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Full text of "Shadowland (Sep 1922-Feb 1923)"

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at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

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www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
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, '. 



SEPTEMBER / 



v 



35<z 



*UAE>OWk4ND 



EXPRESSING THE ARTS 





TV 




A Magazine of Beauty Secrets for Every Woman 



A MAGAZINE to help every woman to be more beautiful than she is and then help her 
to preserve that beauty. Every woman wants beauty: a strong, healthy body; grace; 
charm ; a spirited, active mind. She knows that some are born beauties — others have 
it thrust upon them. What she does not know is that all may attain it if they will. A 
fe\v years ago, those who used cosmetics in any form were called "painted ladies." 
Those who went systematically thru forms of exercise to improve their figures were "vain." 
Now, the use of cosmetics is universal. Physical culture is a habit. Every woman knows that 
she must look her best. She not only tries to assist nature, but to improve it. This is where the 
new magazine /T}€.erut\ 



tV« comes in. 



Elsie Ferguson 
Pauline Frederick 



LILLIAN MONTANYE, 
Editor 

Editorial Advisory Board 

Corliss Palmer 
Alla Nazimova 



Katherine MacDonald 
Jeanette Pinaud 



•fteavit 



■* 



magazine is the modern 



Pandora s Box 



We have gathered about us some of the world's greatest authorities, and are supplying o- 
ers with the best and most authoritative information on all subjects that pertain to pc. 
beauty. Famous beauties of stage and screen, society beauties, beauty parlor experts, celebrated 
dermatologists, many well-known notables are contributing to its pages. A special feature is 

The Beauty Box 

conducted by Corliss Palmer who, as winner of the 1920 Fame and Fortune Contest, was ad- 
judged the most beautiful girl in America. This is an Answer Man department in which Miss 
Palmer answers all questions on the proper use of cosmetics and on everything pertaining to 
beautifying the human face and form divine. She also makes a special plea for 

Physical Beauty 

the importance of the care of the body itself ; the significance of health ; the wholesome charm 
of a strong, well-poised body. Each issue contains a hundred aids to grace and beauty — in- 
numerable little "nothings" that count greatly in the end. /f*Wd - ut\-* 1S t ^ le Open Sesame to 
love, joy, life and all the dear emotions that so many have to \J C^- pass by because they 

have not discovered the sweet secret of pleasing. 4*Wei\it\»* '* — * n ' tse ^ — 

A Thing of Beauty 

a second SHADOWLAND in its artistry. It contains reproductions of famous paintings in 
all their original colors, suitable for framing; beautiful photographs, in color, of famous beau- 
ties of this and other lands which make charmingly decorative pictures for the boudoir. From 
cover to cover rf^Gerutx.* * s pi ctures Q ue > artistic, colorful. It is 

A Magazine That Every Woman Wants 

and that every man wants his wife, daughter, sister or sweetheart to have. There are magazines 
of fashion, art, fiction, politics, homes and gardens — but until a few months ago no one had 
thought of devoting a whole magazine to beauty. 

Dont Forget to Order from Your Dealer 

There is always a rush — sometimes a real scrimmage when <f^©<a\it\-f com es out. The price 
is only 25 cents a copy or you may subscribe at the rate of \J &*• $2.50 a year. 

/f*^€.erut\^ is on the stands the 8th of each month. 

BREWSTER PUBLICATIONS, INC. - - Brewster Buildings, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



,Vs 'A* 





"«?<.. 



Mohammed at Mecca, about 
620 A. D. * * * ' 'Increase the 
wager, but lengthen the Time!" 




ue o 

By l^ccn-ios" 



ime 



Paintings by HAROLD DELAY 



Below, at right, three views of 
Elgin Presentation Watch with 
"Mecca" Bow, $325* The Pres- 
entation Series embodies the new 
19-Jewel C. H. Hulburd Move- 
ment, 12-size bridge model, ex- 
tremely thin. 

All watches of this new series 
have the Invar-Steel Balance, 
which minimizes temperature 
variation and makes for remark- 
ably accurate timekeeping. 

Each Presentation Watch is 
an individual creation. Case din 
a pleasing variety of exclusive 
designs, in White, Green and 
Yellow Gold— $325 to $500 * * 
The Elgin Presentation Series is 
considered the last "word in the 
Gift Idea as applied to modern 
business and social requirements. 



TO MOHAMMED, life was a waiting game. Time lifted 
him from poverty to power. Like Caesar, he sensed Time's 
value to the full, but for the Roman's whirlwind dispatch 
he substituted the patience of the Orient. "Now!" was Caesar's 
watchword. "Wait!" was Mohammed's. 

An Arab rival ridiculed Mohammed's prophecy of the end of 
Persian domination. "Master," cried Abu, the Prophet's zealous 
bodyguard, spurring hotly through the gates of Mecca, "I have 
wagered him ten camels that it will come true within three years ! ' ' 
"Increase the wager," came the Prophet's crafty whisper, 
"but lengthen the Time!" Abu promptly trebled the Time and 
staked one hundred camels — and won ! 

The flight of thirteen centuries — which has increased Moham- 
med's following to three hundred million souls — has brought 
to the world a steadily deepening sense of the Value of Time, and 
of the responsibility which rests on those matchless guardians of 
the priceless minutes of our day — 




SuADOWLAND 



The American Beauty Contest 



jSey^mericoiidDmBlii/lipnp 



"Mirror, mirror, on the wall, 
Am I the fairest of them all?" 

We all know the famous fairy 
story of the Queen who thus ad- 
dressed her mirror — and now 
there is a reason and an opportu- 
nity why every woman should seek 
similar counsel from her mirror. 

Then — if her mirror is encour- 
aging — she should send us her 
photo at once. 

We are looking for beauty and 
only beauty. This is NOT a 
movie contest. 



\yhose "luce Will Ip 



Kef leer? 




The Loveliest Woman in 
America 

You may think it's a tall order to 
find her among so many beautiful 
women. It is — but the Brewster Pub- 
lications, read thruout the length and 
breadth of the land, are determined 
to find her — and find her they will ! 

Somewhere, as you read this page, 
that fortunate young woman may be 
reading the same page, unconscious 
of the fame and rewards that await 
her. 

Is it you? Is it the girl next door? 
Is it that lovely girl you met last 
summer? 

Read the simple rules, and the 
splendid rewards that await Amer- 
ica's loveliest girl! 



These Will Be the Rewards of America's Beauty: 

1. A trip to New York, properly chaperoned, and a chance to take in the pleasures which only that great city affords: 
the opera; the theaters; our wonderful library; the famous East Side; great museums; the celebrated Green- 
wich Village; all the luxurious and beautiful shops on the most luxurious and beautiful street in the world, Fifth 
Avenue; and so on. 

2. A well-known American artist will paint her portrait. 

3. A representative American sculptor will model her head. 

4. These works of art will be exhibited in one of the leading art galleries of New York City and elsewhere. 

5. She will have her picture on the cover of BEAUTY. 

There will be a second prize and a third prize, and possibly more. These will be announced later. In view of the 
fact that the American Beauty may be found in New York City, or its immediate vicinity, the prize in her case will 
be $1,000, instead of the visit to New York. Just think of that 

One Thousand Dollars! ($1,000) 

This is aa unprecedented offer. Do not fail to take advantage of it. Send us your photograph. That is all that is 
required of you. Think what you may win — just because you happened to be born beautiful. Scrupulous care will be 
taken of every picture received. ALL of them will be examined by the contest judges. 

Notice 

Photographs that are submitted to us in our Beauty Contest will be turned over to the Metropolitan Magazine, from 
which they will select photographs to be used on the Metropolitan Cover Contest. 



The Rules 

No photographs will be returned. 
No exceptions will be made to this rule. 
Winners will be notified. 

Snapshots, strip pictures, or colored photographs will not be con- 
sidered. Outside of these, any kind of picture will be accepted; full 
length or bust, full face or profile, 'sepia or black. You may submit as 
nany photographs as you wish, 
hotographers, artists, friends and admirers may enter pictures of their 
vorites. Credit will be given photographers whenever possible, 
i not ask the contest manager to discuss your chances. He has 
hing to do with that end of it. 
not. ivrite letters. The close of the contest will be announced in 

KI0TI0N.&ICTV&E. ClAS S I C 

MAGAZ.INE ^^b^* 1 

SuADQWLAND and ^©<a\itv^ 

' three months in advance. There will be a contest story every 

n all four magazines, with all necessary news and information. 

"t beautiful picture received each month thruout the operation 

■ntest, will be published in a monthly Honor Roll in all four 

s. These girls will be notified when, and in which magazine 

are will appear. This does not mean that they have neces- 

'ified for the final award, nor that those whose pictures are 

;d have failed. The winner will not be decided upon until 

he contest. 



9. Such a coupon as the one below, properly filled out, must be PASTED 
on the BACK of every photograph submitted. 

10. Be sure to put sufficient postage on your photograph. 

11. The contest is open to any girl or woman sixteen years or older, pro- 
fessional or non-professional, in America. That means the whole con- 
tinent! 

NOTE.— Any infraction of these rules will cause a contestant to be disbarred 
from the contest. 

Address your photograph: Contest Manager, Brewster Publications, Inc., 
Brewster Building, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



THE ENTRANCE COUPON' 

This is a portrait of : 

Name 

Address 



Age Weight Height 

Color of Eyes Hair Complexion 

It is submitted to the American Beauty Contest, subject to the rules 
thereof, by : 

Name 



Address. 



Occupation (optional) . 



/ 



AUG 21 1922 



C1B533727 




Volume VII 



Expressing the Arts 




The Magazine of Magazines 
SEPTEMBER, 1922 

iiiiiiiiiiimmiiimiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimmimiiiiiu 

Important Features in this Issue: 
JOHN COSTIGAN Edgar Holger Cahill 

An appreciation of one of the most noteworthy figures among the 
younger men in the world of painting 

WHEN DOCTORS DISAGREE Roscoe Ashworth 

The story of James Joyce and his famous book, "Ulysses" 

REGINALD MARSH VISITS BROADWAY 

A clever artist wields a wicked pencil at the plays along the Great 
White Way 

DAUGHTERS OF HETH Harry Kemp 

Original verses from the pen of a real poet, with an appreciation 
of his work by Gladys Hall 

GRAND OPERA SUB CONSULE GIULIO 




Jerome Hart 



A peep behind the scenes in New York's great opera house, reveal- 
ing certain interesting facts 

A THRESHOLD OF THE LONG AGO IS BATH 

Edward Hungerford 

The author of "The Personality of American Cities" discusses 
the charm of England's most famous spa 

CUP PLATES OF OLDEN TIMES W.Q. Bowdoin 

A wealth of information about a favorite collecting hobby 

THE EXACTING ART OF CARICATURE 

Willard Huntington Wright 

Demonstrating with lucid text and clever examples the leading 
exponents of the art in many lands 

A VETERAN POINTS THE WAY .Frank Harris 

When Analole France, Nobel Prize winner, dared to justify the 
ways of God to man 



Number 1 



1 1 L t 111 I 111 1 1 M 1 1 1 J I r (I J t 1 1 M ] J I II 11 Ml 1 Mil 1 1 II1IM lllll 



Published Monthly by Brewster Publications, Inc., at Jamaica, N. Y. 

Entered at the Post Office at Jamaica, N. Y., as second-class matter, under the act of March 3rd, 1879, 

PRINTED IN U. S. A. 

Eugene V. Brewster, President and Editor-in-Chief ; Guy L. Harrington, Vice-President and Business Manager; 
L. G. Conlon, Treasurer ; E. M. Heinemann, Secretary 

EXECUTIVE and EDITORIAL OFFICES, 175 DUFFIELD STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Adele Whitely Fletcher, Managing Editor 
Elsie Seeligmarm, Editor 




Subscription $3.50 per year, in advance, including postage in the U. S., Cuba, Mexico and Philippines; in 
and foreign countries, $4.50 per year. Single copies, 35 cents. Postage prepaid. One and two cent 
States Government stamps accepted. Subscribers must notify us at once of any change of address, givi 

old and new address. 



Canada 

United 

ng both 



Copyright, 1922, by Brewster Publications, Inc., in the United States and Great Britain. 



JJJTMEL 





Page Five 



Si-IADOWLAND 







Up In the Country 



By Susan Myra Gregory 

Up in the country now I know, 
Soft winds among the grasses go. 

The pussy-willows in the woods 
Have thrown away their winter hoods, 

And if you know just where to look 
Among the ferns that fringe the brook, 

Deep-hidden buds will promise you 
March violets, frail and sweet and blue. 

Beyond the hills a murmuring sound 
Tells where the questing bees have found 

A clump of manzanita flowers 

Stored with the honey of spring showers. 

Under the great oak's leafy mold, 
(Where fairy misers hide their gold) 

A slender lady's-smock has sprung, 
Lured by the first lark's silver tongue. 

Up in the country now I know 
Whose eager feet are fain to go 

Where pebbled waters shine and sing, 
And golden bees are drunk with spring. 

Up in the country now I know 
Whose dreams along the soft winds 
blow — 





Page Six 



>V 




BEHIND THE SCENES 

An Original Poster by Albert Vargas 
Posed by Miami 




BETTY COMPSON 

Painted by Ann Brockman 
From an Edwin Bower Hesser photograph 



.-.— J. 





fr '\: 



^WNM 



..-.--. .......:■■■ 



RICHARD BARTHELMESS 

As interpreted by Wynn, of Paris 




LAST PART OF WINTER 

From an original painting by John Costigan, 
which demonstrates that he derives mainly 
from the Impressionist tradition which has 
given so much vitality to painting in our day, 
particularly to the painting of landscape. W ith- 
in the shimmering mysteries of light and atmos- 
phere that envelop his pictures, ive feel the 
planes and dimensions of a solid, honest earth 



GIRL WITH 
SHEEP 

Illustrating.. Costi- 
gan's concern with 
atmospheric effect. 
There is a fine treat- 
ment of the girl's 
figure beneath the 
revealing folds of 
dress. This interest- 
ing use of the hu- 
man figure, and of 
animals, appeals in 
many of Costigan's 
canvases 



Original paintings 

loaned thru the courtesy 

of Babcock Galleries, 

New York 





tJABOt/bAWE) 



E-XPffSE-SSON 




"The- Aiprrs^ 



John Costigan Carries the Flame 

By Edgar Holger Cahill 



MUCH ink has been spilled in recent years in the 
mildly momentous task of comparing the state 
of the arts in America with the state of the 
arts in Europe and elsewhere. Are our writers as good 
as the English ? Our painters up to the French ? Opin- 
ion varies. These are, after all, sub-academic questions. 
They do not demand answers. There is another ques- 
tion of the same type 
which interests me 
much more at the 
moment. It is this : 
in which of the arts 
is the America of our 
day finding its best 



expression 



? Is it in 



poetry, in the novel, 
in the drama, the 
dance, painting, sculp- 
ture, or architecture? 
I have an opinion im- 
mediately handy. It 
is a purely personal 
opinion, of course, 
without a complete 
armory of standards 
and critical cliches to 
back it up. Neverthe- 
less, I venture to send 
it forth into the 
world. It is that the 
finest expression of 
the American crea- 
tive spirit in our gen- 
eration has come, and 
is coming, from the 
painters. 

In the aesthetic sig- 
nificance of their 
work, in that elusive 
but all important 
thing called talent, 
and in the technical 
mastery of their me- 
dium, the painters, I 
believe, can give all 
our other practition- 
ers of the arts cards 
and spades. There is 




JOHN COSTIGAN 



a logical growth and continuity in the American tradi- 
tion in painting (tho, of course, it leans heavily on 
Europe) which seems to be missing in the other arts. 
They ebb and flow and fluctuate. Painting sweeps up- 
ward in an assured crescendo. Younger men carry for- 
ward and expand the work of their forbears. The flame 
is carried on and grows from decade to decade. 

One of the signifi- 
cant younger men of 
our day who carries 
the authentic flame is 
John Costigan. He 
cannot be called a 
Modern in the sense 
that he belongs to the 
Modernist group. But 
he is modern in that 
he deals in his own 
way with certain spe- 
cific problems of to- 
day. John Costigan 
was born in Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island, 
February 29, 1888. 
When he was sixteen 
he came to New York. 
His art education 
was, as he himself 
says, acquired in two 
years of on and off 
study at the Art Stu- 
dents' League, and in 
the Kit Kat Club's 
night classes and sum- 
mer sketch club. But 
true education is 
largely a matter of 
educating one's self. 
Costigan's work 
shows that he has 
passed thru a care- 
ful training in that 
school. 

There is evident in 
his work technical 
proficiency of a high 
order. But this 
(Cont'd on page 71) 



Photo by Nickolas Muray 



Page Eleven 



StJADQWLAND 




Drawing by Robert James Malone 



Page Tzvelve 



GARETH HUGHES* 

As Robert James Malone sees the popular screen star, who 
has just completed a new picture, entitled "Forget Me Note 



SflWOWLANO 




Photo by Hixon-Connelly 



ERNESTINE MYERS 

A dancer whose exceeding grace has contributed in no small measure to the con- 
stantly growing importance of the art in connection with all theatrical productions 



Page Thirteen 



SkUDOWLAND 




Photo by Alfred Cheney Johnston 



. U 



MURIEL MARTIN 

It is not difficult to understand the general enthu- 
siasm for the Ziegfeld "Follies" when it is devoted 
to the glorification of feminine charm like this 



Page Fourteen 



SfcUFQWLAND 




Photo by Alfred Cheney Johnston 



ELEANOR DELL 

More varied, more amusing, even more beautiful, is 
what they say of the "Follies of 1922." Eleanor Dell's 
many admirers will echo the verdict with fervor 



Page Fifteen 



SuADOWLAND 




Photo by Nickolas Muray 



MARTHA GRAHAM 

A classic dancer of proved ability, who 
is a graduate of the Denishawn School 



Page Sixteen 



Sqaoowland 




Photo by Hori 



LAURENT NOVIKOFF 

A vivid personality lends much to the 
interpretative quality of his subtle art 



Page Seventeen 



S04QTQWLAND 




ANATOLE FRANCE 

Sketch by Wynn 



Page Eighteen 



SuAL>OWL/*NL> 



A Veteran Points the Way 

When Anatole France, Nobel Prize Winner, Dared to 
Justify the Ways of God to Men 

By Frank Harris 



IT was put about a short time ago that Anatole France 
was .down and out; his marriage had 'finished him off, 
men said, and his age made the condemnation seem 
probable. 

Then the Nobel prize for literature was accorded him 
and the ''League of the Rights of the Individual" (Digue 
dcs Droits de I' Homme) gave a banquet in his honor. 
He might have been content at seventy-seven to accept 
the tribute and prudently avoid controversy. 

Instead of that he got up, talked simply from the heart 
and made the speech of his life. Time and again he was 
interrupted by rounds of cheering, and before he sat down 
there were many wet eyes among his auditors. It was 
altogether the bravest and noblest speech I have ever 
heard. For the first time in my experience a man of letters 
rose to the height of the great argument and 'dared to 
justify the ways of God tp men, and the response Was im- 
mediate and passionately enthusiastic. 

Anatole France began by speaking in favor of those 
whom he called "the innocent victims of courts-martial" ; 
he pleaded for the immediate suppression of all such 
military courts. In particular he mentioned Jean Goldsky, 
a well-known journalist who was sentenced to eight years' 
hard labor in 1918; he declared simply that Goldsky was 
innocent, that everyone knew it, that he was "condemned 
only because the government dreaded his influence." A 
good many of us had never heard of Goldsky, but it was 
impossible to doubt Anatole France's quiet testimony. 

He then proceeded to praise the mutineers of the Black 
Sea fleet, which caused a sort of gasp from his audience. 

"Their story is ever famous," he declared, "and I 
wish to recall it briefly so that it may add dignity to my 
speech. In 1919 Andre Marty and Louis Badina refused 
to bear arms against Russia as France had not declared 
war with her, and Russia had given no offense. They 
were both tried by court-martial and sentenced to twenty 
years' hard labor. But two municipal constituencies of 
Paris had since awarded them municipal honors, deeming 
that they had acted rightly." 

An American Analogy 

I could not help contrasting this experience with the 
analogous case of poor Molly Steimer in the United 
States. She was not a sailor disobeying orders, but a 
Russian girl in her teens who asserted that as war had 
not been declared against Russia, President Wilson was 
acting ultra vires and unconstitutionally in making war 
upon that country. Molly Steimer was sentenced to fifteen 
years' hard labor and only recently released from prison. 
No municipal constituency has shown her any honor ; no 
public body of any kind in the States has exerted itself 
on her behalf, and tho Bernard Shaw and others of us 
have spoken and written in her defense, this brainless, 
soulless American administration persisted in keeping that 
noble-hearted girl in prison for years, and when they 
finally did release her by way of kindly atonement, they 
deported her to Russia. 

There is no doubt that Anatole France's advocacy will 

oon bring about the release of Marty and Badina. But 

to speak . in favor of mutineers did not give the full 

measure of France's courage ; he would also defend, he 



said, some so-called traitors, roundly adding that the 
Malvy and Caillaux trials were "judicial monstrosities." 

"Two years after the disgraceful Malvy trial," he went 
on, "the High Court returned to its vomit again and tried 
M. Caillaux. This time the judicial crime had been pre- 
pared at length and carefully. M. Caillaux was sentenced 
on the order of the Government, by magistrates and poli- 
ticians, who thus gave an example of equivocation which is 
practically unheard of in the history of political as- 
semblies. For the honor of mankind, that sentence must 
be torn up." 

After expressing his belief and certainty that "justice 
will triumph some day in the Caillaux case as it 
did in the Dreyfus case," Anatole France complained that 
"the spirit of war outlasts war itself." 

A Passionate Response 

He criticized the Government, the Parliament and the 
press of France and asserted that nowadays "all wars 
are civil wars, and since the victors are as badly off as 
the vanquished, let us repair our ruins together, and if 
possible let us take pity of our common weakness." 

With ever-increasing boldness, he went on to warn his 
hearers. "Up to now," he said, "we have not known ho*w 
to make peace. It is a difficult but necessary art for all 
peoples. We must re-make Europe ; our vei-y existence 
depends upon it." 

The close of his address drew the entire audience to its 
feet. "For pity's sake, if we love glory, if we wish to be 
the first nation of the world, let it be our reason, our 
wisdom, by a just understanding of what is possible, of 
what is kind, by a calm view of humankind, and finally 
by following Goethe's advice : 'Let us be good Euro- 
peans." 

I have never heard such cheers as greeted this appeal 
to the highest impulses of our humanity. At long last 
someone has come who speaks to the God in us and not 
to the brute. And how passionately those fine French- 
men responded ! 

The banquet was held at the Restaurant Universitaries ; 
some three hundred of the first minds in France had 
come together to do honor to the first of living writers. 
Ferdinand Buisson was in the chair, and among the 
speakers were Paul Painleve, ex-Prime Minister and 
Madame Severine. Among the audience, too, I saw still 
more famous persons ; but no one paid any attention to 
them ; it was Anatole France's night and he had risen to 
the occasion if ever man did, and justified our love and 
reverence for him by his pure sincerity and nobly un- 
selfish courage. But alas ! the fateful years have left their 
marks upon his face and figure ; eight years ago when I 
saw him just before the war, he carried himsel* gaily 
erect, now he is a little stooped; the face then, tho framed 
in silver hair and beard, had a look of health. Now the 
lines everywhere, like cracks in old masonry, cry weakness 
and the brown eyes that were so bright are now grown 
smaller and are in the shade, so to speak; but just because 
of his weakness and apparent age it was inspiring to hear 
him defending the despised of men and those persecuted 
for conscience sake — to the end "a brave soldier in the 
Liberation War of Humanity." 



Page Nineteen 



SuADOWLAND 



<-a^*mjaa 




■ ■ 

Photo by Edward Thayer Monroe 



MILDRED WAYNE 

"Nothing nearer than the sixteenth roiv," is what 

they've said to us several times at the Eltinge 

Theater, where Miss Wayne has been playing in 

"The Demi'Virgin." We are not surprised 



Page Twenty 



SUA&OWIAND 




Photo by Strauss-Peyton Studios 



MARJORIE RAMBEAU 

In "The Goldfish," which survived most of the 
summer on Broadway, Marjorie Rambeau be- 
gins her career in a bargain-basement, continues 
it on Riverside Drive, and rounds it out as a 
society wonum in a Park Avenue home 



Page Twenty-One 



^UIAOOWIAND 




Paul Swan, Artist 

The Well-Known Dancer Who is Also 
a Poet, a Sculptor of Talent, and a 
Painter Represented at the Paris Salon 

By Arthur H. Moss 



daily the setting of a worker. We found him 
extremely busy, putting the finishing touches to a 
portrait. While waiting, we strolled about the 
studio, and saw a good deal of his sculpture and 
paintings. Which gave us our first agreeable sur- 
prise. It was the work of a sound artist. 

The portrait finished, Paul Swan turned to 
greet us, and we got our second surprise — he gavi 
us the firm, cordial handshake of an athlete. Hi- 
pictures had led us to expect a pale, ethereal, al- 
most too-beautiful creature. Good-looking he un- 
doubtedly is, but when face to face with him it 



Photo by Bennefte-Moore 

Paul Swan in one of his . 
newest dances, which he 
calls "Egyptian Fantasie" 



T! 



THOUSANDS of peo- 
ple have seen Paul 
Swan dance. Many 
thousands have read or 
heard something about him. 
He has furnished columns 
upon columns of sensational 
copy for the sloppy press. 
But how many Americans 
know that Paul Swan is a 
painter of distinction and 
has exhibited in the Paris 
Salon? How many know 
that he is a sculptor of great 
talent ? Or that he is a poet ? 

From time to time we 
had encountered intimate 
friends of Paul Swan's 
who resented the fact that 
whenever his _ name was 
mentioned, something was 
said about "male dancer," 
and nothing more. They in- 
sisted that he was an artist 
of amazing versatility. And 
so our curiosity was aroused 
and we determined to trail 
this extraordinary being. 

On the outskirts of Paris, 
facing the fortifications, 
Paul Swan has his studio. 
It is a large, beautifully 
decorated place, but essen- 



Page Twenty-Two 



SUADQWLAND 



is his enthusiasm, his vitality 
that impresses one most. 

Our third surprise came 
when he started to talk. He 
immediately plunged into 
humorous comment upon 
what he called the "Paul 
Swan Myth." "You know," 
he laughed, "the Paul Swan 
myth resulting from circus 
advertising and superlative 
adjectives, is the worst por- 
trait of me now in existence. 
I am really a fraternally in- 
clined person. The worst 
thing that can be truly 
hurled at me, is that I have 
the Narcissus complex. 
That I fully realize, and I 
defend it as my chief refuge 
from an unsympathetic 
world. Of course you know 
that I started out as a 
ploughboy on a Nebraska 
farm. This Greek idea is 
not a pose. I simply dis- 
covered something in my- 
self, and attempted to ad- 
just it to modern life and 
make it normal. I really 
believe that I should have 
lived about 350 B. C. When 
I went to Athens, it felt like 
a home-coming." 



The versatile Paul Swan at 
work in his studio as a 
sculptor, and a reproduc- 
tion of Paul Swan's drawing 
of his little daughter, Flora 

Photo by White 




Paul Swan's series of dance matinees in the Greek 
capital were a series of triumphs. From the enthusi- 
astic notices in the Hellenic press, one feels that no 
foreigner since Byron's day had had such public acclaim. 

Tho Swan is devoted to his painting and sculpture, 
he feels that the dance is his best medium. He says 
that he himself is the best medium for expressing 
himself. Thru the dance he can reach his widest public. 

AS AN ARTIST 

In painting, Paul Swan is by no means a modernist. 
The Greek love of form predominates. He does not 
believe m "art for art's sake," but that art should be 
the expression of life "and experience. "I confine my- 
self to portrait work," he said, "but I have a keen feel- 
ing for landscapes and wish I could set them on can- 
vas. If ever I am rich enough to enjoy being a patron 
of the arts, I shall purchase nothing but landscapes." 

We turned the talk to poetry, and here again we found 
him decidedly arrayed against the modernists. His own 
work is all of the classical order, and shows consider- 
able technical" skill. Here is one that appeared in a 
current magazine : 

(Continued on page 70) 



Page Twenty-Three 



iuAOOWLANO 



Jean Cocteau, French poet. 
His recently published vol- 
ume of verse, "Vocabu- 
laire" (La Sirene) is com- 
manding the attention of 
the literary world 





Artistic 
I Parisian 
Personalities 



Photographs by Man Ray 




Jules Pascin, the painter 
who has become an Ameri- 
can citizen, but cannot 
avoid the cafes of Mont- 
martre and Montparnasse 




Georges Auric, one 
of the younger 
French composers, 
whose music is 
often heard at cur- 
rent recitals 



Gertrude Stein, the 
American writer in 
France, among her 
Braques and Picas- 
sos. Miss Stein is 
also about to issue 
a new v o lu m e 
from her pen 



Page Twenty-Four 



pMMMHHMHHMHRMMMMWMMHMMMNMIMttn^ 



ShJADOWLAND 



HMHHHMinMnUMMMM 




h 



-~, 



Photo by Hiller & Mott 



MILES AND JACK MARCHON 

Their Japanese and Javanese Dances are marked for both grace and authenticity. Fol- 
lowing their professional debut with Ruth St. Denis, they attracted favorable attention 
at the Winter Garden in New York, and are well known in vaudeville. A return to New 
York is planned for the coming season, with an Indonesian Ballet of their own creation 



Page Twenty-Five 



iUADOWLAND 



Grand Opera sub Consule Giulio 

Or, Is the Metropolitan Becoming Germanized? 

By Jerome Hart 



IF there be any more difficult job on earth than running 
a grand opera company, I do not know it. An oper- 
atic impresario should have sound musical and artis- 
tic taste; he should be a good judge of what the public 
wants and able to keep his finger on the popular pulse. 
Added to this, he should be a practical business man. 
Above all, he should be able to manage his artists, and, 
needless to say, there is no body of individuals so diffi- 
cult to control as a number of operatic singers, more 
often than not obsessed by an inordinate sense of their 
own 'merits and importance, and richly endowed with 
what is euphuistically called the artistic temperament. 

Signor Giulio Gatti-Casazza, General Director of the 
Metropolitan Opera, and formerly head of La Scala, 
Milan, is a distinguished personage by descent as well as 
by reason of the titular honors conferred upon him by 
his king. In appearance he is the ideal impresario. 
Finely featured, trimly bearded, carefully dressed, and 
looking almost as if he had stepped from a Titian picture 
of a doge of Venice; of dignified deportment and delib- 
erate speech — 
which does not in- 
clude the language 
of the country 
where he has lived 
and prospered for 
more than a dozen 
years — one instinc- 
tively feels that he 
is not the sort of 
man to be trifled 
with. An aristo- 
crat, in fact, an 
bout des angles, I 
have, in the course 
of several conver- 
sations with him, 
heard him profess 
democratic the- 
ories. But, like 
many other theo- 
retical radicals of 
aristocratic lineage, 
he thinks all men 
are on an equality 
— except with him- 
self. 

Gatti-Casazza is, 
in fact, an' autocrat, 
and does not brook 
interference, much 
less dictation, from 
anyone — not even 
from the august 
and opulent com- 
mittee of the 
Metropolitan 
Opera, which de- 
crees whether or 
not his contract 
shall be extended © Mishkin, N. Y. 

or his salary in- Signor Ghllio Gatti-Casazza, General 

creased. ft is, in and formerly head of La Scala, is a di 



fact, rumored that recently he had some warm pass- 
ages at arms with the chairman of the committee, who is 
regarded as the financial alpha and omega of grand opera 
in New York. 

Last season, after his own contract had been renewed 
for three years, Gatti-Casazza would not renew that of 
Geraldine Farrar on the old terms of $1,800 a night — 
despite the fact that she almost invariably crowds the 
house — but offered her a contract with her guaranteed 
number of appearances cut down by just one half. This 
the popular and independent cantatrice at once refused. 
Opera patrons were greatly exercised and divided over 
the matter. So. too, were leading members of the opera 
committee, and the incident found those affluent musical 
amateurs and authorities, • Otto Kahn and Clarence 
Mackay, in opposite camps. 

The fact that Marie Jeritza, a Teutonic cantatrice, had 
been permitted to usurp the position occupied for many 
years by an American singer, who had become the most 
popular prima donna in the company, is not pleasing to 

patriotic patrons 
of opera in New 
York. Moreover, 
opinion is divided 
as to the vocal and 
histrionic merits of 
the blonde and 
more or less beaxt- 
tif til Jeritza. 

Speaking for 
myself, I regard her 
as distinctly in the 
second rank. Her 
Tosca is, like the 
curate's egg, good 
in parts. Her San- 
tuzza is no more 
Sicilian than Cal ve's 
is Chinese, and in 
both parts she tears 
her passion to 
tatters, without 
ever becoming 
really impressive. 
There is ■ no more 
reason why she 
should grovel on 
her knees when 
singing "Vissi 
d'arte" than that 
she should crawl 
on her abdomen. 
It is not impres- 
sive, and least of 
all is it art. In the 
cathedral scene, 
hatless, which no 
Italian woman 
would ever be in 
church — she was 
more like a German 
Director of the Metropolitan Opera (Continued on 

stinguished personage on many counts P a Q c >/ ) 




Page Twenty-Six 



SuAOQWIAND 



Interpreting 
La Tosca 



Geraldine Farrar, American prima donna, 
whose Tosca has been a favorite with 
opera-goers for a decade. She sang re- 
markably well last season, and the fare- 
well demonstrations in her honor, when 
she announced her intention of leaving 
the operatic stage for the theatrical, were 
extraordinary in their fervor 



Photos by Mishkin 





Marie Jerilza, famous 
Austrian cantatrice, 
brought a new inter- 
pretation to the popu- 
lar role of La Tosca 
that set all New York 
a-talking last winter, 
While some folk were 
not pleased with the 
innovations she intro- 
duced, there are many 
who acclaim her the 
world's greatest 
soprano 



Page Twenty-Seven 



SuADOWLAND 



. 




Foreign 
Applied Arts 



Glass by Lobmeyr, Vienna. The 
Lobmeyrs make traditional Bo- 
hemian glass, as well as glass 
pieces of modern designs. Flow- 
ers for hats, made of ribbon by 
Gertrud Goehrke, of Hamburg. 

Porcelain and wood tray by 
Deutsche W erkstatten, Dresden, a 
firm of world-wide fame, which 
employs among its art direc- 
tors Prof. Richard Riemer- 
schmid, president of the .Ger- 
man ff- r erkbund 




Porcelains by Royal 
Manufactory, M eissen. 
Decorated earthenware 
vase by Keramische 
W erkstatten Schleiss, 
Gmunden. This manu- 
factory ivas established 
in 1710 by Bottcher, 
discoverer of kablin. It 
retains the original ro- 
coco style in its work, 
and employs also such 
well-known modern art- 
ists as Paul Scheurich 
and Gerhard Marx 



Right: Art Pottery and 
majolica from Karlsruhe 



tI' fi N ~ v C- v " 




'""f m' 


i 


< Ml 


ESP-'--.,- * 




Porcelain figures 
by Gmundener 
Keramik, one of 
the largest Ger- 
man-Austrian cera- 
mic factories. 
Gmunden is the 
center of the cera- 
mic industry. 
Deutsche W erk- 
statten, Dresden. 
Blown glass ani- 
mals: these ani- 
mals are blown in 
one piece of glass, 
including the 
stand, by R. L. F. 
Schulz, of Berlin. 
Ivory lockets by 
Fritz Schmoll 



Page Tzventy-Eight 



SjAOOWLAND 

From Moscow Cellar to New York Roof 

In Its New Home Atop the Century Theater the Chauve-Souris 
Continues to be Broadway's Premiere Performance 

By Ernest Jerome 



GAZING over the wonderful panorama of New 
York by night from the roof of the Century 
Theater, where the Chauve-Souris has its new 
home and is giving its second program, my thoughts 
went back to a night, now seven years ago, when I first 
saw Petrograd by night from the roof garden of the 
Hotel Europieski. 

The city created by Peter the Great was aflame with 
martial ardor; the blare of bands, the splendid songs of 
marching soldiers, and the shouts of cheering crowds on 
the Nevskii Prospekt were wafted by the summer breezes 
on one of those wonderful nuits blanches which make the 
Russian cap- 
ital a city of 
rare mystery 
and haunting 
beauty. In 
late May and 
June there is 
practically no 
night in 
Northern 
Russia, but 
an exquisitely 
m y sterious 
and lovely 
twilight pre- 
vails. It 
was an un- 
forgetable de- 
light to motor 
out in the 
soft, hazy 
half-light of 
midnight to 
the Islands, 
thru the um- 
brageous 
boulevards, 
lined on 
either side by 
beautiful 
gardens and 
palatial man- 
sions, which 
lead out of 
Petrograd to 
the shores of 
the Gulf of 
Finland. 

We visited 
cabarets not 
unlike the 
Chauve- 
Souris, but, in 
those distant 
and feverish 
days, less re- 
strained, less 
artistic, and 
more remin- 
i s cen t of 




Paris or Berlin. Every man, with the exception of the 
Tartar waiters, with shaven heads and in spotless white, 
seemed to be wearing a uniform, and every woman wore 
a smile, and on the stage often little more. The sweet 
champagne and heavy red wines of the Crimea and Cau- 
casus and the finer vintages of France flowed like water, 
and altho here and there one saw a wounded officer limp- 
ing to his seat, with the assistance of a solicitous female 
friend, there were few signs of the dread conflict which 
was then being waged from the Masurian marshes to the 
Galician border, and which was daily claiming its thou- 
sands of lives. 

A little 
later I was 
in Moscow, 
which was 
even gayer 
than Petro- 
grad ; its open 
air - t restau- 
rant s and 
cabarets be- 
ing even 
more unre- 
strained if 
possible. 
B a 1 i e ff and 
his clever 
companions 
were there, 
singing, danc- 
i n g a n d 
clowning as 
much for 
their own 
pleasure as 
for that of a 
curious pub- 
lic. It was 
con sidered 
chic by aris- 
tocratic offi- 
cial and mili- 
tary society 
to visit the 
dug-out or 
cellar of the 
Chauve- 
Souris, just 
as it used to 
be the thing 
to do to go 
the rounds of 
the old cafes 
and cabarets 
of Mont- 
m art re. Im- 
portant folk 
went even at 
the risk of 
(Cont'd on 
page 69) 



Photograph by Abbe 

Nikita Balieff, described in the program as "Direotor and Stage 
Autocrat." Ever and anon, he emerges from behind the curtains and 
converses with a delighted audience in ah extraordinary jargon 



Page Twenty-Nine 



iuADOWLANO 




Norma 

and 

Constance 

Photos by Abbe 



The Talmadge sisters joined the 
hegira to Europe in August, but 
not before Constance had com- 
pleted the screen version of "East 
Is West." soon to be released 



No less than two fa- 
mous tales have 
claimed the recent at- 
tention of Norma, 
both with an Oriental 
background. Her 
many friends will 
have an opportunity 
to see"TheVoice from 
the Minaret" and "The 
Garden of Allah" be- 
fore long 



Page Thirty 






^UA&QWIAND 




Photo by Victor Geotu 



MABEL BALLIN 

"Married People" is a new screen production 
soon to be released by the Hugo Ballin Pro- 
ductions, in which Mabel Ballin will have the 
leading role, with Percy Marmont playing op- 
posite her. Mr. and Mrs. Ballin are looking 
for an interesting screen story, and may go to 
Italy in search of it 



I . . / hit t\ Ui 



SUAOQWLAND 




Photos by Charlotte Fairchild 



Introducing 

Fania 

MarinofT 



Versatile is the only proper adjective 
to apply to this popular actress of 
Russian birth but American school- 
ing. It was a big jump from playing 
a little boy in "Cyrano de Bergerac," 
at the age of nine, to Marthe Roche 
in "The Hero," and then to a comedy 
part in Frank Fay's "Fables," but 
Miss Marinoff accomplished it with 
apparent ease 



Page Thirty-Two 



SU4L>OWLANO 



When Doctors Disagree 

James Joyce and His Book, "Ulysses," Which Has Become An International Literary Sensation 

By Roscoe Ashworth 



THERE are three geniuses of the New Dispensa- 
tion who have successfully vied with bootleggers, 
flappers and reconstructions st politicians in com- 
pelling the attention of a world distracted. Freud and 
Einstein are two. The third is James Joyce, least dis- 
cussed, perhaps, but indubitably the most intriguing per- 
sonality in the iconoclastic triumvirate. 

As cunning a diagnostician of the genus homo as the 
psychologist Freud, Mr. Joyce, man of letters, at the same 
time reveals a precise, impartial, unemotional mental 
equipment comparable to that of the man of science, 
Einstein. To a greater degree than either, he possesses 
an intuitive faculty, which gives to his genius superiority 
over that of his contemporaries. Of this genius his monu- 
mental epic in varicolored prose, entitled "Ulysses," re- 
cently off the press at Dijon, France, is the hall-mark. 

The intellectual elite of France, America and England 
have hailed the publication of the Joyce opus as the most 
sensational literary event of the year, of the decade, of 
any time within living memory. Whatever else has been 
said of it, competent opinion is agreed that the book is an 
achievement stupend- 
ous in effort, stagger- 
ing in the detail, and a 
little baffling in the 
contents. 

The tome — 732 
pages of more than 
octavo size — is uni- 
que among books. 
Nothing half-way re- 
sembling it has been 
done before in any 
language, and it is un- 
likely that anything 
equalling it will be ac- 
complished in future, 
however talented or 
ingenious the imita- 
tor. Only James 
Joyce could have writ-, 
ten "Ulysses," which 
is the kind of feat a 
man does not perform 
twice in a lifetime. 

Tho the book was 
germinating as far 
back as the Huck 
Finn stage of the 
writer's development, 
the actual job of 
getting it on paper 
was not begun until 
the first year of the 
war. The writing 
continued uninter- 
ruptedly in Paris, 
Zurich and Trieste 
for seven years. They 
were seven years of 
strenuous labor, re- In reading "Ulysses" you 

quiring prodigious tunity to understand its 




imaginative effort. You will not be surprised to learn, then, 
that when Mr. Joyce had finished correcting the last proof 
in February of this year he was ready to take his ease. 
Limited to a thousand copies, the edition was sub- 
scribed virtually in its entirety before the ink was dry. 
Only a few of the more expensive copies are now avail- 
able in Paris. In America the book is a curiosity and is 
fetching enormous prices when it is privately sold. The 
tremendous interest felt at present in the Joyce master- 
piece has created a demand which is almost certain to re- 
sult in a new and cheaper edition in the not far distant 
future. Tho such things cannot be positively stated, it 
would not be amiss to assume that some diligent publisher 
is eagerly awaiting the opportune moment for making the 
book accessible to a wider public. Curiously enough, it 
was an American and a woman who had the courage to 
undertake for the first time to embalm. "Ulysses" be- 
tween two covers. It will be interesting to observe for 
whom she has paved the way. -It is well known that 
American pubHshers are very much awake in these 
matters. The reception of the book since its appearance 

in April — the. first 
copies were ready on 
Mr. Joyce's thirty- 
ninth birthday ■ — has 
been varied, not to 
say, diverting. 

The L o n d o n 
S port i n g T i m es . 
whose readers boast 
an aesthetic taste equal 
to that of Police 
Gazette patrons, by 
flamboyant posters an- 
nounced, ironically 
enough, that "Ulys- 
ses" would be re- 
viewed in its columns 
as the most lurid piece 
of pornography that 
had come London- 
wards in many a day. 
George Bernard 
Shaw, when asked if 
he wanted a copy, ex- 
pressed his surprise 
that anyone could pos- 
sibly imagine an 
Irishman ( ?) paying 
three guineas for a 
book written by an- 
other Irishman. 

Most of the staid 
and stolid -English re- 
viewers have so far 
refused even to open 
the enticing blue 
covers of the book. 
The outstanding ex- 
Photo by Man Ray ception in the conser- 
have your best oppor- v a t i y e ranks is 
author's personality {Cont'd on page 74) 



Page Thirty-Three 



SUADQWLAND 



'" " ' .:: ... ... -•■ - -.. . 




0*L 



Photo by Edward Thayer Monroe 



MADGE KENlNEDY 

tier winsome beauty and histrionic ability wilt soon be 
seen in the screen version of "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon 
Hall." The medieval romance which had many admirers, 
both as a novel and on the stage, will doubtless be 
equally popular with silversheet enthusiasts 



Page Ihuty-t ow 



Su£TOWLAND 



Call the Play-Doctor 

Wherein Are Set Forth the Advantages to be Gained by Not Following in the Footsteps of Shaw 

By Frank J. Wilstach 



THE astute Dion Boucicault once said that "success- 
ful plays are not written; they are rewritten." 
Boucicault's name appeared on many plays, but in 
point of fact, all of them, like Shakespeare's, were old 
plays rewritten. Boucicault was a masterly Play-Doctor. 

It has been said that "The Play-Doctor is the accou- 
cheur of the drama." It seems to me that this is a mislead- 
ing metaphor. The Play-Doctor, to achieve anything 
worth while with the dramatist's bairn, must have it come 
to him a full-grown, healthy individual. It is, then, as 
the family physician, 
that he must begin to 
watch over the off- 
spring till it reach a 
ripe and healthy ma- 
turity. 

Who was William 
Shakespeare? He was 
the rewrite man — the 
Play-Doctor, of the 
Globe Theater, Bank- 
side, London. 



Now along comes 
Keble Howard, the 
English dramatist, who 
states that "A well- 
constructed and well- 
written play is like a 
house of cards. Pull 
one card away, and 
down comes the whole 
fabric. That is a thing 
nobody understands ex- 
cept the dramatist. 
Over and over again it 
has happened that the 
dramatist, with minute 
care and extraordinary 
patience, has built his 
card-house. It is com- 
plete. It is presented 
— not perfect, perhaps, 
but as complete as skill 
can contrive. Then 
somebody thinks to im- 
prove it by pulling out 
a card or two, and 
shoving in something 
foreign to the struc- 
ture. Down comes the 
whole affair, and the 
first-night audience 
sees merely the wreck- 
age of what the drama- 
tist so patiently and 
carefully built." 

Play-Doctors of a high order of intelligence do not 
"shove in something foreign to the structure." That is 
the work of a deplorable bungler. The picture drawn by 
Keble Howard presupposes a dramatist who is amazingly 
expert. To meddle with such a play would be in the 
nature of a crime. Unless, however, the dramatist is so 
skilful that he has been able to provide a perfect product, 
thru a transcendent knowledge of the theater — a rare 



\*0RNftR<X 

SAMUEL SHIPMAN 
Author of the tremendously successful "Lawful Larceny," 
co-author of "East Is West," "Friendly Enemies," and 
also on occasion a Play-Doctor of rare intelligence 



craftsman by the way — his play, without ministrations, 
would be a sorry business. 

There are two dramatists of the English stage of to- 
day who refuse to allow any changes whatever to be made 
in the text of their plays. They are Arthur Wing Pinero 
and George Bernard Shaw. It is pretty much a matter of 
egotism, I would say, that causes Mr. Shaw to put this 
incubus on plays from his pen. It will hardly be denied 
that many of them would have proved very much more 
acceptable for the theater had he permitted the assistance 

of an expert Play- 
Doctor. Mr. Pinero, 
on the other hand, is 
not only able to devise 
highly interestirig 
stories, but his knowl- 
edge as an actor fits 
him to produce them 
adroitly, efficiently, 
scientifically. 

In the same class 
with Pinero are David 
Belasco and the late 
Clyde Fitch. Mr. 
Fitch, like Mr. Belasco, 
rewrote his plays at re- 
hearsals. He was in 
thoro accord with the 
Dion Boucicault dic- 
tum. Those who were 
present at a Clyde 
Fitch rehearsal soon be- 
came aware that he did 
not lay any great store 
on anything he had 
written before produ:- 
ing. It was his custom, 
not only to ask the ac- 
tors how they felt 
about a scene, but also 
anybody who hap- 
pened to be present. If 
anyone could give a 
good reason for any 
new piece of business 
or any change in busi- 
ness, Fitch at once ac- 
cepted the idea and 
then and there rewrote 
the scene. Mr. Belasco 
does the same thing. 

There is no more ex- 
pert reviser of a play 
during rehearsal than 
George M. Cohan. I 
have happened to he in the theater when Mr. Cohan was 
either rehearsing a play or revising it during production 
out-of-town. I have seen him at performance after per- 
formance with a note-book in his hand and have seen him 
the following day make change after change in lines and 
situations. One of the most remarkable examples of play- 
doctoring was that by Mr. Cohan in remodeling "A 
Prince There Was." The play was produced and failed. 
{Continued on page 73) 




Page Thirty-Five 



SuAPQWLAND 




Specimen of the recent work 
of Massaguer, the best known 
of Cuban caricaturists 



(Left) Don Ramon Inclan, 
by Sirio, the foremost cari- 
caturist of South America 



Caricature of Wilson, by the 
German, Thony, leader of the 
"Simplicissimus" group 



(Right) Sketch by Gulbrans- 
sen, of Norway, the greatest 
modern master of caricature 




Enrique Camargo, by Tovar, Spain's most 
proficient and prolific caricaturist 



(Right) An unfamiliar self-portrait by Max 
Beerbohm, reproduced from the "Chap-Book" 



Caricature of the Kaiser, by Tirelli, 
an Italian master of the grotesque 



Page Thirty-Six 



Su4DOWl4NB 



The Exacting Art of Caricature 

Depending on the Creator's Understanding of Motives, a 
Caricature Assumes Qualities Unnecessary to a Cartoon 

B;y Willard Huntington Wright 



THE word caricature — like the word artistic — has 
almost completely lost its significance thru •promis- 
cuous and loose usage. Any schoolgirl with a 
slight talent for sketching likenesses, who draws a ludi- 
crous picture of her teacher, has achieved a "caricature" ; 
and any journeyman newspaper cartoonist who makes a 
series of specious pen-portraits of "leading citizens" or 
local politicians, is likewise set down as a "caricaturist." 
There are even correspondence schools of art which 
guarantee to metamorphose rising young clerks into 
"caricaturists" in a brief course of easy lessons which 
can be mastered between dinner and bedtime. 

Caricature in the true sense, however, is something of 
an entirely different nature. It is a highly specialized 
and sophisticated art which 
appears only during a na- 
tion's prolific maturity, 
when intellectual values 
have been established, 
when the tools of art have 
been keenly sharpened, and 
when the creative mind has 
attained a philosophic in- 
sight. In fact, a good cari- 
cature is as much a matter 
of intellectual penetration 
and analytical acumen as it 
is of craftsmanship and 
technique. 

It is erroneous to regard 
a mere distorted and bur- 
lesqued likeness of a type 
or of an individual — how- 
ever fluent or masterly it 
may be — as a caricature. 
Such work, properly speak- 
ing, is a cartoon ; for, in 
order to achieve success, it 
need be neither critical nor 
analytical ; it need not pene- 
trate beneath the surface, or 
even concern itself with the 
inner truth of its subject. 

Caricature, on the other hand, is a thing of interna! 
values, dependent upon its creator's understanding of 
motives and causes. It deals with the subterranean im- 
plications of visual form, and is at once revelatory and 
instructive. A caricature is possible only when the art- 
ist knows his subject thoroly, and has grasped the hidden 
salients of mind and character. Whereas cartooning is 
the parody of the graphic art, caricature has its literary 
counterpart in satire ; for it embodies — in addition to the 
outer aspect — an accurate interpretation and a vivid 
appraisement of its theme. Caricature, in fine, is psycho- 
logical analysis in terms of visual life, and requires, for its 
prosecution, a scholarly and analytical mind closely and 
almost instinctively synthesized with a highly developed 
and sensitively refined technique. 

Far from being a mere meteoric ephemera, the art of 
caricature possesses an evolution of accumulative experi- 
mentation and slow logical development such as marks 
the progress and growth of all the other and higher arts. 
It began merely as pictorial comedy and burlesque — a 
handmaiden to literary humor. Then it became fantastic 




Portrait-sketch of Hindenburg, by our 
own American caricaiurist, Ralph Barton 



and grotesque, tho still purely visual in conception and 
appeal, and without animating purpose. Gradually it 
came to be used as a weapon and as a means of propa- 
ganda. Later still, taking on an interpretative quality, it 
drifted into vicious grotesqueries and delirious imagin- 
ings. Emerging from this stage, it allied itself with 
contemporary life, growing more and more personal and 
specific. Then, having reached a certain documentary 
profundity, it dealt with ideas and principles — with pol- 
itics, religion, and human psychology. Finally, it became 
philosophical, and was able to penetrate to hidden causes 
and to grapple with the deeper concerns of humanity, 
both individual and typical. 

The word caricature, as a distinguishing term, did not 

come into existence or pos- 
sess its present connotation 
until toward the close of 
the eighteenth century, at 
which time the practice of 
caricature, having divorced 
itself from mere visual 
humor, had developed its 
own medium and had come 
to be recognized as a dis- 
tinct art form. 

Despite the fact that the 
early Romans practised a 
limited and superficial type 
of pictorial caricature, 
comic artists were not held 
in high repute ; and the real 
caricaturists of the an- 
cients were writers such as 
Martial and Aristophanes. 
However, the spirit of 
comedy in graphic art per- 
sisted ; and in the Middle 
Ages there was a veritable 
saturnalia of fantastic and 
outlandish pictures, designs 
and images. 

During this epoch the 
aesthetic imagination ran 
wild, projecting itself into every type of obscene and gro- 
tesque conception ; and all manner of grim and bizarre 
diableries abounded. Out of this wild and prolific 
debauch of the imagination came the gargoyle, which 
alone has survived with any degree of permanent artistic 
interest; altho our popular conception of the devil as a 
tall, sardonic gentleman with cloven feet, spiked tail and 
satyr's horns — as well as our conception of death as a 
sinister animated skeleton — are heritages from this period. 
The age culminated in Holbein's "Danse Macabre" at the 
beginning of the sixteenth century. 

The earliest indication of the modern spirit of carica- 
ture occurred during the Renaissance— a")^ epoch abound- 
ing in travesty in comic art, and - numbering Leonardo 
and Michelangelo among its practitioners. The impetus 
toward graphic irony seems not to have grown suffi- 
ciently strong to override all opposition ; for the Restora- 
tion proved richer than the Renaissance in pictorial satire. 
Callot, early in the seventeenth century, produced his 
famous grotesqueries — "Caprices" — and foreshadowed 
the advent of Hogarth and Goya. The Dutch became 

Page Thirty-Seven 



SuMDOWLAND 



masters of this new medium, and their caricatures were 
disseminated over all Europe. Pieter Breughel and later, 
De Hoogh — a disciple of Callot's — were the leaders of 
this florescence ; and — with the notable exception of 
France, where caricature had been placed under the ban — ■ 
nearly every European nation contributed to this newly 
developed art type. 

The Prolific Eighteenth Century 

The eighteenth century, also, proved a prolific age in 
caricature, both graphic and literary. In pictorial art it 
gave us such widely dissimilar men as Gillray, Hogarth, 
Rowlandson, Sandy, Collet, Cochin, Vernet, Saint-Aubin, 
Bosio, Boilly, Isabey and Goya. And during the first 
half of the nineteenth century, we find men like Cruik- 
shank, Charlet, Grandville, Raffet, Decamps, Pigal, 
Travies, Monnier, Hassenclever and Richter engaged in 
various styles of caricaturistic art. 

But modern caricature, as we know it today — highly 
specialized and definitely circumscribed — began with 
Daumier. the greatest of all modern masters of graphic 
satire. With his surpassing talent for pictorial analysis 
he combined the sensitive instinct of the profound creative 
artist ; and his reputation rests even more on his contribu- 
tions to the evolution of modern aesthetic means, than on 
his capabilities as a satiric draughtsman. Philipon, "the 
father of comic journalism," founded La Caricature in 
1831, and after its suppression four years later, Lc 
Charivari; and it was thru these publications that the 
genius of Daumier — as well as that of Gavarni, Grand- 
ville and Cham — was given to the world. 

Gavarni ranks second to Daumier among the early 
masters of modern pictorial portraiture. Grandville was 
less mordant and less exaggerated, tho always penetrating 
and scholarly ; and Cham, who worked with great f ree- 
ness of technique in pen-and-ink, adhered to a kind of 
Zolaesque naturalism of theme and excution. These four 
men established the terrain of the art of contemporary 
caricature. 

No precise mental attitude or specific stylistic method, 
however, can be traced in the modern development of 
caricature. In fact, the very nature of caricature pre- 
cludes any such unity of spirit or form ; for, of all the 
lesser arts, it is perhaps the most intensely personal. 
Moreover, national influences affect it ; it is fashioned by 
the existing temper of society ; and it reflects the con- 
sciousness of the times in which it is conceived. 

For instance, in England in the nineteenth century we 
find Pellegrini ("Ape") doing his great series of modern 
mimetic portraits in J'anity Fair; Leech making genre 
pictures on homely, genial themes ; Caldecott sketching 
his whimsical and mildly humoristic oddities, the gracile 
and somewhat dignified Crane doing bizarre illustrations 
for fairy tales ; DuMaurier and Keene engaged in in- 
timately human studies and sympathetic social pas- 
quinades ; Tenniel executing full-page political cartoons 
in Punch; Reed dealing in drolleries and whimsicalities ; 
Baxter playing the buffoon and f arcicist ; and Phil May 
combining the jester's wit with the humanitarian's sense 
of pity. 

Characteristics of the French Art 

In France we discover a decidedly different national 
influence at work. Andre Gill, vigorous and original, 
sought the spirit rather than the image ; and tho he 
devoted much of his time to being a political silograph, he 
also gave us many memorable drawings of human gen- 
eralities. Willette, an illustrator and poster artist of the 
Cheret type, was a delicate, whimsical draughtsman of 
travesties, at times sentimental, at others piquant, but 
always adhering closely to actuality. Grevin was a high- 
class comic-paper illustrator, with delicacy of line, who 



only occasionally indulged in personalities. Leandre's 
talent lay in his ability to exaggerate facial characteristics 
until they were almost monstrous, and still to retain an 
exact likeness of his subject. And Caran d'Ache was a 
witty and ludicrous pictorial story-teller, with a simple, 
unencumbered technique. 

Toulouse-Lauterc, Forain, and Louis Legrand repre- 
sent the height of modern French caricature. All were 
profound students of life and humanity; and all were 
technical experts. Lauterc's search was for character, 
and in the faces of his subjects we can read their inner- 
most secrets, and reconstruct their entire day's activities. 
Legrand, who illustrated Edgar Allan Poe's tales, glories 
in grotesqueries, and depicted the moral decay of his 
characters with neither sympathy nor disgust. Forain's 
work is characterized by an iconoclastic and acidulous 
cynicism. He possesses shrewd analytical powers, coupled 
with an almost miraculous ability to snatch aside the cur- 
tain from worldly hypocrisy. His drawings have touched 
caustically upon nearly every phase of contemporary life. 
Forain is one of the world's few great masters of cari- 
cature. Without him, it is problematical whether the 
work of Steinlen or Hermann Paul would exist in its 
present form ; for both these eminent draughtsmen owe 
much to the influence of Forain's genius. 

Germany during the nineteenth century gave us VVil- 
helm Busch, one of that nation's most brilliant comic 
technicians. He produced his effects with the most rigid 
economy of means ; and this skill, coupled with his in- 
tellectual insight, gave him a place of pre-eminence among 
German caricaturists. Obelander was a caricaturist in 
the true sense of the word, and a dexterous technician as 
well, altho of a less trenchant type than Busch. Reinicke 
possessed much of the comic modern spirit of Punch and 
many of his illustrations could be reproduced in that 
journal today without creating the effect of anacronism. 
Hengeler was less dexterous, but his humor was more 
biting and cynical than either Busch's or Reinicke's. 

The Work of Contemporary Artists 

Before coming to the more modern and contemporary 
men a word should be said of Felicien Rops, the Flemish 
artist. Rops's imagination was an atavistic heritage from 
the Middle Ages, and his illustrations for Till Eulen- 
spiegel, as well as numerous of his other drawings, may 
best be described as an art of satanism. His successors 
today are men of the Heinich Kley type. But, despite 
his frenzied extravaganzas, his technical influence was 
tremendous ; and he colored much of the fantastic art 
which came after him. 

Briefly, then, these are the foundations on which the 
art of contemporary caricature has been built. Today, 
however, it is a definite and restricted craft, highly con- 
centrated and painstakingly perfected. It has divorced 
itself from mere humor and burlesque, and from literary 
and documentary inspirations. In its purest manifesta- 
tions it is unembellished philosophic portraiture. 

The finest examples of caricature are to be found in 
Flicgcndc Blatter, Jugendc, Das Narrenschiff, and Sim- 
plicissimus. Heine is perhaps the most prolific and 
diverse of the modern Germans. He works in many 
styles, and in each he exhibits a rare mastery. His field 
of subjects is also a broad one, tho intellectually he al- 
ways remains the energetic doctrinaire. Thony bases his 
technique on old wood-cuts, and largely thru his influence 
a new and popular type of graphic execution was evolved. 
Thony's mannerism has become so perfectly assimilated 
that it expresses his ideas with amazing fluency. His 
caricatures are bitter and cruel, yet they rarely deviate 
from the truth. Von Blix is of the same uncompromising 
temper ; but his dexterity is of a lesser strength, and his 
{Continued on page 68) 



Page Thirty-Eight 




StlADOWLAND 

Shown at the 

Southampton 

Exhibition 



"Crowded Harbor," by 
Felice Waldo Howell 





"Flower Arrangement" 
by Maud M. Mason 



The canvases represent a delight- 
ful group of paintings by distin- 
guished women artists, all members 
of the National Association of 
Women Painters and Sculptors, of 
which Mrs. Emily Nichols Hatch is 
president, and Mrs. Joseph H. 
Choate, Mrs. John Henry Ham- 
mond, Mrs. Charlotte Coman and 
Mrs. H. Van Buren Magonigle are 
honorary vice-presidents. The ex- 
hibition was held in the Memorial 
Hall of the Parrish Art Museum 



"Cloud and Shadow'' 
by Lucile Howard 



Page Thirty-Nine 



SuADOWLAND 




l'hoto by Francis Bruguiere 



JOSEPHINE MacNICOL 

JT hose graceful dancing is one all-sufficient reason for the success 
of the fourth annual production of the "Greenwich Village Follies" 



r<i<jc Forty 



SUADQWLAND 





American glass Cup Plate. Show- 
ing the portrait of Henry Clay. In 
the Collection of W. G. Bowdoin 



m 
Mm 

. -,. 

Cup Plate of Willow Pattern. 

In the Collection of W. G. 

Bowdoin 



J;*£m 




American glass Cup Plate. Show- 
ing the Frigate Constitution. In 
the Collection of W. G. Bowdoin 



"•*/; V 



Cup Plate of Staffordshire Luster. 

In the Collection of W. G. 

Bowdoin 




American glass Cup Plate. 

In the Metropolitan Museum 

Collection 



Cup Plates of Olden 

Times as Collection 

Objects 

ffy W. G. Bowdoin 



NC< 



MM 



American glass Cup Plate. Gro- 
tesque subject. In the Metropoli- 
tan Museum Collection 



THE first tea was brought into Europe in 1610. It 
was known in France in 1636, and reached Russia 
two years later. England welcomed it in 1650, and 
spoke of it as "That excellent, and by all physicians ap- 
proved, China drink, called by the Shineans Tcha, and 
by other nations, Tay, alias Tee." 

Like all the good things of the world, the propaganda 
of tea met with opposition. Heretics like Henry Saville 
(1678) denounced drinking it, as a filthy custom. Jonas 
Hanway (Essay on Tea, 1756) said that men seemed to 
lose their stature and comeliness, women their beauty, 
thru the use of tea. 

Something of this is reflected in a drinking song of 
the period — 

To drink is a Christian diversion, 
Unfit for your Turk or your Persian ; 

Let Mohammedan fools live by heathenish rules, 
And get drunk over teacups and coffee; 

But let British lads sing, give a rouse for the King, 
A fig for your Turk and your Sophi. 

Yet in spite of such handicaps, tea-drinking spread 
with marvelous rapidity. The coffee-houses of London 
in the early half of the eighteenth century became in fact 
tea-houses, the resort of wits like Addison and Steele, who. 
beguiled themselves over their dish of tea. 

The beverage soon became a necessity of life — a tax- 
able commodity. It led to the revolt of the American 
Colonies because of the heavy duties laid upon tea. 

The Boston Tea Party was the logical result. 

Meanwhile the drinking of tea had exercised a pow- 
erful influence upon table furnishings, and the teacups 
and saucers, as well as the teapots, showed this influ- 
ence in the continued improvement in the fictile designs 
that obtained. 

Our ancestors in England, and later in this country, in 
their tea-drinking habits, had no traditions to live down, 
or to destroy. They poured their tea into their saucers, 
and then drank therefrom shamelessly, and even with 
bravado. When they did this, they had no place- to put 
the cups, and our ancestral housekeepers could not stand 
the marking of their snowy linen or the polished San 



Domingo mahogany, with the rims of the moist teacups, 
and so cup plates originated to fill a long felt want. 

The collecting of cup plates nowadays is beset with 
many difficulties. 

All the pieces of historic sets appear to have survived, 
except these miniature plates. 

Some writers try to explain this by suggesting that 
the cup plates ultimately found their way" into the hands 
of destructive children with tremendous mortality, on the 
part of the said plates. This may be one reason for their 
scarcity. They surely are scarce. 

In spite of their scarcity, however, the late Miss Clark 
of South Framington, Mass., specialized on collecting 
these cup plates, and succeeded in assembling over 400 
pieces, which were shown at The Boston Museum of 
Fine Arts in August, 1916. Among these was a rare 
"Beauties of America" cup plate, which had on it a pic- 
ture of the Baltimore Exchange. Other notable exhibits 
in this collection were a "Stoughton Church, Philadel- 
phia," with the acorn border, "Mendenhall Ferry," 
"Savannah Bank," and the "Pittsfield Elm." 

"Mendenhall Ferry" is quite unusual on a cup plate, 
yet two five-and one-half -inch plates, with this rare view 
upon them, have come to light in a negro cabin. 

"The Savannah Bank" is more unusual still. Other 
rare plates in the A. Josephine Clark collection, were the 
Syntax, Wilkie and Don Quixote designs. The collec- 
tion was dispersed before the death of the owner. 

The popularity of these cup plates was very great. 
They ranged in size from three to four and a half, or 
even five inches, in diameter. 

There were two kinds of cup plates. One of pressed 
glass and the other of pottery forms, as produced by the 
Staffordshire potters, for the American market, and 
] dates turned out by American manufacturers. 

The pressed glass varieties carried such subjects as 
Bunker Hill Monument, The Frigate Constitution, The 
American Eagle, the portrait of Henry Clay, geometrical 
designs and decorative devices. At least one grotesque 
design was used. 

(Continued on page 76) 



Pane Forty-O' 



SuiADQWl/XND 




"Tosca," a la Winter Garden. 
James Watts and Annan Kaliz 



Raymond Hitchcock, the inimita- 
ble — to judge by the numerous 
imitations we've seen 





^ 




If you only give him enough 
rope, he'll amuse you. Will 
Rogers in the "Ziegfeld Follies" 



After the Smith Brothers, 
the two best-known men in 
America. Messrs. Gallagher 
and Shean. In the "Follies" 



Michio Itow—several of him, ap- 
parently—in "The Pin Wheel" 



Reginald Marsh 

Visits 

Broadway 

and 

Wields a 

Wicked Pencil 




Page Forty-Tivo 



SuiADOWLAND 



Dada and the Dadas 

B;y Alfred Kreymborg 



WHEN Paris is bored, sad, weary, Paris takes 
to the latest fad. There is always something 
perennial about the old lady who has lived thru 
so many centuries of war, foreign wars, civil wars, re- 
ligious and revolutionary, and who still moves slowly 
and painfully, as with a crutch, to the millions of 
memories — one sees deep mourning everywhere — of the 
late world war. And so, Paris linked her ancient arm, 
which has graciously and gaily accepted so many advances 
heretofore, with the very newest of brazen youths : the 
Dadas. That is why the city on the Seine is still the 
wisest as well as the loveliest of cities, and the most 
civilized. For only when one has achieved civilization, 
can one afford to be 
foolish, absurd, non- 
sensical. If it has any 
meaning at all, Dada 
means nonsense. 
Francis Picabia, one 
of its leaders — whom I 
first encountered in 
New York ten years 
ago — defines Dada 
thus : 

Dada smells of nothing, it 
is nothing, nothing, 
nothing 
It is like your hopes : noth- 
ing 
like your paradise : noth- 
ing 
like your idols : nothing 
kke your politicians : 

nothing 
like your heroes : nothing 
like your artists : noth- 
ing 
like your religions : noth- 
ing | 

Dada, in short, ex- 
presses the disillusion- 
ment of youth, of ado- 
lescence. Those who 
went into the war 
penetrated it with a 
complete illusion of 
some sort, only to 
come out with nothing 
more tangible than 
utter disillusionment. 
Dada is the result. 
Dada is the tragedy of 
disappointment, and 

like so many tragedies, lest it go mad or commit suicide, 
wears the mask of comedy, buffoonery, farce. Farce 
is what Dada wears most of the time. 

I have met many of the Dadas. They are charming 
fellows. I like especially one of the Daddies of Dada — 
a Roumanian — with the picturesque name, Tristan Tzara. 
We have had several seances. Fie is small, and like most 
small men, patient. He is hardly bigger than Napoleon, 
and like Napoleon, plans the campaigns of Dada, and 
like Napoleonic campaigns, Dadaist campaigns come to 
nothing. Small men have farther to go than tall, and 
so they are patient, as Tzara was patient elucidating the 
manifold mysteries of Dada. He is the spokesman of 
Dada, has drawn up many of its engaging manifestos, 




Yes, this is a portrait of a man. It is Arp's 
portrait of Tristan Tzara, a founder of Dada 



which are printed on broadsheets and billboards and dis- 
tributed to the four winds. He is, as Marcel Duchamp 
expresses it, the "traveling salesman" of Dada, its press 
agent everywhere. The publicity campaign would 
stagger the mightiest American drummer. Heinz's 57 
Varieties, Smith Brothers' Cough Drops, Carter's Little 
Liver Pills, The Ingersoll Watch — these and our other 
countless familiars might learn much from Dada. There 
have been no less, Tzara tells me, than twelve thousand 
articles about Dada, articles which have appeared in France, 
England, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Russia and the 
Balkans. Dada is almost universal. There are Dada 
movements in the shape of magazines, art galleries, 

theaters or concert 
halls in all of these 
countries. Even New 
York has a modest 
little group, led by the 
painters, Man Ray and 
Joseph Stella, and 
Edgar Varese, French 
conductor of the late 
New S y m p h o n y 
Orchestra. 

Dada was born dur- 
ing the year 1916 in 
the Cabaret Voltaire 
in Zurich, Switzerland. 
It was founded by 
men of different na- 
tionalities, Tzara, a 
Roumanian ; Arp, a 
Swiss, and Huelsen- 
beck, a German, in all 
the innocence of men 
foregathering in a neu- 
tral cafe for discussion 
of the relative merits 
of the particular art 
movement to which 
they belonged : Tzara 
to the Expressionists, 
Arp to the Futurists, 
Pluelsenbeck to the 
Cubi.;ts. Each decided 
to lay down the arms 
of his own creed in be- 
half of a broader plat- 
form of international- 
ism in art in which 
there must be no 
To Tzara belongs the 
credit of finding the name for the movement, Dada, 
which derives from the French word for hobby-horse. 
"All is Dada," writes Paul Dermee, "everyone has his 
hobby-horse. You worship your Dadas, of which you 
have made gods. The Dadaists know their Dadas and 
laugh at them. It is their great superiority over you." 
There was no expectation on the part of the three con- 
spirators that, from the privacy of cafe gossip, Dada 
would break out into a European disease. Each man 
was to do his work in his own way : the old song of the 
individual evolving his own salvation. Nevertheless, 
Dada soon spread to a brotherhood which denied all isms, 
(Continued on page 70) 



recognized language or symbol. 



Page Forty-Three 



SuADOWLAND 




Photo by NicKoias Muray 



BLANCHE YURKA 

Distinguished ictress, and entrant in the beauty contest, 
icho plans, among other interesting things, to do a series of 
special matinees next winter of Maeterlinck's "Mona Vanna" 



Page Forty-Four 



^UADOWLAND 



Of Which Song Is Made 



B;y Gladys Hall 



"Still loving song, but loving more 
Life, of which song is made . . ." 

THESE words are Harry Kemp's autobiography. 
They tell the whole of him. They tell him so val- 
iantly and so well that to attempt further delinea- 
tion seems to profane something simply and exquisitely 
executed. To go on makes for mere words . . . For, 
unwittingly, perhaps ; felicitously, certainly, he has 
summed up his existence and his philosophy in a phrase. 

He has been called "The Tramp Poet." Perhaps he is 
as well known by that name as his own. Once I said to 
him, "Did you come by the title vicariously or actually? 
Of course I have heard of adventures here and there, 
but between what one hears and what is true . . ." 

"Oh, actually," he said, 
"actually and honestly. I 
was a tramp. It couldn't be 
better earned than that. A 
regular hobo of the road. 
There was a time when I 
camped beside a little lake 
in Jersey with about five 
pennies and some raw whole 
wheat between me and what 
is known as starvation." He 
added reminiscently, "I 
wrote my best sonnet there." 

Which brought to me, ir- 
resistibly, some words of 
Richard Le Gallienne's, 
written in a preface to Mr. 
Kemp's volume of verse. 
The Passing God: "You will 
seek in vain," Mr. Le Gal- 
lienne says, "for the tramp, 
but there is not a page on 
which you will not find the 
poet." 

There is about Harry 
Kemp something more vital 
than I have ever encount- 
ered before. There is an 
exuberance ; an interest, a 
joy of living keen and in- 
genuous. He loves the days 
and the nights ; he loves sor- 
row and joy because they, 
each of them, are a part of 
life, and every part of life 
he finds infinitely worth 
while. He loves the things 
he does, the people he meets, 
the past, the present and 
the future. He is never 
bored. The word ennui is 
probably the one word his 
vocabulary does not em- 
brace. He has no under- 
standing of people who, 
idly embittered, wonder 
what it is all about. Stale 
moments are not his. 

In his preface to Chan- 
teys and Ballads, he says : 
the unimportant has been 



The Daughters of Heth 

"/ am weary of the daughters of Heth." 
— Old Testament. 

The daughters of Heth were lovely girls, 

Who broke men's hearts in their prime — 
Who have handed down their long descent 

From the patriarchs' olden time, 
Whose daughters' daughters' daughters 
thrive 

On the wrecks of the hopes of men. 
The gayety of whose timbrels, still. 

Has wantoned, each age, since then ! 
For the Toil of Man must have its Mate 

Nor strive with its dream, alone, 
Tho it get the shell that holds no pearl 

Or the kiss that gives the groan . . . 
For the daughters of Heth are full of the 
dark 

That roars with a sudden fire ; 
The daughters of Heth are no men's mates, 

Yet every man's desire ; 
They are rudderless ships with silken sails 

That thwart the captain's plan. 
The daughters of Heth are as sure as death 

To break the soul of a man. 
Their hands are warm with tenderness ; 

They stroke till they win their way, 
Tho what it is that they would have 

Themselves can never say, 
Enough that they gain their quick desire 

As the slave would have his hour 
If even himself he must destroy 

To taste the master's power ; 
For their days are ruled by the peacock's 
pride 

And the vanity of the ape, 
The mantel full of tinsel stars, 

The gaudy, crimson cape, 
The jackdaw's glitter of broken shreds, 

The mirror of polished brass . . . 
O, the strength of the man that leans on 
this 

It is brought to a sorry pass ! 

Harry Kemp. 



lost; the everlasting aspects remain .... and it is that 
quality of the everlasting aspects one senses in him. A 
something broad and sweeping and tremendous and deep. 
He has, somehow or other, got down to the throbbing 
fundamentals of human consciousness and has been able 
to rciua.ii! there. Fie has known what he wanted. He has 
never lost his way. 

"I always knew what I wanted," he said, "even when. 
as a boy, I ran away from home so that I might be free." 
"Home," with the Tramp Poet means, literally, his 
birthplace, and that was Youngstown, Ohio. The date 
of his birth being December 15th, 1883. His mother was 
an Englishwoman, and it is to her that he attributes much 
of his sensitive response to song. His father's forbears 

were Pennsylvania Dutch. 

He was twelve when he 
definitely severed his con- 
nections with the halls of 
learning, and until he was 
sixteen he worked in a cel- 
luloid factory and, undoubt- 
edly, carved out the restless 
road of his heart move as 
he worked. At sixteen he 
ran away to sea, shipping as 
cattle man on board a Ger- 
man ship bound for Aus- 
tralia. He appeared in China 
during the Boxer rebellion. 
Then he returned to this 
country and took a turn at 
high school. But the high 
sea and the high road had 
blended with his blood. He 
could learn more where no 
walls hemmed him in, and 
so, with a volume of Chris- 
tina Rossetti and a copy of 
the Bible in his pocket he 
tramped the Genesee Val- 
ley. He went to jail in Texas 
("unjustly, as it happens, 
but what does that mat- 
ter?") he informed me, and 
then he dropt in for a brief 
visit with Elbert Flubbard at 
his Roycraft Shop in East 
Aurora. There were vari- 
ous other brief sojourns in 
schools and colleges, and here 
and there he managed to 
acquire a reading knowledge 
of Latin and Greek. 

The great English poets 
have been Mr. Kemp's chief 
influences and masters, and 
to visit their homes and their 
final resting places inspired, 
not long ago, his stowaway 
trip abroad. He had to go 
to jail again, too, but he did 
get to Westminster, Strat- 
ford-on-Avon, the Cheshire 
Cheese and others. So what 
{Continued on page 67) 



Page Forty-Five 



SuiADO' 



WLANO 




Photo by Francis Brugu 



INTERPRETING WALT WHITMAN 

Ian Maclaren, as the good grey poet, in the 
festival based on the Whitman poem, "Salut 
du Monde," which was a unique contribution 
to the theater of the season because of the 
unusual and beautiful effects of the com- 
bination of dancing, music and choral speech 



Page Forty-Six 



SuADQWLAND 




Photo by Sherril Schcil 



BASIL SYDNEY 

A character study of the man who has brought another 
vivid interpretation to the role of the hero-clown 
in the Theatre Guild's production of Andreyev's 
tragedy of the circus, "He Who Gets Slapped" 



Page Forty-Seven 



SuADQWLAND 





Photo by Strauss-Peyton Studios 



Photo by Evans 



Thomas Meighan, 
who has a won- 
derful part in the 
relentless district- 
attorney who 
sends the woman 
he loves to the 
penitentiary 




Leatrice Joy, who 
plays the patri- 
cian Lydia in 
Paramount's ver- 
sion of Alice 
Duer Miller's 
widely read novel 



This looks like a 
variation of 
"Civic Virtue," 
but actually it is 
symbolical of a 
theme in the sto- 
ry, so Cecil B. de 
Mille assures us 



u 



Photo by Donald Biddle Keyes 



Page Forty-Eight 



Manslaughter" 



SuADOWLAND 




Frank Reicher in the vivid final scene of the symbolic "From Morn to Midnight" 

American Audiences and European Plays 

What of O'Neill and Akins, in the face of the increasing popularity of 
Maugham, Bahr, Ervine and Other Continentals? 

B;y Louis Raymond Reid 



THE New York theater audience has hecome con- 
tinentalized. It accepts — and more, it seeks — in its 
plays the cynical philosophy, the supersophistication 
that are part and parcel of the European theater. This 
opinion is not merely held by actors, managers and critics, 
all of whom are in close touch with all phases of the play- 
house, but it is voiced by theatergoers themselves who 
profess to be observant of amusement tendencies. Indeed, 
the Continental viewpoint is being exerted more and more 
by New York audiences, particularly by those that assem- 
ble at the premieres of plays. 

Such authors as Molnar, Maugham, Schnitzler, Bahr, 
Ervine and Galsworthy are finding increasing favor here, 
while Ibsen and Shaw continue to hold their long prestige. 
The Continental vogue really started with Ibsen. A great 
dramatist, a great thinker, an unyielding realist, he was 
placed among the supermen of the theater by the New 
York public quite as readily and quickly as by the cul- 
tured Europeans. Mrs. Fiske broke a lance for him in 
the dim past of a generation ago. Since then he has been 
played at intervals by such actresses as Nazimova, Mary 
Shaw and Madame Kalich. With Ibsen as the torch-bearer, 
other dramatists of Europe have descended upon New 
York with plays of bitter realism and scorching truth- 
seeking in the one hand and clever sophisticated comedies 
in the other. And they have conquered. They have left 
their impress upon our own dramatists, especially upon 
' the work of Eugene O'Neill and Zoe Akins. 

Close after Ibsen came Shaw, bringing a new manner, 
a new technique. A follower of Ibsen, he said unpleasant 
things in a pleasant way. He found an eager and appre- 
ciative public which preferred his style to that of the 
relentless Norwegian. He fed his audience, like Ibsen, 
with bitter pills, but he took care to coat them with sugar. 



In a large measure he is responsible for the vogue of the 
Continental playwright who has cynicism and cleverness 
on his side. Shaw was the pioneer. And now Molnar, 
Galsworthy, Maugham (not the amiable Maugham of the 
Charles Frohman clays, but the merciless and ironic critic 
of society), Brieux, Ervine, Berger, Andreyev and others 
are reaping the benefits, tho none of these has the Shavian 
facility — perhaps it is desire — to say unpleasant things 
pleasantly. 

During the current season, the foreign playwright has 
been especially conspicuous en the New York stage. A 
large number of their works, it is obvious, would find 
but little welcome outside of New York. Here, however, 
there is a great and increasing audience for them. Such 
plays as "The Nest," by Geraldy, and "Madame Pierre," 
by Brieux, and the Russian supervaudeville, "Chauve- 
Souris," require discriminating, cultured audiences. It is 
a fine testimonial to the development of New York's 
theatrical taste that all of these attractions are prospering 
here. The first audience at "Chauve-Souris" was over- 
whelmingly cosmopolitan. And it is this cosmopolitan 
character of New York's population that has made the 
city the haven for the best — and occasionally the worst — 
of European drama. 

Molnar's diabolical whimsicality was not accepted here 
at first. His "jlf Ignorance is Bliss," one of the finest 
comedies ever tjo have reached the New York stage, was 
a failure when presented. Since then he has grown more 
and more in favor, and now the public raises such a work 
as "Liliom" to the gallery of pronounced financial suc- 
cesses. Maugham's "Our Betters" drew a small public, but 
Maugham's "The Circle" was hailed as a brilliant comedy 
and had a run of several months. 

(Continued on page 78) 



Page Forty-Nine 



StfADUWLAND 




_ 



Photo by W. F. Seely 



PAULINE FREDERICK 

After a summer presentation of "Lawful Larceny," in 
London, Miss Frederick will return to the Neiv York 
speaking stage this season after an absence of eight 
years. Her new offering is a play entitled "By Right 
of Conquest." It is from the pen of Michael Morton, 
and vjill be produced by Arthur Woodj 



Page Fifty 



DORIS 
HUMPHREY 

With a small com- 
pany, Miss Humph- 
rey is presenting a 
series of artistic 
Terpsichorean di- 
vertissements in the 
vaudeville theaters 
of the Or pheum 
Circuit 




Photo Dy Strauss-Peyton 



Page Fifty-One 




Photo by Hungeiford 



The Bishop's Palace and its Feudal Moat, at Wells, near Bath 



A Threshold of the Long Ago is Bath 

Her Very Sedateness and Serenity Bespeak Generations of British Taste and Tradition 

By Edward Hungerford 



OF all the cities in Britain there is, in my opinion, 
not one quite to be compared with Bath. There 
are lordlier towns — yes, others even aside from 
great London, itself — there are more wildly picturesque 
towns — if you demand a definite instance, Edinburgh — 
there are far gayer spas — Harrogate and Brighton — 
seemingly a thousand British towns, brisker in their com- 
mercial endeavors. Yet in Bath you have all these 
qualities — all save that of the rush and roar of business. 
Business and Bath do not seem to go together. It is far 
better so. 

For all else Bath has. Antiquity — the lovely traditions 
that these many years have woven themselves into a fine 
web of romance over the old city, the rare charm of a 
truly beautiful location; these things certainly has this 
most historic of all English watering-places. Then, to her 
site amidst the high hills of Somerset, to her astonishing 
juxta-position of houses and parks and tantalizing streets 
and open places comes her final added charm of good 
architecture. Here was almost the very birthplace of the 
Georgian style — we Americans do so delight in calling it 
the "Colonial." In Pulteney Street and the other thoro- 
fares of the old town, the brothers Adam and the Woods 



— father and son — wrought some of their finest creations ; 
houses that have left their definite impress not alone upon 
England but upon our own great republic three thousand 
miles away. One could easily write a whole book upon 
the fireplaces of Bath. And another upon its ceilings. 



If you go by rail from London down the one hundred 
and seven miles to Bath (in England one always goes 
"clown" from London, whether he goes north, south, east 
or west) you will have a rather dreary two hours — yet 
two hours aboard a train of astounding swiftness. The 
first time that I went down there from Paddington Station 
(in the west of London) I was rather astonished when the 
booking-agent told me that there would be no dining-car 
upon the train ; even tho it was advertised as an express 
and made its journey thru the noon-tide period. What a 
stupid, stodgy, old-fashioned railroad, this non-com- 
petitive Great Western ! And what a stupid, stodgy sta- 
tion-agent to tell me that whopper about the dining-car! 
For here, under the smoky roof of old Paddington was a 
restaurant-car upon my train — all bright and red and gold 
with its spick-and-span steward, all blue and gold, and 



Page Fifty-Two 



SuADOWLAND 



smiling to take my orders . . . But not if I 
was going to Bath. He would receive me in 
his itinerant restaurant if I were going to 
Bristol . . . But not to Bath . . . Why not ? 
I gave vent to a reportorial curiosity : 

"You're in a slip-carriage, sir," said he. Of 
which at the moment I knew nothing what- 
soever . . . 

Two hours later we had crawled thru the 
tremendously long bore of Box tunnel and, 
emerging, were scurrying down a railway 
grade into the old spa of. Bath itself . . . 
The entire quality of the country had been 
transformed — instantly. Gone was the dreari- 
ness of the high and sandy plateau which we 
had been traversing ever since we had left 
the Thames side, nearly an hour ago. In its 
place was come the vista of a deep valley — a 
valley in whose heart ran the silver Avon on 
its way to the sea. From the sheen of the 
river the uplands rose, open fields and many 
a close copse, all fresh and verdant as only an 
English countryside in the spring may ever 
be. (A little later the Bath-folk were to tell 
me, that by some strangely paradoxical local 
traditions, these same uplands were called the 
downs. These English have such fanciful 
ways in their nomenclature). . . . But never 
mind that. You are now looking with me for 
the first time down into the lovely Warleigh 
valley ; rising on either side from the Somer- 
set River Avon ... A valley for romance. 
Such a valley to which Robin Hood might 
have blown his horn or Pan his pipes. You 
could have staged "Midsummer Night's 
Dream" upon its breasts — and suffered no in- 



{At the right) An ancient canal threads the town 

of Bath and bores thru innumerable "tunnelettes." 

(Below) The quiet streets bespeak its generations 

of culture and taste 





Photos by Hungerford 

congruities. An amphithe- 
ater for chivalry. And in- 
deed upon the morrow 
when I was to venture 
forth to see the ruins of an 
ancient castle, which for 
me forever holds a peculiar 
and a poignant interest, I 
was to see in each nook and 
cranny of the battered walls 
which time and battle had 
permitted to remain, how 
hard had once fought the 
doughty Cromwellians and 
their equally doughty an- 
tagonists — in this very val- 
ley, which now sleeps so 
peacefully. 

* * * 

Bath is seated upon the 
steepest slopes of the nar- 
rowest part of this valley of 
the Avon — it is so narrow 
that it comes near to being 
an absolute impasse. When 
first the town confronts 
you from your car window, 
you will be sure to note the 
great regularity of its ter- 
raced rows of grey-stone 



Page Fifty-Three 



SuiADOWLAND 




Photo by Hungerford 

An English countryside is the most wonderfully verdant thing imaginable 



houses : — in 
the distance 
they look like 
the handi- 
work of some 
small boy, ex- 
quisitely neat 
with all his 
toys . . . Grey 
houses and 
the deep, dark 
greens of 
English foli- 
age . . . Grey 
houses and 
amidst them, 
church-spires 
. . . Church- 
spires, yet not 
one amongst 
them half 
so impressive 
as the solid 
square Gothic 
tower of Bath 
Abbey; of 
which more 
in good 
time . . . 

A terraced 
town upon 
the opposite 
side, up to 

the very top of the down, more than seven hundred feet 
above the river. Our side is lost. We catch a vista here, 
a vista there of an ancient and lovable canal, then the 
light itself comes in blotches and in intervals. Our railway 
car is threading a series of small tunnels under one of the 
town-parks ("tunnelettes," a track repairer called them 
to me two or three days later, in all seriousness). We 
cross the Avon and pull into the unpretentious railway- 
station of Bath. . . There ensues the hectic business of 
gathering the hand-baggage together ... A station-por- 
ter thrusts his head into the open window of the carri- 
age .. . 

"No hurrv, sir," says he. "This carnage goes no far- 
ther." 

. . . When we emerge upon the station-platform we 
find that the car (the English always call it a "carriage") 
stands all alone upon the track. We make a friendly en- 
quiry as to the whereabouts of our nice, swift train. 

"It's halfway to Bristol by this time, sir," says the 
porter. 

Now we know the meaning of a slip-carriage upon a 
British railway. We also know why we could not lunch 
in the restaurant-car. There are no passageways between 
the slip-carriages and the rest of the train. 

But why worry about lunch? Twenty minutes later 
we are seated in the dining-room of one of the most 
charming hotels that one might hope to find in the entire 
length and breadth of Great Britain . . . We had started 
forth for Bath, nursing a secret hope that we might be 
domiciled there in the White Hart — our memories of the 
Pickwick Papers are pretty active, even after all these 
years . . . But alas, there no longer is a White Hart. In 
its honored place there arose, more than half a century 
ago, the Grand Pump Room Hotel. There are other hotels 
in Bath, and good ones, too. But, for ourselves, we could 
never, never pass the door of a hostelry that boasted so 
mellifluous a name as the Grand Pump Room. It might have 
been the worst hotel in the town and we still should have 



gone there. 
But it is not 
the worst. I 
honestly 
think, altho 
never having 
tried another, 
that it is the 
best. It cer- 
tainly is as 
good a tavern 
as any way- 
farer might 
seek as a 
haven and a 
roof over his 
head. More 
than this he 
has no busi- 
ness to ask 

Across 
from its door 
is the Pump 
Room — a two 
storied stone 
structure, of 
a rather 
simple classic 
type, which 
altho built 
more than a 
century ago 
has in recent 
years been improved by the Corporation of Bath — at a 
cost of some two hundred thousand dollars. It con- 
tains in its basement and lower floor not only the ruins of 
the superb bath-house which the Romans built more 
than two thousand years ago, but an elaborate and modern 
bathing equipment of a most varied sort. The warm, 
healing waters of Bath are in no way disagreeable ; 
neither to the smell ncr to the taste. The dictum of the 
local physician who looks at your little finger and says 
that you have the gout (if he had had a chance to look at 
your big toe, he might have pronounced it something 
quite different) and that in addition to bathing in the 
waters twice a day you shall drink forty-eight quarts 
of them a week, therefore brings no great hardness nor 
physical discomfort in its train. On the contrary it gives 
you something quite definite to do. Which, upon an ex- 
tended vacation, is almost always quite a blessing. 

I desist. This is no guide-book. We are talking of the 
external charms of Bath, and not the internal ones. And 
so we shall pass the bathing establishment by taking one 
final look, however, at the Pump Room itself — the holy 
of holies of the place. It is a well proportioned apart- 
ment, high-ceilinged and some sixty by one hundred feet 
in its dimensions. There is a bar along a broad alcove at 
one side where you may go to work at your forty-eight 
quarts in every possible interval. But the lion of this 
ample and altogether charming room is a huge statue of 
Beau Nash. 

Beau Nash! Shades of Monsieur Bccucaire! What a 
man this was — this dandy of nearly two centuries ago, fop, 
arbiter of social destinies, feared, hated and — once or 
twice — loved. This Ward McAllister of eld Bath was no 
fool. Trained at Oxford, in the Army and in the shadowy 
Inner Temple of legal London, he possessed rare qualities 
of real executiveness. Without them he never could have 
risen to his years of social domination in one of the most 
socially brilliant communities that the world has ever 
known. Without them — and a quick and ready wit. It is 
related of him that once at one of the formal Assemblies 
(Continued on page 72) 



Page Fifty-Four 



Vanni Marcoux 

of the 
Opera Comique 




Very young, 
very brilliant, 
and very popu- 
lar with his Pa- 
risian public, is 
this artist with 
the lovely bary- 
tone voice 



While the photographs 
depict him as Lorenzoc- 
cio, M. Marcoux is no 
less popular in the bary- 
tone parts of "Carmen," 
"Manon," "Otello," 
"Tosca"' and other roles 
of a long repertoire 



Page Fifty-Five 



Si-IADOWLAND 









MARY LEWIS 




1 






- • 






^ 
£ r 







xMURIEL STRYKER 




Page Fifty-Six 



SuAOOWLAND 



Shadowland 

Goes to 
"The Follies" 

Sketches by Wesley Morse 



&? 



.&#% 



I Ah. 






7 «* 



^X&K^s 




WSt "^ If * 



> p 




* MARY EATON 














MARTHA LORBER 












-A 



Pa<7<? Fifty-Seven 




IN YORK COUNTY 

By William Elbert Macnaughtan 
First Prize 



Page Fifty-Eight 



Camera Contest 
Winners 



On this and the opposite page are the suc- 
cessful competitors of this month's contest. 
On the following page, the second prize 
winning picture. Full details of the con- 
test will be found on page seventy- eight. 





(Above) 

THE COOLIE 

By Arthur D. Chapman 

Third Prize 



THE TENDER BUDS OF SPRING 

By Josephine M. Wallace 

Honorable Mention 





(Above) 
THE BOAT HOUSE 

By F. Detlefsen 
Honorable Mention 



(Left) 

STILL LIFE 

By William Jordan, Jr. 

Honorable Mention 



Page Fifty-Nine 




MONK 

Amalfi, Italy 

By Myers R. Jones 

Second Prize 



Page Sixty 




Mildred Harris and Kamarela Searles in "A Fool's Paradise" 



Life Gives Us These 



By Charles Divine 






Life gives the shepherd a star to watch 
The long, dim night on the lonely hill ; 
The dreamer, a house with a little gate 
And an easy chair on the silent sill. 

Life gives the lover the crescent moon 
To hang on his eyelids and finger-tips ; 

And poets, the songs that stir in their hearts 
Forever to madden their restless lips. 

Life gives the rover a sea and a sail ; 

The peasant, a meadow and furrows of sod. 
And gardens where often the hawthorn blooms, 
And churches wherein he may worship God ; 

The streets of a village, a blacksmith's shop 
That echoes the anvil the livelong day, 
And merry-go-rounds and country fairs, 
And lilac bushes and kisses in May ; 

The curved roads of summer, tree-fringed and cool, 
And walls with wistaria, mystery, song, 

A cottage whose windows are golden at eve. 
And corners where candles are guttering long ; 

A red-striped table-cloth, odors of roasts, 
A kitchen with copper kettles a-gleam, 

And bright, clean pans in a rack on the wall, 
And white wine under an oaken beam. 

Life gives us these, nor haggles for price, 
Except that we see and, seeking, we find, 

And whether life comes to us once or twice — 
That, too, is a question to twitter the mind. 



An open fire in a darkened room, 

The night outside on the window-ledge. 

The crackling logs and cravens of light, 

And the sound of the wind in the tumbling hedge ; 

The lazy patter of rain on the roof, 

Singing a lullaby over your bed, 
A night of soft airs and murmuring leaves, 

And a pillow of dreams for a weary head. 

There are books to read when the world is dull. 
There are roads to walk when the books are dry, 

There are sunsets to follow when roads are long, 
And dawns that even a fool can buy. 

A salt wind blowing, and far-away lands, 
Francs and shillings and nickles and dimes, 

Carnivals, gondolas, whispering nights, 
Japanese lanterns and rivers and rhymes. 

An open cab with a loitering horse, 

The harness a-tingle with cow-bells light, 

And city streets where the faces pass, 
And towers that loom on a moonlit night. 

A woman's love and a mother's pride, 

A coming-back-home from the wandering tours, 

The sight of a doorway known to the heart, 
The grip of an old friend's hand in yours. 

Oh, write it down in a thousand books, 

And carve it deep where the winds will sigh, 
And weave it into the singing brooks : 
Life gives us these, before we die. 



Page Sixty-One 




We 

Artistic 



A. S. M. HUTCHINSON 

There are rumors that the au- 
thor of "If Winter Comes" will 
visit America this fall, when his 
new novel, "This Freedom," is 
published. Cyril Maude will 
have the role of Mark Sabre, 
when the dramatic version of the 
earlier romance is presented to 
New York next winter, while 
the film rights have been 
acquired by the Fox corporation 



Photo © E. O. Hoppe, London 



A. A. MILNE 

Who has followed his successful com- 
edies, "Mr. Pirn Passes By," "The 
Dover Road" and "The Truth About 
Blayds," with an equally popular 
book, "The Red House' Mystery." 
Writing of the latter, he says: "I have 
always adored detective stories'. ■ One 
day about three years ago, I thought 
of rather a good way of murdering 
somebody, so I began to write the 
first chapter and left the rest of the 
story to take care of itself" 




Page Sixty-Two 



oto © E. O. Hoppe, London 



Focus 
Personalities 







F. FABIANO 

We learn with pleasure of the 
recent arrival in America of the 
clever foreign artist whose work 
is endowed with the inimitable 
grace of French art. His femi- 
nine types have long charmed 
the readers of the gay Parisian 
publications, "La Vie Parisi- 
enne," "Le Hire," and "Fantasio" 




HENDRIK WILLEM VAN LOON 

Recently awarded the first John Newbery 
medal by the American Library Associa- 
tion for the most distinguished contribu- 
tion to American literature for children, 
"The Story of Mankind." Few people 
will quarrel with the award to a history 
that has taken rank with the best of best- 
selling novels and has fascinated grown- 
ups even more than the younger genera- 
tion for whom it was intended 



Photo © Underwood & Underwood 



Page Sixty-Three 



SuiADOWLANO 



Double faulting becomes excessively monotonous 
as the minutes wear by, but Lucile persists. "My 
dear little dynamo" perspires Henry, in the ver- 
nacular of his profession, and so sustains her to 
the end. "My dear little pet dynamo," it will be 
yet more intimately over the teacups. Oh, what 
more lovely in her mind than to be condoned for 
the very faults she is inclined in more lucid 
moments of play with her own sex to despise 



Hardly to oulstroke the Indefatigable Male 
would an all night flapper rise at 6 A. M. 
We expect a reaction to Lucile's essential 
feminism which nowadays she affects to 
disdain. "I wonder," so she communes, 
swinging a wicked iron, "whether Henry 
would still adore me as a devotee of his 
favorite game if he kneiv that the only real 
argument I have for golf is its positively 
radical effect on the complexion" 




Lucile 

Goes in For 

Sports 



Thereupon we reveal Ulterior 
Motives for her Athletic Foibles 



Sketches by Olive Butler 




Page Sixty-Four 




&iADOWLT/\ND 



The delicate hobbies of her forbears 
would scarcely have embraced creatures 
of low biological import such as Donald 
impales upon her hook. Free from the 
grosser brutalities of the sport, Lucile 
should blossom into sustained and rosier 
vigor. "But," she exasperates, "if only- 
Henry had not bragged that I was the 
best little angler this side of the Alle- 
ghanies, I might drop this farce and save 
his pet rod from absolute ruination" 








/jft? 



W\ 



■p 



The piteous withdrawal of Lucile to the onslaughts 
of ants-variegated, and spiders-hairy, as she has 
them cataloged in her own peculiar lexicon, are 
lost on a brute like Henry, to whom the sizzling 
of bacon over a fire is panacea for any discomfort 
endured in the open. - '"I should say," palpitates 
Lucile, "that Henry has rather a flair for domestic- 
ity," and folds^ the revelation compactly away 
for later u:e 




As a method of bathing, 
porcelain plumbing is as- 
suredly less hazardous 
than a leap into the 
bosom of the sea, when 
thoughts of heaped jelly- 
fish and oyster shells 
supine, swamp her timid 
brain „ afresh at every 
dive. "I would almost 
rather be laughed at for 
doing a perfectly safe 
and sane Daily Dozen in 
my room," mutinies Lu- 
cile, "than to be adored 
as a picture of uncon- 
scious grace — but," she 
adds, "not quite" 



Page Sixty-Five 




Photos © Underwood & Underwood 



Based on an old Irish legend told to 1 
them by Padraic Colum, the pupils of, 
the Children's School, of New York, 
recently not only wrote but produced 
"The Tooth of Knowledge," without 
the aid of a single grown-up 



Expressionism 

in the 

Children's 

Theater 



To design costumes, furniture, drop 
curtains, and arrange the program 
were only a few of the details of the 
work assumed by the aspiring Thes- 
pians, whose ages ranged from ten to 
twelve years 




Page Sixty-Six 



SUAOQWLANO 



Of Which Song is Made 

(Continued from page 45) 

did that matter? But it would seem that he 
has walked exhaustively thruout the uttermost 
realms of all poetry. Nothing has escaped him. 
Poetry, the love of poetry, the living of it and 
the writing of it, has been the passion of his 
life. He knew it almost as soon as he cov.ld con- 
sciously know anything and the loyalty to it and 
the desire for it has never departed from him. 

"If I seem to have achieved freedom and 
content," he said to me, "and I have, it is be- 
cause I was fortunate enough to know myself 
from the very beginning. I have never had 
any doubts." 

Apart from his philosophy of life, which 
is sharp with the tang of interest and enthusi- 
asm, there is his poetry with which I hesitate 
to deal too explicitly. The faces of women 
are in it, and the rapturous love of women. 
God is in it and the solemnity of the_ old re- 
ligion — the old Scriptures. Spiritism is in it, 
and the belief which has, of late years, been 
touching the world with hope. Red blood is 
in it, and the sea and the camaraderie of the 
open road. Resurgent hope is always in it. 
There is nothing mordant, nothing involved, 
nothing artificial nor pretentious. One reads 
and, perfectly, with a quickened heart-beat and 
a quickened spirit, one understands what he 
means and, beautifully, why he means it. 

He says, also, in his preface to "Chanteys 
and Ballads,-" and referring to h ; s reading of 
the Bible while he was in the Texan jail: 

"And Christ walking about Judea, along the 
roads and from inn to inn, somehow, got into 
my soul ..." 

These are beautiful words. They are the 
more beautiful because they have been said 
with meaning. The deep and true meaning 
that comes from the heart of a man who has 
met death and tragedy, head high. Who has 
sought out high romance, high adventure. Who 
has faced hunger, jail, exile and warfare, and 
still and always, high above his head, main- 
tained, triumphant, the shining sword of song. 

His own "Farewell" makes further mock of 
further words : 

"Tell them, O Sky-born, when I die, 
With high romance to wife, 
That I went out, as I had lived, 
Drunk with the joy of life. 

Yea, say that I went down to death 
Serene and unafraid, 
Still loving Song, but loving more 
Life, of which Song is made." 

iiiiiiiiimiMiiiiiimiimmimiiii 

MOON WORSHIP 
By Elliott W. Hough 

moon — 

Because you create not 

But reflect, 

Because you are passionate 

But still recessive, 

Because you are a thing of beauty 

Loved by lovers, 

Because you ask only admiration 

Which can be freely given, 

Because you sing of love 

And unfilled desire — 

You, emotional Queen. 

1 deify. 

Help me, voluptuous One, 

To avoid truth 

And reality. 

Deliver me from rationality, 

In whose foul clutches 

I writhe. 

With illusion and mysticism 

Fill my heart, 

That 1 may live. 




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Page Sixty-Seven 



Si44DQWLAND 

Stage Plays of Interest 

(Readers in distant towns ivill do well to preserve this list for reference ivlien these spoken 

plays appear in their vicinity.) 



Belasco. — Lenore Ulric in "Kiki." David 
Belasco's production of his own piquant adapta- 
tion of Andre Picard's French farce. Miss 
Ulric scores one of the big hits of the season 
with her brilliant playing of a little gamin of 
the Paris music halls. You will love Kiki as 
you loved Peg — but differently. A typically 
excellent Belasco cast. 

Belmont Theater. — "Kempy." While em- 
bracing many characteristics that recall "The 
First Year," of blessed 
memory, this very hu- 
man domestic comedy is 
no less welcome because 
of that. Demonstrating 
as well the versatility of 
the Nugent family. Fa- 
ther and son collaborated 
in the playwriting, and 
fill two of the chief 
roles on the stage, with 
mother and daughter 
supplementing with two 
others. Truly a family 
affair, but a delightful 
one, with an abundance 
of refreshing fun and 
an absence of domestic 
scandal. 

Bijou Theater. — "The 
Dover Road." A simple 
little romance of a crusty 
bachelor in the guise of 
a deus ex machina. He 

delights to set right the affairs of hasty couples 
who are traveling the English equivalent of 
the road to Reno. He literally intercepts them 
en route, and of course becomes caught in his 
own net. Charles Cherry and an unusually 
able English company give a most finished per- 
formance. A. A. Milne is the author. 

Century Roof. — The "Chauve-Souris" of 
Nikita Balieff and his Russian entertainers from 
Moscow. Second bill. Superb aesthetic vaude- 
ville done with a touch of genius. Be sure 
to see this. Morris Gest deserves a laurel 
wreath for bringing Balieff and his fellow-en- 
tertainers across the ocean. You will fall in 
love with the superbly perfect "Parade of the 
Wooden Soldiers," the stirring music-box 
polka, "Katinka," and the haunting melodies of 
the gypsies in "A Night at Yard's." 

Cort. — "Captain Applejack," amusing melo- 
drama delightfully done. 



SHADOWLAND'S 

List of Plays and Revues 

You Should See 

"The Music Box Revue" 

"Kiki" 

"The Chauve-Souris" 

"Partners Again" 

"The Follies" 



Garrick. — "He Who Gets Slapped." The 
Theatre Guild's interesting production of the 
Andreyev tragedy of a circus clown, told with 
all the haunting overtones of the Russians. 

Globe Theater. — "Good Morning Dearie." 
A musical comedy put together with Mr. Dil- 
lingham's inimitable touch. In other words, a 
sure-fire hit. Featuring Harland Dixon and 
Adele Lewis, and some very catchy music. 
Harris. — "Six Cylinder Love," with Ernest 
Truex. The season's big- 
gest sell-out and a real 
hit. Presenting the 
problems of a couple 
trying to live up to their 
car. Plenty of laughs. 

Morosco. — "The Bat," 
hair-raising melodrama, 
which had its premiere 
August 23, 1920. Still 
drawing crowds. 

Music Box. — Irving 
Berlin's "Music Box Re- 
vue." The biggest mu- 
sical hit of the year and 
a fast-moving entertain- 
ment, studded with clever 
comic hits. The fine 
cast includes Sam Ber- 
nard, Willie Collier, 
Florence Moore, Wilda 
Bennett, Mr. Berlin him- 
self, Mile. Marguerite, 
Emma Haig and Rose 
Rolanda. The staging is a credit to Hassard 
Short. 

National. — "The Cat and the Canary." A 
tense and creepy melodrama that is a logical 
successor to "The Bat" as New York's favorite 
thriller. You'll hold the arms of your orches- 
tra chair all thru this. 

Neiv Amsterdam.' — "Ziegfeld Follies of 
1922." "Glorifying the American Girl." More 
gorgeous, more elaborate, more expensive, 
more distracting, and a little funnier than 
usual. 

Palace. — Keith vaudeville. The home of 
America's best variety bills and the foremost 
music hall in the world. Always an attractive 
vaudeville bill. 



Sehvyn. — "Partners Again." 
Perlmutter, funnier than ever. 



Potash and 



Loezv's N. Y. and Loew's American Roof. — 
Photoplays; first runs. Daily program. 

Loezv's Metropolitan, Brooklyn. — Feature 
photoplays and vaudeville. 

Capitol. — Photoplay features plus a de luxe 
program. Superb theater. 



Rivoli. — De luxe photoplays with full sym- 
phony orchestra. Weekly program. 

Rialto. — P hotoplays supreme. Program 
changes every week. 

Strand. — Select first-run photoplays. Pro- 
gram changes every week. 





r (i if f\ v- AT^'^^ 






Kcjr 



The Exacting Art of 
Caricature 

(Continued from page 38) 

ideas are not so penetrating. Of all the newer 
Germans, however, Arnold shows the greatest 
power, the most telling analysis, and the most 
finished technique. Few modern caricaturists 
have probed so deeply into character, or stated 
their findings with such poignant and ruthless 
accuracy. 

Associated with the German school of real- 
istic pictorial portraiture is the Scandinavian 
Gulbranssen, who for sheer technical finish, 
solidity of effect, and mordant characterization, 
has no superiors and few, if any, peers. His 
satirical portraits are perfect examples of true 
caricature — simple, yet masterly in statement, 
and conceived with a brilliant clarity of vision. 
He surpasses all his countrymen, from Tegner 
and Jiirgensen to Schmidt and Kittelesen ; and, 
indeed, marks the height to which modern 
caricature has attained. 

The French and English Schools 

None of the more recent Frenchmen have 
approached the genius of Forain and Lautrec. 
Sem, however, has done many fine and search- 
ing caricatures ; and among the younger men 
"Mich" also may be mentioned as characteristic 
of the spirit of pictorial irony in France today. 

In England caricature has not entirely freed 
itself from literature and document. Beer- 
bohm ("Max") is an excellent example of this 
retarded development. The most popular and, 
in many respects, the best of England's cari- 
caturists, he constantly depends on ideas for 
his effects. He is superficial in analysis; and 
his technique, compared with that of Thony, 
Arnold and Gulbranssen, is almost amateurish. 
But his whimsical wit and his droll imagination 
often save an inherently banal and poorly ex- 
ecuted picture from complete disinterest. 
Simpson is without "Max's" whimsicality and 
literary appeal ; and while his technique — com- 
posed of simple free lines in the Busch tradi- 
tion — is adequate to its purpose, his exaggera- 
tion and distortion of featural characteristics 
are not of a sufficiently penetrating nature to 
lift him very far above the level of "clever 
cartoonist." "Spy" (Leslie Ward), another 
English caricaturist, suffers from this same 
deficiency in critical observation. He is, in 
fact, merely a more genial and tolerant "Ape." 

Spain,. Italy and the other Latin countries 
supply a more sympathetic milieu than Eng- 
land and America for the development of cari- 
cature. The imagination is less restricted ; 
sentimental ethics are less dominant ; and origi- 
nality has a freer rein. We find, therefore, 
many interesting graphic talents in these na- 
tions. 

Caricature in the Latin Countries 

Tovar represents the best in Spanish cari- 
cature, and occasionally achieves an effective 
and impelling work. In Buenos Ayres, Sirio — 
influenced by the Germans of the "wood-cut 
school" — and Alvarez, a portraitist of featural 
exaggerations, lead the field ; and in Cuba, Mas- 
saguer, tho constantly varying his technique, 
has achieved a noteworthy proficiency. 

Mexico has given birth to numerous cari- 
caturists ; and several competent craftsmen 
have been developed. De Zayas has insight and 
a markedly pronounced artistic scnsibilite ; and 
Cabral has carried distortion to an unusual 
extreme without sacrificing the inner truth. 
Italy, likewise, has produced many caricaturists 
t>f varying personalities and techniques, and in 
Tirelli possesses a master of the grotesque and 
monstrous. His war series — '■'/ Protagonisti" 
— ranks high in its particular field. 

In the United States there are a few men in 
whom the spirit of caricature has taken lodg- 
ment. We are too young to have produced so 
mature and refined an art. Our cultural stand- 
ards are not yet sufficiently fixed ; and the tra- 
ditions of institutionalism have not yet become 
assimilated. However, we have already evolved 
several individualistic craftsmen, altho in none 
of them are there more than faint indications 
of the true instinct for caricature. Only Alfred 
(Continued on page 73) 



Page Sixty-Eight 



SUADOWLAND 



From Moscow Cellar to 
New York Roof 

(Continued from page 29) 

being made a target for the shafts of wit of 
Balieff and his irreverent colleagues. In those 
days Nikita did not wear a faultlessly fitting 
dress suit and well-laundered linen. Jackets, 
blouses and loose flowing ties, or no ties at 
all, were de rigueur, and better dressed mem- 
bers of the audience provoked impolite com- 
ment. But most of the visitors grinned and 
bore it ; and the less thin-skinned even liked 
it, and would sometimes retort with vigor and 
point. 

Today, or rather tonight, the Chauve-Souris 
has emerged from its cellar and is perched on 
the top of a high roof of a beautiful building 
occupying one of the most commanding sites 
in New York, overlooking the park on one 
side and on the other the busiest and brightest 
part of the city. Balieff, as bland if not so 
biting as of yore, his Rabelaisian tendency 
carefully controlled, wears a beautiful dress 
suit and spotless white shirt and vest. He 
is described in the program as "Director and 
Stage Autocrat," for of course anything Rus- 
sian must have its autocrat, and ever and anon 
he emerges from behind the curtains and con- 
verses with a delighted audience in an extra- 
ordinary jargon, and the more he contorts his 
phrases and distorts his words, the better every- 
body likes him ; so why, it may be asked, 
should he seek to improve his English as the 
foreign resident is usually exhorted to do? 

The Secret of the Charm 

People go to the new show of the Chauve- 
Souris as they went to that which preceded it, 
largely to see and hear Balieff, to delight in 
his quaint, convoluted, monosyllabic speeches, 
and to watch that wonderful smile as it gradu- 
ally spreads and illuminates the whole of his 
spacious countenance. As for the new enter- 
tainment, it has the true Russian spirit of 
naivete. Episodes of boisterous humor and 
rollicking drollery are varied by others of quiet 
simplicity and beauty, with the occasional and 
inevitable undercurrent of sadness and tragedy. 

Delightfully tinkling strains by no less a 
composer than Liadoff accompany a musical 
snuff-box episode, in which the characters are 
marionettes, A group of Black Hussars 
( "There-are-no-black-sol-diers-today," remarks 
Balieff, "they-are-all-red" — the last word al- 
most shouted) sing the sonorous and gay regi- 
mental songs of the past ("They-do-not-sing- 
any-more; they 'oivl!" — another shout from 
Nikita). The soldiers are sitting in the dark 
shadows of a cellar against an arched window, 
with a strong blueish light outside — a finely 
composed picture by Remisoff, who is respon- 
sible for the entire decors, which is finely 
imaginative as well as humorous when needs be. 

A New Program 

The famous Wooden Soldiers have been 
kept in the new program, and march and coun- 
ter march with unfaltering rigidity and an ex- 
quisitely bland vacuity. Spanish students sing 
an absurd mock serenade to the single word 
"Pepita," until an irate parent appears on the 
balcony and threatens them with a drenching. 
"Copenhagen Porceleine" takes the place of 
the Dresden or Willow Pattern plate with 
charming effect, and musically the episode is 
exquisite. There are broad Russian farces 
like "Moscow Fiances" and "The Three Hunts- 
men," and half a dozen other numbers, in- 
cluding, by request, the adorable but squawky 
Katinka," and before one realizes it between 
two and three hours of unalloyed enjoyment 
have slipped by. 

Russia's gifts to the world are great and 
numerous, especially in the forms of literature, 
music and art, and perhaps can never be ade- 
quately repaid, altho America is doing some- 
thing in that direction by feeding her starving 
people. She has added to our obligations by 
sending us the Chauve-Souris, and it is hoped 
that they will long remain to show American 
audiences how simplicity and rollicking drollery 
can be combined with the finest art. 




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Page Sixty-Nine 



SuAPQWLAND 




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Dada and the Dadas 



(Continued from page 43) 



including the whilom Expressionism, Futurism, 
and Cubism, as so many narrow academies im- 
prisoning individual liberty inside the confines 
of this or that theory. Fancy a Cubist being 
dubbed an Academician ! Picture the ogres 
of the immediate past turned into mild, inof- 
fensive conservatives of the present ! There has 
been nothing more delicious during my sojourn 
in the French capital than encounters with sun- 
dry of the established Cubists. They hold the 
Dadas in horror, deride them, vilify them as 
charlatans, mountebanks, monstrosities. And 
only a few years ago, the Cubists were them- 
selves treated to such epithets by an outraged 
society. Tomorrow, the Dadas will be termed, 
old-fashioned. In fact, many people are al- 
ready bored with their antics, most of which 
have become painfully familiar. Such is Paris. 

The antics take the form of outlandish maga- 
zines and barbarous public exhibitions, to the 
accompaniment very often of jazz music of a 
vintage several years old, imported from 
America. The exhibitions are introduced by 
strenuous manifestos, street parades, stump 
speeches and newspaper controversies. Riots 
are not infrequent. A typical manifesto fol- 
lows : "Dada raises all. Dada knows all. 
Dada spits on all. But Dada never speaks to 
you of Italy, of accordeons, of ladies' panta- 
lettes, of one's country, of sardines, of Fiume, 
of art (you exaggerate, my friend), of sweet- 
ness, of D'Annunzio, what a horror, of hero- 
ism, of mustaches, of luxury, of the ideal (it 
is lovely), of Massachusetts, of the past, of 
perfumes, of salads, of genius, genius, genius, 
of the eight-hour day. Never, never, never. 
Dada does not speak. Dada has no fixed idea. 
Dada doesn't catch flies. Futurism is dead. Of 
what? Of Dada. A young girl committed 
suicide. Of what cause? Of Dada." And so 
on. 

Tristan Tzara is against holding opinions. 
"I wrote that manifesto to show that you can 
perform two opposing acts together, in one sole 
respiration ; I am against action ; for continual 
contradiction, for affirmation also I am neither 
for nor against and I do not explain, for I hate 
good sense." In other words, all things are 
equal, there is no high or low, good or bad. 
Tzara is the philosopher of Dada. Some of the 
leading poets are Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, 
Francis Picabia, Phillipe Soupault, Louis Ara- 
gen, Paul Morand. Of them all, Picabia ex- 
cells in gossip, vituperation and satire. Sou- 
pault is very fond of jingles. They dont begin 
to compare with the exquisite nonsense of that 
supreme adept in tom-foolery, Lewis Carroll, 



who can out-dada any Dada and still leave 
more sense behind him than most prize logi- 
cians. It was safe for Carroll to have two plus 
two come to five, because he had already mas- 
tered mathematics and could afford to try 
precipices of theory and tight-ropes of con- 
clusion and yet land on the other side of the 
chasm and gravely return to terra firma. But 
there never was and never will be another Car- 
roll. No Dada and no amount of Dadaism can 
match the adventures of Alice. Carroll's ncn- 
sense is a product of exuberance, Soupault's 
and the other Dadas' a tell-tale of disgust, 
weariness, and a desire to annihilate the world 
along with the late war. Thus writes Soupault : 

Philippe Soupault on his bed — 
born on Monday, 
baptized Tuesday, 
married Wednesday, 
sick on Thursday, 
agonized Friday, 
dead on Saturday, 
interred Sunday — 
this is the life of Philippe Soupault. 

Paul Morand seems to have the richest poetic 
endowment and approximates a closer standard 
of making his contradictions intelligible than 
the other Dadas. The leading painters and 
sculptors are G. Ribemont-Dessaignes, Francis 
Picabia, Max Ernst, Marcel Duchamp, Jean 
Crotti, and H. Arp. Arp's portrait of Tzara, 
appended herewith, has enjoyed numerous re- 
productions thruout Europe. Likewise Ribe- 
mont-Dessaignes' sculpture-portrait of a ball 
of twine, a twig and a sponge. A Dada ex- 
hibition is usually crammed with such humbugs, 
along with the throngs who come to admire 
or pooh-pooh them, according to one's tem- 
perament. 

Just what will become of Dada and the Dada- 
ists nobody is as yet daring enough to prophesy. 
M. J. E. Blanche, himself a Dada, declares that 
"Dada will only continue to exist by ceasing to 
be." If you can elucidate this puzzle, you may 
reach a conclusion about Dada. Then again, it 
may be still better not to reach a conclusion. 
If Dada, with or without theory, can give 
birth to a man or two of the first rank — like 
the Cubism, Expressionism and Futurism it 
seeks to destroy — Dada will have justified it- 
self. If it doesn't succeed in this, the world 
will be well off anyhow in having been enter- 
tained at a time when it was more sorely in 
need of distraction than at any other time in 
historv. If the world ever recovers from its 
recent wound, such fellows as the Dadas have 
provided a little of the medicine : laughter as 
good as any other. For this may the gods re- 
member them. 



iimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiNimi iiiiiiiiiimmmmiu 



Paul Swan, Artist 



(Continued from page 23) 



PARTING 



So thus have you passed upon your destined 
way, 

You whom I loved ! 
Your going imaged not the parting I had 
dreamed — 

There were no tears ! 
For you, a glad release, 
For me, a vague and sullen dumbness ; 
And I had rehearsed so often to call you back, 
Knowing not till now the voicelessness of love! 

Despite the man's versatility, Paul Swan 
will always be known chiefly as a classic 
dancer, and back to this subject the conver- 
sation veered. Swan said, "People are forever 
trying to find the meaning of my different 
dances. That's rather absurd and unneces- 
sary. I wish they'd try to enjoy them just 
for their beauty." 

Dr. Rieder has said of Paul Swan's dancing: 
"It springs from a wealth of artistic experi- 



ence. Its appeal therefore is of the very high- 
est order ; and it is not sensational or sensual, 
but largely intellectual. To appreciate him 
fully, requires a fine sense of beauty and a cul- 
tured mind." 

Paul Swan's productivity and industry are 
rather overwhelming. Busy as he is with por- 
trait commissions, he finds time to rehearse 
strenuously for a series of dance matinees that 
he will soon give at the Theatre Fcmina in 
Paris. He also finds time to design his own 
costumes and settings. 

We were very much impressed by Swan's 
keen sense of humor. He delighted in jesting 
and bantering about the curious, sensational 
stories that had been circulated. He said the 
most acceptable tribute that had ever been paid 
him was that of Zoe Akins, the playwright. 
She wrote: "Nothing that Paul Swan himself 
will ever do, will be more interesting than what 
he himself is now." 



Page Seventy 



^UAUQWkAND 



John Costigan Carries 
the Flame 

(Continued from page 11) 

proficiency docs not make him academic. There 
is a solid, downright honesty in Costigan which 
saves him from the pitfalls of virtuosity. This 
honesty shows in everything he does. 

Costigan derives mainly from the Impression- 
ist tradition, which has given so much vitality 
to painting in our day, particularly to the paint- 
ing of landscape. He is concerned a good deal 
with the handling of light and atmosphere, but 
this concern of his does not lead him to forget 
that there is such a thing as solidity. Within 
the shimmering mysteries of light and atmos- 
phere that envelope his pictures we feel the 
planes and dimensions of a solid, honest earth. 
It is an earth for walking and working on, as 
well as an earth to look at. His pictures are 
full of the gravity and depth of forms bend- 
ing and projecting thru three dimensions. 

A Fine Feeling for Dimensions 

"I dont like a landscape unless I feel that I 
can walk into it," says Costigan. His painting, 
"Last Part of Winter," reproduced at the be- 
ginning of this article, might be called a plastic 
demonstration of that statement. "Girl With 
Sheep" illustrates his concern with atmospheric 
effect, but in it, too, there is the same feeling 
for gravity and dimensionality. There is a fine 
treatment of the girl's figure beneath the re- 
vealing folds of dress in this painting. This 
interesting use of the human figure, and of 
animals, appears in many of Costigan's can- 
vases.. Among them one may mention "April," 
a man among a flock of sheep in the trees 
against the sweep of a hill, the mottled April 
sunlight saturating woods and hillside ; "In the 
Autumn Woods," a figure bathed in the sub- 
dued ruddy glow of the woods in autumn. 

In his landscapes the passage of light among 
the tree trunks and over the undulating earth 
increases the feeling of solidity and movement. 
Costigan studies the milieu, the surroundings 
and envelopments of his forms, but he never 
forgets form for its mere surroundings. 
In a picture like "Last Part of Winter," he 
makes us feel the depth of the woods, the 
strong life of the trees, the ever-renewed vital- 
ity of the earth breaking out of the grip of 
winter. One feels that he loves nature. That 
she is for him a renewer of sympathies, a never- 
failing source of inspiration. 

A Nature Lover 

This love of nature, with Costigan, is a very 
real thing. It is not simply that he finds her 
paintable, a pleasant model for an afternoon's 
sketching. Nature to him is more than model : 
she is the companion, the sustainer, the source 
of life and beauty. Looking at Costigan's 
paintings, one is not at all surprised to know 
that he lives on the land. He has a farm near 
Orangeburg, N. Y., where he stays all the 
year 'round, painting and looking after his 
sheep, cows, goats and chickens. Among these 
creatures of the earth, he finds plenty of mate- 
rial for his art. 

Costigan's work was first exhibited at the 
MacDowell Club in 1915. Since that time it has 
been shown at the Corcoran Gallery in Wash- 
ington, in the exhibitions of 1916, 1919 and 
1921, and at a number of Academy shows. At 
the Academy show in Brooklyn, in 1920, he 
won the third Hallgarten prize, and in the 
same year he took the water-color prize at the 
Salmagundi Club. His painting shown at the 
1921 exhibition in the Corcoran Gallery was 
sold to the Duncan Phillips Memorial Collec- 
tion, in Washington. Costigan's work is soon 
to be seen, I believe, in a one-man show in one 
of the New York galleries. 

Costigan's painting is winning its way among 
the critically minded lovers of American art. 
For a man in his middle thirties, he has already 
won a large measure of appreciation. It is, of 
course, impossible to predict what the future 
will bring to a painter as to any other mortal. 
But it is not too rash to predict that Costigan 
will go far if he lives up to the promise and 
the fulfilment of his early work. 




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QASSIC for October 

The Picture Book De Luxe of the movie world 

Presents Rodolph Valentino as the first winner in its cover contest for the October 
number. 

A Star in the Making, this month, is Norma Talmadge. Remember her in "The 
Battle Cry of Peace" and "De Luxe Annie" and "The Safety Curtain" and — all her other 
great roles! 

An article on "Famous Salomes" wonderfully illustrated, to be the first of a series. 
"Famous Camilles" in preparation. 

The prettiest picture of Marion Davies ever published. 

A new department to be called "Iris In." The fourth of "The Darkest Hour" series. 

Two pages of pictures from Nazimova's "Salome" with two beautiful drawings. 

A double spread page of stills from photoplays whose inspiration has been famous 
paintings: The "Hope" of Frederick Watts, "The Bashful Suitor" of Josef Israel, "The 
Beggar Maid" of Sir Edward Burne-Jones, and "The Young Painter" of Rembrandt. 
This is the most artistic and ambitious attempt we have yet made. 

No lover of the beautiful can afford to miss this number of 

The Picture Book De Luxe of the movie world. 

QASSIC for October 



Page Seventy-One 



SuADOWLAND 




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A Threshold of the Long Ago is Bath 



{Continued from page 54) 



of old Bath he espied a gentleman who had 
insisted upon wearing his top-boots to the ball. 
Nash went over to him. He did not encourage 
innovations. He extinguished the guest be- 
fore the entire assemblage by asking him 
why he had omitted to bring in his horse. 

Yet cities, like republics, are ungrateful 
things. And Nash, who for years had been 
the companion of royalty and the adored of 
all women, became infirm. He lost his high 
authority. Others came to replace him — after 
a fashion he was quickly forgotten. He died 
in poverty in a mean house of a mean street 
of old Bath . . . That brought him to atten- 
tion again. The Corporation of Bath gave him 
a grand funeral. It erected a statue to his 
distinguished memory in the Pump Room. And 
finally elevated his tomb to a place among 
those of the princes in Bath Abbey, with this 
single significant line upon his monument : 

"Bathoniae elegantiae arbiter." 

A Gothic Church that Satisfies 

Great as is the Pump Room, Bath Abbey, 
which stands cheek by jowl with it, is far 
greater still. Its high tower we have seen 
dominating the first views of the city that one 
gets from the railway train. That tower, it- 
self, arouses no high praises in the minds of 
the modern Bathonians. They are inclined to 
think that without the high spire of the new 
Roman Catholic church hard by, it would not 
give the proper emphasis to the skyline. With 
this view, I disagree. Bath Abbey, to me, is 
one of the most completely satisfactory 
churches that ever I have seen. In some ways 
it is like a handsome woman, whose features 
individually will not analyze satisfactorily, 
yet taken together produce an ensemble tre- 
mendously alluring. 

So it is with Bath Abbey. Taken individu- 
ally, its architectural features are not alluring. 
Frequently, they are not even good. The main 
western facade with its double rows of angels 
climbing heavenward on Jacob's Ladders ex- 
cites one risibilities. They are fearfully fat 
little angels, who with four hundred years of 
steady climbing (but no arriving) ought to be 
as thin as athletes. Moreover, time has not 
dealt gently with these children. It takes a 
deal of imagination to see them as a real con- 
tribution to the artistic treasures of Great 
Britain. 

Yet, do not make fun of Bath Abbey. Other- 
wise you shall have to eat your words once 
you have gone within the venerable edifice. 
There, surprise awaits you. One of the light- 
est, one of the most delicate, one of the most 
completely satisfactory Gothic churches that 
ever you have visited. This is bound to be your 
verdict. It is the verdict of generations. A 
church which in its details is generally un- 
satisfactory, in the mass is a rare triumph of 
light and beauty. They call it "the lantern of 
England," and well they may. 

Analyzing the Quaint Charm 

To me, however, the Bath that calls with 
irresistible appeal is the Bath of the open, the 
Bath of the high-reaching downs and of the 
lovely streets lined with lovelier houses, of 
the town itself. When I walk those streets, 
I realize that never again can there be in all 
this world a town quite like this. Modern con- 
ditions, chief amongst them the swift develop- 
ment of modern urban transport, will never 
again give us a strictly resort town of rows 
on rows of tightly built city houses. Even 
Bath is beginning to turn her head upon her 
own magnificence. There are too many house- 
agents signs upon these old houses. If you 
will closely observe, you will find that many 



of them are vacant, and have so been this long 
while. Dust gathers in their great rooms. 
The fireplaces upon which I should like to 
write a book have been cold these many years, 
the lovely ceilings are faded and broken. The 
houses are, far too many of them, deserted. 
Modern Bath, which does her best to hold 
her population at about an even fifty thousand 
folk, is building its new houses detached and 
in fine lawns upon the hilltops. 

Yet old Bath does her best to conceal her 
scars, her visible hurts of time. She has an 
old maid's cunning in the thing. And an old 
maid's family pride in the brass plates upon 
the frontages of these houses — here Dickens 
lived, and here Oliver Goldsmith, and here 
Horace Walpole ; here Sheridan, the drama- 
tist ; and Rauzzini, the musician ; John Wood, 
the architect; and Sir William Herschel, the 
astronomer. In fact, it was at his house at 
19 New King Street, Bath, that Herschel dis- 
covered Uranus . . . The names multiply : 
Sir Thomas Lawrence, Gainsborough, Words- 
worth, Richardson, Macaulay, Southey, Louis 
Napoleon, Queen Charlotte, George IV — the 
list runs to a great length. You ought to 
know your English history well when you go 
to Bath. Then and only then can you really 
walk its streets with the great figures of the 
long ago. 

A Literary Background Desirable 

And you ought to know English literature 
as well. Certainly, your Dickens. For what 
is Bath without its suggestions of Mr. Pick- 
wick and every turn and corner ; at the White 
Hart (as I have said on the precise site of the 
Grand Pump Room Hotel) we can see him 
again being welcomed by Angelo Cyrus Ban- 
tam, Esqre, M. C. Here it was that Sam 
Weller performed, whilst an old gentleman 
sitting in the Institution Gardens but last year 
offered to show me the very house where the 
estimable Mr. Weller was entertained at "a 
friendly swarry, consisting of a boiled leg of 
mutton with the usual trimmings," by the most 
dignified flunkey, Mr. John Smaucker and "a 
select company of Bath footmen." The little 
old gentleman averred it as his humble opinion 
that the old town once had held flunkey's clubs. 
But upon being pressed in the matter changed 
the talk to the marital possibilities of the 
Prince of Wales — a most perplexing matter 
to the English. 

If time but permitted, I should take you out 
into the lovely vicinage of Bath ; to the nice 
old cathedral city of Wells, if you would but 
give me the opportunity, certainly to Castle 
Coombe and Farleigh Castle. But I should 
never let you leave Bath without ascending at 
least to Camden Crescent. A _ steep climb, but 
very much worth while. It is up there that 
one goes to see the day die ; the sun goes slowly 
down over the western hills that send their 
half -day shadows down upon the Somerset 
Avon — slowing wending — its way to Bristol 
and the sea. At autumn this view is at its 
best. Preferably in a sharp October day when 
a lifeless, breathless air sends the thin grey 
smoke straight upwards from the many chim- 
ney-pots of the town . . . The smoke settles 
into grey haze. The narrow streets and the 
irregular rows of roof-tops lose their "defini- 
tion. Only the spires, the square tower of 
Bath Abbey, and the silhouetted rims of those 
western hills remain definite and outlined. 
Bath is falling to sleep. Never those twin- 
kling lights that modernity has set into her 
streets and houses . . . Bath is falling to 
sleep. She loves sleep, this dear old lady . . . 
Other towns, and newer and far less lovelier 
ones, may prate of progress . . . Bath slum- 
bers in her memories. 



Page Seventy-Two 



SUAUOWLAND 



Call the Play -Doctor 

(Continued from page 35) 



Mr. Cohan took the ten characters of the play 
and constructed an entirely new story. It was 
then a hit. 

It would appear that even most adroit dram- 
atists and those thoroly acquainted with the 
theater, find it necessary to remodel either be- 
fore or during production. It may be stated, 
then, that the dramatist who refuses to have 
any rewriting of his plays is one who has 
small acquaintance with the theater. Dion 
Boucicault not only rewrote old plays, but, I 
am credibly informed, was in the habit, during 
rehearsals, of rewriting scenes after the cus- 
tom of Mr. Fitch, Mr. Belasco, and Mr. Cohan. 

It is generally understood that to get 
Augustus Thomas to change a line would be 
about the same as to ask him to lop off his 
right arm. However, on the first night of 
"The Earl of Pawtucket" in London, John 
Harwood, who played the part of Wilkins, the 
valet, put in a gag unbeknown to Mr. Thomas. 
After the laughter had died down, the actor 
became alarmed, knowing the author was in 
front ; but Mr. Thomas came around after 
the show and said : "Harwood, I did not know 
until tonight that Wilkins was such a good 
part. I like that gag you put in. Put it in 
again tomorrow night and we will use it as 
the tag of the play." The line, strange as it 
may seem, was "It is raining." At that time 
people had to be rather careful with Augustus 
Thomas, as he carried something that looked 
like a malacca cane, but which was in reality 
a sokd bar of steel. Young Harwood feared 
the malacca cane. 

When we come to examine the history of 
very many highly successful plays, we discover, 
with few exceptions, that the work of the 
dramatist is aided enormously by an expert 
producer, or "Play-Doctor," during rehearsals. 
Another point may be considered : a great num- 
ber of plays which were failures when first pro- 
duced, were rewritten and succeeded after their 
weak points had been discovered during perfor- 
mances. "Shore Acres," for example, was first 
presented under the name of "The Hawthornes," 
touched up by Mr. Heme and produced under 
"Shoreacres Subdivision," and finally retouched 
and reproduced under the title "Shore Acres." 
"Hearts of Oak" was a failure under the name 
of "The Mariner's Compass" and, rewritten, 
was a success under the name "Hearts of Oak." 
The late A. M. Palmer produced success after 
success and he stated that these successes were 
due in great part to the fact that these plays 
were submitted to drastic revision either by 
Alfred R. Cazauran or Eugene Presbury. 

Of plays that failed on try-out productions, 
and finally patched up by the Play-Doctor, one 
of the best-known examples was Bronson 
Howard's "Shenandoah." Mr. Belasco's re- 
writing, and ultimate great success of this 
drama, is well known to playgoers. The only 
successful play of which I ever heard that was 
played exactly as written — not a syllable 
changed — was Booth Tarkington's "Clarence." 
During rehearsals Frederick Stanhope, the pro- 
ducer, suggested to Mr. Tarkington the trans- 
position of a certain line. The change was 
made. It was rehearsed for several days. 
Came the dress rehearsal, when Mr. Stanhope 
discovered that he had been mistaken, apolo- 
gized for the change, and it was then replaced 



as written. On the other hand, Mr. Tarking- 
ton's play, "The Country Cousin," was pro- 
duced five times, and during each interval was 
rewritten by the author. 

After many years around the theater I can 
state, truthfully, that I have never seen a play 
produced which was a success that wasn't given 
what might be called a drastic overhauling, 
either before or during production. I have seen 
many plays brought to success which owed that 
success, in great part, to scenes which were in- 
troduced either at rehearsals or while it was 
being presented out-of-town. 

Only lately I saw a play at Atlantic City. 
I asked the producer the next day how he had 
permitted certain things to happen in the play — 
things which were inimical to its success. He 
told me that the dramatist hed had these vari- 
ous blotches pointed out, but had refused to al- 
low any changes to be made at rehearsal. Now, 
that the play was produced, this author was 
most contrite and anxious to assist the pro- 
ducer in making necessary changes. I saw this 
play in New York some weeks later and was 
pleased that all the absurdities in the first per- 
formances had been eliminated. 

Many a likely play has gone to the store- 
house thru the stubbornness of the dramatist 
who refused to have his manuscript tampered 
with. 

Those of the theater Know very well that 
what is really in a play cannot be discovered in 
the reading. Often a play which seems a good 
sound piece of workmanship, is put in rehearsal 
and once in the hands of actors, it is found that 
it simply wont act. Without the actors — nobody 
can tell ! The action and reaction, one charac- 
ter against the other, reveals the weakness 
which the Play-Doctor must mend. Then, too, 
many plays intended as straight drama, but 
owing to the audiences discovering the ludicrous 
in them, have been played as farce. Some of 
these, of recent years were : "Officer 666," "The 
Bad Man," "Bulldog Drummond," and "The 
Manoeuvers of Jane." Let us take as examples 
two musical pieces in town to-day, which are 
hits. Both of these were presented out-of-town, 
and both seemed hopeless. One of them was 
put in the hospital and underwent a major 
operation. The other enjoyed having two clever 
actors in the cast. One elaborated his part with 
considerable skill, while the other wrote in two 
important scenes. When the play was produced 
these two scenes were the high-lights of the 
piece. But every musical piece cannot have a 
Charles Judels. 

In recent years the Play-Doctor, or producer, 
has come to appreciate his importance to such 
an extent that he is able to exact a percentage 
of the profits, or a part of the author's royal- 
ties. Indeed, there are several specialists who 
will not undertake to produce a play under any 
other conditions. Outside of Mr. Belasco and 
Mr. Cohan, the best-known specialists of the 
time are : Sam Forrest, Frederick Stanhope, 
Max Marcin, John Harwood, Robert Milton, 
William Post, Roi Cooper McGrue, Oscar 
Eagle, Hugh Ford and Walter Hackett. The 
tales these men could tell ! 

There is, of course, another side to the pic- 
ture. Owen Davis lately said : "Some plays are 
born rotten, others have rottenness thrust upon 
them." 



ll MlilMiiiiuiiij in mimiimmii Minimi urn mm immimmmmij 



The Exacting Art of Caricature 



(Continued from page 68) 



Frueh and Ralph Barton have actually achieved 
any degree of proficiency in this field. 

Frueh is European in manner, and at times 
achieves striking critical likenesses with a few 
strokes of the pen — likenesses in which the 
persons limned are revealed as embodiments of 
individual character. Frueh's very cleverness, 
however, tends to defeat his aim. His amazing 
adroitness far outstrips his analytic penetra- 
tion ; and the attractiveness of his technique — 
his fascinating surface brilliancy— focuses at- 
tention on the externals of his subject, and de- 
tracts from a more leisurely contemplation of 



inner qualities. All this is opposed to the 
animating spirit of the best caricature. 

Barton, on the other hand, excels in his in- 
tellectual qualities more than in his technique. 
One is attracted by his cultural attributes 
rather than his manual dexterity. As yet his 
technique is tentalive — he is still searching for 
a personal means of pictorial speech. But even 
now he has succeeded in many instances in 
making his critical intelligence more or less 
articulate. All in all, he bears a closer re- 
lationship to the European masters of cari- 
cature than any of his compatriots. 




Are you 
a sensitive person? 

NATURALLY, you are. Every 
person of culture and refinement 
possesses those finer sensibilities that 
mark the gentleman and gentlewoman. 

And particularly are such people 
sensitive about the little personal 
things that so quickly identify you as a 
desirable associate — socially or in busi- 
ness. 

Attention to the condition of your 
breath ought to be as systematic a part 
of your daily toilet routine as the 
washing of your face and hands. Yet 
how many, many men and women neg- 
lect this most important precaution ! 

The reason is a perfectly natural 
one. Halitosis (or unpleasant breath, 
as the scientific term has it) is an in- 
sidious thing you may be troubled with 
and still be entirely ignorant of. 

Your mirror can't tell you. Usually you 
can't tell it yourself. And the subject is 
too delicate for your friends — maybe even 
your wife or husband — to care to mention 
to you. So you may unconsciously offend 
your friends and those you come in inti- 
mate contact with day by day. 

Halitosis (unpleasant breath) is usually 
temporary, due to some local condition. 
Smoking often causes it, the finest cigar 
becoming the offender even hours after it 
has brought the smoker pleasure. Again, 
halitosis may be chronic, due to some or- 
ganic disorder which a doctor or dentist 
should diagnose and correct. 

Most forms of halitosis, however, may 
easily be overcome by the regular use of 
Listerine, the well-known liquid anti- 
septic, as a gargle and mouth-wash. 

Listerine possesses unusually effective 
properties as an antiseptic. It quickly 
halts food fermentation in the mouth and 
dispels the unpleasant halitosis incident to 
such a condition. 

Provide yourself with a bottle today, 
and relieve yourself of that uncomfortable 
uncertainty as to whether your breath is 
sweet, fresh and clean. — Lambert Pharm- 
acal Company, Saint Louis, Missouri. 



HALITOSIS 

use 
LISTERINE 




— — « 



~— 4 



Page Seventy-Three 



SLlADOWLAND 



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Bl0Ti©rj.Diav&E. 



MAGAZINE 



OCTOBER 



We announce for the October Mo- 
tion Picture Magazine: 

"That Indescribable Something," 
by Frederick Van Vranken. Mr. 

Van Vranken takes several feminine 
stars and analyzes their particular per- 
sonalities and — at the same time — their 
stardom. 

Dick Barthelmess is a figure of con- 
siderable interest. He is building his 
career surely. Adele Whitely Fletcher 
interviewed him and found him the sane 
and normal youth — the youth with 
dreams and ideals. It is a fascinating 
story. 

Then there are colorful impressions, 
penned by Doris Kenyon. They are 
delightful things, descriptive of a num- 
ber of screen celebrities. And they are 
endowed with the same charm which en- 
hances Miss Kenyon's work on the stage 
and on the screen and which has brought 
recognition to her books of verse. 

All in all, the October Motion Pic- 
ture Magazine is beautiful and inter- 
esting — just the thing for the cool 
autumn evenings. 

THE OCTOBER 

M0TI0N.&ICTV&L 

MAGAZINE 



When Doctors Disagree 

{Continued from page 33) 



Middleton Murry, dean of English critics, 
who gave a forthright appraisement, tho he 
let the cat out of the bag by saying that he 
understood only "four-fifths" of the contents. 
Almost unwittingly he referred to Joyce as a 
"half -demented genius," and later regretted it. 
After meeting the author in Paris, he ex- 
pressed his regret, and declared that he would 
have to write a book about "Ulysses" to do it 
common justice. 

Arnold Bennett was restrainedly panegyric, 
greeted the book as the work of a high order 
of genius and as a literary landmark. He was 
constrained to mention, however, that he was 
not in a position to devote the rest of his life 
to a discovery of what "Ulysses" was all 
about. 

A Parody Done in the Grand 
Manner 

What is "Ulysses" about? and what sort 
of fellow is the author ? are two questions 
that are pressing hard for answers. 

I was told by Mr. Joyce that the most satis- 
factory answer to the first question has been 
given by a Frenchman. Valery Larbaud, whose 
private lecture on "Ulysses" prior to its pub- 
lication appeared in the Nouvelle Revue 
Francaise, the best of the French literary 
reviews. M. Larbaud is the translator of the 
works of Samuel Butler, and has, for a for- 
eigner, an uncanny understanding and apprecia- 
tion of English literature. His lecture serves 
as an admirable and almost necessary preface 
to the book it treats. 

As to the second question, every man will 
have to find his own answer. If you can read 
"Ulysses" intelligently, you will probably know 
as well as anyone what kind of a man is Joyce : 
for therein he has inscribed his heart and mind 
and soul. 

To read "Ulysses" intelligently you will 
have to refresh your memory with the ad- 
ventures of the great Greek hero, after whom 
the book is named. The key to the mystery is 
to be found, indeed, in Homer's "Odyssey," of 
which "Ulysses" is a parody done in the grand 
manner. 

The general scheme of the "Odyssey," or 
rather the author's idea of that scheme, is 
closely followed. The first three chapters in 
"Ulysses" correspond to the first five songs 
of the "Odyssey." Stephen Dedalus is the pro- 
totype of Talemachus. You will recognize 
him as the hero in "The Artist as a Young 
Man," with which Joyce won a place in the 
literary firmament. In the next eight songs 
of the "Odyssey," Joyce finds twelve distinct 
episodes, narrating the adventures of Ulysses. 
So that in the fourth to the twelfth chapter, 
inclusive, of "Ulysses" you make the acquaint- 
ance of one Leopold Bloom, the spiritual de- 
scendant of Homer's hero. The last songs of 
the "Odyssey" tell of the return of Ulysses to 
Ithaca and Penelope, and find their counter- 
part in the last three chapters of "Ulysses," de- 
scribing the return of Bloom to his wife, 
Molly. 

Dublin is the Setting 

The scene is laid in Dublin. The action 
takes place in less than twenty-four hours — 
to be precise, between eight o'clock of one 
morning and three o'clock of the next. 

You follow Bloom as he gets out of bed; 
you accompany him from the bed-chamber, 
where he has just left his wife, to the kitchen, 
to the antichamber, then to the butcher, to a 
funeral, the editorial rooms of a newspaper, a 
restaurant, public library, the bar of a hotel, 
a bathing beach, a maternity hospital, the "red 
light" district of Dublin, where he remains 
just a trifle too long. The last chapter is de- 
voted to a transcription in unpunctuated prose 
of an interior soliloquy by Bloom's wife. Noth- 
ing is left unrecorded of the lives of these 
Dubliners. The round unvarnished tale is told 
with an overwhelming wealth of detail. 

But "Ulysses" is not merely a chronicle. In- 
terwoven into the action are veritable essays 
on philosophy, theology, literary criticism, 
politics and history. The latest scientific the- 



ories are discussed. The interludes and digres- 
sions are all of a piece with the action, and the 
comedy in eighteen episodes is a complete, 
carefully organized unit. 

When you perceive the artistic unity of the 
book, all sorts of analogies and correspondences 
suggest themselves, and back of the brilliant 
melange of words and deeds, profound obser- 
vations, inconsequential drolleries and splendid 
images, you begin to realize there is a design 
far more complicated than you at first thought. 

Each episode, indeed, has its esoteric sig- 
nificance, its particular symbol, representing an 
organ of the human" body, and is composed in 
a distinct style. Let us take an example : epi- 
sode four of the adventures of Bloom. Its 
unwritten title in Aeolus. The scene is laid 
in the editorial rooms of a newspaper. The 
organ to which it corresponds is the lungs. 
The art of which it treats is rhetoric. Its 
color is red. The symbolic figure is the editor. 
Journalism is compared to incest. (Upton Sin- 
clair take note.) 

This plan Joyce has designed for himself, 
not for the reader. There is no preface, no 
chapter heading or subhead to reveal it. It 
was this omission of any clue to the cunningly 
concealed plan of the book that so irked 
Arnold Bennett that he said Mr. Joyce had 
overstepped the bounds of courtesy to his read- 
ers. But courtesy is a relative thing after all, 
and to a lettered person much of the charm of 
the book would be lost by aids to the under- 
standing. There is a fascination in solving 
mysteries. 

Scholars have variously interpreted the char- 
acter of Homer's hero, whom Joyce has at- 
tempted to modernize, so to speak, in the per- 
son of Bloom. We know that he is a very 
human man. He loves his country, his mother 
and father, his wife, his son and his friends. 
When confronted by the sufferings of others, 
he is sympathetic and benevolent. But linked 
with his virtues are also human weaknesses. 
This is likewise true of Leopold Bloom. He is 
afraid of death. He dallies too long on Circe's 
isle, as Bloom does at the brothel. In brief, 
Bloom is entirely human, no better and no 
worse than most of us. And the conditions of 
existence in the ancient world where Ulysses 
has his being are found to be negligibly differ- 
ent from those in modern Dublin. 

About the Author 

And now a few words concerning the author 
himself. 

I first met Joyce in the cosy book shop of 
his publisher, Miss Sylvia Beach, an American, 
on the rue de l'Odeon, Paris. (Let it be said 
that the book is a monument to her enterprise 
and courage : for in view of its erstwhile sup- 
pression in the "Little Review" the chance of 
its success was not great, and the outlay was 
heavy. Joyce and his book have met the same 
fate accorded Baudelaire, Flaubert and Whit- 
man.) 

James Joyce was born in 1882 at Dublin. 
He comes of an old family, originating from 
the south and west of Ireland — that Ireland, 
which has its affinities with Spain, France and 
Italy, and to which England is a foreign coun- 
try, notwithstanding the bond of a common 
language. 

He was a pupil of the Jesuit Fathers, and 
was given a solid training in the classics. He 
expresses no opinion either way in regard to 
the Jesuits, tho he has told me that from the 
point of view of his intellectual development 
he owes them much. 

His studies of the humanities concluded, 
Joyce devoted himself to the pursuit of medi- 
cine, first at the University of Dublin, later in 
Paris. At the same time he studied music 
and philosophy — scholastic and Greek — for his 
own pleasure and without any view to a career. 
Returning to Ireland, he married, soon expatri- 
ated himself, and lived at Zurich, Trieste and 
Rome, getting a livelihood by teaching. Mean- 
while, he continued his philosophical and 
mathematical pursuits. Altogether he spent 
fourteen years in Italy, and it was in Italy 



Page Seventy-Four 



that his two children were born. They speak 
Italian as their native tongue. 

As an Irishman, Joyce took no effective 
part in the war. He feels little or no con- 
cern for Ireland's internal conflicts. 

"I dont give a d n what they do there," 

he said recently, after his wife and children 
had left Paris for Dublin. "My only con- 
cern is for the safety of my family." He was 
worried to the point of despair that something 
might happen to them. His fears were not 
groundless : for in a few days he received a 
cable, saying that the train in which they 
were riding to Galway was bombed and they 
were forced to return to London. 

So Irish That the Irish Hate Him 

Joyce is disowned equally by the Nationalists 
and Unionists. He fights no cause, belongs to 
no faction, and in his remarks on the political 
situation in Ireland maintains an impartial at- 
titude, looking at conditions from the point of 
view of a historian ; and, while he is never per- 
sonally involved with the interests of his coun- 
try, he is, as James Huneker once said of him, 
so Irish that the Irish hate him. 

However, his books cannot help but enlarge 
the respect of the intellectuals of all nations 
for Ireland. What Ibsen was to Norway, 
what Strindberg was to Sweden, what Nietz- 
sche was to Germany, what Romain Rolland is 
to France, James Joyce is to Ireland. With 
the publication of "Ulysses," Ireland has made 
her entry into the great community of Eur- 
opean letters. 

In personal manner reserved and reticent, 
Joyce impressed me on first view as being what 
the French call difficult. On the occasion of 
further meetings, however, I learned that he 
is the most affable of men. He is shy of curi- 
osity-mongers. Devoid of pose or affectation 
of any kind, he knows his own worth, which 
he does not prize too highly ; and he is irri- 
tated by those who show a deferential attitude 
in his presence. 

Social rencontres and tea fights he religiously 
stays away from. He would far rather spend 
his time battling with the "devils of syntax 
and epithet." To all the literary or social elite 
he prefers for company a club-footed gargon, 
with whom I have sometimes seen him. 

He is always thinking, always observing. 

"See if you can describe that woman's 
smile," he said to me one day over a cup of 
Bordeaux blanc in a cafe, where was seated 
an old woman, whose wrinkles and rouged 
nose were the ensigns of decrepitude and in- 
temperance. Her smile over a jest made by 
the gargon was an accomplishment which did 
not escape the prehensile eye of Joyce. 

Joyce knows little or nothing of modern 
literary currents. 

"It embarrasses me dreadfully when people 
ask me if I have read so-and-so just out," he 
said. "I have read virtually nothing for the past 
seven years." Recently he ordered a copy of the 
"Arabian Nights' Entertainment." 

In his nature there is a decided Greek strain. 



His extreme individualism is Greek, his non- 
moral attitude toward life is Greek, and the 
practice of his art in its purity and perfection 
is Greek. He has told me that of the Greeks 
Aristotle is his favorite, being the most mod- 
ern. "Read Aristotle," he said, "then apply 
his reflections to the common daily life about 
you here, and see how pat they are." 

There is too much hazy metaphysics in 
Plato. Homer, of course, he has read from 
boyhood, not for love of the author — Joyce 
says there is much in the "Odyssey" to prove 
Butler's contention that it was written by a 
woman — nor for love of Greek poetry, but 
primarily for his love of the hero. 

When, as a schoolboy, his teacher asked the 
members of the class to name their favorite 
hero, and such names as Napoleon, Jesus, Saint 
Francis of Assisi and the national heroes of 
Ireland were given by his classmates, Joyce 
replied, "Ulysses." The psychogenesis of his 
great parody dates from this period. 

Joyce gives me the impression of being con- 
tinually deep in dreams. Yet, he can let him- 
self go at any time, and in play he can go as 
far as who goes farthest and a little farther. 
He is a Celt of the Celts, and has that rare 
combination of seriousness and abandonment. 
He is a rare bon vivant and loves good wine 
and good cheer. Paris is Nirvana to his moral 
nature, for here he can do as he likes with- 
out interference from the "unco guid." His 
same disregard for literary conventions mani- 
fests itself in his daily life. He does what 
the spirit listeth. 

He is always a gentleman in his cups or 
out. Good manners are a religion with him. 
It is always the manner, whether in art or in 
life. 

A Staunch Friend 

Joyce's urbanity never descends to gregari- 
ousness. He has but few friends. Those few, 
however, are staunch. One of them is Adri- 
enne Monnier, poetess and presiding genius at 
the Maison des Amis des Livres, a bookshop 
in Paris, where the foremost of the present 
generation of French litterateurs do congre- 
gate. She has just written for private circu- 
lation a lyric eulogy of Joyce, wherein she 
celebrates the allegiance certain women have 
given to Joyce and his art during the course 
of his life's work. 

There is only one thing I would rather do 
occasionally than to get deep into a cup of 
Asti : and that is to get deep in that cup in the 
company of James Joyce and to listen mean- 
while to his "wild wisdom" and his Irish 
mother wit. Of the tangled threads of dis- 
course I dont remember much afterwards ; but 
I have a residue of impression that seems, 
somehow, to take the edge off "life's more 
bitter flavors." That residue is a sweet cynic- 
ism which confidentially bids defiance to the 
serious-minded world about me, and enables 
me to lift my face with a smile on my lips and 
the tongue in my check to the Master-Dra- 
matist of this great farce-comedy we call life. 




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Page Seventy-Five 



Cup Plates of Olden Times as Collection Objects 



(Continued from page 41) 



world's theaters just at the 
moment when we Americans 
have developed our finest 
theatrical talent in that direc- 
tion? 

ART 

The Etchings of Edward 
Hopper. Fine examples of 
the work of a rising exponent 
of this popular field of art- 
istic endeavor, with editorial 
comment by the distinguished 
artist and critic Guy Pene du 
Bois. 

DECORATION 

The House of Fantasy. In 

other words, the home of 
Robert Winthrop Chandler, 
the man who prefers to decor- 
ate the interiors of the houses 
of his friends to being a social 
decoration himself. 

TRAVEL 

Peterboro', a Town of Artistic 
Personality, by Edward Hun- 
gerford. The author of "The 
Personality of American 
Cities" gives us a fascinating 
pen-picture of the McDowell 
Colony and the beautiful 
countryside in which it is sit- 
uated. 

CARICATURE 

Wynn Invades Germany. 

Shadowland's well-known 
contributor sends some 
sketches from the banks of the 
Rhine that are inimitable. 

SUADOWLANP 

for OCTOBER 



The pottery forms were decorated with 
printed designs similar to those found on larger 
plates. Thus American historical subjects, Eng- 
lish views, Franklin's maxims, Dr. Syntax, Don 
Quixote, the Willow pattern and a long train 
of other devices were used. 

Cup plates do not seem to have been included 
in the black printed ware made by Saddler & 
Green at Liverpool, in the last part of the 
eighteenth century. But early in the nineteenth 
century dark blue printing was employed on 
pottery produced in large quantities at Stafford- 
shire. Enoch Wood (1759-1840), who is 
thought by some to have made much of _ the 
unmarked dark blue ware bearing American 
devices, designed the well-known "Landing of 
the Pilgrims," the "Cadmus" series, the "Bat- 
tery," and others with a border of seashells. 

A Variety of Subjects Furnished 
Inspiration 

Clews, who took over the Cobridge works 
from Stevenson in 1818, made the "States" 
series, "Landing of Lafayette," and others in 
blue, beside the "Picturesque Views" of places 
on the Hudson River, in various colors. Don 
Quixote's adventures furnished subjects for a 
dozen or more designs printed by Clews; 
while the three Tours of Dr. Syntax, after 
designs by T. Rowlandson, published from 
1809 to 1821, are also by Clews. They are 
among the most sought after by collectors. To 
the first Tour belongs "Dr. Syntax and the 
Dairy Maid." The border of flowers and 
scrolls usually found on the larger plates, is 
often reduced materially in the cup plates or is 
again omitted entirely. 

The "Beauties of America," by J. & W. 
Ridgway, had a border of rose-leaf medallions, 
and views of some of the then famous buildings 
in Boston, New York and oth;r American 
cities. These date from 1814 to 1830, and seem 
to be the only American views made by this 
firm. Later the brothers dissolved partnership, 
and various colors and other designs were used. 

Joseph Stubbs and Thomas Mayer, of Burs- 
lem, likewise made cup plates in dark blue. A 
view of Woodlands, near Philadelphia, is by 
the former, and the arms of South Carolina, 
one of a set of eleven, is by the latter. 

R S W (Ralph, Stephenson & Williams, of 
Cobridge) produced some of the best dark blue 
American views, with oak-leaf and acorn bor- 
der, and those of the Boston State House by 
Rogers, are well known. But many of the 
best landscape and portrait plates bear no dis- 
tinguishing maker's mark. It is sometimes pos- 
sible to identify them by the borders used, 
when they coincide with those on marked 
pieces, but the center designs were often copied 
by one factory from another. The borders only 
seem to have been the exclusive property of 
the original designer. 

Cup plates were much in favor about 1840, 
and included local souvenirs, like the Bunker 
Hill Monument, the heads of statesmen, and 
some were adorned with the political emblems 
of the 1840 campaign. Among others subjects 
found on these cup plates are the log cabin, 
Fort Meigs, President Harrison, the Benjamin 
Franklin steamboat, eagle and shield, etc. 

A Well-Known Series 

One of the best-known cup plate series is 
Hall's "Hampshire Scenery," with borders of 
various flowers, such as primroses, hepatica, 
etc., resembling many of the Clews borders. 
They are of a rich blue color. The "Quadru- 
peds Series" is another favorite for collectors. 
Other Staffordshire potters produced cup 
plates for the American market. In such cases 
it was of course wise to select American sub- 
jects. A series that makes a strong appeal, con- 



tains, among other things, a view of the first 
United States Mint, Philadelphia. This has a 
characteristic border that introduces scrolls, 
eagles and flowers. It bears the name of 
Joseph Stubbs. 

The lovely dark blue Davenport ware, with 
designs in the Chinese style, are desirable, and 
when found are generally exceedingly inter- 
esting. There is a constantly growing appre- 
ciation of cup plates as collecting objects 
among sophisticated collectors. The majority 
of the glass cup plates were crystalline glass, 
tho some were colored green, brown, blue, 
yellow, amber, rose, purple and perhaps other 
colors. There were many glass factories in this 
country in Colonial days, as well as later, and 
these supplied American housekeepers with 
cup plates, as well as other glass objects. 
Many of the cup plates of this period were 
not remarkable for their beauty of design. 

Certain cup plates bore mottoes and verses. 
Those made in Liverpool were among these. A 
Romance Series, originating in this city, con- 
tained some lines known as "Returning Hopes," 
as follows : 

When seamen to their homes return, 

And meet their wives or sweethearts dear, 

Each loving lass with rapture burns, 
To find her long-lost lover near. 

The Willow Pattern Legend 

The Willow pattern, used on cup plates as 
well as on the larger plates, has an interesting 
legend. 

A versified version is as follows : 

Two pigeons flying high, 
Chinese vessel sailing by, 
Weeping Willow hanging o'er, 
Bridge with three meu — if not four — 
Chinese temple, there it stands, 
Seems to cover all the land ; 
Apple tree with apples on, 
A pretty fence to end my song. 

A prose version of this legend follows : 

A Chinese mandarin had an only daughter, 
named Li Chi, who fell in love with Chang, a 
young man who lived in the island home repre- 
sented at the top of the pattern, and who had 
been her father's secretary. 

One day the father overheard them making 
vows of love under the orange tree, and he 
sternly forbade the unequal match ; but the 
lovers contrived to elope, lay concealed for a 
while in the gardener's cottage, and thence 
made their escape in a boat to the island home 
of the young lover. The enraged mandarin pur- 
sued them with a whip, and would have beaten 
them to death had not the gods rewarded their 
fidelity by changing them into turtle doves, as- 
shown in the picture. 

The design is called the Willow pattern, not 
only because it is a tale of disastrous love, but 
because the elopement occurred "when the wil- 
low begins to shed her leaves." The whole 
story is set forth in the pattern. To the right 
is the mandarin's country scat. It is two stories 
high, to show the rank and wealth of the pos- 
sessor ; in the foreground is a pavilion, in the 
background an orange tree, and to the right 
of the pavilion a peach tree, in full bearing. 
The estate is enclosed by an elegant wooden 
fence. At one end of the bridge is the famous 
willow tree, and at the other is the gardener's 
cottage, one story high, and so humble that the 
grounds are wholly uncultivated, the only green 
thing being a small fir at the back. At the top 
of the pattern (left-hand side) is an island 
with a cottage; the grounds are highly culti- 
vated, and much has been reclaimed from the 
water. The two birds of the picture are turtle 
doves. The three figures on the bridge are 
the mandarin's daughter, with a distaff ; nearest 
the cottage, the lover with a box, and nearest 
the willow tree, the mandarin with the whip. 



Page Seventy-Six 



SuiADQWLAND 



Grand Opera Sub Corv 
sule Giulio 

(Continued from page 26) 

fraulein out for a spree than a distinguished 
Roman actress meeting her lover. Her Sieg- 
linde is good, but her Elsa is only "cosi-cosi," 
as the Italians say. The best singing and act- 
ing she achieved was in the unequal and rem- 
iniscent "Die Tote Stadt." 

I repeat, Jeritza's claims to supersede Farrar 
are far from obvious. Singularly enough, the 
latter never sang better than she did last sea- 
son, her acting was more finished, and in 
"Zaza" she toned down flamboyancies and ex- 
uberances which were offensive even to her 
admirers. The farewell demonstrations in her 
honor should have convinced Gatti-Casazza 
that he had erred in virtually forcing her out 
of the Metropolitan, and I believe the fact 
will be even more obvious next season. Jeritza 
is, indeed, a poor substitute for Geraldine, and 
I venture to prophesy that the rage for the 
former, so artfully fostered by a noisy claque 
and Teuton propagandists, will be short lived. 

Gatti-Casazza is known to be endeavoring to 
do away with the "star" system. But there 
will always be great popular figures in opera. 
It is easy enough to decry the "star" system 
when there are no Pattis and Carusos around. 
But whenever a singing actor of commanding 
powers comes to the front it is inevitable, and 
the public will continue to demand its favor- 
ites. It may be wise of Gatti to endeavor to 
cut the salaries of leading artists when they 
are excessive. Operatic artists, like the favor- 
ites of the screen, are worth what they bring 
as managerial investments, and no more. 

The autocrat of the Metropolitan, now that 
there is to be no opposition from the Chicago 
Company, is in a position, more or less, to 
offer his own terms, and to say to an artist 
"take or leave it." Consequently he has made 
some severe salary cuts, and has also reduced 
the number of guaranteed appearances, and 
in consequence there is much dissatisfaction in 
the front ranks of the opera corps. This has 
not been diminished by the impresario's an- 
nouncement that he is taking on a number of 
singers, principally Germans, with a view to 
increasing the Wagnerian repertory, as well 
as producing a new opera in German and re- 
viving Strauss's "Rosenkavalier." 

Additional resentment has been caused by 
the reduction of the already unduly scanty 
French repertory, and that resentment has 
been increased by the almost forced retire- 
ment of an admirable French artist, Madame 
Berat, who rather than sing in German, as 
requested by Gatti, withdrew from the com- 
pany. Berat's performance of the old mother 
in "Louise" was one of the most beautiful 
things ever done on the boards of the Metro- 
politan. She will be a great loss to the com- 
pany, and the cause of her retirement is an 
offense to good-taste. 

But if Gatti-Casazza has not been quite fair 
to either American or French artists, while 
he has been more generous in his favors to 
Italian and German singers, it remains to his 
credit that he has made the Metropolitan the 
first opera house in the world. Nowhere else, 
unaided by state or municipality, is there a 
house which gives a full and unbroken half 
year of grand opera, interpreted by great sing- 
ers, with a magnificent orchestra, a chorus of 
the first class and a mise en scene, with a few 
exceptions, of high artistic excellence. 

No one knows exactly what the profits or 
losses of the Metropolitan Opera Company 
have been, except the committee and the im- 
presario. But it is known that the latter some 
time since managed to balance accounts, and 
for the past two or three seasons there has 
been something on the right side of the 
operatic ledger. For having achieved the ap- 
parently impossible, Gatti-Casazza deserves 
much credit. But he must not let his success 
run away with him, or cause him to require 
an enlarged size in head-covering. Especially 
should he remember that he is running an 
American opera house. He might realize this 
better if he began by learning the language 
of the country which pays him so liberally. 



IfGUiiyGUSfiiiJii^ 



It Says So In 



T 



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wherever possible illustrated by the best artists or the 
most recent photographs. 

/QGerutv^ aims to be the woman's magazine par excel- 
lence. It presents all the latest and most reliable in- 
formation from the realms of society, fashion and the 
stage — but its scope is not confined to these. It appeals 
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dear to every woman's heart — charm ; a cleverly written 
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For ^ G<a ^t is the Mirror of Beauty. 

Page Seventy-Seven 



SWADOWLAND 



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POWDER $1.00 

CORLISS PALMER FOUNDA- 
TION CREAM— A heavy, flesh- 
color cream that will hide all 
blemishes and make the powder 
stick on as will nothing else. To 
cover a pimple, or a red nose, or 
the whole face for an all-day 
make-up, there is nothing like it. . .50 

CORLISS PALMER FACE 
ROUGE 50 

CORLISS PALMER LIP ROUGE .50 

THE FOUR, attractively boxed in 
set 2.50 

CORLISS PALMER VANISHING 
CREAM — A light, dry cream o£ 
purity, to be used in the morning, 
or at any time, to freshen the skin 
and make a foundation for the 
face powder 75 

CORLISS PALMER CLEANS- 
ING OR NIGHT CREAM — A 
heavier cream, to cleanse the face 
at night and to soften and beautify 
the skin 75 

CORLISS PALMER LEMON 
CREAM — An exquisite cream of 
even texture, purity and loveli- 
ness. For general use on the face 
and body 75 

THE THREE, attractively boxed 
in set 2.25 

CORLISS PALMER BEAUTI- 
FIER — A lotion of the finest 
quality, for those who do not care 
for creams as a cleanser. An 
absolute corrector of an oily com- 
plexion, a bleacher, an astringent, 
healer of blemishes, and a very 
great enemy of wrinkles 60 

Impressions Are Lasting 

Look Your Best at All Times 

We will mail, postpaid, any of the 
above preparations on receipt of price in 
stamps, cash, or money order. (In mail- 
ing coins, wrap them carefully to prevent 
them cutting a hole in your envelope.) 

RICHARD WALLACE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



The Camera Contest 

'SHADOWLAND" Searches for Art Thru a Lens— and Finds It 



AS befits a magazine expressing the arts, 
/-\ Shadowland is universally noted for 
the exquisite photography which is al- 
ways a feature of its pages. No less beautiful 
than the work of the professional photog- 
raphers is that of the amateur revealed every 
month by Shadowland in its Camera Contest, 
a nation-wide search for artistic effort that is 
proving as stimulating as its results are suc- 
cessful. 

In co-operation with the Pictorial Photog- 
raphers of America Shadowland conducts this 
contest in the fairest and most far-reaching 
manner, and we feel confident our readers will 
indorse the selections this month from the 
beautiful reproductions of the prize-winning 
efforts to be found on pages 58, 59, 60. They 
were selected this month by the following 
Judges : Mr. E. V. Brewster, Mr. John Wal- 
lace Gillies, and Mr. William A. Alcock. A 
list of the prize winners follows : 

First Prise. — "In York County." William 
Elbert Macnaughtan, 293 Cumberland Street, 
Brooklyn. 

Second Prise. — "Monk, Amalfi, Italy." Myers 
R. Jones, 274 Henry Street, Brooklyn. 

Third Prise. — "The Coolie." Arthur D. Chap- 
man, 614 Lake Street, West Hoboken, N. J. 

Honorable Mention. — "The Boat House," 
Dr. F. Detlefsen, 1846 Eddy Street, Chicago, 
111. "The Tender Buds of Spring," Josephine 
M. Wallace, 756 16th Street, Des Moines, 
Iowa. "Still Life," William Jordan, Jr., 126 
Atlantic Ave., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Monthly prizes of at least $25, $15, and $10 
are awarded in order of merit, together 
with three prizes of yearly subscriptions to 
Shadowland to go to three honorary mentions. 
All prize winning pictures will probably be 
published in Shadowland. 

The committee of judges includes: 

Joseph R. Mason, chairman of committee, 
Corresponding Secretary P. P. A. ; Eugene V. 
Brewster, Editor and Publisher of Shadow- 
land; Louis F. Bucher, Secretary Associated 
Camera Clubs of America; Dr. A. D. Chaffee, 
President of P. P. A. ; Arthur D. Chapman, 
Advisory Committee P. P. A. ; G. W. Harting, 
Advisory Committee P. P. A. ; Dr. Chas. H. 
Jaeger, contributing member Pittsburgh and Los 
Angeles Salons ; Miss Sophie L. Lauffer, Secre- 
tary Dept. of Photography, Brooklyn Institute 
of Arts and Science ; George P. Lester, Member 
P. P. A. and Orange Camera Club ; Nickolas 



Muray, portrait photographer ; John A. Ten- 
nant, Editor and Publisher of Photo Miniature; 
Miss Margaret Watkins, ex-Recording Secre- 
tary P. P. A. ; Clarence H. White, ex-President 
P. P. A. 

The jury of selection, to be announced each 
month with their selections, consists of three 
members, to be chosen from the committee or 
the membership of the society. No member of 
the jury thus chosen for any given month shall 
submit pictures for that month's contest. 

Shadowland desires that every camera enthu- 
siast reap benefit from this contest and to this 
end makes the inclusion of the following data 
re contesting prints imperative : 

(a) Date and hour of exposure. 

(b) Stop number used. 

(c) Printing medium used. 

(d) Character of print — whether straight or 
manipulated. 

Any print previously published is not eligible. 

No printing medium is debarred, but capability 
of good reproduction will be a factor in the 
selection of prints. 

Contestants may submit prints up to any num- 
ber and to as many of the monthly contests as 
they desire. 

Prints received on or prior to the first 
of each month to be considered entered in that 
month's contest. 

Name and address of maker, title and number 
must be printed or plainly written upon the back 
of each print. Return address to be written 
plainly upon package. 

Prints must be packed flat. A small mount 
makes for safety in handling but is not required. 

Prints will be acknowledged upon their receipt. 

Rejected prints will be returned immediately, 
provided proper postage for the purpose be in- 
cluded. It is, however, understood that Shadow- 
land reserves the right to reproduce any print 
submitted and to hold such for a reasonable time 
for that purpose. 

Special care will be taken of all prints sub- 
mitted, but neither The Brewster Publications 
nor the Pictorial Photographers of America as- 
sume responsibility for loss or damage. 

All prints and all communications relative to 
the contest are to be sent to Joseph R. Mason, 
Art Center, 65 East S6th Street, New York City. 

No prints will be considered if sent elsewhere 
than stated above. 

Submission of prints will imply acceptance of 
all conditions. 



II IIMII millllll MINIMI III IIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



New York Theater Audience 



{Continued from page 49) 



The Theatre Guild established itself as a 
daring and successful producing organization 
by the presentation of Ervine's "John Fergu- 
son," a grim study of primitive emotions and 
religious feeling, following this with the same 
author's "Jane Clegg." Practically all of its 
productions have been of foreign plays, the 
few exceptions in favor of American authors 
being plays of tense realism. Thus it has aided 
materially in building up the Continental view- 
point. Galsworthy's "Justice" was a big success 
in New York. It failed on tour. O'Neill's 
"Beyond the Horizon," a vivid picture of 
misdirected lives, enjoyed an extensive popu- 
larity here. It likewise failed to interest 
the enormous playgoing public outside of 
New York. 

Seventeen plays from the French have been 
acted here this season. England, Russia and 
Hungary are well represented. Scandinavia of- 
fers Ibsen's "Ghosts" and Berger's "The 
Deluge." Is it any wonder that the New York 
audience is becoming Europeanized ? 

It is scarcely to be denied that if America is 
to build a school of drama that will be as vital 
as it is brilliant, it should cultivate the romance- 
with-a-touch-of-realism of such plays as "The 
First Year," rather than copy the style and 
methods of the European realists. George Ade 
was promising to be the principal factor in the 
development of such a school when he stopped 



short. George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly, 
in following the early footsteps of Ade, appear 
to be headed in the right direction, along with 
Craven and Clare Kummer and Rachel Croth- 
ers, once she ceases preaching, and Zoe Akins 
and O'Neill, once they pay less attention to the 
gloomy, morbidity of the Europeans. 

After all, American civilization is markedly 
different from European. The latter comprises 
racial characteristics that have been in force for 
centuries. We have a new civilization and we 
should express it in our own way. We should 
not have to apply European standards of philo- 
sophy to American life. American life calls 
for American treatment. Let the treatment 
express the gusto, the sense of satire, the 
penetrating vigor and wholesomeness and genu- 
ineness of our people and we will produce a 
literature that will compare with that of any 
race. 

The European play is more and more wel- 
come in New York. It may yet find a hearty 
reception in other parts of America. It has 
been of inestimable value in developing taste 
and discrimination in theatergoers, but among 
our playwrights it should not be held too firmly 
as a model. If we copy the methods and view- 
point of the Europeans in our dramas, we shall 
be only imitations of Europeans ; we shall be 
continentalized not only in our outlook, but in 
the manner of expressing that outlook. 



Page Seventy-Eight 



EDWARD LANGEIt PRINTING CO.. INO., 
JAMAICA, NEW YOEK OITT. 



Corliss Palmer Powder 




CORLISS PALMER 



is the result of scientific 
research and experiment. 
Miss Palmer, by winning 
first prize in the 1920 Fame 
and Fortune Contest, was 
adjudged the Most Beauti- 
ful girl in America, and 
her Beauty articles in the 
Motion Picture Maga- 
zine and Beauty Maga- 
zine have attracted wide 
attention. 

We have secured the ex- 
clusive American rights to 
Miss Palmer's Powder. 
We put it up in pretty 
boxes, which will be mail- 
ed to any address, postage 
[ prepaid, on receipt of 
price, $1.00 a box. It 
comes in only one shade 
and is equally desirable for 
blondes and brunettes. 



Do not think of sitting for a portrait without first using this powder! 

And it is equally desirable for street use, in the Movies and 
everywhere. Send a One Dollar bill or 1-cent or 2-cent stamps 
and we will mail you a box of this exquisite powder. Remem- 
ber that we have the exclusive selling rights to 

Corliss Palmer powder 

Beware of imitations and accept no substitutes warranted to be 
"just as good." There is nothing else like it on the market. 

WILTON CHEMICAL CO. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Extracts from Motion 
Picture Magazine 



I am often asked what kind of face 
powder I use. I have received more 
letters asking this question than I could 
answer, so I had a little circular 
printed stating that I make my own 
powder. And now they are asking me 
to tell them how I make it. Well, I 
cant tell how, but I can tell why. I 
have tried about every powder on the 
market and have done considerable ex- 
perimenting' on myself and on others. 
There is no denying that there are 
several very fine powders on the mar- 
ket, but I felt that none just suited 
me, and so I determined to make one 
that did. You see, in the first place, 
I had some very peculiar ideas about 
the complexion and was very hard to 
please. I am very particular about 
tints and staying qualities, and I want 
a powder that does not look like pow- 
der, that will not blow off in the first 
gust of wind, that is not too heavy nor 
too light, that will not injure the com- 
plexion, and that will not change color 
when it becomes moist from perspira- 
tion or from the natural oil that comes' 
thru the pores of the skin. I also like 
a pleasant aroma to my powder, and 
one that lingers. After experimenting 
with powdered starch, French chalk, 
magnesia carbonate, powdered orris 
root, bismuth subcarbonate, precipitated 
chalk, zinc oxide, and other chemicals, 
and after consulting authorities as to 
the effects of each of these on the skin, 
I finally settled on a formula that has 
been tried out under all conditions and 
that suits me to a nicety. And, most 
important of all, perhaps, this powder 
when finally perfected had the remark- 
able quality of being equally good for 
the street, for evening dress and for 
motion picture make-up. I use the 
same powder before the camera for 
exteriors and interiors, and for daily 
use in real life. So do many of my 
friends, and they all tell me that they 
will use no other so long as they can 
get mine. As to the tint, it is a mix- 
ture of many colors. I learned 'from 
an artist years ago that there are no 
solid flat colors in nature. Look care- 
fully at anything you choose and you 
will see every color of the rainbow in 
it. Take a square inch of sky, for in- 
stance, and examine it closely and you 
will find every color there. Just so 
with the face. Any portrait painter 
will tell you that he uses nearly every 
color when painting flesh. Nothing is 
white — not even snow, because it re- 
flects every color that is around it. 
White face powder is absurd. White 
is not a color. The general tone of my 
powder is something like that of a ripe 
peach. I have made up a few boxes of 
it for my friends, and I feel justified 
in asking them to pay me what' it costs 
me, which is about One Dollar a box. 
I am not in business and do not want 
to make a profit. If any of my readers 
want to try this powder, I wilD try 
to accommodate them, but I cannot 
undertake to put this powder on the 
market in a business way — that is 
something for a regular dealer to do 
if there is enough demand for it. 



Cut out and mail today 




.. „ J —^— ^^^^^CT S 

WILTON CHEMICAL CO. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

For the enclosed One Dollar please send me a box of 
CORLISS PALMER POWDER. 

Name 

Street 

City and State 

T T1 




Moments Which Count 



When you are conscious of the scru- 
tiny of interested eyes which appraise 
everydetail of your appearance, can you 
sit serene, secure in the consciousness 
that there is nothing to criticise but every- 
thing to admire ? 

Happy is the girl who can answer 

yes" in these all important moments. 

She is the girl whoknows that her fresh, 

clear skin and smooth, white neck and 

arms are sure to command admiration. 

The girl who is not so sure of her 
personal attractiveness, who is conscious 
that complexion defects may affect her 
popularity, should waste no time rem- 
edying these conditions. The secret is 
cosmetic cleanliness, which keeps the 
skin free from clogging accumulations. 

Once a day, do this 

Once a day, preferably at bed-time, 
-V give your face a thorough 

cleansing. This doesn't 
mean a harsh, irritating 
scrub, but a cos- 
metic cleansing 
accomplished 
by the gentlest 
possible means. 




Soap is necessary, butonlythe mildest 
soap should be used. This is Palmolive, 
blended from palm and olive oils. 

Onceyou experience the mild, sooth- 
ing effect of its smooth, creamy lather 
you will recognize daily cleansing as the 
surest complexion beautifier. 

Removal, once a day, of the accumu- 
lations of dirt, oil, perspiration and the 
remaining traces of cold cream and 
powder is absolutely essential to a clear, 
fresh skin. 

Neglect results in clogged pores, 
coarse texture and blackheads. When 
the accumulated soil carries infection, 
pimples are the result. 

An ancient secret 

The value of beautifying cleansing 
was discovered long ago, in the days of 
ancient Egypt. It was Cleopatra's secret 
— whatever the embellishments she 
employed, they were applied after the 
daily bath with palm and olive oils as 
cleansers. 

The great queen was famous for her 
beauty long after early youth was passed . 
She kept her looks with the aid of the 



same gentle 1 , stimulating cleansing which 
we recommend today. 

Blended from the same oils 

Palmolive is blended from the same 
costly oriental oils which served Cleo- 
patra as cleanser and beautifier. We 
import them from overseas in vast quan- 
tity to keep the Palmolive factories at 
work day and night. This is necessary 
to supply the world-wide demand. 

This popularity has reduced price, 
as manufacturing volume permits econ- 
omies which lower production costs. 
Thus we are able to supply Palmolive 
for only 10 cents a cake. 

Sowhile Palmolive ranks first as finest 
facial soap, you can afford to follow Cleo- 
patra's example and use it for bathing. 

Complexion beauty does not end 
with the face. Beautify your body with 
Palmolive. 

Volume and efficiency produce 
25-cent quality for 



10c 



THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY, MILWAUKEE, U. S. A. 

THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANAOA. Limited. TORONTO, CANADA 
Also makers of Palmolive Shampoo and Palmolive Shaving Cream 



w mjtm mvm 



J 5 »«»»*«««« *«■«■■*»»*»»»« 




Copyright 1922-The Palmolive Co. 1561 



Bretl Lilho. Co.. N. Y. 



.■,*#)«»»"■••' 



OCTOBER 



350 




EXPRESSING THE ARTS 




A BREWSTER PUBLICATION 




A Magazine of Beauty Secrets for Every Woman 



A MAGAZINE to help every woman to be more beautiful than she is and then help her 
to preserve that beauty. Every woman wants beauty: a strong, healthy body; grace; 
charm; a spirited, active mind. She knows that some are born beauties — others have 
it thrust upon them. What she does not know is that all may attain it if they will. A 
few years ago, those who used cosmetics in any form were called "painted ladies." 
Those who went systematically thru forms of exercise to improve their figures were "vain." 
Now, the use of cosmetics is universal. Physical culture is a habit. Every woman knows that 
she must look her best. She not only tries to assist nature, but to improve it. This is where the 
new magazine /|H©erutv» comes in. 



Elsie Ferguson 
Pauline Frederick 



LILLIAN MONTANYE, 

Editor 
Editorial Advisory Board 
Corliss Palmer 
Alla Nazimova 



Katherine MacDonald 
Jeanette Pinaud 



*ft©<a\At 



i* 



magazine is the modern 



Pandora s Box 



We have gathered about us some of. the world's greatest authorities, and are supplying our read- 
ers with the best and most authoritative information on all subjects that pertain to personal 
beauty. Famous beauties of stage and screen, society beauties, beauty parlor experts, celebrated 
dermatologists, many well-known notables are contributing to its pages. A special feature is 

The Beauty Box 

conducted by Corliss Palmer who, as winner of the 1920 Fame and Fortune Contest, was ad- 
judged the most beautiful girl in America. This is an Answer Man department in which Miss 
Palmer answers all questions on the proper use of cosmetics and on everything pertaining to 
beautifying the human face and form divine. She also makes a special plea for 

Physical Beauty 

the importance of the care of the body itself ; the significance of health ; the wholesome charm 
of a strong, well-poised body. Each issue contains a hundred aids to grace and beauty — in- 
numerable little "nothings" that count greatly in the end. 4*Wd\it\»< ' s ^ e Op en Sesame to 
love, joy, life and all the dear emotions that so many have td \J tf^ pass by because they 

have not discovered the sweet secret of pleasing. 4*tad\itv ls — ' n i tse ^ — 

A Thing of Beauty 

a second SHADOWLAND in its artistry. It contains reproductions of famous paintings in 
all their original colors, suitable for framing; beautiful photographs, in color, of famous beau- 
ties of this and other lands which make charmingly decorative pictures for the boudoir. From 
cover to cover 4^€.d\i,t\*i ' s picturesque, artistic, colorful. It is 

A Magazine That Every Woman Wants 

and that every man wants his wife, daughter, sister or sweetheart to have. There are magazines 
of fashion, art, fiction, politics, homes and gardens — but until a few months ago no one had 
thought of devoting a whole magazine to beauty. 

Dont Forget to Order from Your Dealer 

There is always a rush — sometimes a real scrimmage when 4*tacl\rlt\wf com es out. The price 
is only 25 cents a copy or you may subscribe at the rate of 1/ O^- $2.50 a year. 

^Geiutvt is on the stands the 8th of each month. 

BREWSTER PUBLICATIONS, INC. - - Brewster Buildings, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



m 



llllllllllllllllllHllllHlllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



timiiiiimwiiM 



■■■ 



As civilization advances, the -world's sense 
of the Value of Time awakens, and its 
timekeeping devices increase in accuracy 
and refinement. "Racing With Time," 
DeLay's spirited painting for this month, is 
typical of the upward, onward urge of civi- 
lization. 




CValue of 



By l^conos 




Paintings by HAROLD DELAY 



IME!" One of the shortest words in the Railroad Man's 
mother tongue — and doubtless the most tremendous. 

A race with Time ! There you have the Railroad Man's summary 
of his very life. For Time is his one great objective. His shippers, his 
travelers place above almost every other consideration the Value of Time. 

Speed and safety travel together only when Father Time himself 
leads the way. For Father Time, on America's railroads, stands for 
that amazing development of Time- Service and train dispatching 
which alone make speed and safety possible. 

For half a century, too, Father Time has stood for the finest 
railroad timepieces that money, brains and skill can produce — 



Father Time has been Right's official trade- 
mark for over fifty years. One of America's 
favorite railroad models bears his name. 

It is pictured below with the Rlgin Winding 
Indicator, a device of great value to Railroad 
Men. This is an almost absolute safeguard 
against "run-downs," a common and disas- 
trous cause of trouble. A glance at the indi- 
cator shows the Railroad Man exactly how 
much power his Elgin has in reserve. 

Besides the various Railroad models, the 
Rlgin of today is produced in the Streamline 
series at $35 to $100; the Classic series at $150; 
tlie Corsican series at $175; the Presentation 
series at $300 to $500; and other strikingly 
beautiful and serviceable creations for men 
and -women of all ages and occupations. 



• V*~^ 7*1 E SAaROAB STANDASH FOR HftfcF A CENTWSY.' ; 



MADE IN ELGIN, U, S. A. 





© ..... 



Page Three 



SuAPOwiAND 



The American Beauty Contest 



j/e7$idmcm7)@Qi&tCf[it s 'P0P 



"Mirror, mirror, on the wall, 
Am I the fairest of them all?" 

We all know the famous fairy- 
story of the Queen who thus ad- 
dressed her mirror — and now 
there is a reason and an opportu- 
nity why every woman should seek 
similar counsel from her mirror. 

Then — if her mirror is encour- 
aging — she should send us her 
photo at once. 

We are looking for beauty and 
only beauty. This is NOT a 
movie contest. 



\Jhxz "face Will Ip 




The Loveliest Woman in 
America 

You may think it's a tall order to 
find her among so many beautiful 
women. It is — but the Brewster Pub- 
lications, read thruout the length and 
breadth of the land, are determined 
to find her — and find her they will! 

Somewhere, as you read this page, 
that fortunate young woman may be 
reading the same page, unconscious 
of the fame and rewards that await 
her. 

Is it you? Is it the girl next door? 
Is it that lovely girl you met last 
summer? 

Read the simple rules, and the 
splendid rewards that await Amer- 
ica's loveliest girl ! 



These Will Be the Rewards of America's Beauty: 

1. A trip to New York, properly chaperoned, and a chance to take in the pleasures which only that great city affords: 
the opera; the theaters; our wonderful library; the famous East Side; great museums; the celebrated Green- 
wich Village; all the luxurious and beautiful shops on the most luxurious and beautiful street in the world, Fifth 
Avenue; and so on. 

2. A well-known American artist will paint her portrait. 

3. A representative American sculptor will model her head. 

4. These works of art will be exhibited in one of the leading art galleries of New York City and elsewhere. 

5. She will have her picture on the cover of BEAUTY. 

There will be a second prize and a third prize, and possibly more. These will be announced later. In view of the 
fact that the American Beauty may be found in New York City, or its immediate vicinity, the prize in her case will 
be $1,000, instead of the visit to New York. Just think of that 

One Thousand Dollars! ($1,000) 

This is an unprecedented offer. Do not fail to take advantage of it. Send us your photograph. That is all that is 
required of you. Think what you may win — just because you happened to be born beautiful. Scrupulous care will be 
taken of every picture received. ALL of them will be examined by the contest judges. 

Notice 

Photographs that are submitted to us in our Beauty Contest will be turned over to the Metropolitan Magazine, from 
which they will select photographs to be used on the Metropolitan Cover Contest. 



The Rules 

1. No photographs will be returned. 

2. No exceptions will be made to this rule. 

3. Winners will be notified. 

4. Snapshots, strip pictures, or colored photographs will not be con- 
sidered. Outside of these, any kind of picture will be accepted ; full 
length or bust, full face or profile, 'sepia or black. You may submit as 
many photographs as you wish. 

5. Photographers, artists, friends and admirers may enter pictures of their 
favorites. Credit will be given photographers whenever possible. 

6. Do not ask the contest manager to discuss your chances. He has 
nothing to do with that end of it. 

7. Do not ivrite letters. The close of the contest will be announced in 

KI0TI0N.&ICTV&E. Cl^S S I C 

MAGflllNE ^*- * 

SuiAPOWLAND and ^©<a\itv^ 

at least three months in advance. There will be a contest story every 
month in all four magazines, with all necessary news and information. 

8. The most beautiful picture received each month thruout the operation 
of the contest, will be published in a monthly Honor Roll in all four 
magazines. These girls will be notified when, and in which magazine 
their picture will appear. This does not mean that they have neces- 
sarily qualified for the final award, nor that those whose pictures are 
not published have failed. The winner will not be decided upon until 
the end of the contest. 

Page Four 



9. Such a coupon as the one below, properly filled out, must be PASTED 
on the BACK of every photograph submitted. 

10. Be sure to put sufficient postage on your photograph. 

11. The contest is open to any girl or woman sixteen years or older, pro- 
fessional or non-professional, in America. That means the whole con- 
tinent! 

NOTE. — Any infraction of these rules will cause a contestant to be disbarred 
from the contest. 

Address your photograph: Contest Manager, Brewster Publications, Inc., 
Brewster Building, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

r. ....... — --THE ENTRANCE COUPON ----------- 

This is a portrait of: 

Name 

Address 



Age Weight Height 

Color of Eyes Hair Complexion 

It is submitted to the American Beauty Contest, subject to the rules 
thereof, by : 

Name 

Address ■ 



Occupation (optional) . 



'■¥*" 



r 



rSEP23~ 



O^ 



'C1B547820 




u 




Expressing the Arts 




The Magazine of Magazines 
OCTOBER, 1922 

in i jiimii t m j hi i mi itiiriiiiMiii t ii tuin 11 rn Tiiitnin u 

Important Features in this Issue: 



Volume VII 



THE PASSING OF STAGE DECORATION 

Sheldon Cheney 

A discussion of the revolutionary theories agitating our artists of the theaters 

MRS. WHARTON AND SOME OTHERS 

Burton Rascoe 

A penetrating review of the latest work of this analytical novelist and her 

contemporaries 

WYNN INVADES GERMANY 

Inimitable cartoons of the Diplomat, the Soldier, the Policeman, the 
Maiden, and other strollers unter der linden 

THE TAKEUCHIS : Father and Son. . . . Melville Johnson 

An appreciation of the work of these interpreters of the best in modern 

Japanese art 

THE SEASON OF SYMPHONY Jerome Hart 

The feast that is to be spread for music-loving America this winter 

WILLIAM J. GLACKENS: Master of Color 

Walter Pach 

The one artist whose work is praised by members of the conservative 
school and the most advanced of the modernists 

CANDIDA CONTINUED Benjamin De Casseres 

A pleasing interview with Ellen Van Volkenberg, who adds a fourth act 
to the famous play of G. B. S. 

THE CAMERA CONTEST— This has become an important 
feature in Shadowland. Each month's prize-winning photographs 
are reproduced, and some point in picture taking that will inter- 
est the amateur is discussed. 

immiimiiiimimiiiimiimimmumiiitiiiiiiiiiiin 




Number 2 






Published Monthly by Brewster Publications, Inc., at Jamaica, N. Y. 

Entered at the Post Office at Jamaica, N. Y., as second-class matter, under the act of March 3rd, 1S79. 

PRINTED IN U. S. A. 

Eugene V. Brewster, President and Editor-in-Chief ; Guy L. Harrington, Vice-President and Business Manager; 
L. G. Conlon, Treasurer; E. M. Heinemann, Secretary 

EXECUTIVE and EDITORIAL OFFICES, 175 DUFFIELD STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

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Copyright, 1922, by Brewster Publications, Inc., in the United States and Great Britain. 





Page Five 




t 



Page Six 



J 




AFTER THE PLAY 

An original water-color poster by Giro 



- : — 





i V I k f 



HAROLD LLOYD 

As he is visualized by Wynn in Paris 




Tliuto <o by Albert J, Kopec, L. A. 



DERELYS PERDUE 

Painted by Harry Roseland 
From an Albert J. Kopec photograph 




FLOWERS 

From an original painting by William 
J. Glackens, who, as the first PresU 
dent of the Society of Independent 
Artists, is justifying the predictions 
for a celebrated career assigned to 
him by William M. Chase, J. Alden 
Weir and other authorities of the 
same generation. An appreciation of 
Mr. Glackens' work is given in the 
accompanying article 



WOMAN AND CHILD 

This canvas shows that in his 
painting, which embodies more 
perfectly perhaps than any oth- 
er in this country the great 
discoveries that the Impres- 
sionists made in the realm of 
color, the artist is still keeping 
close to the interest in the sub- 
ject before him which underlies 
the distinguished character of 
his drawing 





rhoto by Nickolas Muray 



DESHA 

The spotlight followed the dancing of Desha thru the Fokine Ballet and 
the "Rose of Stamboul." This year before she comes to Broadway, under 
Rivoli and Rialto management, she will go to Philadelphia and Rochester 



Page Thirteen 




Wynn 
Invades Germany 



THE SOLDIER 

This is the army wear- 
ing the only helmet 
left by those souvenir 
fiends, the doughboys. 
The army is debating 
whether, with condi- 
tions as they are, it 
wouldn't be wise to 
go to the States and 
start a nice little deli- 
catessen store. Yes? 



THE DIPLOMAT 

Herr Gesundheit is 
not tipping his hat, 
politely — he is cool- 
ing his fevered brow. 
He has just had his 
plan on reparations 
turned down, because 
his bitter rival, Herr 
Schwartz, presented 
one that ivasted at least 
six months more time 




THE DOG 

Pilsner, who is the prominent member of 
the Reicher family, got the Iron Cross for 
barking at an Englishman in Cologne, three 
months after the armistice. Pilsner is a 
trifle shy, but the rest of the household are 
not so afflicted. Papa Reicher sits on the 
extreme Right, but Karl cultivates a Marxian 
expression and leans violently to the Left 




Page Fourteen 




THE PROFESSOR 

Judging by the mournful expression on the 
Dachshund's face, who wants to go home to 
his wienerwurst, Herr Professor is going to 
drink it out on this line if it takes all night. 
Also after counting the pile of saucers, the 
conclusion is reached that either the professor 
is a millionaire or his credit is good 



THE MAIDEN 

This is Fraulein Bitte 
gieb Mir, a madchen 
of curves and concen- 
trated expression. Her 
nice yellow pocket- 
book contains but a 
powder-puff ; neverthe- 
less, she is planning 
her evening meal. Will 
she cook it with her 
own fair hands? How 
could you ask such a 
thing? 





THE POLICEMAN 

In spite of his beauti- 
ful costume and the 
star on his hat, his 
feet give him away: 
showing below a 
swinging door, they 
couldn't be told from 
those of a New York 
detective. In other 
words, he is the 
minion of the laiv 
who guides you safely 
from the bank to your 
hotel after you have 
changed a nickel into 
marks 



THE GREAT DIVIDE 

Calculating your tips in nmrks makes Ein- 
stein's theory seem mere child's play. The 
bell-boy is afraid that the lovely young man 
from the V. S. A., where every one is rich, 
will get all worn out before he has counted 
off enough marks to make more than two 
cents, American 







Page Fifteen 




Photo © by Albin 



LOUBOVSKA 

This vivid interpreter of the ballet has been 
dancing with her company in South America 



Page Sixteen 




Photo by Louis Fleckenstein, L. A. 



BETH BERI 

Who, when she is not posing tragically, 
dances blithely across the vaudeville stage 



Page Seventeen 








V s — - OAJS^'i. 



MADEMOISELLE BOUFFANTE 

By F. Fabiano, Paris 



Page Eighteen 



Candida Continued 

In Which Ellen Van Yolkenburg, Master Interpreter of This Extra- 
ordinary Heroine of G. B. S., Adds a Fourth Act to His Famous Play 

By Benjamin De Casseres 



C~> K.ORGE BERNARD SHAW wrote "Candida" 
-—- in three acts. But I was lately the leading man 
Jr in the fourth act of Shaw's play. The leading 
woman was Ellen Van Yolkenburg (Mrs. Maurice 
Browne), who played in the first three acts for three 
weeks at the Greenwich Village Theater. 

The curious thing happened this way : I went to the 
Greenwich Village Theater one Thursday afternoon at 
about four-twenty to have a talk with Miss Van Volken- 
burg. There was a matinee on. I listened-in from behind 
the fireplace at "Candy" going up for auction. The bid- 
ders, as you know, were Eugene Marshbanks, a cosmic 
maA;erick, and the Rev. James' Mavers Morell, the self- 
sufficient wdndbag husband of Candida. 

The play winds up — at five-forty — as every good Sha- 
vian knows, by Eugene going out ''into the night" to rent 
out his soul elsewhere, and the Rev. hubby and Candida 
beginning life on a new basis in a kiss-clinch. The final 
curtain had fallen and I waylaid Miss Van Volkenburg on 
her way to her dressing-room. I stated my intent. The 
dark lady with the big, lustrous, black eyes looked around 
the stage doubtfully for a place where we could talk. Not 
seeing a bench or a seat in the darkness, she suggested 
that we go back on the set and hold high discourse on the 
Greek drama, Sfiaw, puppet-plays and prohibition. 

We had both got comfortably seated on the very old- 
fashioned sofa on which a little while before Candida 
and Eugene had sat spooning in the dead of the night 
with the sword between them, when an unromantic or 
prankish stage-hand rolled up the curtain to give us air 
and light. 

The audience was only half out of the house, and as 
the curtain went up, disclosing Candida and myself 
seated on the sofa in intellectual conference, there was 
amazement on all faces. 

"Why, Mamma, there is another act!" exclaimed a 
young girl to her mother. 

"There cant be, dear. I've read -the play, and Mr. 
Shaw wrote only three acts," replied Mamma. 

We had the curtain lowered until the auditorium 
emptied. 

"What do you think really happened to Candida, Mor- 
ell and Marshbanks after the play?" I asked Miss Van 
Volkenburg. 

Her dark and luxuriant face fluxed to a 
smile. 

"Why, the usual thing. Eugene, the 
poet, came back to see us after he had 
written a poem in twelve cantos sati- 
rizing the English middle-class home 
and glorifying the revolutionary 
spirit of mad poets. He settled 
down with us. Morell got used to 
him and he got used to Morell. 
As the years wore on, Eugene be- 
came a hopeless bourgeois and Mo- 
rell became an apostle of free love. 
They converted each other." 

"And Candida — what' became of her 
in the endless fourth act?" 




"She mothered them both." 
"Platonically, in the case of Eugene?" 
"That's Candida's secret," smiled back Miss Van 
Volkenburg. 

It got chilly on the stage and we went to sit on a bench 
in a dark corner over some steam pipes. . 

"How do the audiences differ in the 'little' theaters 
from the average transient audiences in the larger play- 
houses?" I asked. 

"The audiences in the average Broadway houses art 
people. In the 'little,' intimate theaters they are persons. 
It is the difference between collective attention and indi- 
vidual attention. The 'highbrow' audience sends a thou- 
sand individual reactions over the footlights to the play- 
ers, where the average audience at a mediocre play sends 
but one collective reaction. 

"It must be remembered that the actor or actress who 
is not just a puppet reciting lines is carrying on a double 
cerebral and emotional process at once. He or she is 
living the life of the part and is living in the conscious- 
ness of the audience at the same time. In the 'little' 
theaters this double celebration is accentuated by the, 
presumably, higher psychic organizations of the actors 
taking part in a Strindberg, an Ibsen or a Shaw play, 
and those of the audience." 

"What do you make out of that extraordinary Thekla 
in Strindberg's 'Creditors,' which you played, it seemed 
to me, perfectly?" 

"Thekla is not a woman — but a Strindberg woman. 
She is the incarnation of Strindberg's misogyny. In 
Thekla he shot his venom. Was it because Strindberg 
was conscious of his inferiority to women that he gener- 
ally made them Madame Satans? Freud would say so. 
So will I. 

"Strindberg took all the cobra-de-capello latencies that 
he discovered in the soul of woman and massed them 
into a concrete creation. All his women — those that 
will live in his dramas — were daughters of Iago and 
Lady Macbeth. He has no Cordelia complex — like 
Shakespeare. Shaw in 'Man and Superman' makes of 
woman the pursuer. Strindberg makes her not only the 
pursuer but the executioner." 

"In your extensive repertoire what are your favorite 
parts ?" 

"Nora in Ibsen's 'The Doll's House,' and 
Mrs. Blair in 'Joint Owners in Spain.' I 
never get tired of them." 

Just then tea was announced on 

the stage for the company and a 

few friends. I could not be lured, 

as, far away in Washington 

Heights, six per cent, homebrew 

awaited me. 

Ellen Van Volkenburg is a 

highly differentiated individual 

without being at all eccentric — a 

sure sign of intelligence. On me, 

she made an impression where 

most stage w o m en usually m a k e a 

vacuum. 



Page Nineteen 




Photo by Hoover, Is. A. 



This lovely daughter of Cleopatra lives 
in modern Hollywood instead of ancient 
Egypt. She is Miss Eleanor Louise Putnam, 
an entrant in the American Beauty Contest 



Page Twenty 




hoto by James Harris Connelly. Chicago 



FRANCES WHITE 

The provinces will benefit this winter by Broadway's loss, for 
this musical comedy favorite will tour the country with "The 
Hotel Mouse," one of New York's few successes of last season 



Page Twenty-One 




East Side Interior 



Edward Hopper, Draughtsman 

An Appreciation of the Work of an Etcher 
Who Does Not Belong to the Rank and File 

By Guy Pene du Bois 



SUPPLY and demand are probably as inseparable in 
art as elsewhere. The collectors of prints are 
responsible for the prevailing styles in etching. 
Most collectors of etchings are stamp collectors diverted 
from their original habit, sometimes by a coincident accu- 
mulation of greater sums of money, at other times by 
ambition. It is probable that most truly avid collectors 
get joy thru the creation of envy. These are pathological 
cases. But all collectors of prints of any kind have less 
interest in art than in printing, and less interest in printing 
than in rarity. An early Chinese stamp or a hundred 
gilder proof in perfect condition are collected for precisely 
the same reason. Art is not concerned in that reason. 
Art is scarcely concerned with the numberless, often 
less evident, by-reasons for the collection of prints. Most 
of these are technical — -a matter of putting the cart before 
the horse, a question of variety of line, of quality in ink, 
clearness in impression and of original marginal depth. 
Most etchers do wonderfully intricate traceries with 
agile needles, line photographs of cathedrals, of doorways, 
of old buildings, of architectural masterpieces, of any- 



thing that will prove technical proficiency. This is 
mainly shown, especially since Whistler, by great delicacy, 
a breath-taking nimbleness, a faultless incision. The 
painter may stumble ; the etcher must never stumble. He 
is a performing violinist. His false notes are disasters. 

It is nearly impossible to begin a note on a draughts- 
man like Edward Hopper without scanning the field of 
the art in which he is beginning to get a very much de- 
served recognition. 

Edward Hopper probably believes that he belongs in 
the class of etchers. He also talks about states, inks, 
papers, presses, baths, copper, zinc and the rest. He is 
a good craftsman. But, while the other men are essen- 
tially interested in craft, Hopper drives, with special 
reservations, personal or art reticences, for the presenta- 
tion of things that have appealed to him. About this 
there may be some confusion. The path appears straighter 
than it is. The things that appeal to him are often sat 
upon by him. The house must be in order, the balance 
kept. He sends a railroad train crashing thru an idyl — 
the black engine passes like a throb of conscience— or is 



Page Tzventy-Tzvo 



I 



SuiAOOWLAND 



it this hell we live 
in? 

His composition 
is often barren. It 
is never without 
a certain austerity 
and a definite vis- 
ual integrity. His 
liberties are omis- 
sions. He is afraid 
of extravagance; 
afraid to be car- 
ried by enthusi- 
asm or excitement 
into the ridiculous. 
Bang, comes the 
engine, the reality. 
Straighten up ! 
There is no more 
ordered rendering 
of impressions. 
He may be our 
only true remind- 
er of the rugged- 
ness of the early 
Puritans. He is 
not an easily en- 
slaved animal. 
The discipline 
must be prodigi- 
ous. The man- 
nerisms of the 
loose - thinking 
colorist never 
creep into his 




Night Shadows 




Night in the Park 



work. There 
is little mel- 
low warmth : 
none of the 
rounding 
curves of 
florid flesh in 
it ; but a heat 
nevertheless : 
a flame that 
burns, d e - 
mands, takes 
— a white 
flame. Of this 
order is Ingres 
who was a 
purist, which 
is not neces- 
sarily to say 
a Puritan. 

But perhaps 
it is enough to 
say that Ed- 
ward Hopper 
does not be- 
long to the 
rank and file 
of etchers, 
and that he is 
an artist. That 
is really the 
principal 
thing to be 
considered in 
any creative 
work. 



Page Twenty-Three 



,:■..,. , 




Special study by Maurice Goldberg 



Rose Rotanda, whose interpretative dances in "The Music Box 
Revue" and other Broadway successes have, an unfailing charm 



Twentv-Four 



Too Far to the Left 

The Brilliant Rachmaninoff Declares Himself Out of Sympathy with the "Musical Bolshevists" 
— Those Young Composers Who Ignore Melody and Substitute Cacophony for Harmony 

By Jerome Hart 



WHAT Rachmaninoff has to say with regard to 
the modernist composers deserves to be read 
and pondered, so I shall quote his closing words 
first. They are by way of advice to the young composer. 

I have no doubt they will be laughed to scorn by those 
who, having acquired a nodding acquaintance with the 
rudiments of music and apparently none at all with the 
principles of harmony and counterpoint, and who know 
so little of orchestration that they give the instruments 
impossible things to do, calmly sit down and write what 
they are pleased to call orchestral poems and suites, as 
well as pas- 
sacaglias with 
hideously 
boresome re- 
petitions and 
a never-end- 
ing pedal 
point — not to 
mention bar- 
less and beat- 
less music, 
music with- 
out a key sig- 
nature, and 
what not. 

Rachmani- 
noff's only ad- 
vice to young 
composers is : 

"Work 
hard, and do 
not go too 
far to the 
Left. Dont 
become Bol- 
shevist in 
music." . 

From this, 
one may be 
permitted t o 
draw conclu- 
sions as to 
the great 
pianist's pol- 
itical opin- 
ions, and to 
surmise why 
he shook his 
head sadly 
when Ant- 
cliffe asked 
him if he 
were going 
back to Rus- 
sia. 

Rachmani- 
noff and his 
talented kins- 
m a n and 
teacher, Si- 
loti, know too 
much about 
the practical 




workings of Sovietism to trust themselves to the tender 
mercies of the present Russian regime. It is doubtful if 
Chaliapin ever would have returned to his country had 
not the Bolshevists retained his family as hostage. 

Politics, of course, should have nothing to do with 
music, altho it is noticeable that musical revolution- 
ists nowadays are decidedly radical in their political 
tendencies. So, incidentally, was Beethoven, also Wagner, 
tho the fact did not prevent them from writing glorious 
and thoroly beautiful music. 

But Beethoven and' Wagner were sanely radical, not 

insanely a n - 
a r c h i s t i c. 
They did not, 
to use Rach- 
ma n i noff 's 
words, "go 
too far to the 
Left." They 
did not try to 
subvert the 
rules on 
which music 
is founded; 
they did not 
ignore mel- 
ody, substi- 
tute cacoph- 
ony for har- 
m o n y , and 
indulge in 
vain repeti- 
tions like the 
Dadaists. 

Rachmani- 
noff says lit- 
tle or nothing 
concerning 
music and 
musicians i n 
America. He 
has compared 
certain or- 
chestral con- 
di t.i o n s in 
New York 
with those 
prevailing i n 
London, to 
the advan- 
tage of the 
former. 

After prais- 
ing the qual- 
ity of English 
o r ch e stras 
and conduc- 
tors, he 're- 
fers to the 
difficulty ex- 
perienced i n 
London in 
{Cont'd on 
page 72) 



From a drawing by Pasteriaka 



Rachmaninoff in a Creative Mood - 



Page Twenty-Five 




Youth's 

Sweet-Scented 

Manuscript 

Photos by John Ellis, from Richard 

Walton Tulh/s superb production 

of "Omar, the Tentmaker" 



Verses from the "Rubdlydt of Omar 
Khayyam" 



Young Omar (Guy Bates Post) 
sings to his Shireen (Virginia 
Faire) : 

. . . Ah, that Spring should vanish with 

the Rose! 
That Youth's sweet-scented manuscript 
should close! 
The Nightingale that in the branches 
sang. . . 
Ah tvhence, and whither flown again, who- ■ 
knows ! 

My Love! could you and, I with Him 

conspire 
To grasp this sorry Scheme of Things 

entire, 
Would we not shatter it to bits — and 

then 
Remold it nearer to the Heart's desire? 

Von rising Moon that looks for us again — 

How oft hereafter will she wax ami 

wane ; 

How oft hereafter, rising, look for us 

Thru this same Garden — and for one in 

vain! 



But for his boon companions in 
the tavern, Hassan and Nizam, 
Omar has a gayer song : 

Come, fill the Cup, and in the fire of 

Spring 
Your Winter-garment of Repentance 
fling: 
The Bird of Time has but a little way 
To flutter — and the Bird is on the wing. 

Indeed, indeed. Repentance oft before 
J swore — but was I sober when I swore? 
And then, and then came Spring, and 
Rose-in-hand 
My threadbare Penitence apieces tore. 

When you and I behind the Veil are past. 
Oh, but the long, long while the World 

shall last — 
Which of our Coming and Departure 

heeds 
4s 'the Sea's self should heed a pebble 

cast. 



Page Twenty-Six 



Painted Gardens 



Blondelle Malone might well be called the "Garden 
Artist of America." Pupil of Twachtman and Chase. 
World wanderer in search oj color. She gives her 
paintings a charm as elusive as the fragrance that 
hovers over the old-fashioned gardens of her native 
South. Her first exhibition picture in the Paris Salon 
was "The Garden of Pisarro," painted during a visit 
to Madame Camille Pisarro, wife of the famous 
artist. She has exhibited at the Royal Academy of 
London and Dublin, and in this country at the Archi- 
tectural League and the Pennsylvania Academy. In 
the fall, she plans to have a private exhibition of 
her works at her spacious Beekman Place studio that 
overlooks the East River 





One expects paintings of the prize roses at 
Bagatelle, near Paris, so this charming one 
of the water-lilies is a welcome change. And 
yet, the whole atmosphere of the painting 
seems to say, "Somewhere, just around the 
corner the roses are blooming" 



In this delightful view of a 
corner at "Hopelands," Mrs. 
Oliver Iselin's residence at 
Aiken, S. C, the garden wan- 
ders thru the loggia into the 
house, or is it the house that 
wanders into the garden 



There is an air of quaint in- 
formality in this glimpse of 
Mrs. Willard Straight's garden 
"Whitney Court," Aiken, S. C 
One of the most beautiful gar 
dens in the South and an ever 
fragrant memorial to Mrs. Whit 
nev. Mrs. Straight's mother 




Page Twentv-Seven 



The Passing of Stage Decoration 

Elimination of Scenery as We Know It, Replacement by the Sensation of Endless Space, 
Focalization of Lights, These Are the Revolutionary Theories Agitating the Stage Today 

By Sheldon Cheney 



IN time some historian of the theater will doubtless 
trace out the reasons why stage decoration came to 
occupy such an over-important place in American 
play production during the first twenty years of the 
twentieth century. Certainly the most talented and 
most progressive artists in our theaters today, as a group, 
are to be found, not in the ranks of the actors or the 
playwrights .or the producers, but among the score or 
more young "decorators," who have practically revolu- 
tionized methods of staging within little more than a de- 
cade. One of the reasons, of course, will be discovered 
in the poverty of our playwriting in those years, on the 
same principle which leads a flapper with none too many 
personal charms to doll up more elaborately than her bet- 
ter-favored sisters. Another reason will be found in the 
very evil estate into which stage decoration had fallen in 
the late nineteenth century : that department of stag- 
ing needed creative attention more than any other — and 
has finally got it with a vengeance. But justly or un- 
justly, logically or illogically, the decorator has just 
now been having his day. 

Wouldn't it then be a bit ironical if stage decoration 
suddenly tended to disappear from the world's theaters, 
just at the moment when we Americans have developed 
our finest theatrical talent in that direction ? That is, in 
a very true sense, what is transpiring. At least some of 
the best decorators in the world are discarding the stage 
picture as such, are eliminating the entire stretched-can- 
vas background on which most of the scenic artist's 
effort has centered in the recent past, are saying frankly 



that the matter of stage-setting a play will in future be 
more in the province of the architect, the carpenter and 
the electrician than in that of the painter. This tendency 
has been no secret from the two or three most progres- 
sive men among the American decorators — say, Robert 
Edmond Jones and Norman-Bel Geddes — and they have 
put on paper projects in which decoration, as such, disap- 
pears. But it is a revolutionary idea if one has been 
thinking in terms of the general run of our "best" stage 
productions. 

The argument used by all of us who have written 
much about stage decoration is this : every play must be 
acted out before some sort of background, and that back- 
ground will always have a conscious or unconscious ap- 
peal, and therefore it is better that it be skilfully de- 
signed to be in key with the other elements of the pro- 
duction and to reenforce the mood of the action. Great 
progress has been made toward that goal — which in its 
broader aspect may be called the synthetic ideal of pro- 
duction. A good ideal it is, too, and the reach after it 
has carried stage art a long step forward, out of the old 
unthinking sort of artificiality, away from a lot of things 
that were trivial, tawdry, or cheaply elaborate, toward 
an art that is simpler, more honest, and to a measurable 
extent more beautiful. 

But what few, if any, of us saw was that keeping 
background in key 'means simplification, and that in cer- 
tain types of drama simplification logically approaches 
closer and closer to elimination ; and furthermore, that 
when drama becomes intense enough, concentrated 




A scene from the Theatre Guild's production of "From Morn to Midnight' 



Page Twenty-Eight 



SuADOWLAND 



enough, the best sort of subconscious appeal is made not 
by any consciously designed backing at all but by 
darkness, with the players set out in a pool of light 
down near the audience. And that is what is happen- 
ing on a surprisingly large number of stages ; utterly 
neutral backgrounds, and oftener than not only dark 
space. You may put it clown partly as the logical evo- 
lution of "the new scenery," or as partly due to the 
swing of modernist playwriting toward intensification 
and concentration. Or put it down, if you like, as 
merely the latest whim in staging. But stage decora- 
tion, as decoration, is passing. 

Ultimately, of course, when realism and the realistic 
stage-picture have passed into history or oblivion, the 
picture-frame proscenium and the fourth-wall conven- 
tion will disappear, and we shall have again a stage 
that makes no pretense of being anything but a stage — 
a neutral architectual background, a naked stage, in 
place of the illu'sional stage picture. That is an ulti- 
mate goal with most of the progressives ; but that sort 
of change is not accomplished in either a decade or a 
generation, because it entails not merely different meth- 
ods of staging but the building of new theaters. Ex- 
cept for a few real secessionists like Jacques Copeau, 





Photos by Atelier Jessen 



Above, design by Hans Strobach for a new play by 
Tagore to be produced at the Volkesbiihne, Berlin. 
At the left, a setting for "Manon Lescant," and below, 
another setting for Georg Kaiser's expressionist play. 
"Gas,'' designed by Karl Jakob Hirsch 



TWiji»j i) ui, ■JiUMIUffiBii-'ii!' 



who already has a 
frankly theatrical stage, 
the progressive pro- 
ducers in both Europe 
and America are likely 
to be working for 
many years to come in 
today's theaters, and it 
is their method of seek- 
ing the neutral back- 
ground, rather than 
Copeau's, that sug- 
gested this article. I 
have already foreshad- 
owed the idea in these 
pages, when, in a re- 
view of the Interna- 
tional Theater Exhibi- 
tion at Amsterdam, I 
( Cont'd on page 74) 




Page Twenty-Nine 



Special Photographs 
by Edwin Bower Hesser 



Youth will be served. 
At your service is Gladys 
Walton, who now is 
moving across the screen 
in the personality of 
Bret Harte's "M'liss" 
in the Universal's pro- 
duction entitled "The 
Girl Who Ran Wild" 



When Stars 
in Their 
Courses 

Are Young 




Page Thirty 




Crystal Gazing 

By 
W. G. Bowdoin 



WE put a problem to our 
Wisest Friend, the 
Mathematician. "Tell 
us," we said, "how many snow- 
flakes in a snowdrift three feet 
high and twice as long and wide." 
The Wise One gave no heed, so 
we modified our question : 

"Tell us, then, how many flakes 
in one small goblet of snow." 

At that, the Mathematician 
coughed in his beard and made answer : 

"Each snowflake is but a frosted drop of water. Your 
goblet will hold as many flakes as it holds drops of water. 
Go and make count, drop by drop." 

We did not work out the problem, but we meditated 
on it — thus : In one goblet of snow there must be thou- 
sands of snow crystals — in one gallon measure of snow 
there must be many, many thousands more — in one snow- 
drift three feet high and twice as long and wide there 
must be a thousand million — in the Adirondacks, -when 
December is reigning and the world is white, there must 
be a million times a million times a million times — aghast, 
we ceased to meditate ; it was like trying to define the 
length of one second of eternity. 

And, after all, the paralyzing fact we wish to confront 
you with is: No ttiuo snowflakes are exactly alike. 

Among these numberless crystals there are no dupli- 
cates ! 

What a master the Designer of snowflake patterns 
must be ! 

And what a field for discovery this opens to the 
searcher after the beautiful and original in Design ! 

Beside it, the fascination of prospecting for precious 
metals and gems dwindles into insignificance. 

We do not know who first discovered this "snow 
mine," but we do know who first gave us photographic 
reproductions of the crystals — Mr. W. A. Bently of 

Jericho, Ver- 
mont. 

Nearly forty 
years ago his 
discerning 
mother, having 
a great love for 
the beautiful 
and wonderful 
in nature and 
wishing to de- 
velop in her 
young son a 
kindred- interest, 
gave him a 






s m a 



micro- 



scope. 

It was early 



November, and the Vermont win- 
ter had already descended. So it 
was quite natural that young 
Bently, in his search for objects of 
interest in the. Wonderland of 
Outdoors, should first train his 
magical magnifying lens upon the 
snowflakes. 

Their marvelous beauty amazed 
and thrilled him. It was like a 
glimpse into some land of en- 
chantment. He became intensely eager to have others 
see and enjoy these exquisite gems from Cloudland. 

Appreciating what an encouragement of this interest 
might mean to their son, his parents procured for him a 
photo-micrographic apparatus, with which he could 
photograph the shimmering white flakes in their mag- 
nified form. 

Then there began for the boy a struggle to overcome 
serious difficulties. The tiny flakes were so fragile, so 
evanescent ; they would disappear before the lens of the 
camera could be properly adjusted. And it was only 
after long experiment that a black background of the 
right texture was found to throw the delicate traceries 
into sharp relief on the photographic plate. 

But young Bently never was quite satisfied. So he 
began to experiment with the photo-micrographic ap- 
paratus itself. After many trials, failures and dis- 
couragements, he .perfected the mechanism and the 
method — just three years after his first glimpse of the 
magical crystal. 

But with the perfection of his instrument his inter- 
est in the snowflake did not flag. His work became even 
more fascinating and thrilling. He and his camera went 
"on duty" with the first light snowfall of every autumn, 
and they went into mourning when the sun of the late 
spring forbade the visitors from Cloudland to descend. 
In the years that Mr. Bently has been "crystal gazing," 
he has taken 
nearly five thou- 
sand photo- 
graphs of these 
minute marvels 
of nature. 

He considers 
his most beauti- 
ful specimen 
one that he dis- 
covered just a 
year ago. He 
calls it the 
"good - luck" 
Make, for the cen- 
terpiece forms a 
perfect crystal 
horseshoe. 




Fage Thirty-One 



£uadowland 




The atmosphere of the Occident per- 
meates this landscape of Seiho's 

The 
Takeuchis 

Seiho and Itsuzo, Father 

and Son, Interpreters of 

the Best in Modern 

Japanese Art 

By 

Melville Johnson 



N 




shows a Japanese 
feeling in her work, 
met Itsuzo, who is 
considered the best 
critic of the modern- 
ists in Japan, when 
she was studying art 
with his father Seiho 
Takeuchi. Seiho once 
said to Katherine 
Sturges, "In three 
years I could teach 
you to be an exhibi- 
tion Japanese artist. 
You not only ha\ve 
the true feeling and 
paint from the heart, 
but you would be 
able to learn perfect- 
ly the Japanese 
brush technique, 
which very few for- 
eigners acquire." 
From her study with 
Seiho and also Kawa 
Kawakita, one of the 
best of the younger 
Japanese artists, 
Katherine Sturges 
has developed in her 
drawings that elim- 
ination of detail and 
delicacy of line and touch that are purely oriental in 
conception. Her charming depictions of children 
show a strong Japanese influence. 

Japanese art to the average person means the Japan- 
ese color print. Meritorious modern Japanese paint- 
ings are practically unknown in this country, as our 
modern painters are practically unknow to the layman 
in Japan. The popularity of the color print is ex- 
plained by the excellent reproductions ; while, con- 
versely, the reproductions of the works of the Jap- 
anese modernist that have found their way into 



This lion, from a screen by Seiho, has not been 
conventionalized for the sake of the design 




NOWADAYS Japan- 
ese art circles are. in 
a hurry of assimilat- 
ing American, European and 
Japanese arts. The quality of 

the product is still debatable. We are somewhat in the 
same state as was ancient Rome, where several tendencies 
and schools came together, with at first a great deal of 
confusion and, consequently, the production of poor work. 
Later, when the fusion became perfect, the excellence 
of the results needs no panegyric from me. Japan is 
now going thru the first stage with several schools and 
tendencies, even Cubism and Futurism, entering into the 
melange. 

"The names of Cezanne, Benoir, Matisse, Van Gogh 
and Gauguin are being discussed smoothly in our art 
circles, like a stream in a spring field.' But I think, if 
we enquire into the naked truth, we are apt to be surfeited 
from the water-falling impulse." 

So writes Itsuzo Takeuchi from Kyoto, Japan, to Kath- 
erine Sturges of New York. Katherine Sturges, who, 
perhaps, more than any other of our modern illustrators, 




Page Thirty-Two 







Typically Japanese is the exaggeration of the ferret in this delicate composition by Seiho 



this country have been so poor as to color, and blurred 
as to fineness of line, upon which depends so much of 
their charm, that they have failed to give an adequate idea 
of the originals. 

It is very true that the Japanese artists are now going 
thru that rather trying stage of assimilating Western art 
with a fervor that is not always well directed, and much 
of the academic pedantry of the Occident is being absorbed 
as well as the vigor 
and strength. That 
is always the way. It 
took the Japanese 
many years to absorb 
and thoroly assimil- 
ate Chinese art, but 
they finally made it 
their own. 

Seiho Takeuchi is 
the acknowledged 
leader of this new 
school of art in Jap- 
an. Unlike some of 
the other artists, he 
has remained faith- 
ful to the Japanese 
technique, that abso- 
lute perfection of 
line, yet elimination 
of non-essential de- 
tail in which the Jap- 
anese excel. And yet, 
his work has a dis- 
tinctly Occidental 
cast, perhaps best 
shown- in his animals, 
where he has broken 




/„ 



away from the Japanese tendency of making a composi- 
tion of the animal, in spite of its natural formation. He 
has also acquired perspective, which, strange as it may 
seem to us, was practically unknown to the Japanese 
before the influx of Western art. It might be said of 
them that they had a flat artistic eye. 

Again, in % his landscapes with their delicate trees or 
the perfection of feeling he gets at the edge of water, 

he shows, pronounc- 
edly, the influence of 
Whistler. Of course, 
Whistler was influ- 
enced by the Japan- 
ese, but only so far 
as it made his lines 
more delicate with- 
out sacrificing the 
underlying strength 
of his compositions. 
All Seiho's paintings 
have a soft firmness 
and a beautiful, com- 
pelling composition, 
with the strong, 
clear colors of the 
Japanese school. 
They are worked out 
in powerful brush 
strokes. It is said 
that Japanese art 
students reverently 
bump their heads on 
the floor three times 
when Seiho's name 
(Continued on 
page 73) 




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Plioto © James Wallace Pondelicek, Chicago. 














DRYAD 














An art study of Anna Ludmila 











/ J ar;c' Thirty-Four 



Mrs. Wharton and Some Others 



B;y Burton Rascoe 



IN "The Glimpses of the Moon" Edith Wharton may 
be said to have scored her first definite failure. Yet 
so considerable an artist is she that her one in- 
adequacy is of greater literary importance than the su- 
preme achievement of any other woman novelist native 
to America, save only Willa Sibert Cather. Word reaches 
me from Paris that "The Glimpses of the Moon" was 
composed under serious difficulties, that Mrs. Wharton 
has been ill for the better part of a year, and that she 
wrote much of the novel while racked with pain. This 
would account for the novel's thinness, but not for Mrs. 
Wharton's sponsoring it. Ill or well, there was no urgency 
(I hope) in its being printed, beyond Mrs. Wharton's 
view of it, when completed, as not unworthy of her 
signature. And that, I am inclined to believe, it is not ; 
tho I concede that many a lesser novelist might have 
signed it with pride. 

The truth is that here Mrs. Wharton has made her one 
serious error in the choice of form. She had, frankly, a 
theme for a novelette and, having conceived it as a novel, 
she was constrained to pad it out. Had she bound the 
story by restricting limits of the novelette or the long 
short story, she might have hidden the chill aspect of her 
method. Concision and compactness would have given 
rapidity to the events related, and would have obscured 
the fact that she has left her characters quite impalpable. 
When one must live with the figures of a book thru the 
episodes of four hundred pages, one prefers that they 
emerge more vitally than as ghosts. 

You see, Mrs. Wharton carries the impersonal method 
of composition to a point attained by no other writer. 
Flaubert, long considered the arch-type of objective 
fictionist, is a veritable propagandist beside her. She 
involves herself not at all in the emotions of her charac- 
ters ; she maintains an attitude of well-bred austerity ; 
she tells her story, one suspects, without the slightest 
change of countenance. It is impossible to discover what 
is going on in her mind, whether she approves or con- 
demns, pities or loves. There is something magnificent in 
this, but is it, one asks, quite human? It is a literary 
feat, but is it, ultimately, anything more than a species 
of superior reporting? By her very aloofness she lessens 
the emotional interest in her story and keeps her drama 
to a trim but lifeless literary pattern. 

"The Glimpses of the Moon" 

The obtrusion of the author's personality is, often, a 
disagreeable and inartistic thing. But it is only when the 
author is a sentimental, unintelligent, and inconsequential 
person. That, we know, Mrs. Wharton is not. Nothing 
could well be wiser or more intelligent than her beautiful 
and sympathetic interpretation of "French Ways and 
Their Meaning." In this little book she revealed that 
she has definite ideas about human conduct, ethics, man- 
ners, and customs which it would benefit mankind more 
generally to adopt. It revealed, too, that she has profound 
sympathies and admirations, a philosophy of life that is 
sound, courageous, and enlightened. It would not hurt, 
indeed I think it would help, her novels if she mingled 
that philosophy a bit more freely in their skilled and 
precise delineation of aspects of contemporary society. 

"The Glimpses of the Moon" (a title taken from 
Hamlet's apostrophe to his father's ghost) is concerned 
with the precarious life of society sponges. A young 



couple, Nick and Susy Lansing, indigent but popular, 
have married with the understanding that each shall not 
interfere with the other's chance to get on in the world. 
They are in love, but they take a rational view that it 
might not last; in fact, they rather suspect that their 
romance will fade in rapid time. But, being momentarians 
in their philosophy, they resolve that they shall enjoy 
the dream while it endures. Susy is practical, and years 
of petty hypocrisy in the interest of her own comfort and 
luxury have warped her nicer sense of values and blunted 
her sensibilities. She sees to it that their wedding presents 
are handsome checks rather than the less readily negotiable 
impedimenta of silver and china, furniture and ornaments. 
Cash in hand, they go to Italy, where Susy has also seen 
to it that they enjoy, rent-free, the villa of a wealthy 
friend. Hitherto she had paid for her sponging only by 
the dubious but minor pretense of a respect and cordiality 
she did not feel, by a harmless flattery of dull, impossible, 
but wealthy people. But now she discovers that gratitude 
is demanded of her in more galling ways. It is expected 
that she aid bored and leisured wives in deceiving their 
husbands and act in the interest of women who have 
momentary designs upon the personable husbands of de- 
pendent women. This is a daily sacrifice of self-respect, 
but she must either make it or give up the life of ease and 
luxury to which she and Nick have so long been accus- 
tomed. By ingenious maneuvers favors come her way; 
residences in Italy, Switzerland, France, and England are 
at her disposal. So blunted has her conscience become 
that, thinking always of Nick's happiness, she does not 
hesitate to pack their host's cigars among their effects 
when she is leaving for another proffered dwelling. This 
slight but significant episode brings Nick, when he dis- 
covers it, to a sharp realization that they have both sunk 
pretty far. 

Careful Characterizations 

Well, they hazard more trying situations than this 
without disaster because, as they are brought to realize, 
they love each other. This as a denouement is not dra- 
matic, but it has the effect of inevitability, for Mrs. 
Wharton is careful in her characterization and she has let 
the reader see, even before Nick and Susy know, that 
they cannot very well do without each other. It is all very 
shrewdly worked out, for Mrs. Wharton is a technician 
who does not blunder in her narrative. The difficulty is 
that one is likely to wonder what difference it makes 
whether Nick and Susy love each other or not. They are 
not heroic nor even very interesting characters. This is 
Mrs. Wharton's fault. Intrinsically, as human beings, 
they are as interesting as any other figures portrayed be- 
tween the covers of a book, for no human life is insignifi- 
cant in the hands of a great artist. Nick and Susy are 
without dramatic, that is, human interest precisely for 
the reason that Mrs. Wharton does not quite make them 
flesh and blood. She does not endow them with what, for 
convenience, we shall designate as souls, meaning merely 
that spiritual element which links them in kinship with all 
of us who live our brief day and die. The point is that 
Mrs. Wharton's aloofness is cold and unsympathetic; her 
detachment is such that it kills or prohibits all emotional 
sympathy with her characters. In this novel, Strefford 
only (who is a buffoon and a rake) compels our hearts 
and wins our sympathy as at least a person something 



Page Thirty-Five 



Si-IADOWLANO 



of whose essential self we know. Nick and Susy's pere- 
grinations are endurable largely because of the route 
they take rather than what happens to them while they 
are on it. The novel is, you see, an intimate and, I suppose, 
a faithful picture of certain aspects of modern life as it 
is lived by a moneyed, sophisticated, leisured, cynical, and 
bored group of people whose lives are a transience of 
seasons in the Alps, on the Riviera, in Florence, and at 
the social capitals of Europe and America. As such it is 
important as document in the history of society. And 
that field in America Mrs. Wharton has pretty well pre- 
empted. "The Glimpses of the Moon," tho, by reason of 
its sketchiness, is less important even as document than 
"The Age of Innocence," which portrays with serenity and 
fidelity the social life of America during the closing 
decades of the last century. 

Miss Gather's Intensity 

The high place Mrs. Wharton's achievement occupies 
in the lay and critical opinion of America is, I think, 
something of an accident. She was for a long time, by 
default, the best woman novelist we had. Her social 
position was secure, her intelligence unquestioned, her 
gifts considerable, and her novels distinguished by good 
taste, technical brilliance, assurance, shrewd observation 
and a certain wealth of information concerning the activi- 
ties, manners, and interests of smart people which other 
novelists did not have. She was, in fine, a capable novelist 
of society who happened to be in it. She enjoyed the 
friendship of Henry James and he, in sincerity, bestowed 
upon her the accolade of Sir Hubert's praise. That fact, 
I suspect, had much to do with the case. Certainly now 
there are few critics who dare not show her the deference 
due an artist of the first rank. This, I risk the heresy 
of believing, she is not. She is not, I think, even the 
first among the women writers of America. That position, 
I contend, is held by Miss Willa Sibert Cather. 

The difference between Mrs. Wharton and Miss Cather 
is largely a difference between fine workmanship and 
genius, talent and passion, good taste and ecstasy. It is, 
essentially, that Miss Cather is a poet in her intensity and 
Mrs. Wharton is not. Miss Cather's work has that vital 
quality requisite to moving and enduring art which was 
designated by a profound critic when, viewing the canvas 
of a new painter, he said : "Yes, it is well drawn ; it is 
correct in color, line, proportion. There is nothing 
wrong with it. But, it lacks that !" And he snapped his 
finger. Mrs. Wharton gives us correct pictures ; Miss 
Cather gives us life and the poetry and beauty of its 
emotions. 

Nearly four years have intervened between the publica- 
tion of "My Antonia" and Miss Cather's new novel, "One 
of Ours." She writes slowly; her work will probably 
never be voluminous. There is too fine and delicate a 
cadence, too much singing vibrancy in her sentences for 
her to write much. She is concerned in her new book 
with the presentation of a highly sensitized youth in 
relation to the national culture of America as it is evi- 
denced in the prairie towns of our Middle- West. It is the 
story of a struggle with destiny, a struggle wherein man 
is inevitably defeated whatever his triumphs, and which 
alone among human efforts is always beautiful and tragic 
and pathetic in its ironic implications. 

Claude Wheeler, the hero of "One of Ours," is a youth 
with tremendous potential energies which are frustrated 
and inhibited on every side by a close and sterile environ- 
ment. He is driven in upon himself by the covert 
hostility his individuality inspires, only to break out inter- 
mittently in stormy and futile protest. We follow him, 
a baffled, meditative, aspiring and tragic figure thru a 
dramatic career which, like Hamlet's, takes place largely 
within himself. In Claude Wheeler, Miss Cather has 



created a figure essentially indigenous to America, whose 
problems are the spiritual concerns of the race and whose 
aspirations are the highest aspirations of our native 
culture. 

Miss Cather's style is rich in melodic overtones. It has 
a haunting and caressing beauty. It is a highly personal 
style, rhythmic, well wrought, delicately modulated, chang- 
ing in key and tempo in accordance with the subject matter 
of the moment. As her novel may be said to have sym- 
phonic form, so may her style be likened to the effect of 
an orchestra, the strings and wood-winds dominating. 
Were it not that she already has three novels and a 
volume of short stories to her credit, which are full of 
beauty and distinction, it would be possible to say of "One 
of Ours" that this is the work of a prose artist at the 
full maturity of her powers. That might as well be said 
of Miss Cather's first published work. But certainly 
this is, and for that very reason, one of the outstanding 
books of the season. 

Some Other Books 

At the time this causerie must be sent off to press, my 
impatience to see Sinclair Lewis' "Babbitt" has not been 
requited by his publishers. Mr. Lewis has told me about 
it and Mr. Mencken, who has read the proofs, has spoken 
to me of it in glowing terms. I gather, that it is the 
"Main Street" of the larger industrial cities of the United 
States and that it is quite as full of biting and sardonic 
inferences and implications as its illustrious and popular 
predecessor. It is, then, in terms of "Main Street" that 
I shall speak of "Babbitt" before reading it. This is 
permissible, for next month I am privileged to reverse 
my decision, upon an examination of the evidence. The 
popularity of "Main Street" has been accounted for by 
every speculation except the obvious and generous one. 
Its title, they say, led thousands to buy it ; the city dwellers 
bought it because it roasted the small town ; the small town 
people bought it because they wanted to see what had been 
said about them. Curiosity, they say, not pleasure, ac- 
counts for the sale of the book. This is a cynical and 
pessimistic view of human nature. Incline your ear 
while I whisper that I believe otherwise. Let me argue 
that the make-up of the human soul is not so drab and 
piffling an agglomerate of petty motives. Let me insist 
that there is, in each of us, however indefinite, a secret 
discontent with the limitations life has imposed upon us 
and a vague, determined and imperative wish to make of 
our lives a more splendid, more romantic, more glorious 
event than, in the usual course of things, it is. "Maim 
Street" was prophylactic, and there are few of us who 
object to mental hygiene even when we are made aware 
that we stand in need of it. We may make gestures of 
protest out of deference to the opinion of those about us 
and out of a sense of delicacy which restrains our open 
admission of personal shortcomings. But, deep down 
in our inner being, most of us can stand and even welcome 
criticism, for it is only by a pointing out of our faults 
that we are able to discover and overcome them. 

"Main Street" is a much better book than that critical 
opinion, which is gaged always in inverse ratio to popular 
approval, adjudged it to be. It was modeled, quite obvi- 
ously, on "Madame Bovary" and it suffers from the same 
defects as well as shines by many of the same virtues of 
Flaubert's realistic masterpiece. Its defect is that it is 
carping and lacking in broad human sympathy, but its 
very nature and theme necessitated these attitudes. It suc- 
ceeded, precisely, because it was a sincere and honest ex- 
pression of a discontent with those aspects of small town 
life which none of us especially cares for either. 

"Babbitt," I am told, is a depiction, from the same point 
of view, of the corroding, material, ugly aspect of life in 
(Continued on page 68) 



Page Thirty-Six 



Mateo Hernandez 



A Spanish sculptor living in Paris who is one 
of the few artists in Europe today using the 
"taille directe." He has returned to the sources 
of statuary, and the elimination of modeling 
makes it necessary for him to know his 
subject thoroly 




1 




The beautiful simplicity of line, which 
exemplifies the artist's profound 
knowledge of form, distinguishes this 
porphyry seal exhibited in the last 
Societe Nationale. While in the 
"Vulture" ancient Egypt, with its 
economy of means and the use of 
essentials only, seems to have in- 
spired Hernandez 



Who could resist the appealing 
look in Hippo's eyes? But teclv- 
nically speaking, tremendous en- 
ergy, prolonged imagination and 
an artistic conscience are necessary 
to produce the smooth sweep of 
surface and elimination of detail 
evidenced in this strong piece 




Page Thirty-Seven 



From The 

Famous. Screens 

Painted by 

Robert 

Winthrop 

Chanler 




AN AVIAN ARABESQUE 

Owned by 

Mrs. Joan Sanford 



Page Thirty-Eight 



An Aristocrat in Bohemia 

Such Is. Robert Winthrop Chanler 

By 'Ernestine Hartley 



DESCENDED from an im- 
posing line of worthy and 
even eminent ancestors, with 
Dutch and Puritan blood predomi- 
nating, Robert Winthrop Chanler 
stands today the living antithesis 
of what his heredity might have 
made him. Colonial governors, gen- 
erals, clergymen, jurists — of such 
stock is Robert Winthrop Chanler, 
whose achievements in decorative 
art are unique in the annals of ar- 
tistic America. "When the oldest 
colors have faded, and the young- 
est critics have died," the imprint 
of Chanler's personality will hardly 
have departed. Here is one who 
has "splashed at a ten-league can- 
vas with brushes of comets' hair." 
You have only to look at his as- 
tounding screens, with their gor- 
geous, chromatic arabesques ; his 
crazily beautiful and beautifully 
crazy beasts and birds and flowers, 
and the pulsing harmony and 




DANCE OF THE PLANETS 
Owned by Mrs. Harry Payne Whitney 




THE GIRAFFES 
Exhibited at the famous Salon D'Automne, Paris 



rhythm with which his craft has 
endowed them, to realize that here 
is a potent imagination which has 
soared in realms of beauty denied 
to all but the divinely inspired. 

Bob Chanler, as he is familiarly 
called, even by passing acquaint- 
ances, is one of the shining, it might 
almost be said, dazzling lights of 
Upper Bohemia. And if he would 
he could be reclining in the Knick- 
erbocker Club, lolling in a lan- 
daulet, lounging in the salons of the 
most exclusive residences on Fifth 
Avenue, adorning the Golden 
Horseshoe at the Metropolitan 
Opera, or disporting himself with 
the socially elect at Newport or 
Bar Harbor. 

But altho it can scarcely be said 
of him that he scorns delights and 
lives laborious days, he is emphatic- 
ally a worker. He prefers to 
decorate the interiors of his 
friends' houses to being a social 
decoration himself. Like his dis- 
tinguished social compeer, Mrs. 
Harry Payne Whitney, who has 
purchased one of his finest works, 
he has chosen art as a vocation. 
But unlike her, having run thru a 
pretty large fortune, or, as some say, 
series of fortunes, he has taken up 
art for a living, and what is more, he 
has succeeded, not on the strength 
of his social position and fashionable 
(Continued on page 71) 



Page Thirty-Nine 




Once she was mistaken for her favorite film 
star. Since then she has dressed the part. 
Suzanne, the maid, does not enthuse over 
the ambitions of her mistress. She has just 
spent two hours arranging Madam's coiffure, 
and she feels a re-arrangement coming. 
She is wondering if life is really worth while 



./> 



V * 



. I, 

■ I ii 
II / 



When Dare-Devil Jack returned from dear old 
London, he had developed a strong left with his 
monocle. And the Mayfair accent, acquired from 
the Duchess of Cheshire, was the despair of the 
New York blue-bloods ivho gave him such a rous- 
ing welcome. Jack said later that society people 
in America seemed a bit crude, but as they were 
really trying to do right, ha was willing to help 
them along and lend his charming presence to 
their entertainments 





J^i 



Why does Harold, the virile screen hero 
of the West, hold his right hand so coyly 
behind him? Can it be that he is reaclu 
ing for his gun? Does Harold need pro- 
tection from the Eastern heiress? No. 
Harold has just been looking up the 
amount of her alimony in "Spicy Gossip. 
It was not chance that brought Harold to 
the right spot at the opportune time. 
Harold never took a chance in his life 



Page Forty 



Yearnings 

The Actor Dreams of the Social 
Register, While Newport's Perfect 
Hostess Longs for Celluloid Fame 

Sketches by August Henkel 



We have in this great land of ours a new 
aristocracy. They ride in purple upholstered 
limousines with orchids in a crystal vase. 
For a rest and change they come on to the 
Ritz jor a jew days, where they inscribe the 
register with that magic name Hollywood. 
If after playing in one hundred and thirty- 
five film plays of society, they cant handle 
a head-waiter, they'd like to know the 
reason ivhy 





Percy, star of the Equine Film Company, is 
getting ready to dine with Mrs. van Sickles, 
late of Park Avenue and still later of Reno. 
The coming affair doesn't worry Percy in the 
least. He has been studying the Book of 
Etiquette" all the afternoon. Witness the 
bunch of flowers Percy intends to present with 
a Chesterfieldian bow. Percy, being no slouch 
when it comes to getting himself across, has 
retained the gun and spurs for atmosphere. He 
has heard that Mrs. van Sickles has a place in 
Florida. Percy is very fond of tarpon fishing, 
so he says 






Page Forty-One 



The Vista of the Dance 

Dancing as an Art has always existed. The Modernists say there 
has been a perversion of the spirit of the dance and that it is the 
fault of the times. They are working to carry on its true traditions 

B;y Sidney Baldwin 



EVEN the gods on Olympus took time from direct- 
ing the sun and earth in their courses to tread the 
measures of some immortal dance. While Pan 
the half -god, piping in secluded nooks for mortal maidens, 
brought the dance to men, a gift of the gods. 

Dancing always has been and probably always will be. 
It is not a cause but an effect of social conditions and 
morality. The dance does not demoralize but is demoral- 
ized. Its form is the result of the social system, and if it 
takes a form that is not pleasing, it is some underlying 
error in the social system that has produced it. The dance 
cannot be blamed for the form the social system gives it. 

It is the first of the arts commemorated in picture, song, 
and story. The most remote fairy-tale handed down to 
our children, tells of ''feasting and dancing." The ear- 
liest hieroglyphics 
picture the king sit- 
ting in state with 
groups of dancers 
performing before 
him. The com- 
mercial records 
kept on the cune- 
iform bricks of 
Babylon record 
that a slave danc- 
ing girl was the 
most expensive 
purchase in a day 
of expensive slaves. 

Dancing was by 
no means limited to 
slaves. Salome, a 
queen's daughter, 
pleased the court 
by her skill. Even 
Queen Victoria was 
fond of the polka. 
And the most mod- 
ern of princesses 
can even neglect 
her "Outline of 
History" if she but 
keeps her appoint- 
ment with her 
dancing teacher. 
And why not ? The 
dance is the art of 
movement, just as 
music is the art of 
tone. To move and 
to cry are the first 
things a baby does, 
and tho the in- 
stincts are crowded 
out by those things 
more necessary to 
existence, the need 
for their expression 
exists in all of us. 




L. 



' ■ 'mKBKmHBm 



The Puritan movement, which eliminated everything 
conducive to happiness and preached abstinence from all 
joy as a necessity for future salvation, merely completed 
what the Reformation had started. And with other joy- 
ous things the dance, as an art, was condemned and went 
down under the burden of crimes attributed to it. Only 
the ball-room form (which is the development of the court- 
ship dance) survived its enemies, and served as a connect- 
ing link between the old period of the dance and the pres- 
ent interest. 

There have always been people to whom the waltz and 
its attendant type of dance did not appeal. They wanted 
a fuller, freer method of expression and so, less than 
twenty years ago, other schools of the dance began to de- 
velop. In every case these schools began with a leader 

who had knowledge 
of the dance as it 
was in the zenith 
of its glory, and a 
realization of the 
need of the present 
generation for the 
freedom of thought 
and expression 
which the dance 
gives. 

Isadora Duncan 
was the first of 
these leaders to re- 
vive the classical 
dance in America. 
There had been 
American dancers 
before her, but they 
were individualists 
and had no definite 
theory. Miss Dun- 
can's school has al- 
ways been limited 
to a few students, 
all her pupils were 
taken at an early age 
and educated entire- 
ly underher system. 
It was really a phil- 
osophy of living, 
with the dance as 
an exponent. 

The group headed 
by Florence Flem- 
ing Noyes, and 
called "The Noyes 
Group," is the 
nearest thing 
America now has 
to this. Mrs. Noyes 
does not class her 
school as of the 
dance. It is a 
preparation for all 



Photo by Arnold Genthe 
A group from the Noyes School which does not limit 
itself to dancing, but prepares for all creative work 



Page Forty-Two 



Sui4DOwi*N£> 



creative work and turns out writers, musicians, 
sculptors, as well as business women and social work- 
ers. Unlike the Duncan School, except in their Con- 
necticut summer camp, there is no community life. 
They must draw inspiration for their various work 
from their classes. 

Fifteen years ago, with the Russian Ballet and its 
formal technique, came Chalif. We borrowed our 
ballet as we had borrowed our opera from Europe, 
and we had not had the initiative to separate them. 
Chalif cut the knot and he, perhaps more than any 
other teacher, has given a nation-wide impetus to the 
dance. He has one great attribute, he can create a 
dance and teach it to a teacher. And because he 
could teach people to teach dancing he has progressed 
from a little hall on 42nd Street to the classic build- 
ing he now occupies on 57th Street. And from teach- 
ing the purely formal ballet, he now teaches ballet, toe, 
national, character, interpretive, folk and oriental 
dances, and has composed a thousand and one dances 
of his own. 




Photo by Arthur F. Kales 

While Chalif was organizing his school in New 
York, another school was growing on the Western 
coast. Ruth St. Denis, a long recognized star of the 
theatrical stage, had found in her company Ted 
Shawn, a young man whose creative genius com- 
plemented her own. She was an authority on the 
dances of the Orient. He had ability for expressing 
beauty in dance form. Together they brought to 
Denishawn the personality which has made it the 
acknowledged school of the dance in America. 

For "Denishawn" is a professional school and has 
given to the stage in the last ten years a great many 
important dancers. Florence O'Denishawn who 
(Continued on page 67) 





by Hixon-Connelly Studios 



Above, Florence O'Denishawn, interpretive dancer 
supreme, a product of the school whose name she 
bears. At the left, Ted Shawn, and below, Ruth 
St. Denis, creative artists, whose devotion to their art 
has made "Denishawn" the recognized school of the 
dance in America 



Photo by Hoppe 




Page Forty-Three 



The Season of Symphony 

"Lord, what music hast thou provided for thy saints in heaven, 
when thou affordest bad men such music on earth?" — Isaak Walton 

By Ernest Jerome 



JUST as of yore all roads led to Rome, so nowadays 
do all musical pathways lead to New York. The 
music makers of the Old World need the cachet and, 
still more important, the cash of the new; moreover, they 
are glad to get away from the storm and stress of im- 
poverished and distressful Europe. So they are coming 
among us "not in spies but in battalions." 

In dealing with the coming music season — apart from 
opera, which will have separate attention — the most im- 
portant subject for consideration is the work of the sym- 
phony societies. Besides the Philharmonic and Symphony 
Societies, New 
York is visited 
by the Phila- 
delphia and 
Boston Orches- 
tras, which give 
a dozen con- 
certs each ; 
while last year 
the metropolis 
was treated to 
several extra 
orchestral con- 
certs by Rich- 
ard Strauss, 
whose place 
this season will 
be taken by 
Glazounow. 
Altogether one 
may count on 
over one hun- 
dred symphony 
concerts this 
year as last. 

This is what 
the French call 
un embarras 
de rich esse, 
and yet experi- 
ence shows 
that the appe- 
tite for good 
orchestral mu- 
sic grows with 
that on which 
it feeds, and 
that New 
Yorkers are so 
avid of it that 
nearly all sym- 
phonic concerts 
are largely at- 
tended. Some 
are packed to 
the doors, not- 
ably those of 
the Philadel- 
phia Orchestra, 
which the emi- 
nent Stokowski 




WILLEM MENGELBERG 
The celebrated guest-conductor of the New York Philharmonic Society. His 
commanding ability won world fame for him when in charge of the dis- 
tinguished Concertgebouw at Amsterdam 



has converted into the greatest instrument of its sort now 
in existence ; this is not my own opinion merely but 
that of some of the most eminent Continental musicians 
who have recently come to this country. 

Last season the Philharmonic, which had absorbed 
several members of the disbanded Symphony Orchestra, 
was more or less in a state of flux, and the members had 
to get accustomed to one another as well as to their numer- 
ous conductors, of whom there were four — Stransky, 
Bodansky, Hadley and Mengelberg. Under the magnetic 
Dutch conductor they commenced to assume a homo- 
geneity, a deli- 
cacy of nuance 
and a sense of 
climax which 
were very sat- 
isf ying ; and 
M engelberg 
now and then 
electrified his 
audiences. 

The orchestra 
should be in 
even better 
shape this sea- 
son, for it has 
had six ardu- 
ous summer 
weeks, or near- 
ly fifty per- 
formances un- 
der Hadley — a 
very good mus- 
ician but an 
uni nspiring 
conductor — 
and another 
temperamental 
Hollander, Van 
Hoogstraten, 
who is distinct- 
ly to be count- 
ed with. The 
latter has 
something of 
the Mengelberg 
style and tech- 
nique, and is a 
considerable 
addition to 
wielders of the 
wand in New 
York. His in- 
terpretations of 
the symphonies 
of Tschaikow- 
skyandFranck, 
and especially 
of Brahms, 
were note- 
worthy. He 
made a palpable 



Page Forty-Four 



SUADOWLAND 



hit at the Stadium 
concerts. 

The fact that Wal- 
ter Damrosch is writ- 
ing his memoirs might 
seem to indicate that 
he contemplates retire- 
ment. Be this so or 
not, he should have 
an interesting story to 
tell, extending as it 
does over nearly half 
a century of music in 
New York. It is the 
habit of a small clique 
to sneer at Walter 
Damrosch, which is as 
unjust as it is un- 
grateful, considering 
the obligations under 
which he has placed 
the musical com- 
munity and the real 
ability of the man. 
Liberally aided by 
Harry Harkness Flag- 
ler, he has made the 
New York Symphony 
Orchestra into a reallv 
fine instrument ; the 
work it did under Al- 
bert Coates last season 
being particularly ad- 
mirable. While never 
attempting startling 
interpretations him- 
self, Damrosch may 
be relied upon to give 
sane and significant 
renderings of the 
classics, while he has 
shown himself liber- 
ally disposed toward 

modern composers, even including the younger school of 
iconoclasts. His services to opera have been noteworthy. 
Among the best work Damrosch has done, and is still 
doing, is educating the audiences of the future by means 
of his weekly juvenile symphony concerts. Walter Dam- 
rosch is, in fact, a great musical pedagogue. As for his 
lectures on Wagner and The Ring, they are positive tours 
de force. He seems to know all the operas by heart, he tells 
their stories, elucidates the motifs and plays salient pas- 
sages of the polyphonic scores in wonderful fashion; and 
altho too much Wagner is to me like dining on nothing 
else but roast goose a I'allemand, I can understand the 
admiration he arouses among devout Wagnerites. I repeat, 
Walter Damrosch is a first-class musician and New York 
owes him much. 

When in Europe he arranged with Bruno Walter, con- 
ductor of the Munich Opera, to conduct three concerts 
with the Symphony Society in New York. Walter is only 
second to Weingartner in fame. In 1901 he conducted the 
Imperial Opera in Vienna, where he remained twelve 
years. In 1914 he succeeded the late Felix Mottl as con- 
ductor and general musical director at Munich, where the 
finest opera in Germany is to be heard. The Mozart Cycle 
given under his direction every year in Munich attracts 
large crowds of music lovers from all over Europe. Per- 
sonally I would rather Weingartner had come, but that 
great man, when not busy conducting the Vienna Phil- 
harmonic, is conducting Wagner opera at Buenos Aires, 
where incidentally he is to produce an opera of his own 
this season. 




LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 
Son of a Polish father and an Irish mother, with an Oxford degree. He is world renowned as 
the conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra. The city recently awarded him the Bok Gift of 
$10,000 for doing the most valuable civic work for Philadelphia 



Monteux is pulling the Boston Orchestra together in 
surprising fashion, for, thanks to the German entente, 
led by Fradkin, now playing at the Capitol Theater, it 
almost fell to pieces. But the able French conductor has 
reconstructed it, and it is already getting back to its best 
form, which is saying much. Phillip Hale is enthusiastic 
about it, and surely he ought to know, for there is no better 
informed or abler musical writer in the country. 

At the present stage none of the conductors has made 
known the novelties he intends to produce. Josef Stransky 
has been in Central Europe for some months, conducting 
symphony orchestras and festival performances of Wag- 
ner opera at Baden-Baden and Budapest. At the time 
of writing he had not sent over his own programs, nor had 
Mengelberg, who, however, takes up the baton about the 
mid-season, and does not reveal his programs until he ar- 
rives. Stokowski, who is in Europe, and also Albert 
Coates, are equally reserved. 

There is reason for this, for, like good Freemasons, 
musical conductors have been taught to be cautious. They 
have found, when they have announced some novelty in 
advance, another conductor has jumped in ahead, and they 
have had either to withdraw their tidbit, or give it a second 
or third hearing. If one may be permitted to suggest, there 
are some who would like to hear the works of that modern 
but sane and interesting Russian, Medtner, who has re- 
cently been so favorably noticed by his compatriot and 
contemporary Rachmaninoff. 

Glazounow's compositions we shall doubtless hear 
{Continued on page 67) 



Page Forty-Five 



Punch who smiles so sweetly is 
none other than Frueh himself. 
He is considered one of the 
best caricaturists in the world, 
even Cappiello and San bow- 
ing before him. His book 
called "Stage Folk'" Caricatures, 
by Frueh (Lieber and Lewis), 
is just off the press. The cari- 
catures on this page are lino- 
leum cuts. Frueh was one of 
the first artists in this country 
to use the linoleum cut 




Nazimova of the 
passionate line 
and the Hedda 
Gabler expres- 
sion shows what 
Frueh can do 
when he makes 
up his mind to 
eliminate un- 
necessary lines 




The unforgetable Dis- 
raeli of George Arliss 
looking out of the 
most expressive one- 
line eye ever drawn 




We present 
the Perfect 
Lover. Mr. 
Leo Ditrich- 
stein, of the 
self-sufficient 
jaw 



Attach an Ameri- 
can flag to the cane 
and you will have 
the typical Ameri- 
can. And who has 
done more to make 
the flag popular 
than George M. 
Cohan? 




Page Forty-Six 






Columette 

A Fantasy in One Act 

By J. Gordon Amend 



THE curtain is drawn and a garden is discovered. 
In a sky of midnight blue a moon floods the night 
with its silvery luster. In the center of the stage 
and far back there is a pergola with slender white pillars. 
There are blooming flowers about in profusion and here 
and there a bit of colorful shrubbery. At the right there 
is a decorative marble seat. And at the left there is a 
slender pedestal with an hour-glass on it. 

Pierrot enters and comes down stage as if looking ex- 
pectantly for some one. A few stray grains of sand 
trickle thru the hour-glass and it is run. Impatiently he 
regards it. A silvery bell in the distance marks the 

quarter hour. _, 

Pierrot : 

It is but the quarter hour and the glass has again run 
its course. I will set it for her coming. (He turns the 
hour-glass upside down.) And when you've trickled 
thru but once, my tiring vigil is kept. Oh, heavy laden 
hours that bear my impatience so meanly — until tonight 
— when love itself is lost in the very silence of the 
shadows — to waken again to a fuller life in its glorious 
dawn. 

[In the distance music is heard — and a voice singing, 
Slozvly the words become intelligible.] 

The song — 

Ah, verdant is love in its glorious spring, 

Milade, Milade, 
When days of gold splendor their radiance fling, 
But that's not the shade of the blossoms I bring, 

Milade. 
Red is the warmth of — — 

[Enter Punchinello, with a musical instrument about 

his neck.] _. 

Pierrot : 

Greetings, Punchinello. 

Punch : 
To you — greetings, Pierrot. 

Pierrot : 
And why are you abroad at such an hour of the night 
— and singing a love song too ? 

Punch : 
It is spring and all men love in the spring. 

Pierrot : 
And do you expect to find the lady here in the wood? 
Perhaps you have come to woo a moonbeam? 

Punch : 
A moonbeam — No. They are much too pale, and 
dance till but the first gleams of the sun put them to 
flight. But, Pierrot, I hear that in yonder dale by the 
waterfall there lives a forest nymph. 

Pierrot : 
I have heard it so myself. 

Punch : 
And each night her handmaids fold the waterfall 
about her as a bridal veil and there she waits for her 
lover. To yonder dale I go — to woo the forest nymph. 



Pierrot : 
May good fortune be your companion. 

Punch : 
And how may it be, Pierrot, that you happen to be 

here in the garden ? _ 

Pierrot : 

I ? Oh — I, too, am on love's errand. Tonight I wait 
for her who on the morrow plights her faith with mine. 

Punch : 
The wedding eve it is then. Ah — Pierrette — 

Pierrot : 
No, it is not Pierrette — not just Pierrette. 

Punch : 
I do not understand. Then Columbine — 

Pierrot : 
No, nor just Columbine. Come sit here by me, Punch- 
inello, and I will tell you the story. 
[Pierrot sits on the marble bench.] 

Punch : 
(Carelessly sitting cross-kneed on the ground by the 
bench.) My ears feign not their curiosity. 

Pierrot : 
It happened this way. With all my heart I love Pier- 
rette — and she loves me as well. When I walk with her, 
her bit of a hand in mine, I have no thought for anyone 
but her. And when she smiles — Ah, Punchinello, I see 
the light of stars in her lovely eyes. When she is with 
me, it is all very well — but so short-lived is her spell. No 
sooner have her amorous words been whispered than 
they blow by me like leaves in the chill November wind. 
I want Pierrette only while she is by my side. 

Punch : 

And some men there are who would die but for one 
favored word from her lips. 

Pierrot : 
And upon me she has showered them. It is pleasur- 
able to be sure to listen to them, but at times they grow 
wearisome with their entreating. Loved words are much 
like the jasmine blooms — a little of them and love is all 
the sweeter, but overmuch of them and — oh — their pro- 
fuseness is oppressive. 

Punch : 
Not all would agree with you there, Pierrot. 

Pierrot : 
It is likely, Punchinello, it is very likely. A mere lov- 
er's desires may differ greatly from Pierrot's. Pierrot is 
the great lover of all ages. Pierrot does not seek. He 
is sought ! It is little wonder that he tires by times of 
woman's whimperings. 

Punch : 
But surely you do not dare to call the impassioned 
words of Pierrette whimperings? 

Pierrot : 
Surely I do — not Pierrette's more so than those of all 



Page Forty-Seven 



SuADOWLAND 



women to be sure- 
truly 



-perhaps a little less, for Pierrette is 
Punch : 



Yes? 

Pierrot : 
Charming. I delight in her whimsies. She is so deli- 
cately feminine — and if there is one virtue I worship in 
women it is that. Her hair — have you ever touched it, 
Punchinello? 

Punch : 
It has not been my pleasure. 

Pierrot : 
Sometimes I fancy that a spinner in the sun must by 
some cunning magic have caught a vagrant sunbeam and 
plucked its golden luster for her crown. It falls about 
her shoulders like a shower of the late afternoon sun- 
shine. And her eyes — Oh, Punchinello, they are 

Punch : 
Blue. 

Pierrot : 
Not just blue, Punchinello, but something infinitely 
bluer. Sometimes they are like the night sky — deep, 
foreboding — where I do read passing strange affairs — 
and then again they dance like fringed gentian on a rug- 
ged shore. 

Punch : 
It seems to me your heart bespeaks Pierrette quite 
fondly. 

Pierrot : 
Oh, it does — after a fashion. I like to have her about 
me as one desires a flower — a song — or a sunset. But — 
Oh-hum ! — she talks of a fireside and homey evenings 
and spoils it all. There is nothing so wearisome to Pier- 
rot as domestic felicity. 

Punch : 
But she loves you, Pierrot, and, loving you,, perhaps 
she dreams of a little white cottage with a winding path 
up to the doorway and ragged robins blooming about. 

Pierrot : 
Of course she does. She loves me as much as she is 
capable — that is, as much as Pierrette can love anyone. 
But that is just the trouble, Punchinello — Pierrot must 
have more than the mere gifts of Pierrette. 

[Pierrot gets up and crosses to the hour-glass, regard- 
ing it impatiently. During the ensuing conversation Pier- 
rot divides his attention between the glass and Punch- 
inello.] 

Punch : 

Then it is not Pierrette with whom you plight your 
troth on the morrow. You spoke of Columbine 

Pierrot : 

Ah, Columbine — there of a certain is a wisp of divin- 
ity. I love her, too, with all my heart — and of course 
she loves me in return. When she dances with her leaf- 
brown tresses blowing in the wind and bids me catch her, 
Pierrot knows for the instant love — but once she's caught 
and held within the circle of my heart her lure is van- 
ished as by magic. To want Columbine is enticing — to 
have her is like possessing a coveted rose only to find, its 
fragrance wanting. 

Punch : 

Many are the men that worship at her feet. 

Pierrot : 

It is very true, but in return for all their entreaties 

Columbine worships at the feet of Pierrot. Her love is 

a wayward sort of fancy that I like to have about me — 

it satisfies a certain whim of mine. I can little think of 



life without her wilful caprices — nor with them, to bs 
sure. I love to hear her sing — have you ever heard her 
sing, Punchinello? 

Punch : 
Yes, I heard her singing in the wood one night and I 
thought myriad songbirds made the merry tune. 

Pierrot : 
It is always so with Columbine — her life from every 
dawn to shadowtime is just a song. Once I spoke to 
her of the morrow, and she bid me silence and told me 
that tomorrow was not yet born until today had died. 
Her impudence is delightful, but at times it irritates me 
greatly. If she should wish to flirt with all the knaves 
on the countryside she'd do it, but when I fondle Pier- 
rette she flies into a rage that I must pet her from. 

Punch: 
Jealousy, my dear Pierrot, is the rightful heritage of 
all women. Used well it becomes a virtue, used poorly 
and it is an abomination. 

Pierrot : 
I do not agree. It is entirely too dangerous a weapon 
for the hands of woman. Man was made to be the 
master in all affairs, woman merely to amuse him when 
he tired of worldly vieing. No, I cannot countenance 
this selfishness in Columbine. 

Punch : 
Then it is not with Columbine that you plight your 
troth on the morrow ? 

Pierrot : 
I am betrothed, my dear Punchinello, to both Pierrette 
and Columbine ! 

Punch : 
You are — Oh, surely it is that my ears deceive me. 

Pierrot : 
If they hear that I swear my vows to both Pierrette 
and Columbine, then they have heard well. 

Punch : 
It cannot be ! I do not apprehend ! 

Pierrot : 
I will tell you, Punchinello, how it is. With all my 
heart I love both Pierrette and Columbine — Pierrette, be- 
cause to Pierrot she is as the very sunshine to the flower 
itself, akin as are the summer breezes to the showers of 
spring — Columbine, because she is no less to Pierrot than 
is to the nodding roses the sparkling dew that nightly 
kisses them to their shadow rest. The one with the other 
— both — mean contentment for my every hour — the one 
without the other and my happiness is out of season. 

Punch : 
Did you tell that to both Pierrette and Columbine? 

Pierrot : 
Of course I did to each in turn and each devoutly 
vowed she could not live without me, could not live nor 
did not care to live. Pierrette declared that days with- 
out her name upon my lips would be as night times and 
that her soul would soon be lost in darkness. And 
Columbine averred my kisses on her lips brought forth 
her song. Should I deny them, then her very heart 
would break with sorrow. Between the two I could not 
well decide. By morning should I firmly vow that it was 
Pierrette alone I loved, by night I'd be as sure that it was 
Columbine. And there I was no nearer to my disen- 
tanglement. ^ 

Punch : 

Indeed it was a pretty problem. 

(Continued on page 70) 



Page Forty-Eight 



The Managers of 
the Managers 



The Wifes ot Our Prominent Producers Find 

Time to Reap a Few Laurels of 

Their Own 



Photo bv Lewis-Smith. Chicago 




JANE COWL 
The April Lady, 
having laughed 
and wept her way- 
thru two successful 
years in "Smilin' 
Through," is to ap- 
pear this season in 
a new play. She is 
the loveliest ex- 
ample of the judg- 
ment and good 
taste of Adolph 
Ktauber 



KATHERINE 
CORNELL 
Two of the bright- 
est spots on the 
bleak horizon of 
the past theatrical 
season were those 
twin lights, Mr. 
end Mrs. Guthrie 
McClintock: the 
first with his fault- 
less production of 
"The Dover Road," 
the second with 
her unforgetabl? 
performance in 
"The Bill of Di- 
vorcement" 




BILLIE BURKE 
A feminine Peter Pan 
who in her own de- 
lightful self glorifies 
the American girl just 
as successfully as does 
her husband in his re- 
vues. We'll give you 
three guesses as to the 
name on her visiting 
cards 



Photo by Ira L. Hill 



IRENE BORBONI 
One French Loan that nobody 
wants to cancel! One "French 
Doll" that everybody wants to take 
home! A worthy successor in 
every particular, including eyes, 
to the croivn of Anna Held. And, 
in case you're one of the three 
people who doesn't know it, the 
wife of E. Ray Goetz 



Photo by Edward Thayer Monroe 



Page Forty-Nine 



1 



The Theatrical Menu 

At Times in Danger of being Spoiled by too many Cooks and too many Courses 

By Reita Lambert 



A T this time of year the theatrical season reminds 
/_% one of nothing so much as a French pot-au-feu 
J. JL. freshly made and with every member of the 
household contributing something from his particular pref- 
erence. This confused state of affairs invariably obtains 
every autumn. 

"Ha ! A new season !" cries the world after an arid 
summer diet at seashore and mountain resort ; and all the 
little would-be playwrights along with the regular, sure- 
enough playwrights, and Mr. Baker's Forty-seven Work- 
shop men and those ambitious people who always-believed- 
they-could-write-a-play-if-they-only-had-the-time, flock to 
Broadway with their brain children tucked under their 
arms and chaos results. 

The newspapers help along the situation by printing 
lengthy announcements of various managers' plans for the 
coming season, because genuine news is so scarce, when 
it's perfectly 

obvious on the - 5*5™.^.--, - **■■*****- *~ h-*- sL**msmi. 

surface that if 

all the plays 

announced 

were actually 

produced, there 

would have to 

be a first night 

every night, and 

the dramatic 

critics would be 

receiving their 

breakfast trays 

thru the bars in 

the doors of 

their padded 

cells. 

Of course at 
this time the 
activity along 
the rialto would 
actually seem 
to indicate that 
the managers 
are doing their 
best to live up 
to their fervid 
promises, and 
new plays are 
as thick as 
movie censors 
in Hollywood. 
B y Christmas 
time the theat- 
rical menu will 
be a nicely bal- 
a n c e d affair 
with the proper 
number of cal- 
ories and vita- 
mines to make 
it digestible and 
nourishing. But 
just at present 
it takes a 




sturdy digestive apparatus to partake of the heterogeneous 
fare without fatal results. 

Tragedies, comedies, farces and so-called "revues" are 
served up regardless of order, and the result is like nothing 
so much as a public banquet where you hardly have a 
chance to taste one course before the waiter whisks it 
away and brings on the next one. 

"Pinwheel" was like that — offered in the early summer 
at the Earl Carrol Theater with Raymond Hitchcock and 
one or two other fami'iar names, it was whisked away only 
to reappear the other day at the Little Theater minus Mr. 
Hitchcock or any other helpful condiment, and pretty 
tasteless as a result. "Pinwheel" might serve as an object 
lesson, to all embryo producers of "revues," of what a 
revue should not be. A second glance at the program re- 
veals the fact that it is not called a revue but a "revel." 
Neither of these captions, however, describe it. "Pin- 
wheel" is a 

bore — plain 

and simple. Its 
main attraction 
is a young wo- 
rn a n named 
Ernita Enters. 
She does,- and 
if her perform- 
ance is marked 
by an over- 
abundance of 
"pep," her sar- 
torial inadequa- 
cies effect a 
nice balance. 
There is one 
amusing num- 
ber which suc- 
ceeds in pene- 
trating the en- 
nui of the au- 
dience, and this 
is a burlesque 
classic dance 
by the male 
members of 
the company, 
headed by 
Michio Itow, 
who, by the 
way, is sponsor 
for the enter- 
tainment. 

The strain on 
the new plays 
is a bit more 
trying than 
visual this sea- 
son, as there 
are more than 
the normal 
number of last 



Special study by Maurice Goldberg 

Florence Eldrige, who under the management of A. H. Woods, 
is appearing in Somerset Maugham's new play, "East of Suez" 



year s successes 
held over, with 
which they 



Page Fifty 



SuiADQWLAND 



have to compete. There is, for example, "Kempy," that 
delightful, ingenuous and wholly American little play at 
the Belmont. Then there is that ingratiating little gamin 
"Kiki" with Miss Ulric at the Belasco. It would be a 
fairly safe guess to say that these two will be causing 
the same trepidation among next year's new offerings as 
they are among this year's. "Good Morning Dearie" 
still holds forth at the Globe with no prospect of an 
immediate move, and "Strut Miss Lizzie," the colored 




Photo by Edwin Bower Hesser 

revue, has done for the Earl Carrol Theater what its 
unique innovations in lighting and its rising orchestra 
failed to do for itself. 

"Partners Again," produced last May, is still con- 
vulsing its audiences at the Selwyn, and is probably 
the best Potash and Perlmutter episode that the 
Messrs. Glass and Goodman have recorded. 
"Chauve-Souris" lingers on at the Century Roof, the 
only entertainment of its sort that New York has 
ever had the pleasure of seeing. The charming 
Milne piece, "The Dover Road," promises to round 
out a full year, which would mean that we could 
take the girls to see it when they are home from 
Vassar for the Christmas holidays. "Blossom Time," 
the operetta based on the life of Franz Schubert, 
and with the composer's own melodies lending veri- 
similitude to the story, is back from a summer 
vacation for another run at the Ambassador. 

So much for the left overs. The new additions to 
the pot-au-feu include a couple of new musical pro- 
ductions; "Spice of 1922" at the Winter Garden 
with the engaging Adele Rowland as the only justi- 
fication for its existence unless one counts the pres- 
ence of a good deal of feminine beauty, startlingly 
unencumbered as to costumes. "Sue Dear," another 
new musical piece, opened at the Times Square on 
July tenth and may close at any moment. 
{Continued on page 66) 




.Photo by Edwin Bower Hesser 



(Above) Anne of the "Scandals." The Pennington is no longer 
necessary. Mary Eaton (at the left) still supporting the "Follies" 
on her toes, while waiting for the new play Flo Zeigfeld 
is going to star her in. And Ethelinda Terry (below) 
whose voice is recorded so sweetly by the "Music Box" 




Photo by Edwin Bower Hesser 
Page Fifty-One 




"SEVEN JUGS" 

By Remick Neeson 
First Prize 
This is an example of an almost perfect circular composi- 
tion in which the contour of the jugs are echoed in the 
curve of the stairs and re-echoed in the curving baseboard 



Page Fifty-Two 



The 
Camera 
Contest 



THE camera 
studies that 
have won this 
month's prizes are 
particularly lovely. 
Each month it seems 
to grow more difficult 
for the judges to 
make their final de- 
cision. Amateurs from 
all over the world are 
becoming interested 
and entries are pour- 
ing into the Art Cen- 
ter. Last month a pic- 
ture from Amalfi, 
Italy, won the second 
prize, and this month 
there were entries 
from Shanghai and 
Holland. 

Amateurs seem to 





"EAST RIVER, NEW YORK" 

By John Wallace Gillies — Second Prize 

"East River" is the antithesis of "Seven Jugs." It is a composition of verticals and horizontals. 

Notice how the mast at one end and the smokestack at the other break the diagonal line 

of the bridge and strengthen the composition 



be realizing more and more that the field of 
photography has limitless possibilities for artistic 
expression. Like an artist, a true photographer 
has an artistic vision of his picture before he 
even thinks of his camera. 

A photographer, truly in love with his art, will 
spend days studying a scene with its varying 
shadows and how the composition is improved or 
marred by them. He must, as well, thoroly align 
his angles. Like any art, photography takes 
patience as well as an artistic sense if good re- 
sults are to be achieved ; also there must be a 
certain ground-work in the fundamentals of the 
craft. To the development and strengthening of 
that ground-work Shadowland will discuss 
each month some point in photography that will 
interest and, we hope, benefit the amateur. 

It is a generally acknowledged fact that 
shadows not only lend interest to a picture but 
also act as agents unifying and rounding 
out the composition. Too much importance can- 
not be attached to their proper use. It is well 
worth the time and effort expended, if, after 
having chosen the subject to be photographed, you 
spend a day studying the shadows, until you find 
the exact time when they most improve the com- 
position; this of course applies to nature pho- 
tographs. The value of a shadow depends on its 
intelligent selection. Not all shadows are desir- 

"OLIVE" 

By Mrs. Antoinette B. Hervey 
Third Prize 

Mrs. Hervey, who submitted this delightful portrait, 
did not take up photography until she was a grand- 
mother. The sympathetic relationship between model 
and gown shows that Mrs. Hervey has the eye of a 
true photographer 




Page Fifty-Three 



Si-l4DOWLAND 






analyze their composition and decide 
what made them prize-winning pho- 
tographs. And you will find if you 
do analyze them that shadows play 
an important part in their make-up. 

The prize-winning photographs 
were selected this month by Mr. E. 
V. Brewster, Mr Nicholas Muray, 
the portrait photographer, and Miss 
Sophie L. Lauffer of the Photo- 
graphy Department of the Brooklyn 
Institute. 

First prize. — "Seven Jugs." Re- 
mick Neeson, 216 West Lanval 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Second prize. — "East River, New 
York." John Wallace Gillies, 80 
West 40th Street, New York City. 

Third prize.— "Olive." Mrs. 
Antoinette B. Hervey, 351 West 
114th Street, New York City. 

Special five dollar prize. — "The 
Brook." Frank M. Hohenberger, 
Nashville, Indiana. 

Honorable mention. — "A Maine 
Fishing Village." Eugene P. Henry, 
137 Joralemon Street, Brooklyn, 
New York. 

Monthly prizes of at least $25, 
$15, and $10 are awarded in order of 
(Continued on page 69) 



"A MAINE FISHING VILLAGE" 

By Eugene P. Henry 
Honorable Mention 

The Honorable Mention that Mr. Henry 
received in July was for a study of the 
soft trees of early evening; this time his- 
composition is quite different. It is a 
study of vertical lines and angles. Even 
the low grass stalks at the side of the 
road keep to the lines of his composition! 



"THE BROOK" 

By Frank M. Hohenberger 

Special Prize 

In this camera painting, the photographer has caught perfectly the 

texture of the snow, and even the slush beside the rocks looks very 

wet. The picture was taken at ten o'clock in the morning. This is 

rather good proof of the contention that pictures taken before eleven 

and after three usually give the best results 

able, their usefulness depending on their size and character. 
Generally speaking, the best results can be obtained before or 
after the sun crosses the meridian, sometime before eleven or 
after three is perhaps best. A shadow properly placed can be 
used to break the monotony of a landscape, or to break a 
bare space in a long stretch of road, or it can be used to bind 
together individual objects and masses. Think of a photograph 
of a single tree and how really uninteresting it can be ; while 
if it has a well-placed shadow it becomes a pleasing com- 
position. 

In taking portraits, a face that is lighted by a light so 
intense that the nose casts a deep shadow across the mouth 
is apt to be grotesque, and in any case, it is not artistic. The 
direction of the light should be changed or its intensity should 
be modified ; modified and well-directed light will produce 
shadows that give the effect of a Rembrandt to a composition, 
but it takes time, study, and great patience in the model be- 
cause her pose and the lighting must be arranged innumerable 
times. 

It would be an excellent thing to do to take the prize- 
winning pictures in each issue of Shadowland and try to 




Page Fifty-Four 






Three 

Sapient 

Satirists 





<U) E O. Hoppe 



STEPHEN LEACOCK 



"My Discovery of England" is Mr. Leacock's latest 
contribution to Higher Education. When Mr. 
Leacock is at home, he is called Professor and 
occupies desk space at McGill University. He is 
also the example of the theorem which states "All 
teachers of mathematics should be humorists" 



Photo by E. O. Hoppe 



Behold the father of Archy, the lower- 
case essay writer of the "Sun Dial." Mr. 
Marquis' other child, "The Old Soak," 
has deserted the city room of the New 
York "Tribune" and is now appearing on 
Broadway. On the right is Don's great 
friend, sometimes known as the "Great 
Unpublished," but Benjamin de Casseres 
is now living down the title; his book 
"Chameleon, the Book of Myselves," came 
from the press in August. If the ninety 
per cent, understand it, eleven more of 
his works will come out and the Editorial 
Staff of Paramount Films will have a 
famous author in their midst 



Courtesy Paramount Films 




Page Fifty-Five 




:°«c-ro 



Life's span is brief 



Dreams .... fond belief 



An Old 
French Song 

Drawings by Leo Kober 



And then — good day! 







Of love a ray 



Page Fifty-Six 



\ 



La vie est breve 
Un peu de reve 
Un peu d'amour 
Et puis — bon jour! 

La vie est vaine 
Un peu de haine 
Un peu d'espoir 
Et puis — bon soir! 





With hate, with strife! 



Ah, vain is life 




% 




V;; 



Hope 1 looms up bright 



But then — good night! 



Page Fifty-Seven 




Photo by Edwin Bower Hesser 



LUCIEN MURATORE 

// Signor Muratore joins the Opera National in 
Paris, as a persistent rumor has it, the Chicago 
Opera Company will lose not only a marvelous 
tenor, but a striking and forceful personality as well 



Page Fifty-Eight 



Variety in Applied 
Design 





Courtesy of Cartier et Cie 



"Au Singe Violet" was the sign which swung 
over the Paris shop of Biennais, jeweler, 
from whom Napoleon ordered the solid sil- 
ver service to which the dish above belongs. 
Unfortunately, for him, Waterloo intervened 
before he could use it. It passed thru vari- 
ous royal hands until, in the middle of the 
nineteenth century, it came into the pos- 
session of the Count de Chambrun. It re- 
mained in the de Chambrun family until 
purchased recently by Cartier 



Courtesy Artes e Industries Regiones Portuguessas 



The Peniche lace, which so delicately 
attaches itself to the gold filigree 
sticks of this Portuguese fan, took 
over a year to make. It is pillow-lace 
and many hundred tiny bobbins were 
used. The fan is valued at $ 1,000 




Courtesy Artes e Industries Regiones Portuguessas 



This unusual tea service 
is the work of a young 
artist of the Vienna 
Wiener W erkstaette, who 
modestly signs it A. M. S. 
The design is exceedingly 
simple and graceful. A 
brilliant green handle on 
the teapot gives an added 
note of interest 



Courtesy 

Wiener 

Werkstaette 




The soft, rosy-grey finish on 
the beaten and pierced sil- 
ver, plate and candelabra, 
is obtained by the use of 
some chemical which is 
blown on with great force. 
The secret is carefully guard 
ed by the Basques by whom 
it is made 



Page Fifty-Nine 




The big barn, cleared and rebuilt and gaily decorated with blue-and- 

white cross-barred ginghams, which serves as the central studio 

of Mariarden 



4S Bath is to old England — typifying a charm and an 
/ \ innate culture that cannot die — so is Peterborough 
JL jL. to New England. Save that the New Hampshire 
town does more than merely represent nearly two centuries 
of a quiet but exceedingly virile Americanism. Today it has 
come to be the theater of a decided movement forward in 
the arts. From being a quiet village of New England tra- 
ditions and New England good taste it has entered into the 
very forefront of American cultural progress. It not only 
looks forward, but it steps forward — not too rapidly but 
with a gait of easy assurance, and of a real determination. 
Yet it remains, as it has been for more than one hundred and 
fifty years past, a gentle New England town remembering 
full well its forebears and the debt that it owes to them. 

On the one side Monadnock Mountain rises and on the 
other, the long ridge of Pack Monadnock ; in the village, 
variously called East Mountain and Temple Mountain. 
Neither of these really deserves to be called a mountain. 
Both are squarely crossed by the state highwa_ s. Yet no 
matter how stout your car, or how sturdy her engine, she is 
pretty sure to pant a bit before she reaches the summits. 
"Air pockets," the natives call them, but the fact remains that 
the grades too are stiff. Yet Peterborough would gladly 
yield that every grade around about her be as stiff as Jacob's 



Hand in Hand Go 

Culture and 

Tradition 

In Peterborough, Which has Come to Regard 
Itself as a Real Theater ot all the Arts 

By Edward Hungerford 





The shadows of the branches are doing their 
best to simulate flagstones on this quaint old- 
fashioned path at the colony 



Ladder, rather than have even one of 
her beloved mountains ever taken away 
from her. 

"See old East Mountain this morn- 
ing?" said the night clerk of the hotel 
to me at dawn, as I was hastening off 
to take the early train to Boston. "See 
that last-minute cloud a-hanging on its 
face? A fair day sure enough. A 
month of rain — an hour of sunshine — 
crisp sky and then these old mountains 
of ours are almost near enough, it seems 
to me, to be touched with the out- 



The interior of the fine, red brick meeting- 
house which in 1885 Bulfinch came up from 
Boston to build 



Page Sixty 



SuiADOWLAND 



stretched hand. That's why I'm up here — and not down 
in Boston town." 

He fell to telling me of the year that he had spent in the 
big city. For a time it had fascinated him ; its infinite 
array of sights and sounds. Suddenly he had sickened of 
it all. He longed for the home of his fathers — Peter- 
borough and the mountains forever standing grimly sentinel 
over it. For thoughts of home he could not sleep at night. 
The countryman in him simply would not become towns- 
man. . . . And so he returned. 

I could understand him perfectly. His love for Pete- 
borough — Peterborough set in among the granite, green 
hills and yet high atop them. Walk out in any direction 
from the town ; to the nearest point of vantage. You look 
off afar as if you were looking from some masthead across 
the top of a billowy sea. Only instead of wavecrests, hill- 
crests. Hillcrests blanketed in the rich green verdure of 
our New England. . . . 

Such is the setting of this New Hampshire town. The 
village itself justifies its vicinage. For once man seemingly 
has done his best to show his appreciation of the surround- 
ings that God has given him. Peterborough was founded in 
1738. Its first church was built in 1752 and is quickly dis- 
missed by local historians as being unworthy of remem- 
brance. But, in 1825, Bulfinch came up from Boston and 
there under the shadow of Pack Monadnock, built the 
fine red-brick meeting-house that has been the town's joy 
and pride from that day until this. Such slenderness of 
outline, such sturdiness and stability as it stands, four- 
square to the village street and lifts its belfried spire high 
above the tops of the elms. With its spire, it speaks to 
God as it opens its three broad doors to the folk of earth. 
There, are square iron lanterns, each capped with a bright, 




Courtesy of the "Musical Observer" 

EDWARD MacDOWELL 
Who before his death had willed that his refuge in Peter- 
borough should become the refuge of other creative minds 




brass eagle, on either side of the cen- 
tral doorway and on Sabbath evenings 
these are lighted — a gentle, unobtrusive 
invitation to enter this ancient house 
of prayer. 

Our modern American architects 
have not lacked the courage, however, 
to come up and build almost in the 
very face of the Bulfinch masterpiece. 
Almost within a stone's throw of it is 
the new Town House, built but four 
years ago, by Russell of Boston, and 
lacking only the softening weather 
beatening of but a few more years to 
make it easily to be confounded with the 
very best of the handiwork of the mas- 
ter builders of a preceding century. 
Location and theme were not lacking in 
Mr. Russell's imagination as he planned 
the Peterborough Town House. It is 
richly Colonial, that is if ever you can 
properly call Colonial "rich." To my 
mind that is the chamber music of 
architecture. At its best it is repres- 
sed, delicate. At its very worst it be- 
comes flamboyant or even ornate. 

As a companion and foil to his love- 
ly Town House, Mr. Russell has more 
recently completed for Mrs. Perkins 
Bass a club-house and historical mu- 
seum that some day undoubtedly will 
become the property of the town. Its 
large public rooms reflect the fine at- 
mosphere of the old church and the 
new Town House. In them already 
is being gathered the nucleus of a 

MacDowell's studio cabin on the hillside 

Page Sixty-One 



SuADOWLAND 




The pageant seats at the MacDowell colony, facing the great stage 
designed by Stuart Walker 



historical collection that eventually will depict the 
early life of the township and possibly rival even 
wonderful col- 
lections of Sa- 
1 e m and of 
Marblehead. 
For Peterbor- 
ough has its 
own great his- 
tory. And even 
if its details 
lack just a little 
of the fine col- 
or that the sea 
and the distant 
lands that be- 
yond it lie al- 
ways give to 
a port, the tra- 
ditions of a 
snow - bound 
principal town 
where stage- 
coaches 
changed their 
horses and 



The Spr ague- 
Smith Studio at 
the colony with a 
view of one of 
Peterborough's 
beloved moun- 
tains 



entire 
those 



into, 



quarter sessions sat now and then and again are 
not to be scorned. The town's old tavern still 
stands. It has one or two modern thrills, such as 
an Italian garden and a cafeteria, but upon the 
square Franklin stove in its old-fashioned office 
one may read that a local foundryman wrought 
it for Tucker's Tavern in long-ago 1833. It was 
afterwards that the Twelve Apostles came to bless 
the tavern; which had changed its name but not 
its fame. Their pictures still hang in its ancient 
tap-room. Eleven men in the town, by their given 
names, answered to those of eleven of the Apostles. 
The choking point came to find the Judas. The 
brother of the old-time keeper of the inn came 
forward. 

"I'll take that job on myself," said he. "I'll 
not have it said that Peterborough failed in 
anything." 

Which is local pride raised to the nth degree. 

The high-set architectural standard of the town 
also has received recent impetus in the design of the 
Episcopalian chapel made by Ralph Adams Cram 
and erected in an unusually sumptuous setting in 
Concord Street. Against a background of a rising 
hillside there has been wrought a small stone church, 
in an English Gothic style and from the materials 
of the neighborhood, stone and timber. It is a 
simple, rugged structure, fashioned after the man- 
ner of four centuries ago ; stone laid upon stone, 
timber upon timber, in the crude and honest sim- 
plicity of the thoro artisan of an earlier day. Mr. 
Cram, in his fine little chapel, has not even made 
the concession to modernity of pews. Upon the 
rough flagging of his stone-paved floor he has set 
two shallow rows of straw-chairs — such as one may 
see in the cathedrals of Europe, all the way from 
York to Naples. The chapel is notable for its 
entire absence of the gew-gaws of religious flum- 
mery. It is a little church, such as one might stumble 
in a small village of Normandy, or Devonshire. 
(Continued on page 77) 




Page Sixty-Two 



Current Sculpture 



THE 
ORCHESTRA 

These quaint 
bronze figures, 
a trifle "Pan- 
nish" in expres- 
sion, are the 
work of Michel 
M art in o , a 
young Italian 
sculptor. He 




went thru Yale 
after winning 
the English Fel- 
lowship prize; 
and then studied 
sculpture under 
Lee Lawrie and 
H. Kitzin. The 
Brooklyn, New 
York, Memorial 
Flagstaff is his 
work 



Courtesy 
Ferargil Gallery 



DYING WARRIOR 

(Below) 

The firm yet delicate 
handling of this bronze 
suggests the new manner 
of Paul Manship. But it 
is by John Tweed, an 
Englishman and a pupil 
of Rodin 

Photo by E. O. Hoppe 
Courtesy of Ferargil Gallery 




ROBERT FROST 

By Alfeo Faggi 

(At the Left) 

The sensitive' 
ness and deli- 
cacy of the poet 
has been caught 
by the sculptor 




Photo F. O. Bemra 
Courtesy Bourgeois Gallery 

THE VINE 

(At the Right) 
Harriet Frishsmuth is responsible 
for this exquisitely conceived and 
delicately poised figure. Miss 
Frishsmuth studied in Paris under 
Rodian and Injalbert; in this coun- 
try with Gutzon Borglum 



DAWN 

(At the Right) 

This smooth bronze of sweeping lines and 

enigmatic expression is the work of Lucy 

Perkins Ripley, well-known sculptress and 

winner of many medals 




Courtesy 

Ferargil 

Caller} 



Page Sixty-Three 




Presenting 

the 
Sakharoffs 



Photographs © by E. O. Hoppe 
of London 



Clothilde and Alexander Sakharoff, 
who have been delighting Paris and 
London in their dances interpreting 
musical classics. Above, the dancers 
in a "False Rouge," to music by- 
Chopin, a wonderful study in radiant 
tonalities and vivid chromatics. At 
right, Alexander Sakharoff in a Guitar 
Valse to the plangent accompaniment 
of music by Moszkowski. These 
charming young artists design their 
own dresses and stage decors 



Page Sixty-Four 






"The Greenwich 
Village Follies" 

Original Costume Designs for the Fourth Annual Production 
B^ Howard Greer 



A lady of the Moyen Age 
in blue and silver bro- 
cade with heavy bands 

of fur . . . 




The silhouette dress of heavy 

black lace over tights of black 

silk veiling . . . 



A gown which might adapt it- 
self to formal evening wear . . . 
of vivid green chiffon and tur- 
quoise blue satin . . . 




Page Sixty-Five 



SuADOWLAND 




Drama — Major and Melo 



He Who Gets Slapped. Garrick. — An 

interesting production of the Theatre 
Guild. It is from the Russian of And- 
reyev, and tells the tragic story of a cir- 
cus clown. Perfectly staged and acted. A 
drama that will appeal to the discriminat- 
ing playgoer. 

The Monster. Thirty-Ninth Street.— 
An eerie play that will satisfy the theater- 
goer who is stirred by things gruesome 
and horrifying. Wilton Lackaye heads the 
cast. 

Whispering Wires. Forty-Ninth 



Street. — A headliner among mystery melo- 
dramas ; one that will be relished by the 
seekers after thrills and chills, even tho 
they may have learned the solution before- 
hand. 

The Woman Who Laughed. Long- 
acre. — Admirers of the blonde beauty of 
Martha Hedman will enjoy her and her 
commendable work in this play by Edward 
Locke, which was originally known as 
"My Lady's Lips." It is produced by 
Wallace Eddinger and has a cast of only 
three characters. 



Humor and Human Interest 



Captain Applejack. Cort. — Wallace 
Eddinger and Mary Nash at their best in 
one of the most finished and amusing 
burlesque-melodramas of many a year. If 
you have retained that youthful spirit 
which responds to a search for hidden 
treasure, adventure aboard a pirate ship, 
and romance in a haunted house, you can- 
not afford to miss this play. 

Kempy. Belmont. — Another of those 
very human small-town domestic comedies 
that seem to wear well on Broadway. It 
is exciting and refreshing. A hand to the 
Nugent family : father and son collaborated 
in the playwriting and, with daughter 
Ruth, appear in the cast. 

Kiki. Belasco. — The piquant cocotte of 
the Paris music halls is admirably char- 
acterized by Lenore Ulric. The play is 
produced by David Belasco and adapted 
by him from a French farce by Andre 
Picard. Well worth seeing. 

Lights Out! Vanderbilt. — A rapid -ac- 
tion comedy dealing with the mad whirl 
of Motion pictures. In the cast are Robert 



Ames, Beatrice Noyes and William Inger- 
soll. 

Manhattan.. Playhouse. — A plot that 
needs to be made a little less conventional. 
Also, the dialog should be less burdened 
with epigrams. The ever-popular Norman 
Trevor has the leading role, but Albert 
Gran, who plays the small part of a Dutch 
novelist, walks off with half the honors. 
A satisfying play for one who wishes 
only light amusement. 

Partners Again. Selwyn. — The inimit- 
able Barney Bernard and Alexander 
Carr in a new Potash and Perlmutter 
comedy. 

Shore Leave. Lyceum. — A mild and 
sentimental comedy with a country seam- 
stress for heroine and a "gob" for hero. 
Frances Starr plays the part of the dress- 
maker, Connie Martin, with a great deal 
of charm and variety. James Rennie, the 
marriage-dodging sailor, gives a topnotch 
characterization. A play that will leave 
you feeling that you've had a right good 
time. 



Melody and Maidens 



Blossom Time. Ambassador. — The re- 
turn engagement of this successful op- 
eretta based on episodes in the life of 
Franz Schubert and interspersed with 
songs by that great composer, speaks well 
for the good taste of the theater - and 
music-loving public. Bertram Peacock 
plays the role of Schubert most sympathe- 
tically, and Olga Cook is an enchanting 
Mitzi. 

Chauve-Souris. Century Roof. — Balieff 
and his Russian entertainers from Moscow 
are still the talk of the town. Their unique 
offering pleases even the most 
blase theatergoer. You will 
be haunted by the rhythmic 
perfection of the "Parade of 
the Wooden Soldiers," the 
fire and color 
of "Katinka," 
and the ex- 
quisite music 
of "Copenha- 
gen Porce- 
laine." 

Greenwich 
Village Fol- 
lies. Globe. — 




Three hours of melody, dancing, and fun. 
Beautiful costumes, settings and girls. An 
elaborate, artistic revue. You will like it. 

Plantation Revue. Forty-Eighth 
Street. — Talented negro entertainers pre- 
sent a colorful and tuneful show that is 
the best of its kind on Broadway, chiefly 
because the old negro melodies have been 
less jazzed — true interpretation having 
been considered of greater importance 
than extreme syncopation. 

Ziegfeld Follies of 1922. New Amster- 
dam. — This revue lives up to its assump- 
tion : "Glorifying the American Girl." 
It is as dazzling and distract- 
ing as in the past, tho a little 
less spectacular. All will ap- 
plaud the return of Will 
Rogers ; many will approve 
the unusual 
number of 
humorous epi- 
sodes, and 
many will re- 
gret the omis- 
sion of the 
exquisite Ben 
Ali Haggin 
tableaux. 




The Theatrical Menu 

{Continued from page 51) 

"Whispering Wires," opening August seventh 
at the Forty-ninth Street Theater, is the logi- 
cal successor to "The Bat" and "The Cat and 
the Canary." The first two are splendid spine 
agitators, but they rely for their goose-flesh 
effects onthe mystery of the unknown murder. 
"Whispering Wires" takes a triumphant step 
forward and leads you thru a labyrinth of 
grisly speculation not only as to who but how 
the elderly millionaire, already warned of his 
danger and consequently guarded on every side, 
meets his strange and violent death in spite of 
all precautions. This play is a finely conceived 
and executed piece of work. It has been skil- 
fully dramatized by Kate McLaurin from a 
story of the same name by Henry Leverage. 
Olive Tell, Bertha Mann, George Howell and 
Malcolm Duncan, as the four busiest people in 
the cast, act with insight and finished artistry 
and the denouement which we are warned to 
keep under our hat, is both thrilling and in- 
genious. 

Possibly one of the most important events on 
Broadway this season is the production by 
Arthur Hopkins of Don Marquis's play based 
on his famous column character The Old 
Soak. Here we have a famous author and 
humorist, a famous fictional character, a dis- 
cerning and fastidious producer and, as if this 
weren't enough, a cast that glitters and gleams 
with talent and reputation. Harry Beresford, 
first of all as The Old Soak. Mr. Beres- 
ford is remembered for his inimitable per- 
formance in Irvin Cobb's play, "Boys will be 
Boys," in which he brought the irresistible Peep 
O'Day to life. Minnie Dupree is the wife, and 
besides these two — enough to form a cue at any 
box office — there are Robert McWade, 
George LaGuere, Eva Williams, Grant Mills 
and Robert O'Connor of "The Deluge" fame. 
Mr. Marquis's play has all the homely appeal of 
"Lightnin' " and "Turn to the Right" : A mort- 
gage on the home, an erring son, a sacrificing 
father whose sterling qualities are discovered 
after many misunderstandings. But its humor 
springs from a deeper vein than either of these 
plays and its story takes on an added interest 
as the first play to treat of the Eighteenth 
Amendment. 

Mr. Belasco ushered in the new season on 
August tenth at the Lyceum where he presented 
Frances Starr in a new "sea goin' " comedy, 
"Shore Leave" by Hubert Osborne. Every- 
thing that is needed to contribute toward a per- 
fect production is here, down to the realistic 
booming of the surf, which makes a nice back- 
ground for the hero's love-making. Miss Starr 
works painstakingly for her effects and James 
Rennie does the best work of his life as the 
fickle sailor so assiduously pursued by the per- 
severing Connie Martin. Technically, the pro- 
duction could not be improved, and if it does 
not prove a success, it will probably be due 
not so much to the fact that the play is poor as 
that it never seems quite the proper setting 
for Miss Starr's delicate and exquisite artistry. 
As the naive and illiterate little country 
"modiste," her performance is pervaded thru- 
out by the ghosts of her past successes ; Laura 
Murdock and Marie Odile, the bedizened lady 
in "Tiger ! Tiger !" and Becky. All these seem 
to haunt "Shore Leave" as if reluctant to make 
way for the energetic little Connie Martin, 
which is unfortunate. Possibly this fault will 
be obviated by time, and a well-rounded Connie 
will emerge from the reminiscent confusion 
which blurs the portrayal at present. If this, 
happens, "Shore Leave" will prove an excellent 
entertainment after a trying day at the office 
or in the kitchen. 

And now, if we credit the roseate announce- 
ments for the new season, it would be as well 
to take our dress clothes out of the moth bags 
and hang them on the pulley line. For there 
will be John Barrymore in a new Eugene 
O'Neill play, "The Fountain," and Laurette 
Taylor in Fannie Hurst's "Humoresque." No 
one can afford to miss either of these. The 
Theatre Guild, with Joseph Schildkraut signed 
up for "Peer Gynt" and "Romeo," is continuing 
to sail a-long in the altitude they attained with. 
(Continued on page 76 



Page Sixty-Six 



SllADOWkAND 



The Vista of the Dance 

(Continued from page 43) 



flaunts her diploma in her name; Ada Froman, 
whose portrayal of the Javanese mannikins is 
so perfect, Margaret Severn, the first mask 
dancer, Lilian Powell, Martha Graham and 
cunning little Marjorie Peterson, who is taking 
New York by storm this year, all pay homage 
to the school of Denishawn. And Denishawn 
is soreading; two Eastern branches have been 
opened. And the indefatigable Mr. Shawn is 
now directing the new Prizma music films, so 
popular on movie programs. These are the 
only successful presentation of the dances on 
the screen. 

Quite another form of the dance has been 
beautifully shown to America by Roshanara, 
a young English woman, bred in India, who 
knows the secrets of the "inner courts." 
Roshanara, the product of one school, is a per- 
fect dancer, the mistress of the art of panto- 
mine, a visible melody of music ; a genius with 
a splendid training. But, she is an artist not a 
teacher. Another artist who is master of her 
profession and yet does not teach is Pavlowa, 
who has conquered with imitable grace and 
poise the formal technique of the ballet. 

Probably the finest representation of the 
dance that has gone extensively thru the 
country are the Marion Morgan dancers, who 
have been on vaudeville programs for the last 
few years. Miss Morgan has high ideals. She 
has trained her pupils till they work as tho 
they had one mind, and their dance presenta- 
tions, always based on the old Greek or Roman 
ideas, have done a great deal to raise the stand- 
ard of an art so frequently abused. This group 
is also non-teaching and professional. 

There have been many people who collected 
folk-dances of various countries, but the 
schools that teach these are limited. A course 
in folk-dancing is usually included in other 
schools. Probably the leading folk-dance school 
is that of the American representative of Cecil 



Sharp, who did a most praiseworthy piece of 
work in rescuing from oblivion the folk-dances 
and songs of the Island Empire. In America, 
Charles Rabold is the head of this school, 
which offers a splendid foundation for anyone 
who is interested in folk-dances or pageantry of 
any sort. 

Another group of dancers in New York, 
headed by a young woman, Elise Dufour, is 
working out a most interesting form of the 
dance. Miss Dufour believes in the dance as 
part of life, rather than an art of itself. She 
gathers around her groups of children, and of 
older people, and dancing with them, gives the 
feeling of the various emotions, expressed in 
movement. Miss Dufour uses people as an 
artist uses his paints. 

She handles massed form with such perfec- 
tion that the whole group is composed of 
figures in exquisite detail, complete in them- 
selves and yet related to the whole group in 
constantly changing motion. It is as tho she takes 
from each individual a personal conception and 
molds and combines them all into a work 
which is broader than any mind can fully con- 
ceive. Miss Dufour does not speak of her work 
as dancing ; for the person who is contemplating 
handling large groups of people, study with her 
would be invaluable. 

There are countless other dancers and 
teachers of the dance in America. Every day 
someone finds some new fashion of expressing 
music. There are dancing camps in the moun- 
tains ; there are dancing camps at the shore. In 
the city there are groups of people who dance, 
because they must, on roofs after the sun goes 
down. But wherever you are and whoever 
you are, there is a field of the dance for you, 
and a teacher who will either show you how to 
follow the conventional roads or help you to 
discover a path of your own to the dance. 



MiiiiiiNiillilmimiiiimmimiiiiHiiiMimMMiiiiiTiMiMiiiMlllimi 

The Season of Symphony 

(Continued from page 45) 



conducted by himself, if the Soviet authorities 
permit him to leave the country where he has 
been starving and struggling, like the rest, for 
the past four or five years. His first sym- 
phony, written when he was only sixteen, is 
a remarkable work, all things considered ; and 
his second, produced at the Paris Exposition in 
1899, and his fourth and fifth, which I heard 
done in London in 1897, are strong works. 

Incidentally he wrote a triumphal march with 
chorus for the Chicago Exhibition of 1895. I 
last saw him conduct at the big Pavlosk con- 
cert hall, near Petrograd, in 1915, and he struck 
me as one of the most masterful wielders of 
the baton in my experience. I hope that when 
he comes here he will follow Richard Strauss 
in securing the Philadelphia Orchestra for his 
concerts, for there is none quite so good. 

And this brings us to a consideration of 
Stokowski and his forces. The Quaker City, 
where American music may be said to have 
made its beginnings, can point with pride to 
the fact that its high opinion of its orchestra 
is backed to the limit in New York, where 
every concert is sold out and the subscription 
list is almost as heavily over-subscribed as a 
Liberty Loan, which Arthur Judson, the man- 
ager, tells me is the case this year as last. 

Personally I have done at a Philadelphia 
Orchestra concert what I would not do at a 
concert given by any other symphony orchestra 
which plays in New York. I have stood thru- 
out the evening, and I once found myself in 
good company, for Harold Bauer was stand- 
ing at my side. I have noted the presence of 
more eminent musicians at a Philadelphia Or- 
chestra concert than at any other. On one oc- 
casion I observed Rachmaninoff, Bauer, 
Heifetz, Ysaye, Lhevinne and several others, 
scarcely of lesser note, all listening attentively 
and applauding enthusiastically. Mengelberg 
has reason to say that it is "one of the finest 



organizations I ever had the pleasure to con- 
duct," for I have often heard his own Con- 
certgebouw. Richard Strauss who, as already 
said, selected the Philadelphia last season for 
his own series of concerts, styled it "Ein 
jabelhaftes or Chester I" 

And "a miraculous orchestra" say all of 
those who know and who are not actuated by 
local or other jealousies. One of my great 
musical memories is the performance by the 
Philadelphia Orchestra of Stokowski's own 
arrangement of Bach's "Passacaglia in C 
Minor." The orchestration was superb, and so 
was the performance. I was so moved by it 
that, tho I do not happen to have met Stokow- 
ski, I wrote to him and told him what I thought 
of it all. His reply was as modest as it was 
interesting, and I feel at liberty to quote part 
of it. He said : 

I cannot thank you enough for the great 
pleasure your letter gave me. The'Tassa- 
caglia" of Bach has all my life been a 
work I love, and as I feel that it is not 
enough known by the general public, I 
want to bring it closer to them. Also, al- 
tho I may be biased in my views, it has 
always seemed to me that it called for or- 
chestral expression (it was written for the 
organ), and I felt confirmed in this when 
I came to orchestrate it, as it seemed to 
orchestrate itself with the utmost natural- 
ness. It made me realize what extraordi- 
nary music Bach would have written for 
the modern orchestra had it been at his 
disposal. 

In this last sentence is the germ of the reply 
to those purists who, when men like Elgar or 
Stokowski arrange one of Bach's works for 
the modern orchestra, exclaim in holy anger 
and pious grief that sacrilegious hands are be- 
ing laid upon a masterpiece. 




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Mrs* Wharton and Some Others 



(Continued from page 36) 



the large industrial cities of America. Babbitt, 
the central figure, a right-thinking, forward- 
looking, hundred -per -cent. -American might 
easily reside and be a power in Detroit or 
Pittsburgh, Kansas City or Atlanta, Seattle 
or New York, Chicago or Sandusky. It is an 
engaging theme, a depiction of this man's life 
and ways of thinking, and it offers great criti- 
cal and satiric as well as dramatic and sympa- 
thetic possibilities. It should add greatly to the 
literature designed to reflect and interpret 
American life. If 
Mr. Lewis has done 
as well by the sub- 
ject as he has in 
"Main Street" (and 
I am assured that he 
has), it will be one 
of the season's 
novels which deserve 
the attention of all 
people interested in 
the welfare of our 
country and its 
literature. 

Say what you will 
of the work of Mrs. 
Mary Roberts Rine- 
hart, she has the 
narrative gift. She 
can tell an interest- 
ing story with a 
rapidity and ease 
which few fictionists 
are able to achieve. 
She is, in fine, a 
good story teller, 
not a precisian, a 
stylist, a speculative 
philosopher, a pro- 
pagandist of ideas. 
That is why she is 
the most popular 
and hence the high- 
est paid woman 
magazine writer in 
America. Of her 
new novel, "The 
Breaking Point," it 
may be said that it 
is her best novel 
since "K," a capital 
love story, exciting 
and capable of being 
read without effort. 

Within the space 
of a very few years, 
Katherine Mans- 
field, an English- 
woman in her early 
thirties, has emerged 
as one of the most 
important short 
story writers of her 
period. Deriving 
from Chekhov, with 
that Russian 
master's ability to 

seize upon the essential dramatic significance 
of slight occurrences and to present episodes in 
such a concise and moving a manner that they 
become profound, she has, in "The Garden 
Party," given us a volume of short stories of 
the highest distinction. She has the ironic 
touch, an interesting and intelligent point of 
view, and a style that is fluid and clear. 

The effect of the war upon the younger gen- 
eration of writers in England was, it seems, to 
heighten the slightly cynical, sophisticated 
hedonism which began to creep into modern 
English fiction with Norman Douglas' "South 



Recommended Books 

Shadowland recommends the fol- 
lowing books to the attention of its 
readers: 

Fiction 

"One of Ours," by Willa Cather. Alfred 
Knopf, Inc. 

"The Glimpses of the Moon," by Edith 
Wharton. Appleton. 

"Babel," by John Cournos. Boni & Live- 
right. 

"Batouala," by Rene Maran. Seltzer. 

"Gorgoyles," by Ben Hecht. Boni & Live- 
right. 

"Breaking Point," by Mary Roberts Rine- 
hart. Doran. 

"Certain People of Importance," by Kath- 
leen Norris. Doubleday, Page. 

"The Promised Isle," by Laurids Bruun. 
Knopf. 

"Babbitt," by Sinclair Lewis. Harcourt, 
Brace & Co. 

"The Forsyte Saga," by John Galsworthy. 
Scribner's. 

"Crome Yellow," by Aldous Huxley. 
Doran. 

"The Garden Party," by Katherine Mans- 
field. Knopf. 



Non-Fiction 



by 



"Soliloquies in England," 

Santayana. Scribner's. 
"Books and Characters," 

Strachey. Harcourt, Brace & Co. 
"Readers and Writers," by A. R. Orage. 

Knopf. 
"Belshazzar Court," by Simeon Strunsky. 

Holt. 
"The Opinions of Anatole France," by 

Paul Gsell. Knopf. 
"The Little Misogynists," by Karl Spite- 

lcr. Holt. 
"On Life and Letters," by Anatole France. 

Dodd, Mead & Co. 
"Broken Stowage," by Capt. David W. 

Bone. Dutton. 
"History of Art," by Elie Faure. 

Harper's. 



Wind." There may have been earlier evidences 
of this tendency than this delicious and rakish 
story by Mr. Douglas, but it, at all events, was 
the first conspicuous indicator of the literary 
mood. There have followed in its train, 
each in its individual and charming way, 
"The Pilgrim of a Smile" and "Guinea Girl" 
by Norman Davey ; the superior refinements of 
involved and elliptical decadence of Ronald 
Firbank; and, standing out as the Oscar Wilde 
of his period, the young, accomplished, bril- 
liant, sardonic and 
clever Aldous Hux- 
ley. In "Leda" he 
made the beginner's 
first oblation to the 
Muses in a series of 
polished verses, 
highly erotic and 
disenchanted. Came 
then "Limbo," a vol- 
ume of short stories 
so skilfully done, so 
crispy and cleverly 
satirical, and so full 
of happy observa- 
tions of the follies 
®f contemporary 
society, that Mr. 
Huxley became at 
once the one young 
man in England up- 
on whom all critical 
eyes were turned in 
expectancy. He 
obliged with a full 
length novel, "Crome 
Yellow," which was 
a delight, and his 
latest offering is 
another collection of 
short stories, "Mor- 
tal Coils," with its 
inimitable and superb 
story, "The Tillitson 
Banquet," the brazen 
"Nun's at Lunch- 
eon," and the sharp 
and witty "Giocunda 
Smile." Mr. Huxley 
is certain to become 
a literary fashion 
and he deserves even 
more than that. 



by 



George 
Lytton 



Among the recent 
books of essays, I 
should recommend 
to your attention, 
"Soliloquies in Eng- 
land," by George San- 
tayana, probably the 
only person since 
Remy de Gourmont 
to offer any definite 
contribution to 
philosophic ideas 
and certainly one of 
the greatest masters 
of English now writing; "Margins of Hesita- 
tion" by Frank Moore Colby, a series of wise 
and refreshing essays on contemporary matters ; 
"Books and Characters," by Lytton Strachey, 
with its superb treatment of Voltaire and 
Frederick the Great, quite in the manner of 
"Eminent Victorians" and "Queen Victoria" ; 
"Decadence" by Remy de Gourmont, a re- 
presentative collection of that great French 
writer's essays in the dissociation of ideas ; 
"Belshazzar Court" by Simon Strunsky, a new 
edition of a charming and human book about 
New York. 



Page Sixty-Eight 



SuiAUOWLAND 



(b) 
(c) 
(d) 

(e) 



The Camera Contest 

(Continued from page 54) 

merit, together with three prizes of yearly 
subscriptions to Shadowland to go to three 
honorary mentions. All prize winning pictures 
will probably be published in Shadowland. 

The committee of judges includes: 

Joseph R. Mason, chairman of committee, 
Corresponding Secretary P. P. A. ; Eugene V. 
Brewster, Editor and Publisher of Shadow- 
land; Louis F. Bucher, Secretary Associated 
Camera Clubs of America; Dr. A. D. Chaffee, 
President of P. P. A.; Arthur D. Chapman, 
Advisory Committee P. P. A. ; G. W. Harting, 
Advisory Committee P. P. A. ; Dr. Chas. H. 
Jaeger, contributing member Pittsburgh and Los 
Angeles Salons ; Miss Sophie L. Lauffer, Secre- 
tary Dept. of Photography, Brooklyn Institute 
of Arts and Science ; George P. Lester, Member 
P. P. A. and Orange Camera Club; Nickolas 
Muray, portrait photographer ; John A. Ten- 
nant, Editor and Publisher of Photo Miniature; 
Miss Margaret Watkins, ex-Recording Secre- 
tary P. P. A. ; Clarence H. White, ex-President 
P. P. A. 

The jury of selection, to be announced each 
month with their selections, consists of three 
members, to be chosen from the committee or 
the membership of the society. No member of 
the jury thus chosen for any given month shall 
submit pictures for that month's contest. 

Shadowland desires that every camera enthu- 
siast reap benefit from this contest and to this 
end makes the inclusion of the following data 
re contesting prints imperative : 

(a) Date and hour of exposure. 
Stop number used. 
Printing medium used. 
Character of print — whether straight or 
manipulated. 
Make of camera and lens. 

Any print previously published is not eligible. 

No printing medium is debarred, but capability 
of good reproduction will be a factor in the 
selection of prints. 

Contestants may submit prints up to any num- 
ber and to as many of the monthly contests as 
they desire. 

Prints received on or prior to the first 
of each month to be considered entered in that 
month's contest. 

Name and address of maker, title and number 
must be printed or plainly written upon the back 
of each print. Return address to be written 
plainly upon package. 

Prints must be packed flat. A small mount 
makes for safety in handling but is not required. 

Prints will be acknowledged upon their receipt. 

Rejected prints will be returned immediately, 
provided proper postage for the purpose be in- 
cluded. It is, however, understood that Shadow- 
land reserves the right to reproduce any print 
submitted and to hold such for a reasonable time 
for that purpose. 

Special care will be taken of all prints sub- 
mitted, but neither The Brezvster Publications 
nor the Pictorial Photographers of America as- 
sume responsibility for loss or damage. 

All prints and all communications relative to 
the contest are to be sent to Joseph R. Mason, 
Art Center, 65 East 56th Street, New York City. 

No prints will be considered if sent elsewhere 
than stated above. 

Submission of prints will imply acceptance of 
all conditions. 

iiiiiiiiMimiMiimiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiii 

AUTUMN NIGHT 

By Susan Myra Gregory 

Beauty so keen is like a two-edged sword, 
Or like swift shining flames that kiss and kill. 

This moonlight stirs the same vague restless- 
ness 
That under other moons was wont to thrill 

The heart of Semele, so soon to win 
Immortal radiance thru divine desire — 

God — I could run among your stars this night, 
Shod with strange winds, and bodied with 
white fire ! 




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SUADOWLAND 



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Columette 

{Continued from page 48) 



Pierrot : 
One day, and quite by chance it was, I went 
to see my old friend Sir Capocomico. 

Punch : 
Sir Capocomico, the old alchemist, by the 
new bridge, where the jugglers show each day. 

Pierrot : 
That same Sir Capo it was, and I told him 
of my dilemma. When I had finished, he pon- 
dered long and then he told me very gravely 
that he would aid me. By certain potions that 
he had concocted and by other charms with 
which he was acquainted, the ladies willing, 
he'd take them both and make them as snugly 
into one, as if they'd both been so conceived. 



Punch : 



It cannot be ! 



Pierrot : 
Ah, the cunning of Sir Capo is beyond chal- 
lenge. With all the craftiness of his profes- 
sion he would make their bodies one — and as 
well their minds and souls. Their virtues — 
both those of Pierrette and Columbine — he'd 
consummate with a wiliness that their faults 
would fall as quickly from them as broken 
blossoms in the wind. 

Punch : 
And the women agreed? 
Pierrot : 
Of a certainty they agreed. They both 
avowed they'd rather die than greet each dawn- 
ing day without me by their side. Each was 
afraid the other'd be the favored one and this 
plan quite put an end to their quandary. 

Punch : 
And even now Sir Capocomico works hh in- 
genious plan? 

Pierrot : 
These past seventy-two hours he has been 
employing it diligently and it is favorable prog- 
ress that he reports. At the stroke of twelve 
this night he is to send to me here in the gar- 
den, my beautiful Pierrette and my wilful Co- 
lumbine in one. At last Pierrot, the great lover 
of all ages, is to find his heart's desire — the 
perfect mate. 

Punch : 

But, Pierrot, are you not afraid of 

Pierrot : 
Afraid of — what ? 

Punch : 
The lady. Will you not be afraid to touch 
her lest your hands break her delicate self — 
will you not be afraid lest unapprehended she 
will blow away as quietly as a puff-ball in the 
wind ? 

Pierrot : 
Pierrot is afraid of naught. Love was made 
that Pierrot might be the lover. 

Punch : 

It would be well, my dear Pierrot, to reflect 
a moment on the — consequences of such de- 
sign. Marriage is a perfidious necklace, that 
becomes one throat, yet around another is a 
yoke. I have heard it well said that ordinarily 
marriage is but a progressing predicament of 
love, disillusionment, and deception — the length 
of time of the first depending upon the woman, 
the second upon the man, and the third upon 
them both. 

Pierrot : 

But, my dear fellow, this is no ordinary 
betrothal. 

Punch : 

Perhaps not, but, if you would take the ad- 
vice of an uncomely Punchinello, you would 
look to the treachery of the scheme. 

[The hour strikes as the last grains of sand 
in the hour glass trickle thru.] 

Pierrot : 
The glass has run. It is the hour when all 
my recent fretfulness is banished by a smile 
that has been fashioned to my own desire. 



Punch : 
And it is high time that I am about my woo- 
ing, too. (He gets up and puts the musical in- 
strument about his neck.) Farewell, Piecrot, 
and happiness to you this evening. 

Pierrot : 
Farewell to you. 

[Punchinello sings as he goes out.] 
The song — 

Red is the warmth of fierce passion ablaze, 
That lights the dull nights in a maddening haze, 
Only to flicker and wane as it plays, 

Milade. 

Pierrot : 

It is the mystic hour of midnight — that mo- 
ment when the happy bride Today casts off 
her wedding veil — and is the widow Yesterday 
— that moment when my Pierrette and my Co- 
lumbine — but Hark ! She comes — 

[Enter Columette, dressed in soft, shimmer- 
ing robes of white, that cling closely to her 
delicate form. She enters from the rear and 
zvalks slowly thru the pergola, standing on the 
top step between two pillars.] 

Pierrot : 

It is my Pierrette and my Columbine ! Oh, 
most divine lady ! with all the virtues of the 
two fairest daughters of earth. 

[Pierrot comes closer and, holding out his 
hand, he bows low.] 

Columette : 
Yes, Pierrot, it is I. 

Pierrot : 
My Pierrette and my Columbine — each name 
I would whisper as if I loved the music that 
it made and yet for the life of me I" know not 
which to call you. 

Columette : 
Sir Capocomico called me- — Columette. 

Pierrot : 

Columette — Ah, a lovelier tune. Columette ! 

(Pierrot takes Columette's hand and leads her 

down stage. She watches him quizzically.) 

You are glad to see me, Columette? 

Columette : 

Yes, I think I am glad to see you, Pierrot. 

Pierrot : 
You only think you're glad to see me — but 
perchance you are a little strange to this un- 
tried form. I must not press you too heartily. 
[Pierrot kisses Columette and she draws 
back.] 

Columette : 
Oh! 

Pierrot : 
What is the matter, Columette? 

Columette : 
Nothing is the matter — only — only — 

Pierrot : 
Only what, fairest lady? 

Columette : 
Your — your kiss is strange ! 

Pierrot : 
(Laughing.) Not strange at all, Columette 
— the same old kiss that Pierrette avowed was 
life itself to her. 

Columette : 
Did Pierrette ever say that? 

Pierrot : 
Of course she did. And Columbine averred 
that very kiss brought forth her song. 

Columette : 
And did Columbine ever say that? 

Pierrot : 
Of a certainty. You see, dear Columette, it 
is Pierrot's kiss after all — and not strange, but 
from the very lips that bring eternal happiness 
to Columette. 



Page Seventy 



SllADQWlAND 



COLUMETTE : 

It seems so different — and satisfies — so little. 
Pierrot : 

You jest, fair Divinity. I see the old Co- 
lumbine still up to her wilful wiles. This 
singular strangeness will soon tire itself out 
and once more in Pierrot's loving you'll live 
anew the fullest of life. (Cohunctte starts to 
laugh.) I pray, Columette, at what are you 
laughing ? 

Columette : 

Why, Pierrot, it must be at you. 

Pierrot : 

At me ! And what is there of Pierrot to 
laugh at? 

Columette : 

By all these stars, I swear I do not know — 
(she laughs heartily) — but somehow it gives 
me a great pleasure to laugh. 

Pierrot : 
You bewilder me. 

Columette : 
Perhaps it is your hat. It looks so funny. 
Take it off, Pierrot. (Pierrot takes off his hat 
and she breaks out in laughter again.) I know 
not whether you look funnier with your hat off 
or on. Put it on again. (Pierrot puts it on 
again — and she laughs all the more.) To my 
eyes I guess it makes but little difference. 

Pierrot : 
You laugh at Pierrot — I cannot well believe 
it — and on the morrow — 

Columette: 
What about the morrow? 

Pierrot : 
You take him as a husband. 
Columette: 
Columette take Pierrot as husband on the 
morrow ! Oh, the scampering elves have been 
up to some merry prank ! 

Pierrot : 
Columette, my ears do play me false ! 

Columette : 

Your ears do play you false — I'd say it was 
your wits. You, Columette's husband — ah, no, 
dear Pierrot. Columette is virtue — it is perfec- 
tion its very self that she would wed. And, 
Pierrot, the Perfect Lover, is not Pierrot, the 
Perfect Mate. But — come — we parley time — I 
must away. To you, Pierrot, I leave the garden 
and its moonlight — if you are wise, you'll re- 
main there and not tamper with your lot, for 
there — you're really at your best. 

[She glides to the rear of the stage, pausing 
a moment on the top step of the pergola.] 

Pierrot : 
Columette — 

Columette : 
No, no, Pierrot — (she throws a bit of a kiss 
to him) — a merry night to you. 
[Exit Columette — hurriedly.] 
(Curtain.) 



Announcement 

We have pleasure in announcing that 
the well-known writer, Jerome Hart, has 
joined the staff of Shadowland as As- 
sociate Editor. Formerly editor of the 
"London Globe" principal editorial writer 
and music critic of the "New York 
Herald," Mr. Hart has had world-wide 
experience, and his travels have brought 
him into contact and association with 
many eminent people and persons in the 
public eye. There are few writers today 
with a broader and more comprehensive 
background, and he is specially qualified 
to deal zvith Music and Art matters. 



An Aristocrat in 
Bohemia 

(Continued from page 39) 

connections, but on his artistic merits, which 
are undeniable. 

Bob is in fact a very clever fellow, tho some 
would say a bit erratic. But that is ever the 
way with genius. And whatever his eccentri- 
cities, he is never guilty of those extraordinary 
aberrations and epileptic manifestations yclept 
futurism, cubism, expressionism, or whatever 
fresh name may be found for the hideous tra- 
vesties in painting and sculpture which demon- 
strate nothing so much as that the perpetrators 
have not learned the merest fundamentals of 
the art they affect to practise. 

He may never kave been a social butterfly, but 
time was when Bob Chanler flitted about 
Europe, especially Paris, and was a prominent 
figure in the coulisses and cabarets. He sur- 
rounded himself with a temporary blaze of 
glory by marrying one of the most beautiful 
women of her day, Lina Cavalieri, who gradu- 
ated from the cafe chantant into grand opera. 
Altho this dazzling matrimonial venture was of 
brief duration, he will tell you himself that, 
so far from regretting it, it was an experience 
worth all and more than it cost him, and it is 
said that the beautiful Roman singer had a 
very pretty taste in jewelry. 

A Cosmopolitan 

Today he is wedded to his art, altho he still 
has an eye for a pretty woman, for has not 
Claire Sheridan told the world in her very 
frank American diary how, in a fit of uncon- 
trollable enthusiasm, Bob kissed her on the neck 
while dancing with her, and he has never con- 
tradicted it? 

A cosmopolitan and a convive, his conversa- 
tion is no less colorful than his palette. He 
shines at invective, and levels his verbal shafts 
equally at the rich for their contemptuous 
patronage of art, the bourgeoisie for their 
smug complacency in accepting anything and 
everything that is thrust upon them in its name, 
and at some of the protagonists and hangers-on 
of the modern movement. 

Listen to him as, goblet in hand, filled with 
a beautiful amber-colored beverage, he pro- 
claims his views urbe et orbi: 

"This is the day of flivvers, victrolas, jazz, 
player-pianos, telephones, and buzzing, bawling 
radios," he says, and pauses for a drink. 

"Everyone is in a hurry and on the jump, 
and we have all of us more or less caught the 
infection. I know I have. The old artist- 
craftsman did not live the hectic, complicated, 
confusing life that we live nowadays. No won- 
der he could produce such exquisite examples 
of painting, sculpture and architecture. Dont 
think I am altogether against the moderns. I 
am not. I try to be one myself — sometimes. 
But too many of them make the mistake of 
thinking that art is easy. It isn't. It is hard, 
devilishly hard !" 

And saying this, he runs his hands thru his 
thick and tumbled hair with an eloquent ges- 
ture and takes another drink. 

Art that is Anti-Academic 

Certainly Robert Winthrop Chanler works 
hard enough himself, combining the first fine 
frenzy of inspiration with the meticulous at- 
tention to detail of the craftsman who loves 
his work. His drawing and painting are 
frankly anti-academic, influenced alternately 
by the art of the Renaissance, the Pre-Raph- 
aelites, and the Far East. But there is no 
studied eccentricity, no rebellious realism, nor 
hasty blurred impressionism. It is all tremend- 
ously vigorous and daring, and in its way im- 
mensely effective, and it possesses sometimes a 
spontaneous symbolism which is impressive by 
reason of its apparent unconsciousness. 

And thus it is that his elaborately decorative 
and sometimes almost impassioned screens and 
murals have become very much the vogue, and 
are to be found not only in the seats of the 
mighty and the homes and haunts of the 
wealthy and artistic, but also in several 
museums and art galleries. 




Was it really 
her fault? 

SHE possessed all of the attributes 
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The men she longed most to fasci- 
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lose interest. Some other girl, often 
much less attractive than she, would 
then step into her place. 

The tragic mystery of it all was 
making her life miserable. 
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Page Seventy-One 



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Too Far to the Left 

(Continued from page 25) 



getting sufficient rehearsals, which, as he ieel- 
ingly remarked, is bad for everybody, particu- 
larly the composer. 

"In America," Rachmaninoff went on to say, 
scarcely with his usual accuracy, "you never 
hear that it is impossible to get sufficient re- 
hearsal." 

Conditions have improved only very recently 
in this respect in New York, a fact due to the 
generosity of a few wealthy music lovers, whc 
have paid for extra rehearsals out of their 
own pockets, and who, in fact, largely subsidize 
the leading orchestras. But even some of these 
musical Midases were staggered by the bills 
for rehearsals piled up by Mengelberg. 

In London since the war there are few 
if any very wealthy music lovers, men who 
devoutly love music and are willing to spend 
largely in order that others less fortunately 
placed than themselves may hear the best pos- 
sible music at the lowest possible cost. 

Sir Edgar Speyer was once the financial 
mainstay of the Queen's Hall Orchestra, but 
for certain sufficient reasons he left England, 
and has taken up his residence in this country, 
a residence varied by occasional visits to Ger- 
many. Possibly, had he found it convenient to 
stay in London, the enormous excess tax on 
large incomes would have prevented him from 
continuing his musical benefactions. Certainly 
no one, not even Lord Howard de Walden, one 
of the richest musical amateurs in London, has 
been found to take Sir Edgar's place. 

But all this is scarcely to the point. 

While_ chiding the extreme Modernists or 
Bolshevists, Rachmaninoff finds it in his heart 
to be complimentary to certain English com- 
posers. He mentions that in New York last 
season he heard Vaughan Williams' new Lon- 
don Symphony conducted by Coates ; that he 
had previously heard, in Russia, Elgar's 
"Enigma' Variations and Violin Concerto, and 
also one of Bantock's earlier orchestral poems. 

Of the last, his recollections seem to have 
been not very strong. The symphony by 
Vaughan Williams, however, struck him as it 
did other sound judges, as a work of rare 
beauty and significance. Rachmaninoff greatly 
admires the two works of Elgar, tho much pre- ■ 
ferring the variations. The latter composition, 
he added, is a very great one indeed. 

Incidentally, one saw a good deal of Rach- 
maninoff last season in New York at the 
symphony concerts as an auditor, those which 
he principally patronized being the concerts of 
the Philadelphia Orchestra and one or two 
conducted by Coates. 

All the leading musicians, as a fact, attended 
the concerts of the Philadelphia Orchestra, 
which Stokowski has converted into the finest 
symphonic instrument in the world today, 
better even than the Boston at its best. 



Speaking of the younger Englishmen, like 
Goossens and Frank Bridge, Rachmaninoff 
frankly confessed that they were beyond his 
comprehensions, tho the light touch and inter- 
play of the parts in the latter's chamber music 
arrangement of "Cherry Ripe" and "Sally in 
Our Alley" had pleased him, as they did many 
others who heard Mr. Bridge's work done in 
New York. Goossens may be a musical genius, 
but he succeeds in disguising the fact very 
thoroly in the vagrant, scrappy themes and in- 
harmonic surprises in which he is so fond of 
expressing himself. 

When my old friend Herbert Antcliffe — him- 
self a musician and a skilled writer on the 
divine art — interviewed Rachmaninoff in Eng- 
land, he was somewhat surprised that, after 
his remarks on modern music and its tendencies, 
the composer should have spoken approvingly 
of Medtner, and even suggested study of the 
Russian composer's works. 

"Of Medtner !" exclaimed Antcliffe. "But 
you say you have no sympathy with the 
modernists. Surely Medtner is a modernist of 
modernists !" 

At this Rachmaninoff's dark, sad Muscovite 
face lighted up with one of his rare smiles. 

"Yes," he said, "but Medtner is different. 
He is a great man." 

Which he certainly is. The difference be- 
tween Medtner and most of the young moderns 
is the difference which exists between, say, the 
works of Cezanne and the young so-called ex- 
pressionists, who display their alleged pictures 
at the exhibition of the Independents in the 
Waldorf-Astoria. 

Medtner, incidentally, is of German origin, 
altho he received his musical training in Mos- 
cow and came under the strongest Russian in- 
fluences. His earlier compositions showed 
kinship with Brahms, and in some cases were 
of magnificent quality ; in fact, I have often 
wondered at their neglect. 

Nevertheless, while sharing Rachmaninoff's 
admiration for Medtner, I am disposed to be 
curious, if not skeptical, with regard to his 
later work, which I have not heard. 

One fears that Paul Rosenfeld will be 
tempted by the remarks of Rachmaninoff to 
indulge in one of his perfervid and picturesque 
diatribes in the Dial. However, the great 
Russian has survived Mr. Rosenfeld's previous 
onslaught, in which he said, among other 
cutting things : 

"M. Rachmaninoff comes among us like a 
very charming and amiable ghost." 

If all ghosts were as sane and pointed in 
their utterances as the composer of "It" and 
the brilliant and exhilarating E Minor Piano 
Concerto, there might be more convinced con- 
verts to spiritism. But better a musical ghost 
than a musical Bolshevist, tho it is just pos- 
sible Mr. Rosenfeld might think otherwise. 




Page Seventy-Two 



^UIADOWLAND 



The Takeuchis 

(Continued from page 33) 

is mentioned. This may be a slight exaggera- 
tion, but it is not an exaggeration to say that 
artists from all over the world go to see Seiho's 
famous ceiling decorations in the temple at 
Hongwange. 

It was inevitable that Japan, as she began to 
have relations with the various Western na- 
tions, would sooner or later feel their influence 
in her art, which had reached a period of stag- 
nation during her isolation. The Government 
recognized the new school, when, in 1876, it 
engaged as an instructor Antonio Fentanesi, an 
Italian artist, of the idealist school ; and Charles 
Wirgman, at that time Far Eastern correspond- 
ent of the Illustrated London News, taught 
the Japanese a great deal about the Western art. 

In 1890 the Government, growing suddenly 
conventional, excluded the pictures of the West- 
ern school from the National Exhibition. This 
setback merely irritated the modernists and in- 
creased the flow of art students from Japan to 
America and Europe. During this period much 
credit must be given to Kiyoteru Koroda and 
Kelichiro Kume, pupils of Raphael Collin, who 
were leaders in the fight for recognition of the 
new school. Gradually the Government swung 
into line, and at length showed enough interest 
to send, at government expense, some of her 
most promising art students abroad to study. 

This is a rapid summarization of the growth 
of the school of which Seiho and Itsuzo are 
leaders. Itsuzo says further in his letter to 
Katherine Sturges : 

"The works of Brangwyn are also being dis- 
cussed. But we are only facing the works thru 
the reproductions. I have some books about 
Brangwyn, but I haven't the book you presented, 
the best book yet for study. 

"No Japanese likes to discuss painters, un- 
less they have many reproductions of their 
works. I think, they must at the same time 
read good, critical books, then they can almost 
reach to the point. But, if the people can catch 
the reproductions, they soon hold up both hands 
and say, like mountebanks, 'Wadinsky ! 
Rodin ! Brangwyn.' Who can truly feel the 
depth of soul? Thus we have already passed 
from Cimabue and Giotto to Cubism and Fu- 
turism. Japanese are always apt to throw this 
human-bullet on events of the moment. Of 
course, we try to conduct this spirit in a good 
way. 

"At present, I am intending to introduce to 
my friends the art of Robert Henri. In a few 
years we will have a good art collection in 
Tokyo. Mr. Matsukata (master of the Kawa- 
saki dockyard) has brought back many Eur- 
opean pictures, from the Vevel collection in 
Paris. Mr. Vevel spent forty years making 
this collection, and Mr. Matsukata bought it 
complete. 

"My father and I with some friends were in- 
vited to a private showing a few days ago, and 
what we saw was truly astonishing for us. 
The color prints amount to about nine thousand 
pieces, all the illustrations of the book by Seid- 
litz, 'A History of Japanese Color Prints,' are 
contained in it. Moreover, there are about 
three hundred European paintings — some Greek 
and many Rodin models. For instance, he has 
twenty works of Courbet and twenty-five Gau- 
gins, some Van Goghs, with many Corots, 
Turners and Goyas ; even one pencil work of 
Raphael. He has almost world-famous painters' 
works. He is very fond of Brangwyn, and 
bought many of his large works. This collec- 
tion, when it is built up, supplemented by your 
presented book on Brangwyn, must be the first 
text for my study, which will be a great help 
in enabling me to make my people understand 
better Brangwyn's work." 

Itsuzo's letter has been quoted, practically 
verbatim, with only a few of his quaint idioms 
changed for greater clarity. It shows how hard 
the Japanese are working to absorb Occidental 
art. Even in the very poor paintings that they 
often turn out, when endeavoring to follow too 
faithfully some foreign school and so getting 
a great many of the faults with the virtues, 
there is a very evident sincerity of purpose 
shown. 



Do Women Dress For Men? 



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or Antonio who persuaded our Gloria that he was the wiser? The 
November Motion Picture Magazine will tell you. 

In this same number Gladys Hall and Adele Whitely Fletcher 
will give you another of their sparkling interview-playlets. Theda 
Bara appears in the leading role. 

And do not overlook another bit of information and entertain- 
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Pictorially the magazine never was better. Do not miss it. On all 
news-stands October first. 

NOVEMBER 

BIOTION.DlCTVfeE. 

MAGAZ.INE 



We have prepared a booklet entitled 

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Page Seventy-Three 



SuADOWLAND 



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The Passing of Stage 
Decoration 

{Continued from page 29) 

noted this about the German designs : "If one 
were to name the two most noticeable tenden- 
cies away from the new stagecraft as prac- 
tised in America, one would be the open- 
ing-up of the stage into a sort of black void, 
in which the action is picked out with concen- 
trated lights." Since writing that, I have seen 
some thirty productions in German theaters, and 
I wish to say more about that void as back- 
ground in actual operation. 

In the first place there are those producers 
who utilize the void, but with some vestige 
of highly stylized plastic decoration remaining. 
Thus Leopold Jessner, Intendant of the State 
Theater in Berlin, and the man most talked 
about as Reinhardt's successor in leadership of 
the German stage, often sets a scene by build- 
ing some sort of platform, itself decorative in 
form, against what is practically a curtain of 
darkness or of diffused light. In "Don Carlos" 
the opening scene was of this character. When 
the curtain rose, one had an impression of 
looking into a limitless stage on which had 
been placed a shaped terrace or platform, a bit 
rococo in its curved outline, and regally ex- 
pressive in its coloring. Everything from plat- 
form to forestage was carpeted in rose red, 
and to give added distinction the steps were 
edged in gold, and the false proscenium was 
black with a gold edging. The whole was a 
tour-de-force in distinction, in elegance (really 
no other word will do), and its effectiveness 
was increased three-fold by placing it against 
the immense all-enveloping horizon — as im- 
palpable and unobtrusive as a faintly flushed 
sky. Again and again in the play (for there 
are nearly twenty scenes), there was this use 
of neutral or limitless or blacked-out back- 
ground, sometimes with the whole stage-floor 
in use as in the first scene, again with only a 
figure or two lighted down front. I was told 
that Jessner, working with Emil Pirchan, had 
used similar settings freely for the State Thea- 
ter productions of "Othello" and "Richard 
III"; in the former at times a platform and 
nothing more, in the latter a terrace, then a 
staircase. 

Simplification vs. Elimination 

In other productions, Jessner has tried to get 
down to the same simplicity in staging realis- 
tic plays. Perhaps the most interesting exam- 
ple of half-way elimination of decoration is to 
be found in a setting for Wedekind's "Marquis 
von Keith," illustrated herewith. The sub- 
stitution of a screen for walls, and the absence 
of a ceiling, side walls or any but the absolutely 
essential properties, obviously mark a step be- 
tween "normal" simplification and elimination 
of setting. 

Similar to the "Don Carlos" in marking al- 
most-complete elimination of background were 
certain scenes that I saw in the Berlin Volk- 
biihne's production of "King Lear," and the 
Prince Regent Theater production of "Hamlet" 
at Munich, as staged by Erich Engle, Adolf 
Linnebach and Leo Pasetti. In the "Lear," 
Hans Strobach built some remarkable dramatic 
scenes with a sort of hilltop-against-the-sky ef- 
fect, and several times he used merely a wall or 
platform in silhouette against the sky -dome. 
In the "Hamlet the most memorable scenes 
were those where the stage was . open, with 
merely platforms against a dark or half -lighted 
horizon. The action was picked out of the 
darkness by spots and local floods. In the 
cleverness of the lighting and the restriction of 
decoration, I thought I detected especially the 
influence of Adolf Linnebach, long a crusader 
for the simple stage. A few days earlier I had 
seen a production of "A Midsummer Night's 
Dream" at Linnebach's own theater, the Dres- 
den Schauspielhaus, and noted the well-nigh 
perfect lighting and the extreme simplification 
of settings — but with curtains and gauzes 
cushioning the eye at the back instead of a 
horizon. 

If Jessner, Linnebach and some others prac- 
tically eliminate background while still hold- 
ing by a hair to the older types of staging and 
to reality, with a column here, a balustrade 
there, or a tree-form to suggest a forest, there | 



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Page Seventy-Four 



Suiaoqwland 



are those who cast loose entirely from recog- 
nizable objects and any sense of locality. Per- 
haps the best example in the larger theaters is 
the Volksbiihne's production of "Masse 
Mensch" under the direction of Jurgen Fehl- 
ing and in "settings" by Hans Strohbach. Of 
the seven scenes five were played on variously 
arranged black platforms against an open 
stage (of which the walls were entirely lost 
in darkness) or against black curtains. The 
platforms as such were practically never visible, 
the light seldom touching more than the little 
area in which the actors moved. From these 
scenes everything in the nature of decoration 
and all props had been eliminated. The other 
two touched recognizable reality at only one 
point, where the black curtains at the top of 
the platforms parted and showed the bases of 
two immense columns ; the other scene was an 
atmospheric one in which askew cliff-like 
shapes, half lost in darkness, enclosed the 
stage. 

"Masse Mensch" 

Did the play lose anything for lack of recog- 
nizable backgrounds? I judge not, from the 
fact that I have not been so moved by any 
production in a theater for years — and that in 
spite of a very imperfect understanding of the 
German language. From the moment when 
the curtain rose and three spotlights came up 
on three figures standing out on a black stage, 
to the closing of the final curtains on an ar- 
rangement of platforms and stairs against 
black curtains, the spectator was held tense. 
The play, of course, is swift, concentrated, pre- 
cipitate, "pressed down and running over" — ■ 
which brings up the question of the influence 
of expressionistic playwriting on stage setting. 
There is doubtless more than mere coincidence 
in the simultaneous arrival of expressionist 
playwrights and widespread staging without 
decoration. In the first place, of course, these 
new dramatists write their plays as long series 
of short scenes, rather than in the usual three 
or four acts, and that in itself is an impetus 
toward inelaborate settings. But more im- 
portant, the whole theory of Expressionism, in 
the theater as in painting, minimizes the im- 
portance of locality and setting ; its aim is to 
intensify and express an emotion, lifted out of 
time and place, and it distorts or eliminates out- 
ward aspects of nature if that seems to in- 
tensify further the central feeling. And so, 
where distorted expressionistic painting is not 
utilized in the background, those backgrounds 
tend to disappear, to become voids. It is no 
chance that "Masse Mensch" is possibly the 
best example of Expressionist playwriting 
to reach production and at the same time one 
of the best examples of decorationless staging. 

Then, too, there is the matter of poverty. It 
would be only a spendthrift theater that could 
afford in Germany or Russia today to stage a 
seven-scene play in the elaboration of other 



times. Economy has forced simplification — and 
the necessity has brought its virtues. The first- 
class German theater, be it noted, is such that 
it can attain effects on an empty stage which 
are impossible in nine out of ten American 
theaters. In the first place there is the matter 
of depth. When you localize light on a group 
of actors in the center of a stage like the 
Volksbiihne's, the background is far enough 
away so that it catches none of the light rays, 
leaving a blanket of darkness behind the illu- 
minated actors ; but the average American stage 
is so shallow that the backdrop, cyclorama or 
stage wall is bound to come within any but the 
smallest area of illumination. The plaster half- 
dome or horizon which is so common a back- 
ing on German stages, moreover, swallows 
light, or gives it off — becomes merely distance, 
dark or light — much better than any substitute 
so far offered. In other words, when stage 
decoration is eliminated in Germany, the play 
is acted out in the nearest approach to a void 
that can be imagined. What American in- 
genuity may invent to overcome the handicap 
of shallow, horizon-less stages, I am not pre- 
pared to forecast. I leave that to Jones, Geddes, 
Simonson and the others who have led us such 
a long way out of the original wilderness. 

Other Examples 

I might add other examples in various di- 
rections, going back to Reinhardt who, in his 
"circus" productions, often brings his actors 
clear of the stage proper, playing them almost 
detached in a localized circle of light; or look- 
ing forward to productions of those dozens of 
expressionistic artists who would project their 
dramas merely in space made expressive by 
colored light. But the few examples described 
indicate the general tendency as well as many, 
and the editor begins to grow impatient. If 
I were to go further, it would be to bring for- 
ward similar opinions, about the passing of 
stage decoration, from some of the world's 
leading stage designers, European and Ameri- 
can. For the most progressive among the men 
whom we ordinarily call "decorators" — odious 
term in its implication of plastered-on orna- 
ment — are the quickest to see that there is 
something better than decoration as stage 
background. Robert Edmond Jones, for in- 
stance, not only has expressed the idea in words 
but in his famous production of "Macbeth" at 
the Plymouth Theater in New York, set many 
of the scenes merely by hanging the stage walls 
with dark curtains, putting the actors in local- 
ized light with abstract "forms" that took the 
place of the usual setting and properties. 
Norman-Bell Geddes and Herman Rosse are 
others who have designed for stages approach- 
ing the void. There is considerable opinion to 
the effect that elimination, rather than simpli- 
fication or suggestion, will be the key word to 
staging in our theaters of the next phase. 












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Page Seventy-Five 



SuiADQWLAND 



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William J, Glackens 

(Continued from page 11) 



any native inferiority in art appreciation here 
— for Americans have given prsof that their 
instinct for art is a strong one. What makes 
the condition is again the slenderness of our 
resources for knowing art. 

As the museums grow up in the newer cities 
of this country, there will be a wider and more 
intelligent public for the artist. Meanwhile we 
have got_ to face the fact that in too many 
cases he is called on for work that is the very 
contrary of everything he believes in, until the 
day arrives when — having earned his living by 
bad work — he actually comes to look on it as 
good. This perversion of judgment is the 
greatest misfortune that can occur. So long as 
an artist realizes that a type of work is bad 
there is hope of his getting a chance to do the 
thing that made him enter his profession. When 
once his sense of values is lost, the man ceases 
to realize that he has sold his birthright, and 
becomes part of the system that makes for the 
venal travesty of art which fills our exhibi- 
tions and publications. 

The history of art in America is to a large 
extent a story of our attempts to make the pub- 
lic know what the picture-maker and the 
statue-maker are driving at. It is for this pur- 
pose that we have made the great effort which 
has given us the museums. It is for this pur- 
pose that we start new exhibitions when the old 
ones have got into a rut of hopeless conven- 
tionalism. In no country are the older men 
more eager to find that sturdiness of talent in 
their juniors which will endure thru the years 
of struggle, in no country is there a stronger 
sense among the younger men of the import- 
ance of the few among their seniors who have 
managed to hold to their ideals. It is almost a 
weakness with us : in France one finds a greater 
confidence among the young artists, for the 
tradition of growth — of new discovery — is so 
strong that one finds a sort of healthy irrever- 
ence that is rare here, where the paucity of 
achievement makes the younger men timid 
about striking out on the new paths — along 
which lies their salvation. 

I have spoken at some length of these factors 
in American art because they explain the 
special importance there is for us in the man 
who is willing and able to go ahead. It is the 
recognition of this quality in William J. 
Glackens that made the best of the older 
painters his admirers twenty years ago, when 
his admirable picture of the "Ballet Girl" was 
hidden away in the darkest corner of the old 
"Morgue" at the Academy; and the quality 
was again evidenced when Mr. Glackens ac- 
cepted the work of directing the first hard year 
of the society which gives the unknown artist 
the same chance to be heard as the most dis- 
tinguished in the profession. 



Whatever benefit the profession and the 
country have had from the attitude of mind 
that Mr. Glackens has shown, the most inter- 
esting point for us here is, after all, its effect 
on his own work. To realize what this has 
been, we should look back to the magazines of 
fifteen years ago and more and see how the 
swift, expressive draftsmanship that marks a 
Glackens painting today is the direct continua- 
tion of the quality that informed those remark- 
able drawings that date from the artist's days 
as an illustrator. He, with a few others, 
brought about an immeasurably wider apprecia- 
tion of the fact that life and character are the 
essentials of illustration, and that the drafts- 
man creates a dignified art of his own when 
he follows these instead of imitating the effects 
of inferior oil-painting — the usual medium em- 
ployed by the purveyors of prettiness who have 
done their utmost to degrade one of the oldest 
and most important branches of graphic art. 
And the value of Mr. Glackens' drawings does 
not derive merely from the effect they had in 
bringing about a better standard among the 
editors and in the public, they are works of 
permanent value in their qualities of expres- 
sive comment on American life, and in the re- 
freshing incisiveness of their line and move- 
ment. 

In his painting, which embodies more per- 
fectly perhaps than any other in this country 
the great discoveries that the Impressionists 
made in the realm of color, the artist is still 
keeping close to the interest in the subject be- 
fore him which underlies the distinguished 
character of his drawings. Whether he paints 
figures or landscape or flowers, the full gamut 
of color that has year by year emerged with 
more intensity from the dark painting of his 
earlier period, is never considered as a thing 
apart from the scene before his eyes, it is the 
result of an ever-closer observation of his sub- 
ject — of an ever-stronger power to make his 
color reveal the splendor of the world that 
lives in the daylight. 

For a time he was interested in an imagina- 
tive rendering of themes taken from his read- 
ing, but he soon returned to the things of sight. 
It is with these that his art is concerned — and 
they have led men as high as art has gone. 
For, if Robert Louis Stevenson in his poem 
spoke of the "things not seen with the eyes" as 
the ones that he would fight for, he was speak- 
ing as a moralist and a poet. And William 
Glackens is a painter; it is thru our sight that 
the painters take us to the heights of idea that 
the users of language convey us to by words. 
He has reached his admirable place in his gen- 
eration — a generation especially concerned with 
fidelity to vision — because his seeing of things 
has enriched the vision of all who look on his 
pictures. 



lIMIIIIIIMIIMIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMi 

The Theatrical Menu 

(Continued from page 66) 



"He Who Gets Slapped" and "Lilliom." Clare 
Kiimmer and Roland Young, a matchless com- 
bination, join forces again in Miss Rubber's 
new play, "Pomeroy's Past" ; and Madge 
Rennedy has stepped off the screen to appear in 
Frank Craven's latest jollity, "Spite Corner." 

Margaret Anglin has caused a good deal of 
breathless suspense ,by leasing the Comedy 
Theater for the season without having said 
what for; Ethel Barrymore will do "Hedda 
Gabler" as the forerunner of a season of Ibsen. 
An interesting trio in an equally interesting 
play will be the Millers, Henry and his son 
Gilbert in the former's production of "La Ten- 
dresse," with the latter playing opposite Ruth 
Chatterton in the leading role. Mr. Somerset 
Maugham's "East of Suez," scheduled for the 
near future, has a Eurasian heroine^ and a 
European hero, which, on the face of it, looks 
exciting. 

By the time Galsworthy's "Loyalites" ap- 
pears at the Rnickerbocker under the sponsor- 
ship of Mr. Dillingham in October, we shall be 
needing some new first-night clothes, for there 
are some twenty or thirty plays of more or 



less importance in various stages of incubation 
still to be heard from. 

There are rumors about Mrs. Fiske in a new 
play and, of course, the Guitry's are being 
brought over from Paris. George M. Cohan, 
now occupied with "Little Nellie Relly," is 
going to take a brother playwright under his 
wing, Arthur Goodrich, by name, whose play 
"How Very American" he has found it im- 
possible to resist. Pauline Frederick is coming 
back from Hollywood and Europe to Mr. 
Woods and the legitimate stage, and will be 
seen in "The Guilty One," first in Chicago and 
later in New York. James Forbes, of "Mrs. 
Fair" fame, will be represented by "The End- 
less Chain," and Mr. Tyler will present "West 
of Pittsburgh" by the "Dulcy" authors. A 
new Booth Tarkington play will be William 
Harris' contribution, and, of course, there is a 
new "Greenwich Village Follies." A varied 
menu offered by a well-meaning but slightly 
befuddled corps of cooks, who just at present 
are so overburdened with fall supplies that 
they must serve them all up, and leave their 
patrons to take their choice. 



Page Seventy-Six 



SuiADOWLAND 



Hand in Hand Go 

Culture and 

Tradition 

(Continued from page 62) 

I know of nothing quite like it in America save 
the new-old structure just being completed in 
the MacDowell Colony three miles to the west 
. . . But I anticipate . . . 

It was just fortune — and odd fortune at that 
— that brought to Peterborough her recent pre- 
science as a capital of modern American cul- 
ture. A really great musician — the late Edward 
MacDowell — dining at a house in Boston, ex- 
pressed a desire to find a home in the country 
where he could find peace and comfort — and at 
little cost. A fellow guest made a suggestion : 

"I think that if you went up to Peterbor- 
ough," she said, "you will find all that you wish 
of peace and comfort, at little cost — and great 
beauty, too." 

So came it then that MacDowell went to 
Peterborough. Went for but a single summer 
and then decided to make it a permanent sum- 
mer home. He bought an abandoned farm and 
in its staunch old farmhouse he set his habitat. 
It is today the property of his widow. Gradu- 
ally it has been added to, a staircase here, an 
"ell" there, rooms everywhere, even the great 
music-room — one of the loveliest single apart- 
ments into which I have ever ventured — which 
breathes the spirit of a master mind . . . Yet 
simplicity rules ! not only the house but in the 
entire five-hundred-acre colony, of which it is 
the heart and constant inspiration. 

A Refuge for Creators 

For MacDowell before his death had willed 
that his refuge in Peterborough should become 
the refuge of other creative minds, working 
for the growth and development of the arts in 
all the intensity and pressure under which the 
creative mind always works. A little way from 
his house he had built — some years before 
his death — a small cabin, perched upon a hill- 
side and facing Monadnock and the setting sun. 
This was his refuge. In its single room a piano 
was placed, and there creative art had sanc- 
tuary . . . There are more than thirty such 
refuges in the MacDowell colony of today. 
They are at the service of creative minds ; in 
music, in literature, in art. Each is allotted for 
the summer season to the use of an artist, who 
comes to Peterborough with the proper cre- 
dentials. The cost is low, ridiculously low. 
But the standard is high, astonishingly high. 

The folk who have met the standard and 
who go to the MacDowell Colony are subjected 
to few rules or restrictions. Only two of these 
may fairly be called cardinal ; it is strictly for- 
bidden for anyone to call upon a worker in his 
studio during the hours that it is set aside to 
him — from nine to four — and night-work in 
them is forbidden ; this last as a preventative 
of fire. So rigidly is the first rule adhered to, 
that from the central house of the colony, the 
lunches are sent out at noon each day by special 
truck and in containers. The trend of thought 
of the worker is not broken in upon by the 
hum of small-talk at a lunch table. He lives 
in a colony house — a great house for the men 
and another for the women — and eats his break- 
fast and his dinner in community. But the 
precious hours of day are reserved for his own 
meditations — and his creative endeavors. 

To hold these ideals and gradually expand, 
what seems to be one of the most useful efforts 
in America, has been no easy task for the pro- 
moters of the colony. It always is desperately 
hard up. The new men's lodge, which was 
begun away back in 1914, and arrested _ for a 
time during the progress of the war, is just 
now receiving its shingled roof. Work at 
Peterborough is a slow and serious matter. 
The lodge, like the Episcopalian chapel down 
in the village, is a hand-fabricated thing. Two 
aged stone-masons — survivors of a craft that 
has almost ceased to exist within the United 
States — have slowly erected its stout walls. Yet 
when you stop to bespeak to them your real 
admiration of their handiwork, they will lead 
you silently thru a path in a nearby wood to a 



Why Dont You Buy 

Q^vssic 

The Picture Book De Luxe of the Movie World 

Our November number is the very last word in magazine entertainment. We 
offer in defense of this statement : 



I- 



II- 



III- 



-An extraordinary interview with Nazimova — an autobiography in minia- 
ture. The famous star tells of her girlhood in Russia, her early dramatic 
struggles, her dreams and plans for the future. 

-A magnificently illustrated article — "Famous Camilles." This is the 
second in our popular series. "Famous Toscas" will follow. The 
first, "Famous Salomes," appeared in the October number. 

-A dozen pictorial treats. For instance : A double spread of Marion 
Davies in her new costume picture "When Knighthood Was In 
Flower"; Betty Blythe and her enchanting new gowns; a page of stills 
from Maurice Tourneur's super-picture "Lorna Doone," and one 
from Richard Watson Tully's romantic "Omar, the Tentmaker." 



The Picture Book De Luxe of the movie world 



(Tl^ssic 



For NO VEMBER 



Shadowland 



SPEAKS TO THE 

ART LOVER 

FOREWORD: 

The future of painting resides in America. We have the talent, the serious 
purpose ; we have a group of young men whose work is daily finding a larger and 
more enthusiastic audience. 

The aim of our new art — Futurism, Impressionism, and the like — is the 
overthrow of photographic realism, and the restoration of design to painting. 

RESUME: 

Since June, 1921, Shadowland has been publishing a series of critical articles, 
written by recognized authorities, on the work of our new American artists, and 
reproducing in full color two or three distinctive compositions of each man. 

Among the artists whose work has been reviewed and reproduced are Allen 
Tucker, Ernest Lawson, George Bellows, Bryson Burroughs, William Yarrow, 
Maurice Prendergast, Homer Boss, Thomas Benton, John Marin, Preston Dickin- 
son, John Sloan. 

DECLARATION: 

Shadowland plans to continue this series that has attracted so much co- 
operation and favorable comment. 

In the November number there will be a critique and reproductions of the 
work of Hayley Lever, than whom no living painter of landscapes has a deeper 
feeling for movement. "The waters on his canvases vibrate in the light; his trees 
feel the impact of the winds." 

In December, Shadowland will reproduce and review the work of Charles 
Demuth who, you will remember, two years ago in Paris, executed a series of circus 
scenes and vaudeville phantasies whose impeccable artistry drew world-wide 



Comment. 



Shadowland 

for 
NOVEMBER 



I 'age Seventy-Seven 



SUADOWLAND 



Start a 
Beauty Parlor 

In Your Own Home and 



Make Money 

Wherever you may live, 
whether in a small town or a 
big city, there are in your 
neighborhood many who are 
troubled with superfluous hair, 
moles, warts, birthmarks, etc., 
and you know that electrolysis 
is the only method of perma- 
nently removing them. You 
can get a large part of this 
trade by securing an Electroly- 
sis Outfit and learning how to 
operate with the simple direc- 
tions accompanying it. Any- 
body can learn to do it. It 
requires no knowledge of elec- 
tricity or of physiology. You 
can operate in your own home, 
because all you require is good 
light, two chairs and a table. 
Or you can operate in the 
homes of your customers, be- 
cause the outfit can be carried 
in a small hand valise. The 
usual charge for removing su- 
perfluous hair is $5.00 for half 
an hour's treatment, and there 
are very few places in this 
country where you can get it 
done at any price. I will send 
an Electrolysis Outfit, prepaid, 
to any address on receipt of 
price, $20.00. 

If you wish to take up other 
branches of Beauty Parlor 
work, I will undertake to teach 
by correspondence the follow- 
ing courses on receipt of price: 

Facial Massage $2.00 

Shampooing 2.00 

Eyebrows and Lashes. 1.00 

Reducing 2.00 

Wrinkles 1.00 

Facial Mud Bath 1.00 

Manicuring 3.00 

Pimples, Blackheads, 

etc 1.00 

Double Chin 1.00 

Body Massage 1.00 

All Ten Courses for $10.00 

Each course includes complete direc- 
tions in simplified form. Nearly all of 
the ingredients required can be pur- 
chased at any drug store, such as 
tweezers, bowls, saucers, witch-hazel, 
glycerine, cold cream, etc., except the 
mud bath, which is my own secret 
preparation ; but I will make a special 
price on this and on all my prepara- 
tions, if my pupils prefer them to others. 

This is an Age of Beauty 

In a few years you will see Beauty 
Shops everywhere. Learn the business 
now ! Start in a small way, and some 
day you may own a handsome Beauty 
Parlor on the main street, with dozens 
of girls doing the work for you. There's 
Big Money in it! 

CORLISS PALMER 

Brewster Buildings, Brooklyn, N.Y. 



W 1 

isnl 



=^ 



small stone structure that stands where it can 
catch the first glance of dawn, the last linger- 
ing farewell of dusk. 

"This is our real recreation," they will finally 
tell you. "This will stand long centuries after 
we are gone." 

The Chapel 

A few years before his death, MacDowell, 
tramping thru the Swiss Alps with his wife, 
came quite unexpectedly at a turn of the road 
to a small chapel ; a thing of great beauty but 
of an exquisite simplicity. It consisted of but 
a single room, with an arched loggia without, 
giving to it . . . The musician was rapt in his 
admiration of it. 

"It is the one thing that I have seen over 
here," said he, "that could be transplanted to 
America." 

After his death, Mrs. MacDowell began to 
contemplate the building of the little chapel in 
duplicate upon the grounds of the colony at 
Peterborough. She had an architect go from 
Paris up into Switzerland and make drawings 
and plans of it, but finally was compelled to 
dismiss the idea. The cost was prohibitive. 
Yet Mrs. MacDowell never completely aban- 
doned her pet project. 

A few years ago the way opened for it. 
Thru the generosity of Mrs. John W. Alex- 
ander it was decided to reproduce the Swiss 
chapel — as a memorial studio among the pines 
of New Hampshire. It will serve both as a 
painter's workshop and as a small exhibition 
gallery. To the two aged stone-masons of 
Peterborough was intrusted the difficult task 
of construction. They took it slowly. For 
more than four years they have been building 
the chapel. Each stone that has gone into its 
walls has been minutely inspected. Many stones 
— brought from the nearby hillsides — have been 
rejected for the few that have been accepted. 

Finally the chapel — I cannot help calling it 
that, it is so impressively religious in its 
great simplicity, set there amidst the mighty 
silences of the forest — is almost completed. 
The final touches already are being given to it. 
In another summer it will be ready ; ready to 
begin its progress down the centuries ; a symbol 
of faith, of love and of attainment. 

The success of the MacDowell Colony thru 
a quarter of a century of struggle and of steady 
progress has brought other efforts in its wake. 
Some eight or nine years ago, Miss Marie Weir 
Laughton established on the other side of the 
village her artistic colony which she calls The 
Pasture and which has successfully specialized 
in the teaching and development of aesthetic 
dancing. 

At Mariarden 

The most recent addition to the culture of 
Peterborough, however, is the elaborate Mariar- 
den, which Mrs. Guy Currier, ef Boston, and 
a group of associates, have established within 
the twelvemonth. Mariarden gives itself un- 
reservedly to the drama and the kindred arts 
that go toward its perfection. So it is but 
natural that the chief feature of this new colony 
is its great stage, designed by Stuart Walker, 
of Portmanteau Theater fame. This is the 
most complete structure of its sort ever at- 
tempted for open-air productions. Not only 



is there an elaborate electric equipment, includ- 
ing several groups of spotlights set in floor- 
traps, but under another trap a broad stair 
leading from below, right up into the center 
of the stage. The opportunities that this most 
unusual feature give for stage direction and 
grouping are almost infinite. Yet they are 
equalled by the stage itself; with its broad 
apron and fore-stage giving ample room for 
the enacting of drama scenes, while the screens 
that serve as a drop-curtain are closed. For 
the entire stage there are no screens. Nature, 
herself, painted the back-drop — real trees, a 
real sky, and in the distance the madly beautiful 
reality of the park of Monadnock itself. 

This stage was first inaugurated at the end 
of July last; by a superb production of "As 
You Like It," in which were featured Edith 
Wynne Mathison, Pedro de Cordoba, Adrienne 
Morrison (Mrs. Richard Bennett) and other 
almost equally well-known professional actors, 
with the students of the school in lesser roles. 
Its dancing is in the hands of Ruth St. Denis 
and Ted Shawn, who are creating at Peter- 
borough. An eastern Denishawn, after their 
California model . . . The entire institution is 
under the immediate direction of Mrs. Currier, 
herself for years an actress of high repute . . . 
The social side of the place is quite as much 
her concern as its ambitious artistic side. The 
folk who go to it are assured of comfort. The 
big barn, cleared and rebuilt and gaily deco- 
rated with blue-and-white cross-barred ging- 
hams, which serves as the central studio of 
Mariarden, the nearby refectory, the little 
groups of bungalows here and there and every- 
where upon the three hundred acres of piney 
hillsides bespeak a careful attention, not only 
to detail but to the human necessities of the 
problem. 

The First Free Library 

I shall like to think of Peterborough always ; 
not only as an American town typifying the 
good taste and the real culture of past genera- 
tions — it is a matter of pride to the town that 
it possesses the first free public library estab- 
lished within this land — but representing the tre- 
mendous effort that is now being made to in- 
spire such culture within the present generation. 
I shall like to think of its real modesty — almost 
the first requisite of genuine good taste. For 
when one is done with the real splendors of the 
place, and they are manifold, there remains that 
simplicity. Perhaps nowhere does this show it- 
self more than when one climbs the hill, passes 
thru an unmarked gateway at the roadside and 
enters a half -hidden path that leads thru a 
cathedral-like double-row of trees to the grave 
of MacDowell. It stands alone. And without 
pretense. Nearby is the golf course that he 
gave to the men of Peterborough. You can 
hear them laughing and shouting as you stand 
before MacDowell's monument. 

That monument, a giant boulder. Nothing 
else. A great glacial rock with a simple bronze 
plate bearing the name of the man whose bones 
it shelters and beneath it the immortal words 
that he wrote one evening as he sat in his 
studio cabin upon the hillside : 

"A house of dreams untold 
It looks out over the whispering tree-tops 
And faces the setting sun." 





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Page Seventy-Eight 



Corliss Palmer Powder 




CORLISS PALMER 



is the result of scientific 
research and experiment. 
Miss Palmer, by winning 
first prize in the 1920 Fame 
and Fortune Contest, was 
adjudged the Most Beauti- 
ful girl in America, and 
her Beauty articles in the 
! Motion Picture Maga- 
zine and Beauty Maga- 
zine have attracted wide 
attention. 

We have secured the ex- 
clusive American rights to 
Miss Palmer's Powder. 
We put it up in pretty 
boxes, which will be mail- 
ed to any address, postage 
prepaid, on receipt of 
price, $1.00 a box. It 
comes in only one shade 
and is equally desirable for 
blondes and brunettes. 



Do not think of sitting for a portrait without first using this powder! 

And it is equally desirable for street use, in the Movies and 
everywhere. Send a One Dollar bill or 1-cent or 2-cent stamps 
and we will mail you a box of this exquisite powder. Remem- 
ber that we have the exclusive selling rights to 

Corliss palmer powder 

Beware of imitations and accept no substitutes warranted to be 
"just as good." There is nothing else like it on the market. 

WILTON CHEMICAL CO. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Extracts from Motion 
Picture Magazine 



I am often asked what kind of face 
powder I- use. I have received more 
letters asking this question than I could 
answer, so I had a little circular 
printed stating: that I make my own 
powder. And now they are asking me 
to tell them how 1 make it. Well, I 
cant tell how, but I can tell why. I 
have tried about every powder on the 
market and have done considerable ex- 
perimenting' on myself and on others. 
There is no denying that there are 
several very fine powders on the mar- 
ket, but I felt that none just suited 
me, and so I determined to make one 
that did. You see, in the first place, 
I had some very peculiar ideas about 
the complexion and was very hard to 
please. I am very particular about 
tints and staying qualities, and I want 
a powder that does not look like pow- 
der, that will not blow off in the first 
gust of wind, that is not too heavy nor 
too light, that will not injure the com- 
plexion, and that will not change color 
when it becomes moist from perspira- 
tion- or from the natural oil that comes 
thru the pores of the skin. I also like 
a pleasant aroma to my powder, and 
one that lingers. After experimenting 
with powdered starch, French chalk, 
magnesia carbonate, powdered orris 
root, bismuth subcarbonate, precipitated 
chalk, zinc oxide, and other chemicals, 
and after consulting authorities as to 
the effects of each of these on the skin, 
I finally settled on a formula that has 
been tried out under all conditions and 
that suits me to a nicety. And, most 
important of all, perhaps, this powder 
when finally perfected had the remark- 
able quality of being equally good for 
the street, for evening dress and for 
motion picture make-up. I use the 
same powder before the camera for 
exteriors and interiors, and for daily 
use in real life. So do many of my 
friends, and they all tell me that they 
will use no other so long as they can 
get mine. As to the tint, it is a mix- 
ture of many colors. I learned from 
an artist years ago that there are no 
solid fiat colors in nature. Look care- 
fully at anything you choose and you 
will see every color of the rainbow in 
it. Take a square inch of sky, for in- 
stance, and examine it closely and you 
will find every color there. Just so 
with the face. Any portrait painter 
will tell you that he uses nearly every 
color when painting flesh. Nothing is 
white — not even snow, because it re- 
flects every color that is around it. 
White face powder is absurd. White 
is not a color. The general tone of my 
powder is something like that of a ripe 
peach. I have made up a few boxes of 
it for my friends, and I feel justified 
in asking them to pay me what it costs 
me, which is about One Dollar a box. 
I am not in business and do not want 
to make a profit. If any of my readers 
want to try this powder, I will try 
to accommodate them, but 1 cannot 
undertake to put this powder on the 
market in a business way — that is 
something for a regular dealer to do 
if there is enough demand for it. 



Gut out and mail today 




1 WILTON CHEMICAL CO. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 










] For the enclosed One Dol 
1 CORLISS PALMER POWDER. 


ar please 


send 


me 


a box 


of ; 














Street 
























Moments Which Count 



/• 



When you are conscious of the scru- 
tiny of interested eyes which appraise 
every detail of your appearance, can you 
sit serene, secure in the consciousness 
that there is nothing to criticise but every- 
thing to admire ? 

Happy is the girl who can answer 

yes" in these all important moments. 

She is the girl whoknows that her fresh, 

clear skin and smooth, white neck and 

arms are sure to command admiration. 

The girl who is not so sure of her 
personal attractiveness, who is conscious 
that complexion defects may affect her 
popularity, should waste no time rem- 
edying these conditions. The secret is 
cosmetic cleanliness, which keeps the 
skin free from clogging accumulations. 

Once a day, do this 

Once a day, preferably at bed-time, 
give your face a thorough 
cleansing. This doesn't 
mean a harsh, irritating 
scrub, but a cos- 
metic cleansing 
accomplished 
by the gentlest 
possible means. 




Soap is necessary, butonlythe mildest 
soap should be used;: This is Palmolive, 
blended from palm and olive oils. 

Onceyou experience the mild, sooth- 
ing effect of its smooth, creamy lather 
you will recognize daily cleansing as the 
surest complexion beautifier. 

Removal, once a day, of the accumu- 
lations of dirt, oil, perspiration and the 
remaining traces of cold cream and 
powder is absolutely essential to a clear, 
fresh skin. 

Neglect results in clogged pores, 
coarse texture and blackheads. When 
the accumulated soil carries infection, 
pimples are the result. 

An ancient secret 

The value of beautifying cleansing 
was discovered long ago, in the days of 
ancient Egypt. It was Cleopatra's secret 
— whatever the embellishments she 
employed, they were applied after the 
daily bath with palm and olive oils as 
cleansers. 

The great queen was famous for her 
beauty long after early youth was passed . 
She kept her looks with the aid of the 



same gentle, stimulating cleansing which 
we recommend today. 

Blended from the same oils 

Palmolive is blended from the same 
costly oriental oils which served Cleo- 
patra as cleanser and beautifier. We 
import them from overseas in vast quan- 
tity to keep the Palmolive factories at 
work day and night. This is necessary 
to supply the world-wide demand. 

This popularity has reduced price, 
as manufacturing volume permits econ- 
omies which lower production costs. 
Thus we are able to supply Palmolive 
for only 10 cents a cake. 

Sowhile Palmolive ranks first as finest 
facial soap, you can afford to follow Cleo- 
patra's example and use it for bathing. 

Complexion beauty does not end 
with the face. Beautify your body with 
Palmolive. 

Volume and efficiency produce 
25-cent quality for 



10c 






THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY, MILWAUKEE, U. S. A. 

THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA. Limited. TORONTO, CANADA 
Also makers of Palmolive Shampoo and Palmolive Shaving Cream 

Copyright 1922— The Palmolive Co. 1661 







Brett Litho. Co., N. Y. 



NOVEMBER 



35£ 



*UADOWLANG> 



EXPRESSING THE ARTS 










m. 



WHAT 15 YOUR 

REPUTATION 

WORTH? 



MARY LEONARD had to put a price 
hers if she would save her sister. 

She had to value it in different terms if 
would hold the love of the One Man. 

She had to re-value it if she would keep 
self-respect. 

WHAT DID SHE DO? 

We give you the first episode in the sensational 
screen career of Mary Leonard, her sister Lissa, 
and the man Dermott Trent, in the December 
number of the Motion Picture Magazine, 
when begins Dorothy Calhoun's astounding and 
absorbing serial: 




A Story of 

Tempestuous Youth 

Riotous Living 

High Romance 

Adventure 

Passion 

Sacrifice 

vvila Love 

Revenge 



"THEY WHO FEAST IN BABYLON" 

It deals with the gay, reckless, lovable motion-picture set Its hero is a screen idol — handsome, imperious, clever, 

of romantic Hollywood. Its author bows the mot ; Qn p icture cobny ag no Qther 

Its heroines are twin sisters — one gentle and charming, writer does, and tells her story with frankness and dramatic 
the other arrogant but captivating. intensity. 

IT IS A SUPER-SERIAL 
It Is A Story You Cannot Forget 

Beginning in the 

DECEMBER 

MOTION PICTURE 

MAGAZINE 





^heValue of ^ime 



The Caliph's gift was inscribed, "From tke 
Emperor of the Hast to the Emperor of the West,'" 
On the dial -were twelve doors. The hour was 
struck by the opening doors, which released metal 
balls to fall on a brazen gong. At noon twelve 
horsonen rode forth and shut alt the doors. 



T 



By I^cotio? 

Painting by HAROLD DELAY 

O CHARLEMAGNE'S court from far-away Bagdad 
came an oriental water-clock. 



J f 



King of the Franks and Roman Emperor, the mighty 
Charlemagne was ever mindful of the value of Time. For his 
empire was vast, his government personal: he must needs make 
moments count. Education, brushed aside in his youthful fight- 
ing days, became his burning ambition. While he ate he 
listened to history. While he dressed he gave audience to 
pleas for justice. Wakeful nights found him struggling to 
learn to write. 

Time made the unlettered monarch one of the greatest 
educators of the Middle Ages. 

Haroun-al-Raschid, caliph of Bagdad, read the secret of 
Charlemagne's power and paid it subtle tribute — a wondrous 
water-clock inlaid with gold. 

Proudest possession of a proud empire, eleven centuries 
ago — yet how crude a device compared to those marvelous 
timekeepers of our own day — 




<& 




Page Three 



^^■^H^H 



SUADOWLTAND 





Five Fair Faces 

from the thousands that hope to be reflected in the American Beauty Mirror 

Do You Wish Your Face Reflected There? 



IMPORTANT 

Brewster Publications herewith announces the closing 

date of the American Beauty Contest — December 15, 

1922. Any photographs received bearing a postmark of a 
later date will be disregarded. 

You still have time to become an entrant. Read the 
simple rules and consider the splendid rewards that may 
come to you. 

We are not looking for a movie heroine, or a stage star, 
or an intellectual wonder, or a personality crank. We are 
looking for Beauty — and we are going to find her — the most 
beautiful woman in America ! 

This is an unprecedented offer. Do not fail to take ad- 
vantage of it. Send us your photograph. That is all that 
is required of you. Think what you may win — just because 
you happened to be born beautiful. Scrupulous care will 
be taken of every picture received. ALL of them will be 
examined by the contest judges. 

THE REWARDS 

To the woman who our illustrious judges shall decide is 
the most beautiful in America, will be given: 

1. A trip to New York, properly chaperoned, and a chance to take 
in the pleasures which only that great city affords : the opera, 
the theaters, our wonderful library, the famous "East Side," great 
museums, the celebrated Greenwich Village, all the luxurious and 
beautiful shops on the most luxurious and beautiful street in the 
world — Fifth Avenue — and so on. 

2. A well-known American artist will paint her portrait. 

3. A representative American sculptor will model her head. 

4. These works of art will be exhibited in one of the leading art 
galleries in New York Gity and elsewhere. 

5. She will have her picture on the cover of Beauty magazine. 
There will be a second prize and a third prize, and possibly 

more. These will be announced later. 

In view of the fact that the American Beauty may be 
found in New York City, 
or its immediate vicinity, 
the prize in her case will be 
$1,000, instead of the visit 
to New York. Just think 
of that — - 



One 

Thousand 

Dollars 

($1,000) 



■---THE ENTRANCE 



This is a portrait of : 



Name. . . 
Address. 



Age Weight 

Color of Eyes Hair 

It is submitted to the American Beau 
thereof, by : 

Name 

Address 



REMEMBER 

The judges of our Beauty Contest are well-known artists, 
writers and editors. 

All photographs of entrants will be turned over to the 
Metropolitan Magazine, from which they will select photo- 
graphs to be used on the Metropolitan Cover Contest. 

THE RULES 

1. No photographs will be returned. 

2. No exceptions will be made to this rule. 

3. Winners will be notified. 

4. Snapshots, strip pictures, or colored photographs will not be con- 
sidered. Outside of these, any kind of picture will be accepted ; 
full length or bust, full face of profile, sepia or black. You may 
submit as many photographs as you wish. 

5. Photographers, artists, friends and admirers may enter pictures 
of their favorites. Credit will be given photographers whenever 
possible. 

6. Do not ask the contest manager to discuss your chances.. He has 
nothing to do with that end of it. 

7. Do not write letters. The close of the contest will be announced in 

B10TI0N.&ICTV&E. ClAS S I C 

SuAPOWLAND and «gea\itv^ 

at least three months in advance. There will be a contest story 
every month in all four magazines, with all necessary news and 
information. 

8. The most beautiful pictures received each month thruout the oper- 
ation of the contest will be published in a monthly Honor 
Roll in all four magazines. These girls will be notified when, 
and in which magazine their picture will appear. This does not 
mean that they have necessarily qualified for the final award, 
nor that those whose pictures are not published have failed. The 
winner will not be decided upon until the end of the contest. 

9. Such a coupon as the one below, properly filled out, must be 
PASTED on the BACK of every photograph submitted. 

10. Be sure to put sufficient 
COUPON --------- = a -'i postage on your photo- 
graph. 

11. The contest is open to any 
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or non-professional, in 
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whole continent ! 



Height 

Complexion 

y Contest, subject to the rules 



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NOTE. — Any infraction of these 
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Address your photograph : 
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Publications, Inc., 175 Duffield 
St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Page Four 



w 



NOV -8 1922 



/ 



IC1B5501H2 



{/ 




Expressing the Arts 





VOLUME VII 



The Magazine of Magazines 
NOVEMBER, 1922 / 

mi in mi 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 it i mi iti 1 1 1 tint iiiiii iimimmiij 

Important Features in this Issue: 
HAYLEY LEVER, INDIVIDUALIST Edgar Holger Cahill 

The artist who has the courage to face the world as himself and not as the member of 

some group 

OUR NOVELS AS MIRRORS Burton Rascoe 

Modern novelists are accused of making too great literary use of the imbecilities of the 

average American citizen 

FRANZ MOLNAR AND HIS TYPES 

Kober's sketches of the picturesque characters that appear in the plays of this native of Budapest 

PAINTING SCENERY WITH LIGHT Kenneth Uacgowan 

An illustrated article explaining the three new uses to which light is being put in the theater 

THE BUSINESS OF MANUFACTURING LITERATURE 

Harry Can 

The new literary settlers in the West divulge the secrets of their profession 

MORE TO BE CENSORED THAN FAMED 

Clayton Knight sketches several speaking likenesses on the censored Great 

GRAND OPERA OVER HERE AND BACK THERE 

Edward Hungerford 

An answer to the question: "Can America ever come to the operatic taste and appreciation 

of Europe?" 

OUR LYRICAL PSYCHO-REALIST Babette Deutsch 

An analysis of the work of Conrad Aiken, who uses modern psychology for his running-board 

WITH WYNN IN BERLIN 

This artist's young but appreciative eye has caught, for his facile brush, some typical 

Berliners at home 

WHERE BARGAINING IS THE SOUL OF TRADE 

Francis F. Fulton 

A pleasing tour of the little cobwebby second-hand shops of Paris, with a lesson on how 

to strike a bargain 



lllllimiJlllllMMmilllMIIMMIIItlllMI 



Number 3 





Published Monthly by Brewster Publications, Inc., at Jamaica, N. Y. 

Entered at the Post Office at Jamaica, N. Y., as second-class matter, under the act of March 3rd, 1S79. 

PRINTED IN U. S. A. 

Eugene V. Brewster, President and Editor-in-Chief; Guy L. Harrington, Vice-President and Business Manager; L. G. Conlon, Treasurer; 

E. M. Heinemann, Secretary 

EXECUTIVE and EDITORIAL OFFICES, 175 DUFFIELD STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Elsie Seeligmann, Editor 



Adele Whitely Fletcher, Managing Editor 



Jerome Hart, Associate Editor 



Subscription $3.50 per year, in advance, including postage in the U. S., Cuba, Mexico and Philippines; in Canada and foreign countries, $4.50 per 
year. Single copies, 35 cents. Postage prepaid. One and two cent United States Government stamps accepted. Subscribers must notify us at once 

of any change of address, giving both old and new address. 

Copyright, 1922, by Brewster Publications, Inc., in the United States and Great Britain 



-yrr- 



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'C^fc^ezzcn 



^3s5nn 



Page Five 







CHINOISERIE— 

By Bryant Coleman 

— Red and Gold 

A Slave: 

Three years I have dwelt in the red and gold pavilion — 
Golden arc the walls, the hangings are crimson; 
The bed is red-lacquered, with a canopy of yellow silk. 

My robes are of crimson silk, I have rings and ear- 
rings of gold. 

Always there are poppies, scarlet poppies 
In ox-blood vases, in golden bowls. 

Ail I would give all my rings, all my ear-rings, 
My robes of crimson silk, 

For a window from which I might see a willow tree 
against the sky. 



— Green and Silver 

A Poet: 

Three years I have dwelt in this room — rock-wallcd : 
silvery-grey. 

Sometimes, seated before a moon-white vase of 

silver lilies, 
Clad in a green robe, I write with green ink 

on silver paper. 

Now I sit regarding, from the window, 
The silver of rain against a willow tree. 




Page Six 




THE LETTER 

An original ivater-color poster 
By Giro 




THE FAN 

From the original oil painting 
By Carle J. Blenner 




ROSE ROLANDA 

The shadow connotes a spark of wickedness in Rose Rolanda's dancing. 
Those who have seen her in the "Music Box Revue" say the shadow is right 



Photo by Nickolas Muray 



■«««™ 




GLOUCESTER 
HARBOR 



AFTERGLOW 

"His waters move 

and vibrate in 

the light" 



' 



:-:.r-~--:— - 



■ 








EXPlfS&SSDN 




nm^ ACT£ 



Hayley Lever, Individualist 

The artist who believes that man may draw inspiration 
from all sources, but that the only deadly sin is imitation 

B}> Edgar Holger Cahill 



THIS has been called an age of individualism. It 
probably is ; but, then, ages are tricky things. They 
have a way of turning around and contradicting 
themselves. Our individualistic age, in consequence, is 
an age of rampant collectivism. 

In the arts, never was there such a time for sectarianism. 
Slogans enlist the en- 
thusiasms of thousands, 
and a myriad of eager 
brushes are raised in 
battle under any con- 
venient standard. Men 
are judged not on their 
own merits or demerits 
as painters, but as 
members of groups : of 
the academic group, the 
not-so-academic group, 
the cubist group, the 
futurist group, the ex- 
pressionist group, and 
so on world without 
end or beginning. 

For all our vaunted 
individualism there is 
too much hallooing 
with the pack in con- 
temporary art. And the 
packs are so numerous. 
One could almost wish 
that American artists 
had taken a tip from 
the politicians, and 
adopted the two-party 
system. If we must 
live under the tyranny 
of sects and parties, let 
us have as few as pos- 
sible. But of real in- 
dividuals we can never 
have too many. 

It is always a blessed 
relief to find an artist 
who has the courage 
not to be ashamed of 
his own individuality, 
and to face the world 




Photo by Lumiere 

HAYLEY LEVER 
Who records his impressions honestly — who realizes that all art is 
lyrical — a song of the individual spirit in the dark forest of the world 



as himself, and not as a member of some group or other. 
Meeting such a man in our day is like stepping out of a 
subway crush into a green and quiet place where a lone 
shepherd plays the Pan pipes under the trees. 

I always think of something like that when I look at 
the work of Hayley Lever. In all his painting, whether 

it is of boats dancing 
on the waters of the 
Cornish coast, the ferry 
. bridges and boats and 
streets of Gloucester, 
Massachusetts, the 
steaming asphalt high- 
ways of New York 
City, or the gently up- 
heaving Catskills about 
Woodstock, it is always 
Lever who addresses 
us. 

Lever is an individ- 
ual. I will wager that 
even in Australia, 
where he was born in 
1876, and where he first 
learned the use of the 
brush, sometimes work- 
ing as a house painter, 
that he had a very per- 
sonal way of putting 
the pigment on clap- 
board and shingle. 

Lever has always 
maintained that indi- 
viduality. When he left 
Australia, at eighteen 
years of age, he discov- 
ered St. Ives, Cornwall. 
And he immediately ap- 
propriated it to himself. 
I say appropriated, ad- 
visedly, for of the 
many painters who 
have painted St. Ives, 
no one has made the 
place so peculiarly his 
own as has Hayley 
(Continued on page 77) 

Page Eleven 




Photo by Van Riel, B. A 



CLAUDIA MUZIO 

Metropolitan opera goers who can appreciate singing in its 
most emotional and dramatic forms and who are judges of 
acting will note with great regret that Claudia Muzio is no 
longer on the roster of New York's leading opera house 



Page Twelve 




Photo by Bruguiere 



ERIKA MORINI 

Great women violinists are rare, but Eriha Morini is one of 
the greatest since Madame Norman Neruda. She made her 
New York debut two seasons ago when barely fifteen. Her 
technique is almost flawless, while she achieves great beauty 
of tone. By and by, doubtless when she becomes more 
mature, Erika Morini will be in the hierarchy of violinists 



Page Thirteen 



■■ 




With Wynn 
in Berlin 



HOT DOGS 
The truth of the matter is that these succulent dainties 
are really indigenous to the land of the dachshund. The 
Coney Island species have merely been transplanted 



UNTER DEN LINDEN 

Berlin's glass of fashion and ex- 
ceedingly large mould of form 




Page fourteen 




THE BANK CLERK 

He is still waiting for the 
perfume to start his "From 
Mom to Midnight" complex 





THE STUDENT 

Phrenology does not apply. 
Some day this young degree col- 
lector will startle the world 



THE COSMOPOLITAN 

A week at Brighton, a week- 
end at St. Moritz. Result- 
one monocle and a feather 




STATUES IN THE 
TIERGARTEN 

The left-hand statue rep- 
resents a young gentleman 
just after taking a dare; 
on the right, immediately 
after carrying it thru. He 
plucked a flower right 
under a "Verboten" sign 




Page Fifteen 




Copyright, 1922, Revillon Freres Photo by Robert J. Flaherty 

Illimitable spaces of barren land under a cold Alaskan sky 



Page Sixteen 



The 

Sand Dunes 

of Indiana 

Photos by Frank M. Hohenberger 



They stretch for twenty 
miles along the shore of 
Lake Michigan. Their ever 
changing, drifting outlines, 
dark with trees or brilliant 
with bloom, form a country 
which is unique and wonder- 
ful, quite different from the 
usual idea of a dune country 





The hollows are marshy and thick 
with cat-tails, sedge and cinnamon 
ferns; the soft blending of the browns 
and greens forms an exquisite contrast 
to the more brilliant covering of the 
higher land where violets,'' hepaticas 
and trillium form a perpetual garden. 
The glossy green of the trees, relieved 
here and there by a flowering dogwood, 
turns in autumn to living flame quiv- 
ering against the ashes . of the sand 



Page Seventeen 



W^M 



m^i^m 




Drawn by Robert James Malone 



POLA NEGRI 

Her three outstanding characteristics, eyes, hair 
and expressive shoulder, stand out in ihiz 
clever caricature of the Viennese film star 



Page Eighteen 



Our Novels as Mirrors 

More and More our Novelists are Making Literary Use of the Imbecilities and Con- 
tradictions which make up the Intellectual Equipment of the Average 

American Citizen 

By Burton Rascoe 



NO country — not even the country of Samuel 
Smiles or of Pastor Wagner — has so perfected and 
standardized the axioms of material well-being 
and success as has the United States. Benjamin Franklin 
was our first great national philosopher, by which I mean 
the philosopher who articulated the national ethic and 
gave direction to the communal sense of the greater good. 
William James and the Pragmatists, Artemus Ward, Peter 
Finley Dunne, George Ade, E. H. Howe, Will Rogers, 
and Ring Lardner are Franklin's legitimate successors 
and he, or the race spirit, must accept parentage too 
for Abe Martin, the late Elbert Hubbard, Dr. Frank 
Crane, Arthur Brisbane, the Booster buttons and the 
Rotary Club bulletins. 

It was, from the first, a philosophy of ebullient opti- 
mism, as befitted a youngish country, and it inculcated the 
homely and healthy truths of orderly living, hard work, 
economy, thrift, honesty and good will. Franklin's 
"Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, 
wealthy and wise" informed the national consciousness 
with a direct inspiration which the combined wisdom of 
all the Concord sages was never able to impart. It was 
a sustaining philosophy because it met the particular needs 
and inspirations of a hardy and pioneer people, who were 
just beginning to exploit the prodigious resources of a 
vast new country. It degenerated into a false and inflated 
philosophy, into a specious and ruinous stimulant when 
the pioneer spirit died of inanation, the economic pressure 
became acute, and the exploitation of human beings was 
substituted for the exploitation of land, rivers and min- 
erals. With the development of industrial competition, 
ingenuity, trickery, knavery and self-deception became 
the necessary factors of material success. Whereas men 
had formerly used their hands in wrestin' a living from 
the soil, men now used their heads to wrest a living from 
their neighbors. In the larger cities this often amounts 
to a deadly battle of nerves and wits, wherein the weaker 
or the less callous perish in bankruptcy, poverty and 
spiritual disintegration. 

The Unprepared Mind 

The trouble is that victory itself is seldom sweet. By 
using their minds exclusively and foregoing the creative 
thrill to be derived from tilling the soil, building shelter 
and fashioning beautiful or practicable things, men have 
established a dangerous habit of dependence upon their 
minds for their play as much as for their means of 
earning a living. And their minds have not been prepared 
for that emergency. Their faculties, frequently, have 
been too much occupied in schemes of cheating for them 
to know how to use them in their moments of leisure. 
With the acquisition of money and power, American 
men, especially the great captains of industry in the era 
immediately antecedent to our own, have not known 
what to do with them. The more sensible ones — sensible 
of their limitations — have gone ahead piling up more 
money because that was the only creative satisfaction 
they knew. Some others have satisfied their vanity in a 
pathetic and spectacular philanthropy. Others have em- 
ployed experts to hoard up for them the procurable art 



treasures of Europe. And still others have fulfilled 
thwarted and infantile desires in neronian debauches. 

Meanwhile the maxims of Franklin have been fused 
into a pseudo-philosophy to meet the imperative needs 
of a stifling economic pressure. "Keep Smiling!" "Do 
it now !" "Cheer up !" "Be a booster !" and such exclama- 
tory inanities are not a philosophy but doses of verbal 
heroin and cocaine to stimulate a false and over-wrought 
enthusiasm for dubious endeavors. They, too, are more 
or less necessary to keep up a brave front, and the fact 
that they are opiates cynically administered by commission 
men on the parasitic fringe of industrialism who profit 
from the spurts of false energy, does not make them any 
the less necessary : the administers of the drugs are vic- 
tims, often, of their own opiates and stimulants. 

The Acquisitive Instinct 

The effects of all this are beginning to be reflected in 
our national literature. Criticism, direct or implied, of our 
social and economic scheme*, our cultural development, 
and our national philosophy of success in life is to be 
found in every serious novel or .essay- that comes from the 
presses. The symposium of thirty Americans in "Civil- 
ization in the United States" and the series of articles 
now running in the Nation under the general heading 
"These United States" are illustrative of the direct attacks 
being made upon the system of life which has been evolved 
out of a nominal democracy in industrial competition. 
On the physiological and neurological side the effects are 
even more visibly devastating : one might gather from 
the number of books being published on psychology, psy- 
chiatry, psychoanalysis, psycho-pathology, hygiene and 
health that America was one. vast insane asylum. These 
books are indices of the strain modern urban life imposes 
upon the human mechanism and of the neuroses developed 
as the result of the improper functioning of the creative 
faculties in work and play. 

The more significant spiritual effects of such conditions, 
however, are to be found in their artistic by-products. 
The art of a nation invariably reflects the state of that 
nation's soul. The elder reactionary and academic critics 
of America, such as Dr. Brander Matthews, Paul Elmer 
More and Stuart Pratt Sherman, have been violently 
umbrageous toward the American novel on the score 
that it does not meet the primary requirement of art, 
which is that it mirrors the hopes and aspirations of the 
times and people. Shut up in their ivory towers these 
good men havd failed to perceive that that is precisely 
what the American novel does and has done. 

To take a particular example, in the butt of reactionary 
critical animosity — the work of Theodore Dreiser — we 
have, seen thru the alembic of Dreiser's troubled vision, 
an accurate and disturbing picture of phases of American 
industrialism. Dreiser is a romantic naturalist who finds 
an epic grandeur, in the rise of individuals to merciless 
and remorseless power thru an adaptation of their com- 
bative instincts to the peculiar conditions of the American 
struggle for existence. To win out in such a struggle 
requires imagination and energy, an amenable and dis- 
ciplined conscience and a highly developed acquisitive 






Page Nineteen 



SuiADOWLAND 



instinct. Dreiser's depiction of the last named attribute 
is the thing that has caused his critics to wince and to 
declare his picture false. Mr. Sherman records sarcas- 
tically and with an implication that Dreiser is wrong, 
that, in Dreiser's novels, "The male is characterized by 
cupidity, pugnacity, and a simian inclination for the other 
sex. - ' Those characteristics are, precisely (being only 
.synonyms for the attributes I have named a few sentences 
back), what go to make up men 
like Frank Cowperwood. 

The acquisitive instinct, as all 
psychologists know, is an instinct 
for self-aggrandizement by the 
number and value of possessions ; 
it has moreover an erotic basis ; 
and the possessor of a powerful 
acquisitive instinct is most likely 
to have, in Mr. Sherman's words, 
"a simian inclination for the other 
sex." If that inclination is not 
sublimated into an acceptance of 
symbols of the primary object of 
desire, the acquisitive male's ama- 
tory conquests do take on a simian 
aspect. And if Mr. Sherman has 
failed to observe this he had been 
pathetically blind to human be- 
havior as it is manifested all 
around him. Dreiser's novels, 
then, are documentary volumes in 
certain aspects of our contempor- 
ary social history. Those aspects 
are gradually changing under con- 
ditions brought about by the meta- 
morphosis of industry from spec- 
tacular individual effort into cor- 
porate production, inherited capital 
and transmitted power. 

In Newton Fuessle's excellent 
novel', "Gold Shod," we observe 
the first evidences of the transi- 
tion. Here we have a Dreiserian 
hero, not as a Napoleon of indus- 
try, not as a great schemer and 
organizer, but as a capable and 
highly imaginative factor in a huge 
tentacled industry. He, too, has 
the acquisitive instinct, but it is 
complicated with a creative im- 
pulse which is not satisfied by 
check-mating his rivals in financial 
enterprise or by erratic affairs of 
the heart. He has indeterminate 
desires which monetary success 
does not satisfy ; he is, indeed, the 
more overcome with a sense of 
frustration the more his business 
acumen results in easy victory. 
He has, in fine, a desire to express 
himself in one of the arts, because 
he senses in the arts a symmetry 
and beauty he is unable to find in 
life as he lives and knows it. This, 
then, is the first step toward the 

realization of cultural ambitions from the feudal enter- 
prises of our industrial history. 

In Sherwood Anderson's "Windy MacPherson's Son" 
we have again an intimation of this same tendency to 
aspire to a beauty that lies outside of machines and com- 
petition, industrial wars and throat-slitting economics. 
It is thus that our serious novels have not only mirrored 
the society of their times but have revealed the tendencies 
beneath them. In the novels of Edith Wharton and the 




POETS 

By Paul Tanaquil 

Swinburne 
Love and Lust 

Hand in hand 
Dance a languorous 

Saraband 
In the shining dust — 

Baudelaire 

The white wonder of my lilies — 
Ah, their pallid loveliness 

To my lips more cool and still is 
Than a bought red mouth's caress 

Fair and slim, straight and tall, 

Poison lingers in them all . . . 

Dobson 

One song 

Vibrant with pain — 

Of fair things wrong, 
Of dreamed things vain, 
Of sweet things slain — 

Till I knew suddenly 
The song was all of me. 

Masefield 
His song is a magic 

Stream 
Down from a white peak — 
And, as I hear him speak, 
He seems like one bewitched 
in dream 
By his own music. 



short stories of Mary Wilkms Freeman we have seen the 
tragedy inherent in the survival of Puritanic codes long 
after the conditions requiring them have passed. And in 
the novels of William Dean Howells, Hamlin Garland 
and Henry Blake Fuller we have the cultural aspirations 
of the less acquisitive as they were realized dimly and 
vaguely and without passion by the timid bearers of the 
torch when great energies were involved in industrial 
enterprise. 

Now comes an era of more acute 
dissatisfaction, given impetus by 
the disillusions of war — an era of 
inquiry and criticism, of vigorous 
and insistent pretest against our 
social and economic organization. 
It takes form in the bitter ironic 
apathy of the-later works of James 
Branch Cabell ; in the penetrating 
and sympathetic analyses of the 
cramped, petty tragedies of Ameri- 
can village life — the Winesburg 
stories of Sherwood Anderson ; in 
the nagging contemptuousness of 
"Main Street" ; in the shrill and 
snarling denunciations of Ben 
Hecht ; in the inverted sentimen- 
talism of the cynical younger nov- 
elists ; in the hurt and beautifully 
mournful Icaruses of Willa 
Cather, Joseph Hergesheimer, and 
Thomas Beer. 

But a mirthful mockery at the 
situation has not been realized in 
fiction so well and so completely as 
in Sinclair Lewis's new novel, 
"Babbitt." It is a vast improvement 
over "Main Street." The tone in 
that book was surly; in "Babbitt" 
Mr. Lewis has mellowed his dis- 
content with a sympathetic irony : 
he is merry at his bero's expense, 
viewing him with a disapproving 
but tolerant eye. Even the milieu 
he depicts with a sane and humor- 
ous point of view. And in "Bab- 
bitt" the milieu is almost every- 
thing, the story almost nothing. 
He has set himself to portray the 
business, social, and cultural life 
as it exists in the larger industrial 
cities of America. He aims to 
show how the average successful 
citizen of such a community lives, 
what he thinks, how he uses his 
leisure, how he receives and forms 
his opinion, what his small-talk is, 
what his relationships with men 
and women are. 

He has succeeded superbly. No 
novel of the period is more min- 
utely documented. Flaubert in 
"Bouvard et Pecuchet" utilized the 
imbecilities, inanities, and contra- 
dictions of human conversation 
and expressed beliefs which he had gathered together 
for his projected dictionary of accepted ideas. Mr. Lewis 
has made literary use of the imbecilities, inanities, and 
contradictions. which go to make up the intellectual equip- 
ment of the average contemporary American citizen. 
Listen to this, (Babbitt has been reading the newspaper) : 
But this, say, this is corking! Beginning of the 
end of those fellows! New York Assembly has 
(Continued on page 68) 



Page Twenty 



More to be Censored 
Than Famed? 

Sketches by Clayton Knight 




Royalty deliveries by the 
Ether Transportation 
Company had been so few 
and far between that the 
Olympian A uthor's League 
had not even been able 
to keep up their daily 
supply of Pierian Spring 
water. A committee form- 
ed itself to investigate 
conditions, and we see 
two of the members, 
Rabelais and Petronius, 
starting for the Earth, 
while King Solomon, 
Ovid and Boccaccio shout 
advice from the shore 



Elsie Dinsmore and Little Rollo, elated at the 
news from the Inn, mince out to greet the in- 
famous Shades and persuade them to turn back. 
'We are," they chorus sweetly, "quite capable 
of managing the literary affairs of the Earth." 
Rabelais for once is not even Rebelaisian, and 
Petronius instead of uttering a satire feels like one 



Here we find at Book- 
leg Inn, George Moore 
meditating on his new 
style; David Lawrence 
and his "Women in 
Love," while Jurgen, 
the attentive waiter, 
serves Schnitzler's din- 
ner party to Casanova 
and the Young Girl. 
All are waiting to 
greet the two from the 
great Beyond.' Just be- 
fore the hour of the 
meeting a bolt of Sum- 
mer . lightning com- 
pletely destroys the 
edifice, scorching the 
waiting guests 







Page Twenty-One 



Japanese Sword Guards as Collecting Objects 



By W. G. Bowdoin 



JAPANESE tsuba, or sword guards, have ever ap- 
pealed to the lover of Eastern art. The best of 
them are exquisite in design and workmanship, beau- 
tiful in color and contour, and picture in miniature a 
wide range of the artistic and legendary history of Japan. 
That they have ever been numerous — and this is not 
always a trial to an earnest collector — one can well under- 
stand, for in the feudal days of Japan, each member of 
the military class carried his familiar two swords, and for 
each sword he had a choice of tsuba, rarely less than a 
dozen and sometimes even hundreds, which could be 
changed to vary the appearance of his treasured blades 
from day to day or month to month. 

If, then, we estimate that there were two millions of 
Samurai in 1876, when Prime Minister Sanjo signed the 
decree forbidding the carrying of swords, we may assume 
that tens of millions of sword guards came sooner or 
later into trade. It is certainly a fact, according to Bash- 
ford Dean of the' Metropolitan Museum of Art, that about 
1880 the markets of all curio-loving countries were flooded 
with sword guards, and that never before or since, have 
such admirable specimens, in any number at least, found 
their way out of Japan. 

The tsuba had to be of suitable size to protect the hand, 
strong to withstand impact, and yet light enough not to 
interfere with the proper and needful balance of the sword. 

Court customs and regulations played an important 
part in the development of the sword guard. The swords 
of the Mikado's court at Kyoto, differed from those of the 
Tokugawa aristocracy at Yedo, as well as from the shorter 
swords which commoners were once privileged to wear 
on certain occasions. 
The use of gold in the 
decoration of these in- 
ferior swords was at 
one time strictly for- 
bidden to all below the 
rank of Samurai. Lo- 
cal custom again often 
dictated the style of 
tsuba worn ; thus it is 
not difficult for anyone, 
even slightly acquainted 
with the subject, to rec- 
ognize the guards made 
in certain daimyates. 

Always among the 
Japanese the sword was 
the weapon of highest 
honor and the famous 
saying : "The sword is 
the soul of the Samur- 
ai" came to be the fer- 
vid expression of both 
loyalty and pride. 

Often the Emperor 
assisted in the making 
of a sword blade. The 
adoration of the blade, 
common to almost all 
ancient races, never at- 
tained so high a signifi- 
cance or found such 
artistic expression as 
among the Japanese. 




A CEREMONIAL SWORD GUARD BY YUKAN 

The foundation is of yellow bronze, the lotus leaf is silver bronze, 

and the Heron is inlaid in silver 



The Samurai ultimately embodied in the sword their 
supreme conception of honor and manhood. In the icy 
steel, born of fire, they saw revealed the mystery of Life, 
indivisible from that of Death. Its serenity taught them 
the virtue of that self-control which calmly prepares for 
a mighty struggle. In the unclouded face of the crystal- 
line blade they beheld mirrored the purity and chastity, so 
inseparable from true loyalty. The most precious dowry 
a bride could bring to a Samurai, was the honored sword 
of her ancestors, while many an old Japanese drama is 
based upon the quest and recovery of some lost blade. 
His sword was a part of the Samurai's individuality, and 
people were accustomed to judge his character from that 
of his weapon. 

A legend has it that once Taiko-Hideyosshi, the Japan- 
ese Napoleon, saw the swords of his Generals lying on 
a rack, in the antechamber of his palace, and so expressive 
was their personification, that he at once recognized to 
whom each belonged. 

Next in importance to the blade itself, came the tsuba 
and the menuki, the central stud on the hilt. To illustrate 
the frame of mind in which the Kamakura knights ap- 
proached the tsuba, we may cite their custom of having 
it consecrated by the holy fathers of the Buddhist Church. 
As it emerges from the darkness of the unknown, into 
the twilight of mythology, we find the Japanese race 
armed with a sword of which the tsuba forms an import- 
ant accessory. In the legendary creation of the world, 
it is set forth that the Primeval Mother, after bearing 
the Sun Goddess, the Moon God, and other deities, ex- 
pired in the act of giving birth to the Fire God: The 

Primeval Father, whose 
mighty sobs created the 
Goddess Echo, at last 
in a frenzy of grief 
drew his sword and 
killed the unhappy 
cause of his suffering. 
From the hewn body of 
the slain God rose the 
mountains ;. volcanoes 
sprang from his welling 
blood; of the gory 
drops which bespatter- 
ed the Father's tsuba, 
was born a race of 
war gods thru whose 
achievements the con- 
trol of the Island Em- 
pire came to the de- 
scendants of the Sun 
Goddess. 

Some of the early 
tsubas were thickly 
coated with lacquer, 
and the conventional- 
ized hexagon was used 
to give some their 
shape. 

Later, gilt bronze was 
used as the metal base. 
Fine patterns were 
chased over some of 
these and the modified 
(Continued on page 74) 



Page Twenty-Tzvo 




Photo by Dickson 



Harvest 

Interpreted by The Dufour Dancers 



These dancers scorn orchestras and subdued lights; 
the music of the wind, the bright rays of the sun 
and Nature as a back-drop are the only props they 
desire for their art. Elise Dufour, their leader, 
believes the dance must be closely related to daily 
life, for, she thinks, it is as necessary to dance and 
develop the body and express the soul as it is to 
wear clothes to keep the body warm or to hear 
lectures to improve the soul. So, the Dufour 
Dancers dance with the wind, the waves, the moon- 
light, the rustling trees and the music of the 
spheres. And when they do use a stage, they 
endeavor to bring the spirit of Nature with them 



Page Twenty-Three 



S^:i^±^h_^fU— a. 




Photo by Edwin Bower Hesser 

INA BOURSKAYA 
Described by Chicago critics as "the greatest Carmen since Calve," 
this former star of the Russian Grand Opera Company recently 
made a sensational success , at the Ravinia Park Opera, and has 
been engaged by both Metropolitan and Chicago Opera Companies 
for a series of special performances 

THE song birds are hieing them back from their 
summer homeland to their winter quarters on. Man- 
hattan Island. By the time this copy of Shadow- 
land is in the hands of its readers, impresario, singers, 
conductors, dancers, regisseurs, repetiteurs, and goodness 
knows how many others, will be safely back in the ugly 
old opera house on Broadway, preparing with feverish 
baste for another six months' season of opera. 

And at once subscribers and the general public com- 
mence eagerly to inquire what novelties and what new 
singers the general director and committee have decided to 
provide. Gatti-Casazza is fond of keeping his own coun- 
sel in these matters almost up to the last moment, altho 
just before leaving for his Italian villa in May he dis- 
closed a few facts. 

At the time of writing, the Metropolitan's genial pub- 
licity director, Willy Guard, had not returned from Italy, 
where he also has been sestivating, and the little office on 
Thirty-ninth Street was deserted save by the pleasing 
lady who from her window has seen more famous singers 
come and go than could find room at one time, upon 



Operatic 
Anticipations 

Some interesting novelties and sev- 
eral new artists of note will be heard 
at the Metropolitan this season 

By Jerome Hart 



the ample stage of the Metropolitan. 

Nevertheless we are in the position to 
forecast with tolerable certainty some 
of the principal singers and operatic and 
terpsichorean novelties of the coming 
season. 

To begin, it is settled that Marie Jer- 
itza, around whom the storm clouds are 
already gathering, will reopen the opera 
house in "Thais." At once the question 
arises — will she sing the part made 
famous by Mary Garden in French or 
Italian? The blond and athletic Vien- 
nese prima donna would be scarcely 
likely to sing it in German, although she 
has employed that language in her own 
country in singing "Salome," which, of 



, TAMAKI MIURA 
The charming and petite Japanese prima donna, 
who makes the most perfect Madame Butterfly 
ever seen or heard. She has been singing this 
season with Fortune Gallo's San Carlo Opera 
Company. She believes in the independence of 
Japanese women, and opposed the will of her 
husband and family in coming to America 



Photo by Daguerre, Chicago 

MRHMMH*aSIMHHBMIHMi 




% :\ 




Page Twenty-Four 



SuiADQWlAND 



course, was originally written by Oscar 
Wilde in French, and has always been sung 
in that language by Mary Garden. 

But Jeritza's French is a few shades 
worse than her Italian, and altho Our 
Mary's is none of the best, one has grown 
accustomed to her slight eccentricities of 
accent. We imagine, however, that Strauss's 
opera, if given at all, will be sung in the lan- 
guage in which it was originally written, and, 
the Metropolitan having no completely 
French cast available, we shall have the usual 
hotchpotch of Italians, Germans and Amer- 
icans, as well as few other nationalities, all 
singing in a language with which most of 
them are imperfectly acquainted. 

Flow different from the old days under 
Grau, Hammerstein and Campanini, when 
French artists sang in French opera, German 



EDWARD JOHNSON 

A Canadian-American singer who rose to the posi- 
tion of leading tenor at the famous La Scala, Milan, 
where he sang under the name of Eduardo di Gio- 
vanni, His performances with the Chicago Opera 
Company in this country stamp him as an artist of 
the first rank. He joins the Metropolitan Opera 
forces this season 



ANNA FITZIU 
Irish-American prima donna, formerly of the Metro- 
politan and Boston Opera Companies, and now with 
the San Carlo Company. She is a beautiful woman 
with a beautiful voice , and in the opera_ "Isabeau" 
was a memorable Lady Qpdiva. Mascagni himself 
selected her to interpret the' part in South America 

Photo by Mishkin, N. Y. 

" """" "■ , ..... . . 





■m3 
Photo by Moffett, Chicago 



MARIE 
RAPPOLD 
One of the 
most distin- 
guished and 
accomplished 
of American 
operatic artists 
and a great 
popular favor- 
ite. Her ap- 
pearances with 
the San Carlo 
Opera Com- 
pany in"Aida" 
and other 
operas have 
brought her 
fresh laurels 




Photo by Cartpbell Studio. N. Y 



in German and Italian in Italian, with a few Amer- 
icans of talent in prominent roles! One then got 
really national interpretations of ajmost every work 
presented. 

Jeritza is very anxious to be heard here in "Sa- 
lome," and she succeeded a few weeks ago in induc- 
ing Gatti-Casazza and Otto Kahn to visit Vienna 
especially to hear her in the role. Last season she 
attended a performance of Strauss's work by the Chi- 
cago Company, when she was' accompanied by the 
composer. This fired her with the desire to shew' New 
Yorkers that, given the chance, she could do much 
better than Mary Garden. So she arranged for the 
special performance in Vienna, with the eminent 
(Continued on page 70) 



Page Tiventy-Fkx 







Where Bargaining is 
the Soul of Trade 

A tour of the little cobwebby 

second-hand shops of Paris 

in search of an antique bauble 

or bowl or brochure 

By Francis F. Fulton 

else is there another such bowl. I will be 
generous. Yes ! Monsieur can take it to his 
wife, with my compliments, for thirty 
francs." 

"Merci, madame, les voila." 
"Je vous remercie, monsieur, prenes." 
Customer and shopkeeper part with mu- 
tual esteem, far greater than would have 
existed had the original fifty-franc price 
been paid. 

There are. in Paris, many of the stores 
where prices are fixed, but very few of the 
antique shops come in that category ; with 
them, bargaining, rather than competition, is 
the soul of trade. 



Outside the walls, near the Port St. Ouen, the 
Thieves' Market is held on Sunday mornings. 
During the week, while the chiffoniers and others 
who display their wares there are busy "finding" 
things to sell, the place is deserted save for a few 
wretched creatures who haggle for hours over bits 
of rusted and broken iron 



Near St. Sulpice is a tiny shop crowded with treasures of 
the ancient world. The proprietress is uninterested in any- 
thing more modern than the fifteenth century; Ptolemy and 
Hamurabi are her friends, Caesar and Justinian are expected 
in at any moment, but until they come, or she joins them, 
it is her greatest pleasure to put her present-day visitors 
on intimate terms with the past 



a 



F 



IFTY francs, monsieur." k 
"Fifty?" in tones of horror. 
"Oui, monsieur." 

"But it is too much. I could never pay that." 

A shrug. 

"Figures-vous, madame. It is as a present for 
my wife that I have need of this little bowl. It 
lacks but this one small thing for her complete tea- 
service of pewter. But, fifty francs! She will be 
bitterly disappointed." 

"It would be a shame to disappoint madame. 
Perhaps, if monsieur would give forty-five?" 

"She has seen the bowl in your window, and has 
already invited friends to take tea and admire the 
completed service. Imagine her chagrin, madame, 
— but I cannot pay more than twenty." 

"Twenty francs ! Ridiculous ! But, in consider- 
ation for the guests of monsieur's wife, I could 
sell it for forty francs." 

"I am sorry. Twenty-five, perhaps, but that 
would not interest you. Au 'voir, madame. Pos- 
sibly, somewhere in the quarter, I can find another 
that will do." 

"Wait, monsieur. I know what it is to be em- 
barrassed before guests ! I assure you that nowhere 




Page Twenty-Six 



SuAOGWLANO 



There is a little island. off 

the coast of P'rance whose 

inhabitants, so travelers re- 
port, make their living by 

taking in each other's wash- 
ing. I have a theory, which 

I am sure is sound, that, 

centuries ago, the Islanders, 

crowded for drying room, 

dispatched some hundreds 

of their people to found a 

colony in Paris. That they 

found the Parisian blanchis- 

seusses not to be trifled with 

and so were robbed of their 

normal trade and began 

buying and selling each oth- 
er's mobiliers there can be 

no reasonable doubt. How, 

otherwise, can the hundreds 

of musty little shops that 

are almost as numerous as 

the cafes in that city of 

oasis be accounted for? 

Surely there is no other way 

of explaining the distinc- 
tion that is made between 

the stranger, who merely 

wishes to buy, and some fel- 
low shopkeeper. 

A courtesy that is most 

casual greets the individual 

who, peering thru the dusty 

window, has seen something 

that he longs to possess. 

But if you should hear an 

enthusiastic chorus of 

"E pat ant!" and "Comme 

c'esi rigolo," and find the 

proprietor excitedly show- 
ing his wares to some equal- 
ly excited person, you may 

be quite certain that that 

person has another little 

shop, just as dusty, a few 

doors away. They are am- 
ateurs, in the true, sense, 
these people, and if you can 
convince them that you have 
taste and discrimination, 
your reward will be great, 
for you will see things that 
are stored away waiting 
for a worthy purchaser and 

will hear tales so unbelievable that they must be true — 
tales woven around a worn Cashmere shawl, a bit of old 
lace, or an ancient sword. For there is no place more 

full of stories than these little corners of the world's 
attic. 

Not all the antique shops are cobwebby. I know of 
several that are immaculate, even in the winter, and most 
of them maintain a high polish during the tourist sea- 
son. That is a trying period for them, and, although it 
is their season of greatest harvest, most of the shop- 
keepers are sincerely glad when it is over. The visitor 
is usually suspicious and expects to be overcharged, and 
the boutiquier resents that attitude, but is too polite to 
allow his customer's expectations to be disappointed. 

No, the time from April to November is an unfor- 
tunate one in which to make the acquaintance of the 
little shops. Unlike the pretentious establishments of 
the Place Vendome and the Boulevard Haussmann, 
where business is conducted in expensive but unvarying 




Almost every block in Paris has at least one antique shop, and in 
them you can buy anything from a cuneiform brick to yesterday's 
newspaper. Often the most interesting of these shops are the little, 
dusty places, tucked away in odd corners of the narrow streets 



fashion, they are very temperamental, changing their 
whole character with the fluctuations in the Parisian pop- 
ulation. 

Near St. Sulpice is an overcrowded shop whose pro- 
prietress enjoys an international reputation for her 
knowledge of carved stones. Thru the two grimy win- 
dows that face the street you see a jumble of treasures 
of the ancient world — flashes of rich reds and gold, of 
deep blues, tarnished silver, and coppery greens, from a 
thousand, things that once helped beautify Thebes and 
Babylon, Athens and Rome, Byzantium and medieval 
Paris. They are windows into which you peer, with 
constantly increasing interest, until at last you - see the 
thing that you never knew you wanted, but without 
which life would henceforth be incomplete. 

You push open the door with the tinkling bell, and 
leave Paris and the twentieth century behind. The bell 
tinkles again as the door shuts and madame emerges 
{Continued on page 72) 



Page Twenty-Seven 




A Painter 
on Silk 



Reproductions of the work of 
Charles Fiilop, the Magyar ar- 
tist with an uncanny color sense 

Photographs by Nickolas Muray 



THE DANCERS' 



The music has ended with 
a crashing of cymbals and 
a throbbing of viols: the 
seven dancers, costumed in 
barbaric reds and purples 
and bronze-greens, await the 
drawing of the curtain 



Here, orchestral blacks, limpid 
greys, and brilliant oranges 
merge into a magnificent har- 
mony. The young violinist sym- 
bolizes Art, defying Evil and 
triumphing over the unsym- 
pathetic forces of the Earth 



ELEVATION 





AUTUMN" 



There is a depth of melancholy in 
this portrayal of the dying year 
that few painters on canvas have 
been able to suggest. The back- 
ground pictures somber trees scat- 
tering their leaves about the un- 
happy figures crossing the bridge 
into the desolate land of Winter 



Page Twenty-Eight 



Diane 

of the 

Dance 






"Mtotos hy Joseph A. Stone, Xew Haven. Conn. 



Who would suspect 
this gentle lady in the 
bonnet of stamping 
magnificently thru the 
Storm Scene from 
"William, Tell" or 
working up the tin- 
kling crescendo of 
Anitra's Dance. And 
when she dons pose, 
poise and pearls, what 
a distinctly Oriental 
air she achieves; Pav- 
Iowa and Lubovska 
have both praised 
Dian Montford's work 




Page Tzventy-IVmr 







The Harkness 
Memorial at 
Yale University 



The tower, which is the true Harkner.s 
memorial, is the only example of the 
"double-crown" tower in America. It has 
English chimes made by Loughbridge,. con- 
sisting of ten bells whose first three notes 
are the lowest in the country. On each of 
the four sides of the tower are statues of 
Yale's most distinguished alumni and one 
of the founder of the college, Elihu Yale. 
The tower and the dormitories on the 
famous quadrangle were given by Mrs. 
Steven V. Harkness in memory of her son, 
George William Harkness, of the class of 
'83, who died in 1916. The corner stone of 
the tower was laid in 1917. James Gamble 
Rogers was the architect 



One of the many 
quaint doorways, 
most of them me- 
morials, leading in- 
to one of the six 
courts around 
which the dorml 
tories are built. 
This doorway is an 
example of a pure 
Gothic arch. The 
warm tones of the 
Plymouth granite 
with inserts of 
weather-beaten 
brick are inde- 
scribably lovely 




A Gothic vestibule from which lead 
the curving stairs to the students' 
quarters. In building these quarters, 
Mr. Rogers paid no attention to tradi- 
tional, institutional architecture, but 
considered the comfort of the stu- 
dents and the charm of irregularity 



Page Thirty 




Photo by Evans Studio, L. A. 



MISS VEE WOLF OF HOLLYWOOD 

A charming entrant in the Beauty Contest 



Page Thirty-One 




Respecting the 
American Theater 

Our Theater Would Move a Great Deal Faster if 

Managers, Critics, Actors and Playwrights Could 

Begin to Believe in its Dignity and Power 

By Kenneth Macgowan 



Photo by Standiford Studio 



I 



Above, Jean Brown in "Sally, Irene and Mary"; 
at the right, Ruth Chatterton in "La Tendresse" ; 
and below, Harry Beresford in "The Old Soak" 



SUPPOSE there 
is nothing in. 




America that we 
generally respect — ex- 
cept success and fab- 
ulous abstractions like 
Democracy, Progress, 
and the President. I 
know that we dont 
respect the theater. 

We feel many emo- 
tions for it, strong, 
vivid, compelling emo- 
tions, but never re- 
spect. Some playgo- 
ers love the theater 
with the devotion of 
a movie mother for 
her reformatory son. 
There are managers 
who feel for it the 
passion of the tiger 
for the river buffalo. 
It lures many a play- 
wright with a fascin- 
ation roulette cannot 
boast. Actors em- 

Photo by Abbe 
Page Thirty-Two 




Photo by Hoover, L. A. 

brace the stage with the avidity 
of the Reverend Mr. Straton 
for newspaper print. As for 
critics, you can imagine the 
value they set upon this escape 
from their inferiority complexes. 
You may say that this is 
quite as it should be — this lack 
of respect — and ask me to 
show you anything in the 
American, theater that deserves 
more than the devotion of the 
self-seeker. If I tell you to 
look back to the Greeks or over 
the chasm of the war to the 
Germans, you will be bored or 
patriotic. So I may as well 
content myself with observing 
that all these petty egoisms will 
ultimately get our theater for- 
ward to the place where it will 
deserve the respect that the 
German theater now enjoys; 
but that it would move a great 
deal faster if our managers 
and our critics, our actors and 
our playwrights could begin to 
believe in its dignity and its 
power. 



SuADOWLAND 



Especially our playwrights. Here is the flagrant case 
of the latest of them, Don Marquis. He is a wag and 
a humanist, a scholar and a gentleman. He has created 
a jolly and touching figure in Clem Hawley, the old 
soak. Those who know Marquis' little book or Mar- 
quis' big column know that. It is only once or twice a 
year that so much of the pungency of American life 
gets into our literature. What joy therefore awaits 
the playgoer who has tickets for "The Old Soak." 

Well, exactly what joy? Old Clem, of course, that 
"mammal of iniquity," with his warning to beware 
of "wine and beer and them soft drinks" and stick to 
good hard liquor. Also such a speech as only Mark 
Twain could have written : 

"If I had my way about it, I wouldn't be a human 
a-tall ! A human bein' has got too hard a time of it. 
losin' jobs an' owin' debts an' gettin' preached at. I'd 
rather be an insect, or somethin' . . . like one of those 
pesky little yaller varmint butterflies that goes a-flit- 
terin' an' a-flutterin' around the raspberry bushes an' 
the apple-trees . . . with nothin' to think of but get- 
tin' filled up with juices an' joys." 

Also, the hired girl, Nellie, talking just as char- 
acteristically of her parrot and how it "deceased itself" 
trying out the hootch for Nellie and Clem and Al, the 
ex-barkeep who made it. 

My complaint is not against the man who wrote 
all this about a particular corner of life. My com- 
plaint is against the man who wrote it for the theater. 
It is the same complaint I had against Booth Tarking- 
ton until he wrote "Clarence." Marquis, like Tark- 
ington, appears to have approached the theater as if it 
was really the home for morons that it sometimes 
seems. He said : 

"Oh, yes, I've got to have a plot, haven't I? And 
the plots they like on the stage are the kind I used to 
»ee at the old Fourteenth Street Theater. They're 

Photo by Strauss- Peyton 





Photo by Nickolas Muray 



Above, Frances Starr in "Shore Leave"; at the 
left, Jane Cowl in "Malvaloca" 

always doing those over and over again. That . 
the theater of it." 

So the result is that "The Old Soak" is a mix- 
ture of pungent observation and the son who is 
short in his accounts, of true comedy and the 
sanctimonious banker who eggs the boy on to 
gamble with his mother's little fortune, a mixture, 
in fact, of life and the ten-twent'-thirt'. 

Is the success of "The Old Soak" a testimonial 
to Marquis' good judgment as a contemner of the 
theater? Then "Personality," "Paddy, the Next 
Best Thing," and "Oh, Henry" should be running 
yet. Or does its success testify rather to the readi- 
ness of the public to overlook crass and long-fa- 
miliar melodrama if it is accompanied by such 
humor as Marquis' and such acting as Harry 
Beres ford's? 

Between the attitude of respectable literary men 
like Marquis and that of the low-down vaudevil- 
lian, I choose the varietist when the varietist is 
George Kelly author of "The Torch Bearer." 
This skit-writer, who is also a brother of Walter 
C. Kelly, the "Virginia Judge," has something 
very like respect for the theater. At any rate, he 
gives it as much credit as vaudeville for prefer- 
ring wit to heavy-handed plots. He has accord- 
ingly produced two perfectly good acts of comic 
observation, satire and burlesque on the subject of 
the little theater movement, and he has done it 
without providing anything closer to "action" than 
{Continued on page 66) 



Page Thirty-Three 




The Warlike 

Dance of an 

Oriental 



Special Photographs 
by Hori 



With his javelin poised and his shield 
in position the warrior is ready either 
to fling himself into battle or whirl 
himself into the mad dance that ex- 
presses conflict. He typifies strength, 
which is deceptively veiled in grace 




Page Thirty-Four 



Our Lyrical Psycho-Realist 

Conrad Aiken, the Schubert of Poetry who Fiddles in the Laboratories of 

Viennese Psychologists 

B;y Babette Deutsch 



CONRAD AIKEN is one of those disturbing phe- 
nomena among poets, the man who does not 
belong to a school. When, one considers poets of 
such marked individuality as Frost or Amy Lowell or Sara 
Teasdale there is, usually, the possibility of classifying 
them. Frost, one may say, belongs to the realists, Amy 
Lowell is the self-appointed leader of the imagists, Sara 
Teasdale is first among 
the pure lyricists. But 
Aiken is the round peg 
in the square hole : he 
will not fit, he is too 
smooth, too much given 
to turning and slipping; 
there is no keeping him 
where one might hope 
to find him again. This 
is not meant to place 
Aiken on a pinnacle of 
unique worth, above the 
run of common poets. 
For all his sacred soli- 
tude, his music, and his 
scope, he does not rank 
with Robinson, he is not 
greater than Amy Lo- 
well. His peculiarity is 
to be always so closely 
approaching his various 
colleagues in manner and 
method that he cannot be 
classed with any special 
group as one of its 
spokesmen. Yet he frees 
himself from the charge 
of eclecticism in one im- 
portant respect. He is, 
if not the first poet to 
use modern psychology 
for his running-board, 
certainly the poet who 
does so with the greatest 
consistency and agility. 

In one of his best 
books, which is, curious- 
ly enough, a collection 
of critical papers called 
"Skepticisms," he reveals 
this bias toward psychol- 
ogy almost as strongly as in any of his volumes of poetry. 
He admits, frankly enough, that this study of other poets 
represents his "own particular attempt to urge the poetic 
currents of the day in a direction that might be favorable 
to me." And if one reads it with an eye to these urgings 
one may be rewarded by discovering what poetic currents 
form, in the last analysis, his chosen swimming-hole. 
These are, broadly speaking, a certain formalism in 
method, and what he himself calls "psycho-realism" in 
subject matter. 

At the first approach to his poetry these tendencies 
are not so well defined. His earliest book, "Earth Tri- 




umphant," which appeared in 1914, was prefaced by a 
kind of defiant apology for its likeness to Masefield's 
work in his long narrative pieces. Aiken's second book 
began with a jazzed-up version of the "Spoon River 
Anthology" in the form of a series of sketches of vaude- 
ville artists. "The Charnel Rose," published several 
years later, after the appearance of two further volumes, 

was rich in the shrewd 
charm, the disarming 
penetration of T. S. 
Eliot, tho Aiken himself 
would only acknowledge 
his debt to a more dis- 
tant influence, their com- 
mon master : Jules La- 
forgue. 

Yet if Aiken's early 
work is markedly imita- 
tive, looking back on it 
from the vantage point 
of his later accomplish- 
ment, and with "Skepti- 
cisms" in mind, it does 
betray a search, a grop- 
ing trend. Thruout there 
is the dominating curi- 
osity about form, a curi- 
osity that impelled the 
young student to shape 
his style always upon the 
style of some greater or 
lesser master. Thruout 
is the preoccupation with 
narrative, the unwilling- 
ness to affect the con- 
cision and simplicity of 
the lyric. Thruout, the 
narrative is complicated 
by the desire to probe 
into the psyche of his 
characters, to lay bare 
the secret dream, the un- 
fulfilled desire, the hid- 
den fear. 

"Earth Triumphant" 
is chiefly remarkable for 
certain passages which 
Conrad Aiken might well 
have framed as epitome 
of his own work. All of his poetry reiterates this : 

Thru brightest noon a darkness runs. 
Night whelms dozvn the hug est suns. 

The following couplet from the volume is almost a sum- 
mary of Aiken's performance in "The Charnel Rose" 
and "The House of Dust" : 

Under twilight seas he goes. 

He zveaves, fantastic, skull and rose. 

For the rest, the book is often tawdry, sometimes dull, 

but usually^ musical. It has in it youth's passion for 

strange crimes and subtle lusts, for the brutal 

(Continued on page 67) 



Photo by E. Brunei, Boston 

CONRAD AIKEN 
His chosen themes afford him a rare 
scope, an almost unexplored territory 



Page Thirty-Five 







Franz Molnar 



Sketches by 



Franz Molnar, the Hungarian dramatist, has ten 
plays to his credit. Of these, three have appeared 
on Broadway — "Liliom," "The Devil," and "The 
Love Letter." Two others will be seen this sea- 
son — "The Swan," to be produced by Gilbert 
Miller, with English stars in the leading roles, and 
"Men's Fashions," a typically Molnaresque comedy 






Franz Molnar who, aided by his 
translator, Joseph Szebenyei, has 
charmed us with his characteriza- 
tions of the people of Budapest 






Here is Liliom, the 
lovable, rowdyish 
barker for the merry- 
go-round. He flirts 
with the servant-girls 
as they whirl around 
him, and gives them 
a kiss or a slap as he 
helps them dismount 




The Budapest stenog- 
rapher is one of Molnars 
favorite types. She is al- 
tvays a most sophisticated 
Miss, looking wide-eyed 
for a millionaire husband, 
but glancing occasionally 
toward some humble clerk 
who would make a satis- 
factory "second choice" 





This sagacious street porter is the 
"Postilion d'amour" — the carrier 
of nosegays and billet-doux for the 
lovers of his district. No matter 
how difficult your commission, 
you may trust him to execute it 
promptly and discreetly. Given 
the right inducement, he afterward 
forgets the nature of the errand 



^SSbJBpt, 



Page Thirty-Six 



and His Types 



Leo Kober 



Molnar's genius is not Magyar either in spirit or 
sentiment. He was reared in Budapest, that 
colorful city of bohemianism, extravagance and 
misery. No writer portrays her soul and her 
people so well as he. His characters may seem 
over-grotesque and unconventional, but they 
are not exaggerated. Nor does Molnar make 
fun of his people — he loves them too deeply 



7** 




In the wealthy districts and in the aristo- 
cratic cafes and theaters you see numberless 
ill-matched couples. Youth finds attractions in 
age when wealth and power are its attributes 




When the servant-girl promenades 
with her suitor, she is expected, in re- 
turn for the honor of his company, 
to pay all bills incurred. Marin has 
a Sergeant for a sweetheart, and so 
considers herself far above all the 
other girls in the city park. As 
they stroll along, he tells her of the 
brutality of his Lieutenant, and she 
tells him of the sneers of the cook 



■ v- . : "^il 




x 



£^ I? 




Here is the sleek lawyer who hangs 
around the courts ready to represent 
both defendant and plaintiff. He 
defends the burglar, wins his dis- 
missal, then urges him to hurry 
and pull off another job to pay his 
fee. Some day a burglar with a sense 
of humor will obey that command 
by cracking the safe of the lawyer 








Father Hyacinth who ap- 
pears in "The Swan" is 
one of Molnar's greatest 
character studies. Tho of 
the House of Hapsburg, 
he prefers the life of a 
priest to that of a prince 



/ 



>-£g<K|£ 



Page Thirty-Seven 







Sculpture 

and the 

Dance 



Courtesy of Milch Galleries 



Photo by Nickolas Muray 



THE DANCERS 
These figures express action in every line, 
and it seems as if at any moment they might 
start again on their wild whirling dance. 
It is the work of Harriet Fr'shmuth 




PAVLOWA 
All the ex- 
quisite grace 
and charm 
of motion 
that is indis- 
putedly Pav- 
loiva's have 
been caught 
by Alf Lenz 
in his fairy- 
like bronze 




Courtesy of Scott and Fowles 



Photo by De Witt Ward 



ATLANTA 
Paul Manship's smoothly flowing 
lines symbolize, in this bronze, the 
momentary rest of effortless motion 



Courtesy of Metropolitan Museum of Art 
Page Thirty-Eight 



SLiADOWLAND 



America. This is the home of the "Writers 
Guild." If Los Angeles could be said to have 
a Greenwich Village it would be this. It is 
the only gathering place of the literati. But it 
differs from the New York Greenwich Village 
in this : it opens its doors only to men and 
women of established success. 

It is beautiful — originally a private home, 
with wide porches and green lawns and cool, 
deep rooms decorated by Penrhyn Stanlaws. 
At luncheon there you will find nearly all the 
"big leaguers" of the literary colony — except 
three. Strange to say, you seldom find the 
three immortals who seem to stand at the top 
of the heap just now — Montague Glass, Rupert 
Hughes and Theodore Dreiser. 

Montague Glass has a charming home be- 
tween Los Angeles and Pasadena. He is a 
very prolific writer and has made a large for- 
tune out of Potash and Perlmutter. He says 
that he has been writing much longer than most 
people think — about twenty-seven years. He 
began as a lawyer's clerk in New York. Potash 
and Perlmutter were clients of the firm for 
which he worked. They used to come in, quar- 
reling and calling each other names — but they 
always went out arm in arm. Their names were 
not Potash and Perlmutter. Mr. Glass says 
he got those names from signs on the Bowery. 
Years before he thought of putting them into 
stories, he used to write hack articles for the 
cheaper magazines ; usually he got his inspira- 
tion and material from court decisions. When 
a man sued a restaurant for finding a button in 
his soup, Mr. Glass would rush down to the 
magazines with an article about "The Risks 
of Eating in Cafes." The literary folk in 
Hollywood estimate that "Monte" must be 
getting the most money of any living writer. 

Rupert Hughes is said to receive the highest 
rate of any writer whose stories appear in the 
magazines. He is a terrific worker. He and 
Mrs. Hughes have a palatial home, and their 
invitations are most sought for. In addition to 
keeping up the social end, Major Hughes writes 
scenarios for Goldwyn and directs the pictures 





There are a few famous authors who scorn scenario writing, 

but Rupert Hughes always stands up for it — and holds his 

pencil in the approved Spencerian manner 

"Say it with smiles if you cant say it in Chinese," declares 
Gouverneur Morris, giving his arm to Miss Winter Blossom 
who has the leading role in his fantasy, "Whims of the Gods" 



himself. The other night, the Hughes' gave a 
grand soiree which adjourned about four a. m. 
When the tired servants came into the major's 
den the next morning, they found his desk 
littered with a night's writing. After the 
guests had departed, he sat up — with a new 
novel. He is one of those singular individuals, 
like Edison, who can get along with four hours 
sleep. His output is simply terrific. Not only 
does he drive along, with a scenario, a short 
story and a novel, all at once, but he finds time 
to engage in controversies with local news- 
papers. He does not even disdain turning him- 
self into old Pro Bono Publico. Any news- 
paper editor in Los Angeles is likely to find any 
day a burning, witty, scathing communication 
on his desk, fairly squirming to get out of the 
envelope — two or three pages of two-dollar-a- 
word stuff. He usually signs these with some 
euphonious or peculiar name like Smith and 
hands them out for nothing — just to occupy 
his spare time. 

(Continued on page 76) 



Page Forty-One 




Posed by Jane Novak 



Photo by W. F. Secly, L. A. 



AUTUMN 

Wild is the Music of Autumnal Winds 
Amongst the faded woods. 

— Wordsworth 



Page Forty-Two 



Decorative Wall Panels 




All Photos 

by G. W. 

Harting 



Courtesy ot the 

Wanamaker 

Gallery of 

Decorative Art 




BAIGNEUSE 

Gardner Hale 
Mr. Hale now spends most of his 
time in Paris. Before he left New 
York, he made this overmantel for 
his charming Barrow Street house 



A mural for Mr. 
Grant Kingore 
at Carlton 
House. As usual 
Mr. Chanter 
has given his 



WONDERLAND SEA 
Robert Chanler 



THE FISHERMAN 
Gardner Hale 
This plaster decorative panel in the Italian 
manner shows a different phase of Gardner 
Hale's work. It is strong, but has a rhythm 
that keeps it from being overpowering 




imagination full 
rein, and this 
delightful fan- 
tasy of an Alice 
in Wonderland 
sea is the result 



Page Forty-Three 




Masse-Mensch, to be produced by the New York Theatre Guild as it was in Berlin. A woman 
in a dream-prison of twisted scarlet bars. Behind her, gigantic spectral shadows march 
across the luminous void — an effect produced by light playing upon the plaster sky-dome 

Painting Scenery with Light 

Light as a stimulant of the Imagination; light as a motivator of action; light as a part of the play itself 
are only three of the new uses to which light is being put in the theater 

By Kenneth Macgowan 

With Sketches by Robert Edmond Jones 



IN the 'eighties and 'nineties when electricity came in- 
to the theater to take the place of gas, light was 
only illumination. By the first decade of the twen- 
tieth it had become atmosphere. Today it is taking the 
place of setting in many Continental theaters. Tomor- 
row it may be part of the drama itself. 

The most interesting and significant departures in the 
use of light on the Continental stage have to do with 
the plaster dome or the canvas cyclorama which replaces 
the old backdrops in the sixty or more German theaters. 
It began as an imitation of the sky, an attempt to put one 
more piece of Realism into the theater. It has got to the 
point now where its interesting and important uses have 
nothing whatever to do with realistic fake-heavens. It 
is being employed as a formal element in a stage design, 
or else as a surface on which to paint scenery with light. 

Perhaps it was economy, perhaps a flash of genius ; at 
any rate, it occurred to the Germans that there was no 
particular necessity of lighting the dome or cyclorama. In 
these huge stages it stands at least sixty or seventy feet 
back of the footlights. It is possible, therefore, to make 
it a dim emptiness by merely turning off the lights that 



ordinardy shine upon it, or to give it some vague neutral 
quality from the light of the stage which is reflected on 
its surface. In Othello at the State Schauspielhaus in 
Berlin, Jessner uses his cyclorama, an ordinary canvas 
one, as a formal background bounding the space in which 
his strictly conventionalized indications of settings are 
placed. Thus it is in some scenes a pale neutral wall, in 
some a curious violent emptiness, in others a faintly 
salmon background, in still another a yellow light against 
which figures move in tiny silhouettes. At the Volks- 
biihne in Masse-Mensch the dome becomes a misty void 
in one of the dream scenes ; and then upon this void 
move vast, mysterious shadows of dead men in an end- 
less circling procession. 

Shadows on the dome carry us to a final development 
of lighting in Germany — the projection of scenery, the 
substitution of light for paint as a means of expression. 
Many minds have worked and are working on devices to 
be used for this purpose, but the most important mechan- 
isms find their home in Dresden at the State Schauspiel- 
haus and the State Opera. 

The artistic director of the Schauspielhaus, Adolph 



Page Forty-Four 



SuiADOWLAND 



Linnebach has a 
dome to work 
with, and upon 
this dome or thru 
varnished silk 
from the back, 
lie throws, by 
means of a very- 
simple lantern 
containing an arc 
light but no lens, 
designs painted 
on glass. This 
lantern and the 
transparent 
method of pro- 
jection were used 
in America with 
much success by 
Lee Simonson 
when the New 
York Theatre 
Guild mounted 
Shaw's Back to 
Methusalah last 
spring. Linnebach 
has made the 
mountains of 
Willi elm Tell 
with projection, 
and the settings 
of Gr abbe 's 
Kaiser Hcinrich 
VI, and of the 

expressionistic dramas Das Bist Du, Gas and Jcnseits. 
The simplest method of projection used by Max Hasait 
at the Dresden Opera brings you up sharp against the 
true origins of the thing, and they are almost as old as 
drama. The puppeteers of old Java had shadow-marion- 
ettes centuries before the technical director of the Dres- 
den State Opera made shadow-settings. For Weber's 




Valhalla, the home of the gods, in a production of "Das Rheingold" by Linnebach. 
in Munich. The castle becomes slowly visible in the sky, built of beams of light 



Oberon and for Mozart's Zauberflote, Hasait provides a 
plastic arrangement of inner proscenium and steps, with 
a translucent curtain at the back. From one side of the 
curtain he projects a design in shadows by means of a 
frame hardly two feet wide, across which are fastened 
various thicknesses of gauze. The light that comes thni 
the clearer portions of the gauze is one color, while with 

a light on the 
other side of the 
translucent cur- 
tain, he stains the 
shadows a second 
color. The hue 
of both these 
lights can be 
changed quickly 
or slowly as de- 
sired, producing 
harmonies and 
contrasts of color. 
The other de- 
vices used by 
Hasait for pro- 
jection are em- 
bodied in a 
scheme of stage 
{Continued on 
page 69) 



Richard III, as pro- 
duced by Germany's 
most radical director, 
Jessner of the State 
Theater in Berlin. 
Across blood-red 
steps moves the 
army of Richmond in 
white, or of Richard 
in crimson, to sym- 
bolize the battle 




Page Forty-Five 




pecial Study by Maurice Goldberg 



HELEN MENKEN 

A spiritual photograph of that talented young actress who drifted into 
"Drifting" and remained with such grace last year. This year she is 
Diane Bulmir in a new play, by Austin Strong, ^The Seventh Heaven" 



Page Forty-Six 



Three 

Continental 

Graces 

Photographs by L'Ora, Vienna 




They say thai 
even Paris 
ventured to 
wonder how 
Mme. Diamant 
got into this 
gown. As for 
the rest — well 
— we under- 
stand why Pa- 
risian revues 
are popular 




From Anita Berber's carefree 
expression who would suspect 
that her gown is merely pinned. 
Every night M. Czeltel, the Hun- 
garian artist, pins a new crea- 
tion on this graceful dancer. 
We hope he uses safety-pins 




The coat collar, 
which Zerline Bal- 
ten, so charmingly, 
brings to one's at- 
tention, is very 
nice — but — it fails 
to distract one 
from her exquisite- 
ly small feet that 
dance so lightly in 
foreign revues. Zer- 
line also sings 



Page Forty-Seven 



^m 




Scene : Between the Gates of Hell and the Throne of 

Lucifer. 
Freud ignores Hell and laughs at Purgatory. 
Where, naturally, begins Bacchantian story. 



Villains: 



Enter Con- 
scious Wit, 
Comic Sup- 
plement and 
Caricature. 



Enter 

Lucifer and 
Affinities. 

Liberty, un- 
der another 
name: Miss 
America. 



Comedy and 
Tragedy. 



Enter 
Chorus of 
Desires: 



Inhibitions: 



Prohibitions: 



Wit comes — with Comic Supplement tonight 
And Caricature down spiral steps of light. 
They cling to Wit but he sees Censorship 
And gives his two affinities the slip. 
Together on the spiral steps they pause 
Awaiting Lucifer: amid applause 
He comes with that old maid, Nai Eve, whose 

face 
Shines near him now, beside unnatural Grace. 

Lucifer summons Liberty who comes 
Under another name : she twirls her thumbs 
As Miss America, behold her now 
With iron spikes around her noble brow. 
Bearing her crimson train, comes Comedy 
And in her wake, with mask, is Tragedy. 
Approaching Lucifer, they set their jaws, 
While from the Gates of Hell break more 
outlaws. 



Invitation 
To Sit. 



Banquet Is 
Suggested: 



Suppressed Desires, ambidextrous Passion 
Whose hands are working in industrious 

fashion ; 
Then the drawn figure of Paternity 
Beside his mate, the stout Maternity, 
With them their young Libidos, one female 
The other male — 

united in this ^____^^^ 

tale. 



Then comes six 
inhibitions, once 
confined, 

But broken from 
restraint to face 
mankind : 

Ambition and 
Obscenity, In- 
version, 

Self - Indulgence, 
Ignorance, Per- 
version. 

Behind them, in 
reserve, come 
Prohibitions, 

Fat Drunkenness 
and evil Ex- 
hibitions, 

Esthetic Free- 
dom, Dreams 
of Wetter 
Days, 

Free Speech and 
then Emotion- 
al Displays. 



The crimson brothers, Jealousy and Crime, 
Drag in black Torture and World War 

sublime 
With Famine and with Gluttony to dance 
In Purgatory where they all advance. 

Lucifer bids his followers to sit 

Upon his throne while he approaches Wit. 

Wit now suggests that Lucifer should set 
A feast of reason — or a Freud Banquet. 
Freud enters with a magnifying glass; 
Krafft Ebing with a telescope of brass ; 
Havelock Ellis with a stone matrix 
Wherein the male and female thoughts will 

mix ; 
Then Bernard Shaw with snake around his 

chest 
And Dartvin with a monkey on his breast ; 
Then Oscar Wilde with lily and sunflower 
Followed by Comstock in a thoughtless hour. 

Comstock bids Freud be seated, but no table 
Appears, and the immortals are unable : 
But Oscar Wilde suggests a flow of soul 
And conversation without sex-control. 

Ellis advances, holding Freud in hand : 
It seems that they must improvise a stand : 
But how give birth unto a thought so vast? 

Margaret Sanger 
must be called 
—at last ! 




Miraculous 
Entrance of 
Black Boy 
and White 
Girl: 



'The Throne of Lucifer" 



The lady writer 
enters with a 
small 

Washstand and 
water pitcher, 
very tall : 

Stepping from 
water pitcher 
into sight 

Two natural chil- 
dren rise, one 
black, one 
white. 

Now stepping 
from the 
Washstand, 
Boy and Girl 

In innocence bow 
to the forms 
that swirl 

Around them as 
they leap into 
the midst 

Of their Com- 
plexes which 
begin to twist. 



< 



Page Forty-Eight 



SUAOOWLAND 



Boy and Girl 
Are Psycho- 
analyzed. 



Child's Pure 
Pantomime. 



About t li e m 
circle all sup- 
pressed De- 
sires, 

Inhibitions, Pro- 
hibitions, Liars. 

And Scandal 
Mongers who 
are innocent 

As Boy and Girl 
of any wrong 
intent. 

Down from the 

Gates of Hell 

together flit 
Policemen with 

two little chairs 

that fit 
The Boy and 

Girl. They do 

not understand 
Why Freud ad- 
vances with his 

glass in hand. 

Now magnifying 

glass is fixed 

upon 
Black Boy who 

tells Freud 

everything he's 

done : 
And then upon 

White G i r I 

who answers 

him 
Flushing demure- 
ly — she is somewhat 




'Out of the Magic Cup, with scythe and fork 
Comes dancing Death . . . . " 



prim. 



dolls and have no 



Act III 

{After t w o 
years.) 

The man returns 
with money 
sacks and gold 

Bulging his 
pockets ; 

Then his tale is 
told; 

How he has 
worked and 
prospered over 
there ; 

How busy he has 
been! He 
smoothes her 
hair 

And calls her his 
good wife. 

She proves her 
worth. 

Look ! In their 
beds. Twelve 
children ! 

She gave birth 

During his ab- 
sence — busily 
indeed 

She brought them 
forth ; 

There are twelve 
mouths to feed. 

He looks his chil- 
dren over and 
rejoices. 

They are but 
noisy voices. 



Krafft Ebing looking thru his telescope 
Behold boy's dream and girl's immortal hope : 
"To write a play!" That dream so long 

suppressed 
Tonight in pantomime shall be expressed. 
"To go upon the stage!" That hope, to act, 
Tonight in pantomime becomes a fact. 

WORK AND PLAY 
Plot 
Act I 

A fisherman and his devoted wife 

Complain of hard times ; 

Then to save her life 

He sails his boat across the ocean wild 

Searching for wealth ; 

(Not thinking of a child 

He says good-bye). 

Act II 

The fishwife ever busy at her knitting 
For two years sits, as we behold her sitting. 
(Into her mind, besides the thought of wealth 
Something is stealing up in childish stealth : 
Within her mind a seed begins to grow 
While she sits knitting, rocking to and fro.) 



Moral: 



Pass the 
Censor. 



Boy and Girl 
Receive 
Books of 
Propaganda 
from the Im- 
mortal O. W. 



CURTAIN 

The moral is, be ever active here : 
Have half a dozen children every year. 

APPLAUSE 

This Censorship applauds; then Comedy 
Approaches with a mouth turned up in glee : 
She will instruct wise children how to live. 
And lessons in sex-hygiene freely give : 
But Tragedy resents such forwardness : 
She will instruct her children to express 
Themselves when Freud asks them "Have 

you read me?" 
Or when Krafft Ebing asks: "What do you 

see?" 

Now Oscar Wilde, to pay them for their 

play ; 
From burning fire comes dragging Dorian 

Gray 
Stepping along in attitudes of ease 
Followed by Salome and Charmides. 

Then Shakespeare and Adonis laughing, come 
Together dancing, gracefully handsome : 
{Continued on page 71) 




Page Forty-Nine 



Grand Opera Over Here and Back There 

Can America Ever Come to the Operatic Taste and Appreciation 
of Europe is a Question Often Asked and Rarely Answered 

Efy Edward Hungerford 



IN the heart of the modern Paris stands the Grand 
Opera. It gives its name and the vista of its pres- 
ence to one of the most distinguished of the great 
boulevards which Hausmann cut thru that old city. For, 
no matter how you may scoff and smile at some features 
of the Opera House — its vast, useless retiring-rooms and 
its flamboyant main stair, there is a certain majesty and 
dignity to the exterior of the Gamier masterpiece that is 
not to be gainsaid. Just as the impractical auditorium 
of the theater — entirely too small for so vast a structure 
— also has a distinguished beauty of its own. 

Yet were the Opera to be housed in the shabbiest build- 
ing in all Paris — if one could bring to mind a really 
shabby great building in the French capital — it still would 
be the Opera. Nothing less. When, during the passing 
of the historic sixties, Faust was first produced with 
much eclat, Paris thought nothing at all of going down 
to a shabby old house which still stands in the Square 
of the Arts and Metiers to attend the debut of that most 
famous opera. She thinks nothing today of wandering 
down the grand boulevards and turning up a narrow 
side street to the Opera Comique which for nearly eighty 
years has insisted upon turning its back upon the boule- 
vards and in facing a very small and obscure open square. 
Vistas mean nothing to the Comique. It is to itself, Art. 
And also to a great majority of seasoned Parisians who 
insist upon turning their backs upon the huge and some- 
what dingy Grand Opera and in going repeatedly to its 
intimate and always immaculate white and gold audi- 
torium. 

Nine times a week its curtain rises upon the opening 
scenes of scheduled performances and nine times a week 
the lofty auditorium is filled — to its final seat. The so- 
called "big" Opera House usually has but four auditions 
in the course of seven days and it is not quite so sure to 
be crowded. Save for Faust and the Valkyrie. These 
operas, despite their years, are perennial in their popular- 
ity. The big house, true to its traditions and its govern- 
ment subvention, may and always does go each year into 
operatic experiments. These are expensive. And usually 
unprofitable. At the best, the comparatively small seating 
capacity of the Grand Opera is a very large practical 
handicap. But Gounod and Wagner may be trotted out 
to make good the deficiencies of composers who have 
never won the fickle Paris heart. Faust and the Valkyrie 
are as sure money-makers in the big house as Carmen 
and the Tales of Hoffman and Louise in the smaller one 

Paris Audiences 

In Paris there are six of the so-called "subvention 
houses," national theaters receiving a goodly part of their 
financial support from government sources, in return for 
which they are pledged to do two definite things — to 
maintain the best traditions of the French language and 
music and to retain their prices at levels so low that the 
humblest patron of the arts may be able from time to 
time to attend their performances. Two of these houses 
are solely dramatic, 'the Comedie Franchise and the 
Odeon ; two of them are of a decidedly light character, 
presenting chiefly opera bouffe ; the other two are of the 
Grand Opera and the Opera Comique. At all of them 



resident companies are maintained the year round. To 
be a member, even for a season or two, of any one of 
the four great houses is a distinction to be coveted by 
any actor or singer. These are more than theaters. 
They are training schools. The performances that they 
give never lack distinction. True it is that, in the hard 
poverty-stricken years that have followed the World 
War, some of their settings have grown a bit shabby, but 
there is no shabbiness upon the art that walks the stage in 
front of them. 

La Scala and Others 

Yet the Parisian who demands real art in his theater 
is by no means limited to the "subvention houses" for it. 
That, in the case of the merely spoken drama, hardly 
needs to be stated; yet this last spring when both the 
Grand Opera — its official name is the National Academy 
of Music — and the Opera Comique were doing a busi- 
ness equal only to the capacity of their auditoriums, a 
large theater in the Avenue Montaigne — the Champs- 
Elysees — without one franc of government aid, was con- 
ducting an immensely successful season, financially as 
well as from every artistic aspect. Paris is opera mad. 
For decades the opera has spelled more than merely en- 
tertainment to her; it is her bread and her butter; if you 
please, the lifeblood of her veins. 

London is nearly twice the size of Paris. And yet she 
has failed at all times to maintain successfully even one 
opera house. Her ancient Royal Opera in Covent Garden, 
altho a fearfully unprepossessing house without, within 
is a very comfortable one. Its history is the history of a 
succession of tragedies. Three years ago I witnessed a 
magnificent attempt to turn the traditional ill-luck of the 
old house. Sir Thomas Beecham was presenting grand 
opera as magnificently as it was being offered anywhere 
in the world at that time, even in our own Metropolitan, 
in New York- — but to half-filled houses. The enterprise 
was fore-doomed. . . . This spring I went once again 
to Covent Garden. Another attempt was being made to 
revive its ancient glories. Grand opera was again being 
sung — laboriously this time ; in English and without casts 
of any great distinction. Yet not without at least a de- 
gree of success. The experiment may pull thru. The 
British hate to give up a fight. It is one of the definite 
traits of the British nature. 

You cannot remake British temperament, however ; it 
refuses to be refashioned to the Latin or the Gallic 
models. In New York grand opera is a magnificent suc- 
cess today largely because New York has ceased to be an 
American city. Embarrassing as it may be to state the 
fact, the truth remains that it is the Italian population of 
that city that has made grand opera a popular success 
there. Of the entire world, the Italian is the great opera 
fan. You will find plenty of other good opera houses in 
Europe ; in Geneva there is a lovely small replica of the 
Paris Opera, Berlin has a glorious Stadt Theater : Vienna 
an even finer one ; in Antwerp in May last I saw the droll 
and venerable Daughter of Madame Angot in a house 
that was perfectly delightful in its combination of the 
very antique and the modern. There is a wonderful 
{Continued on page 75) 



Page Fifty 




Photo by Edith Barakavich, Vienna 



MARIA MINDSZENTY 

Vienna's reputation as a city of beautiful women is 
more than sustained by Maria Mindszenty of the 
Vienna Opera House Ballet. She has appeared re- 
cently in Coppelia, Princess of Tragant and Carnaval 



Page Fifty-One 




THE HALLWAY 

By Dr. Arthur Nilsen 

First Prize 

This photograph shows an originality both interesting and daring. Dr. Nilsen shot down for his 

picture, thereby achieving an angle not usually seen. It reminds one of the pictures by Degas 

The Camera Contest 



THE prize photographs in this issue were picked 
from nearly two hundred entries coming from all 
parts of the world and, according to present indi- 
cations, there will be a great many more entries next 
month. There is a high standard of excellence evident 
in practically all the photographs submitted and a steady 
growth of regular contributors ; but the ambitious new- 
comer has exactly the same chance for the prize because 
before all it is the photograph that counts. 

There is some excellent advice to hand-camera users 
on how to make the photograph count ; these paragraphs 
were printed originally in The Photo-Miniature and are 
well worth repeating. 

Learn What to Leave Out 

The first step in the way of making pictures instead 
of mere snapshots out-of-doors is to think what you 
can leave out of the scene before you make your expo- 
sure. The average snapshot includes far too much of 
the subject in front of the lens. Prove this to yourself 
by going over a few of your out-of-door negatives, and 



see whether there is not a little bit in every negative 
which would make a more interesting picture or one 
more "worth while" if all the rest of the film were 
trimmed away. You can emphasize this lesson by en- 
larging a dozen of your outdoor negatives to one 
uniform size. Looking carefully over the enlargements, 
you will see plainly that they all need trimming or cut- 
ting away, so as to give prominence to the chief interest 
in the scene. 

Avoid Wide-Range Views 
The average landscape, as seen by the eye, is chiefly 
interesting or beautiful by reason of its large masses of 
color contrast, its bigness or sense of space, and the 
variety it presents in form and light and shade. To por- 
tray such a scene within the narrow limits of the average 
hand-camera, losing all the sense of space and color con- 
trasts by inharmonious contrasts of light and shadow, 
will usually result in a map-like record lacking charm and 
interest. It cannot be otherwise in the great majority of 
instances. Natural scenes embracing a wide expanse 



Page Fifty-Two 



SuiAOQVLAND 




VERANDA 
By Charles C. Stover 
Second Prize 
This photograph has distinction on account of its pure design; 
all unnecessary things have been eliminated. ' It is a composi- 
tion of horizontals, verticals and angles with the foreground 
broken by the correct lines 

rarely lend themselves to small reproductions possess- 
ing pictorial interest. Leave them to the panoramist 
and learn to see the pictures in the little of nature on 
every hand. You can learn this from a careful sur- 
vey of the pictures shown at any exhibition. 

Landscape With Stream 
To photograph an open landscape with a running 
stream in the foreground, so that the surface of the 
stream will really look limpid and flowing, is not an 
easy task. Under normal conditions the exposure 
should not exceed one-tenth second. Sometimes such an 
exposure is possible even with a panchromatic plate 
and K-l screen. For a landscape with a fairly heavy 
foreground or yellowish green foliage, the only way 
to get a pleasing color value in the landscape and 
clouds in the sky, is to use a tripod, wait patiently 
until there is no movement in the foliage, and give an 
exposure of two seconds with a panchromatic plate or 
film and a K-3 screen. 

Photographing Ravines or Glens 

Dont attempt an instantaneous photograph or snap- 
shot of a ravine or glen, even when the sun is shining. 
The result is bound to be a failure. Use a tripod and 
give it a time exposure with a small lens aperture, to 
get depth and relief, the characteristic features of such 
a subject. Try to get the light falling more on one 
side of the subject than on the other, not directly thru 



the center. With a fairly clear, bright day 
and the lens working at f22 try an exposure 
of thirty seconds. Such subjects should always 
be photographed in the early forenoon or late 
afternoon when the light falls from a low 
angle. Where the light comes almost entirely 
from above, a longer exposure, say thirty-five 
seconds, may be required. 

Lake Views 
A lake generally means a fairly large ex- 
panse of calm surface water. We may or 
may not have it surrounded by hills. But 
while sky light may be cut off by the hills, yet 
we have the reflecting effect of the water sur- 
face. Pictures wherein lakes, large ponds, 
wide-open rivers, and other large masses of 
water occupy any considerable portion of the 
foreground division of the picture, are among 
the cases which call for very great care and 
circumspection as regards point of view. 
Meanwhile the hand-camera man may be wise 
in accepting a word or two of general advice. 

1. Do not let the lake or open water extend 
from one side of your picture to the other. 

2. Do not have much picture space occupied 
by calm water. 3. Avoid bright patches of 
water close to dark rocks, tree trunks, etc. ; 
such strongly marked contrasts of light and 
shade are not likely to be very pictorial. _ If 



INTERIOR, CHAPEL OF ST. SAVIOUR l 

By Miss Antoinette B. Hervey 

Third Prize 

This is an example of beautiful treatment of an, 

architectural • subject. It has depth, height, and a 

great sense of dignity 




Page Fifty-Three 



SUAPUWUAND 



THE GHOST DANCE 
By 

Frank M. Hohenberger 

Honorable Mention 
It was the vision and 
the artistic insight in 
the photographer's 
mind that really pro- 
duced this picture of 
such a delicate pic- 
torial content 



SUNSOAKED 
By Lionel Tompkins 

Honorable Mention 
Looking at this pic- 
ture is like looking at 
a painting with half- 
closed eyes; the divi- 
sion lines, and line is 
merely the separation 
of masses, are very 
distinct. With half- 
closed eyes you see 
things in mass; with 
iopen eyes in detail. 
Notice how beautifully 
the grill-work frames 
the subject matter 





the edge of the lake is fringed with heavy 
foliage, remember the rule to expose for the 
shadows and let the high lights come out as 
they will. 

Beach Views 

A straight-edged sea, whether the straight 
edge be the horizon or the inshore surf, is 
rarely pictorial. The curved line of a bay, or 
the view along the beach giving the oftentimes 
wonderfully beautiful curving lines of foam- 
flecked water, are more interesting. If pos- 
sible, include a glimpse of distant sand-dunes 
or cliffs or out-jutting neck of land. If the 
composition needs a dark spot in the fore- 
ground to balance it, place a bit of washed-up 
timber or a pile of seaweed at the right spot 
and so secure the dark mass required. The 
sky plays an important part in such pictures. 

This month's prize-winning photographs 
were selected by Mr. E. V. Brewster, Clarence 
H. White, president of the Clarence H. White 
School of Photography, and founder, as well 
as one of the leading spirits of the Art Center. 
The third judge was Margaret Watkins, gen- 
erally acknowledged to be one of the keenest 
judges of photographic values in the country. 

First prise. — "The Hallway." Dr. Arthur 
Nilsen, 55 West 10th St., New York City. 

Second prise. — "Veranda." Mr. Charles C. 
Stover, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Third prise. — "Interior, Chapel of St. 
Saviour." Miss Antoinette B. Hervey, 351 
West 114th St., New York City. 

Honorable Mention. — "The Ghost Dance." 
Mr. Frank M. Hohenberger, Nashville, Indiana. 

Honorable Mention. — "Sunsoaked." Lionel 
Tompkins, 301 So. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 
(Continued on page 78) 



Page Fifty-Four 



Dual 
Personalities 



INMAN KNOX 
(Right) 

Not content with acquiring fame as a sculptor 
of children, Mr. Knox, who is a nephew of the 
Bishop of Manchester and grandson of Sir George 
Knox, has started a foundry of his own, where he 
casts all his bronze. Mr. Knox is only twenty-one 











Photo © by Dorien Leigh. Ltd. 



WILLIAM McFEE 

(Below) 

Chief Engineer and an advocate of the oil-burning ships, 
whose pertinent advice to struggling authors is "if you 
cant get published — go to sea." Mr. McFee followed 
his own advice. After sailing the Seven Seas, he spent 
a year on shore trying to be an author and nothing but 
an author. One year cured him — that — and the regularity 
with which his manuscripts returned. He went back to sea, 
consequently the library of the lover of sea stories has 
been enriched by "Casuals of the Sea," "Captain Mace- 
doine's Daughter" and several other volumes. Mr. McFee's 
novel, "Command," is to be published by Doubleday-Page 



ROSS SANTEE 

"Horse-wrangler" from Arizona whose first 
artistic ambition was to be a cartoonist. That 
was several years ago. Now, his sketches of 
horses in action are in great demand. Three 
of his etchings were hung in this year's National 
Academy. In spite of this, Mr. Santee spends 
seven months of every year "wrangling" horses 
on the Bar-F-Bar ranch near Globe, Arizona, 
which may explain his knowledge of horses 



Photo © by 
Paul Thompson 




Page Fifty-Five 




The Business of 

Depicting the Career of Barbara 



From the Sketch-book of 
K. D. Gridley 



From the country village comes 
Barbara to the city village. 
Observing that the long-haired 
artist is never of her sex, she 
straightway enters a barber- 
shop, and after hours of torture 
by shears, steam and electricity 
she emerges, with bristling 
locks and shrinking purse, to 
conquer the landlords-and-ladies 
in and around Greenwich Street 




Bab (she has bobbed her name 
too) is learning that a tarn and a 
smock and a sketch-book do not 
make an artist. After a three 
months' struggle she hasn't acquired 
a foothold even on Round One of 
the Ladder of Fame which, she has 
decided, has more steps to climb 
than have the four flights of stairs 
leading to her little skylight studio 




Bab opens her door to find 
uninvited guests devouring 
her supper. Hunger and 
anger beget courage; she 
follows the example of the 
farmer's wife in the nursery 
rhyme and grasps the carv- 
ing-knife. But these are not 
three blind mice, so they 
whisk away without leaving 
their tails behind them 



Pane Fifty-Six 



Being an Artist 

and Pointing an Obvious Moral! 




The upward curve has 
departed from Bab's lips 
and hair. She has lost 
faith in barbers, art edi- 
tors, Greenwich Village, 
and her own talent. "I 
dont want a career," she 
glooms, "I want a romance" 




Bab turned a corner one day and bumped 
into Romance in the shape of a young 
salesman. And soon she exchanged the 
artist's smock and sketch-book for the house- 
frock and cook-book. But with three squares 
a day consumed and four stairs eliminated 
she is forced to make the scales behave 
by vigorous gymnastics, done to music 




I 1 M 




Two years later we see 
Bab exercising to the 
music of Romance, Jr. 
Nor has she renounced 
her career as a painter. 
At this moment she has 
on exhibition in the 
Home Galleries: Two 
chairs and a table — 
studies in white enamel; 
one kitchen floor — done 
in brown oils; a pair of 
black-and-gold candle- 
sticks; two moss-green 
window boxes; a futur- 
istic smoking-stand to 
ivhich the judge, Romance, 
Sr., awarded first prize 



T^ v * '"- 



Page Fifty-Seven 





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Musicians and 
Their Mediums 



Photo by Lumiere 



Cornelius Van Vliet is a Hollander by birth, 
but an American by education and adoption. 
He was the only soloist to appear twice with 
the Philharmonic Stadium Concerts. This sea- 
son he will be first solo cellist with the Phil- 
harmonic, under Willem Mengelberg; he will 
also give a series of Musicales lntimes at 
Aeolian Hall in conjunction with Cecil 
Arden of the Metropolitan Opera Company 








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• 



Photo by Walter Barnett & Company 



Carlos Salzedo, one of the most eminent harp 
virtuosi who have ever visited this country. Of 
world fame, he has founded in New York the 
Salzedo Harp Ensemble, which tours the country 
from coast to coast, A composer of the modern 
school, he is also solving the seed of what he 
calls "the new harpism" 



One does not expect the Land of Cakes and Bag- 
pipes to produce an eminent pianist, but Frederick 
Lamond, born north of the Tweed, is counted one 
of the two greatest living exponents of the music of 
Beethoven on the piano, the other being Busoni. 
He tours America for the first time this season 



Photo by 
Arnold Genthe 



Page Fifty-Eight 



Wanderings 

The Man About Town 



THIS is going to be a veritable Russian season, and 
even some of the profoundest admirers of Slavic 
music, literature and art are disposed to think that 
the mania for things Russian is being somewhat over- 
done. Thankful as we all are to Morris Gest for the 
Chauve-Souris, there is room for doubt as to the wisdom 
of importing the entire company of the famous Kam- 
erny, or Art Theater of Moscow. 

^ ^ ^ 

"When one recalls the disappointment which befell the 
Theatre du J'icux Colombier, which is to Paris what the 
Moscow Art Theatre is to the old capital of Russia, it is 
impossible to avoid a feeling of dubiety as to the experi- 
ment of bringing over a still more exotic form of dra- 
matic art. Jacques Copeau, one of the most gifted man- 
agers and subtle actors France has produced, with 
a really fine company, including that truly great actor 
Charles Dullin, only managed to struggle along in New 
York with the financial aid of the French Commission. 
That is why the Guitrys are hesitating at coming over, 
and they, as well as Duse and Bernhardt, who both con- 
template revisiting us, require all sorts of guarantees, 
some of which are not likely to be forthcoming. 

We are also promised a visit by Max Reinhardt, the 
famous master of mass 
effects, who is to stage 
here, among other 
things, "A Midsummer 
Xight's Dream," and 
Offenbach's "Orfee aux 
Enfers." No producer 
has greater prestige 
than Reinhardt, whose 
name ranks with Stanis- 
lawsky and Gordon 
Craig for originality of 
stage effects, while his 
groupings and produc- 
tions generally are on a 
much more grandiose 
scale, witness "Sumur- 
un" and "The Miracle." 
Reinhardt also wants 
guarantees, and big 
ones, and nothing is set- 
tled as yet. I believe, 
however, that a S250,- 
000 guarantee is already 
forthcoming for a Ger- 
man Art Theatre in 
New York, which will 
visit other cities in this 
country. 



But to return to Rus- 
sia. The Soviet author- 
ities are so interested in 
the visit to this country 
of the Moscow Art 
Theatre that they have 
chartered an ark to con- 




vey the company with all their scenery and effects from 
Petrograd to New York, and are spending literally bil- 
lions of roubles on the enterprise. One almost scents 
propaganda, but Morris Gest definitively declares that 
any such thing is barred, and one believes him. I 
had a chat with Yisaroff, the advance representative of 
the Kamerny, when he was in New York a few weeks 
ago, and altho he spoke with the reserve and caution 
which might be expected from one who had to return to 
Russia, he gave one the idea that the views of himself 
and his colleagues on Russian politics are akin with those 
of Chaliapin and Balief, and what the two eminent Rus- 
sians think about Sovietism can scarcely be expressed in 
polite language. 



Yisaroff informed me that his famous company of 
forty-five performers, under Stanislawsky, greatest of 
actor-managers, would give a number of classic and 
modern plays, and as these include such standard works 
as Racine's "Phedre," some of Shakespeare's plays, 
Wilde's "Salome," plays by Beaumarchais, Calderon, Ib- 
sen, Goldoni, Synge and others equally well known to 
devout playgoers, they may manage to command large 
audiences despite the fact that the performances are in 
Russian. The plays will be staged in the modern and 

sometimes futurist style. 
Pantomimes will also 
occasionally be given, 
with ballet and or- 
chestra, the latter being 
recruited locally. The 
leading woman is Alice 
Koonen and the leading 
man Nicolai Tzeretelli, 
and the widow of Tche- 
koff, the famous author, 
is one of the performers. 



ALEXANDER GLAZOUNOFF 
Pupil of the great Rimsky-Korsakoff and his successor as head of 
the Petrograd Conservatoire, Glazounoff is one of Russia's most 
eminent composers and conductors. He is to visit America for 
the first time this season, and will conduct symphony concerts 

in several of the larger cities 



Personally I wish they 
would do Andreveff's 
"The Life of Man," of 
which I saw a perform- 
ance at the Kamerny in 
1914. It is one of' the 
most impressive and at 
times thrilling things of 
its kind I have wit- 
nessed, and it moved 
me powerfully, altho my 
knowledge of Russian is 
of the slightest. But the 
diction of the actors 
was so perfect and their 
facial expression and 
gestures of such signifi- 
cance that one had no 
difficulty in following 
every incident and de- 
velopment in this poign- 
ant allegory. 
(Continued on page 73) 



Page Fifty -Nine 




Photograph by Arthur F. Kales 



Mary Pickford gives us a new definition 
for the word "wall-flower" in her latest 
picture, "Tess of the Storm Country" 



Page Sixty 




Random Impressions 



By 

R R Herbert 



THE Automat — the cheerful click of nickels on the 
marble slab as the cashier makes change ... a 
continual clattering of dishes and shuffling of feet 
... A young couple, arm in arm, before the fascinating 
glass-covered shelves. They are obviously newly married 
— you need not look at her gleaming new ring to see that. 
He is explaining how it all works and she squeezes his 
arm as she takes it all in with shining eyes. What fun 
it is to be married and have half a dollar's worth of 
nickels for your lunch ! Laughing and whispering they 
make their choice, and her naive delight as the little doors 
fly open is quite charming. Like two small children they 
hurry away to an empty table, and after a minute you 
may see him trying to cut a large sandwich with one 
hand . . . the foolish young things are actually holding 
hands under the table ... So young. So happy. In 
the Automat. Such is the glamor of Youth and Love. 
* * * * 

Grand Central Terminal — dawn. Dim shadows on the 
cool marble. Muffled sounds, echoed from the vast vaulted 
roof, seem almost an indecency in the great silence . . . 
Is that a pulpit or an information bureau? Are those 
acolytes or porters? Are these worshipers or 
passengers? Is this a cathedral or a railway 
station ? 

* * * * 

Times Square at Midnight — garish with 
crude lights. Just ahead of me, crossing 
Broadway, a girl in crisp, blue ging- 
ham — short sleeves, short skirt. 
Prettily rounded arms and neck 
— deliciously slim legs — her 
trim figure the very epito- 
me of girlhood. How 
cool and fresh and 
wholesome she looks on 
this sweltering night. 
How different. Increas- 
ing my pace I overtake 
her to see what manner 
of face this little girl 
has. Chalk white with 
painted lips that look 
like an ugly wound. 
Thin. Hungry. Fright- 
ened. Shameless. My 
God — whose fault is it? 
The electric signs give no 
answer to my question. 




Commuting . . . Two minutes to make the train, two 
hundred yards to go, the bridge to cross (those terrible 
stairs) and the train in sight . . . My very recent break- 
fast silently pleading with me to walk, my conscience 
prompting me to run — my friend urging me, for the love 
of Mike, to run ... I run . . . Questions race thru 
my mind . . . Will there be time to buy a paper? Will 
I get a seat? Why did I drink so much coffee? Why is 
my respiration so very labored? Am I growing old and 
infirm . . . With a screech of grinding brakes the train 
pulls up as I stagger onto the bridge . . . There is no 
time to buy a paper . . . I do not get a seat ... I 
undoubtedly drank too much coffee ... I wheeze like a 
vacuum cleaner ... I must be growing old and infirm 
. . . But I caught the train . . . Commuting . 



The Movies — rococo lobbies with red plush hand-rails 
— carpets with deep pile — a slight odor of disinfectant. 
— Soft lights from translucent globes now blue, now red, 
as the music dies and swells — crowds behind canvas 
tapes — a sharp elbow in the small of your back — a pro- 
tective male with an arm aggressively around the shoulders 

of a bobbed-haired child 
in a satin cape . . . 
Intermission and the 
pushing rush for the 
choice center seats . . . 
The spotlight and a bow- 
ing orchestra leader — the 
swelling sound of the 
poor man's symphony — - 
a scattering applause. 
. . . Subdued rustlings 



general 



sigh 



of 



and a 

settling content. 
The slow, graceful drap- 
ing back of a silken cur- 
tain — license number 
0013 — black and white 
movement. . . . Whis- 
pers . . . coughs. . . . 
In back a stout lady 
who has forgotten her 
glasses listens audibly to 
captions read in a bored 
voice by a middle-aged 
husband who had rather 
be home with a pipe. 
A close embrace . . . 
Fade-out. 



Page Sixty-One 




Three 
Arguments 
In Favor of 
the Younger 
Generation 



The Mantle of Paternal Success* 

Descends Lightly to Their 

Slim Shoulders 



Photograph by Edward Thayer Monroe 

EVA LE GALLIENNE 
Is one of the few junior players in whose mental 
processes we can believe. She lends to her acting a 
poetry no less delicate and authentic than her father's 
verse. She demonstrated in "Liliom" that she can be 
silent more eloquently and eloquent more silently 
than any of our younger actresses 

CONSTANCE BENNETT 
7s just one more society bud who refuses to blush 
unseen! This graceful daughter of Richard Bennett 
has gone to Paris to perfect further, if that is possible, 
the dancing which delighted the patrons of one of the 

smarter grills this spring 






\ 




Photograph by Marcia Stein 

MARGALO GILLMORE 
First sprang into prominence as the fairer 
daughter of the "Famous Mrs. Fair." Her 
intelligent and moving characterizations 
in "The Straw" and "He Who Gets 
Slapped" prove that talent is even more 
necessary to success than a father who pre- 
sides over the Actors' Equity Association 



Photograph by 
Ira L. Hill 



Page Sixty-Two 



Chairs in the 

Decorative 

Scheme 

Photos by the Courtesy of the Wiener Werkstaette 





This formal arrangement is relieved from 
any tendency of stiffness by the elongated 
chair back with the decorative vine design. 
The silver vases are by Josef Hofmann 



This rounded-bach chair with its three down 
cushions give an air of comfort and infor- 
mality to this group arrangement. To the 
right is undoubtedly one of the most com- 
fortable chairs ever built. The silver lamp 
is by Hofmann, and the wall is relieved 
by a series of brilliant illustrations, for 
Grimm's Fairy Tales, by Joseph Urban 




Page Sixty-Three 




iX 



In the 

Hungarian 

Cinema 



Photographs by D'Ora 
of Vienna 




i * * • • # 



^4t tfte upper Ze/t is Milada Hannerovna, a 
popular film idol of Prague, and well 
known thruout the Continent. Above, Mme. 
Kristincovich, another film favorite and fa- 
mous for her red hair and green eyes. At 
the left is Lucy Doraine, still another beauty 
of the Hungarian silversheet 



Page Sixty-Four 



SijAOQWLAND 




A clay of such amazing power no less than a dozen imitations have sprung 
into being; applied in a moment; starts its work in ten more minutes; and— 



— Injbrty minutes, wiped away, the clay kas forced the clarity and color of 
youth to any humanskinonwhichitia applied. A ntwtriumpkof dermatology 



A New Skin in 40 Minutes 

"with this Astounding Beauty Clay! 



How a Pleasure Trip to Sunny Wales Uncovered 
a Secret of Mother Earth's That Forever Ends 
Any Women's Need for a Complexion Beautifier 



Keep your skin pores clean, open, tinslintr with 
life I My father has made you a remarkable offer be- 
low. Read carefully. 



By Martha Ryerson 

I HAVE brought to America the greatest news 
women ever heard about the skin. From Wales 
where I spent a month without seeing a single 
bad complexion. I went there with a complexion that 
bad been my despair since childhood. One afternoon 
J left it in the hills; exchanged it for one of absolute 
purity and undoubtable natural color. 

Except that I can now let you prove it for yourself' 
I would never tell the story — a story my own father 
found it hard to believel 

Hardest of all to believe is this: the transformation 
took just forty minutes 1 Here are the facts; 

About the first thing one notices in this southern 
English province, is the uniformly beautiful com- 
plexions. The lowliest maid— and her mother, too— 
has a radiantly beautiful skin. Mine, lacking lusture 
and color, with impurities nothing seemed to eradi 
cate or even hide, was horribly conspicuous. 

It was a happy thought that took a most unhappy 
girl on a long walk through the hills one afternoon. 
I had stopped at the apothecary's to replenish my 
cosmetic — to find it was unknown. They did not have 
even a cold cream. The irony of it! In a land where 
beauty of face was in evidence at every turn — the 
women used no beautifiersl Do you wonder I "took 
to the hills?" I didn't want to see another peaches- 
and-creamy complexion that day. But I did. 

At a house where I paused for a drink from the 
spring, I stepped back in surprise when the young 
woman straightened up to greet me. Her face was 
covered with mud. I recognized the peculiar gray of 
that section; very fine, sleek, smooth clay it was. 
Seeing my surprise, the girl smiled and said, "Madam 
does not clay?" I admitted I did not! 

1 Decide to "Clay" 

In a moment, she wet the clay which had dried on 
her face and neck, wiped it away, and stood in all the 
glory of a perfect complexion. I think I shall never 
again envy another as I did that stolid maiden of the 
hills. Her features were not pretty; they did not need 
to be. For no woman will ever have a more gorgeous 
skin. She explained thatthisamazingclay treatment 
did it. The natives made a weekly habit of "claying" 
the skin, quite as one cares regularly for the hair. 

I was easily persuaded to try it. Had I not done 
ridiculous things in beauty parlors where many could 
see my Iplight? We tucked a towel over my blousei 



and from the spring's bed she took the soft t soothing 
clay and applied it. . 

As we sat and talked, the clay dried. Soon I experi- 
enced the most delightful tingling in every facial 
pore; the impurities were being literally pulled out. 
Half an hour more, and we removed the clay mask. 
Hopeful, but still skeptical, I followed into the tiny 
house to glimpse myself in a mirror. 

My blemishes were gone/ 

I fairly glowed with color that spread down the 
neck to the shoulders. My cheeks were so downy 
soft, I felt them a hundred times on the way home. 
Father's surprised look when I entered the rooms of 
the little inn that evening was the most genuine com- 
pliment a woman ever received. In a basket I had 
two crocks of the precious clay. I thought father's 
questions would never end; where did I find it; could 
I take him to the spot: what was its action, and re- 
action, and lotselsel didn't know. Fatheris a chemist. 

Suddenly it dawned on me. He wanted to unearth 
the secret of that clay's amazing properties, and take 
it to Americal For two weeks we staid on: he worked 
all day at his_"mud pies" as I called them. Back 
home at last in Chicago, he worked many weeks 
more. He experimented on me, and on all my girl 
friends. At last, he scientifically produced clay iden- 
tical with that Welsh clay in its miraculous effects — 
only ten times more smooth and pure. 

\nyone May Now Have 
This Wonderful Clay 

News of the wonders performed by this clay has 
brought thousands of requests for it. Women, every- 
where (and men too, by the way) are now supplied 
Forty Minute Clay. The laboratory where it is com- 
pounded sends it direct to the user. A jar is five dol- 
lars, but I have yet to hear of anyone who d'd not 
regard it worth several times that amount. For mind, 
in over six hundred test cases, it did not once fail, 
It seems to work on all ages, and regardless of how 
pimpled, clogged or dull the skin may be. 

The application is readily made by anybody, and 
the changes brought about in less than an hour will 
cause open-mouthed astonishment. I know. 

When I see a woman now, with a coarse-textured 
skin that mars the whole effect of her otherwise 
dainty care of self, it is all that I can do to refrain 
from speaking of this natural, perfectly simple way 
to bring a skin end color such as Nature meant us to 
have— and has given us the way to have. 



FREE DISTRIBUTION 
OF *52S JARS 

(Only One Jar to a Family) 

The general public is entitled to benefit by a 
discovery of this importance. So, for a limited 
time we will distribute regular, full-size $5.00 jars 
of Forty Minute Clay without profit — at only the 
actual cost, which is $1.87. 

You may have your first jar for only this bare 
cost of getting it in your hands! The expenses of 
compounding, refining, analyzing, sterilizing, 
packing, printed announcements, and shipping 
in large quantity, has been figured down to $1.87 
per jar, plus postage. 

For the small laboratory cost price of $1.87 for 
ingredients, shipping, etc., is not really a pay- 
ment: rather, adeposit that we will promptly re- 
turn if you are not unreservedly satisfied that 
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Name. 



Address. 



Page Sixty-Five 



SuADOWLAND 




Drama — Major and Melo' 



The Cat and the Canary. National. — 
Good excitement and suspense. 

Fools Errant. Maxine Elliott's.— Thrill- 
ing situations and excellent dialog. 

He Who Gets Slapped. Garrick.— The 



tragic story of a circus clown. Good. 

The Monster. Thirty-Ninth St. — Grue- 
some and horrifying. 

Whispering Wires. Forty-Ninth St. — 
A headliner among mystery melodramas. 



Humor and Human Interest 



Abie's Irish Rose. Republic. — The au- 
dience never fails to laugh. 

Captain Applejack. Corf. — Excellent 
pirates-and-hidden-treasure burlesque. 

The Awful Truth. Henry Miller's.— 
Ina Claire's new play. The "best yet. 

Dreams For Sale. Playhouse. — Senti- 
mental entertainment. 

East Side, West Side. Nora Baycs'.— 
Norman Trevor in a too-conventional play. 

The Endless Chain. George M. 
Cohan's. — Margaret Lawrence in a play 
about women for women. 

Her Temporary Husband. Frazee. — 
Amusing and safe. 

Hunky Dory. Klaw. — A wholesome 
comedy of Scottish characters. 

Kempy. Belmont. — A very human 
small-town domestic comedy. 



Kiki. Belasco. — Lenore Ulric plays the 
piquant cocotte. Excellent. 

The Old Soak. Plymouth.— Those who 
liked Lightnin' will like this. 

Partners Again. Sehvyn. — A Potash 
and Perlmutter comedy. 

The Plot Thickens. Booth.— A fantas- 
tic farce translated from the Italian. 

Shore Leave. Lyceum. — Frances Starr 
as a country dressmaker, and James 
Rennie as a gob. 

A Serpent's Tooth. Little. — Marie 
Tempest makes it worth while. 

So This Is London! Hudson.— A hit 
with those who like English comedy. 

The Torch Bearers. Vanderbilt. — A 
smart farce, well acted. 

Why Men Leave Home. Morosco. — 
A comedy with an obvious moral. 

Wild Oats Lane. Broadhurst. — Maclyn 
Arbuckle in a human, sentimental role. 



Melody and Maidens 



Better Times. Hippodrome. — Large, 
costly, naive and pretty. 

Blossom Time. Ambassador.- — Franz 
Schubert's life set to his own music. 

Chauve-Souris. Century Roof. — Rus- 
sian entertainers in a unique program. 

Daffy Dill. Apollo.- — Frank Tinney as 
funny as ever. 

A Fantastic Fricassee. Greenwich Vil- 
lage. — The title expresses it. 

The Gingham Girl. Earl Carroll's. — 
Both old and young will like this. 

Greenwich Village Follies. Shicbert. 
— A beautiful spectacle with Savoy and 
Brennan to provide the touch of humor. 



Molly Darling. Liberty. — Snappy, tune- 
ful and clean. 

The Music Box Revue. Music Box. — 
As smart and satisfying as the one last 
year. 

Orange Blossoms. Fulton. — A good 
comedy set to music. 

Sally, Irene and Mary. Casino. — An 
impudent, fresh little musical show. 

Sue, Dear. Times Square. — See com- 
ment on Molly Darling. 

The Scandals of 1922. Globe.— Another 
hand for George White, please. 

The Ziegfeld Follies. New Amster- 
dam. — Amusing, dazzling and distracting. 



The Best in the West 

A list of last yearns successes noiv on tour 



Anna Christie. Eugene O'Neill at his 
best. Worth seeing. 

A Bill of Divorcement. A serious 
drama, well acted. 

Bombo. Good music and new jokes. 

Bulldog Drummond. A 
mystery play everyone will like. 
The Circle. An excellent 
comedy with an all-star cast. 
The Demi- Virgin. An un- 
derdone, un- 
dressed farce. 
Dulcy. Dem- 
onstrating 
that beauty 
triumphs over 
brains. 

The Gold 
Diggers. A 
snappy, color- 
ful comedy. 




Good Morning Dearie. Excellent mu- 
sical entertainment. 

The Hairy Ape. The tragedy of a 
stoker. Good. 

Lawful Larceny. A crook 
melodrama. 

Nice People. A comedy of 
manners. 

Six Cylinder Love, 
A domestic 
comedy with 
a moral. 

The White 
P e a c o c k. 
Good melo- 
drama, writ- 
ten and star- 
red by P e - 
trova. 




Respecting the Amer- 
ican Theater 

{Continued from page 33) 

the suspicion that husbands are falling dead 
right and left because their wives will insist 
on acting. 

One act shows a rehearsal of an amateur 
company, and gives us a great many sure and 
sharp glimpses into the pomps and vanities cf 
the sort of woman who frequently takes to 
directing little theater productions. The second 
act is back-stage at the performance, and it 
rejoices in everything from satire to good old 
slapstick hokum about the accidents of a first- 
night. By the third act, Kelly seems to get a 
little nervous about "the theater." He isn't 
bolstered up by the uproarious mirth of his 
audience or their evident appreciation of Alison 
Skipworth's superb performance as the direct- 
ress and of the good work of most of the 
players from Mary Boland down. Kelly loses the 
poise proper to a member of the N. V. A. Club, 
and he trots out some extraordinarily tedious 
stuff about the bearing of the little theater 
movement on the feelings of an outraged hus- 
band when his wife goes on the stage. 

But there is no pistol, no express stock hidden 
in the clock, no chorus girl vamp, no shortage 
and no false suspicions. Kelly has respect for 
the theater — or is it experience? 

Respect is a difficult thing, of course. There 
is "A Serpent's Tooth," for example, Arthur 
Richman's new play. The presence of Marie 
Tempest at the head of the cast ought to make 
you feel like a most thankless child when you 
discover that, somehow, the evening isn't an 
enjoyable one. Miss Tempest's art or personal- 
ity, or whatever hybrid of the two it may be, 
is as nearly irresistible as anything in the the- 
ater. It shows to fine advantage in the comedy 
moments of this play; for Richman's picture of 
a doting but humorous mother is capital. Un- 
fortunately, he calls on the actress for a tragic 
scene or two, and these scenes are far too 
tragic in the lines of this well-loved face ; it 
should only smile and smile forever. More- 
over, they are not good scenes of tragedy. 
They are conventional. They are almost as 
conventional as the denouncement in which the 
son, caught in a forgery and one or two other 
things, is sent off for one of those English- 
drawing-room-comedy "tests" out on a lonely 
ranch where no temptations live. 

Of course, "A Serpent's Tooth" is a serious 
effort at making our drama into something 
better than a collection of murder-mysteries and 
small-town comedies with a dress-suit finish. 
And we are told to respect it for that. But 
it is really growing tedious — this endless ap- 
plauding, year in and year out, _ of the first 
steps of the infant drama. I begin to suspect 
that the child's a moron. Dont try to con- 
found me by observing that "Peter Pan" was 
^another case of arrested development. He 
could have grown up if he had wanted to. 

Returning to the question of respect for the 
American theater, what a sad light it casts 
over the pleasant comicalities of Frances Starr's 
newest vehicle, "Shore Leave" ! David Belasco, 
of all the managers, ought to feel that his art 
deserves truth instead of cheap "points." So 
far as the actor goes, he insists on faultless 
technique. Miss Starr is ever so charming, 
James Rennie makes quite a gloriously vulgar 
gob for her little dressmaker to fall in love 
with. But what things Belasco lets the rest of 
the cast do ! What dreadful and sure-fire 
absurdities he and they and the author, Hubert 
Osborne, stoop to ! 

"Shore Leave," in the end, serves the Ameri- 
can theater no better purpose than to let me 
remark that it is a Cape Cod comedy well- 
calked with hokum. 

They are a sorry lot, the remaining produc- 
tions of that part of the season dedicated to the 
out-of-town buyer. There is "The Monster," 
for example, a Grand Guignol horror-play. It 
is chiefly notable for Wilton Lackaye's excel- 
lent acting, and for a moment when the heroine 
screams out : "He has no face !" while we are 
all observing the much more horrible fact that 
the actor who has put a mask over his nose, is 
(Continued on page 74) 



Page Sixty-Six 



SUADOWLAND 



Our Lyrical Psycho-Realist 



(Continued from page 35) 



juxtaposition of roses and skulls. It has more 
than a reminiscence of the Masefield of "The 
Widow in the Bye Street" and "The Ever- 
lasting Mercy." 

All the more astonishing is the resemblance 
of "Turns and Movies," Aiken's second book, to 
Masters' terse epitaphs in the "Spoon River 
Anthology." But that portion of Aiken's vol- 
ume which is not suggested by its title begins 
to reveal his true trend. The opening of "Dis- 
cordants," for example, has a melody difficult 
to forget, a haunting minor quality all his own : 

Music I heard with you was more than 

music, 
And bread I broke with you was more than 

bread ; 
A r ow that I am without you, all is desolate; 
All that was once so beautiful is dead. 

Your hands once touched this table and this 
silver, 

And I have seen your fingers hold this glass. 

These things do not remember you, be- 
loved — 

And yet your touch upon them will not 
pass. 

In 1916, the same year that saw the publica- 
tion of "Turns and Movies," there appeared 
"The Jig of Forslin," even more revelatory of 
Aiken's ultimate course. The subject of the 
poem is a typical one for this poet : the adven- 
turing of the soul of man which satisfies vicari- 
ously the dreamer's avidity for experience. The 
workmanship here is uneven. The lurid lights 
that played upon "Earth Triumphant" shed here 
and there a fatal glow. But here Aiken has at 
least discovered the subterranean world of con- 
sciousness which is peculiarly his own territory. 
Here he begins his own spiritual adventures with 
a surer tread than when he walked in the foot- 
steps of other poets. 

All the more disappointing, then, is it to find 
him turning backward with his "Nocturne of 
Remembered Spring." This book is like the title 
of one of the poems it contains : "A Sonata in 
Pathos." Practically all the poems, and their 
titles especially, bear out the suggestion of 
musical melancholy which the Sonata gives. 
There is a "Meditation on a June Evening," 
"Discord," "White Nocturne," "Nocturne in a 
Minor Key," "Episode in Grey," "Innocence," 
"Dust in Starlight." And these nocturnes and 
dim chiaroscuro pictures are marked by an over- 
stressed note of gracile grief, the cherished sor- 
row of the adolescent in the Spring, the soft 
sweet lingering sadness of a reiterated minor 
melody. Here is that Forslin who has "surrend- 
ered his soul to a pleading music." Indeed, the 
word "music" recurs so frequently on these 
pages that a distracted reader loses all sense of 
the word's significance. It is like hearing one's 
favorite tune on a barrel-organ in every street 
thru which one passes on a long walk. Yet 
amidst all this weary wailing, sound voices, how- 
ever muffled, which remind one of Aiken's real 
preoccupation. There is the new, unforgetable 
phrase for the old thought : 

The eyes of death look out thru cherry 

blossoms; 
Death's hand is on the bough and makes it 

sweet. 

And there is the prevision of the refrain of 
"The House of Dust" : 

In a harrowing second of time 

To traverse so many worlds, so many ages, 

And come to this chaos again, 

This vast, symphonic dance of death, 

This incoherent dust. 

In "The House of Dust," which, while pre- 
ceded in print by "The Charnel Rose," was 
actually written first, Aiken returns to the 
method of "The Jig of Forslin." It is a long 
poem composed of various narratives, like a 
lively tapestry, whose colors, unfortunately, have 
faded to a dim mysterious lavender. On the 
whole it is a rounder work than Forslin ; it cap- 
tures more nearly the poet's elusive game. And 



it has at least one passage which at once gives 
the key to the poem and, one is inclined to be- 
lieve, to the philosophy of its author : 

We are like searchers in a house of dark- 
ness, 

A house of dust; we creep with little 
lanterns, 

Throwing our tremulous arcs of light at 
random, 

Now here, novo there, seeing a plane, an 
angle, 

An edge, a curve, a wall, a broken stairway 

Leading to who knozvs zvhat; but never 
seeing 

The whole at once. . . . We grope our 
way a little, 

And then groiv tired. No matter what 
we touch, 

Dust is the answer — dust : dust every- 
where. 

If this were all — what were the use, you 
ask? 

But this is not : for why should we be 
seeking, 

Why should we bring this need to seek . 
for beauty, 

To lift our minds, if there were only dust? 

The best Aiken has to give us is to be found 
in the book for which "The House of Dust" 
might well have been a sketch, namely, "The 
Charnel Rose." The title poem is not especially 
engaging. It is true that in this poem the 
author has found a strong theme, that of nym- 
pholepsy, defined by him "in a broad sense as 
that impulse which sends us from one dream, 
or ideal, to another, always disillusioned, always 
creating for adoration some new and subtler 
fiction." And he uses this theme as a base 
"upon which one might build wilfully a kind 
of absolute music." The theme itself, however, 
leads Aiken astray into paths too fantastic to 
be alluring, while his constant effort to teach 
his poetry to usurp the place of music destroys 
him as Lady Macbeth's urgings destroyed her 
famous husband. 

It is "Senlin," the opening poem of the 
volume, with its suggestive juxtaposition of the 
significant and the trivial, its clear images, its 
marvelous dissolving of the walls of reality 
into the mists of intense dream, that shows us 
Aiken capturing the psychological and poetic 
actuality which so long escaped him. The poem 
is not impeccable. Harlots and demons, violent 
purples and pale violets trip thru it with their 
destructive touch. But it remains Aiken's best, 
and it was well worth waiting for. The poem 
is noted as containing in "The Morning Son 
of Senlin" one of the finest lyrics of our time. 
But it is rather in the structure of the whole, 
in the poet's rare sensitiveness to the subtler 
states of consciousness, and his vivid expression 
of shadowy moods, that "Senlin's" power lies. 

This marks the culmination of Aiken's efforts 
to uncover same of the secrets of human con- 
sciousness. But it will be remembered that 
"The Jig of Forslin" and "The House of Dust" 
showed the same interest if not the same suc- 
cess, and his latest work reveals no new theme. 

"Punch, the Immortal Liar," is indeed almost 
a rewriting of "The Jig of Forslin," tho it is 
doubtful if the author so thinks of it. Punch, 
far more truly than Forslin, "is not a man, 
but Man." The technique of the earlier work 
— what the author likes to call harmony and 
counterpoint — is employed here with almost 
equal freedom. It is a maturer piece. There 
are fewer lapses into monotonous music, rare 
explosions into youthful crudities. The blank 
verse, which is a form seldom employed by 
Aiken, seems particularly fortunate. More- 
over, Punch makes lively reading. Yet in 
spite of these several excellences, it falls short 
of its fine predecessor. If Aiken believes that 
"poetry to be poetry must after all rise . . . 
to this sort of piercing perfection of beauty or 
truth, phrased in a piercing perfection of 
music," it is only in "Senlin" that he has written 
poetry with anything like a sustained effect. 

Again and again, running thru his prose 
critiques, one comes upon a telling phrase, an 
(Continued on page 75) 



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Page Sixty-Seven 



SuADOWLAND 




It had never 
occurred to him 

HE seemed to have all of the qualifica- 
tions for business success — a pleasing 
personality, good education, the ability to 
make and hold friends. He was a good 
judge of people; he knew how to measure 
a situation ; he was alert, aggressive, 
ambitious. 

Yet, somehow or other, he didn't advance 
in business as he should have — as he and 
his friends expected and hoped he would. 
Something seemed to stand in his way. It 
puzzled and disheartened him. 

The thing that held him back was in it- 
self a little thing. But one of those little 
things that rest so heavily in the balance 
when personalities are being weighed and 
measured for the bigger responsibilities of 
business. 

Halitosis (the medical term for unpleas- 
ant breath) never won a man promotion in 
the business world — and never will. Some 
men succeed in spite of it. But usually it 
is a handicap. And the pathetic part of it 
is that the person suffering from halitosis 
is usually unaware of it himself. Even his 
closest friends don't mention it. 

Sometimes, of course, halitosis arises 
from some deep-rooted organic disorder ; 
then professional help is required. Smoking 
often causes it, the finest cigar becoming 
the offender even hours after it has given 
the smoker pleasure. Usually — and for- 
tunately, however — halitosis yields to the 
regular use of Listerine as a mouth-wash 
and gargle. 

Recognized for half a century as the safe 
antiseptic, Listerine possesses properties 
that .quickly meet and defeat unpleasant 
breath. It halts food fermentation in the 
mouth, and leaves the breath sweet, fresh 
and clean. 

Its systematic use this way puts you on 
the safe and polite side. Then you need not 
be disturbed with the thought of whether 
or not your breath is right. You knoiv it is. 

Your druggist will supply you. He sells a 
great deal of Listerine. For it has dozens of 
different uses as an antiseptic. Note the 
booklet with each bottle. — Lambert Phar- 
viacal Company, Saint Louis, U. S. A. 



Our Novels as Mirrors 



(Continued from page 20) 



HALITOSIS 

use 

LISTERINE 




passed some bills that ought to completely out- 
law the socialists! And there's an elevator-run- 
ners' strike in New York and a lot of college 
boys are taking their places. That's the stuff ! 
And a mass-meeting in Birmingham's demanded 
that this Mick agitator, this fellow De Valera, 
be deported. Dead right, by golly! All these 
agitators paid with German gold anyway. And 
zve got no business interfering with the Irish 
or any other foreign government. Keep our 
hands strictly off. And there's another well- 
authenticated rumor from Russia that Lenin is 
dead. That's fine. It's beyond me vnhy we dont 
just step in there and kick those Bolshevik 
cusses out. 

This is, we know, an exact transcript of 
the sort of illogical 
nonsense offered as 
opinion all around 
us every day. 
Babbitt and his pro- 
totypes in life, living 
upon opinions, catch- 
words and slogans 
derived from a 
multiplicity of 
sources, analyzing 
none of them, think- 
ing not at all but 
never suspecting 
they are not think- 
ing, are, by the very 
hasty confusion of 
their accepted ideas, 
incapable of recog- 
nizing, for instance, 
the bad logic of 
"We've got no busi- 
ness interfering with 
the Irish or any 
other foreign gov- 
ernment" and "It's 
beyond me why we 
dont just step in 
there and kick those 
Bolshevik cusses 
out." 

By a judicious 
selection of repre- 
sentative material 
from newspaper 
columns, advertise- 
ments, political cam- 
paigns, business 
boosting "literature," 
and club, cafe, 
home, and Pullman 
smoker conversation, 
Mr. Lewis has suc- 
ceeded in throwing 
into satiric relief the 
shoddy assortment 
of cheap platitudes 
and idiocies that peo- 
ple mouth and be- 
lieve and even stake 
their lives upon. 
None of us can, with 
whole-hearted hon- 
esty, say we are not 
the victims of this 
disposition to clutter 
up our minds with 
specious notions in- 
stead of thinking 

things out log''cally for ourselves. Try as 
we may to assert and maintain our intellec- 
tual independence, we are pressed by the 
weight of mass opinion now and then into the 
easy path of group beliefs and we find our- 
selves, perhaps often with a start, voicing opin- 
ions and platitudes we know, on examination, to 
be false or outworn. It is for that reason that 
Babbitt is, essentially, a sympathetic figure. 
Babbitt himself is, in some respects, Mr. Lewis 
himself, and he is, in some respects, you and you 
and you and the writer of these words . . . 
No less, this mirror of ourselves is not flatter- 
ing. It is amusing, funny even, but we have 
no right to congratulate ourselves on oddities, 
however provocative of mirth. Beneath the 



Recommended Novels 

Shadowland recommends the fol- 
lowing books to the attention of its 
readers : 

"Babbitt," by Sinclair Lewis. Harcourt, 

Brace & Co. 
"One of Ours," by Willa Cather. Alfred 

A. Knopf, Inc. 
"The Red Shawl," by Joseph Herges- 

heimer. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. 
"Lilian," by Arnold Bennett. George H. 

Doran Co. 
"The Three Lovers," by Frank Swinner- 

ton. George H. Doran Co. 
"One Thing Is Certain," by Sophie Kerr. 

George H. Doran Co. 
"The Illusion," by Raymond Escholier. 

G. P. Putnam's Sons. 
"Bennett Malin," by Elsie Singmaster. 

Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
"Babel," by John Cournos. Boni & Live- 
right. 
"Gigolo," by Edna Ferber. Doubleday, 

Page & Co. 
"Down the River," by Roscoe W. Brink. 

Henry Holt & Co. 
"Ocean Echoes," by Arthur Mason. Henry 

Holt & Co. 
"Love and Friendship," by Jane Austen. 

Frederick A. Stokes & Co. 
"Rita Coventry," by Julian Street. Double- 
day, Page & Co. 
"The Optimist," by E. M. Delafield. Mac- 

millan. 
"Anne Severn and the Fieldings," by May 

Sinclair. Macmillan. 
"The Tale of Triona," by William J. 

Locke. Dodd, Mead & Co. 
"Count Morin, Deputy," by Anatole 

France. Dodd, Mead & Co. 
"The Red Knight," by Francis Brett 

Young. E. P. Dutton & Co. 
"Captain Blood," by Rafael Sabatini. 

Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
"Intrusion," by Beatrice K. Seymour. 

Thomas Seltzer. 
"Gargoyles," by Ben Hecht. Boni & Liver- 

right. 
"Flowing Gold," by Rex Beach. Harper 

& Brothers. 



mirth there must be some slight poignant re- 
gret that our lives are not nobler and more 
beautiful. 

That regret came to George F. Babbitt, suc- 
cessful real estate operator, hundred per cent. 
American, and respectable citizen of the com- 
munity, in the form of a contract that lifted 
him out of his self-complacency and set him 
upon the dangerous highroad of introspection 
and of examination into the views and actions 
of others. He achieved a second blooming of 
aspiration and desire, but they were, inevitably, 
pale and puny flowers. They were blighted by 
the arid soil and hostile atmosphere of social 
and business taboos and they withered, ironic- 
ally, in Babbitt's own uncouth and clumsy hands. 
The Babbitts may 
sense and aspire to 
beauty, poise and 
symmetry, but to 
achieve it, hold and 
cherish it, require 
greater capabilities, 
unhappily, than they 
possess. Therein lie 
the tears of things. 
And in the lives of 
Babbitts there is a 
pathetic beauty even 
if they know it not. 
Mr. Lewis has 
shown it to us. 

A. S. M. Hutchin- 
son's "If Winter 
Comes" bored me 
beyond endurance 
and I forsook 
his • sentimental re- 
cital of the sweet 
miseries of a good 
but misunderstood 
man somewhere 
about the middle of 
the book. His new 
novel, "This Free- 
dom," I pursued to 
the final page, thru 
the exasperations of 
a stilted, sophomoric 
style in an effort to 
assure myself in my 
fancied reasons for 
the enormous popu- 
larity of Mr. Hutch- 
inson's books. I 
am in doubt. Grant- 
ed that, in "If Win- 
ter Comes" he chose 
a theme which has 
immemorably been 
loved, and cherished 
and applauded since 
it was first set forth 
in the first of the 



synoptic Gospel, i. e., 
the story of the hum- 
ble but courageous 
soul who suffers for 
the sins of others, 
forgiving them for 
they know not what 
they do — granting 
that, I fail to account 
for the patience of 
readers who can fol- 
low such a story with interest thru a narrative 
method which balks the interest on every page. 
His style is like that of a freshman who tries 
to be "literary." It is made up of involved and 
redundant compound sentences, vague, unnatural 
parts of speech, exclamations that are not excla- 
mations — in fine, the hardest sort of reading I 
ever encountered outside of a stiff scientific 
treatise. The story of "This Freedom" is also a 
sure-fire one, and the probabilities are that its 
vogue will be as great as its predecessor. In 
"This Freedom" the author plays a dolorous 
variation on the theme of "Home and Mother." 
It is hackneyed and Mr. Hutchinson's fiddle is 
squeaky and out of tune, but it will, I suspect, 
bring the customary tears and conversions. 



Page Sixty-Eight 



SUADOWLAND 



Painting Scenery with Light 



(Continued from page 45) 



equipment called the Ars System by the Swed- 
ish company that controls the patents for its 
exploitation abroad. The basis of the sys- 
tem is a canvas cyclorama. This cyclorama 
runs on a semi-circular track hung from the 
gridiron high above the stage. At one end 
of the track is a great roller upon which the 
cyclorama may be wound up, to get it out of 
the way during an elaborate change of scene. 
It takes only half a minute for the cyclorama 
to be run out on the track ready for use. The 
track itself may be swung downward from its 
two front corners to permit particularly large 
drops to be hoisted or lowered ; but it is wide 
enough and deep enough not to interfere with 
the ordinary use of the gridiron. The cyclo- 
rama is made of common, light canvas, but it 
is so cut and joined, and hung on a slight slant 
that it takes up of itself the bulges and wrinkles 
ordinarily produced in our cyclorama by a 
change in the weather. The invention is in 
dispute between those ancient but courteous 
rivals, Hasait and Linnebach. 

With this cyclorama goes an elaborate sys- 
tem of lighting. There are floor lamps con- 
tained in wheeled chariots to illuminate the 
bottom of the cyclorama. Above the pro- 
scenium opening hangs a battery of different 
colored lights — seventy-two in the Stockholm 
State Opera — which play directly upon the 
cyclorama, and three high-powered bulbs to 
light the stage floor. Besides these, the Ars 
System, as installed at Stockholm, includes 
three special projection devices, also hung above 
the proscenium, all the adjustments of which 
are controlled electro-magnetically from the 
switchboard. One of these is the large cloud- 
machine, an arrangement of two tiers of eight 
lamps each, raying out from a common axis. 
These tiers can be moved at different speeds 
and in different directions, while each lamp 
can be turned up and down and sideways at 
will. These projectors each house a six thou- 
sand candle-power bulb and hold a photograph 
or drawing of a cloud. The complex motion 
of these static clouds when projected on the 
cyclorama gives an effect of ever-varying cloud 
formations. Almost absolute realism can thus 
be obtained. A second smaller and less flexi- 
ble cloud-machine with a single central lamp 
and reflecting mirrors is, for some reason, in- 
cluded in the equipment. 

Transparent Projections 

Besides these cloud machines there is a battery 
of three high-powered bulbs and lenses, by 
means of which designs painted on glass slides 
can be projected after the fashion of a magic 
lantern upon the cyclorama or any object on 
the stage. This is the really important feature 
of the Ars System from an artistic standpoint. 
Its possibilities are extraordinary. Harald 
Andre, chief regisscur of the Stockholm Opera, 
has experimented little as yet with this device, 
utilizing it only in one ballet. But he has 
speculated much on the opportunities that it 
presents for uniting a large group of theaters, 
similarly equipped, in the exchange of setting 
designs for the productions in their repertory. 
Andre believes that the economy of projected 
scenery is important artistically as well as 
financially, because it will admit of experiment 
with many new works at slight expense, and 
of the rapid reproduction of the successful 
productions in many cities at once. 

From the absolute artist viewpoint of the 
effect obtained, projection is satisfactory tho 
as yet almost undeveloped. Americans who saw 
the transparent projections of Simonson's de- 
signs of Back to Methuselah realized how little 
these drops had the visual disadvantages of the 
painted variety. They enjoyed a certain incor- 
poreal quality. The landscapes were not de- 
fined like huge oil paintings in false perspective. 
They went into some new category which, for 
the moment, defeated our analysis. Such pro- 
jections may jn time take on the shallow pre- 
tense of painted backdrops, tho I am inclined 
to doubt it. 

In the case of the Valhalla of Das Rheingold, 
as projected in Linnebach' s production at the 



National Theater in Munich, the ethereal qual- 
ity of this kind of scene "painting" again stands 
out. The scene is most successful when the 
lighting is dimmest. In the central portions 
of the second and fourth scenes, when the stage 
is fully lighted, the image of Valhalla holds its 
own against the illumination of the foreground, 
but the foreground itself fails dismally to match 
the beauty of the gods' castle. When the plastic 
foreground is not to be seen, Valhalla hangs in 
the heavens like one of the shapes of Wilfred's 
Color Organ, a thing that seems to have three 
dimensions. When the lights upon the stage 
floor bring out the rocks of the foreground, 
Valhalla loses the reality of three dimensions. 
It still seems truer as well as more beautiful 
than the rocks in front ; in fact it shows up 
pitilessly the trivial canvas life of those boul- 
ders ; but it loses the impression of depth which 
it had at first created. It was doubtless a false 
impression, a foolish illusion. 

The Cloud Machine in Use 

The projected setting is certainly in another 
dimension spiritually from those two ordinarily 
employed in old-fashioned scene-painting. It is 
not in any of the planes of stage-rocks or 
houses. It does not war with the human figure, 
curiously enough. It seems likely that the art- 
ist or director using projected design must 
formalize his foreground, as Simonson did, or 
else hide its commonplace actuality in shadow. 

Ordinary stage pretenses cannot stand beside 
the spiritual plastics produced by light. 

As for the cloud-machine, so long as it is 
trying merely to reproduce nature it is utterly 
unimportant. Something imaginative must be 
done with it before it can expect serious con- 
sideration. In the productions of Andre at the 
Stockholm Opera there are at least two hints 
that the cloud-machine can be used for the 
purposes of art. One of these, rather poorly 
managed, is the use of designed clouds instead 
of natural clouds in one of the scenes of Sam- 
son and Delilah. The other, not perfectly ex- 
ecuted by any means, but most suggestive, oc- 
curs in Verdi's Macbeth. There, in the first 
scene, Andre sets a wild storm-sky in motion. 
He uses negative or black photographs of clouds 
instead of positive or white, and he' sets them 
in motion from on high and at the sides, sweep- 
ing in and down upon the witches. As these 
dark shapes descend in tumult, it seems as tho 
the black earth were drinking black clouds, 
curious and evil portent of the powers of the 
infernal. 

Movement in projection has obviously great 
possibilities as part of the action of the new 
drama. In Kaiser's expressionistic play, From 
Morn Till Midnight, produced by the Theatre 
Guild, Simonson used Linnebach's lantern to 
make the tree in the snow scene change into 
a skeleton, an effect that Kaiser was able to 
foresee onry as a shifting of snowflakes upon 
naked boughs. 

Light itself seems destined to assume a larger 
and larger part in the drama. It is a playing 
force, quite as much as the actors. It can be 
a motivator of action as well as an illuminator 
of it. Jessner of the State Schauspielhaus in 
Berlin uses it as an arbitrary accompaniment 
and interpreter of action. Lights flash on or 
off as some mood changes. They create shadows 
to dramatize a relation of two men. They 
seem to control or to be controlled by the 
action. 

The possibilities are extraordinary. Light as 
the compelling force of a play ; light as a moti- 
vator of action ; light and setting, not as a back- 
ground to action, but as part of it, as some- 
thing making characters exist and act; light as 
an almost physical aura of human bodies ; light, 
therefore, in conflict. 

If light can do such things, even if it can do 
no more than set Valhalla glowing in the 
heavens, it will take a place in the theater that 
no other product of inventive ingenuity can 
reach. Light, at the very least, is machinery 
spiritualized. 




«Jnr. \ 



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Page Sixty-Nine 






SUAOOWIAND 



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m 
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m 



an 



Operatic Anticipations 

(Continued from page 25) 



Page Seventy 



composer himself conducting. What the gen- 
eral Director and Chairman of Committee of 
the Metropolitan thought of it has not been 
made known but one has a shrewd idea that 
"Salome" will not be done at the Metropolitan 
this season. 

Clarence Mackay, who joined the committee 
of the Metropolitan last season, is strongly 
opposed to the revival of the Wilde-Strauss 
opera, and several subscribers have also made 
known their objections. Jeritza, who incident- 
ally in private life is the Baroness von Popper, 
in her eagerness to sing the role, went so far 
as to tell a New York reporter that people 
quite misunderstood Salome's character ; that 
she was wayward rather than vicious, and that 
she simply cried for the Baptist's head as a 
child would cry for a new doll. 

Which prompted a Broadway rhymester to 
pen the following : 

The beautiful Baroness Popper 
Says that Salome isn't improper; 

She is only a child, 

Just a little bit Wilde, 
So why should the opera drop her? 

Speaking of Salome reminds us that New 
Yorkers will have at least one opportunity of 
hearing Strauss's opera this season, for the 
enterprising Fortune Gallo, who has taken the 
Century Theater for the annual Fall season of 
the San Carlo Opera Company, will present 
the Junoesquely beautiful Anna Fitziu as the 
naughty daughter of Herodias. She has been 
Studying the music all summer, and will sing 
it in Italian. 

Among new works to be heard at the Metro- 
politan this season is "Anima Allegra," by 
Franco Vittadini, the book based on an amus- 
ing comedy by the Brothers Quintero. It is, 
according to reports, a light little work, full 
of vivacious melody and exceptionally well 
scored. Lucrezia Bori will most probably 
create the principal soprano role. 

A new German opera to be given this sea- 
son is Max Schilling's "Mona Lisa," the 
libretto by Beatrice Dowsky. Jeritza will play 
the name part in this, which certain German 
critics have hailed as a superlative work of 
genius. But they did the same with regard to 
Eric Korngold's "Die Tote Stadt," and so our 
attitude must be that of the man from Missouri. 

As to revivals, we are promised not only 
"Tannhseuser," but there is a possibility that 
we shall hear "Rheingold," and there are dark 
rumors of "The Ring." Another welcome re- 
vival will be "Rosenkavalier," in which it may 
be hoped we shall hear Frances Alda in the 
part originally played here by Freda Hempel. 
Madame Alda suffers rather than gains from 
the fact that she is the wife of the General 
Director, for, in his scrupulous care to avoid 
a suggestion of favoritism, she does not get all 
the parts she deserves, altho she is a beautiful 
singer. Jeritza is to play Octavian. 

What may prove a sensational engagement, 
if all reports be true, is that of Ina Bourskaya, 
former star of the Russian Grand Opera 
Company. She made a tremendous hit during 
the last Ravinia Park Summer season of 
opera, and is described by good judges as the 
greatest Carmen since Calve. She has been 
engaged both by the Metropolitan and Chicago 
Opera Companies for a series of special per- 
formances. 

Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette" is to be revived, 
with, almost of course, Galli-Curci, and very 
probably Edward Johnson. The engagement 
of the latter Canadian-American tenor is dis- 
tinctly a matter for congratulation. Thanks 
to Muratore and the jealousies which honey- 
combed the Chicago company, and with which 
Mary Garden found herself powerless to cope, 
Edward Johnson has never had a fair chance 
in the United States since his return from 
Italy, where he was a popular idol and 
leading tenor of La Scala under the name 
of Edouardo di Giovanni. His Avito in 
"L'Amore dei Tre Re" is magnificent, and the 
composer Montemezzi, declared that Johnson 
was the finest singer he had heard in the part. 

Of the occasion of his first appearance in 
Chicago in "Fedora" some three years ago, 
Edward Johnson redeemed that vapid work by 
his splendidly artistic singing and acting as 



Loris Ipanoff. Let us hope that Gatti-Casazza, 
having secured a really first class romantic 
tenor, one who can act as well as sing, will 
make the best use of him. 

Two interesting Italian revivals are those 
grandiose and ponderous operas "L'Africaine," 
by Meyerbeer, and Rossini's "William Tell," 
both of which give great opportunity for 
scenic splendor. A new Italian dramatic tenor, 
Giacomo Lauri-Volpi, is likely to be heard in 
both. He is a robust singer who has made a 
big success at leading South American opera 
houses, and it is said that he can make the 
welkin ring after the manner of the stentorian 
Tamagno. 

Chaliapin will repeat his memorable imper- 
sonation of Boris, and may also be heard in a 
revival of "Ivan the Terrible." There is, too, 
some talk of his singing the role of Basilio in 
"The Barber," in which, by the way, he so 
greatly offended the susceptibilities of certain 
New York critics by his somewhat Rabelaisian 
business. Few know that Chaliapin, like some 
other famous tragedians, is an admirable 
comedian. Vividly do we recall his immensely 
comic acting and superb make-up as Don 
Quichotte in Massenet's setting of the Cervan- 
tes story. 

A new tenor of the lyric type to be heard for 
the first time this season at the Metropolitan 
is Michaele Fleta, who has just secured a 
marked success at the Opera in Buenos Aires. 
Besides Johnson, Lauri-Volpi and Fleta, the 
Metropolitan' has those purely American tenors 
Orville Harrold and Mario Chamlee, excellent 
artists both ; and the ever reliable Welsh tenor, 
Morgan Kingston, not to mention the admirable 
Martinelli and Beniamo Gigli. 

Most of the old favorites of the Metropolitan 
are returning, save, of course Geraldine Farrar 
and Claudia Muzio. 

We shall miss Madame Berat ; and, still 
more, poor little Alice Miriam, so cruelly 
snatched from us by death when she was on the 
threshold of what promised to be a successful 
career. Jean Gordon now takes the position of 
leading contralto at .the Metropolitan, remark- 
able progress indeed, bearing in mind she was 
singing at a motion picture palace three seasons 
ago. But she richly deserves her success. 

The quintet of conductors — Bodanzky, 
Moranzoni, Papi, Hasselmans and Bamboschek 
— remains, and there is a possibility that Bruno 
Walter, the eminent director of the Munich 
Opera, will take a few guest performances of 
German opera. Personally, we would rather 
the Wagner operas were left to the able and 
reliable Bodanzky, who has no superstitious 
reverence for the Master's works, but makes 
judicious cuts where necessary. 

It is satisfactory to learn that a new stage 
manager of high artistic renown has been 
engaged — Carl Wy metal, Oberregisseur of the 
Vienna Opera House. It is to be hoped he will 
prevent any more such hideous and oleographic 
productions as that of "Lorelei" last season. 
The decor of "Die Tote Stadt" also was far 
from impressive. By far the best stage pic- 
tures last year were those provided by Joseph 
Urban in the exquisite revival of Mozart's 
"Cosi Fan Tutte," and he had a grim fight to 
gain his own way. 

Of course charming little Rosina Galli will 
return to superintend the ballets and to dance 
for our delight. What would Gatti and we 
others do without her? She will have some 
good chances in "L'Africaine" and the "William 
Tell" ballet, in the Venusberg scene in "Tann- 
hauser," and in "Thais" and "Romeo et 
Juliette." It is just possible that we may see 
a production of Strauss's spectacular "Josefs- 
legende," if that rather startling work can be 
toned down sufficiently to suit the tastes of the 
committee and subscribers. 

The incomparable chorus of the Metropoli- 
tan will doubtless achieve fresh glories under 
the redoubtable Setti. Never was there an 
opera chorus to approach it, and it is one of 
the chief glories of our leading opera house. 

Altogether the season ahead promises to be 
exceptionally brilliant, and should add fresh 
feathers to the already richly plumed cap of 
Cav. Giulio Gatti-Casazza. 



SuiADOWLAND 



Freudian Bacchanal 



(Continued from page 49) 



Then Hamlet and Horatio en- 
twined 

Chased by Ophelia, out of her 
mind. 

And Freud, from analytic Jen- 
sen Dream, 

Brings our Gradiva while the 
psychics scream : 

Lady Godiva passes with a 
shriek 

Unto the royal throne where 
Greek meets Greek. 

A Magic Don Juan and Mephistopheles 

Cup: produce 

A magic cup filled with electric 
juice. 

Electric The Magic Cup is placed; The 

Jazz: Magic Flute 

Of Mozart can be heard : then 

distant, mute 
Beethoven in a symphony erotic 
With Wagner beating time in a 

chaotic 
Accompaniment by Stratiss in a 

springsong 
Beating his hanklephone and 

brazen gong : 
The popular pulsating Humor- 

esque 
Brings Dvorak in the Jazz King 

picturesque, 
Playing the melody of Home 

Sweet Home 
Together on a double fine-tooth 

comb : 
The Aivakcning of Spring 

brings big, black brute, 
To beat the boards with his 

dramatic boot 
While trap drums and piano 

mingle in 
The thoughts of Thais while 

the niggers grin. 

Pandora's Thais and Aphrodite bring this 

Box: way 

Pandora's Box, painted with 

big bouquet 
Of bleeding hearts and orchids 

on the lid 
Beneath which all diseases have 

been hid. 

Now Lucifer opens Pandora's 
Box, 

Whence spring Delusions in 
their tragic socks : 

Delirium and Dreams and 
Merriment, 

Hallucinations and Discourage- 
ment. 

Then Watts, Eltinge, Brennen 

and Savoy, fair 
Out of their parts and dancing 

with Despair : 
Female Impersonators smartly 

dressed, 
Showing complexes which are 

self-expressed. 

Out of the Magic Cup with 

scythe and fork, 
Comes dancing Death — upon his 

head a cork : 
Looking for Boy and Girl, he 

makes a dive, 
But they elude him, very much 

alive. 

Poor Innocents, pursued by 

Death, ask for 
A lively dance : now Gluttony 

and Way- 
worn hands with Famine in a 

ghostly ring 
Around them while the Elemen- 

tals sing. 

Enter Upon the heights pale Chastity 

Chastity: appears, 

Cream pearls caught in her 
gleaming coral ears 



Desire 

of Wit: 



Flight of 
Chastity: 



Fall of 
Parsifal: 



Lecture in 
Purgatory: 



Enter 
Marriage: 



Captured 
Wit: 



Discord and 
Divorce: 



Boy and Girl 
Plight Troth: 



Enter All 
Too Human 
Nature: 



Burning when Wit approaches, 

full of fire, 
His brilliance heightened by a 

fresh desire. 

Wit chases Chastity, becomes 

the butt 
Of Lucifer who covers him 

with smut. 

Chastity flees away from Bac- 
chanal 

Into the opened arms of Parsi- 
fal. 

Parsifal falls beneath the add- 
ed weight, 

While Nietzsche rescues him 
at Hell's Wide Gate. 

Now Nietzsche lectures with 
audacity 

Touching at length on Female 
Chastity : 

Woman is ignorant — to the 
backbone 

When hurled towards marri- 
age, utterly alone ! 

Marriage beholds the two 
chaste souls embracing 

And comes unto them with 
white veils of lacing. 

Poor Wit, unconscious now, 

by Marriage caught 
Is bound in links of gold which 

she has brought. 

In self-defense, Chastity takes 

War's sword : 
Approaches Lucifer and hails 

him Lord : 
Lucifer calls Divorce : then 

frees poor Wit 
From chains of bondage which 

no longer fit. 

Denied by Wit, false Marriage 

seeks to bind 
The Boy and Girl whom Love 

at last makes blind : 
In blind-man's buff, they ex- 
change golden rings 
While Demons drag away the 

once used things : 
Washstand and Pitcher ; Books 

and Box and Cup 
Into the Gates of Hell are 

broken up. 
Both know the truth ! Their 

spirits are downcast : 
Their dreams have vanished 

and their hopes have passed : 
Now they must laugh and 

dance to hide the pain 
Love brings to them with 

Death, ere they regain 
Surcease from sorrow. 

Nature, here demands 

Of children wisdom in these 
censored lands : 

She bids the wise seem mad — 
accept the mask 

Lucifer holds, and go about 
your task : 

Ask not the why nor where- 
fore — modern youth : 

Beware of gazing on the naked 
Truth : 

Hypocrisy is waiting with a 
score 

Of music which has been dis- 
played before. 

Wild Women; Gentlemen and 
Spirits Free 

Advance and welcome her, 
Hypocrisy. 

She is a painted beauty : bring 
her in : 

Mad dancers in Manhattewan. 
begin : 

Join with the masters ; if out 
heads whirl round 

When we are dancing- 
thoughts cannot be bound. 




J|J 






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TO WHOM DOES DICK BARTHELMESS 
OWE HIS SUCCESS? 

There has been much talk 
of late about the "making of 
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the 



Where Bargaining is the Soul of Trade 



(Continued from page 27) 



from a mysterious opening in the rear of the 
shop. She is short and round and threads her 
way with ponderous deftness thru the maze of 
objects that cover the floor. If you like, you 
can tell her your wants, pay her very reason- 
able price, and go. But it will repay you to 
talk with her a while, for she is une savante, 
and with an old cross or bit of alabaster in her 
hand she will illuminate pages of history that 
may have seemed dark and impersonal to you 
before. 

Even more wonderful than her historical 
wisdom is the knowledge she has of her shop. 
It is her boast that she knows everything that 
is there, and, still more marvelous, where it is, 
and the tricks of legerdemain that she per- 
forms are beyond belief. 

Perhaps it is an old copper-and-enamel chest 
that excites your fancy as you catch a glimpse 
of it thru the legs of a Roman chair and be- 
hind a mummy case, half hidden under a pile 
of armor. 

"Touches pas!" cries madame, as you start 
moving the first half-dozen things in the way; 
"je vais vous le montrer, moi-meme." 

A few quick movements and it is before you, 
and not a speck of dust has been disturbed. 

"Marvelous," you say, thinking of her fourth 
dimensional powers. 

"Is it not? It is from Byzantium, at the 
time of Justinian — " and with a few words she 
re-creates the picture of that Emperor's court. 

She does not try to sell you more than you 
want, or can afford, and she has many things 
that she will not sell at all, things that are 
destined for the Louvre when she can no 
longer enjoy them. You come away with a 
very respectful feeling for this kindly old 
woman who lives among her cobwebs and her 
dreams. 

No Montparnassian need worry about the 
furnishings for his studio ; the real difficulty is 
to find the studio to furnish. Near the schools 
south and west of the Luxembourg are numer- 
ous shops that cater, at reasonable prices, to all 
tastes. There are pieces of French gothic and 
peasant oak, Spanish and Italian chests and 



1/ 



tables — simple things, so good that they need 
no tricky ornament or decorative scheme ; 
flippant delicacies from the days of the Grand 
Monarch ; dignified and meaningless formali- 
ties from the Empire ; an occasional example 
of that dreadful style that lacks all the qualities 
that are inherent in art ancient or modern, 
and so is known by the opprobrious epithet of 
"art nouveau." 

Between "art nouveau," which has stolen in- 
discriminately and unintelligently from many 
sources, and the thieves' market, there is an 
obvious analogy. The advantage in interest 
lies certainly with the latter, also known by 
the expressive title of the "Foire aux Puces," 
that spreads itself outside the Port St. Ouen 
on Sunday mornings. There are great piles of 
rags and small articles that the chiffoniers have 
gathered from the ash-cans of Paris during the 
week. Bundles of linen and bedding that have 
flapped on many clotheslines, equal to new in 
that all marks have been removed ; rugs and 
shawls and bits of silk from nobody knows, 
or will tell, where. The pancake vendor sets«up 
his stand and is surrounded by a hungry, 
chattering throng who eat the heavy cakes, as 
big as large plates, with great relish. 

Distinguished appearing gentlemen, silk 
hatted and gloved, poke over piles of fabric or 
ironmongery with their canes, in the hope, 
often realized of finding something of real 
value. The stout, tightly buttoned women of 
the toute petite bourgeoisie are out in force in 
search of bargains in household goods, and 
hold heated arguments over the quality, price, 
and probable origin of the articles on display. 
There are children everywhere, running thru 
the crowds, upsetting people and packages, 
tooting penny horns and shouting insults at 
irate grown-ups. It is a gala, and often not 
unprofitable day for the "mioches" of Mont- 
martre and their "monies!' 

To this have certain of the offspring of the 
Islanders descended. Whereas once they 
washed their neighbors' linen, they now steal it, 
probably finding this latter occupation both 
more profitable and more interesting. 




~\\xlT 



oh 



Everything old and small in Paris eventually finds its way 
to the stalls along the quais. Books predominate, some of 
them dating from the earliest days of printing, and Parisians 
and tourists alike spend many hours browsing among them 



Si-IADOWLAND 



Wanderings 

(Continued from page 59) 

The eminent Russian composer and conductor, 
Alexander Glazounoff, is not expected here until 
about February. He is to give orchestral con- 
certs in several of the large cities as well as in 
New York. Poor Glazounoff ! From all I 
have heard he is a sadly broken man. Not only 
was he for some time on the verge of starva- 
tion, but he could not even find music paper on 
which to set down his ideas and inspirations. 
Some of his symphonies, concerti and smaller 
works are already known in this country, but 
his own interpretations of them will be heard 
with interest. As a composer he is on a parity 
with Rachmaninoff. My impressions of him 
as a conductor when I heard him at Pavlovsk 
in 1915 were highly favorable, tho he struck 
me as more notable for masterfulness than 
magnetism. 



Yet another interesting Russian undertaking- 
is the coast to coast four of the Ukrainian 
National Chorus. They come under the aus- 
pices of Max Rabinoff , who in 1910 brought to 
this country, the first Russian ballet, including 
Pavlowa and Mordkin. Mr. Rabinoff was also 
responsible for introducing here the scenic and 
decorative art of Leon Bakst, Boris Anisfeld 
and Alexander Golovin. It is understood that 
for some time past he has acted as a sort of 
unofficial adviser on Russian affairs to the 
authorities at Washington. It may therefore 
be affirmed that the Ukrainian Choir comes 
under exceptionally experienced and responsible 
auspices. Those who, like the writer, have 
heard some of the great choirs of Russia are 
aware that there is no more glorious and im- 
pressive singing of its kind. The visiting choir 
comprises about forty carefully picked voices, 
and their singing of the haunting folk songs 
of the country is exquisite beyond description 
in words, and is bound to elicit a furore of 
enthusiasm wherever heard. It is indeed choral 
singing in excelsis. The Ukrainians have 
hereditary musical taste and a highly perfected 
technique, for which they can thank their ac- 
complished conductor, Alexander Koshetz. Be- 
sides the choir there are two soloists, Nina 
Koshetz, fitim the Moscow Opera, and Oda 
Slobodskaja, whose style is as dramatic and sen- 
sational in its way as is that of Chaliapin's, who, 
thank the gods, returns to the Metropolitan this 
season. 



An outstanding event of the musical season 
is the reappearance on the concert platform of 
the patriot-premier-pianist, Paderewski. Hav- 
ing spent his fortune as well as his time and 
talents for statesmanship on a country which 
has proved none too grateful, necessity compels 
him to resume the work which brought him 
fame and fortune in such large measure. 
Whether or not his technique and musical tal- 
ents are unimpaired he will be received with 
the enthusiasm and respect due to so truly 
great a man. George Engles, who made a 
marked success as pilot of the N. Y. Symphony 
Orchestra thru Europe, will be his manager, 
so we now have in New York Paderewski's 
first manager, Daniel Mayer, and his last. 
Mayer, who is the doyen of impresarii, can tell 
interesting stories, of his experiences as man- 
ager of famous artists, and one day he may 
do so for Shadowland. 

At the time of writing, Paderewski is an- 
nounced as candidate for the Presidency of 
Poland, and it may be presumed that in the 
event of his election his tour will be canceled. 



S. Jay Kaufman, who has been "round-the- 
towning" in half the capitals and great cities 
of Europe, was back on Broadway early in 
September. He is to be congratulated on his 
bright and amusing foreign letters to The 
Globe; letters which have made him the most 
popular man in Budapest and the most un- 
popular in Warsaw at the present moment. 
Pitts Sanborn has been making his annual 
gastronomic tour of Europe, and is said to be 
contemplating a new annotated edition of 
Brillat-Savarin's "La Philosophic du Gout." 




Good News 

That millions of women tell 



Millions of women, all the world over, 
have found a way to prettier teeth. Some 
by dental advice, some by this ten-day test. 

They have spread the news to others. 
Now wherever you look you see glistening 
teeth, and more smiles to show them. 

We urge you again to accept this test and 
prove to yourself what they know. 

Must combat film 

That viscous film you feel on teeth must 
be combated daily. Otherwise it clings, 
enters crevices and stays. It forms the 
basis of cloudy coats, including tartar. 

It also holds food substance which fer- 
ments and forms acid. It holds the acid in 
contact with the teeth to cause decay. 
Germs breed by millions in it. They, with 
tartar, are the chief cause of pyorrhea. 

Thus most tooth troubles are now traced 
to film, and very few escape them. 

Why it remains 

The tooth brush and the ordinary tooth 
paste cannot effectively combat it. S<b 
nearly everybody, however careful, had 
teeth discolor and decay. 

Dental science has for years tried to com- 
bat this condition. Two ways have now 
been found. Able authorities have proved 
them, and leading dentists now urge their 
daily use. 

REG. U.S. ^KHU^n^B^Mi^HMai 

The New-Day Dentifrice 

Endorsed by authorities and advised 
by leading dentists nearly all the 
world over today. All druggists sup- 
ply the large tubes. 



A new-type tooth paste has been per- 
fected, called Pepsodent. It corrects some 
old mistakes. These two great film com- 
batants are embodied in it for daily appli- 
cation. 

It does far more 

Pepsodent does more than that. It multi- 
plies the starch digestant in the saliva. 
That is there to digest starch deposits 
which may otherwise cling and form acids. 

It multiplies the alkalinity of the saliva. 
That is there to neutralize mouth acids — 
the cause of tooth decay. 

It omits soap and chalk, which now are 
known to bring undesired effects. 

You'll know at once 

Pepsodent brings quick results. A week 
will make them conspicuous. Once you see 
and feel them you will never go without 
them, or let your children miss them. 

Send the coupon for a 10-Day Tube. Note 
how clean the teeth feel after using. Mark 
the absence of the viscous film. See how 
teeth whiten as the film-coats disappear. 
Learn the delights of Pepsodent, with the 
added protection and beauty it brings. 

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coupon now. This is most important. 



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Page Seventy-^Three 



Su4t>OWLAND 



In its DECEMBER number 

MOTION PICTURE 
MAGAZINE 

Invites You 

to spend an hour 

with Dorothy Gish as she 
chats over the teacups with 
Adele Whitely Fletcher. 
Miss Gish ran away from 
picture-making when "Or- 
phans of the Storm" was 
completed, and now she 
comes back to play leading 
lady in Richard Barthel- 
mess new picture. 



to talk with H 



arry 

Carr about Mary Pick- 
ford's Problem. Perhaps 
you believe that Mary 
should be the happiest girl 
in the world because "she 
has everything" — Beauty, 
Youth, Wealth, Adoration, 
Fame. But Mary hasn't 
"everything." Her life 
holds a deep tragedy. . . . 

to give a moment's 



thought to "The Story of 
the Art Title." For years 
there has been a gradual 
turning toward the brief 
caption thrown upon a dec- 
orative background that ex- 
presses the motif of the film 
story. All picture-lovers 
should learn the history and 
psychology of the art title. 

to feast your eyes 



on an extraordinary beauti- 
ful portfolio of the players 
... on many double pic- 
torial spreads ... on ex- 
quisite full-page studies of 
the stars. 

MOTION PICTURE 
MAGAZINE 

for DECEMBER 

On all Newsstands November the first 



Japanese Sword Guards as Collecting Objects 



(Continued from page 22) 



hexagon continued in favor. This type is 
known in Japan as the Shitogi tsuba, from the 
resemblance it bears to the Shitogi cake, a con- 
fectionary used in Shinto ritual. 

The insufficient protection which such tsuba 
afforded to the hand, must have been felt by 
the aristocrats of the period, notwithstanding 
the fact their swords were worn chiefly as an 
ornamental detail of the court costume. A 
century later we find the Sitogi tsuba increas- 
ing in size, and embellished with a semi-cir- 
cular metal ring, which projected on both sides. 

The extension of the cavalry arm of the 
service led to the modification of the sword 
guard, and curved swords, intended for use 
with one hand by a mounted trooper, replaced 
the straight sword, which called for two- 
handed manipulation by the soldiers of the 
infantry. 

The uselessness of the Shitogi tsuba in agres- 
sive warfare, was presently recognized, and the 
swordsmiths were forced to revert to the 
primitive flat metallic discs. The form much 
in vogue in the twelfth century is called the 
Aoi tsuba, from the heart-shaped leaf of that 
plant, known in botany as Asarum. The guard 
is a square, the sides of which are developed 
into heart-shaped forms. 

The Aoi tsuba was generally made of copper 
and gilded, tho sometimes iron or leather was 
substituted. The surface of the guard was 
often decorated with flower motifs in low re- 
lief, or with the dragon-fly, a symbol of 
courage. 

Other decorative forms were flying pigeons, 
a bird , sacred to the War God, Hachiman, 
storks, and young pines. 

By the end of the fifteenth century the tsuba 
makers began to affix their signatures to their 
work. Iron was treated with acids to secure 
a rich dark tonality. Then simple inlaying in 
gold and brass appeared. The perforated 
tsuba was briefly popular. Pictorial ones fol- 
lowed, and carving became a fad with the 
sword-guard designers. 

Cloisonne was used on tsuba for the first 
time by the Hirata school. Then color became 
an important factor in the workmanship, and 
all possible alloys were utilized in order to 
produce the desired tone. Precious stones, 
as well as coral, were used in addition to the 
metal. 

Many of the guards are associated with cer- 
tain legends, the proper understanding of 
which adds greatly to their enjoyment. 

Collectors and lovers of Japanese objets 
d'art, even when they specialize in the selec- 



tion of their treasures, even when they prefer 
the purely ornamental designs, all confess to 
the attraction exerted upon them by the sub- 
jects depicted, the symbolism of the composi- 
tion, the hidden meaning of some scene. How- 
ever, few collectors can be found who have not 
sometimes had cause to bewail their inability 
to understand fully the artist's intention, or to 
name the personages represented. 

Animals and plants were curiously associated, 
to which some symbolism originally attached, 
but the original significance has too often been 
lost in the blind following after tradition. Thus 
the quail and the millet, the peacock and peony, 
Shishi and peony, swallow and willow, tiger 
and bamboo, plum blossom and moon, Chidori 
and waves, deer and maple, boar and Lespedeza, 
are of frequent occurrence. The snake is also 
often shown coiled around a tortoise, some- 
times with a jewel — reminiscent of the snake 
and egg myth. 

Another group of emblems in which the 
association is more strict is that of the "mes- 
sengers" with their resepective deities. For 
instance, the deer is the "messenger" of the 
God of Kasuga Shrine ; the crow that of the 
God of Kumano; the dove is consecrated to 
Hachiman, the monkey to the Sanno Shrines 
of Ohonamoch, the fox to Inari, and the white 
serpent to Benton Horary. Zodiacal charac- 
ters in the form of animals, are also found 
associated, the usual combination being the 
"night" hour with the "day" hour. 

When a workman was about to cast an im- 
portant bronze, he selected a lucky day for 
the operation, and when his work was finished 
he engraved upon it the month and the year, 
following it by a Japanese character signifying 
Lucky Day or Day of Luck Omen. 

The custom of assuming titles is not uncom- 
mon atnongst artists in Japan and a favorite 
one among the makers of sword guards appears 
to have been Niudo, which means a layman 
who has shaved his head, after the fashion of a 
Buddhist priest. 

The words Jiu, or Jiunin, meaning a resi- 
dent, or resident in, are frequently found upon 
sword guards, in connection with the names 
of the town and province in which the maker 
resided. 

Sword guards lend themselves very readily 
to decorative purposes and the variety of sub- 
jects to be met with in these objects is ex- 
tremely large. The native swordsmiths have, 
during the ages, developed a pronounced genius 
for the art treatment of an infinite variety of 
objects that would not, perhaps, have occurred 
to the Occidental artist. 



Ill UMiumni! nun imimi hi in nun in ii i inn iimimitiii minim 



Respecting the American Theater 



(Continued from page 66) 



actually one of those ghastly cripples with- 
out any legs who go stumping about the 
streets. 

If you dont care for such things, you have 
"Whispering Wires," a steadily deteriorating 
specimen of the murder-mystery play. Its first 
act is fairly exciting, but, after this is over, 
and Ben Johnson is dead, it ceases, of course, 
to have much excuse for existence. Its work 
as an actor-eradicator is done. 

Among the accidents of fall is a play of good 
manners, good speech, good actors and every- 
thing but good drama by Louis Evans Ship- 
man, who has gone into partnership with the 
Shuberts to produce "Fools Errant." This story 
of an earnest young man who imagines that or- 
ganizing a company union in a mining camp is 
a milestone in social progress, is burdened with 
much superfluous language. It is overwritten, 
as well as underwritten, by the author. 

There is little to be said for the other new 
pieces except that George White's "Scandals" 



is about as usual, rejoices in Paul Whiteman's 
Orchestra, and would faint dead away if some 
good old masculine comedian like De Wolf 
Hopper invaded its fairyland of love and laugh- 
ter .. . that just such a husky humorist, Frank 
Tinney, makes "Daffy Dills" a most entertain- 
ing piece while he is on the stage . . . that "So 
This Is London !" is the sort of "satire" on 
English manners in which the heroine, Elinor 
Beauchamp, says : "What is the phrase of com- 
mendation? Attaboy'?" . . . that "Manhattan," 
like many another public offender, changed it's 
name after the crime was discovered, and 
adopted the alias "Eastside-Westside" . . . that 
Mrs. Henry B. Harris gave "Lights Out" the 
O. K. before it entered the ring by asking that 
excellent villain, Felix Krembs, to try to play 
a comic crook . . . and that in the case of Ed- 
ward Locke's poisoning drama, "The Woman 
Who Laughed," the author got the title wrong ; 
it was the audience that laughed, and it laughed 
last. 



Page Seventy-Four 



SuiADOWLAND 



Grand Opera Over Here and Back There 



(Continued from page 50) 



great house in Barcelona ; a very presentable 
one in Madrid. 

But it is in Italy that the opera house comes 
to its apotheosis ; in Milan, Italy, that it reaches 
the very highest of all high peaks. La Scala ! 
It is a name to be breathed with respect. And 
veneration. The most famous music theater of 
all this broad world. Beyond even a shadow 
of a doubt. To its stage must come any singer 
who seeks fame ; international prestige and 
recognition. There is no alternative pathway. 

Recently La Scala has been completely re- 
built from the proscenium arch backward. 
The Milanese would not have countenanced any 
tampering with its historic six-tiered audito- 
rium, with the implacable clock set squarely 
over the curtain opening. All else went. The 
ancient stage and its almost equally ancient 
appurtenances. And many millions of lira 
were expended in building for La Scala the 
most modern, the best equipped of all theater 
stages. Now the old house offers not merely 
the distinction of its fine traditions of produc- 
tions but an arena in which they may be set as 
nowhere else — not even in the rejuvenated 
Theater Royal in Drury Lane, London. The 
production of La IVally which I saw in La 
Scala this year was absolutely impeccable. Be- 
fore it dimmed even the most glorious of my 
memories of super-productions in our own be- 
loved Metropolitan in New York. 

Yet the old San Carlo, in Naples, so very, 
very old that its frescoed ceiling seems all but 
ready to drop from aloft, is not less precious in 
its memories and in its traditions than the 
Milan house. It simply has not had the good 
fortune in recent years to be situated in a city 
blessed by an amazing prosperity. Because 
Naples halts, its opera halts. If Naples should 
again return to its ancient prestige and its 
wealth, San Carlos might again become the 
leading opera house of the world. The Italian 
mind would be quite as easily satisfied. Italy 
still would lead in the superb form of drama 
which is told thru the aid of the interpretive 
sense of music. 

Turn this taste back to ourselves. In the 
United States we have no opera ; or at least 
so little in proportion to our wealth and popu- 
lation that it is hardly worth the setting down. 
On that December day four years ago that the 
historic French Opera House, of New Orleans, 
went gloriously to its destruction in a Valhalla 
of smoke and flame, the opera in America 
suffered one of the most crushing losses in its 
history. I make this statement advisedly. 
Music lovers are going to rise up in protest 
and point their fingers to the Metropolitan — its 
long list of real achievements, its great plans 
for the future. 

I know the Metropolitan. I love it, even tho 
I could wish many times that it were less of a 
social institution and more of an opera house. 



But the Metropolitan was opened but as yester- 
day — 1883. It has had but little opportunity to 
acquire traditions. The French Opera House, 
of New Orleans, built in 1857 after the 
model of the Lycee in Barcelona, was fairly 
aromatic in its memories. It was rarely ever 
prosperous. Well, what of that? The opera 
may not have prospered in Bourbon Street, but 
it endured. Please note that. On the night 
preceding the fire that ended its career, there 
was opera in the old house ; on the following 
night there was to have been opera again ; and 
for three months thereafter, or up until the 
coming of Lent. In that old house there were 
scenery and costumes for more than two hun- 
dred standard operas. 

The point at which I am driving is that opera 
was in the very heart of the old New Orleans. 
That made' its Opera House — no matter what 
else it was, forever a thoro artistic success. 
Opera has crept into the heart of metropolitan 
New York. Two opera houses in the height of 
the season are not enough to satisfy the beat- 
ings of that civic organ there. Opera has never 
been in the heart of Boston. Which is the 
chief reason why the fine red-brick Boston 
Opera House in Huntington Avenue — with one 
of the best-planned and most attractive audi- 
toriums in all creation — finally had to close its 
doors, disband its resident company and suffer 
transformation into a theater for high-grade 
burlesque and spectacular productions. 

Recently a huge new opera house has been 
completed in Rochester, N. Y. — at a cost well 
into the millions of dollars. Its donor, Mr. 
George Eastman, has shown sage wisdom in a 
frank statement that the house must spend 
many of its evenings in motion-picture produc- 
tion, until such time as the town, itself, can 
cultivate a musical taste such as to justify a 
greater attention to music in that auditorium. 
He is quite right. . . . One of my favorite 
opera houses, anywhere, is the historic theater in 
Bordeaux which was first built in the days of 
Louis XVI. It still is a glorious place. It has 
a competent resident company which sings 
thoroly capable opera — if not glorious. Bor- 
deaux is approximately the same size as Roch- 
ester. But its musical taste has been two cen- 
turies in the making. In another century or 
thereabouts we ought to have a pretty well ad- 
vanced musical taste here in the United States. 
In that day, perhaps long before, we should 
have many opera houses — real opera houses 
with their own resident companies exchanging 
their stars and engaged in the constant produc- 
tion of creative work. 

We have laid the foundations for that taste 
already. Yet our work is by no means done. 
It may be hardly more than fairly begun. The 
task is a difficult one and fraught with many 
problems. But it is not impossible. In that is 
our great American artistic hope for the future. 



lliliimMMili'imimiiimimiiiiiiiill'Kilimilllllin-'iiliM) 

Our Lyrical Psycho-Realist 

(Continued from page 67) 



acute observation, wherewith Aiken pricks his 
own balloon. When he says that "Brutality 
is no substitute for magic. One must take one's 
mood alive and singing, or not at all," one 
thinks inevitably of the brutalities in his youth- 
ful narrative pieces. When he describes an- 
other poet's verse as being "as liquid and per- 
suasive as drifting in a gondola. There are no 
. . . emotions so intense as to shake one's 
repose," one recalls Aiken's foolish striving 
after musical effects which are no more stimu- 
lating. When he mentions somewhat scorn- 
fully the "current, romantic nostalgia for the 
remote and strange," one wonders whether the 
vicarious wish-fulfillments of his several heroes 
are not touched with the same sickness. The 
chief trouble with this poet would seem to be 
not his unawareness of the modern poet's world 
so much as his unawareness of his own short- 
comings in the interesting direction in which 
he tends to go. Certainly his chosen themes 
afford him a rare scope, an almost unexplored 
territory. "Senlin" alone is an accomplishment 
which bids one look for the final overcoming 



of these stubborn faults. At the same time 
one feels in Aiken's work one great difficulty. 
It is the eternal quarrel in him between the 
pure lyricist, the special pleader for the musical 
character of poetry, and the protagonist of 
"psycho-realism." Too often his preoccupa- 
tion with psychology escapes the nets of his 
music. He can seldom resist a musical effect. 
He is always trying to penetrate to a level of 
consciousness which the music he masters fails 
to express. For, mark you, Aiken's harmonics 
bear little analogy to that of a Strauss or a 
Stravinski. He is the Schubert of poetry 
fiddling in the laboratories of Viennese psy- 
chologists. This is the root of his unsuccess. 
How and when will he reconcile these con- 
flicting impulses? A recent piece of fiction by 
Aiken in the Dial would seem, perhaps, to indi- 
cate that the true medium for the psycho- 
realist _ in him, is prose narrative. Here the 
prose is "alive and singing," rich in memorable 
charm and psychological insight. As for the 
musician in our poet, he may fulfil himself 
in the art of the self-sufficient lyric. 




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SuADOWLAND 

for DECEMBER 

Read "Importing Europe's Foremost 
Stage," an illuminating, powerful article 
on the Moscozv Art Theater, ivhose en- 
tire first line is coming to New York in 
January. The realism of this theater of 
the Russians is far superior to realism 
as ive know it in our theaters. 

Among the plays to be presented is 
Gorky's "The Lower. Depths." Photo- 
graphs from this production zvill illustrate 
the article in the- December Shadowland. 



"Convenient to Everywhere" 

RITTENHOUSE 

HOTEL 

22d and Chestnut Sts. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Rooms with hot and cold 
running water 

Rooms with 

bath 



. $2 UP 
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Club Breakfast, 50c up 
Special Luncheon, 90c 
Evening Dinner, $1.25 



As well as service a la carte 



Music During Luncheon, 
Dinner and Supper 



Page Seventy-Five 



SUADQWLAND 



SHADOWLAND 

SPEAKS TO THE 

ART LOVER 



FOREWORD: 

The future of painting resides 
in America. We have the talent, 
the serious purpose ; we have a 
group of young men whose 
work is daily finding a larger 
and more enthusiastic audience. 
The aim of our new art — 
Futurism, Impressionism, and 
the like — is the overthrow of 
photographic realism, and the 
restoration of design to paint- 
■ ing. 

RESUME': 

Since June, 1921, Shadow- 
land has been publishing a 
series of critical articles, written 
by recognized authorities, on the 
work of our new American 
artists, and reproducing in full 
color two or three distinctive 
compositions of each man. 

Among the artists whose work 
has been reviewed and repro- 
duced are Allen Tucker, Ernest 
Lawson, George Bellows, Bry- 
son Burroughs, William Yar- 
row, Maurice Prendergast, 
Homer Boss, Thomas Benton, 
John Marin, Preston Dickinson, 
John Sloan. 

DECLARATION: 

Shadowland plans to con- 
tinue this series that has at- 
tracted so much cooperation and 
favorable comment. 

In the November number 
number there will be a critique 
and reproductions of the work 
of Hayley Lever, than whom no 
living painter of landscapes has 
a deeper feeling for movement. 
"The waters on his canvases vi- 
brate in the light ; his trees feel 
the impact of the winds." 

In December, Shadowland 

will reproduce and review the 
work of Charles Dem'uth who, 
you will remember, two years 
ago in Paris, executed a series 
of circus scenes and vaudeville 
phantasies whose impeccable 
artistry drew world-wide com- 
ment. 

SuADOWLAND 

FOR 

NOVEMBER 



The Business of Manufacturing Literature 



(Continued from page 41) 



Theodore Dreiser, en the other hand, passes 
up Hollywood and all that therein is. He lived 
out at the Hollywood Hotel for a while and did 
his writing. But one day he rose up with fury 
and said he refused to have further dealings 
with any souls so filled with bromides and plati- 
tudes. He gathered up his belongings and 
moved to Glendale, a suburb of Los Angeles 
that nestles back in the mountains. He is so 
determined not to have "nothing to do with 
nobody," as Sis Hopkins says, that he will not 
reveal his whereabouts to his best friends. 

Mrs. Gertrude Atherton is another of the 
colony who favors solitude. Only when actu- 
ally writing however. At ordinary times, she 
is very friendly and gregarious : but when the 
divine sparks begin to fly, she betakes herself 
into the silence. No one knows where she goes. 
Telegrams, letters, friends cannot reach her. 
Which fact the folks down at the Goldwyn 
Studio bear with Christian fortitude — for a 
reason. Mrs. Atherton composes all her novels 
on a small folding typewriter which has a 
sound like someone trying to have a fit in a 
tin-can factory. On the one occasion when an 
inspiration came on suddenly at the studio, 
everyone else had to leave. Hearing the clatter 
someone asked a witty scenarist what the riot 
was about. "Mrs. Atherton writing a silent 
drama," was the reply. 

Rita Weiman, who is periodically a member 
of the Hollywood literary colony, confesses 
that she has to get herself "fixed up" before 
she can write her plays. Many of the Holly- 
wood writers, having been newspaper men and 
women, can hammer out a story in a boiler 
factory. Miss Weiman says frankly that she 
has to go to some place where she can be 
surrounded by beautiful things, and she always 
wears a green silk Chinese mandarin robe with 
amethyst trimmings. If the green robe faded, 
there wouldn't be any more plays : that's flat 
and final. 

One of the interesting figures in the Holly- 
wood colony is Frank R. Adams, the author of 
"The Time, the Place and the Girl," "A Stub- 
born Cinderella," and other big stage successes. 
He is one of the successful playwrights in the 
history of the stage who deliberately gave it 
up and turned to writing short stories. He says 
it is less difficult and trying. Mr. Adams lives 
in Michigan during the summer and in Los 
Angeles in the winter. He always rents an 
office and works like Peter B. Kyne, but writes 
all his stuff long hand, with an enormous pen — 
to be copied by his young secretary. 

Frances Marion, the highest paid scenario 
writer in the world, has lately turned novelist 
— not to speak of motion picture producer. She 
has a peculiar way of writing. With a pencil, 
she writes the beginnings of sentences, intro- 
ductions, etc. Then, from that, she dictates to 
a stenographer. 

Gene Stratton Porter, the "best seller" of all 
women authors, lives in a suburb of Los 
Angeles. She also dictates her stories to a 
stenographer. She says it was difficult for her 
to learn to do it, but she was rewarded for the 
effort by the saving of actual writing labor. 
She is a housewifely Middle Westerner who 
mingles very little with the literary colony. 

Harold Bell . Wright has several beautiful 
homes in the environs of Los Angeles, but is 
actually living at the present time in Arizona on 
account of his health. Of all living writers he 
has the most unique and interesting methods. 
When the idea for a novel comes to him, he 
writes it down on a card — just the bare idea 
In his study he has a big wire rack, like the 
rack that country hotels use for the mail of 
the guests. He places his card there ; lights 



his pipe and studies it. Then he tears up the 
card and substitutes three cards which divide 
the idea between them — the preparation for 
the story, the climax, and the "blow off" as 
authors term the denouement. Eventually these 
cards are divided and divided until, before he 
begins actually to write a word, he has a card 
showing every bit of description and every 
conversation that will appear in the book. 

Stephen French Whitman, whose "Predes- 
tined" is considered by many critics to be the 
best novel ever written by an American, has a 
somewhat similar method. He makes a map of 
the story with colored pencil — one color for 
each character. Mr. Whitman's neighbors in 
Los Angeles are Mary Pickford's mother and 
Cleveland Moffat. 

Aniza Yezierska lives in Los Angeles a part 
of her time. Altho this immigrant woman 
wrote because she just had to, she confesses that 
writing "comes hard" for her. She says every 
story is a life and death struggle. 

For the most part, the authors work about 
four hours a day. One among them occasion- 
ally works eight or ten. Sometimes when he is 
in the heat of a story, he stays at his typewriter 
all night. This is Gordon Ray Young, writer 
of South Sea Stories. Unlike Harold Bell 
Wright, Mr. Young seldom knows what his 
stories are to be about when he begins them. 

Gouverneur Morris mingles tennis with writ- 
ing. He works in the morning, plays tennis 
in the afternoon, then has another whack at 
the story. He says nothing clears up his ideas 
like tennis. If he finds a story is not going well, 
he always takes up his racquet and fairly bangs 
the inspiration in the nose until it will behave 
as it should. 

A picturesque member of the Colony is 
Konrad Bercovici. He is a Roumanian and for 
a long time lived with Gypsies of that country. 
From the fireside tales he heard the old Gypsies 
tell, he learned the art of story-telling. Not 
consciously however. His ambition was to be- 
come a concert violinist. He made his way 
to America where, to keep the wolf from the 
door, he wrote a story of his old Gypsy life. It 
was eagerly grabbed up. The editors called 
for more. Bercovici, in two years, has become 
one of the highest paid magazine writers in 
the world. He says that Los Angeles is the 
ideal place to write — or would be if he and 
Charley Chaplin were not friends. Chaplin 
gets him over at his house and they sit up all 
night talking. 

Elinor Glyn lives at a Los Angeles hotel. All 
her writing is done at night. While the divine 
fire is burning she rides around in an automobile 
nearly all day and comes back for the soul 
struggle at dewy eve. She mingles socially a 
great deal in Los Angeles. One of her pecu- 
liarities is her hatred for turnips. On one 
occasion she indignantly left a dinner-table 
where the heinous vegetables were served. She 
regarded it as a personal insult. 

I have saved a surprise for the last. One of 
the most practical, money-making, knock-'em- 
dead, sure-fire writing successes at the literary 
colony is the most fastidious and temperamental 
in his methods : Richard Walton Tully. He is 
the author of "The Bird of Paradise," "The 
Rose of the Rancho," and many big hits on the 
stage and screen ; but his writing is always 
done to music. He says it is simply impossible 
for him to write unless a tune is being un- 
raveled. Ordinarily a phonograph will do the 
work, but Mr. Tully confesses with a rueful 
smile that he has several times had a string 
orchestra sent to his house to play in the room 
adjoining his study when he had a difficult 
climax to compose. 




Page Seventv-Six 



Si-IADOWLAND 



Hayley Lever, 
Individualist 

(Continued from page 11) 

Lever. The houses, the harbor, the water, the 
masts picking angular patterns into the sky, 
the boats riding restlessly at anchor, all 
enveloped in the elusive atmosphere of Corn- 
wall — no one has caught these things as Hayley 
Lever has caught them, or put down so much 
of their peculiar life and vitality. 

An American painter who recently visited 
St. Ives, writes : "I saw the boats dancing in 
St. Ives harbor. But they dont dance any 
better than Lever's." 

That statement illuminates one side of 
Lever's work : the feeling for movement, for 
the authentic vibration of living things that we 
find in his pictures. His waters move and vi- 
brate in the light. His trees feel the impact 
of the winds. The light quivers and glows 
upon the earth. 

Look at Smeaton's Quay, St. Ives, with the 
white quay sweeping out into the water to meet 
the dark hill, the boats nodding restlessly all 
around. Or Harbor, St. Ives, with its slowly 
undulating hill, the angular houses, and in the 
foreground the jolly, dancing boats. Or 
Morning, St. Ives Harbor, which won the 
Sesnan medal at Philadelphia in 1917. 

St. Ives and Lever have almost become 
synonymous. But Lever has painted many 
other places. After a period of work and study 
at St. Ives he went to Paris, where he spent 
two years. Later he went to London, and 
twelve years ago he came to America. 

Gloucester first attracted him here. Among 
its winding streets and gardens brilliant with 
masses of flowers, its square cottages sur- 
rounded by gnarled trees, and the water and the 
boats under the dark blue sky of Cape Ann, 
he found interesting material for his art. 
Flower Garden, Gloucester, is an excellent 
example, its earth bursting with life, and 
light-saturated waters. New York, too, has 
furnished him with subjects. Fifth Avenue is 
a fresh impression of a familiar view. 

At the moment, Lever is in Woodstock, 
teaching at the Art Students' League's summer 
school. Already he has made stacks of water- 
color studies of the Catskills, and we may ex- 
pect that delightful bit of the American land- 
scape to be added very soon to Lever's country. 

Lever's work shows good use of color, ex- 
cellent draughtsmanship and arrangement of 
masses, and a fine feeling for the suggestion of 
life and movement. He is a true catholic in 
his appreciations, and is able to become enthu- 
siastic over art from the antique to the ultra- 
modern, not forgetting the Oriental. A man 
may draw inspiration from all sources, he be- 
lieves. The only deadly sin is imitation. Those 
who know Lever's work will realize how little 
of a sinner he is — in this respect. 

His work is represented in many museums in 
America and abroad : in the Corcoran Gallery 
at Washington, the Pennsylvania Academy of 
Fine Arts, the Detroit Museum, the Duncan 
Phillips Memorial Collection, thp New South 
Wales National Art Gallery, to mention a few. 
He has taken many prizes : the silver medal 
of the National Arts Club in 1914, the Carnegie 
Prize of the National Academy of Design in 
the same year, the gold medal at the National 
Arts Club in 1915, the gold medal at the 
Panama Pacific Exposition in the same year, 
and the Philadelphia Water Color prize in 1918, 
and several others. He is a member of the 
National Arts Club, the New Society of 
Artists, and several British art societies. 

Hayley Lever believes, and his work illus- 
trates his belief, that a man must not be afraid 
to record his impressions honestly, without re- 
gard to how others have recorded similar im- 
pressions. He has no patience with the pre- 
tentious lucubrations of mere scholasticism. 
There are those who shun the scholasticism of 
tradition only to put themselves to school to 
the fads of the moment, the scholasticism of 
the vulgar. 

Ho ! for more good, active truants from these 
eternal art sects. Ho ! for more Hayley 
Levers, more men who realize that all art is 
lyrical — a song of the individual spirit in the 
dark forest of the world. 



Are We a Nation of Low-Brows? 

It is charged that the public is intellectually incompetent. Is this true? It is charged 

thzd the public is afraid of ideas, disinclined to think, unfriendly to culture. This is 

a serious matter. The facts should be faced frankly and honestly. 



Without Cultural Leadership, 

The main criticism, as we find it, 
is that the people support ventures 
that are unworthy, that represent no 
cultural standards. The public is fed 
on low-brow reading matter, low-brow 
movies, low-brow theatrical produc- 
tions, low-brow music, low-brow news- 
papers, low-brow magazines. We think 
the criticism is unfair in that it does 
not recognize the fact that the public 
is without cultural leadership. Those 
who have the divine spark get off by 
themselves. We believe the public has 
never" had a real chance, never had 
an opportunity to get acquainted with 
the great and the beautiful things of 
life. Given half a chance, the public 
will respond. 

We believe there has been enough 
talk about the public's inferior taste. 



The time has come to give the public 
an opportunity to find out something 
about philosophy, science and other 
higher things. And it must be done 
at a low price, because the average 
person's pocketbook is not fat. As 
it stands, the publishers charge about 
five dollars a volume, and then won- 
der why the people stand aloof. 

We believe we have a way to find 
out if the people are interested in 
the deeper problems of life. And 
the first thing we decided was to 
fix a price that shall be within the 
reach of the person with the most 
slender purse. 

We have selected a library of 25 
books, which we are going to offer 
the public at an absurdly low price. 
We shall do this to find out if it 
is true that the public is not going 
to accept the better things when 



once given the chance. And we 

shall make the price so inviting that 

there shall be no excuse on the 
ground of ex-pense. 

All Great Things Are Simple 

Once the contents of the following 
25 books are absorbed and digested, 
we believe a person will be well on 
the road to culture. And by culture 
we do not mean something dry-as- 
dust, something incomprehensible to 
the average mind — genuine culture, 
like great sculpture, can be made to 
delight the common as well as the 
elect. The books listed below are all 
simple works and yet they are great 
— all great things are simple. They 
are serious works, of course, but we 
do not think the public will refuse 
to put its mind on serious topics. 
Here are the 25 books : 



Are the People Ready to Read These 25 Books? 



Schopenhauer's Essays. For those who 
regard philosophy as a thing of abstrac- 
tions, vague and divorced from life, Schop- 
enhauer will be a revelation. 

The Trial and Death of Socrates. 
This is dramatic literature as well as sound 
philosophy. 

Meditations of Marcus Aurelius. 
This old Roman emperor was a paragon of 
wisdom and virtue. He will help you. 

The Discovery of the Future. H. 
G. Wells asks and answers the question: Is 
life just an unsolvable, haphazard struggle? 

Dialogues of Plato. This volume takes 
you into Plato's immortal circle. 

Foundations of Religion. Prof. Cook 
asks and answers the question: Where and 
how did religious ideas originate? 

Studies in Pessimism. Schopenhauer 
presents a well-studied viewpoint of life. 
The substance of his philosophy. 

The Idea of God in Nature. John 
Stuart Mill. How the idea of God may 



come naturally from observation of nature is 
explained in this volume. 

Life and Character. Goethe. The 
fruits of his study and observation is ex- 
plained in this volume. 

Thoughts of Pascal. Pascal thought 
a great deal about God and the Universe, 
and the origin and purpose of life. 

The Olympian Gods. Tichenor. A 
study of ancient mythology. 

The Stoic Philosophy. Prof. Gilbert 
Murray. He tells what this belief consisted 
of, how it was discovered, and what we can 
to-day learn from it. 

God: Known and Unknown. Samuel 
Butler. A really important work. 

Nietzsche: Who He Was and AVhat 
He Stood For. A carefully planned study. 

Sun Worship and Later Beliefs. 
Tichenor. A most important study for 
those who wish to understand ancient reli- 
gions. 

Primitive Beliefs. Tichenor. You get 



a clear idea from this account of the beliefs 
of primitive man. 

Three Lectures on Evolution. 
Ernst Haeckel's ideas expressed so you can 
understand them. 

From Monkey to Man. A compre- 
hensive review of the Darwinian theory. 

Survival of the Fittest. Another 
phase of Darwinian theory. 

Evolution vs. Religion. You should 
read this discussion. 

Reflections on Modern S c i e n c e. 
Prof. Huxley's reflections definitely add to 
your knowledge. 

Biology and Spiritual Philosophy. 
An interesting and instructive work. 

Bacon's Essays. These essays con- 
tain much sound wisdom that still holds. 

Emerson's Essays. Emerson was a 
friend of Carlyle, and in some respects a 
greater philosopher. 

Tolstoi's Essays. His ideas will direct 
you into profitable paths of thought. 



25 Books— 2,176 Pages— Only $1.95— SendNoMoney 



If these 25 books were issued in the 
ordinary way they might cost you 
as much as a hundred dollars. We 
have decided to issue them so you 
can get all of them for the price 
of one ordinary book. That sounds 
inviting, doesn't it? And we mean 
it, too. Here are 25 books, contain- 
ing 2,176 pages of text, all neatly 
printed on good book paper, 'Sl/ 2 ^5 
inches in size, bound securely in card 
cover paper. 

You can take these 25 books with 
you when you go to and from work. 
You can read them in your spare 
moments. You can slip four or five 
of them into a pocket and they will 
not bulge. You can investigate the 
best and the soundest ideas of the 
world's greatest philosophers — and the 
price will be so low as to astonish 
you. No, the price will not be $25 
for the 25 volumes. Nor will the 
price be $5. The price will be even 



less than half that sum. Yes, we 
mean it. Believe it or not, the price 
will be only $1.95 for the entire 
library. That's less than a dime a 
volume. In fact, that is less than 
eight cents per volume. Surely no one 
can claim he cannot afford to buy 
the best. Here is the very best at 
the very least. Never were such great 
works offered at so low a price. 
All you have to do is to sign your 
name and address on the blank be- 
low. You don't have to send any 
money. Just mail us the blank and 
we will send you the 25 volumes de- 
scribed on this page — you will pay 
the postman $1.95 plus postage. And 
the books are yours. 

If you want to send cash with 
order remit $2.25. 

Are we making a mistake in ad- 
vertising works of culture? Are we 
doing the impossible when we ask 
the people to read serious works? 



Are we wasting our time and money? 
We shall see by the manner in 
which the blank below comes into 
our mail. 
— — ""■Send No Money Blank «••■ 

Haldeman-Julius Company, 

Dept. K-24, Girard, Kans. 
I want the 25 books listed on this 
page. I want you to send me these 
25 books by parcel post. On de- 
livery I will pay the postman $1.95 
plus postage, and the books are to 
be my property without further pay- 
ments of any kind. Also, please 
send me one of your free 64-page 
catalogs. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Note: Persons living in Canada or 
other foreign countries must send 
$2.25 with order. 



^geei\itv 



Distinctive Features in the December Number 



'If I Were Fourteen," 

by Lillian Montanye 



"The Beauty Parlor," 
by Dorothy Calhoun 

and Gladys Hall 



Additional Features 

by Artists and Experts 



The first article of a very human and penetrating series that will 
appeal to all women — from the Flapper to the Grandmother. "Why, 
that's exactly how I'm feeling and thinking right now !" Miss Four- 
teen will exclaim as she reads this sane, sympathetic narration. "If I 
Were Twenty-One" follows, in the January number. 

A one-act play that will give you many a chuckle and make you think, 
as well. A group of sophisticated New York specialists open a 
Beauty Shop in a Middle-Western town. Wives are made over and 
husbands wake up ! And you'll never guess the surprise climax ! 

Part II of "The Place of the Beauty Specialist in the Community," 
by Mme. Helena Rubinstein, the woman at the top of her profession. 
An illustrated article that settles your question : "Shall I bob my 
hair?" A portfolio of exquisite ladies, photographs of chic Parisian 
costumes, beautiful color prints, sketches, etc. 



Page Seventy-Seven 



£lue>owwand 



DONT LOOK LIKE A PAINTING! 




Extract From 

JXCOTION "PICTURE 
MAGAZINE 

I have tried about every powder 
on the market and have done 
considerable experimenting on 
myself and on others. There is 
no denying that there are several 
very fine powders on the market. 
but- I felt that none just suited 
me, and so I determined to make 
one that did. You see, in the 
first place, I had some very pe- 
culiar ideas about the complexion 
and was very hard to please. I 
am very particular about tints 
and staying qualities, and I want 
a powder that does not look like 
powder, that will not blow off in 
the first gust of wind, that is not 
too heavy nor too light, that will 
not injure the complexion, and 
that will not change color when 
it becomes moist from perspira- 
tion or from the natural oil that 
comes thru the pores of the skin. 
I also like a pleasant aroma to 
my powder, and one that lingers. 
After experimenting with pow- 
dered starch, French chalk, mag- 
nesia carbonate, powdered orris 
root, rice powder, precipitated 
chalk, zinc oxide, and other 
chemicals, and after consulting 
authorities as to the effects cf 
each of these on the skin, T 
finally settled on a formula that 
has been tried out under all 
conditions and that suits me to 
a nicety. And, most important 
of all, perhaps, this powder when 
finally perfected had the remark- 
able quality of being equally good 
for the street, for evening dress 
and for motion picture make-up. 
I use the same powder before the 
camera for exteriors and interi- 
ors, and for daily use in real life. 
So do many of my friends, and 
they all tell me that they will use 
no other so long as they can get 
mine. As to the tint, it is a 
mixture of many colors. I 
learned from an artist years ago 
that there are no solid flat colors 
in nature. Look carefully at 
anything you choose and you will 
see every color of the rainbow in 
it. Take a square inch of sky, for 
instance, and examine it closely 
and you will find every color 
there. Just so with the face. Any 
portrait painter will tell you that 
lie uses nearly every color when 
painting flesh. Nothing is white 
— not even snow, because it re- 
flects every color that is around 
it. White face powder is absurd. 
White is not a color. The general 
tone of my powder is something 
like that of a ripe peach, and 1 
therefore call it "Corliss Palmer 
Peach Bloom Powder." 



USE a powder that is individual in color and 
quality and prove that beauty is yours. 

We recommend this powder to you ! You — 
who love the beautiful ! 

One shade — the peach bloom — has proved un- 
equalled in day attire, evening dress and before 
the camera. 

Wonderful as to its even texture, lovely in its fragrance, and unusual in its 
sticking quality. 

Be natural — use the shade of powder to blend with the flesh color of nature. 

Corliss Palmer Powder 

Price One Dollar the Box 

A written description is useless — -a trial proves the truth ! 

Remember that we have the exclusive selling rights to Corliss Palmer Powder. 

Send a dollar bill or one-cent or two-cent stamps and we will mail you a box 
of this exquisite powder. 



WILTON CHEMICAL CO. 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Cut out and mail today 

WILTON CHEMICAL CO. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

For the enclosed One Dollar please send me a 
box of CORLISS PALMER POWDER. 

N ame 

Street 

City and State 




The Camera Contest 

(Continued from page 54) 

Monthly prizes of at least $25, $15, and $10 
are awarded in order of merit, together with 
three prizes of yearly subscriptions to Shadow- 
land to go to three honorary mentions. All 
prize winning pictures will probably be pub- 
lished in Shadowland. 

The committee of judges includes : 

Joseph R. Mason, chairman of committee, 
Corresponding Secretary P. P. A. ; Eugene V. 
Brewster, Editor and Publisher of Shadow- 
land ; Louis F. Bucher, Secretary Associated 
Camera Clubs of America; Dr. A. D. Chaffee, 
President of P. P. A. ; Arthur D. Chapman, 
Advisory Committee P. P. A. ; G. W. Harting, 
Advisory Committee P. P. A. ; Dr. Chas. H. 
Jaeger, contributing member Pittsburgh and 
Los Angeles Salons ; Miss Sophie L. Lauff er, 
Secretary Dept. of Photography, Brooklyn In- 
stitute of Arts and Science ; George P. Lester, 
Member P. P. A. and Orange Camera Club ; 
Nickolas Muray, portrait photographer ; John 
A. Tennant, Editor and Publisher of Photo 
Miniature ; Miss Margaret Watkins, ex-Record- 
ing Secretary P. P. A. ; Clarence H. White, 
ex-President P. P. A. 

The jury of selection, to be announced each 
month with their selections, consists of three 
members, to be chosen from the committee or 
the membership of the society. No member of 
the jury thus chosen for any given month shall 
submit pictures for that month's contest. 

Shadowland desires that every camera en- 
thusiast reap benefit from this contest and to 
this end makes the inclusion of the following 
data re contesting prints imperative : 

(a) Date and hour of exposure. 

(b) Stop number used. 

(c) Printing medium used. 

(d) Character of print — whether straight 
or manipulated. 

(e) Make of camera and lens. 

Any print previously published is not eligible. 

No printing medium is debarred, but capa- 
bility of good reproduction will be a factor in 
the selection of prints. 

Contestants may submit prints up to any num- 
ber and to as many of the monthly contests as 
they desire. 

Prints received on or prior to the first of 
each month to be considered entered in that 
month's contest. 

Name and address of maker, title and num- 
ber must be printed or plainly written upon the 
back of each print. Return address to be 
written plainly upon package. 

Prints must be packed flat. A small mount 
makes for safety in handling but is not re- 
quired. Prints will be acknowledged upon their 
receipt. 

Rejected prints will be returned immediately, 
provided proper postage for the purpose be in- 
cluded. It is, however, understood that 
Shadowland reserves the right to reproduce 
any print submitted and to hold such for a 
reasonable time for that purpose. 

Special care will be taken of all prints sub- 
mitted, but neither The Brewster Publications 
nor the Pictorial Photographers of America 
assume responsibility for loss or damage. 

All prints and all communications relative to 
the contest are to be sent to Joseph R. Mason, 
Art Center, 65 East 56th Street, New York. 

No prints will be considered if sent elsewhere 
than stated above. Submission of prints will 
imply acceptance of all conditions. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Tenth Annual Exhibition of the Pitts- 
burgh Salon of Photography, under the aus- 
pices of the Photographic Section of the 
Academy of Science and Art, will be held in 
the Galleries of the Carnegie Institute, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, from March 2nd-31st, 
inclusive, 1923. 

The last day for receiving prints for entry 
is Monday, February 5th. Information con- 
cerning the conditions of entry can be ob- 
tained from Charles K. Archer, Secretary, 1412 
Carnegie Building, Pittsburgh, Penn. 



Page Seventy-Eight 



EDWARD LANGER PRINTING CO., INC., 
JAMAICA, NEW YORK CITT. 




A MAGAZINE to help every woman to be more beautiful than she is and then help her 
to preserve that beauty. Every woman wants beauty: a strong, healthy body; grace; 
charm ; a spirited, active mind. She knows that some are born beauties — others have 
it thrust upon them. What she does not know is that all may attain it if they will. A 
few years ago, those who used cosmetics in any , form were called "painted ladies." 
Those who went systematically thru forms of exercise to improve their figures were "vain." 
Now, the use of cosmetics is universal. Physical culture is a habit. Every woman knows that 
she must look her best. She not only tries to assist nature, but to improve it. This is where the 
new magazine <|^©el"ut\ 



tv* comes in. 



Elsie Ferguson 
Pauline Frederick 



LILLIAN MONTANYE, 

Editor 
Editorial Advisory Board 

Corliss Palmer 
Alla Nazimova 



Katherine MacDonald 
Jeanette Pinaud 



4%G<a\ltv* magazine is the modern 



Pandora s Box 

We have gathered about us some of the world's greatest authorities, and are supplying our read- 
ers with the best and most authoritative information on all subjects that pertain to personal 
beauty. Famous beauties of stage and screen, society beauties, beauty parlor experts, celebrated 
dermatologists, many well-known notables are contributing to its pages. A special feature is 

The Beauty Box 

conducted by Corliss Palmer who, as winner of the 1920 Fame and Fortune Contest, was ad- 
judged the most beautiful girl in America. This is an Answer Man department in which Miss 
Palmer answers all questions on the proper use of cosmetics and on everything pertaining to 
beautifying the human face and form divine. She also makes a special plea for 

Physical Beauty 

the importance of the care of the body itself ; the significance of health ; the wholesome charm 
of a strong, well-poised body. Each issue contains a hundred aids to grace and beauty — in- 
numerable little "nothings" that count greatly in the end. 4*W<&\<ltVf ' s tne Open Sesame to 
love, joy, life and all the dear emotions that so many have to \J ts~~ pass by because they 

have not discovered, the sweet secret of pleasing. 4*WeVutVf ls — m itself — 

A Thing of Beauty 

a second SHADOWLAND in its artistry. It contains reproductions of famous paintings in 
all their original colors, suitable for framing; beautiful photographs, in color, of famous beau- 
ties of this and other lands which make charmingly decorative pictures for the boudoir. From 
cover to cover rf^Gcrutvj ' s picturesque, artistic, colorful. It is 

A Magazine That Every Woman Wants 

and that every man wants his wife, daughter, sister or sweetheart to have. There are magazines 
of fashion, art, fiction, politics, homes and gardens — but until a few months ago no one had 

thought of devoting a whole magazine to beauty. 

i 

Dont Forget to Order from Your Dealer 

There is always a rush — sometimes a real scrimmage when 4*WerutVf comes out. The price 
is only 25 cents a copy or you may subscribe at the rate of 1/ c^ $2.50 a year. 

/[^©ei'utVf is on the stands the 8th of each month. 

BREWSTER PUBLICATIONS, INC. - - Brewster Buildings, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ml 



& 



mm 



llillllllllllllllllllllllljll lpai 




Moments Which Count 



When you are conscious of the scru- 
tiny of interested eyes which appraise 
everydetailbf your appearance, can you 
sit serene, secure in the consciousness 
that there is nothing to criticise but every- 
thing to admire ? 

Happy is the girl who can answer 

yes" in these all important moments. 

She is the girl who knows that her fresh, 

clear skin and smooth, white neck and 

arms are sure to command admiration. 

The girl who is not so sure of her 
personal attractiveness, who is conscious 
that complexion defects may affect her 
popularity, should waste no time rem- 
edying these conditions. The secret is 
cosmetic cleanliness, which keeps the 
skin free from clogging accumulations. 

Once a day, do this 

Once a day, preferably at bed-time, 
give your face a thorough 
cleansing. This doesn't 
mean a harsh, irritating 
scrub, but a cos- 
metic cleansing 
accomplished 
by the gentlest 
possiblemeans. 




Soap is necessary, butonly the mildest 
soap should be used. This is Palmolive, 
blended from palm and olive oils. 

Onceyou experience the mild, sooth- 
ing effect of its smooth, creamy lather 
you will recognize daily cleansing as the 
surest complexion beautifier. 

Removal, once a day, of the accumu- 
lations of dirt, oil, perspiration and the 
remaining traces of cold cream and 
powder is absolutely essential to a clear, 
fresh skin. 

Neglect results in clogged pores, 
coarse texture and blackheads. When 
the accumulated soil carries infection, 
pimples are the result. 

An ancient secret 

The value of beautifying cleansing 
was discovered long ago, in the days of 
ancient Egypt. It was Cleopatra's secret 
— whatever the embellishments she 
employed, they were applied after the 
daily bath with palm and olive oils as 
cleansers. 

The great queen was famous for her 
beauty long after early youth was passed. 
She kept her looks with the aid of the 



same gentle, stimulating cleansing which* 
we recommend today. 

Blended from the same oils 

Palmolive is blended from the same 
costly oriental oils which served Cleo- 
patra as cleanser and beautifier. We 
import them from overseas in vast quan- 
tity to keep the Palmolive factories at 
work day and night. This is necessary 
to supply the world-wide demand. 

This popularity has reduced price, 
as manufacturing volume permits econ- 
omies which lower production costs. 
Thus we are able to supply Palmolive 
for only 10 cents a cake. 

Sowhile Palmolive ranks first as finest 
facial soap, you can afford to follow Cleo- 
patra's example and use it for bathing. 

Complexion beauty does not end 
with the face. Beautify your body with 
Palmolive. 

Volume and efficiency produce 
25-cent quality for 



r\rSr~?bf 



THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY, MILWAUKEE, U. S. A. 

THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA. Limited, TORONTO, CANADA 
Also makers of Palmolive Shampoo and Palmolive Shaving Cream 

Copyright 1922-The Palmolive Co. 166 







Br.it Litho. Co.. N. Y. 



^^ m ^ DECEMBER 35<2 

*UAE>OWbANE> 



EXPRESSING THE ARTS 





A Magazine of Beauty Secrets for Every Woman 



A MAGAZINE to help every woman to be more beautiful than she is and then help her 
to preserve that beauty. Every woman wants beauty: a strong, healthy body; grace; 
charm ; a spirited, active mind. She knows that some are born beauties — others have 
it thrust upon them. What she does not know is that all may attain it if they will. A 
few years ago, those who used cosmetics in any form were called "painted ladies." 
Those who went systematically thru forms of exercise to improve their figures were "vain." 
Now, the use of cosmetics is universal. Physical culture is a habit. Every woman knows that 
she must look her best. She not only tries to assist nature, but to improve it. This is where the 
new magazine <|^©cTUtv* comes in. 



Elsie Ferguson 
Pauline Frederick 



LILLIAN MONTANYE, 

Editor 
Editorial Advisory Board 

Corliss Palmer 
Alla Nazimova 



Katherine MacDonald 
Jeanette Pinaud 



/[^©■CVUtv* magazine is the modern 



Pandora s Box 

We have gathered about us some of the world's greatest authorities, and are supplying our read- 
ers with the best and most authoritative information on all subjects that pertain to personal 
beauty. Famous beauties of stage and screen, society beauties, beauty parlor experts, celebrated 
dermatologists, many well-known notables are contributing to its pages. A special feature is 

The Beauty Box 

conducted by Corliss Palmer who, as winner of the 1920 Fame and Fortune Contest, was ad- 
judged the most beautiful girl in America. This is an Answer Man department in which Miss 
Palmer answers all questions on the proper use of cosmetics and on everything pertaining to 
beautifying the human face and form divine. She also makes a special plea for 

Physical Beauty 

the importance of the care of the body itself ; the significance of health ; the wholesome charm 
of a strong, well-poised body. Each issue contains a hundred aids to grace and beauty — in- 
numerable little "nothings" that count greatly in the end. /(•Wel'utv* ' s tne OP en Sesame to 
love, joy, life and all the dear emotions that so many have to \J &~* pass by because they 

have not discovered the sweet secret of pleasing. 4^©d\ltv» ' s — m i tse ^ — 

A Thing of Beauty 

a second SHADOWLAND in its artistry. It contains reproductions of famous paintings in 
all their original colors, suitable for framing; beautiful photographs, in color, of famous beau- 
ties of this and other lands which make charmingly decorative pictures for the boudoir. From 
cover to cover ^©evutv* ' s picturesque, artistic, colorful. It is 

A' Magazine That Every Woman Wants 

and that every man wants his wife, daughter, sister or sweetheart to have. There are magazines 
of fashion, art, fiction, politics, homes and gardens — but until a few months ago no one had 
thought of devoting a whole magazine to beauty. 

Dont Forget to Order from Your Dealer 

There is always a rush — sometimes a real scrimmage when /f^e.eiVitv comes out - The P nce 
is only 25 cents a copy or you may subscribe at the rate of 1/ C7- $2.50 a year. 

/[*^©eil'utv» is on the stands the 8th of each month. 

BREWSTER PUBLICATIONS, INC. - - Brewster Buildings, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



aM2M 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



m 



King Richard at the siege 
of Acre, J /'J I A. D. The 

two-year siege had cost the 
lives of 200,000 Crusaders 
■when Lion- Heart came to 
the rescue. 




^heValue of^Jime 



K 



By l^ranos 

Paintings by HAROLD DELAY 

ICHARD THE LION-HEARTED —"mightiest warrior and 
hardest working Crusader in all Christendom" — knew the Value 
of Time. 



For two long years the city of Acre, near Jerusalem, had defied the 
besieging Crusaders — yet its walls trembled when Richard anchored 
off the Syrian shore. Lion -Heart's great hour had come at last. So 
clear was his vision of Time as his ally that he arose from a sickbed, 
was carried to the trenches on a litter, and with his own sword hewed 
the fortress from the infidel's grip. 

To this day, in the land of the Saracen, the name of Richard is a word 
to conjure with. And today, as it was seven centuries ago, life is a 
battle which no man can win without Father Time as his ally. 

Over the Time of the Crusaders, the Saracen water clock stood guard. 
But the modern world, enriched by experience, intrusts life's costliest 
possession to those marvels of accuracy which human ingenuity and skill 
now place within the reach of all — 



No timepieces yet created by the Elgin de- 
signers have met more universal approval or 
achieved such instant popularity as the four 
new lines listed below: 

New Streamline Series: A line of 12-size 
Elgins specially designed to meet a wide 
variety of tastes — $35 to $100. (The model 
shown below is the $35 Streamlined) 

New Classic Series: Two 12-size thin tnodel 
Elgins with Lord Elgin movement. In White 
or Green Gold, $150. 

New Corsican Series: Three new models in 
Green and White Gold combinations; Lord 
Elgin movement; $175. 

New Presentation Series: "The last word in 
the Gift Idea." C. H. Hulburd movement; 
exclusive models; $300 to $500. 

The material, construction, adjustments 
and service of all Elgin Watches are fully 
covered by the Elgin Guarantee. 




Pagr Three 



SuiADQWtAND 








■V • i ' i 




IK;' 


4 i J 


iJk ' ' 






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K> "'"ik 






L*'—? 









Five Fair F 



aces 



from the thousands that hope to be reflected in the American Beauty Mirror 

Do You Wish Your Face Reflected There? 



IMPORTANT 

Brewster Publications herewith announces the closing 
date of the American Beauty Contest — December 15, 

1922. Any photographs received bearing a postmark of a 
later date will be disregarded. 

You still have time to become an entrant. Read the 
simple rules and consider the splendid rewards that may 
come to you. 

We are not looking for a movie heroine, or a stage star, 
or an intellectual wonder, or a personality crank. We are 
looking for Beauty — and we are going to find her — the most 
beautiful woman in America ! 

This is an unprecedented offer. Do not fail to take ad- 
vantage of it. Send us your photograph. That is all that 
is required of you. Think what you may win — just because 
you happened to be born beautiful. Scrupulous care will 
be taken of every picture received. ALL of them will be 
examined by the contest judges. 

THE REWARDS 

To the woman who our illustrious judges shall decide is 
the most beautiful in America, will be given: 

1. A trip to New York, properly chaperoned, and a chance to take 
in the pleasures which only that great city affords : the opera, 
the theaters, our wonderful library, the famous "East Side," great 
museums, the celebrated Greenwich Village, all the luxurious and 
beautiful shops on the most luxurious and beautiful street in the 
world — Fifth Avenue — and so on. 

2. A well-known American artist will paint her portrait. 

3. A representative American sculptor will model her head. 

4. These works of art will be exhibited in one of the leading art 
galleries in New York City and elsewhere. 

5. She will have her picture on the cover of Beauty magazine. 

There will be a second prize and a third prize, and possibly 
more. These will be announced later. 



REMEMBER 

The judges of our Beauty Contest are well-known artists, 
writers and editors. 

All photographs of entrants will be turned over to the 
Metropolitan Magazine, from which they will select photo- 
graphs to be used on the Metropolitan Cover Contest. 

THE RULES 

1. No photographs will be returned. 

2. No exceptions will be made to this rule. 

3. Winners will be notified. 

4. Snapshots, strip pictures, or colored photographs will not be con- 
sidered. Outside of these, any kind of picture will be accepted ; 
full length or bust, full face of profile, sepia or black. You may 
submit as many photographs as you wish. 

5. Photographers, artists, friends and admirers may enter pictures 
of their favorites. Credit will be given photographers whenever 
possible. 

6. Do not ask the contest manager to discuss your chances. He has 
nothing to do with that end of it. 

7. Do not write letters. The close of the contest will be announced in 

MOTion&icw&E. fWvssic 

MfiGftZINB ^^^ 



SuiADQWLAND and fl eelNit )-? 









In view of the fact that the American Beauty may be 
found in New York City, 
or its immediate vicinity, 
the prize in her case will be 
$1,000, instead of the visit 
to New York. Just think 

of that- 



One 

Thousand 

Dollars 

($1,000) 



at least three months in advance. There will be a contest story 
every month in all four magazines, with all necessary news and 
information. 

8. The most beautiful pictures received each month thruout the oper- 
ation of the contest will be published in a monthly Honor 
Roll in all four magazines. These girls will be notified when, 
and in which magazine their picture will appear. This does not 
mean that they have necessarily qualified for the final award, 
nor that those whose pictures are not published have failed. The 
winner will not be decided upon until the end of the contest. 

9. Such a coupon as the one below, properly filled out, must be 
PASTED on the BACK of every photograph submitted. 

10. Be sure to put sufficient 
THE ENTRANCE COUPON--- :---«, postage on your photo- 



This is a portrait of : 

Name 

Address 



Age 

Color of Eyes. 



Weight Height 

. . . . Hair Complexion 

subject to the rules 



It is submitted to the American Beauty Contest 
thereof, by : 

Name 

Address 



postage 
graph. 

11. The contest is open to any 
girl or woman sixteen 
years or older, professional 
or non-professional, in 
America. That means the 
whole continent ! 

NOTE. — Any infraction of these 
rules will cause a contestant to be 
disbarred from the contest. 

Address your photograph : 
Contest Manager, Brewster 
Publications, Inc., 175 Duffield 
St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Occupation (optional) . 



Page Four 



HN 



22\$& '©C1B552137 



<y 




Expressing the Arts 




VOLUME VII 



The Magazine of Magazines 
DECEMBER, 1922 

Cover Design : Allegorical Conception of the Creation of Pottery 
By A. M. Hopfmuller 

iiiiiimiiiiimimmtiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiimiu 

Important Features in this Issue: 
Romance in Going to Sea William McFee 

The author of Command and Captain Macedoine's Daughter writes of the pull of the sea 

THE CAD AS HERO Kenneth Macgowan 

The old-fashioned hero of the theater is no more; his successor is undesirable but entertaining 

Albert Sterner 

Three examples of his drawings in chalk: Amour Chant, Clare Gwinn and a Nude Study 

The Convenience of the Novel Burton Rascoe 

A discussion of this season's novels and their extraordinary diversity 

CHARLES DEMUTH Thomas Craven 

An artist who is conscious that a picture should be of a piece, and not a collection of 

delicate splashes 

The Play, the Part, and the Time Benjamin De Casseres 

An interview with Lola Fisher, who cannot be lured to the screen 

Heroes or Human Beings? Charles Divine 

Two pages of amusing satire on hero worship, with cartoons by Henkel 

The Wayward Poet of England Llewelyn Powys 

An appreciation of the work of Ernest Dowson 

Importing Europe's Foremost Stage Oliver M. Sayler 

The Moscow Art Theatre as seen thru its masterpiece, Gorky's The Lower Depths 

Three Women Poets Babette Deutsch 

Edna St. Vincent Millay, the Ironist; Sara Teasdale, the Lyricist; Lola Ridge, the Rebel 

The Devil among the Critics Jerome Hart 

A discussion of the question: "What's the matter with modern musical criticism?" 



Li 



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Number 4 



J lit! I ] 11 1 llf 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II M 1 1 1 1I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 MUM 1 1 III 



Published Monthly by Brewster Publications, Inc., at Jamaica, N.Y. 

Entered at the Post Office at Jamaica, N. Y., as second-class matter, under the act of March 3rd, 1879. 

PRINTED IN U. S. A. 

Eugene V. Brewster, President and Editor-in-Chief; Guy L. Harrington, Vice-President and Business Manager; L. G. Conlon, Treasurer; 

E. M. Heinemann, Secretary 

EXECUTIVE and EDITORIAL OFFICES, 175 DUFFIELD STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Elsie Seeligmann, Editor 



Adele Whitely Fletcher, Managing Editor 



Jerome Hart, Associate Editor 



Subscription $3.50 per year, in advance, including postage in the U. S., Cuba, Mexico and Philippines; in Canada and foreign countries, $4.50 per 
year. Single copies, 35 cents. Postage prepaid. One and two cent United States Government stamps accepted. Subscribers must notify us at once 

of any change of address, giving both old and new address. 

Copyright, 1922, by Brewster Publications, Inc., in the United States and Great Britain 



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l J hoto by Edwin Bower Hester 



RUTH STONEHOUSE 

For years with Essanay, she has now organ- 
ized her own company, where her loveliness 
will be jeatured in Western productions 










ALBERTINA RASCH 

This charming study in blues and browns accentuates 
the grace one always associates with Albertina Rasch 





SUNFLOWERS 

"His flower pieces are painted with photographic 
perfection of values, and a remarkable variety 
of tone-contrasts and textural distinctions" 



Paintings by courtesy of 
Daniel's Gallery, New York 



IN VAUDEVILLE 

"The vaudeville 'Caprices' 
are tinged with genuine sat- 
ire, and the illustrations are 
conceived in the true fic- 
tional spirit, but all the same 
the pictures are held together 
by an impeccable artistry" 





fE-XP^E-^SIlN 




nnjigr Afl^rr-g" 



Charles Demuth 

The artist; who is conscious that a picture should be 
of a piece and not a collection of delicate splashes 

By Thomas Craven 



MR. DEMUTH'S attitude toward his work is 
most exhilarating. When I asked him, rather 
precipitately, for an opinion on his art, he re- 
plied in these words : 

"With few exceptions, artists think of themselves too 
constantly as 'artists,' or men of genius — we should al- 
ways be children and 
fools." 

There is a pro- 
found truth in that 
statement ; that is, in 
the first part of it, a 
truth which Chester- 
ton expressed in 
somewhat similar 
fashion in one of his 
essays : "Whistler 
thought too much 
about art to be a great 
artist, and too much 
about himself to be a 
great man." 

Painting, of course, 
lives thru the per- 
fection of its forms, 
but the relation of its 
emotional appeal to 
the intricacies of the 
medium demands the 
written or spoken 
word for communica- 
tion. The aesthetic ac- 
tivity of every age has 
been attended by a 
body of appreciative 
and expository litera- 
ture, the aim of 
which, when legiti- 
mately applied, has 
been to discover to 
the world the true 
concept of the beauti- 
ful. It is doubtful if 
any period has been 
so prolific in critical 
warfare as the pres- 




ent; a condition arising from the ferocious efforts of 
painters to connect themselves with the eternal tradition, 
and to convince the public that modern art is neither mon- 
strous nor diseased. Such a verbal outburst is healthy 
and indispensable in so far as it concerns fundamental 
creative problems, but when the artist esteems himself 

a genius, it is time to 
call a halt. The dif- 
ference between the 
artist and the ordi- 
nary man, as Croce 
has clearly proved, is 
purely quantitative : if 
it were otherwise, art 
would be a very small 
world, forever inac- 
cessible to any but the 
chosen few. When- 
ever painters begin to 
think of themselves as 
creatures of genius, 
their work becomes 
narrow, exotic and 
unintelligible. Mr. 
Demuth is sometimes 
capricious, but he is 
always sane and in- 
telligible. 

He was born in 
Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania. His first for- 
mal training was re- 
ceived at The Penn- 
sylvania Academy of 
the Fine Arts, where 
he came under an in- 
fluence which he re- 
gards as one of the 
controlling factors of 
his development. He 
was a pupil of 
Thomas Anshutz, an 
instructor at the 
Academy and a really 
great teacher — one 
(Cont'd on page 78) 









Photo by Courtesy of Alfred Stieglitz 

CHARLES DEMUTH 



Page Eleven 







A little smiling 
cottage nestling 
in an orchard, 
with its humble 
but happy in- 
habitants, 
makes a pleas- 
ingly rustic pic- 
ture, which like 
its companion 
was exhibited 
recently at 
the Bookery 
Art Gallery 



Photos by Eugene V. Brewster 



The stately, umbrageous tree which dominates this peaceful landscape, 
crossed by a gently flowing stream, is a happy example of sylvan beauty, 
while the warm and hazy atmosphere is rendered with feeling and fidelity 
in a composition which makes a strong appeal to the artistic eye 




Page Twelve 










Photo by Dickerson 



THE SCARF 



Page Thirteen 



gv re C a vv i r\ r\ « aeiat i < f vae x.x.k i anno 




/ra tfcis portrait study of 
Clare Gvoinn, Mr. Sterner 
has achieved a depth and 
body with chalk that is 
more usually associated 
with oils. There is not the 
thinness that is sometimes 
apparent in this medium 



Albert Sterner was born in London of American parents. He studied at Julien's Academy and 
the Ecole des Beaux Arts. His work is represented in practically all the foreign museums and 
in many private collections, including that of the King of Italy. He came to America when he 
was about twenty-six years of age and has done most of his work here. These three examples of 
Mr. Sterncr's work show his significant quality of line; his admirable economy of detail expresses 
motion more eloquently than the most exact rendering. He stimulates rather than tries to 
complete the imagination. Mr. Sterner is equally at home in oils, and his lithographs are fam- 
ous. Aliho he has been exceedingly busy getting ready for his exhibit at the Ehrich Galleries 
in December, he has spent a great deal of time, lately, etching. At his exhibit, which will be 
mostly portraits, will be shown his recently completed ones of Mr. and Mrs. Brooks Nichols. 



Page Fourteen 



Albert 
Sterner 



Three examples of his 
drawings in chalk 






J 



J 



J 



AMOUR CHANT 
Amour Mort, the companion piece 
to the drawing above, was re- 
cently sold to Sir Joseph Duveen 



NUDE STUDY 
Fluidity of line and movement 






• 






- 




Page Fifteen 




Photo by Barakovich, Vienna 



LIANE HAID 

Vienna, the home of lovely women, claims that 
this film favorite is loveliest of them all 



Page Sixteen 




Photo by d'Ora, Vienna 



FRANCES ALDA 

Like Melba, Madame Frances Alda is an Australian with an 
exceptionally lovely voice and an admirable vocal method. In- 
cidentally, Madame Alda is the wife of the General Director 
of the Metropolitan Opera, where she shines with refulgence 



Page Seventeen 








^FE^DOR CHALIAPIN 

Wynn gives his idea how the famous basso looks as Boris Godounow 



- ■ - : ™- ..■■■ ■■■+■■ ■■■■■■■■■■- *: -,:::. ■ ¥ 



Page Eighteen 



Romance in Going to 'Se-a 

By William McFee 



IN spile of a great quantity of argument, we are 
obliged to come back to the old-fashioned definition 
of romance, that it is something a man attempts for 
the sake of a woman. And if it be asked then, is there 
any longer romance in going to sea, it must be confessed 
that, in a general way, there is not, because there are , 
nowadays so many outlets for the energy of romantically 
minded people, most of them much more remunerative j 
than sailing about on the ocean. Moreover, there is 
really very little nowadays that a man can attempt to do 
for a woman, for the simple reason that women have 
decided that they prefer to do all the difficult things for ! 
themselves. I even see in my press-clipping book a piece 
which says that the daughter of an English lord is trying 
to become a Marine engineer. This seems to me to indi- 
cate a move in the right direction, but it would be fatal 
to the ordinary woman's idea that there is "romance" in 
going to sea. She would begin, of course, by keeping the 
twelve-to-four watch, and. I for one would not like to be 
the person who had to call her and get her Out at midnight. 
One of the most difficult and dangerous things in the 
world is trying to make a woman get up when she doesn't 
want to, but there is nothing romantic about it. The 
average engineer would prefer to keep the watch for her 
himself. 

To be perfectly serious, however, it is a pity that the 
old-fashioned notion of achievement for the sake of a 
woman seems to have gone into the discard, because 
women now are repudiating the idea of being in any way 
dependent upon men. It is particularly unfortunate for 
a seaman, because of the nature of his calling. When a 
man goes to sea he is to a large extent dependent upon a 
strong sentiment to carry him thru his work because he 
lacks the daily contact with the society in which he was 
born. He is among strangers, many of them of alien 
race and speech, and when he takes the air in a foreign 
port the environment is strange and disquieting. It is 
easy to see, then, how he will tend to idealize the girl he 
left behind him, or if he is married, the wife and children 
who are quite cheerfully growing up and enjoying them- 
selves without getting very well acquainted with him. 
It is this element of separation from and consecration to 
an invisible ideal which makes the seaman romantic, and 
the fact that he is sometimes unfaithful to it only proves 
his customary fidelity. And yet it must be confessed by 
one who has tested existence in various ways and in many 
moods, that compared with the life offered a man nowa- 
days ashore, the sea is romantic. It is insulated, 
to a degree not comprehended by the general 
mass of shorefolk, from the weasel enter- 
prises and nickel-plated ethics of so much 
of our modern industrial life. To put 
it more succinctly, rascality on the 
ocean is ever a secret and incon- 
venient predilection, since men, once 
they are between sea and sky, are 
aware of the maximum nobility of 
their souls and perceive, somewhat 
to their own discomfort, that the 
rules of society are only the stark 
and visible summits of the submerged 
mountain ranges we call principles and 
cannot be ignored without disaster. 

So it happens that, once the pilot is safe 
in his boat and the course is set over which 




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I from the deep 



tatter, an accession 
last link with the 
pal apparatus tip- 
contributor to the 
tilitarian contriv- 
prence with that 
ur compensation 
of the modern 
ivalry. . . . 
iitic in the sense 
•|iles, is at least 
the sense that 
|upon an accept - 
ther than upon 
es. When this 
m of the hard- 
ended. He has 
t according to 
nder shrouded 
is ocular proof 
r abrogation of 
warks between 
1 and weather 
ty in a feudal 
antic eruptions 
1 liberty are 1 no 
er sky, for he 
His thoughts 
m of a world, 
n just as long 
nably adequate 
> a man to do 

lis romance in 

|re was. It is 

very modern 

rith a certain 

at sea seems 

Vent where all 

Ismooth intel- 

guardian of 

|iearts always 



ust learn to 
of hope and 
h his spirit 
ipline him- 
of resolute 
It do to say 
~^inaTTle"aiways emerges in triumph 
from these ordeals or that, emerg- 
ing, his reward is always there. 
Yet there is often a knightly qual- 
ity in his encounters ; with his 
dark enemies, and he hatches at 
times a glimpse of the shimmering 
robes, and feels on his cheek a 
faint unearthly fragrance, from the 
passing of his inviolable mistress, the 
Spirit of Romance. 



Page Nineteen 




Jfr — *» 








Photo 



/allace Pondelicek 




"/t is t/ie moon . . . 
/r glimmers on the forest tips, 
And thru the dewy foliage drips 
In little rivulets of light, 
And makes the heart in love with night! 



Page 





MLLE. ANNA LUDMILLA 

In spite of her youth, Mile. Ludmilla has been pre- 
miere danseuse with the Pavley-Oukrainsky Ballet as 
well as a participant in several New York musical 
successes. Mile. Ludmilla came from Chicago and has 
returned this season to her native city as premiere 
danseuse of the Chicago Civic Opera Company 



Photo by James Wallace Pondeiicek 



l J aye Twenty-One 




The Baron (Katchaloff), fallen to the estate of the Russian gutter and a cellar lodging for the night, recalls his better 
days and rails at his fate, while Nastya, whose romantic day-dreams he had twitted before, evens up the score with him 

Importing Europe's Foremost Stage 

The Moscow Art Theatre as seen thru its Masterpiece, Gorky's The Lower Depths 

By Oliver M. Sayler 



ONE day last winter, shortly after BaliefFs Chauve- 
Souris had struck its phenomenal stride, I voiced 
an emphatic negative when asked if I thought the 
Moscow Art Theatre would 
agree to come to this country. 
"And even if they were willing 
to come," I asserted, "I dont 
believe their clientele or the 
Government would permit 
their departure. The Studio 
Theaters, the younger genera- 
tion of the Moscow Art Thea- 
tre, yes. They were eager to 
make the trip four years ago. 
But the parent company, 
never." 

In passing this judgment, 
however, I had failed to take 
full account of the effect of 
protracted revolution not only 
upon artists but upon audi- 
ences and even governments. 
Hunger and destitution are the 
most impelling forces to dic- 
tate change of plans. And as 
it has turned out, after one of 
the most intricate series of 
negotiations in dramatic an- 
nals, it is the entire first line 
of the Moscow Art Theatre 
which is coming to New York 
in January, under the direction 
of Morris Gest, with permis- 
sion of the Soviet and the God- 
speed of its audiences, while 
the Studio Theaters will be left 
to keep traditions unbroken. 




Mile. Orlova as the young lover of the play who rouses 
the jealousy of her sister, the keeper of the lodging-house 



To sum up the chronicle of any institution by viewing 
it thru the prism of one of its notable exploits is a rather 
unusual course, but I propose to follow it, in this case, in 

order to avoid the monotony 
in which a catalog of a quarter 
century of play titles and play- 
ers' names would involve a 
brief article like this and in the 
hope of making some of this 
theater's characteristics and 
'customs stand out the more 
vividly by illustration from a 
single production. 

The play I have chosen for 
this purpose is Maxim Gorky's 
N a Dyne or The Lower 
Depths, better known in 
America thru its title in Ger- 
man translation, Nachtasyl, or 
Night Lodging. And the rea- 
son for the choice is not so 
much that the American play- 
goer is already familiar with 
this masterpiece of the great 
prophet of the Revolution, 
thru several published transla- 
tions and productions in Eng- 
lish, German and Yiddish ; it 
is rather because, in this play 
more than in any other thru- 
out its history, the Moscow 
Art Theatre epitomizes its 
dramatic ideals and methods, 
its esthetic theory and prac- 
tice, and thru the production 
of this play it most emphat- 
ically justifies its artistic faith. 



Page Twenty-Two 



Ivan Moskvin, one of the charter 
members of the Moscow Art Theatre 
in 1898, and long accounted as the 
leading high comedian and character 
actor of the modern Russian stage. He 
is here seen as Luka, the old pilgrim 



Vassily Katchaloff as the Baron, 
tattered and forgotten relic of 
better days, who carries to the 
bottom round of the social ladder 
some of the airs and graces of 
his former high estate 





Mme. Olga Knipper-Tchehova, 
widow of the world-famed play- 
wright, Anton Tchehoff. She is 
the Mrs. Fiske and the Ellen 
Terry of the modern Russian 
theater. Here she is seen as 
Vassillissa, the keeper of the 
cellar lodging-house 



In choosing The Lower Depths as sole representative 
and exemplar of The Moscow Art Theatre. I am not for- 
getting that the fate of this stage is far more closely 
associated with the name of Anton Tchehoff than with 
that of Maxim Gorky. Nor am I denying the justice of 
that tradition or its importance. With The Sca-Gull in 
the theater's first season, and later with Uncle Vanya, 
The Three Sisters, and The Cherry Orchard, Tchehoff 
gave to the Moscow Art Theatre and received from it 
both name and fame within Russia and beyond its borders. 
What he contributed in the very beginning to the project 
of Stanislavsky and Nemirovitch-Dantchenko was without 
price or computation. The level of his plays is better 
-u-tained than the level of Gorky's ; the average is higher. 



But at no point does Tchehoff scale the heights of The 
Lower Depths, simply because he is content to remain 
dramatist and artist, while Gorky, at least in this single 
case, achieves the triple role of dramatist, artist and 
philosopher. 

The Moscow Art Theatre discovered Tchehoff. At 
least it rescued him from the failure as a playwright 
which appeared to be his lot. It discovered Gorky as a 
dramatist, too. During the season of 1902-1903, its fifth, 
it produced two of the youthful revolutionist's pieces: 
Myeshchanie or Smug Citizens, and then The Lower 
Depths. After three hundred rehearsals, the average 
period of preparation of a play for- this patient and 
(Continued on page 70) 




At the left is Mile. Skulskaya 
as Kvashnya, the none-too- 
handsome girl of the streets 

At the right is Alexander Vish- 
nevsky, one of the leading 
members of the company. In 
Gorky's masterpiece he portrays 
the Tatar, the silent and stolid 
participant of the motley crew. 
When it comes time to face 
Mecca, like a good Moham- 
medan, out comes his prayer- 
rug, no matter what the rest 
are doing, and he proceeds 
with his ceremonial 




Page Twenty-Th) 




Dancers 

on 
Foreign 
Shores 

Photos by Angelo 



Charlotte Wilke (above) is Swiss, 
and, altho a graduate of the famous 
Dalcroz Dancing School at Paris, 
prefers to dance her own inter- 
pretations rather than follow too 
closely the traditions of the school. 
Claire Banroff, formerly of the 
Imperialist Czarist Ballet, fled to 
Paris to escape the Bolshevik. Her 
dancing is both graceful and virile. 
She is noted for her boyish figure 
and has posed for many sculptors 



p age Twenty-Four 




Photo by Rabinovitrb 



"Sometimes a violent laughter screwed his face, 
And sometimes ready tears dropped down apace." 



THE CLOWN 



Page Twenty-Five 




Collecting Old Glass 

Efy W. G- Bowdoin 



Photographs from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New 
York, and the Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia 



English glass of the eight- 
eenth century, showing an 
air spiral stem of splendid 
workmanship 





American paper-weight enclos- 
ing flowers of colored glass 



An American wine-glass of 
1763, made by Baron Siegel 
at Manheim, Pennsylvania 



OLD glass has its individual charm. The wonder- 
ful beauty of the crystal, the multiple variety of 
form, the bell-like resonance, the satiny feeling 
of its surface, the sparkle of the cut facets, and the 
combination of grace and utility, attract the discriminat- 
ing collector. 

There is also an added attraction in the historical and 
social traditions that cluster about certain pieces. 

The fragility of glass has precluded its survival in 
sufficient quantity to make it common, and yet the col- 
lector who turns 
toward it as a hobby 
will find glass hunting 
by no means without 
charm and zest. Col- 
lecting it in odd cor- 
ners and out of country 
cupboards takes on 
something of romance, 
something more of ad- 
venture, than when 
merely buying of a 
dealer. 

A large Bristol col- 
ored-glass paper-weight 
may cost you ten dol- 




lars in an antique shop, but if you can happily run across 
one of these in private hands, where from an heirloom it 
has perhaps become the toy of children who have used 
it as a hammer with which to drive nails, it may be 
acquired by the alert collector for a veritable song. 

Now is the time to collect old glass. The prices are 
advancing atid pre-war prices are not likely to return. 
The neglected opportunity of today will never recur. 

All forms of collecting are educational, and knowledge 
comes to the true collector, even thru the errors sure 
to be made. It is, 
however, by no means 
difficult to become a 
fairly well-informed 
collector of old glass. 
Counterfeits are nu- 
merous and forgeries 
are turned out by the 
unscrupulous ; absolute- 
ly new glassware after 
old models is on sale in 
hundreds of curio 
shops, but only the ig- 
norant or careless col- 
lector need be taken in. 
(Cont'd on page 75) 



An American glass tumbler of 
the eighteenth century, enam- 
eled in brilliant colors. The 
pontil-mark shows prominent 
ly and thus indicates the age 
of the glass 





Above, one of 
Lind" souvenir 



the "Jenny 
bottles of 



souvenir Domes 01 
1850. At the left, a log-cabin 
whiskey bottle and its mold. 
Popular during the 1840 presi- 
dential campaign 



Page Twenty-Six 



BHHBHHHMnHHHHHHMIMH 



MHHMHHBBHHHNft 










flwwuunm [immmmmm mmmmmm 



Photo by hdward Thayer Monroe 



PEGGY WOOD 

The captivating star of "Marjolaine" is leaving musical comedy 
behind her and entering the serious drama — a sort of half- 
way house on her climb toward grand opera. All this on the 
advice of Mme, Calve, with whom she has been studying. "And 
how," exclaimed her illustrious mentor, "can you perfect a 
voice if you make it work thru eight performances a week!" 



Page Twenty-Seven 



At the right is Marie Vassilieff 
in her studio in the Latin Quar- 
tier. Many artists have been 
making dolls of various sorts 
for grown-up folk, but none of 
ihem has approached her as a 
caricaturist. She is also a 
painter of merit and an author- 
ity on primitive African art 



jpaumxttW 





The reproductions below exem- 
plify the versatility of Mme. 
Vassilieff. The character doll 
is of Andre Derain, the well- 
known French modern painter; 
"Bombo" is an imitation in 
leather of a grotesque African 
idol; the painting of the merry- 
go-round is one that drew 
high praise at the Paris salon 



*«-?*-* !.■: 



The 
Doll-Maker 

of 
Montparnasse 




The Parisian once left to posterity a miniature, a photograph, or 
a marble bust of himself; now he leaves a character-portrait doll 




Page Twenty-Eight 




Thomas H. luce Productions 



LORNA DOONE 

"She was coming toward me . . . I could not see what her face 
was, my heart so awoke and trembled; only that her hair was 
flowing from a wreath of white violets, and the grace of her 
coming was like the appearance of the first windflower ..." 



Madge Bellamy 






■ 



Page Tzventy-Kine 



The Devil Among the Critics 

What's the Matter With Modern Musical Criticism? 



B;y Jerome Hart 



« 



W: 



HAT the devil is the matter with the musical 
critics?" said a friend to me towards the close 
of last season. "Nothing seems to please them. 
They evidently dont go to a musical performance to dis- 
cover its good points, but its bad ones. 

"A few years ago," he continued, "I used to pick up 
the papers in order to get my own impressions of a con- 
cert or an opera confirmed and occasionally revised, and 
was pleased to find that the critics and I were generally in 
agreement. But now, whenever I read a criticism of 
something I enjoyed, I find that I ought not to have done 
so. A famous prima donna, who I thought was singing 
if anything rather better than usual, was, I am told, 
inclined to faulty intonation and bad production. Louise, 
an opera which was 
hailed by Europe 
on its production 
as a master work, 
and very rightly 
too, is vieux jeu 
and rather poor 
stuff. A perform- 
ance by the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra 
of a Brahms sym- 
phony, which I 
thought was the 
best I had ever 
heard, was 'too 
perfumed,' whatev- 
er that may mean. 
A rash young critic, 
with more enthusi- 
asm than experi- 
ence, places Jeritza 
and Chaliapin on a 
parity ; while an- 
other, who is old 
enough to know 
better, exhausts the 
language of hyper- 
bole in praising a 
mountainous con- 
tralto who, I and 
others thought, 
howled and growl- 
ed abominably. I 
repeat, what the 
devil is the matter 
with the critics?" 

"You've said it," 
I replied. "It's the 
devil — or rather 
several devils. It's 
the devil of igno- 
rance, the devil of 
inappreciation, the 
devil of prejudice, 
the devil of favor- 
itism, the devil of 
boredom and, not 
least of all, the 
devil of vanity or 




\ inderwood & T Y nderwood 

GEORGE BERNARD SHAW 
Not many are aware that Shaw commenced his literary career as a musical critic. 
His first book to achieve wide public recognition was The Perfect Wngnerite 



self-conceit, which makes the critic think more of himself 
than of the person or work he is criticizing. The older 
men have lost their enthusiasms, if they ever had any. 
Their senses are dulled and jaded and they think that their 
age and experience entitle them to indulge in snap judg- 
ments on matters which call, if not for profound study, 
at any rate for more than casual hearing. 

"The younger generation of critics are, as a rule, too 
inexperienced and timid to dare to praise that which 
most likely they have heard their seniors jeering and 
sneering at in the lobbies and foyer. Moreover, few of 
them have more than a smattering of music. They know 
its ABC, they have picked up several cliches and added 
a few phi'ases, epithets and adjectives which strike them 

as novel and effec- 
tive, and, having 
rushed from opera 
to concert and from 
concert to opera, 
they dart into the 
press room at the 
Metropolitan or 
their offices and 
bang out their 
'stuff' on a machine 
with the editor's in- 
junction to 'keep it 
down' ringing in 
their ears. How 
can you expect mu- 
sical criticism to be 
much better than it 
is? Moreover, 
when one comes to 
think of it, music 
has never provoked 
much good writing, 
and I suppose it 
never will." 
"Why not?" 
"Because, being 
the most subjective 
of all the arts, it 
can never be the in- 
spiration of a great 
literature. No per- 
fect poem with a 
definitively musical' 
subject has yet 
been written, with 
possibly one excep- 
tion, Arthur O'- 
Shaughnessy's We 
Arc the M usic 
Makers. Dryden's 
Odes to St. Cecilia 
are of their period ; 
formal, stilted and 
rhetorical. Her- 
rick's To Music 
is charming, like 
most of his verse, 
and the Brownings 



Page Thirty 



SUAUOWLAND 



wrote poems of merit uri 
musical subjects, but they 
do not rank among their 
finest work. 

"There is no great 
novel with music as its 
theme or basis — no, not 
excepting Jean Christo- 
p h c ," I said, as my 
friend interjected the 
name. "Romain Rolland's 
book has as much con- 
nection with fine litera- 
ture as a Mahler sym- 
phony has with inspired 
music. The only other 
musical novels I can recall 
are that nauseating ex- 
ample of early Victorian 
insipidity, Charles Au- ■ 
Chester, the principal char- 
acter in which has been 
assumed to be Mendels- 
sohn, and Evelyn Innes. 
by George Moore. Of 
course, Moore was never 
aught but the self-con- 
scious stylist and poseur, 
who invented his style by 
thinking in French and 
writing in English. In 
one or two of his self- 
revelatory if not veracious 
autobiographical volumes 
he shows even more clear- 
ly than in Evelyn Innes 
how meager and inaccu- 
rate is his knowledge of 
music, which, however, he 
affects to discuss as one of 
the cognoscenti." 

"Surely, you have for- 
gotten Huneker's Painted 
Veils." 

"I wish I could. As one 
who had a warm personal 
regard for Huneker and 
admired the robust vigor 
of his mental processes as 
well as the fine gusto 
which often pervaded his 
writings, I can only ex- 
press my profound regret that the book you mention 
found a publisher, altho it was only issued in a limited 
subscription edition. Many passages in that queer jumble 
of cheap fiction, autobiography, musical comment and 
pornography are deplorable. Mind, I am not falling 
foul of its frankness or immorality. That concerns me 
not at all. But the book is worse than immoral, it is 
ill-written." 

"But what about Huneker. as a critic? Did you not 
see that McFee referred to him as a prince among critics, 
or something like that ?" 

"I did. McFee was probably not unmindful of Hune- 
ker's glowing laudation of his own splendid Casuals of 
the Sea. But none the less Huneker was a fine critic as 
well as often a fine writer, especially with regard to 
music, in which he had a solid foundation and an extensive 
background. He knew music au fond, for he began as 
a pianist and musical pedagogue, and of how many of his. 
brother critics could as much be said ? No wonder his 
colleagues were, dazzled by his omniscience and versatility, 
and envied him his knack of digging up recondite and 




One of the best en 
try has produced, 
edge, for at one 



JAMES GIBBONS HUNEKER 

dowed critics of music, art and literature this coun- 

His musical criticism was based on a thoro knowl- 
time he was a pianist and professor of the art 

bizarre words which somehow seemed to fit the subject 
exactly." 

"What do you think of his book about Chopin?" 

"It is one of his best, but I know a better by Liszt, of 
which Georges Sand said, 'un peu exuberant en style, mais 
remplit de bonnes choses et des tres belles pages.' The 
great Hungarian composer and pianist was able fully to 
appreciate the genius of his contemporary, and was not 
afraid to be enthusiastic concerning him. He wrote yet 
one more rhapsody in his Life of Chopin, which I 
advise you to read, if you have not already done so. He 
enables one to understand the man and appreciate the 
musician, while beneath the swift tide of eulogy is the 
undercurrent of searching and informed criticism." 

"Do you mind telling me whom you regard as among 
the best of our musical critics?" 

"Without answering you directly, 1 am glad you have 

put the question, for it enables me to say something which 

I should like you and others to think over. The best 

critics are invariably trained musicians, especially creative 

{Continued on page 72) 



Page Thirty-One 




Photos 

by 
Sherril 
Schell 




Memorable Doorways 



Above is the en- 
trance to the Play- 
ers' Club, facing 
Gramercy Park, in 
New York. This 
fine old house is 
the guardian of tra- 
ditions artistic 
from earlier days. 
It was purchased 
for the Club by 
Edwin Booth in 
1888, who furnish- 
ed it from garret 
to cellar, gave it 
his books and pic- 
tures and rare col- 
lections of every 
sort, and made it 
his home after- 
ward. It was here 
he died, and it is 
his greatest monu- 
ment 




The railing of iron 
grill-work above 
leads to the door- 
way of Washington 
Irving's old home, 
built by him in the 
forties on the 
"Place" in New 
York that still 
bears his name. 
At the left is the 
porch before the 
entrance to the 
Dutch cottage of 
Edgar Allan Poe 
in Fordham, New 
York. It was in this 
little grey shingled 
house that Poe 
spent his last years 



I'dyc Thirty-Tiuti 



The Wayward Poet of England 

Ernest Dowson, Who Composed His Incomparable Lyrics 
in Dingy Taverns and Squalid Lodging-Houses 

ffy Llewelyn Powys 



THERE is something strangely challenging to the 
imagination about the lives of that group of young 
poets and artists who lived in England during the 
nineties of last century. Like their flaunting, resplendent 
leader, Oscar Wilde, the footsteps of each one of them 
seemed dogged by a bitter and envious fatality. 

Lionel Johnson essayed for a few years to give expres- 
sion to his fastidious scholarship, and then, practically a 
dipsomaniac, fell back dead from a high stool in a public 
bar. Aubrey Beardsley, for as short a space, worked at his 
strange fantastical art, sitting at a table under a crucifix, 
golden quill in 
hand, to die of 
consumption 
while still but a 
boy. And the fate 
of the author of 
C y n a r a was 
scarcely more 
fortunate. 

Ernest Dowson 
was born in Kent, 
in 1867. He spent 
the greater part 
of his childhood 
abroad, was 
taught Latin by an 
old priest in Italy, 
for a short time 
was an under- 
graduate at 
Queen's College, 
Oxford, and pass- 
ed the rest of his 
days in the poorer 
sections of Paris 
and London. 

It was indeed a 
peculiarity of this 
exquisitely refined 
and graceful poet 
to feel at ease 
only amidst the 
most squalid sur- 
roundings. It 
seemed that for- 
tune favored his 
bizarre predilec- 
tion, for, as quite 
a young man, he 
inherited an old 
dock, down in the 
Limehouse dis- 
trict, and it was 
in a dilapidated 
house belonging 
to this curious 
property that he 
lived whenever he 
was in London. 

While at Ox- 
ford, he had 
shown his distaste 




"Mm 



[> m 



1 



/ 1 



for the stale, unprofitable, commonplace world, in court 
ing forgetfulness by the use of hashish, and it was prob 
ably the same impulse which prompted him to frequen 
an environment where the humdrum aspect of everydaj 
life was disguised by the garish hand of penury and eld 
He seldom appeared in conventional society. Dressed 
always in untidy, even filthy clothes, he drifted about 
from tavern to tavern, composing on many a beer-ringed 
table his incomparable lyrics. 

When all the world had turned against Wilde and he 
was living, fallen and deserted, in Oakley Street, awaiting 

his last trial, 
Dowson, with an 
artist's civilized 
disregard of mat- 
ters of personal 
conduct, searched 
him out and more 
than any other 
man lightened the 
heart of the dis- 
graced aesthete. 
He was present at 
the Old Bailey 
when the final 
verdict was an- 
nounced ; and it 
was, we may be 
sure, with no very 
sympathetic eye 
that this wayward 
and engaging 
young poet 
watched the har- 
lots of Edgeware 
Road dance for 
joy as the ward- 
ers led from the 
dock to the jail 
the bowed figure 
of his friend. 

But Dowson did 
not depend entire- 
ly upon such sor- 
did spectacles for 
inspiration. It 
happened that 
during one of his 
nocturnal wander- 
ings his eyes had 
fallen upon a cer- 
tain young girl in 
an obscure cafe. 
She was the 
daughter of a 
French emigre, of 
good family, who 
had taken to res- 
taurant - keeping. 
Dowson felt in 
love with her, fell 
(Continued on 
page 76) 






M 



££o KP6ER 



v~> 



ERNEST DOWSON 



Page Thirty-Three 




J hoto by Shirley Vance Martin 



JACKIE COOGAN 



"... The next morning the public was once 
more informed that Oliver Twist was TO LET 
— and that five pounds would be paid to any- 
body who would take possession of him ..." 



Page Thirty-Four 



The Convenience of the Novel 



By Burton Rascoe 



IF the past few years have taught us anything about 
literature, it is that the novel is the most variable me- 
dium of expression in the domain of the fine arts. 
It lends itself to every mood of the mind. It has taken 
the place of the epic; it may be, and often is, the vehicle 
of biography, of reminiscence, of philosophic specula- 
tion, of science, of the light and serious essay, and of 
history. It may be objective or subjective, realistic or 
romantic, analytical or representational, photographic or 
what not. To define its form is an impossibility. 

Probably the most absurdly impertinent book ever to 
receive serious critical encomia was Percy Lubbock's re- 
cent treatise, on the Craft of Fiction, wherein he tried to 
define the scope of the prose narrative in fiction and suc- 
ceeded merely in elucidating the technique and method 
of Henry James. For all his admiration of that master 
of subtle delineation of character, Mr. Lubbock's attempt 
to circumscribe the novel by the Jacobean formula was 
but weaving nets to catch the wind. The novel is pre- 
cisely what the artist wishes to make it. It may be an 
epic drama as in Tolstoi's War and Peace;' it may be an 
Odyssey of the indigent as in Nexo's Pelle: the Con- 
queror; it may be a colossal satire as in Anatole France's 
The Revolt of the Angels; it may be a playground of 
ideas as in Remy de Gourmont's Sixtine ; it may be a 
projection of oneself in subliminal phantasy as in James 
Branch Cabell's Jurgen; it may be an exploration of the 
subconscious as in James Joyce's Ulysses; it may be 
photographic realism as in Sinclair Lewis' Babbitt; it 
may be a free verse narrative as in Roscoe W. Brink's 
Down the River; it may be autobiography pure and sim- 
ple as in John Cournos' Babel; or it may be light enter- 
tainment as in the latest opus by E. Phillips Oppenheim. 
And, in taking any one of these forms, it may be liter- 



almost an exercise in bizarre and fantastic word-weav- 
ing. Gargoyles has none of that: it is written in a se- 
verely concise and simple prose. It is much as if Mr. 
Hecht had cleared the exotically decorated stage whereon 
he had been juggling balls of varied colors and had sud- 
denly shown us a dissecting clinic with himself as chief 
of operations, his sleeves rolled up and gravity engraved 
upon his countenance. He has addressed himself to the 
task of showing exactly what aims and desires prompt 
the average human being in his visible and audible rela- 
tions with those about him, of showing what goes on 
beneath the surface in the petty hypocrisies, polite ges- 
tures, professions of opinion, and ideals of the middle- 
class American citizen. 

_ That, you will concede, is not a task which is likely to 
yield inspiring or elevating results. Even the least intro- 
spective among us is secretly aware that he sometimes 
masks his real motives with a bland deceit. The pre- 
scribed rules of commendable conduct, the traditions of 
amiable and successful human intercourse, the complex- 
ities of accumulated taboos in a heterogeneous civilized 
society, have combined to make the average human mind 
a mass of suppressions, lies and self-deceptions. The 
difficulty is few people are ever aware of them and that 
they make of these defects the dubious virtues they 
recognize as the good, the true and the beautiful. Out 
of their impotence they create a religion and an ethic; 
out of their frustrations they organize a crusade; out 
of their suppressions arise such sickening perversities as 
war, mob violence, lynchings, vice hounding, persecu- 
tions, revivalist debauches, martyrdom and that prevalent 
madness which has somehow come to be conceived as 
normal, salt-of-the-earth sanity. That it is not sanity, 
but in reality a dangerous sort of madness, is something 



ary art of the very highest kind, depending of course that the psychologists have discovered only recently. Out 

entirely upon whether the author has genius. To reject of the Freudian explorations of the subconscious the 

Ulysses or The Revolt of the Angels from the category of research of the psychiatrists and behaviorists and the tests 

novels on the ground that they do not follow the plan of in experimental psychology has come a knowledge of the 



The Golden Bowl is merely to con- 
fess an irrelevant predilection — ■ 
and to be more than a little asinine. 
The present season of fiction 
offers an extraordinary diversity 
of novels, a great number of 
which are of sound and consider- 
able merit. I have spoken in this 
place of Babbitt, One of Ours, 
and The Glimpses of the Moon. 
Now comes a new book by Ben 
Hecht, who pleased one section of 
a large audience and enraged the 
other with his first book, Erik 
Dom, a sustained piece of lyrical 
bitterness. The new book. Gar- 
goyles, is a novel in an entirely 
different genre. It is a psycho- 
logical novel so merciless and ex- 
act in its analysis of human mo- 
tives that it might easily serve as 
a treatise on behavior. In Erik 
Dorn Mr. Hecht showed himself 
to be an extraordinary, if often 
too exuberant, master of epithets 
and of strikingly brilliant word 
combinations. That novel was 




Sketched by Erik I. Smith 
BEN HECHT 



extent to which this madness is re- 
sponsible, not only for individual 
disease and death but for the mis- 
eries which beset mankind. 

If you prefer to remain in ig- 
norance of the mainsprings of 
conduct, if you dislike facing life 
in novels as resolutely and with 
as much disillusion as you are 
forced to face it in life, you will 
not relish Gargoyles. To the com- 
placent and optimistic it will be 
an irritating and perhaps even a 
nauseous book. They will see in 
it precisely what it is not, i. e., 
an unhealthy and immoral novel. 
On the contrary it is so sternly 
moral as to be almost quixotically 
idealistic. The whole effort of 
the writer is concentrated in an 
indictment of that shoddy sexu- 
ality which is never sublimated 
into the creation and enjoyment 
of beauty and serenity. It is a 
derisive and contemptuous sneer 
at that bondage of the flesh which 
(Continued on page 64) 



Page Thirty-Five 



r . 








Study of Charles Weidman by Hori 



PIERROT SINGS 

By Harold Final 



1 heard a bird in an almond tree 
Thrilling deep and long. 

Oh, it must he a starry thing 
To break one's heart with song! 



Tho I have singing things to give, 

Heart-fire and ecstasy — 
I cannot trill a golden note 

Or shake an almond tree. 



Page Thirty-Six 



':' 




Representative Pottery 



Pottery, while it is the product of the individual 
who shapes it on his wheel, is national in its 
design. There is a similarity of line that, ; to the 
eye ot an expert, places it immediately in its 
proper period and country 



Courtesy of tr 




These gay little 
figures, the work 
of Susi Singer, 



Werkstatte 

express the in- 
souciant spirit 
of the Viennese 




The vase is an excellent ex- 
ample of the 16th Century 
Spanish Mdiolica ware, 
while the plate of the same 
ware was made in Seville 
during the 18th Century 



The exquisite green in this 
American-made vase is 
achieved by the most careful 
firing to bring out the color- 
ing in the various metals 
used in and under the glaze 



Page Thirty-Seven 




Today, if you make men jealous or angry, 
the eyes of the cavemen glare out. Even 
Caesar removed the mask of the hero and be- 
came plain man when a pretty miss ogled him 



THE Father of our country was a 
red-head. 
This news won a brief para- 
graph on the front page of the news- 
papers recently, and brought letters 
from elated gentlemen chuckling over 
the discovery that George Washington 
was something more than an austere, 
white-wigged patrician in a gold frame, 
who once eliminated both a cherry-tree 
and a lie. 

Whether or not the college profes- 
sor's word about the red hair under the 
white wig be true, or the assertion that 
Washington spelled window "winder," 
the statement nevertheless remains as 
an exhilarating sign of the modern 
tendency to make heroes into human 
beings. 

The fact that Washington's home in 
Mount Vernon was often the scene of 
drinking, gambling, dancing, and flirta- 
tion — good little every-day sins — does 
not lessen the integrity of his public 
life. 

Biographers are painting more real- 
istic portraits every day. One of the 
difficulties they face is that great men, 
as they gradually recede into the past 
of history, acquire more and more the 
attributes of godhood. Psychologists 
tell us that this is due to the "parent 
image" which a child builds up in his 

Page Thirty-Eight 



Heroes 

or 

Human Beings? 

"Only an equal or a superior 
can really appreciate a man," 
says Ruskin. "The inferior may 
overestimate him in enthusiasm 
or degrade him in ignorance." 

By 
Charles Divine 

Sketches by August Henkel 




■■ ■ .,:■: . ■ .. -. 






SuiALXJWIAND 



mind of a father or mother, until it 
becomes an ideal which can be 
clothed with any halo whatever 
without the interference of trouble- 
some facts. 

H. L. Mencken says : "American 
sentimentality holds that it is inde- 
cent to inquire into the weaknesses 
of the dead, at least until all the 
flowers have withered on their 
tombs." 

Gentlemen with dusters and ladies 
with sculping tools are not waiting 
for the flowers to wither. They 
know perhaps that man always ex- 
alts the past, especially his own past. 
It is as if the formula were : En- 
noble your ancestor, and you en- 
noble yourself ! Give him all the 
virtues, and you will have them all 
yourself — if you are simple-minded 
enough to believe it. 

The hero, as Otto Rank says in 
one of his monographs, should al- 
ways be interpreted as a collective 
ego. This is the type for such fig- 
ures as Hercules, Moses, and Lo- 
hengrin. In being descended from 
such stock the race felt exalted. 

Truer values are being read into 
human actions today, and heroic 
sentimentalities are being investi- 
gated and exploded. Even writers 
of fiction are studying psychology 
in an informal classroom. They 
are dissecting character in the 
laboratory. 

One such class of student-writers 
has been meeting the past year with 
Professor Walter B. Pitkin. They 
are dividing human beings into 
types of behavior and forms of re- 
action during crises. They are learn- 
ing, for example, that a certain man 
who was crossing a railroad track 
with his wife, when her foot was 
caught in a rail, imprisoning her 
before an onrushing train, and who 
stayed at her side and met death 
with her, was not so much a hero as a marked hysteroid 
type. 

"This one trait," says Professor Pitkin, "was com- 
pletely proved by his abnormal fixation on a romantic 
impulse which completely threw his judgment out of 
gear." 

Once no man was a hero to his own valet. Now no 
man is a hero to his own psycho-analyst. 

There is Abraham Lincoln. Sentimental affairs occu- 
pied much of his life, tho the facts have been generally 
glossed over by biographers. He was a type that is 
known to psychiatrists as maniac-depressive — suffering 
from an alternation of two moods, excitement and de- 
pression. 

Dr. L. Pierce Clark's study of Lincoln shows that the 
great emancipator was not able to free himself of a 
devastating inner conflict. It caused him to sink into a 
state resembling coma for half a day at a time. This 
began to be observed after the death of his first love, 
Anne Rutledge. 

Let us be grateful that the biographer is no longer 
afraid to tell the truth. Human traits have been the 
preoccupation of such modern writers as Lytton Strachey 
with his Queen Victoria and Eminent Victorians; Frank 




The deficiency of the internal secretions which made Napoleon 
eligible for glory was also responsible for his downfall. His 
rise and fall followed the rise and fall of his pituitary gland 



Harris with his Life of Oscar Wilde; Van Wyck Brooks 
with his Tlie Ordeal of Mark Twain. Orthodox histories 
and classroom textbooks can never give the student half 
the thrill, the truth, and the glamor of a great man or 
his age as can a slim volume like Edgar Saltus' Imperial 
Purple, which is written in imperial prose. 

The Romans are revealed in a pageant of highlights. 
Cicero obtained a divorce on the ground that his wife 
did not idolize him. Claudius' wife, Messalina, went 
hunting adventures thru the streets of Rome. And Nero 
kicked his wife, Sabina, to death. 

Julius Caesar was tall, slender, superb, and so perfectly 
set out that Cicero "mistook him for a fop" and Cato 
called him "that woman." He is seen in his triumphal 
procession returning to Rome from Spain, Pharsalus, and 
Cleopatra's arms, sitting in his jeweled car, blinking his 
tired eyes, his face and arms painted vermilion ; on his 
head a wreath concealing increasing baldness ; behind him 
a boy admonishing him noisily to remember he was a 
man. . . . Save in battle, Caesar's health was poor, his 
strength was undermined by incessant debauches, and he 
was epileptic, as were Dostoievsky, Petrarch, Moliere, 
Flaubert, St. Paul, Handel, and others. 
(Continued on page 69) 



Page Thirty-Nine 




Photo by J. W. Pondelicek 



LES PA VANES 

Under the somber trees, they dance 
and coquette on moon-drenched lawns 



Page Forty 



Literary Women of the Northwest 




Photos by Henry Berger, Jr. 
Port! rod, Oregon 



When an illness 
sentenced Hazel 
Hall (below) to a 
wheel chair, she 
undertook delicate 
embroidering to 
help fill her days. 
Out of this experi- 
ence grew her per- 
fect "Needlework 
Poems", which form 
Part Two of her 
book "Curtains." 
There are no 
poems like them in 
our literature ; they 
rank her with our 
women poets of 
highest talent 







Anne Shannon 
Monroe is a nov- 
elist and essayist. 
Also she writes 
successful articles 
on Women in 
Business. But to 
her mind she has 
accomplished one 
thing that over- 
tops everything 
else — a hik e 
down the coast 
one winter from 
Seattle to San 
Francisco 




Maryland Allen 
has contributed 
countless short 
stories to Eastern 
magazines, of 
which the best 
known is an 0. 
Henry prize story, 
"The Urge." Mrs. 
Allen does not 
sit by the fire and 
spin yarns; she 
tracks down In- 
spiration in the 
open, preferably 
the South Sea 
Islands 



Page Forty-One 




Above, a portrait of one of the signers of the 
historic Deed of Demission. At the left, 
Hill's famous "Portrait of a Scottish Matron" 



SOMEHOW a great many people are under 
the impression that pictorial photography is 
a development of the late nineteenth century, 
and that Stieglitz, Steichen, White and Kasabier 
were the first to demonstrate that photography is 
a fine art. Certainly this talented four did a great 
deal to rescue the camera from the hands of mere 
mechanics who were slowly but surely educating 
the people to commonplace and meretricious stand- 
ards, but to David Octavius Hill, a Scotsman, must 
be given the credit for first turning out pictorial 
work which holds its own with the best output of 
today. 

Hill was born in Perth in 1802, the son of a 
bookseller. Before he had reached his 'teens he 
showed a marked talent for drawing. His father 
proudly showed his sketches to his customers and 
hung the best of them in the window of the old 
shop. When the lad reached the age of seventeen 
he persuaded his family to send him to Edinburgh 
for a thoro course in the study of art. His interest 
even a-s a boy was directed toward landscape and 
he specialized on this branch in the course at the 
art school. 

In 1823, at the age of twenty-one, he exhibited 
with some local success three pictures : Dunkeld at 
Sunset and two views of his native town of Perth. 
For the next fifteen years he worked steadily on 
landscapes, views of famous Scottish rivers, lakes 
and castles, and apparently finding a ready market 
for them. In 1838- he was elected Secretary of the 



The Father 

of 

Pictorial 

Photography 



A brief sketch of the work of David 
Octavius Hill, a celebrated portrait 
painter of Scotland, who nearly a cen- 
tury ago cannily discovered the camera 
as a medium for artistic expression 



Sherril Schell 




Page Forty-Two 



SuaDQWLAND 



Society of Scottish Artists, 
which finally became the 
Royal Scottish Academy. As 
secretary of the Academy, he 
was instrumental in appoint- 
ing a commission which 
raised a large sum for the 
erection of the Scottish Na- 
tional Gallery. 

As a painter, Hill's most 
important pictures are The 
Braes of Balochmyle, Old and 
New Edinburgh, Ruins of 
Dean Castle, Vale of the 
Forth, The River Tay, and 
by far his most elaborate 
work, The Signing of the 
Deed of Demission. This 
large canvas — eleven feet and 
four inches by five feet, and 
containing more than four 
hundred and fifty portraits — 
is a triumph. A more remark- 
able work of its kind does not 
exist. It is commemorative 
of the Disruption Act of the 
Church of Scotland, and rep- 
resents the signing of the 
Deed of Demission by the 
ministers of the first general 
assembly of the Free Church. 

To paint four hundred and 
fifty portraits and so group 
them to produce a fine picto- 
rial effect was no easy task, 
and the difficulty was in- 
creased by the fact that the 
place of meeting was an un- 
graceful wooden shed with a 
low roof of boards that al- 
most touched the heads of the 
assembly. A further handi- 
cap was the monotony of the 
clerical garb of black, unre- 
lieved save by an equally 
monotonous array of white 
cravats. The grandeur of the 
scene was moral grandeur. 

This historical painting 
represents twenty-one years 
of toil and required a nature 
richly sympathetic and a care- 
ful, patient hand. The orig- 
inal now hangs in the presby- 
tery hall of the Free Church 
in Edinburgh, but thruout 
Scotland are numberless pho- 
tographic reproductions of it. 

It was the problem of re- 
producing this historical can- 
vas that first interested Hill in photography. It was 
found that the execution of an engraving of the picture 
of any high degree of excellence would involve too much 
time and expense. The use of the camera was suggested 
by chance, and the suggestion was followed thru. From 
that time (1842) Hill turned his attention to photog- 
raphy, cannily noting what an admirable aid it might 
be in the painting of portraits. 

The new medium for expression soon cast a spell over 
the painter and it was not long before he devoted most 
of his time to it. Hill worked in "callotype," a process 
long ago deserted for a quicker method. The exposures 
were long, often lasting from twenty, minutes to an hour, 




This "Portrait of a Schoolboy," made about 1843, is as perfect 
in its composition, distribution of light, and suppression of 
irrelevant detail, as is any work of today's camera artists 



altho direct sunlight was frequently used to cut down 
the time. The model was obliged to remain propped in 
position while the perspiration streamed from his fore- 
head and his cheeks took on the color of ripe beets. Evi- 
dently the people of his generation were made of sterner 
stuff than those of ours, who find it trying to remain 
quiet for more than a second or two. 

Among the visitors to Hill's studio on Calton Hill in 
Edinburgh were some of the most famous men and 
women of the time : among them Ruskin, Millais, Dean 
Ramsay, James Nasmyth (inventor of the steam ham- 
mer), Sir James Simpson (discoverer of chloroform), 
(Continued on page 76) 



Page Forty-Three 




Two 
Engaging 

Interiors 



Two of the interiors from the 
Arts-in-Trades exhibition at the 
Waldorf-Astoria. The object of 
the exhibition was to show the 
difference between badly de- 
signed and poorly executed fur- 
niture and carefully planned 
and well carried out design. 
The exhibitors comprised the 
best interior decorators, sculp- 
tors, iron workers and crafts- 
men of all kinds. The Arts-in- 
Trades Society has been in ex- 
istence fifteen years. This is 
their first exhibit, and they plan 
to make it an annual affair 






Photo by F. M. Demarest 

The paneling in this room is from the old 
state breakfast-room in the Hamilton Palace, 
Lanarkshire, Scotland. The carved over-mantel 
has the Hamilton Arms, and dates from the 
late XVII century. The armchair to the left 
of the fireplace has a Beauvais tapestry top and 
came from the collection of the famous Hoent- 
schel. The tapestry at the extreme end is Flemish, 
and dates from the XVII century. While this 
room is assembled from old pieces, it serves 
to give inspiration to the modern designers 



Photo by F. M. Demarest 



Interior by P. W. French 



Practically " everything in this room is a re- 
production, but so faithfully have the designs 
been worked out that the charming Old World 
air of simplicity has been achieved. It is an 
early XVII century English cottage interior 

Interior by Arthur Todhunter 




Page Forty-Four 




Photo by J.WHlett 



FLORENCE" FRENCH 

This charming interpretative dancer is 
returning to the stage, after an absence 
of several years, in a new musical 
show called, "Oh, What's the Use" 



Page Forty-Five 






Photo by White Studio, New. York 





HAZOUTRA 

Now dancing with originality 
and grace in the "Spice of 1922" 



Page Forty-Six 



Johannes 
Kreisler 

Photographs by courtesy of the Selwyns 









The uncommon production of "Johannes Kreisler" lasts 
— including two intermissions — exactly two and one-half 
hours. During this time the forty-two scene-changes 
take place. Of these, twenty are in the first act, twelve 
in the second, and ten in the third. Pictured above is 
an intensely dramatic moment in "The Black Urn," 
which is Scene Sixteen of Act One 






For the past twenty months the reigning theatrical sensa- 
tion of the Continent lias been a fantastic melodrama, 
"Die Wunderlichen Geschichten des Kapellmeisters 
Kreisler," produced in Berlin. Its presentation in New 
York this season as "Johannes Kreisler" will afford 
theater-goers a rare pleasure — not so much from a dra- 
matic standpoint as in point of novelty. For it is 
unique. Its forty-two scenes pass before the eye in 
kaleidoscopic variety by aid of a technical novelty in- 
vented by Svend Gade especially for the production. The 
setting reproduced below is one of unusual luminosity 






That meticulous care has been taken 
to produce congruous costumes un- 
usual in design is demonstrated by 
the above sketches of the Ballet 
Girl, the weird Water Man, the 
Schoolmaster, and the Dancing Nun 

Since Lautenschlaeger with his re- 
volving stage gave impetus to stage 
reform, there has been a great deal 
of more or less successful experi- 
mentation in an effort to expedite 
scene changes. Therefore, this new 
stage creation by Svend Gade has 
stirred the interest of two continents, 
for the innovations achieved by him 
will revolutionize the mechanics of the 
stage. Mr. Gade himself will superin- 
tend the American production, for 
Germany declined to allotv his inven- 
tion to leave the country except under 
bond and accompanied by the inventor 



Page Forty-Seven 



The Cad As Hero 

Broadway Plays Fill the Stage With Entertaining Undesirables 

By Kenneth Macgowan 



THE cad is the hero of the modern theater. Realism 
decreed so when it said that the drama must be a 
photograph of life. 

In the old days heroes may have been good or they 
may have been bad, but at any rate they were always 
heroic. They towered clear out of the petty sins of the 
man-next-door. Nowadays, when we want a protagonist, 
we hunt up an ill-bred waster, a sensual coward, a self- 
indulgent old fool, or a young business man on the make. 
Any one of our neighbors will do, so long as he is enough 
like us to be rabbit-size in any 
spiritual crisis. 

All but one of the ten out- 
standing plays produced on 
Broadway in September have 
cads for heroes, and ten more 
would show a yellow streak 
somewhere if I had the patience 
to try to remember what on 
earth those failures were about. 

Of course, the cad can make 
very exciting entertainment. 
John Galsworthy learned this 
long ago. When he has a per- 
fectly honest, but utterly help- 
less man for a hero (as in Jus- 
tice, for instance), you may be 
sure he surrounds him with all 
manner of cads, including soci- 
ety itself. In Loyalties, his 
newest and by far his most ef- 
fective drama, he has provided 
a whole cast of cads. One man 
— an attorney, who gives up a 
case when he finds his client is 
guiky of crime — ought to be 
absolved, and would be by any- 
body but an American lawyer. 
But all the rest of these "loyal" 
gentlemen are a sad lot. The 
character upon whom Gals- 
worthy and his audience lavish 
most sympathy is a rich young 
Jew who cuts up a dreadful 
fuss because he has his purse 
stolen at a country house. The 
thief is "an officer and a gentle- 
man" who is bored by peace 
and who needs the money to 
silence the father of a girl he 
has ruined. 

These cads provide an exceedingly interesting enter- 
tainment. To begin with, Galsworthy has put them thru 
a series of events full of interest and suspense ; the track- 
ing of the thief has something of the appeal of the murder- 
mystery. On top of that, the playwright has made the 
most of the fumbling human nature which these figures 
present; the play illumines the dark corners of these little 
minds and shows us the faults that we recognize in 
everyone about us. Finally, these nicely shaded character- 
studies provide good material for the actor. Basil Dean, 
the English producer, has got together an admirable en- 
semble from relatively unknown players. 




MY HEART 

By Charles Divine 

]\/fY heart is a Little Theater 
■^ -* Playing poetic dramas in soft lights 
To an audience limited to you. 
Pierrots in pale disorder, 
Walk the stage with ecstasies 
That burst, like Latin temperaments, 
In high, gesticulating eloquence; 
And actors, never recognized before, 
Tear off their masks and speak a part 
More startling than a dream. 

But why do you, exclusive audience, 
Always arise and leave before the end? 
Is it because the simple theme 
Will pass into your heart — 
Or over your head? 

My heart is a "Theatre Intime" 
Playing poetic dramas in soft lights 
To an audience limited to you, 
But every time the curtain falls 
There is a suffocating silence . . . 
And I myself must hurry out in front 
To cry: "Author! Author!" 



There are doubtless some playgoers who would question 
the morals of the heroine of Rose Bernd, the play by 
Hauptmann, in which Ethel Barrymore is beginning her 
season of repertory under Arthur Hopkins' management. 
But, tho Rose was rather free with the husband of her 
mistress, her tragedy must be laid to an imperfect knowl- 
edge of birth control, and to the dissolute, cowardly, or 
over- righteous attitude of her neighbors. It takes a pretty 
lot of cads to bring this staunch peasant to madness and 
the murder of her baby. The passionate but pusillani- 
mous magistrate, in which part 
Dudley Digges has been mis- 
cast ; the village rake, played 
with dash and power by McKay 
Morris ; Rose's adamant old 
father, stiffly and vigorously 
acted by William B. Mack, and 
a circling assortment of igno- 
rant, narrow country types. 

Rose Bernd is a play made 
out of simple and powerful ma- 
terials that somehow fail to 
make the overwhelming dramat- 
ic effect that they ought to. The 
fault is largely Hauptmann's 
for sticking too close to the 
five-act form of construction, 
and leaving two important epi- 
sodes to a hazy sort of explana- 
tion in other scenes. Ludwig 
Lewisohn, the translator, has 
made a bad botch of the country 
dialect. And Arthur Hopkins 
— trying, like all of us in 
America, to escape from the 
grubby reality of our past — has 
created a nice, well-bred version 
of peasantry, instead of the 
reality — vital, lustful, panting. 
There are two impersonations 
of Ethel Barrymore to be seen 
in New York theaters this fall. 
One is in Somerset Maugham's 
obvious and not very exciting 
Chinese melodrama, East of 
Sues. When its star, Florence 
Reed, isn't "emoting" in her 
usual fashion, she is forcing her 
words tensely thru her teeth in 
the familiar Barrymore manner. 
I expected her to step slightly 
forward at the end of the first act, and say: "It's all 
there is. There isn't any more." Unfortunately she dis- 
appointed me. The play went right on. 

Rose Bernd provides the other glimpse of Miss Barry- 
more's art. In the main it is highly satisfactory. There 
are moments, I must confess, when this player has grave 
trouble getting out of the draped velvet of a mad, mad 
Varrick and into the homespun of Rose. But in her two 
most important scenes she sweeps along with a grand sort 
of power that no other American actress can quite touch. 
The caddishness of the hero of La Tendresse is not so 
(Continued on page 66) 



Page Forty-Eight 



,, 








Photo by Edwin Bower Hesser 



Norma Talmadge has completed "The Voice from the 
Minaret," and is now in the land of the Great Sphinx — 
perhaps to cajole from him some secret of ancient Egypt that 
she can use in her next picture "The Garden of Allah" 



Page Forty-Nine 



Robert James Malone: Versatile Caricaturist 




Robert James Malone, 
who started as a car- 
toonist on a Baltimore 
paper, has developed a 
remarkable technique, 
or rather variety of 
techniques, in his cari- 
cature work. He uses 
imagination and varies 
his method to suit his 
subject. There is an 
underlying vein of 
seriousness in his 
things that is absent 
from the work of most 
American cartoonists. 
He spends most of his 
time in Washington, 
where subject matter 
for him is abundant 





Senator William E. Borah struggles with the seven- 
headed political hydra; as usual he poses before 
the spotlight. This caricature is a decided de- 
parture from the usual pen-and-ink satirization 



Senator John Sharp Williams takes on the role 
of Perseus, en route to Yazoo City with his basket 
of halos, spoils of his hard-won battles on the floor. 
Again Malone has produced a poetic conception 




Senator William E. Borah, in less 
allegorical guise, peers under 
his shaggy brows as he takes his 
usual aggressive debating pose. 
Malone here has made a carica- 
ture whose shadows resolve into 
geometrical masses; this is pre- 
vious to making a wood-cut 




"SiLJll 



Senator Miles Poindexter, of 
Washington; since 1911 he has 
dignified the Senate by his 
presence. Malone has caught 
his one bizarre note, the flaunt- 
ing necktie, while the rest of 
the figure is developed in 
the simple outline and shading 







Jascha Heifeitz; emphasizing 
the bow arm, Malone does a dry- 
point caricature of the famous 
violinist. He has secured a com- 
position of blacks tempered 
with delicate line and yet man- 
aged to get a great deal of mo- 
tion into the etching. This is 
a new medium for caricature 



Page Fifty 



Three Women Poets 

The Ironist — The Lyricist — The Rebel 

By Babette Deutsch 

I: Edna St. Vincent Millay 



ONE of the sharpest elements in the poetry written 
by American women is that of humor. The spirit 
of comedy plays alike over the meager and 
strangely majestical output of Emily Dickinson and over 
the images of that grave, delightful child, Hilda Conk- 
ling. It is as tho the feminine mind, preoccupied, as 
it is said to be, with what is personal and immediate, 
escaped from its own intensities by delicate mockery of 
itself. This is true not only of those mentioned above 
but also of such various poets as Adelaide Crapsey, Jean 
Starr Untermeyer, and Elinor Wylie. It is especially 
true of Edna St. Vincent Millay, whose rare power gives 
her a unique position among her contemporaries. Hers 
is not light laughter. It is rather that fine shrewd irony 
which pierces below the tragedy to the white kernel of its 
truth. She is like a rag-picker, sorting out the facts of 
life, and finding among these bones and old bottles the 
strong, supple, shining stuff which makes her toil fas- 
cinating and rewarding. 

She will take an outworn platitude and so turn it and 
twist it and furbish it that it becomes a new thing between 
her fingers. And it is always, or almost always, with an 
ironic gesture that she does this. She forces the gesture 
upon one in the orange-colored sheaf, Figs from Thistles, 
which she published in 1920, three years after her first 
volume, Renascence, had brought her into sudden fame. 
Thus her 

FIRST FIG 

My candle burns at both ends; 

It will not last the night; 
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends — 

It gives a lovely light! 

She handles in much the same way the sonnets which are 
the final figs pulled from her thistle-patch. They are 
richer in sophisticated satire than the sonnets in 
Renascence, but it belongs to Miss Millay 's gift that they 
should be just as stern. The very root of her irony is 
her intensity, her ability to sense sharply, to probe deeply, 
to flinch in nowise before what is to be suffered or to be 
seen. That this is wisdom, one feels in reading the con- 
clusion of the remarkable poem which gave its title to 
her first book : 

The world stands out on either side, 
No wider than the heart is wide; 
Above the world is stretched the sky — 
No higher than the soul is high. 
The heart can push the sea and land 
Farther azvay on either hand; 
The soul can split the sky in tzvo, 
And let the face of God shine thru. 
But East and West will pinch the heart 
That cannot keep them pushed apart; 
And he whose soul is flat — the sky 
Will cave in on him by and by. 

Her own heart is not pinched, whatever else it may be, 
and it is not, if we believe her, altogether a noble heart 
either. Her poems are full of cruelty — and of tenderness, 
and she likes to pour the bitterest potion into a cup of 
disarmingly exquisite design. Her work has been com- 
pared, not idly, with that of the Elizabethans, with their 
ready acceptance of the whole rich, strong, vulgar brew 



that their times had to offer. It is perhaps truer that she 
derives from Donne, whom she was at pains to study, 
the leader of the "metaphysicals" and one of the greatest 
if least known of the English poets. From him she 
could learn to mix love and biology, religion and plain 
passion unashamedly and without absurdity. But, her 
own unlessoned genius insisted on the piling up of com- 
mon, concrete things which makes her slightest and her 
finest poems instinct with life. Thus in Exiled this home- 
sick native of Maine cries out: 

Ahvays I climbed the zvave at morning, 
Shook the sand from my shoes at night. 

That now am caught beneath great buildings, 
Stricken with noise, confused zvith light. 

And the same small, homely, arresting details are to be 
found in such poems as Elegy, Spring, many of the son- 
nets, and in her infinitely poignant Lament. 

Miss Millay's work is not without flaw. There are 
moments when she seeks vainly to recapture the mag- 
nificently simple movement of Renascence, other moments 
when she permits her facility to betray her into empty 
grace. But this is rare, and the average of her work 
is so distinguished as easily to bear any insult she may 
put upon it. It fairly cries for quotation, and it is a 
further tribute that it should be so difficult to quote less 
than the entirety of a poem. She builds up to her climax 
— as was evidenced all the more in her two poetic plays : 
Aria Da Capo and The Lamp and the Bell. Her lyricism 
■ — which seems a matter of course among her more vivid 
gifts of passion and wit and pity — may be heard in this 
'stanza from Elegy : 

But your voice — never the rushing 
Of a river underground, 
Not the rising of the wind 
In the trees before the rain, 
Not the woodcock's watery call, 
Not the note the white-throat utters, 
Not the feet of children pushing 
Yellozv leaves along the gutters 
In the blue and bitter fall, 
Shall content my musing mind 
For the beauty of that sound 
» That in no new zvay at all 
Ever will be heard again. 

II: Sara Teasdale 

Music, rather than the stronger ingredients of Miss 
Millay's poetry, is to be found in the work of Sara 
Teasdale — work that is relatively small in compass, but 
which has placed its author as the foremost of our lyric 
poets. Miss Teasdale is far more feminine, in the ac- 
cepted sense of the adjective. Her verse is sweeter, softer, 
given to the gentler aspects of emotion, the more fugitive 
shades of love's fears and doubts and desires. Where 
Edna Millay sees the blossoming pear-tree in a "squalid 
dirty dooryard" : 

Mindful of the eyes upon it, 

Vain of its new holiness, 
Like the waste-man's little daughter 

In her first communion dress, 

(Continued on page 71) 



Page Fifty-One 



"** ;j 


* t 


•^ 








m 





% :l 




TWILIGHT 

By Robert Hawley 

First Prize 
This picture has a decorative quality, a nice dis- 
tribution of objects, and is very simply treated 



Page Fifty-Two 



The Camera Contest 

Editor's Note — It is with great pleasure that we publish this article on 
camera lenses by Bernard H. Home. Mr. Home is technical instructor at the 
Clarence White School of Photography and is an authority in his subject. 




The 

Camera 

Lens 

By 

Bernard 
H. Home 




STREAMERS 
By Charles H. Jaeger 
Honorable Mention 
The rendering of the water is the out- 
standing feature of this photograph 



ON DECK OF METAGAMA 

By Johan Hagemeyer 

Third Prize 

In spite of the unusual placement of subject 

matter, the picture has excellent balance 



THE lens is the eye of the camera 
Unlike the human eye, it sees in 
detail all in its range of vision. 
Its range of vision is governed by 
its focal length, so that the focal 
length of a lens is very im- 
portant to one who wishes to 
make pictures with a cam- A 
era. Roughly speaking, 
the focal length of a lens JF 
is the distance in inches , . 
from the center of the 
lens to the film or 
plate, when the objects 
focused on are at a 
distance of about fifty 
feet from the cam- 
era. In the Brownie 
and fixed focus cam- 
era the focal length is 
usually the length of 
the camera when 
ready for use. The 
range of vision and 
focal length are close- 
ly related, for the 



OUT OF THE MIST 

By Eleaner L. Smith 

Second Prize 




nearer the film is to the lens the greater is 
the angle of vision, and vice versa. 
Now, in trying to make pictures, 
elimination is important. It must 
be simple, or in other words the 
subject to be made a picture 
of must not have a lot of 
unrelated things on either 
side. There are two ways 
of doing this, by going 
closer with the camera 
or by having a lens of 
longer focal length. In 
the former we are 
likely to have exag- 
gerated perspective, 
which is shown in 
portraits of people 
where the feet are 
much too large. 

Now, as to what 
kind of a lens to use, I 
will have to repeat 
what has been said by 
many authorities, that 
pictures have been 



The accepted and stereo- 
typed point of view has 
been avoided 



Page Fifty-Three 



SwiADOWLAND 




A SUMMER STUDIO 

By Edith R. Wilson 

Honorable Mention 

The variety and treatment of the angles 

in this photograph lend it interest 



made with every kind of lens and with no 
lens. The modern method of making a pic- 
ture has been to try to reproduce it as the 
eye sees it in nature. The pinhole in a 
piece of black paper in place of a glass lens 
comes nearer that result than anything else 
and by extending the bellows of a camera 
we have any focal length and can eliminate 
anything unnecessary, but, owing to the 
small amount of light passing thru, the ex- 
posure is too long, except for some land- 
scapes and outdoor work. I think the 
modern soft focus lens which approximates 
the pinhole quality is the one I prefer for 
all-around work. 

As this is the day of small cameras which 
are carried around in the pocket, a few words 
about them will not be out of place. As a 
rule, pictures made by this class of cameras 
are too small for exhibition, so enlargements 
or enlarged negatives must be made, and 
by various printing processes try to ap- 



FIFTH AVENUE AT ST. PATRICK'S 

CATHEDRAL 

By Kenneth D. Smith 

Honorable Mention 

It took patience to wait until the groups of 

people were placed so as to preserve balance 



proximate the softness and quality of our original 
pinhole. A Brownie or fixed focus camera requires 
less knowledge of photography than any other 
camera and, if the operator can select and know a 
picture when seen, all that has to be done is to 
point in the right direction and press the button. 

But I believe I am supposed to talk about the 
lens and not the camera, so I will start with the 
lens most commonly used, the anastigmatic. There 
are all kinds and all do good work. They are 
rather costly and the greater the focal length the 
greater the cost, so, to bring the outfit within a 
reasonable price, a focal length is made to just 
cover the plate with sharp detail to the corners. 

This lens is made and recommended to have 
great flatness of field and fine detail all over the 
negative. This means that the full size opening 
of the lens may be used, allowing the passage of a 
great deal of light, hence great speed. Also, that 
everything in one plane is in sharp focus, tho ev- 
erything in the other planes is out of focus and 
therefore blurred in the picture. By this one sees 
that for all speed work, sports, and press work, a 
good anastigmatic lens is to be desired. 

The soft focus lenses are recommended spe- 
cially for picture making, but they will not do this 
indiscriminately. They must be studied and tried 
out by numerous exposures of the same subject 
under different conditions and with different size 
stops, until one becomes familiar with the lens, 
otherwise it is hit or miss, and judging from numer- 
ous prints shown it is usually miss. These lenses 
are constructed, or should be, so no one plane is in 
much sharper focus than another, so there is no 
(Continued on page 74) 




Page Fifty-Four 




Photo by Hohen 



JEAN ARUNDEL 

Jean may not have a Motto, but she hopes 
to win a prize in the Beauty Contest 



Page Fifty-Five 




"Spite Corner": Madge Kennedy waits for the 
interpretation of Fate thru the medium of Marie 
L. Day, while Mattie Keene makes garish re- 
ir.irks and Eva Condon looks on apathetically 



Tragedy and 

Comedy in 

Black and 

White 



Sketches by 
Reginald Marsh 




i^^i^lrijiliiSlil^iiliillJS^fe:;: 



"Malvaloca": Rollo Peters and Jane Cowl 

may be interpreting modern Spain, but 

they go against all preconceived notions 

of that picturesque country 




"So This Is London": Marion Grey, Leah 
Winslow, Donald Gallagher, Marie Carroll, 
Edmund Breese and Lawrence D'Orsay in 
the farce depicting the Englishman's Amer- 
ican and the Americans Englishman 



"Rose Bernd": Doris Rankin as the invalid wife, 
Dudley Digges as the unfaithful husband, and 
Ethel Barrymore as the "other woman," dur- 
ing a tense moment in Hauptman's play 




Page Fifty-Six 

\ 



The Play, the Part, and the Time 

One of Broadway's alluring Young Stars remains true to her First Love — the Stage 

By Benjamin De Casseres 



HERE is a feminine Broadway star whose beau- 
tiful face you have never seen on the screen! 
Quel mystere! 

She is Lola Fisher, co-star with Alfred Lunt in Banco. 
Such an anomaly on the Great White Turnpike aroused 
my curiosity. But before I asked her the reason why 
she had not wooed the celluloid tape I thought I'd find 
out something about her life and previous condition of 
theatrical servitude. 

There was no previous condition of servitude. None 
of the "terrible struggles" you read about in the "best 
sellers" and Leonard Merrick. She just "growed" into a 
star, like Topsy. The Fates handed her a bunch of 
American Beauties from the first. 

She has been seven years on the stage, and is still in- 
conceivably young. Of medium height, and slender, 
Miss Fisher has the round face of a child with the ex- 
treme delicacy of coloring only seen in childish com- 
plexions. Her eyes are a soft brown, big and wide apart, 
with long lashes, while her hair is the shining gold-brown 
one would naturally expect to see with such eyes. 

Miss Fisher fairly puckers with individuality. She has 
been endowed with keen intelligence. She reads and 
studies, she paints and does very clever caricatures with 
her pen. 

Now, I am congenitally sex-shy. Whenever I have to 
face a beautiful young 
woman for an inter- 
view, I fortify my 
backbone by reading 
Schopenhauer on 
women. It has the 
same effect on me as 
three cocktails before 
striking the boss for a 
raise. 

But when I entered 
the dressing-room of 
Miss Fisher an hour 
before a Saturday mat- 
inee, my Schopenhauer 
epigrams vanished. 
My shyness receded. I 
was in the presence of 
naturalness, spontane- 
ity and a young woman 
who immediately put 
me at my ease by say- 
ing with a laugh : 

"But I never talked 
fifteen hundred words 
in my life — good gra- 
cious!" 

"Well," I replied, 
"maybe we can talk fif- 
teen hundred words 
together and I can say 
you said it all !" 

A challenge! And 
Miss Fisher, I soon 
saw, could not be chal- 
lenged with impunity. 
With the most pro- 




LOLA FISHER 



voking of smiles she trained her guns on me as she sat 
at her dressing-table under an immense tower of flow- 
ers, the names of which she laughingly confessed she did 
not know. ( She was born in Chicago, you see, where 
there are no flowers. I was wishing I had brought my 
California Handbook of Botanical Wonders to read to 
her, for it is there the old-fashioned geranium be- 
comes a hedge fence, the passion flower a thing of mathe- 
matics and mystery, and the oleander races with the 
eucalyptus. I discovered also that she is just as beau- 
tiful off the stage as on — maybe a little more so.) 

I asked Miss Fisher why she had not gone into the 
"movies." 

"I am," she said, "taking my apprenticeship. No one 
should go into the movies before learning stagecraft from 
the stage itself. I am waiting for the play, the part and 
the time. I do not want an uncongenial part in the films. 
I look on my work as play — isn't that the reason I have 
succeeded so quickly? In my stage career I have never 
tried hard. I have just waited. Patience and play are 
my mottoes. And Lam waiting for the 'movies' to come 
to me. 

"In signing my stage contracts I always insist on leav- 
ing the way clear for an acceptance of the many offers 
I am constantly receiving to do picture work. I believe, 
however, that my first duty is toward the producer of 

the play I am acting 
in." 

"I am told that you 
are a painter and cari- 
caturist besides being 
an actress. A woman 

caricaturist !" 

"Yes, I do carica- 
tures, and my friend, 
Charles Hanson 
Towne, says I am the 
only one extant. You 
see, I dabbled in paint- 
boxes with my sister, 
Blanche Fisher Laite, 
ever since I was a 
child. We used to 
smear up our house 
with colors. I always 
wanted to paint. When 
a child I wanted to put 
into colors every tree, 
horse and house that I 
saw. I still indulge, but 
I do not believe I'll 
ever be a Rosa Bon- 
heur. Anyhow, the 
stage has now become 
my absorption. But, 
you see, I am still with 
the Muses. Is there a 
Muse for actresses ? 

"About caricatures — 

I never knew I did 

them till someone told 

me. I always saw the 

(Cont'd on page 78) 



Photo by Drake 



Page Fifty-Seven 




The 

Continental 

Cinema 



Photographs © by Dorien 
Leigh, Ltd., of London 



At the top appears Asta Niel- 
son, the famous Swedish film 
star, who is best known in this 
country for her playing of 
Hamlet. Miss Nielson is one of 
the few really distinguished 
players of the screen. At the 
right is a highly popular Ger- 
man film actress, Erna Morena 



Page Fifty-Eight 




Study of Nazimova by Rice 



BARS OF ILLUSION 



Page Fifty-Nine 




The 
House 

of 
Wagner 



Above is Siegfried Wagner and his family. Herr Wagner is the son of the great 
composer, and is coming to America next spring to get in touch with the lovers 
of Lohengrin" "Tannhauser," "Parsifal," and other famous operas of his father, and 
to raise funds that the yearly Wagner Festival at Bayreuth may not be discontinued 

Below, Madame Nina Koshetz of the Moscow Opera poses in her Manhattan studio for 
her husband, Alexander de Shubert (left), and the Japanese artist, Toyohari Yama- 
nouchi. Madame Koshetz, who has sung with the Chicago Opera Company and in recital 
in New York, is now touring the country with the famous Ukrainian National Chorus 



In a 

Prima 

Donna's 

Studio 




Page Sixty 



Art Comment 



4T last Paris has a place in which to hang the foreign 

/% collections that have either been bought by or 
1. Jl presented to the Luxembourg. This new gallery 
is on the Tuileries terrace and is called the Salle dc Jen 
de Paume. The American collection makes an excellent 
showing. There was, before the opening, some specula- 
tion about Whistler, but he appears in the American group, 
as does Sargent and Mary Cassatt. Sargent is repre- 
sented by Carmcncita, Mary Cassatt by a pastel of Mother 
and Child; naturally, Whistler's Mother is there, as well 
as L'Homme a la Pipe. 

The full list of Americans represented is much too long 
to give, but Gari Melchers and William McEwen are 
among the Impressionists, while the landscapists and sea- 
scapists include Robert Henri, Colin Campbell Cooper, 
Florence Este 
and Edwin 
Lord Weeks. 
In the sculp- 
ture group are 
found Paul 
Manship's Girl 
and the Two 
■Gazelles, 
Jo Davidson's 
portrait bust of 
President Wil- 
son, and George 
Gray Barnard's 
Lincoln. 

To come back 
from foreign to 
native affairs, 
the National 
Association of 
Women Paint- 
ers and Sculp- 
tors is in the 
midst of a busy 
season. Only 
three days 
elapsed be- 
tween the close 
of their exhibi- 
tion at the Fine 
Arts Galleries 
and the open- 
ing of an exhibition at the Corcoran Galleries at Wash- 
ington, to which they had been asked to submit forty 
paintings, twenty miniatures and twenty pieces of sculp- 
ture. The Corcoran exhibit will last until December 
third. Meanwhile, beginning the first of December at 
the Ferargil Galleries, the same Association will show 
drawings by the members. But that isn't all, for included 
in the program of the American Federation of Arts, which 
plans to hold exhibits thruout the United States, during 
the season, are sixty paintings, fifteen miniatures and 
twenty bronzes from the Women Painters and Sculptors. 

There seems to be a growing movement toward the 
closer alliance of art and trade. For some time the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art has had a department which co- 
operates with manufacturers and turns over to them the 
resources of the Museum, to stimulate and encourage 
better designs in textiles, furniture, glassware, pottery ; in 
fact, every commercial output relating to applied design. 

The first of every year the Museum holds an exhibit, 
jointly with the manufacturers, of the products which, in 
any way have been inspired by Museum pieces. 




Courtesy of Ferargil Gallery 



SPEED 
By Harriet Frishmuth 



Working along similar lines is the Art Center, whose 
avowed purpose is by "general educational propaganda to 
foster and protect the artistic interests of our common- 
wealth thru the application of the arts of design to the 
every-day life of our people, and to advance the decorative 
crafts and industries that are allied to the home and the 
problems that are associated with the making of orna- 
mental objects of every kind." 

The Art Center, whose president is Helen Sargent 
Hitchcock, includes seven organizations composed of 
people in different lines of artistic endeavor but all work- 
ing toward the same end, which is the application of art 
to industry. 

The Art Alliance of America, of which the Hon. Henry 
White is president, tries to promote cooperation between 

artists, art stu- 
dents, artisans, 
publishers, 
manufacturers, 
advertisers and 
others who are 
engaged in ar- 
tistic activities. 
The Art Di- 
rectors Club, 
Joseph Hawley 
Chapin, Presi- 
dent, defines its 
status in such a 
dignified way : 
"it is to advise 
commerce in 
the use of art 
and to interpret 
for art the re- 
quirements of 
commerce." If 
that statement 
was written by 
an art director, 
he used admir- 
able restraint, 
for the lot of 
the art director 
is hard, he is 
the bumper, 
the mediator, 
the go-Detween, who calms down the artist when his 
preliminary sketches are returned and skilfully persuades 
the manufacturer that it is better to have something 
artistic, even if photographic fidelity is sacrificed a little. 
The American Institute of Graphic Arts, Walter Gillis, 
Honorary President, Frederic W. Goudy, President, aims 
not only to stimulate and encourage those engaged in 
graphic arts but also endeavors to have America repre- 
sented in foreign exhibits as well as inviting foreign 
exhibits to this country. 

The New York Society of Craftsmen, Charles E. Pellew, 
President, is trying to develop the spirit of craftsmanship 
and produce by hand rather than by mechanical means. 
The Pictorial Photographers of America, Dr. A. D. 
Chaffee, President, desire to raise the standards of 
photography in the United States by forming centers 
where photographs may be on view and enlisting the aid 
of museums and public libraries. 

The Society of Illustrators, Charles Dana Gibson, 
Honorary President, Edward Penfield, President, has 
(Continued on page 73) 



Photo by Nickolas Muray 



Page Sixty-One 



a 



An Underground Guide to Manhattan 




You wont miss your station during the sub- 
way rush from the Battery to Central Park 
if you watch for the living signboards 

Sketches by Esther Andrews 







WALL STREET 
Enter the caned and 
spatted T.B.M., worry- 
ing how to turn one 
dollar into one thou- 
sand; the alert A.B., 
wondering how to turn 
one college degree in- 
to one dollar; the in- 
solent little A.D.T., 
who can tell them 
both just how to do it 





SHERIDAN SQUARE 
Greenwich Village is now overhead, for soulful 
Sonia and Igor the Russian enter, who need only 
plenty of money and leisure to persuade the 
world that they are geniuses. Elsie, the artist's 
model, is not so ambitious; she merely wants to 
persuade one young man that she would be a 
model wife 



TIMES SQUARE 
Prepare for the matinee crowd, of 
which the most conspicuous mem- 
bers are from upstate. These, hav- 
ing patterned their clothes and 
their manners after Society-as-it-is- 
Screened, are certain they pass for 
natives of Broadway. But they 
deceive none except themselves 



THIRTY-FOURTH STREET 
Exit the Long Island commuters and enter 
the devotees of the beaches. After a day of 
sun and sand and salt water, tempers are 
burning as well as faces and arms. Phronsie 
the Flapper is present in body only — her 
spirit is communing with "that puffickly 
grand life-saver!" 





FOURTEENTH STREET 
You are rolling under the shopping 
district of New York's hoi polloi. 
Mrs. Capek enters, busy with baby 
and bundles, but stops to give the 
pompous Mrs. Morowitch the Rou- 
manian equivalent for "Quit yer 
shovin'!" Mrs. Snitovski, a recent 
arrival from Ellis Island, under- 
stands the situation tho she cant 

understand the language 




I 

V 



"W k. 



COLUMBUS CIRCLE 
The Central Park West 
Bridge Clubs are closed for 
the day and the most preten- 
tious but least prosperous 
members enter, attempting 
to turn the subway into a 
snubway, and trying to regis- 
ter the fiction that the chauf- 
feur has inconsiderately 
failed to meet them with the 
town car 



Page Sixty-Two 



Wanderings 

By 

The Man About Town 



OPERA made an auspicious reentry in New York 
when the San Carlo Company opened its usual 
fall season at the Century Theater. The whilom 
Thespian temple of Gotham millionaires affords a hand- 
some milieu for grand opera, and Fortune Gallo did things 
in good style with the initial performance of that spec- 
tacular work Aida. The popular impresario is a specialist 
in this particular opera, for did he not give it a wonderful 
open-air performance at Sheepshead Bay some four years 
ago, in which a thousand people or so, not to mention 
camels, elephants and horses, participated? 



Altho the Century cannot boast of foyers and vesti- 
bules as spacious as those of the Metropolitan and Man- 
hattan opera houses, the house presented an animated 
spectacle between acts, and the audience was large and 
representative. It was pleasant to meet and greet musical 
and journalistic friends, some of them just back from 
Europe, where they had been to spy out the nakedness of 
the land and virtually live on the exchange, for the dollar 
was never so almighty as it is today. Others had returned 
from seasid'e,*'mountain and lake, bronzed and radiant and 
full of plans for the season just commenced. 



The opulent charms 
of Margarete Matze- 
nauer, the eminent con- 
tralto of the Metropoli- 
tan, were much in evi- 
dence, emphasized as 
they were by a regal 
ermine cloak, which, 
however, seemed some- 
what superfluous with 
the thermometer well 
above eighty degrees. 
Maybe she felt a little 
chilly after her recent 
marital misadventure, 
for the flames of love 
must have been com- 
pletely extinguished by 
the abrupt ending of 
her marriage of incon- 
venience. 



Commissioner En- 
right was present with 
a party of delegates to 
the International Police 
Conference to see that 
the rather stuffy execu- 
tion of Aida and Rha- 
dames was carried out 
with due formality. 
Beautiful Mrs. Foun- 
tain, with the Irish 
eyes, escorted by that 
preux chevalier Leon- 
ard Liebling, attracted 
general notice, and 




Photo by Rabinovitch 

HORACE B. LIVERIGHT 
He has to his credit as publisher the discovery of Hendrik Van Loon and 
Rose Macaulay, and the Modern Library will be his lasting monument 



there were several artistic and literary celebrities, as well 
as musical folk of more or less prominence. But Society 
with a capital S had not got back to town, and with 
the exception of the journalists and some others there 
were few whom one recognized. 



Not even all the critics were at the San Carlo. Of 
course the aristocratic Aldrich, who condescends to write 
the musical reviews for the Times, would not be seen 
at an operatic performance before the opening of the 
Metropolitan. But genial Billy Chase was an excellent 
substitute, and was true to the best sartorial traditions 
of his newspaper. By the way, how angry Aldrich must 
have been at the typographical mess that was made of his 
first telegraphed report of the Pittsfield chamber music 
festival. The Times is, without doubt, the best written 
and the worst "read" paper in the country. 



There was a complaining note in Willy Henderson's 
voice, as if he did not regard the commencement of an- 
other seven months' musical grind with unmitigated 
pleasure. Krehbiel had sent tall and handsome Katherine 

Wright in his place, 
and she must have 
found the tiny room al- 
lotted by the Shuberts 
to the press rather un- 
suited to the unrestrict- 
ed movement to which 
she is partial. But, she 
puffed her cigaret with 
obvious enjoyment 
while she rattled out 
her notice on one of the 
two machines provided 
by a frugal manage- 
ment. 



Gilbert Gabriel, hav- 
ing discovered and ex- 
plored Italy the year 
previously, has since 
written and published 
a clever and sensitively 
written novel entitled 
Jiminy. It was rumored 
that he was abandoning 
musical criticism for a 
different literary field. 
That, I venture to 
think, would be regret- 
table, for he is one of 
the few younger writ- 
ers on musical matters 
with a style which sug- 
gests that he may as- 
sume the mantle of that 
great weaver of words, 
James Huneker. Hav- 
ing mastered his style, 
{Continued on page 77) 



Page Sixty-Three 



SuADOWLAND 



The Convenience of the Novel 



{Continued from page 35) 



not only cripples the minds and mottles the 
characters of people, but gives them a weapon 
wherewith to cripple or harass the free and 
superior spirits of intelligence and imagina- 
tion. 

Gargoyles is, in brief, the story of the rise 
of a successful politician, and of his intimates, 
friends and associates. George Basine is at 
once the product and the victim of Puritanism 
in an industrial democracy. He has all the 
catchwords of conduct and success ; he has a 
moderate degree of intelligence and a great 
deal of acumen ; he is at once a skeptic and 
a credulous man, knowing himself for a sin- 
ner, according to his code and believing all 
the cant of his day ; he is in the beginning 
a healthy animal able "to stare his conscience 
out of countenance," and in the end a mental 
and moral moron thru the attrition of the con- 
stant pressure of platitudes — but a famous man, 
with a senatorship in sight, money in the bank, 
and the admiration and respect of other mental 
deficients who see in this pompous and absurd 
ass the embodiment of their own ideals and 
ambitions. 

There is in Gargoyles no elaborate delinea- 
tion of character : there is the sure and 
pertinent observation in a sentence or a para- 
graph which illuminates what we need to know 
about a figure in a fine flash which another 
novelist might use a chapter in explaining — and 
fail to explain. There is insight and analysis 
in swift, clean strokes. There is beauty, too, 
in the searing acidity of these pages ; for there 
is the beauty inherent in the tragedy of a man 
in conflict with himself (as in the episode of 
Lindstrum, the poet) and in the tragedy of a 
frustrated passion that is nobly centralized and 
nobly borne (as in the episode of Doris' love 
for Lindstrum) and, finally, there is beauty of 
a quivering, poignant kind even in the strained 
hatred and malice of the book, for it is the 
hatred and malice of a sensitive and intelli- 
gent man in reaction to the miseries men make 
for themselves and for others. 

It is my belief that Mr. Hecht is a generously 
endowed writer among the post-war genera- 
tion of American novelists. His influences 
have been largely Continental ; he stems from 
Dostoievsky, Flaubert, Nietzsche and Huys- 
mans rather than from English and American 
models, with one exception, Stephen Crane, 
for there are obvious traces of Crane's in- 
fluence in Hecht's work. It will be seen, 
from this, that Hecht's intuitive sympathies 
with great artists of the realistico-psychologi- 
cal tradition in Europe and with perhaps our 
one great realist in America augur well for 
the sort of intellectual equipment he brings to 
the business of novel writing in America. He 
has given evidence of a vast, restless and 
seemingly inexhaustible energy, producing 
within a single year two novels and two plays, 
and at the same time writing two columns 
every day for a newspaper. If his novels were 
the ordinary, commercial stereotypes, this 
would not seem more than the natural result of 
a conscientious industry, but they have in them 
so much that is genuinely distinctive, so def- 
initely an intelligent attitude, and so valuable 
a gift for imagery, that this overflow of pro- 
ductiveness is so amazing the fear arises that 
he may write himself out before he has achieved 
the poise and restraint that is yet necessary 
to give his work the final touch of greatness. 
Certainly he has most of the elements which 



qualify for that tribute and, in retrospect, it 
seems that he lacks them only because of the 
mendable defects of haste and carelessness. 
And a competent proofreader could help him 
a lot in those defects. 

John Cournos slipped quietly enough into 
the literary scene a few years ago with two 
novels of considerable distinction. He was 




Recommended Books 

Fiction 

The Judge, by Rebecca West. Doran. 

Babel, by John Cournos. Liveright. 

Against the Grain, by J. K. Huysmans. Lieber 

& Lewis. 
Germinie Lacerteaux, by Edmond and Jules de 

Goncourt. Knopf. 
The Cathedral, by Hugh Walpole. Doran. 
The Bright Shawl, by Joseph Hergesheimer. 

Knopf. 
Lilian, by Arnold Bennett. Doran. 
A Tale of Triona, by W. J. Locke. Dodd, 

Mead. 
The Unlit Lamp, by Elisabeth Sanxay Hold- 
ing. Dutton. 
Rough Hewn, by Dorothy Canfield. Harcourt. 
Peregrine's Progress, by Jeffrey Farnol. Little, 

Brown. 
Skippy Bedelle, by Owen Johnson. Little, 

Brown. 
Anne Severn and the Fieldings, by May Sin- 
clair. Macmillan. 
The Wind Bloweth, by Donn Byrne. Century. 
Down the River, by Roscoe W. Brink. Holt. 
Swann's Way, by Marcel Prevost. Holt. 
Some Distinguished Americans, by Harvey 

O'Higgins. Harper. 
Two Little Misogynists, by Carl Spitteler. Holt 
Rita Coventry, by Julian Street. Doubleday 

Page. 
Love and Freindship, by Jane Austen. Stokes 
Rootabaga Stories, by Carl Sandburg. Har 

court. 
The Mercy of Allah, by Hilaire Belloc. Apple 

ton. 

Non-Fiction 
Tramping on Life, by Harry Kemp. Liveright 
The Second Empire, by Philip Guedalla. Put 

nam. 

Letters of James Gibbons Huneker. Scribner. 
My Life and Some Letters, by Mrs. Patrick 

Campbell. Dodd, Mead. 
Beasts, Men and Gods, by Ferdinand Ossen 

dowski. Dutton. 
Rossetti and His Circle, by Max Beerbohm 

Doubleday, Page. 
The Conquest of New Granada, by R. B. Cun 

ninghame-Graham. Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Love Conquers All, by Robert C. Benchley 

Holt. 
Ocean Echoes, by Arthur Mason. Holt. 
Stage Folk, by Afred Frueh. Lieber & Lewis 
American Poetry, an Anthology. Harcourt. 
Admirals of the Caribbean, by Francis R. Hart 

Houghton, Mifflin. 
Preludes and Symphonies, by John Gould 

Fletcher. Houghton, Mifflin. 
Shouts and Murmurs, by Alexander Woollcott. 

Century. 



scarcely noticed at the time and the reason was 
not far to seek: the then younger Englishmen, 
Compton Mackenzie, J. D. Beresford, D. H. 
Lawrence, Hugh Walpole and Gilbert Cannan 
were attracting attention with a similar act — 
the autobiographical novel. American readers 
were, at the time, buying third-rate English 
books in preference to second-rate American 



books on the legitimate-enough ground that 
English novelists were more competent in the 
sheer knack of story-telling than our native 
writers and on the illegitimate theory that 
English literature is invariably superior to 
American literature. Cournos had the mis- 
fortune to hail from Philadelphia and, in con- 
sequence, was not taken seriously even by 
Philadelphians. Moreover, Gilbert Cannan 
had, in Mendel, handled the same theme (the 
conflict of a neurotic and artistic Jew with his 
environment on which Mr. Cournos engaged 
his talents in The Mask and The Wall and did 
so sound a job of it that it rather, for the 
moment, overshadowed Mr. Cournos' achieve- 
ment, if for no other reason than by anticipat- 
ing it. 

Mr. Cournos has now come forward with the 
third volume of his trilogy, Babel. There is a 
continuity in the three books, and there is one 
central character, Gombarov, for them all ; but 
Babel (as have the others) has a separate life 
and unity and may be read as an isolated book. 
There is no reason, indeed, why Mr. Cournos 
should not go on writing novels of himself in 
contact with life every time he finds he has had 
enough interesting experiences to fill a book, 
and so continue until his death, thereby giving 
us the first complete autobiographical novel in 
literary history. Certainly I shall look forward 
to the successor of Babel with even greater 
eagerness than I did to Babel. This new book 
is so honest, so frank and so serious a record 
of things seen and heard and experienced that 
it is a valuable document in the social history 
of the period no less than an entertaining and 
interesting novel. If we had a novel in kind of 
early Athenian, Roman and Florentine life, it 
would be priceless as information whereof 
scholars may now only conjecture. 

Mr. Cournos, it appears, lifted himself up 
from the Ghetto by the bootstraps of his mind 
and temperament, became a newspaper reporter, 
developed a smooth and cadenced prose and a 
narrative gift by arduous practice and went to 
New York and thence to London and Paris, 
seeking always the company of writers and 
painters under the somewhat erroneous impres- 
sion that they would provide him with the 
stimulus to great artistic achievement. They 
did not, they could not, and Mr. Cournos' novel 
is ponderable evidence that they can not, for 
the very reason that the stimulus to great 
artistic achievement must come from within 
and not from without. But they did provide in 
considerable measure the high points of in- 
terest in Mr. Cournos' narrative. And thus as 
a representational document Babel is in the first 
rank of the novels of its kind. 

I should be the last to grant that the re- 
portorial novel, no matter how minutely and 
beautifully it is recorded, may rank with the 
great projections of the imagination; but I 
should say that it has its significance and im- 
portance and that it may, as in the case of 
Babel, be a vehicle of great dramatic beauty and 
power. The love story in Babel is a febrile but 
poignant drama of desire and defect. Gom- 
barov's elaborate self-justifications, his petu- 
lant demands and easy but impermanent 
solace, and his lacerated emotions would be 
comic if they were set down with such in- 
tensity and veracity that we are reminded that 
this is not literature but life and that the very 
comic aspect of life has its inescapable, in- 
(Continued on page 68) 




Page Sixty-Four 




Photo by Albin 



BETTY BLYTHE 

Motion picture enthusiasts will soon have 
en opportunity to see this popular actress 
in a new play, "The Darling of the Rich" 



Page Sixty-Five 



SuABOWlANB 



Stage Plays of Interest 



Drama — Major and Melo- 



The Cat and the Canary. National. — Good 
excitement and suspense. 

East of Suez. Eltingc. — Florence Reed as a 
beautiful, tragic half-caste. 

The Faithful Heart. Broadhurst.— Teach- 
ing us how we may still "Carry On." 

The Last Warning. Klaw. — A mystery that 
keeps one thrilling and guessing. 

Loyalties. Gaiety. — An engrossing Gals- 
worthy play, brilliantly acted. 

The Monster. Thirty-Ninth St.— Emmett 



Corrigan as the villain in a gruesome and 
horrifying play. 

Rose Bernd. Longacre. — Ethel Barrymore 
does some fine work in an obscure and difficult 
drama. 

R. U. R. Garrick. — A social satire done in 
terms of the most hair-raising melodrama. 

To Love. Bijou. — Grace George is the star. 
Review later. 

Whispering Wires. Forty-Ninth St. — A 
headliner among mystery melodramas. 



Humor and Human Interest 



Abie's Irish Rose. Republic. — The audience 
is as amusing as the play. 

The Awful Truth. Henry Miller.— Ina 
Claire learns that the truth is an awful thing 
to have in the house. 

Banco. Rite. — The bubbling Lola Fisher in 
another Kummer comedy. 

Captain Applejack. Cort. — Excellent 
pirates-and -hidden-treasure burlesque 

East Side, West Side. Nora Bayes. — 
Norman Trevor in a too-conventional play. 

The Ever Green Lady. Punch & Judy. — 
The champion of the light-weight comedies. 

The Exciters. Times Square. — Drury Lane 
melodrama. You get your money's worth. 

Her Temporary Husband. Frazee. — 
Amusing and safe. About women for 
women. 

It's a Boy. Harris. — Another lesson for 
those who live beyond their income. 

Kempy. Belmont. — A very human small- 
town domestic comedy. 



Kiki. Belasco. — Lenore Ulric plays the 
piquant cocotte. Excellent. 

La Tendresse. Empire. — Henry Miller as 
the wistful old husband and Ruth Chatterton 
as the spirited young wife. 

Malvaloca. Forty-Eighth St. — An old- 
fashioned, sentimental, tear-drenched romance. 

The Old Soak. Plymouth.— -If you liked 
Lightnin' you'll like this. 

Shore Leave. Lyceum. — Frances Starr as 
a country dressmaker and James Rennie as a gob. 

So This Is London! Hudson. — Makes a hit 
with those who like English comedy. 

Spite Corner. Little. — A pleasing homespun 
comedy with a skimpy plot. 

Swifty. Playhouse. — Review later. 

Thin Ice. Comedy. — Worth while if you 
enjoy listening to clever lines. 

The Torch Bearers. Vanderbilt. — A smart 
satire on the Little Theater movement. 

Why Men Leave Home. Morosco. — A 
comedy with an obvious moral. 



Melody and Maidens 



Better Times. Hippodrome. — Large, costly, 
naive and pretty. 

Blossom Time. Fifty-Ninth St. — Franz 
Schubert's life set to his own music. 

The Chauve-Souris. Century Roof. — Third 
program of Balieff's Russian entertainers. 
Good. 

Daffy Dill. Apollo. — Frank Tinney as 
funny as ever. 

A Fantastic Fricassee. Greenwich Village. 
— All that the name implies. 

The Gingham Girl. Earl Carroll. — Both 
old and young will like this. 

Greenwich Village Follies. Shubert. — 
beautiful spectacle, with Savoy and Brennan to 
provide the touch of humor. 

Hitchy Koo of 1922. Century. — Review 
later. 

The Lady in Ermine. Ambassador. — A 
musical show that is something more than 
vaudeville. 



Molly Darling. Liberty. — Snappy, tuneful 
and clean. 

The Music Box Revue. Music Box. — Very 
easy to look at and listen to. 

Orange Blossoms. Fulton. — Dancing and 
music and dialog equally good. Dont miss it. 

The Passing Show of 1922. Winter Garden. 
— A succession of dances, parodies and songs. 

The Queen O' Hearts. Cohan. — Nora 
Bayes in a musical mixture of pleasing in- 
gredients. 

Revue Russe. Booth. — Vaudeville a la 
Chauve-Souris. 

Sally, Irene and Mary. Casino. — An im- 
pudent show of New York-Irish manners. 

Scandals of 1922. Globe. — Another hand 
for George White, please. 

The Yankee Princess. Knickerbocker. — 
A miniature grand opera. Real music. 

The Ziegfeld Follies. New Amsterdam. — 
Amusing, dazzling and distracting. 



The Best in the West 

A list of last year's successes now 07i tour 



Anna Christie. Eugene O'Neill at his best. 
Worth seeing. 

A Bill of Divorcement. A serious drama. 
Well acted. 

Bombo. Good music and new jokes. 

Bulldog Drummond. A mystery play 
everyone will like. 

The Circle. An excellent comedy with an 
all-star cast. 

The Demi Virgin. An underdone, undressed 
farce. 

Dulcy. Demonstrating that beauty triumphs 
over brains. 

Fools Errant. Thrilling situations and ex- 
cellent dialog. 

The Gold Diggers. A snappy, colorful 
comedy. 



Good Morning, Dearie. Excellent musical 
entertainment. 

The Hairy Ape. The tragedy of a stoker. 
Good. 

The Hotel Mouse. Frances White and 
Taylor Holmes in a light mystery play. 

Lawful Larceny. A crook melodrama. Fair. 

Make it Snappy. Eddie Cantor is the whole 
show. 

Nice People. A comedy of manners. 

The Passing Show of 1921. Smart and 
satisfying. 

Red Pepper. A typical Mclntyre and 
Heath entertainment. 

Six Cylinder Love. A domestic comedy 
with a moral. 

The White Peacock. Written and starred 
by Petrova. 



The Cad As Hero 

(Continued from page 48) 

very notable. In that respect it resembles all 
the rest of the dull and wordy play by Bataille 
in which Henry Miller and Ruth Chatterton 
are appearing. Miller plays a dramatist of 
reputed distinction and some sixty-odd years, 
who is so absorbed in his own importance that 
he cant see that his thirty-year-old mistress 
must be pardoned for finding elsewhere the out- 
let for a physical life which he can no longer 
give her. It takes the whole pack of pathetic 
last-act tricks — Christmas, little children, a cold 
in the head, loneliness — to bring the gentleman 
round. And the best he can do in the end is to 
preach about the higher love of "tenderness." 

Neither .Miller nor Miss Chatterton succeeds 
in doing much to alleviate the play. Miller is 
old enough to give the part reality, but not 
young enough to give it emotional vigor. Miss 
Chatterton brings only immaturity and a black 
wig to the role of the mistress. 

The cad is, of course, a capital figure for 
comedy. The man from God's own country 
(Oklahoma, Arthur Richman tells us in The 
Awful Truth, not California), who questions 
his fiancee's first husband to find out how good 
her morals were, is a splendid, refulgent cad, 
and makes good sport. So is the first husband ; 
for in the process of becoming the second hus- 
band he indulges in just the same sort of moral 
inquiry. There is nothing particularly robust 
in the plot, but the lines are often very clever 
and always intelligent. As the pent-up and 
boiling-over first husband, Bruce McRae plays 
a perfect Bruce McRae part perfectly. He 
leaves Ina Claire and her charms far behind. 

Another sort of cad, a mechanical cad, ap- 
pears in Banco, a farce-comedy adapted by 
Clare Kummer — and very well and honestly 
adapted from the risque French of the man 
who wrote Bluebeard's Eighth Wife. Here 
again, a divorced husband manages to achieve 
what the English courts call the "restitution of 
conjugal rights." In doing so he has to out- 
rage the hospitality of her second husband — 
and on the newly-weds' wedding night. This 
breach of good manners is hardly of any im- 
portance, of course, in a play whose characters 
are arbitrarily twisted and dehumanized to suit 
a preconceived "situation." Because it is a play 
of contrivances instead of natural action, it is 
least interesting in the first two acts, when 
these contrivances are being oiled up. The de- 
humanized husband is played in Punchlike vein 
by Alfred Lunt; the wife much too seriously 
by Lola Fisher, and the second husband de- 
liciously by Francis Byrne. 

Down in the field of ordinary popular drama, 
we strike the drunken but still loving husband 
of Percival Knight's Thin Ice, who must be a 
cad if there are going to be any difficulties for 
his old army- friend to straighten out when he 
comes to work as butler ; and in The Endless 
Chain, by James Forbes, and It's a Boy, by 
William Anthony McQuire, we come upon the 
most dreadful pest of all — the young business 
man on the make. In both plays he is sur- 
rounded with just the sort of wife and friends 
he might be expected to pick: selfish, feather- 
brained wife, and vulgar, ill-educated, money- 
grabbing friends. And in both plays we are 
expected to take an interest in whether or not 
he make's money and keeps his wife's love. In 
It's a Boy, the young gentleman goes thru the 
same plot as in the author's previous play, Six 
Cylinder Love, and in the same successful 
fashion. The Endless Chain is too thin of 
plot and too thick of preachment to divert the 
masses. Thus the American Magazine, drama- 
tized for Broadway, both succeeds and fails. 

Of the remaining productions of the month 
of September, two sets group themselves in 
convenient categories. In The Exciters, by 
Martin Brown, an excellent example of popular, 
legitimate farce-melodrama, art assiduously 
copies life: the etiquette book and "What's 
wrong with the picture?" crop out for the third 
time this season. In Orange Blossoms, on the 
other hand, nature copies art, as Oscar Wilde 
said it would: Neysa McMein's high-cheeked 
and flaming brunette on the magazine covers 
produces the charming star, Edith Day, to 
animate the well-bred ingenuities of Edward 
Royce and Victor Herbert. 



Page Sixty-Six 



SuiADOWLAND 





— In forty minutes, wiped away, the clay 
has forced the clarity and color of youth 
to any human skin on which it is applied. 
A new triumph of dermatology. 




"Father was amazed at the great change" 



This Astounding Beauty Clay Makes 

aNew Skin in 40 Minutes ! 



Here Is the Qreatest "News About Complexion Ever Brought to America. Even 
the Dullest Skin Yields to the Simple But Wonderful "Method Used Abroad. 



By MARTHA RYERSON 

I AM going to tell you how a pleasure trip to Sunny 
Wales resulted in learning a real beauty secret. It 
is a secret of Mother Earth's: a natural, normal 
and gloriously swift way to end forever an unlovely 
complexion. I went to Wales with the worst skin a girl 
could have; one afternoon I left it in the hills! I ex- 
changed it for one of soft texture and full of color. 
And this is how: 

Except that I can now let you prove it for yourself, 
I would never tell the story— a story my own father 
found it hard to believe! 

Hardest of all to believe is this ; the transformation 
took just forty minutes! Here are the facts: 

About the first thing one notices in this southern 
English province is the uniformly beautiful complex- 
ions. The lowliest maid — and her mother, too — has a 
radiantly beautiful skin. Mine, lacking lustre and color, 
with impurities nothing seemed to eradicate or even 
hide, was horribly conspicuous. 

It was a happy thought that took a most unhappy 
girl on a long walk through the hills one afternoon. I 
had stopped at the apothecary's to replenish my cos- 
metic—to find it was unknown. They did not have 
even a cold cream. The irony of it! In a land where 
beauty of face was in evidence at every turn — the women 
used no beautifiers! Do you wonder "I took to the 
hills?" I didn't want to see another peaches-and-creamy 
complexion that day. But I did. 

At a house where I paused for a drink from the 
spring, I stepped back in surprise when the young 
woman straightened up to greet me. Her face was cov- 
ered with mud. I recognized the peculiar gray clay of 
that section; very fine, sleek, smooth clay it was. See- 
ing my surprise, the girl smiled and said, "Madam 
does not clay?" I admitted I did not! 

I Decide to "Clay" 

In a moment, she wet the clay which had dried on 
her face and neck, wiped it away, and stood in all the 
glory of a perfect complexion. I think I shall never 
again envy another as I did that stolid maiden of the 
hills. Her features were not pretty; they did not need 
to be. For no woman ever will have a more gorgeous 
skin. She explained that this amazing clay treatment 
did it. The natives made a weekly habit of "claying" 
the skin, quite as one cares regularly for the hair. 

I was easily persuaded to try it. Had I not done 
ridiculous things in beauty parlors where many could 
see my plight? We tucked a towel over my blouse, and 
from the spring's bed she took the soft, soothing clay 
and applied it. 

As we sat and talked, the clay dried. Soon I experi- 



enced the most delightful tingling in every facial pore; 
the impurities were being literally pulled out. Half an 
hour more, and we removed the clay mask. Hopeful, 
but still skeptical, I followed into the tiny house to 
glimpse myself in a mirror. 

My blemishes 'were gone/ 

I fairly glowed with color that spread down the neck 
to the shoulders. My cheeks were so downy soft, I felt 
them a hundred times on the way home. Father's sur- 
prised look when we met in the garden of the little inn 
later that afternoon was the most genuine compliment 
a woman ever received. In a basket I had two crocks 
of the precious clay. I thought father's questions would 
never end; where did I find it; could I take him to the 
spot; what was its action, and reaction, and lots else I 
didn't know. Father is a chemist. Suddenly it dawned 
on me. He wanted to unearth the secret of that clay's 
amazing properties, and take it to America! For two 
weeks we stayed on, he worked all day at his "mud pies," 
as I called them. Back home at last in Chicago, he 
worked many weeks more. He experimented on me, 
and on all my girl friends. At last, using the natural 
Welsh clay as a base, he produced a compound as mi- 
raculous in its effect — only ten times more smooth and 
pure than the clay used by the peasants abroad. 

Any One May Now Have This 
Wonderful Clay 

News of the wonders performed by this clay had 
brought thousands of requests for it. Women every- 
where (and men too, by the way) are now supplied 
Forty Minute Clay. The laboratory where it is com- 
pounded sends it direct to the user. A jar is five dollars, 
but I have yet to hear of any one who did not regard it 
as worth several times that amount. For mind, in over 
six hundred test cases, it did not once fail. It seems to 
work on all ages, and regardless of how pimpled, clogged 
or dull the skin maybe. 

The application is readily made by anybody, and the 
changes brought about in less than an hour will cause 
open-mouthed astonishment. I know. 

When I see a woman now, with a coarse-textured 
skin that mars the whole effect of her otherwise dainty 
care of self.it is all I can do to refrain from speaking 
of this natural, perfectly simple way to bring a skin and 
color such as Nature meant us to have — and has given 
us the way to have. It is so healthful to use, it cannot 
grow hair (in fact, its action checks that undesirable 
downy growth) and it keeps pores their natural size 
because it is laid on and not rubbed in. 

Keep your skin pores clean, open, tingling with life! 
My father has made you a remarkable offer in the next 
column. Read carefully: 




New Shipments from Abroad! 

Free Distribution 
of $5.00 Jars Extended 

To the public: My first offer of full- 
sized jars without profit exhausted my 
small stock of imported clay. But we 
have just received more, imported direct 
from the British Isles. 

Therefore, I resume for a time the offer 
of a full $5 jar without any laboratory 
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expense of compounding, refining, ana- 
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in large quantity has been figured down 
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W>/fy 



Head Chemht 



THE CENTURY CHEMISTS 
Century Bid., Chicago, Dept. 181 

I accept your "No Profit"offer. Please send 
me a full sized, regular $5.00 jarof Forty Min- 
ute Beauty Clay at the net laboratory cost price 
of $1. 87, plus postage, which I will pay postman 
on delivery. My money back unless only one 
application proves completely satisfactory. 



Nami 

Addra 

P.O... 



Page Sixty-Seven 



SuAOOWLAND 




Just what 

is Listerine, 

anyhow? 

YOU'LL be interested to know 
just why Listerine is so effi- 
cient and so safe as an anti- 
septic — why it has grown so 
steadily in popularity for the last 
half century. 

Listerine consists of antiseptic 
oils and essences, such as thyme, 
eucalyptus, baptisia, gaultheria 
and mentha, scientifically com- 
bined with a saturated solution of. 
boric acid. 

Thus it has a two-fold antisep- 
tic effect — first, the liquid itself 
halts infection ; then upon evap- 
oration it leaves a film of pure 
boric acid to protect the wound 
while Nature heals. 

Its action is safe and sure. Don't 
be without it at home. For with Lis- 
terine near at hand you enjoy that 
comfortable feeling of knowing the 
antiseptic you use is both efficient and 
safe. 

The booklet that comes with each 
bottle explains more fully 

some of its many uses 

A safe, unirritating antiseptic 
for cuts, wounds and scratches, 
affording protection against in- 
fection while Nature heals. 

As a gargle for sore 

throat to ward off more 

serious ills 

As a spray in nasal catarrh. 
A safe and fragrant deodorant 
in matters of personal hygiene. 
Delightful after shaving. 
Effective in combating dandruff. 
Useful in many skin disorders. 

As a mouth-wash to 

correct unpleasant breath 

(halitosis) 

Lambert Pharmacal Company 
St. Louis, U. S. A. 



The Convenience of the Novel 



(Continued from page 64) 



herent pathos. As a panoramic picture of the 
complexities and conflicting desires, the tur- 
moil of ideas and the restlessness of society 
immediately antecedent to the war in the great 
centers of civilization such as Paris, London, 
and New York, Babel is in my opinion a much 
better novel than the more melodramatic work 
by Jacob Wassermann called The World Illu- 
sion. It is, for one thing, more credible and, 
for another, Gombarov is a live, pulsating 
human being while Christian Wahnschaffe is 
but a wraith. 

Jane Austen's fame as a novelist, large and 
secure as it is, has never been, I think, so 
great as it should be. She was the greatest 
social satirist of her era, overtopping Thack- 
eray, I think, by a considerable margin ; and 
she was one of the greatest character por- 
trayers in English fiction. There is literally 
no one who excels her in the choice of the 
precise phrase which gives the whole lineaments 
of a figure in marvelous caricature. She 
worked within narrow limits and concerned 
herself not at all with manners, customs, con- 
ditions or events outside of her immediate 
observation ; but in that small field she cul- 
tured fiction which is an enduring glory to 
English literature. 

Now comes to light a volume of the early 
manuscripts of Miss Austen, published under 
the title, Love and Freindship. It contains two 
gorgeous and bubbling burlesques of the 
romantic novels of Monk Lewis and other 
Ethel M. Dells of the period, and a comic 
history of England in a vein of rich humor 
and subtle satire. Because Miss Austen was 
about seventeen when she wrote these delicious 
little pieces, nearly all the critics, including 
Gilbert K. Chesterton who writes the preface 
to the volume, make the mistake of treating 
them as childish efforts and juvenilia. They 
forget that Miss Austen finished Pride and 
Prejudice before she was twenty-one and that 
one does not develop in three years from a naive 
child into one of the great masters of English 
prose narrative. No : the pieces in Love and 
freindship are the deliberate fabrications of a 
mature and highly sophisticated mind. The 
seeming ingenuousness of the stinging satire 
and chuckling humor of these scraps are the 
calculated effects of a clever girl who knew 
what she was about and knew how to achieve 
it in the happiest and most successful fashion. 
They are apprentice pieces, true enough, in that 
they were never conceived as full-length 
novels, but they are, none the less, perfect even 
as fragments. It would not surprise me 
greatly if Love and Freindship found as much 
favor with the reading public as The Little 
Visiters. It is, certainly, a much funnier book 
and no less certainly a permanent addition to 
the visible works of a woman who has never 
yet, I think, received credit commensurate with 
her achievement as an artist. 

An autobiography to rank with one of the 
great personal confessions is Harry Kemp's 
Tramping on Life. Here is the life story of 
a vagabond, loafer, idealist and poet set down 
with refreshing and amazing candor. It is 
difficult to conceive of a man telling the pitiless 
truth about himself in the fashion set forth in 
this book. This sort of thing is done once in 



a century or so and is left to one's heirs and 
assigns to be published posthumously. One 
cannot but congratulate the people Mr. Kemp 
writes about in relation to himself in this book, 
most of whom are living and presumably on 
friendly terms with Mr. Kemp, on their good 
sportsmanship. For Mr. Kemp spares his 
friends no more than himself. He depicts 
them under the thinnest disguises and exposes 
them to the criticism and ridicule of the 
reader. Indeed, Mr. Kemp permits himself the 
pleasure of criticising and ridiculing them him- 
self — never, mind you, in a spiteful or malicious 
fashion, but as an expression of sober opinion 
and truthful observation. 

It is an absorbingly interesting story of a naif 
and rather clownish fellow, his heart pulsing 
at one moment for the working-man and at 
another moment for his friend's wife, a 
credulous and gullible Utopian, always ready to 
swallow every radical nostrum, march in every 
unpopular parade, follow every literary freak, 
and be blown about by all the winds of hokum 
doctrine. He has an instinct for martyrdom 
and not one grain of commonsense. At twenty- 
five, altho he slept in box-cars and barrooms, 
mingled with prostitutes, pickpockets, tramps 
and all the derelicts, misfits and outlaws of 
society, had been familiarly in contact with 
every vice and crime of the underworld, and 
had discussed sex from every angle with 
Emma Goldman, Upton Sinclair, Elbert Hub- 
bard and all the other sex radicals of the 
period, he was still a lay Anthony worrying 
greatly about the probable effect upon his 
poetry if he should lose his chastity. The 
episode wherein he relates how he learned what 
he wanted to know is one of the most delight- 
fully naive stories I ever read, an unusual and 
touching ideal that gains a little in poetic im- 
pressiveness by being slightly funny. 

Of Rebecca West's excellent novel, The 
Judge, I shall treat in another causerie. I fell 
asleep on the tenth page of J. Middleton 
Murray's Still Life and this was such exquisite 
relief from boredom that I was not prompted 
to return to it. Rita Coventry, by Julian Street, 
I recommend as a novel of more than passing 
interest by a man who is not a flaming genius 
but a most competent craftsman with a knack 
for telling an interesting story. Rex Beach 
deserts the scenario marts in Flowing Gold and 
returns to his desk as a writer of excellent 
stories in the Jack London tradition. Mr. 
Beach is a man of breezy and ebullient imagina- 
tion who sheds no light on the major problems 
of human life, brings to his pages no original 
or impressive viewpoint, but who spins yarns 
which have an appealing and justifiably popular 
romantic and picaresque tinge. In My 
Northern Exposure, by George Chappell, by in- 
tent a burlesque of narratives of the arctic 
and antarctic explorers, I found nothing to 
amuse me. Chappell's talents for humor are 
good, but he invariably blows up every funny 
notion he has into proportions which take all 
the fun out of it. Great writers of parody and 
burlesque, like Thackeray and Beerbohm, get 
all their effects within a few pages ; it is 
impossible to burlesque a book successfully by 
writing another book as long as it is, for the 
greatest element in burlesque, as in the epigram, 
is brevity. 



Illllllll I I I 1 MIIJIUII1 IN MMIMIIi 



TWO VERSES 

By James Edwin Reid, Jr. 



Flowers 



Trees 



Flowers 

Are but the unborn children 

Of the world — 

Children 

TV ho pity us, 

Because we are 

Mortals. 



A tree just stands 

The whole day long, 

And shakes 

With laughter — 

Laughing 

At our puny efforts 

To enjoy life. 



Page Sixty-Eight 



SuADOWLAND 



Heroes or Human 
Beings ? 

(Continued from page 39) 

Heroes? , Yes, but also human beings, subject 
to the frailties of the flesh. Look at the list of 
those who stood on the borderland of genius 
and insanity: Blake, Swift, Johnson, Cowper, 
Lamb, Chatterton, Pascal, Southey, Byron, 
Campbell, Goldsmith, Rousseau, Poe, and others. 

The relation between genius and insanity, 
which other authorities besides Lombroso have 
sought to establish, is being traced thru an end- 
less line of figures as a result of the terrible 
religion of truth. It brings to light such human- 
istic facts as that Hogarth conceived his gro- 
tesque scenes in a Highgate tavern after his 
nose had been broken in a dispute with a drunk- 
ard ; that Socrates often danced and jumped in 
the street apparently without rhyme or reason ; 
or that Fontenelle, when dining with a com- 
panion who was suddenly stricken with apo- 
plexy, did not permit himself to be disconcerted, 
but simply took advantage of the incident to 
change the asparagus dressing from sauce to 
vinegar. 

Another relationship, that between glands and 
personality, has been set forth in a book by 
Dr. Louis Berman. The life of the individual, 
he says, is dominated by his internal secretions, 
the products of his glands (the chemistry of 
the soul ! ) . 

See what forces have made us what we are 
today — the pituitary glands in the head, the 
thyroid in the neck, the adrenal in the stomach, 
all these so-called ductless or endocrine glands. 

Florence Nightingale followed her career of 
nursing so determinedly because of the high 
percentage of masculine endocrines in her com- 
position. Her type was the pituitocentric, as 
was Napoleon's, Nietzsche's, and Caesar's. 

"Destiny is always ironic," says Dr. Berman. 
"The deficiency of the internal secretions which 
made Napoleon eligible for glory was also re- 
sponsible for his downfall. His rise and fall 
followed the rise and fall of his pituitary gland. 

"Before he made himself emperor, it was 
noticed that he was becoming fat, a pituitary 
symptom. A comparison of portraits at dif- 
ferent stages of his rise and fall shows an 
increasing abdominal paunch and a laying down 
of fat in the pituitary areas, around the hips, 
the legs, and so on. The beginning of weak- 
ness in judgment that he was to exhibit soon 
in the invasion of Russia manifested itself at 
the same time. His keen calculating ability at- 
tained the peak of its curve at Austerlitz, Jena 
and Friedland. Thereafter the descent be- 
gins." 

H. G. Wells, in his treatment of Alexander 
the Great in The Outline of History, has much 
to say of Alexander's wise father Philip and 
his mean and murderous mother, Olympias — ■ 
stories which "have to be told because history 
cannot be understood without them. Here was 
the great world of men between India and the 
Adriatic ready for union. And the stories dis- 
play the quality of human beings to whom these 
great opportunities came. 

"Here was this Philip who was a very great 
and noble man, and yet he was drunken. He 
could keep no order in his household. Here was 
Alexander, in many ways gifted above any man 
of his time, and he was vain, suspicious, and 
passionate, with a mind set awry by his 
mother." 

Mr. Wells adds that we are beginning to 
understand what the world might be, were it 
not for our still raw humanity. We are only 
seventy generations away from Alexander, and 
only four or five hundred since our ancestors 
who were savage hunters and charred their 
food in the embers or ate it raw. You cant 
do much with a species in that little time. If 
we make men jealous or angry enough, the hot 
red eyes of the caveman glare out at us today. 

"We have tamed and bred the beasts, but 
we have still to tame and breed ourselves." 




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The interview was so delicious and out of the ordinary that he wrote it up for the 

January MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 

Here are some choice paragraphs from it : 

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about Peg since I came out here that really pleased me ivas said by Doug Fairbanks. 
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fail. Your face is as funny as Charlie Chaplin's feet.' " 

"... Before I married Hartley Manners he brought in 'Peg O' My Heart' one day 
and told me I could play it for a little ivhile until he could finish a good one he ivas 
•writing for me. But I did 'The Bird of Paradise' before I met Hartley. I ivas on 
the map first." 

Another amusing feature in the January number is "If I Were Mr. Hays" — 

two pages of surpassing cartoons by Kober. 



Page Sixty-Nine 



SuADOWLAND 




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Importing Europe's Foremost Stage 



{Continued from {rage 23) 



As well as service a la carte 



painstaking stage, The Lozver Depths reached 
the public and it was recognized at once as a 
work of supreme merit and moment. It has 
held its place in the theater's repertory ever 
since, hardly a season passing without its 
frequent repetition. 

The scenes of the play, as many in this 
country will recall, introduce us to those who 
live and dream and doubt and believe below 
society's deadline ; thieves and street-walkers 
and sots and ragamuffins, their wily hostess, 
her offensive master and her sated lover ; and 
a pilgrim who is one of them and yet not of 
them and whom they tolerate because he under- 
stands them and not because they understand 
him. Death intrudes among them, murder and 
suicide, jealousy between sisters, the last faint 
flickerings of ambition, romance, revenge. At 
each intrusion of one of these natural forces, 
there is a ripple of feeling among the 
denizens of this night lodging, but it vanishes 
with only a trace upon souls whose defiance of 
life is beaten dull. 

Never in any theater have I seen a play 
more emotionally and intellectually overpower- 
ing than Stanislavsky's production of this 
masterpiece of Russia's single living master of 
the drama. 

Some will quarrel with me for calling The 
Lozver Depths a play at all. It isn't, according 
to strict academic standards ; it has the slightest 
of plots, the minimum of structure. It moves 
slowly, stumblingly, to no certain goal. But 
whether it tells a story or not, whether it 
moves or stands still, it lays bare profoundly, 
impressively, piteously, the secret hearts and 
souls of men and women who, like so many of 
the characters of Dostoievsky and Tolstoy and 
even of Dickens, have had to descend to the 
lowest rung of the ladder to catch a gleam of 
eternal things. And that spectacle, when it is 
made convincing by novelist or dramatist, has 
the purging power of the noblest tragedy. 

Aside from this kinship with the austerity 
of Greek tragedy, The Lozver Depths draws 
much of its convincing power from its unusual 
use of and dependence on the channels of ex- 
pression which are peculiar to the art of the 
theater. It is almost wholly independent of 
drama as literature. Less than any play I 
know, is it possible to imagine its potential 
effect in the theater from a reading of its 
printed lines. As I have analyzed this factor 
briefly and pointedly in my book on The Rus- 
sian Theatre, I shall quote : 

"The Lozver Depths is not so much a matter 
of utterable line and recountable gesture as it 
is of the intangible flow of human souls in 
endlessly shifting contact one with another. 
Awkward but eloquent pauses and emphases, 
the scarcely perceptible stress or dulling of 
word or gesture, the nuances and the shadings 
of which life is mostly made and by which it 



reveals its meaning — these, and the instinctive 
understanding of the vision of the playwright 
by those who seek to interpret him, are the 
incalculable and unrecordable channels thru 
which The Lower Depths becomes articulate 
at the Moscow Art Theatre." 

One of the most remarkable things about the 
presentation of Gorky's masterpiece is that 
today, twenty years after its premiere, its lead- 
ing roles are taken by the same players who 
created them : Stanislavsky, the theater's co- 
founder, producer and first artist, as the tat- 
tered Satine, mouthpiece of the playwright's 
defiant faith in the God in man; Katchaloff, 
first actor after Stanislavsky, as the Baron, 
neurotic remnant of better days ; Moskvin, 
Russia's leading high comedian, as old Luka, 
the pilgrim who comes unobstrusively among 
these outcasts of society and gives those who 
are hopeless a gleam, at least, of faith ; 
Luzhsky, admirable character actor, as the 
touzled Bubnoff ; and the sturdy Vishnevsky 
as the stolid Tatar. 

Madame Olga Knipper-Tchehova, widow of 
the playwright, Tchehoff, the first actress of 
the company, used to play the role of the 
street-walker, Nastya, but today she is usually 
seen as Vassillissa Karpovna, the jealous and 
vindictive wife of the keeper of the lodging- 
house. 

Realism is the ruling artistic doctrine of 
Europe's foremost stage. It has turned aside 
to experiment occasionally, but in the main its 
twenty- four years have been devoted to the 
perfection of the theory that the most effective 
esthetic interpretation of life is by way of 
representation or the imitation of life. Copy 
life so faithfully that the traffic of the stage 
has all the illusion of actuality, has been the 
motto of this theater. 

But the Moscow Art Theatre has not been 
content with the imitation of the outer aspects 
of life. Year by year it has penetrated deeper 
and deeper into the psychological and spiritual 
problems of the new plays it produces and also 
the old ones it retains in its repertory. Year 
by year with the close association of a 
permanent group it has sought and found both 
the conscious and the subconscious means of 
conveying these hidden aspects of reality to the 
audience. And today the realism of this stage 
is so far superior to the realism we know, so 
living and vital and pulsating a thing, that it 
is hardly fair to call it by the old terminology. 

Just what it should be called, may be safely 
left with their American audiences when they 
arrive in New York shortly after the New 
Year. We are not over-fond of having labels 
made for us. We like to invent them our- 
selves. And something terse and to the point 
is likely to emerge to describe the means by 
which these artists from Russia convey to us 
so eloquently their interpretation of life. 



Music During Luncheon, 
Dinner and Supper 




Page Seventy 



SuADOWLAND 



Three Women Poets 

(Continued from page 51) 



Sara Teasdale says merely : 

Like girls at their communion 
The pear-trees stand. 

The image is there. The irony is missing. And 
yet Miss Teasdale is quick at unexpected 
turns and prone to brief bitter conclusions. 

The essence of her art is economy. Often 
within a single octave she strikes a more 
resonant chord than another poet will, tho he 
use the fingers of both hands. She prefers 
the brief lyric, the short line, the monosyllabic 
word. And with these simple tools she makes 
something so melodious, so magical, so memor- 
able that one seldom turns away to wonder 
why she is, after all, content with little. 

For Miss Teasdale's theme is as unvarying 
as her method. Her songs are all of love, 
whether it be Sappho's or her own, its ebb or 
its flow, its flame or its shadow. Some five 
years ago she collected many of the lyrics 
which had appeared in previous volumes to- 
gether with a few new ones in a book called 
Love Songs. Here one finds some of the love- 
liest lyrics in modern English poetry. It is 
true that there are a certain number of cliches, 
almost inevitable in this type of verse. And 
Miss Teasdale's trick of surprise in her final 
couplet is a bit overdone. Yet her music is 
always sure, and her sense often sharp. The 
following lyric is fairly typical : 

COME 
Come when the pale moon like a petal 

Floats in the pearly dusk of Spring, 
Coyne with arms outstretched to take me, 

Come with lips pursed up to cling. 

Come, for life is a frail moth flying. 

Caught in the web of the years that pass, 

And soon we two, so warm and eager, 
Will be as the grey stones in the grass. 

The recent volume, Flame and Shadoiv, has 
in it less of the troubled hesitancies, the wist- 
ful joys of young love, and is richer in tech- 
nical beauty as it is in emotional content than 
any of the earlier books. But it differs from 
them only in so far as it is a deeper, graver, 
more mature appreciation of what they 
guessed and hinted at. Such poems as My 
Heart Is Heavy, June Night, and more especially 
The Long Hill, are evidence of the poet's 
growth. Chief among the indications of 
change is the little eight-line poem not found 
in any of Miss Teasdale's books : 

TIRED 

If I shall make no poems any more, 
There will be rest, at least, so let it be. 
Time to look up at golden stars and listen 
To the long mellow thunder of the sea. 
The year will turn for me, I shall delight in- 
All animals, and some of my own kind; 
Sharing with no one but myself the frosty 
And half ironic musings of my mind. 

Ill: Lola Ridge 

If Miss Teasdale frequently celebrates lone- 
liness, one feels of Lola Ridge that she is 
lonely as few other poets dare to be. A fifteen- 
year residence in this country entitles her to be 
considered with these American poets, altho 
she was born in Ireland and lived for some 
time in Australia and New Zealand. Possibly 
because she is a solitary, she has been able to 
realize the American scene and to disentangle 
the subtle complexities of the modern Ameri- 
can world so successfully. Miss Ridge is at 
the opposite pole from Miss Teasdale. Miss 
Millay seems to stand between the two : not 
disregarding, like the latter, the social back- 
ground, nor yet, like the former, more fiercely 
concerned with social issues and impersonal 
realities than with the vivid immediacies of 
love and death. 

There is an almost masculine quality about 
Lola Ridge's work. She has been too close 
to sordidness, ugliness and violence ever to 
escape completely into the serene, silken world 
that ignores the sub-soil from which it 
springs. Strength rather than beauty informs 
these poems. And yet there is beauty in 
abundance — that which she offers with supreme 



irony To the American People in the dedication 
of her first book : 

Will you feast with me, American People? 
But what have I that shall seem good to you ! 

On my board are bitter apples 
And honey served on thorns, 
And in my flagons fluid iron, 
Hot from the crucibles. 

How should such fare entice you! 

The opening poem, the title-poem of the 
book, The Ghetto, is perhaps the most power- 
ful piece Miss Ridge has ever done. It is a 
long poem, and all the more remarkable for 
sustaining, thru over twenty pages, the pas- 
sion, the vigor, the color and the sensitive pity 
of which it is wrought. It is impossible to do 
more than pluck here and there some image 
torn from its context, leaving the poem in its 
full complex significance to be merely guessed. 
Scenes like this : 

The heat in Hester street, 

Heaped like a dray 

With the garbage of the world. 

Portraits like this : 

. . . night by night 

I see the love-gesture of his arm 

In its green-greasy coat-sleeve 

Circling the Book, 

And the candles gleaming starkly 

On the blotched-paper whiteness of his face, 

Like a miswritten psalm . . . 

Glimpses like this : 

The sturdy Ghetto children 

March by the parade, 

Waving their toy flags, 

Prancing to the bugles — 

Lusty, unafraid . . . 

Shaking little fire-sticks 

At the night — 

The old blinking night — 

Swerving out of the way, 

Wrapped in her darkness like a shawl. 

And this: 

Lights go out 

And the stark trunks of the factories 
Melt into the drawn darkness, 
Sheathing like a seamless garment. 

And mothers take home their babies, 
Waxen and delicately curled, 
Like little potted flowers closed under the 
stars. 

Few of the other poems in this book, tho 
they are all far briefer — some only a few lines 
to form an image — are as sustained as the 
opening one. The effect of the volume is 
cumulative. No one poem in the section called 
Manhattan Lights but is added to by all its 
fellows. The poems about labor are like 
hammers on awful anvils, struck with different 
force, with different vibrations and resonances, 
all contributing to a portentous, terrible 
symphony. Yet each 'separate poem, despite 
some imperfections of technique, such as un- 
necessary rhymes or' Whitmanesque inversions, 
is tense and hot with passion, that fierce social 
passion, the love of love and hate of hate, 
which burns here as white and acrid and 
devouring as the most fiery of our more vulgar 
hungers. These images are alive with intimacy, 
swift as a blow, nervous as the fingers of fever. 
Here is Flotsam, with its 

Slovenly figures like untied parcels 
And papers wrapped about their knees. 

And that old woman on the chilly park 
bench, sprawling gracelessly, diffused like a 
broken beetle. There is that smiling tenement 
mother : 

With eyes like vacant lots 
Rimming vistas of mean streets 
And endless washing days . . . 
Yet with sun on the lines 
And a drying breeze. 

The Everlasting Return, with its unfor- 
getable pictures of the Carthaginian galleys 
all but dimming the juxtaposed picture of 
submarine warfare, is brimming with strange 
things intensely realized. There are few 
(Continued on page 75) 




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A Partial List 

of the Contributors to the 

January 

Walter Prichard Eaton 
Benjamin De Casseres 
Kenneth Macgowan 
Babette Deutsch 
Burton Rascoe 
Wynn 

Jerome Hart 
Edward Hungerford 



PRISO NER 




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satisfied. Our framed pictures are unsurpassable. You will do 
well to order your picture framed. Your copy finished in choice 
oil colors will be sent upon receipt of the sum given below in 
any form except stamps. 

Size Unm'td Copies M't'd Copies Fr'md Pict'a 

6X10 $ .75 SI. 00 $3.25 

10X17 1.70 1.95 4.75 

Send 10c for Illustrated Supplement 

FORD'S FOTO STUDIOS ... ELLENSBURG, WASH. 



Page Seventy-One 



£u4E>QWl/XNL> 



B 



SB 



Start a 
Beauty Parlor 

In Your Own Home and 

Make Money 

Wherever you may live, 
whether in a small town or a 
big city, there are in your 
neighborhood many who are 
troubled with superfluous hair, 
moles, warts, birthmarks, etc., 
and you know that electrolysis 
is the only method of perma- 
nently removing them. You 
can get a large part of this 
trade by securing an Electroly- 
sis Outfit and learning how to 
operate with the simple direc- 
tions accompanying it. Any- 
body can learn to do it. It 
requires no knowledge of elec- 
tricity or of physiology. You 
can operate in your own home, 
because all you require is good 
light, two chairs and a table. 
Or you can operate in the 
homes of your customers, be- 
cause the outfit can be carried 
in a small hand valise. The 
usual charge for removing su- 
perfluous hair is $5.00 for half 
an hour's treatment, and there 
are very few places in this 
country where you can get it 
done at any price. I will send 
an Electrolysis Outfit, prepaid, 
to any address on receipt of 
price, $20.00. 

If you wish to take up other 
branches of Beauty Parlor 
work, I will undertake to teach 
by correspondence the follow- 
ing courses on receipt of price: 

Facial Massage $2.00 

Shampooing 2.00 

Eyebrows and Lashes. 1.00 

Reducing 2.00 

Wrinkles 1.00 

Facial Mud Bath 1.00 

Manicuring 3.00 

Pimples, Blackheads, 

etc 1.00 

Double Chin 1.00 

Body Massage 1.00 

All Ten Courses for $10.00 

Each course Includes complete direc- 
tions in simplified form. Nearly all of 
the ingredients required can be pur- 
chased at any drug store, such as 
tweezers, bowls, saucers, witch-hazel, 
glycerine, cold cream, etc., except the 
mud bath, which is my own secret 
preparation ; but I will make a special 
price on this and on all my prepara- 
tions, if my pupils prefer them to others. 

This is an Age of Beauty 

In a few years you will see Beauty 
Shops everywhere. Learn the business 
now ! Start in a small way, and some 
day you may own a handsome Beauty 
Parlor on the main street, with dozens 
of girls doing the work for you. There's 
Big Money in it! 

CORLISS PALMER 

Brewster Buildings, Brooklyn, N.Y. 



! 



The Devil Among the Critics 



{Continued from page 3!) 



Page Seventy-Two 



musicians. Liszt's book on Chopin is one ex- 
ample of my contention. It is the musical 
writer or reviewer of limited accomplishment 
and restricted knowledge of the art who blun- 
ders and generally praises without judgment or 
discretion and blames more or less unjustly. 
He does not know enough, either theoretically 
or practically, to speak ex cathedra and to give 
sound and impressive reasons for the faith 
which he would have his readers believe is in 
him. If he ventures on analysis, he is gen- 
erally wrong, and so, like a once well-known 
English judge, he hands down his decisions 
without giving reasons. Thus it is that the 
mass of musical criticism is comparatively 
worthless as a guide to opinion, while much 
of it is equally negligible as literature." 

"Can you give examples of other great 
musicians as critics?" 

"Yes, several. Germany has produced some 
really fine musical critics of this sort. Gluck, 
for instance ; while Schumann's essays and 
criticisms should be read by all who wish to 
hear and understand music aright. There are 
two branches of musical criticism, both equally 
interesting and important — the one which is a 
scientific analysis of musical form, contents 
and treatment ; the other the spiritual compre- 
hension of the aesthetic side and influence of 
music, possible only to the mind keenly alive 
and highly cultivated. 

"Schumann represented the ideal musical 
critic, for both these essentials are to be found 
in his writings. That is, they are based on 
sound and thoro knowledge and display an ex- 
quisite refinement of appreciation. They are, 
moreover, rich in ideas, marked by not a little 
humor and occasionally sarcasm, altho Schu- 
mann was incapable of savagery in his com- 
ments, and would never say an unkind thing 
just because it happened to be smart." 

"What about Wagner — he wrote a lot about 
music, did he not?" 

"Yes. In addition to his marvelously prolific 
creative faculty, both as musician and poet, he 
had the philosophic, analytic mind, together with 
the gift of trenchant, picturesque expression in 
words. His Opera and Drama opened up for 
the general as well as the educated musical 
reader the vast vista of his imaginings and 
theories, and explained as nothing else could 
the scope of his achievements. Many have 
written about Wagner, but not even that bril- 
liant enthusiast, Bernard Shaw, has explained 
him as he explained himself." 

"Bernard Shaw. I did not know he was a 
musician or a critic." 

"He was both. He learned the theory and 
practice of music from his mother, a fine 
musician. His musical criticisms for the Lon- 
don Star were among the most trenchant and 
stimulating I have ever read, while he wrote a 
delightful little book entitled The Perfect Wag- 
nerite." 

"Wagner wrote only about himself and his 
own music, did he not?" 

"No, there you are wrong. There is his 
little-known book about Beethoven, which, if 
you do not read German, has been competently 
translated, like his Opera and Drama, by Ed- 
ward Dannreuther. In analytical discernment 
as well as pungent expression it is characteristic 
of its author. There is also his treatise Judaism 
in Music, largely provoked by his not inexcus- 
able dislike of Meyerbeer and his music, and 



this, like his work on Beethoven, compels one 
to think, and any writing which does that is 
valuable." 

"Are there any French composers who are 
also critics?" 

"Oh, yes. There are Berlioz, Franck, who was 
quite as much French as Belgian, Saint-Saens, 
Debussy, and, among the most modern, Florent 
Schmitt. Berlioz wrote better than he com- 
posed, while Franck composed much better 
than he wrote, but both of them uttered wise 
and pregnant words about the art in which 
they achieved so much distinction, while they 
displayed a fine appreciation of the work of 
other musicians. Saint-Saens was an erudite 
and admirable critic, as he was a composer 
whose achievements have been ridiculously un- 
dervalued by such men as Paul Rosen f eld and 
others who are iconoclasts of the first order, 
and who have given the world neither good 
music nor good literature. But all of the 
literary composers whom I have named sup- 
port the accuracy of my thesis that the best 
musical critics are those who have created, 
and who must necessarily have a scientific 
and practical knowledge of their subject. These 
men are not only just, they are generous in 
their attitude towards other composers whom 
they seek honestly to understand and explain." 

"Admitting all that you say, will you not give 
me your views about some of our modern 
musical critics — that is, the men who write for 
our papers and magazines ?" 

"You are trying to lure me oh to dangerous 
ground. I have already given my views about 
Huneker, and in dealing with the others it is 
better to class American and English critics 
together. The trouble with criticism in both 
countries is that there are no outstanding figures 
like Huneker and Shaw, men of musical erudi- 
tion — I am not thinking of mere musical his- 
torians or writers of what I will call 'musical 
pot-boilers,' but well-grounded, scientific musi- 
cians, who can pick up a score and read and 
analyze it as easily as the average man picks 
up his daily paper and masters its contents. 
There is no John L. Runciman, whose musical 
learning was on a parity with his literary skill ; 
no Filson Young, whose style as an essayist 
is as superior to that of George Moore as are 
his knowledge and appreciation of music; no 
Hadbw, a trifle academic, but a splendidly 
equipped musician, with a fine capacity for 
delicate literary expression." 

"You are omitting England's well-known 
musical critic, Ernest Newman." 

"I would rather do so, for I find it difficult 
to respect his opinions or admire his style. He 
is the slave of his own phrases as well as of 
his prejudices, and no one has done so much 
to stir up ill-will between British and American 
musicians. There are, however, one or two 
English and American writers on music whose 
work I both admire and respect. I will men- 
tion the brilliant editor of The Chesterian, G. 
Jean-Aubry, of French descent evidently; Ed- 
ward Evans and Robin Legge. Incidentally it 
is to be regretted that the finely critical work 
of Daniel Gregory Mason and Lawrence Gill- 
man does not find a place in our daily press. 
Now, please do not ask me for any further 
expressions of opinion about our critics, some 
of whom are my personal friends, and I would 
not willingly offend them." 




SuiADQWLAND 



Art Comment 

(Continued from page 61) 

for its object the advancement of commercial 
art, especially as it relates to magazine and 
book illustration, advertising in publications, or 
poster advertising. 

The Stowaways, J. M. Bowles, President, is 
a unique organization whose members are 
drawn together both by vocation and avoca- 
tion. They are all interested in prints, books, 
posters, original drawings, typography and 
design. Their main idea is that interchange of 
ideas encourages individual imagination and 
develops powers of usefulness in all organiza- 
tions or related activities of the graphic arts. 

As the Art Center is the rallying spot for all 
these organizations, it would be more than 
surprising if they didn't accomplish a great 
deal. 

During October these constituent organiza- 
tions combined in giving an exhibit ; the Art 
Directors having a very comprehensive display 
of commercial art. During November the work 
of George Jensen, the well-known Danish 
sculptor and silversmith, has been attracting 
much attention. During the latter part of the 
month the past and present members of 
Tiffany Foundation have been holding an ex- 
hibit. 

Lasting until the 20th of this month the Art 
Alliance of America and the New_ York 
Society of Craftsmen are holding a joint ex- 
hibit which includes basketry, book-binding, 
china, embroidery, enameling, furniture, glass, 
illumination, ivory carving, jewelry, leather 
work, polychrome, pottery, photography, print- 
ing, pewter, silver textiles, toys and wood- 
carving. 

Another organization working for the closer 
association of trade and art is the Arts-in- 
Trade, whose successful exhibit was held at the 
Waldorf Astoria. Their main object is to edu- 
cate the public and show what beautiful things 
can be produced for home furnishing if the 
principles of design are properly applied and a 
reasonable amount of care taken in executing 
the pieces. 

Wanamaker's ever interesting Gallery, whose 
exhibit of the Mexican landscapes by Jules 
Merrilac gave such a vivid dash of color to 
the November exhibits, is going back this 
month to its original policy of closely aligning 
their Gallery with their interior decorating 
department and thru December they will show 
Paintings of Interiors. The exhibiting artists 
representing all schools. 

The Wiener Werkstatte, 581 Fifth Avenue, 
has added to its ever changing exhibit of 
Viennese Craftsmanship a wonderful collection 
of Ceramics. 

Scott and Fowles, 667 Fifth Avenue, are 
holding an exhibit of 19th Century Water 
Colors, Drawings and Bronzes. 

The Milch Galleries are exhibiting Marines, 
Landscapes and Floral subjects by Sigurd 
Skow the first part of December and Water- 
colors by Frank Benson the later part. 

Bourgeoise Galleries, 668 Fifth Avenue. Open- 
ing on November 19 and closing on December 
9th, there will be a most interesting exhibit of 
Chinese Paintings. 

Misses Hill Galleries, 607 Fifth Avenue. 
Opening the first Monday in December and con- 
tinuing thru the month will be an exhibition 
of the Silver Mine Artists, Norwalk, Conn. 
Coincidently with that, Miss Julie Stohr will 
show paintings of Italy and France with some 
special studies made in Brittany. 

Dudensing Galleries, 45 West 44th Street. 
During December will be shown a collection of 
Ralph Blakelock's work and in January the 
colorful and decorative paintings of Zander 
Warshawsky go on the walls. 

Macbeth Galleries, 450 Fifth Avenue. From 
November 21st to December 9th, will be held 
the 6th Annual exhibit of Intimate Painting's. 
On December the 12th to 30th, the paintings 
of George Wharton Edwards will be shown, as 
well as paintings by Joseph Pennell and W. G. 
Krieghoff. 

Howard Young Galleries, 620 Fifth Avenue, 
will hold during December an exhibition of 
American and Foreign Paintings. 














Ft's Golf Time Now! 

— In California 

Make reservations NOW for a 
glorious sunshiny winter vacation 
at The Ambassador, Los Angeles. 
January, February and March are 
the height of the social and out-door 
season. 

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Ambassador Golf Club 

Open Air Plunge 

Motion Picture Theatre 

and the famous 

COCOANUT GROVE for Dancing 

Tennis, Riding, Fishing and all sports 

Outside Room and Bath from $5.00 a day. 



CD he Amftassaac 

£os Angeles, Calif 




DO YOU LIVE IN A HAUNTED HOUSE? 

A House Haunted by the Ghost of Your Departed Beauty ? 



Does this Ghost peer over your shoulder 
whenever you glance into a mirror, an un- 
happy reminder that your figure has lost its 
lithe slenderness, that your hair is scant and 
lusterless? 

And, whenever you gaze upon exquisite 
colorful fabrics, does this Ghost whisper: 
"You cannot wear those tints — your skin 



is now muddy and sallow, your eyes are 
dull, your personality has lost its radiance 
and charm"? 

And is this Ghost so omnipresent in your 
thoughts that you have become self-con- 
scious — even morbid? Has it driven away 
your grace and your poise? 

If this case is yours, then 



YOU MUST BANISH THE GHOST BY REPEATING 

Three Magic Words: 



^ecrutv 



for JANUARY 



A study of this magazine and an application of its advice and formulas will gradually 
materialize your departed beauty. But this cannot be accomplished perfectly unless your 
mind be rejuvenated as well as your body. So we offer in our New Year's number 
three special features : 

An "Imaginary Conversation" with Du Barry that will make you laugh — and 
laughter is the finest of beauty tonics. A short story by the author of "Violets 
and Spice" that will fire your imagination. 

An illustrated article, "Good Looks for Xmas," that will banish all the worry 
lines which have been forming because you haven't been able to find suitable 
gifts for the holiday season. 



\J cs~^ January Ls C^^ 



Page Seventy-Three 



Suadowland 



I WHY DO YOU MAKE 1 
S PRESENTS AT XMAS? | 

Is it not because you want to g^ 
make someone happy? Is it not be- 
cause you want that someone to 
know that you have been thinking 
kindly of him? And, does it not 
make you too happy for words, $A 
when your selection turns out to be ** 
the most appreciated of all the gifts XV 
received by those you have remem- 3g[ 
bered ? $£ 

Gloves, neckties, stockings, socks $jj 

— you know the usual list of gifts — - ^WT 

all are welcome in their way — but, $A 

gifts of this kind dont begin to ex- *FJ 

press the real thought you wish to £v 

convey. If you give an umbrella, yj* 

you will be remembered on rainy ^ 

days only. The general line of $A 

presents soon wear out and the gift ^ 

itself is then forgotten. $A 

We Are Glad To Suggest A Gift M 

Which Will Be A Constant Remin- S 

der Of Your Thoughtfulness ^ 

The Year Round |$ 

To those you think the most of, give 2^T 

a yearly subscription for the Motion Pic- 3-jj 

ture Magazine (price $2.50), Classic X$ 

(price $2.50), Shadowland (price $3.50), ** 

or Beauty (price $2.50). Any one of $3 

these magazines will make a mighty ac- st§" 

ceptable gift, and as there are twelve "^A 

monthly issues in a yearly subscription, Vy 

,K^ the recipient simply cannot forget your )$A 

«& gift until Xmas comes again. Inexpen- S\t 

wr sive to buy, yet rich in value, the four <*fot 

a« Brewster Publications offer a wide selec- §«r 

%£. tion to choose from. S~j 

|fi| Besides giving you a selection of ex- sw 

Wj cellent magazines, we aim to save you ** 

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PK son's biggest magazine bargains. If you xtS" 

4^ take two or more subscriptions you may $jli 

$x send each magazine to a different address ^f 

.*& and still take advantage of the special "*& 

Up- prices. Gift Announcement Cards will §\£ 

»=* be sent on request. '•&** 

Vfc Motion Picture $2.50 ) Special s^ 

B Beauty J^i 3.90 M 

#£ Regular Price 5.00 M 

fb Classic $2.50 ) Special §X 

Sft Beauty j^°J 3.90 Jrf 

fffc Regular Price 5.00 *$$( 

t Shadowland $3.50 ) Special W» 
Classic 2.50 j 4.6Q ** 

«« Regular Price 6.00 && 

%% Shadowland $3.50 \ Special 3jjtf 

m Beauty VM ] 4.60 fc$ 

•5s Regular Price 6.00 tfffl 

k| BEAUTY, MOTION PICTURE or CLASSIC ** 

fffc With Pictorial Review $3.15 Sh* 

*& With McCall's Magazine 2.75 jjji 

«j? With Today's Housewife 2.65 Wrf 

*f)K For Canada add 50£ For Foreign add $1.00 XJaj 

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V& BREWSTER PUBLICATIONS, Inc. 1$ 
ffi 175 Duffield St. Brooklyn, N. Y. $A 

Page Seventy-Four 



The Camera Contest 

(Continued from page 54) 



distinct blur, and contours are obtained even 
tho working with the lens at its greatest open- 
ing, usually F-5. By closing the lens gradually we 
make all the planes more distinct but never ob- 
tain a wiry sharpness. This closing-down process 
is done to produce the effect we are striving 
for and may be called selective focussing. We 
can therefore use a soft focus lens for archi- 
tecture and fine detail by closing the lens to 
about F-8, which will retain the soft tones and 
delicacy of outline without the harshness of 
line peculiar to the anastigmatic. The soft 
focus lens is especially desirable for portraiture, 
both in the studio and other places, as it softens 
harsh lines without losing any of the character 
and reduces retouching to a minimum. For an 
all-around lens nothing can equal the soft focus, 
as it can take care of every condition arising, 
with the possible exception of speed work for 
the press. 

The other lens most commonly in use is the 
rapid rectilinear, which is much cheaper than 
the others, gives fine quality, but requires longer 
exposure, as its working aperture is usually 
F-8. As to the most desirable focal length for 
a lens other than the anastigmatic, it should 
be not less than the sum of the length and 
breadth of the plate or film to be used ; that is, 
the 3 T /i by 4% should be 7Vz inches, the 5 by 4 
should be 9 inches, the 6^2 by 8 l A should be 15 
inches. With the anastigmatic the focal length 
should be at least equal to the diagonal of the 
plate or film. When you buy a lens, study it 
carefully, find out what can be done with it 
under all conditions. If you see a picture, 
made with another lens, nearly like something 
you have tried and failed, dont get the other 
lens and cast yours aside, but try to find out 
why you have failed. The lens is only mechan- 
ical, and the picture must really come from 
the brain of the user. 

The judges for this month's contest are 
Eugene V. Brewster, Clarence White of the 
Clarence White School of Photography, _ and 
Louis F. Bucher, secretary of the Associated 
Camera Clubs of America. 

First Prise. — Tzvilight. Robert Hawley. 

Second Prise. — Out of the Mist. Eleaner L. 
Smith, Box 565, R. F. D. No. 1, San Diego, 
California. 

Third Prise. — On Deck of Magama. Johan 
Hagemeyer, Sleepy Hollow, Mill Valley, Cali- 
fornia. 

Honorable Mention. — Streamers. Charles 
H. Jaeger, 471 Park Avenue, New York City. 

Honorable Mention. — Fifth Avenue at St. 
Patrick's Cathedral. Kenneth D. Smith, 701 
Jewett Avenue, Staten Island, New York. 

Honorable Mention. — A Summer Studio. 
Edith R. Wilson, 119 Crary Avenue, Mt. Ver- 
non, New York. 

Monthly prizes of at least $25, $15, and $10 
are awarded in order of merit, together with 
three prizes of yearly subscriptions to Shadow- 
land to go to three honorary mentions. All 
prize winning pictures will probably be pub- 
lished in Shadowland. 



The committee of judges includes: 

Joseph R. Mason, chairman of committee, 
Corresponding Secretary P. P. A. ; Eugene V. 
Brewster, Editor and Publisher of Shadow- 
land; Louis F. Bucher, Secretary Associated 
Camera Clubs of America; Dr. A. D. Chaffee, 
President of P. P. A.; Arthur D. Chapman, 
Advisory Committee P. P. A. ; G. W. Harting, 
Advisory Committee P. P. A. ; Dr. Chas. H. 
Jaeger, contributing member Pittsburgh and 
Los Angeles Salons ; Miss Sophie L. Lauffer, 
Secretary Dept. of Photography, Brooklyn In- 
stitute of Arts and Science ; George P. Lester, 
Member P. P. A. and Orange Camera Club; 
Nickolas Muray, portrait photographer; John 
A. Tennant, Editor and Publisher of Photo 
Miniature ; Miss Margaret Watkins, ex-Record- 
ing Secretary P. P. A.; Clarence H. White, 
ex-President P. P. A. 

The jury of selection, to be announced each 
month with their selections, consists of three 
members, to be chosen from the committee or 
the membership of the society. No member of 
the jury thus chosen for any given month shall 
submit pictures for that month's contest. 

Shadowland desires that every camera en- 
thusiast reap benefit from this contest and to 
this end makes the inclusion of the following 
data re contesting prints imperative : 

(a) Date and hour of exposure. 

(b) Stop number used. 

(c) Printing medium used. 

(d) Character of print — whether straight 
or manipulated. 

(e) Make of camera and lens. 

Any print previously published is not eligible. 

No printing medium is debarred, but capa- 
bility of good reproduction will be a factor in 
the selection of prints. 

Contestants may submit prints up to any num- 
ber and to as many of the monthly contests as 
they desire. 

Prints received on or prior to the first of 
each month to be considered entered in that 
month's contest. 

Name and address of maker, title and num- 
ber must be printed or plainly written upon the 
back of each print. Return address to be 
written plainly upon package. 

Prints must be packed flat. A small mount 
makes for safety in handling, but is not re- 
quired. Prints will be acknowledged upon their 
receipt. 

Rejected prints will be returned immediately, 
provided proper postage for the purpose be in- 
cluded. It is, however, understood that 
Shadowland reserves the right to reproduce 
any print submitted and to hold such for a 
reasonable time for that purpose. 

Special care will be taken of all prints sub- 
mitted, but neither The Brezvster Publications 
nor the Pictorial Photographers of America 
assume responsibility for loss or damage. 

All prints and all communications relative to 
the contest are to be sent to Joseph R. Mason, 
Art Center, 65 East 56th Street, New York City. 

No prints will be considered if sent elsewhere 
than stated above. Submission of prints will 
imply acceptance of all conditions. 




SuiADQWLAND 



Collecting Old Glass 

(Continued from page 26) 



Connoisseurship in old glass is less difficult 
than it is in old china, for example, since pot- 
tery or porcelain collecting is more varied, more 
detailed, has reference to longer periods of 
manufacture, and involves much more specific 
knowledge than glass collecting does. 

There are no pottery marks and no hall- 
marks to puzzle or deceive you. There is no 
such distinction, so difficult to comprehend, as 
that between "soft" china and "hard." At 
present old glass is easy to know and not so 
difficult to find. 

There are seven guides that are highly im- 
portant to the collector : the tint of the glass ; 
the sound of the glass ; the quality of the glass 
material; the weight; the signs of use and 
wear ; the pontil-mark ; the workmanship. 

All these are rudimental. As the collector 
progresses and gains in knowledge and experi- 
ence, other points will naturally develop. 

The Tints of Old Glass.— Old glass is darkly 
brilliant. Modern glass is whitely crystal. The 
experienced collector sees many tints and 
gradations in glass that the novice passes over 
without consideration. These varying tints are 
important guides as to the age of glass. 

Tint is a constant feature in old glass, and 
when a piece of established age is placed upon a 
white tablecloth in juxtaposition with a modern 
specimen, it will show a pronounced difference 
in tint. This serves as one of the most im- 
portant guides and tests, as to both age and 
period, and after some experience will go far 
toward determining the life history of a given 
piece. 

The Sound of Old Glass— Perhaps it was 
because more lead was used in the "metal" or 
raw material ; at any rate, old English and 
Irish-made glass, for some distinctive reason, 
has a far more musical sound than any made 
elsewhere. The sound of old Dutch, French, 
Italian or German glass, is cracked, as it were, 
even tho the vessel itself is not. 

The Quality of Old Glass.— Old English and 
Irish glassware had the best foundation of any 
glass ever made in the world. This applies not 
only to the material entering into the finished 
product, but likewise to its manipulation and 
the final effect produced. 

The Weight of Old Glass. — English-made 
glasses of the first period were all light in 
weight and cloudy in appearance. Later experi- 
ments removed this dull and cloudy appearance 
and led to the production of a substance-like 
crystal. 

The Signs of Use and Wear.— Glass is easily 
scratched, and as the wine-glasses and decanters 
of the olden time were set down upon the hard 
uncovered mahogany dining-tables of the period, 
the feet of the wine-glasses and the bases of 
the decanters logically became scratched. These 
scratches are now a vital means of differentiat- 
ing an old piece from a new one which may be 
intended as a counterfeit. It is thus very im- 
portant to give due consideration to the 
scratches on glassware as a means of deter- 
mining their authenticity. 

The Pontil-mark. — This does not apply to all 
the old glass, but it does apply to all old blown 
glass. It is, in point of fact, a superlative test, 
and may be considered a safe and sure guide. 

The pontil-mark is either a depression in the 
glass, about the size of a finger-end, or a lump 
about the same size standing up from the level 
of the glass around it. The pontil-mark indicates 
primarily that the piece of glass was originally 
blown and, second, that before removing the 
blow-pipe the workman attached the blown 
glass to a pontil. The pontil or punt is an iron 
rod joined to the vessel by a little melted glass 
while the vessel was still hot. When the time 
came for detaching the pontil, it was done by 
contact with cold water, which caused the glass 
to contract. 

In the oldest glass, the pontil-hole is flaked 
with something which resembles mica. In every 
case there are unmistakable signs of the local 
fracture. As a rule, also, the older the glass 
the bigger and rougher the pontil-mark. 

The Workmanship. — The old glass of Eng- 
lish and Irish origin presents many points of 



superiority. French glass of the same period 
seems meager, and the Dutch glass flimsy or 
clumsy. The Italian glass is fantastic and 
tawdry. Both French and Italian ware were 
often gilded, while the Dutch was painted. 
Neither of these features appears as a rule upon 
either English or Irish glass. The substance 
was neither too thin nor too thick, the bowls 
were perfectly rounded, the stems strong and 
stout, but by no means bulky. Neither were 
they too tall or too short. The feet were not 
warped or uneven, but on the contrary they 
held on to the table well. Even in the freak and 
toy pieces, the excellence of the workmanship 
is distinctly obvious. 

Bristol produced the finest glass paper- 
weights. At the base of these you see flowers 
of colored glass, bright and varied in hue and 
executed with marvelous skill. 

It is by no means out of the question for 
the earnest collector to happen upon an old 
crystal gazing-ball, used by the fashionable 
fortune-tellers a hundred years ago, or even one 
of the old glass eggs which eighteenth century 
ladies held in their hands to keep their palms 
cool for a lover's kiss. 

The first industrial enterprise established in 
the United States was a glass bottle factory, 
which was erected in the Virginia colony soon 
after 1607. The works stood in the woods 
about a mile from Jamestown. 

Coarse bottles, and other articles, were made 
at Salem, Massachusetts, in 1639, and a glass 
house was in operation in Philadelphia in 1683. 
Glass factories were subsequently operated in 
New York, Boston and many other Eastern 
cities. 

About 1810, and until the last quarter of the 
century, glass bottles were produced in various 
shapes and bearing different devices. Among 
the earliest of these native products were those 
bearing portraits of Washington and Lafayette, 
those with eagle and shield, some with a car 
drawn by a horse, as well as one showing an 
early locomotive. 

About 1840 certain patent-medicine bottles 
were made in long-cabin devices, and about 1850 
the so-called Jenny hind bottles were pro- 
duced in honor of her triumphs in this country 
under the management of Barnum. 

itllMimilMiiiiiimiiiMiMililllM 



Three Women Poets 

(Continued from page 71) 

abstractions in Miss Ridge's poems, and yet 
they are transparent windows to the spiritual 
ardor which animates them. 

Sun-Up is on the whole a less powerful 
volume than its predecessor. It is chiefly in- 
teresting for the series of poems which gives 
the book its title — poems which sketch, with 
sharp, incredible, inevitable strokes, the con- 
sciousness of a child. For the rest, it is a 
book of protests, of desire no less rigorous 
for knowing it must be thwarted, of courage no 
less terrible for knowing it must be patient. 
That Miss Ridge's anticipated third volume 
will be equally strong is evidenced by such a 
poem as the following : 



Dawn is like a broken honeycomb 

Spilling over the waxen edges of the clouds 

That drip with light. 

Spires, swarming up the mauve mist, 
Reach their rosy tips 
Like little pointed tongues 
First about a shining platter, 
And every window is a brazier 
That cups the living gold. 

Even the squat chimneys 
Rooting heaven 

Catch the sun upon their snouts 
And keep it balancing, 

Only my heart, 
Like a splintered vase, 
Is envious of the light 
It cannot hold. 




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^EVe^/ 



From the 

"Portrait of a Woman 

of Forty" 

by Helen Woljeska 

"The modern Eve turns more and more 
from Adam to the Snake . . ." 

"If love is nothing else, it can at least 
he an exquisite experiment . . ." 

"The fading of one's body is to prepare 
one gradually for an existence altogether 
'without it . . ." 



SUAOOWLAND 

for JANUARY 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, CIR- 
CULATION. ETC., REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF CONGRESS 
OF AUGUST 24, SHADOWLAND published MONTHLY at 175 
DTTFFIELD ST., BROOKLYN. N. Y. for OCTOBER 1st, 1922 
State of NEW YORK. County of KINGS. Before me, a NOTARY 
PUBLIC in and for the State and county aforesaid, personaily 
appeared EUGENE V. BREWSTER, who, having been duly sworn 
according to law, deposes and says that he is the PRESIDENT 
of the SHADOWLAND and that the following is, to the best 
of his knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, 
management (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of the 
aforesaid publication for the date shown in the above caption, 
required by the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in section 443, 
Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, 
to wit: 1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, 
managing editor, and business managers are: Publisher BREW- 
STER PUBLICATIONS, INC., 175 DUFFIELD ST.. BROOKLYN, 
N. Y. Editor ELSIE SEELIGMAN, 175 DUFFIELD ST., 
BROOKLYN. N. Y. Managing Editor. ADELE WHITELY 
FLETCHER. 175 DUFFIELD ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. Business 
Manager, GUY L. HARRINGTON, 175 DUFFIELD ST.. BROOK- 
LYN, N. Y. 2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses 
of individual owners, or, if a corporation, give its name and the 
names and addresses of stockholders owning or holding 1 per 
cent or more of the total amount, of stock.) EUGENE V. BREW- 
STER. 175 DUFFIELD ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. CARLETON 
E. BREWSTER, BAYSHORE, L. I., N. Y. EDWARD BRUE- 
STEL, 175 DUFFIELD ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 3. That the 
known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders own- 
ing or holding 1 per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mort- 
gages, or other securities are: (If there are none, so state.) 
NONE. 4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving tho 
names of the owners, stockholders, and security holders, if any, 
contain not only the list of stockholders and security holders as 
they appear upon the books of the company but also, in cases 
where the stockholder or security holder appears upon the books 
of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, the 
name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is acting, 
is given: also that the said two paragraphs contain statements 
embracing affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the circum- 
stances and conditions under which stockholders and security 
holders who do not appear upon the books of the company as 
trustees, hold stock and securities in a capacity other than that 
of a bona fide owner; and this affiant has no reason to believe 
that any other person, association, or corporation has any interest 
direct or indirect in the said stock, bonds, or other securities than 
as so stated by him. 5. That the average number of copies of 
each issue of this publication sold or distributed, through the 
mails or otherwise, to paid subscribers during the six months 
preceeding the date shown above is . . . (This information is re- 
quired from daily publications only.) EUGENE V. BREWSTER. 
(Signature of editor, publisher, business manager, or owner.) 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 2nd day of OCTOBER. 
1922. E. M. HEINEMANN. (My commission expires March 30, 
1924.) 



Page Seventy-Five 



SuiADOWLAND 



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The Wayward Poet of England 



(Continued from page 33) 



ii. love with her body, her mind, and her soul. 
From that first memorable evening the figure 
of this child lodged itself forever in his brain. 
Night after night he visited the place, sitting 
quietly at a corner table till the guests had 
gone and he could arrange the cards that they 
used to play together. She represented for him 
the very incarnation of that romance for which 
his soul had hungered. It was a strange irony ! 
He, the disenchanted one, in order to outrage 
his most secret soul, had fled to the foul and the 
ugly ; and lo ! there, like a flower come upon 
suddenly in a back yard, like a poppy in a sandy 
desert, he had found that which completely 
satisfied his craving for beauty. Frank Harris 
and others tried to reason with him. Why pour 
the treasure of his heart at the feet of a minx 
so unworthy? They were probably perfectly 
right, for the girl, after Dowson had courted 
her for two years, elected to marry a waiter 
in his stead. 

For the rest of his life, as often as he was 
sober, Dowson spent his time in writing verse, 
charged with a poignant consciousness of the 
transitory nature of all mortal things. "Then 
he drank opaline. Memories and terrors be- 
set him. The past tore after him like a panther 
and thru the blackness of the present he saw the 
luminous tiger eyes of the things to be. But he 
drank opaline." 

The wnsdom of the zvorld said unto me: 
"Go forth and run, the race is to the 
brave: 

Perchance some honour tarrieth for thee!" 
"As tarrieth," I said, "for sure the grave." 

Weary of the emphatic reasonable light of 
the sun, he indulged, more than ever, his taste 
for all things that were moonstruck. Perhaps 
he was born for an earth over which no lumi- 
nary more brilliant than that of the sweet moon 
or the "estranged stars" ever rose. The moon ! 
His imagination had ever been caressed by its 
silver magical shine as it fell upon the correct 
terraces, the elegant statuary, the • artificial 
borders of punctilious walled-in gardens. 

Lunar roses pale and blue 

Lilies of the world beneath. 

In the Pierrot of the Minute we are exactly 
put in touch with this delicate and chastened 
mood of his. There in the Pare du Petit 
Trianon he approaches a Doric temple under 
the faint grey shadows of which mortal men 
"Forthwith forget all joyance of the day!" 
With an expression "puzzled and petulant" he 
waits for his immortal maiden, coquets and 
dallies daintily with her "Until bird's twitter 
beckons me away." The scene is most ex- 
quisitely rendered. One can almost hear as one 
reads its fastidious lines, mingled with the 
"white music," the flittering sound of the velvet- 
soft wings of the damask moths, who, awake 
under that "ruinous moon," sip their sweet sus- 
tenance from many a curled and trumpet- 
shaped blossom. 

Moon-kissed mortals seek in vain 

To possess their hearts again! 

Hoiv ivan and pale do moon-kissed roses 
grow 

And I went reading in that rune of roses 

Which to her votaries the moon discloses. 

But tho Ernest Dowson could escape the bold 
unequivocal rays of the sun in imaginative 
poetry, in actual life it was different. Each 
morning he looked out upon a world which lay 
strident and complacent under its hard light. 
He sought escape in dissipation. "II faut Shy 
toujours -U7i pen ivre." He tried to drown his 
memories in bawdy houses and taverns. But 
ever as the shouts of the merrymakers grew 
loudest the slender girlish figure of his lost 
love made his heart falter. 

/ cried for madder music and for stronger 
wine, 

But when the feast is finished and the lamps 
expire, 

Then falls thy shadow, Cynara! the night 
is thine; 

And I am desolate and sick of an old 
passion. 

Yea, hungry for the lips of my desire: 

I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my 
fashion. 



And then remorse would follow and this ex- 
traordinary boy would turn to religion. But it 
was before no ordinary Saint that he bent his 
knee. In a side chapel of the church of Arques 
was the figure of a holy martyred virgin, rep- 
resented as wearing a beard, and it was here, 
before this bearded icon that the perverted 
spirit of Ernest Dowson spent long hours in 
adoration and prayer. 

Indeed, his neuroticism had now become ex- 
aggerated almost to madness. He grew to fear 
the very room in which he lived, hardly daring 
to enter it, to fear the very statues on the 
mantelpiece lest they should come to life in 
the night time and strangle him ! 

It was during this period that he wrote cer- 
tain short fragments of prose in a singular and 
choice style peculiarly his own. Here is a 
description of the sea coast of France from 
The Dying of Francis Donne. 

"It was brilliant with the promise of summer, 
and the blue Atlantic, which in winter churned 
with its long crested waves so boisterously be- 
low the little white lighthouse, which warned 
mariners (alas! so vainly) against the shark- 
like cruelty of the rocks, now danced and 
glittered in the sunshine, rippled with feline 
caresses round the hulls of the fishing-boats 
whose brown sails floated so idly in the faint 
air." 

By the year 1899 he was back in England 
living in extreme poverty in London. His con- 
sumption grew so much worse that he was 
hardly able to leave the sordid room of his 
lodging-house, the rent for which he was unable 
to pay. He was too proud to let his friends or 
his relations know of his desperate straits. 

Fortunately Robert Harborough Sherard, 
Oscar Wilde's friend and biographer, heard of 
his plight, and tho at that time he was himself 
in the greatest financial difficulties, had him 
conveyed to his cottage at Catford. It was 
here that Dowson spent the last few weeks of 
his life. He never went out of doors. All day 
long he read and talked and coughed in a small 
room, the window of which looked out upon a 
suburban meadow. He refused to see a doctor, 
instead he would send Sherard to the village 
chemist, with prescriptions for the cure of con- 
sumption culled from a volume of Health in the 
Home. 

On Thursday night, February 22, 1900, the 
two friends stayed up talking till five o'clock in 
the morning. Dowson was in good spirits, and 
full of plans for the future. Then as the grey 
cock crew he called for a glass of Gilby's port, 
the only wine that was in the house, drank a 
glass of it, coughed, and fell back dead. 

Upon those eyes, which for thirty years had 
looked out upon a world so different from the 
"pale amber" one they had desired, were now 
placed two large silver coins. Before he was 
buried however, the old woman, whose business 
it had been to lay him out, with "that egotistic 
assertion of life in the presence of the dead — 
the poor irremediable dead !" had spent the 
money at a neighboring ale-house. 

Would Ernest Dowson have resented such a 
sacrilege? I think not. 



mnmiTiMiMiMiiiiiiiimlitimii) 



The Father of Pictorial 
Photography 

(Continued from page 43) 

John Gibson, Lockhart (Sir Walter Scott's 
son-in-law and biographer), William Etty, the 
painter, and Mrs. Jameson, the novelist. 

The late J. M. Gray, curator of the National 
Portrait Gallery of Scotland, put himself on 
record as saying about Hill's work that his 
photographs "resembled nothing so much as 
powerful mezzotints printed in warm-colored 
ink." There is the same broad and effective 
distribution of lighting, the same care for com- 
position and the suppression of irrelevant de- 
tails, and that pleasant dead surface — delicate 
in the light portions and rich and blooming in 
the shadows — which is obtained in such en- 
gravings. 



Page Seventy-Six 



SUADOWLAND 



iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiliiliiiiniiiliililiiliiliiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniMM 

Important Features 
In the JANUARY number of \ 

ShUDOWkAND ( 



The Buffoon Ballet of Lar- 
IONOW Barrett H. Clark 

An illustrated story of the most extraor- 
dinary ballet ever staged 



The Whisperers 

Guy Pene du Bois 

Three painters who have been inspired 
by the spirit of New England 

"Ah, Italy, Thy Fatal Beauty" 

Two pages of cartoons by the inimitable 
Wynn 



Portrait of a Woman of Forty 
Helen Woljeska 

A clever word-picture of a very modern 
woman 

The World's Greatest Failures 
Maurice S. Sullivan 

An amusing article about the discon- 
tented famous, with cartoons by Kelly 



In addition there will be 
a satirical article by Ben- 
jamin De Casseres; Bur- 
ton Rascoe will discuss 
the new books; Kenneth 
M a c g ow an the new 
plays; Jerome Hart the 
recent developments in 
opera; and the pictorial 
features will be of excep- 
tional beauty and interest. 



Shadowland 



{IIMIIIIMIIIIMinMIIlllll'lllllllTllililIIMIIIIMIlllMlllllIIIMIIlllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIMKIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIT 



Wanderings 

(Continued from page 63) 

Gabriel should not permit it to master him. He 
can now afford to think less of the manner of 
his writing than its matter, and above all he 
should make a serious study of the art which 
he criticizes with more or less good judgment. 
That was where Huneker towered above his 
colleagues — he was a practical, thoroly well- 
grounded musician as well as an accomplished 
writer. 

* * * 

No one was greeted with greater cordiality 
by his colleagues than Norman Mason, who 
was acting temporarily as music critic of the 
Brooklyn Eagle, which has also added the dis- 
tinguished artist and writer Joseph Pennell 
to its staff. Handsome and happy Norman is 
a trained musician, who studied singing in 
Italy, where he developed a very pretty tenor 
voice. But his inclinations were toward 
another art, painting, which he studied in Paris, 
where he has exhibited at the Salon. His 
portraits are also seen at leading New York 
exhibitions, while he writes about music as well 
as art in an informed and interesting manner. 
He is a worthy addition to the critics' circle. 

* * * 

It was good to see Harry Osgood, who was 
just back from Germany, where he interviewed 
Richard Strauss in the companionship of 
Deems Taylor, and thus enabled the latter, who 
does not speak German, to write an article 
around the eminent composer for The World. 
That is the sort of good turn Harry Osgood 
is always ready to do for a colleague. He is 
becoming quite a prolific and successful com- 
poser, and his latest composition, Heaven at 
the End of the Road, is proving a best seller. 

* * * 

Horace Liveright gave me the first copy of 
Ben Hecht's Gargoyles, hot from the press, 
when I happened to be in his sanctum. To 
speak frankly, it is a very Ben Hechtic book, 
and I do not like it at all, nor do I think it 
clever. I have rarely come across such an 
entirely unpleasant lot of people in the pages 
of one volume, and I heartily agree with every 
word which that brilliant reviewer Mrs. N. P. 
Dawson, of The Globe, has said about it. 

* * * 

But Boni and Liveright publish many more 
good books than bad, and one must regard 
Gargoyles as a temporary aberration like that 
horrific work by Evelyn Scott, The Narrozv 
House. Horace Liveright has done some fine 
work as a publisher since he has been the sole 
guiding hand of his firm. He has to his credit 
a hundred volumes or so of The Modern 
Library, one of the best cheap editions of 
classic works in existence ; he gave Hendrik 
Willem Van Loon a chance when half a dozen 
other publishers had turned down The Story of 
Mankind, of which Horace Liveright expects 
to have sold one hundred thousand copies by 
the end of the year ; he discovered Rose 
Macaulay, the brilliant author of Potterism 
and Dangerous Ages, whose new novel, Mystery 
at Geneva, is eagerly anticipated ; and he is 
about to include Gertrude Atherton in his list 
of authors. Besides, he has published Eugene 
O'Neill's plays, Molnar's Liliom, an edition of 
George Moore, and that brilliant work, Up 
Stream, by Ludwig Lewisohn. Many more 
could be mentioned, but this record is sufficient. 

* * * 

So one can forgive Horace Liveright for 
having been hospitable to Ben Hecht, Theodore 
Dreiser, Upton Sinclair, Mrs. Scott, and a few 
other abnormal writers. I congratulate him 
cordially on the result of the action brought 
against him by a certain Mr. Sumner, of the 
New York Society for the Suppression of 
Vice. The charge had to do with the publica- 
tion of the Satyricon by Petronius Arbiter, a 
work which we used to translate in the sixth 
form of Winchester College together with 
Ovid's Metamorphoses and Ars Anwris. The 
charge against Horace Liveright of having done 
something in this connection which was contra 
bonos mores was dismissed by Magistrate 
Oberwager in one of the best reasoned literary 
judgments it has been my pleasure to read. 



You Can Raise Your 
Income $50 a Month 




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Mr. Shepard is a representa- 
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Having unlimited territory 
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Name 

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Page Seventy-Seven 



Sl-IADOWLAND 



Why Dont You Buy 

Q^vssic 

The Picture Book De Luxe 
of the Movie World 



The January number answers 
"Yes" to the three questions 
any intelligent person asks 
when he buys a magazine: 

Will its reading matter enter- 
tain me? 

Will its departments teach me 
anything ? 

Will its pictures please me? 

Perhaps the best articles in 
the January number are "Cos- 
tuming the Silent Drama," by 
Maude Cheatham, and 
"Eastern Magic," by Willard 
Huntington Wright. Follow- 
ing these comes "Famous Car- 
mens." And dont overlook 
that amusing interview by 
Regina Cannon, "Will Nita 
Naldi 'April Fool' the Movie 
Directors?" 

The departments are full of 
surprises. You'll get the very 
latest news of the stars and 
the studios. "The Darkest 
Hour" is given over to two 
stars whom you would believe 
never have had a dark mo- 
ment. "Iris In" is exception- 
ally smart. 

The pictorial features are 
superb. Double spreads, full- 
page camera studies, and 
"The Photographer Takes the 

Stage," our new department 
of pictures from popular 
plays on Broadway, is to 
cover four pages instead of 
two — this in response to 
urgent requests from our 
readers. 



The Play, the Part, and the Time 



{Continued from page 57) 



funny side of people's faces and dress, and I 
just naturally set down on paper what I saw. 
No, you cant see them," she laughed. 

"Now, what's an interview without a little 
talk about Ibsen, Shakespeare, Barrie and 
Maeterlinck — " 

Shakespeare, no. But the word "Ibsen" 
electrified Miss Fisher. 

"I dream some day of doing all of Ibsen. 
Ambitious, isn't it? I believe that Ibsen at- 
tracts more women than men. He understood 
women as no dramatist has ever done. He was 
the first great psycho-analyst of woman. He 
put her complexities, her mysticism, her in- 
curable romanticism, her rebellious nature, her 
gipsy heart on the stage. 

"I have felt that the most ecstatic moment of 
my career would be at the moment when I 
walk on the stage as Nora Helmer, Hilda 
Wangel or Hedda Gabler. Probably every 
serious actress has that dream. We look at 
Ibsen as the knight-errant of our sex." 

And yet, while I gained the impression that 
Miss Fisher was intellectual, she is not at all 
of the cerebral type. She is profoundly 
feminine — but what does that mean? Many a 
Hedda Gabler beats beneath a soft brown eye 1 

"And you mentioned Barrie," she ran on. 
"Another one of my gods. To me Mary Rose 
is the greatest of his plays. I would rather do 
that part than Ophelia or Desdemona. You see, 
I'm a heretic." 

"Tell me something about the psychology of 
audiences." 

"I never see individuals in the audience. I 
look on the house as one person. It is like a 
potted plant with many leaves." 



At her own idea of the audience being a 
potted plant she burst into a laugh, the vibra- 
tions of which jarred some of the petals from 
the roses over her head. They fell softly on 
her golden hair, making a lovely picture. I 
had to put a brake on my sentimental complex. 

"When I was acting with Ethel Barrymore,"' 
continued Miss Fisher, "I was astonished at 
the way she could pick individuals out of the 
audience. Back stage she would say to me, 
'So-and-so is sitting in the sixth row, and there 
is So-and-so in the second row of the balcony.' 
As a matter of fact — " 

But at this moment my Japanese walking- 
stick attracted her eye. 

"Japan !" she exclaimed. "Another one of 
my ambitions. I want to go to Japan. I am in 
love with everything Japanese." 

She took down from her mirror a caricature 
of a horse made out of catgut. 

"That was done by a Japanese artist who 
presented it to me. They do curious things 
oyer there. Why didn't I go to Japan instead 
of London !" 

"How would you like to see," I interjected, 
"your name in electric lights billed as Hilda 
Wangel in front of a theater in Tokio?" 

"Too good to be true !" she cried, clapping 
her hands, childlike. 

The clock intoned half past one. It was 
time to make up for Charlotte, and to prepare 
to wait up for her baccarat-playing husband. 

"I'll be in Morocco in an hour," she said as 
she clasped my hand. 

A clear-headed young woman, I thought, as 
I vanished into Forty-second Street ; one who 
will succeed because she knows that all real 
work is just play. 



iimiiilMmiimmmiMiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiimmiiiminmminiimiiiii 



Charles Demuth 

{Continued from page 11) 



who brought to his classes the rigid discipline 
requisite to painting, and who taught the prin- 
ciples of good drawing without academizing 
them. The second influence which he counts 
significant is his association with Alfred 
Stieglitz. In the old days when "291" was 
alive and riotous with ideas, when anyone with 
enthusiasm and conviction could get a hearing, 
the spirit of Stieglitz was predominant ; and the 
young men who looked upon him then as the 
champion of Modernism in America respect 
him tcday as the foe of commercialism and 
convention. 

Mr. Demuth is a familiar figure in the art 
life of Paris where he has lived, at intervals, 
for a number of years ; and his individual ex- 
hibitions in this country and his frequent con- 
tributions to the art of the later tendencies are 
too numerous to be mentioned here. During 
the present year a severe illness threatened to 
put an end to his painting, but I am happy to 
report that he is now able to paint again. 

Roughly speaking, his art may be divided 
into two classes : the first, a satirical Impres- 
sionism ; the second, a modification of Cubism 
which is texturally allied with a more academic 
post-Renaissance tradition. His water-colors 
are exquisite and inimitable, and with those of 
John Marin rank with the best that America 
has produced. He uses the medium with ex- 
treme fluidity, taking advantage of all its 
subtitles and achieving a range of tonal trans- 
parencies which are beautifully clean and 
precise. And at the same time he is conscious 
that a picture should be of a piece and not a 
collection of delicate splashes. Two years ago, 
in Paris, he executed a series of circus scenes 
and vaudeville phantasies, and during the same 
period exhibited a group of illustrations for 



stories by Henry James and Zola. I invite 
those critics who are persuaded that modern 
painting has ruled the representative out of 
art to take a look at these water-colors. The 
vaudeville Caprices are tinged with genuine 
satire, and the illustrations are conceived in 
the true fictional spirit, but all the same the 
pictures are held together by an impeccable 
artistry. 

Cubism, which arose from an enlargement of 
Cezanne's geometrical planes, and which was, 
by virtue of its reason for existence, admirably 
adapted to emphasize a tri-dimensional order, 
has, by a continual process of extension, given 
rise to a decorative art in two planes. Such 
a statement seems paradoxical, but reflection 
will show how obvious and natural this evolu- 
tion has been. The three visible planes of a 
cube when projected beyond the limits of vision, 
that is, to the frame of the canvas, cease to 
function as indications of solidity and become 
simply three flat tones. In this process is to 
be found the source of Mr. Demuth's flat and 
semi- abstract architecture. In his later work 
he has composed structures recognizable as 
churches, mills and barns ; and so delicately 
balanced are the rectilinear forms of these 
buildings that the withdrawal of a single unit 
would cause the structure to collapse. 

His art is decorative in the sense that it is 
opposed to the sinewy bulk of the modern 
realist who strives for solidity and depth. 
But it is none the less valid and beautiful. His 
flower pieces are painted with a photographic 
perfection of values, and a remarkable variety 
of tone-contrasts and textural distinctions. Mr. 
Demuth's work is refined and fragile — it seldom 
fails to charm us with a quality that relates to 
the old art of China, 



Page Seventy-Eight 



DONT LOOK LIKE A PAINTING! 




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ual in its sticking qual- 
ity. 

Be natural — use the 
shade' of powder to 
blend with the flesh 
color of nature. 



Extract from 

MOTION PICTURE 
MAGAZINE 

I have tried about every powder 
on the market and have done con- 
siderable experimenting on myself 
and on others. There is no de- 
nying that there are several very 
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felt that none just suited me, and 
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I also like a pleasant aroma to 
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learned from an artist years ago 
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instance, and examine it closely 
and you will find every color 
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painting flesh. Nothing is white 
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l~. M V 



JANUARY 



35^ 




EXPRESSING THE ARTS 







A BREWSTER PUBLICATION 



Are You Reading 

FEASTERS 

IN 
BABYLON 

that absorbing story of motion-picture 
studio life in Hollywood — bristling 
with tense situations — packed with 
exciting thrills — a hundred-percent 
story that excels in realism, dramatic 
intensity, and romantic charm 




Now running serially in the 

MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 

HPHE heroines were introduced to you in the December number 
— the fiery seventeen-year-old Lissa and her gentle sister Mary, 
two years older. You read of their departure from the dull home 
town for Hollywood — of their disappointments — of their try-out as 
extras — of the dangers that Mary feared and that Lissa challenged. 

In the January number the Villain is almost crowned King — but 
Mary outwits him, saves her irresponsible young sister, and is given 
a glimpse of the hero, Dermott Trent. 

In the February instalment many thrills and surprises await you: 
Mary's desperate resolve for the sake of Lissa — the frenzied party at 
the villa of a millionaire roue — the threat of the younger sister — the 
contempt of Dermott Trent — Mary's visit to the House of Mystery. 




feLDC 




"A man has but one moment of life to call his own. 

"Tlie moment just passed into the score of Time 's cowit, the moment 
which the hand of the clock trembles over, a hairs breadth yet to go — 
these are no man's to claim. One is gone forever; the other may mark 
the passage of his soul. 

"Only this 7>iome)it, this throb of the heart, this half-drawn breath, is 
a living mail's to claim. The beggar has it — the monarch can command 
no more." 



"yheValue of 



CHIEF train dispatcher for the world, I am chief life 
dispatcher for all men. 

Fresh minted from my hand, behold a New Year now 
spread out before you. 

Half a million golden minutes — a royal treasure! 
Beware lest it slip away through careless fingers. 

A New Year's resolution? Aye, here is one. Say to 
yourself every morning of the year, "Today I will make 
every minute count!" 

That this will make all your dreams come true, who 
should know so well as I ? 

For I am Father Time. 





Page Three 



SuADOWLAND 



Women the Greatest Buyers 

in the World 



THERE are 22,000,000 homes in the United States. 
The women who buy for these homes spend on the 
average $500 each, or a total of $11,000,000,000, each 
year. That is more than $36,000,000 every working day. 
Every year it amounts to half as much as America's Liberty 
Bond issue. 

Each woman is a part of this army of buyers, and each, 
if she will, may be guided to wise and economical pur- 
chases if she will but make up her mind each day to read 
as many as she can of the advertisements which manufac- 
turers are printing for her benefit. 

The advertising in every newspaper and every maga- 
zine is a buying guide for this greatest buying force in the 
world. This advertising makes it safe and easy for every 
member of this buying army to make her purchases. 

It establishes in her mind a buying habit and gives 
her a preference of one brand of goods to another or an 
advertised article to one that is unknown. 

It identifies for her a certain product as being standard, 
so that she may easily dodge the wiles of sellers who try to 
sell something that is not so good. 

It fixes merit as an everlasting adjunct to certain articles. 

It makes her know that the manufacturer who is proud 
of his product and jealous of his reputation and character 
cannot do otherwise than make his product at least as 
good as he says it is. 

More than likely it is better. 

Advertising points out where this greatest buyer in all 
the world's history may find quality goods by showing her 
pictures of them over and over again which enables her 
to recognize them easily and quickly. 



t Published by SuiADOWlAND in co-operation with"! 
The American Association of Advertising AgenciesJ 



Page Four 



•JAN -2 1923 ©C1B567008 



- \"3* 



Expressing- the Arts 




VOLUME VII 



The Magazine of Magazines 
JANUARY, 1923 

Cover Design: A Winter Idyl, by A. 71/. Hopfmuller 

iimimimiiniiiiiimniiiiiimiiimutiiimmiimtiu 

Important Features in This Issue: 
JESTS AND VISIONS Benjamin De Casseres 

Men and affairs subject to the mercies of one of our most brilliant satirists 

An Experiment in Music Culture Edward Hung erf ord 

The Eastman School of Music, its educational aspirations and its wonderful new buildings 

The Economies of Experiment Walter Prichard Eaton 

The new stagecraft in the light of recent striking examples 

American Civic Opera Jerome Hart 

The reorganization at Chicago that has brought many changes 

Litterateurs of Modernism Burton Rascoe 

A novelist and a poet who chronicle and characterize a disenchanted age 

Insects, Actors, and Frankensteins Kenneth Macgowan 

Broadway sees some remarkable heroes in some still more remarkable plays 

The World's Greatest Failures Maurice S. Sullivan 

Many of whom would like, with old Omar, "to grasp this sorry scheme of things entire . . . 
and then remold it nearer to the heart's desire ..." 

The Buffoon Ballet of Larionow Barrett H. Clark 

A Russian fable transformed into a glorified absurdity 

Portrait of a Woman of Forty Helen Woljeska 

An analysis that will provoke interest and comment 

Old Laces as Collecting Objects W . G. Bowdoin 




1 1 1 1 1 1 T 1 1 P 1 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 T 1 1 [ I 



Published Monthly by Brewster Publications, Inc., at Jamaica, N. Y. 

Entered at the Post Office at Jamaica, N. Y., as second-class matter, under the act of March 3rd, 1879. 

PRINTED IN U. S. A. 

Eugene V. Brewster, President and Editor-in-Chief ; Guy L. Harrington, Vice-President and Business Manager; L, G. Conlon, Treasurer; 

E. M. Heinemann, Secretary 

EXECUTIVE and EDITORIAL OFFICES, 175 DUFFIELD STREET, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Elsie Seeligmann, Editor 



Adele Whitely Fletcher, Managing Editor 



Jerome Hart, Associate Editor 



Subscription $3.50 per year, in advance, including postage in the U. S., Cuba, Mexico and Philippines; in Canada $4.00, and in foreign countries, $4.50 per 
year. Single copies, 35 cents. Postage prepaid. One and two cent United States Government stamps accepted. Subscribers must notify us at once 

of any change of address, giving both old and new address. 

Copyright, 1923, by Brewster Publications, Inc., in the United States and Great Britain 



4&Z0Z£= 



-5s£k£i 




C^te^ezz^ 



rStos 



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Page Five 



F" 



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N I 



~~J ffirOBM 



'Dl^© 



TO A GUEST 

/ greet you, 

Entertain you, 

Am even gay with you, 

But I know you 

As I do deceit 

Hiding behind a smile. 





COMEDY AND TRAGEDY 

As the clown 

Makes grotesque his part 

To win the crowd, 

So have I seen 

A mourner 

Make ridiculous his grief 

To impress his friends. 




THE WIND 

The ivind is spiked 

With sunlight, 

Clearing my mind 

Of thoughts 

That cluster about one 

Who cannot tolerate 

Light 

And the open spaces . . 



jmmf 





THEATER 

And so they tremble 

In the wings : 

Fear, the forerunner, 

And Sorrow, the shadow, 

Of the tragedy 

Death. 





THE POET 

The poet thought Life 
Too tawdry at close range, 
So decided to escape it, 
That he might see it 
In perspective . . . 
He had not figured 
On obstruction. 



A SONG OF HATE 

Oh, busy Whirl of Unimportant Things, 

Creation of the Devil, 

I hate you, for whenever my heart sings 

You try so hard 

To crush it to your level! 




Page Six 







*rrr$£ 



The Stage Setting and Costumes from the Boudour Ballet 

of Norman -Bel Geddes 

An article about the experiments of this artist in stage-craft, 
light, and color, appears on page sixty-seven of this number 




V 



'- 1 



iD 



The reproductions on this page are 
from the yellow sequence of the 
ballet. The painting and lighting of 
this scene was such tlxat it changed 
from cool blues and greens at the 
beginning, thru yellows, to a burn- 
ing orange and vermilion at the 
climax. The idol is made of layers of 
white wood and is decorated with gold 




a 



m 







Courtesy of the Babcock Galleries 



GRACIA 

C. Bosseron Chambers is an American who has studied in Berlin and 
Vienna. He is best known as a portrait painter, and many of his canvases 
hang in the rooms of the Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, and the 
Osceola Club, St. Augustine, Florida. His decoration and altar-pieces 
in St. Ignatius' Church, Chicago, are worthy of high commendation 










NOCTURNE 



While ivatching modern art movements with an attentive and not unsympathetic 
eye, Eugene V. Brewster's tendencies are toward the methods of Corot and 
Inness, for he has a consuming love of nature and its moods, and he aims 
at simplicity, sincerity, romance, and beauty, rather than sensationalism 




Courtesy of the Bourgeois Galleries 



MORNING 



Cubism has taught Joseph Stella to sub- 
ordinate his ecstasies to a rigid design, 
and in some of his recent pictures he 
has contrived a hard geometrical scaf- 
folding to support his exuberant visions 



K-XP^B-SSON 




-TBiE- AjgfS; 



Joseph Stella 

A Romantic Decorator Who Exhorts the Artist to Derive 
His Motif from His Own Life and Surroundings 

By Thomas Craven 



SINCE Cezanne turned the pictorial vision back to 
the fundamental consideration of design, art has 
produced an extraordinary variety of forms. Fu- 
turism, a sensational outburst of arbitrary symbols, has 
collapsed, leaving hardly a trace of its influence ; Cubism, 
by its very nature a three-dimensional scheme, has para- 
doxically developed into a decorative art of two planes; 
Vorticism, a corruption 
of Picasso's methods, 
is dead and forgotten. 
In Paris there is 
neither safety nor /re- 
pose: the Dadaists, an 
innocuous group of 
humorists, are per- 
forming to a jaded 
public. Defeated in 
serious fields, these 
men have deliberately 
set out to debase art — 
occasionally their fri- 
volity is amusing; in 
most cases it is no 
more than unintelligent 
buffoonery. In Amer- 
ica I see more hopeful 
signs. Here, at least, 
we have sobriety, a 
consistency of purpose 
that is no longer ec- 
centric, and a maturity 
that is rapidly distin- 
guishing our own art 
from Continental man- 
nerisms. And we have 
fully as much diversity 
as the French. From 
time to time I have an- 
alyzed the tendencies 
of our modern men, 
and have pointed out 
that individual devia- 
tions are consolidated 
by elements which 
make all art an endur- 
ing force. In the pres- 
ent instance we have 




JOSEPH STELLA 



Joseph Stella, a European by birth, but by right of his 
work and affiliations one of the most interesting person- 
alities in contemporary American painting. 

Mr. Stella was born in southern Italy in 1879. After 
a classical education which included drawing from life, 
he came to America at the age of nineteen to study medi- 
cine. He had little aptitude for science and soon aban- 
doned it for painting. 
For a while he suffered 
the academic instruc- 
tion of the Art Stu- 
dents' League ; later on 
he entered the old New 
York School of Art 
and won a scholarship ; 
eventually he preferred 
to hire his own models. 
His first exhibition 
was held at the Amer- 
ican Artists' League in 
1905. His work at this 
period, if I may judge 
from drawings contrib- 
uted to a number of 
magazines, was still 
hampered by his aca- 
demic training. He has 
told me that it took 
many years to free 
himself from the fal- 
sities and conventions 
of the schools. To get 
rid of early influences 
he made exhaustive 
studies in oil and pastel 
of the steel mills at 
Pittsburgh, and then 
went to Europe. He 
remained abroad for 
six years, exhibiting at 
Paris and Florence, 
and at the Interna- 
tional Exhibition in 
Rome. In 1913 two of 
his pictures were in- 
cluded in the famous 
(Cont'd on page 78) 



Page Eleven 







iff A 

mHEB — : 



AiAlAlAlAiAl^lAiZ 




-^me^ 



Miss Smithkins, age unknown, is now approach- 
ing the Bridge of Sighs. Her eyes are fixed 
on Byron's famous lines, which start, "I stood 
in Venice ..." She just will be romantic 



Page Twelve 



Ah, Italy! Thy Fatal Beauty 




ONLY A COP 

Hero of the Piazza, as 
brilliant as one of his 
own Venetian sunsets 




THE GONDOLIER 

Chianti is his favorite amusement, but 
under the stimulus of several lire he 
will pole you along the Grand Canal 
moaning "Ave Maria" in a damp tenor 




ST. MARK'S SQUARE 

Little do the pigeons realize 
that they are destined to have 
their pictures grace the ooze 
leather photograph album, 
which will be the foundation of 
the continuous lecture carried 
on by the sweet young tourists, 
entitled, "Now, when I was on 
the other side" 



THE VAMP 

The signorina who has 
just caught a glimpse of 
an American film director 




Page Thirteen 



... 







Photo by Edith Barakovich, Vienna 



LOUISE CARTOUCHE 

The charming soubrette of the Viennese "The- 
atre an der Wien," as Pierrot in the new 
operetta of Anton Lehar, "Chansons a" Amour" 



Page Fourteen 




Photo by Paul Grenbeaux, L. A. 



ETTA LEE 

Miss Lee will shortly be seen with Ethel Clayton 
in the screen version of "The Committance Woman" 



Page Fifteen 







A WATER COLOR 

More depth than is usually attained in a water color, added to an 
intense and vivid interpretation of a personality, marks this painting 



Women 

Three types expressed 
in three mediums 

By 
Guy Rowe 



Guy Rowe says, "I am more interested in ivomen than in anything else, all ages — all 
stages; in fact, I did not start to draw until I was seventeen years old, and decided 
I wanted to paint women as they looked to me. I am still looking and trying; I 
hope to do in paint what Balzac did in literature, and do it for American art, 
with regard to things, strictly as they are, in this country, as woman is, I mean." 



Page Sixteen 




Guy Rowe commenced his studies in the Detroit 
School of Fine Arts, under the personal direc- 
tion of John P. Wilkes. Mr. Wilkes let him 
carry out his own ideas, and so Mr. Rowe came 
to draw what he saw in people rather than 
working up in the usual way from casts and 
posed models. Thanks to this method, his 
craftsmanship has remained unsophisticated 
and he has not that very common tendency of 
displaying learning — his ideas subordinate all 
other things, the character and life of his sub- 
ject are the main things to him. He is not 
interested in technique for its own sake, only 
so far as it aids him to depict character. Mr. 
Rowe has exhibited at the Detroit Museum, at 
the Scarab Club's Annual Exhibitions, The 
American Water Color Society, Netv York 
Water Color Society and the National Academy 




A PENCIL SKETCH 




AN ETCHING 

One of a series 
of market views 



Page Seventeen 




Photo by Charles Hadden Parker 



REFLECTIONS 



Page Eighteen 



Jests and Visions 

Alexander Pope said, "Whatever is, is right." I say, Whatever is, is re-write. 

B;y Benjamin De Casseres 



JESTS and Visions — Puck and Prometheus — are the 
two escapes from the futility of living. Humor and 
dreams — if individuals and nations have not these, 
they perish. (I am writing this on Sunday morning, 
when the sermon complex swims to the top of our con- 
sciousness.) 

Puck hath said in his heart, "What fools these mortals 
he!" But Prometheus, who preceded him by some comets, 
said, What immortals these fools be ! I have not put 
Prometheus' epigram in quotation marks because the 
demi-Titan never said it. At least, it is not recorded. I 
put it in his mouth — and, anyhow, what's the literal 
truth between geniuses ! 

Well, if we immortals are fools, we are certainly guilty 
of some immortal foolishness. Look at the world today 
— behold its sublime damn foolishness. And the pathos 
of its stupidity. Its 
foolishness and its stu- 
pidity are not unique. 
It was the same yester- 
day — for it is the same 
human race — and will 
be the same tomorrow. 
For stupidity is im- 
mortal. In fact, stu- 
pidity is the collective 
genius of the human 
race. Everybody can- 
not be so wise as 
Mencken and myself. 

Humor elevates life 
to the level of a sub- 
lime spectacle. Vision 
is the illusive bale of 
hay hanging a yard in 
front of the old mule, 
Humanity. I personal- 
ly do not propose to 
spill any more of my 
tears over the woes of 
humanity. I went psy- 
chically dry doing that 
stunt when a young 'un. 
For the rest of my life 
I shall smile and smile 
without being too much 
of a villain, and glorify 
Illusion and all manner 
of lies, so that they be 
beautiful. 

So I invite you to 
greet my colossal gold- 
dust twins, Puck and Prometheus — Jest and Vision. 



of them that does not take the job seriously, the only 
ambassador to England that went there "for a corking 
good time," as Theodore Roosevelt said when he quit 
whitehousing. 

Of course, a humorous or saucy diplomatist is anathema 
among the fussy-fossils. Most of our ambassadors have 
never said anything worth recording. Colonel Harvey 
knows there is nothing to say worth recording, so with the 
shade of a smile flitting thru his medulla, he stirs up 
bored America with sudden sallies and furious onslaughts 
— with his tongue in his cheek. His Puckishness is anti- 
traditional. Ecrasez I'Infame! 




WHY HELEN WEPT 

By Harry Kemfi 

T-TELEN wept on the windy parapet . . . 

She saw far off, wide as the sky's embrace, 

The camps of Greece that seemed to fill all space 

But it was not for heart-break nor regret 

Nor any dimming dream in memory set 

That those slow tears crept down her lovely face; 

Nor was she mourning over her disgrace — 

Or that both Greeks and Trojans held her base. 

Nor for whole skies of woe that darkened yet: 

Nor did sh - weep because of Pans dead, 

Nor for that one child that her breasts had fed . 

Because of her, two worlds of men ran mad. 
Combating to and fro in dreadful fight: 
Despite her tender heart, this made her glad. 
And, womanlike, she wept from sad delight/ 



If there is one man who has contributed to the gaiety 
of the wood-alcoholic times in which we Americans live, 
it is Colonel Harvey. Better fifty years of Harvey than a 
cycle of John Hay. Since the Colonel has been in London 
he has contrived to shake up our prejudices and shake 
down some shams. The Colonel is the greatest ambassa- 
dor that we have ever sent abroad. He is the only one 



Have women souls ? No, said Colonel Harvey. When 
you remember that Victoria and Elizabeth ruled the 

British Empire, it re- 
quired courage to utter 
that in England. Nei- 
ther Queen Elizabeth 
nor Queen Victoria had 
a soul. Oliver Crom- 
well and Edward VII 
had. Lady Astor has 
no soul. Margot As- 
quith has no soul. Cleo- 
patra had no soul. Bebe 
Daniels has no soul. 
Tom Meighan has one. 
Joan of Arc, like Dutch 
Kate, of Greenwich 
Village, has no soul, 
while Harry Kemp and 
Charles F. Murphy 
have one. 

The whole matter 
comes to this : How 
can one tell whether 
one possesses a soul or 
not? As I write this, a 
portrait of Pola Negri 
looks down upon me. 
The first time I saw 
Pola (it was in Pas- 
sion, I think), I ex- 
claimed to Frank Wils- 
tach, 

"That woman has a 
soul !" 

"I believe," replied 

Frank, ecstatically, 

"she has an over-soul !" 

How did we arrive at the conclusion that Pola had a 

soul? The close-ups revealed it. If you will study the 

close-ups of Pola Negri, you will notice a thin line of 

scorn running from the corner of both lips toward the 

plump part of the cheek. This is the soul-line in the face. 

She who hath scorn hath a soul. 

Colonel Harvey's knowledge of woman is academic, I 
fear. He should study them — in close-ups. 
The Huneker legend grows. The publication of his 
(Continued on page 75) 



Page Nineteen 




Four of the six murals by Ezra Winter and Barry Faulkner, depicting the history of music 



An Experiment in Music Culture 

By Edward Hungerford 



PRINCE STREET, Rochester . . . 1912 ... An 
old-fashioned, brown-brick, mansard-roofed house 
of the architecture that flippant novelists delight in 
calling "Late General Grant." A struggling school of 
music, if you please, without much backing, without 
many friends. Two musicians devoted to their high 
ideals, working almost hopelessly to make both ends meet 
with it. . . . One musician drops out. Perhaps there 
is a living for just one man in it, without a sacrifice of 
ideals. . . . Perhaps not even that. Yet the other 
musician struggles on. . . . 

Gibbs Street, Rochester . . ,. 1922 . . . For more 
than three hundred feet there stretches the coldly beau- 
tifuLItalian Renaissance facade of a white marble opera 
house and school of music combined. The opera house 
is the third largest theater in the United States — the 
music school, six stories in height, and with nine pipe- 
organs in sound-proof studios, and with forty-eight 
pianos in sound-proof teaching-rooms, has a capacity for 
more than two thousand students. . . . 

This white marble structure is not a commercial insti- 
tution ; it is an educational one. For this reason its title 
has been vested in the University of Rochester; a 
rather quiet, old-fashioned college which for the past 
seventy years has been doing thoro and consistent teach- 
ing in that city. Upon the high-set lintel of the struc- 
ture there has been graven the words : "For the Enrich- 
ment of Community Life." They express its real spirit. 

It is indeed a community institution. There are to be 
no ultimate profits in the operation of either theater or 
school. Upon the cover of your program it is plainly set 
forth that the house is "to be operated and maintained 
for the promotion of musical interests generally in the 



City of Rochester. . . . Any surplus from the operation 
of the theater is to be used in developing the musical 
interests of the city." 

To that high policy is the new Rochester institution 
firmly committed. 

The best minds in America were called into the con- 
struction and decoration of the building itself. The all- 
important problem of the acoustics was put in the hands 
of experts, with the result that in the topmost row of the 
topmost gallery one actually can hear a pin drop upon 
the stage. The remarkable acoustic properties of the 
famous Mormon Tabernacle at Salt Lake City have been 
duplicated. 

It is a very democratic affair, this very newest of the 
great opera houses of the world. Its auditorium pos- 
sesses no boxes. For the permanent subscribers, whose 
guarantee subscriptions are a necessity to its musical 
plans, a sweeping mezzanine balcony has been installed 
at the rear. Yet even this "super-box" — if you are dis- 
posed to call it such— has more than four hundred 
seats, the greater part of which are freely available at 
the box-office. . . . But the most democratic feature of 
the opera house is its great gallery ; locally known as the 
grand balcony. Its fittings are quite as fine as that of 
the mezzanine just underneath. 

The old idea of a segregated folk in an upper gallery, 
who must enter and leave by a separate entrance and 
never mingle at all with the rest of the audjence, and 
who must study the cast from inferior programs, has 
no place whatsoever in the Eastman Theater. The top 
row of the top gallery has the same type of chair and 
the same upholstery as the front row of the orchestra. 
Personally, I vastly prefer the gallery to any other part 



Page Twenty 



SUADOWLAND 



of rhe house. In no other place does one get the 
great sweep and the real grandeur of this magnifi- 
cent auditorium. 

Sweep and grandeur — and amazing simplicity. If 
the Eastman Theater teaches any one thing in its 
lines and its decoration, it is the high value and the 
real beauty of good taste. ... It is ornate ; it is 
gloriously ornate. The huge crystal chandelier with 
a thousand separate lights, which came all the way 
from Vienna to illuminate the theater, drops from a 
domed ceiling and a golden sunburst. Yet it never 
for a moment violates a single canon of good taste. 

The complete absence of boxes from the house gave 
great side-walls ; and these, in turn, an opportunity 
for murals such as no other theater ever has given. 
For the decorative scheme of these walls two eminent 
American painters — Ezra Winter and Barry Faulk- 
ner — were enlisted. The six panels of heroic size 
which they have prepared depict the history of music. 
Already these have taken their stand as art treas- 
ures alongside the murals of the Boston Public 
Library and of the Library of Congress at Wash- 
ington. . . . 

There are many minor decorations. One can 
spend several days studying them out. For a turn 
in one of the main stairways, Maxfield Parrish 
painted a panel ; at a little half-hidden corner of a 
side corridor one hears the splash of running water 
and discovers an Italian fountain of exquisite 
beauty ; Japanese tapestries in this corner and in that, 
and here, there and everywhere — paintings, old and 
new, that have been culled to make the new house 
artistically complete. And these extend from the 
opera house itself into the long corridors of the 
adjoining School of Music, which upon opera and 
concert nights are used as promenades for the 
entr'actes. 

George Eastman believes that appreciation of 
music does not come to a community by the wave 
of a wand or the building of an 'opera house. 
Years, and even generations, of the slow and con- 
sistent training of the youth of a town alone bring 
the widespread musical taste that can place so gi- 
gantic an undertaking as permanent, resident grand 
opera upon a solid footing. With this in view the 




The simple lines and perfect proportion give an air 
of dignity to the corridors of the School of Music 




Eastman School 
of Music has 
already e m - 
barked upon an 
elaborate scheme 
o f extension 
work in the 
grammar and 
the primary 
schools of 
Rochester. The 
results of that 
scheme will not 
be quick. But 
they should be 
very sure in- 
deed. 

(Continued on 
page 77) 



Here you are given 
a glimpse of a 
panel by Maxfield 
Parrish, set into a 
turn of one of the 
main stairways 



Page Twenty-One 



■■■.--- 







Photo © by James Wallace Pondelicek 



THE REHEARSAL 



Page Twenty-Two 




A camera study of Ethelynd Terry, by J. Willett 



IN PERIWIG AND PEARLS 



Page Twenty-Three 




In the screen above, the design is 
leather of varied and beautiful colors 
inlaid on a solid leather background, 
upon which the design was first carved 
by hand; the frame is Macassar ebony 




Decorative Leather 

from 

Amsterdam 



This interesting leather work, recent- 
ly on exhibit at the Waldorf-Astoria, 
is from the shops of J. Brandt, 
and is designed and made by artists 




The fire-screen has a bronze base and 
frame; the figure is leather outlined in 
fine gold wire, which goes thru and 
forms an outline on the asbestos back. 
At the left, the solemn leather raven sits- 
amidst a colorful leather background, 
the design of which was first pressed in 
by hand with a hot die and then painted 



Page Twenty-Four 



MUBaaaMaaMMllUMIItdBMBBHHHHMHVHHMnflHHHflBHHHHUHBMBHnnHUHHHflnBHBHHUB 




Photo by Edward E. Jacobsen 



Hazel Lindsley's appealing beauty charmed all who saw her in the 
photoplay, "Sea of Dreams." She is an entrant in the Beauty Contest 



Page Twenty-Five 




The 
Economics 

of 
Experiment 

If the new stagecraft is but a new 
and more lavish way to spend 
money, it will accomplish very 
little for our theater; if it sim- 
plifies as well as intensifies, then 
it will open a whole new range 
of possibilities 

Walter Prichard 
Eaton 

Illustrations by Everett Henry 



This scene from R. V. R. is laid in the scientist's laboratory and shows 
how effectively the apparatus is projected against the luminous sky 



EXPERIMENT in the theater depends not only 
on the enthusiasm of the artists, but on their 
financial resources. This is a commonplace which 
the artists are prone to forget and the public to ignore. 
The public, indeed, is interested only in results, and has 
been too long accustomed to a comfortable richness in the 
playhouse to tolerate anything skimpy, except under very 
special circumstances. Accordingly, if an author writes 
a play in seven or eight scenes, as O'Neill has twice done, 
and as Shaw did in Back To Methuselah, or if the play, 
like Shaw's, is of such great length that rt has to be per- 
formed in sections, or if the producer wishes to try some 
novel method of presentation, of uncertain value as popu- 
lar entertainment (like the Jones-Hopkins Macbeth, for 
instance), one of two things is essential if the experiment 
is to be made on a scale that gives it any hope of success 
— either the producer must have a considerable bank 
reserve, or he must have the ingenuity to make his pro- 
duction with the minimum of expense, and the maximum 
of effect. 

It is not entirely unfortunate that the experimenter 
seldom has the bank reserve. Tree's answer to the riddle : 
When is a repertoire theater not a repertoire theater? — 
When it is a success, tells the story of more than one 
experiment which ended on the rocks of the tame and 
respectable, or which came to make its productions on 
such a scale that they were of little or no service to the 
theater in general. Subsidy seems especially to work 



either for display or conventionality. On the other hand, 
the ingenuity of the directors in accomplishing much with 
little is of direct benefit to every theater, professional 
and amateur, and free experiment in our playhouse per- 
haps depends more upon this ingenuity of the directors 
than upon any other one factor. 

For example, the projector which Lee Simonson pro- 
cured not long ago in Germany, from the inventor, 
Adolph Linnebach, while it is primarily a device to paint 
a backdrop with living light instead of flat color, is an 
enormous money saver. If (as in Back To Methuselah) 
you have several outdoor sets, it is perfectly possible to 
paint each backdrop on a slide hardly two feet square, 
which is projected on a translucent white cloth, thru which 
it shows, thus doing away with a great deal of labor and 
material. It is also used in R. U. R. to paint sky and 
smoke-stacks. Mechanical aids that do away with labor 
and material are common enough in all industries, but 
they have been slower in reaching the theater, because 
in the theater they have to be invented less by mechanics 
than by artists ; they must increase illusion and beauty as 
well as decrease cost, or they are vain. That is why 
modern Germany has made so many valuable contribu- 
tions to stagecraft; her theater artists have been also 
mechanically inventive. 

In the Jones-Hopkins production of Macbeth, the action 
took place in front of a vast black hanging which swept 
around into the wings, and all the light came down from 



Page Twenty-Six 



SuA&OWLAN& 



overhead in three pencil beams. There was a definite 
emotional reason for this, of course, but it should be 
noted that it also served to screen out the wings with 
shadow. If, for every scene of the play, special scenery 
had been built to screen out the wings, the cost of pro- 
duction might have risen to prohibitive prices. But light 
and shadow are the cheapest scenery in the world. In 
Back To Methuselah, Lee Simonson, the designer, framed 
his proscenium arch with a "cut-out" of conventionalized 
foliage, which seemed quite in place, of course, in the 
opening act, "the Garden of Eden," but which remained 
for all the rest of the play. It served a double purpose in 
his scheme : it caused the audience to be reminded in sub- 
sequent acts of the play's beginnings, as if it were all 
viewed thru the arch of Eden, thus aiding in a unity of 
impression, and it cut off enough of the audience's chance 
to peep into the wings or up into the flies, to enable him 
to do away with a considerable number of pieces of 
scenery which would otherwise have had to be built as 
screens, and each night moved about by stage hands. 
Similarly, a low platform, used first in the act called 
The Thing Happens, served to elevate the president's 
chair into prominence, and enabled more people to be 
comfortably handled on a smallish stage ; but the same 
platform could be manipulated into a temple step, into 
the base of temple columns, and finally into a masking 
screen for the projector which painted the big cloud on 
the backdrop in the final act. These devices had their 
definite place in the play, so that they were not realized 
by an audience as devices at all ; but they made it easier 
to finance a daring experiment, and they make it easier 
for other producers, especially those of restricted re- 
sources, to accomplish good things. 

It is doubtful if Back To Methuselah lost the Theatre 
Guild much money, but it certainly made them none — 
directly, that is. How- 
ever, by being able to put 
it on, they gained so much 
public interest that this 
year, only eight months 
later, they have more than 
five thousand subscribers, 
and they have a European 
reputation which enabled 
them to secure for their 
first bill this autumn the 
fascinating and important 
Bohemian drama, R.U.R. 
With five thousand sub- 
scribers, which actually 
means nearer ten thou- 
sand seats, the Guild is 
now bound to take in 
enough money to pay for 
k any reasonable production. 
They cannot absolutely 
fail. They have removed 
the worst of the gambling 
element from the theater. 

In the delightful remi- 
niscences of old Sol Smith, 
you will find the account 
of a stock company in 
which Sam Drake, the 
leading man, quite liter- 
ally doubled in brass. Not 
only would he play three 
or four parts of an 



Another scene from R. U. R., 
where living light gives an 
extraordinary effect of bound- 
less space 



evening, but in Pizzaro, after his death, he had to fall 
far enough off stage to play slow music to bring down 
the curtain. Actors in those palmy days had to be actors ! 
In the modern company, chosen entirely for its fitness to 
present one specific play, versatility has given way to 
specialization to "the type" and infrequently, even when 
the cast is long, does the same actor play two parts. If, 
however, a producer wishing to experiment either by the 
frequent production of new plays for short periods, or 
with certain dramas calling for long casts, or with unusual 
dramas put on for a special performance or two by his 
company engaged regularly in another play, hopes to 
make his experiments effectively and yet at a minimum 
cost, he will have to secure actors who are flexible, and 
even who are willing to double. 

Back To Methuselah, played in three sections, each 
running for a week, if it is to be presented without 
staggering expense, must be acted by a rather small com- 
pany. If different people were employed for the different 
sections, two-thirds of the company would be idle all the 
time. The salary bill would be tripled, or nearly so. Of 
course, a certain few characters run thru the play and 
have to be acted by the same players. However, on the 
whole, the play could be acted by three sets of players, 
and would be- so acted if it were cast in the usual way. 
The Theatre Guild, in casting it, had to try out a great 
number of actors, many of whom were entirely satisfac- 
tory in one part, but could not meet the test of some other 
part they would have to play. It became a search for 
versatile players. 

The point is, of course, that the experimental theater, 

to be free, needs besides the inventive talent of its 

scenic and producting artists, the services of willing 

and versatile actors. Far less than in the so-called 

{Continued on page 75) 




Paije Txeentv-Seven 



. 




Photo © by James Wallace Pondelicek 



/ walked alone in the mountains where wonders and glories are, 
And I lijted my hands in gladness to clasp 'a luminous star; 
I reached thru infinite spaces — Love, do you understand? 
When I held the star of my dreaming, I thrilled to the touch of your hand. 

— Edgar Daniel Kramer. 



Page Twenty-Eight 



Czech Puppets With a History 



Photographs by Sherril Schell 





— ~. 



-+^fc%?Wt»ms'j«t 



A CENTURY or so ago, when the first Bohemians 
settled in New York, there came with them a poor 
cobbler, and like most people he had so many 
children he didn't know how to amuse them. Back in 
Bohemia he had delighted not only his own children but 
the children of all the villagers as well with his puppet 
shows. Unfortunately, the puppets and toys had been 
left behind and the cobbler could not afford to send for 
them, so he sat down and with his cobbler's tools carved 
a new set, from memory, including all the types that had 
been handed down for generations. For in Bohemia 
nearly every family has its own puppet show, and it isn't 
used only for the enjoyment of the children, either. 

Altho the children are always put in the front rows at 
the performance, the whole community attends and when 
Kapulinka and 
Kasparek, who 
have posed in the 
picture above to 
the left, come out 
on the stage the 
audience usually 
joins in any argu- 
ments they may 
have. Later Kas- 
parek calls the 
Devil, whose 
name is Czech, 
and who finds it 
impossible to do 
evil in the pres- 
ence of the chil- 
dren, so he is 
forced to carry 
presents for the 
children in a 
wheelbarrow, a 
tiny carved kit- 
ten, a diminutive 
flower pot and in- 
numerable other 
small articles 



. ■ , P..- ■■-■..,.-... 



i[i« #!*H(»«» 




which the devil very meekly gives to Kasparek, who 
hands them over the footlights to the children. 

The whole cast is the group in the picture at the bot- 
tom of the page. Reading from left to right they are : 
the guardsman bold, the simple peasant girl, the good, 
old devil, who later becomes a monk, the woodsman, 
another peasant girl and her lover, the daring robber, a 
farmer and a wealthy householder of Prague. 

Modern Czech puppets are smaller and respond better 
to the fingers of the puppeteer. They still retain the 
characteristic modeling of their predecessors, even for 
the dramas that are written for them today. Even now 
practically, every family has its puppet theater. At the 
Webster Branch of the New York Library there is a 
collection of puppets and a theater equipped with modern 

scenery and a 
light - board, the 
puppets them- 
selves change 
character by 
changing cos- 
tumes. The 
Czecho - Slovak 
Art Shop makes 
a business of im- 
porting the pup- 
pets and the thea- 
ters that go with 
them. Not the 
least fascinating 
importations are 
the wooden toys ; 
a few of them are 
shown above. Of 
course, all are ex- 
aggerations and to 
some no name is 
possible. The Jan 
Huss church is 
now the home of 
the old cobbler's 
puppets. 



Page Twenty-Nine 




Photo by Abbe 



YVONNE GEORGE 



Another Yvette Guilbert, whose singing of "Fai 
Pas Sii y Faire" in "The Greenwich Village 
Follies" is treating a sensation in New York 
that is only comparable with the popularity 
oj her "Mon Homme" in Paris during the war 



Page Thirty 



The Toast 

of the 

Continent 







Endja Mogout (left) is a piquant nineteen-year- 
old dancer and screen star of Hamburg, Germany 

The vivacity and sparkle that characterize the 

beautiful women of Vienna is intensified in 

Catherine Brunner, the dancer (above) 



Page Thirty-One 




Photo by Kcabe, Rome 

Two outstanding members of the Chicago Civic Opera Com- 
pany are Angelo Minghetti (above), a new lyric tenor, and 
Edith Mason (below), wife of the conductor, Giorgio Polacco 



UNTIL America has something cor- 
responding with a ministry of fine 
arts, as in European countries, it 
is perhaps useless to look for a national 
scheme for encouraging music^in ^ general 
and opera in particular. Mr. John C. 
Freund, the veteran musical editor and 
publisher of Musical America, has for sev- 
eral years been insistent on the importance 
of creating a secretary of the fine arts with 
a seat in the presidential cabinet, and from 
time to time the project receives support 
from music clubs in some of the larger 
centers. But it is still very much in the air. 
In New York the City Chamberlain, Mr. 
Philip Berolsheimer, himself a music lover 
who has done not a little to give the public 
of the great metropolis free music in the 
form of open-air band concerts, recently 
formulated a comprehensive municipal 
scheme for the establishment of a great 
music conservatorium and opera house in 
a central part of the city. This would in- 
volve the expenditure of anything from 



American 
Civic Opera 

4 

An Experiment at Chicago 

By 
Jerome Hart 



twenty million to forty million dollars, and, like 
the ministry of fine arts, it is still in cloudland. 

In some of the large cities the municipalities are 
assisting the symphony orchestras and other musi- 
cal projects for the benefit of the public, and music 
is being increasingly recognized thruout the coun- 
try as what it is, the most democratic and widely 
popular of all the arts, and therefore one which 
should have the support of the government and 
municipal authorities. There is, however, a phase 
or branch of music which has not been popularized 
and democratized to the same extent as the rest, 
and that is grand opera. It remains in America, as 
it began in Europe, the most exclusive branch of 
music, which can only be enjoyed by comparatively 
a limited number because of its high cost, a cost 
which places it beyond the means of the masses of 
the people except for the occasional visits of per- 
ipatetic companies. 

A real attempt to reduce the aristocratic and 
plutocratic exclusiveness of grand opera has re- 
cently been made in Chicago, and the result will be 



Photo by Hutchinson 




Page Thirty-Tzvo 




It is much to be regretted that 
New York will not be in- 
cluded in the itinerary. The annual visit to the Eastern 
metropolis was always an event of first-class importance, 
one which was looked upon by music lovers and con- 
firmed operagoers as giving a much-needed fillip to the 
season, for it tended to stimulate a wholesome and de- 
sirable spirit of rivalry on the part of the wealthy and 
influential Metropolitan Opera Company. 

New York opera lovers will miss above all the richly 
varied repertory of the Chicago Opera Company, in 
which French opera had its due part. We can never be 
too grateful to a company which enabled us to hear such 
interesting works as Pelleas and Melisande, Le Chemi- 
neau, Les Contes d' Hoffmann, Louise, Le Jongleur de 
Notre Dame, Herodidade, Thais, and others done by 
French artists of such admirable quality as Maguenat, 
Dufriche, Dupanne, Defrere, Cotreuil, Yvonne Gall, our 
own Mary Garden, and others eminent at the Paris Na- 



Amelita uaui-^urci is singing with both the Metropolitan and Chicago upera com- 
panies this season as last. Here she appears for the first time as Madame Butterfly 



tional Opera and Opera Comique. French works were 
sung by the Chicago organization in their native lan- 
guage, for the most part by French artists, and the per- 
formances set standards of the highest value, which the 
Metropolitan would sometimes have done well to emu- 
late. 

Which reminds us that there is some room for disquiet 
in the fact that Mr. Gatti-Casazza's almost autocratic 
position in New York will be strengthened by the discon- 
tinuance of the visits of the Chicago company. This 
may be to the advantage of the committee and share- 
holders of the wealthy and powerful Metropolitan 
Opera Company, but whether it will be altogether in the 
best interests of artists and the public remains to be seen. 
The very able but almost too dominant general director 
of the Metropolitan is now operatic monarch of all be 
(Continued on page 76) 



Page Thirty-Three 



' 



THE DANCERS 

Wayne Albee hus very effectively posed 
Betty and Leonora after Harriet Frishmuth's 
well-known and delightful piece of sculpture 



Page Thirty-Font 



Litterateurs of Modernism 

A Novelist and a Poet Who Chronicle and Characterize a Disenchanted Age 

Efy Burton Rascoe 



THE publication in English of an incredibly good 
translation by C. K. Scott Moncrieff of the siz- 
able first part of Marcel Proust's monumental A 
La Recherche dn Temps Perdu (Remembrance of Things 
Past), under the title Swann's Way, reminds me of the 
story, with its piquant moral, of the discovery of Marcel 
Proust. In 1913 there came into the office of the Nou- 
velle Revue Francaise, the booming organ of what was 
then the most significant and articulate section of the 
Parisian younger generation, a huge, unwieldy, closely 
penned, almost illegible manuscript bearing the title, 
Dn Cote de CJiea Swann. It was dedicated, of all per- 
sons, to Gaston Calmette, former editor of the Figaro, 
a man certainly of some political and journalistic no- 
toriety but of no literary significance. The busy editors, 
Jacques Riviere and Gaston Gallimard, regarded the 
weight, bulk and illegibility of the manuscript, raised 
skeptical eyebrows at the dedication and returned the 
work with no more than a casual glance at the first few 
pages. A few months later the novel appeared under the 
aegis of a publisher 
who prints books at 
authors' expense. 
Riviere and Gallimard 
read it and recognized 
it as the novel they 
had rejected. They 
also recognized it as 
one of the most re- 
markable literary 
works of their gener- 
ation, almost an epoch- 
making achievement in 
prose. They consid- 
ered the possible expi- 
ations for their stu- 
pidity and carelessness, 
viewing with some 
favor a hand-in-hand 
leap from the top of 
Eiffel tower ; but, in 
the end, they decided 
that one of them ought 
to go to see Proust. 

Gallimard sought 
out Proust's address, 
which was that of an 
ancient and musty 
hotel in one of the ar- 
istocratic neighbor- 
hoods. Arriving at the 
house, he passed thru 
a number of dark and 
deserted halls and cam° 
at last to the door of 
a vast, murky, vaulted- 
ceilinged bedroom. As 
soon as his eyes began 
to focus, he descried, 
by the light of a single 
guttering candle, a lit- 
tle, wizened old man 
in bed, wearing a 




Aldous Huxley, the young author of Mortal Coils, who has 
added immeasurably to current literature with his exquisite 
style, irony and insight into the psychology of all moods 



nightcap, swathed in heavy robes, and beside him on a 
table de nuit a towering mass of scribbled sheets. Intro- 
ductions, apologies, compliments, contrition, forgiveness, 
and a contract, ensued* in that interview. Proust ac- 
cepted the N.R.F. as his publisher. When the first two 
volumes, of which the English translation is now avail- 
able, were set up, Proust objected to the typography and 
the paging, and to please him the entire double volume 
was reset by the publishers at their expense. Such was 
their penance. 

Proust's Remembrance of Tilings Past comprises five 
volumes. It is a presentation of Parisian "old family" 
life of the last generation. It is a curious, meticulous 
work of infinite detail, devoid of plot and "action" and 
given over to the minute recording of characterizing in- 
cident. While yoti read, a firmly etched impression is 
made upon your mind of subtle and civilized decadence 
in a fashionable, cynical, blase, and debilitated society. 

Proust writes whereof he knows. He is now an aging 
valetudinarian, said to be so delicately sensitive to colds 

that he sneezes when 
-j the lawn is mowed 

outside his window. 
He spends mast., of his 
time in bed, writing in 
a delicate script these 
memories and impres- 
sions of what our 
moralists would term a 
"wasted life." He was 
born into a financially 
secure and aristocratic 
family. He possessed 
both sensibility and 
curiosity and he lived 
the life of a man about 
town, a dilettante, a 
connoisseur of ama- 
tory emotions, with no 
purpose save to enjoy 
himself in a manner 
consonant with his 
taste and abilities. He 
was a dandy and a 
Don Juan, an aesthete 
and an erudite man. 
When age and declin- 
ing health cut him off 
from contact with life, 
he withdrew grace- 
fully and without re- 
gret to the ivory tower 
of a litterateur and be- 
gan to compose these 
memoirs of a rare and 
gifted and interesting 
personality. 

Proust's method, 
but hardly his manner, 
is somewhat analogous 
to that of Dorothy 
Richardson. His 
{Cont'd on page 64) 



Page Thirty-Five 




Other Beverages 

that 

Should be Prohibited 



Sketches by Henkel 



NEAR-BEER 

The workingman's noonday solace was a glass 
of beer with his lunch — before Mr. Volstead 
acted. Now he spends his hour of leisure 
glooming over the passing of the good old 
days and endeavoring to extract one-half-of- 
one-per-cent solace from a bottle of near-beer. 
The endeavor never meets with success. There- 
fore, we contend that any beverage which adds 
to the depression of the workingman and sub- 
tracts from his content and multiplies his 
worries should be prohibited 




s~ 



' 0bt ■ f 

n i 




AFTERNOON TEA 
You see them every day between 
three and six in every aristocratic 
tearoom in the city, these little 
twosomes and threesomes and four- 
somes, drinking innumerable cups 
of Orange Pekoe and Oolong, and 
helping themselves generously to 
dishes of scandal and gossip. "The 
cup that cheers" has become "the 
cup that sears." Shall we prohibit it? 



BUTTERMILK 
We have all met him — the 
Buttermilk Bore. "Absolute- 
ly cured me of that nawsty 
dyspepsia . . . four glasses 
a day . . . won'erful stuff 
... . ought to try it, old fel- 
low . . . most rejuvenating 
. . . 'Member how seedy I 
looked last summer? Well, 
look at me now . . . Look 
At Mel!!" His vis-a-vis looks 
— and if looks could kill . . . 



Page Thirty-Six 



ICE-CREAM SODA 
Poets rhyme "love" with "dove" and 
"stars above" but George-of-the-soda- 
counter-in-any-drug-store (you see one of 
lum glowering below) would rhyme it 
with "shove." He would tell you that 
these "calf-lovers" are a menace to his 
business. They sit and sip and smirk for 
hours at a stretch. "They're public nui- 
sances," says George — and we, being in 
the crabbed, thirties, agree with him. We 
have forgotten that once-upon-a-time we 
looked into Her face at a soda-counter, 
our heart singing, "Drink to me only 
with thine eyes." Or was it that less 
elevating ditty: 

"The prettiest girl I ever saw 
Was sipping soda thru a straw." 







HOT CHOCOLATE 

Any dietician will 
tell you that one 
cup of hot chocolate, 
with three lumps of 
sugar, and topped by 
a four-inch pyramid 
of Grade-A whipped 
cream, will, if taken 
twice a day, increase 
the scale register of 
those under weight 
from three to seven 
pounds a week — thus 
increasing the at- 
tractiveness of the 
weighee. But, alas! 
it is always the over- 
plump damsel who 
indulges in the bev- 
erage so rich in car- 
bohydrates, and asks 
for more 




CEREAL COFFEE 
What is wrong with the above picture? You see a chic French maid present- 
ing her mistress with a coffee service for two. The hostess obviously is 
embarrassed; the guest is puzzled What ghastly thing has happened? Is 
there a crack in His Reverend's cup? Is there a fly in the cream? No, 
indeed. The guest has just remarked, reprovingly, that he never partakes of 
stimulants in any form — that he drinks only cereal coffee. How should the 
hostess meet this situation? How would you meet it? 



s ■ tS 




tS ,\4<i-\ '}.- —i niniii'yUiiti' ., . _ 





PINK LEMONADE 

Scene — Circus Grounds 

Characters — Lemonade Vendor, Popper, 

Bobby, Baby 

Lemonade Vendor: Here's your pinkest lem~ 



i-i-i-ce cold . . . fi-i-i-ve centsaglass! 
I wannanother drinkuvit, popper. 
No! You've had three and you'll be 
then what will your mommer say 



onade . . , 

Bobby: 

Popper: 
sick, and 
to me? 

Bobby: Wa-a-a-a-w, wa-a-a-a-a-a — 

Baby: Ya-a-a-a-a-h, ya-a-a-a-a — 

Popper: // / once get these young'uns home, 
I'll never take 'em out again! 

(Chorus of Bobby and Baby and the Lemon- 
ade Vendor.) 



Page Thirty-Seven 







MzzLMl^: _ 



Photo by Victor Georg 



LAURETTE TAYLOR 

To the gratification of her many admirers, Miss 
Taylor will bring the much-beloved "Peg o' My 
Heart" to the screen in the not distant future 



Page Thirty-Eight 



Insects, Actors, and Frankensteins 

Broadway Sees Some Remarkable Heroes in Some Still More Remarkable Plays 

B;y Kenneth Macgowan 



JUST twenty seasons ago Broadway fed upon A 
Royal Rival, Don Ccrsar's Return, If I Were King, 
The Helmet of Navarre, Alice of Old Vincennes, A 
Gentleman of France, and Monsieur Beaucaire. The 
solidest fare that it could stomach that year was A Mes- 
sage from Mars — and two plays in which certain young 
players named David Warfield and Maude Adams were 
beginning to attract attention: The Auctioneer and Qual- 
ity Street. 

Some time in the winter of 1902 somebody or other 
recklessly gave two performances of an odd thing called 
Pelleas and Mclisande, and two performances of a reck- 
less attack upon society known as A Doll's House. A 
visiting star acted Magda a few times in repertory, and 
Mrs. Patrick Campbell managed to drag out a run of 
fourteen nights in another play by that eminent second- 
rater, Hermann Sudermann : The Joy of Living. That 
was the sum of serious Continental drama presented to 
New York in the eight months of the season of 
1901-1902. 

In the thirty-one days of October, 1922, Broadway 
has turned up — besides two rather tedious and thoroly 
artistic dramas from France and Spain — an Italian com- 
edy and two Czecho-Slovak dramas of devastating orig- 
inality. These five are Paul Geraldy's To Love, the 
Quintero Brothers' Malvaloca, Pirandello's Six Char- 
acters in Search of an Author, Karel Capek's R. U. R., 
and The World We Live In, by Karel and his brother 
Joseph. 

The World We Live In is a bitter satire on humanity 
in the terms of the lowest forms of animal life. R. U. R. 
is a mordant and powerful labor-tract showing the red 
revolution that comes when workers are only machines. 
Six Characters in Search of an Author is a comedy on 
the conventions of the theater plus a dramatic disserta- 
tion on what the philosophers call "identity" or "reality 
of experience." 



The cast of characters in The World We Live In is a 
list of insects. The dominant figures in R. U . R. are 
Frankenstein workmen called "robots" and stamped out 
by machinery. The principals in the Italian piece are six 
characters from an unknown dramatist's brain who in- 
vade the theater looking for someone to write their story. 

A mad mimic world, my masters, but a most interest- 
ing one. 

It is a bit of rather extraordinary internationalism 
which unites William A. Brady and the Theatre Guild 
with these two dramas of the Capeks of farthest Prague 
— either of them a play that would make a pretty good 
text for a bolshevist political speech. 

R. U. R., the one the Theatre Guild is responsible for 
importing, is a good deal more like a dramatization of 
the Communist Manifesto of 1848 than of Mary Woil- 
stonecraft Shelley's Frankenstein. It shows us a pic- 
ture of what the communists tell us our world now is. 
Labor has become a machine — it has become the machine 
of a machine. For the purposes of Capek's parable, this 
machine is a manlike figure invented by one Rossum, 
and sold all over the world as Rossum's Universal Robot 
(hence R. U. R.). The rulers of the world live in lux- 
ury and idleness upon the labor of the robots. These 
rulers decay, morally and physically. For one thing, 
race suicide sets in. Is it so very different a picture from 
the painting of Marx and Engels or Lenin and Trotsky? 

At this point in the drama — just about the middle of 
the second act — enters the battle cry of the Communist 
Manifesto: "Workers of the world unite! You have 
nothing to lose but your chains. You have a world to 
gain." The robots, who have been doing the fighting 
of the nations as well as their work, rise across a red sky, 
and exterminate their masters. 

There is a certain difficulty here — a difficulty that 
Lenin would be the last to deny that he had encountered. 
{Continued on page 66) 




Sketched by Reginald Marsh 

Charles Quartermaine, Diana Bourbon, Jeannette Sherwin, Cathryn Young, Felix Aylmer, H. G. Stoker and James 
Dale in Loyalties, Galsworthy's fine drama of race prejudice, which is having a tremendous success in New York 



Page Thirty-Nine 



T 




The children of the Modern School at Stelton, New 
Jersey, made the three drawings on this page. Two are 
done in brilliant crayon, and the third in water color. 
The two dancing figures are in white against a vivid 
green background with a rainbow flashing across the 
sky. The nude figure is in green against a red back- 
ground with the high-lights in yellow. The sketch in 
the lower left-hand corner is a water color which runs 
thru the whole color scale from red thru orange, yellow., 
green, blue and purple, and is the creation of Sammy 
Pearl, who is thirteen years of age. Sammy also makes 
woodcuts by a method which he has evolved himself; 
some of his results are excellent, and great deal of his 
work is used in "Voice of the Children," which is the 
magazine written, illustrated, edited, planned and printed 
by the children of the school. The remarkable thing is 
that the children, whose ages range from eight to thir- 
teen, have had no training in art. They create their own 
designs and conceive their own color schemes. The 
results are examined by the teachers, and the good 
points are praised; the bad points the children have to 
work over and find out the best way to correct them 



Expressionism 

by the 
Modern Child 




The idea is that everything in art comes from 
within, and that if the restriction of a technique 
is imposed upon an artist, he may try to hold 
himself to the limitations of that method and 
therefore lose some of his inspirational values; 
whereas, if he worked out his own system, he 
tvould give a clear portrayal of his artistic con- 
cept of a subject. The children recently gave 
an exhibition of their work at the Civic Club 
gallery. The youngest exhibitor was five, and 
the oldest fifteen; these pictures were chosen 
from that exhibit. As a whole, it was a re- 
markable showing, and lined up very well be- 
side many of the "impressionistic" exhibitions 
that have invaded New York this season. Many 
of the older artists seem to be trying to lose 
their training and return to the primitive — in 
most cases they have not succeeded. Whereas 
the children, having nothing to forget, approach 
their subject in a direct and simple way, 
thereby producing a true primitive concept 



Page Forty 




The 

Modern Child 

in Sculpture 



CYRILS McCORMACK 
By Mario Korbel 

Mario Korbel is of Cze- 
choslovak descent.- He 
studied at the Chicago Art 
Institute under Lorado 
Taft. He has made some 
of the finest portrait 
busts in America; sev- 
eral examples of his work 
are at the Metropolitan 
Museum of Fine Arts 
Mr. Purdy, of the Schoo 
of American Sculpture, 
says, "too much cannot 
be said of his brilliance 
as an artist or the bright- 
ness of his future." The 
two busts on this page 
are the children of John 
McCormack 






BOBBY (Left) 

By Frederick C. 

Guinzberg 

The young Ameri- 
can sculptor, who 
made this, went to 
the Art Students 
League, giving up 
his work to go to 
war; he later re- 
turned to it and 
has exhibited in 
Paris 



HEAD. OF AN 

AMERICAN BOY 

By Polygnatis Vagis 

This young Greek sculp- 
tor studied at the Beaux 
Arts Institute of Design. 
For a time he was assist- 
ant to Gutzon Borglum. 
Two years ago he exhibit- 
ed at the National Acad- 
emy, and this year his 
work has been shown at 
the Art Center 

CHILDREN OF MR. 

AND MRS. E. SPENCER 

MACKY 

By F. Petrie Collin 

Dr. Collin is a practising 

physician as well as a 

sculptress 



GWEN 

McCORMACK 

(Right) 

By Mario Korbel 




Page Forty-One 



Madame Louise 
Homer Stires has a 
rich musical inherit- 
ance, and her delight- 
fully clear soprano 
voice has lyrical qual- 
ities that make it one 
of great promise. Her 
success in recitals with 
her mother, for many 
years leading contralto 



The world of the the- 
ater contributes many 
instances of talent in 
the second generation. 
Among them, Marjorie 
Kummer, ivhose first 
notable success as an 
actress was achieved 
in her mother's bril- 
liantly witty play, 
"Rollo's Wild Oats." 
As a writer of clever 
dialog for the theater, 
Clare Kummer has 
few rivals, as those 
who recall "A Suc- 
cessful Calamity," 
"Good Gracious Anna- 
bel," and "The Moun- 
tain Man" will testify 



with the Metropolitan, 
but now identified with 
the Chicago Opera 
Company, is also due 
in no small measure 
to the charming com- 
positions of her father 
that are almost invari- 
ably a part of each 




The poems of Grace 
Hazard Conkling and 
those of her small 
daughter, Hilda, are 
strongly individual- 
istic in spite of the 
bond of kinship. 
W here Mrs. Conkling's 
verse is dominated by 

quaint whimsical 
quality, Hilda's is 
often characterized by 
emotional impulse 
written with an unerr- 
ing instinct for ex- 
pression. Mrs. Conk- 
ling's "Afternoons of 
April" has recently 
been reissued, while 
Hilda's second vol- 
ume, "Shoes of the 
Wind," has just come 

from the press 



Page Forty-Two 



The World's 
Greatest 

Failures 

Many of whom would like, with old 
Omar, "to grasp this sorry scheme of 
things entire . . . and then remold 
it nearer to the heart's desire . . '\ 

By Maurice S. Sullivan 

Sketches by Eldon Kelly 



SARAH BERNHARDT, the great French novel- 
ist, Mary Garden, the detective, and Charles 
Chaplin, the eminent tragedian, were chatting. 

"What," asked Chaplin of the novelist, "do you 
think of the art of Joseph Jefferson?" 

The Bernhardt was positive in her opinion. 

"He made a serious mistake in painting pastorals. 
He should have done portraits." 

"What nonsense is this," you ask, "Bernhardt a 
novelist, Garden a detective, Chaplin a tragedian, 
and Jefferson a painter?" 

This may seem nonsense to you, but it would not to 
the persons mentioned. If their ambitions were realized, 
Bernhardt, Garden, and Chaplin might meet as novelist, 
detective and tragedian ; and had the goal of Joseph 
Jefferson been attained they might discuss his canvases. 





Mary Garden would like to wear a shiny badge and catch burglars in their act 



Charles Chaplin longs to wear the garb of Hamlet and, papier- 
ruache skull in hand, intone Shakespeare's famous soliloquy 

These four are but modern instances of persons who 
are leaders in their own art, craft or profession, ardently 
desiring to excel in another field often far removed from 
their own. History records the names of many such, 
from ancient emperors down to the mimes of the movies. 

Sarah Bernhardt, who shares 
, with Duse preeminence on the 
^emotional stage, greatest in 
popular estimation, wishes to 
conquer in the world of letters. 
She has written her first novel, 
The Idol of Paris. It is not an 
autobiography, as the title might 
lead one to suppose. 

Mary Garden, among the 
leaders in grand opera, would 
like nothing better than to have 
a shiny badge pinned on her 
bosom, certifying to the world 
that she is a duly qualified and 
authorized special investigator. 
In Los Angeles recently she 
confessed, thereby startling her 
most intimate friends. 

"Women," says Miss Garden, 
"are naturally curious, and 
therefore might have great suc- 
cess in detective work." 

It should be a pleasure to be 
investigated by Miss Garden. 
One would almost get into 
trouble purposely for the sake 
of boasting that he was being 
trailed by such a famous person ! 



Page Forty-Three 



SkJADOWLAND 



Chaplin's friends know he harbors a plot to snatch the 
wreath from the brow of Walter Hampden. He is serious 
in his belief that he can play Hamlet superlatively. Great 
critics of dramatic art are beginning to acknowledge that 
Chaplin is without a peer in his own field ; that he is not 
a mere buffoon, but a consummate artist. Yet despite 
what would seem discouraging handicaps, he cherishes 
a hope that some day he will pace the stage and, amid an 
awesome hush ask himself whether " 'tis noblejf* in the 
mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous for- 
tune or to take arms against a sea of troubles and, by 
opposing, end them." 

In other days he played a page in a Shakespearian play. 
It may be he did not do so well, and now desires to show 
those persons who once sniffed at the hoi polloi stricken 
with mirth at the very sight of his feet. At home he is 
the litterateur and student of the drama. 

From early times men, whom exceptional ability or 
chance has placed in high places, have looked wistfully 
upon the fame possessed by others. 

Francis Bacon writes of Adrian, "the emperor that 
mortally envied poets and painters and artificers in works 
wherein he had a view to excel." 

Kings and emperors, looked up to, with envy, by their 
subjects, often have burned with envy of those same 
subjects. The Roman Emperor Nero made himself ridicu- 
lous in trying to achieve success as a poet. His courtiers 
and other hangers-on flattered him outrageously until he 
began to believe Homer himself had a purple-clothed 
rival. History records little of Nero's literary efforts 
except that they were decidedly mediocre. 

Caligula also thought to bring added laurels to the 
imperial brow. The qualities of his physique rather 
than of his mind impressed Caligula. With such noble 
muscles swelling under his toga, he could not endure 
seeing victorious gladiators, adored by patrician ladies. 
So Caligula descended to the arena and himself gave 
battle for the favors of feminine lovers of sport. It was 
as if President Harding should don a pair of "trunks" 
decorated with the stars and stripes and enter the ring 
with Jack Dempsey. When one considers that emperors, 
even of late years, were somewhat particular about their 
associates, in public, at least, the enormity of Caligula's 
debasement is appreciated. Far from gaining honor in 
the arena , 

Caligula ac- 

quired only 
contempt. 

Frederick 
the Great of 
Prussia was 
another ruler 
who yearned 
to become no- 
table in the 
history of lit- 
erature. He 
gathered 
about him 
men of fame 
in letters, in- 
cluding Vol- 
taire, to learn 
the mechanics 
of successful 
writing. 
While osten- 
sibly patron- 
izing literary 
men, he was 
trying to de- 
velop his own 
suppositious 




Sarah Bernhardt's secret ambition is to be known as a successful novelist 



abilities, and men eager to read him their latest pro- 
ductions found Frederick eager to read his own first. 
One may easily understand the envy of a king for a 
master of literature, for many a king's fame is and was 
inferior to the fame of a subject. But a king of France 
nourished an ambition not so likely to result in the plaudits 
of posterity. Louis XVI fancied himself as a locksmith! 
Perhaps there were a few objectionable gentlemen to be 
hanged, and one craved an audience with His Majesty, 
as he had rather good reasons for believing himself inno- 
cent. His Majesty was busy repairing the work on the 
pantry door, and could not be disturbed. Perhaps the 
ambassador from Albion awaited without. His Majesty 
presented his compliments, and requested his noble visitor 
to step around to the toolhouse. 

Another example among royalty was the Prince of 
Monaco. Almost everyone knew that Monte Carlo, the 
celebrated gambling resort, was conducted by the prince. 
Few were aware that he bore on his breast an American 
decoration for his achievements in science. He contributed 
much to our knowledge of the ocean bottom; its topog- 
raphy, creatures, and flora. He invented a diving-bell 
capable of withstanding tremendous pressure. A useful 
potentate, the Prince of Monaco. He took money from 
persons who didn't know how to care for it and devoted 
it to increasing mankind's store of knowledge. 

There have been American kings whose royal bliss 
was alloyed with envy. The case of Frank Gotch, the 
ruler of wrestlers, was sad. Gotch was the champion 
wrestler of the world, and there are many who would 
rather be that than King of England. But Gotch was not 
happy. Why, reasoned he, did he not have two crowns, 
when it was apparent that he had the toughest muscles 
in all Christendom? He was jealous of another king, 
the champion boxer of the world. Gotch decided to win 
that title too. Just to get practice he entered the prize 
ring with a second-rate fighter. It seemed but a stepping- 
stone to his new kingdom ; but alas ! he was ingloriously 
knocked out. 

What impels men to look with longing eyes upon the 
laurels of others when their own heads bear proud cor- 
onets? Vanity, envy, and ambition seem to be the dom- 
inant motives. It is certain that Nero was actuated by 
vanity, Hadrian by envy. Chaplin doubtless is honestly 

ambitious. 

How this 
ambition, 
when unat- 
tained, eats at 
the heart of 
the ambitious 
one, is vivid- 
ly illustrated 
in The Jonr- 
n a I of a 
Disappointed 
Man, a book 
written by W. 
N. P. Bar- 
bellion, and 
prefaced bv 
H. G. Wells'. 
Barbellion, a 
competent 
English nat- 
uralist, re- 
cords his 
longing to be- 
co m e a fa- 
mous writer, 
and his fail- 
(Cont'd on 
page 77) 



Page Forty-Four 




Photo © by James Wallace Pondelicek 



THE SWORD 

Mile. Theo Hewes, assisted by M. Syman- 
ski, in a picturesque Oriental dance 
developed from an old Japanese legend 



Page Forty-Five 



Art Comment 



CUBISM, according to Louis Bouche, is doomed. 
France, the land of its birth, is repudiating it and 
returning to first principles and realism. Whether 
the younger modernists became tired of its difficult angles 
or whether the appearance in this year's Salon of Geome- 
trism, fathered by the Spanish painter Picabia, who also 
was responsible for Dadaism, pointed a formless or per- 
haps mathematical finger in the direction toward which 
they were going, proved too much for their artistic eyes 
will never be known. However, the fact remains that real- 
ism is once more in evidence. To prove that his statement 
is correct, Mr. Bouche will hold an exhibition of the young 
French modernists, in March, in the Belmaison Gallery, 
which he has promised will be representative and com- 
prehensive. 



Mile. Cecile Sorel has evidently 
for she has sold 
all her furniture, 
her art treasures 
and everything 
she had collected 
for her eigh- 
teenth century 
house. "One 
needs," she said, 
"to change one's 
skin every so of- 
ten." Her new 
skin is to be a 
Rena i s sance 
country house 
and a modern 
house in town. 
Emulating the 
example of Ma- 
dame Pompa- 
dour, she is 
gathering her ar- 
tist friends to 
help plan her 
scheme of dec- 
orations. In fact, 
Mile. Sorel has 
had quite an ar- 
tistic year, for 
Eugene Carrol- 
Kelley, the Chicago artist, made 
a series of pastel studies of 
this Comedie Franchise comedi- 
enne. Most of the drawings 
were made either in the loge 
or in her dressing-room. Per- 
haps the influence of her recent 
noticed when her new houses are 



felt the artistic unrest, 




"THE OAKS" 
By Sophie Marston Brennan 
Here is art weighted with the purpose of nature, not 
landscape that has been dreamed, but a creative han- 
dling of sunlight and shadow, a physical quality in 
a forest branch and a pictorial quality in atmosphere 



American trip will be 
complete. 



Walter Biggs has decided that his teaching at the 
Washington Square School, which recently broke away 
from the Artists' League, and his illustrating work isn't 
enough to keep him busy, so he has started an evening 
class at his studio, one night a week. Only a chosen 
few are asked to attend. 



Temperament seems to be affecting the artists this 
season ; Haley Lever and George Luks went to Pittsburgh 
on a committee. Just what it was about the Pittsburgh 



scenery that attracted Mr. Lever is a difficult thing to say. 
However, it did, and he left Mr. Luks to make the return 
trip alone while he stayed on several weeks painting 
furiously. The results are awaited with interest both by 
Mr. Luks's and Mr. Lever's large and appreciative public. 



The staying habit also hit John Sloan, who, sometime 
last summer went to Taos, New Mexico, planning to stay 
two weeks. But that fascinating place proved his undoing. 
He stayed four months. Meanwhile his classes at the 
Artists' League had to commence without him. Homer 
Boss came to the rescue, and work at the League went 
merrily on in spite of Mr. Sloan's absence. 



Now that Mr. Sloan has returned and taken over his 

classes it is quite 
probable that 
Homer Boss 
will give a se- 
ries of twelve 
lectures at the 
League on anat- 
omy. Mr. Boss 
studied under 
Clifford Beale, 
who was a pupil 
of Anschutz, the 
originator of 
this particular 
style of teaching 
anatomy. Mr. 
Boss starts with 
a skeleton and 
builds up the 
muscular system 
with clay. By 
the time the 
course is com- 
pleted the pupils 
have positive 
knowledge of 
the structure of 
the human body, 
the shape and 
size of the mus- 
cles and exactly what their 
functions are. This is a new 
method of teaching anatomy 
here, but has been a hobby of 
Mr. Boss for several years ; in 
fact, he gave up his portrait 
painting for a time to master it thoroly. Mr. Boss was one 
of the charter members of the Independent Society of 
Artists. 

%z ^ ^c 

There is a rumor that Wladyslaw T. Benda, whose 
exotic-looking women with inscrutable eyes add so much 
charm to the illustrative world, is to have an exhibit. 
The only thing that has been keeping Mr. Benda from 
having one is that he thinks it is too much work. He 
absolutely refuses to make the arrangements for it, but 
now some good Samaritan has come forward and offered 
to take the details off his shoulders if he will supply the 
material. If it takes place, it will not only include 
Mr. Benda's illustrations, but his posters, murals and 
(Continued on page 71) 



Page Forty-Six 



Sculpture in Porcelain 

Five Examples of that Beautiful and Difficult Ceramic Work Called Pate-sur-pate 








Lois Whitcomb Rhead is the young 
sculptor who created these charming 
figures in ceramic sculpture. Mrs. 
Rhead is a member of the National 
Association of Women Painters and 
Sculptors, at whose exhibit her things 
were shown. Altho Pate-sur-pate is 
one of the most difficult mediums to 
work in, consisting of a cutting proc- 
ess, similar to a cameo, thru layers 
of white porcelain which have been 
superimposed on a blue base, Mrs. 
Rhead has chosen to specialize in it, 
and the results she obtains of white 
bas-relief against blue are exquisite. 
She has studied under Conrad Dress- 
ier, Leon V. Solon and Frederick H. 
Rhead, who was a pupil of Taxile 
Doat. Taxile Doat, the famous French 
maker of ceramics, adopted the Pate- 
sur-pate process after it had been de- 
veloped in the Royal Manufactory of 
Sevres. Mrs. Rhead has also ex- 
hibited at the Architectural League, 
The Art Institute of Chicago, and the 
San Francisco Museum of Fine Arts 



Page Forty-Seven 




The ballet ensemble against the Cubistic background of colorful patchwork and three-dimensional vistas 

The Buffoon Ballet of Larionow 

A Russian Fable Transformed by Color and Movement into a Glorified Absurdity 

By Barrett H. Clark 



IN the early days, long before America had heard of 
Cezanne or had a Greenwich Village of its own, a 
picturesque group of young revolutionary artists, led 
by Michael Larionow, founded a society in Moscow 
whose professed purpose it was to accept all that was 
new and reject the traditions of the past. Their mani- 
festos and expositions — not to mention their antics in 
public — scandalized the old, but roused the enthusiasm 
of the young. New schools succeeded one another so 
fast that even Larionow could not remember all the isms 
which he inaugurated or those in which he participated. 

After fifteen years of experimentation, it chanced that 
he was given a definite piece of work to do, a work that 
demanded specific effects, designed for actual use in a 
theater. This was the Soleil de Minuit, produced by the 
Diaghilev Russian Ballet in 1915. It was a triumph for 
Larionow and marked a turning-point in the Russian bal- 
let — the theorist forgot his theories and gave free rein to 
his instinctive passion for color, for strong and even vio- 
lent contrasts, and to his love of movement and rhythm. 

Larionow's next ballet was Conies Russes, produced 
in 1917. It too created a sensation, tho the critics were 
antagonized because he "mixed symbolism with realism" 
and "defied all the canons of art in his juxtaposition of 
colors." 



Following Contes Russes, came the most strikingly 
original ballet of all — Chout, or The Buffoon. It is a 
Russian Legend in Five Tableaux, and the story goes: 

Once upon a time there was a Buffoon and his wife. 
The Buffoon racks his brains for some trick to play on 
the other buffoons. All of a sudden an inspiration oc- 
curs to him : 

"Listen," he says to his wife; "I am expecting seven 
buffoons. I will order you to prepare dinner, you will 
refuse and I will pretend to kill you. Then I will strike 
you with this whip and you will revive. In that way we 
can sell the whip for a high price." 

No sooner said than done. The seven buffoons ar- 
rive, witness the miracle, buy the whip, and return home. 

The buffoons then kill their wives and try the whip, 
but the wives make no move. 

The seven buffoons then decide to kill the Buffoon, 
but the latter, fearful of their wrath, disguises himself as 
his own cook. The buffoons are furious at the disap- 
pearance of the culprit, but as they are pleased with the 
cook, they carry her off, determined to keep her until 
they find her master. 

Now the seven buffoons have seven daughters. A 
wealthy merchant arrives to choose him a wife. But the 
rich man chooses the cook, and carries her off. That 



Page Forty-Eight 



Sliadowland 



night the poor Buffoon is 
at his wits' end. He finally 
begs the merchant to allow 
him to disappear out of the 
window for a moment. 
The merchant ties a sheet 
round him and lets him 
down to the ground. But 
when the sheet is pulled 
up, lo and behold, there is 
only a goat on the end of it ! 

Suddenly the Buffoon 
marches in, followed by 
seven soldiers, demanding 
his cook. The buffoons 
offer to give him the goat, 
whereupon the Buffoon 
orders their instant arrest. 
The merchant must pay a 
fine of a hundred rubles. 
The Buffoon and his wife 
return home in high glee. 

In the production of this 
ballet the curtain, a riotous 
symphony of gorgeous non- 
sense, rises on a delightful 
Cubist setting: reds and 
yellows and blues seem to 
be thrown about at ran- 
dom, three-dimensional 
vistas crudely painted on 
flapping canvas running off 

in every direction. In the midst of this patchwork we 
see the Buffoon and his wife, themselves bright patches 
in the midst of other bright patches. They begin to 
dance: it is Cubistic dancing, thoroly nonsensical and 
delightful. 

The Prokofieff music is as odd and apparently mean- 
ingless as the costumes and settings and dances. 

"This is absurd," you say to yourself, and laugh. 




But this is precisely what 
Larionow intended you 
should do. You laugh be- 
cause the drawing of the 
scenery is off center, be- 
cause the Buffoon is awk- 
ward, because the music is 
"crazy," but you laugh. 
The room is not a rcom at 
all, and the stove is the 
sort of thing a child of six 
might execute. The great 
gold coins which the buf- 
foons give to the Buffoon 
for the whip are like large 
wedding-cakes. 

You are not for a mo- 
ment deceived ; it is all so 
deliciously childlike, so 
transparent, that you for- 
get to analyze and to 
judge. Larionow realizes 
that a stage is not a picture 
but a stage, and he will tell 
you that the essential spirit 
of a ballet or a play is to 
be got out of the ballet or 
play, and not out of any 
picture that may be set on 
the stage; for him the set- 
ting and costumes are sim- 
ple means to an end; they 
must serve at most to accentuate what is happening on 
that stage. You must therefore judge a setting by its 
spirit, which is and must be produced by means totally 
different from what goes to the making of a picture in 
a gallery. 

The spirit of Chout is not "picturesque," it is not static, 
or intellectual : the little fable is high nonsense ; absurdity 
{Continued on page 73) 




Above, two of the 
seven buffoons look- 
ing on in amazement 
at the Chief Bufoon 
who, having killed his 
wife, brings her to life 
at a stroke of a magic 
whip 



Here are the chief 
Buffoon and his wife, 
who are so pleased 
with the success of the 
shrewd trick they have 
played upon their 
friends (winning 
thereby one hundred 
rubles) that they pro- 
ceed to perform a 
thoroly nonsensical 
and delightful Cubistic 
dance 




Page Forty-Nine 



1 




Posed by Wanda Grazer for Howard C. Cloyes 



THE WIND 



Who has seen the wind? 

Neither I nor you: 
But when the leaves hang trembling, 

The wind is passing thru. 



Who has seen the wind? 

Neither you nor I: 
But when the trees bow down their heads, 

The wind is passing by. 

■ — Christina Georgina Rossetti. 



Page Fifty 



Portrait of a Woman of Forty 

"I am happier at forty than I was at twenty. For I now hold what 
I then only hoped for — and now I do what I then only dreamed" 

By Helen Woljeska 



WE usually are classified as young women and 
old women. This is just as tho one should 
classify roses as budding ones and fading ones 
— leaving out those that glow in full bloom. 

Shakespeare was mistaken. There are three ages 
only : youth, the ascent — maturity, the mountain-top — 
age, the descent. Some of us never reach the summit, 
but, after a little climb up, begin to creep down again. 

There are many more blossoms than fruits — among 
humans, too. 

A beautiful maturity is not the preservation of a 
beautiful youth, but the growing into a new beauty. 

I laugh at the silly legend invented for and by brain- 
less women that after a brief and pretty spring we have 
to fade with good grace — or make ourselves ridiculous. 
The pretty spring is nothing compared to the glowing 
summer, the superb autumn — and even my winter shall 
be beautiful. Not in a futile attempt to imitate the gaiety 
and romance and innocence of youth, or the pride and 
passion and compassion of maturity — but in the majesty 
of sumptuous age, a body of ivory and silver, a spirit of 
wisdom, forgiveness, irony and peace. 

Perhaps the fading of one's body is to prepare one 
gradually for an existence altogether without it? Oh, 
you long, cream-colored body of mine, you coppery hair 
and yellow eyes — I shall be sorry to part with you. 

Everybody consists of earth and flame, and during 
his lifetime can convert the one into the other. Some of 
us finish by being clods of clay. 

The difference between a primitive and a developed 
personality is the difference between a block of marble 
and a marble statue. 

The god besides whom no other god should be toler- 
ated is the deepest I. 

How I stand with myself is the important thing, not 
how I stand with others. - 

To me, there is only one sin — violation of one's own 
laws. Every time one sins against them, whether from 
base or noble motives, one weakens one's essential indi- 
viduality. And finally it will disappear completely, leav- 
ing nothing but an empty shell, a nonentity, of zero. 

Our own deepest consciousness is the only little part 
of God we'll ever be able to grasp. 

We all 
want a cen- 
ter around 
which to re- 
volve. I've 
found mine 
in my own 
self. 

My body 
is part of all 
other matter, 
my soul is 
part of all 
other spirit, 
and whether 
I live or die, 
I remain in 
that union. 

As long as 




I am in this life I must be interested in my body as well 
as in my soul. If I have a charming soul, but fail to keep 
my nails manicured, I am not a charming personality. 

I have made for myself a little ante-Copernican uni- 
verse. In its center, immobile but variable, stands that 
little part of God which I have been able to recognize — 
my Ego. All the happenings of life, "good" or "bad," 
"physical" or "spiritual," serve the same purpose of 
revealing to me more of God ; of learning to revolve 
about him, in my acts, in more beautifully balanced 
circles. 

By pretending that we "wish to make the world a bet- 
ter place to live in" or "help our weaker brethren," we 
flatter ourselves and blur the issues. Our task is with 
ourselves only. That way only can we eventually help 
others. For a clear, deep, strong personality will always 
be inspiration and support to those he meets. 

Freedom is always within reach of him who dares to 
grasp it. 

Philosophers and idealists, from Socrates to Malvida, 
have simplified the problem of life, which is both phys- 
ical and spiritual, by simply dismissing the physical side 
with all its claims. That, to me, is not a solution. It is 
a shirking. 

Love gives the supreme possibility of creating beauty 
and grace and secret, enchanting things — even when we 
ourselves do not feel it. 

Some people judge love as one judges a piece of cloth, 
according to how long it lasts. But love is a fragile 
work of art, a rapturous song, a delirious perfume — to 
be judged by its intensity and fire and magic, not by 
its durability. 

If love is nothing else, it can at least be an exquisite 
experiment. 

We must find a new, broader, freer way to love. The 
old one — which made love an end in itself — is strewn 
with the victims who starved and perished on it. Per- 
haps to us it will become the most wonderful way for 
plumbing our own depths . . . ? 

Some lovers treat us as tho we were a new cravat, to 
be enjoyed and displayed in fair weather only. But we 
want to be our lover's monk-cowl, in closest contact with 
him, enveloping and shielding him completely. 

If you play 
with a pan- 
t h e r , you 
must not ex- 
pect him to 
display the 
virtues of 
the ox. 

Those who 
build the 
happiness of 
their lives on 
love, build on 
q ui cksand. 
Love — but do 
not overesti- 
m a t e its 
(Cont'd on 
page 69) 



Page Fifty-One 



/ 





WAITING FOR 
A BREEZE 
By Charles J. 
McManus 
First Prize 
Transparency 
and lines that 
lead the eye 
easily from ob- 
ject to object 
are the two out- 
standing fea- 
tures of this 
delicate picture 



The Camera Contest 

Editor's Note : Mr. Mason, who has written this month's article, 
is Chairman of the Judging Committee for The Camera Contest. 
He gives an excellent idea of the proper way to plan a photograph 



Page Fifty-Tzvo 



THE SHEPHERD AND HIS FLOCK 

By W. H. Zerbe 

Second Prize 

Pastoral with a pleasing composition 



THE STONE-CRUSHER 

By K. B. Lambert 

Third Prize 

The building up of the composition and an 

air of activity make this picture interesting 





MADISON 
SQUARE 
By Irving Levy 
Honorable Mention 
A rather unusual 
view of Madison 
Square, broken in 
a most interesting 
way by the branch 
in the foreground 



What Lens Did You Use? 

B;y Joseph R. Mason 

WHEREVER a group of camera studies or photo- 
graphs are exhibited, persons invariably ask, "What 
lens did you use?" Not because they are inter- 
ested in the texture or quality, the sharpness or the softness 
of the print, but merely because the picture, the subject and 
its arrangement, has attracted them. The query, then, is 

synonymous to 
saying: The in- 
telligence that 
"saw" the pic- 
ture was, origi- 
nally, concealed 
somewhere in 
the glass that 
composed the 
lens. 

R ea s o n ing 
further along 
these lines, one 
would reach the 
conclusion that 
the more costly 
the lens the bet- 
ter should be the 
picture. Let us 
see if this be 
true. First, we 
are agreed that 
the camera is a 
light-tight box 
and that light 
must be con- 



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Page Fifty-Three 



SllADOWLAND 




lary, and. when He sees a picture he studies the arrange- 
ment — and the lighting. 

I should like to see a real picture in which the basis 
is not composition, first of all. To do this, it is necessary 
to have a subject or principal object, and the remainder 
of the picture subordinated to it. 

It is my opinion that photography is the only business 
in the world in which the amateur excels over the pro- 
fessional. If there is another, I should like to know of 
it. The amateur is constantly striving to do things 
differently, and he arouses a desire in the prospective 
purchaser for a different treatment. The professional, 
with a heavy overhead expense, will only experiment 
when he is assured of a sale. He cannot afford to waste 
time and material otherwise. 

There are laws that apply to photography as well as 
painting. The painter can use color — it is impossible for 
the photographer to do so. He is restricted to black and 
white and the tones thereof. When you look at a beau- 
tiful scene, ask yourself: "Am I looking at the arrange- 
ment or am I being tricked with the coloring?" 

During the month of November there was an exhibit 
of Mrs. Kasebier's prints on the Pictorialists' walls at the 
Art Center. This exhibit was the subject of much praise, 
yet she told us that some of these prints had been taken 
with an outfit that had cost exactly four dollars. One young 
man said that he wished to ask her, "What lens did you 
use?" but at my suggestion refrained from doing so. 
Mrs. Kasebier's usual reply to that query is: "Some of 
us take pictures with lenses that are not for sale in the 
open market." Meaning a mental vision. The model 
(Continued on page 68) 



STILL LIFE: SUNLIGHT 

By Dr. F. Detlefson 

Honorable Mention 

Lights and shades, black against white, make this 

a striking example of still life photography 



IN THE SHADOW OF THE CATHEDRAL 
By C. Kuentzel 
Honorable Mention 
A good arrangement of angles with an element of in- 
terest added to the street by the shadow of the leaves 



trolled and can, therefore, be admitted only at a given 
point. Today it is possible to buy this light-proof box 
for as little as two dollars. 

Our next consideration is this piece, or pieces, of glass 
commonly known as the lens. This can be bought for 
a dollar and a half or hundreds of dollars. Now we are 
ready to "shoot" the masterpiece. Armed thus, the 
aspiring amateur sallies forth. After he has taken all 
the film that he had, he sends it to the corner drugstore, 
and there it is given to some fellow who does thousands 
of these rolls in a day. Back they come and the aspiring 
amateur sees his proofs. But something has happened. 
The picture doesn't look the same. 

Maybe about this time he sees a scene similar to the 
one he had taken — with this exception : this fellow has a 
picture. Right there is again breathed that sigh, "What 
lens did you use? I took a scene and you took the 
same, or a similar scene ; you got a picture and I didn't. 
You had an intelligent lens and I didn't. Maybe if I got 
that make of lens I could make good pictures." And 
straightway he goes to buy another lens. But somehow 
he doesn't get the masterpiece. 

Gradually it dawns on him that there is a something 
lacking in his prints and that thing is — composition. 
When he has reached that point, the words in the query 
about the lens have practically passed from his vocabu- 




Page Fifty-Four 




-J 

Photo by Maurice Goldberg 



As vivid, exotic and colorful as the new 
"Music Box Revue" itself is the Oriental dance 
number of Ruth Page and Hubert Stowitts 






Page Fifty-Five 







®y v ^ «s? ^ ^ ^ 




The Misfit Audience 



The traveling salesmen, whose business 
territory is the Middle West, have heard 
that a certain Russian revue is the pep- 
piest show in New York. Behold them 
endeavoring to register joy when, instead 
of saucy chorus girls in tantalizing cos- 
tumes, they find demure maidens in the 
voluminous skirts of the Russian peasant; 
instead of American jazz, they hear haunt- 
ing folk tunes; even the jokes — if there 
are any — cannot be appreciated, for no 
word of English is spoken on the stage 





tm 



From the outskirts of New Jersey come Uncle John and Aunt Bessie with 
their niece and nephews from back home in Indiana, to treat them to a show 
in the Big City — first-row-balcony seats. But as the curtain falls on the first 
act, they are all feeling more like making a retreat of it than a treat. What 
is this Eugene O'Neill driving at, anyway? And what was the High School 
Principal thinking of when he told them this was the best play in town? 




The head of the English Department of the University, 
with his wife, introduces the four new instructors in the 
department to the Rialto from an upper box at a popular 
musical revue. To these young men, who have worked 
their way thru college, chorus girls, and ultra-modern 
music and dancing and humor, have been non-existent. 
The comedies of Aristophanes and the "Divina Corn- 
media" of Dante they understand and relish, but come- 
dies musical leave them bewildered and embarrassed 



The flapper daughters of the 
rich have tracked down a 
Little Theater in Greenwich 
Village, having been told 
that there is a very naughty 
Freudian one-act play on the 
program. But its allusions 
go quite over their heads. 
They try to disguise their 
ignorance by assuming keen 
interest or an air of great 
sophistication 



Below, observe a quartet of 
T. B. M.'s trying to enjoy a pop- 
ular domestic farce in which the 
wife is domineering and ex- 
travagant, the children are pert 
and petulant, and the hus- 
band is harassed and unhappy. 
The story lacks novelty — it is 
much too true to life to interest 
them. They leave before the 
final act, thereby missing the 
happy ending and the oppor- 
tunity to inject a little hope for 
the future into their own lives 




(Lxn: 



Page Fifty-Six 



Wanderings 

The Man About Town 



THE playwriter who sat and sniggered at the initial 
performance of the 49ers at the tiny Punch and 
Judy Theater must have had fellowship with Job, 
who exclaimed, "My desire is . . . that mine adversary 
had written a book." That happy band of brothers 
who so nobly assist one another in the toilsome task 
of trunk trundling gave what the posters described 
as "a new form of entertainment." As a fact, most 
of it was vieux jcu; at any rate, what was new wasn't 
good and what was good wasn't new. Alexander 
Woollcot, who has transferred his shrewd and com- 
petent comments on the theater to the Herald, wisely 
kept his name out of the program, and was thus able 
to speak of the show with his customary frankness and 
freedom. 



A few of the turns were downright silly, and even 
the work of Heywood Broun, one of the prominent con- 
tributors, was far from entertaining. This may have been 
due to the fact that that excessively proud parent was 
depressed at the charge recently leveled at him of having 
written the worst 
novel of the season. 
Certainly his sketch 
was of the sketchiest 
description. He, him- 
self, has related in the 
World how he went to 
see it twice, and that 
on the second occa- 
sion he suffered a 
little more acutely 
than he did at the 
initial performance. 
Critics and commen- 
tators do well not to 
try to show how much 
better they can write 
operas, plays and 
sketches than the rest, 
for usually they fall 
down in the attempt, 
and lose whatever 
reputation for su- 
perior ability they 
may have gained 
from cutting up the 
works of others. 



Hugh Walpole, the 
brilliant English 
novelist, altho he ad- 
mitted having suf- 
fered severely from 
the violent attack of 
hospitality made upon 
him on the occasion 
of his first visit to 
America, has ventured 
upon a second, this 
time by request, to 
deliver a series of 
lectures upon the 




HUCH WALPOLE 



The well-known British novelist, essayist and lecturer 
who is now making a tour of the United States 



modern* novel. Few are better qualified to deal with the 
subject, and he is not likely to be guilty of the stupidities 
and indiscretions of some of his British predecessors on 
the lecture platform. 



Singularly enough, tho for years past we have been 
constantly treading on each others heels, Mr. Walpole 
and I have never met. He was living at Epsom, near 
the famous Downs on which the classic Derby is annually 
run, when I was staying in the same neighborhood, and 
a literary friend whom we have in common wished to 
arrange a meeting between us which never came off. 
When I was in Lemberg, Galicia, in the early stages of 
the great war, and later, when I entered the famous for- 
tress of Przemysl after it fell into the hands of the 
Russians, I heard he was there with the Russian Red 
Cross, but again we managed to escape each other. 



Then at Petrograd, a few months later, I needed some 
official reports typed in a hurry, and the head of the 

office where I took the 
work told me she was 
busy typing Mr. Wal- 
pole's new novel from 
the MS. he had just 
delivered. This was 
that fine book "The 
Dark Forest," much 
of which he had 
written while at the 
Russian front. But 
once more we missed 
each other. He is a 
clever writer and 
shrewd commentator, 
and I was glad to 
notice that in his first 
lecture here he dep- 
recated the literary 
affectation and high- 
brow pose, of which 
we get so much in 
certain quarters. 



Broadway is now 
at its busiest, bright- 
est and best. The dif- 
ficulty for The Man 
About Town is to 
decide where to go 
and what to see or 
hear first. One is al- 
most as perplexed as 
was the chameleon 
when some practical 
joker deposited it 
upon a crazy quilt, 
and the poor creature 
did not know what 
color to assume. I 
try not to miss the 
{Cont'd on page 70) 



Photo by Mary Dale Clarke 



Page Fifty-Seven 




Famous 
Stradivari 



Being the history and development of 
a distinguished art and something of 
the migrations of celebrated instru- 
ments to the shores ot the new world 



By 



J. C. Freeman 



The "Lipinski" violin. Made by Stradivari in 1713. 
the famous maker's so-called "Golden Period 7 ' 



THE world's master maker of violins was Antonio 
Stradivari, of Cremona, who lived for ninety-three 
years, from 1644 to 1737, and during that period 
turned out instruments which have never been surpassed 
and rarely equalled. Many of these are making sweet 
music at the present time or are in famous collections. 

The period 1600-1785 in Italy witnessed the development 
of the art of violin making to the highest point it has ever 
attained anywhere. Italy became the storehouse of exqui- 
site treasures of the luthier's art, and in addition to Cremona, 
the cities of Brescia, Venice, Milan, Rome, Genoa, Naples 
and Florence became famous for the violins made within 
their gates. But Cremona, thru the consummate art of 
Stradivari, Guarnerius, the Amati, Bergonzi, and others, 
earned a world-wide reputation. To this day mention of 
"Cremona" means to violin players and lovers of the in- 
strument in all lands a violin or violoncello of surpassing 
beauty of workmanship and tone. 

By 1785 activity in violin making in Italy had almost 
ceased. The great wars which deluged Europe in blood 
caused a well-nigh complete extinction of the gentler arts, 
including that of Stradivari, his contemporaries and suc- 
cessors. However, violin players had learned the superi- 
ority of seasoned and perfectly fashioned instruments of a 
previous period and so refused in large measure to patronize 
the violin makers of their day. 

The migration of violins from Italy to prosperous Euro- 
pean countries then began ; France, Belgium and Holland 
especially absorbing the best of Cremona's treasures. As 
economic conditions improved in Germany and Russia, 
those countries also took large numbers, and by the middle 



J. C. Freeman^ eminent" connoisseur, with a twenty- 
thousand dollar Strad from the Wurlitzer collection 

Photo by Rabinovitch 




Page Fifty-Eight 



S&ADQWLAND 



of the nineteenth century the most celebrated Stradivari 
had been found and carried out of Italy. It should also 
be borne in mind that during his life Stradivari was 
patronized by kings, princes, nobles and others in many 
countries, and thus some of his choicest masterpieces 
were sent direct to foreign lands. 

About 1860 a few wealthy amateurs in the United 
States became interested, and from that time there has 
been a steadily increasing flow of famous violins to this 
country. As far back as 1890 I made my first trip to 
Europe for the sole purpose of collecting rare instru- 
ments. It was possible even then, traveling off the 
beaten track and in comparatively unfrequented places, 
to make finds which were eminently worth while. Today 
one may travel the length and breadth of Italy and not 
even see a masterpiece, except in a museum. Where 
have they gone ? To every civilized country in the world, 
and especially to America. 

They do not go out of existence. They go out of cir- 
culation, as it were. Changing economic conditions, how- 
ever, bring them out of hiding. Such has been the his- 
tory of the past hundred years, and this is what is hap- 
pening today. The great war has impoverished the 
world, especially Europe. Consequently, fine violins, 
beautiful paintings, rare books, and other works of art 
are rapidly crossing the Atlantic. It is safe to say that 
within the past twelve months at least as many Stra- 
divari violins have been brought over as there were al- 
ready in the United States. 

By far the largest and finest accumulation of famous in- 



Professor Leopold Auer's Strad. made in 1691. 
It has been used by Heifetz and Elman 
pupils of the well-known virtuoso and pedagog 



Fritz Kreisler, with his superb instrument made 

by the Cremona master in 1736, when in his 

ninety-second year 




Photo by Mary Dale Clarke 




struments in this country is the Wurlitzer collection. The 
Lipinski, 1715; the Artol, 1721; the Piatti, 1717; the Pin- 
grie, 1713; and L'Eveque were all acquired for that col- 
lection. The Pingrie recently became the property of Mr. 
Kane, of Philadelphia, and L'Eveque of Mr. F. J. Frost. 
Another fine Strad, I hear, has recently been purchased in 
Europe by Mr. Nahan Franko. The Sancy, 1713, one of 
the finest, was secured in April of last year by Mr. Felix 
E. Kohn, thru the Wurlitzer collection. Mr. Kohn al- 
ready owned the Huggins, a very admirable example. 

The great violinist Joachim once owned a "long model" 
Strad, made in the year 1698. This also is a recent addition 
to the Wurlitzer collection. Others which should be men- 
tioned are those recently acquired by Mrs. Conway, 1722; 
Mr. Andrews, 1721 ; and the beautiful instruments of Lady 
Speyer, of New York, and Mr. Max Adler, of Chicago. 

Restricting myself to violins by Stradivari, I shall en- 
deavor, as briefly as possible, to outline the characteristics 
of a few of the fifty or sixty instruments which were in this 
country prior to the war. The pioneer American amateur 
collectors were the late R. B. Hawley, of Hartford, and 
John P. Walters, of Brooklyn. Ordinarily the average man 
is content with one, or possibly two, fine violins. Hawley, 
however, when he died owned twelve, among them two 
Strads and a Guarnerius. These and his other violins I have 
already fully described in the brochure I wrote in 1903, en- 
titled. "The Hawley Collection," published by the Chicago 
firm with which I was formerly associated. Hawley, how- 
ever, owned two other Strads, one of which afterwards 
(Continued on page 72) 



Page Fifty-Nine 



The Comic Page 

Some maintain that the strip cartoons constitute a remarkable ico- 
nography of modern American ideas and institutions, from which 
posterity will be able to learn much of the present trend of thought 

B;y Frederick Hugh 



IF you asked any schoolboy, or, for that matter, any 
adult, to mention the names of ten American presi- 
dents, he would undoubtedly experience considerable 
difficulty in doing so. On the other hand, very few people 
sufficiently educated to read simple words would find it 
hard to enumerate ten nationally known characters of 
strip cartoons. Who has not heard of Mutt and Jeff? 
Of Jiggs and Maggie? Of Polly and Her Pals? Of 
Them Days is Gone Forever? They are known from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific — from the Canadian to the Mexican 
borders, and their daily exploits bring joy to millions 
of simple hearts. 

It is a phenomenon of absorbing interest — this curious 
devotion of a nation to the creatures of a cartoonist's 
brain, and one which well repays investigation. For 
whom are these ostensibly humorous pictures primarily 
intended — children or adults? To what class do they 
cater? Wherein lies their uncanny attraction? What is 
their effect upon the circulation of the paper? 

Let us take one example, probably the best known and 
most widely syndicated — "Bringing Up Father." Briefly, 
this is the Odyssey of one Jiggs, a gentleman of humble 
antecedents and vulgar habits, married to a lady with 
social aspirations and pugilistic tendencies, by name 
Maggie. This Jiggs has, among other distressing habits, 
a passion for corned beef and low company, to attain 
which, he is constantly seeking to avoid the company of 
his wife. As often as he temporarily succeeds in this 
endeavor, Maggie trails him down and proceeds to beat 
him up. The last picture in the strip usually shows him 
in a hospital as a result of his marital infelicities. 

Now there is nothing very depraved in this, but at the 
same time it must be admitted that the humor is not of a 
very high order. Nor can Jiggs be considered a triumph 
of draughtmanship, tho he is infinitely better than 
many of his contemporaries. The outstanding wonder 
about "Bringing Up Father" is the fact that for the 
last ten (?) years Jiggs has been planning to escape 
from Maggie in this manner ; he is always detected, 
always beaten up — and still the public never tires of 
him. Granted that the ingenuity of Mr. McManus in 
devising new variations on this domestic theme is little 
short of marvelous, one is still left to ponder on the men- 



tality of a people who can endure such rubbish for so long. 

The strip cartoon is a typical and indigenous American 
creation. Nowhere else does it flourish ; nowhere else 
could it flourish. It is at the same time a remarkable trib- 
ute to American mental dexterity — just conceive of the 
strain required to devise a new joke every day! — and a 
very severe indictment of American intelligence. In New 
York City, only one large daily is published which has 
not got a comic section. No provincial paper could exist 
without one. The absurdities are syndicated thruout the 
length and breadth of the country, and it is no exaggera- 
tion to say that many a man subscribes to his paper, not 
because he approves of its policy or its politics, but be- 
cause it chronicles the doings of the Gumps, whereas its 
rival merely contains the daily ravings of Krazy Kat. 

There are some who maintain that the cartoons are 
harmful and immoral ; that they teach boys to secrete 
carpet tacks where their elders seek to sit, and to trip up 
old gentlemen on slippery sidewalks. That may be so, 
but it is not their chief demerit. There are others who 
claim that they constitute a remarkable iconography of 
modern American ideas and institutions, from which pos- 
terity will be able to learn much of the prevalent trend of 
thought. There is more than a little truth in this asser- 
tion. They undoubtedly reveal a phase of American life 
as nothing else can do. Their great fault would appear to 
be that they are vastly overdone. There are too many of 
them, and they appear too often to preserve the right 
proportions of humor, satire, individuality and spon- 
taneity. They cease to be an expression of the American 
spirit — their great justification — when they become, as 
they have done, merely the vehicle for unloading upon a 
long-suffering public all the most hoary old jokes and 
wheezes. 

The blame is not with their creators, who merely sup- 
ply a demand, and wax rich on it. It is the people with 
atrophied imaginations who create the demand that are 
worthy of censure. 

Meanwhile — I must really hurry out and buy my 
paper. I wonder where the skipper is taking the Tooner- 
ville trolley today. 

It's just a habit .... 




Page Sixty 



Knights of the Knapsack 



Said Harry Kemp to Harry Franck, 

"You are the champion outdoor crank!" 

Said Harry Franck to Harry Kemp, 

"I scorn to tramp where you have tremp !" 

Said Charley Furlong to the others, 

"Come, Come! We're all good hobo brothers!" 

Carl Clausen then addressed the three: 

"Please dont forget I tramped the sea!" 



Carl Clausen's days 
had been spent roving 
the high seas in Dan- 
ish barkantines until 
he discovered Cali- 
fornia three years ago. 
He liked the lay of the 
land, and wrote a yarn 
of buccaneers to line 
his pockets. He is still 
writing stories and 
his pockets are over- 
flowing. "But some 
day the sea will get 
me again," he declares 




Harry Franck is the 
Lord High Knight 
of the Knapsack. 
He has gone adven- 
turing the world 
over — in fact, we 
suspect he has led 
many a youth to 
stray. His first 
book, "A Vagabond 
Journey Around 
the World," was 
followed by "Four 
Months Afoot in 
Spain." Later he 
became a Zone Po- 
liceman; then Vag- 
abonded down the 
Andes. Last year 
he was W orking 
North from Pata- 
gonia; some of 
these days he may 
astound the world 
with his experi- 
ences On the 
March on Mars 




Charles Wellington Furlong, the 
helmeted knight above, has been 
a daring explorer, a roving plains- 
man, a cowboy — an all-round ad- 
venturer who heeds the call of 
his publishers occasionally and re- 
turns to smug civilization to chron- 
icle his adventures in "The Gate- 
way to the Sahara," "Tripoli in 
Barbary," and "Let 'er Buck" 



Photo by Henry Berger. Jr. 



Photo by Henry Berger, Jr. 





to by jVIuray 



Half a dozen years ago Harry 
Kemp ventured on a trip around 
the world with a bank-roll of 
twenty-five cents. On his return 
he ventured into the hazardous 
fields of Poetry and Drama. So 
successful was this departure that 
he ventured into book - writing, 
with the result that his "Tramp- 
ing on Life" is the joy of the 
critics and the talk of the towns 



Page Sixty-One 







Photo by Maurice Goldberg 



MYRTA BONILLAS 

A screen actress of ability who played opposite 
William Farnum in "A Stage Romance" and 
"Shackles of Gold," and will soon be seen in 
"Penzie," a Fox picture, featuring Mary Carr 



Page Sixty-Two 




A very rare wed- 
ding veil that was 
probably made in 
Switzerland about 
ninety years ago. 
From the collec- 
tion of Mrs. John 
W. Alexander. At 
the right, a bor- 
der for a hand- 
kerchief of Rus- 
sian bobbin-lace 
of the twentieth 
century 




Old Laces as Collecting Objects 

By W. G. Bowdoin 



THE origin of lace is veiled in obscurity. There 
is much contention for the honor of the discovery 
and application of this art, and claimants have ap- 
peared in nearly all the countries of Western Europe. 
Legendary traces of lace-making appear among the ancient 
Swiss lake dwellers and frequently in the Orient. 
The Egyptians knew and loved it. 

However, we know that needlework was, 
in the earliest recorded ages, the solace, 
pastime and occupation of queens and 
great ladies. It was the daily employ 
ment of the convents. Lace was 
constantly made by the nuns ex- 
pressly for the service of the 
church, and as early as the four- 
teenth century, lace was famil 
iarly and popularly known as 
"Nuns' Work." This early 
nomenclature has survived, and 
even today, in some districts, 
ancient lace is still thus styled. 
The nuns, however, did not 
enjoy a monopoly in the field 
of needlework and they had no 
combination in restraint of 
trade, as early manuscripts in- 
form us the monks also were 
commended for their dexterity 
in embroidery as well as for their 
skill as calligraphers 
and illuminators. 

Bui while there 
is much to indicate 
the extended prac- 
tice of needlework 
as far back as the 
primitive Egyptians, 
in connection with 
those wonderful tex- 
tiles of theirs that 

, , I i , Lace-pillow with 

have come down to I French. At the 

US thru the tombs, bins of the early 




yet no absolute proof exists of extended lace-making, 
as now commonly understood, prior to the late fifteenth 
or the early sixteenth century. 

Some have been inclined to the opinion that lace owes 
its origin to the difficulty of disposing of the unraveled 
ends of linen garments and hangings ; while this 
may account for the first formation of fringes 
with ornamental headings, the art of lace^- 
making was more gradual in its evolution. 
Embroidery came first, then it and 
lace went hand in hand until finally 
they diverged ; the line of demarka- 
tion grew more and more pro- 
nounced, and finally they became 
separate and distinct entities. 

For many of its earlier years 
dace, because of the amount of 
labor required in making it, was 
i regarded as sacred to the service 
I of religion alone, and it was not 
| until some time after the four- 
teenth century that this idea 
I was finally dispelled. 

Even then kings and queens 
alone had the right to use it 
in quantity. Later the nobles 
were thus privileged, and finally 
lace became so lavishly employed 
that numerous cases appear upon 
the records, where 
financial ruin over- 
took those who were 
over-extravagant in 
its purchase for the 
trimmings of cra- 
vats, ruffles and even 
for the garniture of 
seventeenth - century 
boots, that were then 
fashionable in 
France. 
(Cont'd on page 78) 




Courtesy of the 

Metropolitan 

Museum of Art 



bobbins attached, 
side, English bob- 
nineteenth century 



Page Sixty-Three 



SM4L>OWL/XNt> 



Litterateurs of Modernism 

(Continued from page 35) 



strange syntax, his involuted prose, his tenuous sentences 
running sometimes to three pages, is a premeditated, con- 
scious means to an effect of analytical narrative. He has 
shown by his parodies in Pastiches ct Melanges that he 
can imitate the vigorous directness of Sainte-Beuve and 
the cadenced simplicity of Renan ; and, indeed, in his 
later volumes, particularly in Sodom et Gomorrhe, he has 
lightened the texture of his paragraphs, abbreviated his 
sentences, and achieved a characteristic French clarity 
and lucidity. Over his style many critical wars have 
already been waged. Some have 
gone so far as to say that Proust 
doesn't write French at all, but a 
barbarous language fashioned out 
of a French vocabulary. This is 
merely the jealous regard of the 
conservative French for the pres- 
ervation of perhaps their most 
cherished possession — the clarity 
and simplicity of their prose. 
Something is happening to that 
prose : Proust and Giraudoux, Ro- 
mains and Carco, Gide and Lar- 
baud, are introducing into it solvent 
elements to give it the weight and 
grandeur, the diversity and novelty 
of English prose. They are all men 
who have been influenced largely 
by English writers. 

Anatole France, carrying on the 
tradition of Montaigne, Chateau- 
briand and Renan, has brought 
French clarity and simplicity to 
perfection : it has been found neces- 
sary to. develop other qualities. 
Proust has contributed much. He 
has gone to school to Ruskin and 
(in contrast) to Pater, to Meredith, 
and, most assiduously of all, to 
Henry James. His long and ex- 
haustive novels, which are to be en- 
joyed attentively and leisurely, are 
psychological documents in which 
care is given to the significance of 
the smallest details in the delinea- 
tion of character. Swann's Way 
relates the progress of the love 
affair of a young aristocrat, eru- 
dite in the preciosities of amour, 
with Odette, a woman of the lighter 
sort, whom he endows with possi- 
bilities he endeavors her to realize. 
It is but a long and delightful elu- 
cidation of the truth that we adore 
in each other an image we our- 
selves project. Meanwhile it is an 
amazingly acute analysis of the 
surface and hidden emotions of 
well-bred people, upon whom rests 
the weight of centuries of tradition 
in matters of courtesy, manners, in 
short, of good form. 

That anyone could put into ex- 
cellent English, the elegant tenuos- 
ities of M. Proust's prose, preserv- 
ing at once the sense and flavor 
of the original, was hardly to be 
expected. Mr. Moncrieff has 




H 



Crock of Gold, by James 
Stephens. New edition, illustrated. 
Macmillan. 

Swann's Way, by Marcel Proust, 
translated by C. K. Scott Moncrieff. 
Holt. 

Letters of James Gibbons Huneker, 

edited by Josephine Huneker. Scrib 
ners. 

The Love Legend, 

Boyd. Scribners. 



Lilian, by Arnold Bennett. Doran. 

Germinie Lacerteaux, by Edmond and 
Jules de Goncourt, translated with 
an introduction by Ernest Boyd. 
Knopf. 

The Penitent, by Edna Worthley 
Underwood. Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Where the Blue Begins, by Christo- 
pher Morley. Doubleday, Page & 
Co. 

Command, by William McFee. Double- 
day, Page & Co. 

Rootabaga Stories, by Carl Sandburg. 
Harcourt. 

The Wind Bloweth, by Donne Byrne. 
Century. 

Disenchantment, by C 
Brentano. 



Nights and Days on the Gypsy Trail 
by Irving Brown. Harper. 



Jurgen, by James Branch 
Robert McBride & Co. 

Love Conquers All, by Robert 
Benchley. Holt. 



Rough Hewn 

Harcourt. 




achieved this feat, in recognition of which he should be 
saluted as the model translator. As a rule, translators 
are, an incompetent and insensitive lot : Mr. Moncrieff 
gives us Proust and at the same time a fine bit of English 
literature. 

The publication of T. S. Eliot's long poem, The Waste 
Land (Boni & Liveright), is, I think, an event of the 
first importance, to be celebrated by the literate with at 
least that measure of interest they reserve for the latest 
news of the Fascisti, political cam- 
paigns, changes in the British cab- 
inet, and the front-page murder ; 
for in The Waste Land, Mr. Eliot 
surveys, if not precisely these, at 
least analogous events in their 
proper perspective and gives to us 
their ultimate values in terms of 
beauty and with beauty's speech. 
If I were to obey my first unreflec- 
tive impulse, I should say that The 
Waste Land is one of the finest 
poems in the English language. 
Certainly it is one of the most curi- 
ously beautiful — a perfect flower 
of a sick epoch, a literary creation 
to place beside Ulysses and Jurgen 
as reflecting an age in which the 
irony of indifference is made the 
more provoking by a hint of balked 
idealism. 

Let me be frank : This poem 
sings of modern life in accents so 
anguished, passionate, bitter, hurt 
and plaintive that it tortured my 
emotions almost beyond endurance. 
. . . That experience, I know, has 
nothing whatever to do with the 
poem's artistic value : that thou- 
sands have drenched with copious 
tears the printed page whereon are 
written the words of Over the Hill 
to the Poorhouse does not prevent 
that composition from being a very 
tawdry and inferior work of the 
imagination. Discount, then, the 
irrelevant fact that a mere reading 
of this poem induced in me such 
physiological phenomena as may be 
described as a rushing of hot, fe- 
verish blood to the head, a depress- 
ing sense of weight about the 
heart, moisture in the palms and 
eyes, tremors in the nerves, an in- 
creased rapidity of respiration — 
in short, the accountable and vis- 
ible phenomena attending ecstasy, 
wonder and despair (or, perhaps, 
intimations of poignant beauty) ; 
and then ask, appropriately and 
reasonably: "But what is the 
poem's aesthetic significance? 
Wherein lies its beauty?" 

That beauty and significance lies 

in the personal expression Mr. 

Eliot has given to his vision of 

modern society. He has limned 

(Continued on page 70) 



by Woodward 



it 



1 



E. Montague. 



Cabell. 



by Dorothy Canfield. 



Page Sixty-Four 







, 






Photo by Robert Flaherty. © 1922, Revillon Freres 



THE DOG SPEAKS 



Calm tho not mean, courageous without rage, 
Serious not dull, and without thinking sage; 
Plcas'd at the lot that Nature has assigri'd, 
Snarl as I list, and freely bark my mind; 
As churchman wrangle not with passing spite, 
Nor stateman-like caressing whom I bite; 
View all the canine kind with equal eyes, 
I dread no mastiff, and no cur despise: 
True from the first and faithful to the end, 
I baulk no mistress, and forsake no friend. 
My days and nights one equal tenour keep, 
Fast but to eat, and only wake to sleep: 
Thus stealing along life, I live incog 
A very plain and downright honest dog. 

— William Hamilton. 



Page Sixty-Five 



SlJAOOWLAND 

Stage Plays of Interest 



Drama — Mapr and Melo- 



The Cat and the Canary. National. — Good 
excitement and suspens