment he may be able to reach with Japan, has set the 
leading statesmen of Europe to talking for peace. But 
the conditions which are inspiring statesmen and dip- 
lomatists to advocate concessions to Japan by Russia 
are very different from what they were a little while 
ago. Then it was fear that Russia would draw the 
other nations into her Japanese entanglement. Now 
it is the formation of an anti-German coalition to 
maintain Russia's position in the family of nations 
and circumvent Germany in her schemes for domi- 
nating in the politics of Europe. To that end, Rus- 
sia's moral and national strength must not be allowed 
to become further weakened by Japan ; at the same 
time, Japan must not be denied the best of the fruits 
of her victories. This sudden change of front as con- 
cerning Russia has come during the past week, and 
the underlying cause is the determined effort of the 
Kaiser to force Norway back into the Sweden-Norway 
federation under King Oscar, making Norway more 
than ever a dependency. Norway wants to be a Re- 
public, or at least an independent monarchy, with the 
right to say who the king shall be. To all this, King 
Oscar vehemently objects, and the Kaiser is backing 
him up. Diplomatists believe that an agreement al- 
ready obtains between Oscar and the Kaiser which 
will make the Sweden-Norway federation little better 
than a dependency of Germany. In that event, Rus- 
sia would lose supremacy on the Baltic, and Norway 
would become a naval base of Germany against Eng- 
land and France. And to still further disturb the 
situation, Austria is vigorously protesting to the 
powers against German aggressiveness in the direc- 
tion of the Adriatic. The Morocco incident, too, 
grows more threatening. 

In view of all this the several powers, other than 
Germany, find it necessary to re-establish the political 
equilibrium by restoring Russia to her former posi- 
tion as a "balance of power'' nation. Russia is now 
firmly convinced that Germany has been a false friend 
right along ; that when the Kaiser intimated to the 
Czar that Germany could be relied upon to hold up 
his hands in the Far East he did not mean it, but he 
did mean that at the opportune moment to commence 
a policy of aggression, knowing beforehand that the 
Russo-Japanese war would make it impossible for the 
Czar to threaten Germany's frontier. It is easy 
enough to see that the surest way to keep the Kaiser 
within bounds, and protect Austrian and other ter- 
ritory he is coveting, including supremacy in Norway 
and Sweden, is to restore Russia to her footing of 
two years ago that she may assume a threatening at- 
titude toward Germany, should occasion require, and 
have the military strength to make it effective. It 
is for these reasons that England, France and the 
United States are bringing all the force of their in- 
fluence upon Japan and Russia to lose no time in 
agreeing upon terms of peace. 

For once, and for the first time, 
The Socialistic the socialists of Europe are recog- 
Influence. nized as an influence worth con- 

sidering. The socialists of Swe- 
den and Norway, backed by those of England, France 
and Germany, are in line against the scheme of the 
Kaiser to force Norway back into the Sweden-Nor- 



July 22, 1905. SAN FRANCISCO 

federation, ami especially ■ 
tncnt are those of Sweden. It I ,| that if 

is undertaken, the Swedish will leave 

no stone untnrned to handicap kins; 1 incit- 

ing public resentment and weak. a rmj or- 

ganization. They know they will have the sympathy 
and co-operation of the English and French 

and possibly very much more than mere good w j|j 
from the German socialists. It is admitted by the 
level-headed of European statesmen that while 
this indirect encouragement to the Swedish socialists 
by certain of the powers is going to make them a 
r of considerable strength in" Sweden's politics 
to circumvent ( 'scar and William, and ma) 
them altogether, the aftermath is likely to be a rapid 
and aggressive growth of socialism which will finally 
develop into a problem whose solution may weaken 
every throne of Europe. This class of diplomatists 
believe it is playing with fire to wink at the Swedish 
socialists in their effort to let Norway set up an in- 
dependent government, yet on the other hand, if the 
socialists are not encouraged, England, France and 
Russia will have to undertake the job of defeating the 
plans of King Oscar and Emperor William, and the 
maintenance of Norway's integrity and national in- 
dependence. Under the circumstances, it is not 
difficult to understand the importance of having Rus- 
sia cleared of her Japanese complications that she 
may be free to act in the Xorth. 

The constitutional monar- 
Defying the Czar, chy party of Russia has noti- 
fied the Czar that in spite of 
his edict to the contrary, it shall meet in convention 
to devise ways and means to reform the administra- 
tion of the affairs of the nation. Indeed, the notifica- 
tion goes so far as to hint to the Emperor that con- 
tinued resistance to the introduction of reform meas- 
ures may oblige the people to do away with the 
Romanoff dynasty and select another family to ad- 
minister the affairs of the country. The cool, delib- 
erate and determined way the constitutional party 
leaders are prosecuting their purpose makes it very 
clear that they are in earnest. For the moment, the 
Czar is inclined to let them go on and see if any good 
will come of a convention, and the appointment of 
De Witte on the peace commission indicates a radical 
change of policy, but, on the other hand, it is surmised 
by some that the moment De Witte gets out of the 
country, the war party will again capture the Emperor 
and cause him to disperse the convention and resume 
his old policy of crushing by military force all op- 
position to the methods of the several bureaus. The 
uprising of the labor element is pretty much a thing 
of the past, which is not surprising, seeing that the 
discontented adopted the. red flag of anarchy to in- 
dicate their purpose. 

Japan is serene and tranquil during all the agita- 
tion in Europe, knowing very well that her victories 
will weigh all they are worth in the balance when 
settlement day comes. Meanwhile, her warships and 
soldiers are invading Russian waters and territory at 
unexpected places. Vladivostock is being invested in 
a slow but sure way, and Linevitch with his great 
army is kept in a state of anxiety. The mystery of 
Oyama's strategy is past finding out by Russia s 
generals. 



NEWS LETTER. 3? 

BANKING. 

Sa.r\ Francisco Servings Union 

.«.' California St.. cor. Webb St.. San KrnncHco. 
,*•■" t'"M'. President: \v c B DeFraman imhikht 

wSEi,.^ '"•' -'■ -..it,, Sffiwf 1**1 

>\ lllirtm A. Magec, Robert Watt 

deposits and loans on n - ountry 

remittances mny be ami by Wella, Farg or hv check, 

Pf.-JS" payable In Ban Francisco, bul the responsi- 

bility or this savings bank commences only with tbi 

the money. The signature of the depositor should ae- 
ny the Drat deposit. No charge Is made for pass book 
I ranee fee. - 

Office Hours-S a. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday evenings. 6:30 to 8:00. 

December 31. 1904 MS40133 

Ouaranl Japltal, Paid-up llooo'wo 

Reserve and Contingent Funds [, 'sTellOg 

Continental Building & Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 

.S"l California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital jl7nnnnon 

Paid-in Capital j'SoOW 

Front and Reserve Fund 450 000 

Interest paid on deposits at the rate of 6 per cent per annum 
on term and 5 per cent on ordinary deposits. 

Dr. Washington Dodge, President; William Corbln, Secretary 
and General Manager. 



Security Savings Bank 

316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 500.000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 265 OuO 

Banking by mail a specialty. 

Directors— William Babcock, Parrott & Co. ; S. L. Abbott, Se- 
curity Savings Bank; O. D. Baldwin, O. D. Baldwin & Son; Jos. 
D. Grand. Murphy, Grant & Co.; B. J. McCutchen, Page, McCut- 
chen & Knight; L. F. Monteagle, Capitalist; R. H. Pease. Pres. 
Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warren D. Clark, Williams, Dimond & 
Co.; James L. Flood, Capitalist; J. A. Donohoe, President Dono- 
hoe-Kelly Banking Co.; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob Stern, 
President Levi Strauss & oo. 



California Safe 

Deposit and 

Trust Co. 

* 

Corner 

California and Montgomery 

Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CAPITAL and SURPLUS $1,411. 161.19 
TOTAL ASSETS . 4,943.782.83 

Interest paid on deposits, sub- 
ject to check, at the rate of 
two per cent per am. una. 

Interest paid on savings de- 
posits at the rate of three and 
six-tenths per cent p • r 
annum. 

Trusts executed. We are 
authorized to act as the 
guardian of estates and the 
executor of wills. 

Safe deposit boxes rented at 
$6 per annum and upwards. 

Get a box at once and guard 
against loss by Fire or Burg- 
lars. 



J. Dalzell Brown 



Manager 



California Home Building Loan Company 

No. 7 Powell Street 

5 per cent interest paid on Savings Accounts; 6 per cent on Term 
Accounts of $100 or more. Loans made on Real Estate, repay- 
able in monthly installments under definite contract. 

OFFICERS— P. B. Roberts, ^resident; F. M. Parcells, Vice- 
President; R. L. Handy, Secretary; Jos. Hutchinson, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS— P. B. Roberts, F. M. Parcells, Jos. Hutchin- 
son, James Frazer and Charles J. Robinson. 



FAT FOLKS 

I reduced by weight seventy pounds, bust six taoheB, -*£*. 
six Inches, and hips fourteen inches in a short time by a guar 
anteed harmless remedy, without exercise or starvmg. I wm 
tell you all about it. Enclose stamp Address MRS. B.R. RICH 
ARDS, 225 EAST NINTH ST., RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA. 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange 




J. C. Wilson 




Banker and Broker 




LOCAL AND EASTERN STOCKS AND BONDS 


490 California Street, San Francisco 




Telephone Mam 


3070 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN S u th e e »££?"**«$£ 

remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 
Send for circular. Naber, Alfs & Brune. 325 Market St., S. F. 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



"Pooh, pooh," said the man 

with the yellow whiskers, "to lose 
a big navy isn't such a staggering 
blov bv any means. Why, my 



For Women 
and Children 
Traveling Alone 

X5he Rio 
Grande 
Scenic Line 
Excursions 

JUST FILL THE BILL 

Personally Conducted to 
the East 

NO CHANGE OF CARS 

Details— also free books of 
travel, handsomely illustrated, 
may be had of 

W. J. SHOTWELL. Genera,! Agent 

DENVER AND PIO GRANDE R. R, 

625 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




ABOUT 
YOUR 
TRIP 
EAST 



When planning your Eastern trip, the 
Question always arises: "How shall I 
go?" Ijet me offer a suggestion. The 
Missouri Pacific operates both Pullman 
and Tourist Sleepers through from 
California to Kansas City, St. Louis 
and Chicago without change of cars, 
which carry you through the world- 
famed scenery of Colorado by day- 
light. Dining and cafe cars on all 
through trains; service a la carte. 

Write us for our lowest rates and 
handsomely Illustrated books of travel. 



W.J. SHOTWELL, General Afenl 



625 Market St. 



S*n Frinoljoo 




ALL THE YEAR 
»\ ROUND TOURS 

Travel by Sea 

Bxcelloat Sn-Tlce, Uv Rites, Inclwlliii Berth ind Me.li 

Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Kure ^ , , ^ eattle Tacoma 

Victoria Vancouver Etc. 

AliSka t a nd h Mexlco. 8irlDg l0nKer trlps t0 

Por Information rerardln, silllnj dllea elc.obtalo (older 

SAN FRANCISCO TICKET OFFICES 
a New Montgomery St. (Palac- Hotel) 
10 Market St.. and Broadway Wharves. 

0. D. DUNAXN. Gene's I assenger Agent 
lu Market Street, Son Fnuiotsrn 



country could see every warship 
she possesses sent to the hottom 
without admitting that she was at 
all crippled by the loss." The 
crowd stared at him. "May I ask," 
the conductor queried, "what 
country you hail from?" "I'm from 
Switzerland." replied the yellow- 
whiskered man. 



July 22, 1905. 

¥.**.«v.v.ibf.v.vv.M.v%r.v.M.v.v.ir.irv.Yint 



— — Tomson — Bobson tells the 
most impossible fish stories ! Jon- 
son — Of course ! Fish stories 
wouldn't be worth listening to if 
they weren't impossible. 




Stylish * 
Suits 



15* 



Dressy Suits $20 5 

Pants $4.50 I 

My $25.00 Suits are the* 

best in America. S 

<J r Per Cent Saved by jet-g 
at ting your suit made byjj 

JOE POHEIM g 

TIE TAILM R 

1110-1112 Market St £ 

jj 201-203 Mont<y St.. S. F.5 



i 3im»l 
i Frw' 




Train* leave niul «re due 
to arrive at 



COAST LINE (Narrow I.RiiffA). 
(Foot of Market Street.) 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Fbom Junk 25. lnOS 

Fbrry Dspot 

(Foot of Market Street.) 



LlATlt - 



MAIN LINE. 



— ARRITX 



7.46AStmlft Cruz Kxciirsl.ui (Sunday 

only) 916p 

8.1&A Nf'VHrk, Centcrxllle. San .lone, 
Fciton. BoiiMit Creek, Santa 

Cruz and Way Stations 5 65p 

tS-ISANewnrk, 8an Jose. Felton, Doulder 

Creek. Santa Cruz t7 69p 

T2.16pNewark. Ceniervlilc, Sun Jose, 
New Altnaden.LnaGatoa, Pel ton, 
Boulder Creek, Santa Crnr and 

Principal Way StatlonB 10-66a 

7.48P 4- 16p Newark. San Joee, Lob Gatus, 

Wright 1865a 



7.00a P.imlni. ViicavlllP. Winters. IEuiin-py 
7.00a IclQlimtmd, Menlclft. s.icran.ciiio, 

tiulaun and Way Sn.tlons 7.28p 4-15pSaturday and Sunday for Fclton, 

ItuulderCrei-k. Santa Cruz &8 66a 

6.08p COAST LINE (llnmri *.aii K «). 



4.r»8p 
4-48p 



7 08p 



7.40a Vallcjo. Napa, ChJImukh. *anta 
RoBa. Murtluez, San Ruin n .... 

7.40a NIIch, PleaHiu.toii, 1,1 ver 111 o re, 

Tracy, Latbrop, Stockton... t .28p - 

8.00a 61itiHi.fi Express — (V la Davie). 
Williams. Wlil.iws, tFrmo, Red 
Bin IT. Portland. Tacoma. Seattle. 

8.00a Oavln. Woodland. Knight* Landing, 
Muryuvlllc. Orovllle 

8.20A Martinez. Antloch, Byron, Tracy. 
Stockton. Newman, Loa Banoa, 
M-ndota. Ar n», Ilanford, , 

.« V|MI1 "»- I'ortirvllle \ 

8.20a Port CoMa. Lmlirop. Merced. Mo- ' 
dento, Raymond, Frertio, Han- 

rord, VlHullii. Itak'TBllelcl.... ... 

8.40a Nllee, San June, Llvenoore, Stock- 
Ion (tMlll..u), Valley Spring, 
lone, Saerainento, Placcrvllle, 
Colfax. Ma.vsvllle, Red Bluff.... 

8-40a Oakdale, Chinese, .lames town, 

Sonora, 'I'm duiitne and Angels... 

JJ.^pA Atlantic KxpreflB-ORClnil and Kast. 

8.40a Richmond, port Co.ia. Martinez 

and Way Siailona (tConcord) .... 

10 20a Vallt'Jo, Dally. Napa, Sunday only 
10.20a I.os Angelc- Pasacnger— Port 
Costa. Miiriluez. Byron, Tracy, 
La tli r op. Stocktoo, Merced, 
Raymond, K regno, Goshen Junc- 
tion, Ilanrord. Lemoore, VlBalla, 

••.. " lllCfi silfiii. Lob Angelea 

10-20a El Paso. Kansas City, St. Louis and 

Chicago 7.rfip 

11.00a The Overland Limited — Omaha. 

Chicago. Denver, Kaunas City... 6.43p 
1140aN1U-b. San Jose and Way Stations. «...*8P 

tl.00psi..Trtiiiciito River Steamerfl 111. OOP 

5.40pB< nhla. Winters. Sacramento, 
Woodland, Knights Landing, 

Mnrynvll!e and Orovllle 10.48a 

3.40p1Iii> ward. Nlles, and Way StatlonB 748P 
4-OOp Vii 1 lejo, Martinez, 8nn Ramon, 

Napa, Ca lift toga, Santa Rosa 8.28a 

4.00pNMch. Tracy. Stockton, Lodl. 1028a 

4.40p Hay ward, Nlles, Irvtngton, 6n.nl t8 48a 

a.—, .loac. I.lvermore 1 111.48a 

B.OOPTbe owl Limited- Newman, Loa 
Raima, Mcminn, Fresno, Tulare, 

"'» ken. Held. Los Angeles 8. 48a 

S-OOpCblciigo and St. Louis Speolal-El 
Paso. Imuinub city. St. Louis and 

Chicago .... 9 48* 

t6.20PIIavw,ird. Nllcsand San Jose....." 7.08a 
6.20pVal)ejo. port Costa, Benlcla, Sul- 

sun, Sacramento 11 28a 

e-OOpkahUrn Kx press— Omaha, Chicago, 
Denver, Kansas City, St. Louis, 
Martinez, Stockton, Sacramento, 
r. nn „« cn °. Sparks. Montello. Ogden .. 1248p 

B.20p Hay ward, N les and San Jose 9 48a 

7.00pi:.*i,o Passenger-Port Costa, Be- 
nlcla, SulBun, Elmlra, Dixon, 
Davis. Sa. ramento, Bparks, Tono- 

-, m~ ^ r " ,t1, {i "'diieid and Keeler 7.08a 

7-40pPort Costa, Martinez, Byron, Tracy, 

Modesto, Merced. Fresno .... 1208P 
7.4rpTosrmlte and Marlposs Big Trcei 
t * n ttV, Ib "''ymund-Wiiwona R< ute).. 8.48a 
7.40 P ValleJo, Sunday onlv 11.28a 

8,20pOre«on & 1 alirSrnla Exprepa— Sao- 
rnmento, MnrysvlJIe, Redding, 
onn ,, p " rl,nil 'l-Puget Sound nn-l Bait. 848a 
8 00p Hay ward, Nlles and Sas Jose (Snn- 



tW (Third an 



T.i 



fend Streets.) 



6. 10A San J use and Way StatlonB 6 30p 

17.00a San .lone and Way stations 6.40p 

7-48p 7.16a Monterey. Santa Cruz Excursion 

(Sunday only) 10-lOp 

7 48p 8.00a New Almaden (Tues.. Frl., only).. 4-10p 
8.00a The Conster San Jose, Baltnas, 
San Ardo, Paso Roblcs, Santa 
Margarita, San Luis ObtBpo, 
Guadalupe, Gavlota, Santa Bar- 
bara. San Buenaventura. Oxnard, 

BorliRDk, Los Angeles 1030p 

4 48p 8.00a Giimy. HoUlBter, Castrovllle, Del 
Monte. Paclllc Grove. Barf, 

Loinpoc. .. 10-30p 

9-OOASan Jose, Tres Plnos. WalsonvlMe, 
Cap I tola. Santa Cruz, Pacific 
Grove. SaltnnB. San Luis Obispo 
and Principal Way Stntl >ns 



4.08P 



4-08P 

4.28P 19.00a 1." 



4.1PP 



Gatos, Wright, Boulder Creek, 
a Santa Clara and Narrow 

6.48P Gauge t7.4cp 

7.48P 10 30A San Jose and Way Stations 1 2 r P 

11 .30a Sun Joseanc' Wnjl Stations 7 4l p 

2 16PSan Jose and Way Stailons 836a 

t3. OOP Del Monte Express— Santa Clara, 
San Jose. Wutt-onv Hie, Santa 
Cruz. Del Monte, Monterey 

Pacific Gr.vc t12-16P 

(■3-OOpl.o^ (iatos. Wright, n..ulder Creek, 
San tu Cruz, via Santa Clara and 

Narrow Gauge 1045a 

S-30pSmitli San Francisco. San Jose. 
Gllroy. Holllster. Tres Finos, 
Watsonvillc, Cup! tola. Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, Pacific Grove. 1P,45*a 

430p San Jose and Way Stations f7 55a 

t6 00pSantn Clara, San Johc. Los GatoB, 

Wright ,., . 19. - A 

|6.3rp San lose and Principal Way Stations {J. 40a 

6.46pSiinset Express— Red wood, San 

Jose. Gllroy. Salinas, Pnso 

Rotiies, San Luis Ohlapo, Santa 

ItiirlnirR. Los Anceles, Demlng, 

EI Pnso. New Orleans 9 10a 

6 45pEI l*nao, Kausas City, St. Lonls, 

Chicago 1030P 

B 45pPiiJaro. Watsonvllle. Cnpltola. 

Santa Crnz. Castrovllle, Dell tlO.Kp 

Mont--, Pacific Grove ( t10.30r 

'6-16pSihi 1M [eo. lieresford, Belmont, 
San Carlos. Redwood. Fair OnkB. 

Men!.. p„rk. Palo Alto .... +6-4PA 

6.3?pSnn Jose ami Wav Stations B 36a 

8-0 pl'alu Altoa d Way St>-ttona 1p15a 

1 1 .3 p Smith San Francisco, Ml librae, Bur- 
Hiignme. San Mateo. Belmont 
Sin Carl, s, Redwood. Fa1rt»aks. 

M'-nlO Park and Palo Alto 9 45 P 

11.3 r PSalurdny8 i nly for Maj • field. Moun- 
lain View. Suunyvale, Lawrence. 
6 nta Clara and San Jose ........ :g 45p 

_ OAKLAN O "HAR B T R>ERRY 

(Foot of Mai ci St.) 
t 7 15 ». m. 9.00 a m. 1 1.00 a.m. 

1.00 p.m. 3.00 p.m. 5.15 p.m. 



A for Morning. 
tSiiihluy excepted 
^.Monday only. 
{Dally, and Btnp* at nil stall 



P for Afternoon. 
is luj only. 



The « ■ n- 
wtH call for and ch" 
residences Teieph >i 



k baggage from ho;<Mi, and 



BYRON MAUZY 



PIANOS Warr JST. d „, 

Sohmer Piano Agency 

308-312 Post SUan Francisco 

KecelTed Gold Medal— Highest Award World'i Fair. 8t Loulf, U04. 



July 32. 1905. 



\ smoker's sore tongue 
and mouth are relieved by 
cleansing the teeth with 

S0Z0D0NT 

Liquid. Ptrtvdfr or Paste. 
ASK YOUR DENTIST 



SUNBEAMS 

lStnl*n fmm Tblvvw* ' 

It was tin- last half of the 

ninth. The pitcher had gone up 
in the air and the liases were full 
as three goats 1 lie seore was 5-4 
in favor of the team in the field. A 
single would tie the score. A two- 
bagger would win the game. Two 
men had flied out, and the man at 
the hat had two strikes against 
him. It was a crucial moment. 
And. as we say, the pitcher was 
rattled. Suddenly the catcher held 
up his hand. His right hand. He 
removed his wire mask and stepped 
toward the pitcher, who advanced 
to meet him. With mouth close 
to the pitcher's ear. the catcher 
whispered something. What it 
was no one heard but the pitcher, 
who returned to the box. The ball 
shot true across the plate. "Strike 
three!" cried the umpire. The 
pitcher had saved the day. Now, 
then, the thing we wish to know is 
this: What did the catcher say to 
the pitcher? 

"Why did you say in public 

that your wife was a regular cat? 
Don't you think that was a cruel 
remark?" "Why, no," said Jones, 
surprised. "I meant it as a hu- 
morous comparison. ' She' is so 
fond of expensive rugs and cush- 
ions." 

— 1 — Mr. Subbubs — Great heav- 
ens, Lucy ! Mary Ann tried to 
start the fire with gasoline, and she 
has been blown out through the 
roof! Mrs. Subbubs— Well, it's 
her day out anyhow. Stop at the 
intelligence office on your way 
down to-day. 



HAND 

SAPOLIO 

FOR TOILET AND BATH 

Pincers roughened by needlework 

catch every stain and look hopelessly 
dirty. Hand Sapolio removes not only 
the dirt, but also the loosened, injured 
cuticle, and restores the fingers to 
their natural beauty. 

ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



\\ h) •! >u decline to ans 

wcr when 

had b : l>efoi 

the chauffeur's friend. "This 
\oiir fir-.: "i if coil 

That- just tin point. I got my 
job with the swell thai own9 this 
benzine wagon on the strength of 
my representation- that 1 hail been 
in jail eight tinn - for violating the 
-peed laws." 

"I'm nevci going on another 

fishing trip with Jinx." "What's 
the matter?" "lie's a rank amateur 
— you should have heard the ac- 
count of the trip he gave my wife 
last night. He ipieered me good 
and plenty." "Told some whop- 
pers, eh?" "Whoppers nothin'l lie 
told the truth!" 

Wife (reading) — Here's an 

account of a man who left home- 
one evening after supper six 
months ago to get shaved, and he 
hasn't been seen since. Husband — 
Huh ! I suppose he is still waiting 
for his turn. 

He — It seems to me that 

whenever a pretty woman marries 
she either marries a very ugly man 
or else a fool. She (sadly) — Do 
you think so, George, dear? Then 
we had better break our engage- 
ment. 

Torn — Now that your en- 
gagement is broken, are you going 
to make Clarissa send back your 
letters ? George — You bet I am ! 
I worked hard on those letters; 
they're worth using again! 

"Oh, yes, he's a very intel- 
lectual man." "What makes you 
think that?" "I judged so from his 
talk." "What does he talk about?" 
"He's always talking about how in- 
tellectual he is." 

She— That Mr. Boorisch is 

a man of pronounced tastes, is he 
not? He — Monotonously so. Hie 
makes the same sounds over his 
soup that he does over his pie. 

"A horseshoe is supposed 

to be a sign of good luck." "And 
so it is," replied the sport, "if it 




f\ GOOD thing is usually a tar- 
get for imitators. Be sure to 
insist on CLUB COCKTAILS if 
you want the satisfaction that goes 
with a royal drink. 

It is not enough for imitators to 
use the same ingredients — the 
secret of CLUB superiority is the 
exquisite proportions of liquors 
used and the ageing. This 
formula cannot be imitated — so 
CLUB COCKTAILS remains the 
only brand. 

Seven kinds — Manhattan, Mar- 
tini, Vermouth, Whiskey, Holland 
Gin, Tom Gin and York. 

C. F. HEUBLE1N & BRO., Sole Proprietors 

Hartford New York London 

I PACIFIC COAST AOENTS 

SPOHN-PATRICK COMPANY 
Ban Francisco, Los Angeles. 
Denver, Salt Lake City, Seattle. 

Mrs. Grammercy — You look 

awfully worried, my dear girl. 
Mrs. Park — It's all on account of 
my stupid maid. She let me go 
out with Fido when I was wearing 
the gown that harmonizes with Ba- 
bette. — Puck. 

Bosh — Did you get anything 

out of that oil deal you were tell- 
ing me about? Josh — Yes, indeed; 
I got a great deal of light on the 
subject of speculating that I didn't 
have before. 

The Cop — Phwat do ye call 

it, Maggie? The Cook — Shure, 
'tis a Welsh rabbit, ye ignoramus ! 
The Cop — Faith, t' judge from th' 
flavor av the divil, he musht have 
been raised on cheese ! 

An ape of the Breslau Zo- 
ological Gardens has been success- 
goes under the wire first on your fully operated on for cataract, and 

is the first of her kind to wear 



horse.' 

"Are there really Amazons 

in Africa?" "I suppose so." "When 
an Amazon flies to arms it does not 
necessarily mean that she is going 
to war, does it?" 

Tom'mj — Grandpa, will you 

please blow this candle out? Grand- 
pa — Why, Tommy? Tommy — 
Because I heard pa say we get 
$10,000 when you snuff it. 

Little Willie — Say, pa, what 

does this paper mean by "ties of 
blood?" Pa — Must be a new shade 
of red neckties, my son. 



spectacles. 



ETNNEN'S BESK 
XPILET 



asftWi; 



PRICKLY HEAT, » 
CHAFING, an* • 
SUNBURN, -ffffi 

Removes all odor of pcra pi ration* De- 

M iigbtfu'l after Shaving. Sold everywhere, or 

mailed on receipt of 25c. Gee Mcnnen's (the original). Sample Free. 

GERHARD MENNEN COMPANY. N.»»rlt.N.J. 



4 o SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

Lewis and Clark Centennial 



July 22, 1905. 



Portland, Ore., July 10th. 

By August 1 st fifty Bontoc lgorrotes will 

reach Portland to build a village at the Fair, and re- 
main as a living ethnological exhibit during the Ex- 
position. For a time it seemed that Portland was not 
going to have this interesting feature, but after much 
hard work on the part of those interested in the 
enterprise, the consent of Uncle Sam was secured, 
and the lgorrotes were collected and put aboard ship 
• at Manila. It was necessary to obtain the consent 
of Secretary Taft and Governor Luke E. Wright, of 
the Philippine Islands, before the natives could be 
procured. The Government gave its consent for the 
head-hunters to come to America only after receiving 
rigid assurance that they would be returned to their 
homes. At the Portland Fair these people of limited 
apparel will do their peculiar holiday dances, eat dog, 
smoke cigarettes and otherwise add to the gaiety of 
the Exposition. Their village will be located near 
the Homer Davenport bird and animal farm. As this 
will be the first time any 01 these interesting wards 
of the nation have been on exhibition in the Pacific 
West, it is expected that they will attract much at- 
tention. • 

Fair weather and record-breaking crowds 

made the week past the most successful since the 
President pressed the button at Washington, on June 
1st. On July 4th the crowd far surpassed that of 
opening day, the turnstiles registering 53,703 admis- 
sions. There were patriotic exercises, with a stir- 
ring speech by Dr. Stephen S. Wise, a local Jewish 
preacher, in the morning, and in the evening thou- 
sands of people lined the shore of Guild's Lake to 
watch the finest fireworks display ever seen in the 
Pacific Northwest. The attendance at the Fair so 
far has been beyond the expectations of the manage- 
ment and of Portland people, in spite of rainy 
weather, which interfered somewhat during the first 
few days. The weather now, however, is ideal, clear, 
warm days being succeeded by cool and refreshing 
evenings. 

The skull and horns of a Rocky Mountain 

sheep were found some time ago by an Idaho man 
firmly imbedded twenty feet from the ground in the 
trunk of a large tree. The section containing the 
curiosity has been taken to the Exposition, where it 
is attracting much attention. It is presumed that, 
when the tree was a sapling, the sheep got entangled 
in its branches and died. As the sapling grew into 
a tree, the sheep was lifted heavenward, and its skull 
and horns became imbedded in the trunk. 

Heliograph signals are now being flashed from 

the snow-line of Mt. Hood to a station near the Gov- 
ernment's building on the Exposition grounds, 
seventy miles distant. Mt. Hood appears to be but 
three or four miles away. A squad of United States 
troops, in command of a lieutenant, has established a 
signal station near the summit of the grand old peak, 
and the Exposition is in daily communication with 
the mountain. Several parties of adventurous people 
will climb to the summit of Mt. Hood during the sum- 
mer as a sort of side trip from Portland. 

Do not throw away your soiled gloves or cra- 
vats or laces, nor yet your "a little dingy" suit of 
clothes. Just send them to Spaulding's Cleaning and 
Dyeing Works, at 127 Stockton street, and in a few 
days you will have them back — and you will be 
amazed to see how fresh, clean and new they look. 



The Western Fire Appliance Co. 

is installing its modern system of 

Fire Protection 

throughout the homes 
of California. 

15he cost is only 20 cents per year 

At a trifling expense we can probably 
save you hundreds of dollars of pro- 
perty in case of fire. 

For further particulars address 

WESTERN FIRE 

APPLIANCE CO., Inc. 

916 MARKET ST. SAM FRANCISCO. CAL. 

phone Main 5913 



Save the fronts of the Packages- We pay money for the Three B'e 

Trata Mark 

PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR 

Boston Brown Bread 
Plum Pudding 
Griddle Cakes and 
Muffins 

j AtH roar grocer for it 

Jp PUT UP IN RED PACKAGES 
AND IN 10 POUND SACKS BY 

Allen's B. B. B. Flour Co. 

PaciQc Coast Factory ... SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Mall ns five 2 cent stamps and we will send Sample Package prepaid 




Headquarters for Process) ve Chiropody 

DRS. BROWN «£ LEANER 

SURGEON CHIROPODIST 

Removes corns entirely whole (painless) without knife, bun- 
Ions and Ingrowing nallB cured by a special and painless 
treatment. 

Hours: 9 to 6 p. m. Saturdays, 9 to 6 p. m. and 8 to II p. m. 

6 GEA'Ry ST'REET 

Telephone BLACK 2702 Junolion Geary and Kearny 



R.OY W. R. 

SMITH ta BARTLEY 

High-class furmishing goods. Shirts to order. Im- 
ported Materials. 



106 THIRD STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. PHONE MAIN 3010 




Celery growing in the peat-lands of California. 

From the August Overland Monthly. 



Price p«r Copy, to cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. Annual Subscription. $4.00. 







Vol. LXXI. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 29, 1905. 



Number 5. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTBR Is printed and published 
every Saturday by the 1'roprietor. Frederick Marriott. llalleck 
Uullding. '£& Sansome street, San Francisco, t'al. 

Entered at San Kranciseo Fosloilice as second-class matter. 

New York Olllce— twhere Information may be obtained regarding 
sii.si rlptlons and advertising)— 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy. 
Representative. 

London Olllce— 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
Intended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
1.ETTEK should be sent to this office not later than 9 a. m. 
Thursday previous to day of issue. 



Mayor Schmitz's forgettery was in good work- 
ing order during the Grand Jury investigation. 

If the complaint against Matilda Christ, 

matron at the city prison, is true, she ought to change 
her name. 

Maestretti is to be vindicated at the primary 
election if it takes every ballot law violater in the 
city to do it. 

Canada wants to keep Collins because Cali- 
fornia kept a murderous burglar. Letting it go at 
that, we get the best of the trade. 

Those who marvel at the largely increased 

registration forget that the population of San Fran- 
cisco is not retrograding. 

With Democrats quiet and Labor Unions har- 
monious, the gangsters will have no difficulty in cap- 
turing the Republican primaries. 

One Chicago city block records twenty-seven 

births in six months, and seems to be proud of it. 
The pride of some people is peculiar. 

It is to be hoped that Collins will make good 

his defense against extradition. Exile in Vancouver 
will about fit his crime. 

New Jersey is building a boulevard one hun- 
dred miles long. It will have to be a circular track, 
or else hang over at both ends. 

It might be well for those merchants who are 

worrying over the threat of a Chinese boycott to con- 
sider something more than the personal dollar. 

Local papers record the breaking of a woman's 

leg through the use of French heels. Women suffer 
worse tortures than that in order to keep in style. 

Two Oakland men are hunting faithless wives 

who have joined the "Holy Rollers." It is worthy 
of mention that certain funds went with the wives. 

The old adage that "politics makes strange 

bedfellows" is exemplified by the Democratic Exami- 
ner appearing as the only defender of Republican 
Mayor Schmitz. 

An inventor has constructed a machine which 

makes "pies like mother used to make." What is 
now needed is some means of bringing back appetites 
that boys used to have. 

Fairfax Wheelan is to be punished for his per- 
nicious activity. The Election Commissioners have 
decided to bottle him up during the primaries, even 
if they have to violate the law in doing it. 



The Czar has ordered the Siberian Railway to 

be double-tracked, but he does not .say whether it is 
to afford two lines of retreat from Manchuria or to 
have two streams of reinforcements. 

Brick McPherson is in jail for borrowing a 

dollar and a half on the promise of seven millions in 
return, but his victim is still outside of the foolish 
house. 

New Yorkers have been blackmailed by a gang 

organized as a "reporters' association." New Yorkers 
must be easy, or else they have a peculiar brand of 
reporters in that city. 

The fact that systematic robbery is going on 

in all the high-priced apartment houses may be ex- 
plained by the fact that the people who live in them 
must have some means of meeting the expense. 

St. Louis had a dry Sunday, but it took a regi- 
ment of cavalry to make it effective. Any one who 
has spent a July in the Missouri city will understand 
why. 

With stories of electrified eggs, fights with 

sharks and impossible serpents, and other wierd vis- 
sions of a disordered brain, Alameda is rapidly build- 
ing up a reputation that will not redound to its credit. 

Chinese editors in San Francisco are fast as- 
suming civilized ways. Latest reports from San 
Francisco's Chinatown are to the effect that the 
bosses of the Chinese dailies have gone gunning for 
each other. 

Ladies should be careful about catching fleas 

in public. A young woman who divided her atten- 
tion between John L. Sullivan on the Central stage 
and one of the pesky insects has been placed under 
arrest. 

San Francisco has broken her registration rec- 
ords. It is also announced that local immigration 
records have been broken during the first six months 
of the present year. That means that next year regis- 
tration records will receive another shock. 

The bureau of publicity and promotion of the 

Chinese boycott seems to be in the San Francisco 
Chinatown. It might have a salutary effect on our 
Mongolian citizens to give them a little of their 
own medicine. 

Mrs. Sophie Mayer, of New York, has attended 

to her household duties, raised six children, studied 
law, been admitted to the bar, and at the same time 
added to the family exchequer. Her husband is so 
proud of her that he intends taking her into partner- 
ship. 

Whether the peace commission amounts to 

anything or not, the plenipotentiaries will have a 
royal time, live high and see a lot of things that they 
did not know were on eafth. In a sense, they are the 
guests of Uncle Sam, and he never does things half 
way. , _ 



4 SAN FRANCISCO 

MALIGNED REPORTERS. 

The unsavory details of the blackmailing mess into 
which prominent New Yorkers have been thrust by 
publicity of the workings of a gang calling itself the 
"Reporters' Association," is but another evidence of 
the ignorance and gullibility of the general public. 

But in this instance there is something more, and 
worse than the blackmailing of pseudo respectable 
people. That the victims stood for the crime and paid 
their money lor the suppression of certain articles 
derogatory to their characters, is of itself indication 
that these "respectable" people have been doing 
things that will not bear the light of publicity. 

That money was paid at all is the surprising thing, 
under the circumstances. It seems strange in ibis age 
of the world that any one, and especially a New 
Yorker, should believe that reporters of newspapers 
had it in their power, even if they had the inclination, 
to publish any article, or, for that matter, to suppress 
any article, at will. 

Reporters work under general directions, and can 
neither publish nor suppress any article reflecting on 
any individual. That rests with the editors. This 
fact is, or should be, so generally known that any 
one who would even offer money to a reporter for 
the suppression of an article shows crass ignorance. 

But the worst of the expose of the scheme which 
drew money from the pockets of the Xew Yorkers 
is the fact that a stigma is cast upon the great body 
of newspaper reporteis. Their integrity is impugned 
and their honor assailed all because a set of scoun- 
drels who could not secure nor hold positions on 
newspapers use the insignia of a respectable body of 
men for the purpose of furthering their nefarious 
plans. 

It may be set down as an invariable rule that any 
man who either demands or. requests money or other 
favors because of his connection with a newspa >> r 
as a reporter is doing so in contravention of strict 
rules of the office for which he works. 



A LESSON IN LAW. 

There seems to be a general disposition on the part 
of the public to sneer at the efforts of the courts to 
place that tricky limb of the law, Collins, behind the 
bars. It is conceded that none deserves imprisonment 
more than the man who uses his knowledge of the 
law to defeat the ends of justice, but the impression 
prevails that Collins is "smarter" than all the rest 
of the bench and bar of California and Canada. 

There is a lesson in this Collins case that it would 
be well for the profession and the laity to observe. 
Collins is not out of jail because he has bested the 
courts, but because the law is made for the purpose 
of guaranteeing to an innocent man every possible 
opportunity of proving his innocence. 

Because a guilty man takes advantage of these 
technicalities is not to the law's discredit, but rather 
to its credit. The outcome is never in question. In 
the end Collins will be sent to serve his term in prison 
if he be guilty of the offenses charged against him. 
No one is suffering from this law's del iv. It di ies not 
matter whether Collin? begins his term, it" he be found 
guilty, now or a year front now. The punishment 
will be the same, and the term to be served just as 
long. 

Collins is now, and has been for months, suffering 
punishment from his misdeeds. He has been harassed 
by the courts and hounded from place to place in his 
endeavor to escape. He is constantly in custody of 



NEWS LETTER. July 29, 1905 

court officers, and spends his nights within prison 
doors. When he was free, and on his way to fancied 
security, he was constantly in fear of the hand of an 
arresting officer. If his soul be so constituted that he 
feels the weight of a conscience, his dreams are beset 
with visions of a deserted wife and children. 

But the end is sure. There is no escape from the 
effects of his evil work. When he has exhausted all 
the technicalities of the Canadian law, as he has that 
of the laws of California, he will be brought back to 
this State, and will have to go on trial on the charge 
of perjury, and should he be convicted he will have to 
face a sentence much more severe than the one which 
could have been meted out to him on the bigamy 
charge from which he ran away. 

It has appeared that the Canadian courts have been 
eager to extend aid to the fugitive, but the results in- 
dicate that the Dominion judges were simply doing 
that which has already been done in the courts of 
California. They were permitting Collins to exhaust 
every technicality, and in the end the ruling has been 
invariably against the lawyer who prefers devious 
ways to those that are honorable and straightfor- 
ward. 

Collins has been much in the public eye because 
of the peculiarity of his position and because of the 
boldness of his defiance of the law. In himself he is 
of little importance, but his case will serve as a 
precedent for years to come. Should he be found 
guilty and sent to the penitentiary, he will be buried 
in oblivion, and his malodorous female companions 
will sink to their former obscurity. 



A GOOD THING FOR CALIFORNIA. 

The reduction of freight rates on refined sugar in 
carload lot from California to Missouri River points 
and points in Kansas and Nebraska twenty-two cents 
— from fifty to twenty-eight cents — should greatly 
stimulate that home industry. Hitherto it has been 
almost impossible for California refineries to com- 
pete with the Eastern concerns in the Missouri River 
territory because of the discriminating rates of trans- 
portation. Indeed, several of the smaller beet sugar 
refineries have practically been out of business for a 
long time on that account. But this reduction of 
twenty-two cents per one hundred pounds will no. 
only place our refineries on a parity with the Eastern 
and Southern houses, but will of itself afford a rea- 
sonable profit. 

It is understood that the equalization will be made 
more positive in the near future by advancing the 
rates from New Orleans and the East to the common 
points in the Middle West. When that shall have 
been done, the California refineries will have nothing 
to complain of in the matter of rates, and more ivel 
the reduction will certainly stimulate beet sugar cul- 
ture in this State to the utmost capacity of the fac- 
tories. At least it is reasonable to expect such re- 
sults, for at the prices the refineries will be able to 
pay for beets should make beet farming highly profit- 
able. In this matter the railways have been exceed- 
ingly generous, though, of course, it will be money 
in their pockets by increased tonnage. Their tire ab- 
sense of reason to charge that the sugar industr) of 
California is being discriminated against in favoi 
of Eastern and Southern factories will exercise a 
good moral influence in all trade circles. This re 
duction in the cost of marketing home refined sugar 
in the Middle West is a great thing for California. 



July 39. 1905 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

DISGRACEFUL NEGLECT OF DUTY. 



\ - I more p | in 

iatc Park :i the 

habil ring about the entrances '.■> tin- Park, 

ami even upon the grounds within the enclosure, i" 
ply their vocation, which is that of the hiXKlhim in 
all the deviltry that the word implies. 1 Ine of their 
favorite occupations is 1.1 waylay children and 
them, under threats of bodily harm, to give up their 
baseball hats ami halls, tennis raquets ami other 
implements of fichl games. To such an extent has 
this lawlessness grown that it is not safe for boys or 
girls to go to the Park unattended by grown per 
-"ii>. The consequence is. the grounds set aside 
for field sports are of no use at all to little folk, be- 
cause of this hoodlum element that is constantly ho> 
ering around the approaches to the Park. The vaga- 
-bonrls often go so far as to deprive children of their 
hats, gloves, wraps and the like. 

If the police department is not equal to the task of 
protecting children visiting the Park it should frank- 
ly say SO, and quit making a show of doing its duty. 
If it is too weak or disinclined to cope with these 
hoodlums and toughs, it may rest assured that the 
parents are not only- able but quite willing to protect 
their children, and if their indignation reaches the 
point of action, there will be trouble for the police 
as well as for the hoodlums. It is a burning shame 
that afier the expenditure of thousands of dollars 
to prepare playgrounds in the Park for the use of 
children they are deprived of their use by young 
toughs, thieves and highwaymen. But it all comes 
from willful neglect of duty on the part of the police, 
and that should be considered an offense of sufficient 
magnitude to cause their dismissal in disgrace from 
the force. Meanwhile let parents keep their little folk 
from the Park, unless they are accompanied by 
grown persons to give them proper protection. Be- 
cause what is everybody's business is nobody's busi- 
ness, there has been no concerted movement to oblige 
the police to do their duty in the premises, and for 
this reason there should be some sort of public action 
on the part of families whose children are in the habit 
of going to the Park to make their going and coming 
safe. 



THE NAVY'S DISGRACE. 

With the memory of the terrible accident, if so it 
may be called, on board the gunboat Bennington, in 
San Diego harbor, comes the thought that but the 
grossest carelessness could be accountable for the 
disaster. In the past the American navy has been 
free from such "accidents," and with the exception of 
the blowing up of the Maine, in Havana harbor, no 
war vessel of the United States has ever met with 
serious casualty. 

With the passing of the immediate horror conse- 
quent upon such a terrible disaster comes the inquiry 
into the reason why. Sound boilers do not explode 
unless there be carelessness on the part of those in 
charge of them. It has not been claimed that the 
engineer in charge of the Bennington did not do his 
full duty. The blame, then, must lie with officers 
higher up in the service. 

It is claimed among the men of the Bennington 
that the boilers had been in bad condition for sev- 
eral months, and that such fact had been reported 
to the proper officials. But no action was taken, and 
a lax policy on the part of some one in authority has 
cost scores of lives. Just who is to blame for this 
rests with the board of inquiry to develop. It is 



ed by men bclov. the offii ial grade that through 
. blunder on the part of th< irtment at 

oncord w 

•11 for repairs when ii ,,dcd thai the 

Henntngton should be sen) t.. thi 

■ ensure lies within the office of th< 

■ cut itself, and the same punishment should 
he meted out there as would have been the portion of 
the engineer had the disaster resulted from fault in 
the boiler room. 



A MURDEROUS DOG-CATCHER. 
The brutal dog-catcher. Gustave Scherf, who shol 
and killed Rudolph AY. Schultze for trying to protect 

his child's pet dog. is resorting to all kinds of tricks. 
talsehood and hypocrisy to escape responsibility for 
his dastardly and cowardly act. He tangles himself 
in the web of his own invention. He cannot remem- 
ber what kind of a gun he used; he remembers that 
he thought Mr. Schultze was about to use a knife 
on one Murphy, his dog-catching partner, and he 
remembers that he had no intention to shoot his vic- 
tim, but just to frighten him. In fact, he remembers 
little of the details and incidents, but of the main is- 
sue, that of the cold-bloodedness of the murder, his 
memory is clouded and uncertain. One tiling he re- 
members distinctly, which is that he did not aim the 
gun at Schultze — shot at random, as it were. Such 
stumbling to conceal is not often seen. 

Scherf's principal witness, one Murphy, frankly 
admits that he lied in his testimony before" the Coro- 
ner, and that in truth an effort was made to hide or 
make way with the revolver with which the shooting 
was done. Ex-poundmaster Irwin says he had trou- 
ble with Schultze about a year before, and that is 
all he knows about the shooting. In short, the de- 
fense is resorting to dark and doubtful means to jus- 
tify the shooting, but he himself and his witnesses 
supply all needed proof that it was a cold-blooded 
murder. But it may be said in his defense that no 
one having a spark of human kindness in his heart, 
or who knows how to feel kindly toward any living 
thing, would be a dog-catcher. Hence only brutal 
acts would be expected from such a man as Scherf. 



There was seen in San Francisco a day or two 

ago the stimulating spectacle of two men who had 
each been husband to a certain woman allowing her 
body to go without burial rather than come, forward 
and do anything in behalf of the dead. For the 
credit of humanity, it must be said that such hap- 
penings are as unusual as they are revolting. 

A student of dime novels in Illinois followed 

the story and example of the villain up to where he 
robbed a bank, but he forgot to arrange for his es- 
cape. The student of such literature should be care- 
ful about details. 



Bryan says he does not want to eliminate any 

ambitious Democrat from the list of Presidential as- 
pirants. Mr. Bryan need not bother himself. The 
people will attend to all matters of that kind. 



White silk stockings are all the rage in New 

York's smart set; also the dress skirts are held higher 
when in public. Vanity and idiocy are twins the 
world over. 



This settles the problem. Battleships are pre- 
ferred by naval men because they afford more room 
for dancing than do torpedo boats. 



SAM FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 



DR. STEPHEN TRIES A NEW TRICK. 

Chief Surgeon J. I. Stephen of the Emergency Hos- 
pital is very anxious for a rule that will effectually ex- 
clude newspaper reporters from one and all the city 
hospitals. He is well satisfied that the reporters see 
and hear too much in these institutions of an unpro- 
fessional and disgraceful character, which they de- 
cline to omit in their "copy." As between exposure 
of his vicious and disreputable methods and keeping 
the public in ignorance of them, he very naturally 
would prefer the latter. Any man of his brand of 
character would, and the fact that he is trying to 
keep the public in ignorance of his doings is an open 
confession that he is guilty of acts and conspiracies 
that would better be kept secret for his professional 
and personal reputation's sake. An honest public 
official is perfectly willing that his administration 
of the concerns of his trust shall be seen of all men, 
but the dishonest official spends more time in divis- 
ing ways to deceive the public as to his official con- 
duct than he does to the legitimate duties of his posi- 
tion. Dr. Stephen condemns himself for being a thor- 
oughly dishonest and disreputable public official by 
trying to conceal his official conduct. Dr. Stephen 
says he is indorsed by the Health Board and Mayor 
Schmitz and Abe Ruef in his plan to throw a wall of 
secrecy about the conduct of the city hospitals. As 
to Schmitz and Ruef, undoubtedly they are with 
him. They are that kind of folk. They work behind 
the curtain. 

But as to the Board of Health endorsing Stephen's 
infamous plan to prevent publicity of his official con- 
duct, well, to say that he is a reincarnation of Ana- 
nias would just about locate his whence. The fact 
is, the Board of Health is not only opposed to the 
exclusion of newspaper reporters from the hospitals, 
but would, if it could, strip Stephen of his epaulets so 
quick that his head would swim. Not one of the hos- 
pital doctors is in sympathy with the man personally 
or with his methods, but Schmitz and Ruef like him 
and his way of conducting his office. If the public 
will send Schmitz and Ruef to the dump pile of politi- 
cal refuse their Stephen and other "agencies" would 
quickly find lodgings at the same dump. The Board 
of Health is now composed of honorable and well 
equipped doctors of medicine, and they are doing 
all they can to improve the hospital service and 
guard against the introduction of infectious and con- 
tagious diseases into the city, but the}' are handi- 
capped by the Schmitz-Ruef-Stephen gang, and it is 
up to the public to say if the gang is to continue in 
control of the city's affairs and concerns or not. 

THE CHINESE BOYCOTT. 

Twenty thousand Christian Chinese of Canton 
have joined hands with the pagan Chinese to boycott 
American goods and wares. The Christian natives 
of the other trade centers of China are equally deter- 
mined to have no more business intercourse with 
the United States until there is established reciprocal 
immigration as well as reciprocal commercial rela- 
tions between the two countries. Thus it would seem 
our yellow brothers are very much like we Americans 
in one respect, at least. They do not mix up their 
religion with their business. Business is one thing 
with them, as with us, and religion is another. Busi- 
ness is of this world and religion is of the next. At 
least our Christian missionaries to China seem to 
have preached that kind of a gospel over there. And 
not only so, but the several Christian sects, by main- 
taining a boycott against each other in the matter 
of dealing out salvation to the yellow heathen have 



taught the people of that country that trade discrimi- 
nation is as effective in crushing out the commercial 
devil of selfishness as it is in knocking out the devil 
of this and that dealer in future salvation. More- 
over, the boycott was never heard of in China until 
the several Christian sects introduced it. 

This is in no sense an attack upon the Christian 
religion, but it is an attack upon the methods of many 
Christian missionaries, for they set a pace that is 
hurtful to the material interests of America and the 
spiritual well-being of those whom they lead out of 
the darkness of superstition into the outer darkness 
of the religion of trusts and labor unionism. Naturally 
these Chinese pagans would jump to the conclusion 
that when put upon a parity with the white man in 
the matter of soul equality and salvation, the old gulf 
of separateness in this world should be filled up with 
the sentiment of the Fatherhood of God and the 
Brotherhood of man, which is so vehemently 
preached to them as a cardinal principle of the 
Christian religion. Ninety per cen| of the good ac- 
cruing from one brand of civilization for us, and 10 
per cent for them, does not appeal to them as being 
quite consistent with our professions, and shall we 
blame them if they insist upon following our example 
and our religion as practiced before their face and 
eyes? Now, all the Chinese ask is a more even divi- 
sion of the good things accruing from the interchange 
of thought, of joint efforts and commodity inter- 
change. Either the Chinese are utterly unfit and un- 
worthy of our religion and our respect, and should be 
treated accordingly, or they are worthy of both and 
are justly entitled to honest dealing and reciprocal 
trade relations, including personal intercourse in the 
channels of commerce. We have taught them how 
we demand and enforce our demands, and shall we 
condemn them for being apt students? 

Mrs. Chadwick, who entrapped the monied 

men of the land, complains because a rat is sharing 
her cell. She should try her wiles on the rodent. 

It is not good domestic economy to go to the 

expense of a new carpet, when Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works, at 353 Teh"ama street, will clean 
your old one so perfectly that you would hardly 
know yourself that it was not direct from the carpet 
maker. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 30 California street, San 

Francisco, deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, 
personal, political, from press of State, coast and country. Tel. 
Main 1042. 




ftfCHAS. KLILUS & COM 

&£XCLUSIVT.A> 

HIGH GRADL CLOTHIERS 

This Fall's Clothes we now present with new fash- 
ion plates (that bear the crest of originality) are so 
constructed as to give the wearer that herculean ef- 
fect without the aid of a mattress of padding. This 
is Clothes Science, and will be appreciated by gentle- 
men who understand. 






July 29. 1905 



SAN FRANCTSCO NEWS LETTER 



H**"""""- JIOWN CR1F.R JJV*-^w»JJ 



la there no chance for honest men 

1" serve the public without cheatii . 
I mean content with now and then 

Sending the public monej fleeting. 
I~ •■• essential thai the folk 

Who buy for us and those who sell 
Should always have the white and yolk 

And leave us nothing but the shell? 

K. Matsumoto, of the Japanese Parliament, 

and envoy from the Mikado to the peace conference, 

.lever fellow. He says: "1 have been meeting a 
number of prominent San Francisco business men at 
the Bohemian Club, and have talked over the situa- 
tion with the officers of the Union Iron Works." Who 
told him that so much of our business was done in 
the Bohemian Club, and how on earth did he 
learn that the gentlemen of the Union Iron Works 
would be flattered by being called officers. 

The question of dependent children in this 

State is growing to be a very grave matter. It is out 
of all proportion that a community of our population 
should be supporting nearly eight thousand depend- 
ent children, and that we should be. paying half a 
million dollars a year for this purpose. A regular 
overhauling of this matter is very necessary, and at 
once. The natural guardians of the children should 
not be allowed to neglect their obligations. 

The report that over five hundred women and 

girls are needed for the canneries at Marvsville calls 
attention to a very light and useful sort of female 
labor. It must be noted that if the need of the 
canneries is not filled by decent wdiite help, a great 
impetus will be given to the Chinese immigration 
movement, for the fruit must be gathered. If the 
wdiite people will not work, the yellow man must have 
his chance. 

Frank French, the so-called boodling Senator, 

has just pleaded "not guilty." It seems a long time 
since this matter was brought up, and only now is a 
plea entered. Stay, there was a demurrer, but the 
man who filed that has gone to Victoria, and we have 
forgotten all about French in our interest as to 
whether his counsel will return. It must be gratify- 
ing to Mr. French to know that newspaper fame can- 
not last forever. 

The case of Martin Fleming, at the City and 

County Hospital, is peculiar. In Mr. Fleming they 
found a man who, according to all accounts, is the 
most efficient executive officer which the institution 
ever had, and yet he is suspended for "the efficiency 
of the service." He may have a sense of humor, which 
can explain this sort of thing, but the sense seems to 
be so abnormally developed as to border on the 
crazy. 

The General Superintendent of the National 

Children's Home Society says that California barters 
the souls of its children. Just what he meant is not 
very plain, but there is little doubt that he was right, 
for we barter all sorts of souls, including those of 
children. But then, unfortunately, the same thing- 
is true of everywhere else. 

Mrs. Hueter, of San Jose, should call herself 

an exceedingly fortunate woman so far. There have 
been women — but it is a painful subject. It is very 
doubtful if the people concerned in so sensational a 
matter ever got let down quite so easily. 



1 In- proverbial new broon ping clean 

in Vlameda County, where |udge Waste, newly ap- 
pointed to the Superior Bench, has taken upon him- 

sell to rebuke a local lawyer for breaking bis word 

Being a Judge, he now views the misdeeds of the 
Bar from a new standpoint, but the proverb "Waste 
not, want not," Should be called to his attention if 

he desires to live in peace among the members of 
the Bar. 

The playful habits of the young boy of Via- 

■ l ountj with the air gun is beginning to be 

somewhat of a nuisance. Some three cases have oc- 
curred within a very brief period of time of young vil- 
lains deliberately and with malice aforethought maim- 
ing their school mates. The parents of the injured 
boys are making a mistake in protecting these young 
re irobates. A severe punishment meted out to a 
few of them would no doubt put an end to the habit. 

A combination of buggy and electric car seems 

to have been too much for General Funston, at all 
events for a little while. But he was blest 'in this 
case, as he has been all through, by the devoted 
friendship of the newspapermen, who gave him as 
good a notice as if he had been the President him- 
self. The latter, by the way, has always had the 
best of the papers. 

The street speaking agitation in Oakland is 

one of the funniest performances on record. It ap- 
pears to consist of an arrest, the payment of one 
hundred dollars bail, the release of the prisoner, and 
the whole performance repeated night after night, 
with a repetition which is somewhat uncanny. Oak- 
land is a sleepy place, for sure. Even a street row 
cannot wake it. 

The spectacle of the Mayor of a city of this 

size and importance being taken in hand by a Grand 
Jury and lectured and badgered like a naughty in- 
fant, is far from an inspiring sight. The worst of it 
is that the humiliation which all citizens feel in the 
humiliation of the executive is the fact that the ex- 
ecutive deserved it. He was simply abject. 

Berkeley is sitting down with a beautiful com- 
mittee of fifteen and a professor of law in the chair 
to amend the town charter. What joy there will be 
ahead and what satisfaction for the people of Ber- 
keley when that charter is complete. Few things are 
as hard in the making and as unsatisfactory in the 
result as a town charter. 

The news of the steady and unselfish work of 

the sailors of the Bennington under their dreadful 
conditions is such a surprise after the bath of filth 
and miserable greed through which we have to wade 
that it actually inspires the Town Crier with some 
hope. 

An Alameda County man is gravely endeavor- 
ing to solve the problem as to whether the fact that 
his wife chews snuff entitles him to a divorce. It 
should at least prevent a dose of that osculation 
which was formerly termed delightful, but now is 
merely contagious. 

The old fight between the stepmother and the 

daughters comes out in the Thayer will case in Oak- 
land. Women are really so much more ferocious than 
men, who are not worried particularly about shades 
of relationship nor shady relationship either, for 
that matter. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 



An English Girl Criticizes San Francisco Society 



(The editor has received a number of anonymous letters protesting 
Miss Trevelyan's communications. It is not for the editor to 
take sides in this ease as the opinions of Bliss Treveiyan are over 
her signature. The News Letter will give space to tho.-e who wish to 
disprove the statements of Miss Treveiyan providing the signatures 
of the authors accompanies the letters as a guarantee of good faith.) 



In London, in the very highest circles, one clasps 
hands with the true Bohemian spirit. For Bohemia 
is a state of mind, and there is no reason why the rich 
man should not journey thither as well as the poor 
artist. Bohemia is not all garlic and coal oil stoves. 
Indeed, I have known men with palates bred to ter- 
rapin and truffles who, in a corner of their hearts, 
have kept the true spirit of Bohemianism burning 
brightly. Misguided men and women use Bohemian- 
ism as a cloak to cover peccadilloes and poverty, and 
the world at large accepts Bohemianism at the false 
value these pretenders put upon it. 

Especially is this true in America. Some one was 
telling me about a divorcee who has recently married 
a staid business man. "Fancy his marrying her," 
exclaimed my gossipy friend. "Why, he must be the 

only man in town who doesn't know that she " 

"Perhaps the stories about her are exaggerated," 1 
protested. "Oh, no," says my friend, 'she's a 
regular Bohemian !" 

Shades of Murger! Moral indiscretion is not the 
only passport to Bohemia. To be sure, forgiveness 
is a shining virtue in that happy land, and transgres- 
sions may be more easily overlooked there than on 
the grim outside — but the badge of Bohemia is not 
by any means the scarlet letter. People may wear 
the Bohemian badge in spite of their scarlet sins, 
but never because of them. No ! Bohemia is a state 
of mind and heart, a happy-go-lucky, come day, go 
day, God send Sunday sort of way of looking at 
things. Your true Bohemian loves to share his good- 
ies, and he believes that there is just one thing that 
compares to giving, and that is receiving ! But he 
is not akin to a sponger nor yet a grafter. When 
the wheel of fortune turns his way, he is always ready 
to share his prosperity. 

In Europe, true Bohemianism is not so often con- 
founded with the plated article as out here. Hirsute 
haloes do not make a Bohemian, and young men and 
women who run to hair and soiled linen falsely flatter 
themselves when they claim the title of Bohemians. 
At a reception given by the Sequoia Club I met a 
young artist whose talent is in inverse ratio to his 
conceit. He was dressed in a studiously slovenly 
style, and his speech needed manicuring badly. He 
sprinkled every sentence with a damn, just to appear 
risque. He pointed out the various local notables to 
me, and had something ill-natured to say of each one. 
His rude and disagreeable remarks had not the sav- 
ing grace of wit, and yet when he had finally removed 
his presence from my vicinity, one of the gushing peli- 
cans of the club rushed up tc me and gurgled : "Isn't 
he just the most original thing you've ever met? Of 
course, he's awfully Bohemian, but what can you 
expect of the dear artist chaps?" Bohemian fiddle- 
sticks ! 

There appear to be a lot of people of this sort lying 
around loose in San Francisco who should not be tol- 
erated by decent people. Even near-culture is not 
more reprehensible than fake Bohemianism. This 
base imitation somehow flourishes in San Francisco. 
Women who have to live in one room convert a few 
cheap Oriental draperies into a cozy corner, keep 



plenty of beer and cigarettes on hand for their 
friends, and fancy that they are awfully Bohemian, 
don't you know. Men who neglect their wives and 
children, who are always on hand when the free wine 
flows fastest, sail under the same false flag. Artists 
and literati, who have no true claim to the glad and 
generous spirit of Bohemianism, take all the pre- 
rogatives of the cult and pay none of the obligations. 
This same fraudulent Bohemianism has even attacked 
the smart set. 

A society girl with the most vicious tongue and 
disagreeable temper is called "awfully Bohemian," 
by her friends. She wears the title by flimsy right 
of risque remarks and nimble ankles, which she is 
ever ready to show in Cakewalk or fancy dance. Yet 
she never does a generous deed nor thinks a generous 
thought ; she is ever the first to blow a bubble of scan- 
dal, and she always chooses her friends by their bank- 
accounts, taking crumbs from rich men's tables that 
would choke a true Bohemian. 

The other night a quartette of friends took me to 
dine in a little Italian restaurant on Montgomery 
street which is supposed to be the happy hunting 
ground of real Bohemia. It was awfully funny to 
watch the conscious air of the regular habitues, most- 
ly artists and newspaper people, I believe. For the 
most part they felt called upon to eat and talk in a 
bizarre fashion, and in general adopt a pose which 
they thought would impress the outsiders as being 
very Bohemian. This professional Bohemianism is 
usually adopted by mediocre people, who can find no 
other way of attracting attention. 

That it does attract attention in San Francisco 
there is no doubt. In London that sort of thing would 
be tolerated as cheap, and no one of sense would be 
mislead into regarding such persons as personages. 
Fancy an English hostess allowing a man to drape 
the lettuce salad on his head, as I am told Gellett Bur- 
gess once did at a dinner party given in his honor 
in San Francisco. Such a "stunt" would not have 
been appreciated by a London audience, I can assure 
you. People of talent, even if they are a bit eccentric, 
are received in the best society in England for their 
talent is an open sesame to doors that are bolted 
against the newly rich. 

— Constance Treveiyan. 



-REMOVED- 



C. H. Rehnstrom & Co. 



Tailors and Importers 

HAVE MOVED TO NEW AND PERMANENT 
QUARTERS IN THE 

Mutual Savings Bank Bldg. 

MarKet, Kearny S Geary Sts. 



July 29. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Milos Mur..\ Gopccvich has won the suil bi 
In relatives ..t hia late wile, the romantic I 
Floyd, to break her will, the Lake I ount) 
before whom the celebrated case waa tried has lound 
that Mrs. Gopcevich w.^ ,.1 sound and mind 

when upon lu-r death bed she wrote the document 
by which she made the Conner gripman the heir to 
her great fortune. Gopcevich will be given p 
sion ot the beautiful Lake Count] summer h 
in the grounds ..1 which Harry lioyd delight 
play at Deing D Artagnan or Bragelonne. 1 he ludge 
took ilue notice of the testimony regarding what" were 
called the vagaries of the romantic girl, hut he saw 
111 them nothing to cause him to believe that even 
when indulging in her most extravagant fancies she 
was not as sane as many of the women who, because 
they did not understand her nature, were inclim 
the belief that because she was unconventional and 
cared as little for society's tattle as do most men and 
women whose minds are above petty scandal, she was 
therefore insane. Luring the trial, in reviewing some 
of the testimony bearing upon her theatrical repre- 
sentations of the heroes of Dumas' famous novels, I 
expressed the opinion, based upon Harry Floyd's 
letters, and especially to her governess, that she was 
as sane and as brainy a woman as there was in the 
State. The Lake County Judge has reached about 
the same conclusion. 1'resumably, the contestants 
will carry the case to the Supreme Court. The es- 
tate is worth about a million, and it is notorious that 
no will disposing of that amount of property ever 
went uncontested in this State. The case is of more 
than usual interest, not so much for the amount of 
money involved in it as for the character of Harry 
Floyd. Among our rich women she was unique. She 
made her own life, and lived it in her own way. That 
way was unusual, though to her it was doubtless en- 
joyable. For the rules with which our so-called so- 
ciety folk tie themselves, she cared nothing. She 
had her own friends, her own homes, and a life in 
the woods and the mountains, hunting, fishing and 
riding, now a gay cavalier and again, in imagination, 
the heroine of an old romance, were preferred by her 
to late hours, heavy dinners, exhausting teas, dances 
and all the gay roundelay of town. Who will say 
that her choice showed she was not far more sane 
than the scores of women she knew who find it nec- 
essary to take the rest cure to recover from the fine 
time they think they have had? But, again, it is 
agreed, here was a girl of gentle breeding, of innate 
refinement, of superior education and wide culture, 
of wealth and social position, who took for her hus- 
band a gripman of a cable car. Well, what of that? 
The philosopher is yet to come who will read to us 
a woman's heart. The ladies of the clubs will talk 
by the hour on the emancipation of women, the 
equality of the sexes, and all the other themes dear 
to their hearts, the main purpose of all such discus- 
sions being to affirm that our women should be as 
free as their brothers to do what they will. Yet, let 
one of these same women marry out of her "class" — 
agreeing for the sake of argument that in this some- 
what democratic city there are "classes" — and at 
once there goes up a roar of protest. Why? Because 
our dear theorists are simply theorists, and nothing 
more. They are like the down-town merchant who 



will agree with you that every man should vote at 
the primary, but who considers n beneath his dignity 
LSI his own ballot. I lain Floyd was so much 
stronger than some of her women acquaintances the) 
thought her crazy. The weak ones never under- 
stand. 

* * * 

Thej were discussing the tableaux vivant at the 
1 Tpheum. She was well read and something of a 
gusher. The well-developed forms of the poseurs 
had made an impression on her. 

"They are magnificent," she said. "The Creeks are 
not all dead yet," 

"Creeks!" he said. "What makes you think of 
1. reeks? You should see them at Fishermen's 
Wharf, and at the vegetable markets early in the 
morning. Xot all dead yet! Well, I guess not. You 
just go up on Broadway and Montgomery avenue and 
see them for yourself. Then see Jack Holland." 

She sighed. Her poetical allusion to the storied 
beauty of the ancient Greeks was lost upon him. She 
had wasted her gushes on the air. But he had with 
him a small bale of green goods. The expenditure of 
large sections of it solaced her. She was a true 
philosopher. Instead of discussing Grecian art she 
drank copiously of beer, and ate heroically of rarebits. 
Even in the company of one who is not a poet life 
has its compensations. 

* * * 

During the recent hot spell, the apples were baked 
on the trees in the Salinas Valley. Down in Tulare, 
potatoes were cooked in the ground. In San Diego 
grapes were turned into raisins on the vine. In 
Sonoma the apricots and peaches were stewed in their 
own juice by the sun's heat, and on the chicken 
ranches around Petaluma it was only necessary to 
pluck and draw a pullet before serving it on the 
table. The birds were cooked to a turn as they stood 
in the sand of the yards. Up at the Geysers, the 
hot springs bubbled and boiled with more than usual 
fury, and Shasta's slumbering volcano threw out 
tons of hot mud. The scientists agreed that all 
these unusual manifestations of nature were indica- 
tions that something was troubling old Sol. The real 



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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



truth, however, is that so much hot air has gone up 
from San Francisco during the past three weeks from 
politicians in training for the primary that the atmos- 
phere covering the State 'has been superheated to the 
boiling point. This condition, with a naturally warm 
summer sun, has caused the hot time we have had 
in the old town, and up and down the valleys. The 
foggy weather during the past seven days, says .Mr. 
.McAdie, has been caused by the condensation of the 
political agitators who are working for "reform" on 
the hill tops of the Western Addition. After primary 
day we will be again able to write, like 1'lupy Shute, 
"bright and fair." 

* * * 

A man over in Alameda says he has discovered a 
preventative against old age. He surrounds his hen's 
nests with electric wires. When the hens go to 
lay he turns on a gentle current. As a result, the 
eggs are charged with electricity. These eggs, when 
eaten, transmit their electrical properties to the con- 
sumer. When you see an Alameda commuter with 
gray hair legging it down Market street for the Nar- 
row Guage boat, don't call for the police or ring for 
an ambulance. That ancient is all right. He is full 
of electric eggs, and it will take a team of horses 
to stop him. The discoverer of the electric egg, who 
is a true benefactor of the human race, with an eye 
to the future glory of the city by the slough, intends 
introducing his eggs into the Alameda maternity hos- 
pitals, with the idea that Alameda's future genera- 
tions will be so full of electric life that they will get 
up and show West Berkeley and East ( lakland that 
there are other towns on the map. 
# # # 

The Park Commissioners have forbidden autos in 
the Park after up. m. Now, wouldn't that make 
you sit up and take notice? What is a fellow going 
to do after eleven o'clock? If there is an hour when 
bubbling is really enjoyable it is after the show on 
a fine moonlight night. Along the beach, where one 
can listen to the murmuring of the waves, and all 
that sort of thing, don't you know. If there are other 
low murmurs that come not from the waves, why, 
that makes the ride all the more enjoyable. But that 
sort of thing can't be enjoyed until after n p. m. 
The waves don't begin the right kind of murmur any 
earlier in the evening. It seems to me this arbitrary 
order of the commissioners should arouse public 
protest. What are the heroines of the drama and the _ 
members of the Chorus Cirls' League to do for a little 
fresh air if they can't bubble to the beach after 
eleven? The poor things work hard all the afternoon 
and evening entertaining the public; they don't re- 
move the grease paint until eleven, and not until 
then can they get a little exercise. And the I 'ark 
Commissioners must know of their own knowledge 
that exercise is necessary to a chorus girl's health. 
Why, this eleven o'clock order is really fierce. Pres- 
ently we will have a curfew bell at midnight, and 
everybody will have to go home. I suggest that the 
anti-auto order be made a special subject of discus- 
sion at the next regular meeting of the Peacock Club, 
of which, I understand, that well-known artist, \\r. 
Laymance, is past president. 

$ * =•: 

Dean Miller had read much about John D. Rocke- 
feller, and he could figure out no plan by which he 
could reach the total of that eminent philanthropist. 
So Miller killed himself. He left a large fortune to 
his brother Clark, with the condition that if Clark 
did not abstain from cocktails for three years he 
should not inherit. Clark now confesses that never 



July 29, 1905 

before in his tempestuous career did he have such a 
deep thirst for cocktails as at present. That reminds 
me of a story about Ross Jackson and old Dr. Simp- 
son, both of whom have passed away, in their day 
no two men were better known around town. 

Ross went into Simpson's office one day and said : 
"Doc, I don't feel right up to the nines. Seems to me 
some of my interior mechanism has slipped a cog. 
Just run over me with your little old tack hammer 
and make a general survey of all my dips, spurs and 
angles." 

Simpson carefully examined his friend, and then 
solemnly announced the verdict. 

"Ross," said he, "you are working overtime. You 
take too many in too brief a period. Consequentlv. 
your concentrates are clogged. You must let up 
from now on." 

"Well," said Ross, "what's the sentence?" 

"I will have to limit you hereafter to three cock- 
tails a day," said the doctor. 

"Well, Doc, that won't be so bad when I get used 
to it," said Jackson. "I suppose I had better begin 
taking your old prescription right away. Tell you 
what we will do, Doc. Let's go downstairs and take 
to-day's dose of three right away." 

And they did. 

* * * 

Foreman Andrews, of the Grand Jury, assisted the 
Dolice in a raid on a tenderloin "establishment in 
Belden Place. Mr. Andrews seems very persistent 
in keeping after the women. 

Every Sunday afternoon a half-hour of music is 
given in the Greek amphitheatre on the Berkeley cam- 
pus. Visitors from this city must leave town 011 the 
four o'clock boat to get to Berkeley in time for the 
programme, which commences at five. Returning, 
if one makes good connections, town may be reached 
again by seven o'clock. If you go home to dinner. 
you will not reach your dining room until half an 
hour later, unless, mayhap, you arc at one of the 
down-town hotels. Now, why couldn't the Berkeley 
programmes be started an hour earlier? Then visit- 
ors from this city could reach the university before 
the chill of the evening was on the hills, could enjoj 
the programme, and get back in town for dinner and 
possible evening engagements. 
* * * 

Jumbo, Jr.. the little elephant, is all the rage in 



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[iggftmgffi. aUfcU Q, 9M-9M Market St. 




July 29, 1905 

London society. He attends all the swell (unci 
and his funny tricks prove verj entertainin 
highly educated. When the London ],.,, 
Jumbo the) should send to tins citj and 

•r educated a^r<. Thej can cause more fun in 
a minute than Jumbo could in an hour. Bj contact 
with society they have become quite tame. Th< 
out of the hand, and upon occasion have been known 

nn\ symptoms of almost human intelligi 
Moreover, they may be hail at almost an 
development. 

* * * 

In her unromantic moments. Mrs. B. M. Howell is 
a cook — plain and fancy. In her hours ,,i ease she is 
a disciple of the magi, a follower of the great Mulliga- 
tawny, a believer in the supernatural powers of the 
('■rand Pan j arum, and a worshiper at the shrine of the 
Mighty Jibernanesee, Neck of the Woods, the 
Speaker of the Awful and Unknown Words. Inci- 
dentally, Mrs. Howell paid some fifty- simoleons to 
one Dr. T. J. Betiero to put her on easy terms with 
the shades across the Styx. Betiero gave her some 
hashish to eat. She says she ate it. Then she 
dreamed a dream. That dream alone was worth the 
fifty. Mrs. Howell had eaten of her own cookery for 
untold years, but she never before had a dream like 
that. Of course she doesn't know what kind of 
dreams her viands induced in others who ate of her 
productions while she was chief stoker for a private 
hotel. But if an}' of them were like unto her hashish 
nightmare, Mrs. Howell thinks she should get fifty 
a dream. The hashish, she says, also made her 
speechless. Horrors ! A speechless cook ! Think of 
it, ye martyrs ! She is now recovering her vocabulary 
and is freely aiming large sections of it at Betiero. 
She has a low-down idea that he is a grafter. Mrs. 
Howell should work out her revenge on this com- 
municant with the shades. She should take him as 
a private boarder, and make him eat of her cookery. 
Will he dream ? Not all the shades of all the cows 
that have gone down in the pot roasts of the yester- 
years could prevent it. Such a revenge would be in- 
deed sweet. Think of it ! The man made her speech- 
less, and she a cook ! No punishment could be too 
severe for him. 

* * * 

There has been a merry muss in the City and 
County Hospital about the head nurses. As the re- 
sult of an innovation which was to better conditions 
there, two executive nurses are out — Miss Julia Kane 
and Miss Florence Dakin — and a Miss Rutley has 
been placed in charge. From the stories that have 
come out of the institution, it appears that Miss Kane 
is a personal friend of Mrs. "Mayor" Schmitz, who 
has managed to keep her in the hospital in the face 
of complaints. Miss Dakin has great experience 
and a mile of commendations. But in the scrimmage 
she had to go. It is rumored that Miss Kane is to 
be placed in the Emergency Hospital. Mrs. Schmitz 
says so, and what she says is something akin to law. 
The trouble at the City and County Hospital was 
because Miss Kane refused to co-operate with Miss 
Dakin, who was not in name, but in fact, over her. 
While Miss Kane contended, the patients suffered. 

* * * 

It is not often that there is a contention for the pos- 
session of country homes in California, because there 
are beautiful spots over its entire length and breadth, 
but there was a scramble for the James Flood place at 
Alma in the Santa Cruz Mountains when Mrs. Flood 
announced to her husband that she would not go 
there any more, and he put the place on the market. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



tt 



Pears' 

Most soaps clo- 
the skin pores by 
the fats and free 
alkali in their com- 
position. 

Pears' is quickly 
rinsed off, leaves 
the pores open and 
skin soft and 



the 
cool 



Established in 1789. 



could not 
Harry L. 
In conse- 
lose any 



Airs. Francis Carolan determined that she 

be happy if she did not get it, and Dr. 

Tevis found in it exactly what he wanted. 

quence of the competition, Flood did not 

money on this investment, notwithstanding the fact 

that he has improved it for years. It was the place 

his first wife loved, but her sister, wife No. 2, did not 

find her happiness there. Those who know all about it 

say that it is too far from society's summer tracks, 

for Mrs. Flood, who is a devotee of the fickle modern 

goddess. 

* * * 

Whether or not one believes in equal suffrage, 
there is no doubt about the respect all feel for Susan 
B. Anthony, unquestionably one of the best-known 
women of the century. Her many years, as well as 
her honors, set lightly upon her, and she is the same 
enthusiastic woman she was in her most aggressive 
days. There is but one marked difference in her now 
from ten years ago when she was here; her keen, 
kind old eyes are deeper set in her well modeled face. 
She looks quite like a dear old grandmother who 
would sit in the inglenook to do the family darning. 
It is a curious thing to note that nearly all the con- 
spicuous suffrage advocates have lived or are living 
far beyond the allotted span. 

In looking over the ground in California, Miss An- 
thony and the almost equally well known Reverend 
Anna H. Shaw, who is with her, seem to think that 
the cause of suffrage has gained since the years of 
defeat. The casual observer thinks that the women 
outside the active workers in the different small or- 
ganizations, are absolutely indifferent about the is- 
sue. 



The Russian zemstvos seem to be bigger than 

the Czar. At all events, they are holding their con- 
gress in spite of his edict to the contrary. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

Cures Poison Oak and all skin ...seases. Sold by all druggists. 



Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper 

& Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 



CULINARY TOPICS AND TABLE FASHIONS 

WRITTEN FOR THE NEWS LETTER BY CORNELIA C. BEDFORD 



A TRULY SEASONABLE DINNER. 
The temotation to those of us who live in cities 

msmm 

climates and sadly laci the jweet din . 

Cream of Onion Soup 

Boiled Rice c-i a i1 

Tomato and Cucumber ba ad 
... c Cheese 

Wafers 

Raspberry Ice Coftee 

In purchasing the meat select a small leg with loin 
attached. When delivered, trim off an] J ext a fat, 
and keep in a cool place until needed in the kitchen 
Land, should always be thoroughly cooked a .it is 
less readilv digested than the mature mutton , there 
ore allow' a full fifteen minutes for each pound and 
ten minutes extra for heating through. Have tie 
oven very hot, that the outside may sear quickly 
Rub the meat over with a little flour, dredge with 
sal ad pepper, stand on a rack in the dripping pan 
and place' ,i! the oven. Lest the fat scorch a few 
spoonfuls of boiling water may be poured into the 
nan ■ as the fat melts, it is used tor basting For this 
hot operaUon a long-handled spoon is needed, a few 
spoonfe s of the sizzling fat are ladled over the meat 
ad the oven closed. This should be repeated every 
fifteen minutes during the roasting From he _ at 
and glaze remaining in the pan when the meat is done 
a brown gravy may be prepared to be used the next 
day in converting the remainder of the roast into a 

^This part of the cooking is done within the hour 
or two immediately preceding the dinner as the meat 
should go from the oven direct to the table, but ear- 
lier in the day much of the meal can be made in readi- 
ness Of ices and ice creams, it is usual to allow 
a quart for five people; but of the raw ingredients a 
little less than that amount is needed, Since mixtures 
swell slightly during the freezing process. With 
these proportions in mind, it will be easy to compute 
the quantity needed for a family. < me full quart erf 
raspberries, if very large and juicy, will yield nearly 
a pint of juice; after picking over the fruit is rn ■ . 
mashed and heated just enough to make the seeds 
separate from the pulp. Turn into a doubled ch se- 
cloth bag and press to extract every drop of juices 
For this pint of juice dissolve two scant cupfuls ol 
granulated sugar in one quart of boiling water and 
boil for five minutes, then cool. Add to this the rasp^ 
berry juice and two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice 
and freeze, the result being two quarts of delicious 



ice. Many of the freezers on the market turn with a 
crank, but there are some which are automatic, and 
only need to have the contents of the freezing can 
stirred through once or twice at proper intervals to 
ensure thorough freezing from center to circumfer- 
ence. They are a distinct advance over the elder type 
of freezer, and as we know from experience, are thor- 
oughly satisfactory and call for less muscular effort 
than the old kind. 

To prepare the palate for the cooling ice, a salad is 
to be served, and this will combine cucumbers and to- 
matoes. Select the latter for evenness of size, 
smoothness and solidity, one for each person, take 
half as many cucumbers. Several hours before dinner 
cut a slice from the stem end of each tomato, and with 
a teaspoon scoop out the seeds, then invert on a plate 
that all the water may drain off. Keep these shells 
on the ice until needed. Pare the cucumbers, remov- 
ing a half inch or more from the stem end ; cut into 
lengthwise quarters, then into dice. Drain and drop 
into ice water to make them crisp. The dressing 
should be the simple French one — four tablespoonfuls 
of olive oil, a half teaspoonful of salt, quarter table- 
spoonful of pepper and one tablespoonful of vinegar 
or lemon juice. Mix the first three ingredients, then 
drop the acid in slowly, stirring rapidly that it may 
be blended with the oil. Mix this with the drained 
and dried cucumber, and fill the tomato shells. Ar- 
range each filled tomato in a lettuce nest on a small 
plate. Should there be some cooked dressing or 
mayonnaise in the ice box, a teaspoonful may be 
dropped on each, but this rich dressing is better 
omitted at this season with this dinner. 

The mint sauce is the third cold dish which can be 
prepared in advance. Pick the leaves from the mint 
stalks, wash and rinse thoroughly, then chop fine. 
Cover a half cupful with a cupful and quarter of 
vinegar, which is not too strong, add two tablespoon- 
fuls of powdered sugar and stand in a cold place, stir- 




PERSUA 

THE DIRT 1 
AND EY D1S 
ING CLEANS 



Pearline is kind to fabrics 



July 29. 1905 SAN FRANCISCO 

U> until '.. 
red without straining in .1 sauce 

The fat lamb and mutl itive in its nature, 

and for that reason the starch) \<„ rved with 

u should have the opposite tendency, ["his is why 
rice forms an ideal combination with this meat, and 

:.illv served with it, while the acid of th< 
mato gives the necessary tone to the stomach. V\ 
the North arc so much addicted t.i the potato thai 
serve it on every occasion, and so [or this dinner a 
dish of potatoes nia\ be added if there are those in 
the family who insist on having them, but they are 
not really needed. Rice, to be properly cooked, 
should be dry with every grain standing up by it- 
self. To attain this restdt is extremel} easy. Have 
ready a large kettle of rapidly boiling water — four 
or rive quarts at the least. Drop in a teaspoonful of 
salt, then add one cupful of raw rice which has been 
thoroughly washed in several waters. Keep the 
water at a mad gallop that the grains may be sepa- 
rated by the motion. In from twelve to twenty min- 
utes it will be done — test by rubbing a few grains be- 
tween thumb and ringers. When no hard core can 
be detected, turn into a sieve to drain off all water; 
cover the to]> with a towel and stand over a small 
saucepan of boiling water or the top of the tea kettle 
for ten minutes. This will give a perfect result — one 
quite different from the sticky mass so often seen. 

It is usually easy to ruin peas in the cooking, a 
frequent fault being the too liberal use of water. For 
a quart of peas, measured after shelling, put into a 
saucepan a large tablespoonful of butter, a half tea- 
spoonful each of salt and sugar and a dash of pepper. 
When melted add the peas, cover and shake over the 
hottest part of the fire for five minutes ; then add three 
tablespoonfuls of water and draw to one side where 
they will cook more slowly. Unless very old they 
should be done in half an hour; add a spoonful or 
two more of water if in danger of burning, the quan- 
tity depending upon their juiciness. They should be 
almost dry when dished. 

Onion soup is one of our most delicious summer 
cream soups. To make it take two bunches of onions, 
peel, trim and slice them. Place in a saucepan with 
three cupfuls of water and one teaspoonful of butter 
and simmer until sufficiently tender to press through 
a sieve. While they are cooking, prepare a cream 
sauce with one pint of milk, one large tablespoonful 
of butter and two of flour. To this, when thick and 
smooth, add the onion pulp, season and cook for five 
minutes longer. If too thick add a few spoonfuls of 
hot milk and serve with it a plate of fried croutons. 



NEWS LETTER. 



13 



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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 




Wand 



O&ohu 



ty no wand butJitasturt's^ 





Ezra Kendall in "Weather Beaten Benson." at the Columbia. 

The gum-chewers were gathered together about 
me. The curtain rose, but I didr't look. Not yet. 
There is greater fascination in the jaws of the human 
than of any other animal. And when they arc mov- 
ing regularly, persuasively, juicily, the species man 
rises to an absorbing study. Behold the metrical and 
rhythmical pastime of jaws, poetical therefore. There 
was a grand chorus of jaws. There seemed to be a 
million, for every one manipulated itself into at 
least a thousand. They were not only chewing, but 
they were chawing. They bit it and" strung it and 
wound it. Afterwards they gave little loving clothes- 
line dips, soft fondlings in the side of the cheek, and 
high jaw curves. Great gum! To what grandeur you 
ascend ! I knew the curtain must be up, for the gum- 
chewers had grown inartistic. Their performance 
lacked plot and versatility — it was even waddy. I 
glanced at the stage. I was at the Central. 

Just a moment, gentle, gumless reader. I have as 
much taste as I used to think was mine. I had to go. 
Not because I was sent — no, no — but because I felt 
the overwhelming desire to go. I get that way once 
in a while ; 1 must go to the Central to keep in touch 
with life. I want the real. It is pleasant to see peo- 
ple in all phases, stuck up by pride and gum. The dif- 
ferent stickers show you the two sides of the slot. I 



found what I wanted. You disagree with me? Very 
well. Don't care for melodrama? Take, then, your 
old emotional problem play, your analytical rendition 
of amor, your Pinero-spiced dissensions — take them, 
but give me an audience melodramatic. 

By chance, there was no melodrama at the Central. 
It was doubtless the heavy villain's vacation week, 
and rivers of guilty blood did not flow, while he went 
sequestering among innocei.t babbling brooks. The 
Central was on a respite from crime. Condition then : 
my melodramatic audience is facing a comedy drama. 
Still, there were signs of the past. Big sister Annie 
was two seats away. Mother Goose was in the next 
row and looked cobwebby. Miss Beeman's Best was 
to right and left. And the stage was doing its own 
work to look natural. The girl on the stage is Sue 
Eudaly ! I knew it. We are, at least, wrapped in the 
veil of melodrama. The soubrette is industriously 
playing full up to the lead of the leading lady, and 
she wears a blooming scarlet skirt. In fact, which is 
the leading lady? I find out by the cyclone cheer 
from < llympus. So I am putting my lamps on "June," 
who is Agnes Rankin. 

Further proofs : Herschel Mayall has instantly 
knocked out two Turks with the little finger of his 
left hand. The house vociferates with one accord. 
The great harp of surface emotion is let loose, and 
the pepsin throng claim the divine right of showing 
their feelings. I am where sentiment is played on 




Kate Condon, the peerless contralto, who is scoring such a brilliant successes 
Flora McDonald in "Bob Boy" at the Tivoli. 



July 29. 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



till it is a drug in the mai k< : . and slow mui 
fath. ■ Iteraates with a jig. I hi 01 

the understudy of the prin rked. 

I am where pa king term- with b 

where the play sapient! 

. where the conception of [tin is full) 
in a marine country reel and the hei iwing 

But here cynicism is never pess He 

us and love is sublime. l"o flirt 1- to 
tarried or get shot. In "Blue Jeans' 
apt to mean both. The code of right is steely, and hu- 
mor takes the precaution to have itself announced. 
There I reveled for an hour. And we went away 
happy. 

( >n the stage, heartrending pleadings vary with 
manly reiteration, like: "I'll punch your head!" A 
retort of the audience : "She's a wise one!" Herschel 
Mayall is making love to all the girls, marrying them 
all. too, the courageous man. I guess lie's a hero — 
at whatever he does the gallery howls gladly. The 
audience is not troubled to surmise anything, and 
Mayall is not troubled by whatever he is doing. 

There's an interesting dramatic species at the Cen- 
tral. It is the comic villain. He can't be new. but 1 
hadn't thought of him in a long time. The heroine 
doesn't like him, but she laughs at him: neither the 
hero, but he has to smile; you smile and laugh, too. 
He is unprincipled but amusing; though after the 
goods, he insinuates himself into your regard. And 
the good-humored effrontery of his character seem- 
to insulate him against getting caught. He is a re- 
markable creature ; almost marvelous as any man in 
the audience. 

"Blue Jeans" is the "Uncle Tom's Cabin" of where 
the woodbine climbeth, and June threatens to be ever- 
lasting as little Eva. If she will always take fleshly 
form winsome as Agnes Rankin, we shall be glad to 
see her. I liked Miss Rankin best when she came 
through the little brown curtain to the right. Have 
you noticed that little brown curtain to the right at 
the Central? It's more important than the drop. It's 
the veil of Fate. Through here the actors come after 
acting to receive the tornadoes of approval or con- 
demnation that express the divine emotions of the 
top gallery. 1 '. G. C. 

If you have just returned from your favorite min- 
eral spring and feel a longing for the cocktail route, 
but lack a legitimate excuse to fall from the water- 
wagon, don't fail to visit the Orpheum this week 
and listen to Talbot and Rogers, styled the Legit 
and his friend. . Be sure to take a seat up-stairs and 
give a standing order to the waiter — you'll need it, 
and no one will blame you. But there are others on 
the bill that will interest you. La Belle Estellita is a 
clever Spanish dancer with all the skill which the race 
lays claim to, but her singing is rather weak. Follow- 
ing La Belle Estellita comes the real treat of the bid. 
Bertie Fowler, monologist, will remind you of your 
fall from the water wagon on account of Talbot and 
Rogers, and make you feel ashamed of yourself for 
having been so foolish. Her imitations of the over- 
imbibed youth is positively the cleverest ever seen 
or heard outside of liquidation parlors. And as a 
counter stunt the "baby with lusty lungs" caused 
many tears to, flow from the infants present, while 
their parents laughed convulsively. S. Miller Kent 
and his Chinese servant, Mr. Frayne, rush on the 
stage and talk against time in a one-act skit called 
"Just Dorothy." The Dorothy in the play is only in 
Mr. Kent's imagination, but the rapidity of his move- 
ments and short time between drinks, turns your 



usual, and Jack Martin and his 
thcart h- 
r than you ha red from tl menl 

: Bo) s' Trio" come forward, and 
pv the Do lis the unpleasant mem 

sJbol and his friend, hut before you have a 
chance to call the waiter, he wakes up and sinj 

or two in the good old messenger boy fashion. 

I he Hebrew of the trio is ihe favorite, and contrib- 

iarl of the show. The Wilton Brothers 

comical turn on the bars, and add to the main 

features of the bill. 

* » * 

The Central's offering for next Mondaj night will 
ie James II. Wallick's story of western life, "The 
1 attle King." a play that is considered one of the 

truest histories of the West ever written by a play- 
wright. The principal role will be essayed by Her- 
schel Mayall, and he is never better in anything than 
a [iart which calls for rugged manhood and a fine fig- 
ure. Mr. Mayall will ride a thoroughbred Kentucky 
horse belonging to Irving Rosenblatt, of this city. 
The animal is a well known figure in Golden Gate 
I 'ark, where he has created much comment by his 
beauty and many tricks. The cast is a large one, and 
includes all the members of the Central Stock Com- 
pany. 

(Continued to Page 18.) 




Mme. Celina Bobe, the Parisian Xylophone and Violin Virtuoso, whq 
will appear at the Orpheum Sunday afternoon. 



16 SaN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

What California 

Agriculturists Demand 



By Thomas B. Wilson. 

The esteemed San Francisco Chronicle lakes the 
Fresno Republican to task for demanding such modi- 
fication of the Exclusion Act as will open our gates 
pretty wide to Chinese labor, but the Chronicle really 
proves the correctness of the Republican's position. 
It says: "When coolies were obtainable in large num- 
bers, land was a drug in the California market. It 
has only been since the effective operation of the ex- 
clusion laws that desirable immigrants have been 
attracted in large numbers, and it is their purchases 
of small parcels of land which have increased the 
value of the holdings of big owners." 

What the Chronicle says is literally true — too true 
for its position. "When coolies were obtainable" 
there were but very few people in California, com- 
paratively speaking, and "land was a drug in the 
market" because no one wanted land. It is equally 
true that "it has only been since the effective opera- 
tion of the exclusion laws that desirable immigrants 
have been attracted in large numbers" but the "opera- 
tion of the exclusion laws" had nothing whatever, 
not even remotely, to do with turning the tide of im- 
migration to California. People came here because 
of the low land values, climatic perfection ami varied 
products of the soil. Before the inflow of immigrants 
began, California was a wide, wild waste of unim- 
proved lands, that were held by speculators who did 
not care to cultivate their holdings. Certainly they 
sold "parcels" of their land to the new comers. They 
were glad enough to do so, because every 
"parcel" sold enhanced the value of the remaining 
acres. And so in time immigration dolled the whole 
State with small ranches. Immigration could not 
have been delayed because of the presence or compe- 
tition of coolies, for they never become land-owners. 
They do not desire to. They are hewers of wood 
and drawers of water, nothing more nor less. They 
have never aspired to be anything else; besides, per- 
haps it is safe to say that the majority of the immi- 
grants never gave the matter of Chinese exclusion a 
thought. It did not concern them in an) way, 1ml 
they have known by costly experience for some years 
that the exclusion act deprives them of a desirable 
labor supply, and makes the tilling of the s, ,il any- 
thing but a profitable business. 

Concerning the good work of parceling the- great 
land holdings to new comers, and the consequent re- 
sult of the farming communities being multiplied 
over and over again, the esteemed Chronicle fails lo 
see that every "parceling" of the great estates in- 
creases the demand lor Asiatic field labor. The 
owner of a "parcel" is ordinarily equal lo the cultiva- 
tion of his acres to where the crop begins to mature, 
but he requires considerable additional help to har- 
vest his products. Unless that is forthcoming at once 
and at a wage schedule that the market price for his 
products will justify, his year's labor avails him noth- 
ing, if, indeed, he is not forced to sustain a loss. This 
is conspicuously true of fruit, berry and vegetable 
products, which demand instant and continuous at- 
tention until they are housed. Fruits and berries 
more especially do not suspend their maturing pro- 
cess until the pickers are on the ground. Hence the 
rancher is at the mercy of an inadequate supply of 
labor at best, and a supply, so far as white labor is 
concerned, that is as uncertain as March winds, to 
say nothing of the almost certainty of a strike for 



July 29, 1905 

higher wages at the critical time — when the crop 
must be gathered at once or be lost. 

The experience of ranchers all over California is 
that there is not nearly enough willing white labor 
available to insure the saving of the crops. This, add- 
ed to the further fact that there is no certainty what- 
ever that the labor under employment will not take 
advantage of rapidly ripening products and suspend 
operations unless wages are guaranteed that would 
absorb all the orofits of a year's work. If these con- 
ditions prevail with only a small portion of the State's 
acreage "parceled out." would not an influx of im- 
migrants only make fruit and berry growing a still 
more precarious and doubtful occupation? Is it not 
misleading to invite immigration lo come and divide 
these vast tracts of unimproved agricultural lands 
into small ranches when every man in the State 
knows that immense sums of money are lost every 
year because labor cannot be secured to gather the 
croos? Why are hundreds of ranches for sale in every 
fruit county? Is it because the soil is unproductive? 
Is it because social life is objectionable? Ts it be- 
cause there is lack of school and church advantages, 
or means of transportation? Not at all. Tt is simply 
because they are unprofitable under our system of 
obtaining labor supply, and its unreliability when ob- 
tained. There is not a fruit or berry ranch in the 
whole State of California that is not under the iron 
heel of white labor, and all the deeper into the vitals 
of ranching will the heel grind its way as the "par- 
celing" goes on without an adequate and reliable 
labor supply. If the esteemed Chronicle will take 
the trouble to ascertain the facts — eet the opinion of 
the ranchers in California — it will find that they are 
practicallv of one mind on the labor question : that 
they see no solution of the nroblem other than in such 
modification of the exclusion laws as will permit them 
to look to Asia for their supplv. and that unless some 
such relief comes, the business of cultivating the 
soil will gradually grow worse as the demand for 
labor grows greater by the "parceling-" pro.-ess of 
increasing the number of ranches with no additions 
to the labor supply. 

The fact of the matter is. the dog-in-the-manger 
autocracv of selfish labor unionism, the idiotic ranting 
against the "yellow oeril" bv political spell-binders, 
and the silly vanorings of blear-eved sentimentalists 
are keening up this hue and cry against repealing or 
modifving the exclusion laws, and to them the agri- 
culturists of California are indebted for the uncertain 
and unsatisfying conditions under which they have 
to plant and reap — and often go broke. 

Fresh Milk 
is always obtainable. Borden's Earlo Brand Condensed Mill- 
is absolutely pure eow's milk combined with the finest grade 
of granulated sugar. For sale at your grocers. Avoid un- 
known brands. 



LIQUOR HABIT 

This seems Impossible but is God's truth. This treatment has 
never failed in a single ease- 34 hours after you eome. you go 
away permanently cured. 

CURED IN 

THE DR. CARSON ONE DAY LIQUOR CURE CO. 

Ofnoes— 604 Montgomery St.. cor. Clay- Black 643. 

Sanitarium— gig McAllister near Franklin. South 714 

24 HOURS 



July 29. 1905 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 17 



AUGUST 

OVERLAND MONTHLY 



NOW OUT 



CONTENTS 

Celery Growing in the Peat-Lands . of California 

By Arthur Inkersley 101 

The String of Life A Lay Sermon by Armond. . . .108 

As the Dead Love, (Poem) By Stanly Coghill m 

Alligators and Rattlesnakes near the Delta of the Mississippi 

By Fred A. Hunt 113 

Opportunity, (Poem) By Jeanette H. Carey 116 

The Outcast By J. Gordon Smith 117 

How We Caught the Burglar By Ethel L. Preble 123 

The Wooing of Titania By Katharine Elise Chapman. .127 

The Birth of Friendship, (Poem) By Ichninotani Gleason 131 

Adapted from the Japanese. 

The White Owl By Lauren T. Tuttle 132 

Humility (Poem) By Ichninotani Gleason 131 

Translated from the Japanese of K. Shinomiya. 

A Mountain Wilderness in the City'sHeart. .By Harold French 136 

Lest We Grow Too Content (Poem) . . By Mabel Porter Pitts 139 

Taken in and Done For By John Baden 140 

Their Golden Wedding Day By Evelyn Singer 143 

The Legend of Lake Jcnive By Harry Willard Pierce 145 

The Republic of Colombia By Mary A. Davis 150 

Lethe (Poem) By Jeanette Heintzen Carey. . . .168 

To Beautiful Miyajima by Fishing Boat. . By Charles Lorrimer 169 

An Apostrophe to the King Mountain of the Royal Gorge, Colorado. . 

(Poem) By James Edward Wolfe 175 

How Children May be Trained to Express Thought in Music Language 

By Cora W. Jenkins 176 

Are the United States a Nation?.. By Thomas Blackburn 181 



THE BEST IN THE WEST 



18 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 

Pleasure's Wand 



July 29, 1905 



(Continued from Page 15.) 

Glickman's Yiddish players produced "Gabriel," 
a light, four-act opera, last Tuesday evening at the 
Grand Opera House. To one widi a good or even 
fair knowledge of German this play proved to be 
n.ost interesting as well as amusing. The attend- 
ance was not as great as the play deserved, but the 
lack of proper advertising, I fear, was the cause of 
this. Ellis Glickman made a most charming Herzog 
Constantine, and all through the play carries a per- 
sonage fully equal to the best that San Francisco 
has ever had the pleasure of enjoying. But perhaps 
a character even better was that of Adrian, as por- 
trayed by M. Goldberg. Adrian is the villain in the 
cast, and there were many faint hearts in the audience 
who would have volunteered police service if the play 
and players were real. J. Weisman, the physician, is 
entitled to equal honors, although his part does not 
exact the same qualifications as the others. The real 
interest, however, centers in Gabriel, an artist, and 
Dinah, his wife. Bernard Schoengold, assisted by 
Clara Raffalo, carried these characters through the 
play with a vim that enthused the entire audience, 
and gained a full, share of applause and sympathy. 
The only regret we have to offer is that San Fran- 
cisco's Jewish and German colonies did not give the 
support that this splendid company deserves. 

* * * 

This Saturday afternoon and evening at the Cali- 
fornia Theatre, Ibsen's famous play, "Ghosts," will be 
presented by Belasco, Maver & Price with the clever 
young actor, Harry Mestayer, in the role of Oswald, 
supported by a specially selected company, including 
such well-known players as Kate Dalglish, Robert 
Wayne, Grace Goodall and Edwin E. Bailey. 
"Ghosts" proved a veritable sensation last week 
in Los Angeles, where the Ibsen play was presented 
at the Belasco Theatre before two of the largest au- 
diences ever seen in that theatre. There has been a 
big demand for seats for the performances of 
"Ghosts" at the California. 

* * * 

The re-opening of the Columbia Theatre for the 
regular season takes place next Monday night, and 
the first of a long list of unusually attractive offerings 
will be the Liebler & Company attraction, Ezra Ken- 
dall, in "Weather Beaten Benson." This laughter- 
provoking star has many friends here who were won 
by his infectious comedy in his former success, "The 
Vinegar Buyer." "Weather Beaten Benson" is said 
to be even a better vehicle for the. display of Kendall's 
talents, and he will be supported in his efforts by a 
strong company, including Thurlow Bergen, Harold 
Russell, John D. Garrick, Philip Bishop, Kathryn 
Browne, Ethel Brandon, Edith Taliaferro, Polly 
Stockwell, Elizabeth King and Red O'Neal. The • iri- 
ginal scenes and effects will be brought here un- 
changed, including the great rain-storm, which is 
described as the most realistic downpour ever seen 
on the stage. 

* * * 

James J. Morton, monologist, will make his re-ap- 
pearance at the Orpheum Sunday afternoon. Smith 
and Campbell, "the men of quality," are coming back, 
and no doubt will be hailed with "delight by all lovers 
of a hearty laugh. The Patty brothers, head to head 
balancers, will be seen for the first time in San Fran^ 
cisco. They come direct from the London Hippo- 



drome. Mr. Alexander Patty is the only man in the 
world who actually walks down a flight of stairs on 
his head. Mine. Celina Bobe, a renowned Parisian 
xylophone and violin virtuoso, will be another Euro- 
pean importation. The eminent young actor, Mr. S. 
Miller Kent, who has made an unequivocal hit in his 
delightful comedietta, "Just Dorothy, which he will 
present for the last times, and the Miessenger Boys' 
Trio will change their songs and specialties. La 
Belle Estellita. the fascinating Spanish singer and 
dancer, who has thoroughly established her claim 
as the legitimate successor ot Carmcneita : the Wilton 
brothers, the excruciatingly funny bar performers, 
and the Orpheum Motion Pictures, showing the latest 
novelties, will complete a capital and varied pro- 
gramme. 

* * * 

Glickman's Yiddish players will continue at the 
Grand Opera House, where their quaint, clever and 
extraordinary performances are exciting both interest 
and admiration. Their programmes fur next week 
will be as follows: Mondaj Night, "Joseph in 
Egypt;" Tuesday night, "The Interrupted Wed- 
ding;" Wednesday night, "Rabbi Osher in America" 
(by request) ; Thursday night, "Kol Nidrey" (by re- 
quest) ; Friday and Saturday nights. "Jacob and 
Esau ;" Sunday night, "King Solomon." For the Sat- 
urday and Sunday matinees, "The Little Rabbi" will 
be presented. The company has been strengthened 
by the addition of the famous Yiddish actress. Mme. 

Bertha Tanzman. 

* * * 

White Whittlesey, an ideal actor of romantic roles. 
whom San Francisco playgoers hold in affectionate 
regard and delight to honor, will begin at the Alcazar 
next Monday what is likely to be his most remarkable 
and brilliant summer engagement. Since he was last 
seen here, Whittlesey has been successfully launched 
as a star under Belasco. Maver & Price's direction. 
Whittlesey's special season has added interest from 
the fact that he will not essay any part in which he 
has hitherto been seen. His first offering is the first 
San Francisco production or the romantic play. "The 
Fortunes of the King," in which J. K. Ffackett 
achieved fame. To follow, August ;th. Mr. Whittle- 
sey essays Henry Miller's famous role of Sydney Car- 
ton, in the picturesque play of the French Revolution, 
"The Only Way." There will be no Sunday matinees 
during the Whittlesey season, but Thursday matinees 

will be resumed. 

* * * 

"Rob Roy" continues to pack the Tivoli at every 
performance. It will begin the third week of its run 
Monday night. Kate Condon, Anna Lichter, Arthur 



FOR INFANTS OR ADULTS 

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"POI" 

Is an Ideal Health Food. Strength- 
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Boon to Dyspeptics and Invalids. 

For sale by 

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or sent prepaid on receipt 
of 60e by 

Hawaiian Poi Flour Co. 

HONOLULU, M. I. 

LUTTED'S HAWAIIAN "POI" 




July 29, 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Cunningham, redely Webb, Frank K Hayes ami 
Barron Berthald have made great hiti in thi 




JIatt B. Snyder. Central Theatre. 



"Princess Fan Tan," the delightful Japanese musi- 
cal extravaganza, participated in by nearly three hun- 
dred clever children, will receive its final presenta- 
tions at the Chutes to-morrow afternoon and evening 
and at the Monday matinee the regular specialty 
performances will be resumed. Schepp's dogs and 
ponies, a veritable circus in vaudeville, will repeat 
the hit that they made at the Orpheum recently, and 
Carlisle and Baker, "the colored artistocrats," and 
ragtime pianists, composers and vocalists, will make 
their first appearance here. Mr. and Mrs. James P. 
Lee and little Madeline Lee will present their beauti- 
ful playlet, "Thou Shalt Not Steal." Hallen and 
Hayes will offer an up-to-date black-face singing and 
dancing act, and Ed. Cressy, the "rube" monologist ; 
Briseno, a celebrated wire walker, and the animato- 
scope, showing many modern and amusing moving 
pictures, will complete the programme. 

* * * 

"The Woman in the Case," in which Blanche 
Walsh is to appear here early in the season, concerns 
people and events of the fashionable social circles 
of New York, and consequently the gowns worn by 
the principal female characters will be of considerable 
interest to local playgoers. Other notable gowns 
will be worn by Miss Dorothy Dorr, who made one 
of the big hits of the play in New York, and also by 
the bridesmaids, who will be played by Grace Gib- 
bons, Jean Patriquin and Miss Katherine Belle. 

* * ^ 

Juliet Crosby will be seen in New York next season 
as the heroine of "The Heart of a Geisha." Her Ko- 
hamma San is a most tender, pathetic and delightfully 

shaded personation. 

* * * 

The Japanese newspapers of San Francisco devote 
much space to admirative reviews of "The Heart of 
a Geisha." They are amazed at the faithful picture 
of Japanese characters and customs, and credit Col- 
gate Baker, the author, with a perfect understanding 

of Japanese life. 

* * * 

William Hoffman is the new leader of the Palace 



Hotel orchestra. He 1- a finished violinist, and has 

1. Under his eye the on 
guests uf tin- In- hotel with some 

tine mtlsiC 

"Yes, l weighed myself yesterday out at the 

- ■ ■• k yards. I low much do you suppose? Give it 
tip? Two hundred and eighty-three." "< In the hoof 
or dressed?" 



"Your monej or your life!' growled the foot- 
pad. "Take my life," responded the Irishman. "I'm 
savin' me money for me old age." 

"Miss Anteek says this is the most sanitary 

of all the ages." "She ought to know." said the man 
who roomed across the hall, "she's compared a good 
many of them." 



Towuseod'* California glace fruits, in flre-etehed boxes, are 

shipped to all parts of the world. The new store is located at 7ts; 
Market street, between Third aud Fourth streets, two minutes' walk 
from Call building. 

rontrnl Thontro Belasco A Mayer, proprietors 
^VSIJl-rui Uieuiie, Market St., near ith. Phone Sou Hi 633 

Week beginning July 31. Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 

James H. Wallick's melodramatic masterpiece of western life 

THE CATTLE KING 

W ith Herschel Mayall In the titl* role. A border play that has 
never been equaled for true heart interest, quaint and rich 
Mexican sostumea. See the Kentucky thoroughbred which 
will do all manner of tricks- 
Next— No Wedding Belle for Her. 
Prices evening 100 to 60c. Matinees 10c, 16c, 25c. 

Tivoli Opera House. °° rMr *«&.•£? stnM 

Only matinee Saturday. Third week begins Monday night. 
De Koven aud Smith's romantic comic opera 

ROB ROY 

Great success of Kate Condon. Anna Lichter. Arthur Cunning- 
ham, Teddy Webb, Frank R. HayeB and Barron Berthald. 
Produced under the stage direction of Max Freeman. 
Firottime at popular prices, 26, 50 and 75 cents. 

{ irnhpi irr\ O'Farrell St., 

^fjJI ltfUri). bet> Stockton and Powell Sts. 

Week commencing Sunday matinee, July 30 

COMEDY AND SENSATION 

James J. Morton; Patty Brothers; bmith and Campbell; Mme. 
Celina Jttube; Wilton Brothers; Messenger Boys' Trio; La Belie 
Estellita; Orpheum Motion Plctmesand last week of 



MR. 



Kegnlar matinees every Wednesday, 
Sunday Prices— iuc, 250, 50c. 



S. MILLER KENT 

Thursday. 



Saturday and 



Grand Opera House 

GLICKMAN'S YIDDISH PLAYERS 

Special engagement of Mme. Bertha Tanzman. 

Monday— 'Joseph in Egypt." 

Tuesday— "The Interrupted Wedding." 

Wednesday— "Rabbi Osher in America," (by request) 

Thursday— "Kol JSidrey," (by request) 

Friday, Saturday— "Jacob and Esau." 

Saturday and Sunday matinees— "The Little Kabbi." 

Sunday night— "King Solomon." 

Coming— Denis O'Sullivan. 

Prices— 26, 35. 60, 76c. and $1. 



Colurr.bia Tbeatre. 



Gottj-ub, ,\i .utx & {Jo, 

Leitseei and Managers. 



Beginning next Monday, July 3lst. 
The comedian you all know 

EZRA KENDALL 

In his newest laughter creating &ucoess 

WEflTHER BEATEN BENSON 

Plenty of good gravy for all. 



Alcazar Theatre 



Bslabco & JVIa yer. Proprietors 
D. Pbioi, Gen'l. Mgr. 



Tel. Alcazar 

Week commencing Monday, July 31. Regular matinees Thurs- 
day and Saturday. Keturn of the favorite romantic actor, 

WHITE WHITTLESEY 

It the first San Francisco production of J. K. Hackett's great 
success 

THE FORTUNES OF THE KING 

August 7— White Whittlesey in the dramatic tale of two 
cities, The Only Way. 

Evenings 25 to 75 cents. Matinees Thursday and Saturday 25 to 
50 cents. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 




1 hear that the fine country-seat Jack London has 
recently purchased near Glen Ellen is really intended 
as a wedding gift to his prospective wife, Miss L'har- 
maine Kittredge. The scenery around the author's 
new home is charming, as indeed is all the country 
in that locality, and in this delightful woodland re- 
treat will be written London's forthcoming novel. 

I am surprised that even more people do not select 
this locality for summer homes. It has all sorts of 
inviting natural advantages, and besides, there is a 
charming colony of literary people to give it a delight- 
ful atmosphere. 

* * * 

Almost every one who has a house in the country 
entertained at week-end parties last Saturday, and as 
a result things lagged worse than ever in town. 
Not even an engagement announcement has shivered 
the deadly dullness into bits. If a society chronicler 
could send her astral body through space to visit 
the various summer resorts, her other self might sup- 
port the vacant life in town. Even the society people 
who profess to be spending the summer in town are 
so constantly speeding away for a day here and a 
day there that they do not bestir themselves to give 

town life a lift. 

* * * 

Miss Leslie Green has about completed the ar- 
rangements for her wedding to Howard Huntington, 
on August 19th. Her bridesmaids will be Miss Eliza- 
beth Huntington, Miss Marion Huntington. Miss 
Elizabeth Livermore and Miss Ruth Knowles. The 
maid of honor will be the bride's sister, Miss Ruth 
Green, and Hugh S. Stewart, of Los Angeles, will be 
best man. Miss Green will doubtless make a beau- 
tiful bride in her soft, shimmering satin gown trim- 
med with rare old lace. Like so many of .the recent 
brides, her bouquet will be a combination of orchids 
and lilies of the valley. The bridesmaids will wear 
cream colored gowns, and will carry pink tiger lilies. 
The Green home in Berkeley is a charming and spa- 
cious old-fashioned house, that could accommodate 
many guests, but with the simplicity that has always 
characterized the Green, as well as the Huntington 
families, only 150 of the closest friends and relatives 
will be invited to the ceremony. 

Two weeks after the wedding, Mr. and Mrs. Gil- 
bert Brooks-Perkins (Clara Huntington) will start 
on a tour of the world. They will spend a year trav- 
eling, and will then settle down again in New York, 
where they will make their home. The Perkinses 
move in the best literary and artistic set in New York 
and care nothing for the frivolings of the smart set 
into which their millions would plunge them if they 
cared for that sort of thing. 

* * * 

I hear that several wealthy families intend to win- 
ter in San Francisco. The more the merrier, says 
Mrs. Grundy, and no one hears a dissenting voice. 
A Montana millionaire and a wealthy Salt Lake 
widow are among those who are looking for suitable 
houses in which to entertain. The Murrays, who 
bought the Hugh Tevis place at .Monterey, and have 
previously only made short excursions into town, 
have leased the Blair house on Van Ness avenue for 
the winter, and will probably be among the notable 
entertainers of the season. 



It is good news to the many friends of the Kip fam- 
ily to learn that Mrs. Ernest Robinson, of Kansas 
City, who is at present visiting her mother, Mrs. 
William Ingraham Kip, in San Rafael, will prolong 
her visit another month. The Kips will return to the 
city in the middle of August. 

* * * 

Mrs. Robert Greer has been a great addition to 
Sausalito society this year. Even in the days of its 
bachelordom "The Hutch" has never witnessed mer- 
rier scenes than since Mrs. Greer took the household 
reins. On Wednesday of this week she gave a lunch- 
eon, after which the guests enjoyed a few rounds of 
bridge whist. 

* * * 

Mrs. L. L. Baker took a dozen young people for a 
week's outing at Cazadero, and a mighty jolly time 
they've all had. Mrs. Baker goes East in the fall to 
put her daughter, Helen, in a New York finishing 
school, and to bid au revoir to Dorothy, who goes 
for a wander-year abroad before making her formal 
bow to society. 

* * * 

Mrs. Theodore Tomlinsou (Ethel Keeney) has at 
last set the date for her visit to her family, and will 
arrive here in the middle of August. She has de- 
ferred the trip so many times in order that her hus- 
band might accompany her. It was because Mr. 
Tomlinson could not get away just then that they did 
not come to the Blakeman-McMillan wedding. Mrs. 
Tomlinson and Mrs. McMillan are cousins, but their 
affection has always been more like sisters. 

Mr. Rudolph Spreckels has sailed for Honolulu, 
and Mrs. Spreckels and the children have gone to 
Monterey, where they will spend most of the sum- 
mer. Miss Virginia Joliffe, Mrs. Spreckels's favorite 
sister, will be her guest a great deal of the time. 

* * * 

Arrivals at Hotel Del Monte for the week ending 
July 24, 1905 : Burlingame — Mrs. Whittell, Miss 
Whittell. San Francisco — Miss Gertrude Joliffe, Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis Lipman, Mr. and Mrs. T- Campbell 
Short, T. A. Donohoe, Mrs. E. S. Rothschild. Alfred 



VISIT THE 



White House 

ART ROOMS 

FOR 

Wedding 

AND 

Engagement Presents 



July 29, 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ai 



L. Murstein, Mr. and Mrs. T. Kirkpa trick, Mi 

II. Howe. Mrs. Hamilton Higgins, Mi and Mr-. \V. 

B. Tubbs, Mr>. A. N. I'owne, Mr. and Mn 

E. Wordcn, Mr. and Mi>. I. B. I 

1 Iwens, S. P. Jossclyn, 1 ieorgc Andrews, Mr. F. Mcy- 

erstein, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 1'. Braslan, Mr. and 

Mrs. Hear) Dernham, Miss Demham. 

* * * 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael during week ending Tues- 
day, July -'5. 1905: Mis. 1.. Wormser, Mrs. Bruiner, 
Mrs. Blauvelt, Miss Blauvelt, Major Blauvelt, U, S. 
Army, C. Byron Russell, Percival i>. kahn, Paul Ver- 
dier. G. L. Cadwalader, Mrs. I. Lawrence Poole, Mrs. 
(1. \Y. Gibs, Mrs. W. G. Holcombe, F. 1 ». Cochrane, 
11. Silver. O. P. H. Shelley, Mr. and Mrs. J. II. Bid- 
die, son and maid. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weber, Mrs. 
1 .. T. Hunter, F. A. Berlin, Ed. F. Sweeney, Mrs. F. 
McDonnell, T. F. Cunningham, F. R, Stamp. 

Some of the swellest and wealthiest of the East- 
ern nobs may be encountered any day in the Palace 
Hotel Palm Garden and Grill, and their signatures 
may be deciphered on the register by a patient and 
ingenious man. The great and effete East, as bucolic 
editors love to term it, is awaking to the fact that 
San Francisco is on the map. No doubt the wonder- 
ful success of the last grand opera season had some- 
thing to do with it. And then the possession of such 
perfectly appointed hotels as the Palace has much 
to do with enticing here the people who are dying to 
learn new ways of being separated from tbeir money. 
The trouble is that the Palace does not charge 
enough to impress many of the very rich with the 
belief that it is at the very top of the hotel list. Per- 
haps the new Fairmont, when it is opened, may be 
able to satisfy even the most exacting in that regard. 

Could our grandfathers have looked at the dental 
display made Tuesday and Wednesday of this week 
at the Palace Hotel, in the Maple Room thereof, by 
the chief exhibitors at the Denial Congress in Port- 
land, they would have marveled at the diverse con- 
trivances invented for putting new grinders and 
other teeth into a man's head without pain. The use 
of electricity in modern dentistry is simply wonder- 
ful, and it is almost a pleasure now to visit the man 
whose office formerly was shunned as if it were a 
chamber of tortures. 

"Got any literary recognition yet?" "Well, two 

magazine editors said 'Hello' the other day." 

TO PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

Physician occupying his offices only three hours 
daily (2:30 p. m. to 5:30 p. m.) desires to sub-let re- 
maining hours of day and evening to responsible 
physician. Central location. Address, "Physician," 
Box 6, S. F. News Letter. 

Fashion in Champagne. 

Speaking of champagnes, our New York corre- 
spondent writes that the predominance of Moet & 
Chandon White Seal at all fashionable functions at 
Newport, Saratoga and other watering places is re- 
markable. The present vintage appears to have 
caught the taste of the bon vivant, it being pro- 
nounced not too sweet, but medium dry, of an ex- 
quisite bouquet, and is said to agree best with a con- 
stitution taxed to the utmost by a strenuous society 
life — The Caterer. 

The Star Hair Bemedy is the best tonic : restores tolor, stops falling. 
Druggists, hairdressers. Accept no substitute. Star Remedy u>., 
1338 Polk street, telephone East 4626. 



Building Repair Sale 

which began last Monday is still going on and will 
continue all next week. By reason of the flooding 
of several of our departments when the fire occurred 
above us on July 5th. our ceilings were badly 
damaged and on this account 

UNPRECEDENTED BARGAINS 

are offered to make room for repairs. The discounts 
vary all the way from 20 per cent to 50 per cent and 
apply to many of our most attractive designs in 

Decorated China, Cat Glass, Gold Decorated Glass, 

Banqnet Lamp Globes, Burnt Wood Novelties 

Art Goods, Kitchen Wares, etc. 

Watch the Papers for Interesting Details 

NATHAN-DOHRMANN CO. 

122-132 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



ENTERTAINMENTS. 
July 25 (Tuesday)— Mrs. William Ingraham Kip and 

Mrs. Ernest Robinson gave a motor party. 
July 26 (Wednesday) — Mrs. Robert Greer gave a 

luncheon and bridge party at "The Hutch," Sau- 

salito. 
July 2y (Thursday) — Miss Estelle Kleeman gave a 

luncheon in Oakland in honor of Mrs. William 

P. Harvey. 



FARES, PLEASE! 

An interesting dialogue between a woman and a 
railway conductor, in which the woman got the 
best of it, is reported by the Philadelphia Press : 

"I shall have to ask you for a ticket for that boy, 
ma'am." 

"I guess not." 

"He's too old to travel free. He occupies a whole 
seat and the car's crowded. There are people stand- 
ing." 

"I can't help that." 

"I haven't time to argue this matter, ma'am. You'll 
have to pay for that boy." 

"I've never paid for him yet." 

"You've got to begin doing it some time." 

"Not this trip, anyway. ' 

"You'll pay for that boy, ma'am, or I'll stop the 
train and put him off." 

"All right; put him off if you think that's the way 
to get anything out of me." 

"You ought to know what the rules of this road 
are, ma'am. How old is that boy?" 

"I don't know. I never saw him before." 



Try Oxir 



Stanford=Richmond Coal 

From the Richmondvale District 
Newcastle, N. S. W., Australia. 

Intense heat, little ash, and no clinKer. 
Direct from the mine to the consumer. 



SOLD TO TRADE ONLY. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT AND 

SEE THAT YOU GET IT. 



Richmond Coal Co. 

Agents 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 




The Insurance Commissioner of Maryland has 
recommended in his report that the mixed insurance 
laws of that State be codified and brought down i" 
date, and he has also suggested that all the special 
charters be repealed. Baltimore collected enough 
from the insurance companies to enable the balance 
of the State to do almost anything it pleases without 
expense to itself in making or mending laws. 

* * # 

Mr. Frank S. Tesch has resigned the office of 
Deputy Superintendent of Insurance for Colorado, 
and E. E. Rittenhouse has been appointed to fill the 

vacancy. 

* * * 

Mr. Allan Foreman, in the Journalist, wiggles his 
ears and brays in writing on the "Utterly ridiculous 
position in which newspapers put ihemselves" in re- 
lation to life insurance. In the discussion of his as- 
sertion he says, referring to a bill which a New York 
Senator was to introduce : "There is no such thing as 
a 'deferred' premium nor a 'lapsed' premium. There 
is such a thing as a 'deferred' dividend and a 'lapsed' 
policy, and Senator Marks has some ideas perhaps on 
that subject, but imagine such a man preparing a 
bill to regulate the insurance business! Then further 
on he announces that he is going to make them (the 
companies) 'invest their surplus' in such securities, 
etc., as may be desirable to protect policy-holders. 
'Invest their surplus,' from which it is implied that 
there is no other money to invest but the 'surplus.' 
All of the assets are required to be invested. The sur- 
plus is an asset. It is not distinct from any other 
money on hand. The New York Sun, usually a bright 
paper on financial matters, continually referred to the 
Equitable's '$400,000,000 of assets and $80,000,000' of 
surplus, and many of its reporters summed up the 
thing as $480,000,000 of assets. Imagine how the 
insurance people feel at such statements and the con- 
tempt they must have for such critics." 

If this summing up by that potentate of journalism, 
the Warwick of newspaperdom, would not melt ice 
cream in a freezer or make a coyote sing bide a wee', 
then the cream and the coyote are each lost to a sense 
of the superbly ludicrous. There is only oik thing 
more ridiculous that is possible for the writer to 
imagine — the contempt he has earned from life in- 
surance men for his colossal ignorance about the ques- 
tion he assumes to argue. Surplus as an asset exists 
only in the brains of a foreman. The insurance com- 
missioners do not so regard it, and a lapsed premium 
does not necessarily lapse a policy. < )h, fie, Allan ; 
buy a first reader on life insurance, and try again in 
the kindergarten class. 

* * + 

Insurance Commissioner Hart, of Wisconsin, has 
notified all the life insurance com lanies doing busi- 
ness in that State to the following effect : "You are 
hereby notified that Chapter 448 of the Laws of 1905, 
which was published and went in force on June 24th, 
amends Section 1952 of the Wisconsin Statutes of 
1898. to read as follows: 

"'Section 1952. Every life insurance corporation 
doing business in this State upon the principle of 
mutual insurance, or the members of which are 1 
titled to share in the surplus funds thereof, may make 
distribution of such surplus as they may have accu- 
mulated annually, or once in two, three, four or ii e 



..ears, as the directors thereof mu, from time to time 
determine. In determining the amount of the surplus 
to be distributed there shall be reserved an amount 
not less than the aggregate net value of all the out- 
standing policies, said value to be computed by the 
American Experience Table of Mortali.y with inter- 
est not exceeding four and one-half per cent. Nothing 
in this section shall be construed to hereafter permit 
any such corporation to defer the distribution, appor- 
tionment or accounting of surplus to policy-holders 
for a longer period than five years, and on all poli- 
cies, hereafter outstanding, under the conditions of 
which the actual distribution is provided for at a 
definite or fixed period, the apportioned surplus shall 
be carried as a liability to the class of policies on 
which the same was accumulated.' 

"Your special attention is directed to that part of 
said chapter which reads as follows: 

" 'Nothing in this section shall be construed to 
hereafter permit any such corporation to defer the 
distribution, apportionment, or accounting of surplus 
to policy-holders for a longer period than five years.' " 

It will be remembered that the germ of the idea of 
the passage of this law came when the Equitable con- 
tended against Mr. Hart that it had a right to defer 
dividends. Mr. Hart was beaten in the courts, but 
not content, went to the Legislature for an amend- 
ment to the law, and evidently has secured it, and 

means to enforce it. 

* * * 

The 11th to the 1 6th of September has been de- 
signated by the Special Agehts Association of the 
Northwest as Insurance Week at the Lewis and 

Clark Fair. 

* * * 

The insurance agents are evidently going to figure 
in this month's shortages. L. H. Hayes, manager 
of the Boston agency, who succeeded, is reported to 
be -50,000 behind to his companies. Lewis M. Spen- 
cer, a life and bond insurance agent of Chicago, has 
gone into voluntary bankruptcy — liabilities $357,645, 
assets $260. He owes the Northwestern Life of Min- 

nea] olis almost $18,000. 

* * * 

Mr. George II. Tyson, manager of the Tyson 
agency, is taking a vacation trip through Southern 
California. 

* * * 

The inspectors of the Fire Underwriters' Inspection 
Bureau should not alone lie welcomed on their calling 
but should be called upon. They point out the dan- 
ger or causes of fires, and show the methods to cor- 



RUG 




Big stock for discriminating buyers. 
Oriental and Domestic. 




261 GEARY STREET. 



UNION SQUARE 



July 39. 1905 



Micm. In the semi-annual r<-| .>r roan. 

shown that careful inspection by 
its it -ccurcd changes or the removal 

parently proximate causes of fire in iliis city to the 
number of 4263; in Los Angeles 44''.;: in Portland 
3418; in Seattle 1336; in TaCOma 40.^: in Spokane 
047. How much this improvement i»t" the hazard lias 
reduced the first waste is not known, but the quantity 
— lar^e as it is — exists, although undetermined. 

* * * 

A recent cable despatch from P.erlin savs in sub- 
Stance: "The imperial supervisory office for private 

insurance companies has demanded of the Equitable 
Life Assurance Society and Mutual 1 il'c Insurance 
Company of New York that they declare by August 
1st in what manner they propose separating their 
premium reserves on German policies from the gen- 
eral reserves, and how thev intend to invest them. 
The amounts affected are $7,500,000 in the case of 
the Equitable and $5,250,000 in the case of the Mu- 
tual." Judging from this, the echoes of the Equi- 
table fight have reached the empire of the Kaiser. 

Mr. Harry P.oyd. who was assistant general agent 
of the Hamburg Rremen under General Agent Ru- 
dolph Herold. died recently in Spokane. Sneaking 
of his death, an insurance paper of this city says : "He 
was a bundle of nerves and of energy ; lie suffered the 
ordinary relapse common to high-strung people, and 
in a fit of despondency chose to raise by a voluntary 
act the veil of the future. He is both mourned and 
regretted." 

The Interstate Commerce Commission Bulletin No. 
15. just issued, gives some figures interesting to ac- 
cident insurance men. It gives an account of rail- 
road accidents in the United States during the months 
of January. February and March of this year, and 
shows that during the quarter there were 28 passen- 
gers and 204 employees killed, and 1,651 passengers 
;'iid 2.062 employees injured in train accidents, mak- 
ing in all 232 persons killed and 3.713 injured in train 
a<-oidents. Other accidents to passengers and em- 
ployees not the result of collisions or derailments 
bring the total number of casualties up to 909 killed 

-ml '4.397 injured. 

* * * 

Secretary of State John Hay, who diedjuly 1st at 
his country home in New Hampshire, carried a policy 
!'■ r $100,000 in the Equitable. Mr. Hay took the pol- 
icy in 1887, when he was 47 years old. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

INSURANCE 



*3 



OLfricnqt 

WHISKE" 




P. Hotaling <£L Co. is an 
old -established firm- 53 
years on the Pacific 
Coast. Their reputation 
for honesty and integ- 
rity is u ncj tie st ion able. 
When they say Old 
KirK WhisKy is abso- 
lutely pure, they 
mean exactly what 
they say. The best 
people on earth 
drinK Old Kirk 
WhisKy 



APR 



FIRE. MARINE AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

FIREMAN'S FUND 

Insurance Company of San Francisco, Cal. 
Capital. $1,000,000. Assets, $6,500,000 

Founded A. D. 1792. 

Insurance Co. of North America 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital J3.000.00* 

Surplus to Policy-holders 6,022,011 

JAMES D. BAILET, General Agent. EOS Pine St.. 8. P. 



Royal Exchange Assurance of London 

Incorporated by Royal Chai ter, A. D. 1720. 



Capital Paid-up, 13.446,100. 

Surplus to Policy-holders. $8,930,4:1.41 



Assets. J24.662.043.36 
Losses Paid, over 1134,000,000 

Pacific Coast Branch: 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager, 501 Montgomery Street. 
HERMANN NATHAN and PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Mgr». 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD. Established I860. 

Capital $1,000,000.00 

Asse ts S.340.I36.94 

Surplus to Policyholders.. 3,414,921.16 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager r>aciflc Department. 
COLIN M. BOYD. Agent for San Francisco, 216 Sansome Street. 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital 16,700,001 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co.. Agents. 316 California St., 3. P. 

Cash Capital, $200,000. Cash Assets, 1394,164.16 

PACIFIC COAST CASUALTY CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
Head Office, Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

Employers' Liability. General Liability. Teams. Elevators. Work- 
man's Collective. Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers— Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice- 
President; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; 
F. P. Deering, Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edw. L. Brayton, Jno. C. 
Coleman, F. P. Deering, E. if. Green, I. W. Hellman. Jr., Geo. 
A. Pope, Henry Rosenfeld, A. A. Son, Wm. S. Tevis. 

Unexcelled for 'iberality and security. 

LIFE, ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND 
HEALTH POLICIES. 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building, 

San Francisco. 

PHENIX 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 
J. H. LENEHAN, Gen. Agt., CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. C. OLDS, State Agent for Pacific Coast 
KOHL BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Manheim, Dibbern & Co. 

STOCK AND BOND BROKERS AND GENERAL IN- 
SURANCE AGENTS. 

217 Sansome St. San Francisco 



24 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 29, 1905 

SAN FRANCISCO'S PUBLIC SPIRIT. Round About Town. 



Is there no public spirit in San Francisco or is 
this community dead, and does it want the "cork in 
the bottle" so that people coming to San Francisco 
must of necessity be imprisoned within the city limits 
on account of the deplorable condition of the subur- 
ban outlets of this city? — the so-called "Pride of the 
Pacific?" What has the tourist to do in San Fran- 
cisco when he comes here.' He cannot seek his entire 
pleasure wandering through the shopping district. 
One visit to Tamalpais, one visit to Golden Gate Park 
and to the Presidio, and what then have we to offer? 
There are no pleasure vessels on the bay, there are 
no pleasure drives in Alameda County except by car- 
riage and water transportation, which is long and te- 
dious, and do we want to send tourists to other coun- 
ties than our own, or do we want to show them the 
magnificent surrounding beauties of San Francisco. 
In the whole State of California there is no more 
beautiful scenery than exists on the peninsula be- 
tween the Golden Gate and San Jose, combining the 
magnificent scenery throughout the length of the 
Spring Valley Water Company's lands, in San Mateo 
County, through to Half Moon Cay, the rugged beau- 
ties to Pescadero and La Honda, through the Big 
Basin territory, the ocean drives of Santa Cruz, the 
fruit valleys of Santa Clara, the grand scenery from 
Lick Observatory, both terrestrial and astronomical, 
and last, what every Californian is proud of, the old 
world chapel and Stanford University, Palo Alto. 
Can anybody get to any of these places to-day out of 
San Francisco except by following swill wagons, ma- 
nure wagons or milk wagons, over roads that would 
be a disgrace to any uncivilized community, let alone 
what is alleged to be the "Queen City of the West?" 
There is a movement on foot now to give San 
Francisco what has long been needed both internally 
and externally. How far have the people of San 
Francisco shown their support of the Adornment 
Committee, whose members to their great personal 
disadvantage are endeavoring through the noted 
Chicago architect to beautify the internal conditions 
of our city? How much support have they given 
to the new boulevard out of San Francisco, which, 
if supported, will result in a road from San Fran- 
cisco to San Jose, opening up all the connecting 
country for the pleasure, amusement and amazement 
of tourist travel? Southern California cannot offer 
one iota of what lies here at our doors. Public spirit, 
if any exists, should within 24 hours raise the amount 
of money necessary to utilize the lands given up for 
this boulevard by the Spring Valley Water Company 
Crocker Estate Company and South San Francisco 
Land and Improvement Company, all of which have 
been closed for years to the public, and it would be 
in any other city— cities of far less wealth and mag- 
nitude than San Francisco. We boast of our beauties 
but God Almighty is the only one that has ever done 
anything for San Francisco— the people themselves 
have no cause to congratulate themselves that by 
any public spirit of the city alone San Francisco has 
anything to be proud of in its surroundings This 
new boulevard has been exploited in the daily papers 
Ihe response of many has been prompt. One hun- 
dred men have subscribed $100 each. Are there only 
one hundred public spirited citizens in San Fran 

CISCO? 

Let us hope that this boulevard is not doomed to 
failure by the lack of either enterprise or generosity 
on the part of the 400,000 inhabitants of this city 



Theatre-goers hereabouts will be pleased to 

know that Mr. Charles W. Strine, the well-known 
manager, has secured Mine. Sarah Bernhardt for an 
American tour, commencing next spring. Mr. Strine 
has arranged to give San Franciscans a rare treat 
by prolonging Mme. Bernhardt's stay in this city be- 
yond the usual time of her engagements at a given 
point, and for this he will have the applause and 
thanks of more people than he thinks for; besides, 
it will add popularity to an already very popular 
manager. Mr. Strine has made his reputation by ac- 
cepting invitations only of the best artists of Europe 
and America to conduct their tours, and hence when 
he announces a series of attractions, the public is as- 
sured in advance that they will be high-class and thor- 
oughly wholesome. 

* * * 

Frank Winch, press agent of the Central Theatre, 
is about to take a trip East, getting away from his 
theatrical duties in the employ of Belasco and Meyer 
for a few weeks. He is going to Chicago and New 
York, and while there will be in consultation with 
various managers on matters pertaining to the pro- 
duction of plays. In particular, Mr. Winch will see 
about the presentation of his latest effort. He has 
written a new play, and it has been accepted by a 
manager at this time particularly prominent in the 
public eye. Winch calls his new play "an intense 
drama." We all know that he is good at that sort 
of thing. His "Criminal of the Century" made a 
big hit. Winch is a prolific and versatile producer. 
By the way, Winch's career affords some striking in- 
stances. Seven years ago an enterprising newspaper 
writer discovered a bell boy who could write very 
readable poetry. He was at the California Hotel. 
The interested scribe rang it for a page story in a 
Sunday supplement. The boy was Winch. Who 
would take a bell boy seriously? But the young chap 
made good, and better. The most sanguine predic- 
tions of that writer. He became a successful news- 
paper man himself. He has been a war correspond- 
ent. One of his memorable achievements of endur- 
ance was to walk through Death Valley. He was the 
seventh man to do this and live. 



There are not so many medical men around the cor- 
ridors of the Palace this week, but they keep dropping 
in every day from somewhere or other, just as if the 
tip had been given out by the members of the big ex- 
cursion which we recently had here that the Palace 
is "all right." I have traveled some, and can testify 
that the Palace is hard to beat, and in some respects 
cannot be equaled. 



WIGS 

A wig must be absolutely perfect to defy detec- 
tion, and who wants it known he wears a wig? 
My wigs for ladies and gentlemen are of such 
exquisite texture and fine workmanship as to 
deceive the most observant. I use and match 
hair colors exactly. Prices moderate. Send for 
wig and toupee self measuring blank. 
Mail Orders Promptly Filled. You are cordially 
requested to visit my new Shampoo and Facial 
Massage Parlors. Hairdressing and Dyeing 
Parlors- Quintonica for the hair. 

GLEDLRER 

123 5TOCKTONvST 



July 19, 1905 SAN FRANCISCO 

HOME SITES FOR WAGE EARNERS. 

The commercial .in<l industrial growth of .1 
ntingent largely ut>>>n opportunil 

earners v~> live comfortably at a cost thai 
mensurate with the wage, ami \' 

secure homes within easy access of tin- place of em- 
ployment Necessarily, the home site has 
aiderably removed from the business and industrial 
centre where the <•• und is within the ability 

of the employee to pay. But even then, the site 
would be without value unless there was cheap and 
rapid transit between it and the place of employment. 
With these two hindrances removed, the chief factor, 
next to capital, which is the wageman, the influx 01' 
skilled and unskilled lahor would he assured. 

San Francisco is not. unfortunately, blessed with 
areas of desirably located land for home building In 
this class, or rather the prices are too high for nearby 
lots, while the facilities for going to and from loca- 
tions further removed are either inadequate or too 
expensive. Property values in the towns across the 
bav are generally too high for such home builders. 
consequently other and more suitable locations have 
to be sought. It is this demand of wagemen for 
building lots and the desirability of the location that 
resulted in the laying out of Bay View Park, a beau- 
tiful tract of land adjoining Berkeley on the north, 
and reached by the Key Route boats and county 
line cars on San Pablo avenue. The cost of full lots at 
the Park are about what the cost per front foot would 
be on this side, while the facilities for going and com- 
ing are of the most perfect rapid transit sort, and at a 
cost of time and money very little more than to the 
outskirts of San Francisco. On the whole, therefore, 
it would seem that Bay View Park has settled the 
home problem for men of moderate means, as well 
as for people who wish to enjoy the comforts _ of 
country life and still be in a position to lead an active 
business life. 

To hunger and thirst for the best there is to 

eat and drink is natural, but the man who does not 
lunch at Moraghan's Oyster Stalls in the California 
Market has no such hunger, for Moraghan serves only 
the very choicest. 

Do not throw away your soiled gloves orcra- 

vats or laces, nor yet your "a little dingy" suit of 
clothes. Just send them to Spaulding's Cleaning and 
Dyeing Works, at 127 Stockton street, and in a few 
days you will have them back— and you will be 
amazed to see how fresh, clean and new they look. 

Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and factory 

for $7 50 per ton" half ton, $4; quarter ton. $2. Use Briquettes for 
cookins and heattag and you will save at least one-third on your 
fSel I Ml Phone : Tesla Coal Co., South 95. and your order will 
receive prompt attention. ^ — 



NEWS LETTER. 



95 




WIDELY 
rtlTATED BUT NEVER EQUALLED 

THE GENUINE 



Murray SLanman's 

Florida Water 



The Perfume of Perfumes. 

REFRESHING, DELIGHTFUL. 

Without exception the best 
Toilet Water In the World. 

ABK YOUR DEOGGIBT FOR 

MURRAY & LAWMAN'S 

ANT, SEE THAT TOO GET IT. 



Seal Skin Garments a Specialty 

It anV.n.H me much I'lrmure 
t*» (iiifiounc* that the latest 
Mr I*" for *€>■*« >n 1V06-1906 

hare uThred, and I urn now 

for fa-»hiona>'l<' fur Knnnenta 
f*t all kln<|A «* Blu-rt notice. 
Beit Quality. Correct Style 

and Perfect Fit. 
My fur garment* arc Kiinr- 
anteed to give entire eat In - 
raottoDi )">cause they are 
marie of the very best quality 
of akliiR. l»y the most compe- 
tent furriers, fashioned after authentic stylet*, and fit perfectly 
Therefore they look well, lit well and wear well. 

RE-DYEING. REPAIRING AND REMODELING 
of garments to the latest styles receives the same careful atten- 
tion as new work. 

H. OSWALD. Reliable Furrier 
637 O'FARRELI. ST. Tel. East 8848. SAN FRANCISCO 




R.OY 

SMITH 



W. R. 

HARTLEY 



High-class furnishing goods. Shirts to order, 
ported Materials. 



Im- 



106 THIRD STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. PHONE MAIN 3010 



Headquarters for Proifieaslve Chiropody 

DRS. BROWN c& LEANER 

SVRGEON CHIROPODIST 

Removes corns entirely whole (painless) without knife, bun- 
ions and ingrowing nails cured by a special and painless 
treatment. 

Hours: 9 to 6 p. m. l-aturd ays, 9 to 6 p. m. and 8 ta 10 p. m. 

6 GEATty STUEET 

Telephone BLACK 2702 Junction Geary and Kearny 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 3 

AmouD 1 1 e r share 10 cents 

Levied July I, 1906 

Delinquent in office Aug. 4, 1906 

Day of sale of delinquent t took Aug. 22, 1906 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Boom 14, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Julia Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. a 

Amount per share scents 

Levied July 12.1906 

Delinquent in office Aug. 16, 1906 

Day of sale of delinquent stock Sept. 4. 1906 

J. 8TADTFELD Jr.. Secretary. 
Office— Boom 66, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Oal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Bisdon Iron and Lo- 
comotive "Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year and 
the transaction of such other business as may be brought Defore the 
meeting, will be held at the office of the company. No. 298 Steuart st., 
Ran Francisco, on MONDAY, the 7th day of August, 1906. at 11 o'clook 
A. M. AUGUSTUS TAYLOE. Secretary. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Seg. Belcher & Mides Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 87 

Amount per share -\- & cents 

Levied July «. 1906 

Delinquents offloe Aug. 8. 1906 

Day of sale of delinquent stook Aug, 28, 1906 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Boom 60, Nevada Blook »09 Moc tgomery St.. San Francisoo, 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 




Experts who have recent- 

A Tonopah Bonanza ly inspected the property 

Mine. . of the Double Eagle Gold 

Mining Company, which 
lies two miles south of Tonopah, express the opinion 
that it has all the earmarks of a mine which will prove 
of more than ordinary value, even in this wonderful 
district, where the ores in so many instances have 
been fabulously rich. The ores so far developed on 
the Double Eagle are of a better quality than that 
turned out by any of the leading mines of this local- 
ity, now world famous, carrying 80 per cent in gold, 
whereas the percentages of silver run as high as 70 
to 75 in silver, leaving the comparatively small mar- 
gin of 20 per cent in gold, a very material advantage, 
it must be admitted, in favor of the new bonanza 
property. The Double Eagle property includes, in 
all, nine claims. On four of these, the May, Camilla, 
Doctor and Alice, the work of development has been 
commenced with shafts. A new hoist has just arrived 
on the ground for the May shaft, which has already 
been carried down to a depth of 120 feet. This is 
where work will now be carried on, opening up a vein 
of ore which is of very high grade. Where it is now 
cut the vein shows a width of four and one-half feet, 
running $57 in gold, with a 14 inch streak, assays 
from which run from $160 to $450 per ton in gold. 
At a point So fe'et in depth a streak of ore on the hang- 
ing wall has opened out recently to 14 inches, show- 
ing high values in gold, while from the bottom of the 
shaft samples taken, within the past week, run all the 
way from $500 to $1,000 per ton. On Monday next 
work in the May shaft will, it is expected, be in full 
blast, under the direction of Manager T. F. Costello. 

The delay in enforcing act 
Lives Sacrificed. by No. 1174, fathered by State 
Gross Negligence. Mineralogist Anbury during 

the last session of the Legis- 
lature, which provides for an appropriation of $5,000 
to erect guide posts to the water on deserts of the 
southern counties is causing much unfavorable com- 
ment through the mining regions of this section of 
the State. Men are dying by the score in their at- 
tempts to reach the new desert mining camps, and 
travel is growing all the time, yet no effort has so far 
been made to save the unfortunates from a fate al- 
most cei lain to overtake any one who, for the first 
time, penetrates the arid wastes of land, trusting to 
his own judgment to escape the dangers which beset 
him on every side. It seems to be a case of what is 
everybody's business is nobody's, and the only way, 
apparently, to begin this work of life-saving, is for 
the State Mining Bureau officials to take the matter 
into their own hands and have guide posts erected. 
The Board of Supervisors, responsible for the delay 
in carrying out this important project, are open to 
severe censure, and they would doubtless be hard 
put to explain their outrageous neglect of duty, which 
has already cost the lives of many men. 

The half-hearted man- 
How Mining Prospers ner in which so many 
in South America. shareholders of the Corn- 

stock mines regard the 
efforts now being made to open up this wonderful 
lode at depth, can simply be viewed as characteristic 
pf a people dead to all enterprise, rendered effete by 



the wide-spread spirit of gambling. The difference 
elsewhere is striking. Allan Kinkead, a young Ne- 
vada man, now general manager of the Angelo Deep 
( lold Mines on the Rand, tells a different story of how 
things are done in other parts of the world, which 
should put some people here to shame, if they pos- 
sessed any in their make-up. He has a shaft down 
3860 feet, and has started another on mines belong- 
ing to the Hercules Company, which will be of still 
greater magnitude. The Angelo shaft is f> feet by 
46 feet inside the timbers, with 8 compartments, 6 
for hoisting, 1 for pumps, and I for ladders. It is 
equipped to handle 6,000 tons of rock per day, and 
9,000 men are employed. The company has 440 
stamps dropping on ore, the average value of which 
is only $7.50 per ton, and is about to erect another 
mill with 600 stamps. This will bring the crushing 
capacity of the plant up to 5,000 tons of ore in 24 
hours. There was a time when the west of America 
set the pace in mining for the world at large, but of 
late years the lethargic disposition of investors on the 
Pacific Coast has checked all enterprise and hampered 
the efforts of those who still labor to keep the indus- 
try up to its old standard of excellence. 

The market for Comstock 
Pine-St. Market, shares is in the dumps again. 
Prices, while not much lower, 
are groggy, and business has been at a stand-still for 
some days past. There is little use preaching mining 
values under the circumstances. If a streak of solid 
ore materialized in some mine on the lode, the 
chances are the stock would drop out of sight over 
night. That is the way improvements on the mines 
seems to strike the generation of speculators which 
now constitutes the speculative element on Pine 
street. There are hopes, of course, that a change for 
the better may come at any moment. There is need 
of it, and the prayers of the faithful are all framed 
toward that end so devoutly desired. In the mean- 
time, hope is the main-spring of life among the tal- 
ent. 



The market for Tonopah-Goldfield-Bullfrog shares 
is not a shade better than their neighbors on the 



Starr ®. Dulfer 

SAN FRANCISCO and TONOPAH 

STOCK COMMISSION BROKERS 
Tonopah, 

Goldneld, 

Bullfrog 

OFFICES 

Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco; Tonopah, Nev 
H. W. Hellman Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Member*— S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. 



July 29, 1905 



though a dull Spell had struck 
all the prospering camps of Nevada for the ti' 
ing. The "midsummer quiet" is the waj 
leading authorities put it. and it cannot be denied the 
term is aptly applied, as it happens to be midsummer 
and the situation is undoubtedly quiet. In the mean- 
time, awaiting better times, it is satisfactory to note 
that the miners of "New Nevada" arc still striking it 
rieli in the mines, and that although a Stock may 
drop in value, it is on reports that ore is being takeii 
out in many instances running up into the hundreds 
of dollars per ton. The Montana-Ton. )pah dividend 
will be paid on August 1st. 



37 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

A SEMPERVIRENS OUTING. 
The members of the Sempervircna Club of Cali- 



\\ hat a team Scott, the "cowboy." and Thomas 
Lawson would make? Both of these individuals have 
shown themselves competent to guage the credulity 

of the average journalistic mind, and employ this 
failing of weak humanity to serve their ends. The 
stories of desert bonanzas, coppered bv every wide- 
awake man in the country, have been worked up to 
the point of hysteria, only to flatten out again of 
themselves, to the astonishment of the reading public, 
who now find time to wonder what all the fuss was 
about. And just think of the thousands of dollars 
of good advertising space gone to waste, the only re- 
sult being the amusement furnished eventually by an 
exhibition of the wonderful acumen which guides and 
directs "braineries" which purport to guide and di- 
rect public opinion, forsooth ! 



Scores of people are taking advantage of the 

$48.50 rate for a few day's outing in the Yosemite 
Valley, for the tour includes every expense — hotel 
accommodations, carriage drives and trail trips to 
Mirror Lake, Vernal Falls, Nevada Falls and Glacier 
Point. But the ticket that secures all these good 
things reads via the "Wawona Route." Be sure to 
get the right sort of a ticket. It is not often that such 
an opportunity comes one's way for an outing in the 
most picturesque country in the world with free 
'lotel and carriage rides for four days at so little cost 
Xo one should let this chance for a short season of 
real pleasure slip by without profiting by it. All 
particulars may be obtained at 613 Market street, 
Southern Pacific ticket office. 



The transcontinental railways know more 

than some think they do about when the Panama 
canal will be completed. 



William S. Thomas, C. E., E. M. 

MINING AND CONSULTING ENGINEER 
Prompt and Reliable Assaying 

Rhyolite, Nevada 



We are now offering the treasury stocK of 

THE DOUBLE EAGLE MINING CO. 

of Tonopah, Nev., at 10 Cents per Share 
ZADIG & COMPANY 

306 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of— San Francisco Stock Exchange. 
California Stock and Oil Exchange. Merchant's Exchange. 



ttia have just completed arrangements 
months camping in the Stat. Redwood Park. Com- 
lions tents, with floors, have been installed, and 
a competent chef with a corps of able assistants arc 
already on the spot, preparing l",.r the comfort of the 
many campers— -Sempervirens members and their 
friends— who will avail themselves of tins opportunity 
row familiar with the beauty and natural wonders 
of this incomparable forest. 

I he 8:15 narrow guage on the morning of August 
3d will convey the pleasure seekers to Boulder Creek, 
where, after luncheon, they will leave by stage for the 
Sempervirens camp, some eight miles distant. Camp- 
ing outfits will be sent down some days in advance. 
Mr. A. P. Hill, of San Jose, as well known for his 
genial manner and enthusiastic nature as for his 
wonderful panoramic views of the Big Basin, is tak- 
ing a great interest in the outing, attending to its 
details and giving desired information on all mooted 
questions. 

The California State Redwood Park — or Big Basin, 
as it is commonly called — is a tract of wonderfully- 
timbered land lying in the Santa Cruz Mountains, 
forty miles south of San Francisco. It is bounded 
by a chain of hills, and because of its natural sur- 
roundings and inconvenience of access, it was com- 
paratively unknown until January, 1901. A few ar- 
dent nature lovers — the charter members, so to speak, 
of the Sempervirens Club — made at that time in the 
name of the people of California so strong a demand 
for the preservation of this magnificent redwood for- 
est that the State Legislature appropriated $250,000 
for the purchase of some four thousand acres, to be 
held in trust for the present and future generation, 
to visit and enjoy, free to all, forever. 

To encourage the advancement of scientific forestry 
and to assist in the preservation of other groves of 
sequoia — both sempervirens and gigantea, and to dis- 
seminate forestry information generally, is the un- 
derlying plan of the Sempervirens Club. Mrs. Lovell 
White is the president of the organization, and under 
her wise leadership much has been accomplished in 
the way of stimulating interest in the good work. 
Branch clubs have been formed in several counties al- 
ready, and the Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San Mateo. 
Los Angeles, Alameda and Boulder Creek sections 
are enthusiastic supporters of the parent club. It is 
a club of which men and women are equally inter- 
ested. The dues are $1 a year. A club house for the 
State club will be commenced in the near future, Mr. 
I. T. Bloom, of Boulder Creek, having given to the 
Sempervirens Club a most beautiful site for the pur- 
pose. It is on the very edge of the Big Basin and is 
an ideal location. 

For the present the only entrance to the State 
Redwood Park is the one road from Boulder Creek. 
Excellent horses and comfortable tallyhos can be ob- 
tained there, and a two hours' drive through a most 
beautiful country brings one to "Governor's Camp," 
where Mr. Pilkington, the park warden, lives. A 
movement is now on foot, however, to build a direct 
road from San Jose to the edge of the Big Basin — a 
distance of twenty-seven miles through what is 
known as Saratoga Gap. This is a well-known pass 
in the Santa Cruz Mountains, having 2,600 feet ele- 
vation above sea level, and lying just above the town 
of Saratoga, which is seventeen miles distant from 
San Jose. When this road shall have been completed 
it will make a magnificent scenic highway, and will 
afford one of the finest automobile runs in the state, 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 



FROM BOTTOM TO TOP 
That is the record made in one year by 

The Hartford Perfected Dunlop Tire 

To attain this result we did not have to provide our Demonstrators with copies of letters from in- 
terested dealers damning other types NOR did we give our men sections cut from rival tires so pre- 
pared as to weaken them. 

ALL FAIR METHODS having proved futile to stem the wave of popularity THE HARTFORD 
PERFECTED DUNLOP TIRE now enjoys, ONE COMPETITOR has furnished his salesmen with 
prejudiced letters and fake sections decrying this tire. 

We welcome honest criticism, but protest against FAKIR methods. 



THE HARTFORD RUBBER WORKS COMPANY, Hartford, Conn. 



NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
PHILADELPHIA 
ST. LOUIS 



BRANCH HOUSES 

BUFFALO 
CLEVELAND 
DETROIT 
KANSAS CITY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

CHICAGO 

MINNEAPOLIS 

DENVER 

LOS ANGELES 



PITIfK' Guaranteed 22 H. P. Price $1400. Below is I lie 
DUlV/11 r ?_ c ? rd _° f et ° el L<;» r9 »' Eagle Eoek Hill .Contest. 



November 24. 11104. 




BUCK. Price SHOO, 22 H. P. Time 2.18 2-5 

Price 

Pope Toledo $3600 

Mathewson .,,,„,, 

Thomas SS 

Columbia . ' £= 

F ^»» :::::::: S 

Kambler. $135 „ 



H. P. 



80 
10 



CUYLER LEE, Agent for California 



Time 
2.154-6 
3,31 4-8 
2.42 4-6 
2.53 4-6 
4.08 3-6 
6.25 1-5 



359 Qolden Gale Ave.. San Prvnclaco. 



1032 So. M In St., Los Aneeles 



Automobile Photographs 



A SPfC I ALT)- 



DEVELOPING, PRINTING AND MOUNTING IN 

TERIOR AND EXTERIOR WORK GUARANTEED 

PRICES REASONABLE. 



114 GEARY STREET 



J. D. Mehrten 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Great Win ton "A' 




HORSE POWER IS HERE 

Eats up the hills easily, quietly. Nothing like it 
in the market for the money. 

Nearly a half hundred Wintons sold in Cali- 
fornia this year. Every owner perfectly satisfied. 
You know what this means. Look this car up 
carefully. It will pay you. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 

901-925 Golden Gate Ave., S&n Francisco 



1MOMPT SERVICE 

(Sfnturtr Hrrtrir (Enmpany 

Supply Electric Batteries for Automobi lea. 

Best Repair Shop in Town. Electrical Supplies, Machinery. 

House Wiring and Repairing. 

No. 28 srCOND ST. Under Grand Hotel. TEL. BVSH 533 



July 39, 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




The Autocrank. 



"The business automobile has but reached the hori- 
zon of its largo Geld," says John Jacob Astor, who 
for years has been a most anient motor car enthusi' 
ast. "From delivering tons of coal in cities to the 
rural deliver] of mails in scattered villages ami for 
all kinds of intermediate work, its utility is extending. 
The working horse's elimination from large cities 
will he welcomed by every lover of animals. Horsi 9 
falling on icy pavements, or suffering acutely during 
summer, will soon, we all hope, be forever past, 
while the problem of street maintenance and cleaning 
will be practically solved. 

"The farmer whose horses plowed all day and who, 
with his family, naturally needs recreation when work 
is done, will invoke his automobile, that, as a sta- 
tionary engine may have been cutting feed, sawing 
wood or what not. switch the motive power to the 
driving wheels, and with a joyful 'All aboard!' be 
off to the nearest town, though it may be miles away." 

Mr. Astor believes that the racing car will continue 
to go at increasing speed upon the earth, until pres- 
ently outgrowing its limitations, it will soar off into 
space. "Whether it must always remain in the at- 
mosphere,' he says, "or may some day rise superior 
to gravitation, time alone can tell." 

According to the rules of the Bennet cup race, the 
contest must be held either in the country by which 
the cup is held, or in France. France now has pos- 
session of the cup, yet the Automobile Club of France 
has formally decided by a vote of 23 to 14, not to 
compete for the cup in 1906, but to return the trophy 
to the donor. Should this occur and the race become 
obsolete, then the contest for the Vanderbilt cup 
would become, indisputably, the championship event 

of the world. 

* * * 

H. A. Lemmon, of Carson City, Nevada, is contem- 
plating racing the fast Reno to San Francisco over- 
land train in his automobile. The distance from Car- 
son to San Francisco by road is the same as from 
Reno to this city by rail, so the motorist will start 
from Carson. Mr. Lemmon recently made the trip 
from Reno to this city in twelve hours' running time, 
and as the time of the passenger train is about an 
hour slower, he is of the opinion that he can cover 
the distance faster than the train. If the railroad 
company is agreeable to allowing their train to race 
with the chug-wagon of Mr. Lemmon, the novel 
contest will take place within the next few weeks. 

* * * 

Time was when it was diamonds or fast horses; 
now one or more automobiles is the hall-mark of 
worldly wealth among California's aristocracy. The 
latest prominent Californian to enter the motor-car 
field is Alden Anderson of Sacramento. Reports 
from the Capitol City are to the effect that the Lieu- 
tenant-Governor of this State is out almost daily 
in his Autocar, and can soon be termed an "enthu-^ 

The introduction of so many high-class automobiles 
in Alameda County has served to develop many 
chauffeurs, among them being a number of fair devo- 
tees of autoing who manage large and speedy cars 



wonderful skill. Mrs. 11. Ra prominent 

launch into autoing 

on an ambitious scale with a powerful Columbia ma- 
chine. Mrs. Ramsey's automobile is of the Victoria 

tr similar to tin- one owned bj Rudolph 
Spreckels, which has attracted so much attention in 
this locality. 

« * « 

the habitual drunkard, the devil wagon has 

proved a boon. Heretofore the jolting of the patrol 

interfered with their repose while en route to the 

tanks. Now they are wafted into dreamland by the 

movement of the auto over the car tracks and 

gh spots in the pavement. 

* * * 

The efficiency of the change of the police patrol 
in the city of Los Angeles from horses to electricity 
is becoming very apparent, and it may not be long 
before the commissioners of San Francisco will test 
the motor car in order to have demonstrated its ad- 
vantages in carrying prisoners to the lock-up with 
celerity. The auto in the southern metropolis has 
the distinction of being the first wagon of its kind 
to be used in the West. 



James B. Dill, millionaire corporation lawyer of 
New Jersey, and one of the most enthusiastic auto- 
mobilists in this country, is about to leave for Seattle, 
Washington, with his wife and daughters, where 
they will take to the automobile and tour north to the 
Klondike. He will return home in time for his an- 
nual visit to his camp in Maine. Mr. Dill usually has 
three machines on trips of this sort, driving one 



Special Sales Department 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUNDRIES 



FOR SALE.— 1904 White Steamer, newly painted, top and lamps, 

etc. , fully equipped $1,000 

White Stanhope $300 

St. Louis Touring Car $900 

Agents for Packard, Stevens-Duryea and Thomas Flyer, Pa- 
cific Motor Car Co., 49 City Hall avenue. 

ARE you going on a tour? Don't forget Weed's Chain Tire 
Grip (prevents machine from skidding.) Does not affect the tire. 
Can be put on or removed in 5 minutes. See agents, 105 Front St. 

WANTED.— If you have a second-hand automobile you wish 
to sell, write Yosemite Motor Works, 123 City Hall avenue, San 
Francisco. Edward Mohrig, Manager. 

WANTED.— Ruckboard in good condition. Will pay about $100. 
Address Box 6, this office. 

WHY use Eastern Dry Batteries? The Bull Dog Dry Cell Is 
the best made for automobiles and is "fresh," being manufac- 
tured in San Francisco by Pacific Carbon and Battery Co., 105 
Front street. 

EXCHANGE.— Fine thoroughbred trotter for runabout In good 
condition. "Value $500. Address Box 10, this office. 

FOB SALE— Rambler )90e, excellent condition- New tires. Open to 
oiler. Box 10, News Letter. 

NEW— Knox runabout cheap. Owner has purchaaed larger car. 
Address Box 17. News Letter. 

WANTED.— Small car in good condition, gasoline preferred. 
State price. Box 12, News Letter. 

FOR SALE.— A "Duryea" automobile In perfect condition; has 
never been used. Three cylinder, 12 h. p. Holds six people. A 
bargain. Owner leaving city. 1S14 Market street, S. F. 

FOR SALE.— Locomobile steamer, in fair condition. Price $175. 
Address Box 13, News Letter. 

WANTED-Oadillao or Buekboard; mutt be - cheap and in gcod 
condition. Box 14, News Letter, 

$275.— Buckboard in good condition; owner leaving State. Box 
16, News Letter. 

WANTED.— Every automobile owner to increase power of his 
machine 15 to 25 per cent by equipping it with a "Schebler Car- 
buretor." I >r information and prices see agents, 105 Front St. 



3° 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 29, 1905 



himself, his daughter piloting another, and the third 
carrying the supplies, with a machinist and servant. 

* * * 

Automobile touring is on in earnest in the East at 
the present time. The run from Chicago to St. Paul 
proved such a combination of bad roads and rainy 
weather that it reminded drivers of the run from New 
York to Pittsburg two years ago. As usual the White 
steamers scored heavily. Walter C. White and R. 
H. Johnston were the first of the automobilists to ar- 
rive at St. Paul. They left Chicago 24 hours after 
the regular schedule and arrived in St. Paul in 43 
hours and 36 minutes, covering 500 miles. He states 
that at Dubuque the road resembled the bed of a 
creek more than a public highway. Mr. White's 
time represents the total elapsed time, and no deduc- 
tions were made for stops. As less than two hours 
were spent on the road after dark, Mr. White's time 
was phenomenal. The second car to show up was a 
White steamer driven by H. K. Sheridan. 

* * * % 

Little Things to Watch. 

Keep your tank full. 

Scour those platinum points. 

Pay cash for your motor car. 

Don't buy second grade gasoline. 

Keep your wiring in condition. 

Mind your speed. The constable will get you if 
you don't watch out. 

See that the water circulates. A hot engine means 
a hot time for you. 

Look out for gasoline leaks. They don't come of- 
ten, but they come nasty if they come when you are 
not looking. 

Keep your tires inflated. Makes 'em wear better 
and ride nicer. 

Clean your engine often. 

Start her easy. Makes tht rear tires wear longer. 

Don't run around corners like the mill tail of to- 
phet. Rim cuts tires and you may kill a dog. 

Grease is not meant for radiators. Keep it out. 

Loose battery connections are bad. Stops the en- 
gine. 

Keep your points bright and 1-32 of an inch apart. 

Brag about your machine. 

Throw away your cigar before you monkey with 
gasoline. 

Don't carry your spark plug in your pocket. You 
know where it belongs if you will stop to think. 

Use hydrochloric acid to clean spark plugs'. 

Don't oil your tires. Makes 'em rot. 

Learn to time your valves. Do this. It's easy and 
important. 

Don't fill your tank by lamplight. . 

Carry some coarse linen and litharge and glycerine 
paste to mend leaky joints with when you are far 
away from home. 

Don't use your forward gear while the car is run- 
ning backward. It's mighty bad for the machine; 
although you can do it and get away with it for a 
time. 

Retard the ignition before you crank. Otherwise 
you may get a crack on the arm that will not remind 
you of the happy days down on the farm. 

Number your wires and terminals if you don't want 
the crowd to guy you while you fuss trying to make 
the right connection. 

* * * 

Charles C. Moore, a member of the executive com- 
mittee of the Automobile Club of California, was ac- 
companied by several friends on a trip around the 
bay last Sunday in his new Winton car. 



The daughter of Sam C. Hammond leaves shortly 
on a tour in her father's new Model A Winton ma- 
chine, which arrived here this week. The auto is 
finished in colors selected by Mr. Hammond, and is 
being admired a great deal. 



THE SILENT MILEAMINUTE CAR 




HOLDS LOS ANGELES TO SAN FRANCISCO WORLD'S RE- 
CORD, 24 HRS. 54 MINS. MADE BY A REGULAR STOCK CAR. 

15he POPE-TOLEDO 

Demonstrations by appointment with 

POPE-TOLEDO TOURING CAR COMPANY 

134 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



The 1905 

Side Entrance 16 Horse Power Double Cylinder Touring Car 

Has Arrived 

Call and see it. ^^^______ 

Rambler Automobile Agency, ""c^JjJh"' 

Phone South 1007. 



The QUEEN 



EXCELS FOR PRICE, POWER 
AND PERFECTION 




It will pay you to see the QUEENS before buying. 



Model B. Runabout, 12 h. p. 
Model B. detachable tonneau 12 h. p. 
Model C. " " 18 " 

Model E. touring car, 18 h. p. 
Model E. special, 18 h. p. • 



$925 
$1025 
$1100 
$1150 
$1500 



RARIG AUTOMOBILE S GARAGE CO. 

827-833 Folsom Street. Tel. Jessie 2091 San Francisco. Cal. 



July 29, 1905 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



1 •'■ automobile and Garage I ompany, 

for the Queen lin< 
are now situated in their spacious and han 

11 street, near Fourth. 
I he Queen i« making friends rapidly, and several 
sales have been made. The cars, althi 
powerful, exceptionally good hill-climbers and rich 
looking, are very reasonable in price compared to 
other autos on the market in competition. 

* * * 

II. Wall, of Oakland, drove to Los Gatos last 
Sunday in his powerful Columbia car. returning the 
following day. lie reported having had a delightful 
trip, the roads being in fair condition. 

* * * 

Freight trucks of five ton capacity and passenger 
cars and 'busses with a seating capacity of from a 
score to forty people, will be handled on this coast by 
the Pioneer Automobile Company, who have just 
been appointed Pacific Coast agents for the Chicago 
Commercial Manufacturing Company. 

* ♦ * 

John D. Spreckels was accompanied on his recent 
trip to San Diego in one of his White touring cars 
by Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield Baker, and the creditable 
showing of the car on this run resulted in Mr. Baker 
purchasing a White steamer, and also in a sale of 
one of these autos to R. P. Burr, manager of the 
Sacramento branch of Baker & Hamilton. 



The Fairbank-Morse Co. have an Oldsmobile 
French type touring runabout which their traveling 
representative, Mr. Rose, uses on his journeys 
throughout the State. He left last week for a trip 
through the San Joaquin Valley. He is having great 
success with his motor car. 



3» 



Hotel Los Olivos 



Midway between Santa. Bar- 
bara. and San Luis Obispo. 
First class in ev.ll respects. 

Auto parties running between San Francisco and 
Los Angeles all stop here. Good shooting and 
fishing during seasons. 



Z5?>e Cameron 




Shaft Drive. 

Air Cooled. 
Road Clearance 9 In. 

Motor in Front. 
Never Necessary to 

crawl under car. 
Pacific Coast Branch 

The James Browr 
Machine Co. 

Manfs. and Agts. 
8 CITY HALL SQ. S. r\ 



Model L, 12-15 H. P. 1150 lbs. Price $1150.00 



Other Models 
$875 to $1350.00 



THERE ARE APPROXIMATELY 70.000 AUTO- 
MOBILES I