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Full text of "Shall capital own labor? The Rebel Democracy the enemy of the people. Seymour and Blair's nomination means revolution, repudiaton and slavery! Published by the Union Republican Congressional Committee, Washington, D.C"

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SHALL CAPITAL OWN LABOR? 
THE fl[B[[ OiOCii:! Tlt[ IMt M W PM. 



SEYMOUR aud BLAIR'S lYOMIMTIOiY MEAA'S 

REVOLUTION. REPUDIATION AND SLAVERY! 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNION REPUBLICAN CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE, V/ASH!NGTOT. ff.'C/ 



Keep our Designs Secret till after Election! 
5;^^PrJVA TE AD VICES FROM UR MOS T S TRENUO US FRIENDS 
Afr THE NORTHREQUEST THAT WE SHOULD PROTEST AGAINST 
THE IMPRUDENT EXPRESSIONS THAT HAVE ESCAPED SOME 
SOUTHERN SPEAKERS SINCE THE ADJOURNMENT OF THE 
NA TIONAL DEMOGRA TIC CONVENTION— Charleslon Mercury. 

Who began the War. 

" Iivill tell you another fact, ivJiich is enough for. this lime, that t/.s iJie laic 

tear WAS PRODUCED BY THE DEFEATED DEMOCRATIC PARTY IN 18 GO, SO tve shall 

never have peace till it is restored to power in 18GS.^>— Ex-United States and ex- 
Confederate Stales Senator Toombs' speech at Atlanta, Ga., July S, 1S6S. 

What they begun it for. 
"The new (Confederate) Constitution has put at rest forever all the agitating 
questions relating to our jyeculiar institutions — African Slavery — as it exists 
amongst us, the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. Tins 

%VAS TUE IMMEDIATE CAUSE OP THE LATE RUPTURE AND PRESENT REVOLUTION. 

=:= * * Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea — (the 
idea ox Mr. Jefferson that 'the cuslavcmcnt of the Afncan teas in violation of 
the laics of nature, and wrong in principle, socially, morally and politically:) 
Its foundations arc laid — its corner stone rests ltpon the great truth =^= * 
■"■ THAT SLAVERY Subordination to the superior race is iiis {the negro's) natu- 
ral AND NORMAL CONDITION !" — Confederate Vice-President A. H. Stephens' 
speech at Savannah, Ga., 3Iarch 21, 18G1. 

What Justification they had for it. 
"IVhat right has the North assailed? What interest of the South has been 
invaded ? What justice has been denied ? Or what claim founded in justice and 
right has been withheld ? CAN EITHER OF YOU TO-DAY NAME ONE 
GOVERMENTAL ACT OF WRONG DELIBERATELY AND PUR- 
POSELY DONE BY THE GOVERNMENT AT WASHINGTON CfF 
WHICH THE SOUTH HAS A RIGHT TO COMPLAIN ? I challenge 
the answer While, on the other hand, let me show the facts which now stand 
as records in the history of our country. 






"When ice of the Soulh demanded the slave-trade, did they not yield the right 
for tiuenty years ? When ue asjccd and demanded a three fifths representation 
in Congress for our slaves, icas it not granted'} Wien we asked and demanded 
the return of any fugitive from justice, or the return of those persons oioing 
labor or allegiance, vmsit not incorporated in the Constitution, and again ratified 
and strengthened in the Fugitive-slave Law of 1850? 

" But do you reply, that in many instances they bare violated tins compact, 
and have not been faithful to their obligations ? As individuals and local com- 
munities, they may have done so ; hut not by the sanction of the government : 
for that has always been true to Southern interests. 

"And I must declare here, as I have often done before, and which has been 
repeated bv the .i^rcatest and Avisest statesmen and patriots in this and other 
lands, THAT IT IS THE BEST AND FREEST GOYERXMEXT, THE 
MOST EQUAL IX ITS RIGHTS, THE MOST JUST IX ITS DE- 
CISIOXS, THE MOST LEXIEXT IX ITS MEASURES, AND THE 
MOST IXSPIRIXGIX ITS PRIXCIPLE;S TO ELEVATE THE RACE 
OF MAX, THAT THE SUX OF IIEAYEX EVER 8H0XE UPOX\ 

" Xow, for you to attempt to ovoihroio such a government as this is the height 
o/ MADNESS, FOLLY. AND WICKEDNESS, to which I can neither lend my sanction 
nor my vote." — .1. JL Stephens' address in ihc Georgia Convention, Jan., 1861. 



Blair on the Democracy. 
"The Democratic party of the pre38ut 
day is Democratic in u irae, aad notbiui? 
else. The old Jeffersou and Jackson prin- 
ciples have been abandoned. THE MA.N 
WHO DID NOT ESCA.PE THE ROPE 
BY THREE II0UR3 IS THE AUTHOR 
OF ALL TO WHICH THE DEMO- 
CRA.TIC PA-RTY OF THE PRESENT 
DAY SUBSCRIBES. It has not one 
scintilla of true Democracy to animate its 
carcass." — F. P. Blair. 

Southern Hatred for Labor. 

In 183G, in the House of Representatives, 
Mr. Pickens, of South Carolina, (afterward 
Governor of that State when, in 18G0, she 
attempted to secede,) said that there never 
wa3asociety"!o7iereONECLA.S3 WOULD 
NOT PRICTICALLY AND SUBSTAN- 
TIALLY OWN A^fOTHER CLASS IN 
SOME SHAPE OR FORM) •• " All 
society settles down into capitalists and 
laborers. THE FORMER WILL OWN 
THE LATTER, EITHER COLLECT- 
IVELY THR.OUGH THE GOVERN- 
MENT.OR INDIVIDUALLY THROUGH 
A STATE OF DOMESTIC SERVITUDE, 
AS EXISTS IN THE SOUTHERN 
STATES. THE ONLY CONTEST IN 
THE WORLD IS BETWEEN THE TWO 
SYSTEMS." 

Laborers should bo slaves. 

Kciit, of Soutli Carolina, a Democratic 
Representative in Congress, and a rebel 
soldier daring the war, declared " free so- 
ciety a failur.5." "The ordinanceofGod," 
he said, "CONDEMNS MANKIND TO 
LABOR, AND CERTAIN MENIAL OC- 



CUPATIONS ARE INCOMPATIBLE 
WITH MENTAL CULTIVATION" 

Slavery, according to him, produced a su- 
perior class of genUemen, who were "SUB- 
STITUTES FOR AN ORDER OF NO- 
BILITY." 

Ruffin, of Virginia, author of "The Politi- 
cal Economy of Slavery," tired the first 
gun in the recent war, and the last also, for 
after the surrender of the rebel armies he 
blew his own brains out with a rebel musket- 
ball. RUFFIN PROPOSED IN THE 
BOOK REFERRED TO TO REFORM 
THE "HIRELING LABOR SOCIETY" 
OF THE NORTH. HE WANTED TO 
REDUCE THE LABORING CLASS TO 
"DOMESTIC BONDAGE." 

Slavery the basis of Democracy. 

'■'■Slavery ii the basis of American De- 
mocracy; for the subordination of an in- 
ferior race has secured, and always will 
secure, the equality of the superior race." 
New York Day Book, January, 1856. 

"The South maintains that slavery is 
RIGHT, NATURxVL, and necessary, and 
docs not depend on dilTerence ot com- 
plexion. The laws of the slave States jus- 
tify the holding of ioJutemen in bondage." 
Richmond Exarainer, 18oG. 

Filzhugh. author of " Cannibals All, or 
Who Shall be Masters," said that a negro 
male slave would "be worth about $800; a 
while slave, by reason of his harder work- 
ing nature, would be worth $1,000." He 
summed uo his s}''stem in these words: 
"LIBERTY FOIi THE FEW— SLA- 
VERY IN EVERY FORM FOR THE 
MASSES." 



The Democratic newspapers in the South 
denounced free society as a "monstrous 
abortion." 

"Free society, as at present organized, is 
radically wrong and rotten to the corf>. * 

* * SLAVEliY IS ^0T ONLY NAT- 
URAL OP ORIGIN AND RIGHT, BUT 
IS ESSENTIAL TO REPUBLICAN- 
ISM." — Xem Orleans Delta, (^Democratic.) 

"History, both sacred and profane, 
SHOWS THAT SLAVERY IS NATU- 
RAL AND NORMAL: that 'the expe- 
iieiice, the practice, and the history of 
mankind vindicate shivery * * AS A 
NATURAL AND CONSERVATIVE IN- 
STITUTION.' ''—Richmond {Va.) Exam- ■ 
aminer, {Democratic.) I 

"SLAVERY IS THE CORNERSTONE 
OF OUR REPUBLICAN INSTITU- 
TIONS—THE GREAT PEACEMAKER 
BETWEEN CAPITAL AND LABOR." 

LyncJiburg (Fa.) Republican, {Democrat.) i 

"Master and slave is a relation in society j 
as necessary as that of parent and child. I 

* * * The Northern States will have to I 
introduce it; SLAVERY IS THE NATU- ' 
RAL AND NORMAL CONDITION OF 
THE LABORING MAN, WHETHER 
WHITE OR BLACK. - * * The 
great evil of Northern free society is, that 
it is burdened with a servile class of me- 
clianics and laborers, unfit for self-govern- 
inent, yet clothed with all (he attributes 
and powers of citizens." — Charleston {S. 
C.) ifercuri/, (Democratic.) 

"Slaveryisamoral, religious, and natural 
institution. - * * THE LAWS OF ALL 
THE SOUTHERN STxlTES JUS H- 
FIED THE HOLDING OF WHITE 
MEN IN SLAVERY. - * * THE 
PRINCIPLE OF SLAVERY IS IN IT- 
SELF RIGHT, AND DOES NOT DE- 
PEND ON DIFFERENCE OF COM- 
PLEXION, * - * and that is the doc- 
trine maintained by the whole Southern 
y>ves5.'"— Richmond Enquirer, (DemocratiG.) 
A Glorious Aristocracy. 

Hammond, of South Carolina, who later 
in life denounced Northern meclianics as 
the "mudsills of society," at the beginning 
of his Democratic career declared, in the 
same Thirty-Fourth Congress, ' Hhat siaceri/ 
teas the greatest of all blessings which a land 
Providence had bestowed tqwn the South'' 
and its '■'glorious aristocracy/." 

Governor McDuffie, of South Carolina, 
declared in the House of Representatives. 
in 1856, that when the masses stapped out 
of bondage "they branclicd into four re- 
curring subdivisions— THE HIRELING 
THE BEGGAR, THE THIEF. AND THE 
PROSTITUTE-WHICH HAVE NO 
GENERAL EXISTENCE UNLESS 
THERE HAVE BEEN A COMMENCE- 
MENT OF EMANCIPATION." 



In less, John C. Calhoun, the Demo- 
cratic apostle of disunionism, declared that 
the protection of slavery was a "HIGHER 
LAW" THAN THE CONSTITUTION 
AND "THE LAWS OF THE GENERAL 
GOVERNMENT." 

Hammond, of South Carolina, declared, 
that the difference then between the white 
slave (i. e., our workingmen,) and the 
negro was that ''the negro is hired for life 
and well compensated," and the "WHITE 
SLAVE IS HIRED BY THE DAY, NOT 
CARED FOR, AND SCANTILY COM- 
PENSATED." 

Senator Mason, of Virginia, declared 
publicly that "the so-called free States" 
would be more properly styled "the servile 
States. ' ' 

Ko Union With the North. 

The Richmond Dispatch of the 10th of 
January, 1863, used this language : 

"We warn the Democrats and Conserva- 
tives of the North to dismiss from their 
minds at once- the miserable delusion t/iat 
the South can ever consent to enter again, 
upon any terms, the old Union . If the JS'orth 
will allow us to write the Constitution our- 
selves, a7id give us every guarantee we would 
ash, we toould sooner be under the govern- 
ment of England or France tJtan zcnder a 
Union with 7»en who have shown that they 
cannot act in good failh, and are the most 
barbarous and inhuman, as loell as the most 
treacherous, of mankind." 

Governor Z'jbulon B. Vance, of North 
Carolina, made an elaborate speech at 
Wilkesboro', in tliat State, in the fall of 
1864, in which he declared that — 

" There teas no more possibilily of recon- 
structing the old Unio7i, and reconstructing 
things as they were four years ago, than 
exists for you to gather up the scattered bones 
of your sons who have fallen in this struggle 
from one end of tbe country to the other, 
reclothe them with flesh, (ill their veins 
with the blood they hive so generously 
shed, &c." 

What they said during the War. 

On the 17th of August following. Robert 
Toombs, of Georgia, said, in a letter dated 
Washington, Georgia: 

"I canconceive of no extremity to which 
my country could be reduced IN WHICH 
I WOULD, FOR A SINGLE MOMENT. 
ENTERTAIN AMY PROPOSITION 
FOR ANY UNION WITH THE NORTH 
ON ANY TERMS WHATEVEU. When 
all else is lost, I propose to unite with the 
thousands of my own countrymen 
WHO HAVE FOUND IIONOrtABLE 
DEATHS, IP Nor GRAVES, ON THE 
BAl'TLE FIELD." 

In January, 186:3, Jcfil-rson Davis said, 
in a speech at Richmond, a? reported in 



the Eiclimoncl Enquirer of January 7, of 
that year: 

" Yoa fijht the offscourings of the earth. 
If the question were proposed to you 
whether j'ou would combiae with hijcnas 
or Yankees, I trust every Virginian would 
say, ^ give me the hyena.'' ^^ [Cries of 
"good," "good,'' and applause j 

I'Totice to tlic Democracy. 

The New Hampshire Democrats having 
proposed that ''if the South v.-ill come 
back into the Union the Democracy of the 
North will do all in their power to gain for 
them (the Southern States) such guaran- 
tees as will secure their safety," the Rich- 
mond Senfinel nt Wic siinie time declared: 

"DO THE NEW HAMPSHIRE DEM- 
OCRATS REASON FOR ONE MO- 
MENT THAT WE WOULD SO MUCH 
AS THINK OF REUNION WITH 
SUCH A PEOPLE ? RATHER TELL 
0NE:T0 be wedded to a CORPSE. 
T.ATE-EIi JOIN HANDS WITH A 
FIEND FROM THE PFIV' 

A. H. Stephens declared, July 23, 1883, 
in a speech at Charleston, S. C, after the 
battles of Gettysburg and Yicksburg: 

"As for reconstruction, such a thing Avas 
impossible — such an idea must not be tole- 
rated for a moment. THE ONLY TERMS 
ON WHICH WE CAN OBTAIN PER- 
MANENT PEACE IS FINAL AND 
COMPLETE SEPARATION FROM TBE 
NORTH. Rather than submit to anything 
short of that, let us all resolve to die like 
men worthy of freedom." 

Proclaiming Civil War. 

The treasonable letter of Frank Blair 
Avas endorsed by the New York rebel Con- 
vention, and is the key-note of the cam- 
paign. It is dated June SO, and contains 
this threat of civil war : 

"If the President elected by the Democ- 
racy enforces, or permits others to enforce, 
these reconstruction acts, the Radicals, by 
the accession of twenty spurious Senators 
and fifty Representatives, will control both 
branches of Congress, and his administra- 
tion will be as powerless as the present one 
of 3Ir. Johnson. 

"There is but one way to restore the 
Government and the Constitution, and that 
i.s for TDK Prrsidknt klkct TO DE- 
CLARE THESE ACTS NULL AND 
VOID, COMPEL THE ARMYTO UNDO 
ITS USURPATIONS AT THE SOUTH, 
DISPERSE THE CARPET-BAG STATE 
GOVERNJMENTS, allow the white 

I'EOl'UE TO HIC01JGANIZ13 TlllilU OWN OOV- 
KKN.MKNTS, AND KLKCT SeNATOUS AND Re- 
PIIESKKTATIVKS 

"Wc must restnro the Constitution be- 
fore we can restore the fmnnces, and to do 
this we muu have a President wlio will 
execute the will of the people r.Y tuamp- 

I-mo INTO DUST THK USUnPATIONS OF CON- 



GRESS, KNOAVN AS THE nECO'^^STRUCTION 
ACTS." 

Approved by the Convention. 

The New York copperhead Convention, 
which did not contain a loyal delegate from 
the South, nor one who had not taken an ac- 
tive part ag^iiust the Government, 

"Resolved— THAT WE REGARD THE 
RECONSTRUCTION ACTS (so called) 
OF CONGRESS AS USURPATIONS 
AND UNCONSTITUTIONAL, REVO- 
LUnONARY, AoSD VOID." 

V/hat the Author Says. 

Here is General Hampton's own con- 
struction of the meaning of this resolution, 
delivered at a mass-meeting of the Cop- 
perhead and rebel Democracy before he 
lefo New York: 

" I7c can have no relief until the Dcmo- 
cratic party will come out and pledge itself 
that the while people of the South shall vote. 
I leant all to register an oath that, when they 
do vote, their votes shall he counted. AND 
IF THERE IS A MAJORITY OF 
WHITE VOTES, THAT YofJ WILL 
PLVCE SEYMOUR AND BLAIR IN 
THE WHITE HOUSE ItT SPITE OF 
ALL THE BAYOJ^ETS THAT SHALL 
BE BROUGHT AGAINST THEM." 

The President to begin the V/ar. 

The President, after expressing his opin- 
ion that the rebel States were legally "or- 
ganized and restored" under his "policy," 
prior to March 4, 1867, says, in his elec- 
toral college veto: 

"The only legitimate authority under 
which the election for President and Vice 
President can be held therein must be de- 
rived from the governments instituted 
before tint period. It clearly follows 
that the State governments organized in 
those States, under act of Congress for that 
purpose, as under militarv control, ARE 
ILLEGITIMATE AND OF NO VALID- 
ITY WHATEVER; and, in that view, the 
votes cast in those States for President and 
Vice President, in pursuance of acts passed 
since the 4th of March, 1807, and in obe- 
dience to the so-called acts of Congress, 
cannot be legally received and counted; 
while the only votes in those States that can 
be legally cast and counted will be those 
cast in pursuunce of the laws in force in 
the several States prior to the legislation by 
Congress upon the subject of reconstruc- 
tion." 

Hampton's Definition of the Plat- 
form. 

General Wade Hampton said in his 
speech at the first ratification meeting he 
attended at Charleston: 

^^ I yield to none in devotion to thaf'Loff 
Cause'' for which we fought. NEVER 
SHALL I ADMIT THAT THE CAUSE 
ITSELF FAILEO, AND THAT TEIK 



PRINCIPLES WHICH GAVE IT LIFE 
WERE THEREFORE WRONG. NEVER 
SHALL I BRAND THE MEN WHO 
UPHELD IT SO NOBLY AS 'REBELS' 
OR 'TRAITORS.' Never skall I iguo- 
miniously sccksalcty or base promotion by 
a, clastrtrcily denial or treacherous betrayal 
ofit." 

"Agree among yourselves, and act firmly 
on this ogreement, that you icill not employ 
any one xolio vioUs the Jiadical ticket. Use 
(ill the means that are placed in your Jiands 
to control this element by which the Radical 
party seek to degrade us while they secure 
success, and we can turn their batteries 
against tli-emselves." 

Rebel Faith in Seymour. 
"From first to last — from the so-called 
;;uti-slavery amendment of the Constitution 
to the flood of t>ash for all parposes, mili- 
tary, civil, financial and commercial — all the 
■reconstruction laws of the xohole pence period 
fall to pieces IF THE DEMOCRACY 
SUCCEED IN ELliCTING ^XX. SEY- 
MOUR AS THEIR STANDARD- 
BEARER. We can take part in such 
a conflict. W"e believe from the depths 
of our understanding that these Congres- 
sional misdoings are all, one like the otber, 
perfectly void." — Yi'est and South. 

A Pair of NortJiern Traitors. 
"On the 3d of November next the Ameri- 
can people will endeavor to restore those 
States to their constitutional rights. Should 
this by a possibility fail, the white popula- 
tion of those States may succeed in placing 
themselves in possession of their govern- 
ments; OTHERWISE AS SURE AS THE 
ANGLO-SAXON BLOOD RUNS IN THE 
VEINS OF SOUTHERN MEN, THERE 
WILL BE AN UPHEAVAL OF CIVIL 
WAR, and then, should Congress sustain 
the blacks, ashes icill cover the ruins of the 
■whole Rf public.'''' — General Tom. Ewing''s 
Speech in Washington. 

"When the Democratic party has elected 
the next President, it will be manifest to 
everybody that tVe negro governments can- 
not be permanent. If the Senate and the 
Southern negroes shall then yield to the will 
of the country we shall have immediate 
tranquillity. But if tbey choose to make a 
fnctioua opposition, TQE SOUTHERN 
WIHTES VVILL PROBABLY CUT THE 
GOHOTAN KNOT WITUOUT WAIT- 
ING FOR A CHANGE IN THE SEN- 

nTETOHAVE IT UNITED."-:^/'. Y. 

'\Vorld. 

The Lost Cause Hegained. 
The following is an extract from the 
si)eech of General Ramsey at the Demo- 
cratic State Convention of Georgia: 

"We have aroused in our might once 
more, under the leadership of Seymour 
;iod Blair, to raise the Constitution from 



the dust. Georcia has passed through a 
fiery ordeal. Wo have seen our soldiers 
fall, our cities in fl imes, our citizens torn 
from their peaceful homes. We looked 
upon it unmoved and unblanched. But 
we can bear it no loniier. WE W'ILL 
NOW, AT ALL HAZARDS, RECOVER 
OUR LOST LIBERTIES and restore the 
State. Vie are in the midst of a great revo 
liilion, ichich may erid peacefully at the bul- 
lot-bo.r; but if not, then the true men of 
the South will rally once more around their 
now folded banner, and icill try the issue 
at the cartridge-box. THERE aRE MEN 
IN THE NORTH WHO ARIO NOW 
TRULY WITH YOU, AND WHO WILL 
IN SUCH A CONFLICT, IF NECES- 
SARY, LEAD YOUR BATTALIONS. 
We did not make the other war; it was 
forced upon us." 

"Gov. Swaun, of Maryland, declared in 
a recent speech to a Democratic meeting in 
York, Pennsylvania : 'Just as sure as 

\0V LIVE, WHEN YOU MOVE THE NEGKO 

FiiOM TnR rnoTECTioN OF THE Freed- 
MEJi's Bureau atsd the military arm 

W^HICH KOW PROTECTS HIM, DIS SUN WILT. 
GO DOWX IN DARKNESS AND OPPRESSION."' 

— Gov. Swann^at York, Penna. 

"Now, for the first time, we have a plat- 
form of principles and leaders around whom 
we could ralW. For the first time we have a 
platform we can adhere to. We have a work 
to do which can bo accomplished. We 
have leaders to represent those principles 
who will carry us outof the 'slough of de- 
spond." PEACE HAS ITS VICTORIES 
AS W^ELL AS W^AR; THOSE GREAT 
PRINCIPLES FOR W^HICH WE 
FOUGHT, AND WHICH WE FEARED 
WERE LOST, :MAY YET BE 
ACHIEVED.— G'e/iera^ A. i?. Lawton, Sa- 
vannah. 

"New Orleans, September 9, 1868." 
" T. L. Tullock, Secretary National Union 
Committee : 

"Jly home in St. Fraucisville was mob- 
bed by armed Democrats on the 29th of 
August. They said they wanted to wash 
their hands in m}' blood and would have 
my life. They leveled their guns at my 
wife, and threw burning torches upon my 
gallery. I was not in the house at the time. 
"J. P. Newsham, M. C." 

Kentucky's Loyalty. 

The LouisvSk^ Journal^^xs: 

"HAMPTON, FORREST, AND LEE 
ARE ACCESSIONS TO THE DEMO 
CRATIC PARTY. THEY ARE LIKE 
3IILE-POST3 ALONG THE DEMO- 
CRATIC HIGHWAY THAT LEADS 
THROUGH THE SOUTH, denoting the di- 
rection and distances to a state of rcil peace 
and union. We are proud of them ; and 
we present them with coufideuee to the 
people of the North, and v.-e s:)y, 'Here 



are our trophies.' THEY ARE WORTH 
ALL THE BUREAUS AND CARPET- 
BAGS AND NEGRO MILITIA AND 
-TOLLECTOR^ AND PETTY MILI- 
TARY TYRANTS AND GREASY CON- 
TRA.CTORS AND FAT BOND- 
HOLDERS THAT A CORRUPT CON- 
GRESS CAN MANUFACTURE BE- 
TWEENTHIS AND DOOMSDAY." 

Congress Must be Destr'oyed. 

"The great Democratic party -will rise in 
ils might and majesty and pulverize and 
j)urge the Congress, just as Cromwell 
purged the long Parliament. THE SIGNS 
OF THE TIMES ARE PREGNANT 
WITH RESISTANCE TO RADICAL 
TYRANNY, AND THE DAGGER OF 
BRUTUS MAY AID IN ACCOMPLISH- 
ING OUR REDEMPTION FROM RADI- 
CAL RULE, RUIN, AND USURPA- 
TIO'^.— Mobile Tribune.'' 

"I love the American flag as dearly as 
any other man SO LONG AS IT REPJRE- 
SENTS A GOVERNMENT IN THE 
HANDS OF THE DEMOCRATIC 
PARTY, AND NO LONGER."— CVy^tom 
Taaiali Rijnders^ 

More Blood-letting Demanded. 

"We know there are many Democrats 
at the North, including some distinguished 
soldiers, who believe that the political at- 
mosphere, poisoned by the long reign of 
Radical despotism, will not be so purified 
that liberty may flourish on it, until a just 
rliasiisement is infictcd xipon the daring men 
toho have conapired against the freedom of the 
nation. In other words, that the counter- 
r.evoluiion will not be complete icithout more 
Mood-letting. " — Mobile liegistcr. 

On Saturday, the 5th instant, the rebel 
General J. T. L. Sueed, in a speech before 
the Central Democratic Club of Memphis, 
declared : " I am for peace — I want peace 
— again, and if a single outrage is committed 
like that of young Urnvvn, Imnfor uiterl// 
destroying and wiping out everi/ member of 
111' Ttadical parly in this State.'''' 

Exterminate the Negro. 

"Willi the skull and cross-bones of the 
'lost cause' before us, we will swear that 
this is ii white nvin's government. WE 
MUST MAKE TIIR NEGRO UNDER- 
STAND WK Atni THE MEN WE 
WERE WHEN WE HELD IIIM IN Ali- 
.lECT BONDAGE, and to make him feel 
ihat when forbearance ceases to be a virtue 
lie has aroused a power that will control 
hini or destroy him."— J/t'/v^i't/i {Miss) 
Mercuri/. 

"The nigger and the white man are no*^ 
likely to agree, unless the nigger yields to 
the white ■maiL's views, which he c<in do or 
die. He has not the intellect, and the white 
men, Avho oulnunil)er tiiem live to one, 



will never, no! never, consent to be his 
bondman or his inferior in any sense." — 
Ultra KuMux. 

Colored Men Not to Vote. 
"In conclusion I have a few plain words 
for the colored people — directly to them — 
truthfully, if not agreeably, I have a right 
to advise them, because I am their friend. 
They know I am. I SAY TO THEM, 
THEN, YOU CANNOT AND WILL 
NOT BE PERMITTED TO PARTICI- 
PATE PERMANENTLY AND SUB- 
STANTIALLY IN THE POLITICAL 
POWEROF Tins COUNTRY, OR ANY 
PART FF IT. REMEMBER WHAT I 
SAY. This is the 'white man's country" 
it is his government, and he intends to keep 
both. You cannot and will not hold 
either, nor will either be held by others for 
you." — J. B. Campbell, at Charleston Demo- 
cratic Convention. 

Fought on the "Wrong Side. 
"If radicalism be maintained, we shall 
have the continuance of an existing des- 
potism, which will be intensified by suc- 
cess. In that event, many who, like my- 
self, have opposed secession and rebellion 
for the sake of liberty and constitutional 
government, and fancied ourselves wiser 
than the rebels, if not more patriotic, will 
have to confess our mistake. In the present 
aspect of afairs I HAVE TO CONFESS 
THAT If IS YET TO BE DECIDED 
WHETHER THOSE WHO FOUGHT 
FOR THE UNION, AND IN DOING SO 
SADDLED THE COUNTRY WITH A 
GREAT ARMY AND A GREAT DEBT, 
AND FOUNDiLD GREAT MERCE- 
NARY INTERESTS AND COURUPT- 
ING INFLUENCES HOSTILE TO 
EVERY FORM OF GOVERNMENT, 
HAVE NOT BLUNDERED."— J/o??Y(7(?«i- 
ery BLiir, August 11, 18G3. 

How to Treat Republicans. 

Tlie Mobile Register exhorts ils disciples 
to deal witli the white Republicans after 
this fashion : 

'■'■They are dogs, and should he treated as 
dogs— dogs only tolerated now because the 
poicer of the sicord is in the Juinds of our 
enemies in Congress, but loill not be tolerated 
one hour after the people recover the liberty 
iodo justice upon their oppressors. IT IS 
THE" DUTY OF EVERY SOUTHERN 
MAN TO CUT THESE VEUMIN. E.v- 
communicate them; spew them out as out- 
casts and s )cial i)ariahs, willi whom it is 
disgraceful to hold social intercourse." 
A Warning to Seymour. 

'''■Jf Governor Seymour should undertaketo 
smooth off the rough corners of General 
Blair's jilatform, he will only injure the 
cause he desires to pro7note, and lessen the 
chance of his own success. 'This is no time 
for temporizing.'" — Richmond Disptatch. 



Rebel Faith in Northern Democrats 

'■'Comrades, brothers^ year (tfler year you 
lore the confederate flag through fire and 
tempest, and upon more than two hundred 
battlefields covered it tcitli. glory. Your im- 
perishable glories are intrenched in the im- 
pregnable fortresses of the past, and no. 
power can dim their Cuulgeuce. What 
though your flag went down bathed in 
woman's consecrated tears, and baptized in 
the best blood of the nation? THE DEMO- 
CRA.TIO PARTY OFFERS THE MOST 
HONORABLE TERMS. IT ENDORSES 
PRINCIPLES FOR WHI JH YOU BAT- 
TLED." — From a speech delivered by Gene- 
ral Cullen A. Battle, of the confederate 
army, in Mobile, at the Democratic grand 
rally, Monday, August 10. 

"I give my hearty support to Seymour 
and Blair because the latter is pledged in 
favor of the cause of the South by military 
power, while Governor Seymour is too well 
known as an uncompromising champion 
of our rights to require endorsement from, 
any quarter.'''' — Speech of Ex-Governor 
Henry A. Wise, of Virginia. 

Reason for Repudiation. 

General Thomas F. Bowie, the leading 
Democrat of Maryland, said in his Balti- 
more speech: 

"If there be any class of men I would 
sooner tax it would be those men who fur- 
nished the means to carry on the most un- 
holy, wicked, and cruel war in history. I 
would not tax them as jrroperty, BUT I 
WOULD BECAUSE I CAN READ 
UPON THE FACE OF THESE BONDS 
A CONTRIBUTION TO AN UNHOLY 
AND WICKED PURPOSE." 

"I can tell you that every man shall be 
compelled to do bis duty. They have got 
to take sides with us or the other part}'. 
We loill have no neutrals; all must show 
what they are. If they are not for us then 
they icill be against us. We must be a unit 
on this very grave question.'''' — Forrest at 
Brownsville. 

Booth Still Lives. 

"The spirit of Wilkes Booth still lives, 
thank God! THEREFORE TAKE COUR- 
AGE ! SEYMOUR, BLAIR, AND THE 
REVIVAL OF THE GREAT CAUSE IS 
THE MOTTO OF EVERY TRUE MAN." 
— Pine Bluff {Ark.) Vindicator. 

"Goon, boys; SWEAR TO MURDER 
NORTHERN HUNS 1 ARM YOUR- 
SELVES AND ORGANIZE, and be ready 
to respond promptly when called on, and 
fight bravely even if you get killed !" — 
Memphis Appeal. . 

White Negroes in Congress ! 
The New York World says: "For as 
many crimes against law, Constitution, and 
human nature as our Congress commits, the 



British people would smash Parliament and 
hang peers and commoners in Hyde Park. 
Blood is thicker than water. Race stands 
by race, all except rump Congressmen. 
They stand by the negroes whom they stir 
up to rebellion. The new rebellion will 
array the people of the United States against 
two hundred thousand negroes and two 
hundred white negroes in Congress. God 
save the radical rebels if they bring on mor:' 
war, for the people won't save them.'''' 

Humphrey Marshall asserted in his Louis- 
ville speech that if the Democratic ticket 
was elected his party would '•'xoipe ouV all 
that laid been done in the toay of reconstruc- 
tion, and the fourteenth amendment to th'. 
Comtitution. 

"Mississippi Must Vote." 

John Forsyth proclaims, through the 
columns of the ^lobile Advertiser: ''■Mis- 
sissippi must rote, and the Democracy will 
see to its being counted. Texas and Vir- 
ginia cannot go through with the forms of 
the Radical programme in time to be ad- 
mitted before the election, as Congress will 
adjourn beforehand. But they must vote.'''' 

How Georgia Acquiesces. 

"The bold declaration of Francis P. Blair, 
Jr. * ■* * The Democratic party have 
also proclaimed the reconstruction acts un- 
constitutional, null, and void, and if their 
candidates are elected the legal governments 
of the Southern States shall be reinstated, 
though the sword has to be invoked.'" — Au- 
gusta Constitutionalist. 

"The reconstruction acts are null and 
void, and shall not stand. * * * The 
grinning skeletons which have been set 
up in our midst as legislators shaM be 
ousted by Frank Blair, whom ouu pahty 

HAS EXPRESSLY APPOINTED FOR THAT PUR- 
POSE. All these things shall be swept away 
from the bosom of the country." — Robert 
Toombs, Atlanta. 

Toombs has not yet abandoned the idea 
of calUng the roll of his slaves from Bunker 
Hill. He says: 

"That all these reconstruction acts as 
they are called— these schemes pf delusion, 
of villainy, and of tyranny— sAaW no 
longer curse the statute-book nor oppress the. 
free people of the country.'''' — Speech in At- 
lanta, July 23. 

He proceeds: "That these so-called Gov- 
ernors and Legislatures wliloh have been 
established in our midst shall at once be 
made to 'vacate. THE CONVENTION AT 
NEW YORK APPOINTED FRANK 
BLAIR SPECIALLY TO OUST 
THEM."— 5/?<?cc/t at Atlanta. 

Captain Dunlap Scott recently made a 
Seymour campaign speech in the Georgia 
House of Representatives. He closed as 
follows: 



"TVie time was token we thovfjM the North 
teas against us, and thai toe must submit to 
the terms of the cnnqueros, howercr derjrad- 
inq. THAT TIME HAS PASSED. 
ALREADY BIIE HAS GIVEN UN- 
MISTAKABLE EVIDENCE OF HER 
RETURNING SENSE OP JUSTICE 
TO AN IMPOVERISHED AND DOWN- 
TRODDEN PEOPLJ^ Already her sig- 
nal guns hate herft jired from her great 
inetropoli^^id their rcverherations, as they 
roll in ilurlmer-tones from the Pacific to the 
Atlantic, and from the seaboard to the 
mountains, bid vs to be of good cheer, stand 
firm, dispute every inch of the constittitional 
\-ights lefttii^, until the reinforcements reach 
us:' 

The ex-Coufcdeiate General A. R. Law- 
ton, said iu a speech at Savannah, Geor- 
gia: 

"Now, f^r the first time, tee have a plat- 
form of princi/ples and leaders around lohom 
toe could rally. It v: as the noblest, best bold- 
est declaration of principles ever laid down in 
the United Stafes,SinCi the demonstration here 
to-night shows it was in unison with the 
feelings of the people. There teas nothing 
that the South wanted that was not there:' 

Our competitors being carpet-baggers, 
f-callawags, jayhaT>4:ers, and thieves, we 
may occasionally be jostled against them, 
or,"lbrsooth, be forced to figUt with un- 
manly weapons. But we shall not shrink 
from the unwholesome task, and only ask 
our friends to bear vvilh us, as the end 
sought will justify the means. We must 
destroy the unseemly beast and bury his 
filthy carcass out of sight. That to ill be the 
toor'lc of the summer and fall campmgn. — 
JAlVeJloc.k {Ark.) Gazette. 

Seymour With ttto Rebels 
"Do you not create revolution wlien you 
say that ourpersons may be righ'fally seized, 
your property confiscated, your homes en- 
tered? Are you not exposing yourselves, 
your own interest.-', to as great a peril as 
that with wliich you threaten us? Remem- 
ber this: THAT THE BLOODY AND 
TREASONABLE AND REVOLUTION- 
ARY DOCTRINE OP PUBLIC NE 
CEBSITY CAN BE PROCLAIMED BY 
A MOB AS WELL AS BY A GOV- 
ERNMENT."— >S'ci^?«c?«''s speech to the New 
York rioters. 

"IIIAVEREAD THE CONFEDER- 



ATE CONSTITUTION AND IT IS BET 
TERTHiNOURS; TIIl^N WHY NOT 
OBVIATE ALL DIFFICULTY BY 
SIMPLY ADOPTING THAT CONSTI 
TUTION V— Seymour to Andy. Buggies. 

The Debt Must bo Repudiated. 

Lamdin P. Milligau,th2 unhung "Sonof 
Liberty," who escaped the gallo??s by the 
mercy ot Abraham Lincoln, has been 
making a speech near Logansport, Indi- 
ana, in which he said: 

"I HOLD THAT IT IS A VILLAIN- 
OUS DEBT, every dollar of it, from ii:s 
very inception. NEVER A DOLLAR OF 
THAT DEBT WAS CONTRACTED FOR 
YOUR LIBERTY AND WELFARE; yet, 
under the Constitution, this v/as the onl}' 
justification for coutrading it. The war 
was waged in theiaterestsof the monetar}' 
and manufacturing interests of the countrj', 
and not to restore the Union. I t^ld theai 
so in 1882, inl8G;J, and again in 1861. Tiiea 
they stopped mo. ' ' 

Negroes to bo Re-cnslavcd j 
"The peaple are per.suaded that th3 war 
is still in existence, so f.ir as rebels can con- 
tinue it; TH^T THE TRIUMPH OF 
SEYMOUR AND BLAIR WOULD RE- 
ENSLAVE THE NEGRO AND RE- 
ESTABLISH SOUTHERN DOMINA- 
TION." — Memphis Appeal, August. 

The State Central Democratic Committee 
of Louisiana have issued a circular, signed 
officially by the President and several mem- 
bers of the committee, advising the rebel 
Democrats to concentrate all "resentment" 
upon white Republicans, and "to withdraw 
from them all countenance, association, and 
patronage, and to thwart every effort they 
may make to maintain a position and sociO' 
foothold among you.'''' . 

Gen. BLA.IR at the head of the mili- 
tia AVILIi BE A MATCE FOR GeN. GrAKT AT 
THE HEAD OF THE KEGULAR AIIJIT. — [Gcn. 

Ewing, Jr. 

Secession is not dead; it is more alive 
today than ever. I support Blair because 
be promises a revolution. — [Gov. Wise, 
Richmond. 

: If WE AKESUCCESSFULIN THE APPROACH- 
ING CONTEST WE SHALL GAIN ALL THAT WE 
HWE LOST IN THE " LOST PAUSE." — [Mo- 
bile Tribune. 



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