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Full text of "Shekel hakodesh (the holy shekel). The metrical work of Joseph Kimchi"

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\\tktl ^altota&lf* 



l^tzob ^agtralf* 



SHEKEL HAKODESH 



(THE HOLY SHEKEL) 



The metrical work of 
JOSEPH KIMCHI.coc nov- wio 

Now edited for the first time from MSS. at the Bodleian, 
with an English Translation, Introduction, Notes, etc. 



to which is added 

YESOD HAYIRAH 

(THE FOUNDATION OF RELIGIOUS FEAR) 

from MSS, in the British Museum, 
with an English Translation and Notes, 

BY 

HERMANN GOLLANCZ, M.A., D.LIT. 

Goldsmid Professor of Hebrew, University College, 

University of London. 



HUMPHREY MILFORD 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 

LONDON EDINBURGH GLASGOW NEW YORK 

TORONTO MELBOURNE CAPE TOWN BOMBAY 



1919. 



PREFACE. 

My pleasure in sending forth this volume is mingled 
with disappointment, inasmuch as, owing to various difficulties 
resulting from the war, there has been great delay in its 
appearance. Furthermore, owing to the war's demands on 
labour, by which my printer was suddenly deprived of one 
worker after another, a few typographical errors (as shown in 
the Errata) could not be avoided ; nor was it possible to obtain 
new castings to express certain transliterations, such as the 
'ch' in Kimchi and Mibchar. 

I have to express my thanks to my friend, Dr. A. 
Buchler, Principal of Jews' College, for his kindness in revising 
the proofs of the text of the Shekel Hakodesh. 



H. G. 



CONTENTS 



SHEKEL HAKODKSH (The Holy Shekel) 



Dedication 



PAGK 



Introduction 



TRANSLATION 



Chapter 
I. On 

n. 

HI. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

v vn. 

vra. 

rx. 

x. 

XI. 

XII. 
XIII. 
XIV. 

XV. 

XVI. 

XVII. 

XVIII. 

XIX. 

XX. 
XXI. 
XXII. 



Wisdom 

Humility . 

Abstinence 

Modesty and Shame 

Self-Denial 

Man's Confidence and Despair 

Deliberation and Endurance . 

SumcncNCY .... 

Kindness and Charity 

Poverty and Asking Help 

Silence and Speaking Opportunely 

Truth 

Companionshd? and Association 
The Testing of Friends, &c. . 
Discernment and Manners 
Keeping a Secret 
Kingship ..... 
Stupidity, Pride, and Folly 

Jealousy 

Hypocrisy, Slander, &c. . 
Visiting Friends and the Sick, &c. 
Collection of Maxims 



lll.-XX. 



Notes to the Hebrew Text 

of "Shekel Hakodesh" (The Holy Shekel) 



1-60 

2 
II 

13 
18 

20 

23 

2* 
26 

23 

30 
32 
36 

37 

44 
46 

48 

49 
5i 
53 
54 
56 
58 



63-78 



YESOD H A Y I R A H {The Foundation of Religious Fear) 

PAGE 

TRANSLATION 81— 115 



Chapter 
I. 

n. 
m. 

IV. 

v. 

VI. 

vn. 
vm. 

IX. 

x. 

XI. 

xn. 
xm. 

XIV. 

XV. 

XVI. 

xvn. 
xvm. 



On Fear 

Prayer and Service . 

The Law and Wisdom 

Appreciation 

Shame and Shamelessness 

Pride and Meekness 

Endurance 

TTtt mtt.t tv . 

Chastity . 
Desire 
Contentment 
Industry . 
Science and Speech 
Counsel and Secrets 
Dignity and Dominion 
Deliberation and Haste 
Visiting and its Abuse 
Love and Companionship 



82 

83 

85 
90 

92 

93 

94 
96 

97 

99 
101 

104 

107 

108 

no 

112 

"3 
114 



Notes to the Hebrew Text of " Yesod Hayirah " 

(The Foundation of Religious Fear) 119-125 
Tabids I. and II. 
Errata. 



HEBREW 



Text op vnpn bpv 
Text of nnvn w 



jfi — ro 



Appendix : Verses of the " Shekel Hakodesh " by 
Kimchi, as found in the Editor's MS. copy of 
Maimonides' More Nebuchim, written in 1476. Tfi 



— Ifi 



INTRODUCTION. 



INTRODUCTION. 



INTRODUCTION. 

In pleasing contrast with the sorrowful persecutions which 
at various times under diverse reigns affected the social con- 
dition of the Jews of Spain in the Middle Ages, the literary- 
activity of a number of great scholars shines forth in all the 
brilliance of power to comfort and cheer the student of history 
and the general reader amid the perusal of cruel and doleful 
experiences. Even in the social and political history of those 
times, Jewish names stand out prominently to prove the 
exception to the rule, these Jews taking as they did a leading 
part in the affairs of the State; but what seems to be of 
more permanent value than even the solitary expressions of 
royal favour bestowed upon individual Jews in one province 
or another, are the literary careers and the splendid monu- 
ments of learning and scholarship identified with the names of 
some of the best sons of Israel, who, working under adverse 
conditions, have bequeathed to us possessions which command 
our admiration and call forth our tribute of praise. 

It is not too much to assert that the high in- 
Early tellectuality of the early Spanish Jews exerted 
Spanish an influence of the most pronounced and far- 
Jews reaching character, and has left a mark upon 
later day Jewry which cannot bo gainsaid. We 
are thinking of such names in the world of letters as Solomon 
Ibn Gabirol, Yehuda Halevi, Moses Ibn Ezra, Abraham Ibn 
Ezra, Abraham Ibn Daud, Alcharisi, and the giant minds 
Moses Mairaonides and Moses ben Nachman (Nachmanides) ; 
while among those who flourished in the Provence, there figure 



iY 

such celebrities as Meshullam and his five learned sons, 
Tehuda and Samuel Ibn Tibbon, and the renowned family 
of the Kimchis, who had migrated from Spain. The list is 
indeed so large that in an Introduction we cannot mention 
even by name all the members that belong to this galaxy of 
literary effort ; the more so as we are chiefly concerned in the 
present volume with such names as are directly connected 
with the work, which, having for so many centuries remained 
in manuscript, now for the first time emerges to the full 
light of day. 

The problems revolving round the fascinating 
Kimchi metrical work of Joseph Kimchi, which, for 
Gabirol reasons that he has himself given in his brief intro- 
Honein duction, he has called Shekel Hakodesh (the 

Holy Shekel) concern chiefly the Mibchar Ha- 
peninim (' Choice of Pearls '), a work originally written in 
Arabic, and translated into Hebrew; and they concern more 
or less also the Collection of Maxims and Sayings originally 
put together in Arabic by the Nestorian Christian Honein, 
and translated into Hebrew by Yehuda Alcharisi under the 
title of Musre Haphilosophim (Maxims of the Philosophers). 
How far is the Shekel Hakodesh an original work, and 
to what extent is it indebted to the ' Mibchar Hapeninim ' ? 
Is the Arabic version of the 'Mibchar Hapeninim' the un- 
doubted work of Solomon Ibn Gabirol? And is the Hebrew 
translation with which we are familiar the unquestionable 
rendering of Yehuda Ibn Tibbon ? 

These are some of the questions that stare lis in the 
face at the outset of our inquiry. 

" Scholars are not wanting," says De Rossi (sub 
De Rossi Gabirol) " who attribute to Solomon Ibn Gabirol 

the 'Mibchar Hapeninim' an excellent book of 
Morals; but according to others and with more reason too, 
it is said to have been composed by Jedaja Badirasi." 



In the words of Steinschneider (H. U. d. M. 

Steinschneider 1893, p. 387 §222): "We have become accustomed 

on "Mibchar" to ascribe to Gabirol the lost Arabic original 

in H. U. of the " Choice," without laying stress upon the 

consideration that we have no further evidence 
for it than the passage in Kimchi, which remained unnoticed 
among all Jewish scholars, who made use of the "Choice" 
expressly or tacitly, and the number of such is large and 
of significant authority. At the head of such stands Jehuda 
Tibbon, who mentions the book by name, and quotes some 
of its sayings without alluding to author or translator. 

Palquera mentions the "Choice" as an example 

Palquera of the works compiled by the Wise One of the 

on Nations, a designation by which it was intended 

"Mibchar" to explain the origin of the Sayings ; at all events 

it proved that Palquera did not regard Gabirol 
as the compiler. We must admit that all this is strange, and 
requires explanation, if credence is to be placed in the ob- 
servation contained in Kimchi's not unsuspicious introduction 
according to the single MS. R. And this is not all. In Gabirol's 
Ethics there occur a number of Sayings from the "Choice" 
without mentioning the source, and not always in the same 
language, which has a bearing upon the authorship." And 
later on, Steinschneider remarks: "If, as is thought, Gabirol 
compiled the "Choice" in his youth for his own use, we see 
no reason why his name should have been omitted. The very 
arrangement of the sentences, furthermore, does not evidence 
the systematic method which was Gabirol's characteristic." 
And in a previous passage (§221) Steinschneider avows: "I 
confess that I do not regard the said work as Gabirols with- 
out reservation. No edition till the 19th century makes mention 
of an author or translator. Gaulmyn's conjecture that Jedaja 
ha-Penini (13th cent.) was the author was taken up later; it 
is not worthy of criticism. L. Rosenthal (Cat. p, 178 n, 927), 



Tl 



in passing a strong censure upon this error, and adding his 
own view, makes the following remark : All this is false. 
Solomon b. Gabirol collected the sayings of the Arabs and 
translated them into Hebrew, as is clear to every sensible 
person. This assertion is however only a false conjecture 
of Filipowski's (1851) and already controverted in C. R p. 2321." 
Nevertheless Steinschneider, as though not wishing to be 
too dogmatic upon the subject, feels himself constrained to 
say elsewhere: "We enter upon a vexatious literary problem 
with the feelings of a wanderer, who approaches a road with 
the conviction that obstacles of an insurmountable character 
will present themselves to him, and yet he cannot and dare 
not hold back... If Jehuda Ibn Tibbon has preserved for us 
in his translation of the 'Duties of the Heart' the memory of 
his rival, so has the latter preserved for us the name of the 
author or translator of the 'Choice of Pearls' — if the intro- 
duction is authentic and correct." 

Steinschneider has something further to say on 

Steinschneider the subject in his 'Arabische Literatur der Juden 

in (1902). In §82, pp. 125—128, he deals with R. 

"Arabische Salomo ibn Gabirol (for Gabriel) b. Jehuda, and 

Lit. d. Juden" enumerates his writings; and on p. 127 he begins 

his reference to the "Perlenauswahl" or "Choice 
ot Pearls" with the expression zweifdhaft, remarking that 
■inwiSK iKDbo was the Arabic title of a collection of anony- 
mous maxims that had become popular, having been attri- 
buted, according to a very old source, to Gabirol, but which 
was still a subject of wide investigation, resulting in no de- 
cision as to authorship. He continues : "We possess two Hebrew 
forms of this work, a) a translation in 64 chapters, according 
to contents, perhaps by Jehuda ibn Tibbon, at all events from 
the 12th cent., entitled DWJfin IPIM, etc ; b) a metrical version, 
with additions, by Joseph Kimchi, named vnpn bpw in 22 
chapters, each concluding with a homonym-distich, giving the 



• * 

Vll 



subject and number of maxims. This latter old work has as 
yet not found an editor, though large portions have appeared 
in five different places, vide the comparative list in H. U. 
Anh. 29. p. 999. The 'Holy Shekel' does not seem to be ex- 
clusively a versification of a)". 

Gross in his "Gallia Judaica" (Paris, 1897, pp. 
Henri 417 — 418) refers to Joseph ben Isaac Kimchi as 
Gross the author of the published works ^an 'D on 
grammar, of a commentary on Proverbs with the 
inexact title npin 'D, and one on Job ; and he continues : "He 
has also translated and put into verse, under the title tnpn bpw, 
the 'Choice of Pearls' DWfin "inao of Ibn Gabirol, etc. Cf. the 
preface of this version as given by M. Steinschneider in the 
Je8hurun, edited by Dr. Joseph Kobak (1891) VIII, 68 etc." 
In a foot-note to this passage in the Jeshurun, S. writes : 
"Gabirol's authorship of the Choice rests solely on the evidence 
of the metrical writer Joseph Kimchi in the later copy of MS. 
Opp. 1404, communicated by Dukes (Cat. Bodl. p. 2321)" etc. 
In this passage it is important to note inter alia (for reasons 
to. which reference will be found in another part of this In- 
troduction), a statement with regard to the youth of the 
authors — Gabirol and Joseph Kimchi — with whom we are 
specially concerned. 

As far as I can trace, Graktz has no special 
H. Oraetz reference to the 'Shekel Hakodesh.' With regard 
to its author and the family generally, he re- 
marks in his 'History of the Jews' (Eng. edit. Ill p.* 404, 
which is an exact translation of the original) : "In Narbonne 
there lived about this time the Kimchi family, whose achieve- 
ments cannot be said to correspond with their fame, but 
who directly for Narbonne, and indirectly for posterity, effected 
more than the greatest masters. The founder of the family, 
Joseph ben Isaac Kimchi (flourished 1150 — 1170), had im- 
migrated from South Spain to Narbonne, probably on account 



Alohariai problem, and to enable Hebrew scholars, inl- 
and acquainted with the Arabic original, to institute 
"the Musre" a comparison between Gabirol's * Mibchar ' and 

Honein's "Musre Ha-philosphim," we are indebted 
to the pleasing edition by Dr, A. Loewenthal of Tarnowitz, 
who in 1896 published his "Sepher Musre Ha-philosophim," 
(Sinnsprflche der Philosophen), the Hebrew text, translation, and 
introduction. But speaking of the Hebrew text, our minds 
go back in gratitude further still, to the earliest Hebrew 
translation of this work, which was accomplished by one of 
the celebrated translators of Maimonides' More Nebuchim, 
namely, Yehuda b. Solomon Alcharisi. The learned ones of 
Lunel had requested him to render into Hebrew this splen- 
did work consisting of proverbs, sayings &c, about 1216 
to 1218. Dr. Loewenthars text is based upon the incorrect 
and incomplete version which appears in the volume styled 
|133 pu (Riva di Trento 1562). But in this Introduction we 
cannot enter into a study of Honein's Arabic original, or of 
Alcharisi's Hebrew translation. The " Musre Ha-philosophim," 
is simply introduced here to assert its importance for com- 
parative purposes, in dealing either with the " Mibchar " at- 
tributed to Gabirol, or with the " Shekel Hakodesh " the work 
of Joseph Kimchi. And I am afraid that even with all our 
advanced knowledge on the subject we must agree with Loe- 
wenthars opinion, that " it is difficult to say in what relation 
this book (the Mibchar) stands to Honein's apothegms. A 
glance at the two works show most frequent parallels, which 
however vary in important points. At the present stage of 
inquiry, the question as to the mutual relationship will 
scarcely be settled." 

And this does not exclude the possibility that, as the 
once reputed author of the • Mibchar \ R. Yedaya Hapenini, 
was disowned, so It. Solomon Ibn Gabirol (or Avicebron) t 
who since then has enjoyed the reputation of being the 



XI 



author, may yet be dislodged from this pedestal, and the honour 
(at all events in part) transferred to another. 

Be this as it may, this Collection of maxims and 
The "Shekel" proverbs, known as the 'Mibchar/ attributed in 
in its relation recent times . to Gabirol, translated into Heb- 
to the rew (as some with good reason opine) by Yehuda 
"Mibchar" Ibn Tibbon, is closely related to the work 
contained in this volume, hitherto in MS. in 
the Bodleian and other libraries. The ' Shekel Hakodesh ' is 
the work of Joseph Eimchi of Narbonne, (perhaps also of 
Lunel), 1105 — 1170, himself no mean author, father of the 
celebrated grammarians R. David (p'Yl) and Moses Kimchi. 
The 'Shekel Hakodesh' is written in Hebrew, and is in 
part a versified form of the ' Mibchar Hapeninim/ But it is 
something more. It collects its material from whatever 
source possible; and so it comes about that while we find in 
by no means the same order or language the maxims similar 
in sentiment as found in the ' Choice of the Pearls/ and 
while by far the larger portion is undoubtedly the 'Mibchar/ 
we have an admixture of sayings that may be even more 
directly traceable to Honein's Arabic collection, and some 
few the source of which we cannot as yet identify. Stein- 
schneider remarks (U.d. M. § 200) that "Honein's book was 
probably known to the Spanish Jews of the 11th century;" 
and I would add this: — that as Alcharisi's Hebrew transla- 
tion was drawn upon by succeeding Jewish writers, there is 
every possibility that the original Arabic version influenced 
Hebrew writers anterior to Harisi, who were acquainted with 
the Arabic language and literature. 

What is there, therefore, to prevent the theory 

« Relation of that, as we know Joseph Kimchi was well ac- 

the "Shekel" quainted with Arabic, he was able to go to the 

to Honein original source, — Honein's Collection, though this 

does not exclude the possibility of his having 



Alchariai problem, and to enable Hebrew scholars, un- 

and acquainted with the Arabic original, to institute 

"the Musre" a comparison between Gabirol's 'Mibchar' and 

Honein's "Musre Ha-philosphim," we are indebted 
to the pleasing edition by Dr. A. Loewenthal of Tarnowitz, 
who in 1896 published his "Sepher Musre Ha-philosophim," 
(Sinnsprttche der Philosopher*), the Hebrew text, translation, and 
introduction. But speaking of the Hebrew text, our minds 
go back in gratitude further still, to the earliest Hebrew 
translation of this work, which was accomplished by one of 
the celebrated translators of Maimonides' More Nebuchim, 
namely, Yehuda b. Solomon Alcharisi. The learned ones of 
Lunel had requested him to render into Hebrew this splen- 
did work consisting of proverbs, sayings &c, about 1216 
to 1218. Dr. Loewenthal's text is based upon the incorrect 
and incomplete version which appears in the volume styled 
p3J pu (Riva di Trento 1562). But in this Introduction we 
cannot enter into a study of Honein's Arabic original, or of 
Alcharisi's Hebrew translation. The " Musre Ha-philosophim," 
is simply introduced here to assert its importance for com- 
parative purposes, in dealing either with the " Mibchar " at- 
tributed to Gabirol, or with the " Shekel Hakodesh " the work 
of Joseph Kimchi. And I am afraid that even with all our 
advanced knowledge on the subject we must agree with Loe- 
wenthal's opinion, that " it is difficult to say in what relation 
this book (the Mibchar) stands to Honein's apothegms. A 
glance at the two works show most frequent parallels, which 
however vary in important points. At the present stage of 
inquiry, the question as to the mutual relationship will 
scarcely be settled." 

And this does not exclude the possibility that, as the 
once reputed author of the ' Mibchar \ R. Yedaya Hapenini, 
was disowned, so II. Solomon Ibn Gabirol (or Avicebron) t 
who since then has enjoyed the reputation of being the 



XI 



author, may yet be dislodged from this pedestal, and the honour 
(at all events in part) transferred to another. 

Be this as it may, this Collection of maxims and 
The "Shekel" proverbs, known as the 'Mibchar/ attributed in 
in its relation recent times . to Gabirol, translated into Heb- 
to the rew (as some with good reason opine) by Yehuda 
"Mibchar" Ibn Tibbon, is closely related to the work 
contained in this volume, hitherto in MS. in 
the Bodleian and other libraries. The ' Shekel Hakodesh ' is 
the work of Joseph Kimchi of Narbonne, (perhaps also of 
Lunel), 1105 — 1170, himself no mean author, father of the 
celebrated grammarians R. David (p'1'1) and Moses Kimchi. 
The 'Shekel Hakodesh' is written in Hebrew, and is in 
part a versified form of the ' Mibchar Hapeninim/ But it is 
something more. It collects its material from whatever 
source possible; and so it comes about that while we find in 
by no means the same order or language the maxims similar 
in sentiment as found in the ' Choice of the Pearls/ and 
while by far the larger portion is undoubtedly the 'Mibchar/ 
we have an admixture of sayings that may be even more 
directly traceable to Honein's Arabic collection, and some 
few the source of which we cannot as yet identify. Stein- 
schneider remarks (U. d. M. § 200) that "Honein's book was 
probably known to the Spanish Jews of the 11th century;" 
and I would add this: — that as Alcharisi's Hebrew transla- 
tion was drawn upon by succeeding Jewish writers, there is 
every possibility that the original Arabic version influenced 
Hebrew writers anterior to Harisi, who were acquainted with 
the Arabic language and literature. 

What is there, therefore, to prevent the theory 

* Relation of that, as we know Joseph Kimchi was well ac- 

the "Shekel" quainted with Arabic, he was able to go to the 

to Honein original source, — Honein's Collection, though this 

does not exclude the possibility of his having 



Xll 



been in part indebted to the ' Mibchar ' in its original Arabic 
form or in the Hebrew version then extant ? In my Notes, 
I have here and there indicated the passages in Honein to 
which some of the maxims in the * Shekel ' might be traced. 
I do not intend these to represent an exhaustive study, but 
to serve as samples, as finger-posts on the road of enquiry. 
I have further included parallels to be found in the delight- 
ful and terse poem blVT\ imo *w by Hai Gaon, anterior to 
both Gabirol and Kimchi, striking both on account of the 
similarity of ideas and language. 

Carmoly certainly fell into a great error in asserting that 
Kimchi's book had nothing to do with the ' Choice of Pearls', 
and that all those who identified the two works as one only 
speak by hearsay. 

One question more. Does perhaps the heading of the 
last chapter of the ' Shekel ' DnDicn man betray his original 
source — the Musre Ha-philosophim, and thus help us in our 
enquiry ? 

There is little doubt that Steinschneider, though he had 
not a complete MS. of the ' Shekel ' before him, is quite justified 
in asserting that Kimchi did make use of the "Choice", as 
he adopts at least a portion of the headings in his metrical 
version, his arrangement differing not only in the sequence of 
chapters but in that of particular maxims. 

Kimchi states towards the end of his brief introduction 
that he put together those sentences which seemed to him 
closely related. He was not a slavish translator or borrower ; 
he was not wedded to any one collection of ethical and moral 
maxims. Though he was not quite an independent and orig- 
inal author, he yet followed a method and arrangement of 
his own, and he has his own way of applying scriptural 
expressions and phrases. And the same applies to Ibn Tib- 
bon's (if it be his) Hebrew translation of the ' Mibchar/ If 
Kimchi was acquainted with it and even used it, he may 



XXII 



have drawn equally upon the Arabic original, when it listed 
him. 

I think I ought in this place to refer to the criticism 
as to the omission of the name of Solomon Ibn Gabirol in 
the original Arabic and in most of the Codices giving the 
Hebrew translation. Personally I would not attach too 
much importance to this omission. Cannot we conceive, 
that even if Gabirol were author or compiler of the 'Mibchar 
Hapeninim', there might have been hesitation on his part, 
owing to his modesty, to identify himself openly and publicly 
with a work which was the first-fruits of his literary effort, 
and composed in his youth ? It could scarcely have arisen from 
the fact, that as his work was largely borrowed from non- 
Jewish sources, he was afraid, considering especially Gabirol's 
troublous experiences, to run the gauntlet of a narrow 
prejudice at the hands of his own brethren ; such com- 
positions were, in reality, the order of the day. 

To set at rest once and for all the question of Kimchi's 
apparent indebtedness to the ' Mibchar/ and the extent to which 
he seems to have drawn both in language and thought from 
this splendid monument of antiquity, I refer the reader to the 
Table of Comparison (I) which I have prepared at a great 
deal of labour, in which I have, as far as possible, traced 
sentence by sentence the counterpart of Kimchi's rhymed 
version in the ' Mibchar.' By closely examining both versions 
it will become clear as in no other way, not only how far 
Kimchi carried out his intention as set forth in his brief in- 
troductory remarks " of weighing these Maxims in the balance 
of metre," but also what a delightful original turn Kimchi 
gave to the somewhat rough, too laconic, and, often on that 
account, obscure expressions as contained in the Hebrew ver- 
sion of the 'Mibchar*. 

The numbering as regards the ' Mibchar ' is that adopted in 
that mo9t welcome edition of the 'Mibchar' published in 1859 



xir 



by my old friend, the late Rot. B. H. Ascher, with an English 
translation and notes, under the title of " A Choice of Pearls." 

Although this Introduction is not concerned 

Theory with a study of the ' Mibchar/ yet I cannot 

as to resist en passant the temptation of making a 

Chapter 38 further suggestion upon the subject It occurred 

of the "Mibchar" to me in the course of my investigating the 

relationship between each individual sentence 
in the ' Shekel ' and the ' Mibchar ', that as far as concerns a 
certain chapter of the ' Mibchar/ namely, that on the nno 
nmonn (which by the way Ascher strangely renders "Urban- 
ity," but which should be "Desirable qualities," as Stein- 
schneider already points out), this chapter XXXVIII might 
have been the basis or ground- work of the " Choice of Pearls" 
itself; and that radiating from this Chapter the work itself 
expanded and grew to its present proportions. This chapter 
may contain the skeleton of the whole work; §379 refers to 
ten qualities; §380 to others: §381 to thirteen further qualities, 
§382 to seven more, §384 to seven again, and so on in 
§387, 8, 9, 90, 91, to the end of the Chapter. And we might 
go further, and add to this Chapter X XXVIII the two Chap- 
ters XLII & XLIII, — the former being m«h -pi nmn 'tf 
" Pointing out the straight way," and uab Mnn mVD 'P " The 
directions of a Sage to his son." 

It is unnecessary, for the sake of merely extending 
this Introduction, to labour this contention in detail ; the very 
expressions seem to me to tell the tale : — " Speaking truth, 
Lovo of man, Giving to him who asks, Constancy, Hospitality, 
Shamefacedness, Forgiveness of wrong, Doing good, Shunning 
fools, Fear, Honour, Sufficiency, Endurance, Liberality, Jealousy, 
Modesty, Cheerfulness, Humility, Treatment of relatives, Ab- 
staining from injury, Slander, Keeping a Secret, Niggard- 
liness, Domestic economy, Wisdom, Avoiding the flatterer, 
Helping the poor, and Companionship." Compare these heads 



XT 



with those of the 'Mibchar/ or with those of the 
'Shekel' of Kimchi — the subject of this work, and I 
venture to think there will be found some substratum for 
my contention, and material enough for further investigation 
and study. 

I have included in this volume the Hebrew text 

The of the riNTn 1iD\ It has only been printed once 

'Tesod before, by the Mekize Nirdamim, in 1896. Hav- 

Hayirah" ing had the advantage of three sources at my 

disposal, I have printed one text, viz. : — the MS. 
British Museum (Or. 2396), and given the variants occurring 
in the other sources,— the MS. Harleian (5686), and the text 
by S. Baer. The latter MS. is especially valuable; it is 
written round the margins of a magnificent convolut, in the 
main a liturgical work, and being fuller than the one from 
which our text is printed, I have been able to supplement the 
defective portions as regards Or. 2396. 

As regards the authorship of this work, I cannot agree 
with that assigned to it by Dr. S. Baer. To my mind he 
has afforded no evidence whatsoever, which is the opinion 
also of Haim Brody, Berlin, as expressed in the same period- 
ical Mekize Nirdamim, 5656. And although I am unable at 
present to offer any solution upon the subject, 1 have intro- 
duced the Tesod Hayirah into this volume for quite another 
reason, and that is, that it may help to throw some light upon 
our present enquiry with regard to the ultimate sources of 
the ' Mibchar ' and the ' Shekel/ It struck me in the course 
of my reading that^ several unusual expressions occurred in 
the 'Yesod,' identical with such as occurred in both the 
' Mibchar ' and the ' Shekel ' : this seemed to me far from acci- 
dental ; and the question thereupon presented itself to my 
mind, Who borrowed from Whom ? Or, can all three works 
be referred to one original source ? Only in determining 
accurately this important point may we be able to arrive at 



XYi 

th# authorship of the ' Yesod.' 

For the better understanding of this inter-connection, it 
maybe useful to consult Table II. 

The first English translation of the work ' Tesod Hayirah ' 
was published by me in 1915 under the title, " The Founda- 
tion of Religious Fear," issued from the Gresham Press, 
Pilgrim Street, Ludgate, E.C. London, 

I have to express my regret that, in consequence of the con- 
tinuation of the War, yet not wishing to delay this publication any 
longer, I was unable to avail myself, for critical purposes, of one 
or two more or less complete texts of the ' Shekel Hakodesh ' in 
foreign libraries, and I have therefore had to depend upon the two 
MSS. in the Bodleian library, totally different in age and style, 
and therefore of a character which has materially helped me 
in determining readings in a number of cases. 

Considering the variation in these two MSS., the dif- 
ference in the order of the Chapters, in the number of Chap- 
ters, and the strange interpolations of whole passages in 
Chapters to which they clearly do not belong, it would 
have been almost desirable for comparative purposes to have 
had the two MSS. printed together in this volume; but, as 
it is, 1 have indicated, in the Notes attached, as best I could, 
the variations and divergencies in the two MSS. 

For purposes of verification, I also had before me the 
former labours of Hirsch Edelman ih the " Path of Goodness," 
(London, 1852); the periodicals Der Orient, Jeschurun, and 
Zion, (in which I detected many a surprising error, clearly not 
due to the printer), containing contributions to the subject 
by Dukes, Steinschneider, & Kobak, and last but not least, a 
MS. collection of some of the said maxims which I found on 
the fly-leaf of the MS. copy of the More Nebuchim in my 
possession, written four years before the editio princeps. 
Judging from Steinschneider's description of the sentences 
interspersed by Kimchi in his commentary on Proverbs npin 'D 



xvn 



(printed at Breslau 1868 by Baer Dubrowo), I have a strong sus- 
picion that they are identical with the maxims contained in 
my MS. I have no means of testing this during the War, 
having tried in various quarters to obtain a copy of the 
printed work, but without success. No copy is to be found in 
the British Museum or the Bodleian. I have, therefore, thought 
fit to reproduce in this publication the highly interesting form 
in which these maxims appear in my manuscript. 

I might conclude our subject of inquiry, and quote by 
way of summing up, the following pithy remarks occurring 
in the Introduction to Edelman's pleasing contribution. He 
is speaking of " the collection of sayings by princes of learn- 
ing, and the sentences and parables of illustrious scholars, 
even if the authors of some are not specially known; the 
reliques of the days of yore, and the meditations and aspira- 
tions of those mighty philosophers, the sages of Greece, 
Arabia, and other countries, upon whom shone the light of 
wisdom to recognise and acknowledge the One only God, the 
Lord of the Universe, and to know how to walk in His ways 
to espouse moral virtue, humility, and many other good parts, 
and who by the perfection of their minds and souls attained 
to the highest degree of excellency !" (I would add, by way 
of parenthesis: would that Jewish authors and their works 
were always spoken of with such fine feeling and honest 
appreciation by non-Jewish writers !) And he continues : 
"The chief and distinguished philosophers and sages of our 
people introduced them into the innermost sanctuary of Jew- 
ish literature; who exerted themselves in translating them, 
collecting them, and compiling them ; as, for instance, " The 
Book of Morals of the Philosophers (Sepher Muissare Hapi- 
lusuphim), or the "Choicest Pearls" (Mibchar Hapeninim) 
and some also the book "Tikkun Middoth Hanephesh," (Im- 
provement of the Attributes of the Soul), which the great 
Rabbi Solomon Ben Gabirol originally composed in the Arabic 



xviii 

language, but were translated into Hebrew by other great 
scholars in Israel. Rabbi Joseph Kimchi, the father of the 
eminent Rabbi David Kimchi, joined these "golden tresses" 
unto the " pearls " in the book called the " Choicest Pearls," 
and he weighed them by the "Holy Shekel" (Shekel Hako- 
desh), balancing them on the scale of metre, to enhance its 
beauty, and augment its attraction!" 

It will repay the reader to peruse the various items con- 
tained in this " Collection of parental instructions to children," 
and to note more particularly in 'The Last Will of Rabbi 
Yehudah ibn Tibbon ' a number of sayings from the mouth 
of Ben Mishle, identical with the maxims found in Kimchi's 
'Shekel Hakodesh/ 

Finally, in " A Few Notes," by Mr. Leopold Dukes (p. 59), 
the latter remarks : " Respecting the work " Holy Shekel,"... 
I would like also to draw attention to the great value of its 
contents. Whoever looks at it with a critical eye, will find 
that the author had another and more correct version of the 
Mibchar Hapeninim before him than ours." 

I have called the text printed in this volume which is 
(Bodl. 1976 (1) Poc. 50) A, and referred to the second MS. 
(Bodl. N. 1975, MS. Opp. 639, olim 1404) as B. The former 
consists of 3 1 1 leaves (63 written pages and one fly blank), and 
the latter of 18 leaves (36 pp.) small 4°. 

The former MS. (A) is bound together with a 

The work by Hariri. The writing is rather bold, and 

Bodleian MSS. fairly good. It has been more or less tampered 

of the with throughout by some later hand, evidently 
"Shekel" correcting here and there according to the other 
MS., as the first of three marginal notes, though 
differing slightly, show. Alterations have been made by draw- 
ing a line through the words, not in all cases judiciously, and 
at times quite unnecessarily. So that it happens, that such 
proposed emendations confuse, instead of helping to render 



XIX 



the text somewhat clearer. 

MS. (B) is a small quarto by itself, the writing thin and 
neat, but most trying. On the front fly-leaf in faint ink ap- 
parently old, there occurs the following:— 'no BHpn bpV ifiD 

nroo ifiD mm pi"i hv vm 'nop p naiDon pmn ,m \2 *|or 

p n nb bpvn fi'y onw own e'y itidd pan 'j imm 'no Dwaen 

.-had *"d rvh nt D'Sroin onna onuoo o^ro nwbv ^Dim 

I have to add that, owing undoubtedly to an error in 
binding, what should have been Chap. XXII, is placed in A 
between Chapters XV and XVI. I have restored Chap. XXII 
to its proper place, viz:— at the end of A., instead of leav- 
ing it as I found it. 

I am also responsible for the numbering both of the 
chapters and stanzas throughout the ' Shekel ;' this remark 
applies equally to the 'Yesod'; they are entirely wanting in 
the original MSS. 

We can almost mark the stages of Kimchi's work on 
the 'Shekel/ provided that the MS. (A) represents the exact 
work of Kimchi himself, without any interpolation on the part 
of the copyist. Not only do we have such notices inserted 
between each stanza as on ' Finished/ in* ' Another/ JDHD nriK 
' Another quatrain* mmai '» * Another similar to it/ or n*W on 
'Finished by Heaven's help/ n"W Dnrui DH 'Finished and 
completed by Heaven's help' ; but we find at the end of a chapter 
such and similar expressions, with interesting variations, as 
n*ya lyffn (or p*bo) on 'The chapter is, by Heaven's help, 

ended ; ' or again — n"ya nao:n -,yrn m p*bo — onroi on 
— D^pjn ijHWi nt oSiy V'n wwi on — nnb in* mien lyvn 

:'"b h^>2 ib)2 -iy»n nt b"v onroi on 
■wit nt inn* wi ntarm «nn . tyr Kim n"ya nt ijnp p*to 

:np*nrn nyr 

In the body of the work we also find such interpolations 

as yyno mm «pn it nnn nan inn bpvo or mm in* 
b^ipd or mab mira nn*. 



I have omitted in this edition all these expressions as 
unnecessary and perhaps confusing. These interpolations are 
entirely absent in Cod. B. 

As regards my English translation of the ' Shekel/ I have 
attempted to reproduce the spirit of the original, endeavouring 
to be as literal as it was possible in this attempt I trust it 
will convey to the general reader the true sense of the versi- 
fier Joseph Kimchi, who in many instances has invested the 
maxims and sayings which he had before him with a warmth 
&nd vigour wholly absent in the original. In spite of his 
occasional obscurity, our gratitude is therefore due to him for 
having given us in his metrical version not a work at second 
hand, but one that may well rank as an original contribution 
to the vast store-house of Hebrew Literature. 

My own devout and humble thankfulness to Him 'who 
graciously bestoweth upon man knowledge, and teacheth unto 
mortal understanding/ for having granted me the merit of 
making this delightful work accessible to Hebrew and English 
readers ! 



H. G. 
January 5677-1917. 



TRANSLATION 



OF 



SHEKEL HAKODESH. 



(The Holy Shekel.) 



I have omitted in this edition all these expressions as 
unnecessary and perhaps confusing. These interpolations are 
entirely absent in Cod. B. 

As regards my English translation of the ' Shekel,' I have 
attempted to reproduce the spirit of the original, endeavouring 
to be as literal as it was possible in this attempt I trust it 
will convey to the general reader the true sense of the versi- 
fier Joseph Kimchi, who in many instances has invested the 
maxims and sayings which he had before him with a warmth 
and vigour wholly absent in the original. In spite of his 
occasional obscurity, our gratitude is therefore due to him for 
having given us in his metrical version not a work at second 
hand, but one that may well rank as an original contribution 
to the vast store-house of Hebrew Literature. 

My own devout and humble thankfulness to Him 'who 
graciously bestoweth upon man knowledge, and teacheth unto 
mortal understanding,' for having granted me the merit of 
making this delightful work accessible to Hebrew and English 
readers ! 



H. G. 
January 5677-1917. 



TRANSLATION 



OF 



SHEKEL HAKODESH. 



(The Holy Sliekel.) 



I BEGIN 
" THE HOLY SHEKEZ,." 

wise one, lay it to heart at all times, yea, every day, 
whether week-day or feast-day, sabbath or new moon, and 
you will find in ' The Holy Shekel ' every good quality, more 
precious than gold, yea, than fine gold. 

The object of this work is to make clear the proverb and 
parable, knowledge and counsel, the words of the wise and 
their dark sayings, the maxims of the sages and men of under- 
standing, and their conceits. 

I, Joseph the son of Isaac, surnamed Kimchi, have weighed 
such in the balance of the Holy Tongue, measuring them in 
verses ; I found them originally scattered here and there, 
some in Arabic, and some in Hebrew, and I have weighed 
them so that they may be easily understood, both as regards 
matter and language. 

1 have, therefore, called the book 'The Holy Shekel/ 
collecting the proverbs and maxims resembling one another, 
into their appropriate chapters ; there are in all 22 chapters, 
according to the number of the letters of the Torah (i.e., 
Hebrew alphabet) . I have summed up the verses of each and 
every chapter at the end thereof, the number being contained 
in the similarly-sounding final words of the concluding couplet 
— one line of which sets forth the subject matter, and the 
other the number of rhymes, for the benefit of those who 
would be wise and understand. 

The wise will hear, and gather doctrine and speech, and 
the man of understanding will gain prudence. 

Now, I say, the vital soul (of Wisdom) is beyond the 
heavens in duration. Take millstones from the mountains of 
Intelligence and grind therewith the flour of Thought, and 
having made all due preparation for the sweet fare and rich 
repast, dress thy (spiritual) food and mix thy (ethereal) wine, 
so that their fragrance may be wafted as myrrh in every 
man's countenance. 



Regard these rhymes well. There cannot be compared to 
them ornaments of the choicest gold, even of the gold of 
Parvaim ; — they are as rows of precious stones set in beauteous 
pattern of finest linen, a delight both to the eyes and the 
heart; I have arranged them in verse, weighing them not 
in the material balance, but balancing them in my mind, and 
this for the daughter of the son of Kimchi. 

The sparks of burning instruction glow as a torch : where- 
fore grasp them not with tongs but with the heart. Such 
verses are written upon the tablet of the heart of man ; where- 
fore place thou them upon these tablets. 

[Open the gates (i.e., ' Begin the Chapters '), and you will 
find for every man instruction, making for wisdom of the 
widest range.] 

CHAPTER I. 
On Wisdom. 

i. 

Wisdom giveth life to its possessor, paying the reward 
of God for His service. By wisdom doth man acquire the 
days of this life, a goodly name, and honour after death. 

2. 

The rain of Heaven reviveth the seed in the hour in which 
it falleth ; but if it fall too heavily, it will surely kill the seed. 
Wisdom, too, the wise man's heart reviveth ; but the more 
it groweth, the surer 'twill lead to eternal life. 

3- 
Grieve not when thy wealth doth perish, if thy sense and 
honour remain ; for why shouldst thou pine for the scabbard, 
when thy hand the sword doth retain ? 

4. 
Who is meet to be king o'er the world, the ship as mariner 
or captain to guide ? He who in all things is wise, is alert 
in deciding, enduring much in the search after wisdom. 

5. 
Why should he who wisdom gathereth, he whose hand 
layeth hold of truth, fear the bear, the lion, or adder, the 
poison of dragon, or aught that doeth harm ? Despond thou. 



if thy good sense doth fail, such loss will never be regained ; 
wherefore keep thy sense for aye ; once gone it will not come 
again. 

6. 

The man whom God with much knowledge hath graced, 
need have no care for wealth or possessions ; 'tis peace that 
marketh the wise man's end ; the end of wealth is bitter, 
and sad remorse. 

Search thou for understanding, seek wisdom, and regard 
not the issue ; investigate her hidden worth, her treasure- 
store, and beauty. 

7- 
Verily, as a man without a wife is fear without wisdom ; 
but wisdom without fear is as a woman without a spouse. 
Understanding without wisdom is as a bow without a string ; 
but the man in whom these two are found will ever " rise from 
high to higher." 

8. 

No man is accounted great by reason of his body's strength, 
but according to the brilliance of his mind, his wisdom, and 
his prudence. Not he who wanteth bread doth want ; who 
wisdom wanteth, wanteth much, he lacketh that which 
sustaineth life. 

9- 
Lo, wisdom may indeed be found in the poor and forlorn 
state, as well as in the abundance of this world's wealth and 
power ; just as this field will produce all wheat, whilst the 
one adjoining will bring forth thorn and brier. 

10. 

If 'tis wisdom which thou dost love, choose upright action, 
and hate rebellion. Know, wisdqfj} is like a tree, action is its 
fruit. Wisdom (theory) to practice joined will lead a man 
to the day of his death ; but knowledge, whence no actions 
flow (die with him) , he leaveth no aftermath. 

11. 

Choose the seat of the wise, and men will honour thee for 
thy good sense, and praise thee in full measure. When thou 
woulclst err, they will teach thee ; and whensoever thou wouldst 



Regard these rhymes well. There cannot be compared to 
them ornaments of the choicest gold, even of the gold of 
Parvaim ; — they are as rows of precious stones set in beauteous 
pattern of finest linen, a delight both to the eyes and the 
heart; I have arranged them in verse, weighing them not 
in the material balance, but balancing them in my mind, and 
this for the daughter of the son of Kimchi. 

The sparks of burning instruction glow as a torch : where- 
fore grasp them not with tongs but with the heart. Such 
verses are written upon the tablet of the heart of man ; where- 
fore place thou them upon these tablets. 

[Open the gates (i.e., ' Begin the Chapters '), and you will 
find for every man instruction, making for wisdom of the 
widest range.] 

CHAPTER I. 
On Wisdom. 

i. 

Wisdom giveth life to its possessor, paying the reward 
of God for His service. By wisdom doth man acquire the 
days of this life, a goodly name, and honour after death. 

2. 

The rain of Heaven reviveth the seed in the hour in which 
it falleth ; but if it fall too heavily, it will surely kill the seed. 
Wisdom, too, the wise man's heart reviveth ; but the more 
it groweth, the surer 'twill lead to eternal life. 

3- 
Grieve not when thy wealth doth perish, if thy sense and 
honour remain ; for why shouldst thou pine for the scabbard, 
when thy hand the sword doth retain ? 

4. 
Who is meet to be king o'er the world, the ship as mariner 
or captain to guide ? He who in all things is wise, is alert 
in deciding, enduring much in the search after wisdom. 

5. 
Why should he who wisdom gathereth, he whose hand 
layeth hold of truth, fear the bear, the lion, or adder, the 
poison of dragon, or aught that doeth harm ? Despond thou, 



if thy good sense doth fail, such loss will never be regained ; 
wherefore keep thy sense for aye ; once gone it will not come 
again. 

6. 

The man whom God with much knowledge hath graced, 
need have no care for wealth or possessions ; 'tis peace that 
marketh the wise man's end ; the end of wealth is bitter, 
and sad remorse. 

Search thou for understanding, seek wisdom, and regard 
not the issue ; investigate her hidden worth, her treasure- 
store, and beauty. 

7- 
Verily, as a man without a wife is fear without wisdom ; 
but wisdom without fear is as a woman without a spouse. 
Understanding without wisdom is as a bow without a string ; 
but the man in whom these two are found will ever " rise from 
high to higher." 

8. 

No man is accounted great by reason of his body's strength, 
but according to the brilliance of his mind, his wisdom, and 
his prudence. Not he who wanteth bread doth want ; who 
wisdom wanteth, wanteth much, he lacketh that which 
sustaineth life. 

9- 
Lo, wisdom may indeed be found in the poor and forlorn 
state, as well as in the abundance of this world's wealth and 
power ; just as this field will produce all wheat, whilst the 
one adjoining will bring forth thorn and brier. 

10. 

If 'tis wisdom which thou dost love, choose upright action, 
and hate rebellion. Know, wisdo^ is like a tree, action is its 
fruit. Wisdom (theory) to practice joined will lead a man 
to the day of his death ; but knowledge, whence no actions 
flow (die with him), he leaveth no aftermath. 

s 

II. 

Choose the seat of the wise, and men will honour thee for 
thy good sense, and praise thee in full measure. When thou 
woulclst err, thev will teach thee ; and whensoever thou wouldst 



falter, they will make thee understand, and direct thee in the 
right way. 

12. 

Knowledge and action are twins by birth, one giving glory 
to the other. Action without understanding, how can it be 
pure ? And where there is no action, what reward hath 
understanding ? 

13. 
I would rather leave wisdom through folly and lack of 
knowledge than, knowing what is right, forsake it in scorn # 

14. 
A man, wise in his time, was once asked, " How is it that 
thou excellest all others in wisdom ? " And he replied : 
" I did not spend that which I had upon the juice of grape 
or wine,— upon the midnight oil it was spent." 

Truly man's body without wisdom is as a house without 
a base, as a field in which the thorn springeth forth in the 
furrow. 

IS- 
Canst thou find a quality in man higher than that which 
recogniseth the measure of his position, so that when he 
speaketh, he will but speak to all men according to his rule 
and regulation ? 

16. 

A man of wisdom will continue in the search for wisdom, 
seeking knowledge wherever it may dwell or be kept. There 
is no fool equal to him who may think that he hath finished 
and completed his studies. 

17- 
Obtain wisdom, and say not that thou hast enough to 
sustain fully therewith the position thou dost hold ; for know, 
that wealth without wisdom will be lost, so that it ceaseth 
to exist, and thou mayest remain bereft of all things ; whilst 
he who laboureth in the search for wisdom, and stoopeth to 
search out and find one to enlighten him, may on the morrow 
be in the track of rising higher ; and, having been the tail 
before, may rise to become the head. 



<5 

18. 

Kings may rule the world, but the wise role kings. Men of 
understanding find delight in their wisdom, bat fools delight 
in their folly. 

19. 
Blindness of heart is blindness indeed ; therefore incline 
thou the ear to hearken ; for what availeth the open eye, if 
the heart itself be closed ? 

20. 

How many men there are in the world who, as they make 
their appearance, strike terror ; bnt when they once begin 
to speak, they are thought to be no better than dumb ? 

21. 

There are men of stature and height, men of muscle, able 
to brandish the spear and the lance ; but of what avail are 
they without knowledge, being altogether Wiring in under- 
standing and wisdom ? 

22. 

If a thing be dearly good, let the man of wisdom take hold 
of it ; if it clearly doth harm, let him move away from it ; 
if it be doubtful whether it be good or ill, let him cast his 
burden upon the Lord. 

23. 
A man who with wisdom humility doth join, win find that 
among all qualities it standeth pre-eminent. So also will he 
be respected and honoured, who at all times joineth forgiveness 
with power. 

24. 

The hard-working student whose constant aim it is to 
strengthen himself in his studies, even to tread in the path of 
wisdom, is not likely to be possessed of two things — a greasy 
face or portly body. 

25. 
My son, if thou wouldst be wise, choose four things, and 
beware lest thou neglect the fifth : be learned ; if this cannot 
be, be a learner, a listener, be law-loving, and be not too much 
given to bitterness. 



falter, they will make thee understand, and direct thee in the 
right way. 

12. 

Knowledge and action are twins by birth, one giving glory 
to the other. Action without understanding, how can it be 
pure ? And where there is no action, what reward hath 
understanding ? 

13. 
I would rather leave wisdom through folly and lack of 
knowledge than, knowing what is right, forsake it in scorn # 

14. 
A man, wise in his time, was once asked, " How is it that 
thou excellest all others in wisdom ? " And he replied : 
" I did not spend that which I had upon the juice of grape 
or wine, — upon the midnight oil it was spent." 

Truly man's body without wisdom is as a house without 
a base, as a field in which the thorn springeth forth in the 
furrow. 

IS- 
Canst thou find a quality in man higher than that which 
recogniseth the measure of his position, so that when he 
speaketh, he will but speak to all men according to his rule 
and regulation ? 

16. 

A man of wisdom will continue in the search for wisdom, 
seeking knowledge wherever it may dwell or be kept. There 
is no fool equal to him who may think that he hath finished 
and completed his studies. 

17. 
Obtain wisdom, and say not that thou hast enough to 
sustain fully therewith the position thou dost hold ; for know, 
that wealth without wisdom will be lost, so that it ceaseth 
to exist, and thou mayest remain bereft of all things ; whilst 
he who laboureth in the search for wisdom, and stoopeth to 
search out and find one to enlighten him, may on the morrow 
be in the track of rising higher ; and, having been the tail 
before, may rise to become the head. 



«-0 

18. 

Kings may rule the world, but the wise rule kings. Men of 
understanding find delight in their wisdom, but fools delight 
in their folly. 

19. 

Blindness of heart is blindness indeed ; therefore incline 
thou the ear to hearken ; for what availeth the open eye, if 
the heart itself be closed ? 

20. 

How many men there are in the world who, as they make 
their appearance, strike terror ; but when they once begin 
to speak, they are thought to be no better than dumb ? 

21. 

There are men of stature and height, men of muscle, able 
to brandish the spear and the lance ; but of what avail are 
they without knowledge, being altogether lacking in under- 
standing and wisdom ? 

22. 

If a thing be clearly good, let the man of wisdom take hold 
of it ; if it clearly doth harm, let him move away from it ; 
if it be doubtful whether it be good or ill, let him cast his 
burden upon the Lord. 

23. 

A man who with wisdom humility doth join, will find that 
among all qualities it standeth pre-eminent. So also will he 
be respected and honoured, who at all times joineth forgiveness 
with power. 

24. 

The hard-working student whose constant aim it is to 
strengthen himself in his studies, even to tread in the path of 
wisdom, is not likely to be possessed of two things — a greasy 
face or portly body. 

25- 
My son, if thou wouldst be wise, choose four things, and 
beware lest thou neglect the fifth : be learned ; if this cannot 
be, be a learner, a listener, be law-loving, and be not too much 
given to bitterness. 



26. 

In searching for wisdom at the hands of the wise, be not 
slow to ask questions. Be not ashamed to confess, " I know 
not," if thou grasp not the depths of a matter. If thou dost 
overcome this sense of bashfulness, thou wilt in time be recognis- 
ed and esteemed by those among whom thou dost move. 

27. 

Exult not when men honour thee for thy wealth and 
power ; for when thy honours flee from thee, then also will 
their flattery flee. Let it be most sweet to thee, if thou dost 
honour gain from that pre-eminence which moveth with thee, 
even when thou dost roam abroad. 

28. 

To him who enquireth, Who are the great ones of the 
world, the wise or the rich ? Answer, He who carrieth about 
with him all that he hath, that which may sustain him, whether 
he cross the desert, or travel by sea. 

29. 

Then say, Why dost thou find it is the way of the world 
for the wise to be knocking at the door of the rich ? Because 
the wise of heart, knowing the folly of the rich, make allowance 
for their poverty in sense when compared with their own. 

30. 

Cease from speaking vanity, and using smooth speech ; 
and excite not thyself at the forward and crooked. Yet how 
good is it for man to have his tongue smooth, when he cometh 
to seek understanding and wisdom ! 

3i- 
Men of intelligence and understanding give five as the 
number of points from which knowledge and wisdom start, 
namely, Silence, Attention, Memory, Exercise, and Study ; 
these form, as it were, the tower and wall of the edifice. 

32. 

There are three things which distinguish a man, and 
without the full possession of which no one can be called 
" wise of heart." They are as follows : — Never to despise the 
man below thee in knowledge while he be earnest in acquiring 
learning ; never to be jealous of the man who can command 



a richer home and a wealth of golden treasure ; and never to 
ask payment of one whose heart is fully turned to the search 
after wisdom and knowledge. 

33- 
In enquiring for knowledge, ask questions, even though 
they give evidence of folly ; but in keeping knowledge, guard 
it as thou wouldst guard the diamond, agate, or amethyst. 

34- 
He who is clothed in the garb of bashfulness while seeking 
wisdom, will on the morrow wrap himself in the cloak of folly ; 
therefore rend this garment, and take thy stand at the door 
of the wise, as the pauper at the door (of the rich) . 

35. 
If a believer hath lost some form of knowledge, let him 
seek it at the hand of whomsoever it be ; yea, even at the hand 
of the sceptic it is right that its loss be restored. 

36. 

To seek knowledge and search out wisdom, travel every 
city and spot ; for what may be regarded as of little account 
by some may be considered of value by others. 

37. 
Impart thy knowledge to him that knoweth not, and learn 
that of which thou art ignorant, and which thou dost not know ; 
by doing so, thou wilt keep up afresh the knowledge which 
thou hast, and wilt continue to acquire information and 
learning anew. 

38. 

Knowledge impressed upon the heart of the young is like 
engraving on stone ; but if man take to learning in old age, 
it is like making an impression on sand. 

39- 
Do not that violence to knowledge to place it in the hands 
of men who are the fools of society, lest thou commit a sin 
thereby ; but put it in the hands of those who love its ways, 
and then life and grace thou shalt find. 

40. 

As for the wise of heart, poverty will never debase him, 
nor will lust lead him astray ; his knowledge is like unto a 



10 

See Wisdom enthroned as a king, and Beauty as his 
lieutenant 1 Joseph's beauty it was which bound him in 
the prison-house ; his wisdom it was that brought him into 
the presence of the king. 

54- 
Beware of the simpleton who is religious, and the fool who 
is ceremonial, also of the scholar who is without scruple ; 
their hope will indeed be lost for ever. 

55. 
A wise man was once asked by the men of his time, Who 
is the Lord of the Universe, our Creator ? He replied : It 
is forbidden to investigate such a matter ; we are too weak 
in our natures, and would come to sin in the attempt to 
fathom it. 

56. 

Knowledge is as a tree producing goodly fruit ; if good 
fruit be in it, all is in it ; if this be not in it, what is in it ? 

57. 
The best of possessions is knowledge ; purchase it for thyself 
from those who sell it (i.e. teachers). He who hath this as a 
possession, what doth he lack ? If he lack this, what doth 
he possess ? 

58. 

The subject of study inscribe on thy heart, and repeat it 
twice and thrice until thou dost know. Exceeding much 
study may weaken thy sense, and the intellect becloud. The 
lamp, when trimmed, will burn on anew ; fed with too much 
oil, it will burn itself out. 

59. 
Choose Wisdom as thy portion, so that it may be for a 
standard o'er thy head. 

[" Far a standard " =140, the number of lines in this section.] 



[Explanation. As each letter in Hebrew has a numerical value, the 
letters farming the Hebrew word 'for a standard' amount to 140 ; and so 
mutatis mutandis with the italicised expression at the end of each chapter. 
But they do not stand the test throughout as giving the number of rhyming 
lines. See p. 1., para. 4.] 



11 

CHAPTER n. 
On Humility. 

60. 

Meekness of spirit is the halo of the wise ; impudence is 
the sign of the fool. 

61. 

If thou hear one speak insultingly concerning thee, pay 
no heed to him, nor regard him, lest thou hear more cruel 
things said about thee, and thou wouldst stumble and fall. 

62. 

Do not reply to the insult of a fool, for whatsoever the insult, 
it is less vile than the one who uttereth it. Silence is the best 
reply, for by silence thou canst best forget it. 

63. 

Choose three things for thyself, and through them thou 
shalt find favour with the Creator of all : Humility, wherewith 
to subdue all folly ; Reverence, by which to lessen sin ; and 
Knowledge, teaching how to use moral suasion with men by 
the art of well-chosen language. 

64. 

In mixing with men, it is often useful to be dumb, though 
able to speak ; to be deaf, though able to hear ; and blind, 
though able to see. In this way thou shalt be much courted, 
and become their chief and ruler. 

65- 
He is not of highest quality who only abstaineth from 
harming his fellow-men, but he who taketh upon himself a 
share of the burden of their injuries ; and, whatsoever may 
happen, he goeth forth to meet them with a cheerful 
countenance. 

66. 

The disciple of a Sage, once seeing his Master insulted by 
a fool, was incensed, and in his anger sought permission to 
handle roughly and to inflict bodily harm upon the offender ; 
whereupon the Sage replied, ' Tis not the part of the wise 
to permit loss or bodily ill to be done to one's fellow-man. 



19 

See Wisdom enthroned 66 a king, and Beauty as his 
lieutenant 1 Joseph's beauty it was which bound him in 
the prison-house ; his wisdom it was that brought him into 
the presence of the king. 

54- 
Beware of the simpleton who is religious, and the fool who 
is ceremonial, also of the scholar who is without scruple ; 
their hope will indeed be lost for ever. 

55- 
A wise man was once asked by the men of his time, Who 
is the Lord of the Universe, our Creator ? He replied : It 
is forbidden to investigate such a matter ; we are too weak 
in our natures, and would come to sin in the attempt to 
fathom it. 

56. 

Knowledge is as a tree producing goodly fruit ; if good 
fruit be in it, all is in it ; if this be not in it, what is in it ? 

57- 
The best of possessions is knowledge ; purchase it for thyself 
from those who sell it (i.e. teachers). He who hath this as a 
possession, what doth he lack ? If he lack this, what doth 
he possess ? 

58. 

The subject of study inscribe on thy heart, and repeat it 
twice and thrice until thou dost know. Exceeding much 
study may weaken thy sense, and the intellect becloud. The 
lamp, when trimmed, will burn on anew ; fed with too much 
oil, it will burn itself out. 

59. 
Choose Wisdom as thy portion, so that it may be for a 
standard o'er thy head. 

[" For a standard " =140, the number of lines in this section.] 



[Explanation. As each letter in Hebrew has a numerical value, the 
letters farming the Hebrew word k for a standard ' amount to 140 ; and so 
mutatis mutandis with the italicised expression at the end of each chapter. 
But they do not stand the test throughout as giving the number of rhyming 
lines. See p. 1 M para. 4.] 



11 

CHAPTER II. 
On Humility. 

60. 

Meekness of spirit is the halo of the wise ; impudence is 
the sign of the fool. 

61. 

If thou hear one speak insultingly concerning thee, pay- 
no heed to him, nor regard him, lest thou hear more cruel 
things said about thee, and thou wouldst stumble and fall. 

62. 

Do not reply to the insult of a fool, for whatsoever the insult, 
it is less vile than the one who uttereth it. Silence is the best 
reply, for by silence thou canst best forget it. 

63. 
Choose three things for thyself, and through them thou 
shalt find favour with the Creator of all : Humility, wherewith 
to subdue all folly ; Reverence, by which to lessen sin ; and 
Knowledge, teaching how to use moral suasion with men by 
the art of well-chosen language. 

64. 

In mixing with men, it is often useful to be dumb, though 
able to speak ; to be deaf, though able to hear ; and blind, 
though able to see. In this way thou shalt be much courted, 
and become their chief and ruler. 

65- 

He is not of highest quality who only abstaineth from 
harming his fellow-men, but he who taketh upon himself a 
share of the burden of their injuries ; and, whatsoever may 
happen, he goeth forth to meet them with a cheerful 
countenance. 

66. 

The disciple of a Sage, once seeing his Master insulted by 
a fool, was incensed, and in his anger sought permission to 
handle roughly and to inflict bodily harm upon the offender \ 
whereupon the Sage replied, ' Tis not the part of the wise 
to permit loss or bodily ill to be done to one's fellow-man. 



12 

67. 

The man who hath both much knowledge and humility, 
is called blessed by all who look upon him ; for by the two he 
lesseneth the number of his foes, and his band of supporters 
increaseth. 

68. 

The Wise Man spake : " I will lift up my soul " (i.e., can 
swear) " that no fault will be found in me when my humility 
shall be weighed in the balance." 

69. 

The end of all strife and contention is regret ; but the 
end of humility is strength and possession. 

70. 

If a man cannot control himself, how can he sway another 
man's soul ? 

When in enmity a man scoffeth at words spoken in praise 
of thee, leave friendship undisturbed till the morrow ; forget 
the reproachful word for the day, and perchance thou wilt have 
changed a foe into a friend. 

72. 

Be ready betimes to bend the knee, and to incline thy frame ; 
take heed that thou be not slothful therein. When, with their 
hand, men throw a stone at thee, stoop, then shalt thou cause 
them to miss their aim, and thus thou shalt escape. 

73. 
To endure pain is to halve the pain ; to try to thrust it 
off, is to increase it. 

74. 
Having had thy full say in reproach of another, bear him 
no further grudge ; leave room for reconciliation. 

75. 
Seek no ruling position in thy city, and never look down 
upon thy inferiors. 

76. 

O man, if one would honour thee by flattering words and 
false, strive thou until they may be applied to thee in all 



13 

truthfulness. Trust no man who doth ascribe to thee deeds 
of merit which thou hast not performed. And if thy fellow- 
men praise thee for some pre-eminence which is not in thee, 
turn thou from their company. 

77- 
Be lowly and humble in spirit amid the greatness of thy 
glory ; and have no care for the fortune which * hath never 
come to thy hands. 

78-79. 

When a man discerneth in others some advantage which 
he hath not, then is the time to regulate the sense of humility 
within him. If, for example, he see one richer than he is, 
let him think that the other is a great man, and superior to 
himself in righteousness. If he observe a poor man, let him 
reflect that he is poor and lowly, and that his opportunities 
for sin are, therefore, poorer and less. If he behold an aged 
man, one full of years, let him say, Truly his length of days are 
due to his devotion unto Heaven. When he looketh at a 
youth, let him realise that his transgressions have been few, 
and that his guilt is slight. If he see one who is better informed, 
let him consider that he is pure and innocent in bis intelligence. 
And if he regard the simple-minded, let him think, peradven- 
ture he will be judged for his sins in the balance which will 
weigh them but as errors of judgment. 

To the way of humility I incline, and thus my heart will 
understanding gain. 

[" My heart "=42, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER III. 
On Abstinence. 

80. 

To be too fond of this world and of that which is therein, 
provoketh the wrath of Heaven. If thou sacrifice this fond- 
ness, thou shalt be sure of the glory and grace of thy God. 

81. 

All man's striving in this world is but for honour, riches, 
and ease ; and yet he who loveth this life too much is often 



u 

far removed from them, and more closely bound to sorrow 
and sighing. 

82. 

Fret not for the store laid up, for the riches heaped of 
yore, fearing lest men rob thee of them, when they steal thy 
substance and wealth. 

Leave that which thou requirest not, seize but that which 
thou dost need ; then shall the glory of God be thy rereward, 
and good fortune shall be thy meed. 

83- 

In the day of happiness, think of sorrow, and in the day 
of evil, hope in God, that He may deliver thee from the 
oppression of anguish and sickness. 

84. 

See the advantage of poverty over riches ! Be wise, and 
feel thyself abashed and ashamed ; for no man rebels against 
God's Word in attempting to get poor, but he doth so in the 
endeavour to grow rich. 

85 
Say unto the man who hath much provision : " Have 
sufficient years been granted thee wherein to spend thy hoard ? " 

86. 

Enquire of the man who hath gotten himself wealth, if he 
hath also assured himself of the years of his life. 

87. 

There are four causes of sorrow which affect men in this 
world : When poverty cannot extricate itself, so as to become 
strong by reason of wealth ; when occupation leaveth no time 
for leisure, and is ever engaging a man ; when there is no 
end to a man's longing for a thing which he can never obtain ; 
and when there is unceasing care, which goeth on to the very 
end and finish. 

88. 

A man of understanding who esteemeth himself will think 
little of this world's splendour. 

89. 

Man in this world may be likened to the fruit of a tree ; 



IS 

whilst ripening, it is gathered by those who find it ; when 
matured, it is longed for, and enjoyed by thsoe who see it ; 
while if it be not gathered, it falleth, and the beasts trample 
it underfoot. 

90. 

In the days of youth fear the day of death, and depart 
from sin ; for upon old camels the skins of young sheep are 
borne. When the lambs and the rams are in grazing, many 
of the young ones perish, and so on the shoulders of the old are 
the caskets of many young lives carried to the grave. 

91. 

When a mortal passeth from this world, men of worth will 
ask, What life did he lead ? But they who only think of earth 
enquire, How much did he bequeath to his children ? 

92. 

Is not man in this world, by accident and birth, as a creature 
e'er surrounded by serpents at every turn ? Where'er he 
goeth, whene'er he cometh, they endanger his every path ; 
in constant fear, he dreadeth lest now, by this one or by that, 
he be suddenly attacked. 

93. 
He who mortifieth himself, ever thinking with delight of 
his latter end, will preserve his life unto eternity ; while if he 
keepeth it alive for the pleasure of this world alone, let him 
know and understand that in this way he killeth the life that 
is within him. 

94- 
Have a care and weep for man's mortality, and rejoice not 
at life's pleasantries ! 

95. 
Proclaim unto people day after day the message ; there 
they sit in silence, they answer not, nor give ear. . . . But 
when the Day of Judgment cometh, they will perforce rise up 
and stand in the presence of their Maker, called upon to give 
account of their wrong-doings. 

96. 

The man whose sole delight is in this world, may be likened 
to a dog sucking bones ; thinking that it is sucking blood from 
the bone, it sucketh the blood of its own lips. 



21 

135- 
As for the man who ruleth not over his desire, his end will be 
all evil and bitter ; and, as though stung in the heel by the 
adder, will be what the day bringeth him forth, his pain 
growing greater and keener. 

136. 

Shouldst thou seek counsel, and not find the adviser in 
whom thou canst confide, then turn from that which thy desire 
doth prompt, lest for thyself thou spread destruction's net. 
Lo, thy desire for thy good sense doth lie in wait, when sense 
doth stop its ear and close its eye ! 

137. 
Were it not for three considerations, things would go all 
well with man, and his right-doing would be assured, namely 
(the powerlessness of) old age (to impress its experiences) ; 
the stubbornness with which pride is decked ; and the desire 
of man which cometh upon him, and is not vanquished. 

138. 

He who taketh the counsel of his heart's desire will in a 
brief moment destroy the joy of his heart ; but he who 
rebelleth against the promptings of desire will receive due 
honour, and, rising above, will prove himself the victor, and 
be helped. 

139- 
Strive not with a miser, who delighteth in keeping and 
holding back from thee his wealth ; strive rather with thine 
own desire, fight against it, and scatter thy fierce passion. 

140. 

'Tis ever so ; while counsel sleepeth, passion waketh, watch- 
ing at all times and hours. If wise counsel be overcome, 
rising passion showeth its brazen front. 

141. 

If in goodness the child his life begin, he will continue so 
until old age ; he who in his youth doth sin, will remain a 
sinner unto death. 

142. 

How long, O man, will thy heart yet slumber ? When 
wilt thou wake from thy sleep ? The world's battles leaving, 
strengthen thyself, and fight with thy desire the goodly fight. 



81 

that relief thou hast found ; for if, by asking, thou hast lightly 
thy honour esteemed, thy loss will be greater than thy gain. 

212. 

Of all the bitter things thou hast tasted, is there one more 
bitter than to beg a favour from thy friends and companions ? 

213. 
Rather endure want than beg a favour from one unaccus- 
tomed to give ; for the worst part of asking is felt at the time 
when thou takest the gift with a blush. 

214. 

Better by far to encounter a bear than to encounter a fool ; 
but in meeting the man with a liberal heart, tranquillity of soul 
shall be thine. For while he doth give to another his dole, the 
liberal man himself doth feel the shame of the other, his lan- 
guage and tone are delicious ; the kindnesses done thee he ne'er 
will recall, to oblivion they all are consigned. 

215. 
He who asketh for more than he doth require or more than 
is his wont, will find his just reward in this; — he'll be denied 
and suffer want. 

216. 

The man who putteth off the date of his giving, on whose 
word thou canst never rely, may be likened to a figure painted 
and copied, — the mere image and form of the real. 

217. 

If thou goest to a miser to ask a favour, he will surely 
refuse thee, and be also thy foe ; if he meet thee abroad, or 
meet thee at home, not a word will he give thee, not even a 
glance. 

218, 

To be the guest of a miser is to suffer want that cannot be 
described ; his horse will go fasting, left without fodder ; and 
so will the guest, not receiving that which he doth require. 

219. 

How ill a thing is poverty ! Niggardliness is worse. 
The man who turneth to the miser bringeth upon himself 
contempt and shame. 



32 

220. 



'Tis better for a man to be carried to the grave than to beg 
a gift from the miser ; for he'll be like the fisherman who 
goeth forth, thinking to catch fish in a desert of sand. 



221. 



A kind-hearted man once said to his friends, let this secret 
arrangement be binding upon us ; Never beg a favour of me 
but through a trusty friend, or by letter ; for if thou dost ask 
it with thy lips, two-fold will be the loss ; your dignity will 
suffer, and all my merit will be gone. 

222. 

Shouldst thou need a gift, ask rather of one who once 
was rich and hath become poor, than ask of one who was once 
poor and hath now become rich, and is a man of means. 

223. 

Only then from the miser shouldst thou take a gift, when 
from the generous thou gettest no help. Surely the lion will 
not turn from feeding on curs, if he find no sheep his hunger 
to still. 

224. 

Thy townsmen all will shrink from thee, if thy hearth be 
enclosed and narrow ; but if no bars keep thee back, and so 
prevent thy going forth, then on thy way thou shalt not find 
the thorns (to vex thy path). 

225. 

And like to myrrh are waters pure which run along the 
ground; the freshness, aye, the scent thereof, is wafted in 
man's face ; but standing water stagnant turns, its odour 
doth affect the nostril most unpleasantly. 

226. 

'Tis in the hour when thy worldly goods are few, that thou 
must beware that thou be not poor in spirit and soul. 
[" Poor "=34, the number of lines in this section.] 



33 

CHAPTER XI. 
On Silence, and Speaking Opportunely. 

227. 

Silence is never the loser ; in speaking there's always regret ; 
'tis far better to be silent and still, than to babble and be nearer 
to sin. 

228. 

Thy words and acts are in thy power before the word is 
spoken ; once said, the word hath power over thee, all control 
from thee hath passed. 

229. 

Why speak of something which, when known, will do thee 
harm, and bring about thy fall ? If not spoken and made 
known, thou still hast hope that it may accrue to thy profit. 

230. 

The penalty of silence is less than that of speech. Who 
can tell how bitter and sore may be the pain of speech ? 

231. 

Bind the tongue fast, and let it not loose, lest thou bring 
on thy head much guilt ; if silence doth bring one remorse 
and regret, how endless the train that speaking will bear! 

232. 

Thy tongue bind fast, as thou wouldst a treasure bind ; 
for if thou heed not, it will fare ill with thy soul. 

233. 
If thou wouldst choose the right and proper counsel, then 
choose the muzzle for thy mouth, and silence for thy lips. 

234. 
Within the mouth of man his stumbling block doth lie ; 
as a thief it lieth in wait under his very tongue ; at its bidding 
man falleth low, bearing punishment at every turn ; and thus, 
indeed, he doth increase his sorrow manifold. 

235. 
O creature, see how He who in the heaven dwelleth created 
thee ! Two ears and eyes thou hast, two cheeks and feet ; 



94 

two knees and hands thou hast, two loins and thighs, yet a 
single tongue in an enclosure hid, but two tongues never. 
Two walls, moreover, He hath designed, they are the lips 
and teeth. Doubly cautious be then with thy words, closely 
thy tongue to heed, and an asset it will be to thee to safeguard 
thee for life. 

236. 

In man's mouth lieth length of days ; life and death are 
between his cheeks. 

237. 

How goodly if man's sense doth rule the words that from 
his lips do flow ! But when his words his sense do rule, they 
become his chiefest foe, his bitterest enemy. 

238. 

If thou cease from speaking, respect for thee will grow ; 
and likewise thy reverence will fail by the multitude of words. 

239- 
'Tis good if speech can remove some harm, or be of use to 
thee ; where iths is not, 'twere better far to hold thy peace ; 
speech hath no hope for thee. 

240. 

If idle words one's sense outrun, their mastery over man 
is gained ; but if in man his sense prevail, his words do all to 
him belong. 

241. 

Let thy words be few, and thy faults will be few ; increase 
thy words, and thy woes will increase. 

242. 

If in the night thou wouldst wish within thine own dwelling 
to speak, take heed and lower thy voice, and softly utter thy 
words ; or even in daytime listen well, and hear ; nay, whilst 
thou art thinking, look round and see, if the matter which 
thou hast in mind may safely be spoken aloud. 

243. 
A slip of the tongue may cost a man his head ; he may by 



.35 

his own words be destroyed ; whilst a slip of the foot, though 
sudden the hurt, may quickly be cured and restored. 

244. 

O ye who would be wise, the root of things consider ; set 
thy heart to understand them, and thou shalt find that under 
four heads they may all be classed ; learn thou their secret 
and investigate them. Some things, at first, of service are, yet 
caution bid as they proceed ; some things do neither harm nor 
good, these shun and best avoid ; there are things, too, 
where danger lurks both at the start and finish ; and there 
are things which are all good both at the end and the beginning. 
Then leave the three that go before, and the fourth head seize, 
hold fast ! 

245- 

At all times keep this rule in mind : there's something 
still better than silence, 'tis this — to speak the truth. 

246. 

The word of the wise will turn away anger and wrath, and 
many a word will restrain the revengeful spirit. 

247. 

The wise-hearted one, in speaking, will often relieve, by 
refraining from speaking, he will doubly redeem. His words 
to the lowly bringeth relief ; they are addressed to the haughty, 
when they spread out their nets. 

248. 

If a man be not an expert in his work, let him not speak 
with too great confidence on that matter. 

249. 

Nothing is of greater honour to a man than the word fitly 
and rightly spoken ; it setteth a golden crown upon his head, 
and placeth the chain of gold around his neck. 

250. 

To speak what is folly, yet know how to get clear by thy 
speech, is better by far than not to speak at all. Much better 
to appear as a sluggard, when called on to do something 
deceitful and false, than to hasten and join in the attempt, and 
suffer thyself to be broken. 



94 

two knees and hands thou hast, two loins and thighs, yet a 
single tongue in an enclosure hid, but two tongues never. 
Two walls, moreover, He hath designed, they are the lips 
and teeth. Doubly cautious be then with thy words, closely 
thy tongue to heed, and an asset it will be to thee to safeguard 
thee for life. 

236. 

In man's mouth lieth length of days ; life and death are 
between his cheeks. 

237. 

How goodly if man's sense doth rule the words that from 
his lips do flow ! But when his words his sense do rule, they 
become his chiefest foe, his bitterest enemy. 

238. 

If thou cease from speaking, respect for thee will grow ; 
and likewise thy reverence will fail by the multitude of words. 

239- 
'Tis good if speech can remove some harm, or be of use to 
thee ; where iths is not, 'twere better far to hold thy peace ; 
speech hath no hope for thee. 

240. 

If idle words one's sense outrun, their mastery over man 
is gained ; but if in man his sense prevail, his words do all to 
him belong. 

241. 

Let thy words be few, and thy faults will be few ; increase 
thy words, and thy woes will increase. 

242. 

If in the night thou wouldst wish within thine own dwelling 
to speak, take heed and lower thy voice, and softly utter thy 
words ; or even in daytime listen well, and hear ; nay, whilst 
thou art thinking, look round and see, if the matter which 
thou hast in mind may safely be spoken aloud. 

243. 
A slip of the tongue may cost a man his head ; he may by 



3r> 

his own words be destroyed ; whilst a slip of the foot, though 
sudden the hurt, may quickly be cured and restored. 

244. 

O ye who would be wise, the root of things consider ; set 
thy heart to understand them, and thou shalt find that under 
four heads they may all be classed ; learn thou their secret 
and investigate them. Some things, at first, of service are, yet 
caution bid as they proceed ; some things do neither harm nor 
good, these shun and best avoid ; there are things, too, 
where danger lurks both at the start and finish ; and there 
are things which are all good both at the end and the beginning. 
Then leave the three that go before, and the fourth head seize, 
hold fast ! 

245- 

At all times keep this rule in mind : there's something 
still better than silence, 'tis this — to speak the truth. 

246, 

The word of the wise will turn away anger and wrath, and 
many a word will restrain the revengeful spirit. 

247. 

The wise-hearted one, in speaking, will often relieve, by 
refraining from speaking, he will doubly redeem. His words 
to the lowly bringeth relief ; they are addressed to the haughty, 
when they spread out their nets. 

248. 

If a man be not an expert in his work, let him not speak 
with too great confidence on that matter. 

249. 

Nothing is of greater honour to a man than the word fitly 
and rightly spoken ; it setteth a golden crown upon his head, 
and placeth the chain of gold around his neck. 

250. 

To speak what is folly, yet know how to get clear by thy 
speech, is better by far than not to speak at all. Much better 
to appear as a sluggard, when called on to do something 
deceitful and false, than to hasten and join in the attempt, and 
suffer thvself to be broken. 



Before all things guard thy mouth, and then as the hart 
from the hand of the huntsman thou shalt be delivered. 
[" From the hand "=54, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAI>TER XII. 

« 

On Truth. 

252. 

The wise find relief in truth and equity, fools in laying 
hold of lying and conspiracy. 

253. 
When one young in years once rose up, and an old man 
opposing, endeavoured to speak, they addressed him and said : 
" Shame on you ! Hold your tongue ! How dare you stand 
up to oppose such a man, whose years are such as to claim our 
submission ? " Whereupon he replied : " Knowest thou 
not that Truth is much greater and older than he ? " 

254. 
Answer the wise in a fair, honest way when they discuss a 
matter with knowledge and wisdom ; give ear to such, and 
they will become thy benefactors, for truth is a thing to be 
loved, desired, and received with favour ; and even though 
our friend be a Plato, great and exalted, and renowned for his 
learning, the right of our judgment we claim in the matter of 
truth, for Truth is to us a friend dearer by far than aught. 

255. 
Speak the truth without favour, and respect not old age ; 
Truth is older, strong in years as the world. 

256. 

Knowledge is slighted, unsupported by wealth ; whilst 
wealth without knowledge hideth many a stain. The rich 
man, though he lieth, is justified by wealth ; the poor, though 
speaking the truth, seek justice in vain. 

257- 
To me it seems strange that men should expend such 



*7 

marvellous wealth and fabulous sums on the purchase of 
knaves to serve them as slaves, since they might easily gain, 
without price or pain, the hearts of the free by mere courtesy,, 
by one pleasant act, and speech full of tact. 

258 

The wealth that's gained from vain pursuits decreaseth ; 
whilst he who setteth his hand to save, gradually increaseth. 
To speak the truth be thy resolution bold. 

[" Hand "=14, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XIII. 
On Companionship and Association. 

259- 
Above all, thy true and faithful companion thou shouldst 
know, his faults to pardon and to forgive his sins ; the man 
who is ever ready to seek offence, keep at arm's length, let 
him meet his own kind. 

260. 

Experience will teach thee that good more or less lurketh 
in everything, save in the attachment of fools ; be it, there- 
fore, thy rule to avoid them altogether. 

261. 

Adopt the advice honestly given to thee which agreeth 
with thine own common sense ; but reject the counsel that 
is approved by thine own base desire. 

262. 

Choose an associate who will always be thine, and ready 
to serve thee as thine own hand, bending before thee in all 
things, as though a true slave all in thy power. 

263, 

Take heed to pay to thy companions true regard, so that 
they be bound as friends, closely attached to thee ; bestow 
on them all thought and heart, when they make their call, 
provide for them a proper place, a cosy seat, and comfort 
during their stay ; and while they speak, open thou thy 
ears to catch their every word. 



25i. 
Before all things guard thy mouth, and then as the hart 
from the hand of the huntsman thou shalt be delivered. 
[" From the hand "=54, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAFER XII. 
On Truth. 

252. 

The wise find relief in truth and equity, fools in laying 
hold of lying and conspiracy. 

253. 
When one young in years once rose up, and an old man 
opposing, endeavoured to speak, they addressed him and said : 
" Shame on you ! Hold your tongue ! How dare you stand 
up to oppose such a man, whose years are such as to claim our 
submission ? " Whereupon he replied : " Knowest thou 
not that Truth is much greater and older than he ? " 

254. 
Answer the wise in a fair, honest way when they discuss a 
matter with knowledge and wisdom ; give ear to such, and 
they will become thy benefactors, for truth is a thing to be 
loved, desired, and received with favour ; and even though 
our friend be a Plato, great and exalted, and renowned for his 
learning, the right of our judgment we claim in the matter of 
truth, for Truth is to us a friend dearer by far than aught. 

255. 
Speak the truth without favour, and respect not old age ; 
Truth is older, strong in years as the world. 

256. 

Knowledge is slighted, unsupported by wealth ; whilst 
wealth without knowledge hideth many a stain. The rich 
man, though he lieth, is justified by wealth ; the poor, though 
speaking the truth, seek justice in vain. 

257. 
To me it seems strange that men should expend such 



37 

marvellous wealth and fabulous sums on the purchase of 
knaves to serve them as slaves, since they might easily gain, 
without price or pain, the hearts of the free by mere courtesy, 
by one pleasant act, and speech full of tact. 

258 

The wealth that's gained from vain pursuits decreaseth ; 
whilst he who setteth his hand to save, gradually increaseth. 
To speak the truth be thy resolution bold. 

[" Hand "=14, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XIII. 
On Companionship and Association. 

259. 
Above all, thy true and faithful companion thou shouldst 
know, his faults to pardon and to forgive his sins ; the man 
who is ever ready to seek offence, keep at arm's length, let 
him meet his own kind. 

260. 

Experience will teach thee that good more or less lurketh 
in everything, save in the attachment of fools ; be it, there- 
fore, thy rule to avoid them altogether. 

261. 

Adopt the advice honestly given to thee which agreeth 
with thine own common sense ; but reject the counsel that 
is approved by thine own base desire. 

262. 

Choose an associate who will always be thine, and ready 
to serve thee as thine own hand, bending before thee in all 
things, as though a true slave all in thy power. 

263, 

Take heed to pay to thy companions true regard, so that 
they be bound as friends, closely attached to thee ; bestow 
on them all thought and heart, when they make their call, 
provide for them a proper place, a cosy seat, and comfort 
during their stay ; and while they speak, open thou thy 
ears to catch their every word. 



Before all things guard thy mouth, and then as the hart 
from the hand of the huntsman thou shalt be delivered. 
[" From the hand "=54, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHMPTER XII. 
On Truth. 

252. 

The wise find relief in truth and equity, fools in laying 
hold of lying and conspiracy. 

253. 
When one young in years once rose up, and an old man 
opposing, endeavoured to speak, they addressed him and said : 
" Shame on you ! Hold your tongue ! How dare you stand 
up to oppose such a man, whose years are such as to claim our 
submission ? " Whereupon he replied : " Knowest thou 
not that Truth is much greater and older than he ? " 

254. 
Answer the wise in a fair, honest way when they discuss a 
matter with knowledge and wisdom ; give ear to such, and 
they will become thy benefactors, for truth is a thing to be 
loved, desired, and received with favour ; and even though 
our friend be a Plato, great and exalted, and renowned for his 
learning, the right of our judgment we claim in the matter of 
truth, for Truth is to us a friend dearer by far than aught. 

255. 
Speak the truth without favour, and respect not old age ; 
Truth is older, strong in years as the world. 

256. 

Knowledge is slighted, unsupported by wealth ; whilst 
wealth without knowledge hideth many a stain. The rich 
man, though he lieth, is justified by wealth ; the poor, though 
speaking the truth, seek justice in vain. 

257. 
To me it seems strange that men should expend such 



87 

marvellous wealth and fabulous sums on the purchase of 
knaves to serve them as slaves, since they might easily gain, 
without price or pain, the hearts of the free by mere courtesy, 
by one pleasant act, and speech full of tact. 

258 

The wealth that's gained from vain pursuits decreaseth ; 
whilst he who setteth his hand to save, gradually increaseth. 
To speak the truth be thy resolution bold. 

[" Hand "=14, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XIII. 
On Companionship and Association. 

259- 
Above all, thy true and faithful companion thou shouldst 
know, his faults to pardon and to forgive his sins ; the man 
who is ever ready to seek offence, keep at arm's length, let 
him meet his own kind. 

260. 

Experience will teach thee that good more or less lurketh 
in everything, save in the attachment of fools ; be it, there- 
fore, thy rule to avoid them altogether. 

261. 

Adopt the advice honestly given to thee which agreeth 
with thine own common sense ; but reject the counsel that 
is approved by thine own base desire. 

262. 

Choose an associate who will always be thine, and ready 
to serve thee as thine own hand, bending before thee in all 
things, as though a true slave all in thy power. 

263, 

Take heed to pay to thy companions true regard, so that 
they be bound as friends, closely attached to thee ; bestow 
on them all thought and heart, when they make their call, 
provide for them a proper place, a cosy seat, and comfort 
during their stay ; and while they speak, open thou thy 
ears to catch their every word. 



a* 

264. 

Two couples are closely attached, like threads in the 
weaver's loom ; they are Silence, the sister of Goodwill, and 
the Darer, who to the Doer is kin (lit., " and the Tempter, 
who is brother to the Murderer "). 

265. 

Change not a friend that is old and dear for a new, while 
the old one is heart and heart with thee still. Contemn not 
a man because he doth err. " Let not one man be despised of 
thee ; in like manner, a thousand friends will never suffice ; 
let thy substance and silver win them for thee. 

266. 

The substance and the wealth of man, though wingless, 
fly away ; but correction is a treasure true ; there is no 
fortress like a friend. 

267. 

Choose a comrade in whom thy heart believeth ; for a 
man who hath not such a friend, is as the left hand without 
the right. 

268. 

Choose among men the comrade in whom thy heart can 
safely trust ; throw off the brother who, with deceitful heart, 
doth build the traitor's home, though he wash it white and 
clean. 

269. 

If only by the flesh we go, among kinsmen near we claim 
a brother ; but if we think of soul and spirit, we call our friend 
our kith and kin. 

When with men thou wouldst mix, choose him who will 
not lead thee astray, so as to cause thee to stumble and fall, 
And all through life with this one aim, a man will suffer to 
serve his friend ; and when he finds him sorely tried, he'll 
labour hard to set him free. 

270. 

Be thou ready and first thy companion to greet, and to 
give him warm welcome and an honourable place ; and when 
thou dost call him, and wish to address him, be sure that thou 
call him by his dear pet name. 



8* 

271. 

There is no greater boor on earth than he who, looking 
out for all men's errors, attacheth blame to them, while he 
doeth just the very same ; and while he his own defects doth 
hide, and will not see his faults, he looketh round and findeth 
fault with all that others do. 

272. 

Companions may, in truth, be classed in threefold groups : 
attend to these, and thou soon wilt learn the mystery. Some 
comrades act as food to men, thy endless joys depend on them ; 
the boast and worth of others seem like drugs, for certain times 
prescribed ; there are those, too, who, like recurring sickness 
lurk, and bring naught but endless harm to health. 

273. 
To join with fine natures is a source of great pride ; to 
join with the senseless bringeth pain and remorse. 

274. 

Choose him for thy friend who will always be thy pride, 
who, when aught thou dost want, will be ready to help thee ; 
or, when thou dost utter what is in thy mind, in him thou 
shalt find a champion bold ; or, should it e'en fare thy temper 
thou lose, he'll bear with thy words at all times and all seasons. 

275. 
He may be called a fast friend and true who, with all his 
strength and might, will raise thee on high. 

276. 

The friendship of a stupid man is bound to end in sorrow ; 
a wise man will find relief and refreshing if he hold aloof 
from him 

277. 

The best of beasts require the whip ; the best of wives 
their lord and sire ; the wisest man advice doth need, without 
it will his wisdom lack. 

278. 

Between thy two selves thy friend to task do call ; and if 
thy reasoning he will not heed, then tax him further in the 
presence of a third. If he take the caution, regard him as a 



264. 

Two couples are closely attached, like threads in the 
weaver's loom ; they are Silence, the sister of Goodwill, and 
the Darer, who to the Doer is kin (lit., " and the Tempter, 
who is brother to the Murderer "). 

265. 

Change not a friend that is old and dear for a new, while 
the old one is heart and heart with thee still. Contemn not 
a man because he doth err. Let not one man be despised of 
thee ; in like manner, a thousand friends will never suffice ; 
let thy substance and silver win them for thee. 

266. 

The substance and the wealth of man, though wingless, 
fly away ; but correction is a treasure true ; there is no 
fortress like a friend. 

267. 

Choose a comrade in whom thy heart believeth ; for a 
man who hath not such a friend, is as the left hand without 
the right. 

268. 

Choose among men the comrade in whom thy heart can 
safely trust ; throw off the brother who, with deceitful heart, 
doth build the traitor's home, though he wash it white and 
clean. 

269. 

If only by the flesh we go, among kinsmen near we claim 
a brother ; but if we think of soul and spirit, we call our friend 
our kith and kin. 

When with men thou wouldst mix, choose him who will 
not lead thee astray, so as to cause thee to stumble and fall, 
And all through life with this one aim, a man will suffer to 
serve his friend ; and when he finds him sorely tried, he'll 
labour hard to set him free. 

270. 

Be thou ready and first thy companion to greet, and to 
give him warm welcome and an honourable place ; and when 
thou dost call him, and wish to address him, be sure that thou 
call him by his dear pet name. 



39 

271. 

There is no greater boor on earth than he who, looking 
ont for all men's errors, attacheth blame to them, while he 
doeth just the very same ; and while he his own defects doth 
hide, and will not see his faults, he looketh round and findeth 
fault with all that others do. 

272. 

Companions may, in truth, be classed in threefold groups : 
attend to these, and thou soon wilt learn the mystery. Some 
comrades act as food to men, thy endless joys depend on them ; 
the boast and worth of others seem like drugs, for certain times 
prescribed ; there are those, too, who, like recurring sickness 
lurk, and bring naught but endless harm to health. 

273. 
To join with fine natures is a source of great pride ; to 
join with the senseless bringeth pain and remorse. 

274. 

Choose him for thy friend who will always be thy pride, 
who, when aught thou dost want, will be ready to help thee ; 
or, when thou dost utter what is in thy mind, in him thou 
shalt find a champion bold ; or, should it e'en fare thy temper 
thou lose, he'll bear with thy words at all times and all seasons. 

275. 
He may be called a fast friend and true who, with all his 
strength and might, will raise thee on high. 

276. 

The friendship of a stupid man is bound to end in sorrow ; 
a wise man will find relief and refreshing if he hold aloof 
from him 

277. 

The best of beasts require the whip ; the best of wives 
their lord and sire ; the wisest man advice doth need, without 
it will his wisdom lack. 

278. 

Between thy two selves thy friend to task do call ; and if 
thy reasoning he will not heed, then tax him further in the 
presence of a third. If he take the caution, regard him as a 



264. 

Two couples are closely attached, like threads in the 
weaver's loom ; they are Silence, the sister of Goodwill, and 
the Darer, who to the Doer is kin (lit., " and the Tempter, 
who is brother to the Murderer "). 

265. 

Change not a friend that is old and dear for a new, while 
the old one is heart and heart with thee still. Contemn not 
a man because he doth err. ' Let not one man be despised of 
thee ; in like manner, a thousand friends will never suffice ; 
let thy substance and silver win them for thee. 

266. 

The substance and the wealth of man, though wingless, 
fly away ; but correction is a treasure true ; there is no 
fortress like a friend. 

267. 

Choose a comrade in whom thy heart believeth ; for a 
man who hath not such a friend, is as the left hand without 
the right. 

268. 

Choose among men the comrade in whom thy heart can 
safely trust ; throw off the brother who, with deceitful heart, 
doth build the traitor's home, though he wash it white and 
clean. 

269. 

If only by the flesh we go, among kinsmen near we claim 
a brother ; but if we think of soul and spirit, we call our friend 
our kith and kin. 

When with men thou wouldst mix, choose him who will 
not lead thee astray, so as to cause thee to stumble and fall, 
And all through life with this one aim, a man will suffer to 
serve his friend ; and when he finds him sorely tried, he'll 
labour hard to set him free. 

270. 

Be thou ready and first thy companion to greet, and to 
give him warm welcome and an honourable place ; and when 
thou dost call him, and wish to address him, be sure that thou 
call him by his dear pet name. 



3? 

271. 

There is no greater boor on earth than he who, looking 
out for all men's errors, attacheth blame to them, while he 
doeth just the very same ; and while he his own defects doth 
hide, and will not see his faults, he looketh round and findeth 
fault with all that others do. 

272. 

Companions may, in truth, be classed in threefold groups : 
attend to these, and thou soon wilt learn the mystery. Some 
comrades act as food to men, thy endless joys depend on them ; 
the boast and worth of others seem like drugs, for certain times 
prescribed ; there are those, too, who, like recurring sickness 
lurk, and bring naught but endless harm to health. 

273. 
To join with fine natures is a source of great pride ; to 
join with the senseless bringeth pain and remorse. 

274. 

Choose him for thy friend who will always be thy pride, 
who, when aught thou dost want, will be ready to help thee ; 
or, when thou dost utter what is in thy mind, in him thou 
shalt find a champion bold ; or, should it e'en fare thy temper 
thou lose, he'll bear with thy words at all times and all seasons. 

275. 
He may be called a fast friend and true who, with all his 
strength and might, will raise thee on high. 

276. 

The friendship of a stupid man is bound to end in sorrow ; 
a wise man will find relief and refreshing if he hold aloof 
from him 

277. 

The best of beasts require the whip ; the best of wives 
their lord and sire ; the wisest man advice doth need, without 
it will his wisdom lack. 

278. 

Between thy two selves thy friend to task do call ; and if 
thy reasoning he will not heed, then tax him further in the 
presence of a third. If he take the caution, regard him as a 



4a 

gain ; but if he yield not, think him wanting in sense ; he 
will scarcely be missed when his number is called. 

279. 

Reprove not, and waste not your words on a man ; for if his 
own sense upbraid not, how can another reprove ? 

280. 

How good it is to mix with men who know their worth and 
station ! Turn far from him who's not of these ; in his friend- 
ship there is no blessing. 

281. 

The friendship that is perfect is always free from feud and 
strife ; the truest sign of friendship is two hearts made one for 
ever. 

282. 

Always join and never part from the man of fine spirit 
and unruffled mind ; in his attachment and friendship thou 
thyself shalt be courted, and in the face of all men thou shalt 
be acknowledged. * 

283. 

Esteem the friend who chideth thee at any time, but not 
in the presence of another ; and let him think he hath gained 
thereby some part at least of thy power and possession. 

284. 

Plant the love of thy friend in thy very life's soil, as thou 
wouldst labour to fasten the pegs to thy tent ; and if thou wilt 
plant it with liberal root, it will be borne on the tongue, as 
fruit on the branches are borne. 

285. 

The eye of a needle is not too narrow to hold two friends 
that agree ; the breadth of the world is not sufficiently wide 
to contain in its fold two foes. 

286. 

Dost thou wish to prove thy friend, to know if he be false 
or true, ask thine own heart to act as diviner, and the truth 
it will surely divine. 

287. 

Trust not the man who boreth thee with his troubles, but 



41 

leeepeth from thee his joys ; his tongue may be all smooth for 
thee ; his friendship's but alloy. 

288. 

Love thou the man who first hath done thee good, and 
return him help and kindness ; so love the man thou hast 
gained as friend, for in his heart thy friendly acts all friendliness 
do blend. 

289. 

Love thy friend more than thou wouldst thy brother ; for 
until he becometh my truest friend, how can I love even ,a 
brother ? 

290. 

Hid deep in the heart true friendship is found, its impression 
is sealed on the tongue ; men's hearts are as mirrors that see 
eye to eye, their secrets are never revealed. 

291. 

Play not the hypocrite with thy friend, nor by questioning 
people pry into his secrets, lest thou meet with a man who will 
blacken his name, and so estrange from thee his friendship. 

292. 

Deal freely with thy friend with all thy wealth and very 
life ; do likewise unto thy kinsmen with thy substance, mind, 
and speech ; be courteous unto all men, and greet them on thy 
way ; and as for thine enemy, be thou liberal and kind unto 
him, when he is sorely in need of thy charity and service. 

293. 
Beware of the man who loveth thee when it suiteth the 
occasion, and serveth his purpose ; for he will quickly turn his 
back when thou findest out his true aim and way. 

294. 

Impart, as in winnowing, thy love to a friend, and never 
reveal the secret of another ; when thine enemy cometh to 
make peace with thee, implore thou God on his behalf. 

295. 
Put not thine hand to a thing if thou wilt not complete it, 
so that the reward be not lost. If thou once say " Yes," with 
regard to a matter, never change it to " No." 



40. 

gain ; but if he yield not, think him wanting in sense ; he 
will scarcely be missed when his number is called. 

279. 

Reprove not, and waste not your words on a man ; for if his 
own sense upbraid not, how can another reprove ? 

280. 

How good it is to mix with men who know their worth and 
station ! Turn far from him who's not of these ; in his friend- 
ship there is no blessing. 

281. 

The friendship that is perfect is always free from feud and 
strife ; the truest sign of friendship is two hearts made one for 
ever. 

282. 

Always join and never part from the man of fine spirit 
and unruffled mind ; in his attachment and friendship thou 
thyself shalt be courted, and in the face of all men thou shalt 
be acknowledged. % 

283. 

Esteem the friend who chideth thee at any time, but not 
in the presence of another ; and let him think he hath gained 
thereby some part at least of thy power and possession. 

284. 

Plant the love of thy friend in thy very life's soil, as thou 
wouldst labour to fasten the pegs to thy tent ; and if thou wilt 
plant it with liberal root, it will be borne on the tongue, as 
fruit on the branches are borne. 

285. 

The eye of a needle is not too narrow to hold two friends 
that agree ; the breadth of the world is not sufficiently wide 
to contain in its fold two foes. 

286. 

Dost thou wish to prove thy friend, to know if he be false 
or true, ask thine own heart to act as diviner, and the truth 
it will surely divine. 

287. 

Trust not the man who boreth thee with his troubles, but 



41 

fceepeth from thee his joys ; his tongue may be all smooth for 
thee ; his friendship's but alloy. 

288. 

Love thou the man who first hath done thee good, and 
return him help and kindness ; so love the man thou hast 
gained as friend, for in his heart thy friendly acts all friendliness 
do blend. 

289. 

Love thy friend more than thou wouldst thy brother ; for 
until he becometh my truest friend, how can I love even ,a 
brother ? 

290. 

Hid deep in the heart true friendship is found, its impression 
is sealed on the tongue ; men's hearts are as mirrors that see 
eye to eye, their secrets are never revealed. 

291. 

Play not the hypocrite with thy friend, nor by questioning 
people pry into his secrets, lest thou meet with a man who will 
blacken his name, and so estrange from thee his friendship. 

292. 

Deal freely with thy friend with all thy wealth and very 
life ; do likewise unto thy kinsmen with thy substance, mind, 
and speech ; be courteous unto all men, and greet them on thy 
way ; and as for thine enemy, be thou liberal and kind unto 
him, when he is sorely in need of thy charity and service. 

293. 
Beware of the man who loveth thee when it suiteth the 
occasion, and serveth his purpose ; for he will quickly turn his 
back when thou findest out his true aim and way. 

294. 

Impart, as in winnowing, thy love to a friend, and never 
reveal the secret of another ; when thine enemy cometh to 
make peace with thee, implore thou God on his behalf. 

295. 
Put not thine hand to a thing if thou wilt not complete it, 
so that the reward be not lost. If thou once say " Yes," with 
regard to a matter, never change it to " No." 



40. 

gain ; but if he yield not, think him wanting in sense ; he 
will scarcely be missed when his number is called. 

279. 

Reprove not, and waste not your words on a man ; for if his 
own sense upbraid not, how can another reprove ? 

280. 

How good it is to mix with men who know their worth and 
station ! Turn far from him who's not of these ; in his friend- 
ship there is no blessing. 

281. 

The friendship that is perfect is always free from feud and 
strife ; the truest sign of friendship is two hearts made one for 
ever. 

282. 

Always join and never part from the man of fine spirit 
and unruffled mind ; in his attachment and friendship thou 
thyself shalt be courted, and in the face of all men thou shalt 
be acknowledged. * 

283. 

Esteem the friend who chideth thee at any time, but not 
in the presence of another ; and let him think he hath gained 
thereby some part at least of thy power and possession. 

284. 

Plant the love of thy friend in thy very life's soil, as thou 
wouldst labour to fasten the pegs to thy tent ; and if thou wilt 
plant it with liberal root, it will be borne on the tongue, as 
fruit on the branches are borne. 

285. 

The eye of a needle is not too narrow to hold two friends 
that agree ; the breadth of the world is not sufficiently wide 
to contain in its fold two foes. 

286. 

Dost thou wish to prove thy friend, to know if he be false 
or true, ask thine own heart to act as diviner, and the truth 
it will surely divine. 

287. 

Trust not the man who boreth thee with his troubles, but 



41 

fceepeth from thee his joys ; his tongue may be all smooth for 
thee ; his friendship's but alloy. 

288. 

Love thou the man who first hath done thee good, and 
return him help and kindness ; so love the man thou hast 
gained as friend, for in his heart thy friendly acts all f riendliness 
do blend. 

289. 

Love thy friend more than thou wouldst thy brother ; for 
until he becometh my truest friend, how can I love even t a 
brother ? 

290. 

Hid deep in the heart true friendship is found, its impression 
is sealed on the tongue ; men's hearts are as mirrors that see 
eye to eye, their secrets are never revealed. 

291. 

Play not the hypocrite with thy friend, nor by questioning 
people pry into his secrets, lest thou meet with a man who will 
blacken his name, and so estrange from thee his friendship. 

292. 

Deal freely with thy friend with all thy wealth and very 
life ; do likewise unto thy kinsmen with thy substance, mind, 
and speech ; be courteous unto all men, and greet them on thy 
way ; and as for thine enemy, be thou liberal and kind unto 
him, when he is sorely in need of thy charity and service. 

293. 
Beware of the man who loveth thee when it suiteth the 
occasion, and serveth his purpose ; for he will quickly turn his 
back when thou findest out his true aim and way. 

294. 

Impart, as in winnowing, thy love to a friend, and never 
reveal the secret of another ; when thine enemy cometh to 
make peace with thee, implore thou God on his behalf. 

295. 
Put not thine hand to a thing if thou wilt not complete it, 
so that the reward be not lost. If thou once say " Yes," with 
regard to a matter, never change it to " No." 



4a 

gain ; but if he yield not, think him wanting in sense ; he 
will scarcely be missed when his number is called. 

279. 

Reprove not, and waste not your words on a man ; for if his 
own sense upbraid not, how can another reprove ? 

280. 

How good it is to mix with men who know their worth and 
station ! Turn far from him who's not of these ; in his friend- 
ship there is no blessing. 

281, 

The friendship that is perfect is always free from feud and 
strife ; the truest sign of friendship is two hearts made one for 
ever. 

282. 

Always join and never part from the man of fine spirit 
and unruffled mind ; in his attachment and friendship thou 
thyself shalt be courted, and in the face of all men thou shalt 
be acknowledged. * 

283. 

Esteem the friend who chideth thee at any time, but not 
in the presence of another ; and let him think he hath gained 
thereby some part at least of thy power and possession. 

284. 

Plant the love of thy friend in thy very life's soil, as thou 
wouldst labour to fasten the pegs to thy tent ; and if thou wilt 
plant it with liberal root, it will be borne on the tongue, as 
fruit on the branches are borne. 

285. 

The eye of a needle is not too narrow to hold two friends 
that agree ; the breadth of the world is not sufficiently wide 
to contain in its fold two foes. 

286. 

Dost thou wish to prove thy friend, to know if he be false 
or true, ask thine own heart to act as diviner, and the truth 
it will surely divine. 

287. 

Trust not the man who boreth thee with his troubles, but 



41 

leeepeth from thee his joys ; his tongue may be all smooth for 
thee ; his friendship's but alloy. 

288. 

Love thou the man who first hath done thee good, and 
return him help and kindness ; so love the man thou hast 
gained as friend, for in his heart thy friendly acts all friendliness 
do blend. 

289. 

I/)ve thy friend more than thou wouldst thy brother ; for 
until he becometh my truest friend, how can I love even t a 
brother ? 

290. 

Hid deep in the heart true friendship is found, its impression 
is sealed on the tongue ; men's hearts are as mirrors that see 
eye to eye, their secrets are never revealed. 

291. 

Play not the hypocrite with thy friend, nor by questioning 
people pry into his secrets, lest thou meet with a man who will 
blacken his name, and so estrange from thee his friendship. 

292. 

Deal freely with thy friend with all thy wealth and very 
life ; do likewise unto thy kinsmen with thy substance, mind, 
and speech ; be courteous unto all men, and greet them on thy 
way ; and as for thine enemy, be thou liberal and kind unto 
him, when he is sorely in need of thy charity and service. 

293- 
Beware of the man who loveth thee when it suiteth the 
occasion, and serveth his purpose ; for he will quickly turn his 
back when thou findest out his true aim and way. 

294. 

Impart, as in winnowing, thy love to a friend, and never 
reveal the secret of another ; when thine enemy cometh to 
make peace with thee, implore thou God on his behalf. 

295. 
Put not thine hand to a thing if thou wilt not complete it, 
so that the reward be not lost. If thou once say " Yes," with 
regard to a matter, never change it to " No." 



4* 

296. 

If thou find a companion whose thoughts thou art able to 
gauge, cleave unto him ; for men's faults are beyond mortal 
ken ; this one thou knowest thoroughly, then stand by him. 

297. 

Like an earthenware vessel is the love of a fool ; once it is 
broken, to its former condition it will never return ; the friend- 
ship that is formed between men of discretion is like a vessel 
of gold, hard to break, and easily mended. 

298. 

With the froward and haughty indeed it will go like an 
earthenware vessel, when knocked, it is broken beyond repair ; 
but the man of good sense and discretion will be like glittering 
gold ; he will brighten when beaten, and be roused to do better. 

299. 

Not at once, but by steps and degrees, disclose thy deep 
love for thy friend ; as, not at once, but month by month, 
the tree bringeth forth its new fruit, so confess thy love by 
degrees, and fulfill thy friend's desire. 

300. 

Beware of evil companionship, where nothing is wise or 
right ; for by associating with the evil-disposed, thou wilt 
learn every bad habit and trait. 

301. 

The man who can live with a woman of ill-heart showeth, 
indeed, what is patience, and more, what is skill ; he resembleth 
the wolf of the forest, forsooth, which never changeth its 
nature, though it changeth its hair. 

302. 

What wound or eruption is like unto her who leaveth her 
husband to lead her own life ? In his heart she doth rankle 
as a bad, putrid sore ; though sick of her, rid of her ne'er 
he can be. What disease can equal such suffering of soul, such 
affliction of heart, and grief without end ? 

303. 
In making thy choice, take thy seat with the best, and 
thou shalt be honoured by God and by man ; but if with the 



48 

senseless thou chooseth to sit, thy comrades will lead thee to 
naught but disgrace. 

304. 
'Tis not good that man, though wise, should gain his end 
always. "fis not wealth that hath the power to hide one's 
guilt from view ; where wisdom ruleth, man's faults and crimes 
may soon be blotted out of sight. Let silence as a muzzle to 
thy mouth be e'er applied ; and see, too, that thy words are 
few, and cautiously restrained. If knowing this, thou dost 
not heed this sage advice, 'tis better far thy bones should perish 
in the grave. 

305. 

The man who rusheth in where his honour and fame are 
at stake, dare not quarrel with the world, if they suspect him 
of evil intent. 

306. 

There are four things which lead men on to strife and ruin 
dire : haughtiness, and stubbornness, indolence, and rashness 
of desire. 

307. 

The companionship of a foolish man is as a tooth that 

giveth pain ; for both there is but one and the same cure : 

pluck it out. Thou canst not long endure his wicked senseless 

talk ; for soon, indeed, without delay, thy love will turn to hate. 

308. 

Change not the charms which grace thy wife for another 
woman's charms ; for, leading thy good sense astray, lust means 
to play thee false. A wiser man than thou once fell, King 
Solomon was his name ; then see that thou art truly wise, 
and fall not in sin's way. 

309. 

Of all choice things a friend do choose ; seek his wishes to 
fulfil, however great the task, and thus his friendship set upon 
thv heart. 

[" The task "=108, the number of lines in this section.] 



4* 

296. 

If thou find a companion whose thoughts thou art able to 
gauge, cleave unto him ; for men's faults are beyond mortal 
ken ; this one thou knowest thoroughly, then stand by him. 

297. 

Like an earthenware vessel is the love of a fool ; once it is 
broken, to its former condition it will never return ; the friend- 
ship that is formed between men of discretion is like a vessel 
of gold, hard to break, and easily mended. 

298. 

With the froward and haughty indeed it will go like an 
earthenware vessel, when knocked, it is broken beyond repair ; 
but the man of good sense and discretion will be like glittering 
gold ; he will brighten when beaten, and be roused to do better. 

299. 

Not at once, but by steps and degrees, disclose thy deep 
love for thy friend ; as, not at once, but month by month, 
the tree bringeth forth its new fruit, so confess thy love by 
degrees, and fulfill thy friend's desire. 

300. 

Beware of evil companionship, where nothing is wise or 
right ; for by associating with the evil-disposed, thou wilt 
learn every bad habit and trait. 

301. 

The man who can live with a woman of ill-heart showeth, 
indeed, what is patience, and more, what is skill ; he resembleth 
the wolf of the forest, forsooth, which never changeth its 
nature, though it changeth its hair. 

302. 

What wound or eruption is like unto her who leaveth her 
husband to lead her own life ? In his heart she doth rankle 
as a bad, putrid sore ; though sick of her, rid of her ne'er 
he can be. What disease can equal such suffering of soul, such 
affliction of heart, and grief without end ? 

303. 
In making thy choice, take thy seat with the best, and 
thou shalt be honoured by God and by man ; but if with the 



43 

senseless thou chooseth to sit, thy comrades will lead thee to 
naught but disgrace. 

304. 
'Tis not good that man, though wise, should gain his end 
always. 'Tis not wealth that hath the power to hide one's 
guilt from view ; where wisdom ruleth, man's faults and crimes 
may soon be blotted out of sight. Let silence as a muzzle to 
thy mouth be e'er applied ; and see, too, that thy words are 
few, and cautiously restrained. If knowing this, thou dost 
not heed this sage advice, 'tis better far thy bones should perish 
in the grave. 

305. 

The man who rusheth in where his honour and fame are 
at stake, dare not quarrel with the world, if they suspect him 
of evil intent. 

306. 

There are four things which lead men on to strife and ruin 
dire : haughtiness, and stubbornness, indolence, and rashness 
of desire. 

307. 

The companionship of a foolish man is as a tooth that 

giveth pain ; for both there is but one and the same cure : 

pluck it out. Thou canst not long endure his wicked senseless 

talk ; for soon, indeed, without delay, thy love will turn to hate. 

308. 

Change not the charms which grace thy wife for another 
woman's charms ; for, leading thy good sense astray, lust means 
to play thee false. A wiser man than thou once fell, King 
Solomon was his name ; then see that thou art truly wise, 
and fall not in sin's way. 

309. 

Of all choice things a friend do choose ; seek his wishes to 
fulfil, however great the task, and thus his friendship set upon 
thv heart. 

[" The task "=108, the number of lines in this section.] 



4* 

296. 

If thou find a companion whose thoughts thou art able to 
gauge, cleave unto him ; for men's faults are beyond mortal 
ken ; this one thou knowest thoroughly, then stand by him. 

297. 

Iyike an earthenware vessel is the love of a fool ; once it is 
broken, to its former condition it will never return ; the friend- 
ship that is formed between men of discretion is like a vessel 
of gold, hard to break, and easily mended. 

298. 

With the froward and haughty indeed it will go like an 
earthenware vessel, when knocked, it is broken beyond repair ; 
but the man of good sense and discretion will be like glittering 
gold ; he will brighten when beaten, and be roused to do better. 

299. 

Not at once, but by steps and degrees, disclose thy deep 
love for thy friend ; as, not at once, but month by month, 
the tree bringeth forth its new fruit, so confess thy love by 
degrees, and fulfill thy friend's desire. 

300. 

Beware of evil companionship, where nothing is wise or 
right ; for by associating with the evil-disposed, thou wilt 
learn every bad habit and trait. 

301. 

The man who can live with a woman of ill-heart showeth, 
indeed, what is patience, and more, what is skill ; he resembleth 
the wolf of the forest, forsooth, which never changeth its 
nature, though it changeth its hair. 

302. 

What wound or eruption is like unto her who leaveth her 
husband to lead her own life ? In his heart she doth rankle 
as a bad, putrid sore ; though sick of her, rid of her ne'er 
he can be. What disease can equal such suffering of soul, such 
affliction of heart, and grief without end ? 

303. 
In making thy choice, take thy seat with the best, and 
thou shalt be honoured by God and by man ; but if with the 



43 

senseless thou chooseth to sit, thy comrades will lead thee to 
naught but disgrace. 

304. 
'Tis not good that man, though wise, should gain his end 
always. 'Tis not wealth that hath the power to hide one's 
guilt from view ; where wisdom ruleth, man's faults and crimes 
may soon be blotted out of sight. Let silence as a muzzle to 
thy mouth be e'er applied ; and see, too, that thy words are 
few, and cautiously restrained. If knowing this, thou dost 
not heed this sage advice, 'tis better far thy bones should perish 
in the grave. 

305. 

The man who rusheth in where his honour and fame are 
at stake, dare not quarrel with the world, if they suspect him 
of evil intent. 

306. 

There are four things which lead men on to strife and ruin 
dire : haughtiness, and stubbornness, indolence, and rashness 
of desire. 

307. 

The companionship of a foolish man is as a tooth that 

giveth pain ; for both there is but one and the same cure : 

pluck it out. Thou canst not long endure his wicked senseless 

talk ; for soon, indeed, without delay, thy love will turn to hate. 

308. 

Change not the charms which grace thy wife for another 
woman's charms ; for, leading thy good sense astray, lust means 
to play thee false. A wiser man than thou once fell, King 
Solomon was his name ; then see that thou art truly wise, 
and fall not in sin's way. 

309. 

Of all choice things a friend do choose ; seek his wishes to 
fulfil, however great the task, and thus his friendship set upon 
thv heart. 

[" The task "=108, the number of lines in this section.] 



43 

296. 

If thou find a companion whose thoughts thou art able to 
gauge, cleave unto him ; for men's faults are beyond mortal 
ken ; this one thou knowest thoroughly, then stand by him. 

297. 

Like an earthenware vessel is the love of a fool ; once it is 
broken, to its former condition it will never return ; the friend- 
ship that is formed between men of discretion is like a vessel 
of gold, hard to break, and easily mended. 

298. 

With the froward and haughty indeed it will go like an 
earthenware vessel, when knocked, it is broken beyond repair ; 
but the man of good sense and discretion will be like glittering 
gold ; he will brighten when beaten, and be roused to do better. 

299. 

Not at once, but by steps and degrees, disclose thy deep 
love for thy friend ; as, not at once, but month by month, 
the tree bringeth forth its new fruit, so confess thy love by 
degrees, and fulfill thy friend's desire. 

300. 

Beware of evil companionship, where nothing is wise or 
right ; for by associating with the evil-disposed, thou wilt 
learn every bad habit and trait. 

301. 

The man who can live with a woman of ill-heart showeth, 
indeed, what is patience, and more, what is skill ; he resembleth 
the wolf of the forest, forsooth, which never changeth its 
nature, though it changeth its hair. 

302. 

What wound or eruption is like unto her who leaveth her 
husband to lead her own life ? In his heart she doth rankle 
as a bad, putrid sore ; though sick of her, rid of her ne'er 
he can be. What disease can equal such suffering of soul, such 
affliction of heart, and grief without end ? 

303. 
In making thy choice, take thy seat with the best, and 
thou shalt be honoured by God and by man ; but if with the 



43 

senseless thou chooseth to sit, thy comrades will lead thee to 
naught but disgrace. 

304. 
'Tis not good that man, though wise, should gain his end 
always. 'Tis not wealth that hath the power to hide one's 
guilt from view ; where wisdom ruleth, man's faults and crimes 
may soon be blotted out of sight. Let silence as a muzzle to 
thy mouth be e'er applied ; and see, too, that thy words are 
few, and cautiously restrained. If knowing this, thou dost 
not heed this sage advice, 'tis better far thy bones should perish 
in the grave. 

305. 

The man who rusheth in where his honour and fame are 
at stake, dare not quarrel with the world, if they suspect him 
of evil intent. 

306. 

There are four things which lead men on to strife and ruin 
dire : haughtiness, and stubbornness, indolence, and rashness 
of desire. 

307. 

The companionship of a foolish man is as a tooth that 

giveth pain ; for both there is but one and the same cure : 

pluck it out. Thou canst not long endure his wicked senseless 

talk ; for soon, indeed, without delay, thy love will turn to hate. 

308. 

Change not the charms which grace thy wife for another 
woman's charms ; for, leading thy good sense astray, lust means 
to play thee false. A wiser man than thou once fell, King 
Solomon was his name ; then see that thou art truly wise, 
and fall not in sin's way. 

309. 

Of all choice things a friend do choose ; seek his wishes to 
fulfil, however great the task, and thus his friendship set upon 
thv heart. 

[" The task "=108, the number of lines in this section.] 



44 

CHAPTER XIV. 

On the Testing of Friends, their Indulgence, and 

Forgiveness. 

310. 

A faithful friend him thou shouldst call, who cheerfully 
renders thee help ; whether money or life is what is required, 
he is ready to meet thy need. 

If thou wouldst select a friend worthy the name, try him, 
and see, if he'll stand this one test : — If, when thou dost cross 
him and thwart him, he will keep true as before, he is the man 
thou shouldst hold, for he loveth thee no less. 

312. 

Trust not him who praiseth thee when he be in want, and 
awaiteth thy help ; but trust him who speaketh of thee with 
pride, even when thou refusest his request. 

313. 
Three things prove if men are wise ; learn them well, and 
never shalt thou turn to folly : Be humble amid all provocation ; 
be a hero in the fight ; be pleased to grant a man's request. 

3*4- 
If lovingly thou do a thing, thy former faults will be 
concealed ; if sullenly thou show thyself, thy secret sins will 
be disclosed. 

315. 
Think not ill of any man, if once thy pardon he hath craved ; 
forgive and pardon all his guilt, if once his sin he hath confessed. 

316. 

As for him who will not trust the apology sincerely made, 
nor readily forgive the man who hath frankly said, " I've 
erred," — deem his friendship as though it had never been, and 
give him now a good wide berth. 

317- 
When, for their guilt or shortcomings, thy friends beg 
indulgence, forgive ; for know, forgiveness is in the heart of 
generous men ; it's in the path of intelligence. 



45 

3*8. 

Judge all men's errors kindly, even before thy indulgence 
is craved ; nor think ill of the man whose guilt is not proved, 
for in this case the guilt will be thine. 

319- 
From the day of a man's apology, harbour not in thy mind 
his wrongdoings, though his wrong may be clear, and he may 
offer a doubtful excuse ; understand thou this, and be not 
unkind. 

320. 

No man can be found more neglectful than he who doth 
not choose the most genial of friends ; yet far more neglectful 
is he, the prodigal, who, once having made them, loseth the 
friends he hath won. 

321. 

Receive the man who, be he true or false, cometh to thee 
with regret for past offence ; for, in this very act of his humilia- 
tion, he raiseth thee in men's esteem. 

322. 

When a man refuseth in public to obey thee, he showeth 
that thou hast some honour to lose ; and whenever in private 
he offereth thee slight, doth he not show that he feareth thy 
superior power ? 

323. 
Pardon transgression and sin in fools, as thou wouldst 
pardon them in nobler men. 

324. 
Refuse not to give to a man, though he may have refused 
thee thy request ; and refuse not to pardon, though he may 
have done thee harm. 

325. 
To confess thy sin is thy very first task, when forgiveness 
for trespass thou seekest ; for should thy denial confession 
preclude, thou hast nothing further to hope, as thy sin will 
be graver, aye, double. 

326. 

Be quick to pardon thy friend's transgression ; and should 
he become thy foe, reveal it not in the course of thy contention. 



46 

327- 
Have control over men and thou wilt find thy delight ; 
be revengeful, and thou wilt find care and woe. 

328. 

Before some deed thou wouldst perform, consider well, hast 
thou the power to do it ? If, say, thou givest order that a 
man be killed, hast thou the power to dispose of him thus ; or 
is thy command empty as the wind, which goeth forth only 
to return whence it came ? 

329. 
Why should a man who sinneth all his days, when his 
fellow committeth one sin against him, fly into a rage, and 
forget that his own trespass and sin are not by the world 
forgotten ? 

330. 

If, in the multitude of words, thou speakest against thy 
friends, let it not seem hard to thee, if they speak against thee 
also. 

33i. 
Pardon the man who hath sinned and confessed, pardon 
him in full, and forgive him completely. 

[Part of the word " Forgive "=38, the number of lines 
in this section.] 



CHAPTER XV. 
On Discernment and Manners. 

332. 

Not in the warning by experience bought, doth highest 
wisdom lie ; but to be forewarned, and not to fall, this is true 
wisdom. 

333- 
The man of understanding who hath his heart directed well, 
discerneth that which is far from right, and keepeth himself 
therefrom ; and knowing, though regretfully, in what his 
strength is weak, he resteth content, and moveth not beyond 
the limits of his power. 



47 

334- 
No man's faith can be secure, whose perception is not sure ; 
he will not open his mouth to speak, if he doth not understand 
the trend. 

335- 
Abide thy opportunity, and keep thy tongue on guard ; 
give attention to thy subject, and consider well thy task. 

336. 
In a clever man's writing and talk thou wilt see a proof 
of his faculties, of his spirit and mind ; so also a gift, and the 
way the gift comes, will show a man's nature, his motive, and 
thought. 

337. 
Take care of the good things found in creation ; beware 
of the evil and bad. 

338. 

In truth, man's body and soul have taints in them both ; 
why expect, then, that either be perfect or whole ? 

339. 
Wouldst thou o'er people rule with delight, deal with them 
kindly, and not with brute force ; if respect and all honour thou 
wouldst from them win, then see that thou fail not their love 
to obtain. If thou but draw their hearts with a thin silken 
cord, their bodies and chattels thou'lt gain without fail. 

340. 
As long as thou rulest with decency and ease, thou wilt 
sway the good folk, the best among men; at thy word of 
command they'll encamp, or move on ; but if thou wouldst 
know how with the baser and rougher to act, I say, thou wilt 
only subdue them by keeping them under the heel. 

34 1 - 

Before I can gauge another man's worth, it behoves me 
to know my own back-bone and strength, and to conduct myself 
towards men with a kindness that alone is able to win. 

[" My back "=19, the number of lines in this section.] 



46 

357- 
If, ia striving with thee, the king views thee askance, 
beware lest thou face him and turn to him straight ; see, too, 
that thy words are remarkably few, or they will fail to gain for 
thee thy suit. 

358. 

A king, through strict justice, doth establish the land, 
for his subjects by truth he doth lead ; better is he than a 
season of plenty, and better than food and rich produce is the 
light of his countenance. 

359- 

The worst kings are they who frighten the upright and good ; 
they rule the worst who make offerings grow few ; the worst 
of companions is he who misleadeth his friend ; and so the 
land full of plenty, which is not safe, is hateful to live in ; it 
giveth no rest. 

360. 

If a man oppress his neighbour, to the King or Prince he'll 
appeal ; but if the king act with rigour, and rob a man of his 
justice, to whom shall the man lift up his plaint and his cry, 
and whither shall he then turn for justice ? 

361. 

While the king is in anger stand not before him, for as a 
lion he will tear and seize on the prey ; turn from the storm, 
and escape to the mountain ; stand not by the stream while 
the waters overflow. 

362. 

Strength and honour are a crown to the head of the wise 
man, who can boast of the king as his friend. If he be likened 
to the high hill and steep, where the cypress and nard their 
rich fragrance distill, let him remember there also do serpents 
dwell, they in their lurking place crouch ; from thence, too, 
wild lions and leopards may leap. The ascent has been hard, 
indeed ; but even now, thinking thou hast a firm footing, 
thou standest as though on the grave. 

363. 
If the Regent doth hate thee, and sorely oppress thee, then 



51 

trust not the love of the King ; but the Regent as friend may 
turn the King's wrath, and spare thee to walk securely. 

364. 
Keep God's command, obey the King's word, and then in 
safety shalt thou go on thy way. 

[" In safety " =26, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XVIII. 
On Stupidity, Pride, and Folly. 

365. 
Five faults may be found in a fool, and these cannot be 
found in any other : he showeth anger without any cause ; 
most of his labour is useless and vain ; when he maketh a 
resolve to give aught away, not to the fit doth he give ; nor 
his love nor his hate knoweth its bounds ; and in time he 
betrayeth the secret that his friend hath not told. 

366. 

How little distinction doth the world draw between the 
fool and the upright and pure ! 'Tis as the pearl of high price 
found in the desert, the value of which is not known. 

367. 
Three things there are at which the heart groweth faint : 
When redoubled pains the wise attack ; when madmen lead 
the man of sense ; when the wicked hold sway over the 
righteous and good. 

368. 

Six are ever victims of anxious care — the rich, who from 
his height hath fallen ; the rich who, sooner or later, feareth a 
fall ; the man that's revengeful and full of spite ; the slave 
of ambition, whom nothing will sate ; and he who seeketh for 
high honours, unsuited to his station. 

369. 
If we weigh the hate of the wise and the love of the fool 
in the balance, " I prefer to endure the hate of the wise," the 
prudent will say. 



W 

357- 
If, in striving with thee, the king views thee askance, 
beware lest thou face him and turn to him straight ; see, too, 
that thy words are remarkably few, or they will fail to gain for 
thee thy suit. 

358. 

A king, through strict justice, doth establish the land, 
for his subjects by truth he doth lead ; better is he than a 
season of plenty, and better than food and rich produce is the 
light of his countenance. 

359- 

The worst kings are they who frighten the upright and good ; 
they rule the worst who make offerings grow few ; the worst 
of companions is he who misleadeth his friend ; and so the 
land full of plenty, which is not safe, is hateful to live in ; it 
giveth no rest. 

360. 

If a man oppress his neighbour, to the King or Prince he'll 
appeal ; but if the king act with rigour, and rob a man of his 
justice, to whom shall the man lift up his plaint and his cry, 
and whither shall he then turn for justice ? 

361. 

While the king is in anger stand not before him, for as a 
lion he will tear and seize on the prey ; turn from the storm, 
and escape to the mountain ; stand not by the stream while 
the waters overflow. 

362. 

Strength and honour are a crown to the head of the wise 
man, who can boast of the king as his friend. If he be likened 
to the high hill and steep, where the cypress and nard their 
rich fragrance distill, let him remember there also do serpents 
dwell, they in their lurking place crouch ; from thence, too, 
wild lions and leopards may leap. The ascent has been hard, 
indeed ; but even now, thinking thou hast a firm footing, 
thou standest as though on the grave. 

363. 
If the Regent doth hate thee, and sorely oppress thee, then 



61 

trust not the love of the King ; but the Regent as friend may 
turn the King's wrath, and spare thee to walk securely. 

364. 
Keep God's command, obey the King's word, and then in 
safety shalt thou go on thy way. 

[" In safety " =26, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XVIII. 
On Stupidity, Pride, and Folly. 

365. 
Five faults may be found in a fool, and these cannot be 
found in any other : he showeth anger without any cause ; 
most of his labour is useless and vain ; when he maketh a 
resolve to give aught away, not to the fit doth he give ; nor 
his love nor his hate knoweth its bounds ; and in time he 
betrayeth the secret that his friend hath not told. 

366. 

How little distinction doth the world draw between the 
fool and the upright and pure ! 'Tis as the pearl of high price 
found in the desert, the value of which is not known. 

367. 
Three things there are at which the heart groweth faint : 
When redoubled pains the wise attack ; when madmen lead 
the man of sense ; when the wicked hold sway over the 
righteous and good. 

368. 

Six are ever victims of anxious care — the rich, who from 
his height hath fallen ; the rich who, sooner or later, feareth a 
fall ; the man that's revengeful and full of spite ; the slave 
of ambition, whom nothing will sate ; and he who seeketh for 
high honours, unsuited to his station. 

369. 
If we weigh the hate of the wise and the love of the fool 
in the balance, " I prefer to endure the hate of the wise," the 
prudent will say. 



S£ 

37°- 
He who with a fool consorteth will himself become a fool ; 
but he who with the wise of heart doth walk, will have a name 
like myrrh diffused, when crushed by human hand ; just as 
the wind, driving across the fragrant spice, will bear to every 
face the sweet perfume, the beauteous scent. But should the 
wind o'er carrion pass, far different is the case ; for smells, 
and stench, and odours ill, will sicken all the air. 

37i. 
Equal all and on one plane are friend and foe to the fool ; 
what matters it, to whom all's the same ? For his folly there 
is no cure. 

372. 

What man is he who has to thank himself for bringing his 
shame to view ? 'Tis he who entereth the place where folly 
hath no right ; who will perforce his own seat choose, when 
once his seat's assigned ; who talketh too much, and, what is 
worse, talketh out of time. 

373. 
When a fool has had his say, of his swearing take no note. 

374- 
The man all meek, who cannot boast, will betimes receive 
a brother's help ; but the high and haughty will be abased, 
and trampled in the dust. 

375. 

He doth err who on his wit and counsel doth rely ; he will 
surely fall, who trusteth to his sense alone. 

376. 

I wonder why, O man of reason, thou settest not thy heart 
to think : " Why be vain ? " " Why proudly boast ? Dost 
thou forget thy origin — Nature's part in the begetting ? " 

377- 
The man, in senseless pride bedecked, deems his own soul 
too dear ; boasting his powers beyond all due, he congratulates 
himself ; but from the time he thinks he is rising, he will be 
sure to find that he is being brought down low. 



53 

378. 

Be not led by a fool to tread into the heap (and so bespatter 
thyself). 

[" Heap "=33, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XIX. 
On Jealousy. 

379- 
How great an ill is jealousy ! How sickening a sore ! It 
breaketh the very bones of man, and destroyeth his body soon. 
Hatred may be kept from view for ever and for aye ; but 
jeaslousy is discerned at once ; to all men it is clear. 

380. 

Thou mayest succeed in pleasing all save him who envieth 
thee thy riches ; for his heart will never be content, till thou 
hast lost thy happiness and wealth. 

381. 

Thou canst not find a sinner greater than the man who 
hateth one to whom honours have come ; for continually 
upon his Creator he poureth forth his wrath, chafed at what 
He hath willed as the other man's lot. 

382. 

On the day thou callest a fool to thy help, thou dost invite 
him to destroy thee root and branch ; for were it not that there 
are trees in the forest, the axe which is seized by the hand of 
man would indeed have nothing to hew. 

383. 
A cure there is for every form of hate, save for the hate 
that springeth from envy. 

384. 
The envious one will not have length of days, since he hath 
neither hope nor expectation ; he will grieve, and his grief 
will be unending, if he find that he can do no further harm 
unto others. 



56 

399- 
Beware, and treat no man with scorn, nor let him feel thy 
slight ; a tiny fly may choke a man, having seized him by the 
throat. 

400. 

Who from an evil companion his distance shall keep, his 
Rock of Salvation is sure to behold and so the tongue of the 
slanderer he need never fear. 

[" Behold "=15, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XXI. 

On Visiting Friends and the Sick, and on Nuisances 

in Visiting. 

401. 

He who faileth to visit his intimate friend doeth violence 
to his soul ; but he whose dull visit is one heavy wail, will meet 
with confusion, insult, and shame. 

402. 

Visit but rarely, attachment will grow; from visits too 
frequent estrangement will spring. 

4<>3- 
Let not a mile be the proverbial stile, when thou shouldst 
visit the sorrowing and sick ; let two miles be as nothing, when 
as peacemaker thou'rt sought, to cause strife and dissension 
to cease among men. 

• 404. 
Visit not thy friends at all times and all hours, but keep 
back thy foot from their dwelling ; see, how men long for the 
showers of rain, when for a time they are kept back from the 
earth ! 

405. 

When a bore once came to visit a friend, prolonging his stay 

to an inordinate length, the patient remarked — " If thou hast 

business to do, then say so, be quick ! Let's be done with the 

tiling ! Or if it's a debt thou hast come to claim, then speak 



57 

of the debt. How much do I owe ? I'll give it : Take it 
and go ! " 

406. 

O dullard, if thou'lt be advised for thy good, pray visit the 
sick no longer ; for worse, worse by far than the sickness itself, 
are the visits that prove thee a bore. 

407. 

A patient was once asked, " What aileth thee ? " And he 
answered forthwith, " My will, that is stubborn and sinful." 
They said unto him then, " What is the wish that thou wouldst 
now ask ? " And he answered and said, " My sole wish is 
that Heaven may forgive me my sins." Again they did ask, 
" Shall we go and fetch the physician ? " And he answered 
and said, " 'Twas he who made me ill." They continued and 
spake, " Shall we give you some relish ? " And his answer 
was then, " I am sick of all food." 

408. 

To keep off the bore from thy circle of friends, have little 
to do with him, give him no ear. 

409. 

Like tasting: of honeycomb's droppings, is the pleasure of 
dining with friends ; to dine with men that are hateful to 
thee, is as bad as the fever and scab. 

410. 

When thou seest two in close converse, quickly withdraw 
and hold back ; obtrude not thyself on their presence. 

411. 

The world grows sick of the society of those who never 
cease to prate. 

412. 

A King, to get rid of the bore he did hate, bethought him 
of this fine device : He bade them inscribe on the signet he 
wore these words which bluntly told him his mind — " Canst 
thou not see thou art a great bore ? O dull one, rise and 
begone ! " And this ring he would turn again and again, till 
the bore rose up and went off. 

4*3- 
Is it not writ in the 8th and 9th chapters of Medical Lore, 



68 

that, as the quaternary fever is the visit of the heavy and dull ? 

414. 

When a dull man visiteth thee at one time or another, and, 
stupidly chatting on a host of things, repeateth himself in his 
talk, then make thyself deaf, and pretend to be blind, act as 
though thou hast lost the use of thy feet, and as though thy 
mouth, in rebellion, had resolved not to speak. 

415. 
Visit a friend, visit the sick ; but, pray, cease thou from 
visiting at all, if thou must needs be heavy and dull. 
[" Heavy "=31, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XXII. 

Last Chapter of the Book. 
Collection of Maxims. 

416. 

Before the tyrant or ruler shed not thy tears, for not alone 
will he mock thee, but he will also despise thee ; so to the man 
without troubles reveal not thy sorrow, askance he'll look at 
thee, or he may not even regard thee. 

417. 

Be ready to seek advice from all, whether they be young 
or old ; at times thou mightest think it well to act on advice 
that cometh from a boor. 

418. 

Reside in the place where thy fathers have dwelt, and set 
up thy dwelling in their old habitation ; there's a place in 
the world for all who would dwell in it ; e'en the bird nestles 
best in its own favourite nest. 

419. 

To a woman a secret thou shouldst never disclose, lest for 
thy pains it bring thee derision ; if thou dost prize dearly 
the life that is thine, quaff not the poison, — it's too great a trial. 



38 
420. 

He who entrusteth his possessions to his child or to his 
wife, will sure come to beggary, having first come to shame. 

421. 
He that chideth him who refuseth to take sound advice, 
who speaketh to hearts that are closed, is like one who singeth 
a song to the dead, or crieth in prayer to the shades. 

422. 

The man of sense needs but few words whereby he may 
profit, and be corrected ; understanding well, he will see the 
purpose of things ; he will fix them deep within his heart, and 
grasp them from end to end. 

423. 
The man always laughing is a fool, and for his folly there 
is no cure and relief ; at the time when he showeth his teeth, 
he loseth his dignity and honour. 

424. 

Take a long time to make up thy mind, and then shall thy 
actions be perfectly sound ; for the garden-fruit that is late 
in appearing will always be sweeter and far more mature. 

425. 
Spend not thy strength, O wise one, in the attempt to 
overcome the wicked ; but being strong and all-daring, oppose 
a bold front ; for oft in his net the victor will fall, and the 
conquered will truly the conqueror be named. 

426. 

In speaking, a stupid man will send his tongue in advance 
of his good sense ; but a man of sense will check his tongue, 
and let prudence keep it back. 

427. 

The fool in mischief findeth his sport ; hence his reason 
cometh after his tongue ; but the man of sense delay eth his 
words, and beginneth no matter until he hath grasped it. 

428. 

He who promiseth a gift from day to day, sickeneth the 
heart with hope deferred ; as the lowering clouds, that rainless 
pass, cover the face of the earth with gloom. 



£8 

that, as the quaternary fever is the visit of the heavy and dull ? 

414. 

When a dull man visiteth thee at one time or another, and, 
stupidly chatting on a host of things, repeateth himself in his 
talk, then make thyself deaf, and pretend to be blind, act as 
though thou hast lost the use of thy feet, and as though thy 
mouth, in rebellion, had resolved not to speak. 

415. 
Visit a friend, visit the sick ; but, pray, cease thou from 
visiting at all, if thou must needs be heavy and dull. 
['Heavy "=31, the number of lines in this section.] 



CHAPTER XXII. 

Last Chapter of the Book. 
Collection of Maxims. 



416. 

Before the tyrant or ruler shed not thy tears, for not alone 
will he mock thee, but he will also despise thee ; so to the man 
without troubles reveal not thy sorrow, askance he'll look at 
thee, or he may not even regard thee. 

417. 

Be ready to seek advice from all, whether they be young 
or old ; at times thou mightest think it well to act on advice 
that cometh from a boor. 

418. 

Reside in the place where thy fathers have dwelt, and set 
up thy dwelling in their old habitation ; there's a place in 
the world for aU who would dwell in it ; e'en the bird nestles 
best in its own favourite nest. 

419. 

To a woman a secret thou shouldst never disclose, lest for 
thy pains it bring thee derision ; if thou dost prize dearly 
the life that is thine, quaff not the poison, — it's too great a trial. 



58 
420. 

He who entrusteth his possessions to his child or to his 
wife, will sure come to beggary, having first come to shame. 

421. 
He that chideth him who refuseth to take sound advice, 
who speaketh to hearts that are closed, is like one who singeth 
a song to the dead, or crieth in prayer to the shades. 

422. 

The man of sense needs but few words whereby he may 
profit, and be corrected ; understanding well, he will see the 
purpose of things ; he will fix them deep within his heart, and 
grasp them from end to end. 

423. 
The man always laughing is a fool, and for his folly there 
is no cure and relief ; at the time when he showeth his teeth, 
he loseth his dignity and honour. 

424. 

Take a long time to make up thy mind, and then shall thy 
actions be perfectly sound ; for the garden-fruit that is late 
in appearing will always be sweeter and far more mature. 

425. 
Spend not thy strength, O wise one, in the attempt to 
overcome the wicked ; but being strong and all-daring, oppose 
a bold front ; for oft in his net the victor will fall, and the 
conquered will truly the conqueror be named. 

426. 

In speaking, a stupid man will send his tongue in advance 
of his good sense ; but a man of sense will check his tongue, 
and let prudence keep it back. 

427. 

The fool in mischief findeth his sport ; hence his reason 
cometh after his tongue ; but the man of sense delay eth his 
words, and beginneth no matter until he hath grasped it. 

428. 

He who promiseth a gift from day to day, sickeneth the 
heart with hope deferred ; as the lowering clouds, that rainless 
pass, cover the face of the earth with gloom. 



60 

429- 
If thy soul shall fulness have, and poverty thou dost fear, 
then turn about, and take advice, and show thyself truly wise : 
of food take less, and duly shun the vice of gluttony ; how little 
meat for proper folk will readily suffice ! Too many wives, 
in the next place, see that thou dost avoid, and be on thy 
guard, lest thou dost sin, and thy strength unto strangers give. 
Whene'er thy soul desireth some object to attain, think, is not 
the price thou pay'st for it much too high and dear ? Surely 
it is better by far to leave of thy riches to thy foes, than, 
recklessly spending all that thou hast, to beg cold charity of 
the wealthy. 

430. 

When kindly fortune waiteth on man, the very stones on 
the road shall yield him bdellium and gold ; and if it be 
destined that he shall succeed, the branch that is dry shall 
blossom in his hand ; be assured and believe that on the day 
he doth sow, beautiful branches will bud and spring forth. 

43i. 
If thou listen to counsel, thou'lt shine forth bright, and 
thy soul shall be at ease with herself, finding favour with all. 
[" With herself "=35, the number of lines in this section.] 



Finished with tJte help of God. 
Blessed be He who giveth power to the weary, and to him who 
hath no strength He increaseth strength. 



NOTES 



TO THE 



SHEKEL HAKODESH. 



NOTES TO THE. SHEKEL HAKODESH. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

[A. stands for MS. Bodl. 1976 (1), Poc. 50,— the text as printed in this 
volume ; B. stands for MS. Bodl. 1975 (Opp. 693, olim 1404), with which it 

is collated.] 



I) B. has awatn viaa ™d mn r\pn b?v *iw # 2) B. *pS run. 

3) In margin: — pai ira jnv naan pSen anam aapSi aiam dcdk 
a^BiStn nwna* "pna errn ,S»? Swaj 'j neSff "i B*ava "p naana an 
■wnaa impi jap ita fine nam annbiai antral annan inaee nnai awvmn 
wan p*Sa ipvtyn wS*ar»t nanaa pan 'j Sin* ia mw *i aanm inmAit 

/mi pnr ia *jbv urn ^anya ia* Mini awaan "inaa iS mpi nnayS 

4) Text has inn, margin vnit in the same handwriting. 

5) The foregoing passage occurs in B. as follows : — bvn panS IfiDH n? 
aapSi anam ccdm ,anniai a*aiaa »Srei anwm a*aan nan nsyiai nyn nrSai 
naS* 'i aoaien *m awa *p naana an iai iBffi jwn naan pSen tnam 
annai inaaa inai ,a*airmn 'waAan icb *pna aran ,Sna"a naiaan mm* 'j 
mwp "i nanm ,imAii Saane ibd impi jap naa one nam annaiai an'Svai 
*inaa iS mpi ,nnayS r\^r\ p*Se ip<nyn K"Sa*K nanaa pan 't Sik«p ia 
Sprea wnSpv »nep ja naiaan prw ia «jdv 'aim ^aiya iar mm a*a*acn 
p Sy ,waiai maana B'raSnS Spa nwr na (nSnna v.-pv iiara) ,mpn prS 
Sptpea mn*"pri aire maa nSnna rw«r maya ,«npn Spr let? n* *nmp 
a^raan B^ran 'mam ,tnnit anaae B'Sre on'Sy -ny *naaim t jpipr\ pr^a 
B'Sea awn *ara nannna iyn nyicr Sa *mn waai ,anS nann iptra mS nr 
per* / paai aan SaS jr*^ ,paefn aam ipii pap aein 'k ; mnn nnmo a*sn 
: nayci lan *?aa nap* mSiann paai npS *paw aan 

6) In place of this B. has vipn Spr. 7) B. nara. 8) B. inaa ; cf. Prov. 
IX. 2. B. 1**1 ; ibid. 9) B. naa. 10) B. D'C*. 

The 1 in this and the following instances is written thus B*vr..l ; B. omits 
1 in these lines. B. adds*:— 'nnnn SaS \rhv a^a ^aijr 

(1. B'amnn as marginal note in A.) ianS iaS «inp ^nami ani nnp 'nS«r 
: cnpSaS »|« nci:a p< inn 'enSai 

II) B. a-»2ra. 12) B. ompSaa. 13) B. (?) nn. 14) B. has hSk 
enimSa cnniaa. 15) B. adds:— nann naana naia wiih Sa h* inxan anjrr mnfi 
:BH\ It is interesting to note the similarity between this brief introduc- 
tion and that in Alcharisi's Se/er Afusrc Haphilosophim (Loewenthal, 1896). 
This work will be referred to in these pages either as Afusre or Honein. 
[See Introduction.] 



64 NOTES 

[L K] 

1) B. omiU these two words. 2) MS. ne3n..i, 3) Cf. Eccles. VII, 12. 
4) B. pn OiSrS. 5) B. 316 on maa. (y. nrnn n»* (The Foundation of 
Religious Fear 1 ) I [1]. [See Introduction.] In the following notes this 
book will be cited either as Yesod or Foundation. Compare also the whole 
7th Chapter of Honein (p. 7 Hebr.) as expressing the same spirit 

6) B. an* ; Cf. Yetod XI [111]. 7) B. iinn. 8) R W. 9) B. '**. 

10) B. p*. 11) B. vmh 12) Cf. Yesod III [43]. 13) R itS. 14) R pS 

15) MS. *m *nn mS CM. I have adopted the reading of B. 

16) B. pp. 17) R *3. 18) B. p*. 19) R nrnni. 20 R *Sao rn, 
21) B. *S3. 22) MS. i**...i; B. wk. 23) R Ban. 24) B. »ap. 
24a) As R MS. seems to have pop. 24b) B.ron. 25) B. rmann. 
26) B. nr*o no?, 27) R inserts n\ 28) B. -pirn. 29 R Sarn. 

30) MS. iran in* ta ; I have adopted B's reading. 31) MS. 310...1 
32) As B. MS. seems to have Zipyh. 33) MS. iqm, 34) SaSl -jS noan, 
35 B. iiroinS or tmnnfr, 36) B. moS. 37) B. ^ao ; C/. Honcin, p. 32 (4) 

:w iS rovn iV* man m aw noa, 

38) B. nnn 39) B. imonn ; Cf. Honein, p. 12, mS*o va^r onun ao'o 

i*?ara ijho n*Sam, 

40) Cf. Yesod III [48.] 41) B. 03. 42) MS. f?a Sao altered into 

Sa Saa. 

43) The words from )T?3* till noan (next line) omitted in B. 

44) B. inserts n*. 45) B. mnSi 45a) MS. on ; have adopted B. 

46) B. m. 47) B. 3irpS. 47a) B. inserts W. 48) B # 0W* ; Compare 
Fewd IV, [50]. 

49) B. noa. 50) Wno. 51) B. 11JD\ 52) B. p\ 52a) Curiously, 'Choice* 

(Ascher, 1859) has p*. 

53) B. by. 54) Added from B, 55) B. 13non. 5C) B. p«T 57) B. pun* 

58 B, has a different reading, quite unintelligible. 

59) B. ia. 60) B. in*. 61) B, won. 62) B. inn. 63) B. (?) mon. 

64) B DV. 65) B. omits the words from the following iS till \nn (next 
line.) For [26] Cf. Hai Gaon, (Sa*n noio '*) :— rnnSi moSS Y? nan Sm 
rni »nn m can*? aar n*n. 

66) As B. ; MS Yra. 67) B. imaa. 68) As B.; MS. YTD 3 . 

69) B. Sh. 70) B. 11DV 71) As B. ; MS. w*n. 72) B. yhv. For [27] 
Cf. Hai Qaon, (ibid.) :— d«3*i*S ^iSna lae.Ti ,o^aniHa Yirp n?3 im*i ; 
also Honein, p. 5:— 13T* 'ea "|n*n nm*n* and nanS 13 pwm Ss 
niD3 "po mo\ 

73) msS nys. 74) We should perhaps read "lei**? or laut'rt similar ta 
b*\*h [28 ] 75) B. i.vroao. 76) As B. ; MS. seems to have irp. 



NOTES €5 

77) B. sans. 78) B. ibioi. 79) B. iSara. 

The idea in this line is not clearly expressed ; but we may gather the 
meaning from the Musre, p. C2 (Hebr.) :— wiyn nSyo B'Dann i?T *a 
: noann nSyo "jy-i* *S on^ryni 

80) B. innn. 81) B. SnSna. 82) B. run. 83) waa, 84) B. d'ibib. 85) 
B. .•uiani noan, 86) As B; Ma Dnw for an *an, 87) I adopt this form as 
in B., though A. has mp* altered in text into imp. 88) B. inserts «Sn. 89) B. 
an. 90) B. Sa\ 91) B. njm. 92) As in B. ; MS. rmaisn. 93) B. -na»a. 94) B. 
By. 95) B. nana. 96) As B. ; MS. D'Ha*. 96a) Of. F«o<£ III [33]. 97) B. ptap. 
In former line 'Orient* has -npai for ttnam. For the idea contained in this 
couplet, compare Tesod III [46] 

98) B. Sarn. 99) B. S*. 100 ) B. omits. 101) B. naS. 102) B. an, evidently 
an error. Cf. F«od III [45]. 103) As B.; MS. rn. 104) As B. ; MS. nj»». 
105) B. nun. 106) As B. ; MS. wrwn 107) B. *Sy. 108) B. mn. 109) B. 
nmm. 110) B. mi*. Ill) B. jw. 112) B. BBf*n. 113) B's reading is doubtful, 
B?a or ava. Might not the correct reading be nya, and refer to the y*1 
of the preceding line ? 

113a) Either a**o, or understand IttfK before a*rn. 114) B. njnn. 115) 
B. lav. 116) B. iap\ li6a) B. an -|S. 117) B. maana. 118) B. Snnn. 119) B. 
■wra. A. has in margin ian» K*a. 120) B. irrVarni. 121) B. inn m. 122) As B ; 
MS. laS. 123) B. r»\ 124) B. i*t. 125) B. %. 126) As B. ; MS. w. 127) B. 
B*r\ 128) B. wSiita. 129) B. B«n\ 130) a added in margin. 131) B. Ana. 
13 ) As B. ; MS. yr. 133) B. aa, evidently wrong. 134) B. vnnain. 135) B. 
nnannn. 136) B. mfn. 137) As B. ; MS na. 138) B. dwih, 139) B. ykv, 140). 
B. wa*y, 141) nn in both A. and B. ; quite unintelligible, unless it stand 
for nw or a* thou'. 142) B. n/n. 143) As B. ; MS. "na. 144) As B. ; MS. **vn. 

145) In margin ai K*a, For impa here and in [32], compare Isaiah 48, 12. 

146) The last two lines do not occur in B. 147) B. Via p. 148) In margin 
n?S K*3. 149) B piS. [55] belongs, according to the Mibchar, to iirvn ,a iyr. 

150) Cy. Afusre. (Hebr. p. 11):— amp uvnraa nynia VnnnS iA *im 
: ia\iSn nrvS nSyaff For [56] Cy. Jfiure. (Hebr. p. 40) :— iBio 'Sa Sar 
: na ay rVna ibid ay Sari ,na <Sa jbwa. 

151) In place of these and the remaining lines of this chapter, B. has • 
the following concluding couplet:— ^ap 'nn ibid Sjn na«a nap naan yna 

: Sap "naa bicbci onnnna pro. 

152) For [56] and [57] compare Yesod [48], 153) B. -pea. 154) B. nai\ 
155) B. ian-a\ 156) B. ana. 157) B. laaan. For this last line, compare Uontin^ 
p. 48 (46):— 'ui nwS *pv ");n pp*n irio. 



ee notes 

[IL 2] 

1) AsB; M&Vdto. In B the following Hue, occurring in A as [2731 
precedes [60]: — wnrru Sna w ,i*m3itra on n* Vmi 2) iS aS, CL Feso* 
VII [76]. S) B. Torn. 4) B. anm. 5) B. wnrn Cf. Yaod, Md ; also Hontin 
p. 32 (3):— uoo a« Sana narrn Sapoi noo mn» nrroa Voun. 6) R 
vnvrm, evidently wrong. 7) R TO**\ 8) R vmS. 9) R seems to hsve 
mVto for D**S in 10) R 3003. 11) R Bin. 12) R *fn Ttpi for tS w* "nyi. 
For [65] Cf. ffonem, p. 32 (6):— «o 3«n Sa* pi mv?o fsrw *o a» pi 
awn Tirr*. 13) B. pnnS. 14) R p*. 15) B. has before this mam nricno 
mr»n nnon Sao mjrw, 16) R rrnAna ion ••npan. 17) As R ; MS. rraiwn. 
13) B. i*?30 or iSao. 19) R wrS. 20) R Snp. 21) R rmi*, eridentlj wrong. 
22) MS. has after this tmn with faint line through it 23) As B. ; MS. 
nwt. 24) B. ppi ty. 25) R w. 26) Cf. Ytmd X [103]. 27) B. ipru. 281 
B. oi<3. 29) B. oV>. 30) B. frer. 31) As B ; MS. mwrn. 32) R liwm, 
perhaps better. Cf. Teaod VI [70] for the whole of [72]. 33) As B. ; MR 
\*y?T. For [73] CI Honein, p. 35 (5) mn\ rmo Yipa mnn vSn o^nrr *o. 
34) B. foia. 35) B. own. 36) B. S*. 37) B. -p™*. 38) R omits. 39) B # 
Spi, evidently wrong. 40) yr*7. B. concludes this chapter with the following 
couplet: — , ,3»»* ini* rot "proa ?n ,nuy SiSoo nann on 

: anr« rwvi nuoS ,S'aro v^ nit mnn on 

41) The next teven lines occur in B. under the heading "npan lyr, 
42) B. HMT. 43) The alternative reading ; MS. has as B. nnuy in text. 
44) B. airn\ 45) idem. 46) B. w*Vt 47) B. mini. 48) B. wn y\*z. 49) 
B. 3rn. 50) B. iSpi. 51) B. might be I3nt 52) B. 3irn\ 53) MS. doubtful ; 
looks like UM or 0*. Read [79] before this line, and not as printed. 



["I. 3] 

1) MS. liasS with S deleted. 2) MS. has *ri above the word in different 
*nk. 3) MS. has nnutta. 8a) The MS. might read either Hint* or OiMH, 
4) MS. has after this, above the line, in different ink 1PM. 5) In margin 
ion. 6) B. iini. From these words onwards, the couplets with several 
variations are misplaoed in B. under mpan nyr. 7) R may be read iruSait*. 
8) As in margin ; text \nn. 9) B. may be insoov. 10) B. nsa. 11) In MS. 
the first letter may read a or 3. 12) B. 0*31. 13) B. oar. 14) After this 
B. has the following :— iwi in* rutt "p*° w wo? *?Jfc *S)J pen aSa. 

15) B. mien. 1G) B, -pSm, perhaps to be preferred. 17) B. vrmSwi. 
18) R omits this line. 19) B. nnoi. 20) B. innnn. 21) B. nw. For [93] 
Of. //orififi, p. 35 (7):— nanw irca nvnnS nxvr *o. 22) B. meinon. 23) 
B. wita. 24) Tlie next three lints are omitted in B. 25) Might be read 



NOTES 67 

aisv. 26) MS. looks like pva. 27) Almost hopeless ; the word seems to 
be VJO?S, but it is doubtful. 

28) B. varies in the order of the succeeding couplets. Here it adds:— 
,0'mSo D<D nnwS non win nSiy nsrots oik 

: nimw 3*33 vsnp »a ijr ,1*0* *)'Din oninnr tpDin Cf. Yesod XII [126]. 

29) B. has after aSa either niona DpiS or nioTJ oy?S, both unsatisfactory. 
30) B. has p*io. 31) idem. 32J B. lirn, evidently wrong. 33) B. (?) ny. 
34) B. doubtful ; seems to be iup<vS or ittp* nr*. 35) B. n?. 36) B. *: M. 

37) B. 3irnnro ; our MS. has been tampered with, and looks like aim ni«3. 

38) B. dji. 39) B. iimnitS. 40) B. mno. 41) B. T*on, 42) B. mann. 43) 
B. nsto. 44) B. on. 45) B. nipryon. 46) "noSi nun. 47) B. n*v\ 48) B. 
D'.tVh. 49) B. no. 50) B. Stt. 51) B. has this couplet after the next two 
couplets. 52) B. nonpn. 53) B. ]in Sa, 54) B. rnya. 55) B. Smn. 56) As 
B. ; MS. noioa. 57) B. y\m\ 58) B. prnni. 59) B. npn. 60) B. wrn, 61) 
As B. ; MS. oh. 62) B moa, 63) B. ibns^dS, 64 As B. 65) B. nut or n**. 
66) B. Tin. 67) Might be Tin Sk. 68) B. has for these five words n'ttita 
npm nm 69) B. nit. 70) B. nayS. 71) B. npm. 72) B. iry. 73) B. orap\ 
74) B. Tin nn. 75) As B. ; MS. looks like iw. 76) B. nr* ; B. has Da noa 
for 'aa noa. 77) B. maTj. 78) B. b^oo. 79) B. on«3npoi. 80) B, pam. 81) 
B. adds \T. 82) B. oSiyS. 83) As B. ; MS. V*\ 84) As B. ; MS. VM. 85) 
B. non. 86) As B. ; MS. jpn\ 87) B. viSx 88) As B. ; MS. |pno. 

89) B. has, in place of this ending, the following couplet to conclude 
the Tipsn Tj?r :— ,on?n iSyco iS -prm (1. can) onai th by mo* 

: nnm icdo mm ,innn*a *\h nmi 



[IV. T] 

I ) B. Min nr. 2) As B. ; MS. tot. 3) As B. ; MS. 110D ipn, 4) B. nr 
mn. 5) B. inoam. 6) B. TiO«6. 7) B. otwim, 8) B. Si30\ • 9) B. *n:nS. 
10) B. omits. 

For [121] Cf. Bonein, p. 45 :— ^3*? 1DH /won no in* oanS \h*m 
: nSja i3oo r"3nn iff* ino3 Tan nryn 

II) B. omits this couplet entirely. 11a) B. ^m*. 12) B. Uffcn. 13) B. 
B. ^na. 14) B. nsnnvni. 15) B. im*a, 16) In B. this is placed under iyr 
n«nan, a chapter by itself, see Table II. 17) B. mm, 18) B. *T33. 19) 
B. omits. 20) Delete ; evidently an error. 21) B. amA. 22) B, seems to 
be n*an Spa. 23) B. omits. 24) B. b». 25) B. raum, 26) B. ntr3\ 27) B. 
n«,piai. 28) B. has, as the final couplet of nrian Tjw, the following :— 

,an -\phn n* nttnsi map /D'imho dj b^hSho ri3 
: an njon duo nn qk ,D'nnn tofivoa own nmi 



68 NOTES 

29) 1. *pfo ; MS. *rVm. 30) As the concluding couplet of nty WB W 
B. has :— ,nw *rm iby (? L -a An) *o w /b* tS* wr»3 en 

: mit po rmnm jtniA **n naie mo 



[V. m 

1) The heading in B. it nwnn nany. 2) Perhaps ivnay 1 ?. 3) B. mn ro, 
4) B. irAr. 5) B. nnwna. 6) B. iron. 7) B. D'en. 8) B. 'S wit, 9) B. 
nioifa 'o rwn •now. 10) B. OJ. 11) B. wwS w. 12) B. inserts here the 
following:— ,inK«an p*raS nwn n*y n* *?apo 

: won* n*?yo -wo Aar nn* "jSim 
13) B. irit. 14) B. num. 15) MS. may also he read nrn. 16 (?) n*\ 
17) B. has for these three words ny Saa attan *a. 18) B. may. 19) B. 
W 20) As B. ; MS. tana*. 21) B. onpim. 22) As B. ; MS. ww. 23) B # 
has nwn nwn yon nSl jpr. 24) B. inserts hare the following :— 

,nSmn oy k*oj ma pit dj ,nihp ey my pit 
: nSyw oy pa pu cj ,npAno oy noaon (? 1. *S) nS 
25) Or yna. 26) B. wa\ 27) B. mooi. 28) B. itiy). 29) B. rrnn. 30) 
B. rwa. 81) B. omits. 32) As B. ; MS. seems to have f en. 33) B. ror\ 
34) B. DVio. 35) B. ryni, 36) B. ny, 37) B. oiprn, 38) B. seems to have a 
different reading. 39) B. Sy. 40) As B. ; MS. 'it. 31) B. yor, 42; As B. ; 
MS. uuiani nain, 43) B. nnrS. 44) B. ty. 45) B. vipw. 46) aairn or 
laiin ; scarcely a compound of two forms. 47) B's concluding lines are :— 

/<w narS *S iSfia o*San /SSno nora «Wai *ova 
: ^h DiftDoa won nnnn ,nano nS rpaS nay* *nwnS 



[VI. 1] 

1) In B. this is headed pnean *\yv ; the succeeding chapter mpnn *iyv 
2) As B. ; Ma has rrioi. 3) B. T^*°. 4; As B. ; MS. mnnni. 5) B. ^aS. 
6) B. T*?nw. 7) B. oa. 8) B. f?ymS. 9) B. tt*. 10) 1. i*n ; MS. inr ; 
B. 1*1% 11) B. iy, 12) B. nwn». 13) B. nen, 14) B. w», 15) B. r*% 
16) As B. ; MS. nnwS, 17) B. ny\ 18) B. wr\ 19) B. iwy\ 20) B. wnw 
ona. 21) As B. ; MS. has nnonn, 22) B. concludes the chapter here with 
the following:— ,"na noa parn vSr ,phv '»nSna nean dm 

: v?a po onnnm ,te© nnp» ^i 1 * 

[155] In B. tliis is the beginning of onua mpnn nyr, 23) B. w?o, 
24) B. -who. 25) B. ww, 26) B. ia<?a ian*. 27) B.' myan. 28) B. *ra. 
For [156] Compare /fai Gaon in ^rarn-.Dio n*r :— ?SmrS ^ior 'fin nc^ri 
: *?* ra *?an n*rn «7Ko h*r 29) B. SxrS ; MS. bnivh, 30) B. wAiir, 



NOTES 69 

31) B. nSnnn. 32) B. Sk«mS. 83) B. minS. 34) B. yyn* mstSi ; MS. has 

"pHlil, 35) After this B. concludes as follows :— 

,131* vmm mpn Ss *]k ,nw3 n\i Sk» mpn 
: i3n -ifioo Dnwm ,vti idid d.io Y? np 

[VIL T] 

1) B. has two distinct chapters, )incn '«> and S3DH 'ff. 

2) B. pan, 3) B. ymK. 4) B. Ssani ; Cf. Honein, p. 18 (18) ftwnon 
Siraon p tiSa» 5) B. nninN. 6) B. ^Sn ; MS. pSn. 7) B. wA, 8) B. dkidi. 
For [164] cf. Honein, p. 20 (49) :— nnsi tsnxpn trsnn man kSi 

: mpim iwr Cjm nmnnn 

9) B. ]WD1. 10) B. concludes here pno.1 '«> thus : — 

,13 i*i3' D'pnxn ,Kin 'nS *iyem n? 
: ia po nmns /inej n»nn Sk mm 
For [165] cf. Honein, p. 15 : — nnK nMnts>3 ^pSy iuar nao Djnnn Sk 

Diun, 11) B. (?) nirw pi pnnS ; translation according to B. 12) B. S33 
Hi. 13) B. S3D. 14) B. WKin dj. 15) B. I3in. 16) B, riKl. 17) B. n"n&\ 
18) B. 1*. 19) B, 3aS3, 20) B. for Kin p has M\ 21) B. 1*. 22) B ^3*3, 
23) B. y\*\ 24) B. Siren. 

In plaee of [172], [173], and [174] B. has the following, concluding 
SsDn 'p ;— ,mam n\m p niDn ytth m?Knn p3 ,y2t3 103 en j»k 

: ni3iK \m "i'n:ioK *po ,pi:Kn nn'oS pkij «nn kS dk 

,k3* nosn dk ,peKo mm lyern m 
: ksk po on vriim ,vw nS»K vmnetp Sy 
For the first two lines misplaced, compare [190]. 

[viii. nj 

1) There are several points of resemblance in chapter XI of the YesocT 
For [175] and [176] cf. Honein, p. 32 (23) :— p nnn DK D1K p 

: p^Dn kS iSis i? p'fiD* *bv no nxin o*i ,uae ioyo3 p^BDn iS p^ow no DSiyn 

2) Perhaps "piTD, as below [183] ; unless it be "pom. Cf. Yesod XI 
[114] for the who'e stanza. 

8) Cf. also Hai Goon (S3*n 1D10 n*r) for [179], [180], [181] :— 

,d*3Hjd niUK SKtrn Ski ,D'3tpy njni Sisk nfi nSo3 
. . . • 

,D'S3ko proS iKnn Ski ,o^Svun *nne3 noyn Ski 
• • . • 

,nni33 ^ rp3i pi* &»m ,nni3 Y>° uni nianoi 

: nK'pn bm.i Dn»3 SaKn dki ,nw3n Ten ^pm oinw 

4) Cf. Yesod XI [122]. 

5) [184] rather unsatisfactory ; see Translation, a tentative rendering. 



70 KOTES 

1) Alternative reading, m in marga, nrs. 2) & D«. 3) R. C*TMT. 
4) B. -pS Sj oppm rap. 5) R jm. $) R mrt. 7) R. mrx 8) R 79*1. 
9 J la MS. a 1 has been added Urns _l More the fint word of each half- 
line. 10) R ITO. 11) R c*. 12) Aj R ; MS. p-sm. 13) R bat rwi for 
TO ta. U) R ifwr. 15) R W>. 16) R. enra. 17) A* R : MS. rr». 18) 
R **?a, 19) Aj R ; MS. onarc. 20) R wcp\ 21) R. Traa for mi «=^. 22) 
Aa B. ; MS. wtw, 23) R rrrr. 24) R. -srs car?. 25) R. psa. 26) R. 
6tf . 27) R «^r. 28) R. nu 29) R tttm. 

Yfx [200] L 1. c£ Earuin, p. 49 awn o«n r^ rnrrai r«ra a* ten 
mam S* r*en. 

90) R yhm. 31) R nn. 32) R. if. 33j R. arnim. 34) R wra. 35) 
B. uiSa. 36) R fn. 37) R pn. 38) R S*. 39) R -poo. 40) R rn. 41) 
Aa B, ; better perhaps TiA ; MS. *mjS. 42) The final couplet in R is:— 
,y trr yhym ,npm rvm (?) pai ,npai "p™* npnai lena 
: *]t icoo smm rccn rrmn ,ruom nyar 1 ? roncn icr 

[XT^] 

1) R divide* into two parte:— nn 'r and rr?*rn '«r. 2) B. "»rr 3) 
B. rpn, 4) B. "irem. 5) R nrirnn. 6) R iSpsroa. 7) R seems to have 
■paan. 8) B. nrwin. For [209] Cf. Honein, p. 5 :— tpn I'Sn -p ™* ,Q 
vrpa. 0) is. mea "jaS p« npo «no mn mcr "p oinm. 

After this B. inserts final couplet thus: — 

,n* "ncit "pionc^ yt-h moun eyci rror oyo 
: nit 'eo oraca 'a jnm poi nam -|S ommn 

B, then pioceeds to rrVitrn 'r, beginning as A. continues. 

10) B. S« won. 11) B. nm\ 12) B. S*n. 13) B. *:a. 14) B. rcra. 
15) Aa IS. ; MS. -nya. 16) For f> «* B. has rw. For this line Cf. Banein 
p. 42 (18):— msaSn nnor Sarn 'bum rue. 17) B. man. 18) B. mm. 19) 
B. nnava or nnarj; Is A. another form of nnr •grave'? 20) B. wio. 21) 
B. waan 22) B. pna 'io« 23) B. m-nron. 24) B. inSta or 'a. 25) B. 
nS*r nSarn. 26) B. w*. 27) B. Y*ajoai. 28) Or, as the 'Mibchar* paitnna 
15. »)Dnnna, 29) B. p"»Dn. 30) B. mjynnS. 31) B. mS'a. 32) B. I'Svao- 
33) B. omits. 34) B. iruo'San. For 95) read 5) B. TO. For 46) read 36) 
B. mo, 37) B. mnm. 38) B. defective ; has only m... 39) B. 'J'O, 40) For 
on '3 B. has ova, 41) B. &2ne>a. 42) As B. ; MS. ore:. 43) B. pooa v»y, 
44) B. tftt*. 46) As B. ; MS. la. 46) B. axon. 47) B. perhaps cm\ 48) B. 
orno, 40) B. ends tlie chapter thus: — 

,vn ma nxptr nya ^paD ary my") aio hS.t 

: 'H'i nnnn nn naom ^'H *aao Snrn kSi 
.Sec note 3) of VIII. 



NOTES 71 

[XL J**] 

1) B.'s heading is nptnvn ' «f . 2) B, uhn, 3) B. Yibhd, 4) B. in, 5) Of, 
Yesod XIII [145]. 6) B. i^pam for ib'ran *»n a:n. 7) B. nan\ 8) B. nyna 
or ny-m, 9) As B. ; MS. r*, 10) B. wi, 11) B. omits. 12) B. Y?rn. 13) 
B. seems to be D'BfrS. 14) B. "pan. 15) B. an. 16) B. IXKn. For [232] and 
[64] Cf. Eat Gaon ('n'e'tf) : — ,niDKi *yfia &v -purS 

: miann pa rrn aSuai 

17) As B. ; MS. norm. 18) B. npnai. 19) B. Sh # 20) B. inp«nrai. 21) 
B. tjena, and omits «mh, 22) B. omits. 23) B. inserts after this DH'l D*anai 
fi^noi DHBfi. 24) As B. ; MS. clearly *)n. 25) B. town, and then inserts 
ti'Ta nnn hS Jinn na 1 ? la jyoS, 26) B. ttSaaa. 27) As B. ; MS. clearly 
isimi rn, 28) B. 'b pa nowS for S 'S Hin, 29) B. «hH. 30) B. "p*. 31) 
B. adds trn, 32) B. *n\ 33) B. Sa. 34) B, (?) nara. 35) This couplet and 
the following are placed later in B. B. adds Sa Sjf after najp. 36) B. deletes 
p S*. 37) B. inserts ana. 38) B. omits ^S. 39) As B. ; MS. DM, 40) B. 
perhaps nana. 41) B. *ii\ 42) B. rjov. 43) After this B. inserts:— 

/irfcjnro r«H ^mS |?h (or nau) na» Sa *a nri 
: inSa «nnS vnano) prf? nar «n p laa 

44) B. ana, 45) Both A. and B. have -jnu ; it should doubtless be V^a. 
46) B. has in text -pna ; in margin "nya. 47) B. omits. 48) B. Dva OH *]H. 
49) B. airnn, 50 B. by t 50) B. jwSa, 52; B. a«in\ 53) B. nanSi. 54) B. 
viyvea, 55) B. D«nc. 56) B. seems *]*a. 57) As B. ; MS. am*, 58) B. seems 
DpSnn. 59) As B. ; MS. DhhtS. 60) B. might be Dna. 61) I insert this line 
from B. ; it is omitted in A. 62) B. a?yn. 63) B. origan. 64) B. concludes 
the chapter thus :— ,ina Wi ncS Diona fi^r ny *?aa 

: 71a DiTnnn pa hion am 

After this, B. has the heading np*nrn Sy tamaan Bnmn pin* ny«\ 

65) B. has npm m*e mar a<ny Saa, 66) B. law ; A. has aaiff\ th« 
second a in a later hand, and placed above the word. 67) B. nam, 68) 
Or, as B., itfKa. 69) The first letter looks like o. 70) B. nanSi. 71) Sic ; 
perhaps 'ffaa. 72) n superadded by a later hand. 73) B. |'H. 74) B. iaa 
SjJ 1131 n»H. 75) B. nff\ 76) B. m-na ; B. inserts the following:— 

,mSattn naan r»nS yaia nan 
: (?) nn*oa mbna nai *:aa 

In place of [251] B. has the following ending : — 

,a* kSi ^a» nn« iSmi ^anofS aaaa marS aSiyS 
: t9M ma arrmn man nya ,nmaa man nbjnn pirn 



?2 XOTES 

rxn 2*] 

1) B. ma rt3M TTF. 2) As B. ; MS. ras. 3) R raids after this as 
fofows ;_ naranS V9 S-wn rar pr\ 4) The last fiwr words sbcwld perhaps 
be deleted. 5) R omits. 6) R reads "Be tj ?« «* ^ ■**» Ba * 1 ^ ^^ 
tt». 7) R 33? can. 8) R omits. 9) R has for the last Sir words ?» W 
osnj. 10) R omits the last two words. 11) R- omits the last two words. 
12) B. San. 13) R might be read 73=. 14) R ?3 f or ex 15) R or«. 16) 
This stanza closely resembles the concluding passage XV11I [1S6] of the 
Te$od ; compare also Hai Goon (rzzrn "«« T) : — 

^ ' ". T io C3 ;nnS «vt tit L ' v;ir> n-ssyn p rep 
In place of [258] R ends :— 

/p mn 3t3 i2T Sa nri ,1*1 err nam wfr 
: t* neo 7* rmn rot nxsm ,rn "t^n T c^r e*m 

[XIIL *] 

1) B. vtnntm raimn ensn ifr. 2) As R ; MS. rpw. 3) As R ; MS. 
irauo or muna 4) R t* nnan. 5) So R ; MS. 3-rot. 6) R T*3. 7) R 
omits tS wim. 8) R 'x\ 17*3 733 "J7 ^rn. 9) R -nrpTi "pan t?233 .-main 
13 nparn ran*. 10) R t»7* t*? n3%r - **) B. omits. 12) R r^s s-mS 
13101 irer. 13) B. nee nysi. 14) R 13«3 7m rs*o 3 % r?7 pit ^nptn. 

The next 12 lines, enclosed in square brackets, I hare added from 
MS. B. ; they are wanting in MS. A. 

16) B. TO. 16) B. '*. 17) Or rmsr ; probably M^r as Mibckar § 253 
/ma K5*r Trya B*o* 7*1. 18) B. omits. 19) B. pp. 20) R npo. 21) B- 
mi3\ 22) B. tjj. 23) B. nann\ 24) B. pjy. 25) B. T»aS. 26) R s ems 
awaro. 27) B. wnp\ 28) B. r»* '23. 29) B. cio nitnav 30) B. wmS. 31) 
B. mintm. 32) B. C3np3. 33) B. DTO3 to in. 34) R "wort 35) R omits. 
3e) B. nan. 37) B. pir. 38) B. -pon\ 

39) B. inserts here :— ,W3iw7 pno w y\\* irn nan mi 

: innsnS wem fVyinS wen pm 

40) B. mori33 irwia t». *1) B. t™. 42 ) B. wcn . 43) R 1*37. 44) 
B. D n. 45) B. fijn. 46) B. Diea 47) B. -pro*. 48) Not quite clear in B ; 
: pips mn (or mrn) &vn (or nou) nn» 0*\ 49) B. looks like nn, evidently 
wrong. 50) B. ipa«i. 61) B. pea. 52) B. r'H. 53) B. inSyoi iot^. 64) B. 
noSvn. 65) B. pao, 66) B. nasSs. 56a) B. mien. 57) B. pr?. 68) B. njnio. 
59) R noioS ^maim, 60) B. vny. 61) As B. ; MS. n-nam. 

62) B. has here the following somewhat tantalising lines : — 
,yn?m pvn ^no (? ra) in Sa ica (or ;obc) pro nrn n? no 

^•nann idhS p^nn ^ prS pm \cv irai 
^ruax ^aaSai cSp Tann ^n ^a nari ' 
: yriHiv dk ih yann cm nra n? no nyr *b 



NOTES 73 

63) MS. doubtful ; B. has D^K, 64) B. toniaW 'V1V&1, 65) B. adds 
UTW or itw, 66) B. iat WH # 67) B. (?) ntaia or tMlo. 68) B. p. 69) B. 
ft* pna. 70 B. nffKi, 71) B. omits. 72) B. *?k. 73) B. *n*n. 74) B. ffttK. 
75) As B. ; MS. )b, 76) B. arm, For [289] Cf. Proverbs VIII. 17. 77) B. 
•Mi. 78; B. SaS. 79) B. **?*. 80) B. vwt. 81) As B. ; MS. *fiv. 82) B. Sk, 
83) B. n«f?. 84) B. *]K. 85) B. imam. For these lines, Cf. Yesod XVIII 
[183]. 86) B. rpnn. 87) B. adds :— ymm liar *Sy Binn /wvm ninn "pan. 

The 4th line of [292] contains a broad-minded teaching, frequently 
denied to Judaism. 

88) B. nnntn, 89) B. aw*. 90) As B. ; MS. Slip,, evidently wrong, 
91) B. wrongly nryn. 92) B. lan*. 93) B. may be mm. 9-1) B. nnStcn, 95) 
Or perhaps thw *b\ 96) B. pn niDKn, 97) B. npnS. 98) B. inverts, begin- 
ning with the third and fourth lines. 99) B. Saa *Ja. 100) B. omits. 101) 
B. nnw, 102) B. inK:n. 103) B. w, evidently wrong. 104) B. natsn. 105) 
B. ne-io. 105) B. nSpil. 107) B. omits the whole line. 108) B. adds |OM), 
109) B. D"n. 110) B. ninn. Ill) B. ends the chapter thus:— 

,nSa «M8i hv^ nmi *pSa ]n onan nanK 
: nSa nifio waoa noa nnnnn mpnS anKn dm 

B. heads the following nnann na'ten njr*\ 

112) B. lorn. 113) B. wit man. 114) B. ijn Vnj SaiD, 115) As B. ; 

A. has nnnoS na>Ka, 116) B. ffC3. 117) B. iDnm. 118) As B. ; MS. arnnra 
119) B. omits n. 120) B. iaani, In [304] B. has IK in the beginning of the 
second line. 121) B. (?) nnai, 122) Added by a later hand. 123) B. iS, as 
also in margin of MS, 124) As B. ; MS. apna aip, evidently wrong. 125) 

B. nSxjn. 126) As B. ; MS. nmo. 127) B. Sa ma \in hS *a. 128) B. vno. 
129) B. 'M. 130) B. iniiaA. 131) B.'s ending is :— 

,iTKa norn Ski mo iidi (1.) ^rcaa pan Y? nan nna 
:iTHa icdo nao rrnnn ,iSatra trr van 1 ? nianm 

[XIV. T] 
1) B's heading is D'amKn nrna, 2) B. am* Kin nr. 3) As B. ; MS. 
Kin, 4) B. "naj. 5) B. omits. C) B. lans, 7) B. adds ^, 8) B. iKfln, 9) B. 
njr, 10) B. wv. 11) B. ny. 

12) Before this B. adds:— ,mini jn nan ,dik *by hnrn nya 

:in*yoa inpyoi ,ijn ioa vm moki 

13) B. void. 14) B. Saa. 15) As B. ; MS. has D'JM. 
B. concludes here with the following :— 

:nr nao nnnn man njn ,nt una ;nan D»aniK nrna 

16) B. begins a new chapter, which precedes this, with the heading 
mStmnn Siap njrr. 17) A3 B. ; MS. has *a. 18) B. adds Kin. 19) B. ]<ki 
nKa mKn iks ipw\ 20) B. adds Y?. 21) As B. ; MS. faniM, 22) B. niavua. 



74 NOTES 



23) Aj R; MA n* 24) R ?•. i^) R r» ») ttigfet sot that he cnmi I 
17) R 1*3. ») R *5«s» ») R (?) tbl 3D) R prat»hij ?2 77 *»; i* 
Mtmt to Lave friay. 21) R r r. 3!) R csds the chapter :— 

: Al'JI "£Q t^ IT! »1 ^3 t3 /?I2T«12 TX 

With £323] R begins a new chapter nrrrrs tpf with the words V*ra 
***. 33) R s^3C7. 34) R refc. 

35) R inserts : trj nrsi *iwwrj rnsre ;?«t -27 ~32 zn *ry ?■« 

3«) B. ir?3 bjh. 37) R adds -p. 38) R 2~ cj. 33) As R ; MS. J rrr2, 
40) B. aern. 41) R nam. 42) R arsr. 43) R j-.tt. 44) R *rV. 45) R 
TOG. 46) R T^M. 47) R t^r. *•) B. »n\ 49) B. ** . 

B/i final couplet is :— ,H2nx ns*j* n» ,n« na 



[XV. 1C] 

I) The heading in B. is msnn ->.;». 2) The second half of the line 
in B. seem* to be 72021 irn pS Sor* iyS. 3) R p?. 4) B. vuan. 5) R 
•pot. 6) B. men. 7) B. T***2. 8) As B.; MS. n*. 

9) In the original MS. (A.) the whole of the chapter XXII, consisting 
of 38 lines, is wrongly interpolated here (Set Introduction p. XIX). 

The next five lines rightly appear in B. under .TU.in '9 10) R ni2H 

II) R inserts : — ,iSpcai wy-n van run *2 pn?3 

: iSro3 133 st (?) i?r:o* via nrsi 
12) As 15. ; MS. B**i32\ 13) R omits. 14) B. concludes as follows:— 

,713.1*3 E.T31B3 np3im ,BT.B1 Bl* '23 Wl IcS 

: nsn*3 rrmn Ss paw ,r*it *23 mans -pS trn 
15) B. logins here a new chapter nj.isnn 'r. 16) As B. ; MS. Bn 3,1*3. 
17) B. D33S 18) B. ^30. 19) B. njpn. 20) As B. ; MS. «n\ 21) B. jms 
♦312. 22) B. 1*. 23) As B. ; MS. orriM. 24) As R ; MS. ^m. In 1. 1. of 
[341] read T3nS ; MS. vaS 

Compare for [330] and [340] Honein p. 27 (2), Aristotle's advice to 
Alexander of Macedon, the language being somewhat different from that in 
nniD.i r.0 :- 

•jnarpa '3 ansn* rissni ,Bn^* *j3»on3 a?n by Siro nw mxi* ri33nr3 
nwun rissn *S '3 yii ,f?W b.tSj? vssnro sno nnv b.tS* ^nan3 Bnsn* 
/2i mrpS iSav ioiS iSsvrs penn *3 ,iDnrn ivvn nryo3 b* o n^ssSm 
See Note on p. 343 (referring to p. Ill, English translation) of my edition 
'The Kthicul Trestisos of Berachya' (1902). Compare also [257] of Shekel 
and [I HO] of Yetod. 



NOTES 75 

B. concludes the chapter thus : — 

,ia -|S nnp iSar '*ye dj >a*o nn* eSiy idib p 
: na ittoa nnnn t*m ,nan3na nan ^ nybi 



[XVI. TW 

1) B. Ton nnb. 2) B. pat rf?:m <?*. 3) B. omits. 4) B. larot, 5) B. vjn, 
6) B. Tnon. 7) These two lines omitted in B. 8) B. inn, Cf. for the idea 
contained in [345] Yesod XIV [150] ; compare also Hai Gaon's Tff :— 

/iam m TDa pin cm 
: lapi poiDO 13193 ih \T 
9) B. .T,T. 10) B. omits. 11) B. ipnn, 12) B. WM. 13) B, jr*. 14) 
B. 1*b. 15) inserts l"n na\ 16) B. <?*. 17) B. fi*. 18) As B„ or win. 19) 
B. b*\ 20) B. wrani. 21) B. ends :— 

,mmS tena* Sara no* ,td 13*1 nnnons pio run 
: sninn nnnna poi /udoi eibno ncS no*r pa 



[XVII. p] 

1) B. W31B. 2; B. wi ISO. 3) B. Sie. 4) B, nA t 5) As B. ; MS. pHV. 
6) B. S33. 7) B. pop. 8) B. inin wir\ 9) B. omits. 10) B. bj. 11) B. par. 
12) B. wronply Cb333, 13J B. nbinen. 14) B. nan. 15) B. m Kin. 16) B # 
nysra. 17) B. rotu*. 18) B. piby\ 19) B. omits. 20) B. omits. 21) B. pibjn. 
22) B. omits pj?n 'D Shi, 

For [361] Cf. Hon tin, p. 23 (3) 

,vSy vsuy nitranrn nytcs *jSaS nannn S« 
: vSj id.ti iyio mnv3 «f*a epiff mnra laan Sxr kS e\n *a 
Also p. 35 (6) 'ui ibys nj?Bf3 Tin' *?* ^SoS namw *o 

23) B. »«S. 24) B. t)ian\ Cf. #ai tfaon (TV) 

# aipm ibo Sxa nisn &m 
: (or asini) anpni Toyn nn Sy *a njn 
25) B. «|iB«n. 26) B. ry. 27) B. nr«. 28) B. nsn. 29) As B. ; MS. p 
30) B. im\ 31) B. iSo, 32) B. tor am. 

B/s final couplet is :— ,nnea3 ^ton <nn Tan Sa mi ^So w Sk *& Tor 

: nntaaa Ton nnxen vmn ,nsbS Ten nan nr -ijrtcfi 
It is this final couplet which is reproduced in the translation, and not 
the one piinted. 



[xviii. rw 

1) Word superadded by a later hand ; in copy of text ]'K. 

For [368] Cf. Honein p. 18 (3) :— /loinni ,napen ,7\}hi nen* *b nrr 



7*5 XOTES 



wren vf a v$ arrm /jca n*:B mnr rnr* r?2si ,r-si p nnesn 
• (TPpnr) wyrra Byro jst 17 w •d /fins cm 

Our text enumerate* bat fire ; we can supplement the sixth from H<mein m 
2) Another version in the margin rrr» *;«?. 3) With these lines B. 
begins rhmn tfv. 4) B. omits. 5) B. rcpn 6) R omits. 7) R "r^nt. 8) B. 
ron. 9) B, concludes the chapter : — 

,*n *p cnoisi rr.nrjr -ev^ pn *r^rr ysrsi naS 
:*n neo errmna psi rStwn 'a^a "frn Sk 
10) B. adds P*M. In B. this couplet and the two following appear under 
fin par" *:nn l*r. 11) B. ^r. Cf. Yesod VI [62] and [CiJ]. 12) R 

nmhyrh mrcrni. 13) B. ends thus :— 

,13 S* O'anip (?) jr.rrra m*3 ctsA tnt '33 

: *i3 ^tcn *raea rrmna psi 



[XIX B*] 

1) B. ma3 dV?S *nn *ja. 2) B. -p**- 3) B. w. 4) B. -p**. 5) B. 
*ap. 6) B. i|»p. 7) B. omits these two lines. Cf. Yesod X [98]. 8) B. mcr. 
9) B. *S A. 10) B. kS iS. 11) B. \n\ 12) B. nyan pna. 13) B. nail. 14) 
As 15. ; later correction in A., originally iniooiv. 

14) in [387] should be 14a). B. concludes as follows : — 

: n "jS w ^pn *pea ,*3pn S* nSiyS bt^k nrya 
: n rwon nnnn ruon cxi /irwb kjt.o *nn punai 



[XX. a 

1)B. omits ri p«". 2) B. iya. Cf. Honein, p. 32 (7) :— *ai* IP* runm 
: impn ^mSa irSynS Sawn yaaa ina^er D'Syrr? Sain cat b** upr nnrr 

3) B. **?3. 4) B. (?) irun\ 5) As B. ; MS. nmps. 6; B. inserts here :— 
,voioa bih '3a p*nm nn*an 'no **?y ipin run 
: vovki voioa 'a onn* *oioa rein pun p* j^a 

6) B. looks like la mja. 8) B. lab p\ 9) B. it, 10) B. frm. 11) B. 
(?) viy Saa. 12) B. hSi. 13) B. ircaS. 

After this, from [393], B. omits the whole remaining portion of this 
chapter. 

For [396] Cf. Honein, p. 24 (35):— '3a naio nrm D'mn D^a3M /iom 
. ownan m*i rjoa B^auon nioipon aiarn rpa* lewa niaitan nnno iaryi ,o"m 

14) Doubtful whether 1 or \ I have adopted the latter, though I call 
attention to the phrase in Genesis XLIX, 19. 

15) The word paoa, originally inserted here, has been deleted by a 
later hand. 



NOTES 77 

[XXI. K3] 

1) B's heading is ^pan l*r. 2) B. Ip'a, 3) B. loin, or a half-formed 
D. 4) B. O'pim. 5) B. fi'anp. 6) B. njr. 7) B. n*arrrk 

8) The same simile in almost the same words in Yesod XVII [175]. 
Cf. R. Yehuda Halevi's couplet "On Clouds of Rain" (Treasures of Oxford, 
pp. 46 and 51) : — 

,main o^a wer* n*aaa *,y&*i pjr *Sa naia no> 

: maaSn Sa a<yyn o*pnra nwya naan kSi pnrn nyi 

9) In B. this comes after the next couplet 10) B. *pnut. 11) B. imro. 
12) B. ntntPD, 13) In B. this couplet comes after the following. 14) Here 
begins the nnaan iyv of B. 15) B. no*. 16) B. wip. 17) B. adds im. 
18) B. has ana iaa dih for awaS 1*1 ,naa. 19) B. nmo wi, a better 
reading. 20) B. n^aff. 21) As B. ; MS. lai. 22) B. mnita dj. 23) AsB.; 
MS. kSi. 24) B. aia. 25) As B. ; MS, nam 26) B. yw\ 

27) This whole line omitted in B. B. finishes the chapter thus :— 

,wwa naa arm hS ,wnaa vp* ir* naa 

,uoo v*" P«h *nnr ny ,un*rni m 'Sy maan kS 

,-nn may noiyoi noanoi ,Savm noio *S*a naa raS 

: tin mo vvr onnnn men d ji ,mana iaa vmmo ipoi 



[XXIL 33] 

1) B. h*?. 2) B. *pSo «n\ 3) B. dh. 4) B. van w i* hS »a. 5) B. n*n t 
6) B. rwa. 7) B. omits. 8) With the help of B., I think I have succeeded 
in restoring the corrupt text in A. I feel tempted to read JW in place of |ffl. 
Cf. Yesod XI [120] ; also Hat Goon (as before) .— 

,kiv 'nn inuo into rmS tarn 

,Tnna na n* m ia? 

,*]ji»o S* mua mv nm 

: ruAo Sm nova nar *nn 

9) B. pn»a^. 10) B. n^nn. 11) B. jvd»A. B. inserts here :— 

,rmrm iS «n mm ,i«rynn iS pic iff* 
: rriannS ijn 1 *Si ,oSan *Sa on onw 
For [419] Cf. Honein p. 22 (106) ;— 

/ui -no dSxm v* in hS nom o»*an Sy vim iSnn 

12) B. T1. 13) B. nro. 14) B. inserts here :— 

: nSoa nm* n*a na* «Sn /nSw wmo iS nann irn 
15) *Sr. 16) B. **im. 17) B. ocffoi vSh pnS oyapn. 18) B. on*. 19) 
B. iitYiiA jo* mm. 20) B. wr. 21) B. in-inm. 22) B. omits. 23) B. pom. 



78 NOTES 

24) B. tym. 25) 1. fna\ Both A. and R nto. 26) R moS, and ends the 
chapter. Cf. Honem, p. 32 (21) n«n p nuifc mnn. 

R breaks off here, and concludes with a personal poem. 

27) MB. has poi ; I propose moot 

For latter portion of [429] cf. Honein, p. 25 (46) :— pno nanS Ann 
: i«na ramnS perro uin iwiA Snun dim mo*r aw id* # |pt nnan nn*n man 

28) *|S superadded in later hand. 



TRANSLATION 

OF 

YE SOD HA YIRAH. 

(TIte Foundation of Religious Fear.) 



78 NOTES 

24) B. tyrn. 25) 1. b)b\ Both A. and B. nSfc'. 26) B. nxA, and ends the 
chapter. Cf. Horuin, p. 32 (21) rmin p mnfi rnnn. 

B. breaks off here, and concludes with a personal poem. 

27) MS. has \nm ; I propose loot. 

For latter portion of [429] cf. Honein, p. 25 (46) :— jmo DanS Ann 
: i»na vamatS •pwrro uin vannS Swi dim rocr arc idm ,jp? nnm *wi*n ixan 

28) lS superadded in later hand. 



TRANSLATION 

OF 

YESOD HAYIRAH. 

(Tlte Foundation of Religious Fear.) 



BOOK ON THE FOUNDATION OF 
RELIGIOUS FEAR. 



Have I not written for thee a number of times counsels 
regarding knowledge, how to acquire wisdom and instruction, 
and to comprehend words of understanding ? The fear of 
the Lord is the beginning of wisdom ; there is good success 
to every one that exerciseth himself in these pursuits ; his 
praise endureth for ever. 

Men of understanding have asked me to teach them the 
ways of instruction and wisdom, to give them rules whereby 
they might find life for their bodies while they are upon the 
earth, and help them towards the life of the soul on the day 
when they shall be called to ascend on high. 

I was much astonished at their request ; it seemed, indeed, 
strange in my sight, considering that the matter is closed 
and concealed, nay, hidden from the eye of all creatures ; no 
mortal knowing and estimating the way; — 'tis but found 
by those who fear God. 

I then turned to inquire, and to search in the Law of 
God, and I attuned my thoughts ; I tested in the refining 
vessel the opinions of experts who went before me, and I 
realised that all is nought and vanity beside the fear of the 
Lord. 

Therefore, why shall I remain silent ? Is it not well 
that I rouse the slumberers, and build up a habitation firm 
and exalted upon the mountain-top whither my goal shall be ? 
Indeed, as for the " Foundation of Fear," I will establish it 
upon its true basis, and set it forth in chapters and stanzas. 

Hearken unto me, and incline thine ears ; attend with thy 
heart, and open thy eyes ; rebel not against the words of my 
mouth and against my voice when I speak ; accept my 
instruction, and I will argue and order my subject with the 
help of direct proverbs, clear and transparent. 

Take advice, and harden not your hearts ; for why shall 
it be unto you as a snare ? Try to understand that all my 
words are honestly meant ; there is nothing perverse or crooked 
in them. They are intended to flow upon the human heart 
with the fertilising effect of the former and latter rain. 



98 

8g. 

Are you dazzled by beautiful appearances, by embroideries, 
by fine purple garments ? * * * Think of the earthenware 
garden-pot ; it may be gilded over, indeed, but in reality 
there is the earthy odour clinging to it still. 

90. 

Lay bare to thyself the folly of thy inclination and its 
consequences before thou exposest thyself to the danger ; and 
having weighed its scandal, depart from it ; for why shouldst 
thou hug it, if it be to thy shame ? * * * 

91. 

See the strange woman who flatters with the words of her 
mouth ; these are as drawn swords, to win over the simple and 
wanting in heart, who know not the right way ; their feet are 
suddenly entangled, and caught in the net and snare, and they 
have no rest. 

92. 

The simple one goes after her as a lamb brought to the 
slaughter ; and while sinners fall by her, the man good and 
righteous before God will always escape. Cleave, therefore, 
to thine own wife, rejoicing in her beauty, and revelling ij^ her 
love. 

93. 
How much better it is to caress a lioness than a senseless 
woman ! Better to kiss the lips of an adder or scorpion than 
foolishly to kiss her lips 1 You may think it pleasant to have 
her company to your heart's content ; but understand, you'll 
have a full share of shame and disgrace to follow. 

94. 
In living with the wife of thy youth, see to attach thyself 
to men of principle ; and let not senseless beauty entice thee, 
nor the thought of money or substance lead thee astray, 
remembering that according to the root and stem the tree will 
produce its fruit — even a revolting growth. 

95. 
Love life's companion with a constant love, and then you 
may be assured of her love ; and when you thrust her aside, 
thrust her aside with your left, but draw her near to you with 



99 

your right hand ; otherwise your heart will flit about hither 
and thither. And while you are strict with her, be so with 
gentle caution, for then you shall have peace at all hours and 
times. 

96. 

Be glad, rejoice in the charms of the love (lit. " hind ") 
destined for thee by Heaven ; so she for ever will find her fullest 
joy, and delight with gladness in thee. Understand, too, there 
are times to embrace ; but there is also a time when it is better 
to be alone than to caress. 



CHAPTER X. 
On Desire. 

97. 
Fear God, and do His will, and desist from doing thine own 
pleasure ; for then thou shalt find thy wish in carrying out 
God's will, either as regards thy life or thy possessions. Know 
also that the more thou strengthenest and fortifiest thyself in 
the exercise of His wishes, the greater shall He make thy 
power and strength. 

98. 

Take heed unto thyself, lest two companions which are 
ever agitating within thee mislead thee by their blandishments, 
namely, the organ of sight and the emotion of the heart, which 
two conspire in thee to cause thee pain. Would the axe and 
the hatchet be present to cut down, if there were no wood 
among the trees of the forest or in the thicket ? 

99- 
Listen unto me, and hearken not unto the desires of thy 
heart, gaping inordinately ; and should she be willing to turn 
either to the right or to the left, then turn thou far aside from 
her ways, remembering that what at first might appear to thee 
glorious, ends in loss and mockery. 

100. 

Grasp the knowledge that desire in thee is a sickness, affect- 
ing thee just as decay and the moth affect garments, tearing 
them ; and if you think that thereby you will obtain thrae, 



100 

objects which you have not as yet obtained, you give evidence 
that your common sense and natural ability have already 
taken leave of you. 

101. 

Guard against Desire, which wages a hard and heavy battle 
with thee. Fight against her, and have no wish to live on 
terms of peace with her ; rather brandish in her face shield 
and buckler ; for in warring with her will be thy peace ; and 
to be at peace with her will mean war to thee. 

102. 

A man will think himself sharp enough both to obtain 
his desires and to find wisdom, and he may think that he has 
found it ; but he does not clearly understand that in the 
keen search for his desires he has hindered it (i.e., the search 
for wisdom), just as a child in searching for fire takes it, and 
places it in a fire-pan full of water. 

103. 

Conquer thy heart's desire before it conquers thee, and 
breaks thee ; for if thou dost not rule over thine own spirit, 
how canst thou rule over others ? Why suffer thy soul to 
be sullied, when, being choice, she has a place in the house of 
the King of kings ? 

104. 

Forsake thy desire before it forsakes thee, and thou shalt 
be at rest. Have no longing for that which has not been 
allotted to thee, and thou wilt not procure for thyself trouble 
and labour. Rise and take unto thyself the balm of wisdom 
to heal thy inclinations, though they be of long standing, and 
deeply-rooted as the plague. 

105. 

Rejoice and be glad in thine own lot ; then sorrows and 
sighing will flee from thee. Despair of ever attaining that 
which is beyond thy lot, and thou wilt find ease. Will not thy 
grief, on the morrow after the loss of a thing, be in proportion 
to the joy which thou didst experience in obtaining it ? 

106. 

See, if the fire of thy desires enflame the chambers of thy 
heart, overstepping as it were its banks, and burn within thee 



101 

as a fire raging in a forest and as a flame consuming the fields ; 
then let the cloud of renunciation, distilling its dews within 
thy heart, tend to extinguish its flames. 

107. 

Take advice, and make Desire subservient to the Fear of 
God ; and beware lest thou break asunder the thick bands 
which attach thee to this Fear ; for why shouldst thou ever be 
afraid of the harm done by Desire, even though chains and 
iron bars be in her hand ? 



CHAPTER XI. 
On Contentment. 

108. 

Fear God, who openeth the windows of heaven's favour and 
poureth forth a blessing upon thee, and rest content with that 
which He hath prepared for thee, whether much or little be 
found in thy pocket ; then shalt thou bear thy poverty when 
it cometh as a traveller, and thy want as an armed man, 
being supported. 

109. 

Find thy contentment in that which thou possessest, and 
weary not thyself to increase desirable things ; and if thou 
rejoicest in thy lot as it is, even though thou hast little, thou 
wilt have indeed a pleasant life. God will accept thy deeds ; 
what matters it if they be but few, so long as they be cleanly ? 

no. 

Eat thy bread as far as thou requirest it, in order to live and 
to satisfy thy wants, but do not overfeed ; for what is the use 
of indulging to excess, if thou must give it up in pain, and suffer 
burning in thy palate and throat ; or what is the use of filling 
thyself with loathsomeness, if thou canst stop, and not waste 
thy foodstuff ? 

in. 

Understand that food nourishes the body just as rain does 
the ground ; it gives sap and fat to the bones, and goes towards 
the growth and development of the human frame. Is it not 
a fact, however, that when there is too much rain, the seed 



100 

objects which you have not as yet obtained, you give evidence 
that your common sense and natural ability have already 
taken leave of you. 

IOI. 

Guard against Desire, which wages a hard and heavy battle 
with thee. Fight against her, and have no wish to live on 
terms of peace with her ; rather brandish in her face shield 
and buckler ; for in warring with her will be thy peace ; and 
to be at peace with her will mean war to thee. 

102. 

A man will think himself sharp enough both to obtain 
his desires and to find wisdom, and he may think that he has 
found it ; but he does not clearly understand that in the 
keen search for his desires he has hindered it (i.e., the search 
for wisdom), just as a child in searching for fire takes it, and 
places it in a fire-pan full of water. 

103. 

Conquer thy heart's desire before it conquers thee, and 
breaks thee ; for if thou dost not rule over thine own spirit, 
how canst thou rule over others ? Why suffer thy soul to 
be sullied, when, being choice, she has a place in the house of 
the King of kings ? 

104. 

Forsake thy desire before it forsakes thee, and thou shalt 
be at rest. Have no longing for that which has not been 
allotted to thee, and thou wilt not procure for thyself trouble 
and labour. Rise and take unto thyself the balm of wisdom 
to heal thy inclinations, though they be of long standing, and 
deeply-rooted as the plague. 

105. 

Rejoice and be glad in thine own lot ; then sorrows and 
sighing will flee from thee. Despair of ever attaining that 
which is beyond thy lot, and thou wilt find ease. Will not thy 
grief, on the morrow after the loss of a thing, be in proportion 
to the joy which thou didst experience in obtaining it ? 

106. 

See, if the fire of thy desires enflame the chambers of thy 
heart, overstepping as it were its banks, and burn within thee 



101 

as a fire raging in a forest and as a flame consuming the fields ; 
then let the cloud of renunciation, distilling its dews within 
thy heart, tend to extinguish its flames. 

107. 

Take advice, and make Desire subservient to the Fear of 
God ; and beware lest thou break asunder the thick bands 
which attach thee to this Fear ; for why shouldst thou ever be 
afraid of the harm done by Desire, even though chains and 
iron bars be in her hand ? 



CHAPTER XI. 
On Contentment. 

108. 

Fear God, who openeth the windows of heaven's favour and 
poureth forth a blessing upon thee, and rest content with that 
which He hath prepared for thee, whether much or little be 
found in thy pocket ; then shalt thou bear thy poverty when 
it cometh as a traveller, and thy want as an armed man, 
being supported. 

109. 

Find thy contentment in that which thou possessest, and 
weary not thyself to increase desirable things ; and if thou 
rejoicest in thy lot as it is, even though thou hast little, thou 
wUt have indeed a pleasant life. God will accept thy deeds ; 
what matters it if they be but few, so long as they be cleanly ? 

no. 

Eat thy bread as far as thou requirest it, in order to live and 
to satisfy thy wants, but do not overfeed ; for what is the use 
of indulging to excess, if thou must give it up in pain, and suffer 
burning in thy palate and throat ; or what is the use of filling 
thyself with loathsomeness, if thou canst stop, and not waste 
thy foodstuff ? 

in. 

Understand that food nourishes the body just as rain does 
the ground ; it gives sap and fat to the bones, and goes towards 
the growth and development of the human frame. Is it not 
a fact, however, that when there is too much rain, the seed 



100 

objects which you have not as yet obtained, you give evidence 
that your common sense and natural ability have already 
taken leave of you. 

IOI. 

Guard against Desire, which wages a hard and heavy battle 
with thee. Fight against her, and have no wish to live on 
terms of peace with her ; rather brandish in her face shield 
and buckler ; for in warring with her will be thy peace ; and 
to be at peace with her will mean war to thee. 

102. 

A man will think himself sharp enough both to obtain 
his desires and to find wisdom, and he may think that he has 
found it ; but he does not clearly understand that in the 
keen search for his desires he has hindered it (i.e., the search 
for wisdom), just as a child in searching for fire takes it, and 
places it in a fire-pan full of water. 

103. 

Conquer thy heart's desire before it conquers thee, and 
breaks thee ; for if thou dost not rule over thine own spirit, 
how canst thou rule over others ? Why suffer thy soul to 
be sullied, when, being choice, she has a place in the house of 
the King of kings ? 

104. 

Forsake thy desire before it forsakes thee, and thou shalt 
be at rest. Have no longing for that which has not been 
allotted to thee, and thou wilt not procure for thyself trouble 
and labour. Rise and take unto thyself the balm of wisdom 
to heal thy inclinations, though they be of long standing, and 
deeply-rooted as the plague. 

105. 

Rejoice and be glad in thine own lot ; then sorrows and 
sighing will flee from thee. Despair of ever attaining that 
which is beyond thy lot, and thou wilt find ease. Will not thy 
grief, on the morrow after the loss of a thing, be in proportion 
to the joy which thou didst experience in obtaining it ? 

106. 

See, if the fire of thy desires enflame the chambers of thy 
heart, overstepping as it were its banks, and burn within thee 



101 

as a fire raging in a forest and as a flame consuming the fields ; 
then let the cloud of renunciation, distilling its dews within 
thy heart, tend to extinguish its flames. 

107. 

Take advice, and make Desire subservient to the Fear of 
God ; and beware lest thou break asunder the thick bands 
which attach thee to this Fear ; for why shouldst thou ever be 
afraid of the harm done by Desire, even though chains and 
iron bars be in her hand ? 



CHAPTER XI. 
On Contentment. 

108. 

Fear God, who openeth the windows of heaven's favour and 
poureth forth a blessing upon thee, and rest content with that 
which He hath prepared for thee, whether much or little be 
found in thy pocket ; then shalt thou bear thy poverty when 
it cometh as a traveller, and thy want as an armed man, 
being supported. 

109. 

Find thy contentment in that which thou possessest, and 
weary not thyself to increase desirable things ; and if thou 
rejoicest in thy lot as it is, even though thou hast little, thou 
wilt have indeed a pleasant life. God will accept thy deeds ; 
what matters it if they be but few, so long as they be cleanly ? 

no. 

Eat thy bread as far as thou requirest it, in order to live and 
to satisfy thy wants, but do not overfeed ; for what is the use 
of indulging to excess, if thou must give it up in pain, and suffer 
burning in thy palate and throat ; or what is the use of filling 
thyself with loathsomeness, if thou canst stop, and not waste 
thy foodstuff ? 

in. 

Understand that food nourishes the body just as rain does 
the ground ; it gives sap and fat to the bones, and goes towards 
the growth and development of the human frame. Is it not 
a fact, however, that when there is too much rain, the seed 



100 

objects which you have not as yet obtained, you give evidence 
that your common sense and natural ability have already 
taken leave of you. 

IOI. 

Guard against Desire, which wages a hard and heavy battle 
with thee. Fight against her, and have no wish to live on 
terms of peace with her ; rather brandish in her face shield 
and buckler ; for in warring with her will be thy peace ; and 
to be at peace with her will mean war to thee. 

102. 

A man will think himself sharp enough both to obtain 
his desires and to find wisdom, and he may think that he has 
found it ; but he does not clearly understand that in the 
keen search for his desires he has hindered it (i.e., the search 
for wisdom), just as a child in searching for fire takes it, and 
places it in a fire-pan full of water. 

103. 

Conquer thy heart's desire before it conquers thee, and 
breaks thee ; for if thou dost not rule over thine own spirit, 
how canst thou rule over others ? Why suffer thy soul to 
be sullied, when, being choice, she has a place in the house of 
the King of kings ? 

104. 

Forsake thy desire before it forsakes thee, and thou shalt 
be at rest. Have no longing for that which has not been 
allotted to thee, and thou wilt not procure for thyself trouble 
and labour. Rise and take unto thyself the balm of wisdom 
to heal thy inclinations, though they be of long standing, and 
deeply-rooted as the plague. 

105. 

Rejoice and be glad in thine own lot ; then sorrows and 
sighing will flee from thee. Despair of ever attaining that 
which is beyond thy lot, and thou wilt find ease. Will not thy 
grief, on the morrow after the loss of a thing, be in proportion 
to the joy which thou didst experience in obtaining it ? 

106. 

See, if the fire of thy desires enflame the chambers of thy 
heart, overstepping as it were its banks, and burn within thee 



101 

as a fire raging in a forest and as a flame consuming the fields ; 
then let the cloud of renunciation, distilling its dews within 
thy heart, tend to extinguish its flames. 

107. 

Take advice, and make Desire subservient to the Fear of 
God ; and beware lest thou break asunder the thick bands 
which attach thee to this Fear ; for why shouldst thou ever be 
afraid of the harm done by Desire, even though chains and 
iron bars be in her hand ? 



CHAPTER XI. 
On Contentment. 

108. 

Fear God, who openeth the windows of heaven's favour and 
poureth forth a blessing upon thee, and rest content with that 
which He hath prepared for thee, whether much or little be 
found in thy pocket ; then shalt thou bear thy poverty when 
it cometh as a traveller, and thy want as an armed man, 
being supported. 

109. 

Find thy contentment in that which thou possessest, and 
weary not thyself to increase desirable things ; and if thou 
rejoicest in thy lot as it is, even though thou hast little, thou 
wilt have indeed a pleasant life. God will accept thy deeds ; 
what matters it if they be but few, so long as they be cleanly ? 

no. 

Eat thy bread as far as thou requirest it, in order to live and 
to satisfy thy wants, but do not overfeed ; for what is the use 
of indulging to excess, if thou must give it up in pain, and suffer 
burning in thy palate and throat ; or what is the use of filling 
thyself with loathsomeness, if thou canst stop, and not waste 
thy foodstuff ? 

in. 

Understand that food nourishes the body just as rain does 
the ground ; it gives sap and fat to the bones, and goes towards 
the growth and development of the human frame. Is it not 
a fact, however, that when there is too much rain, the seed 



102 

becomes rotten in consequence, and you lose the whole 
advantage? 

112. 

Enjoy of bread and water thy proper ration, and eat not 
more than to satisfy ; for you will find that the body derives 
satisfaction and benefit from the little, whilst superfluity 
breeds discomfort. Some salt in your cooking gives it a 
pleasant taste ; but if you salt it too much, what is the good 
of swallowing it ? 

Have prepared a dish of greens and vegetables, as long 
as it's ready at meal-time ; for what is the good of even fat 
lamb, if you have to wait for it when you're dying of hunger, 
and it's not forthcoming. There is a blessing in the rain that 
cometh in its due season ; but what is the use of the rain-cloud 
out of season ? 

114. 

Eat, indeed, your regular fare, and hanker not after the 
table of kings ; for why should you bother to look for that 
which you will not find at the time you want it ? Why lose 
the enjoyment of that which you can have, in searching with 
difficulty in the dark amid the haunts of others ? 

US- 
Eat to your satisfaction in the house of a friend, and be 
glad to partake of whatever he has prepared for his own meal ; 
for know, how much better it is to have merely a dry morsel 
with ease in the house of a kind and good-hearted fellow, than 
to have a repast off meats, fat and juicy, together with the 
growl of a stingy miser. 

116. 

Eat what you can afford to eat, and fix your ration, eating 
and leaving somewhat. Beware against defiling yourself 
with that which is prohibited, finding sufficient in that which 
is allowed. Let thy soul abhor the hot stench of foods which 
may even be more agreeable. 

117. 
Have thy drink mixed, diluted with water, though thou 
mayest have by thee new wine and musk. Say not, " Drinkers 
like to have the pleasure of the strong taste, and the bright 



103 

colour, so delightful to the eye " ; to-morrow thou mayest be 
in want of it to quench thy thirst, and thou wilt not have any 
of it. 

118. 

'Tis better thou shouldst rule over thy bread and wine 
according to thy appetite, than that they should rule over thee ; 
for know, that unwittingly much wine will reveal and lay bare 
thy heart's secret, exposing thy blemishes, with the result that 
they will rise against thee to thy shame — those that were 
stored away and concealed within thee. 

119. 

Keep thy mouth closed, and neither eat nor drink aught 
until thou hast pronounced the blessing to God, thy Creator, 
unto Him who hath provided for thee even before He created 
thee, and ordained all necessaries to supply thy wants. And 
when thou hast eaten to satisfaction, it behoves thee a second 
time to praise His Name — Blessed be He. 

120. 

Make thy dwelling as firm and fixed as a house of stone, 
and in it be thy hand open wide. Then when thou sittest 
therein both in summer and winter, thou shalt have rest and 
security under the shade of thy roof ; just as the bird of 
freedom dwelleth in her nest; and though the tempest be 
great, she findeth her rest. 

121. 

Have several changes of raiment wherewith to clothe thy- 
self decently, according to thy means ; neither walk about 
half-dressed or in tatters, nor dress thyself in purple or 
embroideries ; prepare thy supplies all in appropriate measure, 
and then things will be to thy honour, and not to thy shame. 

122. 

In whatever you do, act with a plan, and arrange your 
outgoings methodically. Let your garments always be clean 
(lit. " white "), and the bread of your table sufficient ; and 
neither deck yourself in the splendour of gold and fancy-work, 
nor accustom yourself to partake of foods which are rich and 
sweet. 



102 

becomes rotten in consequence, and you lose the whole 
advantage ? 

112. 

Enjoy of bread and water thy proper ration, and eat not 
more than to satisfy ; for you will find that the body derives 
satisfaction and benefit from the little, whilst superfluity 
breeds discomfort. Some salt in your cooking gives it a 
pleasant taste ; but if you salt it too much, what is the good 
of swallowing it ? 

113. 
Have prepared a dish of greens and vegetables, as long 
as it's ready at meal-time ; for what is the good of even fat 
lamb, if you have to wait for it when you're dying of hunger, 
and it's not forthcoming. There is a blessing in the rain that 
cometh in its due season ; but what is the use of the rain-cloud 
out of season ? 

114. 

Eat, indeed, your regular fare, and hanker not after the 
table of kings ; for why should you bother to look for that 
which you will not find at the time you want it ? Why lose 
the enjoyment of that which you can have, in searching with 
difficulty in the dark amid the haunts of others ? 

115. 
Eat to your satisfaction in the house of a friend, and be 
glad to partake of whatever he has prepared for his own meal ; 
for know, how much better it is to have merely a dry morsel 
with ease in the house of a kind and good-hearted fellow, than 
to have a repast off meats, fat and juicy, together with the 
growl of a stingy miser. 

116. 

Eat what you can afford to eat, and fix your ration, eating 
and leaving somewhat. Beware against defiling yourself 
with that which is prohibited, finding sufficient in that which 
is allowed. I>t thy soul abhor the hot stench of foods which 
may even be more agreeable. 

117. 
Have thy drink mixed, diluted with water, though thou 
mayest have by thee new wine and musk. Say not, " Drinkers 
like to have the pleasure of the strong taste, and the bright 



103 

colour, so delightful to the eye " ; to-morrow thou mayest be 
in want of it to quench thy thirst, and thou wilt not have any 
of it. 

118. 

'Tis better thou shouldst rule over thy bread and wine 
according to thy appetite, than that they should rule over thee ; 
for know, that unwittingly much wine will reveal and lay bare 
thy heart's secret, exposing thy blemishes, with the result that 
they will rise against thee to thy shame — those that were 
stored away and concealed within thee. 

119. 

Keep thy mouth closed, and neither eat nor drink aught 
until thou hast pronounced the blessing to God, thy Creator, 
unto Him who hath provided for thee even before He created 
thee, and ordained all necessaries to supply thy wants. And 
when thou hast eaten to satisfaction, it behoves thee a second 
time to praise His Name — Blessed be He. 

120. 

Make thy dwelling as firm and fixed as a house of stone, 
and in it be thy hand open wide. Then when thou sittest 
therein both in summer and winter, thou shalt have rest and 
security under the shade of thy roof ; just as the bird of 
freedom dwelleth in her nest; and though the tempest be 
great, she findeth her rest. 

121. 

Have several changes of raiment wherewith to clothe thy- 
self decently, according to thy means ; neither walk about 
half-dressed or in tatters, nor dress thyself in purple or 
embroideries ; prepare thy supplies all in appropriate measure, 
and then things will be to thy honour, and not to thy shame. 

122. 

In whatever you do, act with a plan, and arrange your 
outgoings methodically. Let your garments always be clean 
(lit. " white "), and the bread of your table sufficient ; and 
neither deck yourself in the splendour of gold and fancy-work, 
nor accustom yourself to partake of foods which are rich and 
sweet. 



94 

6;. 

Know that by meekness thou shalt stand upon the strong 
fort, upon the rocky crag and cliff ; and if thy heart dwell in 
lowliness within thee, thy dwelling shall be in the topmost 
station without. See how oil, smooth in itself, rises to the 
surface, and is used for the anointing of kings and princes I 

68. 

Is that man wise who sees his heart ascending in the heights 
of pride ? He will not bear with the disposition of meaner 
men, how then will they endure his senseless folly ? Will he 
not dwell alone as the leper without friends, covered up to the 
upper lip? 

69 

Will the man of pride escape by his greatness, by the bold- 
ness of his heart which is exalted on high ? Verily he breaks 
the upper beam of the door of his house, when he lifts up his 
head, and draws himself up straight. Will the citadel and 
high tower stand firm, which is built in dust or unburnt brick ? 

70. 

Be lowly in thine own sight, and thou shalt be high in the 
sight of others, and there will be hope when thou art in distress 
(or, and there will be no hope to thine enemy). As for the 
reviling curse of a man, bear it with meekness and lowliness ; 
in its passing, it will not come unto thee. Thou wilt bend low 
thy head in face of sling-stones ; and as for dart and spear, 
they will miss their mark. 

Know, too, that meekness will aid thee, even though they 
who fight against thee increase in strength ; therefore humble 
thyself, rather than be humbled at the hand of those who rise 
up against thee. By its merit shall thy horn be exalted in 
gloty, and thy step shall never slip. 



CHAPTER VII. 
On Endurance. 

72. 

Fear God, and endure His judgments, believing He judges 
truthfully and righteously ; and even though their taste be 



95 

bitter to thy palate, are they not sweet and pleasant to thy 
soul ? Canst thou ever heal the disease of a man's heart 
except by strong potions ? 

73. 

Pear and endure God's decrees and judgments, and answer 
them not with arrogance and boldness ; and then, being long- 
suffering, will He bear with thee in thy actions, and He will not 
suffer His anger to rise. Lift up thyself by prayer, if thou hast 
not prayed, and understand that this matter is not determined 
by thee. 

74- 
Bear with men, and God will bear with thee ; in His 
mercies He will be long-suffering with thee. Bear with men, 
and they will bear with thee, and God will give thee strength 
from on high. Be like the ass crouching under its burden, 
even though it break its back and bones. 

75. 
Wouldst thou endure thy great men, and fearing them 
clothe thyself in terror at their exalted power, and not bear 
with thy smaller ones, and be afraid lest thou be found wanting 
and become rejected ? Couldst thou throw off thy supports 
as mountain chaff ? Would not their removal be hard as a 
weighty stone ? 

76. 

Endure things ; muzzle yourself, and be silent ; for if 
you answer a fool, you will hear more things. 'Tis better 
that you should yourself in privacy tolerate unpleasantness 
than that others should hear it ; your reply might only have 
the effect of disclosing some shady spot in your own career, 
which had hitherto been kept secret. 

77. 
Is it not better to endure that which you have neither 
strength nor the power to remove ? What is better calculated 
to remove the worries and sorrows of a man than the power 
of endurance which comes to his aid ? Herein lies the panacea 
for all mourning and grief, the healing of all the ills of the flesh. 



becomes rotten in consequence, and you lose the whole 



Enjoy of bread and water thy proper ration, and eat not 
more than to satisfy ; for yoo win find that the body derives 
satisfaction and benefit from the little, whilst superfluity 
breeds discomfort. Some salt in your cooking gives it a 
pleasant taste ; bat if yoo salt ft too much, what is the good 
of swallowing it? 

113. 
Have prepared a dish of greens and vegetables, as long 
as it's ready at meal-time ; for what is the good of even fat 
lamb, if you hare to wait for it when you're dying of hunger, 
and it's not forthcoming. There is a blessing in the rain that 
cometh in its due season ; but what is the use of the rain-cloud 
out of season ? 

114. 
Eat. indeed, your regular fare, and hanker not after the 
table of kings ; for why should you bother to look for that 
which you will not find at the time you want it ? Why lose 
the enjoyment of that which you can have, in searching with 
difficulty in the dark amid the haunts of others ? 
115- 
Eat to your satisfaction in the house of a friend, and be 
glad to partake of whatever he has prepared for his own meal ; 
for know, how much better it is to have merely a dry morsel 
with ease in the house of a kind and good-hearted fellow, than 
to have a repast off meats, fat and juicy, together with the 
growl of a stingy miser. 

116. 
Eat what you can afford to eat, an< 
and leaving somewhat. Beware ag 
with that which is prohibited, finding 
is allowed. Let thy soul abhor the ho 
may even be more agreeable. 

"7- 
Have thy drink mixed, diluted wi 
ma-vest have by thee new wine and musl 
like to have the pleasure of the stronj 



colour, so delightful to the eye " ; to-morrow thou mayest be 
in want of it to quench thy thirst, and thou wilt not have any 
of it. 

118. 

'Tis better thou shouldst rule over thy bread and wine 
according to thy appetite, than that they should rule over thee ; 
for know, that unwittingly much wine will reveal and lay bare 
thy heart's secret, exposing thy blemishes, with the result that 
they will rise against thee to thy shame — those that were 
stored away and concealed within thee. 
119. 

Keep thy mouth closed, and neither eat nor drink aught 
until thou hast pronounced the blessing to God, thy Creator, 
unto Him who hath provided for thee even before He created 
thee, and ordained all necessaries to supply thy wants. And 
when thou hast eaten to satisfaction, it behoves thee a second 
time to praise His Name— Blessed be He. 
120. 

Make thy dwelling as firm and fixed as a house of stone, 
and in it be thy hand open wide. Then when thou sittcst 



102 



becomes rotten in conse qu ence, and yon lose the whole 
advantage? 



Enjoy of bread and water thy proper ration, and eat not 
more than to satisfy ; for yon will find that the body derives 
satisfaction and benefit from the little, whilst superfluity 
breeds discomfort. Some salt in your cooking gives it a 
pleasant taste ; bat if you salt it too much, what is the good 
of swallowing it ? 

Hi 
Have prepared a dish of greens and vegetables, as long 
as it's ready at meal-time ; for what is the good of even fat 
lamb, if you have to wait for it when you're dying of hunger, 
and it's not forthcoming. There is a blessing in the rain that 
cometh in its due season ; but what is the use of the rain-cloud 
out of season ? 

114. 

Eat, indeed, your regular fare, and hanker not after the 
table of kings ; for why should you bother to look for that 
which you will not find at the time you want it ? Why lose 
the enjoyment of that which you can have, in searching with 
difficulty in the dark amid the haunts of others ? 

115. 
Eat to your satisfaction in the house of a friend, and be 
glad to partake of whatever he has prepared for his own meal ; 
for know, how much better it is to have merely a dry morsel 
with ease in the house of a kind and good-hearted fellow, than 
to have a repast off meats, fat and juicy, together with the 
growl of a stingy miser. 

116. 

Eat what you can afford to eat, and fix your ration, eating 
and leaving somewhat. Beware against defiling yourself 
with that which is prohibited, finding sufficient in that which 
is allowed. I^et thy soul abhor the hot stench of foods which 
may even be more agreeable. 

117. 
Have thy drink mixed, diluted with water, though thou 
mayest have by thee new wine and musk. Say not, " Drinkers 
like to have the pleasure of the strong taste, and the bright 



103 

colour, so delightful to the eye " ; to-morrow thou mayest be 
in want of it to quench thy thirst, and thou wilt not have any 
of it. 

118. 

'Tis better thou shouldst rule over thy bread and wine 
according to thy appetite, than that they should rule over thee ; 
for know, that unwittingly much wine will reveal and lay bare 
thy heart's secret, exposing thy blemishes, with the result that 
they will rise against thee to thy shame — those that were 
stored away and concealed within thee. 

119. 

Keep thy mouth closed, and neither eat nor drink aught 
until thou hast pronounced the blessing to God, thy Creator, 
unto Him who hath provided for thee even before He created 
thee, and ordained all necessaries to supply thy wants. And 
when thou hast eaten to satisfaction, it behoves thee a second 
time to praise His Name — Blessed be He. 

120. 

Make thy dwelling as firm and fixed as a house of stone, 
and in it be thy hand open wide. Then when thou sittest 
therein both in summer and winter, thou shalt have rest and 
security under the shade of thy roof; just as the bird of 
freedom dwelleth in her nest ; and though the tempest be 
great, she findeth her rest. 

121. 

Have several changes of raiment wherewith to clothe thy- 
self decently, according to thy means ; neither walk about 
half-dressed or in tatters, nor dress thyself in purple or 
embroideries ; prepare thy supplies all in appropriate measure, 
and then things will be to thy honour, and not to thy shame. 

* 122. 

In whatever you do, act with a plan, and arrange your 
outgoings methodically. Let your garments always be clean 
(lit. " white "), and the bread of your table sufficient ; and 
neither deck yourself in the splendour of gold and fancy-work, 
nor accustom yourself to partake of foods which are rich and 
sweet. 



104 

CHAPTER XH. 
Oa Imdostiy. 

123. 

Fear God, and cast thy burden upon Him, and pot not thy 
strength in thy substance ; for why shouldst thou be anxious 
to acquire worry and much toil in consequence of thy wealth? 
Remember, there comes a day when thou must leave it, how- 
ever much it may be — the day when " the wind passeth over 
thee, and thou art gone/' 

124. 

Acquire according to what you require, and honestly too ; 
for why weary and worry yourself with that which is beyond 
your requirements ? For this you are so keen ; it is not your 
allotment; why should you break into it? All the share 
that you get is the labour ; the remainder is left to him who 
is a stranger to it. 

125. 
Wouldst thou be confident because thy wealth is great, 
even though thou didst not obtain it honestly ? Why not 
rather think of the day at thy latter end, when thou shalt have 
to give to strangers that which thou hast gotten ? Thus 1 shalt 
thou be " like a partridge which hatcheth, but bringeth not 
forth in pain." 

126. 

A man who is busy labouring and toiling to gather riches 
and to gain possessions, and is not satisfied the greater and 
richer he becomes — this one desire of his heart engrossinglhis 
whole being, is like a thirsty man who drinks salted things, 
thus increasing his thirst to his own discomfort. 

127. 

Do you stare at fools who mount on high, and marvel when 
they triumph with their wealth ? Does your heart mislead 
you, as you regard what seems their permanent power and 
influence, and their prosperous state ? Then open your eyes, 
and see ahead the thick clouds gathering, and the storm passing 
over them, and they are no more. 

128. 

The fool, when he dresses in fine style, thinks to himself 



105 

that he is sure to win favour, and presumes in his passion to 
enter high society, being devoid of prudence ; but he is as the 
peacock, glorying in its beautiful feathers, while revealing its 
shame and reproach. 

129. 

If a man be clever, and his knowledge burn as a fire within 
him, why should you lay stress on his beautiful apparel ? 
For when night cometh, he divests himself thereof, and you 
would not be ashamed to have respect for his frame. Choose 
of the nut the kernel, and cast away the husk and shell. 

130. 

See the superiority of the wise over fools, even though the 
treasures of the latter increase and multiply. The wise 
possess honour in their lifetime, and leave a good name as a 
memorial at their death ; while, when their end comes, both 
the remembrance and the glory of fools are the same as their 
beasts. 

131. 
See, when the wise man disputes and contends with a 
fool, he has annoyance and disturbed peace, and is made the 
object of scorn. The discussions of the wise are conducted 
quietly and pleasantly, whilst the shameful noise of the fool 
is heard from afar. Would that one could write down in a 
book and cut out and engrave on a rock for ever (the words of 
the wise) ! 

132. 

The fool exclaims in his impudent folly : " Thanks to my 
intelligence, knowledge, and common sense, thanks also to 
my own powers and abilities, I have been able to amass a fine 
amount of riches and every desirable object ; I am able to 
obtain every wish of my heart by means of my wealth ; and 
as for myself, pocket and knowledge are synonymous terms." 

133. 
The wise man speaks : " Hearken unto the Law and the 
Commandment, so that thou mayest find discipline and wisdom ; 
for by these means thou wilt be able to fulfil thy desires, and 
wilt not be in want of anything. Where is there wealth com- 
parable in worth to that of Wisdom, and what object is as 
desirable as Prudence ? " 



104 

CHAPTER Xn. 
On Industry. 

123. 

Fear God, and cast thy burden upon Him, and put not thy 
strength in thy substance ; for why shouldst thou be anxious 
to acquire worry and much toil in consequence of thy wealth? 
Remember, there comes a day when thou must leave it, how- 
ever much it may be — the day when " the wind passeth over 
thee, and thou art gone." 

124. 

Acquire according to what you require, and honestly too ; 
for why weary and worry yourself with that which is beyond 
your requirements ? For this you are so keen ; it is not your 
allotment ; why should you break into it ? All the share 
that you get is the labour ; the remainder is left to him who 
is a stranger to it. 

125. 

Wouldst thou be confident because thy wealth is great, 
even though thou didst not obtain it honestly ? Why not 
rather think of the day at thy latter end, when thou shalt have 
to give to strangers that which thou hast gotten ? Thus r shalt 
thou be " like a partridge which hatcheth, but bringeth not 
forth in pain." 

126. 

A man who is busy labouring and toiling to gather riches 
and to gain possessions, and is not satisfied the greater and 
richer he becomes — this one desire of his heart engrossingYhis 
whole being, is like a thirsty man who drinks salted things, 
thus increasing his thirst to his own discomfort. 

127. 

Do you stare at fools who mount on high, and marvel when 
they triumph with their wealth ? Does your heart mislead 
you, as you regard what seems their permanent power and 
influence, and their prosperous state ? Then open your eyes, 
and see ahead the thick clouds gathering, and the storm passing 
over them, and they are no more. 

128. 

The fool, when he dresses in fine style, thinks to himself 



105 

that he is sure to win favour, and presumes in his passion to 
enter high society, being devoid of prudence ; but he is as the 
peacock, glorying in its beautiful feathers, while revealing its 
shame and reproach. 

129. 

If a man be clever, and his knowledge burn as a fire within 
him, why should you lay stress on his beautiful apparel ? 
For when night cometh, he divests himself thereof, and you 
would not be ashamed to have respect for his frame. Choose 
of the nut the kernel, and cast away the husk and shell. 

130. 

See the superiority of the wise over fools, even though the 
treasures of the latter increase and multiply. The wise 
possess honour in their lifetime, and leave a good name as a 
memorial at their death ; while, when their end comes, both 
the remembrance and the glory of fools are the same as their 
beasts. 

131. 
See, when the wise man disputes and contends with a 
fool, he has annoyance and disturbed peace, and is made the 
object of scorn. The discussions of the wise are conducted 
quietly and pleasantly, whilst the shameful noise of the fool 
is heard from afar. Would that one could write down in a 
book and cut out and engrave on a rock for ever (the words of 
the wise) ! 

132. 

The fool exclaims in his impudent folly : " Thanks to my 
intelligence, knowledge, and common sense, thanks also to 
my own powers and abilities, I have been able to amass a fine 
amount of riches and every desirable object ; I am able to 
obtain every wish of my heart by means of my wealth ; and 
as for myself, pocket and knowledge are synonymous terms." 

133. 
The wise man speaks : " Hearken unto the Law and the 
Commandment, so that thou mayest find discipline and wisdom ; 
for by these means thou wilt be able to fulfil thy desires, and 
wilt not be in want of anything. Where is there wealth com- 
parable in worth to that of Wisdom, and what object is as 
desirable as Prudence ? " 



104 

CHAPTER XIL 
Om ImAntry. 

123. 

Peas Gad, and cast thy burden upon Him, and put not thy 
strength in thy substance ; for why shouldst thou be anxious 
to acquire worry and much toil in consequence of thy wealth? 
Remember, there comes a day when thou must leave it, how- 
ever much it may be — the day when " the wind passeth over 
thee, and thou art gone/' 

124. 

Acquire according to what you require, and honestly too ; 
for why weary and worry yourself with that which is beyond 
your requirements ? For this you are so keen ; it is not your 
allotment ; why should you break into it ? All the share 
that you get is the labour ; the remainder is left to him who 
is a stranger to it. 

125. 

Wouldst thou be confident because thy wealth is great, 
even though thou didst not obtain it honestly ? Why not 
rather think of the day at thy latter end, when thou shalt have 
to give to strangers that which thou hast gotten ? Thus* shalt 
thou be " like a partridge which hatcheth, but bringeth not 
forth in pain." 

126. 

A man who is busy labouring and toiling to gather riches 
and to gain possessions, and is not satisfied the greater and 
richer he becomes — this one desire of his heart engrossingYhis 
whole being, is like a thirsty man who drinks salted things, 
thus increasing his thirst to his own discomfort. 

127. 

Do you stare at fools who mount on high, and marvel when 
they triumph with their wealth ? Does your heart mislead 
you, as you regard what seems their permanent power and 
influence, and their prosperous state ? Then open your eyes, 
and see ahead the thick clouds gathering, and the storm passing 
over them, and they are no more. 

128. 

The fool, when he dresses in fine style, thinks to himself 



105 

that he is sure to win favour, and presumes in his passion to 
enter high society, being devoid of prudence ; but he is as the 
peacock, glorying in its beautiful feathers, while revealing its 
shame and reproach. 

129. 

If a man be clever, and his knowledge burn as a fire within 
him, why should you lay stress on his beautiful apparel ? 
For when night cometh, he divests himself thereof, and you 
would not be ashamed to have respect for his frame. Choose 
of the nut the kernel, and cast away the husk and shell. 

130. 

See the superiority of the wise over fools, even though the 
treasures of the latter increase and multiply. The wise 
possess honour in their lifetime, and leave a good name as a 
memorial at their death ; while, when their end comes, both 
the remembrance and the glory of fools are the same as their 
beasts. 

131. 
See, when the wise man disputes and contends with a 
fool, he has annoyance and disturbed peace, and is made the 
object of scorn. The discussions of the wise are conducted 
quietly and pleasantly, whilst the shameful noise of the fool 
is heard from afar. Would that one could write down in a 
book and cut out and engrave on a rock for ever (the words of 
the wise) ! 

132. 

The fool exclaims in his impudent folly : " Thanks to my 
intelligence, knowledge, and common sense, thanks also to 
my own powers and abilities, I have been able to amass a fine 
amount of riches and every desirable object ; I am able to 
obtain every wish of my heart by means of my wealth ; and 
as for myself, pocket and knowledge are synonymous terms." 

133. 
The wise man speaks : " Hearken unto the Law and the 
Commandment, so that thou mayest find discipline and wisdom ; 
for by these means thou wilt be able to fulfil thy desires, and 
wilt not be in want of anything. Where is there wealth com- 
parable in worth to that of Wisdom, and what object is as 
desirable as Prudence ? " 



106 

134- 
The fool clothes himself in garments of every dye and 
texture. When persons in high stations, kings, and princes, 
see him, they rise, and bow down low before him. Most not 
the wise man feel abashed when he sitteth, clothed in rags, 
deliberating in the assembly ? 

135. 
The fool carries all his greatness in the clothes on his back ; 
and when he takes them off, he at the same time divests himself 
of all his glory. If then he be like an ass carrying burdens, will 
the name of ass be ever taken off from him ? But the wise, 
being precise as to his clothing, never while he lives loses the 
respect due to him. 

136. 

The fool will have dainty dishes and rich drinks, the 
choicest of fare ; whatever is in season is prepared for him, 
one meal after another, day by day ; but as for the man of 
knowledge, can he satisfy his hunger and dine off his know- 
ledge, without bread and meat ? 

137. 
Pools eat their bread in wickedness, perfectly at ease, 
and drink the wine of violence, opening their mouth wide as 
the grave, while they are never full, hungry for more cup- 
boards ; but as for wisdom, it keeps its professors alive without 
choice foods and wines. 

138. 

Behold, all ye inhabitants of the world, hearken, and judge 
in righteousness and equity, to interpret (justice) with much 
wisdom, which is better than rubies, great riches, and sub- 
stance ! A man may obtain wealth by wisdom, but he cannot 
obtain wisdom by wealth. 

139- 
Obtain money, but honestly and uprightly, in order to 
supply the necessaries of life. Investigate and find out what 
are the limits of thy household requirements ; for why shouldst 
thou labour for thousands and tens of thousands (of pounds) ? 
Of thy surplus give a portion to thy soul (i.e., to spiritual needs), 
and await the mercies and bounties of the Lord. 



107 

CHAPTER Xin. 
Oft Silence and Speech* 

140. 

Fear God, with an upright heart, and sustain thy words in 
justice, wisdom, and sound sense. Remove from thyself 
frowardness of speech, and a heart devising and planning 
iniquity. Why shouldst thou be continually at variance, and 
disputing in all things like a slanderer and tale-bearer ? 

141. 

Fear God, and place a muzzle upon thy mouth, uttering 
nothing deceitful before Him, thinking thereby to obtain His 
praise, and to find favour in His sight in thy lauding Him. 
Be, therefore, continually in fear and dread, trembling at His 
majesty and wrath. 

142. 

Stop thy mouth, and close its opening with the handle of 
a lock exceeding strong and firm, strengthening its bolts for 
thy soul's sake as with an iron edge on doors of brass, which no 
winged bird with its light breath can easily undo. 

143. 
Realise that regret and remorse are of no avail in the case 
of three things — a maiden when she has once lost her maiden- 
hood ; a stone when it has once been flung from the sling ; and 
a dart when it has been shot from the bow. Thus also is it 
with the word of man : it cannot be recalled when it is once 
spoken. 

144. 

Open the gates of thy heart before thou openest the flood- 
gates of thy mouth, and reflect concerning matters what their 
effect may be, viewing the end of a thing at the beginning. 
For remember, that in the power of the tongue are bound up 
the instruments of either death, or life and health. 

145. 
Rule over the words of thy mouth, and they will not rule 
over thee, but thou shalt be the stronger and shalt prevail. 
Only speak after due silence, and do not repeat what has once 
been said. How good and pleasant is the word spoken in its 
season, as the former and the latter rain which cover the corn- 
field ! 



110 

speaks forth what is in the innermost recesses. I/>wer, there- 
fore, thy voice when thou givest counsel at eventide, and look 
about at thy surroundings when thou givest it at morning-dawn. 

CHAPTER XV. 
On Dignity and 



157. 
Fear God, and strengthen thyself to serve Him, for He formed 
thee to do Him honour. Think little of thy honour in com- 
parison with His, and lower thine eyes in His presence. Under- 
stand that he who honours His Master will be honoured, and 
receive glory before Him. 

158. 

Flee from dominion, yea, even if it pursue thee to lay 
hold of thee, and fly from it when it does follow after thee ; 
for her race is swift, when thou fleest from her, until she 
overtake thee. But if thou shouldst follow and run after her, 
yea, while in thy flight thou hast her by the heel, she will 
thrust thee off. 

159- 
Find thine honour in delightful actions ; why try to find 
it in haughtiness of heart ? Understand that a man's pride 
is his shame, and leads him on to follow as a dog ; whilst the 
lowly in spirit is oft placed at the head of a people, however 
despised he may be in his own sight, however much the 
derision in which he may be held. 

160. 

One who is boastful of his learning and anxious to rejoice 
in a great name like that of men of renown, and is continually 
mounting higher in the flights of his proud imagination, 
flitting and hovering over the habitations of the great — as 
regards such a one, have nothing to do with him, and measure 
not thyself- according to his intelligence and learning, for his 
learning is that of fools. 

161. 

Should thy heart be exalted on account of the position 
and honour which fall to thy lot, and shouldst thou imagine 
in the greatness of thy thoughts that all that befalls thee is 
in consequence of thine own strength ; understand, that in 



Ill 

proportion to thy ascent on high will be the down-gsade, 
resulting in thy destruction. 

162. 
For three things men are honoured in life, but two of them 
have slippery edges. Men are honoured either for their wealth 
or for their station, commanding strong positions. But does 
not such honour turn at the turn of Fortune ? And what 
remains of it all but a stumbling-block ? 

163. 
The third heritage of honour, however, is given to thee of 
God ; this is the real honour ; thou canst acquire it by God's 
service and by a lowly disposition, if thou leadest it on gently. 
But in the day on which thy heart becometh proud, it vanisheth 
and departeth as the traveller at his opportunity. 

164. 

Modesty, which is the heritage of birth, will never leave 
thee unto the finish ; but if thou hastenest to show thyself in 
the perfume-house (of fame), in the sight of man it will dis- 
appear on that very day. It may be likened to good wine 
which has settled on its lees, but which, on being poured out, 
loses its scent and flavour. 

165. 

Fear God, and honour thy parents, for in their honour 
thou wilt ever find thine own honour. Realise and call to 
mind the toil which they have endured on thy account, and 
consider when thou wilt be able to help them in their labours. 
He who dispenseth rewards will surely repay thee the kindness 
and consideration which thou showest to those who have 
loaded thee with their bounties. 

166. 

Canst thou forget her who did nurse thee and gave thee 
suck, though she be grown old ? Wouldst thou mock at thy 
father now grown grey ? Who knoweth whether thou wilt 
even inherit their gold, or whether, in the whirligig of Time, 
they may not inherit that which is thine ? Maybe old age 
will be thy lot, and thou wilt find thy reward both in this 
world and in the next. 

167. 

Show thyself great in giving every man the respect due to 
him, and then thou wilt receive honour and respect accordingly ; 
for when thou dost esteem thyself lightly, thou wilt raise thyself 



112 



in men's estimation and win a good prize. So think little of 
thine own honour in the presence of thy King, and be humble 
and subservient to Him. 



CHAPTER XVI. 

Ob Deliberatioa aad Haste. 

168. 

Fbak God, and await His mercies, and hope for His continuous 
help. Hope deferred, 'tis true, maketh a man sick ; but there 
is healing in hoping unto Him, for it is in His power to bring 
the thing to pass, which is ordered and held in reserve by Him. 

169. 

Have fear, and do thy work with deliberation, and ride 
not upon the cloud of haste. Will that man be ensnared who 
directs his steps aright in accord with perfect equity, walking 
uprightly ? But a man who is in haste to have the tip of his 
ear bored, can he escape ? Will he go forth to his freedom ? 

170. 

Do with deliberation that which thou hast not yet 
attempted ; for why wilt thou tear down the height of what 
has been built already ? If thou be in a hurry to begin some 
undertaking, always look to the end at its beginning ; plough 
violently the furrows of thy thought and ideas, and then thou 
wilt be able to produce timely and seasonable fruit. 

171. 

See what an advantage it is to be deliberate, for in this 
case the end of a thing brings not its regret with it. It is 
right to think a matter well out, and to give it full consideration, 
whether it be a case of doing or speaking ; for how good a thing 
it is when the conception be perfect ; whilst hurried action 
may be compared to a birth that goes prematurely to the 
oblivion of the grave. 

172. 

Two made a start from their resting-place, and betook 
themselves on the way. The one who proceeded cautiously 
reached the goal, whilst he who ran felt his feet slipping. 
Before the winged bird has mounted on high, the hawk without 
wing soars aloft, and is destroyed. 



113 

CHAPTER XVH. 
On Visiting and its Abuse. 

173- 
Fear God, and visit His Temple morning and evening to seek 
His mercies ; accustom thyself, too, to visit the God-fearing 
in sincerity and truth, and not in a false manner. As regards 
thy friend's house, weigh thy steps and regulate them judi- 
ciously, paying thy visits but rarely. 

174. 

When thou visitest the king and princes, remain silent 
rather than multiply words. Make thy call at the opportune 
moment, and with no light gait. Make thy step firm as brass ; 
whilst in returning, be as quick as the eagle. 

175. 
Understand that he who pays daily visits will be regarded as 
of no account — nay, he will be considered a bore. How much 
better it is not to pay frequent and continuous visits ! Let this 
be your guide and motto : " The rain which comes con- 
tinuously makes people tired of it, whilst they welcome it 
with gratitude as soon as it is kept back." 

176. 

How good it is to pay your calls (at intervals) for a few 
moments, for then you will become neither a bore nor a burden ! 
But if you are sure that your company is agreeable, then have 
the courage to enjoy more of the honey, according to the full 
limit. At New-Moon it is customary to pronounce the bene- 
diction, because for a couple of days the moon has been hidden 
from view. 

177. 

How good and pleasant it is for friends to visit each other 
in times of joy and sorrow, and to be prepared constantly to 
share each other's burdens and troubles, though it may cost a 
sacrifice, and mean stooping down ! But keep strange, and 
do not be in a hurry to call and face a man, when he has fallen 
into disgrace. 

178. 

Visit thy own confidential friend, and do not make too 
many calls on thy intimate's household — that is, if thoube 



112 



in men's estimation and win a good prize. So think little of 
thine own honour in the presence of thy King, and be humble 
and subservient to Him. 



CHAPTER XVI. 

On Deliberation and Haste. 

168. 

Fear God, and await His mercies, and hope for His continuous 
help. Hope deferred, 'tis true, maketh a man sick ; but there 
is healing in hoping unto Him, for it is in His power to bring 
the thing to pass, which is ordered and held in reserve by Him. 

169. 

Have fear, and do thy work with deliberation, and ride 
not upon the cloud of haste. Will that man be ensnared who 
directs his steps aright in accord with perfect equity, walking 
uprightly ? But a man who is in haste to have the tip of his 
ear bored, can he escape ? Will he go forth to his freedom ? 

170. 

Do with deliberation that which thou hast not yet 
attempted ; for why wilt thou tear down the height of what 
has been built already ? If thou be in a hurry to begin some 
undertaking, always look to the end at its beginning ; plough 
violently the furrows of thy thought and ideas, and then thou 
wilt be able to produce timely and seasonable fruit. 

171. 

See what an advantage it is to be deliberate, for in this 
case the end of a thing brings not its regret with it. It is 
right to think a matter well out, and to give it full consideration, 
whether it be a case of doing or speaking ; for how good a thing 
it is when the conception be perfect ; whilst hurried action 
may be compared to a birth that goes prematurely to the 
oblivion of the grave. 

172. 

Two made a start from their resting-place, and betook 
themselves on the way. The one who proceeded cautiously 
reached the goal, whilst he who ran felt his feet slipping. 
Before the winged bird has mounted on high, the hawk without 
wing soars aloft, and is destroyed. 



113 

CHAPTER XVTL 
On Visiting and its Abuse. 

173. 
Fear God, and visit His Temple morning and evening to seek 
His mercies ; accustom thyself, too, to visit the God-fearing 
in sincerity and truth, and not in a false manner. As regards 
thy friend's house, weigh thy steps and regulate them judi- 
ciously, paying thy visits but rarely. 

174. 

When thou visitest the king and princes, remain silent 
rather than multiply words. Make thy call at the opportune 
moment, and with no light gait. Make thy step firm as brass ; 
whilst in returning, be as quick as the eagle. 

175. 
Understand that he who pays daily visits will be regarded as 
of no account — nay, he will be considered a bore. How much 
better it is not to pay frequent and continuous visits ! Let this 
be your guide and motto : " The rain which comes con- 
tinuously makes people tired of it, whilst they welcome it 
with gratitude as soon as it is kept back." 

176. 

How good it is to pay your calls (at intervals) for a few 
moments, for then you will become neither a bore nor a burden ! 
But if you are sure that your company is agreeable, then have 
the courage to enjoy more of the honey, according to the full 
limit. At New-Moon it is customary to pronounce the bene- 
diction, because for a couple of days the moon has been hidden 
from view. 

177. 

How good and pleasant it is for friends to visit each other 
in times of joy and sorrow, and to be prepared constantly to 
share each other's burdens and troubles, though it may cost a 
sacrifice, and mean stooping down ! But keep strange, and 
do not be in a hurry to call and face a man, when he has fallen 
into disgrace. 

178. 

Visit thy own confidential friend, and do not make too 
many calls on thy intimate's household — that is, if thoube 



114 

instructed in the fear of Heaven, and thy instruction be sup- 
ported by practical rules. For as a rule foolish talk will deal 
falsely with the generous one, and impugn his truthfulness 
with a taint of falsehood. 

179. 

Pay an occasional visit to a man when sick, for in such 
visit there is relief ; put, however, a muzzle over thy mouth, 
and walk in gently ; if thou remain any length of time, it will 
be resented. Should he, however, be seriously ill, refrain 
altogether from visiting him, and rather offer up prayer for his 
recovery. 

180. 

Realise that words, when they are put in the balance, are 
weighty ; so do not think to lighten thine own heart and soul 
by letting them come glibly out of thy mouth. Why shouldst 
thou bother others with the weight of thy words, when thou 
canst not bear them thyself ? 

181. 

When men ask thy opinion concerning a difficult question 
which is being raised, and weighed in the balance, give them a 
direct reply, even if it be heavy for the heart of man to bear ; 
and even though the question be light as mountain chaff, let it 
be like a bar of iron and lead (i.e., as though it were a matter of 
weight) ; give it thy proper attention. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 
On Love and 

182. 

Fear God, and place His love and fear in thy heart, firmly 
planted ; also love those who fear Him, and their companion- 
ship choose thou in thy friendship ; for can the man of fear be 
found who would kick at the love of truth, fixed in his breast ? 

183. 

I/)ve the friend who is true to thee, and let his companion- 
ship be kept by thee. Devote thyself to him with might and 
main when he stands in need of thy help ; for this is the most 
generous form of love ; it is the most glorious kind of affection, 
resulting from companionship. 



115 

184. 

As for him who is thy friend for the purpose of getting at 
times what he wants from thee all to his own advantage, but 
who, when thou requirest him, lies hidden and concealed, give 
him up, and stop thy friendship, for what benefit dost thou 
derive from words smooth as butter ? 

185. 

The acquisition of friends, constant and true, is a good 
thing, and their love is worth keeping ; thou shouldst even 
close thine eyes, and pretend not to see their faults, wilful or 
otherwise. Can the potter join the fragments of earthenware 
once broken asunder, and can they be renewed when once 
destroyed ? 

186. 

When thou obtainest servants to minister to thy wants, 
think, that as long as they remain in thy possession, they 
remain but as servants ; then why not obtain and attach to 
thyself freemen, those of noble and exalted station, gaining 
them by suavity of speech and winning language, by constant 
attentions and kindliness of action ? 



Finished is the Book 

on the Foundation of Religious Fear. 

Thanks be to God 

Whose Glory has been revealed 

and made manifest 

unto His people ! 



114 

instructed in the fear of Heaven, and thy instruction be sup- 
ported by practical rules. For as a rule foolish talk will deal 
falsely with the generous one, and impugn his truthfulness 
with a taint of falsehood. 

179. 

Pay an occasional visit to a man when sick, for in such 
visit there is relief ; put, however, a muzzle over thy mouth, 
and walk in gently ; if thou remain any length of time, it will 
be resented. Should he, however, be seriously ill, refrain 
altogether from visiting him, and rather offer up prayer for his 
recovery. 

180. 

Realise that words, when they are put in the balance, are 
weighty ; so do not think to lighten thine own heart and soul 
by letting them come glibly out of thy mouth. Why shouldst 
thou bother others with the weight of thy words, when thou 
canst not bear them thyself ? 

181. 

When men ask thy opinion concerning a difficult question 
which is being raised, and weighed in the balance, give them a 
direct reply, even if it be heavy for the heart of man to bear ; 
and even though the question be light as mountain chaff, let it 
be like a bar of iron and lead (i.e., as though it were a matter of 
weight) ; give it thy proper attention. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 
On Love and 

182. 

Fear God, and place His love and fear in thy heart, firmly 
planted ; also love those who fear Him, and their companion- 
ship choose thou in thy friendship ; for can the man of fear be 
found who would kick at the love of truth, fixed in his breast ? 

183. 

Love the friend who is true to thee, and let his companion- 
ship be kept by thee. Devote thyself to him with might and 
main when he stands in need of thy help ; for this is the most 
generous form of love ; it is the most glorious kind of affection, 
resulting from companionship. 



115 

184. 

As for him who is thy friend for the purpose of getting at 
times what he wants from thee all to his own advantage, but 
who, when thou requirest him, lies hidden and concealed, give 
him up, and stop thy friendship, for what benefit dost thou 
derive from words smooth as butter ? 

185. 

The acquisition of friends, constant and true, is a good 
thing, and their love is worth keeping ; thou shouldst even 
close thine eyes, and pretend not to see their faults, wilful or 
otherwise. Can the potter join the fragments of earthenware 
once broken asunder, and can they be renewed when once 
destroyed ? 

186. 

When thou obtainest servants to minister to thy wants, 
think, that as long as they remain in thy possession, they 
remain but as servants ; then why not obtain and attach to 
thyself freemen, those of noble and exalted station, gaining 
them by suavity of speech and winning language, by constant 
attentions and kindliness of action ? 



Finished is the Book 

on the Foundation of Religious Fear. 

Thanks be to God 

Whose Glory has been revealed 

and made manifest 

unto His people I 



NOTES 



TO THE 



YESOD HAYIRAH. 



NOTES TO THE YESOD HAYIRAH. 



[H. stands for MS. Harleian, 5686 ; B. stands for Baert text. 
The text, as printed in this Tolume, is from MS. Or. 2396 (Brit. Museum]. 



1) H. omits iaa. 2) H. *•*. 3) B. mm*. 4) B. &*pm, 6) H. and B. 
mnn. 6) H. and B. *n\ 7) B. onSar, 8) H. and B. wya, 9) H. mnaa. 
10) H. omits. 11) B. kvS. 12. H. ?maian. 13) H. and B. p*a, 14) B. 'tt # 
15) B. Wttfo 'b 16) B. MV3. 17) H. a«n. 18) H. ma\ 19) B. WK, evidently 
wrong. 20) B. «10M. 21) H. DWtt. 22) H. mpSoi. 



[I. K] 
1) B. K. 2) H. and B. S*n. 3) H. Mini. 4) H. nnuo, evidently copyist's 
error. 5) B. mum. 6) H. minus. 7) B. nmimta mtvex 8) H. and B. D«n 
nSnm aits. 9) H, mm. 10) H. *aaS. 11) B. lAn. 12) H. D'rf?*. 13) H. Dan. 
14) H. and B. 'fin. 15) H. and B. mo. 16) B. mi©. 17) H. limiV 18) H. 
D^iy 1 ?. 19) H. mm. 20) B. manr. H. mimr, evidently wrong. 21) B. and 
probably H. D*np\ 22) H. and B. Dnm. 23) H. and B. '»*. 24) H. mm. 
25) H. and B. mm. 26) H. DBMOI. 27) B. pna. 28) H. and B. *bl*. 29) 
B. Koiba. 30) H. irip. 31) H. vya D^yn. 32) B. mn. 33) B. imr. 34) B # 
vmnna, 35) H. vpm innna im, 36) B. i»pa"i. 



[II. 3] 
1) B. a. 2) B. rAann. 3) H. nSanm mayn lyr. 4) H. and B. npav. 

5) H. and B. HayS. 6) H. and B. rAy*. 7) B. nySai. 8) B. SaS. 9) H. 
nny »nn. 10) H. and B. &<-iruA mim Sioyn '*. 11) B. -piim. 12) H. ^nn. 
13) H. may. 14) H. m 15) H. l*np. H. "fai. 16) H. omits. 17) H, and 
B. pm. H. inserts n*. 18) H. and B. *pSl. 19) H. myoS. 20) B. *piya 
21) H. and B. inSfin. 22) H. W 23) B. T™- H - I* 1 ' 1 preferable. 24) H. 
vann. 25) H. *]aSo. 26) B. has rum mn mai bim hSi. 27) H. *pmi. 28) 
B. inSwi. 29) H. and B. uarS nrm. 30) B. pm ; H. (?) pm. 31) H. Sy. 32) 
H. «m. 33) H. &n ; B. B*n. 34) H. no Saa. 35) H. and B. inknr. 36) H. and B. 
1*na. 37) B, mn, 38) B. imp, 39) H. nAvM, 40) B. owi. 41) H. and 
B. ananm, 42) H. and B. nSann, 43) H. ipy. 44) H, Divan may. 



120 NOTES 

[HI. J] 

1) B. J. 2) H. pam or pair, 3) H. i*w imn *a ftm. 4) B, Dmv Sy. 

5) H. iSar. 6) B. *?y and inserts man. 7) H. omits from mnm to T** - 

adding marginal note pnyen »tS Ten. 8) H. and B. laS. 9) H. *p. 10) H. 

seems to have rum. 11) B. rrVoen. 12) H. may. 13) B. npm preferable. 

14) B. pa?. 15) H. aina. 16) maj aipS. 17) H. and R m iwjA. 18) R 

sin, 19) nana. 20) H. nam nn. 21) H. mn. 22) R irons* ; H. almost 

illegible (?) ms«s\ 23) H. »:r. 21) H. era. 25) H. ais ; R mnn. 26) BL seems 

mmp. 27) R H. Smai or Snaai. 28) R nrrtna. 29) H. mm 30) H. and 

B. nnnyi nny. 81) EL ?y. 32) H. rmsSna. 33) H. mua. 34) H. seems 

inaji. 35) R o*Sna. 36) B. maSa. 37) H. and B. nmm. 38) R mayS, 39) 

B. snevH 40) B. mrsSi. 41) B. pio. 42) B. mm. 43) R wna. 44) R 

wia. Text should be Dnna. 45) H. and B. run*. 46) H. and R 'man, 47) 

H. omits. 48) B. m\ 49) H. Mm, 50) H. inserts T*\ 51) H. crn. 52) R 

irVu vm. 53) B. nn\ 54) B. inwv. 55) B. nrvn. 56) R nyi. 67) B. 

■ppo. 58) H. nd B. 2\ 59) H. and B, p*. 60) H. and B. Sm. 61) H. ia 

|nr. 62) H. and B. may. 63) H. and B. nnoa. 64) H. nmenn. 65) H. 

int. 66) H. o'yi. 67) R places mS before nnyiS. 68) H. ersj. 69) H. 

and B. ym. 70) H. nn*m ; B. nnrv, 71) H. and B. yniua. 72) B. 

nS«n vmpan. 73) B. non, 74) H. and B. wpav\ 75) nine. 76) H. O'oan. 

76a) H. Sy ; B. D'pim dj D'anpS 77) H. ^'yin. 78) R pawn S*yin pi. 79) 

H. mxo. 80) B. rpm m*o, 81) B. and probably H. ma. 82) H. **r. 83) 

H. inserts on, 84) B. inserts n*. 85) H. ip^nr. 86) H. omits. 87) H. and 

B. nab. 88) H. T r ? c - 89) H. nr»w; B. view. 90) H. cw. 91) H. 

D'vy. 92) H. and B. inSur. 93) H. ny\ 94) H. and B. ir.ra. 95) H. dhi. 

96) H. and B. -:3a' 97) H. *a, omitting *S ; B. n, 98) H 'r*A. 99) H. 

ennn. 100) H. nnn 101) H. omits ; B. ir*. 102) B. my. 103) H. m*u; 

B. mu. 104) B. '**?. 105) H. and B. pm py. 106) H. and B. finnitS. 107) 

M. iJfcn. 108) B. naiyi. 109) H. and B. nyer 4 ?. 110) B. vywi, 111) H. 

H. icSm ibna ; B. ipSm dm ir*. 112) R neirn. 113) B. D/rno 114) B. 

O'^oa. 115) B. 'a oj o^na ; H. seems cmca. 116) II. and B hrm. Ml) 

H. and B. infiS. 

[IV. 1] 

1) B. x 2) H. mm. 3) H and B. -a-flf. 4) H. ry. 5) B. laaS. 6) B- 
mun. 7) H. Dry; B. py. 8) H. and B. mm. 9) B. nS nnooa. 10) H. and 
B. mSj. 11) The MSS. concur in this reading, but the words should prob- 
ably be <ca »ryo. 12) H. *ea. 13) B. icnS. 13a) B. -nana. 14) H. inserts 
p. 15) B. D^ren, 16) H. reads after la thus:— loin aito aS janS. 17) 
H. and B. wncr\ 18) B. i*dd, 19) According to H. 20) B. rAooo. 



NOTES 121 

21) B. pi. 22) H. noS. 23) B. MM. 24) H. blirSr. 25) H. omits. 26) H. 
|«y, 27) Our MS. is defective after this stanza, omitting all till the last 
stanza of nuyni ftiMjn iyr, which continues on different parchment till 
the end. 28) H. nana, 



IT- H] 

This and the next chapter are added according to the Harleian ; they 
are missing in Brit, Mus. Or, 2396. 

1) B. r»ann\ 2) B. irMn. 3) B. b*rJM wo, 4) B. yw. 5) B. ^mm*. 
6) B. \*v. 7) B. nnnya, 7a) B. t*. 7b) B. rojo. 8) B. awa. 9) B. nwannS. 

10) According to B, ; H. Saa, 11) B. m*. 12) B. tin bM, 13) B. Mbn. 14) 
B. WOMS for 'M *>*, 



[VL 1] 

1) B. rnion, 2) B. ba, 3) Or ro*i ; B. mn, 4) B. iiata, 6) So it 
seems ; B. i*»*. 6) B. nn*i, 7) B, NabirS, 8) B. pa*r\ 9) B. ovn. 10) B. 
raiS. 11) B. »5^. 12) According to B. ; H. seems in'iio. 13) B. niMiS, 14) 
B. nSnn, 15) B. nhim. 16) B. *S*. 17) B. naiSoS for nSyoS •?*. 18) B. S*. 
19) B. aSn na ar» *ai. 20) B. rMia ^nar w. 21) B, ttSab. 22) B. b**\ 
23 B. maaa nM*. 24) B. narS. 25) B. inoipi. 26) According to B. ; H. 
waa. 27) According to B. ; H. tm. 28) H. IMirS, 29) B. Mr. 80) B. 
n*na*a. 31) H. inserts M*n. 32) B. T°* fi . 



[VH. T] 

1) H. ntobi. 2) B. awn wi. 3) H. bo*ba. 4) H. rwA, 5) H. twpva. 

6) H. ten. 7) H. wwx 8) H. iwyi W*H Mi tel. 9) H. teb*\ 10) H. 
nM Stenn. B. Stonm. 11) B. mivi. 12) H. witen. 13) B. 1A1. 14) H. iS. 
15) H. n»nnn, 16) B. inserts ir*. 17) H. vfo. 18) B. m*A. 19) H. ww. 
20) B. maa. 21) Added according to H. and B. 22) H. d*ttiM. 23) H. and 
B. ina-i. 24) H. ry. 25) H. max*. 26) H. seems ia*M, 27) B. ten ; H. as 
text. 28) H. binan ; B. ia bmn, 29) H. nam. 



[VIII. n] 

1) B. w. 2) H. inwa. 3) B. -pAw. 4) H. na bn vun m*d* &ni. 5) B. 
naan. 6) H. nhynb. 7) B. yhw. 8) B. bntoa. 9) H. whm. 10) H. ^a pn 
na; B. ^ pM nai. 11) H. iteia ban aaS; B. also itoaa. 12) ranS, 13) H. 
wtoi. 14) B. *}ib\n. 15) H. and B. jm. 16) H. mSi. 17) H. and B. 1*m. 
18) H. to, 19) H. and B. nMio. 20) H. M»m. 21) H. and B. pa. 22) H. 



122 NOTES 

seems nmSi. 23) H. and R San. 24) H. nwa ; R rwa. 25) H. omits. 
26) B. *m. 27) H. r»nn ; B. pxn naS. 28) H. dtim. 29) R nrA. 80) 
U. ipon™. 31) H. con. 32) IL and R Sat, 

[". D] 
1) H. and B. rm*n. 2) H. -na* 1 ? . R najS. 3) R winroto. 4) B. nnnS. 
B) H. T"» J B. a^ # 6) H. and R pit' 7) H. iSlpS. 8) H. seems HX 9) H. 
D*Sro. 10) H. wtnn. 11) H. -pi**, 12) H. mao, 13) H. hSi. 14) IL T^n ; 
B. on?S Tan. 15) B. «ra. 16) H. .*»«•' ; B. ntnt\ 17) B. pno. 18) R »o* 
19) H. omits. 20) R mil. 21) H. pyo. 22) H. and R mhm. 23) B. nam, 
24) IL iaaa. 25) H. rm% 26) H. and B. innp. 27) H. mi*. 28) H. and 
B. Y\vih. 29) B. one*. 30) H. trxnc. 31) H. and B. rwia, 32) EL 0*n« 
nS ; B. n<nfti, 33) H. and B. insert aioi. 34) This whole line not in H. 
35) H. omits. 36) H. pv». 37) H. p'ano, 38) H. pn t 39) R pvn. 40) B. 
prn, 41) H. mSo*aa ; R niSaoa. 42) B. wn. 43) H. and R y\\*n. 44) 
H. ioo ; H. mbn ; B. niSn pS? f? an apyi. 45) B. nuionn p *]S "wai run , 
46) B. **. 47) H. r-nr. 48) H. omits. 49) B. iron. 50) R imn. 51) H. 
SaS. 52) H. seems W, 53) H. naaS, 54) H. and R in, 55) R lonm. 56) 
H. nSpJ I*. 57) B. rrV*a, 58) H. seems p'arA. 59) H. seems parr^D. 



[X. *] 

1) H. mmnn, 2) B. nor, 3) H. win*. 4) H. *a*n, 5) H. *Sa. 6) H. 
and B. *S* # 7) H. and B. mub. 8) H. and B. *Sa. 9) H. po*«S. 10) H. 
pirnni, 11) H. \nn, 12) H. nSnno. 13) IL and B. -pinn. 14) R ooia; IL 
seems the same. 15) H. and B. omit Sh. 16) H. lax 17) H. DTtonS, 18) 
H. inoan. 19) IL you*!, 20) H. and B. maa. 21) H. noip*. 22) H. and 
B wiiitn, 23) IL h*o. 24) H. nmSo. 25) H. n*ayn or Tayn ; B. Tayn, 26) 
B. rrnya ; IL seems the same, hut it is doubtful. 27) H. and R nnnna. 
28) IL and B. rtaa, 29) H. 1rm*n, 30) H. and B. -norm. 31) H. mpn, 32) 
II. V*ri\ 33) IL and B. *Sn, 34) H. and B. Siua, 35) H. and B. pa*ya. 
36) II. and B. "]ni*n. 37) IL wivrva, 38) B. ri*\ 39) B. bv. 40) H. seems 
nao\ 41) II. and B. ynnn. 42) H. TP7\b*r\. 43) H. rrna?\ 44) H. and R 
Iobmi. 45) II. and B. pmn. 46) IL nniay. 47) H. looks like nvniDio ; 
hut we recall the phiaso (Ps. II. 3) : 10'nay... 10W1D10 nit npnu. 48) H. 
^ya. 49) IL am, 

[XI. m 

1) B. main, la) B. naonS, 2) H. and B. 0"1MO. 3) IL irita. 4) The 
former half of this line, though written in H., bears the 'delete' mark, and the 
latter is altogether missing. 5) H. and B. Sap), 6) H. and B. DOtyoa, 



NOTES 123 

7) B. ^Who. 8) H. and B. *a*n 9) H. inserts f>. 10) H. WW, 11) B. 
HtfpS. 12) H. and B. *m 13) H. and B. wu. 14) H. and B. Win 15) B. 
hW\ 16) H. Ipin, 17) H. and B. »*a*S. IS) H. WW!; B. WW. 19) B # 
WwA. 20) H. wmm 21) H. •fa*. 22) H. omits. 23) H. to*D, 24) B. mnn. 
25) B. )nSrS. 26) H. mm, 27) H. and B. wi*S. 28) B. ai?*ri. 29) B. won. 
30) H. nwro. 31) H. and B. b<avn a 82) H. H*f\ 33) H. and B. mSva. 34) 
B. nam, 35) H. "Va. 36) H. Sao, 37) H. and B. Sa lAl. 38) H. VP". 39) 
H. and B. m»dw. 40) H. wa ; B. inna. 41) H. byjnn. 42) H. rmn wa ; 
B. tmrS <nita. 43) H. iwh. 44) H. pa. 45) H. t"*S. 46) H. seems noa. 
47) H. -piHM, 48) B. loa. 49) H. and B. fm 50) B. aw, 51) H. omits. 
52) H. iprron 53) H. mm. 54) H. lair* ; B. nana. 55) H. *aiwS, 56) H. 
and B. T a8f . 57) H. inserts AH, 58) B. *pao, 59) H. pp. 60) . npim H; 
B. ipw. 61) H. and B. 11M. 62) B. wpa. 63) H. raSl. 64) B. 1**a # 65) 
H. omits. 66) H. seems na<avi. 67) H. Ipin ; B. 1pn # 68) H. rtplria ; B. 
npna. 69) H. *pnbiv. 70) B. ^nn Sun 71) H. SiaiA. 



[xii. a*] 

* 

l) H. adds im*a wvmfcnn nVim. 2) B. 'n S* ^rw. 8) B. iw*. 4) 
B. mjan. 5) H. and B. ail. 6) H. ipfoiii. 7) H. inn. 8) B. •£ jm. 9) H. 
not clear, seems *)^n. 10) H. and B. yjttfin 11) H. and B. W nw. 12) H. 
mm*. 13) H. and B. wm. 14) B. -tf> phnh. 15) H. io«nn 16) H. lirna. 17) 
H. ai pn -p**- 18) H. itf*a. 19) H. and B. lPi*a. 20) H. wan 21) H. 
Kiipn. 22) H. ia Sn, The word should evidently be Aan, Of. Jeremiah 
XVIT. 11 23) H. iS wr*f>\ 24) B. iiSab, 25) B. -ptupn 26) B. OtJT. 27) B. 
fiwSra. 28) H. r*. 29) H. Hto 1 ?. 30) H. and B. n*n 31) B. wna. 32) H. 
aii*a ; B. bttsa. In margin wn& t^a' 'pheasant'. 33) H. «ua. 34) H. Sn. 85) 
B. w*a. 36) H wn 37) B. I'pw. 38) B. r<m 39) H. iwna. 40) B. nW. 41) 
B. ine^p. 42) H. anan. 43) B. piatS. 44) H. nm. 45) H. n«*. 46) H. pn. 
47) B. n^B. 48) H. and B. *na, 49) H. and B. wwn 50) B. »aS. 51) H. 
irtya. 52) H. and B. n*. 53) H. and B. nw*n. 54) H. 'w or mm. 55) B. 
W. 56) H. lp\ 57) H. and B. note. 58) B. twi*. 59) B. Mtftt. 60) H. 
and B. wiwn. 61) H. -naa. 62) H. awn 63) B. eva ; H. has wa (or DV3) 
'D 'o ova m. 64) H. *a«wi. 65) H. «W, 66) H. and B. owSra. 67) 
H. and B. wnn. 68) B. alia. 69) H. mp\ 70) B. i**n 71) H. and B. 
run. 72) B. iry. 73) H. noana. 74) B. w«n 75) B, nr*a. 76) H. and B. 
Tin 77) H- ypm ; B. ipw, 78) H. *ia<ia ; B.iaia. 79) H. and B, Sun. 
80) B. nam. 



124 NOTES 

[xin. y\ 

1) B. imm ; H. adds pTltn. 2) H. p. 3) H. and B. inserts Sa. 4) 
H, and B. Sail. 5) H. nw. 6) B. Sit Mil. 7) H. vJbS, 8) H. continues 
here with the second half of the next line. 9) B. nvru, 10) H. has here 
the seoond half of the former line. 11) B. bnn&S, 12) H. 11M. 13) H. and 
B. )H1. 14) B. rto\ 15) B. nSm 16) B. h* jo. 17) H. seems TOO, 18) 
H. omits. 19) H. and B. n*n, 20) B. inserts Sain, 21) B. ian\ 22) H. 
y*T. 23) H. b*oani Q^pt, 24) H. )tM, 25) H. am*M, 26) H. and B. l»Ma 
27) H. .opSn 

[xiv. t] 

1) H. and B. n**n, 2) H. and B. na*S, 3) H. and B. W. 4) H. 
vnba, 5) H. naiyS, 6) B. noMa. 7) H, run* Sm ; B. vmvS. 8) H. mm, 9) 
H. seems miM. 10) According to H. ;B. and our MS. have 'ra. 11) H. 
linai. 12) B. lib. 13) H. oio*a 14) H. ia*aa. 15) H. omits. 16) H. ropa. 
17) H. pannn ; B. p imn omi, 18) B. omits. 19) H. tS**. 20) H. and B. 
iniMno, 21) B. imax 22) H. rqna. 23) B. inserts M*n; H. inserts *X 24) 
H Sabn. 25) H. owi Sr. 26) H. iinrn. 27) H. and B. irAjft. 28) H. 
pSr. 29) H. firVbo. 30) H. porn. 31) B, inbiia. 32) H. inserts lib. 33) 
B. has *pib for |*m. 34) In the case of B. delete JttSjS to make sense. 35) 
B. us rnn. 36) B. inM. 37) H. naSii. 38) H. *pm. 89) H. «pra*n ; B. 
*p*an DM mj'\ 40) H. and B. ann*. 41) H. bit, 42) H. noSi. 43) H. and 
B. mi*. 44) H. liao. 45) H. nS». 46) H, n*y, 47) B. wwi. 48) B. pone. 
49) B. ir<a. 50) H. SMir*a. 51) H. a<»ai. 

[XV. IB] 

1) B. na*S. 2) B. vtiaa Sm iMia San i*m, 3) H. vnn. 4) H. viva, 
5) H. «|M. 6) B. lima, 7) H. *piia. 8) B. inserts M*n. 9) H. nap*. 
10) H. and B. ibinn, 11) H. ana. 12) H. maaSn, 13) B. win. 14) H. has 
rMiS nn Sb* hm n««hi. 15) H. and B. aSjn Min w*a. 16) H. seems mora, 
17) B. Suoi. 18) B. nwi. 19) B. Six 20) B. npma ; H. has hmio 'a 'M 
Tpns tt. 21) H. mi ; B. M5 njn. 22) H. TpnnS. 23) B. nnaao. 24) 
B. (and H. seemingly) ioa. 25) H. omits rrn* 1M. 26) B. biiaa, 27) B. 
nnMl. 28) H, W; B. I.T. 29) H. fittSMD. 30) H. ]m\ 31) H. and B. *HOM. 
32) H. nSnjn. 33) H. and B. nwA. 34) bMl. 35) H. and B. *nn 36) Added 
according to H. and B. 37) B. lona. 38) H. wax 39) H. IOvS. 40) H. 
lopira. 41) H. and B. inn. 42) H. nyu\ 43) B. inserts Min. 44) B. 1VM. 
45) B. inpm 46) H. i«n\ 47) B. naba. 48) H. Mxon. 49) B. "wit. 50) 
H. anwya. 51) H. Sm w*a. 52) B. -tain. 



NOTES 125 

[XVI. TO] 
1. H. .pnom nvwian '* 2) H. wjn*\ 3) H. and B. rpvn. 4) H. pai. 

5) H. and B. ana, 6) H. and B. w. 7) H. seems *pn. 8) H. and B. um. 
9) H. nana. 10) H. and B. nnnS. 11) H. *p«- 12) H. hr\*h. 13) H. na«n. 
14; H. »ojin. 15) H. and B. inya. 16) H. imn. 17) natfnoa. 18) H. inserts 
♦a. 19) B. d'DSr. 20) H. *|S. 21) H. ^jn. 22) H. pan. 



[XVII. p] 

1) 1. H. nivaani ntpm 'r, 2) H. ip^« 5) B. jronnv 4) B. vm*. 
6) H. pin ay. 6) H. vSjn. 7) H. *pipa ; B. Ynpa. 8) H. and B. &r\yh. 
9) B. inserts ax. 10) H. now. 11) H. and B. jm. 12) B. nnaaS. 13) EL 
nnpS *]S mi. 14) H. nm. 15) H. nw. 16) H. no). 17) B. -npa. 18) H. 
and B. mnnna. 19) B. naao. 20) H. andB. Tim*. 21) H. iSw ; B. An 
22) H. and B. lSipSpa. 23) H. tin. 24) H. 1DVO ; B. WO. 25) H. omits. 
26) 'o x«n dm Qji. 27) H. and B. <Sy. 28) B. won n* a*?anS. 29) H. and 
B. lipaa. 30) H. *paa. 31) H. yhn\ 32) H. rw. 33) H, and B. vSna. 
84) H. and B. nSfin. 35) H. and B. *«n. 36) EL and B. ansa. 37) H. 
Taan. 38) H. y*»b. 39) H. and B. ann*. 40) H. and B. yhm. 41) H. 
anu«». 42) H. Spv. 43) B. nnaa. 44) H. la* ; our text might be read 
ipr ; B. is undoubtedly ipr. 



[xviii. m] 

1) H. has no special heading for the following stanzas; they form a 
continuation of nnrm maan ly*. 2) H. vanm. 3) B. iS vhv man pi 
njnS. 4) H. nxo'n. 5) H. and B. nanita. 6) H. nan, 7) H. pn, 8) EL 
nyiiaa. 9) H. iiy. 10) B. -piHoa!. 11) H. mm. 12) EL nan. 13) H. mnao. 
14) B. ^ am*. 15) B. npS; H. inserts nit. 16) B. ?». 17) H. nan. 18) 
H, mxanoa. 19) B. inserts mm, 20) H. nipSnS, 21) B. pap. 22) H. and B. 
morS. 23) H. and B. "p**. 24) B. aum. 25) H. an:ur. 26) H. nanS. 27) 
H. v«nn. 28) H. vn\ 29) H. anioa. 30) B. inn* 1 ?. 31). H. anjra. 32) H. 
anayi for 'a an. 33) H. tuip. 34) H. rmox. 35) H. maaa. 36) In place of 
this ending. H. has : w mm aa man n^mna nitvn ma n*«r loSra 







TABLE I. 








Showing comparison between 


Kimchi'f Ycrses in the "Shekel" 




and the sentence* in the "Mibchar" (see. 


Ascher's edit). 




Number 


Corresponding 


Number 


Corresponding 


Number 


Corresponding 


in 


to No. in 


in 


to No. in 


in 




to No. in 


A^^wv^a^vv 


Mibchar 


Shekel 


Mibchar 


Shekel 




Mibchar 


1 


1 


30 


38 


59 


Final couplet 


2 


••• 


31 


39 


60 




78 


3 


499 


32 


42 


61 




79 


4 


4 


33 


43 


62 




80 


5 


5, 6 


34 


45 


63 




81 


t 


10, 11 


35 


49 


64 




82 


7 


428 


86 


50, ?64 


65 




S3 


8 


415 


37 


52 


66 




85 


9 


••• 


38 


53 


67 




86 


10 


12 


39 


64, 68 


68 




89 


11 


13 


40 


56 


69 




87 


IS 


27 


41 


67 


70 




90, 93 


13 


15 


42 


58 


71 


?92, 


99, T 101 


14 


16, 17 


43 


59 


72 




T 103 


15 


20 


44 


••• 


73 




104 


16 


21 


45 


••• 


74 




98 


17 


22, 23 


46 


60 


75 




42 


18 


25 


47 


61 


76 




477, 482 


19 


414, 415, 416 


48 


63 


77 


514, 


524, 527 


20 


614 


49 


65 


78 




••• 


21 


415 


50 


66 


79 


Final couplet 


22 


4C0 


51 


69 


80 




497 


23 


28 


52 


72 


81 




498 


24 


29 


53 


73 


82 




499, 500 


25 


30 


54 


74 


83 




502 


26 


31 


55 


76 


84 




504 


27 


34 


56 


••• 


85 




••• 


28 


36 


57 


••• 


86 




537 


29 


37 


58 


••• 


87 




505 



Number 

in 

Shekel 


Corresponding 

to No. in 

Mibchar 


Number 

in 
Shekel 


Corresponding 

to No. in 

Mibchar 


Number 

in 
Shekd 


Corresponding 

to No. in 

Mibchar 


88 


506 


127 


Final couplet 


166 


137 


89 


509 


128 


187 


167 


138 


90 


••• 


129 


184 


168 


139—140 


91 


••• 


130 


183 


169 


141—142 


92 


510 


131 


184 


170 


144 


93 


518, 620 


132 


••• 


171 


146 


94 


621 


133 


••• 


172 


143, 147—151 


95 


••• 


134 


186 


173 


153—154 


96 


623 


135 


190 


174 


Final couplet 


97 


do. 


136 


195 


175 


157 


98 


512 


137 


196 


176 


158 


99 


516 


138 


199 


177 


159 


100 


526 


139 


204 


178 


160, 161 


101 


534 


140 


203 


179 


162 


102 


••• 


141 


?188 


180 


165 


103 


627 


142 


904 


181 


166 


104 


529 


143 


201 


182 


16S 


105 


541 


144 


202 


183 3 


(second part of) 


106 


542 


145 


1200 


184 


?443 


107 


543 


146 


123 


185 


172 


108 


544 


147 


124 


186 


167 


109 


547 


148 


125 


187 


169 


110 


?458 


149 


Final 


188 


171 


111 


559 


150 


126, 127 


189 


173 


112 


551 


151 


129 


190 


175 


113 


559—560 


152 


128, 130 


191 


Final couplet 


114 


561 


153 


131 


192 


323 


115 


••• 


154 


••• 


193 


205 


116 


••• 


155 


132-133 


194 


206 


117 


Fioal couplet 


156 


•■• 


195 


207 


118 


328 


157 


134 


196 


••• 


119 


329 


158 


••• 


197 


••• 


120 


330, 331 


159 


Final couplet 


198 


••• 


121 


332 


160 


••• 


199 


••• 


122 


333 


161 


114 


200 


••• 


123 


336 


162 


115 


201 


••• 


124 
125 


176 
177 


163 | 

164 J 


116, 117, 219 


202 
203 


445 
326 


126 


178 


165 


135—136 


204 


327 



Number 

in 
Shekel 

205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 



Corresponding 

to No. in 

Mibchar 


[Number 

in 
Skekd 


Corresponding 

to No. in 

MUckar 


[Number 
Skekd 


Corresponding 

to No. in 

Mibchar 


ZK 


244 


353 


283 


276 


Final couplet 


245 


358 


284 


279 


565 


246 


361 


235 


281 


566 


247 


T359 


286 


282 


do. 


248 


360 


287 


283 


563 


249 


■•• 


288 


284 


568 


250 


T 358— 359 


289 


258 


569 


251 


Final couplet 


290 


285 


571 


252 


372 


291 


286 


573 


253 


••• 


292 


287 


575 


254 


••• 


293 


288 


577 


255 


••• 


294 


290 


578 


256 


375—376 


295 


da 


680, 581 


257 


398 


296 


••• 


582 


258 


Final 


297 


••• 


564, 583 


'259 


245—246 


298 


••• 


584 


260 


248 


299 


447 


?587 


261 


249 


300 


300—301 


••• 


262 


250 


301 


302—303 


••• 


263 


251 


302 


304 


... 


264 


252 


303 


305—306 


Final couplet 


265 


253 


304 


310 


337 


266 


254 


305 


307—808 


338 


267 


255 


306 


311 


340 


268 


••• 


307 


••• 


842 


269 


257—258 


308 


452 


344 


270 


259 


309 


Final couplet 


847 


271 


260 


310—811 


312—813 


348 


272 


261 


312 


314 


349 


273 


264 


313 


490 


• •• 


274 


262 


314 


••• 


349 


275 


263 


315 


292—293 


850 


276 


266 


316 


294 


346 


277 


268 


317 


295 


345 


278 


269 


318 


296 


351 


279 


270 


319 


297 


354 


280 


272 


320 


298 


855 


281 


? 274, 280 


321 


299 


357 


282 


273 


322 


do. 



Number 

in 
Shekel 


Corresponding 

to No. in 

Mibchar 


Number 

in 
Shekel 


Corresponding 

to No. in 

Mibchar 


Number 

in 
Shekel 


Correspondiag 

to No. in 

Mibchar 


323 


106 


360 


371 


397 


615-617 


324 


107 


361 


454 


398 


616 


325 


108—109 


362 


870 


399 


618 


326 


110 


363 


289 


400 


Final couplet 


327 


111 


364 


Final couplet 


401 


401 


328 


112—113 


365 


620 


402 


402—403 


329 


••• 


366 


••• 


403 


404 


330 


••• 


367 


488 


404 


405 


331 
332 


Final couplet 
208 


368 
369 


487 

••• 


405 
406 


407 
406 


333 


209 


370 


••• 


407 


408, 409 


334 


210—211 


371 


627—628 


408 


633 


335 


212 


372 


629 


409 


634 


336 


213 


873 


••• 


410 


645, 632 


337 


■•• 


374 


622 


411 


635 


338 


••• 


375 


623 


412 


686 


339 


242 


376 


624 


413 


637 


340 


244 


377 


625 


414 


638 


341 


Final couplet 


378 


Final couplet 


415 


Final couplet 


342 


315—817 


379 


589—690 


416 


••• 


313 


317 


380 


592 


417 


••• 


344 


••• 


881 


591—593 


418 


••• 


345 


318 


332 


••• 


419 


••• 


346 


••• 


383 


594 


420 


••• 


347 


319 


384 


595 


421 


417 


348 


320 


385 


697 


422 


418 


349 


321 


886 


596 


423 


424, 430 


350 


322 


887 


Final couplet 


424 


••• 


351 


319 


388 


599—600 


425 


643 


352 


Final couplet 


389 


603 


426 


••• 


353 


362—363 


390 


605 


427 


••• 


354 


364 


391 


606 


428 


••• 


355 


365 


392 


609 


429 


••• 


356 


366 


393 


611 


430 


••• 


357 


367 


394 


612 


431 


Final couplet 


358 


369 


395 


613 






359 


368 


396 


••• 







TABLE II. 



1 


TtQSfflX 


2 


■nirn 


3 


my$n 


4 


urn on 


6 


pnon 


6 


nmitn 


7 crnSna pnean 


8 


mpnn 


9 


Saon 


10 


ropenenn 


11 


ntrn 


12 


nnan 


13 


mmm 


14 


SidSdii 


15 


mitnn nan* 


16 


tenn 


17 


mann 


18 


iDion 


19 


njmnn 


20 


onann 


21 


nw nh*w 


22 


nann no'fcn 


23 


miann nwia 


24 


nanMn nnaw 


25 


nanun 


26 niS«nnn Siap 


27 


mi arm na*r* 


28 


camm n^na 


29 


iiD'n mnon 


30 


pi»n 


31 


ni^>ixn 



Order of Chapter* C o rres p ond- C or respond- Oorrespoad- 

in ing in *7pV ieg in hpw img m 

MibcJuw Cod. A. Cod. R mrra w Hari M& 



13 
13 14 



14 



13 or 14 ... 18 

... ... xo 

••• ... io 
14 16 

13 15 18 

14 17 18 
10 18 14 

9 11 

4 19 8 



(22 Chs. (31 beads) (18 heeds) 
or beads) 

to to to 

ItS [4] 

... •»• —m ••• 

2 2 6 

•a. ^ 



6 16 p5] 

4 



6 6 ••• ••• 

>•• / ••• ••• 

7 8 ... [7] 

© ... II ••• 

O ... ... ... 

4 9 5 



5 ... 10 ••• 

v * i ... ... 

12 4 [5] 



••• 



••• 



••• 



••• 



Order of Chapters 
in 
Mibchar 


Correspond- 

• Lam. 

ing in 7pr 
Cod. A. 


ijrr 


to 


32 np<nrn 


11 


33 trnmn nbyo |iw 


••• 


np*n«rn Sy Dwann 


... 


34 Y?on 


17 


35 nonn nariMn 


12 


86 nnyn 


... 


37 d^mh m-inarm 


••• 


38 nmonn nno 


••• 


39 D^mnn iipa 


21 


40 D'Sinn mpa 


21 


41 )DHin am* man 


••• 


42 nith in nnm 


••• 


43 uaS oarm rrnto 


••• 


44 mn tAiyno nw.6 




nan &Siyn nanm 


... 


45 Q^nSna prraan toyo? nwmn ... 


46 mn 


8 


47 nSnrn rAn 


... 


48 rwspn 


19 


49 ipinn 


20 


50 a L n jn man 


••• 


51 mS'Sim yin prS 


20 


52 pn prn 


20 


53 morn 


••• 


54 nA'Dan \ 




55 mion > 


18 


56 nSwn J 




57 macnnnn 


• a. 


58 nauan nvw 


• a. 


59 nnaan 


21 


60 mrpjrn 


• •• 


61 pn*on 


*.. 


62 pSpS ,'imn 


»•• 


G3 maxSn 


• a* 


64 nwnon 


• »• 



Correspond- 

• La..** 

ing in 7pr 
Cod. B. 
to 

20 



Correspond- 
ing in 
tmvn nib* HarL MS. 
to 



13 



••• 



12 



••• 



6 



17 



••• 



[i«] 



16 



[15] 



ERRATA. 



TEXT : 



[78] for jar* read |pn* 

[79] has to be read before the last line bat one. 
[176] for Dttit read run 
[220] [221] for *) and «) read *) and ») 
[242] [243] for ") and «) „ «•) and •) 

[297] for •) read *) 

[387] for ") „ "a) 

[27] p. MD for Dmra read DrWtt 

[38] p. 3D for *•) read *%) 



TRANSLATION : 



p. 3 (10) for 'wisdow' read 'wisdom* 

p. 10 [Explanation] for 'farming 1 read 'forming, 

p. 15 (89) for tbsoe' read those' 

p. 27 (l&o) for 'prevaile' read *prevaiP 

p. 34 (239) for Sins' read 'this 5 

p. 48 (346) for 'when' read 'if 

p. 53 (379) for 'jeaslously* read 'jealously* 



?£ 



Bukd [214] CTK Ti 

nros r» sh am hz rusa? 
nyrm vxrn re naiai 

.JUIJVJ Y"1U mm S\Tf "ifH 

„ [356] *:^ 'n mt ^ 

c?n "pwn npmnn ot 
.nmbma "ynai isnr* ;* 

» [«)4] -fan -pn 

B7T33V90 "T7T1 "t^Vn 

e.tSk pSa* "iko in* »aa 
.orrS? 123 mm &a pnp» 

„ [286] D*3fin 0*03 

rnai aia nrw iaSa 
,rnx» rru mm ooip 10a 

ip^m ioo mo ncn irit 

iprm ins^a vr?ioi 

ipna ra »m> pwr nyi 

.ippn nSioa nor cm 

-paron wn 



rros iA on 

PCHS1 8 1^*1 V IO OH 

(OidLXX.6) 

^a* ruse an rua 
|n» nja na* irit 
thtjh a» tS ian kVi 

(dtf. XXIV. 21) 

1*3? fea tmw tm "p° 
one ntcvn nanpnn &* 

(ft* XXT. 17) 

tnian rc$ Sa mpao Vm 
orn ixyaa t»o icSn 

"HP3 0*3* *1V YT1* Cm 

(ft* XXVII. 19) 

*pnut nyiS mnn nya 
•jS mm mn *a -pS iw Sm? 

coann SapS maa run 
onp* rrVioa *imm 

lax? aaia run axya dmi 

■jrraion a^nn 
■rV?v imaion *a 



,vrrm na nn arum ,vanp rue amm 

,ipm r.yra *jyS *Sd mSom 

:'ui mp '"i mpn in 'out 'inan rty 



Lower in different handwriting :— 

nitawn *a ,mion mn mScrn am* 

: ipn* m»om i^yi* 

[The references to the Chapters in the Book of Proverbs at 
the beginning of each couplet or stanza are absent in the 
original ; this remark obviously applies also to the sections 
of the Shekel Hakodesh indicated in the square brackets.] 



IB 



n 



Shekel [201] jn n*K 

vwyS mm *Si nat Sjn 
.m* nxiM ip* Sy omi 

[93] w&j ^ D u 

m»w n^S nminaa von 
.ronns* in *a piami yi* 

[H6] nana *fij 

in* 1S1 wy »u* 

,W 1KD iS H pitl 

[376] rftpi aia 

jnw iaS Sm p* ik*m 
f jmr iayo "oyfi m 

[370] roan n« "pin 



» 



» 



(AM. v. 16) 

np Sy Dn an* run 
iTin Sa SSp* *to rm 

(tfttf, v. 17) 

«wi mm itrw nnwt »o 
D^y Winn by ro«ro t>M in 

(AM, «. 25) 

Sh nnoa A n nw 
•win Ai i**y *w 

(»Wtf. XII. 9) 

S<aro oik Sa Sir non* 

01* tlMim -pit 

(t&u*. XIII. 20) 



nv 103 iiat run Sa aS oan n* iSim Soy ^03 nyn 
mo* «|nS inn am ipu mm '*ora Sy naiya mi 
.mw nun wan*i ivita nSr roSaa Sy miya pn 



» 



» 



» 



it 



»» 



[244] -j^ in r* 

dwrt iaS ow obiy 
.oni* iipn DniD nyi 
onnnna m* sin p* 
omaia Mivn nmS oa pn 
onnnm omrma pu 
omvina im aw 
.omyai Diio tS npi 

[383] onva *n 

,m»op ixo nuov dm *a 

[379] 

maa *nn oSiyS ia naupm 
.niair *nn wnasyi *pA 

[289] jnn anat ny tea 

mm* nya nno 
# mm *am* iy 

[304j ri nan* wwin 

voot ny Saa pw 
# vovm d<Svi 



(tM& XIV. 12) 

*iai i»* S*a*o vun ro*a 

D'rm nyamS oSia ipSnm 

nSyinS onSnn Da ** 

iifrym pa >Sa ono 

mxio mnn Da ivm v oj 

am onnnn "iai r* ny 

run aityn nvSv p Sy 

(OtA. v. 30) 

mum p*o mior f> pit 

D'oSiyS D'^yo mn niuv 
nSm naoi nyn imo nnap 

(tWd. XVII. 17) 

ann «aMm nn 
n* anMM pn »a 

(»W. XVIII. 2S) 



Hi 



Shekd [1*4] nOTO 

i»n ma (or »a*) 'ws* 
,uvn nino j*w* 

„ [65] ^nn t* 

wawS pnno ?jm 
# to* T2DO py Sa^i 

yp mSi SaDn i*n ntAi 
.yio Sai pa ^ovn inn 

» p] D^ren tai 

djw nai* &mi *rr n*a 
.wvrn n* *rA nann tun 



9} 



9) 



» 



» 



[235] 



onan ana 

D'ora jai* *]S 
D^snoi DHtn 

uoirS Mson mSi 

D*ra innn mSi 
trSwa rpo mn 



[118] 



[121j 



pit to 

iDyts anoa yiM 
,io*y paS wa 

wia vn *d» j.unnS 
,nSja inw «na* im 

[346] ^W i^n 

# *)oa *Sy |oh3 st naw 

[342-343] nn JDKJ1 

laSo Ton wim fiar 
,TJon nnom nunn own v* hid i*? dim ua Sa nya 



(«uiL n. ii) 

naia ■woo r*M Sa 
nvyea pnoi S»aro 

(ibid UL 30) 

na» mo Sya wm 
D.-rptj rm Saion in 

(Out IV. 22) 

*r iAS in*** "w* 
ian Mft futt nvyn dm 

(ibid VIU. 11) 

'^rwn nw tppnv wa 
finaan aS n*nn noanm 

(tW«l. IX. 19) 

ma ivm m^ n*o 

o*n nwai 

Mai o^na 

•u*o *]ina in p#Si 

mow wr A pm 

jinn iaS ia j^rf? 

•pan hy pSi 
•wim irn prVm 

(ibid. XI. 2) 

o*i* nai onan 
na* *ivm im 

(tWd.) 

wnSyto alow **m nijm* 
viba iai nvr mS*i 

(t&id. v. 13) 

t\wm -hdi iai S* mm 
(•Wd) 
lawn mo iS nhv nya 



APPENDIX. 

[On the fly-leaf of a MS. copy of the More Nebuehim 
in the possession of the Editor.] 



bvuiM jvjn arno rma 
D<nppn njrSi m*S ipa *f?y 
•fi'iipy a*?n nayo *pn hi 

nppw ivm pnto 

npsi bsv w* *nVi S* 

nprn ^3 *na nav 

npno psrn do? paiera 

npan aS nonoi Sd^d 

,npn n&o Sjr dj "pS 

loyai moan oho ioidi 
.ncSr »Sro rnn dSo *?jn 

£fce*«j [19] ^rprrt 

DWK ton 2'Vp 1 ? p *7* 

# o***n n?b S'yv 
[7] pn ?K t TWZb DM ^ 



» 



,*Sroa 'mrm twr nm 

ddim vein ant miana 

''nana *nop ua ipv *a* 

npin nio«rS idio am* 
npn ino njn p^a 
pntao S* imo »ori 
mo anpn op*mn &* 
nwa *ui* nun nw 
mS by nana ma nnj? 

^po njn paa *ao noS 
Duaun nvrna pianm 

(Proverbs II. 2) 

imy m aaS piip 
•6 Dinb laS «mh *a 

(tWtf. II. 3, 5) 

noan *Sa nun* no* 
nm* *Sa noan pi 



i> 



[10] 



9» 



99 



<io rnovn m nvyon 
.nfi nvyon o:n j^n 

naa^n nion ov 
.runw o^iy naS 
[43] 

.nnjiao aSa *>n nuyoa dm -jk 



9) 



[224] H5H O 

d*SAaoa ^ni^ao ^ 
,d*S«naoi D'pino vtv 



irv nna noan a nun dm 
noan ntoo* *a miann 

nryo no* dim noan 
nvyo pto noan p* 

nnaw n*a nryo *?a noan 

(iWd. ii. io) 

vtv tin -vnaunoa -pun 
nniinna p >npo o 



[1801 
&nb?2 Cbtt C'JWOa rc*T33 CTI tmain *3 .("FT 

/Cnt«3 -pnfity ^ tbtmi -pa^ Da ^>pr6 airnn 161 
: ("D/wip torn t6i ^c-f^oa rcn»nK c"P^» cnaan "pw 

[181] 

**in6j?a cbsii B'jwsa rniTaa p^pera *ty ybm 

finm cipv a^>a naa* lara nmasn nawn nr6 tick 

: nrnon msijn toa *?naa ,rtf>pa nnn poa nvm dki 

[xvni rr] 
wnanm narwn ijw 

[182] 

,njnoj -ja^ rpna vurm inanK rw rwi ,toa m* 

/njp-6 nnan pwr mam ,vk*y hk o: *f> narw 

: (vijripj cp^n ty (•noun (•ramn bjdo kt puk cwconn 

[188] 

jmnw *]nK vin imam /p ]oxan "|jn n« avnt 

,mrj^> "ps npa o-pKoai -jffBja rte irp aranm 

: mart cmmao eviavi own ,D*aHn ^>a nana im mm 

[184] 

jfl»n ?a w *po "inya i*nx cnp*? («*]anK» WK 
.("niKiano cwai ttim \t iron cpw ^ Kttn nvi 
: nwono e°np^n^ "f> cnoi ,inarwo moi ,injnB 

[185] 

,onanK cmora^ aio nam .nuiDK cpp n^anwn map 

,wvm *6 i^«a ,(*Dru:tPi ("nan? ^ao c^rp Dtyni 

: ("omoa errr dki .men -icw cvmn "rcv (*nian^ ^avn 

[186] 

/("onaya on ^ ysy cmpa onay e^niYB^ *p napnn 

.tnrjui nnen .omn *ja "je^ crmp vin t6 noVi 

: onom ( ,4 nuioN nitoai ,mo»j;j lit^i ^an proa 

rocm TID'' "ibd oto 
c: rmnn ntou idj^> rvnaa ton to6 rot? 



nter>n w 



afl 



[xvii. p] 



cnrroan Tjrcr 

[173] 

,ipan tovn Ann kt 
(wr na npa^> wronm 
bbipdi epina "pn rvaoi 

[174] 

nnen -fa *3fl "ppaa 
cowj6 paj cpp^a nntn 

[175] 

,("nnaa^ urn #awra w *6 ova nv npaen »a «( u j?t 

(■nnjri *]b m« nan /jronna ipan tab dk tkd ip* ran 

: nvnna vwpa* txjh ow /ranna la psip* oro ibd 

[176] 

xmvh ( ,s \t »6i naa* *6i ,n*j?r6 "ipa^> ana no ,( ,4 i*n 

,nDiaoi lp tm nmn toa ,1-11073 emp»a "^ roru ( ,e DNi 

: cvroiao o*ova »m \yob ,"pa^> v* rasf> wmnna 



,(npiai any mm ppa^ 
/ip»a »b "jh now p"rxa 

,nnan na-m ton .oorr nar 

«nnw« ^pn ton .rjna^a 

: nnwa ^p nvtn awto 



[177] 

jrfc uw noi aia no Jim 

ruA Ton c°"pxiix epai 

"ipa^> ptn «5i /lajnm 

[178] 

#1^ pwn *pn -pan 

(•novo tot rwi*a nrw om 

ipwn ^>aj n*ff *a tf?a^ 

[179] 

,r6yn w onip'aa »a ij?d^ .n^noa »*k ipa^> nye na^ 

/nbpa nroy rmn can ,bn ( M "pton r>sb Diono rwi 

: cntowi tmn npa dk aioi npan to* ("rtona naa* caw 



.itostn inrowa ^ ipa^> 

,citoijn i«^oa i^» bpnb 

: itot£ aen cton .cntoptopa 

/iman rva ipa^» Term ^»ki 

,vna cnxoKno cwn) dji 

: cijvdk nx ianar6 ana cty 



JIB rwvn "iw 

[1801 

#orrti» rtsi D^Tsoa ("OTaa on anain *a -cut 

/Dn«X3 -prist? ty "|&Mi iaa^> na ^prt awnn rti 

: ("DnKit? tew 161 /("■j'vQa cwnn cju^ naan tw 

[181] 

,nn*6pa ctei awKoa (•niTaa ("hpvo "by t£iw 

.nnMV ("ipt? ate laa* i»k nmain nawn nrt nan 

: nmai niBiyi bra bwo ,rtpa onn paa mnn dki 

[xviii. m 
crronm ranwi nj?e^ 



[182] 

,njnaa -p^ mna wkti inana na n»n bum nt 

#ny*rt oinan («v«n» mam #tot nx dj "f> narroi 

: enjnpa cp*n ty wowi cnanKi apaa kt anan omronn 

[183] 

jnmv "|n« \in imam .^b pwn -|jn n« ainn 

,nirjtf> tix nya < w i,iNaai "jtPBaa vte rj^ aianm 

: mart cTnmeo ("navi pjwn ^anan te nana km nun 

[184] 

,m*on te ik -pa inya van ("np^ ("■prof iwi 
.wiwano cwai irca \t itpsaa (*pw ^ trcea dvi 
: nwono cnp^rt "|^ rnai .wamw tidi nnjns 

[185] 

,onanK cniait^ am nam ,maiaN ("pap D*am»n map 

,Drv*n rt ito«a ,("DnaaBn marrt tea (*ra<p rtym 

ironiaa rvm dm .Tien itwt ptdih isv (•mart tevn 

[186] 

,(»DHaj;a nn i^ -py ("nya onap < ,p ]nvwri "p napnn 

.n»raai nnen ,nmn »aa yir&b ("na^p \m »6 naVi 

: onom ( M niaiaK rrtiaaai #mo»jH iie6i qan pnaa 

(*: ntrm rtaa viyb rmaa i»k to6 rot? 



tm>ti i»» 



afl 



[XVII. p] 

(vnrraan nyff 



,npiai mj; o^om ppa^ 
,ipffa *6 "|« no«i pixa 

,nnai nain ton ,oon ma? 
: wnms ^>p rmn ai&6i 



[173] 

npan tovn Ann ht 
own* na ipa^> wronm 
ttfitpoi epina "pn rvaoi 

[174] 

(W*j6 pa cTmp*a nnen 
,nenro rvtwi -|!>jn ( ,o nD-»si 



[176] 

/( M nnaa^ urn ,apna \t «b ova nv ipaen »a ,( u jn* 

(■nnjn "^ nw mm /jronna ipan 16 dk "tkb np» noi 

: nnina vwpa* txjh om /idiyd la jimp ow tod 

[176] 

,«t^D^j cvp k^>i naa< »6i ,d*jht6 *ipa^> aia no ,( m ik-i 

/HDiaoi ip wan nmn ^aN ,111073 emp'a -^ n»"i3 cdhi 

: WDiao D*ova «»n ]yob ,*pa^> & mab wmnro 



[177] 

jrfc D»jN noi aio no jwi 

riMh Ton (■■paira spai 

ipa^> pun *6i /wanrn 

[178] 

^ pwn "pn "pan 

cnovo to nKT»a nn» dxi 

ipam tea nse* *a jyo^ 

[179] 

,r6j?n v enip'aa *a ij?d^ ,n^>noa era npa^> oye na^ 

,«-6p3 mmy iron cm ,bn c-pSni cw Diono nntn 

: rn^sn Ktrn nya dm aioi npan to* (*rtona naa* caxi 



^aw mnotpa i^> "ipa^> 

,("itoijn wwja ib bpnh 

: i^ at?n cton ,(«itoptopa 

/irnan rva *ipa^> Tenn ^ni 

#vna cmoxno ewn) nil 

: cirvDK rw ia»?an^ ana cty 



3D iwvn tw 

[1801 

/Dnitya rtsi DWKoa <*D«raa on Dnann *a ,rj?T 
/Dn«xa -pnBff ty -j»B3i -jaa^> oa ^>prt awnn N 1 ?! 

[181] 

,nmtya rtsi m?kd3 (•nvraa (^pB» ty ■ptow 

.nniw enptp a^>a naa* i»« nmaan nawn art -non 

: nmon mwjn bra bnso /rtpa win poa min dki 

[XVIII. |T] 

wronrn rnnan ijw 



[182] 

.njmw nab rpna wkti inanN nx n*n bm m» 

,njprt nnan cv«n» mam ,wv nx dj "fi nanm 

: <*njnpa cp»n ty cnoxn cnanKi tsjno nt pun wxonn 

[188] 

jrnat? "jnK \-in imam ,j? p*on "jjn n» airw 

,mTj^ -pt nya r-pKoai "jt^Bja vte (rp ananm 

: mart PTnwfio cwwi nwn ^anan ^>a nana K*n nwi 

[184] 

.niton ?a in -po wpa ran* ("np*? ( M nanio tw 
^•mwano CKia^i ino3 \t iffsaa <"tii* *(? ksbj on 
: niKono mp^rt "j^ cnoi ,inanKo tidi /injnB 

[185] 

,onan« ("mow? aio nam ,maiBK ("pap D*amnn map 

,orron rt i^«a ,(*onj:iBn ("mnr teo ("pa*y rtpm 

iranioa cw dki nnsn iw cvoin •w ("mart tavn 

[188] 

wraya on ^ noy cniya onay ("■jniTan -p mpnn 

.tpraai d*wi amn ♦» "jffs^ mil? vin rt nrti 

: DHom ("fflJitw nitoai ,nio*ya jib6i »ian pnoa 

rurvn ■ntf ibd oto 

c: n»rui rtjj idj?^> rniaa ip x to6 nap 



turvti it&» 



2E> 



[XVII. p] 



«cnpni mj? dwi ffp:^> 

/lpBtt *6 "|K nDHI p"TX3 

: npim qton rvfapo obsn 

,nnm na-in ^«i ,ddvt mtp 

: onwa ^>p win ait^i 



[173] 

(twt na ipa^ oarunm 

[174] 

onen -jte »3fi ppm 
(•owyb ]i3i c"pip*a nw 
,nenro n^n ■jta rnDiBi 



[175] 

/("nnas^ wn »atym \t t6 mo nv ipson «a ,( u jn* 

cwijn ^ ni« n«n /jronrD ipan *6 dn iko np< noi 

: nmrD vn»pa» nxj?3 dni /ronna ia ]ixip> dbu ibo 

[176] 

,Kffo^> ( w \t »6i 1^3* »6i ,D<jm^ ipzb aita no ,( ,4 iK"> 
,nonoi ip pan main ton ,nio*jtt empo ^ n«ii ( w dki 



[177] 

jr6 d»jb noi aia no ,n«n 

rush Ton ("-pxirc rpai 

npa^ ptn tbi ,"i33nm 

[178] 

,"l^> io«:n -pn "pan 
(•novo *?n n«n^ nn« dxi 

[179] 

,.-6j?n v empoa »a iyo^ ,n^>noa t^« "ipa^» dj?b n^> 

/•nbpa riTDjj n\nn en ,bk ( M "]iSni (^b 1 ? mono nwi 

: («r6»fin Nt?n np dk ami npan ix ("l^ina nay com 



,i^3«i innate i^> npa^ 

: ltoo^ asm ctoi ,ci^ip^pa 

.iman n»a npa^> Tonn bw 

,ima cmoNno cawi) dji 

: cvwbk nx lanan^ ana cty 



[167] 

/raaji ip* nvrn nnoi ,er»N '33 ^a "raa^ enaaa n\n 

iCiairn aio nan ^dttotd di vin r-prjn ^>pn »ai 

: najm jaaa mm rton /piaa ^pn yho »»^i 



[XVL Tfi] 

c jnmom prion ura 

[168] 

.nawo owjnffn rw ^>n»i /inon nx mpi Ann kt 

,nanK irtmna •}« ,."6nof? tr»« no nawno rtmm 

: nanjn rnioar kvi win ,n*oan^> rra »a ]pofr 

[169] 

jitoid ap ty -^ aann bin #rpwj» pnoa nvjn ht 
,nnt^a T^nmi (ntfv (•mna njnr cpa* vuk (vpmn 
: eniTn? kjp dm ton*n /Pitena craw ("pan jkt bwi 

[170] 

#vwa Vtjd onnn noto ,vwp »6 no rwpn pnoa 

,innn« wma cran ny nowo to e^n,-6 ptn O'dki 

: wya ins *p cwsv t«i /"jaa^ »D^»n mum cmn 

[171] 

#rnrm r« rvnm ]?& »pnoa pin* ^ p» *a nm 

,noaoa w tyyoa isdd »d< -jaa^ cma^noa onnn aioi 

: nofy6 ("nmba p«n dm /("o^r mn *o* ana no cm 

[172] 

.nnimw yna ipnnm ,onwiDD ijhm dw 

,nna^a i^n nyo pm ,«Bn^> bk -|too rw 

: nn*i max cpaa p lam ("sjijm spa nty* Dioa 



HKvn me 5 

[159] 

,a!? cona -jaaa n*nn no^i ,D'0'j?an onpyoa "naa n\n 

,a^aa r6i*6 aw* m /D3"6p Kin ("niaab on *a .jm 

,(»aty va»jD wn maa dki ,( M oy bnt6 mi toer onn^i 

[160] 

.n^nan crowa maa db6 no»»i ,inoana nio» wk 

,D^i3T ty men e]£iym on nty» i33^> o^maoi 

: o^*w noan k\-ii ,inoarn ftaa6 wnn tei .lnjne 

[161] 

spyrh ity» to* Tiaam miem ty "|3^> nvwi 

.(""jprna -pp nroto ^>a tok "pa 1 ? c^-na *ty ("ffom 

: C"jpnr6 n^sa roc \nn ^n^yo an *fl^ *a .("hjtp 

[162] 

,nip^>n »ni)» in* owai ,m«a cnnaiao on rote 

»mpm o»ra nteooi (ww in nanj^ iaaa riea 

: mpis 1 ? i^« en* p cnnm ,Drnas ay miaa nau* *6n 

[163] 

/(•vrvDN -naa «im ,p>p •$ wnten p npto naa en* 
/(••'B*^ cnaSnan »a <r6sc? ffsai to* miapa wrap 

: cwjn "^n awa ^ *]Sm r^m ,ia "pa^> naa» cdvi 

[164] 

/("iDina ttb3 \i» n"? "poi ,nij?»» vn^ cniaa] en» 

.c r iOT , a n^ ena»n Tj?a ,nnn3a n^a n*itnr6 p«n *ai 

: iDjnDi cirm aei p-nn nn /mop ty nypwa aia ]«a 

[165] 

»c^u6 laaa »nn miaaai ,"pVi» "raai ,ten kv 

»Dtojn oa ^loyn tidi /*]a ipa» ("opa" man pai 

: n^ioa ybnub ^ioan nerca ^ ^ioa» ("ton tyai 

[166] 

.nan* a ax aj^m *napr iaa dk (•■jripyo he? hk nacmn 

/("na^Da "]m« cwt* ^iki /aan? n« arvnn j?t *oi 

: «aai nra cnwron ^ioa n« *6n ,"|«ian nap? on 



[167] 

naaai up* irnn onoi /»*k ^a to naa^ ("-dm n\-i 

.(•nairn aiB "ran ^on^rp dt wi <«°"prjn ^>pn >ai 

: najw jbm rpnn vtei /TTiaa tpn pta »jbVi 



[XVL TO] 

cnnrom pnon njw 

[168] 

,naie>o nnjntwi n« te'i /HDn n» rnpi .ten ht 

,nan« interna ^k ,nteo^> bw Ta nation nteini 

: nanjn miotp wn inw *"wan^ rra *a tyo^» 

[169] 

.rtmro ay ty ^ aa"in tei ,rp»j» proa nt^jn nt 
#nvw«3 item ntfv coma mjnt cyy vutt cvpwn 
: wmw nx' DNi tern x*i»m ct»k rjwi jnn* aron 

[170] 

*VM3 te» onnn noto ,vwp »6 no nffjm pnoa 

.innrw w«T3 tran np noiKo te e*tei-6 pen ("ow 

: wya ins "j^ ciw mi /jaa^ <ote wnm cnw 

[171] 

.nann p» nnnR ]yo^» ,pnoa pin* -jb v* *a n«i 

,noaoa in t^yoa isdd »d» "jaa^» ("nia^noa cnnn aim 

: nofy6 cnrn^a pun am ,(»D»D*te mn »o» aio no cjm 

[172] 

.Dnimw "|"na ipnnni .nnunoD ij?oa dw 

.nna^a vton nj» pm oxeri oh iteo jwm 

: on^i man ( M p«a p na«n crpyvi spa nty< oioa 



HKI'n 110' fi 

[159] 

,2b 0*0113 "1333 n»nn no^i ,D»o»j»n on^oa 1333 n\i 

.a^M r6i*6 ym* lai ,D3i^p Kin cnna^ on »a .jm 

,("aty wya wn maa dm ,( m dj; bmi^ mi betr ("inrw 

[160] 

/D^iin cniatftt ma db6 roan ,ino3n3 roo* i»k 

,d*^i3? ty men Pjsiyrm nn nty' i33^> ("^ni3Di 

: d^ik no3n nmi ,inoam fovb innn ^>ki /lnjns 

[161] 

/■jptofc iVj7 , » wn n33m nnpn ty -j3^> dith 

/(*°1pni3 -|T n«xo ^>3 ibw 133 1 ? o^iij ty crwn 

: c*jp»Tn^ p6»w mo \in yityo mi ^ »a ,( M nyi* 

[162] 

,mp^n ^nee 4 irv nwai ,di»3 ("anaiao on rvahto 

,mpm dh"3 nteooi (miie* i« ibtij^ 1333 noa 

: mpis 1 ? i»te (*m* )3 cnron ,nni3fi dj? (*iii33 ro*» *6i 

[163] 

.cvrvoK ii33 ni.ii ,e°]n' *fi cdm^i p n^to 1133 en* 
^•"ts's 1 ? cn3Si3n »a ^fit? trs3i te imam irwp 

: c»n»jn "]Si eroo i^> -|Sn r^m ,ia *p3^ na* cdvi 

[164] 

/CiDina ns3 vp *6 "pDi ,nij?'3x im^ <«ni33] en* 

.("••era n^s 1 t*/i3N.i »j»jd ,nnK33 iva nwv6 pan »ai 

: lojNsi ( 4, imi 3fii pun dvi ,viat? ty rippitpa aio pa 

[165] 
.0VlJ6 1333 Mil D113331 ,"piVp 1331 ,^N.1 KT 

»otoya D3 ^>ioj?n »noi ,*p 137a* («djw» nan pi 

: D^>103 ifrQXh ^1D3n ("IIMO "I^> ^0* ( 4 ^1D3.1 tyai 

[166] 

,.13*&'3 as 3j;^ni „i3pt 133 dk (""jnp^o *w nN naBTin 

,("n3"D3 "]niH (nan** ^i«i 'D3.it nx ervnn j?t »oi 

: N33i n?3 rnKson "j^iD3 n« kSi .-jKian ri3p? on 



Hfi nui'it nib* 

[187] 

,naaai ip* n»nn nnoi nu »aa to naa^ (*naaa n\n 

^nairn am nan .corwjo m wi c°"prpa ^>pn <ai 

: najai yaaa rwn vton /fiua ^pn *pte »»to 



[XVL tB] 

[168] 

Jiawo nnjwn n« ^n*i /men nx mpi Ann m» 

,nariN irtmna -|K ,n^>no^ «w Ta naanoD rtmm 

: nanjn mioff twi in«i ,nN»a.-6 rra *a ijh£ 

[189] 

,nnvu5 ay ty ^ aain ton ,rp»j» pnoa rajn kt 
,nrit^a itoim ntfv coma mjnt ( 4 p* vum (vpiw 
: ("nrm? tra< dm torn wena cram rpan jwt e>w 

[170] 

»W33 ^uo oiTPin noto .vwp »6 no rwpn ]inoa 

/innnN w«ia tran *iy nowo to ctoinV pan O'dki 

: cnjvja ins ^ ewxr tki /pa^> *o^n wnm cmw 

[171] 

/Tnsin r« nnrw ]po^> ,pnoa pin* ^ v* »a nm 

rtioaoa in tpyoa isdo »o» "pa 1 ? cmavnoa cinn aim 

: noty^ <"nrr6a ptn dki ,("D»D*to0 rnn *b» am no cjm 

[172] 

.Dnimw -rna ipnnm ,DnunoD ij?oa d»3W 

,nna^a yhr\ nyo pm ,ixfirf> bk -|toro jwm 

: on*i man cp«a p nam ("spjwi spa r6r onna 



[159] 

,a"? ("nna naaa n\nn noto ,n^pn onpjfoa naaa rvn 

,a^>aa nVi*6 ait?' lai ,na^p wn ("niaa^ on *a .jrn 

/C'aty vjt» wn maa otn ,( M ny w^ nn ^>eff ("inrp&^i 

[160] 

.D^nsi cnioffa Tiaa db6 no»*i /inoana nw» tok 

,n^iar ty dib»i sjbijkw on nty* laa^ c^naoi 

: d^in noan n\-ii ,inoam itea6 wnn ^w /injnc 

[161] 

/"IpVn^» ity» *wk *naani imw ty "p*? dith 

/("■jprna it n»«D to *wk -pa 1 ? e^ru «ty pwn 

: c^ann!? r6»sa nan \nn ^ntyD nn <fi^> »a ,("njrr 

[162] 

/Hip^n 'w» in* MBtti /Dn«3 canaiac on rwte 

,ropm n*T3 nteooi emit? in itnj^> iaaa ( M iea 

: nipia 1 ? i^« (*\-p p cnnw ,nrvias ny (*niaa rut' »6n 

[163] 

.cvjtdk Tiaa mm ,c"|n» -j^ (»D\"iten p »b^w tiaa en* 
,( m, b'&6 cnaVun 'a .r6i>» trsai tot miajn vrap 

: c*jvjn "jtoi c?»Na "6 -jS-n «)ton /ia -pa^> naa» cnvi 

[164] 

,C"ioin3 -nsa \*v «^> "pel ,mras vnto ctmaa] en* 

,( w, iDva ntor enawi »a»jn ,("in«aa jva niN*ir6 p«n »ai 

: loyai ( 4, irm aei p*nn on ,mo& ty nypwa anra pa 

[165] 

,ntoi6 iaaa \-in miaaai ,yibv naai ,to»n m* 

/Dtoj?a ca tooyn »noi /"a ipa» ("nya" -nan pai 

: ntooa "ybovh tooan nmo "ft tooa* ("biQin tyai 

[166] 

,na"»a a« aj^m ,nap? -taa dk («*]np»ao «w n« natrnn 

/("na'-oa "piix (*iEn* <to»i »mpi? nx bww j?t -di 

: xaai ma ("rowan "]tooa n« ntoi ,"|Nian nap? nn 



[Uf] 



T~7*» ■ w-i/ •i*F' «r« *2 |*W/ 



: |4# * • nil! ff^jii'i rT£C ^r^xs nz? c^tjt* cp CM 

[1M] 

: imp? re ^2 r* "12^22 (■ pi : 1 nt • > /«« L . tfi »*p tost 

[15*] 

fkz\ but "p Tssr **zn tc2 <-c*rnK rTran ex ran 

*?£ji n t» spsm irrrac -ps? rrmc? sprnn (to:? 

: n6a rr*32 tck mr kti ,'icpr ?2*r yis ck 2101 

[US] 

x^p ]*ok* c^rs? rmr? p ?*rtn pro "pn ek ran 

/pirn pen nn ;r>snsr2 mem (—erra vroe fp 

: "jaa? nno p^ssn ?K2n ,2? tw p«6 p*?nn hoti 

[iw] 

,onBr c*btk c*»Kn ne?i ,nn*w rnn pap yno cipo 

,nmna ns nay* cc»£3i ,d»32k -rpe lpyn »d jn> 

: nnnea "p*20 ?k earn ,c*2"!jra yvtjf ?ip teffm 



[XV 1C] 

.rmtrm -roan njra? 

[157] 

.(■mask "p* 1 * 3 l? 07 X'miy? pnKnm Ann kt 

,n33? -pyjn ?fitrm ,"pia3 rw ttqs ?p ?pm 

: maaa cm kp»i ,*dd3 \t vm* nx naam '3 ,jrn 

[158] 

,"|B"nn »a Di3i ,ywrb emnra vyt rrrwno ma 

,ispnn <rw* iv ( f nc-i» ,-6p3 nrwno »d ij?d? 

: o o -jsnnn wpp dj? nous nnn« prim rpmn dm 



roei»n nio» 



,133m e*Tj;n ,iteo» ctb *p 

.ensiT no anwi^ <«wi 

: na c*|«bp» eiptei mv 103 

,d*131 nam *6i dovt n3ff 
/Canixy nn dk pb mn3 
:onrt ( ,T pbn nvr yvobs\ 



[145] 

noni ,"j*fi 'Tana ty tows 

,i3ib bsin t^inn iron 

,wj?3 131 3ioi d*jb noi 

[146] 

,r-j3nK3 Ksoa -jp^n "2 jrn 



[XIV. T] 

►mom crwyn ijrc 



,mi33 ^nwjno (hd^i 
wish biv »w ten ni* 
: cnim tee? my Djmr6 

,nn3i (Hn« nnp rjtooi 

,("nnxi -jr (rhsos "j^3^ Dtn 

: iinni D»afi -p .ikt Him 

,i33^> i^ip3D3 cnaio ipk 

,("i3y3 jnam ("oion ^ 

: wan (»td3 idi mi3 \in 

,i3p3 -p i33^> rw» ibw 

,i3ni j?n D»wn nobi 

: 13^3 rnin3 dni 3ip3 nix 

,njwn YnixyiD TP ni,n 
cnjnb mnn tei (""piD3 
:nj?p3i iwo ri»n CD'osibi 



[147] 

emiy 1 ? p«nm ,ten kt 
"|iidi ywy >vm rmn 
,nwi4 « iid (mo«3 

[148] 

/jrrap iid te -|jn n« nnp 

.vrap te *;rrcpD mini 

D^ste n« "j3 nam *sn 

[149] 

d^iok t^a dhmhto m3 

ipw ty "jnn3 n-i3Doi 

"1^13* nx«n iwh dib *6n 

[150] 

133^ "pID ^3n D1» n«i 

"J33^> 113p \T ]*« DNI 

bit yav "piff3 e)j??n »t£ 

[151] 

1313^ (■•■pbiys cna ("psnnn 

rown ]B ,(«^nii8no net? 

,iroj? n« (*63t«i ("U?ob 



oy 



rown me' 



[182] 

qffflja vm dk "pro ntw6 rototo -jaa^ »nnfl top 

,"|twna "jon aan nn^jn naa^> e^r ova *a ]yob 

: "|»b6 tsd npow nnstp rniTXD na^ m^ op dki 

[153] 

,iivjp t; ihkV »a rnjn* ,rniW> rp* <w6 r"jnta 

»vwna rrnatoi nwin B«Ka -jnvn mnK ,-pn najn 

: innp^ na *p pK nanoa <""prn hk nton ib ,Y> top 

[164] 



,.T>jn to tj TiDff ,ron td3 
,Ktoai n no spam -ptoKa 

•♦ ("Kto ( 4 TI»3D TDK »wnn »6i 

♦rp pon» <«]]«£ rrre'y t> 

qaioi "pon nn ,e°to"iB*a 

: -pa^ nno p'oyn toon 

/Dnt^ dhpk D^B^n noto 
/Dmna no rojp wmi 
: nnrwa *p*aD to earn 



("dtwtk (""jaw dk nm 

•pa^> mm? eyiffnn cntA 

/iK*pn toKn "JriB dk aioi 

[155] 

town fjna "|jn dk hki 
nsvsm enera inw py» 
,a^> pw p«6 p*ton noVi 

[156] 

-d^tik nnn pap tto Dipo 
,D*3aK Tpo ipyr *a pn 
,D»aijn "jnxy Vip town 



[XV 10] 

•rrmwn -nasi ijw 



♦miaa^ -pr »a jpo 1 ? 

,ru£ tj*jd town 

: roo» run nan naaj w 

/pnn *a dui ,ynfrh 

,"|Bpnn nwt ly cnoua 

: ("-jBinn roa'pj? oy noua 



[157] 

^naii^ fORnni /ton kt 
»TTiaa nK maa to torn 
vjhk rw naaon *a ,jm 

[158] 

enflina ("jx rmwo ma 

•Tjpa nrrano »a ij?d^ 

nnnK p-mi «pnn dki 



n*i»n "no« 



/■ojm e e Tj?n ,&&& ( u sb -p 

fnorv no 3w6 (»*6i 

: "o prpoy Pipboi mv ids 

,D*"m n3-in *6i Don mp 
x"Dmsj; on dm "]zb mn3 
: Dnt^> rp^n ww -piefoi 



ny 

[145] 

nom ,*j»fi nana ty ^>iffo 

/imS bam ennn -iron 

*wja iai aioi D'jN noi 

[146] 

CMpn D*oan n« "jroBa 
•^ iiai ,DiT-o"6 ("]nK em 

,(*-|3?lK3 KXOJ "\pbn *3 JH1 



[XIV. T] 

♦■rem cn^rn njw 



,( 4 ni33 I'mvyio (hd«i 
pnsb bzv vw\ ban m* 
: eniDi bsw my oynii-6 

,nn3i (Hns nnp r^soi 

,("-nrrai -|T rtotw "j^off om 

: mriKi dub "p .-ikt xim 

,("ujn yum roion ^ 
: wan ( u td3 noi mi3 vw 

,13p3 "|^ 133^> W WK 

nsni yi o^Kn no^>i 
: 13^3 rmna dki 3ipj mx 

,nyipn "pnisyio pp nvn 
("njrfc nnnn tei ( n "piD3 
:n j?pai mtp'o rwn CD'oai^i 



[147] 

maij^ f DNnni ,b»n kt 
■jiiDi "|my hmk nw 
,cv«n^ " iid c*iiok3 

[148] 

,nnxy mo to -|jn n« nnp 

,inxy b« "jnxyo mioi 

D»3fito nx *]3 nmn on 

[149] 

d^id« ^k onwRno nn3 

v\m by -jnn3 muooi 

•]^13» "iix»n -ibw D"io ttbn 

[150] 

■dA "pio ^>jn Die n«T 

■j33^> nap »m tk dki 

^k ■]»& *]0W3 rjjnn »o^ 

[161] 

pio^> ( w "j^iys ("N* ("ffinnn 

jwan ]fi ,("*]nn»no -net? 

,nnxy n» o^otwi ("jyo^ 



BJT 



tnrm m»* 



[182] 

^ercja H*n dk "pio-ram mtoto inb <nns Tioff 

^pma pn acn ("lir^n naa^> epr ova »a ijrc£ 

: tw6 "irao (npotw nneff rm^xo na^ mity* op d«i 

[153] 

/irwp "i^i pirn »a «ijn* ^n6A <"pn wk^> <r\rvb& 

/inena <*matoi nwin »no -jrwr mrro ,*pn najn 

: wnp^> na "p pH lanea <rpm n» nton ib ,"|^> mot? 

[164] 



jiton te ■£ iidip ,( u on -noa 

#mwi n mo rjwn "jrfaiio 

: ("K^a wao tdk mrw »6i 

,rp pan* hjb£ ewp ^ 

/■pioi "pen nn /^tnw 

: "pa^ nro p*Dj?n town 

,DnB^ onp»K onwtn noto 
,Dmna no nay* weai 
: onwn "p»ao te cam 



www eqansn dk nm 

*p2b vrvmv sjwnn mo^ 

,wpn ^>a«n "ps dk aioi 

[185] 

towi p jns "|jn dk nm 
naiDHi r-iffra win p r 
,a^> pw p«6 p»toin noto 

[158] 

.oniH nnn yap -pio Dipo 
,D>ja« Tpo lppp *a jm 
,D»aijn -|nxp top beam 



[XV IB] 

jm»pn -nasi *w 



jtmxh jn* *a p»fr 

,toA n»a»ya torm 

: waa rnn kbpi /raaa vn 

,"jspnn r»» iv cnowa 
: ( ,o "jB"inn (wpp dj? noua 



[157] 

*cnaij^ powim ,to<n m* 
»Tnaa n« itiaa to? Vpm 
whk n« naaon »a ,jni 

[158] 

ene-ma rw rrruwio ma 

r&pi nnxvra «a \peh 

nnmt pnni rpmn dki 



n«vn iio' 



/"i33m e»Tj?n ,iteo* c»b "p 

/CisiT no a»w6 (n6i 

: is cfpajp Enptei mi* im 

,onrr nam t6i ddh mtp 
^•nmsp on dk "\2b mm 
:onrt> rp^n n\-p "piaten 



[145] 

nam ,-pa nana ty ^i»o 

nrrt tain amnn iron 

,wjn nan aioi d-j?3 noi 

[146] 

cwpn D'oan n» °]naeD 
•f> anai annrn^ htik oni 
,r-|3Ti«n kxo3 "jpta *5 jm 



[XIV. T] 



.maa "pnwjno cto"i 
/Ona^ taff tfw ten m* 
: cniDi tat? nxy dj?hi.-6 

.mnai rmK nnp r)teoi 

,( u -nnxi i? cntatfa "jtaff dot 

: -nnKi o»3B "p nm» Him 

/Q^> "|^1P3D3 (""131D new 

x M iaj» jnani ("Bion ta^ 
: imd ("Toa idi naia sin 

,-opa "j^ Ksh rw* "WH 

,*nni jn Dtwi noto 

: -obd mina d«i aip3 nro 

,njnffn -jYirajno f p nvn 
cnjrfc innn tei ( !, -piM 
:nj?pai "iibpo <"wn ("D'onto 



[147] 

maij6 p«nm ,ten kt 
"pioi "jm? »imk rwi 
,nwpb " niD moKa 

[148] 

.yuty mo te -|jn n« nnp 

,inxj? te "jnxj» n-noi 

o^sta nx -p nmn «an 

[149] 

D'31DK «w dhmicid ina 

ww ty -pia n-uooi 

■jVd* nix«n -ww dib kSt 

[150] 

*ia3^> "jniD ^>3n o-ib m-\ 

"p3? l"Op \T T« OKI 

te -pot? -jewa e)j?Tn *eh 

[161] 

1313^ (""ptoye ( w n« rpsnnn 
nK»an lfi ^nnnno iidw 



rWB) pry |«.. _ 



ft *fr» • 






<i» > 



rop*iRn 



■ens *-, 



4 ■ 



■«*n ^fC 



•l' 



£7? p?n RJT V.TT21 



[im. n 

^TGTU i JpV.tt" 1 



: tam pe6 croc in 5r2 



,i*3£^> pn? m?n (*>ki 
: i»3nm irwrc Tim 

: rwihm nnro cme** rpa 
/HDin ^jnn 161 on3.T> 

,noiDB» j^p ("*TD pKl 

: Koaoa 133 -on naroi 

,nc njw nrA nnen "ib>k 

,ncxn nan mm b>K"idi 

: kb"idi D w nm mo <ba 



[140] 
"?2?2*! «C2T. 2^2 74CT KT 

n* nsrp? rpo lom 
prim yhos rmn noTi 

[141] 

.ysh ciore ( i b*w .ten kt 

may rat 3*»m> awnn tei 

"113*1 kt rmn tdhi 

[142] 

(Trine n» mam ,7s men 

cpfiri erwo pk ptm 

(■Dnmrt ^p3 .t.t »6 tok 

[148] 

evbry y» nertoa »a ("jn* 
,( u n^jD3 »a nn» p6ma 
/prw dk nvwpn «*m 

[144] 

men "pa^ nj?e> nne 
■jan* no d.t^k punm 



nm\n tidi 



[130] 

,D*^Da by D'oan inn* n»n 
rniya "naa .ftna» n^oan 

DTiaa Dj; D^MH pan 

[131] 

na ana Bfiff J law Dan. enm 

,nma oan nana mm 

-ifloa ana»i in* *di 

[182] 

iniat? niry ^ cmy ^w 

c.-6ud (*pn pp^> »raini 

,( H npya <"*a^ ("niiHn m/m 

[133] 

.rmxoi mm yo^ ,nan dm 
(■"jnriKn nij6o^ trcon nai 
: cnono p mora man w ,noana ( M np« *iew cnpiy ("fwn 

[134] 



/Dnioa rpatf> caio dpi 
:anona par lea oxp Kiaa 

,pnen nro pm ?jt >ik 

,pmo^> yet? ^oan na topi 

: pnvi iy^> msa axrm 

,^aen »noana »mjiaj 

/torn («*ma nya man ton 

: ib may »o»aa maarn 

,neam noia ^ Kxen my 
/.naisa -iDnn ato ,psnn *iew 



DBiai -iin nSan tpato tow 

/]ioip* win im» D^ate 

inaira na^> can vw xbn 

[135] 

,vna by iTiaa Nt?< tooa 
,wj^ vuo -non dp tidvi ,(*nnion ew -nana sin qni 



/nvax to !?ai pnKi 
/D»yiiai one? onnrwo lto 
: ("D*jnp ff^ Kim my Tina 

zinioa ny maa ^>a tidi 



: invn ny miaa nio» Kto 

Pinion on 1 ? lorf? d»3s» 
,nmj?D nape rora or n»a 
: rniTXi crt> >toi inoana 

/D'Dcn |w we«i rnnn^a 

,D'Dia« lajni wa» ato 

: D'D'Djn nmen on 1 ? pita 



,vn:a «in naa* oanm 

[136] 

nrwoi D'oyaoa ("Diyo» tow 
tnyb wrv new *?a pai 
wajn a!? nan ("ywn 

[137] 

yana on 1 ? lan 1 ? o*toi» 

,pn «9a DiTB nye toN^ai 

CTvnn n^ya neanm 



vr 



nMvn noK 



[138] 

,iew pur *BBt*>o ibbpi ipottn ,i^>n ♦aw to iki 

/lBto^ pnp pm an cnrijn nwifio ("me** no3n ("ai-D 

noan ctiijp^ tev w\ /0\i03m ("Tnt; ("nan rop nhn 

[i»] 
,njiDKi pr*3 poo nap 
^*"]pim »p3 pirn ("p'm 
/peA pto nan mie3i 



,13 rtWron TUDttD '31X1 

,013*13 ik sjtoa wn noi 
: laiBi <■*» ( w HDn ^k ipi 



[Xiii. y] 

minm np*n»n rbyn ijre* 



^atsn («p3 rafitpoa "pan 

e^siai n« *ty mn 3^1 

: teni p«6 trto 131 ^»aa 

#i»jrt pny .uyn («tei 

.owjd in treoni -j^noa 

: wnrn lnroPD Tim 

/(•nunna ninety toa nxa 
,ntrpi nry itta 'SijtfD cpa 
:nen^nn nnna ("iib** rpa 

/main tyin kVi omit? 
/noiDB* jrt>p ( ,,% to pai 

: KB3D3 133 131 .11131 

,ne njw 13T? nnen iew 

,nsxn 131 nnn« trKioi 

: kbidi D w nm mo ^o 



[140] 

^ai /D'on 3^3 *;Kn kt 

ne nippy ("-pe iom 

p^ini vb&Q mnn no^i 

[141] 

/■j'B^ mono ( f D'Bn ,ten kt 

inst? n« rtwr? 3iBnn tei 

•nan kt n\m Tom 

[142] 

(Tnne ntt maoi q*B own 

(»-|ffB3^ DnT p«Q nK p Tni 

("Dnnifi 1 ? ^p3 n\T vb urn 

[143] 

er6i3* pn ne6t*>3 *a ( 1, j*t 
,(»n^33 *a nn» n^ina 
,paw» d« nmtppn *xni 

[144] 

dib3 "p3^ nye* nne 

*]«13* no d.i^k pianni 

(••Dnwj* ]ib6 T3 '3 wab 



riKvn w 



[130] 

• ,D^oa ty D»ean inn' nxi 
onaa oy D^oan |iiah 

[131] 

n« ana ostfi ipk Dan ciki 

,nroa nan nana nam 

ieoa ana»i in* »oi 

[132] 

irow niry ^ cnay ^ik 

cnto» c*pn pp^» »naim 

,(«ntpya e ^ rniiKn anwti 

[133] 

,nnxai mm yap ,nan otti 

("■jniiKn niKte 1 ? axon nai 

("none p mana man w ,naana rip" ipk cimy enw 

[134] 



,onnxiK io*jn lai dm 
/Dnioa («pia£ caio dpi 
:onona pia? iaa oxp Kiaa 

,pnn nro pm tar ,^ix 

,pmo^ yep ^oan Tia ^>ipi 

: pnvi iy^> nxa axn'i 

^api *neana wuiaa 

,»V*m e*nia nya man ^>ai 

: *6 may »o»aa 'naani 



,neam ioia *\b Kxan e*iy 
/naisa ionn ttb) ,psnn ipk 



♦ /•T 



DSiai nn nSan pa^ ^w 

/paip' wiK irn* D^ate 

inapa nab nan Pia< «Vn 

[135] 

,ma ty niaa kp* ^oa 
,iny^> inae nan dp udm kronen (»kp* nana Kin oki 



,d»»3* wo ^>ai pjixi 
/D'jniai onp D'innpe i^>i 
:( M D^ip pia^> Kim my noa 

zimoa oy niaa ^a iid 11 ! 



: invn iy miaa -no* k^>i 

,nman nn^ lan 1 ? d^cp 
.mnyo tob» cora nr vra 
: ("niTXi on 1 ? ^a inaana 

,D'Dan ]« intr'i canntea 

,D'DiaK layn i»ap k^i 

: o-D'oyi nman nnb y»2 



/pua Kin laavcanm 

[136] 

nnpai cayaaa (*d w ^ik 
my^> iwv ipk ^>a pan 
uiayi a^» Dan cyzwn 

[137] 

ypia on 1 ? ian^> o^ik 

,pn ,( ?a DiTB nys 'piKPai 

( ,7 n«nn n^ya neanm 



i* 



nm*n iw 



[xil xq 



[123] 

/jama ^tiyn 161 .rprr n^yi ia item bwi ht 

,-|31dd ty tb»A bov cam njw» nwp^> pnn noto 

: "pw rm map* "p nn ,a*i dki wth airyn ov ma? 

[124] 

nmoa o"ja*»nm ey3»n noi ,pT*a din ■£> rpn n nap 

,mnoa Kian noi e^P^na W3W e^y pnn cnroi 

: iron phhm ifr -mieni jipm pi ip^»n la i6n 

[125] 

•enrwp *6 ("pro cnvita tun ,e r ai *p*P pn newa noann 

.wnpb two win onb ,"|nnna m» ^ -natn *6n 

: vnta ("ia^n *6i i:n -ibw campa -|teya -pm 

[126] 

.C76ud cnnwjfo fin ysph me*i y;« wk pnn btijk 

,n^iffo ia^> ni«n vbyi /vpyni yu dki yap» t6i 

: n^>p3 WKDsa epov iw D*mte nnp* iiw kdx ica 

[127] 

,DJina W3 i»k ty nonm on by n^oan nmnn 

mm rnnyitoa cony iw: ty c"|tw ^ ^wi 

: D3W ioa may nm *D*33y «ay ntn cpy npe 

[128] 

,nio»y3 rwmb mya noT mopn w D^yo noiy ^oa 

.niOTO p» 161 ny nwn^ wti ("innna eny* D3i 

: nio^a w mfr\ ("lntria (»6jp vfi3a nxu e^ua ("Diiea Kim 

[129] 

,vi3a n« naa^> oann nm ,(»inyna cvt* mpim irat^o oan 
,in*n» n» naa^» anan 161 .idbbw vrr\ »Sn rW "nya 
:vnoi («vrwto pn "|tom ,iaina p» no n*no ina 



mrm nw Tp 

[1153 

,crw6 pan two *p m ,n»opi pn rvaa paw Via* 

»na^ py aim ana n»aa cnann ne mutea did no jni 

: rvah )w dni an »nara tynnn pp jrn c^a dpi 

[116] 

nrnm ^3K (»"|pn n« onen c6a*6i awn w* c^aso toan 

/(•nn^na n cnxovn rp nowa ppw ^k t»mi iotwii 

: wa nop* dni -jn^as («nanx *nsa "jtrfij c^pjnn 

[117] 

,("P^ D»op cnna ai Dm ,D»oa tonei yao n« jitd 
.("i^p^ ns ronoi opo aioa vnrnb D»p3 Ktoi "io«n 161 
: <"p*Ki na («-jkd* mrt ffpan («noa mno ♦Viki 

[118] 

,*p iteo» t6 ("Dm "pan na "jj"i "|ort> »ty bwon raion 

,iaa^> to t^om rjpro Vpa ,tm» nann "p* *a pn 

.(•♦■jaina pea om *popa n«w6 ctao) -pio pfw 

[119] 

,tw to "pan np nowo nntrni baxn *6i ,"pe Dion 

ttidto ^aTrt ^a "ppi .ynz dio "|Vpan i»« 

: (""piaei Tna io» (*"pa^ Tip *f> nw <""|paw nnai 

[120] 

,nmns tt win vtyi ,D»jaK n»a -jniann n»a pap 

*nnoai vpvr\ imp ^xa cspim rp'P npa ap n »ai 

: nnuo rcton won an dki .(ropa pawn inn ("tib^ »6n 

[121] 

,K*om ywr\ («n»K -naa^ n«^no nwtoi wia^ nop 

♦(■roaan pnxa opn «^>i ,nnpi onp <"T? tWi uto 

: n«3B6 t6i tiaa^ *|^> rmi /»wna tan r-ppm pni 

[122] 

/(•npina *]njwr n« mom ,0Bffea "ptys ta n« ntpp 

,npsoa n»xo3 ("-pnto nsi ,D'3a^> "jHja Ten nwi 

: npnoi yso o^ia* ^nn k^i ,nopTi ib Vi^aoa o°spnn n^>i 



ny 



ronm iw 



pur. an 



[123] 

/pro ^myn 161 .rpn* (T^»pi la item ,ten m» 

/pioo ty T»aA tey earn npa» niap^> pnn noto 

: "pw rm mar v on /a-i dki inw anyn w ma? 

[124] 

.irwtt cya^nni eya«n noi ,pn*a nm "tf* Hpn ^ nap 

,mnoa tnan no? cn,P^na waw mVy pnn cnroi 

: nnw (■mm "itf> miom ,ny*a\n pi ptoi la i6n 

[125] 

.rwap *6 ("p-nra pnwo oai iCai ■p»P pn en two neann 

.wnpfr -rama win omb /jnnna or "^ mam i6n 

: w*rt>a mrin 161 nan trw ("umpa "jteya nam 

[128] 

♦rnmaD cnnwyVi pn fsph mw yar toh pin tsnsK 

«nVwo ia^> nwn vtyi .vvym bn dki yac* t6i 

: <-6pa mnoxa rpov iwh wntoo row* *iw kox ica 

[127] 

,wma iiu ton ty nonm on lty* o^oan nmnn 

,mm ("ormtea <*nny pw ty («"|tw» -ja^ "6im 

: dtki ioa may mm /D»aay »ay mn my npe 

[128] 

,mo»ya wmrt onya nor mopi w wbyo neny ^oa 

,nioro pa* 161 oy »&>K"6 wn cinnna r?r cai 

: nio»^a (*»» 161 ennana e^a* veaa mna maa ("Diioa mm 

[129] 

/inaa n» naai? oann noi .("wyra cvh npim ^aaro can 
.m»n» n» iaa^> anan 161 ,ioowfi* am i6n cW mya 
nnoi mnwto pn *]tom .laina b» no nanno ma 



n«vn *i»» Tp 

[115] 

jrmh ran two t? *ti ,n»opi pn rvaa patfi tott 

,H3^> y>y aitai ana n*aa cnann ns cmito am no jrn 

: n«6 |o»* dki an man tyinn pjr pi <r^a dpi 

tll«] 

nrom ^ia» (»"jpn n» onw c6at6i iwi *wk c^okd ton 

,enn\na h ("whwii ,t? iDwa p pB>n to -|»mi ia»m 

: -inva nojtt dki yh*sm cnjnx *nxa -|ffflj ("tyjnn 

[117] 

,("l«i o*op ( a -|n« an dm /D*oa tonei "jKao n» aim 
,( 4 7P^> nx n«ioi opo aiea vn«6 n*pa *6n noun *6i 
: <*pw («ia ( 4,, jkds nnn ppan ctiod mno *Viki 

[118] 

/p itoo* t6 cnm -j^on na -p"i -jen^ ^p bwor\ rauon 

/■jaa^ to t^iDm ,"jrna by* rbx> na-in *]3« *a p"n 

,( M "pina poo dki -popa rreo«6 ( u kxo3 -pio jhw 

[119] 

,tw to "pan Tp nowo nrwm ^a«n nto .7* Dion 

rpiono ,(«»aTf^ ^a "ppi ,"|tna otb T? van t#k 

: (""piaoi Tna ioff c-pa^ Tip T? nito (""paw mxi 

[120] 

,nmnB tp rww vtyi #0*33* rra lnunn rva pap 

,nnoai optyn inTip ^>xa («rpini ( M pp nya a^n »ai 

: nmao wton won an dot ^ra«pa pe>n Tin ctib^ *6n 

[121] 

,kxdjti awn cnw Tiaa^ rvnbno iwbn rnabi nop 

^■nxaen paixa tspn k^>i #nnpi ony ( mm [b T?n 161 

: nxoe6 161 Tiaa^ t? rwn ,*ima ^>an r-ppin pm 

[122] 

/(•npina ywt* n» nom ,o£ffoa -ptya ^>a n« nt?p 

,npfioa nKXoa rianto nsi /n*33^ ym Ten nvn 

: npnoi par ( T, ^a« ^:nn 161 ^nopn tb ^^>aaa ( w ^«nn k^i 



PL ID 




<na*i3 "p pn pn *bw 

/713T3 K303 &PS DK 3*1 SKI 

• nacin? ps sno -pita CI 

Cdtii© n\3"vn ?3*p kti 

/♦cms C7an »an erer »ai 

: D*pj («cdi7*c3 nan 2*1 

,p-tf*3 16 -pt spa C72im 
,irui T*n cnnn pax?3 
: p-iorfc Trttian |nn 161 

/JTCtK TTiri wK D7j 1D3 

,noip3 nrrari omen 
: rnowo ^jnn kVi apro «n» 

/( M nyaie6 spoin n? tenr 161 
^"rmjn -ims3i ,rt7im 
:e*n»Di:6 sic no ybo 3-1 dm 

JW33 ("t^ik nj6 wn rnn 

:ru3jnny 163 tyi* noi 



[1M] 

e rror* nrw* tdk fcci in* 

* jJ'Jm TBK2 J7 pBTDrTi 
#"pTI22 K2 |A'M P37DTTI 

UM^ iiMMUte MM^^^^^^^ft ^^^^^^^^^ b^k 

/Kn cxno ipTTta nsvn *31 

#"PBT73 SI'S frMi I Oacpl 

[HO] 
(Ti '."Wi 'T ^3f1? Ml bl3K 

wtpn *3 incs rt*yw noi 
.crwnp* tew :jp» »6oi 

[in] 
ctt"iij Ttn* teno *3 .cm 

0*01 J>7n ]BT* 03 ("rTnT 

B3 ijnf n*ow maia i6n 

[118] 

,d»di orf) (*Tpn n ^13K 
man spA bj»3 Kxoni 

,10J»3 npr "]^»3n nte 

[US] 

p-m ann notrjy mnrw 

HUSl HKT3 .*W3 tWOf! i*101 
,n313 ("13 WJ?3 DW "100 



[114] 

,D»s^on ("fn 1 ?!^ ("iwvi tei noma won iBwcteKD ^ian 
,canxn cdwj^ k*id ( w nn 16 ir« na rpa^> y:<n noi 
: ma'trn *]Snnni 3-1 pps 1 ? ptthoh c^nion ("roan ■pm 



tmw "n* 



,norcjn cnraar 

wixn tab pmn mai 

: noito oy "|V vin nontoi 

: nt&Q »a notn noan ewxo 

,n«»3n kxd t»r vnrhon 

: crwbn d^o "ibw nnno -pna 



3?< 
[101] 

^a norrfcn m«no "not? 
,ystov nnentea «a jj?d^> 

[102] 

■crown -atma pn» ana* 
pna »a yr> bw *6i 
nnrn .twt rpaen nyia 

[10J] 

dim "|^ mum ty Vwe 
/■jnna Vano rrnn *6 dki 



/Dnaam iy *p ^won nwt 
/Dnn bvr\o win "p» ran 
: onwi "|te crvaa ("nni-pna crrhya "|pb3 c**nnj?n noto 

[104] 

,pnm y\m airpn »wi t&k dim ("-jniKn nn airy 
,p*j?3<i toy "f> ("napn 161 ^pfrna wk imt cnonn »6i 
: j?33a ]vm am jra* (•*•?» nuwfc noan n* "^ np mpi 

[105] 

,nTT3K1 DW 100 D31 

,nni3Q nxdi "jptoi c^roa 

: nroro spin whs warp 



,vnru to ty *p^ mna 
,ivnarfc may p^> -pro 



/■jp^na aw noa nwv rhp 

wt«o tbv noa wwni 

mob cprjn tpin i6n 

[108] 

cTtwrh vm nmp dm nm 
ijpa "ij?an ewa *ja -ipani 



[107] 

,cmajB (•dt^h nm»a («^mwh n» nnen /idid nnp 

,m3M ("nwioiD omnia? cpna^ «3 to /£ cnopvii 

: nTa e*tora c^bd mpimi o^ij£ .Tpn urn yvr\ 



y 



n**n rm>' 



[xl m 



♦rnpfinonn ijw 

[108] 

cnwrm row iw ten kt 
,^3»3n "itww i^ pftnom 
,-|Sno3 to -jam pponi 

[10»] 

,-|T3 bw no3 pfiD NXO 

/Kin (ntwtt p^i3 now »3i 
»"pa^o ov6»n (»te*pi 

[110] 

rjrwio n prf* n* to* 

wpn «5 nrnoa (^»jnn noi 

,( u n«np^> tew rjpff *6oi 

[in] 

O^DlXJtfl ]TT 03 <"mn» 

D3 ipr o«bw ni3i3 *6n 

[US] 
,D»01 Drf? (""pri H !?13K 

nwn «pA o>?03 jreoni 
,iopo3 Djm ■f'Mn rt?o 

[118] 

pTi Dm ni3&y (»nnn« 

nuan ntn*a rwa 8*on noi 

,nsi3 ("ia wjn DV2 "ioo 

[114] 

jonhan ("irftiB^ewnnton nonnn man •MwcteKo ^>i3K 
j&yrxn cwnyk two ctoi t6 tou n« rpa^ jw»n noi 
: <"D*3nwi "jSinni 3i vpsb ermxon cjniun OToen *pm 



*n3ia -jV pn*i tixi *o» 

,fl3T3 MSD3 0JH3 DK 31 OKI 

: ruoinfr po eroo pionoi 

(*d*iiko manr6 ya»n 161 

/«D«n3 ojnn wi eyon *3i 

: D"p3 (•001^03 non om 

,\nm vb -JK ,t»m (T3iBn 
,]iiji -pn ennni pa*j» 
: jnorfc "puron mn *6i 

•nan* T^in TON DtM 103 

,noip3 nn»3*i nrmB'i 
: ("noiKo tynn «Vi 3pi3 w 

fnysmb rpoin np tean *6i 
,(»nujn inio3i ,rt>jnm 
:("nyoi3^> 3ib no *]nte 31 dki 

hT3133 (*"^3in ntf> \ini rn» 

.ram "|3i3jn^ n3»p3n 

:n33jnny Ktetyi' noi 



nttvn rw. 



,noixyi ("nraa 
,(■713*1 \Jo pmn mai 
: noite oy ^ »nn nontei 

niao *a now noan ckixd 

,rw3n kxd wk iwhon. 

(■71160 d^o ivh nnno "pna 

,Dnatrn ly *p Litton new 
,on?a !?ffiD rrnn "p* run 
onn "jte civaa cnnrpna cmiya i»B3 eniDyn no^i 

[104] 

,ynm "jrnK airyn twi ibw oioa <rjniKn n« airy 
.CW toy *f> wapn 161 »Tpfrna iant "wie norm *6i 
: y33a jam dki "px* ("6k niKB-6 noan nx "p np mpi 

[105] 



3$ 

[101] 

■■p non6n mure mtw 

<no6r penn 161 ,noy or6 

spim nnontea »a ]yo^> 

[102] 

cwiwn 3»na pn* emk 
pna »a yn ^atr» »6i 
nnrm .wit rpaon nyaa 

[101] 

moa "p^> nnsn Vy Vwo 
,*|nna tono rrnn *6 dni 



,nnW1 Ml* 1DD D31 

,nni3D kxdi ip^n r^rua 
: nnwa spin two inary 

,wiru ^>a ty "p^ mna 

wnriv nemo nar6i 

,vmar6 mao* p^ "pro 



/jpfrna aw noa notPir6y 

vn«o *6&» noa wwvn 

ino^ ("jiarya spin *6n 

[106] 

cqrniKn era nmp dk mn 
ny*a nyan cma p nyani 



[107] 

,(*may3 cw6k nm*a (•"jniwh nk rwi »idid nnp 
,m3Ki rrprvnDiD cmniay cprwn N3 bx rfi cnowni 
nra e6na («6*b» nipimi dVij6 rvpw m»n ym 



KJ7 ntrfitt nw» 

[95] 

juwr inn »nn nranm ,d*jidk nann (•qn^p avw 

jMHi citim (""p^rro* ena^ »anpn po» tooff nmn otn 

:roun pri tea nten tw /Cn^pan mmta r6 rnonm 

[96] 

,rmjp -^ twitano w« ran* ( w ri>«Ra rt>jn now 
«rnom pvn tei nnw tea ^>jni nyh -p norn mm 
: irnw (••panto aio *wk np en ,o»n»y crank *a jni 



PL «•] 

♦emxrin njrcr 

[97] 

/■pun te nn nwpo «pm ,mn n« &pro ,ten m» 

,"pina w froa ixan run ywya "pun n» fcwom 

♦♦"pwi -|ma way rturb "Dam npn "T> aits no jm 

[98] 

/p cinn* wk d»p w op^na line* p sp mar 
/p-'xyn -ja itearv wit onw >2b mum pp mm 
: "poai -1 jp »xj;a py (*te Vwai pia -jinn? (wa»n 

[99] 

,pn r te^> it* mj» iaa^> mwrfc yawi 161 r^n jrav 

/("pmni .TaTrtyonoD Jy*»nvnb ik Piwrt naxn »ai 

: pirafo na^ rrnn "into ,( M n^nna ■£ ( u »n» mwrb 

[100] 

anaa ("DDia ffjn api ioa *p noma ("ymKn »a nm 

,("DHona "ppa kxd3 ( i naa ( w te *6 ton na m-6 ai&nn »ai 

: d«tto -po 1KX&3 -p t»k itecn ("iruian ( w noan i6n 



rrnvn w 



,n6ixon wb cwm b»"\ 
,e*n^3Di mr ]ru nam bw 



♦ i 



,( tt n«fl»fl» nnyfl'i N*n ]y&b 
,nflnn nnanKn <a awnm 
:neim ]\bp nnns trcoro 



[87] 

/To no» (""pniya n»K n«i 
ffin ontf> ]nn e*w 

[88] 

]n rbv* <"*fiva nnsnnn 

^«ttd dim mjD S-rcni 

»nnnrot pn^> -p^ nan 



[89] 

,nt!n^> ]D3"iki vv nop-n (»n w 3i cnmo o*bi* b* o»anh 
jwbti ons (»ts^D3i nnw new rmpo <"]*yo ^ o*sn 161 

,(*uaa td cnBiso cnn *te 

[90] 

rb«n y-in "px» n» s|Wrt 

/mVp n» "jrron <"irw iidi 

npno npi "pop amonn 

[91] 

np^nn (»nnoK m? ran 

a 1 ? "iDm owns mr6 

(■onero D^>3*1 nato cmKnfii 

[92] 

rmrw ^ "jtih* <nsi 
d*t6h *3bV rpHS k»ni 
na»m pb pan -jrwa 



:nenio ("nwx rarer laim 

,13 p»"|nmy sjwnn dim 
/ian«n ("■jnna^ nt no'?) 
:iaw mo aiar "m romaa 

,nirvns nen *ai *.tb 10a 
,mma3 "|-n iyr n^> i»k 
:niniao nr6 rw ("Dmnm 

,»yn nao «te ^>av ne>a 
,na nato owim *toa w 
trnnanN rwm hTTO 



[93] 

ni^oa ww rpnno *]&tt£ wa^> ("pre <"par6 aio no n«T 

.( 4i n^3*M n»nw (*p&»n 161 ,3-ipyi ana nsp ("pa»n ami 

: nfym \\bp ( ttm py a-i dm ,( tt "|niwn Kton »a <*Byjni 



/0*ni3ie«n hmk3 paii nm 

,ni3im ]ioo *pr ton 

: rnwrr toa*i nvy rpy «■» 



[94] 

omy3 ntr» "j^> -lannna 
, ( -6aD cw yvv< ton 
yui («bhw 'B^» »a )yo^ 



KJ7 nrwi vw 

[95] 

•hjim inn vtn nnantn ,d»jidk nanK (""|n«jn 3in« 

•rum ctok ("-p^cma* <*nab »3"ipn po» toot? nmn ow 

:roijn pn te3 oton tki /('•nfJpan no*»3 nS <"Tonm 

[98] 

.rrnjr ^ dv^otd t»k ranK rr6*K3 fyn now 
snom p»r» tei nra» ^aa torn ,tj6 "p nowi iwn 
: rnnen c*p3nte 3ib *nwt ny v*i ,dy\*p rpurft *3 jm 



[X. i] 

♦emKnn -ijw 

[97] 

^3im ^>3 nn nwpo *prn /avr\ n» tppni Ann m» 

#T3VUW "JVB33 ixen iixi "jnwja "pin n« mtom 

:"hini 7113 ontjr wer6 n3jni npn "|^ 3i» no jm 

[98] 

,"p oyyv im o«jn w op^ro ■pn»» ]fi ^ nw 
^xyn "p tewn» "i»k onw ^ muni yy nun 
: *pD3i njp «xj» py o^a ^boi yra "jinn!? cmm 

[99] 

,pn rhsb n»B mj» 133^> eniiNrb pwn 161 (*"te jrar 

,rpmni toy! tyo noo >kdot6 ix (•po«r6 nsitn »3i 

: pintt6i rob n\in inw ,( M r6»nn3 "^ cw mH*r6 

[100] 

/DHJ3 ("ooia wjn 3pT ids "p nooij r-jniiKn *3 nm 

,("DHOnO Yl»3 KXDJ ("133 ("^ l6 "WW H3 JHWG 31Bmn »3l 

: dhi-ia -joe 1KXD3 13 nam •pasn ( w "jnai3n rnosn i6n 



ron»n w p 

[87] 

fbnan wd^ c\HT\n S»i >CB^tw n»o "pao nw 

/("n^w rnr ]ro nsm *w ,na no» (""pi jn new ntn 
: ?£»Daa naa n*aa "paxp /( M "j^n ontf> jnn e^to 

[88] 

X u n«fi*B» rmjwa ton \pob ]n ntya cwa nnsnnn 

,riBnn nnanaa »a aienni ^"t^° wm mpa S-rcni 

:ne"im ]*6p mm rcroni »nnnn» parf? "ja^> nan 

[89] 

*nvr\& prm &*fc» nop"ii on*»ai ("hkid o^bi* ^< o»ann 
,n&>B"ii o^o peteai nntw ivr mipo cppo *ty o»an »b\ 
:n&n»a <«rmw nanx laim ,(*iaaa ?b ovifiiso cnn ^>a 

[90] 

,13 cqniny cp&nn mea vb)vn jnn -p** w tpffn 

,ianwi (""inena^ nr neVi ,iartp m "jnitn cnnx iidi 
nam mo aiar in ns*oa npno np-i ytxf ewann 

[91] 

,mn»nB non »ai ,.tb ids np^nn cnno* mr n«i 

.nimaa -jm ij?t »b itm zb *iom owe nn-6 

:nimao D.-6 r«i (»nn»nBi ("antra D^>a"i nato miKnfli 

[92] 

,Navi nao ^k !?av roa nrnw ^>n "ptor mm 

,na nato o»KBim ,etea \t d\-6n vsb cpns fc*Ki 

: rnnanK na»m ,.-p*na notpni p^> pan "jnaira 

[93] 

m^oa i«twk rpnno yrtb wsb <"prn cpan^ aio no ron 

^■ni^oa n»nfiw (*p&*n 161 ,anpjn trna naff ("p&»n aioi 

: ntrm \\bp ( um py an dot ,( a "jniiKn i6on »a ropani 

[94] 

,e*niaioKn nwio pan nm nmja new ^ Tannro 

j-iiaini poo "pr ^ni *."6aD c*bv *jiw» ton 

: rniaai toa*i nwjp rpp ns pai cerw »b^» »a jpo^ 



KJ7 iwph i*» 

[96] 

jiaiw *|nK vrn nnanm ,o*aiDK nam* ("in»jn avm 

,roro wjh ("pbew ( f nab ,a"ipn x& bKDtr nmn dki 

:mijn ya*> baa obtfn rw /pnbpan no*na nb ("innm 

[96] 

.rrnjr *p Dvibmo *wk rami prt"iQ ibjn nop 
jrnm pern bai row baa bam /rpb "p noam iwn 
: nrnwi ("panbo aio -law np m ,d»jvj? rpianb »a jm 



[X. i] 

♦(Tnxnn ipar 

[97] 

/■jam ba rot rwpo ipm »ia«*i rot erym ,bm m* 

♦Tana ik "jrosa wen rim ywya -pin n» twom 

j"jaiKi -jma dw rtBrb naam njrn -|b ai& no jm 

[98] 

,-p cipjn* ipn n»p w opbna "prw \t ,*p <mov 
spvyn ^a ibaam ivr nnw ,ab nutm yy mm 
: "poai ijp «xya py (°ba bntoi ]ru "jinnb cuwi 

[99] 

,pnrbabiTBmj?B'pab cmwnb ywn nbi ( w bK pov 

.rprnm rva yt bj?o hod ,bn»»nb ix H»o«nb na«n »ai 

: pirwbi nab rvnn iron ,( M nb*nna *]b nr mKBnb 

[100] 

,DHaa coma &jn apT iaa *p nooia ( u "imwn »a nm 

,( M DHona -jTa Kxoa cnaa ("bit Kb -wra na anwib awnn *ai 

: omiB 100 untcs "p *wk "]bacn ('•■jruian ("roan Kbn 



rornn w 



V 

[87] 

,na note* (""piyj raa n«i 
/( M "j^n on? 1 ? inn e6to 

[88] 

]n ntya o^fiva nnennn 

^itd oioa mya Snsni 

•nnnnn pan 1 ? "ja 1 ? mn 



,f6rcon »o^ own ■?«! 
/C*n^3Di mr jro ;wn toi 
: .-fcoaa naa n»aa -paxy 

.ctpwb* npj?jD»a^n]yo^ 
,nfinn nromo 'a airnm 
:nfl-irn ytop mm iwoni 

[89] 

•ran*? prim bw nop-n wai crono o*bi» •*« o*anJt 
,ras"ii b*b ("o^dji nroj twh rmpo ("fyo ty o*an n^i 

,(*"ujd re cnwiB enn »"?a 

[90] 

AThp r\» -|rron (*nn« tidi 
npno np"i "pw vwann 

[91] 

a 1 ? lorn D'Kne nn-6 
conena nto-i nato cdihitbi 

[92] 

rpin« ■>« -ptor *run 
d\-6k «»■? ("pnx mm 
nopni p*? pan "iruna 



:wwa ("tikix nans laini 

,13 (""inyny c|itcnn n-ioa 
/larwn (""inna 1 ? m no"?i 
nam mo aiar -m nenaa 

,nirvns nen »ai ,.tb ioa 
.mmaa "|-n ij?t vb iw 
:mmjo orf? rw ("anviBi 

,savi nao ^n tev raa 
,na nato owim ,ttte3. \t 
trnnann rown ,nma 



[93] 

ni^oa cnff» rpiano to fir) wa*? cpni ("pan 1 ? am no rwi 

/("ni^Da rvntm (*p^n 161 ,anpyi wo net? rp»»n aioi 

: mwi p^p (""joy a*i dm ,( tt "|mwn uton *a <«oy3m 



/CnwioKn n«Ka pan nm 

,ni3im poo -pT •>«! 

: ("nun Via«i ray* rp y ne. 



[94] 

nmya new *]•? lannna 

hT?3D r»BV ^H*^ *?N1 

ywi ( 4t Brw 'fl 1 ? -a jyo 1 ; 



00 



.U3b2 T.^p» ]fi tron 
: naim pino pao iew 

,D3»a» no^ eron ,pnm 
(•niifix rot mW> ^ain *6n 
: D3oo^> irw rp na pm 

,WB3^» nite am ep3 n*6e6 
,0*ffBir6 mn nai ,te3 Ta 

:t£>B-D IK 0*0 3JD JDO' DM1 

Anrot n*oio o^6a *en pus 
,Dnen o<3nn ^>ai dp »wki 
tonnca nnnw» to nwy 

,("ntf6a D^mn (*Ta mvwb 
,row6 mm pp anp\n 



[M] 

cw^pm DTK *3ao Tnonn 

DiT3BD D^JI BTQ "pm 

d\-6kd iron Bnan i6n 

[81] 

"iraa -fry* my\ m» 

.nian (wtoa acton dni 

*ta onw n&yn noto 

[82] 

nijrox mo mp» no ntn 

rtam a 1 ? nan d^>03 nai 

#c*epwn cnn^Bi pon ne 

[88] 

]n ntyo nimxn »a ("jn* 

o'ann to ni»n» mi 

loam dt ("iKxa ("t6 ( lf n» 

[84] 

wiom np maa rpn tow 
o»jrax rp^jn nme tjd 



: nKioicminciDiDi ,matM cn"Bi»a tmmvi^ cton dim 

[85] 

/("DTiaa on? ijrn x^> "«w« t»j» Tnoro ("j?»nn 

,DTD»nx(* , jpnniDniW>j? <"nrT> tow vin jmoi 

: mm ("D'nix »3'j?a aio ^acn -mm ]n ttxoni ("Ten mn 



[IX. 0] 

orm-iyn -nr "ljrcr 

[88] 

/(•vmnTKO p^ on toi /(naj/? £ pr ton kt 

♦vnwpanptoarpnn^ la pr jn •jkw dki 

: vntoyo (713a jnn 161 /("6ipa jmn *6i »nn« me* 



twvn nw' 



.(•nnyi pny cayn «a bm 
,ni?3n nVjr n"?i «]» p»a 
: nw nana »b "po *a jni 

/ronna isk "pK* n,ojn 

/Vonoo rp ma ]n* ( u ^>ni 

: wwjn vona mae* dki 

,nnnn onj? ptuo pa^>ni 

,(-nna^ n«m ^»pn bab 

icrrraa p« ioa con *6i 



no 

[73] 

,i*a»m ote riT» c^iaDi mt 

ppyo n« *po e^iacM 

/intwa 16 dk ewa ( w ^snn 

[74] 
/('•DM^'K -|^D»1 DWK ^lap 
/Jl^aD' DW3K ^>iaDn '31 

,»poa fan oniona own 

[75] 

onnea -p^ina nn ^iaDnn 

nnem ,yiyt toon ckSt 

in pea ( w n,nTn' n« Brown 



[76] 

/ onan yearn ^Da napn dki ,wnnni ("[ne] Dionni nan bizo 

pa^> nnx o^aon n^ ai»i 



/("anm* cms iyo»* nntaa 
: omnon o«oioi fo» n,a 

/itd.^ ("tip *6i na na 
,nrya wsoa nero c^ao ioa 
: rwa rt>no ^>aV «sno lai 



nto^ ("pan ty oinani 

[77] 

V« nttw ^»aiD n*nn aits *6n 
wn Cjiaxy niaia* td> <oi 
,(»naini ^>a« ^ (*onan lai 



[viii. n] 



.vuh na^> "\b yaxni 

,vaiom dj; Sip KTn *6i 

: vaipoo pie* ^>«n ym 

,nnjn^> j»sn -jan ]j?d^> 

,nnnn« nj? n^ ao^n na\s 

: nrbyo p ty nxsnni 



[78] 

,(nnoa oik >ta ^kh *n* 

,mjrax n,nn rwy epi^ai 

^to inw rwpn pnDi 

[79] 

nijwx nno "ty «a townn 

pna -pno nx nnnn^> 

cnaian cna wx nNX2' dni 



BD 



,oa ijn* 16 tw o-p^ys 

,Da^>a m^p» ]fi KYni 

: nairn "pno po "ii^k 

,dw no^> r»»i ,jttxm 
(•dtibx riK mtofr ^>ain *6n 
: Qioish nn« ona na ;»«i 

.vsib ubv am epj mto6 
.("ffflir^ tw» nai ,tej ra 

:&fi"D IK O'O ajD JDO» DK1 

annK d*dio on6a »an p«a 
,Dnan nwn tei dp tow 
:nnnoa on^yo to mop 

,("n*r6a n»mn cpa mnB6 
jiiwfc mm pp anp\n 



nni»n nc 

[80] 

w6pm dtk »aao Ynonn 
d\-6ko m*m anan kSt 

[81] 

-inna Ytyfl rwjn m» 

,nwn (•Di^aa treon c«i 

»ta Dnw rwpn tvsfn 

[82] 

mp*» n*» mp^ no nm 

("i^fiwa a 1 ? nan otea nai 

,( ,4 rpievi onm>w lion ns 

[83] 

jn ntyo rojrwn »a ( w j?t 

D»ann ^>a man* nai 

loam or cmrao rt6 ("D« 

[84] 

rvaioni ay maa rpn tow 
D»jrux mtyi nme iiya 



: nmoi ("nmn pno idi ,matw (wwa tkwwV r^n on 

[85] 

/("DTiaa onr ijrr 16 *ipk "ptryo Ynom ryrcnn 

fOmo'nNcepffnniDni^ty cnynb ^iff »nn ynoi 

: o*wi ("d^w 072 aio ^atn iDm jn axoro ("Ton tvn 



[ix. o] 

[88] 

/(•vnimiKO "ja^ on ^ni /(nay 1 ? ^ "px» to«n kt 

/rnwwnp^narjrpvfc 1a -px* jn -|iw dki 

: vntoyo pjnaa jnn 161 .ei^pa yocn »6i ^n« diok 



rwvn ■!»' 



,eniTjn pny own w ton 

/Hitj-i nty* »6i *]» TTK3 

: n«r nana »b ^eo '3 j?t 

,i*orna iBN t"im* "Pin 

/poi-ioo rp c-p ]n* ( u f?xi 

: vexjn van Ta&» dmi 

,n-nn ony pwo pa^>ni 

,(».tt3^ n**m Vpn bib 

tpnraa pK ids B*on *6i 

/ onan yoern roa ruyn dmi 
^♦tok nnix ij;ok» onoa 
: nninon d*didi pot? "p 

.yvot6 cry nbi na "p 

/HTJD NX03 "WK (*63D 103 

: n» a n^>no ^ nbid lai 



no 

[73] 

,wn cb» m»n rtiaoi kt 
■pe^e n« *po rtiao*! 

[74] 
.CWte T>ao»l D'E»K ^130 

«mvd3 fan eniona own 

[75] 

onnea "pfrn n» toaonn 

insm ,yvjnr toon ckSi 

in pea ( w *jnTn* n« &»onn 

[76] 

,Bmnm ("[hb] oionm nan Viao 

■pa^> rout o^aon t> ami 

niW> ("-pan ty orum 

[77] 

1'H new ^>aio nwi aio i6n 
cb*k epaxj? nuia* to* *oi 
,owini baa ^ coron iai 



[viii. ni 



•rvijr 

,ntb na^> -j 1 ? ywm 

,V3iom ny bnp KTn 161 

: Imuran tyik" ten jm 

,nnjnb y an -p ij?d^> 

,nnnn« nj* t> ats*n w« 

: nrbya p *ty ixsnni 



TJW 

[78] 

,nnoa cw *toa ten nt 

,mjp» -pi rwj* rpiTJ*. 

#*ta mix ne>j?n "pnoi 

[79] 

my*3X mo *ty to teffnn 

Trra Tine nx 7-11,-6 

ciaian ona »»k -jnxo* dmi 



/(TnTTSI 1^ pTl «TTBt3 712} rt25 2T2^ T5K #^HTI 3TT1 

/Cmn jte jot nj? rrnss c^r tt?*-. m»2 »2 nn 

/en6 rvbjp ryrys m bess <rp& 22* 121 

: cnzn *p2 insra* 121 .^j? r6r P "»s* 'P? ran 

[«] 

,innc by rcfyfcn cm 122^ rwr -kw bp*k carm 

,wiBff rtfoo tec* n2*»i ,cc^a8n cnr* 22^ ban* 161 

: inwr ^7 ma;n ,c»c»jrn to jnraa /na^ str> *6n 

t«9] 

siesn? di iwt 12^ npa .cTnaua mm um otovi 
«nwpt ("inoipa wm cm pna»» v*a W23 spare n«i 



: rwnr 16 rua^ w Tfi?2 ("lrroa en Vijsi tj? 

[70] 

,<?i<mvb mpn <"pri ,cnr ppa mini -pJ'Pa ^w mi 

/ "|Ki2n t6 (*pn<2j?n reborn mays rpn en jk nenai 

: "]«n9nn warn pn ton jayhp *32K too^> wn tparn 

[71] 

.ynrvb loxjn i2n om ,"p?pn rropn »a njn 

/jooipno T2 JH2J «nn nato ,"jffBaa j?aam 

: ("^oyfi otojrt> oion ato ,11222 onn "^anp mpai 



[VII. ?] 

[72] 
,0D<Dnai HOK2 "J2 BlfiE" *WK VBBff HK ("H^IDI ,totfl KT* 

#D'D*jB3 yvtob ipno i6n wwiA pddpb no dki 

: cdixj; (wpHw ¥b dk vuk ai n^no otoj^ wrni 



n*i»n iiB' 



/naijo bs *j*j» rvnn dmi 

,mpoi eawa "p nxavb 

: ( u miB» ms nyi ( ,( 6ai wm 



ID' 

[69] 

nnnaa nj? inso rwnn 
1j?d^ CE^ann^ t^jnn mVi 



[60] 

#inyr Kto noa btftv nvn D*oann n« "iria^a man m^i 



-chidm ty p -\b mv can 
nnnaff w,vnj»» *6 "iDMni 

»w»j» ^>pa wi -ptpyoa js 
: vm^ »ito "pre to *WK 



■ptow» dm npa an noi 

[61] 

.vutoo tPiani ,ten mt 

,pijmd va rww na*Mi 

,D\-6«no i^ anan m^>i 



[VI. 1] 



c« rrupm mxn w 

[62] 

#majn pixa ten mv 

,"pa^ Dl"6 "JIW DM1 

vnnton niteo vbs -iiar 

[63] 

nayoa nay pun nwrwi 
man .v*n vy nipe* »ai 

,1J?1X» hot \-p rap dvi 

[64] 

n« ennxij rmyn »a njn 

zismi i^o inn anwi jwii 

(•paw anp o^w op Mto 

[65] 

,.-11*01 ( M t» nis^n cq^ai!? cava ,"pa^> dit dmi »nwnnn 

,mwi pw "p an ]»oi? ("-jniMJ ni^aoa -iManm 

:cniiM"6 n«m *ib? 'by nnyi onjr iaa&> ov mar 



,m*oi nan \nn ^hmti 

/i-PNJa MttOTM iT3J» DM1 

: enaan aiE» m^>i ,(*na Ma wm 

,iMiao nM maira D»on -npo 
,( s im^ ia^> vhn ,oa nbay 
: imhw orfc nty» dm oji 

,('utae6 ntyn new na: non 

,uim as>j? »ty tea nan 

: utrj? nty dmi td nmm 



fr+» 



TD 



ni«vn *no» 



,( M r6vm otr uy rvm -inai 

jc'ntyo^ nyo^Bff onoKim 

,om>n j^d |Bn ny mixo 

,Dnrt> mtyo (»"|naff iai 

: unm ^d inpo* iai 

,innu by rvfcyon nna 
,imoff ntoD too* row 
: infiff ty nojn ,(*D*yn ^ 

,ns3n9 m -iew ia^> tiya 
/Htipt cwoipa wtn ona 
: nsnp 16 n3a^> ik nsya 

,C"]K3e6 nipn H'Ki 'D^it P 3 
,*;«nn »6 cm*ayn niton 
: •jtconn ("n»3rn p ^w 

,*prr6 losyi m dot 

/■poipno T3 j?333 vw 

: («-joyfl otoj6 won *6i 



[86] 

may nb6 "pwri mm 

na^> «a^ to* ,ton jm 

jomai npi eny ^wo Kim 

[67] 

e*6y "rioyn m»a o njn 

totra ('••pa^ aw» iai 

hy nby pi twk ,p» nm 

[68] 

iaa^» nm» *wk wx oarm 

.("otoan d^n aa^> too* *6i 

yiixoa maV ae* vhn 

[89] 

.cnnaua mto puk them 

0"uw* w»a Niao rpp»o nw 

("vwa m yraw Ty Tioyvi 

[70] 

nnni *p3*ya toff n»n 

maya ("pn wan nenai 

,o*j6p *3aK 7irt wn epm 

[71] 

/■piyn mayn »a njn 

noto /pwa yarn 

/naaa ovm ^3^p myai 



[VII. t] 



[72] 



,ea»onai note p wimp* itw vbbp n« cntoioi .ton m» 
/D»o»yaa iffB3^ ipno vbn vrmah eooyo no om 

: rowy < § o»ipn?a »b dk matt a 1 ? n^>no nbiyb iwmnn 



HKW W 



jrxao bz wpa svnn dni 
: emir* ws njn ( 1( 6aj im 

[60] 

,mjrr *6# noa tew nvn D^oann n» -pa^a Pian «^i 



ID' 

[59] 

nEnnaa nj? inso nwnn 
inxDi yvp n» *^ ini 



r("ino« i?y p "j^> nv ("••an 
nnnaff iK,vnyotp *6 nonni 

»wnn e)KO "|^> nun 
,wjd ^>pa \in "pppoa js 



■ptow* dk n»a si noi 

[61] 

,viE>bn van bxn nt 

wvam ana rrnn naw 

/Dvfacno "£ wan 161 



[VI. i] 



[62] 

,nuyi p"ixa ten ki» 

,"jaa^> orfc "|tw otn 

vnnton rnboo rte mar 

[63] 

nayoa -iay en» roorwi 

■nan ,v*n »o* Tips* *ai 

#ijran nan w »p an 

[64] 

n* (rowo nuyn 'a n JH 

/ibni "jte ]nn anwi .torn 

HiaiK" w\p D^m op «^n 

[65] 

#niwi ( u w nis^n cq»ai^ cava .yob dit dki ,niunnn 

,nuoi pto "ja an )»d^ ("-jniw nibaoa iNsnni 

tOTnwti n«m ibj? 'ty nnjn any "pat? or liar 



,ms3i nan vin ywn 

,mwa awm naa* dki 

: cnjBn aia* j6i ,ena »a i»h 

,wiao nx maua dot -iipo 
/CiN^ ia^ *6n ,oa boy 
: wb>3 m*6 nty* dk dji 

.H3bb6 ntyn new m non 

,uim at?? ty tea dpi 

: i:»p nty dki td nrrm 



<" v '» i* 



no 



n»n«n rw* 



[52] 

,vtye dk itr» k^> wa^> dk ,en3»n ("nana yxa noi 

,1^3*13 bp Kin DK1 D^CODI CD^D pa ( M tP13K tton 

: ct^dd jy cnnnow* dwib cnoiffi ,aio Tart ia |»k dki 

[St] 

,(«nmD ia v« twhs Tan^ 

/win rtyoi inao noo 

: inrp ff^na yn nm 



vpao vnsrh mm ana* 

,ia -nayn K3 ^>ki /injnfl 

maw cfl^oao K*va 

[54] 

Ta.-6 '«an pt b»aa» mn 
yrt Ka k^> ttt>K dk rani 



.innnR n« eyai -iaj?&>a 
,vnajn "jn^ Ka&> proa 
nnBro( ,, DB6»VionoTX'i»H Tiflxanisp PDmwTX bno 

[55] 

/Koaoa ut tfyoa dk nwvy vh new tj; onana nam 
.noin ^jnn noi ,n&73 *iaa *a nnx nana pxa noi 

: cnotya "ipwn "inK vuk (*)7 mrn^ pmpni 17 awnn 

[56] 

,037a njra ^ns kxd3 dki annua to^i hkt nam 

,ww V37 mpw no ^y ia tb»h hk loxpa Ta* 161 

: ("D3n^> mfu wk on? Vj?n ^1 vj»p 10x7 ana i6n 



[V. 

♦nrpm 

/wm ao*n Kcrnn Dioa 
,cwiKn D^ip Tjn kt \nn 
: itn pnx En3K atrro nai 

,ns"im na nxoni .-p»j»a 

,nfixo^> rprnrnw ^>a »ty 

: nsiffn r-jnmjo man 161 



ni 



■ijra 

[57] 

■pxjD wanm Ann kt 
,mooi ntra anaV rmpn *ai 
•(•DHWRno niDa^> mnn K\m 

[58] 

nnns e-pfc^a* dk -^ aion 

•pab '37 ropn aia kSt 

/njD <T«y o»xjrn noto 



fmwi to* *TD 

[46] 

,vyna D*on bwk. axon ny ,D»pim o» "Dy^ noan fpm 

/(""i^jntyi ny *ana ^o ( M n 1 yoi«6 ]iki^ pa spo ij?d^» 

: vyw by spon #iyw nipo n« ("wbrr par an 

,( m nn"no ro dot nnoDna D'oan^ no ^sh ("mown 

^••omoa nnmn ioy3 »6n ^nnnaan ty dh^k jtw noi 

: nnvn no ikxd* djitd onjra dvw m *3 n»n 

[48] 

,-mni punn tpk to Kxom ,noi»o iDnn *6i ,noan nap 

/("nns 1 ? ntpro ^wy c^nai an nan ,ta napnn mytei 

: nnooi fan ip» to nwm awmd mp« noanm 



[iv. 1] 



M 



,13101 rmn^ tola i»k 

,n D'xxoa innr wnx tea 

: urn eny mna Djmr6 

cn^ian »3*jn n*nn iew 
: ("ri"!^ (•onnooa & no d:i 



[49] 

inioa n« lam ,b»n m» 
,mna ro no ny "io«n »ai 

[50] 

Tsni? ,( , "in t ? »ry nps 

nmps en^y Bnwa noai 

#te mnn noisy py »»i 



[51] 

,ioxya nxr C'SD vpyo tei ,ioipo n« Yarfc yaws ^ia« 

,( ,8 ioir6 ma 1 ? ens lo^iya aio nnrw kxo-i ,oip3» »an 

: loyoi inn asi ao3 ina /i^kop i« wo* to o* 1 dki 



no 



mrwi nw 



[52] 
.rtom bp Kin DK1 D^lffaDl ("D»J^D ]»a ("tPIJK Btevi 

: ct^db ty cnmioBf* c^ne enow /aio i»arh la )»» dm 

[5t] 

,enniD ia v« -lewa Tar6 

,inan vtyoi inaa hod 

: -iniT &*D^>na *pn nm 



vyao mart mm anaa 

,ia -nayn to toi /injne 

maw ("n^DOD *rava 

[54] 

Tar6 ,Kan )ot ^aera n«n 
■p^ **a *6 -raw n« awn 



/innn« nx cpai iajwa 
/imajn *p^> nat? cnoa 
nnmacwte toDnD*nnMt -riBsa mey comww croc 

[55] 
,KB3D3 lit B»J?03 DN WW? l6 WK IV Dnana "Dm 

,no-in fynn noi ,;wjh "iaa «a nn« "iana jnta noi 

: cnotya ipun -in* von ("py mw6 eniBm nij? awnn 

[56] 

,D3<ya ijw ^ns nxd3 nm onrma Ta*i nm* im 

,ww wp wp£3 no *to n toh n« idxjd "va* >6i 

: rD3n^> kpi3 itm on? tya ^p*i wp idxij; ana *6n 



,i&»ni ao»n Konn dim 
/CnriKn atop tjn m» \in 
: wi pro k>i3n atrro nai 

,nB-im na xxoni rptpyoa 

,nsxD^> (-pnimix ^>a ty 

: newn e-jnmya wian 161 



[v. ni 
n?j?m rwan ijra 

[57] 

•pxya owanm Ann nt 
,niDDi ntra tena^ noyn »ai 
,(»D^i«no moa^ n\nn iwn 

[58] 

nnnn ( 4 *|W«a» on ^ auan 

-pa!? »37 "popn am *bn 

mjtt cpp n*xj;n nofo 



HHVfl "1»» 



"ID 



[46] 

,D'pim n» iaj£> noan s]im 

|1Kia» pK CJ330 jpoV 

[47] 

n^oan^ no -\2b ("niottn 
,("«Dnioa nnma ioj» *6n ^on'oari ty d.t6n ynn* noi 



,i*yna Q*o^ wk. axon ny 
,( ,,o vjnBn dj? »an3 te ("•■jyowV 
: vyu ty sjwi /ijhm mpo 

,("«nn«no m otn nnoana 



: nnvn no wxo» mitd 

,"inani psnn -nwt ^>a Kxoro 

/("nns 1 ? a»ra -jib^ ( U6 ^ai 

: nnooi pan np» to nwro 



onjr*a d*k*ib dj »a ron 

[48] 

,noi«o iDnn *6i <noan nap 

an DMi ,^>a njpnn nny^ai 

#d»mm9 mp* noanm 



[IV. T] 



W 



ziaiei rmna^ torn n»« 

,ia D'wroa mnr caiix tea 

: iam eny miaj Djrnn^ 

en^m wpa ronn nana 

#cn w »n 1KT K^>1 ,10*3*1 

: ("rpfa (•Dnnooa ff* no mi 



[49] 

inion n« nam ,bxn m» 

/Dn^K -px wpp *6 *a jm 

,DNia n? no nj? loan *ai 

[50] 

Tar6 /C"ja^ wp nps 

nmps ww ffUNa noai 

£a ronn noisy yy tn 



[51] 

.idxjd nsr c n *sa incryo ^>ai ,ioipo nx ta-6 ^a»o ariiH 

/(""loin 1 ? ina^ cna lo^iya aio nnn« kxoi ,oip2>* *an 

: ioyoi inn jsi jdj *iaa ,iteo» ik iro* ^n o* dmi 



no 



n*i<n n& 



[52] 

,vtye r\n w k^> w£& dk ,puKn ("•nana pxa noi 

/V^na bp Kin DK1 B^WaDI C'D^D 1»3 ("Bn3K OteM 

: ct^do by ("innate owns cnowi ,aita vsnh 1a pK dki 

[5«] 

/(•nnio la pn two TanV 

/wan rtyoi inao neo 

: inn* arajtoia tvt nni 



vjob mark rwvi ana* 
,ia Tapn R3 ton /injne 

[54] 

Tart /«an p? toapo nvt 

Trt R3 K^> TOK HK JWll 



/innnK nx ("pai nayffa 
/imajn Trt R3ff proa 
nntnarDtftotoDnoTx-iffK mwaniey comwTx «roo 

[55] 

,Koaoa ik p poa dk nrwp rt "iwh ny onana nam 
.win tojnn noi ,n»ya naa »a nnK nana pxa noi 

: cnrtjn ipian nnK bum cry nnrt (-mem tij; awnn 

[56] 

,037a njra tone kxds dki onnKa Tan rwr new 

,dj»ki w»y mpsa no ^bv ia wit nK icxya Ta» ato 

: ("D3rt kpu im» on? tya ^p<i va»p vsvsjf aw rtn 



[v. 

♦mj?m 

.iwii ao*n Konn Dioa 
/CnriKn Dtoy Tjn kt *nn 
: mn pnx ffi3K a»ro nai 

,ns"im na kxdhi .T«j»a 

,nsxrt c-pmnTK ba ty 

: rwwn e"|mnjn man rti 



n] 



[57] 

"|D*j?a w'anm ,to<n kt 
,niDoi ntra vnab nopn »ai 
/(•D^iKno niDa^ nvin knt, 

[58] 

nnnK o-[w«a» dk t> aion 

■pa^ »a*p TDyn are rtn 

mya (*pp D»xyn noto 



rwwi n»< 



"ID 
[46] 



,vj*na D*on en3K axon nj; ,n*pim o* ■ojrt" nosn *pn 

,( ,M TjnBn DJ7 *3H3 to ( MB "|VD1^ 

: vyw ty f|*Dw ,iyo3 mpo 



|W2' pK "|33D 1J?dS 
DK ( m 1S^IT p31* ffM 

[47] 

D'osn^ no "p^> e'niD«n 
,(" e nrno3 on«n3 ioj;3 *6n ^"o^oan ty dh^k pin* noi 



,(»«Dn«nD nn dni nnosns 



: onvn no inxd* dsitd 

,-irDni penn -raw to wtoro 

.(""ins 1 - awna pff p ( ,w toai 

: nnDoi pen np* to nwni 



nnjna D**n* m *a nm 

[48] 

,noi«o nonn t6i >no3n nap 

3*i dki ,to ropnn mytoi 

,d»3'3bd mp» noanm 



[iv. T] 



W 



.laioi vnina^ toi3 mtf» 



njw 



[49] 

vtow n» iDm A«n m» 



,13 d*nxo3 mix* ( M 3iix to« ,on*ta "px can* »6 *3 jm 
: 13m enj* mi33 ojm.-6 .mna nt no *ty ionh oi 

[50] 

Y3.-6 ,(*"p^ *3*y rips 

nmps 00*37 en3K3 nosi 

/to ninn noixj? pj; t?*i 



emsn *3^3 n*nn i»h 

,cn w K"i iht 161 #10*3*1 

: cn^ito (•onnooa & no dji 



[51] 

,ioxy3 nsn*- (»'S3 vtryo toi ,ioipo n« -von 1 - ^»3»o ewk 

/("loirt ins 1 ? (»H3 io'?iy3 3io nnra* xxo*i ,oip»* *an 

: ioj*di inn jbi 303 133 Abaaw i« i3*o* te o* dki 



no 



JllfFn TTD* 



[52] 

,vtye m ne?" k^> wsb dk wxn c»nana >rea noi 

,i<6jna bp Kin dki n^waoi ("dt^d pa c*etuk ote»n 

: ot^dd bv ewer cane cnoien ,aio Tar6 u ]»k dki 

[5t] 

,cnniD la i»k n&wa *rartf> 

/iron i^poi imo noo 

: inn* fc*e^>na fn nni 



rj?ae rrarh mm ena» 

,ia "iiajm to tei ,mjnB 

mew m^Doo t«n»a 

[54] 

Tan^ /»an pr ^aera n*n 
*pfa «3 *6 new n* ram 



.lrmn* n« cpai najrcra 
,imajn "p^ «a&» cnoa 
nnBnacwtetonno'wwK •nwanw? comwra croc 

[65] 
,KBaDa IK K>J7Da DK DTWJJ l6 "WK "I? Dnna *iam 

^no-in fynn noi ji»jb naa *a nrot nana j?xa noi 

: motya npun nn« vuk ("py nirn^ enwro ny awnn 

[58] 

,orjn "ij?k> ^ns nxoa dki annua T»a*i run* new 

,dmti w»p inpsa no *bv ia ton n« idsjd to* kVi 

: ("wrfc ttvu ivx on? tya ^p<i wp lanj* ana i6rr 



[V. ffl 



,n?j;m 



,-ia*ni ao*n Ktonn aioa 
,(nrwn atop ijn kt» »nn 
: mn pnx k>uk aarru nai 

,ns"ini na worn ."p»j»a 

,ncxD^> e*pnin-iiN Va »ty 

: newn ('"jmnya ffian *6i 



[57] 

•pxya ec^anni Ann m» 
,mooi nca vrab nojrn »ai 
.(WMKno mDa^» nvm K»m 

[58] 

nnnx («*par«a* n» -p aion 

-jaa^> »37 tbj»i aio *6n 

/nj» epp D»xj?n no^i 



nnwi "no* 



"ID 



[46] 

,D'pim w isyb nosn rim 

\my pN epao jyo^ 

n« ( m is^n* p3i» tern 

[47] 

D'D3rt> no isb cmoxn 
,( u, Dnion Dn«ro ioy3 «^n ^"o^oan ty nn^N inn" 1 noi 



,vjm D % on arun axon ny 
,( MO vyifc>i oy *3rn to ( w "jyoiE6 
: vpu ty «j wi ,iyo3 mpo 

,(i«nn«no ro dki nnosm 



: onvn no ikxd* dsito 

,Tnani psnn -wk ^»3 wrani 

,( m nnB^> 3K»n3 "pary ("^"ni 

: -inDDi pan ip» ^>3 mami 



ony<3 o*H-» D3 '3 run 

[48] 

,noi«o iDnn n 1 ?! ,no3n nap 

3i dki ,ta roprm mytei 

#d»3»3bd mp» nosnni 



[iv. 1] 



wronn *w 



.laioi vnina^ baa ixm 

,13 d'nxoj mix* (»3"11X ^>3» 

: 13m ony mi33 Djmrti 
(•n«i:n ^••yn runn tok 

/CPP*K"l ikt *6l ,10*3*1 

: ( w n«i^ (»onnD03 2" no mi 



[49] 

1^103 n« ism ,ten kt 

,d.tVn "pit wro *6 »3 jni 

,wna ro no <ty no«n »3i 

[50] 

T3.-6 ,(*-p^> »j»p nps 

nmps cn»37 ffi3K3 ,1031 

/?3 ronn noisy py a»i 



[51] 

,ioxy3 nxv ("'S3 vtryo "?3i ,ioipo n« "vsn 1 ? ^»3»o ana« 

,( M ioir6 iroS ( W H3 io'?iy3 310 nnrw kiwi ,oipa» *on 

: loyoi inn jbi 303 133 Abttovf i« wo* ^n b» dni 



2D mwi w 

[38] 

,o<pvni D»3np r6p nvtw ^pntw pops moan i*n 
/("D'pim (»nn«3 nwpa Avssb i^opi aw rmaun r^pio w 
: D'pino B)« nwaa pi cma ,n-n*6 ^n tow onn 

[39] 

,mp^>a noiHD wpn bm ,miap napn nai #noan mp 

,nnn Tinn cionp row ,"ptppo to bv-6 narwn 

: nine rna*D niatnon ^b cty rep^na r\b:y 'afiiNa 

[40] 

,nn»* (""pbiyfl rwpn i»« Vp ^nsan nbn ux njn 

*c°Dnn» on dm ytoan ,! ?p n/ppo "j^ <"n»«n* ym 

: <"D*rp kpd aia? k»* dm ,imeh *6 no ^ jiponn 

[41] 

,("ir6»iw by nap towto ,vno^ i6 ichm ,noan ^w 

,ine* ty "man m noto ,vnpr run iiok .pn dki 

: wpa mv t6i anpte pw dwhm *6r ( M npa pxa nev 

[42] 

,nnj?T xb rux r-jr.ffia an xbn ,va nvin no^i ,noan bxv 
,nnxpi r^saa ^ r>H *a* .<aa^ ( w wa» nosn *6i 
xb vmt ( ,w n« trans ("wi e»D*rnK "jniK lapo* dk 'an 

: nnwM 

[43] 

,ntooi d» a^>a tik ( ,w *xa r&wo noan to mn ( ,w n*na 

„-6na i« mop ,rm ^a 1 ? napa pwi mi* mm* 

: ntyo^> oa tniBi Vain xbi ,mvo2 tpsin pw mop* tki 

[44] 

/('"Itiki \»y npsi Jns Dion "|« ,oam D»oann n* roar 
#]tkoi obs rpa onna-6 "|aa^> n« now ,po«n nn 
: |rm tm »jk no«n 161 ,-j 1 ? aim id* two noni 

[«] 
,nawn cnypa K»n dn p*n ,c"Dn»ro6 id^i »noan tiot 
,na (""lxsrr xb nm toa »ja ,n»^oa^ no^n ht no 1 ?! 
■naipa naioa nox* d.si .o»pten ^p "jp? pnrnn 



• 108' 



imvn w 30 

[30] 

,nts>tt3 non to« ,*nn n3K nrr ew cntsm* to to i*i 

nvrnpn mini noan pi . m ntoa V3a^> Wuom 

: (rrtsnrm to "w» i3a^> ioa .w»A cwrr hti D3 vm 

[31] 

,frrno an dk "ft jn» toi ."jtmS ("pijtt nap ,mw nip 

mion inn *wk jno «to w^ .(""ppo too *a 1^ 

: m?jrt> na "pin an no <"pk iwtnjw "\b iiopn K\ni 

[32] 

,idsbi ana «jk iD«n («*6i noioi noan njp .mm nap 

,w aron c»j?j tan ana pn6 vh dki £*a«» nirr nw» *ch 

: "id itox D3 snt h»jn t6i p a*i oi )to*a y*a noi 

[38] 

,Nin atrro noai -"wiwd »o Ta T»n *6i ,noan n3D 
.imatrn* lama w> no i6n wins arm »to avrrn 
: mito 1 in vara ime toi '("Jffwa rne* *wk nin &»i 

[34] 

,ni&ua njrn t6i ,jn idwi <"mup nop nap ,min n3p 

.niK3i nopa ipn omana rnmonn rnrroa *raon »6i 

: niton opt? no« mm sjim ,n*oito an may app jm 

[35] 

,nn*ap ("*a to iaa^> nrw ,noana i» mina roonnn 

,nnp^ («wmS noan cvh itwi D'nm co^yn 'to na amm 

: nn'to ("nnnxaa *a ipo^> ,-{3a^ ("nnenr i*h 'a en* 

[36] 

.onna »ato to tow ppa tfnrw ntrv 'to noan nm 

.D'TXp npp* D3i ,D'pnio^ vjnai cvmpav nbtt* 

: onsa op unra .mo D*wa ,DWirf? laa* rmvsi 

[37] 

,na"ipa cnosi ss" new nppa -nm* 'too nean 
,naicn ("vnpayn >r\b vnpa wxpi rwp ian cm 

: naian ( 7 »niT£ ntpp* naw .vyw nsrw wa* nno^ 



2D n*vn tid» 

[38] 

wpm D»anp p6y nrno ^pntra ffopa prawn ikt 
,PD*pim pmwo rwa Av&ib toffi k»m pnwan pVjno *an 
: D^pmo epx news pi pma ,mii6 "pSn i^an* onn 

[39] 

,my^a nowo p&pn ton ,miaj? iaj?n nai wioan nap 

,m-in mnn pidtd pdmi sywo bs wb mrwn 

: mns pna»o mafcnon ^fi pty peptoia n^y 'JBiMa 

[40] 

,Dn»* p"ptoj» na>j?n -ipm ty -jnsan nbii dm njn 

ww on dm nnoan »ty -ptt^o *^> pvwwi* ym 

: pdtj; mipo aiar m&» dmi ,iwm m^> no 12b pponn 

[41] 

,pwtoM&> by my towto #im»^ m^> no^ni ,noan ^>mk> 

/inoM ty inan nr noto ,wijn* run man ,jnn dmi 

: wya mr Mto anptos pn d»xhm by pnpa jrea nev 

[42] 

#nnjn» m^> pdm py-ena an vbn .va nvin noto ,noan b»v 
/nnsyi pn^fija ^ p«t »jk .«aa^ p»w*a' "idmh Mto 
xb (mm ( ,w nM nana p*nn pott* *|nw ujna* dm *an 

: nrmn 

[43] 

,ntoxoi d* a^>a "ihm ( ,04, xa ntotro noon ^a k»m p»n*iu 

,nto"u im mop ,nn ^a 1 ? ropa jnai "n* tom 

: ntyo 1 ? d: tnisi Vain Mto ,oi&>oa awn pm /nay t/mi 

[44] 

/( I0, inMi )«y npsi ,ns DiDn im ,oam wosnn hm naar 
,]tmoi d^>b spa unnanh iaa^> ns nonen .yean nm 
: ]?m tu *jm lean 161 ,^ aim w» two nam 

[45] 

,nawn DiTrjn M\n dm pm ^"Dn«n»^ noto ,noan tiw 
,na (""iv sn* m 1 ? om ,tea »aa ^tooa 1 ? no'jn nt noto 
■nanjw naioa nex* dmi .D»pto)n by "jjnt jn»nn 



♦ 108* 



[30] 

,nvmi non to» ,»nn unatt ntm w* (rnttn^ to by i*n 

/wmpn mini noan pi . m n^>m V3a^> ^room 

: ("jwwi ty new ua^> 103 Avnb nrwrv K\n D3 vtn 

[31] 

,nn»no an dk n> jn» *?ki /jtmS cnjn nap ,rnm nip 

,nmon inn new ]no *by ca^b cnnpo ikd *a ij»^ 

: nn?jrt> na n,3in an na ("r* -iwtnjD n^mopntwii 

[32] 

,ncBBi 3H3 »3K nowi (**6i .noioi noan nap .nnin nip 

,nt? ew cjn dpi 3H3 1^»^> *6 ran ,^3B» mrt nw *D^> 

: no iVto oa ,ns rap* *6i van on ]^»a jnra nei 

[38] 

,xin avm noai rpniwo »o n»a n?«n t6i ,noan tod 
.lmacw iaina vn no ttbn ,urnna tsnn *to awn 
: why p mna, inns by^ .pytrwa nns» nw nm m 

[34] 

,niN33 njm *6i >p noioi (»mi3y nop nap .nnin rop 

,niK3i noj?3 n»» onnana cnmonn rniroa rcron nil 

: niton opt? no« nnin spm ,twyitof am may apj? im 

[38] 

,nn'3p c*a ty a pab urn ,noana i« nmna nwnnn 

,nnjr£ cwm^ noan Ci6 new D'ntn m'jm »ty na annni 

: nn*to ("-jniiioa *a ]jrctf> /pa^ cnnt^in* vk *a cm* 

[38] 

.orvu "3to ->y bnrw yya jrhww rwv ''by r\oan ntt*\ 

.orvxp nwy wi ,D»pnno^> vjrwn rn'mpav nbw 

: ansa ay n»TO ,»Kn b^obo jovmrh naa* vpitsi 

[37] 

,nanpa cnoxi nx* new njnya .nitr 'too noan 
,naion c«rnp3vi ,nS niya mnrpi reap lan dki 

: naun cniTS ntyjp naw ,*yn ntrw raw nno 1 ? 



***r- , ► ■_ 












'* 






* » —^ . «_ 



■ i 



■ ^m i . 



J 



• I b«* i y \ ( •« , -j 



I • *M • 






r - • * 

• m*tmm* ¥*«*« «^» **^tt «**%^ y i^t f ^«m ^«%«^ 



.n^c* sr6 pic 21 ttjci n*22 .ran* *?22 rmm 

,rr7tzi Ttzsb ma 1:22 ,cpnsr t? rem x-a: tei 

: rrm "ryv *aa pipT .ec*rre -ire en ,?» nsi 

[»T] 

/•moie6i (-rroij^ enmm jtsam nvybs rrnr nap 

,m?^ vw szrna nmm rpo ns?j» *fee cns^i 

: mra nccr 12b ib rcrrro .cram ^? :ffl« raya wm 

[M] 

,nMm min r6m lffsai ,enns6 nnir6 nan* Ten* 
-newo ^jn» 161 ,enp' nift i 1 ? w* tosn inaun 

f^noinn ^>? "i£j?i pa» noa nni pi c»twa rmnoirn 

[28] 

'tftmh C'b nn*ni ,K»n (Tian nem* is»n tei ,mw nap 

#nte?a (TCP neon (*\nn ,fMi mar m piojn na van 

:< «n*ia -n-m ppa ("onwi dki .nVia* mpi is-ik na pit 



nm»n mo' O 

[15] 
»0«r« ("^3 V3B5D ffpa^ D»3^D ^D ^fi te "pDPa 

/D»aiBn non nm rw» cton "|Wj» on noi ("noi ,r\» »o ma? 
: ra&riD nrea nw* mm »wb^ "noyn wk ton »oi 

[18] 

.mobs noanni trian »6n /pop "iaa 'as -jtppaa 
.noai noa "?idj nnpn dki ,ma ("■jn'rsw dk peoi 
: nsiKs te "jtea mp ntr» <rpnna now nopn *6 tki 

[17] 

,("DHDm womn rm^iDa ("-joipr no ^>a by nmn cnan 

jorvnyn by "\b bbsrm vpzb tan ty pianm 

: wronn nmay cnp»j? K\m («i-6'Bnn nanyo ton rum 



[in. 1) 

criMnm rmnn nyt? 

[18] 

,nmni njn mo^ btwi ,omnH n*w "f> ("pianm 
: mm <win mix ety pots N\n rj»w *a jrn 

[19] 

fWMD mp» "i^ mnm • nmip irrnm ten m» 

,D'D*yaa n^an "j^ i^>B3i CTtpyo *wn me tyi 

: D'D<i D*ae> "pun ena tui iffBa^ ixi« rpzb mm nam 

[80] 

,np?n jp mnn nnai ,mxoi nmn nap ,na*a nap 

.npim rrona dki b» rwrvb nanpn ("n^oon jwi ( w, ai 

: cnpim te ("nmaj? mo jrn pia» *6 v» map neai 

[21] 

,onp» anwini TfiD "i»k onsD <"pap nap ,nmn nap 

.roini nmK iaa ona top ,-^affa pso ^ "6ia cm 

: Dn.-6 y* wo* ty mm njm cma»; ra-ipa -j^n 



:§: 

•*• ■■•• ^B ^BBBJBj BB BBBBBB BBBB Qj^Tl^^ ^^^* *** " ^i^* ^**™ J ^P ^^P^^^W ^BBJB 

* * s~ ~ ~ mrm» riM . «&. £• t >.w 

• • i ^f * m9 I ••» mm mm mmmm • • • ^ ^ «w> • •« •■*> ^ ^* ■* ■ 

* ■ • '• | « I > I /« // . P. ' « mi •» j* ■»■■«» V ■ • al ■ I Wall 

l'*PTJT*2? !2*2^ K^* #™Tjt TK7 C^2*n ^**£CT ("^-Sm 

*tss *rsr h^* ("TTT'K" -:£? (""prr »r .*« rr 

: rrrnc *k pars ?x ran -,r*sr irr c"*p?s crrrrn 

[13] 

••»M •»•%# ••* ••■» j» Iiiih« %»%*»^ «*•*••■» ^WU a»«««a^ «*^^ 

■ • 

'P"Jm J?^^ T22 ^CP»P *^!TX "T™flCr*2 *^ T2^ fa !Tp21 

: r,yy. -? ;pji c-jsn*-.: ,rpir ?x T2r irnam 

[i« 
: (razuob irsmi v?x »np inxi ^jrrir *nc "pip 
,1:17s ^» "Ki22 *y prrr "p 2 *]^ir. ir» rw n^"" 
: irs» ^>7 npn reis nrx i*3£^ n»r -pip rwn 



mrwi w 
[I- M 



ra 



en 



,.-6am cjid nb m /noan W> nnwm iitwn (wm x w rt 

*ntojn row rran nai .cmn ennuo nn*»»-o 

: c.T>nni aio owi utovwa* v&& ctikhm (*nnnnRa dji 

[«] 
fatoan ("Rosa i^»» dki ,b*k *xa cum 161 Awi kt 
,Ram ^str < M n\*in con ntch "]b n»nn ( W ^R nRT ("♦an 
: naioj ( M nrro ^ vrrvo »wn /pnm *o rw .noan nai 

[«] 
#dhmk cpHY- ban kt 

K W D^D^ ^R WT3 TlJHl »31 

: (»D^pr nso n^n nnnr& ctiimrp open nnoa ( w, ai 



/twpi any -po on dki 
,dhm3 oa^> Tim mnsa 



,no'to mnn c"to yam 
noma bz p*oi ,(*dbrd 
: no*j« mix T,niR opm 

-now ("«^ik i\t oViai 

,(»RDioa nwi *pRi "^ pjn 

: nei3i tooa n\T t6 dki 

/D^is6 Rtsnn *6i /jnppsa 

,rfyvn\ *iai ^>aa -pnw 

: nteni t-b oionn te wi 

,(*rpini ( M imina cmw law 

/ip vom Tom ani-6 

: CTp»ai dj? npaT) awn *ai 



.convn ten nanta kt 

•pip «a jwft ,(*niR« <*rm 

A*nh Ton tdj£> "|iwn 

[5] 

,"ppyo cpina "infii kt 

»nym twjd noan ton 

,imno avan jn» *oi 

[6] 

tuA inrwi ,to«n rt 
ty n*n» miaa nv nam 
("iiya pp n*xpn to tei 

[7] 

n^p^ Tin n\T <",to«n kt 

jvna JJff awn .Ktann »ai 

,:wa ]ht T) 3iot Kim 



[II- 31 

cn-ropm crhirm <r\yv 

[8] 

.rom iaio ipi ,nto a^a enaiy^ ia enpani Ann m» 

maa dp -jim AiD3* iew v?id3 to ty p^> (nty'i 

: rote Tip pm Ah Kin &n ,noiKD cntpyn cte oin^ai 

[9] 

,nnrt> iaiy vin mjrtoi /]&*& nvin may ^>k miay 

,(» D vpnt6 tpmm teyn new ,"|tey ba ty -j^ inn* noi 

: one* D*ostPDi /ion ain« »nm^ dk *a "^ ^mv noi 

[10] 

,i*3*ya aio teen ]n axoni ,V3B^> Wenm Ann m» 
/Wnno mm m* n»n /jrfow vuho bmn *ai 
: win "jS pfi*i (""jan* r« mot? ynw vine n«i 

[ii] 
cmiay to npyn dim mina V3B rarrp ^k m» 
jinn ysm e^a ty jw zionn lenp wac^m ( m mi 
:c»myiD^ men 161 ,nn« M ero^i -pnfiff nam 

[18] 

•mica "nojn m« (""jn^fin vuh orpyn *ai Ann m» 

-mra naifi w ]fi "pa^ ,«3 ink (""|ti ("^y owp 

: mino ik naato b» naeni "jnioa ipa ero^D (*zmnn 

[13] 

,n3«i ma ya \nn cynoi ,V3£^ iioyn tok mpo yap 

juijn yn ^aa nonn w« "piona n na^> A ffpai 

: nwn *]*? jnai (""jsnm ,cpan bx metf iniom 

[14] 

: ("I3aic6 inarm Yb* mp -inKi ,(»-jn^fcn ttd -py 
#i3ij» ^>k "|»iaa *e> rnwn 'pa "|^w lev rut rpm 
: 13*3* ty nptri no-e n^« i*3B^> n*sr *]n>A nixvi 



rroim w 
[I- K] 



ro 



W 



,.-6am tjio n 1 ? bm ,noan W> 

,nteyi ruu» na»n nai 

: enS-ini aio diw Dito cma 

.nai'ron e°KDaa ito qmi 
,»a*n ^>Btr < u n\-in cdk tipd^> 
: naio j otiitd ^a 1 ? (".tpd kvti 

,nwpi onj; -po on dki 

,D»tMa oa^> Tin* mnsa 

: cnnppv neo "j^"> toxin 1 ? 

*"io'te rrnn (**n» yarn 

nDHW ^3 ] , K01 ,(*DflKD 

: no*pj mix -|niK npm 

*oen c^ik ivp D^>iai 

/THDioa rmn ym "\b pjn 

: noro woa nw »6 am 

,d"?ix6 Konn t6i /pvyoa 

,otoni nan ^>aa -pnw 

: otem -pe monn b» iun 

,cvpini (*vnvo ("mix ton 

,ip ram nom oror6 

: (*vp»ai dj; npa*6 aie>n »ai 



en 

nnwrn |pn eiwn «<■" m 

,cn w un onnuo nmwna 

»fi3^> cn«xo3 (*nnnn«a na 

[2] 

,Br»K »33 euro xb) >b»n m 
-jb n»nn c*h run* can 
,"pnn» *o rw <noan na 

[»] 
,OHMK ("iikt ten m 
^"d^id^ te nm»a npn »a 
ffnuaw open nnoa ( w <a 

^■orwii ten narwo m 

,V3B^» Ton moj^ -|K»ar 

[5] 

,"ptryo rpwa nnei m 

/Tipni "pp jn noan to 

#imro nvan yr *o 

[6] 

T«A inrwn ,ton «i 
ty nw <"maa dp ian 
("Tiya w o»xpn to to 

[7] 

wpb inn n*m ("/ton to 

jma jjb? awn ,Konn o 

.mm ]nt "j^ awrr Kin 



•n^ 



« •* * 



* 00 ' 



t . 



*m 







,**:£? m -ne 72:7 »J2 
: («-» nri» n772 ?2m 

/f "\-jp nit pprr? r> 210 »6n 

./*ri3nn r ,f ncsn .z*m rma 

: *r?*r rut vx? by tstw 

/irpfi D3 % r;n *b io»zn 

,inp? noioi ,tnpK *ltWt 
: lnxi 13? tko *ry cnr* 

,trpio^ C3^> rrnn no^i 

.trpyi ^>nB3 ]*w ,on pro 

: cpp^i mi' lea onin^ 





( n pK2 T2M HV» T*jm 



^csrn.nrr'MtiTa.u;, 

p231 OOJ }12t r»2 ri32*l 

/Vnncis •hdv nsr cnc* 

^ C2»3tk lani ,»u?oer 
^npi *b n3"6 nsn bx\ 
cteo ro"»j?Ki nraiKi 

,D233^ lffpn b«\ ,1D13 inp 

r»noK bs »2 ijrn idh 
,ni22Sn by po^na mm 



<■♦ 



■nD* 1 1SD 



,-idioi noan nj?*6 njni 'nixyioa nwto ^ *nana i6n 
^aS aiia ^atr ,cn rwv noan rwm ,nra now p.-6 

: "7j^> moij? inS-in ,n.-penj; 



,noam nDio cnimiK Dirto 

,no*w ty dtij?3 onifii^ 

: ncroi »nb unb rrn* 

,nnt6flj r^ya kvi nam 

,nnNaro omr to 1701 

: nnaxoa ovite ck-i^ in'? 

,«jvjn pro bx n-iina 
/"3fi^> vn "wit biv *n 
: ("^ n»T nybn bsm 

,( w nv n« ppn^ *b am *6n 
..'nunn cnoen ,onn »mn 

,inpa oa^m ^ iQ'Bn 
/inp} noioi ,N-ipN new 
: wxi idt *wo ly onw* 

,ffpio^> na^> nvin no^i 

/tppjn ^>nB3 |»ki ,on pro 

: Cff p^i mv loa onii-6 



nrnn^ nra *no 'ji^kb? 

(•n«nn ona iksd' ( 4 o»pim 

dwid rtbyb itnp* on 

cnn^iw ty "wo Tinoni 

.('•na-ni nanj? ipuk jn* *6i 

"nrt>i ^ »jk 'mam 

cnuian cpxo niaa *nanai 

H^Ka ^an *wk "•n-M-ii 

,Doni,aerp ^n no nnjn 
paai ( m kbw Smr rva roatfi 
,vnnoio >hd*« nitr cno* 

,^ oa^TK ioni ^aiyoff 
^ipi *e na*tf> non tei 
n*ivo nnjw nrwim 

,Daaa^> itppn tei noio inp 
(*»no» ^>a »a ijni iD3i 



ISC 



.n«Tn mD* 1 



[430] 

,r6noi 2b K3T0 r6mro ,]noa nv nv -pen* -iw 
: ntato non« py nw ciboi ova 6ao pjD 

[481] 

,Dnj?m idio nnp aw nnen opm ■jffea »nn ok nvua 

#nn»a^ h t6n -wra bj» -wen "?o« y> na^om 

»nn6 i^n runn je mat? n» ^oi ,D*tw cnmn tei 

,nnp* vdt n«o vty ion ,-q -|tpfl3 m«n nan ^oi 

: nnnpyn p totPD pn 3i*6 D»a'it6 -wij? airj6 aits *6n 

[432] 

,r6nai |t? nrein pa 6 nwn ff\s nr6xn ny 
,r6 a» aa» y V it T n n^*o ty nton njDi 
: r6&» nn«fi idv p dm .jnai poa ty w pan 

[433] 

,r6 in in -jtffij man ,m?n idid yoe?n dk 
: ?6' Dtreon wu paa r» /nstno D«nn inxa 

♦rrpa to p^D 



-ISD 



.nNvn mo'' 



[430] 

, ( -6noi 2b kdio ri>mna ,]r\D2 uv nv "pay new 
: n^wo non« py npa» cneoi ova ^ao pjD 

[481] 

,Dnj?ni noio nnp ait? /men opm -jt^sa \~in ok nrua 

/Dnt^a 1 ? n *hn tbd bj» -incn toM "\b no^yom 

»nn6 i^n ronn.p mem n» bsn jowi <"nmn bm 

#nnp» wn nxo vty ion ,u -|B>fl3 nixn im bs\ 

: D'T&pn p towo \\n ynb wswh amy ivyb am xbn 

[432] 

,rbrm ]V rmnn pM ft awn era nrftxn ny 
,rft s» bd» yy it -jin nftxo ty rftpn njDi 
: rftc nn«B idv p dm ,yoa jnu by m ysmn 

[433] 

,."ft p p tj»m nun .nntn imo yoirn dm 
: rft DMXon wo pa p» flaeno o«nn tvim 

♦rryn to p^o 
♦ v y x^i ra bjjt6 jnu -p*o 



1BD 



♦ PIK-PH TID" 1 



tnpn hpv *T3 

[430] 

,nbrtoi 2b szin r6nira ,\nm dv dv "pan* tw 
: nrwo hoik |<y noa* cnooi dm ^ao pjD 

[431] 

,Dnyrn noio nnp mts^ /men Dpm "]ff£3 \in dk nrua 

/DnBoV h N^n -ipa rays ,nncn Von "\b no^yom 

,on6 *]^n njnnifl iidbt n» ^i ,D*tw (win bm 

,onp< von n«o vty idk ,u ^B3 man nan *?ai 

[432] 

,rtf>roi ]B» nrcin pa i^ awn &»n nr6xn ny 
,rtf> a» aa» yy it -pri rv^xo ty nton nysi 
: nto* nn«fi idv p dk ,ytM yw by u ]dkh 

[433] 

,r6 jn in "]C£J man ,nn?n idid yoffn dk 
: n*> DKxen vna pa t«30 ,.-Qeno D*m -msa 



1SD 



.n*n\-i T)D' 1 



tnpn hpv *TJ 

[430] 

: n^tta no™ ]7 nD3* ciboi ntw 6ao pp 

[431] 

,onym noio nnp ait? ,*rnfln Dpm "psa vrn dk nn» 

#DntfaS h «Sn -»Ett taps ,nnen ^a« ~\b no'yom 

,on6 "jTn wnn.]fi top n» ^ai ,dwj cnrm bm 

,onp' vm n«o vty idk ,u -p bj niKn "qt ^oi 

: D»T»yn p bxvo pn ai*6 dwi6 *itfiy 2vyb aio i6n 

[482] 

•n^mi |ff nwn p» 6 awn w»k nn^sn ny 
,n^> a» ea» p j? it *pn n6xo by nton njni 
: nto» nnKfl idv p dk ,jnm j?b3 ty d: ]onn 

[438] 

,nb ]n in -pea man ,nnrn "idio yovn nx 
: i*6' DKSon vna ^ja r» /nseno D"nn inxn 

♦.tjd to pbo 
s*y K*n na ciy 1 ? ]ro: -|vo 



J3 **a*m 

[418] 

,iwa *p*o m» tbombts ,n rm -pma* n: cipo 
: eupa eppn "naa ksm pi -c^> ratrp ty mps jro 

[419] 

: ctto£ nnw r»nn te men cm jnccr "pea n* 

[480] 
7TW ("Ml -J73 *T ^ D»03J Tpfi* *WK 

: ("rrapa^ innnm ,cnEna *nn wenna 

[481] 

: d»d^6 pjrrci ^enoi .nvch "To imvr dtk ioa 

[488] 

,cntf>a iy nnana rai 

cnpm 16 obb»^» oj?ap*i 

: DTOpo crop n» p»i 

[483] 

/"vbseh nnwi pw mv i.tb pirw na-p *wk enwm 

[484] 

,n^aoa ■pmtyfio to m» w "inapnoa pun 
: o^enao (*dj orpine w inwna p »nj» »a 

[485] 

,n*o nym la ("few na wn to yana r«A pa &*» 
: ("rum noH Kin mroon dj ^6w inzna nsjon »a 

[486] 

/i^aD 5 ? rtaff »ae n» w«6 lar ny mp» ^ao vum 
: ibstn ip nrw w«6 nbyb nn«nna ^a^o b*w 

[487] 

,13136 nn« \in iruian p tyi non nwy ^oa^ pine* 
: wa» t; nana tor 161 .man n« tiw ^a&wn 



vnpn Spar 23 

[411] 

: irnana dik »aa ( w n<xp ,inrwi ("now -pKon 

[412] 

,inyaa by carnal ra*i naa wi» rpn c^o 
: ina^ iy nyaan 6 ( w, m ,oip maan 

[413] 

jvjwn w fffjw maa mximn isoa aina kSi 
: rvyan nmpa wanr ,mana enaa em* aeno i»« 

[414] 

( M ,mnNai nysa -ppa» naa nan 

: mnoi cruiffi ian ("ana i«6 cnto 

,mijD d»» (""pm ,nsnna ynkt wn 

: ,(»m-iiDa on? 7*1 ,noT:D -p^j-n 

[415] 

,naan noate -^ "nm ,r6in bw n: anw *ipa 
: iaan pao ntrcon ,Drmi-ina wann dk 



[XXII. 33] . 

jmoion -nan Kim 



nan pnw *» 

,bin rt« -jaw 
: -jm* 161 

,-ijn tei JpT 
: *nj?3 ca^a enxy 



[416] 

naia rrnn (6k 

ttjn^ nvr "|^ »a 

\\y 6a er>i6i 

( 4 »"aD i 1 ? *6 'a 

[417] 

^>ao b*v nay 
won *iew cnp v* 



33 «npnSp» 

[418] 

.iraa -|3iVo nn now ,n3 mi -proaa vu oipe 
: napn r^ij?n 1133 axes pi ,D^ijrt> vatn* ty nipe jro 

[419] 

/(•pna^ "pan p tid r6i3 vin bx nvm nj^> 
: hvdA nrw cwi to men ddi ,moff "jfffl3 n« 

[420] 
/HW ( M D31 "IJ73 «T ty D*D33 Tpfl* "l»N 

: errffps^ innnNi ,cnBrD »nn lrwwna 

[481] 

,d*dwd n\2b ( u by isnm tepo mt «n6 rwioi 
: d»d^>!6 pjnxi V?kw wnob yv tw» din ids 

[42*] 

<"Aw nam bj?o ^awj «ro6 

/Dni^a "jy onana pa«i 

cnpm *6 swob Dj?ap»i 

: nnxpo onxp n« p*i 

[4231 

A^vbach mKfin p«i ,noiff i.tb pint? naT -nut whsi 
: ("imow B'poo \t mn ntt *bv (*T3P -wit nj?n 

[424] 

.D^i^aoa "pnityflo ^a i\t wi "in3»no3 "pwi 
: D^enao ("w D'pino i\t "in«nna )3 »nj» »a 

[425] 

,rrao PTym ia rfew n3 wn to jrana rwA pa bw 
: cmra no»s Kin mnaon D3 ,(»6ifl» wzna nwon *a 

[428] 

Abscb iSaw *3S n« 13126 naT ny Dip* ^>3D enj« 
: itaan ijn nn« 13126 dVij^ nrwma ^awo arw 

[427] 

,13126 in« \nn irman p tyi non nwj? ^oa^ piw 
: wa» iv nana to* t6i ,inan nx in** tavern 



[411] 

: irnana dik »3a c«mxp /innnen ("now -p-iNon 

[412] 

,wjob ty caina^ im ,naa «3iff n»n c^o 
: ina^> ny nyaon ft ( w, m /Dip maan 

[413] 

,rvyvffr\ dj rn^'Dtr maa nwimn nsoa awa kSi 
: ivjrai nmpa wanp ,mana ciaa wuk aano i»« 

[414] 

(",mn«ai nysa "ppa* naa anw 

: maim prowi nan cana pa6 cfti 

,n-npa on? ("i^vt ,nenna -|3tk wn 

: /Cn-moa n^ ^si ,non3a -|ft:rn 

[416] 

,naan isate ^ "nm .rftin bpk u: anw npa 
: iaan po cason ,Drprnna uiann dk 



[XXII. 33] . 

jnwan -nan Kim 



nan pnw *js 

ftjn eft* -]3n3*» 
: *ij» ca^a (•nxy 



[416] 

naia rrnn (ft« 

capft nw "j^» »a 

iu» fta erofti 

(*B»ao i^> »6 'a 

[417] 

^ao bm rvty 
axon nw cnj? v* 



33 »ipn Sp» 

[418] 

,13*33 "|3^o n« now ,13 n\n -proaa n3 nipo 
: (*i3pa eppn maa nxd3 pi ,ri>ijrt> vain* *ty oipc jrn 

[419] 

,cp*Ta^ -|N*an p tid 1-613 *nn to n&w -tj^ 
: hvd3^ nni&» <"»nn to nion ddi ,mety "j^fi3 n« 

[480] 
,r\W ( M D31 "IJ73 *T ty D*D33 Tpfl* "\Vt* 

: errffpa^ innnni ,e»n&na *nn irvwna 

[421] 

,d*dwd rnsh ( u ty "Dmi tepo u*n ff*t6 n*aioi 
: d*o^*6 pjmn y»inoi ,D*no^> -w tw dtk ioa 

[428] 

r^>*jn*i nam tsya ^a»o bn6 

.Dmte TJ? D*"QT3 1*3*1 

CTlpm *6 OfitWD^ OJ?ap*l 

: orrapo nnxp n« p*i 

[4281 

,e*v6ao^ ni^fin rw >nv\v in*e pirw nan* "i&»k cwwi 
: cimoei o*yoo *n* mn n« *-63* ("i*3» "iff* npn 

[424] 

,n*^aoa "pmtyflo ^>a i*n* ?ki inaemoa jinn 
: D*toiao cm D*pino i*n* "innnna p *3nyo *a 

[426] 

,nxo ("rym la ("j*oki na i&n b* yvra n*£ ]*a b>*x 
: ("nxi3 not Kin mnaon dj ,e^is* inma rwaon *a 

[428] 

Abxb ibsv *3B n« I3ie6 "m* ny Dip* ^>ao anjK 
: ltean ijn nrot 13126 nbiyb "lnxnna b'svo &*tn 

[427] 

,i3iz6 *in« \nn iruian p tyi no*? nwj* ^*oa^ pina? 
: i3*a* *tj? nana ^n* vfo ,mai nx -inx* ^sawm 



vipn hpv 



: imana din *3a pa**? 



33 
[411] 

/inrwi mow "pKon 

[412] 

,wjdb ty cy\nsh im /raa row rrn onto 
: ina^> ny njnfin "6 c^m /Dip maan 

[413] 

jvjmwi dj rrwatf rruna nwimn -isoa aina *6n 
: jvyan nmpa wanp ,mana cnaa ena* aerie ie>K 

[414] 

<",mnR3i nysa -ppa< naa twit 

: ma-mi rnim nan cana par? onto 

,rmya nvp <r\vyi ,nenna "|3tk wn 

: /Cmiioa one? -psi ,non33 -p^m 

[415] 

/raan "loate -\b bim ,r6in aw 03 am* npa 
: naan po dkxdh ,Dnnnna piann dk 



[XXII. 3D] . 

.ifiono innx nyt? 

jnoion -nan Kim 



nan pnw *jb 

: "|Ta* D3i 

An (6n -pw 

: -prr *6i 

ny3 ^>ai p? 
: "iy3 rate <«nxjj 



[416] 

naia rvnn (Ak 

«y£ iTiT "^ »a 

113* ^a b*»6i 

(«B»ao "^ vb *a 

[417] 

^ao to nity 
rccon im cny &»* 



33 »"*'» *P» 

[418] 

,W33 "pite nK now ,13 n\n -pro* ru nipo 
: nspa rppn ids kxd3 pi «dVij6 vaew »ty nipe jro 

[4193 

/(•|VT3^ "jlTOn p TID n^3 sin te ntww 1jtf> 

: hpdA nrw <»»nn to rnon ddi ,moff "|tfS3 n« 

[«0] 
,fTPK ( M D31 1J?3 «T ty D*033 TpB' "WK 

[421] 

,D»oino nn^ e6y nanm ^>3po wk ff»*6 n»3ioi 
: d»o^ pym tf?anDi ,n»no^ w tiw» dik ids 

[428] 

r,^yvi nam oyo ^3#d »h6 

/Dni^a ny onana ra^i 

cnpm t6 ofitwj^ ojnpM 

: onxpo omp n« p«i 

[423] 

/(in^D^ nwei pin ,n»iff ijvb pine' tot *wk vwtm 
: cimofii bs»j«d vp run n« ,r63* (T3ff ipk nyn 

[424] 

/D^i^oa Tmtyeo *?3 i\t mi iropnos twi 
: o^anao (»dj D'pinD w inKnro p »3ij» »3 

[426] 

,rrco nym 13 (*tdki to wn ^>k yens nx3^> p b^k 
: emu n&K wn rwuon d: j&w i nana rowan »a 

[426] 

Abzub iSsb? us n« \xmb tot ny mp* ^>30 btijk 
: itopi ijn nn* 121B6 ubyb nrwnna ^3PD »*w 

[427] 

,13126 inx snn W3ian p tyi non nwp ^ds 1 ? pirn? 
: wa* ly 1313 brv t6i ,vtoi nx m** ^aporo 



vnpn Spar 23 

[411] 

: lrnana dik ^a ( w D»xp ,vwm mew -pKon 

[412] 

,vijdb by cawa 1 ? «»i /raa low rrn ( u "|to 
: ina^> *ry npaon ^ ( w, .ti /Dip maan 

[413] 

,rvyEn dj rm'Dtr mata nunmn *isoa ama i6n 
: ivyai nmpa inanp» ,mana ciaa am* aeno *wk 

[414] 

(■vmnnai oysa -ppa* naa ensK 

: maim evuien nan wra pa6 cnto 

»mijD on? c^i*jn ,nenna -ptfe wn 

: .crmioa d»w t»si ,no"ua "p^m 

[415] 

,naan loa^o ■£ bnm .r6in aw m anw ipa 
: iaah po n«xon ,&Trnna piann dk 



[XXII. 2D] . 

♦moion nan Kim 



: -pa* nai 
.bin eba *\m> 

/ijh ^ai |pr 
: *ij?j ca^a crop 



[416] 

naia rrnn c^h 

CJjr6 nw "^ *a 

y\x ^a bt»hVi 

( 4 »"aD "j 4 ? &6 <a 

[417] 

^>ao bm rrap 



w 



,nnan ny 

,DJT<33ffDD 

: Dirty yby 



npn Sp» 

[403] 

ipan eny nrrnn ^»d 
o»33p6 d»3p mm 

[404] 

"I^t "ipim 

"ibo ntn 

Tijn d"tk *» 

[405] 

»a ipa^> ins 

lap y*n 

7? dk .ik mpi 

7? n«n »3« dk -|K 



,r6in »3fi 
ino ,pop 

: win npi 6ww 

[406] 

,impao bin im bt»ki ,ojwi ana* 7? tdio nnp 
: v6noo tkd "pipaa Ktwtf> vty rwin W& 

[407] 

.vuwm new in? Mj? ,T*ton no r6irtf> inoa 

: T\n>bD «»n pi oanwi #m no Ya^> ni«n .i^ noun 

,Tn« rrtnn wn D3ri »kmi nmpa 7?3n now 

: v&ra mn pre te D3? ,T>aw inianwi 

[408] 



r. -|n3TKn oijraa 

,nnpioi rpx nfii33 
c: nmpi cnnsoa 

JDTM '330 D*3P D'3W 

: dud -pro ojar6 



/jmana naa nm 

[409] 

(•pawn oy n^aK 

[410] 

tim nmn ( M npa 
-iron ton >Dno pm 



mpn Spir 



3 

[395] 



,ri3prni in3i3ffo tid ,"p njr6 isb "Wk pv 
: ro»to* njn ron* dn ,n3D3* naio n?rv dn 

[896] 

,noi D»3«noi jn "ira'i 3io rooff* ny ^>33 oan wuk 
: Nn3i nto 3iry oipoi ,»flno j?33 3i3Tn nwjras 

[897] 



,133P i^ p»rn3 






^>31D ff!3K 


.i3im irv3 1133 






torn \t 


,mK3»o ty nop3 






opar6 mm stom 


: cnrm* 3py tki 






«j*m» r6yo iPfl3^> 

[398] 


,nb!t 3tei ns3 






rran N3t?o dtk 


ann nwp*i ,nN3ff 






[399] 


.■p3»jn n?p3 


\-p 




^>s m«i /1ob>3 rm 


: "p^ p3no 


\T 




]Bp 313? V13M BN 

[400] 


/tm n*o ijw 


■TOT TK 


,p pffo loxy p»mo 


: fri ("DKXon vna "ifioo ,jnn ]ie6o m« *6 



[XXI. KM 



c.-npaa ff 



n^mm ramKn mpa njw 



[401] 



»ww ccoim vte p3i 3niK c-np3 IT3D »*« 

: 1BPK3»P \\bp KXD» 133 DIM 1p3 BTO -|K 

[402] 

.nam* ni3to spin enipim c»nj£ ip3 

: now niwer spin ,eni3i-ip wnfi dk "jh 



K3 



rtpn hfm 



[408] 

ipan cry nmon ^»o 
o»3a»"6 d*3P moi 

[404] 

te nipao ^*rn 
■^n -lpini 

100 HK1 
TIJD DTK ♦» 
[406] 

«a ipa^ tm 

lop -p-wi 

"1^ dk .ib rujn 

■^ a«n »3« dk -ja 

,3«n »3K PB» 
[408] 

,impao Vin 123 eron ,djwi ans* ^ *idio nnp 
: in^noo n«o "pipaa xvsb vty n*nn wo^> 

[407] 

,»nNom <fffl3 inr nay ,*p^n no n^r6 no« 

: 'nn^D K\n p-i oa*wn -km no ^sb ni«n ^ now 

,»niK n"?nn Kin mjw -kbit nmp3 "fan noK 

: *rt>no Kin jito bs D^p ,-|^aK3 vnanwi 

[408] 



,D»aim w6n *wk 
: wto cwatsfo mto 

/Onan np 

,Dn»33tPOD 

.otwi nxyna 
: Oi-pty yby 

,n^in »3B 

,ina»B* n« 

-ino ,pop 

/iniffj^i 

iidk ,aino 

: win npi 6*V) 



(•: -jnjTKn tMjroa 

,nnpnoi s)is nfiiaa 
c*: nmpi cnnsos 

-dik •uao vnv warn* 
: dtid -pna 032.-6 



,-|mana T33 nm 

[409] 

(""pinK op r6o« 

[410] 

Tioa nKnn e 4 nya 
inan ^»ki ,ono pni 



vip n Spy 



3 

[395] 



,roprni iruiaara mo ,p nirb ia^ ipk pv 
: ro*to» np nm* dn ,n3oa* naio nrrv dk 

[396] 

,noi D«rnoi p "ina*i aio rooff* ny tea Dan vm» 
: «nai nto m?jr» oipoi ^sno jhj mam rwpoa 

[397] 



»i3a» )^> p'?na 






telD t?13N 


/Uim w»a naa 






!?nu NT 


»vw3»d ty nop3 






Dpjr6 nm ensM 


: nmu* apy mi 






spm» r6j» iPfl3^> 

[398] 


*err atei run 






iran njipo din 


am nwp»i ,n«jff 






j7-it*i warn ts» 

[399] 


,T3»jn n?p3 


».t 




to mtn .toot iTn 


: "pru pJna 


NT 




pp aia? vi3M bw 

[400] 


.tn» to ljw* 


T* TN 


,p pffo loxp pvnD 


: in ("DKXon vro ibdd ,jnn jwte m w n^» 



[XXI. KM 

('.■npaa inaam n^inrn raniRn Tpn ijw 

[401] 

#ww cDoini vto pai am« rnpa mo b*k 
: iBrotan? \\bp kxd* naa dtk -ipa pnx -p 

[402] 

,niarw mate spin onipirn cny 1 ? -ipa 

: maw nwoff spin ,emai-ip vnyb dn IN 



130 wxfti Spv 

: Tin r^oa vna ,mVxm ^in 



[XX. 3] 

c»jn \ssr\ jrn pern s|3nn ijw 

[388] 

: nman cnpn ton* no* 

,( 4 into* in-D tya md cpto offpnoi 

: vrryn inwtoi own njra yaw 

[889] 

iinmna tr6r6 epja noe*srv ,(»nmp^ non jn la^i *ian 
:nnp*rci mo n« -nno'i d^>jp oa ,i*v:m »dio by pern nvt •o 

[890] 

mm /»fln tai did -m ci'anwa isv m« nyovn njD 
,u nan* 16 

,Bnt^M3 "13"6 1311 1BW ]2TJ3 NJBN ,*nDB* "pina 

: nann wen nHOB* »a 

[891] 

#mj* pun to »jsn im ptjd T3*j» rnna tow mnn dk 
tcviy^ Tjrt> wv yean »sn Tjorrp *6 ,]okj \m dn *a 

[892] 

,nan nsa no *?3 nox |*« *a ,nw nmio to pun to 
: -on t6i nx ohmu^ yrb** c*i6 jnai rn fOH» b**k 

[893] 

: "pno ton bjibtp p ,Y-nn nro rpemn to 

[394] 

,epm ne*n mryi ,dSij6 »yn mi bsv uy mn 
: rpno wn -iBDun »a ym ,d"tk^ rp-wi -m nan toi 



wipn hp* HO 



[XIX. B^] 



[379] 

,n-nitp »nn vnioxri ,rp:6 rhra naoi njn *wo n*up 

[380] 

/-ja tups rpenj? ty trwo pn mr6 tain vamn ta 
: -pie. tai ("ptny ma** ny n^> cnvr rrar» *6 »a 

[381] 

,»sa ip* it ■»»* era by (wp BNta jwin ntraon 16 
: nn iBfiu rwan ,Ton espnp wra -rua wn o 

[388] 

/in&np d:o« -pra vnth myh inn ntnpn nv ctin 
: ima k 1 ? nmpa vn* t pnnn *■«?« "ir nty «Vfa 

[383] 

#nnwi vkd niww t> ]»k 
: nuop TXQ chime? ck <a 

[384] 

,rtmn 161 mpn »nn p£ 16 

wk ty nron warn :kt 

: r6j?w 161 pn c«nn 0*6 16 

[385] 

.nixuyn taxaa i«n id* "pa* ttnana «nn to mp& 
: mam mta njaern nnw ,o«3tj» «in ( tt njw fye 1 ? 

[386] 

,( m v«2bb» ototi cna nx 1371 ,ve' 03 xapo dtwi wto 
: imp* taiaa lnaiacra bpki innfiffoo »nn imaew K"Na 






■* • * 






• ^^ ^ 



* * 



.**•- 



«■* 



• * 






S7»: 



/J* ;4 i^s • #% | f» I %mt f% • «»W«b> km IS* s«» y^ • ftkvA #* 

: r :, ;ry T272 zv2?s n? T2? c-ne nwn* *]*k 

[877] 

ran* 1522T2 ra? mw r*K 

r;n ,nwnn T2i j65 nor* 

[878] 

: W ] M 302 wen rmm iedd tibd^ naun n?i 



non n« ("-jenn itm nan« e*3 

: *p> nasi ctoum ( M iate 

[364] 

,rn ton npiwt i^>ir6 d\-6n njnav man cty 

: n v i rro ifiD pianna irro naa mow ^ 



[xviii. rn 

♦nbixm nitom nfrcan "ijhp 

[366] 

: irtora ii«on *6i ^dm rowon nron 

.injw* an P'"to 'Ojns w w k% 

.inwan vuni6 rare mpo tjd* t6i 

: iniN spew wjd ,jm t)iw »6 tidi 

[366] 

nail *w Brow otoj^ 

.Dn»noa mp* ntoiM 

: inca jrna w *6 nrno 

[367] 

#ia«3 bay) ^aw ,aa^ nrrty *p» tko nn rate 
: n note* yem pnx mn ,jhwd wuoi njn pun 

[368] 

,me«o D'otoj^ Da ftam nawi 

/mi nnfi' *wjn it -na ■wp vmtn 

.mere n»etoj^ wn ibm lam 

: maaai ^ mm jwk r6j?o enm 

[369] 

«son >D2n nanni o^sa o«oah n«3tr rbpvr\ dm 
: nna tkd |U3 en» te ^>n D3 ,n*Mnn mora pn* 



atvxt ynK WJ? CJ 
: in^x* »6 *a ,DD»;»n 



• IU 



wrfn hpw 

[857] 

,"]nw aT -pan OK 
■paTi ,n isn but 

[358] 

,cro» neKa map to o*a ,pK tdjt oBBroa "fas 
: ontei an niKiano aio vjs -iiki -cpae?* pro aio 

[359] 

D*atea ibtk jnrt 

riTan rpTi jvd* 
nnoai ("njnen pK 

[360] 

,nan d-ik ^"pirr ok 

-ipn ^>k piytf> 

urn ,imK Dion* CN 

*o ^.xi pjnr vA rf>a 

[361] 

(»vjsa ncyn b» 
^sa iiDjrn te 

[368] 

B'sten mam 
t6 nan ten 

DTB 13 DHJD 

,n^na? nsa-n nu lai 

[363] 

(•ntrn rrn» dm 
nnoan ^k 



,Dnp» onwH Tneo 

-cm] ("Tonon ton 

Anana tok rjrv 

: omao rniuff na pK 

mojr ("Kin 

»"jten ton 

("pip j?» CKin 

: ib" naxi c*p>T 

#idw nya •po 
.prpon* mpvi ca 
*Btom in tot 
("epoBr nj?a -lru 



iiaai my 
»nnna wm tyi 

,( w Kff»31 totoi 

,cnsa njr 
'Dno3Dj?nv*iKnvn^ai 
:onap by -ioij?a wrap 

/jten nanK bx 



npn hf» to. 

[349] 

ny w ■j^'DN \t ,*iren x^> -piD dx 

/ij»ro itdx rvnn ."in*6 inwnn ( ,e ax 

,iaro -p 1 ? -133 jnvi inx^ -piD jib* rpemn ora 

: ("unn one nb jnvi 'B»jb> to inBtwin (">6 bs* 

[350] 

: niaimn ma ntpto tid "jx ,niaaSn tid own mo 

[351] 

zircon^ t*» "[2b ax ,ttid ("rhs* anx D'pxn -px 
: cu*Mnb ma \w wnt "px ,7110 mm lnaan «!? ox 

[352] 

,b» -jm »ao *inx to dtxo tid rfa era c"te 
: 6* rna tbdi ,aiano3 y& to mow 

[xvii. r] 

♦"pen ij?t? 

[353] 

,wpn tsroi isixi («w nxo waron ( i ij?3in w "j^o puk 
: i^ipa jfoen pan Tteai /6-iu 1 ? nw *it?X3 eton xt 

[354] 

,nmoi iDtro ^33 btix w jjnn»6 Ttoi m *a njn 
: n? x^>3 D«pnr6 nw tfh ,nt 162 ivsyb oroa na pxi 

[355] 

bsi» mi ,xnu t?o yj» mn 

: vo»o lata* x 1 ? nru nai ,(«pix 

,22b nam ,pw xxdj tv na dj 

: voio t>33 tso fyin fob xsn 

[356] 

/Dr6 nantaxn nno npmn ox ^pay ^33 aw bw tjd 
: an^rua wn (•^idib^ )s ,nno mown naipn ax 



no wipn hpv 

[357] 

-pan »i3 isn te 

[S58] 

,oro» neKa map bs e*a f in Toy* Bfltsraa "jte 
: ontei ai mwano ai» vas iiki ,( u yaff» pro aio 

[359] 



.inw* -|niK wp D3 
: in*tot» *6 *a ,Do^on 



.onts* ohmr itisd 

.tmi ("ronon Kin 

,nnana iw (>«ym 

: d'tuo ("ntoff na x>» 

-[lap* own 

/■j^on tei 

(ywp* (•"Kin 

/low nw "i^d 
.pepon* mpn cj 
,eteni in *?n 
: ( M epoB» nya ma 

naai cny 
,onna wki tyi 

,(«W»J1 bbr\ 

,nnsa ny 
'DnoaDynviKnrn^i 
tonap by iciya wvejr 

,isi "]b xivo 
span nans •?« 



D'atea itPN yin 

(>»o»a<D3a ibw yin 

wan rrn n*D* 

nnoai ( w nyattn pn 

[360] 

,nan din i"piffy» dk 

itpn ^s piy6 

um ,"inia Dion* dn 

[361] 

cum nayn bn 
p)iio* mo *a 

DIM »3fiO 11D 

»3B3 neyn bx 

[362] 

D»aton mana 
inb nan ban 

DH13 la DHJO 

/onww nxaii nu ui 
Djew ,nP5 ikd in«ty 

[363] 

("itrn nvp dk 
nnoan te 



■npn bfw -ft} 

[349] 

ny <o* "jtdk tp /wot »b -piD dk 

njrani itdn rrnn *nxb infipnn cdk 

-una "p^> "133 jnvi -ina 1 ? -jniD psx rppnn ova 

: cinn one •oh jnw w:v b» instrnn ("*6 ^>3» 

[350] 

: nuimn niD npto tid -|« ,ni33to iid n^t^n tid 

[351] 

: (*i: , Bsn i ? mo |w k»k -pa ,"piD mm inoan «■? dh 

[352] 

,b* "l*n *30 -ins V« mno mo rto b»k eta 
: 6* rm ibdi ,Diono3 "]"s ^>« mot? 

[xvii. p] 

♦■pen ijrcr 

[353] 

,wpn bw iin»n (*w *jkd waian opsin w -jte ana* 
: itopa j?dbti pan -jteai /6-n^> nw una rt«n kv 

[354] 

rtitnoi "otra ^aa o»nn w ,Dnn&6 "jtoi m *3 njn 
: nr *63 D*pnr6 nrt tfh <n? *6a tidj£ enra ro \w 

[355] 

bsw nai ,mw -pa *vj?3 mn 

: vo'o ia?3» vb -iru nai .(•prx 

,33} D3ni ,p1C XXDJ W H3 DJ 

: voio ^33 T30 *ton e^ «sn 

[356] 

,nnb nanoxn ono npmn ax ,erw tea n'W bw "jte 









# * 'f~ ^ * *f "** ** *^ • ***** 



■fc-J 



IMS] 

s l*» .IW i m C* i w * ^ f .-.J • O i 1 1 IK I I • *m /K 

r • 

• «»^^— 0% Mt*»«« imy p*^*** /«^^^^%f » ■! » /yw^ ««^«% «*«*^ 

[MS] 
[844] 

/pvnc -pa rrpfiw /ara rtae mo rem 
: "j32?2 ii:i nam ,wm 16 tfva irw jpp 

[S45] 

,naT3i mm pex r6i» -p ct» npa 
: nap nvr -pTi »]isbs laa ww nu 

[846] 

,s]jnn Tim -en to* cik 
: cpa *ty cmeai pro m» ro«n 

[847] 

,ite«6 vwm ,cw6 me ("tpvnn ck 

[848] 

,on*a r«a 13 -iyiai insane iaab ix rnoa dtk 
: on* nam uib^ <a .vrtb ("mono mw *6 



ripn bf* 3D 



[XV. IB] 



('♦mrunm msnn w 

]332] 

,toro ia iaio inn nan dik Kip* t6 

:toaa n»n» Die inn nan dtk «ip* -jh 

[333] 

,jrao3i nun pa^ i»a* wit c.wo* to ia^i ^affo vm 
: ja j6i apiw w c]«3j? tea ,rto ia pK noa oronoi 

[334] 

/(iman vbrwn ij? lrmoio nto aw y» . 

: in^an iy »2b vy iai ty vb nns» nyai 

[835] 

,"hib6 n« (mioibi ,('73Dt vao n«n 

: yisb (mo earn ,('"p3"jya pDynni 

[336] 

,inm irwai iter *ty n*tn iniBDi dik (»ana 
: cnmte itrcs nxyi iaa^> wiana bv nnnn inrooi 

[387] 

: nnnsm o*jn teo iko insi ^''D^iaaa a^ain teo morn 

[338] 

,coio &;z ia^i nyb era* ("(p) spj no« 

: ("D^on n\T naw /D'oio ^ya o.T3t? 

[339] 

/Dr6 aitsa doj? ruronn .o»oy ty tone .Tnn ( w dk 

.onwja laam ip^n ,( M anan«^> yuni «an 

: DiToaai oniwaa ( M Mpn ^an r^a coniaa^ -ppon 






*rr;2 7c r* .tics 

VC2 "ppO pK 

: (*e»tm6 n?en T7cr :ra ,z«?2^ rrw ;rrtf> ^insn 

[SM] 

: ("nrra £ ]r "p tv; cm xtws (T7X2 "pc ]r ar»*6 

[385] 
[3*6] 

: "p*iK n? (»an2 ten 5w /pnw ttb^ ^tnsi wo 

[327] 

rfiajrn rr'K? r^ren (n*nn> dk 
: cnanr "ion cpu mnn ck "|» 

[328] 

: no initrj^ "|T3 it* ii? *rn v^? rim ,-1272 nan one 
: win Tin 1 ? *]« i£i^> -p ntoa* r» srw mini cnwn ck ik 

[329] 



,1!? won cjre »em 
: i^d ^01 won mar »a 

^tei 7W m^ia 
: i^yc rty on nan dh 

,r6orn w ->fiDi ^nen pi 
: W ibd ruio vin vifiooa 



/Crc (^a6> «en *rerc dtk 

TOT *6l ,DFD W H3»K 

[330] 

(*7"oro *mn r» dk 
7373 nt?p rn»n* tot 

[331] 

/im-in njon njn nr ijrcn 



npn hpv 



.rwbv t by 

.rbv^h awn a 1 ?! 

•naai ,idj» 

: rfow ( u n« 



[313] 

13na3 rwbv 

own no 1 ? 
anwi /HDrtoa 



[314] 

.d»3b^» vn iw ( u ]»oio i^> noa» ian anww ctij» 
: ("D^iss nsn dki void ^ r6a* *m ("^ wen nj?i 

[315] 



,im:na "|oo ntotan* 
: mown wwsm ijwa 

,nitorann nya 

,nx-nn nysra 

,nry>n »6 ibxa 

: rnxa npm tkd 

/i 1 ? ^lno t *ixip^> ix iair6 
: l^aari ljnoi ana ana* 

rpo ^xan* mo 
: -pew nar dk »a 

,vr6«nn dv np »a 

/("onana nxo vte o»anwn 
: nntca ("pjpi Brian* 

,*ip&* dsi inn noxn dk 
:pnpio imx r»k »aa c*a£^ 



on« ^>j? tip aitfnn ( w ^« 
nboi ^ino n*nn nmh ("p 

[316] 

]<DN3 WK wan 

^mo ia»K <. ,8 nai 

wan* n« awn 

ipim n» pw 

[317] 

("■jamK erfysvv nj?a 
(■na»rao r6ron »a jm 

[318] 

mart* warn btk ^>a p 
/njn vty awnn to aa 

[319] 

mn rain "py aayn* to 
,pso »a»n (*aa /ma "man «a 

[320] 

niapo totya bsy niwen *6 
nasi nap ■«•« b*y ind -inv 

[321] 

Asann^ "p xa pun ^>ap 
/■pae^ pa* w*a »a 



: ("0^**6 n^oni Virion ids 
: cn^ra ib ;n "p jnn dki 



[322] 

*ta -ps n« moo 

[383] 
[384] 
[385] 

,-pjn? to ty c^ino^ (*t?p3 mi ,"jjij? mm 
: -pij? too -^ s^ro ^min wi neis *nn dk »3 

[336] 

: "pit* ny cana ^onn btx\ ,"pniN jwri ^inoi nto 

[837] 

,n:upnn wk^ ("toon (n«nn> dk 
: cnjinn "ibui npu mnn ck ■;« 

[328] 

: na wwj£ "|T3 fc* iij? »an vby awn ntrj?o mew ono 
: nnn "pm*> -j« ibiA p r6ia* r« vr» ("jnnb ("nren dk ih 

[329] 



,)b iTan dj;b Nam 
: ltyo toi won mar *a 

,( 4, "ptoi "jnm nma 
: "ptys rty on nan dk 



,ntorn w ieai ^nen pi 
trb' ifiD miD *nn msDoa 



,(«VD> («to6) Ken "ICN DTK 

mar *6i ,oina w na*N 

[830] 

(«-p-Dro nam n« dm 
■prjn wp cmr to 

[331] 

,rrnm Hon ibn6 ^ino 
,vmn men njn nr -ljrcri 



,nvbv t by 
,nbcsb awn xbi 

: rfow ( n nx 



[313] 

lanaa rwte 

nmx ntA 

nj» (*°vaj? max 

amxi ,nontea 



[814] 

.d»39^> vn -tpx cpio "i^> noa» isi snww c*nj?a 
: ( u o»3ifix non dxi void -j^ r6* w ( u ^ xaem njn 

[315] 



,imaia "joo ntocan* 
: woem inxom Wfl 

.rrfatann nya 
,nx-nn nytra 

/Hivn x 1 ? "6X3 

: rnxa npm nxo 

/6 ^ino t -mp 1 ? ix iair6 
: i^aen ijnoi ana enax 

,"po ton* ma 
: -p^x* na?* nx *a 

.vntonn m* fj; "a 
: mix pp* 

.canaro nxo vVx o*amxn 
: ontsa rnyai onanx 

/ip» dxi wx noxn dx 
tcnpio "jnix &**x *aa ("*afl^> 



mx ^j? jip aifcmn e^x 
ntei too mm •wifc ("p 

[316] 

pX3 13*X P13X 

^nio ia*x i*wi 

inanx nx awn 

lpim nx pxi 

[317] 

("lamx ("nton* nj?a 
(■navuD ntoon *a jm 

[318] 

nia£ wan* mx ^>a p 
#njn i*ty awnn ^x oa 

[319] 

p*x cam -pp aayn* to 
,pBD *atrn coa ,-rna "rnxn *a 

[320] 

niapo toa buy nxxen x^ 
naxi Dap nam b*y ixd -in*.* 

[321] 

,tonr6 "j 1 ? xa cnax ^ap 
,-ps^ yaa* ntpxa *a 



(* 



rqtt Sp» 





rw 


,n3*i3iff3 


^MBnJKman 


,nmK Tlpjtt DK '3 


riKifli rn ]*h 


Bri3Kman*o» 


("63M vr» »6 p 


j nniosT? &*m 


cnno p^ £33 




[808] 


/into? new ("•♦fiva 


y»w in n* Ton b* 


{ryweh K3 njr ^>33i 


•^or njrno pemn »3 


: ^nosn mor p ^7 


rpo nan npm 1331 




[30»] 


i*an trp3 


/inao ^33 insn ram 


,pims 


TP 


vw nfico 


>yh by avff iman 


:pn 


cwran 



[xrv. t] 

ocrfrnoi Dmkwnrn Mnrcn nrra njn? 



/jnmp^ aiwon 
:*]mxm» wwai 

,*jman 
,inD*yani 

: lronpm 

nj?3 -pin* 

rp»ri 

J P^KCW ^31 



[810] 

now am* *np* ro 
,-p"non np poti dp 

[811] 

puk jnan nma pM 

lop pfcnn dh 

idj?3 <«Wn npai 

( § "|3^» *ty io»» 

[812] 

bw by roman tot 

i^> b^i .nail* 

cmv two ik 

nn "6 ny«n (*np 



[299] 

,nbm bit -fr 0"anu6 "|nan» rorr nnx nj?sa 
: ( ,M *6on isfin run ^ (»°min ,inenr6 -oa» e*ns |*j;d 

[300] 

»rojn own oan na p* ,njn mare wnavn 
: nijn nno ^>a na mo^n ,njn man nan^a *a 

[301] 

»( ni ijn to*n ^aiDn ro *ijn ( u 'ntrx man ^aio 
: ij?ata k^> -jk njw sj^n* ,ijr a«6 nan wn *a 

[302] 

.rvvaj ("*nanjn ns«3o rw»s njnm pnj »*n 

,i-naio^ bwo* vfn na j>ip<i ,nno nao loa twi ia^a 

:rnnoa jn (•"lmnooi -naxaoa ( n «B>£3^ a«ai afA rhrto v*n 

[303] 

cnaani <«a<anjn dj? nap cawiw 



.Dim 


^»n wjo 


.c^Dan 


mana atrn stn 


: DT1D3 


-|3i^p nai» nSi 




[304] 


,i»ee? ny ^>aa p*s» 


^a»a mi6 .ana p« 


#vdpk c^yi nan* 


□a tou iBnjn ]in p* 


/pdidi vjwt Tnon 


,noan (» i maj *6 dn 


,voiw -pffnto n£& 


monoi npwucr *6 dk 


: vdxj? copiai nap 


( ,u 1^ *ina aio e"i6n *6 ck 




[305] 


,nim Mm hp 


Dipoa «a n»» dth 


: nrn njrb im 


Di»a an w naw 




[306] 


jvnnm ina* *t6 


D18 1 ? DW30 nj»1K 


*"nn\no D"X£n "?aai 


c»m^xjn nwpjn nwa 



'* ^ '** *'• * . 



*~ i%*t * mmM * 



00 + I 






■ # l~ * ,, mm 



• » 



T* 2^K i i^ill T * |9 



(*: "p"ttrr ran "p2P2* ,7m: T^V ** t" 23 

,7*2? 772 z*bT >~ z*:* T22S rw rat *J2 ^2^1 

ci "jT2xi "rp"nt2 "par r? ream "ptnrTi 

[MS] 
^m *£? POT? ?22 TTTK 2.TK TTU 1TK2 C > U».1 

/*: i2*n te wen cTpr.r r? crn? *]£.-r :m *p2 *2 

[»4] 

,rr>;r b* cttp thk tici ^rrrsK rmin "pnnD 
: rfcnr. ton »j£ 1,-2125 cs [K2] -|2? c*?rr6 -pawn 

[Mfl 



1212 t rnten dk 

"1212 ("p TOKH CK 

[t96] 

,vto npa-n niso ba\r\ to» tdk -on nnxon dk 



,1*12? T2tr rttcn C^ST" 

: itsp. to u6a 1^» 



: xby "no*n mpin^ ^2in 

,cnn ^2 c"noK2 
: inionp^ aier* 
,2nr ^2 non 



nsDo enawi »did^ r» *a 

[M7] 

nen r^D2 ronKe 
*6 ,inroer» dm 
"idid »n» run* 

/im'2» npp 



[398] 

^'"■vnioi ynts \-p rials nj?2 ,2nr2 idid 'nx ^2tro btw 



-mam dtto ("^kd 
: ("niaaSn nnannn 



[281] 

.rna^pn nanxn 

[282] 

,njn nui nn *ip* bmd csTnsnn t6i -Ton nnannn 
: enjnu Bm«n !» cna nvin -^ vonw /imana ip'n 

[283] 

,w& -jra *?a« .("dtij? ^>aa ("tdim maim nan ain« 
: riiim isoaoi it no -p pit i^a r^ rmm 

[284] 

»D'bdi ("D^n« »ty Dnoooa "p^a "pan nanx yea 

: d»bj;d )ie6 »ty («jiaw wnam *vrw\ 

[285] 

,n»amK »3b6 ram niv6 ens irp p* »no ap3 
.dwk *aa6 ^ano ns i^ia n^iy arm (*d: 

[286] 



,-jamx 

,»nai ara cn&'K 

-j^> nw Kin *a 

c: aw pro lai 

,inaits -po jno dj 
: inarrao pmi ,pts6 

aio -j 1 ? mp ("TJMt 

.laioi VT 

,in»jp DTK 

: iate ana: 

,ivm Tiya n»o 
: nvr ^amx tj? 



(■pnanS nnn nya 

("rwr iafc 

■p^> ("na ^>Nff 

/DDip ioa 

[287] 

■j^ p^m <a ,ia pari to 

[288] 

Ton amx 

Vim ct,^ nton 

rainx meai 

\nn -jnaiaa 

[289] 

ans ••amx n« 
m anxx -px »a 









«Mfr«^M« 



t' 



'» ''" 






' » 



» mmm • 



9 

9 • fl . 



• *0*0*0 S^/ S W++90 . 1 






■«*«* fc~s •« * -2^ . -» 



it hi 



in: 



E»TT] 



r 



JWB2 TVffK *27 77- ]-* *r*3TT2Ti TTH2 "piX (^2W? 

• ( i iwn i* 4 ~* 1 1 1 1« i*7" 'Hi/ /- -*^7 u«»n . ^ r|U*i 

i".y»y?\ tic tot riTcy k? ceki r.irsi "pa? "ian cpim 

: r "papb inn aizm in?: zki r.-^nw nana m» cvif n 

♦ r"|**3C2 ^r ton ("flpei (••■nc *icn vm a:rn |«n cm 

[179] 

,nnK injs ynrr c: »nns ctk rrain tot 
: inn to war y* »itear irrar s6 ( w ck *a 

[280] 

/in?yo r"C3 vsty y; -rac ctk man aio no 
: won n*totn >6 *a iacn croto pmi nnw 



[264] 

,3->ik T3 o'Bina D'pano D«3M 

: ,3"nn 'n« n'DDi pn nina np*rw 

[265] 

j(mntPV3"pj? ia^> tijd arm (Kin) nana ponp nan rpbnn ^k 
/p^Jft W ton cnw cnnn cxa nna cn^nn ^>k 
: yyffti rona run "jsdd n p» D'anw bj^jc p d: 

[266] 

,-dk 'tea psiy^ ("pp tei pn to nex 
: nan ica rpye pw two ioa pooo pm 

[267] 

: po» *te teoffa nan <te k*n »a po«c *p^> ia nan ^ *ina 

[268] 

♦meai -poo *p^> ia obiy »aao *]•? nna ian 
: mo»i ("naia ma c"naa» aipp ate tiaa* n»a nan 

[269] 

.mini trsa nNff mpa caniKni .span "ikp nnn 

[: -j^tra"! ins* »6 k*k eno nna ,uw# nnannn ny 

(*«,•] Win? pro \t idxj? i",p»ap tea nte *o* teai 

: i^n^ ny tea me' /]? wpnm dik '3a nyai 

[270] 

»meipD n^noa i? ra'nnm /"pan? mtoa onpo n\n 
: nietpa a*an o^a maai i? »np ,idb»3 cntnpn ny tei 

[271] 

»ini8a ntriy xini tyso tea ("d«wh D'Ewo ioa njn »»n 
: cnnun tev n?i inoa* ididi on« '3a own nnini 

[272] 

,D'pte rahm onann no« 

: DTioa pm oa nan *p3? 

.e^a? proa on *vtm nnan 

: DT3 y\bsrs *nn topi 






[»7] 
: PTOB y3P? TJ,C 2X2 ETC (""i'MI! *32 TOP llVl 

,t ^r £2Tpn .tst p ,B7S« toe xrcr 52 



nun. n 

CU0] 

AS\yb ^insn ".zm nte .pun -ran *^ jn te^ 
: w*32 ;r;r on? nmn 752 cnuter. crpa* r> *^ni 

[MO] 

,cn c»-i2T can w bto "p^unr-ana-i 
: ens npmrn rxn ,c*ei=r nantfo na^ 

[Ml] 

,vnp "fisvb D*aoe ('.p-nta "pr nan 
: mm yiwn cj? c»aDoi -ptr o» "|* 

[MS] 

»TP 103 n^ Kini inwnai *f> Kin ivk "an nro 
: "pa? nw i^*o *iai tea ^ paa mnv 

[MS] 

-nrp} -pan "naaa en-iron 

,ia npa*6 cai ,vt-po) dji i*ann 

,wia (""jniKi npa n^p "ja!?i yy o*w 

CMatrisi inar^ cips i^ ymrh 

.-unpen c^ "i£do wn ib?k npai 

: ( M i2'3 to nexa to a»ffpn^> "pwt 



*ipn hpw 2b 

[851] 
/TO *3S3 bttn TM /Tfi TIDBf 10B>D ^>3D 

:*po ponnnni ,13*10 aio "]b np»n»i 



[Xii. y] 

[253] 
ION 

#iBn» ^>ai pikxo no» dv D»oann nnuo 
: iffp *?ai ipff kixo ov D^oan nrmo 

[253] 

]pt k»&6 (»d*d» tjtc manoa awn 

(« (laanarf? 'din ]pt Kirn) -naaai naa 

■noyn t« ,p)nv ena ,i^> noiw 

: wroi-6 tko ipt Kim en333i hm 

no»n <a jnn *6 dn iiyi < s n3y 

: woo tko my ]pn ^>na Kin pa) 

[254] 
131 ty Ip^na .('"13 33^>3 D3H n3JJ 

naana Kim itik ib on ,( 8 jnoi noan 

yio^AKi ,( w imi -"om airw noKn »a 

,wainK Kin D3 wm tkoi aii ^na 

: ua^an mi* noKn tk ,i A mnaa onw os&>o 

[255] 

,D*as Kiva lpT *3fi mwi o*6i "iai noK 
: D»aw T3K uby bw zinao ikd pT hok 

[256] 

,B»oio Da* noan *6a Kin D3 /ran? c^ao maea noan 
: D^on i2i &»nao w bh p ,a?a dki mk w p*w 






17 






— 



TT3 




' • f -»# , *m mm* -~ § ' * ' V *' *• ■.-»■•>*■ • »fc - W |^ Jj 

[MS] 
[Mt] 

: rgpsn r.yz? n^s r* % -^rcm rje (tzkp can nai 

C»47] 



.wna-a 

,( M ner tyi 
avvt\ -hy 

: ("TlKWa 



/TTTC T2TT TT 32* E3T1 

[848] 

rot ("noa* but 

trutt CK *3 

[249] 
TD3 FI3i6 CpKl 

wwn c 4 ^? "nan 

tb mop in« 

ant n*n b»bt» 



[850] 

nana pww» icwo am tko ,i-idk3 torn kw isno 

: "I3BW D3 "HOD BNW "FK3 .10*101 ip» TW9 to"? 31B1 



«npn Spar "? 

[234] 

Mivb nnn cb^k sn& ppna /itfw^> bwao n»n ^>a »ea 
: uw cm ^wi nan *?aa myy\ teaa nw rbrh 

[235] 
,Q>QV2 ]SW "]h N")3 "W* Niaj Wl 

/(■D^m d»bki .dw wma 

joppm unbn ,d»mi dto 

: dow^ »xon t6i -udo -pna cnn iwVi 

^B»aen D»nsp ,moin w i 1 ? ram 

4?q^M3 anerpo rvn -pan by pfo 

: D"r6 neie6 innn cnsiN wn jw^i 

[236] 

: i«rfc pa lniei rAn «o» ,v»r6 <""pw ("btokti to *ea 

[887] 

,maioi i.ts njj?o cty spiy <"n\T p^affa ana no 
: m* armi ron novo nteff ty vnnaio spiya pit 

[238] 

,(»ia:» yir» nano rann dk 
: ian [ana] c^p* -jmioi ("]a ^p 

[239] 

.rbjnn N<ao ik "joo pra too nan aw no 

: r6mn dw ia ^ p* »a jwnn» *p aio nt pp* ck 

[240] 

,Yhy i»iT inano ^>a .l^awj ai nnaio ("ffw 
: («i^» r«T maio ^a ,("-inv (°n\T tot? dk *jk 

[241] 

f ms» 0700 mos 0700 

: rrcun naio man nana 

[242] 

,*ia*in nW mwa (""pa r"pr. ex 
/(♦"pa'ai "pan ^eswn two nnp 



ED vtpn hpw 

bs spt b» ,in*a epitivu pK 

: rcmiD r6jr era »aa 

[tie] 
.bn iTnn to "|ruai ,-noff ^napo -pDaa rm rnj?a 
: bi mo vna mson npn ,^>ajn ^Jk -pim impi 



[XI. «'] 

[227] 

,ne-in Ten vin -naiai .npraa ncnn j*k d^>ij£ 
: MDrm nan wtod me ntmni cnn t»k "f> 210 mfen 

[228] 

,t^j?£oi rpoKe to ^y ^>ns <nn inn vrn *b dk 
: (m^j? faro* nam wr "jts mann nam ex ra 

[229] 

#T^nran twi mi cpn -p K»an njrm dk .man na"6 "p no 
: "fi'yinb na era inVnin .enrnn 161 na ram k^ dk 

[280] 

,1080 axae 31a "p np*ner aiMao 

: "isi ind cwn jn cman axa bz »a 

[281] 

^"D'stw "pwn *by Dn?n ^ rnton •?« nrwi p«6 moK 
: D'ops can (""pan by ,nn*o np*wn by noinnn dki 

[288] 

nxw enrann ioa '"|J1b6 nK iixk 

: -ix' tkd i»B3^ .mow \nn k^ dki 

[288] 

,rnpinai ma -idio rmnan dk 

: rnpwai "pe wk Dionoa inan 



jnpn hpv 



ro 

[219] 



,1300 jm mp iKo "inv (•"to tax ,idi jn en 
(•"ijo^d'i \vv2b win «*a> ny c*6 id rvipta r« 

[380] 

.nnap^ taw i^> aio ,ino »^a to ^tw 
: nnanoa o»n mtf> *f>in wh non win *a 

[221] 



,ijnri 


man ana twit my 


,("n*iDiK 


us»n cnvm (wno 


»ty2K 


»a ntow "»30 ntevn to 


#nia» 


pa6 ty W ]DK3 'S 


j?jo» ( M D3»rwa 


irwnn oa^sa cok <a 


: n-Dtro tai 


OWM T33 




[222] 


BW H30 


■p* fwin d« tot? 


,Bnui 


vwrna Ttpp «ro6 


(•■win 


pDO VIM I'D KVl 


: an vrm 


ta rrtnn rvn ton 




[223] 


npa 


nana «^a ( m b»k to nnp 


: DUHJ TO 


onw) ronton «^> 


)KX nnxo* 


16 nya nn« *6n 


: D'ata 


«jTiB w mono^ 




[224] 


,onx 


( 4 "|^ -pnuavo dk 


tO'Xp "J3 


"|TJ? '» ta TK 


,n«x "ppc 


c*rma cv r« 


: B'xip cfliwon 


■pna »6 u 




[225] 


pK 


»3fi ty natoa d<o 


.ram 


nby> f)x ta^> -noa 



12 WHQRl T^W 

[810] 

: (•moa "p^ y* nv2 eno .mecr ^ wn cnm sn ? 

[*ii] 
x n nmn -oa »a "pte atnn »nn to -jntoff r nit nwton ok 
: rtyn ie» has "pceri nvp -mm -iran imp* 

[SIS] 

: nnano tewa -id oa p*n .onnn nrmo cyan njn 

[SM] 

/Tunoa e^in k^> torn toi tibid Vuo 

:( M n3zn3 "jp^n nprn hwm njD cyi nim 

[SM] 
,21B ("TUB ^>33 FUSE 2H V\3D 

: nmas c^ ip sns b2 enseal 

-inn* uietei vt 12121 .ctj6 in* njn ana* istk 



: ("nrara na nrrn -n&r ")W cf?i^> ram "f> ("T2t» »6i 

[S15] 

♦cmmpi nsix p "inva tow 
: iruo i?»ntr n&* i»o Kin p 

[816] 

("inea npio -^ t"w iff* 
,idwj ^j? n^ij6 \yvo pro 
imor (»nn"ixon nnraa 

: rvsbn imenai kxid *nn 

[817] 

,-|KjtPi "in^Kt? yao* .cntotrn ntoff ^"2 crono dk 
: c-jKaiDi i»-i^2 wy e«^r w qoo man ?»♦ 

[818] 

,mjor6 bsv *6i cmoro ^d n»na cToaRnna dth 
j rniMrfc ns \-p 16 kw dj ,n'jjfna toi? w idto 



npn Spv 


13 


vvu n« 


■irw ^3 tPW 


: nb*bv kxd» 


my "ino m^ 




[2041 


-D^TH "]00 


mm bw nya 


cnonn 


friero cRwro 


AT]n nayn 


team ,jnr> 161 




[205] 


nan c*by 


ioih »nn <r\n ny 
D*pm toon 

[20S] 


i 


■p "jrow -nya non vnvy 

,na ijn ns iy -jma enaa 

,"]St -pari* pixm 

: n 5 Dtreon win pianm 



PL T 

♦crfowrn tm iy» 

[207] 

: wnjoi evpin nwra /in* 

[208] 

»ti nowi iud n\in ,ena*6 |n 

: nbpvos rrnn epno (*n wnn 

[209] 

: rjfi^> ^pn i^> rpnwn dki ,wj» ip % n vum c-jnaaa 



im: 



»■ ■ . * 



r*» 



-"? 



4 ■«- ««» mm i 






IMC 



i * 



i (^err Tr 27*£ re rr" rr*cr p p^*ir te* 

: (*mre* •:,"• mcz rr» m . m s; -r ztt. cnc* nan 

[IM] 

.tk «£2 rrs rr ( ,, ^ns£D• r*i» 

: '■•:•,-: •?? ?ie e^r* rsrw 'ate 



.STT**1*m r^?p* niTp ™K2 n*~i* \— rwiii;/ * ir>» 

[MO] 

.:ma ^rr r^ rnr**s nms ,nn cjt rvm dim 
tr'smxi iru pre w ]*» (■■cic .nam t mrsa anm 

[Ml] 

/nmr zrtrr> k?* ,nar ?;n rip* *?p en «rr ana m* 
: mxR isw "sp % ?? ctm rmn ^a bkvp *^a pro 

[Mt] 
[MS] 

cma in* ivk ana en» 



j A." 



npn *p» 



."TJOT ]*N 
,niBai • 

D^ny pirn 
: rram 

»npBD Ha DV DV 

: npin ty -inv 

,m»fin oil Taa T> mT 
: mnoo *6m aio ^>aoi ^ noan 

,m?»nn pi 

,moin n»nn jd 

,en3Kn reran 

: maw vin 

,tot ntn'2 paini Tin 
: b' k pjoa nnnn 



na 

[187] 

l«r6 ok 

"pDD NT ^ 
WIX pISD T2T* 

T&m *ty nay 

[188] 

*roo t»m nn 
T> tf pan 16 ok 

[18t] 

♦infort pno nwnn 
ropni wen tj^> btik* 

[180] 

,jrca ioa pan p* 

nnn Dion ysfti 

xvm \-in «*? ok 

"inaioK "joo 

[iti] 

Ton nop ip^na 

,on^ nea penoni 



[IX. O] 



pirn norm njw 

[1»2] 

.d*w »aa na iy»» nma tya pm ciiyo -ima 
: dtmdi (* dtjnsi n>o* niT)m yeo i^> vr po 

[188] 

,rpa^> ty opm oioiff ,on dw "pap mam 
: "js'T jfi i^> mowi jnnoi (•■pon i^> 



["»: 

m 

^sc 2T2J2 cpsis np 

pS TB DMS1 <pt31 "J" 111 

: "p!n "V5T K2 n*V IS JTB 

[1»1] 

"Jifili* BJ70 



'T*T2r6 TSnjfl pn 2T T*3*?2 1p* *TP *M 

! "pTm 3BT» 0^5 p32 "pM^ TOJ *TT» ^K W 

[its] 

p*£DS ^ nVP »"p JIIS T1D 



^KW -ran nn teo rranon 

/rra *te cna »ttd *te pio 

: *xn w *f>i «ot» ^ vxn 

[1M] 

xhon b* ry nth -prei .monw roan te to v\m 

tt Dte» «TJJ BWT (TDp)pp ATH3J B«VI ^WO TBI l6n 

.nanw in* lpanrv vh) *rjrt> o*a*w -nam pico 
: naam "pnityeo te i»te» la nm cno mron nn 

[1M] 

pa ,*n* pianm «rrrn -npn 

»nwnm nw» moan tea 

rnaaSn nrotpa row bwi 



[172] 

jn nan tea ten -^ bp dk 

,"|wa* -pan ny »a 

,teio ids »ffsn putt p* *a 

: "jtnjaa BnaK nasi too p^> 

[173] 

: njn ty teim naio ty mioa 

[174] 

/Hiv itep iaj naji ,N3 term w te by 

: nil' pao vna ruo* -nt ijw ty pian* dm 



[viii. n] 



[175] 



"IDK 



,,"jte ioa -wy pun oyoa pfino* ips 

: "jto ioa miatea ^ n pw an "jtei 

[176] 

,-ixw ioa tpj; dun ^>n nnoa ih n nr« 

: -ir nxo ^ n jw ixin i^i wy p»ni 

[177] 

,"[rtm^ Dan tei ,ton pte ^ WN3 penon 
: "jntow n« inn pw ,^NPn njn »rty naynn 

[178] 

,-rnv D3 ^38*1 p<SDD ]1TD oyo 

/ipm ns bttim nam 137 nan 

,niNno p mi pp is dtni 

npso n« ninte^ n pN icViya, 



*o 



n? n *p# 



**rr? cr®h cnp^n 

,13WI in33 ^33 

: ("uin mna 3"2r» 

: ^>3n "i^> onan "\vx 

jrrts) jnn p? nipis too 
: nn*aj« t? *o* nnwte 

/O'Jttfi ^»3D ton TK 

: jrjs ^a ty ^»30 ma? 



[168] 

rp ins npim -pn 

[164] 

.nana inoo r»tt te 
-nerjraa (Troei ^atro 

[165] 

no Kin dki toon note 
^»3 ty npjnnn ton 

[166] 

nam n»3»o *x? toio *an 
("rww pi pnrtf> V, 

[167] 



[168] 

,n&6n^>i ( u njn ?jb tab p B3 ,nirnm natr row ^ pt 

D3 nton *TND np ,K3 t6 "WH ("131 fy ("3^ ]W p M 

: ("nto ntoio 

[16»] 
/1313* (»K1i"I }3 BTUHn ("33^31 w"UKTD 31Q ( a "f> DO CWW 

nawi ins »B3 in^w maoi wty inaj»»a 

[170] 

,"j3w ij^ (»t"w ;b 
: *pffi TniD» eip»n 



citron t»io 
,n3iB tko n\-in 

.-p» to6 Y* *3 

: nainoi None 



[171] 

<a njn pa & 
mnih rvm 

wx\ toao p ty 
torn wpvn 



npnSp» a 

,r6ninm pis oni ,psn Tnte ty <3jn onan "ivb 

,rbru mnjnni c 6 ia^> rnx /n-rap *ffn^> it pijk te »a 

,rt>jnn *teo »awa D*a*i» iopJ» te^> na tjj nanai 

: ntew tod now num /it6 in jwjn ]n ton p ty 

[Mil 

: ten era ten *6n /tew *nn te teie6 

[157] 

,( M ntena n<nteo mrttw ,«a »jk nan "pa c6iwt6 

,ntea thw »nte crrnnK rtw»7& nawi dm 

: rnSnn rmerui cniafc -jana te minx pit dm 

[158] 

,*pin spin "pnana Tan /"po ntyo 1 ? oan onppoa 
: "jon 1 ? ]nw^ pnn »a mm ,-po noo^ wip ntyoai 

[15»] 

,itjo nxT i6i tei'i aa»» ianp nwa noa nw 
: i 1 ' x a disdo^ Kxom rrnn tbdi pan nt njraa 



[VII. ?] 



rtaom pnon njw 



[160] 

: nit? n»n? m»o enjraiK »min line np »a ninon 

[181] 

,nco rjtjn »axa eteam iron 

: nso -jB^ca te Man tm ino 

[162] 

,on»n tidb ,naio pnnnrw to* pro 
: o»sna bpk ate ,jn nnnnM niTnon i« 



[148] 

,*nw T2jr» bah tiaa tot m»K 

,«aa^a xrm *mw n» jnab 

/nana r\b vpib njyit wart 

: (^iibi -1202a n»n n»mn 



[VL 1] 

( l oi*o mpnn &wi prawn -isny 

[150] 

/('l^fi 1T3 (» n»ani 737a ^a *^j? tea nna 
: (• i^nx nbsri tid* np «a w *m rtaa wwnnrn 

[i»i] 
.prnn dm pma« wok ^nfrjnn? n*o* njnj con 
: pntr en? (rp& ito nmb erra r« -Ipnb stt it* 

[158] 

7m it *bx aa 16 nan ba^> -oa ("nanr te 
: jwi mn Dipsr» ,te iaw ptoa ("nov* 

[153] 

flwn "|Psa5 nan wo ,d^ij6 "pnio* tea noa 
: wv6 to* ("*6i vehyfr cnna amy p^> ]*k »a jm 

[154] 

(»-jj?m »xj? wr ten "pjr qm 

.ens -^ rnwia n n"io«n t? 

hits cn^n 16 pn **p .\>* qk 

: <"d»k ("noun ty (-D^ia itwiaM 

[165] 

/vans n»a pe"i*6 «a nrwo ("imo n* tppa^> Dan enaie 

,va£^> Daan^> bw «bi (* "in^o wn mnc^ dv on 

.cnn* ty neve wa ana ,vmteffo "i»a^» 6 anai 



[139] 

,f an "pa ("win yaei *wy *^a wt6 ano c»nn to 
: cp sn "jfiK nnayi win or6m an "jnwn oy 

[140] 

mi cn3»er> mrym #nwi njn yn tea my nwnn 
: n*o (»pyoi onn ("tho nwnm nmroo ray *nn ia ty 

[141] 

/inupta a*oo w inn^a sm nana 

: imo ciy wain \t wnyaa ran dki 

[142] 

#TroEto (*ppni iar» \t "pa^ wo ny puk puk 
: irnnn coy am naavn tena enw monte te nan 

[143] 

.vwurb ( 4, yoiw ten w ty wit 

: nnBin nan* yah p * nxo^ 

[144] 

,naton "rn* ipann* pan* onw piiyi nwn 
: (•mfij 161 tj^ iwvmp .enaci emy *ip» (•rwnri ronn* 

[145] 

,nim3oi mnoff ny^> raw w ,wrw vm to mo» tepo 
: ninaNi nuw ny te vnaio* ,nyoxo i30T »y:s ty dtki 

[146] 

,n"nr hvi pi nftyen tea .naioK wwawn nan tea 
: miaya poyi pny pm /utnjn in roiena -f? m 

[147] 

.inTno an by nwns* *6 imo pm oik pto «a *6 
: inw wto iv mam* Kin .wins aiijn nma* dk 

[148] 

Arbvtb niKBn pw now .ibbvoi ton pa dno 
: my »aa vaxyi oya d^b spy? to ^yir6 16 »a 



npn Spv 



,moa vin 

/("plKna "fOB? 

/pinna 
: >"6i?a 

rapwo na i\t i? 
: rop»ai 'naaya ci 



[131] 

te Twj» pa mt 

teio wi *6 dk 
teio cnn na* 

[ist] 
&?S3 man nnapi te 

[13S] 

onwn jtb6b6 win -iidk 

nittno vuri -iidk 

man la p* iidk e^ cmjr 

imo n\n ite "iidk tr» Tip 

[134] 

wra nwn Enao (»n»it 
rw» puk oru *n» k^> »a 

[135] 

iapj? "jBna \t pe»wrai 

[136] 

mon kVi nxp narnn dk 

■pwrt aip* T0HD TlD 
■f>3ts6 ("3YiK -px* »a 

[137] 

.njmo p»nn cmp-rei ,dtk wy to naiw ntrte «W 
: ("nyaoj 161 n»a man aa ,( a niK3 ffiatea spi? n^p jpt 

[138] 

,(«->ts' ia^ paw op (*j?:"ia iaa^> nixn n*p nit ^apo 
: rnjai nx3 \-p Kwnsi /raw p way n« <■ mooi 



,i33nan a^ en? .w 

/ispmnn (•niDufo 

.O'WMn m ,inrej£ 

: ("ukjgti ffS3 

,("nK13 KVl K3 *6 TON ip^ 

: rnxa msn i\-6k Tiaafr 



,innnH njni ma txs 
: v6ro nanni ior t^ 



,naa< ■p'? la ton pjn» 

,no»n t? ]B mm nen 

: no ("lrjri utn cook* nj? 



tnpn Spr TD 

[124] 

-3H3 »3t ty cny o^a otwu ,N7i mion mo ind ntriae* 
( si : 3HN.-6 dji rptya ff£3 n« ("(nj?) a^an 1 ? nns^n pn 

[125] 



( n no« cnwa tye 

,nnnon 

/iron* n« 

c:nap tni 

,mjB a^> bwi 

: nanm 



noiy WK din 
void iotyn» 

TOWS TV QN "|K 
DTK "3a \"V &V 

pn^noi pi ^>a 
vte ixapn* 



[126] 

*imjn ntwo rvrvyo nam pvienai ruion iww nivnt 
: nrvnan pann nj? ^aa nron ,n^xa nfya enipai ny ^>aa 

[127] 

,nm on -pn (""j"6n *o* jnxna Ton ntwianrv* 
c°: ri r'ri nns disddi ind^> nm aw en»6 rnn rip* 






[128] 



/nnyoaa nw Kim itop pn6 non»6 d\-6k -ion 
: maij? T3j?r6i r6>?3 to onaiy mioki nnw maj?^ 

[129] 

,i^>a;r *s^> ^in ^atpo BT13K «in *o 

: v>"D'i -pa» jws nai cinr 

[130] 

,envn ruion tow ruian »»« nopw *6 
: aru» cna r6a iniKn nntotf iy 






m« 



■*• 



II WI 



[IV. .TJ 






[11*] 

tut] 

[110] 

: %-tk cr:2e iic2 r?a rnps *2i ?oe 531 

[«i] 

: v?;2 (tw r*r» n2* nr» /tpcs i2f rs>* tcan 

[ist] 

,c*32? vit; vrv r? ^22 ■rrrsjm pmna jtk npnw» 
: c*j2* ^nr nrxi rrrx? iT2 "pi* ir»6 man 

[1SS] 

,ir2nK2 np2i^i( ,u 2niK»3£ r« *2pn* z*prn n"2"«G nir» 
b22 ran ("vr^rrm (""jm2 *£2 cast te ("w&fin c»tem 

( u : inp"TC2 re? 



mpn hpv T 

[106] 

,-pniatpne no tidn bm ,3«n anan n*n wn nan 

( M ,"|moa ano nrien (",tomn eye "ptoj^ on ox 

c: i^njKn nai* ^«n ,"jmnta -|n3*n qk 

[107] 

<MEnn dji mpin ("awini ,toaffo "ptop ronan ox 
<■: lenatei anw rtoyo noiy ,a»w ioa mw nwmn (•?« 

[108] 

jipim p« ^k nrx t6a n^ lyio vns» «rn *6n 
,npixi nix oipo nns? w»ai "in cqirt ("ni* ("nt ^>a ]»koi 
c: npim nixonai by cmaij^ #p ova lima *3B rte tidjn 

[109] 

("lot? conoi ("-jinD ( M ,D'3»3pi d»p»k cntny monn to 

,Dn"6aa 
: nrrmtM 'tyato dhwk to cneny ibdnp otk *3a noa 

[110] 

/inp-rc ("b«j?odi ("vniaii nono 
: into? tok^ f apoi rpNO 

[in] 

: maioon "penv torom 

[112] 

,mo^n cms aitwi cnnnpoi bthi n»o» rvnton nipixo 
: mo»an rrrcn ps3 iitd nam rn *6a onw dhfi 

[113] 

: law -p-iK w o»etoj^ ,uitd by nntaaa wk vum 

[114] 

.mm la lais-i ;^n «to ,wio» ^an -im* rpno 
: ram win mrw r« wk cntojra anwa c^n uim 

[115] 

,na»» cirrsa iiaa -^ ("top idid ipk 
: natr inn cnon ntoj? nanxo noi 



f 



,?7£ tk rs r? ("7^P3 w ti? (■■•an 

:r.zr rs? ?2 r- ire sprr era 

O^b^o^ft^o^ii^o^OjM f^^^MiA p^^^^^^g*^^ ^^OMft^»^hi^a%f^k^ft& 

* ."in ("tch rns?i ("noun 

[100] 

r: :t:?i ran to b? ?,rp .s£i? ^? ^anne ba 

[101] 

: vnur ("wrx Ef m 122 ,72m rree ("rw sru* 

[100] 

(«•: »Br2i p»ts nac wen frbva tp 

[100] 

: man ns» hs *# rrcnnnn 

[104] 

irm icn -k?k pn te any 
.^7:1 "pin "is?K cpas npi 

[100] 

,n2tr ca brti »a jrm w 

»»n2 \t t/k ik ete rp "p* o 

: liRixa *6n warn .dtk 



tnpn hfv 



[88] 



[89] 

,imop^ iwnoi wn iaxa ,n^iya non itwk ]^» ens 

cwfcaK* vimi wn nwrfc ,toi3D mn» -who enm 

(•: imoor nvm ^>£ij cvp #»** '33 mm i»p^ 16 cki 

[90] 

,di«mib iidi njvo dv kt onwa *o*a 

#d»kiw cnnaa nmp n^pr d^dj c^y *a 

,d**6b iwio* nmn d^ki onraa niyia 

(•*: d»iwui owao wap iap^ onyj cnw 

[91] 

»tob^ on^in noi dik »ja cwnon ni« wpa* o^k »ia 
: vaa^ ^ron noi mm*? bpk itow* rvywn win 

[92] 



cvrmtooi impoa 
,vma»3D ^>a mem 
ewmavu to mupd 
: wnuo ntooi 

ixsn Kim wm 

otoy man ty 
: rum* t« »a 

("mmonn vffwb 



iniaao dik ioa 

1*83101 1***103 

too tnd cirnnsi 

[98] 

n* nmow *o 

c°innn«3 -non 

ro*iT dm "|« 

piarvi jrr 

[94] 

am naa 

notrn ton 

[95] 

,at?p yw ruiy r«i rpntpo roan* oj6 nvi di^> *npn ( M 

,a»n l^av r teno onio*^ ^>ip laajn 

(*: a»nnni? msv »» tidj^ Tiy jioip* inn Toyoto 



[00] 

r>nsro pre 2^ rcn -mn 2*7 rarae ctk 
: r«es7n it (-prs mn »2 nsmrpre rnfirscn 

[07] 

»7IWl «l-»7^ «*7l Cs!> I pWll wUK 

("-•up* ";r» airm Teas tp <*r»7 tea 

»!7s is* ^a rj C72p3 *n* "n? c*an 

: nxr sna? *a an imo ep^n* era 

[00] 

#"Tj?^ mnn *a zTffn sjuf/rf} ("aiBfnn njra 

c: Tjarr (•■we »a awn curmnrt awnn rnyi 

[oo] 
.rip-ran man maw {Timtn 

r: mpsTs r»an rwen mai 

[100] 

r: 12? J nte\i -nx ^7 rpnp ,13^7 ^7 ^anno bs 
: rwr (-vmw c*?yn iaa ,ir»n nnto c»srv anae 

[101] 

,]Ep» rwc rr.n ip» dtk *J3 »»a en* 
c: ]dc?2t pis srt^KS oteji ("^M VT» 

[10S] 

(■WBTppn to» in ^7 nobpm 
: nron tbtk ^3 ^7 rannnn 

[10ft] 

srm "en "icw pn ^a ait7 
Aiii i^in new ("tido npi 

[106] 

ATvbon K*na »n ("7173 dtk 

.inser o»a Vru »a tti Ta* 

ana «n» "pK ut cto w •]*« »a 

: nKixa <*6n mem ,dtk 



mpn ^p» 



y 

[88] 



: row D^»ij7 "i5» pp" tkd ,vrj» wsa mp» p am* 

[89] 

,imop^ vwnoi wn i:ma ,rhrjf2 non btdk j^k cne 

c»in^3K* wtro Kin nwnb Aanao .TT two ensn 

(•: iniooT nrm btu c\t »e*n *aa vm vsfi* »b dm 

[90] 

.D»RBne mm nn<o dv kt omw '0*3 

,dww cnnaa rimy n»jp? c^o; c^y »a 

»d»»6b iwid» nrnn o*toti onraa mjna 

(": D'KBnai owao ( u D*a&» iap^ onya ( l, nia»n 

P>1] 

«wt^ ("rVin noi one ♦» ("nnion ov wpa* d^k <aa 
: wa^> 'wan noi vwfc wk itow» noiun »3BW 

[92] 

lo^iya bth *6n 
imaao dik ids 



("/rn-6iDi vnpoa 
,vnia»aD to twna 
(".rniavu to dwpd 
: wiitjd ntooi 



rotarci Vienna 

[93] 

cnnnnRa Ton 

ru«rv dk "|K 

pian»i yr 

[94] 

jkt. naa 
notyn ton 

[95] 

,atrp rw ruij? p*i ("pntro caBT nj6 dm di^ mpn <r 

,a»n i^av c ^3Ho Dnio-6 top laajn 

(*: arnnrfc mxv »ae mej^ "ny iioip* pn iDyoto 



ixsn Kim wbj 

otoy nwn ty 
: navD* tk «a 

("nimonn nw»6 
: niD*pn cnwifc 



[in. :] 

[80] 

m? noi c?i? prna =x «a vr6x c»?ao enwn px tok 

: 1210 *X1 fr^X 11225 2"p Tin WW nnatn DK 

[81] 

(»: nnuoi nsn? 01123 ex *a ioto2 cnn dtk ant mn no 
: nnaxi pr *>x p2Ti nno msa ixo id^ij; nxo ^a *a 

[88] 

,in*rxi ns^ ^n nsrw "6? dik ("infi* x^ 

,irva pm nan? to* ex cnx *J2 inix l^wtr 

/iate nnp -pram "px "p»x no yvty 

: nap *p 21a nan ten maa t,bdx» 

[88] 

,nip te 1 ? njn en mn nxi naio ova 

: nnooi 2110001 pxo T,nix V*n 

[84] 

/»Bnanm o^ani ^at?n /wnp ^v en pnn»a can 
: twnnn^ ¥f» tz^t6 on »a tan nai moo nax r* *a 

[86] 

: raa6 ik»*v6 h iV bwi mito na-in cbw ta -nox 

[88] 

: D"3c nip ox i^> onox ,o»nn njp mx !?a ta 

[87] 

.letora cnx par nwi» n&anxa 

,woxr6 na x^>i px msyrh 12 px ffna 

,icj? »nn rmam noy we px nrm 

.vyhvrh tei* pxi n^an pi6 mem 

: win ny in^ana n^> :po pxi nanai 



■npn Sp» * 

[71] 

/ino dv^> run nan»6 ,naff naio ("rpro aw 
: nnon ^ na»» (-nva anw ,rw cov 1 ? p main nan 

[72] 

Asp wi ?k ("nuMWi noip rpsa -pa («*£» pn 
: ^xam cvuHnann ?n ,to ipnr p»6 spn 

[73] 

: udd an npx nnn <* *i3ijnt* ijrc ^>aiD 

[74] 

: Dipo mto6 rwn ,mpn te ("j'snn enow 

[76] 

: ivjw O'oM nun wi /"p*ya tow \nn te rrrw 

[76] 

: nne» man to nun n» mo ,Dnp» nana "pin* dk k>uk 

: onw rwyn »b ntfx niaia -p naT fc"K <»tot nnoan to 

: oron^ocniD ,-p p* Tin mx »ja ( w "pi.T ck tk 

[77] 

,"piiaa bn otn nn ^>fifc» Kai n«n 
r: "p<a t<a 16 iw )idd «ty ann ("ton 

[78] 

< u : imy pn» p ty ie>£3 <ty )nn» din ba^> cnim wp ( a vm* 
,inp*n nam an wn »a <"afc»n< ,meo peoa tpj? nm» npa 

[79] 

r/iniiy oyc mi»to ban "p «in »a raew ,»ay ron« dmi 
CMnvn -pixa to< ray D3CKa tdh» ,D'D» yap ]p? nm» om 
oneew rn^pi n^p nn vyps *a (*aaw ,d*d»^ vy* nxT am 
,iroian^ ("ejm "jr sin *a atwi» vty ,inoana epio nn* dki 
: wmb» ^p&'a inxan by \t \ra *a ("am* ,«ni> nm» dki 

,^ mjiajv nai («tjdk nuyn "pY> 

: * a V isd dibddi .TTnn n? wa 



[in. a] 

♦nrcmen ijw 

[80] 

,ia» noi o^iy ptrna ax *a vnto D»yao tfiJKn px noK 
: mo toi "|m^k tiM 1 ? np wi inw nna?n dk 

[81] 

(•: nrnaoi r\my maa dk *a io^ws arm dik TOK Mm no 
: nruM p* to pan ono tim iko lo^iy anno to *a 

[88] 

,inT« vasS fto nans *to dtk ("ine* h^ 

-irva pm nan? to* ax dtk »aa win torn* 

,-ra^a nnp -pixm fTX "|)<k no airp 

: nar -j^ aits nan ton iiaa ibdk* 

[88] 

*mp toV njn an nsn n«i naw ova 

: nnooi aiKaooi pixo -|ntw ^n 

[84] 

/Wianm a^am ^aa»n .nny «to an p"irra Ban 
: anemnn^ k^>i va?j?."6 dk »a ton nai moo anaK p* *a 

[85] 

: vaa6 w*jnn^ n ib awi ,r ano na-in earn to "no* 

[86] 

: d w mp dk i^ onoK ,a»ain nap dtk f?a to 

[87] 

,ieto»a dtk par maw nwuc 

,nv3xr6 na k^i pK -wrjfffc ia pK a*-n 

,isj? »nn imam nop »kjb pK rmen 

A&bvnb ^ar pro n^an pi6 mem 

: isin ij? irv"?ana rh bjid pxi nanai 



[71] 

nno nvb ron nanKb ,naff nano cspna aw 
: nnon -|b nant (»Dra aniK /naff cw^ p mem nan 

[78] 

,bxy \nn ?k witdp noip spsa "pa ("bet? pn 
: bxjni cmtwann tk ,td ip"»r p«"? epn 

[73] 

: udd an nyx nnn r»irijnr ipx bam 

[74] 

: oipo mto6 rwn ,mpn to ("penn mesa 

[76] 

: -print D»obyb nran ?ki ,p«ya toit? »nn to rnw 

[76] 

: Dns?' man ba nrn nr mo ,Dnpff nana -pnrr dk tna« 

: onw ntyyn Kb "ie>k mara *p *ot aw ("to nraan to 

: urotworm ,"p |»k nn dik "22 ( M "piiT dk tk 

[77] 

,"p-naa t m dki nn bet? nan n\n 
e°: -pna »a Kb new ]idd *by JKnn ("bKi 

[78] 

(**: miy pn» p by wn ny • pin* dtk bab ("nun wy cenaK 
,inp-rc nam an Kin *a < M apn» .men peoa "wy nm» nya 

[79] 

(",inny aye* rvjiybi /bsen "p Kin *a casrn* ,»ay nuT dki 
r/invn "piKa bK nay ajcKa •»»» ,d»d« yat? pr run* dki 
.woera rnbpi D-bp an wb *a razw ,D'D»b Tyx nm* dki 
/injianb ( M s)m "jr Kin »a a»n* vby /inoana spoio run* dki 
: in«» bptra inKon by \t jna »a («atew ,*»ns nm* dki 

,<ab naaian* nai cnoK niayn -ptb 

: * a V i£D disdoi nnnn m nytra 



*- 



• ~~ 



scr 




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• * ■ 






«■■ ■* I ft I 



^ 



■ 
■ ■ • • 

: rrsrr ztk r?n? mrrs ran an* fit .wan 

tm 

f'mr* rsm nm ?a tk irw c? ("i?atr 5t vmt 
: vnr? ("?rtp2 hit \z z: vcsin oys» ]n\np2 »a 

[«] 

<•: \-i J? ^pra p mr pit ir» .tsstj Kr» cam tski 

[»] 
r M : pjpi n;? f»r;i:? ?a nnnw ,pei an ?a nnns cnnin 

[70] 

f": ir.?i?a %no ("rm« na»K /incwa ?nc \t k? *o 



[61] 

,0*3133 vt *vyo D3»xi vx o"^ nsv iw nan jpuk 
: Ma* ^j? inns dbu lea niaa^ ty ("♦vninsin ^>3 kSi 

[62] 

,DH3y n«o c"^ vn ("i^i D3 e"i33nn tei jdir not? 

.DHIOnn (—JH^V 11331 D»D3H "11331 ("tfnilKn 1133 

: dho* n*33n i^ vn ( w, i^i f m nK "jrosio v^yHty pn 

[63] 

,jw< "ii33 Rip'i 1333 n\T "D3nn m3m "pin 
,jtit ^D3n cnjnn ( w ns ^n i3nnn3 nt33 n\T p 

,1K3S C—W NlipO »B1\11 1ND33 "\bO 103 ^>3ff nKl 

("•: wan "|te <3fi rw torn ,1*63 idko *]iro spv »s* 

[64] 

,i3iy ton ^D3i ,*w *n< ( iw nBo idem 
: i3«n ( ,w nx3 onipn '3 ,Kian tn» »6 D3no D3 

[56] 

,i3*n3 nbiy ( ,<9 in» Kin *o ,mi *33o nsn? note 
c°: 13NXD won D3 e6n3 ^3 /iniK npn nWm /D3j? 

[56] 

,rp33*K am isiyi jho iuV^cc" 

: n»3 no n*3 pi r?i n»3 t6i3 n»3 pi 

[57] 
,»3'3T^ "f> p? JHO «D33 1BW 

: »3p no lorn ,ion no twpi 

[68] 

,U3'3n ijr vbvi roan /ispnn *p^> »ty ( lo ipiB 

('",1303' b3B>ni ,ni3»3 p'nio vp croin iko r6 

( ,M : lraan pr ( u *3ii3 p* ,pfoi w wp*ro un 

[59] 

/D3 1 ? "|trKi <ty niv6 in3 "p pVn^ noan 
: 6 3 V 1BDD3 -^ iby ,.i3D nnnn ibdo 



T gnpn Spe 

[42] 

cnan* vb na -«y» noan ncK 
("n *iaip» p« isj?n poooa 

[«] 
»nna»ep nsa nffpo ^a noan 
: nn:i22 a^a K»n nffpoa (""pH 

t*4] 

,d«to ft cmi nan Kim n»pm m*o »ty Taw btuk 

: D"WT »b D^3KO ^>aiKl 32B?0^> ^>B3 IV* Kfill 1D3 

[46] 

/Wt» ( ,m ^>t k^i ( m ineana cnnx ^jn* ib?k nan anJK 
: ltrsii iv e<ea cniDn* Kim cwsxn nne ryo ioa 

[46] 

("Mtt'atrm ana t^ ]n ,ikx:m c*pto njmKa »*k ^a 
,1320 (" j nic'? 22b can ( in inr ,nsK3 ij;t *a jrri jrr 

,irvarni ia^> ( ,B ^j? nan ( ,M .njrv ck ("nyr vb Him jn* 

/i^'Him i^jt ^iem oin-.njn» vb "ibtk kti nyr* k^ 

: upvnm iniK tav ,vib nyr »a aiem njrv 16 

[47] 

/jne t*« m pt -\v» paa pianm jhk ropn tot 
: jnn two irwrr ]e ,nenoi nee morn 

[48] 

,wao ty onw won rot V*D3 bw kbtt np 
: wht3 ism ("anp* njm pa crux ia» 

[49] 

(•".B»nn mon c*in^rxa nmi rai noan pita oannoi njip 
.c*fcn nai Kin rn^Ka vncwaDs n k?i aaiD on m» ^a 

[50] 

.cwifcn nana i^bj tpk ra »no ty oaaa^ tt i6n 
: a'N^s e*iT mi vrm -ant v»jn >n?pj -«wt naaa byi 



rnpn Sp» 1 

[38] 

,noann by tow onswn nbm 
: nobnt* can ia» r*vDP3 (••mow 

[84] 

,r6i» tyo "ino nay vpy noan npa ( M nt?3 niD3 neiy 
: nyr ty £ia dp ryiaj 'nne mpo ty mojn ww jnp p 1 ? 

[85] 

.rwpa* b^k ^3 T3 man rows mat* 
<•*: wan** inTan nnsia T3 i^bri 

[38] 

nnio n\n Dipo ^ai tjj ^a ,noan wwni naian »n^ 
: in* Dj?a np< n«o rrow mm ova c"|Bp »nn dh »a 

[37] 

,jnn r^>i rbaon nw« ioVi ,jn* «^ "jnaian inb 
: jno ^»ai pa spwi "jnjn nan n»nn pkt nff yn dk 

[38] 

/nra njnn onjH a^ ty pK <"^p mnea noan 
: n3pr nya nnw (rvrofy dk torn »"?? mnea wn ■]» 

[89] 

.iRDnn bsb ("•ojr »^ir wk T3 nriw nna noan inonn to* 
:w*on pi o«n tri nam o»anwn Ta row wi pn 

[40] 

c",inT3pn tb c"nwn D3 ,a^» D3n «ra (•"nu* R^> ( m vn 

,wrw» "wr a»nj ty cmm ,wm ( ,e *ty nns ioa ybsv 

,-ptpa rw ( m y:n la o ,0 nn , »rc iv* tidb6 ("vnnrn 

: -pap ^>ro max* p yen n^aan to* itysai 

[41] 

("vjmai by svn cnya ("D'bwi ?r n-tapn 
qnoan pw pa^ ,wtow "6aD ( ui inn *a 
: qmw* paw tr .pianoi tostro nvp 1? 



[25] 

.nowi nvon nn« nanai ,^at?o ja "p nna .nya-iRa nna 
(■na-in ^si cm amx ir )n»D ir na*6 rrn R^> dk /Dan rm 

[26] 

•rwwn »fio ntmn cdr noan »m ,\&a \in to 

: rroinD po \nn r 1 ? dr ior^ njrw r^ r»nn to cna 

: rvoip' p naaai aema mo nwi ena w» »6 ox 

[27] 

(vjra ntoram pn by uy -|naa dr ntyn to 

(" : "|-naa ejiiy "par ny rj-nj? -pun* pimaa to »a 

: "pua cro "wr iin ty naaa «nn dr "|^ any* <*tk 

[28] 

rvuyn ,nn»tpy w D^oan ,^>ana ny ^na »o toie^ 
: imyD* nanoi o» 7m .np* ( T 6a n*a c""pbn lam 

[29] 

,ih ( w xip oiovirsd oy n»wy »nnw oy <ma ^ cnovn 
c. i^aa6 onjn ntyo cnoim .ah ("Dann onwyn nteo^ 

[SO] 

,ppyi rtvfcnt oy rrnnnn toi ,mp^n »nsen mv nano ym 
noam nnan riRiaa /uw6 dr p^rr canaRa ans noi 

:»pa^ 

[»i] 
r.neam mian n^nn nn tor ,njm p »no ("Dnw rwon 
:noim ^woa ran *an i\oh\ ntpyoi p-on ywi np*rv 

[82] 

,13 lo^rw ny a 1 ? nan rRiipo » % r ]»r ,wtoa rwbv 

Aaab ram oy pibtit niya rncana vnnn em* ro?a^ *to 

,ian» -raw cam irva np* an tor!? rupo nw vh\ 

nan: ia^> ipk enn bab rnyHi noan thd toff* *6i 



mpn Sp» 1 

[16] 

,iovoi aano "?33 p tewi ,ffp3» nosn nip osn &ri3R 
: i83i w*Htn 133 »3 3»no Kin nwo iniD3 iy3 f w 

[17] 

rtahso ro "p^yo ( 4, dk -p n itw "io«n toi cnoan nap 
: ^»3 ion inp 01 ion ny y^>3» cnosn ^3 pn *3 jni 

.ftWTPl |»30 »3B ("ffp3^ V3331 TOSH PITT ?*» TW 

: wo n w 33?^> n\i dki ,moS r6yo r6y» n^rfr 

[18] 

/DniK low * D»03nn c^n ,pn nsaw D'aten bm 
:oni^3D3Dy «^oa pm ,on3»33 Dy tod prn 

[19] 

,d»3tk on ("3wpr6 p ty ,jniy own 33^» pny 
en u*yyr\ mpe V*jn* 16 *dwd vm r*i3^ b^k »a 

[*0] 

#imnoa ("T^na» din »33d rnosi 
: iniH 3»nn dM 131 ima d3dki 

[«i] 
,pYi (""ii3Di rwm yiiT ty3i "pm ikd noip vim 
(«•: p«i ind noanoi ^b»i i3ip3 pn rijni ^*yio v»n 

[28] 

: 13 npar «n3« D3n "»,py^ 13101 131 

: i3»3Do nprrw ,ptf> pui i3i 

: iarp ("to *ty i, 1 ^ ,pbidd 13101 131 

[S3] 

jftm km pi nityon ^33 ( M ,[ni3y] inosn^ i3n vuh 
: n^non r6i3^ ny ^33 (•nanon 13331 id* pi 

[24] 

/jam no3n 3^3 noV? ("pKm Ton ("pioy* *** 
: per rpji nay ind riNin om^ ow nvnb prow k^> 



T^^V^a^^m .^h ,^^m b^b. abbs* ««B«Bm*Bff *«b«£1 

:it: 

I "irX-— JC **JS"i Z.5^ *2Jt? ^2H*3C 

[MI 

..—2 -r*s* ;*»rr -srn cics sp: rrsn 

: \- v, % z.tziz :n« ^ in»£2 pi -qt in*ssi 



[I. K] 

/imnjn b« ( 4 bioa obtfb (»n»bya n« n^nn enoan 
: mio nna (Hiaai aits dp i«n »o» naip nw na 

EM 

,Dn»D» (TOT DM TT* nj?3 D'ptH rW» pnfc 1BO 

: on*pn ny **nb nann dki ,o*oan ab rvnn noanm 

[83 

/pini ikw "|baB* cdk na* "jn»p dm cromn b« 
jypa ainm a-in nyn *by ann vin "pa *a 

/ban »by -pbob nw new wn »o 

,bain am r6o tw raw by im, 

.nut baa po ("pay baa oan 

(••: baio ikd roan wit bum Kb ok 

[5] 

,p»?no noxa cm /noan spin "ipk m» wno^ 

: pno bai fan nana in bntpoi nrnwi ano 

,ksid »nn t6 mas row *a naK "jbaff dk rwnwi 

<*•: kxv \t dk ar \t Kb »a ,nyb "jbaff dk -hob* ( M p by 

[6] 

rpap bjn pn by ruKT bs ,nyn tkd b« wan wk ba 
(>«: y*y; jm -© pn nnn» oa ,aibe* ff»Kb nean mm v\n 

,nn*bana cwwn #noan witt m»a -npn 
: nn*avoi nan ji tvy\tt n» rem 

[7] 

,nsrn ("xba bya raa noan Kba hkt »no» 

:bya 'baa ntrxa rwv ("*ba noan d;i 



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/S , S»75* 277 .TUT iV) p2* .TT2 5T2 PZ^TOrB STOBO) 

,=*;rx2 rj-2 K7 «2 2^^2(•) 7pr2 zvTpr *nrjp 132 ruTO) 

/• W2722 K7 2H27 2721 .nja* T£72 T2"2 Tip* *£Bm 

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