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Full text of "Ships of the United States Navy and their sponsors"

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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



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Ships of the United States Navy 

and their Sponsors 

1797 to 1913 



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Ships of the 

United States Navy 

and their Sponsors 



1797— 1913 



Compiled by 1 

Edith Wallace Benham 
Anne Martin Hall 



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COPYRIGHT, I913 
BY 

ANNE MARTIN HALL 
EDITH WALLACE BENHAM 



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NORU OOD'MAfS'U-S-A 



FOREWORD 

1 HIS volume has been prepared primarily for the 
Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy, to 
bring together from widely scattered and inaccessible 
sources all obtainable facts relating to the naming of 
the fighting craft of our Navy — old and new — and 
the bestowing of the names upon these vessels by 
sponsors. There is a widespread public interest in 
these subjects and no ready means of information. 

Records of Navy namings, launchings, or christen- 
ings have been preserved nowhere in book form. 
Laborious research has been necessary to collect and 
verify fragmentary data. To discover exact dates 
of launchings, records of christenings, and to verify 
the names of sponsors, it has been necessary to search 
Navy Department records, histories of Navy Yards, 
histories of cities, numberless old newspaper files and 
periodicals of a number of cities, and to correspond 
with a very large number of individuals. 

Complete biographies of individuals or complete 
histories of vessels are manifestly impossible in this 
volume. Biographical notes of patriots for whom 
Navy vessels have been named are not given as com- 
plete biographies. Historical notes of vessels are not 
given as complete histories. Conspicuous facts of 
biographies and of histories are set forth for the pur- 
pose of interesting and unmistakable identification, 
and for the inspiration of every reader with patriotic 
pride in the achievements of our Navy. 

[iii] 



FOREWORD 



Full accounts of all launchings would be repetition. 
Accounts typical of different periods and localities 
have been selected without regard to class of vessel. 

Records in this volume, with the exception of some 
of the very old ships, have been submitted to sponsors 
or to their representatives. 

Authorities for biographical notes of Naval officers: 
Navy Department Records, Hamersley's Naval En- 
cyclopedia, Hamersley's Records of Living Officers of 
the Navy, J. F. Cooper's Lives of Distinguished Naval 
Officers, History of the United States Navy by Clark, 
Stevens, Alden, Krafft. 

Grateful acknowledgments are made to Miss Isabel 
Smith of the Navy Department Library for valuable 
assistance in research work; to the United States 
Naval Institute and Mr. Robert Skerrett for the use 
of The Baptism of Ships; to photographers for the 
use of copyrighted pictures. Sincere thanks to Mrs. 
Thomas H. Eastman for kind interest and correspon- 
dence; to Mr. Charles A. Schieren, Jr., and many 
other friends who have encouraged and assisted the 
work. 

Anne Martin Hall, Editor 



[iv] 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



Custom of Bestowing the Name on U. S. Navy Vessels ix 

Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy . . xv 

Ships of the U. S. Navy with Known Sponsors, Alpha- 
betically Arranged i 

Nomenclature and U. S. Statute Laws Governing 

Names of Vessels 202 

The Baptism of Ships — A History of the Custom Among 

Various Nations 207 

Index of Names of Known Sponsors of U. S. Navy 

Vessels 219 



[V] 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Frigate "Constitution" Frontispiece 

Launching of a Battleship and launching stand .... facing page viii 

Breaking the bottle and naming the ship "Aylwin" x 

Mrs. Mary Campbell Underwood, Sponsor for U. S. S. " Birmingham " and 

Founder of the Society of Sponsors xJv 

U.S. Battleship "Alabama" 2 

U. S. Torpedo Boat Destroyer "Ammen" 6 

Launch of U. S. Battleship "Arkansas" 8 

Launch of a Submarine Torpedo Boat I2 

Launching part of Torpedo Boat Destroyer " Benham " 20 

U. S. Armored Cruiser " Brooklyn," Flagship of Rear Admiral Schley in the 

Spanish-American War 26 

Launching party of U. S. Torpedo Boat Destroyer "Burrows" ... 28 

U.S. Battleship "Connecticut" 42 

A Submarine Torpedo Boat submerged 46 

A Submarine Torpedo Boat coming to the surface 48 

A Submarine Torpedo Boat on the surface 50 

The Old U.S. Frigate "Delaware" in stone Dry Dock at Norfolk Navy 

Yard, June, 1843 54 

U. S. Battleship "Delaware," 5th 56 

U. S. Battleship Florida, 4th 68 

U. S. S. " Hartford " 78 

Launch of U. S. Battleship "Iowa" 86 

Launching stand of the U. S. Battleship " Kansas" 90 

U.S. Torpedo Boat Destroyer "Lamson" 94 

"Ready!" Launch of Torpedo Boat Destroyer "McCall" .... 98 

Launching Party of U. S. Battleship "Michigan" 108 

U. S. Sloop " Monongahela " 114 

Sponsor and Launching Party of U. S. S. "Montana " 116 

Awaiting the start of the Battleship "New Hampshire" 120 

U.S. Battleship "New Jersey" 122 

[vii] 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

U. S. Armored Cruiser " North Carolina " facing page 126 

U.S. Cruiser "Olympia," Flagship of Commodore Dewey in the Spanish- 
American War 130 

"Baptism!" U. S. Torpedo Boat Destroyer " Patterson " .... 136 

Ship of the Line "Pennsylvania," ist 140 

U. S. Torpedo Boat Destroyer " Perkins " 144 

U. S. Gunboat " Petrel" 146 

Launch of U. S. Torpedo Boat Destroyer "Roe" 158 

Breaking the bottle upon the bow of the U. S. Cruiser "Salem" . . . 162 
U. S. S.. New York, 4th, Flagship of Rear Admiral Sampson in the Spanish- 

u American War 164 

X*'' >^ U. S. Training Ship "Severn," formerly "Chesapeake," 2d ... . 166 

Waiting to Strike. Launch of U. S. S. "St. Louis" 172 

U. S. Monitor "Tallahassee," formerly "Florida" 176 

Sponsor and Launching Party of the U. S. S. "Tennessee" .... 178 

Launch of Battleship "Texas," ist 180 

Launch of Battleship "Texas," 2d 182 

A Very Young Sponsor and Maids of Honor of the Battleship "Texas," 2d 184 

: U.S. Battleship "Virginia" 188 

U.S. Armored Cruiser "Washington" 192 

Launch of U. S. Battleship "Wyoming" 200 

Waiting for the Signal U. S. S. "Wyoming" 202 



[ viii ] 




LAUxNCHING OF A BATTLESHIP AND 
LAUNCHING STAND 



V 



BESTOWING THE NAME 

1 HE launching of a Navy ship is an engineering 
feat of great magnitude, usually so successfully per- 
formed that the spectator thrills with enthusiasm 
entirely devoid of anxiety. Each succeeding fighting 
ship becomes larger and heavier, and careful calcula- 
tion must be worked out bearing directly upon the 
launching even before a single rivet has been 
driven. 

It is the usual custom in launching naval vessels 
to send them into the water stern first, the fuller 
form of the hull aft tending to make the vessel rise 
more quickly from her first plunge than would be the 
case were she sent into the water bow first, and it also 
makes the pivotal strain less at that instant when the 
bow on entering the water and the stern upon rising 
throw the burden of weight upon the forward poppets 
or timber shores. 

In the earlier years of our Navy the name of a 
United States Navy ship was usually bestowed by 
an officer of the Navy. The naming party went on 
board to be launched with the ship, and the sponsor 
broke a bottle of wine or water over the bow of the 
vessel and pronounced the name at the moment that 
the bow struck the water. 

The ceremony of bestowing the name has always 
been a civil ceremony and without intent of religious 
significance. 

[ix] 



BESTOWING THE NAME 



Examined records give only one instance of religious 
ceremony in connection with the launch of a United 
States Navy ship. Prayer, offered by a clergyman, 
preceded the civil ceremony of launching and naming 
"Princeton" (ist). 

Early records of naming ceremonies are not com- 
plete owing to destruction of old records, and to lack 
of newspaper space or enterprise, for the records dis- 
covered show that Navy launchings were occasions 
of great public interest and enthusiasm, and were 
attended by large numbers of people. Many promi- 
nent officials were present and were launched with 
the ship. Commodore John Paul Jones was aboard 
the "America," the first ship of the line launched in 
America, and in several instances the Secretary of 
the Navy has been launched with a Navy ship. The 
"America," built in 1782, was presented to the French 
Government. 

The first record of a United States Navy naming 
or "christening" is that of the "Constitution," October 
20, 1797, on which occasion Captain James Sever, 
U. S. Navy, "broke a bottle of wine over the bow of 
the frigate." When the frigate "Independence" was 
launched, June 20, 18 14, "an ofllicer of the 'Consti- 
tution' (Commodore Bainbridge) had the honor of 
christening her as she struck the water." The frigate 
" Brandywine," in 1825, "smote the water in fine style 
and Captain Dove stationed on her bow christened her 
with the usual ceremony." 

In 1828 the first woman sponsor appears in print, 
but her identity may be forever shrouded in the mys- 
tery of the words: "The 'Concord' glided beautifully 
into her destined element and was christened by a 
young lady of Portsmouth." (Preble's History of the 




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BESTOWING THE NAME 



Portsmouth Navy Yard.) In those days it was not 
the fashion to put the names of ladies in the papers. 

From that date up to the present time examined 
records give the names of few men who have partici- 
pated in the naming of United States Navy ships. 
The ships were: the *' Pennsylvania" in 1837; the 
"Dale" in 1839; the "Princeton" (ist) and the frig- 
ate "Raritan" in 1843; the "San Jacinto" in 1850; 
the "New Ironsides" in 1862; the **Miantonomah" 
in 1863; the "Quinnebaug" in 1866; the "Mackenzie" 
in 1901. 

A bottle of wine has been broken upon the bows of 
the majority of our Navy vessels at the time of naming. 
Some vessels have been sprinkled with water, the 
bottle of water usually having been brought from the 
river for which the ship was named, or from a spring 
in the state or near the city for which the ship was 
named. 

There have been a few unique exceptions. A bottle 
of brandy was broken over the bow of "Princeton" 
(ist) and over the frigate "Raritan" in 1843, and upon 
"San Jacinto" in 1850, and "New Ironsides" in 1862, 
by the Naval officers who bestowed the names, — 
probably to stimulate their good luck as strongly as 
possible. A fair young woman sponsor broke a bottle 
of pure Irish whiskey over the bow of the "Shamrock" 
in 1863, bestowing the name. The "Germantown" 
and the "Pawtuxet" were sprinkled with wine and 
water commingled at the time of naming. 

Some Navy ships have been launched without 
ceremony of any kind, notably the "Monitor" and 
the " Boston." 

Of late years it has become the custom for the 
launching party to stand upon a platform beside the 

[xij 



BESTOWING THE NAME 



ship's Stem, and at the instant that the vessel starts 
to move toward the water the sponsor breaks a bottle 
of champagne against the bow and pronouncing the 
ship's name says: "I name thee in the name of the 
United States." 



NOMINATING THE SPONSOR 

IN the old Navy it was the custom for Navy Yard 
officials to invite a sponsor to break the bottle of wine 
or water and bestow the name upon the vessel. Some- 
times contestants for the honor were allowed to draw 
lots. 

Of late years it has been the custom for the Navy 
Department to request the Governor of the State 
to nominate a sponsor for the vessel to be named for 
a State ; or the Mayor or Council of a City to nominate 
a sponsor for the vessel to be named for a city. 

When torpedo boat destroyers are launched, it is 
customary for the Navy Department to nominate as 
sponsor, if possible, some member of the family of the 
officer for whom the vessel is to be named. If no 
member of the family is available, the Navy Depart- 
ment or the officials of the Shipbuilding Company 
designate a sponsor. 

Editor 



[xii] 






The Society of Sponsors 

of the 
United States Navy 

Organized 1898 



^7^ 




MRS. MARY CAMPBELL UNDERWOOD 
Sponsor for U.S.S. ''Birmingham" and Founder 
of the Society of Sponsors 



roSTON 



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Society of Sponsors of the United 
States Navy 

Honorary Life President: 

Mrs. lewis UNDERWOOD, 
Bessemer, Alabama 

Honorary Members: 

The Admiral of the Navy GEORGE DEWEY 

REAR-.\DiiiRAL CHARLES D. SIGSBEE 

Rear-Admiral RICHARD WAINWRIGHT 

Chaplain: 
GEORGE LmNGSTON BAYARD, U. S. Navy 



OFFICERS ELECTED, February, 1913 
President: 

Mrs. REYNOLD THOMAS HALL, 

Norfolk, Virginia 

First Vice-President: 

Miss RUTH LAWRENCE 
New York, N. Y. 

Second Vice-President: 

Mrs. JOHN H. BURKE, 
Hogan, Montana 

Secretary: 

Miss EDITH W.ALLACE BENHAM, 
W^ashington, D. C. 

Treasurer: 

Mrs. ELISABETH GOLDSBOROUGH ADAIMS, 

Washington, D. C. 



[XV] 



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SOCIETY OF SPONSORS OF 



BOARD OF CONTROL 

Mrs. REYNOLD THOMAS HALL, Chairman, 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Mrs. lewis LOUER, 
Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. green CLAY GOODLOE, 

Seattle, Washington 

Miss ELIZABETH LEGERE FLEMING, 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mrs. JOSEPHUS DANIELS, 
Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. DE WITT COFFMAN, 
Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. RUSSELL CREAMER LANGDON, 
Seattle, Washington 



[xvi] 



THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



CONSTITUTION 
I 

The name of the organization is Sponsors of the United 
States Navy. 

II 

The objects of the Society are: 

1. The securing to its members of those benefits which should 
accrue from an acquaintance and association of women residing 
in different parts of the Union. 

2. The cultivation of a love of our country and its form of 
government. Remembering the occasion which gives member- 
ship in the Society, it is expected that the members will take a 
pride in the achievements of the Navy, and will, within their proper 
spheres, be interested in the promotion of a healthy, popular 
sentiment for the development and support of the United States 
Navy. 

3. The undertaking of such benevolent work as the Society 
may determine. 

Ill 

Any woman who shall have been a sponsor for a man-of-war, 
or other vessel connected with the United States Navy, as one of 
its fighting craft or training ships, shall be eligible to membership 
in the Society; provided, however, that she shall file an applica- 
tion for membership with the Board of Control of the Society, 
and at least three-fourths of the Board vote to admit such 
applicant. 

IV 

The management of the Society's affairs, except when it is in 
meeting assembled, shall be under the supervision of a Board of 
Control, to be composed of seven members, one of whom shall be 
the President of the Society, who shall be ex-officio Chairman of 
the Board. The officers, besides the Board of Control, shall 
consist of a President, a First Vice-President, a Second Vice-Presi- 
dent, a Treasurer and a Secretary. The office of Secretary and 

[ xvii ] 



SOCIETY OF SPONSORS OF 

Treasurer may be combined and held by one person. The said 
officers shall be elected to serve until the next annual meeting 
following their election, but the term of members of the Board of 
Control (other than the President) shall be two years, and until 
their successors are elected and qualified. 

At the first election of officers, three members of the Board shall 
be chosen for one year, and three for two years, and thereafter 
three members shall be selected at each meeting, to serve for two 
years. 

Vacancies in the Board of Control, or in any office, may be 
filled by the Board of Control until the next annual or special 
meeting of the Society. 



There shall be an annual meeting of the Society held at Wash- 
ington, in the month of February, and upon a date to be fixed by 
the President, and in her default, by the Secretary, at least thirty 
days before the day of meeting, and notice of the time fixed for 
such meeting shall be given through the press and by written notice 
mailed to the several members by the Secretary. 

Special meetings may be held when called by the Board of Con- 
trol or by the President. 

A special meeting must be held when request is made therefor 
in writing by any five members of the Society, who shall state the 
objects of the special meeting, and it may be called by either the 
Board, the President, or the Secretary. At least fifteen days' 
notice in writing shall be given of any special meeting, stating 
the time and place of meeting, and mailed to each member at her 
address. 

If, from any cause, officers shall not be chosen at the annual 
meeting, such officers, including members of the Board of Control, 
may be chosen at a regularly called special meeting. 

The Constitution can be amended at any annual meeting and a 
proposed amendment that shall have been approved by the Board 
of Control may be adopted at a special meeting. 

It shall require the affirmative vote of two-thirds of those voting 
to carry an amendment of the Constitution. Notice of voting 
upon an amendment shall be sent to every member at least thirty 
days before the meeting, requesting a signed ballot. 

[ xviii ] 



THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



BY-LAWS 

I. Officers 

1. The Board of Control shall consist of seven members, one 
of whom shall be the President of the Society, and such Board 
shall, except when the Society is in annual or special meeting, be 
vested with the management and control of its affairs. It may 
fill vacancies in any office. 

2. The President shall preside at all meetings of the Society, 
but shall not vote except in case of a tie. 

3. The President is ex-officio a member of the Board of Con- 
trol and Chairman thereof, and is entitled to vote on matters 
before the Board. 

4. In the absence of the President, a Vice-President shall dis- 
charge her duties, but in case of a vacancy in the office of Presi- 
dent, it must be filled by the Board of Control, the member so 
elected to serve for the unexpired term. 

5. The Secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings of the 
Society, and the Board of Control, and shall preserve in a well- 
bound book the names and addresses of the members. She shall 
mail notices of meetings to the several members at their addresses 
shown on the record, and she shall perform such other duties as 
the Board of Control shall prescribe. 

6. The Treasurer shall keep safely the funds of the Society, 
disburse the same as directed by the Society or the Board of Con- 
trol, and take proper receipt therefor. She shall make a full report 
of receipts and disbursements at each annual meeting, and at such 
other times as the Board of Control may require, and it shall be a 
part of her duty to notify the members who are in arrears and to 
request payment. The Board of Control may remove the Treas- 
urer and designate another to discharge the duties of the office 
for the balance of the term. 

7. The term of office of the several officers, except members 
of the Board of Control, shall be one year, and until the successors 
are elected. Members of the Board of Control, except the Presi- 
dent, shall be elected for two years, and to serve until their suc- 
cessors are elected. 

[ xix ] 



*^' 



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SOCIETY OF SPONSORS OF 

II. Meetings 

1. There shall be an annual meeting at Washington on some 
day to be named by the Board of Control, or by the President, 
and in the month of January or February of each year. Special 
meetings may be held at Washington when called, as prescribed 
in the Constitution. However, those present shall contitute a 
quorum. 

2. Prior to each annual meeting the Board of Control shall 
designate a committee of three to be known as an Entertainment 
Committee, who shall have charge of functions provided by the 
Society for the entertainment of the members. Also, that com- 
mittees for North, South, East and West be formed. 

3. Two months in advance of each meeting any member de- 
siring to submit a motion or motions or any suggestion as to 
motions to be made, at such meeting, should send them to the 
Secretary, who in turn should mail a copy of the projected motions 
with each invitation to attend the meeting of the Society. 

Ill 

1. The annual dues of membership are three dollars. 

2. The annual dues of new members of the Society are divided 
into three installments, payable according to the portion of the 
Society's fiscal year in which a particular member should enter; 
i.e., a member entering during the first third of the fiscal year be 
assessed $3.00; a member entering during the second third be 
assessed $2.00, and during the last third, $1.00. 

3. If any member of the Society fails to pay dues within three 
months after the Treasurer has sent notice that dues for the cur- 
rent year are now payable, a second notice shall be sent saying 
that it repeats the notice previously given on such and such a 
date. 

4. Such special assessments as the Board of Control or the 
Society may make, not to exceed dollars in any one year. 

IV. Certificate and Insignia 

I. The Society shall have a seal which shall be in the custody 
of the Secretary, and its form and legend may be adopted by the 
Board of Control. 

[xx] 



THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

2. A certificate of membership in the Society of such form as 
the Board of Control may prescribe shall be furnished each member 
applying therefor, and the same shall be signed by the President 
and countersigned by the Secretary, who shall affix the seal. 

3. A badge or other insignia of the Society may be adopted by 
the Board of Control, and when adopted shall not be changed. 

V 

The Board of Control may adopt such rules, regulations and 
by-laws not inconsistent with the Constitution or a by-law adopted 
by the Society, as in its opinion are necessary and proper. 



[xxi] 



SOCIETY OF SPONSORS OF 



List of Members of Society of Sponsors 
of the United States Navy 

1913 

Sponsor Warship 
Mrs. Elisabeth Goldsborough Adams, Wash- 
ington, D. C Paul Jones 

Miss Ethel C. Andrews, Camden, N. J Ammen 

Miss Grace Balch, Washington, D. C Balch 

Mrs. I. B. Beard, Jackson, Miss Mayrant 

Mrs. William Bedloe Beekman, New York, N. Y. ... Trenton 

Mrs. Charles Belknap, Washington, D. C Vestal 

Mrs. Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, New York, 

N. Y Nicholson 

Miss Edith Benham, Washington, D. C. San Francisco, Benham 

Mrs. William C. Bitting, Jr., St. Louis, Mo St. Louis 

Mrs. William Blalock, Atlanta, Ga Ericsson 

Mrs. Frank W. Brooks, Jr., Detroit, Mich Michigan 

Mrs. Charles Edward Brown, Columbus, Ohio Ohio 

Mrs. John Burke, Hogan, Montana Montana 

Miss Lorna Dorothea Burrows, Cleveland, Ohio. . . .Burrows 

Miss Anna Cahall, Bridgeville, Del Delaware 

Miss Elsie Calder, Brooklyn, N. Y New York 

Mrs. George Cameron, San Francisco, Cal Intrepid 

Mrs. Colin Campbell, Tottenham House, Savernake 

Forest, Marlborough, England Illinois 

Miss Helen Cassin Carusi, Washington, D. C Cassin 

Miss Minnie Darlington Coates, Philadelphia, Pa Concord 

Mrs. DeWitt Coffman, Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. . . .Alliance 

Miss Minnie Conrad, White Post, Virginia Montana 

Mrs. Allan Corson, Princeton, N. J Princeton 

Mrs. Frederic R, Coudert, New York, N. Y Old Maine 

Mrs. Josephus Daniels, Washington, D. C Bagley 

Mrs. Gregory Caldwell Davison, New London, 

Conn D-i, formerly Narwhal 

Miss Anna Belle Dickie, Camden, N. J Olympia 

Mrs. Charles Vaughan Ferguson, Hartford, Conn. . . . Wilkes 

[ xxii] 



THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Sponsor Warship 

Miss Elizabeth Legere Fleming, Jacksonville, Fla. . . .Florida 

Mrs. Walter T. Gaither, Wheeling, W. Va Wheeling 

Mrs. Green Clay Goodloe, Seattle, Washington . .Washington 
Miss Eleanor Gow, West Newton, Mass. ^-2, formerly Cuttlefish 

Mrs. Henry S. Grove, Germantown, Pa Lanison 

Mrs. Walter H. Grove, Ardmore, Penn Cyclops 

Mrs. Harry W. Hand, Melrose Park, Pa Parker 

Mrs. Reynold Thomas Hall, Norfolk, Va Roe 

Miss Julia Harris, Tacoma, Wash Tacoma 

Mrs. Richard Hatton, Baltimore, Md Warrington 

Mrs. Clement D. Hebb, Washington, D. C Sassacus 

Miss Agnes Herreshoff, Bristol, R. I Porter 

Mrs. Daniel Engle Hoffman, Mt. Airy, N. C. . .North Carolina 

Miss Alice Thornton Jenkins, Washington, D. C Jenkins 

Mrs. Wilbur Birch Joyce, Minneapolis, Minn Minnesota 

Miss Constance Henley Kane, New York, N. Y Henley 

Mrs. William B. Kinney, Newark, N. J New Jersey 

Mrs. William W. Kitchen, Gulfport, Miss Mississippi 

Miss Dorothy Eunice Knight, Denver, Colo Wyoming 

Miss Jean Knox, Germantown, Pa Jarvis 

Miss Margaret V. Lake, Milford, Conn. . .G-i, formerly Seal 

Mrs. Russell Creamer Langdon, Raleigh, N. C Rozvan 

Mrs. Chester B. Lawrence, Jr., Plainfield, N. J Bailey 

Miss Ruth Lawrence, New York, N. Y Lawrence 

Mrs. Dean Howard Lightner, Aberdeen, S. D. . .South Dakota 

Mrs. Lewis Louer, Chicago, 111 Des Moines 

Miss Claudia Lyon, Sherman, Texas Texas 

Miss Mary Louise Macon, Helena, Ark Arkansas 

Mrs. Charles Wight MacQuoid, Roselle, N. J Bancroft 

Miss Katherine H. Magoun, Haddonfield, N. J Preston 

Mrs. Albert H. Matthews, Brooklyn, N. Y Brooklyn 

Miss Lesley Jean Meakins, Montreal, Quebec H-i 

Mrs. H. Clifford More, Gavioto P. O., Cal Marietta 

Mrs. John Earl Morgan, Oshkosh, Wis Wisconsin 

Mrs. David Murray, Binghamton, N. Y Galena 

Miss Marylee Nally, Ossining-on-Hudson, N. Y Jouett 

Mrs. Lewis Nixon, New York, N. Y Tallahassee, Holla^id 

Miss Georgeanne Pollock Patterson, Washington, 

D, C Patterson 

[ xxiii ] 






SOCIETY OF SPONSORS OF 

Sponsor Warship 

Mrs. John R. Pels, New Rochelle, N. Y Denver 

Miss Lorna Pinnock, Salem, Mass Salem 

Mrs. Joseph Wright Powell, Germantown, Pa Aylwin 

Miss Coral Quay, Sewickley, Pa Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Preston Rambo, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Georgia 

Mrs. George H. Rock, Washington, D. C Terry 

Mrs. James Grafton Rogers, Denver, Colo Colorado 

Miss Annette Reid Rolph, San Francisco, Cal F-2, 

formerly Barracuda 

Mrs. George Culaer Rugg, St. Paul, Minn Whipple 

Mrs. Thomas F. Ruhm, Mare Island, Cal Jupiter 

Mrs. Adam John Schubert, Gooding, Idaho Idaho 

Mrs. Robert Nugent Somerville, Cleveland, Miss. . Tennessee 

Mrs. John G. South, Frankfort, Ky Kentucky 

Miss Dorothy W. Sproul, Chester, Pa Chester 

Miss Mary Alice Spry, Salt Lake City, Utah Utah 

Miss Elizabeth Stevens, Boston, Mass. C-2, formerly Stingray 

Mrs. George W. Sturdivant, Centerville, Iowa lozva 

Miss Grace Anna Taussig, Chestnut Hill, Pa G-4 

Mrs. Mae Chauncey-Stanton Todd, Grand Rapids, 

Mich Chauncey 

Mrs. George Toland, Washington, D. C Juniata 

Mrs. James H. Tomb, Arlington, Mass Boxer 

Miss Margaret Tredway, Dubuque, Iowa Dubuque 

Miss Josephine Tynan, San Francisco, Cal. F-i, formerly Carp 

Mrs. Lewis Underwood, Bessemer, Ala Birmingham 

Miss Mildred Walke Walter, Providence, R. I Walke 

Mrs. Barclay Warburton, Philadelphia, Pa Philadelphia 

Mrs. John D. Westbrook, Norfolk, Va Nashville 

Mrs. W. H. Wolfe, Jr., Parkersburg, W. Va West Virginia 

Miss Anna May Yeiser, Paducah, Ky Paducah 



CHARTER MEMBERS 

Mrs. Frederic T. Bassett Miss Lilian Chambliss 

Mrs. William Blalock Mrs. Helen Wilson Chapin 

Miss Mary Campbell (Mrs. (Mrs. Green ClayGoodloe) 

Lewis Underwood) Miss Minnie Conrad 



[xxiv] 



THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Mrs. Frederic R. Coudert 
Miss Helen Deshler (Mrs. 

Charles Edward Brown) 
Miss Helen Drury (Mrs. 

James H. Tomb) 
Miss Anna Belle Dickie 
Miss Annie Keith Frazier 

(Mrs. Robert Nugent 

Somerville) 
Miss Rebekah Glenn (Mrs. 

Daniel Engle Hoffman) 
Miss Louise Gooding (Mrs. 

Adam John Schubert) 
Miss Eleanor Gow 
Miss Maria Guild (Mrs. 

John D. Westbrook) 
Mrs. Alfred W. Haywood 
Mrs. Alice Gould Hawes 
Miss Julia Harris 
Mrs. Clement D. Hebb 
Mrs. Roy Hearne 
Miss Grace Herreid (Mrs. 

Dean Lightner) 
Mrs. William W. Kitchen 
Mrs. Chester B. Lawrence 
Miss Ruth Lawrence 
Mrs. Lewis Louer 
Mrs. Charles W. MacQuoid 



Mrs. John Earl Morgan 

Miss Mary Morgan 

Miss Mira O'Brien 

Miss Florence Pardee 

Miss Cora Peabody (Mrs. 
James Grafton Rogers) 

Mrs. John R. Pels 

Miss Lorna Pinnock 

Miss Coral Quay 

Miss Harriet Rankin (Mrs. 
Charles Vaughan Fergu- 
son) 

Mrs. Edward P. Ramsey 

Miss Rose Marie Schaller 
(Mrs. Wilbur Birch Joyce) 

Miss Ida May Schieren (Mrs. 
Albert H. Matthews) 

Miss Gladys Smith (Mrs. 
William C. Bitting, Jr.) 

Miss Dorothy Sproul 

Mrs. John G. South 

Mrs. George W. Sturdivant 

Miss Stella Tate 

Miss Margaret Tredway 

Mrs. Mae S. Chauncey Todd 

Mrs. George F. Toland 

Mrs. W. H. Wolfe 

Miss Anna May Yeiser 



[xxv] 



SOCIETY OF SPONSORS OF 



Officers of the Society of Sponsors of the United 
States Navy since its organization, 1 908-1 91 3 



Honorary Members 

The Admiral of the Navy, 

George Dewey 
R e AR- Admiral Winfield Scott 

Schley 
Rear-Admiral Robley D. 

Evans 
Rear-Admiral Charles D. 

SiGSBEE 

Rear- Admiral Richard Wain- 
wright 

Chaplain 

Chaplain George Livingston 
Bayard, U. S. Navy 

Presidents 

Miss Mary Campbell. 1908 
Miss Minnie D. Coates. 

1909, 1910 
Mrs. John G. South. 1911 
Mrs. Reynold T. Hall. 1912, 

1913 

Vice-Presidents 

Miss Annie Keith Frazier. 

1908 
Miss Minnie Conrad. 1908 
Mrs. Roy Hearne. 1909 
Mrs. Lewis Nixon. 1909 
Mrs. Charles W. MacQuoid. 

1910 
Mrs. George Toland. 1910 
Miss Anna Cahall. 1911 

[ xxvi ] 



Miss Anna May Yeiser. 191 i 
Mrs. John R. Pels. 1912 
Mrs. George Cameron. 191 2 
Miss Ruth Lawrence. 1913 
Mrs. John H. Burke. 1913 

Secretaries 

Mrs. John G. South. 1908 
Mrs. William W. Kitchen. 



1909, 1910 
Miss Edith Benham. 
1912, 1913 



1911, 



Treasurers 

Miss Ida May Schieren. 1908 
Miss Mira O'Brien. 1909 
Mrs. John R. Pels. 1910, 

1911 
Mrs. Charles W. MacQuoid. 

1912 
Mrs. Elisabeth Golds- 
borough Adams. 1913 

Board of Control 
Miss Helen Deshler. 1908, 

1909 
Mrs. John R. Pels. 1908, 1909 
Mrs. J. Earl Morgan. 1908, 

1909 
Mrs. Helen Wilson Chapin. 

1908, 1912, 1913 
Mrs. Roy Hearne. 1908, 

1910, 1911 
Miss Anna Hocht. 1908 



THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Mrs. George W. Sturdivant. 

1909, 1910 
Miss Ida May Schieren. 

1909, 1910 
Miss Helen Drury. 1909 
Mrs. James H. Tomb. 1910 
Mrs. John G. South. 1910 
Miss Anna B. Dickie. 1910, 

1911, 1913 
Mrs. Charles W. MacQuoid. 

1911 



Miss Minnie D. Coates. 

1911, 1912 

Miss Mary L. Macon. 1911, 

1912 
Miss Ruth Lawrence. 1911, 

1912 
Mrs. Lewis Louer. 1912, 1913 
Miss Elizabeth L. Fleming. 

1912, 1913 

Mrs. Josephus Daniels. 1913 
Mrs. De Witt Coffman. 1913 



3n a^emoriam 

Mrs. Alice Blake Gould Hawes 1908 

Miss Florence Pardee 1910 

Rear-Admiral Winfield S. Schley 1911 

Rear-Admiral Robley D. Evans 1911 

Mrs. Emily Beale McLean 1912 



[ xxvii ] 



r . I rs 



I \C 



Ships of the United States Navy 

and their Sponsors 

1797 to 1913 



Ships of the United States Navy 

and their Sponsors 
1797-1913 



ALABAMA (30) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 368 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, 12,150 tons 

Named for the State of Alabama 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 18 19) 

Launched May i8, 1898, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Morgan, daughter of Senator 
John T. Morgan, of Georgia. 

1 HE picture was of the utmost beauty and impress- 
iveness with the masses of Alabama blossoms so 
heaped on the foredeck that they seemed to be floral 
conning towers; the bright color contrasts afforded by 
the uniforms of Naval officers; and above all the 
tremendous salutation that came from all steam 
whistles within range and the shouts of the multitude, 
doubly enthusiastic and happy because the news had 
just come that the battleship "Oregon" had safely 

[3] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



arrived at Barbadoes after her perilous race of 13,000 
miles from San Francisco — the best news since the 
battle of Manila Bay. 



ALASKA 

SCREW SLOOP 
Tonnage, 1,122 Guns, 12 

Named for Alaska Territory 

Organized 1868 

Launched October 31, 1868, at the Navy Yard, 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

Sponsors: Miss Grace Hull, daughter of Mayor 
Hull, of Boston, named the vessel. Miss Emma Hartt, 
daughter of Naval Constructor Edward Hartt, U. S. 
Navy, knocked away the last wedge. 



ALBANY (2d) 
unarmored protected cruiser 

Length, 346 feet Beam, 43 feet Draft, 16 feet 

Displacement, 3,9S4 tons 

Named for the City of Albany 

Capital of New York 

Launched January 14, 1899, at the Armstrong 
Mitchel Company, Newcastle-on-Tyne, England. Pur- 
chased on the stocks by the United States March 16, 
1898. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John Charles Colwell, wife of 
Captain John C. Colwell, United States Navy, U. S. 
Naval Attache in London at the time of launching. 

[4] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



ALGOMA 

SCREW SLOOP 

Tonnage, 483 

r Named for Algoma, Wisconsin 

{Indian named town) 

Launched August i8, 1868, at the Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Maria Decatur (Mrs. Wyndham 
Mayo), daughter of Captain Stephen Decatur, U. S. 

Navy. 

ALLIANCE (2d), Launched "HURON" 

SLOOP OF WAR 

Length, 213 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 16 feet 

Displacement, 1,805 tons 

Named for Alliance ist 

{Named in compliment to France, our ally in the Revolutionary War) 

Launched March 8, 1875, at the Navy Yard, Nor- 
folk, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Eulalie Boush (Mrs. DeWitt 
Coffman), daughter of Naval Constructor George R. 
Boush, who built the ship. 

The sun shone in splendor and everything was 
auspicious for the launch of the sloop-of-war *' Huron." 
Long before the appointed time streams of humanity 
poured into the Navy Yard. A battalion of marines 
in full uniform was drawn up on the ground, and a 
full brass band. Without the least impediment the 
gallant ship freed herself and slid off the ways in 

[5] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

magnificent style. The crowd cheered, the band 
played, and a national salute of twenty-one guns was 
thundered from the "New Hampshire." Just as she 
moved off the ways Miss Eulalie Boush, lovely daugh- 
ter of Constructor Boush, broke a christening bottle 
of old native Virginia wine over the bows of the ship 
and said: "Thy name is 'Huron' and may success 
attend thee." 

AMMEN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 28g feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet, 5 inches 

Displacement, 883 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Daniel Ammen, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 20, 19 10, at New York Ship- 
building Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Ethel C. Andrews, Camden, New 
Jersey, daughter of Mr. G. M. Andrews, the General 
Manager of the New York Shipbuilding Company. 

Maids of Honor: Miss Priscilla Magoun and Miss 
Mary Magoun, daughters of the Vice-President of the 
Shipbuilding Company, Miss Christine Wright and 
Miss Ethel Scovel, Miss Beatrice Scovel, Miss Eliza- 
beth Macgill and Miss Marian Furness. 

Rear-admiral daniel ammen, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Ohio in 1820. Appointed Midshipman in 
1836. In the Civil War he performed conspicuous 
blockading service as executive officer of the "Roa- 
noke," and in command of the "Seneca." Com- 
manded the "Seneca" at battle of Port Royal, 
November 7, 1861. Commanded the "Patapsco" in 
[6] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



the attack on Fort McAlister and Fort Sumter, 1863. 
Commanded the "Mohican" in bombardment of Fort 
Fisher, 1864 and 1865. 

AMPHITRITE 

DOUBLE TURRET MONITOR 

Lengthy 259 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, 4,000 tons 

Named for **Amphitrite" 

{Wife of Neptune and daughter of Oceanus) 

Launched June 7, 1883, at the yard of Harlan & 
HolHngsworth, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Sponsor: Miss Nellie Benson, daughter of Cap- 
tain N. R. Benson, of the Harlan & HoUingsworth Co. 

United states ship "Amphitrite" was engaged 
May 12, 1898, at San Juan, Porto Rico. Under fire 
July 5, 1898, off Cardenas, Cuba. 

ANNAPOLIS 
composite gunboat 

Length, i68 feet Beam, j6 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 1,010 tons 

Named for City of Annapolis, Maryland 

{The capital of Maryland and the seat of the United States Naval Academy) 

Launched December 23, 1896, at Crescent Ship- 
yard, Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Georgia Porter, daughter of Cap- 
tain Theodoric Porter, U. S. Navy. 

United states ship "Annapolis" was engaged 
July 15, 1898, Baracoa, Cuba, Spanish-American War. 

[71 



pU 0>-^*^ 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



ARKANSAS (3D) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 554 feet Beam, 93 feet Draft, 28 feet 

Displacement, 26,000 tons 

Named for the State of Arkansas 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1836) 

Launched January 14, 191 1, at New York Ship- 
building Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Louise Macon, Helena, 
Arkansas, daughter of Representative Robert B. 
Macon, Member of Congress from Arkansas. 

Among those present were Representative Macon; 
Honorable George von L. Meyer, Secretary of the 
Navy; Honorable Beekman Winthrop, Assistant Sec- 
retary of the Navy; Admiral of the Navy of the 
Argentine Republic; many United States Senators 
and Congressmen from Washington; a great throng 
of people, many of them having come all the way from 
Arkansas. 

While twenty thousand spectators watched in breath- 
less silence, Miss Mary Macon, a dainty Southern girl, 
shattered a bottle of sparkling champagne against 
the towering prow just as the great ship started its 
splendid poise and moved slowly and evenly into the 
Delaware. 



[8] 




Photo by New York Shipbuildibg€fi\^ U ^ 
LAUNCH OF U.S. BATTLESHIP "ARKANSAS "vi^'gt;^ .<y' 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 

ATLANTA (zd) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 277 feet Beam, 42 feet Draft, 16 feet, 10 inches 

Displacement, 3,000 tons 

Named for the City of Atlanta 

( The capital of Georgia) 

Launched October 9, 1884, at the shipyard of John 
Roach & Sons, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Jessie Lincoln (Mrs. J. L. Beck- 
with), daughter of Mr. Robert Lincoln, the Secretary 
of War under President Arthur. 

Among those present were Secretary of War Robert 
Lincoln, Secretary of the Navy William E. Chandler, 
Rear-Admiral Simpson, Rear-Admiral Jouett, and 
many distinguished officials. 

"y^ dauntless soul erect^ who smiled on death." 

AYLWIN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, SOS feet Beam, jo feet Draft, g feet 

Displacement, i,oio tons 

Named for Lieutenant John Cushing Aylwin, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 23, 191 2, at William Cramp 
& Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Joseph Wright Powell (Bertha 
Osterhout), wife of Mr. Joseph W. Powell, Assistant 

[9] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

to the President of the Cramp Shipbuilding Company, 
formerly a Constructor in the Navy, who resigned. 

Lieutenant AYLWIN was bom in Quebec, 
Canada. At the commencement of the War of 1812, 
he was asked by Captain Isaac Hull to go with him 
on the "Constitution," and April 24, 1812, was ap- 
pointed sailing master in the United States Navy. 
Took prominent part in the engagement, August 19, 
1 81 2, between the *' Constitution" and the *'Guer- 
riere." Was highly commended by Captain Hull 
for skill in handling and maneuvering the "Constitu- 
tion" during the fight. Was wounded in the shoulder. 
Commanded the forecastle division in action between 
the "Constitution" and the "Java," December 29, 
1 812, and was commended for bravery and coolness 
in action. Was severely wounded and died from 
effects of the wound, January 28, 18 13. 

In his journal Captain Hull speaks of him as a 
young ofllicer of great promise, and in the report of his 
death calls him "A dauntless soul erect, who smiled 
on death." 



A-i (Formerly PLUNGER) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 122 tons 

Launched February i, 1902, at Crescent Shipyard, 
Elizabethport, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Ernestine Wardwell, of Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

[10] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



A-2 (Formerly ADDER) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 122 tons 

Launched July 22, 1901, at Crescent Shipyard, 
EHzabeth, New Jersey. 

Spo7isor: Mrs. Wainwright. 

A-3 (Formerly GRAMPUS 3D) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 12^ tons 

Launched July 31, 1902, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California, for the J. P. Holland Tor- 
pedo Boat Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Marley F. Hay, wife of Superin- 
tendent of Construction at the Union Iron Works. 

A-4 (Formerly MOCCASIN) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 122 tons 

Launched June 13, 1903, at Crescent Shipyard, 
Elizabethport, New Jersey, for the J. P. Holland 
Torpedo Boat Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Rice. 

A-5 (Formerly PIKE) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 125 tons 

Launched January 14, 1903, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frank Baker Zahm, wife of Naval 
Constructor F. B. Zahm, U. S. Navy, on duty at 
Union Iron Works at the time. 

[II] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

A-6 (Formerly PORPOISE) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 122 tons 

Launched June 24, 1903, at Crescent Shipyard, 
Elizabethport, New Jersey, for J. P. Holland Torpedo 
Boat Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. E. B. Frost, wife of Mr. E. B. Frost, 
of the Crescent Shipyard. 

A-7 (Formerly SHARK) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 122 tons 

Launched June 24, 1903, at Crescent Shipyard, 
Elizabethport, New Jersey, for the J. P. Holland 
Torpf^do Boat Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Walter Stevens Turpin, wife of 
Lieutenant Commander Turpin, U. S. Navy, on duty 
at Crescent Shipyard at the time. 

BAGLEY 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, I S7 feet Beam, 17 feet Draft,/ hes 

Displacement, IJS tons 

Named for Ensign Worth Bagley. "' 

Launched September 25, 1900, at P 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Josephus Daniels (Aa. 
Bagley), eldest sister of Ensign Worth Bagle>. 

[12] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Eight representatives of Ensign Bagley's family 
were present. 

There were numbers of offerings of flowers sent by 
Spanish War Camps named for Ensign Worth Bagley, 
making the "Bagley" almost a ship of flowers, the 
prow having been covered with flowers bearing the 
name Bagley, given by Worth Bagley Camp, Spanish 
War Veterans of Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

A bronze memorial tablet, placed on the conning 
tower, and a bronze name-plate for the ship, were the 
gifts of his mother, Mrs. Adelaide Worth Bagley. 

Unusual interest was manifested in the launching, 
and delegations from various war camps and many 
naval officers were present. 

A bottle of champagne braided in ribbons of the 
national colors was used to baptize the ship. 

Ensign worth bagley, U. S. Navy, was 
born in Raleigh, North Carolina, April 6, 1874: was 
appointed Naval Cadet September, 1891; Ensign July, 
1897. Ensign Bagley was the first naval officer killed 
in action during the Spanish-American War of 1898. 
He served on the United States torpedo boat "Win- 
slow" and lost his life in its attack on batteries at 
Cardenas, Cuba, May 11, 1898. 

BAILEY 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 205 feet Beam, 19 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 280 ions 

Named for Rear-Admiral Theodorus Bailey, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 5, 1899, at Gas Engine and 
Power Company, Morris Heights, New Jersey. 

[13] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Florence Beekman Bailey (Mrs. 
Chester B. Lawrence), granddaughter of Rear-Admiral 
Theodorus Bailey, 

Rear-admiral theodorus bailey, United 

States Navy, was born in New York in 1805. 
Appointed Midshipman in 18 18. In the Mexican 
War, in command of the "Lexington," 1847-48, he 
distinguished himself in fitting out and leading expedi- 
tions against the enemy. In the Civil War he was 
Farragut's second in command in the battle of New 
Orleans. In the "Cayuga" led the attacks on Forts 
Jackson and St. Philip. Unguarded, accompanied by 
Lieutenant George H. Perkins, he faced a maddened 
crowd and formally demanded the surrender of New 
Orleans. Was officially commended by Farragut and 
chosen bearer of despatches to Washington announ- 
cing the victory. 

BAINBRIDGE (2d) 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 24s feet Beam, 23 feet Draft, g feet 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Commodore William Bainbridge, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 27, 1901, at Neafie & Levy Ship 
and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Bainbridge-Hoff (Mrs. Bertram 
Greene), great-granddaughter of Commodore William 
Bainbridge, and daughter of Captain William Bain- 
bridge-Hoff, U. S. Navy. 

Secretary of the Navy John D. Long was present. 

[141 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Commodore william bainbridge, United 

States Navy, was born in Princeton, New Jersey, in 
1774. In command of the "Norfolk," captured a 
number of French privateers. In command of the 
"Constitution" in 1812, captured the British frigate 
"Java," in which fight he was severely wounded. For 
gallantry in this fight he received a gold medal from 
Congress. 

BALCH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 305 feet Beam, 31 feet Draft, 9 feet 

Displacement, 1,010 tons 

Named for R ear-Admiral George Beall 
Balch, U. S. Navy 

Launched December 21, 191 2, at William Cramp 
& Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Grace Balch, daughter of Rear- 
Admiral George Beall Balch. 

In naming the ship. Miss Balch said: 

'** BALCH,' I name thee! 

Sail on, nor fear to breast the sea. 

Our hearts, our hopes are all with thee." 

Accompanying Miss Balch were Mrs. George Beall 
Balch, Stephen Bloomer Balch, Mr. and Mrs. Frede- 
rick E. Sears, Rev. and Mrs. George William Lay, Mr. 
and Mrs. Francis DuPont Balch, Mr. and Mrs. Mal- 
colm K. Gordon, Mrs. George V. Balch, and a number 
of guests. 

Rear-admiral george beall balch, 

United States Navy, was born in Shelbyville, Ten- 

[IS] 




SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

nessee in 1821. Appointed Acting Midshipman in 
1837. Was in the Mexican War from May, 1846, to 
its close. In the attack on Alvarado under Com- 
modore Conner and the joint bombardment with the 
Army at Vera Cruz, the surrender of that city, and 
San Juan d' Ulloa, March, 1847, and at the capture 
of Tampico. 

He was executive officer of the "Plymouth," 1851-55, 
with Commodore Perry in the Japan expedition. In 
command of the advance post at Shanghai, was 
wounded in a fight between rebels and Imperialists. 

In the Civil War performed many heroic services. 
In command of the "Pawnee" in 1863, saved General 
Terry's command when attacked by Confederate 
batteries. Engaged in the joint operations of Rear- 
Admiral Dahlgren's Navy forces and General Foster's 
Army forces in Stono River, South Carolina, in 1864, 
and in bombardment of Battery Pringle. In 1865, 
among other operations, successfully engaged Con- 
federate batteries at North Edisto, South Carolina. 

In recognition of his efficient services Commander 
Balch was advanced one grade, to the rank of Captain, 
in 1866. Commodore 1872, Rear-Admiral 1878. 



BALTIMORE (3D) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, J27 feet Beam, 48 feet Draft, ig feet 

Displacement, 4,413 tons 

Named for the City of Baltimore, Maryland 

Launched October 6, 1888, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

[16] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Theodore D. Wilson, wife of Chief 
Constructor Theodore D. Wilson, U. S. Navy. 

United states ship "Baltimore" was present 
at the War in Chili in 1891. Took part in the battle 
of Manila Bay, May i, 1898, Spanish-American War. 

BANCROFT 
training ship (gunboat) 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 32 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 82Q tons 

Named for George Bancroft 

American historian and statesman and founder of the United States Naval Academy 
at Annapolis, who was born at fVorcester, Massachusetts, October j, 1800. In 1845 
he entered President Polk's Cabinet as Secretary of the Navy, with the determination 
of founding a Naval Academy. Served until 184.6, when for a month he acted as 
Secretary of War. 

The "Bancroft" was launched April 13, 1892, at 
Crescent Shipyard, Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Frances Moore (Mrs. 
Charles Wight MacQuoid), daughter of Mr. Miller 
Moore, the Treasurer of the Shipbuilding Company, 
and granddaughter of Mr. Samuel L. Moore, the 
President of the Company. Miss Moore was invited 
by Secretary of the Navy Tracy to name the vessel. 

Miss Moore made a pretty picture as the wind tossed 
her blond hair and the long ribbons of her big hat. 
She cried in a clear voice: "I name thee 'Bancroft,'" 
and whirling the beribboned bottle around, smashed 
it upon the bow. The ship slid away like a bird, her 
deck covered with cheering people, while every whistle 
tooted wildly and the great crowd set up a shout. 

Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Miller F. 
Moore, Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Moore, George W. Mel- 

[17] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

ville, Chief of Bureau of Steam Engineering, U. S. 
Navy, Chief Constructor Wilson, U. S. Navy, and 
many other prominent officials. 



BARNEY 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 157 feet Beam, 17 feet Draft, 4 feet, 11 inches 

Displacement, 775 tons 

Named for Commodore Joshua Barney, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 28, 1900, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Esther Nicholson Barney, of 
Fredericksburg, Virginia, daughter of Captain Joseph 
N. Barney, and a great-granddaughter of Commodore 
Joshua Barney, for whom the vessel is named. Miss 
Barney's great-grandmother was a sister of Commodore 
Samuel Nicholson and Commodore James Nicholson. 

Miss Barney was accompanied by her mother, Mrs. 
J. N. Barney; her sister, Mrs. J. W. Adams; and her 
nephew, Nicholas Barney Adams, of Fredericksburg, 
Virginia. 

Commodore joshua barney. United states 

Navy, was born in Baltimore in 1759. He was for 
some time in the French Navy. Was very active in 
the Revolutionary War, and, among other deeds, led 
a boarding party in the capture of the ship "Charming 
Molly." In command of the "Hyder Ali," of 16 guns, 
captured the British sloop-of-war "General Monk," 
of 18 guns, off Cape May. Was wounded at the battle 
of Bladensburg. 
[18] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



BARRY (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 24.5 jeet. Beam, 23 feet Draft, 6 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Commodore John Barry, U. S. Navy 

Launched March 22, 1902, at Neafie & Levy Ship 
and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Sponsor: Miss Charlotte Adams Barnes, great- 
grandniece of Commodore John Barry. 

A special jubilee of all the Irish Societies was made 
on this occasion. 

Commodore john barry, United states 

Navy, was born in Ireland in 1745. He received one 
of the first commissions in the Navy. In 1776 com- 
manded the "Lexington," the first cruiser to sail, and 
captured the British schooner "Edward," the first 
Navy prize. In 1781, returning from conveying to 
France our Minister Laurens in the "Alliance," he 
captured the "Atalanta" and "Trepassa," and was 
severely wounded. He held many important com- 
m.ands and was one of the bravest and most daring of 
officers. He was the third Commander-in-Chief of 
the Navy. 



[19] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

BE ALE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet - Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Edward Fitzgerald 
Beale, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 30, 1912, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John R. McLean (Emily Beale), 
Washington, District of Columbia, daughter of Lieu- 
tenant Edward Fitzgerald Beale, U. S. Navy. 

Among those present were the Russian Ambassador 
and Mme. Bahkmetieff, the latter another daughter of 
Lieutenant Beale, and Mr. and Mrs. Edward Beale 
McLean, his grandchildren. 

Lieutenant edward fitzgerald 

BEALE, United States Navy, afterwards General 
Beale, United States Army, whose father and grand- 
father served in the United States Navy and were 
awarded medals of honor by Congress, was graduated 
from the Naval Academy in 1842. 

During the War with Mexico he distinguished him- 
self by carrying despatches through the enemy's lines, 
and was presented with a sword by his fellow-officers 
for his gallant services. He was commended for con- 
spicuous bravery by Commodore Stockton. 

After this War he resigned to become Superintend- 
ent of Indian Affairs. He was given rank of Major- 
General and detailed to terminate the Indian War in 
California. 

He became Minister to Austria under President Grant. 

[20] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



BENHAM 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 505 feet Beam, j/ feet Draft, 9 feet 

Displacement, 1,010 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Andrew Ellicott 
Kennedy Benham, U. S. Navy 

Launched March 22, 191 3, at WilHam Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Edith Wallace Benham, only 
daughter of Rear-Admiral Andrew E. K. Benham, U. S. 
Navy. Miss Benham broke a bottle of champagne 
upon the bow of the vessel, saying: "'Benham' I name 
thee, in the name of the United States." Master 
Harry Benham, grandson of Rear-Admiral Benham, 
and son of the late Lieutenant Henry Kennedy 
Benham, U. S. Navy, helped to saw away the last 
block that held the ship. The little boy exclaimed: 
"There she goes! / did it." 

Accompanying Miss Benham were Miss Emily 
Benham, sister of Rear-Admiral Benham; Master 
Harry Benham and his mother, Mrs. Philip Walker; 
Rear-Admiral Charles E. Clark, who commanded the 
"Oregon" in the Spanish-American War; Mrs. Clark; 
Rear-Admiral Willard H. Brownson, whose ship "De- 
troit" was ordered by Admiral Benham to fire the 
shot at the Brazilian insurgents' ship that ended the 
Revolution in January, 1894; Captain Albert W. 
Grant, who was navigator of the "San Francisco," 
Rear-Admiral Benham's flagship; Lieutenant W. H. 
Faust, who was Rear-Admiral Benham's flag secre- 
tary; Captain Reynold T. Hall and Mrs. Hall; Naval 
Constructor Elliot Snow and Mrs. Snow. 

[21] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Rear-admiral andrew ellicot Ken- 
nedy BENHAM, U. S. Navy, was bom at Staten 
Island, New York, April lo, 1832; appointed Midship- 
man in 1847; served on the brig "Dolphin" in the 
East India squadron, 1 847-1 850; was wounded during 
the capture of a piratical Chinese junk near Macao, 
China; in Brazil squadron and Paraguay expeditions 
1858-1859; South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in 
1 861-1862; took part in the battle of Port Royal; 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron 1 863-1 865, when his 
ship was at sea for thirteen months without going into 
port; in command of North Atlantic Station 1 892-1 893 ; 
ordered to Brazil in 1893, in chief command during the 
rebellion. On January 29, 1894, he took action to 
prevent the insurgent Brazilian Navy from interfer- 
ing with United States merchant vessels in innocent 
and regular operations of loading and unloading at the 
wharves of Rio Janeiro, that city being in the hands 
of the regular government. For this action, which set 
a new precedent in international law, he received the 
commendation of the United States Government 
and the approval of his countrymen. He retired later 
in 1894. Upon his giving up command the Secretary 
of the Navy, the Hon. Hilary A. Herbert, wrote him a 
letter, as follows: 

"Sir, — Upon your retirement from active service I desire to 
express to you the Department's appreciation of the abihty and 
good judgment shown by you in guarding American interests while 
in command of the South Atlantic squadron. 

"Your prompt and decisive action at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 
in giving full protection to United States commerce merits 
especial commendation, and I congratulate you upon such a 
happy termination of a long and honorable career on the active 
list in the Navy." 

[22] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



He died at Lake Mahopac, New York, on August 
II, 1905. 

Rear-Admiral Benham's father. Commander Timo- 
thy Green Benham, U. S. Navy, was born near New 
Haven, Connecticut, August 10, 1793. Midshipman 
in 1 8 14. Served in Commodore Porter's squadron in 
the West Indies for the suppression of piracy and 
was wounded in an encounter with pirates. Had dis- 
tinguished service during the Mexican War in com- 
mand of the "Bonita," and took an active part in 
the expedition against Vera Cruz, Alvarado, Trontero, 
Tobasco and Laguna les Terminos in 1846. Died 
June 17, 1861, at Staten Island, New York. 

Lieutenant Henry Kennedy Benham, United States 
Navy, son of Rear-Admiral A. E. K. Benham, was born 
July 27, 1867; appointed Midshipman in 1884; at- 
tached to the "Marietta'* when with the *' Oregon" 
she made the memorable voyage from the Pacific to 
the Atlantic in 1898, Spanish-American War. He 
died when in command of the "Truxtun," April 8, 1904. 

BENNINGTON 

GUNBOAT 

Length, 230 feet Beam, j(5 feet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, 1,710 tons 

Named for the Town of Bennington, Vermont 

{In commemoration of the Battle of Bennington, Aug. 16, 1777) 

Launched June 3, 1890, at N. F. Palmer & Com- 
pany, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Anne Aston, daughter of Chief 
Engineer Ralph Aston, U. S. Navy, Inspector of 
Machinery for the United States Navy at Chester at 
that time. 

[23] 



BUIC 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

BIDDLE 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 157 feet Beam, 17 feet Draft, 4 feet, 11 inches 

Displacement, ij^ tons 

Named for Captain Nicholas Biddle, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched May i8, 1901, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Emily B. Biddle (Mrs. Charles 
West Churchman), of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
great-great-grandniece of Captain Nicholas Biddle. 

Captain Nicholas biddle, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Philadelphia in 1750. He was in command 
of "Andrea Doria," 16 guns, in 1775, and captured 
so many prizes that he had but five of his original 
crew when he returned to the Delaware River. Sailed 
not long after from Charleston, South Carolina, and in 
a few days came back with four prizes. In engage- 
ment with the "Yarmouth," 64 guns, March, 1778, 
his ship, the "Randolph," 32 guns, blew up and the 
gallant Biddle and three hundred men perished in a 
blaze of glory. 

BIRMINGHAM 

UNARMORED SCOUT CRUISER 

Length, 420 feet Beam, 47 feet Draft, 16 feet 

Displacement, 3,750 tons 

Named for the City of Birmingham, Alabama 

Launched May 29, 1907, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

[24] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Mary Campbell (Mrs. Lewis Under- 
wood), daughter of Mr. E. K. Campbell, a prominent 
la\vyer of Birmingham, Alabama. 

A PARTY of thirty people went up from Birming- 
ham. Eight young Birmingham girls were Maids of 
Honor, selected for prominence of families. 



BLAKELEY 
torpedo boat 

Length, IJS jeet Beam, ij feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 196 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Johnston Blakeley, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 23, 1900, at George Lawley 
& Son Corporation, Boston, Mass. 

Sponsor: Miss Nellie M. White, Winchenden 
Springs, Massachusetts, a relative of Hon. John D. 
Long, Secretary of the Navy. 

Captain johnston blakeley, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Ireland in 1781. Was appointed Mid- 
shipman in 1800. In 1 81 3, in command of the *' En- 
terprise," captured the privateer "Fly." In 18 14, in 
the "Wasp," captured H. B. M. S. "Reindeer" by 
superior gunnery. Congress voted him a gold medal. 
He cut out the "Mary" with military stores from 
under the guns of the "Armada," 74 guns. Sank the 
"Avon." Captured the "Atalanta." He was lost at 
sea in the "Wasp," in 18 14. 

[25] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

BOXER (4th) 

WOODEN BARKENTINE TRAINING 

SHIP 

Length, Ii8 feet Beam, 2g feet Draft, 9 feet 

Displacement, 346 tons 

Named for the Brig Boxer 

{Captured by the U. S. brig "Enterprise" in 1813) 

Launched October ii, 1904, at the Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire.^ 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Drury (Mrs. James Harvey 
Tomb), daughter of Pay Director Hiram E. Drury, 
U. S. Navy. 

BRANDYWINE 

FRIGATE 

Forty-four guns Tonnage, 1825 

Named for Brandywine Creek 

{The scene of the battle of Brandywine, Sept. Ii, 1777) 

Launched June i6, 1825, at the Navy Yard, Washing- 
ton, District of Columbia. 

Sponsor: Captain Marmaduke Dove, U. S. Navy. 

"About eight o'clock we observed the President of the United 
States on the main deck of the frigate standing near Lieutenants 
Skinner and Piatt of the Navy. We also observed officers of the 
Yard on board, among whom we recognized Colonel Briarly, and 
near the bows Captain Dove with a bottle in his hand to be em- 
ployed in the usual ceremony of christening. On the wharf stood 
Commodore Tingey and his lady and a number of spectators. 
Alongside the wharf in a gunboat moored near for the purpose was 
Judge Southard, Secretary of the Navy, his wife and daughter. 
The ship smote the water in fine style and Captain Dove, sta- 

[26] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 

Lieutenant william burrows, United 

States Navy, was a Midshipman in 1799. He dis- 
tinguished himself at TripoH. He died on the American 
brig "Enterprise" during the fight with the British 
brig "Boxer" September 13, 1813. He encouraged 
his men by calhng to them, "Stand fast, and the day 
will soon be ours." 

Among the many men prominent in early colonial 
history, numbered in the Burrows family, was Major 
Robert Pike, prominent in the King Philip War, 
because of his opposition to the Salem Witchcraft 
delusion, and for his liberality and breadth of view 
on religious questions. His life has been published 
under the title of The New Puritan. 

B-i (Formerly VIPER) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 170 tons 

Launched March 30, 1907, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Electric 
Boat Company, of New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Lawrence Y. Spear, wife of Vice- 
President Lawrence Y. Spear, of the Electric Boat 
Company, formerly a Naval Constructor, U. S. Navy, 
who resigned. 

B-2 (Formerly CUTTLEFISH) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, lyo tons 

Launched September i, 1906, at Fore River Ship- 
building Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Elec- 
tric Boat Company, of New York. 

[29] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor Gow, young daughter of 
Commander John L. Gow, U. S. Navy, on duty at 
Fore River at the time. 



B-3 (Formerly TARANTULA) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, lyo tons 

Launched March 30, 1907, at Fore River Ship- 
building Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Elec- 
tric Boat Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George Stanley Radford, wife 
of Naval Constructor G. S. Radford, U. S. Navy, 
on duty at Fore River Shipbuilding Company at the 
time. 

CALIFORNIA 
armored cruiser 

Length, $02 feet Beam, 6g feet Draft, 24. feet 

Displacement, 13,680 tons 

Named for the State of California 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1850) 

Launched April 28, 1904, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Florence Pardee, daughter of 
Governor George C. Pardee, of California. 

Mrs. Walter S. Martin, daughter of Henry T. Scott, 
President of the Union Iron Works, pressed the button 
starting the ship. 

The launching took place under the auspices of the 
Native Sons of the Golden West. 

[30] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



CANANDAIGUA 

STEAM SLOOP 

Tonnage, 1,395 Seven guns 

Named for Canandaigua River 

Launched March 28, 1862, at the Navy Yard, 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

Sponsors: Mrs. J. W. Stone, of Dorchester, and 
Mrs. J. B. Dow, of Boston, each broke a bottle on 
her bow and announced her name, as the National 
Flag was unfurled at her bow, main and stern. 

United states ship "Canandaigua," in 1863 
took part in operations off Charleston, South Carolina. 
Rescued the officers and crew of the "Housatonic" 
sunk by a torpedo off Charleston, February 17, 1864. 

CANONICUS 
single turret monitor 

Two guns Tonnage, i,oj2 

Named for Canonicus 

{Chief of the Narragansett Indians, who gave to Roger Williams the land on which 
Providence, R. I., was founded in 1636) 

Launched August i, 1863, at the yard of Harrison 
Loring, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Macomb, daughter of Chief Engineer 
Macomb, U. S. Navy, christened the battery as it 
touched the water. 

1 HE U. S. S. "Canonicus" engaged the battery at 
Howlett's, James River, in 1864. Took part in at- 
tacks on Fort Fisher in 1864. Was struck thirty-six 
times the first day. Was under fire at Fort Moultrie. 

[31] 



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CASSIN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Tonnage ifiio 

Named for Captain Stephen Cassin, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 20, 191 3, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Cassin Carusi, great- 
granddaughter of Captain Stephen Cassin. 

Captain Stephen cassin was bom in Phil- 
adelphia in 1783. Entered the Navy as Midshipman 
in 1800. He served with distinction in Tripoh. In War 
of 1812 commanded *'Ticonderoga" in battle of Lake 
Champlain, and was rewarded by Congress with a gold 
medal for bravery in that action. Four of the enemy's 
gunboats united in an attack upon the "Ticonderoga," 
again and again coming almost within grappling dis- 
tance, but were as often repulsed. 

CASTINE 

GUNBOAT 

Length, 204 feet Beam, 32 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 1,177 ^^'"■^ 

Named for the City of Castine, Maine 

Launched May ii, 1892, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Martha Highborn (Mrs. Paul 
Pearsall), daughter of Chief Constructor Philip Hich- 
born, United States Navy. 

[32] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



U. S. S. "Castine" was attached to the Atlantic fleet, 
Spanish-American War. Under fire July 5, 1898, at 
Mariel, Cuba. 

CHARLESTON (ist) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Displacement, 4,040 tons 

Named for the City of Charleston, South 

Carolina 

Launched July 19, 1888, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice Scott (Mrs. Alice Scott 
Smith), San Francisco, California, daughter of the 
President of the Union Iron Works. 

1 HE United States ship *' Charleston'* took Island 
of Guam, 1898, during the Spanish-American War. 
Struck an uncharted reef north of Luzon Island, in 
1899, and was lost. 



CHARLESTON (20) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 424 feet Beam, 66 feet Draft, 22 feet 

Displacement, 9,^00 tons 

Named for City of Charleston, South Carolina, 
AND for U. S. S. "Charleston" 

Launched January 23, 1904, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Rhett (Mrs. Theodore J. 
Simons, Jr.), daughter of the Mayor of Charleston, 
South Carolina. 

[33] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

CHATTANOOGA (2d) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 2g2 feet Beam, 44 feet Draft 1$ feet, p inches 

Displacement, 3,200 tons 

Named for the City of Chattanooga, 
Tennessee 

Launched March 7, 1903, at Crescent Shipyard, 
EHzabeth, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Lilian Nell Chambliss, daughter 
of the Mayor of Chattanooga, Tennessee. Miss 
Frances Bond and Miss Rieta Faxon were Maids of 
Honor. 

CHAUNCEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 245 feet Beam, 23 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Commodore Isaac Chauncey, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 26, 1901, at Neafie & Levy Ship 
and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Mae Chauncey Stanton Todd, 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, great-granddaughter of 
Commodore Chauncey. 

Commodore isaac chauncey, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Black Rock, Connecticut, in 1772. En- 
tered the Navy as a Lieutenant in 1799. In 1802 was 
appointed Acting Captain of the frigate "Chesapeake," 

[34] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



the flagship of Commodore Valentine Morris' squadron 
against TripoH. Bore distinguished part in operations 
against Tripoli. In War of 1812 was appointed to 
command on all the Lakes except Champlain. Under 
his direction the major part of our fleet on the Great 
Lakes was built and afterwards used successfully at 
York (now Toronto) and along the whole of the Niagara 
frontier, especially against Sir James Yeo's fleet. He 
is described as "A model of gallantry, energy and skill.'* 

CHESTER 

UNARMORED SCOUT CRUISER 

Length, 420 feet Beam, 4.7 feet Draft, 16 feet, p inches 

Displacement, 3,750 tons 

Named for the City of Chester 

{The oldest town in Pennsylvania) 

Launched June 26, 1907, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Wallace Sproul, Chester, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of State Senator William C. 
Sproul. 

CHEYENNE (Formerly WYOMING) 

SINGLE turret MONITOR 

Length, 252 feet Beam, 50 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 3,225 tons 

Renamed for the City of Cheyenne 

( The capital of Wyoming) 

Launched September 8, 1900, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Hattie Warren (Mrs. John J. 
Pershing), daughter of United States Senator Francis 

[35] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

E. Warren, of Wyoming, named the Monitor "Wyo- 
ming" for the State of Wyoming. Governor Richards 
and staff, of Wyoming, were present. 

« 

CHICAGO 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 32^ feet Beam, 48 feet Draft, ig feet 

Displacement, 4,500 tons 

Named for the City of Chicago, Illinois 

Launched December 5, 1885, at John Roach & 
Sons', Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Edith Cleborne (Mrs. Henry W. 
B. Glover), daughter of Medical Director Cuthbert 
J. Cleborne, U. S. Navy. 

Mr. Du Bosy, according to a Japanese custom, let 
loose three birds at the moment of launching with 
red, white and blue ribbons around necks. In Japan 
doves were originally believed to be messengers of 
Hachiman, the warrior's patron god, and their use at 
the launching of the warship meant wishing success 
in arms. 

The U. S. S. "Chicago" was attached to the North 
Atlantic Fleet in the Spanish-American War. 

CINCINNATI (2d) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 300 feet Beam, 42 feet Draft, 18 feet 

Displacement, 3,181 tons 

Named for the City of Cincinnati, Ohio 

Launched November lo, 1892, at the Navy Yard, 
New York, N. Y. 
[36] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Stella Mosby, daughter of the 
Mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The U. S. S. "Cincinnati" was under fire April 27, 
1898, off Matanzas, Spanish-American War. 



CLEVELAND 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 292 feet Beam, 44 feet Draft, IS feet 

Displacement, 3,200 tons 

Named for the City of Cleveland, Ohio 

Launched September 28, 1901, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Ruth Hanna (Mrs. Medill McCor- 
mick), daughter of United States Senator Mark Hanna 
of Ohio. 

COLORADO (1ST) 

STEAM FRIGATE 

Tons, 34.00 Guns, 40 

Named for Colorado River 

Launched June 19, 1856, at the Navy Yard, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Nannie Seddon Dornin (Mrs. 
Joseph N. Barney), daughter of Captain Thomas A. 
Dornin, U. S. Navy. 

In her own words : "Accompanied by her father, Com- 
modore Thomas A. Dornin, commanding the Navy Yard at 

[37] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Norfolk, and by a distinguished company of Naval officers, 
she went on board the vessel, then in the immense shiphouse. 

"While waiting for the signal to break the bottle of wine, 
an old sailor said: 'Miss Nannie, let me wipe off the bottle 
for you first.' Having been brought up in the Navy and 
acquainted with sailor tricks, Miss Dornin declined with 
thanks, fearing he would substitute water for the wine. 

"The launching was a beautiful one, and as the 'Colo- 
rado' glided into the water, salutes were fired from the old 
'Pennsylvania* and two other men-of-war which were off the 
Yard. The whistles of numerous steamboats, the cheers 
from hundreds of spectators assembled on the shore, made 
it almost impossible to hear the various bands. After quiet 
was restored, Miss Dornin was placed in a chair covered 
with a United States Flag, and shipped over the ship's side 
on to the deck of a steamer and landed at the Navy Yard, 
where she marched to the Commodore's house, preceded by 
the band and escorted by a large company of Naval officers, 
the Mayors of Norfolk and Portsmouth, and many distin- 
guished men. 

"An elegant collation was served at the Commodore's 
house, where Miss Dornin assisted her father and mother in 
receiving the guests. A ball was given in her honor when 
the 'Colorado' was commissioned, and she stood with the 
Admiral to receive the guests." 

1 HE U. S. S. "Colorado" ist, in 1861, took part in 
the attack on Pensacola, Florida. In 1862 engaged 
four Confederate steamers off S. W. Pass. In 1863 
engaged in all bombardments and assaults on Fort 
Fisher. 



[38] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



COLORADO (2d) 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 502 feet Beam, 69 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 13,680 tons 

Named for the State of Colorado 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1876) 

Launched April 25, 1903, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Cora M. Peabody (Mrs. James 
Grafton Rogers), daughter of James Hamilton Pea- 
body, Governor of Colorado. 

1 HOSE on the upper stand were Governor and 
Mrs. James H. Peabody, Miss Jessie Peabody, Mrs. 
James Peabody, Mayor Wright of Denver, Mrs. C. 
C. Welsh and daughters, Attorney-General and Mrs. 
Miller, Otto Mears, Ex-Governor and Mrs. J. B. 
Grant, all from Denver. 

Others on the stand were Mayor Weaver of Phila- 
delphia, Assistant Secretary of the Navy and Mrs. 
Darling, Assistant Secretary of State Francis B. 
Loomis; Chebik Bey, Turkish Embassy; Senor Riano, 
Spanish Embassy; Captain Borelskoff, Russian Lega- 
tion ; Commander Takahira, Japanese Legation ; many 
Admirals and officers of the United States Navy. 

The din of ten score wedges, the noise of twin saws, 
and the cries of hordes of workmen were all lost in 
the mighty shout and the screech of whistles that 
announced the successful launching of the "Colorado." 

High up on the ways the great ship rested in her 
cradle. In the wonderful pageant Miss Cora Peabody 

[39] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Stood the central figure and 20,000 people cheered 
as she smashed the gaily decorated bottle. The 
champagne sprayed the sponsor but she was too busy 
cheering to mind. "Colorado — Hurrah" was the 
launching cry and it went up with a mighty shout. 
After the launch a banquet was served to a large 
number of guests at the shipyard. 

COLUMBIA (sth) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 411 feet Beam, $8 feet Draft, 22 feet 

Displacement, 7,350 tons 

Named for the District of Columbia 

Launched July 26, 1892, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Morton, daughter of Hon. 
Levi P. Morton, Vice-President of the United States. 

United states ship "Columbia" was with the 
North Atlantic Fleet, Spanish-American War. 

CONCORD (2d) 
gunboat 

Length, 230 feet Beam, 36 feet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, ijio tons 

Named for City of Concord, Massachusetts 

{The scene of the Battle of Concord, in 1775) 

Launched March 8, 1890, at John Roach & Son's, 
Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Minnie Darlington Coates, daugh- 
ter of Major Joseph R. T. Coates, Mayor of Chester, 
Pennsylvania. 

[40] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Among those present were Judge John S. Keyes, 
Daniel Chester French, the sculptor, and representa- 
tives from Concord, Massachusetts. 

J. HE U. S. S. " Concord '* was in Commodore 
George Dewey's squadron in the Battle of Manila 
Bay, May, i, 1898, Spanish-American War. 

CONNECTICUT (4TH) 

FIRST CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 450 Beamy 76 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 16,000 tons 

Named for the State of Connecticut 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched September 29, 1904, at the Navy Yard, 
New York, N. Y. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice Wells, New York City, N. Y., 
daughter of Mr. Edgar F. Wells, and granddaughter 
of Gideon Wells, of Connecticut, Secretary of Navy 
during Civil War. 

CONSTITUTION 
wooden sailing ship 

44 guns 
Displacement, 2,200 tons 

Named in Honor of the Constitution of the 

United States 

Launched October 21, 1797, at Navy Yard, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Captain James Sever, whose ship was 
on the stocks at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, await- 

[41] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

ing an action, went down to break a bottle of wine 
over her bow. 

He stood at the heel of the bowsprit, and according 
to time-honored usage, baptized the ship with a bottle 
of choice Madeira, from the cellar of the Honorable 
Thomas Russell, a leading Boston merchant. 

The people began to assemble at daylight to witness 
the launching, the firing of a gun being the signal 
that all was propitious. In the words of a newspaper 
writer of the day: "At fifteen minutes after twelve, 
at the first stroke of the spur shores, she commenced 
a movement into the water with such steadiness, 
majesty and exactness as to fill every heart with 
sensations of joy and delight." 

" Saturday last, about half after twelve o'clock, the 
United States Ship 'Constitution' entered her destined 
element. She had a fine launch, without any acci- 
dent happening, after which there was a discharge of 
sixteen guns. The 'Constitution' was originally to 
have been launched September 20th but disappointed 
a large number of people by sticking on the ways." — 
Boston Gazette J Monday, October 23, 1797. 

"We were in hopes this day to have announced 
the launch of the frigate 'Constitution.' But after 
two attempts on Wednesday and Friday to set her 
afloat, she now remains in perfect safety on the ways 
on which she was constructed." — Boston Weekly 
Gazette, Sept. 25, 1797. 

"Among the respectable spectators on the occasion 
was the Chief Magistrate of the United States, the 
Governor and Lieutenant Governor of this Common- 
wealth." — Boston Mercury y Sept. 22, 1797. 

"First, her timbers are of our own growth and 
excellent. Second, her figure is like the 'Constitu- 

[42 1 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



tion/ beautiful, and she carries at her head the figure 
of Hercules. Third, the most important part of her 
as regards the safety of her people and which is im- 
mersed in a treacherous element, is covered with 
copper to secure her against those small vermin who 
like our Jacobins work out of sight secretly and insidi- 
ously." — Columbian Sentinel, Sept. 20, 1797. 

1 HE U. S. frigate "Constitution" was famous in the 
Tripolitan War, 1804. Known as *'01d Ironsides" for 
strength and good fighting in War of 18 12. Captured 
five British vessels of war and ten other British 
vessels. Rebuilt by Order of Congress and now at 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

** After you. Pilot** — Craven 

T. A. M. CRAVEN 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 147 feet Beam, 16 feet Draft, 4. feet, 7 inches 

Displacement, 146 tons 

Named for Captain Tunis Augustus Macdonough 

Craven, U. S. Navy 

Launched September 25, 1899, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Spo?isor: Miss Amy Craven, daughter of Mr. 
Alfred E. Craven, and granddaughter of Captain T. 
A. M. Craven. 

Those present were Mrs. Frank Learned, daughter 
of Captain T. A. M. Craven; Naval Constructor 
Lloyd Bankson, U. S. Navy, Lieutenant Commander 
Nauman, U. S. Navy, and oflSicials of the Bath Iron 
Works. 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Captain tunis Augustus macdonough 

CRAVEN, U. S. Navy, was born in Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, January ii, 1813. Appointed Mid- 
shipman in 1829. As a Lieutenant on the U. S. S. 
**Dale," served with distinction in battles of the 
Mexican War. From 1850 to 1857 in command 
of the "Corwin" on Coast Survey duty. In 1857, 
in command of the Atrato Expedition, surveyed a 
route for a proposed ship canal through the Isthmus 
of Darien via the Atrato and Truando rivers. In 
1859, in command of the "Mohawk," captured two 
slave ships, one the "Wildfire," with five hundred 
slaves. The ship was taken to Key West; the slaves 
were sent back to Africa. 

In i860 saved the crew of the "Bella," a foundering 
Spanish vessel, for which he was given a gold medal 
and a diploma by Queen Isabella II. In 1861, in 
command of the "Crusader," performed conspicuous 
blockade service off the Florida Coast. In the "Tus- 
carora," 1861-1863, performed with distinction special 
blockade service in European waters. 

In command of the "Tecumseh," April, 1864, joined 
Admiral Lee's squadron in the James River. Joined 
Admiral Farragut's fleet August 4, 1864, at sunset 
for the attack on Mobile. On August 5, 1864, the 
fleet steamed up Mobile Bay, the "Tecumseh" leading 
the attack. The first gun was fired by the " Tecumseh " 
at six forty-seven. At seven fifteen the "Tecumseh" 
was struck by a torpedo and sank almost immediately, 
carrying down her gallant commander. His death 
was characterized by an incident that revealed his 
heroism and chivalry. At the moment of the explosion 
Captain Craven and the pilot were in the tower over 
the turret. There was no way of escape except through 

[44] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



a narrow opening, just sufficient for one to pass through. 
Seeing the inevitable fate of the vessel, both instinc- 
tively made for the opening. When they reached the 
place together Captain Craven drew back, saying, 
"After you, Pilot." The pilot, Collins, who escaped 
to tell of the act of heroism, relates: "There was 
nothing after me; as I got out the vessel seemed to 
drop from under me." Captain Craven has been 
called "the Sidney of the American Navy," and his 
heroism has been the theme of poet and historian. 

CUMBERLAND (2d) 

STEEL TRAINING SHIP 

Length, 176 feet Beam, 45 feet Draft, 16 feet 

Displacement, 1,800 tons 

Named for the Cumberland River and U. S. S. 

"Cumberland" 

Launched August 17, 1904, at the Navy Yard, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Pauline Morton (Mrs. J. Hopkins 
Smith), daughter of the Hon. Paul Morton, Secretary 
of the Navy. 

Among those present were Secretary of Navy Paul 
Morton and Governor John L. Bates of Massachu- 
setts. 

Noteworthy in connection with the launching was 
that Peter Morton, of Charlestown, one of the sur- 
vivors of the crew of the "Cumberland" of Civil War 
fame, broke out the Stars and Stripes from the tem- 
porary staff at the ship's stern. 

Among the spectators was Miss Mary Sweetser, of 
New York, who witnessed the launch of the old "Cum- 
berland " fifty years before. 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



GUSHING 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 138 feet Beam, 14 feet Draft, 4 feet 10 inches 

Displacement, 105 tons 

Named for Commander William Barker Gushing, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched January 23, 1890, at Herreshoff Manu- 
facturing Gompany, Bristol, Rhode Island. 

Sponsor: Miss Katherine B. Herreshoff (Mrs. 
Amidon), daughter of Mr, John B. Herreshoff, Presi- 
dent of the Herreshoff Mfg. Go. 

Commander william barker gushing, 

U. S. Navy, was born in Delafield, Wisconsin, in 1842. 
His career was filled with daring planning and clever 
execution. He was especially distinguished for the 
destruction of the Confederate ram "Albemarle." He 
undertook the attack with a steam launch carrying a 
spar torpedo and towing an armed cutter. When near 
the "Albemarle" he was detected but pushed forward 
under a shower of bullets and fire of howitzers. He 
had time to drive the steam launch over the baulks 
and to explode the torpedo against the "Albemarle," 
sinking her, before his launch was destroyed. Gushing 
and one other escaped, the rest were captured. For 
destroying the "Albemarle" he received the thanks of 
Congress and promotion to Lieutenant Commander. 



[46] 



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C-i (Formerly OCTOPUS) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched October, 4, 1906, at Fore River Ship- 
building Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Electric 
Boat Company, of New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Frances Webster, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, a granddaughter of the President of the 
Old Colony Bank of Boston. 

C-2 (Formerly STINGRAY) 
submarine torpedo boat 

Launched April 8, 1909, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Electric Boat 
Company, of New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Stevens, New Bedford, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Naval Constructor William 
B. Ferguson, U. S. Navy. 

C-3 (Formerly TARPON) 
submarine torpedo boat 

Launched April 8, 1909, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Electric Boat 
Company, of New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Katherine Theiss, daughter of 
Commander Emil Theiss, U. S. Navy, Inspector of 
Machinery for U. S. Navy at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company at the time. 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

C-4 (Formerly BONITA) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched June i6, 1909, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Julius Curtis Townsend, wife of 
Lieutenant JuHus C. Townsend, U. S. Navy, stationed 
at Fore River at that time. 

C-5 (Formerly SNAPPER) 
submarine torpedo boat 

Launched June 16, 1909, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Electric Boat 
Company of New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice Nicoll, daughter of Dr. 
Matthias Nicoll, of New York City, and a niece of 
Mrs. Shear, wife of one of the Vice-Presidents of the 
Electric Boat Company. 

DAHLGREN 
torpedo boat 

Length, 147 feet Beam, 16 feet Draft, 4 feet, 7 inches 

Displacement, 147 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral John Adolph Dahlgren, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 29, 1899, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John Vinton Dahlgren (Mrs. 
Harry Symes Lehr), wife of the youngest son of Rear- 
Admiral Dahlgren, christened the destroyer with a 

[48] 




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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



bottle of champagne provided by the Colonial Dames 
of America. 

Among the speakers at the banquet was Judge 
Charles Croley, who was with Admiral Dahlgren when 
his vessel, the "Harriet Morse," was blown up by a 
torpedo at Georgetown Inlet. 

Rear-admiral john a. dahlgren, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Philadelphia in 1809. Appointed 
Midshipman in 1826. In 1847-57 when on ordnance 
duty, invented the famous Dahlgren gun, introduced 
howitzers afloat and ashore, and wrote important 
works on ordnance. In 1861, when ordnance officer at 
the Washington Navy Yard, Congress promoted him 
to command of the yard for conspicuous services after 
all other officers had resigned and left him alone with 
Lieutenant Wainwright to defend the yard. 

In 1863, in command of South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, he co-operated with General Gillmore in 
the occupation of Morris Island and destruction of 
Fort Sumter, South Carolina. In 1864 his squadron 
co-operated with General Sherman in the occupation 
of Savannah. In 1865 his squadron occupied Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, after the evacuation, and George- 
town. He was twice Chief of Bureau of Ordnance. 



DALE (1ST) 

SLOOP OF WAR 

Tons, 675 Guns, 8 

Named for Commodore Richard Dale, U. S. Navy 

Launched November 8, 1839, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Sponsor: Commander John M. Dale, U. S. Navy, 
son of Commodore Richard Dale, U. S. Navy, of 
Revolutionary fame. 

"On the occasion of the launching Commander 
Dale wore the sword presented to John Paul Jones 
by Louis XVI of France. The sword came into the 
possession of Commodore Richard Dale after the 
death of John Paul Jones. " — Niles Register. 



DALE (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 24S feet Beam, 23 feet Draft, 6 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Commodore Richard Dale, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 24, 1 901, at the Yard of William H. 
Trigg & Co., Richmond, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Hasell Wilson (Mrs. John 
Trevor Gibson), of Philadelphia, daughter of Mr. 
Joseph M. Wilson. 

Commodore richard dale, u. s. Navy, 

was born November 6, 1756, in Virginia. Was ap- 
pointed Midshipman July, 1776. He was captured 
and imprisoned several time by the British. Escaped 
to France and joined John Paul Jones. He served 
as First Lieutenant on the "Bon Homme Richard" 
in her memorable fight with the "Serapis." Was the 
first to board the ship and was severely wounded. In 
command of the "President" he did fine service before 
Tripoli from 1 801-1802. At the death of John Paul 
Jones, the sword presented to John Paul Jones by 
Louis XVI was conveyed to Commodore Dale. 

[50] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



DAVIS 
TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 14.6 feet Beam, 15 feet Draft, 5 feet, 10 inches 

Displacement, 1^4 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Charles H. Davis, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched June 4, 1898, at the yard of Wolff & 
Zwicker, Portland, Oregon. 

Sponsor: Miss Helena Wolff, daughter of the 
Vice-President of the Wolff & Zwicker Company. 

An unusual feature of this launch was that two 
-divisions of Naval Reserves were drawn up at attention. 

Rear-admiral charles h. davis, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1807. 
Was appointed Midshipman in 1823. He did valuable 
Coast Survey work and wrote valuable works on Tides 
and Currents of the Ocean; also translated many valu- 
able works. In the Civil War he was Fleet Captain 
in Dupont's expedition against Port Royal, South 
Carolina. He was flag officer at naval engagements 
at Fort Pillow, and at Memphis in 1862, which effected 
the destruction of the Confederate ironclad fleet. 
Was with Farragut at Vicksburg and successfully co- 
operated with General Curtis in the Yazoo in 1862. 



[51] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

"Owr Country. In her intercourse with foreign nations may she 
always be right; but our Country, right or wrong." — Decatur. 

DECATUR (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 245 irickes Beam, 2$ feet Draft, 6 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Commodore Stephen Decatur, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched September 26, 1900, at the yard of 
William R. Trigg & Company, Richmond, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Maria Decatur Mayo (Mrs. 
Walter Cutting), of Norfolk, Virginia, granddaughter 
of Captain Stephen Decatur, U. S. Navy, and great- 
grandniece of Commodore Stephen Decatur for whom 
the destroyer was named. 

Commodore Stephen decatur, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Maryland in 1779, died in 1820. Entered 
the Navy as Midshipman in 1798. In 1803 was in 
command of the "Enterprise" in Commodore Preble's 
Mediterranean squadron, and in 1804 led a daring 
expedition into the harbor of Tripoli for the purpose 
of burning the U. S. Frigate "Philadelphia" which had 
fallen into Tripolitan hands. He succeeded in his 
purpose and made his escape under the fire of the 
batteries. This brilliant exploit earned him a Captain's 
commission and a sword of honor from Congress, and 
it was said by Lord Nelson to be "The most daring 
act of the age." 

In the War of 1812, in the "United States," he cap- 
tured the "Macedonian;" and in the "President" 
fought a superior fleet till his own decks were covered 
with the dead and wounded. 

[52] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



DELAWARE (30) 

FRIGATE 

Named for the State of Delaware 
Launched at Norfolk Navy Yard, October 21, 1820. 

W E do not recall to have witnessed upon any 
occasion, since we became residents of Norfolk, so 
strong a manifestation of patriotic feeling as was 
exhibited at the launch of the 'Delaware' on Satur- 
day, and if we might be permitted to consider the 
countenances of every spectator that came under our 
notice, as an index to what was passing within, it 
would not be extravagant to say, that every bosom 
glowed with enthusiastic delight, unfelt before. 

"For several days preceding, parties of the most 
respectable citizens, from our sister states of North 
Carolina and Maryland, Richmond, Petersburg and 
our surrounding country to the distance of one hundred 
miles, were continually arriving, until our houses of 
private and public entertainment were filled to over- 
flowing, not to mention the large number who were 
entertained by their friends and relatives in the borough. 

"The hour announced for the launch being necessarily 
earlier than met the general convenience, our citizens 
were aroused from their beds by bands of the volun- 
teer corps, and before 8 o'clock the streets approaching 
the river were almost impassable from the numbers 
anxiously pressing to the steamboats and other convey- 
ances provided to transport them to the favorite scene. 

"A little after eight o'clock the Richmond Light 
Infantry Blues and the Independent and Junior Volun- 
teer Corps landed at Dickson's Wharf at Portsmouth 
from the steamboat 'Richmond' and marched to the 

[S3] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Navy Yard where they were received by a detachment 
of the Portsmouth Volunteer Rifle Corps. The miU- 
tary were now ranged on each side of the sHp and their 
bands being posted, continued to dehght the spectators 
by playing elegant airs. 

"About half after ten o'clock this model of Naval 
architecture was named and glided into her destined 
element, in a style of elegance which charmed every 
beholder and became a subject of general congratu- 
lation. 

"The military and a large concourse of strangers and 
citizens now repaired to the Commodore's residence 
and partook of a handsome collation, served up under 
a spacious tent erected for the occasion. 

"The ladies who remained at the Yard after the 
launch united in a dancing party. 

"The Frigate 'Guerriere,' which was superbly deco- 
rated with flags of all nations, fired a salute at the 
moment the ship struck the water. In the evening 
the 'Guerriere' was splendidly illuminated. 

"A party of ladies and gentlemen partook of a 
very handsome dinner at Commodore Cassin's, when 
the following volunteers were drunk: By Captain 
Swift, * Francis Grice, Naval Constructor' ; by Mor- 
decai Cooke, 'The U. S. Ship Delaware' ; by Captain 
McPherson, U. S. N., 'The Army of the United 
States' {Three cheers); by Colonel Armstead, 'Vir- 
ginia' {Six cheers)] by Dr. Boyd, U. S. N., 'The 
U. S. S. Delaware'; by Frederick Vincent, 'Com- 
modore Cassin'; by Col. Constant Freeman, 'Vir- 
ginia Ships and Virginia Women, may they be well 
manned' {Twelve cheers); by Com. Barron, 'Navy 
of the United States.'" — American Beacon, Monday, 
October 23, 1820. 

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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



DELAWARE (sth) 

FIRST CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, S^o Jeet Beam, 8$ feet Draft, 26 feet 

Displacement, 20,000 tons . 

Named for the State of Delaware 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1787) 

Launched February 6, 1909, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna Cahall, Bridgeville, Delaware, 
daughter of Dr. L. H. Cahall, and niece of Governor 
Simeon H. Pennewill, of Delaware. 

Maids of Honor were Miss Frances Hazel, of 
Dover, Delaware, and Miss Helen Coleman du Pont, 
of Wilmington, Delaware. 

Among those present were Governor Pennewill, 
Assistant Secretary of the Navy Satterlee, and large 
numbers of Government officials and representatives 
from the State of Delaware. 

Under the brilliant sun of a superb winter morning 
the "Delaware" was successfully launched. With 
the first perceptible movement of the massive hull 
ten thousand Virginians and Delawareans shouted 
with joy and hundreds of steel-throated whistles 
shrieked as Miss Anna Pennewill Cahall smashed a 
bottle of Delaware champagne against the steel bow, 
exclaiming, "I name thee 'Delaware' — God be with 
thee, in peace and in war." 

A pretty feature of the launching was the liberation 
at the moment the ship was named of a number of 

[55] 



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''Rostov' 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

carrier pigeons which soared high in the air and im- 
mediately shot away at great speed northward, each 
carrying a despatch to the people of Delaware that 
the ship was named and afloat. 

After the launching there was a large banquet where 
toasts were drunk according to time-honored custom. 



DE LONG 

TORPEDOBOAT 

Length, 17s feet Beam, 17 feet Draft, 5 feet 

Displacement, ig6 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Commander George W. 

De Long, U. S. Navy 

Launched November 23, 1900, at the yard of George 
Lawley & Son Corporation, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Sylvia Laure De Long Mills 
(Mrs. Walter Sands Mills), daughter of Lieutenant 
Commander George W. De Long, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant commander george w. 

DE LONG, U. S. Navy, was born in New York 
City in 1844. Appointed Midshipman in 1861. He 
commanded the Arctic exploration steamer **Jeanette" 
in an expedition for the discovery of the North Pole, 
1 879-1 88 1. The "Jeanette" was crushed in the ice. 
Three months later after discovering three islands, and 
dragging boats and provisions over shifting ice and 
open water, he died from exposure and starvation when 
almost within reach of help. 



[56] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



DENVER 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 292 feet Beam, 44 feet Draft, 1$ feet, 9 inches 

Displacement, 3,200 tons 

Named for the City of Denver 

(The Capital of Colorado) 

Launched June 21, 1902, at Neafie & Levy Ship and 
Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Roberta W. Wright (Mrs. John 
R. Pels), daughter of Mayor Wright, of Denver, 
Colorado. 



DES MOINES 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 292 feet Beam, 44 feet Draftyisfeet 

Displacement, 3,200 tons 

Named for the City of Des Moines 

( The Capital of Iowa) 

Launched September 20, 1902, at Fore River Engine 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Elsie Macomber (Mrs. Lewis 
Louer), daughter of Mr. Jay Kingsley Macomber, of 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

Miss Cora N. Carleton, from Haverhill, the home 
of Secretary of the Navy Moody, cut the rope that 
released the cruiser. 

[57] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

DETROIT (3RD) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 2 $7 feet Beam, 57 feet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, 2,073 ions 

Named for City of Detroit, Michigan 

Launched October 28, 1891, at Columbian Iron 
Works, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Florence Malster, daughter of 
President Malster, of the Columbian Iron Works. 

United states ship "Detroit" was engaged 
May 12, 1898, at San Juan, Porto Rico, Spanish- 
American War. 

DICTATOR 

IRONCLAD 

Tonnage, 3,300 

Named by John Ericsson 

{Who said: "Her powerful armament will make her a dictator") 

Launched December 26, 1863, at the De Lamater 
Shipyard, New York, N. Y. 

Sponsor: Miss De Lamater, daughter of Mr. C. 
H. De Lamater. 

1 WO unsuccessful attempts to launch the vessel 
had disappointed large crowds. For the third and 
successful attempt Captain Ericsson, Mr. C. H. De 
Lamater, Miss De Lamater, Chief Engineer Robie, 
U. S. Navy, and others went aboard. 

[58] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



DRAYTON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Commodore Percival Drayton, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched August 20, 1910, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Emma Gadsden Drayton, daughter 
of General Thomas Fenwick Drayton, of Charleston, 
South Carolina, next of kin to Commodore Percival 
Drayton. Miss Drayton's father was a brother of 
Commodore Drayton. 

Mr. J. Coleman Drayton, of New York, a nephew, 
and Mrs. J. Madison Taylor, of Philadelphia, a niece, 
were present. 

Commodore percival drayton, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 
1 8 10, and died while Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, 
in 1865. He commanded the "Pawnee" at the battle 
of Port Royal, South Carolina, in 1861. Was with 
Dupont at Fort Sumter. Commanded the "Hartford'* 
at the battle of Mobile Bay on August 5, 1864. Was 
Farragut's fleet captain and chief of staff, at which 
time he rendered gallant service. He was a brave 
officer, a true Christian and gentleman. 



[59] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

DUBUQUE 

COMPOSITE GUNBOAT 

Length, 174 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 1,083 ^°^-^ 

Named for City of Dubuque, Iowa 

Launched August 15, 1904, at Gas Engine & Power 
Company, Morris Heights, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Tredway, daughter of 
Mr. Harry Ennis Tredway, Dubuque, Iowa. 

1 HE ship started so suddenly that Miss Tredway 
was unable to pronounce the words *'I name thee 
* Dubuque,' " and in the swift rush down to the water, 
the vessel set fire to the ways. Miss Tredway and 
the officials of the Company boarded a tug and went 
alongside and the sponsor was able to break the bottle 
of champagne in approved fashion. 

DUNCAN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 305 feet Beam, 31 feet Draft, p feet 

Displacement, 1,010 tons 

Named for Commander Silas Duncan, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 5, 1913, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Clark, of Maiden, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of Mr. Silas Duncan Clark, whose 
great-grandfather was a cousin of Commander Silas 
Duncan. 

[60] 



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Commander silas duncan, u. s. Navy, 

was born in New Jersey. Was appointed Midship- 
man in 1809. As Third Lieutenant of the "Saratoga" 
in the battle of Lake Champlain, was sent in a gig to 
order the gunboats to retire. Received the concen- 
trated fire of the enemy, but succeeded in delivering 
the orders to the commander of the "Allen." Was 
severely wounded and lost his right arm. Received 
the thanks of Congress for his gallant conduct. From 
1818-1824 saw active service in the "Independence," 
"Hornet," "Guerriere," "Cyane" and "Ferret." 

DUPONT 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 175 feet Beam, 17 feet Draft, 4. feet, 8 inches 

Displacement, 165 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Samuel F. Dupont, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 30, 1897, at Herreshoff Manufac- 
turing Company, Bristol, Rhode Island. 

Sponsor: Miss Lillian Converse, daughter of 
Commander George A. Converse, U. S. Navy, com- 
manding Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island, at 
the time. 

U. S. S. "Dupont" was under fire May 6, 1898, off 
Matanzas, Spanish-American War. 

Rear admiral samuel f. dupont, u. s. 

Navy, was born in New Jersey in 1803. Midshipman 
in 1 8 1 5 . In 1 845, in the Mexican War, in the " Cyane," 
captured San Diego; took possession of La Paz, and 
assisted in the capture of Mazatlan; entered the har- 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

bor of Guaymas, burned two gunboats and cut out a 
Mexican brig under heavy fire. In 1848 landed at 
San Jose with one hundred men and defeated a Mexican 
force five times as great. In 1861 he was in command 
of the fleet that made the brilHant and successful 
attack on Port Royal. A distinguished tactician. 



D-i (Formerly NARWHAL) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched April 8, 1909, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Gregory Caldwell Davison, daugh- 
ter of Rear-Admiral Shepard, U. S. Navy, and the 
wife of Mr. Gregory C. Davison, Vice-President of 
the Electric Boat Company, a graduate of the Naval 
Academy in 1892, who resigned from the Navy. 



D-2 (Formerly GRAYLING) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched June 16, 1909, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, Built for Electric 
Boat Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Catherine H. Bowles, Boston, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Mr. Francis T. Bowles, 
President of the Fore River Shipbuilding Company, 
who resigned from the Navy while Chief Constructor 
of the Navy and established the Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Company. 

[62] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



D-3 (Formerly SALMON) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched March 2, 1910, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Electric Boat 
Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Fitzgerald, daughter of Mayor 
Fitzgerald, of Boston, Massachusetts. 



ENTERPRISE (3RD) 
steam sloop of war 

Named for U. S. S. "Enterprise" 2d 

{Famous in the French War in 1800 and the Tripolitan War; and for the capture 
of the British brig "Boxer" in 18 13) 

Launched June 13, 1874, at Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Sponsor: Miss Lillian Seaman, pretty daughter 
of Sailmaker Seaman, U. S. Navy. 



ERICSSON 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 149 feet Beam, 15 feet Draft, 4 feet, 9 inches 

Displacement, 129 tons 

Named for John Ericsson 

{The inventor and builder of the "Monitor" and designer of the " Princeton," the first 

screw vessel of war) 

Launched May 12, 1894, at Iowa Iron Works, 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

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Sponsor: Miss Carrie Kiene (Mrs. William Bla- 
lock), daughter of Colonel Peter Kiene, christened the 
"Ericsson" with American champagne. As she broke 
the bottle Miss Kiene spoke Longfellow's lines: 

"*In spite of rocks and tempest's roar, 
In spite of false lights on shore, 
Sail on, nor fear to breast the sea.' 
'Ericsson,' I name thee." 

The "Ericsson" was the first vessel of war ever 
launched on inland waters. A half holiday was 
declared for the event, and after an imposing parade 
to celebrate so unusual an event as the launching of 
a Government vessel, the launching took place amid 
great enthusiasm. 

United states torpedo boat "Ericsson" was in 
the naval engagement off Santiago, Cuba, July 3, 1898, 
Spanish-American War. 



E-i (Formerly SKIPJACK) 
submarine torpedo boat 

Launched May 27, 191 1, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Electric Boat 
Company, New London, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Donald Raymond Battles, wife 
of Naval Constructor D. R. Battles, U. S. Navy, on 
duty at Fore River Shipbuilding Company at the 
time. 



[64] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



E-2 (Formerly STURGEON) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDOBOAT 

Launched June 15, 191 1, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, for Electric Boat 
Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Nelson Little, daughter 
of Captain William N. Little, U. S. Navy, on duty at 
Fore River Shipbuilding Company at the time. 

The launching was attended by the Boston Chamber 
of Commerce and the visiting Chicago Chamber of 
Commerce, and Governor John Burke of North Dakota. 



FANNING 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, ^42 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Nathaniel Fanning, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched January ii, 191 2, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Kenneth McAlpine, wife of Cap- 
tain Kenneth McAlpine, U. S. Navy, Inspector of 
Machinery for U. S. Navy at Newport News at that 
time. 

Lieutenant Nathaniel fanning, u. s. 

Navy, served in the engagement between the *'Bon 
Homme Richard" and "Serapis," September 23, 1779. 
When most of his men had been killed, he took a fresh 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

gang into the top and succeeded in clearing the tops 
of the "Serapis" of her men. Passed with his men, 
when the yards of the ships were locked, from the 
**Bon Homme Richard" to the "Serapis" and directing 
the fire of his men with hand grenades and other 
missiles, drove the British seamen from their stations. 
Paul Jones says: "He was one cause among the 
prominent in obtaining the victory," when recom- 
mending Fanning for promotion. 



FARRAGUT 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 21 S feet Beam, 20 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 2gj tons 

Named for Admiral David Glasgow Farragut, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July i6, 1898, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California. 

Spo7isor: Miss Elizabeth Ashe, San Francisco, 
California, a niece of the wife of Admiral Farragut. 

Admiral david Glasgow farragut, 

U. S. Navy, was the first Admiral of the United States 
Navy. He was born near Knoxville, Tennessee, in 
1 801. Entered the Navy at the age of nine. Com- 
manded a prize at the age of twelve. His career was 
a succession of brilliant achievements. 

His most notable service was in the "Hartford," in 
command of the Gulf Blockading Squadron in the 
Civil War. The passage of the Mississippi was forced 
in April, 1862, and New Orleans surrendered. 

[66] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Later at Mobile, reinforced by Monitors and undis- 
mayed by the loss of his leading ship, the Monitor 
"Tecumseh," sunk by a torpedo, he forced the passage 
into the Bay and destroyed or captured the Con- 
federate ships. In 1866 by Act of Congress he was 
made Admiral of the U. S. Navy, a grade previously 
unknown in the American Navy. 



FLORIDA (4Th) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 510 feet Beam, 88 feet Draft, 28 feet 

Displacement, 21,823 tons 

Named for the State of Florida 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 184s) 

Launched May 12, 1910, at the Navy Yard, New 
York, N. Y. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Legere Fleming (Mrs. 
Frank Percival Hamilton), Jacksonville, Florida, daugh- 
ter of the late Governor of Florida, Francis P. Fleming. 

Miss Fleming was appointed by Governor 
Gilchrist of Florida. For the first time in a Navy 
launching the sponsor was accompanied by a guard 
of honor, five Florida girls, chosen by Governor Gil- 
christ, and five Navy girls. The Florida members 
were Miss Nellie Fletcher, daughter of Senator Fletcher; 
Miss Alene Buchanan, of Jacksonville; Miss Mary 
Milton, daughter of Ex-Senator Milton, of Marianna; 
Miss Eugenia Carter, daughter of Judge Carter, of 
Pensacola; Miss Genevieve Bisbee, daughter of Ex- 
Congressman Bisbee. The Navy girls were Miss 
Marian Leutze, daughter of Admiral Leutze; Miss 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Heather Baxter, daughter of Naval Constructor Bax- 
ter; Miss Katherine Heilner, daughter of Admiral 
Heilner; Miss Grace Walling, daughter of Captain 
Walling; Miss Baldwin, sister of Lieutenant Com- 
mander Baldwin. 

The scene was unusually brilliant owing to the 
presence of the large number of Naval officers in 
uniform. Among those present were Vice-President 
James S. Sherman, Secretary of the Navy George 
von L. Meyer, Assistant Secretary of the Navy Beek- 
man Winthrop, Governor Albert W. Gilchrist and 
staff, Admiral of the Navy George Dewey. 



FLUSSER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, zSgjeet Beam, 26 Jeet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 700 tons 

Named for Commander Charles W. Flusser, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 30, 1909, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Genevieve Virden, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, grandniece of Commander Flusser. She was 
accompanied by Mr. G. H. Lindenberger, nephew of 
Commander Flusser. 

Commander charles w. flusser, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Maryland in 1832. Was appointed 
Midshipman in 1847. He especially distinguished 
himself on board the "Miami" and in other actions 
during the Civil War. In the fight with the "Albe- 
[68,] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



marie," when he was in command of the "Miami" 
and "Southfield" lashed together, a shell from his 
own guns rebounded from the heavy side of the "Albe- 
marle," exploded and killed him. 



FOOTE 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, i6o feet Beam, i6 feet Draft, 5 feet 

Displacement, 142 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Andrew Hull Foote, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October i, 1896, at Columbian Iron Works, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Laura Price, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Rear admiral andrew hull foote, 

U. S. Navy, was born in Connecticut in 1806. Was 
appointed Midshipman in 1822. In 1856, in com- 
mand of the "Portsmouth," during hostilities between 
England and China, was fired upon at Canton by the 
Chinese forts. Apology being refused, he attacked 
the four forts with the "Portsmouth" and "Levant" 
and with two hundred and eighty men landed and 
took the forts by storm. In 1862, in command of the 
Western Flotilla, attacked and forced the surrender 
of Fort Henry. Later, although he had been wounded 
at Fort Donelson, he proceeded down the Mississippi 
and reduced Island No. 10. In 1863 he succeeded 
Admiral Dupont in command of the South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron. 

[69] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

FOX 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 146 Jeet Beam, 15 jeet Draft, 5 feet, 1 1 inches 

Displacement, JS4 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Gustavus V. Fox, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched July 4, 1898, at the yard of Wolff & 
Zwicker, Portland, Oregon. 

Sponsor: Miss Vera Patterson (Mrs. Roy Getes), 
daughter of Captain W. H. Patterson, of Portland, 
Oregon. 

Lieutenant gustavus v. fox, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Saugus, Maine, in 1821. He served in 
the Mexican War, but resigned in 1852. In 1861 was 
made acting Captain. Planned the expedition for 
the capture of New Orleans and several important 
campaigns. Was made Assistant Secretary of the 
Navy, in which office he did valuable work. 

F-i (Formerly CARP) 
submarine torpedo boat 

Launched September 6, 191 1, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California, for the Electric Boat Com- 
pany, of New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Josephine Tynan, San Francisco, 
California, daughter of Mr. J. T. Tynan, the General 
Manager of the Union Iron Works. 

vJLD Neptune received a terrible shock when the 
formidable submarine fighting machine was launched 

[701 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



into his watery domain. The pretty httle nine year 
old Sponsor stood on the ways and broke a bottle of 
California champagne across the bow of the craft 
whose fighting will be under the sea. 

More than two hundred guests witnessed the launch- 
ing. Among those present were Mr. W, R. Sands, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. McGregor, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. 
Tynan, Miss Margaret Tynan, Joseph Tynan, Gover- 
nor Oddie of Nevada, and prominent Army and Navy 
officers. 



F-2 (Formerly BARRACUDA) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched March 19, 191 2, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Annette Ried Rolph, little daughter 
of the Hon. James Rolph, Jr., Mayor of San Francisco, 
California. 

"1 NAME thee 'F-2'" said the pretty little white- 
gowned sponsor, in youthful, buoyant voice, as she 
broke the bottle of champagne over the bow of the 
submarine fighting craft. The submarine glided down 
the ways and took a queer list to port. For a moment 
it looked as if the diving monster was going completely 
under water, but it quickly righted itself and rested 
light and buoyant as it came to a standstill. A watch 
and chain were presented to Miss Rolph as a souvenir 
by the Electric Boat Company. 

Among those present were Mayor and Mrs. Rolph, 
Governor Tasker Oddie of Nevada, and a number of 
Navy officials and notable people. 

[71] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

F-3 (Formerly PICKEREL) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched January 6, 191 2, at the Moran Company, 
Seattle, Washington, for the Electric Boat Company, 
of New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. M. F. Backus (Elise Piutti), wife 
of a prominent banker of Seattle, Washington. 

F-4 (Formerly SKATE) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched January 6, 191 2, at the yard of Moran 
Brothers, Seattle, Washington, for Electric Boat Com- 
pany, New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. M. F. Backus (Elise Piutti), wife 
of a prominent banker of Seattle, Washington. 

GALENA 
ironclad. six guns 

Named for Galena River 

Launched February 14, 1862, at Mystic River, 
Connecticut. 

* 

No record of a Sponsor at this launching. 

Relaunched March 13, 1879, at the Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, Virginia, after complete rebuilding as a 
wooden ship. 

Sponsor: Miss Carol Gillis (Mrs. David Murray), 
daughter of Captain James H. Gillis, U. S. Navy, 
commanding the receiving ship " Franklin," was invited 
to "take away the bad luck from an unchristened 
ship." 

[72] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



The "Galena" was launched with a large party on 
board, among whom was Secretary of the Navy Thomp- 
son. 

United states ship "Galena" in 1862 was 
under fire in James River; in 1864 engaged the ram 
"Tennessee;" was in attacks on Fort Powell, Fort 
Gaines and Fort Morgan. 

GALVESTON 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 292 jeet Beam, 44 feet Draft, 15 feet 

Displacement, $,200 tons 

Named for City of Galveston, Texas 

Launched July 23, 1903, at William R. Trigg & 
Company's, Richmond, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Ella Sealey (Mrs. Emerson Root 
Newell), of Galveston, Texas, daughter of Mr. George 
Sealey of Galveston, who was a leading citizen and 
philanthropist. Miss Julia Joynes was Maid of Honor. 

GENESEE 

DOUBLE ENDER 

Seven guns Tonnage, 803 

Named for Genesee River 

Launched April 2, 1862, at the Navy Yard, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Emily Dorr of Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts. 

The "Genesee" was under fire many times in the 
Civil War. In 1863 at Fort Fisher; up Mississippi River 
at Baton Rouge; Port Hudson; Vicksburg. In 1864 
at Mobile and Pensacola and Fort Gaines. 

[73] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

GEORGIA 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 435 feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, 14,948 tons 

Named for the State of Georgia 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched October ii, 1904, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Stella Tate (Mrs. Preston Rambo), 
sister of Congressman Carter Tate, of Georgia. 

1 HE Sponsor presented the battleship with a 
magnificent silver punch bowl. Governor Joseph M. 
Terrel, of Georgia, and Staff were present. 



GERMANTOWN 
sloop-of-war 

Twenty-two guns Tonnage, Q39 

Named for Germantown, Pennsylvania 

{Where the Battle of Germantown was fought, October 4, 1777) 

Launched October 22, 1846, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Watson, daughter of John Fanning 
Watson, the Philadelphia annalist. 

A LARGE number of distinguished citizens were 
on board and the Corps of Germantown Blues, Captain 
J. D. Miles, were present by special invitation. The 
ceremony of christening was performed by fair hands 

[74] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



and *Germantown/ the baptismal name of the ship — 
a Revolutionary name — full of patriotic and thrilling 
associations, was pronounced by the daughter of 
Revolutionary ancestors, who broke a bottle of wine 
and water over the scroll figurehead at the bow. 

The wine was presented by Mrs. Commodore Bain- 
bridge and the water was obtained by Miss Watson 
from the celebrated spring at the battleground at 
Germantown. 

Miss Watson was assisted by Passed Midshipman 
George P. Welsh, U. S. Navy. 

"Miss Watson was attired in pure white and wore 
in her girdle a neat bouquet of freshly-culled flowers. 
— Philadelphia North American. 



)» 



GOLDS BOROUGH 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, iq8 feet Beam, 20 feet Draft, 6 feet, 10 inches 

Displacement, 255 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Louis M. Golds- 
borough, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 29, 1899, at the yard of WoM & 
Zwicker, Portland, Oregon. 

Sponsor: Miss Gertrude Ballin, young daughter 
of the Superintendent of the Wolff & Zwicker Company. 
Governor Geer and Staff, of Oregon, were present. 

Rear-admiral louis m. goldsborough, 

U. S. Navy, was born in Washington, D. C, in 1805. 
Was a Midshipman at seven. In 1827 commanded a 
night expedition of four boats and thirty-five men 
which rescued the British brig "Comet," captured 

[75] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



*- 



by Greek privateers. Served honorably during War 
with Mexico. Present at the fall of Vera Cruz and 
the capture of Tuxpan. In 1861-62, in command of 
the North Atlantic Station, planned and executed a 
joint naval and military expedition which effected the 
capture of Roanoke Island in 1862. 

G-i (Formerly SEAL) 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Launched February 8, 1911, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia, for Lake Torpedo Boat Company. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret V. Lake, daughter of 
the president of the Lake Torpedo Boat Company, the 
inventor of the type of submarine, named the vessel 
in the presence of a number of friends, and officers 
of the Navy and the Shipyard. 

GUERRIERE (3D) 

STEAM SLOOP 
Twenty-one guns Tonnage, i,3QS 

Named for the Frigate "Guerriere" (ist) 

{Which was captured and sunk by the "Constitution" in 1812) 

Launched September 9, 1867, at the Navy Yard, 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

Sponsors: Miss Jennie Lenthall, daughter of 
Chief of Bureau of Construction John Lenthall, U. S. 
Navy; and Miss Emma Hartt, daughter of Naval 
Constructor Edward Hartt, U. S. Navy, of the Navy 
Yard, broke two bottles of wine over the bow and 
named the ship *'Guerriere." 

[76] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



HARTFORD 

WOODEN SLOOP-OF-WAR 

Length, 226 feet Beam, 43 feet Draft, 18 feet 

Displacement, 2,ygo tons 

Named for the City of Hartford 

{The Capital of Connecticut) 

Famous as the flagship of Admiral Farragut in the Civil War. Engaged the 
forts at New Orleans. With the fleet near Vicksburg. At the Battle of Mobile Bay. 
Bombardment of Port Hudson and Fort Morgan. 

Launched November 22, 1858, at the Navy Yard, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Sponsors: Miss Carrie Downes (Mrs. James Hoy), 
daughter of Captain John Downes, U. S. Navy, who 
broke a bottle of water from a Hartford spring; Miss 
Lizzie Stringham (Mrs. James B. Creighton), daughter 
of Commodore Stringham, U. S. Navy, who broke a 
bottle of water from the Connecticut River; Lieu- 
tenant G. H. Preble, who broke a bottle of salt 
water across her figurehead. 

1 HE splendid new steam sloop-of-war, * Hartford' 
was successfully launched from the Charlestown Navy 
Yard at precisely seventeen minutes past eleven 
o'clock this forenoon, in the presence of a vast multi- 
tude of the citizens of Boston, Charlestown, Chelsea 
and the surrounding towns. 

''Through the courtesy of Commodore Stringham, 
a large number of ladies and gentlemen, many of the 
officers of the Navy and others went on board of the 
'Hartford' and were launched in her. A large plat- 
form was erected, temporarily, on the west side of the 
shiphouse, which was filled with people, as were the 

[77] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

tops of all the small buildings overlooking the scene. 
A line of scows was placed from the wharf to the Ship- 
of-the-Line 'Vermont/ which was converted into a 
reception room for the guests of her distinguished 
rival. The band attached to the U. S. Receiving Ship 
*Ohio' was ordered on board the *Vermont/and con- 
tributed materially to the interest of the occasion. 
The 'Ohio' was decked in holiday attire. 

"The plates of the saws had gone nearly through 
the planks, when the gallant ship, impatient to leave 
terra firma, broke the remaining hindrance and glided 
down into the waters at her feet, amid the shouts of 
the spectators, who at first said cautiously, * She moves/ 
then as doubt gave way to certainty, a confident 
'There she goes!' announced the success of the launch. 
A salute was fired from the battery on the sea wall, 
and, amid loud cheers and the waving of handker- 
chiefs, the good ship gracefully settled down upon her 
destined element. 

"As soon as the ship cleaved the waves, two young 
ladies who stood in the bow, broke each a bottle con- 
taining water and named her 'Hartford.' This cere- 
mony was performed by Miss Lizzie Stringham, and 
Miss Downes, and Lieutenant G. H. Preble, who 
broke a bottle of salt water across her figurehead. 
Miss Stringham used a bottle of Connecticut River 
water, Miss Downes a bottle of water from a Hartford 
spring." — Boston Journal, November 22, 18 $8. 



[78] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



HELENA 

LIGHT DRAFT GUNBOAT 

Length, 250 feet Beam, jp feet Draft, 9 feet 

Displacement, I,J92 tons 

Named for the City of Helena 

{The Capital of Montana) 

Launched January 30, 1896, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Agnes Belle Steele (Mrs. John 
H. Burke), daughter of the Mayor of Helena, Montana. 

United states ship "Helena" was under fire 
July 2, 1898, at Pt. Tunas, Spanish-American War. 

HENLEY 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Captain Robert Henley, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched April 3, 191 2, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Constance Henley Kane, great- 
grandniece of Captain Henley. 

Captain Robert henley, u. s. Navy, in 

18 1 2, commanded one of the divisions of gunboats 
manned from the crew of the ''Constellation" in the 
boat attacks on the British frigates lying in Hampton 
Roads. September 11, 1814, as master commandant 
of the "Eagle," flagship of Captain Macdonough, in 
the battle of Lake Champlain, led the American line. 
He received the thanks of Congress and a gold medal. 

[791 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



HOLLAND 

SUBMARINE TORPEDO BOAT 

Displacement, 74 tons 

Named for J. P. Holland 

{Builder of the first submarine for the United States Navy) 

Launched at Crescent Shipyard, EHzabeth, New 
Jersey, for the J. P. Holland Torpedo Boat Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Lewis Nixon, wife of Mr. Lewis 
Nixon, President of the Crescent Shipyard, formerly 
a Naval Constructor, U. S. Navy, who resigned. 

HOPKINS 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 238 feet Beam, 23 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 4.08 tons 

Named for Commodore Esek Hopkins, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched April 24, 1902, at the yard of Harlan 
& Hollingsworth, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Alice Gould Hawes, Providence, 
Rhode Island, great-great-granddaughter of Admiral 
Esek Hopkins. 

Commodore esek hopkins, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Scituate, Rhode Island, in 171 8. He was 
the first Commander-in-Chief of the Continental 
Navy and the only officer in the Navy who has borne 
that title. He successfully harassed the British, al- 
though not strong enough to meet the enemy's fleets 
victoriously. 
[80] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



HOUSATONIC 

SLOOP-OF-WAR 

Displacement, 1,240 tons Thirteen guns 

Named for Housatonic River 

Launched October 21, 1861, at the Navy Yard, 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

Sponsors: Miss Jane Coffin Colby, and Miss 
Susan Peters Hudson (Mrs. WilHam H. Chase), 
daughter of Commodore WilHam L. Hudson, the 
Commandant of the yard. 

A bevy of ladies stood on the bow. The Stars 
and Stripes were hoisted at the main, the pennant 
at the mizzen, and the Jack at the fore. As the ship 
struck the water Miss Colby and Miss Hudson each 
broke a bottle of pure grape juice upon the bow and 
at the same time pronounced the name "Housatonic.'* 
The Navy Yard band which was on board struck up 
"Hail Columbia" and then "Yankee Doodle" amid the 
cheers of the great crowd. 

IN the Civil War U. S. S. "Housatonic" participated 
in the capture of a number of sloops and schooners. 
Was sunk by a torpedo boat off Charleston Bar in 
1864. 

HULL (2D) 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 238 feet Beam, 23 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 408 tons 

Named for Commodore Isaac Hull, U. S. Navy 

Launched June 21, 1902, at the yard of Harlan & 
HoUingsworth, Wilmington, Delaware. 

[81] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Sponsor: Miss Mabel Hull, a descendant of Com- 
modore Hull. 

Commodore isaac hull, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Connecticut in 1775. His father, an officer 
in the Revolutionary Army, was captured and died 
aboard a British prison ship. Young Hull's first 
service of note was when he sailed into the harbor of 
Porte Platte, Hayti, in broad daylight and with . a 
small vessel, the "Sally," captured the fort, spiked 
the guns, and succeeded in getting away with a French 
Letter of Marque. He served under Commodore 
Preble during Tripolitan trouble. His most noted 
command was the "Constitution" in 181 1. He dis- 
played brilliant seamanship when he escaped from the 
British squadron under Admiral Blake in 1812. Just 
one month from the time he escaped from Admiral 
Blake he met and destroyed the "Guerriere." 

H-i 

SUBMARINE 

Launched May 6, 191 3, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Lesley Jean Meakins, niece of 
Mr. John A. McGregor, President of the Union Iron 
Works. 

H-2 
submarine torpedo boat 

Launched June 4, 191 3, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California, for Electric Boat Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William Ranney Sands, wife of 
the representative of the Electric Boat Company in 
San Francisco. 

[82] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 

IDAHO (2d) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 275 feet Beam, 77 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 13,000 tons 

Named for the State of Idaho 

(Which was admitted to the Union in iSgo) 

Launched December 9, 1905, at William Cramp 
& Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Louise Gooding (Mrs. Adam John 
Schubert), of Gooding, Idaho, young daughter of 
Governor Frank R. Gooding, of Idaho. 

UN the stand were Governor Gooding and Staff, 
Mrs. Gooding, Senator and Mrs. Dubois, Congressmen 
Burton L. French and Addison T. Smith of Idaho, 
and a large party from Idaho. An enormous crowd of 
spectators witnessed the launch of the great battleship. 

ILLINOIS (2d) 
first-class battleship 

Length, 368 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, 11,552 tons 

Named for the State of Illinois 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 18 18) 

Launched October 4, 1898, at Newport News Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Nancy LEiTER(Mrs. Colin Campbell), 
daughter of Mr. Levi Z. Leiter, of Chicago, Illinois. 

Governor JOHN R. tanner, of Illinois, and 
Staff, and many prominent representatives from the 
State were present. 

[83] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

INDEPENDENCE 

SHIP-OF-THE-LINE 

Tonnage, 2,2$^ Seventy-four guns 

Named for American Independence 

Launched June 20, 1814, at the Navy Yard, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Commodore William Bainbridge, U. S. 

Navy. 

At three o'clock she moved majestically into her 
destined element and was welcomed by a federal salute 
from the frigate 'Constitution' and the acclamations 
of many thousand spectators. An officer of the 
* Constitution' had the honor of christening her as she 
struck the water, and she now bears the broad pennant 
of Commodore Bainbridge." — Boston Sentinel. 

Among the toasts drunk at the collation that fol- 
lowed were: ''The President of the United States: 
His signature to no peace but an honorable one." 
"Commodore Bainbridge: He who conquered the 
enemy of the 'Constitution' will not fail to maintain 
the honor of the American flag on the 'Independence.'" 

INDIANA 
first-class battleship 

Length, 348 feet Beam, 6q feet Draft, 24. feet 

Displacement, 10,288 tons 

Named for the State of Indiana 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1816) 

Launched February 28, 1893, at William Cramp 
& Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania. 

[84] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Jessie Miller (Mrs. A. M. Hopper), 
daughter of United States Attorney-General W. H. H. 
Miller. 

1 HE President of the United States, Benjamin 
Harrison, and Cabinet were present. Others present 
were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. H. Miller, Mr. Samuel D. 
Miller and many prominent officials and people from 
Indiana. 

U. S. S. ^'Indiana" was engaged May 12, 1898, at 
San Juan, Porto Rico, at Battle of Santiago, July 3, 
1898, Spanish-American War. 

INTREPID (2d) 

STEEL TRAINING SHIP 

Length, 176 feet Beam, 45 feet Draft, 16 feet 

Displacement, 1,800 tons 

Named for the Ketch "Intrepid" 

{Which carried the officers and men who set fire to the "Philadelphia" at Tripoli 

in 1804) 

Launched October 8, 1904, at the Navy Yard, 
Mare Island, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen de Young (Mrs. George 
Cameron), daughter of Mr. Michael H. de Young, 
proprietor of the San Francisco ChronicU. 

IOWA (2d) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 360 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 24. feet 

Displacement, 11,346 tons 

Named for the State of Iowa 

{fFhich was admitted to the Union in 1846) 

Launched May 28, 1896, at William Cramp & Sons* 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

[85] 



PUBLIC 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Lord Drake (Mrs. George 
W. Sturdivant), daughter of Governor F. M. Drake, 
of Iowa. Near Miss Drake on the stand stood Miss 
Herbert, daughter of Secretary of the Navy Herbert, 
Mrs. M. D. Shonts and Mrs. E. D. Goss, daughters 
of Governor Drake. 

Among those present were Vice-President Adlai E. 
Stevenson, Secretary of the Navy Hilary A. Herbert, 
Secretary Morton, Governor Drake and Staff, Senator 
Gear, Senator AlHson, Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Drake, 
Mrs. John A. Drake, and a large delegation from Iowa. 

The warship's massive hull stood high in the air, 
and hundreds of flags fluttered in the sunlight. About 
her bow were gathered representative men of the 
nation; officers in glittering uniforms; and beautiful 
women. All eyes were centered upon the Sponsor, 
who held in one hand a magnificent bunch of Ameri- 
can Beauty roses and in the other the beribboned bottle 
of champagne. Thirty thousand spectators waited 
breathlessly. ** I name thee * Iowa, * " the Sponsor cried, 
and swinging high the bottle, smashed it on the side 
of the ship. With a superb sweep of the bow the ship 
slid down the ways with terrific momentum, cheered 
by a din of whistles and the yells of thirty thousand 
people. 

"Wake, giant of oak and steel, 
Asleep by the yellow sand. 
And give to the sea thy keel, 
And bid farewell to the land. 
At the touch of beauty arise, 
At the words that shall bid thee move, 
At the hand that shall thee baptize, 
And give to the sea its love. 

[85] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



"Then wake, O giant of steel 
That sleeps by the yellow sand. 
Arise from thy dreams and feel 
The thrill of a Nation's hand!" 
From the "Launching of the Iowa," by S. H. M. Byers. 

United states ship "lowa" was under fire 
May 12, 1898, San Juan, Porto Rico; May 31, 1898, 
Santiago, Cuba; July 3, 1898, Battle of Santiago. 
Spanish-American War. 

JAR VIS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Midshipman James C. Jarvis, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 4, 191 2, at New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Jean Knox, daughter of Mr. Samuel 
Knox, the President of the New York Shipbuilding 
Company. Miss Knox was accompanied by Mrs. 
Knox and Miss De Rousse. 

Midshipman james c. jarvis, u. s. 

Navy, during the fight between "Constellation" and 
*' Vengeance," February 2, 1800, was sent aloft in 
command of the topmen to endeavor to secure the 
mast, and when warned of his danger, as it was about 
to fall, refused to leave his post and went over the 
side with the falling rigging. Only thirteen years 
old when killed. Captain Truxtun commended his 
devotion to duty in his report to Congress, and his 
heroism was approved by "a solemn resolution" of 
that body and his loss mentioned as a "subject of 
national regret." 

[871 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

JENKINS 
TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 28g feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Thornton A. Jenkins 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 29, 191 2, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice Thornton Jenkins, daughter 
of Rear-Admiral Thornton A. Jenkins. Miss Jenkins 
was accompanied by her sister, Mrs. W. G. Andrews. 
The bottle of American champagne was encased in a 
silver casing, and the inscription was "U. S. T. D. 
Jenkins, April 29, 191 2 — B. I. W., Bath, Maine — 
Miss Alice Thornton Jenkins, Sponsor.'* 

Rear admiral thornton a. jenkins, 

U. S. Navy, was born at Orange Court House, Virginia, 
in 1811. In the Fall of 1862, commanded the "Oneida," 
blockading off Mobile. Was next appointed Fleet 
Captain and Chief of Staff of Farragut's fleet and was 
present at the passage of Port Hudson and fight with 
Grand Gulf batteries, Warrenton and Grand Gulf, 
in March, 1863. On the " Monongahela " he was 
wounded during the engagement at College Point, 
being in command of three armed vessels in convoy 
duty. 

Was In command of the "Richmond," and senior 
officer in command of the naval forces below, at the 
surrender of Port Hudson, July 9, 1863. Was in 
command of a division on the Mobile blockade from 

[88] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



December, 1863, to the Battle of Mobile Bay, August 
5, 1864, in which, and all the subsequent operations, 
he took part. 

He was commended by Admiral Farragut for zeal 
and fidelity to duty. Admiral Farragut said of him: 
"He carried out the spirit of one of Lord Collingwood's 
best sayings, 'not to be afraid of doing too much, and 
those who are seldom do as much as they ought.' 



> >> 



JOUETT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral James E. Jouett, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 15, 191 2, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Marylee Nally, a cousin of 
Admiral Jouett, and selected by Mrs. Jouett and the 
Navy Department to christen the *'Jouett." She is 
the daughter of Mr. E. J. Nally, who married Miss 
Lee Warren Redd, a daughter of Captain Oliver Redd, 
of Lexington, Kentucky. The latter and Admiral 
Jouett were sisters' children and came of fighting stock, 
being the grandsons of Captain William Allen of 
Revolutionary fame. 

Rear admiral james e. jouett, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Kentucky in 1828. Midshipman 
in 1 841. Served in Mexican War. In 1861, Lieu- 
tenant Jouett with marines from the "Santee" boarded 
and destroyed the Confederate steamer "Royal Yacht" 
in Galveston Bay, where he had a hand-to-hand con- 

[89] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

flict with the commander of the vessel. He received 
severe wounds from a pike in the right arm, side and 
lungs. For gallant conduct he received the thanks of 
the Navy Department. 

In 1864, commanded the "Metacomet" at Battle 
of Mobile Bay. After the battle the "Metacomet" 
pursued and engaged the gunboats ''Gaines," 
"Morgan" and "Selma." The "Gaines" was crip- 
pled and the "Selma" surrendered. Lieutenant Com- 
mander Jouett received advancement thirty numbers 
for heroic conduct. 

JUNIATA 

STEAM SLOOP-OF-WAR 

Displacement, 1,240 tons 

Named for the Juniata River 

Launched March 20, 1861, at the Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Angela Turner (Mrs. George 
Toland), daughter of Rear-Admiral Thomas Turner, 
U. S. Navy, commanding Philadelphia Navy Yard 
at that time. 

In her words: "I was escorted to the bows of the 
vessel by Lieutenant (afterward Admiral) Donald 
Fairfax, U. S. Navy, and I broke across them a bottle 
of Juniata water decorated by the sailors with red, 
white and blue ribbons, saying, *Go forth to victory, 
*Juniata.' A piece of glass cut my wrist and an 
officer rushed up with his handkerchief and said, 
'This is the first blood shed on the 'Juniata.' " 

United states ship "Juniata" had active ser- 
vice in the Civil War. Took part in first and second 
bombardments of Fort Fisher. 

[90] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



KANSAS (1ST) 

SCREW 

Three guns Tonnage, 4.10 

Named for the River Kansas 

Launched September 29, 1863, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Annie McClellan, daughter of 
Surgeon James McClellan, attached to the Receiving 
Ship at Philadelphia. 

"The deck of the vessel was filled with people. 
As she slid into the water a young daughter of Surgeon 
McClellan christened her by breaking a bottle of 
champagne over her prow. U. S. vessels are usually 
baptized in the name of the United States. This 
one was baptized in the name of Neptune." 

— North American. 

United states ship "Kansas" took part in 
first and second attacks on Fort Fisher, 1864-65. 

KANSAS (2d) 
first-class battleship 

Length, 450 feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 16,000 tons 

Named for the State of Kansas 

Launched August 12, 1905, at New York Ship- 
building Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna Hoch, Topeka, Kansas, daugh- 
ter of Governor Edward W. Hoch, of Kansas, baptized 
the ship with water from a Camden County, New 
Jersey, spring. Governor Hoch, of Kansas, and Staff 
were present. 

[91] 



PL) QLIC 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

KATAHDIN (zd) 

RAM 

Length, 2^0 feet Beam, 42 feet Draft, 1$ feet 

Displacement, 2,183 tons 

Named for Mount Katahdin, Maine 

Launched February 4, 1893, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Una Soley, daughter of Hon. J. 

B. Soley, Assistant Secretary of the Navy. 

KEARSARGE ( ist) 

STEAM SLOOP-OF-WAR 

Length, 201 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 13 feet 

Displacement, 1,461 tons 

Named for Mount Kearsarge, New Hampshire 

Launched September ii, 1861, at Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. McFarland, of Concord, New 
Hampshire, wife of the Editor of the Concord Statement. 

United states ship "Kearsarge ist" sank the 

C. S S. "Alabama" off Cherbourg, June, 1864. Was 
wrecked on Roncador Reef, February 2, 1894. 

KEARSARGE (20) 
first-class battleship 

Length, 368 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, 11,500 tons 

Named for Mount Kearsarge, New Hampshire 

{And the old "Kearsarge" of Civil War fame) 

Launched March 24, 1898, at Newport News Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

192] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Herbert Winslow, wife of Lieu- 
tenant Commander Herbert Winslow, U. S. Navy, 
son of Captain John A. Winslow, who commanded the 
famous old "Kearsarge" in the fight with the "Ala- 
bama." Miss Margaret Eastman, of Washington, was 
Maid of Honor. 

The "Kearsarge" was launched the same day as the 
battleship " Kentucky." 



KENTUCKY (20) 
first-class battleship 

Length, 368 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, 11,500 tons 

Named for the State of Kentucky 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1792) 

Launched March 24, 1898, at Newport News Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Christine Bradley (Mrs. John G. 
South), daughter of Governor William Bradley, of 
Kentucky. A cut-glass bottle of water from the 
spring on the old Lincoln Farm was used to christen 
the ship. 

A hail of small "good luck" bottles of Kentucky 
Bourbon, thrown by enthusiastic Kentuckians, bom- 
barded the ship as she went down the ways. The 
"Kentucky" was launched the same day as the battle- 
ship "Kearsarge." 



[93 1 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

KEOKUK 
ironclad battery 

Named for the Town of Keokuk, Iowa 

Launched December 6, 1862, at Dry Dock Iron 
Works, New York, N. Y. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Whitney, wife of Mr. C. W. Whit- 
ney, the designer of the battery, bestowed the name 
"Keokuk" on the ironclad in the presence of a large 
number of Navy officers. 

It was the general opinion that the deck of this 
Naval battery would be partly submerged, but the 
fears of those on board proved groundless. 

United states ship "Keokuk" took part in 
the attack on Charleston, South Carolina, April 7, 
1863. Sank next day off Morris Island. 

LACKAWANNA 

STEAMSLOOP 

Seven guns Tonnage, 1,533 

Named for Lackawanna River 

Launched August 9, 1862, at the Navy Yard, Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Imogen Page Cooper (Mrs. George 
Dennis), daughter of Commodore Cooper, U. S. 
Navy, broke a bottle of champagne, saying, "In the 
name of Neptune I name thee 'Lackawanna.'" 

At least eight thousand people crowded the yard. 
The "North Carolina" was crowded with a brilliant 

[94] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



company, her flags were flying, and her yards were 
manned. 

United states ship "Lackawanna" in 1863 
opened fire on Fort Powell. At Fort Morgan, lashed 
to the "Seminole," stood in line of battle. 



LAMSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 700 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Roswell H. Lamson, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June i6, 1909, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry S. Grove, wife of the Presi- 
dent of the Shipbuilding Company 

Lieutenant roswell h. lamson, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Missouri. Appointed Midship- 
man in 1858. He was commended by Admiral Dupont 
for conduct in the battle of Port Royal and captures 
of Forts Walker and Beauregard in 1861. Commanded 
the "Mount Washington" in joint Army and Navy 
operations in Nansemond River. Took prominent and 
leading part in capture of batteries at Hills Point. 
Congratulated by Admiral Lee for performance of this 
duty. Commanding the "Gettysburg," took promi- 
nent part in attack on Fort Fisher and gallantly 
piloted powder-boat "Louisiana" in under the fort. 

[95] 



-^OSTO^ 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

LANCASTER 

STEAM SLOOP 

Length, 233 feet Beam, 46 feet Draft, 19 feet 

Displacement, 3,2^0 tons 

Named for the City of Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Launched October 20, 1858, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Harriet Lane (Mrs. Harriet Lane 
Johnson), niece of James Buchanan, President of the 
United States. Miss Lane had previously had the 
honor of having the U. S. S. "Harriet Lane" named 
for her and her portrait was placed in the cabin. 

At eight minutes after twelve, amidst the wild 
huzzas of the multitude and the boom of cannon, the 
immense mass freighted with living beauty sped grace- 
fully into the water. As soon as the bow of the ship 
reached the briny deep, the bottle of 'Wheatland 
Spring Water' was broken by Miss Lane over the bow. 
Her portion of the work was well done. Among the 
guests on board were George Plitt, Esquire and lady. 
Colonel W. L. Bladen and lady. Captain Carr and 
Major English, with others of note." — Philadelphia 
Public Ledger. 

Miss Lane (Mrs. Harriet Lane Johnson) was a niece 
of President Buchanan, and it was from his home, 
Wheatland, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, that the bottle 
of water came. She presided over the White House 
during her uncle's administration, and prior to that 
at the American Legation when Mr. Buchanan was 
our Minister to England. She was a woman of great 
beauty and charm. 

[96] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



"Don*t give up the ship." — Lawrence 

LAWRENCE (30) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 240 feet Beam, 22 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 4.00 tons 

Named for Captain James Lawrence, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched November 7, 1900, at Fore River Ship- 
building Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Ruth Lawrence, of New York City, 
only daughter of Supreme Court Justice Abraham 
Lawrence, and greatniece of Captain James Lawrence. 
Miss Lawrence is a well-known author. 

Captain james lawrence, u. s. Navy, was 

born in New Jersey in 1787. Was appointed Mid- 
shipman in 1798. In 1803, on the "Enterprise," dis- 
tinguished himself in an attack on boats in Tripoli 
harbor, led by Porter. In 1804 engaged in the de- 
struction of the "Philadelphia" in Tripoli harbor in 
the ketch "Intrepid." In 1813, in command of the 
"Hornet," captured the British "Peacock." For this 
he was promoted to Captain and given a medal, and 
command of the frigate "Chesapeake." He died in 
the "Chesapeake" after her memorable fight with 
the "Shannon," June i, 18 13. His dying words were 
"Don't give up the ship." A brave and chivalrous 
officer. 



[971 



PU B LlG 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

LOUISIANA (3D) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 4^0 feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 16,000 tons 

Named for the State of Louisiana 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1812) 

Launched August 27, 1904, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Juanita LaLande, of New Orleans, 
Louisiana, chosen as a beautiful representative of one 
of the old Creole families of the State. Miss Ruby 
LaLande, Miss Alice Stauffer and Miss Margaret 
Castellanos were Maids of Honor. Miss LaLande 
was appointed sponsor by Governor Newton C. 
Blanchard. The State was represented by Lieutenant 
Governor Sanders and the Staff of Governor Blanchard. 
The party included President Roosevelt and Governor 
Montague of Virginia. 

McCALL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 28g feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Edward R. McCall, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 4, 19 10, at New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Jessie Willits, daughter of Captain 
A. B. Willits, U. S. Navy, Inspector of Machinery at 
the New York Shipbuilding Company at that time. 

[98] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Lieutenant edward r. McCall, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Charleston, South Carohna, in 
1790. Appointed Midshipman in 1808. In September, 
1 81 3, on the "Enterprise'* in her engagement with 
the "Boxer," Lieutenant McCall took command after 
her captain had been killed and gained a victory, for 
which he received a gold medal from Congress. 

McKEE 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, ggjeet Beam, 12 feet Draft, 4 feet 

Displacement, 65 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Hugh W. McKee, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 5, 1898, at Columbian Iron Works, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Wardwell (Mrs. William H. 
Humrichouse), of Baltimore, Maryland. 

Lieutenant hugh w. McKEE, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Kentucky in 1844. Appointed Midshipman 
in 1 861. He was killed in an attack upon the Corean 
Forts at Boissee anchorage, June 11, 1871. He fell 
just as he mounted the parapet of the Coreans' strong- 
hold and at the head of his men. 

U. S. S. "McKee" was under fire August 8, 1898, off 
Sagua la Grande. 



[99] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



MACDONOUGH (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Lengthy 240 feet Beam, 22 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 4.00 tons 

Named for Commodore Thomas Macdonough, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 24, 1900, at Fore River Engine 
Company, Weymouth, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Lucy Thaler Macdonough (Mrs. 
Charles Reade), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a descend- 
ant of Commodore Thomas Macdonough. 

Commodore thomas macdonough, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Delaware in 1783. Appointed 
Midshipman in 1800. He distinguished himself in 
the Tripolitan War. In 1804, in the "Intrepid," 
engaged in the destruction of the "Philadelphia" at 
Tripoli. He served in the War of 181 2. As com- 
mander of our Naval forces on Lake Champlain, 
whipped the superior British force in 1814. Received 
a medal and promotion. 

MACHIAS 
gunboat '^ 

Length, 204 feet Beam, 32 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 1,177 ^onj 

Named for City of Machias, Maine 

(/n which harbor took place the first naval engagement of the Revolutionary War) 

Launched December 8, 1891, at the Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Ethel Hyde, daughter of President 
Hyde, of the Bath Iron Works. 

[ 100] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



U. S. S. **Machias" was under fire off Cardenas, 
Cuba, May ii, 1898, Spanish-American War. 

MACKENZIE 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, gg feet Beam, 12 feet Draft, 4. feet 

Displacement, 65 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Commander Alexander 
Slidell Mackenzie, U. S. Navy 

Launched February 19, 1898, at the Charles Hillman 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Master Charles Hillman, grandson of 
Mr. Charles Hillman, President of the Shipbuilding 
Company. 

Lieutenant commander Alexander 

SEIDELL MACKENZIE was appointed Midshipman 
in 1855. Served in the "Kineo" and "New Ironsides" 
during the Civil War. Was killed in Formosa, June 
13, 1867, while leading a party against the savages 
who had murdered the whole crew of the American 
bark "Rover" ^ome time before. 

MACKINAW 
double-ender 

Ten guns Tonnage, gj4 

Named for Mackinaw Strait 

Launched April 22, 1863, at the Navy Yard, Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Minnie Bradford, daughter of 
Paymaster Bradford, U. S. Navy. 

[ 101 1 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

The "Mackinaw" in the Civil War, engaged in 
operations around Norfolk and the James River. 
Engaged a Confederate ram; engaged Confederate 
ironclad. In 1865 was engaged at Fort Fisher; Fort 
Anderson. 

MADAWASKA 

STEAM SLOOP 

Fifteen guns Tonnage, 3,280 

Named for Madawaska River 

Launched July 8, 1865, at the Navy Yard, Brooklyn, 
New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Delano, daughter of Naval Construc- 
tor Benjamin F. Delano on duty at New York. 

MAINE (ist) 
first-class battleship 

Length, 310 feet Beam, 57 feet Draft, 21 feet 

Displacement, 6,650 tons 

Named for the State of Maine 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1820.) 

Launched November i8, 1890, at the Navy Yard, 
New York, N. Y. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice Tracy Wilmerding (Mrs. 
Frederic R. Coudert), granddaughter of Secretary of 
Navy Benjamin F. Tracy. 

IN the presence of fully 30 thousand people on a 
perfect Autumn day our first armored cruiser was 
launched. Close to the big ship's prow was built a 
little platform, gay with red, white and blue bunting 
and streamers, affording close standing room for 
[ 102 ] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



about twenty people, to be occupied by the christen- 
ing party. 

Distinguished officials and guests gathered around 
the stand. The booming of guns announced that the 
Secretary of the Navy had arrived. Everything was 
ready. The crowd waited breathlessly. " She moves ! '* 
"Not yet!" "Yes, she's off!" Crash went the bottle 
and the foam of champagne splashed over Miss 
Wilmerding, over Secretary Tracy and Ex-Secretary 
Whitney, and all on the stand. A novel form of 
salute to the new cruiser were firework bombs thrown 
into the air over the vessel as it floated clear of the ways. 

U. S. S." Maine" was blown up by a submarine mine 
in the harbor of Havana, Cuba, February 15, 1898. 



MAINE (2d) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 388 jeet Beam, ys feet Draft, 23 feet, 10 inches 

Displacement, 12,500 tons 

Named for the State of Maine and U. S. S. 

"Maine" 

Launched July 27, 1901, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Preble Anderson, of Port- 
land, Maine, daughter of William Henry Anderson 
and Alice Preble, and great-granddaughter of Com- 
modore Edward Preble, U. S. Navy. Hon. J. F. Hill, 
Governor of Maine, and Staff were present. 



[103] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

MANHATTAN 

IRONCLAD MONITOR 

Length, 23s jeet Beam, 46 feet Draft, 14 feet 

Tonnage, 2,100 

Named for Manhattan Island 

Launched October 14, 1863, at Secor's Shipyard, 
Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Gregory, daughter of Rear- 
Admiral Gregory, bestowed the name "Manhattan." 

Admiral Farragut and Admiral Dupont were present. 
Sixty thousand spectators lined the shores. 

U. S. S. "Manhattan" in 1864 engaged in attacks 
on Fort Morgan. Engaged the ram "Tennessee." 

MARBLEHEAD (20) 
unarmored cruiser 

Length, 2S7 feet Beam, sy feet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, 2,oy2 tons 

Named for the City of Marblehead, 
Massachusetts 

Launched August ii, 1892, at City Point Iron 
Works, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles F. Allen, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Among those present were Assistant Secretary of 
the Navy Soley and many representatives from the 
city of Marblehead. 

U. S. S. "Marblehead" was under fire April 29, 
1898, at Cienfuegos, Cuba, Spanish-American War. 

[104] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



MARIETTA (2d) 

COMPOSITE GUNBOAT 

Length, J74 feet Beam, 34 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, QQO tons 

Named for the City of Marietta, Ohio 

Launched March i8, 1897, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, Cahfornia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. H. Clifford More, daughter of 
the late General T. C. H. Smith, U. S. Vol., and later 
paymaster in the Regular Army. 

Mrs. More was chosen as representing one of the 
oldest families of Marietta, being greatniece of Gov- 
ernor Woodbridge of the *' Northwest" when Marietta 
was the capital, and granddaughter of Dudley Wood- 
bridge, one of the pioneers. 

MARYLAND (20) 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, $02 feet Beam, 69 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 13,680 tons 

Named for the State of Maryland 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched September 13, 1903, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Jennie Scott Waters (Mrs. B. T. 
Abercrombie), daughter of General Francis E. Waters, 
of Baltimore. Miss Waters was chosen for the honor 
by Governor John W. Smith, of Maryland. 



[105] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



MASSACHUSETTS (30) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 348 feet Beam, 6q feet Draft, 24. feet 

Displacement, 10,288 tons 

Named for the State of Massachusetts 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched June lo, 1893, at William Cramp & Sons* 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Leila Herbert, daughter of the 
Secretary of the Navy, Hon. Hilary A. Herbert. 

The Secretary of the Navy and many Government 
officials and officers of the Navy were present. 

U. S. S. "Massachusetts" was in bombardment of 
Santiago, May 31, 1898, also June 6, 1898. 

MAYRANT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER ) 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Captain John Mayrant, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 23, 1910, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Norvelle Adams (Mrs. L B. 
Beard), great-great-granddaughter of Captain Mayrant, 
and daughter of Sallie Yerger and Wirt Adams. Miss 
Adams was accompanied by Mrs. R. B. Mayes and 
Mrs. Wirt Adams. 

Captain JOHN mayrant, while a Midship- 
man, led the boarders in the fight between the **Bon 
[106] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Homme Richard" and the "Serapis/' September 23, 
1779. Commodore Paul Jones said of him, **It was 
my good fortune to command many brave men, but 
I never knew a man so exactly after my own heart, 
or so near the kind of man I would create, if I could, 
as John Mayrant." 

MERRIMAC 

SCREW FRIGATE 

Tonnage, 3,300 Guns, 40 

Named for Merrimac River 

Launched June 15, 1855, at the Navy Yard, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary E. Simmons, daughter of 
Constructor Melvin Simmons, U. S. Navy. 

VjREETED by the cheers of a vast concourse of 
people and a salute of twenty-one guns, the 'Merrimac' 
was launched. As she passed into the water the 
ancient ceremony of christening was performed by 
Miss Mary E. Simmons, who broke a bottle of water 
from the Merrimac River over the bow. After the 
ceremony Commander Gregory entertained with a 
collation at his house, and a collation was also provided 
in the joiner's loft for the entire force of workmen." — 
Boston Daily Advertiser. 

The "Merrimac" was partly burned by Navy Yard 
officials when the Norfolk Navy Yard was abandoned 
in the Civil War. Was rebuilt as an ironclad by the 
Confederates and participated in the renowned en- 
gagements in Hampton Roads. 

[107] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

MIAMI 

DOUBLE-ENDER 

Length, 208 Jeet Beam, 33 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 730 tons 

Named for the Miami River 

{Indian tribe name) 

Launched November i6, 1861, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Ann Ingersoll (Mrs. J. H. Hutchin- 
son), daughter of Charles Ingersoll, a prominent lawyer 
of Philadelphia, and an intimate friend of Miss Angela 
Turner, whose father, Admiral Turner, then in com- 
mand of Philadelphia Navy Yard, invited Miss 
Ingersoll to christen the *' Miami." 

U. S. S. "Miami" took part in bombardment of 
Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Civil War. 

? 
MIANTONOMAH 

DOUBLE TURRET MONITOR 

Tonnage, 1,564 

Named for Miantonomah 

{Chief of Narragansett Indian Tribe) 

Launched August 15, 1863, at the Navy Yard, New 
York. 

Sponsor: Master Hiram Paulding, son of Rear- 
Admiral Hiram Paulding, U. S. Navy. 

1 HE ironclad was launched from the wooden ship- 
house, the first of her class built. As the ship came 
through the gates she was christened by Master 
[108] 




z 

< 






c/2 






C 

z 



< 

z 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Paulding. The crews of the " North CaroHna," " Hart- 
ford" and "Quinnebaug" manned the riggings and 
sent forth such cheers as only sailors can. 

MICHIGAN (2d) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Lengthy 458 feet Beam, 80 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 16,000 tons 

Named for the State of Michigan 

(fVhich was admitted to the Union in 1837) 

Launched May 26, 1908, at New York Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Carol B. Newberry (Mrs. Frank 
W. Brooks, Jr.), Detroit, Michigan, daughter of the 
Hon. Truman H. Newberry, Secretary of the Navy. 

Among those present were Governor Fred M. 
Warner, of Michigan, Senator Burrows and Senator 
Smith. 

MILWAUKEE (3D) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 424 feet Beam, 66 feet Draft, 22 feet 

Displacement, 9,700 tons 

Named for the City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Launched September lo, 1904, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Janet Mitchell (Mrs. Mackie), 
daughter of United States Senator John L. Mitchell, 
of Wisconsin. Miss Lily Jeffrey pressed the button 
to release the ship. 



[109] 



lOSTOW 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

MINNEAPOLIS 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 411 feet Beam, 58 feet Draft, 22 feet 

Displacement, 7,350 tons 

Named for the City of Minneapolis, 
Minnesota 

Launched August 12, 1893, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Washburn (Mrs. Hamil- 
ton Wright), daughter of Senator William D. Wash- 
burn, of Minnesota, at whose request the cruiser had 
been named ''Minneapolis." 

Among those present were Vice-President Adlai E. 
Stevenson, Secretary of Navy Hilary A. Herbert and 
Mayor Eustis of Minneapolis. 

MINNESOTA (ist) 
steam frigate 

Forty guns 4,600 tons 

Named for Minnesota Territory 

Launched December i, 1855, at the Navy Yard, 
Washington, District of Columbia. 

Sponsor: Miss Susan L. Mann, of Washington, 
broke a bottle of water from the Minnesota River 
over the bow of the ship and gave the name ''Minne- 
sota." The water was brought from Minnesota by 
Honorable Mr. Rice of Minnesota. 

Two bottles of wine were produced on board, the 
first glass being tendered the Sponsor. The Secre- 
tary of the Navy was on board the vessel partaking of 

[no] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



the supposed dangers and real excitement of the 
launch. The steamer "Engineer" was stationed for 
the accommodation of the President of the United 
States and Members of his Cabinet and invited guests. 
U. S. S. ** Minnesota ist" was flagship of Admiral 
Stringham in 1861. Captured a large number of 
vessels. Took part in expedition against Hatteras. 
In 1862 engaged the *'Merrimac" and "Patrick 
Henry." In 1864-65 took part in attacks on Fort 
Fisher. 

MINNESOTA (20) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 450 feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 16,000 tons 

Named for the State of Minnesota 

(Which was admitted to the Union in i8j8) 

Launched April 8, 1905, at Newport News Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Rose Marie Schaller (Mrs. Wilbur 
Birch Joyce), daughter of State Senator Schaller, of 
Hastings, Minn., who was a close friend of Governor 
John A. Johnson. Maids of Honor were Miss Con- 
stance Day and Miss Lillian McMillan. Governor 
Montague and Staff, of Virginia, were present. Miss 
Schaller was appointed to present to the "Minnesota" 
the silver service given by the State of Minnesota. 



[Ill] 



y< 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

MINNETONKA 

SCREW SLOOP 

Tonnage, 2490 Guns, 21 

Named for Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota 

Launched July 3, 1867, at the Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Bailey, daughter of Rear- 
Admiral Theodorus Bailey, U. S. Navy, Commandant 
of the Navy Yard at the time. 

MISSISSIPPI (1ST) 
paddle wheel 

Ten guns 

Named for Mississippi River 

Launched May 5, 1841, at the Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

"Yesterday was a general holiday. Thousands gave 
up business to witness the launch of the splendid 
vessel. A few minutes before twelve the National 
Grays came marching on board to lively airs by the 
band. Some five or six hundred people were on board. 
Blows from the battering ram set the vessel in motion. 
All went smoothly save for the chagrin of the officer 
commissioned to break the bottle of wine over her 
bow. By anxiety or some unfortunate miss the 
forcibly directed blow missed its aim and the bottle 
plunged into the river." — Philadelphia Public Ledger. 

U. S. S. "Mississippi" ist was in Perry's expedition 
to Japan in 1853. In battle below New Orleans 1862. 
Abandoned and blown up at Port Hudson 1863. 

[112] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



MISSISSIPPI (2d) 
FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 375 feet Beam, 77 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 13,000 tons 

Named for the State of Mississippi 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1817) 

Launched September 30, 1905, at William Cramp 
& Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mabel Clare Money (Mrs. Wil- 
liam W. Kitchen), daughter of Senator H. P. Money, 
of Mississippi. 

Senator Money was fourteen years a Member of 
Congress and fourteen years United States Senator 
from Mississippi, and resigned after twenty-eight 
years' continuous service. Miss Money was accom- 
panied by her father. Admiral Dewey and a Japanese 
prince. 

MISSOURI (2d) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 388 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 23 feet 11 inches 

Displacement, 12,300 tons 

Named for the State of Missouri 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1821) 

Launched December 28, 1901, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Marion Cockrell (Mrs. Edson 
Gallaudet), daughter of Senator Francis N. Cockrell, 
of Missouri. 

[113] 



BOs>> 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Among those present were Secretary of Navy John 
D. Long and Secretary of Interior Ethan A. Hitch- 
cock, of Missouri. 

MONADNOCK 

DOUBLE TURRET MONITOR 

Length, sjS feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, 3,goo tons 

Named for Mount Monadnock, New Hampshire 

Re-launched after complete rebuilding September 
19, 1883, at the Continental Iron Works, Vallejo, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Lulu Irwin, daughter of Captain 
John Irwin, U. S. Navy, captain of Mare Island Navy 
Yard, California, at the time. 

A HE Monadnock was originally launched March 
23, 1864, at the Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts. 
*'As the 'Monitor' passed out of the shiphouse the 
Marine band on board struck up the 'Star Spangled 
Banner,' the National ensign was displayed and the 
vessel was formally christened by one of the many 
young ladies on her deck." 

MONAGHAN 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet, 4 inches 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Ensign John R. Monaghan, U. S. Navy 

Launched February i8, 191 1, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

[114] 




^S" 




U.S. SLOOP "monongahela" 







AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Ellen R. Monaghan, Spokane, 
Washington, a sister of Ensign John R. Monaghan. 

Ensign JOHN R. monaghan, U. S. Navy, was 
appointed a Naval Cadet in 1891. He distinguished 
himself in an engagement with the natives of Samoa 
in 1899. Was killed April i, 1899, while endeavoring 
to remove to the rear Lieutenant Lansdale, who had 
been wounded. Captain Edwin White said in his 
report: "He stood steadfast by his wounded superior 
and friend — one brave man against a score of savages. 
He died in a heroic performance of duty." 

monocacy 

double-ender 

Six guns Tonnage, 1,370 

Named for Monocacy River 

Launched December 14, 1864, at the Denmead 
Shipyard, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Ella Denmead, daughter of one 
of the proprietors of the shipyard. 

1 HERE were about two hundred and fifty people 
on board, among them Major-General Wallace and 
staff. Commodore Dornin, Commandant of the Naval 
Station, and other distinguished men. 

MONONGAHELA 

SCREW SLOOP 

Tonnage, 1,378 

Named for Monongahela River 

Launched July lo, 1862, at the Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

[IIS] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Emily Virginia Hoover, daughter 
of Naval Constructor Hoover, U. S. Navy. 

1 HE "Monongahela,*' in the Civil War, engaged 
the batteries at Port Hudson, March, 1863. Farragut's 
flagship May 23 to June 22, 1863. Took part in opera- 
tions at Brazol, Tepus, September 16, 1863. Off New 
Orleans April 6, 1864. Off Mobile Bay June, 1864. 
Lashed to the "Kennebec," passed the Forts with 
Farragut August 5, 1864. Rammed the "Tennessee" 
and grounded. 

MONTANA 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 502 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 2$ feet 

Displacement, 14,500 tons 

Named for the State of Montana 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 18 8 g) 

Launched December 15, 1906, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Minnie Conrad, daughter of Mr. 
W. G. Conrad, a distinguished citizen of Montana. 

MONTAUK 

ironclad monitor 

Named for Town of Montauk, Long Island 

Launched October 9, 1862, at the Continental Iron 
Works, Greenpoint, Long Island. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary E. Gregory, daughter of 
Rear-Admiral Francis H. Gregory, U. S. Navy, dashed 
a bottle of champagne against her bow, naming the 

[116] 




SPONSOR AND LAUNCH 



u.s .s 



MONTANA 



^6ST> 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Monitor "Montauk" and adding, *'Here goes the 
Montauk, her enemies to baulk." 

Many persons conquered their fear that an ironclad 
might sink and were launched on the "Montauk," 
being anxious to say they had been launched in this 
ironclad of which so much was expected. 

U. S. S. "Montauk," in 1863 took part in attacks 
on Fort McAllister; destroyed Confederate steamer 
"Nashville" ; took part in attack on Morris Island, 
Fort Wagner and Sullivan Island. In 1864, in attack 
on Fort Sumter; in 1865, on Fort Anderson. 

MONTEREY 

DOUBLE TURRET MONITOR 

Length, 256 feet Beam, 59 feet Draft, 14 feet, 10 inches 

Displacement, 4,084 tons 

Named for the City of Monterey, California 

Launched April 28, 1891, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Kate C. Gunn, daughter of Mr. 
J. O'B. Gunn, of San Francisco, christened the ship 
with California champagne. 

Mrs. Harrison, wife of the President of the United 
States, started the launch by pressing an electric 
button. 



[117] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

MONTGOMERY (30) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Lengthy 257 feet Beamy 37 feet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, 2,072 tons 

Named for the City of Montgomery 

( The Capital of Alabama) 

Launched December 5, 1891, at Columbian Iron 
Works, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Sophia Smith (Mrs. Edward Pey- 
ton Ramsey), daughter of Passed Assistant Engineer 
John A. B. Smith, U. S. Navy, Inspector of Machinery 
for U. S. Navy at Columbian Iron Works at that time. 

U. S. S. "Montgomery," engaged May 12, 1898, San 
Juan, Porto Rico, Spanish-American War. 

NANTASKET 

STEAM SLOOP 

Ten guns Tonnage, goo 

Named for Nantasket, Massachusetts 

Launched August 15, 1867, at the Navy Yard, 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Emma Hartt, daughter of Naval 
Constructor Edward Hartt, U. S. Navy. 



[118] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



NASHVILLE 

LIGHT DRAFT GUNBOAT 

Length, 220 feet Beam, 38 feet Draft, 11 feet 

Displacement, 1,371 tons 

Named for the City of Nashville 

(Capital of Tennessee) 

Launched October 19, 1895, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Maria Guild (Mrs. John D. West- 
brook), daughter of Mayor Guild, of Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. Maids of Honor were Miss Georgie Orr and 
Miss Frances Reid. 

U. S. S. *' Nashville" was attached to the North 
Atlantic Fleet, during the Spanish-American War. 
Captured the first prize vessel. 

NEBRASKA 
first-class battleship 

Length, 43s feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 23 feet, 9 inches 

Displacement, 14,948 tons 

Named for the State of Nebraska 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1867) 

Launched October 7, 1904, at the yard of Moran 
Brothers, Seattle, Washington. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Nain Mickey, daughter of 
Governor John H. Mickey, of Nebraska. 

Miss Nellie Moran was Maid of Honor. 

A beautiful gold watch was presented to Miss 
Mickey, as a souvenir of the occasion, by the builders 
of the "Nebraska." 

[119] 



e= 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

NEWARK 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 311 feet Beam, 49 feet Draft, 18 feet 

Displacement, 4,083 tons 

Named for the City of Newark, New Jersey 

Launched March 19, 1890, at WilHam Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Annie Boutelle, daughter of Con- 
gressman Charles Boutelle, of Maine. 

U. S. S. "Newark" took part in bombardment of 
Manzanilla, Cuba, August 12, 1898, Spanish-American 
War. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE (20) 
first-class battleship 

Length, 450 feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 16,000 tons 

Named for the State of New Hampshire 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched June 30, 1906, at New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Hazel E. McLane (Mrs. John 
Alexander Clark), daughter of Hon. John McLane, 
Governor of New Hampshire. 

Maids of Honor were Miss Marion Sortwell, of 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Miss Margaret Thayer, 
of Concord, New Hampshire. Miss McLane was 
accompanied by her brothers Clinton A. and John R. 
McLane, and members of the Governor's Staff. 

[120] 




J CO m 
o 



i^ 



^v/ 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



NEW IRONSIDES 

IRONCLAD 

Eighteen guns 3,486 tons 

Named for "Old Ironsides" 

{The frigate " Constitution") 

Was flagship of attack on Fort Sumter, April 7, 
1863. Took part in attacks on Fort Wagner, Fort 
Moultrie and Fort Fisher. 

Launched May 10, 1862, at the yard of Wm. Cramp 
& Sons, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: The ironclad was named by Commodore 
Charles Stewart, U. S. Navy. 

"No launch in years has attracted more attention. 
The recent celebrated engagement between the * Moni- 
tor' and the 'Merrimac,' in Hampton Roads, opened 
the eyes of the people to the great superiority of the 
* Ironclad,' and everyone who could wended his way 
to get a sight of the new monster. 

"At nine o'clock Commodore Stewart and a number 
of Naval Officers took position in the bow. At pre- 
cisely 27 minutes after 10 o'clock the *New Ironsides' 
gracefully glided into its element. As the frigate 
touched the water Commodore Stewart broke a bottle 
of brandy over the bow, saying: 'Success to the "New 
Ironsides" — May her career be prosperous and glori- 
ous.' This was followed by the breaking of two 
bottles of Madeira of the vintage of 1808, which was 
passed among the invited guests. 

"The gallant old Commodore whose name is conspic- 
uously connected with 'Old Ironsides' suggested the 
name 'New Ironsides.' In a letter accepting the Navy 
Department's invitation to name the vessel, he said: 
'Why not add "New" to the n^imtV — Public Ledger. 

[121] . 



"eosTo^ . 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

NEW JERSEY 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 435 feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 23 feet, p inches 

Displacement, 14,948 tons 

Named for the State of New Jersey 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1787) 

Launched November lo, 1904, at Fore River Ship- 
building Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William B. Kinney, daughter of 
Hon. Franklin B. Murphy, Governor of New Jersey. 

NEWPORT 

COMPOSITE GUNBOAT 

Length, i68 feet Beam, 36 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 1,010 tons 

Named for the City of Newport, Rhode Island 

Launched December 5, 1896, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Frances LaFarge (Mrs. E. H. 
Childs), daughter of Mr. John LaFarge, of New York, 
and granddaughter of Commodore Perry. 

NEW YORK (5th) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 56s feet Beam, 95 feet Draft, 28 feet 

Displacement, 28,367 tons 

Named for the State of New York 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched October 30, 191 2, at the Navy Yard, 
New York. 
[122] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Elsie Calder, daughter of Repre- 
sentative William M. Calder, of New York, attended 
by Miss Kathleen Fitzgerald, daughter of Representa- 
tive John J. Fitzgerald, of New York. 

XjRILLIANT sunshine beat upon the towering red 
and gray hull and upon the fifty thousand eager spec- 
tators surging in the Navy Yard and filling every roof 
or vessel as far as the eye could reach. Flashing effects 
of sky and water helped to make vivid the bunting 
with which vessels and buildings were dressed. At 
half after ten o'clock a salute of 21 guns and the dip- 
ping of flags announced the arrival of President Taft, 
who proceeded through cheering crowds to the stand 
built about the bow of the mammoth ship. Beside 
him stood Miss Elsie Calder, carrying an armful of 
flowers and holding in her hand the silver-cased berib- 
boned bottle of champagne. Little Miss Fitzgerald 
stood ready with an armful of flowers to pelt the ship. 

Grouped about them were Secretary of the Navy 
Meyer; Governor Dix and Staff; Rear-Admiral Hugo 
Osterhaus, Commander-in-Chief of the North Atlantic 
Fleet; Rear-Admiral Bradley A. Fiske, commanding 
the First Division; Captain Albert Gleaves, Comman- 
dant of the New York Navy Yard; Major-General 
Thomas H. Barry, Brigadier-General Tasker H. Bliss, 
and a brilliant assemblage of Army and Navy officers, 
and ladies. Among the ladies were Miss Helen Miller 
Gould and members of the Society of Sponsors of the 
U. S. Navy. 

At eleven o'clock the great ship began her flight to 
the river. A mighty cheer went up from the multi- 
tude; sirens on the warships "Wyoming," "Arkansas," 
"Florida" "Utah," "Delaware," ''Connecticut" and 

[ 123 ] 



BC 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

on countless river craft screeched, and bands played 
unheard in the din. 

A luncheon was given in the sail loft to President 
Taft and a large number of invited guests immediately 
after the launching. 

NIAGARA (2d) 

SCREWFRIGATE 

Displacement, 4,580 tons Twelve guns 

Named for Niagara River and U. S. S. "Niagara" 

{One of Commodore Perry s fleet at the Battle of Lake Erie) 

''Niagara 2d" was launched February 3, 1856, at 
the Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Annie C. O'Donnell, of New York. 

The "Niagara" went down the ways sooner than 
was expected and disappointed many who arrived 
by slow coaches. She broke loose from her fastenings 
and at ten-thirty began to slide slowly down the ways. 
There were about seventy-five ladies and gentlemen 
on board. The "North Carolina" immediately fired 
a salute and cheers of the crowd rent the air. After 
she had been drawn up to the wharf she was duly 
named by Miss O'Donnell. 

U. S. S. "Niagara 2d" later carried our first Atlantic 
sub-marine cable-telegraph. 

NICHOLSON 
torpedo boat 

Length, 17s feet Beam, 17 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 218 tons 

Named for Captain Samuel Nicholson, U. S. Navy 
Launched September 23, 1901, at the yard of Lewis 

Nixon, Elizabethport, New Jersey. 
[124] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, 
whose husband was an officer in the United States 
Navy, and descendant of Commodore Matthew Cal- 
braith Perry. 

Captain samuel Nicholson, u. s. Navy, 

was a Lieutenant on the "Bon Homme Richard." Was 
appointed Captain in 1794. Commanded the frigate 
''Deane" and captured three sloop s-of- war. He was 
the first Commander of the frigate "Constitution." 

His two brothers. Captain John Nicholson, U. S. 
Navy, and Captain James Nicholson, U. S. Navy, also 
served with distinction in the Revolutionary War. 

Commodore William C. Nicholson, U. S. Navy 
(son of John), was Midshipman under Decatur in 
the "President," War of 1812. Served also in Civil 
War. 

Commodore James W. A. Nicholson, U. S. Navy 
(grandson of Captain Samuel), was with Perry in 
the expedition to Japan, 1853-55. I^i command of 
the "Isaac Smith," took part in battle of Port Royal. 
Participated in capture of Jacksonville, Fernandina 
and St. Augustine. In command of the "Manhattan," 
took part in battle of Mobile Bay, the capture of the 
ram "Tennessee," and bombardment of Fort Morgan. 



NIPSIC 

GUNBOAT 

Displacement, 1,37 j tons 

Named for Nipsic Lake, Ontario 

Launched June 15, 1863, at the Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. 

[ 125 ] 



BOi 



^'<JA 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Rebecca Scott (Mrs. Henriques), 
of Washington, assisted by Miss Lucy L. Hale (Mrs. 
William E. Chandler), of Dover, New Hampshire. 

1 HE *'Nipsic" and the "Shawmut'* were launched 
the same day. The **Nipsic" was launched from the 
open yard. Almost immediately the "Nipsic" was 
followed by the "Shawmut" from the shiphouse. 
U. S. S. "Nipsic" had blockade duty in 1864. 



NORTH CAROLINA (20) 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 502 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 25 feet 

Displacement, 14,500 tons 

Named for the State of North Carolina 

{Which ratified the Constitution in ijSg) 

Launched October 6, 1906, at Newport News Ship- 
building & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Rebekah Williams Glenn (Mrs. 
Daniel Engle Hoffman), daughter of Hon. Robert B. 
Glenn, Governor of North Carolina. 

Accompanying Miss Glenn as Maids of Honor were 
Mrs. A. H. Arrington, wife of the Governor's private 
secretary, and Miss Lillian Thompson. 

Among those present were Governor and Mrs. 
Robert Brodnax Glenn, Governor Glenn's entire staff, 
Adjutant-General T. R. Robertson and wife. Lieuten- 
ant Commander Victor Blue, U. S. Navy, and many 
prominent North Carolinians. 



[126] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



NORTH DAKOTA 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 510 feet Beam, 8$ feet Draft, 26 feet, 11 inches 

Displacement, 20,000 tons 

Named for the State of North Dakota 

{Which was admitted to the Union in i88q) 

Launched November lo, 1908, at the Fore River 
Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Benton, daughter of Colonel 
John Benton, of Fargo, North Dakota. 

Miss Benton was accompanied by Mrs. Alice Nelson 
Page, of Grand Forks, North Dakota. 

Governor John Burke, of North Dakota, and Staff 
were present. 

NYACK 

gunboat 

Length, l8l feet Beam, 32 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 600 tons 

Named for Town of Nyack, New York 

Launched October 6, 1863, at the Navy Yard, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Emma Paulding, daughter of Rear- 
Admiral Leonard Paulding, U. S. Navy, and grand- 
daughter of Rear-Admiral Hiram Paulding, named the 
ship. 

U. S. S. "Nyack" in 1864 took part in attack on 
Fort Fisher; in 1865 in capture of Fort Anderson. 



[127] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

O'BRIEN 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 17s ff ft Beam, 17 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 220 tons 

Named for Captain Jeremiah O'Brien, U. S. Navy, 
AND for His Four Brothers 

Launched September 24, 1900, at Crescent Ship- 
yard, Ehzabethport, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Mira O'Brien, great-great-grand- 
daughter of Joseph O'Brien, brother of Captain Jere- 
miah O'Brien, U. S. Navy. 

In recognition of the antecedents of Miss O'Brien 
and the name of the boat, the keel of the "O'Brien" 
was painted green and the roses carried by Miss 
O'Brien were tied with green ribbons. The sword 
captured from Lieutenant Moore in the first Revolu- 
tionary Naval engagement was taken to the launching 
of the "O'Brien." 

r IVE O'Brien brothers were residents of Machias, 
Maine, when the battle of Lexington, April, 1775, was 
fought. When the news reached Machias the patriotic 
citizens erected a liberty pole. A British sloop-of- 
war, the " Margaretta," arrived in Machias harbor 
under the command of Lieutenant Moore, and the 
latter declared that unless the pole were cut down he 
would destroy the town. 

During the parley that followed a lumber sloop 
left Machias and lazily drifted toward the sea as if 
about to pass near the warship. The sloop, apparently 
badly handled, fouled the warship and instantly scores 
of Yankees boarded the foreign craft armed with 

[128] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



pitchforks, axes and muskets. A battle followed in 
which the Americans were victorious after losing six 
men and killing ten of the enemy, including Lieutenant 
Moore. This was the first Naval engagement of the 
Revolution. 

The lumber sloop was under the command of Jere- 
miah O'Brien and four of his brothers were in the 
crew. Joseph O'Brien, the youngest brother, was 
only sixteen years old and his request to form one of 
the party was refused. He smuggled himself aboard 
the craft and during the fight proved to be very much 
of a man. 

Lieutenant Moore's sword was given to Joseph 
O'Brien, the baby of the crew. 

OCTORORA 

GUNBOAT — DOUBLE-ENDER 

829 tons Six guns 

Named for Octorora Creek, Pennsylvania 

Launched December 7, 1861, at the Navy Yard, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Emma Hartt, daughter of Naval 
Constructor E. Hartt, and granddaughter of Naval 
Constructor Samuel Hartt, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. "Octorora" was engaged at Fort Morgan; 
engaged batteries at Vicksburg; in 1864 engaged Fort 
Powell; passed the Forts at Mobile lashed to the 
"Brooklyn" — Civil War. 



[129] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

OHIO (3D) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 388 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, i2,$oo tons 

Named for the State of Ohio 

{Which was admitted, to the Union in 1803) 

Launched May i8, 1901, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Deshler (Mrs. Charles 
Edward Brown), daughter of Mr. William G. Deshler, 
of Columbus, Ohio, and related to Governor George K. 
Nash, of Ohio. 

Miss Deshler was accompanied by Miss Louise 
Deshler and Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Sinks. 

Among those present were President McKinley and 
Mrs. McKinley, Secretary of State Hay, Secretary of 
Navy Long, Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, Secretary 
of Interior Hitchcock, Governor Nash of Ohio. 

" You may fire when ready, Gridley." — Dewey 

OLYMPIA 
unarmored protected cruiser 

Length, 340 feet Beam, 53 feet Draft, 21 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 5,865 tons 

Named for City of Olympia 

(The Capital of the State of Washington) 

Launched November 5, 1892, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna Belle Dickie, San Francisco 
California, daughter of the General Manager of the 
Union Iron Works. 

[130] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



At the launching, Miss Dickie's hand was cut with 
the broken glass, and Admiral Belknap, taking this 
little incident as an omen, predicted that the ship 
would be the first to shed blood for the new Navy. 
This prediction was fulfilled at Manila Bay. 

At the launching Miss Elsie Lilienthal, the daughter 
of a prominent San Francisco banker, cut the rope. 

U. S. S. *'01ympia'' was Commodore Dewey's flag- 
ship in the Battle of Manila Bay, Spanish-American 
War. 

OMAHA 

SLOOP-OF-WAR 

length, 250 feet Beam, 38 feet Draft, 16 feet 

Displacement, 2,4.00 tons 

Named for Omaha River 

Launched June lo, 1869, at the Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Kitty Marchand (Mrs. Valentine 
Nelson), daughter of Commodore Marchand, U. S. 
Navy. 

The naming ceremony was performed by Miss Kitty 
Marchand, daughter of the Commodore, who named 
the vessel "Astoria." The "Astoria" was re-named 
"Omaha." 

ONEIDA 

SCREW 

Nine guns Tonnage, i,02S 

Named for Oneida Lake, New York 

{Indian tribe name) 

Launched November 20, 1861, at the Navy Yard, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

[131] 



©o; 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Mary E. Meade (Mrs. James H. 
Sands), daughter of Post Captain Richard W. Meade, 
U. S. Navy, then in command of receiving ship 
** North CaroHna," at New York. Miss Meade chris- 
tened the ship with salt water. 

U. S. S. "Oneida" was with Farragut's fleet in the 
passage of Fort Jackson and Fort Philip April 24, 1862, 
and in the passage of Fort Morgan, 1864. 

ONONDAGA 

IRONCLAD 

FouT guns Tonnage, 1,2^0 

Named for Onondaga, New York 

(Indian tribe name) 

Launched July 29, 1863, at Continental Iron Works, 
Greenpoint, Long Island. 

Sponsor: Miss Sallie Sedgwick, daughter of 
Senator Sedgwick, of Onondaga, New York. 

"The baptism of the 'Onondaga' was to have been 
preformed by Miss Quintard, the daughter of the 
designer. On Saturday she visited the vessel, entering 
with spirit into the plans for the extensive festivities 
of the launch. On Tuesday she was dead, having 
fallen a victim to a malignant disease. The christen- 
ing was performed by little Miss Sedgwick." — New 
York Herald. 

In the Civil War the "Onondaga" had active service 
in James River. 



[132] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



OREGON (2D) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 348 feet Beam, 69 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 10,288 tons 

Named for the State of Oregon 

{Which was admiued to the Union in 1859) 

Launched October 26, 1893, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Daisy Ainsworth (Mrs. Percy 
Tredegar Morgan), daughter of Captain J. C. Ains- 
worth, President of the Oregon Steam Navigation 
Company, who was the pioneer of river navigation 
in Oregon and Washington, and in the development 
of the entire Northwest. 

Miss Eugenia Shelby, of Portland, Oregon, pressed 
the button that released the vessel. 

U. S. S. "Oregon" was in action with Cervera's 
fleet. Battle of Santiago, July 3, 1898, following a 
record-breaking trip from the Pacific. 



OSSIPEE 

STEAM SLOOP-OF-WAR 

Length, 207 feet Beam, 38 feet Draft, 13 feet 

Displacement, 1,240 tons 

Named for Ossipee River 

{Ossipee Indian tribe) 

Launched November i6, 1861, at the Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. McFarland, wife of the Editor of 
the Concord Statesman, assisted by Mrs. Sawyer. 

[133] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



U. S. S. "Ossipee'* passed Forts of Mobile with the 
*' Itasca," May 14, 1865. Was at the surrender of 
Fort Morgan, August 23, 1865. 

OZARK (3D) (Formerly ARKANSAS, ist) 

S I N G L E - T U R R E T MONITOR 

Length, 252 feet Beam, so feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 3,223 tons 

Named for the State of Arkansas 

{Re-named for Ozark, Arkansas) 

Launched November lo, 1900, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Bobbie Newton Jones, daughter 
of Governor Daniel W. Jones, of Arkansas, named 
the Monitor "Arkansas." 

PADUCAH 

COMPOSITE GUNBOAT 

Length, 174 feet Beam, 55 feel Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 1,085 ^°^^ 

Named for the City of Paducah, Kentucky 

Launched October ii, 1904, at Gas Engine & Power 
Company and Charles L. Seabury & Company, Morris 
Heights, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna May Yeiser, daughter of 
Hon. D. A. Yeiser, Mayor of Paducah, Kentucky. 

Miss Yeiser was attended by Mrs. Henry Craig 
Yeiser, Cincinnati, Ohio, Miss Florence Yeiser, and 
Miss Aline Bagby, Paducah, Kentucky. 

Among those present were Mr. Henry Craig Yeiser, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Mr. Edwin J. Paxton, Paducah, 

[134] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Kentucky, Mr. Urey Woodson, Owensboro, Kentucky, 
Miss Frances Gould, Paducah, Kentucky. 

PARKER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 30s feet Beam, 31 feet Draft, 9 feet 

Displacement, 1,010 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Foxhall Alexander 

Parker, U. S. Navy 

Launched February 8, 1913, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry W. Hand (Elizabeth Sheble), 
wife of the Vice-President of the Shipbuilding Company. 

ReAR-ADMIRAL FOXHALL ALEXANDER PAR- 
KER, U. S. Navy, was born in New York in 1821. 
Appointed Midshipman in 1837. In the Civil War 
co-operated with the Army of the Potomac. Pro- 
tected Alexandria, Virginia, after the Battle of Bull 
Run, Active service off Charleston, South Carolina. 
Commanded Naval Battery at the bombardment of 
Fort Sumter. Commanded the Potomac Flotilla. 
Commissioned as Captain for good service in Civil 
War. In 1872 drew up a code of signals for Steam 
Tactics. Was the author of Fleet Tactics Under 
Steam, The Naval Howitzer Afloat and other valu- 
able works. Was one of the founders of the U. S. 
Naval Institute. 



[135] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

PATTERSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 287 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Commodore Daniel Todd Patterson, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 29, 1911, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Georgeanne Pollock Patterson, 
of Washington, daughter of Rear-Admiral Thomas 
Harman Patterson, and granddaughter of Commodore 
Daniel Todd Patterson. Her brother. Colonel R. H. 
Patterson, U. S. Army, accompanied her to the launch- 
ing, also a party of friends from Washington. 

The vessel slid down the ways almost before Miss 
Patterson could swing the bottle of champagne against 
the steel prow and say: "I name thee 'Patterson,' 
and good luck!" The destroyer swept across the 
Delaware River, uproariously saluted by river craft, 
while buglers from League Island Navy Yard sounded 
a fanfare. 

Commodore daniel todd Patterson 

entered the United States Navy in 1800. Captured on 
U. S. Frigate "Philadelphia" by Tripolitans. Prisoner 
of war three years. Commanded Naval forces at New 
Orleans, 1813. Co-operated with Major-General Jack- 
son at Battle of New Orleans, and for his splendid 
services there received the approval of the United 
States Congress and thanks of the Legislature of the 
State of New York. One of the Naval Commissioners 

[136] 





eosT^ 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



during President Jackson's Administration. Twice 
commanded the Mediterranean Fleet; flagships, 
"United States" and "Delaware.' 



>> 



PAULDING 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 28q feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Hiram Paulding, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched April 12, 1910, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Emma Paulding, granddaughter of 
Rear-Admiral Hiram Paulding, and daughter of Rear- 
Admiral Leonard Paulding, U. S. Navy. 

Rear-admiral hiram paulding, u. s. 

Navy, was born in New York in 1797. Appointed 
Midshipman in 1 811. In War of 181 2, in the "Presi- 
dent" and "Ticonderoga," took part in the actions 
with the British fleet on Lake Champlain. In 1815 
served in the "Constellation" in War with Algiers 
and took part in capture of Algerine cruisers. Held 
many important commands. In 1861 was appointed 
by President Lincoln to assist the Navy Department 
in putting the Navy afloat and other important opera- 
tions, which he performed with ability and zealous 
devotion to duty. 



[137] 



60-^0>^v 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

"/ have not yet begun to fight" — Paul Jones 

PAUL JONES (3D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 245 feet Beam, 23 feet Draft, 6 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Commodore John Paul Jones, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched June 14, 1902, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Elizabeth Goldsborough Adams, 
wih of Naval Constructor L. S. Adams, U. S. Navy, 
on duty at the Union Iron Works at the time. 

Commodore john paul jones, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Scotland in 1747. In 1775 was appointed 
First Lieutenant of the "Alfred," the first American 
flagship. He hoisted the first Continental flag afloat, 
the yellow flag with rattlesnake and pine tree. In 
1776, in command of the "Alfred" and "Providence," 
captured many prizes. 

In command of the "Ranger," at Quiberon Bay, 
February 14, 1778, he received from the French fleet 
the first salute to the Stars and Stripes. In the 
"Ranger," captured the British sloop-of-war "Drake." 
Jones was the terror of British shipping and seaport 
towns. 

In 1779, in the "Bon Homme Richard," whipped 
the "Serapis" after his own ship was practically a 
wreck. He moved his men to the "Serapis" just 
before his own ship went down, saying, "I have not 
yet begun to fight." 

Commodore Jones was knighted by France and pre- 
sented with a sword by the king. Congress gave him 

[138] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



a vote of thanks and command of the *' America," then 
building. The "America" was the first ship-of-the- 
hne launched in America and Paul Jones was aboard. 

PAWNEE 

STEAM SLOOP 

Tonnage, i,28j Fifteen guns 

Named for Pawnee River 

{Indian tribe name) 

Launched October 8, 1859, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Grace Tyler (Mrs. John B. 
Scotia), daughter of Mr. Robert Tyler, named the 
vessel in the presence of an immense crowd, and broke 
a bottle of claret over the figurehead, a great Pawnee 
chief. 

U. S. S. "Pawnee" in 1861 took part in attack on 
Fort Sumter; in second engagement of Potomac 
Flotilla; engagement at Matthias Point; expedition 
at Hatteras Inlet; Battle of Port Royal. In 1862 
capture of Fernandina. 

PAWTUXET 

SIDE WHEELER 

Eight guns Tonnage, gj6 

Named for the Pawtuxet River 

Took part in first attack on Fort Fisher 1864, second 
attack on Fort Fisher 1865. Attack on Fort Anderson, 
1865. 

The "Pawtuxet" was launched March 19, 1863, 
at the Navy Yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 

[139] 



©OST.- 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Anna M. Vanderbilt, of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

"At eleven-thirty a. m. a large and gay company 
were on board to be launched in the new steamer. 
Miss Anna M. Vanderbilt, of Philadelphia, a fair, 
graceful and accomplished young lady, had been se- 
lected to christen the ship. 

" In a moment it started with its precious freight and 
slowly and steadily it rushed to the water, its home 
and resting place. As soon as it had fairly bathed 
itself, Miss Vanderbilt broke over the side a bottle of 
wine and sea water commingled and christened it the 
* Pawtuxet' and bade it success in its important work. 

"The company after the launch retired to a hall, 
where they enjoyed themselves in a social dance for 
a few hours. There was a liberal display of female 
beauty on this occasion, and Portsmouth can boast 
of as many as in the State." — From the Independent 
'Democrat. 

PENNSYLVANIA (ist) 

S H I P - O F - T H E - L I N E 

I20 guns Tonnage, 3,241 

Named for the State of Pennsylvania 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1787) 

Launched July i8, 1837, at the Navy Yard, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Commodore James Biddle, U. S. Navy. 

"The navy yard and public storehouses were filled, 
and the wharves presented one uninterrupted dense 
mass of spectators. The multitude was estimated 
at the lowest calculation to comprise one hundred 
thousand persons. Two cannons, discharged in rapid 

[140] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



succession, told in a voice not to be misunderstood, 
that in ten minutes the launch would take place. 

"The sturdy shipwrights had already quitted their 
repose and with ponderous strokes were knocking 
away the beams supporting the vessel. Some three 
hundred, as we are informed, lent their strength to 
the work of liberation, and the echoing blows were fast 
dying away for the still more welcome sound of the 
battering-ram, sent with huge force against the bows. 
Instantly there was great agitation throughout the 
multitude, we could even see its effect in the sister 
state of New Jersey. The cry ' she moves ' rose from 
a hundred thousand lips. The band struck up our 
national hymn, the cannon roared, the thousands on 
ship and shore again and again iterated their glad and 
mutual huzzas. 

"As she met her element, Commodore James Biddle, 
seated at the giant figurehead of Hercules, gave her 
name, 'Pennsylvania,' with the appropriate cere- 
monies. 

" Commodore Stewart, Commandant of the Navy 
Yard, and Captain Read were among the distinguished 
officers on board." — The National Gazette. 



PENNSYLVANIA (2d) 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 502 feet Beam, 6q feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 13,680 tons 

Named for the State of Pennsylvania 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 17S/) 

Launched August 22, 1903, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

[ 141 ] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Coral Quay, daughter of Hon. 
Matthew S. Quay, United States Senator from Penn- 
sylvania. 

Among those present were Governor Pennypacker 
of Pennsylvania, Senator Quay, Senator Penrose, 
Admiral C. D. Sigsbee, U. S. Navy, Mayor Weaver of 
Philadelphia, and an immense throng of spectators. 

PENSACOLA 

STEAM SLOOP-OF-WAR 

Length, 230 feet Beam, 44 feet Draft, 18 feet, 7 inches 

Displacement, 3,000 tons 

Named for Pensacola, Florida 

Launched August 13, 1859, at the Pensacola Navy- 
Yard, Florida. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Moreno Mallory (Mrs. 
Henry Bishop), daughter of the Hon. Stephen R. 
Mallory, afterward Secretary of the Confederate States 
Navy. 

The gangway headboards of the ** Pensacola" were 
decorated with cornucopias — "horns of plenty," Pen- 
sacola being the Indian word for "plenty." 

U. S. S. "Pensacola" was with Farragut's squadron 
in the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip April 
1864. Took part in Battle of New Orleans and Battle 
of Mobile Bay. 

PEQUOT 

SCREW STEAMER 

Tonnage, 5pj Ten guns 

Named for Pequot River 

Launched June 4, 1863, at the Navy Yard, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts. 
[142] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Baury, daughter of Reverend Doctor 
Baury of Boston. 

U. S. S. *Pequot" in 1864 took part in operations 
on James River; took part in bombardment of Fort 
Fisher. In 1865 shared in capture of Fort Fisher; 
capture of Fort Anderson. 



PERKINS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Commodore George Hamilton Perkins, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 9, 1910, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Larz Anderson (Isabel Weld 
Perkins), Washington, District of Columbia, daughter 
of Commodore George Hamilton Perkins. 

Commodore george Hamilton perkins, 

U. S. Navy, was born at Hopkinton, New Hampshire, 
October 20, 1835, died in Boston, Massachusetts, 
October 28, 1899. Entered the Navy as Midshipman 
in 1 85 1 and served his country with honor forty-eight 
years. His intrepid conduct at the passage of the 
forts below New Orleans in 1862 — his heroism in the 
surrender of that city — his skill and daring on notable 
occasions on the Mississippi River and in the Gulf of 
Mexico — and his achievements in Battle of Mobile 
Bay August 5, 1 864, when as commander of the " Chick- 
asaw" he compelled the surrender of the "Tennessee" 
— won from the Navy unqualified admiration and 

[ 143 ] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

from Farragut these words: "The bravest man that 
ever trod the deck of a ship." 

He participated in the actions at Forts Jackson and 
St. PhiUp, April 24, 1862; capture of the "Governor 
Moore" and three ships of the Montgomery Flotilla, 
and the surrender of New Orleans April 25, 1862; 
skirmishes on the Mississippi River, July, 1862; Port 
Hudson and Whitehall's River, July, 1862; capture 
of the "Mary Sorley" and capture of the "Tennessee," 
August 5, 1864; Battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 
1864; Fort Powell, Fort Gaines and Fort Morgan, 
August, 1864. 

" We have met the enemy and they are ours.'' — Perry 

PERRY (3D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 24s feet Beam, 2j feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 27, 1900, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Maud O'Connor, daughter of Cor- 
nelius O'Connor. 

Commodore Oliver hazard perry, u. 

S. Navy, was the son of Captain Christopher Ray- 
mond Perry, U. S. Navy, a distinguished officer of the 
Revolutionary War. Born in Rhode Island in 1785. 
Appointed Midshipman in 1799. Served in the Tri- 
politan War and was promoted to Acting Lieutenant 
at seventeen. His most conspicuous service was in the 
War of 1 81 2. He led the boats in Commodore Chaun- 
cey's attack on Fort George in 1813. Later, com- 

[144] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



manded forces on Lake Erie. Defeated the English 
Squadron in the battle of Lake Erie. He received a 
gold medal for this victory. 

Captain Matthew Calbraith Perry, U. S. Navy, 
brother of Commodore Perry, was born in 1795. 
Appointed Midshipman in 1809. Served in the War 
of 181 2. Commanded the Gulf Fleet in the Mexican 
War. In 1853, in command of East India Squadron, 
went to Japan and effected a treaty which opened 
Japanese ports to American commerce. 

PETREL 

GUNBOAT 

Length, i8l feet Beam, j/ feet Draft, ii feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 890 tons 

Named for the Petrel 

{A sea bird, frequenting the high seas and rarely landing) 

Launched October 13, 1888, at the Columbian Iron 
Works, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Virginia Schley (Mrs. Ralph M. 
Stuart Wortley), daughter of Captain Winfield Scott 
Schley, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. "Petrel" was in the squadron of Commodore 
Dewey at the Battle of Manila Bay, May i, 1898, 
Spanish-American War. 

PHILADELPHIA (ist) 

FRIGATE 

Forty-four guns Tonnage, 1,240 

Named for the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Built at Philadelphia in 1799 by subscriptions of 
the merchants of that city and cost ^179,349. 

[ 145 ] 



ships of the united states navy 

"The Launch" 

"Frigate City of Philadelphia" 

" At half past two o'clock yesterday (Thursday, Nov. 
28, 1799) afternoon this elegant ship was safely launched 
into the Delaware accompanied by the acclamations 
of thousands of spectators who lined the shore. As 
soon as she was afloat salutes were fired from the 
'Augusta' and the 'Richmond,' armed brigs lying at 
anchor in the cove. 

" The tide serving at an earlier hour than was ex- 
pected, owing to a strong wind from the southeast, the 
launch took place sooner than was intended, by which 
a great number of people who promised themselves the 
pleasure of viewing this beautiful operation were dis- 
appointed, but who were, however, much gratified by 
afterwards seeing one of the finest ships ever built 
in this country safely moored." — Philadelphia Gazette. 

She was known in the U. S. Navy as the "Phila- 
delphia." 

Note. — The "Philadelphia" sailed on her third cruise July 28, 1803, 
commanded by Captain William Bainbridge, for the Mediterranean. While 
chasing a Tripolitan corsair, October 31, 1803, she ran on an uncharted rock 
in the harbor of Tripoli, where the wreck still lies. In 1804, U. S. Navy 
Volunteers embarked in the ketch " Intrepid " and set her on fire, under 
Tripolitan guns. 

PHILADELPHIA (2d) 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 327 feet Beam, 48 feet Draft, 19 feet 

Displacement, 4,410 tons 

Named for City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Launched September 17, 1889, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

[146] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Minnie Wanamaker (Mrs. Bar- 
clay Warburton), daughter of Hon. John Wanamaker, 
Postmaster-General of the United States. 

Among those present were Mrs. Benjamin Harrison, 
wife of the President of the United States, the Hon. 
John Wanamaker, many prominent officials and an 
immiense crowd of spectators. 

PLYMOUTH 
sloop-of-war 

gSg tons Twenty-two guns 

Named for Plymouth, Massachusetts 

{Where the "Mayflower" landed in 1620) 

In Commodore Perry's Squadron in the expedition 
-to Japan in 1853. 

Launched May 31, 1836, at the Navy Yard, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts. 

*'The weather was delightful, the sea smooth, and 
hosts of ladies and gentlemen were present to witness 
the pleasing spectacle. A band of music, stationed 
in the shiphouse, enlivened the scene by playing several 
national airs. When all was ready, the connecting 
planks were cut, the band struck up 'Yankee Doodle,' 
and gracefully the * Plymouth' glided along the inclined 
plane into her destined element, saluted by the huzzas 
and cheers of the spectators. The Yankee jack, as 
she skimmed along the water, displayed its stars from 
a flag-staff at the fore, the long streaming pennant 
waved at the main, and the glorious stripes and stars 
swelled out in naval pride from her mizzen. Two 
young sailors, one stationed at each side of her head, 
anointed her with bottles, and named her as she left 

[ 147 1 



sosr5>. 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

the cradle for the deep." — From a newspaper clipping 
pasted in a Register for 1842, by Commodore Preble. 

PORTER 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, //J feet Beam, // feet Draft, 4 feet, 8 inches 

Displacement, 16$ tons 

Named for Commodore David Porter, U. S. Navy, 
AND HIS Son, Admiral David Dixon Porter, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 9, 1896, at Herreshoff Manu- 
facturing Company, Bristol, Rhode Island. 

Sponsor: Miss Agnes M. Herreshoff, daughter 
of Mr. Nathaniel G. Herreshoff, the designer of the 
"Porter." 

Commodore david porter, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1780. Appointed 
Midshipman in 1798. In 1799 took part in the fight 
between the "Constellation" and "LTnsurgente." 
In 1803 was captured in the "Philadelphia" at Tripoli. 
In 1 81 2, in command of frigate "Essex," had a most 
adventurous career, making many captures of British 
packets and crippling British commerce. In 1813 
cruised in the Pacific and captured many vessels. In 
1 8 14, at Valparaiso, surrendered the "Essex" to 
superior force of British frigates "Phoebe" and 
"Cherub" only when his own ship was too disabled 
to offer resistance longer, the contest having been 
unequal in every way. 

Admiral David Dixon Porter, U. S. Navy, son of 
Commodore Porter, was born in 181 3. Appointed 
Midshipman in U. S. Navy in 1829. In the Mexican 

[148] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



War served with distinction in the " Spitfire." En- 
gaged in every action on the coast. In the Civil War 
rose from Lieutenant to Admiral in two years. In 
1862 Commander Porter commanded the mortar boat 
flotilla under Farragut at the passage of Forts Jack- 
son and St. Philip. Bombarded forts at Vicksburg. 
Commanded the Mississippi Squadron as Acting Rear- 
Admiral. In 1863 co-operated with General Sherman 
in capture of Arkansas Port, for which he received a 
vote of thanks of Congress. Co-operated with General 
Grant in the capture of Vicksburg. Received thanks 
of Congress and promotion to Rear-Admiral. In 
command of North Atlantic Blockading Squadron 
bombarded forts at Cape Fear River. Commanded 
Naval forces at Fort Fisher and for his brilliant work 
received thanks of Congress for the fourth time. In 
1866 was made Vice-Admiral. In 1870 was made 
Admiral of the Navy. 

PREBLE (3D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 24J feet Beam, 23 feet Draft, 6 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Commodore Edward Preble, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 2, 1901, at the Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Ethel Preble, of San Francisco. 

Commodore edward preble, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Maine in 1761. In 1779, in the Provincial 
Marines of Massachusetts, as Midshipman, he distin- 
guished himself in the fight between the "Protector" 

[ 149 ] 



larr T, 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

and the British privateer "General Duff." He was 
later captured and imprisoned in the prison ship 
"Jersey." In 1799 was commissioned Lieutenant in 
the U. S. Navy. In 1803-1804, in his flagship "Con- 
stitution," he performed brilliant service in command 
of the fleet at Tripoli which made the six great attacks 
and finally effected peace. He received a gold medal 
and thanks of Congress. 

PRESTON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 28g feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, joo tons 

Named for Lieutenant Samuel W. Preston, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 14, 1909, at New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Katherine Magoun, daughter of 
the Vice-President of the New York Shipbuilding 
Company. 

Lieutenant samuel w. preston, u. s. 

Navy, was appointed Naval Cadet in 1858. He was 
Dahlgren's Flag Lieutenant in 1862. Was commended 
by Admiral Dahlgren for gallant conduct. Was taken 
prisoner at the assault on Fort Sumter, September 8, 
1863, and confined in Libby Prison for months. When 
released, he became Flag Lieutenant to Admiral Porter. 
Took part in exploding powder boat "Louisiana" 
under Fort Fisher. Was recommended for promo- 
tion for daring and bravery. Was killed while assault- 
ing Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865. In reporting his 
loss, his commanding officer said: "He fell the fore- 
most, at the front." 
[150] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 

PRINCETON (1ST) 

SCREW 

6y2 tons 

Named for Princeton, New Jersey 

{Prominent in Revolutionary history and the scene of the Battle of Princeton) 

Launched December lo, 1843, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Lieutenant Edward R. Thompson, U. S. 

Navy. 

"Notwithstanding the pitiless rain a crowd 

gathered in the Navy Yard. Within the shiphouse a 
goodly company of ladies and gentlemen had gathered. 
On board were two or three hundred people many of 
whom endangered their necks by venturing leaning 
down to get a look at the new engine below. 

"A sharp crashing sound was heard and as the vessel 
glided out of the shiphouse into the water Lieuten- 
ant Thompson gave the vessel her name according to 
time-honored custom, and broke a bottle of American 
whiskey over the bow. 

*'A committee of members of the Franklin Institute 
was posted on the platform surrounding the ways 
with an instrument for the purpose of ascertaining the 
velocity with which the ship went down the ways. As 
she moved off the ways the 'Star Spangled Banner' 
rang out and cheers loud and long mingled with the 
roar of cannon. The Secretary of the Navy, Hon. 
David Henshaw, and the City Authorities were on 
board. 

"Just before the vessel was released Captain Stock- 
ton, U. S. Navy, who was in charge, assembled those 

[iSi] 



'Oa> 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

on board and a prayer was offered by the Rev. Doctor 
Suddards: 

"'Eternal God, Creator of the Universe, Governor 
of Nations. Humbly we prostrate ourselves before 
Thee and ask Thy blessing. Most humbly we beseech 
Thee with Thy favor to behold and bless Thy servant 
the President of the United States and all the officers 
of the Government. May the vessel about to be 
launched be guarded by Thy gracious Providence and 
care. May it not bear the sword in vain, but as the 
minister of God be a terror to those who do evil and a 
defense to those who do well. Graciously bless its 
officers and men. May love of country be engraven 
upon their hearts. Remember in mercy both arms 
of our National defense, and may virtue, honor and 
religion pervade all their ranks. Bless all nations 
and individuals on the earth and hasten the time when 
the benefits of holy religion shall have so prevailed 
that none shall wage war again for the purpose of 
aggression and none shall need it as a means of defense. 
All of which blessings we ask in the name of Him who 
taught us to say: "Our Father who art in Heaven" 
... — U.S. Gazette. 

This is the single instance found in examined records 
of any religious service at the launching of a U. S. 
Navy ship. 

The "Princeton" was the first screw vessel of war 
ever built. The propeller was invented by Ericsson. 
The engine was from the works of Merrick & Towne. 

In 1884, the Princeton's 12-inch gun burst, and killed the Secretary of State, 
the Secretary of the Navy, Captain Kennon and Colonel Gardiner. 



[152] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



PRINCETON (2d) 

COMPOSITE GUNBOAT 

Length, i68 feet Beam, 36 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 1,010 tons 

Named for City of Princeton, New Jersey, 
AND U. S. S. " Princeton " 

Launched June 3, 1897, at the yard of John H. 
Dialogue & Son, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaretta Updike (Mrs. Allan 
Corson), daughter of Hon. E. Mulford Updike, Mayor 
of Princeton, New Jersey. 

The launch was attended by a large delegation of 
citizens and officials of Princeton, including a delega- 
tion from Princeton University. All wore badges 
"Launching of the 'Princeton'" in Princeton colors. 
The champagne bottle was decorated with streamers 
of Princeton colors. 

U. S. S. " Princeton" was in the North Atlantic Fleet, 
Spanish-American War. 

PURITAN (2d) 
double turret monitor 

Length, 2Q0 feet Beam, 60 feet Draft, 18 feet 

Displacement, 6,060 tons 

Named for New England Puritans 

Launched December 6, 1882, at the yard of John 
Roach & Sons, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Fales, of Newport, Rhode Island. 
U. S. S. "Puritan" took part in operations off San 
Juan, Porto Rico, Spanish-American War. 

[153] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

QUINNEBAUG 

STEAM SLOOP 

Tonnage, 8jr 

Named for Quinnebaug River 

Launched March 31, 1866, at the Navy Yard, Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Lieutenant Commander David B. Har- 
mony, U S. Navy. 

As the vessel entered the water Lieutenant Com- 
mander Harmony broke a bottle of water over her 
bow and pronounced her name. 

RALEIGH (2d) 
unarmored protected cruiser 

Length 300 feet Beam, 4.2 feet Draft, 18 feet 

Displacement, 3,183 tons 

Named for the City of Raleigh 

{Capital of North Carolina) 

Launched March 31, 1892, at the Navy Yard, Nor- 
folk, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Alfred W. Haywood, daughter 
of Governor Thomas M. Holt, of North Carolina. 

The Secretary of the Navy, Benjamin F. Tracy, 
was present. Governor Holt and Staff were escorted by 
the Edgecombe Guards of Tarboro, North Carolina, 
also by the 4th Regiment Va. Vols.; and the Norfolk 
Blues and Grant Battery. A large number of represen- 
tatives from North Carolina were present. An im- 
mense assemblage witnessed the ceremonies and the 
scene had all the brilliancy of a Navy Yard launching 
attended by many officials in uniform. 

[154] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



U.S.S." Raleigh'* was in the squadron of Commodore 
George Dewey, Battle of Manila Bay, May i, 1898. 

RARITAN 

FRIGATE 

Forty-four guns Tonnage, i.,726 

Named for Raritan River 

Launched June 13, 1843, at the Navy Yard, Phila- 
dephia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Commander Frederick Engle, U. S. 

Navy. 

After twenty-two years' repose beneath the roof 
of the shiphouse the frigate "Raritan" was launched. 
At the firing of a gun the sound was heard of mauls 
splitting the blocks and the "Raritan" glided out of 
the house into the water. As the National Air was 
played Captain Engle stood at the bow and, break- 
ing over the figurehead a bottle of choice whiskey, 
named the ship. Secretary of the Navy Upshur was 
present and an enormous crowd of spectators. 

REID 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, S feet 

Displacement, yoo tons 

Named for Captain Samuel Chester Reid, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 17, 1909, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Lina Andrews, Bath, Maine, niece 
of the President of the Bath Iron Works. 

[iS5l 



SSsi^ 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Captain samuel Chester reid, u. s. 

Navy, was born in 1783. He served as Acting Mid- 
shipman under Commodore Truxtun. In War of 1812 
commanded the privateer ''General Armstrong." In 
September, 18 14, in the harbor of Fayal, was attacked 
by the boats of three British men-of-war. Reid 
defeated and scattered the enemy and scuttled his 
own ship to prevent capture. He received the com- 
mendation of Congress for this remarkable battle. 
Captain Reid was appointed a Sailing Master in the 
Navy and held the position until his death. 

RHODE ISLAND (20) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 43 j feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, 14,948 tons 

Named for the State of Rhode Island 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1790) 

Launched May 17, 1904, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. F. C. Dumaine, wife of one of the 
Directors of the Fore River Shipbuilding Company. 

RICHMOND (2d) 

STEAM SLOOP 

Length, 22s feet Beam, 42 feet Draft, 17 feet 

Displacement, 2,700 tons 

Named for the City of Richmond 

(Capital of Virginia) 

Launched January 26, i860, at the Navy Yard, 
Norfolk, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Robb, at whose side stood Miss 
Berryman. 

[156] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



The Norfolk "Day Book "gave the following account: 
"This morning, the signal being given by Construc- 
tor Pook, the gunboat 'Richmond' was let from her 
warp and consigned to her native element. From a 
fair calculation we are led to believe that twelve thou- 
sand persons were present. As the 'Richmond' 
glided off she was welcomed by a salute from the 
'Pennsylvania.' We are sorry to mention that on 
account of the great quantity of crinoline that was 
present in the crowd many of the young men were 
prevented from seeing the launch, on account of which 
a meeting will be called in a few days for the purpose 
of petitioning the Legislature to allow each of the fair 
sex so much circumference and no more." 

U. S. S. "Richmond," in Civil War, took part in 
battle of Mobile Bay, attacks on Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip and Port Hudson. 



RODGERS 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, i6o feet Beam, i6 feet Draft, 5 feet 

Displacement, 142 tons 

Named for Commodore John Rodgers, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November lo, 1896, at the Columbian 
Iron Works, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Elsie Carroll Agnus, grand- 
daughter of Charles Carroll Fulton, of Baltimore. 

Commodore john rodgers, u. s. Navy, 

was born in 1771. Entered the Navy as Lieutenant 
in 1798. Was executive officer of the "Constellation" 

[IS7] 



aosrg;^^ 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

when she captured the French frigate "L'Insurgente'* 
in 1799, for which he and the other officers received a 
silver medal and thanks of Congress. In the War with 
TripoH, distinguished himself in command of the 
*'John Adams" and the "Congress." In 1805 became 
commander of the squadron against Tripoli. In War 
of 1 81 2 performed conspicuous service in command of 
a squadron. In 1823 he served as Acting Secretary 
of the Navy. 

Captain George W. Rodgers, U. S. Navy (brother 
of Commodore John). Midshipman in 1804. Was on 
board the "Wasp" when she captured the "Frolic," 
October 16, 181 2. Received the thanks of Congress. 

Rear-Admiral John Rodgers, U. S. Navy (son of 
Commodore John). Born in Maryland in 181 2. 
Appointed Midshipman in 1828. In May, 1862, in 
the "Galena," was in command of the expedition of 
gunboats before Drury's Bluff, when two-thirds of the 
crew of the "Galena" were killed and wounded. In 
the "Weehawken," captured Confederate ironclad 
"Atlanta," June, 1863. 

Rear-Admiral Christopher R. P. Rodgers, U. S. 
Navy (son of Captain George W.). Appointed Mid- 
shipman in 1833. Served in Mexican War. Dis- 
tinguished as Fleet Captain under Admiral Dupont in 
the battle of Port Royal, 1861, and in capture of Fort 
Pulaski, 1862. Also as Fleet Captain at Charleston in 
the "New Ironsides," 1863. Admiral Dupont said: 
"No language could overstate his services to his 
country and to myself." 

Commander George W. Rodgers, U. S. Navy (son 
of Captain George W.). Midshipman 1839. Was 
killed while in command of the "Catskill" at Fort 
Sumter, August 17, 1863. 

[158] 




e^ST^ 



/ 1 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



ROE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Francis A. Roe, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 24, 1909, at Newport News Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Reynold Thomas Hall (Anne 
Martin), wife of Captain Reynold T. Hall, U. S. Navy, 
Inspector of Machinery for the U. S. Navy at Newport 
News Shipbuilding Company at the time. 

Rear-admiral francis a. roe, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Elmira, New York, October 4, 1823. He 
graduated from the Naval Academy in 1848. In the 
"Porpoise," in 1854, engaged thirteen heavily armored 
Chinese junks, destroyed six and scattered the fleet. 
In the "Pensacola," 1862, he led the starboard column 
of Farragut's fleet at the passage of Forts Fisher and 
St. Philip and was commended for gallantry. In 
the ''Sassacus," May 5, 1864, in Albermarle Sound, 
engaged the Confederate ram "Albermarle" and 
gunboat "Bombshell." 

He was commended by the Navy Department for 
gallant and meritorious conduct. He received thanks 
of the Cabinet for a special mission to Mexico in 1867. 
He took Santa Anna prisoner from an American ship 
and sent him out of Mexico. He received the sur- 
render of Vera Cruz and established a provisional 
government. 

[1591 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

ROWAN 
TORPEDOBOAT 

Length, 170 feet Beam, ly feet Draft, 5 feet, 11 inches 

Displacement, 210 tons 

Named for Vice-Admiral Stephen C. Rowan, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 8, 1898, at the yard of Moran 
Brothers, Seattle, Washington. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edward Moale, Jr. (Mrs. Russell 
C. Langdon), wife of Lieutenant Edward Moale, U. S. 
Navy, and daughter of Ex-Governor Semple of 
Washington. 

Vice-admiral Stephen c. rowan, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Ireland in 1805. Was appointed 
Midshipman in the U. S. Navy in 1826. Took active 
part in the War with Mexico and in the acquisition of 
California. In 1861, in command of the ** Pawnee," 
took part in the capture of forts at Hatteras Inlet. 
In 1862 performed conspicuous services in command 
of a flotilla in Sounds of North Carolina, and in the 
attack of Army and Navy on Roanoke Island. 

For his brilliant achievements he was promoted to 
the rank of Commodore. Commanded Naval forces 
at the fall of Newbern and participated at Forts 
Wagner, Gregg and Moultrie. Commanded "New 
Ironsides" off Charleston. In 1870 was made Vice- 
Admiral of the Navy in recognition of distinguished 
service. 



[160] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



SACRAMENTO 

SLOOP 

Displacement, 1,367 tons Guns, Q 

Named for Sacramento River 

Launched April 28, 1862, at the Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Tilton, of Boston, christened the 
"Sacramento" "gallantly" by breaking a bottle on 
her bow. The company of ladies and gentlemen on 
board sang the "Star Spangled Banner" as she glided 
into the water. 

U. S. S. "Sacramento" captured schooner "Wan- 
derer" off Cape Fear River, 1863. Special service 
in search of privateers. 

SAGINAW 
side wheel steamer 

Four guns Tonnage, 4^3 

Named for Saginaw River 

Launched March 3, 1859, at the Navy Yard, Mare 
Island, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Cunningham, daughter of Captain 
Robert B. Cunningham, U. S. Navy. 

"As the beautiful fabric kissed the waters. Miss 
Cunningham performed the ceremony of Naval Bap- 
tism by breaking a bottle of wine, the generous fluid 
being of California vintage." — San Francisco Herald. 

First ship built at Mare Island. 



[i6i] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

SALEM 

UNARMORED SCOUT CRUISER 

Length, 420 feet Beam, 47 feet Drafty 16 feet, g inches 

Displacement, 3,750 tons 

Named for the City of Salem, Massachusetts 

Launched July 27, 1907, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Lorna Pinnock, daughter of Mayor 
Thomas G. Pinnock, of Salem, Massachusetts. 

Among those present were Admiral Francis T. 
Bowles, Mayor Thomas G. Pinnock, Hon. Alden R. 
White, Congressman Joseph F. O'Connell, Congress- 
man Charles Q. Tirrell, and City Marshal William 
E. Hill. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

UNARMORED PROTECTED CRUISER 

Length, 310 feet Beam, 49 feet Draft, 18 feet 

Displacement, 4,083 tons 

Named for City of San Francisco, California 

Launched October 26, 1889, at the Union Iron 
Works, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Edith Wallace Benham, young 
daughter of Commodore A. E. K. Benham, U. S. 
Navy, commanding Mare Island Navy Yard. Assisted 
by Miss Mary Scott, daughter of Vice-President 
Irving Scott of the Union Iron Works. 

U. S. S. "San Francisco" was under fire August 
12, 1898, off Havana, Spanish-American War. 

[162] 




©OSTo; 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



SANGAMON 

SINGLE TURRET MONITOR 

Guns, 4 Tonnage, 849 

Named for Indian Word "Chief'' 

Launched October 27, 1862, at the yard of Raney 
& Son, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Fannie Thomas (Mrs. Frederick 
T. Bassett), daughter of Mr. WilHam Knapp Thomas, 
who superintended the construction of the vessel for 
John Ericsson, the designer. Miss Thomas was in- 
vited by John Ericsson and Mr. Raney. 

U. S. S. "Sangamon" took part in bombardment of 
Fort Sumter, 1864, and in the occupation of Charleston 
and Fort Sumter in 1865. 



SAN JACINTO 

STEAM SLOOP 

Six guns Tonnage, 1,446 

Named for San Jacinto, Texas 

{Because of the great victory of the Texans over Santa Anna, April, 1826) 

Launched April i6, 1850, at the Navy Yard, Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Commander Charles H. Bell, U. S. 
Navy, second in command of the Navy Yard. 

"An immense crowd gathered to see the spectacle. 
A large number, including many respectable ladies, 
were on board by invitation. The deck of the 'North 
Carolina,' ship-of-the-line, was filled with fashionable 
females. The signal being given and the bolt with- 

[ 163 ] 



60sfs^ 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

drawn, Commander Bell broke a bottle of best brandy- 
over her bowsprit, her colors flew up and she slid 
down the ways. The 'North Carolina' fired a salute 
of seventeen guns and the band played national airs 
that touched a chord of pulsation in every true 
American/' — New York Herald. 

U. S. S. "San Jacinto" in 1861 took Mason and 
Slidell from British steamer "Trent." Captured a 
number of vessels. 



SAN MARCOS (Formerly TEXAS, ist) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 301 feet Beam, 64 feet Draft, 22 feet 

Displacement, 6,315 tons 

Named for the State of Texas 

{Re-named for town of San Marcos, Texas) 

Launched June 28, 1892, at the Navy Yard, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Madge Houston Williams (Mrs. 
Roy W. Hearne), daughter of Mr. W. H. Williams, and 
granddaughter of the famous Colonel Sam Houston, 
named the ship "Texas." 

The launching took place during a heavy rainstorm, 
and fifteen thousand people stood deep in mud to 
witness the ceremony. 

U. S. S. "Texas ist" was in bombardments of San- 
tiago June and July, 1898, Guantanamo June 12 and 
15, 1898, Spanish-American War. 



[164] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



SARATOGA (4™) (Formerly NEW YORK, 4th) 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 380 feet Beam, 64 feet Draft, 25 feet 

Displacement, 8,150 tons 

Re-named for City of Saratoga, New York 

( The scene of the Battle of Saratoga in 1777) 

Launched December 2, 1891, at William Cramp 
& Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Page (Mrs. Arthur Wheeler 
Francis), daughter of Mr. J. Seaver Page, Secretary 
of Union League Club, named the cruiser "New York" 
for the State of New York. 

Mrs. Harrison, wife of the President of the United 
States; Secretary of Navy Tracy and Secretary of 
Agriculture Noble were present. 

U. S. S. "New York" was Flagship of Admiral 
W. T. Sampson, Spanish-American War. Under fire off 
Matanzas, April 27, 1898; at San Juan, May 12, 1898; 
at Santiago, June 6 and 16 and July 2, 1898. 



SASSACUS 
side wheel double-ender 

Eight guns 974. tons 

Named for Indian Word "Tribe" 

Launched December 23, 1862, at the Navy Yard, 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Wilhelmina G. Lambert (Mrs. 
Clement D. Hebb), daughter of Mr. William Lambert. 

[165] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Miss Lizzie Benham and her father, General Henry 
W. Benham, attended Miss Lambert at the launching. 
Naval Constructor Hanscom said he wanted the pret- 
tiest girl in New Hampshire to name the vessel, and 
Miss Lambert was selected. 

U. S. S. *'Sassacus" in 1863, in company with the 
"Mattabassett," captured the Confederate "Bomb- 
shell" and disabled the "Albermarle." Took part in 
attacks on Fort Fisher. 

SEMINOLE 

STEAM SLOOP 

Tonnage, Sot 

Named for Seminole River 

Launched June 25, 1859, at the Navy Yard, Pensa- 
cola, Florida. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Willis Dallas (Mrs. Wil- 
liam Chase Strong), daughter of Commodore Dallas. 

United states ship " Seminole," lashed to the 
" Lackawanna," stood in line of battle at the passage of 
Fort Morgan. 

SEVERN (Formerly CHESAPEAKE 2d) 

SHEATHED TRAINING SHIP 

Length, 175 feet Beam, 37 feet Draft, 16 feet 

Displacement, 1,175 ^0^^ 

Named for the Frigate " Chesapeake " and 
Chesapeake Bay 

(Re-named for the River Severn) 

Launched June 20, 1899, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 
[166] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Elise Bradford (Mrs. Edward 
Darlington Johnson), daughter of Admiral R. B. 
Bradford, U. S. Navy, Chief of Bureau of Equipment 
at the time, named the ship "Chesapeake.'* 

SHAMROCK 
side wheel double-ender 

Eight guns Tonnage, gj4. 

Named for the Shamrock 

(/n acknowledgment of services rendered the Nation by Irish sailors and soldiers, and 
launched on their Patron Saint's day — St. Patrick's Day) 

Launched March 17, 1863, at the Navy Yard, Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Sallie Bryant, daughter of Mr. 
William Cullen Bryant, broke over the bows a bottle 
of pure Irish whiskey, bestowing upon the vessel the 
name "Shamrock." A beautiful shamrock wreath was 
presented to the Sponsor as a souvenir. 

United states ship "Shamrock" in 1864 took 
part in the capture of Plymouth, North Carolina. 
Raised the ram "Albemarle" sunk by Lieutenant 
Cushing in Roanoke River. 

SHAWMUT 

GUNBOAT 

Eight guns Tonnage, gy^f. 

^ Named for Indian Village of Shawmut, 

Massachusetts 

Launched June 15, 1863, at the Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. 

[167] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Lucy Hale (Mrs. William E. 
Chandler), of Dover, New Hampshire, assisted by 
Mrs. U. L. Hanscom. 

"Among those from abroad were Senators Hale 
and Clark of New Hampshire, while Portsmouth con- 
tributed lavishly of its wealth of female beauty." 

United states ship "Shawmut" took part in 
capture of Fort Anderson, February, 1865. 

SHENANDOAH 

SLOOP-OF-WAR 

Eleven guns Tonnage, 1,395 

Named for Shenandoah River 

Launched December 8, 1862, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Selina Pascoe. 

United states ship "Shenandoah" took part 
in attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864. 

SHUBRICK 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Lengthy 175 feet Beam, 17 feet Draft, 5 feet 

Displacement, 200 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral William Branford 
Shubrick, U. S. Navy 

Launched October 31, 1899, at the yard of William 
H. Trigg & Company, Richmond, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Caroline Shubrick, Mont Vale, 
North Carolina, daughter of Dr. John Shubrick, a 
descendant of Rear-Admiral Shubrick. 

[168] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



The President of the United States WilHam 
McKinley, Secretary of the Navy Long, and Governor 
Tyler of Virginia were present. 

Rear-admiral william branford shu- 

BRICK, U. S. Navy, was born in 1790. Was appointed 
Midshipman in 1806. He was a Lieutenant on the 
"Constitution" when she captured the "Cyane" and 
"Levant" in 1815. Active in the War with Mexico 
and captured the town of Mazatlan and other Mexi- 
can ports. In 1859, by prompt and decisive measures, 
made Paraguay apologize for firing on the U. S. S. 
"Waterwitch," for which service he was commended 
by the President of the United States. 



SMITH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Lengthy sSg feet Beamy 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, joo tons 

Named for Lieutenant Joseph Bryant Smith, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 20, 1909, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edward Bridge Richardson, 
daughter of Rear-Admiral John E. Pillsbury, a rela- 
tive of Lieutenant Smith. 

Lieutenant Joseph bryant smith was 

born in Maine in 1826. Entered the Navy in 1841. 
Commanded the "Congress" in the absence of the 
Captain when she was sunk by the Confederate ram 
"Merrimac" at Hampton Roads, March 8, 1862. 

[169] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

He was killed in the engagement. Lieutenant Smith's 
father was, at that time, Chief of Bureau of Yards and 
Docks at the Navy Department. While at church 
the morning after the battle, he was called out by the 
Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles, and told that 
the "Cumberland" had been sunk and that the "Con- 
gress" had surrendered to the enemy. The father's 
reply was "If that be so then Joe is dead — he would 
never have struck his flag." 

SONOMA 

PADDLE WHEEL STEAMER 

Tonnage, 955 

Named for Sonoma Creek, California 

Launched April 15, 1862, at the Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary N. Bleecker, a relative of 
Paymaster Bleecker, U. S. Navy, was invited by 
Admiral Stringham to name the ship. 

United states ship "Sonoma" took part in 
the capture of the "Virginia" in 1863, and in attack 
on Forts Beaulieu and Roseden. 

SOUTH CAROLINA (4TH) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 4J0 feet Beam, 80 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 16,000 tons 

Named for the State of South Carolina 

{Which ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched July ii, 1908, at William Cramp & Sons* 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

[170] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Frederica Ansel, daughter of the 
Hon. Martin F. Ansel, Governor of South Carohna. 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 502 feet Beam, 69 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 13,680 tons 

Named for the State of South Dakota 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1889) 

Launched July 21, 1904, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Grace Herreid (Mrs. Dean Light- 
ner), daughter of Governor Charles M. Herreid, of 
South Dakota. 

STERETT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 27 feet Draft, 8 feet, 4 inches 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Lieutenant Andrew Sterett, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 12, 1910, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Rosalie Gittings, of 
Baltimore, Maryland, the daughter of John Sterett 
Gittings, and great-great-niece of Lieutenant Andrew 
Sterett. 

Lieutenant Andrew sterett, u. s. Navy, 

was appointed a Lieutenant in 1798. He commanded 
the "Enterprise" and captured a Tripolitan cruiser in 
1 801, after four hours' fight, for which he received the 
thanks of Congress. 

[171] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

STEWART 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 245 feet Beamy 25 feet Draft, 6 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 420 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Charles Stewart, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May lo, 1902, at Gas Engine and Povi^er 
Company, Morris Heights, New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Paul Lee Cocke (Frances Rodney 
Stewart, granddaughter of Rear-Admiral Charles 
Stewart). 

Rear-admiral charles stewart, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Philadelphia in 1778. Appointed 
Lieutenant in the Navy, 1798. In 1800, in command 
of schooner "Experiment," captured French schooners 
"Deux Amis," the "Diane," and the privateer "Laura 
Bridger." In 1804 engaged in the attacks on Tripoli 
and in the destruction of the "Philadelphia." In 
181 2, in command of the "Constellation," assisted 
in the defense of Norfolk. In 181 5, in the "Con- 
stitution," after a gallant fight made the double cap- 
ture of the "Cyane" and "Levant." He received a 
gold medal and thanks of Congress. 

ST. LOUIS (2d) 
unarmored protected cruiser 

Length, 424 feet Beam, 66 feet Draft, 22 feet 

Displacement, 9,700 tons 

Named for the City of St. Louis, Missouri 

Launched May 6, 1905, at Neafie & Levy Ship and 
Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
[172] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Gladys Bryant Smith (Mrs. 
William C. Bitting, Jr.), daughter of Mr. James 
Elwood Smith, St. Louis, Missouri. Maids of Honor 
were Miss Rebecca Van Lennep and Miss Wright. 

STOCKTON 
torpedo boat 

Length, 17s U^^ Beam, 17 feet Draft, 5 feet 

Displacement, 200 tons 

Named for Commodore Robert F. Stockton, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 27, 1899, at the William Trigg 
Company, Richmond, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Katherine Stockton, Princeton, 
New Jersey, daughter of Mr. Bayard Stockton and 
great-granddaughter of Commodore Robert F.Stockton. 

Commodore Robert f. stockton, u. s. 

Navy, was born in New Jersey in 1796. Was 
appointed Midshipman in 1811. Served with dis- 
tinction in the War of 18 12 and was commended for 
gallantry. In 1821 he secured the purchase of Liberia. 
Captured many slave ships and a Portuguese privateer. 
His exploit in following the African **King Peter'' 
into the wilderness was daring enough to read like 
fiction. Commodore Stockton was one of the first 
to advocate a steam Navy, and the "Princeton," 
advocated by him, furnished the model of other screw 
vessels. In 1846 he took important part in the con- 
quest of California and establishing the authority of 
the United States. 

[173] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

STRINGHAM 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, 225 feet Beam, 22 feet Draft, 6 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 340 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Silas Horton 
Stringham, U. S. Navy 

Launched June lo, 1899, at the yard of Harlan 
& HoUingsworth, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Sponsor: Miss Edwina Stringham Creighton, 
daughter of Rear-Admiral J. Berkeley Creighton, and 
great-granddaughter of Rear-Admiral Silas Horton 
Stringham. 

Major-General of the Army Nelson A. Miles and 
Assistant Secretary of the Navy Charles H. Allen 
were present. 

Rear-admiral silas horton string- 
ham, U. S. Navy, was born in Middletown, New 
York, in 1798. Was appointed Midshipman in 1810. 
In 181 2 he was on the "President" in the fights with 
the "Belvedere" and the "Little Belt." In 1815 he 
took part in the capture of Algerine cruisers. In the 
Mexican War distinguished himself in command of 
the "Ohio." In 1861, in command of the North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, co-operated with 
General Butler in the successful attack on the forts at 
Hatteras Inlet. 



[■74] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



SWATARA 

SCREW SLOOP 

Ten guns Tonnage, 8^1 

Named for Swatara Creek in Pennsylvania 

Launched May 23, 1865, at the Navy Yard, Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Esther Johnson, of Baltimore, 
whose father was a Naval Officer. 

TACOMA 
unarmored protected cruiser 

Length, 2g2 feet Beam, 44 feet Draft, 15 feet 

Displacement, 3,200 tons 

Named for the City of Tacoma, Washington 

Launched June 2, 1903, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Julia M. Harris, of Tacoma, 
granddaughter of General Matthew Morton McCarver, 
who founded Tacoma, and daughter of a prominent 
lawyer of the city. Miss Louise Stone pressed the 
button that released the ship. 

TACONY 
side wheel 

Ten guns Tonnage, gj4 

Named for Tacony Creek, Pennsylvania 

Launched May 7, 1863, at the Navy Yard, Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Ellie M. Wells (Mrs. William H. 
Reeder), daughter of Lieutenant Commander Clark 
H. Wells, U. S. Navy, Captain of the Yard 

[175] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Between seven and eight hundred people were on 
board. As the bow touched the water Miss Wells 
broke a bottle of water taken from Tacony Creek and 
named the ship. 

TALLAHASSEE (Formerly FLORIDA, 3D) 

SINGLE T U R R E T - M O N I T O R 

Length, 252 jeet Beam, $0 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 3,225 tons 

Re-named for City of Tallahassee 

{Capital of Florida) 

Launched November 30, 1901, at the yard of Lewis 
Nixon, Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Sally Wood (Mrs. Lewis Nixon), 
daughter of General Wood, of Florida, a noted Indian 
fighter, named the ship "Florida." 

TALLAPOOSA 
double-ender 

Tonnage, 650 

Named for Tallapoosa River 

Launched February 17, 1863, at the Navy Yard, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Montgomery, daughter of 
Commodore J. B. Montgomery, U. S. Navy, named 
the vessel, saying: "In the name of the Government 
of the United States, I name this vessel 'Tallapoosa.' 
May her career be triumphant." 



[176] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



TENNESSEE (30) 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 502 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 25 feet 

Displacement, 14,500 tons 

Named for the State of Tennessee 

{JVhich was admitted to the Union in 1796) 

Launched December 3, 1904, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Annie Keith Frazier (Mrs. 
Robert Nugent Somerville), daughter of Governor 
James B. Frazier, of Tennessee. Maids of Honor 
were Miss Mary Guy Trigg, Miss Elizabeth 
Thomas, Miss Estelle Shook, Miss Augusta McKeldin 
and Miss Estelle Bailey. 

Governor and Mrs. Frazier and the Governor's 
entire military staff were present. The Governor's 
party alone comprised over fifty persons — many 
Army and Navy officers and prominent people. 

To the tune of countless shrieking whistles, the 
plaudits of a distinguished company, to the cheering 
of the multitude, the waving of a sea of snow-white 
handkerchiefs, was the cruiser ''Tennessee" launched. 
There was no sign of stage fright as Miss Frazier stood 
awaiting the signal. As the cruiser started down the 
ways the young Sponsor swung the bottle of champagne 
against the giant bow and in clear tones named her 
"Tennessee." Decked from stem to stern with a 
long line of flags of all nations flying from cords 
fastened to her fighting tops, the cruiser took the 
water without a hitch. A more inspiring scene could 
hardly be imagined, and in point of setting and bril- 
liancy the launching was never surpassed. 

[177I 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

TERROR 

DOUBLE TURRET MONITOR 

Lengthy 258 feet Beam, 55 jeet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, 3,900 tons 

Launched March 24, 1883, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Martha Highborn (Mrs. Paul 
Pearsall), daughter of Chief Constructor Philip Hich- 
born, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. "Terror" was engaged May 12, 1898, at 
San Juan, Porto Rico. 

TERRY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, ^42 tons 

Named for Commander Edward Terry, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 21, 1909, at Newport News 
Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George Henry Rock, wife of Naval 
Constructor G. H. Rock, U. S. Navy, on duty at 
Newport News at the time. 

Commander edward terry, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Connecticut. Was appointed Acting Mid- 
shipman in 1853. Was attached to the "Richmond" 
in her engagement with the Confederate ram "Ma- 
nassas" and steamers in the Mississippi River, and at 

[178] 



il- 




AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Fort McRea, 1861. At bombardments and passage 
of Forts Jackson and St. Philip in 1862, and at cap- 
ture of New Orleans. Was in the engagements at 
Vicksburg, Port Hudson, 1863, and the battle of 
Mobile Bay, 1864. 

TEXAS (2d) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, $6$ feet Beam, pj feet Draft, 28 feet 

Displacement, 28,367 tons 

Named for the State of Texas 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 184s) 

Launched May i8, 191 2, at Newport News Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Claudia Lyon, the young daughter 
of Colonel Cecil Lyon, Republican National Com- 
mitteeman from Texas. Miss Mary Colquitt, daugh- 
ter of Governor O. B. Colquitt of Texas, Miss Mae 
Furey, Miss Ura Link and Miss Garland Bonner were 
Maids of Honor. 

General Manager Homer G. Ferguson of the Ship- 
building Company initiated little Miss Lyon in the art 
of breaking the bottle. 

Among those present were Miss Helen Taft, daugh- 
ter of President Taft, Secretary of the Navy George 
von L. Meyer, Secretary of the Treasury Franklin 
MacVeagh, Colonel B. T. Bonner, representing Gover- 
nor Colquitt. Richmond Pearson Hobson, Naval 
hero and Congressman, responded to one of the toasts. 

Fifteen thousand people witnessed the launching. 
One of the interesting features of the launching was the 
taking of motion pictures of a launching for the first 

[179] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

time, and the releasing of the ship by two massive 
steel triggers instead of the sawing away of blocks. 

THORNTON 

TORPEDO BO AT 

Length, 175 feet Beam, 17 feet Draft, 5 feet 

Displacement, 200 tons 

Named for Captain James S. Thornton, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 15 1900, at the William Trigg 
Company, Richmond, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Thornton Davis, daughter 
of Mr. Charles Thornton Davis, Readville, Massa- 
chusetts, and grandniece of Captain James S. Thornton. 

Captain james s. thornton, u. s. Navy, 

was born in New Hampshire in 1826. Was appointed 
Midshipman in 1841. He was executive officer of 
Farragut's flagship, the "Hartford," before New 
Orleans in 1862. Commanded *' Winona" at Mobile 
Bay where she sounded the approaches under a galling 
fire. Executive officer of the "Kearsarge" in her 
memorable fight with the *' Alabama." He was 
advanced several numbers for gallantry in battle. 

TICONDEROGA 
sloop-of-war 

Tonnage, 1,533 Guns, il 

Named for Ticonderoga, New York 

{The scene of the Battle of Ticonderoga in 1775) 

Launched October i6, 1862, at the Navy Yard, 
Brooklyn, New York. 
[180] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Katherine Heaton Offley (Mrs. 
Joseph D. Wilson), of Georgetown. In the midst of 
a shower of rain the ship was launched from the ship- 
house. As she breasted the sea Miss Offley broke a 
bottle of water on her bows and announced her name. 

United states ship "Ticonderoga" took part in 
the first and second attacks on Fort Fisher, 1864-65. 

"7 will die at my post before a man shall be taken from the ship." 

— TiNGEY 

TINGEY 
torpedo boat 

Length, lys f^^t Beam, 17 feet Draft, 4 feet, 8 inches 

Displacement, 163 tons 

Named for Captain Thomas Tingey, U. S. Navy 

Launched March 25, 1901, at the Columbian Iron 
Works, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna T. Craven (Mrs. Owen H. 
Oakley), daughter of Henry S. Craven and great-great- 
granddaughter of Commodore Thomas Tingey. 

Captain THOMAS tingey, U. S. Navy, was 
born in England in 1750. After serving with distinc- 
tion in the British Navy, he resigned and came to 
America. In the Revolutionary War served in the 
Continental Navy. In 1798, when the Navy was 
reorganized, he was appointed by the President a 
Captain in the Navy. In command of the "Ganges" 
and two other vessels, he captured sixteen French 
privateers in the West Indies. In 1799, when a British 
command of greater force tried to impress some of 
his men, Tingey said: "I will die at my post before a 
man shall be taken from my ship" and beat his crew to 

[181] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

quarters. The Britisher left. Peace declared, Cap- 
tain Tingey, with other officers, received discharge. 
In 1799 when Congress authorized the building of six 
ships, one to be built at Washington, Captain Tingey 
was summoned to direct the laying out of a Navy 
Yard, and was made superintendent. In 1804 by 
Act of Congress he was re-appointed a Captain in the 
Navy and given command of the Washington Navy 
Yard, where, until his death in 1829, he devoted him- 
self to Navy Yard development and Navy Yard 
organization. 

TIOGA 

PADDLE WHEEL DOUBLE-ENDER 

Tonnage, 819 Eight guns 

Named for Tioga River 

Launched April i8, 1862, at the Navy Yard, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. H. P. Grace. 

Governor Andrews and wife and other officials were 
launched on board. 

U. S. S. "Tioga" in 1862 took part in operations of 
James River flotilla. In 1863 in coast blockade. 

TONOPAH (Formerly NEVADA) 

SINGLE TURRET MONITOR 

Lengthy 252 jeet Beam, 50 jeet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 3,225 tons 

Named for the State of Nevada 

(Which was admitted to the Union in 1864.. Re-named for Tonopah, Nevada) 

Launched November 24, 1900, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

[182] 




Photo by Newport News ShipbuildinstJdt 
LAUNCH OF BATTLESHIP "TEXAS" 2D ("^•. 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Grace Boutelle (Mrs. Eugene T. 
Savage), daughter of Representative Charles A. Bou- 
telle, of Maine, named the ship "Nevada.' 



» 



TRENTON 
sloop-of-war 

Eleven guns Tonnage 2,300 

Named for the City of Trenton 

{Capital of New Jersey) 

Launched January i, 1876, at the Navy Yard, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Katherine M. Parker (Mrs. 
William Bedloe Beekman), daughter of Hon. Cortlandt 
Parker, a most distinguished lawyer of New Jersey. 
Miss Parker's grandfather was a member of Congress 
and a prominent citizen of New Jersey. 

The "Trenton" was wrecked during a hurricane at 
Samoa in 1889. 

TRIPPE (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 2Sg feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Lieutenant John Trippe, U. S. Navy 

Launched December 20, 1910, at the Bath Iron 
Works, Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John S. Hyde, wife of the President 
of the Bath Iron Works. 

Lieutenant john trippe, u. s. Navy, was 

appointed a Midshipman in 1798. He received thanks 

[183] 



ecGTo^ 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



of Congress and a sword for distinguished services 
performed with Preble's Squadron in engagements 
before TripoU in 1804. 



TRUXTUN (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 24.8 feet Beam, 22 feet Draft, 6 feet, 6 inches 

Displacement, 433 tons 

Named for Commodore Thomas Truxtun, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 15, 1901, at the Maryland Steel 
Company, Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Isabella Truxtun (Mrs. Frank H. 
Brumby), daugher of Commodore William Truxtun, 
U. S. Navy, and great-granddaughter of Commodore 
Thomas Truxtun. Mrs. H. B. Hare, of Philadelphia, 
pressed the button that released the ship. 

Commodore thomas truxtun, u. s. Navy, 

was born on Long Island, New York. He captured 
many valuable prizes during the Revolution. In 
command of the "Constellation," of thirty-six guns, 
captured the French frigate "L'Insurgente," of fifty 
guns, in 1799, and on February 2, 1800, fought to a 
surrender the frigate "La Vengeance," also of fifty 
guns, but "La Vengeance" got away in the dark 
during a heavy squall, the main mast of the "Con- 
stellation" having fallen overboard. For this action 
Congress awarded him a gold medal. 



[184] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



TUSCARORA 

SCREW SLOOP 

Tonnage, 997 Guns, 10 

Named for the Tuscarora River 

{Indian tribe name) 

Launched August 24, 1861, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Lardner (Mrs. Edwin 
R. Reakirt), daughter of Captain James L. Lardner, 
U. S. Navy, Captain of the Navy Yard at the time. 

There were at least five hundred people on the decks 
of the ''Tuscarora," among whom was Miss Lardner, 
upon whom had been conferred the honor of naming 
the vessel. 

U. S. S. "Tuscarora" took part in the attack on 
Fort Fisher, December, 1864. Took part in the 
capture of Fort Fisher, January, 1865. 

UTAH 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 510 feet Beam, 88 feet Draft, 28 feet 

Displacement, 21,82$ tons 

Named for the State of Utah 

(Which was admitted to the Union in 1896) 

Launched December 23, 1909, at New York Ship- 
building Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Alice Spry, daughter of 
Governor William Spry, of Utah. Maids of Honor 
were Miss Chloe Smoot and Miss Barbara Howell. 

Among those on the stand were Governor and Mrs. 
Spry, James Spry, Senator Reed Smoot and daugh- 

[185] 



*-' i- L 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

ters, Miss Dell Fay Norris, Judge and Mrs. Samuel 
Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Sharp, Senator and 
Mrs. Henry Gardner, Senator George Sutherland. 

VERMONT (1ST) 

SHIP-OF-THE-LINE 

2(5jj tons Sixteen guns 

Named for the State of Vermont 

{fVhich was admitted to the Union in 1791) 

Launched September 14, 1848, at the Navy Yard, 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

At 11.30 A. M., Commodore Parker gave the order 
to Mr. Pook, the Naval Constructor, to let her go, 
and at the word the last connecting link was cut. 
Without waiting to have the foremost chucks dis- 
placed she crushed them like sand and glided majesti- 
cally along the ways into her destined element, saluted 
by the roar of artillery, the martial music of the band 
of the ' Franklin ' and the cheers of the mighty multi- 
tude. A beautiful young lady performed the usual 
ceremony of naming her. There were about six 
hundred persons on board including several ladies." — 
Boston Post. 

VERMONT (2d) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 4.50 f^^i Beam, 76 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 16,000 tons 

Named for the State of Vermont 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1791) 

Launched August 31, 1905, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 
[186] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 

Sponsor: Miss Jennie Bell, daughter of Governor 
Charles J. Bell, of Vermont. Maids of Honor were 
Miss Mary E. Morse and Miss Virginia Perry. 

VESUVIUS (3D) 
dynamite cruiser 

Length, 2S2 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 10 feet 

Displacement, gjo tons 

Named for Mount Vesuvius 

Launched April 28, 1888, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor Breckinbridge (Mrs. 
Lyman Chalkley), daughter of Congressman Breckin- 
bridge, of Kentucky. 

United states ship '' Vesuvius" was engaged 
off Santiago, May 13 to June 26, 1898, Spanish- 
American War. 

VICKSBURG (2d) 

COMPOSITE GUNBOAT 

Length, 168 feet Beam, 36 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, 1,010 tons 

Named for the City of Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
AND U. S. S. "Vicksburg" 

Launched December 5, 1896, at the Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Trowbridge, daughter of the Mayor 
of Vicksburg. 

U. S. S. "Vicksburg" was under fire May 7, 1898, 
at Havana, Cuba, Spanish-American War. 

[187] 



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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

VIRGINIA (4Th) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 435 feet Beam, 76 feet Draft, 23 feet, g inches 

Displacement, 14,948 tons 

Named for the State of Virginia 

{Called the Mother State. Ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched April 5, 1904, at Newport News Ship- 
building & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mathilde Gay Montague, young 
daughter of Governor Andrew Jackson Montague, of 
Virginia. 

1 HE greatest crowd that ever gathered at Newport 
News thronged the shipyard and covered every roof 
and corner to witness the launching of the battleship 
"Virginia." Excursion steamers and boats of every 
description crowded the river. It was a holiday for 
all tidewater Virginians. April skies were blue, April 
breezes soft and balmy. Hundreds of flags fluttered 
in the brilliant Southern sunlight. 

About the "Virginia's" bow were gathered men 
prominent in the affairs of the Nation, Army and 
Navy officers, Government ofl[icials, and lovely daugh- 
ters of the Old Dominion. Companies of troops from 
Fort Monroe and a regiment of Virginia State Troops 
escorted Governor Montague. 

The party on the stand were embowered in Vir- 
ginia roses. Miss Mathilde Gay Montague, young 
daughter of Governor Montague, was the most self- 
possessed person present. While the crowd cheered and 
bands played "Dixie" and "Star Spangled Banner," 

[188] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



she broke a bottle of Virginia champagne on the bow 
of the ship as she started down the ways. "I name 
thee ' Virginia/ " she said, and on all sides went up 
the shout "Virginia, Virginia, Virginia" as the great 
ship named for the Mother State glided into the waters 
not far distant from the course up which had sailed 
the first ship bringing colonists to Virginia's hospitable 
shores. 

WABASH 

STEAM FRIGATE 

Length, 262 feet Beam, 51 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, 4,6^0 tons 

Named for the Wabash River 

Launched October 24, 1855, at the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Pennsylvania Grice, daughter 
of Mr. Francis Grice, the Naval Constructor, *'with 
nerve and grace that showed her fitness for the task," 
broke a bottle of water from the Wabash River upon 
the scroll work ornamenting the bow. 

United states "Wabash" took part in the cap- 
ture of Forts at Hatteras Inlet. Led the fle t in 
Battle of Port Royal, 1861. Took part in fir?'*; and 
second attacks on Fort Fisher. Flagship of Admiral 
Dupont. 

WACHUSETT 

SLOOP-OF-WAR 

Nine guns 1,032 tons 

Named for Wachusett River 

Launched October lo, 1861, at the Navy Yard, 
Charlestown, Massachusetts. 

[189] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Mary C. Frothingham (Mrs. 
Charles O. Neil), daughter of Hon. Richard Frothing- 
ham, assisted by Miss Letitia McKean Buchanan 
(Mrs. George Fife), daughter of Purser Buchanan, 
U. S. Navy. 

The honor of officiating in the rite was coveted by 
a large coterie, and the contestants having drawn lots, 
it fell to Miss Frothingham. The party occupied the 
forecastle and as the vessel went down the ways the 
sponsor broke a bottle of water over her bow, naming 
her "Wachusett." 

United states ship "Wachusett" in the Civil 
War took part in operations in York and James Rivers. 
In 1864 captured Confederate steamer "Virginia" and 
steamer "Florida." 

WALKE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 28Q feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 7,^ tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Henry Walke, U. S. Navy 

Launched November 3, 1910, at Fore River Ship- 
building Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mildred Walke Walter, grand- 
daughter of Rear-Admiral Henry Walke. 

The launching was a private one. Miss Walter was 
accompanied by her parents and a number of friends. 

Rear-admiral henry walke, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Virginia in 1808. Appointed Midship- 
man in 1827. In the Civil War, in command of the 
"Carondelet," took part in battles of Belmont, Fort 

[190] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Henry, Fort Donelson, Island No. lo, Fort Pillow, 
Memphis, and the engagement with the Confederate 
ram "Arkansas/* For his distinguished services he 
received thanks of Congress, thanks of the Secretary 
of the Navy, and commendation of Admiral Foote. 

WAMPANOAG 

FRIGATE 

Tonnage, 3,281 Guns, 1$ 

Named for Wampanoag River 

Launched December 15, 1864, at the Novelty Iron 
Works, New York, N. Y. 

Sponsor: Miss Case, daughter of Commander 
Augustus Ludlow Case, U. S. Navy, second in command 
of the Navy Yard. 

Admiral Farragut, Admiral Paulding, and Admiral 
Gregory were present. 

WARRINGTON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 289 feet Beam, 26 feet Draft, 8 feet 

Displacement, 742 tons 

Named for Commodore Lewis Warrington, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched June i8, 1910, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Cornpany, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Richard Hatton (Elizabeth Stuart 
Cottman), great-granddaughter of Commodore Lewis 
Warrington on the maternal side. 

[191] 



/O 1 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Commodore lewis warrington, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Williamsburg, Virginia, November 
3, 1782, died October 12, 1851. Served in War with 
Tripoli as junior officer. Commanded the U. S. 
corvette "Peacock" in the fight with H. M. S. "Eper- 
vier," Commodore Wales, on April 29, 18 14; the 
"Epervier" was captured in an action lasting forty- 
two minutes. For this brilliant achievement Congress 
passed a vote of thanks to Captain Warrington, his 
officers and men, and presented him a gold medal, 
and his native state, Virginia, presented him a gold- 
hilted sword. 

The Secretary of the Navy in announcing his death 
in general orders, said: "Commodore Warrington 
stood conspicuous among the distinguished men who 
have done honor to our country ; his devoted patriotism, 
his great skill and indomitable courage, have won for 
him its lasting gratitude." 

WASHINGTON (sth) 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 500 feet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 25 feet 

Displacement, 14,500 tons 

Named for the State of Washington 

{JVhich was admitted to the Union in i88g) 

Launched March i8, 1905, at New York Ship- 
building Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Stewart Wilson (Mrs. 
Green Clay Goodloe), daughter of United States 
Senator John L. Wilson, of the State of Washington. 
Miss Wilson was appointed Sponsor of the "Washing- 
ton" by Governor Albert E. Meade. 

Maids of Honor were Miss Grace Denny, Seattle, 

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Miss Harriet Allen, Seattle, and Miss Maude Wads- 
worth, Spokane. 

Among those present were Mr. De Courcy May, 
Hon. John L. Wilson, former Governor John H. Mc- 
Graw, who represented Governor Albert E. Meade, 
who was unavoidably absent. 

WEEHAWKEN 

IRONCLAD MONITOR 

Tonnage, 840 Guns, j 

Named for Indian-named Village of Weehawken, 

New Jersey 

Launched November 5, 1862, at the yard of Joseph 
Colwell, Jersey City, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Nellie Comstock (Mrs. Josephus 
Miller), daughter of Captain Joseph Comstock, U. 
S. Navy, bestowed the named upon the ship. 

United states ship "Weehawken" in 1863 
captured the Confederate ironclad "Atlanta." En- 
gaged batteries at Morris Island and Fort Wagner. 
Was under fire at Fort Moultrie. Sunk off Morris 
Island. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

ARMORED CRUISER 

Length, 502 feet Beam, 69 feet Draft, 24 feet 

Displacement, 13,680 tons 

Named for the State of West Virginia 

{Which became a separate State in 1863) 

Launched April i8, 1903, at Newport News Ship- 
building & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Katharine V. White (Mrs. W. H. 
Wolfe), daughter of Governor Albert White, of West 
Virginia, unanimously chosen by the Legislature to 
name the "West Virginia." 

Maids of Honor were Miss Grace Ralston White, 
Miss Ethel Sabin White, twin daughters of Governor 
White, and Miss Ashton Wilson, daughter of Ex- 
Governor E. W. Wilson of West Virginia. 

Accompanying the party were Governor and Mrs. 
White. 

I HE small elevated, flag-draped platform had the 
appearance of a flower bed when filled with the lovely 
young women carrying enormous bunches of American 
Beauty roses. The huge red-painted ship towered 
high above their heads, gaily decorated with brightly 
fluttering flags. Uniforms of Army and Navy officers, 
of Governors' stafl^s, and Militia officers shone in the 
brilliant sunlight. Bands played patriotic airs. Four 
companies of soldiers from Fort Monroe and a regiment 
of Virginia Militia acted as escort to Governor Monta- 
gue, of Virginia. 

The last block that held the ship was sawed away. 
Slowly the ponderous hull began to move. "I name 
thee 'West Virginia,'" and a bottle of champagne 
crashed against the moving side. Faster, faster, till 
the ways sent up smoke, plunged the vessel down into 
the water. A deafening shout went up, whistles blew, 
bands played. Pandemonium of joy reigned. Virginia 
and West Virginia were again united. 

Interesting historic significance was lent to the 
occasion by the presence of the Governor of West 
Virginia and the Governor of Virginia. It was the 
first time a Governor of West Virginia had ever offi- 

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cially visited the Mother State since the separation 
forty-two years before. It was a love feast. It was 
also a German-American love feast, for by a happy 
coincidence the German cruiser "Gazelle" and the 
U. S. battleship "Missouri" were lying peacefully in 
the same dry dock, not far from the "West Virginia," 
and the German officers and sailors attended the 
launching and gave three lusty cheers for the U. S. 
Navy. 

Following the launching a banquet was given to 
six hundred guests by the Shipbuilding Company. 

WHEELING 

UNARMORED COMPOSITE GUNBOAT 

Length, 174 feet Beam, 34 feet Draft, 12 feet 

Displacement, ggo tons 

Named for City of Wheeling, West Virginia 

Launched March i8, 1897, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Lucie S. Brown (Mrs. Walter T. 
Gaither), Wheeling, West Virginia, daughter of Mr. 
Curtis Park Brown. 

WHIPPLE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 248 feet Beam, 22 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 43J tons 

Named for Captain Abraham Whipple, U. S. Navy 

Launched August 15, 1900, at Maryland Steel 
Company, Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Elsie Pope (Mrs. George Culaer 
Rugg), of St. Paul, Minnesota, great-great-grand- 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

daughter of Captain Whipple. She was accompanied 
by her mother, Mrs. Sibley Pope. 

Mrs. F. W. Wood, wife of the President of the Mary- 
land Steel Company, started the ship by pressing the 
electric button. 

Captain Abraham Whipple, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1733. Dur- 
ing the old French War, 1 759-1 760, he commanded the 
privateer ''Gamecock," and in a single cruise captured 
no less than twenty-three vessels. In June, 1772, he 
commanded the volunteers that took and burned the 
British revenue schooner "Gaspe." In the "Provi- 
dence" and the "Columbus" he did gallant work 
against the foe. 

WILKES 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Length, iy$ feet Beam, 17 feet Draft, 4 feet, 8 inches 

Displacement, 16$ tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral Charles Wilkes, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched September 28, 1901, at Gas Engine & 
Power Company, Morris Heights, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Harriet E. Rankin (Mrs. Charles 
Vaughan Ferguson), daughter of Mr. A. E. Rankin, 
Hartford, Connecticut, and eldest great-granddaughter 
of Rear-Admiral Charles Wilkes. 

Rear-admiral charles wilkes, u. s. 

Navy, was born in New York in 1801. Appointed 
Midshipman in 1818. In 1838-42 commanded the 
wonderfully successful exploring expedition that went 

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around the world. Author of Meteorology y Western 
America and Theory of the Winds. In 1861, in 
command of the "San Jacinto,'* took from the 
EngHsh passenger steamer "Trent" the Confederate 
commissioners to England, Mason and SHdell. Was 
compHmented by the Secretary of the Navy, although 
the prisoners had to be given up. In i862j commanded 
the James River Flotilla. In 1863 commanded Special 
Blockade Squadron in the West Indies. 

WILMINGTON 

LIGHT DRAFT GUNBOAT 

Length, 250 feet Beam, 39 feet Draft, 9 feet 

Displacement, 1,392 tons 

Named for City of Wilmington, Delaware 

Launched October 19, 1895, at the Newport News 
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Anne B. Gray, of Wilmington, 
Delaware, daughter of United States Senator George 
Gray, of Delaware. 

United states ship "Wilmington" was en- 
gaged at Cardenas, May 11, 1898; Manzanilla, July 18, 
1898, Spanish-American War. 

WINOOSKI 

PADDLE WHEEL STEAMER (d O U B L E -E ND E r) 

Tonnage, 974 Ten guns 

Named for Winooski River 

Launched July 30, 1863, at the Navy Yard, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts. 

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Sponsor: Miss Mary Rindge Sleeper (Mrs. 
Gustavus B. Maynadier), daughter of Honorable 
John S. Sleeper, of Roxbury, Massachusetts. 

WINSLOW 

TORPEDO BOAT 

Named for Rear-Admiral John A. Winslow, U. S. 

Navy 

Launched January 6, 1897, at Columbian Iron 
Works, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss E. H. Hazel, daughter of Ex-State 
Senator Hazel of Pennsylvania. 

Rear-admiral john a. winslow, u. s. 

Navy, was born in North Carolina in 181 1. Appointed 
Midshipman in 1827. Served gallantly in Mexican 
War. For gallantry at Tobasco was commended by 
Commodore Perry. In the Civil War was in command 
of the Mississippi Flotilla, 1861-62. Commanded the 
"Kearsarge" when she sank the "Alabama," June 19, 
1864, in the famous fight off Cherbourg. For this, 
action Captain Winslow was promoted to the rank of 
Commodore. 

U. S. S. "Winslow" was under fire May 11, 1898, 
at Cienfuegos, Spanish-American War. 

WISCONSIN 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, 368 jeet Beam, 72 feet Draft, 23 feet 

Displacement, 11,552 tons 

Named for the State of Wisconsin 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1S48) 

Launched November 26, 1895, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 
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Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Stephenson (Mrs. John 
Earl Morgan), daughter of Senator Isaac Stephenson, 
of Marinette, Wisconsin. 

Little Miss Gage, daughter of Governor-elect Henry 
T. Gage, of California, pressed the button that started 
the ship. 

WORDEN 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 248 feet Beam, 22 feet Draft, 6 feet 

Displacement, 433 tons 

Named for Rear-Admiral John Lorimer Worden, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 15, 1901, at Maryland Steel 
Company, Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Daniel F. Worden, daughter-in- 
law of Rear-Admiral Worden, who was accompanied 
by her husband, Mr. Daniel F. Worden, of New York. 

Mrs. A. G. Wilson, wife of the Superintendent of 
the Marine Department of the Maryland Steel Com- 
pany, pressed the electric button that released the ship. 

Rear-admiral john lorimer worden, 

U. S. Navy, was born in New York, in 181 8. Appointed 
Midshipman in 1834. He was famous as first Com- 
mander of the "Monitor" and nearly lost his eyesight 
by an exploding shell striking upon the eyehole of the 
pilot house during the action between the "Monitor" 
and " Merrimac," March 9, 1 862. In 1 863 , in command 
of the "Montauk," destroyed the "Nashville" under 
the guns of Fort McAllister. Took part in attack 
on Charleston by Dupont's ironclad fleet. 

Captain Worden was promoted and received the 

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thanks of Congress for his distinguished gallantry in 
the engagement with the "Merrimac" and in other 
battles. 

WYOMING (1ST) 

SCREW SLOOP 

Six guns Tonnage, ^26 

Named for Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania 

Launched January 19, 1859, ^^ the Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Florida Grice, daughter of 
Chief Constructor Francis Grice, baptized the ship 
with water. 

U. S. S. "Wyoming," at Manila, on July 16, 1863, 
engaged the Forts and Japanese vessels in redress for 
an attack made by the Prince of Nagata upon the 
American steamer *' Pembroke." The ''Wyoming" 
was shelled eleven times and had four killed and eleven 
wounded. The Japanese vessels were disabled and 
sunk. 

WYOMING (2d) 

FIRST-CLASS BATTLESHIP 

Length, J62 feet Beam, qj feet Draft, 28 feet 

Displacement, 26,000 tons 

Named for the State of Wyoming 

{Which was admitted to the Union in 1890) 

Launched May 25, 191 1, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Eunice Knight, daughter 
of former Chief Justice Jesse Knight, of Wyoming, and 
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god-daughter of Governor J. M. Carey, who appointed 
her to name the battleship. 

Among those present were Secretary of Navy G. v. L. 
Meyer, Governor Joseph Carey of Wyoming and Mrs. 
Carey, Senator and Mrs. C. D. Clark of Wyoming, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hourer of Wyoming, Senator 
and Mrs. Geo. T. Oliver. 

YANTIC 

WOODEN STEAM BARK 

Seven guns Tonnage, jpj 

Named for Yantic River 

Launched March 19, 1864, at the Navy Yard, Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary E. Knowles, daughter of 
the master of the gun carriage shop. 

U. S. S. "Yantic" took part in the Civil War, in 
first and second attacks on Fort Fisher in 1864-65; 
and in capture of Fort Anderson in 1865. 

YORKTOWN (2d) 

GUNBOAT 

Length, 230 feet Beam, 36 feet Draft, 14 feet 

Displacement, 1,74.0 ions 

Named for Town of Yorktown, Virginia 

{The scene of the Battle of Yorktown in I/81 and the surrender of Cornwallis) 

Launched April 28, 1888, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Ship and Engine Building Company, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Cameron, daughter of United 
States Senator Don Cameron, of Pennsylvania. 

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NOMENCLATURE OF VESSELS OF THE U. S. 

NAVY 

X HE Continental Navy was a heterogeneous collec- 
tion of vessels, partly vessels commissioned by the 
Continental Congress, partly vessels fitted out and 
commissioned by the Colonies, and many privateers. 

The first government vessels were purchased by a 
Marine Committee appointed by Congress, and were 
re-named by that Committee. Among the first names 
were: "Columbus," for Christopher Columbus; "Al- 
fred," for Alfred the Great; "Cabot," for the early 
explorer of America; "Andrea Doria," for the famous 
Genoese sailor; "Lexington," for the Battle of Lexing- 
ton, the first Revolutionary conflict. 

The thirteen ships authorized to be built December 
13, 1775, were by resolution of Congress to be named: 
"Congress," "Randolph," "Hancock," "Washington," 
"Trumbull," Raleigh," "Efl^ngham," "Montgomery," 
"Warren," "Boston," "Providence," "Virginia" and 
"Delaware." Among the next names authorized were: 
"Ranger," "Alliance," "Hornet," "America" and 
"Deane." 

In 1794 Congress authorized six frigates to be built, 
to be named: "United States," "Constitution," "Con- 
stellation," "President," "Chesapeake," "Congress." 

In 1798 the Navy Department was established, and 
Benjamin Stoddert was appointed the first Secretary 
of the Navy. 

March 3, 1 8 19, Congress passed the first statute law 
governing the naming of vessels of the Navy. 

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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



"Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America, in Congress assembled, That all the 
ships of the Navy of the United States, now building, or here- 
after to be built, shall be named by the Secretary of the Navy, 
under the direction of the President of the United States, accord- 
ing to the following rule: to wit: Those of the first class shall be 
called after the states of this Union, those of the second class 
after the rivers; and those of the third class after the principal 
cities and towns, taking care that no two vessels in the Navy 
shall bear the same name." 

June 12, 1858, the following Act was approved: 

"And be it further enacted. That all the steamships of the Navy 
of the United States now building, or hereafter to be built, shall be 
named by the Secretary of the Navy, under the direction of the 
President of the United States, according to the following rule, 
namely. All those of forty guns or more shall be considered of the 
first class, and shall be called after the States of the Union; those 
of twenty and under forty guns shall be considered as of the second 
class, and be called after the rivers and principal towns or cities; 
and all those of less than twenty guns shall be of the third class, 
and named by the Secretary of the Navy as the President may 
direct, care being taken that no two vessels in the Navy shall 
bear the same name." 

At the commencement of the Civil War a large 
number of vessels were purchased for the Navy and 
an Act of Congress, August 5, 1861, authorized the 
Secretary of the Navy to change the names of pur- 
chased vessels. 

A large number of vessels were hurriedly built for 
the Navy, and in some instances were somewhat indis- 
criminately named. The first vessels built were gun- 
boats of the "Shawmut" class, to many of which were 
given Indian names, the name often being taken from 
an Indian-named town or village or creek near where 
the vessel was built. Next came sloops-of-war of the 
'*Tuscarora" class, named after Indian-named rivers. 

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Double-enders of the "Sassacus" class were also given 
Indian names. Some vessels were named after places 
of Naval engagements, such as "Vicksburg." 

The "Harriet Lane," named for the niece of Presi- 
dent Buchanan and transferred from the U. S. Treasury 
Department to the Navy, is the only fighting vessel on 
the Navy lists named for a woman. 

The "Monitor," an entirely new type of vessel, was 
named by Ericsson himself at the request of the Navy 
Department. Ericsson, in his letter to the Secretary 
of the Navy, says : 

"The impregnable and aggressive character of this structure 
will admonish the leaders of the Southern rebellion that the 
batteries on the banks of their rivers will no longer present barriers 
to the entrance of the Union's forces. But there are other leaders 
who will be admonished. . . . 'Downing Street' will hardly view 
with indifference this last 'Yankee notion' — this Monitor. . . . 
On this and many similar grounds, I propose the name of this 
battery — 'Monitor.'" 

Ironclads of the "Monitor" type were classed as 
Monitors. Many were given Indian names, such as 
"Canonicus," "Manhattan," "Miantonomah." 

At the beginning of the Spanish War, Act of Con- 
gress, May 4, 1898, was passed: 

"That hereafter all first-class battleships and monitors owned 
by the United States shall be named for the States and shall not 
be named for any city, place or person until the names of the States 
shall have been exhausted." 

May 13, 1908, the Act of May 4, 1898, was superseded 
by an Act providing that "Monitors may be named as 
the President may direct." The names of the Monitors 
"Florida," "Arkansas" and others have been changed 
and Monitors are no longer named for States. 

The Act of March 3, 1901, provided 

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"That the President of the United States be, and is hereby- 
authorized to establish, and from time to time to modify, as the 
needs of the service may require, a classification of the vessels of 
the Navy." 

That was put into effect, and vessels of war were 
divided up as follows: 

"Torpedo boat destroyers, torpedo boats, tugs, sailing ships, 
and receiving ships shall not be rated. Other vessels shall be 
rated by tons of displacement, as follows: 

"First-rates, men-of-war only of 8,000 tons and above. 

"Second-rates, men-of-w^ar of 4,000 tons and under 8,000 tons, 
and converted yachts and auxiliary vessels of 6,000 tons and above, 
except colliers, refrigerating ships, distilling ships, tank steamers, 
repair ships, hospital ships, and other ships constructed or equipped 
for special purposes. 

"Third-rates, men-of-war from 1,000 to 4,000 tons, and con- 
verted and auxiliary vessels from 1,000 to 6,000 tons." 

The above changes of statute laws will explain the 
seeming inconsistency of Navy namings at different 
periods. 

Under existing statute laws our battleships and 
armored cruisers are named for States of the Union; 
our cruisers for cities. Torpedo boat destroyers and 
torpedo boats are named after distinguished Naval 
Officers. Submarines are designated by letters and 
numerals. 

At the present time, fuel ships, such as colliers, are 
given Greek mythological names. Oil carriers are 
being assigned Indian names of rivers of the country 
in which oil is produced, repair ships after distin- 
guished engineers, and all ships that are not specified 
under the law are to be named according to their 
distinctive purpose. 

There is strong sentiment in favor of perpetuating 
on our Navy lists the names of our most famous vessels, 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

in commemoration of their glorious records, and as 
reminders of the worthy deeds of our history. Such 
names, if continued in association with the current 
national Hfe, would be a constant inspiration to the 
country and the Navy. 

Editor 



[206] 



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[copyrighted, 1909.] 

U. S. NAVAL INSTITUTE, ANNAPOLIS, MD. 



THE BAPTISM OF SHIPS. 
By Robert G. Skerrett. 



Just once so often during the upbuilding of our modern navy 
there is agitation anent the particular form that the launching 
cermony should take; and the special rock upon which there is 
a split is over the use of wine or water. There are some good 
souls intensely insistent, in the name of temperance, that water 
shall be spilled upon the vessel's bow at the time of naming, 
while there are others, probably unconsciously subscribing more 
closely to tradition, who urge with equal vim that wine shall be 
the element in the baptismal ceremony. Both of these partisans 
are more or less right, but all of them have commonly lost sight 
of the derivation and the real significance of the performance. 
The whole question is primarily a religious one, while the popular 
attitude to-day is one of tolerance toward a surviving superstition. 

From the very beginning of primitive man's venture upon the 
water — perhaps because of the frail character of his craft, he 
recognized the risks he ran and in his superstitious awe sought the 
protection of the hidden powers that ruled the wind and the 
waves. Through all the devious paths of developing religions, 
early man strove to placate opposing deities and to propitiate the 
favoring gods who, to him, became more or less personal.* As 
his religion became more concrete his gods took the material 
shape of idols, and that they might be always with him he first 
fashioned some part of his vessel more or less after the manner 
in which he pictured them, and never launched his craft until 
after he had made tribute by word or act to his protecting deity. 
Later on, his idols ceased to be the grotesque semblance of ani- 
mals and demons and became benignant and human-like, and 
for these he made a special place within his vessel and sanctified 
that place of keeping. 

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It is quite impossible to follow chronologically the evolution 
of the launching ceremony, but enough can be found here and 
there to point to a reasonable sequence, and for a probable sur- 
vival of the most ancient practices we must naturally turn to the 
customs still remaining among primitive peoples. Ellis, in his 
"Polynesian Researches," tells us that the Samoans and the 
Fijians used to make human sacrifices to their shark deities who 
ruled the waters. In Tahiti, it was the custom to shed human 
blood when a new canoe was built or launched. Again, Mariner, 
in "Tonga," tells us that men were sometimes sacrificed in order 
to wash a new canoe's deck with blood, and that it was likewise 
the practice to use men as living rollers on which to launch the 
craft. In this there is a strange likeness to the ancient Norse 
habit of attaching human victims to the rollers upon which they 
launched their ships; and in the Eddas this ceremony is referred 
to under the name of "hlun-rod" or roller-reddening. Among 
the Tonga islanders it is the custom to-day still to offer kava and 
oil to the sea gods, and in all of these ceremonies the native 
priest plays a conspicuous part if the ancient rites prevail. These 
votive offerings or oblations are still made among the primitive 
peoples of many parts of the world, and in this particular they 
show the persistent permanence with which such practices are 
handed down from the ages past. 

So far as actual records go, the earliest account of a votive 
offering to the gods upon the completion of a ship dates back 
twenty-one hundred years before Christ, and it seems that even 
then man dared not venture upon the sea until he had thus pro- 
pitiated the gods. On an Assyrian tablet, found some years ago 
by Professor Schiel, we have a Babylonian account of the Deluge 
and of the building of the Ark, and of the religious ceremony at 
its completion. Rendered into English, the story reads, in part, 
as follows: 

Eighthly, its interior I examined. 
Openings to the water I stopped; 
I searched for cracks and the wanting parts I fixed; 
Three sari of bitumen I poured over the outside;. 
Three sari of bitumen I poured over the interior; 
Three sari of men bearers who carried chests on their heads. 
I kept a saros of chests for my people to eat. 
Two sari of chests I divided among the boatmen. 
To the gods I caused oxen to be sacrificed. 

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■^ To the Chinese belongs the palm for pioneer work in breasting 
the tempestuous sea and in carrying their explorations into far 
lands — their commerce reaching at a very remote period as far 
west as the Persian Gulf. Probably no existing country has held 
with more faithfulness of detail to its ancient religious practices 
in most of their forms. In "A Discourse of the Navigation of 
the Portuguese," translated into English in 1579, is found this 
fairly full account of the Chinese practices at the launching of 
their ships: "When they launched their ships into the sea at 
the first making, the priests go apparelled with long garments, 
being very rich of silk, to make their sacrifices in the poops of 
them, where the place of prayer is, and they offered painted 
figures, and they cut and burned them before their idols with 
certain ceremonies that they make, and sing songs with an 
unorderly tone, sounding certain little bells. They worship the 
devil, where they have him painted in the fore-part of the ship, 
because, as they say, he should do no hurt to the ships. In all this 
discourse they are eating and drinking at discretion." 

Among the Chinese these ceremonies have since undergone no 
substantial change, and in every large junk there is a shrine in 
honor of the goddess Tien-how, w^ho is the tutelary deity of 
sailors. In addition to the goddess Tien-how, the Chinese sailors 
particularly engaged in the river traffic are devotees of the god- 
dess Loong-moo or the Dragon's Mother. In honor of this latter 
deity the master of every river junk makes tribute at the begin- 
ning of a voyage. Prior to weighing anchor, he takes his place 
at the bow, which, agreeably to Chinese tradition, is the most 
sacred part of the ship, and there proceeds to propitiate the 
Dragon's Mother. Before him on a small temporary altar are 
placed three cups containing Chinese wine or "saki." With a 
live fowl in one hand, the master performs the Kow-tow, and 
raising the cups one after the other from the altar he elevates 
them, above his head before emptying them upon the deck by way 
of a libation. Next he cuts the throat of the fowl with a sharp 
knife and sprinkles the deck immediately about him with the blood 
of the sacrifice. One of the crew now presents the master 
with several pieces of silver paper, which in turn are sprinkled 
with the sacrificial blood and then fastened to the door-posts and 
lintels of the captain's cabin. This is suggestively like one of 
the rites of the Jewish Passover. 

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The Bible tells us of the glories of the fleets of Tyre, and his- 
tory records as well much of the religious pomp and ceremony 
associated with the ships of ancient Egypt. The mythology of 
ancient Egypt is full of the part played by its deities in watching 
over its hardy mariners, and there can be no doubt whatever that 
some form of priestly ceremony and blessing was a part of the 
launching of the ships of the state at least, if the records of Du 
Sein and other historians are to be trusted. At the battle of 
Salamis, the Greeks went into the fight just after the conclusion 
of religious ceremonies, which consisted of sacrifices offered to all 
the gods and the pouring of a special libation to Zeus, the Pro- 
tector, and to Poseidon, Ruler of the Seas. In those days, it was 
the common custom among the Greeks to name their vessels after 
goddesses, and as a further propitiation the launching was made 
the occasion of a religious ceremony which Virgil described as 
follows: 

Ipse caput tonsae foliis evinctus olivae, 

Stans procul in prova, pateram, extaque salsos 

Porricit in fluctus, ac vina liquentia fundit. — ^Eneid. 

Here we see the part that wine played in the early days. Appian 
also described the religious aspect of the blessing of the ancient 
ships: "On the shores of the sea altars were erected where their 
bases might be washed by the waves. In a semi-circle the ships 
of the fleet were drawn about near by, their crews the while main- 
taining a profound silence. The priests in boats rowed three 
times round the fleet . . . adding prayers to the gods that ill- 
luck should not befall the vessels. Then returning to the shore, 
they immolated bulls or calves, the blood of which reddened the 
sea and the shore." 

The use of water in the ancient ritual dates back to the Greek 
ceremony of lustration and to the later Roman practice of using 
water not only as a token of purification but also as an element in 
the act of priestly blessing. Here we have the pre-Christian 
practice of baptism. Like other pagan customs, wine and water 
were given place in Christian ceremonials, but not infrequently 
with a modified or deeper meaning. It was thus that wine and 
water became elements of the sacrament of the Christian Church, 
while water alone remained the token of purification and a part 
of the blessing at the time a person was brought into the church, 

[210] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



named, and placed under the protection of a particular patron 
saint. 

During the Middle Ages, religious zeal and its derivative super- 
stitions led to the custom of naming ships after saints, as the 
more ancient craft had been named after pagan gods and god- 
desses; and this practice was carried to the extremity of saintly 
image-worship — no craft being sent to sea without its shrine and 
an imposing array of attendant images. Thus began the practice 
that subsequently led to the evolution of the figurehead and the 
effigies placed in the niches about the stern galleries of more 
modern vessels. Guerin, in his history of the French Navy, 
tells us that the ships of Louis IX, when he sailed for the Holy 
Land in 1248, were provided with every facility for conduct- 
ing mass, each ship having an altar and priestly retinue. These 
altars were situated in the after part of the ships — just as the 
Greeks and Romans reared their shrines there in their own 
days, and the index of the antiquity of the practice survives in 
the name of the "poop" deck — the highest aftermost deck of the 
older type of modern vessels. This name is derived from the 
Latin term "puppis," which was the name the ancients gave to 
the honored after deck where they kept their "pupi" or doll-like 
images of their tutelary deities and where they offered before 
them libations and sacrifices. 

As Taylor has told us in his "Primitive Customs," "Some 
religious ceremonies are marvels of permanence, holding sub- 
stantially the same form and meaning through age after age, and 
far beyond the range of historic record." In proof of this, re- 
membering what has been recorded of ancient Greece, it is in- 
structive to know that at the launching of a modern Greek vessel 
her bow is decorated with flowers, and at the instant the ship 
takes the water her captain raises a jar of wine to his lips and 
then empties the rest of it upon the deck of his craft. Among 
the Turks, the launching of a vessel is of religious significance, 
and a priest attends asking the blessing of Allah and praying 
that the ship may have a prosperous and a successful career and 
ride safely over the waves in all weather. Sheep are sacrificed 
just as the vessel starts for the water, and the flesh is subsequently 
given to the poor. No wine is spilt upon the vessel's bow, but 
a feast is afterwards given to the participating officials and the 
invited guests. 

[211] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

In Russia, when a naval vessel is launched, the Greek Church 
participates in a very imposing manner. The service includes the 
blessing of the ship in detail — the officiating priest and his 
attendant acolytes and choristers marching through all the decks, 
burning incense, carrying lighted candles, and sprinkling the craft 
everywhere with holy water — all the while prayers are read and 
chants are sung. When the ship has thus been blessed the crew 
are asembled before an altar especially reared for the occasion 
within the vessel, and, after the craft's colors are blessed, each 
member steps forward to the altar, kisses the priest's hands, and 
receives the benediction of the church. This carries us back 
directly to the practice among the Egyptians of purifying their 
ships by lighted torches, of burning sulphur, and of the breaking 
of eggs by the priests within their vessels, and later to the very 
similar custom among the Greeks leading to what generally be- 
came known as "the purification of the ship." Combined with 
the subsequent libations, we see in the present ceremony of the 
Greek Church a survival of the ancient practice which had for 
its purpose the driving out of evil spirits, the purifying of the 
body, the propitiation of the deities, and the beginning of a new 
life. In Russia, to-day, wine does not enter into the ritual of the 
church at the launching of ships, the breaking of a bottle of wine 
at the actual naming of the vessel being a secular performance 
entirely apart from ecclesiastical participation. In this we see the 
reflex of the practice among other nations introduced into Russia 
only within the recent period of her advent upon the sea. 

During the days of Venetian dominance upon the Adriatic and 
the Mediterranean, the church took a conspicuous part in the 
launching functions of all official craft. It was then the custom 
to espouse the Adriatic at the time of the floating of the vessel, 
and this was done with much significant pomp, the ceremony 
closing by the Doge or some other high official throwing a bridal 
ring into the sea. In the Museum at Venice to-day there are a 
number of these rings, and in recognition of that old custom a 
pretty revival of it was practiced at the launching of the sub- 
marines recently built for the Italian Government. 

In 1488, when the "Sovereign" was launched at Humble — 
England's foremost dockyard of mediaeval times, in the presence 
of Henry VII, we are told the ship was formally renamed and the 
renovated vessel blessed with all the ceremonial display customary 

[212] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



in England in pre-Reformation times — "A mitred prelate with 
attendant train of priests and choristers, crosier in hand, with 
candle, book, and bell, and holy water stoup" performing the 
benediction. With the coming of the Reformation under Henry 
VIII, the official participation of the Church of Rome disappeared 
in England upon such occasions. The same, too, is true of Prot- 
estant Europe during the same period, although we are told the 
Lutherans practiced a baptismal ceremony at the launching of 
their vessels while they attach no importance to the observance. 
In the early part of the seventeenth century, in England, the 
launching of government vessels was entirely devoid of religious 
significance so far as the church was concerned, and what did 
survive of ancient custom was more strictly a remnant of the 
far-away pagan libation. The ship "Prince Royal" was launched 
at Woolwich in 1610, and the launching function was performed 
by Prince Henry in the manner described as follows by Phineas 
Pette, one of the master shipwrights of James I: "The noble 
Prince, himself, accompanied with the Lord Admiral and the 
great lords, were on the poop, where the standing great gilt cup 
was ready filled with wine to name the ship so soon as she had 
been afloat, according to ancient custom and ceremony performed 
at such times, and heaving the standing cup overboard. His 
Highness then standing upon the poop with a selected company 
only, besides the trumpeters, with a great deal of expression of 
princely joy, and with the ceremony of drinking in the standing 
cup, threw all the wine forwards toward the half-deck, and 
solemnly calling her by the name of the ' Prince Royal,' the 
trumpets sounding the while, with many gracious words to me, 
gave the standing cup into my hands." 

During the same century, in the Catholic parts of Europe, the 
Church of Rome still participated. In 1675, Henry Teonge, 
Chaplain in the British Navy, visited Malta in His Majesty's 
Ship "Assistance," where he witnessed the launching of a Mal- 
tese craft, which he describes in this manner: "This day we saw a 
great deale of solemnity at the launching of a new bryganteen of 
23 oares, built on the shoare, very neare the water. They hoysted 
3 flaggs in her yesterday, and this day by 12 they had turned her 
head neare the water. When as a greate multitude of people 
gathered together, with severall of their knights and men of 
quality, and a clowd of fryars and churchmen. They were at 

[213] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

least 2 howers in their benedictions, in the nature of hymns or 
anthems, and other their ceremonys; their trumpetts and other 
music playing often. At last 2 fryars and an attendant went into 
her, and kneeling downe prayed halfe an howre, and layd their 
hands on every mast, and other places of the vessell, and sprinkled 
her all over with holy water. Then they came out and hoysted a 
pendent to signify she was a man of warr; and then at once 
thrust her into the water." Malta was given to the Knights 
Hospitalers by the Catholic Emperor Charles V in 1530,. and 
being an island and under its own particular government, we see 
that the ceremony had escaped the immediate influence of the 
Reformation. 

In Catholic France in the eighteenth century and at the be- 
ginning of the nineteenth century, especially among the merchant 
craft and fishing vessels, the launching ceremony was closely 
analogous to the baptismal ritual at the time of christening an 
infant. The custom was one that lay close to the hearts of the 
common people, and the parish priest, a god-father and a god- 
mother chosen for the occasion were the principal participants — 
the god-parents not infrequently being children. The ceremony 
was very simple and lovely. The god-father carried a bouquet 
which he duly presented to the god-mother, and with this done, 
both sponsors then pronounced the name chosen for the new 
vessel, and the priest repeating it so declared the vessel named — 
finishing the ceremony with the sprinkling of holy water upon 
the bow of the boat and with a benediction. To-day, the official 
ceremony at the launching of naval vessels carries out in spirit 
this older practice save that there is more pomp and churchly 
parade. There is a god-father and also a god-mother. Should 
the ship be named after a national hero or a famous officer, one 
of the sponsors is generally a descendant. A priest high in the 
dignity of the church leads in the formalities accompanied by 
acolytes and choristers. He blesses not only the ship, herself, but 
also, in accordance with ancient custom, sprinkles holy water 
upon the launching ways and gives them the benediction of the 
church. No wine is spilled upon the ship's bow, but the distin- 
guished guests are invited to what is termed a "vin d'honneur" 
where champagne flows freely and a bountiful repast is served. 
This is a very old custom that has existed for many centuries — 
especially among the fishermen of Europe, and to decline either 

[214] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



the food or the drink then oJfFered was formerly considered an 
omen of misfortune. 

It was not until the early part of the nineteenth century that 
either a layman or a woman took any part in the official ceremony 
at the launching and naming of a British man-o'-war. Prior to 
that time, if the formalities were not conducted by a member of 
the royal family, the naming was done by some high functionary 
of the port or dockyard staff. The present Queen of England is 
said to have originated the religious service now a part of the 
launching of British ships of war; and the occasion when the 
practice was thus instituted was at the launching of the "Alex- 
andria" — named after her — in 1875. Since then a full choral 
service has been prescribed, which includes extracts from the 
107th Psalm — beginning with the twenty-third verse — together 
with a special prayer of great beauty. The benediction is in 
accordance with the ritual of the Church of England and there- 
fore does not include the use of holy water. The civil ceremony 
which follows consists of the usual naming of the vessel by a fair 
sponsor, after which a bottle of wine is smashed upon the vessel's 
bow. This blessing of a British ship carries us back by actual 
record of the fourteenth century, when in 1390, so the monk of 
St. Denys tells us, referring to the Duke of Bourbon's expedition 
to Genoa under the Earl of Derby, that "According to ancient 
custom and to ensure success, the ships were blessed by the 
priests"; and again, in July of 1418, the Bishop of Bangor was 
sent to Southampton to give a benediction to the King's ship 
lately built there — called the "Grace Dieu," and was an occa- 
sion of much imposing ceremony: the worthy bishop being paid 
five pounds for his trouble. William Laird Clowes, in his history 
of "The Royal Navy," tells us that there is no trace in the British 
records of ship-baptism with wine in the fifteenth century. 

In the latter part of the eighteenth century and during a consid- 
erable period in the first half of the nineteenth century, it was the 
custom in France to remove all impediments to the launching of 
their ships but a single beam or heavy timber which is commonly 
known among the shipwrights as the "dog-shore." This beam 
was canted against the stern post of the vessel in such a manner 
as to keep her from voluntarily sliding toward the water, and 
when everything was in readiness this shore was chopped through 
and knocked out of the way. This task was hazardous in the 

[215] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



extreme and a volunteer for the work was commonly chosen from 
among the convicts in the galleys. Clothed in red, this man would 
take his place between the launching ways and under the shadow 
of the juggernaut-like craft that towered ponderously above him. 
At the proper signal, he would begin to chop with his axe into 
the dog-shore, and if alert and quick enough he was able to drop 
into the pit dug for him before either this timber fell or the ship 
rushed down upon him crushing out life or fearfully wounding 
him. Not infrequently the man was killed and very often hewas 
wounded and blood flowed, thus seeming to perpetuate the sacri- 
ficial off"erings of the ancient Norsemen and the similar primitive 
practices among some of the South Sea Islanders. If the convict 
escaped with his life, freedom was the reward for his perilous 
undertaking. 

In our own country, tradition does not carry us very far back 
so far as we are immediately concerned — our ceremonies natu- 
rally following the customs prevailing in England at the time our 
forebears landed here; and so far as the records examined go 
to show, there was no religious significance given to this function 
by us. 

It has been said that water was used at the launching of the 
"Constitution," in 1797; but if this be so, it was broken upon the 
bow of that ship at one or the other of the two unsuccessful eflPorts 
first made to get that vessel overboard. When the "Constitu- 
tion" was finally launched at the third effort, the late Rear-Ad- 
miral George H. Preble tells us in his manuscript history of the 
Boston Navy Yard, that "Commodore James Sever stood at 
the heel of the bowsprit, and, according to time-honored usage, 
baptized the ship with a bottle of choice old Madeira, from the 
cellar of the Honorable Thomas Russell, a leading Boston mer- 
chant." No one can question the fighting merits of the "Consti- 
tution," nor belittle that abundant glory that she reflected upon 
our flag in the days when every victory counted with especial 
weight. Let those that attach a superstitious value to either wine 
or water bear this fact in mind. 

In 1858, the U. S. S. "Hartford" was launched at Boston, her 
launching sponsors being three in number. One was the daughter 
of Commodore Downes, one the daughter of Commodore String- 
ham, and the other was then Lieutenant George H. Preble of the 
navy. As she touched the water, Miss Stringham broke a bottle 

[216] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



of Connecticut River water across the ship's figurehead, Miss 
Downes smashed a bottle of Hartford Spring water, and Lieu- 
tenant Preble concluded the formalities by emptying a bottle of 
sea water upon the vessel's bow. The particular significance of 
each bottle of water is too plain to call for explanation; and, 
again, the performances of the "Hartford" are too fresh to need 
present point. In each case, however, it is quite evident that 
neither the wine nor the water had anything to do with the fight- 
ing efficiencies and the enduring good fortune of those famous 
vessels. . . . 



[217] 



Index of Sponsors 



Note. — For convenient reference the known married names of maiden sponsors 
ire also given, under their initial letters, with maiden name in brackets. 

SPONSOR WARSHIP 

\.BERCROMBiE, Mrs. B. T. (Waters) Maryland 

\dams, Mrs. Elizabeth Goldsborough Paul Jones 

'\dams, Miss Norvelle Mayrant 

Agnus, Miss Elsie Rodgers 

AiNswoRTH, Miss Daisy Oregon 

Allen, Mrs. Charles F Marblehead 

Amidon, Mrs. Katherine Herreshoff Gushing 

Anderson, Mrs. Larz (Perkins) Perkins 

Anderson, Miss Mary Preble Maine 2d 

Andrews, Miss Ethel Ammen 

Andrews, Miss Lina Reid 

Ansel, Miss Frederica South Carolina 

Ashe, Miss Elizabeth Farragut 

Aston, Miss Anne Bennington 

Backus, Mrs. M. F F-3 and F-4. 

Bailey, Miss Florence Beekman Bailey 

Bainbridge, Commodore William Independence 

Balch, Miss Grace Balch 

Ballin, Miss Gertrude Goldsborough 

Barnes, Miss Charlotte Adams Barry 

Barney, Miss Esther Nicholson Barney 

Barney, Mrs. Joseph N. (Dornin) Golorado ist 

Bassett, Mrs. F. B. (Thomas) Sangamon 

Battles, Mrs. Donald Raymond E-i 

Baury, Miss Pequot 

Beard, Mrs. I. B. (Adams) Mayrant 

Beckwith, Mrs. J. L. (Lincoln) Atlanta 

Beekman, Mrs. William B. (Parker) Trenton 

Bell, Commander C. H San Jacinto 

Bell, Miss Jennie Vermont 

Belmont, Mrs. O. H. P Nicholson 

Benham, Miss Edith Wallace Benham and San Francisco 

Benson, Miss Nellie Amphitrite 

Benton, Miss Mary North Dakota 

Biddle, Miss Emily B Biddle 



[219] 



INDEX 

SPONSOR WARSHIP 

BiDDLE, Commander James Pennsylvania ist 

Bishop, Mrs. Henry (Mallory) Pensacola 

Bitting, Mrs. William C. (Smith) St. Louis 

Blalock, Mrs. William (Kiene) Ericsson 

Bleecker, Miss Mary Sonoma 

Boush, Miss Eulalie Alliance 

BouTELLE, Miss Annie Newark 

Boutelle, Miss Grace Tonopah 

Bowles, Miss Catherine S. H D-2 

Bradford, Miss Elise Severn 

Bradford, Miss Minnie Mackinaw 

Bradley, Miss Christine Kentucky 

Breckinbridge, Miss Eleanor Vesuvius 

Brooks, Mrs. Frank W. (Newberry) Michigan 2d 

Brown, Mrs. Charles Edward (Deshler) Ohio 

Brown, Miss Lucie S Wheeling 

Brumby, Mrs. Frank H. (Truxtun) : Truxtun 

Bryant, Miss Sallie Shamrock 

Burke, Mrs. John H. (Steele) Helena 

Burrows, Miss Lorna D Burrows 

Cahall, Miss Anna Delaware 

Calder, Miss Elsie New York 

Cameron, Mrs. George (de Young) Intrepid 

Cameron, Miss Mary Yorktown 

Campbell, Mrs. Colin (Leiter) Illinois 

Campbell, Miss Mary Birmingham 

Carusi, Miss Helen Cassin Cassin 

Case, Miss fVampanoag 

Chalkley, Mrs. Lyman (Breckinbridge) Vesuvius 

Chambliss, Miss Lilian N Chattanooga 

Chandler, Mrs. William E Shawmut 

Chase, Mrs Housatonic 

Childs, Mrs. E. H Newport 

Churchman, Mrs. Charles West (Biddle) Biddle 

Clark, Miss Dorothy Duncan 

Clarke, Mrs. John Alexander (McLane) New Hampshire 

Cleborne, Miss Edith Chicago 

CoATES, Miss Minnie D Concord 

Cocke, Mrs. Paul Lee Stewart 

CocKRELL, Miss Marion Missouri 

Coffman, Mrs. De Witt (Boush) Alliance 

Colby, Miss Jane C Housatonic 

CoLWELL, Mrs. J. C Albany 

Comstock, Miss Nellie Weehawken 

Conrad, Miss Minnie Montana 

[ 220] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Converse, Miss Lilian Dupont 

Cooper, Miss Page Lackawanna 

Corson, Mrs. Allan (Updike) Princeton 

Coudert, Mrs. Frederic R. (Wilmerding) Maine isi 

Craven, Miss Anna T Tingey 

Craven, Miss Amy T.A.M. Craven 

Creighton, Miss Edwina S Stringham 

Creighton, Mrs. James B. (Stringham) Hartford 

Cutting, Mrs. Walter (Mayo) Decatur 

Dahlgren, Mrs. John Vinton Dahlgren 

Daniels, Mrs. Josephus Bagley 

Davis, Miss Mary Thornton Thornton 

D.wison, Mrs. Gregory C D—i 

Decatur, Miss Maria Algoma 

Delano, Miss Madawaska 

De Lamater, Miss Dictator 

Deshler, Miss Helen Ohio 

De Young, Miss Helen Intrepid 

Dickie, Miss Anna Belle Olympia 

DoRNiN, Miss Nannie Seddon Colorado ist 

Dorr, Miss Emily Genesee 

Dow, Mrs. J. B Canandaigua 

Downes, Miss Carrie Hartford 

Drake, Miss Mary Lord Iowa 

Drayton, Miss Emma Gadsden Drayton 

Drury, Miss Helen Boxer 

Dumaine, Mrs. F. C Rhode Island 

Fales, Miss Puritan 

Ferguson, Mrs. Charles Vaughan (Rankin) Wilkes 

Fitzgerald, Miss D—3 

Fleming, Miss Elizabeth L Florida 

Francis, Mrs. Arthur M. (Page) Saratoga 

Frazier, Miss Anna K Tennessee 

Frost, Mrs. E. B A-6 

Frothingham, Miss Mary C Wachusett 

Gaither, Mrs. Walter T. (Brown) Wheeling 

Gallaudet, Mrs. Edson (Cockrell) Missouri 

Getes, Mrs. Roy (Patterson) Fox 

GiLLis, Miss Carol Galena 

Gittings, Miss Dorothy R Sterrett 

Glenn, Miss Rebekah North Carolina 

Glover, Mrs. Henry W. B. (Cleborne) Chicago 

Gooding, Miss Louise Idaho 



[221] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

GooDLOE, Miss Green Clay (Wilson) Washington 

Gow, Miss Eleanor B-2 

Grace, Mrs. H. P Tioga 

Gray, Miss Anna B Wilmington 

Gregory, Miss Mary Manhattan and Montauk 

Greene, Mrs. Bertram (Hoff) Bainbridge 

Grice, Miss Mary Florida Wyoming isi 

Grice, Miss Pennsylvania Wabash 

Grove, Mrs. Henry S Lamson 

Grove, Mrs. Walter H Cyclops 

Guild, Miss Maria Nashville 

GuNN, Miss Kate C Monterey 

Hale, Miss Lucy H Shawmut 

Hall, Mrs. Reynold Thomas (Martin) Roe 

Hamilton, Mrs. Frank P. (Fleming) Florida 

Hand, Mrs. Henry W Parker 

Hanna, Miss Ruth Cleveland 

Harmony, Lieutenant Commander David B Quinnebaug 

Harris, Miss Julia M Tacoma 

TT n* -o ( Alaska, Guerriere, 

Hartt, Miss Emma < ., , ^ 

( Nantasket, Octorora 

Hatton, Mrs. Richard (Cottman) Warrington 

Hawes, Mrs. Alice Gould Hopkins 

Hay, Mrs. Marley F As 

Haywood, Mrs. Alfred W. (Holt) Raleigh 

Hazel, Miss E. H Winslow 

Hearne, Mrs. Roy W. (Williams) San Marcos 

Hebb, Mrs. Clement D. (Lambert) Sassacus 

Henriques, Mrs. (Scott) Nipsic 

Herbert, Miss Leila Massachusetts 

Herreid, Miss Grace South Dakota 

Herreshoff, Miss Agnes M Porter 

Herreshoff, Miss Katherine B Gushing 

Hichborn, Miss Martha Castine and Terror 

Hillman, Charles Mackenzie 

Hoch, Miss Anna Kansas 

Hoff, Miss Bainbridge Bainbridge 

Hoffman, Mrs. Daniel Engle (Glenn) North Carolina 

Hoover, Miss Emily V Monongahela 

Hopper, Mrs. A. M Indiana 

Hoy, Mrs. James (Downes) Hartford 

Hudson, Miss Sue Housatonic 

Hull, Miss Grace Alaska 

Hull, Miss Mabel Hull 

Humrichouse, Mrs. W. H. (Wardwell) McKee 

Hutchinson, Mrs. J. H. (Ingersoll) Miami 

[ 222 ] 



INDEX 

SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Hyde, Miss Ethel Machias 

Hyde, Mrs. John Trippe 

Ingersoll, Miss Ann Miami 

Irwin, Miss Lulu Monadnock 

Jenkins, Miss Alice Thornton Jenkins 

Johnson, Mrs. Edward D. (Bradford) Severn 

Johnson, Miss Esther Szvatara 

Johnson, Miss Harriet Lane (Lane) Lancaster 

Jones, Miss Anne Seymour Nereus 

Jones, Miss Bobbie Newton Ozark {Arkansas) 

Joyce, Mrs. Wilbur B. (Schaller) Minnesota 2d 

Kane, Miss Constance Henley Henley 

Kiene, Miss Carrie Ericsson 

Kinney, Mrs. William B New Jersey 

Kitchen, Mrs. William W. (Money) Mississippi 

Knight, Miss Dorothy Eunice Wyoming 

Knowles, Miss Mary Yantic 

Knox, Miss Jean Jarvis 

La Farge, Miss Frances Newport 

Lake, Miss Margaret V G—i 

La Lande, Miss Juanita Louisiana 

L.ambert, Miss Willhemina Sassacus 

Lane, Miss Harriet Lancaster 

Langdon, Mrs. Russell Creamer (Moale) Rowan 

Lardner, Miss Margaret Tuscarora 

Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Bailey) Bailey 

Lawrence, Miss Ruth Lawrence 

Lehr, Mrs. Harry Symes (Dahlgren) Daklgren 

Leiter, Miss Nancy Illinois 

Lenthall, Miss Jennie Guerriere 

LiGHTNER, Mrs. Dean (Herreid) South Dakota 

Lincoln, Miss Jessie Atlanta 

Little, Miss Margaret N E—2 

Louer, Mrs. Lewis (Macomber) Des Moines 

Lyon, Miss Claudia Texas 2d 

Mc.'\lpine, Mrs. Kenneth Fanning 

McClellan, Miss Annie Kansas ist 

McCoRMiCK, Mrs. Medill (Hanna) Cleveland 

McFarland, Mrs Ossipee and Kearsarge ist 

McLane, Miss Hazel E New Hampshire 2d 



[223] 



INDEX 

SPONSOR WARSHIP 

McLean, Mrs. John R. (Beale) Beale 

Macdonough, Miss Lucy T Macdonough 

Macomber, Miss Elsie Des Moines 

Macon, Miss Mary Louise Arkansas 

Mac Quoid, Mrs. Charles W. (Miller) Bancroft 

Magoun, Miss Katherine Preston 

Mallory, Miss Margaret Moreno Pensacola 

Malster, Miss Florence Detroit 

Mann, Miss Susan L Minnesota 

Marchand, Miss Kitty Omaha 

Matthews, Mrs. Albert H. (Schieren) Brooklyn 

Mayo, Miss Maria Decatur Decatur 

Maynadier, Mrs. G. B. (Sleeper) Winooski 

Mickey, Miss Mary Nain Nebraska 

Meakins, Miss Lesley Jean H-i 

Miller, Miss Jessie Indiana 

Miller, Mrs. Josephus (Comstock) Weekazvken 

Mills, Mrs. Sylvie DeLong DeLong 

MoALE, Mrs. Edward Rowan 

Monaghan, Miss Ellen R Monaghan 

Money, Miss Mabel Clare Mississippi 

Montague, Miss Mathilde Gay Virginia 

idoNTGOMERY, Miss May Tallapoosa 

Moore, Miss Mary Frances Bancroft 

More, Mrs. H. Clifford Marietta 

Morgan, Mrs. John E. (Stephenson) Wisconsin 

Morgan, Miss Mary Alabama 

Morgan, Mrs. Percy T. (Ainsworth) Oregon 

Morton, Miss Helen Columbia 

Morton, Miss Pauline Cumberland 

Mosby, Miss Stella Cincinnati 

Murray, Mrs. David (Gillis) Galena 

Nally, Miss Marylee Jouett 

Newberry, Miss Carol B Michigan 

Newell, Mrs. Emerson Root Galveston 

Nelson, Mrs. Valentine Omaha 

NicoLL, Miss Alice C-5 

Nixon, Mrs. Lewis Tallahassee and Holland 

Oakley, Mrs. Owen H. (Craven) Tingey 

O'Brien, Miss Mira O'Brien 

O'Conner, Miss Maud Perry 

O'Donnell, Miss Annie C Niagara 

Offley, Miss Katherine H Ticonderoga 

O'Neil, Mrs. Charles (Frothingham) Wachusett 



[224] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Page, Miss Helen Saratoga 

Pardee, Miss Florence California 

Parker, Miss Catherine Trenton 

Pascoe, Miss Selina Shenandoah 

Patterson, Miss Georgeanne Pollock Patterson 

Patterson, Miss Vera Fox 

Paulding, Master Hiram Miantonomah 

Paulding, Miss Emma Nyack and Paulding 

Peabody, Miss Cora Colorado 2d 

Pearsall, Mrs. Paul (Hichborn) Castine and Terror 

Pels, Mrs. John R. (Wright) Denver 

Pershing, Mrs. John J. (Warren) Cheyenne 

PiNNOCK, Miss Lorna Salem 

Pope, Miss Elsie Whipple 

Porter, Miss Georgia Annapolis 

Powell, Mrs. Joseph Wight Aylwin 

Preble, Lieutenant G. H Hartford 

P -RLE, Miss Ethel Preble 

JE, Miss Laura Foote 

Quay, Miss Coral Pennsylvania 2d 

Radford, Mrs. George Stanley 5-j HI 

Rambo, Mrs. Preston (Tate) Georgia • ' 

Ramsey, Mrs. Edward P. (Smith) Montgomery 

Rankin, Miss Harriet E Wilkes 

Reade, Mrs. Charles (Macdonough) Macdonough 

Reakirt, Mrs. Edwin R. (Lardner) Tuscarora 

Rhett, Miss Helen Charleston 2d 

Rice, Mrs A-4. 

Richardson, Mrs. Edward Bridge Smith 

RoBB, Miss Richmond 

Rock, Mrs. George H Terry 

Rogers, Mrs. James G. (Peabody) Colorado 2d 

Rolph, Miss Annette Ried F—2 

Rugg, Mrs. George C. (Pope) Whipple 

Sands, Mrs. William Ranney H-2. 

Savage, Mrs. Eugene T. (Boutelle) Tonopah 

Schieren, Miss Ida May Brooklyn 

ScHALLER, Miss Rose Marie Minnesota 2d 

Schley, Miss Virginia Petrel 

Schubert, Mrs. Adam J. (Gooding) Idaho 

Scotia, Mrs. John B. (Tyler) Pawnee 

Scott, Miss Alice ; Charleston ist 

Scott, Miss Rebecca Nipsic 



[225] 



T AT n r* v 



INDEX 

SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Sealey, Miss Ella Galveston 

Seaman, Miss Lilian Enterprise 

Sedgwick, Miss Sallie Onondaga 

Sever, Captain James Constitution 

Shubrick, Miss Caroline Shubrick 

Simons, Mrs. Theodore J. (Rhett) Charleston 2d 

Sleeper, Miss Mary R JVinooski 

Smith, Mrs. Alice Scott Charleston ist 

Smith, Miss Gladys B St. Louis 

Smith, Mrs. J. Hopkins (Morton) Cumberland 

Smith, Miss Sophia Montgomery 

SoLEY, Miss Una Katahdin 

Somerville, Mrs. Robert N. (Frazier) Tennessee 

South, Mrs. John G. (Bradley) Kentucky 

Spear, Mrs. Lawrence Y B-i 

Sproul, Miss Dorothy W Chester 

Spry, Miss Alice Utah 

Steele, Mrs. Agnes Belle Helena 

Stephenson, Miss Elizabeth Wisconsin 

Stevens, Miss Elizabeth C-2 

Stewart, Commodore Charles New Ironsides 

Stockton, Miss Katherine Stockton 

^tone, Mrs. J. W Canandaigua 

Stringham, Miss Lizzie Hartford 

Sturdivant, Mrs. George W. (Drake) Iowa 

Tate, Miss Stella Georgia 

Theiss, Miss Katherine C-5 

Thomas, Miss Fannie Sangamon 

TiLTON, Mrs Sacramento 

Todd, Mrs. Mae C. Stanton Chauncey 

ToLAND, Mrs. George (Turner) Juniata 

Tomb, Mrs. James Harvey (Drury) Boxer 

Townsend, Mrs. Julius C C-4 

Tredway, Miss Margaret Dubuque 

Trowbridge, Miss Ficksburg 

Truxtun, Miss Isabella Truxtun 

Turner, Miss Angela Juniata 

TuRPiN, Mrs. Walter S ^^7 

Tyler, Miss Grace Pawnee 

Tynan, Miss Josephine F—i 

Underwood, Mrs. Lewis (Campbell) Birmingham 

Updike, Miss Margaretta Princeton 

Vanderbilt, Miss Anna M Pawtuxet 

Virden, Miss Genevieve .Flusser 



[226] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Wainwright, Mrs A-2 

Walter, Miss Mildred W Walke 

Wanamaker, Miss Minnie Philadelphia ist 

Warburton, Mrs. Barclay (Wanamaker) Philadelphia ist 

Wardwell, Miss McKee 

Wardwell, Miss Ernestine A-i 

Warren, Miss Hattie Cheyenne 

formerly Wyoming 

Washburn, Miss Elizabeth Minneapolis 

Waters, Miss Jennie Scott Maryland 

Webster, Miss Frances C—i 

Wells, Miss Alice Connecticut 4th 

Westbrook, Mrs. John D. (Guild) Nashville 

White, Miss Katherine V West Virginia 

White, Miss Nellie M Blakeley 

Whitney, Mrs. C. W Keokuk 

Williams, Miss Madge H San Marcos 

formerly Texas 

Willets, Miss Jessie McCall 

Wilmerding, Miss Alice Tracy Maine ist 

Wilson, Miss Helen S Washington 

Wilson, Mrs. Joseph D. (Offley) Ticonderoga 

Wilson, Miss Mary H Dale 

Wilson, Mrs. Theodore D Baltimore 

WiNSLOw, Mrs. Herbert Kearsarge 

Wolfe, Mrs. W. H. (White) West Virginia 

Wolff, Miss Helen Davis 

Wood, Miss Sally Tallahassee 

Worden, Mrs. Daniel F Worden 

Wortley, Mrs. Ralph M. S. (Schley) Petrel 

Wright, Mrs. Hamilton Minneapolis 

Wright, Miss Roberta W Denver 

Yeiser, Miss Anna May Paducah 

Zahm, Mrs. Frank B A-^ 



[227] 



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