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Full text of "The Shahnama;"

vol.. IX. 



T R U B N E R ' S 

ORIENTAL SERIES 



i/ 



Complete Work now Ready. Post 8vo. cloth, price 10s. Gd. each. 

THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSI. 

Doue into English by 
ARTHUR GEORGE WARNER, M.A. 

AND 

EDMOXD WARXER, B.A. 

Tlie vear a.d. 1010 saw the completion of the Shdhndma, the great 
1'er.siair ei)ic. Its author, the poet Firdausi, spent over thirty Ifoori; 
ou'4 vears in its coiiipositiou, only to experience, when the task had 
been" actiieved, a heart-breaking disappointment weU worthy ot m- 
clusiou in any record of tiie calamities of authors. His worii has 
sur-v-ived the test of time, and by general consent is accounted to be 
one of the few great epics of the world. Geographically, and in some 
other resiiects, it may be said to stand half-way between the epics ol 
Europe and those of India. In its own land it has no peer, wnile in 
construction and subject-matter it is uni(|ue. Other epics ct\utre 
round some heroic cliaracter or incident to which all else is sub.ser- 
vient. In the .^liAhndma there is no lack either of heroes or of in- 
cidents, but its real hero is the ancient Persian people, and its theme 
their whole surviving legendary history from the days of the Pirst 
Man to tiie death of the last Sdsiinian Shdh in the middle of the seventh 
century of our era. It is the glory of the Persian race that they alone 
among all nations possess such a record, based as it is on their own 
traditions and set lorth in the words of their greatest poet. In another 
sense, too, the Shdhndma is unique. Tlie authors of the other great 
epics tell us little or nothing of their own personalities or of their 
sources of information. Their works are fairy palaces suspended in 
mid air ; we see the result, but know not how it was achieved. The 
author of the Shillindma takes us into his confidence from the first, so 
tliat in reading it we are let into the secret of epic-making, and can 
apply the knowledge lliiis gained to solve the problem of the con- 
struction of its great congeners. To the student ot comparative 
mytliiilogv and folk-lore, to the lover of historic romance or roniantic 
historv, and to all that are fond of tales of high achievements and the 
gests of inToes. the Sbdiniama is a stoiclioiisc of ricli and abundant 
material. To set forth a com]ilete presentment of it with the needful 
notes and elucidations is tlie object of the present translation, made 
from two of tlie best printed texts of the original — that of Vullers and 
Laudauer, an<l that of Turner Macau. 



THE 

SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 



DONE INTO ENGLISH BY 

ARTHUR GEORGE WARNER, MA. 

AND 

EDMOND WARNER, B A. 



The homes that are the diceUincjs of to-day 
Will sinic 'neath shower and sunshine to decay. 
Hut storm and rain shall never mar what I 
Have built^the pulace of my poetry." , 

FiRDAUSI. 



VOL. IX 




LONDON: 
KEG AN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., L^ 

BROADWAY HOUSE I CARTER LANE, E.G. 
1925 



The rights of translation and of re /■reduction are reserved. 



PIMNTED IN GREAT BRITAIN BY THE DEVONSHIRE PRESS, TORQUAY 



THE SHAHNAMA 



VOL. IX. 



\ 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 

Page ix, lines 1-3, for " v, xi, xii," read " vii, xiii, xv." 

Page 130, Col. I, line 14 from bottom, for " xii " nacf " xv." 

Page 131, Col. I, line 21, for " xii " read " xv." 

Pages 123-133, in the case of Roman numerals, fvr ' vii " reod 
" ix," for " viii " read " x " etc. 

Page 195, Col. 2, line 11, delete first comma. 

Page 196, Col. I, line 11 from bottom, delete "Ahran." 

Page 216, Col. 2, after line 10 from bottom, insert " Reign of, 
J57, V, 281 seq. Note on, v, 281." 

Page 225, Col. I, line S from bottom, delete " Bandwi." 

Page 240, Col. 2, line 13 from bottom, before " 102 " insert " i." 

Page 245, Col. 2, line 12, for " 162 " read " 162." 

Page 251, Col. I, line 11 from bottom, after "of" insert comma. 

Page 257, Col. 2, line 11, before and after "vitrified" inseit 
comma. 

Page 268, Col. 2, line 15 from^ bottom, after" oi" insert comma. 

Page 276, Col. I, line 3 from bottom, read " Olympias." 

Page 279, Col. 2, line 5 from bottom, for " 363 " read " 263." 

Page 289, Col. I, line 25, for " 140 " read " 140." 

Page 302, Col. _>, line 10 from bottom, /o^  85 " read "23." 

Page 310, Col. I, line 3, for " ig6 " read " 171." 

Page 311, Col. 2, line 15 from bottom, after "by" insert " viii, 
190. 

Page 327, Col. 2, line 31 end, add " ix, 23." 

Page 328, Col. I, line 26, for " 205 " read " 105." 

Page 334, Col. I, line 7, for "Northman" read "Northmen." 

Page 337, Col. 2, line 2 from bottom, add " viii, 108." 

Page 362, Col. I, line 7 from bottom, insert comma at end. 

Page 363, Col. I, line 25 end, insert comma. 

Page 366, Col. I, line 23, before " 137" insert " vii." 

Page 372, Col. 1, line 14, delete " vi." 

Page 385, Col. I, line 23, delete " 176." 

Page 386, Col. 2, line 10 from bottom, after " Khnrasdn," insert 
" 176." 

Page 39X, Col. 2, line 7 from bottom, delete " Yazdagird." 



PREFATORY NOTE 

The General Index at the end of this vohime should 
be consulted in preference to the Indexes to the 
separate volumes of this work. — E.W. 



CONTENTS 



PAQB 

Prefatory Note ........ v 

Abbreviations ........ xi 

Note on Pronunciation ....... xii 

THE SASANIAN dynasty (concluded) 
KuBAD (Commonly Called Shirwi) — 

SKCT. 

1. How Shirwi ascended the Throne, announced his 

Will, and sent Chiefs to his Father with 
Counsel and Excuses .... 8 

2. How Khusrau Parwiz answered Shirwi . . 15 

3. How Shirwi grieved for Khusrau Parwiz and how 

the Chiefs were displeased thereat . . 27 

4. How Barbad lamented Khusrau Parwiz, cut off his 

own Fingers, and burned his Instruments of 
Music ....... 29 

5. How the Chiefs demanded from Shirwi the Death 

of Khusrau Parwiz and how he was slain by 
Mihr Hurmuzd ..... 32 

6. How Shirwi asked Shirin in Marriage, how Shirin 

killed herself, and how Shirwi was slain . 36 

Ardsiii'r, Son of Shirwi — 

1. How Ardshir, Son of Shirwi, ascended the Throne 

and harangued the Chiefs . . -44 

2. How Guraz was displeased at Ardshir being Shah 

and how he caused Ardshir to be slain by 
Piruz Son of Khusrau .... 

^ . 45 

Guraz (also called Farayin)— 

I. How Guraz (also called Farayin) received News of 

the Slaying of Ardshir, hastened to Iran, took 

Possession of the Throne, and was killed by 

Shahranguraz . . . . .51 

PiJrAndukht— 

1. How Purandukht ascended the Throne and slew 
Piriiz, Son of Khusrau, and how her own 
Life ended ...... 56 

ix 



CONTENTS 



AzARMDUKHT- 



SECT. PAGE 

I. How Azarmdukht ascended the Throne and how 



she died ...... 

FarrukhzAd — 

I. How Farrukhziid ascended the Throne and how he 
was slain by a Slave .... 

Yazdagird — 

1. How Yazdagird ascended the Throne and addressed 
* the Chiefs ...... 

2. How Sa'ad, Son of Wakkas, invaded Iran, how 

Yazdagird sent Rustam to oppose him, and 
how Rustam wrote a Letter to his Brother 

3. How Rustam wrote to Sa'ad, Son of Wakkas, 

and how he rephed .... 

4. How Rustam fought with Sa'ad, Son of Wakkas, 

and was slain ..... 

5. How Yazdagird consulted with the Iranians and 

went to Khurasan ..... 

6. How Yazdagird wro^e to Mahwi of Siir . 

7. How Yazdagird wrote to the Marchlords of Tiis 

8. How Yazdagird went to Tiis and how Mahwi of 

Siir met him ...... 

9. How Mahwi of Siir incited Bi'zhan to war with 

Yazdagird and how Yazdagird fled and hid 
himself in a Mill ..... 

10. How Mahwi of Siir sent the Miller to kill Yazdagird, 

and how the Archmages counselled Mahwi 
to forbear ...... 

11. How Yazdagird was slain by Khusrau, the Miller 

12. How Mahwi of Sur was informed of the Obsequies 

of Yazdagird and ascended the Throne 

13. How Bizhan, hearing of the Slaying of Yazdagird, 

and of Mahwi of Siir's Accession to the 
Throne, led forth the Host to fight with him 

14. How Mahwi of Siir was taken and slain by Order 

of Bizhan ..... 

15. Account of the Completion of the Shahnama 
Index . .... 
General List of Abbreviations 
General Table of Contents . 
Corrections and Additions 
General Index 



59 
61 

70 

72 
78 

83 

85 
89 

90 
95 

96 



lOI 

107 
1 12 



"5 

118 
121 
123 
135 
139 
177 

191 



ABBREVIATIONS 

C. — Macan's edition of the Shahnama 
L. — Lumsden's do. 

P.— Mohl's do. 

T. — Tihran do. 

v.— Vullers' do. 

BCM. The Chahar Maqala (" Four Discourses ") of Nidhami-i- 

'Ariidi-i-Samarqandi. Translated into EngUsh by 
Edward G. Browne, M.A., M.B. 

CTC. Theophanis Chronographia. Ex Recensione loannii 

Classeni. 

LEC. The Lands of the Eastern Califate. By G. Le Strange. 

NIN. Das Iranische Nationalepos von Theodor Noldeke. 

NT. Geschichte der Perser und Araber sur Zeit der Sasaniden 

. . . von. Th. Noldeke. 
RM. The Rauzat-us-safa ; or, Garden of Purity. . . . By 

Mirkhond. . . . Translated ... by E. Rehatsek. 
RSM. The Seventh Great Oriental Monarchy. By George 

Rawlinson, M.A. 

ZT. Chronique de Abou-Djafar-Mo'hammed-Ben-Djarir-Ben- 

Yezid-Tabari, traduite . . . Par M. Hermann Zoten- 
burg. 



xiu 



NOTE ON PRONUNCIATION 

a as in " water." 

i as in " pique." 

u as in " rude." 

a as in " servant." 

i as in " sin." 

M as in " foot." 

ai as in " time." 

au as in ou in " cloud." 

g is always hard as in " give." 

kh as ch in the German " buch," 

zh ^ ^ in " azure," 



XV 



IV 

THE SASlNIAN DYNASTY 
(Concluded) 



VOL. IX. 



XLIV 

KUBAD (COMMONLY CALLED SHIRWI) 

HE REIGNED SEVEN MONTHS 

' ARGUMENT 

Kiibtid on his accession sends two cliiefs to accuse of niis- 
governniont the fallen and imprisoned Shah, Khusrau Parvviz, 
who justifies himself at great length. His fall is made the 
subject of a lament by Barbad, the minstrel, who afterwards 
mutilates himself. The chiefs, noticing symptoms of remorse 
in Kubad, insist upon the death of Khusrau Parwiz who is 
kilh'd with all his other sons. Kubad falls in love with, 
and wishes to marry, Shiri'n, who poisons herself rather than 
consent, and Kubad himself is poisoned soon afterwards. 

NOTE 

The days of the reign of Kubad (Kobad II., Feb. -Sept.', 
A.D. 628) were few and evil. Tradition already had prepared 
the ground for this in the unfavourable account given of 
his early years. ^ The murder of his father was followed by 
that of all his brothers, and by the tragic death of Shirin, 
while in addition to all these horrors a frightful pestilence 
broke out in his reign and the great mortality that ensued 
still further weakened the resources of an already almost 
cxliausted country and hel])ed to pave the way for the suc- 
cessful Arab invasion of a few years later on. Kubad is 
represented in the poem as a loutish, uneducated youth,- 
but even if his abilities had been great it is difficult to see 
how he could Ijave extricated himself from the coil in which 



' See Vol. viii., p. 390 • Id, 

3 



4 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

he found himself involved without mishap to himself or 
others. He owed his release from prison and perhaps his 
life to the very conspirators that subsequently demanded 
of him for their own security the death of his father. To 
have refused would have been fatal to himself, while in all 
probability his father and his brothers, with the exception 
of one who would have been made Shah, would have perished 
all the same. It is inconceivable that the conspirators would 
have run the risk to themselves of restoring Khusrau Parwiz, 
with his black record of ingratitude as instanced by his treat- 
ment of Bandwi and Gustaham,i to \^\^ former position as 
ruler. With the exception of his infatuation for Shirin, which 
hardly can be regarded as historical, Kubad throughout his 
short reign was the victim of circumstances. 

§§ 1 and 2. Kharrad, son of Barzin, was one of the niost 
trusted ministers of Khusrau Parwiz and planned the assassina- 
tion of Bahram Chubina.^ According to Tabari he fell at 
the battle of Dhu Kar.^ 

As the epoch of the Sasanian Dynasty draws to an end 
through scenes of deepening tragedy the legitimist leanings 
of the tradition seem to become more and more pronounced 
and we have an instance here. It is hardly to be supposed, 
historically speaking, that formal charges of misgovernmcnt 
were drawn up against, and as formally answered by, Khusrau 
Parwiz, but rather that someone, desirous of vindicating 
that Shah's memory and conversant with the circumstances 
of the time, soon after his death drew up the charges and the 
replies thereto. Versions of them are given in both the 
Arabic and Persian Tabari and elsewhere. Four of the 
charges are found in both the Tabaris as well as in the Shah- 
nama.* They are : — 

1. The murder by Khusrau Parwiz of his father Hurmuzd. 

2. The .illegitimate accumulation of treasure as a result 

of the financial oppression of the people. 

3. The harsh treatment of the royal princes. 

4. The refusal to restore the True Cross. 
To these the Arabic Tabari adds : — 

1. The general ill-treatment of all prisoners. 

2. Enforced recruiting for the royal Haram even of 

women already married. 

? See Vol. viii., p. 354 seq. ' Id. p. 331 seq. ' Id. p. iQQ- 

 NT, 363 seq, ZT, ii., 334 se^. 



KUBAD [COMMONLY CALLED SHlRWl) 5 

3. The keeping of the troops for a long period absent 
from home. 
The Persian Taburi adds : — 

1. The imprisonment of the troops defeated by the Arabs 

at Dhu Kar and by Heraclius. • 

2. The exactions of arrears of tribute for the previous 

twenty or thirty years. 

3. The attempt to slay the youthful Yazdagird (after- 

wards the last Sasanian Shah). 

4. The deposition of Nu'man, prince of Hira.^ 

5. The mutilation and subsequent execution of Mardan- 

shah.- 

In the Arabic Tabari eight charges are made against 
Khusrau Parwiz two of which — those relating to the royal 
Haram and the refusal to restore the " True Cross " — are 
left unanswered. 

In the Persian Tabari eleven charges are formulated to 
each of which in the same order an answer is made. Some 
of the charges, however, must be regarded as later additions 
while that relating to Nu'man is not likely to have suggested 
itself to a Persian and must come from an Arab source. In 
the Shahnama there are eight charges, all of which are more 
or less answered, but not in the same order as they are pre- 
ferred, but in the following: — 1, 6, 7, 8, 2, 5, 3, 4. Thus 
Khusrau Parwiz replies to the most serious accusations — 
those of offences against persons — first. The Shahnama 
agrees most closely wath the Arabic Tabari, supplies the missing 
answer mth regard to the " True Cross," but does not deal 
with the (jravamen of the royal Haram question, as that par- 
ticular charge is not one of those mentioned in the j^oem. 

Galinush subsequently served in the war against the Arabs, 
fought at the Battle of the Bridge, and was perhaps slain at 
Kadisiya.^ 

§ 5. Indignant legitimate tradition is naturally very 
wroth with Mihr Hurnmzd, the murderer of Khusrau Parwiz, 
whom it describes as the lowest of the low and vilest of the 
vile. According to Tabari, however. Mihr Hurmuzd was the 
son of Mardanshah, the governor of Nimriiz and one of the 
most obedient and faithful of Khusrau Parwiz' officials. In 
the Persian Tabari's version of the Romance of Bahram 



' See Vol. viii., p. 190. ' See p. 6. 

' NT, p. 365 note. RM, Pt. II., vol. iii., pp. 95, 116. 



6 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSi 

Chubina that hero's brother, Yalaii-sina in the Sliahnama, is 
called Mardanshab. Yalan-sina is always represented as 
being one of Bahram (.'hubina's most loyal adherents just as 
the other brother, Gurdwi, was a firm supjjorter of Khusrau 
Parwiz, while their- sister Gurdya held an intermediate position, 
faithful to Bahram Chubina, but opposing his kingl}'- ambition 
in every way in her power. Later on when married to Gus- 
taham, the maternal uncle of Khusrau Parwiz, she agreed, 
on condition that she should become the Shah's wife and that 
a full amnesty should be given to all her adherents, to murder 
he..- husband and did so. There would be nothing strange 
therefore in Mardanshah, if identical with Yalan-sina, becoming 
reconciled to, and receiving high oflfice from, Khusrau Parwiz. 
He would serve one master as faithfully as he served the other. 
In the circumstances the strange thing would have been lor 
the treacherous Shah not to have taken the first convenient 
occasion against him. According to the story the Shah, 
two years before his deposition, consulted the astrologers 
who informed him that his death would come from Nimrvlz. 
He therefore began to siispect and summoned Mardanshah, 
but finding no pretext for putting him to death, as he was 
perfectly loyal and withal an aged man, determined merely 
to cut off his right hand and make him a large i)resent of money 
as compensation. The sentence was carried out. Mardan- 
shah regarded such a mutilation as worse than death and, 
when shortly afterwards the Shah was good enough to send 
and express his regret for what had occurred, asked the 
Shah to grant hini a boon. The Shah swore to do so, on which 
Mardanshah requested that his head should be struck off 
in order to wipe out the disgrace put upon him. The Shah, 
bound by his oath, felt himself obliged to consent and the 
execution took place accordingly. The Shah wished to make 
Mardanshah's son governor of Nimruz, but he refused and 
withdrew from the army.^ He joined the conspiracy against 
Khusrau Parwiz^ and by avenging his father on the Shah 
justified the prediction of the astrologers. 

The account given by Theophanes of the last days of the 
Shah is different. As a general rule it is not prudent to put 
iaith in stories of what occurred in Oriental palaces or prisons, 
but owing to the special circumstances of the case his in- 
formation may be good in this instance, as it appears to be 

»NT, p. 379. ZT, ii., 330. "See Vol. viii., p. 196. 



KUDAD [COMMONLY CALLED SHIRWI) 7 

l);iso<! on letters written by ireniclius. After the capture of 
Klnisrau Parwi'z by the (H)n.s])irators, he was bound and 
confined in the " House of Darkness," which he had himself 
built as a stronj^hold for his treasures. Here he was sparingly 
fed on bread and water for, said Slu'rwi : " Let him eat the 
gold that he has vainly amassed, and for whose sake he has 
starved many, and made the world itself a desert." Shirwi 
also sent satraps to revile and spit upon him, had his son 
Mardasas, whom he had wished to crown, slain before his eyes, 
and all his other sons as well, sent his enemies to beat and 
spit upon hira, and, after five days of such treatment, had him 
put to death with arrows. Shirwi then wrote to Heraclius 
to announce the death of the detested Khusrau Parwiz, 
arranged terms of peace, released all the captives, and restored 
the " True Cross." ^ With regard to these latter statements 
of Theophanes it should be observed that peace was not 
concluded, and the " True Cross" restored, till after the death 
of Shirwi.^ 

According to Tabari Kubad had Mihr Hurmuzd put to 
death.3 

§ 6. The association of Khusrau Parwiz and Shirin began, 
it would seem,'* before his accession to the throne, and he 
reigned for thirty-eight vears. If Shirwi really wished to 
marry Shirin it must have been for political motives and 
because she had been so much in his father's confidence and 
might furnish useful information. For a son to raarrv his 
father's wives was, according to Persian ideas, quite the correct 
procedure in the circumstances. 

Kubad is said to have been bitterly reproached by his 
two sisters, Purandukht and Azarmdukht, for his share in 
the deaths of his father and brothers, and to have suffered 
much from sickness and remorse. He died at Dastagird, 
but from what cause is uncertain.^ The plague was very 
virulent at the time. Poison was often made to account 
for what was really due to disease. 



' CTC, i., 502. ' NT, p. 392 and note. * Id. p. 382. 

'See vol. viii., p. 383. » NT, p. 3S4 and notes. 



THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSl 



§1 



Hon) Shirivi ascended the Throne, announced his Will, 
and sent Chiefs to his Father with Counsel and 
Excuses 

Now when Shirwi sat on the goodly throne, 
And donned the royal crown so much desired, 
The leaders of the Iranians each drew near 
To proffer hi'm the homage due to kings, 
Exclaiming : " Worshipful and honoured Shah ! 
Know, God gave thee the crown, and now thou sittcst 
Securely on the throne of ivory. 
And may thy sons and scions have the world." 

Kubad replied : "Be ever conquering 
And happy. Never will we practise ill. 
How good is justice with benevolence ! 
The world will we keep peaceful and cut off 
The works of Ahriman by every right, 
Ancestral precedent that greateneth 
The Glory of our Faith. I will dispatch 
A message to my sire and tell him all. 
He is in evil odour in the world 
Through his ill deeds : let him excuse his faults 
To God and turn to custom and the way. 
If he shall heed me he will Jiot resent 
My conduct. Then will I devote myself 
To state-affairs and strive to compass justice 
Both publicly and privily, do good 
Where good is due, and break no poor man's heart. 
I need two honest men of goodly speech, 
Whose memories are charged with ancient lore." 



KUBAD [COMMONLY CALLED STltRWt) 9 

He asked the assembly : '' Whom shall I employ ? 
Who is most shrewd and honest in fran ? '' 

The warriors all surroested by their looks 
Two men of lore if they should oive consent. 
Kiibad pereeived whom the Iranians 
Agreed to ehoose : one of them was Ashtad, 
The other was Kharrad, son of Barzin, 
The old — two sages eloquent and heedful. 
Kubad addressed them thus : " O ye wise men. 
Ye chiefs experienced and veteran ! 
Deem not the conduct of the world too toilsome, 
Because the Great by travail compass treasure. 
It is for you now to approach the Shah ; 
Perchance through you he may conform himself. 
Appeal to him by instance new or old 
As there is need." 

With tears unwillingly 
Those sages made them ready. When Kharrad, 
Son of Barzin, and when Ashtad, who had 
Gashasj) for sire, had mounted on their steeds, 
As bidden, Kubad said : " Now with right good will 
'Tis yours to take the road to Taisafun,^ 
To carry to my glorious sire a message. 
And bear it all in mind from first to last. 
Say : ' 'Twas no fault of ours nor did the Iranians 
Cause this, but having left the way of Faith 
Thou hast thyself incurred God's chastisement, 
For, first, no son legitimate wall shed 
His sire's blood though impure or give assent 
Thereto and fill the hearts of upright folk 
With pain. Again, thy treasures fill the world, 
And thine exactions reach all provinces, 
While, thirdly, many horsemen brave and famed 
Within Iran who gladdened there have left 
Son, country, and their own pure kith and kin, 

' Couplet omitted. 



lo THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSl 

Have parted, this to Chin and that to Ruin, 

And now are scattered o'er each march and land. 

Again, when Caisar, who had done and borne 

So much for thee, had given thee a host 

And dauirhter too with treasure and much else. 

Desired of thee the Cross of Christ for Rum, 

So that his land might be revived thereby, 

How did the Cross of Jesus profit so 

Thy treasures when complaisance on thy part 

Would have made Caesar glad ? But thou didst not 

Restore it, hadst not wit enough for that, 

Or one to guide thee to humanity. 

Again, thy greed was such that wisdom's eye 

Was all obscured in thee, and thou didst seize 

The chattels of the poor whose curses brought 

111 on thy head. Thou slewest thy mother's brothers,^ 

Two loyal men who gave thy throne a lustre. 

Moreover thou hadst sixteen sons whose days 

And nights were passed in prison while no chief 

Could sleep secure from thee but hid in fear.^ 

Know, that which hath befall'n thee is from God ; 

Reflect on thy foul deeds. As for myself, 

I am but as the instrument in all 

This wrong, am but the heading of the tale. 

By God, 'twas not my fault, no aim of mine 

To wreck the Shah's throne ! Now for all seek grace, 

i\.nd say so to these chieftains of Iran ; 

Turn from ill deeds to God — the Guide to good— - 

Who may abate the woes that thou hast brought 

Upon thyself.' " 

On hearing this the twain 
Departed with their hearts all seared and sore 
Till, sorrowful and weeping, they arrived 
At Taisafun and in that city sought 

' Bandwi and Gustaham. 

* This sentence comes at the end of the speech in the text. 



KUDAD [COMMOXT.V called SIltRWt) IT 

Tlio palace of Mai'usi|)aM(l lor there 

The exalted kin<i!; resided, (ialiiiush 

Sat at the palaee-^ate : thou woiildst have said : — 

" Earth is eonvulscd before him ! " lie was nrmed 

111 lielin and breastplate, all the Arab steeds 

Wore bards, and all his soldiers were drawn up, 

Equipped, and sword in hand. He grasped a niaee 

Of steel, his heart all fire and storm. Now when 

Kharrad, son of Barzin, and when Ashtad, 

Son of Gashasp, those sages twain, dismounted, 

He rose forthwith, rejoiced to look on them, 

And gave them place befitting, hailing them 

As famous chiefs. The eloquent Kharrad 

First laved his tongue in valour and then said 

To Galinush : " Kubad the glorious 

Hath donned in peace the Kaian crown. Iran, 

Ti'iran and Rum have tidings that Shirwi^ 

Is seated on the throne of king of kings. 

Why this cuirass and helm and massive mace ? 

Who is thine enemy ? " 

Said Galinush : — 
" O veteran ! may all thy doings prosper. 

Thou art concerned about my tender frame C. 2029 

Because I am in iron garniture. 
I bless thee for thy kindness ; thou deservest 
That I shall sprinkle jewels over thee. 
Thy words are naught but good, and may the sun 
Be thine associate in the world. Declare 
Why thou hast come, then look for my reply." 

lie thus gave answer : " Glorious Kubad 
Commissi )ncd me to bear Khusrau Parwiz 
A message and if now thou wilt ask audience- 
l will deliver what the world-lord said — 

' That being the name by which he had been generally known, 
his real name (Kubad) having been kept secret. See Vol. viii., 
pp. 371, 416. 

• Reading with P. 



12 



THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSI 



That monarch of the flock." 

Said Galiiiush : — 
" \Vho can remember words so well as thou, 
O worshii)ful ? Yet nathless Shah Knbad 
Gave me full many a counsel touching this. 
And charged me, saying : ' Let none have by day 
Or niffht an audience of Khusrau Parwiz 
Unless thou hearest what the messenger 
Hath got to say in Persian new or old.' " 

Ashtad said : "I hold not my message secret, 
O fortunate ! It is : ' The sword is fruiting, 
And nuzzling princes' heads.' In this regard 
Now ask for audience of Khusrau Parwiz 
That we may tell the message of the Shah." 

This hearing Galniush arose, made fast 
His mail, went to the Shah with folded arms. 
As servants should, and said thus : " Live for ever, 
O Shah ! May evil never vex thy heart. 
There cometh by Ashtad and by Kharrad, 
Son of Barzin, a message from the Shah 
From court." 

Khusrau Parwiz laughed out and said : — 
" Speak wiser words for if he be the king 
Then what am I, and why am I wdthin 
This narrow prison, and why need'st thou ask 
That I shall grant an audience unto any, 
Be their words false or true ? " 

So Galimish 
Returned to those two warriors, reported 
The answer of the paladin, and said : — 
" Now go with folded arms, declare your message, 
And hearken his reply." 

Those sages twain 
Of honest speech inswathed their visages 
In sashes brought from Chin and, when they saw 
The Shah, did reverence and waited long 



KUBAD [COMMONLY CALLED SlllRWt) 13 

What while he sat upon a loft}' throne 

Adorned with efTinics of sheep and wolves, 

Impleaehed with gold and gems, with under hitu 

A couch of yellow broidery. lie leaned 

On cushions hued like lapis-lazuli, 

Held a fine quince and drowsed there all amort. 

When he beheld those chiefs supreme in wisdom c. 2030 

He roused himself and secretly invoked 

God's help. He laid that fine quince on the cushions 

That he might welcome those two wayfarers.^ 

The quince slipped from the cushions, rolled unbruised 

Upon the couch and thence from throne to floor. 

Ashtad ran, took it up, wiped off the dust, 

And laid the quince upon his head. The world-lord 

Turned from Ashtad that he might neither see 

Nor scent the quince. They set it on the throne, 

And stood themselves. The matter of the quince ^ 

Perturbed Khusrau Parwiz who boded ill, 

Looked up to heaven, and said : " O truthful Judge! 

Who can establish one whom Thou o'erthrowest. 

Who join what Thou hast broken ? W^hen bright 

fortune 
Departeth from a race it bringeth sorrow 
Because the day of joy is passed away." 

Then to Ashtad : " Now for thine ambassage 
From mine unnatural child of ill repute, 
And from that handful of conspirators. 
My hateful and black-hearted enemies. 
jMalignant fools are they and in their folly 
Most wretched. Fortune will desert our race ; 
None will rejoice again ; the crown and throne 
Will pass to those unfit ; this royal Tree 
Will be destroyed ; the Base will be exalted ; 
The spirits of the Great grow sorrowful. 

' ' ces deux esclavcs.' Mohl. 
• I^cadin^ with P. 



14 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSi 

The majesty ^vill bide not with our sons, 

Or with our kindred or {)osterity ; 

Their friends all be their chief est enemies, 

Revilcrs and destroyers of the race. 

This quince hath made the secret evident ; 

The throne of king of kings will bear no fruit. 

Now tell to me the words that thou hast heard : 

I count his less than water in the stream." 

Then those two men released their tongues to speak, 
And told all that Kubad, his son, had said, 
Not keeping e'en a whisper back from him. 
The king of kings, when he had heard the message. 
Writhed with distress and heaved a deep, cold sigh. 
Then said he to those chiefs : " Hear my response. 
And bear it to the young prince, every word. 
Say : ' Quit thine own misdeeds ere blaming others'. 
What thou hast uttered are they words of thine ? 
A murrain on the prompter [^ Speak not so 
2031 As to rejoice thy foe with thy fool's talk. 

And let him learn that thou hast not the wisdom 
To furnish speech with knowledge from thy brains. 
If thy trust is in words that profit not 
Thou mak'st default in soul and wisdom too. 
He that shall call thee wicked, then acknowledge 
Thee to be world-lord, should not sit before thee, 
And order matters whether great or small. 
Think not in future of such messages 
Or thou wilt cause thy foemen to rejoice. 
My state hath been appointed me by God ; 
My hopes are set upon the other world. 
And thou by these thy charges which are lies 
Wilt gain no glory in the nobles* eyes.' " 



' Reading with P. and T. 



KUBAD {COM mux LY called SIllRWt) 15 



^2 



Hoiv Khaarau Pariciz answered ISliinvi 

" Now will I make full answer that thou niayst 
Repeat my words in publie. They will serve 
As my memorial when I am gone — 
A truthful statement of my case — and thou 
AVilt know, when I reveal my grief and travail, 
That all ni}^ treasures were derived from toil. 
Thou speakest in the first place of Ilurmuzd, 
His anger with mc, and those bygone days : 
My father's wrath against us was aroused 
By slanderer's "words and thus confusion came. 
When I had learned what occupied his thoughts 
I left Iran by night, avoiding roads. 
He sought my death by poison ; I perceived 
No antidote but flight and so I fled, 
And was not taken in the net of bale. 
I heard that ill had come upon the Shah, 
And quitted Barda' when the news arrived. 
That knave Bahram Chubina with his troops 
Opposed us on the battlefield. I fled 
From him too on the dav of fight that I 
Might fall not in his clutches. Afterwards 
I came a second time and bravely fought. 
My troublous foi'tunc passed away and all 
The realm that I had lost returned to me. 
My contest with him was no brief affair ; 
The whole world were spectators of the strife. 
By the command of God who multiplieth 
His benefits on us, and is the Guide 
In good and ill, Iran and Turkistan^ 

? Turdn in the text:. 



1 6 THE SH Ah NAM A OF FIRDAUSt 

Submitted and Bahrain Chiibina's plans 
Were foiled. Released from war with him 1 hasted, 
First, to take vengeance for my father's death. 
C. 2032 Bandwi and Gustaham, my mother's brothers, 
Men that had not a peer in any land. 
Had risked their lives for me and were all mine 
In love as well as kinship, but there were 
My father's death and mine own grief thereat ; 
I was not sluggish to avenge his blood. 
I lopped Bandwi both hand and foot for he 
Had made the Shah's place dark, while Gustaham, 
Who disappeared and sought some distant nook, 
Was slain all unawares by my command : 
Those murderers' lives and aims all came to naught. 
Next, as to whatthou said'st of thine own case,. 
Of thine own strait confinement and affairs ; 
It was to keep my sons from evil deeds 
That would recoil upon themselves. Ye were 
Not straitly bound in prison, not misj)rized, 
And had no harm to fear. I did not then 
Treat you with scorn but held my treasury 
At your disposal, acting as the Shahs 
Had done before, not idly or without 
A precedent. Chase, minstrelsy, and polo — 
All that befittcth chiefs — were yours at will. 
With hawks and cheetahs, jewels and dinars. 
Your so called prison was a palace where 
Ye lived in joy. I dreaded thee moreover 
Through what the readers of the stars had said. 
That was the cause of thine imprisonment 
That thou mightst do us naught of injury — 
The very injury that thou art doing. 
I never parted with thy horoscope 
Till I had sealed and given it to Shirin. 
When I had reigned for six and thirty years. 
And thou past doubt amidst such pleasant days 



KUBAI) (COMMOXLY CALLliD SlllRWl) 17 

(iav'st all the matter to the wind, although 

Much time had passed o'er us, there came to thee 

A letter out of Hindustan but not 

\Vith()ut my cognizance. The chief of Rajas 

Sent us a letter, jewels, divers stuffs, 

An Indian scimitar, white elephant. 

And all that I could hope for in the world, 

And with the scimitar was gold brocade 

With all varieties of gems uncut. 

To thee the letter was on painted silk ; 

So when I saw the Indian script I called 

An Indian scribe, a fluent, heedful speaker, 

\\\\o when he read the Indian Raja's words 

Wept for the letter ran : ' Live joyfully 

For thou art worthy both of joy and realm. 

And on the day of Dai in month Azar C. 2033 

Thou wilt be king and ruler of the world. 

Thy sire will reign for eight and thirty years. 

For so the stars ordain. Good times will shine 

I^pon thee ; thou wilt don the crown of greatness.' 

These words have been fulfilled to me to-day. 

But we should wash riot from our hearts alTection. 

I was aware that fortune had decreed 

That when thy throne had gained its brilliancy 

Mine only portion would be toil and pain, 

And that my bright day would be turned to gloom ; 

But as I gave, had Faith, made friends, and loved 

I did not lour by reason of that letter. 

I gave it, having read it, to Shirin, 

And pondered much upon it. In her keeping 

Are both the letter and the horoscope. 

And no one great or small is ware thereof. 

If thou wouldst see it make request of her ; 

Thou haply mayst regard it more or less. 

I wot that seeing it thou wilt repent. 

And seek to heal the past. For what thou said'st 

VOL. IX. B 



1 8 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSi 

Of bonds and of imprisonments, and how 
Wc have done others hurt, 'tis this world's way, 
And that of former chiefs and kings of kings. 
And if thou know'st it not speak with an archmage ; 
He will enlijihten thee thereon and tell thee : — 
' 'Tis ill to keep God's enemy alive.' 
Those that were in our prison were mere divs 
Complained of by the righteous. Neither bloodshed 
Nor utter harshness ever was our trade. 
I shut up criminals and did not hold 
Of small account wrongs done by them to others ; 
But now I hear that thou hast freed these men — - 
Men worse than dragons — and for this thou art 
A sinner guilty both in word and deed 
In God's sight. Now that thou art lord be prudent, 
And if thou know'st not how consult the wise. 
Forgive not those that vex thee though thou hopest 
For wealth through them, and 'what can better bonds 
For one in whom thou seest naught but harm ? 
In talking of my wealth thou hast not shown 
Good sense and wisdom. We have never asked 
For more than toll and tax. When these were paid 
If any were still rich, though men might say 
That they were foes and miscreants of the seed 
Of Ahriman, we thought of God and j)assed 
Such matters lightly by. From Him I had 
The crown and throne, and they have cost me dear. 
2034 The Maker of the world, the righteous Judge, 

Hath willed this change of fortune. In the world 

His will is paramount, so when He would 

Our minishmcnt we seek not for addition. 

We sought to please our Judge, but by our toils 

Have not evaded His apportionment. 

And when He asketh me I will tell all. 

That Questioner is wiser than thou art, 

And one more jwtcnt in all good and ill. 



KUBAD {COMMONLY CALLED SlIlRWl) 19 

Tlic miscreants that stand before thee now 

Are not thy friends or kin, and what they say 

Of nic that also will they say of thee 

Before thv foes. They are but slaves of o<)ld 

And silver : thou wilt find in them no helper. 

They have possessed thy heart and there instilled 

Each fault of mine. Such words as these are not 

In thy philosophy and will not profit 

Those miscreants' minds, but I have uttered them 

For my foes' sake that they who read this letter, 

AVrit in the ancient tongue, may know that lies 

I.aek lustre even from the mouths of Shahs. 

'Twill be too a mcmoi-ial in the world, 

A consolation to the man of wisdom. 

And after our decease whoe'er shall read 

These words of ours will learn our policy. 

I gathered armies from Bartas and Chin, 

And everj^where appointed generals. 

Then made attacks upon mine enemies 

Till none dared raise his head. When they were 

scattered 
Our treasuries were all filled. The whole land toiled 
For us, and from the sea so many gems 
Were brought us that the shipmen grew aweary. 
Plain, sea, and mountain, all were mine. Now when 
The treasury of drachms had been expended 
The coffers were refilled with new dinars, 
^Vith precious stones and royal jewelry. 
As well as clothes and implements of war. 
And when our crown was twenty-six years old 
Our treasuries were rich with many gems. 
I struck a new die for my drachms and turned 
To joy and merriment. That year when I 
Had ta'en account I found the total sum 
Ten million of dinars. Paid:iwasis,i 

' Sec Vol. vii., p. 95 note. 



20 THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSI 

In Persian reckoning, I spent and squandered. 
Eaeh purse contained twelve thousand in dinars, 
And those thus spent were royal, while besides 
The tribute and dinars from Hindustan, 
The realm of Riim and land of sorcerers ; 
Besides from every province gifts and tribute 
From all the sovereigns and potentates ; 
C. 2035 Besides New Year and Autunm offerings, 

The gifts of horses and of fair-faced slaves ; 

Besides cuirasses, helmets, axes, swords. 

Which every one sent to us liberally ; 

Besides musk, camphor, sables, beaver-skins. 

Red weasels' and white wolves', our subjects all 

Set suchlike loads upon their beasts and sought 

Our court in haste ; none was recalcitrant. 

Abundant toil of all sorts have we spent 

To amass a treasure — one additional 

To those known as Khuzra and as 'Ariis,i 

Reserved by nie against an evil day. 

We long discussed what name the hoard should have, 

And in the end we called it Bad Awar.- 

Thus in my six and twentieth year of reign 

Heaven till the eight and thirtieth favoured me ; 

My chieftains were all safe, my foes all quaked, 

And now I hear that thou art sovereign — 

An evil juncture this for all the world, 

Which reft of pleasure must perforce be mute. 

Thou wilt make earth calamitous, fulfilled 

With suffering and profitless. Moreover, 

Those same injurious persons that surround thee, 

And are the Light ^ of thy dark nights, will give 

Thy throne up to the wind that thou mayst not 

Enjoy the world. Were there with thee a sage. 

So that thy darkened mind might be illumed. 

Thou wouldst not do amiss in giving gifts 

' Sec Vol. viii., p. 406. ' Id. ' Urmuzd in text. 



HUB Ad (COMMONLY CALLED SHIRWI) 21 

So that 111}' \vcallli nii<iht rcucli I he poor. My son, 

Whose days are few, whose wisdom is l)ut scant ! 

SoHeituck' will rob thy soul of joy. 

This know, that these our treasures are thy stay ; 

The opportunity is in thy grasp. 

They are the appanage of royalty ; 

A world that is all moneyless is lost. 

A pauper Shah will be unjust, and he 

Whose hand is empty hath no strength or worth. 

Without the means of largess he by all 

Will be declared a fraud and not a Shah. 

Moreover, if thy riches reach thy foes. 

And all the idols come to Brahmans' hands, 

The worshippers will turn from God, thy name 

And fame be spurned. If thou art treasureless 

Thou wilt not have an army, and thy subjects 

Will hail thee not as Shah. The dog is good 

At begging bread, but if thou fillest him 

He threateneth thy life. Again, thou said'st 

About my strategy that I have stationed 

The troops along the roads, and blamest me 

Through ignorance, not knowing gain from loss. 

The answer is that by my toil I gathered C. 2036 

My splendid treasures, captured foreign cities, 

And shattered all my foes that we might sit 

Without vexation, toil, or injury 

In peace upon the pleasant throne. I scattered - 

My horse about the frontier, and (to show 

The difference 'twixt the worthless and the worthy) 

When thou recall'st the troops from every side 

The foe will see the road clear, for Iran 

Is like a garden in the jocund Spring, 

Whose hajopy blossoms never fail to flower, 

A garden of pomegranate and narcissus. 

Of apples and of quince ; but when the orchard 

Bccometh void of men the enemy 



11 THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSl 

Will root up Jill the marjoram and snap 

All l)ranches of |)t)meoTanate and o!" quince. 

Iraivs walls are its troops and o(;.»r ol' war, 

Its thorns all arrows on its battlements, 

And if in wantonness thou flingest down 

The garden-wall the garden is as waste. 

As sea or upland. Cast not down its wall 

Or thou wilt break the Iranians' hearts and backs, 

For then will raid and ravage, horsemen's shouts, 

And all the incidents of war ensue. 

Expose not thou our children, wives, and land 

To trouble : let but one such year elapse. 

And sages will describe thee as a fool. 

Now I have heard that thou dost give high place 

To men unworthy. Know that Nushirwan, 

Son of Kubad,^ recorded in his Letter 

Of Counsel that whoe'er doth give his arms 

To foes doth give himself to slaughtering, 

Since, when he asketh back those arms for use, 

The enemy will fight. ^ As for the message 

Of Caesar, which hath made thee call me heartless, 

And self-willed, thou recallest not the facts : 

Thy words were prompted by some counsellor. 

As for my tyranny and his good faith, 

Canst thou discern good faith from tyranny ? 

Receive mine answer, thou of little wit ! 

But let me say withal, as is but right, 

Thou art the plaintiff and the witness too— 

A thing no man of wisdom would allow. 

Whezi Cicsar washed off from his face the dust 

Of bale he chose me as his son-in-law 

For valour's sake. Whoever walketh not 

The earth for ill, and hath some share of wisdom 

Within him, knoweth that Bahram Chubina 

Began the feud and that the Iranians 

' Reading with P. and T. ' See Vol. viii.. p. 27. 



KUBAD [COMMONLY CALLED SHIRWI) 23 

Took sides with him. The Uunians did not triumph 

O'er him ; the driftin<>- sand ean not bind fast- 

The mountain ! Hut in Ihrd fi^lit God vouehsafcd 

To aid me. and tiic armies of tlie worhl 

Were nau<jht to me. The Iranians liavc heard C. 2037 

Of those events, and thou shouldst liear from thetn. 

As for myself, I did whatever I could, 

Upon the day of fight, for Niyatus 

With kindness and with magnanimity, 

But have not reckoned that day's recompense, 

And Farrukhzad will tell thee just the same : 

Look not upon the world with boyish eyes. 

Gashasp, who w^as oiu' treasurer, can tell, 

And that good archimage, our minister, 

That I bestowed upon the Ruman troops 

A hundred thousand purses from our treasures. 

I gave to Niyatus a thousand nuggets. 

With earrings and red gold. Each nugget's weight 

Was as a thousand treasury-miskals 

I reckoned. I bestowed on him withal 

Fine watered pearls that experts had found flawless, 

And every one worth thirty thousand drachms 

To jewellers, and five score noble steeds, 

Selected from my stables — fifty saddled. 

The others very choice, housed in brocade. 

Mates for the wind upon the waste. I sent 

All these to Caesar with my thanks withal. 

For what thou said'st about the Cross of Christ, 

That bit of old wood flung among my treasures — 

A matter of no loss or gain to me — 

Thou hast been listening to some Christian's talk. 

I mused that one like Caesar, great and might}^ 

Surrounded as he is by learned men — 

Philosophers and potentates and priests — 

Should call one that was executed God ! 

While as for this dry, rotten wood, if this 



24 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

Merc useless Cross were God "twould be Urmiizd, 
Whose name we give to every month's first day, 
And would have vanished from our treasury 
As Christ himself departed from the world. 
Again for what thou said'st : ' Make thine excuse, 
Amend thy conduct and ensue God's path, 
I answer : ' May the two hands of Kubad, 
His feet and lips and tongue rot ! It was God 
Who placed the crown upon my head : I took, 
And revelled in the gift. I have returned it 
Since He demanded it. What next I wonder ? 
To Him will I confess, not to a boy 
Scarce able to distinguish good and ill.' 
All that God doth is welcome unto me 
Though I have seen much woe and bitterness. 
For eight and thirty years have I been Shah, 
And none among the kings hath been my peer. 
He that bestowed this world on me may give 
Another but will have no thanks of mine ! 
c. 2038 I will pronounce a blessing on the realm : — 
' May earth be ever teeming with the wise.' 
So long as God shall help and succour us 
None will dare curse." 

Then said he to Kharrad : — 
" O Memory of the great ones of the world ! 
Say to that foolish and impetuous boy : — 
' The lustre of our countenance is dimmed : 
Farewell to thee for ever. As for me. 
May all our converse be henceforth with sages.' 
As for yourselves, illustrious messengers, 
Ye Persians eloquent and eminent ! 
To both of you I also bid farewell. 
Say nothing but the words that ye have heard. 
I give my blessing to the world at large, 
\Vhich we have looked on as a jiassing thing. 
All mother-born must die — whome'er thou hast 



KUBAD [COMMONLY CALLED SHtRWt) 25 

III iiiiiul Khiisrau l*ar\vi/, hack lo Kiil);'ul. 

S,) t()«) Ilushaiin'. .Jainsln'd. aiul Taliinuras— 

To all tlie world the loiiiits of fear and hope — 

Whom div and l)easl acknowledged, passed and died 

When their day ended. Faridnn, the blest, 

Who banned ill, elose or open, from the world, 

And stayed Zahhak the Aral)'s hand from evil, 

Seajx^l not by bravery the clutch of fate. 

So was it Avith Arish whose arrow's flight 

Was one farsang ;^ victorious Karan, 

The captvH'cr of cities ; Kai Kubad, 

Who having come from IMovnit Alburz became 

Through manhood world-lord over all the folk. 

And built himself a world-famed house of crystal, ^ 

Adorned with lustrous pearls and gates of gems.^ 

So was it with Kaiis, that man of might, 

Who took the world by skill and policy, 

lie that adventured toward the sky above. 

Unwitting of the j)rocesses of time ; 

So too with Siyawush, that lion famed, 

Who slew two tigers in his youthful days,* 

And built Gang-di/h'' with toil but gat therefrom 

No treasure. Where are now Afrasiyab, 

The Tiu"kma?i king, whose semblance e'en in dream 

None seeth ; where Rustam, Zal, Asfandiyar, 

Whose fame is their memorial with us ; 

Gudarz and his choice sons, three score and ten. 

Those cavaliers u})on the riding-grovmd. 

And lions of the fray ; where Kai Khusrau, 

The noble lion-man who in the fight 

Made lions prisoners ; and Shah Gushtasp, 

The convert to ' The Good Faith,' he by whom 

' Much further according to the legend. See Vol. v., p. 12. 

' This is attributed to Kai Kaus elsewhere. See Vol. ii., pp. Si, loi. 

* This line occurs three couplets too low in C. 

* This is not mentioned elsewhere in the poem. 
'See Vol. ii., pp. i8g, 279. 



26 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

Grace was renewed ; where went renowned Sikandar, 
Who overturned the world, and where Jamasp, 
Who shone in astrologic lore more brightly 
C. 2039 Than Sol or Vxnus ? Where is that famed Shah, 

Bahram Giir, matchless in his strength and courage ? 

No Shah was like him in munificence ; 

The turning heaven dared not to touch his head. 

Where is that Shah, my grandsire, bright of soul 

Who ruled the world as Kisra Niishirwan ? 

Where are the seven and forty world-lords ?^ Gone 

Is all their work, gone are the Great and Wise, 

The warrior-horsemen and the men of lore. 

These passing those in prowess and those these 

In years ? They all have left this spacious world. 

Left palace, hall, and riding-ground. Midst Shahs, 

Though some were older far, I had no peer. 

I walked the world for good and ill, and held 

The evil day aloof. 'Twas mine to traverse 

Full many a rugged path and sweep away 

Full many a foe. My treasures fill all lands ; 

Wliere earth and water are my toil is seen. 

^V^hcn with me too the world shall cease, and all 

The nobles' hopes grow dim, with my son also 

The throne will not abide, for he will quit it. 

And all his fortune end. What time the angel 

That taketh souls approacheth I shall say : — 

' Take my soul gently.' I will clear my heart 

By penitence, and freedom from offence 

Shall be my breastplate. Well have men of wisdom, 

Good, veteran, learned, declared : ' If wakeful fortune 

Decline one must expect fears manifold, 

And he whose day of greatness hath gone by 

* Khusrau Parwlz was only the forty-third Shah. Perhaps 
some, who never became Shahs, such as Siyawush and Asfantliyar, 
are included, or it may be that the author of this defence (sec p. 
4) wrote from his own point of view, not that of the supposed 
speaker. 



HUB Ad {COMMONLY CALLED SHIRWI) 27 

Is I'Dolisli if lie askclh its rt'liirii/ 
This is my lucssage to the workl, lu iiitun 
And niiiihty too : ere lontv tlie Shall and all 
His lanujiis troops will l;ill to slaughtering 
Ivieh other and (ling fire on field and IVll ; 
Then sires will fall by sons and sons by sires ; 
Oui- enemies, the people that discoursed 
or evil deeds and ehilling words, will pay 
The smart when we arc gone and not for long 
Enjoy the world. Since rule and greatness end 
With me what reck if Lion or another 
Shall have the sway ? " 

Ashtad and brave Kharrad, 
Son of Barzin, those sages, when they heard 
The message of that leader, were heart-pierced. 
And smote their heads. Both sorrowed for their 

words ; 
They bnlTeted their faces, rent their robes C. 2040 

In grief, and scattered dust upon their heads. 
Those ancients fared forth from his presence, weeping, 
In anguish, with their hearts all arrow-points. 
With furrowed faces and in sore distress 
They went before Shirwi and every whit 
To that man brainless and incompetent 
Detailed the message that the Shah had sent. 



§•5 

How Shirivi grieved for Khusrau Partviz and hoiv the 
Chiefs ivere displeased thereat 

Shirwi wept bitterly on hearing this ; 

His heart quaked for the crown and throne, and when 

The company dispersed that had dismayed him 



28 THE SH Ah NAM A OF FIRDAUSl 

With foul words clamouring for his father's blood, 
And burning the youth's heart, he left the throne 
Of kingship, clasped with honoured hands his head, 
And wept blood on his breast. News of that weeping 
And of the lamentation of the king, 
Came to the host and all were in dismay. 
They met, discussed Khusrau Parwiz, and cried : —  
" If he shall sit upon the throne again 
He will disgrace the captains of the host." 

Whenas the sun rose o'er the darksome hills 
The malcontents awoke and went to court. 
The Shah, on hearing of it, took his seat 
Upon the throne, and those of high degree. 
Akin or alien, approached the presence. 
They took their seats with scowls but no one spoke. 
The king said : " Gibbeting is the desert 
Of him that mourneth not my father's woes. 
I call such misbegotten and a knave. 
Let none depend on such because that man 
Is rottener than a rotten willow-tree." 

He gat this answer from the men in fault : — 
" Call whosoever saith : ' I serve two Shahs ' 
A fool at heart and vile whate'er his rank." 

Shirwi rejoined : " For Shahs no wealth no troops ! 
For one month we will utter pleasant words. 
And give no hint of duress to my sire ; 
He may make statements that will gladdeji us 
Because his treasures are in every coast." 
C. 2041 On hearing this they rose to seek their homes. 

Then Shah Shirwi gave orders to the cooks : — 
" Let nothing be denied Khusrau Parwiz : 
Serve up his food upon a golden service, 
And let the food itself be rich and grateful." 

The servers brought it but he would not eat 
The viands that were profltcred, hot or cold. 
Shirin's hand brought to him all that he ate 



KUBAD (COMMONLY CALLED SHIRWI) 29 

Because she sorrowed with him in his grief. 

She was his sole good friend and soothed his woes 

Both day and night, shared all his hopes and fears, 

And quaked for him like willow in the wind. 

A month passed and meanwhile Khusraii Parwiz 

Was full of pain and anguish night and day, 

His faults and crimes recalled to memory, 

And little relish of that life had he. 



Hoiv Bdrhad lamented Kliusrau Parwiz, cut off his oivn 
FitKjcrs, and burned his Instruments of Music 

Now list the lamentation of Barbad,^ 
And grow forgetful of the Avorld at large. 
On hearing that the Shah, not by advice 
And 'gainst his will, no longer filled the throne, 
That " men are seeking how to murder him ; 
The soldiers are renouncing fealty," 
Barbad came from Chahram to Taisafiin 
With tearful eyes and heart o'ercharged ; he came 
To that abode and saw the Shah whereat 
His tulip-cheeks became like fenugreek. 
He bode awhile in presence of the Shah, 
Then went with wailing to the audience-hall. 
His love flamed in his heart, his heart and soul 
Burned in his anguish for Khusrau Parwiz ; 
His eyes rained like a cloud in Spring and made 
His bosom as the margent of the sea. 
He fashioned him a dirge upon the harp, 
And to that dirge he sang a mournful })laint. 
' For the story of Barbad sec Vol. viii., p. 396 seq. 



30 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSi 

With visage wan and heart fulfilled with grief 
He thus lamented in the olden tongue : — 



" O Shah ! O noble chieftain ! O Khusrau ! 

O great ! O strong ! O hero ne'er cast down ! 
Where are thy mastery and greatness now, 

Where all thy Grace, thy fortune, and thy crown ? 

" Where that imperial circlet, towering height ? 

AVhcre are thine armlets and thine ivory throne? 
Where all thy manliness, thy Grace, and might. 
Who 'neath tliy wings hadst this world for thine 
own ? 

" Oh ! whither are thy dames and minstrels gone, 
Gate, audience-hall, and leaders of thy day, 
C. 2042 The diadem and Kawa's gonfalon, 

And all the blue-steel falchions, where are they ,? 

" Where are the head, the crown that loved it well — 
Mate of the earrings and the throne of gold ? 
Where are Shabdiz, his stirrups and his scll- 
The steed that 'neath thee ever caracol'd ? 

" Where are thy helmet, head, and habergeon 
All golden and compacted gem to gem, 

Thy cavaliers in gold caparison, 

Whose swords made enemies the sheaths for I hem? 

" Where all the camels for thy progresses. 
The golden litters and attendance rife, 
Led steeds, white elephants, and dromedaries ? 
Have one and all grown hopeless 01 thy life ? 



KUBAD [COMMONLY CALLED SHIRW!) 31 

" Where arc thy fluent tongue and courteous, 

Thy heart, thy purjiosc, and thine ardent soul ? 
Why reft of all art thou abandoned thus ? 
Hast read of such a day in any roll ? 

'' Oh ! trust not to this world \vhose remedy 
Is weaker than its bane. 'Twas thy desire 
To have a son to aid and succour thee : 

Now through the son the gyves are on the sire ! 

" It is by sons that kings obtain their might, 
And are unblemished by time's travaihngs ; 

Yet ever as his sons increased in height 

Both Grace and vigour failed the king of kings. 

" None that shall lend an ear while men recall 
Tiie story of Khusrau Parwiz nmst dare 

To trust the world. Account as ruined all 
Iran and as the pards' and lions' lair. 

" Of the Sasanian race the Shah w^as head — - 

One peerless in the sight of crown and state : 
The foeman's wishes are accomplished. 
And, like fran, the race is desolate. 

'' No man possessed a larger host than he. 

Yet who had cause for justice to beseech ? 
The great ])rotector brought the misery, 

And now the wolves are making for the breach ! 

" ' O Shah devoid of shame ! ' thus tell Shirwi, 
' Such conduct is Jiot ^vorthy of this court. 
Count not upon thy trooj)s' lldelity 

When war is rife o;i all sides.' God support 



32 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSi 

" Thy soul, my master ! and it is my prayer 

That He thy foemen's heads may headlong fling. 

By God and by thy life, my king ! I swear 

By New Year's Day, by sun, and joeund Spring, 

" If e'er this hand of mine again shall tin-n 
To harping may no blessing light on me ; 
Mine instruments of music will I burn 
That I may ne'er behold thine enemy." 

He cut four fingers off and grasped the stumps 
Within his other palm. Returning home 
He kindled fire and burned his instruments, 
While those about Kubad both day and night 
At all that might befall them quaked with fright. 



§5 

How the Chiefs demanded from. Shirivi the Death of 
Khusrau Pariviz and how he ivas slain by Mihr 
Ilurmuzd 

C- 2043 Shirwi, a timid, inexperienced youth, 

Found that the throne beneath him was a snare. 
While readers of mankind saw that 'twas time 
For men of might. Those that had done the ill. 
And had produced that coil, went from the hall 
Of audience to the presence of Kubad 
To mind him of their infamous designs : — 
" We said before and now we say again 
Thy thoughts are not on government alone. 
There are two Shahs now seated in one room. 
One on the throne and one on its degree. 



KUDAD {COMMONLY CALLED SIIIRWI) 33 

And whc'U relations nrow "Iwixl sire and son 
They will behead the servants one and all. 
It may not be, so speak of it no more." 

Shirwi was iri^htcned and he played poltroon 
Because in their hands he was as a slave. 
He answered : " None will bring him to the toils 
Except a man whose name is infamous. 
Ye must go homeward and advise thereon. 
Inquire : ' What man is there that will abate 
Our troubles secretly ? ' " 

The Shah's^ ill-wishers 
Sought for a murderer to mvu'dcr him 
By stealth, but none possessed the pluck or courage 
To shed the blood of such a king and hang 
A mountain round his own neck. Everywhere 
The Shah's foes sought until they met with one 
Blue-eyed, pale-chcckcd, his body parched and hairy, 
With lips of lapis-lazuli, with feet 
All dust, and belly ravenous ; the head 
Of that ill-doer was bare. None knew his name 
Midst high and low. This villain (may he never 
See jocund Paradise !) sought Farrukhzad, 
And undertook the deed. " This strife is mine," 
He said. "If ye will make it worth my while 
This is my quarry." 

" Go and do it then 
" If thou art able," Farrukhzad replied. 
" Moreover open not thy lips herein. 
I have a purse full of dinars for thee. 
And I will look upon thcc as my son." 

He gave the man a dagger keen and bright, C. 2044 

And then the murderer set forth in haste. 
The miscreant, when he approached the Shah, 
Saw him upon the throne, a slave attending, 
Khusrau I'arwiz quaked when he saw that man, 

' Khusrau I'arwi'z. 
VOL. IX. C 



34 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

And shed tears from his eyelids on his cheeks 
Bcaaiise his heart bare witness that the day 
Of heaviness was near. He cried : " O wretch ! 
What is thy name ? Thy mother needs must wail 

thee." 
The man replied : " They call me Mihr Hurmuzd, 
A stranger here with neither friend nor mate." 

Thus "said Khusrau Parwiz : " My time hath come, 
And by the hand of an unworthy foe, 
^Vhose face is not a man's, w^iose love none seeketh." 

lie bade a boy attending him : "Go fetch. 
My little guide ! an ewer, water, musk, 
And ambergris, with cleaner, fairer robes." 

The boy-slave heard, unwitting what was meant, 
And so the httle servant went away, 
And brought a golden ewer to the Shah 
As well as garments and a bowl of water, 
Whereon Khusrau Parwiz made haste to go. 
Gazed on the sacred twigs and muttered prayers : 
It was no time for words or private talk. 
The Shah put on the garments brought, he made 
Beneath his breath confession of his faults. 
And wrapped a new simarre about his head 
In order not to see his murderer's face. 
Then Mihr Hurmuzd, the dagger in his hand, 
Made fast the door and coming quickly raised 
The great king's robe and pierced his liverstead. 

Such is the process of this whirling Avorld, 
From thee its secret kcei)ing closely furled ! 
The blameless speaker and the boastful see 
That all its doings are but vanity. 
For be thou wealthy or in evil case 
This Wayside Inn is no abiding-place ; 
Yet be offenceless and ensue right ways 
If thou desirest to receive just praise. 

Wlien tidings reached the highways and bazars ; — 



KUBAD [COMMOyLY CALLED SHIRWI) 35 

" Khiisrau Paruiz was slaiiohtcrcd thus," his foes 

Went to the pahiee-prisoii of the sad, 

Where fifteen of his noble sons were bound. 

And slew them there, thouoh innoeent, what time 

The fortune of the Shah w^as overthrown. 

Shirwi, the world-lord, dared say naught and hid 

His grief though he wept sorely at the news. 

And afterwards sent twenty of his guards 

To keep his brothers' wives and ehildren safe ; C. 2045 

Now that the Shah had been thus done to death. 

So passed that reign and mighty host aw'ay, 
Its majesty, its manhood, and its sway 
Such as no kings of kings possessed before, 
Or heard of from the men renowned of yore. 
It booteth nothing what the wise man saith 
When onee his head is in the dragon's breath. 
Call this world " crocodile " for it doth gnaw 
The prey that it hath taken with its claw. 
The W'Ork of Shah Khusrau Parwiz is done ; 
His famous hoards and throne and host are gone. 
To put one's trust in this world is to be 
In quest of dates upon a willow-tree. 
W^hy err in such a fashion from the way 
Alike by darksome night and shining day ? 
W^hate'er thy gains let them suffice thee still 
As thou art fain to save thy soul from ill, 
And in thy day of strength hold thyself weak ; 
For kindly impulses and justice seek, 
And be intent on good. For what is thine 
To give or spend do as thou dost incline ; 
All else is pain and toil. How goodlier 
Than we are friends whose faithfidness is clear ! 
Such faithfulness of friends is greatly dear. 



36 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 







How Shirwi asked SJiirin in Marriage, how Shirin 
killed herself, and hoiv Shirivi ivas slain 

Since I have ended with Khusrau Parwiz 
I speak next of Shirwi and of Shirin. 

As soon as three and fifty days had passed 
Since that whereon that glorious Shah was slain 
Shirwi dispatched Shirin a messenger 
To say : " Thou wicked, potent sorceress. 
Learned but in necromancy and black arts ! 
In all Iran thou art the guiltiest. 
By necromancy didst thou gain the Shah, 
And by thy craft thou bringest down the moon. 
Quake, guilty one ! and come to me. Abide not 
Thus in thy palace, joyful and secure." 

Shirin raged at his message and abuse 
So foul and senseless. Thus she said : " God grant 
That parricides possess not Grace or presence. 
I will not see the wretch e'en from afar 
At funeral or feast." 

That mournful dame 
Sent for a scribe and had a document 
Drawn in the olden tongue, instructing him 
Regarding her last wishes and estate. 
She kept a little poison in a pyx ; 
She could not well procure it in the city. 
She kept it on her, sewed a winding-sheet 
To wrap her form — that cypress of the garden — 
And then returned this answer to Shirwi : — 
** Ej^alted Shah, the wearer of the crown ! 
Now perish all thy words and perish too 
The villain's heart and spirit that hath heard 



KUBAD {COMMONLY CALLED SIltRWl) 37 

Of witchcraft save by name and joyed therein. 

Had Shah Khusrau Parwiz been one to cheer 

His soul with sorcery there would have been 

A sorceress within his bower, and she 

Had seen his faee.^ He kept me for his })leasure, 

And when the dawn was peejjing he was wont 

To call me from the golden bower and joy 

At sight of me. Shame on thee for such words ! 

Such knavish talk becometh not a kinff. 

Remember God, the Giver of all good, 

And utter not such words in others' hearing." 

They brought the answ^er to the Shah. Shirwi 
Raged 'gainst the guiltless dame^ and said : " Thou 

needs 
Must come. None is blood-thirstier than thou. 
Come and behold my crown's top. If it be 
Magnifical then do it reverence." 

Shirin, on hearing this, was full of pain ; 
She writhed ; her cheeks grew wan. She thus 

replied : — 
" I will not come to thee save in the presence 
Of those wise men that are about thy court, 
Men of experience and clerkly skill." 

Shirwi dispatched and summoned fifty men 
Both wise and old, then sent one to Shirin, 
To say : " Arise and come. Enough of talk." 

Thereat she robed herself in blue and black, 
And drew anear the Shah, approached apace 
The Rosary of Revellers^ — the spot 
Wherein those fluent Persians were — and sat 
Behind the great king's curtain as became 

' Reading with P. 

» So far as the charge of witchcraft was concerned. Shirin (Vol. 
viii., p. 389) had murdered Maryam, Kubad's mother. 

' " elle alia droit a la salle de fete de Schadegan." Mohl or, 
more strictly, Barbier de Meynard, who completed the translation 
from §4 to the end of the poem. 



38 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

The virtuous. He sent to her to say : — 

" Two months^ of mourning for Khusrau Parwiz- 

Are o'er. Now be my wife that thou mayst take 

Thy pleasure and avoid a mean estate. 

I will maintain thee as my father did, 

And e'en with more respect and tenderness." 

Shirin replied : " Let me be righted hrst, 
And then my hfe shall be at thy dispose. 
I will not hesitate in answering 
The hest and purpose of thy glorious heart." 

Shirwi agreed to that fair dame's request, 
C. 2047 Whereat the noble lady raised her voice 

Behind the royal curtains, saying : " O Shah ! 
Be happy and victorious. Thou said'st 
That I was a bad woman and a witch, 
Remote from purity and rectitude." 

Shirwi replied : " 'Twas so, but generous folk 
Do not take dudgeon at mere hastiness." 

Shirin addressed the other Persians present 
Within the Rosary of Revellers, 
And asked : " What have ye seen in me of ill. 
Guile, folly, and dark ways ? For many a year 
I was the mistress of Iran and helped 
The Brave in everything. I ne'er ensued 
Aught but the right ; fraud and deceit I banned. 
Through my word many were made governors. 
And took their portions of the world full oft. 
Who hath beheld my shadow in Iran 
Away from home ? If any one hath marked 
My shadow, crown, and state let such declare 
What he hath seen or heard and by his answer 
Reveal the truth." 

The magnates in attendance 
All spake her fair. " In all the world," thc}^ said, 
" She hath no peer in public aiul in private." 

' Reading with P. 



KUBAD [COMMONLY CALLED SHIrwI) 39 

Shiriii proceeded lliiis : " Ye lords and chiefs 
Jiotli veteran and redoubled ! three thinos make 
Tlie worth ol' women that bedeck the throne 
Of greatness : one is motlesty and wealth 
Wherewith her husband may adorn his house ; 
The next is bearing blessed sons, that she 
May e'en exceed her spouse in hajijiincss ; 
The tliird is having beauty and fine form, 
Joined with the love of a sequestered life. 
When I was mated to Khusrau Parwiz, 
And entered on seclusion, he had come 
Weak and dispirited from Riim to live 
Within our land, but after reached such power 
As none had heard of or had looked upon. 
Moreover I have had four sons by him 
To his great joy — Nastur, Shahryar, Farud, 
And ^Nlardanshah, blue heaven's coronal. 
Jamshid and Faridun had not such sons ; 
May my tongue perish if I lie herein ! 
Their bodies all are now beneath the dust, 
Their spirits roaming in pure Paradise." 

Unveiling then her lovely countenance, 
And musky hair, " There is my face," she added, 
" Such as it is. If there be falsehood show it. 
My hair was all my hidden excellence. 
For none on earth e'er used to look thereon. 
What I display is all my sorcery. 
Not necromancy, fraud, and evil bent." 

None had beheld her hair before, no chief C. 204S 

Had heard thereof. The elders were astound. 
And their mouths watered. When Shirwi beheld 
The visage of Shirin his spirit flew 
Unmarked away from him. Her face so dazed him 
That love of her filled all his heart. He cried : —  
" I want none but thyself. If I have thee 
For wife Iran can give me nothing more. 



40 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

I will not go from thy commands, but linm 
My loyalty to thee upon mine eyes." 

The lady of the lovely face replied : — 
" I still need somewhat of the Iranian king. 
I have two wants if thou wilt bid me speak, 
And may thy king of kingship last for ever." 

Shirwi replied : " My soul is thine, thy wish, 
Whate'er it be, is granted." 

Said Shirin : — 
" All treasures laid up by me in this land 
Thou shalt assign me as mine own before 
This noble company and write thyself 
Upon this roll that thou renouncest all, 
Both small and great." 

Shirwi made haste to do 
Her bidding. Having gained her wish she quitted 
The Rosary of Revellers, the chiefs 
And noble Persians, went home, freed her slaves. 
And made them happy with that wealth of hers 
Whereof she gave a part to mendicants. 
And to her family a larger share. 
She gave too somewhat to the Fanes of Fire, 
The feasts of New Year's Day and Mihr and Sada, 
To ruined homes and caravansarais 
Then turned to lions' lairs. All this she gave 
As offerings from Khusrau Parwiz, the world-lord, 
And joyed his soul thereby. She sought the garden 
And taking off her veil sat unadorned 
Upon the ground and summoning her folk 
Assigned with courtesy a place to each, 
Then cried thus loudly : " Hear, ye unaggrieved ! 
For none will ever see my face again. 
Fear ye the Judge of those that seek for justice, 
The Lighter of the sun and moon and stars, 
And speak but truth ; deceit is not for sages. 
Since first I came before Khusrau Parwiz, 



KUDAD [COMMONLY CALLED SUllUVl) 41 

First made mine entry to his golden bower, 
And was chiel' wife and Cilory oT tiie Shah, 
llatli any I'anlt at all appeared in me ? 
There is no need to speak to save my face : 
What booteth that to woman in her need ? " 

All rose to make reply : " Famed dame of dames, c. 2049 
So eloquent and wise and bright of soul ! 
By God ! none ever saw thee, ever heard 
Thy voiee behind the curtains. Verily 
Thy like hath sat not on the goodly throne 
Since Shah Hiishano-.'* 

Then all the servitors. 
Slaves emulous and vigilant of heart. 
Exclaimed : " Exalted lady praised in Chin, 
In Rum and in Taraz ! who would presume 
To speak aught ill of thee ? Could evil-doing 
Befit that face of thine ? " 

Thus said Shirin : — 
" This reprobate, whom heaven above will curse, 
Slew his own sire to comjiass crown and throne. 
And may he never more see fortune's face ! 
Hath he himself shut death out by a wall 
Who lightly recked thus of a father's blood ? 
He sent a message to me that bedimmed 
Mine own shrewd soul. I answered : ' While I live 
I\Iy heart shall serve my Maker.' I declared 
My ])urpose fully, fearful of my foe : 
He may defame me publicly when dead. 
Ye are free agents and my slaves no longer." 

They wept much at her words and furthermore 
Consumed with anguish for Khusrau Parwiz. 
Informants went before the Shjih and told 
What thev had heard about that guiltless dame. 
He asked : " Hath that good lady further wishes ? " 

She sent to say : "I have one wish, no more : 
I fain would ope the late Shah's charnel-house ; 



42 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

I have a great desire to look on him." 

Shirwi rcpHcd : " So do, 'tis natural." 
The keej)er oped tlie door. That pious lady 
Began her wailing, went and laid her face 
Uj)on the visage of Khusrau Parwiz, 
S])ake of the past and took the mortal bane :^ 
She sent the dust up from her own sweet life. 
She sat beside the Shah with visage veiled. 
Clad in a single eamphor-scented robe ; 
She set her back against the wall and died ; 
She died and won the plaudits of the world. 
Shirwi fell sick when he had heard the news, 
For such a spectacle afTrighted him. 
He bade construct another sepulchre, 
And make her diadem of musk and camphor, 
c. 2050 He shut the old Shah's charnel. Soon they gave 
Shirwi the bane ; the world had had its fill 
Of Shahs ! Thus luckless both in birth and death 
He left the throne of kingship to his son. 
One reigneth seven months and in the eighth 
Doth don the camphor crown ! Of earth's good things 
To have possession of the throne is best. 
Of evils life cut short is evilest. 

: >C/. p. 36. 



XLV 

ARDSHIR, SON OF SIIIRWI 
HE REIGNED SIX MONTHS 

ARGUMENT 

Ardshir's accession is well received by the people. He 
makes Piriiz, son of Khusrau, the captain of the host. Guraz, 
on the pretext of avenging Khusrau Parwiz, but really with 
the intention of seizing the kingship for himstlf, schenios to 
bring about the death of the Shah who is murdered at a 
banquet by Piniz. 

NOTE 

Ardshir (Artaxerxes III., September, A.D. 628 — April, 
A.D. 630) was, according to Tabari, only seven years old 
at his accession. By some accounts he was only one year 
old at the time.^ He was of course a mere, puppet in the 
hands of the nobles. The " True Cross," if the date of its 
elevation at Jerusalem — Sept. 14th, A.D. 629 — be correct, 
must have been restored during his reign. '^ 

§ 1 , The Arabic Tabari says that the realm was administered 
by Mih-Azar-Gushnasp (Mihr 'Hasis in the Persian version), 
the High Steward, who had charge of the Shah's person. 
This may account for his being made out to be a regicide in 
the Shahnama. He really seems to have b:'en a well-inten- 
tioned man who did his best in very difficult circumstances. 
At all events, according to the Persian Tabari, ' Shahrbaraz, 
after taking j)os3ession of Cte.siphon, slew him and other 
nobles on the i)retext of avenging the death of Khusrau 
Parwiz. 

' XT, p. 386. ZT, ii., 347. - NT, p. 392 note. 



44 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

§ 2. It appears that Shalirbaiaz (Guraz) was not con- 
sulted when Ardshir was raised to the throne, and he made 
this an excuse for taking violent measures. The occasion 
was a favourable one for an ambitious general in command 
of an army. Moreover, he had an understanding, confirmed 
by matrimonial alliances, with Heraclius, who no doubt 
promised to recognise him if he became Shah. He accordingly 
marched upon Ctesiphon with 6,000 or, according to another 
account, 60,000 troops. The High Steward made an attempt 
at resistance, but Shahrbaraz with the connivance of the 
captain of the guard and other chiefs was successful and the 
usual scenes of outrage and massacre ensued.^ 



§1 

How Ardshir, Son of Shirivi, ascended the Throne and 
harangued the Chiefs 

Now as the next confronting me I voice 
The reign of Shah Ardshir, I have no choice. 

When Shah Ardshir sat on the throne both young 
And old flocked to him from Iran, for many 
Were chiefs grown old, to hear what he would say.^ 
The young Ardshir then loosed his tongue and thus 
He spake : " Ye well-tried warriors ! may one, 
Whoe'er he be, that sitteth on the seat 
Of sovereignty possess an open mind, 
And worship God. We will ensue the course 
Of former Shahs, ensue too Grace and Faith. 
May we remember God who giveth good, 
May all our acts be just ! I will advance 
The pious and make tyrants bleed. I trust 
The army to Plruz, son of Khusrau, 
Who loveth equity and loyal lieges. 

' For the above see /(i., p. 386 and «o/es. ZT, ii., 3.47. RSM, p. 541 

' Couplet omitted. 



ARDSHIR. SOS OF SHIRWI 45 

They for their part with such a paladin 
Still will be happy and serene of soul." 

Full many were contented with his speech ; 
A peaceful ruler was the wish of each. 



§2 

How Gurdz tvas displeased at ArdsJnr being Shah and 
how he caused Ardshir to he slain hy Piruz, Son of 
Khusrau 

Then tidings reached Guraz, who had involved 

Khusrau Parwiz in sorrow and distress, 

And he dispatched from Rum a man to say : — 

" The crown of vile Shirwi is in the dust. 

Hell take his soul aiid be his charnel-house C. 2051 

O'erturned ! Who ever knew a lofty cypress 

Wrecked in the garden by the grass, and one 

Like to Khusrau Parwiz, whose peer as king 

Time's eye and heart perceive not, who bestowed 

My greatness on me, and I have not turned 

From his behest ? Now fate dethroneth him, 

And fortune's face is utterly averse ; 

The circling heaven is his foe and maketh 

His portion to be hidden in the earth ; 

The sun and moon amerce him of his sway. 

And take the crown and throne from such a king, 

Bestow the sovereignty upon Shirwi, 

And give up all Iran to wretchedness ! 

When he j)assed and Ardshir assumed the crown 

Both young and old rejoiced in him, but I, 

If I have any portion in Iran, 

Will suffer not Qur countrv's air tg breathe 



46 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

Upon him. Have I not received the news 

Of Shah Khiisraii Parwiz wrecked by the words 

Of one of evil mark ? I will not have 

A king like this one though the age be Shahless, 

For there is much contention in his head, 

And he adviscth with another host. 

Now will I come in force with chosen chiefs 

Of Rum and of Iran, and we shall see 

What sort of Head that is to whom such schemes 

Apj)cal. I will uproot him so that never 

Shall he' name kingship more." 

He sent a runner 
To seek the ancients of the Iranian host, 
And strove in other fashion to advance 
His ill designs by writing to Piriiz, 
Son of Khusrau, thus : " The Sasanians' fortune 
Is louring and we need a world-aspirant 
To gird himself for action. Haply thou 
. Art ware of what to do and how to take 
The needful steps, wilt seek for many helpers, 
Both young and old, wilt clear away Ardshir, 
And afterwards attain thy whole desire, 
Be safe and well contented ; but if thou 
Reveal this plot, and feed the sword of war 
With blood, I Avill lead forth such hosts from Rum 
That I shall make the world dark in thine eyes. 
Heed avcII my" words, and mayst thou think no scorii 
Of mine intent ; thou nuist not fall through folly. 
Oh ! pass not from the throne of majesty 
To underneath the dust. Rc])entance then 
Will not avail thee when in wreak my sword 
Is reaping heads." 

Piruz, son of Khusrau, 
When he had read that letter and perceived 
The whole intendment of that self-willed man, 
C- 205 i Much pondered on the matter and consulted 



AUDSlliR, SON Ol- SIliRWt ^7 

Tlic ancient ma<Tnate.s, saying: " Tliis alTair 
Ilatli conic upon inc unawares and like 
A revelation ! " 

This was tlieir re))ly : — 
" Famed and redoubted chieftain ! if our Shah 
Shall perish we shall riohtly ])erish too 
For such a crime. Let not Guraz' words move thee 
To perpetrate such ill, but take occasion 
For doing good. Write him a fitting answer. 
And wake him from his dream. Sav : ' Thwart not 

thou 
God's purj)oses ; give not the Div a way 
To thine own heart. Reflect upon the case 
Of Shah Khusrau Parwiz and all the wronsf 
That led to his undoing, for what time 
Thou didst depose him the Sasanian fortune 
Went at one blow, and when Shirwi ascended 
The royal throne and girt his kingly loins 
Folk hoped such days as when Khusrau Parwiz 
Was Shah whose wits were keen in all regards. 
And if the world became what it became, 
And gat no profit from the state of things, 
It was because the world dealt foolishly. 
And by one stroke lost its advantages. 
Now that Ardshir, succeeding to Kubad, 
Is seated as the Shah upon the throne. 
The world rejoicing in his majesty, 
And earth and time exulting in his Grace, 
Why should the world, now tranquil, he convulsed 
By pain and war ? Knock not at evils' door ; 
Those that slay blameless kings will prosper not. 
In this strife circling heaven must not raise 
Iran in dust. I fear that God will end 
The Iranians' term for ills more heinous still.' " 

Piruz, on this wise counselled, wrote Guraz — 
That \illain of \ile race (may none like him 



48 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

Be ever chief !) — a profitable letter. 
And thou hadst said that one had got his heart 
Between the shears when he had read those words. 
In fierce wrath with Piriiz, son of Khiisrau, 
He gathered all his baggage and commanded 
The host to march forth plainwards. At the news 
Piriiz dispatched a cameleer to go 
In all haste to Tukhar to summon him, 
Informing him at large of the affair. 
Of what Guraz was doing and the strife 
About the imperial throne. Then from Tukhar 
This answer reached Piriiz, son of Khusrau : — - 
C. 2053 " Risk not the blood of the Iranian chiefs, 
O noble man ! but hear what saith Guraz, 
Since thou hast written on such wise perchance 
He may not come to fight with thee." 

Now when 
Piriiz, son of Khusrau, had seen that letter 
His heart had no repose from evil thoughts, 
But gloomed with thinking how to harm the Shah, 
Whose wont it was to summon him, for he 
Was an observant man and eloquent. 
And served as minister and treasurer. 
He came one dark night for an audience, 
And found the wine bright and the welcome warm. 
Ardshir was seated in his palace-hall 
In company with many young and old, 
And when Piriiz, son of Khusrau, came raised. 
Thou wouldst have said, his head to heaven, called 
For harp, and all the hall was filled with music. 
Piriiz, son of Khusrau, when midnight came. 
Had drunk one man^ of wine while the companions 
Of Shall Ardshir were all bemused ; no minstrel 
Was left that kept his wits. The miscreant 
Dismissed the company : he and the Shah 

* See Vol. i., p. 290 note. 



ARDSlllR. SON OF SUlRWt 49 

Alone remained. That man of outrage rose, 

Laid hand upon the Sliah's hps unawares. 

And held it there until Ardshir was dead. , 

The palace filled with scimitars and arrows. 

All there — ambitious youths and warriors — 

Were fautors of Piruz, son of Khusrau. 

Upon this manner ceased Ardshir to be 

^Vlien he had had six months of sovereignty. 



VOL. IX 



XLVI 

GURAZ (ALSO CALLED FAKAYLN) 

HE REIGNED FIFTY DAYS 

AKGUMENT 

Guiaz, hearing of ArdshiVs death, marches on Taisafun and 
urged on by his younger, though dissuaded by his elder son, 
usurps the throne. His rule described. A plot is formed 
against him and he is slain while returning from the chase. 
The throne remains vacant for a while. 

NOTE 

C/. note to previous reign. Guraz (Shahr-Barz, April 
27th — June 9th, A.D. 630) reigned for forty days.^ He was 
one of the three chief generals employed by Khusrau Parwfz 
in his long war against the Eastern Roman Emj>ire. His 
real name, according to Tabari, was Farruhan. This in 
Palilavi would be Earrukhan, which by a misreading has 
become Farayin in the Shahnama. 8hahrbaraz (Shahrguniz, 
or Shahrwaraz) is, says Tabari, a title. Eirdausi uses the 
shortened form Guraz, which moans " boar," because it 
is more convenient metrically. The title may have been 
appropriate enough. In the Shahnama the general is split 
up into two personalities — Guraz or Farayin, the usurper, 
and Shahranguraz, the avenger of the breach made by the 
upstart in the sacred line of Sasanian succession.^ In Tabari 
the leader of the revolt is a native of Istakhr named Pusfar- 
rukh.^ Shahranguraz in the Shahnama is also of the same 
city. 

' NT, p. 390 and note. ' Id. pp. 2<j2. and )iotc. 3S8 and 7iote. ^ Id. 

50 



Gl'UAZ (ALSO CALLLD l-AUAviS) 51 



§1 

Holo Gurdz [also called Fardi/in) received Neivs of the 
Slayinfj oj ArdsJnr, hastened to Iran, took Pos- 
session of the Throne, and was killed bij Shahrdn- 
gurdz 

Piruz. soil of Khusrau, dispatched a post, 

AikI letter too, in secret to Giiraz, 

AVhose sombre soul, what time the messenger 

Arrived, grew like the sun, and from those parts 

He led forth such an army that the way 

Was barred to fly and emmet. Like the wind 

He sped to Taisafun, his soldiers' hands 

All had been bathed in blood. When he arrived 

The chiefs went out to welcome him, but none 

Among the troops dared breathe for they were few. C. 2054 

Guraz, on entering the city, stayed not 

For minister and counsellor but chose 

A void place, and the magnates })rivily 

Conferred with him. Piruz, son of Khusrau, 

Set loose his tongue and said : " Famed paladin ! 

Whom hast thou chosen to be king of kings. 

And illustrate the crown of majesty ? " 

The warrior Guraz made answer thus : — 
" I have not any secrets from Iran. 
To-morrow look ye out for some new Shah 
To sit like some new moon upon the throne." 

Since knowledge is the glory of a man 
Walk not, if thou canst help it, foolishly. 
He that hath wisdom speaketh goodly words. 
And ns il orowcih he dcsei'l ct h ill. 



52 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

It is the best of man's accomplishments, 

The world's endeavour and the way of God. 

Of things that grace one not there is no need 

To speak at large for he will foolishly 

Disgrace himself howe'er he may exalt 

The case in point. When wisdom hath deserted 

The head, and shame the eye, fame and disgrace, 

And cold and hot, are one — no terror this 

To any coward whether quick or dead. 

IMake, if thou canst, all good thy business 

Because the world abideth not with any. 

Let all thy usance be humanity, 

Munificence and uprightness thy Faith. 

When Farayin assumed the royal crown 
He uttered what was in his mind and said : — 
" Let me assume the kingship for a while. 
And sit upon the throne of gold in joy. 
Far better scatter wealth and be exalted 
Than purchase sixty years of servitude. 
Thus will I sit a while in sovereignty^ 
Arrayed in satin^ and in painted silk, 
And after me my son shall take my throne. 
Assume this royal crown, be king as was 
His sire, and be exalted and renowned. 
\Vhoe'er shall minister to our delight 
Shall be a happy man among mankind. 
In feast-time we will drink with joyful hearts. 
In war-time we will hunt our enemies." 

His elder son said privily to him : — 
" Who of us, father ! ever wore the crown ? 
Feel not secure, take means to compass wcaltli ; 
Thou wast the world's protector ; keej) to that. 
ir ;iny member of the royal race 
Shalt come thou wilt not long be here ; thy heart 
Will keep of kingshi{) only grief and })ain ; 

\ Ox " bcaver-skins." 



GURAZ {ALSO CALLED FARAvIN) 53 

Thou wilt be wretched, destitute, and wan." 

Then said tlie younocr son : '' Thou hast become C. 2055 
Crowned in the worUl and hast both troops and 

treasures 
Befitting royalty, but treasurcless 
Wilt have to labour still. AVhat ancestor 
Of Faridun, who had Abtin to sire. 
E'er wore the crown ? Hold fast the world by courage 
And treasure. Nobody is born a king."^ 

The younger's words pleased Farayiu the best, 
Who bade his elder son : " Be not so raw." 

He laid out in the royal offices 
The muster-roll and called all troops to court. 
He gave drachms night and day and many robes 
Of honour ill-deserved. Within two weeks 
Of all the treasury of Shah Ardshir 
Remained not what would buy an arrow's phmie ! 
Whene'er Guraz would go forth to the pleasance 
The lights were torches made of ambergris, ' 
Four score before and four score after him : 
Behind them came his friends and partisans. 
Of gold and silver were the goblets all, 
The golden gem-encrusted.^ 'Twas his use 
To feast all night. The nobles' hearts were full 
Of vengeance on him. 'Twas his wont to roam 
A-nights the gardens and the riding-groimd. 
Save but to sleep and wake, to eat and plunder, 
That slight, weak-witted one knew naught. He went 
Drunk ever to re})ose and with a sash 
J'rom Chin about his head. The troops were all 
Vexed to the heart at him while all the province 
Was full of turmoil and distress. He lost 
All trace of generosity and grew 
Unjust, unfortunate, and good for naught. 
The world was wrecked by his iniquity, 

'But cf. Vol. vi., p. 320. ^ The above couplets transposed. 



54 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

And at his handling people smote their heads. 

He shed the blood of innoeents until 

The troops grew wi'oth with him. He used to shut 

His eyes for gold and woidd liave sold the world 

To win dinars. P'olk eursed him. All desired 

His death and meeting privily discussed 

His deeds. Hurmuzd Shahranguraz, a horseman 

Redoubted of the city of Istakhr — 

The glory of the chieftains — thus addressed 

One night the Iranians secretly : " Ye chiefs ! 

The time of Farayin is proving grievous ; 

He holdeth all the chiefs in light esteem. 

Why have your brains and hearts become thus 

straitened ? 
Through him all eyes are tearful, livers charged 
With blood. Is no physician to be found ? 
He is not royal or Sasanian ; 
Why gird the loins before him ? Of a truth 
2056 Your hearts have flown out of your breasts or else 
Your pluck hath disaj)peared ! " 

The folk replied : — 
" Since there was no one left fit for the throne 
None is inspired by jealousy to take 
This base-born's heart away ; but we adopt 
Thy counsel. Tell us from thy stores of lore 
How to release Iran from this insane 
And hot-brained Shah ill both in word and deed. 
May he be never blessed ! " 

Shahranguraz 
Replied : " The Iranians have sulTercd long. 
If ye will harm me not but i)lay the Persian 
E'en now by holy God's aid will I bring him 
Down from his throne to dust." 

He gat this answer : — 
" May no harm come to thee ! All we the host 
To-day are thy supporters and thy stronghold 



GUR.fZ {ALSO CALLED FARAyIN) 5.5 

II ill lu-ivlruiii Inlall tlico/' 

Ilcariiin I his 

That royal wai'iior sought how to st'l. 

Hands on Ihr woillilcss Shah. Now lie one day 

Took order and departed from the city 

To hunt, anil of the Iranians a troop 

Of lords and lioires fared, escortinir him. 

lie uro-ed his eourser on and rode about 

As 'twere Azargashasp, the cavaliers 

Encircling him and beating up the game. 

Now at what time they tin-ned back city-wards 

Shahranguraz looked at the hapless Shah 

With boldness, chose an arrow from his quiver, 

One that was straight and had a point of steel, 

And urged his black steed while the host looked on. 

He stretched the bow and drew it out at whiles 

To chest or head, then notched, as if in sport. 

An arrow on the string and drew the bow 

Till it concealed the point, and loosed his thumb. 

Forthwith the shaft struck on the monarch's back. 

Who dropped his whip. The arrow was all blood 

Up to the feathers and the iron head 

Protruded from his navel. All the troops 

Unsheathed and all that night while dust-clouds rose 

They ])lied their swords and knew not whom they 

fought, 
But took and gave back blows and cursed or blessed 
That deed. Now when the yellow Veil appeared. 
So that the world seemed like a leopard's back, 
There was a multitude of slain and maimed. 
And cavaliers and leaders were astound. 

That great host was dispersed like timid sheep c. 2057 

When they perceive a wolf. Long they remained 
Without a king : none cared to claim the crown. 
For long they sought and sought in vain to trace 
Some royal scion of the noble race. 



XL VI I 
PURANDUKHT 
SHE REIGNED SIX MONTHS 

NOTE 

Purandukht (Puranducht, summer A.D. 630 — autumn 
A.D. 631), reigned, according to Tabari, for one year and 
four months. Her name, it appears, should be spelt with a 
B, not with a P. She is said to have restored the " True 
Cross," but it seems more probable that this was done in the 
reign of Ardshir. She made the leader of the successful 
conspiracy against Shahrbaraz her prime minister.^ She 
was the first historical female Shah and it was in allusion to 
her reign and that of hfer sister Azarmdukht that the distich 
is quoted in Mir Khand : — 

" No dignity remains in a household 
In which the hens are crowing like cocks."^ 



§1 

How Purandukht ascended the Throne and slew Piriiz, 
Son of Khusrau, and how her oivn Life ended 

'Tis but crude policy when women rule, 
But yet there was a lady — Purandukht — 
Surviving of the lineage of Sasan, 

' For the above see NT, p. 390 seq. and notes, ZT, ii., 340. 
• RM, Pt. II., vol. iii., p. loi. 

56 



PURANDUKHT 57 

And well road in the royal voliinio : hor 

They seated on I he throne of sovereij^nty, 

Tlie (ireat strewed jewels over lier, and then 

She s])akc npon this wise : " I will not have 

The people seattered,^ and I will cnrieh 

The poor with treasnre that they may not bide 

In their distress. God grant that in the wx)rld 

There may be none agorieved because his pain 

Is my calamity. I will expel 

Foes from the realm and walk in royal ways." 

She niade search for Piruz, son of Khusrau, 
Who was delated by an alien, 
Whereat she chose some warriors from the host 
Who broiioht Piriiz before her. She exclaimed : — 
" Foul-purposed miscreant !- thou shalt receive, 
As infamous, the guerdon for thy deeds." 

She bade bring from the stalls a colt unbroken, 
And bound, firm as a rock, Piriiz thereto 
Without a saddle and wdth yoke on neck. 
The vengeful lady had that untamed steed 
Brought to the riding-ground and thither sent, 
With lassos coiled up in their saddle-straps, 
A band of warriors to urge the colt 
To utmost speed, to strive from time to time 
To thrown Piruz and ever roll itself 
Upon the ground. That colt won much applause 
Until with skin in shreds and dripping blood 
Piriiz gave up the ghost right wretchedly. C. 2058 

Why having done wrong seekest thou for justice ? 
Nay, ill for ill ; that is the course of right. 

Piirandukht ruled the world with gentleness ; 
No wind from heaven blew upon the dust, 
But when six months had passed beneath her sway 
The circle of her life bent suddenly ; 
For one w'cek she was ailing, then expired, 

' Through misgovernment. ' One couplet omitted 



58 THE SHAHNAMA OF FlRDAUSt 

And took away with her a fair renown. 

Such is tlie })roccss of tlie turning sky, 
So potent while so impotent are we ! 

11" thine be oj)ulencc or [)overty, 
If hfe afTordeth gain or loss to thee, 

If thou shalt win what thou dcsirest so. 
Or disappointed be in wretchedness, 

And whether thou be one of wealth or woe. 
Both woe and wealth will pass away no less. 
Reign as a Shah a thousand years, five score. 
For sixty years or thirty, ten or four. 
It Cometh to one thing, when all is done. 
If thou hadst many years or barely one. 
Oh ! may thine actions thine own comrades be, 
For they in every place will succour thee. 
Let go thy clutch upon this Wayside Inn 
Because a goodlier place is thine to win. 
If thine endeavour be to learning given 
Thou wilt by knowledge roam revolving heaven. 



XLVIIT 

AZAUMDUKHT 

SHE REIGNED FOUR MONTHS 

NOTE 

Before Azarmdukht (Azermidocht, end of A.D. 631 — 
beginning of A.D. 632) came to the throne there seems to 
have been a short interval during which a distant scion of the 
royal House, who took the name of Piruz, ruled for less than a 
month. The chief noble of the time, who was governor of 
Khurasan, wished to make Azarmdukht his wile on wliich slie 
had him privately executed. This noble's son was the Rustum 
that fought and fell at Kadisiya some years later. On 
hearing of his father's fate Rustam, who was in temporary 
authority in Khurasan, marched with a great army against 
Azarmdukht, oveithrew her and put her to death after she 
had reigned six months. Her name probablv means " modest 
girl."i 

§1 

How Azarmdukht ascended the Throne and how she died 

There was another dame hight Azarmdukht, 
Who had fruition of the crown of greatness. 
She came, sat down upon the royal throne, 
And made herself the mistress of the world. 
Her first words were : " O sages, veterans, 
And masters of affairs ! be just in all, 

' I'or the above see NT, p. 303 ^'I'l notes, Z'l', ii, 350 seq. 

59 



6o THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

And follow precedent, for ye hereafter 

Must make the bricks your pillow. I will foster 

The loyal liege, assist him with dinars, 

And if he erreth be longsuffcring ; 

But him that is disloyal and deserteth 

The way of wisdom and of precedent 

Will I suspend in shame upon the gibbet. 

Be he an Arab, Ruman cavalier, 

Or Persian thane." 

She filled the throne four months. 
But with the fifth disaster came thereto, 
c. 2059 For she too died, the throne had not a Shah, 
But was the plaything of the ill-disposed. 
With the revolving sky 'tis everything 
To be all vengeful with its fosterling. 



XLIX 

FARRUKHZAD 
HE REIGNED ONE MONTH 

NOTE 

Between, and even larlier than, the dcatli of Azarnidukht 
and the accession of Yazdagird III., the order of the dynastic 
succession becomes very confused. The names of the Shahs 
vary in the different lists. The reason is that it was a period 
of great internal unrest and various aspirants to the throne 
held contemporaneously some short-lived authority in different 
j)rovinces of the empire. One of these princes, Farrukhzad 
(Fairukhzad-Khusrau) has received the honour of being 
included in the list of the Shahs as recorded in the Shahnama. 
Two accounts of the length of his reign are given in Tabari. 
According to one, it lasted for six months, according to the 
other, for a year. Both agree that he did not die a natural 
death, and one of them states that his death was instigated 
bv the adherents of Yazdagird.^ 



§1 

IIdiv Farrukjzdd ascended the Throne and how he teas 

slain by a Slave 

Then from Jaliram they summoned Farrukhzad, 
And seated him uj)on the throne of kingsliip. 
There with a pious soul lie praised the Maker, 

• NT, p. 397 and note. Cf. RSM, p. 544. 
61 



62 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIIWAUSt 

And said : " Son of the kings of kings am I, 
And would have naught but quiet in the world. 
The mischief-maker shall not be exalted 
While I am Shah, but him that from his heart 
Ensueth right, and is not mischievous, 
Will I hold dear as my pure soul, and seek not 
To harm the harmless. Him that beareth toil 
On our behalf we will reward with treasure. 
We will hold dear all friends and raise the fame 
Of chieftains everywhere, but all my subjects, 
Both friends and enemies, are safe v>ith me." 

The troops all blessed him : " Ne'er may earth and 
time 
Lack thee." Yet when his throne was one month old 
The head of all his fortune came to dust. 
He had a slave, a cypress-tree in stature. 
Fair, lusty, and well-liking. That knave's name 
Was Siyah Chashm.^ May heaven ne'er bring his 

like ! 
The Shah too had a handmaid whom he loved. 
She chanced on Siyah Chashm all unawares 
One day, who sent to say : "If thou wilt meet me 
At such a place thou shalt have endless gifts, 
And I will deck thy crown with jewelry." 

The handmaid heard, made no reply, l)ut Avent 
And told the thing to Farrukhzad who raged, 
And could not eat or sleep in his concern. 
He put the feet of Siyah ('hashm in fetters. 
And cast him into prison. When the knave 
Had been confined awhile the Shah released him, 
C. 2060 For many pled for him. The slave returned 
To serve the Shah and cut his lifetime short, 
For just as such a bad malignant slave 
Would do he sought revenge upon the Shah, 
And seizing on a time when Farrukhzad 

• Black-eyed. 



FARRUKHZAD 63 

Rej)osed himself put poison in the wine. 

The Shah drank, Uvcd one week, and all that heard 

About his fate lamented him. The kingship 

Was in extremities and foes appeared 

On every side. The throne of king of kings, 

Through these ill doings of the Iranians, 

Was overturned. 

Of such a fashion are 
Time's revolutions ! Let it be thy care 
To gather for thyself therefrom thy share. 
P^at what thou hast and trust the morrow not. 
For it may hold for thee a difTerent lot : 
To gi\"e to others it may take from thee. 
Thou callest this a world and verily 
It doth whirl ! So enjoy thine own, let go 
The surplusage that thou hast toiled for so 
To other folk but never to thy foe. 
Else whensoe'er thy day is overpast 
Thy hoards will be as is the desert-blast, 
Thy treasures all become thine enemy's ; 
So give away to set thy mind at ease. 



YAZDAGIRD 
HE REIGNED TWENTY YEARS 

ARGUMENT 

Yazdagird becomes Shah. The country is invaded by the 
Arabs. He sends Rustani, the captain of the host, to oppose 
them. Rustam takes a desjjondent view of the situation, 
and after some attempt at negotiations is defeated by the Arabs 
at Kadisiya and slain. The war continues, and Yazdagird 
withdraws to Khurasan to get help from Mahwi of Sur, the 
governor. Mahwi plots with Bizhan, a Turkish prince, 
against Yazdagird, who is betrayed in battle and takes refuge 
in a mill, where he is slain by tlie miller at the bidding of 
Mahwi. Mahwi assumes the crown, makes war on Bizhan, 
is taken prisoner, and put to death. The poem ends with a 
brief passage, in which Firdausi gives some account of the 
completion of his undertaking, of help afforded him and of 
discouragements undergone, and concludes with a well founded 
assurance of his own future fame. 

NOTE 

Yazdagird (Isdegird III., A.D. 632-6.'j2 or 653) has given 
his name to a chronological era which still obtains among the 
Parsis. It dates from June 16th, A.D. 632. He was the son 
of Shahryar, son of Khusrau Parwiz, and was an infant at 
the time when that Shah and his sons were put to death 
after the accession of Shirwi (Kubad;*) On that occasion 
he was taken for safety to Istakhr. Tabari says that he was 

>Seep. 34, 35. 
64 



YAZDAGIRD 65 

murdered at the age of twenty-eight after a reign of twenty 
3'ears. He was therefore only eight years old when a party 
among the nobles set him up as a puppet king at Istakhr 
(Persepolis), the old seat of empire, Ctesiphon at that time 
being in the hands of a rival claimant of the throne. In the 
contention that followed Yazdagird was successful, and in 
the course of A.D. 633 he became recognised as sole Shah, 
the administration remaining in the hands of the chiefs.^ 
He had succeeded to a heritage of woe. His empire was 
ill-prepared for the troubles that were in store for it. Ex- 
hausted by long wars, torn by domestic dissentions, and 
lately devastated by plague, it had to confront a new and 
vigorous organization inspired by religious enthusiasm and 
impelled thereby to extend its borders on every side. Had 
Yazdagird been a born leader of men and come to the throne 
in the prime of life, he might for the time at least have been 
successful, but in the circumstances, and taking into con- 
sideration what we can gather as to his own character, we 
can now see how hopeless from the outset his prospects were. 
Students of Persian, however, have probably reason to feel 
grateful to his reign, for even though we put aside as unsatis- 
factory what tradition tells us on the subject, a reasonable 
presumption remains that with the return of settled govern- 
ment to a distracted country there was a revival of interest 
in the story of the Iranian race and its heroes, and that com- 
pilations were then made from which we still though indirectly 
benefit. 2 

§§ 2-11. The following is intended to supplement Firdausi's 
inadequate account of the Arab conquest of the Sasanian 
empire. He appears to assign it to the last years of Yaz- 
dagird's then nominal sovereignty. From time immemorial 
the Iranians and Semites had been at enmity.^ In Iranian 
legend this feeling had found expression in the story of the 
wicked Shah Zahhak, who, though originally an Aryan 
myth,^ came to be regarded in succeeding ages as an earthly 
king with his seat at Babylon. When, later still, the Iranians 
again felt the weight of Semitic oppression, he was turned 
into an Arab.^ Although during Sasanian times the semi- 
independent kingdom of Hi'ra served to some extent as a 
buffer-state between the Persian empire and the wilder Arab 

' NT, p. 397 seq. and notes. ' Cf. Vol. i., p. 67. ' Id. p. 10. 

* Id. p. 7. ' Id. pp. 54, 135. 141. 

VOL. I^v fi 



66 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

tribes there was always the liability of raids and the dangeJ' 
was much increased when Klmsrau Parw^iz was so unwise 
as to put an end to the long-standing dynasty of the princes 
of Hira and appointed a governor of his own in their stead. ^ 
In his reign too had occurred the disastrous battle of Dhu 
Kar, in which the smallness of the forces engaged were out 
of all proportion to tlie importance of the result. The Arabs 
celebrated their victory with songs of triumph. ^ With that 
inspiring memory and revelation of Persian weakness, with 
the prospect of rich spoil to be won, and a nation of infidels 
to be converted, it is not surprising that hostilities should 
break out between the young and vigorous and the old and 
enfeebled empire. Muhammad himself, tradition tolls us, 
addressed a threatening letter to Khusrau Parwiz, who tore 
it up, and the Prophet, on hearing of this, said : " He has 
rent his own realm. "^ Muhammad died in June, A.D. 632 — 
the month of tlie child Yazdagird's accession. x\bu Bakr, 
the first Khalifa, being apprised by an Arab chieftain, who 
had embraced Islam, of the state of the Persian empire, 
sent his great general, Khalid, to begin hostilities. Khalid 
was very successful in numerous engagements, and tem- 
])orarily the whole tract bordering the western bank of the 
Euphrates from the Roman frontier almost to the Persian 
Gulf came into the hands of the Arabs. Khalid made Hira 
his headquarters, and was preparing to attack Ctesiphon 
and invade fran when he was recalled by Abu Bakr to take 
command of the forces destined for the Syrian campaign. 
" This is 'Umar's doing," said Khalid. " He does not want 
to see me conquer 'Irak."^ The departure of Khalid was the 
Persians' opportunity. Encoiiraged by Rustam, who under 
Yazdagird had become commander-in-chief, the inhabitants 
of the conquered region rose against the Arabs but unsuccess- 
fully. At this juncture Abu Bakr died and was succeeded 
by 'Umar, who began his reign by giving Abii 'Ubaida the 
chief command in Syria in the ])lace of Khalid. Then, it 
is said, he appealed publicly to the Faithful to volunteer 
for the invasion of Persia and for two days in vain, the super- 
session of Khahd having caused great indignation. It may, 
however, have been thought that the acquisition of so m!ich 
fertile territory and the consequent proximity to tlie Persian 



' Vol. viii., p. 190. ' NT, p. 342. " ZT, ii., 325. 

<■ Id. iii., 348. 



YA/.DACIRD 67 

capital, wore a sunuieiit achievement for the time being. 
Nevertheless, on the third day, when 'Umar made his a|)])eal, 
Abii 'Ubaida (not Klialicrs successor) oiTered himself and 
Sa'ad, son of Wakkas, followed suit. A thousand others 
imitated their examjile. 'Umar gave Abii 'Ubaida the chief 
command as he liad been the first to volunteer. The Persians 
in the meantime had withdrawn to Ctesiphon, whence Rustam 
dispatched a force, which had with it the flag of Kawa/ 
to watch the enemy. Abii 'Ubaida, who was very inferior 
in numbers, threw a ])ridge across the Eujjhrates, attacked the 
I'ei'sians, was defeated and slain. This battle is known as 
" The Battle of the Bridge," and took place in November, 
A.D. 634. An attack, however, by the Persians on Hira 
failed, and the Arabs raided the Persian settlement of Baghdad 
(not of course the well-known city of that name") where 
twice a year a fair was held. 'Umar appointed Sa'ad, son of 
Wakkas, to succeed Abu 'Ubaida, and both sides made efforts 
to reinforce their respective armies. The Persian adherents 
west of the Euphrates again rose. Rustam crossed the river 
with a great host, and advanced to Kadisiya where the Arabs 
had concentrated. The battle that ensued is said to have 
lasted four days with varying fortune till a dust-storm turned 
the scale in favour of the Arabs. The slaughter was very 
great and so was the spoil. 'Umar forbade the Arabs to make 
any further advance for the present, but as the situation 
of their camp proved to be very unhealthy he directed Sa'ad 
to choose a more suitable site, whereupon Sa'ad foimded 
Kufa. Thenceforth the whole of the region west of the 
Euphrates was lost to the Persians. To secure the lower 
course of the Euphrates and Tigris 'Umar also founded Basra, 
west of the Shatt-al-Arab. The battle of Kadisiya seems to 
have been fought A.D. 636-7, but the chronology of the period 
is somewhat uncertain. Then came a considerable pause in 
the Arab advance. The Arabs seem to have spent the in- 
terval well in securing what they had gained while the Persians 
on the other hand appear to have been paralysed by their 
misfortunes. At all events, when the invasion was resumed 
and Sa'ad, crossing the Euj)hrates, marched on Ctesiphon, 
no resistance was offered and Yazdagird, who had lingered 
there too late to secure the removal ot most of his treasures, 
fled with his court to Hulwan.^ His example of flight seems 



\'()1. i., p. 154 seij. - Sec Vol. vi., p. 254. ' See Vol. vii., p. 1S7. 



68 THE SH Ah NAM A OF FIRDAUSt 

to have been followed by a majority of the inhabitants. The 
Arabs came in for an immense booty according to Oriental 
accounts. If, however, we take into consideration the 
domestic troubles of the years preceding Yazdagird's accession, 
and what must have been the financial needs of the short-lived 
Shahs of that period, we are justified in suspecting that the 
amount of precious metals and of the more portable forms 
of wealth generally was not so great as has been affirmed. 
Sa'ad, when he had established himself in the Persian cajiital, 
asked permission of 'Umar to pursue Yazdagird who had 
gathered a considerable army under the command of a 
Mihran^ at Jalula in the neighbourhood of Hulwan. 'Umar 
refused to allow Sa'ad to go in person and instructed nini to 
send instead Hashim who was either his brother or his nephew. 
Hashim was much inferior in point of numbers, and it was 
six months before he brought the Persians to a decisive en- 
gagement. He then won a complete victory, and followed 
up his success at Jalula by the capture of Hulwan. Yazdagird 
fled to Rai and 'Umar, contejit for the moment with what 
had been achieved, forbade any further advance. The next 
stage of the Arab conquest was made outside the sphere of 
Sa'ad's authority, who sent, however, by 'Umar's command 
troops to assist. In the north Mesopotamia, and in the 
south Khiizistan, were invaded and annexed. A raid was 
made also across the Persian Gulf from Bahrain into Pars, 
but without lasting results, as the Arab forces got into diffi- 
culties and had to be rescued by an expedition sent for the 
purjiose from Basra. About A.D. 640 in consequence, it 
is said, of com])laints made by the people of Kiifa, 'Umar 
recalled Sa'ad and Yazdagird seized the opportunity to make 
a supreme effort to recover his lost possessions. A large 
army, summoned from the yet unconquered provinces of the 
eTn])ire, was concentrated at Nahavand, some fifty miles 
south of Hamadan, and [)laced under a Persian general named 
Piruzan. On this 'Umar ordered Nu'man, who was in com- 
mand in Khuzistfin, to gather all available forces from the 
regions already annexed and march against tlie enemy. 
Nu'muii, who was greatly inferior in point of numbers, found 
the Persians strongly encamped at Nahavand and tried in 
vain to bring on a general engagement. In the end he managed 
to effect liis purpose by means of a stratagem. He broke up 

' See id. p. 185. 



YAZDAGIRD 69 

liis camp and made a liasty retreat. Piruzan wciil in |iur.suit, 
on which Nu'man turned upon hJin and won what the Arabs 
call "The Victory of Victories" (A.T). (Mi -2). Piiu/.an 
was taken prisoner and slain, and Nu'man Jiimsclf fell in the 
fi.i^ht. This was the last effort of the Persians at a national 
resistance. Henceforth their o])])osition was merely pro- 
vincial or local, and wholly ineffective. One after another 
the remaining provinces of the Sasanian empire were over- 
run by the Arabs and permanently annexed, while Yazdagird, 
who had fled from Rai after the disaster of Nahavand, re- 
mained a fugitive till his death some ten years later. 

§ 2. In Tabarf Rustam's father is called Farrukh-Hurmuzd, 
the governor of Khurasan, who was slain, it is said, by Azarm- 
dukht and avenged by his son.^ Khurasan probably formed 
part of the satrapy of Nimruz, one of the four into which Nushir- 
wan divided his empire.- Tradition makes the governors 
of that satrapy, and their sons play a very important part 
during the last few } ears of the Sasanian dynasty.^ The 
position of commander-in-chief held by Rustam at the battle 
of Kadisiya, probably indicates that he had been instrumental 
in bringing about the elevation of Yazdagird to the throne.'* 

Rustam's brother was named Farrukhzad. 

§ 3. Mughira, son of Shu'ba, was one of the companions 
of Muhammad, and played a prominent role in the affairs of 
the time. He went on a similar embassy to the Persians 
before the battle of Nahavand.^ He was governor for a time 
at Basra,'' Mecca,' and Kufa, where he died in A.D. 670/'^ 

§ 4. Sa'ad took no personal part in the battle of Kadisiya. 
He was suffering from sores at the time and had to content 
himself with merely directing operations.^ Consequently 
he did not slay Rustam in single combat as Firdausi states. 
When the dust-storm came on the fourth day of the battle, 
Rustam was seated under an awning erected on the bank 
of the canal of Kadisiya and surrounded by the camels that 
carried his treasure. The awning was blown into the water. 
and Rustam took shelter among them. In the confusion 
caused by the storm, the Arabs broke the Persian centre. 
One of them, named Hilal, striking in the darkness at random 
among the camels, hapj)ened to hit the one under which 



'p. 59. 'Sec Vol. vii., p. 214. 'pp. 5, 6, 59, 87, 95 seq. 

' NT, p. 397 note. NIX, p. 13. ' ZT, iii., 474. • Id. 404. 

' Id. iv., 2. ' Id. 16. ' Id. iii., 398. 



70 THE SHAhnAMA OP FiRDAUSf 

Rustani was seated, and cut the cord that secured its load 
of treasure which fell on Rustam's head. Thougli injured, 
he made an atteinj)t to swim across the canal, Init was cauglit 
by Ililal and slain. ^ 

§§9-11. There is a general agreement in Persian tradition 
that Yazdigird did not die a natural death. The scene of it 
is mostly laid at Marv, and the most pojndar version associates 
it with a mill. Firdausi's story evidently has been worked up 
as the appeals addressed to Mahwl show. The villain's 
guilt too is more emphasized, and he is made more directly 
responsible for the tragedy. Elsewhere the nailer murders 
the Shah for mere greed. Marv a})pears to be a likely place 
for Yazdagird to have chosen to reside in, as he could easily 
escape thence across the Oxus in case of need. In some 
accounts he does cross and negotiates to little purpose with 
the Turks, but is brought back across the river for the final 
scene. What the truth of the matter was seems to be quite 
uncertain. 

§14. According to the account in the Persian Tabari, 
Mahwi, after the death of Yazdagird, remained at Marv till 
he was compelled to leave owing to the approach of the Arabs, 
when he fled across the Oxus and took refuge with the Turks.^ 
Their Khan is the Bizhan of the Shahnama. 



§1 



Hoiv Yazdagird ascetided the Throne and addressed the 

Chiefs 

When Farrrukhzad departed Yazdagird 
Became the Shah upon tlie day of Ard 
In month Sapandarmad. What said the man 
Brave, eloquent but weary of Hfe's span ? 
" Would that my mother had not brouoht mc forth, 
High heaven not turned o'er me ! 
The days of greatness and the days of want 

' Id. 396. ^ ZT, iii., 505. 



YAZDAGIRD 71 

For all soon cease to be. 
TiiiK', as thou lookest, passcth ; !i()nc can lake 

Anns to contciul with it, 
So furnish forth the board and drain the eup, 

And sad talk intermit. 
What though thou ride high heaven yet bricks will 
prove 

Thy pillow at the last ; 
If thou be king what of the end ? First throne, 

But what when life hath past ? 
Let not thy heart be troubled, trust not much 

High heaven as thy supjjort ; 
It aeteth as it willeth ; elc})hant 

And lion are its sj)ort. 
'Twill outlast thee, its tale is long ; be not 

With pride of life o'erflown ; 
Thou canst not better Faridun or be C. 2061 

Parwiz^ with crown and throne.^ 
From those exalt seven planets do thou well 
Consider what to Yazdagird befell." 
W^hen he sat happy on the throne of kingship. 
And placed upon his head the crown of might, 
He said : " By process of the turning sky 
I am the true-born son of Nushirwan. 
Mine is the sway from sire to sire and mine 
Are Virgo, Sol, and Pisces. I will seek 
For greatness, wisdom, hardihood, contention. 
And manliness, for life and fortune stay 
With none, nor treasure, kingship, crown, and throne. 
Fame will abide for aye but not desire ; 
Put ofT desire then and exalt thy fame. 
It is by fame that man shall live for ever 
While his dead body lieth in the dust. 
How good are Faith and justice in a Shah ! 
The times are full of blessings on his fan\e. 
» Khusrau Parwiz. ' Couplet omitted. 



72 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

I purpose while I live to pluck up ill, 
Both root and branch." 

The chiefs applauded him, 
And hailed him as the monarch of the earth, 
And thus it was, till sixteen years had sped, 
That sun and moon revolved above his head. 



§2 

How Sa'ad, Son of WakJcds, invaded Iran, how Yazda- 
gird sent Rustam to oppose him, and how Riistam 
wrote a Letter to his Brother 

It was so that 'Umar, the famous Arab, 
Commander of the Faithful, ^ he whose sword 
Turned day to night, the man approved by God, 
Who hath no equal, sent the chosen Sa'ad, 
Son of Wakkas, with troops against the Shah. 
When Arab fortune worsted Persian, 
And the Sasanians' fortune had grown dark. 
The world had had full measure of its Shahs ; 
Gold was not seen, the mite was manifest. 
Good turned to evil, evil turned to good, 
The path lay Hellward, not to Paradise, 
The wheel of circling heaven was changed and cut 
All kindness for the Persians clean away. 
The slave must do the almighty Maker's will, 
And bear what He infiicteth. Save with Him 
There is no life or joy. 

When Yazdagird 
Learned what had chanced he gathered troops on all 
sides, 
C. 2062 And bade Hurmuzd's son lead them forth. His name 

' He assumed this title. 



YAZDAGIRD 73 

Was Riistani. He was wary, wise, a warrior 

And potentate, a reader ol the stars, 

Exeeeding shrewd and all attcnt to hear 

The arch images' words. He niarehed away 

With all the noble, those that were alert 

And brave, and after thirty months they sought 

To fight at Ktidisiya. Being learned 

In heaven's lore as an astrologer, 

And one both just and good, he said : " No time 

Is this to fight, the river of the Shahs 

Will flow not in this bed," and so he took 

His astrolabe, observed the stars and smote 

His head because it was a day of bale, 

Then wrote in grief and told his brother all. 

First offering praise to God who had ordained 

His good and evil fortune, and proceeded : — - 

" Well may the revolutions of the sky 

Fill the observer with disquietude ! 

I am the guiltiest person of the time, 

And therefore have been caught by Ahriman, 

Because the kingship passeth from this House ; 

No season this of conquest and the Grace ! 

From the fourth heaven Sol is looking down 

To hasten to the fight of mighty men. 

Both Mars and Venus bode mishap to us, 

And none can 'scape high heaven. Mercury 

And Saturn are opposed, the former too 

Hath entered Gemini, Such is the case, 

A great event is toward, and my heart 

Is weary of its life. I can discern 

All that will be but fain woidd hold my peace. 

When I agnized this secret of the sky — 

That it assigncth us but grievous travail — 

I wei)t right sorely for the Iranians, 

And burned for the Sasanians. Woe is me 

For head and crown, for state and throne, and woe 



74 THE SH Ah NAM. I OF FIRDAUSt 

For majesty, for fortune, and for Grace 
Because hereafter will defeat betide them 
From the Arabians, tlie stars not turn 
Save to our hurt, and for four hundred years 
None of our royal race will rule the world ! 
An envoy from our foemen came to me, 
And divers parleyings followed. ' We,' they said, 
' Will give up to the Shah the tract between 
The river-bank and Kadisiya ; ye 
Shall grant us access to some trading centre 
That we may sell and buy ; we will not ask 
For more hereafter ; we will pay large dues, 
And will not seek the chieftains' diadems, 
C. 2063 But will obey withal the king of kings. 
And render hostages at his demand.' 
Such is the talk. No action hath ensued, 
But still the stars are adverse. Long will be 
The strife. Fierce Lions will be slain })y hundreds. 
The chieftains that are with me in the war —  
Galbwi of Tabaristan and Armani, 
Who do the deeds of Ahriman in fight, 
Mahwi, he of Suran, and other chiefs. 
Who wield the heavy mace and battle-ax — 
Heed not our foes proposals but observe : — 
' Who are these haughty folk and what do they 
Both in Iran and in Mazandaran ? 
For road and territory, weal and woe. 
We must employ the mace and scimitar ; 
We will exert ourselves, quit us like men. 
And make the world both dark and strait to them.' 
None of them knoweth circling heaven's design. 
And how its aspect hath been changed to us. 
On reading this take measures with the chiefs, 
Make preparations and lead lorth the host, 
Collect the treasures, handmaids, and state-robes, 
Then hasten Azar Abadaaan — 



"o^ 



YAZDAGIRD 75 

The (hvellino- c)!' tlic jMiolity and tlie Fyqq. 

WhaU-Ncr herds of horses thou iiinysl have 

Send to the treasiirei" of Azar»vaslias|). 

If sokUers seek thee from Zabuhstan, 

Or from Iran, im])lorino- thy protection, 

Receive and treat with kindness their excuses 

In view of what the turning skv is doinjr — 

Tlic cause of joy and terror to us all, 

At whiles exalting and at whiles abasing. 

Let mother know my words for of a truth 

She will not look upon my face again. 

Greet her from us and counsel her at large 

Not to be troubled here below\ If any 

Shall bring bad news of me be not too downcast, 

For know that in this Wayside Hostelrj^ 

He that aniasseth treasure by his toil 

Will find his toil more than such worldly treasure, 

And that another will enjoy the fruit. 

What need was there for so much toil and greed ? 

Desire is lessened not by having more. 

At all times worship God and purge thy heart 

Of all affection for this Wayside Inn 

Because our fortune is in straits, the king 

Will see me not again. Do thou and all 

Our House, botli old and young, unceasingly 

Piaise God and pray the Maker, for with this 

My host I am in stress, in travail, grief, 

And bitter fortune, and shall not escape C 2064 

At last. May this sweet comitry of Iran 

Be in prosperity ! Whenas the world 

Is straitened to the king hold treasure, life, 

And person of small worth, for of that race 

So famed and honoured there is no one left 

Save that exalted one. Watch over him 

By day and niglit till I have fought the Arabs. 

Be not remiss in toil for he is now 



76 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSf 

All that we have to look to in this world, 
And the Sasanians' memorial. 
For no one will behold that House again. 
Woe for the head and crown, for seal and right 
Since royal throne will go adown the blast ! 
Fare well, be not concerned, and ever be 
Before the world-lord, and if ill betide him 
First give thine own head to the scimitar 
Ungrudgingly. When pulpit fronteth throne, 
And when Abii Bakr and 'Umar shall be 
As household words, our long toils will be lost, 
And long will be the fall before the rise. 
Thou wilt not see throne, diadem, or state : 
The stars award the Arabs everything.^ 
There will not be throne, crown, or golden boot. 
Or gem, or coronet or flaunting flag. 
One man will toil, another will enjoy ; 
None will give heed to justice or to bounty.^ 
Then warriors will be men that fight afoot 
While horsemen will be mocked and flouted at ; 
The warlike husbandman will be despised. 
High birth and majesty will bear no fruit ; 
Then men will rob each other, none v>n\\ know 
A blessing from a curse, and secret dealing 
Prevail o'er open, while the hearts of men 
Will turn to flint, sire will be foe to son. 
And son will scheme 'gainst sire ; a worthless slave 
Will be the king, high birth and majesty 
Will count for nothing ; no one will be loyal. 
There will be tyranny of soul and tongue. 
A mongrel race — Iranian, Turkman, Arab — 
Will come to be and talk in gibberish.^ 
Z. 2065 They will collect all treasures 'neath their skirts. 
Toil and resign the j^roduct to their foes. 

'Two couplets omitted. 'Three couplets omitted. 

• See Vol. i., p. 34. 



YAZDAGIh'l) 77 

(iriff, travail, billerness will thus prevail 

As joy did in Bahrain Gur\s days ; feasts, song. 

Race and renown will cease ; men will set traps, 

Will seek their profit in another's loss, 

And make their pretext Faith ; no difference 

Will be 'twixt Sprino- and Winter ;i there will be 

No wine at feasts ; they will not recognise 

Degree and place but live on barley-bread. 

And dress in wool. When much time hath passed 

thus 
None will regard the noble Persian stock. 
They will be shedding blood for lucre's sake. 
An evil age will be inaugurate. 
My heart is full, my face is w^an, my mouth 
Is parched, my lips are filled with sighs to thiidc 
That after I — the paladin — have gone 
Sasanian fortune shall become thus dark ; 
So faithless hath revolving heaven grown, 
Ta'en umbrage, and withdrawn from us its love ! 
If with my lance I strike a brazen mountain 
I pierce it, being brazen-bodied too. 
But now my shafts with steel-transfixing heads 
Are impotent with men that wear no mail ! 
My sword, which felled the necks of elephants 
And lions at a blow, can not cut through 
An Arab skin ! My knowledge bringeth loss 
On loss upon me. Would that I possessed not 
This wisdom since it causcth me to know 
Of this ill day ! The chiefs that are with me 
From Kadisiya are both hardy men 
And hostile to the Arabs. They expect 
That this brake will be filled, that earth will run 
Like the Jihun. with our foes' blood. None knoweth 
The secret of the skies and that this strife 

' Muhammadan years being lunar the months are associated with 

no particular season. 



78 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSI 

Can not be auicklv ended ; but when fortune 

Departeth from a race what profit conieth 

Of travail and of fight ? Be prosperous, 

My brother ! May the Shah's heart joy in thee 

Because this Kadisiya is my charnel, 

My breastplate is my shroud, my helmet blood : 

Such is the secret of the lofty sky. 

Bind not thine own heart to my griefs but keep 

Thine eyes upon the Shah, and sacrifice 

Tliysclf for him in fight, because the day 

Of Ahrinian is coming on apace 

When circling heaven will sliow us enmity." 

When he had sealed the letter he said thus : — 
" My blessing be upon the messenger 
That shall convey this letter to my brother. 
And tell him not what I have said, but other ! " 



§3 

Iloiv Ruslam wrote to Sa'ad, Son oj Wakkds, and Jioiv 

he replied 

2066 He sent a messenger in swiftness like 

The flash and thunder-clap to Sa'ad. They wrote. 

In apprehension yet not in despair, 

A letter on white silk and thus endorsed : — 

" This from the paladin of j^aladins — 

The warlike Kustam, son of Hurnuizdshah^— 

To Sa'ad, son of Wakkas, the prudent, wise. 

And circumspect, who hath come forth to fight." 

It thus began : " We still must fear the World-lord, 
The Holy, who sustaincth turning heaven, 

' Cf. Mardanshah as a proper name and p. 59. 



y.lZDAGiJd) 7<j 

Whose rule is justiee and beneficence. 

May blessinos from Ilini rest upon the king. 

The histro ol' the sionct, crown, and throne, 

The loril of sword, of diadem and lasso, 

Whose Cirace restraineth Ahriman in bonds. 

A hateful matter hath occurred to us 

In these uncalled for labours and this strife. 

Rej)ly to me and say who is your kin^r, 

Who thou art, what thy ride and custom are, 

And whose assistance is it that ye seek 

With unmailcd soldiery and unmailed chief ? 

Fed uj) with bread thou art still ravenous ; 

Thou hast no elephants, no throne, no baggage. 

Enough for thee to live within Iran, 

For crown and signet are another man's, 

W^ho hath Grace, elephants, and crown and throne — 

A famous Shah of lengthy lineage. 

No throned king hath such stature or the moon 

In heaven such aspect. When enthroned he sitteth 

With smiles that make his silvern teeth appear ; 

His gifts would purchase Arabs in the gross. 

And not impoverish his treasury. 

His dogs, his hawks, and cheetahs are twelve thousand. 

And they are decked with golden bells and varvels. 

The whole \vaste of the wielders of the spear 

Could find not in a year from end to end 

Enough to feed his cheetahs and his hounds 

When he is hunting on the plain. The Arabs, 

From drinking camels' milk and eating li/ards, 

Have reached a pitch whereat the Persian throne 

Is coveted ! Shame, shame on circling heaven ! 

Ye have no veneration in your eyes. 

Or, in yo;n- wisdom, love or reverence. 

With such a visage and such tastes and ways 

Is thy heart set upon the crown and throne ? 

If thou art seeking power within thy means. 



8o THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

And art not merely speaking words in jest, 
2067 Dispateh to us some man of goodly speech, 
Send some brave veteran and man of lore, 
That he may tell me thine intent and who 
Doth lead thee to attempt the royal throne. 
Then will I send a horseman to the Shah 
To ask of him whatever thou wilt ask, 
But seek not with so great a king to fight, 
For shame at last will come upon thy face. 
His grandsire was the world-lord Nushirwan, 
Whose justice made the aged young again. 
His fathers have been Shahs, and he is king ; 
The a^e rcmembereth none like to him. 
Fill not the world with curses on thyself, 
Misprize not thine own precedents. Regard 
This letter of advice and bar not thou 
Thine eyes and ears to wisdom." When the letter 
Was sealed he gave it to high-born Piruz, 
Son of Shapiir. To Sa'ad, son of Wakkas, 
This paladin and magnates from Iran, 
Of ardent soul, went whelmed in iron, silver. 
And gold, with golden shields and golden girdles. 
On hearing, Sa'ad, that noble man, set forth, 
Swift as the flying dust, to meet Piruz 
With troops, forthwith dismounted and inquired 
About the army and its paladin. 
About the Shah, his minister and host. 
The watchful leader and his provinces. 
He sjn-ead his cloak beneath Piruz and said : — 
" We hold the sword and spear to be our mates : 
Brave warriors make no mention of brocade, 
Of oold and silver or of food and slumber. 
Ye have no part in manhood but are like 
To women with your colours, scents, and forms. 
Your prowess is in donning broidery, 
Adornino- roofs and dccoratinu' doors." 



YAZDAGIRD 8i 

Piruz then gave the letter and told Sa'ad 
The words of Rustam. Sa'ad heard, read, and 

wondered. 
He wrote an answer baek in Arabic, 
Announcing good and ill. He wrote there first 
The name of God and of His messenger, 
]Muluunmad, who direeteth to the truth. 
He spake of Jins and men, of w^hat the Prophet, 
The Ilashimite,! had said, the Unity 
Of God, of the Kuran, of promise, warning, 
Of menace and of novel usages. 
Of liquid pitch, of fire, and icy cold. 
Of Paradise, its streams of milk and wine. 
Of camphor and of musk, of bubbling springs. 
Of wine and honey and the trees of heaven.'^ 
Then : " If the Shah accepteth the true Faith 
He will obtain both Avorlds with joy and kingship. 
And have withal the earrings and the crown. 
Perpetual beauty and prosperity. 

His intercessor there will be Muhammad, c. 2068 

His form like pure rose-water. In as much 
As Paradise will be thy recompense 
We must not plant thorns in the garth of bale. 
The personality of Yazdagird, 

This spacious world, such gardens, riding-grounds. 
And halls and palaces with all the thrones 
And crowns, the festivals and revelries. 
Are less worth than one hair of an Houri. 
In this our Wayside Hostelry thine eyes 
Are dazed by crown and treasure, and thou trustest 
Too much in ivory throne, in wealth, and signet, 
In fortune and in crown. W^hy be concerned 
About a world when one draught of cold water 
Out-prizeth it ? Wlioever cometh forth 

• Hashim was the great-grandfather of Muhammad. 

• This is taken from the Kuran. Cf. Vol. i., p. yy. 

VOL. IX F 



82 THE SHAHNAMA OF FlRDAUSl 

To figlit with me will see a narrow grave, 
And Hell, naught else ; but Paradise is his 
If he believeth. Mark how he should fare. 
He still will choose the one and shun the other 
As every wise man knoweth." 

Then he set 
The Arab seal thereon and praised Muhammad, 
The messenger of Sa'ad, son of Wakkas, 
Went with all speed to Rustam. Now what time 
Sliu'ba Mughira w^ent forth from the chiefs 
To journey to the paladin, a noble. 
One of the Iranians, came in from the way 
Before the captain of the host, and said : — 
" A messenger hath come — a weak, old man — 
Without a horse or weapons and ill-clad. 
With thin sword slung about his neck and shirt 
All plainly tattered." 

Rustam thus apprised 
Pre])ared a tent-enclosure of brocade. 
They laid a carpet of gold thread of Chin ; 
The soldiery turned out like ants and locusts. 
They set a golden ante-throne whereon 
The captain of the host assumed his seat 
With eight score warriors attending him —  
Horsemen and lions on the day of battle — 
With crowns, with violet robes, and golden boots, 
With torques and earrings, v/hile the tent-enclosure 
Was royally adorned. Shu'ba IMughira, 
On coming to the tent-enclosure, walked not 
Upon the cloth but humbly on the ground. 
And used his scimitar as walking-stick. 
He sat upon the dust without a look 
At any— captain of the host or chief. 
Then Rustam said to him : " May thy soul joy, 
And by its knowledge make thy body strong." 
Shu'ba Mughira said : " If thou, good sir ! 



YAZDAGIRD 83 

Acceptest the true Faith, peace unto thee." 

Now Rustani, hearing this, was vexed and frowned. 
He took and gave the letter to a reader. c. 20O9 

That learned man told him what was writ, and Rustam 
Made answer : " Tell him : ' Thou art neither king 
Nor an aspirant to the diadem, 
But thou hast seen my fortune in eelipse,^ 
And so thy heart ambitioneth my throne. 
The case is one of moment to the wise. 
But thou hast not considered it. If Sa'ad 
Had the Sasanian throne I well might share 
His feasts and fights, but since the faithless stars 
Bode ill, what shall I say ? This is the day 
Of bale. If for my guide I take INIuhammad, 
And this new Faith for old, all will go wrong- 
Beneath this crook-backed sky, and all go hard 
With us.' But as for thee, depart in peace ; 
The day of battle is no time for words. 
Tell Sa'ad : ' To die with honour is a thing 
Far better for me than crude parleying." 



§4 

How Rustam joiKjJd with Sa'ad, Soit of WaJcJcds, and 

ivas slain 

Shu'ba Mughira went his way, and Rustam 
Bade to array the host and sound the trumpet. 
From all sides troops assembled, clouds of dust 
Arose, and din that dcafed the sharpest ears. 
" The steely lance-heads mid the murky reek 
Are," thou hadst said, " stars mid night's azure 
gloom," 

» Reading with P. 



84 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

While spears ne'er ceased to smite on glittering helms. 

The strife endured three days, till water failed 

The Iranians, and their warriors' hands and steeds 

Became unfit for combat. Rustam's lips 

Grew as the dust with drought, his tongue was split. 

And men and horses battened on moist clav, 

So grievous was the stress ! 

Shouts rose like thunder 
From Rustam and from Sa'ad as they advanced, 
Each from his post. Each left his army's centre, 
And drew off from the field. Departing thus 
They came beneath a steep-up eminence. 
And there those chieftains twain assailed each other 
Revengefully upon that scene of strife 
Till Rustam, roaring like a thunder-clap. 
Smote with his sword Sa'ad's charger on the head. 
Smote the swift charger which came headlong down, 
2070 And brave Sa'ad was unhorsed. Then Rustam reared 
Aloft a trenchant blade to show to him 
The Day of Doom, and was in mind to strike 
His head off, but by reason of the dust 
Raised by the troops they could not see each other. 
Then Rustam lighted from his steed and saddle 
Of leopard-skin and fastened to his belt 
His charger's reins but, while dust blinded him, 
Sa'ad hurried up and smote him with the sword 
Upon his helm whence blood ran down his face. 
And while his eyes were blinded by the gore 
The aspiring Arab gained the upper hand, 
Again smote Rustam on the head and neck. 
And flung his warrior-body on the dust. 
None in the two hosts were aware thereof. 
Or whither those two paladins had gone, 
But searched until they found the scene of strife. 
The Iranians, when they spied their paladin 
Slashed by the scimitar from head to foot, 



YAZDAGIRD 85 

Fled. Miuiy a chieftain pcrislied in the press, 

And many failed for thirst upon the saddle. 

The world had had full measure of the Shahs. 

The host fared to the monarch of Iran, 

And hastened on the way both day and night. 

When Rustam had been slain in fight, and when 

The chiefs' heads were all turned, the Muslim host 

Sped like a savage lion in pursuit. ^ 

At that time Yazdagird was at Baghdad ; 

To him the troops came flocking and announced 

That Rustam was no more, and that the sea 

Was dry with grief, that many men had fallen. 

And that the rest had fled the battlefield. 

The hosts, both Persian and Arabian, 

Reached Karkh, and Farrukhzad, son of Hurmuzd, 

Wroth and with tearful eyes came from the Arwand, 

Arrived at Karkh, fell on the enemy, 

And not an Arab warrior survived. 

The Persians marched out from Baghdad intent 

To meet the foe, and bloodv was the event. 



Hoiv Yazdagird consulted with the Iranians a7id icent 

to Khurasan 

When Farrukhzad had gone back to the Shah, 

All over dust and in his fighting-gear, 

He lighted from his charger, did obeisance, 

' The French version of the rest of this section is as follows : — 
" Yezdegird ^tait k Bagdad lorsque ses troupes afiluerent autour 
de lui. Farrukhzad, fils d'Hormuzd, furieux et rcpandant des 
larmes, traversa le Tigre, entra dans Kerkh et livra un assaut 
terrible qui ne lassa vivant aucun des guerricrs armcs de lances. 
Les troupes sortirent aussitot de Bagdad et alKrcnt chercher le 
combat dans la plaine ; mais lorsque la poussitre de la lutte se fut 
dissipee, les Iraniens etaient en fuite." 



86 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

Blood in his eyes and anguish in his heart, 
And said to Yazdagird : " Why weep so nmch ? 
Is it to wash the throne of kings with tears ? 
2071 Thou only of the royal race art left 

To wear the crown and sit upon the throne. 

One, with a hundred thousand enemies, 

How canst thou battle when exposed to all ? 

Betake thee to the forest of Narwan ; 

The folk will gather to thee there and thence. 

Like valiant Faridiin, do thou renew 

The fight hke fire." 

The king of kings gave ear. 
New thoughts occurred. Upon the morrow's morn 
He sat upon his throne, assumed the crown, 
Held an assembly with his men of lore, 
The magnates and shrewd-hearted archimages. 
And said : " What seemeth good to you herein ? 
What precedents recall ye from the past ? 
Saith Farrukhzad to me : ' Depart and take 
Thy followers to the forest of Narwan : 
The people of Amul, are servitors. 
The people of Sari all slaves, to thee, 
And, when thy troops are many, come again 
With puissance to battle with the Brave.' 
Do ye approve ? " 

They all of them exclaimed : — 
" That is the course." 

The king of kings rejoined : — 
" It is not well. I purpose otherwise. 
Shall I desert the chieftains of Iran, 
And this great host, our country, throne, and crown 
To save myself ? That were not majesty. 
Or manliness or policy. To fight 
The foe is better for me than disgrace. 
The leopard spake a saw in this regard : — 
' Whene'er the time of stress shall come on thee 



YAZDAGIRD 87 

Turn not in folly from thine enemy.' 
For just as subjects should obey their kin<> 
lu good and ill so he nmst not desert them 
In their distress and go off to his treasures." 

The great men blessed him, saying : " Crown 
and signet 
Exist for ends like these. Think what thy will 
And wishes are, and what assurances 
Thou wouldst of us." 

The Shah thus answered them : — 
" Anxiety is ruin to the heart. 
Our best course is to go to Khurasan 
Where we shall feel secure from strife w4th foes, 
For there we are possessed of many troops, 
And valiant paladins. The Turkish chiefs 
And Khan of Chin will come and do us homaoe 
While I will make the union stronger still 
By marriage with the daughter of Faghfiir. 
A great host will arrive to succour us, 
The magnates of Turan and mighty men. 
There is the warden of the marches too, 
Mahwi, with horsemen, elephants, and wealth 
Of all kinds. He is our chief governor, C. 2072 

The highest of the guardians of our coasts. 
I raised him when he was a vagabond, 
A minstrel and a braggart, giving him. 
Though worthless, name and w^orth, men, government. 
Lands, elephants. Base though he be and vile 
Still his advancement hath been at my court. 
Now I have heard an archmage quote this saw^ : — 
' Of one whom thou hast wTongly harmed bew^are : 
Of one made rich by thee thy hopes are fair.' 
I never injured him in aught, and he 
Will 'venge me on my foe." 

But Farrukhzad 
Smote his two hands together and exclaimed : — 



88 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

" O Shah who fearest God ! put httle trust 

In those of evil bent. In this regard 

There is a modern saw which runneth thus : — 

' Howe'er on birth thou practise witchery, 

And strivest such an one from rust to free, 

Since the All-giver framed him thus to be 

To loose God's bonds thou wilt not find a key.' " 

" O mighty, raging Lion ! " said the Shah, 
" To make this trial will work me no hurt." 

He stayed that night and, when the morning broke. 
Those noble men set forth and left Baghdad 
For Khurasan, and took their travail lightly. 
The chieftains of Iran all sorrowful 
Accompanied their Shah, that noble man, 
And called down blessings on him, saying : " INIay 

time, 
And earth, ne'er lack thee." 

From the host rose wails 
For grief and at the going of the king. 
And all the Iranian thanes — the warriors' stay — 
Drew near to him with outcries and in tears. 
And said to him : " O Shah ! we are thy slaves 
With souls and bodies filled with love for thcc. 
We all will go with thee to learn how fortune 
Will sport with our king's life, for if we lose 
Our Shah how can our hearts find joy in home. 
And country ? We will quit our settlements. 
Our children, and our wealth to share thy toils. 
We care not for our lives without thy throne : 
May fortune ne'er abandon thee."^ 
2073 With eyes 

All tears the king of kings said to those nobles : — 

" Be ever more intent in praising God. 

It may be I shall look on you again. 

And that our sorrows and distress will cease. 

» Three couplets omitted. 



YAZDAGinD 89 

Ye all arc my true helpers and the heirlooms 
Left by my sires. I would not have you harmed : 
Share not mine ills then. AVe will mark the intent 
Of circling heaven, its progress, and to whom 
It showeth love. Resign yourself thereto : 
None can evade its secret })urposes." 

Then said he to the merchantmen of Chin : — 
" Make no long tarrying here, else will the Arabs 
Convert your quest of gain to loss." 

They parted 
AVith pain and trouble, sorrow, care, and w^ailing. 
So Farrukhzad, son of ITurmuzd, led forth 
The troops and called the veterans of Iran, 
And then the Shah set out with w^ail and woe. 
The leader led the van. Stage after stage 
He marched to Rai and tarried there for wine, 
And minstrelsy, thence went he to Gurgan, 
Like wind, and stayed one se'nnight sad or glad. 
Departing thence toward Bust he set his face 
With wrinkled cheeks and body in ill case. 



§6 

How Yazdagird ivrote to Mdliivi of Sur 

The w^orld-lord, resolute to go to Marv, 

Wrote to Mahwi of Siir, the governor, 

In rage and pain, in tears and hope deferred, 

And calling an experienced scribe poured forth 

His heart, and it was full. He first praised God, 

The all-wise Lord, the Fosterer, the Master 

Of circling Mars and Sol, of cle]:)hant 

And ant, at will creating out of naught, 

And needing no instructor, then proceeded : — 



90 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

" What hath befallen us ! And gone are all 

This kingship's hue and j^erfume. Rustani's death 

Upon the battlefield and by the hand 

Of one whose name is Sa'ad, son of Wakkas, 

A landless, low-born, witless, aimless man, 

Hath straitened all the world to us through sorrow. 

Now that Sa'ad's army is at Taisafun, 

With woods and foot-hills fronting them, array 

Thy host to fight with his and summon all 

Thy troops to that same end.^ Lo ! I will follow 

Behind my letter swiftly as the wind. 

And give thee what I purpose in my mind."^ 



How Yazdagird wrote to the Marchlords of Tils 

He wrote moreover to the folk of Tus, 

With full heart and with face like sandarac. 

First offering his praises to the Judge 

" From whom are fortune, strength, and excellence, 

Grace, triumph, throne, and diadem of kingship. 

From foot of ant to soaring eagle's plume. 

From elephant on land to crocodile 

In water, all arc faithful, do His will. 

And draw no breath unless by His command. 

This from the world's Shiih, mighty Yazdagird, 

Son^ of a famous king and valorous. 

Victorious leader of the Iranian host. 

Who guardeth his domain, desireth more, 

And Cometh of a great. God-fearing race 

That thank their stars that they possess the crown, 

' Three couplets omitted. " Two couplets omitted. 

' Reading with P. 



YAZDAGTRD 91 

Have peopled earth and made crown, throne, and 

signet 
Ues[)Iendent, to his niarehlords witli their thrones 
And treasures, Graee, high-bearing, crowns and host 
At Shamirtin, lluina,* and Mount llada, 
Kahit and elsewhere. May the Fosterer 
^Vateh over us and keep you from the scath 
Of evil hap. In sooth the chiefs have heard. 
For it hath been an ensign in the Avorld, 
That in regard to warfare, valoiu', birth. 
Our hearts are full of kindness, love, and justice. 
High birth especially constraineth us — 
The Shahs — to let our toils exceed our treasures _ 

On your behalf. What time Bahram Chubnia, 
That malcontent, grew noted and rejected 
Our rule and diadem ye all abandoned 
Your marches, spacious cities, pleasances. 
Your parks and palaces, and in that case. 
In terror of disaster, made your homes 

On dale and lofty height. If God almighty C 2075 

Shall grant me strength and fortune favour us 
I will repay your good deeds lavishly. 
And pray to Him who watcheth o'er the world. 
In sooth ye must have heard of what the stars 
Have brought upon our head by these vile Snakes 
With looks like Aliriman, who lack all knowledge. 
Shame, fame, and treasure, fortune and descent, 
And fain would let the world go to the winds. 
It is the compass of the lofty sky 
That tribulation shall befall this realm 
By these vile miscreants, these Raven -heads, ^ 
Devoid of sense and knowledge, fame and shame. 
These greedy men, who covet diadems, 

' " Rouindiz." Mohl. 

'The Persians translated "'Arab" by " Zagh " (raven) and 
applied the expression to those hated enemies. 



92 THE SH Ah NAM A OF FIRDAUSi 

Have fixed their eyes upon this royal state, 

And Nushirwan once dreamed that this our throne 

Would lose its brilliant lustre. He beheld 

A hundred thousand Arabs — raging camels 

With bits! snapped — seeking how to cross the Arwand, 

And bring destruction on our fields and fells, 

Saw that both Fire and Fane of Fire would perish. 

The light of New Year end and Sada feast. 

That in Iran and Babylon dark smoke 

Would rise from tilth and crop to Saturn's sj)here. 

While on the world-king's hall the battlements 

Would tumble to the ground.^ The dream is now 

Fulfilled and heaven's favour fain to quit us. 

Those that we value most will be misprized, 

The base will be set up on high by fortune, 

111 scattered through the world, mishap apert 

And good concealed. In all the provinces 

Some tyrant, some obscene calamity. 

And signs of dark night's coming will appear. 

Our glorious fortune be cut off from us. 

Now as our counsellors and paladins — 

Men of pure rede — advise we purpose going 

To Khurasan and to its warlike marehlords. 

Because now of the governor of Tus 

Have I led here the elephants and drums, 

And we shall see how fortune will make bonds 

Of our frail knots. I am girt up for battle 

That I may meet the Arabs face to face. 

While Farrukhzad— my very veins and skin. 

And my firm friend — is now at Altiiniya, 

Intent on fight, and host eonfronteth host. 

While Kashmigan, that warrior's son, hath reached 

Our court and spoken well and loyally. 

' Properly the piece of wood passed through a perforation made 
in the nostrils of a camel to guide it by. 
" See Vol. viii., p. 66. 



YAZDAGIRD 93 

I heard wliat he could tell about these marches, c. 2076 

Their heights aud depths, their caves, retreats, the 

hold 
Upon Mount Gunibadan and Jarmana, 
The fort of Lazhawardi for our stores, 
Spots such as Al, Makhziuu, and waste of Gil : 
lie kindly oj)ened all his heart to me. 
My host for battle is too numerous 
To tarry long within these narrow holds. 
We have held council ; all the paladins 
Attended ; we debated and resolved 
To take with us crown, throne, and seal and 

signet. 
All garments of Kashmir and Rum and Chin, 
Such goods as we can gather from Kibchak 
And from Kirwan, all that Ave have in hand 
Of clothes and carpets, articles of gold, 
With gems uncut and all that most we prize. 
And provand and equipment for the future. 
Of oxen forty thousand will drag loads 
Of unthrashed corn and after these will come 
Twelve thousand asses drawing loads of dates 
For us. A trusty archimage will bring 
Pistachios, millet, and pomegranate- juice. 
Attending on the outcome they will send 
Thereafter many asses' loads of salt. 
And add a thousand camels' loads of millet, 
Fat from the tails of sheep and butter-skins. 
A thousand Bactrian camels will bring dates, 
Another thousand sugar, as their loads. 
Twelve thousand also will bring drums of honey. 
All these will come at one time to the holds. 
13esides all these my servants will bring in 
Some forty thousand salted carcases. 
And of black naphtha in the next two months 
Three hundred camel-loads. An archimage 



94 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

With escort will arrive from^ Shamiraii, 
And from Mount Rada while, in sight of all 
The elders and the wise, the moiuitain-chiefs, 
Sent by the marchlords, will convey whate'er 
Is needed to the gates and give the list 
To our own treasurer, and if the Great 
Among the folk wall but restrain themselves 
They will in sooth receive no injury 
Among the valleys and the lofty hills 
From Arab or from Turkman. Help from you 
In these our strenuous times will aid us much. 
Our minister, that wise and holy man. 
Will now give orders to our treasurer 
To send five robes of Persian make to all 
)77 That toil for us and, when those toils are over, 
A splendid turban of gold broidery. 
In these our present troubles each shall have 
Two score drachms from our treasures, afterwards, 
For service rendered, for each drachm three-score. 
Each worth more than ten dangs,^ and he will read 
This legend : ' In the name of holy God, 
The Object of our reverence, hopes, and fears,' 
Upon one side. The other side will bear 
Our face and crown, the legend : ' Through our love 
The earth becometh fruitful.' These have been 
Prepared for New Year's Da}^ the nobles' eyes 
• Fulfilled w'ith wealth. God's blessiuQ- on the man 
Whose faults are few and who forgetteth not 
Our diadem." 

The Shah when he had sealed 
The letter sent it to the army-chiefs. 
With this king's missive in his hand there came 
A horseman of high fortune and high aim. 

' Reading with P. 
' The dang properly was a quarter of a drachm. 



Y.lZn.lCIRD 



95 



§8 

JIuiv Yazdayird went to T us and how Mdhwi of Stir 

met him 

Tliciicc they conveyed the driiins and came to Tus 

From Nishaj)ur. INIahwi of Suv had news : — 

" The Shah is on the road to Dahistan," 

And went to meet him with a mighty power, 

All sj)earmen and in coats of mail, and when 

The Glory of the royal state ajjpeared, 

The flag- of majesty and such a host, 

Alighted from his steed forthwith and paid 

His dnty to the king of kings, walked softly 

Upon the bnrning dust and from his eyes 

Shed tears of reverence. He kissed the around. 

Prolonging his obeisance, iill his troops 

Acclaimed the Shah and touched earth with their 
heads, 

While Farrukhzad cnrankcd his })owers when he 

Beheld the visage of Mahwi of Siir 

By whom his heart was joyed and whom he coun- 
selled 

At large : " This Shah of royal race do I 

Commit to thee to serve him, suffering not 

The blast to blow on him, and none save thee 

To earn his thanks. I must depart to Rai, 

Uncertain whether I shall see again 

The royal crown for 'gainst these Arab sj)carmen 

Full many such as I have died in battle. 

There was not one within the world like Ilustam, 

The horseman, never hath the ear of sage 

Heard tell of such, yet by a Raven-head^ c. 2078 

' See p. 91. note. 



96 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

Was he cut off, so adverse was our day ! 
God grant to him a place among the Just, 
And give the swarthy Ravens to our spears ! 

Mahwi rephed : " O paladin ! the Shah 
Is eye and soul to me. I undertake 
In thy place to defend thy king, thy Heaven." 

So Farrukhzad, son ofHurmuzd, departed 
To Rai as bidden by the Shah, The sky 
Revolved awhile with matters in this stay, 
And all love passed from that malignant's brain, 
And none dared go to battle with the Arabs 
Because the azure sky was helping them ; 
The visage of the monarch of tran 
Grew wrinkled ; the foe's deeds made strait his heart. 
Mahwi saw that the Shah was at a stay. 
And driven on by fortune helplessly, 
Ambitioned speedily the throne and changed 
In policy, in manners, and dispose. 
Then for a season he began to affect 
111 health and barely showed the Shah respect. 



§9 

How Mdhivi of Sur incited Bizhan to tvar with Yaz- 
dagird and how Yazdagird fled and hid himself 
in a Mill 

There was a paladin, a Turk by race, 
A man of influence and named Bizhan ; 
He dwelt within the coasts of Samarkand 
Where he had many kin. Ill-starred Mahwi, 
Becoming self-assertive, wrote to him : — 
" Thou prosperous scion of the paladins ! 



YAZDAGIRD 97 

A strife hath risen that will bring thee profit : 

The Shah is of all places here at Marv 

And with no troops ! His head and crown and state, 

Wealth, throne, and host, are thine if thou wilt come. 

Recall the vengeance owing to thy sires, 

And give this unjust race its just reward." 

Bizhan, considering the letter, saw 
That insolent IMahwi would win the world, 
Then spake thus to his minister : " Thou chief 
Of upright men ! what sayest thou to this ? 
If I lead forth a host to aid Mahwi 
'Twill be my ruin here."^ 

The minister 
Replied : " O lion-hearted warrior ! 

'Twcre shame to hclj) IMahwi and then withdraw. C. 2079 

Command Barsam to set forth with a host 
To aid upon this scene of strife. The sage 
Will term thee daft to go and fight in person 
At the insistence of this man of Sur." 

Bizhan replied : " 'Tis well, I will not go 
Myself." 

He therefore bade Barsam to lead 
Ten thousand valiant cavaliers and swordsmen 
To IMarv with all the implements of war 
If haply he might take the Shah. That host 
Went like a flying pheasant from Bukhara 
To Marv within one week. One night at cock-crow 
The sound of tymbals went up from the plain. 
How could the king of kings suspect Mahwi 
Of Sur to be his enemy ? Shouts rose. 
A cavalier reached Yazdagird at dawn 
To say : " Mahwi saith thus : ' A host of Turks 
Hath come. What is the bidding of the Shah ? 
The Khan and the Faghfur of Chin command : 
Earth is not able to support their host ! ' " 

' Two couplets omitted. 

VOL. IX G 



98 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSl 

The Shah wroth donned his mail. The armies 

ranged.^ 
He formed his troops to right and left, and all 
Advanced to battle. Spear in hand he held 
The centre, and the whole world was bedimmed 
With flying dust. He saw how lustily 
The Turks engaged, unsheathed his sword, and came. 
As 'twere an elephant before his troops. 
Earth Nile-wise flowed. Like thundering cloud he 

charged. 
But not a warrior supported him ; 
All turned their backs upon that man of name, 
And left him mid the horsemen of the foe. 
The world's king, when IMahwi withdrew, perceived 
The practice hid till then — the intent and plan 
To capture him — yet played the man in light. 
Displaying valour, strength, and warriorship. 
Slew many at the centre, but at length 
Fled in despair, with falchion of Kabul 
In hand, pursued by many Turks. He sped 
Like lightning mid night's gloom and spied a mill 
On the canal of Zark^. Alighting there 
The world's king lay in hiding from his foes 
Within the mill. The horsemen searched for him ; 
All Zark was hue and cry. The Shah abandoned 
c. 2080 His gold-trapped steed, his mace, and scimitar 

With golden sheath. The Turks with loud shouts 

sought him, 
Excited by that steed and equipage. 
The Shah within the mill-house lurked in hay. 
With this false Hostel thus it ever is : 
The ascent is lofty and prolound the abyss. 
With Yazdagird, while fortune slumbered not, 
A throne enskied^ by heaven was his lot. 
And now it was a mill ! Excess of sweet 

> Couplet omitted. » See LEC, p. 400. • Reading with T. 



YAZDAGTRD 99 

IJrcd banc for him and, if thou art discreet. 

Affect not this world for its end is ill. 

Whiles a tame serpent to the touch it still 

At whiles will bite, and hot that bite will be. 

Why then affect this cozening hostelry 

While like a drum the sional to be gone 

Thou hearest, bidding : '' Bind the baggage on, 

And for sole throne the grave's floor look upon ? " 

With mouth untasting and with tearful eyes 
The Shah abode until the sun arose, 
xVnd then the miller oped the mill-house door. 
lie bore a truss of grass upon his back. 
A low-born-man was he, by name Khusrau, 
Poor, foolish, unrespected, i)urposeless. 
He lived upon the profits of his mill. 
Which gave him full employment. He beheld 
A warrior, like a lofty cypress, sitting 
In dolour on the ground with kingly crown 
Upon his head and with brocade of Rum 
Bright on his breast ; his eyes a stag's, his chest 
And neck a lion's ; of beholding him 
The eye ne'er tired. He was unique in form ; 
VV^ore golden boots ; his sleeves were fringed with 

pearls 
And gold. Khusrau looked, stood astound, and 

called 
On God, then said : " O man of sunlike mien ! 
Say in what sort thou camest to this mill ? 
Why didst thou take it for thy resting-place 
Full as it is of wheat and dust and hay ? 
Who art thou with such form, such Grace and looks ? 
Sure, heaven never saw the like of thee ! " 

The Shah replied : " I am Iranian-born, 
In flight before the armv of Tiiran." 

The miller said, abashed : "I have no comrade 
Save penury, but still, if barley -bread, 



loo THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

With some poor cresses from the river-bank, 
Will serve thee I will bring them ; naught have I 
Besides : a man so straitened well may wail." 

Throuoh stress of fiffht the Shah had rested not, 
Or eaten, for three days and so replied : — 
" Bring what thou hast, that and the sacred twigs 
Will serve my turn." 
c. 2081 The poor and lowly miller 

Brought him the cresses and the barley-bread. 
Made haste to fetch the sacred twigs and, reaching 
The toll-house^ on the way, crossed to the chief 
Of Zark to make request for them. Mahwi 
Had sent men on all sides to find the Shah, 
And so the chieftain asked the miller : " Friend ! 
, For whom need'st thou the sacred twigs ? " 

Khusrau 
Replied : " There is a warrior at the mill, 
And seated on the hay, a cypress slim 
In height, a sun in looks, a man of Grace, 
With eyebrows arched and melancholy eyes : 
His mouth is full of sighs, his soul is sad. 
I set stale fare before him — barley-bread. 
Such as I eat myself — but he is fain 
To take the sacred twigs while nmttering grace. - 
Thou well mayst muse at him." 

The chief rejoined : — 
" Go and inform Mahwi of Sur hereof, 
For that foul miscreant must not reveal 
His proper bent when he shall hear of this."' 
Forthwith he charged a trusty man to take 

' The tcll-house was at the ford or ferry. The same word 
might also mean a place of worship and accordingly Mohl or rather 
his successor (see p. 37 note) translates : — " II se rcndit au lieu 011 
etait I'oratoire ct fit prevenir aussitot le chef de Zark qu'on liii 
dcmandait le Barsom." 

^ See Vol. i., p. 80 s.v. Bdj. 

' I.e. if subsequently he should learn that we knew and did 
not tell him. 



YAZDAGIRD loi 

The miller to Malnvi who asked ol' liini, 

Then anxious for himself ; " For whom didst thou 

Require the saered twigs ? Tell me the truth." 

The miller all a-tremble made rei)ly : — 
" I had been out to fetch a load and flung 
The mill-door open roughly, when knoAv this : 
The sun was in mine eyes, but his are like 
Those of a startled fawn ; his locks are dark 
As the third watch of night ; his breath suggesteth 
Musk, and his face embellisheth his crown. 
One that hath never seen the Grace of God 
Should take the mill-house key. His diadem 
Is full of uncut jewels, and his breast 
Bright with brocade of Rum. The mill hath grown 
As 'twere a sun through him, and yet his food 
Is barley-bread, his seat upon the hay ! 
' Spring,' thou wouldst say, ' in Paradise is he : 
No thane e'er set so tall a cypress-treej.' " 



§10 

How Mdliivi of Stir sent the Miller to kill Yazdagird, and 
Jioiv the Architnages counselled Mdhivi to forbear 

Now when Mahw'i had taken thought he knew : — 

" 'Tis none but Yazdagird ! " and bade the miller : — 

" Haste and cut off his head forthwith or I 

Will cut thine own off presently and leave c. 2082 

None of thy stock alive." 

The chiefs, the nobles, 
And mighty men heard this and all the assembly 
Were filled with wrath at him ; their tongues were 
charged 



I02 THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSI 

With words, their eyes with tears. An archimagc, 

By name Radwi, whose mind wore wisdom's bridle, 

Said to Mahwi : " O thou mahgnant one ! 

Why hath the Div confused thine eyes ? This know : 

The royal and prophetic offices 

Are two gems set within one finger-ring. 

To break one is to trample life and wisdom 

Beneath thy feet. Reflect upon thy words, 

And then forbear. Be not the Maker's foe. 

First will disaster come on thee herefrom. 

Then thou wilt leave a seed-plot for thy child, 

With fruit of colocynth and leafage blood. 

Ere long thou wilt behold thy head abased ; 

Thy villainy will be exposed ; thy sons 

Will reap what thou hast sown. This deed of thine 

Will wreck the Faith of God, and crown and throne 

Will curse thee." 

Then a devotee devout. 
Who never put his hand forth to injustice, 
By name Hurmuzd, son of Kharrad, a man 
Who rested in the Faith, said to Mahwi : — 
" O thou oppressor ! quit not thus the way 
Of holy God. I see thy heart and sense 
Bedimmed. We see thy breast a tomb. Though 

strong 
Thou hast no brain ; thy mind is weak ; thou seekest 
The smoke and not the fire. I see that thou 
Wouldst have the malediction of the world. 
And, when thou quit'st it, travail, smart, and anguish. 
Now will thy lifetime prove a wretched one. 
And fire thy dwelling-place when thou de})artest." 
He sat. Shahran rose and addressed Mahwi : — 
" Why this audacity ? Thou hast opposed 
The king of kings and cottoned with the Khan 
And the Faghfur. Full many of this race 
Have proved of no account yet men ne'er hasted 



YAZDAGIRD 103 

To slay them. Shed not, as tlioii art a slave, 
The blood of Shahs because thou wilt be cursed 
Till Dooiusday/' 

This he said, and sat down weeping 
In anguish with heart full and eyes all gall. 
Then Mihr-i-Niish stood forth in deep distress, 
With lamentation, and addressed ]Mahwi : — 
" O evil man of evil race, who art 
Not well advised or just ! a crocodile 
llespecteth royal blood, a leopard finding 
A slain king doth not rend him. O thou worse 
In love and instinct than the beasts of prey ! 
Thou covetcst the Shah's crown ! When Jamshid 
Was slaughtered by Zahhak did that affect C. 20S3 

Heaven's will ? Nay, when Zahhak had won the earth 
Abtin appeared, the glorious Faridun 
Was born, the fashion of the world was changed. 
And thou hast heard what tyrannous Zahhak 
Brought on himself as sequel of his crimes, 
For though he lived above a thousand years 
Still in the end the avenger came to him. 
Then, secondly, W'hen Tur, the exalted one, 
Afflicted by his longing for Iran, 
Slew in his folly virtuous fraj, 
On whom the very dust looked pitjingly. 
Dispatched him^ to the hero Faridun, 
And gave the world to sorrow, Minuchihr, 
One of the race, appeared and undid all 
Those bonds. When, thirdly, princely Siyawush 
Went forth to war, albeit reluctantly, 
Afriisiyab, inspired by Garsiwaz, 
Washed sliame and honour from his mind and wits. 
And slew the youthful and right royal prince, 
So that the world became his enemy. 
Sprung from that i)rince the world-lord Kai Khusrau 

' His head, according to the story. See Vol. i., p. 202. 



I04 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

Canic and filled all the world with hubbub, clave 

Asunder with his scimitar his grandsirc,i 

And frayed all those that else had sought revenge. 

The fourth count is the feud against Arjasp, 

The slayer of Luhrasp. Asfandiyar 

Went forth to fight with him and took swift wreak. 

Fifth, is the vengeance ta'en for Shah Hurmuzd. 

Khusrau Parwiz, whenas he felt confirmed 

In heart and power, dealt in the way we know 

Both with Bandwi and Gustaham. The sky, 

Which then revolved, revolveth still. ^ Forgetting 

What they had done for him, when his sire's blood 

And love and family appealed to him, 

He in his day of strength abated theirs.^ 

One may not scorn the occasion of revenge, 

For such a time will quickly come to thee. 

And thou wilt suffer for thine evil thoughts. 

Thy son will reap what thou hast sown, and fate 

Will not rest long from vengeance ; so refrain 

From all this treasure-hoard, this heritage 

Of crown and precious things. Thou art revolting 

Because the Div enjoineth, and abjuring 

The way of God. The Div, as thou wilt learn, 

Is tempting thee with things not for thine honour. 

Burn not thy soul and body in Hell-fire : 

Dim not this world-illuming crown but gather 

Thy scattered troops ; recant what thou hast said ; 

Go ask the Shah to pardon thee and when 

Thou seest him renew thy fealty. 

From there prepare to battle with the foe ; 

Be instant both in counsel and excuse. 

For not to hearken to the words of sages 

Will mark thee out as evil in both worlds. 

Men bring to naught things done a da}^ too late. 

' Afrdsiyab, whose daughter Farangfs married Siyavviish. 
* I.e. history repeats itself. ' Vol. viii., pp. 354, 358. 



YAZDAGIRD 105 

Wilt thou treat Yazdagird, the king of kings, 

\Vorse than niahgnant Turks, for in the fray 

He is a Uon, on the throne a Shah 

As bright as sun and moon, a memory 

Of the Sasanians ? None is oirdle-oirt 

Like him. From sire to sire his ancestors 

Were mighty men and compassers of wisdom 

From Niishh-wan, the Shah, back to Ardshir, 

AVhilc, seventh backward from Ardshir, Sasan, 

The world-lord, had the crown, ^ for God entrusted 

To him the Kaian crown, and all the kings 

W^ere of that glorious race. Now many a man 

Hath been thy better, but they ne'er conceived 

Designs like these. As for Bahram Chubhia, 

Three hundred thousand skilful cavaliers 

On barded steeds fled at one shaft of his,'^ 

And left the field of fight to him ; but when 

His heart grew weary of the race of Shahs 

The head of his resplendent fortune fell. 

So Fara} in, who sought the throne of kings 

Unworthily and bathed his hands in blood. 

Was in like manner miserably slain : 

This age endureth not such mockeries. 

Fear Him, the Lord, the Maker of the world. 

For He created throne and crown and signet. 

Defame not thine own person w'antonly 

Because ere long such things will rise against thee. 

Know that whoever speaketh not the truth 

To thee is thy soul's foe. Now thou art sick 

W^iile I am as the leech, a leech that waileth, 

» De jure not de facto. The first Sdsan, here referred to, was 
the son of Dara and after his father's overthrow by Sikandar took 
refuge in obscurity. Several generations later a descendant of 
his of the same name became the fathei of Ardshir Piipakan — the 
founder of the Sdsdnian Dynasty. The Sasanians, naturally sought 
to connect themselves with the old line of the I'crsian monarchy, with 
the Achaemenids in history and with the Kaidnians in legend. CJ. 
Vol. vi., Y>. 199. 

•See Vol. viii., p. 126. 



io6 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSf 

And shcddeth drops of blood. Thou art thyself 
Less than the slave of slaves. Be not ambitious 
In thy heart's thoughts. Leave strife to holy God, 
And seek in honour's way the throne of greatness." 

The sh(^j)licrd-borni had set his heart uj)on 
The throne : the arehimages' rede was hard. 
So hath it ever been ; 'tis no new thing : 
The flouts of fortune are past reckoning, 
Exalting to the sky above this one. 
And making that vile, wretehed, and undone, 
Not leagued with that, on war with this not bent. 
But void of wit, shame. Faith, and precedent. 

The archmages all, till the world gloomed and moon 
Succeeded sun, warned that vindictive man, 
Who was not one hair better for their talk. 
And said when night came : "Ye must leave me now 
::. 2085 O sages ! I will ponder this to-night, 

And take all kinds of wisdom to my breast. 
We will call twenty wise men from the host 
That we may need not to deplore this ill." 

The prudent arehimages went their ways, 
The men of war arrived. Mahwi held session 
With his confederates 2 and said : " What think ye 
Herein ? If Yazdagird remain alive 
Troops will collect to him from every side ; 
My secret purposes have been exposed. 
And all, both great and small, have heard thereof ! 
My life will end through his hostility. 
And neither folk nor field and fell be left." 

A wise man said : " Thou shouldest not have acted 
At first so. If the monarch of Iran 
Be ill-disposed toward thee then past doubt 
111 will befall thee from him, yet 'tis ill 
To shed his blood for then God will avenge him. 
To left and right are cares and pains of all kinds : 

'I.e. Mahwi. Cf. p. 87. » Reading with P. 



YAZDAGIRD 107 

Consider how thou nccd'st niiist. act herein."" 

Maliwi's son said to him : "" Well counselled sire ! 
Since thou hast made the Sliah thine enemy 
Be rid of him ; troo})s from Maehin and Chin 
Will come to him and earth grow strait for us. 
Hold this no trifle. Since thou hast })revailed 
Tempt not the maws of lions. Thou and all 
Thy host will be iii)rooted from the world 
If standard-wise the Shah's skirt be unfurrd." 



§11 

Hoiv Yazdagird teas slain hij Khusrau, the Miller 

Thereat the shameless, infamous Mahwi 
Turned fiercely to the miller, saying : " Up ! 
Take cavaliers and shed my foeman's blood." 

The miller, hearing, knew not what to do. 
But when at night the moon assumed her throne 
Departed mill-ward to the Shah and when 
He left the court-gate of Mahwi his eyes 
Were charged with tear-drops and his heart was full. 
Forthwith Mahwi dispatched some cavaliers 
To follow swift as smoke, instructing them : — 
" See that ye sully not the crown and earrings. 
The signet and the royal robes with blood. 
And strip the Shah when lifeless." 

With his eyes 
All tearful and cheeks yellow as the sun 
The miller went, exclaiming : " Judge almighty. 
Who art above the processes of time ! 

Wring presently his heart and soul for this C. 2086 

Abhorred behest ! " 

W'ith heart all shame and qualm, 



io8 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

With wetted cheeks and tongue all charged with dust, 
He reached the Shah and drawing nigh with caution. 
As one would speak a secret in the ear. 
Stabbed with a dirk his middle. At the blow 
The Shah cried : " Ah ! " Then tumbled head and 

crown. 
And barley-bread before him, to the dust ! 
He that abideth when he might depart 
From this world hath no wisdom in his heart, 
And wisdom is not in the turning sky. 
Whose love is as its stress and enmity. 
'Tis well to look not on the world and so 
From these its doings love and wrath not know. 
The planets weary of their fosterlings, 

And guiltless folk like Yazdagird are slain ; 
None else hath perished thus of all the kings, 

Nor of his host a plier of the rein. 
The horsemen of accursed Mahwi, on seeing 
That royal Tree thus laid to rest afar 
From palace and his scenes of ease, drew near, 
Gazed, one and all, upon his face, removed 
His cincture, violet robe, and coronet. 
His torque and golden boots, and left him there 
In miserable case upon the ground — 
The monarch of Iran flung on the dust, 
Blood-boltered, with gashed side !^ Those emissaries. 
When they arose, all framed their tongues to curse : — 
" Oh ! may Mahwi himself fare, prostrate thus. 
All gory on earth's face." 

They told Mahwi :— 
" The exalted Shah hath passed away from throne. 
From battle and delights," and he commanded 
To take, when it was night, the monarch's corpse. 
And fling it in the stream. The miller took 
The body of the Shah forth from the mill, 

' Reading the couplet that follows here two couplets lower. 



YAZDAGIRD 109 

And flung it (mark the horror !) in the water, 1 
And there it floated with a bobbing head l^ 

AVheu it was day and people went abroad 
Two men of worship visited the spot. 
One of these men austere and sober reached 
The river-bank and, when he saw the eorpse 
All naked in the water, hurried back 
In consternation to the monastery. 
And told the other monks what he had seen : — 
" The Shah, the master of the world, is drowned, 
And naked in the water-way of Zark ! " 

Then many of those holy men — the chief 
And others of all ranks — set forth. A cry 
Of anguish rose from them : " O noble man, c. 2087 

And royal crown-possessor ! none e'er saw 
The wearer of it in such plight as this, 
Or ever heard before the time of Christ 
A case like this king's through his wicked slave, 
This misbegotten dog, this reprobate, 
AVho fawned upon his master till ill came ; 
Mahwi's just portion is to be accursed. 
Woe for the head and crown, the height and mien ! 
Woe for the breast and arms, the hands and mace ! 
Woe for the last descendant of Ardshir ! 
Woe for that cavalier so young and goodly ! 
Strong wast thou ; thou hadst wisdom in thy soul. 
And thou hast gone to bear the news hereof 
To Niishirwan that, though thy face was moonlike. 
And though thou wast a king and soughtest crowns, 
Yet in the mill they pierced thy liverstead, 
And flung thy naked body in the stream ! "^ 

Four of the monks went stri[)ped into the water. 
Seized the bare body of the youthful king, 

• Thus, if we interpret the passage by strict Zoroastrian princi- 
ples, polluting one of the elements and adding sacrilege to regicide, 
bate/. Vol. iv., p. 129. 

' Couplet omitted. ' Three couplets omitted. 



no THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSi 

That grandson of the world-lord Nushirwan, 

And drew it to the bank while young and old 

Lamented greatly. They prepared for him 

Within the garth a charnel-house and raised 

Its summit to the clouds. They sealed his wound 

With gum, with pitch, with camphor, and with musk, 

And then arrayed him in brocade of gold. 

With fine Egyptian linen underneath. 

And dark-blue Russian cloth o'er all. They decked 

His place of rest with wine and gum and camphor. 

With musk and with rose-water. 

When the form 
Was hidden of that noble Cypress-tree 
What said that honoured thane of Marv ? "In secret 
A guerdon waiteth him that after travail 
Departeth with good conscience from the world." 

Another said : " Though man may laugh, yet know 
That he is of the sufferers, for he 
Will find the falseness of the turning sky, 
Which will reveal to him both rise and fall." 

Another said : " Call not him one of wit 
That serveth his own form with princes' blood. 
And seeketh wealth, despite of infamy. 
With soul unf earful of an evil end." 

Another said : " Since the Shah's lips are closed 
I see not crown or royal seat or signet. 
Or courtiers or a realm or diadem. 
Or throne or helmet, and if these possess 
No moment in themselves why this expense 
Of toil and time ? " 
2088 " Thy good report, I sec," 

Another said, " will win thee worthy praise. 
Thou in the garth of Paradise didst set 
A cypress : now thy soul beholdcth it." 

Another said : "God took thy soul and gave 
Thy body to the care of the devout. 



YAZDAGIRD iii 

Hereby thy soul is lirofited, hereby 

\\\\\ harm betide the foe. The Shah hath now 

His work in Paradise ; his foenian's soul 

Is on the road to Hell." 

Another said : — 
" Wise, knowledge-loving Shah sprung from Ardshir ! 
Thou reapest now the erop that thou didst sow : 
The lamp of sovereignty is still alight." 

Another said : " Though thou'rt asleep, young king! 
Thy spirit is awake. Thy lips are mute. 
And with full many a groan thy spirit passed 
And left thy body free. Thy work is done : 
Thy soul is busy now. Thy foenian's head 
Is on the stake. Although thy tongue is tied 
Thy spirit speaketh, and thy soul is purged 
Although thy form is pierced, while if thy hand 
Have dropped the reins thy spirit still will wield 
The spear in battle." 

Said another one : — 
" O famous warrior ! thou hast departed 
With thine own works as guide. Th}^ royal seat 
Is now in Paradise ; this earth of bale 
Is now another's share." 

" The man that slew 
One such as thee," another said, " will look 
Upon harsh days anon." 

The prelate said : — 
" Thy slaves are we and laud thy holy soul. 
lie this, thy charnel, as a garth all tulips. 
This bier thine upland and thy plain of joy." 

They spake, took up the bier and carried it 
From waste to mausoleum. Thither came 
The hapless Shah, crown, throne, and casque at end. 
O man of many years, whose words still run ! 

Turn from the path of greed, break off thy strain. 
What shall we say hereof ? Was justice done. 



112 THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSt 

Or vengeance by the seven planets ta'en, 
On Yazdagird ? The sage, if unresolved 

Upon the point, could make me no reply, 
Or if he spake 'twould be in words involved 

That keep the answer still a mystery. 
If thou hast means, good man ! indulge thy heart ; 

Trust not to what the morrow promiseth, 
Because the world and thou perforce must part. 

And time accounteth for thine every breath; 
Thou shouldest sow not any save good seed 

In what remaineth of thy mortal strife ; 
Control the door of appetite and greed ; 

He that provided will provide through life. 
And life itself will but produce for thee 

Fair fame and happiness, good friend ! Then still 
2089 With all thy might eschew iniquity. 

For from a wise man should proceed no ill. 
Bring wine ; our day is nearly o'er and hence 

We must away, for what hath been will be. 
Had I incomings balancing expense 

Then time would be a brother unto me. 
The hail this year like death on me hath come. 

Though death itself were better than the hail, 
And heaven's lofty, far-extending dome 

Hath caused my fuel, wheat, and sheep to fail. 



§12 

IIow Mdhioi of Sur was informed of the Obsequies'^ of 
Yazdagird and ascended the Throne 

One came and told Mahwi of Sur : " The world-lord 
Is hidden in the dust. The prelates, priests, 

' " Slaying " in the text. 



YAZDAGIRD 113 

And monks ol" Rum- all those of life austere, 

Both young and old, throughout that mareh and 

land — 
Went wailing, took his body from the stream, 
And made for him within the garth a charnel — 
A great one, higher than the mountain-slopes."^ 

IMahwi, that hiekless wretch, exclaimed : " Iran 
Had ne'er before affinity with Rum." 

He sent and slew the builders of that charnel, 
With those that mourned, and gave that march to 

spoil. 
Such was his will and worth ! Thereafter he 
Made search throughout the world and found not one 
Of that great stock. He had a croAvn and signet, 
The Shah's erewhile, and to that shepherd-born 
The throne appealed. He called his intimates. 
Announced the piu-pose that he had at heart. 
And told his minister : " Experienced man ! 
The day of strife and battle is upon us. 
I have no treasure, fame or lineage. 
And may but give my head up to the winds. 
The name that is upon my signet-ring 
Is Yazdagird : my scimitar hath failed 
To make men yield to me. Throughout Iran 
Men are his slaves although his kin is scattered. 
The sages do not hail me as the Shah, 
The soldiers do not recognise my seal. 
My machinations tended otherwise. 
Oh ! wherefore did I shed the world-king's blood ? 
All nitiht am I sore-troubled in mv thoughts : 
The World-lord knoweth how it is with me." 

The counsellor replied : " The thing is done. 
And connnon talk. Act for thine own behoof. 
For thou hast burst thy belt. The Shah is dust C. 2090 

Within the charnel ; dust hath healed his soul. 

» Reading with P. 

VOL. IX H 



114 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSi 

Call round thee all the world-experienced men, 

And set thy tongue to words of pleasantness. 

Say thus : ' The Shah gave me the crown and signet 

As emblems of authority, perceiving 

The coming of an army from the Turks, 

Called me at dead of night, and said : " When bruit 

Of war ariseth who can say which side 

The dust will be, so take this crown and ring. 

For they may help thee on the day of battle. 

I have one daughter only left to me : 

In truth she is in hiding from the Arabs. 

Hereafter yield not to the foe my throne, 

And by these tokens walk thou in my steps." 

I have then from the Shah as legacy 

This crown and in accord to his behest 

Am sitting on the throne.' By this device 

Give thou thine acts a gloss for who will know 

The truth from falsehood ? " 

" Good ! " exclaimed Mahwi, 
" Thou art a minister — a peerless one ! " 

He summoned all the captains of the host, 
And spake at large to them to that efTect. 
They knew : " It is not true, and well it were 
To cut his head off for his shamelessness." 

A paladin observed : " 'Tis thy concern 
If what thou say est be the truth or not." 

He heard and sat him down upon the throne. 
By his deceit gat hold of Khurasan, 
Distributed the earth among his chiefs, 
And said : " I am the world's king with the signet.' 

lie called his kin and said the same at large ; 
He took the whole earth as it were a gift ; 
The stars were in amaze at him. He chose 
The vicious as accorded to his nature, 
Debased the sages and made everywhere 
Chiefs of the bad. The head of right was humbled. 



YAZDAGIRD 115 

And knavery on all sides manifest. 

lie gave his cider son Balkli and Ilarat, 

And sent troops to each quarter. As his host 

And treasures grew the heart of that ingrate 

Was gratified. He gave his troops rewards 

And put them in good case ; he filled the heads 

Of his own kith and kin with vapourings. 

Then with his troops and valiant warriors, 

Preceded by the scouts and Garsiyim — 

A veteran chief — they marched upon Bukhara, 

Intent on war, for " Chach and Samarkand 

Are ours," Mahwi said, " and they must be made 

The captives of this crown and seal, for so 

Did Yazdagird, king of the world, command — C. 2091 

Chief of the planets seven. With the sword 

Will I take vengeance on Bizhan by whom 

The fortune of earth's king w^as turned to gloom." 



§13 

How Bizhan, hearinq of the Slaying of Yazdagird and 
of Mdhwi of Siir^s Accession to the Throne, led 
forth the Host to fight with him 

In time news reached Bizhan : " Mahwi hath seized 
The throne of might and everywhere imposeth 
His seal and signet ; earth accei)tcth him, 
And now with warlike troops his face is turned 
Toward the .lihun for battle." 

" Who bestowed 
The sianct on him ? " asked Bizhan, and one 
Acquainted him with all : " When thou didst reach 
The desert of Farab, and fortune's lips 
Were closed to good and ill, there parted hence 



ii6 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUSt 

To him a force of haughty cavaUers 
In quest of fame, for he had said : ' If thou 
Wilt send me troops I will dispatch to thee 
By privy pact the crown of king of kings 
With golden throne and signet. In the world 
The sovereignty is fitly thine.' Thy troops 
Went hence in haste and found the Shah at Marv. 
They compassed him about. The Iranians fled. 
When that wise king was left alone he feared 
That ill might come upon him from the host. 
There was a certain mill upon the ford. 
And thither went the Shah, a sun in Grace. 
Mahwi of Sur heard of him, sent and slew him. 
And through the royal signet gained the world 
When he had slain his master. Now the more })art 
Of praise and blame in this affair is thine, 
Thine were the valiant horsemen and the strife." 

Barsam said thus : " O king ! what time^ I took 
A mounted force from Chach- Mahwi had said 
To thee : ' The golden throne of Yazdagird, 
His armlets set with gems, his crown withal 
And treasure, will I send to Balkh. The throne 
And crown within the world must needs be thine.' 
I fought three days at Marv^ When on the fourth 
The world's light shone I battled furiously, 
For I was pressed. Tyrannical Mahwi 
Displayed his back. The Iranian king of kings, 
Abandoned, like a furious lion charged 
c. 2092 My troops and slaughtered many of my chiefs. 
But, when he had no comrades left, he too 
Displayed his back ; but how that master -slayer. 
That faithless slave, ])ut him to death I know not. 
Thus with no toil Mahwi obtained and used 
His master's treasures. Then the miscreant, 
Becoming dazed by so much wealth, appeared, 
» Reading with P. » Couplet omitted. 



YAZDAGIRD 117 

Thou mightcst say, as if he ne'er had seen me ! 

Although my troops remained two months at ]\Iarv 

lie gave us no kind look but put to death. 

And privily, his lord, so great a king. 

The lustre ol' the world, a cavalier 

That 'raiseth o'er the orbit of the moon 

His head amidst the host ' thou wouldst have said. 

No Turk encountered and escaped his mace : 

He broke oin- nobles' hearts. I have not seen 

Such breastplate, hand, and mace. ISIahwi thus 

furnished 
Seized on the realm in this unholy wise. 
Now that the foe in arms invadeth thee 
Thou and thine army must be up and doing. 
Let not weeds blossom in the royal garden 
Or it will be forgotten." 

Hearing this, 
Bi/han raged much at having helped to dim 
The fortune of the Shah, then bade assemble 
Ilis host of Turks, his horsemen of the day 
Of battle, sped forth from Kachar Bashi, 
And lost no time upon the road. Wheiuis 
He drew anear Bukhara all the waste 
Was covered with his troops to whom he said : — 
" Haste not and let Mahwi be first to lead 
His host across the water^ to contend 
^Vilh me. Perchance on him I may avenge 
The Shah." 

He asked thereafter : " Did the king 
liCave no availful child ? Had he no brother ? 
Tn the default of sons had he no daughter, 
Whom we might carry with us and assist, 
And take full satisfaction of Mahwi ? " 

Barsam replied : " My lord ! this race's day 
Is passed ; the Arabs hold those provinces ; 

• The Oxus. 



ii8 THE SHAHNAMA OF FIRDAUS! 

No Shah is left or worshipper of Fire." 

Bizhan, on hearing this, resumed his march, 
Astound at this world's doings. Scouts announced : — 
" A host hath come and campeth at Baigand. 
They crossed in boats, their dust obscured the sun." 

Bizhan, the chief, led on his troops to war, 
And when Mahwi of Sur beheld them thou 
c. 2093 Hadst said : " His soul took flight." He was in 
dudgeon 
At all those breastplates, helmets, shields of Chin, 
At all those maces, spears, and battle-axes 
Of Chach. The air grew dark and earth was lost 
To sight therein as he arrayed his host. 



§14 



How Mdhivi of Silr was taken and slain by Order of 

Bizhan 

Bizhan, when he had drawn up his array, 
Prepared an ambush for the Iranians ; 
Mahwi knew of it and with loud exclaims 
Departed from among his troops. Bizhan 
Looked forth, beheld the flag, and knew : " Mahwi 
Is minded to take flight," and bade Barsam : — 
" Lead from the central host what troops thou hast, 
And draw toward one side ; we must not let 
Mahwi decline the battle and haste thus 
Jihun-wards. Speed and keep him well in sight. 
For we nmst deal with him in other wise." 

Barsam of Chin observed the flag and drew 
His troops apart until with frowning face. 
And malisons upon his lips, he reached 
The desert of Farab, there found Mahwi, 



YAZDAGIRD 119 

And, with his weight upon the stirrups, charged ; 
Then, closing face to face, he j)Hcd his sword, 
Disphiying valour, seized his I'oenian's belt, 
Unseated him and dashed him to the ground. 
Alighted, bound his hands, and then remounting 
Drove him along in front. With that came up 
Barsam's own comrades, and the bruit of him 
Filled all the plain. They said : " O chief ! iNIahwi 
Should be beheaded on the w-ay." 

He answered : — 
" Not so ; Bizhan as yet is not informed 
About the capture." 

Presently Bizhan 
Gat new^s : " That ill-conditioned slave is taken," 
Heard and grew glad of heart. He hugged himself. 
And thus released from care roared lion-like. 
Then many valiant Turks came and discussed 
The fashion of the slaying of Mahwi. 
All that they recognised as of his court 
They put to death — a countless multitude. 
Thev looted all the baggage and dragged off 
Mahwi stripped bare of all. The guilty wretch 
Lost all his wdts when he beheld Bizhan, 

Was as a soulless body w'ith affright, c. 2094 

And strewed upon his head the unstable sand. 
Bizhan said : " O thou miscreant ! may none have 
A slave like thee ! Why didst thou put to death 
That righteous Shah, the lord of victory 
And throne, and by ancestral right both Shah 
And king, the memory of Niishirwan ? " 
Mahwi made answer thus : " The evil-doer 
Can look for naught but slaying and reproach. 
Now smite my neck for wrong done and fling dow^n 
My head in presence of this com})any." 

The other gave reply : "I will so act 
That I shall banish vengeance from my heart," 



55 



I20 THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSl 

Struck off Miihwi's hand with the scimitar, 

And said : " This hand hath not a peer in crime. 

The hand thus lopped, he said : " Cut oIT his feet 
That he may not escape," and further bade : — 
Cut off his nose and ears, let him be placed 
Upon a horse out on the burning sand 
Until he sleepeth in his shame." 

The}' bound him 
From head to foot with cords, the clarions sounded, 
A herald went the circuit of the host, 
And, as he passed the entry of the tents. 
Made proclamation : " Slaves that slay your masters ! 
Indulge no foolish thoughts, and may all those 
Without compmiction for a monarch's life 
Be as Mahwi and never see the throne." 

There was a prince, by name Guraz, at once 
The glory and the pleasure of Mahwi. 
He was the governor of Marv what time 
Mahwi died wretchedly. As eldest son 
He was his father's lustre, who had made 
A crown of gold for him. When fortune loured 
Upon Mahwi the horsemen rode to Marv 
From all sides. Tumult spread. The war-cry rose. 
And strife and turmoil filled the land. Guraz 
Was slain mid those dark doings, and the day 
Of all his race was done. He had three sons 
Among his troops, three favourite sons possessed 
Of crown and throne. A lofty pyre was kindled. 
And he and his three sons were burned thereon. 
None of the seed remained or if some did 
Men harried them. The chieftains cursed that race. 
All vengeful for the slaughter of the Shah : — 
" May it be cursed and may there never fail 
A man to curse it as it hath deserved." 

Bizhan, the Turk, too was an evil-doer. 
Ilis own time came, his wisdom was estranged. 



YAZDAGIRD 121 



And I have heard that he grew mad at last, 

And was so till he slew himself. Well done, c. 2o<ji 

Thou still revolving, erook-baeked sky ! Since tlien 

Hath been the e})oeh of 'Umar, made known 

The Faith, and to a pulpit changed the throne. 



§15 

Account of the Completion of the Shdhndma 

When five and sixty years had passed me by 

I viewed my task with more anxiety, 

And as my yearning to achieve it grew 

My fortune's star receded from my view. 

Persians well read and men of high degree 

Wrote all my work out and would take no fee. 

I over-looked from far, and thou hadst said 

That they had rather handselled me instead ! 

Naught but their praises had I for my part. 

And while they praised I had a broken heart. 

The mouths of their old money-bags were tied. 

Whereat mine ardent heart was mortified. 

Of famous nobles of this town 'Ali, 

The Dilamite,! most shared the work with me. 

For he, a man of ardent temper made. 

Through kindliness of soul forwent no aid. 

Husain, son of Kutib, a Persian lord. 

Asked me for naught without its due reward, 

But furnished gold and silver, clothes and meat, 

And found me ways and means, and wings and feet. 

As for taxation, naught thereof know I ; 

All at mine ease in mine own quilt I lie. 

' In Vol. i., p. 35, the names arc given according to the reading 
of BCM. 



122 THE SHAHNAMA of FIRDAUSI 

What time my years attained to ten times seven 
And one my poetry surmounted heaven. 
For five and thirty years I bore much pain 
Here in this Wayside Inn in quest of gain, 
But all the five and thirty years thus past 
Naught helped ; they gave my travail to the blast, 
And my hopes too have gone for evermore 
Now that mine age all but hath reached fourscore. 
I end the story of Shah Yazdagird, 
And in Sapandarmad, the day of Ard, 
And year four hundred of Muhammad's Flight, 
The last words of this royal book I write. 
For ever flourishing be Shah Mahmud, 
His head still green, his heart with joy imbued. 
I have so lauded him that publicly 
And privily my words will never die. 
Of praises from the Great I had much store ; 
The praises that I give to him are more. 
May he, the man of wisdom, live for aye. 
His doings turn to his content alway. 
This tale of sixty thousand couplets I 
Have left to him by way of memory. 
2096 My life from days of youth to eld hath sped 
In talk and hearkening what others said. 
When this, my famous tale, was done at last 
O'er all the realm my reputation past. 
All men of prudence, rede, and Faith will give 
Applause to me when I have ceased to live. 
Yet live I shall ; the seed of words have I 
Flung broad-cast and henceforth I shall not die. 



The Shahnama of Firdausi is ended. 



INDEX 



This Index and the Table of Contents at the beginning of the 
volume are complementary. References to the latter are in 

Roman numerals. 



Arab, Arabs, booty found by, at 
Ctcsiphon (?), 68 
annex Mesopotamia, 68 

Khuzistan, 68 
= 'Umar, 72 
seal, 82 
=Sa'ad, 84 
defeated, 85 

Niishfrwan's dream of, 92 
Arabian, Arabians, 74, 85 
Arabic, 81 
Archmages, viii 
Ard, day, 70, 122 
Ardshir Papakan, first Sasanian 

SMh, 105, 109, III 
Ardshfr, son of Shirwi, Sh4h, 
vii, 43 seq. 
makes Piriiz general, 44 
entertains Piriiz at feast, 

48 
death of, 49 

treasury of, squandered by 
Guraz, 53 
Arish, famous franian archer, 25 
Arjasp, king of Turan, 104 
Armani, Iranian chief, 74 
'Arus, treasure, 20 
Arwand (Tigris), river, 85, 92 
Asfandiyir, son of Shdh Gush- 

t^p, 25, 26 note, 104 
Ashtad, franian chief, 1 1 seq. 

chosen to visit Khusrau 

Parwiz at Taisafiin, 9 
and Kharrdd parley with 
Galinush, 11 

visit Khusrau Parwiz, 

12 
report to Shirwf, 27 
Astrolabe, 73 



Abbreviations, list of. xi 
Abtin, father of Faridiin, 53, 103 
Abii Bakr, Khalifa, 76 

begins war with Persian 
Empire, 66 
Abu 'Ubaida, Arab general, 66 
supersedes Khdlid in Syria, 
66 
Abu 'Ubaida, Arab general, 67 
made commander in Persian 

campaign, 67 
slain, 67 
Afrdsiyab, ruler of Turan, 25, 

103 
Ahriman, the Evil Principle, 8, 

18, 73. 74. 79, 91 
Al, place, 93 
Alburz, Mount, 25 
'All, the Dilamite, friend of Fir- 

dausi, 121 
Altuniya, place, 92 
Amul, city in Mazandardn, 86 
Apologue, 86 
Apothegms, 87, 88, no 
Arab, Arabs, 3, 5, 25, 60, 69, 70, 
72, 75 seq., 79, 89, 92, 
94, seq., 114, 117 
invasion of fran by, 3, 65 

seq. 
steeds, 1 1 
tribes, 65 
triumph of, over Dhu Kar, 

66 
chieftain, incites Abu Bakr 

to invade Persia, 66 
concentrate at Kddisfya, 67 



123 



124 



INDEX 



Astrologer, 73 

Azar, month and day. 17 

Azar, AbMagan (Azargashasp 

q.v.), 74 
Azargashasp, spirit of tlic light- 

ning. 55 
temple of (Azar Abadagan) 

at Shiz (Takht-i-Salai- 

m^n) in Azarbaijan, 75 

Azarmdukht, Shah, viii, 56, 50, 

69 
reproaches Kubad, 7 
end of, 59, 60 



B 



Babylon, 65, 92 

Zahh4k, king of, 65 
Bactrian, camels, 93 
Bad Awar, treasure, 20 
Baghdad, Persian settlement of, 
67 
raided by Arabs, 67 
Baghdad, citj' (C/. Vol. viii, p. 
109 note), 88 
Yazdagird quits, 88 
Bahrain, group of islands in 

Persian Gulf, 68 
Bahram Chubina, frdnian hero, 
6, 15, 16, 22, 91, 105 
assassination of, referred 

to. 4 
Romance of, 5 
Bahrdm Gur, Shdh, 26, 77 
Baigand, city and fortress 
between Bukhara and 
Oxus, 
Mahwi encamps at, 118 
Balkh, city, 116 

bestowed by Mdhwi on his 
son, 115 
Bandwf, maternal uncle of Khus- 
rau Parwiz 4 
execution of, referred to, 4, 
16, 104 
B4rbad, minstrel, vii, 29 and 
note 
visits Khusrau I'arwiz in 

prison, 29 
lament of, 30 



Barda', city on the borders of 
Azarbaijan and Armenia, 

15 
Barsam, general of Bizlian 97. 
117 
marches on Marv, 97, liG 
M^hwi's conduct to, 117 
pursues and overtakes 

Mahwi, 118 
captures Mahwi, 119 
Bartas, region in Turkistan, 19 
Barzfn, father of Kharrid, 4, 9, 

12, 27 
Basra (Bassora), city on the 
Shatt-el-Arab, 68, 69 
founded by 'Umar, 67 
Battle of the Bridge, 5, 67 
Bizhan, Kh4n of Turks, viii, 70, 
96 
M4hwf writes to, 96 
consults his minister, 97 
sends troops to Marv, 97 
M^hwi makes war on, 115 
nic rches against Mahwi. 117 
lays ambush for Mahwi, 118 
sends Barsim in pursuit of 
Mahwi, 118 
hears of Malawi's capture, 

119 
puts Mihwi to death, 120 
goes mad and kills himself, 
120, 121 
Brahman, 21 

Bridge, Battle of the, 5, 67 
Bukhara, city on the ZarafshAn 
river in the province of 
Sughd, 97, 115, 117 
Bust, city in SistAn, 89 



Ci^,SAR, 10, 23 

letter of, about the True 
Cross referred to, 22 
Chdch (Tashkand), city in TiirAn, 
115, 116 
battle-axes of, 118 
Chahram (Jahram), city in PArs 
29, 61 



INDEX 



125 



Chin country (often =Tuidn), 10, 
19, 41, 107, 118 

sashes from, 12, 53 

gold thread of, 82 

Khdn of, 87 

merchantmen of, 89 

shields of, 118 
Christ, 24, 109 

Cross of, 23 
Christian, 23 
Commander of the Faithful, 72 

'Umar, the first. 72 and note 
Contents Table of, vii 
Cross, the true, 4, 5, 10, 24 

restoration of, 7, 56 

of Christ, 23 

Elevation of, 43 
Crystal, House of, 25 and note 
Ctesiphon (Taisafun q.v.), 65 
seq. 

taken by Shahrbardz, 43, 44 
Sa'ad, 67 

booty found at, 68 



D 



Dahistan, town, also district 
north cf the Atrak. 95 

Dai, day, 17 

DAng, coin, 94 and note 

Darkness, House of, 7 

Dastagird, city, 7 

Dliu Kdr, Battle of, 4, 5, 66 

Dilamite, 'All the, friend of Fir- 
dausi, 121 

Div, divs, 18, 25 

= Ahriman, 47, 102, 104 



Egyptian, no 
linen, no 



FaghfiJr of Chfn, 87, 97, 102 
Faithful, Commander of the, 72 
'Umar, the first, 72 and note 



Farab (Firabr), town on the 
Oxus opposite to Amwi, 
desert cf, 115, 118 
Fardyin (Gurdz, Shahrbardz^.w.), 
Shdh, vii, 50, 53, 105 
accession-speech of, 52 
counselled by his eldest son, 

52 
counselled by his youngest 

son, 53 
misrule of, 53 
plot against, 54 
Faridiin, Shah, 25, 39, 53, 71, 

86, 103 
Farruhdn (Farrukhan). See Far- 
ay in. 
Farrukhdn (Farruhdn). See Far- 

dyin . 
Farrukh-Hurmuzd (Hurmuzd 

q.v.), father of Rustam, 69 
FarrukhzAd, Shah, viii, 61 seq., 
70 
Siyah Chashm and, 62 
poisons, 63 
Farrukhzad, son of Hurmuzd, 
brother of Rustam, and 
favourite of Khusrau Par- 
wiz, 23, 87, 92, 95 
bribes Mihr Hurmuzd to 
murder Khusrau Parwiz, 

33 
defeats the Arabs, 85 
counsels Yazdagird, 86, 87 
leads the host to Khur4s4n, 

89 
entrusts Yazdagird to 

Mahwi, 95 
goes to Rai, 96 
Farud, son of Sliirin and Khusrau 

Parwiz, 39 
Firdausi, 69 

account of Arab conquest 
by, supplemented, 65 
Yazdagird's death, 70, 
107 

reflections on, 108, 
III 
on completion of Shdhndma, 

121 
friends and assistants of, 121 
exempt from taxation, 121 



126 



INDEX 



Firdausi, time spent on Shdh- 

n4ma, by, 122 
praise of Sultan Mahmud, 

by, 122 
Flight of Muhammad, referred 

to, 122 
Ford and toll-house of Zark, 100 

and note, 116 



GALBwf, franian chief, 74 
Galiniish, Persian general, 5, 11, 
12 
parley of, with Kharrad and 
Ashtad, II 
Gang-dizh, stronghold, 25 
Garsiwaz, brother of Afrasiy^b, 

103 
Garsiyun, Iranian chief, 115 
Gashasp, father of Ashtad q.v., 1 1 
Gemini, constellation, 73 
Gil (Gil, Gilan ?), district on 
south-west coast of Cas- 
pian, 93 
Glory. See Grace. 
Grace or Glory, the divine, 8, 26, 
30, 31, 41, 44, 47, 73, 74, 
79. 90, 91. 95. 99. 100, 
101, 116 
Gudarz, franian hero, 25 

seventy sons of, 25 
Gumbadin, Mount, 93 
stronghold on, 93 
Gurdz (Shahrbaraz, Farayin 

q.v.) general of Khusrau 
Parwiz and Shah, vii, 44 
rebelhon of, 45 
message of, 45 
writes to Piriiz, 46 
Piriiz writes to, 47 
account of, 50 
meaning of, 50 
dual personality of, 50 
marches on Taisafiin, 51 
confers with frdnian mag- 
nates, 51 
misrule of, 53 
conspiracy against, 54 
goes hunting, 55 



Gur4z, end of, 55 
Guraz, son of Mahwi, 
referred to, 107, 115 
governor of Marv, 120 
put to death with his sons, 
120 
Gurdwi, brother of Bahrdm 

Chiibina, 6 
Gurdya, sister of Bahram Chu- 

bina, 6 
Gurgan, province on the south- 
eastern shores of the 
Caspian, 89 
Gushtasp, Shah, 25 
Gustaham, maternal uncle of 
Khusrau Perwiz, 4, 6 
assassination of, referred to, 
16, 104 



H 



HamadAn, city in 'Irak 'Ajami, 

68 
Haram, of Khusrau Parwiz, 4, 5 
Harat, city in north-western 
Afghanistan, 115 
bestowed by Mahwi on his 
son, 115 
Hashim, Arab general, 68 

sent by 'Umar in pursuit of 

Yazdagird, 68 
wins battle of JaliilA, 68 
takes Hulwdn, 68 
Hashimite=Muhammad, 81 and 

note 
Heraclius, Eastern Roman Em- 
peror, 5, 7 
Shirwi's letter to, 7 
alliance of, with Shahr- 
baraz, 44 
Hil^l, Arab, 69 

slayer of Rustam son of 
Farrukh-Hurmuzd, 70 
Hindustan, 17, 20 
Hira, city, west of the Euphrates 
near Nedjef, 5, 66 
kingdom of, 65 

abolished by Khusrau 
Parwiz, 66 
attacked by Persians, 67 



INDEX 



127 



Hcuri. 81 

House of Darkness, 7 
Crystal, 25 and note 

Hulwan, town on the border of 
'Irak 'Ajami, west of Kir- 
m^nshih 
Yazdagird retires to, 67 
taken by Hishim, 68 

Hurmuzd, son of Nushirwan, 
Shdh, 4, 15, 104 

Hurmuzd (Hurmuzdshdh, Far- 
rukh-Hurmuzd q.v.), 
father of Rustam, 72, 78 
85, 89, 96 

Hurmuzd Shahranguraz (Shah- 
ranguraz q.v.), 54 

Hurmuzd, devotee, 102 

pleads with Mahwf for Yaz- 
dagird, 102 

Husain, friend of Firdausi, 121 

Hiishang, Shah, 25, 41 



Indian, scimitar, 17 
script, 17 
scribe, 17 
fraj, sonof Faridiin, 103 
'Irak, 66 

fran, vii, viii, 9 seq., 15, 21, 22, 
31. 36, 38. 39. 44. 45. 51. 
66. 74. 75. 79. 85, 86, 88, 
92, 96, 103, 106, 108, 113 
franian, frdnians, viii, 22, 23, 
40, 47, 48, 63, 73, 76, 88, 
90, 116 
homage Shirwl, 8 
choose two chiefs to visit 
Khusrau Parwiz in prison, 
9 
plot against Gurdz, 54 
go hunting with Gur^z, 55 
race, 65 

enmity of, with Semite, 

65 
announces arrival of Shu'ba 

Mughira to Rustam, 82 
defeat of, at Kidisfya, 84 
retreat to Yazdagirtl, 85 
— born, 99 



frdnians, defeat of, at Marv, 116 

ambushed, 118 
Istakhr (Perscpolis), 50, 54 

Yazdagird taken to, 64 

made Shdh at, 65 



Jahram. See Chahram. 
Jalula, 68 

Jamdsp, minister of Gushtasp, 26 
Jamshid Shah, 25, 39, 103 
Jarmana, place, 93 
Jerusalem, 43 

Elevation of the True Cross 
at, 43 
Jesus, 10 

Jihiin (Oxus), river, 77, 115, 118 
Jins, 81 



K 



KABUL, city 

falchion of, 98 
Kachar Bashi, city in Tiiran, 117 
Kadisiya, town west of Euph- 
rates and near 
Nedjef, 5, 73, 74, 77, 78 
Battle of, 5, 67, 69 

date of, 67 
canal of, 69 

Rustam advances to, 73 
Kaian, crown, 11, 105 
Kai Kiiis, Shdh, 25 
Kai Khusrau, Shdh, 25, 103 
Kai Kubad, Shdh, 25 
Kalat, stronghold, 91 
Karan, Iranian hero, 25 
Karkh, a suburb of Baghdad, 85 

Arab defeat at, 85 
Kashmigdn, son of Farrukhzdd, 

92 
K4wa, the smith, 30 

flag of, 30, 67 
Khdlid, Arab general, 66 

begins hostilities against 

Persian Empire, 66 
recalled to lead Syrian cam- 
paign, 66 



128 



INDEX 



Kh^n of Chin, 87, 102 

= Bizhan, 97 
Kharr^d, son of Barzin, Iranian 
minister, 4, 11, 12, 24 
end of, 4 
chosen to visit Khusran 

Parwiz at Taisa fiin, 9 
Ashtad and, parley with Gal- 

inush, II 

visit Khusrau Parwiz, 12 

report to Shirwi, 27 
Kharrdd, father of Hurmuzd, 102 
Khurasan, province in north- 
eastern fran, viii, 59, 6g, 

87, 88, 92 
Mahwi becomes master of, 

114 
Khusrau Parwiz, Shah, vii, 

4 seq., II, 12, 25, 26 note, 

30. 31. 33 se(/., 38 seq., 

45 seq. 
charges against, 4, 5, 9, 10 
reply of, to charges, 5, 14 

seq. 
Haram of, 4, 5 
last days cf, Theophancs' 

account of, 6 
Shirwi's treatment of, 7 
sons of, executed, 7, 35 
Shirin and, 7 

imprisoned atTaisafun, 9 
companioned by Shirin, 29 
Barbad visits, 29 

laments over, 30 
steed of, 30 
son of, 31 

referred to, 33 and note 
kingdom of Hira aboUshcd 

by, 66 
Muhammad's letter to, 66 
Khusrau, father of Piruz, vii, 44, 

46, 48, 49, 51. 57 
Khusrau, a miller, '. iii, 99. See 

Miller. 
Khuzistdn (Susiana), province at 

head of Persian Gulf 
annexed by Arabs, 68 
Kluizr4, treasure, 20 
Kibchak, region east of tlie Jax- 

artes and north cf Tdsh- 

kand, 93 



Kirwan (Karw4n, district north 

of Jaxartes ?), 93 
Kisra Niishirwdn. See Nushir- 

wan . 
Kubad, son of Piriiz, Sh4h, 22, 

25 
Kubad (Shirwi q.v.), Shah, vii, 

3, 4, 9, II, 12, 14, 24, 32, 

47. 64 
tragic reign of, 3 

pestilence during, 3 
boorishness of, 3 
difficult situation of, 3 
reproached by his sisters, 7 
Kiifa, city, west of Euphrates 

and north of Nedjef, 68, 

69 

founded by Sa'ad, 67 
KurAn, 81 

quoted, 81 and note 
Kutib, father of Husain, 121 



Lazhawardi fort, 93 
Lull rasp, Shah, 104 



M 



Machin (China), 107 
Mahmiid, Sultan, praise of 122 
Makhzum, place, 93 
M4hwi, Persian cliief, viii, 70, 74, 
89, 95, 97. 100 seq. 118 
described, 87 
FarrukhzM entrusts Yaz- 

dagird to, 95 
accepts charge of Yazda- 

gird, 96 
becomes disaffected to Yaz- 

dagird, 96 
writes to Bizhan, 96, 116 
betrays Yazdagird, 97, 98, 

116, 117 
<piest of, for Yazdagird, 100 
has tidings of Yazdagird, 

lOI 

consults his warriors, 106 
son of, counsels, 107 



INDEX 



129 



MAhwi, son of, receives Balkh and 
Marat, 115 

governor of Marv, 120 
put to death with liis 
sons, 120 
sends miller to slay Yazda- 
gird, 107, 116 
troops after niillor with 
instructions, 107 
troops of, strip corpse of 

Yazdagird, 108 
hears of death of Yazdagird, 

108 
bids miller throw corpse of 
Yazdagird into stream, 
loS 
slays monks, 113 
consults his intimates and 

minister, 113 
advised by his minister, 113 
claims the throne on false 

pretences, 114 
becomes master of Khur- 

ds4n, 114 
evil rule of, 114 
makes war on lii'zhan, 115 
conduct of, to Barsam, 117 
cresses Oxus and camps at 

Baigand, 118 
flees, 1 18 

overtaken by BarsAm, 118 
captured by Barsam, 119 
put to death by Bizhan, 120 
Marchlords, viii 

Mardanshah (Yalan-sina q-v.),^, 6 
son of, 5, 6 

conspires against Ivhusrau 
Parwiz, 6 
mutilation and execution of, 
6 
Mardanshah (Mardasas), son of 
Shirin and Khusrau Par- 
wiz, 39 
Mard4sas (Mardinsliah q.v.), 7 

execution of, 7 
Mars, planet, 73, 89 
Mariisipand, palace, 1 1 
•Marv, oasis and city in ancient 
northern Khurasdn, now 
in Turkistan, 70, 89, 116, 

VOL. IX 



Marv, traditional scene of Yaz- 
dagird's death, 70 

Yazilagird at, 97, 116 

thane of, no 

apothegm of, no 

conduct of Mihwi to Bar- 
sam at, 117 

Gurdz, son of Mdhwi, gov- 
ernor of, 120 
Mazanda.rin, region between 

Alburz range and Caspian, 

74 
Mecca, city, 69 
Mercury, planet, 73 
Mesopotamia, 

annexed by Arabs, 68 
Mih-Azar-Gushnasp, minister of 
Ardshir, son of Shirwi, in 

Arabic Tabari, 43 
put to death, 43 
Mihr, fea^t, 40 

Mihr 'Hasis, minister of Ardshir, 
son of Shirwi, in Persian 
Tabari, 43 
put to death, 43 
Mihr Hurmuzd, murderer of 
Khusrau Parwiz, vii, 34 
account of, 5 
referred to, 6, 33 
conspires against Ivhusrau 

Parwiz, 6 
put to death, 7 
described, 33 
Mihr-i-Nush, 103 

pleads with Mdhwi for Yaz- 
dagird, 103 
Mill, viii, 98, 116 
Miller, viii, 70 

Yazdagird and, 99 

informs chief of Zark about 

Yazdagird, 100 
informs Mahwi about Yaz- 
dagird, lOI 
bidden to slay Yazdagird, 

107 
bidden to fling corpse into 
stream, 108 
Mnn'ichihr, Shdh, 103 
Mir Kh4nd, distich of, quoted, 56 
Monks, 109 

find Yazdagird, 109 



I30 



INDEX 



Monks, lament over and entomb 
Yazdagird, 109 seq. 
sentences of, over Yazda- 
gird, no 
slain by Mahwi, 113 
Mughira, son of Shu'ba. See 

Shu'ba Mughira, 69 
Muhammad, the Prophet, 69, 81 
seq. 
letter of, to Khusrau Par- 

wiz, 66 
Flight of, referred to, 122 
Muslim, 85 



N 



Nahavand, city, south of Ham- 
adan, 68, 69 
Yazdagird concentrates his 

forces at, 68 
Battle of, 69 
Narwan, forest of, 86 
Nastur, son of Shirin and Khus- 
rau Parwiz, 39 
Nile, 98 
Nimriiz*, 5, 6 

satrapy of, 69 
Nishd.pur, city in Khurasan, 95 
Niy^tiis (Theodosius, son of 

Maurice), 23 
Note on Pronunciation, xii 
Nu'man bin Munzir, prince of 

Hfra, 5 
Nu man, Arab general, 68 

sent by ' Umar to fight Yaz- 
dagird, 68 
defeats Pfriizan at Naha- 
vand, 68 
slain, 69 
Niishirwdn, Sh4h, 22, 26, 71, 80, 
92, 105, 109, no, 119 
Letter of Counsel of, 22 
division of Empire by, 69 
dream of, 92 



O 



Omen of the quince, 13, 14 
Oxus (Jihiin), river 

referred to, 117 and note, 118 



PAHLAvf, middle Persian lan- 
guage of Ashkanian (Par- 
thian) and Sasanian times, 

50 
Paidawasis, Persian coin=five 

dinars, 19 
Pars (Persis, Farsistan), country 
on eastern shore of Per- 
sian Gulf, 68 
Parsis, 64 

Parwiz. See Khusrau Parvviz. 
Persepolis (Istakhr), 65 
Persia, 66 

Persian, Persians, 5, 7, 20, 37, 
40, 54, 60, 66, 67, 69, 70, 
72, 77. 79. 85, 121 
ideas on marriage, 7 
language, 12, 65 
= Ashtad and Kharrad, 24 
exonerate Shirin, 38 
empire, 65, 66 
Gulf, 66, 68 
win " The Battle of the 

Bridge," 67 
fail in attack on Hira, 67 
defeat of, at Kadisiya, 67, 
84 

Jalula, 68 
Nahavand, 69 
Shu'ba Mughira's embassy 

to, 69 
robes, 94 

transcribe Shahndma for 
Firdausi, 121 
Pestilence, in reign of Kubdd, 

3-7 
Piruz, son of Khusrau, minister 
of Ardshir son of Shirwi, 
vii 
appointed general, 44 



*See p. 333 note. 



INDEX 



131 



Pfniz, letter of Guraz to, 46 
takes counsel, 46 
writes to Guraz, 47 
Guraz marches against, 48 
appeals to Tukhar, 48 
feasts with Ardshir, 48 
informs Guraz of the death 

of Ardshir, 51 
put to death, 57 
Piruz, franian prince, 59 
Piriiz, son of Shapiir, Iranian 
noble 
takes Rustam's letter to 
Sa'ad, 80, 81 
Piruzan, Persian general, 

commands Persian forces at 

Nahavand, 68 
slain, 69 
Pisces, constellation, 71 
Plague. See Pestilence. 
Pronunciation, Note on, xii 
Purandukht, Shah, vii, 56 
reproaches Kubad, 7 
makes Shahranguraz prime 

minister, 56 
True Cross and, 56 
Pusfarrukh, 50 



Q 

Quince, omen of the, 13, 14 



R 



R.\D.\, Mount, 91, 94 
Kadwi, archimage 

pleads with Mahwi for Yaz- 

dagird, 102 
Rai, city and district near Tih- 

ran, 68, 69, 89, 95, 96 
Raja, 17 

letter of, 17 

put in charge of Shi'rin, 17 
Raven, Raven-head, 91 and note, 

95 note, 96 
Revellers Rosary of 38, 40 
Roman, 50, 66 
Rosary of Revellers, 38, 40 
Riiina, place, 91 



Rum, Eastern Roman Empire, 
10, II, 20, 39, 41, 45, 46, 

113 
brocade of, 99, loi 
monks of, slain by Mahwi, 

"3 
Ruman, Riimans, 23, 60 
Russian, cloth, no 
Rustam, son of Zal, frinian hero, 

25 
Rustam, Persian commander 

in chief under Yazdagird 

III., viii, 66, 67, 69, 73. 

81 seq., 90, 95 
overthrows Azarmdukht, 59 
advances to Kadisiya, 67, 

73 
end of, 69 
finds evil aspects in the stars, 

73 
writes to his brother, 73 
hears of Shu'ba Mughira's 

arrival, 82 



Sa'ad, son of Wakkas, Arab 
general, viii, 67, 68, 82 
seq., 90 
succeeds Abu 'Ubaida, 67 
at Kadisiya, 67, 69 
founds Kiifa, 67 
takes Ctesiphon, 67 
recalled, 68 
sent by 'Uniar to invade 

fran, 72 
letter of Rustam to, 78 
taken by Piriiz 80, 81 
Sada, feast, 40, 92 
Samarkand, city in Turkistan, 

96, 115 
Sapand^rmad, month, 70, 122 
Sari, city in Mazandaran, 86 
Sa.san, son of Dara, 105 and iiote 

lineage of 56, 105 
Sasanian, Sasanians, 4, 5, 46, 
47. 50. 54. 65, 72. 73, 76, 
77. 83, 105 
Dynasty, 4 



132 



INDEX 



Sasanian, Empire, conquered by 

the Arabs, 65 seq. 
Satrapy, satrapies, Niishirwdn's 

four, 69 
Saturn, planet, 73 

sphere of, 92 
Seasons, confusion of the, 77 note 
Semite, race, enmity of, with 

Iranians, 65 
Shabdiz, steed of Khusraii Par- 

wiz, 30 
Shahnama, viii, 4 seq., 43, 50, 61, 

70 
completion of, Firdausi on, 

121 
length of, 122 
date when completed, 122 
Shahran, 102 

pleads with Mahwi for Yaz- 
dagird, 102 
Shahranguraz (Hurmuzd Shah- 
ranguraz, Guraz q.v.), vii, 

50 
heads conspiracy against 
Guraz, 54 
Shalirbaraz (Guraz q.v.), Iranian 
general, 43, 50 
rebellion of, 43, 44 
alliance of, with Heraclius,44 
Shahr-Barz. See Shahrbaraz. 
Shahguraz (Shahrbaraz q.v.), 50 
Shahrwaraz (Shahrbaraz q.v.), 50 
Shahryar, son of Shirin and 
Khusrau I^arwiz, 39 
father of Yazdagird, 64 
Shamiran, stronghold north of 

Harat (?), 91, 94 
Shapiir, father of Piruz, 80 
Shatt-al-Arab, the combined 

streams, of the Tigris and 
Euphrates, 67 
Shirin, wife of Khusrau Parwiz, 
vii, 28, 36 
Khusrau Parwiz and, 7 
has charge of Shirwi's horo- 
scope, 16 

Raja's letter, 17 
companions Khusrau Par- 
wiz in prison, 29 
reproached and summonetl 
by Shirwi, 36 



Shfrin, makes her will, 36 
goes to Court 37 
justifies herself, 38, 40 
sons of, 39 

unveils to the Court, 39 
Shirw: falls in love with, 

39 

makes request of Shirwi, 40, 

41 

goes home, 40 

distributes her wealth, 40 

frees her slaves, 41 

poisons herself, 42 
Shirwi (Kubad q.v.). Shah, vii, 
7, 8, II, 27, 28, 31 seq., 
36, 45, 47, 64 

treatment of Khusrau Par- 
wiz by, 7 

writes to Heraclius, 7 

horoscope of, 16 
kept by Shirin, 16 

Ashtad and Kharrad report 
their interview with Khus- 
rau Parwiz to, 27 

reproaches and summons 
Shirin, 36, 37 

falls in love with Shirin, 39 

grants Shirin's requests, 40, 

42 
poisoned, 42 
son of, 42 

length of reign of, 42 
Shu'ba Mughira, companion of 
the Prophet, 69, 83 
embassy of, 69, 82 
Sikandar (Alexander the Great), 

Shah, 26 
Siyah Chasm, slave of Farrukh- 
zad, 62 
handmaid of Farruklizad 

and, 62 
imprisoned, 62 
released, 62 

poisons Farrukhzad, 63 
Siyawush, son of Kai Kdus, 25 

and note, 26 note. 103 
Snakes = Arabs, 91 
Siir, Siir^n, city near Ispahan, 
74. 89. 95. 97. 100, 1x6, 
118 
Svrian, 66 



INDEX 



133 



Tauaki, historian, 4, 56, 61, u^, 
6y 
Arabic, 4, 5, 7, 43, 50 
Persian, 4, 5, 43, 70 
Tabaristin (Mazandaran), 74 
Table of Contents, vii 
Tahmuras, Shah, 2^ 
Taisafiin (Ctesiphon), city on left 
bank of Tigris, g, 10, 90 
Khusrau Parwi'z imprisoned 

at, 9 
Barbad visits Khusrau Par- 
wiz at, 29 
Taraz, city north-east of T4sh- 

kand, 41 
Taxation, Firdausi's exemption 

from, 121 
Theophanes, Greek Chronicler, 
account of last days of 
Khusrau Parwiz by, 6 
Tigris, river, 67 
Toll-house and ford of Zark, 100 

and note, 116 
Tukhar, Iranian general, 

refuses to help Piruz against 
Gurdz, 48 
Ti'ir, son of Fan'dun, 103 
Tiiran, 11, 89, 99 
Turk, Turks, 70, 96 seq., 105, 114, 

117, 120 
Turkish, 87 
Turkistdn, 15 
Turkman, Turkmans, 25, 76, 94 

king = Afrasiyab, 25 
Ti'is, city in Khurdsan, viii, 90, 

95 
governor of, 92 



U 



'Umar, Khalifa, 66 seq., -jz, 76, 
121 
founds Basra, 67 
sends Hdshim in pursuit of 
Yazdagird, G8 
Nu'man to fight Yazda- 
gird, 68 
Sa'ad to invade frdn, 72 
Urmuzd, the Good Principle, 24 



Vknus, planet, 26, 73 
Victory of Victories, The, 69 
Virgo, constellation, 71 



W 

Wakkas, father of Sa'ad q.v 
viii, 72, 78, 82, 90 



Yalan-sina (Mardanshah q.v.), 

6 
Yazdagird, Shah, viii, 5, 61, 64 

seq., 68 seq., 72, 81, 90, 

101, 105, 106, 113, 115, 

116, 122 
Era of, 64 
taken for safety to Istakhr, 

64 
age of, at accession, 65 
difficult position of, 65 
historical importance of 

reign of, 65 
flight of, from Ctesiphon, 67 

Hulwan, 68 
last attempt of, to recover 

his empire, 68 
concentrates his forces at 

Nahdvand, 68 
defeated and a fugitive, 69 
death of, referred to, 69 
host returns to, after Kdd- 

isiya, 85 
hears of Rustam's death, 85 
quits Baghdad, 88 
makes for Marv, 89 
entrusted to Mahwi by 

Farrukhzdd, 95, 96 
at Marv, 97, 1 16 
hears of the coming of the 

Turks, 97 
betrayed by Mihwi, 98 
defeated, 98, 116 



134 



INDEX 



Yazdagird, miller and, 99 seq. 

described, 99, 10 1 

Mahwl bids miller slay, 107, 
116 

slain, stripped and flung into 
stream, 108, 109 and note 

corpse of, recovered, lam- 
ented over and entombed, 
109 seq. 

Firdausi on, m 



ZabulistAn, 75* 
Zahh4k, Shah, 25. 65, 103 



ZahhAk, an Aryan myth, 65 
king of Babylon, 65 
an Arab, 65 
Zal, son of Sam and father of 

Rustam, 25 
Zark, town south-east of Marv, 
98 
canal of, 98 

corpse of Yazdagird flung 
into, 109 

recovered from. 109 
ford and toll-house of, 100 

and note 
chief of, 100 

hears from miller about 
Yazdagird, 109 



•See p. 333 note. 



GENERAL LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 

C. — Macan's edition of the Shahndma 

L. — Liimsden's Do. 

P. — Mohl's do. 

T. — Tihrin do. 

v.— Vullers' do. 

AM. The Voiage and Travayle of Sir John Maundeville, Knight 

. . . Edited ... by John Ashton. 
AS. The Shah Nameh cf . . Firdausi. Translated and 

abridged. ... By James Atkinson Esq. 
BAG. A History of Ancient Geography. By E. H. Bunbury 

F.R.G.S. 
BAN. A Plain and Literal Translation of the Arabian Nights' 

Entertainments. ... By Richard F. Burton. 
BBR. Buddhist Records of the Western World. Tran^^latcd 

from the Chinese of Hiuen Tsiang (A.D. 629). By 

Samuel Beal. 
BCM. The Chahir Maqala (" Four Disccurses ") of Nidhami-i- 

'Arudi-i-Samarquandi. Translated into English by 

Edward G. Browne, M.A., M.B. 
BGDF. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. 

By Edward Gibbon. Edited by J. B. Bury, M A. 
BHA. The History of Alexander the Great, being the Syriac 

Version of the Pseudo-Callisthenes. Edited . . . with 

an English Translation and Notes, by Ernest A. Walhs 

Budge, M.A. 
BLEA. The Life and E.xploits of Alexander the Great, being a 

Series of Translations of the Ethiopia Histories of 

Alexander. . . . By E. A. Wallis Budge, M.A. 
BLHP. A Literary History of Persia. By Edward G. Browne, 

M.A. 
BLRE. History of the Lower Roman Empire. By J. B. Bury. 
BPB. Photius : Bibliotheca. Ex Rccensione Immanuehs Bek- 

keri. 
CIG. Corpus Inscriptionum Graecarum. 

CTC. Theophanis Chronographia. Ex Recensione loannis 

Classeni. 
DAA. Arriani Anabasis . . . F. Diibner. 
DAI. Arriani Indica . . . F. Dubner. 

DEL J. Darmcstetcr, fitudes Iranicnnos. 

135 



136 



GENERAL LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 



DFKHP. 

DHA 

DZA. 

EHI. 

EP. 

GDF. 



GH. 

GHP. 

GIP. 

GKS. 

GYZ. 



HAP. 

HB. 

HEP. 

HIE. 

HLP. 
HQC. 
HRVP. 

HS. 

JFB. 

JP. 

JRGS. 
JZ. 
KA. 
KUR. 

LAN. 

LEG. 

»The 



H'story cf the Parsis. By Dcsabliai Framji Karaka, 

C.S.I. 
The History of Antiquity. From tlie German of Professor 

Max Duncker. By the late Evelyn Abbot, M.A. 
Professor Darmestcter's Trans, of the Zandavasta in the 

Sacred Books of the East. Reference to Parts ' and pages. 
The History of India as told by its own Historians. By 

Sir H. M. Elliot, K.C.B. 
Eastern Persia, an Account of the Journeys ci the Persian 

Boundary Commission, 1870-71-72. 
The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. 

Py Edward Gibbon, Esq. With Notes by Dean Milman 

and M. Guizot. Edited, with additional Notes, by 

William Smith, L.L.D. 
The Land of the Hittites. . . . By John Garstang, D.Sc. 
Histoire des Perses par le Comtc de Gobineau. 
Grundriss der Iranischen Philologie. 
Kleine Schriften von Alfred von Gutschmid. 
Geiger : Das Yatkar-i Zariran und sein Verhaltniss zum 

Sahnime. Sitzungsberichte der philosophisch-philolo- 

gischen und historischen Classe der k.b. Akademie der 

Wissenschaften zu Miinchen. j8go. Bd. II. Heft I. 

P- 43- 
History of Art in Persia from the French of Georges Perrot 

and Charles Chipiez. 
The Country of Balochistan. ... By A. W. Hughes, 

F.R.G.S. 
Essays on the Sacred Language, Writing and Religion of 

the Parsis. By Martin Haug, Ph. D. Edited and 

enlarged by E. W. West. Ph. D. 
The' Indian Empire. By W. W. Hunter, C.S.I., CLE., 

L.L.D. 
The Legend of Perseus. By E. S. Hartland. 
Q. Curtius Rufus . . . ed. Edmundus Hedicke. 
Vetcrum Persarum . . . Religionis Histoiia. Ed. 2nd. 

By Thomas Hyde. 
Syntagma Dissertationum quas olim auctor doctissimus 

Thomas Hyde S.T.P. separatim edidit. 
The earliest English version of the Fables of Bidpai . . . 

now again edited and induced by Joseph Jacobs. 
Persia Past and Present, by Professor A. V. Williams 

Jackson. 
The Journal of the Royal Geographical Society. 
Zoroaster. By A. V. Williams Jackson. 
Asia. By A. H. Keane, F.R.G.S. 
Kitab-i-Yamini of Al Utbi. Translated by the Rev. 

James Reynolds, B.A. 
The Arabian Nights' Entertainments. A New Translation 

from the Arabic. ... By Edward William Lane. 
The Lands of the Eastern Caliphate. By G. Le Strange. 

second edition of Part I. is referred to unless otherwise specified. 



GENERAL LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 



137 



LPC. A View of the History and Coinage of the Parthians. By 

Jolin I.inilsay. Esq. 
MA. Ak'-KaiKhu Ic Grami . . . Par Paul Meyer. 

MCAI. Ancient India as described by Megasthenes and Arrian. 

... By J. W. M'Crindle, M.A. 
MCI. The Invasion of India by Alexander the Great. . . . By 

J. W. M'Crindle, M. A. . . . New Edition. 
MP. Reliqua Arriani et Scriptorum dc rebus Alexanflri M. 

Fragmenta collegit . . . Carolus Miillcr. 
MGN. Narrative of a Journey through the Province of Khorassan, 

etc. By Colonel C. M. MacGrcgor, C.S.I., CLE. 
MHP. History of Persia. By Sir John Malcolm, G.C.B. 
MLM. The Life of Muhammad. By William Muir, Esq. 
MM. Ma^oudi : Les Prairies d'Or. Texte et traduction par C 

Barbier dc Mcynard et Pa vet de Courteillc. 
MPC. Pseudo-Callisthcnes, primum edidit Carolus MuUerus. 
MS J P. A Second Journey through Persia, etc. By James Morier 

Esq. 
MZA. Rev. L. H. Mills' Trans, of the Zandavasta in the 

Sacred Books of the East. Reference to Part and 

pages. 
NAR. Beitrage zur Gcschichte des Alexanderromans, von Prof. 

Dr. Th. Noldeke in Denkschriften der . . . Akademie 

der Wissenschaften . . . Wien, 1890. 
NIN. Das Iranische Nationalepos von Theodor Noldeke. 

NK. Geschichte des Artachsir i Papakan aus dem Pellewi iiber- 

setzt . . . von Th. Noldeke. 
NPS. Noldeke : Persische Studien. II. Sitzungsberichte der 

Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften. CXXVI. 

Band. 
NSEH. Sketches from Eastern History. By Theodor Noldeke. 

English Translation. 
NT. Geschichte der Perser und Araber zur Zeit der Sasaniden 

. . . von Th. Noldeke. 
OHS. The History of the Saracens. By Simon Ockley. Fourth 

Edition. 
RFGM. The Five Great Monarchies of the Ancient Eastern World. 

By George Rawlinson, M.A. 
RII. The History of Herodotus. ... By George Rawlinson, 

M.A. 
RK. The Koran translated from the Arabic. By J. M. Rod well. 

Second Edition. 
RM. [In Vols. Ill and IV) The Mahibharata translated into 

English Prose [hy Kisari Mohan Ganguli). Published by 
Pratapa Chandra Rai, CLE. 
{Elsewhere) The Rauzat-us-safa ; or. Garden of Purity. . . 
By . . . Mirkhond . . . Translated by YL. Rchatsek. 
RP. {In Vols. I and V) Records of the Past. First Series. 

(Elsewhere) Professor Rawlinson's Parthia in the Story of 
the Nations' Series. 



I3« 



GENERAL LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 



RPNS. Records of the Past. Second Series. 

RSM. The Seventh Great Oriental Monarchy. By George Raw- 

linson, M.A. 
SAC. The Chronology of Ancient Nations ... of Albfruni . . . 

translated ... by Dr. C. Edward Sachau. 
SHC. The " Higher Criticism " and the Verdict of the Monu- 
ments. By the Rev. A. H. Sayce. 
SK. The Koran . . . Translated ... by George Sale, Gent. 

SM. History of the Early Kings of Persia . . . Translated from 

the original . . . Persian of Mirkhond ... by David 

Shea. 
SP. The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea . . . Translated from 

the Greek and annotated by Wilfrid H. Schoff, A.M. 
STD. The Dabistan . . . Translated ... by David Shea and 

Anthony Troyer. 
WLS. In the Land of the Lion and Sun ... By C. J. Wills. M.D. 
WPR. The Parsi Religion. By John Wilson. 
WPT. Dr. E. W. West's Trans, of the Pahlavi Texts in the Sacred 

Books of the East. Reference to Parts and pages. 
YMP. The Book of Sir Marco Polo . . . newly translated. . . . 

By Colonel Henry Yule, C.B. 
ZT. Chronique de Abou-Djafar-Mo'hammed-Ben-Djarii-Ben- 

Yezid Tabari, traduite . . . Par M. Hermann Zotenburg. 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



VOLUME I 



Preface . 



Vol. 



I 

PAor. 
vii 



INTRODUCTION 
Chapter I. — Land and People 
Chapter II. — Poet and Poem 
Chapter III. — Text and Translation 

List of previous Translators 

Ancient Persian Calendar 

Genealogical Tables 

Abbreviations 

Note on Pronunciation . 

THE SHAhnAma 
The Prelude — 

SECT. 

1. Invocation 

2. Discourse in Praise of Wisdom 

3. Of the Making of the World 

4. Of the Nature of Man 
Of the Nature of the Sun . 
Of the Nature of the Moon . 

7. In Praise of the Prophet and his Companions 

8. On the Compilation of the Sh4hn4ma 

9. Of the Poet Dakiki . 

10. How the present Book was begun 

11. In Praise of Abu Mansiir, Son of Muhammad 

12. In Praise of Sultdn Mahmud 



6. 



3 
23 
76 

87 

88 

90 

93 
95 



100 

lOI 

102 
104 
105 

105 
106 
108 
109 
109 
no 

112 



THE BEGINNING OF THE HISTORY : THE 
PISHDADIAN DYNASTY 
GaiiJmart — 

1. The Greatness of Gaiumart and the Envy of 

Ahriman . . . . . • .118 

2. How Siyamak was slain by the Dfv . . .120 

3. How Hiishang and Gaiumart went to fight the 

Black Div 121 



139 



140 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



HiJSHANG 

SKCT. 

1. The Accession of Hushang and his civilising Arts 

2. How the Feast of Sada was founded 



Vol 



Tahmukas- 
I. 



Jamshid — 
I. 

2. 

3- 
4- 

Zahhak — 



5- 
6. 

7- 



Tahmuras ascends the Throne, invents new Arts, 
subdues the Divs, and dies .... 



The Greatness and Fall of Jamshid 
The Story of Zahhak and his Father . 
How Iblis turned Cook .... 
How the Fortunes of Jamshid went to Wrack 



The evil Customs of Zahhak and the Device of 
Irma'il and Karma'il .... 

How Zahhak saw Faridiin in a Dream . 

The Birth of Faridiin .... 

How Faridiin questioned his Mother about his 
Origin ...... 

Tha Story of Zahhak and K4wa the Smith . 

How Faridiin went to Battle with Zahhak . 

How Faridiin saw the Sisters of Jamshid 

The Story of Faridiin and the Minister of Zahhak 

How Faridiin bound Zahhak 



1 

PAGE 
122 
123 



126 



135 
137 
139 



147 

154 

161 

164 

•166 



FARfoiiN- 



I. 
2. 

3- 

4- 

5- 
6. 

7- 

8. 

9- 
10. 
II. 
12. 
13- 

14. 

15- 
16. 

17- 
18. 
19. 
20. 



How Faridiin ascended the Throne . . .174 

How Faridiin sent Jandal to Yaman . . .177 

How the King of Yaman answered Jandal . . 181 

How the Sons of Faridiin went to the King of 

Yaman ....... 183 

How Sarv proved the Sons of Faridun by Sorcery. 184 
How Faridun made Trial of his Sons . . .186 

How Faridun divided the World among his Sons . 189 
How Salm grew envious of fraj . . . .189 

How Salm and Tiir sent a Message to Faridun . 191 
How Faridun made Answer to his Sons . . 193 

How fraj went to his Brothers . . . .197 

How fraj was slain by his Brothers . . . 199 

How Faridiin received Tidings of the Murder of 

fraj ...... . . 202 

How a Daughter was born to fraj . . . 205 

The Birth of Miniichihr ..... 206 

How Salm and Tiir had Tidings of Miniichihr . 208 

How Faridun received his Sons' Message . . 209 

How Faridun made Answer to his Sons . . 211 

How Faridun sent Miniichihr to fight Tiir and Salm 215 
How Miniichihr attacked the Host of Tiir . .218 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



141 



FARfDiJN {continued) 

SECT 

21. 



Vol. I. 

PAGE 
220 



How Tiir was slain by IMinucliihr 

22. How Mini'ichihr wrote to announce his Victory to 

Faridiin ....... 221 

23. How Karan took tlic Castle of the Alans . . 223 

24. How Kakwi, the Grandson of Zahhak, attacked the 

franians . . . . . . . 225 

25. How Salm fled and was slain by Minuchihr . . 227 

26. How the Head of Salm was sent to Fan'dun . . 229 

27. The Death of Faridiin ..... 232 

MiNUCHIHK — - 

1. How Minuchihr ascended the Throne and made an 

Oration ....... 237 

2. The Birth of Zal ...... 239 

3. How Sam had a Dream touching the Case of his Son 243 

4. How Miniichihr took Knowledge of the Case of Sam 

and Zal ....... 248 

5. How Zal went back to Zabulistan . . .251 

6. How Sam gave the Kingdom to Zal . . . 253 

7. How Zal visited Mihrab of Kabul . . . 256 

8. How Riidaba took Counsel with her Damsels . 259 

9. How Rudaba's Damsels went to see Zal . . 263 

10. How the Damsels returned to Riidaba. . . 267 

11. How Zal went to Riidaba . . . . .270 

12. How Z41 consulted the Archimages in the Matter 

of Riiddba ...... 273 

13. How Zal wrote to Sam to explain the Case . . 275 

14. How Sam consulted the Archmages in the Matter 

of Zal 278 

15. How Sindukht heard of the Case of Riidaba . . 280 

16. How Mihrab was made aware of his Daughter's 

Case ....... 284 

17. How Minuchihr heard of the Case of Zal and 

Riiddba 288 

18. How Sam came to Miniichihr .... 289 

19. How S4m went to fight Mihrab .... 292 

20. How Zal went on a Mission to Miniichihr . . 295 

21. How Mihrab was wroth with Sindukht . . 299 

22. How Sam comforted Sindukht .... 301 

23. How Z41 came to Minuchihr with Sam's Letter . 306 

24. How the Archmages questioned Zal . . . 308 

25. How Zal answered the Archmages . . . 309 

26. How Zal displayed his Accomplish ;nent before 

Minuchihr . . . . . . -311 

27. Miniichihr's Answer to SAm's Letter . . .314 

28. How Zal came to Sim . . . . .316 

29. The Story of the JMrth of Rustam . . . 320 

30. How Sdm came to see Rustam .... 324 

31. How Rustam slew the White Elephant . . 327 



142 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



MintJciiihr {continued) 

SECT 



33- 

34- 

35- 

Naudar — 

I. 

2. 

3- 

4- 



6. 

7- 

8. 

9- 

10. 
II. 
12. 
13- 



Vol.. I. 

PAGE 

How Rustam went to Mount Sipand . . . 330 

How Rustam wrote a Letter announcing his 

Victory to Zal ...... 332 

The Letter of Zal to Sam ..... 334 

Miniichihr's last Counsels to his Son . . . 335 



How Naudar succeeded to the Throne . 

How Pashang heard of the Death of Miniichihr 

How Afrdsiyab came to the Land of fran 

How Barman and Kubad fought together and how 

Kubad was slain ..... 

How Afrdsiyab fought with Naudar the second 

Time ....... 

How Naudar fought with AfrAsiyab the third Time 
How Naudar was taken by Afrasiyab . 
How Wisa found his Son that had been slain 
How Shamasas and Khazarwan invaded Zabu- 

Iist4n ....... 

How Zal came to help Mihr^b .... 

How Naudar was slain by Afrasiyab . 
How Zal had Tidings of the Death of Naudar 
How Ighriras was slain by his Brother . 



Zav- 



I . Zav is elected Shah 



339 
342 
345 

346 

350 
352 
355 
356 

358 
359 
362 

364 
367 

370 



GarshAsp- 
I. 

2. 
3- 
4- 

Index 



How Garshisp succeeded to the Throne and died, 
and how Afrasiyab invaded fran . 

How Rustam caught Rakhsh .... 

How Zal led the Host against Afrasiyab 

How Rustam brought Kai Kubad from Mount 
Alburz ....... 



374 
378 
381 

382 
389 



VOLUME n 



Genealogical Tables 

Abbreviations. 

Note on Pronunciation 



THE KAIANIAN dynasty 



Kai 



KubAd — 

SECT 
I. 



PAGE 
3 
5 

6 



page 



How Kai Kubdd ascended the Throne and warred 
against Turin .... 

2. How Rustam fought with Afrasiyab . 

3. How Afrasiydb came to his Fatlior 

4. How l^vshang sued to Kai Kubad for Peace 

5. How Kai Kubad came to Istakhr of Pdrs 



II 

13 
16 

18 

22 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 143 

Kai KAxJs— Vol. II 

Part I. The War with MAzandarAn — 

SICCT. PAGE 

1. The Prelude 29 

2. How K4us sat upon the Throne and was tempted 

to invade Mazandardn ..... 30 

3. How Z41 gave Counsel to Kaiis .... 36 

4. How Kdiis went to Mazandaran . ... 38 

5. The Message of Kai Kaus to Zal and Rustam . 42 

The Seven Courses of Rustam — 

6. The First Course. How Rakhsh fouglit with a 

Lion ... ..... 44 

7. The Second Course. How Rustam found a Spring 46 

8. The Third Course. How Rustam fought with a 

Dragon ....... 48 

9. The Fourth Course. How Rustam slew a Witch . 50 

10. The Fifth Course. How Rustam took IJlad cap- 

tive ........ 52 

11. The Sixth Course. How Rustam fought with the 

Di'v Arzhang ...... 57 

12. The Seventh Course. How Rustam slew the 

White Div 59 

13. How Kaiis wrote to the King of Mazandardn . 63 

14. How Rustam went on an Embassy to the King of 

MAzandaran ...... 66 

15. How Kkus fought with the King of Mdzandaran . 70 

16. How Kiiis returned to the Land of trkn and fare- 

welled Rustam ...... 76 

Part II. The Doings of Kai Kaus in the Land 
OF BarbaristAn and other Tales — 

1. How Kai Kaus warred with the King of Hama- 

var^n ....... 82 

2. How Kdiis asked to Wife Suddba, the Daughter 

of the King of Hdmavaran . • . . 86 

3. How the King of Hamavaran made Kaiis Prisoner 88 

4. How Afrasiyab invaded the Land of fran . . 91 

5. How Rustam sent a Message to the King of Ham- 

avaran ....... 93 

6. How Rustam fought with Three Kings and deliv- 

ered Kaus ....... 95 

7. How Kaiis sent a Message to Afrasiyab . . 98 

8. How Kdiis ordered the World .... loi 

9. How Kaiis beguiled by Iblis ascended the Sky . 102 

10. How Rustam brought back Kaiis . . • 104 

The Story of the Fight of the Seven Warriors — 

11. How Rustam went with the Seven Warriors to the 

Hunting-ground of Afr^iyAb . . . 107 

12. How Rustam fought with the Turanians . .HI 



144 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Kai Kaus —  

Part II. The Story of the Fight of the Seven Warriors 

{continued) — Vol. II 

SKCT. ^ PAGE 

13. How Pi'lsam fought with the Iranians . . .112 

14. How Afrasiyab fled from the Battlefield . . ii6 



Part III. Suhrab — 

1. The Prelude ...... 

2. How Rustam went to the Chace. 

3. How Rustam came to the City of Samyngan 

4. How Tahmina, the Daughter of the King of Samai 

gan, came to Rustam .... 

5. The Birth of Suhrab. .... 

6. How Suhrab chose his Charger . 

7. How Afrasiyab sent Barmdn and Human to Suhrji 
How Suhrab came to White Castle 
How Suhrab fought with Gurdafn'd 
The Letter of Gazhdaham to Kaiis 
How Suhrab took White Castle . 
How Kaiis wrote to Rustam and summoned him 

from Zabulistan ..... 
How Kaiis was wroth with Rustam 
How Kaiis and Rustam led forth the Host . 
How Rustam slew Zhanda Razm 
How Suhrab asked Haji'r the Names of the Chiets 

of fran ...... 

How Suhrab attacked the Army of Kaiis 

18. How Rustam fought with Suhrab 

19. How Rustam and Suhrab returned to Camp. 
How Suhrab overthrew Rustam. 
How Suhrab was slain by Rustam 
How Rustam asked Kaiis for an Elixir . 
How Rustam lamented for Suhrab 
How Rustam returned lo Zabulistan . 
How Suhrab's Mother received the Tidings oi hi 

Death 



8. 

9- 
10. 
II. 
12. 

13- 

14 

15- 

16. 

17- 



20. 
21. 
22. 

23- 
24. 

25- 



Part IV. The Story of SiyAwush — • 

1. The Prelude ..... 

2. The Story of the Mother of Siyawush . 

3. The Birth of Siyawush 

4. How Siyawush arrived from Zabulistan 
3. The Death of the Mother of Siyawush. 

6. How Siidaba fell in Love with Siyciwush 

7. How Siydwush visited Siidaba . 

8. How Siydwush visited the Bower the second Time 

9. How Siyawush visited the Bower the third Time 

10. How Siidaba beguiled Kdiis .... 

11. How Siidiba and a Sorceress devised a Scheme 

12. How KAiis inquired into the Matter of the Babes . 

13. How Siyawush passed through the Fire 



119 
120 
I 22 

123 
126 
127 
129 

131 
132 
136 
'37 

138 
T42 

148 
U9 

152 
159 
Ib2 

165 
168 
172 
177 
179 
182 

184 

191 
193 
195 
197 
199 
200 
202 
206 
210 
21 1 
214 

2»5 

218 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



M5 



K\i Kaus — 
Part IV. The 

SECT. 
14. 

15- 
16. 

17- 
18. 
19. 
20. 



Story of Siyawush (continued) — 



How Siyawush begged Si'idaba's L'fe of liis Father 
How Kaus hoard of the Coming of Afrasiyab 
How Siy4wush led forth the Host 
The Letter of Siyawush to Kai Kaus . 
The Answer of Kai Kaus to the Letter of Siyawu 
How Afr4siy4b had a Dream and was afraid . 
How AfrAsiydb inquired of the Sages concerning 
his Dream ...... 

21. How Afrasiyab took Counsel with the Nobles 

22. How Garsiwaz came to Siyawush 

23. How Siyawush made a Treaty with Afrasiydb 

24. How Siyawush sent Rustam to Kaus 

25. How Rustam gave the Message to Kaus 

26. How Kaiis sent Rustam to Sistan 

27. The Answer of Kaus to the Letter of Siyawush 

28. How Siyawush took Counsel with Ba hram and Zang 

29. How Zanga went to Afrasiyab . 

30. How Afrasiyab wrote to Siyawush 

31. How Siyawush gave up the Host to Rahram . 

32. The Interview ot Siyawush with Afrasiyab . 

33. How Siyawush displayed his Prowess belC'ie 

Afrasiyab ..... 

34. How Afrasiyab and Siyawush went to the Chase 

35. How Piran gave his Daughter to Siyawush . 

36. How Piran spake to Siyawush about Farangfs 

37. How Piran spake with Afrasiyab 

38. The Wedding of Farangis and Siyawush 

39. How Afrasiyab bestowed a Province on Siyawush 

40. How Siyawush built Gang-dizh 

41. How Siyawush discoursed with Piran about the 

Future ...... 

42. How Afrasiyab sent Piran into the Provinces 

43. How Siyawush built Siyawushgird 

44. How Piran visited Siyawushgird 

45. How Afrasiyab sent Garsiwaz to SiyAwush . 

46. The Birth of Farud, the Son of Siyawush 

47. How Siyawush played at Polo 

48. How Garsiwaz returned and spake Evil before 

Afrasiyab ...... 

49. How Garsiwaz returned to Siyiwush . 

50. The Letter of Siyawush to Afrasiyab . 

51. How AfrAsiyib came to fight witli SiyAwush 

52. How Siyawush had a Dream 

53. The Parting Words of Siyawush to Farangfs. 

54. How Siyawush was taken by .Vfrasiyib 

55. How Farangis bewailed herself before Afrdsiydb 

56. How Siyawush was slain by Gurwi 

57. How Piran saved Farangis 



Vol. U 

I'AGE 
222 
224 
226 
229 
230 
232 

238 

239 
242 

243 
246 
247 
249 
232 
255 
257 
261 

263 

267 
268 
270 

272 

274 
276 
279 

282 
285 
285 
287 
289 
291 
292 

296 
301 
306 

307 
308 
310 
312 

317 
320 

323 



VOL. l.X 



146 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Kai Kaus — 

Part IV. The Story of Siyawush [continued) — - Vol. II 

SECT. PAGE 

58. The Birth of Kai Khusrau .... 325 

59. How Piran entrusted Kai Khusrau to the Shep- 

herds . . . . . . .328 

60. How Piran brought Kai Khusrau before AfrasiyAb 330 

61. How Kai Khusrau went to Siyawushgird . . 333 
Part V. How Rustam avenged Siyawush and how 

Giv BROUGHT Kai Khusrau to TrAn — 

1. Firdausi's Lament over his old Age . . . 336 

2. How Kaiis heard of the Case of SiyAwush . . 337 

3. How Rustam came to Kaiis .... 338 

4. How Rustam slew Sudaba and led forth the Host. 340 

5. How Faramarz slew Warazad . . . .341 

6. How Surkha led his Troops to fight with Rustam . 344 

7. How Afrasiyab led forth the Host to avenge his 

Son . . . . ... . . 348 

8. How Pilsam was slain by Rustam . . . 350 
g. How Afrasiyab fied from Rustam . . . 353 

10. How AfrAsiyab sent Khusrau to Khutan . . 355 

11. How Rustam reigned over Turan for Seven Years. 357 
12. 



How Zawara went to the Hunting-ground of 
Siyawush ...... 

How Rustam harried the Land of Tiiran 

How Rustam returned to fran . 

How Giidarz had a Dream of Kai Khusrau . 

How Giv went to Tiiran in Quest of Kai Khusrau 

The Finding of Kai Khusrau 

How Giv and Kai Khusrau went to Siyawushgird 

How Kai Khijsrau won Bihzad . 

How Farangis went with Kai Khusrau and Giv to 
fran ....... 

How Kulbad and Nastihan fled from (jiv 

How Piran pursued Kai Khusrau 

How Pi'rAn contended with Giv . 

How Piran was taken by Giv 

How Farangis delivered Piran from Giv 

26. How Afrasiyab found I'iran on the Way 

27. How Giv disputed with the Toll-man . 
How Kai Khusrau crossed the Jihun . 
How Kai Khusrau came to Ispahan 
How Kai Khusrau came to Kaiis 
How Tiis refused Allegiance to Kai Khusrau . 
How Giidarz was wroth with Tiis 
How Gudarz and Tiis went before Kaiis on th 

Matter of the Kingship 
How Tiis and FarAmarz went to the Castle of 

Bahman and came back foiled 
How Kai Khusrau went to the Castle of Bahman 

and took it ..... 



13- 

14. 

15- 
16. 

17- 
18. 

19. 
20. 

21. 
22. 

23- 

24. 
25- 



28. 
29. 
30- 
31- 
32. 
a- 

34- 

35- 



339 
360 
361 
363 
365 
369 
373 
374 

377 
378 
380 
382 

385 
386 
388 
390 
392 
394 
397 
399 
402 

403 
405 
40O 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



M7 



Kai Kaus — 

Part V. How Rustam Avenged Siyawush, etc. {continued) — 

Vol. II 

SECT. P.^OK 

36. How Keii Khusrau returned in Triumph . . 409 

37. How Kdiis set Khusrau upon the Throne of King- 
ship 411 



Index 



VOLUME HI 



DYNASTY [contimied) 



Abbreviations. 

Note on Pronunciation 

THE KAIANIAN 
Kai Khusrau — 
Part I. How Kai Khusrau, to avenge Siyawush, 

SENT A Host against Tur.4n — 

SECT. 

1. The Prelude ....... 

2. How the Nobles did Homage to Kei Khusrau 

3. How Kai Khusrau made a Progress through his 

Realm ....... 

4. How Kai Khusrau sware to Kai Kaus to trike 

Vengeance on Afrasivab .... 

5. How Kai Khusrau numbered the Paladins . 

6. How Kai Khusrau bestowed Treasures on the 

Paladins ....... 

7. How Kai Khusrau sent Rustam to the land ot 

Hind 

8. How Kai Khusrau reviewed the Host . 

The Story of Farud the Son of Siyawush — 

9. The Prelude ...... 

10. How Tus went to Turkistan 

11. How Faruil heard of the Coming of Tiis 
iz. How Fan'id and Tukhar went to view the Host 

13. How Bahram came to h'arud upon the Mountain 

14. How IJaliram went back to Tus 
How Rivniz was slain by Farud 
tlow Zarasp was slain by Farud 
How Tiis fought with Farud 
How Gi'v fought with Farud 
How Bizhan fought with Fariid . 
How Fariid was slain .... 
How Jarira slew herself .... 
How Tus led the Host to the Kdsa Riid, and how 

ralashan was slain by Bizhan 
How the frAnians suffered in a Snowstorm . 
How I3ahr4m captured Kabuda 
How the franiaus foufijht with Tazhav 
How Afrasiyab iiad Tidings of Tiis and his Host 



4'3 



I'AGK 
3 



16. 

i8. 

19- 

20. 
21. 



^3- 
24. 

26. 



15 
17 

19 

20 

24 

26 

30 
31 

37 
38 
41 
44 
47 
51 
52 
53 
54 
57 
bi 
62 
66 

68 
71 
73 
75 

78 



14^ 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Kai Khusrau — 

The Story of Farud the Son of Siyawush {continued) — 

Vol 

SECT. 

27. How Piran made a Night-attack on the franians . 

28. How Kai Khusrau recalled Tiis 

29. How Fariburz asked a Truce of Piran . 

30. How the Iranians were defeated by the Turkmans. 

31. How Bahram returned to look for his Whip upon 

the Battlefield ..... 

32. How Bahram was slain by Tazhav 

33. How Gfv slew Tazhav in revenge for Bahram 

34. How the franians went back to Khusrau 

Part H. The story of Kamus of Kash.4n — 

1. The Prelude ..... 

2. How Khusrau reviled Tiis 

3. How Khusrau pardoned the Iranians . 

4. How Khusrau sent Tiis to Tiiran 

5. The Message of Piran to the Army of fran 

6. How Afrasiyab sent an Army to Piran. 

7. How Tiis slew Arzhang 



How Human fought with Tiis 



9. How the franians and Turanians fought the second 
Time ...... 

10. How the Turanians used Sorcery against the Host 

of fran ...... 

11. How the franians retreated to Mount Hamawan 

12. How the Host of Tiiran beleaguered Mount 

Hamiwan ..... 

13. Hov/ Piran went in Pursuit of the franians to 

Mount Hamawan .... 

14. How the franians made a Night-attack 

15. How Kai Khusrau had Tidings of his Host . 

16. How Fariburz asked to Wife Farangis, the Mother 

of Kai Khusrau .... 

17. How Tiis saw Siyawush in a Dream 

18. How Afrasiyab sent the Khan and Kamiis to help 

Piran ...... 

19. How the Khan of Chin came to ?Iamawan 

20. How the franians took Counsel how to act . 

21. How Giidarz had Tidings of the Coming of Rustam 

22. How the Khan of Chin went to reconnoitre the 

Army of fran ...... 

23. How Fariburz reached Mount Hamawan 

24. How Piran took Counsel with the Khan of Chin 

25. How Giv and Tiis fought with Kamiis. 

26. The Coming of Rustam ..... 

27. How the franians and Turanians arrayed their 

Hosts ....... 

28. How Rustam fought with Ashkabiis 



III 


PAOi.: 


80 


84 


87 


89 


95 


98 


lOI 


104 


110 


1 1 1 


i'3 


i'5 


117 


118 


Iiq 


120 



I -'5 

128 
131 

I3-J 

137 
139 

142 

146 
149 

151 
153 
155 

160 

163 
164 
168 
170 

174 
179 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

K\i KnusKAU — 

Part II. The Story or Kamus of Kashan {continued) — Vo 



SKLT 



Converse coiictrniiig the Coming 



How Pi'raii held 
of Kiistam 

30. How the franians and Turanians set the Battle in 

Array ....... 

31. How Aiwa was slain by Kamus . . . . 

32. How Kdmiis was slain by Rustam 

Part III. The Story of Rustam and the Khan of 
Chin — 

I. How the Kh4n of Chin had Tidings of the Slaying 

of Kamus ...... 

2. How Chingish fared with Rustam 

3. How the Khan of Chin sent Human to Rustam 

4. How Pirdn took Counsel with Human and the 

Khan 

5. How Piran came to Rustam 

6. How the Turanians took Counsel for Battle with 

the Iranians 

7. How Rustam harangued his Troops 

8. How the Iranians and Turanians set the Battle in 

Array ...... 

Q. How Rustam reproached Piran . 
10. How the Battle was joined 

II. How Shangul fought with Rustam and fled . 

12. How Rustam fought with Sawa. 

13. How Rustam slew Gahar of Gahan 

14. How the Khan was taken Prisoner 

15. How the Host of the Turanians was defeated 

16. How Rustam divided the Spoil . 

17. How Rustam wrote a Letter to Kai Khusrau 

18. How Kai Khusrau made Answer to Rustam' 

Letter 

19. How Afrasiyab had Tidings of the Case of his 

Army ...... 

20. How Rustam fought with Kafiir the Man-eater 

21. How Afrasiy4b had Tidings of the Coming of 

Rustam ...... 

22. Afrasiyab's Letter to Puladwand 

23. How Puladwand fought with Civ and Tiis . 

24. How Rustam fought with Puladwand . 

25. The Wrestling of Rustam and Puladwand . 

26. How Afrasiyab fled from Rustam 

27. How Rustam returned to the Court of the Shdh 

28. How Rustam went back to Sistdn 



149 



L III 

TACK 



182 

185 

187 
188 



192 
194 
196 

199 
201 

206 
211 

217 
219 
221 
223 
224 
227 
230 
232 
237 

239 

241 
243 

249 

257 
259 
262 
265 
267 
269 



Part IV. The Story of the Fight of Rustam 
WITH the Div Akw.vn — 
I. Prelude ....... 



272 



I50 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



K.M Khusrau — 

Part IV. The Story of the Fight of Rustam 

SECT. 

2. How Kliusrau summoned Rustam to 

Di'v Akwan .... 

3. How Rustam went in Quest of the Div 



Vol. Ill 
etc. {continued) — 

fight tlie 



PAGIC 



How the DiV Akwan flung Rustam into the Sea 



How Afrasiyab came tc inspect his Steeds, 

how Rustam slew the Dlv Akwan . 
How Rustam went back to the Land of fran . 



and 



273 
275 
276 



279 

281 



Part V. The Story of Bizhan and Manizha— 

1. The Prelude 287 

2. How the Irmanians appealed to Khusrau . . 289 

3. How Bizhan went to fight the wild Boars . . 292 

4. How Gurgi'n beguiled Bizhan .... 294 

5. How Bizhan went to see Manizha, Daughter of 

Afrasiyab ....... 296 

6. How Bizhan went to the Tent of Manizha . . 298 

7. How Manizha carried off Bizhan to her Palace . 299 

8. How Garsiwaz brought Bizhan before Afrasiyab . 301 

9. How Piran begged Bizhan's Life from Afrasiyab . 305 
10. How Afrasiyab put Bizhan in Ward . . . 309 
ir. How Gurgin returned to fran and lied about Bizhan 310 

12. How Giv brought C-urgin before Khusrau . • 315 

13. How Kai Khusrau saw Bizhan in the Cup that 

showed the World . . . . .318 

14. 'How Khusrau wrote a Letter to Rustam . . 319 

15. How Giv bore the Letter of Kai Ivhusrau to 

Rustam . . . . . . .321 

16. How Rustam made a Feast for Giv . . . 324 

17. How Rustam came to Khusrau . . . .326 

18. How Ivai Khusrau held Feast with the Paladins . 329 

19. How Rustam made Petition for Gurgin to the Shah 331 

20. How Rustam equipped his Escort . . . 333 

21. How Rustam went to the City of Khutan to Piran 334 

22. How Manizha came before Rustam . . . 337 

23. How Bizhan heard of the Coming of Rustam . 340 

24. How Rustam took Bizhan out of the Pit . . 344 

25. How Rustam attacked the Palace of Afrasiyab by 

Night 347 

26. How Afrasiyab went to fight with Rustam . . 349 

27. How Afrasiyab was defeated by the Iranians . 351 

28. How Rustam returned to Kai Khusrau . . 353 

29. How Kai Khusrau made a Feast. . . . 355 
359 



Index 



VOLUME IV 



Abbreviations. 

Note on Pronunciation 



page 
3 
4 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 151 

Til !•: K \ I A X I A \ DYNASTY (roiitiuued) 

Kai Khusrau {coil till tied) — 



Vol IV 



Part \I. Tiii£ Uattle ok tiii-; Twelve Rukiis —  
sia-T. 

1. The Prelude ...... 

2. How Afrasiyab called together his Host 

3. How Kid Khusrau sent (a'ldarz to fit^Iit the Ti'ir 

4nians ...... 

4. How Giv was made the Bearer of Ovcituics from 

Giidarz to Pi'ran ..... 

5. How Giv visited Piran at W'isagirtl 

6. The Arraying of the Hosts. 

7. How Bi'zhan went to Giv to urge him to fight 

8. How Human asked Piran for I^eave to fight . 

9. How Human challenged Riihham 

10. How Human challenged Fariburz 

11. How Human challenged Gudarz. 

12. How I^izhan heard of the Doings of Human. 

13. How Giv g^ve the Mail of Siyawush to Bizhan 

14. How Human came to battle with Bizhan .. 

15. How Human was slain by Bizhan 

16. How Xastihan made a Night-attack and was slaii 

17. How Gudarz asked aid of Khusrau 

18. The Answer of Khusrau to the letter of Gudarz 

19. How Khusrau arrayed the Host. 

20. How Piran wrote to Gudarz Son of Kishwad . 

2 1 . The Answer of Gudarz to the Letter of Piran . 

22. How Piran asked Succour from Afrasiyab 

23. The Answer of Afrasiyab to the Letter of Piian 

24. How the Iranians and Turanians fought a pitclie: 

Battle 

25. How Giv fought with Piran and how Giv's Horse 

jibbed ...... 

26. How Gudarz and Piran arranged a Battle of 

Eleven Rukhs ..... 

27. How Pir4n harangued his Men of Name 

28. How Gudarz and Piran chose the Warriors for Ih 

Battle of the Eleven Rukhs 

29. How Fariburz fought with Kulbad 

30. How Giv fought with Gurwi 

31. How Guraza fought with Siyamak 

32. How I'uruhil fought with Zangula 

33. How Ruhham fought with Barmin 

34. How Bizhan fought with Ruin . 

35. How Hajir fought with Sipahram 

36. How Gurgin fought with .Andariman . 

37. How Barta fought with Kuhram 

38. How Zanga, Son of Shiwarin, fought with .\khAst 

39. How Gudarz fought with I'irdn . . . . 



■ACK 



10 

12 

16 

19 
22 
26 
29 

31 

34 
35 

39 
44 
47 
49 
53 
56 
5S 
61 

63 

68 

75 
78 

81 

84 

88 
93 

95 

99 

99 

100 

lOI 

102 

102 

103 
104 

105 
105 
106 



152 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Kai Khusrau — Vor.. IV 

Part VI. The Battle of the Twelve Rukhs {continued) — 

SECT. PAGE 

How Gudarz returned to the Warriors of Iran . 109 

How Lahhak and Farshidward bewailed Pi'ran . 112 
How Lahhak and Farshidward took the Road to 

Tiiran . . . . . . .115 

How Ciustaham pursued Fahhak and Farshidward 1 1 7 
How Bi'zhan followed after Gustaham . . . iiy 

How Lahhak and Farshidward were slain by Gusta- 
ham . . . . . . . .121 

How Bizhan beheld (iustaham in the Mead . .123 

How Kai Khusrau built a Charnel-house for Piran 
and for thf other Chiefs of Tiiran, and how he 
slew Gurwi the Son of Zira . . . .126 

48. How the Turanians asked Quarter of Kai Khusrau 129 

49. How Bizhan returned with Gustaham. . . 132 



40. 
41. 
42. 

43- 
44. 

45- 

46. 
47- 



his Host against 



and 



Part VII. The Great War of Kai Khusrau with 
Afrasiyab — 

In Praise of Sultan Mahmiid 
How Kai Khusrau arrayed 

Afrasiyab ...... 

How Afrasiyab heard that Piran was slain 

that Kai Khusrau had arrayed his Host. 
How Kai Khusrau had Tidings that Afrasiyab 

advanced to fight with him. 

5. How Shida came before his Father Afrasiyab 

6. How Afrasiyab sent an Embassage to Kai Khusrau 

7. How Kai Khusrau sent an Answer to Afrasiyab 
How Kai Khusrau fought with Shida the Son 

Afrasiyab ...... 

How Shida was slain by Khusrau 

How the Ba,ttle was joined between the Hosts 

How Afrasiyab fled ..... 

How Kai Khusrau announced his Victory to Kaiis 
How Afrasiyab went to Gang-bihisht 

14. How Khusrau crossed the Jihiin 

15. How Kai Khusrau fought with Afrasiyab the 
second Time ..... 

16. How Afrasiyab took Refuge in Gang-bihisht 

17. The Letter of Afrasiy4b to the Faghfur of Chin 

18. How Kai Khusrau arrived before Gang-bihisht 

19. How Jahn came to Kai Khusrau with an Embas 
sage from Afrasiyab . 

20. How Kai Khusrau made Answer to Jahn 

21. How Kai Khusrau fought with Afrasiyab and took 
Gang-bihisht .... 

22. How Afr^siyib fled from Gang-bihisht 

23. How Kai Khusrau gave Quarter to the Family of 
Afrasiyab ....... 



I. 
2. 



4- 



8. 

9- 
10. 

II. 

12. 
13- 



139 

145 

150 

157 
158 
161 
168 

171 

175 
177 

i>^3 

185 
186 

187 

lyo 

193 
196 
198 

200 
204 

207 
21 I 

212 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 



153 



Vol 



K \l KlIUSRAU — 

Takt \"II. The Gkeat Wau, etc. {continued) — 

24. How Kai Kliiisiau exhorted the Iranians 
■25. How Kai Kluisrau wrote a Letter with tlic News 
of his Victory to Kai Kai'is .... 

26. How Kai Khusrau had Tidings of tlie Coming of 

Afrdsiyab with the Host of the Faghfur. 

27. The Message of .Vfrasiyiib to Kai Khusran . 

28. How the Iranians antl Turanians fc^tight 

29. How AfrasiyAb made a Night-attack upon K'ai 

Khusrau and was def:;ated .... 

30. How the Faghfur of Chin sent an Envoy to Kai 

Khusrau ....... 

31. How Afrasiyab crossed the Sea .... 

32. How Kai Khusrau sent the Prisoners and Tieasure 

to Kai'is with a Letter ..... 

33. The Answer of Shah Kaiis to the Letter of Khusiau 

34. The Embassage of Kai Khusrau to the Faghfur of 

Chin and the King of Makran 

35. How Kai Khusrau fought with the Iving of Makran 

and how the King of Makran was slain 

36. How Kai Khusrau crossed the Sea 

37. How Kai Khusrau reached Gang-dizh. 

38. How Kai Khusrau returned from Gang-dizh to 

Siyawushgird .... 

39. How Ivai Khusrau returned from Ti'iran to the 

Land of Iran ..... 

40. How Kai Khusrau returned to his Grandsire 

41. How Afrasiyab was captured by Hum of the Race 

of r'aridun ..... 

42. How Afrasiyab escaped from Hum 

43. How Kaus and Kluisrau came to Hum 

44. How Afrasiyab was taken the second Time and 

how he and Garsi'waz were slain . 

45. How Kaus and Khusrau returned to Pars 

46. The Death of Kai Kaus 

47. How Kai Khusrau fell into Melancholy 

48. How the Nobles inquired why Khusrau had closed 

his Court ...... 

49. How the frinians summoned Zal and Rustam 

50. How Kai Khusrau saw Surush in a Dream . 

51. How Zal admonished Kai Khusrau 

52. How Kai Khusrau answered Zal. 

53. How Zal rebuked Kai Khusrau. 

54. How Kai Khusrau answered and how Z^l c^cused 

himself ...... 

55. How Kai Khusrau gcve his last Charge to 

Iranians ...... 

56. How Kai Khusrau apiiointcd Gudarz to be 

Mandatary ..... 



th 



hi 



. IV 
.vr.K 
216 

217 

219 

,221 
223 

224 

229 
230 

232 

238 
241 
247 
250 

256 

259 
261 
264 

266 
269 
270 

272 

275 
277 
280 

282 
284 
2S6 

288 

291 

294 



154 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Kai Khusrau — 

Part VII. The Great War, elc. {continued) — Voi.. IV 

SECT. rAOK. 

57. How Zal asked of Kai Khusrau a Patent for Rustam 296 

58. How Kai Kausrau gave a Patent to Giv . . 298 

59. How Kai Khusrau gave a Patent to Tiis . . 299 

60. How Kai Khusrau gave the Kingship to Luhrasp. 300 
6t. How Kai Khusrau farewelled his Women . . 304 

62. How Kai Khusrau went to the Mountains and 

vanished in the Snow ..... 303 

63. How the Paladins were lost in the Snow . .308 

64. How Luhrasp had Tidings of the Disappearance 

of Kai Khusrau . . . . . .311 

LuhrAsp— 

1. How Luhrasp built a Fire-temple at Balkh . . 316 

2. How Gushtasp quitted Luhrasp in Wrath . .318 

3. How Gushtasp returned with Zarir . . . 320 

4. How Gushtasp set off for Rum .... 323 

5. How Gushtasp arrived in Rum .... 324 

6. How a Village-chief entertained Gushtasp . .327 

7. The Story of Katayun the Daughter of Caesar . 329 

8. How Caesar gave Katdyiin to Gushtasp . -331 

9. How Mirin asked in Marriage Caesar's second 

Daughter 333 

10. How Gushtasp slew the Wolf .... 337 

11. How Ahran asked Caesar's third Daughter in 

Marriage 34- 

12. How Gushtasp slew the Dragon and how Caesar 

gave his Daughter to Ahran. . . . 346 

13. How Gushtasp displayed his Prowess upon the 

Riding-ground . . . . . • 349 

14. How Caesar wrote to llyas and demanded Tribute. 352 

15. How Gushtasp fought with llyas and slew liim . 355 

16. How Ca;sar demanded from Luhrasp Tribute for 

fran 35^ 

17. How Zarir carried a Message from Luhrasp to 

Cajsar ....... 359 

18. How Gushtasp returned with Zarir to the Land of 

fran and received the Throne from Luhrasp . 361 
Index . 367 

VOLUME V 

I'AOE 

Abbreviations. ........ 3 

Note on Pronunciation ....... 5 

THE KAIANIAN DYNASTY {continued) 
Gushtasp — 
Part I. The Coming of Zarduhsht and the War 

with Arjasp — 

SECT. 

1. How Firdausi saw Daki'ki in a Dream. . . 30 

2. How Luhiasp went to Balkh and Gushtasp sat 

upon the Throne . . . .  Z^ 



33 

35 
37 
4° 
4-i 

43 
47 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS I55 

GushtAsp — 

Part I. The Coming of Zarduhsht, clc. [continued) — Vol. V 

SKCT. PAOt: 

3. How Zarduhsht appeared and how Giishtasp 

accepted his livaiigul .... 

4. Mow Gushtasp refused to Arjasp the Tribute for 

Iran ....... 

5. Hew Arjasp wrote a Letter to Gushtisp 

6. How .\rjasp sent Envoys to Gushtasp. 

7. How Zarir made Answer to Arjasp 

8. How the Envoys returned to Arjasp with the 

Li-ttcr of GushtcLsp .... 

9. How Gushtasp assembled his Troops . 

10. How Jamasp foretold the Issue of the Battle to 

Gushtasp ....... 48 

1 1. How Gushtasp and ArjAsp arrayed their Hosts . 54 
iz. The Beginning of the Battle between the franians 

and Turanians, and how Ardshir, Shirii, and 
Shidasp were skin ..... 56 

13. How Girami, Jamasp's Son, and Xfvzar w-ere slain 58 

14. How Zari'r, the Brother of Gushtasp, was slain by 

Bidirafsh Oi 

15. How Asfandiyar heard of the Slaying of Zarir . 65 

16. How Asfandiyar went to Battle with Arjasp . 66 

17. How Nastiir and Asfandiyar slew Bidirafsh. . 69 

18. How Arjasp iied from the Battle ... 71 

19. How the Turkmans received Quarter from Asfan- 

diyar ....... 72 

20. How Gushtasp returned to Balkh ... 74 

2 1 . How Gushtasp sent Asfandiyar to all the Provinces, 

and how the Folk received from him the good 

Religion ....... 76 

22. How Gurazm spake Evil of Asfandiyar . . 78 

23. How Jamasp came to Asfandiyar ... 80 

24. How Gushtasp imprisoned Asfandiyar. . . 82 

25. How Gushtasp w-ent to Sistan and how Arjasp 

arrayed his Host the second Time. . . 85 

26. The Words of Dakiki being ended, Firdausi 

resumeth, praising Shah Mahmud and criti- 87 
cising Dakiki ...... 

27. How the Host of Arjasp marched to Balkh and 89 

how Luhrasp was slain .... 

28. How Gushtasp heard of the Slaying of Luhrasp and 

led his Army toward ]?alkh .... 93 

29. How Gushtasp was put to Flight by .\rjasp . 96 

30. How Jamasp visited Asfandiyar. ... 98 

31. How Asfandiyar saw his Brother Farshidward . 103 

32. How Asfandiyar came to the Mountain to Gush- 

tasp ........ 

33. How Gushtasp sent Asfandiyar the second Time 

to fight Arjasp . . . . . . 1 1 ) 



106 



124 



156 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

GusHTASP^ Vol. V 

Pakt II. The Story of the Seven Stages — 

SECT. PAGE 

1. The Praise of Mahim'ul the great King. . .118 

The Seven Stages of Asfandiyar — 

2. The First Stage : How Asfandiyar .slew two 

Wolves . . . . . . . iig 

3. The Second Stage : How Asfandiyar slew two 

Lions ....... 

4. The Third Stage : How Asfandiyar slew a 

Dragon . . . . . . .125 

5. The Fourth Stage: How Asfandivar slew a 

Witch .... 1 .. 128 

6. The Fifth Stage : How Asfandiyai slew the 

Simurgh . . . . . . .131 

7. The Sixth Stage : How Asfandiyar passed 

through the Snow . . . . .134 

8. The Seventh Stage : How Asfandiyar crossed the 

River and slew Gurgsar . . . .139 

9. How Asfandiyar went to the Brazen Hold in the 

Guise of a Merchant ..... 143 

10. How the Sisters of Asfandiyar recognised him . 147 

11. How Bishiitan assaulted the Brazen Hold . . 150 

12. How Asfandiyar slew Arjasp .... 152 

13. How Asfandiyar slew Kuhram . . . -155 

14. How Asfandiyar wrote a Letter to Gu^lita.'^p and 

his Answer . . . . . .159 

15. How Asfandiyar returned to Gushtasp . . 161 

Part HI. The Story of Asfandiyar's Fight with 
Rustam — 

1. How Asfandiyar ambitioned the Throne and how 

Gushtasp took Counsel with the Astrologeis. 167 

2. How Asfandiyar demanded the Ivingdom from liis 

Father . . . . . . .170 

3. How Gushtasp answered his Son . . .172 

4. How Katayiin counselled Asfandiyar . . .175 

5. How Asfandiyar led a Host to Zabul . . .177 

6. How Asfandiyar sent Bahman to Rustam . .179 

7. How Bahman came to Zal. . . . . 1S2 

8. How Bahman gave a Message to Rustam . .184 

9. How Rustam made Answer to Asfandiyar . .187 
ID. How Bahman returned . . . . .190 
ir. The Meeting of Rustam and AsfandiyAr . .192 

12. How Asfandiyar summoned not Rustam to the 

Feast . . . . . . .196 

13. How Asfandiyar excused himself for not summon- 

ing Rustam to the Feast . . . .198 

I). Ilow Asfandiyar spake Shame of the Race of 

Rustam ....... 200 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 157 

GusHTASP — Vol. V 

Part III. The Story of Asfandiyar's Fight, e/c. {continued) — • 

SKCT. I'AOK 

13. How Rustam answered Asfandiyar, praising his 

own Race and Deeds ..... 202 

16. How Asfandiydr boasted of his Ancestry . . 204 

17. How Rustam vaunted his Valour . . . 207 

18. How Rustam drank wine with Asfandiyar . . 210 

19. How Rustam returned to his Palace . . .215 

20. How Zal counselled Rustam . . . .218 

21. How Rustam fought with Asfandiyar . . . 222 

22. How the Sons of Asfandiyar were slain by Zawaia 

and Faramarz . . . . . .225 

23. How Rustam fled to the Heights . . . 229 

24. How I^ustam took Counsel with his Kin . . 234 

25. How the Simurgh succoured Rustam . . . 235 

26. How Rustam went back to fight Asfandiyar. . 240 

27. How Rustam shot Asfandiyar in the Eyes with an 

Arrow ....... 243 

28. How Asfandiyar told his last Wishes to Rustam. 247 

29. How Bishutan bare the Coffin of Asfandiyar to 

Gushtasp . . . . . . .251 

30. How Rustam sent Bahman back to fran . . 256 

Part IV. The Story of Rustam and Shaghad 

1. The Prelude ....... 261 ~ 

2. How Rustam went to Kabul on behalf of his 

Brother Shaghad ..... 263 

3. How the King of Kabul dug Pits in the Hunting- 

ground and how Rustam and Zawara fell 
therein . ..... 268 

4. How Rustam slew Shaghad and died . . . 271 

5. How Zal received News cf the Slaying of Rustam 

and Zawara, and how Faramarz brought their 
Coffins ami set them in the Charnel-house . 273 

6. How Faramarz led an Army to avenge Rustam and 

slew the King of Kabul . . . .276 

7. How Rudaba lost her Wits through Mourning for 

Rustam . . . . . . . 27S 

8. How Gushtasp gave the Kingdom to Bahnian and 

died . . . . . . . .279 

Bahman, Son of Asfandiy.4r — 

1. How Bahman sought Revenge for the Death of 

Asfandiyar . . . . . .283 

2. How Bahman put Z41 in Bontis .... 285 

3. How Faramarz fought with Bahman and was put 

to Death 287 

4. How Bahman released Z41 and returned to fran . 288 

5. How Bahman married his own Daughter Humdi 

and appointed his Successor. . . . 290 



158 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

HumAi— Vol. V 

SFX'T. PAGE 

1. How Humai cast away her Son Dar^b on the River 

Farat in an Ark ...... 294 

2. How the Laundercr brought up Darab. . . 296 

3. How Darab questioned the Launderer's Wife about 

his Parentage, and how he fought against the 
Riimans .... 

4. How Rashnawad learned the Case of Darab 

5. How Darab fought against the Host of Rum 

6. How Humai recrgnised her Son. 

7. How Humai seated Darab upon the Throne 



Index 



300 
302 
305 
307 
309 
313 



VOLUME VI 



PAGE 

Genealogical Table of the Sasanians .... 3 

Abbreviations. ........ 5 

Note on Pronunciation ....... 8 

THE KAIAnIAN dynasty (concluded) 
DArAb— 

1. How Darab built the City of Darabgird . . 20 

2. How Darab defeated the Host of Shu'ib . . 21 
3 How Darab fought with Failakiis and took to Wife 

his Daughter ...... 22 

4. How Darab sent back the Daughter of Failakiis 

to Riim, and how Sikandar was born . . 25 

Dara, Son of Darab — 

1. How Dara harangued the Chiefs and took Order 

for the Realm ...... 34 

2. The Death of Failakiis and Sikandar 's Accession 

tc the Throne ...... 35 

3. How Sikandar went as his own Ambassador to 

Dara ....... 38 

4. How Dara fought with Sikandar and was worsted. 42 

5. How Dara fought with Sikandar the second Time. 43 

6. How Sikandar fought with Dara the third Time, 

and how Dara fled to Kirman ... 46 

7. How Dara wrote to Sikandar to propose Peace . 49 

8. How Dara was slain by his Ministers ... 50 

9. How Dara told his last Wishes to Sikandar and 

died ........ 52 

10. How Sikandar wrote to the Nobles of Irin . . 57 

Sikandar — 

1. How Sikandar sat upon the Throne of fran . . 85 

2. How Sikandar wrote to Dilarai and Riishanak, 

the Wife and Daughter of Dara, touching the 
Nuptials of Riishanak. .... 85 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 159 

SiKANDAR {continued) — Vol. VI 

SECT. PAGK 

3. How Dilarai answered the Letter of Sikandar . 87 

4. How Sikandar sent his Mother, Nahid, to fetch 

Rushanak, and how he married her . . 89 

5. How Kaid of Hind had a Dream, and how Mihran 

interpreted it . . . . . , gi 

6. How Sikandar marched against Kaid of Hind and 

wrote a Letter to him ..... 98 

7. How Kaid of Hind answered Sikandar's Letter 

and announced the Sending of the Four 
Wonders ....... 99 

8. How Sikandar sent back the Messenger to receive 

the Four Wonders . . . . .100 

9. How Sikandar sent Ten Sages with a Letter to 

inspect tlie Four Wonders of Kaid of Hind . 10 1 

10. How the Ten Sages brought the Daughter, the Cup, 

the Leech, and the Sage, from Kaid of Hind 

to Sikandar ...... 103 

11. How Sikandar tested the Sage, the Leech, and the 

Cup sent by Kaid of Hind . . . .104 

12. How Sikandar led a Host against Fur of Hind 

and wrote a Letter to him . . . .110 

13. How Fur answered the Letter of Sikandar . . iii 

14. How Sikandar arrayed his Host to fight with Fur 

of Hind and made iron Steeds and Riders filled 
with Naphtha . . . . . .112 

15. How the Host of Sikandar fought with the Host 

of Fiir, how Fiir was slain by Sikandar, and 
how Sikandar seated Sawurg upon the Throne 
of Fiir . . . . . . .116 

16. How Sikandar went on a Pilgrimage to the House 

of the Kaaba . . . . . .119 

17. How Sikandar led his Troops from Judda toward 

Misr . . . . . . . .121 

18. Sikandar's Letter to Kaidafa, Queen of Andalus, 

and her Answer ...... 123 

ig. How Sikandar led his Troops to Andalus and took 

the Hold of King Fary4n . . . .124 

20. How Sikandar went as an Ambassador to Kaidafa 

and was recognised by her . . . .127 

21. How Kaidafa counselled Sikandar . . .132 

22. How Tainiish, the Son of Kaidafa, was wroth with 

Sikandar, and how Sikandar took Precaution 
against him . . . . . .134 

23. How Sikandar made a Compact with Kaidafa and 

returned to his Troops. . . . .138 

24. How Sikandar went to the Country of the Brah- 

mans, iii(]uired into tlu-ir Mysteries, and 
received an Answer , . . . .143 



i6o GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SiKANDAR (continued) — Vol. VI 

SECT. I'AUK 

25. How Sikandar came to the Western Sea and saw 

Wonders . . . . . . .147 

26. How Sikandar reached the Land of Habash, 

fought, and was victorious . . . .149 

27. How Sikandar reached the Land of the Narmpai, 
how he fought and was victorious, how he 
slew a Dragon, ascended a Mountain, and was 
forewarned of his own Death . . .150 

28. How Sikandar reached the City of Women, named 

Harum, and saw Wonders there . . . 153 

29. How Sikandar went into the Gloom to seek the 

Water of Life and spake with Birds and 
Israfi'l . . . . . . .159 

30. How Sikandar went to the East, saw Vv'oadeis, and 

built a Barrier against Yajuj and Majiij . .163 

31. How Sikandar saw a Corpse in a Palace of Jewels 

on the Top of a Mountain, and the Speaking 
Tree, and how he was warned of his Death . 1 66 

32. How Sikandar marched his Army to Chin, carried 

his own Letter to Faghfiir, and returned to 

his Army wich the Answer . . . .169 

33. How Sikandar returned from Chin, made War 

against the Sindians, and went to Yaman . i 74 

34. How Sikandar marched toward Babil and found 

the Treasure of Kai Khusrau in a City . . 1 76 

35. How Sikandar went to the City of Babil, wrote a 

Letter to Arastalis, and received his Answer . 1 78 

36. Sikandar's I etter to his Mother . . . .181 

37. How Sikandar's Life ended and how they carried 

his Coffin to Iskandan'ya . . . .183 

38. How the Sages and other Folk lamented Sikandar 185 

39. How the Mother and Wife of Sikandar lamented 

him . . . . . . . .187 

40. Firdausi's Complaint of the Sky and Appeal to God 189 

THE ASHKANL\N dynasty 

SECT. 

1. The Praise of Mahm lid ..... 207 

2. The Tribal Kings . . . . . .210 

3. How Papak saw Sasan in a Dream and gave him 

a Daughter in Marriage . . . .211 

4. How Ardshir Papakdn was born, and of his Case 

with Ardawan . . . . . .213 

5. How Ardawdn's Slave-girl fell in Love with 

Ardshir and how he fled with her to Pars. . 217 

6. How Ardawan heard of the Flight of Ardshir with 

the Damsel and pursued them . . .220 

7. How .\rdawan wrote to Bahman, his Son, to take 

Ardshir 223 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS i6i 

The Ashkanian Dynasty [continued) — Vol. VI 

SKCT. PACK 

8. How Tabcik helped Ardshir, fought with Bahman, 

and conquered him ..... 225 

9. How Anlawan led forth his Host for Battle with 

Ardshir and was slain . . . . .227 

10. How .'Vrdshir fought with the Kurds and was 

defeated . . . . . . .230 

11. How Ardshir attacked the Kurds by Night and 

overthrew them ...... 232 

12. The Story of Haftwdd and the Case of the Worm . 232 

13. How Ardshir fought with Haftw4d and was worsted 236 

14. How Mihrak of Jahram sacked the Palace of 

Ardshir ....... 237 

15. How ^Ardshir heard about the Worm and made 

Shift to slay it . . . . . .239 

16. How Ardshir slew Haftwad .... 244 



THE SAsANIAN dynasty 
Ardshir Papakan — 

SECT. 

1. How Ardshir Papakan sat upon the Throne in 

fJaghdad ....... 258 

2. The Case of Ardshir and the Daughter of Ardawan 259 

3. How Shapiir was born to Ardshir by the Daughter 

of Ardawin, and how after seven Years Ard- 
shir heard of his Son and acknowledged him. 261 

4. How Ardshir, to find out the Future of his Reign, 

sent to Kaid of Hind, and Raid's Reply . . 266 

5. The Adventure of Shapur with the Daughter of 

Mihrak, and his taking her to Wife . . 268 

6. How Urmuzd was born to Shdpiir by the Daughter 

of Mihrak ....... 271 

7. Of the Wisdom of Ardshir and his Method of 

administering the Realm . . . .273 

8. How Kharrad praised Ardshir . . . .284 

9. On the Faithlessness of Fortune. . . . 285 

10. How Ardshir charged Shapur and died. . • 286 

1 1. Thanksgiving to the Maker and Praise of Mahmiid, 

the great King . . . . . .291 

Shapur, Son of AuDSufR — - 

1. How Shapur sat upon the Throne and delivered 

a Charge to the Chieftains .... 295 

2. How Shapur fought with the Riimans, how Baz- 

dnush, their General, was taken Priscncr, and 
how Cajsar made Peace with Shdpiir . . 296 

3. How Shapur seated I'rmuzd upon tlieThrone and 

died . . . . . . . . 299 

Vol. IX L 



1 62 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Urmuzd, Son of Shapur — Vol. VI 

SECT. TACJE 

1. How Urmuzd addressed the Assembly. . • 302 

2. How Urmuzd gave up the Throne to Bahram, 

charged him, and died . . . . . 303 

Baiiram, Son of Urmuzd — 

I. How Bahram succeeded to the Throne, charged 

the Nobles, and died ..... 307 

BahrAm, Son of Bahram —  

I. How Bahram, Son of Bahram, ascended the 

Throne, charged the Nobles, and died . .311 

Bahram Bahramiyan — 

I. How Bahram Bahramiyan succeded to the Throne 

and died four Months aftfr . . . -313 

NARsf, Son of Bahram — 

I. How Narsf succeeded to the Throne, counselled his 

Son, and died . . . . . '315 

Urmuzd, Son of Narsi —  

I. How Urmuzd, Son of Narsi, ascended the Throne, 

and how his Life ended . . . .31(8 

Shapur, Son of Urmuzd, surnamed Zu'l AktAf — 

1. How Shapur, Son of Urmuzd, was born forty dnys 

after his Father's Death, and how he was 
crowned . . . . . . .328 

2. How Tair, the Arab, carried of? the Daughter of 

Narsi and married her, how Shapur went to 
Yaman to fight him, and how his Daughter 
fell in Love with Shapur .... 330 

3. How Tair was bemused by his Daughter and how 

she came to Shapur, who took the Hold and 
slew Tair ....... 333 

4. How Shapur went disguised as a Mci chant to Riim, 

how he was taken by Caesar, and how Caesar 
ravaged the Land of fran .... 335 

5. How the Damsel took Measures to free Shapur, ard 

how he Red with her from Rum . . . 339 

6. How the High Priest and the Captain of the Ho=t, 

hearing of Shapi'jr's Arrival, went to him 
with the Troops ...... 345 

7. How Shapur made a Night-attack, and how Ca?sar 

was taken ....... 346 

8. How Shai)ur went to Riim and foiight willi Yanus, 

Caesar's Brother . . . . . '351 

9. How the Rumans placed Bazanush upon the 

Throne of Cajsar ; his Letter to Shapur and 

the Answer. ...... 3p3 



GENERAL TABLE 01- CONTENTS 163 

Shapur, Son of Urmuzd, {continued) — Vol. VI 

SECT. PAGE 

10. How BazAniish went to Shapur and* made a Treaty 

cf Peace ....... 335 

11. How JMani, the Painter, came to Shapur with Pre- 

tence of being a Prophet, and was sld in . . 358 

12. How Shapur made his Brother Ardshir Regent till 

his own Son should grow up, and how his Days 
ended ....... 360 

Ardshir, Brother of Shapur — 

I. How Ardshir sat upon the Throne and gave a 

Charge to the Officers ..... 363 

Shapur, Son of ShapiJr — 

I. How Shapur, Son of Shapur, sat upon the Tlirone 

and gave a Charge to the Officers . . . 365 

Bah RAM, Son of Shapur — 

I. How Bahram sat upon the Throne and gave a 

Charge to the Officers ..... 368 

Yazdagird, Son of ShapiJr — 

1. Hov/ Yazdagird sat upon tlie Throne and gave a 

Charge to the Officers ..... 374 

2. How Bahram Gur, Son of Yazdagird, was born and 

sent to be brought up by Munzir, the Aiab . 375 

3. How Bahram went to the Chase svith a Damsel and 

how he displayed his Accomplishment . . 382 

4. How Bahram showed his Accomplishment in the 

Chase before Munzir ..... 384 

5. How Bahram came with Nu'man to Yazdagird . 386 

6. How Yazdagird put liahram in Bonds, how he 

escaped by the good Offices of Tainiish, and 
how he returned to Munzir .... 389 

7. How Yazdagird, by the Advice of an Archmage, 

went to the Spring of Sav and was killed by 

a Water-horse . . . . . . 30i 

8. How the Iranians took Counsel and placed Khus- 

rau upon the Throne ..... 394 

9. How Baliram Gi'ir heard of the Death of his I-'ather 

and invaded fran ..... 395 

10. Tfow the Iranians heard of Bahram's Pillaging 

and wrote to Munzir, and how he replied . 397 

11. How Bahram Gur arrived at Jahram with the Host 

of Munzir, and how the Iranians went out to 
 him ........ 400 

12. How Bahram Gur harangued the frdnians as to his 

Fitness to rule, how they rejected him but 
promised him the Kingship if he would take 
the Crown from between the Lions . .402 



iG.j GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Yazdagird, Son of Shapur {continued) — Vol. VI 

SECT. PACiE 

13. How Bahram and Khusrau went to the Waste, and 
how Bahram slew the Lions and took his Seat 
upon the Throne ..... 409 
Index . . . , 413 

VOLUME VII 

PAGE 

Prefatory Note ........ v 

Abbreviations. ........ xvi 

Note on Pronunciation ....... xviii 

THE SAsANIAN dynasty {continued) 

BahrAm Gur — 
sect. 

1. How Bahram ascended the Throne, charged the 

Officers, and wrote Letters to all the Chiefs . 7 

2. How Bahram pardoned the Fault of the Iranians, 

farewelled Munzir and Nu'man, and remitted 

the Iranians' Arrears of Taxes ... 9 

3. How Bahram went to the House of Lambak, the 

Water-carrier, and became his Guest . . 12 

4. How Bahram went to the House of Baraham, the 

Jew, who treated him scurvily . . .16 

5. How Bahram bestowed the Wealth of Baraham 

upon Lambak . . . . . .19 

6. How Bahram slew Lions and forbade Wine- 

drinking ....... 21 

7. The Story of the young Shoemaker and how 

Bahram allowed Wine again . ... 24 

8. How Riizbih, Bahram's High Priest, ruined a 

Village by a Stratagem and restored it . . 26 

9- How Bahram married a Country Miller's Daughters 31 

10. How Bahram found the Treasures of Jamshid and 

bestowed them upon the Poor ... 34 

1 1. How Bahram, returning from Hunting, went to the 

House of a Merchant and departed displeased . 39 

12. How Bahram slew a Dragon and went to a Yokel's 

House ....... 42 

13. How Bahram went to the Chase and espoused the 

Daughters of the Thane Barzin ... 48 

14. How Bahram slew Lions, went to the House of a 

Jeweller, and married his Daughter. . . 55 

15. How Bahram went to the Chase and passed the 

Night in the House of Farshidward . . 67 

16. How a Bramble-grubber revealed the Case of 

Farshflward, and how Bahram bestowed 
that Householder's Wealth upon the Poor . 70 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 165 

JjAiiUAM GuR {continued) — - Vol. VII 

SECT. rAi;K 

17. How IJaliiain went to the Chase ami slow Lions . 74 

18. How Jialire'im went to hunt the Onager, showed 

liis Skill before the Princes, and retuined to 
Baghdad and Istakhr ..... So 

19. How the Khan of Chin led forth a Host to war 

with Bahrain, and how the frdnians asked 
Quarter of the Kh4n and submitted to him . 84 

20. How Bahram attacked the Host of the Khan and 

took him ....... 89 

21. How Bahrain took a Pledge from the Tur;mians, 

how he set up a Pillar to delimit the Realm, 

and placed Shahra upon the Throne of Turan. 90 

22. How Bahram wrote to announce his Victory to his 

Brother Narsi and returned to Iran . . 92 

23. How Bahram wrote a Letter of Directions to his 

Officials ....... 96 

24. How Bahram called before him the Envoy of Cajsar, 

and how the Envoy questioned and answered 

the Archmages . . . . . .101 

25. How Bahram dismissed Caesar's Envoy and 

charged his own Officials . . . .106 

26. How Bahram went with his own Letter to Shangul 

King of Hind . . . . . .109 

27. How Shangul received the Letter from Bahram 

and made Reply . . . . .114 

28. How Shangul prepared a Feast for Bahram, and 

how Bahram displayed his Prowess . . 116 

29. How Shangul suspected Bahram and kept him from 

Iran . . . . . . . .118 

30. How Bahram fought with the Wolf at the Bidding 

of Shangul and slew it . . . . .121 

31. How Bahram slew a Dragon . . . .124 

32. How Shangul became troubled about Bahram and 

gave a Daughter to him . . . .126 

33. How Faghfiir of Chin wrote to Bahram and how 

he replied . . . . . . .129 

34. How Bahram fled from Hindustan to fran with the 

Daughter of Shangul ..... 131 

35. How Shangul followed Bahram, learned who he 

was, and was reconciled to him . . • I35 

36. How Shangul went back to Hind and Bahram to 

Iran 137 

37. How Shangul with seven Kings visited Bahram . 140 

38. How Shangul returned to Hindustan, and how 

Bahram remitted the Property-tax to the 
Land-owners . . . . . .144 

39. How Bahrim summoned Gipsies from Hindustan . 14S 

40. How the Time of Bahrim came to an End . . 150 



i66 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Yazuagird, Son of Bahram Gur — \'oL. VII 

SKCT. I'AGK 

I. How "\'azdagir<l sat upon the Throne and exhorted 

the Captains of the Host . . . • 1 54 

HURMUZ — - 

I. How Hurmuz, Son of Yazdagird, ascended the 

Throne . . . . . . .157 

PiRiiz — 

1. Flow Piriiz sat upon the Throne and made an 

Oration . . . . . . .161 

2. How Piriiz built the Cities of Piruz-Ram and 

Badan-Piruz, and how he went to war with 
Turan 163 

3. The Letter of Khu.shnawaz to I'lriiz . . .165 

4. How Piriiz fought with Khiishnawaz and was 

slain . . . . . . . .167 

Balash — 

1. How Balash ascended the Throne and harangued 

the Iranians . . . . . .171 

2. How Siifarai had Tidings of the Slaying of Piriiz, 

how he wrote a Letter to Khiishnawaz, and 
how Khiishnawaz replied . . . .173 

3. How Siifarai fought with Khiishnawaz, and how 

Kubad was released from his I jondage . .176 

KuBAD, Son of Piruz — • 

1. How Kubad sat upon the Throne and made an 

Oration to the franians . . . . 18S 

2. How Siifarai went to Shiraz, how the Iranians 

slandered him to Kubad, and how Kubad slew 
him 190 

3. How the Iranians put Kubad in Bonds and com- 

mitted him to Rizmihr, the Son of Siifarai, 
and how Jamasp, the Brother of Kubad, was 
set upon the Throne . . . . -195 

4. How Kubad escaped from Ward with Rizmihr, 

how he wedded the Daughter of a Thane, and 
how he took Refuge with the Haitalians . 197 

5. How Kubad returned from Haitdl to Iran, how 

he had Tidings of the Birth of his Son, Niishir- 
wan, and reascended the Throne . . .199 

6. The Story of Kubdd and Mazdak, and how Kubad 

adopted the h'aith of Mazdak . . . 201 

7. How Nushirwan rejected the Faith of Mazdak and 

slew him and his Followers .... 205 

8. How Kubad nominated Kisri as Successor; 

and how the Great gave him the name of 
Niishfrwan ...... 209 



GENERAL TAI^LE OF CONTENTS 167 

Ni^sHfRwAN — Vol. VII 

TAKr I. Nushirwan's Administration of the 
Realm, his Wars with Frontier-Tribes 
and with kum, and the revolt of 

NUSHZAD 

8KCT. PAOE^ 

1. The Prelude 220 

2. How Nushirwdn ascended the Thruiie and made 

an Oration to the Iranians . . . .221 

3. How Nushirwdn divided his Realm into four 

Parts and wrote a Decree to his Officers on 

the Administration of Justice . . .224 

4. How Nushirwan required Babak to muster the 

Host 230 

5. How Niishi'rwan harangued the franians, and how 

the Kings acknowledged his Supremacy. . 234 

6. How Nushirwan went round his Empire and built 

a Wall in the Pass between Iran and Turin . 236 

7. How Nushirwan chastised the Alans anil the Men 

of Baliich and Gilan ..... 239 

8. How Munzir, the Arab, came to Nushirwan for 

Succour against the Injustice of Caesar . . 244 

g. The Letter of Shah Nushirwan to Caesar of Rum . 247 

10. How the Letter of Nushirwan reached Caesar and 

how he replied ...... 248 

11. How Nushirwan went to war with Caesar . . 249 

12. How Nushirwan took divers Strongholds in his 

March to Rum . . . • . • -54 

13. The Battle of Nushirwan with Farfuriyus, the 

Leader of Caesar's Host, the Victory of Nushir- 
wan, and his Capture of Kaliniyiis and Anta- 
kiya ........ 255 

14. How Nushirwan built the City of Zib-i-Khusrau in 

the Likeness of Antakiya and settled the 
Riiman Captives therein . . . . 259 

15. How Caesar wrote to Nushirwan and sent Tribute . 261 

16. The Birth of Nushzid, the Son of Nushir\van, by a 

Woman who was a Christian . . .263 

17. The Sickness of Nushirwan and the Sedition of 

Nushzad 265 

iS. The Letter of Nushirwan to Ram Barzin, the 

Warden of the March of Mada'in, respecting 

the Taking of Nushzad .... 2G7 

19. How Ram Barzin fought with NushzAd, and how 

Nushzad was slain . . . . .272 



Part 1 1. The Story of Buzurjmihr and the 
Seven T3anquets of NusniRWAN — 
I. How Nushirwan had a Dream and how Buzurjmihr 

interpreted it . . . . • . 2S1 



i68 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

NuSufRWAN 

Part II. The Story of Buzurjmihr, etc. (continued) — Vol. VII 

SKCT. I'.VOK 

2. The fir.-;t Banquet of Niishirwan to the Sages, and 

the Counsels of Buzurjmihr .... 287 

3. The second Banquet of Niishirwan to Buzurjmihr 

and the Archimages . . . . .290 

4. The third Banquet of Niishirwan to Biizurjmiiir 

and the Archimages ... . . . 296 

5. The fourth Banquet of Niishirwan to Buzurjmihr 

and the Arcliimages . . . . . 30 1 

6. The fifth Banquet of Niishirwan to Buzurjmihr 

and the Archimages ..... 304 

7. The sixth Banquet of Niishirwan to Buzurjmihr 

and the Archimages ..... 307 

8. The seventh Banquet of Niishirwan to Biizurjmihr 

and the Archimages . . . . .312 

Part III. The Story of Mahbud and other 
Matters — 

SECT. 

1. The Story of Mahbiid, the Wazir of Niishirwan, 

and how Mahbiid and his Sons were slain by 

the Sorcery of Ziiran and a Jew . . -318 

2. How the Sorcery of Ziiran and the Jew in the 

Matter of Mahbud was discovered, and how 
both were slain by Command of Niishirwan . 323 

3. In Praise of the Wisdom of Niishirwan, and how 

he built the City of Siirsan . . . .326 

4. The Story of the War of the Khan with Ghatkar, 

the Prince of the Haitalians, the Defeat of 
Ghitkar, and how they set Faghanish upon 
the Throne ...... 328 

5. How Niishirwan had Tidings of the Battle of the 

Khan with the Haitalians and how he led a 
Host against the Khan .... 333 

6. How the Khan had Tidings of the Coming of the 

Host of Niishirwan to Gurgan and wrote a 
Letter in the Cause of Peace .... 337 

7. How Niishirwan answered the Letter of the Khan 342 

8. How the Khan bethought himself and wrote offer- 

ing his Daughter in Marriage to Niishirwan . 345 

9. How Niishirwdn answered the Letter, and sent 

Mihran Sitad to see and fetch the Daughter 

of the Khan ...... 349 

10. How the Kh4n sent his Daughter, escorted by 

Mihran, with a Letter and Treasures to 
NiishirwAn ...... 354 

11. How the Kh4n witlidrew, and how Niishirwcin 

marched from tiurgan to Taisafiin . . 358 

12. Discourse on the Justice of Niishirwan and how 

Mortals had Peace under his Usages . . 364 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 169 

NusIlfRWAN 

Part 111. The Story or MAiiisun, clc. {continued)-- Vol. VII 

si;cT. ,. i--\t-i'^ 

13. How Buzurjinihr counselled Nuslnrwan uiul dis- 
coursed on good Deeds and \Vords. . . 3O6 

Part IV. The Introduction of the Game of Chess 
INTO Iran. The Legend of the Inven- 
tion OF the Game. The Discovery of 
the Hook of Kalii.a and Dimna 

1. How the Kaja of Hind sent the Game of Chess to 

Nushirwin ...... 3^^4 

2. How Buzurjmihr invented Nard, and how Niishir- 

wan sent it with a Letter to the Raja of Hind . 389 

3. The Story of Gav and Talhand, and the Invention 

of Chess 394 

4. How Niishirwan sent Barzwi, the Leech, to Hin- 

dustan to fetch a wondrous Drug, and how 
Barzwi brought back the Book of Kalila and 
Dimna ....... 423 

Index ,......••• 433 

VOL. VIII 

page 

Abbreviations ........ xv 

Note on Pronunciation ...... xvi 

THE S.isANIAN DYNASTY (continued) 
Ni!fshir\v.4n (continued) — 
Part V. The Fall and Restoration to Favour of 

Buzurjmihr, and the Wisdom of Nush- 

Irwan — 
sect. 

1. How Nushirsvan was wroth with Buzurjmihr and 

ordered him to be put in Ward ... 4 

2. How the Ambassador of Caesar came to Niishirwan 

with a locked Casket and how Biizurjmihr 

was set at large to declare its Contents . . 8 

3. Discourse on the Responses of Niishirwan . . 14 

4. Niishirwan's Letter of Counsel to his Son Hurmuzd 25 

5. How an Archmage questioned Niishirwan and how 

he made Answer ...... 28 

Part VI. The Shah's last Years — 

1. How Niishirwan made ready to war against 

Caesar ....... 43 

2. How Niishirwin took the Stronghold of Sakila 

and how a Shoemaker had Dealings with him . 46 

3. How the Envoys of C;csar came to Niishirwan 

witli Apologies and Presents. . . .51 

A. How Niishirwan chose Hurmuzd as his Successor. 54 



lyo GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Nlisiiirwan — 

Part VI. Tiik S iah's Last Years {conti)nied) — Vol. VIII 

SECT. I-AGE 

5. How the Archimages qiicstioned Hunmizd and 

how he repHed ...... 57 

6. How Nushirwan appointed llurmuzd as his Suc- 

cessor and gave him parting Counsels . . 61 

7. How Nushirwan had a Dream and how Buzurjmihr 

interpreted it as signifying the Appearance of 
Muhammad ...... 66 

HuRMUZD, Son of Nijfshirwan — 

1. The Prelude ....... 77 

2. How Hurmuzd ascended the Throne and harangued 

the Chiefs ....... 78 

3. How Hurmuzd slew fzid Gashasp, Zarduhsht, 

Simah Barzfn, and Bahram Azarniihan, his 
Father's Ministers . . . . .81 

4. How Hurmuzd turned from Tyranny to Justice . 90 

5. How Hosts gathered from all Sides against Hur- 

muzd, and how he took Counsel with his 
Wazirs . . . . . . .92 

6. How Hurmuzd heard of Bahram Chiibina and 

sent for him ...... 96 

7. How Bahram Chubi'na came to Hurmuzd and was 

made Captain of the Host .... 100 

8. How Bahram Chubina went with twelve thousand 

Cavaliers to fight King Sawa . . .106 

9. How King Sawa sent a Message to Bahram 

Chubina and his Answer . . . .113 

10. How King Sawa and Bahram Chubina set the 

Battle in Array against each other. . . 115 

1 1 . How King Sawa sent another Message to Bahram 

Chubina and his Answer . . . .117 

12. How Bahram Chubina had a Dream in the Night, 

how he gave Battle the next Morning, and 
how King Sawa was slain . . . .121 

13. How Bahram Chubina sent a Letter announcing his 

Victory, and the Head of King Sawa, to Hur- 
muzd, and his Answer . . . . .129 

14. How Bahram Chubina fought with Parmuda. Son 

of King Sawa, and overcame him, and how 
Parmuda took Refuge in the Hold of Awaza . 134 

15. How Bahram Chubina sent a Message to Parmuda 

and how Parmuda asked Quarter . . . 138 

16. How Bahram Clu'ibina asked of Hurmuzd a War- 

rant to spare the Life of Parmuda and the 
Answer . . . . . . .141 

17. How Hurmuzd's Letter, granting Quarter to Par- 

muda, reached Bahram Chubina, and how 
Bahram Chubina was wroth with Parmuda . 143 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 171 

HuRMUZD, Son of NusnfRWAN {conliniied) — Vol. VIII 

SKi-T. '"Ati '•: 

18. How Parmrida came before llurmuzii with llie 

Treasures sent by Hiihraiii Clii'il)ina . . 1 49 

19. How Iliinmizd hoard of tlie Ill-doing of Hahrani 

Chubina and made a Compact with the Khan 151 

20. How Hnrmuzd wrote a chiding Letter to Bahram 

Chubi'na and sent him a Distaff-case, Cotton, 

and Women's Raiment . . . -153 

21. How^ Bahram Chubina ]nit on the Woman's Dress 

and showed himself therein to the Chiefs of the 
Host 134 

22. How Bahram Chubina went to hunt and saw a 

Lady who foretold the Future to him . .156 

23. How Bahram Chubina assumed the royal Style 

and how Kharrad, Son of Barzin, and the 
Archscribc fled . . . . . • 15'*^ 

24. How Hnrmuzd received News of ]5ahram Chi'i- 

bina's Doings, and how Bahram Chubina sent a 
Frail of Swords to Hurmuzd . . . .160 

25. How Bahram Chubina made known to the Chiefs 

his Designs upon the Throne, and how his 
Sister Gurdya advised him . . . .163 

26. Bahram Chiibina's Letter to the Khan and how he 

coined Money ^vith the name of Khusrau 
Parwiz and sent it to Hurmuzd . . .172 

27. How Bahram Chubina wrote to Hurmuzd and how 

Khusrau Parwiz fled from his Father . -173 

28. How Hurmuzd sent Ayin Gashasp with an Army 

to fight Bahram Chubina and how he was slain 

by his Comrade . . . . .177 

29. How Hurmuzd grieved, refused Audience to the 

Iranians, and was blinded by Bandwi and 
Gustaham . . . . . • .182 

Parwiz heard of the Blinding of 

• . . • .184 

. • . .196 

Parwiz sat upon the Throne and 
made an Oration . . . . . -197 

3. How Khusrau Parwiz visited his Father and asked 
Forgiveness . . . . • .198 

4. How Bahram Chubina heard of the 1 Minding of 
Shah Hurmuzd and how he led his Troops 
against Khusrau Parwiz .... 200 

5. >Iow Khusrau Parwiz and Bahram Chubina met 
and parleyed ....•• 204 

6. How Bahram Chubina and Khusrau Parwiz 
returned, how Ciurdya advised Bahram Chu- 
bina, and how Khusrau Parwiz told his Pur- 
pose to the Iranians . . . • .220 





30. 


, How Khusrau 
Hurmuzd 


Kh 


USRAU 


Parwiz — 




I. 


, The Prelude 




2. 


. How Khusrau 



172 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

KiiusRAU Parwiz {coiilinited) — Vol. VIII 

SECT. _ I'AGE 

7. How Bahrain ChubiiKt attacked the Army of 

Khusrau Parwiz by Night and how Khusrau 
Parwiz fled . . . . . .226 

8. How Khusrau Parwiz went to his Sire and fled to 

Riim, and how Hurmuzd was slain . . 230 

9. How Bahram Chubina sent Troops after Khusrau 

Parwiz and how Bandwi contrived to rescue 

him from tlicir Hands. . . . .233 

10. How Balrram, the Son of Siyawush, took Bandwi 

and carried him to Bahram Chubina . . 237 

11. How Bahram Chubina summoned the Magnates of 

fran, how they discussed his Pretensions to 
the Kingdom, and liow he acceded to the 
Tlirone ....... 239 

12. How Bandwi plotted with Bahram, the Son of Siya- 

wush, to slay Bahram Chubina, and how 
Bandwi fled from Bond .... 245 

13. How Khusrau Parwiz went toward Riim by the 

Desert-route and how a Hermit told him of 

the Past and Future ..... 249 

14. How a Cavalier of Caesar came to Khusrau Parwiz 

and how he sent an Answer by Gustaham, 
Balwi, Andiyan, Kharrad, Son of Barzin, and 
Shapur to Csesar. ..... 257 

15. How Caviar answered the Letter of Kliusrau Parwiz 2G0 

16. How Caesar wrote to Khusrau Parwiz, declining to 

help him, and his Answer . . . .261 

17. How Caesar wrote the second Time to Khusrau 

Parwiz about giving him Aid . . . 264 

18. How Khusrau Parwiz answered Caesar about the 

Alliance ....... 269 

19. How Cresar made a Talisman and deceived the 

Envoys of Khusrau Parwiz, and how Kharrad, 

Son of Barzin, solved the Mystery . . . 271 

20. How Kharrad, Son of Barzin, expounded the 

Faith of the Indians and exhorted Caesar . 275 

21. How Caesar sent a Host and his Daughter to Khus- 

rau Parwiz. . . . . . .278 

22. How Khusrau Parwiz led his Host to Azar Abada- 

gan and how Bandwi met him on the Way . 281 

23. How Bahram Chubina had Tidings of the Coming 

of Khusrau Parwiz and wrote a Letter to the 
Chiefs of fran, and how the Letter fell into the 
Hands of Khusrau I'arwiz and his Answer . 284 

24. How Khusrau Parwiz fought with Bahram Chu- 

bina and how Kut, the l^unian, was slain . 288 

25. How Khusrau I'arwiz fought with I'ahram Chu- 

bina the second Time, was defeated, and 
escaped from him by the Help of Surush . . 292 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 173 

Khusrau Parw/z [continued) — Vol. VIII 

8KCT. I'ACK 

26. How Khusrau Parwi'z fought the third Time with 

Bahram Chubina and defeated him . . 300 

27. I low Khusrau Parwiz sent an Army under Nastuh 

after Baliram Chi'ibina, and how Bahram 
Chubina captured liim and reached the Khan 
of Chin . 303 

28. How Khusrau Prrwiz pillaged the Camp of Bah- 

ram Chubina and wrote a Letter to Ca>sar who 
answered it with a Robe of Honour and Gifts 306 

29. How Niyatus was wroth with Bandwi and how 

Maryam made Peace between them . . 309 

30. How Khusrau Parwiz gave Presents to Niyatus 

and the Rumans, how he dismissed them to 
Riim, and wrote Patents for the Nobles of Iran 312 

31. Firdausi's Lament for the Death of his Son . • 3'5 

32. The Story of Bahram Chubina and the Khan of 

Cliiu i^d 

33. How Makatiira was slain by Bahram Chubina . 320 

34. How the Lion-ape slew a Daughter of the Khan, 

how it was slain by Bahram Chubina, and how 
the Khan gave him a Daughter and the King- 
dom of Chin . . . . . • 3-- 

35. How Khusrau Parwiz heard of the Case of Bahram 

Chubina and wrote a Letter to the Khan, and 
how he replied . . . • • -3-7 

36. How Khusrau Parwiz sent Kharrad, Son of Barzin, 

to the Khan and how he schemed to slay Bah- 
ram Chubina . . . . • '331 

37. How Bahram Chubina was slain by Kuliin as 

Kharrad, Son of Barzin, had planned . . 336 

38. Plow the Khan had Tidings of Bahram Chiibina's 

Death and how he destroyed the House and 
Family of Kuliin . . . . • 343 

39. How Khusrau Parwiz had Tidings of the Slaying of 

Bahram Chubina and honoured Kharrad, Son 

of Barzin . . . . .  ■3-15 

40. How the Khan sent his Brother to Gurdya, the 

Sister of Bahram Chiibina, with a Letter 
touching her Brother's Death and asking her 
in iMarriago as his (,_)ueen, and her Answer . 346 

41. How Gurdya consulted her Nobles and fled from 

Marv 349 

42. How the Khan received Tidings of the Flight of 

(hirdya and how he sent Tuwurg with an Army 
after her, and how Gurdya slew Tuwurg. . 351 

43. How Gurdya wrote to Gurdwi . . . . 354 

44. How Khusrau Parwiz slew Bandwi . . . 354 

45. How Gustaham rebelled against Khusrau Parwiz 

and took Gurdya to Wife .... 355 



174 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

KnusRAU Parwiz [continued) — • Vol. VIII 

SECT. rA(iE 

46. How Khusrau Parwiz took Counsel with Gurdwi 

concerning Gustaliani and how Gurdya, 
prompted by Gurdwi, slew him . . . 358 

47. How Gurdya wrote to Khusrau Parwiz and how 

he summoned and married her . , .361 

48. How Gurdya showed her Accomplishment before 

Khusrau Parwiz . . . . . -303 

49. How Khusrau Parwiz sent an ill-disposed March- 

lord to Rai and how he oppressed the Folk 
there ....... 365 

50. How Gurdya made Sport before Khusrau I'arwiz 

and how he gave Rai to her .... 367 

51. How Khusrau Parwiz portioned out his Realm . 368 

52. How Shirwi, the Son of Khusrau Parwiz, was born 

of Maryam with bad Auspices and how Khus- 
rau Parwiz informed Ca*sar . . . •371 

53. How Caesar wrote a Letter to Khusrau Parwiz, 

sent Gifts, and asked for the Cross of Christ . 374 

54. How Khusrau Parwiz answered Caesar's Letter and 

sent Gifts ....... 379 

The Story of Khusrau Parwiz and Shirin — 

55. The Prelude .... ... 382 

56. How Khusrau Parwiz loved Shirin, how they 

parted, how he met her again while hunting 
and sent her to his Bower . . . '383 

57. liow the Nobles heard that Shirin had come to the 

Bower of I\husrau Parwiz and how they 
advised him and were satisfied with his Answer 3 86 

58. How Shirin murdered Maryam and Khusrau Par- 

wiz put Shirwi in Bonds .... 3S9 

59. How Khusrau Parwiz made the Throne of Takdis 391 

60. The Story of Sarkash and Barbad, the Minstrel, 

and K^husrau Parwiz ..... 396 

61. How Khusrau Parwiz built the Palace of Mada'in 400 

62. Discourse on the Splendour and Cjreatness of 

Khusrau Parwiz. ..... 405 

63. How Khusrau Parwiz turned from Justice, how 

the Chiefs revolted, and how Guraz calletl 

in Caosar ....... 407 

64. How Caesar withdrew through an Expedient of 

Khusrau Parwiz antl how the Chiefs released 
Shirwi from J5onds ..... 409 

65. How Khusrau I'arwiz was taken and how Shirwi 

sent him to Taisafun . . . . .418 

Index 423 



GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 175 

vol,. IX 



rAGE 
V 

xi 



29 



Prefatory Note ....... 

Abbreviations. ....... 

Note on Pronunciation ....... xii 

THE SASAXIAN DYNASTY (concluded) 
Kub.4d (commonly called Shi'rwi) — 

SECT. 

1. How Sliirvvi ascended the Throne, announced his 

Will, and sent Chiefs to his Father with Counsel 

and Excuses ...... 8 

2. How Khusrau Parwi'z answered Shirwi . . 15 

3. How Shirwi grieved for Khusrau Parwi'z and how 

the Chiefs were displeased thereat . . 27 

4. How Barbad lamented Khusrau Parw'iz, cut off 

his ow-n Fingers, and burned his Instruments 
of Music ....... 

5. How the Chiefs demanded from Shirwi the Death 

of Khusrau Parwi'z and how he was slain by 
Mihr Hurmuzd ...... 32 

6. How Shirwi asked Shi'n'n in ^Marriage, how Shirin 

killed herself, and how Shirwi was slain . 3G 

Ardshir, Son of Shirwi — 

1. How Ardshir, Son of Shirwi, ascended the Throne 

and harangued the Chiefs .... 44 

2. How Guraz was displeased at Ardshir being Shah 

and how he caused Ardshir to be slain by Piruz 

Son of Khusrau ...... 45 

Guraz also called FAR.\YiN — 

I. How Guraz, (also called Farayin,) received News 
of the Slaying of Ardshir, hastened to irkn, took 
Possession of tlic Throne, and was killed by 
Shahranguraz . . . . . .51 

PUR.^NDUKnr — 

I. How Piirandukht ascended the Thrf>iie and slew 
Piruz, Son of Ivhusrau, and how her own Life 
ended ....... 56 

AzAR.MnUKHT — 

I. How Azarmdukht ascended the Throne and how 

she died ....... 59 

Farrukhz.\d — 

I. How Frrrukhzad ascended the Throne and how 

liQ was slain by a Slave , . . , 6j 



176 GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Yazdagird — Vol. IX 

SKCT. I'ACiE 

1. How Yazdagird ascended the Throne and ad- 

dressed the Chiefs ..... 70 

2. How Sa'ad, Son of Wakkas, invaded fran, how 

Yazdagird sent Rustam to oppose him, and 
how Rustam wrote a Letter to his Brother . 72 

3. How Rustam wrote to Sa'ad, Son of Wakkas, and 

how he replied . . . . . .78 

4. How Rustam fought with Sa'ad, Son of Wakkas, 

and was slain ...... 83 

5. How Yazdagird consulted with the Iranians and 

went to Khurasan ..... 85 

6. How Yazdagird wrote to Mahwi of Sur . . 89 

7. How Yazdagird wrote to the Marchlords of Tus . 90 

8. How Yazdagird went to Tus and how Mahwf of 

Siir met him ....... 95 

>• g. How Mahwi of Sur incited Bizhan to war with 
Yazdagird and how Yazdagird fled and hid 
himself in a Mill ...... 96 

10. How Mahwi of Siir sent the Miller to kill Yazdagird, 

and how the Archi mages counselled Mahwi to 
forbear ....... loi 

11. How Yazdagird was slain by Khusrau, the Miller 107 

12. How Mahwi of Siir was informed of the Obsequies 

of Yazdagird and ascended the Throne. . 112 

13. How Bizhan, hearing of the Slaying of Yazdagird 

and of Mahwi of Siir's Accession to the Throne, 

led forth the Host to fight with him . . 115 

14. How Mahwi of Siir was taken and slain by Order 

of Bizhan . . . . . . .118 

—■ — 15. Account of the Completion of the Shahnama . 121 



CORRECnONS AND ADDITIONS 

VOLUME I. 

Page xii, line 21, for ' Evil ' read ' evil.' 

Page xiii, line 15, for ' Born ' read ' born.' 

Page 4, line 4, delete ' still.' 

Page 5, line 2z, after ' camel ' add ' of which the red-haired variety 

was most esteemed.' 
Page 6, line 21, for ' Scythian ' read ' Elamitic' 
Page 7, line 19, for ' was ' read ' became,' line 25 and elsewhere, for 

' Trit4 ' and ' Traitana ' read ' Trita ' and ' Traitana,' 
Page 9, line 16 and elsewhere, /jr ' Azarbijan ' read ' Azarbaijan.' 
Page 10, bottom. The date of the fall of Nineveh has lately been 

assigned to the year b.c. 612. Seo ' The Fall of Nineveh,' 

p. 9 seq. By C. J. Gadd. 
reference namber 2, after R insert P. 
Page 1 1, line 29 and elsewhere, for ' Hira and Aiibar ' read ' Hira and 

Ambar.' 
Page 13, reference number 2, for ' NESH ' read ' NSEH.' 
Page 14, line 25, for ' Samanides ' read ' Samanids.' 
Page 17, delete lines 7-10. 

reference number i, add ' See too A. V. Williams Jackson,' 

' From Constantinople to the Home of Omar Khayyam,' 

Ch. V.' 
Page 19, line 19, for ' Sacaestan ' read ' Sacaestan.' 

reference number 3, delete ' iii.' 
Page 21, line 7 and elsewhere, for ' Nuh ' read ' Nuh.' 

line 12, for ' appealed ' read ' turned.' 
Page 29, line 12 from bottom, r/ LEC, pp. 206, 207 and note. 
Page 31, delete lines 13-16, and read ' that Fazl, son of Ahmad, is 

referred to on both occasions.' 
Page 33, line 23, delete full stop, insert comma, and for' Such is not ' 

read ' not be in.' 
Page 34, five lines from bottom, delete ' While I sat looking on ' and 

read ' While I o'erlooked from far.' 
Page 37, line 22, for ' Ariidi read ' 'Ariidi.' 
Page 38, seven lines from bottom, for ' Bazh ' read ' Bdzh.' 

six lines from bottom, after ' city ' add reference number i. 
at bottom add note ' » The quarter in which Bizh was situated 

was known as Tabaran.' 
Page 39, bottom, reference number i, delete ' §1 and 7 ' and read' The 

too spiritual conception of the Deity in §1 and the refer- 
ences to 'All in §7.' 

VOL. I.\ ij-j M 



1 78 CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 

Page 41, last line, for ' axe ' read ' ax.' 

Page 43, note 2, for ' fakka ' read ' fakka,' and for ' Cf.' read ' Of.' 

Page 45, line 24, after ' indigo ' add reference number 2. 

line five from bottom, after ' Cemetery ' add reference number 3. 
at bottom add ' « Cf. End. Brit, (nth ed.), Vol. 11, p. 917, 

col. 2. 
' Professor A. V. Williams Jackson's suggestion that, as 
burial in the Muhammadan cemetery was refused, the 
corpse of Firdausi was reconveyed within the walls and 
buried in ground belonging to him, seems far f.om im- 
probable. From Constantinople to the Tomb of Omar 
Khayyam, p. 291. 
Page 50, line 7, for ' Ahriman ' read ' Ahriman.' 
Page 51, line 23, add reference number i. 

bottom, add ' ' Thus Piran (see p. 55) may represent Perun, 
the Slavonic god of thunder.' 
Page 61, line 3, delete ' which ' and to end of sentence, and insert ' i.e. 

of Azargashasp.' 
Page 62, bottom, after reference number 7 insert DZA, i, 209. 
Page 67, line 18, end, add 'bin.' 
Page 68, line 9, end add ' or identical with.' 

bottom, reference number i, add NIN, 15. 
Page 69, bottom, for ' 108 ' read ' 107.' 
Page 71, line 19, after ' Oxus ' insert ' Caspian.' 

line 20, after ' Dardanelles ' insert ' Mediterranean.' 
bottom, reference number 6, after ' 80 ' add ' notes.' 
Page 73, line 8 from bottom, for ' land ' read ' earth.' 

,,7 ,, after ' Shahs ' add reference number i. 

,,5 ,, after ' canal ' add reference number 2. 

bottom, add ' » Kai Kubad. See Vol. ii, p. 22. ' Id. 192.' 
Page 74, line 8, after ' tree ' add reference number i. 

bottom, add ' > Cercis Siliquastum.' 
Page 77, line 11, for ' the first half ' read ' three-fifths.' 

line 8 from bottom, after ' repetitions ' add reference 

number i. 
bottom, add ' ' These of course do not include the great 
duplications of tradition in the poem.' 
Page 82, line 11, for ' regarded ' read ' looked upon.' 
line 25, after ' farr ' add reference number 2. 
bottom, add ' ' pp. 369, 370.' 
Page 83, line 18, before ' miibidan ' insert — 

line 25, after ' subject ' add reference number 2. 
bottom, add ' * The expression is used, however, of Bahram 
Gur (Vol. vii, p. 78) and of Nushirwan (viii, p. 14). 
It is also applied to non-franians, to Suhrab, who was 
opposing the Iranians (ii 145), Pirdn (ii, 261, 275, 324, 
iii, 106), Pilsam (ii, 3.52), Tazh^v, an Iranian deserter 
(iii, 28), Bazaniish (vi, 297), ami tiicre are other 
instances.' 
Page 84, line 3, for ' ca.mp enclosure ' read ' camp-enclosure.' 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 179 

Page 85, line 20, for ' end ' read ' beginning.' 

Page 87, bottom, add ' Rogers, The Shah-namah of Fardusi. Trans- 
lated from the original Persian. 1909. (A version 
partly in verse and partly in epitomized prose ) 
Page 88, lines 11 and 17, for ' Ardibihisht ' read ' .\rdihihisht.' 
line 12 and bottom, for ' Sharivar ' read ' Shahrivar.' 
lines 12 and 26, for ' Farvardin ' read ' Farvvardin.' 
line 17 and page 89, line 3, for ' Adar ' read ' Azar.' 
Page 89, line 4, for ' Din ' read ' Dai.' 

Page 90, line 9, for ' 3 generations ' read ' 4 generations' ' and aid at 
bottom,' ' See Vol. v. p. 203.' 
for' Barmaiun. Kataiun.' reai ' Purmaya. Kaianush.' 
15 add as son to Minuchihr • Zarasp.' 
17, add as son to Tits ' Zarasp.' 
Page 92, line 5 add as descendant from Tiir ' Mali AfnM, d.' 
line 10, add as descendant of Wisa ' Kurukhan.' 
line II, for ' Piran ' read ' Piran = Gulshahr.' 
line 15, to descendants of Afrdsiydb add ' Manizha, d.= 
Bizhan ' 

and delete ' Ruin.' 
line i-j, for ' Kurakhan ' read ' Kurakhan.' 
Page 93, lines 20 and 22, transpose ' EP ' and ' EHI.' 
Page 94, delete lines 4-5. 

bottom, add ' ZT. Chronique de Abou-Djafar-Mo'ham- 
med-Ben-Djarir-Ben-Yezid Tabari. Traduitc sur la 
version Persane d'Abou-'Ali Mo'hammed Bol'ami par 
M. Hermann Zotenberg.' 
Page 100, line 4, for ' Shaddad son of Ad ' read ' Shaddad son of 'Ad.' 
Page 100, Line 7, for ' Shaddad ' read ' Shaddad.' 
Page 100, line 10, for ' Nasiru'd ' read ' Nasiru'd.' 
Page 104, after line 4 insert —  

' Thus is it now : what the world's end will be 
None knoweth openly or privily.' 
Page loC), line 12, for ' The ' read ' In,' 
Page 108, Line 15, for ' with ' read ' to.' 
Page 112, line 2, for 'The' read ■/«.' 

8 from bottom, for ' light ' read ' blaze.' 
Page 113, line 7 and elsewhere, for ' Ind ' read ' Llind.' 

line 19, end, add full stop. 
Page 117, line 2, Delete 'FOR.' 
Page 1 18, line 4, for ' mountain of the holy ' read ' Mountain of the 

Lioly.' 
Page 120, line i, for ' Slain ' read ' slain ' and delete ' the Hand of.' 
Page 121, line 5, for 'Fight' read 'fight.' 
Page 126, line 5, add ' This is the first of many douLilets in the poem.' 

line 16, for ' gold ' read ' good.' 
Page 129, line 6 from bottom, for ' o ' read ' of.' 



i8o CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 

Page 130, line 11, after ' gallery ' insert . . . 

line 23, for ' have ' read ' find,' and add to reference 4 
• WPT. i. 142. ' 
Page 131, line 15, for ' They ' read ' they.' 
Page 132, line 11, add full stop at end. 
Page 135, line 3, for ' departed from ' read ' abandoned.' 

line II from bottom, end, delete comma and insert full stop. 
Page 138, line 8 from bottom, delete ' thou my ' and read ' any.' 
Page 141, line 4 from bottom, for ' light ' read ' Grace.' 
Page 142, line 5 from bottom, for ' downstricken ' read ' down- 
stricken.' 
line 4 from bottom,/?)' ' Aspikan ' read ' Aspikan.' 
Page 143, line 7, for ' i ' read '2.' 
15, for ' 2 ' read ' 3.' 
20, for ' Baghdad ' read ' Baghdad.' 
25, after ' Ispahan ' add reference number 4. 
31, for reference number 3 read 5. 
33> foy reference number 4 read 6. 
bottom, after reference 3 insert ' * ZT, i, 117,' and for 
reference numbers 4 and 5 read 5 and 6. 
Page 145, line 25, for ' Evil ' read ' evil.' 
Page 147, line 7, for ' Kurds ' read ' Kurds.' 
Page 161, line 6, for ' Bait al ' read ' Baitu'l.' 

Page 171, line 2, for ' HIS REIGN WAS ' read ' HE REIGNED.' 
Page 173, line 31, for ' glory ' read ' Glory.' 
Page 174, after line 21 add '§24. We have here another doul)lct, 

Cf. p. 290.' 
Page 175, line 13, for ' He,' read ' Be.' 
Page 181, line 13, delete ' never ' and insert it after ' children.' 

2 from bottom, end, insert comma. 
Page 184, line 18, for ' except ' read ' unless.' 
Page 189, line 4 from bottom, for ' Envious ' read ' envious.' 
Page 199, line 7 from bottom, for ' Slain ' read ' slain.' 
Page 201, note, line 4, for ' Namah ' read ' Namah.' 
Page 205, line 9, for ' Born ' read ' born.' 
Page 207, line 13, for ' Chach ' read ' Chach.' 
Page 208, line 12, for 'wagons did they fill' read 'wains they 

filled.' 
Page 2oy, line ig, for ' no longer harbouroth ' read ' hath ceased 
to harbour.' 
line 20, for ' evident ' read ' plain.' 
Page 211, delete line 2 and read 'With treasure nnd brocade, 

dinars and gems.' 
Page 212, line 21, for ' All ' read ' all.' 

line 7 from bottom, for ' torquoise ' read ' turquoise.' 
Page 219, I'ue 5 from bottom, for ' a ' read ' the ' and after ' ball ' 
add reference number i. 
bottom, insert ' » See p. 79.' 
Page 221, line iS, f>>r • .Announce ' re id • announce.' 
line 7, from bottom, for ' he ' read ' He.' 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS i8i 

Page 2Z\, line 1 1. nf/er ' me ' insiyt ' stcay.' 

Page 2J.|, linr i j, for ' Stoj) to draw hrcalli ' read ' To brcatlic' 

2 2, for ' nioralisinp; ' rtuid ' ni'imlliiif^." 
Page jj(>, li:u" 4. dc'L'/e ' of our." 
Page 227, line J I, for " Slain ' ri atl ' slam ' and drlclc ' llie Hand 

of.' 

Page 228. line g, for ' produce of it ' read ' fruit thereof.' 

Page 230, line 9, for ' our avenging ' read ' vengeful.' 

Page 236, after line 7 insert ' §18. Cf. previous reign, §24.' 
line 8, beginning, insert ' §29.' 

5 from bottom, beginning, insert ' §31.' 

Page 237, bottom, note i, add ' But cf. Vol. v. p. 30.' 

Page 250, side reference, prefix ' V.' 

Page 252, line 15, for ' Danbar ' read ' Dambar.' 

Page 256, line 4, for ' Dunbar ' read ' Dambar.' 

Page 275, line 3 from bottom, for ' Explain ' read ' explain.' 

Page 2S0, line 9, and elsewhere, for ' Almighty ' read ' almighty ' 
when not absolute. 

Page 284, line i, for ' Aivare ' read ' aware.' 

Page 292, line 20, for ' War against ' read 'fight.' 

Page 293, end of note, add ' 309.' 

Page 299, line 6 from bottom, for ' Wroth ' read ' wroth.' 

Page 307, line 7 from bottom, add reference number i after ' lasso.' 

Page 325, line 11, for ' Sam ' read ' Zal.' 

P'T-ge 337. li"« 2, delete ' FOR.' 

Page 338, line 6, for ' Yast ' read ' Yasht,' and at bottom, note i, 
after i insert ' Cf. p. 59.' 

From 342, line 3 from bottom, for ' Knowhow ' read ' Know 
how.' 

Page 347, line 10, for ' lowered ' read ' loured.' 

P^o<^ 351. side reference, insert 2. 

4 lines from bottom, insert comma after ' throb.' 

Page 352, line 4, delete semicolon. 

Page 354, line 21, for ' Guzhdaham ' read ' Gazhdaham.' 

Page 355, line 4 from bottom, delete comma at end. 

Page 358, line 6 and elsewhere, for ' Hirmund ' read ' Ilirniund.' 

Page 366, line 12, delete 'not.' 

Page 373, line 2, for ' HIS REIGN WAS ' read ' HE REIGNED.' 

Page 378, line 7, for ' lance ' read ' spear.' 

Page 380, line 6 from bottom, after ' harm ' add reference number i, 
and at bottom add ' ' Cf. BLHP, i, 452. Jackson, 
" From Constantinople to the Tomb of Omar 
Khayyam," p. 119.' 

Page 3S1, line 4 from bottom, for ' plants ' read ' plans.' 

VOLUMIC II. 

Page V, line 13, end, add — 

Page ix, line 25, delete ' Kai.' 

Page 3, line, 12, for' Katiuim ' read ' Kaldvun.' 



i82 CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 

Page 3, li:ie 15, to children of Gushtasp add Farshidward, Shfn'i, 

and thirty-seven others (un-named), for ' l^>ishu- 

tan ' read ' Kishutan aud for ' Afrid ' read ' Afri'd. 

bottom, after (20) insert =d. of Kaid. 

Page 5, line 20, after ' d'Or,' add full stop, and for ' tcxte ' read 

' Texte.' 
Page 6, heading, for ' NOTE ON PRONUNCIATION ' read 

• ABBREVIATIONS.' 
Page 18, hne 4, for ' Kharzarwan ' read ' Khazarwan.' 
Page ig, line 18, for ' Turkestan ' read ' Turkistan.' 
Page 27, line i, delete full stop at end. 

line 4 from bottom. ' There is actually a tribe existing to 
this day among the Elburz Mountains, or the 
fastnesses of ancient Hyrcania, which still bears 
the name Div Sapeed.' S. G. W. Benjamin, 
Persia and the Persians, p. 302. 
Page 29, note i, add ' Vol. v, p. 116.' 
Page 61, line 9, for ' bears ' read ' bear.' 
Page 69 line 20 add semicolon at end. 

Page 81, line 3 from bottom, after ' crystal ' insert reference number 9 
and at bottom add ' Ru'ns near Aivani-Kaif fKai?) 
some forty miles South-east of Tihran are still 
traditionally ascribed to Kai Kaus. See A. V. 
Williams Jackson. From Constantinople to the 
Home of Omar Khayyam, p. 123.' 
Page 89, line 25, end, insert comma. 

26 after ' Kaus ' insert comma. 
Page 96, line 6 from bottom, after ' Zawara ' add reference miniher i 
and at bottom add ' 'This is the first mention of 
Rustam's brother.' 
Page 97, line 5, for • a Zam of ' read • Zam's stream with.' 

bottom, delete ' The name of a river ' and read ' i.e. tlie 
Oxus.' 
Page 103, line 12, for 'What ever' read ' Whr.lev cr.' 
Page 118, bottom, for ' i, p. 236 ' read ' v, p. 30.' 
Page 119, bottom, ajter ' V ' insert full stop. 

Page 121, line 21, after ' him ' insert reference number i, and at 
bottom add ' ' C. adds rightly : — 

They led him hcrdwards 
That they might have their portion from that steed ; 
As I have heard, he covered forty mares 
And one became with foal. 

Cf. p. 128 and NIN, p. 45 note i.' 
Page 157, line 7, for ' spoken ' read ' unspoken.' 
Page 196, line 16, for ' heart and eyes ' read ' Heart and Eyes.' 
Page 200, line 11, for ' she ' read ' She.' 
Page 221, line 13, for ' unled ' read ' unsoiled.' 
Page 224, end of last line, insert reference number i and add at 

bottom ' » See pp. 38 seq., 88 seq.' 
Page 225, ]in(^ 12, for ' All-righteous ' read ' all-righteous.' 
Page 229, line 16, for ' Who ' read ' who.' and clscivhcre. 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 183 

Page z.\-j, line 5 and elsewhere, for ' Almiglity ' read ' almighty ' 

ivhcn not absolute. 
Page 252, Une 4, for ' iny ' read ' iiiiiu.' 

Page 256, hne G from bottom, for ' caparisoncil ' read ' bctrapped.' 
Piigc 257, hue 2 from bottom, delete full stop niid insert comma at 

end. 
Page 261, hne 21 and elsewhere, for ' Holy ' read ' holy ' juJicn not 

absolute. 
Page 265, line 18, delete comma at end. 
Page 2S1, line 11, for 'Iran ' read ' Ti'uan.' 
Page 2S5, line i, for ' dressed ' read ' drest.' 
Page 306, line 14, end, insert semicolon. 

Page 310, line 4 from bottom, for ' All-holy ' read ' all-holy.' 
Page 312, line 4 from bottom, after ' league ' insert comma. 
Page 313, line 5 from bottom, end, Jwser/ comma. 

4 from bottom after ' hearing ' insert comma. 
Page 321, line i, end, add reference number 1. 

12, end, add reference number 2. 
bottom, insert ' > See p. 261. « See p. 293.' 
Page 328, line 11, for ' Kalur ' read ' Kalii.' 

5 from bottom, for ' blunt ' read ' pointless.' 

4 from bottom, for ' would go ' read ' hunted,' and 

insert full stop at end. 
3 from bottom, delete ' To hunt,' and for ' at ' read 
• At.' 
Page 341, line 8 from hottom, for ' Kawa ' read ' Kawa.' 
Page 374, line 6 from bottom, end, insert reference number t. 

bottom, insert ' 'See p. 312.' 
Page 377, line 22, insert reference number 1. 

bottom, insert ' » See p. 273.' 
Page 384, line 7 from bottom, delete comma and insert full stop at 

end. 
Page 390, bottom, delete " and insert ' ". 
Page 395, line 3, end, insert reference number i. 

bottom, insert ' See p. 363.' 
Page 412, last line, for ' toward ' read ' tow'rd.' 

VOLUME III. 

Page 3, line 24, end, rt(fi' Kisari Mohan Ganguli and i)ublislied by.' 
Page 14, line 30, end, add reference number 5 a}id ' The text also 

allows the view that Fariid dwelt on Mount 

Sapad. See Vol. v, p. 30.' 
Page 15, Note i, end, add ' There was no difficulty in finding an 

additional rhyme without using ' Pashan.' 

' Gashan ' (much) rhymes with ' Pashan ' in 

Vol. v)ii, p. 397 and note. 
Page 20, Une 22, end, add reference number i, and at bottom 

• ' Cf. Vol. I, p. 61.' 
Page 36, line 8, for ' Tis ' read ' 'Tis.' 
Page 45, line 2^, for ' that ' read ' thou.' 



1 84 CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 

Page 59, line 17 and elsewhere, for 'Almighty' read 'almighty' 

when not absolute. 
Page 68, line 18, for ' stoncand ' read 'stone and.' 
Page 83, note 2, end, add ' (j). 10).' 
Page 84, line 7 from bottom and elsewhere, for ' All-holy ' read 

' all-holy ' when not absolute. 
Page 102, line 22 for ' Omnijiotent ' read ' omnipotent.' 
Page iro, Une 2 and elsewhere, for ' Who ' read ' who.' 

6, for ' Whom ' read ' whom.' 
Page 130, Hne 11, add comma, at end. 
Page 134, line 6, end, add ! 

line 15, end, add ". 
Page 141, line 2 from bottom and elsewhere, for ' Holy ' read ' holy ' 

when not absolute. 
Page 148, note, for ' Pehlcvan ' read ' Pehlewan ' and after ' donna ' 

delete comma 
Page 151, line 4 from bottom, add full stop at end. 
Page 172, note, for ' Car ' read ' car.' 
Page 191, line 12, for ' Abul ' read ' 'Abu'l.' 
Page 194, line 8, for ' Khan ' read ' Khan.' 
Page 213, line 22, for ' Oleader ' read ' O leader.' 
Page 234, note, for ' Et ' read ' et ' and for ' comblan ' read ' com- 

blani.' 
Page 237, line 7, prefix ". 
Page 241, line 22, delete ' far.' 
Page 251, note, for ' Sur ' read 'sur.' 
Page 275, line 10, end, delete ! 
Page 285, line 8 from bottom, for ' fraicheur ' read ' fraicheur.' 

last line, add reference number 2. 
Page 287, side reference, for ' V. 1063 ' read ' V. 1065 ' and subse- 
quent side references consecutively, i.e., ' V. 1066,' 

' V. 1067,' etc., up to page 305. 
Page 294, line 7, for ' buffalos ' read ' buffaloes.' 
Page 298, note, for ' La ' read ' la.' 
Page 304, line 11, delete semicolon and insert comma. 
Page 305, line 25, add side reference ' V. 1086,' and read subsequent 

side references consecutively, i.e., ' V. 1087.' 

' V. 1088,' etc., up to page 356. 
Page 318, note, for ' II ' read ' il.' 
Page 328, line 12, end, insert semicolon. 
Page 348, line 15, add comma at end. 



VOLUME IV. 

Page V, line 5, end, delete iuU stop and insert — 
Page ix, line 10, for ' wrath ' read ' Wrath.' 
Page 8, line 10, end, add ' See Vol. vii, pp. 381, 422.' 
Page 31, line 6, delete comma and insert semicolon. 
Page 40, line 9, end, add reference number i. and insert at bottom 
' • Cf. Vol. i, p. 386 and note.' 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 185 

Page 85, note, prefix reference uuntjjcr i. 

Page 139, note 2. add ' It is interestinj,' to find the dog appearing 
in tlu' Hock of Tohit in which there are frunian 
elements. Cf. Vol. iii, p. 271 and End. Brit. 
T I th \'a\. s.v. ToLit.' 

Page 141, line 9, end, delete 

Page 143, line 6, from bottom, insert comma at end. 
Page 144, line S, delete comma and insert semicolon. 
Page 150, line 8, for ' butfalos ' read ' buffaloes.' 

§3. There appears to be a doublet here as Afrasiyab is 
first said to be beyond Jaz and then at Tiaigand, 
i.e., in the neighbourhood first of the Jaxartes and 
then of the Oxus, but the context favours the 
latter position. 
Page 155, line 10, delete and insert ' He ranged the army's centre 

and its wings.' 
Page 256, line i, delete and insert ' All lillcd with minstrelsy and 
harp and wine.' 
bottom, delete comma and insert semicolon. 
Page 259, line 7 from bottom, delete ' Barda', a cavern ' and insert 

' to Barda', one ' 
Page 262, note 2, Add ' The situation of Barda' would, however, 
make Lake Gokcha more appropriate. Cf. 
P- ^59-' 
Page 304, line 14, end, delete comma and insert .semicolon. 
Page 324, line 12 from bottom, for 'shore' read ' river",' and at 

bottom add note ' » The Euphrates.' 
Page 3-5. li"e 8 after ' city ' add reference number i and at 
bottom add 7iote ' ' Shiirab. Cf. Vol. vii, p. 

254-, 
^3.ge 339, line i, for ' sea ' read ' river.' 

Page 340, line 3, for ' sea ' read ' stream.' 

Page 344, line 16, for ' sea ' read ' .stream.' 

25. for ' sea ' read ' river.' 

28, for ' sea ' read ' stream.' 

31, for ' sea ' read ' stream.' 
Page 346, line iS, end, add reference number i, and at bottom add 
note ' » Cf. Vol. v, p. 233 note.' 



VOLUME V. 

Page 14, line 2 from bottom, end, add reference number 11, and at 
bottom '"Spitama seems to mean 'White.' 
See JZ, p. 13.' 

Page 30, line 19, for ' Girdkuh ' read ' Girdkiih.' 

line 24, add ' It has been stated by an oriental authority 
that Dizh Gumbadan (' the Domed Fort ') and 
Girdkuh were identical. See LEG, p. 365.' 

Page 71, line 13, for ' his ' read ' a.' 



l85 CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 

Pdge 71, lino 17, end, add reference number i and at Ix.ttom ' ' In 
Firdaiisi Ni'ish Azar is tlic son of Asfandiyar, 
but in D^ikiki may of course be a brother and 
the one referred to above.' 

Page 126, Unc 4, end, add reference number i and al bolloni ' ' Cf. 
p. 233 note.' 

Page 133, Hne 21, for ' wisdon ' read 'wisdom.' 

Page 160, line 23, end, add quotation mark.' 

Page 161, last line, end, insert full stop. 

Page 214, line 14, end, add quotation marl..' 

Page 277, line 8, insert full .stop. 

6 from bottom, end, insert semicolon. 

Page 288, note i, add • Cf. E.P. i, 256.' 

VOLUME VI. 

Page vi, line 3, for ' Married ' read ' married.' 

Page ix, line 14, for ' Rumans ' read ' Riimans.' 

Page 3, line 8 from bottom, delete ' Rustam.' 

7 from bottom, for ' Chubina ' read ' Cliubina.' 
4 from bottom, for ' Shirwi ' read ' Shirwi ' 

Page 6, line 21, for ' Muller ' read ' Miiller.' 

Page 15, line 10, for ' legend ' read ' Legend.' 
note 3, add ' Cf. Vol. vii, p. 79.' 

Page 17, line i, for ' Mukaffa ' read ' Mukaffa' ' 

Page 39, line 6 from bottom, end, delete ? and iv.sert ! 

Page 64, bne 8, for ' Ravi ' read ' Ravi.' 

Page 81, line 2, end, insert hyphen. 

Page 89, line 5, for 'Married' read 'married.' 

Page 98, line 14, end, insert comma. 

Page 133, line 4, end, insert semicolon. 

Page 135, line 12 from bottom, read • He must not jirixily devise.' 
10 from bottom, for ' wise ' read ' sage.' 

Page 136, line 4, end, insert ! 

Page 137, line 7, end, insert comma. 

Page .150, bottom line, end, insert comma. 

Page 154, line 13 from bottom, end, insert full stop. 

Page 161, line 20, end, insert reference number i. 

bottom, insert note ' ^ Cf. Vol. i, pp. 118, 132.' 

Page 207, line 7, after ' above ' insert ' (p. 195)-' 

Page 209, line 10, end, insert reference numbey 1, and at bottom add note 
' ' Mohl, rightly according to Ncildeke (NIN, p. 26 
and wo/e), reads 'S4m4nians' for 'Ashk^nians.' The 
former claimed descent from Bo.hram Chubina.' 

Page 210, line 13 from bottom, end, delete comma. 

Page 212, note, add ' Cf. p. 201.' 

Page 231, line 4 from bottom, end, insert comma. 

Page 250, line 9 from bottom, for ' Chubina ' read ' Clu'ihina.' 

Page 288, line 9, beginning, delete ". 

Page 291, line 10 from licttom, after ' Oh ' insert ! 

Page 292, line i, end, insert comma. 



I'agc 


2<)6, 


Page 


i.)S, 


Page 


3"4. 


Page 


31-:. 


Page 


316, 


Page 


3-!3. 


Page 


3^7. 


Page 


330, 


Page 


37-:. 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 187 

line f) from bottom, for ' Runidns ' read ' linnunis.' 
line 13 from bottom, fuf ' J'ars ' read ' Pars.' 
bottom line, end, insert C(jmma. 

line 3, for ' respect ' nad ' respccteth ' and for ' thou 
art '  thou'rt.' 
316, second note, prefix z. 

note, line 5 from bottom, end, insert comma. 

line 7, for ' Ambar ' read ' Ambar.' 

line 8, for '■ 'Abbasid ' read ' 'Abbasid.' 

note, for ' Shammas ' read ' Shammas.' 

line 2 from bottom, for ' the spring of ' read ' a lake 

near.' 
bottom line, after ' birth-place ' add, reference number 8, 
and at bottom add note ' ' The lake in question 
being the source of two rivers the expression 
' Spring ' used by Firdausi in connexion with 
it is not wholly inappropriate.' 
Page 376, line 7 from bottom, for ' great ' read ' Great.' 
Page 387, line 12 from bottom, prefix ". 
Page 402, line i, end, insert comma. 



VOLUME VII. 



Page vii, line 4, for ' SASANIAN ' read ' SAsANIAN.' 
Page xi, line 13 from bottom, for ' Feasts ' read ' Banquets.' 
Page 85, line 16 from bottom insert comma at end. 

3 from bottom, /or ' Kharzarwan 'read' Khazarwan.' 
Page 95 , line 18 end delete comma and insert semicolon. 
Page 106, line 15, after ' scabbards ' insert comma. 
Page no, line 15, for ' an as ' read ' as an.' 
Page 118, line 11 from bottom, for ' Irdn ' read ' Iran.' 
Page 155, line 9 ivomhottom, delete s,cm\co\on and insert amMW^.. 
Page 156, line 6, after ' Hormisdas ' delete comma and insert ' III. 
Page 184, note, line 14 from bottom, ajter ' bunch ' delete . and 

insert ? 
Page 185, bottom note, prefix 4. 

Page 207, heading, for ' KUBAD ' read ' KUBy^D.' 
Page 209, line 2, after ' belcw ' insert reference number i, and at 
bottom add ' ' Cf. MHP, ii, 77, RH, Bk. iii, 
ch. 33 and note.' 
line 3 from bottom, end, delete i and insert 2, and before 
note delete i and insert 2. 
Page 217, line 4 from bottom. Sura appears to be identical with 
Thapsacus of which Tiphsah (i Kings, iv. 24) 
meaning probably ford ' seems to have been 
the Hebrew form. The army of Cyrus the 
Younger in his expedition against his brother 
Artaxerxes II. (Mnemon) crossed the river there 
on foot. Xenophon, Anabasis, I, i\', 17. 



1 88 CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 

Page 227, line 5 from bottom, after '_ crown ' insert comma. 

Page 231, bottom Hue, delete full stop and insert comma. 

Page 239 and 247, heading, read ' NOSHfRWAN.' 

Page 251, line 13 from bottom, for ' Garshasp ' read ' Gashasp.' 

Page 263, line 6 from bottom, delete comma and insert semicolon. 

Page 275, bottom line, end, insert comma. 

Page 300, line 11, insert comma after ' For ' and ' know.' 

Page 331, line 4, delete ' the ' arid insert ' from.' 

Page 348, line 20, for ' Sahh ' read ' Shah.' 

Page 369, line 18, for ' frowning face ' read ' looks afrown.' 

Page 395, line 10, for ' was ' read ' were.' 

1 1, for ' were ' read ' was.' 

Page 400, line i, for ' crown ' read ' treasure.' 

2, for ' treasure, for ' read ' crown because.' 

Page 41C, bottom line, for 'Almighty' read 'almighty.' 

VOLUME VIII 

Page V, line 17, for ' answer ' read ' Answer ' 

Page viii, line 13 from bottom, add ' to Caesar.' 

Page XV, line 20, for ' PCHAP ' read ' HAP.' 

Page 72, line 21, for ' Khan's read ' Khan's.' 

Page 91, note, for ' Parwiz read ' Parwiz.' 

Page 122, line 14, delete first hyphen. 

Page 138, line 19, delete id. 

Page 143, line 10, insert comma after ' Letter ' and ' Parmiida.' 

Page 147, line 11, for 'great' read ' Great.' 

Page 153, line 18, delete iuU stop and insert coTama.. 

Page i8g, line 16, for ' Zab ' read ' Zab.' 

Page 190, line 16, for ' Garabzin,' ' Galabzin ' read ' Garabzi'n ' 

' Galabzin ' 
Page 191, line 12, according to Muir's ' The Life of Mohammad,' 

edited by T. H.Weir (1923), p. 431 note, the 

battle of Dhu Kar was fought A.D. 611. 
Page 192, note, for ' PCHAP ' read ' HAP.' 
Page 205, line 6 from bottom, after ' take ' insert reference number i 

and at bottom add ' » See Vol. 5, p. 156 note.' 
Page 225, justify hne 25. 

Page 265, line 22, delete full stop and insert comma. 
Page 270, line 5, for ' Luhrasp ' read ' Luhrasp.' 

line 6, for ' Asfanfiyar ' read ' Asfandiyar.' 
Page 272, line i, insert comma after ' one.' 
Page 279, line 4 from bottom, for ' and readers of the stars ' read 

' with the astrologers.' 
Page 285, line 5, for ' great ' read ' Great.' 
Page 287, line 20, for ' achieved ' read ' accomplished.' 
Page 313, line 21, end, delete full stop and insert comma. 
Page 317, line 2 from bottom, delete comma. 
Page 327, line 13, for ' brave ' read ' Brave.' 
Page 328, bottom, for ' in haste ' read ' with speed.' 
Page 343, bottom, for ' gory ' read ' glory.' 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS 189 

l''i6^ 34^' ^'""^ ^ iTom bottom, for ' in a letter to the king.' 

read ' to the monaich in a k'tt( r.' 
Page 353. line 5. for ' If read ' It ' 
Page 362, line 1 1 from bottom, delete hyphen. 
Page 374, line 8, for ' Ot ' read ' Of.' 
Page 411, line 8, J^r ' the ' read ' thy.' 
Page 421, line 12 from bottom, for ' Gah'nus ' read ' Galinusli.' 



GENERAL INDEX 

This Index and t/ic General Table of Contents in this volume are 
complementary. References to the latter are in Italics. 



Aaishma Dakva, demon, iii., 272 
= Asmodeus probably, iii, 
272 
Aban, genius, iii, 287, 328 
'Abbas, Arab chief, attacks Hur- 

muzd, viii, 93 
'Abbasid, 'Abbasids, Muhamma- 
dan dynasty, vi, 327 
rise of, i, 13 
fall of. i, 14 
Abbreviations, General List of, 

ix, 135 
Abdaas, bishop, vi, 372 
Abraham, patriarch, vi, 65 
Abtin (Aptya, Athwya), mythi- 
cal Iranian hero, husband 
of Faranak and father of 
Fan'dun, ix, 53, 103 
legend of, i, 145 
Zahhak slays, i, 151, 153 
Faridun avenges, i, 170 
mythological origin of, i, 
171, 172, 174 
Abii-'Ali Muhammad, Persian 
poet, Shahncima of, i, 69 
Abu Bakr, the first Khalifa 
(A.D. 632-4), i, 12, ix, 76 
begins war with Persian 
Empire, ix, 66 

Abu Dulaf, friend of Firdausi, i, 

35 
assists Firdausi, i, 35 

reciter of the Shahnama, 
i- 3^ 



Abii'l 'Abbds Fazl bin Ahmad, 
minister of Mahmiid and 
perhaps a patron of Fir- 
dausi, i, 30, 100, iv, 141 
account of, i, 36 
disgrace of, may have af- 
fected Firdausi, i, 37 
Abu'l Fazl, minister under the 
Samanids, father of Abu 
'AH al Bal'ami who trans- 
lated Tabari, vii. 430 
patron of Riidagf, vii, 3S3 
Abii'l Kasim (Firdausi, q.v.), i, 
24. 38, 99, 112, iv, 140, 
v, 89, 119, vi, 20, 207, 
viii, 28 
Abii'l Kasim of Gurgan, shaikh, 
iii, 191 
dream of, about Firdausi, iii, 

191 
Abii' Muzaffar. See Nasr. 
Abu Mansiir bin Abdu'r Razzak, 
prince of Tiis, i, 67 seq., 
vi, 16 
Shahnama of, vi, 16 

probably compiled by 
Magi for, i, 69, viii, 71, 

73 
importance of, for Fir- 
dausi, viii, 73. 
Abii Mansur bin Muhammad, son 
of above (?), ijg 
patron of Firdausi, i, 29, no 
murdered, i, 29, in 
praise of, i, 1 10 
advice of, to Firdausi, i, 
1 1 1 



191 



192 



GENERAL INDEX 



Abu Raihan Muhammad. See 

Albfnim'. 
Abu Talib, uncle of Muhammad, 

i, 12 
Abi'i 'Ubaida, Arab general, ix, 66 
supersedes Khalid in Syria, 

ix. 66 
Abu 'Ubaida, Arab general, ix, 

67 
made commander in Persian 

campaign, ix, 67 
slain, ix, 67 
Accession of a Shah, ceremony 

at, vi, 409 
Achaemenid, Achaemenids, the, 

first historical Persian 

dynasty, i, 64, v, 10, 2S1, 

vi, 194, 197, 198 
Achshunvvar. See Akhshunwar. 
'Ad, father of Shaddad, q.v. 

Arab tribe, viii, 276 
'Adan, seaport and territory in 

southern Arabia, vi, 386 
Adar. See Azar. 
Adarbad, son of Mahraspand, 

Zoroastrian Saint, v, 16 

note 
ordeal of, v, 16 note 
Aden. See 'Adan. 
Adonis, iv, 315 
Aegean sea, vi, 204 
Afrdsiyab, son of Pashang, ruler 

of Turan and one of the 

arch-enemies of Iran, 142- 

^53, i. 42, 55. 72. ii, II, 13. 
14, 16 seq., 20, 79, 81, 
g8 seq., 118, 127, 149, 184, 
189, 242 seq., 257 seq., 283, 
286, 288, 322 seq., 335, 347 
.<eq., 360 seq.. 369, 373, 
380, 381, 386, 392 seq., 
401 sej.,iii, 8, 12,13,15,23, 
26, 27, 29, 40. 42, 47. 73. 
76 seq., 100, 108, 123, 134, 
136, 143, 146, 1.52, 153, 
164, 165, 176, 183, 185, 
T93, 200 seq., 207 seq., 211, 
213, 218, 223, 228, 241, 
260 seq., 268, 271, 277 
seq., 285, 29.5, 298, 300, 
320, 333, 337, 339, 3A(> 



Afr4.siyab — cant. 

seq., iv. 7, 8, 17, 19 seq., 

25. 29, 4^^. 5(>. 5^ seq., 65, 
66, 70, 75, seq., 83, 89, 93, 
94, 96, 103, 108, no, 113, 
117, 128, 129, 145, 146, 
150 seq., 192 seq., 235, 252, 
253. 273, 287, 289, 294 V. 
12, 13, 21, 44, 62, 176, 
203, 208, vi, 15, 79, 177, 
240 and note, vii, 330, 
335. 337. 359. viii, 2.42, 
30". 349, ix, 25, 103 

one of the Zoroastrian triad 
of evil, i, 59 and note 

mythological origin of, i, 

337 

first mention of, in Shah- 
nama, i, 342 
advocates war with Nau- 
dar, i, 343 

bidden by Pashang to in- 
vade Iran, i, 343 

sends Shamasas and Khaz- 
arwan to invade Sistan, i, 

345 
marches to Dahistan, i, 346 
writes to Pashang, i, 346 
encourages Barman to chal- 
lenge the Iranians to 
single comibat, i, 347 
rewards Barman, i,3.|H 
fights with Naudar, i, 348 

and seq. 
encounters Karan, i. 350 
victorious, i, 350, 352 
beleaguers Naudar in Dah- 
istan, i, 353 
sends Kuri'ikhan to attack 

Pans, i, 353 
takes Naudar and other 

chiefs prisoners, i, 355 
hears of the death of BAr- 
man and bids Wisa pur- 
sue K4ran, i, 356 
hears of the Turkman de- 
feats, i, 362 
sends for, and slays, Naudar, 

i, 362 
spares the other captives at 
Ighrfras' request, i, 363 



GHM-RAL IXDILX 



103 



Afrasiyab, imprisons the cap- 
tives at San, i, 363 
advances to Rai, i, 3(^3 
wroth ,vith, and slays, Igh- 

rfras, i, 367 
fights v.-ith Zk\, i. 36S 
Pashang's vrath with, i, 

374 ^ 
invades Irdn, i, 374 seq., 

381 
sends Kuli'in to intercept 

Kustam, i, 382 
fights with Arabs for irkn 

and takes it, ii, 92 
king of Tiiran and Chin, ii, 

99 

expelled from fran by Kai 
Kaus and Rustam, ii, loi ^ 

fights with the Seven j 
Warriors, ii., iii seq. | 

nearly taken prisoner by 
Rustam, ii, 14, 116, 354, 
iii, 242, 250 and note 

plot of, against Suhrab and 
Rustam, ii, 129 

gifts of, to Suhrab, ii, 130 

identical with Astyages in 
legend, ii, 191 

referred to, ii, 522, 347, 394, 
iii, 206, iv, 145, 130, 194 

invades fran, ii, 224 seq. 

dream of, ii, 232, 243, 297, 
iv, 170, 267 

determines to sue for peace 
and sends hostages, ii, 
235 seq. 

receives Zanga and consults 
Piran, ii, 253 seq. 

sends Pi'ran to welcome 
Siyawush, ii, 258 

plays at polo with Siya- 
wush, ii, 264 

marries Farangis to Siya- 
wush, ii, 275 

recalls Siyaw-ush, from 
Gang-dizh, ii, 285 

sends Garsiwaz to Siya- 
wushgird, ii, 289 

deceived by Garsiwaz res- 
pecting Siyawush, ii, 296 
seq. 

VOL. IX. 



AfrdsiyAb, sends Garsiwaz to 
summon Siyawush and 
Farangi's to court, ii, 300 
seq. 

attacks, takes, and has 
Siyawush executed, ii, 314 
seq. 

appealed to by Farangis, ii, 

317 
ill-treatment of Farangis by, 

ii, 320, 322 

referred to, iv, 204 
appeal of Pirdn to, ii, 324 

referred to, iv, 205 
spares Farangis, ii, 325, and 

her son Kai Khusrau, ii, 

3^7 

interview of, with Kai Khus- 
rau, ii, 332 
referred to, iv, 205 

sends Surkha against the 
franians, ii, 344 
marches to avenge Sur- 
kha, ii, 348 

fights with Tiis, ii, 353 

rescue of, from Rustam by 
Human, ii, 354 

crosses the sea of Chin, ii, 
356 

consults Piran about Kai 
Khusrau, ii, 336 

returns, ii, 362 

vengeance of, on fran, ii, 

3 ^'3 
pursues Kai Khusrau, ii, 

388 seq. 
disgraces Piran, ii, 390 
turns back at the Jihi'in, ii, 

394 
Kai Kluisrau's oath to take 

vengeance on, iii., 21 
hears of the approach of 

the Iranian host, iii, 

71 
bids Piran gather troops, 

iii, 71, 79 
numbers the host, iii, 79 
loss of kindred of, in battle, 

iii, 94 
rewards Pirdn, iii, 106 
reinforces Piran, iii, 118 

N 



194 



GENERAL INDEX 



Afrasiyab, announces to his 
chiefs the defeat of his 
host, iii, 242 

exhorted by his host to con- 
tinue the war, iii, 243, 249 

makes his preparations, iii, 
243. 250 

sends Farghar to spy on 
Rustam, iii, 250 

consults with Shida, iii, 250 

describes Rustam, iii, 251 

receives Farghar's report, 
iii. 253 

consults with Piran, iii, 253 

bids Piran continue the war, 
iii, 254 

sends Shida to summon 
Puladwand, iii, 255 

consults Puladwand, iii, 256 

interferes in the fight be- 
tween Rustam and Pulad- 
wand, iii, 263 

withdraws to Chin and 
Machin, iii, 265 

goes in pursuit of Rustam 
and is defeated, iii, 280 

hears of the case of Bizhan 
and Manizha iii, 301 

consults Kurakh4n, iii, 301 

sends Garsiwaz to search 
Manizha's palace, iii, 301 

sentences Bizhan to death, 

iii. 304 
respites Bizhan, iii, 308 
imprisons Bizhan, iii, 309 
disgraces Manizha, iii, 309 
escapes from Rustam, iii 

348 
bids Piran prepare for war, 

iii. 349 
arrays the host against 

Rustam, iii, 350 
flees from Rustam, iii, 352 
goes to Ivhallukh, iv, 10 
addresses his nobles, iv, 10 
sends Shida to Kharuzm, 
iv, II. 

PirAn against fran, iv, 11 
reinforcements and bids 
him break off negotia- 
tions with Giv, iv, 20 



AfrasiyAb, receives tidings from 

Piran, iv, 77 
= king of Gang, iv. 134 
Kai Khusrau's great war 

with, 152, iv, 133 seq. 
encamped at Baigand (Kun- 

duz), iv, T51 
hears ill tidings of Piran and 

of the host, iv, 151 
distress of, iv, 152 
swears to be avenged on Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 152 
hears of the advance of Kai 

Khusrau, iv, 153 
harangues and equips his 

host, iv, 153 
patrols the Jihun with boats, 

iv. T53 
holds a council, summons 

Kurakhan, and crosses the 

Jihun, iv, 154 
sends Kurakhan with half 

the host to Bukhara, iv, 

marches to Amwi, iv, 154 
encamps in Gilan, iv, 155 
arrays his host, iv, 155 
takes his post at the centre, 

iv, 153 
gives Shida command of the 

left wing, iv, 155 
sends Jahn to guard Shida's 

rear, iv, 155 
gives a grandson command 

of the right wing, iv, 

156 

commands to Gurdgir, 
Nastiih, Ighriras, and 
Garsiwaz, iv, 156 
proposes to invade Nimruz, 

iv, 156 
reviews the host and pre- 
pares to encounter Kai 

Khusrau, iv, 15S 
urged by Shida not to 

delay the attack, iv, 159 
reply of, iv, 160 
wishes to meet Kai Khusrau 

in single combat, iv, i6i 
sends Shida on an embassage 

to Kai Khusrau, iv, iGi 



GENERAL INDEX 



195 



Afrdsiytib, hears of Shida's 
death, iv, 176 

grief of, iv, 176 

commands in person against 
Kai Khusrau, iv, 179 

sends Jahn to the left, iv, 
180 

reinforced by Garsiwaz, iv, 
181 

forced by Garsiwaz and 
Jahn to quit the field, iv, 
182 

returns to camp, iv, 1S3 

abandons his camp and re- 
crosses the Jihun, iv, 184 

joins forces with Ivurakhan, 
iv, 186 

staj'S at Bukhara, iv, i<S6 

withdraws to Gang-bihisht, 
iv, 187 

reinforced by Kakula, iv, 
iSS 

sends troops to Chach, iv, 
188 

under Tawurg desertward, 
iv, 188 

marches to meet Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 190 

commands the centre, iv, 190 

hears of Kurakhan's defeat 
and return, iv, 193 

hears that Rustam is ad- 
vancing, iv, 194 

fails in attempt to surprise 
Rustam and withdraws to 
Gang-bihisht, iv, 194, 
seq. 

asks aid from the Faghfur, 
iv, 196 

prepares Gang-bihisht for a 
siege, iv, 107 

besieged in Gang-bihisht, 
iv, ig8, 208 seq. 

offers terms of peace to Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 203 

rallies his troops at the 
storming of Gang-bihisht, 
iv, 2og 

escapes, iv, 211 

gets possession of the trea- 
sures of PfrAn, iv, 2Tq 



Afrdsiyib, arrays his host to 
light with K;'.i Khusrau, 
iv, 220 

offers Kai Khusrau peace or 
single combat, iv, 221 

fights a general engagement 
against Kai Khusrau, iv, 
223, 226 

defeated and escapes by 
flight, iv, 227 

army, of, surrenders to Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 228 

takes refuge at Gang-dizh, 
iv, 230 

captive kindred of, sent to 
Kai Kaus by Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 232 

Kai Kai'is on, iv, 237 

Khusrau 's inquiries concern- 
ing, iv, 247 

hears of Kai Khusrau's ap- 
proach and quits Gang- 
dizh, iv, 248 

searched for by Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 248 

fears of the f ranians concern- 
ing, iv, 249 

Kai Khusrau takes counsel 
with Kai Kaus about, iv, 

25S 
wanderings and wretched 

plight of, iv, 2.59 
takes refuge in a cave near 

Barda', iv, 259 
lament of, overheard by 

Hiim, iv, 260 
capture of, by Hum, iv, 

261 

Darmesteter on, iv, 136 
pitied and unbound by Hum, 

iv, 262 
escapes into lake Urumiah, 

iv, 262 and note 
attracted by the voice of 

Garsiwaz, iv, 263 
holds converse with Garsi- 
waz, iv, 266 
recapture of, by Hum, iv, 

2G6 
slain by Kai Khusrau, iv, 

268 



196 



GENERAL INDEX 



Afrasiyab, daughter of = Fa- 
rangis, iv, 304 

Khan of Chin descended 
from, vii, 334 

hoard of, viii, 14S, 406 
Africa, vi, 30 

Afri'gli, king of Kh'.razm, ii, 190 
'Afrit, genie, i, 42 
Agani, Sargon I. of, v, 293 
Age, old, Firdausi's lament over 

his, ii, 336 

Golden. See Golden. 
Aghraeratha (Ighn'ras, q.v.), iv, 

137 
Aghrerad (Ighn'ras, q.v.), i, 338 

Aghriras. See Ighriras. 

Agni, Vedic personification of 
fire, ii, 25 

Ahdn^mak (Andarznamak), Pah- 
lavi treatise, vi, 257 

Ahmad, son of Isma' il, Sdmanid, 
vii, 383 

Ahmad, son of Sahl, lord of Marv, 
V, 260, 261 

Ahmad, Fazl son of. See Abii'l 
'Abbas Fazl. 

Ahmad Hasan Maimandi, minis- 
ter of Mahmiid, i, 32, 39, 

45 
Ahmad ibn Muhammad, patron 

of Firdausi, i, 29 
Ahran, Ruman chief, 154, iv, 

342 seq., 353 
bidden by Caesar to slay the 

dragon of Mount Sakila, 

IV, 342 
takes counsel with Minn, 

iv, 342 
referred by Mirin to Hishwi, 

iv, 344 
Ahran, required by Gushtasp to 
furnish liini with arms, iv, 

345 
goes with Gushtasp and 
Hishwi to Mount Sakila, 

iv, 34^' 
Hishwi and, welcome (kish- 
tcisp on his return, iv, 

347 
gives gifts to Gusht4.sp, iv, 

347 



Ahran, has the dead dragon con- 
veyed to Caesar's court, 
iv, 348 

marries Caesar's third 
daughter, iv, 348 

Mirin and, display their 
accomplishment on the 
riding-ground, iv, 349 

Caesar's wrath with Mirin 
and, iv, 351 

Mirin and, send a scornful 
inessage to Caesar, iv, 353 
set to guard the baggage, 

iv, 355 
i Ahriman, the Zoroastrian Evil 
Principle, sometimes used 
metaphorically, 139,1, 5, 6, 
50, 134. 138, 159, 194.205, 
2t8, 236, 238, 241. 245, 
287, 315, 360 ; ii, 34, 42, 
43. 51. 53. 56, 78, 160. 
208, 214, 217, 250, 260, 

303. 315. 324. 358, 3f>i. 
374 seq., 405 seq. ; iii, 
17, 123, 214,228, 2.51,266, 
275, 277, 287, 293, 294. 
300, 303, 304, 314, 316, 
318, 338 ; iv, 23, 41 seq., 
45, 46, 89, 103, 124, 128, 
130, 162, 163, 179, 206, 
243, 272, 288, 342, 348, 
352 ; V, 17, 33, 36, 45, 50, 
90, 99, 103, 122, 123, 125, 
147, 177, 198, 206, 246, 

271, 276; vi, 106, IT2, 

206, 240, 281, 290, 299, 
318, 384; vii, 89, 233, 
265, 271, 290, 312, 323, 
334. 359. 366, 367, 369 ; 
viii, 19, 21, 22. 86, 87, 176, 
177, 198, 210, 219, 243. 
293. 333. 3f>4. 421 ; ix, 
8, 18, 73, 74, 79, 91 
envies Gaiiimart, i, 118 
son of (the Black Div), i, 119 
Surush warns Gaiumart 
against, i, 119 
ridden by Tahmuras, i, 125, 

127 
= Zahhak, i, 162 
= Salm and 'J"ur, i, 194 



GENERAL INDEX 



197 



Ahriman=AfrAsiyAb, i, 366 

Faith of, ii, 358 ; vi, 281, 290 

= idolatcT, viii, 54 

= Band\vi or Guslaliam, 

viii, Sy 
= Kharrad, son of Jiarzin, 

viii, III 
= Bahram Chiibina, viii, 295 
Ahuna Vairya, Zoroastrian 

sacred formula, v, 17 
Ahura Mazda (Urmuzd), the 
Zoroastrian Good Prin- 
ciple, i, 116, 235 ; ii, 23 
81 ; iv, 137 
Ahwaz, city and province 
(KhuzistAn, Susiana), i, 
28G ; vi, 35, 199, 298, 357; 
vii, 197, 198, 201, 214, 
224 ; viii 400, 402 
Airan-ve^o (Iran-vej q.v.), ii, i8g 
Akem IVIanau, Zoroastrian de- 
mon, iii, 271, 272 
=Akuman = Akwan, iii 272 
assails Zarduhsht v, 17 
Akesines (Chinab), Indian river, 

vi, 31. 64 
Akhast, Turanian hero, 151 ; 
iv, 105 
chosen to fight with Zanga, 

iv, 97 
slain by Zanga, iv, 106 
Akhshunwar ( Achshunwar) , 

Haitalian king, vii, i6o 
Akki, foster-father of Sargon I 

of Agani, v, 293 
Aknaton, Pharaoh (XVIII 
dynasty) 
lover of peace like Yazda- 
gird, son of Shapiir, vi, 371 
'Akr Babil, prison, viii, 194, 196 
Akuman. See Akem Manau. 
Akwan, div, J50, iii, 270 seq., 280 
seq., 284, 309 
Story of, iii, 271 

Professor Noldekc on the, 

iii, 271 
Firdausi on, iii, 273, 281 
boukler of, iii, 271, 27O, 309, 

343. 344. 347 
removed from pit's mouth 
by Kustam, iii, 345 



Akwan, appears in the form of 

an onager, iii, 273 seq. 

pursued by Kustam, iii, 275 

foils Kustam, iii, 276 

takes Kustam at a disad- 
vantage, iii, 276 

offers Kustam a choice of 
deaths, iii, 277 

outwitted by Kustam, iii, 
277 

slain by Kustam, iii, 28 1 

described by Rustam, iii, 282 
Al, place, ix, 93 

Alans (Alani), people, now the 
Ossetes of the Caucasus, 
141, 167, i, 217 ; iv, 14, 
60, 65, 301 ; vi, 395 ; 
viii, 36<) 

invade Iran, i, 19 

castle of the, i, 223 

taken by Karan, i, 223, 

seq. 
castellan of, duped by 
Karan, i, 224 

monarch of, vi, 395 

Nushirwan's dealings with, 
vii, 216, 239 seq. 

King of = Khusrau Parwiz, 
viii, 208, 209, 213 
Alar, a village in Ardshir-Khurra 

q.v., vi, 205 
Albfriini, Abu Raihan ]\Iuham- 
mad, Oriental author and 
chronologist (A.D. 973- 
1048), ii, 189 

account of Alfir (Gangdizh ?) 
by, ii, 190 
Alburz, mountain-range south of 
the Caspian, also mythi- 
cal range (Hara-bcre- 
zaiti) surrounding the 
earth, 142, i, 4, 71, 145, 
158, 235, 248, 250, 277, 
298, 351. 373 ; ii. II. 23, 

27, 79. 96, 1-14. 336, 401 ; 

iii, 120 ; iv, 136 ; v, 202 ; 

vii, 177 ; ix, 95 
Faridiin taken by his mother 

to, i, 152 
Zci.1 cast away, and found, 

upon, i, 241 seq. 



iq8 



GENERAL INDEX 



Alburz, Kai Kubad brought by 
Rustani from, i, 3.S2 scq. 
Kai Kaiis' buildings on, ii, 
81 
Aleppo (Chalybon - Beroea), city 
in northern Syria, vii, 
218 ; viii, 41 
Alexander I, king of Epirus 

Italian expedition of, vi, 12 

attributed to Alexander 

the Great, vi, 12 

Alexander the Great (Sikandar 

q.v.), B.C. 356-323. son of 

Philip II of Macedon and 

his queen Olympias, 1,14, 

49 ; ii, 8 seq. ; iv, 314 ; 

V, 30 ; vi, 193, 194, 204, 

252, 253, 373 ; vii, 383 

barrier of, i, 16 ; vi, 78 

legend of, in the Kuran, 

vi, 78 

persecutor of Zoroastrian- 

ism, i, 15, 59, 61, 63, 338 

paternity of, i, 55 and note ; 

vi, 16, 18 
one of the Zoroastrian triad 

of evil, i, 59 and note 
said to have burnt the Zoro- 
astrian scriptures, i, 63 
Zoroastrianism under, i, 63 
Era of, ii, 190 
accompanied by experts to 

the East, vi, 11 
Romance of, origin and 
growth of, vi, 12 seq. 
diagram to illustrate, vi, 
84 
Syriac Christian Legend of, 

See Syriac. 
Muhammad's references to, 
in the Kuran, vi, 15, 77 
Persian national hero, how 

he became, vi, 15 
cities founded by, vi, 13, 

18 
name, Persian legend of his, 

vi, 19 
Aristotle, tutor of, vi, 29 
letter to, vi, 68 
correspondence about the 
succession with, vi, 81 



Alexander the Great, Roxana 

(Rushanak) and, vi, 30, 32 

reign of, first years of, in 

history and romance, vi, 

30 
Darius' banquet, his flight 
from, vi, 30 
his pursuit of, vi, 31 
murderers of, his treat- 
ment of them in history 
and romance, vi, 32, 33 
daughter of, marries, vi, 

33 

Eakirs and, vi, 61 

Calanus and, vi, 61 

Porus and, historical ac- 
count of, vi, 63 
camp of, his visit to, vi,64 

iron steeds, his device of, vi, 
64 

stature of, vi, 64 

Cleophis and, vi, 65 

Ammon, Oasis of, his visit 
to, vi, 65 

Candace (Kaidafa) and, vi, 

65 5^^. 

Antigonus (Naitkun), as- 
sumes name of, vi, 66 

Plutarch's Life of, vi, 67 

Brahmans, visit of, to the, 
vi, 67 

Indus mistaken for the Nile 

by, vi, 68 

marvels of his return-jour- 
ney, vi, 69 

admiral of (Nearchus), vi, 69 

Amazons and, vi, 12, 72 
legend of, vi, 72 

Gloom and Fount of Life, 
legend of his expedition 
to, in the Pseudo-Cal- 
listhenes, vi, 74 seq. 

Andreas, his cook, legend of, 
vi, 76 
in the Kuran, vi, 77 

Will of, vi, 81 

death of, vi, 82 

dispute over his place of 
interment, vi, 82 

corpse of, taken to Memphis, 
vi, 82 



GENERAL INDEX 



199 



Alcxaiukr, the Great, interred at 
Alexandria, vi, 82 
lonil) of, vi, 8z 

Mas'i'uH on, vi, 82 
S. Chrysostom on, vi, 82 
wars on the death of, vi, 
197 
Alexander, son of Alexander the 
Great and Cleophis (?). vi, 

65 
Alexandria (Iskandariya q.v.), 
city and sea-port in 
Egypt, vi. 13. 15. 17. 83 
founded by Alexander the 

Great, vi, 13 
Pseudo-Callisthenes orig- 
inated at, vi, 13 
Alexander, the Great, buried 
at, vi, 82 
his tomb at, vi, 82 
Mas'iidi on, vi, 82 
S. Chrysostom on, vi, 82 
Alfir (Gangdizh ?), palace-fort- 
tress of the capital of 
Kharazm, ii, 190 
Al Hadr. See Hatra. 
'AH, husband of Fatima, daugh- 
ter of Muhammad, and 
fourth Khalifa (A.D. 656 
—661) 
Muhammad on, i, 12, 106 

cult of, i, 13 

known as " the Lion," i, 13. 

107 
assassination of, i, 13 
Firdausi's references to, i, 
24. 37. 40, 41. 106, 107; 
ii, 337 and note 
'All, the Dilamite, friend and 
helper of Firdausi, i, 35 '• 
ix, 121 
transcriber of the Sh4h- 
nama, i, 39 
Alif, terminal, Firdausi's use of, 

iii. 283 
Al Iskandariis. See Ilalai. 
Al Khidr (Khisr q.v.), the Green 
Prophet, vi, 78 and note 
Alkiis, Turanian hero, ii, 114 



Alkus, fights with, and worsts, 
Zawara, ii, H5 
slain by Kustani, ii, 113 
Allah, Muhammadan name of 

the Deity, i, 5" 
Al Mansur, 'Abbasid Khalifa 
(A.D. 754-775). founder of 
Baghdad, vi, 254 
Almds, river, iii, 251 
Alp-Arselan (Arslan), Seljuk Sul- 
tan (A.D. 1063-1073), n, 
219 note 
Alptigin, founder of the Ghazni- 

vid dynasty, i, 20 
Altuniya, place, ix, 92 
Aiwa, Rustam's spear-bearer, 
slain by Kamus, I49' 
iii, 188 
Aiwa, Iranian hero, probably 
identical with the above, 
V, 166 
slain by Niish Azar, v, 
226 
Amasis, viii, I93 
Amazons, their disputed visit to 
Alexander, the Great, vi, 
12, 72 
origin of, vi, 71 
described, vi, I53 5<'?- 
Sikandar's correspondence 
with, and visit to, vi, i53 

Ambar (Anbar, Piriiz - Shapur), 
city on the left bank of 
the Euphrates some forty 
miles west of Baghdad, 
founded by Shapur son of 
Urmuzd (Sapor II.) The 
word means " granaries." 
vi, 3-7 i viii, 188 
foundation of, attributed to 
the Azdites, i, it 

Ambassadors, instances of kings 
and chiefs going in person 
as ambassadors or spies, 
vi, 3^5 

Ambuh, place, iii-, 41 

Amen-Ra, Egyptian god per- 
sonated by Nectanebus. 
vi, 16 



200 



GENERAL INDEX 



Ameshapentas, tlio, personifica- 
tions of good (]ualitics in 
Zoroastrian tlicology, iii, 
271 ; V. 15 seg. 

Amida (Diyarbakr), city on the 
upper Tigris, vii, 187 

Ami'n, 'Abbasid Khalifa, (A.D. 
809-S13), i, 14 

Ammianus Marcellinus (4th cen- 
tury A.D.) Roman histor- 
ian, V, 13 

Ammon, Oasis of, Alexander the 
Great's visit to, vi, 30, 65 

'Ammuriya, Riiman stronghold 
in Asia Minor between 
Sivri Hisar and Ak-Shahr 
probably representing the 
ancient Amorium but 
sometimes confounded 
with Angora (Anguriya) 
the ancient Anc3'ra fur- 
ther to the north-east, vi, 
23 note, 89, viii, 46 (C/. 
LEC. pp. 134, 153) 
Failakiis marches from, 
against Darab, vi, 23 

Amorium. See 'Ammuriya. 

Amr, Arab chief, attacks Hur- 
muzd, viii, 93 

Amul, city in Mazandaran, i, 145, 
177. 289, 298, 344, 366, 
367 ; ii, 18, 104 ; v, 284 ; 
vii, 89, 237 ; viii, 355, 
SSfJ, 358, 392 ; ix, 86 

Amul. See Amwi. 

Amulet, of Kai Khusrau, iv, 133 
given by Zarduhsht to As- 
fandiyar, v, 130 

Amwi (Amul, Amuyah, now 
Charjui), city on the left 
bank cf the Oxus where 
crossed by the route from 
Marv to Bukhar4, iv, 11, 
65, 154, 184, 206; vii, 
91 and note. 331, 357,359; 

yiii. 354 
Andbdeh, vi, 32 

Ana.^sth(?tics, employment of, i, 

236, 321 seq. 
An bar. See Ambar. 
Ancyra. Sec Ammuriya. 



Andalus (Land of the West oy of 

the Vandals), Spain, r^^g, 

vi, 66, 122, 138 

queen of (Kaidafa (j-v.), vi, 

121 sec/. 

Andaman, Iranian noble, viii, 

202 
Andarab, town in Afghanistan 
between Balkh and Kabul, 
iv, 65 
Andariman, Turanian hero, 151, 
ii, 264 ; iv, 26 ; v, 29 
fights with Gustaham, iv, 87 
steed of, slain by Hajir, iv, 

87 
rescued by the Turkmans, 

iv, 87 
chosen to fight with Gurgin, 

iv, 97 
slain by Gurgin, iv, 104 
Andariman (Vajjdarcmaini), 

brother of Arjasp, v, 12, 

141. 135 
commands one wing of the 

host, V, 46 
executed by Asfandiyar, v, 
158 
Andarznamak (Ahdnamak), 

Pahlavi treatise, vi, 257 
Andiv, country, viii, 313 
Andiyan, Iranian wairior, jy2 
viii, 225, 257, 259, 269, 293, 
294, 296 

deceived by Caesar's talis- 
man, viii, 273 
Bahram Chubina writes to, 

viii, 285 
receives Kirman, viii, 313 
Andreanticus, sea, vi, 77 
Andreas, Alexander the Great's 
cook, 
legend of, vi, 76 seq. 
in Kurdn, vi, 77 
Androphagoi, the, iii, 191 
Anestres Castri = Nushirwan, vii, 

383 
Angora. See 'Ammuriya. 
Angra Mainyu =Ahrinuin, ii, 28 
Animals, domestication of, i, 126 
Ant, the, l-irdausi's plea for, i, 

201 and note 



GENERAL INDEX 



20I 



Antahiya (Antioch), city in 
Syria on the Orontes, i6j, 
viii, 41 
taken by Niishirwan, vii, 
218, 25S scq. 

Anligonus (Naitkun), name as- 
sumed by Alexander the 
Great in legend, vi, 
66 

Antioch. See Antakiya. 
New, vii, 218, 250 

Antiochus, Macedonian general, 
vi, 76 

Antiochus Sidetes, ii, 80, 81 

Aogemaide, Pahlavi treatise, iv, 
136 

Antipater, regent in Macedonia 
for Alexander the Great, 
intrigued against by 
Olympias, vi, 82 

Aphrodite, goddess, iv, 315 

Apollo, god, and the Python, 
vi, 203 

Apologues, i, 242, 265, 285 ; 
iii, 332 ; iv, 18, 21, 28, 
47 ; vi, 310 ; ix, 86 

Apothegms, i, 259, 260 ; 11, 157, 
1 58, 170, 224, 254, 273, 
298, 300, 313, 315, 330. 
357. 383 ; iii. 53. 9i. 96, 
167, 188, 212, 260, 277, 
301, 316, 341, 348, 350, 
351 ; iv. 13. 32, 33, 38, 
39. 59, 93. 108, 121, 131, 
268 ; V, 78, 105, 168, 214, 
242, 249, 250, 265 ; vi, 
50, 303. 343 ; vii, 17, 18, 
20, 42, 270, 277, 296, 301, 
403 ; viii, 119, 166, 206, 
215, 221, 235, 295 ; ix, 
87, 88, no 

Apprentice, a merchant's, enter- 
tains, and finds favour 
with, Bahrani Gur, vii, 
40 seq. 

Apries (Pharoah-Hophra, B.C. 
589-570). vi, 16 

Apsheron, peninsula on the 
western shore of the Cas- 
pian, i, 58, note 
Aptya. See Ablin. 



.\rab, Arabs, 162, i6j, ii, 79, 81, 
99 ; iii, 14 ; iv, 14 ; v, 
31 ; vi, 66, 171, 209, 254, 
321 seq., 377, 385, 396, 
398, 402, 406 ; vii, 10, 
107, 201, 219, 244, 245, 
247 ; viii, 67,94, 188, 190, 
191, 208, 230, 241, 250, 
251 ; ix, 3. 5. 25, 60, 69, 
70, 72, 75 seq., 79, 89. 92, 
94 seq., 114, 117 
migration of, northward, i, 

1 1 

raids of, into Persian terri- 
tory, i, 12 ; vi, 17, 21, 

domination of, over Iran, 1, 

12 seq. 

king = Mardas, i, 135 

= Zahhak, i, 139, 275 
rebellion of, against Kai 

Kaiis, ii, 83 
Afrasiyab fights with, for 

fran, ii, 92 
Darab demands tribute from 

vi, 22 
steed, i, 243, 251, 290 ; vi, 

380 ; viii, 126, 302 ; ix, 11 
cymbal, vi, 244 
invasion of, viii, 72, 93 ; ix, 

3. 65 seq. 
withdraw, viii, 96 
sage, sages, vii, 406 

quoted, vii, 277 
tribes, ix, 65 
triumph of, over Dhu Kar, 

ix, 66 
chieftain, incites Abu Bakr 

to invade Persia, ix, 66 
concentrate at Kddisiya, ix, 

67 
booty found by, at Ctesi- 

phon (?), ix, 68 
annex Mesopotamia, ix, 68 

Khiizistan, ix, 68 
= 'Umar, ix, 72 
seal, ix, 82 
=:Sa'ad, ix, 84 
defeated, ix, 85 
Nushirwin's dream of, viii, 

66 seq., ix, 92 



202 



GENERAL INDEX 



Arabia, ii, loo ; vi, 70, 72, 206, 
322, 355 ; viii, 24 note 
trade of, ancient, i, 1 1 
Iran and, the portion of 

Traj, i, i8y 
Shapiir son of Urmuzd's 
expedition to, vi, 322 
Arabian, Arabians, vi, 378, 388, 

ix, 74. 85 
Faith, vi, 95 
Nights, i, 51 ; vi, 71,78,250; 

vii, 317 

provenance of, vi, 250 ; 

vii, 3 
quoted, vi, 73 
Arabic, language, i, 32 ; vi, 
147, 205 ; viii, 73 ; ix, 
81 
infrequent in Shahnama, i, 

47 
versions of Pahlavf texts, vi, 

255 seq. 
Fables of Bidpai (Kahla and 
Dimna) translated into, 
vii, 382, 430 
Tabari. See Tabari. 
Arachosia, the district about 

Kandahar, vi, 32 
Aragan (Ramkubad), town, vii, 

188 
Aral Sea, i, 57 note ; iii, 10 
Arar tree, vi, 19 
Aras (Araxes), river in Azar- 
baijan, v, 13, 14 
confused with the Oxus, i, 

71. 370 
Arash, king of the Khiizians 

q.v., iv, 146, 148 
Arash, son of Kai Kubad. See 

Kai Arash. 
Arash, Ashkanian king, vi, 197, 

210 
Arash, Iranian chief, vi, 394 
Arash, city. See Hulwan. 
Arastalis (Aristotle q-v.), j6o, 

vi, 35 
counsels Sikandar, vi, 179 
sentences of, over the coltin 
of Sikandar, vi, 185 
Aristi, uncle of Zarduhsht (Zor- 
oaster), V, 17 



Araxes (Aras q.v.), battle of, viii, 
76 

Arayish-i-Kum (1 lierapolis), city 
in northern Syria, west 
of the Euphrates and 
north of Aleppo, vii, 217, 
218, 254 ; viii, 188 
taken by Niishirwan, vii, 

255 

Arba, river, viii, 194, 195 

Archer, iv, 179 

constellation, v, 86 

Archery, i, 263, 297, 312, 359 ; 
n, 163, 266, 293, 328 ; 
iii, 53 scq.. 74, 93. 9^ seq.. 
179 scq., 246 ; iv, 38, 48, 
99, loi, 102, 104, 107, 122, 
179. 338; V, III, 122, 
229, 239 seq., 272 ; vi, 
379, 383 seq. ; vii, 54, 
55, 80, 118, 122, 125 

Archimages, 141, 168, lyo, iy6 

Architect, Riiman, and Khusrau 
Parwiz, viii, 401 seq. 

Architecture, invention of, i, 

129, 133 

Archscribe, 171. See Izid Gas- 
hasp and Mihran. 

Ard, day, i, 88, q.v., ii, 287 ; iv, 
252 ; vi, 298, 390 and 
note ; vii, 112 ; ix, 70, 
122 
Shahnama finished on the 
day of, i, 24 

Ardabil (Badan - Piruz q.v.), city 
in Azarbaijan, ii, 336, 405, 
iv, 147, 188 ; vii, 89, 163, 
224 ; viii, 93, 99, 100, 
184, 226 

Ardawan, Bahrdm, Artabanus 
III or IV, the last Ash- 
kanian (Parthian) king, 
160, 161, vi, 3, 205, 214 
seq., 254 seq., viii, 214, 285 
Macrinus, his war and treaty 
with, i, 81 

effect of, on Persian coin- 
age, i, 81 
= Bahram, vi, 197, 210 
status of, in Persian tradi- 
tion, \i, 201 



GENERAL INDEX 



203 



ArtlawAn, daughter of i6t, vi, 

202 

marries Ardshir PApakdn, 
vi, 202, 229 

incited by her brother 
Bahman to poison Ard- 
shir Pajiakan, vi, 259 

condemned to death, vi, 
260 

saved by Ardshir Papa- 
kan's minister, vi, 260 

gives birth to Shapur, vi, 
261 

restored to favour, vi, 
265 
writes to Papak, vi, 214 
summons Ardshir Papakan 

to court, vi, 214 
receives gifts from Ardshir 

Papakan, vi, 215 
highly esteems Ardshir 

Papakan, vi, 215 
sons of, vi, 215, 255, 267 

note 

their fate, vi, 228, 229 and 
tiote, 259 
disgraces Ardshir Papakan, 

vi, 216 
Ardshir Papakan intrigues 

with slave-girl of, 160, vi, 

201, 217 seq. 
eldest son of, made ruler of 

Pars, vi, 218 and note 
consults the astrologers, vi, 

218 
Ardshir Papakan, vainly 

pursued by, vi, 221 seq. 
returns to Rai, vi, 223 
writes to his son about 

Ardshir Papakan, vi, 223 
Ardshir Papakan marches 

against, vi, 227 
prepares to encounter Ard- 
shir Papakdn, vi, 227 
defeated, captured by Khar- 

rad, and slain by Ardshir 

Papakan, vi, 228 
buried by Tabdk, vi, 229 
palace of, at Rai spared (?) 

by Ardshir Pdpakdn, vi, 

229 and note 



ArdawAn, secretary of, slain by 
Shapur, vi, 256 
= Mihrak = Mithrak = 
Madik (?), vi, 256 
Ardibiliisht, ameshaspenta q.v., 
iii, 286, 328 
month, i, 82 ; v, 16, 39, 
92 note 
Ardshir, son of Bizhan, 

goes with Zarir to Rum, iv, 

360 
hails Gushtisp as Shah, iv, 
362 
Ardshir, son of Gushtdsp, 15^, v, 
26, 51 
death of, foretold by Jam- 

4sp, v, 49 
slain, v, 57 
Ardshir, Iranian hero, perhaps 
the son of Bizhan, supra 
tells Nastiir where to find 

Zarir, v, 67 
takes Fardmarz prisoner, v, 
288 
Ardshir (Bahman q.v.), Shah, vi, 
213, 271 and note 
meaning of, v, 259 and note 
Ardshir (Artaxerxes II), brother 
of Shapur, Sasanian Shah, 
163, vi, 3, 328 
Shapur arranges for the suc- 
cession with, vi, 360 seq. 
title of, vi, 364 
abdication of, vi, 364 
Ardshir, high priest temp.^ 
Piriiz, vii, 179 seq. 
released by Khushnawdz, 
vii, 180 
Ardshir, high priest temp. 
Nushirvvdn, vii, 304, 333, 

337. 34^ 
discourse of, vii, 305 
questions Buzurjmihr, vii, 
308 
Ardshir Khurra (Khurra - i - Ard- 
shir), city, (Gur or Jur, 
now iMruzabad), and dis- 
trict in Pdrs, vi, 199, 205, 
206, 229 and note, 231, 
241, 245; vii, 206; viii, 
251, 252, 412 and note 



204 



GENERAL INDEX 



Ardshir Khurra, city, Ardshir 
Papakan builds a I'lrc- 
temple in, vi, 230 
makes irrigation-works in, 
vi, 230 

meaning of, vi, 290 -note 
Ardshir Papakan (Artaxerxes I), 
Shah and founder of tlie 
Sasanian dynasty, 160, 
161 ; i, 42 ; ii, 10 ; v, 10 ; 
vi, 193, 209 note, 213 seq., 
294 seq., 303, 307, 315, 
322, 325, 405 ; vii, 79, 
185, 212 ; viii, 191, 214, 
222, 265, 270, 285, 392, 
393; ix, 105, 109, III 

Notes on, vi, 193 seq., 254 
seq. 

founds a new national 
dynasty, restores Zoroas- 
trianism, and collects its 
scriptures, i, 62 seq. 

genealogical table of his 
descendants, vi, 3 

rise of, compared to that of 
Cyrus the Great, vi, 194 
Tabari's account of, vi,i98 

legend of Cyrus the Great 
transferred to, vi, 195 

birth of, vi, 213 

summoned to court by Arda- 
wan, vi, 214 

equipped by Papak, vi, 214 

presents gifts to Ardawan, 
vi, 215 

Ardawan favours, vi, 215 

prowess of, in the chase, vi, 

215 

disgraced, vi, 216 

writes to Papak, vi, 216 

advised by Papak, vi, 216 

intrigues with Guln4r, vi, 
217 seq. 

hears from Gulnar of the 
presage of the astrologers, 
vi, 219 

flees with GulnAr to Pars, 
vi, 220 seq. 

followed by the divine Grace 
in the form of a mountain- 
sheep, i, 374 ; vi, 221 seq. 



Ardshir Papakan, adherents flock 

to, vi, 223 
addresses his supporters, vi, 

224 
founds a city, vi, 202, 224 
receives promises of help, 

vi, 224 
joined by Tabdk, vi, 225 
Tabak and, defeat Bah- 

man, son of Ardawan, vi, 

226 
marches from Pars against 

Ardawan, vi, 227 
defeats and slays Ardawan, 

vi, 228 

as recorded in Karnamak, 

vi, 202 
gives the spoil to the troops, 

vi, 229 
spares (?) Ardawan's palace 

at Rai, vi, 229 and note 
Tabak counsels, vi, 229 
marriage of, with Ardawan's 

daughter, vi, 202, 229, 259 
returns to Pars, vi, 229 
builds Khurra-i-Ardshir, vi, 

229 and note 
irrigation-works of, at 

Khurra-i-Ardshir, vi, 230 
war of, with the Kurds, vi, 

196, 230 seq. 
and Haftwad,vi, 236 seq. 
message sent by arrow to, 

vi, 238 
worsted by Haftwad and 

entertained and coun- 
selled by two youths, vi, 

239 seq. 
slays Mihrak, vi, 241 
marches to attack the Worm 

vi, 241 
gives instructions to Shahr- 

gi'r, vi, 241 
stratagem of, against the 

Worm, vi, 242 
slays the Worm and its 

attendants, vi, 244 
summons Shahrgir, vi, 244 

and note 
takes Haftwcid's stronghold, 

vi, 244 



GENERAL IXPF.X 



2o5 



Ardshir P^pakdn, defeats and 

slays Haftwad and Shah- 

wi. vi, 245 

carries off the spoil, vi, 245 

builds a Fire-temple, vi, 245 

rewards the two youths, vi, 

245 
invasion of Kirman by, vi, 

205. 245 
goes to Taisafun, vi, 245 
principles of government of, 

vi, 250, 273 seq., 2S6 seq. 
Reign of, 161, vi, 254 seq. 

Note on, vi, 254 

length of, vi, 254 

Tabari on, vi, 254 
coins of, vi, 256, 257, 265 
Shapiir crowned by, vi, 257 
cities of, vi, 257 
prophecy of, vi, 257 
enthroned at Baghdad, vi, 

258 
title of King of kings of, vi, 

193. 199. -^54. 258, 273 
inaugural address of, vi, 258 
daughter of Ardawan and, 

stories of, vi, 255 

plot of, with her brother 
Bahman, to poison, vi, 

259 
discovers plot against him, 

vi, 260 
consults his minister, vi, 260 
condemns the daughter of 

Ardawan to death, vi, 260 
minister of, saves daughter 

of Ardawan and mutilates 

himself, vi, ig6, 261 
Shapur, son of, born, vi, 261 
hears about Shapur from his 

minister, vi, 262 
recognises and acknow- 
ledges Shapur, vi, 264 
restores the daughter of 

Ardawan to favour, vi, 265 
rewards his minister, vi, 265 
makes a new coinage in 

honour of his minister, vi, 

256, 265 
builds Jund-i-ShApiir, vi, 

266 



Ardshfr Pdpakin, harassed by 
wars, consults Kaid, vi, 

266 
wroth at Raid's advice, vi. 

267 
seeks in vain for the daugh- 
ter of Mihrak, vi, 268 
referred to, vi, 270 
discovers Urmuzd, vi, 271 
counsels Urmuzd, vi, 280 
calls and counsels Shdpur, 

vi, 286 5^17. 
Church and State, his views 

on, vi, 250 seq., 286 
duration of his dynasty, vi, 

252, 257, 289 
death of, vi, 291 
Baluchistan, his failure to 

conquer, vii, 242 
Nard, invention of, attri- 
buted to, vii, 382 
True Cross in treasury of, 

viii, 380 
Ardshir, son of Shirwi, Shah, 

175. ix, 43 seq. 
makes Piruz general, ix, 44 
entertains Piruz at feast, ix, 

48 
death of, ix, 49 
treasury of, squandered by 

Guraz, ix, 53 
Are^a/-aspa. See Arjasp. 
Aries, constellation, i, 88, 118, 

310. 335; iii. 26, 38. 187, 

318 ; iv, 24, 147, 158, 180; 

V, 39, 109, 118, 119, 126; 

viii, 342, 394 
Ariobarzanes, the murderer of 

Darius Codonuinus, vi, 32 
Ariobarzanes, satrap, vi, 32 and 

note 
Arish, legendary Iranian archer, 

V, 62 ; vii, 234 and note ; 

viii, 75, 219 and note ; ix, 

25 
Aristobulus, Greek writer, temp. 

Alexander the Great, vi, 

12 
Aristotle (Arastdlis q.v.), Greek 

philosopher (B.C. 384- 

322) 



2o6 



GENERAL INDEX 



Aristotle, Alexander the Great's 
tutor, vi, 29 
letter to, vi, 68 
correspondence with, 
about the succession, vi, 
81, 83 
silk-worm, his account of, 
vi, 204 
ArjAsp, Turanian hero, ii, 264 ; 

iv, 26 
Arjasp (Areja?-aspa), king of 
Turan, 155, 156, i, 61 ; 
ii, 9, 29 ; iii, 109 ; v, 9, 
II seq., 20, 22, 24 seq., 29, 
31, 51 seq., 89, 98, 99, 107 
seq.. 116, 141, 142, 159, 
167, 171, 172, 180, 206; 

vii, 330, 335. 337. 359; 
viii, 95, 104, 148 ; ix, 104 

hoard of, viii, 148 

in receipt of tribute from 
Gushtasp, v, 32 

hears of Gushtasp's resolve 
not to pay tribute, sum- 
mons, and harangues his 
priests, v, 36 

sends Bidirafsh and Nam- 
khast to Gushtasp, v, 37, 
40 

receives Gushtasp's answer 
and calls out the host, v, 

45 
gives one wing to Kuhram, 
V, 46 
the other to Andariman, 

V, 46 
the chief command to 

Gurgsar, v, 46 
banner to Bidirafsh, v, 46 
vanguard to Khashash, v, 

46 

rear to Hushdi'v, v, 46 
marches against Iran, v, 46 
defeat of, foretold by Jam- 

^sp, v, 52 
gives one wing to Bidirafsh, 

V. 55 

the other to Gurgsar, v, 

56 

centre to Namkhast, v, 56 
takes the rear himself, v, 56 



Arjasp, gives Kuhram the com- 
mand in chief, v, 56 

thrice offers rewards to any 
that will fight Zarir, v, 61, 
62 

offer of, accepted by Bidi- 
rafsh, V, 62 

calls for Bidirafsh to fight 
Nastur, v, 69 

fights with the franians, v, 

71 
defeat of, v, 72 

proclaimed by Gushtasp, 

V. 75 

hears of Asfandiyar's im- 
prisonment and of Gush- 
tasp's absence in Sistan, 
V, 86 

Summons his chiefs, v, 86 

sends Situh as spy to fran, 
V, 86 

on receiving Sitiih's report 
calls out the host, v, 87 

sends Kuhram to attack 
Balkh, V, 90 

marches against Gushtasp, 

V, 94 
commands the centre, v, 

95 

defeats Gushtasp and be- 
leaguers him on a moun- 
tain, V, 96 

Asfandiyar's vow of, and 
prayer for, vengeance on, 
V, 103, 104 

hears of Asfandiyar's arrival, 
V. 108 

proposes to retreat, v, 108 

sends awav the spoil of 
Balkh, V," 108 

five sons of, v, 108 

persuaded by Gurgsar to re- 
main and tight, v, 108, 109 

makes Gurgsar leader of the 
host, V, 109 

arrays the host, v, 109 

commands the centre, v, log 

surveys the battlefield from 
a height, v, no 

prepares for flight if needful, 
V, no 



GENllRAL IXDEX 



207 



Arjasp, dismayed at Asfandi- 
yar's prowess, reproaches 
GurgsAr v, 1 1 1 

hears of Gurgsir's capture 
and flees, v, 112 

entertains Asfaiuliyar dis- 
guised as a merchant, v, 

145 
questions AsfandiyAr, v, 146 
allows Asfandiyar to enter- 
tain the Turkman chiefs, 
V. 149 
prepares to attack Bishutan, 

V, I. 5 1 
bids Kuhram prepare for 

war, V, 151 
sends out Turkhan with 

troops to reconnoitre, v, 

151 

hears from Kuhram that As- 
fandiyar has come, v, 152 

bids the Turkmans march 
out in force, v, 152 

palace of, attacked by As- 
fandiyar, V, 153 

arms and encounters As- 
fandiyar, V, 153, 154 

beheaded by Asfandiyar, v, 

154 
palace of, fired and his wo- 
men earned off by Asfan- 
diyar, V, 154. 162, 
head of, thrown from the 
ramparts of the Brazen 
Hold, V, 157 
sons of, grieve for, v, 157 
Asfandiyar takes the trea- 
sure of, V, 161 
Khan of Chin descended 
from, vii, 334 
Arjuna, one of the five Paii- 
davas (Indian mythology) 
iv, 138, 139 
Ark, 158 
Arman, Armenia or district in 

Azarbaijdn, vii, 263 

Armani, Iranian chief, ix, 74 

Armenia (Arman, Irman q.v.), 

country, iii, 12 ; vi, 202, 

203 ; vii, 153, 224 ; viii, 

93, 96, 184, 193, -0-2. 377 



Armenia, Roman, vii, 1S7 

Armenian, Armenians (Irman- 

ians), iii, 286; viii, 188, 

189, 195, 226, 248, 282 

version of the Pseudo-Cal- 

listhenes, vi, 14 
— like, viii, 254 
= Mausil, viii, 293 and note 
Armi'n, son of Kai Kubdd. See 

Kai Armin. 

Arnawaz, sister of Jamshid, wife 

of Zahhak and Faridiin, 

and mother of fraj, i, 142 

married to Zahhak, i, 146 

seq. 
counsels Zahhak as to his 

dream, i, 148 
Faridun meets, i, 162 
Zahhak tries to kill, i, 167 
son of, by Faridun, i, 177 
Arnold, Mathew, his " Sohrab 

and Rustum," ii, 118 
Arran, the modern Karabagh, 
the region between the 
Kur and Aras rivers, i, 9 
Arrian, Greek historian (A.D. 
96-180), vi, 31, 68 
Anabasis of, vi, 12 
Indica of, vi, 12 
Caspian Gates of, vi, 32 
on the stature of Porus, vi, 
64 

Ichthyophagi, vi, 69 seq. 
Alexander and the 
Amazons, vi, 72 
death of Alexander, vi, 82 
Arrow-shots, three famous, viii, 

Bahram Chubina's, viii, 126 
Arsaces, name of the founder and 
other kings of the Parth- 
ian (Ashkanian) dynasty, 
vi, 197 
Arsacid, Arsacids, dynastic title 
of the above, iii, 9 ; vi, 
205, 255 ; vii, 156, 185, 
212 
imperial system of, vi, 198 
some of, escape from Ard- 
shir Pipakan to Armenia, 
vi, 203 



2o8 



GENERAL INDEX 



Arsac-d, rivalry of, with Sasa- 

nians, viii, 73 
Arsalas, murderer of Darius 

Codomanus, vi, 32 
Arses, Shah (B.C. 338-336) vi, 29 
Arslan Jazib, one of Mahmud's 

generals, i, 100 
referred to, i, 114 
Artabanus III (II according to 

some reckonings), Parth- 
ian king (A.D. 10-40), iii, 

9, 10 
Artabanus, son of above, iii, 9 
Artabanus, Persian captain of 

the guard temp. Xerxes, 

V, 282 
Rustam and, v, 282 
Artabanus III or IV (Ardawan 

q.v.), vi, 20I 
Artang, the house of the heresi- 

arch Mani, ii, 19 and tiote ; 

vii, 355 and note ; viii, 

172 and note, 362 and note 
Artaxerxes Longimanus, Sliah, 

V, 281, 282 
Bahman and, v, 2S2 
Artaxerxes Mnemon, Shah, i, 59 
Artaxerxes Ochus, Shah (B.C. 

359-338), vi, 18 note, 29 
Nectanebus II conquered 

by vi, 29 
murdered, vi, 29 
Artaxerxes I, Sasanian Shah. 

See Ardshir Papakan. 
Artaxerxes II (Ardshir brother 

of Shapur), Sasanian 

Shah, vi, 363 
Arts, invention of the. See 

Gaiumart, Hushang, 

Tahmuras, and Jamshid. 
'Anis, treasure, viii, 406 and 

7iote, ix, 20 
Arwand (Dijla, Tigris), ii, 392, 

404 ; vi, 329 ; viii, 90 ; 

ix, 85, 92 
Faridun's crossing of the, i, 

I Co 
Arzhang, a di'v and commander 

of the troops of Mazan- 

daran, 143 ; ii, 43, 44, 56 

seq., 63, 64 ; v, 203 



Arzhang. put in charge of Kai 
Kaiis and his troops when 
taken prisoners, ii, 41 
slain by Rustam, ii, 57 
Arzhang, dungeon of, iii, 309 
Arzhang, Turanian hero, 148, 
iii, 76, 77 
challenges the Iranians, iii, 

119 
slain, iii, 120 
Arzhang, Mani the heresiarch's 

house. See Artang. 
Aryan, Aryans, race, iii, 10 and 
note, iv, 137 
race, i, 7 
early seats of, i, 7 
meaning of, i, 7 
organization of, i, 7 
primitive religion of, i, 7 
belief in magic of, i, 8 
division of, i, 8 
India and Iran conquered 

by, i, 8 
Indian, their relations with 
the Iranians, i, 15 
Arzu, daughter of Sarv and wife 
of Salm, i, 18S and note 
referred to, i, 178 seq. 
Arzii, daughter of Mahiyar the 
jeweller, vii, 59, 61 
referred to, vii, 55, 56, 58 
sings to Bahram Gur, vii, 60 
Bahram Gur woos and weds, 

vii, 61 seq. 
meaning of, vii, 65 note 
Ascalon, city in Palestine, v, 292 
Asdepias acida, plant. See 

Homa. 
Asfandiyar (Spc«to-data, Span- 
dat), mythical Iranian 
hero, son of ShAh Gush- 
tasp, and the rival in 
legend of Rustam, 155- 

157. i. 4^. 55 ; ii. 29 ; V, 
9, 10, 12, 24 seq., 29, 30, 
41 seq., 45, 49. 69 seq., 
90 seq., 25S, 259, 261, 
279, 281 seq., 289, 290, 
293 ; vi, 15, 49, 55. 
200, 213, 224, 242, 251, 
271 ; viii, 95, 104 and 



GENEILIL IXDF.X 



209 



Asfandiyar— com/. 

tiote, 171, 270, 33.', 395 

vo(e ; ix, 25, 26 note, 104 
invulnerability of, v, 19 
sisters of, 156, v, 20, 22 

carried off by the Turk- 
man?, V, 93, 100, 171 

rescued by, v, 153, 162 

lament over, v, 252 seq. 
marriage of, with Ilumdi, 

V, 22, 77 

ignored by Firdausi, v, 22 
birth of, V, 32 
answers, in conjunction with 

Zarir and Jamasp, Ar- 

jasp's letter, v, 42 
triumph of, over ArjAsp 

foretold by Jamasp, v, 52 
given command of one wing, 

V. 55 

addresses his five brothers, 
V, 65 

hears his father's offer of 
the crown and throne to 
the avenger of Zarir, v, 66 

slays Bidirafsh, v, 70 

presents the head of Bidira- 
fsh and the steed of Zarir 
to Gushtasp, V, 71 

divides the host, v, 71 

attacks, with Nastiir and 
Niish Azar, the Turkmans, 
V, 71 

grants quarter to the Turk- 
mans, v, 72 

made chief ruler of frin 
under Gushtasp and sent 
by him to convert the 
world, V, 76 

rests from his labours, v, 77 

makes Farshidward gover- 
nor of Khurasan, v, 77 

reports the success of his 
administration to Gush- 
tasp, V, 77 

slandered by Gurazm, v, 78 

recalled to court, v, 80 seq. 

sons of, 157, V, 80, 81 

resigns his host to Bah man, 
V, 82 

arraigned by Gushtasp, v, 83 

vol.. IX. 



.•\sfandiyar, put in bonds, v. 
84 

sent to Gumbadcin, v, 84 

solaced by Bahman and 
others, v, 85 

Jamasp advises Gu.shtdsp 
to release, v, 07 

hears of arrival of Jamasp, 
V, 98. 99 

parley of, with Jdmasp, v, 
99 seq. 

eight and thirty brothers 
of, v, loi, 103, III, 160 

bids Jamasp send for black- 
smiths, V, lOI 

breaks his bonds himself, v, 
102, 206 

calls for his steed and arms, 
V, 102 

sets off with Jamasp, Bah- 
man, and Niish Azar, v, 

103 

vow of, v, 103 

laments over Farshidward, 
V, 104 

prays that he may avenge 
Farshidward on .\rjasp, v, 
104 

shrouds Farshidward, v, 105 

sees and addresses the corpse 
of Gurazm, v, 105 

passes the Turkman trenches 
and defeats the outposts, 
V, 106 

interview of, with Gush- 
tasp, V, 106 

receives the promise of the 
crown and undertakes to 
deliver Gushtasji, v, 107 

arrays and leads the host, 
V, 109 

attacks the Turkmans, v, 
no 

defeats Kuhram, v, no 

takes Gurgscir prisoner, v. 
Ill 

defeats Arjdsp, v, 112, 206 

grants quarter to the Turk- 
mans, V, 113 

distributes the spoil, v, 
114 

o 



2IO 



GENERAL INDEX 



Asfandiyar, undertakes to rescue 
his sisters from the Turk- 
mans, V, 115 

prepares to invade Tiirdn, 
V, 115 

Seven Stages (Haft Khwan) 
of, ii, 29; V, 27, 118, 119, 

121, 135, 162 ; viii, 171 
Story of, 1^6, V, 116 seq. 
compared with Rustam's, 

V, 117 
rivalry in legend between 

Rustam and, v, 116 
quits Balkh and goes, with 

Gurgsar as guide, to 

Tiiran, v, 120 
offers the kingdom of the 

Turkmans to Gurgsar in 

return for faithful service, 

V, 120 
questions Gurgsar, v, 120 

seq., 124, 125, 128, 131, 

134. 139, 141 
during his adventures in 

the Seven Stages, leaves 

Bishiitan in command, v, 

122, 124, 126, 129, 132 
note, 144 

praised by Bishiitan and the 

host, V, 123, 125, 131, 133 
scythed chariot made by, 

V, 126 
revived by Bishiitan after 

encountering the dragon, 

V, 127 
song of, V, 129 

amulet given to, by Zar- 

duhsht, V, 130 
encourages the Iranians to 

persevere, v, 136 
prays for deliverance from 

the snow, v, 138 
leaves the baggage behind, 

V. 138 
reproaches Gurgsar for giv- 
ing false information, v, 

139. 140 
offers to make Gurgsar 
captain of the Brazen 
Hold if he will be a trusty 
guide, V, I4Q 



Asfandiyar, guided by Gurgsar 

crosses ford with host, 

V, 140 
cursed by Gurgsar, v, 141 
slays Gurgsar, v, 141 
surveys the Brazen Hold, v, 

142 
captures, questions, and 

slays two Turkmans, v, 

142 
Bishiitan and, consult, v, 

143 

stratagem of, to take the 
Brazen Hold, v, 116, 143 

disguised as a merchant, 
interviews Arjasp, v, 145 

assumes the name of Khar- 
rad, V, 146 

questioned by Arjasp, v, 146 

trades as a merchant in the 
Brazen Hold, v, 147 

meets his sisters, v, 147 

gives a banquet to the Turk- 
man chiefs, V, 149 

surprises the Brazen Hold, 
V, 152 seq. 

provides for his sisters' 
safety, v, 153 

attacks the palace of Arjasp, 

V, 153 
encounters Arjasp, v, 154 
beheads Arjasp, v, 154 
fires Arjasp's palace, v, 154 
carries off the women, v, 

154 
quits the Brazen Hold and 
leaves Sawa in charge, v, 

.154 
joins Bishiitan, v, 155 
pursues Kuhram to the 

Brazen Hokl, v, 156 
encounters and takes Kuh- 
ram prisoner, v, 157 
grants no quarter to the 

Turkmans, v, 158 
puts to death AndarimAn 

and Kuhram, v, 158 
announces his victory to 

Gushtasp, V, 159 
disposes of the spoil, v, 

t6t 



GENERAL INDEX 



211 



AsfandiyAr, carries off his sisters, 
the womenfolk of Arj4sp, 

and others from the 

Brazen Hold, v, 162 
sets fire to, and dismantles, 

the Brazen Hold, v, 162 
sends his sons homeward by 

dirterent routes, v, 162 
returns himself by the Seven 

Stages, V, 162 
picks up his left baggage, 

V, 162 
hunts while waiting for his 

sons, V, 162 
rejoined by his sons, v, 163 
welcome of, on his return 

to fran, v, 163 
banquets with Gushtasp, v, 

164 
fight of, with Rustam, 
Story of, 156 

recited by Nadr, son of 

Harith, at Mecca, v, 166 

complains to his mother of 

Gushtasp's treatment of 

him, V, 167 
counselled by his mother, 

V, 1 68, 175 
fate of, foretold by Jamasp, 

V, 169 
recounts his deeds before 

Gushtasp, V, 170 
promised the throne by 

Gushtasp when he has 

brought Rustam and his 

kin in bonds to court, v, 

173. 174 
meets with an ill omen on 

starting for Zabulistcin, v, 

177 
consults with Bishiitan, v, 

178 
sends Bahman on an em- 
bassage, V, 179 seq. 
message of, to Rustam, v, 

179 
receives Rustam's answer 

from, and is wroth with, 

Bahman, v, 191 
converses of Rustam with 

Bishiitan, v, 192 



Asfandiydr, goes attended to 

\ meet Rustam, v, 192 

1 parleys with Rustam, v, 

192 seq. 

declines Rustam's invita- 

I tion to visit him, v, 193 

invites Rustam to a feast, 

V, 195 
repents of having invited 

Rustam, v, 196 

counselled by Bishiitan to 

keep on friendly terms 

with Rustam, v, 196, 217 

does not summon Rustam 

to the feast, v, 197 
wrangles with Rustam, v. 

198 seq. 
does not assign Rustam his 
proper seat at the feast, 
v, 200 
remonstrated with by Rus- 
tam, V, 200 
bids Bahman resign his own 
\ seat to Rustam, v, 200 

vilifies Zal and Rustam, v, 

201 
recounts his lineage, v, 205 
j his exploits, v, 205 

his capture of a hill-fort, 
V, 206 
tries a handgrip with Rus- 
tam, V, 208 
1 challenges Rustam, v, 209 

astonished at Rustam's 
prowess at the board, v, 
210 
declines Fustam's overtures, 
V. 211 seq. 
I calls Zabulistan " Babble- 

I stead," V, 216 

parodies Rustam's address 
to royal tent-enclosure, 
V, 216 
arms for fight with Rustam, 

V, 223 
refuses Rustam's sugges- 
tion of a general engage- 
ment, V, 224 
informed by Bahman of the 
slaying of Niish Azar and 
i\Iilir-i-Nush, v, 227 



212 



GENERAL INDEX 



Asfandiyar, enraged with Rus- 
tam, V, 228 

wounds Rustam and 
Rakhsh, v, 229 

jeers at Rustam v, 229 

calls upon Rustam to sur- 
render, V, 230 

returns to camp, laments 
for Nush Azar and Mihr-i- 
Niish, and sends their 
corpses to Gushtasp with 
a message, v, 232 

converses with Bishutan of 
the fight with Rustam, v, 
232, 240 

Simurgh instructs Rustam 
how to overcome, v, 237 
seq. 

branch of tamarisk fatal to, 
V, 239 and note 

summoned by Rustam to 
fight and becomes des- 
pondent, V, 240 

Rustam's final effort for 
peace with, v. 241 seq. 

Bahman and Bishutan hear 
of the overthrow of, v, 244 

address of, to Bishutan, v, 

245 

Rustam bewails, v, 246 

confides Bahman to Rustam, 
V, 248 

foretells evil for Rustam, v, 
248 

gives his last charge to 
Bishutan, v, 249 

death of, v, 250 

Rustam laments over, v, 250 

corpse of, sent to GushtAsp 
by Rustam, v, 251 

funeral procession of, con- 
ducted by Bishutan, v, 

251 
lamentations over, v, 252 

seq. 
corpse of, displayed by 

Bishutan, v, 253 
Rustam writes to Gushtdsp 

to excuse himself in the 

matter of, v, 256 
Xerxes and, v, 282 



Asfandiyar, Bahman on the ven- 
geance due for, v, 283 
referred to, v, 288 
Asfandiyar-nama (Spand-dit- 

nama), v, 26, 27 
Ashemaogha, vii, 188 
Ashi Vanguhi. the genius of 

piety, iv, 137 
Ashk, presumed founder of the 
Ashkanian (Parthian) 
dynasty, vi, I<J7, 210 
meaning of, vi, 197 
Ashkabiis, Turanian hero, j./.^> 
iii, 183, 186, 207, 268 
challenges the Iranians, iii, 

179 
Ruhham worsted by, iii, 179 
Rustam's fight with, iii, 109, 
179 seq. 

referre 1 to, viii, 75 
parleys with Rustam, iii, iSo 
slain by Rustam, iii, 181 
Ashkanian, Ashkanians, race and 
dynasty, i, 49 ; iii, 9, 11 ; 
v, 10, 282 ; vi, 196, 209 ; 
viii, 214 
duration of rule, vi, 193 
times, Firdausi's lack of 
materials for, vi, 193 
surviving traditions of, 
transferred to other 
dynasties, vi, 194 
importance of, vi, 194 
genealogy, vi, 197 
Ashkash, Iranian hero, iii, 33, 34, 
89, 347. 350, 332 ; iv, 13, 

57. 61. 65 
Rustam and, go to rescue 

Bizhan, iii, 334 
conveys baggage toward 

Iran, iii, 34O 
Kai Khusrau sends, to 

Khdrazm, iv, 15 
Shida defeated by, iv, 60, 72 
troops of, recalled, iv, 145 
seiit with a host to Zani, iv, 

I.S7 
pillage of Makrdn by, 
stopped by Km Khusrau, 
iv. 243 



GENERAL INDEX 



213 



Ashkasb, appointed governor of 
Makraii, iv, 244 
Kai Khusrau welcomed by, 
on his return from Gang- 
dizh, iv, 251 
Ashtad, Iranian chief, ix, 1 1 seq. 
chosen to visit Khusrau 
Parwiz at Taisafun, ix, 9 
and Kharrad parley with 
Galini'ish, ix, 11 
visit Khusrau Parwiz, ix, 

12 
report to Shi'rwi, ix, 27 
Asia, iv, 315, v, 293, viii, 187 
Minor, vi, 30 ; viii, 193, 194 
Central, vi, 73 
Asmodcus, demon, iii, 272 
Asoka, Indian king (B.C. 264- 

228-7). i, 15 
Asp, as Persian termination, ii, 9 
Assurbanipal, Assj'rian king, and 
Khusrau Parwiz, reigns 
of compared, viii, 193 
Assyria, v, 292 
Assyrians, i, 10 

invasions of fran by, i, 10 
Astawadh. See Haftwad. 
Astivihad, demon, iv, 137 
Astrolabe, i, 104, 188, 310 note ; 
ii. ^15, 273 ; iv, 158, 297 ; 
vi, 376 ; vii, 353 ; ix, 73 
Astrologer, Astrologers, Astro- 
logy, 1, 104, 18S. 255, 310 
and vote ; ii, 233, 284, 
409 ; iv. 27. 158, 159, 279, 
284, 334, 335 ; v, 48, 168 
seq., 263 ; vi, 108, 109, 
114, 132, 195, 198, 201. 
218, 227, 377 ; ix, 73 
importance of, in Shah- 

nania, i, 52 
consulted by Faridiin, i, 194 
Minuchihr i, 251, 307 
Zk\ i, 255 
S4m i, 278 

Kai Kaus ii, 103, 215, 217 
Afrasiyab, ii, 273 ; iv, 158 
Siyawush, ii, 282 
Kustam, iii, 219 
Kai Khusrau, iv, 158 
Human, v, 310 



.\strologcr, consulted by Sikan- 
dar, vi, 180 
Ardawan, vi, 218 
Vazdagird, son of Shapiir, 

vi, 375 seq., 390 
Bahram Gur, vii, i.}.], 145 
Khan of Chin, vii, 353 
Talhand, vii, 408, 413, 418 
Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 372 
Astyagcs (Istuvcgu), king of the 
IMedes (Manda q.v., 15. C. 
584-550) 
conquered by Cyrus, i, 18 ; 

vi, 194 
identified by Armenian his- 
torians with Zahhak, i, 72, 
144 
Mandane and, legend of, ii, 

190 
Afrasiyab and, in legend, ii, 
191 
Asura. See Ahura. 
Atbara, tributary of the Nile, vi, 

65 
Athenaeus, Greek writer (2n(l-3rd 

centuries A.D.), iv, 316 
Deipnosophistae of, ii, 10 

quoted, iv, 314 
Athens, schools of, closed by 

Justinian, vii, 280 
Athravans, priests of the Cult of 

Fire, i, 56 
Athwya. See Abtin. 
Atkinson, James, on the Shah- 

nama, vi, 250 
Atossa, wife of Cambyses and 

Darius Hystaspis, v, 11 
= Hutaosa, wife of Gush- 

tasp (?), V, 1 1 
Atropatene (Azarbaijan q.v.), i, 

9, 61 
primitive seat of I'ire-wor- 

ship, i, 56 
sub-kingdom in Parthian 

times, vi, 198 
Attock, town on the Indus in 

northern India, vi, 52 
Aurand, father of Shah Luhrdsp, 

v, 205 
Aurva/-aspa (Luhrasp q.v.), iv, 

316 ; v, II 



214 



GENERAL INDEX 



Autumnal equinox, iv, 313 

Kai Luhrasp crowned at, iv, 

313 
Avars, Caucasian tribe, viii, H)\ 

Avasta. See Zandavasta. 
Avidius Cassius, Roman general, 

vi, 291 note 
Awa, Iranian hero, iv, 149 
Awaza, stronghold, lyo, viii, 134, 

138 
Axumite, Ethiopian, dynasty, 

viii, 24 note 
Ayas, region, v, 61, 74, 107 
Ayin Gashasp (Yazdanbakhsh), 
Iranian noble, lyi, viii, 
75, 150 note, 222 
Hurmuzd consults, viii, 174, 

177 
and the prisoner, story of, 

viii, 177 seq. 
marches to Hamadan, viii, 

178 
consults a seer, viii, 178 
murdered, viii, 181 
avenged by Bahram Chu- 

bina, viii, 181 
troops of, disperse, viii, 181 
Azad Sarv, Firdausi's authority 
for the Story of Rustam 
and Shaghad, v, 260 scq. 
Azad Sarv, archmage and agent 
of Niishirwan, v, 261, vii, 
283 and note 
goes to Marv, vii, 283 
discovers Biizurjmihr, vii, 

283 
returns with Buzurjmihr to 
court, vii, 283 
Azada, Riinian slave-girl, vi, 382 
goes hunting with Bahram 

Giir, vi, 382 
tries to shame Bahram Giir 
in his markmanship, vi, 
383 
slain by Bahram Giir, vi, 
384 and note 
Azar (Azarbaijan q.v.), ii, 195 
Azar, genius, iii, 287, 328 
Azar (Adar), month and day, i, 
88, 89 ; vi, 41 1 ; viii, 
244, 421 ; ix, 17 



Azar Abadagan (Azarakhsh, 
Azargashasp q.v.), Fire- 
temple at Shiz (Takht-i- 
Sulaiman) near the south- 
eastern border of Azar- 
baijan, not at Tabriz with 
which the place has been 
wrongly identified (NT, 
p. 100, note), IJ2, IV, 
259 ; vii, 86, 224, 362 ; 
viii, 282 ; ix, 74 
importance of, i, 61 
visited by Kai Khusrau, 

iii, 20 
Kai Khusrau and Kai Kaus 
go on a pilgrimage to, iv, 

258 
Khatiin, wife of Khan, sent 

to serve at, vii, 5 
Bahram Gur visits, vii, 86, 

94 

Nushirwan visits, vii, 250, 

363 

Azar Afruz, third son of Asfan- 
diyar, v, 81 

Azarakhsh (Azargashasp, Azar 
Abadagan q.v.), Fire- 
temple, i, 61 
importance of, i, 61 

Azarbaijan (Atropatenc q.v.), 
province in north-western 
Persia, i, 9, 61 ; ii, 336 ; 
iv, 136 ; V, 16 ; vi, 198, 
203 ; vii, 160, 214 
meaning of, i, 56 

Azargashasp, spirit of the light- 
ning, i, 73, 248, 309, 349 ; 
ii, 57, 294, 345 ; iii, 23, 53. 
72. 92, 97. "4. 194. 276, 
327; iv, 84, 100, 147, 
175. 275, 307, 360 ; vi, 
381 ; vii, 21, 79, 2^2 ; 
viii, 46, 122, 152, 176, 
245. 256, 415 
temple of (Azar Abadagan 
q.v.), iv, 136. 258, 259 ; 
vii, 89, 250, 317. 365; 
viii, 68, 184, 210 and note 
visited by Kai Khusrau, 
iii, 20 



GENERAL IXDEX 



215 



Azargashasp, temj)l ^ of Kai 

Khusrau and Kai Kaus 

go on a pilgrimage to, 

iv, 238 
rcfcrrocl li>, i\-, J64 
= Gushasp q.v., vi, 212 

and note 
Bahram Gur visits, vii, 

86, i3<) 
high priest of, converts 

Sap.'nud to Zoroastrian- 

ism, vii, 139 
Niishirwan visits, vii, 250, 

Khusrau Parwiz visits, 
viii, 283, 307, 312 
Azargashasp, Iranian warrior, 

viii, 296 
Azar Makan, father of Farrukh- 

zad, viii, 40S 
Azarmdukht, Sliah, lyj, v, 294 ; 

ix, 56, 59, 69 • 
reproaches Kubad, ix, 7 
end of, ix, 59, 60 
Azarnarsi, son of Hurmuzd son 

of Narsi, vi, 318 
Azdites, Arab tribe, i, 11 
Azhi, \zi (Dahaka, Zahhak q.v.), 

i, 142 ; ii, 81 



Babak, Tribal Iving. Sec Papak. 
Babak, muster-master of Nushir- 
wan 
bidden to enrol the host, 

767, vii, 230 
insists on Niishirwan 's at- 
tendance for enrolment, 
vii, 231 
asks pardon of the Shah, vii, 

Babar, founder of the Mogul 
dynasty in India 
resolutions of, as to wine- 
drinking, vii, 75 note 

Babblestead, nonce name given 
by Asfandiyar to Zabul- 
istan, V, 216 

Babil (Babylon (j.v.), 160 



I!al)r-i-Hayan, a surcoat of leo- 
pard or tiger skin worn by 
Rustam in battle, iii, 184, 
186 
referred to, iii, 278 

Babylon (Babil, gate of the god), 
city on the left bank lA 
the Euphrates, now repre- 
sentee! by the modern 
Hillah on the right bank, 
ii, 80 ; iii, 286 ; vi, 17, 
31, 81, 83 ; viii, 191. ^49 i 
ix, 65, 9^ 
hanging gardens of, v, 293 
Sikandar marches toward, 

vi, 176, 178 
prodigious birth at, vi, 81, 

180 
Sikandar sickens at, vi, 181 

dies at, vi, 81, 183 
Zahhak king of, ix, 65 

Babylonia, ii, 80, 81 

Babylonian, vi, 254 
script, vi, 320 

Bacchus, Saint and IMartyr, viii, 
188 

Bactria, region between the 
Hindu Kush and the 
Oxus, vi, 32, 198 

Bactrian plains, iii, 10 

camels, viii, 47 ; ix, 93 

Badakshan, region south of the 
Upper Oxus and east of 
Balkh, famous for its 
rubies, iv, 65, 192 
signet-ring of, i, 300 
gem of, vi, 382 and note 

Bddci.n-Piruz (Shahram - Piruz, 
Ardabil q.v.), city built 
by Shah Piruz in Azar- 
biiijan, i66, vii, 160, 163 

Badar, Jiadr, battle of, ii, 337 
note, V, 166 

Bad Awar, treasure viii., 406, 
and nott', i<., 20. 

Baeton, Greek writer, temp. 
Alexander the Great, vi, 
12 

Baghdad, city on the Tigris, 
founded by the 'Ab- 
basid Khalifa Al Mansur 



2l6 



GENERAL INDEX 



Baghdad — cont. 

as his capital in A.D. 762, 
on the site of an old Baby- 
lonian city (Baghdadu), 
161, 165, i, 14, 160 ; iii, 
35 ; iv, 147, 256 ; V, 28 ; 
vi, 254, 290, 322, 327 ; 
vii, 83 and note ; viii, 109 
note, 112, 174, 193, 203, 
393 ; ix, 68 

Ardshir Papakan enthroned 
at, vi, 258 

Yazdagird quits, ix, 88 

Persian settlement of, ix, 67 
raided by Arabs, ix, 67 
Bagiz, vi, 32 
Bagoas, vi, 29 

Bahar, district in Turkistan 
where Siyawushgird was 
built, ii, 286 
Bahman (Vohu Manau), ame- 
shaspenta q.v., iii, 286, 
327 ; V, 16 ; vi, 362 and 
note 

Yasht, PahlaviText, vii, 188 

month and day, iv, 81 note, 
V, 310; vii, 31 and 
note 
Bahman (Ardshir, Artaxerxes), 
son of Asfandiyar, Shah, 
156, J57, i. 42 ; ii, 9 ; 
v, 81, 166, 251, 254, 293. 
297, 303 ; vi, 20 note, 34 
and note, 49, 200, 213, 
270 and note ; viii, 270 

eldest son of Asfandiyar, v, 
80 

Asfandiyar resigns the host 
to, V, 82 

hears of Asfandiyar's im- 
prisonment, V, 85 

goes with others to solace 
him, V, 85 

accompanies Asfandiyar 
from Gumbadan, v, 103 

sent on an embassage, v, 
179 seq. 

crosses the Hi'rmund, v, 182 

coming of, reported to Z41, 
V, 182 

interview of, with Zdl, v, 183 



Bahman, follows Rustam to the 
hunting-ground, v, 184 

tries to kill Rustam, v, 
184 

interview of, with Rustam, 
v, 185 seq. 

entertained by Rustam, v, 
186 

astonished at Rustam's 
appetite, v, 186 

leaves Rustam, v, 190 

gives Rustam's answer to 
Asfandiyar, v, 191 

Asfandiyar's wrath with, v 
191 

resigns his seat at the feast 
to Rustam, v, 200 

informs Asfandiyar of the 
slaying of Niish Azar and 
Mihr-i-Nush, v, 227 

hears of Asfandiyar's over- 
throw, V, 244 

confided to Rustam by 
Asfandiyar, v, 248 

Zawara warns Rustam 
against, v, 250 

remains with Rustam, v, 
252, 256 

instructed by Rustam and 
profits thereby, v, 256 

Gushtasp advised by Jam- 
asp to write to, v, 258 

Gushtasp 's letter of recall 
to, v, 258 

equipped by Rustam for his 
journey, v, 258 

welcomed and called Ard- 
shir by Gushtasp, v, 259 
and note 

long arms of, v, 281 

appointed by Gushtasp to 
succeed him, v, 279 

historical position of, in 
Persian legend, v, 281 

ascends the throne and har- 
angues the chiefs on the 
vengeance due for Asfan- 
diyar, V, 283 

invades Sistan, v, 2S4 seq. 

sends a hostile message to 
Zal, V, 285 



GENERAL INDEX 



217 



Bahman, rejects Zal's concilia- 
tory overtures, v, 280 

sacks Zal's jiaiace, v, j86 

pillages Zabulistaii, v, 287 

lights, defeats, aiul exe- 
cutes Faramarz, v, 288 

Bishutan intercedes for Zal 
with, V, 288 

stops the pillage of Zabul 
and rt'lcascs Zal, v, 289 

quits Zabul by Bishutan's 
advice, v, 290 

passes over his son SAs4n 
and nominates Humai antl 
her issne as successors to 
the throne, v, 291 

death of, v, 294 

referred to, v, 310 
Bahman, son of Ardawan, 160, 
161, vi, 202, 225, 227, 260 I 

made ruler of Pars, vi, 218 
and vole 

referred to, vi, 222 

bidden by Ardawan to seek 
out Ardshir I'apakan, vi, 

223 
wounded and put to flight 
by Ardshir Papakan and 
Tabak, vi, 227 
escapes to Hind after the 

defeat of Artlawan, vi, 228 1 
urges his sister to poison ! 
Ardawan, vi, 259 
Bahman, Iranian magnate, temp. 
Xiishirwan, vii, 312 ; viii, 1 
22 
Bahman, castle of, in Azar- 
baijan, 146, ii, 336, 405 
seq. 
Bahrain, group of islands off 
the Arabian shore of the 
Persian Gulf, vi, 330 ; ix, 
68 
Bahram, genius, iii, 287, 328 ; 
vii, 406 and note 
day, viii, 279 

fatal to Bahr4m Chubina, 
viii, 337 and note. 339 
and 7tote 
Bahrdm, moralist, quoted by 
Firdausi, ii, 186 



Bahram (V'ardancs), son of 
( ii'id;irz anil Ijrotiier oi tjiv, 
Iranian hero and Parth- 
ian king, 145, 147. 14^ : 
ii. ii. 3.5. 38. 5«. 62, 85, 
127, 138, 144, 158, 249, 
257, 258, 271, 290, 318, 
338, 340 ; iii, 13, 15, 19. 
43, 46 seq., 67, 72, 95 seq., 
114, 116, 132, 200, 214, 
232 ; iv, 8, 312 ; vi, 

197 

takes part in the Fight of the 
Se\'en Warriors, ii, 107 
seq. 

goes with Siyawush against 
Afrasiyab, ii, 226 

put in command by Siya- 
wush, ii, 250, 257 

interviews Farud, iii, 47 seq. 

Farud presents his mace to, 

iii, 50 
reports his interview with 

Farud to Tus, iii, 51 
tries to save Farud, iii, 52 
reproaches the Iranians, iii, 

66 
slays Kabiida, iii, 74 
rescues the crown of Riv- 

niz, in, 94 
loses his whi]i, iii, 11, 95 
becomes fey, iii, 93 
succours a wounded brother, 

iii, 97 
finds his whip, iii, 95 
loses his horse, iii, 95 
set on by Turkmans, iii, 98 

Ruin, iii, 99 
wounds Ruin, iii, 99 
interviews Piran, iii, 99 
attacked by Tazhdv, iii, 

loi 
found by Giv, iii, 102 
death and burial of, iii, 104 
Bahram, son of Zarasp, Iranian 

hero, goes with Zarir to 

Rum, iv, 360 
commands the host in 

Zarir's absence, iv, 360 
hails Gushtdsp as Shdh, iv, 

302 



2l8 



GENERAL INDEX 



Bahram, franian warrior or king, 

iv, 268 
Bahram = Ardawan, \^i, 197, 210 
Bahrani, son of Piruz, Iranian 

warrior, temp. Bahram 

Giir, vii, 85 
Bahram, father of Shirwi temp. 

Nushirwan, vii, 251, 262 
Bahram, son of Urmuzd, Sasan- 

ian Shah (Varahran I), 

162, vi, 3 
receives the throne from, 

and is counselled by, 

Urmuzd, vi, 303 seq. 
mourns for Urmuzd, vi, 

306 
Reign of, vi, 307 seq. 

Note on, vi, 307 
appoints his successor and 

dies, vi, 309 
Mani and, vi, 327 
Bahram, son of Bahram, Sasan- 

ian Shah (Varahran II), 

162, vi, 3, 308 
appointed to succeed his 

father, vi, 309 
Reign of, vi, 310 

Note on, vi, 310 
story told of, vi, 310 
Bahram, son of Shapur, Sasan- 

ian Shah (Varahran IV), 

J'5J, vi, 3, 371 
Reign of, vi, 36S 

Note on, vi, 368 
ruler of Kirman, vi, 368 
title of, vi, 313, 368 
seal of, vi, 368 
Tabari's account of, vi, 368 
daughter of, vi, 369 
resigns the throne to his 

brother, vi, 369 
dies, vi, 369 
Bahram, son of Siyawush, iy2, 

viii, 75, 163, 245 
reported slain, viii, 128 
returns with captive sor- 
cerer, viii, 128 
speech of, viii, 166 
related to Bahram Chubina, 

viii, 187 
wife of viii, 187 



Bahram, son of Siyawush, wife of, 

warns Bahram Chubina, 

viii, 247 
pursues Khusrau Parwiz, 

viii, 233 
besieges Khusrau Parwiz, 

viii, 236 
beguiled by Bandwi, viii, 

236. 243 
returns with Bandwi to 
Bahram Chubina, viii, 
238 
blamed by Bahram Chu- 
bina, viii, 238 
given custody of Bandwi, 

viii, 238 
slain by Bahram Chubina, 
viii, 247 
Bahram, Iranian general, left in 
charge of host by Khus- 
rau Parwiz, viii, 296 
Bahram, father, in Persian 
Tabari, of Bahram Chii- 
I bina, viii, 77 

Bahram, name of, inscribed on 
cup incites Khusrau Par- 
wiz to afflict Rai, viii, 
365 and note 
Bahram Azarmihan, Iranian 
scribe, lyo 
Hurmuzd attempts to 

suborn, viii, 85 seq. 
reveals state-secret to Hur- 
muzd, viii, 88 
put to death, viii, 89 
Bahram Bahramiyan, Sasanian 
Shah (Varahran III), 162, 

vi, 3. 316. 3^4. 334 

Reign of, vi, 313 
Note on, vi, 313 

miscalled " Kirmanshah," 
vi, 313, 368 

appoints his son to succeed 
him, vi, 314, 315 
Bahram Chubina, son of Gas- 
hasp, marchlord of Rai, 
Persian warrior and usur- 
per, lyo-iys, i, 14 ; vi, 
209, 250 ; viii, 70, 73, 
184, 187, 199, 209, 214, 
215. 343 seq.. 352 seq.. 



GF.xrn.ir ixnr-x 



210 



Bahram Chubina — coul. 

350 seq., 360, iSi ; ix, o, 
15, 16, 22, 91, 105 

Romance of, viii, 72 seq., 
1S7, igi, 304 itolc ; ix, 5 
NiJldckc on, viii, 73 

account of, viii, 72 

seller of sheep's heads and, 
viii, 74, 107 

dream of, viii, 75 

withholding of booty by, 
viii, 76, 1 48 

insult of Ilurmuzd to, viii, 

defeat of, in I.azic war, viii, 

76 
sends swords to Ilurnuizd, 

viii, 76 
parentage of, viii, 76, 77 
malicious speech about, viii, 

77. 150 
coinage of, viii, 77, 173 
brought to notice of Hur- 

muzd, viii, 98 
described, viii, 98, 206 
identified by Zad Farrukh, 

viii, 99 
sent for by Hurmuzd, viii, 

100 
consulted by Hurmuzd, viii, 

100 
made commander-in-chief, 

viii, 102 
selects his troops, viii, 102 
justifies his method in so 

doing, viii, 104 
receives Rustam's banner 

from Hurmuzd, viii, 105 

Mihran as recorder from 
Hurmuzd, viii, 106 
marches from Taisafiin, viii, 

106 
refuses to be recalled, viii, 

108 
marcfics to Kliuzislan, viii, 

log and note 
hay-seller and, viii, 109 
marches toward Dama- 

ghdn, viii, 109 
parley of, with Faghfur, 

viii, 112 



i>ahrain Clu'ibina, refuses Sciwa's 

olfcrs, viii, 113 seq., 117 

seq. 
counselled by Kluirrad, viii, 

121 
arrays his host, viii, 122 
prayer of, before battle, 

viii, 123 
encourages the franians 

against Sawa's sorcery, 

etc., viii, 124 seq. 
defeats and slays Sawa, viii, 

126 
doings of, after battle with 

Sawa, viii, 130 
rewarded by Hurmuzd, viii, 

133 

ordered to attack Parmuda, 

viii, 133 
holds revel in a garden, 

viii, 135 
attacked by and defeats 

Parmuda, viii, 135 seq. 
besieges Parmuda in Awaza, 

viii, 138 
informs Hurmuzd, viii, 138 
negotiates for surrender of 

Awaza with Parmuda, 

viii, 138 seq. 
receives surrender of, and 

insults, Parmuda, viii, 143 
blamed by Kharrad and 

archscribe, viii, 144 
tries to appease Parmuda, 

viii, 145 
lias inventory made of the 

wealtii in Awaza, viii, 147 
sends fzid Gashasp witli 

spoil to Iran, viii, 148 
Hurmuzd begins to suspect, 

viii, 151 
advances of, to Khan re- 
jected, viii, 153 
goes to Balkh, viii, 153 
guided by an onager, viii, 

136 

incited to seek the king- 
ship, viii, 158 

change in, viii, 158 

questioned by Kharratl, \iii, 
i5'S 



220 



GENERA T. INDEX 



Bahrain Cliubina, sends Yalan- 
sina after Kharrad and 
archscribe, viii, 159 

pardons archscribe, viii, 160 

Luck of, viii, 162 

renounces allegiance to 
Hurmuzd, viii, 162 

intercepts the royal letters, 
viii, 163 

consults the chiefs, viii, 163 

becomes friends with the 
Khan, viii, 172 

appoints a prince for Khura- 
san, etc., viii, 173 

marches to Rai, viii, 173 

avenges murder of Ayin 
Gashasp, viii, 181 

historical campaign of, 
against Khusrau Parwiz, 
viii, 189 

carline and, viii, 1S9, 303 

marches to the Kahrawan, 
viii, 201 

spies' report of, to Khusrau 
Parwi'z, viii, 201 

Khusrau Parwiz marches to 
meet, viii, 203 
interview of, with, viii, 
204 seq. 

tampers with troops of 
Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 225 

combat of, with Khusrau 
Parwi'z, viii, 228 

arrives at Taisafiin, viii, 231 

sends Bahram, son of Siya- 
wush, in pursuit of Khus- 
rau Parwiz, viii, 233 

blames Bahram, viii, 238 

chides, warns and im- 
prisons Bandwi, viii, 238 

addresses the magnates, viii, 

239 
elected Shah, viii, 243 
gives malcontents three 

days to quit Iran, viii, 244 
plot against, viii, 245 seq. 
warned, viii, 247 
slays ]5ahram, son of Siya- 

wush, viii, 247 
hears of Bandwi's escape, 

viii, 248 



Bahrcim ("liul'fna, deceived by 
forged letters, viii, 287, 
293. 294 
marches against Khusrau 

Parwiz, viii, 2S7 
goes to Azar Abadagan, 

viii, 28S 
arrays his host, viii, 289 
fights with and slays Kut, 

viii, 290 
sends back corpse of Kut, 

viii, 291 
worsts Rumans, viii, 292 
" Harvest of," viii, 292 
charges and routs Khusrau 
Parwiz' centre, viii, 294 
fights with Gurdwi, viii, 294 
goes to fight Khusrau Par- 
wiz and his body-guard, 
viii, 297 
leaves Janfuriiz in charge 
of host, viii, 297 
puts to flight and pursues 
Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 298 
Suriish saves Khusrau Par- 
wiz from, viii, 209 
deserted by his chiefs, viii, 

302 
retreats, viii, 302 
releases Nastuh, viii, 306 
goes to Rai, viii, 306 
welcomed by Khan, viii, 316 
asks oath of Khan, viii, 317 
counsels Khan to resist 

Makatiira, viii, 318 
challenged by Makatiira, 

viii, 319 
fight of, with Makatiira, viii, 

320 

Khan sends gifts to, viii, 321 

asked by Khan's wife to 

avenge ^dealh of her 

daughter on lion-aje, viii, 

324 
battle of, with lion-ape, viii, 

325, 
extradition of, demanded by 

Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 328 
urges Khan to make war 

on frdn, viii, 330 
sets foith for frdn, viii, 331 



GENERAL INDEX 



221 



Bahrain Chiibina, Kharrcid at- 
tempts to prejudice, with 
Khcin. viii, 333 

arrives at Marv, viii. 336 

fatal day of, viii, 337, 339 

Kulun seeks interview with, 
viii, 330 
stabs, viii. 340 

sister of, mourns, viii, 340 

dying speech of, viii, 341 

makes Yalan-sina his man- 
datory, viii, 342 

letter of, to Khan, viii, 343 

burial of, viii, 343 

name of. on cup, viii, 365 
and n?tz 

assassination of, referred to, 
ix, 4 
Bahram Giir, Sasanian Shah 
(Varahran V), 163-165. i, 
42 ; vi, 3, 250, 325, 329 
and note, 394 seq. ; vii, 
160, 164, 165, 170 and 
note, 174, 178, 187, 334, 
359; viii, 75, 129 and 
note ; ix, 26, 77 

birth of, vi, 375 

Yazdagird advised by mag- 
nates to choose governor 
for, vi, 376 

put in Munzir's charge, vi, 

372. 378 
goes with Munzir to Yaman, 

vi, 378 
nurses of, vi, 378 
education of, vi, 378 seq. 
obtains his tutors' dismissal, 

vi, 380 
makes choice of steeds, vi, 

380 

slave-girls, vi, 38 1 
goes to the chase- with a 

slave-girl, vi, 382 
markmanship of, vi, 383 

seq. 
slays his slave-girl, vi, 384 

and note 
goes hunting with Nu'm^n 

and Munzir, vi, 384 
picture of, hunting, sent to 

Yazdagird, vi, 385 



BahrAm Gi'ir, returns with 
Nu'm^n to Yazdagird, vi, 
386 

complains of Yazdagird to 
Munzir, vi, 387 

receives advice and his slave- 
girl from Munzir, vi, 3S8 

falls into disgrace at court, 

vi, 389 

asks Tainush to intercede 
for him, vi, 389 

released and return? to Mun- 
zir, vi. 390 

welcomed by Munzir, vi, 390 

hears of his father's death 
and of the election of 
Khusrau, vi, 395, 396 

claims the kingship and is 
snpported by Munzir, vi, 
396 seq. 

interview of, with Jawanwi, 
vi, 398 

negotiates w'th the Iran- 
ians, vi, 401 seq. 

Iranians produce examples 
of Y'azdagird's cruelty to, 
vi, 404 

addresses the Iranians, vi, 
404 

proposes to decide the ques- 
tion of the kingship by 
ordeal, vi, 403 

promises to rule justly, vi, 
406 

agrees to be the first to face 
the ordeal, vi, 409 

Reign of, 164, vii, 3 seq. 
Note on, vii, 3 seq. 
length of, vii, 3 
largely legendary, vii, 3 

character of, vii, 3 

resembles Jarnes V of Scot- 
land, vii, 3 

accession of, vii, 7 
age of, at, vi, 373 
inaugural measures at, 
vii, 7 seq. 

holds eight days' court, vii, 
7 seq. 

appoints ministers, vii, 4, 
8, II 



222 



GENERAL INDEX 



Bahrani Gur, sends letters to 

the chiefs, vii, 8 
pardons his enemies, vii, 9 
makes festival for three 

days, vii, 9 
rewards Nu'man and Mun- 

zir, vii, 10 
honours Khusrau, vii, 10 
remits arrears of taxes, vii, 

II 
restores the nobles exiled 

by Yazdagird to their 

honours, vii, 1 1 
proclamations of, vii, 12, 

79, 82 
persecutes the Christians, 

vi, 373 ; vii, 4 
war of, with Rum, vii, 4 
adventures of, 164, vii,' 4, 

12 seq. 
forbids wine-drinking, vii, 

allows wine-drinking again, 

vii, 25 
whip of, vii, 47, 54, 63, 64 
ecjuipage of, for the chase, 

vii, 48, 76 
loses and finds his tughral, 

vii, 49, 50 
visit of, to Barzin, vii, 49 seq. 
marries Barzin's daughters, 

vii, 53 
hunting-feats of, vi, 383 

seq. ; vii, 54, 55, 77, 80, 81 
visits a jeweller, vii, 56 seq. 
course of life of, bewailed by 

Ruzbih, vii, 56 
many wives of, vii, 56 
asks and obtains Arzu in 

marriage, vii, 61 seq. 
visit of, to Farshidward, vii, 

68 
forbids all plundering, vii, 

79 
ear-marks and brands 

onagers, vii, 81 
remits the tribute of Barkuh 

and Jaz, vii, 82 
visits Baghdad, vii, 83 
holds revel at Baghdad, 

vii, 83 



Bahram Giir reproaches Ruzbih 

for parsimony, vii, 83 
reported to be given up to 

pleasure, vii, 84 
reproached by his chiefs, 

vii, 84 
secret preparations of, 

against the Khan, vii, 85 
summons his chiefs, vii, 85 
levies a host, vii, 86 
makes Narsi viceroy, vii, 86 
goes to Azar Abadagan, vii, 

86, 94, 139 
march of, to Marv against 

the Khan, vii, 89 
defeats the Khan at Kash- 

mihan, vii, 4, 5, 90, 170 

note 
marches on Bukhara, vii, 

90 
defeats the Turkmans, vii, 

91 

grants peace to the Turk- 
mans, vii, 91 

boundary pillar of, vii, 92, 
160, 161, 164 

makes Shahra ruler of 
Turan, vii, 92 

goes to Istakhr, vii, 95 

makes gifts of treasure, vii, 

95. 96 
deposits the Khan's crown 

in a Fire-temple, vii, 95 
goes to Taisafun, vii, 95 
welcomed by Narsi and the 

chiefs, vii, 96 
remits taxes for seven years, 

vii, 5. 97 
happiness of the world 

under, vii, 99 
bestows Khurasan on Narsi, 

vii, 99 
inquires about Caesar's en- 
voy, vii, 100 
gives audience to Caesar's 

envoy, vii, loi 
Caesar's questions to, vii, 102 
parting gifts of, to Caesar's 

envoy, vii, io6 
addresses the archmages, 

vii, 106 



GENERAL INDEX 



223 



Bahrdm Gur, wazi'r complains of 

Shangul to, vii, loy 
writes to Shangul, vii, 110. 
visit of, to Hind, vii, 3, 112 

seq. 

motive of, vii, 5 

fabulous, vii, 6 
bears his own letter to Hind, 

vii, 112 
audience of, with Shangul, 

vii, 112 
entertained by Shangul, vii, 

116 
wrestles before Shangul, vii, 

117 
displays his markmanship 

before Shangul, vii, 118 
calls himself Barzwi, vii, 

121 
slays monsters, vii, 121 seq. 
offered a daughter and great 

advancement by Shangul, 

vii, 127 
takes to wife one of Shan- 

gul's daughters, vii, 128 
receives an invitation from 

Faghfiir, •/ii, 129 
reply of, vii, 130 
tells Sapinud of his wish to 

quit Hind, vii, 131 
meets some Iranian mer- 
chants and pledges them 

to secrecy, vii, 133 
feigns sickness, vii, 134 
escapes with Sapinud, vii, 

134 
reproached by Shangul, vii, 

135 

makes a league with Shan- 
gul, vii, 137 
welcome of, on his return, 

vii, 137 
addresses the nobles, vii, 

13S 
praised by the nobles, vii, 

130 
makes a new treaty with 

Shangul, vii, 140 
entertains Shangul and 

seven other kings, vii, 

140 seq. 



BahrAm Giir, appointed Shan- 
gul's heir, vii, 143 

parting gifts of, to Shangul, 
vii, 144 

takes account of his trea- 
sures, vii, 144 

term of life of, foretold by 
the astrologers, vii, 144 

resolves to levy no more 
taxes, vii, 145 

unsuccessful attempts of, to 
benefit his subjects, vii, 
146 seq. 

Gipsies introduced into fran 
by, vii, 6, 149 

appoints Yazdagird his suc- 
cessor, vii, 150 

death of, vii, 6, 150 

Firdausi's reflections on, 
vii, 150, 151 

mourning for, vii, 151 
Bahram-Gushnasp, father, in 

Arabic Tabari, of Bahram 
Chiibina, viii, 77 
Bahram Tal, viii, 138 and note 
Baida (White), a town in Pars a 
few miles north of Shi'raz, 
not to be confounded 
with the stronghold 
known as " White Castle" 
further north, i, 236 ; vi, 
198 and note, 199 
Baigand, city and fortress 
(Kuhandizh ?) between 
Bukhara and the Oxus, 
vii, 176 

Afrasiyab encamps at, iv, 

marches from, iv, 154 
Mahwi encamps at, ix, 118 
Baisinghar Khan, grandson of 

Timur the Lame, life of 

Firdausi by, i, 23 
edition of Shahndma of, i, 

23 

preface to, i, G7 
Baitu'l Mukaddas (Gang-i-Diz- 
hukht), Zahhak's capital 
(Babylon ?), also an Arab 
name for Jerusalem, i, 
161 



224 



GENERAL INDEX 



Baitu'l Har^m, the Kaaba q.v., 

vi, 119, 121 
B^j, Zoroastrian system of pray- 

insr, i. So 
Bakhtagan, father of Buzurj- 

mihr, vii, 279 
Baku, town on the peninsula of 
Apsheron on the western 
shores of the Caspian and 
a chief centre of the 
petroleum industry, i, 58 
nole 
Bakyir, mountain where Afra- 
siyab had a palace, iv, 136 
Balaam, prophet, v, 15 
Bal'ami, Abii 'Ali Muhammad 
al-, (died A.D. 99^), 
Samanid minister and 
compiler of the Persian 
version of Tabari's An- 
nals, vii, 5 
Balas (Balash q.v.), Sasanian 

Shah, vii, 170 seq. 

Balash, king of Kirman, slain by 

Ardshir Papakan, vi, 205 

Balash (Balas), Sasanian Shah, 

166, vi, 3 

appointed regent by Piruz, 

vii, 164 
hears of the overthrow of 

Pfriiz, vii, 1&9 
Reign of, vii, 170 seq. 

Note on, vii, 170 
character of, vii, 171 
introduces pubhc baths, vii, 

171 
end of, vii, 171 
title of, vii, 171 
accession of, vii, 171 
Siifarai's letter to, vii, 173 
welcomes Sufarai on his 
return from Turan, vii, 
181 
dethroned, vii, 182 
Balkh, city in northern Afghani- 
stan. 154, ^55. ii. loi- --8 
231, 242, 246, 249; iii. 
153, 192 ; iv, 19. 20, 65, 
156. 157. 255 ; V. 18, 20, 

29, 31. 33. 41. 48. 73. 86, 

87, 91. 104. 171. 255 ; 



Ealkh — conf. 

vii, 94. 331. 359, 384 ; 
viii, 22, 74, 95. 153. 159. 
161, 173 ; ix, 116 

ancient seat of Aryan civili- 
zation, i, 7 

situated on ancient trade- 
route, i, 57 

seat of the Magi, i, 60 seq. 

Zoroaster's successful evan- 
gel at, i, 61 ; V, 18 

Zoroaster slain at, i, 61 v, 

92. 93 

rhyme-word, Firdausi's dif- 
ficulty with, i, 74 

Shahnama, scene of, shifted 
to, ii, 9.; iv, 317 

Siyawush defeats Garsiwaz 
at, and takes, ii, 229 

Luhrasp makes, his capital, 

iv, 713 

becomes a devotee at, v, 

Kuhram sent by Arjasp to 

attack, V, 90 
stormed, v, 92, 93 
Luhrasp slain at, v, 91, 93 
spoil of, sent away by 

Arjasp, V, 108 
Asfandiyar quits, to invade 

Turan, v, 120 
aphorist of, viii, 221 
bestowed by Mahwi on his 
son, ix, 115 
Baliich, Baluchistan (Gcdrosia, ^ 
Makran), country, 167, ii, • 
80, 226; iii, 34; iv, 136; 
vi, 12, 70 ; vii, 340 
Ardshir Papakan 's ill suc- 
cess against, vii, 242 
Nushirwan conquers, vii, 242 
becomes prosperous, vii, 362 
Baluchis, people, vii, 241 seq. 
ravages of, vii,' 217, 241 
chastised by Nushirwan, vii, 

242 
Balwi, Iranian noble, 172, viii, 
257, seq. 
deceived by Caesar's talis- 
man, viii, 273 



GENERAL I \ /)/■:. \ 



L'alwi, praised by Casar, viii, 279 
receives Chacli, viii, 314 

Baniddt, father of Mazdak, vii, 
188 

B^miyan, city in Afghanistan, 
north of the Kuh-i-liaba 
mountains and famous 
for its Buddhist remains, 
iv, 65 

Banak, Iranian chief, temp. Ard- 
shir Papakan, vi, 202 

Bandawa, Sindian chief, defeated 
by Sikandar, vi, 175 

Band-i-Kaisar, dam at Shiish- 
tar, vi, 295 

Bandwi, Iranian noble temp. 
Kubad, vii, 207 

Bandwi, maternal uncle of 
Khusrau Parwiz, iyi-173, 
viii, 200, 202, 204 seq., 224, 
225, 227, 231, 234, 245 
seq., 289. 296, 298, 356, 

357; ix, 4 

imprisonment of, viii, 77, 
176 

Gustaham and, escape and 
revolt, viii, 182 

referred to, viii, 189 

put to death, viii, 191, 355 

accompanies Khusrau Par- 
wiz in his flight, viii, 231 

turns back and murders 
Hurmuzd, viii, 232 

rejoins Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 

233 

promises to save Khusrau 

Parwiz, viii, 234 

disguises himself as Khus- 
rau Parwiz, viii, 235 

beguiles Bahram, son of 
Siyawush, viii, 23O, 245 

imprisoned by Bahram 
Chubina, viii, 238 
Bandwi, Bahram Chubina hears 
of escape of, viii, 24S 

entertained by Mausil, viii, 

249 
goes with Mausil to meet 

Kluisrau Parwiz, viii, 282 
Bahram Chubina writes to, 

viii, 285 



Band^vi, causes defeLtion of Pah- 
rim Chiibina's chiefs, viii, 
302 
insults of, to Niyitus, viii, 

309. 310 
reconciled to Niydtus, viii, 

311 
minister of Khusrau Parwiz, 

viii, 313 
adherents of, beheaded, viii, 

370 
execution of, referred to, ix, 

16, 104 
Bani Tayy, Arab tribe, viii, 

188 
Banquets, the Seven, of Niishir- 

wan, 168. See Niishir- 

wan. 
Baniigashasp, daughter of Rus- 

tam and wife of Giv, 

ii. 4 
stays with Rustam while 
Gfv seeks Kai Khusrau, ii, 

365 

suitors of, ii, 383, 384 

rejoins Giv, ii, 395 
Bar, mountain-range in Khura- 
san, V, 30 
Bar, treasure, viii, 406 and note 
Baraham, a Jew, 164, vii, 13 

entertains Bahram Gur 
scurvily, vii, 16 seq. 

goods of, confiscated, vii, 20 

Barbad, minstrel, 175, viii, 396 

seq., 406, ix, 29 and note 

supersedes Sarkash, viii, 399 

visits Khusrau Parwiz in 
prison, ix, 29 

lament of, ix, 30 
Barbar, Barbaristin, town and 
country (British Somali- 
land), 143, ii, y^ i''^.- 90. 
93, 98 ; iii, 207, 269 ; iv, 
136, 148 ; vi, 114 ; vii, 
327 ; viii, 381 

identification of, ii, 79 

king of, ii, 83, 94, 95 
taken prisoner by Guraza, 

ii- 97 
sends embassy to Gush- 

tksp, V, 75 



VOL. IX. 



226 



GENERAL INDEX 



Barda', city in Arran^.w., now in 
ruins, on the Tharthur a 
tributory of the Kur, iv, 
147 ; vii, 341 ; viii, 99, 
100, 184, 222, 226 ; ix, 15 
Afrasiyab takes refuge in a 
cave near, iv, 259 

Bardi. See Baida. 

Barkuh, city between Istakhr 
and Yazd, vii, 79, 80 
tribute of, remitted by Bah- 
ram Giir, vii, 82 

Barmaiiin (Purmaya '/■'''■), 
brother of Faridiin, i, 90, 91 

Barman, son of Wisa, Turanian 
hero, 142, 144, 151, i, 
92, 342 ; ii, 18, 129, 130, 
150, 349 ; iii, 79, 210 ; iv, 

spies out the Iranian host, i, 

346 
challenges the Iranians to 

single combat and slays 

Kubad, i, 347 
rewarded by Afrisiydb, i, 

348 
besieges Gazhdaham in 

White Castle, i, 354 
defeated and slain by Karan, 

i. 354 
revival of, in legend, ii, 119 
marches on Iran, ii, 228 
defeated by Siyawush, ii, 
229 
chosen to fight Ruhham, iv, 

97 
slain by Ruhh4m, iv, 102 
Barrier, Alexander's (Sikan- 
dar's), in the Caucasus, 
160, i, 16. vi, 189, 249 
legend of, vi, 78 
site of, vi, 79 
described, vi, 164 
Barsaentes, satrap, vi, 32 

murderer of Darius Codo- 

manus, vi, 32 
executed, vi, 32 
Barsdm, general of Bfzhan, ix, 

97. 117 
marches on Marv, ix, 97, 116 
Mcihwi's conduct to, ix, 117 



Bar?dm, pursues and overtakes 
Mahwi, ix, 118 
captures Mdhwi, ix, 119 

Barsam, the sacred twigs, imple- 
ment in Zoroastrian reli- 
gious ceremonial, i, 80 

Barsine (Stateira), eldest daugh- 
ter of Darius Codomanus, 

vi, 33 
marries Alexander the Great, 
vi, 33 
Barta, Iranian hero, 751, iii, 25, 
92 ; iv, 149 
chosen to fight with Kuh- 

ram, iv, 97 
slays Kuhram, iv, 105 
Bartds, region in Turkistan, ix, 

19 

Barzin, sacred Fire and Fire - 
temple on the Binaliid 
Kuh, south west of Tiis 
and Mashad in Khurasan, 
i, 237 ; ii, 107 ; vi, 391 ; 
viii, 216 
Iranians worship at, vi, 400 

Barzin, Fire-temple built by 
Luhrasp at Balkh, iv, 318 

Barzin, Iranian hero, i, 365 ; ii, 
12, 22, 73 ; iii. 25, 127, 

273 
Barzin, father of Bihzdd, temp. 
Yazdagird son of Shapiir, 

vi, 395 
Barzin, Iranian noble, temp. 
Bahram Giir, 164 

visited hy Bahram Gur, 
vii, 49 

entertains Bahrdm Gur, vii, 
50 seq. 

gives his daughters in mar- 
riage to Bahram Gur, 164, 

vii, 53 
Barzin, father of RAd and Dad, 

temp. Bahram Gur, vii, 86 
Barzin, father of Ustad, temp. 

Ni'ishirwan, vii, 251 
Barzin, father of Shadan, vii, 

382, 423 
Barzin, bower of, vii, 83 
Barzin, general of NushirwAn, 

viii, 17 



GENERAL IMJEX 



2 27 



Barzin, father of Kharrad, iji- 
^73. viii, 74, 76, 190. 205 
and passi)ii, ix, 4, 9, 12, 
27 

Barzin, father of Jahn, viii, 391 

Barzwi, noncc-nanie assumed by 
Bahrain Gur in Hind, 
vii, 121, 134 

Barzwi, physician and sage, 
temp. Nushirwin, i6(), vii, 

383 
goes on a mission to Hind, 

vii, 424 
consults a sage, vii, 427 
hears of the book of Kahia 

and Dimna (Fables of 

Bidpai), and procures it 

for Nushirwan, vii, 427, 428 

translates the above into 

Pahlavi, vii, 382, 428 
asks boon of Nushirwan, 

vii, 429 
Basra (Bassora), city on the 

Shatt-el-Arab, ix, 68, 69 
founded by 'Umar, ix, 67 
Bastam, city near Damaghan on 

the road to Nishapur, vii, 

357 

Bastan-nama (Khud^i - n4ma), 

Firdausi's chief authority, 

V, 24, 27, 261 ; vi, 17, 84 

traditional origin of, i, 67 

discussed, i, 68 

translated into Arabic by 

Ibn Mukaffa', vi, 16, 373 

modern Persian, i, 67 seq. ; 

vii, 382 

Bastavairi, Bastvar (Nastur (/.u.), 

V. 12, 25 
Batanin (Marcian), Ruman 

general, viii, 41, 47, 52 
Baths, public, introduction of, 

by Balash, vii, 171 
Battle of the Twelve Rukhs, 151, 
iv, 7 seq., v. 29 
Firdausi's reflections on, iv, 

98, 106 
Eleven Rukhs, 151, iv, 88 
arranged by Gudarz and 
Piian, iv, 95 seq. 
of the Bridge, ix, 5, 67 



Battlestead = Brazen Hold, v, 

121 
Bazamish (Valerian, q.v.), 161 
defeat of, and capture by, 
Shipiir son of Ardshir, vi, 

■294. -95 
single combat of, with Gar- 

shAsp, vi, 297 
bridge built by, at Shush- 

tar, vi, 298 
Bazdnush (Jovian q.v.), 162, 163, 

vi, 324, 326 
elected Emperor, vi, 353 
sues for peace, vi, 353 
accepts Shapur's terms, vi, 

355 
Bazh, suburb of Tiis, i, 38 
Bazrangi, dynasty of Tribal 

kings, vi, 198 
Bazur, Turanian warlock, iii, 128 
uses magic against the fran- 

ians, iii, 128 
wounded by Ruhham, iii, 129 
Beas (Hyphasis), easternmost of 
the rivers of the Punjab, 
vi, 64 
Bedouins, i, 135, 179 

desert of the, iv, 148 
commanded by Zahir in Kai 
Khusrau's host, iv, 148 
Bel, Babylonian god, v, 293 

temple of, v, 293 
'Belisarius, Roman general (A.D. 
505-565). vii, 1S6, 187, 
217, 218 
Berber, race in northern Africa, 

vi, 73 

Berbera, trading-station in the 
Gulf of Aden, ii, 79 

Berlin, viii, 192 

Berozias, Barzwi q.v., vii, 3S3 

Bessus, satrap, toiip. Alexander 
the Great, vi, 32 
assumes royal state in 

Bactria, vi, 32 
executed, vi, 32 

JJhima, one of the five Pan- 
davas, iv, 138, 139 

Bhutdn, Indian kingdom, bet- 
ween Assam and Thibet, 
vi, 8 J 



228 



GENERAL INDEX 



Bibliotheca, of Diodorus, v, 293 
Bid, a div, ii, 44, 54, 55, 93 

slain, ii, 59, 64 ; iii, 256 ; 
iv, 296 ; V, 204 
Bidad, city of Cannibals in the 
vicinity of Sughd, iii, 244 
seq. 

meaning of, iii, 244 note 

stormed by Rustam, iii, 246 
Bidirafsh (Vidrafsh), Turanian 
hero, 155, V, 24, 25, 41, 
51, 52, 62 seq. 

goes as envoy to Gushtasp, 
V, 37, 40 seq. 

returns with Gushtasp's 
answer, v, 44 

receives banner from Ar- 
jasp, V, 46 

commands one wing, v, 56 

volunteers to fight Zarir, v, 
62 

slays Zari'r, v, 63 

fights Nastur, v, 70 

slain by Asfandiyar, v, 70 

head of, presented to Gush- 
tasp, v, 71 
Bidpai, Indian sage, vii, 383 

Fables of (Book of Kalila 
and Dimna), brought to 
Persia, i6g, vii, 213, 382 
Bih Afrid, daughter of Gush- 
tasp, ii, 3 ; V, 22 

taken captive by the Turk- 
mans, V, 93, 94, 100 

goes with Humai to draw 
water and meets As- 
fandiyar, V, 147 

escapes from Arj asp's 
palace, v, 153 

laments over Asfandiyar, v, 
252 

reproaches Gushtasp, v, 254 
Biiiafridh, ancestor of Ardshir 

Papakan, vi, 200 
Bih Ardshir, Seleucia q.v. as 
rebuilt by Ardshir Papa- 
kdn, vi, 254, 291 note, 
viii, 194, ig6 
Bihbihan, town near the left 
bank of the Tab river in 
Pars, vii, 188 



Bihisht (Paradise), name of the 
country round Gang, iv, 

195 

Bihistun. See Bistiin. 

Bihruz, a scribe temp. Bahram 
Gur, vii, 71 seq. 
makes an inventory of the 
goods of the miser 
Farshidward, vii, 72 

Bihzad (" well bred "), the horse 
of Siyawush and sub- 
sequently of Kai Khus- 
rau, 146, ii, 391 ; iv, 172, 

303 
Siyawush's last charge to, 

ii, 312 
Farangis instructs Kai 
Khusrau how to obtain, 
ii, 374 seq. 
Bihzad, Gushtasp's horse, v, 56, 

69 
Bihzad, Iranian chief, temp. 
Yazdagird son of Shapiir, 
vi, 395 ; vii, 85 (?) 
Bihzad, Iranian chief, teuip. 
Kubad son of Piriiz, vii, 
207 
Binalud, mountain-range, west 
of Mashhad, north of 
Nishapiir, v, 29 
Birds, Sikandar holds converse 

with, 160, vi, 160 
Birka-i-Ardshir, city in Pars 
founded by Ardshir Papa- 
kan, vi, 290 and note 
Birmaya, cow, i, 151 

supplies the infant Faridiin 

with milk, i, 151 
slain by Zahhak, i, 152, 153, 
162 ' 
Birthmark, characteristic of 
Kaian race, ii, 372 ; iii, 
49 and note 
described, ii, 372 ; iii, 49 
Siyawush's, iii, 49 
Kai Khusrau's, ii, 372 ; iii, 

49 and note 
Farud's, iii, 49 
Bisa (Fasa, Pasa, city south of 
Lake Bakhtigan in Pars, 
vii, 89 ?) 



GEKFR.ir. TXDEX 



229 



Bishop </»- predate (/.ji., iv, 341,348 
as militarist, i, 373, 378 ; 
iv, 197 ; V, 300 ; vi, 352 
advisi's Cicsar, iv, 330 
Nuslizaii's last requests to, 
vii, 273 
Bishi'itan (Peslio-tanu), brother 
of Asfandiyar, 756, i^y, 
V, 66, 117, 178, 179, 182, 
195, 216, 223, 244 seq., 
249 seq., 261, 288 seq. 
an immortal, v, 12, 19 
birth of, V, 32 
commands the host during 
Asfandiyar's absence in 
tlie Seven Stages, v, 122, 
124, 126, 129, 13^. 144. 

150 
Asfandiyar praised by the 
host and, v, 123, 125, 131, 

133 
revives Asfandiyar after his 

encounter with the dragon 

V, 127 
prays for deliverance from 

the snow, v, 138 
Asfandiyar and, consult, v, 

143 

sees Asfandiyar's signal and 
approaches the Brazen 
Hold, V, 150 

passes himself off as Asfan- 
diyar, V, 143, 151, 152 

joined by Asfandiyar, v, 

155 

advises Asfandiyar, v, 179 

Asfandiycir holds talk about 
Rustara with, v, 192 

advises Asfandiyar to main- 
tain friendly relations 
with Rustam, v, 196, 217 

Rustam served with un- 
tempcred wine by, v, 211 

despair of, at the situation 
between Rustam and 
Asfandiydr, v, 218 

laments for Niish Azar and 
Mihr-i-Nush, v, 232 

Asfandiydr talks of the 
fight witli Rustam to, v, 
240 



Bishi'itan, hears of Asfandiyar's 
overthnnv and laments 
for him, v, 244 

Rustam bewails Asfandiydr 
to, v, 246 

Asfandiyar's last charge to, 
V, 249 

heads Asfandiydr's funeral 
train, v, 251 

displays the corpse of As- 
fandiyar, V, 253 

reproaches Gushtasp, v, 253 
Jdmasp, V, 254 

consoles Katiyun, v, 255 

supports Rustam's over- 
tures to (iushtasp, v, 257 

intended by Gushtasp to be 
Bahman's minister, v, 279 

intercedes for Zal, v, 288 

intercession of, accepted, v, 
289 

counsels Bahman to quit 
Zabul, v, 290 
Bistam (Gustaham q.v.), viii, 255 

and note, 256 
Bistun (Bagistana i.e. " Place of 
God," Bchistiin, Bisi- 
tiin), a lofty rock a few 
miles east of Kirmanshah 
and famous for its in- 
scriptions, i, 379 ; ii, 128 ; 
iii, 12, 184, 350 ; iv, 190 ; 
v, 56, 184 ; vii, 61, 363 ; 
viii, 209 

inscription of Darius Hys- 
taspis at, i, 6 ; v, 1 1 
Gotarzes at, iii, 9, 11 

= Zars white elephant, i, 328 

= Rustam, v, 229 
Biwarasp (Zahhak), i, 72, 144 

meaning of, i, 135 
Biward, Turanian hero, iii, 161 

comes to aid P/ran, iii, 152 
Biward, Iranian chief /e»!p. 
Yazdagird son of Shapi'ir, 
vi, 395 
Bizhan, frdnian hero, son of Giv, 
147, 130-15-^. ii, 4. 366 
and note ; ii, 4, 366 and 
note : iii, 20, 45, 67, 76 
seq., 81, 92, loi, 115, 121, 



230 



GENERAL INDEX 



Bizhan — cont. 

129, 130. 133. 130, 141- 
157 set]., 211, 234, 247, 
248, 253, 259, 204, 271, 
284 seq., 289, 330 seq., 337 
seq., 349, 350. 352 seq. ; 
iv, 7, 13, 26 seq., 56, 77, 
88, 91, 102, 123 seq., 147, 
292 ; vi, 194 
favourite with the poet, iv, 8 
parentage of, iii, 324 
friendship of, with Gusta- 
ham the son of Gazhda- 
ham, iii, 15 
relations of, with Gi'v, iii, 15 
undertakes to slay Palashan, 
iii, 26 

to carry off the crown 
and handmaid of Ta- 
zhav, iii, 27 
swears to avenge Zarasp, iii, 

59 
borrows a steed from 
Gustaham, iii, 59 
the mail of Siyawush, 
iii, 60, 69 
worsts Farud, iii, 62 
praises Farud to Tus, iii, 62 
fights with Fariid, iii, 64 

Palashan, iii, 70 
pursues Tazhav, iii, 77 
takes Ispanwi captive, iii, 78 
prowess of, with Kawa's 

standard, iii, 93 
shares his steed with Gusta- 
ham, iii, 95 
goes with Giv in quest of 

Bahram, iii, 102 
attacks Bidad, iii, 244 
goes to summon Rustam, 

iii, 245 
worsted by Puladwand, iii, 

25S 
Story of, and Manizha, 150, 
iii, 12, 28.5 seq. 
historical basis of, iii, 11 
Molil on, iii, 285 
Firdausi on, iii, 287 
referred to, viii, 72 
volunteers to go to the help 
of the Irmdnians, iii, 291 



Bizhan, goes to Irman with 
Gurgfn, iii, 292 
destroys the wild boars, iii, 

293 
envied by Gurgin, iii, 294 
steed of, iii, 296, 302, 313 
interview of, with Manizha's 

nurse, iii, 297 
visits Manizha, iii, 298 
drugged, iii, 299 
wakes in Afrasiyab's palace, 

iii, 300 
holds revel with Manizha, 

iii, 300 
discovered by Garsiwaz, iii, 

302 
taken before Afrasiyab, iii, 

303 

sentenced to death, iii, 304 
lament of, iii, 305 
imprisoned, iii, 309; v, 116 

searched for by Gurgin, 

iii, 310 
receives Rustam's ring, iii, 

340 

Rustam's conditions of re- 
lease for, iii, 345 

released, iii, 346 

pardons Gurgin, iii, 346 

joins in attack on Afra- 
siyab's palace, iii, 347 

presented to Kai Khiisrau 
by Rustam, iii, 354 

holds converse with Kai 
Khusrau, iii, 356 

desires to fight Human, iv, 

39 

asks Gi'v to lend him the 
niaii of Siyawush, iv, 40 

seeks Gudarz' permission to 
fight Human, iv, 41 

receives the mail of Siya- 
wush from Giv, iv, 45 

parleys with Human, iv, 

45 
returns after the fight in 

Human's armour, iv 51, 
defeats night-attack and 

slays Nastihan, iv, 54 
attacks with Giv I'iran's 

centre, iv, 83 



GENERAL INDEX 



23 1 



Bfzhan, fights with Farshidward, 
iv, 87 

chosen to fight with Ruin, 
iv. 97 

slays Ruin, iv, 103 

asks Giidarz for help for 
Gustaham, iv, 117 

rescues Gustaham, iv, 124 
seq., 132 

brings back the corpses of 
Lahhak and Farshid- 
ward, iv, 126, 132 

Kai Khusrau remonstrated 
with by, and other nobles, 
for refusing audience, iv, 

Kai Khusrau gives audience 
to, and other nobles, iv, 
283 seq. 
Kai Khusrau 's gift to iv, 

295 
brings Luhrasp before Kai 

Khiisrau, iv, 300 
sets out \\4th Kai Khusrau 

on his pilgrimage, iv, 306 
refuses to turn back when 

bidden by Kai Khusrau, 

iv. 307 
Kai Khusrau farewells and 

warns, and his comrades, 

iv, 308 

disappears and is sought 
in vain by, and his 
comrades, iv, 308 
end of, iv, 309 
Gudarz' grief for, iv, 310, 

312 
sons of, go with Zarir to 

Rum, iv, 360 

hail Gushtasp as Sheih, iv, 
362 
Bizhan, Ashkdnian king, vi, 197, 

210 
Bizhan, Khdn of Turks, jy6, ix, 

70, 96 
Mdhwi writes to, ix, 96 
consults his minister, ix, 97 
sends troops to .Marv, ix, 97 
Mihwi makes war on, ix, 115 
marches against Mahwi, ix, 

117 



Bizhan, Khiin of Turks, lays am- 
bush for Mihwi, ix, 118 
sends Barsain in pursuit of 

Mahwi, ix, 118 
hears of Mahwi's capture, 

ix, 119 
puts Mahwi to death, ix, 1 20 
goes mad and kills himself, 
ix, 120, 121 
Black Di'v. See Div. 

horse, Gushtasp 's, v, 18 

cured by Zarduhsht, v, iS 
Stone, meteorite built into 
the wall of the Kaaba at 
Mecca, ii, 163 and note, 
vi, 65 
Blest, Country of the, vi, 74, 76 
Boars, wild, devastate Irman, 
iii, 290 
slain by Bizhan, iii, 293 
Bombyx Mori. See Silk. 
Book of Kings, Firdausi's Shah- 
nama, i, 43 
Indication and Revision, 
Mas'udi's, vi, 252 
quoted, vi, 252 
Boot, golden. See Golden. 
Borysthenes, river (Dnieper q.v.), 

iii, 191 
Boulder of the Div Akwan, iii, 
271, 343 seq., 347 
Rustam carried off on, iii, 
276 

flung into the sea with, 
iii, 278 
raised from the sea, iii, 309 
used to cover Bizhan's pris- 
on, iii, 309 
removed from pit's mouth 
by Rustam iii, 345 
Boundary-pillar, Bahrain Giir's, 

vii, 92, 160, 161, 164 
Bowl, the full, svmbolism of, vi, 

&3 
Brabantio, his warning to 

Othello, vi, 324 
Brar/rok-resh, a Karap. v, 13 
slayer of Zarduhsht, v, 13 
Brahman, Hindu priest, iii, 29 ; 
iv, 30 ; v, 207, vii, 425 ; 
ix, 2 1 



232 



GENERAL INDEX 



Brahmans (Gymnosophistse), 159 

vi, 64 
Palladius on, vi, 61 
country of, vi, 143, 147 
hear of Sikandar's coming 

and write to him, vi, 

143 

Sikandar's interview with, 
vi, 67, 143 seq. 

described, vi, 144 

reply to Sikandar's ques- 
tions, vi, 144 seq. 

Sikandar quits, vi, 147 
Brahmanism supersedes Budd- 
hism in eastern fran, i, 16 
Brains, human, prescribed to 
Zahhak by Iblis, i, 139, 
146 
Bramble-grubber, 164. See 

Dilafruz. 
Brand-mark, iii, 291 

of Kaiis, iii, 291 
Brazen Hold, the 1^6, v, 116, 
117, 119 seq., 159. 197. 
206, 255 

route to, v, 120, 135 

described, v, 121, 135, 141 

Asfandiycir's stratagem for 
taking, v, 116, 143 

surprised from within by 
Asfandiyar, v, 152 seq. 
left in charge of Sawa, v, 

154 
Arj asp's head thrown from 

the ramparts of, v, 157 
Asfandiyar destroys, v, 162 
referred to, viii, 171 
Bride, the, one of the Kai Kaus' 

treasures, iv, 295 
given by Kai Khusrau to 

Giv, Zal, and Rustam, iv, 

293 
Brides of the Treasure, Genii 

that watch over secret 

hoards, vi, 250 
Bridge, Battle of the, ix, 5, 67 
Browning, Robert, his poem of 

" The Glove," vi, 384 
Bucephala, city founded by 

Alexander the Great, vi, 

18 



Bucephalus, horse of Alexander 

the Great, vi, 18 
birth of, vi, 26 
a mare (Ethiopic version), 

vi, 18 
offered by Darius to Porus, 

vi, 31 
death of, vi, 18, 64 
city built by Alexander in 
memory of, vi, 18 
Buddha, birth stories of, vii, 383 
Buddhism, in eastern fran and 
Kabulistan, i, 15 
superseded by Brahman- 
ism, i, 16 
regarded as idolatrous by 
Zoroastrians, i, 16 
Buddhist saints, story of two, vi, 

63 
Budge, Dr. E. A. Walhs, his 

editions of the Syriac 

and Ethiopic versions of 

the Pseudo-Callisthenes, 

vi, 14, 17 note 
Budini, race, vi, 73 
Buiti, demon, assails Zarduhsht 

i, 62 ; V, 17 
Bukhara, city on the Zarafshan 

river in the province of 

Sughd, ii, 241 ; iv, 65 ; 

vii, 331, 348, 359, 384 ; 

ix, 97, 115, 117 
Kurakhan sent to, iv, 134 
Afrasiyab joins Kurakhan 

at, iv, 186 
Fire-temple built by Tiir at, 

iv, 225 
Bahram Giir attacks, vii, 90 

receives tribute from, vii, 

94 
Bukhtakan. See Bakhtagan. 
Bulghar (Bulgaria), viii, 406 
Bull, mythological, i, 71 ; ii, 
407 ; vii, 24.5 
-fish, ii, 128 
Bundahish, Pahlavi text, i, 91, 
92, 117, 125, 131, 235, 
236, 337 ^iote, 338, 369 ; 
ii, 3 note, 11, 26. 81, 118, 
189 
meaning of, i, 70 note 



GENERAL IXDEX 



!33 



Bu ulaliMi, account of Creation 

in, i, 117 
BurAb, court-farrier to Cajsar, 

iv, 326 
refuses to employ Gushtasp, 

iv, 3^7 
Buraza, minister under Yazda- 
gird son of Shapur, vii, 4 
Burial-place of Rustam's race, 
the scene of the battle be- 
tween Bahman and Far4- 
marz, v, 287 
Burjak and Burjatur, vi, 207. 

See Youths, the two. 
Burjasp, Turanian hero, iv, 26 
commands the loft wing, iv, 
26 
Burns, quoted, viii, 3 
Burrus, Praetorian prefect temp. 

Nero, vii, 279 
Burzmihr, Iranian warrior, vii, 
86 
bears Narsl's letter to Bah- 
ram Gur, vii, 94 
Burzmihr, scribe, viii, 81, 87, 313 
= Buzurjmihr (?) q.v., viii, 

71 

Burzuyala, Turanian hero, iv, 
182 
fights and flees from Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 183 

Biisipas, nonce name used by 
Human when parleying 
with Rustam, iii, 198 

Bust, city in Si'stan, situated at 
the junction of the Kan- 
dahar and Helmund 
rivers, i, 252 ; iv, 65 ; v, 
173. 277, 287; vi, 175; 
vii. 173, 395 ; ix, 89 
stream of, i, 252 

Buzgu^h, name of tribe, ii, 55 
and note, iii, 207 

Buzurjnihr, thief counsellor of 
Nushirwan in frdnian 
tradition and famous for 
his wisdom, lOy-ijo, i, 
27 ; V, 261 ; vii, 5 ; viii, 
3 seq., 67 seq. 
associated with the I'ersian 
Wiidom-litcraturc.vii, 278 



liuzurjniihr, a semi-mythical 
personage, vii 280 
f<jund by Azdd Sarv at Marv, 

vii, 283 
undertakes to interpret 
Nushirwan's dream vii, 

goes with Az4d Sarv to 

court, vii, 283 
adventure of, with a snake, 

vii, 284 
interprets Nushirwan's 

dream, vii, 284 
rewarded and honoured by 

Niishirwan, vii, 286, 289, 

304, 311, 315, 388 
accomplishments of, vii, 286 
discourses of, at the Seven 

Banquets of Niishirwan, 

vii, 287 seq. 
on fate and fortune, vii, 291 
on the attainment of great- 
ness, vii, 291, 296 
on what is worthiest, vii, 

291 
on sages, vii, 288, 291, 292, 

294, 296 seq., 309 
on fools, vii, 297, 298, 306 
on conduct, vii, 288, 291 

seq., 299, 309 
on kings, vii, 290, 294, 295, 

301, 312 
on the wise administrator, 

vii, 294 
on sons, vii, 295, 303, 311. 
on riches and poverty, vii, 

295 
questioned by Ardshir and 

Yazdagird, vii, 308 
on scribes, i, 27 ; vii, 311 
on loyalty, vii, 312 
discourse of, vii, 366 
questioned by Nushirwin, 

vii, 367 seq. 
expounds the game of chess, 

vii, 380, 388 
invents the game of nard, 

vii, 381, 389 
welcomed on his return from 

Hind by Nushirwan, vii, 

393 



234 



GENERAL INDEX 



Buzurjinihr, goes liunting with, 

and is suspected of theft 

by, Nushirwan, viii, 4 
disgraced by Nushiiwaii, 

viii, 5 
instructs Nushfrwiin's page, 

viii, 5 
refuses to admit himself in 

the wrong, viii, 6 seq. 
treated with increasing 

rigour, viii, 7, 8 
released, viii, g 
divination by, viii, 10 seq. 
advises with Nushirwan, 

viii, 47 seq. 
instructed by Nushirwan 

to prove Hurmuzd, viii, 

56 seq. 
abolition of Fire-worship 

foretold by, viii, 68 
death of, viii, 69, 71 
= Burzmihr (?), viii, 71 
Mas'udi on, viii, 71 
Byzantine title, vii, 218 



CiESAR, the dynastic title of the 
kings of the West or Rum 
who were regarded as be- 
ing descended from Salm, 
the son of Faridun, 154, 
161, 162, 165, i6y, i6g, 
172-174, i, 262 ; ii, 383 ; 
iii, 9; vi, 112, 297, 353 ; 
vii, 163 ; viii, 8 seq., 19, 
43 seq., 51 seq., 230, 232, 
245, 252 seq., 257 seq.. 299, 
306 seq., 334, 373 seq., 
408 seq. ; ix, lo, 23 

transliteration of, i, 84 and 
note 

temp. Luhrasp, 154, iv, 339 
seq. : V, II, 32, 167 

daughter of = Katdyun, iv, 
314 ; V, 167, 205 

capital of, founded by Salm, 
iv, 325 



Cajsar, temp. T.uhrasp, Nastar, 
master of the herds to, iv, 

325 

refuses to employ Gush- 
tasp, iv, 326 
Biirab, court-farrier to, iv, 
326 

refuses to employ Gush- 
tasp, iv, 327 
proposes to give his eldest 
daughter in marriage, iv, 

329 
wrath of, at his daughter's 
choice of Gushtasp, iv, 

330 
yields to bishop's counsel, 

iv, 331 
refuses to provide for his 

daughter and Gushtasp, 

iv, 331 
bids Mirin slay the wolf of 

Faskun, iv, 333 
inspects the slain wolf, iv, 

341 

marries his second daugh- 
ter to Mirin, iv, 341 

bids Ahran slay the dragon 
of Mount Sakila, iv, 342 

third daughter of, iv, 342 
seq. 
married to Ahran, iv, 

348 

rejoices in his two sons in 
law, iv, 348 

proclaims the tidings of the 
slaying of the wolf and 
the dragon, iv, 349 

sons-in-law of, display their 
accomplishment on the 
riding-ground, iv, 349 

sees Gushtasp's prowess and 
questions him, iv, 350 

learns the truth about the 
wolf and the dragon and 
asks pardon of Gushtasp 
and Kat4yun, iv, 351 

wrath of, with Mirin and 
Ahran, iv, 351 

seeks to find out through 
Kat^yun who Gushtdsp 
is, iv, 351 



GENERAL INDEX 



235 



Caesar, tciufy. Luhrasi>, receives 
Gushtasp with honour at 
court, iv, 352 
Ilyas refuses to pay tribute 

to iv. 352 
receives a scornful message 
from Mirin and Ahran, iv, 

353 
takes counsel with Gushtisp, 

iv. 333 
bids Gushtasp lead foiLh 

the host, iv, 354 
arrays the host, iv, 355 
Gushtasp brings the dead 

body of Ilyas to, iv, 355 
welcomes Gushtasp after his 

victory, iv, 356 
consults Gushtasp about 

demanding tribute from 

fran, iv, 356 
sends an envoy to Luhrdsp, 

iv, 356 
gives audience to Zarir, iv, 

360 
replies, to, and dismisses 

Zarir, iv, 361 
questions Gushtasp, iv, 361 
sends Gushtasp to Zarir's 

camp, iv, 361 
goes to feast with Gush- 
tasp and discovers who 

he is, iv, 363 
gives gifts to Katayun, iv, 

363 

the Iranian chiefs, iv, 364 
parts in good will from 

Gushtasp, iv, 364 
sends embassy to Gushtasp 
on hearing of Arjasp's de- 
feat, V, 75 
temp. Humai, sues to Rush- 
nawad for peace, v, 307 
= Failakus9.i'., vi, 24, 26, 27 
= Sikandar q.v., vi, 40, 42, 49 
113, 114, 118, 121, 122, 
124, 128, 129, 142, 158, 
161, 170, 174, 178, 183 
= Valerian (Baz4nush q.v.), 

vi, 32G 
= Jovian (Bazdniish q.v.), 
vi, 353. 354 



Cicsar, tevip. Shdpur son of 
Ardsliir, jOi 
pays tribute, vi, 29S 
temp. Shapur son of Urmuzd, 
162. vi, 341 seq., 345 
seq. 
Shapur in disguise visits, vi, 

336 

entertained by, vi, 337 

discovered by, vi, 337 
arrested by, vi, 337 
sewn up in an ass's skin 

by, vi, 338 
put in charge of wife of 

vi, 33«'? 
invades and ravages Iran, 

vi, 338 
Shapur prepares to attack, 

vi, 346 
overthrown by Shapur at 

Taisafun, vi, 346 seq. 
Shapur's treatment of, vi, 

349. 357 
mother of, vi, 351 
brother of (Yanus q.v.), vi, 

351 

temp. Yazdagird son of Sha- 
pur, vi, 389 
pays tribute, vi, 3S9 
temp. Bahram Giir, 165 
embassage of, to BahrAm 

Giir, vii, 5, 86, 100 
marches on Iran, vii, 84 
propounds questions to Bah- 
ram Giir, vii, 102 
envoy of, questioned by the 
high pri(.-.st, vii, 104 
temp. Nushirwan, i6j, 169, 
iy2-ij4, vii, 244 seq., 269, 

273 

replies to Nushirwan con- 
cerning Munzir, vii, 245 

treasures of, taken by Nush- 
irwan, vii, 255, 258 

sues to Nushirwan for peace, 
vii, 261 

sends tribute to Nvish/rwin, 
vii, 362 

death of, viii, 43 
temp. Nushirwan, Ilurmuzd, 
and Khusrau I'aiwiz, J72 



236 



GFNERAL INDEX 



Caesar, ioiip. Nushirwan, etc., 
offends Nushirwan, viii, 
44 seq. 

marches against Nushir- 
wan, viii, 46 

attacks Hurmuzd, viii, 93 

retakes cities, viii, 93 

makes peace with Hurmuzd, 
viii, 95 

welcomes Khusrau Parwiz, 
viii, 257 

offers help to Khusrau Par- 
wiz, viii, 261 

cliangcs his mind, viii, 262 

consults the astrologers, viii, 
264 

decides to help Khusrau 
Parwiz, viii, 265 

offers daughter to Khusrau 
Parwiz, viii, 266 

offers of, accepted by Khus- 
rau Parwiz viii, 269, 270 

talisman of, viii, 271, 275 
deceives Riiman envoys, 

viii, 272 
mastered by Kharrad, 
viii, 274 

gifts of, to Kharrad, viii, 278 

writes to Khusrau Parwiz, 
viii, 279 

praises Ruman envoys, viii, 
279 

counsels Maryam, viii, 279, 
280 

gives Niyatiis cliarge of 
Maryam, viii, 280 

corpse of Kut sent to, viii, 
291 

Khusrau Parwiz announces 
death of Bahram Chu- 
bina to, viii, 345 

daughter of, gives birth to 
Shirwi, viii, 371 

Khusrau Parwiz' letter to, 

viii, 373 
rejoicing of, at birth of 

Shirwi, viii, 374 
embassy of, to Khusrau 

Parwiz, viii, 374 
gifts of, given by Khusrau 

Parwiz to Sliirwi, viii, 381 



Cicsar, tetnp. Nushirwan, etc., 
invited to seize fran, viii, 
408 
tricked by Khusrau Parwiz 

and retreats, viii, 410 
letter of, about the True 
Cross referred to, ix, 22 
Csesarean birth, of Rustam, i, 

236, 32 T 5^17. 
Calanus (Sphines), Indian as- 
cetic, vi, 61 
Onesicritus and, vi, 61 
Alexander the Great and, 

vi, 61 
death of, vi, 61 
derivation of, vi, 61 
identical with the sage sent 
by Kaid to Sikandar 
{see Four Wonders), vi, 62 
Calendar, Zoroastrian, i, 88 ; iii, 
286 
adopted by Darius Hystas- 
pis, i, 59 
Callinicus. See Kaliniyus. 
Callisthenes, Greek historian 
temp. Alexander the Great 
vi, 12, 74 
Romance of Alexander 

fathered on, vi, 13 
account of, vi, 13 
Callitris quadrivalvis, the Arar 

tree, vi, 19 
Cambyses, father of Cyrus the 
Great, ii, 190 
identical with Siyawush in 
legend, ii, 191 
Cambyses, son of Cyrus the 
Great and King of Persia 
(B.C. 528-521), V, 10, II ; 
vi, 16 
Camel, piece in chess, vii, 422 
position of, vii, 422 
move of, vii, 422 
Cancer, constellation, iii, 125, 
151, 255 ; vii, 257 
moon in, an evil omen, i, 1 88 ; 
iii. 255 (?) 
Candace (Kandakc, Kaidafa 
q.v.), dynastic title of the 
queens of Ethiopia, vi 
13. 7^ 



(7/:\\7:/i'.//, /.\7)/;.V 



237 



Caiidace Alexander the Ciroat 

and, vi, 65 5^17. 
Candahar. See Kandahar. 
Cannibalism, iii, mi, 244 
Canopns, star, i, i>SS 

of Yaman, i, 266 ; ii, 203 ; 
iii, 297 ; vi, 382 
Cappadocia (Pdlawina), vi, 294 
Captives, mutilation of, vi, 323, 

334. 34^5. 357 
settlement of, vi, 327, 357 

Carline and BahrAm Chubina, 

viii, 1 89, 303 
Carnclians, ii, 123 

of Yaman, ii, 123 
Carrhjc, defeat of Crassus at, i, 15 
Carthagenians, the, vi, 30 

Alexander the Great's 

legendary visit to, vi, 30 
Casaubon, Isaac, vi, 13 
Caspian Sea, i, 3, 4, 16, 19, 56, 

57, 338; ii, 189, 336; 

iii, 10, 192 ; iv, 136 ; v, 

13 
Caspian Gates, iv, 315 ; vi, 31, 

32 

Cassander (B.C. 350-297), eldest 
son of Antipatcr and 
King of Macedonia, vi, 82 

Castellan, bishop as. See Bishop. 

Castes, division of Aryans into, 

i. 7 

Iranians into, i, 130, 132 
Castle, White. 5d:e White Castle, 
of the Alans. See Alans. 
Bahman. See Bahman. 
Obli\ion, vii, 184 

Kubad son of Piriiz 

confined in, vii, 184 

escapes from, viii, 184 

Catholicus, viii, 195 

Catullus, Roman poet (B.C. 84- 

54). i. (>o 
on Persian next of kin 
marriage, i, bo 
Caucasus, mountain-range run- 
ning in a soutix-easterly 
direction from the Black 
Sea to the Caspian, i, lO ; 
iv, 316 ; vi, 15 ; vii, 214, 
217 ; viii, 72 



Caucasus, pa.sses in, i, 16 ; vi, 79 
fortified, i, 16, vii, 153, 
187, 216, 239 
Mas'udi's account of, 
vii, 215 

barrier (mythical) of Alex- 
ander the Great (Sikan- 
dar) in, i, 16 ; vi, 78, 189, 
249 
legend of, in the Kuran, 

vi, 78 
site of, vi, 79 
described, vi, 164 
Cave, cavern, in Mazandaran, ii, 
28 

White Div's, ii, 28, 55, 58 
seq. 

Afrasiyab's, in A/arbaijan, 
iv, 136 seq.. 259 seq. 
Central clime. See Clime. 
Chach (Shash, Old Tashkand, 
now' in ruins), city on the 
right bank of the Jax- 
artes west of Ferghana, 
famous for its bows, ii, 
241, 258 ; iv, 19, 187, 188. 
255 ; vii, 167, 329, 334. 
340, 343. 348, 358, 359; 
viii, 314,377 ; ix, 115. "6 

bow of, i, 227 ; iii, 123, 181, 
227 ; V, 244 ; vi, 384 ; 
viii, 125, 126, 294 

government of, given to Tus 
by Rustam, ii, 358 

thane of, one of Firdausi's 
authorities, vi, 197, 210 
referred to, vi, 229 and 
note 

daughter of governor of, 
vii, 2S5 

intrigue of, vii, 285 
executed, vii, 286 

battle-axes of, ix, 118 
Chaghan, district on the right 
bank of the Oxus where 
that river is crossed from 
Tirmid, and city further 
north on the upper waters 
of river of the same name, 
iii, 152, 177, 228 ; vii, 94, 
157. 359 



^38 



GENERAL INDEX 



Chaghan, ceded by Kubad to 
the Haitalians, vii, 198 
monarch of = Faghanish, vii, 

333 
Chaghwan = Chaghan (?), vi, 174 
Sikandar visits, vi, 174 
quits, vi, 175 
Chaha, hostelry of, i, 45 
Chahar Makala, Persian treatise, 
i. 23 
account of Firdausi in, i, 38, 

39, 45 

Chahram (Jahram q.v.), city in 
Pars 

Chalah, viii, 193 

Chalandshan. See Chanland- 

shan. 

Chalcedon, viii, 194, 195 

Chalybon-Bcroea (Aleppo), city 
in northern Syria, vii, 218; 
viii, 41 
held to ransom by Niishir- 
wan, vii, 218 

Champions, the Twelve, vii, 15O. 
See Rukhs. 

Chamrosh, mythical bird, i, 235 

Chanlandshan ( K h a 1 a n j a n . 
Khanlanjan), district and 
town (Firuzan) near Ispa- 
han on the Zayinda river 
{see LEC. pp. 206, 207 
and note), i, 29 
Ahmad ibn Muhammad of, 
patron of Firdausi, i, 29 
Firdausi's escape from 
drowning at, i, 26, 29 

Chao-wou=Sawa q.v., viii, 72 

Characters, chief, of Shahnama, 

i. 49 
Characteristics, of fran, i, 3 seq. 
Characteristics of a Happy Man, 

Pahlavl text, vii, 279 
Charam, j^lace in Iran, iii, 40, 41, 

52, 68. 85, 86, III, 112 
Charbar, place on the coast of 

]ialuchistan (Makran), vi, 

70 
Chares of Mytilene, Greek writer 

and official at the court of 

Alexander the Great ii 

JO ; vi 61 



Chare- of Mytilene, story by, of 
Hystaspes and Zariadres 
cjuoted, iv, 314 
Charinda, river, iii, 10 note 
Charjui (Amwi q.v.), city on the 

Oxus, vii, 91 note 
Charogos. SeeTainiish. 
Chase, equipage for, vii, 48, 76 ; 

viii, 384 
Chess, game of, i6c), vi, 201 ; 
vii, 14 and note, 280, 385 
seq. ; viii, 371 
Note on, vii, 380 
sent by the Raja of Hind to 
Niishirwan, vii, 5, 380, 
384 seq. 
expounded by Buzurjniihr, 

vii, 380, 388 
symbolism of, vii, 381 
two forms of, vii, 38 1, 388, 

422 
changes in powers of pieces 

in, vii, 381 
Mas'udi on, vii, 382 
invention of. Story of the, 
i6g, vii, 394 seq. 
Chess-board, vii, 14, 385, 388 
Chess-men, vii, 14, 380, 388 
Chevy Chase, ii, 82 
Chigil (Naryn ?) district and 
river, tributary of the 
Jaxartes, iv, 135 
monarch of, v, no 

commands the left, v, no 
= Arjasp, v, 54, 86 
Turkman of, =Gurgsar, v, 

139 

Chihrzad (Humai), daughter and 
wife of Shah Bahman, ii, 
3 ; V, 290 and 7tote 
meaning of, v, 290 and note 

Chi'jast (Khanjast, Urumiah), 
lake in Azarbaijan, iv, 
136 note 

Cliildren, sometimes brought up 
un-named, i, 8, 179 

Chin, country, China, but gen- 
erally in the Shahnama 
equivalent to Chinese 
Tartary and sometimes 
to Ti'ir^n, 160, 165, 173, 



GENERAL IMJHX 



^39 



Chin, count! y, China — coul. 

i, J07, 229. 230, 2G1, 267, 
351. 371 : ii. 77. 82, III, 
M3. 154. 156. 237, 277. 
2S6, 287, 289, 297, 305, 

307. 357. 359. i^i, 394 ; 

iii, 4O, 49, 103, loO and 

passim. 
assigned by Faridun to Tiir, 

i, 189 
brocade of, i, 269, 233 and 

passim 
coasts of, vi, 1 73 
cloth of gold from, ii, 275 ; 

vi, 182, 334 
dinars of, iv, 241 
Faghfiir of. See Faghfur. 
helm of, i, 132 
images of, v, 35 
implements of, vi, 122 
Khan of. See Khan. 
King of = Afrasiyab, ii, 99; 

iv, 165, 170, 230 

= Khan, iii, 227, 228; 
vii, 87 

= Arjasp, V, 36, 52, 55, 
69, 86, 108 

= Faghfur, vii, 131 
lord of = Mahmud, iv, 142 

= Sikandar, vi, 113 

= Faghfur, vi, 171 
mace of, iii, 129 
ornaments of, ii, 232 ; vi, 

102, 139 
paper of, vi, 172 
pen of, vi, 57, 99 
prince of = Khan, iii, 226 

= Afrasiyab, iv, 194 

= Arjasp, V, 35 

=Parmuda, viii, i,\z 

= Sawa, viii, 222 
rarities of, vi, 171, 173 ; vii, 

49 
robes of, iii, 329 ; viii, 205, 

257 

Rose of = daughter of the 
Khan, vii, 363 and nole 

sea of, i, 113, 140, 252, 349; 
ii, 12, 256, 276, 285, 356, 
357; iii, 151, 252; iv, 
^37. 2^4 ; V, 109, 203, 



149 



Cliin, sea of — -conl. 

■^:M. 239 note : vi 
vii, 343 ; viii, 377 
shield of, iii, 125, 140, 256 ; 

ix, 118 
Sikandar goes to, vi, 169 
silk of, i, 157 ; iii, 104, 165 ; 
V, 159, 295 ; vi, 85, 266 ; 
vii, 73. 92, 347. 364. 418 ; 
viii, 258, 269, 374 
steel of, iii, 186 
stuffs of, vi, 143, 215 
ware of, vii, 78 
sage of, viii, 235 
sashes from, ix, 12, 53 
gold thread of, ix, 82 
merchantmen of, ix, 89 
China, country, vi, 204 

silk industry of, vi, 204 
Chinab (Akesines), river in the 

Punjab, vi, 31, 64 
Chinese, viii, 72 

language, vi, 147 
Chingish, Turanian hero. I4'j. iii, 
207 
volunteers to avenge Kamiis, 

iii, 194 
challenges Rustam, iii, 194 
slain by Rustam, iii, 195 
Chi'nwi, noble of Chin, viii, 331 
Chionitae, people, v, 13 

geographical position of, v, 

13 

Chorene, Moses of. See Moses. 

Chosrau, Chosroes I (Kisra), 

Sasanian Sh4h, vii, 212, 

281. See Nushirw4r^ 

Chosroes, king of Armenia, vi, 

202 
Christ, 174, vi, 339 ; vii, 
249, 264, 270, 273, 
ix, 24, 109 
Faith of, vi, 133, 339 
274 ; viii, 43, 191, 
310, 380 
account of, viii, 276 
father of, viii, 276 
mother of, viii, 276 
Cross of, viii, 377, 3S0 

23 

laughter of, viii, 191, 380 



207, 
2 70 ; 

; vii, 
272, 



IX, 



240 



GENERAL INDEX 



Christian, Christians, 767, vi, 
342 ; vii, 171, 254, 270 ; 
viii, 21, 67, 195, 196, 256, 
272, 308, 310, 381 ; ix, 23 
rites of marriage, vi, 104 
Faith, vi, 336 
persecution of, vii, 153 
Firdausi's view of, vii, 219 
wife of Nushirwan, vii, 263, 
274 

mother of Niishzad, vii, 

263 
helps NiishzAd in his 

revolt, vii, 266 
laments for Niishzad, 
vii, 276 
support Niishzad, vii, 266, 

shut gates of Karsan against 
Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 252 
Christianity, vi, 138 

polemics against, vii, 219, 
270, 273 
Chiibin (Jiibin), father, accord- 
ing to Mas'iidi, of Bahram 
Chiibina, viii, 77 
Chubina, viii, 215, 222 

meaning of, viii, 98 note 
Cilicia (Kaidafa), most south- 
easterly province of Asia 
Minor, vi, 294 
Circesium, viii, 188 
City of Women, 160. See Hariim. 
Claudius, Roman emperor (A.D. 

41-54), iii, 10 
Cleophis, Indian queen, vi, 65 
Alexander the Great and, 
vi, 65 
Climate, of Iran, i, 4, 5 
Mazandardn, ii, 27 
Clime, Climes, the seven, i, 40, 
71, 122, 123, 238 ; ii, 15 
note, 372 ; iii, 290, 317 ; 
vi, 179, 262, 266, 273, 280, 
376, 377 ; viii, 39.5 
Kai Khusrau surveys, in his 

divining-cup, iii, 318 
Central, i, 71, 122 ; ii, 27 
Cloud, emblem of prosperity, i, 
73, 113, 114 ; ii, 263 and 
note ; iv, 141 ; vi, 96 



Cloud, thunder-, as water-steal- 
ing demon, i, 7 
of bale = Afrasiyab, ii, 13 
name given by Rustam to 
himself, ii, 53 

Clough, quoted, viii, 187 

Cocks and hens, taught to crow 
daybreak, i, 126 

Colchians, people of the south- 
eastern shores of the 
Euxine, vi, 72 

Colic, cure of, vii, 39 

Commander of the Faithful, ix, 

7-2 
'Umar, the first, ix, 72 and 
note 
Commons, king of the, vii, 3 
Communists (Mazdakites, q.v.), 

vii, 185 
Companions of the Prophet 
(Muhammad), ijg 
praise of, /jp, i, 106 
Constantinople, vii, 316 ; viii, 
194 
conspirator against Nushir- 
wan escapes to, vii, 316 
Contents, General Table of, ix, 

139 

Cook, chief, of Nushirwan, griev- 
ance of, viii, 18 

Cordwainer. See Shoemaker. 

Corn-land, taxes on, vii, 215 

Corpse, 160 

Cos, island in the ^gean sea, vi, 
204 
silk industry of, vi, 204 

Cosmogony, ancient Iranian, i, 

5. 71 
Firdausi's, 102, iv, 136 
Country of the Blest. Sec Blest. 
Courses, the Seven, of Rustam, 

143, ii, 29, 44 seq. 
Crassus, the triumvir (B.C. 115- 

53). i. 15 
defeat of, at Carrh;r, i, 13 

Creation, Zoroastrian account of, 

i. 5. 117 
Firdausi's account of, i, 102 

seq. 
Crete, island, south of Greece, 
vi, T,ii note. 



GENERAL INDEX 



241 



Crete, Minos king of, legend of, 

vi, 323 note 
Crocodile, iii, 278 

= assassin, i, iii 

= Kamus, iii, 192 
Cross, the, 174. vi, 351, 352; 

vii, 249, 270, 276 ; viii, 308, 

309, 374 

captured by D4rab, vi, 306 
and 7wte 

religion of, vi, 138 

Passion of, vi, 339 

the true, viii, 191, 196, 253, 
377. 37S, 380 ; ix, 4, 5, 
10, 24 

restoration of, ix, 7, 56 

of Christ, ix, 23 

Elevation of, ix, 43 
Crows and Owls, story of, viii, 

263 and note 
Crystal, House of, ix, 25 and note 
Ctesias. See Ktesias. 
Ctesiphon (Taisafiin q.v.), city on 
the left bank of the Tigris 
some 25 miles below Bagh- 
dad, originally an exten- 
sion of Seleucia on the 
right bank of that river, 
ii, 80; vi, 321, 322, 325, 
372 ; viii, 42, 188, 189, 
193. 194. 196 ; ix, 65 seq. 

taken by Shahrbaraz, ix, 

43. 44 
Sa'ad, ix, 67 
booty found at, ix, 68 
Culture-heroes. See Gaiiimart, 
Hushang, Tahmuras, and 
Jamshid, i, 118 seq. 
Cup, divining-, of Kai Khusrau, 
iii, 317, 318, 323 
inexhaustible, of Kaid, i$g, 

vi, 94, 100, 109 
poisoned, proffered to Ard- 

shfr PapakAn, vi, 259 
crj'stal, to detect poison (?), 
vii, 51 
Cybele, Greek goddess, vi, 71 

= Hittite Ma, vi, 71 
Cymbals, of the Brides of the 
Treasure, vi, 250 ; vii, 35 
and note 

vol-. IX. 



Cypress, of Kishmar. See Kish. 
mar. 

Cyrus the Great (B.C. 558-528), 
son of Cambyses and 
founder of the Persian 
empire 
legend of, in Herodotus 
identical with that of Kai 
Khusrau, ii, 9, 190 
in Ctesias transferred to 
Ardshir Papakan, vi, 

195 
rise of, i, 18 

compared to that of Ard- 
shir Papakan, vi, 194 
historical parallel with Kai 
Khusrau, v, 10 



D 



Dabistan, 17th century Persian 
treatise, v, 28 
Cypress of Ki.shmar, account 
of, in, V, 28 

Dad, franian warrior, vii, 86 

Dadafrid, melody, viii, 398 and 
note 

Daevas. See Div. 

Daghwi, desert in Turkistan, ii, 
193; iv, 117 

Dahaei.e.," foes "or" robbers," 
a name given by the Iran- 
ians to the nomad tribes 
dwelling east of the Casp- 
ian and north of the 
Atrak in the region now 
occupied by the Yamut 
Turkmans, i, 19 ; iii, 
10 

Dahaka (Azhi, Azi, Zahhak 
q.v.), evil spirit, i, 7, 142, 
172 

Dahistcin, stead or home of the 
Dahae q.v. and town 
between Harat and Marv, 
1, 280, 344 seq., 349, 363, 
iv, 61, 72, 79, 148, 157 ; 

ix, 95 
Naudar beleaguered in, by 
Afrasiyab, i, i^i 



242 



GENERAL INDEX 



Dai, genius, i, 88, 89 ; iii, 287, 
328 
month or day, i, 88, 89 ; v, 
43 ; vi, 306 ; viii, 173, 
421 ; ix, 17 
pa Mihr, day, i, 88 ; v, 
16 
Dai Marj, place where Bahram 
Giir is said to have been 
drowned, vii, 6 
Daitya, river, v, 13 
Daizan (Tair q.v.), vi, 322 
legend of, vi, 322 
daughter of, legend of, vi, 

Dakhma, " Tower of Silence," i, 
81 and note 

Dakiki, Persian poet, ijg, 154, 
155. ii. 3 'tiote, 8 ; v, 
10, 13; vi, 196; viii, 
190 
account of, i, 28, 67, 69, 
log ; V, 20 

Firdausi and, v, 21 seq., 
30, 87, 88 
work of, compared with the 
Yatkar-i-Zarirdn, v, 24 
seq. 

Damaghan, city on the road from 
Tihran to Nishapur and 
the capital of the province 
of Kumis, ii, 15 ; iv, 255 ; 
viii, 109, i8g 

Daman-i-Kuh, the northern 
"mountain-skirt" of mod- 
ern Persia, iii, 15 

Damascus, chief city in Syria, 

vi, 195 
Nicolaus of, Greek his- 
torian, temp. Augustus, 

vi, 195 
Damdwand, volcano nearly 
20,000 feet high and the 
culminating peak of the 
mountain-range south of 
the Caspian, i, 143, 144, 
148 ; vi, 202 ; viii, 391 
Zahhdk fettered on, i, 169, 

173 
Arish's arrow-shot from, v, 
iz 



Dambar, city in Kabulistan (? ) 
which was regarded as 
Indian, i, 252, 256 ; iv, 
278, 283, 284 ; vii, 396, 

399. 421 

Damdad, Nask, i, 70 note 
1 Damur, Turanian hero, ii, 296, 
319 ; iv, 156 
overthrown by Siyawush, 

ii, 295 
advocates execution of Siya- 
wush, ii, 317 

Danbar. See Dambar. 

Dandamis. See Mandancs. 

Dang, coin, ix, 94 and note 

Danishwar, the dihkan, sup- 
posed compiler of the 
Bastan-nama, temp. Yaz- 
dagird III, i, 67, 68 

Danube, river, v, 1 1 

Darius' expedition to, v, 1 1 . 

Dara, son of Darab, Shah (Darius 
Codomanus q.v.) 158, i, 
42 ; ii, 3, 9 ; v, 281 ; vi, 
83 seq., 112, 113, 123, 
124, 132, 137, 170, 172, 
188, 325, 353 ; viii, 220, 

242, 387 

first historic Shah in the 
Shahnama, i, 49 

origin of name, v, 297 note 

legendary son of Darab, vi, 
17, 27 

appointed by Darab to 
succeed him, vi, 27 

Reign of, 15S, vi, 29 seq. 
Note on, vi, 29 seq. 

historical account of, vi, 29 

movements of, after his 
final defeat by Alex- 
ander (Sikandar), vi, 31 

Sikandar's correspondence 
with the wife and daugh- 
ter of, vi, 33 

accession of, vi, 34 

letter of, to the kings, vi, 

34 
pays his troops, vi, 35 
ambassadors come to, vi, 35 
demands tribute froni 

Sikandar, \i, 50 



GENERAL INDEX 



243 



Dari, marches against Sikandar, 

vi. 37 

Sikandar 's visit to the camp 
of, vi, 38 

invites Sikandar to a ban- 
quet, vi, 40 

ambassador of, recognises 
Sikandar, vi, 40 

sends horsemen in pursuit 
of Sikandar vi, 41 

defeated by Sikandar, vi, 43 

collects another army, vi, 

43 
defeat of vi, 44 
goes to Chahram vi, 44 

Istakhr vi, 44 
takes counsel with his chiefs 

vi, 45 
collects a new host vi, 46 
marches from Istakhr, vi, 46 
defeat of, vi, 46 
withdraws to Kirman, vi, 

46 
bewails himself, vi, 47 
letter of, to Sikandar, vi, 49 

Fur, vi, 50 
marches against Sikandar, 

vi, 51 
abandoned by his troops 

and flees, vi, 51 
murdered by his ministers, 

vi, 52 
murderers of, arrested by 

Sikandar, vi, 53 
dying interview of, with 

Sikandar, vi, 53 
vengeance promised to, by 

Sikandar, vi, 53 
tells his last wishes to 

Sikandar, vi, 54 
bestows Rushanak upon 

Sikandar, vi, 55, 86 
dies, vi, 55 
burial of, vi, 56 
Seisin, son of, vi, 211 
kindred of, support Ard- 

shi'r Papakdn, vi, 223 
Dara (l)aras), city, viii, 41, 194 
taken by Niishirwan, viii, 41 
ceded by Khusrau I'arwiz, 

viii, 188 



D4rA Pandh, viii, 189, 284 

goes disguised to Khusrau 

Parwiz' camp, viii, 2S6 

betrays Bahram Chubina, 

viii, 286 
returns to Bahram Chubina, 
with forged letter, viii, 287 
T>krkh, Shah, son of Bah man 
and Humii, 158, i, 42 ; 
ii, 3. 9 ; V, 281, 292, 297 
seq. ; vi, 11, 34 and 7iote, 
49. 83, 84, 86, 132, 137, 
172, 188 ; vii, 215 ; viii, 

191 
foundling legend of, ii, 11; 

V, 293 seq. 

Tabarf's version of, v, 
297 note 
birth of, V, 294 
referred to, v, 294 seq. 
exposed on the Farat, v, 

295 
found and adopted by a 

launderer, v, 296 seq. 
royal birth of, asserts itself, 

V, 298 
youthful escapades of, v, 298 
brought up as a cavalier, v, 

299 
feels lack of natural affec- 
tion for the launderer, v, 

300 
hears of his case from the 

launderer's wife, v, 300 
enlists, v, 301 
seen by Ifuniai, v, 302 
and the adventure of the 

ruined vault, v, 303 
receives gifts from Rashna- 

wad, V, 304 
questioned by Rashnawid, 

V, 304 
prowess of, against the 

Riimans, v, 305, 306 
praised and rewarded by 

Rashnawcid, v, 305, 306 
captures the Cross, v, 306 

and )wte 
takes of the spoil one spear, 

V, 307 
returns to Iran, v, 307 



244 



GENERAL INDEX 



Darab, Rashnawad hears from 
the launderer and his wife 
of the case of, v, 308 

Rashnawad writes to Hnmai 
about, V, 308 

recognised by Humai as 
being her son, v, 308 

appears with Rashnawad 
Isefore Humai, v, 309 seq. 

crowned by Humai and 
accepts her excuses, v, 310 

Humai proclaims the ac- 
cession of, V, 311 

visited by, and rewards, the 
launderer and his wife, 

V, 311, 31-2 

Reign of, 158, vi, 11 seq. 
Note on, vi, 11 seq. 

father of Sikandar in Per- 
sian legend, vi, 16 

legendary father of Dara, vi, 

17 
liarangues the chief-;, vi, 20 
ambassadors come to, vi, 21 
employs Ruman artificers, 

vi, 21 
wars with the Arabs, vi, 21 
defeats and demands tribute 

from Arabs, vi, 22 
wars with Rum, vi, 22 
defeats Failakus, vi, 23 
grants terms of peace to 

Failakus, vi. 24 
marries the daughter of 

Failakus, vi, 25 
returns to Pars, vi, 25 
becomes disaffected towards 

his wife (Nahid), vi, 25 
marries again, vi, 27 
Dara is born to him, vi, 27 
fails in health, vi, 27 
appoints Dard to succeed 

him, vi, 27 
dies, vi, 28 
Ddrab, Darabgird, city in Pars, 

756', vi, 17, 198, 199; 

viii, 313 
Darband, town and pass be- 
tween the Caucasus q.v., 

and the Casj^ian, ii, 336 ; 

viii, 369 nole 



Darband, Pass of, described, 
i, 16 

fortification of, i, 16, 17 

and note, vii, 213, 239 

Mas'iidi's accounts of, 

vii, 215 

Dari, vii, 430 and note 

Dariel, Pass of, in the Caucasus, 

vi, 79 
Darius, Hystaspis, Shah, i, 9, 65 ; 
V, 10 ; viii, 187 
trilingual inscription of, at 

Bihistiin, i, 6 
Zoroastrian calendar adopt- 
ed by, i, 59 
reign of, and Gusht^sp's 

compared, v, 11 
conversion of, v, 1 1 
Darius, Codomanus (Dara q.v.) 
Shah, i, 49 ; vi, 16, 17, 29 
defeated at Issus, vi, 30 
Alexander escapes from the 

banquet of, vi, 30 
defeated at Gaugamela, vi, 

31 

asks that his family may be 
restored to him, vi, 31 

writes to Porus, vi, 31 

historical account of the 
death of, vi, 31 

daughter of, marries Alex- 
ander, vi, 33 

corpse of, sent to Pars, vi, 

33 

assassins of, punished, vi, 33 
Dareja, river in Azarbaijan, v, 

14 
Darkness, Land of. See Gloom. 

House of, ix, 7 ; 
Darmdn, viii, 202 
Darmesteter, Professor, un I'ir- 

dausi's geography, ii, 7<), 

80 
on Afrdsiy^b's capture by 

Hum, iv, 136 

Story of the Worm, vi, 203 

Haftvvad, vi, 206 
Darun, Zoroastrian religious rite, 

V, 19 
Daryai Riid, river in Azarbdijan, 

V, 14 



GENERAL INDEX 



\5 



Dastaginl, city, viii, 103, 196 ; 
ix, 7 
taken by Heraclius, \iii, Kq 

Dashma, franian hero, iv, 148 

Dastan (Zal </.?'.), i, 84, 248, 264 

Daslan-i-Sain (ZAl q.v.), i, 84 

D4stan-i-Zand (Zal q.v.), i, 245 
and }iole, 248 

Date-palm, i, 4 

taxes on, vii, 215, 225 

Daughter of Kaid. See Kaid, 
Four Wonders of. 

Daulat Shah, author of " Lives 
of the Poets," i, 24 

Death, early, I'lrdausi's justifi- 
cation of, ii, 119 

Dead Sea, viii, 192 

Deinon. See Dinon. 

Deipnosophistce, of Athcnaeus, ii, 

ID 

quoted, iv, 314 
Derketo, goddess, v, 292 

legend of, v, 292 
Destiny, Muhammadan and Zor- 
oastrian conceptions of, i, 

52 
Dewasarm, king of Hind, vii, 381 
sends the game of chess to 
Niishirwan, vii, 380 
Dharma, Indian god of righteous- 
ness, iv, 138 
follows in the form of a dog 
the Pandavas in their pil- 
grimage, iv, 139 
Dhoulkarnain. See Zu-'l-kar- 

nain. 
Dhu K4r, battle of, viii, 188, ix, 
4. 5. 66 
historical account of, viii, 

190 
date of, viii, 191 
Diagram to illustrate reign of 
Gushtasp, V, 27 
Persian Romance of Alex- 
ander the Great, vi, 84 
Diba-i-Khusraui, treasure, viii, 

406 and note 
Dice, vii, 381 

used in the game of nard, 

vii, 3''^ I. 389 
symbolism of, vii, 381, 382 



Dihkdn, Persian generic title, i, 
56, 81 
Fiiith of, vi, 95 
Dijla (Arwand, Tigris q.v.), river, 
i, 100 
Faridi'in's crossing of, i, 160 
Dilafn'iz, franian hero, iv, 147 
Dilafri'iz, a bramble-grubber, 
Bahram Gur and, vii, 70 
seq. 
Dilafruz-i-Farruk!ipai, franian 
slave-girl, 162, vi, 3 
slave to Caesar's wife, vi, 

338 
pities Sha])nr, vi, 339 
discovers who Shapiir is, vi, 

339 
frees Shapiir from the ass's 

skin, vi, 340 
escapes with Shapur from 

Rum, vi, 340 seq. 
entertained by a gardener, 

vi, 34^ 
praised by Shapur, vi, 346 
named and honoured by 

Shapur, vi, 356 
meaning of, vi, 356 note 

Dilam, Dilaman, district on the 
Caspian now represented 
by Talish and part of 
Gilan, vi, 202, 227 ; vii, 
243. 244, 362 

Dilamids (Buyids), dynasty rul- 
ing in south-western fran 
in the loth century A.D., 
i, 14. 21, 45 

Dilamite, 'AH the, friend and 
helper of Firdausi, i, 35 ; 
ix, 121 

Dihinjam, Caesar's (temp. Luh- 
rasp) second daughter, iv, 

333 
asked in marriage by Mirin, 

iv, 333 
married to Mi'ri'n, iv, 341 
Dilarai, wife to Dara and mother 
of Rushanak, 15S, J59, vi, 
87 seq. 
visited by Nahi'd, vi, 89 
Dimna, Kalila and, i6r). See 
Fables of Bidpai. 



>46 



GENERAL INDEX 



Dina-i Mainog-i lsh\ra.d, Pahlavi 
text, ii, 189 
quoted, vii, 279 

Dinar, gold coin, i, 81, 231, 363 
and passim 

Dinawari, Arabic historian 
(ninth century), vi, 16, 
64, 80, 81, 256, 323 ; vii, 
6, 156, 186, 214 

Dinkard, Pahlavi text, i, 70 note, 
373 ; ii, 26, 8t ; vi. 
252 

Diodorus, Greek historian, temp. 
Julius Caesar and Augus- 
tus, V, 293 
Bibliotheca of, v, 293 

Diognetus, Greek writer, temp. 
Alexander the Great, vi, 
12 

Dionysus, Greek god, vi, 71 

temple of, visited by Si- 
kandar, vi, 71 

Diram. See Drachm. 

Dirazdast (Longimanus), title, 
v, 281 ; vi, 324 and note 

Div, di'vs (Daevas), demons or 
" foreign devils," 140, 143, 
150, i, 42, 82, 130, 131, 
134, 148, 227, 290; h, 
27. 33. 34. 38. 41 seq., 57 
seq., 68, 73, loi, 102, 
144 ; iii, 70, 74, 200, 232, 
244, 255, 257 seq., 261, 
268, 273 seq., 320, 330 , 
iv, 86, 87, 177, 288, 295 , 
v, 32, 58, 66, 71, 108, 174; 
201, 202, 213, 220, 230; 
245 ; vi, 135, 146, 150, 
241 ; vii, 115, 154, 174, 
368 seq. ; viii, 159, 161, 
206, 209, 211, 217, 218, 
290, 341. 342, 399 and 
note, 418 ; ix, 18, 25 
rebel against Tahmiiras, i, 

127 
overthrown by Tahmiiras, i, 

127 
teach Tahmiiras the art of 

writing, i, 127 
build edifices for Jamshid, i, 
133 



Div, divs, carry Jamshid on his 
throne up to the sky, i, 1 33 

title of honour, ii, 29 

song of a, ii, 31 

Arjasp informed by a, of 
Gushtasp's resolve not to 
pay tribute, v, 36 

Mazdak's five, vii, 205 

Biizurjinihr's ten, vii, 368 

Akwan. See Akwan. 
= Ahriman, 7J9, i, 82, 126, 
156, 195, 260 ; ii, 46, 324, 
342. 370. 386, 400 ; iii, 
189, 293. 333 ; iv, 63, 84, 
201, 206, 278, 282, 286, 
289 seq., 301, 322, 341 ; 
v, 35, 81, 180, 188, 189, 
194 seq., 218, 228, 242 ; 
vi, 349 ; vii, 93, 107, 109, 
117, 143. 154, 206, 227, 
268, 289, 303, 304, 323, 
332, 368 seq., 376, 390 ; 
viii, 27, 50, 87, 123, 215, 
222, 304, 341, 346, 411 . 
ix, 47, 102, 104 

= Bahram Chiibina, viii, 
153. 219, 293. 298 

 — witch, viii, 161 

= Zahhak, viii, 242 

= Kuliin, viii, 342 

Binder of the=Tahmuras, 
i, 42, 125, 126, 214 
= Gudarz, iv, 35 
= Rustam, iii, 253, 262 

Black, son of Ahriman, /jp, 
i, 82, 117 ; ii, 53 ; v, 199 ; 
viii, 171 

White, 143, i, 82 ; ii, 27, 39 
seq., 43. 44. 54. 55- 58 seq., 
66, 93, 163, 373 ; iii, 143, 
256, 314 ; iv, 136, 296 ; 
v, 117, 176, 203, 207, 234 
defeats Kaiis, ii, 40 
blood of, cures blindness, 

ii, 58. 62 
slain by Rustam, ii, 60 
Divining-cup. See Cup. 
Dneiper (Borysthenes), river in 
southern European Rus- 
sia, flowing into the Black 
Sea, iii, 191 



cnNERir. ixnnx 



217 



Don (Tanais), river in soutlicrn 

Juiropcan Russia, (lowing 

into tlie Sea of Azov, iv, 

315 note, 316 

Doiti, The Mot-all Philosophie of, 

vii, 3^3 
Drachm (diram), silver coin, i, 

81 
Dragon, 143. 154, 156, 160, 164, 
165, i, 42, 123 ; vi, 132, 
146 
Faridi'in takes the form of, 

i, 1S6 
of the Kashaf, i, 235 

Sdm and the, i, 296 seq., 
V, 202 
slain by Rustam and 

Rakhsh, ii, 48 seq. 

of Mount Sakila, iv, 342 seq. 

Gushtasp and, iv, 343 seq. 

teeth of, produced by 

Hishwi to Caesar, iv, 351 

referred to, iv, 358 

Sikandar's adventure with, 

vi, 71. 151 
slain by Bahram Gur, vii, 

42, 123 seq. 
described, i, 123, 296 ; iv, 

345 ; v, 202 . vi, 151 ; 

vii, 43, 123 
Dragon = Afrisiyab, iii, 22, 46, 

211, 219, 222. 248, 319, 

343 ; iv, 270 
= Ahriman, i, 195 ; iii, 330 
= Ardawan, vi, 222 
= Fur, vi, 113 
= Giv, iii, 58 
= Human, iv, 43, 52 
= Palashan, iii, 26 
= Puladwand, iii, 264 
= Rakhsh's dam, i, 379 
= Rakhsh, i, 380 
= Rustam, iii, 222 
= Zahhak, i, 155, 158, 161, 

163, 168, 169, 275, 288, 

292 
Dragon's child =Rudaba, i, 304 
Drangiana (Sfstan), province in 

eastern fran, i, 4 ; vi, 32 
Dream, dreams, veridical, i, 51 
Firdausi on, vii, 281 



Drea 11, Abul K4sim of Gurgan's, 

iii, 190 
Afrasiyab's, ii, 232 seq. 

referred to, ii, 243, 297 ; 
iv, I 70, 267 
Firdausi's, of Mahmud, i, 1 1 2 

Daki'ki, v, 23, 30 
Gudarz's, ii, 363, 404 
Gushtasp's, v, 19 
Raid's, V, 62, gi 
Ratayiin's, iv, 316, 329, 330 
Niishirwan's, vii, 282 seq. ; 

ix, 92 
Odatis', iv, 315 
Papak's, vi, 200, 212 
Piran's, ii, 325 
Sam's, i, 243, 244 
Siyawush's, ii, 309 
Tiis', iii, 149 
Zariadres', iv, 315 
Draupadi, joint wife of the five 

Pandavas, iv, 138 and 

note, 139 
Drought and famine in Iran, i, 

3. 5. 370. 371 ; li. 363 ; 

vii, 159, 162 
Piriiz's measures to allev- 
iate, vii, 159, 162 
breaking up of, described, 

vii, 163 
Mazdak's parable concern- 
ing, vii, 201 
Drvaspa, genius of cattle, iv, 137 
Dualism, i, 5, 49, 50, 52, 56, 58 
taught by Urmuzd to Zar- 
duhsht, v, 16 
Dughdhova, v, 14, 15 
account of, v, 14 
Duk, plain, yiii, 282, 284 
mountain, viii, 289 
Dukhtniish. See Niisha. 
Dunbar. See Dambar. 
Duncker, Professor, ii, 9 

on date of Zandavasta, ii, 9 
Durdsrobo, a Karap q.v., v, 15 
Dust, prevalence of, in Iran, i, 3 
as a metaphor, i, 73 and 
passim 
Dynasty, dynasties, Iranian, i, 49 
Pishdadian q.v. 
Kaianian q.v. 



248 



GENERAL INDEX 



Dynasty, Ashkanian q.v. 
Sasanian q.v. 



Eclipse of sun, total, temp. 

Piriiz, vii, 159 
Edessa, S. James of, i, 374 
Eggs, golden, as tribute, vi, 24, 

36, 160, 169 
Egypt (Misr, q.v.), ii, 80 ; vi, 12, 

16, 17, 72, 81, 82 ; viii, 

187, 193 
Pseudo-Callisthenes written 

in, vi. 13 
invaded by Alexander the 

Great, vi, 30 
Egyptian Egyptians, vi, 16 ; 

viii, 193 ; ix, no 
falsification of history by, 

vi, 16 
thorn, viii, 210 
linen, ix, no 
Ekbatana (Hamadan), the capi- 
tal of Media, i, 17 ; ii, 

191 ; vi, 31, 32 
capital of the Manda, q.v., 

i. 17 
Elam (Susiana, Khuzistan), 

ancient kingdom and Per- 
sian province at the head 
of the Persian Gulf, i, 9 ; 
vi, 194, 198 
Elburz. See Alburz. 
Elements, the four, i, 102, 286 
Elephant, elephants, i, 112 and 
passim 
towers on, iv, 179 
Fur's, vi, 115, 116 

Sikandar's device to over- 
come, vi, 115, 116 
= Rustam, iii, 221, 253 
= Rakhsh, iii, 257 
= Fur, vi, 117 
piece in chess, vii, 285, 

423 

position of, vii, 388, 422 
move of, vii, 422 
White, ZAl's, 141. i, 328 
referred to, i, 377 



Elephantine, the = Rustam, ii, 

6.5, 67 
Eleven Rukhs, Battle of the, iv, 
88 
arranged by Giidarz and 

Pi'ran, iv, 95 seq. 
Firdausi's reflections on, iv, 
7, 98, 106 
Ellipi, kingdom of, i, 9, 17 
Elixir, 144, ii, 177, 178 
Elymais (Elam, q.v.), kingdom, 

vi, 198 
Endless peace, the, vii, 217 
Enotokoitai, the. vi, 80 
Epirus, ancient kingdom in 
northern Greece, vi. 12 
Alexander I of, vi, 12 
his expedition to Italy, 
vi, 12 
Equinox, autumnal, iv, 313 
Erinde, river, iii, 10 and note, 11 
Esdras (Ezra), Jewish priest and 
scribe, supposed by the 
Muhammadans to have 
restored from memory the 
law lost during the cap- 
tivity, vii, 207, 264 
Ether, viii, 275 
Ethics, Muhammadan, respected, 

viii, 74 
Ethiop, Ethiopian, Ethiopic, i, 
44 ; iii, 226 ; vi, 43, 71, 
80 
= Indian, vi, 13, 68 
western and eastern, vi, 13, 

68, 71 
version of the Pseudo-Callis- 
thcncs, q.v., vi, 17 and 
note. iS, 30, 33, 66, 67, 
71, 74, 82, 83 
Ethiopia, vi, 72 

flight of Ncctanebus to, vi, 

18 note 
western and eastern, vi, 68 
= India, vi, 68 
Eumenes, Greek ephemcrist, 
temp. Alexander the 
Great, vi, 12 
Euphrates (Farat, q.v.), river, ii, 
80 ; V, 292 ; vi, 31. 327 ; 
vii, 217 ; viii, 188, 190 



GENERAL INDEX 



2-!9 



Euxinc, sea, i, i6 ; ii, 191, 336; 

vi, 72 
Eye, metaphor for child, i, 17S, 

I So, 181, 1S5, 194 ; ii, 

297, 3-!S ; V, 272 ; vii, 

276, 356 
evil, ii, -204, 252 ; iii, 141, 

157. 337 ; iv, 144, 282 ; 

V, 194. 245, 2.51, 290 ; 

vi, 266, 402 ; vii, 78, 81, 

172 ; viii, 16, 417 

turns milk to bane, vii, 320 

seq., 324, 325 



Fables of Bidpai (Book of 
KaHla and Dimna), vii, 
213, 427 seq. ; viii, 202 
note, 390 

introduction of, into Persia, 
vii, 213 

translation of, vii, 382, 3S3 
Firdausi's account of, vii, 

430 
vogue of, vii, 383 
origin of, vii, 383 
Niishirwan's acquisition of, 

vii, 423 seq. 
Faghanish, temp. Piruz, kin<^ of 

the Haitalians, 16S, vii, 

157 

helps Piriiz for a considera- 
tion, vii, 157 

temp. Niishirwan, 168 

made king instead of 
Ghatkar, vii, 333 

Niishirwan takes counsel 
about, vii, 333 

descent of, from Bahram 
Giir. vii, 334 

Niishirwan writes to, vii, 

337 
makes submission to Niish- 
irwan, vii, 360 
Faghfiir, dynastic title of the 
rulers of Chin and IMachin, 
152. 153. 160, i, 262 ; 
ii, 383 ; iv. II, 135. 196, 
238 seq. ; v, 221 ; vi, 35, 



Faghfiir — cout. 

80, 113, 169 seq., 325 ; 
vii, 340. 343. 40'"^ : viii, 
74 ; ix, 87, 97, 102 

temp. Kai Khusrau, helps 
Afrdsiyab, iv, 219 

Khan and, sue to Kai 
Khusrau for peace, iv, 
229 

orders Afrasiydb to quit 
Khutan and Chin, iv, 
230 

grants facilities to Kai 
Khusrau for his march 
through Chin, iv, 239 

Khan of Chin and, welcome 
Kai Khusrau, iv, 240 
confirmed in the posses- 
sion of Chin and 
Machin, iv, 252 

temp. Sikandar, ambassa- 
dors from, come to Dara, 

vi, 35 
Sikandar visits as his own 

ambassador, vi, 170 
gives audience to Sikandar, 

vi, 170 
entertains Sikandar, vi, 171 
answers Sikandar, vi, 172 
gifts of, to Sikandar, vi, 

173 
sends envoy with Sikandar, 

vi, 173 

temp. Bahram Giir, 765 

daughter of, the wife of 

Shangul, vii, 115 
hears of Bahram Giir's ex- 
ploits in Hind, vii, 129 
invites Bahram Giir to visit 

him, vii, 129 
Bahram Giir's reply to, vii, 

130 
temp. Niishirwan, viii, 97 
Faghfiir, son of Sawa, viii, 74, 

75. 120 
confused with Faghfiir of 

Chin, viii, 74 
parley of, with Bahram 

Chiibina, viii, 1 1 2 
head of, on spear, viii, 

132 



250 



GENERAL INDEX 



Failakiis (Philip II of Macedon), 
grandfather in Iranian 
legend of Sikandar (Alex- 
ander the Great), 158, vi, 
57, 102, 112, 125. 130, 131, 
151, 182 ; vii, 215 ; viii, 

387 
wars with Darab, vi, 22 
allied with the king of Rus, 

vi, 22 
inarches from 'Amniuriya to 

encounter Darab, vi, 23 
defeated and returns to 

'Ammuriya, vi, 23 
sues for peace, vi, 23 
agrees to send tribute, and 

give his daughter in 

niarriage, to Darab, i$8, 

vi, 24, 25 
adopts Sikandar as his heir, 

vi, 27 
Faith, Faiths, the four, vi, 92, 

95 
of Christ, Christian, vi, 133, 

352, 356 
of Ahriman, ii, 358 ; vi, 

281, 290 
Faithful, Commander of the, ix, 

72 
'Umar, the first, ix, 72 and 

note 
Fakirs, the, vi, 61 

Alexander the Great and, 

vi, 61 
Onesicritus and, vi, 61 
Fakka', a kind of drink, i, 43 

note 
Falatun (Plato), vii, 100 ; viii, 

264 
Falconry, ii, 108, 196; vi, 176; 

vii, 42, 48 seq., 54, 55, 76 

and note 
origin of, i, 126 
Famine, See Drought. 
Farab (Fariyab ? q.v.), iv, 185 
Farab (Firabr), desert and town 

on the right bank of the 

Oxus opposite to Amwi, 

q.v., vii, 91, 92 
desert of, ix, 115, 118 
Fara'in, Iranian chief, vii, 207 



Faramarz, son of Rustam, 146' 
157. ii. 4. 319. 341 seq.' 
349, 351. 354 ; iii. 18, 30- 
35, 36, 202, 323, 325, 326' 
328 ; iv, 14 ; v, 173, 174, 
182, 183, 198, 231, 260, 
261, 272, 274, 281, 283, 
284 

parentage of, iii, 323 

appointed to expel the 
Turkmans from Zabulis- 
tan, iii, 31 

referred to, v, 184 

Zawara and, sent by Rustam 
to bid Zal and Riidaba 
prepare to receive Asfan- 
diyar, v, 190 

slays Mihr-i-Nush, v, 227 

goes to Rustam and Asfan- 
diyar, v, 247 

marches against Kabul, v, 
274, 276 

takes the corpses of Rustam, 
Zawara, and Rakhsh from 
the pits, and conveys 
them to Zabul for burial, 
V, 274 seq. 

fights with the king of 
Kabul and puts him 
and his kin to death, v, 
276, 277 

makes a Zabuli king of 
Kabul, V, 277 

returns to Zabul, v, 277 

hears of Bahman's invasion 
and marches against him, 
V, 287 

defeated and put to death, 
V, 288 
Faranak, wife of Abtin and 
mother of Faridun, i, 90, 

145. 157 
Faridun brought up by, on 
Birmaya's milk, i, 151 
taken by, to Mount 

Alburz, i, 152 
told by, about his origin. 

i. ^5Z 
prays for Faridiin's safety, 

i. 158 



GENERAL INDEX 



251 



r"ar4nak, rejoices over Faiidun's 
success, i, 175 
gifts of, to Faiidi'iii, i, 176 
Faranak, daughter of liarzin, 

vii, 53 
married to Bahrain Gi'ir, 

vii, 53 
Farnngis, daughter of Afrasiyab, 

wife of Siyawush, and 

mother of Kai Khusrau, 

1^5, 1^6, 148, ii, 270 seq., 

2S8 seq., 299, 306, 373, 

381, 386 5^^. ; iii, 96, 117, 

203, 211 
Mandane and, identical in 

legend, ii, 191 
Siyawush marries, ii, 270 
Afrasiydb summons, to 

court, ii, 300 seq. 
Siyawush confides in, ii, 307 

seq. 
Afrasiyab appealed to by, 

ii, 317 seq. 
imprisoned, ii, 320 
sentenced, ii, 322 
Pfran saves and takes charge 

of, ii, 324 seq. 
Kai Khusrau born of, ii, 326 
dwe'ls at Siyawushgird, ii, 

333 
instructs Kai Khusrau how 

to find Bihzad, ii, 374 
gives Giv the mail of 

Siyawush, ii, 376 
crosses the Jihi'in, ii, 392 
provided for by Kai Kaiis, 

ii, 399 
Fariburz marries, iii, 14S 
referred to, iii, 146 seq., 202 ; 

iv, 205, 213, 216 
death of referred to, iv, 304 
Farat (Euphrates), river, 158, 

V, 294, 309 ; vi, 37, 42, 

43, 290 ; viii, 93, 250 
DArAb cast away upon, v, 

295 
FarAyi'n (Guriz, Shahrbariz^.z;.), 

Shah, lys, ix, 50, 53, 105 
accession-speech of, ix, 52 
counselled by his eldest son, 

ix, 52 



Farayin, counselled by his 

youngest son, ix, ^i 
misrule of, ix, 33 
plot against, ix, 54 
Farfuriyus (I'orphyrogenitus ?), 

Ki'iman general, i6y, vii, 

218 
defeated by Niishirwan, vii, 

256 
makes report to Caesar, vii, 

260 
Farghan, Riiman architect, and 

Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 401 

seq. 
Farghana, region south of the 

Jaxartes, east of Sughd, 

iii, log 
Farghar, Turanian hero, iii, 250 
goes to spy on Rustam, iii, 

250 
reports to Afrasiyab, iii, 253 
Farhad, Iranian hero, ii, 73, 85, 

138 316, 338, 340 ; iii, II. 

20, 25, 34, 45, 48, 127, 

268, 289, 313, 327, 331, 

352 ; iv, 13, 15, 21, 25, 

42, 147, 292 
Parthian origin of, iii, 1 1 
goes as envoy to the king of 

Mazandaran, ii, 63 
takes part in the Fight of 

the Seven Warriors, ii, 

III 
steed of, iii, 313 
goes with Rustam to rescue 

Bizhan, iii, 334 
left in command bv Giv, 

iv, 83 
put in command of the left 

wing, iv, Qi 
left at Gang-bihisht, iv, 219 
Farhcid, Iranian general, temp. 

Niishirwan, vii, 251 
commands left wing, vii, 251 
Farhad, lover of Shirin, viii, 192 
Fariburz, son of Kai Kaus, 148, 

151, ii, 3, 62, 199, 316, 

335. 336, 340. 358, 405 
seq., 409; iv, 14, 24, 32, 
45, 50. 145 seq., 164, 166, 
167, 174, 177, 182, 187, 



252 



GENERAL INDEX 



Fariburz — cont. 

211, 213, 215, 238, 239, 
253, 258, 268, 289, 331 ; 

iv, 13, 34. 37. 91 
encampment of, described, 

ii. 155 
claims of, to the throne sup- 
ported by Tus, ii, 401, 

iii, 13 
recognises Kai Khusrau as 

Shah, ii, 410 
Kai Khusrau 's letter to, 

iii, 84 
reads to the chiefs Kai 

Khusrau's letter, and 

supersedes Tus, iii, 86 
sends Ruhham to Piran, iii, 

87 
obtains an armistice and 

prepares to renew the 

campaign, iii, 89 
fights and is defeated, iii, 90 
returns to Iran, iii, iii 
asks Rustam to support his 

suit to Farangis, iii, 146 
marries Farangis, iii, 148 
leads the van of Rustam's 

expedition to succour Tus, 

iii, 148 
meets Giidarz, iii, 163 
joins forces with Tus, iii, 

169 
goes to Kai Khusrau with 

tidings of victory, iii, 236 

seq. 
returns to the host, iii, 241, 

243 
commands the right wing, 

iv, 24 
superseded pro tern, by 

Katmara, iv, 92 
chosen to fight with Kulbad, 

iv, 97 
slays KulbM, iv, 99 
commands with TukhAr the 

troops from Khawar, iv, 

148 
slays Fartus, iv, 181 
commands the right, iv, 191 
takes part in the siege of 

Gang-bihisht, iv, 199 



Fariburz, Kai Khusrau remon- 
strated with by, and 
other nobles for refusing 
audience, iv, 275 
Kai Khusrau's gift to, iv, 

295 
sets out with Kai Khusrau 

on his pilgrimage, iv, 306 
refuses to turn back when 

bidden by Kai Khusrau, 

iv, 307 
Kai Khusrau farewells and 
warns, and his comrades, 
iv, 308 

disappears and is sought 
in vain by, and his com- 
rades, iv, 308 
vainly reminds his com- 
rades of Kai Khusrau's 
warning, iv, 309 
end of, iv, 309 
Faridun (Thraetaona), Shah, son 
of Abtin and Faranak,r^o, 

141, 133, i. 30. 42, 54, 55. 
90 seq., 142, 286, 336, 341, 
349, 351, 364, 370. 382. 
384, 385; ii, ". 17, 19, 
21, 29, 33, 36, 37, 99. 193. 
195, 204, 237, 274, 318, 
327. 392, 400, 404 ; iii. 
21, 37. 245. 257; iv, 17, 
66, 69, 89, 91, 142, 149. 
151, 153, 168, 174, 203, 
204, 221, 222, 255, 259, 
260, 262, 266, 269, 286, 
289, 299, 313, 328; V, 32, 
34, t6o, 180, 196, 204 
seq., 245, 260, 261, 271, 
283 ; vi, 73, 172, 209, 
406 ; vii, 37, 38, 60, 62, 
73, 79, loi, 120, 199, 207 ; 
viii, 129, 205, 218, 231, 
242, 260, 300, 376 seq., 
391, 392 ; ix, 25, 39, 53. 
71, 86, 103 

mythological origin of, i, 171 
seq. 

Zahh4k's dream of, i, 147 
seq. 

advent of, prophesied, i, 
149 



GENERAL INDEX 



253 



Fari'dun, birth of, i, 150 

father of, slain by Zahhdk, i, 

151 
brought up on the milk of 

the cow Birniaya, i, 151 
taken by his mother to 

Mount Alburz, i, 152 
palace of, burned by Zahhak, 

i. 152, 153 
questions his mother about 

his origin, i, 152 
contemplates revenge on 

Zahhak, i, 154 
dissuaded by his mother, i, 

154 
Kawa revolts to, i, 157 
resolves to war with Zahhak, 

i, 157 

brothers of, i, 158 

ox-head mace invented by, 
1,158 

rewards the smiths, i, 158 

goes to fight Zahhcik, i, 159 
seq. 

visited and instructed by 
Suriish, i, 159 

life of, attempted by his 
brothers, i, 160 

saves himself by his magic 
power, i, 160 

van of, led by Kawa, i, 160 

crosses the Arwand (Dijla, 
Tigris), 1, 160 

enters Zahhak's capital, i, 
161 

overthrows Zahhdk's talis- 
man, i, 161 

seeks in vain for Zahhak, i, 
162 

finds the sisters of Jamslu'd, 
i, 162 

hears where Zahhak is, i, 163 

Story of, and Zahhak's min- 
ister (Kundrav), i, 164 

doings of, reported to Zah- 
hak by Kundrav, i, 165 

attacked by, and over- 
throws, Zahhdk, i, 168, 
288 

counselled by Surush about 
Zahhak, i, 1O8, lOy 



Faridiin, becomes Shdh, i, 168 
fetters Zahhak upon Mount 

Damawand, i, 169 
Reign of, 140, i, 171 seq. 

Note on, i, 171 seq. 
three sons of, i, 174, 177 

ethnical significance of, i, 

54 
accession of, i, 174 
holds a feast, i, 175 
makes a progress through 

the world, i, 17G 
builds himself a seat, i, 177 
sends Jandal on a mission, i, 

177 
receives Jandal s report, i, 

182 
instructs his sons how to 

deal with Sarv, i, 182 
sons of, outwit Sarv, i, 184 

receive Sarv's daughters 
in marriage, i, 185 

return home, i, 186 

proved by Fan'dun, i, 186 

named by Faridiin, i, 187 

wives of, named by Fari- 
diin, i, 188 

horoscopes of, taken by 
Faridiin, i, 188 
divides the world among 

his sons, i, 189 
grows old, i, 189 
Salm and Tiir write to, to 

demand the abdication of 

fraj, i, 191 
makes answer to his sons, i, 

193 
holds converse with fraj, i, 

195 
writes to Salm and Tiir, i, 197 
fraj's head sent to, i, 202 
mourning of, for fraj, i, 203 

^eq. 
sight of, injured by mourn- 
ing for fraj, i, 204 
hopes for issue from fraj, i, 

205 
recovers his sight, i, 206 
gifts of, to Miniichihr, i, 207 
gives a feast to the nobles, 
i, 207 



254 



GENERAL INDEX 



Faddun, receives an embassage 

from his sons, i, 209 
makes answer to his sons, 

i, 211 
sends IVIiniichihr to fight 

with Salm and Tur i, 215 
hears of Minuchihr's vic- 
tory, i, 222 
Minuchihr sends the heads 

of Salm and Tur to, i, 222, 

229 
welcomes Minuchihr on his 

return in triumph, i, 230 
confides Minuchihr to Salm, 

i, 231 
gives thanks to God and 

prays for death, i, 232 
distributes the spoil to the 

troops, i, 232 
enthrones Minuchihr, i, 232 
passes his last days in 

austerities, i, 232 
dies, i, 232 
burial of, i, 233 
mourning for, i, 233, 237 
Firdausi's reflections on, i, 

170, 232 
final warfare of Zahhak 

with, i, 278, cf. 173 
Mount Sipand besieged by 

order of, i, 329 
Grace of, i, 335 
saying of, ii, 219 and note 
flag of = flag of Kawa, vi, 59 
capital of, vii, 215, 238 
Farikin (Maiyafarikin, Martyr- 

opolis), city in Roman 

Armenia, vii, 200 
taken by Kubad, vii, 200 
Fdriyab, city half way between 

the town of Marvrud and 

Balkh, iv, 65 
Farr, i, 82. See Grace. 
Farruhan (Farrukhcin). See 

Fardyin. 
Farrukh, ruler of Nimriiz, viii, 

375 
Farrukhan (Farruhan). See 

Farayin. 
Farrukhdnzdd (Farrukhzad q.v.), 

viii, 195 



Farrukh-Hurmuzd (Hurmuzd 
q.v.), father of Rustam, 
ix, 69 

Farrukhzad (of glorious birth), 
name assumed by Gush- 
tasp in Riim, iv, 351 seq., 

357. 360 
j Farrukhzad, Shah, J75, ix, 61 
I seq., 70 

Siyah Chashm and, ix, 62 
poisons, ix, 63 
Farrukhzad (Farrukhanzad q.v.), 
son of Hurmuzd, brother 
of Rustam, and favourite 
of Khusrau Parvviz, ix, 23, 

87. 92, 95 
conspires with Guraz, viii, 

408, 412 
goes to the host, viii, 412 
rebels in favour of Shirwi, 

viii, 413 
brother of, viii, 413 and 

note 
conspires with Tukhar, viii, 

414 
proclaims Shirwi Shah, viii, 

hears where Khusrau Par- 
wiz is hiding, viii, 419 

holds talk with Khusrau 
Parwiz, viii, 420 

bribes Mihr Hurmuzd to 
murder Khusrau Parwiz, 

ix, 33 
defeats the Arabs, ix, 85 
counsels Yazdagird, ix, 86, 

87 
leads the host to Khurasan, 

ix, 8g 
entrusts Yazdagird to 

M4hwi, ix, 95 
goes to Rai, ix, 96 
FarrukhzAd, Iranian warrior, 
viii, 241, 296 
speech of, viii, 240 
Farsang (parasang), measure of 
length, about 3.88 miles, 
i, 82 
Farshidward, son of Wisa and 
brother of Piran, Turan- 
ian hero, 75-', i, 92 ; iii, 



GENERAL INDEX 



555 



Farshfdward — com/. 

90, 166, 198, 205, 252 ; 
iv, 7, 10, 119, 122, 125, 
133. 153. 160, 162 
summons Pircin to save 

Farangi's, ii, 322 
commands with Lahhak the 

right wing, iv, 26 
attacks the Iranians in 

flank, iv, 82 
opposed by Zanga, iv, 83 
goes to help Piran and 

attacks Giv, iv, 85 
prowess of, iv, 86 
fights with Guraza, iv, 87 

Bizhan, iv, 87 
Lahhak and, put in joint 
command, iv, 84 
Piran's instructions to, 

iv, 95 

hear of the death of Piran 

and the coming of Kai 

Khusrau, iv, 112 

lament for Piran, iv, 112 

take counsel with the 

host, iv, 113 
fight and escape Iranian 

outpost, iv, 116 
referred to, iv, 118, 120, 

126 
repose themselves, iv, 121 
corpses of, brought back 
by Bizhan, iv, 126, 132 
deaths of, announced to 
Afrasiyab iv, 152 
Farshidward, brother of Asfan- 
diyar, 153, v, 20, 22, no, 
114, 141, 171 
governor of Khurasan, v, 77 
stationed on the Iranian 

right, v, 94 
mortally wounded by Kuh- 

ram, v, 95, loi, 104 
Asfandiycir laments for, v, 
loi, 104 

resolves to avenge, v, 104 
dies, V, 104 
shrouded by Asfandiyar, v, 

105 
Farshidward, a miser, 16^, vii, 
07 seq. 



Farshfdward, a miser. Bahram 
Gur visits, vii, 68 seq. 

pretended destitution of, 
vii, 68 seq. 

wealth of, described, vii, 70, 

72, 73 
Fartiis, Turanian hero, iii, 182, 
213, 231, 251 

comes to aid Pirdn, iii, 152 

hears of the coming of 
Rustam, iii, 175 

slain by Fariburz, iv, 181 
Farud, son of Siyawush and 
Jarira daughter of Piran, 
and half brother of Kai 
Khusrau, 145, 147, i, 92, 
370 ; ii, 3, 291 ; iii, 8, 14, 
42 seq., 72, 85, 87, 93, 107, 
III seq. ; iv, 42, 135 ; 
V, 30 

birth of, ii, 291 

liostiHty of Tiis to, iii, 13 

Story of, 14J, iii, 37 seq. 

referred to, iii, 39 

advised by Tukhar, iii, 47, 
52 seq. 

interview of, with Bahram, 
iii, 47 seq. 

birth-mark of, iii, 49 

gives his mace to Bahram, 

iii, 50 
eighty slaves of, the, iii, 55 
their mockery of Tiis, iii, 

their mockery of Giv, iii, 

slays the steed of Tus, iii, 56 
wounds the steed of Giv, iii, 

58 
slays the steed of Bizhan, 
 iii, 61 

worsted by Bizhan, iii, 62 
attacks the Iranians, iii, 63 
prowess of, iii, 64 
mortally wounded, iii, 64 
dies, iii, 65 
mother and slaves of, 

destroy themselves, iii, 66 
burial of, iii, 68 
Kai Khusrau's gritf for, iii, 

8 } seq., 1 12 



256 



GENERAL INDEX 



Fariid, son of Shirin and Khusrau 

Parwiz, ix, 39 
Farukhzad. See Farrukhzad. 
Farwardi'n, genius, i, 88 ; iii, 
287, 328 
name of month and day, i, 
88, 133, 263 ; iii, 230, 286, 
317. 323 ; vi, 375 ; vii, 
363 ; viii, 367, 371 
origin of, iii, 286 
Faryan, king, father-in-law of 
Kaidrush, 759, vi, 66, 67, 
124 seq., 171, 172 
city of, taken by Sikandar, 

vi, 124 
slain, vi, 125 

daughter and son-in-law of, 
taken prisoners, vi, 125 
brought before Naitkun, 

vi, 126 
sentenced to death, vi, 126 
pardoned, vi, 126 
Fciskun, forest in Rum, iv, 333, 
335 seq. 
Wolf of, 154 

described, iv, 333, 336 
Mirin bidden by Ca?sar to 

slay, iv, 333 
Gushtasp undertakes to 
slay, iv, 336 
keeps tusks of, iv, 338 
tusks of, produced before 
Caesar by Hishwi, iv, 

351 
referred to, iv, 359 

Fatima, daughter of Muhammad 
and wife of 'Ali, i, 12 

Fazl. See Abu'l 'Abbas Fazl. 

Feast. See JNIihrgan, Nauruz, 
New Year's Day, Sada. 

Ferghana. See Farghana. 

Fight of the Seven Warriors, 143, 
ii, 82, 107 seq. 

Firdausi, Persian poet and 
author of the Shahndma, 
146, 134, 135, j6o, 173. 
i, 3, 22 seq, ; ii, 9, 10, 82, 
119; iii, 1 1, 108, 271, 
272 ; iv, 136, 138, 314, 
316; V, 10, 20 seq., 29, 
282 ; vi, 16, 17, 64 seq., 



Firdaus: — covt. 

72, 78, 80 seq, 197, 198, 
202, 250, 254, 294, 313, 
375, 321 seq.. 326, 328 
368 ; vii 3, 4, 6, 133, 156, 
159, 185, 186, 188, 213, 
214, 217 seq., 317 ; viii, 
71, 73, 74, 187, 190, 192, 
193, ix, 69 

materials for the life of, i, 
23 seq. 

personal references of, in the 
Shahnama, i, 24 seq. 
conclusions from, i, 35 

date of birth of, i, 24 

Muhammadan of the Shi'ite 
sect, i, 24, 106, 107 

fond of wine, i, 25 ; iv, 313 ; 
V, 164, vi, 291, 306, 309, 
314, 362, 369 ; vii, 277 

owned or occupied land, i, 
25 ; vi, 411 ; ix 112 

escape of, from drowning, i, 
26, 29 

son of, i, 26 ; viii, 190 

referred to {?), i, 27 ; 

vii, 277, 311 
death of, 173, i, 26 ; viii, 
190 

complains of old age, 160, 
i, 26 ; ii, 336 ; iv, 141 ; 
v, 262 ; vii, 220 

patrons, friends and helpers 
of, i, 29 seq., 35, 39, no ; 
ix, 121 

exempted from taxation, i, 
33. 39; ix, 121 

Nizami's account of, i, 38 
seq., 45 

later legends of, iii, 15, 109, 
igi ; iv, 8 

Dakiki, and. See Daki'ki. 

Mahmud and. See Mah- 
mud. 

Satire of. See Mahmud. 

Shahnama of. See Shah- 
nama. 

Yusuf and Zuli'kha of, i, 45 

admits Muhammadan tradi- 
tions into Shdhnama, 
viii, 42 



GENERAL INDEX 



^57 



Firdausi, and rhyme-word, viii, 
397, note 
account of Arab conquest 
by, supplemented, ix, 

65 

Yazdagird's death, ix, 70, 
107 

reflections on, ix, 108, 
III 
on completion of Shalinama, 

ix, 121 
time spent on Shdhnama, 

ix, 122 
praise of Sultan Mahmud- 
Sec Mah'iiud 
Fire, ancient cult of the Aryans, 

i. 7. 49, 56 
priests of. See Magi, 
region of, ii, 56 
Hiishang's discovery of, i, 
123 

institution of the Cult of, 
i, 116, 123 

Feast of Sada, i, 124 
ordeal by, 144, ii, 218 seq. 
sacred, vi, 21, 201, 212 
Fire — fane or temple, 154. See 
Azar Abadagan, Azar- 
gashasp, Barzin. 
— worship, abolition of, pro- 
phesied, viii, 68 
Firiiz, Iranian king, iv, 149 
Firuzabad. See Gur. 
Firuzi Kuh, pass in the Alburz 

range, ii, 28 
Fish, mythological, i, 71, 72, 
148, 252 ; ii, 15, 299 ; iv, 
279; vii, 341 and note, 
406 ; viii, 212 and note 
salt, the, legend of, vi, 76 

seq. 
— eaters. See Ichthyo- 
phagi. 
Fleece, Golden. See Golden. 
Flesh-meats, introduction of, 
attributed to Ahriman, 

i. i3« 
Flight, of Muhammad, referred 

to, ix, 122 
Flying-machine, of Kai Kaiis, ii, 

103 



Fo-lin, vi, 73 and note 
Footman (pawn), piece in chess, 
vii, 385 
position of, vii, 388 
move of, vii, 422 
promotion of, vii, 422 
Ford and toll-house of Zark, ix, 

100 and note, 116 
Fort, hill, Malcolm's descrip- 
tion of a, i, 236 
Fortifications vitrified vi, 79, 165 
Fount of Life, the, vi, 74 
seq. ,158 seq. 
Sikandar's expedition to, 
vi, 158 seq. 

account of, in the Pseudo- 
Callisthcnes, vi, 74 seq. 
Sikandar fails to find, vi, 
160 
Founts, the Seven, viii, 392 
Four, Wonders of Kaid. See 
Kaid. 
Faiths, vi, 91, 95 
Frangrasyan (Afrasiyab, q.v.), 
i, 338 ; ii, 81, 189 ; iv, 

137. 138 
Frashokart, son of Gushtasp, v, 

26 
Frasiyav (Afrasiyab, q.v.), i, 

338 ; ii, 8r 
Fravashi, i, 369 ; ii, 82 ; iii, 286 
Frazdanava, lake or river, v, 13 
Fruba, sacred Fire, vi, 201, 255 
Funj, leader of Khan's host, 

temp. Nushirwan, vii, 330 
Fur (Porus, q.v.), dynastic title 

and Indian king, temp. 

Sikandar, i^g, vi, 31, 51, 

62, 64, 110. seq. 123, 132, 

135, 137. 170, 172. 175 ; 

vii, 395 

Dara's letter to, vi, 50 

Sikandar's war with, vi, 67, 
1 1 2 seq. 

routed by Sikandar's iron 
steeds, vi, 116 

single combat of, with Sik- 
andar, vi, 117 

slain, vi, 117 

troops of, submit to Sikan- 
dar, vi, 118 



VOL. IX. 



258 



GENERAL INDEX 



Furuliil, Iranian hero, i^i, iv, 

24. 33 
chosen to fight with Zan- 

gula, iv, 97 
slays Zangula, iv, loi 



Gabriel, angel, 1, 114 ; iv, 140 ;■ 

vi, 138 note 
Gahan (Kahan, town above 
Juwayn on the Farah 
river which flows into 
the northern end of the 
Lake of Zirih in Sistan ?) 
149, iii, 152, 177, 224, 225 
Gahar, Turanian hero, 1^9, iii, 
216, 224, 251 

comes to aid Piran, iii, 152 

slain by Rustam, iii, 225 
Gaiumart, the first Shah and 
culture-hero, and the first 
man in Zoroastrian tradi- 
tion, ijg, i, 90, 91, 116, 
123 ; vi, 208 ; viii, 24, 
5.5, 260, 269, 310, 376 

Reign of, i, 117 seq. 
Note on, i, 117 

greatness of, i, 118 

culture-hero, i, 118 

son of, i, 119 

slain by Black Div, i, 120 

envied by Ahriman, i, 119 

warned by Suriish, i, 119 

grief of, for the death of 
Siyamak, i, 120 

bidden by Suriish to avenge 
Siyamak, i, 120 

goes with Hiishang to fight 
Black Div, i, 121 

death of, i, 1 2 1 

Firdausi's reflections on, i, 
121 

rites of, vii, 53 

Faith of, vii, 273 ; vii, 277 
Galbwi, Iranian chief, ix, 74 
Galinush, put in charge of Khus- 
rau Parwiz, viii, 421 ; ix, 

5. II. 12 
parley of, with Kharrad and 
Ashtcid, ix, 12 seq. 



Gandarep, monster, i, 143 

slain by Keresaspa, i, 172, 

173 
Gang, mountain, iv, 162 ; v, 216 
Gang, sea of, ii, 362 
Gang, stronghold in Tiiran and 

seat of Afrasiyab, ii, 241, 

261, 309, 344, 357, 369 ; 

iii, 236, 253 ; iv, 258 
king of = Afrasiyab, iv, 134 
two places known as, iv, 136 
= Gang-bihisht q.v., iv, igo, 

195. 197. 198, 202, 208, 

218, 220, 221, 229, 232 
= Gang-dizh q.v., iv, 247 
Gang-bihisht, north of the Jax- 

artes, stronghold and seat 

of Afrasiyab, 152, iv, 135, 

136, 207 seq., 228 
Afrasiyab at, iv, 187 

marches from, iv, 190 

returns to, iv, 196 
described, iv, 195 
prepared for a siege by 

Afrasiyab, iv, 197 
besieged by Kai Khusrau, 

iv, 198, 208 seq. 
taken by storm, iv, 209 seq. 
occupied by Kai Khusrau 

for a while, iv, 218 
Giidarz left in command of, 

iv, 2 1 9 
Gustaham, son of Naudar, 

left in command of, iv, 238, 
Kai Khusrau dwells for a 

year in, iv, 254 
Gang-dizh (Gang-i-Siyawush), 

stronghold, 145, 153, iv, 

135, 136, 186 note, 203, 

257, 264 ; ix, 25 
possible identification of, ii, 

i8g 
meaning of, ii, 19 
building and description of, 

ii, 279 seq. 
Afrasiyab takes refuge at, 

iv, 230 
Kai Khusrau resolves to 

pursue Afrdsiyib to, iv, 

231 

niarches to, iv, 247 



GENERAL ISJ)l-X 



250 



Gangdizh, Kai Khusrau, forbids 

his troops to injure, iv, 247 

enters, iv, 248 

remains a year at, iv, 249 

advised by his paladins 

to leave, iv, 249 
appoints a governor for, 

iv, 249 
distributes treasure at, iv, 
250 
Gang-i-Dizhukht (Baitu'l Muk- 

addas q.v.), i, 161, 226 
Gang-i-Siyawush. See Gang- 
dizh. 
Ganges, Indian river, vi, G4 
Garamik-kart. See Giranii. 
Garcha, Turanian hero, iii, 152 
comes to aid Piran, iii, 152 
Garden of the Hesperides, vi, 74 

Indians, viii, 196 
Gardener, a, vi, 341 

entertains Shapur son of 

Urmuzd, vi, 341 seq. 
sent by Shapur to the high 

priest, vi, 344 
describes Shapur, vi, 344 
rewarded by Shapur, vi, 357 
Gargwi, Iranian hero, v, log 

commands the left, v, 109 
Garib, surface-measure, vii, 215 

and note 
Garshasp. See Keresaspa. 
Garshcisp, son of Zav, Shah, 142, 
i, 90, 91, 174 ; ii, 336 
Reign of, i, 373 seq. 

Note on, i, 373 
relation of, to Keresisp, i, 

174 
accession of, i, 374 
death of, i, 375 
Garshasp, Iranian hero, i, 42, 

144, 207, 212, 214, 239, 

345 ; ii, 4 ; iii, 260, 273 ; 

V, 202 
relation of, to Keresispa, i, 

174 ^ 
Garshasp, Iranian chief, tevip. 

Shapur son of Ardshir, vi, 
297 
single combat of, with Baz- 
^nijsh, vi, 297 



Garshasp, frAnian noble, temp- 

Nushi'rwan, viii, i.S 
Garsiwaz, brother of Afrasiyab, 

145. 150. 153. i, 92, 342. 
349; ii, 3, 188, 189, 193, 
195, 228, 231 seq., 249, 
253, 264, 268, 269, 286, 
289 se?., 313 seq. ; iii, 197, 
208, 306, 310, 350, 352 ; 
iv, 10, 135 seq., 209 seq., 
252, 268 ; vi, 325 ; ix, 

103 

defeated by Siyawush, ii, 
229 seq. 

sues for peace to Siyawush, 
ii, 237 seq. 

fails to string the bow of 
Siyawush, ii, 266 

visits Siyawush, ii, 289 seq. 

envies SiyiwTish, ii, 292 seq. 

challenges Siyawush, ii, 294 

slanders Siyawush, ii, 296 
seq. 

betrays Siyawush, ii, 301 
seq. 

compasses the death of 
Siyawush, ii, 315 seq. 

charged with the execution 
of Farangis, ii, 322 

goes to Manizha's palace, 
iii, 301 

finds Bizhan, iii, 302 

takes Bizhan before Afra- 
siyab, iii, 303 

ordered to execute Bizhan, 
iii, 304 

imprison Bizhan, iii, 309 
disgrace Manizha, iii, 309 

put in charge of the ele- 
phants, iv, 156 

reinforces Afrasiyab, iv, iSi 

Jahn and, compel Afra- 
siyab to quit the field, iv, 
182 

commands the rear, iv, 191 

taken prisoner by Rustam 
at the storming of Gang- 
bihisht, iv, 210 

referred to, iv, 211 

sent to Kai Kaiis, iv, 233 

imprisoned, iv, 23.5 



26o 



GENERAL INDEX 



Garsi'waz, sent for by Kai Kaiis 
and Kai Khusrau, and put 

to the torture, iv, 265 
voice of, attracts Afra- 

siy4b from lake, iv, 265 
holds converse with Afra- 

siyab, iv, 266 
slain by Kai Khusrau, iv, 
269 
Garsiyiin, Iranian chief, ix, 115 
Gashan, as rhyme-word, viii, 

397 note 
Gashasp, Iranian chief, vi, 394 
addresses the nobles on the 
succession to the throne, 
vi, 394 
Gashasp, Iranian general, temp. 
Niishirwan, vii, 251 
put in charge of baggage- 
train, vii, 251 
Gashasp, Iranian noble, viii, 17, 

18 
Gashasp, father in ShahnAma of 
Bahram Chiibina, viii, 76, 
99, 162, 169, 304 
Gashasp, father of Ashtad q.v., 

ix, II 
Gathas, ii, 8; v, 11, 12, 17 
Gaugamela, village near Nineveh, 
vi, 31, 32 note 
battle of, vi, 31 
Gaumata (the false Smerdis), 
Magus, vi, 207 
usurpation, and death of, i, 

58 
overthrow of, celebrated at 
the Magophonia, i, 59 
Gav, king of Hind, i6(j, vii, 395 
seq. 
mother of, vii, 395 seq. 
two marriages of, vii, 395, 

396 
two sons of, vii, 395, 

396 

becomes queen, vii, 397 

tries to keep peace be- 
tween her sons, vii, 397 
seq. 

hears of the death of Tal- 
hand, vii, 419 

reproaches Gav, vii, 420 



Gav, mother of, chess invented 
to appease, vii, 421 
death of, vii, 423 
birth of, vii, 395 
tutor of, vii, 397, 398, 401, 
402, 407, 408, 410, 413, 

417. 421 
rivalry between Talhand 

and, vii, 397 seq. 
war between Talhand and, 

vii, 404 seq. 
attempts of, at accommoda- 
tion with Talhand, vii, 

405, 408, 413 
defeats Talhand, vii, 412 
proposes a decisive battle to 

Talhand, vii, 414 
victory of, vii, 416 
invents chess to console his 

mother for the death of 

Talhand, vii, 421 
Gaza, city in south-western 

Palestine, vi, 30 
siege of, by Alexander the 

Great, vi, 30 
Gazhdaham, Iranian hero and 

castellan of White Castle, 

144. i. 369 ; ii. 131. 13^. 

134. 138, 139, 145. i4(> ; 

iii, 15, 25, 33, 40, 45, 294 ; 

iv, 13, 24, 149 
besieged by Barman, i, 354 
relieved by Karan, i, 354 
Suhrab described by, ii, 136 
evacuates White Castle, ii, 

137 
Gedrosia (Makran, Baluchistan), 

vi, 69 
Gelani. See Gilan. 
Gemini, constellation, vi, 155 ; 

viii, 86, 203 ; ix, 73 
Genealogical tables 

Pishdadian dynasty, i, 90, 

91 
Kaianian dynasty, ii, 3 
Sdsanian dynasty, vi, 3 
Kings and heroes of TurAn, 

i, 92 
Iranian heroes, ii, 4 
Genealogies, fictitious, v, 282, 

290, 293; vi, 199, 2x1 



GENERAL INDEX 



261 



Genealogies, of Papak in Tabari, 
vi, 200 

Mas'udi, vi, 200 
Geography, Firdausi's, ii, 28 

Darmestctcr on, ii, 79, 80 
Geometrician, vi, 377 
Geopothros (Gotarzes q.v.), iii, 9 
George, Armenian general, viii, 

195 
Germanus, \ii, 218 
Germany, vi, 73 

Gharcha (Georgia), country be- 
tween the Caucasus and 
• the Aras, iv, 14, 65 
king of, iv, 149 
Gharchis (Georgians), vii, 94 
Ghatkar, ruler of the Haitalians, 
q.v., 168 ; vii, 334, 33.5 
hears of, and destroys, the 
Khan's embassy to Niish- 
irvvan, vii, 330 
prepares to oppose the Khan 

vii, 330 
defeated, vii, 332 
Ghaznin, city in Afghanistan, 
the capital of Sultan 
Mahmiid, i, 20, 257 ; iv, 
14 ; v, 173 ; vii, 173 
Ghee, clarified butter, vi, 105 
Ghiil, a sorceress, i, 42 ; v, 117, 
128 
referred to, v, 121 
described, v, 130 
slain by Asfandiyar, v, 131 
Ghundi, a div, ii, 44, 54, 55, 
93 ; iii, 256 ; iv, 296 ; 
V, 204 
Ghiir, district in Afghanistan 
between Harat and Ghaz- 
nin, ii, loi 
Ghuz, a Turkish tribe and desert 

east of Gurgan, iv, 60 
Gil, Gilan, district on the south- 
west coast of the Caspian, 
167. i, 230, 231 ; ii, 226, 
293 ; iv, 148, 265 ; V, 13 ; 
vi, 227 ; vii, 224, 340, 
362, ix, 93 
river of = KiziI Uzun, also 
called Safid Rud, iv, 154 
waters of =Caspian, i, 230 



Gil, Afrdsiyab's camp in, iv, 155 
Ni'ishirwan's dealings with, 

vii, 216, 242 seq. 
captives from, settled at 
Sursin, vii, 328 
Gimirri. See Kimmerians. 
Gipsies, the, 165, vii, 6 
Noldekc on, vii, 6 
language of, vii, 6 
brought into frdn by Bah- 
ram Gur, vii, 149 
Girami (Garamik-kart), son of 
Jamasp, 155. v, 24 seq., 58 
death of, foretold by Jam- 
asp, V, 50 
worsts Namkhast, v, 59 
rescues Kawa's flag, v, 59 
slain, V, 59 
Giravgard, Turanian stronghold 
on the Oxus, iii, 73, 80 
occupied by the Iranians, 
iii, 78 
Girduni, Sirdarra, pass in the 
Alburz range, ii, 28 ; vi, 

32 
Sawachi, pass in the Alburz 
range, ii, 28 

Girdkuh, fortress, v, 30 

Girih (Jirrah), place south of 
Shiraz, vi, 199 

Giv, Iranian hero, son of Gudarz, 
and father of Bizhan, 146- 
I5I' 154. ii. 4. 25, 33. 35. 
38, 62, 70, 73, 85, 91, 127. 
138 seq., 148, 151, 158, 
160, 188, 193, 197. 271, 
318, 319, 338, 340. 349, 
351. 362, 388 seq. : iii, 11, 
13, 18, 19, 27, 33, 45. 48, 
seq. 57. 67. 75. 7^, 81, 85, 
86, 89 seq., 96, loi seq., 
108, III, 114 seq., 121 seq., 
127, 129, 130, 133. 139 
seq., 143, 154. 155. 157. 
159, 161, 169, 170, 182, 
183, 187, 206, 211. 227, 
231, 238, 244, 245, 247, 
248, 253, 255, 259, 264, 
268, 273, 289, 291, 292, 
294, 296 seq., 302, 305, 



262 



GENERAL INDEX 



Gi'v — cont. 

307 seq., 311 scq., ^o seq., 

337 seq., 350, 353 seq. ; 

iv, 7, 8, II, 13, 15, 16, 19 

seq., 26 seq., 39 se^., 52, 

54. 56, 59, 69, 82 5^^., 90, 

99, 102, 136, 147, 157, 223, 

2 26, 2-27, 233 5^(7., 292, 

296, 306 seq. : V, 207, 

208 ; vi, 194 ; viii, 168 

meaning of, ii, 335 

historical character, iii, 9 

relationship of, to Rustam, 

ii. 155, 365. 384 ; iii. 323 
son of Gudarz, ii, 158 
wife of, ii, 365, 384 ; iii, 323 
sister of, ii, 384 ; iii, 323 
father of Bizhan, ii, 366 

and note 
solicitude of, for Bizhan, 

iii, 15 
harries Mazandaran, ii, 39 
taken prisoner in Mazan- 
daran, ii, 40 
released by Rustam, ii, 58 
taken prisoner in Hama- 

varan, ii, 90 
released by Rustam, ii, 97 
goes in search of Kai Kaiis, 

ii, 104 
takes part in the Fight of 

the Seven Warriors, ii, 

107 seq. 
bears letter from Kaiis to 

Rustam, ii, 139 
encampment of, described, 

ii, 155 
helps to saddle Rakhsh for 

the fight with Suhrab, ii, 

160 
Suhrab described by, ii, 166 
quarrels with Tiis over the 

future mother of Siya- 

wush, iii, 194 
sent by Ot'idarz to seek Kai 

Khusrau, ii, 364 seq. 
finds Kai Khusrau, ii, 370 
receives the mail of Siy4- 

wush, ii, 377 
exploits of, in defence of 

Kai Khusrau, ii, 378 seq. 



Giv, tells how he captured 
Piran's wife and sister, ii, 

383 
overthrows Piran and his 

hobt, ii, 385 
releases Piran, ii, 387 
at the Jihun, ii, 391 seq. 
announces Kai Khusrau 's 

arrival in Iran, ii, 304 
accompanies Kai Khusrau 

to Ispahan, ii, 396 
rewarded by Kai Kaus, ii, 

399 
goes on an embassy to Tus, ii 

400 
bears Ivai Khusrau 's letter 

to the castle of Bahnian, 

ii, 408 
undertakes to slay Tazhav, 

iii, 28 

burn the barricade at the 
Kasa riid, iii, 29 
horse of, wounded by Farud, 

iii, 58^ 
lends Bizhan the mail of 

Siyawush, iii, 60, 69 
sees Palashan approaching, 

iii, 69 
burns the barricade at the 

Kasa rud, iii, 73 
parleys with Tazhav, iii, 75 
rouses the Iranians, iii, 81 
rallies the host, iii, 91 
many kindred of, slain, iii, 94 
urges Bahram not to return 

to the battlefield, iii, 96 
goes in quest of Bahram, iii, 

102 
takes Tazhav captive, iii, 

102 
buries Bahram, iii, 104 
made adviser to Tus, iii, 116 
interrupts Tus' parley with 

Ilunian, iii, 122 
raids Ivhutan, iii, 247 
steed of, iii, 257 
worsted by Pulddwand, iii, 

258 
interferes in the fight 
between Rustam and 
Puladwand, iii, 263 



GENERAL INDEX 



263 



i\\v, opposes Bfzhan's expedi- 
tion to Irnian, iii, 291 
qiR'stions tiurgin about Bi- 

zlian, iii, 31 1 
wrotli with t'lurf^iii, iii, 314 
appeals to Kai Khiisrau, iii, 

315 
comforted by Kai Khusrau, 

iii, 315, 318 
sent to summon Riistam, 

iii, 319 

met by Zal, iii, 321 

tells liizhan's case to Rus- 
tam, iii, 322 

announces Rustam's ap- 
proach to Kai Khusrau, 
iii, 326 

goes to welcome Rustam, 

iii. 353 
holds parley with Piran, 

iv, 20 
overtures of, rejected and 

returns to Gudarz, iv, 21 
commands the rear, iv, 24 
referred to, iv, 39 
tries to stop Bi'zhan from 

fighting Human, iv, 40, 43 
over-ruled by Gudarz, iv, 

43 
refuses to lend Bizhan 
the mail of Siyawush, iv, 

43 
repents of his refusal, iv, 

44 
son of = Bizhan, iv, 76 

ordered to dispatch troops 
to oppose Lahhak and 
Farshidward, iv, 82 

sends Zanga and Gurgin, iv, 

83 
leaves Farhad in command 

and attacks with Bizhan 

Piran 's centre, iv, 83 
defeats Ruin, iv, 84 
fights with Piran, iv, 84 
attacked by Lahhak and 

Farshidward, iv, 85 
superseded pro tern, by 

Shidush, iv, 92 
chosen to fight with Gurwf, 

iv, 97 



Giv, takes Gurwi prisoner, iv, 100 

opposes Bfzhan's going to 
help Gustahani, iv, iig 

consents to Bfzhan's going 
to help Ciustaham, iv, 120 

brings Gurwf before Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 127 

given a command, iv, 149 

commands the real, iv, 191 

takes part in the siege of 
Gang-bihisht, iv, 199 

goes with the captives to 
Kai Kaus, iv, 233 

gives Kai Kaiis tidings of 
Kai Khusrau, iv, 234 

rewarded by Ivai Kaus, iv, 
236 

returns to Gang-bihisht 
with letter for K.ai Khus- 
rau, iv, 238 

made governor of the coun- 
try between the sea and 
Gang-dizh, iv, 246 

welcomes Kai Khusrau on 
his return from Gang- 
dizh, iv, 250 

rewarded by Kai Khusrau, 
iv, 252 

Gudarz and, meet Hum, iv, 
263 

hear of Hum's adventure 
with Afrasiyab, iv, 263 

Kai Khusrau remonstrated 
with by, and other nobles 
for refusing audience, iv, 

275 
sent by Gudarz to summon 

Zal and Rustam, iv, 278 
bidden with other chiefs by 

Kai Ivhusrau to make an 

assembly on the plain, iv, 

291 seq. 
Kai Khusrau 's gift to, iv, 

295 
receives grant of Kum and 

Ispahan, iv, 298 
sets out with Kai Khusrau 

on his pilgrimage, iv, 306 
refuses to turn back when 

bidden by Kai Khusrau, 

iv, 307 



264 



GENERAL INDEX 



Giv, Kai Khusrau farewells 
and warns, and his com- 
rades, iv, 308 
disappears and is sought 
in vain by, and his 
comrades, iv, 308 
end of, iv, 309 
grief of Gudarz for, iv, 310, 

Givgan, Iranian hero, ii, 109, 

155 ; iii. 34 ; Jv, 24 
Gloom, the (Land of Darkness), 
160, V, 30 ; vi, 79 
conception of, vi, 73 
visited by Asfandiyar, v, 76 
Sikandar's expedition to, 
vi, 74 seq. 

account of, in the Pseudo- 
Callisthenes, vi, 74 seq. 
Sikandar hears of, vi, 158 
enters, vi, 159 seq. 
emerges from, vi, 162 
jewels of, vi, 162 
Glory, the divine. See Grace. 
Glove, The, Browning's poem 
of, referred to, vi, 384 
note 
Go-between, old woman as, i, 

280 seq. 
Gog and Magog (Yajiij and 
Majuj, q.v.), the barbarous 
nomads of northern Asia, 
i, 16 ; vi, 78 
Golden, Age, i, 129, 134 

boot, iv, 34, 180, 243, 282, 

300. 359 
Fleece, land of the, i, 57 
Gomer. See Kimmerians. 
Good Thoughts, Words, and 
Deeds, Zoroastrian for- 
mula, i6(), vii, 317, 318 
symbolised in the game of 
nard, vii, 381 
Gordyene, kingdom, south of 

Armenia, vi, 198 
Gotarzes, Parthian king and 
Iranian hero (Gudarz, 
q.v.), iii 109 
memorial tablet of, iii, 9 
Geopothros, iii, 9 
coin of, iii, 9 



Gotarzes, war of, with Vardanes, 

iii, 10, II 

Meherdates, iii, 10 seq. 
character of, in history, 

iii, 10 
Grace or Glory, the divine, i, 

113, 114, 116, 123, 130 

seq., and passim 
account of, i, 82 
visible appearances of, i, 82, 

130, 374. 385 ; vi, 221 

seq. 
Granicus, river in Asia Minor 

flowing into the Propon- 

tis (Sea of Marmara), vi, 

30 
battle of the, vi, 30, 31 
Grapes, bunch of, Kubad and 

the, vii, 183 note 
Greece, vi, 30 

Greed and Need, personification 
of, vi, 146 ; vii, 71, 205, 
'206, 368, 369 
Greek, Greeks, i, 10 ; v, 282 ; 
vi, 82 
relations of, with the Iran- 
ians, i, 14 
history and legend in rela- 
tion to Persian dto, ii, 9 
conception of India, vi, 68 
captives, mutilation of, by 

the Persians, vi, 373 
philosophers entertained by 
Nushirwan, vii, 280 
Green, Prophet, the. See Al 
Khidr. 
sea, the, vi, 174 note, viii, 
46 and note 
Gretna Green, vi, 323 note 
Griffon, fabulous bird, i, 23=5 and 

Hole 
Gudarz, son of Kishwad, Iranian 
hero, and father of Giv, a 
reminiscence of the Par- 
thian king Gotarzes, q.v., 

146. 148, 151-153. i. 4^ ; 

ii, 4. 33. 35. 3«. 62, 70. 
73, 83, 91, 1^7. 138, 142. 
157. 177. 178. 193. 250, 
286, 290, 316, 318, 335, 
338, 340. 349, 371 i'^?-. 384, 



GENERAL INDEX 



265 



Gudarz — cont. 

388, 394, 406 ; iii, 8, II, 
15, 18, 19. 24, 28, 33, 38, 
40, 43 seq., 50, 51, 67, 81 
seq., 85, 88 seq., 100, iii, 
112, 115, 117, 118, 120, 
123, 126, 127, 129 seq., 

134. 136, 137. 139. 143. 

145, 149 seq., 154 seq., 

164, 169, 172, 177, 1S7. 

205, 206, 211 seq., 220, 

225, 232, 236, 246, 253, 

254. 255, 258, 264, 268, 

273. 277, 289, 298, 302, 

305, 308, 322, 327, 329 

seq-, 337 seq., 354, 337 

iv. 7. 13. 79, 80, 85, 88 

seq., 102, 103, 106 seq., 

113 seq., 136, 145 seq., 

149, 157, 162, 171, 180, 

igi, 206, 226, 227, 292, 

299 ; V, 207, 208 ; vi, 
194 ; viii, 104, 168 ; ix, 

23 
taken prisoner in Mazan- 

daran, ii, 40 
released by Kustam, ii, 58 
leceives Ispahan from Kai 

Kaiis, ii, 78 
taken prisoner in Hama- 

varan, ii, 90 
released by Rustam, ii, 97 
censures Kai Kids, ii, 105 
takes part in the Fight of 

the Seven Warriors, ii, 107 
mediates between Kai Kaiis 

and Rustam, ii, 144 seq. 
encampment of, described, 

ii, 153 
sons and grandsons of, ii, 

158 ; iii, 33 ; ix, 25 

loss of, iii, 83 note, 94, 
131 ; iv, 310, 312 

survivors of, iv, 298 
consoles Siyawush for his 

mother's death, ii, 199 
appointed ruler of Su^hd 

and Sipanjab, ii, 3.58 
returns to fran, ii, 3O2 
sees Suriish in a dream, ii, 

363 



Gudarz, sends Gi'v to seek for 

Kai Khusrau, ii, 364 
hears of Kai Khusrau's 

arrival in fran, ii, 3<)3 
welcomes Kai Khusrau and 

Giv, ii, 396 
accompanies them to Is- 

taklir, ii, 31)1) 
dispute of, witli Ti'is, ii, 400 

seq. 
goes with Kai Kliusrau to 

the castle of Bahman, ii, 

407 
advises Tus to avoid 

Kalat, iii, 41 
supersedes Tus, iii, 83 
informs Kai Khusrau about 

Farud and the defeat of 

the Iranians, iii, 83 
sends Bizhan for Kawa's 

standard, iii, 92 
Iranian watchman and, iii, 

136 seq. 
meets Fariburz, iii, 163 

Rustam, iii, 171 
warns Rustam not to trust 

Firan, iii, 212 
sends Ruhham to help Rus- 
tam, iii, 227 
praises Rustam, iii, 248 
steed of, iii, 313 
goes to welcome Rustam, 

iii, 353 
sent to invade Tiiran by Kai 

Khusrau, iv, 13 
ordered to negotiate with 

Piran, iv, 13 
negotiations failing, marches 

from Raibad to meet 

Piran, iv, 22 
arrays his host, iv, 24 
gives the right wing to 

Faribur;:, iv, 24 

baggage to Hajir, iv, 24 

left wing to Ruhham, iv, 

24 
rear to Giv, iv, 24 

posts a watchman on the 
mountain-top, iv, 23 

takes his station at the cen- 
tre, iv, 24 



2G6 



GENERAL INDEX 



Gudarz, counsels Bizhan as to 
his fight with Human, 
iv, 41 

over-rules Giv's objections, 
iv, ^^ 

rewards Bizhan, iv, 52 

prepares to resist a night- 
attack, iv, 53 

gives a force to Bizhan, iv, 

54 
joins battle with Piran, 

iv, 55 

writes to Kai Khusrau, iv, 
56 

sends Hajir with the letter, 
iv, 57 

receives Kai Khusrau 's 
reply, iv, 62 

prepares to renew the fight, 
iv, 63 

receives Ruin with a letter 
from Piran, iv, 67 

entertains Ruin, iv, 68 

dismisses Riiin with pre- 
sents and the reply to 
Piran 's letter, iv, 74 

prepares for the flank-attack 
of Lahhak and Farshid- 
ward, iv, 82 

sends Hajir with orders to 
Gfv, iv, 82 

harangues the host, iv, 89 

resolves to fight in person, 
iv, 90, 92, 96 

gives the left wing to Far- 
had, iv, 92 
right wing to Katmara, iv, 

rear to Shidush, iv, 92 
chief command to Gusta- 
ham, iv, 92 
instructs Gustaham, iv, 92 
holds a parley with Piran 
and arranges with him the 
Battle of the Eleven 
Rukhs, iv, 95 seq. 
slays Piran's steed, iv, 107 
pursues Piran, iv, 108 
calls on Piran to surrender, 

iv, 108 
Piran wounds, iv, 108 



Gudarz, slays Piran, iv, 109 

drinks Piran's blood, iv, 109 
sends Ruiiham to fetch 

Piran's corpse, iv, no 
harangues the host, iv, no 
resumes his command, iv, 

III 
calls for volunteers to pursue 

Lahhak and Farsh'dward 

iv, 116 
sends Gustaham, iv, 117 

Bizhan to help Gustaham, 

iv, 119 
comes before Kai Khusrau 

with the other champions, 

iv, 126 
receives Ispahan, iv, 129 
commands the left wing, iv, 

147 

takes part in the assault on 
Gang-bihisht, iv, 208 

left in command at Gang- 
bihisht, iv, 219 

Giv and, meet Hum, iv, 263 
hear of Hum's adventure 
with Afrasiyab, iv, 263 

gives Kai Khusrau and Kai 
Kaus tidings of Afrasiyab, 
iv, 264 

Kai Khusrau remonstrated 
with by, and other nobles 
for refusing audience, iv, 

275 

takes counsel with other 
nobles, iv, 277 

sends Giv to summon Zal 
and Rustam, iv, 278 

goes with other chiefs to 
meet Zal and Rustam, iv, 
282 

audience of, with Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 283 seq. 

holds, witli other chiefs, at 
the bidding of Kai Khus- 
rau, an assembly on the 
])lain, iv, 291 seq. 

Kai Khusrau 's charge to, iv, 
294 
gift to, iv, 295 

asks Kai Kiiusrau for a 
patent for Ciiv, iv, 298 



GENERAL INDEX 



267 



Giklarz, goes with Kai Khiisrau 

on his jiilgriinago, iv, 30O 
turns liatk at the bidding 

t)[ Kai Khusrau, iv, 307 
laments tiie loss of the pala- 
dins, iv, 310, 312 
returns to frin, iv, 310 
promises fealty to Luhrdsp, 

iv, 312 
grantlsons of, go with Zarir 

to l^um, iv, 360 

hail Gushtasp as Shdh, iv, 
362 
Gudarz, Ashkdnian king, vi, 197, 

210 
Gudarzians, descendants of 

CU'idarz son of Kishwad, 

iii, 108, 115, 200, 214 
Gular, place, vi, 206 
Gulgiin (bright-bay), steed of 

Gudarz, iii, 366 
steed of Luhrasp, v, 64 
steed of Bahram Giir, vii, 57 
Gulshahr, wife of Piran, ii, 269, 

276. 2S8, 387, 390 
prepares Jarira's wedding 

outfit, ii, 270 

presents gifts to Farangis, 

ii. 275 
announces the birth of Kai 

Khusrau to Piran, ii, 326 
referred to, ii, 3S3 
Gulzaryiin, river in Turkistan 

(Jaxartes), ii, 358, 381 ; 

iv, 187, i8g, 190, 218, 219; 

vii, 329, 340, 360 
Gulndr, slave-girl of Ardawan, 

vi, 217 
meaning of, vi, 217 note 
intrigue of, with Ardshir 

PapakAn, vi, 217 seq. 
reports the presage of the 

astrologers to Ardshir 

Papakan, vi, 219 
fiees with Ardshir Papakan 

to Pars, vi, 220 
Gumbadan, mount and strong- 
hold, V, 29, 86, 152, 171, 

177, 206 ; ix, 93 

situation of, v, 30 
Asfaiuliyar warded at, v, 84 



Gund-i-ShApur (Shdpur Gird, Rds 
Shai)i'ir, Kand-i-Slu'ipiir, 
Jund-i-Shapi'ir), city in 
Khuzistan, north-west of 
Shuslitar and now rrpre- 
sentcd by the ruins of 
Shahdbad, vi, 295 ; vii, 
219, 276 
built for Roman captives, 

vi, 295 
Mani-gate of, vi, 327 
Niishzad imprisoned at, 
vii, 264 and note 
Gur (Jur, Zur, Firiizabad), city 
in Pars, south of Shiraz, 
vi, 199, 205, 229 note, 230, 
245 
Giir, nickname of Bahram son of 
Yazdagird, vii, 6 

Noldeke on, vii, 6 
Giiran, king of Kirman, iv, 

146 
Guraz (Shahrbaraz, Farayin 
q.v.), general of Khusrau 
Parwiz and Shah, 1^4, 
I'PS, viii, 194, 408, 409 
seq. ; ix, 44 

conspires with Farrukhzad, 
viii 408 

invites Caesar to take fran, 
viii, 408 

rebels, viii, 411 ; ix, 45 

letters of, ix, 45, 46 

letter of Piruz to, ix, 47 

account of, ix, 50 

meaning of, ix, 50 

dual personality of, ix, 
50 

marches on Taisafun, ix, 

51 

confers with Iranian mag- 
nates, ix, 51 

misrule of, ix, 53 

conspiracy against, ix, 54 

goes hunting, ix, 55 

end of, ix, 55 
Guriz, son of Mahwi, 

referred to, ix, 107, 115 

governor of Marv, ix, 120 

put to death with his sons, 
ix, 120 



268 



GENERAL INDEX 



Gurdza, Iranian hero, i^i, ii, 
73, 340 ; iii, 20, 25, 34, 45, 

48, 92, 129, 141. -253 ; iv, 

15. 24, 34 

takes king of Barbar prison- 
er, ii, 97 

takes part in the Fight of the 
Seven Warriors, ii, 107 
seq. 

encampment of, described, 

ii. 155 
goes witli Rustam to rescue 

Bizhan, iii, 334 
fights with Farshidward, iv, 

87 
chosen to fight with Siya- 

mak, iv, 97 
slays Siyamak, iv, 100 
Gurazm (Kavarazem), a relative 
of Gushtasp, 155, V, 12, 
22, 53, 99, loi, 102, 104 
seq., 171, 205, 261 
envies Asfandiyar, v, 78 
death of, referred to, v, 97 
Asfandiyar addresses the 
corpse of, v, 105 
Gurdafrid, daughter of Gazhda- 
ham, 14-f, ii, 119, 138 
referred to, ii, 131 
encounter of, with Suhrab, 

ii, 132 seq. 
beguiles Suhrab, ii, 133 seq. 
Gurdgir, son of Afrasiyab, ii, 
92 
commands the troops from 
Tartary, Khallukh, and 
Balkh, iv, 156 
Gurdwi, brother of Bahram 
Chubina, lys, 174, viii, 
74, 202, 205, 206, 231, 
293. 295, 296, 298, 342, 
349. 354. 358 ; ix, 6 
a legitimist, viii, 74 
Gustaham and, persuade 
Khusrau Parwiz not to 
make a night-attack, viii, 
224 
takes charge of baggage, 

viii, 228 
Bahram Chubina writes to, 
viii, 285 



Gurdwi, fights with Bahram Chu- 
bina, viii, 294 

receives province, viii, 313 

informs Khusrau Parwiz of 
Gurdya's doings, viii, 356 

writes to, and sends Khus- 
rau Parwiz' letter to, 
Gurdya, viii, 360 

wife of, goes with letters to 
Clurdya, viii, 360 

hears of the plight of Kai 
and informs Gurdya, viii, 

367 
Gurdya, sister of Bahram Chu- 
bina, 171, 173, 174, ii, 
119; viii, 74, 104 note, 
187, 191, 347, seq., 358 

365 ; ix, 6 
a legitimist, viii, 74 
present at council, viii, 164 
speech of, viii, 165, 167, 

171 
referred to, viii, 221 
counsels Bahram Chiil)ina, 

viii, 221 
laments Bahram Chubina, 

viii, 340 
resident at Marv, viii, 346 

seq. 
informs her followers of the 

Khan's offer of marriage, 

viii, 349 
starts for fran, viii, 351 
parleys with Tuwurg, viii, 

352 , ... 

arrives at Amwi, viu, 354 

doings of reported to 1-Chus- 
rau Parwiz, viii, 356, 358 

met by Gustaham, viii, 356 

asked in marriage by Gusta- 
ham, vhi, 357 

receives letters from Khus- 
rau Parwiz and Gurdwi, 
viii, 360 

plots murder of Gustaham, 
viii, 360 

justifies murder of Gusta- 
ham, viii, 361 

reports death of Gustaham 
to Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 
361 



GENERAL IXDICX 



2<ig 



Gurdya, dresses up as a warrior 
to please Khusrau Parvviz, 
viii, 363 
prowess of, in drinking, 

viii, 364 
appointed overseer of royal 

bower, viii, 364 
diverts Khusrau Parwiz and 
saves Rai, viii, 368 

Gurgdn (Hyrcania), province 
watered by the Atrak and 
Gurgan rivers on the 
south-eastern shores of 
the Caspian, 168, iv, 61 ; 
vi, 373 ; vii, 89, 237, 337, 
338, 357. 358, 361 ; viii, 
15. 3.55 ; ix, 8y 
Abu'l Kisim of. See Abii'l 
Kasim. 

Gurganj, one of the two capitals 
of Kharazm (Kat (Kath) 
being the other), situated 
on the Persian side of the 
Oxus, iv, 60 

Gurgin, son of Milad, Iranian 
hero, 150. 151, ii, 33, 35, 
62, 70, 73, 85, 90, 127, 

138, 144,316, 340. 394; iii. 
II, 12, 19, 20, 25, 48, 108, 
115, 126, 145, 182, 211, 
253, 264, 268. 273, 285, 
289, 292, 294 seq., 300, 
305, 310 seq., 322, 323, 
331 seq., 345, 346, 352 ; 
iv, 13, 15, 21, 24, 147, 
191, 292 ; viii, 72, 211, 216 

takes part in the Fight of 
the Seven Warriors, ii, 
107 seq. 

undertakes embassage to 
Afrasiyab, iii, 29 

goes with letter from Kai 
Khusrau to Rustam, iii, 

^74 
accompanies Bizhan to Ir- 

m4n, iii, 292 
refuses to help Bizhan 

against the wild boars, 

iii, 293 
envies and beguiles Bizhan, 

iii, 294 



Gurgin, goes with Bizhan in 

quest of Manizha, iii, 296 

searches for Bizhan, iii, 310 

finds Bizhan's steed, iii, 311 

questioned by Giv about 

Bizhan, iii, 312 
false account of, about Biz- 
han's disappearance, iii, 

313 

Giv's wrath with, iii, 314 

appears before Kai Khusrau, 
iii, 316 

imprisoned, iii, 317 

appeals to Rustam, iii, 331 

released, iii, 333 

goes with Rustam to rescue 
Bizhan, iii, 334 

pardoned by Bizhan, iii, 346 

opposes Lahhak, iv, 83 

chosen to fight Andariman, 
iv, 97 

slays Andariman, iv, 104 

Kai Khusrau remonstrated 
with by, and other nobles 
for refusing audience, iv, 
283 seq. 

audience of, with Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 283 seq. 
Gurgsar, tribe, v, 43 and note 
Gurgsar, Turanian hero, Jj6, v, 
117, 131 seq., 146, 233 
note 

made captain of the host by 
Arjasp, V, 46 

given command of one wing, 
V, 56 

persuades Arjasp to remain 
and fight Asfandiyar, v, 
108, 109 

made leader of the host, v, 
109 

taken prisoner by Asfandi- 
yar, V, I I I 

offers to guide Asfandiyar to 
the Brazen Hold, v, 113 

goes as guide with Asfandi- 
yar to Ti'iran, v, 120 

offered the kingdom of the 
Turkmans by Asfandiyar 
in return for faithful ser- 
vice, V, 120 



270 



GENERAL INDEX 



Gurgsar, describes the route to 
the Brazen Hold, and the 
Seven Stages, v, 120 seq., 
124 seq., 128, 132, 134 
chagrin of, at Asfandiyar's 
successes, v, 124, 128, 

131. 133 
reproached by Asfandiyar 

for giving false informa- 
tion, V, 139, 140 

offered the captainship of 
the Brazen Hold by 
Asfandiyar in return for 
trusty guidance, v, 140 

shows the Iranians a ford, 
v, 140 

questioned by Asfandiyar 
for the last time, v, 141 

curses Asfandiyar, v, 141 

slain by Asfandiyar, v, 141 
Giirkan (Juzjan), city and dis- 
trict between Marvrud 
and Balkh, iv, 65 
Gurkils, tribe (?), viii, 15 
Gurukhan, Iranian hero, iv, 149 
Gurwi, Turanian hero, 145, 151, 
152, ii, 296, 314, 319, 338, 
340 ; iii, 197, 199, 237 ; 
iv, 7, 99, III, 252 ; v, 
272 

challenees and is overthrown 
by Siyawush, ii, 295 

advocates the execution of 
Siyawush, ii, 317 

carries out the execution of 
Siyawush, ii, 320 

chosen to fight with Giv, iv, 

97 
taken prisoner by Giv, iv, 

100 
brought by Giv before Kai 

Khusrau, iv, 127 
executed, iv, 129 
Gurzban, vi, 394. See Gurkan. 
Gushasp, sacred Fire, vi, 201 
Gushasp, chief scribe, temp. 
Bahram Gi'ir, vii, 11 
bidden to remit the arrears 
of taxes, vii, 1 1 



Gushasp, noncc-namc assume I 
by Bahram Giir, \ii, 59 
seq. 

Gushasp, nonce-name assumed 
by Bahram (jiir, vii, 59 
seq. 

Gush-bistar, a savage, vi, 80, 177 
meaning of, vi, 177 note 
interview of, with Sikandar, 
vi, 177 

Gushtasp (Vistaspa, Vishtasp, 
Hystaspe?'), son of Luh- 
rasp, father of Asfandi- 
yar, and Sh^h, 154-1^7, 
i, 42, 61 ; ii, 3, 9 ; iii, 
109; iv, 314 seq, 334 
seq., V, 24 seq., 61, 68, go, 
92 seq., 103 seq., 119, 130, 
148, 154. 155, 159, 166 
seq., 180, 181, 183, 205, 
206, 208 seq., 213, 216, 
220, 221, 233 note, 243, 
248 seq., 281, 289, 293 ; 
vi, 20, 49, 55, 200, 213, 
251, 252, 258 ; vii, 359 ; 
viii, 41, 68, 95, 148, 213, 

270, 392, 393 ; ix, 25 

son of Luhrasp, iv, 318 
jealousy of, respecting the 

grandsons of Kai Kaiis, 

iv. 318 
asks Luhrasp to appoint him 

heir to the crown, iv, 318 
departs in wrath for Hind, 

iv, 319 
arrives at Kabul, iv, 320 
overtaken by Zarir, iv, 320 
takes counsel with the 

chiefs, iv, 321 
returns to Luhrasp, iv, 322 
pardoned by Luhrasp, iv,32 2 
determines to quit Iran, iv, 

3-^3 
takes a steed of Luhrasp's, 

iv, 323 
story of, in Rum, ii, 10 ; 

iii, 285 ; iv, 324 seq. 
interview of with Hishwi, 

iv, 324 



'The Hystaspes of legend not necessarily the father of Darius I. Sic Vol. iv, 
P 314 seq- 



CliSERAL l.MJliX 



2 71 



GushtAsp, vainly seeks work in 
Rum as a scribe, iv, 325 
herdsman, iv, 326 
camel-driver, iv, 326 
blacksmith, iv, 327 
dreamed of by Katayiin, iv, 

goes to Caesar's palace, iv, 

330 

chosen for her husband by 
Katayun, iv, 330 

marries Katayun, iv, 331 

spends his time in the chase, 
iv, 33^ 

makes friends with Hi'shwi, 
iv, 332 and note 

asked by Hishwi to under- 
take the adventure of the 
wolf of Faskun, iv, 335 

undertakes to slay the wolf 
of Faskun, iv, 336 

provided with steed and 
arms by Mirin, iv, 336 

goes with Mirin and Hishwi 
to the forest of Faskun, 

iv, 337 
prays for help, iv, 337 
gives thanks for his victory, 

iv, 338 
• takes the wolf's tusks, iv, 

338 
•welcomed by Hishwi and 

Mirin on his return, iv, 

339 

discovers to Katayun his 
royal race, iv, 340 

referred to, iv, 343 seq. 

asked by Hishwi to under- 
take the adventure of the 
dragon of Mount Sakila, 

iv, 31.5 
bids A bran provide a steed, 
sword, and other arms, 

iv, 345 
goes with Ahran and Hish- 
wi to Mount Sakila, iv, 

346 
takes two of the dragon's 

teeth, iv, 346 
gives thanks for his victory, 

iv. 347 



Gushtasp, welcomed by Hishwi 
and Ahran on his return, 

iv, 347 
accepts gifts from Ahran 

and bestows part upon 

Hishwi, iv, 347 
returns to Katayun, iv, 348 
goes to the sports on 

Csesar's riding-ground, iv, 

349 
prowess of, at polo and 

archery, iv, 350 
questioned by Ca;sar, iv, 350 
reproaches Caesar for his 

treatment of Katayun, iv, 

350 
claim of, to have slain the 

wolf and the dragon, iv, 

351 

confirmed by Hishwi, iv, 

351 

reconciled to Caesar, iv, 351 

goes to court and is received 

witli honour by Ctcsar, 

iv, 351 
consulted about Ilyas by 

Ca;sar, iv, 353 
leads forth the host, iv, 354 
refuses the overtures of 

Ilyas, iv, 354 
brings the body of Ilyas to 

Caesar, iv, 356 
routs the host of Ilyas, iv, 

356 
returns in triumph to Caesar, 

iv, 356 
recognised by Zarir, iv, 360 
goes to Zarir's camp, iv, 361 
hears of Luhrasp's abdi- 
cation in his favour, iv, 

362 
saluted as Shah by the 

chiefs, iv, 362 
invites Caesar to a feast, iv, 

362 
sets out for Tran with Kata- 
yun, iv, 364 
parts in good will from 

Caesar, iv, 364 
welcomed and crowned by 

Luhrisp, iv, 36^ 



272 



GENERAL INDEX 



Gushtasp, Reiga of, 154, v, 9 seq. 
Notes on, v, g seq., 116 seq., 

166 seq., 260 seq. 
division of, v, 9 
points of interest in, v, 9 
compared with that of 
Darius Hystaspis, v, 10 
diagram to illustrate, v.ay 
legend of Zarduhsht and, v, 

18 
black horse of, v, 18, 28 
sees his place in Paradise, v, 

19 
Ridge of, V, 29 
succeeds Luhrasp as Shah, 

sons of, V, 32 

pays yearly tribute to Ar- 

jasp, V, 32 
converted by Zarduhsht, v, 

33 

helps to spread the Faith, 

V. 34 
establishes Mihr Barzin and 

other Fire-fanes, v, 34 
conversion of, recorded on 

Cypress of Kishmar, v, 34 
advised by Zarduhsht not 

to pay tribute to Arjasp, 

V, 35 
receives embassage from 

Arj4sp and takes counsel 

with his chiefs, v, 41 
sends answer to Arjasp, v, 43 
summons the host, v, 47 
marches against Arjasp, v, 

48 
bids Jamasp foretell the 

issue of the fight, v, 48 
distress of, at Jamasp's 

proi)hecy, v, 53 
encouraged to fight by 

Jamasp, v, 54 
gives Zarir the standard and 

the command of the cen- 
tre, V, 55 

one wing to As!"andiyar, 

V, 55 
other winsj to Shidasp, v, 

55 

the rear to Nastur, v, 55 



Gusht'jsp, takes up his position 

on a height, v, 55, 56, 63 
referred to, v, 60, 64 seq., 

89 
hears of the death of Zari'r, 

V, 64 
wishes to avenge Zan'r, v, 

64, 68 
dissuaded by Jamasp, v, 64, 

69 
offers his daughter Humai 

to the avenger of Zarir, 
V, 64 

crown and throne to the 

avenger of Zarir, v, 66 

gives his steed and arms to 

Nastur, v, 69 
sees and laments over Zarir's 

corpse, V, 73 
bids Nastur lead the host 

home, V, 74 
marries J-Iumai to Asfandi- 

yar, v, 74 
gives Nastur a command 

and bids him invade 

Turan, v, 74 
rewards the host, v, 75 
builds a Fire-fane and makes 

Jamasp its arch mage, v, 

75 

Mansion of, v, 75 

writes to his governors to 
announce the defeat of 
Arjasp, V, 75 

receives embassies and tri- 
bute from Caesar and from 
the kings of Barbaristan, 
Hind, and Sind, v, 75 

makes Asfandiyar chief 
ruler of Iran and sends 
him to convert the world, 
V, 76 

sends the Zandavasta to 
each clime, v, 77 

Gurazm slanders Asfandiyar 
to, v, 78 

sends Jamisp I0 recall As- 
fandiyar to court, V, 80 

convokes an assembly and 
arraigns Asfandiyar, v, 
82 seq. 



GENERAL INDEX 



273 



Gushtasp, puts Asfandiyar in 
bonds, V, 84 

sends Asfandiyar to Gum- 
badan, v, 84 

takes the Zandavasta to 
Si'stan, V, 85 

welcomed by Rustam and 
Zal, V, 85 

kings revolt from, v, 85 

while in Sistin hears from 
his wife of the sack of 
Balkh and the captivity 
of his daughters, v, 93 

calls together his chiefs and 
summons the host, v, 94 

marches from Sistan toward 
Balkh, V, 94 

takes command of the cen- 
tre, V, 94 

thirty-eight sons of, slain, 
and defeat of, in fight 
with Arjasp, v, 95, 96 

takes refuge on a mountain, 
V, 96, lOO 

consults Jamasp, v, 96 

sends Jamasp to Asfandiyar 
with the offer of the crown 
in return for help, v, 

97 

interview of, with, and pro- 
mise to resign the crown 
to, Asfandiyar, v, 106 

commands the centre, v, 109 

makes thanksgiving for vic- 
tory, V, 113 

promises to resign the crown 
to Asfandiyar when he 
has delivered his sisters 
from captivity, v, 114 

summons troops, rewards 
Asfandiyar, and sends 
him to invade Tiirdn, v, 

115 

hears of Asfandiydr's suc- 
cess and writes to him, v, 
160 

gives a banquet on Asfan- 
diyar 's return, v, 164 

consults Jamasp and the 
astrologers on Asfandi- 
yar's future, v, 168 

VOL, IX. 



Gusht4sp, Asfandiyar recounts 
his deeds to, v, 170 seq. 
promises to resign the throne 
to Asfandiyar when he 
has brought Rustam and 
his kin in bonds to court, 

V. 173, 174 
Asfandiyar sends the corpses 

of Niish Azar and Mihr-i- 

Niish, and a message to, 

V, 232 
Asfandiyar's last message to, 

V, 249 
hears of Asfandiyar's death 

and laments for him, v, 

252 
wrath of the nobles with, v, 

252 
reproached by Bishutan, v, 

253 

Humai and Bih Afrid, v, 

254 
Rustam's overtures to, v, 

256 

Bishutan testifies in Rus- 
tam's favour to, v, 257 

reconciled, and writes, to 
Rustam, v, 257 

advised by Jamasp to write 
to Bahman, v, 258 

writes to Rustam and Bah- 
man to recall the latter, 
V, 258 

welcomes and gives Bahman 
the name Ardshir, v, 259 

tells Jamasp of his wishes 
as to the succession, v, 279 

dies, V, 280 
Gustaham, son of Naudar and 
brother of Tus, i, 90 ; ii, 
127, 336 ; iv, 194 

Tus and, sent by Naudar 
to conduct the Persian 
women to Alburz, i, 351, 

353 

hear of Naudar's death, i, 

364 
passed over in the suc- 
cession, i, 369, 370 
Kai Khusrau sends troops 
to succour, iv, 157 

S 



274 



GENERAL INDEX 



Gustaham, son of Naudar, at- 
tacks the Turanians, iv, 178 
sent to Chach with troops, 

iv, 188 
reports his defeat of Khur- 

akhan, iv, 193 
takes part in the assault on 

Gang-bihisht, iv, 208 
left in command of Gang- 
bihisht, iv, 238 
goes to welcome Kai Khus- 
rau on his return from 
Gang-dizh, iv, 252 
left behind as viceroy on Kai 
Khusrau's return to Iran, 
iv. 254 
Gustaham, son of Gazhdaham,' 
Iranian hero, 152, i, 369 ; 
ii, 12, 58, 107; iii, 19, 25, 
33. 45. 48. 59, 92, 93. 127, 
129. 139, 141. 211, 247, 
248, 253, 273, 289, 294, 
322, 350; iv, 7, 13, 15, 
24. 33. 93, 132 seq., 149, 
191, 292 
takes part in the Fight of 
the Seven Warriors, ii, 
107 seq. 
friendship of, for Bizhan, 

iii. 15 
lends Bizhan a steed, iii, 60 
mounts behind Bizhan, iii, 

95 
attacks Bidad, iii, 244 
sends Bizhan to summon 

Rustam, iii, 245 
goes with Rustam to rescue 

Bizhan, iii, 334 
fights with Andariman, iv, 

 87 

made commander in chief 
pro tent, vice Gudarz, iv, 

- ?~ 

Gudarz instructs, iv, 92 

resigns his command to 

Gudarz, iv, 1 1 1 
volunteers to pursue Lahhak 

and Farshidward, iv, n6 
wounded, iv, 123 

'This is assumed in a\\ cases where it 
CJ. Vol. i, p. 369. 



Gustaham, son of Gazhdaham, 
rescued by Bizhan, iv, 
124 seq. 
healed by Kai Khusrau, iv, 

133 
Kai Khusrau remonstrated 
with by, and other nobles 
for refusing audience, iv, 

275 

audience of, with Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 283 seq. 

Kai Khusrau's gifts to, iv, 

295 

sets out with Kai Khusrau 
on his pilgrimage, iv, 306 

refuses to turn back when 
bidden by Kai Khusrau, 
iv, 307 

Kai Khusrau farewells and 
warns, and his comrades, 
iv, 308 

disappears and is sought 
in vain by, and his 
comrades, iv, 308 

end of, iv, 309 
Gustaham, Iranian warrior, temp. 
Yazdagird son of Shapur, 
vi, 394 

lions of, slain by Bahram 
Giir, vi, 410 

Bahram Gur's commander- 
in-chief, vii, 85 
Gustaham (Bistam q.v.), 

maternal uncle of Khus- 
rau Parwiz, I-/I-I/4, viii, 
199, 200, 202, 204 seq., 
227, 228, 231, 25.5, 257, 
259. 269, 282, 289, 293, 
295, 298 ; ix, 4, 6 

imprisonment of, viii, 77, 17b 

Bandwi and, escape and 
revolt, viii, 182 

informs Khusrau Parwiz of 
the blinding of Hurmuzd, 
viii, 184 

referred to, viii, 189 

revolt of, viii, 191, 355 

saves Khusrau Parwiz from 
Turk, viii, 220 

is doubtful wbigh Gus(aliani is me^nt. 



GENERAL INDEX 



275 



Gustaham (Bistdm), Gurdwi and, 
dissuade Khusrau Parwiz 
from making a night- 
attack, viii, 224 
treasurer, viii, 229 and note 
accompanies Khusrau Par- 
•wiz in his flight, viii, 

231 

turns back and murders 
Hurmuzd, viii, 232 

rejoins Khusrau Parwi'z, viii, 
233 

Khusrau Parwiz warned 
against, viii, 255, 256 

deceived by Caesar's talis- 
man, viii, 272 

praised by Caesar, viii, 279 

Bahram Chiibina writes to, 
viii, 285 

chooses comrades for Khus- 
rau Parwiz in battle, viii, 
296 

receives Khurasan viii, 313 

summoned to court, viii, 355 

hears of execution of Band- 
wi, viii, 355 

hears of Gurdya's doings, 
viii, 356 

goes to meet Gurdya, viii, 
356 

asks Gurdya in marriage, 

viii, 357 
Gurdya plots murder of, 

viii, 360 
intimates of, beheaded, viii, 

370 
assassination of, referred to, 

ix, 16, 104 
Gutschmid, Alfred von, on the 

Cyrus legend in Ctesias, 

vi, 195 
Guzihr, Tribal King, vi, 198, 199 



H 



Habash (Ethiopia), 160, vi, 149 
people of, encountered by 
Sikandar, vi, 149 
Haftanbukht. See Haftwad. 
Haft Khan, ii, 29 



Haft Khwdn, ii, 29 ; v, 117 and 
note 
of Rustara and Asfandiyar 

compared, v, 1 1 7 
M4n, ii, 29 
Haftwdd (Haftanbukht, Asta- 
wadh). Tribal King, 161, 
vi, 199 
account of, in Tabari, vi, 

205 
daughter of, vi, 205, 206, 

233. 234 

becomes guardian of the 
Worm, vi, 236 

Noldeke and Darmestcter 
on, vi, 206 

son of, vi, 206 

helps his father against 
Ardshir Papakan, vi, 
236 

Story of, 161, vi, 232 seq. 

seven sons of, vi, 233, 235 

rise to power of, vi, 235 

builds, and migrates to, a 
stronghold, vi, 235 

Ardshir Papakan and, vi, 
236 seq. 

slain by Ardshir Papakan, 
vi, 245 
Haital, Ilaitalians, country and 
people (White Huns), 
dwelling north of the 
Oxus, 166, 168, vii, 6, 
153, 161. 164, 171, 174, 
181, 187. 197, 340, 342, 
390 ; viii, 45, 242, 329. 

370. 377 
origin and scat of, i, 19, 

20 
confused with the Turks, 

vii, 4 
Bahram Giir's defeat of. vii, 

4 

help Piriiz, vii, 156, 157 
Piruz's expedition against, 

vii, 159, 164 seq. 

tradition of, vii, 160 
king of, vii, lOo, 184 

helps Kubad, vii, 198 
Kubcid's flight to, vii, 170, 

184, 198 



276 



GENERAL INDEX 



Haital Haitalians, Niishirwan's 

alliance with the Khan 

against, vii, 317 
Khan's war with, vii, 328 seq. 
Khan's embassy to Niishir- 

wan destroyed by, vii, 330 
host of, levied to oppose the 

Khan, vii, 331 

defeated, vii, 332 
Niishirwan's help sought by, 

vii, 33^ 
Faghanish made king by, 

vii, 333 
Niishfrwan takes counsel 

concerning, vii, 333 334, 
make submission to Niish- 

irwan, vii, 360 
Ha'iy, son of Kutiba, governor 

of Tiis and a patron of 

Firdausi, i, 35, 39 
Hajir, Iranian hero, 144, 151, ii, 

134, 136, 140, 349 ; iv, 

103, 147, 191 
taken prisoner by Suhrab, 

ii, 131 
misleads Suhrab, ii, 152 seq. 
life of, attempted by Rus- 

tam, ii, 176 
attacks Bidad, iii, 244 
put in charge of the bag- 
gage, iv, 24 
bears letters from Gudarz 

to Kai Khusrau, , iv, 57 
rewarded by Kai Khusrau, 

iv, 58 
bears Kai Khusrau's reply 

to Gudarz, iv, 61, 62 
goes with orders to Giv, iv, 

82, 83 
slays Andariman's horse, 

iv, 87 
chosen to fight with Sipah- 

ram, iv, 97 
slays Sipahram, iv, 104 
Halab (Chalybon - Beroea, 

Aleppo), city in northern 

Syiia, iv, 359, 360 ; viii, 

41. 46, 47 
Ilalai (Olympia (?), Nahid), 
daughter, in legend, of 
Philip II of Macedon, vi,i9 



Halai, reason for her repudiation 
by Darab and her naming 
her son Iskandar (Sikan- 
dar), vi, 19 

Halai-Sandarus. See Halai. 

Hamadan (Ekbatana), city in 
'Irak-i-'Ajami, vi, 31 ; vii,, 
6 ; viii, 178, 189 ; ix, 68 

Hamavaran (Yaman), south- 
western Arabia, 143, ii, 
25, 78 seq., 94, 96 seq., 
139, 143 seq., 213, 215, 
218, 250 ; iv, 296, 299; V, 
174, 207, 208, 220 ; viii, 
104, 168 
king of, 143, i, 338 ; ii, 85 
seq., 93, 207 and note ; v, 
176 
asks quarter of Rustam, 

ii, 97 
releases Kai Kaiis, ii, 97 
Hamawan, mountain, 148, iii, 
^37. 13S, 
154. 158, 
169, 172, 
v, 116 
by the 



14-^, 144. 
161, 164, 

177; iv. 



fi 



ranians. 



135, 

153. 

167, 

299 
occupied 

iii, 132 
Hamdan Gashasp, Iranian chief, 

viii, 122, 163, 204 
speech of, viii, 166 
Hamza, of Ispahan, tenth cen- 
tury Arabic historian, vi, 

257 
Handgrip, as test of strength, ii, 

64, 66, 67 ; V, 208 
Hani bin Mas'ud, Arab chief, 

viii, 190 
Haoma. See Homa. 

= Hum, q.v. 
Haraiti Bareza (Alburz, q.v.), 

mountain, iv, 137 
Hardm, the environs of Mecca, 

vi, 65, 120 and note, 

121 
Haram, of Khusrau Parwiz, ix, 

4- 5 
Harat, city in north-western 
Afghanistan, ii, loi ; iii, 
222 ; viii, 71, 92, no, 
116, 117, 130, 173 



GENERAL INDEX 



77 



Harat, early scat of Aryan civili- 
zation, i, 7 
battle of, i, 21 
Firdansi flees to, from Mah- 

111 ud, i, 39 
desert of, ii, 228; viii, 114 
marchlord of. See Makh. 
bestowed by Mahwi on his 
son, ix, 115 
Harts, father of Kais, viii, 250 
Harith, father of Nadr, q.v., v, 

166 
Harith bin Jabala, prince of the 
Ghassanians, vii, 217 
protected by Justinian, vii, 

217 
war of, with Munzir, vii, 217 
Harpagus, Persian noble, temp. 
Astyages, ii, 190 
= Piran in legend, ii, 191 
Harum (City of Women), 160, vi, 
73, 153 seq. 
visited by Sikandar, vi, 153 

seq. 
Sikandar's correspondence 
with the ruler of, vi, 153 
seq. 
Harunu'r-Rashid, Khalifa (A.D. 

786-809), i, 14 
Hariit, angel, iii, 286, 288 
' Harvest of Bahram,' viii, 292 
Hasan Sabbah (The Old Man of 

the Mountain), v, 30 
Hashim, Arab general, ix, 68 

sent by 'Umar in pursuit of 

Yazdagird, ix, 68 
wins battle of Jalula, ix, 68 
takes Hulwan, ix, 68 
Hashimi, a descendant of Hashim 
the great grandfather of 
Muhammad, i, 25 ; vi, 362 
and note 
Hashiniite = Muhammad, ix, 81 

and note 
Hcishish, murderer of Darius 

Codomanus, vi, 32 
Hatra (Al Hadr), city, vi, 321 
seq. 
account of, vi, 322 
besieged, vi, 322 
fall of, legend of, vi, 322 



Hatra, king of, vi, 323 

Haug, his theory of the origin of 

Zoroastrianism, ii, 8 
Hauz, tank or pool, i, 203 and 

note, vii, 50 and tiotc 
Hawk, hawks, domestication of, 

by Tahmuras, i, 126 
two white, Kai Kubad's 

dream of, i, 385 
Hawking. See Falconry. 
Hay, sack of, Bahram Chiibina 

and the, viii, 109 
Hazar, Hazaran, Turanian hero, 

v, 24, 56, 59 
Hazara, father of Iviit, viii, 291 
Hecataeus, Greek historian (6th- 

5th centuries B.C.), vi, 13 
Helenopolis, city in Bithynia, vi, 

61 
Heraclius, Eastern Roman Em- 
peror (A.D. 610-642), V, 

306 note ; viii, 187, 191 ; 

ix, 5. 7 
attempts of, for peace with 

Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 194, 

195 
takes Dastagird, viii, 194 
retreat of, viii, 195, 196 
Shirwi's letter to, ix, 7 
alliance of, with Shahrbaraz, 
ix, 43, 44 
Hermit, Khusrau Parwiz and the 

172, viii, 254 
Herodotus, Greek historian (B.C. 

484-425). ii. 9 ; iii, 191 ; 
vi, 13, 16, 68, 72, 73 ; viii, 

193 
legend of Cyrus the Great in, 
ii, 190 ; vi, 195 
Heroes, chief, of mixed descent, 

i. 55 
Vale of, vii, 6 
Hesperides, Garden of the, vi, 

Hierapolis. See Arayish-i-Riim. 
High priest, temp. Shapur son of 
Urmuzd, vi, 343 seq. 
hears of Shapur's return, vi, 

344 
informs the captain of the 
host, vi, 345 



278 



GENERAL INDEX 



Hijaz, north-western Arabia, 
viii, 24 and note, 66, 67 

Hilal, Arab, ix, 69 

slayer of Rustam son of 
Farrukh-Hurmuzd, ix, 70 

Himalaya (Himavat), mountain- 
range dividing India from 
Thibet, vi, 74, 81 

Himavat. S.'e above. 

Himyar — Hamavaran (Yaman), 

ii, 79 
Hind, Hindustan, 14-;, J59, 161, 

165, i6g, i, 231, 261 ; ii, 

92, 228, 287, 289 ; iii, 30, 

152, 164, 165, 177, 204, 

221, 222, 235, 237, 238, 

242 ; iv, 14, 60, 65. 133, 

196, 208, 272, 317, 320 ; 

V, 76, 188, 257, 262, 265, 

277 ; vi, 80, 81, 91, 98 

and passiin 
land of sorcerers, i, 163 
Mai of, i, 252 
king of (Shangul) temp. Kai 

Khusrau, iii, 162, 210, 

218, 251 

temp. Bahram Gur, vii, 

113, 119, 126, 128 

temp. Niishirwan, viii, 52 
lord of = Shangul, iii, 187 
man of = Shangul, iii, 216 
prince of, iv, 71 
lord of = Mahmud, iv, 142 
monarch of, iv, 319, 321 
kings of, send tiibute to 

Gushtasp, iv, 75 
ambassadors from, come 

to Darab, vi, 21 

Dara, vi, 35 
ruler of = Fur, vi, 51 
Sikandar invades, vi, 98 
silk of, vi, 99 
king of=Kaid, vi, 103 
Sikandar becomes king of, 

vi, 118 
people of, help the Sindians 

against Sikandar, vi, 175 
Raja of, i6g. See Raja. 
Bahr4m Gur's visit to, vii, 

5, no seq. 

motive of, vii, 5 



Hind, Rahram Gur"s visit to, 
fabulous, vii, 6 
king of, entertained by 
Bahram Gur, vii, 140 
seq. 
Nushfrwan goes to, vii, 241 
Hindiya (Amida ?), city in 
Roman Armenia, vii, 200 
taken by Kubad, vii, 200 
Hindu Kush, mountain-range in 

Afghanistan, ii, 80 
Hindustani, vii, 6 

Gipsy language a debased 
form of, vii, 6 
Hiong-Nu, probably the Huns, v, 

13 
Hira, city west of the Euphrates 
near Mashad 'Ali (Nedjef), 
vi, 372; vii, 217; viii, 
188, 191 ; ix, 5, 66 
seat of the dynasty of Al 

Munzir, i, 55 
kingdom of, ix, 65 

abolished by Khusrau 
Parwiz, ix, 66 
attacked by Persians, ix, 67 
Hira (Jebel Niir), mountain 

north of Mecca, viii, 42 
Hirbad, keeper of the women's 
house of Kai Kaiis, ii, 202, 
206 
Hirmund (Helmund), river in 
Sistan in eastern Iran, i, 
358,359; iii, 321 ; V, 178, 
182, 186, 191, 196, 219, 
285 
referred to, v, 198, 231 
Hisham ibn Muhammad ibn 
Al-Kalbi, Arabic historian 
(Sth-gth centuries A.D.), 
vi, 30 ; viii, 73 
Hishwi, Riiman toll-collector, 
iv, 334 seq. 
interview of, with Gushtasp, 

iv, 324 
becomes friends with Gush- 

t4sp, iv, 332 
asks Gushtasp, on behalf of 
Mirin, to undertake the 
adventure of the wolf of 
Fdskun, iv, 335 



GENERAL INDEX 



279 



Hishwi, goes with Gushtasp and 
Mirin to the forest of 
Fdskun, iv, 337 

Mirin and, welcome Gush- 
t^p on his return, iv, 339 

asks GushtAsp, on behalf of 
Ahraii, to undertake the 
adventure of tlie dragon 
of Mount Sakila, iv, 344 

goes with Gushtasp and 
Ahran to Mount Sakila, 
iv, 346 

Ahran and, welcome Gush- 
tasp on his return, iv, 347 

receives gifts from Gush- 
tasp, iv, 348 

confirms Gusht^sp's claim 
to have slain the wolf and 
dragon, and produces 
their teeth to Cjesar, iv, 

351 

-Hittite, Hittites, vi, 71 
empire, vi, 71 

Hiuen Tsiang, Chinese traveller 
(A.D. 603-668), vi, 63 
quoted, vi, 63, 73 

Hoibaras, Persian slave, temp. 
Astyages, vi, 195 

Hold, The Brazen. See Brazen 
Hold. 

Holy Ghost, the, vi, 13S and note 

Holy Questions, Mountain of the, 
i, 62 

Homa (Soma), a plant held 
sacred by the Zoroas- 
trians, i, 8 and note, ii, 8 
juice of, ii, 8 
referred to, iv, 138 

Homer, vi, 13, 72 

epic method of. contrasted 
with Firdausi's, i, 47 
quoted, vi, 68, 73 

Hormisdas I. See Urmuzd son 
of ShApiir. 

Hormisdas H. See Urmuzd son 
of Narsi. 

Hormisdas (Urmuzd son of 
Urmuzd son of Narsi), 
Persian prince, takes re- 
fuge with the Romans, vi, 

3i«. 3-25 



Hormisdas, goes with Julian 

to the East, vi, 325 
Horoscope, i, 152 

of the sons of Faridun, i, 188 
ZaI, i, 251, 278 
Rustam, i, 278, 307 
Siyawush, ii, 196, 205, 234 
Mi'rin, iv, 334 
Shaghad, v, 264 
Ardawan, vi, 218 
Bahram Gur, vi, 376 
Yazdagird son of Shapur, 

vi, 390 

Shirwi, vi i, 37.2 ; ix, 16, 17 

Horse, of Persian royalty, how 

distinguished, ii, 410 note 

Gushtasp's black. See 

Black horse, 
(steed, knight), piece in 
chess, vii, 285, 423 
position of, vii, 388, 422 
move of, vii, 422 
Houri, maid of Paradise, i, 272 ; 

ix, 81 
House of Darkness, ix, 7 

Crystal, ix, 25 and note 
Houses, the Twelve, of the sky, 
1, 103, 188 
good influence of, i, 52 
Hrazdan, river in Armenia, v, 13 
Hiilwan (Arash), town, vii, 187, 
201 
situation of, vii, 187 
Yazdagird retires to, ix, 67 
taken by Hashim, ix, 68 
Hum (Haoma, q.v.), hermit, 153, 
iv, 135 seq., 259 seq. 
hears Afrasiyab lamenting 

in the cave, iv, 260 
capture of Afrasiyab by, iv, 
261 

Darmesteter on, iv, 136 
pities and unbinds Afrasi- 

ycib, iv, 262 
tells his adventure with 
AfrasiyAb to Gudarz and 
Giv, iv, 363 

Kai K4us and Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 264 
suggests how Afrasiyab may 
be recaptured, iv, 265 



28o 



GENERAL INDEX 



Hum, recaptures Afrasiyab, iv, 

266 
Huma. See below. 
Humai (Huma), daughter of 

Gushtasp, ii, 3 ; v, 12, 

25 

marriage of, with Asfandi- 
yar, v, 22, 74 
ignored by Firdausi, v, 22 

offered in marriage to the 
avenger of Zarir, v, 64 

taken captive by the Turk- 
mans, V, 93, 100 

goes with Bih Afrid to draw 
water and meets Asfandi- 
yar, v, 147 

escapes from Arj asp's pal- 
ace, V, 153 

bewails Asfandiyar, v, 252 

reproaches Gushtasp, v, 254 

Humai (Chihrzad, q.v.), daughter 

and wife of Bah man, and 

mother of Darab, ShAh, 

157, 158. ii, 3. 9, 10 ; v, 

2S1, 290 seq. ; vi, 20, 22, 

190 
mairied to Bahman, v, 290 
Bahman appoints, and her 

issue, to succeed him, v, 

291 
Semiramis (?), v 293 
genealogies of, v, 293 
Reign of, 158, v, 292 seq. 

Note on, v, 292 seq. 
accession of, v, 294 
Darab born of, v, 294 
referred to, v, 296 
hears of Riiman invasion 

and bids Rashnawad lead 

forth the host, v, 301 
reviews the host, v, 302 
affected on seeine: Darab, v, 

302 
hears from RashnawAd 

about Ddrab, v, 308 
recognises that Darab is her 

son, V, 308 
thanksgiving largess of, v, 

309 
Rashnawdd and Darab ap- 
pear before, v, 309 seq. 



Humai, crowns, and excuses her- 
self to, Darab, v, 310 

proclaims Darab, v, 311 
Humai, Iranian chief, tcDip. 
Bahram Gur, vii, 88 

goes as envoy to the Khan, 
vii, 87 
Hiimdn, son of Wisa and brother 
of Piran, Turanian hero, 
144, 148. I4g. 151, i, 92; 
ii, 129, 130, 132, 148, 150, 
264, 390 ; iii, 90, 91, 93, 
108, 120 seq., 133 seq., 
142, 149, 152, 1.53, 158, 
166, 169, 177, 182, 192, 
202, 205, 210, 217, 227, 
232, 234, 252, 259, 330 ; 
iv, 7, 8, 10, 29 seq., 44, 
55. 56. 61, 75, 76. 91, 118, 
152 

Barman and, join Suhrab 
with troops, ii, 129 

Afrasiyab's instructions to, 
ii, 129 

misleads Suhrab as to Rus- 
tam, ii, 165, 169 

reproaches Suhrab for spar- 
ing Rustam, ii, 171 

throws the blame for Suh- 
rab's death on Haji'r, ii, 
176 

withdraws from fran under 
safe conduct, ii, 176, 181, 
182, 184 

rescues Afiasiyab from Rus- 
tam, ii, 354, 355 

persuades Afrasij'ab to 
abandon the pursuit of 
Kai Kliusrau, ii, 394 

parleys with Tiis, iii, 121 

leads the host against Tiis, 
iii, 127 

counsels Piran, iii, 134 

pursues the Iranians to 
Mount Hamawan, iii, 135 

ralhes the Turanians, iii, 

139 

reconnoitres the Iranians, 

iii, 174 ^ ^ 
informs I'l'ran of the arrival 

of Rustam, iii, 174 



GENERAL INDEX 



281 



Ili'iiiian, parleys disguised with 
Kiistani, iii, i(j6 
commands the centre, iv, 25 
dissuaded from fighting by 

Pi'ran, iv, 30 
parleys with Bizhan, iv, 45 
armour of, donned by Bi- 
zhan, iv, 51 
Turanians' grief at death of, 
iv, 51 
Huns, the, i, 10 ; v, 13 ; vi, 15 ; 

vii, 153 

settlement of, at Samar- 
kanil, i, 19 

^\hite. 5fe Haital. 
Hur, father of Bihruz, vii, 72 
Hurmuz (Urmuzd), Ashkanian 

king, vi, 197 
Hurmuz (Urmus), city and island 
on the south-eastern shore 
of the Persian Gulf, vi, 
204 
Hurmuz (Hormisdas IH), Sh4h, 
166, vii, 153, 186 

appointed by Yazdagird to 
succeed him, vii, 155 

Reign of, vii, 156 
Note on, vii, 156 

defeated by Pi'ruz, vii, 157 

pardoned by Pirilz, vii, 156, 
158 

leads the van in the war 
with the Turkmans (Hai- 
talians), vii, 164 

perishes in battle, vii, 168 
Hurmuz, minister of Bahram 

Gur, vii, 26 
Hurmuzd (Hormisdas IV), son 
of Nushirwan, Shah, i6g- 
IJ2, vii, 279 ; viii, 56 
seq., 69 seq., 74 seq., 78, 
87, 147, 169, 170, 174, 
198, 209, 212, 213, 222, 
232, 265, 270, 304, 312, 
333. 355. 370. 376 ; ix, 4, 
15. 104 

son of the Khan's daughter, 

vii, 317 
sent against the Turks, vii 

317 

examination of, viii, 3, 57 



llunniizd (Shah), counselled by 
Nushirwan, viii, 25 seq. 

Niisliirwan's testament in 
favour ol, and last coun- 
sels to, viii, 61 seq. 

Reign of, 170, viii, 70 

Note on, viii, 70 

character of, viii, 70 

system of administinticn of, 
viii, 71 

justice of, viii, 71 

instances of, viii, 90 seq. 

scribes executed by, viii, 71 

insult of, to Baliiam Chu- 
bina, viii, 76 

Lazic war renewed by, viii, 
76 

Bahram Chiibina's gift of 
swords to, viii, 76 
accession of, viii, 78 

turns to evil courses, viii, 
81 

puts to death tzid Gas- 
hasp, viii, 83 

poisons Zarduhsht, viii, 83 
seq. 

schemes against and puts 
to death Simah Parzin, 
viii, 85 seq. 

attempts to suborn Bahram 
Azarmihan, viii, 85 seq., 

gives audience, viii, 86 

hears state-secret from Bah- 
ram Azarmihan, viii, 88 

puts to death Bahram Azar- 
mihan, viii, 89 

repentance of, viii, 90, 93 

places of residence of, viii, 
90 

wars of, viii, 92 

attacked by Sawa, viii, 92 

Sawa's letter to, viii, 93 

attacked by Caesar, viii, 93 
Khazars, viii, 93 
Arabs, viii, 93 

consults the Iranians, viii, 

94 

counselled by his wazir, viii, 

94 
makes peace with Ca?sar, 

viii, 95 



282 



GENERAL INDEX 



Hurmuzd (Shah), attacks and de- 
feats the Khazars, viii, 95 

sends for Mihran Sitad, 
viii, 97 

hears prophecy about Bah- 
ram Chiibina, viii, 98 

orders search to be made for 
Bahram Chubina, viii, 99 

discovers and sends for 
Bahram Chubina, viii, 100 

consults Bahram Chubina, 
viii, 100 

gives chief command to 
Bahram Chubina, viii, \oz 

questions Bahram Chubina, 
viii, 103 

gives Rustain's banner to 
Bahram Chubina, viii, 105 

sends Mihran with Bahram 
Chubina, viii, 106 
intelhgencer after Bahram 

Chubina, viii, 107 
to recall Bahrain Chubina, 
viii, 108 

Kharrad, son of Barzin, 
as envoy to Sawa, viii, 
no 

hears of Bahram Chiibina's 
victory, viii, 132 

makes thanksgiving, viii, 132 

rewards Bahram Chubina 
and the troops, viii, 133 

surveys spoils sent by Bah- 
ram Chubina, viii, 150 

grows suspicious of Bahram 
Chubina, viii, 151 

dismisses the Khan with 
gifts, viii, 152 

hears from Kharrad of Bah- 
ram Chiibina's disaffec- 
tion, viii, 160 

consults with high priest, 
viii, 161 

Ayin Gashasp, viii, 174, 
177 

plans to make away with 
Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 174 

hears of Khusrau Parwiz' 
flight, viii, 176 

imprisons ]5andwi and Gus- 
taham, viii, 176 



Hurmuzd (Shah), hears of the 

murder of Ayin Gashasp, 

viii, 182 
dethroned and blinded, viii, 

183, 200 
visited in prison by Khusrau 

Parwiz, viii, 185, 198, 230 
requests of, to Khusrau Par- 
wiz, viii, 199 
referred to, viii, 211 
counsels Khusrau Parwiz, 

viii, 230 
murdered, viii, 232 
Hurmuzd Garabzin or Galabzin 

(Ivharrad son of Barzin 

q.v.), viii, 190 
Hurmuzd, priest, vii, 188 

assists Nushirwan in his 

disputation with Mazdak, 

vii, 188, 206 
Hurmuzd, Iranian general, vii, 

251 
commands the outposts in 
Niishirwan's army, vii, 251 
Hurmuzd (Hurmuzdshah, Far- 
rukh-Hurmuzd q.v.), 
father of Rustam, ix, 72, 
78, 85, 89, 96 
Hurmuzd ShahrangurAz (Shah- 

ranguraz q.v.), ix, 54 
Hurmuzd, devotee, ix, 102 

pleads with Mahwi for Yaz- 
dagird, ix, 102 
Hurmuzdagan, vi, 193, 199 

battle of, vi, 193, 199, 202, 
256 
Husain, friend of Firdausi, ix, 

121 
Hushang, son of Siyamak, min- 
ister of Gaiiimart, and 
Shah, 139, 140, i, 42, 90, 
91, 126 ; ii, 204 ; iv, 133, 
286, 292, 302 ; V, 180, 
245 ; vii, 37, 273 ; viii, 
376 ; ix, 25, 41 
Firdausi's etymology of, i, 

121 
goes with Gaiiimart to fight 

the Black Div, i, 121 
slays the Black Div, i, I2i 
Reign of, 140, i, 122 



GENERAL INDEX 



283 



Hushang, Reign of, Note on, i, 

12Z 

succeeds Gaiiiniart, i, 122 
culture-hero, i, 123 
discovers lire, i, IJ3 
institutes Fire-worship, i, 1 23 
founds the Feast of Sada, i, 

124 
domesticates animals, {,124 
dies, i, 124 
Firdausi's reflections on, i, 

124 
rites of, vii, 53 
Faith of, viii, 380 
Hushdiv, Turanian hero, v, 46 
put in charge of the rear, v, 
46 
Hushyar, astrologer, vi 372, 375 
takes Bahram Giir's horo- 
scope vi, 176 
Hushravah (Kai Khusrau, q.v.), 

iv, 137, 138 
Hutaosa, wife of Gushtasp, v, 1 1 

= Atossa (?), V, II 
//fyaonas (Khyons, Chionitae ?), 

people, V, 13 
Hyapates, son of Scmiramis, v, 

292 
Hydaspes, id. 

Hydaspes (Jhilam), river in the 

Punjab, vi, 18, 31, 62, 63 

Hydraotes (Ravi), river in the 

Punjab, vi, 64 
Hyperboreans, the, vi, 74 
Elysium of, vi, 74 
Hyphasis (Beas), river in the 
Punjab, vi, 64 
Hyrcania (Gurgan, q.v.), ii, 27 ; 
iii. 10 ; vi, 373 
Giv, prince of, iii, 9 
Hystaspes (Gushtasp, q.v.), iv, 

314 seq. 
Hystaspes, father of Darius I, v, 
10 
governor of Parthia, v, lo 



iBLfs, the Muhammadan Devil, 
140, 143, iv, 206, 282 ; V, 
174, 218 



Iblis, occasional substitution of* 
for Ahrinian in the Shah- 
nama, i, 50, 70 ; ii, 82, no 

tempts Zahhak, i, 136 seq. 

turns cook, i, 137 seq. 

causes serpents to grow out 
of Zahhcik's shoulders, i, 

139 
counsels, garbed as a leech, 
Zahhdk, i, 139 
Ibn Mukafta', Persian scholar 
and Arabic writer, vi, 373 ; 
vii, 161 
account of, vi, 17 
translator of the Bastan- 
nama into Arabic, vi, 17 
Fables of Bidpai (the 
Book of Kalila and 
Dimna) into Arabic, 
_ vii, 3S3 
Ibrahim, Abraham the pat- 
riarch, vi, 1 1 9, 120 
house of =the Kaaba, vi, 119 
Ichthyophagi, vi, 81 

Sikandar and, vi, 69, 147 
Arrian on, vi, 69 
modern accounts of, vi, 70 
city of, described, vi, 177 
go to meet, and are visited 

by, Sikandar, vi, 17S 
hand over the treasures of 
Kai Khusrau to Sikandar, 
vi, 178 
fd-i-Kurdi, Feast of, i, 143 
Ighriras (Aghraeratha, Aghrc- 
ra.d, Aghriras), brother of 
Afrasiyab and Turanian 
hero, 142. i, 92, 337, 342 
seq. : ii, 18, 20, 303, 304 ; 
iii, 8 ; iv, 136, 206, 262 
characterised, i, 55, 338 
opposes war with Iran, i, 

343 

Barman's single combat, 

i. 347 
over-ruled by Pashang, i, 

344 

Afrasiydb, i, 347 
Iranian captives saved by, 

i. 3(^3 

released by, i, 365 seq. 



284 



GENERAL INDEX 



Ighrhas, upbraided and slain by 
Afrasiyab, i, 367 
Pashang's grief for, i, 374 
revival of, in legend, iv, 135 
given a command, iv 156 
head of, sent by Kai Khus- 
rau to Kai Kaiis, iv, 185 
referred to, iv, 267 
Ijds bin Kabi'sa, viii, 188 

governor of Hira, viii, 190 
Ila, Turanian king, iv, 182 

fights with Kai Khusrau, iv, 
182 
Ilyas, ruler of Khazar q.v., 154, 
iv, 361 
tribute demanded of, by 

Caesar, iv, 352 
refuses tribute and declares 

war, iv, 352 
makes overtures to Gush- 

tasp, iv, 354 
corpse of, brought by Gush- 
tasp to Cajsar, iv, 355 
Imagery, of Shahnama. See 

Shahnama. 
Imaus, Greek form of Himalaya 

q.v., vi, 12 
'Inanian, 'Inanians, Arab tribe, 

vi, 324. 330, 331. 333 
Ind. See Hind. 

India, iv, 316 ; vi, 17, 64, 81, S3, 
204 
frinians and Aryans of, i, 15 
Palladius on, vi, 61 
Ancient, M'Crindle's, quoted, 

vi, 68 
= Ethiopia, vi, 68 
Indian, Indians, iy2, vi, 81, 375, 
397 ; vii, 135, 146; viii, 

377 
= Ethiopians, vi, 13, 68 
sages, vi, 61, 83, 91 seq., 143 

seq., 266 
bells and gongs, vi, 175 ; 

viii, 46, 120 
bane, vi, 259 

king of = Shangul, vii, 118 
tongue, vii, 117, 143 
sword, falchion, scimitar,viii, 

127, 145. 417 ; ix. 17 

Garden of the, viii, 196 



Indian, Indians, Faith of, iy2, 

viii, 275 
script, ix, I 7 
scribe, ix, 17 
Indies, Greek idea of two, vi, 13 
duplicate races in, vi, 68 
Indo-European race, i, 7 
Asiatic branch of, i, 7 

Aryans, i, 7 
' early seats of, i, 7 

religion of, i, 7 
Indra, Indian god, ii, 25 ; vi, 203 
Vritra and, ii, 25 ; vi, 203 
Indus, river, i, 71, 252 ; ii, 21 ; 

iii, 177, 204, 237. 251 ; V, 

293 ; vi, 62, 67, 70 ; vii, 

241 
mistaken for the Nile, vi, 68 
Introduction, to Shahnama, i, 3 

seq. 
lollas, Alexander the Great's cup- 
bearer, vi, 82 
Iraj, youngest son of laridun 

q.v. and the protagonist 

of the Iranian race, 140, i, 

54, 90, 91, 211 ; ii, 8, 16, 

19, 20, 237, 297,302; iii, 8; 

iv, 146 ; V, 42, 44, 261 ; 

vi, 353 ; vii, 73 ; viii, 266, 

376 and note, 392 ; ix, 103 
etymology of, i, 174 
naming of, i, 188 
horoscope of, i, 188 
receives Iran and Arabia as 

his portion, i, 189 
abdication of, demanded by 

Salm and Tiir, i, 192 
offers to go to his brothers, 

i, 196 
visits Salm and Tur, i, 19S 
reception of, by Salm and 

Tur, i, 198 
offers to resign his kingship 

to his brothers, i, 200 
slain by Tur and Salm, i, 

201 
head of, sent to Faridun, i, 

202 
mourning for, i, 203 seq. 
daughter of, 140, i, 205 

married to Pashang, i, 205 



GENERAL INDEX 



285 



fiaj, daughter of, gives birth to 

Minuchihr, i, 206 
vengeance for, i, 215 seq. 

referred to, i, 335, 349 
Iraj, king of Kabul, iv, 146 
'IrAk, ix, 66 

= 'frak 'Arabi (Babylonia), 

vii, 214, 224 
Iram, gardens of, i, 100, 113; 

ii, 78 ; vii, 235 and 

note 
Iran, 142-144. 14^. 148. 150, 152- 

155. 157, 15S, 162, 163, 

163, i6y, 172. 173, 173, 

176, i, 3, 113, 152, 153 

and passim 
boundaries of, i, 3 
physical features of, i, 3 
gradual desiccation of, i, 3 

and see Drought, 
climate of, i, 4 
flora of, i, 4 
fauna of, i, 5 
land of contrasts, i, 5, 58, 

60 
cosmogony of, i, 5 
people of, i, 6 
-vej, region, i, 9 

situation of, i, 9 

Zoroaster's (Zarduhsht's) 
birth-place, i, 62 
Arab conquest of, i, 12 
Arabia and, Iraj's portion, 

i, 189 
-Shahr, ii, 81 
fought for by Afrasiyib and 

the Arabs, ii, 92 
invaded by Suhrab, ii, 130 
lord of=Mahmud, iv, 142 
monarch of = Darab, vi, 21, 

26 
and Shahnama compared, 

vi, 193 
invaded by Munzir and 

Nu'min, vi, 397 
Rum's tribute to explaine 1, 

vii, 187 
Iranian, Iranians, 144, 147-131, 

153. 155. 163-167. 171, 

176, i, 9 and passim 
neighbours of, i, 9 



frdnians, historical relations of, 
with Semites, i, 10 
Assyrians, i, 10 
Arabs, i, 1 1 ; vi, 17; ix, 

65 seq. 
Greeks and Romans, i, 14 
Aryans of India, i, 15 
Tiirdnians, i, 16 seq. 
Kimmerians, i, i 7 
Scythians, i, 17 
Parthians, i, 18 
Alani, i, 19 
Huns, i, 19 
Turks, i, 20 
traditional relations of, with 
other Indo - Europeans, 
Semites, and Turanians, i, 

54. 55. 56 
revolt against Jamshid and 
summon Zahhak to Iran, 

i. 139 
chiefs of, imprisoned at 
Sari, i, 363 
plot for release with Igh- 

riras, i, 363 
inform Zal, i, 366 
released by Kishwad, i, 

367 
provided for by Zal, i, 

367 
bewail Naudar, i, 364 
wish to withdraw from the 

Seven Stages, v, 135 
encouraged to persevere by 

Asf andiyar, v, 1 36 
provoked to combat by 

Zawara, v, 225 
Sikandar's proclamation to, 

vi, 44 
bewail themselves, vi, 48 
counsel Dar4 to come to 

terms with Sikandar, vi, 

48 
ask quarter of Sikandar, vi, 

51 
hail Sikandar as ruler, vi, 56 
after Yazdagird son of 
Shdpur's death meet for 
counsel in Pdrs, vi, 394 
Jawanwi sent by, to Mun- 
zir, vi, 397 



286 



GENERAL INDEX 



Iranians, offer prayer at the Fire- 
fane of Barzin, vi, 400 

loyal, support Bahram Gur, 
vi, 402 

procedure of, to elect a 
Shah, vi, 403 

decide to reject Bahram 
Gur, vi, 403 

remonstrated with by Mun- 
zir, vi, 403 

object-lesson of, to Munzir, 
vi, 404 

accept Bahram Gur's pro- 
posal for settling the 
question of kingship by 
ordeal, vi, 406 

ask Munzir to intercede 
with Bahrdm Gur for 
them, vii, 9 

arrears of taxes of, can- 
celled, vii, II 

levied by Bahram Gur, vii, 
86 

resolve to submit to the 
Khan, vii, 87 

send Humai as envoy to the 
Khan, vii, 87 

letter of, to the Khan, vii, 87 

ask for Narsi's good offices 
with Bahram Giir, vii, 93 

lament for the death of 
Piriiz, vii, 169 

revolt against Kubad, vii, 

195 
put Kubad in fetters, vii, 

195 
ask pardon of Kub4d, vii, 

200 
pardoned by Kubad, vii, 200 
take Sakila, viii, 47 
chiefs received in audience 

by Hurmuzd, viii, 86 
consulted by Hurmuzd, viii, 

94 
defeat the Khazars, viii, 96 
advise Bahr4m Chubina, 

viii, 102, 121, 239 seq., 287 
SAwa employs sorcery 

against, viii, 123 
encouraged by Bahram 

Chubina, viii, 124 



Iranian, Iranians, defeat the 

Turks, viii, 126 
revolt against Hurmuzd, 

viii, 156 
elect Bahram Chubina 

Sh4h, viii, 243 
homage Shirwi, ix, 8 
choose two chiefs to visit 

Khusrau Parwiz in prison, 

ix, 9 
plot against Guraz, ix, 54 
go hunting with Guraz, ix, 

55 
race, ix, 65 

enmity of, with Semite, 

i, 54 ; ix, 65 
announces arrival of Shu'ba 

Mughira to Rustam, ix, 82 
defeat of, at Kadisiya, ix, 84 
retreat to Yazdagird, ix, 85 
-born, ix, 99 

defeat of, at Marv, ix, 116 
ambushed, ix, 118 
Irma'il and Karma'il, Zahhak's 

cooks, 140, i, 146 
Irman, (Arman q.v.), i, 345, 358 ; 

iii, 12, 285, 292. 296, 

3" 

devastated by wild boars, 

iii, 290 
Irmanians (Armenians q.v.), 150, 

iii, 286 
complain to Kai Khusrau 

of the wild boars, iii, 290 
Iron steeds, Sikandar's, vi, 115 
Isa (Jesus), viii, 276 note 
Isdigird I (Yazdagird son of 

Shapur), Sasanian king, 

vi, 371 
Isdigird II (Yazdagird son of 

Bahram Gur), Sasanian 

king, vii, 153 
Ishmael, vi, 65, 120, 121 
Iskandar. See Sikandar. 
Iskandar, herb, vi, 26 
Iskandariya (Alexandria), 160, 

vi, 183 
Sikandar buried at, vi, 185 
Island, the=Meroe, vi, 65 
Islands, Male and Female, vi, 72 
origin of legend of, vi, 72 



GENERAL INDEX 



2f<7 



Isma'il. See Ishmael. 

Isnia'i'l, brother of Sultan Mah- 

niud, i, 21 
Isnnpwi. See Ispanwi. 
Ispahan, city in 'Irak-i-'Ajami, 

-f A i. 351 ; ii. 394. 399 ; 
iii, 109 ; vi, 57, 86, 87, 
199, 201, 202, 210 ; vii, 
6, 84, 214, 224 ; viii, 90 
given to Giidarz, ii, 78 ; iv, 

129 
arrival of Kai Khusrau at, 

ii, 396 
bestowed on Giv by Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 298 
Ispanwi, slave-girl of Tazhav, 
iii, 14, 27, 77 
taken captive by Bizhan, 
iii, 78 
Ispuruz, mountain in the neigh- 
bourhood of Alazan- 
daran, ii, 38, 56, 57, iv, 
136, 230 
Israfil, archangel, 160, vi, 78 
Sikandar's interview with, 
VI, 83, 161 
Issedones, tribe situated on the 
Tarim basin in eastern 
Turkistan, iii, 192 
Issus, town, plain, and gulf in 
Cilicia, vi, 30 
battle of, vi, 30, 31 
Darius' family taken pris- 
oners at, vi, 31 
Istakhr (Persepolis), city in Pars, 
142, 165, ii, II, 22, 28, 
339 ; vi, 57, 198, 199, 
202, 211, 223, 225, 231, 
3-26, 356, 386 ; vii, 83, 
95, 188 ; viii, 90, 313 ; 
ix, 50, 54 
buildings at, attributed to 

Humai, v, 293 
Dara marches from, to en- 
counter Sikandar, vi, 37, 
46 

returns to, vi, 44 
Sikandar crowned Shdh at, 

vi, 59 
taken by Ardshir Papakan, 
vi, 227 



Istakhr, Ardshir Papakan 
marches from, against the 
Kurds, vi, 230 
returns victorious to, vi, 
232 
Yazdagird taken to, ix, 64 
made Shah at, ix, 65 
Istuvegu. See Astyages. 
Italy, vii, 218 

Alexander of Epirus' ex- 
pedition to, vi, 12 
Alexander the Great's 
legendary expedition to, 
vi, 12, 30 
Iwan-i-Kcrkh, vi, 327 
Izads (Yazatas), the, iii, 286 
Izid, viii, 75 

Izid Gashasp, archscribe, J 70, 
viii, 74 
confusion in name of, viii, 

75. 76 
put to death by Hurmuzd, 

viii, 75. 83 
malicious speech of, viii, 77 

and note, 150 and note 
imprisoned, viii, 81 
sends for high priest, viii, 81 
Izid Gashasp, Iranian warrior, 

viii, 103, 122, 136, 138, 

149, 350, 353. 356 
conducts spoil to Iran, viii, 

148 
goes hunting with Bahram 

Chiibina, viii, 156 
speech of, viii, 165 



Jabala bin Salim, viii, 73 
Jacob of Sarug, Syriac poet. 
Syriac Christian Legend 
of Alexander the Great 
versified by, vi, 15, 74, 78, 
84 
JAdiistan, vi, log and note 
Jagatai, mountain-range in 

Khurasdn, v, 29 
Jahn, son of Afrasiyib, Turan- 
ian hero, 152, i, 92 ; ii, 
264, 268 ; iv, 156, 162, 
200 seq., 214 



288 



GENERAL INDEX 



Jahn, son of Afrasiyab, sent to 

guard Shida's rear, iv, 155 
advances to the attack 

and is defeated by Karan, 

iv, 178 
stationed at the centre with 

Afrasiyab, iv, 179 
sent to the left with troops, 

iv, 180 
Garsiwaz and, compel Afra- 
siyab to quit the field, iv, 

182 
commands the right, iv, 

190 
helps to defend Gang- 

bihisht, iv, 209 
taken prisoner by Rustam, 

iv, 210 
sent to Kai Kaiis, iv, 

233 
interned by Kai Kaus, iv, 

235 
spurious passage about, iv, 
272 note 
Jahn, architect of throne of 

Takhdis, viii, 391 
Jahram (Chahram), 161, 163, 
city in Pars, vi, 44, 119, 
202, 225, 237, 241, 268, 
400 ; vii, 185 ; ix, 29, 61 
Dara goes to, vi, 44 
degert of, vi, 401 
Jdj (? Chach q.v.), iv, 150 
Jalalpiir, city in the northern 

Punjab, vi, 18 
Jalula, town north-east of Bagh- 
dad, i, 12, ix, 68 
battle of, i, 12, ix, 68 
Jam, son of Kubad and brother 
of Nushirwan, vii, 316 
conspires against Nushir- 
wan, vii, 316 
Jcimcisp, chief minister of Shah 
Gushtasp, 155, i, 42 ; ii, 9 ; v, 
12, 22, 24 seq., 58, 206, 
216, 248 ; viii, 171, 393 ; 
ix, 26 
omniscience of, v, 19, 48 
answers, in conjunction with 
Zarir and Asfandiyar, Ar- 
jasp's letter, v, 42 



Jamasp, foretells the death in 
battle of Ardshir, v, 49 

Shidasp, V, 50 

Girami, v, 50 
exploits of Nastur, v, 50 
death of Nivzar, v, 51 

Zarir, v, 52, 70 note 
triumph of Asfandiyar, v, 

52 
defeat of Arjasp, v, 52 

encourages Gushtasp to 
fight, V, 54 

referred to, v, 59, 102 

dissuades Gushtasp from 
avenging Zarir, v, 64, 68 

made archmage of Fire- 
temple built by Gush- 
tasp, v, 75 

sent to recall Asfandiydr to 
court, v, 80 seq. 

advises Gushtasp, when be- 
leaguered by Arjasp, to 
release Asfandiyar, v, 97 

volunteers to go to Asfan- 
diyar, V, 97 

reaches Gumbadan in dis- 
guise, V, 98 

interview of, with Asfan- 
diyar, V, 99 seq. 

sends for blacksmiths to 
uncliain Asfandiyar, v, loi 

sets off with Asfandiyar, 
Bahman, and Niish Azar, 
V, IC3 

foretells Asfandiyar's fate, 
V, 169 

reproached by Bishiitan, v, 

254 
advises Gushtasp to write 

to Bahman, v, 257 
writes by Gushtasp's orders 
to recall Bahman, v, 258 
Gushtasp tells his intention 
as to the succession to, v, 
279 
prophecy of, viii, 68 
additions of, to throne of 
Takhdis, viii, 392 
Jdmasp, son of Piriiz, 166, vi, 3 
supersedes Kubad temporar- 
ily, vii, 184, 195 



GENERAL INDEX 



2 So 



Jamdsp, son of P.'ri'iz, titio of, 
vii, 1 86 
fate of, vii, iS6, 200 
James, St., bishop of Edessa, i, 

374 
James V of Scotland, vii, 3 

Bahram Gi'ir's resemblance 
to, vii, 3 
Jamhur, king of Hind, vii, 395, 

396. 39'^. 399. 401. 403 

Jamshid, son of Tahmiiras, Shdh 

and culture-hero, 140, 164, 

i, 42, 90, 91, ; ii, 4, 33, 

37, 168, 204, 358, 399 ; 
iii. 7. 57. 257, 273 ; iv, 
63. ^ii, 149. 203, 206, 
272, 274, 290 ; V, 2>^, 34. 

38, 47, 180, 202, 215, 216, 
245, 271, 284 ;■ vi, 45 
and note, 172, 209 ; vii, 
36 seq., 107, 162, 173, 211 ; 
viii, 22, 242, 269, 310, 
332, 341, 3S7 ; ix, 25, 39, 

103 
Reign of, 140, i, 129 scq. 

Note on, i, 129 seq. 
the Iranian Noah, i, 129 
meaning of, i, 130 
ascends the throne, i, 131 
greatness of, i, 131 
culture-hero, i, 132 
makes armour, i, 132 

raiment, i, 132 
institutes castes, i, 132 
great builder, i, 133 
introduces jewelry and per- 
fumes, i, 133 

Iccchcraft, i, 133 

ship-building, i, 133 
carried by the di'vs into the 

air, i, 133 
feast held in memorial of, i, 

134 
fall of, i, 130, 134, 139 
franians revolt against, i, 139 
fliglit and death of, i, 139 
sisters of, married to Zah- 

hAk, i, 146 

found by Faridun, 140, i, 
162 

referred to, iv, 304 

VOL. IX. 



Jamshi'd, treasure of, founti by 
Hahram Giir, 164, vii, 36 
described, vii, 36 

Jandal, envoy of Faridun, 140, 

i. ^77 
asks Sarv's daughters in 
marriage for Faridun's 
sons, i, 178 
informs Faridun of the out- 
come of his mission, i, 182 
Jandal, city in Hind, vii, 140 

monarch of, entertained by 
Bahram Gur, vii, 140 
seq. 
Janfuruz, Iranian general, viii, 

297 
Jamisiyar, minister of Dara, vi, 
52. 88 
murders Dara, vi, 52 
informs Sikandar of Dara's 

murder, vi, 52 

arrested by Sikandar, vi, 53 

executed, vi, 56, 88 

Jaranjas, Turanian hero, iv, 156 

Jarira, daughter of Piran, wife 

of Siyawush, and mother 

of Farud, J-/7, i, 92 ; ii, 

3 ; iii. 43 
married to Siyawush, ii, 

268 seq. 
birth of her son Farud, ii, 

291 
referred to, iii, 39 
advises Farud, iii, 42 
dream of, iii, 63 
kills herself, iii, 66 
Jarmana, place, ix, 93 
Jasha, king, i, 67, 68 
Jatakas, vii, 383 
Jats, people of north-western 
India, vii, 6 
fabulous origin of, vii, 6 
Jawanwi, Iranian magnate, vi, 
373 ; vii, 8, 10 
goes as ambassador to Mun- 

zir, vi, 398 
interview of, with Munzir, 

vi, 398 seq. 
recognises the divine Grace 
in Bahram Gur, vi, 398 
seq. 



290 



GENERAL INDEX 



Jawanwi, suggests a course of 

action to IMunzir, vi, 400 
returns to fran, vi, 400 
bidden by Bahram Gur to 

remit the arrears of taxes, 

vii, II 
Jaz (Gaz), town north-west of 
Ispahan, vi, 337 ; vii, 76, 

79. 80 
tribute of, remitted, vii, 82 
Jerusalem, v, 306 note, vi, 81 ; 

viii, 191, 196 
Elevation of the True Cross 

at, ix, 43 

Jesus, i, 42 ; viii, 191 ; ix, 10 

sayings of, viii, 276 and note 

Cross of, viii, 3 So 

laughter of, viii, 191, 380 

Jew, Jews, 168, vi, 356 ; vii, 13, 

273 ; viii, 21, 67, 276 
Faith of, vi, 95 
Bahram Gur's adventure 

with a, vii, 16 seq. 
persecution of, vii, 153 
Zuran's plot with a, against 

Mahbiid, vii, 320 5^^. 
bewitches Niishirwan's food, 

vii, 321 
makes confession to Niishir • 

wan, vii, 325 
Fables of Bidpai, vogue of 

largely due to, vii, 383 
Jewelled tree, Kai Khusrau's, iii, 

329 

Jeweller, a, 164. See Mahiyar. 
daughter of, 164 

Jewels, discovery of, i, 133 
Palace of, 160 

Jhilam (Hydaspes), river in the 
Punjab, vi, 18, 31, 63 

Jihun (Oxus q.v.) river, 146, 152, 
i. 215, 219, 345. 375 ; ". 
i^.igscq., 99, 229, 237,248, 
258, 311, 340, 390, 394, 
399, 404 ; iii, 58, 159 ; 
iv, 10, 12, 20, 53, 60, 79, 
153. 154. 157. 181, 184, 
187, 194, 255, 304 ; V, 12, 
29, 40, 45, 48, 203 ; vii, 
92, 165, 166, 180, 329, 
338, 340 ; viii, 94 99, 



Ji'hiin — cont. 

134. 174. 332 ; ix, 77, 115, 

118 
boundary between Iran and 

Tiiran i, 71, 370, 371 
confused with the Aras, i, 

370 
fords of, viii, 331 
Jins, ix, 81 

Johari Das, Babu, quoted, vi, 81 
Joktan, vi, 65 

= Kahtan, vi, 65 
Joshua, vi, 77 

Moses and, Muhammadan 
legend of, vi, 77 
Jovian (Bazanush), Roman Em- 
peror (A.D. 363-4), vi, 
324 seq. ; viii, 41 
confused with Valerian, vi, 

324 
Judaism, vi, 327 

Judda, the port of Mecca, J59, 
vi, 121 
Sikandar arrives at, vi, 121 
Julian (Yaniis), Roman Em- 
peror (A.D. 361-363), i, 
12 ; vi, 325 
confused with Valerian, vi, 

324 
not an emperor in the Shah- 

nama. vi, 324, 326 
expedition of, against Per- 
sia, vi, 324 seq. 

Julius Valerius, early Latin 
translator of the Pseudo- 
Callisthenes, vi, 14, 61, 
66 seq., 71, 74, 78, 79, 
81 

Jund-i-Sh4pur (Gund-i-Shapur 
q.v.), city, vi, 256 
= Ras-Shapur, vi, 256 
foundation of attributed to 
Ardshir Papakan, vi, 266 

Jupiter, planet, i, 72, 161, 188, 
281 ; ii, 115 ; iii, 318 ; 
iv, 143, 295 ; V, 256 ; vi, 
138, 172, 292 ; vii, 49, 
248, 357 ; viii, 28, 152, 

157. 395 
Justin I, Eastern Roman Em- 
peror, vii, 316 



cnxr.R.ir. ixnnx 



291 



Justin II, Eastern Roman Em- 
peror, vii, 212 ; viii, 41 
Justinian, Eastern Roman Em- 
peror, i, 16 ; vii, 212, 219, 
317 ; viii, 41 

silkworm introduced into 
the West during reign of, 
vi, 204 

bargains of, with Nushfrw^n, 
vii, 214, 216 seq. 

protection of Harith bin 
Jabala by, leads to war 
with Nushirwan, vii, 217 

successes of, in the West, 
vii, 217 

closes the schools of Athens, 
vii, 280 
Juya, a div, ii, 71 

slain by Rustam, ii, 72 



K 



Kaaba, the, i3g, vi, 65 
account of, vi, 65 
Sikandar's expedition to, 
vi, 67, 83, 119 

Kabab, small pieces of meat 
skewered together for 
roasting, ii, 103 ; iii, 69 ; 
iv, 121 ; v, 152 ; viii, 250 

Kabisa, viii, 188 

Kabtun, king of Misr and the 

progenitor of the Copts, 

vi, 121 

welcomes Sikandar, vi, 121 

praises Kaidafa to Sikandar, 

vi, 122 

Kabiida, 147, one of Afrasiyab's 
herdsmen, iii, 73 
slain by Bahram, iii, 74 

Kabul, Kabulistan (Afghanis- 
tan), city and country, 
141, 157, i, 57, 252, 264, 
268, 277, 282, 283, 286, 
294, 298, 299 note, 300, 
302 seq., 316, 357, 378 ; 
ii, 12, 18, 21, 92, 228, 260, 
271. 341 ; iii. 17. 35. 145, 
153. 165, 174, 186, 190, 
202, 206, 321 ; iv, 14, 65, 



K^bul — cohI. 

146, 278, 283, 292 ; v, 
126, 170, 173, 224, 242, 
251, 260, 263 seq., 271, 
273 seq., 284, 287 ; vi, 
207 ; vii, 173 

Buddhism in, i, 15 

superseded by Brahman- 
ism, i, 16 

dagger of, i, 219 ; vi, 320 

Z41 visits, i, 256 

Beauty of = RudAba, i, 
262, 316 

monarch of =Mihrab, i, 294, 

365 
rejoicings at, over Zal's 
successful embassy to 
Minuchihr, i, 314 
preparations at, to welcome 

Sam and Zal, i, 315 
falchion of, 1, 376 ; ix, 98 
Shaghad sent to be brought 

up at, V, 264 
king of, J57, V, 264, 271 
daughter of, marries Sha- 
ghad, V, 264 
Shaghad and, plot against 

Rustam, v, 265 seq. 
gives a feast, v, 266 
pretends to quarrel with 

Shaghad, v, 266 
treachery of, v, 268 seq. 
abases himself before 

Rustam, v, 269 
entertains Rustam and in- 
vites him to hunt, v, 
269 
hypocrisy of, v, 271 
Faramarz sent against, v, 

274, 27O 
defeated and put to death 
with all his kin, v, 277 
tribute of, question about, 

V, 265 
Faramarz makes a Zabuli 

king of, V, 277 
monarch of, entertained by 
Bahram Giir, vii, 140 seq. 
K4chir Bishi, city in Turin, ii, 
258, 360, 361 ; vii, 330, 
358 ; ix, 1 1 7 



292 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kadisi, Kadisiya, town on one 
of the canals west of the 
Euphrates and south of 
Mashad 'AH (Nedjef), vi, 
119, 330 ; ix, 5. 73. 74. 
77. 78 

battle of, i, 12, 143 ; ix, 5, 
67, 69 
date of, ix, 67 

canal of, ix, 69 

Rustam advances to, ix, 73 
Kac^asta (Urumiah q.v.), lake, 

iv, 137 

Kaf, mythical Mount Alburz 
q.v., ii, 83, 404 ; iv, 65, 
149 ; viii, 66 and note 

Kafur, king of Bidad, I4g, iii, 191 
worsts the Iranians, iii, 244 
slain by Rustam, iii, 245 

Kahtan, desert of, i, 287 

Kahtan, the Arabic form of 
Joktan, the progenitor of 
the southern Arabs, vi, 
65, 120 

Kai, meaning of, ii, 8 

Kaian, Kaianian {see Kai), ii, 8, 
9, 22, 404 ; iii, 5 seq., 9, 
14, 43, 67, 112, 147, 307, 

318, 320, 328, 342 ; iv, 
5 seq., 24, 33, 35, 65, no, 
127, 150, 166, 175, 234, 
260, 262, 269, 273, 279, 
285, 286, 289, 293, 308, 

319, 324 ; V, 7 seq.. ID, 
47. 49, 52, 54, 57. 59, 60, 
67 seq.. 73 seq.. 79, 86, 91, 
97, 122, 168 203, 210, 
223, 253, 254, 282, 288. 
289, 291, 311 ; vi, 9 seq., 

17. 34. 48, 55. 57. 59, 81, 
112, 125, 141, 179, 180, 
194, 199. 200, 202, 210, 
223, 237 note ; viii, 65, 
216 

dynasty, i, 49, 373 ; ii, 7 
seq. ; iii, 5 seq. ; iv, 5 
seq. ; v, 7 seq. ; vi, 9 seq. 

genealogical table, ii, 3 

birth-mark, ii, 372 

stature, ii, 375 

saying, iv, 33 



Kaian, throne, viii, 214 
race, viii, 217 
crown, ix, 11, 105 
Kaianiish (Ivataiiin), brother of 
Faridun, i, 90, 91, 158 
V, 261 
referred to, i, 147, 165 
Purmaya and, summon the 
smiths to Faridun, i, 158 
go with Faridun against 

Zahhak, i, 159 
attempt to kill Faridun, i, 
160 
Kai Arash, son of Kai Kubad, 
ii, 3, 23, 204. 205 ; vi, 
197, 210, 228 ; viii, 216 
Kai Armin, son of Kai Kubad, 

ii, 3- 23 
Kaid, Indian king, 759, 161, i, 
55 ; vi, 61, 83, 91 seq., 
112 
identical with Mandanes 

(Dandamis), vi, 62 
consults Mihran about his 

dreams, vi, 92 seq. 
dreams of, interpreted by 

Mihran, vi, 94, seq. 

Four Wonders of, 159, vi, 

94, 97 and note, 99 seq. 

daughter, 759, vi, 94, 100, 

102, 104 

described, vi, 100, 102, 

104 
married to Sikandar, vi, 

104 
reference in Sikandar's 
Will to, vi, 182 
cup, described, vi, 94, 
100 

principle of, explained, 
vi, 109 
leech, vi, 94, 101 

prescribes for Sikandar, 
vi, 107 
sage, vi, 94, 101 
= Calanus, vi, 62 
Sikandar's encounter of 
wits with, vi, 62, 104 
seq. 
explains the principle of 
the cup, vi, 109 



GENERAL INDEX 



^03 



Kiiid, soiuls his I'oiir Wonders 

ami utluT gifts to Si- 

k.imlar, \ i, 103 
revival of, in legem!, v i, 25O, 

2G6 
prophecy of, vi, 256, 257, 267 
consulted by Ardshir Papa- 

k^n, vi, 266 
advice of, to Ardshir Papa- 

kan, vi, 267, 273 
Kaiddfa (Cilicia), vi, 294, 297 
Kaidafa (Kandake, Candace q.v.), 

159. vi, 83, 121 scq.. 325 
obtains Sikandar's portrait. 

vi, 122 
praised by Kabtiin to Sikan- 

dar, vi, 122 
receives a letter from 

Sikandar, vi, 123 
answers Sikandar's letter, vi, 

123 
welcomes Kaidriish on his 

return from captivity, vi, 

127 
receives Naitkun (Sikandar) 

graciously, vi, 128 
state of, described, vi, 128, 

130, 133 
gives audiences to Naitkun 

(Sikandar), vi, 12S seq. 
recognises Sikandar, vi, 129 

seq. 
hears Sikandar's embassage, 

vi, 129 
covenants of, with Sikandar, 

vi, 132, 138 
warns Sikandar against 

Tainiish, vi, 133 
chides Tainiish, vi, 135 
takes counsel with Sikandar 

about Tainiish, vi, 135 
approves of Sikandar's 

scheme, vi, 137 
takes counsel with her 

nobles, vi, 139 
gifts of, to Sikandar, vi, 140 
Sikandar's final message to, 

vi, 143 
Kaidriish (Kandaros, Candaules), 
son of Kaidafa (Candace), 
vi, 134. 135 



Kaidriish, wife of, vi, 66 

taken with his wifi-, by 

Sikandar, vi, 125 
brcjught with his wife before 

Naitkiin, vi, 126 
sentenced with his wife to 

death, vi, 126 
pardoned with his wife, vi, 

126 
gratitude of, vi, 127 
returns to Kaidafa, vi, 127 
presents Naitkun (Sikan- 
dar) to Kaidafa, vi, 127 
Kaihan. See Kaid. 
K;u Kaiis, son of Kai Kubcid and 
Shah, 143-147. I5~, 153. 
i, 42, 338 ; ii. 3. 8 seq., 23 
seq., 33 seq., 54 seq., 61 
seq., 109, no, 127, 130, 
233. 243 seq., 264, 269 
seq., -2^2), 284, 286, 290, 
296, 301. 316. 318, 319, 
335. 347. 361. 364, 371. 
372. 383. 401 ; "i. 7. 9, 
13, 14, 20 seq., 24, 30, 45, 
51, 84, 85, 88, 90, 93, 96, 
113,145,147,166,174,236, 
238, 239. 289. 307, 327 ; 
iv, 13, 61, 129, 135. 136, 
162, 167 seq., 185, 191, 
199, 201, 203, 217, 218, 
232 seq., 254, 256 seq., 269 
seq., 278, 287, 289, 290, 
292, 295 seq., 306, 310, 
314, 321 seq. ; V, 29, 30, 
116, 173, 174, 190, 203, 
207, 208, 210, 215, 216; 
vii, 74, 107, 115; viii, 
22, 104, 168, 270, 341 ; ix, 

25 
Reign of, 143, ii, 25 seq. 
Notes on, ii, 25 seq., 79 
seq., 118, 188 se^., 335 
visits Rustam, ii, 83 
tempted by divs, ii, 30 scq., 

82, 102 scq. 
goes to Mount Kaf, ii, 83 
defeats Afrasiyab and re- 
gains fran, ii, 100 
makes Rustam paladin of 
paladins, ii, loi 



294 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kai Kaiis, buildings of, on 
Mount Alburz, ii, 8i, loi 
flying-machine of, ii, 103 
fall of, from the sky, ii, 104 ; 

V, 174 

repentance of, ii, 105 

hears of Suhrab and sum- 
mons his chiefs, ii, 136 
seq. 

bids Tus hang Rustam and 
Giv, ii, 143 

apology of, to Rustam, ii, 

147 
encampment of, described, 

ii. 153 

overthrown by Suhrab, ii, 
160 
refuses to cure Suhrab, ii, 

178 
attempts to console Rustam, 

ii, 181 
marries the future mother of 

Siyawush, ii, 194 
receives Siyawush at court, 

ii, 198 
bestows Kuhistanupon Siya- 
wush, ii, 199 
conduct of, in the case of 

Siyawush and Sudaba, ii, 

200 seq. 
sends Siyawush to fight 

Afrasiyab, ii, 225 
rejects terms of peace and 

quarrels with Rustam, ii, 

244 seq. 
hears of the defection of 

Siyawush, ii, 258 
grief of, at the death of 

Siyawush, ii, 337 
hears of Kai Khusrau's 

arrival in Iran, ii, 395 
receives Kai Khusrau, ii, 

397 
rewards Giv, ii, 399 
provides for Farangis, ii, 

399 

arbitrates between Tus and 
Giidarz, ii, 403 seq. 

welcomes Kai Khusrau on 
his return from the 
castle of Bahman, ii, 410 



Kai Kaiis, requires Kai Ivhus- 
rau to swear vengeanc^ 
on Afrasiyab, iii, 21 
welcomes Giv and hears 
his tidings of Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 234 
gives a feast, iv, 234 
deals with the captives, iv, 

235 
proclaims the conquest of 

Tiiran and Chin, iv, 236 
rewards Giv, iv, 236 
sends Giv back with letter 

to Kai Khusrau, iv, 238 
hears that Kai Khusrau is 

returning and goes with 

the nobles to welcome 

him, iv, 256 
receives gifts from, and hears 

the adventures of, Kai 

Khusrau, iv, 257 
gives a feast in honour of 

Kai Khusrau, iv, 257 
counsels a pilgrimage to the 

temple of Azargashasp, 

iv, 258 
Kai Khusrau and, hear from 

Giidarz of Hum's adven- 
ture with Afrasiyab, iv, 

264 

send for Garsiwaz and 
put him to the torture, 
iv, 265 

make thanksgiving before 
Azargashasp, iv, 269 

go in state to the temple 

of Azargashasp, iv, 270 

prays that he may die, iv, 

270 
• obsequies of., iv, 271 
treasure of, called " The 

Bride " bestowed by Kai 

Khusrau on Giv, Zal, and 

Rustam, iv, 295 
favour shown by I.uhrasp 

to the grandsons of, iv, 

318, 321 seq. 
grandsons of, go with Zarir 

to Rum, iv, 360 

hail Gushtasp as Shah, iv, 
362 



GENERAL INDEX 



205 



Kai Kai'is, Rustam's patent 
from, v, 203 

Kai Khusrau, son of Siyawush 
and Farangis, Shah, 146- 
154, 160, i, 42, 309 ; ii, 
3. 9, 25. 104, 189, 190, 334 
seq., 386 seq. ; iii, 13 seq., 
47. 55. 57. 66, io6, 108, 
in seq., 132, 134, 166, 

173. 175. i8(J. 191. 197. 
198, 202, 205, 211, 226, 
228, 238 seq.. 249, 250, 
271, 277, 285, 286, 289, 
294 seq., 326 seq., 338, 
353 se^. ; iv, T seq., 19, 21, 
30, 31. 36, 56 seq., 65, 66, 
71, 72, 76 seq.. 90, 99, 
115, 144 seq., 152, 153, 
237 seq., 262, 267 se^., 
317 seq., 319, 321 ; v, 10, 
12, 21, 39, 173, 188, 203, 
204, 208, 215, 284, 289 ; 
vi, 79. 177 ; vii, 120, 173, 
359 ; viii, 148, 219. 270, 
332, 392 ; ix, 25, 103 

fravashi of, ii, 82 

identical with Cyrus the 
Great in legend, ii, 9, 190 

prophesies respecting, ii, 310, 
372, 390 

birth of, ii, 325 seq. 

account of youth of, ii, 
328 seq. 

questioned by Afrasiyab, ii, 

332 

dwells at Siydwushgird, ii, 

333 
sent to Khutan, ii, 356 

Machin, ii, 357 note 
described by Suriish, ii, 363 
Giidarz sends Giv to seek, 

ii, 364 seq. 
recalled, ii, 370 
found by Giv, ii, 370 
birth-mark of, ii, 372, iii, 

49 note 
saves Pirdn's life, ii, 387 
at the Ji'hun, ii, 391 seq. 
arrives at Zam, ii, 394 
visits Giidarz at Ispahan, 

ii. 396 



Kai Khusrau, tells his story to 
I\ai Kaiis, ii, 397 
praises Giv to Kai Kaiis, ii, 

398 
goes to Istakhr, ii, 399 
enthroned as Shah, ii, 400, 

411 
supported by Giidarz and 

opposed by Tiis, ii, 400 

seq. 
letter of, to the defenders of 

the castle of Bahman, ii, 

407 
establishes Fire-worship at 

the castle of Bahman, ii, 

409 
pardons Tiis, ii, 410 
Reign of, 147, iii, 7 seq. 

Notes on, iii, 7 seq., 108, 
191, 271, 285 seq. : iv, 
7. 135 seq. 

last link with the Vedas, 
iii, 7 

longest in respect of sub- 
ject matter in the poem, 
iii, 7 

divisions of, iii, 7 

episodes of, iii, 7 

warlike character of, iii, 
8 

subject-matter of, iii, 8 
accession of, iii, 17 
goes on a hunting expedi- 
tion, iii, 19 

to the temple of Azar- 
gashasp, iii, 20 
swears to take vengeance on 

Afrasiyab, iii, 21 
prepares for war, iii, 23 

seq. 
offers reward for the head 

of l'alash4n, iii, 26 

crown of Tazhav, iii, 27 

slave of Tazhav, iii, 27 

head of Tazhav, iii, 28 

burning the barricade at 
the Kasa riid, iii, 28 

going on an embassage to 
Afrasiydb, iii, 29 
warns Tiis to avoid Kaidt, 

iii, 39 



295 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kai Khusrau, hears of the death 
of Farud and of the defeat 
of the Iranians, iii, 84 

wratli of, with Tiis, iii, 84 
seq.. Ill 

writes to Fariburz, iii, 84 

disgraces Tus, iii, 86 

imprisons Tus, iii, 87 

pardons Tus and the fran- 
ians, iii, 114 

hears of the peril of the 
Iranians on Mount Ham4- 
wan and summons Rus- 
tam, iii, 142 seq. 

sends Rustam to succour 
the Iranians, iii, 145 

furthers the suit of Fari- 
burz to Farangis, iii, 

147 
hears of Rustam's victory, 

iii, 239 
disposes of the captives and 

spoil, iii, 240 
sends gifts to Rustam and 

the host, iii, 241 
goes to meet Rustam on his 

return in triumph, iii, 

267 
gives a feast to the chiefs, 

iii, 268 
rewards Rustam, iii, 269 
holds a court and hears of 

the doings of the div 

Akwan, iii, 273 
writes to summon Rustam, 

iii, 274 
g les to welcome Rustam on 

his return from slaying 

the div Akwan, iii, 282 
rewards Rustam, iii, 283 
hears at a feast of the case 

of the Irmanians, iii, 289 
calls for volunteers, iii, 291 
sends Bi'zhan and Gurgin to 

Irnian, iii, 292 
comforts Giv for the loss 

of Bizhan, in, 315, 318 
imprisons Gurgin, iii, 317 
promises Giv to consult the 

divining-cup about Biz- 
han, iii, 317 



Kai Khusrau sends Giv to sum- 
mon Rustam, iii, 319 

sends the host to meet 
Rustam, iii, 327 

welcomes Rustam, iii, 328 

jewelled tree of, iii, 329 

requests Rustam to rescue 
Bizhan, iii, 330 

releases Gurgin at Rustam's 
request, iii, 333 

equips Rustam for his quest 
of Bizhan, iii, 333 

welcomes Rustam on his 
return, iii, 354 

rewards Rustam and his 
comrades, iii, 356 

holds converse with Bizhan, 

iii, 356 
gives gifts to Manizha, iii, 

356 
hears that the Turanians 

are invading Iran, iv, 12 
summons his paladins, iv, 13 

host, iv, 14 
sends Rustam to Hindustan, 

iv, 14 

Luhrasp to the Alans, 
iv, 14 

Ashkash to Kharazm, iv, 

15 

Gudarz to Turan, iv, 15 
orders Gudarz to negotiate 

with Piran, iv, 15 
receives letter from Gudarz, 

iv, 58 
rewards Hajir, the bearer, 

iv, 58 
prays for victory, iv, 58 
sends Hajir with answer, 

iv, 61 
leads a host to aid Gudarz, 

iv, 62 
referred to, iv, 85 
presage of, that Piran would 

be slain by Gudarz, iv, S^, 

88 
reaches Gudarz, iv, iii, 126 
receives Gudarz and the 

other champions, iv, 126 
Gurwi brought by Giv 

before, iv, 127 



GESERAL INDEX 



297 



/ 



Kimsrau, lainonts uvcr 

I'iraii, iv, 127 
buries Pirau and the Tur- 
anian ohani[)i()ns, iv, 128 
puts Cuirwi to deatli, iv, 1^9 
rewards the host, iv, 129 
gives Ispahan to Gudarz, 

iv, 129 
pardons the Turanian host, 

iv, 131 
amulet of, iv, 133 
heals Gustaham, iv, 133 
summons reinforcements, 

iv, 134, 145 
Great War of , with Afrasiyab, 

152, iv, 135 seq. 
exemption of, from death, 

iv, 138 
recalls the troops under 

Luhrasp, Kustam, and 

Ashkasli, iv, 145 
stations Tiis on his right 

with Kawa's standard, iv, 

146 
gives the right wing to Rus- 

tam, iv, 147 

left wing to Gudarz, iv, 

147 

commands to various 
chiefs, iv, 148, 149 
hears of Afrasiyab's passage 

of the Jihiin, iv, 157 
sends troops to the aid of 

Gustaham, son of Nau- 

dar, at Balkh, iv, 157 

Ashkash with a host to 
Zam, iv, 157 
marches to Kharazm, iv, 157 
surveys the seat of war and 

entrenches the host, iv, 

157 

Shida's embassage to, iv, 161 

sends Karan to welcome 
Sliida, iv, 165 

proposes to figlit in single 
combat, iv, 166 

rejects the frdnians' sug- 
gestions of a peace, iv, 
167 

accejjts Shi'da's challenge, 
iv, 168, 169 



K':ii Klnisrau, sends Karan with 
a reply to Sliida, iv, i().S 

arms to fight witli Sliida, 
iv, 171 

makes Ruhham his stand- 
ard-bearer, iv, 171 

sends instructions to the 
host, iv, 171 

parley of, with Shida, iv, 
172 

accepts Shida's challenge 
to a wrestling-bout, iv, 

175 
gives Ruhham charge of his 

steed, iv, 175 
wrestles and overthrows 

Shi'da, iv, i 75 
instructs Ruhham to bury 

Shida, iv, 176 
spares the life of Shida's 

interpreter and bids him 

return to Afrasiyab with 

tidings, iv, 176 
prays for vengeance on, and 

attacks, Afrasiyab, iv, 178 
bids Shammakh attack, iv, 

180 
attacks with Rustam from 

the centre, iv, 180 
fights with Ustukila, fla and 

Burzuyala, iv, 182 
returns to camp, iv, 183 
hears of Afrisiyab's retreat, 

iv, 184 
offers praise to God, iv, 184 
pursues Afrasiyab, iv, 185 

seq. 
marches to Sughd, iv, 188 
hears tidings of Afrasiyab, 

iv, 188 
sends Gustaham, son of 

Naudar, to Chacli, iv, 188 

Rustam to encounter 
Tawurg, iv, 188 
marches from Sughd and 

reduces the Turkman 

strongholds, iv, 189 

to the Ciulzaryun, iv, 189 
commands the centre, iv, 

191 
prays for victory, iv, 191 



298 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kai Khusrau, hears of the defeat 
of Kurakhaii by Gusta- 
ham, son of Naudar, iv, 

193 
hears of Rustam's defeat 

of Tawurg, iv, 193 
warns Rustam to beware of 

Afrasiyab, iv, 194 
plunders the camp of, and 

pursues, Afrasiyab, iv, 

195 

besieges Gang-bihisht, iv, 
198, 208 seq. 

converses with Rustam, iv, 
198, 199, 222 

receives Jahn in audience, 
iv, 200 

decUnes Afrasiydb's pro- 
posals for peace, iv, 207 

with Rustam, Gustaham 
son of Naudar, and Gii- 
darz, assails Gang-bihisht 
on all sides, iv, 208 seq. 

prays for victory, iv, 208 

takes Gang-bihisht by storm, 
iv, 2og seq. 

searches vainly for Afra- 
siyab, iv, 212 

gives the spoil of Gang- 
bihisht to the troops, iv, 
217 

grants quarter to the Turk- 
mans and assumes the 
government of Turan, iv, 
217 

dwells for a while at Gang- 
bihisht, iv, 218 

leaves Giidarz and Farhad 
at Gang-bihisht, iv, 219 

marches against Afrasiyab, 
iv, 220 

rejects Afrasiyab's over- 
tures, iv, 223 

fight a general engagement 
against Afrdsiydb, iv, 223, 
226 

entrenches his troops and 
prepares with Tiis and 
Rustam for a night-at- 
tack from Afrasiyab, iv, 
224 



Kai Khusrau, repulses Afrasi- 
yab's night-attack, iv, 225 
defeats Afrasiyab, iv, 227 
receives the submission of 

Afrasiyab's army, iv, 228 
gives a feast, iv, 228 
offers praise to God, iv, 228 
returns to Gang-bihisht, iv, 

228 
accepts the submission of the 

Khan and Faghfiir, iv, 229 
resolves to pursue Afra- 
siyab to Gang-dizh, iv, 

231 
plan of, opposed by the host, 

iv, 231 

supported by Rustam, iv, 
231 

agreed to by the host, iv, 
232 
sends Giv with Afrasiyab's 

captive kindred to Kai 

Kaiis, iv, 232 seq. 
leaves Gustaham, son of 

Naudar, in command at 

Gang-bihisht and marches 

to Chin, iv, 238 
demands facilities from the 

Khan, the Faghfiir, and 

the king of Makran, iv, 

238 
marches through Khutan, 

iv, 240 
welcomed by the Faghfiir 

and the Khan of Chin, iv, 

240 
stays three months in Chin, 

iv, 241 
leaves Rustam in Chin and 

marches to IVIakran, iv, 

241 
sends an embassy to the 

king of Makran, iv, 241 
gives honourable burial to 

the king of Makran, iv, 

243 
stops the pillage of Makrcin, 

iv, 243 
stays a year in Makran, iv, 

244 
makes ready a fleet, iv, 244 



GENERAL INDEX 



>99 



Kai Kluisrau, leaves Ashkash as 
governor and marches to 
the desert, iv, z\\ 

voyage of, iv, J45 
wonders of, iv, 245 

lands, iv, 246 

appoints Giv governor, iv, 
246 

receives the submission of 
the chiefs, iv, 247 

seeks for tidings of Gang- 
dizh and of Afrasiyab, iv, 
247 

marches to Gang-dizh, iv, 
247 

forbids his troops to injure 
Gang-dizh, iv, 247 

enters Gang-dizh, iv, 248 

searches for Afrasiyab, iv, 
248 

remains a year at Gang-dizh, 
iv, 249 

urged by his paladins to 
return to Iran, iv, 249 

appoints a governor for 
Gang-dizh, iv, 249 

distributes treasures at 
Gang-dizh, iv, 250 

marches seaward from Gang- 
dizh, iv, 250 

welcomed by Giv, iv, 250 

crosses the sea to Makran, 
iv, 251 

welcomed in Makran by Ash- 
kash and the chiefs, iv, 

251 
appoints a governor for 

Makran, iv, 251 
marches to Chin, iv, 251 
welcomed by Kustam, iv, 

251 
confirms the Faghfiir and 

Khan in the possession of 

Machin and Chin, iv, 252 
goes with Rustani to Siya- 

wushgird, iv, 252 
rewards Kustam and Giv, 

iv, 252 
welcomed by Gustaham, son 

of Naudar, iv, 252 
goes to Gang-bihisht, iv, 253 



Kai Khusrau, prays for satis- 
faction on Afrasiyab, iv, 

253 

dwells for a year in Gang- 
bihisht, iv, 254 

desires to return to Kai 
Kcius, iv, 254 

leaves Gustaham, son of 
Naudar, as viceroy, iv, 

254 

carries off treasure from 
Chin and Makran, iv, 254 

arrives at Chach, iv, 255 
Sughd, iv, 255 

met by Khuzan and Tali- 
man, iv, 255 

makes offerings to the Fire- 
temple at Bukhara, iv, 

255 
crosses the Jihun, iv, 255 
arrives at Balkh, iv, 255 
welcomed everywhere by 

the people, iv, 255 
goes by Talikan, the Marv- 

riid, Nishapur, and Dam- 

aghan to Rai, iv, 255 
stays two weeks at Kai, iv, 

256 
announces his approach to 

Kai Kaus, iv, 256 
goes to Baghdad and thence 

to Pars, iv, 256 
reception of, by Kai Kaus, 

iv, 256 
presents gifts, and tells his 

adventures, to Kai Kaiis, 

iv. 257 
has a feast given in his 

honour by Kai Kaus, iv, 

257 
rewards the troops, iv, 258 
takes counsel with Kai Kdus 

concerning Afrasiyab, iv, 

258 

goes with Kai Kaus on a pil- 
grimage to the temple of 
Azargashasp, iv, 25S 

Kai Kaus and, hear from 
Giidarz of Hum's adven- 
ture with Afrdsiyab, iv, 
264 



300 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kai Khiisrau.and Kai Kaus, send 

for Garsiwaz, and put him 

to the torture, iv, 265 
shiys Afrasiyab, iv, 26S 

Garsiwaz, iv, 269 
Kai Kaus and, make thanks- 
giving before Azargash- 

asp, iv, 269 
treasurer of, makes gifts to 

Azargashasp, iv, 269 
sends letters announcing 

his triumph to all the 

chiefs, iv, 270 
holds festival and bestows 

treasure, iv, 270 
goes with Kai Kaiis in state 

to the temple of Azar- 
gashasp, iv, 270 
performs the obsequies of 

Kai Kaus, iv, 271 
assumes the crown as sole 

Shah, iv, 272 
becomes world-weary, iv, 

272 
closes his court and with- 
draws to his oratory, iv 

274 
prays that he may be taken 

from the world, iv, 274 
passes a week in prayer, iv, 

274, 279 
remonstrated with by the 

nobles, iv, 275, 279 
replies to the nobles, iv, 276 

279 
passes five weeks in prayer, 

iv, 280 
hears from Suriish that his 

prayer is granted, iv, 

280 
bidden to appoint Luhrasp 

as his successor, iv, 281 
puts off his royal robes, iv, 

281 
receives Zal, Rustam, and 

others in audience, iv, 283 

seq. 
pardons Zal, iv, 291 
orders an assembly to be 

held on the plain, iv, 

291 



Kai Khusrau, treasure of, dis- 
posal of, iv, 294 
found by Sikandar, 160, 
vi, 176 

charge of, to Giidarz, iv, 294 

gifts of, to Giv, Zal, and 
Rustam, iv, 295 
Gustaham, iv, 295 
Giidarz, iv, 295 
Fariburz, iv, 295 
Bizhan, iv, 295 
Zal's companions, iv, 297 

confirms Rustam in pos- 
session of Nimruz, iv, 297 ; 
V, 203 

bestows Kum and Ispahan 
on Giv, iv, 298 

confirms the charge of 
Kawa's flag, and gives 
Khurasan, to Tus, iv, 300 

summons and crowns Luh- 
rasp, iv, 300 

Zal's protest to, against 
Luhrasp's succession to, 
Iv, 301 

justifies his choice of Luh- 
rasp, iv, 301 

takes leave of the franians, 
iv, 303 

women of, lament for him, 
iv, 304 

commends his women to the 
honour of Luhrasp, iv, 305 

dismisses the Iranians, iv, 

305 
counsels Luhrasp, iv, 305 
bids Luhrasp farewell, iv, 

306 
sets forth on his pilgrimage 

with some of his chiefs, 

iv, 306 

Indian parallel, iv, 138 
again appealed to by the 

franians, iv, 306 
reply of, iv, 307 
bids his chiefs return, iv, 307 
rests with his remaining 

chiefs by a spring, iv, 307 
prepares for his passing, iv, 

308 
farewells his chiefs, iv, 30S 



CKXERir. i\i)r:x 



301 



Kai Khusrau, warns his chiefs 
of the coming of the snow, 
iv, 308 
disappears, iv, 308 

Kai Kubad, Shah and founder 
of the Kaianian dynasty, 
142, i, 42, 373, 374 ; ii, 3, 
8, 12, 14, 16, 18 seq., 26, 
33. 34. 36. 37. 87, 143, 
144, 249, 260, 270, 274, 

3^7. 336. 363. 390, 394 ; 

iii, 34, 49, 51. 57, 144 ; 
iv. 35. 70. 149. 16S, 201, 
283, 298, 302 ; V, 174, 
180. 188, 189, 202, 205, 
210, 221, 272 ; vi, 197, 
210 ; vii, 37, 74, 115, 120, 
173 ; viii, 89, 170, 260. 
270, 310, 332 ; ix, 25 

brought by Rustam from 
Mount Alburz, i, 382 seq. 

tells his dream to Rustam, 

i. 385 
accepted by Zal and the 
other chiefs as Shah, i, 387 
Reign of, 142, ii, 1 1 

Note on, ii, 11 
origin of, ii, 1 1 and tiote 
makes peace with Afra- 

siyab, ii, 20 
gifts of, to Zal and Rustam, 

ii, 21 
descendants of, commanded 
by Dilafruz, stationed on 
Kai Khusrau's left hand, 
iv, 147 
Kai Manush, vi, 200 
Kai Pasliln, son of Kai Kubdd, 
ii, 3, 23, 204, 205 ; iv, 
302 
Kais, Arab chief, entertains 
Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 
250 
Kaiser Friedrich Museum, viii, 

192 

Kait. See Kaid. 

Kai Ugf, vi, 200 

Kaiwan, franian statistician, vii, 

1 1 



Kaiwan, calculates the arrears of 

taxes, vii, 1 1 
Kakula, Turanian hero, iv, 188 
reinforces Afrisiydb, iv, 188 
Kdkwi ((/. Karkwi), grandson of 
Zahhak, 141, i, 226 
attacks the Iranians, i, 225 
defeated and slain by Minii- 
chihr, i, 227 
Kalahur, warrior of Mdzandaran, 
ii, 67 
tries a handgrip with Rus- 
tam, ii, 07 
Kalat, stronghold, iii, 39 ; ix, 91 
home of Farud, iii, 39 
Kai Khusrau bids Tus to 

avoid, iii, 39 
Tiis marches to, iii, 40 
captured by the Iranians, 
iii, 66 
Kalat-i-Nadiri, stronghold, ii, 
189 ; iii, 14 
described, iii, 14 
Kale (Nereis), daughter of Alex- 
ander in the Pseudo-Cal- 
listhenes, vi, 77 
Andreas, the cook, and, 
legend of, vi, 77 
Kalila and Dimna, Book of, 769. 

See Fables of Bidpai. 
Kaliniyus (Nicephorium, Callini- 
cus, Wari'gh q.v., Rakka), 
city situated at the junc- 
tion of the Belikh and the 
Euphrates, i6y, viii, 188 
taken by Niishirwan, vii, 
218, 257 
Kalu, mountain in Turan, ii, 328' 
Piran sends Kai Khusrau 
to be brought up on, ii, 
328 

goes to see Kai Khusrau 
at, ii, 329 
Kalus, Ruman chief, iv, 356 
sent as envoy to Ilyas, iv, 

352. 358 

laihrasp, iv, 357 
entertained by Luhrasp, iv, 

357 



' Misprinted " Kalur " 



302 



GENERAL INDEX 



to 



Kalus, describes Gushtasp 
Luhrasp, iv, 358 
dismissed with honour, iv, 

359 
Kamus, Turanian hero, 148, 149, 
iii, 107, 151, 152, 161, 162, 
164 seq., 168 seq., 172, 176, 
178, 181 seq., 200, 207, 
209, 213, 216, 224, 229, 
232. 235, 241, 242, 251, 
252, 256, 268, 269 ; iv, 
297 ; V, 167, 199, 220 
Story of, of Kashan, 148, iii, 
108 seq. 

Firdausi on, iii, 269 
comes to the aid of Piran, 

iii, 151 
plan of campaign of, 

adopted, iii, 162 
leads the attack, iii, 168 
hears of the coming of Rus- 

tam, iii, 175 
Rustam described by Piran 

to, iii, 183 
challenges Rustam, iii, 187 
parleys with Rustam, iii, 188 
fights, and is taken prisoner 

by, Rustam, iii, 1S9 
end of, iii, 190 
Kanabad, mountain, part of the 
Binalud range north of 
Nishapur in Khurasan. 
The name may be preserved 
in the modern Gunabad, 
a village to the north of 
that range, iv, 23, 37, 47, 
48, 51. 55. 56, 76, 88, 112 
occupied by Piran, iv, 22 
Kand. See Kaid. 
Kanda Gashasp, Iranian war- 
rior, viii, 103, 122, 163 
speech of, viii, 166 
Kandahar, city in southern 
Afghanistan, i, 286 ; iv, 
65 ; V, 233 note 
Kandake (Candace q.v., Kaidafa 

q.v.), vi, 66 
Kandaros. See Kaidrush. 
Kandaules. See Kaidrush. 
Kand-i-Shapiir. See Gund-i- 
Shapiir. 



Kangha (Kharazm q.v.), country, 
ii, 189, 190 

Kangde? (Gang-dizh q.v.), 

stronghold, ii, 189, 190 

Kanir. See Tainush. 

Kannuj (Kanauj), city near the 
west bank of the Ganges 
in the division of Agra in 
the United Provinces of 
British India, i, 261, 357 ; 
iii, 35 ; iv, 278, 283, 284 ; 
V, 257 ; vi, 64, 207, 352 ; 
vii, 115, 119, 123, 128, 
129, 134, 137, 3''^5, 3^^. 
390. 393. 425 
conquest of, by Mahmud, 
i, 99, 100 and note. 

113 

Sikandar reaches, vi, no 

river of, vii, 112 and note, 
390 

monarch of = Shangul, vii, 
140 

Bahram Gur appointed heir 
to, vii, 143 
Karabagh (Arran), district north 
of the Aras, i, 9 

seat of primitive Fire-wor- 
ship, i, 56 
Karakh-Maishan, town built on 

the lower Tigris by Ardshir 
Papakan, vi, 199, 291 
noie 
Karan, son of Kawa, franian 
hero and the mythical 
progenitor of a family 
famous in Ashkanian 
times, 141, i, 207, 211, 214 
seq., 344. 345. 3^5 ; ". 
II seq., 18, 22, 119 ; iii. 
9; iv, 14G ; vi, 194; 
viii, 168 ; ix, 85 

takes the Castle of the 
Alans, i, 223 seq. 

reports his success to Mini'i- 
chihr, i, 225 

commands Naudar's host, 

i. 345 

tells of his encounter with 

Afrasiyab, i, 350 

counsels Naudar, i, 353 



GENERAL IXlJliX 



3"3 



Karan, son of Kawa, with 
Shidi'ish and Kishwad, pur- 
sues Kurakhan, i, 354 
defeats and slays BdrniAn, 

i. 354 
defeats Wisa, i, 357 
meets and defeats Shama- 

sis, i. 361 
bears to Zav the news of 

his election as Shah, i, 

370 
re-appearance of, in legend, 

iv, 135, 146 
made champion of the host, 

iv 149 
sent by Kai Khusrau to 

welcome Shi'da, iv, 165 
bears Kai Khusrau's answer 

to Shida, iv, 168 
opposes and defeats Jahn, 

iv, 178 
family, of, vii, 171 

glorification of, vii, 170 
origin of, vii, . 185 
rivalry of, with Mihran, 
vii, 185 

Karan, mountain, the name 
given from the above 
hero to part of the Al- 
burz range which lies 
between Mount Dami- 
wand and Amul and 
formed his principality, 
and that of his descend- 
ants as late as and after 
the Muhammadan con- 
quest, V, 112 

Karan, Iranian chief, tonp. Yaz- 
dagird, son of Shapiir and 
Bahram Gur, vi, 394 ; 
vii, 86, 90 

Karan, mountain-chief, viii, 
189 

Karap (Karpan), v, 17 
meaning of, v, 14 

Kara su, river, v, 14 

Karaz, viii, 252 and note. 

Kargascirs, a wild tribe, i, 253 
and note, 277, 279, 286, 
290, 294, 298, 319, 340 ; 
ii, 98; iii, 318 



KarimAn. Iranian hert) and groat- 
great-grandfather of Kus- 
tam, ii, 4, i_'5and note, 
V, 202 

KdristAn, viii, 188 

Karkh, suburb of Baghdad, iv, 
147 ; ix, 85 
Arab defeat at, ix, 85 

Karkh = Khurram Ab4d (?), vi, 

3-'7 
Karkwi {cf. Kakwi), a descend- 
ant of Zahhak, i, 290 
attacks Sam, i, 290 
slain by Sam, i, 291 
Karma'il and Irma'il, Zahhak 's 
cooks, 140 
device of, i, 146 
Karnamak - i - Ardshir - i - 
Pipakan, Pahlavi text, 
vi, 14 note, 61, 198, 301, 
325 ; vii, 380 
account of, vi, 195 
resembles Yatkar-i-Zari- 

ran, vi, 196 
purport of, vi, 196 
portion of Shahnama cor- 
responding with, vi, 196 
compared with, vi, 200 
seq., 205 seq., 255 seq. 
Firdausi and, vi, 196 
polo episode in, vi, 196 
Karnapr.ivaram :s, vi, 80 
Karpan (Karap q.v.), v, 14 
Karsan, viii, 188, 232 

gates of, shut against Khus- 
rau Parwi'z, viii, 252 
walls of, fall down, viii, 253 
Khusrau Parwiz stays at, 
viii, 253 
Karshipta, mythical bird, i, 235 
Karsiyun, Turanian hero, iv, 10 
Karun, mountain. See Karan. 
Kariin, river joining the Shat al 
Arab at its delta, vi, igg 
note 

dam on, vi, 295 
Kdsa rud (Kashaf q.v.), river, 
147, iii, 28, 68, 69, 71. 72. 
82, 105 ; iv, 90 
barricade at the, iii, 29 
bi^rnt by Civ, iii, 73 



304 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kashaf (Kasa riid q.v.), river in 
north-eastern Khurasan, 
i, 235, 296 
story of the dragon of, i, 296 
seq. 

Kashan (Kasan, town in Farg- 
hana, north of the Jax- 
artcs ?), iii, 108, 151, 170, 
177, 180, 181, 188, 192, 
204, 207, 224, 237, 242 ; 
iv, 189 ; V, 39 ; vii, 331, 

334 
Kamiis of, Story of, 14S, iii 

108 seq. 
in Turan, iii, 108 
in fran, iii, 109 
man of=Kamus, iii, 189 
Kashan, city between Ispahan 

and Kum, iii, 109 
Kashmar. See Kishmar. 
Kashmigan, son of Farrukhzad, 

ix, 92 
Kashmihan, place north-east of 
Marv, vii, 89 
Bahram Gur's victory at, 

vii, 90 
Siifarai's victory at, vii, 170 
note, 176 
Kashmir, country, i, 113 ; ii, 271, 
338 ; iii, 35. 152,237,251 ; 
iv, 14, 60, 65 ; V, 263 ; 

vii, 395, 396, 421 
king of, vi, 31 
monarch of, entertained by 
Bahram Giir, vii, 140 seq. 

Kastantaniya (Constantinople), 
viii, 265 

Kastarit. See Kyaxares. 

Kaswin. See Kazwin. 

Kat (Ivath), one of the two 
capitals of Kharazm 
(Gurganj being the other) 
situated on the right 
bank of the Oxus, iii, 152 

Katayi'in (Nahid), daughter of 
Caesar, wife of Gushtasp, 
and mother of Asfandiyar, 
154. I5^K ii, 3 ; iv, 34^ ; 
V, II, 253 
referred to, i, 55 ; v, 205, 
249. 252 



Katayun, eldest daughter of 
Caesar, iv, 348 
Story of, 154, iv, 329. seq 
marriage of, iv, 329 seq. 
dreams of Gushtasp, iv, 329 
sees and chooses Gushtasp 
for her husband, iv, 330 
marries Gushtasp, iv, 331 
sells a jewel, iv, 332 
discovers that Gushtasp is 

of royal race, iv, 340 
persuades Gushtasp to go 
to the Sports on Caesar's 
riding-ground, iv, 349 
Caesar reproached by Gush- 
tasp for his unkindness to, 
iv, 350 
reconciled to Caesar, iv, 351 
referred to, iv, 358 
receives gifts from Caesar, iv, 

363 

goes to Iran with Gush- 
tasp, iv, 364 

sons of, v, 32 

counsels Asfandiyar, v, 168, 

175 
ancestry of, v, 205 
Asfandiyar's last message 

to, v, 249 
laments over Asfandiyar, v, 

252 

consoled by Bishiitan, v, 255 

Katib, Arab chief, vi, 21, 65, 120 

Katmara, Iranian hero, iv, 92 

put in command of the right 

wing, iv, 92 

Kaus, Shah. See Kai Kaus. 

brand-mark of, iii, 291 
Kaus, son of Shah Kubad, vii, 

316 
Kavarazem (Gurazm q.v.), v, 12 
Kavi (Kai), ii, 8 
Usa, ii, 25 
Kavi (Kavig), v, 14 
Kavig (Kavi), v, 17 
meaning of, v, 14 
Kavi Husravah (Kai Khusrau 

q. v.), iv, 137, 138 
Kdvya Ushana (Kai Kaus, q. v.) 

ii, 25 
Kavyan (Kaian), ii, 3 



GENERAL INDEX 



3^5 



Kawa, the smith, 140, i, 155 seq., 
207, 214 ; iv, 165, 178 ; 
vii, 185 ; viii, 72 ; ix, 30 

Zahh4kand, Story of, 140, i, 
154 seq. 

revolts and goes to Faridun, 

i. 157 
leads I'aridun's van, i, 160 
flag of, i, 143, 160. 211, 217, 

218, 237, 332 ; ii, 12, 227, 

341. 349. 354. 400, 402, 
405, 406, 410 ; iii, 25, 38, 
39, 48, 84, 85, 116, 121, 
126, 129, 135 seq., 149. 
161 ; iv, 24, 25, 34, 55, 
59, 92, 112, 146, 180, 226, 
243, 282, 292, 359 ; vi, 
347 ; vii, 250 ; viii, 385 ; 
ix, 30, 67 
origin of, i, 157 
Bizhan's prowess with, iii, 

93 

half of, taken by Piran, 
iii, 94 

staff of, cloven by Piilad- 

wand, iii, 258 

Tiis confirmed in charge 

of, by Kai Khusrau, iv, 
300 

rescued by Gira.mi,v, 59,69 
Kawian, standard, i, 211 
Kazirim, town west of Shiraz, vi, 

199 
Kazwi'n, city north-west of Tih- 

ran, v, 30 
Kerdtor. See Tainiish. 
Keresasp, Keresaspa, Iranian 

hero, i, 234, 235, 373 ; ii, 4 
account of, in the Zanda- 

vasta, i, 172 
later development of, i, 174 
Kcresavasda (Garsiwaz q.v.), ii, 

1S9 ; iv, 137 
Khalaj (Kharlikh), a Turkish 

tribe dwelling north of the 

Jaxartcs and cast of 

Tdshkand, vii, 92 
Khalid, famous Arab general 

temp. Muhammad, v, I2 
begins hostilities against 

Persian Empire, ix, 66 

VOL. IX. 



Khdlid, recalled to lead Syrian 
campaign, iv, 66 

Khallukh (c/. Khalaj), iv, 10, 
156; v. 42, 44, 55. 61, 74, 
90, 107, 112, 157, 242, 255 

Khdn of Chin, the, temp. Kai 
Kai'is, ii, 383 
temp. Kai Khusrau, 148, 149, 
iii, 108, 160 seq., 164 seq., 
172, 175 seq., 181, 184, 
1S7, igoseq., 196, igSseq., 
205, 207 seq., 215, 217, 221 
222, 226 seq., 235, 241, 
242, 251, 252, 256, 268, 
320 ; iv, 60, 135, 2385^5. ; 
V, 199, 220 

Khan of Chin = Arj asp, v, 47, 51, 

72 

temp. Sikandar, ambassadors 

from, come to Dara, vi, 35 

temp. Bahram Gur, 165, vii, 

49, 91. 93. 97. loi, I" 
invades Iran, vii, 84 
responds graciously to the 
franians' embassage, vii, 
88 
gives himself up to pleasure 

at Marv, vii, 88 
fate of, in war A^ith Bahram 

Giir, vii, 5, 90 
crown of, placed in a Fire- 
temple, vii, 95 
Khushnawaz, son of, vii, 

165 
temp. Nushirwan, 16S, vii, 1S6, 
328 seq. ; viii, 43, 52, 87, 
89, 97 5^^. 
daughter of, married to 
Nushirwan, 16S, vii, 213, 

357 
historically ruler of the 

Turks, vii, 317 
relations of, with Nushir- 

wdn, vii, 88 

the Haitalians, vii, 317, 

328 seq. 
embassy of, to Niishirwdn, 

vii, 329 
hears of the destruction of 

his embassy by the Hai- 

tdlians, vii, 330 

u 



3o6 



GENERAL INDEX 



Khan of Chin, leads forth his 
troops, vii, 330 
defeats the Haitahans, vii, 

332 
Nushirwan takes counsel 

about, vii, 333, 334 
descent of, from Afrasiyab 

and Arjasp, vii, 334, 
Nushirwan writes to, vii, 

337 
purposes to invade Iran, vii, 

337 

hears of Nushirwan's ad- 
vance, vii, 338 

takes counsel, vii, 338 

sends embassy to Nushir- 
wan, vii, 339 

hears his envoy's account 
of Nushirwan, vii, 344 

offers to make affinity with 
Nushirwan, vii, 345 

attempts to outwit Nushir- 
wan, vii, 351 

gives audience to Mihran 
Sitad, vii, 351 

invites Mihran Sitad to 
choose a wife for Nushir- 
wan, vii, 352 

consults the astrologers, vii, 

354 
entrusts his daughter to 

Mihran Sitad, vii, 354 
gives presents to Mihran 

Sitad, vii, 356 
parts with his daughter at 

the Jihiin, vii, 356 
daughter of, 16S 

described, vii, 352, 357 
evacuates territory, vii, 

358 
Khan of Chin {see too Parmuda), 
temp, Hurmuzd, Khusrau 
I'arwiz, and Yazdagird, 
171. 173, viii, 141 seq., 
190, lyi, 204, 215, 220, 
263 seq., 306, 316 seq., 
342 seq., 346 seq., 351, 

352. 356, 357. 3(>3 ; ix, 
87, 102 
supposed war of, with Hur- 
muzd, viii, 72 



Khan of Chin, marriage of 
daughter of, with Nushir- 
wan referred to, viii, 72 
letter of, viii, 77 
dismissed by Hurmuzd with 

gifts, viii, 152 
refuses advances of Bahram 

Chiibiiia, viii, 153 
becomes friends with Bah- 
ram Chubina, viii, 172 
brother of, 173, viii, 190, 191 
reports flight of Curdya, 

viii, 351 
ordered to go in puisuit, 

viii, 331 
parley of, with Giirdya, 
viii, 3.52 
daughter of, viii, 190 

killed by lion-ape, 173, 
viii, 322, 324 
queen of, viii, 190 

asks Bahram Chubina to 
avenge her daughter, viii, 

324 
disgraced, viii, 344 

welcomes Bahram Chubina, 
viii, 316 

swears friendship with Bah- 
ram Chubina, viii, 317 

dominated by Makatiira, 
viii, 317 

advised by Bahram Chubina 
to slight Makatiira, viii, 
318 

views fight between Bahram 
Chubina and Makatiira, 
viii, 320 

sends gifts to Bahram Chu- 
bina, viii, 321 

refuses to give up Bahram 
Chubina, viii, 329 
distrust Bahr4m Chu- 
bina, viii, 334 

impress of seal of, obtained 
by Kharrad, viii, 338 

burns Kuliin's kindred, viii, 

334 
seeks in vain for Ivharrad, 

viii, 344 
mourns for P.ahram Chu- 
bina, viii, 344 



GENERAL ISDEX 



307 



Khan of Chin, brother of, 77J 
= Bizhan, ix, 97 

Kh^nagf, Ruman noble, viii, 375, 

378 

leads Cajsar's embassy to 

Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 374 

Khusrau Parwiz' gifts to, 

viii, 382 
returns to Rum, viii, 382 

Khin-i-lrman (Arman q.v.), iii, 
290 

Khanjast (Chijast, Urumiah), 
lake in Azarbaijan, iv, 
136, 2O4 ; viii, 282 

Khar (Khuvar) of Rai, district 
and town (now Aradun), 
so called to distinguish 
it from a town of the same 
name in Pars, situated 
south-east of Tihran, i, 
368, 374, 381 

Kharazm (Khiva), country, ii, 
189, 190 ; iv, II, 12, 15, 
60, 61, 72, 137, 173, 186, 
287 ; vi, 72 ; vii, 238, 

359 
Kharazmians, people, ii, 190 ; 

vi, 72 
Kharijites, Muhammadan sect, i, 

13 
Kharrad, Iranian hero, i, 365 ; 

ii. II, 22, 33, 73, 340; 

iii, 115. 127, 139, 211, 

273, 289 ; iv, 15 
Kharrad, nonce name assumed 

by Asfandiydr, v, 146, 

140 
Kharrad, temp. Ardshir Papa- 
kdn, Iranian warrior, 161, 
vi, 284 
takes Ardawcin prisoner, vi, 
228 
temp. Bahrim Gur, frdnian 

chief, vii, 85 
temp. Kubid son of Piruz, 

archimage, vii, 207 
temp. Nushirwin = (?) the 
above, vii, 251 
Kharrad. sacred Fire, vi, 212 

and note, 226, 391 
Kharrad. bower of, vii, 83 



Kharrad, son of Barzin (Hur- 

muzd Gan'ibzin or Galab- 

zin), iyi-iy3, viii, 74, 76, 

iSSseq., 205, 225, 257 seq.. 

269, 270, 331 scq., 381 ; 

ix, 4, II, 12, 24 
sent by Hurmuzd as envoy 

to S4wa, viii, no 
beguiles S4wa and flees, viii, 

III 
flight of, reported to Sawa, 

viii, 112 
counsels Bahram Chubina, 

viii, 121 
seeks, refuge, viii, 123 
counts Iranian slain, viii, 

127 
blames and counsels Bahram 

Chubina for his behaviour 

to Parmuda, viii, 144, 

146 
questions Bahram Chubina 

on his adventure with the 

onrger, viii, 15S 
flees from Balkk with arch- 
scribe, viii, 159 
makes report of Bahram 

Chubina to Hurmuzd, viii, 

160 
real name of, viii, 190 
waits on Khusrau Parwiz, 

viii, 252 
speech of, to Caesar, viii, 259, 

275 
masters Caesar's talismans, 

viii, 274, 275 
Ca^sar's gift to, viii, 278 
praised by Ca\sar, viii, 279 
made chief minister, viii, 314 
speech of, to Khcin, viii, 332 
attempts to prejudice Bah- 
ram Chubina to the Kh^n, 

viii, 333 
intrigues against BahrAm 

Chubina, viii, 334 secj. 
cures daughter of queen of 

Chin, viii, 336 
incites Kulun to kill Bahram 

Chubina, viii, 337 
asks boon of queen of Chin, 

viii, 33'"^ 



3o8 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kharrad, returns to fran and is 
rewarded, viii, 345 
reads out Caesar's letter to 
Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 376 
end of, ix, 4 

chosen to visit Khusrau 

Parwiz at Taisafun, ix, 9 

Ashtad and, parley with 

Galiniish, ix, 1 1 

visit Khusrau Parwiz, ix, 

12 
report to Shirwi, ix, 27 
Kharrad, franian general, de- 
feats Khazars, viii, 96 
Kharrad, father of Hurmuzd, ix, 

102 
Khashash, Turanian hero, v, 47 
made leader of the van, v, 
46 
Khata (Cathay), northern China, 

ii. 357 

Khatlan (Khuttal), a general 
name for the non-Muham- 
madan regions to the 
north and east of Khura- 
san ( = Haital ) , more 
specifically a district on 
the right bank of the 
upper Oxus west of, or 
forming part of, Badakh- 
shan, iii, 218, 228 ; iv, 
65 ; vii, 94, 331, 359 

Khatun, consort of the Khan of 
Chin, vii, 5 
fate of, in war with Bahram 
Giir, vii, 5 

Khawar, the West or Khura- 
san ( ? ) , perhaps = Khar 
q.v., iv, 147, 148. Cf. 
Karan (mountain). 

Khazar, Khazars, region and 
people north of the Cau< 
casus, i, 1 7 ; ii, 285 ; iv, 
71.316, 352 55^., 358, 361 ; 
vii, 83, 214, 224 ; viii, 

94. 377. 379 
invasion of, viii, 72, 93 
defeated, viii, 96 
Khazarwan, Turanian hero, 142 
Shamasas and, invade Zabu- 
listan, i, 345, 358 



Khazarwan parleyed with by 

Mihrab to gain time, i, 

358 
slain by Zal, i, 360 ; ii, 18 
Khazarwan, temp. Bahram Giir, 

king of Gilan, vii, 85 
takes the Khan prisoner, 

vii, 90 
Khazarwan, franian noble, temp. 

Khusrau Parwiz, speech 

of, viii, 241 
Khazra, treasure, viii, 406 and 

note 
Khilafat, the, i, 12 seq. 
Khil'at, robe of honour, i, 82 
Khir, place on the south-western 

shore of Lake Niris in 

Pars, vi, 198 
Khisr (Al Khidr, q.v.), chief and 

prophet, vi, 159 
goes with Sikandar to the 

Gloom, vi, 159 
parts company with Sikan- 
dar, vi, 160 
finds the Fount of Life, vi, 

160 
Khiva (Kharazm), country, ii, 

190 
Khorasan. See Khurasan. 
Khshathro-saoka (Gang-dizh ?), 

stronghold, ii, 189, 190 
Khudai-n4ma (Bastan-Nama), i, 

66 ; V, 24 
Khurasan, province in north- 
eastern fran, iy6, ii, 399 ; 

iv, 148, 203 ; V, 28, 77 ; 

vi, 242, 301 ; vii, loo, 

214, 224, 237, 335 ; viii, 

78, 94, 241, 313, 355, 369; 

ix, 59, 69, 87, 88, 92 
Narsi made ruler of, vii, 

99 
governor of, viii, 75 
prince of, viii, 173 
Maliwi becomes master of, 
ix, 114 
Khurasan, chieftain, viii, 241 

speech of, viii, 240 
Khurasani. See IMakh. 
Khurdad, amcshaspenta, i, 88 ; 
iii, 287, 328 



GENERAL INDEX 



309 



Khiirdad, month and day, i, 88, 

I5() ; vii. 11^, 225, 351 ; 

viii. J 5. 173 
Khurm, seat of an oracle, vi, 82 
UR-aning of, \-i, Sj 
oracle of, consulted, vi, 184 
Khurra-i-Ardshir. See Ardshir 

Iv hurra. 
Khurram Abad (Karkh ?), city, 

vi, 327, 357 and note 
Khurshi'd, genius and day, i, 88 ; 

V, 92 note 
Khurshid, Iranian chief, viii, 

270, 296 
Khushnawaz, ruler of the Haita- 

lians, 166, vii, 194, 198, 

359 ; viii, 75, 168, 242, 

245. ^67 
Piruz advances against, vii, 

164 
writes to Piruz, vii, 165 
appeals to Bahram Giir's 

treaty, vii, 166 
prayer of, to God, vii, 167 
digs a trench, vii, 67 
defeats Piruz by a feint, vii, 

168 
correspondence of, with 

Siifarai, vii, 174 seq. 
defeated by Siifarai, vii, 

177 
takes refuge in Kuhandizh, 

vii, 177 
sues for peace, vii, 178 
releases Kubad, Ardshir, and 

other captives, and gives 

up the spoil, vii, 180 
Khusrau, Shah. See Kai Khus- 

rau. 
Khusrau, Iranian noble, 163, 

164, vi, 408 
elected Shah in succession 

to Yazdagird son of Shi- 
pur, vi, 395 ; vii, 1 1 
proposes that Bahrcim Gur 

shall begin the ordeal, vi, 

409 
does homage to BahrAm Giir, 

vi, 410 
honoured by Bahram Cair, 

vii. 10 



Khusrau, father of Khazarwan, 
viii, 241, 29O (?) 

Khusrau Parwiz, son of Hur- 
muzd, Shdh, iyi-175, v, 
294, 306 note ; vi, 3 ; viii, 
71, 74, 170, 173, 174, i8i, 
182, 191 seq., 216, 304, 
306, 316, 334, 335. 342. 
358. 367 seq., 395 note, 
413 note ; ix, 4 seq., 1 1, 
12, 25, 26 note, 30, 31, 33 
seq., 38 seq., 45 seq. 
horse of, story of, viii, 91 
Hurmuzd plots to kill, viii. 

174 
flees, viii, 175 
adherents gather round, 

viii, 175 

swear fealty to, viii, 176 
goes to Baghdad, viii, 184 
visits Hurmuzd in prison, 

viii, 185, 198, 230 
extensive historical con- 
quests of, viii, 187 
materials for reign of, in 

Shahnama, viii, 187 
flight of, historical, from 

Ctesiphon, viii, 188 
affects Christianity in exile, 

viii, 188 
helped on terms by Emperor 

Maurice, viii, 188 
historical campaign of, 

against Bahrim Chvibina, 

viii, 189 
visits of, to Fire-temple at 

Shiz, viii, 190, 283, 307, 

312 
Nu'man bin Munzir exe- 
cuted by, viii, 190 
triumphal arch of, viii, 

192 
Assurbanipal and, reigns of, 

compared, viii, 193 
fall of, historical account of, 

viii, 193 seq. 
attempts of Heraclius to 

make peace with, viii, 194, 

195 
treatment of defeated gen- 
erals by, viii, i<)4 






3IO 



GENERAL INDEX 



Khusrau Parwiz, prediction con- 
cerning, viii, 194 
Reign of, 796, viii, 186 seq. 

Note on, viii, 186 seq. 
Hurmuzd's requests to, viii, 

1 99 
spies' report of Bahrain 

Chubina to, viii, 201 
takes counsel, viii, 202 
marches to meet Bahram 

Chubina, viii, 203 
interview of, with Bahram 

Chubina, viii, 204 seq. 
attacked by Turk and saved 

by Gustaham, viii, 220 
dissuaded from making a 

night-attack, viii, 224 
troops of, tampered with by 

Bahram Chubina, viii, 

226 
sends away his baggage, 

viii, 228 
combat of, with Bahram 

Chubina, viii, 228, 229 
retreats to, and holds, the 

bridge of Nahrawan, viii, 

228 
worsts Yalan-sina, viii, 229 
flees to Taisafiin, viii, 229 
counselled by Hurmuzd, 

viii, 230 
prepares to flee, viii, 231 
takes refuge in a shrine, 

viii, 233 
arrives at Babil, viii, 249 
entertained by Kais, viii, 250 

Mihran Sitad, viii, 251 
town of Karsan and, viii, 

252 
interview of, with Hermit, 

viii, 254 
warned against Gustaham, 

viii, 255, 256 
welcomed by Caesar, viii, 

257 
takes up his abode at 

Warigh, viii, 257 
instructs his embassy to 

Cassar, viii, 257 
Caesar offers daughter to, 

viii, 266 



Khusrau Parwiz, accepts Casar's 

offer, viii, 269, 270 
welcomes Niyatiis and 

Waryam, viii, 280 
marches to Diik, viii, 282 
Mausii anil, viii, 283 
returns to Duk, viii, 284 
Dara Panah goes over to, 

viii, 286 
forges letter to Bahram 

Chubina, viii, 286 
sends corpse of Kut to 

Csesar, viii, 291 
decides to fight without 

Ruman help, viii, 292, 293 
arrays his host, viii, 293 
resolves to fight in person, 

viii, 295 
bodyguard of, viii, 296 
leaves Bahram in charge of 

host, viii, 296 
flees from Bahram Chubina, 

viii, 298 
saved by Suriish, viii, 299 
returns to Niyatiis and 

Maryam, viii, 299 
suspected of Christian ten- 
dencies, viii, 308 
gives banquet to Niyatiis 

and Riimans, viii, 309 
restores captured cities to 

I^iim, viii, 312 
makes Ivharrad, son of Bar- 

zin, chief minister, viii, 

314 

proclamation of, viii, 314 

demands extradition of Bah- 
ram Chubina, viii, 328 

advised to send envoy to 
Khan, viii, 329 

resolves to put Bandwi to 
death, viii, 354 

summons Gustaham, viii, 

355 

hears of Gurdya's doings, 
viii, 356, 358 

writes to Gurdya viii, 359 

hears of the death of Gusta- 
ham, viii, 362 

welcomes Gurdya to court, 
viii, 362 



GENERA f. rXDF.X 



3TT 



Kliusraii Parwiz, Giinlya (Iri'sses 
up to please, viii. 303 

warned by Shirin against 
(iiinlya, \iii, 304 

makes Cjiialya overseer of 
royal bower, viii, 364 

oppresses Rai, viii, 365 

relieves Rai, viii, 368 

organizes the realm, viii, 3G9 
seq. 

puts to death adherent? of 
Bandwi and Ciustaham, 
viii, 370 

consults astrologers on birth 
of Shirwi, viii, 372 

grieved at Shirwi's horo- 
scope, viii, 372 

consults the high priest, 
viii, 372 

writes to Caesar, viii, 373 

Caesar's embassy to, viii, 

374 
gives Caisar's gifts to Shi'rwi, 

viii, 381 

presents to Khanagi, viii, 

3S2 
and Shirin, ix, 7 

Story of, 174, viii, 382 seq. 
equipage of, for the chase, 

viii, 384 
married to Shirin, viii, 386 
justifies his marriage, viii, 

388 
gives gilded chamber to 

Shirin, viii, 389 
displeasured with Shirwi, 

viii, 390 
and throne of Takdis, viii, 

391 seq. 
palace of, story of, viii, 400 

seq. 
Farghan and, viii, 401 seq. 
imprisons Riiman artificers, 

viii, 402 
releases Riiman artificers, 

viii, 403 
treasures of, viii, 406 
Guraz intrigues against, viii, 

408 
device of, against Gurdz and 

Caesar, viii, 409 



Khusrau Parwiz, sends Farrukh- 
zad to the host, viii, 

hears Kubad proclaimed 

Shah, viii, 416 
arms and hides in ganlen, 

viii, 417 
palace of, plundered viii, 

418 
discovered, viii, 419 
holds talk with Farrukhzad, 

viii, 420 
recalls former presage, viii, 

420 
imprisom-d, viii, 421 
duration of reign of, viii, 

421 , 

charges against, ix, 4, 5, 9, 

10 
reply of, to charges, ix, 5, 

14 seq. 
Haram of, ix, 4, 5 
last days of, Theophanes' 

account of, ix, 6 
Shirwi's treatment of, ix, 7 
sons of, executed, ix, 7, 35 
imprisoned at Taisafiin, ix, 

9 
companioned by Shirin, ix, 

29 
Barbad visits, ix, 29 

laments over, ix, 30 

steed of, ix, 30 
son of, ix, 31 

referred to, ix, 33 and tiote 
kingdom of Hira abolished 

by, ix, 66 
Muhammad's letter to, ix, 

66 
Khusrau and Shirin, Persian 

poem, viii, 192 
Khusrau, father of Piruz, 175, 

vii, 44, 46, 48, 49, 51, 57 
Khusrau, a miller, ij6, ix, 99. 

See Miller. 
Khutan, town and district in 

eastern Turkistan, 146, 

ISO, ii, 277, 288, 325, 357, 

383 ; iii, 107. 242, 247 ; 

iv, 26, 219 ; vii, 84, 115, 

330. 334. 35'J 



31^ 



GENERAL INDEX 



Khutan, raided by Giv, iii, 247 
monarch of, iv, 1 1 

Afrasiyab, iv, 230 
Kai Khusrau marches 

through, iv, 240 
people of, make submission 
to Nushirwan, vii, 360 
Khuza' Arab tribe, vi, 63 

rule of, ended by Sikandar, 
vi, 120 
Khuzan, a king of Pars, iv, 146, 
191 
meets Kai Khusrau in 
Sughd, iv, 255 
Khiizians, people of Khuzistan, 

q.v., iv, 146 
Khuzistan (Susiana, 'Arabistan), 
province at the head of 
the Persian Gulf, vi, 290 
and note, 298, 327, 357 ; 
viii, 109 and note, 193 
annexed by Arabs, ix, 68 
Khuzra, treasure, ix, 20 
Khvaituk-das, i, 60 

Catullus on, i, 60 
Khyons (Hvyaonas), v, 13, 25 
Kibchak, region east of the Jax- 
ates and north of Tash- 
kand, iv, 254 ; ix, 93 
Kibtfs, vi, 397 and note 
Kimak, a river in Kibchak, iv, 

203, 231 
Kimmerians, the, i, 17 
Kinam-i-Asiran, near to, or iden- 
tical with, the ruins of 
Shiis (Siis, Susa), vi, 327, 
357 and note 
King, the ideal, iii, 16 

of kings, title of, vi, 193, 197 
meaning of, in Achae- 
menian and Parthian 

times, vi, 198 
assumed by Ardshir Papa- 
kan, vi, 193, 199, 254, 
258, 273 
of the Commons, vii, 3 
piece in chess, vii, 382, 385 
position of, vii, 388, 422 
check to, vi', 422 
mate to, vii, 423 
piece in nard, vii, 382, 389 



Kings, Book of, Firdausi's, i, 43 
i IVrsian, viii, 73 

Tribal. See Tribal. 
Kirman, region in southern Iran, 
15S, iv, 146 ; vi, 31, 47, 
57. 59. 199. 202, 205, 245, 
252 ; vii, 214 ; viii, 313 
Dara retires to, vi, 46 
etymology of, vi, 204, 236 
Ardshir Papakan's invasion 
of, vi, 205, 245 
Kirmanshah, title, vi, 313, 368 
Kirmanshah, city between Bagh- 
dad and Hamadan, vii, 
187 ; viii, 192 
Kirmanshahan, city in Kirman, 

south of Yazd, vi, 368 
Kirwan (Karwan, district north 

of Jaxartes ?), ix, 93 
Kirwi, Iranian noble, vii, 23 

story of, vii, 22 
Kishmar, plape south of Nisha- 
pur in the Kuhistan dis- 
trict of Khurasan, v, 35 
Cypress of, v, 27 
account of, v, 28, 34 
Gushtasp and, v, 34 
Kishwad, Iranian hero, father 
of Gudarz, 151, i, 207, 

344. 365 ; ii. 4. II. 12, 
18,22, 33, 70, 73, 107, 112, 
138. 318, 384, 399, 404, 
409 ; iii, 19, 24, 33, 45, 
100, 121, 123, 126, 143, 
154, 187, 215, 289, 302, 
305. 308, 311, 327, 339; 
iv, 20, 32, 35, 63, 147, 
174, 180, 263, 294, 310, 
360, viii, 104 
Karan, Shidiish, and, pursue 

Kurukhan, i, 354 
sent by Zal to release the 
Iranian captives, i, 367 

Kishwaristan, Iranian hero, iv, 
148 
commands the troops from 
Barbaristan and Rum, iv, 
148 

Kisra, Shah, 166. See Nushir- 
wan. 

Kitradad, Nask, i, 373 



GENERAL INDEX 



3^5 



Knathaiti, Pairika, female per- 
sonification of idolatry, i, 
172 

Kobad, Shah. See Kubad. 

Ktesias, Greek historian (5th 

century B.C.), vi, 13, 68 

legend of Cyrus in, ii, 9 ; vi, 

195 

Gutschmid on, vi, 195 
account of Scmiramis in, v, 

293 

Persica of, v, 293 
Kubad, Iranian hero, brother of 
Karan, 142, i, 207 

acts as Minuchihr's scout, i, 
217 

parleys with Tiir, i, 217 

accepts Barman's challenge 
to single combat, i, 347 

dissuaded by Karan, i, 347 

reply of, i, 347 

fights and is slain, i, 348 
Kubad, Shah. See Kai Kubad. 
Kubad, son of Piriiz and father 
of Nushirwan, Sh4h (Ko- 
bad), 166, vi, 3, 208 ; 
vii, 179 seq. and note, 226, 
247 ; viii, 25, 46, 72. 168, 
169. 245, 265, 285, 312, 
369 ; ix, 22, 25 

captivity of, among the 
Haitalians, vii, 160 

leads the rearguard in the 
war with the Turkmans 
(Haitalians), vii, 164 

taken prisoner, vii, 168 

released, vii, 180 

made Shah instead of Bal- 
ash, vii, 182, 188 

Reign of, 166, vii, 183 seq. 
Note on, vii, 183 seq. 
historical sketch of, vii, 

183 
title of, viii, 183 and note 
reform of taxation by, vii, 

183 note, 215 
with the help of Shdpur of 

Kai overthrows and puts 

Sufarai to death, vii, 191 

seq. 
dethroned, vii, 184, 195 



Kub4d, imprisoned, vii, 184 

escapes, vii, 184, 197 

marriage of, vii, 1S4, 1S6, 
198 

gives his wife a signet-ring, 
vii, 198 

cedes Chaghdn to the Hai- 
talians in return for their 
help, vii, 198 

goes to Ahwaz, vii, 19S 

hears of the birth of Nushir- 
wan, vii, 199 

marches on Taisafun, vii, 
199 

pardons the Iranians and 
Jamasp, vii, 200 

makes Rizmihr chief minis- 
ter, vii, 200 

wars of, with Riim, vii, 187, 
200 

takes cities from Rum, vii, 
200 

makes his capital at Ma- 
da'in, vii, 201 

builds a city and hospital, 
vii, 20 1 

drought in reign of, vii, 201 

Mazdak and, vii, 1S4, 201 
seq. 

Mazdak's parable to, vii, 
201 

converted by Mazdak, vii, 
184, 204 

presides over the disputa- 
tion between Nushirwan 
and Mazdak, vii, 207 

gives judgment against Maz- 
dak, vii, 208 

hands over Mazdak and 
his followers to Nushir- 
wan, vii, 208 

repentence of, vii, 209 

testament of, vii, 210, 316 

age of, vii, 210 

death of, vii, 210 

sons of, vii, 316 
Kubdd (Shirwi q.v.), son of Khus- 
rau Parsviz and Maryam, 
Sh4h, lys, viii, 190, 196 ; 
ix, 3 seq., 9, 11, 12, 14, 24, 
3^. 47. (^4 



314 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kubad (Shi'rwi'), secret and public 

names of, viii, 371, /|i6 
proclaimed Shah, viii, 416 
imprisons i\liusr,ui Parwiz, 

viii, 421 
accedes to throne, viii, 421 
Reign of, 175, ix, 3 

Note on, ix, 3 

tragic, ix, 3 

pestilence during, ix, 3 
boorishness of, ix, 3 
difficult situation of, ix, 3 
reproached by his sisters, ix, 

7 

Kubad, son of Jam son of Kubad, 
vii, 316 
plot to make, Si\ah, vii, 316 

Kubard, Turanian hero, iv, 190 
commands the left, iv, 190 

Kiich, tribe or town (Kuk ?) in 
Kirman, ii, 226 

Kufa, city west of the Euphrates 
and in the neighbourhood of 
Mashad 'AU (Nedjef), viii, 
190 ; ix, 68, 69 
wood of, vi, 381 
founded by Sa'ad, ix, 67 

Kiih, nonce name assumed by 
Human, iii, 198 

Kuhandizh (Baigand q.v.), vii, 
177 
Khiishnawaz takes refuge in, 
vii, 177 

Kuhila, Turanian hero, iv, 181 
slain by Minuchihr, iv, 181 

Kuhistan, generally a mountain- 
ous region, particularly 
that of northern Iran, 
Parthia, or of the high 
ranges further south, but 
in the Shahnama = Ma 
wara'u'n-Nahr (Transox- 
ania), ii, 199 

Kuhram, Turanian hero, 13T, ii, 

349 
chosen to fight with Barta, 
iv, 97 ; V, 29 
» slain by Barta, iv, 103 

Kuhram, brother or son of Ar- 
jksp, 156, v, 29, 58, 89 
seq., 10b seq., 112, 141, 159 



Kuhram, commands one wing of 

the host, V, 46 

in chief, v, 56 
sent by Arja;s[) to attack 

Balkh, V, 90 
troops of, storm Balkh, burn 

the Fire-temple, and slay 

Zarduhsht and the priests, 

V, 92 

stationed on the left, v, 95 
mortally wounds Farshid- 

ward, v, 95 
appointed by Arjasp to send 

away the spoil of Balkh 

in the charge of his 

younger brothers, v, loS 
commands the right, v, no 
defeated by Asfandiyar, v, 

no 
bidden to prepare for war, 

V, 151 

retreats to the Brazen Hold, 
V, 152 

mistakes Bishutan for As- 
fandiyar, v, 152 

hears the cries of the Iran- 
ian watch from the Brazen 
Hold and takes counsel 
with Andariman, v, 155 

makes for the Brazen Hold 
with his troops, v, 156 

pursued by Asfandiyar, v, 

156 
encountered and taken 
prisoner by Asfandiyar, 

V, 157 
executed, v, 15S and note 
Kujaran, city and province on 

the Persian CJulf, vi, 205, 

206, 232 
Haftwid migrates from, to 

stronghold, vi, 235 
Kulbad, Turanian hero, brother 

of Piran, 146, 131, i, 92, 

342 ; ii, 18, 264, 388 ; 

iii, 166, 177, 198, 199, 205, 

210, 222, 231, 234, 252 ; 

iv, 10, 26 
wounded by Zal, i, 361 
death and revival of, in 

legend, ii, 119 



GENERAL INDEX 



3^5 



Kiilbid, pursues Kai Khusrau, ii, 

377 *■'•'/• 
chosen to figlit with I'ari- 

burz, iv, <)7 
shiiu by Fariburz, iv, yy 
Kuluu, Turauian hero, i, 382, 387 
sent by Afrasiyab to inter- 
cept Rustam, i, 3S3 
slain by Rustam, i, 386 
Kulun, Turk in league with 

Kharrad against Bahram 

Chubina, Jyj, viii, 335 
incited by Kharrad to kill 

Bahr4m Chubina, viii, 337 
arrives at Marv by help of 

Khan's seal, viii, 339 
seeks interview with Bah- 
ram Chubina, viii, 339 
stabs Bahram Chubina, viii, 

340 
maltreated, viii, 340 
kindred of, burnt, viii, 344 
Kum, city in 'Irak 'Ajami, 

between Tihran and Ka- 

shan, ii, 399 
bestowed on Giv by Kai 

Kaus, ii, 399 

Kai Khusrau, iv, 298 
Kumar, city or cape in India, ii, 

103 and note 
Kundrav, minister of Zahhak, 

140 
mythological origin of, i, 143 
Faridiin and. Story of, 140, 

i, 164 
goes to Zahhak with tidings 

of Faridun, i, 165 
Kundur, Turanian hero, iii, 152, 

185, 210, 215, 251 ; v, 

112, 
worsted by Rustam, iii, 224 
stationed on the right, v, 94 
Kunduz (Kuhandizh, Baigand 

q.v.), iv, 151 
Afrasiydb encamps at, iv, 

151 

marches from, iv, 154 

Kur (Cyrus), river in Transcau- 
casia flowing into the 
Caspian sea, v, 13 

Kuraish, Arab tribe, vi, 65 



Kurakhdn. son of Afrasiyiib, i, 
! <>2 ; iv, 10 

counsels Afrasiyab, iii, 301 
summoned and sent with 
troops to Bukliara by 
Afrasiyiib, iv, 154 
joined by Afrasiyab, iv, 186 
defeated by (iustaham son 

of Naudar, iv, 193 
defeat of, announced to 
Afrasiyab, iv, 194 
Kurakhan, governor of Balkh, 

viii, 22 

Kuran, vi, 65 ; viii, 277 note ; 

ix, 81 aiul nule 

quoted, i, 99 ; v, 166 ; viii, 

42, 192 ; ix, 81 and note 

references to Alexander the 

Great in, vi, 15, 78, 84 
legend of Moses and the 
salt fish in, vi, 77 
Gog and Magog in, vi, 78 
Kurd, Kurds, the people of 
Kurdistan q.v., 161 , i, 9 ; 
vi, 193, 203, 257 
language, i, 64 
legend of the origin of the, 

i, 146 
Ardshir Papakan 's war with, 
in Karnamak, vi, 196, 
206, 256 

Shahuama, vi, 230 seq. 

Kurdistan, mountainous region 

north of Mesopotamia, vi, 

330 

Kurdzad, daughter of Mihrak 

q.v. 
Kuria Muria Islands, off the 
southern coast of Arabia, 
vi, 72 
Kurukhan, Turanian warrior, i, 

353 
sent by Afr4siy4b to attack 

Pars, i, i^i 
Kurus, Indian tribal race, iv, 

388 
Kus, i, 177. See Tammi'sha. 
Kiit, Ri'iman warrior, 772, viii, 

281, 289, 291 
slain by Bahram Cln'ibfna 

viii, 290 



3i6 



GENERAL INDEX 



Kiit, corpse of, sent back to 
Rumans, viii, 291 

Kutch (read Kuch q.v.), iii, 34 

Kutib, father of Husain (or 
Ha'iy) one of Firdausi's 
patrons, i, 35 ; ix, 121 

Kyaxares (Kastarit), king or 
chief and leader in the 
confederacy that over- 
threw Nineveh, i, 18 



Labarum, the, v, 306 tioie 
Ladaa (Pashan), battle of, iii, 

13 seq., 80 seq., 89 seq., 

123 ; iv, 27. 37, go, 120, 

299 
Lagus, Ptolemy son of. See 

Ptolemy. 
Lahhdk, Turanian hero, brother 

of Piran, 132, i, 92 ; ii, 

323 7wie ; iii, 90, 166, 

198 ; iv, 7, 71, 122, 125, 

133, 160, 162 
summons Piran to save 

Farangis, ii, 322 
pursues the Iranians to 

Mount Hamawan, iii, 135 
commands with Farshid- 

ward the right wing, iv, 26 
attacks the Iranians in 

flank, iv, 82 
opposed by Gurgin, iv, 83 
goes to help Piran and 

attacks Giv, iv, 85 
prowess of, iv, 86 
put in chief command with 

Farshidward, iv, 94 
Piran's instructions to, iv, 

95 ^ 
Farshidward and, hear of the 
death of Piran and the 
coming of Kai Khusrau, 
iv, 112 

lament for Piran, iv, 112 
take counsel with the host, 

iv. 113 
fight, and escape from, 
frdnian outpost, iv, 116 



Lahhak, Farshidward and, re- 
ferred to, iv, 118, 120, 126 
repose themselves, iv, 121 
corpses of, brought back 
by Bizhan, iv, 126, 
132 
deaths of, announced to 
Afrasiyab, iv, 152 
Lambak, a water-carrier, 164 
entertains Bahram Giir, vii, 

13 seq. 
rewarded by Bahram Cnir, 
vii, 20 
Land of Darkness. See Gloom. 
Land-tax, Mahmiid's remission 
of, vi, 196, 208 
Nushirwan's reform of, vii, 
215, 225 
Latin version, early, of Pseudo- 
Callisthenes. See Julius 
Valerius. 
Launderer, a, foster-father of 
Darab, 15S, v, 292 
finds Dar4b in the Farat, v, 

295 
Darab adopted by, and his 

wife, V, 297 
quits his home with wife 
and D4rab and settles 
elsewhere, v, 298 
becomes wealthy but 
sticks to trade, v, 29S 
perturbed at Darab's youth- 
ful escapades, v, 298 
brings up Darab to be a 

cavalier, v, 299 
Darab's lack of natural 

affection for, v, 300 
wife of, informs Darab of 

his case, v, 300 
Rashnawad sends for, and 
his wife, v, 304 
informed by, of the case 
of Darab, v, 308 
visits, with his wife, D4r4b 

at his accession, v, 311 
dismissed with gifts, v, 312 
Lazhawardi, fort, ix, 93 
Lazica, region on the eastern 
shore of the Black Sea, 
vii, 215 ; viii, 194 



GENERAL INDEX 



317 



Lazic war, renewed by Hur- 

muzd, viii, 76 
Bahram Chiibina defeated 

in, viii, 76 
Leech of Kaid, i^g. See Kaid. 
Legend, Syriac Christian, of 

Alexander. See Syriac. 
Leo, constellation, ii, 405 ; iii, 

81, 318; vi, 172, 180; 

vii, 410 ; viii, 122, 394 
Libra, constellation, i, 310 ; vi, 

97 
Life, Fount of. See Fount. 
Water of, 160 .Id. 
Plutarch's, of Alexander the 
Great, vi, 67 
Lion, lions, slain by Rakhsh, 143, 

ii. 45 

Asfandiyir, 156, v, 125 

Bahram Gur, 163-165, vii, 

55. 77 
-ape, IJ3, viii, 322 seq. 
Lion's House, constellation of 

Leo. i, 188 
Irion's Mouth, the, place, iv, 245 
Loadstone, chamber of, viii, 275 
suspended cavalier in, \'iii, 

275 

Longimanus (Dirazdast), title of 
Artaxerxes I, son of Xer- 
xes, V, 281 

Lucerne (Medicago sativa), tax 
on, vii, 215 

Liich, perhaps = Kuch q.v., vii, 
362 
captives from, settled at 
Siirsan, vii, 328 

Luhrasp, Shah, 134, 155, i, 42 ; 
ii, 3. 9 ; iv, 57. 65, 135. 
337. 347. 356 seq. ; v, 10, 
20, 21 and note, 26, 29, 
36, 38, 64. 68, 80, 86, 87, 
90 seq., 98 seq., 104, 114, 
141, 154, 155, 157, 159, 
160, 1O7, 171, 180, 183, 
205, 208, 243, 255, 281. 
284 ; vi, 55, 200 ; viii, 
95. 148, 213, 270, 392 ; 
ix, 104 
sent to the Aldns by Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 14 



Luhrdsp, successes of, iv, Co, 

71 
troops of, recalled, iv, 145 

nominated by Suriish to be 

Kai Khusrau 's successor, 

iv, 281 
crowned by Kai Khusrau, 

iv, 300 
Zal's protest against the 

succession of, iv, 301 
succession of, justified by 

Kai Khusrau, iv, 301 

acknowledged by Z41, iv, 

302 

the chiefs, iv, 303 
undertakes to respect Kai 

Khusrau 's wives, iv, 305 
counselled and farewellod 

by Kai Khusrau, iv, 306 
addresses the chiefs, iv, 311 
receives the fealty of Za! 
and other chiefs, iv, 312 
praises and rewards ZaI, 

iv, 312 
coronation of, iv, 312 
Reign of, 154, iv, 314 seq. 

Note on, iv, 314 seq. 
harangues the chiefs, iv, 316 
makes Balkh his capital, iv, 

317 

builds the Fire-temple of 
Barzin, iv, 318 

shows favour to the grand- 
sons of Kai Kai'is, iv, 318, 
321 seq. 

refuses to appoint Gush- 
tasp his heir, iv, 319 

sends Zarir in pursuit of 
Gushtasp, iv, 320 

pardons Gushtasp, iv, 322 

hears of Gushtasp 's fiight, 

iv, 323 
consults Zarir and the sages, 

iv, 323 
searches in vain for Gush- 

t4sp, iv, 324 
receives K^lus, Caesar's en- 
voy, in audience, iv, 357 
entertains Kalus, iv, 357 
consults Zarir, iv, 358 
questions Kaliis, iv, 358 



3ii 



GENERAL INDEX 



Luhrasp, dismisses Kaliis with 
honour, iv, 359 
sends Zarir with other chiefs 
on a mission to Rum, iv, 

359 

messasje of, to Caesar, iv, 361, 

welcomes and crowns Gush- 
tasp on his return to 
Iran, iv, 364 

resigns the throne to Gush- 
tasp and becomes a de- 
votee, v, 31 

converted by Zarduhsht, v, 

33 

advises Gushtasp to resign 

the kingship to Asfan- 

diyar, v, 66 
opposes Kuhram, v, 91 
slain, V, gi, 93, 99 
Asfandiyar's vow to avenge, 

V, 103 
Lumsden, his edition of the 

Shahnama, i, 76 
Luna. See Moon. 



M 



Ma, Hittite goddess, vi, 71 
= Cybele, vi, 71 
priestesses of = Amazons, vi, 

71 
Macan, his edition of the Shah- 
nama, i, 76 ; vi, 60 
Mace, Faridun's, i, 161, 163, 165, 

168 
the making of, i, 158 
Macedonia, vi, 81, 82 
Macedonian invasion of the East, 

vi, 68, 6g 
Machin (China), ii, 357 note, 370, 

394 ; iii. 46. 253, 265 ; 

iv, 151, 203, 229, 231, 234, 

252 ; V, 142, 145 ; viii, 

417 ; ix, 107 
Machine, flying, of Kai Kaus, ii, 

103 
Macrianus, Praetorian prefect, vi, 

294 
treachery of, to Valerian, 

vi, 294 



M'CrindIc, Ancient India of, 

quoted, vi, 68, 80 
Mada. See Medes. 
Mada'in, Ctesiphon (Taisafun), 
and the neighbouring 
cities, i6y, iy4, vii, 201, 
244, 266, 272, 337, 363 ; 
viii, 4, 46, 192, 193 
Nusliirwan sends his Ruman 

captives to, vii, 259 
palace of Khusrau Parwiz 
at, story of, viii, 400 
Madik, king of the Kurds, mean- 
ing of, vi, 203, 256 
Madofryai, mountain, part of 
the Alburz range, south- 
east of the Caspian, v, 30 
Magi, priests of the Medes 
(Mada), i, 9 ; ii, 190 ; vi, 
372. 373 ; vii, 171, 184 
preservers of tradition, i, 56, 

60 
meaning of name, i, 56 and 

note 
rise to power of, i, 58 
influence of, declines after 
the Greek conquest, i, 59 
principal seats of, i, 60 
literature of, i, 61 
language of, i, 64 
compile the prose Shah- 
nama for Abii Mansur, i, 
69 
advocates of next-of-kin 
marriage, ii, 1S9 
Magian, Magians, vii, 60 
chant, vii, 60 
fire, vii, 409 
Magic, i, 51 

derivation of, i, 56 
sympathetic, i, 8 
Magism, v, 11 
Magog. See Gog. 
Magophonia, import of, i, 59 
Magus. See Magi. 
Mahabharata, Indian Epic, iii, 
8 ; iv, 316 ; vi, 31, 80 
the passing of the five P4n- 
davas in, compared with 
that of Kai I^husrau, iv, 
138 



GENERA L IXDEX 



319 









Mdh Afrid, grandmother of 

Miniichihr, i, 205 
Mah Afri'd, deiughter of Ti'ir, iv, 

304 
Mkh Afrid, daughter of Barzin, 

vii. 53 
married to Bahram Giir, 
vii, 53 
Mah Azar, scribe, viii, 81 
Mahan, Iranian noble, v, 260, 263 
Mahbiid (Mebodes), minister of 
Kubad and Nushirwan, 
16S ; vii, 213 
instrumental in making 
Nushirwan Shah, vii, 316 
Niishirwan's treasurer, vii, 

319 
sons of, vii, 319 

serve Nushirwan's meals, 
vii, 319, 321 
wife of, prepares Niishlr- 

vvan's food, vii, 321, 322 
envied by Zuran, vii, 319 
fall of, vii, 317, 322 
Nushirwan's repentance 

with regard to, vii, 317, 

325 
Mah i-Azada Khu, wife of Tur, i, 
1S8 
meaning of, i, 188 note 
Mahiyar, minister of Dara, 
murders Dara, vi, 52 
tells Sikandar of the mur- 
der, vi, 52 
arrested by Sikandar, vi, 53 
executed, vi, 56, 88 
Mahiyar, Iranian noble, vii, 38 
praises Bahram Giir, vii, 38 
Mahiyar, a jeweller, 16^, vii, 55 
secj. 
daughter of. See Arzii. 
entertains Bahram Giir, vii, 
59 seq. 
Mahmiid, Sultan (A.D. 999- 
1030), i, 100; iii, 15; 
viii, 24 
account of, i, 21 
- brothers of, i, 21, 114 
Firdausi's praise of, jjq, 
152. 155. ^56, 160, 161 ; 
i, 2Q seq., 112 seq.; iv. 



Mahmiid — cunt. 

135 seq., 139 ; V, 30, 89, 
118, 262 ; vi. 20, 107, 279, 
292, 370 ; vii, 277 ; ix, 
122 
Firdausi's feeling against, 
i. 33 ; vi,62, 92 se^. and note 
Satire on, i, 23, 40 seq. 
alleged ill treatment by, 
i, 33. 36 seq. : vii, 431 
alleged repentance of, i, 45 ; 
iv, 8 

occasion of, iv, 8 
approves of Firdausi's ver- 
sion of the fight between 
Rustam and Ashkabiis, 
iii, 109 
remission of the land-tax by, 
vi, 186, 208 

Mahraspand, father of Adarbad, 
V, 16 ytote 

Mahrwi, viii, 248 

Mahwi ( = Shahwi ?), one of 
Firdausi's authorities, i, 
67 ; vii, 382 

Mahwi, Persian chief, iy6, ix, 

70. 74. 89. 95. 97. 100 seq., 

118 
described, ix, 87 
Farrukhzad entrusts Yaz- 

dagird to, ix, 95 
accepts charge of Yaz- 

dagird, ix, 96 
becomes disaffected to Yaz- 

dagird, ix, 96 
writes to Bizhan, ix, 96, 116 
betrays Yazdagird, ix, 97, 

98, 116, 117 
quest of, for Yazdagird, ix, 

100 
has tidings of Yazdagird, ix, 

lOI. 

consults his warriors, ix, 106 
son of, counsels, ix, 107 
receives Balkh and Marat, 

ix, 115 
governor of Marv, ix, 120 
put to death with his 
sons, ix, 120 
sends miller to slay Yaz- 
dagird, ix, 107, 116 



320 



GENERAL INDEX 



Mahwi, sends troops after miller 
with instructions, ix, 107 

troops of, strip corpse of 
Yazdagird, ix, 108 

hears of death of Yazda- 
gird, ix, 108 

bids miller throw corpse of 
Yazdagird into stream, 
ix, 108 

slays monks, ix, 113 

consults his intimates and 
minister, ix, 113 

advised by his minister, ix, 

113 

claims the throne on false 
pretences, ix, 114 

becomes master of Khura- 
san, ix, 114 

evil rule of, ix, 114 

makes war on Bizhan, ix, 

"5 
conduct of, to Barsam, ix, 

117 
crosses Oxus and camps at 

BaiEjand, ix, 118 
flees, ix, 118 
overtaken by Barsdm, ix, 

118 
captured by Barsam, ix, 119 
put to death by Bizhan, ix, 

120 
Mai, city in Turkistan, i, 252, 

256, 261 ; iv, 278, 284 ; 

vii, 91, 331, 385, 421 
Mai, king of Hind, vii, 395, 396, 

399, 4" I. 403. 404 
Maidan, riding-ground, i, 83 
Maidhyo-maungha, cousin and 

first convert to Zarduhsht, 

V, 17 
Mail of Siyawush, iii, 58, 60, 61, 

69, 81 ; iv, 40, 41, 44, 

45. 51 
referred to, iv, 42, 43 
Maishan (Mesene), a small state 
on the lower Tigris, vi, 199 
Majijj (Magog), 160. See Yajiij. 
Makati'ira, Turkman chief, iy3, 
viii, 317 
dominates the Khan, viii, 
318 



Makatiira, slighted by the Khan, 
viii, 31S 
challenges Bahram Chii- 

bina, viii, 319 
fight of, with Bahram Chii- 
bina, viii, 320 
Makh, viii, 71, 78 
Makhzum, place, 93 
Makna Bad, city, iii, 109 
Makran (Gedrosia, Baluchistan), 
country on the shore of 
the Arabian Sea, ii, 80, 
82 ; iv, 136, 203, 231, 
234. 237 seq., 254 ; vi, 
182, 202, 397 ; vii, 390 ; 
viii, 393, 417 
king of, /jj, iv, 238 seq. 
refuses facilities to Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 239, 242 
buried by Kai Khusrau, 
iv, 243 
Kai Khusrau marches upon, 
iv, 241 
stops pillage of, iv, 243, 

244 
prepares a fleet in, iv, 244 
sails for Gang-dizh from, 
iv, 245 

returns to, iv, 251 
goes to Chin from, iv, 251 
Alexander the Great's re- 
turn by, productive of 
marvels, vi, 6g 
etymology of, vi, 69 
Malcolm, Sir John, identification 
and description of Mount 
Sipand by, i, 236 ; v, 30 
version of Suhrab by, ii, 

118 
on the scene of the death of 
Bahram Gur, vii, 6 
Malika, daughter of Tair, vi, 3, 

324 
legend of, vi, 323, 330 seq. 
offers to betray her father's 

stronghold to Shapiir, vi, 

331 

makes the garrison drunk, 

vi, 333 
opens the gate to Shapiir, 

vi, iii 



CnXHRAL jxniix 



3-:i 



Malika, goes to Shdpur's camp, 

vi. 333 
Mamigonian, Armenian family, 

viii, iSS 
M4mun, Khalifa, i, 14 ; vii, 382, 

430 
jNIan, the First (Gaiumart q.v.), 

i. 5 
on the nature of, ijg, i, 104 
of Sigz (Kustam), ii, 100 and 
>iote 
Man, weight, i, 290 and nole ; 
viii, 148 and note, 314, 399 
Manachihr, i, 206 note 
Manda, nomads, i, 18 

confused with the MadA 
(Medes), i, 18 ; vi, 194 
empire of the=empire of 
the Medes, ii, 191 
Mandane, daughter of Astyages, 
ii, 190 
= Farangi's in legend, ii, 191 
Mandanes (Dandamis, Kait, Kai- 
han, Kand, Kaid q.r.), vi, 
61 
Onesicritus and, vi, 61 
identical with Kaid, vi, 62 
Mani, heresiarch, i6j, ii, ig nole ; 
V, 118 and note ; vi, 307 ; 
vii, 188 
account of, vi, 327 
-gate, vi, 327, 3.59 
teaching of, vi, 32S 
disputation of, with the high 

priest, vi, 35S 
executed, vi, 359 
Manicheism, ii, 19 note 
Manizha, daughter of Afrasiyab, 
750, iii, 285, 295 scq., 304, 
308 sea., 348, 349 
Bizhan and. Story of, i§o, 
iii, 7, 12 

historical basis of, iii, 1 1 
Mohl on, iii, 285 
Firdausi on, iii, 287 
referred to, viii, 72 
sends her nurse to ]iizhan, 

iii, 297 
invites Bizhan to visit her, 

iii, 298 
drups Bizhan, iii, 299 



Manizha, wakes Bizhan in Afrasi- 

yab's palace, iii, 300 
holds revel with Bizhan, iii, 

300 
disgraced, iii, 309 
made Bizhan's attendant, 

iii, 310 
referred to, iii, 318, 319 
hears of the arrival of Rus- 

tam's caravar, iii, 337 
interviews of, with Kustam, 

iii. 337. 34^ 
bears Rustam's ring to 

Bizhan, iii, 340 
kindles signal fire for Kus- 
tam, iii, 344 
receives gifts from Kai 
Khusrau, iii, 35G 
Manshiir, Turanian hero, iii, 161, 
165, 172, 182, 185, 199, 
205, 210, 213, 226, 231, 
241, 251, 256 
comes to the aid of Piran, 

iii, 151 
hears of the coming of Kus- 
tam, iii, 175 
Mansion of Gushtasp, Fire-tem- 
ple, V, 75 
Mansiir bin Niih, Samanid prince 
(A.D. 96 1 — 976), i, 20, 21 
V, 21 ; vii, 5 
Maniishan, a king in Pars, iv, 

146, 180, 191 
ManusA'ihar (Miniichihr), i, 338 
Manwi, viii, 253 

Marathi, Scythian people, iv, 315 
Marchlord, ill-disposed, op- 
presses Kai, 174, viii, 366 
destroys gutters and cats, 

viii, 360 
recalled, viii, 368 
Marcian (Batariin q.v.), viii, 41 
Marco Polo, Venetian traveller 

(A.D. 1254-1324), vi, 74 
Mardanshdh, (Valan-sina q.v.), 
viii, 74, 76 ; ix, 5, 6 
son of, ix, 5, 6 

conspires against Khusrau 
Parwiz, ix, 6 
mutilation and execution of, 
ix, 



vol.. IX. 



X 



322 



GENERAL INDEX 



Mardanshah (Mardasas), son of 
Shirin, viii, 189, 191, 193, 
196 ; ix, 39 
execution of, ix, 7 

Mardas, father of Zahhak, Story 
of, 140. i, 135 seq. 
murdered by Zahhak, i, 137 

Mardasas. See Mardanshah. 

Mardwi, Turanian hero, iii, 77 

Mardwi, Persian official, viii, 21 

Mardwi, gardener, viii, 397 

Margh, city in Turkistan, i, 256 ; 
iv, 278, 284 ; vii, 91, 331, 
412, 421 

Mark, birth. See Birthmark. 

Marriage, next of kin (Khvaitiik- 
das), i, 60 ; ii, 189 ; v, 17 

Mars', planet, i, 72, 276, 332, 339 ; 
ii, 247, 407 ; iii, no, 159, 
178. 318, 332 ; vii, 92, 
252, 418 ; viii, 395 ; ix, 

73. 89 
Martyropolis, ceded by Khusrau 

Parvviz, viii, 188 
Marusipand, palace, ix, 11 
Mariit, angel, iii, 286 
Marv, oasis and city in ancient 
northern Khurasan, now 
in Turkistan, lys, i, 45 ; 
ii, loi ; V, 29, 260, 261, 
263 ; vii, 174, 357 ; viii, 
20, 93, 173, 336, 337. 346 
seq., 352, 356 ; ix, 70, 89, 
116, 117 

early seat of Aryan civi- 
lization, i, 7 

as rhyme-word, vii, 88 note 

Khan reaches, vii, 88 

Bahram Giir marches on, 
vii, 89 

Azad Sarv finds Buzurj- 
mihr at, vii, 283 

traditional scene of Yaz- 
dagird's death, ix, 70 

Yazdagird at, ix, 97, 116 

sage of, ix, no 

apothegm of, ix, no 

conduct of Mahwi to Bar- 
sam at, ix 117 

Guraz, son of Mahwi, gov- 
ernor of, ix, 120 



Marvell, quoted, viii, 399 note 
Marvrud (Murghab), river in 
Khurasan flowing into 
and forming the Marv 
oasis, ii, 228 ; iv, 255 ; 
viii, 92 
Mary, Maryam, mother of Jesus, 

viii, 276 note, 277 note 
Maryam, daughter of Csesar, ij3, 
174, viii, 188, 192, 276 
note, 278, 279, 373. 374. 
380, 
murder of, viii, 193, 389 
referred to, viii, 255, 266, 

269, 270, 371, 381, 389 
counselled by Caisar, viii, 

279, 280 
Niyatus put in charge of, 

viii, 280 
as peace-maker, viii, 310 
Mashad, city in Khurasan, ii, 189 
Mashya and Mashyoi, the off- 
spring of Gaiiimart, the 
first man, i, 117, 131 
Masius, Mount, viii, 41 
Massagetae, tribe, iii, 192 
Mas'iidi, Arabic historian (died 
A.D. 956), V, 293 ; vi, 62, 

63,82, 193. 257. 313. 315 ; 

vii, 3, 4, 6, 153, 280 

version of the death of 
Rustam by, v, 261 

genealogies of Papak ac- 
cording to, vi, 200 

' Book of f ndication and Re- 
vision' by, vi, 252 

apologue of the owls by, vi, 
310 

parentage of Yazdagird son 
of Shapur according to, 

vi. 371 

account of the fortifications 
at Darband by, vii, 215 

origin of the game of nard 
according to, vii, 3S2 

origin of the game of chess 
according to, vii, 382 

on Buzurjmihr, viii, 71 
Maundeville, Sir John, vi, 13, 72 
Maurice, Eastern Roman Em- 
peror, viii, 1 8 7, 188 



GENERAL INDEX 



3-53 



Maurice, helps Kliusrau Parwiz 
on terms, viii, 188 
murcUr of, \iii, 193 
Mausil, Armenian prince, viii, 
188, 189, 248, 282, 295 
entertains Bandwi, viii, 249 
Klnisrau Parwiz and, viii, 283 
referred to, viii, 293 and 
note 
Ma wara 'u'n-Nahr (KuhistAn 
q.v., Transoxania), ii, 19, 
199 ; iii, 151 
Maximian, Roman Emperor, viii, 

188 
Mayam, place, iii, 40, 41, 53, 11 1 
Mayors of the palace, Oriental, i, 

14 
Mazaga, Indian city, vi, 65 

taken by Alexander the 
Great, vi, 65 
Mazana (Mdzandaran, q.v.), ii,28 
Mazandaran, region lying be- 
tween the Alburz range 
and the Caspian, 143, i, 
4, 5, 12, 253, 279, 290, 
294. 296, 298, 319, 323. 
339, 378 ; ii, 25 seq., 33, 
34, 36 seq., 45, 55, 60 seq., 
66 seq., 75, 76, 78, 81, 93, 
105, 139, 143 seq., 293 , 
iii, 144, 167, 207, 215; 
232, 243, 256, 260, 324, 
330; iv, 86, 136, 296, 
299; v, 116, 117, 203, 
207, 220 ; vi, 373 ; vii, 
215 ; viii, 48 ; ix, 74 

approach to, from Iran, ii 
28 

description of, ii, 27 

king of, 143, ii, 39, 43, 54, 
62 seq. 
interview of, with Rus- 

tam, ii, 67 
fight of, with Rustam, ii, 

73 
transforms himself into a 

rock, ii, 74 
death of, ii, 75 
Mdzandardnian, a native of, or 
pertaining to, Mdzan- 
daran, iii, 320 



Mazda, Ahura. Sic Ahura. 
Mazdak, heresiarch, J 66, i, 63 ; 
vii, 184, 185 
disputation of, with Nushfr- 

wdn, vii, 188, 206 seq. 
account of, vii, 188, 201 
becomes chief minister to 

Kubad, vii, 201 
influence of, over Kubad, 

vii, 201 
parable of, to Kubdd in time 

of drought, vii, 201 
practical application of 
Kubad's reply by, vii, 
202 
converts Kubad, vii, 204 
preaching and practice of, 

vii, 204 
attempt of, to convert Nush- 

irwan, vii, 205 
Kubad decides against, vii, 

20S 
executed with his followers 
by Nushirwan, vii, 208 
Mazdakism, vii, 1S4 
Mazdakites, vii, 184 

great assembly of, vii, 205 
massacre of, vii, 185, 208 
Mebodes. See Mahbiid. 
Mecca, city, v, 31, 166 ; vi, 120 ; 
ix, 69 
Sikandar's visit to, vi, 64, 

119 seq. 
account of, vi, 64 
Medea, land of, i, 57 
Mede, Medes (Mada), Aryan 
people, i, 7, 10, 17, 56, 58, 
I 72 ; vi, 194, 203 

I account of, i, 9 

confused with the Manda 
(nomads), i, 18 ; vi, 194 
empire of the=empire of 
the Manda, 1, 17 ; ii, 191 
Media, iv, 315 ; vi, 31 ; vii, 6 ; 
Magna, vi, 201, 203, 256 
I vii, 214 

Median, vi, 195 

Median, language (Zend), i, 64 
seq. 
empire, ii, 9 ; vi, 194 
Mediterranean, the, vi, 294 



32} 



GENERAL INDEX 



Megara, city in Greece, vi, 323 
note 
legend concerning, vi, ^i^) 
note 
Megasthenes, Greek writer, 
temp. Alexander the 
Great, vi, 68 
Meherdates (Milad), Parthian 

prince, iii, 10 seq. 
Memphis, Egyptian city, vi, 82 
corpse of Alexander the 
Great taken to, vi, 82 
Merchant, a, 164 

entertains arid displeases 
Bahram Gur, vii, 39 

made the slave of his own 
apprentice, vii, 42 
Merchants, Iranian, made acces- 
sories to Bahram Gur's 
flight from Hind, vii, 133, 

134 

Mercury, planet, i, 72 ; iii, 159, 
318 ; V, 243 ; vi, 171, 224 ; 
viii, 299, 395 ; ix, 73 

Meroe, island and city of, vi, 13, 

65 
Meru, mythical mountain, iv, 139 
Mesopotamia, vi, 30, 294, 321 
Arab invasions of, iii, 14 
annexed by Arabs, ix, 68 
Mesopotaniian desert, vi, 322 
Messiah, the, viii, 267 
Mih-Azar-Gushnasp, minister of 

Ardshir, son of Shirwi, in 

Arabic Tabari, ix, 43 
put to death, ix, 43 
Mihr, month and day, i, 88, 8g, 

174. 175. ^3-i ; vi, 24, 33, 

55 
Mihr, feast, ix, 40 
Mihr, sacred Fire. See Mihr 

Barzin. 
Mihr Azar, priest, vii, 188, 206 
assists Nushirwan in his 

disputation with Mazdak, 

vii, 206 
Mihr Barzi'n, sacred Fire and 

Fire-temple, vi, 201, 212 

and note 
established by Gushtasp, v, 

34 



Mihr Barzin, Iranian warrior, 

temp. Bahram Gur, vii, 85 
Mihr Bidad, Iranian magnate, 

vii, 21 
entertains Bahram Gur, vii, 

22 
Mihr 'Hasis, minister of Ardshir, 

son of Shirwi, in Persian 

Tabari, ix, 43 
put to death, ix, 43 
Mihr Hurmuzd, Iranian noble, 

175, viii, 196 ; ix, 34 
account of, ix, 5 
referred to, ix, 6, 33 
conspires against Khusrau 

Parwiz, ix, 6 
put to death, ix, 7 
described, ix, 33 
Mihr-i-Niish, second son of 

Asfandiyar, ii, 3 ; v, 80, 

283 
slain by Faramarz, v, 227 
death of, reported to Asfan- 
diyar by Bahman, v, 227 
corpse of, sent to Gush- 
tasp, v, 232 
Mihr-i-Niish, Persian sage, vii, 

270 
quoted, vii, 270 
Mihr-i-Niish, ix, 103 

pleads with Mahwi for Yaz- 

dagird, ix, 103 
Mihr Narsi, chief minister of 

Bahram Gur and of his 

son Yazdagird, vii, 4, 153 
sons of, vii, 4 
Mihr Piruz, Iranian warrior, 

temp. Bahram Gur, vii, 85 
Mihrab, king of Kabul, 141, 142, 

i, 234, 361; ii, 12,14, 18,21 
visited by Zal, i, 256 
tributary to Sam, i, 256 
daughter of (Rudaba),i, 257, 

V, 203 
praises Zal to Sindukht, i, 

260 
hears from Sindukht of the 

loves of Zal and Rudaba, 

i, 284 
reproaches Rudaba, i, 289 
Sam sent against, i, 292 



GENERAL INDEX 



325 



Mihr4b, hears of Scim's cominc;, 

i, 292, 2i)g 

IMiiu'ichilir's assent to 

Zal's marriage, i, 314 

felicitates Sindukht, i, 315 

Sindukht and, prepare to 

welcome Sam and Zal, i, 

314 

entertain Sdni and Zal, i, 

317 
visit Sam, i, 319 
hears of the birth of Rustam, 

i. 323 
goes with Z41 and Rustam 

to meet Sam, i, 324 
parleys with Shamasas and 

Khazarwan to gain time, 

1,358 
writes to summon Zal, i, 

359 
IMihrak, Tribal King, 161, vi, 3, 

199, 237, 238, 237, 267, 

268, 270, 272, 273 ; vif, 

185, 192 
=Mithrak, vi, 206 
slain by Ardshir Papakan, 

vi, 241 
daughter of, 161, vi, 3, 241, 

256, 257, 268 seq., 272 
escapes, vi, 241, 256, 268 
referred to in Kaid's 

prophecy, vi, 267 
discovered by Shapiir, vi, 

268 seq. 
informs Shcipur of her 

birth, vi, 270 
marries Shapiir, vi, 270 
birth of her son Urmuzd, 

vi, 271 
= Mithrak = Madik = Arda- 

wan (?), vi, 256 
importance of, in legend, vi, 

257, 2G7 ; viii, 72, 73 
Mihrak, servant of Niishirwdn, 

viii, 18 19 
Mihran, Indian sage, J59, vi, 

91. 97 
consulted by Kaid about 

his dreams, vi, 92 seq. 
interprets Kaid's dreams, 

vi, 94 S''^- 



7-:. 73 



of 



Mihrdn, family, vii, 156 
imjiortance of, viii, 

proverb on, vii, 185 

account of, vii, 185 

rivalry of, with family 
K4ran, vii, 185 

men of mark among the, 
vii, 186, 187 ; viii, 74 
Mihr4n, treasurer to Yazdagird 

son of Shdpiir, vi, 387 
Mihrdn, Irdnian general, vii, 251 

commands the centre of 
Nushirwan's host, vii, 251 
Mihran, archscribe, viii, 76 

sent with Bahram Chubina, 
viii, 106 

counsels Bahram Chubina, 
viii, 122 and note 

seeks refuge, viii, 123 

congratulates Bahram Chu- 
bina, viii, 129 

takes counsel with Kharrad, 
viii, 159 

flees from Balkh and is 
retaken, viii, 159 

pardoned by Bahram Chu- 
bina, viii, 160 

referred to, viii, 163 

speech of, viii, 166 
Mihran Sitad, Iranian high priest 
and envoy, temp. Nushir- 
wan, 168, vii, 186, 350, 
361, 363 ; viii, 96, 100 

attempt of the Khan to out- 
wit, vii, 352 

takes charge of the Khan's 
daughter, vii, 354 

receives gifts from the Khan, 
vii, 35t> 

welcomed on his return, vii, 

357 

embassage of, referred to, 

viii, 72, 97 
sent for by Murmuzd, viii, 97 
tells of prophecy about 
Bahram Chubina, viii, 
98, 216 
death of, viii, 99 
Mihran SitAd, merchant, enter- 
tains Kluisrau I'arwiz, 
viii, 251 






326 



GENERAL INDEX 



Mihras, father of Ilyas ruler of 

Khazar, iv, 352 
Mihras, Caesar's envoy, vii, 

261 
negotiates peace with Nush- 

irwan, vii, 261 
Mihrdat. See Meherdates. 
Mihrgan, feast, i, 175 and note, 

iv, 313 ; vi, 230 and note, 

245 
Mihrmas, vi, 200 
Mil as rhyme word, i, 75 
Milad, Iranian hero, iii, 11, 12, 
25, 29, 145, 274, 289, 293, 
345 ; iv. 83, 147, 191 ; vi, 
394 ; viii, 72, 211 
import of word, viii, 73 
customs of, viii, 216 
Milad (Taxila), Indian city, vi, 
102, 109, no 
situation of, vi, 62 
Sikandar approaches, vi, 
98 
Military obsequies, temp. Nushir- 

wan, vii, 252 
Milk, bane of, vii, 125 and note, 

324 
easily " turned," vii, 317 
poisoned by the Evil Eye, 
vii, 320 seq., 324, 325 
Mill, iy6, ix, 89, 116 
Miller, a, daughters of, 164 
becomes Bahram Giir's 

father-in-law, vii, 34 
dignified by Bahram Gur, 

vii. 34 
Miller, a, iy6, ix, 70 

Yazdagird and, ix, 99 
informs chief of Zark about 

Yazdagird, ix, 100 
informs Mahwl about Yaz- 
dagird, ix, loi 
bidden to slay Yazdagird, 
ix, 107 

fling corpse into stream, 
ix, 108 
Miiigrelia, province on the east- 
ern shore of the Black 
Sea, vii, 215 
Minister, piece in chess. See 
Wazir. 



Minos, king of Crete, vi, 323 note 

legend of, vi, 323 note 
Mi'nii, viii, 253 ami note 
Miniichihr, Shah, 140-142, i, 42,. 

90, 91, 209 seq., 274, 275, 

319, 337. 339 seq., 348, 

363 ; ii, 19, 29, 33. 36. 37. 

302, 318, 400 ; iii, 9, 30, 

87, 115 ; iv, 10, 65, 69, 

70, 76, 136, 206, 283, 285, 

298 ; V, 12, 174, 252, 284 ; 

vi, 200, 353 ; viii, 219, 

223, 392 ; ix, 103 
birth of, i, 206 
etymology of, i, 206 and 

note, 234 and note 
Faridun's gilts to, i, 207 
goes to fight Salm. and Tur, 

i, 216 
makes proclamation to the 

host, i, 218 
contends against Salm and 

Tur, i, 219 
prepares for a night-sur- 
prise, i, 220 
sends Tur's head to Faridun, 

i, 222 
sends Karan to take the 

Castle of the Alans, i, 223 

seq. 
hears of Karan's success, i, 

225 
defeats and slays Karkwi, i, 

225 seq. 
pursues and slays Salm, i, 

227 
pardons Salm's troops, i, 229 
sends Salm's head and a 

letter to Faridun, i, 229 
return of, in triumph, i, 230 
welcomed by P"aridun, i, 230 
confided to Sam by Faridun, 

i. 231 
enthroned by Faridun, i, 232 
mourning of, for, and burial 

of, Faridun, i, 233 
Reign of, 141, i, 234 seq. 

Note on, i, 234 seq. 
accession and inaugural 

address of, i, 237 
Sam's address to, i, 238 



GENERAL IXDEX 



327 



Minuchilir, hoars of Sdm's find- 
ing of Zal, i, 2.|.S 

sons of, i. 248 

sends Naiidar to congratu- 
late Sam, i, 24S 

summons Sam and Zal to 
court, i, 24Q 

Sam ti'lls the story of his 
quest to, i, 250 

Zal's horoscope taken by 
order of, i, 251 

gifts of, to Sam, i, 251 

hears of the case of Zal and 

Riidaba, i, 288 
advises with the archi- 
mages, i, 288 

welcomes Sam, i, 2S9 

hears of Sam's campaign, i, 
290 

bids Sam destroy Mihrab 
and his belongings, i, 292 

receives Zal well, i, 306 

consults the astrologers as to 
Zal, i, 307 

Zal proved by hard ques- 
tions by order of, i, 308 

Zal displays his accomplish- 
ment before, i, 311 

gracious reply of, to Sam, i, 

314 

warned of his death by the 
astrologers, i, 335 

counsels, and gives the 
throne to, Naudar, i, 335 

dies, i, 336 
Minuchihr, son of Arash, iv, 
149 

commands the troops from 
Khurasan, iv, 148 

slaj^s Kuhila, iv, 181 

commands the left, iv, 191 
Mirin, Riiman chief, 154 

asks Caesar's second daugh- 
ter, Dilanjam, in marriage, 

iv, 333 
bidden by Caesar to slay the 

wolf of Faskun, iv, 333 
casts a horoscope, iv, 334 
asks Hishwi to interest 

Gushtdsp in his behalf, 

iv, 334 



Mi'rln, provides Gushtisp with a 
steed and arms, iv, 330 

goes with Gushtasp and 
Hishwf to the forest of 
Faskun, iv, 337 

Hishwi and, welcome Gush- 
tasp on his return, iv, 339 

informs C;csar that he has 
slain the wolf, iv, 341 

marries Caesar's daughter, 
iv, 341 

consulted by Ahran, iv, 342 

refers Ahran to Hishwi, iv, 

344 
letter of, to Hishwi, iv, 344 

Ahran and, display their 
accomplishment on the 
riding-ground, iv, 349 
Caesar's wrath with, iv,35i 
sends a scornful message 

to Caesar, iv, 353 
set to guard the baggage, 
iv, 355 
Mir Khand (Mirkhond), Persi n 
historian (A.D. 1433- 
1498), V, 30 ; vi. 62, 315 ; 
vii, 3, 4, 6, 156, 159, 171, 
183, 186 ; viii, 192 
distich of, quoted, ix, 56 
Miskal, measure of weight, vi, 24 

and note, viii, 394 

Mist (Egypt), 159, ii, 79, 80, 84, 

94. 96, 143, 286; vi, 114, 

115, 122, 181 ; viii, 381 

king of temp. Kai Kaiis, ii, 

94. 95. 98 
king of, defeated by Sikan- 
dar, vi, 37 

welcomes Sikandar, vi, 
121 
invaded by Sikandar, vi, 37, 

121 
sea of, vi, 120 

Sikandar stays a year in, vi, 
121 
Mithra, Mitra, god, i, 7 
Mithradat. See Meherdates. 
Mithrak, vi, 20O 

= Mihrak, vi, 206 
=Mihrak=Madik = Arda- 
wdn (?), vi, 256 



328 



GENERAL INDEX 



Mithrates. See Meherdates. 
Mithradatcs I, Parthian king, ii, 

80 
Modes of speech, viii, 30 
Mohl, Jules, his edition and 
translation of the Shah- 
nama, i, 76, 77 ; vi, 60 
on the Story of Bizhan and 
Manizha, iii, 285, 286 
the Worm, vi, 203 
Wisdom-literature, \di, 280 
Mong, Indian city, vi, 18 
Monks, ix, 109 

find and recover corpse of 

Yazdagird, ix, loy 
lament over and entomb 
Yazdagird, ix, 109 seq. 
sentences of, over Yazda- 
gird, ix, 109 seq. 
slain by Mahwi, ix, 113 
Monophysite, viii, 195 
Moola Firooz, i, 201 note 
Moon, one of the seven planets, 
i, 72, viii, 395 
on the nature of the, zjp, i, 

205 
=Tur, i, 223 

divided by Muhammad, 
viii, 42, 67 
Moses, Hebrew law-giver, v, 294 
Salt Fish and, legend of, vi, 

77 
Faith of, vi, 95 
Moses of Chorene, Armenian 
historian (5th century 
A.D.),i, 72 
account of Zahhak by, i, 144 
Rustam by, i, 236 
Mosul, city in Mesopotamia, vi, 

322 
Mountain, mountains, sanctity 
of, i, 118 
of the Holy Questions, i, 

62 
— skirt (Daman-i-Kuh), iii, 

15.91. 95 
= Rakhsh, iii, 221, 251 
Old man of the, v, 30 
— sheep, personification of 

the divine Grace, vi, 201, 

221. See Ram. 



Mu'awiya, Khalifa (A.D. 661- 

679), i, 12, 13 
Miibid, i, 83 
Mugliira, son of Shu'ba. See 

Shu'ba Mughira, ix, 69 
Muhammad, the Prophet (about 
A.D. 571-632), i, 13, 40, 
41 ; ii, 337 note ; vi, 65, 
190, 292 ; viii, 42, 191 ; 
ix, 69, 81 seq. 
on 'All, i, 12, 106 
praise of, i, 106 
quoted, i, 106, v, 166 
reference of, to Alexander 
the Great in the Kuran, 

vi, 15. 77 
Muhammad, birth of, vii, 213 

Nushirwan and, 120, viii, 
68 
divides the Moon, viii, 42, 

67 
letter of, to Khusrau Par- 

wiz, ix, 66 
Flight of, referred to, ix, 122 
Muhammad Kasim, Arab gen- 
eral, vi, 325 
Muhammad Laskari, friend of 

Firdausi, i, 99 ; iii, 286 
Muhammad Mahdi, his edition 

of the Shahnama, i, 76 
Muhammad, son of Abdii'r-Raz- 

zak, i, 68, 99 
Muhammadan, Muhammadans, 
vi, 78 ; viii, 73 
elements in Shahnama, viii, 

42 
ethics respected, viii, 74 
Mukaffa'. See Ibn Mukaffa'. 
Miiltan, city in the Punjab, vii, 
140 
monarch of, entertained by 
Bahram Giir, vii, 140 
Mumasenni, tribe, i, 237 
Munzir, al, dynasty of, i, 55 
Munzir, prince of Hira, temp. 
Yazdagird son of Shapiir 
and Bahram Giir, 163, 
164. vi, 372, 394, 406, 
408 ; vii, 9 
visits Yazdagird, vi, 377 
monarch of Yaman, vi, 378 



GENERAL TXDEX 



329 



Munzir, returns to Yaman with 
Bahrain, vi, 378 
chooses nurses for Bahrani, 

vi, 37^'' 

dismisses Jiahram's tutors, 
vi, 3S0 

provides Bahram Gur with 
steeds, vi, 380 

provides BahrAm Gur with 
slave-girls, vi, 381 

goes to the chase with Bah- 
ram Gur, vi, 384 

sends a picture of Bahrim 
Giir shooting to Yazda- 
gird, vi, 385 

sends Bahram Gur with 
Nu'nian to Yazdagird, vi, 
386 

receives a letter from Yaz- 
dagird, vi, 387 

counsels and sends Bahram 
Gur a slave-girl and pre- 
sents, vi, 388 

welcomes Bahram Gur on 
his return, vi, 390 

supports Bahram Gur's 
claim to the throne, vi, 
396 seq. 

invades fran, vi, 397 

interview of, with Jawanwi, 
vi, 398 seq. 

refers Jawanwi to Bahram 
Giir, vi, 398 

advises Bahram Gur to 
negotiate with the Iran- 
ians, vi, 401, 404 

intercedes with Bahram Gur 
for the Iranians, vii, 10 

rewarded by Bahram Gur, 
vii, 10 
Munzir, son of Nu'man, prince of 
Hira, temp. Nushirwin, 
i6j, vii, 244 seq. 

protected by Niishirwan, 
vii, 217 

war of, with Hdrith bin 
Jabala, vii, 217 

sent by Nushirwan to invade 
Rum, vii, 246 
Murddd, ameshaspcnta, i, 88 ; 
iii, 287, 328 



Mush, town west of Lake Van, 

viii, 188 
Mushkinab, a miller's daughter, 

vii, i2 and tiole 
taken to wife by Bahram 

Gur, vii, 33 
Mushkinak, a miller's daughter, 

vii, 32 and note 
taken to wife by Bahram 

Gur, vii, 33 
Muslim, ix, 85 
Mutawakkil, Khalifa (A.D. 847- 

861), i, 14 
Cypress of Kishmar de- 
stroyed by, V, 28 
Mutilation, instances of, vi, 261, 

323. 334. 348, 357. 404 
Mytilene, Chares of, Greek wnriter, 
temp. Alexander the 
Great, ii, 10 ; vi, 61 
quoted, iv, 314 



N 



Nabarzanes, Persian general, vi, 

32 
pardoned by Alexander the 
Great, vi, 32 
Nadir, Shah, iii, 14 
Nadr son of Harith, v, 166 

recites the story of Rustam 
and Asfandiyar, v, 166 
fate of, V, 166 
Nahavand, city, south of Hama- 
dan, i, 12 ; ix, 68, 69 
Yazdagird concentrates his 

forces at, ix, 68 
Battle of, i, 12 ; ix, 69 
Nahid (Katayi'ui, q.v.) 
Nahid (Halai, Olympias ?), 

daughter of Failakus and 
mother of Sikandar, i^g, 
vi, 24 seq., and note 
married to Darab, vi, 25 
troubled by offensive 

breath, vi, 26 
cured, but repudiated by 

Darab, vi, 26 
returns to l'"ailakus ami 
gives birth to Sikandar, 
vi, 26 



330 



GENERAL INDEX 



Nahid, visits Dilarai and Rusha- 
uak, vi, 89 
referred to, vi, 1S7 
Nahid, the planet Venus, vi, 214 
Nahrawan, city near Baghdad, 
east of the Tigris ; also a 
canal on the eastern bank 
of that river, quitting it 
about 100 miles above, 
and rejoining it about 100 
miles below, Baghdad, 
vii, 141 ; viu, 187, 204, 
206, 231 
bridge of, viii, 223, 228 seq. 
broken down by Khusrau 
Parwiz, viii, 229 
Naishapur. See Nishapur. 
Naitkiin (Antigonus), minister 
of Sikandar, name of, 
assumed by Sikandar, vi, 
66, 125 seq. 
personates Sikandar, vi, 125 

seq. 
Kaidriish and his wife 
brought before, vi, 126 
sentenced to death by, vi, 
126 
pardoned by, vi, 126 
= Sikandar, vi, 131, 133. 

134. 141 
Nakula, one of the five Pan- 
davas, iv, 138 
referred to, iv, 139 
Names, use of, in sympathetic 
magic, i, 8, 177, 179 
secret and public, viii, 372 
and note 
Namkhast, Turanian hero, v, 24, 
26 
goes as envoy to Gushtasp, 

V, 37. 40 

returns with Gushtasp's 
answer, v, 44 

given command of the cen- 
tre, v, 56 

worsted by Girami, v, 59 
Napata, city in Nubia, vi, 65 
Naphtha, iSg. i, 56 

black, iv, 208, 209 

use of, in sieges, iv, 208, 
209 



Naphtha, Sikandar 's iron steeds 
filled with, 139, vi, 115 

Fur's elephants and troops 
routed by the use of, vi, 
116 

used to vitrify Sikandar's 
barrier, vi, 165 
Nard, game of, i6g, viii, 371 

invention of, vii, 280, 381, 
382, 389 

sent by Niishirwan to the 
Raja of Hind, vii, 5, 381 

meaning of, vii, 381 

symbolism of, vii, 381 

Mas'iidi on, vii, 382 

described, vii, 389 
Nariman, Iranian hero, father of 
Sam and great-grand- 
father of Rustam, i, 42, 
174, 207, 212, 239, 299, 

333. 344 ; ii. 4, 49, ii5. 

119, 125, 126, 162, 354 ; 

iii, 17. 35 ; V, 196, 199. 

202, 242, 262, 264, 266, 

289 
death of, described, i, 329 
Narimanau, epithet of Kere- 

saspa, i, 172, 174 
Narmpai, name of a tribe, 160, 

ii, 55 and note, 63, 64 ; vi, 

71 and note 
Sikandar and, vi, 150 
Narses (Narsi, son of Bahrdm, 

q.v.), Saisanian king 
Narses, Exarch, treatment of, by 

Empress Sophia, viii, 76 
Narses, general, viii, 189 
Narsi, Ashkanian king, vi, 197, 

210 
Narsi, son of Bahram, Shah 

(Narses), 162, vi, 3, 313. 

316. 325. 330. 331. 337 ; 

vii, 359 
Reign of, vi, 315 seq. 

Note on, vi, 315 
title of, vi, 315 
inaugural address of, vi, 315 
daughter o'f, 262. See 

Niislia. 
Narsi, brother of Bahram Gur, 

i(>5, vi, 3 ; vii, 4, 95. i^^ 



GENERAL 1M)I:X 



331 



Narsi, made captain of the host, 

vii, II 

regent, vii. 86 
fails to persuade the fran- 

ians to resist the Khan, 

vii, 87 
Hahrani Gur's letter to, vii, 

9^ 
writes to Bahram (jur on 
behalf of the Iranians, vii, 

94 

goes with the chiefs to wel- 
come Bahram C.i'ir, vii, 96 
made ruler of Khurasan, 

vii, 99 
welcomes his brother on his 
return from Hind, vii, 137 
Narwan, forest of,near Tammisha 
q.v. i, 217, 218 ; ii, 341 ; 
viii, 35^^ 360. 377 ; ix, 86 
Nasibin (Nisibis, q.v.), vi, 326 
cession of, vi, 355 
inhabitants of, refuse to 
submit to Shapur, vi, 356 
taken by Shapur, vi, 356 
Nasiru'd-Dfn, title of Subuk- 
tigin, q.v., i, 21, 100, 114 
Nasr, Amir, brother of Sultan 
Mahmud, i, 21 ; vi, 196 
account of, i, 100 
referred to, i, 114 
praise of, i, 114 ; vi, 207 
Nasr, Arab chief, vi, 65 

appeals to Sikandar for 

help, vi, 120 
made ruler of Mecca, vi, 121 
Nasr, son of Ahmad, Samanid, 
vii, 340 
patron of Riidagi, vii, 383 
Nastar, Ca;sar's master of the 
herds, iv, 325 
refuses to employ Gushtasp, 
iv, 326 
Nastihan, Turanian hero, son of 
W isa and brother of 
Pi'ran, 146. 131, i, 92 ; ii, 
264 ; iii, 79. 198, 210, 231, 
25^ ; iv, 53 seq., 61, 75. 

77 
pursues Kai Khusrau, ii, 

377 ^'■'l- 



Nastihan, slain by Bizhan, iv, 

54 
Nasti'ih, Iranian hero, ii, 4 ; iii, 

46 ; iv, 14S 
Nastuh, Turanian hero, iv, 156 
Nastiih, son of Mihran Sitad, 77J, 
. viii, 225, 303 
advises Hurmuzd, viii, 96 
released by Bahrdm Chii- 
bina, viii, 306 
Nastiir (Basta-vairi, BastvAr), 
son of Zarir, 755, v, 12, 
25, 26 
exploits of, foretold by 

Jamasp, v, 50 
given command of the rear, 

V, 55 
fights victoriously, v, 60 
goes in search of Zarir, v, 67 
finds Zarir's corpse and 

laments over it, v, 67 
exhorts Gushtasp to avenge 

Zarir, v, 68 
goes forth with Gushtasp 's 

steed and armour, v, 69 
challenges Eidirafsh, v, 69 
fights with Bidirafsh, v, 70 
attacks, with Asfandiyar and 

Niish Azar, the Turan- 
ians, V, 71 
leads the host home, is 

given a command, and 

invades Tiiran, v, 74 
stationed on the Iranian 

left, v, 94 
commands the right, v,-i09 
Nastiir, son of Shirin and 

Khusrau Parwiz, ix, 39 
Nature-worship, of the Aryans, 

i. 7. 51 
Nau-Ardshir = Nard, vii, 381 
Naubahar, Fire-temple at Balkh, 

31 
Luhrasp retires to, v, 31 
Naudar, Shah, 142, i, 90, 91, 
369 ; ii, 20, 36, 70, 153. 
336, 400, 404 ; iii, 8, 24, 
39, 50, 57. ^7. «6, 112, 
123, 132, 177, 187, 215, 

257, 28CJ, 294, 327 ; >v, 

13, 61, 70, 157. 167, 178, 



332 



GENERAL INDEX 



Naudar — cont. 

191, 193. 206, 237, 254, 

262, 267 ; vii, 37, 171 ; 

viii, 223, 242 
embassies of, to Sam, i, 248, 

288 
returns with Sam to court, i, 

289 
counselled by Miniichihr and 

appointed his successor, i, 

335 

laments for Miniichihr, i, 

336 
Reign of, 142, i, 337 seq. 

Note on, i, 337 
accession of, i, 339 
evil rule of, i, 339 
revolts against, i, 339 
appeals to Sam, i, 339 
the chiefs reconciled to, 

by Sam, i, 341 
rewards Sam, i, 342 
marches against Afrasiyab 

to Dahistan, i, 345 
battles of, with Afrasiyab, 

i, 348 seq. 
takes counsel with Karan, 

i. 349 

defeated, i, 350, 353 

sends Tus and Gustaham 
to conduct the Persian 
women to Alburz, i, 351 

beleaguered in Dahistan, i, 

353 

escapes from Dahistan, i, 

355 
pursued and taken by Afra- 
siyab, i, 355 
slain, i, 363 

the Iranians bewail, i, 364 
Nauriiz, Persian New-year's day 
when the sun enters Aries, 
vi, 33. 55, 273, 389 ; via, 
216 
Nawand, place in Khurasan on 
the Binaliid Kuh (?), ii, 
107 
Naztab, a miller's daughter, vii, 
32 and note 
taken to wife by Bahram 
Giir, vii, 33 



Nearchus, admiral of Alexander 

the Great, vi, 12, 61, 70 
Ichthyophagi, account of 

by, quoted by Arrian, vi, 

69, 70 
Nectanebus II (Nekht-neb-f), 

the last Pharaoh 
personates Amcn-Ra and 

becomes the legendary 

father of Alexander the 

Great, vi, 16 
story of, vi, 18 and note 
Need, personification of. See 

Greed. 
Negroes, the, described, vi, 73, 

157 
cause frost and snow to 
harm Sikandar, vi, 156, 

157 
Nekht-neb-f. See Nectanebus. 
Nereis. See Kale. 
Nero, Roman emperor (A.D. 54- 

68), vii, 279 
Neryosang, ii, 82 
Nestorian, Nestorians, viii, 195 

Metropolitan, vii, 219 

Patriarch, vii, 219 
New Year, Persian, beginning of, 

i, 74. 88 
Feast of (Nauriiz, New 

Year's Day), i, 74, 274 ; 

vii, 94, 200 

origin of, i, 133 
Nicaea, Indian city, vi, 18 
Nicephorium (Callinicus, Kalini- 

yiis q.v., Warigh, Rakka), 

viii, 188 
Nicolaus of Damascus, Greek 

historian temp. Augustus, 

vi, 195 
Nil, as rhyme-word, i, 75 
Nile, i, 40, 71, 114, 297 ; ii, 96, 
153. 217, 310, 402 ; ill, 
38, 41, 58, 208, 224, 225 ; 
iv, 145 seq., 180, 333 ; v, 
176, 188, 191, 245 ; vi, 42, 
169, 171, 269 ; vii, 48, 
250, 344, 416 ; viii, 126, 
284. 293, 294 ; ix, 98 
Blue, vi, 65 
mistaken for Indus, vi, 68 



GENERAL IMjEX 



333 



Ni'inri'iz— Si'stan=ZabulistAn,' i, 
252. 264, 346, 357 ; ii, 21, 
34. 69, 77. So, 84, 338, 
395 ; iii. 17, 35, 319 ; iv, 
136. 188; V, 85, 248, 288 ; 
vii, 327 ; viii, 196, 284 ; 
ix, 5, 6 
conlirmcd to Rustam by Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 297 
Zal by Luhrasp, iv, 312 
Sikandar marches to, vi, 175 
satrapy of, ix, 69 
Nineveh, viii, 193 
fall of, i, 10 
kings of, that attacked 

Iran, i, 10 
battle near, viii, 194 
Ninus, mythical founder of 

Nineveh, v, 292, 293 
Ninyas, son of Ninus, v, 293 
Niris, salt lake in Pars, vi, 17 

referred to, vi, 21 

Nisa, city (Muharamadabad ?) 

in Khurasan or town in 

Kirman, vii, 89 ; viii, 19 

Nishapiir, city in Khurasan,* i, 

36, 45 ; ii, loi ; iv, 255 ; 

V, 28 seq., 291 ; vi, 298 ; 

viii, 173 ; ix, 95 

Nisibis (Xas.'bfn q.v.), city in 

northern Mespotamia, i, 

374 
sieges of, i, 374, viii, 41 

peace of, vi, 254 
cession of, hy Jo. ian, vi, 326 
by Khusrau Parvviz (?), 
viii, 188 
Nisus and Scylla, story of, vi, 

323 note 
Nitetis, vi, 16 

Nivzar, son of Gushtasj), 755, v, 
2O 
death of, foretold by Jam- 
asp, V, 50 
slain, V, 60 



Niydtus (Theodosius, son of 
Maurice), Jjj, viii, 189, 
281, 289 ; ix, 23 

brother of Crcsar, viii, 280, 
310 

put in charge of Maryam, 
vi'i, 280 

welcomed by Khusrau I'ar- 
wiz, viii, 280 

WToth with Khusrau Par- 
wiz, viii, 290 

watches fight between Khus- 
rau Parwiz and Bahram 
Chubi'na, viii, 297 

entertained at banquet by 
Khusrau Parvviz, viii, 309 

quarrel of, witli Bandwi, 
viii, 309 

threat of, to Khusrau Par- 
wiz, viii, 310 

reconciled to Pandwi, viii, 

3" 
returns to Rum, viii, 312 
Nizami, Persian poet, viii, 192 
Nizami-i-'Arudi, Persian writer 
{12th century A.D.), i, 

23 
account of Firdausi by, i, 38 

seq., 45, 46 
Noldeke, Professor, v, 20, 21, 

2S2 ; vi, igS note, 199 and 

note, 253, 313, 372 ; viii, 

71, 188 
on the div Akwan, iii, 271 
quoted, v, 118 
treatise of, on the Alexander 

Romance, etc., vi, 14 and 

7!0te 

on the Story of the Worm, 

vi, 203, 205, 206 
on llaftwad, vi, 206 
on the Gipsies, vii, 6 
on Sufarai, vii, 171, 185 
on Wisdom-literature, vii, 

281 



'Prop'rly speakinR, ZiUmlisliiii is llie name of tin- hilly cmiiUi y about the 
upper waters of the lliliiuiml, while Niinriiz and Sibtiin are synonymous 
nam s for the low lying lands inio which i:s waters di scend, but I-'irdausi does not 
seem to make any such liistinciion. 

• The city has sullered much in the past from the ravages of war and earth- 
quake and has been rebuilt SLveral times on tlightly varying siicts, 



334 



GENERAL INDEX 



Noldcke, on Romance of Baliram 

Chiibina, viii, 73 
North, Sir Thomas (A.D. 1535- 
1603 ?), vii, 383 
version of the Fables of 
Bidpai by, vii, 383 
Northman, the, vi, 19 

found the Russian empire, 
vi, 19 
Note on Pronunciation, preced- 
ing text in each volume 
Nubia, vi, 65 
Niih bin Nasr, Samanid prince 

(A.D. 942-954). vii, 5 
Niih II. bin Mansiir, Samanid 
prince (A.D. 976-997), i, 
2t, 36 ; V, 21 
Nu'man, prince of Hira, 162, 
164, vi, 372, 396, 404 
visits Yazdagird, vi, 377 
goes to the chase with Bah- 

ram Gur, vi, 384 
goes to the Persian court 
with Bahram Giir, vi, 
. 386 

returns to Yaman with 
letters and presents, vi, 

387 
welcomes Bahram Gur on 

his revisiting Yaman, vi, 
390 
invades Tran, vi, 397 
rewarded by Bahram Gur, 
vii, 10 
Nu'min bin Munzir, prince of 
Hira, viii, 188 ; ix, 5 
put to death, viii, 190 
Nu'man, Arab general, ix, 68 

sent by 'Umar to fight 

Yazdagird, ix, 68 
defeats Piriizan at Naha- 

vand, ix, 68 
slain, ix, 69 
Nurse, Manizha's, iii, 297 

interview of, with Bizhan, 
iii, 297 
Niisha (Dukhtnush), daughter of 
Narsi, 162, vi, 3, 324, 

331 

carried off by the Arabs, vi, 

323. 330 



Niish Azar, Firc-templc at 
Balkh, V, 92 note, 173, 
24^,255 
burnt by the Turkmans, v, 

93 
Nush Azar, youngest son of 
Asfandiyar, ii, 3, v, 166, 
283, 285 

attacks, with Nastiir and 
Asfandiyar, the Turanian 
host, V, 71 

builder of a Fire-temple, v, 
81 

with Asfandiyar at Gum- 
badan, v, 98 

informs Asfandiyai of Jam- 
asp's arrival, v, 98, 99 

accompanies Asfandiyar 
from Gumbadan, v, 103 

slays Turkhan, v, 151 

wrangles with Zawara, v, 226 

slays Aiwa, v, 226 

slain by Zawara, v, 227 

death of, reported to Asfan- 
diyar by Bahman, v, 227 

corp.se of, sent to Gushtasp, 

V, 232 

Nushirwan (Kisra, Chosroes I), 

Shah, 166-1J0, i, 27, 42 ; 

V, 260 ; vi, 3, 201 ; vii, 4, 

199, 220, 273 seq., 279 seq., 
320 ; viii, 3 seq., 71, 72, 
86 seq., 98, 129, 169, 108, 

200, 205, 209, 300, 312, 
313. 377 : ix, 22, 26, 71, 
80, 92, 105, 109, no, 119 

collector of Iranian tradi- 
tion, i, 67 

quoted, vi, 208, 209 an^i 
note 

ori<^in of name, vii, 1S5, 211 
and note 

birth of, stories of, vii, 18O, 
197 seq. 

assistants of, against Maz- 
dak, vii, 188, 206 

upbringing of, vii, 200 

Mazdak's attempt to con- 
vert, vii, 205 

disputation of, with Maz- 
dak, vii, 206 seq. 



GENflR.U. INDEX 



335 



Nuslurwi'in, Kiibad dt-ciiles in 
favour of, vii, 208 

executes Mazdak and his 
followers, \ii, 208 

Kii bad's testament in favour 
of vii, 210, 316 

Reign of, i6y, vii, 212 seq. 
Notes on, vii, 212 scq., 279 
seq., 316 seq., 380 seq., 
viii, 3 seq., 41 seq. 

Roman Emperors contem- 
porary with, vii, 212 

historical events of reign of, 
in the Shahnama, vii, 213 

marriage of, with the daugh- 
ter of the Khan vii, 347, 
seq. 
referred to, viii, 72, 97 seq. 

waisof, with Rum, vii, 213, 
217 

first campaign of, vii, 218, 
249 

cons}iiracy against, vii, 214, 
316 

division of empire by, vii, 

214, 224 ; ix, 69 
bargains of, with Justinian, 

vii, 214, 216 seq. 
taxation reformed by, vii, 

215, 224 

wall of, in the Caucasus, J67, 
i, 16 ; vii, 215, 239 
JMas'udi's account of, vii, 

215 

dealings of, with the Alans, 
vii, 216 

Gildn, vii, 216 
Baluchis, vii, 217 

Munzir supported by, vii, 
217, 244 

and consequent war with 
Riim, vii, 217, 244 

jealous of Justinian's suc- 
cesses in the West, vii, 
217 

promises to rule justly, vii, 
221 seq. 

attends muster at the insist- 
ence of liabak, vii, 231 

approves of liabak's con- 
duct, vii, 232 



NushirwSn, method of, in levying 

tioops, vii, 233 
wtites to Caesar on Munzir's 

behalf, vii, 245 
supplies Munzir with troops 

for the invasion of Rum, 

vii, 246 
goes to A/.ar AbadagAn, vii, 

250 
disposition <.)l host by, vii, 

251 
addresses his troops, vii, 251 
proclamations of, vii, 252, 

365 
burial of dead soldiers by, 

vii, 232 
policy of, with enemies, vii, 

253 
takes Shi'irab, vii, 254 

Arayish-i-Rum, vii, 255 

Caesar's treasures, vii, 

255. 258 

defeats Farfurius, vii, 256 
takes Antakiya, vii, 258 
disposes of the Ruman cap- 
tives, vii, 259, 327 
Ruman cordwainer and, vii; 

260 
envoy fiom Caesar comes 

to, vii, 261 
grants peace to Caesar, vii, 

262 
appoints Shirvvi to receive 

the Ruman tribute, vii, 

262 
Christian wife of, vii, 263 

mother of Nushzad, \ ii, 
263, 274 seq. 

helps Nushzad, vii, 266 

laments for Nushzad, vii, 
276 
imprisons Nushzad, vii, 264 
illness and reported death 

of, vii, 264, 265 
hears of Nushzad's revolt, 

vii, 266 
instructs Ram Barzin how 

to act, vii, 267 seq. 
Seven Bancjuets of 168, vii, 

280, 287 seq. 

possiule origin of, vii, 280 



336 



GENERAL INDEX 



Nushirwan, Seven Banquets of, 
Buzurjmihr's discourses 
at, vii, 287 seq. 

dream of, vii, 282 

consults the archmagos, vii, 
282 

seeks for a dream-interpre- 
ter, vii, 2^2 

dieam of, interpreted by 
Buzurjmihr, vii, 284 

rewards and honours Bu- 
zurjmihr, vii, 286, 289, 304, 

311. 315 _ . 

relations of, with Singiba, 

vii, 317 

the Haitalians, vii, "317 
with Mahbud and his sons, 
vii, 319 seq. 
suspects Zuran, vii, 324 
greatness of, vii, 327 
buildings of, vii, 327 
embassy of Khan to, vii, 329 
consults the chiefs as to 
Faghanish, the Khan, and 
the Haitalians, vii, 333 
leply of chiefs to, vii, 334 
rejoinder of, to chiefs, vii, 

336 
prepares for war with the 
Khan, vii, 337 
writes to his chiefs, the 
Khan, and Faghanish, 

vii. 337 
marches from Mada'in, vii, 

337 
goes to Gurgan, vii, 337 

receives embassy from the 

Khan, vii, 339 
holds a court, vii, 340 
displays his prowess before 

the assembly, vii, 341 
dismisses the Khan's envoy 

with a letter, vii, 344 
Khan's offer of affinity to, 

vii, 347 
reply of, vii, 349 
occupies territory evacuated 

by the Khan, vii, 358 
Haitalians and others bring 

gifts to, vii, 360, 362 
gives praise to God, vii, 361 



Nushirwan, leceives the tiibute 

from Rum, vii, 362 
goes to the temple of Azar- 

gashasp, vii, 363 
greatness of, vii, 364 
questions Buzurjmihr, vii, 

367 seq. 
receives the game of chess 

from Hind, vii, 380, 385 
Raja of Hind's embassy to, 

^ii. 384 

rewards Buzurjmihr for dis- 
coveiing how to play 
chess, vii, 388 

sends Buzurjmihr with pre- 
sents and the game of 
nard to Hind, vii, 390 

proposes wager with the 
Raja, vii, 391 

welcomes Buzurjmihr on 
his return from Hind, vii, 

393 
acquires the Book of Kalila 

and Dimna, vii, 423 seq. 
sends gifts to the Raja, vii, 

rewards Barzwf, vii, 429 

precautions of, as to suc- 
cessor, viii, 3 

goes hunting with Buzurj- 
mihr, viii, 4 

suspects and disgraces 
Buzurjmihr, viii, 5 

treats Buzurjmihr with in- 
creasing ligour, viii, 7, S 

reconciled to Buzurjmihr, 
viii, 9 

questioned by archimagcs, 
viii, 14 seq., 28 seq. 

gives judgment against his 
own son, viii, 16 

chief cook of, aggrieved, viii, 
18 

counsels Hurmuzd, viii, 25 
seq. 

writes to console Caesar's 
son and successor, viii, 

43 
wroth at answer received, 

viii, 45 
invades Rum, viii, 46 



GENER.U. IXDEX 



337 



NushirwAn, success of, viii, 47 

checked, viii, 47 
in want of money, viii, 47 
takes counsel with Biizurj- 

mihr, viii, 47 
refuses advances from a 

shoemaker, viii, 50, 71 
high esteem of, for scribes, 

viii, 50 
grants peace to, and takes 

tribute from, the Kumans, 

viii, 52 
returns to Taisafi'in, viii, 53 
sons of, viii, 56, 63 
instructs Biizurjmihr to 

prove Hurmuzd, viii, 56 

seq. 
testament of, in favour of, 

and last counsels to, 

Hurmuzd, viii, 61 seq, ; ix, 

22 
directions of, as to inter- 
ment, viii, 65 
hall of, shattered, viii, 68 
death of, \iii, 69, 71 
system of administration of, 

viii, 71 
ministers of, put to death by 

Hurmuzd, viii, 81 seq. 
choice of Hurmuzd by, story 

of, viii, 87 
palace of, viii, 193 
dream of, ix, 92 
Niish Zad = Mihr-i-Nush, q.v., 

V. 285 and note 
Nushzad, father of Mihrak, 

vi, 237, 241, 267, 270, 

273 
Nushzad, son of Nushirwin, 

i6y, vii, 213, 265, seq. 
histoiical account of, vii, 219 
Firdausi's account of, vii, 

263 seq. 
education of, vii, 263 
imprisonment of, vii, 264 
hears report of Niishirwdn's 

death, vii, 265 
revolts, vii, 266 
helped by his mother, vii, 

266 
writes to Caesar, vii, 266 

VOL. IX. 



Niishzdd, goes to fight with Rdm 

Barzin, vii, 272 
exhorted to yield by Piriiz, 

vii, 273 
reply of, to Piruz, vii, 274 
wounded, vii, 275 
repents, vii, 275 
sends message to his mother, 

vii. 275 
dies, vii, 275 

lamentation for, vii, 276 
Firdausi's reflections on, vii, 

276 



O 



Oasis of Ammon, vi, 65 

Alexander the Great's visit 

to, vi, 65 
Oblivion, Castle of, vii, 184 
Obsequies, military, in the time 

of Nuslurvvan, vii, 252 
Oceanus, Homeric and Oriental, 

i. 71 
Odatis, Scythian princess, iv, 315 

legend of, iv, 315 
Odenathus, Arab chief, vi, 222 
Shapiir son of Ardshir and, 

vi, 294, 325 
confused with Valerian, vi, 
324 seq. 
Odorico, Minorite Fiiar and tra- 
veller (A.D. 1286-1331), 
vi, 13 
Old Man of the Mountain, the, v, 

30 
Olives, taxes on, vii, 215, 225 
Olympias (N^hid, Halai ?), wife 
of Philip of Maccdon and 
mother of Alexander the 
Great 
legendary relations of, with 
Nectanebus, vi, 16, 18 
choice by, of name for her 

son, vi, 19 
intrigues of, vi, 82 
Omartes, Scj^thian chief, iv, 315 

legend of, iv, 315 
Omen, ii, 192, v, 177 

of the quince, ix, 13, 14 

Y 



33^ 



GENERAL INDEX 



Omphis, Indian king, vi, 62 
Onager, the div Akwan as, iii, 
273 seq. 
Bahram Chubina guided by, 
viii, 156, 158 
Onesicritus, chief pilot of Alex- 
ander the Great and 
writer, vi, 67 
untrustworthy, vi, 12, 61, 67 
Fakirs and, vi, 61 
Calanus and, vi, 61 
Mandanes and, vi, 61 
Onnes, minister of Ninus, v, 292, 

.293 
Ordeal by fire, ii, 218 seq. 
Ormus (Hurmuz), city on the 

Persian Gulf, vi, 204 
Osrhoene, kingdom in northern 

Mesopotamia, vi, 198 
Othello, play of, quoted, vi, 324 
Owls, Mas'iidi's apologue of the, 

vi, 310 
and Crows, story of, viii, 263 

and note 
Ox, the first, i, 5 

legend of the, i, 117, 236 
Ox of Kai Kaiis, ii, 26 
Ox-hide, or skin, filled with gold 

as tribute, v, 265 and 

note ; vii, 262, 363 ; viii, 

46, 52, 53 
Oxus (Jihiin, q.v.), river, i, 57 ; 
ii, 190 ; v, 12, 29, ; vii, 
156. 317 ; viii, 72 
ancient trade-route, i, 57 
confused with Aras, i, 71, 

370 

change in course of, i, 57 
note, iii, 10 

referred to, ix, 117 and note, 
118 
Oxyartcs, father of Roxana 
(Riishanak), wife of Alex- 
ander the Great, vi, 32 



Padashkvar, a mountain or sec- 
tion of the Alburz range, 
i, 338 



Page, of Nushi'rwan, viii, 5 
seq. 
relative of Biizurjmihr, viii, 

5 
instructed by Buzuijmihr, 

viii, 6 
takes messages between 
Nushirwan and Biizurj- 
mihr, viii, 6 seq. 
Pahlav, region, ii, 77, 102 ; iii, 

222 
Pahlavan, i, 83 ; vi, 194 
Pahlavi, middle Persian language 
of Ashkanian (Parthian) 
and Sasanian times, vii, 
6, 113, 188, 380 seq. ; viii, 

73. 74 ; ix. 50 
meaning of, i, 64, 83 
Firdausi's use of the word, 

i, 69 
Fables of Bidpai translated 

into, vii, 382 
language (middle Persian), 

v, 24, 26, vi, 194 
texts, ii, 27 ; v, 13, 14, 24, 

30, ; vi, 195, 196, 257 
version of the Pseudo-Callis- 

thenes, vi, 14, 16, 84 
writing and reading, con- 
fusion in, vi, 14, 62, 205, 

206 
Paiddwasi, Persian coin = five 

dinars, vii, 95 and note, 

viii, 381 and note ; ix, 

19 
Paighu = Turanian, v, 13, 21 

7Jote, 38 note, 41 note, 44 

note ; viii, 190 
Paikar-i-Guid, melody, viii, 398 

and note 
Pairika. See Pari. 
Palace of Jewels, 160 
Paladins, 154 
Palashan, Turanian hero, 147, 

iii, 26, 79 
surveys the Iranian host, 

iii, 69 
slain by Bizhan, iii, 70 
Palawina (Cappadocia), vi, 294, 

297, 298 
Palestine, vi, 30 



GENERAL INDEX 



339 



Palladius, bishop, vi, 6i, 62 

treatise of, on the Brah- 
mans, vi, 61 
interpolated into the 
Pseudo-CaUisthenes, vi, 
61 
Palmyra, city in Syrian desert, 
vi, 294, 322, 324 ; vii, 217 
Palus Maeotis (Sea of Azoff), vi, 

73 
Pandavas, the five, iv, 138, 139 
pilgrimage of, compared 

with that of Kai Khusrau 

and his paladins, iv, 138 
Pand Namah, of Moola Firooz, i, 

201 note 
Pandnamak-i Vadsh6rg-Mitr6-i 

Bukhtakan, PahlavT text, 

vii, 279 
Pandu, Indian king, iv, 316 
Papak, Tribal King, 160, vi, 3, 

194. 195. 198 seq., 2H 

note and seq., 227, 252, 

254. 256 ; viii, 214. 219 

and note, 285 
Sasan and, vi, 212 
daughter of, marries Sdsan, 

160, vi, 213 

mother of Ardshir Papa- 
kan, viii, 214 
Ardawan's letter to, vi, 214 
dies, vi, 218 
kindred of, support Ardshir 

Papakan, vi, 223 seq. 
Papakan Ardshir. See Ardshir 

Papakan. 
Parable, Mazdak's, vii, 201 
Paradise Lost referred to, vi, 71 
Pari, i, 83, 172 
Paris, city, MSS. of the Pseudo- 

Callisthenes in National 

Library at, vi, 14 
Parmuda {see too Khdn of Chin), 

170, lyi, viii, 75, 117, 130, 

12,6 seq., 146, 1^0 seq., 164, 

174 
hears of Bahr4m Chubina's 

victory and takes counsel, 

viii, 131 
marches toward Jihun, viii, 

131 



Parmuda, approaches Balkh, 
viii, 134 
j attacks and is defeated by 

' Bahrdm Chubina, viii, 

134 seq. 

escapes to .'\w4za, viii, 138 

besieged by Bahram Chii- 
! bina, viii, 138 seq. 

negotiates surrender of 
Awaza with Bahram Chii- 
bina, viii, 139 seq. 

surrenders Awaza and sets 
out for fran, viii, 143 

insulted by Bahram Chu- 
bina, viii, 144 

Bahram Chubina tries to 
placate, viii, 145 
Pars (Persis, FdrsistAn), country 
on the eastern shores of 
the Persian Gulf, 142, 153. 
160, i, 351, 353, seq., 357, 
368, 371 ; ii, 23, 28, 76. 
loi, 226, 275, 286, 362, 
410 ; iv, 146, 256, 269, 
270, 318 ; V, 293, ; vi, 17. 
25, 32 note, 37, 45, 115, 
119, 194 and passim ; vii, 
86, 90, 95. 190, 194. 201, 
206, 214, 224 ; viii, 109 
note. 112, 216, 241, 393, 
395 ; ix, 68 

corpse of Darius Codomanus 
sent to, vi, 33 

Ardshir Papakan fiees to, vi, 
220 
marches from, against Ar- 

dawan, vi, 227 
returns to, vi, 229 

Iranians, after the death of 
Yazdagird son of Shapiir, 
meet to consult in, \i, 394 
Parsi's, ix, 64 

Part Kings. See Tribal Kings. 
Parthia, kingdom, v, 10 

Hystaspcs governor of, v, 
10 
Parthian, Paithians, i 10, 60, 64 ; 
vi, 203, 256, 322 ; vii, 156; 
viii, 73 

conquest of fran by, i, 19 

Zoioastrianism under, i, 63 



340 



GENERAL INDEX 



Parthian, dynasty, iii, 9, ii ; v, 
281 ; vi, 194, 201 
uses the title of King of 
kings, vi, 197 
Great King, vi, 198 
history, events of, repro- 
duced in distorted form in 
Shahnama, iii, 11 
kingdom, ii, 80 
Parvviz, Iranian chief, vi, 394 
Parwiz, meaning of, viii, 187. 

See too Khusrau Parwiz. 
Pashan (Ladan), battle of, iii, 15, 
80, 89 ; iv, 27, 36, 42, 
90, 206 ; viii, 397 and 
note 
Pashang, father of Miniichihr, i, 
90 ; iii, 25 (?) ; iv, 136, 
marries daughter of fraj ; 
i, 205 
Pashang, ruler of Turan and 
father of Afrasiyab, 142 ; 

i, 92, 336, 337 ; ii. II. 13. 

18, 20, 21, 297, 401 ; iii, 

15 ; iv, 78, 136, 151, 174, 

222, 266, 289 
consults his chiefs as to war 

with fran, i, 342 
bids Afrasiyab invade fran, 

i, 343. 375 

advised by Ighriras not to 

make wai, i, 344 
overrules Ighriras, i, 344 
Afrasiyab's letter to, i, 346 
wroth with AfrasiyAb, i, 

374 

Pashang (Shida, q.v.), son of 
Afrasiy4b, i, 92 ; iii, 15 

Pashin, son of Kai Kubad. See 
Kai Pashin. 

Pashin, Iranian noble, vi, 408 

Patashwargar, region, vi, 202 and 
note 

Pat-khusrau, brother of Gush- 
tasp, V, 26 

Patrician, iv, 348 

Patrons of Fiidausi, i, 29 

Pauravas, Indian race and dyn- 
asty, vi, 31 

Pauriishasp. See Pourushaspa. 

Pel fumes, invention of, i, 133 



Periods, mythic and historic, of 

Shahnama, i, 49, 53 
Perozes (Piruz), Sasanian king, 

v'ii, 159 
Persepolis (Istakhr), city in 

Pars, vi, 31, 32 note, 373 ; 

ix, 65 
buildings at, attributed to 

Humai, v, 293 
Zoroastrian sciiptuies said 

to have been burnt at, i, 

63 
Persia, i, 308 ; ii, 191 ; iii, 109, 
128 ; iv, 8 ; v, 306 note ; 
vi, 61, 278 ; vii, 118, 129, 
381 ; viii, 195 ; ix, 66 
Chess brought to, vi, 201 ; 

vii, 280, 284 seq. 
Fables of Bidpai brought to, 
vii, 213, 423 seq. 
Persian, Peisians, i, 6, 8 seq., 73, 
74 ; ii, 190 ; v, 74 ; vi, 30 
44, 45, 81, 143, 148, 157, 
170, 201 and passim 
bard, quoted, vii, 265 
dispute with the Riimans 
over Sikandar's burial, vi, 
184 
empire, ii, 9 ; vi, 197, ix, 65 
war of, with Riim, viii, 41 
history and legend in rela- 
tion to Greek history and 
legend, ii, 9 
language, vi, 147, 205 ; vii, 
134, 140, 143, 430 ; ix, 12, 

monks introduce the silk- 
worm into Europe, vi, 204 
mutilation of captives, vi, 

323. 334. 348, 357- 404 
sea or gult, vi, 204, 205, ix, 

66, 68 
swords, vii, 135 
wisdom-literature, vii, 278 

seq., viii, 3 
verse, vii, 383 

Fables of Bidpai trans- 
lated into, vii, 383 
conquest of Yaman, viii, 24 

note 
raid Syiia, viii, 41 



GEN ERA J. INDEX 



.rfi 



iVisiaii, iVrsians, defeat by 
Romans rcfcrictl tt), viii, 

war with Turks, viii, jj 
Book of Kings, viii, 73 
Tabari. See Tabari. 
= Bahram Chubina, viii, 113 
= Hurmuzd, viii, 116, 117 
prince = Bahrain Chubina, 

viii, 319 
ideas on marriage, ix, 7 
= Ashtdd and Kharrad, ix, 

24 
exonerate Shiiin, ix, 38 
win ' The Battle of tlie 

Biidge,' ix, 67 
fail in attack on Hira, ix, 67 
defeat of, at Kadisiya, ix, 
67, 84 

Jalula, ix, 68 
Xahavand, ix, 69 
Shu'ba Mughira's embassy 

to, ix, 69 
robes, ix, 94 

transcribe Shalmama for 
Firdausi, ix, 121 
Persica, of Ktesias, v, 293 
Persis (PArs, Farsistan), vi, 195 
Pesho-tanu (Bishutan q.v.), v, 

12 
Pestilence, in reign of Kubad, ix, 

3. 7 . 
Petroleum, in ancient cult and 

modem industry, i, 56 seq. 

Pharasmanes, King of Kharazm, 
vi, 72 

Philip II of Macedon, (Failakus, 

B.C. 382-336), father of 

Alexander the Great, i, 

55 note, vi, 16, 29 

Nectanebus and, story of, 

vi, 18 
names his son Alexander, 
vi. 19 

Philon, Macedonian noble, vi, 76 

Philosophers, Greek, enter- 
tained by Niishirwin, vii, 
280 

Phocas, Eastern Roman Em- 
peror, viii, 187, 189, 193, 
194 



Phosi)hf)r, UKiining star, ii, 123 
Piiolius, (luoted, viii, 191 
Phraates 11, Parthian king, 
(13. C. 13S-127), ii. So, 81 
Phraates = Farh ad, iii, 11 
Phrygians, the, vi, 71 
Pil, as rhyme-word, i, 75 
Pillar, Bahram Giii 's, vii, 92, 160, 

i6t, 164 
Pilsam, Turanian hero, 1^4, 146, 
ii, 112 seq., 320, 323 note, 
350 seq. : iii, 204 
pleads for Siyawush, ii, 315 
summons I'lran to save Far- 
angis, ii, 322 
Piran, son of Wisa, Turanian 
hero, cousin, commander- 
in-chief, and counsellor of 
Afrasiyab, 145, 146, 148- 
152, i, 92 ; ii, 3, 112, 188, 
257 seq., 264, 277, 291, 
3". 315, 316. 335, 350, 
370. 377. 379 seq., 397. 
398 ; iii, 13, 26 note, 39, 
42, 58, 90, 91, 98 seq., 102, 
108, 120, 122, 123, 125, 
142, 149 seq., 158, 160, 
161, 169, 181 seq., 192, 193, 
199 seq., 216 seq., 222, 
227, 232, 234, 242, 252, 
253. 259, ?>05 seq., 335 ^e?-. 
349, 350, 357 ; iv, 7. 10 
seq., 15 seq., 29 seq., 36, 
38, 41, 47, 59 seq., 88 seq., 
93 seq., 103, 106 seq., 117, 
118, 129, 134, 145, 159, 
160, 162, 205, 206 ; viii, 
414 
character of, i, 55 
identical with Harpagus in 

legend, ii, 191 
advises Afrdsiyab to receive 
Siyciwush, ii, 253 note and 
seq. 
goes to welcome Siydwush, 

ii, 258 seq. 

daughter of, 145. See J arira. 

arranges marriages for 

Siy4wush, 145, ii, 26S 

seq. 

entertains Siydwush, ii, 278 



34^ 



GENERAL INDEX 



I'l'ran, offers to licl]i Siyawush to 

builtl Gang-dizh, ii, 27S 
prophecy of Siyawush to, ii, 

2S2 seq. 
goes to collect tribute, ii, 285 
visits Siyawush, ii, 2S7 

Afrasiyab, ii, 288 
summoned to save Far- 

angis, ii, 322 seq. 
pleads for Farangis, ii, 324 
takes charge of Farangis, ii, 

325 
dreams of Siyawush, ii, 325 
protects the infant Kai 

Khusrau, ii, 326 seq. 
advises Afrasiyab respecting 

Kai Khusrau, ii, 356 
sends Kulbad and Nastihan 

to pursue Kai Khusrau, 

ii. 377 
overthrown with his host 

by Giv, ii, 385 
appeals to Kai Khusrau, ii, 

386 
released, ii, 387 
desciibes Giv's prowess to 

Afiasiyab, ii, 389 
disgraced, ii, 390 
retires to Khutan, ii, 390 
appointed to oppose the 

Iranians, iii, 71, 79 
marches on Giravgard to 

surprise the Iranians, iii. 

80 
captures the Iranians' herds, 

iii, 81 
defeats the Iranians, iii, 82, 

94 ^ 
Ruhham's embassy to, iii, 87 

grants a month's aimistice 
to Fariburz, iii, 88 

losses of, in battle, iii, 94 

takes half of Kawa's stand- 
ard, iii, 94 

sends Ruin to attack Bah- 
ram, iii, 98 

goes to see Bafiram, iii, 99 

hears of the Iranians' re- 
treat, iii, 105 

informs Afrasiyab and re- 
turns in triumph, iii, 106 



Piran, goes to Khutan, lii, 107 
goes to oppose Tus, iii, 117 
informs Afrasiyab of the 
Iranian invasion, iii, 118 
reinforced, iii, 118 
joins battle with Tus, iii, iiS 
sends a wailock to bring a 
snowstorm on the Iran- 
ians, iii, 128 
defeats the Iranians, iii, 131 
takes counsel with his chiefs, 

iii, 133 
pursues the Iranians, iii, 134 
sends Lahhak and Human 
on in advance, iii, 135 
reaches Mount Hamawan, 

iii, 137 
beleaguers the Iranians, iii, 

138 
attacked by Tus, iii, 139 
hears of the approach of 

reinf 01 cements, iii, 151 
haiangues his host, iii, 151 
goes to meet his allies, iii, 

153 

plan of campaign of, re- 
jected, iii, 162 

hears of the arrival of Iran- 
ian succouis, iii, 164 seq. 
Rustam, iii, 174 

takes counsel with Kami'is 
and the chiefs, iii, 175, 182 

attacks the Iranians, iii, 176 

describes Rustam to Kamus, 
iii, 183 

parleys with Rustam, iii, 202 

reports to his kindred his 
interview with Rustam, 
iii, 206 

declines Rustam's terms, iii, 
217 

retieats, iii, 231 

counsels Afrasiyab, iii, 253 

uiges Afiasiyab to with- 
draw to Chin, iii, 265 

city of, iii, 335 

enteitains Rustam in dis- 
guise, iii, 335 

pursues Rustam, iii, 349 

sent by Afrasiyab to invade 
Iran, iv, 11 



GENERAL INDEX 



313 



PirAn, liokls park-y with (ii'v, iv, 

JO 

informs Afrcisiyab, iv, 20 
receives reinforcements, iv, 

20 
rejects Giv's overtures, iv, 

21 
occupies Kandbad, iv, 22 
arrays his host, iv, 25 
gives the centre to Huni4n 
iv. 25 

left to Burjisp, iv, 26 
right to Lahhdk and 
Farshidward, iv, 26 
sets scouts on the mountain- 
top, iv, 26 
dissuades Human from 

fighting, iv, 30 
heais of Hiimdn's death, iv, 

51 
sends Nastihan to make a 

night-attack, iv, 53 
hears of Neistihan's death, 

iv, 55 
attacks Giidarz, iv, 55 
proposes terms to Gudarz, 

iv, 63 
sends Ruin with letter to 

Gudarz, iv, 67 
receives Giidarz' reply, iv, 74 
haiangues his troops and 

prepares for battle, iv, 75 
sends messenger to Afra- 

siyab, iv, 75 
receives Afrasiy4b's reply, 

iv, 80 
becomes despondent, iv, 81, 

98 
sends LahhAk and Far- 

shfdward to take the 

Trinians in flank, iv, 82 
fights with Gfv, iv, 84 
appeals to Lahhak and 

Farshidward for help, iv, 

85 

announces the proposed 
Battle of Eleven Rukhs, 
iv, 94 

gives the chief command to 
Lahhdk and Farshidward, 
iv, 94 



Piran, instructs them, iv, 95 

holds a parley with Gudarz 

and arranges with liim 

the Battle of the Eleven 

Rukhs, iv, 95 seq. 

steed of, slain by Gudarz, 

iv, 107 
falls under his steed and is 

injured, iv, 107 
flees from Gudarz, iv, 107 
refuses to surrender, iv, 

108 
wounds Gudarz, iv, 108 
slain by Giidarz, iv, 109 
lamented for by Lahhak 
and Farshidward, iv, 112 
Kai Khusrau, iv, 127 
buried with the Turanian 
champions by Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 128 
death of, announced to 

Afiasiydb, iv, 151 
treasures of, taken pos- 
session of by AfrasiyAb, iv, 
219 
Piriiz (Perozes), ShAh, 166, vi, 3 ; 
vii, 4, 153, 178 seq., 335, 
359 ; viii, 73, 75, 168, 
242, 245, 267, 285 
passed over in the succes- 
sion by Yazdagird, vii, 

155 
helped by the HaitaHans, 

vii, 156, 157 
defeats Hurn^uz, vii, 157 
Hurmuz p^irdoncd by, vii, 

156, 158 
Reign of, 166, vii, 159 seq. 

Note on, vii, 159 seq. 

calamities of, \ii, 159 
title of, vii, 159 
relic of, vii, 159 
measures of, against drought 

vii, 159, 162 
cities of, vii, 159, 163 
expedition of, against 

HaitaHans, vii, 159, 

seq. 

tradition of, vii, 160 
in mythical story, 
161 



the 
164 



vii. 



344 



GENERAL INDEX 



Piruz (Perozes), Bahram Gur's 

pillar said to have been 

moved by, vii, i6i 
daughter of, taken prisoner, 

vii, i6i 

child of, the wife of 
Kubad, vii, i6i, 184 
accession of, vii, 161 
advances against Khiish- 

nawaz, vii, 164 
gives the van to Hurmuz, 

vii, 164 
gives the real to Kubad, 

vii, 164 
gives the regency to P)alash, 

vii, 164 
makes Sufarai (Sarkhan) 

minister to Balash^ vii, 

164 and note 
raphes to the appeal of 

Khiishnawaz, vii, 165, 167 
defeated by Khushnawaz, 

vii, 168 
death of, vii, 168 
Iranian tradition of the 

revenge for, vii, 170 
Sufarai determines to 

avenge, vii, 173 
Piruz, franian chief, vii, 85 
Piiuz, Iranian general, vii, 187 
Piruz, Iranian warrioi, vii, 219, 

273 seq. 
exhorts Nushzad to yield, 

vii, 273 
Piriiz, father of Ustad, viii, 

296 
Piruz, son of Khusrau, minister 

of Ardshir son of Shiiwi, 

175 

appointed general, ix, 44 
letter of Guiaz to, ix, 46 
takes counsel, ix, 46 
writes to Guraz, ix, 47 
Guraz marches against, ix, 

48 
appeals to Tukhar, ix, 48 
feasts with Aidshir, ix, 48 
informs Guraz of the death 

of Ardshir, ix, 51 
put to death, ix, 57 
Piruz, Iranian prince, ix, 59 



Piri'iz, son of Shapur, fianian 
noble, takes Rustam's 
letter to Sa'ad, ix, 80, 81 

Piruzan, Persian general, com- 
mands Persian forces at 
Nahavand, ix, 68 
slain, ix, 69 

Piruz-Ram (Ram-Piruz), city 
built by Piruz, 166, vii, 

159, 163 
Piruz Shapur (Ambar q.v.), vi, 

3^7. 357 
Pisces, constellation, i, 310 and 

note : ii, 407 ; iii, 26, 159, 
318 ; iv, 364 ; vi, 395 ; 
vu, 245 ; viii, 51, 342 ; 
ix, 71 

Pishdadian, Pishdadians, i, 116, 
373 ; vii, 161, 171 
Dynasty, i, 49, 115 seq., 
122 ; ii, 9, 336 ; iii, 9, 13 ; 
vi, 194 

Plague. See Pestilence. 

Planets,the seven, vi,2o6 ; vii,4o8 
created by Ahriman, 3, 52 
evil influence of, i, 52 
symbolized in the game of 
naid, vii, 3S2 

Plato (Falatiin), Greek philo- 
sopher (B.C. 427-347), vii, 
100 note 

Planisphere, ii, 215, 216 

Pleiads, Pleiades, i, 114, 205, 
244. 245, 267, 332 ; ii, 
148, 282, 394, 408 ; iv, 
183, 245, 329; V, no, 
131 ; vi, 169, 401 ; \\\, 
365 ; viii, 53, 158 

Plutarch, Greek wiiter (A.D. 46- 
120), vi, 67 

Poll-tax, vii, 215, 225 

Polo, game of, 145, ii, 263 seq., 

292; iv, 349, 350; vi, 329, 

379,382; vii, 57, 118, 143, 

235 ; viii, 246, 247, 25S, 

371 ; ix, 16 

episode in Karndmak and 

Shahnama, vi, 196, 257, 

263, 271 

-stick, ii, 292 ; iv, 350 ; vi, 

27T, 272; vii, 118; viii, 247 



GENERAL INDEX 



315 



Ponis (I'"i'ir (/.;■.). liuliaii king, 
vi, 17, ()i siq., 00, 70, .S3 
son of, vi, 18, 63 
Darius' lettci to, vi, 31 
origin of name of, vi, ji 
kingdom of, vi, 31 
Alexander and, historical 
account of, vi, 63 
in the Pseudo-Callisthc- 
nes, vi, 64, 67 
statute of, vi, 64 
nephew of, vi. So 
Pourushaspa, father of Zai- 
duhsht (Zoroaster), ii, g ; 

V, 14. 15. 17 
Prefatory Note, vii, v 
Prelate, or bishop q.v., iv, 341, 
34S ; vi, 184 
as militarist, iv, 197 ; v, 
306; vi, 124; viii, 47 
and vote 
Prelude, to Shahnania, i, 99 seq. 
Kai Kaus, ii, 29 
Suhrdb, ii, 119 
Siyawush, ii, 191 
Kai Khusrau, iii, 15 
Farud, iii, 37 
Kamus, iii, no 
Akwan, iii, 272 
Bizhan and Manizha, iii, 2S7 
Battle of the Twelve Rukhs, 

iv, 9 
Rustam and Shaghad, v, 261 
Niishirwan, vii, 220 
Hurmuzd, viii, 77 
Presbyter, iv, 348 
Prithd, Indian princess, iv, 316 
Procopius, Byzantine historian 
(6th century A.D.), vii, 187 
Prometheus, i, 57 
Pronunciation, Note on, preced- 
ing text in each volume. 
Property-tax, remission of, 165 
Prophet, the, Praise of, Jjp 
Proverb, i, 194, 195. 197 ; vii, 

185 ; viii, 187 
Pseudo - Callisthenes, Greek 
Romance of Alexander 
the Great, ii, 9 ; vi, 
30 seq., 62 seq., 71, 72, 
74 seq. 



Pseudo-Calisthcncs, account and 
versions of, vi, 13 seq., 

17 
vogue of, \ i, 17 

treatise of I'allacliiis inter- 

p(jlated in, vi, 61 
Alexander and Porus in, vi, 

64 
historic elements in, vi, 83 
Egyptian elements in, vi, 83 
Persian elements in, vi, 83 
Arabic elements in, vi, 83 
diagram to illustrate, vi, 84 
Ptolemy, son of Lagus, one of 
Alexander the Great's 
generals, king of Egypt 
(B.C. 323-283), and his- 
torian, vi, 12, 13, 66 
Piilad, a div, ii, 44, 54, 55, 64, 
93 ; iii, 256 ; iv, 296 and 
note ; v, 204 
Pul4d, Iranian hero, ii, 22 
Pulad, Turanian hero, ii, 264 ; 

iii, 199, 234 
Piilad wand, Turanian hero or 
div, I4g ; iii, 191, 268, 
270 
summoned by Afrasiyab, iii, 

254 
goes to help Afrasiyab, iii, 

255 
takes counsel with Afra- 

siyAb, iii, 256 
worsts Tus, iii, 257 

Giv, Ruhhdm, and Biz- 
han, iii, 258 
cleaves in twain Kawa's 

standard, iii, 25S 
challenged by Rustam, iii, 

259 
overthrown by Rustam, iii, 

264 
withdraws with his army 

from the luld, iii, 265 
Pun-t (Berbera q.v.), ii, 79 
Piirandukht, Shah, lys, v, 294 ; 

vi, 3 ; ix, 56 
reproaches Kubad, ix, 17 
makes Shahranguiaz prime 
minister, ix, 56 
True Cross and, ix, 56 



346 



GENERAL INDEX 



Purmaya (Barmaiiin), brother of 

Faridun, i, 90, 91 ; v, 261 

referred to, i, 147, 165 

Kaianush and, summon the 

smiths to Faridun, i, 158 

go with Faridun against 

Zahhak, i, 159 
attempt to kill Faridun, 
i, 160 
Pusfairukh, ix, 50 
Python, Apollo and the, vi, 203 



Q 



Queen of Chin (wife of the 
Khan), viii, 190 

daughter of, slain by lion- 
ape, viii, 322 

asks Bahram Chubina to 
avenge her daughter, viii, 

324 
steward of, plots with Khar- 
rad against Bahram Chubina 

viii. 335 
daughter of, cuied by Khar- 

rad, viii, 336 
grants boon to Khan ad, 

viii, 338 
disgraced, viii, 3^4 
Questions, Mountain of the Holy, 

i, 62 
hard, vii, 102 seq. 
Quince, omen of the, ix, 13, 14 
Quintus Curtius, Roman writer 

(ist century A.D.), vi, 65 
on the Amazons, vi, 72 



R 



Races, duplicate in West and 
East, vi, 68 
fair-haired, vi, 73 
Rad, ruler of Zabulistan, vii, 86 
Rada, Mount, ix, 91, 94 
Radwi, archimage 

pleads with Mahwi for Yaz- 
dagird, ix, 102 

•The village of Riwad to the south 
was once the western boundary ol the 



Rai, city and district near Tih- 
ran, 174, i, 363, 366 seq. ; 
ii. 23, 399 ; iii, 242 ; iv, 
147, 255, 256 ; V, 14, 18 ; 
vi, 32, 202, 219, 229 ; vii, 
84, 160, 184 ; viii, 72, 
155, 166, 171, 173, 174, 
189, 214, 216, 240 ; ix, 
68, 69, 89, 95, 96 
seat of the Magi, i, 60 
Khar of. See Khar, i, 368, 

374. 381 

Ardawan's capital, vi, 201 

Shapur of, vii, 184, 185, 191, 
192 

seat of Arsacid power, viii, 
72 

Bahram Chubina goes to, 
viii, 306 

Khusrau Parwiz oppresses, 
viii, 365 

misery of, viii, 367 

Gurdya delivers, viii, 368 
Rai. See Raja. 

Raibad, town, about twenty 
miles west of Nishaptii, 
and district east of the 
Jagatai range, in Khura- 
san,*, iv, 17, 22, 23, 47, 
55, 76, 88, 112, 134 

occupied by Gudarz, iv, 
16 

arrival of Kai Khusiau at, 
iv, III, 126 
Rdja (Rai) of Hind, temp. Luh- 
rasp, iv, 321 ; ix, 17 
temp. Niishirwan, i6g, vii, 140 
and note, 143, 424 

proposes wager to Niishir- 
wan, vii, 5, 385, 387 

receives game of nard from 
Nushirwan, vii, 5, 381, 
389 seq. 

fails to discover how to play 
the game, vii, 392 

pays forfeit to Nushirwan, 

vii, 393 
receives Ntishirwan's gifts 
from Barzwi, vii, 425 

of the range may perhaps indicate what 
district. 



GENERAL INDEX 



347 



Kaja, assists Barzwi in his mis- 
sion to Hind, vii, 428 

letter of, ix, 17 

put in cliarge of Shirin, 
ix, 17 _ 
Rakhsh, Rustam's steed, T42, i, 
3S6; ii, 13, 42 scq., 67, 74, 
94, 97, 110, 116, 139, 143, 
311 354; iii, 146, 177, 
186, 189, 194, 195, 223, 
224, 226, 227, 229, 259, 
264, 275, 276, 278, 279, 
313. 3^4. 3-26, 335, 342. 
344. 346 seq., 350, 352 ; 
iv. 295 ; V, 117, 184, 192, 
198. 207, 208, 214, 219, 
228 seq., 234 seq., 266, 275 

caught by Rustam, i, 378 
seq. 

described, i, 379, 380 

care taken of, i, 380 

slays a lion, ii, 45 

encounters a dragon, ii, 48 

stolen by Turkmans, ii, 121 
seq. 

sire of Shurab's charger, ii, 
128 

saddled by Giv, Ruhliam, 
and Tiis for the fight with 
Suhrab, ii, 160 

referred to, iii, 184, 228, 
253 ; V, 199 

wounded by Asfandiyar, v, 
229 

returns home without Rus- 
tam, V, 229 

Rustam's thought of aban- 
doning, V, 235 

healed by the Simurgh, v, 

237 
tries to save Rustam, v, 

270 
falls into the pit, v, 270 
body of, taken from pit by 

Faramaiz, v, 275 
tomb of, V, 276 
loid of = Rustam, v, 306 
Rakhshasas, vi, 13 
Rakka (Callinicus, KAliniyus ^.t;., 

Nicephorium, Warigh), 

city, viii, 188 



Ram, personification of the 
Divine Grace, i, 374. See 
mountain-sheep. 
Rustam's life saved by a, ii, 

46 

constellation, ii, 299 ; v, 129 

Ram, Fire-temple, vi, 202, 226 

Ram, franian wairior, viii, 291 

Rdm Ardsliir, city, vi, 202, 290 

and note 
Rdm Barzin, high priest and 
general, 167, vii, 275 
Kubad's testament kept by, 

vii, 210 
Nushirwan's instructions to, 
concerning Nushzad, vii, 
267 seq. 
goes to fight with Nush- 

z4d, vii, 272 
hears of Nushzad 's last 
wishes, vii, 276 
Ram Barzin, Persian official, 

viii, 313 
Rambihisht, wife of Sasin, vi, 

198 
Ram Hurmuz, city in Khuzistan, 
east of Ahwaz, vi, 199 
plain of, vi, 199 
Ramishn - i - Ardshir, district, 

vi, 202 
Ram Kubad (Aragan), city, vii, 

188 
Ram Piruz. See Piiuz Rdm. 
Rangwi, Iranian warrior, viii, 

296 
Rasafa, viii, 188 
Rashnawad, captain of the host 
to Hum^i, 158 
assembles troops, v, 301 
Darab enlists under, v, 

301 
host of, reviewed by HumAi, 

V, 302 
marches on Riim, v, 302 
and the adventure of the 

ruined vault, v, 303 
gives presents to Darab, v, 

304 
questions DarAb, v, 304 
sends for the laundercr and 

his wife, v, 304 



348 



GENERAL INDEX 



Rashnawdd, Darab and, defeat 
the Rumans, v, 305, 306 
praises Darab, v, 305, 306 
offers Darab tJie spoil, v, 306 
grants peace to Caesar, v, 

307 
returns to Iran, v, 307 
hears from the launderer and 

his wife about the case of 

Darab, v, 308 
writes to Humai about the 

case of Darab, v, 308 
appears with Darab before 

Humai, v, 309 seq. 
Ras-Shapiir (Gund-i-Shapur, 

q.v.),city. vi, 255, 256 
Rati, weight, vi, 156 and note 
Raven, Raven-head, ix, 91 and 

note, 95 note, 96 
Ravi (Hydraotes), river in the 

Punjab, vi, 64 
Rawalpindi, town and distiict in 

the Punjab, vi, 62 
Rawlinson, Sir Henry, his ac- 
count of Gotarzes' insciip- 

tion at Bihistun, iii, 9 
Rawlinson, Professor, vi, 253 
Red Sea, ii, 364 
Reeds (bamboos), vi, 71 

gigantic, seen by Sikandar, 

vi, 148 
used in house-building, vi, 

71, 148 
Religion, War of the, v, 19, 26 

two campaigns of, v, 29 
Remus, See Romulus. 
Reseph, viii, 188 
Responses, of Nushirwan, viii, 14 

seq., 28 seq. 
Revellers, Rosary of, ix, 38, 40 
Rhyme-words, i, 74 ; ii, 228 

note ; v, 261 ; vi, 372 ; 

vii, 88 and note, 89 and 

note, 174 and note, 245 and 

note, 263 and note 
Firdausi and, viii, 397 note 
Ridge of Gushtasp, v, 29 
Riv-Ardshir, city east of the 

Jarahi river near the head 

of the Persian Gulf, vi, 202 
referred to, vi, 224 



Rivm'z, son-in-law of Ti'is, 14^, 
iii, 14, 25, 45, 57, 60, 71 
prepaics to attack Farud, 

iii, 51 
referred to, iii, 55 
burial of, iii, 68 
Rivniz, son of Kai Kaus, ii, 3 ; 
iii, 14, 96, 113, 114, 232 
slain, iii, 93 

battle for crown of, iii, 94 
Rivniz, son of Zarasp, iv, 360 
Zarir and, go to Rum, iv, 360 
hails Gushtasp as Shah, iv, 
362 
Rizniihr (Zarmihr), son of Sufa- 
rai, 166, vii, 207 ; viii, i6g 
identical with Sufaiai, vii, 

185 

Kubad and, go to the Hai- 
talians, vii, 186 

fate of, vii, 186 

loyalty of, to Kubad, vii, 196 

helps Kubad to escape from 
prison, vii, 197 

negotiates a marriage for 
Kubad, .vii, 197 

made chief minister, vii, 200 
Rizwan, angel, ii, 39 and note, 

288 
Roc, mythical bird, i, 51, 235 
Roman, Romans, i, 10 ; iii, 2S6 ; 
vi, 254, 318, 325, 326 ; vii, 
214 ; viii, 188, 189, 195 ; 
ix, =;o, 66 

relations of, with the Iran- 
ians, i, 14 

empire, Eastern, i, 373 ; vi, 

253 
war of, with Persian, viii, 

41. 193 _ 
Alexander's legendary visit 

to, vi, 30 
emperors, vi, 321, 371, 372 
neglect the defences of the 

Caucasus, vii, 187 
so-called tribute of, to 

Persia, vii, 1S7 
treatment of Munzir by, vii, 

217 

leads to war with Nushir- 
wan, vii, 217 



GENERAL l.\DEX 



349 






Romans.defeat Bahr^m Chiibfna, 

viii, 76 
Romance of Alexander the Great 
(Pseiulo-Callisthenes, 
q.v.), vi, II scq., 88 
incorporation of, in Shdh- 

ndma, vi, 16 
vogue of, vi, 1 7 
sources of marvels in, vi, 12, 

69 
diagiam to illustiate, vi, 84 
Rome, vi, 194, 197, 203, 301, 

Shapi'ir son of Ardshir's wars 

with, vi, 294, 297 
BahrAm Gur's war with, vi, 

373 
Romulus and Remus, foundling 

legend of, v, 293 
Rook, piece in chess. See Rukh. 
Rosary of Revellers, ix, 38, 40 
Roxana (Rushanak, q.v.), vi, 33 
Alexander and, vi, 30 
account of, vi, 32 
Rudiba, daughter of Mihrab 
king of Kabul, wife of Zal, 
and mother of Rustam, 
141, 157. i. 145. 299 : ii, 
44, 180 ; v, 182, 184, 190 
note 
Story of Zal and, i, 256 seq. 

referred to, iii, 285 
Zal hears of, i, 257 
description of, i, 257, 259, 

264, 266, 272 
hears of Zal, i, 260 
falls in love with Zal, i, 260 
handmaids of, go in quest of 
Zal, i, 263 
interview ZAl, i, 266 
invite Z41 to visit RudAba, 

i, 267 
reproached by the porter, 

i, 267 
describe Z41, i, 268 
prepares to receive 7.k\, i, 

269 
entertains, and plights her 

troth to, Z41, i, 272 
Zk\ consults the archiniagcs 
on the matter of, i, 273 



Rudaba, go-between of, with 

Zal, i, 2 So 
7A\ sends Sdm's kttei to, i, 

280 
rewaids her go-between, i, 

281 
go between of, discovered by 

Sindukht. i, 281 
reproached by her parents, i, 

282, 2S7 
congratulated by Sindukht, 

i. 315 
seen and admired by Sam, i, 

318 
married to Zal, i, 318 
Zdl and, go to Si'stan, i, 319 
giievous travail of, i, 320 
saved by the Sfmurgh, i, 321 
Caesarean operation per- 
formed upon, i, 322 
gives birth to Rustam, i, 

322 
fasts in sorrow for Rustam, 

v, 278 
fren2ry of, v, 278 
regains her wits, v, 279 
referred to, v, 190, 289 
lamentation of, v, 289 
Riidagi, Persian poet, versifies 
the Fables of Bidpai, vii, 

3S3. 431 

Riidbar, district, v, 30 

Rudj'-Ab, father of Papak (in 
Shahnama), vi, 200, 212 

Rue, vnld, as a prophylactic, i, 
380 

Ruhham, son of Gudarz, Tidnian 
heio, ii, 4. 62, 73, 144, 158, 
340 ; iii, 19, 33, 48, 67, 
115, lit scq., 139 sf(/., 154, 
157, 182, 187, 211, 248, 
259, 264, 268, 273, 322, 
350, 352 ; iv, 13, 15. 21, 
31, 37, 147 ; vii 156 
helps to saddle Rakhsh for 
the fight with SuhrAb, ii, 
160 
mortally wounds Farud, iii, 

64 
embassy of, to Pirdn, iii, 87 
attacks ]5azur, iii, i^ij 



350 



GENERAL INDEX 



Ruhham, worsted by Ashkabiis, 

iii, 179 
goes to the help of Rustam, 

iii, 227 
worsted by Pulddwand, iii, 

258 
goes with Rustam to rescue 

Bizhan, iii, 334 
commands the left wing, iv, 

24 

superseded pro tern, by 
Farhad, iv, 92 

chosen to fight with Barman 
iv, 97 

slays Barman, iv, 102 

sent by Giidarz to fetch 
Piran's corpse, iv, 110 

acts as Kai Khusrau's stan- 
dard-beaier in his combat 
with Shida, iv, 171 

protests against Kai Khus- 
rau's fighting on foot with 
Shida, iv, 174 

holds Kai Khusrau's steed, 

iv, 175 
instiucted by Kai Khusrau 

to bury Shida, iv, 176 
Kai Khusrau remonstrated 

with by, and other nobles 

for refusing audience, iv, 

275 
Ruhham, king of Rai, temp. 

Bahram Giir, vii, 85 
Ruhhcim, Iranian warrior, vii, 

156 
helps Piruz to gain the 

throne, vii, 156, 186 ; 

viii, 73 
Ruin, son of Piran, 151, i, 92 ; 

iii, 207, 234 ; iv, 10, 71, 

90, 102, 152, 153, 162 
summons Piran to save 

Farangis, ii, 323 and note 
sent by Piran to attack 

Bahram, iii, 98 
wounded by Bahram, iii, 

99 
put in command of ambush, 

iv, 26 
bears letter from Piran to 

Giidarz, iv, 67 



Ruin, entertained by Giidarz, iv, 
68 
returns to Piran with Gii- 
darz' reply, iv, 74 
goes to help Piran against 
Gi'v and is defeated, iv, 84 
chosen to fight with Bizhan, 

iv, 97 
slain by Bizhan, iv, 103 
Riiina, place, ix, gi 
Rukh, piece in chess (castle), vii, 

385. 423 
position of, iv, 8, ; vii, 388, 

422 
move of, iv, 8 ; vii, 422 
Rukhs, Battle of the Twelve, 151; 
iv, 7 seq. 
meaning of, iv, 7 
Battle of the Eleven, 151, 
iv, 88 
arranged by Giidarz and 

Piran, iv, 95 seq. 
Firdausi's reflections on, 
iv, 7, 98, 106 
referred to, v, 29 ; vii, 156 
Riim, the Eastern Roman Em- 
pire, 15^, 15S, 162, i6y, 
^72. 173, i, 15, 229 ; ii, 
143. 297, 307, 360 ; iii, 
106, 151, 164, 296 ; iv, 14, 

133. 148. 196, 197. 208, 
272, 312, 314, 316, 317, 
2,2^ seq., 330, 331, 333 55?-. 
339, 341 seq., 345, 348, 349 

352, 353. 355. 356, 359, 

361, 364, ; V, 75, 76. 102, 

180, 188, 262, 301, 305 ; 

vi, 40, 41, 45, 51, 53, 81, 

94, 104, 113 seq., and 

passim 
king of = Mahmiid, i, 113 

= Sikandar, vi, 172 
West and, Salm's portion, i, 

189 
brocade of, i, 157, 183, 210, 

252, 2G3, 316 and passim ; 

iii, 26, 235, 291, 297, 355 ; 

iv, 128, 271. 364 ; v, 295 ; 

vi, 56, 89 ; vii, 64, 67, 276, 

384 ; viii, 157, 173, 278. 

337. 367. 374 ; i^'. 99. loi 



GENERAL INDEX 



351 



Rum, hdm of, iii, 114 
sea of, iii, 177 
city in, founded by Salm, iv, 

3-25 
ravaged by Rashnawdd and 

DarAb, v, 307 
ambassadors from, come to 

DArab, vi, 21 
Darab wars with, vi, 22 
prince of, vi, 22 
chiefs of, vi, 23, 153 

withdraw on Darab's ap- 
proach, vi, 23 
tribute of, to frin, vi, 24 

explained, vii, 187 
ambassadors from, come to 

Dara, vi, 35 
reed (pen) of, vi, 85 
stufTs of, vi, 143 
philosophers of, vi, 115, 

154 ; viii, 279, 382 
cavaliers of, vi, 167 
Shah of = Sikandar, vi, 170 
Sikandar's policy to safe- 
guard, vi, 178 
Arastalis' advice to Sikan- 

dar concerning, vi, 179 
invaded by Shapur, vi, 350 
slave-girls of, chosen by 

Bahram Gui, vi, 382 
Bahram Gur's war with, vii, 

4. 5, 84 ^ 
Niishirwdn's wars with, vii, 

213 
robes of, viii, 308 

captured cities of, restored 
to, viii, 312 

monks of, slain by Mcihwi, 
ix, 113 
Kiiman, Riimans, 154, 158, 162, 
167, 172, 173, iii, 309 ; iv, 
357. 360, 363 ; V, 173, 205 
292 ; vi, 44, 45, loi seq., 
113, 114, 127, 142, 148, 
1 08, 170, 179 seq., and 
passim 

slaves, i, 252 ; vi, 3S2 ; vii, 

54. 2.50 
invade Ircin, v, 301 
defeated by Rashnawdd and 

Daiab, v, 305 seq. 



Ruman, Riimans, king of = Philip 
of Macedon, vi, 19 
carry out works in fran, vi, 

21 
= Sikandar, vi, 50, 52, 

Iranians ask quarter of, vi, 

51 
tongue, vi, 160 ; vii, 256, 

261 
dispute with the Persians as 

to Sikandar's burial, vi, 

184 
sages, vi, 1S5 

their sentences over the 
coffin of Sikandar, vi, 
I, 85, seq. 
silk, vi, 280, ; vii, 424 
defeated by Shapur, son of 

Ardshir, vi, 297 
engineeis build bridge at 

Shiishtar, vi, 299 
astrologic tablets, vi, 376 
eunuchs, vii, 67, ; viii, 

279 
pen, vii, 73 

helmet, vii, 89, 272, 274 
bishop, vii, 275, 276 
envoy, viii, 8 seq. 
surrender to Niishirwan, viii, 

47 
entrench themselves, viii, 

47 

sue for peace and pay tribute 
viii, 51 seq. 

architect, viii, 193, 401 

marches, viii, 252 

robes, viii, 253 

helms, viii, 105, 276, 417 

worsted by Hahr4m Chii- 
bina, viii, 292 

artificers imprisoned by 
Khusrau Parwiz, viii, 402 
released by Khusrau Par- 
wiz, viii, 403 
Riimiya (New Antioch, Siirsin 
</.!'.), a suburb of Ctcsiphon 
(Taisafun)on the east bank 
of the Tigris, vii, 218 
Riis (Russia), vi, 19 ; viii, 406 

king of, vi, 22 



352 



GENERAL INDEX 



Rushanak (Roxana, q.v.), daugh- 
ter of Dara (in Shahnama) 
and wife of Sikandar, 15S, 
159. ii. 3 ; vi, 86 seq., 188 
account of, vi, 32 
derivation of, vi, 33 
bestowed by Dai a on Sikan- 
dar, vi, 55 
son of, vi, 81, 181 
visited by Nahi'd, vi, 89 
married to Sikandar, vi, 90 
reference in Sikandar's Will, 
to, vi, 181 
Rushan Piruz, city, vii, 160 
Russia, vi, 19 
Russian, Russians, vi, 19 
empire, vi, 19 

foundation of, vi, 19 
cloth, ix, no 
Rustam, son of Zal, fianian 
national hero, 141-150, 

153, 154. 15^, 157, i. 42, 
68, 90, 174, 235 seq., 376 
seq. ; ii, 4, 18, 25, 34, 35, 
42 seq., 79, 92 seq., 188, 
236, .237, 271, 286, 290, 
311, 316, 318, 319, 335, 
MA seq., 349 se^-, 37i, 372, 
380, 394, 400 ; iii, 24, 35, 
36, 40, 107 seq., 121, 134, 
138, 141 seq., 155, ib^seq., 
182 seq., 294, 307, 308 ; iv 
II, 13, 27, 30, 65. 157, 
167, 172, 198, 226, 227, 
277, 285, 289, 292, 319, 
324 ; v, 9, 22, 30, 50, 73, 
86, 165, 254 seq., 278, 279, 
281, seq., 298 ; vi, 325, 
395 ; vii, 151 ; viii, 106, 
177, 219, 223, 332 ; ix, 25 

Caesarean birth of, i, 
236, 321 seq. 
account of, in Moses of 
Chorene, i, 236 

presage of, by the astrolo- 
gers, i, 278, 307 
Simurgh, i, 321 

oiigin of name, i, 322 and 
note 

effigy of, sent to Salm, i, 322 

nurturing of, i, 324 



Rustam, goes with Zal and 

Mihrab to meet Sam, i, 325 

slays the white elephant, i, 

327. 377 
bidden by Zal to take Mount 

Sipand, i, 329 
takes Mount Sipand, i, 331, 

377 
sends the Spoil to Zal, i, 333 
sets fire to Mount Sipand, i, 

333 
bidden by Zal to prepare for 

wax-, i, 376 
reply of, i, 376 
Zal gives Sam's mace to, i, 

378 
obtains Rakhsh, i, 378 
goes in quest of Kai Kubad, 

i, 382 seq. 
slays Kulun, i, 386 
first campaign of, ii, 11 seq. 
nearly takes Afrasiyab 

prisoner, ii, 14, 116, 354 
rewarded by Kai Kubad, ii, 

21 
Seven Courses of (Haft 

Khwan) 143, ii, 44 seq. 
life of, saved by a ram, ii, 46 
song of, ii, 51 
rescues Kai Kaiis in Mazan- 

daran, ii, 58 
handgrip of, ii, 66, 67 
encounter of, with Kalahur, 

ii, 67 

Juya, ii, 71 
audience of, with the king of 

M^zandaran, ii, 67 seq. 
encounter of, with the king 

of Mazandaran, ii, 73 
rewaided bj^ Kai Ivaus, ii, 77 
entertains Kai Kaiis, ii, 83 
takes the king of Shim 

prisoner, ii, 97 
defeats Afrasiyab, ii, 100 
made paladin of paladins by 

Kai Kius, ii, loi 
goes in search of Kai Kaus, 

ii, 104 
takes part in the Fight of the 

Seven Warriors, ii, 107 seq. 
slays Alkiis, ii, 115 



GENERA!. I.\l>i:.\ 



353 



Kiistam, and Siihrab, Story of, 

ii, 1 1 S seq. 
loses Kaklish, ii, 121 
Afrasiyab's plot against, ii, 

129 
holds a drinking-bout, ii, 141 
quarrels with Kai K4us, ii. 

142 
reconciled by Giidarz, ii, 144 

seg. 
goes in disguise to see Suh- 

r4b, ii, 149 
adventure of, with Zhanda 

Rami, ii, 149 seq. 
Suhrab described by, ii, 151, 

166 
encampment of, described, 

ii. 154 
armed by Tus, Giv, and 

Ruhham for his fight with 

Suhrab, ii, 160 
challenges Suhrab, ii, 161 
charge of, to Zawara, ii, 167 
dechnes Suhrab's advances, 

ii, 169 
saves his life by a ruse, ii, 

170 
prays that his strength may 

be restored, ii, 171 
learns too late that Suhrab 

is his son, ii, 173 
grief of, ii, 173 seq. 
makes a truce with Humdn, 

ii, 176 
tries to slay Hajir, ii, 176 

himself, ii, 177 
brings up Siyawush, ii, 196 
maiches with him against 

Afrisiyab, ii, 225, seq. 
returns and quarrels with 

Kai KAus, ii, 242 seq. 
grief and wrath of, at the 

death of Siyawush, ii, 338 

seq. 
puts Surkha to death, ii, 346 
lights with the Turanians, ii, 

349 seq. 
appoints Tus ruler of Ch4ch, 

ii. 35S 
Gudarz ruler of Sughd and 
Sipanjab, ii, 35S 

VOL. IX. 



Rustam, daughtn of, ii, 3S3, 

384, iii, 3^3 
wife of, ii, 3S4, iii, 323 
hears of Kai Khusrau's 

arrival in fran, ii, 395 
Turkman occupation of Za- 

bulistan, accoimt of by, iii, 

14 
goes to do homage to Kai 

Khusrau, iii, 17 
witnesses Kai Khusiau's 

oath to avenge Siyawush, 

iii, 22 
proposes to Kai Khusrau to 

expel Turkmans from ZA- 

bulistan, iii, 30 
asks Kai Khusrau to pardon 

Tiis and the franians in 

the matter of Fai lid, iii, 

"3 
summoned by Kai Khusrau, 

iii. 143 
advocates the maiiiage of 

Fariburz and Faiangis, 

iii, 146 
marches to succour Tus, iii, 

148 
meets Gudarz, iii, 171 
takes counsel with Tus and 

the chiefs, iii, 172 
arrays the host, iii, 177 
fight of, with Ashkabiis, 

legend about, iii, 109 

leferied to, viii, 75 
parleys with Ashkabiis, iii, 

180 
slays Ashkabiis, iii, 181 
described by Piran, iii, 183 
harangues the troops, iii, 

186, 219. 223. 232, 235 
challenged by Kamiis, iii, 

187  
spear-bearer of, slain by 

Kdmiis, iii, 188 
parleys with Kimiis, iii, 188 
takes Kamiis prisonei, iii, 

189 
and the Kh4n of Chin, Story 

of, I4(), iii, 191 seq. 
refe.red to, iii, 193 
slays Chingish, iii, 195 

Z 



354 



GENERAL INDEX 



Rustam, parleys with Human, 

iii, 196 
conditions of peace offered 

by, iii, 197. 205 
parleys with Pi'ran, iii, 202 
proposes peace on terms to 

the Iranians, iii, 211 
warned by Giidarz not to 

trust Piran, iii, 212 
wrath of, with Piran, iii, 218 
unhoises Shangul, iii, 221 
prowess of, in battle, iii, 222 

seq. 
overthrows Kundur, iii, 224 
slays Sciwa, iii, 224 

Gahar, iii, 225 
attacks the Khan of Chin, 

iii, 225, seq. 
victorious, iii, 231, seq. 
wroth with Tiis and the 

Iranians, iii, 234 
sends Fariburz to Kai Khus- 

rau with tidings of victory, 

iii, 236, seq. 
leads on the host, iii, 238 
reaches Sughd, iii, 244 
sends troops to attack 

Bidad, iii, 244 
slays Kafiir, iii, 245 
besieges and stoims Bidad, 

iii, 246 
sends Gi'v to raid Khutan, 

iii, 247 
praised by Giidarz, iii, 248 
described Dy Afrasiyab, iii, 

251 
attacks the Turanians, iii, 

257 
challenges Puladwand, iii, 

259 
overthrows PulAdwand, iii, 

264 
defeats the Turanians, iii, 

266 
divides the spoil, iii, 266 
ravages Tiiran, iii, 266 
returns in triumph, iii, 267 
asks Kai Khusrau's leave to 

return to Zdl, iii, 269 
rewarded by Kai Khusrau, 

iii, 269 



Rustam, Story of fight of, with 
the div Akwan, J79, iii, 
271 seq. 

summoned to court by Kai 
Khusrau, iii, 274 

pursues the div Akwan, iii, 

275 
foiled by Akwan, iii, 276 
taken at a disadvantage by 

Akw4n, iii, 276 
offered a choice of deaths by 

Akwan, iii, 277 
outwits Akwan, iii, 277 
finds Rakhsh among Afra- 

siyab's herds, iii, 278 
encounters Afrasiyab's 

herdsmen, iii, 279 
defeats Afrasiyab, iii, 280 
slays Akwan, iii, 281 
carries off the spoil, iii, 

281 
welcomed by Kai Khusrau, 

iii, 282 
tells his adventure with 

Akwan, iii, 282 
rewarded by Kai Khusrau, 

iii, 283 
returns home, iii, 283 
summoned to court in the 

matter of Bizhan, iii, 319 

seq. 
visited by Giv, iii, 322 
promises to help Giv, iii, 

324 
goes with Giv to court, iii, 

326 
address of, to Kai Khusrau, 

iii, 327 
undertakes the rescue of 

Biziian, iii, 330 
plan of, iii, 333 
chooses his comrades, iii, 

334 
goes disguised to Turan, iii, 

335 
gives presents to Piran, iii, 

336 
welcomed by Piran, iii, 336 
opens a market, iii, 337 
interviews of, with Mam'zha, 

iii. 337. 342 



GENERAL IXJJliX 



355 



Rustam, soiuls food and his ring 

to Jiizhan, iii, 340 
removes boulder of Akwan 

from pit's mouth, iii, 345 
makes conditions foi release 

with Bizhan, iii, 345 
releases Bizhan, iii, 346 
arrays his troops against 

Alrdsiy4b, iii, 350 
mocks Afrasiyab, iii, 351 
defeats Afrasiyab, iii, 352 
triumphant return of, iii, 

353 
presents Bizhan to Kai 

Khusiau, iii, 354 
rewarded by Kai Khusrau, 

iii, 356 
goes to Sistan, iii, 356 
sent to Hindustan by Kai 

Khusrau, iv, 14 
successes of, iv, 60, 71 
troops of, recalled, iv, 145 
commands the right wing, 

iv, 147 
attacks with Kai Khusrau 

from the centre, iv, 180 
goes %\dth Zawara to the 

right wing, iv, 180 
sent to the desert to attack 

Ta^\^lIg, iv, 188 
reports his defeat of Tawurg, 

iv, 193 

advances, iv, 194 

failure of Afrasiyab's at- 
tempt to surprise, iv, 195 

takes part in the siege of 
Gang-bihisht, iv, 199, 208 
seq. 

Kai Khusrau 's converse 
■with, iv, 198, 199 

captures Jahn and Garsiwaz, 
iv, 210 

advises Kai Khusrau to 
reject Afrdsiydb's over- 
tures, iv, 222 

ordered to prepare for a 
night-attack from Afra- 
siyab, iv, 224 

supports Kai Khusrau 's pro- 
posal to pursue Afrasiyab 
to Gang-dizh, iv, 231 



Rustam, left by Kai Khusrau in 
Chin, iv, 241 

welcomes Kai Khusrau on 
his return from Gang- 
dizh, iv, 251 

accompanies Kai Khusrau 
to Siydwushgird, iv, 252 

summoned by the frinians 
to remonstrate with Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 278 

with Zal and the sages, sets 
forth for fr4n, iv, 279 

met on arrival by Giidarz 
and other chiefs, iv, 282 

holds converse with the 
Iranians, iv, 282 

audience of, with Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 283 seq. 

holds, with other chiefs, at 
the bidding of Kai Khus- 
rau an assembly on the 
plain, iv, 291 seq. 

Kai Khusrau 's gift to, iv, 

295 
confirmed by Kai Khus- 
rau in possession of Nini- 
[ ruz, iv, 297 

' sets out with Kai Khusrau 

on his pilgrimage, iv, 

306 
turns back at the bidding of 

Kai Khusrau, iv, 307 
laments the loss of the pala- 
dins and returns to fran, 

iv, 310 
Zeil and, welcome Gushtasp 

to Sistin, V, 85 
rivalry in legend between 

Asfandiycir and, v, 116 
Haft Khwan of, compared 

with that of Asfandiyar, 

V, 117 
Asfandiyar's fight with. 

Story of, 156, V, 166 seq 

recited by Nadr, son of 

Harith, at Mecca, v, 166 

referred to, v, 169, 170, 30O 

Gushtdsp bids Asfandiyai 

go against, v, 173 
Asfandiydi's message to, v, 

179 



356 



GENERAL INDEX 



Rustam, life of, attempted by 
Bahman, v, 184 

interview of, with Bahman 
V. 185 

entertains Bahman, v, 186 

great appetite of, v, 1S6, 210 

jests with Bahman on his 
small appetite, v, 1S6 

sends Zawara and Faramar'z 
to bid Zal and Riidaba 
prepare to receive Asfan- 
diyar, v, 190 

goes to the Hirmund, v, 
igi 

parleys with Asfandiyar, v, 
192, seq. 

invites Asfandiyar to visit 
him, V, 193 

accepts Asfandiyar's invita- 
tion to a feast, v, 195 

tells Zal, of his interview 
with Asfandiyar, v, 196 

indignation of, at not being 
summoned to the feast, 
v, 197 

sets forth to reproach Asfan- 
diyar, V, 198 

wrangle of, with Asfandiyar, 
v, 198 seq. 

demands his proper seat at 
the feast, v, 200 

Zal and, vilified by Asfan- 
diyar, v, 201 

details his ancestry, v, 202 

recounts Sam's exploits, v, 
202 

his own exploits, v, 203, 
207 

patents of, from Kai Kaus 
and Kai Khusrau, v, 203 

aged six hundred years, v, 
204 

tries a handgrip with Asfan- 
diyar, v, 209 

accepts Asfandiyar's chal- 
lenge, V, 209 

asks for neat wine, v, 211 

makes fresh overtures to 
Asfandiyar, v, 211 seq. 

addresses the royal tent- 
enclosure, v, 215 



Rustam, bids Zawara bring him 
his arms, v, 218 

rejects Zal's counsels, v, 220 

arms for battle, v, 222 

gives Zawara charge of the 
troops, V, 222 

goes with Zawara to the 
Hirmund, v, 222 

instructs Zawara, v, 222 

crosses the Hirmund and 
summons Asfandiyar to 
the combat, v, 223 

suggests a general engage- 
ment, v, 224 

distress of, at the death of 
Niish Azar and Mihr-i- 
Niish, V, 228 

offers to surrender Zawara 
and Faramaiz to Asfan- 
diyar, v, 228 

wounded by Asfandiyar, v, 
229 

flees from Asfandiyar, v, 
229 

sends Zawara with a message 
to Zal, v, 230 

parleys with Asfandiyar, v, 
231 

recrosses the Hirmund, v, 
231 

kin of, grieve over his 
wounds, V, 234 

bids the leeches to attend to 
Rakhsh first, v, 234 

despair of, v, 235 

advised by Zal, v, 235 

Zal summons the Simurgh 
to the aid of, v, 235 

healed by the Simurgh, v, 
237 

instructed by the Simurgh 
how to overcome Asfan- 
diyar, V, 237, seq. 

cuts the fatal branch of 
tamarisk, v, 239 

prepares the arrow, v, 240 

summons Asfandiyar to re- 
new the light, v, 240 

makes a final eifort for peace 
with Asfandiyar, v, 241 
seq. 



GENERAL IXDEX 



357 



Kustam, bewails Asfaiuliydr ti> 
Bishutan, v, j-j<i 
Asfaiuliyar cduriik-s lialiman 
to. V, 2.\fi 

foretells an evil future for, 

V, 24S 
laments Asfandiydr, v, 250 
warned by Zawara against 

Bahman, v, 250 
sends Asfandiyar's corpse to 

Gushtasp, V, 251 
Bahman remains with, v, 

252, 256 
instructs Bahman, v, 256 
writes to Gushtasp to excuse 

himself in the matter of 

Asfandiyar, v, 256 
overtures of, to Gushtasp 

supported by Bishutan, 

V, 257 
Gushtasp accepts the ex- 
cuses of, and writes to, v, 

257 
requested by Gushtasp to 

send back Bahman, v, 258 
equips Bahman for his jour- 
ney, V, 258 
Story of, and Shaghcid, 157, 

V, 260 seq. 

provenance of, v, 260 seq. 
death of, v, 261, 273, 289 

versions of, v, 261 
Kabul's tribute to, question 

of, V, 265 
Shaghad and the king of 

Kabul plot against, v, 265 
takes up Shaghad 's cause, v, 

267 
prepares to occupy Kabul 

with a host, v, 268 
persuaded by Shaghad to go 

with Zawara and a small 

escort, V, 268 
pardons king of Kabul, v, 

269 
entertained by king of 

Kabul, v, 269 
goes hunting with Zawira, 

V, 270 
falls a victim to treachery, 

V, 270 



the 

274 



be- 



Rustam, Shaghdd, glories over, 

V, 271 
slays Sluiglu'ul, v, 272 
last words of, v, 272 
corpse of, taken from 

pit by Faramarz, v, 
obsequies of, v, 274 seq. 
Artabanus and, v, 282 
burial place of, v, 287 

scene of the battle 

tween Bahman and Fara- 
marz, V, 287 
personification of the Sacae, 

i, 68; vi, 194 
conduct of, in Hamavaran, 

viii, 104, 168 
banner of, bestowed on 

Bahram Chiibina, viii, 

105, 217 
Rustam, Persian commander in 

chief under Yazdagird III, 

176: ix, 66, 67, 69, 73, 81 

seq.. 90, 95 
brother of Farrukhzad, viii, 

413 and note 

revolt of, viii, 413 
overthrows Azarmdukht, ix, 

59 
advances to Kadisij'a, ix, 67, 

73 
end of, ix, 69 
finds evil aspects in the stars 

ix, 73 
wiites to his brother, ix, 73 
hears of Shu'ba Mughira's 

arrival, ix, 82 
Riizbih, Bahram Gur's high 

priest, 164, vii, 26 seq., 54, 

67 
bewails Bahram Gur's 

course of life, vii, 56 
reproached by Bahram Giir 

for his parsimony, vii, S3 
Ruzbih, scribe, viii, 252 



Sa'ad, son of W'akkas, Arab 
general, 176, ix, 67, 68, 
82 seq., 90 



358 



GENERAL INDEX 



Sa'ad, succeeds Abu 'Ubaida, ix, 
67 
at Kadisiya, ix, 67, 6g 
founds Kiifa, ix, 67 
takes Ctesiphon, ix, 67 
recalled, ix, 68 
sent by 'Umar to invade 

fran, ix, 72 

letter of Rustam to, ix, 78 

taken by Piruz, ix, 80, 81 

Sabbakh, king of Yaman, iv, 146 

Sabz dar sabz, melody, viii, 399 

and note 
Sacae (Scythians), i, 17, 19 

Rustam a personification of, 
i, 68; vi, 194 
Sacaestan. See Sistan. 
Sacrifice, human, and serpent- 
worship, i, 143 
Sada, feast of, 140, i, 23 ; iv, 
317 ; V, 309 ; vi, 33, 55, 
230 and note, 245, 273, 
389; vii, II, 94, 200; 
viii, 68, 133, 216, 313 ; 
ix, 40 92 
institution of i, 124 
Sada, Iranian noble, vii, 312 
Safid Rud, river flowing through 
Gilan into the Caspian, 
V, 13. 16 
Sagastan (Sistan q.v.), v, 13 
Sage, sages, 159, vi, loi, 103 
Indian, vi, 62 

naked (Brahmans q.v.) 
of Kaid. See Kaid. 
saying of, viii, 155 
Sagittarius, constellation, i, 188 ; 

iv, 355 
Sagsar, Sagsars, district and 
tribe, i, 279 and note, 290, 

323. 339 ; ii, 143 ; iii- 152, 

207 
Sahadeva, one of the five Pan- 

davas, iv, 138 

referred to, iv, 139 
Sahl, wife of fraj, i, 188 

referied to, i, 182 seq. 
Sahl, son of Mahan, Iranian 

noble, V, 260, 261, 263 
Saifu'd-Daula, title of Sultan 

Mahmud, i, 21 



Sakil, son of Ca;sar, temp. 
Luhrasp, iv, 355 
commands the left wing, 

iv. 355 
Sakila, mountain, i6g, iv, 342 ; 
viii, 41 
dragon of, 154, iv, 342 seq. 
referred to, iv, 343, 351, 

358 

stronghold of, taken by 

Rumans, viii, 47 

Saklab (Slavonia), ii, 360 ; iii, 

152, 164, 177, 185, 204, 

218, 221 seq., 235, 238, 

243. 255 ; vi, 179 ; vii, 

112, 115, 364 ; viii, 379 

Salm, eldest son of Faridiin, 140, 

141, i, 42, 90, 91, 183 seq., 

335. 342, 344. 362 ; ii, 

19, 237, 318 ; iii, 37, 115, 

iv, 66, 69, 269, 272 ; v, 

205, 261, 284 ; vi, 353 ; 

vii, loi ; viii, 266, 270, 

300, 376 note, 378, 381 

racial significance of, i, 54 

etymology of, Firdausi's, i, 

174 
naming of, i, 187 

horoscope of, i, 188 

receives Rum and the West, 

i, 189 
envies fraj, i, 190 
plots with Tur, i, 190 
Tiir and, demand the abdi- 
cation of Iraj, i, 191 
Iraj visits, i, 198 
Iraj not welcomed by, 

i, 198 seq, 
slay Iraj, i, 201 
send fraj's head to Fari- 
diin, i, 202 

hear of Minuchihi, i, 208 
send an embassy to Farl- 

dun, i, 208 
receive Faridiin's reply, i, 

213 seq. 
prepare for war, i, 215 
worsted by Minuchihr, i, 

220 
plan night-surprise, i, 220 
worsted, i, 221 



GENERAL INDEX 



359 



Salm, hears of Tiir's defeat and 

death, i, zz^ 
retreats on the castle of the 

A14ns, i, 2Zi 
prevented by Miniichihr, i, 

flees from Miniichihr, i, 227 

slain by Miniichihr, i, 228 

troops of, ask quarter of 
Miniichihr, i, zzS 

head of, sent to Faridiin, i 
229 

Scimitar of, iv, 335 seq. 
Salt, Rustam's caravan of, i, 
330 seq. 

desert, i, 3 

fish, legend of the, vi, 76 seq. 
Sdm, son of Nariman, Iranian 
hero, father of Zal and 
grandfather of Rustara, 
^41. 142. i, 42, 207, 212, 
231, 235, 238 seq., 337, 
344, 375 : ii. 4. 16, 17, 33, 
34, 49, 125, 126, 137, 140, 
173, 182, 183 ; iii, 35, 121, 
202, 215, 260, 279, 283 ; 
iv, 222, 251, 290, 301, 
319 ; v, 14, 15, 58, 62, 63, 
196, 198 seq., 242, 262 
seq., 266, 267, 274, 285, 
286, 289, 290 ; vii, 74 ; 
viii, 223 

pronunciation of, i, 95 note 

etymology of, i, 171 seq. 

Miniichihr confided to, by 
Faridiin, i, 231 

mace of, i, 235, 290, 297, 328 
given by Zal to Rustam, 

i. 378 
speech of, to Miniichihr, i, 

238 
casts away his son Zal at 

birth, i, 241 
hears rumours of Zil, i, 243 
dreams of, concerning Zal, 

i, 243, 244 
consults the archmages and 

bidden to seek his son, 

i, 243 
finds his son on Mount 

Alburz, i, 244 seq. 



Sim, son of, restored to hira by 
the Siinurj^li, i, 247 
returns home witli Zal, i, 248 
congratulated by Minii- 
chihr, i, 248 
goes with Zal to court, i, 249 
tells of his quest to Minii- 
chihr, i, 250 
Miniichihr's gifts to, i, 251 
public rejoicings at his 

home-coming, i, 252 

goes to the wars and leaves 

Zk\ to rule in Zabulistan, 

i. 253 

Mihrab tributary to, i, 256 

Zal writes to, about Riidaba, 

i. 275 
receives Zal's letter, i, 277 
consults the astrologers, i, 

278 
Rustam's birth foretold to, 

i, 278 
replies to Zal's letter, i, 279 
returns from the war, i, 280 
summoned to court, i, 289 
welcomed by Miniichihr, i, 

289 
tells of his campaign, i, 290 
slays Karkwi, i, 291 
bidden to destroy Mihrab 
and all his belongings, i, 
292 
welcomes and promises to 

help Zdl, i, 293 
writes to Miniichihr and 
pleads past services, i, 295 
tells of the slaying of the 
dragon of the Kashaf, i, 
296 
" One blow," i, 297, 299 
receives Sindukht in aud- 
ience i, 302 
invited by Sindukht to 

visit Kabul, i, 305 
dismisses Sindukht with 

gifts, i, 305 
hears of Zal's success with 
Miniichihr and informs 
Mihrab, i, 314 
goes with Zal to Iviibul, i, 

317 



36o 



GENERAL INDEX 



Sam, sees Riidaba and felicitates 
Zal, i, 318 

returns to Sistan, i, 319 

entertains Mihrab and Sin- 
dukht, i, 319 

leaves Zal the regent of Sis- 
tan and goes on a cam- 
paign, i, 319 

hears of the birth of Rustam, 

i, 323 
wxites to congratulate Zal, 

i. 323 

comes to see Rustam, i, 324 

bids Zal and Rustam fare- 
well, i, 327 

hears of Rustam's success 
at Mount Sipand and 
writes to Zal, i, 334 

Naudar's appeal to, i, 339 

goes to court, i, 340 

met and offered the crown 
by the Iranian chiefs, i, 

340 
refuses the crown, i, 340 
reconciles the chiefs and 

Naudar, i, 341 
counsels Naudar, i, 341 
rewarded by Naudar, i, 341 
departs, i, 341 
death of, referred to, i, 345, 

346, 349 
obsequies of, 358 
mace of, given by Zal to 

Rustam, i, 378 
exploits of, recounted by 

Rustam, v, 202 
Sam, Iranian warrior, temp. 

Yazdagird son of Shapur, 

vi. 395 
Sama Keresaspa Narimanau, 

Iranian hero, i, 171 seq. 
Samangan, city south-east of 
Balkh (?), 144 ii, 121 seq., 
130 
king of, 144, ii, 118, 140, 184 
entei tains Rustam, ii, 122 
father of Zhanda Razm, 
ii, 150 
Samanid, Samanids, i, 14, 20, 
21, 67; vii, 5, 383 
end of dynasty of, i, 21 



Samarkand (Sogdiana, Sughd), 
city and distiict in Turk- 
istan, ii, 241 ; vii, 167, 
358, 359 ; viii, 377 ; ix, 
96, 115 

early seat of Aryan civili- 
zation (?), i, 7 

settlement of the Huns at, 

i. 19 
Sambaz, Iranian chief, speech of, 

viii, 242 
Samiran, king, vi, 405 and note 
Samkuran, Iranian hero, iv, 149 
Sandar, Sandarus, the Arar tree, 

\i, 19 
Sandal, Sandali, city in Hind, 

vii, 395. 396, 401 seq. 
king of, entertained by 

Bahram Giii, vii, 140 seq. 
Sanja, a div, ii, 39, 40, 44, 55 ; 

iv, 296 ; V, 204 
Sanscrit, vii, 382 
Sapad, mountain. See Spento- 

data. 
Sapandarmad. See Sipandar- 

mad. 
Sapimid, daughter of Shangul, vi, 

3 ; vii, 144 
married to Bahram Giir, 

vii, 128 
finds out who her husband is, 

vii, 131 
plans Bahram Gur's flight 

from Hind, vii, 132 
reproached by Shangul, vii, 

135 

converted to Zoroastrian- 

ism, vii, 139 
visited by Shangul, vii, 142 

Sapor I (Shapur son of Ardshir 
q.v.), Sasanian king, vi, 
294, 321 

Sapor II (Shapur son of Uimuzd 
q.v.), Sasanian king, i, 
374 ; V, 13 ; vi, 294, 321 ; 
viii, 41 

Sapor III (Shapur son of Sha- 
pur q.v.), vi, 365 

Sarakhs, city in Khurasan, be- 
tween Nishapur and Marv, 
ii, 108 



GENERAL INDEX 



361 



Saraparda, i, 84 

Sunoslftnnia viuiiiialc. See 

} Ionia. 
Sargon I. of Agani, v, 293 

foumlling legend of, v, 

393 
Saif, city in MAzandaran, i, 230, 
289, 366; V, 174; vii, 
237 ; viii, 168, 341, 355, 
392 ; ix, 86 
Iranian captives imprisoned 
at, i, 363 
released, i, 367 
Sar-i-pul-i-Zohab, vii, 187 
Sarkab, Ruman general, viii, 281, 

292 
Sarkash (Sergius), minstrel, 174, 
viii, 193, 398 seq. 406 
Story of, 174, viii, 396 
disgrace of, viii, 399 
Sarkhin. See Sufarai. 
Sari'ich, desert in Kirman, ii, 226 

vii, 362 
Sariig, Jacob of, Syriac poet. 

See Jacob. 
Sarv, king of Yaman, 140, i, 211, 
286 ; v, 260 ; vi, 73 
daughters of, asked in mar- 
riage by Faiidiin for his 
sons, i, 178 
consults his chiefs, i, 179 
agrees, conditionally, to 
Faridun's request, i, 181 
attempts to outwt Fari- 
dun's sons, i, 183 seq. 
gives his daughters in mar- 
riage to Faridun's sons, 1, 
185 
Sarv=Azad Sarv, q.v. 
S4sdn, cponym of Sasanian dyn- 
asty, viii, 219, 220, 330, 

341 

S^dn, son of Bahman, ii 3 ; v, 
290 
disinherited and flees from 

court, V, 291 
account of, v, 291 

SisAn, name of Dara's son and 
several of his descendants, 
ii 3 ; vi, 200, 211, 224, 
255 ; ix, 105 and nole 



SAsAn, descendants of, help Ard- 
shfr Papukan, vi, 224 

House of, vi, 251, 270 and 
note 

lineage of, ix, 56, 105 and 
note 
Sdsdn, father of Ardshir Papa- 
kin, 160, vi, 3, 193, 198, 
200, 201, 240 

legend of, vi, 211 seq. 

marries daughter of Papak, 
vi, 213 
Sdsanian, SAsanians, i, 11, 374 ; 
iii, 9 ; V, 13, 281 ; vi, 81, 
209, 225, 253, 257 ; vii, 
85, 185, 212, 237 ; viii, 65, 
72, 73, 214, 262, 330, 413 
note ; ix, 4, 5, 46, 47, 50, 
54, 65, 72, 73, 76, 77, 83, 

105 

dynasty, i, 49, 374 ; ii, 10 ; 
v, 10, 282 ; vi, 249 seq., 
253. 257, 321 ; vii, I seq.. 
381 ; viii, 73 ; ix, 4 
Tabari on the rise of the, 

vi, 198 
characterised, vi, 249 
Zoroastrianism under, vi, 

251 
Mas'iidi on Church and 

State under, vi, 251 
duration of, vi, 257 
empire, i, 11 ; vi, 193, 327 ; 
viii, 193 

conquered by the Arabs, 
ix, 65 seq. 
genealogical table of, vi, 3, 

253 
Tabari's history of, vi, 14 

note 
fictitious genealogies of, v, 
290; vi, 199, 211, 256 
view of Sikandar, vi, 15, 224 

and note, 240 and note 
rivalry with Arsacids, viii, 

73 
usage, viii, 190 
architecture, viii, 193 
race viii, 285, 3S6, note 
Satire, Firdausi's, on SuItAn 

Mahmud, i, 40 seq. 



■',62 



GENERAL INDEX 



Satrapy, satrapies, Niishirwdn's 
four ix, 69 

Saturn, planet, i, 72, 100, 161, 
204, 245, 295, 311 ; ii, 
183, 208, 215, 247, 263. 

310, 319, 394. 407 ; iii. 
32, no, 178, 232, 237, 254, 
268, 318 ; iv, 31, 214 ; 
V, 68, 89, 136, 154, 159, 
220,233 ; vi, 97, 115, 176, 
281, 318, 385 ; vii, 92. 
151, 252, 267, 346, 418 ; 
viii, 24, 66, 321, 392, 305 ; 

ix. 73 
sphere of, ix, 92 
Sav (the Sdvbar of tho Pahlavi 
texts, now Chashmah-i- 
Sabz), a lake among the 
hills in the neighbourhood 
of Tus and Mashad, i6j, 

vi, 373. 392 
legend of, vi, 372, 391 seq. 
Savalan, mountain in Azarbaijcin 

V, 14 
Sawa, Turanian hero, 149, iii, 224 

slain by Rustam, iii, 224 
SAwa, Iranian hero, v, 154 

left in charge of the Brazen 
Hold by Asfandiyar, i, 

154 
Sawa, luler of the Turks, lyo ; 
viii, 74, 94 seq., 100 seq., 
1,07, 108, 110 seq., 123, 129 

132. 133. 135. 137. 139. 

164, 169, 174, 216, 219, 

222, 224, 240 
= Chao-wou, viii, 72 
attacks Hurmuzd, viii, 92 
letter of, to Hurmuzd, viii, 

93 

prophecy about, viii, 98 
Hurmuzd sends Kharrad, 

son of Barzin, to, viii, no 
hears of Bahram Chiibina's 

army and blames Kharrad 

viii, no 
offers of, to Bahram Chu- 

bina, viii, 113 seq., 117 seq. 
employs sorcery against the 

Iranians, viii, 123 
defeated and slain, viii, 126 



Sawa, head of, set on lance, viii, 
130 
wealth of, sent to Hurmuzd, 
viii, 133 

Sawurg, Indian king, 139, vi, 64, 
n8 

Sayce, Professor, on the Ama- 
zons, vi, 71 

Scandinavians, vi, 73 

found the Russian empire, 
vi, 19 

Scimitar of Salm, iv, 335 seq. 

Scotland, vi, 79 

vitrified forts in, vi, 79 

Scribe, scribes, office of, highly 
esteemed, i, 27 and note ; 
vii, 311 ; viii, 50 
put to death by Hur- 
muzd, viii; 71, 81 seq. 

Scriptures, Zoroastrian. See 

Zandavasta. 

Scylla, Nisus and, story of, vi, 
323 note 

Scythia, iv, 316 

Scythians (Sacae), their relations 
with the Iranians, i, 17 
wars of, with Darius Hys- 
tapsis, V, n 

Seasons, confusion of the, ix, 77 
note 

Sects, Muhammadan, i, 99 
parable of, i, 107 

Seleucia (Bih Ardshir q.v.), city 
on the right bank of the 
Tigris, opposite to Ctesi- 
phon (Taisafiin), ii, 80 ; 
vi, 254, 291 note, 322 ; viii, 
189, 194, 196 

Semiramis, legendary queen of 
Assyria, historically Sam- 
muramat, wife (?) of 
Samsi Adad king of Assy- 
ria (B.C. 824-804), ii, 10 ; 
vi, 66, 405 note 
legend of, v, 292, 293 
Humai and, v, 292, 293 

Semites, the, i, 9 

relations of, with the Iran- 
ians, i, 9 seq., ix, 65 

Seneca the younger, Nero's tutor 
(B.C. 3— A.D. 65), vii, 279 



GENERAL INDEX 



3^'3 



Seoses (Sufarai ?), Persian com- 
mander-in-chief, temp. 
Kiibail, vii, 187 

Sergiopolis, \iii, iSS 

Sergius, Saint and Martyr, viii, 
1 88 
patron saint of Khusrau 

Parwi'z, viii, 18S, 195 
Roman leader in Tabari, 
viii, 188 

Sergius (Sarkash), minstrel, viii, 

193 
Serpent, serpents, on Zahhik's 

shoulders, i, 139 
worship and human sacri- 
fice, i, 143 
Seven, favourite number in Per- 
sian story, vii, 186, 280, 
Banquets of Nushirwan. See 

Banquet. 
Climes. See Climes. 
Courses (Haft Khwan) of 

Rustam. See Rustam. 
Planets. See Planet. 
Persian nobles, legend of the 

vi, 207 

transferred to Ardshir 
Papakan (?), vi, 207 
Stages (Haft Khwan) of As- 

fandiyar. See Asfandi- 

yar. 
Warriors, Fight of the, 143, 

ii, 25, 82, 107 seq. 
Founts, jewel, viii, 392 
and forty Shahs, viii, 395 

and note 
Severus, Roman Emperor (A.D. 

146-211), vi, 322 
Hatra besieged by, vi, 322 
Shabahang, Farhdd's steed, iii, 

313 ; iv, 8 
Bizhan's steed, iv, 47 
Shabdiz, Bahram Gur's steed, 

vii, 37, 80 
Giv's steed, iii, 257 
Luhrasp's steed, iv, 323 

taken by Gushtasp, iv, 

3^3 
Mihrab's steed, i, 326 
Khusrau Parwiz' steed, viii, 

407 ; ix, 30 



Shabrang, Bahram Gur's steed, 
vii, 37, 80 
P>i'zhan's steed, iii, 296, 302, 
313 ; iv, 8, 39. 50. 119, 
124 
ShidAn son of Barzi'n, one of 
Firdausi's authorities, i, 
67, 69 ; vii, 382, 423 
Shaddad, son of 'Ad, legend of, 

i, 100 
Shcidward, treasure, viii, 406 and 

note 
Shaghad, son of Z41, 137, v, 
261 

Story of Rustam and, 157, v, 
260 seq. 

provenance of, v, 260 
birth of, V, 263 
astrologers' evil prognostic 

of, V, 264 
sent to be brought up at 

Kabul, V, 264 
marries the daughter of the 

king of K4bul, v, 264 
king of Kabul and, plot 
against Rustam, v, 265 
seq. 
pretended quart el of, with 
the king of Kabul, v, 266 
goes to Zabul, v, 267 
cause of, taken up by 

Rustam, v, 267 

persuades Rustam to go 

with Zawdra and a small 

escort to Kabul, v, 268 

warns the king of Kabul of 

Rustam's coming, v, 269 

glories over Rustam, v, 271 

outwitted and slain by 

Rustam, v, 272 
corpse of, burnt, v, 277 
Shah, accession of, ceremony at, 

vi, 409 
Shdhi, city in H4mdvaran, ii, 89 
Shahcibad, the modern name for 
the ruins of Gund-i-Sh4- 
pur in Khuzistan, vi, 295 
 Shahd, river, ii, 108; iii, 11, 
116, 118, 123, 152, 173, 
230, 241 ; vi, 391, 392 
Shahd, mountain, iii, 237 



3^>4 



GENERAL INDEX 



Shahnama (Bastan-nama, Khii- 
dai-nama), isg, i, 66 ; ix, 
4 scq., 43, 50, 6i, 70 

subject-matter of, how pre- 
served, i, 56 

oiigin of, i, 65 seq. 

put into wilting, i, 66 

Prose, compilers of, referred 
to, vlii, 71, 73 

probably compiled by Magi, 
i, 69 

referied to, by Firdausi, i, 
108, 109 ; iv, 141 seq. ; 
vi, ig6 

more than one, i, 29, 66, 67, 
69 

Dakiki and. See Dakihi. 
Shahnama, Firdausi's, 139, iy6, 
3, 23 seq. ; iii, 7, 9, 11, 
14, 271, 286 ; iv, 7, 8, 
1^6 seq., 316, V.9- seq., 19, 
20, 22 seq., 27 seq., 293, 
294 ; vi, 3 and note, 30, 
31, 66 seq., 72, 79, 82 seq., 
194 seq., 205 seq., 249 seq., 
253, 256, 270 note, 294, 

301. 307. 310. 325. 326; 
vii, 5, 156, 184, 185, 215, 
217. 317. 381 ; viii, 3, 41, 
42, 71, 72, T^seq., xS-j seq. 
191, 192 

scene of, i, 3 

theme of, i, 8, 47 

Baisinghar Khan's edition 
of, i, 23 

completion of, Firdausi on, 
176 ; ix, 121 

date of completion of, i, 24 ; 
ix, 122 

length, metre, and language 
of, i, 47; iv, 8 ; ix, 122 

anomalies of, i, 48 
explained, i, 48 

divisions and chief charac- 
ters of, i, 49 

machinery of, i, 51 

leading motives of, i, 53 

cosmogony of, i, 71 ; iv, 136 

imagery of, i, 72 

editions of, i, 76 

translations of, i, 77, 87 



Shahnama, principles of the 
present translation of, i, 
77 seq. 

certain terms used in, ex- 
plained, i, 80 seq. 

Firdausi on the compilation 
of, i, 108 

historic element in mythical 
period of, iii, 8 seq. 

Greek subject-matter in, vi, 
II 

derivation of Sikandar given 
in, vi, 19 

historic period of, i, 49; vi, 29 

Tian and, analogy between, 

vi, 193 
portion of, corresponding to 

Karnamak, vi, 196 
Karnamak and, compared, 

vi, 200 seq., 255 seq. 
Wisdom-literature in, vii, 
278 seq. 
Shahnama, of Abii- 'All Muham- 
j mad, i, 69 

' Shahra, chief, 165, vii, 92 

made king of Tiiran by 
Bahram Gur, vii, 92 
Shahram-Piruz. See Badan 

Piriiz. 
Shahran, ix, 102 

pleads with Mahwi for Yaz- 
dagird, ix, 102 
Shahran Guraz, Iranian warrior, 

speech of, viii, 239 
Shahranguiaz (Hurmuzd Shah- 
ranguraz, Guraz q.v.), 

175: ix, 50 
heads conspiracy against 
Guraz ; ix, 54 
Shahr-Bami-Iram, sister of Gfv 
and wife of Rustam, ii, 4, 

384 
Shahrbaraz (Guraz q.v.), Iranian 

general, viii, 194 ; ix, 43, 

50 
revolt of, viii, 195 
sons of, viii, 196 
rebellion of, ix, 43, 44 
alliance of, with Heraclius, 

ix, 44 
i Shahr-Baiz. See Shahibardz. 



GENERAL INDEX 



3^'5 



Sluilirgir, warrior in Sikandar's 

host, vi, 125, 126 

takes Kaidi'ifa's son and 

daiiglitcr-in-law piisoncrs, 

vi, 125 

Shahrgir, captain of the host to 

Anlshir Papakan, vi, 241 

Ardshir's instructions to, vi, 

241 
goes to Ardshir's help, \i, 
244 and Hole 
Shahrguraz (Shahrbardz q.v.), ix, 

50 
Shahrinaz, sister of Jamshid, 

wife of Zahhak and Fari- 

dun, and mother of Salm 

and Tur, i, 90, 142, 164 

seq., 177 
married to Zahhak, i, 146 
sons of, by Faiidiln, i, 177 
Shahn'r, Shahrivar, ameshas- 

penta, i, 88 ; iii, 286, 328 

month and day, i, 88 ; v, 

310 ; vii, 76 
Shahrwaraz (Shahrbaraz q.v.), 

ix, 50 
Shahrwi, archimage, vi, 329 
minister during Shapur son 

of Urmuzd's minority, vi, 

329 
Shahryar, son of Shiiin and 
Khusrau Parwiz, ix, 39 
father of Yazdagird, ix, 
64 
Sh4hwi, eldest son of Haftwad, 
vi. 237 
referred to, vi, 206 
helps his father against 
Aidshir Papakan, vi, 236 
executed, vi, 245 
Shahwi (=iMdhwi ?), one of Fir- 
dausf's authoiities, vii, 
382, 394 
Shakespeaie, quoted, iii, 286 ; 
V, 156 nole ; vii, 383 ; viii 
1 87 
Shakn, region, iii, 152, 177, 185, 
192, 204, 222, 223, 228, 

237 
Sh4m (Syria), ii, 80, 84 ; vi, 357 ; 
viii, 170 



Sham, king of, taken prisoner by 

Rustam, ii, 97 
ShamAsas, Tiirdnian hero, i.f2 ; 
i, 346 ; ii, 12, 18 
Khazarw4n and, invade Ki.- 

"bulistan, i, 345, 35S 
parleyed with by Alihrab to 

gain time, i, 358 
flees from Zk], i, 361 
met and defeated by Karan, 

i. 3'Ji 
Shambalid, daughter of Barzin, 

vii, 53 
married to Bahram Gur, vii, 

53 
Shamiran, Turanian hero, iii, 185 

comes to aid Piran, iii, 152 

Shamiran, stronghold north of 

Harat (?), ix, 91, 94 
Shammakh, king of Siir, iv, 57, 

146 
Shammas, legendary founder of 

Fire-worship, vi, 339 note 
Shammas, Ntishzad's general, 

vii, 219, 272 
Shamta, viii, 195, 196 
Shangul, king of Hind, temp. 

Kai Khusrau, /^p, iii, 161, 

172, 185, 198, 205, 210, 

217. 251 
comes to aid Pircin, iii, 152 
volunteers to light Rustam, 

iii, 209, 216 
challenges Rustam, iii, 221 
worsted, iii, 221 
temp. Cahram Gtir, 165, vi, 

325 ; vii, 109 seq. 
border-raids of, vii, no 
gives audience to the Iran- 
ian envoy (Bahram Giir), 

vii, 112 
state of, described, vii, 

1 12 
brother of, vii, 113 
vaunts his own greatness, 

vii, 114 
wife of, the daughter of the 

Faghfur, vii, 115 
son of, vii, 1 15 
entertains Bahram Gur, vii, 

116 



366 



GENERAL INDEX 



Shangul, Bahram Gur wrestles 

before, vii, 117 
plays at polo, vii, 118 
Bahram Giir displays his 

markmanship before, vii, 

118 
tiies to find out who the 

Persian envoy (Bahram 

Gur) is, vii, 118 seq. 
takes counsel with his sages, 

vii, 126 
offers a daughter and great 

advancement to Bahram 

Gur, vii, 127 
marries Sapinud to Bahrdm 

Gur, vii, 128 scq. 
goes to a festival, vii, 

134 
hears of Bahram Giir's flight 

vii, 135 
reproaches Sapinud, vii, 135 
makes a league with Bahram 

Gur, 137 
bids farewell to Sapinud, vii, 

137 
makes a new treaty with 

Bahram Giir, vii, 140 
entertained with seven other 
kings by Bahram Giir, vii, 

140 seq. 
visits his daughter Sapinud, 

vii, 142 
farewells Sapinud, vii, 143 
makes Bahram Giir his heir, 

vii, 143 
Bahram Giir's parting gifts 

to, vii, 144 
sends Gipsies to fran, vii, 

149 
Shapigan, treasury of, i, 61, 62 
Shapiir, Pishdadian hero, i, 210, 

211, 215 
slain, i, 352 
Shipiir, Kaianian hero, ' ii, 271, 

338, 340 ; iii, 19, 289, 322, 

331 ; iv, 292 
hails Gushtasp as Shah, iv, 

362 
Sh&piir, Ashk4nian (Parthian) 

king, vi, 197, 210 

' May be identical wiili 



Shapiir, son of Papak, vi, 199 
Shapiir, son of Ardshir Papakan, 
Shah (Sapor I), 161 , i, 42 ; 
vi, 3, 256, 303, 307, 313, 
315, 321 seq., viii, 265 

compilation of Zandavasta 
under, i, 62, 63 

stories of, in Karnamak, vi, 
196, 255 
Tab'ari, vi, 255, 257 

crowned in his father's life- 
time, vi, 257 

secret birth of, vi, 261 

origin of name, vi, 262 
note 

recognised and acknow- 
ledged by Ardshir Papa- 
kan, vi, 264 

discovers the daughter of 
Mihrak, vi, 268 seq. 

summoned and counselled 
by Ardshir Papakan, vi, 
285 sea. 

J. 

confused with Shapiir son 
of Urmuzd, vi, 294, 321, 

324. 327 

Reign of, 161, vi, 294 seq. 
Note on, vi, 294 
historical inaccuracies of, 
vi, 294 

wars of, with Rome, vi, 294, 
297 

Odenathus and, vi, 294 

defeats the Rumans, vi, 
297 

leccives tribute from Caisar, 
vi, 298 

builds cities, vi, 298 

bids Bazaniish build a bridge 
at Shiishtar, vi, 298 

summons and counsels Ur- 
muzd, vi, 299 
Shapiir, son of Urmuzd, Shah 
(Sapor II), 162, 163, i, 
374 ; V, 16 note ; vi, 3, 
294. 295, 307, 371, 373, 
405 (?) ; vii, 359 ; viii, 

41 

provides for uniformity of 
Zoroastiian doctrine, i, 62 

ihe above in legend. 



GENERAL IXDEX 



3^>7 



Shapur, s<jn of Urmuzd, Zoroas- 
trian canon closed under, 

i. 03 
referred to, vi, 318 
Reign of, 162. vi, 321 seq. 

Note on, \i, 321 seq. 
bridge of, at Taisafun, vi, 

321. 3^9 
icsidences of, vi, 321, 330 
confused with Shapur, son 

of Ardshir, vi, 294, 321, 

3^4. 327 
triumphant treaty of, with 

the Riimans, vi, 326, 355 
cities of, \i, 327, 357 
birth of, vi, 328 
crowned as an infant, vi, 328 
education of, vi, 329 
Mdlika offeis to betray her 

father's hold to, vi, 331 

opens the gate to, \i, 333 
sends Malika to his camp, vi, 

333 
treatment of Arab captives 

by, vi, 323, 334 
receives the title of Zii'l 

Aktdf q.v., vi, 335 
returns to Pars and receives 

tiibute, vi, 335 
consults the astrologers, vi, 

33.5 
visits Caesar in disguise, vi, 

336 
entertained by Ca?sar, vi, 

337 
denounced by a Persian resi- 
dent at Caesar's court, vi, 

337 
arrested, vi, 337 

sewed up in an ass's skin and 
imprisoned, vi, 338 

pitied by an Iranian slave- 
girl, vi, 339 

freed from ass's skin by 
slave-girl, vi, 340 

entertained by a gardener, 
vi, 341 seq. 

sends the gardener to the 
high priest, vi, 344 

described by the gardener, 
vi, 344 



ShApiir, praises the slave-girl, vi- 

34<3 

prejiarcs to attack Caesar, 
vi, 346 

sends spies to Taisafun, vi, 
346 

sends tidings of his victory 
over Caesar to the prov- 
inces, vi, 348 

treatment of Caesai by, vi, 

340 
invades Riim, vi, 350 
defeats Ydnus, vi, 352 
bids Bazanush come to him, 

vi, 354 
dictates terms of peace, vi, 

355 
returns to Istakhr, vi, 356 
takes Nasibin, vi, 356 
names and honours the 

slave-girl, vi, 356 
rewards the gardener, vi, 357 
keeps Caesar captive, vi, 357 
sends Caesar's corpse to 

Rum, vi, 357 
arranges a disputation be- 
tween Mam' and the high 

piiest, vi, 35S 
Mani executed by, vi, 359 
ananges foi the succession 

with his brother Ardshir, 

vi, 360 seq. 
dies, \i, 362 
ShApur, son of Shipiir, Shih 

(Sapor III), 163, vi, 3, 

251, 360, 371 ; vii, 171, 

186 
Ardshir, son of Urmuzd, 

resigns the throne to, vi, 

364 
Reign of, 163, vi, 365 seq. 

Note on, \i, 365 
death of, vi, 366 

Tabari on, vi, 365 
Shapur, son of Yazdagird, king 

of Armenia, vi, 373 
Shdpur of Rai, Kubad's com- 
mander-in-chief, vii, 184, 

185 ; viii, 72 
summoned to overthrow 

Siifarai, vii, 191 



368 



GENERAL INDEX 



Shapur of Rai, conference of, , 
with Kubad, vii, 192 
goes to Shiraz and arrests 

Sufarai, vii, 193 
conveys Sufarai to Sh4h 
Kubad, vii, 194 
Shapur, Iranian noble, temp. 
Nushinvan, vii, 304, 333 
Shapur, Iranian wairior, J72, 
viii, 202, 225, 257, 259, 
269, 293, 296 
deceived by Caesar's talis- 
man, viii, 273 
praised by Caesar, viii, 
279 
Bahram Chiibina writes to, 

viii, 285 
receives Istakhr and Darab- 
gird, viii, 313 
Shapiir, father of Piruz, ix, 

80 
Shapur Gird (Gund-i-Shapur (/.y.) 

city, vi, 295, 298 
Shatt-al-Arab, the combined 
streams of the Tigiis and 
Euphrates, ix, 67 
Shawaran, Iranian hero, 151, ii, 
73, 90, III, 228, 249, 250, 
255. 271, 318 ; iii, 20, 34, 
43, 45. 48. 67, 115, 334, 
iv, 97. 105. 147. 275 
Shawwal, the tenth Muham- 

madan month, vi, 208 
Sheep's heads, Bahram Chiibina 
and the, viii, 74, 107 
omen of, reported to Hur- 
muzd, viii, 108 
Shem, patriarch, vi, 65 
Shepherds, Kai Khusrau brought 

up by, ii, 328 seq. 
Sher-kappi, viii, 322 note 
Shi'ban, vi, 397 

Shida (Pashang), son of Afra- 
siyab, 152, i, 92 ; iii, 262, 
350 ; iv, 10 seq., 15, 135, 
156, 158 seq., 206, 222, 
2S7, 290 
consulted by his father, iii, 

250 seq. 
goes on embassy to Piilad- 
wand, iii, 255 



Shida, refuses to interfere in the 
fight between Rustam and 
Piiladwand, iii, 363 

sent by Afrasiyab to Khk- 
razm, iv, 11 

defeated by Ashkash, iv, 
60, 72 

commands the left wing, iv, 

155 

surname of, meaning of, iv, 

155 note 
urges Afrasiyab to attack 

Kai Khusiau, iv, 159 
Afrasiyab's leply to, iv, 

160 
wishes to meet Kai Ivhus- 

rau in single combat, iv, 

161 
goes on an embassage to 

Kai Khusrau, iv, 161 
skirmish of, with Iranian 

outposts, iv, 164 
welcomed by Kai an, iv, 

165 

mail and steed of, iv, i68 

receives Kai Khusrau 's reply, 
iv, 170 

returns to Afrasiyab, iv, 170 

goes to fight Kai Khusrau, 
iv, 171 

parley of, with Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 172 

challenges Kai Khusrau to 
a wrestling-bout, iv, 173 

urged by his interpreter to 
flee from Kai Khusrau, iv, 

174 
refuses, iv, 174 
wrestles and is overthrown, 

iv, 175 
Kai Khusrau instructs Ruh- 
ham to bury, iv, 176 
Sliidasp, minister to Tahmiiras, 

i, 127 
Shidasp, son of Gushtasp, 155, 
ii, 3 ; V, 26, 58 
death of, foretold by Jam4sp 

V, 50 
given command of one wing, 

V, 55 
slain, V, 58 



GENERAL INDEX 



S'iO 



Shidiish, franian hero, i, 211 ; ii, 
58, 85, 158, 340 ; iii, 33, 
45, 48, 127, 129, 130, 139, 
141, 157, 248, 253 ; iv, 
13, 15, 25, 191 

with K4ran and Kishwdd, 
pursues Kurakhan, i, 354 
put in command of the 
rear, iv, 92 

Kai Khusrau remonstrated 
with by, and other nobles, 
for refusing audience, iv, 

-275 
Shi'ite, Shi'itcs, Muhammadan 
sect, i, 13 
origin of, i, 13 
Firdausi a, i, 24 
Shikbdn, TrAnian warrior, vi, 

395 
Shiknan, place, vii, 359 
Shingan, region, iii, 228, 238 ; 

iv, 65 
Shiraz, citj' in Pars (Farsistan), 
166, i, 236 ; vi, 198 note, 
210 ; vii, 6, 173, 190, 193, 
194 
Sliiriu, wife of Khusrau Parwiz, 
174, 175. viii, 187, 194, 
363. 383. 407 ; ix, 28, 36 
enmity of, to Shirwi, viii, 

189, 191, 193 
account of, viii, 192 
Khusrau and, Persian poem, 

viii, 192 
meaning of, viii, 193 
Maryam murdered by, \'iii, 

193. 389 

a Christian, viii, 195 

warns Khusrau Parwiz 
against Gurdya, viii, 364 

Khusrau Par\viz and, ix, 7 
Story of, i'74, viii, 382 
married to, viii, 386 

gilded chamber given to, 
viii, 389 

hears Kubid proclaimed 
Sh4h, viii, 416 

informs Khusrau Parwfz, 
viii, 416 

has charge of Slu'rwi's horo- 
scope, ix, 16 

VOL. IX. 



Shiri'n, has charge of Rdja's letter 
ix, 17 
companions Khusrau Par- 
wiz in prison, ix, 29 
reproached and summoned 

by Shirwi, ix, 36 
makes her Will, ix, 36 
goes to Court, ix, 37 
justifies hciself, ix, 38, 40 
exonerated, ix, 38, 41 
sons of, ix, 39 
unveils to the Court, ix, 39 
Shir\vi enamoured of, ix, 39 
makes request of Shirwi, ix, 

40,41 
goes home, ix, 40 
distributes her wealth, ix, 40 
frees her slaves, ix, 41 
poisons herself, ix, 42 
Shirkhan (Shirvan, district and 
town west of the Caspian 
between the Kur river and 
Darband ?), i, 169 
Shirkhun, a Zabuli, v, 184 

guides I3ahman to Rustam, 
V, 184 
Shiiu, son of Gushtasp, 155, v, 26 

slain, V, 57 
Shiriiya, son of Bi'zhan, iv, 360 
goes with Zarir to Riim, iv, 
360 
Shirwan (Shirvan ?) iii 216. 

See Shirkhan. 
Shirwi, franian hero, i, 207, 215 
helps to take the Castle of 

the Alans, i, 223 seq. 
conveys the spoil to Faridun, 
i. 230, 232 
Slu'rwi, Nushirwan's commander- 
in-chief, vii, 251 
appointed to receive the 
Ruman tribute, vii, 262 
Shfnvi (KubM q.v.). Shdh, 174, 
175, viii, 188, 190, 
seq. : ix, 7, 8, II, 27, 2 
31 seq., 36, 45, 47, 64 
Shirfn's enmity to, \'iii, i 

191. 193 
internment of, viii, i(],^^96, 

391 
released, viii, 196, 4^5 

A.\ 




370 



GENERAL INDEX 



Sh'rwi (Kubad), secret and public 
names of, viii, 372, 416 

astrologers consulted at 
birth of, viii, 372 

ill-omened horoscope of, viii, 
372 ; ix, 16 

referred to, viii, 373, 390 
kept by Shirin, ix, 16 

Khusrau Parwiz gives 
Cajsar's gifts to, viii, 381 
boorishness of, viii, 390 

Khusrau Parvviz' displeasure 
with, viii, 390 

sends to take Khusrau Par- 
wiz, viii, 419 

Reign of, lys, ix, 3 
Note on, ix, 3 
Length of, ix, 42 

tieatment of Khusrau Par- 
wiz by, ix, 7 

writes to Heiaclius, ix, 7 

Ashtad and Kharrad report 
their interview with Khus- 
rau Parwiz to, ix, 27 

reproaches and summons 
Shirin, ix, 36, 37 

falls in love with Shirin, ix, 

39 
grants Shirin 's requests, ix, 

40, 42 
poisoned, ix, 42 
son of, ix, 42 
Shirzad, herald in Niishirwan's 

host, vii, 252 
Shirzil, franian warrior, viii, 

296 
Shiz (Takht-i-Sulaiman), seat of 
the Magi in Azarbaijan, i, 
60 ; viii, 190 
Fire-temple at, vii, 5 
Khatiin sent to, vii, 5 
Shoemaker, Bahram Gur and 
the, 164, vii, 24 
Nushirwan and the, i6g, 

vii, 218, 260 
offer of, to advance money 
to Nushirwan, viii, 48 
rejected, viii, 50, 71 
ci'u'ba Mughira, companion of 
"'whhe Prophet, ix, O9, 83 
p^^ assy of, ix, 69. 82 



Shu'ib, Arab chief, 158, vi, 21 
attacks Darab, vi, 21 
defeated and slain, vi, 22 
Shiilak, Gushtasp's steed 
(Dakiki), v, 73 
Asfandiyar's steed (Fir- 
dausi), V, 126 
Shiirab (Sura), city on the 
Euphrates, east of 
Antioch, vii, 217 
place of Gushtasp's exile, 

vii, 254 
taken by Nushirwan, vii, 

217. 254 
Shiirsan, vi, 379 

Shiis (Siis, Susa), city on the 
Karkhah river north west 
of Shiishtar in Khuzistan, 
vi, 327 

Shiishtar, ^"hustar, city on the 
Dujayl (Kariin) river in 
Khuzistan, vi, 199, 295 
and note, 299 ; viii, 381 
dam and bridge at, vi, 298, 
326 

Sicily, vi, 30 

Alexander the Great's legen- 
dary visit to, vi, 30 

Siege-operations, iii, 246 ; iv, 208 
51?^. ; vii, 254, 257 

Signs, the Twelve (Zodiac), vii, 
408 

Sigz, man of (Rustam), ii, 100 
and note ; iii, 183, 209, 

218, 221 

Sigzian, a native of Sigz, v, 226 
and note 228 
= Rustam, iii, 209, 225, 227 ; 

v, 241 
= Zawara, v, 226, 2 28 
= Faramarz, v, 228 
Sikandar (Iskandar, Alexander 
the Great, q.v.). Shah, 158- 
160, i, 42, 49 ; ii, 3, Sseq.; 
V, 30 ; vi, II, 13, 16, 18, 
29. 30, 33. 193. 210, 240 
and note, 325, 353 ; viii, 
52, 214, 217, 242, 262. 
381, 387. 392 ; ix, 26 
paternity of, i, 55 and 
note 



[ 



GENERAL INDEX 



371 



Sikandar, clorivation of, in Ta- 

bari, vi, ly 
dciivation of, in Shdhnima, 

vi, 19, 26 
birth of, vi, 18, 26 
adopted as his heir by Faila- 

kus, vi, 27 
counselled by Arastih's, vi, 

35 
refuses tribute to Ddrd, vi, 

36 
prepares for war with Dard, 

vi. 37 
invades, and defeats king of, 

Misr, vi, 30, 37 

Iran, vi, 30, 37 seq. 
visit of, to the camp of Dkrk, 

' vi, 38 
invited to banquet with 

Dara, vi, 40 
takes the golden cups of 

Dara, vi, 40 
recognised, vi, 40 
escapes, vi, 41 
defeats Dara, vi, 43, 44, 46 
issues proclamation to the 

Iranians, vi, 44, 47 
gives the spoil to his troops, 

vi, 44. 47 
marches from 'Irak against 

Dara, \n, 46 
enters Istakhr, vi, 46 
answers Dara's letter, vi, 50 
marches from Istakhr, vi, 51 
hears of Dard's murder, vi, 

52 
arrests Darei's murderers, vi, 

53 
finds Dara still living, vi, 53 
promises to avenge Dcir4, vi, 

53 
promises to carry out Ddri's 

last wishes, vi, 54 
Dari bestows Riishanak 

upon, vi, 55, 86 
laments for, and buries, 

Dara, vi, 55, 56 
executes Dard's murdereis, 

vi, 56 
hailed as ruler by the frin- 

ians, vi, 56 



Sikandar, sends envoys to Ispa- 
han and to the family of 
D4ra, and letters to the 
provinces, to announce 
his accession, vi, 57 
crowned Shah at Istakhr, 

vi, 5<j 
Reign of, 15S, vi, 60 seq. 

Note on, vi, 60 seq. 
diagram to illustrate Per- 
sian Romance of, \ i, 84 
inaugural address of, vi, 85 
correspondence of, with the 
the wife and daughter of 
Daici, vi, a 86, seq. 
marries Riishanak, vi, 90 
invades Hind, vi, 98 
Kaid and, vi, 61, 98 
approaches Milad, vi, 61, 98 
inquires about the Four 
Wonders of Kaid, vi, 100 
Four Wonders and other 
gifts sent by Kaid to, vi, 
103 
marries daughter of Kaid, vi 

104 
sage of Kaid and, vi, 62, 104 

seq. 
principle of the cup ex- 
plained to, vi, log 
conceals his treasures, vi, 

no and note 
advances to Kannvij, vi, no 
troops of, protest, vi, 113 
remonstrates with his troops 

vi, 113 
troops of, ask pardon, vi, 

114 
war of, with Fiir (Porus), vi, 

67, no seq. 
hears of Fiii's elephants, vi, 

"5 

his device to overcome, vi, 

"5 
challenges Fiir to single 

combat, vi, 116 
slays I'lir, vi, 117 
Fiir's troops submit to, vi, 

n8 
becomes king of Hind, vi, 

n8 



372 



GENERAL INDEX 



Sikandar, bestows Hind on 

Sawurg, vi, ii8 
visit of, to Mecca and the 

Kaaba, vi, 64, 67, 119 seq. 
ends the rule of the Khuza' 

in Arabia, vi, 120 
sets up Nasr instead of the 

Khuza', vi, 120, 
goes to Judda, vi, 121 
marches to Misr, vi, 121 

welcomed by king of, vi, 
121 

stays for a year in, vi, 121 
Kaidafa (Candace) and, vi, 

vi, 65, 121 seq. 
poitiait of, obtained by 

Kaidafa, vi, 122 
Kaidafa praised by Kabtun 

to, vi, 122 
\viites to Kaidafa, vi, 123 
Kaidafa's answer to, vi, 123 
assumes the name of Nait- 

kiin (Antigonus), vi, 66, 

125 seq. 
pleads (as Naitkiin) for 

Kaidriish and his wife, vi, 

126 
goes (as Naitkiin) to Kai- 
dafa, vi, 127 
graciously received by Kai- 
dafa, vi, 128 
audiences of, with Kaidafa, 

vi, 128 seq. 
recognised by Kaidafa, vi, 

129 seq. 
delivers his message, as 

envoy, to Kaidafa, vi 129, 

134 
covenant of, with Kaidafa, 

vi, 132, 138 
warned by Kaidafa against 

Tainiish, vi, 133 
insulted by Tainush, vi, 134 
counsels Kaidafa about Tai- 
niish, vi, 135 
covenant of, with Tainush, 

vi, 136 
Kaiddfa's gifts to, vi, 140 
returns with Tainush, vi, 141 
welcomed by his troops, vi, 
141 



Sikandar, rsveals himself to Tai- 
niish, vi, 142 

entertains at a banquet, 
gives gifts to, and dis- 
misses, Tainush, vi, 143 

final message of, to Kaidafa, 

vi, 143 
Brahmans hear of the com- 
ing of, and write to, vi, 

143 

interview of, with the Brah- 
mans, vi, 67, 144 seq. 

quits the Brahmans, vi, 147 

Fish-eaters (Ichthyophagi, 
q.v.) and, vi, 69, seq., 147, 
177 

adventuie of, with a whale, 
vi, 71, 147 

sees gigantic reeds (bam- 
boos), vi, 71, 148 

attacked by snakes, scor- 
pions, and boars, vi, 148 
the people of Habash, vi, 
149 
the Narmpai, vi, 150 

adventure of, with a dragon, 
vi, 71, 151 

visits the temple of Diony- 
sus, vi, 71, 152, 166 

warned of his death, vi, 152, 
161, 166 

marches toward Hariim, the 
City of Women (Amazons 
q.v.), vi, 153 seq. 

encounters snow and frost, 
vi, 156 

encounters great heat, vi, 

157 
encounters the negroes, vi, 

157 
reaches and inspects Harum, 

-^i. 157 
marches westward and finds 

a fair-haired race, vi, 73, 

158 
hears of the Gloom, q.v., and 

of the Fount of Life, q.v., 

and prepares to visit them 

vi, 158 
sets forth with Khisr as 

guide, vi, 159 



GENERAL INDEX 



373 



Sikandar, Khisr ami, part com- 
pany, vi, U)0 
fails to find the Fount of 

Life, vi, 160 
interview of, witli biuls, vi, 

160 
interview of, with Israfil, vi, 

7S, lOI 
emerges from the Gloom, vi, 

162 
matches eastward, vi, 163 
hears of YAjiij and Majiij, 

vi, 163 
barrier of, j6o, i, 16 ; vi, 7S, 

164, 2. ,9 
Speaking Tree visited by, vi, 

167 seq. See Tree, 
reaches " The World's 

End," vi, 168 
receives gifts, vi, 169 
expedition of, to Chin, vi, 

80, i6g seq. 
goes as his own ambassador 

to the Faghfiir, vi, 

170 
describes himself, vi, 171 
Faghfur's gifts to, vi, 173 
departs with Faghfur's en- 
voy, vi, 173 
identity of, discovered by 

the envoy, vi, 173 
dismisses the envoy with 

gifts and a message to 

Faghfur, vi, 174 
anives at Chaghwan, vi, 

174 
marches to Sind, vi, 175 
defeats Band^wa, chief of 

the Sindians, vi, 175 
marches to Nimruz, vi, 

175 

receives gifts from the king 

of Yaman, vi, 175 
meets Gush-bistar, vi, 177 
carries ofl the treasuies of 

Kai Khusrau, vi, 178 
policy of, for safeguaiding 

Riim after his decease, vi, 

8r, 178, 197 
adopts the advice of Aras- 

tali's, vi, 180 



Sikandar, arrives at Habil, vi, 
180 

prodigious birth at, vi, 81, 
180 

consults the astrologers 
on, vi, 180 
warned of his end, vi, iSo 
sickens, vi, i8i 
Will of, vi, 8r, i8i 
grief of the troops for, vi, 

183, 184 
dies, vi, 183 
dispute as to burial of, vi. 

184 
body of, taken to Iskanda- 

riya, vi, 185 
sentences of sages over, vi, 

82, 83, 185 
cities of, vi, 83, 189 
Zoroast:ian and Sasanian 
view of, i, 59 and note, 61 
seq. ; vi, 15 and note, 224, 
240 ; vii, 79 and note 
Silk, account of, vi, 204 

introduction of, into the 
West, vi, 204 
Silk-worm. See Silk. 
Silvia, Vestal, v, 293 
Simah Barzin, scribe, Hurmuzd 
plots against, 170, viii, 85, 
seq. 
Simmas, chief herdsman of 

Ninus, V, 292 

Simurgh, mythical biid, 156, J57, 

i, 51 ; iii, 15S, 313, 330 ; 

V, 117, 132 seq., 166, 246, 

248, 255 

described, i, 235 and note, 

253. 276, 302, 326. V, 132 

nest of, on Mount Alburz, i, 

241, 244. 250 
young of. i, 242, 250, v, 132, 

133 

fmds and biings up the in- 
fant Zal, i, 242 

informs Z^l of his parentage, 

i. 245 
gives Zdl one of her feathers, 

i, 246, 321 

their efficacy, i, 246, 320 
restores ZAl to Sam, i, 247 



374 



GENERAL INDEX 



Simurgh, referred to, i, 251 

succours Riidaba, i, 320 seq. 
foretells Kustaiu's future 

greatness, i, 321 
slain by Asfandiyar, v, 133 
summoned to Rustam's aitl 

by Zal, V, 235 seq. 
heals Rustam and Rakhsh, 

V. 237 
instructs Rustam how to 

overcome Asfandiyar, v, 

237 

Sind, the river Indus and the 
parts adjacent, i, 113 ; ii, 
285 ; iii, 10 note, 117, 185, 
216, 238 iv, 65, 71 ; V, 
75, 180, 203, 277 ; vi, 113; 
vii, no, 112, 390 
king of, iii, 185 ; vi, 113, 
entertained by Bahram 
Gur, vii, 140 seq. 
kings of, send tribute to 

Gushtasp, v, 75 
chiefs of, vi, 123 
warriors of, vi, 132, 137 
Sikandar marches to, vi, 175 
Sindbad, the sailor, vi, 71 

lands on a whale, vi, 71 
Sinde, river, iii, 10 and note 
Sindian, Sindians, 160, vii, 126 
defeated by Sikandar, vi, 

175 
Sindukht, wife of Mihrab and 

mother of Riidaba, 141, i, 

259, 299 
Mihrab praises Zal to, i, 260 
discovers the loves of Zal 

and Riidaba, i, 281 
reproaches Riidaba, i, 282 
informs Mihrab about Zal 

and Riidaba, i, 284 
goes with gifts to Sam, i, 

300 seq. 
well received by Sam, i, 302 
invites Sam to visit Kabul, 

i. 305 
returns to Kabul, i, 306 
hears of Zal's success with 

Miniichihr, i, 315 
felicitates Riidaba, i, 315 
•C/. Vol. v., p. 30. 



Sindukht, Mihrab and, prepare 
to welcome Sam and Zal, 

i, 315. 317 

entertain Sam and Zal, i, 

3 1 7 -"^'''l- 
visit Sam in Si'stan, i, 319 
Sinjibii, first historical Khan of 
the Turks, vii, 317 
relations of, with Niishir- 

wan, vii, 317 
Haitalians and, vii, 317 
Sipahram, Turanian hero, J51 ; 
ii, 228, 229, 388 ; iv, 26, 
103 
chosen to fight with Hajir, 

iv, 97 
slain by Hajir, i\', 104 
Sipand (Spewto-data, q.v., Spen- 
dyad, Sapad, White 
Castle), mountain north- 
west of Nishapiir, 142, i, 
377 ; ii, 118 ; v, 30, 116, 

117 
Malcolm's identification and 

desciiption of,' i, 236 
Zal bids Rustam take, i, 329 
described, i, 329 
taken by Rustam, i, 331 
treasures of, i, 331, 332 
hold of, destroyed by Zal's 

orders, i, 333 
Sipandarmad, ameshaspenta, 

q.v., iii, 287, 328 ; v, 18 
month, i, 89 ; iv, 252 ; ix, 

70, 122 

day, i, 88, 89, viii, 331 
Sipanjab (Farghana ?), region, i, 

375 ; ii. 241,342,344. 345 
358 ; iii, 151 
Sipansar, Iranian warrior,viii, 293 
Sistan = Nimriiz = Zabuiistan,' 
144, 149, 155, ; i, 319 ; 
ii, 80, 335, 365 ; iii, 165, 
166, 191, 207, 321, 356; 
iv, 14, 278 ; V, 13, 17, 29, 
85, 86, 89, 94, 173, 174, 
201, 220, 248, 261, 264, 
267 ; vi, 32, 198 ; vii, 214 
former capital of, i, 4 
lake of, i, 4 ; v, 239 note 
" Ste p. 333 note. 



GENERAL ISDEX 



373 



Si'stdn, orig;in of name, i, 19 

invadoil l)y Sliamasas and 

Khazarwan, i, 358 
mourning in, for Kustam, v, 

278 
invaded by Bahman, v, 284 
seq. 
Siti'r, Persian measure of weight, 

iii, 184 
Situh, Turanian heio, v, 86, 87 
goes as a spy to Iran and 
reports to Arjasp, v, 80, 

Siyah Chasm, skive of Farrukh- 
zad, ix, O2 
handmaid of Farrukhzad 

and, ix, 62 
imprisoned, ix, 62 
released, ix, 62 
poisons Farrukhzad, ix, 63 
Siyamak, son of Gaiumart, /J9, 
i, 117, 119 
slain by the Black Div, i, 120 
lamentations over, i, 120 
Siyamak, Turanian hero, i^i, iv, 

97 
chosen to fight with Guraza, 

iv, 97 
slain by Gurdza, iv, 100 

Siyavakhsh. See Siyiwush. 

Siydvashana. See Siyawush. 

Siydwush, son of Kai K4us, and 
father of Farud and Kai 
Khusrau, 144-148. ; i, 55, 
92 ; ii, 3, 25, 82, 104 note 
187 seq., 335, 338 seq., 346 
seq., 363. 371. 372, 374 
seq.. 3«3. 386, 388, 396, 
403, 411 ; iii, 8, 13, 18, 19, 
21, 22, 29. 39. 42. 43. 51. 
52, 57, 66, 67, 71, 72, 87, 
93, 99, 112, 117, 118. 137. 
146, 148, 149, 156, 163, 
183, 197, 199, 200, 201, 203 
seq.. 211, 214, 226, 237, 
238, 256, 283, 289, 297, 

307. 315. 324. 347; iv. 7. 
17. 18, 34, 50, 51, 70 seq., 
89. 90, 95. 96. 102, 109, 
120, 127, 129, 130, 137, 
152, 159, 162. 167, 168, 



S i y awiish — ro n I . 

172, 201, 202, 204, 205, 
214. 215, 22J, 223, 231, 
235. 249, 250, 252, 257, 
267, 270, 271, 283, 285, 
289, 299, 305, 307, 310 ; 
v, 174, 176, 192, 208, 272 ; 
viii, 104, 349, 395 note ; 
ix, 25 and note, 26 note. 

103 
mother of, 144, ii, 3 
Story of, 144, ii, 188 seq. 
Note on, ii, 188 seq. 
good examjile of Fir- 
dausi's method, ii, 188 
Prelude to, ii, 191 
identical with Cambyses, 
the father of Cyrus the 
Great, in legend, ii, 191 
adventure of the mother of, 

ii. 193 
destined to misfortune from 
birth, ii, 196 
brought up by Rustani, ii, 

196 
horoscope of, ii, 196, 205, 

234 
returns to court, ii, 197 
made ruler of Kuhistan, ii, 

199 
mourns for liis mother's 

death, ii, 199 
temptation of, by Siulaba, 

ii, 200 seq. 
marches against Afrasiy4b, 

ii, 225 seq. 
demands hostages of Afrd- 

siyab, ii, 239 seq. 
goes over to Afrasiyab, ii, 

258 seq. 
plays at polo with Afrasiyib 

ii, 264 
archery of, ii, 266, 293 
mairiage of, with Jarira, ii, 

268 seq. 
marriage of, with 1-aiangis, 

ii, 270 seq. 
entertained by PirAn, ii, 278 
buikls cities, ii, 278 seq. 
consults the astrologers, ii, 

282 



376 



GENERAL INDEX 



Siyawush, foie tells the future to 

I'iran, ii, 282 seq. 
entertains Piran, ii, 287 
entertains Garsiwaz, ii, 290 

scq. 
plays at polo with Garsiwaz, 

ii, 292 
challenged by Garsiwaz, ii, 

294 
overthrows Gurwi and Da- 

mur, ii, 295 
slandered by Garsiwaz to 

Afrasiyab, ii, 296 seq. 
summoned to court by 

Afrasiyab, ii, 300 seq. 
betrayed by Garsiwaz, ii, 

301 seq. 
excuses himself from going 

to coutt, ii, 306 
passion of, ii, 307 seq. 
foretells the future to Faran- 

gis, ii, 310 seq. 
charges and turns loose 

Bihzad, ii, 312 
attacked and taken by 

Afrasiyab, ii, 314 
execution of, ii, 320 

referred to, iv, 268 
Blood of (plant), ii, 321 
birth-mark of, iii, 49 
mail of, iii, 58, 60, 61, 69, 81, 

iv, 40 scq., 51 
murderer of = Afrasiyab, iv, 

198 
garth of = Siyawushgiid, iv, 

238 
goods of, viii, 148, 151 
Siyawush, Iranian chief, J72 ; 

viii, 128, 163, 187, 233 

son of = Bahram, viii, 247 
Siyawush, wild duck, ii, 104 

note 
Siyawushgird, city built by Siya- 
wush, 145, 146, 153 ; ii, 

301, 314, 373 ; iv, 250, 

252 
building and desciiption of, 

ii, 285 seq. 
becomes the home of Kai 

Khusrau, ii, 333 
referred to, iv, 238 



Skirts, binding together of, in 

battle, iv, 85 and note, 177 

and note, 209 
Slavs, viii, 194 

Smerdis, the false, v, 1 1 ; vi, 207 
Snakes = Arabs, ix, gi 
Snowstorm, iii, 108 

Iranian host distressed by, 

iii, 71, 128 ; V, 137; vi, 156 
paladins of Kai Khusrau 

lost in, iv, 308 seq. 
Sohrab and Rustam, Matthew 

Arnold's, ii, 118 
Sol, planet, viii, 395 
Soma. See Homa. 
Son of Firdausi, death of, viii, 

190 
Song, of a div, ii, 31 
of Rustam, ii, 51 
of Asfandiyar, v, 129 
of the daughter of Barzin, 

vii, 52 
of the daughter of Mahiyar, 

vii, 60, 61, 66 
Sophia, Empress, her treatment 

of Narses, viii, 76 
Sorcerer, a Jewish, brings about 

the death of Nushirwan's 

minister, Mahbud, vii, 320 

seq. 
Sorceress, Rustam and a, 143, ii, 

50 seq. 
Sudaba and a, 144, ii, 214 

seq. 
Asfandiyar and a, 1^6, v, 128 

seq. 
Soshyans, the Zoroastrian Mes- 
siah, i, 131 
Souterrain, ii, 137 iv, 212 
Spain (Andalus), vi, 66 
Spand-dat (Spento-data, Asfan- 
diyar), V, 24 seq. 
Span-dat-nama (Asfandiyar — 

nama), v, 26, 27 
Speaking Tree, the, 160. See 

Tree. 
Speech, modes of, viii, 30 
Spendyai, mountain. See 

Spe>zt6-data. 
Spe«t6-data (Spand-d4t, As- 

fandiyir q.v.), v, 12 



GEXniiAL INDEX 



377 



Spe;(t(')-data (Spciulyarf, Sapad, 
Sipand q.v. ), mountain 

north-west of Nishapur, 

ii, iiS ; V, 30, 116, 117 
Sphint-s. See Calanus. 
Spica, star, i, 245. 271 ; viii, 379 
Spitama, clan name of Zarduhsht 

(Zoroaster), i, 236 ; iv, 15 
Spityura, brother of Yinia (Jam- 

shid), i, 130 
Spring, a, 143 

of Sav, q.v., 163 
Srovbar, mythical serpent, i, 172 
Stages, the Seven, J56. See As- 

fandiyar. 
Stateira. See Barsine. 
Steed, piece in chess. See Horse. 
Steeds, iron, Sikandai's, J59, vi, 

"5 

filled with naphtha, vi, 115 
Fur's elephants and troops 
routed by, vi, 116 
Stone, the Black. See Black. 
Strabo, Greek geographer (born 

c. 63 B.C.), vi, 68, 81 
Strength, handgrip as test of. 

See Handgrip. 
Subuktigin, father of Sultin 
Mahniud, account of, i, 20 
^~ title of, i, 21 

referred to by, i, 100, 114 
Sudaba, daughter of the king of 
Hamavaran and wife of 
Kai Kaiis, 143-146, ii, 3, 
79, 188, 189, 200, seq. 225, 
249, 257, 335, 339 
description of, ii, 86 
marries Kai Kiiis, ii, 88 
imprisoned with Kai Kaiis 

by her father, ii, 91 
released by Rustam, ii, 97 
temptation of Siyawush by, 

ii, 200 seq. 
slain by Rustam, ii, 340 
referred to, v, 174 
Sufaiai (Sarkhin, SukhrA, 
Seoses ?), 166, vii, 170 
and note, 171, 173 seq. ; 
viii, 72, 75, 168, 285 
appointed minister to the 
regent Balash, vii, 164 



Sufarai, glorification of, in 

Iranian tradition, vii, 170 

account of, vii, 173, 184, 

185 
resolves to avenge Piriiz, 

vii, 173 
writes to Haldsh, vii, 173 
marches on Marv, vii, 174 
correspondence of, with 

Khushnawaz, vii, 174 
defeats Khushnawaz, vii, 

177 
gives the spoil to the troops, 

vii, 177 
Khiishnawdz sues for peace 

to, vii, 178 
consults his troops, vii, 
178 
resolves to make peace, vii, 

179 
replies to Khushnawdz, vii, 

179 
returns to Iran in triumph, 

vii, 180 
welcomed by Balash and 

the chiefs, vii, r8i 
greatness of, vii, 181, 190 
dethrones Balish and makes 

Kubad Shah, vii, 1S2 
proverb concerning, vii, 185 
identical with Rizmihr, vii, 

185 

fall of, vii, 190 seq. 
Ku bad's letter to, vii, 193 
arrest of, vii, 193 
property of, confiscated, vii, 

194 
conveyed to Shdh Kubad, 

vii, 194 
executed, vii, 195 
son of, (Rizmihi), vii, r96 
Sufis, vi, 59 and 7iole 
Sughd (Sughdiana, Samarkand), 

district and city in Turk- 

istan between the Oxus 

and Jaxartes, i, 19 ; ii, 

230, 232, 237, 241. 249, 

358 ; iii, 244 ; iv, 65, 1S8, 

189. 255; vii, 331. 337. 

358, 359 
Sughdiana, vi, 72. See Sughd. 



378 



GENERAL INDEX 



Suhrab, son of Rustam and 
Tahmina danghter of the 
king of Samangan, 144, 
ii, 4, 25 ; iv, 296 ; v, 204 ; 

vi, 325 
Story of, J44, ii, 118 seq. 

Note on, ii, 118 

purely episodic, ii, 118 

Sir Jofin Malcolm's ver- 
sion of, ii, 118 

Matthew Arnold's version 
of, ii, 118 

Prelude to, ii, 119 
lament of, for the loss of 

Gurdafrid, ii, 119, note 
questions his mother as to 

his father, ii, 126 
chargei of, sired by Rakhsh, 

ii, 128 
Afrasiyab's plot against, ii, 

129 

gifts to, ii, 130 
invades fran, ii, 130 
takes Hajir prisoner, ii, 131 
beguiled by Gurdafrid, ii,i33 
described by Gazhdaham, 

ii, 136 
sees from White Castle the 

Iranian host advancing, 

ii, 148 
seen while feasting bj'' Rus- 
tam, ii, 150 
hears of the death of Zhanda 

Razm, ii, 151 
misled by Hajir, ii, 152 seq. 
overthrows the camp-en 

closure of Kaus, ii, t6o 
challenged by Rustam, ii, 

161 
Rustam described by, ii, 

154. 169 

advances of, to Rustam, 

ii, 169 
spares Rustam's life, ii, 170 
again encounters Rustam, ii, 

172 
makes himself known to 

Rustam, ii, 173 
last requests of, to Rustam, 

ii. 173 

mourning for, ii, 182 seq. 



Si'ikhra. See Sufarai. 

Sukhta, treasure, viii, 406 and 

rwfe 
Sultan. See Mahnnul. 
Sumai, viii, 195 
Sun, on the Nature of the, Jjg, 

i, 105 
one of the seven planets, i, 

72 

in astiology, i, 188, 310 

and note 
total eclipse of, vii, 159 
Sunday, viii, 378, 380 
Sunnites, orthodox Muhamma- 

dans, i, 13 
oiigin of, i, 13 
Siir, city near Ispahan, iy6, iv, 

146, 180 ; ix, 74, 89, 95, 

97, 100, 116, 118 
Sura. See Shurab. 
Surkha, son of Afrasiyab, 146, 

i, 92 ; ii, 344 seq. 
taken prisoner by Fara- 

marz, ii, 345 
death of, ii, 347 
Sursan (Zib-i-Khusrau, Rumiya 

q.v.) city built by Nushii- 

wan, 168, vii, 317, 327, 

328 
Surush, angel, the messenger of 

Urmuzd, 75,7, 172, i, 51, 

175, 182 ; ii, 288, 289, 

364, 408 ; iii, 277 ; iv, 

139, 203, 265, 283, 307; 

V, 170, 253 ; vi, 199 

note, 372 ; vii, 38 ; viii, 

173 
warns Gaiumait against the 

Black Div, i, 119 
bids Gaiumart avenge Siya- 

mak, i, 120 
visits and instructs Faiidun, 

i, 159 
counsels Faridun about Zah- 

hak, i, 169 
appears to Gudarz in a 

dream, ii, 363 
referred to, iv, 273 
informs Kai Khusrau that, 

his prayer is granted, iv, 

281 



GENERAL IXDEX 



379 



n 



Surush, angel, bills Kai Khusrau 
appoint J.nhiasp as his 
successor, iv, 281 
may bo assunicd to bavc 
acconipanittl Kai Klius- 
rau on his pilgrimage, iv, 
139. 303. 308 
saves Khusrau Parwiz from 
Bahram Chubina, viii, 
189, 299 

Surush, day, i, 88 ; vi, 411 

Surush, astrologer, vi, 372 

takes liahram Cn'ir's horo- 
scope, vi, 376 

Siisanak, a miller's daughter, 
vii, 32 and note 
taken to wife by Bahram 
Giii, vii, 33 

Susiana (Khiizistdn q.v.), vi, 295, 
321 ; vii, 184 

Sviatoi, island lying off western 
shore of the Caspian, i, 58 
tiote 

Swat, river in Northern India, 
vi, 65 

Swyamvara, Indian form of 
mairiage, iv, 316 

Syavarshana (Siyawush . q.v.), 

iv, 137 

country, ii, 80 ; 
viii, 193 
raiiled by Persians, viii, 41 
Syriac, version of the Pseudo- 
Callisthenes, vi, 14, 16, 18, 
30, 31 seq., 61, 63, 65, 66, 
68, 71, 72, 74, 78 seq. 
Chiistian Legend of Alex- 
ander, vi, 14, 15, 74,78,84 
quoted, vi, 15 

metrical version of, vi 
15. 78, 84 
Syrian, ix, 06 



11, 1S9 ; 
Syria (Sham), 
vi, 30 ; 



Tabak, frdnian chief, 161, vi, 202, 

suspected by Ardshii Papa- 
k4n. A, 225 ] 



Tabak, justifies himself, v'l 226 
Aidsliir IVijiakan and, de- 
feat Bahman, vi, 226 
buries Ardawan, \ i, 22<) 
atlvises Arilshir I'apakan to 
marry the daughter of 
Ardawan, vi, 229 
Tabaii, Arabic historian (A.D. 
838-923), iii, 108 ; vi, 14 
note, 16, 19, 30, 198, 200, 
291 note, 310, 313, 315, 
321, 326 ; vii, 3 seq., 156, 
159, 160, 170, 171, 185 
186, 217 ; viii, 73, 73 seq.. 
188; ix, 4, 50, 01, O4, 
69 
account of death of Rustam 
by, V, 261 
etymology of Dirdb, v, 

297 note 
Sasanians, vi, 14 note 
Alexander's battles with 

Darius, vi, 30 
Yajuj and Majuj, vi, 78 
rise of Sasanian dynasty, 

vi, 198 
Ardsliir Papakan, vi, 198, 

203 
genealogies of Papak, vi, 

200 
Worm, vi, 205, 206 
Haftwad, vi, 203, 206 
length of Ardshir Papa- 
kan 's reign, vi, 234 
Ardawan 's daughtei, vi, 

255 
Shapur, son of Ardshir 

Papakdn, vi, 255, 257 
death of Shdpur, son of 

Shapu*-, vi, 305 
Bahr4m, son of Shapur, 

vi, 368 
Yazdagird, son of Shapur, 

vi, 371 seq. 
Kubad and Nushirwdn's 

reform of taxation, vii, 

183 note, 215 
Turks, vii, 317 
Persian, vii, 5 ; viii, 42, 73 
seq.. 187 seq. ; ix, 4, 3, 43, 
70 



38o 



GENERAL INDEX 



Tabarf, Persian, story from, con- 
cerning Kubad, vii, 183 

note 
Arabic, viii, 42, 73, 1S7, 190 

195 ; ix, 4, 5, 7, 43, 50 
Tabaristan (Mazandaran, q.v.), 

i, 39, 40 ; ix, 74 
Firdausi's stay in, i, 39 
chief of, i, 39, 40 

patron of Firdausf, i, 39 
Table of Contents, General, ix,i39 
Tables, Genealogical. See Gene- 
alogical. 
Tacitus, Roman historian (A.D. 

55-120), iii, 10 and note, 

15 ; vi, 73 
Tahm^sp, father of Zav, i, 90, 

369, 370 ; ii, II ; iv, 283 
Tahmina, daughter of the king of 

Samangan and mother of 

Suhrab, 144; ii, 4, 118 
precautions of, for her son's 

safety, ii, 127, 140, 149 
mourning of, for Suhrab, ii, 

184 seq. 
death of, ii, 186 
Tahmuras, Shah, 140, i, 42, 90, 

91, 214 ; ii, 168 ; iii, 293 ; 

iv, 133 ; vii, 9 and note, 

273 ; viii, 277, 332, 376 ; 

ix. 25 
Reign of, 140, i, 125 seq. 

Note on, i, 125 
Binder of the Div (Ahri- 

man), i, 125, 127, 214 
Ahriman and, legend of, i, 125 
culture hero, i, 125, 126 
divs rebel against, i, 127 
conquers and enslaves the 

divs, i, 127 
taught wiiting by the 

divs, i, 127 
dies, i, 128 
Firdausi's reflections on, i, 

128 
horn of, iii, 335 
Tainush (Chaiogos, Keratoi, 

Kanir), son of Kaidafa, 

J59 ; vi, 66, 67, 134 seq. 
Kaidafa warns Sikandar 

against, vi, 133 



Tainush, Fui 's son in law, vi, 

133 

insults Sikandai, vi, 134 

Kaidafa chides, vi, 135 

Kaidafa and Sikandar con- 
sult about, vi, 135 

makes a covenant with 
Sikandar, vi, 136 

accompanies Sikandar on 
his return, vi, 141 

Sikandar discovers himself 
to, vi, 142 

asks grace of Sikandar, vi, 
142 

pardoned by Sikandar, vi, 
142 

entertained at a banquet, 
presented with gifts, and 
dismissed, by Sikandar, 

vi, 143 
Tainush (Theodosius), 163, vi, 

372, 389, 404 

goes to Yazdagird as ambas- 
sador, vi, 389 

asked by Bahram Giir to 
intercede with Yazdagird 
for him, vi, 389 

obtains Bahram Giii's re- 
lease, vi, 390, 404 
Tair (Daizan, q.v.), Arab chief, 
162 ; vi, 3, 322, 324, 330 
seq. 
Taisafun (Ctesiphon, q.v.), 16S, 
174 > vi, 397 ; vii, 18S, 
194, 361, 363 ; viii, 53, 90, 
109 note, 118, 173, 175, 
180, 182, 229, 241 ; ix, 9, 
10, 90 

Ardshir Papakan goes to, 
vi, 245 

Shapur's bridge at, vi, 321, 

329 
sacked by Tair, vi, 330 
Shapur sends spies to, vi, 346 
Caesar defeated and taken 

prisoner by Shapur at, vi, 

347 
Niishirwan returns to, viii, 

53 
Bahram Chiibina marches 

from province of, viii, 106 



GENERAL INDEX 



381 



Taisafi'in, Khusrau Panviz im- 
prisoned at viii, 421 ; ix, q 
Barbae! visits Khusrau Par- 
wiz at, ix, 29 
T4j, viii, 71 

Tdkdis, Throne of, IJ4, viii, 391 
account of, viii, 391 
added to by J4m4sp, viii, 

Takht {or TAk)-i-BustAn, place 
some four miles north- 
east of Kirmanshah in the 
Persian province of Arde- 
lan and famous for its 
Sas4nian bas-reliefs, vi, 
257 ; viii, 192 

inscription at, vi, 257 
Takht-i-Khusrau. 5eeMada'in. 
Takht-i-Sulaim4n (Shiz, q.v.), 

viii, 1 89 
Talhand, Indian prince, i6g, 
vii, 394, 396 seq. 

Story of Gav and, i6g, vii, 
394. seq. 

mother of. See Gav. 

birth of, vii, 396 

tutor of, vii, 397, 398, 401, 
402, 408, 410, 414 

rivalry between Gav and, 
vii, 397 seq. 

war between Gav and, vii, 
404 seq. 

rejects Gav's offei of accom- 
modation, vii, 406, 409 

death of, foretold, vii, 408, 
413. 418 

defeated by Gav, vii, 412 

accepts Gav's proposal for a 
decisive battle, vii, 415 

defeat and death of, vii, 
416 
Talikan, city and stronghold 
east of Marv, ii, 228 ; iv, 
65. 255 

ceded by Piruz to the Hait4- 
lians, vii, 156, 160 

importance of, vii, 156 
Talimdn, f 1 dnian hero, i, 2 1 1 , 2 1 7 

meets Kai Khusrau in Sughd 
vi. 255 



Talisman, Ca;sar's, J72 

described, viii, 271, 275 
deceives Persian envoys, 

viii, 272 
mastered by Kharrad, viii, 

274 

Tamaiisk, plant, i, 4 ; v, 240, 
243, 246, 247, 256 
branch of, fatal to Asfandi- 
y4r, v, 239 and note 

Tammisha (Kus), town in Eastern 
JNIazandarAn, formerly a 
seat of Faridun's, between 
Sariyah and Astarabad, i, 
177, 216, 230 

Tami'iz, viii, 77 note 

Tanais, river, iv, 315 and note 

Tarak, river (the Atrak, the 
boundary between Gur- 
gcin and Dahistdn, or the 
Turk flowing into the 
Jaxartes west of Tdsh- 
kand ?), vii, 164, 165, 359 

Tardz, city now in ruins, north- 
east of Tashkand neai the 
present town of Aulich- 
Ata, i, 257, 266; V, 157 ; 
vi, 268 ; viii, 370 ; ix, 41 
Cypress of = Rud4ba, i, 269 
Idols of, ii, 123, 206; iii, 
248 ; iv, 218 ; viii, 370 

Tartary, iv, 156 

Taurus, constellation, iii, 168 ; 
iv, 177 ; vi, 151 ; vii, 282 

Tausar, high piiest under Ard- 
shir Papakan, i, 62 
letter of, i, 63 

Tawdba, Iranian hero, iii, 25 

Tawurg, Turanian hero, iv, 188 
sent on an expedition by 

Afrasiyab, iv, 1S8 
defeated by Rustam, iv, 193 

Taxation, i6j, vii, 224 

Fiidausi's exemption from, 

i. 35. 39 ; ix, 121 
reform of, by Kub^d, vii, 183 
note, 215, 225 
Nushirwin, vii, 215, 225 
seq. 

Taxila, Indian city, vi, 63 
situation of, vi, 62 



382 



GENERAL INDEX 



Tazhav, an franian deserter to, 
and son-in-law of, Afrasi- 
yab, 148 ; iii, 27, 28 
sends Kabiida to spy out the 

Iranian host, iii, 73 
paileys with Giv, iii, 75 
defeated, iii, 77 
flees with Ispanwi, iii, 77 
pursued by Bizhan, iii, 77 
escapes to Afrasiyab, iii, 78 
attacks Bahram, iii, 100 
taken prisoner by Giv, iii, 
102 
Temperaments, the four, vii, 38 1 
symboUsed in the game of 
nard, vii, 381 
Tennyson, quoted, v, 281 
Tharthai, river in northern 

Mesopotamia, vi, 322 
Theodore, brother of Herachus, 

viii, 194 
TlieodosiopoUs, citj- in Armenia, 

vii, 187 
Theodosius II. (Tainiish, q.v.). 
Eastern Roman Em- 
peror (A.D. 401-450), vi, 
372 ; vii, 187 
Theodosius (Niyatiis, q.v.), viii, 

189 
Theophanes, Greek Chronicler, 
account of last days of 
Khusrau Parwi'z by, ix, 6 
Thermodon, river on the south- 
ern shores of the Euxine, 
vi, 72 
Thornbrake town, the world, i, 

310 
Thraetaona, i, 171 seq. ; ii, 81 
Thrita, i, 171 seq. 
Tiber, river, v, 294 
Tibciius XL, Eastern Roman 
Emperoi, \ii, 212 ; viii, 42 
Tigris (Arwand), river, vi, 294 
322 ; viii, 193, 194 ; ix, 
67 
small, the, vi, 199 and note 
lower, vi, 291 note 
bridge over, vi, 321 
Tihran, citv, ii, 28 ; iii, 109 ; v, 

14. '18 
edition of Shahndma, i. 76 



TIr, genius, iii, 287, 328 

month and day, i, 88, viii, 

394 
Tiri, eunuch of Guzihr, vi, 198 
Tirmid, city and fortress north 
of the Oxus (Jihiin) where 
the route from Balkh to 
Samarkand crosses that 
river, ii, 229, 258 ; iv, 65 ; 
vii, 156, 157, 331 
Tirudih, village in the neighbour- 
hood of Istakhr (Persc- 
polis), and the birth-place 
of Ardshir Papakan, vi, 1 98 
Tishtar, Sirius, i, 235 
Tobit, Book of, iii, 272 
Toll-house and ford of Zark, ix, 

100 and note, 116 
Tollman, Giv and the, 146 ; ii, 
390 
Gushtasp and the, iv, 324, 
332 and note, 334 seq., 344 
seq., 351 
Trade-routes, ancient, i, 11, 57 
Traitana, i, 7, 8, 171 seq. 
Trajan, Roman Emperor (A.D. 
98-117), vi, 322 
siege of Hatra by, vi, 322 
Translation, the principles adop- 
ted in the present, i, 76 seq. 
Translators of the Shahnama, 

list of previous, i, 87 
Treasuie, of Jamshid, 164, vii, 36 
Kai Kh israu, 160, iv, 295 ; 

vi, 178 
Sikandar, vi, 1 10 and note 
Khusrau Parwa'z, viii, 406 
Tree, the Speaking, 160, vi, 79 
described, vi, 167 seq. 
Sikandar visits, vi, 167, seq. 
warns Sikandar of his death, 
vi, 168, 169 
Triad of evil, Zoroastrian, i, 59 

and note 
Tribal, or Part, Kings, the, 160, 
vi, 180, 203, 204, 225, 252, 

253 

origin of, vi, 179, 181, 210 
character of their rule vi, 

197, 198 
number of, vi, 198 



GENERAL INDEX 



383 



Tribal, or Part Kings, ArdawAn, 
the chief of, vi, 201 
Firilausi on, vi, 210 

Tribute, Rum's to frAa, vi, 24; 
vii, 214,215, 248,262,333, 
338,362; viii, 52, 53 

Trita, i, 7, 8, 171 seq. 

Tshatrang-Xamak, Pahlavi text, 
vii, 3S0, 381 

Tughral, a species of falcon,, vii, 

49 
described, vii, 48 
Bahrdm Gur's, vii, 48 seq. 
Tukhar, Fariid's counsellor, 14J, 
iii, 43 5^^. 
tells Farud the blazons of 

the Iranian chiefs, iii, 44 
counsels Farud, iii, 47, 52 seq. 
Tukhdr, king of Dahistan, iv, 148 
commands with Fariburz 
the troops fiom Khdwar, 
iv, 148 
slays a scout from Makran, 
iv, 242 
Tukhdr, Iranian chief, viii, 228 
takes letter to Caesar, viii, 
263 
Tukhar, Iranian general, con- 
spires against Khusrau 
Parvviz, viii, 414 
releases Shirwi, viii, 413 
refuses to help Piruz against 
Guraz, ix, 48 
Tukhara, fidnian warrior, viii, 
296 
son of, viii, 314 
Tumaspa (Tahniasp, q.v.), i, 369 
Tur, second son of Fan'dun and 
luler of Turin, 140, 141, 
i. 42, 90 seq., 335, 337, 
34^.344. 362 ; ii, 8, 17, 19, 
99. 237, 262, 297, 302, 303, 
318, 327, 363, 390; iii, 

7. 30. 37. "5. 197. 245, 
246 ; iv, II, 34, 66, 69, 70, 
78, 166, 167, 188, 201, 203, 
206, 269, 272, 290 ; V, 42, 
206, 261, 284 ; vi, 353 ; 
vii, 73 ; viii, 266, 300, 376 
note, 378 ; ix, 103 
racial significance of, i, 54 



Tur, etymology of, i, 174 
naming of, i, 187 
horoscope of, i, 188 
made ruler over the Turk- 
mans and Chin, i, 189 
plots with Salm, i, 190 
Salm and, demand the abdi- 
cation of Iraj, i, 191 
Iraj visits, i, 198 
reception of fraj by, i, 
198, seq. 
slay Iraj, i, 201 
send fraj's head to Fari- 
diin, i, 202 

hear of Minuchihr, i, 208 
send fen embassy to Fari- 
diin, i, 208 
receive Fan'dun's reply, 

i, 213 seq. 
prepare for war, i. 215 
parley of, with Kubad, i, 217 
Salm and, worsted by Minu- 
chihr, i, 220 
plan a night-surprise, i, 

220 
worsted, i, 221 
slain by Minuchihr, i, 221 
head of, sent to Faridiin, i, 

222 
Fire-temple at Bukhara 

built by, iv, 255 
daughter of, iv, 304 
= Turan, iv, 51, 164 
chief of = Human, iv, 51 
prince of = Shida, i\ , 164 
Tiiran (Turkistan), the legendary 
patrimony of Tiir, q.v. and 
a general name for the 
non-franian regions north 
of the Oxus (Jihiin), 142, 
146, 14S. 13J, IS3. 165- 
i6j ; i, 189, 229, 351, 371, 
ii, 9, 18, 25, 79, 82, loi. 
112 and passim ; iii, 8, 11, 
15, 25, 29 and passim ; 
iv, 10, 15, 17, 19, 20, and 
passim ; v, 12, 20 seq., 25, 

32, 41. 43. 45. 53. C)i. and 
passim; vi, 43. 182, 398; 
vii, 43, 92, I3<i. 156, 178; 
viii, 118, 123, 130, 242, 



384 



GENERAL INDEX 



Tiiran — cont. 

329. 331. 349, 350. 376, 

405, 407 ; ix, II, 89, 99 
monarch of Chin and=Afra- 

siyab, ii, 99 
host of, ii, no 
lord of = Mahinud, iv, 142 
Turanians (Turkmans), 143, 148, 

149' 1 51-153. 155. 165; 

i, 9, 10, 54 ; ii, 11, 81, 265; 

iii, 30, 115, 320, 322 ; iv, 

7, 81. 129, 223, 227; V, 

13, 20, 116 ; vii, 90 ; viii, 

123, 320 
historical relations of, with 

the Iranians, i, 16 
Turk, Turks, i, 10, 20 ; viii, 95, 

103, 121, 135, 136, 138 

seq., 142, 164, 169, 170, 

189. 316, 320, 349, 352 ; 

ix, 70, 96 seq., 105, 114, 

117, 120 
confused vdth the Haita- 

Uans, vii, 4 
historical appearance of, vii, 

317 
Tabari on, vii, 317 

defeat the Haitahans, vii, 

332 
described, vii, 332 
War of, with Persians, viii, 

72 

prophesied, viii, 98 
= Sawa, viii, 98 
defeated, viii, 126 
find Sawa's corpse, viii, 127 
sorcerer, sends ill dream to 

Bahram Chubina, viii, 

121, 128 

put to death, viii, 129 
heads of chiefs of, sent to 

Hurmuzd, viii, 130 
retreat to Tiiran, viii, 131 
three, the, viii, 187, 204 

one of, attacks Khusiau 

Parwiz, viii, 220 

reproved by Bahram 
Chubina, viii, 221 

lead night-attack on Khus- 
rau Panviz, viii, 227 
= Makatura, viii, 319 



Turk, Turks = Kulun, viii, 343 
defeated by Yalan-sina, viii, 

353 

Turkhan, Turanian hero, v, 151 
sent with troops to recon- 
noitre outside the Brazen 
Hold, v, 151 

Turkish, ix, 87 

Turkistan (Tiiran), I4y, ii, 19 ; 
iii, 109, 228 ; iv, 233 ; v, 
55 ; vi, 179, 278, 280. 397; 
vii, 84, 92, 118, 334, 365 ; 
viii, 324, 336, 363, 376, 

377. 407 
Turkman, Turkmans (Tiiian. 

ians), 148, 153, i, 20, 189, 

263, 343, 352, 357; ii, 

12, 14, 15, 92, 100 and 

passim ; iii, 30, 63, 81, 93, 

and passim ; iv, 10, 13, 

15, 19, 20, 22, 29 and 

passim ; v, 22, 25, 36, 39, 

40. 44. 47. 51. 52, 61, 72, 
90 seq., 98 seq., 104 seq., 
108, no, 113, 114, 116, 

135, 152, 157. 158, 171. 
173, 206, 254 ; vii, 48, 88. 

92, 97. 177. 179, 239, 344. 
364 ; viii, 377 ; ix, 25, 76, 

94 

slave-boy of Zal meets the 

damsels of Rudaba, i, 263 

seq. 

make peace with Zav, i, 371 

army of, surrenders to As- 

fandiyar, v, 72, 113 
monarch of=Arjasp, v, 74 
led by Kuhram, storm 
Balkh, burn the Fire- 
temple, and slay Zar- 
duhsht and the priests, v, 

92, 93 
take Gushtasp's daughters 

captive, v, 93 
kingdom of, offered by 

Asfandiyar to Gurgsar in 

return for faithful service, 

V, 120 
ordered by Arjasp to march 

out from the Brazen Hold 

in foice to. attack the in- 



GENE UAL 1X1) EX 



38: 



Turkman, Turkmans — out. 

vadcrs under Bishiitan, v, 

hear the cries o( the frdn- 

ian watch in the Brazen 

Hold, V, 155 
refused quarter by Asfandi- 

yAr, V, 158 
language, vi, 147 
defeated by BahrAm Giir, 

vii, 90, 91 
sue for peace, vii, 91 
war of Piriiz with, vii, 164 

seq. 
inroads of, through the 

Caucasus, vii, 238 
make submission to Nushir- 

wan, vii, 360 
=Turk, viii, 87, 89, 94, 

217 
king = Afrisiydb, ix, 25 
Tiis, son of Naudar, franian hero, 

146-149. 154, iy6 ; i, 90 

353. 370 ; ii. 33. 35. 38, 
58, 62, 70, 73, 85, 90, 91, 
127. 138. 142, 148, 177. 
188, 193, 197, 199, 226, 
257. 316, 319. 335. 338, 
340. 349, 353 seq., 371, 
383. 394 ." i". II. 18, 19, 
24, 25, 37 seq., 45 seq., 60, 
62, 64, 66 seq., 76, 78. 80, 
82 seq., 108, III seq., 132 
seq., 136 seq., 145, 149 
seq., 154, 155, 159, 161, 
163, 166, 167, 169, 170, 
172, 174, 177 seq., 182, 
183, 187, 206, 211, 213 
seq., 225, 228, 230, 232, 
234. 235, 238, 246, 248, 
253. 254, 255, 257, 259. 
268, 273, 277, 289, 294, 
307, 322, 327, 329 ; iv, 13, 
15. 62, 79, 9T, 157, 180, 
191, 224, 226, 227, 242, 
292, 296, 306 seq. ; v, 
57. 116, 207, 208 ; viii, 
1 68 
Gustaham and, sent by Nau- 
dar to conduct the Iranian 
women to Alburz, i, 351 

yoL. IX. 



Tus, Gustaham and, hear of 
Naudar's death, i, 3O4 
passed over in the succession 

i. 3(J9. 370 
character of, i, 369 
appointed captain of the 

host, ii, 78 
taken prisoner in Hama- 

varan, ii, 90 
released by Rustam, ii, 97 
goes in search of Kai Kdiis, 

ii, 104 
engaged in the Fight of the 

Seven Warriors, ii, 107 

seq. 
commanded by Kai Kaiis to 

hang Rustam and Giv, 

ii. 143 
encampment of, described, 

ii, 153 
summons Rustam to fight 

Suhrdb and helps to 

saddle Rakhsh, ii, i6o 
quarrels with Giv over the 

future mother of Siya- 

wush, ii, 194 
supersedes Siyawush, ii, 246 

seq. 
leads the host home, ii, 258 
intercedes for Surkha, ii, 

347 
worsted in fight by Afrasi- 

yab, ii, 353 
appointed ruler of ChAch, ii, 

358 
returns to ivkn, ii, 362 
dispute of, with Giidarz over 

Kai Khusrau, ii, 400 seq. 
advocates the claims of Farl- 

burz, ii, 401 
asks pardon of Khusrau, ii, 

410 
hostility of, to Fariiil, iii, 13, 

51, ^2 
marches on Kaldt, iii, 40 
sends chiefs to attack Farud, 

iii, 47 seq. 
Bahrdm's remonstrance 

with, iii, 51 
hoise of, slain by Farud, iii, 



386 



GENERAL INDEX 



Tiis, resolves to attack Kalat, ni, 

62 
remorse of, for the death of 

Fan'id, iii, 67 
builds a charnel for Farud, 

Rivniz, and Zarasp, iii, 

68 
marches from Kalat, iii, 68 
defeats Tazhav, iii, 77 
occupies Giravgard, iii, 78 
defeated by the Turkmans, 

iii, 82 
deprived of his command, 

iii, 83 
Kai Khusrau's wrath with, 

iii, 84, III, 112 
superseded, iii, 86 
returns to Kai Khusrau, iii, 

86 
disgraced, iii, 86 
imprisoned, iii, 87 
pardoned, iii, 114 
challenges Piran to battle, 

iii, 117 
joins battle with Piran, iii, 

118, 126 
parleys with Human, iii, 121 
piays to be delivered from 

the snowstorm, iii, 128 
retreats to Mount Ham4- 

wan, iii, 132 
makes a night-attack upon 

Pi'ran, iii, 139 
harangues the host, iii, 141 
hears of the approach of suc- 
cours, iii, 159 
takes counsel with the host, 

iii, 167 
arrays the host, iii, 169 
chiefs and, take counsel with 

Rustam, iii, 172 
Rustam's wrath with, iii, 

234 
collects the spoil, iii, 235 
worsted by Piiladwand, iii, 

257 
leads a host to Khaiazm. iv, 

61 
son of = Zarasp, iv, 135 

made overseer of the host, 
iv, 149 



j Tiis, posted on Khusrau's right, 
i iv, 146 

takes part in the siege of 

Gang-bihisht, iv, 199 
oidered to prepare for a 
night-attack from Afra- 
siyab, iv, 224 
Kai Khusrau remonstrated 
with by, and othei nobles, 
for refusing audience, iv, 

275 

Giidarz, and other ^nobles 
take counsel, iv, 277 

audience of, with Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 283 seq. 

holds with other chiefs, at 
the bidding of Kai Khus- 
rau, an assembly on the 
plain, iv, 291 seq. 

Kai Khusrau's gifts to, iv, 
295. 300 

asks for further recognition 
from Kai Khusrau, iv, 
299 

letains the charge of Kawa's 
flag and receives Khur- 
asan, iv, 300 

sets out with Kai Khusrau 
on his pilgiimage, iv, 
306 

refuses to turn back when 
bidden by Kai Khusrau, 

iv, 307 
Kai Ivhusrau farewells and 
warns, and his comrades, 
iv, 308 

disappears and is sought 

in vain by, and his 

comrades, iv, 308 

end of, iv, 309 

Tiis, city, now in ruins, north of 

Mashad in Khurasan, i, 

39 ; V, 28 ; vi, 393 ; ix, 

90, 95 
birthplace of Firdausi, i, 38, 

41. 45 
governor ol, i, 39 
piince of, i, 100, 114 

legendary origin of, iii, 14 
legend concerning Fiidausi's 
burial at, iii, 191 



CESllRAL ISDLX 



3S7 



1 lis, city, treasure of Kai Kdi'is 
called " The IJride " stored 
at. iv, 295 
SAm and the dragon of, v, 

202 
local legend of, vi, 372, 391 

seq. 
governor of, ix, 92 
Tuwurg, Turanian hero, ii, 253 
Tuwurg, brother of Khdn, lyj, 
viii, 364 
reports flight of Gurdya, viii, 

351 
sent in puisuit, viii, 351 
parleys with Gurdya, viii. 

Twelve Kukhs (Champions), 
Battle of the. See Rukhs. 

Signs (Zodiac), vii, 408 
Tyre, city, vi, 30 

siege of, vi, 30 



U 



Clad, a div, 143, ii, 28, 59, 6i ; 

iv, 296 note ; v, 204 note 
Rustam and, ii, 52 seq. 
niade king of Mdzandaran, 

ii, 76 
'Umar, Khalifa (A.D. 634-643), 

i, II seq., 67 ; ix, 66 seq., 

72, 76, 121 
founds Basra, ix, 69 
sends Hcishim in pursuit of 

Yazdagird, ix, 68 

Nu'm4n to fight Yazda- 
gird, ix, 68 

Sa'ad to invade frdn, ix, 

7^ 
'Umar Khayyam, Persian poet 

and scientist (died A.D. 

1 1 23). V, 30 
Ummayyads, Muhammadan 

ilynasty, i, 12, 13 
Une, daughter of Alexander the 

Great in the Pseudo-Cal- 

listhcnes, vi, 77 
Ural Mountains, iii, 192 



Urmuzd, the Good Principle, i, 
5, 50, 116 seq., 236, ii, 82, 
iii, 271, 286, 317, 327 ; iv, 
139. 185 ; v, 15 seq. ; vi, 
55. 3(>2. 372. 387 ; vii, 
228, 406 and note ; viii, 
285 ; ix, 24 
Unity of, symbolised in the 

game of nard, vii, 381 
day, i, 88 ; iii, 323 ; vi, 302 
and note, 306, 375 

Urmuzd, Ashkanian (Parthian) 
king, vi, 197, 210 

Urmuzd, son of Shapur, Shcih 
(Hormisdas 1), 161, 162, 
vi. 3, 257, 273, 280, 313. 

327 
discovery of, by Ardshir Pa- 

pakan, vi, 257, 271 
birth of, vi, 271 
counselled by Ardshir Pd- 

pakan, vi, 280 

Shapur, vi, 299 
Reign of, 162, vi, 301 seq. 

Note on, vi, 301 
title of, vi. 301 
story about, vi, 301 
Urmuzd, son of Narsi, Shdh 

(Hormisdas II), 162, vi, 3, 

294. 295. 307. 315. 316. 
325 ; vii, 359; viii. 41 
Reign of, vi, 318 seq. 

Note on, vi, 318 
sons of, vi, 318 
inaugural address of, vi, 318 
pregnant wife of, enthroned, 
vi, 320 
Urmuzd (Hormisdas), son of 
Urmuzd, Persian Prince, 
vi, 318, 325 
referred to (?), vi, 337 
Urmuzd Ardshir (Ahwaz), city in 
Khuzistan, vi, 290 and 
note 
Urmuzd, frdnian warrior, viii. 296 
Uroscopy, vi, loi, 107. loS 
Urumiah (Khanjast or Chi'jast), 
lake in Azarbaijan, iv, 
136 ; viii, 195 
Afrasiydb escapes from Hum 
into, iv, 262 and note 



388 



GENERAL INDEX 



Ustad, fraiiian general, \ii, 251 

commands Nushirwan's 

right wing, vii, 251 

Ustad, franian warrior, viii, 296 

Ustukila, Turanian hero, iv, 182 

fights with Kai Khusrau, iv, 

182 

'Utbi, Al, secretary to Sultan 

Mahmud, i, 32 
'Uthman, Khalifa, i, 12 
Utterakuri, a legendary people, 

^i, 74 
Uzava (Zav), Shah, i, 369 



Vale of heroes, vii, 6 
Valerian (Bazanush), Roman 

Emperor (A.D. 253-260), 

vi, 323 seq. 
defeat and capture of, by 

Shapur son of Ardshir, vi, 

294. 295 

memorials of, vi, 295 
confused with Odenathus, 

Julian, and Jovian, vi, 

324 seq. 
death of, in captivity, vi, 

326 
Valkash (Vologeses I), Parthian 

(Ashkanian) king, i, 62, 63 
Va^idaremaini (Andariman), 

brother of Arjasp, v, 13 
Varahran I (Bahram son of 

Urmuzd), Sasanian king, 

vi, 307 
Varahran II (Bahram son of 

Bahram), Sasanian king, 

vi, 310 
Varahran III (Bahram Bahrami- 

yan), Sasanian king, vi, 

313. 368 

Varahran IV (Bahrani son of 

Shapur), Sasanian king, 

vi, 313. 368 
Varahran V (Bahram Gi'ir), 

Sasanian king, vii, 3 
Vardancs (Bahram), Parthian 

(Ashkdnian) king, iii, 9 

seq., 109 



Vardanes, wars of, with Gotarzes, 
iii, 10, II 
assassination of, iii, 10, 11 
character of, iii, 15 
Varewg-ana, the raven, i, 235, 236 
Vedas, i, 129, 144, 171, 234, 337, 
ii, 8, II, 25 

Vega, star, vii, 245 

Vendidad, Nask, vii, 188 

reference to Mazdak in, vii, 
188 

Venus, planet, i, 72, 100, 194, 
276, 303, 322, 332, 339 ; ii, 
115. 275, 345; iii, 143, 
159, 254, 318, 332 ; V, 
159; vi, 98, I02, 171, 190, 
212, 224, 332 ; vii, 53, 
151, 263 ; viii, 152, 359, 
394. 395 ." ix, 26, 73 

Verethraghna, the raven, ii, 25 

Victory of Victories, The, ix, 69 . 

Vidrafsh (Bidirafsh), v, 24, 26 

Village-chief, 154 

Vineyards, taxes on, vii, 215, 225 

Virgo, constellation, iii, 24 ; viii, 
359 ; ix, 71 

Vishtasp (Vistaspa, Gushtasp, 
q.v.), V, 24 

Vistaspa (Vishtasp, Gushtasp, 
q.v.), iv, 316; V, II 

Vistasp-sast, v, 11 

Vitrified fortifications, vi, 79, 165 

Vivanghat, i, 129 

Vohiiman. See Vohu Manau. 

Vohu Manau (Vohiiman, Bah- 
man), ameshaspenta, iii, 
271 ; V, 16, 17 

Volga, river of European Russia, 
falling into the Caspian, 
iv, 316 

Vologeses I (Valkash), Parthian 
(Ashkanian) king (A.D. 51 
-77), i. 62, 63 

Vologeses II, Parthian (Ashka- 
nian king), i, 19 

Vologeses (Balash), king of Kir- 
man, temp. Ardshfr Papa- 
kdn, vi, 205 

Vologeses (Balash), Shah, vii, 170 

Vonones I, Parthian (Ashkdnian) 
king (A.D. 8-12) 



GENERAL INDEX 



389 



Vouru-Kasha, sea, iv, 137 
\'iitra, deinon, ii, 25 
Indra and, vi, 203 
VulkTs-f-aiulaiuT rtlitioii uf the 
Shalinania, i, 77 ; vi, Go 



\V 

Wahr, region, iii, 177, 228, 235 
WakkAs, father of Sa'ad g.v., 

176; ix, 72, 78, 82, 90 
W4Ud, Khalifa, vi, 325 
Walnuts, taxes on, vii, 225 
War of the Religion, v, 19, 26, 29 

two campaigns of, v, 29 
Warazad, king of SipanjAb, i-f6, 

ii, 3^1 seq., 346 
Warigh (Callinicus, KAliniyus, 
q.v., Nicephorium, Rakka) 
cit}, viii, 188, 253, 257, 
280 
Khusrau Parwiz takes up his 
abode at, viii, 257 
Warriors, the Seven, Story of the 
Fight of, 143. ii, 25, 82, 
107 seq. 
Warstead = Bidad, iii, 245 
Wash, city, viii, 24 and note 
Water, scarcity of, i, 3 

— courses, underground, i, 3 
— horse, 163, vi, 373, 392 
referred to, vi, 373 
legend of Yazdagird and 
the, vi, 392 
— stealing demons, i, 7, 338 
of Life, 160, v, 30 ; vi, 159, 
160 
Wazir (minister), piece in chess, 
vii, 385, 423 
position of, vii, 388, 422 
move of, vii, 422 
West, Dr. E. W., referred to, v, 

II 
West, the, Salm's portion of the 
world, i, 189 
gateway of, viii, 369 and 
note 
Western sea, the, 160, vi, 138 
Whale, mistaken for an island, 
vi, 71, 147 



Whale, Sikandar's adventure 
with a, vi, 71, 147 

Wheeler, James Talboys, quoted, 
vi, 81 

Whip, Bahrdm Gur's, vii, 47, 54, 

63. 64 
object of reverence, vii, 47, 

54. 63 
White Castle (Mount Sipand, 
q.v.), stronghold north- 
west of Nishapur, 144, i, 
369; ii, 118, 131, 138 
Malcolm's identification 

and description of, i, 

236 ; V, 30 
besieged by Barman, 1, 

354 
evacuated by Gazhdaliam 

ii. 137 
Div, 143. See Dfv. 

Elephant,/^/. S^e Elephant. 

Huns (HaitaHans, q.v.), 1, 20 
Will, of Alexander the Great, vi, 
81 
provisions of, vi, 81, iSi 

Kubad, son of Piriiz, vii, 210 
Wine-drinking, forbidden by 
Bahrani Gur, vii, 23 

again permitted, vii, 25 

Firdausi's love of. See Fir- 
dausf. 
Wisa, Turanian hero, uncle of 
Afrasiyab, 142, i, 92, 337, 
342, 353. 361, 362 ; ii, 112 
354 ; iii. 79, 102, 105, 121, 
197, 202, 206 ; iv, 32, 39, 

50, 54. 55. 74. 84, 95. 99. 

103, 113, 115, 122 
pursues Karan, i, 355 
finds Barman dead, i, 356 
defeated by Karan, i, 357 
returns to Afra.siyab, i, 357 
sayings of, iv, 32 
Wisagird, city in Turin, ijT, iv, 

19. 20, 65 ; vii. 157, 331. 
Wisdom, praise of, vii, 103 
Firdausi's, I3g 

referred to, vii, 278 
— literature, Persian, vii, 278 

seq., vni, 3 

iMolil on, vii, 280 



390 



GENERAL INDEX 



Wisdom, literature, Noldekc on, 
vii, 2S1 
apportionment of, viii, 202 
Witch, 143, 156. See Sorceress. 
Wizard-land, vii, 120 and note 
Wolf, 154, 156, 165, vii, 121 seq. 
and note 
slain by Bahram Giir, vii, 

123 
of Faskiin. See Faskiin. 
Women, City of, 160 See Hariim. 
Wonders, 160, iv, 245 

the Four, of Kaid, i^g. See 
Kaid. 
World, on the making of the, ijg 
Worm, the, 161, vi, 195, 206, 238 
seq. 
Story of, 161, -vi, 196, 203 
seq., 232 seq. 
Mohl, Noldeke, and Dar- 
mesteter on, vi, 203 seq. 
cult of, vi, 235 
Ardshir Papakan's strata- 
gem against, vi, 242 
servants of, vi, 242 seq. 
Writing, art of, taught by the 
divs to Tahmuras, i, 127 



X 

Xerxes, Persian king (B.C. 485- 
465). v, 282 
Asfandiyar and, v, 282 
effigy of, falls, vi, 30 



YAjxij and MAjiij (Gog and 
Magog, q.v.), 160, vi, 79, 
163 seq., 211 note 
legend of, in the Kuran, vi, 

78 _ 
Tabari on, vi, 78 
described, vi, 163 
Ya'kub bin Lais, Persian chieftain 
and founder of the Saffari 
dynasty, i, 67, 68 
Ya'kubi, Arabic historian (died 
A.D. 891) 



Yalan-sina (Mardanshali), bro- 
ther of Bahram Chubina, 
viii, 74, 102, 122, 135, 138, 
157, 163, 169, 204, 288, 
291, 296 seq., 303, 316, 

356, 337 ; ix, 6 
goes hunting with Bahram 

Chubina, viii, 156 
pursues and brings back 

archscribe viii, 159 
speech of, viii, 165, 170 
worsted by Khusrau Parwiz, 

viii, 229 
commands the centre, .-iii, 

289 
Bahram Chubina makes, his 

mandatory, viii, 342 
defeats the Turks, viii, 

353 
negotiates marriage between 
Gurdya and Gustaham, 

viii, 357 
Yama. See Yima. 
Yaman (Hamavaran), south- 
western Arabia, 140, 160, 
162, i, 181 seq., 266, 286; 
ii, 80 ; iv, 146 ; v, 260 ; 
vi, 73, 120, 121, 324, 331, 
385. 386, 396, 401 ; vii, 
262 ; viii, 98 
king of = Sarv, 140, i, 178, 
179, 182 
Yaman, carnclians of, ii, 123 ; iii, 
289 
Canopus of, ii, 203 ; iii, 297 ; 

vi, 382 
onyx of, vi, 128 
striped stuff of, vi, 175 
monarch of, vi, 175 ; viii, 
16 
gives gifts to Sikandar, 

^i. 175 
= Munzir, vi, 378, 387, 

390 
Bahram Gur goes to, vi, 378, 

390 
conquered by Persians, viii, 

24 note 
curtains of, viii, 148, 151 
Yanus (Julian), brother of Ca?sar, 
162, vi, 324, 326 



GENERAL IXDEX 



391 



Ydnus, Icatls a host against SliA- 

piir, vi, 351 
(kfoatcd, vi, 352 
Vaslit XXII, nu'trical para- 

j)lirasi' of, vii, 318 
Yatkar-i-Zariran, Pahlavi text, 

V, 13, 24, 27 and nole ; vii, 

380' 

with Daki'ki's 
24 scq. 
KArnimak, vi, 



compared 
work, V 
resembles 
195, 196 
Yazates (Izads), 



the, iii, 286 



Yazd, city in central Persia, vi, 

Yazdagird, son of Shapiir, Shah 

(Isdigerd I), 163, 164. vi, 

3 ; vii, 4, 10, log, 119, 

171. 185. 359 

referred to, vi, 369 ; vii, 

74 
Reign of, i6j, vi, 371 seq. 

Note on, vi, 371 5^^. 
parentage of, uncertain, vi, 

371 
lover of peace like Aknaton 

of Egypt, vi, 371 
titles of, vi, 371, 372 
Tabari on, vi, 372, 373 
coins of, vi, 373 
evil administration of, vi, 

374. 404 
makes search for a governor 

for his son Bahram Gur, 

vi, 376 seq. 

Nu'man and Munzir visit, 

^'i. 377 
puts Bahrim Giir in Mun- 

zir's charge, vi, 378 

receives from Munzir a pic- 
ture of Bahrdm Giir shoot- 
ing, vi, 385 

Bahram Giir returns to, vi, 
386 

gives presents to, and sends 
a letter by, Nu'mdn to 
Munzir, vi, 387 

disgraces Bahram Giir, \i, 

389 
sends JJahram Gur back to 
Mun_ir, vi, 390 



Yazdagird, consults the astrolo- 
gers, vi, 390 

death of foretold, vi, 301 

attacked by bleeding of the 
nose, vi, 390 

death of, vi, 373, 393 
Noldeke on, vi, 373 

corpse of embalmed and 
taken to Pars, vi, 393 
Yazdagird, son of Bahrdm Giir 
(Isdigerd II), Shdh, 166, 
vi, 3 ; vii, 4, 152, 136, 160, 
187 

welcomes his father on his 
return from Hind, vii, 

137 
apjjointed by Bahram Giir 

to succeed him, vii, 150 
Reign of, 166, vii, 153 seq. 

Note on, vii, 153 

a blank in Shahnama, vii, 

153 

historicallj important, vii, 

153 

wars of, vii, 153 

fortifies passes in the Cau- 
casus, vii, 153, 1 87 

title of, vii, 153 

sons of, vii, 153 

appoints Hurmuz to suc- 
ceed him, vii, 155 

dies, vii, 155 
Yazdagird (Isdigerd III), Shdh, 
176, V, 294 ; vi, 3 ; viii, 
55, 73 ; ix, 5. 61, 64 seq., 
68 seq., 72, 81, 90, loi, 
105, 106, 113, 115, 116,122 

Reign and Era of, 176, ix, 
64 
Note on, ix, 64 

taken for safety to Istakhr, 
ix, 64 

age of, at accession, ix, 65 

difficult position of, ix, 65 
Yazdagird, historical importance 
of reign of, ix, 65 

flight of, from Ctesiphon, ix, 

^7 

Ihilwan, ix, 68 
last attempt of, to recover 
his empire, ix, 68 



392 



GENERAL INDEX 



Yazdagird, concentrates his 
forces atNahavand, ix, 68 

defeated and a fugitive, ix, 
6f) 

death of, referred to, ix, 69 

host returns to, after Kadi- 
siya, ix, 85 

hears of Rustam's death, ix, 

85 
quits Baghdad, ix, 88 
makes for Marv, ix, 8g 
entrusted to Mahwi by 
Farrukhzad, ix, 95, 96 
at Marv, ix, 97, 116 
hears of tlie coming of the 

Turks, ix, 97 
betrayed by Mahwi, ix, 98 
defeated, ix, 98, 116 
miller and, ix, 99 seq. 
described, ix, 99, loi 
Mah\vi bids miller slay, ix, 

107, 116 
slain, stripped and flung into 
stream, ix, 108, 109 and 
note 
corpse of, recovered, la- 
mented over and en- 
tombed, ix, 109 seq. 
Firdausi on, ix, iii 
Yazdagird, chief scribe, temp. 
Nushirwan, vii, 304, 307, 
312, 333, 337, 339, 39 + 
discourse of, vii, 305 
questions Biizurjmihr, vii, 
308 
Yazdan, viii, 75 
Yazdanbakhsh (Ayin Gashasp 

q.v.), viii, 75, 76 
Yazdin, viii, 195, 196 
Year, New, festival at, i, 104 
Yima (Yama, Jamshid), i, 7, 

130, 374 
legend of, i, 129 
Yokel, a, 164 

entertains Bahrdm Gur, vii, 

43 seq. 
wife of, her converse with 

Bahram Gur, vii, 45 

presage of, vii, 46 
rewarded by Bahram Giir, 

vii, 48 



Youths, two, bid Ardshir Papa- 
kin not to tarry in his 
flight from Ardawan, vi, 
201, 222 

Youths, two', entertain and coun- 
sel Ardshir Papakan in 
the matter of the Worm, 
vi, 207, 239 seq. 
help Ardshir Papakan to 
slay the Worm, vi, 242, 
244 

Yudhishthira, eldest of the five 
Pandavas, iv, 138 
renunciation of the world, 
and ])ilgrimagc to heaven 
of, compared with that of 
Kai Khnsrau, iv, 138 

Yunan, vi, 95 and note, viii, 258 
Faith of, vi, 95 



Z 



Zab, lesser, tributary of Tigris, 
viii, 189 

Zabul, ZabuIistan=Nimruz = 
Sistan, ^ 141, 142, 144, 
156 ; i, 248, 252, 254, 264, 

282, 324, 332, 357, 361, 
364, 366, 367, 371, 375, 
381 ; ii, 21, 28, 42, 61, 
83, 92, 126, 138, 141, 142, 
156, 168, 227, 228, 245, 
260, 338, 362, 363, ; iii, 
14, 134, 141, 145, 153, 165, 
171, 174, 175, 186, 190, 
199, 200, 202, 206 seq., 217 
246, 250, 269, 274, 321, 
326, 342, 347, 354, 356 ; 
iv, 147, 279,283,296, 311; 
V, 85, 86, 167, 169 seq., 
173, ^75 seq., 181 seq., 
193. 194. 212, 215, 219, 
223, 224, 235. 248, 251, 
252, 255, 256, 258, 265, 
266, 273, 275 seq., 281, 

283, 285 seq. ; vi, 207 ; 
vii, 173, 174, 193; viii, 
369 ; ix, 75 

invaded by Shamasas and 
Khazarwan, i, 345, 358 



' Not the same apparently as those above. 



• See p, 333 note. 



GENERAL IXDEX 



303 



ZAbul, vintage of, ii, no 

occupied by tlic Turk mans, 

i, 19 ; iii, 14, 30 
C"iusht<is|> goes to, v, 85 
Moon of=Kudaba, v, 190 

and note 
called " Babblcstead " b> 

Asfandiyar, v, 216 
Bahman's sojourn in, v, 252, 

256 
pillaged by Bahman, v, 287 
Bahman quits, v, 290 
Zabuli, a native of Zabul, iii, 

188,201,257,326; V, 212 

a, made king of Kabul, v, 
277 
Zad Farrukh, suggests Bahrain 
Chiibina to Hurmuzd, 
viii, 99 

speech of, viii, 241 
Zadsham, king of Tiiran and 
grandfather of Afrasiy4b,i, 
92, 342 seq.. 376 ; iv, 149, 
163. 166, 203 

ofifspring of =Afrasiyab, iv, 
178 
Zagros, mountain-range in wes- 
tern fran, viii, 189 
Zahhak (Azhi Dahaka), son of 
Mardis, Arab king and 
Shah, 140, 141 ; i, 42, 90, 
91 ; ii. 33, 81, 318 ; iii, 
257 ; iv. 89, 206, 272, 274, 
290 ; V. 12, 180, 203, 204, 
284 ; vi, 15, 45, 172, 209, 
240 and note ; vii, 185, 
199; viii, 218, 239, 241, 
387. 391 ; i-^. -5. 65, 
103 

protagonist of idolatry and 
of the Semitic race, i, 54, 
143, 226, 256 

one of the Zoroastrian triad 
of evil, i, 59 and note 

referred to by Moses of Cho- 
rene, i, 72, 144 

Story of, 140, i, 135 seq. 

tempted by Iblis, i, 136 seq. 

father of, 140 

murdered by, i, 137 
referred to, viii, 387 



Zahhdk, becomes king of the 
Arabs, i, 137 
serpents grow out of tiie 

shoulders <jf, i, I3<j 
Iblis' advice to, i, 139 
invades frAn, i, 139 
captures and slays Jamshid, 

i, 140 
Reign of, 140, i, 141, seq. 
Note on, i, 141, seq. 
not destroyed, i, 143 
feast in celebration of over- 
throw of, i, 143 
dream of, i, 147 

Arnawaz' advice to, con- 
cerning, i, 148 
takes counsel with the archi- 

magcs, i, 149 
warned by Zirak, i, 149 
seeks for Faridiin, i, 150 
slays Abtin, i, 151, 153 

iiirmaya, i, 152 
burns Fandiin's palace, i, 

152, 158 
K4wa and. Story of, 140, i, 

154 seq. 
K4wa revolts against, i, 156 
Faridiin resolves to war 

with, i, 157 

marches against, i, 159 
capital of, i, 161 

entered by Faridiin, i, 161 
talisman of, overthrown by 

Faridiin, i, i6i 
sought for in vain by Fari- 
diin, i, 162 
minister of, 140, i, 164 seq. 
hears from Kundrav of Fari- 
' diin's doings, i, 165 
goes to fight with Faridiin, 

i, 166 
enters his palace, i, 167 
overthrown by Faridiin, i, 

168 
Sunish's counsel to Faridiin 

concerning, i, 1O8, 169 
fettered to Mount Damd- 

wand, i, 1O9 
future final destruction of, 

J. 173 
saying of, ii, 171 and note 



394 



GENERAL INDEX 



Zahhak, an Aryan myth, ix, 65 
king of Babylon, ix, 65 
an Arab, ix, 65 

Zahi'r, Iranian hero, iv, 14.S 

commands the Bedouins in 
Kai Khusrau's army, iv, 
148 

Zainig'u, Zaini'gav, ii, 81 

Zairi-vairi (Zariadres, Zarir, q.v.), 
iv, 316 ; V, 12 

Zal (Dastan, Dastan-i-Sam, Das- 
tan-i-Zand, Zal-i-zai), son 
of Sam and father of 
Rustam, 141, 142, 15J, 

154. 156, 157 ; h 145. -235, 
384, 387 ; ii, 4, II seq., 
18, 19, 21, 33 seq., 49, 58, 
61, 62, 69, 77, 140, 168, 
169, 180, 182, 227, 228, 
271, 286, 290, 318, 319, 
338, 362, 371 ; iii, 8, 17, 
18, 21, 22, 35, 121, 132, 
138, 141, 147, 190, 202, 
221, 245, 269, 274, 279, 
283, 307, 321, 322, 325, 
328, 331, 347. 351. 354. 
355 ; iv, 13. 147.222,251, 
277. 319 ; V, II, 14, 15. 
58, 86, 169, 173 seq., 197, 
200, 204, 210, 212, 219 
seq., 231, 240 seq., 246, 
255, 256, 261, 277 seq., 
281, 283, 290; vi, 79; 
viii, 223 ; ix, 25 

vaiious names of, i, 84, 245 
and note, 248 and note 

born with white hair, i, 
240 

cast away by Sam, i, 241 

found and brought up by 
the Simurgh, i, 242 

seen by a caravan, i, 
242 

informed of his parentage by 
the Simurgh, i, 245 

given a feather by the 
Simurgh, i, 246 

restored to Sam by the 
Simurgh, i, 247 

goes with Sam to court, i, 
249 



Zal, horoscope of, taken, i, 251 
made regent of Zabul by 

Sam, i, 253 
progress of, in the arts, i, 255 
makes a progress through 

his realm, i, 256 
Riidaba and, story of, i, 257 

seq. 

referred to, iii, 285 
hears of, and falls in love 

with Mihrab's daughter, 

i, 257 seq. 
described, i, 260, 268 
sees Riidaba's handmaids, 

i, 263 
interview of, with Riidaba's 

handmaids, i, 266 
invited to visit Riidaba, i, 

267, 269 
goes to Riidaba, i , 270 seq. 
plights his troth to Riidaba, 

i, 272 
consults the archimages on 

the matter of Riidaba, i, 

273 

writes to Sam, i, 275 

go-between of, with Riidaba, 
i, 280 

sends Sam's letter to Rii- 
daba, i, 280 

goes to plead his cause with 
Sam, i, 292 

bears a letter of appeal from 
Sam to Miniichihr, i, 295 

well received by Minii- 
chihr i, 306 

astrologer's presage con- 
cerning, i, 307 

questioned by the arch- 
images, i, 308 

answers the archimages, i, 

309 
displays his accomplishment 

before Miniichihr, i, 311 
returns to Sam, i, 316 
goes with Sam to Kabul, i, 

317 
felicitated by Sam, i, 318 
married to Riidaba, i, 318 
and Riidaba go to Sistin, i, 

319 



GENERAL IXDI-X 



305 



Zal, left regent of Sistdn by S4m' 

i. 3>y 
siiiuiuoiis tlic Si'murgh to 

succour Kiulaba, i, 320 
goes with Rustam and Mih- 

rdb to meet Sam, i, 324 
bids Rustam take Mount 

SijKind, i, 329 
hears of Rustam's success, 

i. 33^ 
bids Rustam destroy the 
hold of Mount Sipand, i, 

333 
informs Sam of Rustam's 

exploit, i, 334 
buries Sam, i, 358 
hears from Mihrdb that 

Shamasas and Khazar- 

wan are invading Zabu- 

listan, i, 359 
goes to the help of Mihrdb, 

i. 359 

shoots arrows into the ene- 
mies' camp, i, 359 

slays Khazarwan, i, 360 

wounds Kulbad, i, 361 

puts Shamasas to flight, i, 
361 

hears of the death of 
Naudar, i, 364 

fights with Afrasiyab, i, 
368 

proposes the election of a 
new Shah, i, 370 

reproached by the frin- 
ians, i, 375 

reply of, i, 375 

bids Rustam prepare for 
war, i, 376 

gives Sam's mace to Rus- 
tam, i, 378 

collects horses for Rustam, 

i. 37« 
marches against AfrAsiydb, 

i, 3«i 
urges the frcinians to choose 

a Shah, i, 381 
sends Rustam to summon 

Kai Kubid. i. 382 
goes to do homage to Kai 

Khusrau, iii, 1 7 



Zal, witnesses Kai Khusrau 's 
oath to avenge Siydwush, 
iii, 22 

son of = Rustam, iii, 132 

meets Giv, iii, ^^ i 

sayings of, iii, 316, 351 

sumnjoned by the franians 
to remonstrate with Kai 
Khusrau, iv, 278 

sets out for fran with Rus- 
tam and sages, iv, 279 

met on arrival by Gudarz 
and other chiefs, iv, 282 

holds converse with the 
Iranians, iv, 282 

audience of, with Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 283 seq. 

asks pardon of Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 290 

holds, with other chiefs, at 
the bidding of Kai Khus- 
rau, an assembly on the 
plain, iv, 291 seq. 

Kai Khusrau's gift to, iv, 

-295 
companions of, rewarded by 

Kai Khusrau, i^', 297 
returns thanks, iv, 298 
protests against Luhrasp's 

succession, iv, 301 
acknowledges Luhrasp as 

Shah, iv, 302 
sets out with Kai Khusrau 

on his pilgrimage, iv, 

306 
turns back at the bidding of 

Kai Khusrau, iv, 307 
laments the loss of the pala- 
dins and returns to Iran, 

iv. 310 
promises fealty to Luhrisp, 

iv, 311 
Rustam and, welcome Gush- 

tasp to Sistan, v, 85 
hears of Bahman's ap- 
proach, V, 182 
interview of, with Bahman, 

V, 1S3 
give Bahman a guide to 

conduct him to Rustam, 

V, 184 



396 



GENERAL INDEX 



Zal, Riklaba and, l)i(l(len by 
Rustam to prepare to 
receive Asfandiyar, v, 190 

Rustam recounts his inter- 
view with Asfandiyar to, 
V, 196 

Rustam and, vilified by 
Asfandiyar, v, 201 

receives a message from 
Rustam by Zawara, v, 
230 

grieves over Rustam 's 
wounds, V, 234 

summons the Simurgh to 
Rustam's aid, v, 235 

goes to Rustam and Asfan- 
diyar, V, 247 

forebodes Rustam's future, 
V, 247 

father of Shaghad, v, 260, 
263 

sends Shaghad to be brought 
np at Kabul, v, 264 

laments for Rustam, v, 273 

sends Faramarz against 
Kabul, V, 274 

bids Riidaba to cease to 
mourn for Rustam, v, 
278 

receives and replies to Bah- 
man's hostile message, v, 

285 
goes to meet Bahman, v, 

286 
palace of, sacked, v, 286 
Bishutan intercedes for, v, 

288 
released and returns to his 
palace, v, 289 
Zal-i-zar (Zal, q.v.), i, 84, 248 and 

note 
Zam (now Karkhi), town on the 
left bank of the Oxus 
beween Amwi (Charjui) 
and Tirmid, where, there 
was a crossing-place, ii, 
394. 395 ; iv, 65. i57 ; vii, 
359 
= Oxus, ii, 97 
Zamyad, Yasht, i, 338 
Zamzam, iv, 258 note 



Zand, comment, i, 65 
Zandavasta, i, 116, 129, 144, 171 
seq.. 234, 337, 338, 369; 
ii, 8, 25 seq., 81, 118, 189, 
190 ; iii, 8 ; iv, 151, 228, 
253, 259, 308 ; V, II seq., 
30, 36, 41, 43, 51, 82, 85, 
100, 173, 176, 216, 241, 
294. 299. 309 ; vi, 17. 55, 
226, 252, 343, 356 ; vii, 
200, 207, 283, 302 ; viii, 
96, 246, 283, 312 

traditional origin of, i, 61 
discussed, i, 62 

language of, i, 63 seq. 

meaning of, i, 65 

origin of chief characters in, 

i, 65 
diffusion of traditions in, i, 

extant portions of, i, 70 

note 
quoted, i, 99, 130, 141, 142, 

17-i. 235, 369; viii, 218, 

240 
sent by Gushtasp to every 

clime, V, 77 
burnt by the Turkmans at 

Balkh, V, 92 
passage from, metrically 

paraphrased, vii, 318 
Zanga. Iranian hero, 145, 151, 

ii. 73. 90. 228, 249, 271, 

31S ; iii, 20, 34, 43. 45, 

48, 67, 92, 115, 350 ; iv, 

13. 15. 24, 105, 147 
takes part in the Fight of 

the Seven Warriors, ii, 

107 seq. 
accompanies S i y a w u s h 

against Afrasiyab, ii, 

226 
sent on an embassy to Afra- 
siyab, ii, 250 seq. 
goes with Rustam to rescue 

Bizhan, iii, 334 
opposes Farsliidward, iv, 

83 
chosen to fight Akhast, iv, 

97 
slays Akhdst, iv, 106 



GENERAL INDEX 



397 



Zanga, Kai Klmsrau remon- 
stratod with by, and 
other nobles, lor refusing 
audience, iv, 275 
Zangula or Zangula, Tiirdnian 
hero, 151, iv, 26 
chosen to fight with Furii- 

hil, iv, 97 
slain by Furiihil, iv, 101 
Zarang, former capital of Sistcin, 
situated some twenty 
miles from the north- 
eastern shores of Lake 
Zirih, i, 4 
Zarar, vi, 200 

Zarasp, son of Miniichihr, i, 248 ; 
iv, 147 (?)• 
kindred of ', go to the 
temple of Azargashasp, 
iv, 270 
go to meet Zk\ and Rus- 

tam, iv, 2S2 
go with Zarir to Rum, iv, 
360 
Zarasp or Zarasp, son of Tiis, 14^, 
iii, 24, 54, 57, 59, 60, 67, 
72, 113, 114 ; iv, 135 
goes against Fariid, iii, 53 
referred to, iii, 55; iv, 149 
burial of, iii, 68 
Zarzisp, treasurer of Kai Khus- 
rau, iv, 269 
makes gifts to Azargashasp, 
iv, 269 
Zarasp, franian hero, iv, 180, 301 
Zarathustra, Zarathushtra. See 

Zarduhsht. 
Zarduhsht (Zarathushtra, Zoro- 
aster), prophet, law-giver, 
and evangelist of ancient 
frdn, 755, i, 53, 116, 235, 
236 ; ii, 8, 9 ; iv, 272 ; 
v, 9 seq., 23 seq., 27, 28, 
42, 51, 77, 173, 206, 216,. 
217, 241, 255 ; vi, 55.252, 
328; \ii, 9, 207,264,318; 
viii, 67, 213, 308 
Zandavasta revealed to, i, 61 
title of a line of priest- 
princes, i, 61 • 

'!(■!> not clear whi 



Zurduhsht, account of, i, 02 
meaning of, v, 13 
legend of, v, 14 seq. 
converts Gushtasp, v, 18, 

33 

success of evangel of, v, 34 
plants the Cypress of Kish- 

mar,, v, 27, 34 
advises Gushtasp not to jjay 

tribute to Arjdsp, v, 35 
referred to, v, 36, 38, 41 
slain at Balkh, v, 92, 93 
amulet given to Asfandiy^r 

by, v, 130 
religion of, under the Sds4- 

nian empire, vi, 251 
girdle of, v, 16 ; vi, 332 riole. 
Fire-fane of, vii, 139 
high priest of, converts 

Sapimid, vii, 139 
saying of, viii, 218, 240 
Zarduhsht, high priest, 170, viii, 

81 
visits fzid Gashasp in prison, 

viii, 82 
visit of, reported to Hur- 

muzd, viii, S3 
poisoned by Hurmuzd, viii, 

83 seq. 
Zariadres (Zairi-vairi, Zarir, q.v.), 

v, 26 
legend of, iv, 314 seq. 
Zarir (Zariadres, Zairi-vairi), 

brother of Shah Gushtdsp, 

^54, 155. i. 42 ; ii, 3 ; ; iv, 
315. 316, 318, 347; v, 12, 
13, 24 seq., 37, 41 seq., 49 
seq., 60 seq., 73, 94, 109, 
169, 181, 193, 254, 261 

sent by Luhrasp in pursuit 
of Gushtasp, iv, 320 

charger of, iv, 321 

returns with Gushtasp, iv, 
322 

consulted by Luhrasp, iv, 

323. 35S 
advises Luhrdsp, iv, 358 
goes with other chiefs on a 

mission to Rum, iv, 359 
reaches Halab, iv, 360 
ich Zarasp is inttndcd, 



398 



GENERAL INDEX 



Zarir entrusts the host to 

Bahram, iv, 360 

goes to Caesar's court, iv, 360 

audience with Caesar of, and 

recognition of Gushtasp 

by, iv, 360 

gives Luhrasp's answer to 

Caesar, iv, 361 
visited in his camp by Gush- 
tasp, iv, 361 
informs Gushtasp of Luh- 
rasp's abdication in his 
favour, iv, 362 
Love-story of, v, 26, 27 
Death-story of v, 26, 27 
converted by Zarduhsht, v, 

33 
answers, in conjunction with 
Asfandiyar and Jamasp, 
Arjasp's letter, v, 42 
death of, foretold by Jam- 
asp, V, 51 
receives the standard and 
the command of the cen- 
tre from Gushtasp, v, 55 
prowess of, v, 61 seq. 
slain by Bidirafsh, v, 63 
Zarir-nama, v, 26, 27 
Zark, town south-east of Marv, 
ix, 98 
canal of, ix, 98 

corpse of Yazdagird flung 
into, ix, 109 
recovered from, ix, 109 
ford and toll-house of, ix, 

100 and note 
chief of, ix, 100 

hears from miller about 
Yazdagird, ix, 109 
Zarmihr. See Kizmihr. 
Zarniish, city in Khiizistan, vi, 35 
Zartusht Bahram Pazdhii, 
author of the Zartusht- 
nama, v, 18 
Zartusht-nama, poem, v, 18 
Zav, Shah, 142, 143, i, go, 91, 
381 ; ii, II, 36 ; iv, 283 
Reign of, 142, i, 369 scq. 

Note on, i, 369 
mentioned in the Zanda- 
vasta, i, 369 



Zav, accession of, i, 370 

drought and famine in tlie 

time of, i, 371 
concludes peace with the 

Turkmans, i, 371 
dies, i, 372 
Zawara, brother of Rustam, 146, 

157. ii. 4. 96, 228, 347, 

349 ; iii, 30, 202, 325, 

328 ; iv, 24, 34 ; v, 173, 

174, 182 seq., 187, 191, 

231, 260, 261 
engaged in the Fight of the 

Seven Warriors, ii, no 

seq. 
worsted by Alkiis, ii, 115 
rescued by Rustam, ii, 115 
made leader of Rustam 's 

host, ii, 142 
left in charge of Rustam's 

host, ii, 161 
goes on embassy to Human, 

ii, 176 
safe-conducts Hunicin from 

fran, ii, 176, 181, 182 
incites Rustam to avenge 

Siyawush, ii, 360 
given a command, iv, 149 
goes with Rustam to the 

right wing, iv, 180 
referred to, v, 186, 228, 

261 
Faramarz and, sent by Rus- 
tam to bid Zal and 

Riidaba prepare to re- 
ceive Asfandiyar, v, igo 
brings Rustam's armour, v, 

218 
put in charge of the troops, 

V, 222 
goes with Rustam to the 

Hirmund, v, 222 
Rustam's instructions to, v, 

222 
provokes the Iranians 1 o 

combat, v, 225 
slays Niish Azar, v, 227 
goes in quest of Rustam, v, 

230 
takes from Rustam a mess- 
age for Zdl, V, 230 



GEN ERA 1. ISDHX 



399 



Zawara, grifvcs over Rustani's 

wounds, V, 234 
goes to Rustain and Asfan- 

diyar, v, 2.\-j 
warns Riistam against Bah- 

nian, v, 230 
Rustam and, with small 

escort, goto Kahtil, v, 268 
goes hunting with Rustam, 

V, 270 
falls a victim to treachery, 

V, 270, 273 
death of, V, 273 
body of, taken from the pit 

by Faramarz, and buried 

V, 275 
Zend, language, i, 64 

improper use of term, i, 64 
Zeus, Babylonian, vi, 22 

oracle of, consulted, vi, 22 
Zhanda Razm, maternal uncle of 

Suhrab, 144, ii, 149, 151 
accompanies Suhrab to Iran, 

ii, 150 
death of, ii, 150 
referred to, ii, 160 
Zhangwi, Turkman noble, viii, 

331 
Zib-i-Khusrau (Riimiya, qv.), 

city, i6y, vii, 259 
Zijanak, daughter of Ardawan, 

q.v., 161, vi, 255 
Story of, in Karnamak, vi, 

255 

Tabari, vi, 255 

Shdhnama, vi, 259 seq. 
Zinfgav, ii, 81 
Zira, father of Gurwi, 152, ii, 295, 

314 ; iii, 120, 197, 199 ; iv. 

97. W, 127, 219 ; V, 272 
Zirak, an archimage, i, 150 
warns Zahhak, i, 149 
Zirih, sea or lake, i, 4 ; ii, 80 ; iv, 

130 
the Lake of Sistan, i, iv ; ii, 

80 
Zirih, son of Shah I'iriiz, vii, 170 
Zodiac, viii, 394 
Zoroaster. See Zarduhsht. 
Zoroastrian, Zoroastrians, v, 17; 

vi, 206, 251, 328 



Zoroastrian, cosmogony, i, 5 

view of Buddhism as idola- 
trous, i, 16 
conception of destiny, i, 52 
propaganda, i, 58 scq. 
triad of evil, i, 59 and note 
scriptures. See Zandavasta. 
calendar, i, 88 

adopted by Darius Hys- 
taspis, i, 59 
Zoroastrianism, i, 49 ; vi, 15, 196, 
251. 252, 327, 328 ; vii, 
188, 317 
conceptions of, i, 5, 51. 5.2 
original seat of, i, 56 seq., 

62 
becomes tlie state religion, 

i. 59 

declines after Alexander's 
conquest, i, 60 

scriptures of. See Zanda- 
vasta. 

under the Parthians, i, 60, 

63 

revival of, i, 63 

based on nature-worship, i, 
116 

existed before Zoroaster, i, 
116 

under the Sisanian empire, 
vi, 251 

millenia of, vi, 252 
Zii'l Aktaf, title of Shdpi'ir, son 
of Urmuzd, 162, vi, 323 

meaning of, vi, 323 
Zu'lfakar, ii, 337 and note 
Zu'1-karnain (Sikandar, Alex- 
ander the Great), vi, 51 

legend of, in Kur^n, vi, 78, 
84 

barrier of, vi, 78 
site of, vi, 79 
Ziir. See Giir. 

Ziiran, NiishirwAn's chamber- 
lain, 16S 

envies Mahbud, vii, 319 

plots with a Jew against 
Mahbud, vii, 320 seq. 

makes confession to Niishir- 
w4n. vii, 324 



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